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Sample records for kaiparowits plateau utah

  1. Tying rock properties from core to depositional processes and examining the relationship through forward seismic reflection modeling in the Kaiparowits Plateau, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dworsky, Karenth

    Nearshore fluvial to tidal transitional depositional systems are becoming increasingly important due to the large number of global hydrocarbon reserves held in such deposits. These deposits are inherently complex due to their heterolithic nature and therefore, interpreting facies and facies relationships in seismic reflection profiles is problematic. The fluvial and tidally influenced nearshore deposits of the late Cretaceous John Henry Member (JHM) of the Straight Cliffs Formation, located in the Kaiparowits Plateau of southern Utah, offers an excellent opportunity to improve our understanding of how the fluvial to tidal transition impacts subsurface petroleum reservoirs and their expression in seismic reflection profiles. The focus of the first chapter is to investigate the impact of heterogeneous depositional environments and their rock properties to model amplitude versus offset (AVO) using a single core. Core EP-25 exhibits lithofacies from a progradational succession, from shoreface through tidal to fluvial. In order to model the most likely lithofacies stacking patterns present in the core, Markov Chain analysis was conducted. Benchtop measurements performed on 1 inch core plugs obtained rock properties (Vp, Vs, density, permeability, and porosity) for each lithofacies. Average rock properties for each lithofacies were used to generate synthetic seismic reflection models of the different upward fining facies associations documented directly from the core, in order to model variations in amplitude versus offset responses as a function of variable tidal influence. The focus of the second chapter is to capture probable 3-dimensional geobody distributions with a particular focus on coal geobody distribution using previously studied cores and outcrops on the plateau. Three different seismic forward models were created ranging in complexity, using cores EP-25, EP-07, density logs, and the nearby outcrop study Left Hand Collet. The rock properties obtained from the

  2. Landform map of the Kaiparowits Coal-Basin area, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Sargent, K.A.; Hansen, D.E.

    1980-01-01

    A 1:125,000 scale map of the Kaiparowits Coal-Basin area of Utah is presented. The map portrays the shape and erosional resistance of and features, and it is intended to be a modified slope-analysis map for use by planners in their identification of areas suitable for transportation routes and construction sites. Depositional landforms such as alluvial flats, stream courses, dune fields, and alluviated pediments are shown, and a stratigraphic section of the rocks in the area is provided. (JMT)

  3. Facies architecture and depositional environments of the Upper Cretaceous Kaiparowits Formation, southern Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Eric M.

    2007-04-01

    The Kaiparowits Formation is an unusually thick package of Upper Cretaceous (late Campanian) strata exposed in Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument of southern Utah, USA. The formation was deposited within the rapidly subsiding Cordilleran foreland basin as part of a thick clastic wedge derived from sources in the Sevier orogenic belt, thrust sheets in southeastern Nevada and southern California, and the Mogollon slope in southwestern Arizona. Channel systems in the Kaiparowits Formation shifted from northeastward to southeastward flow over time, and for a short period of time, sea level rise in the Western Interior Seaway resulted in tidally influenced rivers and/or estuarine systems. Thick floodbasin pond deposits, large suspended-load channels, and poorly developed, hydromorphic paleosols dominate the sedimentary record, and all are suggestive of a relatively wet, subhumid alluvial system. This is supported by extremely rapid sediment accumulation rates (41 cm/ka), and high diversity and abundance of aquatic vertebrate and invertebrate fossils. Facies and architectural analysis was performed on the Kaiparowits Formation, resulting in the identification of nine distinct facies associations: 1) intraformational conglomerate, 2) mollusc-shell conglomerate, 3) major tabular sandstone, 4) major lenticular sandstone, 5) minor tabular and lenticular sandstone, 6) finely laminated, calcareous siltstone, 7) inclined heterolithic sandstone and mudstone, 8) sandy mudstone, and 9) carbonaceous mudstone. These facies associations are interpreted as: 1) channel lags, 2) rare channel-hosted storm beds, 3) meandering channels, 4) anastomosing channels, 5) crevasse splays and crevasse channels, 6) lakes, 7) tidally influenced fluvial and/or estuarine channels, 8) mud-dominated floodplains, and 9) swamps and oxbow lakes. Based on this analysis, the formation is subdivided into three informal units, representative of gross changes in alluvial architecture, including facies

  4. Crocodyliform Feeding Traces on Juvenile Ornithischian Dinosaurs from the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) Kaiparowits Formation, Utah

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Clint A.; Drumheller, Stephanie K.; Gates, Terry A.

    2013-01-01

    Crocodyliforms serve as important taphonomic agents, accumulating and modifying vertebrate remains. Previous discussions of Mesozoic crocodyliform feeding in terrestrial and riverine ecosystems have often focused on larger taxa and their interactions with equally large dinosaurian prey. However, recent evidence suggests that the impact of smaller crocodyliforms on their environments should not be discounted. Here we present direct evidence of feeding by a small crocodyliform on juvenile specimens of a ‘hypsilophodontid’ dinosaur from the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) Kaiparowits Formation of southern Utah. Diagnostic crocodyliform bite marks present on a left scapula and a right femur, as well as a partial probable crocodyliform tooth crown (ovoid in cross-section) preserved within a puncture on the right femur, comprise the bulk of the feeding evidence. Computed tomography scans of the femoral puncture reveal impact damage to the surrounding bone and that the distal tip of the embedded tooth was missing prior to the biting event. This is only the second reported incidence of a fossil crocodyliform tooth being found embedded directly into prey bone. These bite marks provide insight into the trophic interactions of the ecosystem preserved in the Kaiparowits Formation. The high diversity of crocodyliforms within this formation may have led to accentuated niche partitioning, which seems to have included juvenile dinosaurian prey. PMID:23460882

  5. Environmental geologic studies of the Kaiparowits coal-basin area, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Sargent, K.A.

    1984-01-01

    The Kaiparowits coal-basin area may contain as much as 20 billion tons of coal; it is a major coal-resource area and a potentially important energy supply area for the southwestern United States. However, the economic development of this coal could constitute a possible threat to the great natural beauty of the area. The impact caused by an attendant increase in population would be great. The US Geological Survey in 1975 started a series of studies of the Kaiparowits coal-basin area. The results of these studies are now being published as a folio consisting of 12 earth-resource maps showing hydrology, bedrock and surficial geology, coal resources, landslides, landforms, and scenic features related to geology. These maps are designed to help land-use planners and land developers make intelligent decisions on the most desirable use of this rich and beautiful land. 50 refs., 23 figs.

  6. Hydrogeology of the Markagunt Plateau, Southwestern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spangler, Lawrence E.

    2010-01-01

    The Markagunt Plateau, in southwestern Utah, lies at an altitude of about 9,500 feet and is capped primarily by Quaternary-age basalt that overlies Eocene-age freshwater limestone of the Claron Formation. Over large parts of the Markagunt Plateau, dissolution of the Claron limestone and subsequent collapse of the overlying basalt have produced a terrain characterized by sinkholes as much as 1,000 feet across and 100 feet deep. Numerous large springs discharge from the basalt and underlying limestone on the plateau, including Mammoth Spring, one of the largest springs in Utah, with a discharge that can exceed 300 cubic feet per second. Discharge from Mammoth Spring is from the Claron Formation; however, recharge to the spring largely takes place by both focused and diffuse infiltration through the basalt that caps the limestone. Results of dye tracing to Mammoth Spring indicate that recharge originates largely southwest of the spring outside of the Mammoth Creek watershed, as well as from losing reaches along Mammoth Creek. Maximum groundwater travel time to the spring from dye-tracer tests during the snowmelt runoff period was about 1 week. Specific conductance and water temperature data from the spring show an inverse relation to discharge during snowmelt runoff and rainfall events, also indicating short groundwater residence times. Results of major-ion analyses for samples collected from Mammoth and other springs on the plateau indicate calcium-bicarbonate type water containing low (less than 200 mg/L) dissolved-solids concentrations. Investigations in the Navajo Lake area along the southern margin of the plateau have shown that water losing to sinkholes bifurcates and discharges to both Cascade and Duck Creek Springs, which subsequently flow into the Virgin and Sevier River basins, respectively. Groundwater travel times to these springs, on the basis of dye tracing, were about 8.5 and 53 hours, respectively. Similarly, groundwater travel time from Duck Creek

  7. Reconnaissance for uranium-bearing carbonaceous materials in southern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zeller, H.D.

    1955-01-01

    A reconnaissance investigation for uranium-bearing carbonaceous materials was made in three major areas of southern Utah: Kaiparowits Plateau, Henry Mountains, and Kolob Terrace. No uranium deposits of economic interest were found. A few l- to 2-foot beds of carbonaceous shale in the Dakota(?) sandstone contain 0.006-0.007 percent uranium. Other carbonaceous sediments that were examined contain 0. 002 percent or less uranium.

  8. Evidence for high taxonomic and morphologic tyrannosauroid diversity in the Late Cretaceous (Late Campanian) of the American Southwest and a new short-skulled tyrannosaurid from the Kaiparowits formation of Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Thomas D.; Williamson, Thomas E.; Britt, Brooks B.; Stadtman, Ken

    2011-03-01

    The fossil record of late Campanian tyrannosauroids of western North America has a geographic gap between the Northern Rocky Mountain Region (Montana, Alberta) and the Southwest (New Mexico, Utah). Until recently, diagnostic tyrannosauroids from the Southwest were unknown until the discovery of Bistahieversor sealeyi from the late Campanian of New Mexico. Here we describe an incomplete skull and postcranial skeleton of an unusual tyrannosaurid from the Kaiparowits Formation (Late Cretaceous) of Utah that represents a new genus and species, Teratophoneus curriei. Teratophoneus differs from other tyrannosauroids in having a short skull, as indicated by a short and steep maxilla, abrupt angle in the postorbital process of the jugal, laterally oriented paroccipital processes, short basicranium, and reduced number of teeth. Teratophoneus is the sister taxon of the Daspletosaurus + Tyrannosaurus clade and it is the most basal North American tyrannosaurine. The presence of Teratophoneus suggests that dinosaur faunas were regionally endemic in the west during the upper Campanian. The divergence in skull form seen in tyrannosaurines indicates that the skull in this clade had a wide range of adaptive morphotypes.

  9. Evidence for high taxonomic and morphologic tyrannosauroid diversity in the Late Cretaceous (late Campanian) of the American Southwest and a new short-skulled tyrannosaurid from the Kaiparowits Formation of Utah.

    PubMed

    Carr, Thomas D; Williamson, Thomas E; Britt, Brooks B; Stadtman, Ken

    2011-03-01

    The fossil record of late Campanian tyrannosauroids of western North America has a geographic gap between the Northern Rocky Mountain Region (Montana, Alberta) and the Southwest (New Mexico, Utah). Until recently, diagnostic tyrannosauroids from the Southwest were unknown until the discovery of Bistahieversor sealeyi from the late Campanian of New Mexico. Here we describe an incomplete skull and postcranial skeleton of an unusual tyrannosaurid from the Kaiparowits Formation (Late Cretaceous) of Utah that represents a new genus and species, Teratophoneus curriei. Teratophoneus differs from other tyrannosauroids in having a short skull, as indicated by a short and steep maxilla, abrupt angle in the postorbital process of the jugal, laterally oriented paroccipital processes, short basicranium, and reduced number of teeth. Teratophoneus is the sister taxon of the Daspletosaurus + Tyrannosaurus clade and it is the most basal North American tyrannosaurine. The presence of Teratophoneus suggests that dinosaur faunas were regionally endemic in the west during the upper Campanian. The divergence in skull form seen in tyrannosaurines indicates that the skull in this clade had a wide range of adaptive morphotypes. PMID:21253683

  10. Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    With its myriad of canyons, unusual rock formations and ancient lakebeds, Utah is a geologist's playground. This true-color image of Utah was acquired on June 20, 2000, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. The dark aquamarine feature in the northern part of the state is the Great Salt Lake. Fourteen thousand years ago, the Great Salt Lake was part of Lake Bonneville, which covered much of northern and western Utah. The extent of the lakebed can be seen in light tan covering much of northern and western Utah and extending into Idaho. (Click for more details on the history of Lake Bonneville.) Other remnants of Lake Bonneville include the Great Salt Lake Desert (the white expanse to the left of the Great Salt Lake) and Lake Utah (the lake to the south of Salt Lake City). The white color of the Great Salt Lake Desert is due to the mineral deposits left by Lake Bonneville as it drained out into the Snake River and then proceeded to dry up. The dark bands running through the center and northeastern part of the state are the western edge of the Rockies. The dark color is likely due to the coniferous vegetation that grows along the range. The tallest mountains in the Utah Rockies are the Uinta Mountains, which can be seen in the northeastern corner of the state bordering Colorado and Wyoming. The white fishbone pattern in the center of the Uinta Mountains is snow that hadn't yet melted. To the southeast, one can see the reddish-orange rocks of the northernmost section of the Colorado Plateau. Utah's well-known desert attractions, including Arches National Park, Canyonlands National Park, and Glen Canyon, are located in this region. The long, narrow lake is Lake Powell, created after the construction of Glen Canyon Dam in the 1950s. Image courtesy NASA MODIS Science Team

  11. Discriminating Mining Induced Seismicity from Natural Tectonic Earthquakes in the Wasatch Plateau Region of Central Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, J. R.; Pankow, K. L.; Koper, K. D.; McCarter, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    On average, several hundred earthquakes are located each year within the Wasatch Plateau region of central Utah. This region includes the boundary between the relatively stable Colorado Plateau and the actively extending Basin and Range physiographic provinces. Earthquakes in this region tend to fall in the intermountain seismic belt (ISB), a continuous band of seismicity that extends from Montana to Arizona. While most of the earthquakes in the ISB are of tectonic origin, events in the Wasatch Plateau also include mining induced seismicity (MIS) from local underground coal mining operations. Using a catalog of 16,182 seismic events (-0.25 < M < 4.5) recorded from 1981 to 2011, we use double difference relocation and waveform cross correlation techniques to help discriminate between these two populations of events. Double difference relocation greatly improves the relative locations between the many events that occur in this area. From the relative relocations, spatial differences between event types are used to differentiate between shallow MIS and considerably deeper events associated with tectonic seismicity. Additionally, waveform cross-correlation is used to cluster events with similar waveforms—meaning that events in each cluster should have a similar source location and mechanism—in order to more finely group seismic events occurring in the Wasatch Plateau. The results of this study provide both an increased understanding of the influence mining induced seismicity has on the number of earthquakes detected within this region, as well as better constraints on the deeper tectonic structure.

  12. Anastomosing grabens, low-angle faults, and Tertiary thrust( ) faults, western Markagunt Plateau, southwestern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Maldonado, F.; Sable, E.G. )

    1993-04-01

    A structurally complex terrane composed of grabens and horsts, low-angle faults, Tertiary thrust( ) faults, gravity-slide blocks, and debris deposits has been mapped along the western Markagunt Plateau, east of Parowan and Summit, southwestern Utah. This terrane, structurally situated within the transition between the Basin and Range and Colorado Plateau provinces, contains Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary and Cretaceous sedimentary rocks. The structures are mostly Miocene to Oligocene but some are Pleistocene. The oldest structure is the Red Hills low-angle shear zone, interpreted as a shallow structure that decoupled an upper plate composed of a Miocene-Oligocene volcanic ash-flow tuff and volcaniclastic succession from a lower plate of Tertiary sedimentary rocks. The period of deformation on the shear zone is bracketed from field relationships between 22.5 and 20 Ma. The graben-horst system trends northeast and formed after about 20 Ma (and probably much later) based on displacement of dated dikes and a laccolith. The central part of the system contains many grabens that merge toward its southerly end to become a single graben. Within these grabens, (1) older structures are preserved, (2) debris eroded from horst walls forms lobe-shaped deposits, (3) Pleistocene basaltic cinder cones have localized along graben-bounding faults, and (4) rock units are locally folded suggesting some component of lateral translation along graben-bounding faults. Megabreccia deposits and landslide debris are common. Megabreccia deposits are interpreted as gravity-slide blocks of Miocene-Oligocene( ) age resulting from formation of the Red Hills shear zone, although some may be related to volcanism, and still others to later deformation. The debris deposits are landslides of Pleistocene-Pliocene( ) age possibly caused by continued uplift of the Markagunt Plateau.

  13. Hydrologic reconnaissance of the Wasatch Plateau-Book Cliffs coal-fields area, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waddell, Kidd M.; Contratto, P. Kay; Sumsion, C.T.; Butler, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    Data obtained during a hydrologic reconnaissance in 1975-77 in the Wasatch Plateau-Book Cliffs coal-fields area of Utah were correlated with existing long-term data. Maps were prepared showing average precipitation, average streamflow, stream temperature, ground- and surface-water quality, sediment yield, and geology. Recommendations were made for additional study and suggested approaches for continued monitoring in the coalfields areas. During the 1931-75 water years, the minimum discharges for the five major streams that head in the area ranged from about 12,000 to 26,000 acre-feet per year, and the maximum discharges ranged from about 59,000 to 315,000 acre-feet per year. Correlations indicate that 3 years of low-flow records at stream sites in the Wasatch Plateau would allow the development of relationships with long-term sites that can be used to estimate future low-flow records within a standard error of about 20 percent. Most water-quality degradation in streams occurs along the flanks of the Wasatch Plateau and Book Cliffs. In the uplands, dissolved-solids concentrations generally ranged from less than 100 to about 250 milligrams per liter, and in the lowlands, the concentrations ranged from about 250 to more than 6,000 milligrams per liter. Most springs in the Wasatch Plateau and Book Cliffs discharge from the Star Point Sandstone or younger formations, and the water generally contains less than about 1,000 milligrams per liter of dissolved solids. The discharges of 65 springs ranged from about 0.2 to 200 gallons per minute. The Blackhawk Formation, which is the principal coal-bearing formation, produces water in many of the mines. The dissolved-solids concentration in water discharging from springs and mines in the Blackhawk ranged from about 60 to 800 milligrams per liter. In the lowland areas, the Ferron Sandstone Member of the Maneos Shale appears to have the most potential for subsurface development of water of suitable chemical quality for human

  14. A bimillennial-length tree-ring reconstruction of precipitation for the Tavaputs Plateau, Northeastern Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Troy A.; Meko, David M.; Baisan, Christopher H.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the extensive network of moisture-sensitive tree-ring chronologies in western North America, relatively few are long enough to document climatic variability before and during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) ca. AD 800-1300. We developed a 2300-yr tree-ring chronology extending to 323 BC utilizing live and remnant Douglas-fir ( Pseudotsuga menziesii) from the Tavaputs Plateau in northeastern Utah. A resulting regression model accounts for 70% of the variance of precipitation for the AD 1918-2005 calibration period. Extreme wet and dry periods without modern analogues were identified in the reconstruction. The MCA is marked by several prolonged droughts, especially prominent in the mid AD 1100s and late 1200s, and a lack of wet or dry single-year extremes. The frequency of extended droughts is not markedly different, however, than before or after the MCA. A drought in the early AD 500s surpasses in magnitude any other drought during the last 1800 yr. A set of four long high-resolution records suggests this drought decreased in severity toward the south in the western United States. The spatial pattern is consistent with the western dipole of moisture anomaly driven by El Niño and is also similar to the spatial footprint of the AD 1930s "Dust Bowl" drought.

  15. Formation of Potholes by Surficial and Endolithic Bacteria on the Colorado Plateau Near Moab, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, K.; Southam, G.

    2004-05-01

    The area of the Colorado Plateau near Moab, Utah is home to an ecosystem delicately balanced on a substrate of Triassic and Jurassic aeolian sandstones with little to no soil. Any surface feature in which the limited precipitation can be captured helps sustain the desert life in this semi-arid environment. Naturally occurring "potholes" fulfill this function in certain sandstone surfaces. Potholes range in size from shallow depressions to large swimming-pool sized features that can retain water throughout most of the year. In this study we focused on circular potholes that showed no indication of joint control, and held 5 to 9 gallons of water. Their formation is controlled by three types of bacterial growth: 1)black biofilms that line each pothole, 2)bacteria in the accumulated bottom sediments of the potholes and 3)the ubiquitous cryptoendolithic cyanobacterial communities found centimetres beneath the surface of the host sandstone. On-site and in-lab water testing were conducted during the dry season with de-ionized water to quantify the of ion concentrations extracted from the rock as an estimate of the overall bacterial activity and to determine what in the arenitic quartz sandstones is providing sustenance to these communities. ICP-MS showed elevated Ca++ (up to 14 mg/L) and Si++ (up to 2 mg/L) ion concentrations indicating that the calcite cement as well as the quartz grains are being dissolved. Daily fluctuations in phosphate levels were also observed which correlate with on-site water monitoring that showed pronounced diurnal cycling of pH values, between pH 8 and 10, indicating biological activity. Further exploration was conducted using SEM studies identified thick biofilms coating the sandstone surface as well as large fungal populations. The electron microprobe was used to determine distributions of ions in feldspar grains across the grain profile in areas exposed to the biofilms to determine if any local leaching had occurred. Our investigations show

  16. Land and federal mineral ownership coverage for the Uinta Basin, Wasatch Plateau and surrounding areas, northeastern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Biewick, L.H.; Green, G.A.

    1999-01-01

    This Arc/Info coverage contains land status and Federal and State mineral ownership for approximately 25,900 square miles in northeastern Utah. The polygon coverage (which is also provided here as a shapefile) contains three attributes of ownership information for each polygon. One attribute indicates whether the surface is State owned, privately owned, consists of Tribal and Indian lands, or, if Federally owned, which Federal agency manages the land surface. Another attribute indicates where the Utah School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration (SITLA) maintains full or partial subsurface mineral rights. The third attribute indicates which energy minerals, if any, are owned by the Federal govenment. This coverage is based on land management status and Federal and State mineral ownership data compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the former U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM), and the Utah School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration at a scale of 1:100,000. This coverage was compiled primarily to serve the USGS National Oil and Gas Resource Assessment Project in the Uinta-Piceance Basin Province and the USGS National Coal Resource Assessment Project in the Colorado Plateau.

  17. Interactions of fluid and gas movement and faulting in the Colorado Plateau, southeastern Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipton, Z. K.; Evans, J. P.; Kirschner, D.; Heath, J.; Williams, A.; Dockrill, B.

    2002-12-01

    The east-west and west-northwest striking Salt Wash and the Little Grand Wash normal faults in the Colorado Plateau of southeastern Utah emit large amounts of CO2 gas from abandon drill holes, springs and a hydrocarbon seep. The leakage of similar CO2 charged water has also occurred in the past as shown by large localized tufa deposits and horizontal veins along the fault traces. These deposits consist of thick tufa terraces and mound extending up to 50 meters from the fault damage zones. The faults cut a north plunging anticline of siltstones, shales, and sandstones, and the fault rocks are fine-grained with clay-rich gouge. The Little Grand Wash fault displaces these rocks approximately 290 m and the Salt Wash graben offsets rocks approximately 130 m; both faults extend at least to the top of the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation, which contains thick salt horizons 1.5 - 2 km at depth. Well log, geologic surface and geochemical data indicate the CO2 reservoirs and sources have been cut by the faults at depth providing a conduit for the vertical migration of CO2 to the surface, but limited horizontal flow across the fault plane. Three- dimensional flow modals show how the faults damage zones permeability is adjacent to the faults and the leakage though the damage zones is localized near the regional anticlines fold axis. Analysis of the fluids emanating from the faults aims to locate the sources and determine the chemical evolutions of the fluids. δ2H and δ18O isotopic data show that the ground waters are meteoric and have not circulated deeply enough to experience an oxygen-isotope shift. δ13C data and PCO2 values indicate that the gas is external to the ground water systems (i.e., not from soil zone gas or dissolution of carbonate aquifer material alone). 3He/4He ratio 0.30 - 0.31 from springs and geysers indicate that the majority of the gas is crustally derived and contains a minimal component of mantle or magmatic gases. δ13C values of 4 to 5 per mil from

  18. Survey of literature relating to energy development in Utah's Colorado Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, A.

    1980-06-01

    This study examines various energy resources in Utah including oil impregnated rocks (oil shale and oil sand deposits), geothermal, coal, uranium, oil and natural gas in terms of the following dimensions: resurce potential and location; resource technology, development and production status; resource development requirements; potential environmental and socio-economic impacts; and transportation tradeoffs. The advantages of minemouth power plants in comparison to combined cycle or hybrid power plants are also examined. Annotative bibliographies of the energy resources are presented in the appendices. Specific topics summarized in these annotative bibliographies include: economics, environmental impacts, water requirements, production technology, and siting requirements.

  19. Extension in the Colorado Plateau/Basin and Range Transition Zone, Central Utah: An Active or Passive Process?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasterok, D.; Wannamaker, P. E.; Chapman, D. S.; Doerner, W.

    2007-12-01

    The Colorado Plateau-Great Basin transition zone (TZ) in central Utah is a presently extending lithospheric block composed of previously stable Proterozoic lithosphere. TZ extension may be driven by high topography resulting from overthickening during the Laramide Orogeny and passive plate boundary forces similar to the Great Basin. However, high TZ topography coupled with a thinned lithosphere may indicate dynamic mantle upwelling and active processes acting within the TZ. To investigate the active vs. passive rifting hypotheses we have collected 56 new broadband and 9 long-period MT stations to merge two existing MT lines for a combined length of 400~km (124 sites) covering the eastern Great Basin into the Colorado Plateau at a latitude of ~38.5°N. We have also collected over 300 new heat production and thermal conductivity measurements across the southwest to develop a thermal model of the eastern Basin and Range and Colorado Plateau. MT data show a semi-contiguous highly conductive body in the lower crust of the eastern Great Basin that rises to a shallow depth of <20~km beneath the TZ. This conductive layer appears to be connected to the surface by a series of symmetric rift related normal faults mapped at the surface. These normal faults may be acting as pathways for large-scale fluid connection between the upper and lower crust. MT inversion results suggest an electrical anisotropy factor >3 in the upper mantle with an enhanced conductivity in a N-S orientation that is in agreement with observations of fast seismic SKS split direction. We propose that anisotropy observations may be due to small degrees of interconnected partial melt aligned with a N-S geologic strike beneath the Basin and Range. A thermal model, combining measured thermophysical properties with existing heat flow data, MT measurements, and estimates of seismogenic depth is used to predict lithospheric thickness and mantle temperature variations along the MT profile. Lithospheric thicknesses

  20. Potential impacts to perennial springs from tar sand mining, processing, and disposal on the Tavaputs Plateau, Utah, USA.

    PubMed

    Johnson, William P; Frederick, Logan E; Millington, Mallory R; Vala, David; Reese, Barbara K; Freedman, Dina R; Stenten, Christina J; Trauscht, Jacob S; Tingey, Christopher E; Kip Solomon, D; Fernandez, Diego P; Bowen, Gabriel J

    2015-11-01

    Similar to fracking, the development of tar sand mining in the U.S. has moved faster than understanding of potential water quality impacts. Potential water quality impacts of tar sand mining, processing, and disposal to springs in canyons incised approximately 200 m into the Tavaputs Plateau, at the Uinta Basin southern rim, Utah, USA, were evaluated by hydrogeochemical sampling to determine potential sources of recharge, and chemical thermodynamic estimations to determine potential changes in transfer of bitumen compounds to water. Because the ridgetops in an area of the Tavaputs Plateau named PR Spring are starting to be developed for their tar sand resource, there is concern for potential hydrologic connection between these ridgetops and perennial springs in adjacent canyons on which depend ranching families, livestock, wildlife and recreationalists. Samples were collected from perennial springs to examine possible progression with elevation of parameters such as temperature, specific conductance, pH, dissolved oxygen, isotopic tracers of phase change, water-rock interaction, and age since recharge. The groundwater age dates indicate that the springs are recharged locally. The progression of hydrogeochemical parameters with elevation, in combination with the relatively short groundwater residence times, indicate that the recharge zone for these springs includes the surrounding ridges, and thereby suggests a hydrologic connection between the mining, processing, disposal area and the springs. Estimations based on chemical thermodynamic approaches indicate that bitumen compounds will have greatly enhanced solubility in water that comes into contact with the residual bitumen-solvent mixture in disposed tailings relative to water that currently comes into contact with natural tar. PMID:26057623

  1. Evaluation of undiscovered natural gas in the Upper Cretaceous Ferron Coal/Wasatch Plateau Total Petroleum System, Wasatch Plateau and Castle Valley, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henry, M.E.; Finn, T.M.

    2003-01-01

    The Total Petroleum System approach was used to estimate undiscovered gas potential of the Wasatch Plateau and Castle Valley, central Utah. The Ferron Coal/Wasatch Plateau Total Petroleum System was geologically defined and subdivided into seven assessment units, six of which were formally evaluated. Geologic data considered in defining the assessment unit boundaries included thermal maturity, coal presence and thickness, overburden thickness, and faulting intensity. Historical production data were also used to estimate volumes of gas from undrilled areas. The one conventional assessment unit includes almost the entire area of the petroleum system and is characterized by known accumulations that occur in structural or combination traps in sandstone reservoirs. The estimated undiscovered conventional producible gas that may be added to reserves of this unit ranges from a low (F95) of 14.8 billion cubic feet (BCFG) [419 million cubic meters (Mm3)] of gas to a high (F5) of 82 BCFG [2321 Mm3] and a mean value of 39.9 BCFG [1130 Mm3]. Continuous gas accumulations are those in which the entire assessment unit is considered to be gas-charged. Within these assessment units, there may be wells drilled that are not economic successes but all are expected to contain gas. Coalbed gas is in this continuous category. Mean estimates of undiscovered gas for the five continuous assessment units are: (1) Northern Coal Fairway/Drunkards Wash-752.3 BCFG [21,323 Mm3]; (2) Central Coal Fairway/Buzzard Bench-536.7 BCFG [15,194 Mm3]; (3) Southern Coal Fairway-152.6 BCFG [4320 Mm3]; (4) Deep (6000 feet plus) Coal and Sandstone-59.1 BCFG [1673 Mm3]; (5) Southern Coal Outcrop-10.6 BCFG [300 Mm3]; and Joes Valley and Musinia Grabens-not assessed.The mean estimate of undiscovered gas for the entire TPS is 1551.2 BCFG [43,914 Mm3]. There is a 95% chance that at least 855.7 BCFG [24,225 Mm3] and a 5% chance that at least 2504 BCFG [70,888 Mm3] of undiscovered producible gas remain in the TPS

  2. Hydrogeology of the Mammoth Spring groundwater basin and vicinity, Markagunt Plateau, Garfield, Iron, and Kane Counties, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spangler, Lawrence E.

    2012-01-01

    The Markagunt Plateau, in southwestern Utah, lies at an altitude of about 9,500 feet, largely within Dixie National Forest. The plateau is capped primarily by Tertiary- and Quaternary-age volcanic rocks that overlie Paleocene- to Eocene-age limestone of the Claron Formation, which forms escarpments on the west and south sides of the plateau. In the southwestern part of the plateau, an extensive area of sinkholes has formed that resulted primarily from dissolution of the underlying limestone and subsequent subsidence and (or) collapse of the basalt, producing sinkholes as large as 1,000 feet across and 100 feet deep. Karst development in the Claron Formation likely has been enhanced by high infiltration rates through the basalt. Numerous large springs discharge from the volcanic rocks and underlying limestone on the Markagunt Plateau, including Mammoth Spring, one of the largest in Utah, with discharge that ranges from less than 5 to more than 300 cubic feet per second (ft3/s). In 2007, daily mean peak discharge of Mammoth Spring was bimodal, reaching 54 and 56 ft3/s, while daily mean peak discharge of the spring in 2008 and in 2009 was 199 ft3/s and 224 ft3/s, respectively. In both years, the rise from baseflow, about 6 ft3/s, to peak flow occurred over a 4- to 5-week period. Discharge from Mammoth Spring accounted for about 54 percent of the total peak streamflow in Mammoth Creek in 2007 and 2008, and about 46 percent in 2009, and accounted for most of the total streamflow during the remainder of the year. Results of major-ion analyses for water samples collected from Mammoth and other springs on the plateau during 2006 to 2009 indicated calcium-bicarbonate type water, which contained dissolved-solids concentrations that ranged from 91 to 229 milligrams per liter. Concentrations of major ions, trace elements, and nutrients did not exceed primary or secondary drinking-water standards; however, total and fecal coliform bacteria were present in water from Mammoth and

  3. Petrologic and isotopic data from the Cretaceous (Campanian) Blackhawk Formation and Star Point Sandstone (Mesaverde Group), Wasatch Plateau, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fishman, Neil S.; Turner, Christine E.; Peterson, Fred

    2013-01-01

    The presence of discrete minerals associated with coal—whether (1) detrital or authigenic constituents of the coals or in thin mudstone or siltstone units interbedded with coals, or (2) authigenic phases that formed along cleats—might influence its utilization as an energy resource. The build-up of sintered ash deposits on the surfaces of heat exchangers in coal-fired power plants, due to the alteration of minerals during combustion of the coal, can seriously affect the functioning of the boiler and enhance corrosion of combustion equipment. In particular, the presence of sodium in coals has been considered a key factor in the fouling of boilers; however, other elements (such as calcium or magnesium) and the amount of discrete minerals burned with coal can also play a significant role in the inefficiency of and damage to boilers. Previous studies of the quality of coals in the Cretaceous (Campanian) Blackhawk Formation of the Wasatch Plateau, Utah, revealed that the sodium content of the coals varied across the region. To better understand the origin and distribution of sodium in these coals, petrologic studies were undertaken within a sedimentological framework to evaluate the timing and geochemical constraints on the emplacement of sodium-bearing minerals, particularly analcime, which previously had been identified in coals in the Blackhawk Formation. Further, the study was broadened to include not just coals in the Blackhawk Formation from various localities across the Wasatch Plateau, but also sandstones interbedded with the coals as well as sandstones in the underlying Star Point Sandstone. The alteration history of the sandstones in both formations was considered a key component of this study because it records the nature and timing of fluids passing through them and the associated precipitation of sodium-bearing minerals; thus, the alteration history could place constraints on the distribution and timing of sodium mineralization in the interbedded or

  4. Fish Lake, Utah - a promising long core site straddling the Great Basin to Colorado Plateau transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, D. W.; Abbott, M. B.; Bailey, C.; Wenrich, E.; Stoner, J. S.; Larsen, D. J.; Finkenbinder, M. S.; Anderson, L.; Brunelle, A.; Carter, V.; Power, M. J.; Hatfield, R. G.; Reilly, B.; Harris, M. S.; Grimm, E. C.; Donovan, J.

    2015-12-01

    Fish Lake (~7x1.5 km and 2696 m asl) is located on the Fish Lake Plateau in central Utah. The Lake occupies a NE-striking tectonic graben; one of a suite of grabens on the Plateau that cut 21-26 Ma volcanic rocks. The lake outflows via Lake Creek to the NE where it joins Sevenmile Creek to become the Fremont River, a tributary to the Colorado River. A bathymetric survey reveals a mean depth of 27 m and a max depth of 37.2 m. The lake bottom slopes from NW to SE with the deepest part near the SE wall, matching the topographic expression of the graben. Nearby Fish Lake Hightop (3545 m) was glaciated with an ice field and outlet glaciers. Exposure ages indicate moraine deposition during Pinedale (15-23 ka) and Bull Lake (130-150 ka) times. One outlet glacier at Pelican Canyon deposited moraines and outwash into the lake but the main basin of the lake was never glaciated. Gravity measurements indicate that lake sediments thicken toward the SE side of the lake and the thickest sediment package is modeled to be between 210 and 240 m. In Feb 2014 we collected cores from Fish Lake using a 9-cm diameter UWITECH coring system in 30.5 m of water. A composite 11.2-m-long core was constructed from overlapping 2 m drives that were taken in triplicate to ensure total recovery and good preservation. Twelve 14C ages and 3 tephra layers of known age define the age model. The oldest 14C age of 32.3±4.2 cal ka BP was taken from 10.6 m. Core lithology, CT scans, and magnetic susceptibility (ms) reveal three sediment packages: an organic-rich, low ms Holocene to post-glacial section, a fine-grained, minerogenic glacial section with high ms, and a short section of inferred pre-LGM sediment with intermediate composition. Extrapolating the age model to the maximum estimated sediment thicknesses suggest sediments may be older than 500-700 ka. Thus Fish Lake is an ideal candidate for long core retrieval as it likely contains paleoclimatic records extending over multiple glacial cycles.

  5. Thermal state of the lithosphere in the Colorado Plateau - Basin and Range transition zone, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, William Gillespie

    1997-12-01

    New or revised heat flow data are presented for 22 sites in and near the transition zone between the stable Colorado Plateau (CP) province and the extending northeastern Basin and Range (BR) province. Where the transition is marked by high elevations, heat flow is often depressed by recharging groundwater. At one site in the southern Wasatch Mountains, two wells yielded a heat flow estimate apparently free of this disturbance. Heat flow at the site is greater than 90 mW msp{-2} and probably about 150 mW msp{-2}. This site required correction for topography (10-20%), microclimatic effects (5%), paleoclimate (5%) and uplift and erosion (very uncertain, 12 to 50%). The sampling requirements for thermal conductivity of very heterogeneous formations were derived; the thermal conductivity sample at this site must be 30 to 50% larger than conventional statistical arguments suggested. The other reported heat flow sites are located in the central-western CP and adjacent transition zone. Mean heat flow for this region of the CP is 53 ± 9 mW msp{-2}, significantly less than the values of 60 to 65 mW msp{-2} cited for other parts of the CP province. The transition from CP to BR heat flow regimes is within this field survey, and occurs across a distance of about 40 km. Heat flow data from this and earlier studies indicate that the thermal transition is collocated with the eastern edge of the Inter-mountain Seismic Belt; the seismicity occurs only in warm crust. Other regional geophysical data sets were compiled in an attempt to apply independent constraints to the thermal conditions of the lithosphere. At present, seismic, EM and magnetic data do not resolve deviations of deep crustal temperature from quasi-steady geotherms. Therefore these data do not discriminate between alternative hypotheses for the uplift of the CP and the development of the transition zone. A model of crustal augmentation by magmatic underplating is proposed to explain the seismic velocity structure in

  6. Fault-controlled CO2 leakage from natural reservoirs in the Colorado Plateau, East-Central Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Na-Hyun; Han, Weon Shik; Watson, Z. T.; Graham, Jack P.; Kim, Kue-Young

    2014-10-01

    The study investigated a natural analogue for soil CO2 fluxes where CO2 has naturally leaked on the Colorado Plateau, East-Central Utah in order to identify various factors that control CO2 leakage and to understand regional-scale CO2 leakage processes in fault systems. The total 332 and 140 measurements of soil CO2 flux were made at 287 and 129 sites in the Little Grand Wash (LGW) and Salt Wash (SW) fault zones, respectively. Measurement sites for CO2 flux involved not only conspicuous CO2 degassing features (e.g., CO2-driven springs/geysers) but also linear features (e.g., joints/fractures and areas of diffusive leakage around a fault damage zone). CO2 flux anomalies were mostly observed along the fault traces. Specifically, CO2 flux anomalies were focused in the northern footwall of the both LGW and SW faults, supporting the existence of north-plunging anticlinal CO2 trap against south-dipping faults as well as higher probability of the north major fault traces as conduits. Anomalous CO2 fluxes also appeared in active travertines adjacent to CO2-driven cold springs and geysers (e.g., 36,259 g m-2 d-1 at Crystal Geyser), ancient travertines (e.g., 5,917 g m-2 d-1), joint zones in sandstone (e.g., 120 g m-2 d-1), and brine discharge zones (e.g., 5,515 g m-2 d-1). These observations indicate that CO2 has escaped through those pathways and that CO2 leakage from these fault zones does not correspond to point source leakage. The magnitude of CO2 flux is progressively reduced from north (i.e. the LGW fault zone, ∼36,259 g m-2 d-1) to south (i.e. the SW fault zone, ∼1,428 g m-2 d-1) despite new inputs of CO2 and CO2-saturated brine to the northerly SW fault from depth. This discrepancy in CO2 flux is most likely resulting from the differences in fault zone architecture and associated permeability structure. CO2-rich fluids from the LGW fault zone may become depleted with respect to CO2 during lateral transport, resulting in an additional decrease in CO2 fluxes

  7. Nevada and Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Roughly centered on the state of Utah, this MODIS true-color image shows the Great Salt Lake in Utah's northern panhandle. In the southern part of the state, the reddish rock of the Colorado Plateau extends southward into Arizona. To the west is Nevada.

  8. Quality of life on the Colorado Plateau: A report to camera-survey collaborators in southeast Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Jonathan G.; Reis-Ruehrwein, Jessica B.; Sexton, Natalie R.; Blahna, Dale J.

    1999-01-01

    In recent years, the goal of the UTC has changed from simply encouraging tourism development to understanding the relationship between tourism and community quality of life. Elements of the new UTC mission include: “make Utah a better place to live by increasing the economic contribution of tourism,” and “protect base resources and maintain quality of life for residents and visitors alike” (Utah Division of Travel Development, 1997). The Social, Economic, and Institutional Analysis Section [SEIAS]/ Midcontinent Ecological Science Center/U.S. Geological Survey conducted this research in late spring through winter of 1997 in an effort to answer those questions posed by the collaboration. This report provides an overview of the research and presents summary results. 

  9. Coal-bed methane in Utah, New Mexico, Colorado, and Wyoming: Resources, reserves, and production

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, S.N. ); DeBruin, R.H. ); Tremain, C.M. ); Whitehead, N.H. III )

    1993-08-01

    Coal-bed methane reserves of 10 tcf, in-place resources up to 250 tcf, and dramatically increased production rates from Cretaceous and Tertiary formations affirm the importance of the Rocky Mountain gas province well into the 21st century. These resources have been calculated for the individual states and basins using a variety of criteria and methods and the resource numbers are not necessarily comparable. The Book Cliffs, Emery, Wastach Plateau, Kaiparowits Plateau, and Sego coal fields in Utah contain a coal-bed methane resource of 10.4 tcf. The Book Cliffs and Emery coal fields contain 8.3 tcf or 80% of this resource. The San Juan basin, New Mexico and Colorado, has 10 tcf (reserves), 40 tcf (resources) in the Fruitland Formation, and 28 tcf (resources) in the Menefee Formation. The Raton basin, Colorado and New Mexico, has 10.2 tcf of resources in the Raton and Vermejo Formations. The Piceance and Sand Wash basins in Colorado have estimated resources of more than 96 tcf. The Powder River, Green River, Hams Fork, Wind River, Hanna, Rock Creek, and Bighorn coal fields in Wyoming have resources of 54.4 tcf. The Powder River, Wind River, Green River, and Hams Fork coal fields contain 87% of this resource. In August, 1992, coal-bed methane production accounted for 49% of all gas produced from the San Juan basin (New Mexico) and 30% of all New Mexico production. For 1991, coal-bed methane production in Colorado from the San Juan and Piceance basins was 16% of all Colorado gas production.

  10. Stratigraphy and structure of the Sevier thrust belt and proximal foreland-basin system in central Utah: A transect from the Sevier Desert to the Wasatch Plateau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawton, T.F.; Sprinkel, D.A.; Decelles, P.G.; Mitra, G.; Sussman, A.J.; Weiss, M.P.

    1997-01-01

    The Sevier orogenic belt in central Utah comprises four north-northwest trending thrust plates and two structural culminations that record crustal shortening and uplift in late Mesozoic and early Tertiary time. Synorogenic clastic rocks, mostly conglomerate and sandstone, exposed within the thrust belt were deposited in wedge-top and foredeep depozones within the proximal part of the foreland-basin system. The geologic relations preserved between thrust structures and synorogenic deposits demonstrate a foreland-breaking sequence of thrust deformation that was modified by minor out-of-sequence thrust displacement. Structural culminations in the interior part of the thrust belt deformed and uplifted some of the thrust sheets following their emplacement. Strata in the foreland basin indicate that the thrust sheets of central Utah were emplaced between latest Jurassic and Eocene time. The oldest strata of the foredeep depozone (Cedar Mountain Formation) are Neocomian and were derived from the hanging wall of the Canyon Range thrust. The foredeep depozone subsided most rapidly during Albian through Santonian or early Campanian time and accumulated about 2.5 km of conglomeratic strata (Indianola Group). The overlying North Horn Formation accumulated in a wedge-top basin from the Campanian to the Eocene and records propagation of the Gunnison thrust beneath the former foredeep. The Canyon Range Conglomerate of the Canyon Mountains, equivalent to the Indianola Group and the North Horn Formation, was deposited exclusively in a wedge-top setting on the Canyon Range and Pavant thrust sheets. This field trip, a three day, west-to-east traverse of the Sevier orogenic belt in central Utah, visits localities where timing of thrust structures is demonstrated by geometry of cross-cutting relations, growth strata associated with faults and folds, or deformation of foredeep deposits. Stops in the Canyon Mountains emphasize geometry of late structural culminations and relationships of

  11. Aspects of the palynology of the Chinle Formation (Upper Triassic), Colorado Plateau, Arizona, Utah, and New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, Richard A.

    1982-01-01

    This study deals with 16 palynological samples from Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah, that represent six members of the Chinle Formation of Late Triassic age. The samples, in ascending sequence, show a gradual change in the spore-bisaccate ratio from a preponderance of spores to numerical dominance of bisaccate pollen grains. This change is interpreted to indicate a climatic trend toward increasing aridity. The trend is thought to represent the decreasing energy phase of the oldest of three depositional cycles posited by Lupe (1977, 1979). The late Karnian age indicated for the Chinle Formation by pollen and spores is based on material from the lower part of the formation, leaving open the possibility that the upper part of the Chinle may be younger.

  12. Response of springs to longwall coal mining at the deer creek and cottonwood mines, Wasatch Plateau, Utah. Information circular/1994

    SciTech Connect

    Kadnuck, L.L.M.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the response of ground water contained in the overburden to underground mining in the Wasatch Plateau Coalfield. The study involved evaluating the response of local ground water resources overlying the Deer Creek and Cottonwood coal mines in Emery County, UT. The goals of this study were to (1) quantify fluctuations in spring discharge associated with undermining, (2) assess longevity of discharge fluctuations, and (3) correlate the stratigraphic locations and elevations of springs in the overburden stratigraphic column with zones of overburden failure.

  13. Along-strike sequence stratigraphy across the Cretaceous shallow marine to coastal-plain transition, Wasatch Plateau, Utah, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gani, M. Royhan; Ranson, Andrew; Cross, David B.; Hampson, Gary J.; Gani, Nahid D.; Sahoo, Hiranya

    2015-07-01

    Current sequence stratigraphic models deal with stratal packages almost exclusively along depositional-dip. A high-resolution outcrop example detailing sequence stratigraphic architecture along depositional-strike is largely lacking. This outcrop study provides a detailed sequence stratigraphic correlation along depositional-strike for a length of ~ 50 km. Moreover, this study focuses on the facies and stratigraphic relationships particularly at the very transition between coeval marine and nonmarine strata, which is relatively underdocumented. Within the Mesaverde Group of central and eastern Utah, the Upper Cretaceous shallow-marine Star Point Sandstone and paralic Blackhawk Formation are relatively well studied along depositional-dip in the Book Cliffs, but the nature of their spatio-temporal transition particularly along depositional-strike in the NNE-SSW trending Wasatch Plateau remains poorly documented. Facies-scale to stratigraphic-scale data were gathered from ten outcrop "windows" along the eastern margin of the Wasatch Plateau. The vertical and lateral transition between marine and nonmarine strata varies in complexity within the study area. In the southern part of the study area near the central Wasatch Plateau, the shallow-marine Star Point Sandstone passes stratigraphically upward into the nonmarine Blackhawk Formation in one simple transition without any intercalation of marine and nonmarine strata. In the northern part of the study area, however, where the Star Point Sandstone to Blackhawk Formation transition is complex, aggradationally stacked shallow-marine sandbodies (i.e., parasequences) taper and completely pinch-out within coastal-plain mudstones in a paleo-landward direction over short distances (< 1 km), representing potential stratigraphic traps. These marine sandbodies are intercalated with coeval nonmarine strata within the Blackhawk Formation. Fourth-order sequence boundaries and flooding surfaces were correlated along the lower

  14. 50,000 years of vegetation and climate history on the Colorado Plateau, Utah and Arizona, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coats, Larry L.; Cole, Kenneth L.; Mead, Jim I.

    2008-01-01

    Sixty packrat middens were collected in Canyonlands and Grand Canyon National Parks, and these series include sites north of areas that produced previous detailed series from the Colorado Plateau. The exceptionally long time series obtained from each of three sites (> 48,000 14C yr BP to present) include some of the oldest middens yet discovered. Most middens contain a typical late-Wisconsinan glaciation mixture of mesic and xeric taxa, evidence that plant species responded to climate change by range adjustments of elevational distribution based on individual criteria. Differences in elevational range from today for trees and shrubs ranged from no apparent change to as much as 1200 m difference. The oldest middens from Canyonlands NP, however, differ in containing strictly xeric assemblages, including middens incorporating needles of Arizona single-leaf pinyon, far north of its current distribution. Similar-aged middens from the eastern end of Grand Canyon NP contain plants more typical of glacial climates, but also contain fossils of one-seed juniper near its current northern limit in Arizona. Holocene middens reveal the development of modern vegetation assemblages on the Colorado Plateau, recording departures of mesic taxa from low elevation sites, and the arrival of modern dominant components much later.

  15. Tectonic development of Upper Cretaceous to Eocene strata of southwestern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstrand, P.M. )

    1994-01-01

    Upper Cretaceous to Paleogene nonmarine sedimentary rocks of southwest Utah record Sevier foreland basin sedimentation, Laramide-style folding and intermontane sedimentation, and cessation of Laramide deformation. The formations that record this tectonic evolution arc, from oldest to youngest, the Iron Springs, Kaiparowits, Canaan Peak, Grand Castle (informal name), Pine Hollow, and basal part of the Claron. The upper part of the Santonian to lower Campanian( ) Iron Springs Formation represents synorogenic, fluvial deposits derived from the Wah Wah and Blue Mountain thrust sheets of southwestern Utah. The middle to upper Campanian Kaiparowits and upper Campanian( ) to lower Paleocene Canaan Peak Formations are an upward-coarsening sequence derived from southeastern California and southern Nevada. Initial Laramide-style deformation occurred during latest Cretaceous or early Paleocene time, influencing the depositional pattern of the Canaan Peak fluvial system. The lower Paleocene Grand Castle formation represents an east- to southeast-flowing, braided-river system with the same source as the Iron Springs Formation (the Wah Wah and Blue Mountain thrust sheets). Conglomerate of Grand Castle onlaps the easternmost Sevier thrusts and is folded by Laramide structures. Although strata of the Grand Castle formation represent post-thrust and, in part, pre-Laramide deposition, initial development of a south-southwest-trending, Laramide-style upwarp controlled the geometry of the Grand Castle basin. 55 refs., 11 figs.

  16. Rise and Demise of a Southern Laramide Hinterland Plateau, US-Mexico Border Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawton, T. F.; Clinkscales, C. A.; Jennings, G. R.

    2011-12-01

    New U-Pb geochronology and stratigraphic data sets suggest that an elevated, altiplano-like plateau existed in the backarc region of what is now southern Arizona and southern New Mexico during Late Cretaceous through Paleogene (~28 Ma) time, and indicate that the Laramide province of the US was thus flanked on both its western and southern sides by hinterland plateaus. The Laramide stratigraphic record of southwestern New Mexico and southeastern Arizona formed during a short time period spanning 75-70 Ma, as indicated by numerous, newly-dated, interbedded tuff beds. The Laramide deposits (Fort Crittenden Formation of Arizona, Ringbone and Skunk Ranch Formations of Arizona, Cabullona Group of Sonora), which contain growth strata developed adjacent to steep thrust faults, accumulated in lake and lake-margin fan-delta and alluvial-fan settings on the northern margin of a volcanic arc whose main magmatic locus lay in northeastern Sonora and northwestern Chihuahua. By the end of basin development, the arc had migrated northward to occupy the former depocenters, such that intermediate volcanic rocks interfinger with and overlie the lacustrine deposits, and subvolcanic plutons, one with an age of 69 Ma, intrude and cross-cut thrust faults. Laramide strata unconformably overlie lowermost Upper Cretaceous (~97 Ma) strata and contractional structures are unconformably truncated beneath Oligocene (~33 Ma) volcaniclastic rocks. Detritus derived from the Cretaceous arc is abundant in Campanian fluvial strata (Kaiparowits Formation and Mesaverde Group) of the southern Colorado Plateau. East-west normal faults with as much as 3 km of displacement and a related array of conjugate NW- and NE-striking normal faults, many of these previously interpreted as reverse and transcurrent faults, are widespread in ranges of southern New Mexico and southeastern Arizona. These faults post-date Laramide contractional structures and are in turn cut by Neogene N-S normal faults. The east

  17. Major-element evidence for multiple magma batches in the evolution of Pleistocene and Holocene volcanic rocks of the Markagunt Plateau volcanic field, southwestern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Nealey, L.D.; Maldonado, F. )

    1993-04-01

    Pearce element ratios (PER) provide an initial understanding of the evolution of Pleistocene and Holocene alkali basalt to trachyandesite magmas of the Markagunt Plateau. The magmas erupted from numerous cinder cones, shield-like centers, and dikes. Vent areas were controlled by structures (e.g., grabens) related to the tectonic evolution of the transition zone between the Basin and Range and Colorado Plateaus provinces. The cinder cone-fed basalt flows and a single dike-fed basalt flow are probably older than shield-fed basalt and trachyandesite flows. Chemically, cinder cone- and dike-fed basalt flows are more mafic than shield-fed basalt flows. Trachyandesite flows are latite and benmoreite (58.7--59.7 wt % SiO[sub 2]). PER analysis of flow chemistry indicates that the shield-fed flows represent at leas three cogenetic magma batches, that cinder cone-fed flows must be related to more than one magma batch, but that all andesite is genetically related to a common parent magma. The dike-fed basalt flow is not genetically related to any other magma type. Although several magma batches erupted, chemical variations in the magmatic series are consistent with the fractionation of the observed phenocryst phases: olivine, plagioclase, clinopyroxene, and spinel. This four-phase fractionation assemblage relates compositional differences within each basalt type better than it does the entire magmatic series. Fractionation of no single mineral phase can adequately explain chemical variations in the basaltic magmas of the Markagunt Plateau.

  18. Assessment of total nitrogen and total phosphorus in selected surface water of the National Park Service Northern Colorado Plateau Network, Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming, from 1972 through 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Juliane B.; Thoma, David P.

    2012-01-01

    Nutrients are a nationally recognized concern for water quality of streams, rivers, groundwater, and water bodies. Nutrient impairment is documented by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as a primary cause of degradation in lakes and reservoirs, and nutrients are related to organic enrichment and oxygen depletion, which is an important cause of degradation in streams. Recently (2011), an effort to develop State-based numeric nutrient criteria has resulted in renewed emphasis on nutrients in surface water throughout the Nation. In response to this renewed emphasis and to investigate nutrient water quality for Northern Colorado Plateau Network streams, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service, assessed total nitrogen and total phosphorus concentration data for 93 sites in or near 14 National Park units for the time period 1972 through 2007.

  19. Fault-controlled advective, diffusive, and eruptive CO 2 leakage from natural reservoirs in the Colorado Plateau, East-Central Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Na-Hyun

    This study investigated a natural analogue for CO2 leakage near Green River, Utah, aiming to understand the influence of various factors on CO2 leakage and to reliably predict underground CO2 behavior after injection for geologic CO2 sequestration. Advective, diffusive, and eruptive characteristics of CO2 leakage were assessed via a soil CO2 flux survey and numerical modeling. The field results show anomalous CO2 fluxes (> 10 g m-2 d-1 ) along the faults, particularly adjacent to CO2-driven cold springs and geysers (e.g., 36,259 g m-2 d-1 at Crystal Geyser), ancient travertines (e.g., 5,917 g m-2 d-1), joint zones in sandstone (e.g., 120 g m-2 d-1), and brine discharge zones (e.g., 5,515 g m-2 d-1). Combined with similar isotopic ratios of gas and progressive evolution of brine chemistry at springs and geysers, a gradual decrease of soil CO2 flux from the Little Grand Wash (LGW; ~36,259 g m -2 d-1) to Salt Wash (SW; ~1,428 g m-2 d-1) fault zones reveals the same CO2 origin and potential southward transport of CO2 over 10-20 km. The numerical simulations exhibit lateral transport of free CO2 and CO2-rich brine from the LGW to SW fault zones through the regional aquifers (e.g., Entrada, Navajo, Kayenta, Wingate, White Rim). CO2 travels predominantly as an aqueous phase (XCO2=~0.045) as previously suggested, giving rise to the convective instability that further accelerates CO2 dissolution. While the buoyant free CO2 always tends to ascend, a fraction of dense CO2-rich brine flows laterally into the aquifer and mixes with the formation fluids during upward migration along the fault. The fault always enhances advective CO2 transport regardless of its permeability (k). However, only low-k fault prevents unconditional upright migration of CO2 and induces fault-parallel movement, feeding the northern aquifers with more CO2. Low-k fault also impedes lateral southward fluid flow from the northern aquifers, developing anticlinal CO2 traps at shallow depths (<300 m). The

  20. Workforce: Utah

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    In the decade leading up to 2012, Utah will see the second highest rate of job growth in the U.S. and an increasing demand for well-educated employees. Technology-related professions will see their ranks swell by 43 percent, while healthcare will grow by 42 percent. Teachers' numbers will increase by 37 percent: nearly 24,000 new jobs for…

  1. Zion National Park, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Though the Grand Canyon may receive all the attention due to its tremendous size, the smaller canyons of the Southwest are arguably more sublime. This true-color image of Zion Canyon in southwestern Utah was taken by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus aboard the Landsat 7 satellite on October 10, 2001. Zion Canyon is located in the lower half of the image amidst the crisscross pattern of rock formations. The canyon walls, made of red and white sandstone, rise 2,000-3,000 feet from the canyon floor and are peppered with hanging vegetation. Over a period of four million years, the Virgin River cut a path through the western edge of the Colorado Plateau to form the canyon. The river and its tributaries resemble branches across the gray-green landscape in the upper section of the image. They eventually join the canyon, often as spectacular slot canyons only a few feet wide, and exit at the bottom of the image on the way to the Colorado River. Image by Robert Simmon, based on data provided by the Landsat 7 Science Team and the Arizona Regional Image Archive

  2. UTAH VOLUNTEER MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Goal 1) Promote and coordinate stream monitoring efforts in Utah as an effective watershed educational tool. Task 1) Inventory and compile an annotated list of existing volunteer monitoring programs and related efforts in Utah. Task 2) Promote monitoring activities throughout the...

  3. Mode and mechanisms of plateau uplifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgetchin, T. R.; Burke, K. C.; Thompson, G. A.; Young, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    The mode and mechanisms of plateau uplifts are reported, based on discussions which occurred as part of a conference on plateau uplifts sponsored by the Inter-Union Commission on Geodynamics and the Lunar and Planetary Institute. Major plateaus and high plains of the world are discussed with emphasis on the Colorado Plateau, which possesses a shield-like crust 45 km thick and occupies most of eastern Utah and parts of Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Several uplift mechanisms are described, including thermal expansion due to a deep mantle plume or hot spot, and hydration reactions such as serpentinization. It is concluded that uplifts are most commonly associated with either subduction and its direct effects, or deep-seated thermal disturbances.

  4. Utah: Salt Lake Region

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Winter and Summer Views of the Salt Lake Region     View Larger Image Magnificent views of the region surrounding Salt Lake City, Utah are captured in these winter and summer images from the ...

  5. Landslides and debris flows in Ephraim Canyon, central Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, R.L.; Fleming, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    The geology of 36 km{sup 2} in Ephraim Canyon, on the west side of the Wasatch Plateau, central Utah, was mapped at a scale of 1:12,000 following the occurrence of numerous landslides in 1983. The geologic map shows the distribution of the landslides and debris flows of 1983-86, as well as older landslide deposits, other surficial deposits, and bedrock. Several of the recent landslides are described and illustrated by means of maps or photographs.

  6. Geologic map of Bryce Canyon National Park and vicinity, southwestern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowers, William E.

    1991-01-01

    Bryce Canyon National Park is located along the eastern escarpment of the Paunsaugunt Plateau, which along with the Markagunt Plateau to the west, form the southernmost of the High Plateaus of Utah. The park’s unique scenery has been created by forces of differential erosion acting on colorful rocks exposed along and below the rim of the plateau. Park headquarters and major scenic viewpoints that lie on or near the rim of the plateau are accessible from Utah Highway 12 mi west of the park. More remote parts of the park are located in canyons beneath the rim and are accessible only by foot, along horse trails or from a few unimproved dirt roads that approach the park boundary from the east or south.

  7. Geology of the Red House Cliffs area, San Juan County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mullens, Thomas E.

    1955-01-01

    The Red Cliffs area comprises 296 square miles of canyon and plateau country in southwestern San Juan County, Utah.  The rocks that crop out in the area are mostly deposits of terrestrial environment and are of Permian, Triassic, Jurassic, and Quaternary ages.  The aggregate thickness of these rock is about 3,500 feet.

  8. Maps showing distribution of bismuth in heavy-mineral concentrates, Richfield 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, William R.; Motooka, Jerry M.; McHugh, John B.

    1985-01-01

    Located in west-central Utach, the Richfield quadrangle covers the eastern part of the Plioche-Marysvale ingeous and mineral belt, which extends from the vicinity of Plioche in southeastern Nevada east-northeastward for 250 km (155 mi) into central Utah. The western two-thirds of the Richfield quadrangle is in the Basin and Range province and the eastern third is in the High Plateaus of Utah, a subprovince of the Colorado Plateau

  9. Maps showing distribution of barium in heavy-mineral concentrates, Richfield 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, William R.; Motooka, Jerry M.; McHugh, John B.

    1985-01-01

    Located in west-central Utach, the Richfield quadrangle covers the eastern part of the Plioche-Marysvale ingeous and mineral belt, which extends from the vicinity of Plioche in southeastern Nevada east-northeastward for 250 km (155 mi) into central Utah. The western two-thirds of the Richfield quadrangle is in the Basin and Range province and the eastern third is in the High Plateaus of Utah, a subprovince of the Colorado Plateau

  10. Jurassic crustal deformation in west-central part of Colorado Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, F.

    1985-05-01

    Although the Jurassic Period is commonly thought of as a time of tectonic quiescence, updated isopach maps and new sedimentologic information indicate that it was a time of notable crustal deformation on the Colorado Plateau. A significant change in structural style occurred in Middle Jurassic time, especially during the erosion interval that produced the J-3 unconformity. Prior to late Middle Jurassic time, the region had been tilted westward and structural troughs formed in the area of the present-day Circle Cliffs uplift and in the vicinity of the Circle Cliffs and Black Mesa regions were uplifted and the nearby Henry and Kaiparowits regions began to be downwarped as troughs or basins. It cannot be determined if or how the present-day monoclines flexed during the Jurassic. However, the direction of structural tilt across these areas changed from west side down to east side down during the late Middle and early Late Jurassic. The Monument region, the largest and most persistent structural element in the region, changed from a structural bench to a positive structure in the early Late Jurassic. In most cases the positive structures subsided more slowly than adjacent downwarps. Two exceptions during the Late Jurassic are the Black Mesa and Emery uplifts. These are the only uplifts that actually rose above the level of sediment accumulation. Jurassic rocks are not known to contain significant hydrocarbon resources in this region, but their tectonic history may offer clues to the structural history of underlying Paleozoic strata, which are the primary hydrocarbon exploration targets.

  11. Utah Paiute Tribal Restoration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Allen C.

    The Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah Restoration Act (1980) restored federal recognition of the tribe after a quarter century of ambiguous political status, and resulted in significant improvements of educational status of tribal members and intensification of the political presence of Southern Paiutes. Following the Paiute Indian Termination Act…

  12. Chicanos in Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, D.; And Others

    Demographic data on the Chicano in Utah and their position relative to various public agencies were gathered. Focus was on the number of Chicanos serving as staff in the agencies; to what degree the agencies served the Chicanos in meeting their needs for a self-sufficient life style; how the Spanish speaking perceived their needs and the ability…

  13. Utah Mock Trial Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oswald, Linda, Comp.

    Background materials and guidelines for secondary students and educators in Utah who wish to participate in the state-wide mock trial competition are provided. Many parts of the publication can be used by educators in other states who are using mock trials in their classrooms or who are developing a state-wide mock trial competition. The manual…

  14. New Horned Dinosaurs from Utah Provide Evidence for Intracontinental Dinosaur Endemism

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, Scott D.; Loewen, Mark A.; Farke, Andrew A.; Roberts, Eric M.; Forster, Catherine A.; Smith, Joshua A.; Titus, Alan L.

    2010-01-01

    Background During much of the Late Cretaceous, a shallow, epeiric sea divided North America into eastern and western landmasses. The western landmass, known as Laramidia, although diminutive in size, witnessed a major evolutionary radiation of dinosaurs. Other than hadrosaurs (duck-billed dinosaurs), the most common dinosaurs were ceratopsids (large-bodied horned dinosaurs), currently known only from Laramidia and Asia. Remarkably, previous studies have postulated the occurrence of latitudinally arrayed dinosaur “provinces,” or “biomes,” on Laramidia. Yet this hypothesis has been challenged on multiple fronts and has remained poorly tested. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we describe two new, co-occurring ceratopsids from the Upper Cretaceous Kaiparowits Formation of Utah that provide the strongest support to date for the dinosaur provincialism hypothesis. Both pertain to the clade of ceratopsids known as Chasmosaurinae, dramatically increasing representation of this group from the southern portion of the Western Interior Basin of North America. Utahceratops gettyi gen. et sp. nov.—characterized by short, rounded, laterally projecting supraorbital horncores and an elongate frill with a deep median embayment—is recovered as the sister taxon to Pentaceratops sternbergii from the late Campanian of New Mexico. Kosmoceratops richardsoni gen. et sp. nov.—characterized by elongate, laterally projecting supraorbital horncores and a short, broad frill adorned with ten well developed hooks—has the most ornate skull of any known dinosaur and is closely allied to Chasmosaurus irvinensis from the late Campanian of Alberta. Conclusions/Significance Considered in unison, the phylogenetic, stratigraphic, and biogeographic evidence documents distinct, co-occurring chasmosaurine taxa north and south on the diminutive landmass of Laramidia. The famous Triceratops and all other, more nested chasmosaurines are postulated as descendants of forms previously restricted

  15. 76 FR 18245 - West Tavaputs Plateau Road Restriction Order, Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-01

    ..., as follows: The public is prohibited from driving a motorized vehicle on Horse Bench, Jack Canyon... receive a reply during normal business hours. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Four roads (Horse Bench, Jack... authorized use only. Horse Bench, Jack Canyon, Jack Ridge, and Cedar Ridge Roads in Carbon County,...

  16. HCMM hydrological analysis in Utah. [Utah lake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Progress in analysis of Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) infrared and visible observations of the hydrology of Utah Lake is reported. Correlation between HCMM intensities converted to temperature and ground truth temperatures was investigated, and a conversion offset value determined. Ground truth surface temperatures minus HCMM temperatures were plotted against several hydrological parameters. Relationships among visible data, thermal data, and algae concentrations were considered, and summer concentrations of predominant algae species determined. Investigations on the effects of varying algae concentrations on evaporation rates are reported. Efforts to develop a model for evaporation estimation are reported. The relationship between air and water surface temperatures was studied and the temperature distribution in different segments of the lake investigated. Indications of the existence of thermal springs are reported. Correlation of HCMM surface temperature data and depth to groundwater were investigated.

  17. Fluorspar deposits of Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurston, W.R.; Staatz, M.H.; Cox, D.C.

    1954-01-01

    The studies of fluorspar localities in Utah made by the U. S. Geological Survey during and since the recent war are summarized. The fluorspar at the Cougar Spar and Blue Bell mines in the Indian Peak Range of western Beaver County occurs as fissure veins in fault and breccia zones in volcanic and intrusive rocks. At the Monarch (Staats) claims in west-central Beaver County fluorspar was mined chiefly from a fault between limestone and rhyolite porphyry. The Thomas Range district in Juab County has yielded sizeable tonnages of fluorspar from pipes in faulted dolomite and rhyolite porphyry. From 1918 to 1924 the Silver Queen mine in Tooele County produced fluorspar from flssure veins in faulted limestone. The report describes the geology of producing mines and the various prospects examined. Production and reserves of fluorspar for Utah are summarized.

  18. Salt Lake City, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Salt Lake City, Utah, will host the 2002 Winter Olympic Games. The city is located on the southeastern shore of the Great Salt Lake and sits to the west of the Wasatch Mountains, which rise more than 3,500 meters (10,000 feet) above sea level. The city was first settled in 1847 by pioneers seeking relief from religious persecution. Today Salt Lake City, the capital of Utah, is home to more than 170,000 residents. This true-color image of Salt Lake City was acquired by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+), flying aboard Landsat 7, on May 26, 2000. The southeastern tip of the Great Salt Lake is visible in the upper left of the image. The furrowed green and brown landscape running north-south is a portion of the Wasatch Mountains, some of which are snow-capped (white pixels). The greyish pixels in the center of the image show the developed areas of the city. A number of water reservoirs can be seen east of the mountain range. Salt Lake City International Airport is visible on the northwestern edge of the city. About 20 miles south of the airport is the Bingham Canyon Copper Mine (tan pixels), the world's largest open pit excavation. See also this MODIS image of Utah. Image courtesy NASA Landsat7 Science Team and USGS Eros Data Center

  19. Utah's Educational Reform Programs, 1991-93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    In November 1983, the Utah Education Reform Steering Committee issued the report "Education in Utah: A Call to Action." To meet Utah's double challenge of rapid growth and quality enhancement, the report stated that Utah needed to: (1) increase the allocation of financial resources to education; (2) demand reforms in many aspects of education; and…

  20. New geothermal database for Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blackett, Robert E.

    1993-01-01

    The Utah Geological Survey complied a preliminary database consisting of over 800 records on thermal wells and springs in Utah with temperatures of 20??C or greater. Each record consists of 35 fields, including location of the well or spring, temperature, depth, flow-rate, and chemical analyses of water samples. Developed for applications on personal computers, the database will be useful for geochemical, statistical, and other geothermal related studies. A preliminary map of thermal wells and springs in Utah, which accompanies the database, could eventually incorporate heat-flow information, bottom-hole temperatures from oil and gas wells, traces of Quaternary faults, and locations of young volcanic centers.

  1. Crust and Mantle Structure Beneath the Colorado Plateau (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grand, S. P.; van Wijk, J. W.; Baldridge, W. S.; Aster, R. C.; Ni, J. F.; Wilson, D.

    2010-12-01

    The La Ristra experiment consisted of a northwest trending linear deployment of 72 broadband seismic stations from West Texas to western Utah with 15 to 20 km spacing. The resulting 1400 km seismic line provides unprecedented images of crust and mantle along a cross section that crosses the Colorado Plateau from near Mount Taylor in the east to the Marysvale volcanic field in the west. Surface wave analysis shows the Colorado Plateau to have a 120-150 km thick high seismic velocity lid that we identify with cold lithosphere. A sharp negative gradient below 120-150 km depth indicates a sharp boundary to the lithosphere at depth with hot asthenosphere in contact with the base of the lithosphere. Receiver function analysis shows central Plateau crust to be 42-50 km thick thinning to 30-35 km thick at the edges. Isostatic calculations show that only a fraction of the Plateau elevation can be explained by thickened crust thus the high topography of the Plateau has a largely mantle source. Bodywave tomography is consistent with the surface wave analysis but shows that at both edges of the Plateau there are narrow (50-100km) high velocity zones extending to at least 200 km depth. We interpret these seismic anomalies as mantle downwellings that are part of small edge convection cells initiated by lateral temperature gradients created by extension in the Great Basin and Rio Grande Rift. Numerical modeling indicates the convection is significantly eroding the lithosphere at the edges of the Plateau accounting for the high elevations observed there. Associated upwellings are responsible for the late Neogene-Quaternary magmatism surrounding the Plateau.

  2. Utah Heavy Oil Program

    SciTech Connect

    J. Bauman; S. Burian; M. Deo; E. Eddings; R. Gani; R. Goel; C.K. Huang; M. Hogue; R. Keiter; L. Li; J. Ruple; T. Ring; P. Rose; M. Skliar; P.J. Smith; J.P. Spinti; P. Tiwari; J. Wilkey; K. Uchitel

    2009-10-20

    The Utah Heavy Oil Program (UHOP) was established in June 2006 to provide multidisciplinary research support to federal and state constituents for addressing the wide-ranging issues surrounding the creation of an industry for unconventional oil production in the United States. Additionally, UHOP was to serve as an on-going source of unbiased information to the nation surrounding technical, economic, legal and environmental aspects of developing heavy oil, oil sands, and oil shale resources. UHOP fulGilled its role by completing three tasks. First, in response to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Section 369(p), UHOP published an update report to the 1987 technical and economic assessment of domestic heavy oil resources that was prepared by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission. The UHOP report, entitled 'A Technical, Economic, and Legal Assessment of North American Heavy Oil, Oil Sands, and Oil Shale Resources' was published in electronic and hard copy form in October 2007. Second, UHOP developed of a comprehensive, publicly accessible online repository of unconventional oil resources in North America based on the DSpace software platform. An interactive map was also developed as a source of geospatial information and as a means to interact with the repository from a geospatial setting. All documents uploaded to the repository are fully searchable by author, title, and keywords. Third, UHOP sponsored Give research projects related to unconventional fuels development. Two projects looked at issues associated with oil shale production, including oil shale pyrolysis kinetics, resource heterogeneity, and reservoir simulation. One project evaluated in situ production from Utah oil sands. Another project focused on water availability and produced water treatments. The last project considered commercial oil shale leasing from a policy, environmental, and economic perspective.

  3. Poisonous snakebite in Utah.

    PubMed

    Plowman, D M; Reynolds, T L; Joyce, S M

    1995-12-01

    A retrospective study was done of poisonous snakebite in Utah to determine the current epidemiology and scope of treatment, reviewing emergency department logs and other sources statewide for a 69-month period. Of 61 cases of poisonous snakebite identified, 13 occurred in snake hobbyists or venom laboratory personnel and were considered nonaccidental, and 48 were inflicted by native noncaptive snakes. These bites were considered accidental, and all were presumed to be from rattlesnakes. Nearly three fourths of the victims were male, ranging in age from 2 to 56 years (mean, 22 years). Most accidental bites occurred in areas of high human populations, during the summer months, in the afternoon or evening hours, and during recreational activities. Of the 48 bites, 11 (23%) were provoked. Two thirds of bites were on the upper extremities, and a third were on the lower extremities. More than half of the victims had no first-aid treatment recorded. Of those who did receive first aid, many were subjected to possibly harmful treatments, including tourniquets and ice application. The median time to a hospital was 68 minutes, with a range of 15 to 440 minutes. Swelling and discoloration were the most common signs and pain and paresthesia the most common symptoms. Half the bites resulted in minimal or no envenomation, 17 (35%) produced moderate envenomation, and 6 (12%) severe envenomation. Most patients with moderate or severe envenomation received antivenin, but the dosages given were usually less than recommended dosages. Five patients received surgical treatment based on clinical findings. One child died in a snake-handling incident. Long-term morbidity was unknown due to lack of follow-up. The Utah Poison Control Center was poorly utilized as a reporting and informational resource. PMID:8553638

  4. HCMM hydrological analysis in Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Data reduction and preliminary comparisons and correlations of Heat Capacity Mapping Mission data to ground truth measurements were made. The data covered Utah Lake and the surrounding area. Output modes include a digital hard copy record of the intensity value for each pixel and color graphics. Analyses of non-diatom net plankton (algae), turbidity, nitrogen, phosphorus, and temperatures were made. In addition, infrared data for the agricultural area around Utah lake were also preliminarily examined and compared to depth to groundwater data.

  5. Annotated geothermal bibliography of Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Budding, K.E.; Bugden, M.H.

    1986-01-01

    The bibliography includes all the Utah geothermal references through 1984. Some 1985 citations are listed. Geological, geophysical, and tectonic maps and reports are included if they cover a high-temperature thermal area. The references are indexed geographically either under (1) United States (national studies), (2) regional - western United States or physiographic province, (3) Utah - statewide and regional, or (4) county. Reports concerning a particular hot spring or thermal area are listed under both the thermal area and the county names.

  6. Dirhinus texanus (Hymenoptera: Chalcididae) from Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pech, L.L.; Gates, M.W.; Graham, T.B.

    2011-01-01

    We collected a Dirhinus texanus (Hymenoptera: Chalcididae) in Salt Creek Canyon, Canyonlands National Park, San Juan County, Utah. This is the first record for D. texanus in Utah. Copyright ?? 2011 BioOne All rights reserved.

  7. Mantle structure beneath the western edge of the Colorado Plateau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sine, C.R.; Wilson, D.; Gao, W.; Grand, S.P.; Aster, R.; Ni, J.; Baldridge, W.S.

    2008-01-01

    Teleseismic traveltime data are inverted for mantle Vp and Vs variations beneath a 1400 km long line of broadband seismometers extending from eastern New Mexico to western Utah. The model spans 600 km beneath the moho with resolution of ???50 km. Inversions show a sharp, large-magnitude velocity contrast across the Colorado Plateau-Great Basin transition extending ???200 km below the crust. Also imaged is a fast anomaly 300 to 600 km beneath the NW portion of the array. Very slow velocities beneath the Great Basin imply partial melting and/or anomalously wet mantle. We propose that the sharp contrast in mantle velocities across the western edge of the Plateau corresponds to differential lithospheric modification, during and following Farallon subduction, across a boundary defining the western extent of unmodified Proterozoic mantle lithosphere. The deep fast anomaly corresponds to thickened Farallon plate or detached continental lithosphere at transition zone depths. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Heat flow in the north-central Colorado Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodell, John Michael; Chapman, David S.

    1982-04-01

    We report new heat flow measurements at 25 evenly distributed sites in the north-central Colorado Plateau. Heat flow values computed for these new sites and one previously published site range from 43 to 116 mW m-2 but fall into the following distinct subsets related to physiographic and tectonic elements within the Plateau: (1) heat flow of 51 mW m-2 (12 sites; s.d. 6) in the San Rafael Swell and Green River Desert which constitute the core of the Colorado Plateau at this latitude, (2) heat flows of 69 mW m-2 (5 sites; s.d. 10) and 88 mW m-2 (4 sites; s.d. 19) in successive parallel north-south bands approaching the Wasatch Plateau to the west but still 80 km east of the Basin and Range physiographic boundary, (3) heat flow of 64 mW m-2 (5 sites; s.d. 2) along the Salt Anticline trend which strikes northwest in the region of Moab, Utah. Heat flow results for the entire Colorado Plateau have been reexamined in view of our new results, and the overall pattern supports the concept of a low heat flow `thermal interior' for the plateau surrounded by a periphery some 100 km wide having substantially higher heat flow. Average heat flow in the thermal interior is about 60 mW m-2 compared to 80-90 mW m-2 in the periphery. This regional heat flow pattern supports a model of Tertiary lithospheric thinning under the Colorado Plateau whereby the plateau is still in transient thermal response and a 15-20 m.y. lag between uplift and corresponding surface heat flow anomaly is to be expected. The position of the heat flow transition between our interior and peripheral regions in the northwest plateau is roughly consistent with lateral warming and weakening of the Colorado Plateau lithosphere initiated at the Basin and Range boundary some 20 m.y. ago.

  9. Prospects for Utah look good

    SciTech Connect

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2006-01-15

    Utah enjoys its first boom in over a generation. Recently Arch Coal, Andalex, CONSOl Energy and PacifiCorp ramped up their coal mining operations or re-opened closed facilities. Arch Coal's Skyline mine was able to mine over 200,0000 tons of coal throughout 2005 and its SUFCO mine produced 7.5 mt of coal during 2005. The article based largely on the recent 'Annual review and forecast of Utah coal', reports on developments in the state whose coal production could break records in 2006. 1 ref., 4 photos.

  10. CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect

    ROMINE, L.D.

    2006-02-01

    A systematic approach to closure planning is being implemented at the Hanford Site's Central Plateau to help achieve the goal of closure by the year 2035. The overall objective of Central Plateau remediation is to protect human health and the environment from the significant quantity of contaminated material that resulted from decades of plutonium production in support of the nation's defense. This goal will be achieved either by removing contaminants or placing the residual contaminated materials in a secure configuration that minimizes further migration to the groundwater and reduces the potential for inadvertent intrusion into contaminated sites. The approach to Central Plateau cleanup used three key concepts--closure zones, closure elements, and closure process steps--to create an organized picture of actions required to complete remediation. These actions were merged with logic ties, constraints, and required resources to produce an integrated time-phased schedule and cost profile for Central Plateau closure. Programmatic risks associated with implementation of Central Plateau closure were identified and analyzed. Actions to mitigate the most significant risks are underway while high priority remediation projects continue to make progress.

  11. The Colorado Plateau IV: shaping conservation through science and management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wakeling, Brian F.; Sisk, Thomas D.

    2010-01-01

    Roughly centered on the Four Corners region of the southwestern United States, the Colorado Plateau covers some 130,000 square miles of sparsely vegetated plateaus, mesas, canyons, arches, and cliffs in Arizona, Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico. With elevations ranging from 3,000 to 14,000 feet, the natural systems found within the plateau are dramatically varied, from desert to alpine conditions. This book focuses on the integration of science and resource management issues in this unique and highly varied environment. Broken into three subsections, this volume addresses conservation biology, biophysical resources, and inventory and monitoring concerns. The chapters range in content, addressing conservation issues–past, present, and future–on the Colorado Plateau, measurement of human impacts on resources, grazing and wildland-urban interfaces, and tools and methods for monitoring habitats and species. An informative read for people interested in the conservation and natural history of the region, the book will also serve as a valuable reference for those people engaged in the management of cultural and biological resources of the Colorado Plateau, as well as scientists interested in methods and tools for land and resource management throughout the West.

  12. Radiative plateau inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballesteros, Guillermo; Tamarit, Carlos

    2016-02-01

    We describe how monomial chaotic inflation becomes compatible with the latest CMB data thanks to radiative corrections producing a plateau. The interactions of the inflaton with other fields, required for reheating, can flatten the potential and moderate the production of primordial gravitational waves, keeping these below the current upper bound. We show that the appearance of a plateau requires that the inflaton couples to fermions and to another scalar or a gauge group. We give concrete examples of minimal particle physics models leading to plateaus for quadratic and quartic chaotic inflation. We also provide a three-parameter model-independent description of radiatively corrected inflation that is amenable to CMB analyses.

  13. Remembering the University of Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haglund, Elizabeth, Ed.

    Nineteen essays comprise this personal and historical look at the University of Utah and the relationship between the university, its people, and the community. Essays include: "One Cannot Live Long Enough to Outgrow a University" (Ramona Wilcox Cannon); "Ever in the Freshness of Its Youth" (G. Homer Durham); "The Final Payoff" (David W. Evans);…

  14. Utah: Going against the Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvik, Elaine

    1982-01-01

    While enrollment and demographic trends worry the higher education community in other states, Utah's higher education future is bright. Financial support from the Mormon Church, high birth rate, strong institutions (both public and private), a cohesive, conservative community, and large potential natural resources give optimism to the state. (MSE)

  15. Salt Lake City, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The 2002 Winter Olympics are hosted by Salt Lake City at several venues within the city, in nearby cities, and within the adjacent Wasatch Mountains. This simulated natural color image presents a late spring view of north central Utah that includes all of the Olympic sites. The image extends from Ogden in the north, to Provo in the south; and includes the snow-capped Wasatch Mountains and the eastern part of the Great Salt Lake.

    This image was acquired on May 28, 2000 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution

  16. 75 FR 71726 - Central Utah Project Completion Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-24

    ... Central Utah Project Completion Act AGENCY: Department of the Interior, Office of the Assistant Secretary... Utah Project Completion Act Office, 302 East 1860 South, Provo, Utah 84606. The documents are also... Baxter, Central Utah Project Completion Act Office, 302 East 1860 South, Provo, Utah 84606; (801)...

  17. Preliminary geologic section from Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, to Enterprise, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barosh, P.J.

    1967-01-01

    The 154-mile long geologic cross section trends nearly perpendicular to the structural grain of the Basin-Range province in Nevada, and in Utah extends eastward into the transition zone between the Basin-Range and Colorado Plateau provinces. The structure is characterized by complex thrust: faults, involving uppermost Precambrian to lower Mesozoic sedimentary rocks, and normal faults which cut: the thick sequence of Tertiary volcanic rocks as well as older rocks. Some of the normal faults are the result of caldera collapse. The principal normal faults trend northerly west: of Delamar, Nev., and form north-trending basins and ranges. Farther east the principal faults trend northwesterly, and form a moderately rugged highland rather than distinct basins and ranges. The uppermost Precambrian-Paleozoic strata thin markedly eastward across the region. The pre-Pennsylvanian sedimentary rocks vary from 32,500 feet: in thickness at the Nevada Test: Site (Harley Barnes, E. N. Hinrichs, F. A. McKeown and P. P. Orkild, written commun., 1963) to 4,500 feet: in the Beaver Dam Mountains in western Utah (Cook, 1960). Thick Mesozoic deposits, similar to those of the Colorado Plateau, are present in western Utah, but are represented in eastern Nevada by only thin patches of Triassic rock.

  18. The Newcastle geothermal system, Iron County, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Blackett, R.E.; Shubat, M.A.; Bishop, C.E. ); Chapman, D.S.; Forster, C.B.; Schlinger, C.M. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1990-03-01

    Geological, geophysical and geochemical studies contributed to conceptual hydrologic model of the blind'' (no surface expression), moderate-temperature (greater than 130{degree}C) Newcastle geothermal system, located in the Basin and Range-Colorado Plateau transition zone of southwestern Utah. Temperature gradient measurements define a thermal anomaly centered near the surface trace of the range-bounding Antelope Range fault with and elongate dissipative plume extending north into the adjacent Escalante Valley. Spontaneous potential and resistivity surveys sharply define the geometry of the dominant upflow zone (not yet explored), indicating that most of the thermal fluid issues form a short segment along the Antelope Range fault and discharges into a gently-dipping aquifer. Production wells show that this aquifer lies at a depth between 85 and 95 meter. Electrical surveys also show that some leakage of thermal fluid occurs over a 1.5 km (minimum) interval along the trace of the Antelope Range fault. Major element, oxygen and hydrogen isotopic analyses of water samples indicate that the thermal fluid is a mixture of meteoric water derived from recharge areas in the Pine Valley Mountains and cold, shallow groundwater. A northwest-southeast trending system of faults, encompassing a zone of increased fracture permeability, collects meteoric water from the recharge area, allows circulation to a depth of 3 to 5 kilometers, and intersects the northeast-striking Antelope Range fault. We postulate that mineral precipitates form a seal along the Antelope Range fault, preventing the discharge of thermal fluids into basin-fill sediments at depth, and allowing heated fluid to approach the surface. Eventually, continued mineral deposition could result in the development of hot springs at the ground surface.

  19. HCMM hydrological analysis in Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, A. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of applying a linear model to HCMM data in hopes of obtaining an accurate linear correlation was investigated. The relationship among HCMM sensed data surface temperature and red reflectivity on Utah Lake and water quality factors including algae concentrations, algae type, and nutrient and turbidity concentrations was established and evaluated. Correlation (composite) images of day infrared and reflectance imagery were assessed to determine if remote sensing offers the capability of using masses of accurate and comprehensive data in calculating evaporation. The effects of algae on temperature and evaporation were studied and the possibility of using satellite thermal data to locate areas within Utah Lake where significant thermal sources exist and areas of near surface groundwater was examined.

  20. Lead Levels in Utah Eagles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Michelle

    2006-10-01

    Lead is a health hazard to most animals, causing adverse effects to the nervous and reproductive systems if in sufficient quantity. Found in most fishing jigs and sinkers, as well as some ammunition used in hunting, this metal can poison wildlife such as eagles. Eagles are raptors, or predatory birds, and their lead exposure would most likely comes from their food -- a fish which has swallowed a sinker or lead shot in carrion (dead animal matter). As part of an ongoing project to investigate the environment lead levels in Utah, the bone lead levels in the wing bones of eagles have been measured for eagle carcasses found throughout Utah. The noninvasive technique of x-ray fluorescence was used, consisting of a Cd-109 radioactive source to activate lead atoms and a HPGe detector with digital electronics to collect the gamma spectra. Preliminary results for the eagles measured to date will be presented.

  1. Paleogeographic and paleotectonic development of Laramide basins of SW Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstrand, P.M. )

    1993-04-01

    Initial Laramide-style deformation in SW Utah began in latest Cretaceous (late Campanian or Maastrichtian) time during deposition of the conglomeratic Canaan Peak Formation (TKcp) which thins onto a broad arch located on the northern Paunsaugunt Plateau (Paunsaugunt upwarp). This NNE-SSW trending upward affected sediment dispersal patterns during the early Paleocene and was the southern basin margin for braided fluvial sediments of the Grand Castle Formation (Tgc). These sediments were shed SE, from the inactive Sevier highlands, as far east as the Table Cliff Plateau. Laramide deformation increased during the late( ) Paleocene, after deposition of the Tgc, with the formation of at least two closed basins. During the late( ) Paleocene, the Johns Valley and Upper Valley anticlines, and Circle Cliff Uplift developed with sediment being shed to the SE, E, and SW into the Pine Hollow basin. During initial development of the Pine Hollow basin, the underlying TKcp and Tgc were reworked into the basal Pine Hollow Formation. Small alluvial fans bounded the basin, grading laterally into low-energy fluvial, playa mudflat, and ephemeral lacustrine environments. The basal Claron Formation represents a broad, closed basin that initially developed during the later Paleocene to the SW of the Pine Hollow basin. The Claron basin was bordered by low relief uplands, fluvial floodplains, and calcrete paleosols to the north and moderate relief uplands to the west and east. Shallow lacustrine deposition occurred to the south. Lacustrine onlap of Laramide structures by middle Eocene suggests cessation of Laramide deformation by this time.

  2. Extinct mountain goat ( Oreamnos harringtoni) in Southeastern Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, Jim I.; Agenbroad, Larry D.; Phillips, Arthur M.; Middleton, Larry T.

    1987-05-01

    The extinct Harrington's mountain goat ( Oreamnos harringtoni Stock) is predominantly known from dry cave localities in the Grand Canyon, Arizona, in addition to two sites in the Great Basin, Nevada, and from San Josecito Cave, Nuevo Leon, Mexico. A dry shelter in Natural Bridges National Monument, on the central Colorado Plateau, southeastern Utah, preserves numerous remains of the extinct mountain goat in addition to pack rat middens. Remains from a 100-cm stratigraphic profile indicate that O. harringtoni lived on the plateau >39,800 yr B.P., the oldest directly dated find of extinct mountain goat. Plant macrofossils indicate that Engelmann's spruce ( Picea engelmannii), limber pine ( Pinus flexilis), rose ( Rosa cf. woodsii), and Douglas fir ( Pseudotsuga menziesii) grew during the late Pleistocene where a riparian and a pinyon-juniper ( Pinus edulis-Juniperus osteosperma) community now predominates; Douglas fir are found only in mesic, protected, north-facing areas. Limber pine, Douglas fir, bark, and grasses were the major dietary components in the dung. A springtime diet of birch ( Betula) is determined from pollen clumps in dung pellets.

  3. Libraries in Utah: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... bcpl.lib.ut.us/ Cedar City Southern Utah University Gerald R. Sherratt Library 351 West University Boulevard CEDAR CITY, UT 84720 435-865-8156 ... 84321 435-792-6970 ext. 5014 Utah State University Merrill-Cazier Library Interlibrary Services Office 3045 Old ...

  4. 78 FR 9807 - Utah Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ... conditions of approval of the Utah program in the January 21, 1981, Federal Register (46 FR 5899). You can... announced receipt of the proposed amendment in the September 30, 2010, Federal Register (75 FR 60375). In... notice (64 FR 70765). Utah's proposed VER definition is functionally identical to and no less...

  5. 77 FR 34892 - Utah Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

    ... Register (46 FR 5899). You can also find later actions concerning Utah's program and program amendments at... Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 944 ; Docket ID ] Utah Regulatory Program AGENCY: Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement, Interior. ACTION: Proposed...

  6. 75 FR 60375 - Utah Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-30

    ... January 21, 1981, Federal Register (46 FR 5899). You can also find later actions concerning Utah's program... Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 944 Utah Regulatory Program AGENCY: Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement, Interior. ] ACTION: Proposed rule; public...

  7. 77 FR 73966 - Utah Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-12

    ... of the Utah program in the January 21, 1981, Federal Register (46 FR 5899). You can also find later... receipt of the proposed amendment in the September 5, 2012, Federal Register (77 FR 54491), provided an... approved on December 3, 2007 (72 FR 68029) and November 14, 2008 (73 FR 67630). We notified Utah of...

  8. Migration and Life of Hispanics in Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallenstein, Nancy L.

    This paper presents a historical and cultural overview of the migration and life of Hispanics in Utah and identifies three themes: search for a better life, need for and acquisition of a sense of belonging, and substance of the Hispanic people. Over the past 4 centuries, Hispanics have migrated to Utah from New Mexico, Mexico, and Central and…

  9. 40 CFR 81.345 - Utah.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Utah. 81.345 Section 81.345 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.345 Utah. Utah—SO2 Designated area Does not meet...

  10. Project PEER: Continuing Education in Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hengesbaugh, Jean Houger

    A continuing education program to provide technical training or consultation for laboratory technologists practicing in rural and urban Utah has been established by the Centers for Disease Control and the Utah State Department of Health under the name Project PEER (Pursuing Excellence through Education Regionally). The core of the program is a…

  11. Understanding Career Plateauing: Implications for Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Carol S.; Salomone, Paul R.

    1994-01-01

    Defines career plateauing, explains types and sources of plateauing, and suggests counseling interventions to assist individuals to recognize and adjust to plateauing. Recommends proactive measures to perpetuate work motivation of effective plateaued workers and to remediate work behavior of ineffective, plateaued workers. Includes 19 citations.…

  12. 75 FR 18231 - Central Utah Project Completion Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-09

    ... Central Utah Project Completion Act AGENCY: Department of the Interior, Office of the Assistant Secretary... conversion of Central Utah Project water from irrigation to municipal and industrial use and possible... of Central Utah Project (CUP) Bonneville Unit water, delivered to Wasatch County, Utah,...

  13. 77 FR 6141 - Notice of Utah's Resource Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-07

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Utah's Resource Advisory Council Meeting AGENCY: Bureau of Land... Management's (BLM) Utah Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will meet as indicated below. DATES: The Utah RAC will meet Wednesday, March 28, 2012, (8:30 a.m.- 4:30 p.m.), in Salt Lake City, Utah. ADDRESSES:...

  14. 76 FR 18244 - Notice of Utah's Resource Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-01

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Utah's Resource Advisory Council Meeting AGENCY: Bureau of Land... Land Management's (BLM) Utah Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will meet as indicated below. DATES: The Utah RAC will meet Tuesday, May 10, 2011, (8 a.m.-5 p.m.), in Salt Lake City, Utah. ADDRESSES:...

  15. 78 FR 35956 - Utah Resource Advisory Council Subgroup Conference Call

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

    ... Bureau of Land Management Utah Resource Advisory Council Subgroup Conference Call AGENCY: Bureau of Land... Advisory Council (RAC) Subgroup will host a conference call. DATES: The Utah RAC Subgroup will host a... person must meet at the BLM, Utah State Office, 440 West 200 South, Salt Lake City, Utah, in the...

  16. The Colorado Plateau: cultural, biological, and physical research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, Kenneth L.

    2004-01-01

    Stretching from the four corners of Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, and Utah, the Colorado Plateau is a natural laboratory for a wide range of studies. This volume presents 23 original articles drawn from more than 100 research projects presented at the Sixth Biennial Conference of Research on the Colorado Plateau. This scientific gathering revolved around research, inventory, and monitoring of lands in the region. The book's contents cover management techniques for cultural, biological, and physical resources, representing collaborative efforts among federal, university, and private sector scientists and land managers. Chapters on cultural concerns cover benchmarks of modern southwestern anthropological knowledge, models of past human activity and impact of modern visitation at newly established national monuments, challenges in implementing the 1964 Wilderness Act, and opportunities for increased federal research on Native American lands. The section on biological resources comprises sixteen chapters, with coverage that ranges from mammalian biogeography to responses of elk at the urban-wildland interface. Additional biological studies include the effects of fire and grazing on vegetation; research on bald eagles at Grand Canyon and tracking wild turkeys using radio collars; and management of palentological resources. Two final chapters on physical resources consider a proposed rerouting of the Rio de Flag River in urban Flagstaff, Arizona, and an examination of past climate patterns over the Plateau, using stream flow records and tree ring data. In light of similarities in habitat and climate across the Colorado Plateau, techniques useful to particular management units have been found to be applicable in many locations. This volume highlights an abundance of research that will prove useful for all of those working in the region, as well as for others seeking comparative studies that integrate research into land management actions.

  17. Site Selection for the Southern Utah Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieda, David; Springer, R. Wayne; Gondolo, Paolo; Lebohec, Stephan; Ricketts, Paul; Zimmer, Chris

    2008-10-01

    During 2007-2008, the University of Utah performed a survey of various high-altitude sites in southern Utah to select the site for the new 32" Southern Utah Observatory telescope. The site survey process consisted of evaluation of weather and climate databases as well as characterization of atmospheric seeing at each site over several months using several automated SBIG Polaris monitors that were deployed at selected sites. In this talk, I will describe the results of the site survey, including atmospheric seeing measurement histories at several potential sites. I will also describe the final selected site and the timeline for construction and operation of the telescope.

  18. TIBIAL PLATEAU FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Júnior, Mauricio Kfuri; Fogagnolo, Fabrício; Bitar, Rogério Carneiro; Freitas, Rafael Lara; Salim, Rodrigo; Jansen Paccola, Cleber Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Tibial plateau fractures are joint lesions that require anatomical reduction of joint surface and functional restoration of mechanical axis of a lower limb. Patient profile, soft tissue conditions, presence of associated injuries and the available infrastructure for the treatment all contribute to the decision making about the best treatment for these fractures. High-energy fractures are usually approached in a staged manner respecting the principle of damage control, and are primarily targeted to maintain limb alignment while the resolution unfavorable soft tissue conditions is pending. Low-energy trauma can be managed on a singlestage basis, provided soft tissues are not an adverse factor, with open reduction and internal fixation. Stable fixation and early painless joint movement are related to a better prognosis. New developments as locked plates, bone replacements, intraoperative 3D imaging are promising and will certainly contribute for less invasive procedures and better outcomes. PMID:27077054

  19. Plateau Rayleigh instability simulation.

    PubMed

    Mead-Hunter, Ryan; King, Andrew J C; Mullins, Benjamin J

    2012-05-01

    The well-known phenomena of Plateau-Rayleigh instability has been simulated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The breakup of a liquid film into an array of droplets on a cylindrical element was simulated using a volume-of-fluid (VOF) solver and compared to experimental observations and existing theory. It is demonstrated that the VOF method can correctly predict the breakup of thins films into an array of either axisymmetric droplets or clam-shell droplets, depending on the surface energy. The existence of unrealistically large films is precluded. Droplet spacing was found to show reasonable agreement with theory. Droplet motion and displacement under fluid flow was also examined and compared to that in previous studies. It was found that the presence of air flow around the droplet does not influence the stable film thickness; however, it reduces the time required for droplet formation. Novel relationships for droplet displacement were derived from the results. PMID:22512475

  20. REACTIVE MULTIPHASE BEHAVIOR OF CO{sub 2} IN SALINE AQUIFERS BENEATH THE COLORADO PLATEAU

    SciTech Connect

    R.G. Allis; J. Moore; S. White

    2003-10-21

    Field and laboratory investigations of naturally occurring CO{sub 2}-reservoirs are being conducted to determine the characteristics of potential seal and reservoir units and the extent of the interactions that occur between the host rocks and the CO{sub 2} charged fluids. Efforts have focused on the Farnham Dome, located in central Utah, and the Springer-St. Johns field in Arizona and New Mexico. The Springer-St. Johns field is particularly significant because of the presence of extensive travertine deposits that document release of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere. CO{sub 2} accumulations at both fields occur in sedimentary rocks typical of CO{sub 2} reservoirs occurring on the Colorado Plateau. The main achievements were: (1) to assess the possibility of CO{sub 2} leakage from the Farnham Dome of central Utah; and (2) prepare a paper for presentation at the 3rd Annual Conference on Carbon Sequestration.

  1. On the Elementary Firing Line in Utah

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hetzel, Louise

    1971-01-01

    Relates the experiences of a second grade teacher conducting a field trip to a pioneer cabin in Arches National Monument, Moab, Utah. Children participate in activities characteristic of that period. (BL)

  2. Utah Science Activities, Update 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Utah Water Science Center

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), a bureau of the U.S. Department of the Interior, serves the Nation by providing reliable scientific information to describe and understand the Earth; minimize loss of life and property from natural disasters; manage water, biological, energy, and mineral resources; and enhance and protect our quality of life. The USGS has become a world leader in the natural sciences thanks to our scientific excellence and responsiveness to society's needs. This newsletter describes some of the current and recently completed USGS earth-science activities in Utah. As an unbiased, multi-disciplinary science organization that focuses on biology, geography, geology, and water, we are dedicated to the timely, relevant, and impartial study of the landscape, our natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten us. Learn more about our goals and priorities for the coming decade in the USGS Science Strategy at http://www.usgs.gov/science_strategy/ .

  3. An Examination of Avoided Costs in Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2005-01-07

    The Utah Wind Working Group (UWWG) believes there are currently opportunities to encourage wind power development in the state by seeking changes to the avoided cost tariff paid to qualifying facilities (QFs). These opportunities have arisen as a result of a recent renegotiation of Pacificorp's Schedule 37 tariff for wind QFs under 3 MW, as well as an ongoing examination of Pacificorp's Schedule 38 tariff for wind QFs larger than 3 MW. It is expected that decisions made regarding Schedule 38 will also impact Schedule 37. Through the Laboratory Technical Assistance Program (Lab TAP), the UWWG has requested (through the Utah Energy Office) that LBNL provide technical assistance in determining whether an alternative method of calculating avoided costs that has been officially adopted in Idaho would lead to higher QF payments in Utah, and to discuss the pros and cons of this method relative to the methodology recently adopted under Schedule 37 in Utah. To accomplish this scope of work, I begin by summarizing the current method of calculating avoided costs in Utah (per Schedule 37) and Idaho (the ''surrogate avoided resource'' or SAR method). I then compare the two methods both qualitatively and quantitatively. Next I present Pacificorp's four main objections to the use of the SAR method, and discuss the reasonableness of each objection. Finally, I conclude with a few other potential considerations that might add value to wind QFs in Utah.

  4. 78 FR 49400 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Utah; Revisions to Utah...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-14

    ... within Utah's rules. On February 14, 2006 (71 FR 7679), we approved many of the re- numbered rules from... R307-110-29 of the September 20, 1999 submittal incorporated by reference. \\1\\ On April 18, 2007 (72 FR... October 13, 2005 proposed rule on Utah's September 20, 1999 submittal (70 FR 59681), we did not propose...

  5. CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION OPTIMIZATION STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    BERGMAN, T. B.; STEFANSKI, L. D.; SEELEY, P. N.; ZINSLI, L. C.; CUSACK, L. J.

    2012-09-19

    THE CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION OPTIMIZATION STUDY WAS CONDUCTED TO DEVELOP AN OPTIMAL SEQUENCE OF REMEDIATION ACTIVITIES IMPLEMENTING THE CERCLA DECISION ON THE CENTRAL PLATEAU. THE STUDY DEFINES A SEQUENCE OF ACTIVITIES THAT RESULT IN AN EFFECTIVE USE OF RESOURCES FROM A STRATEGIC PERSPECTIVE WHEN CONSIDERING EQUIPMENT PROCUREMENT AND STAGING, WORKFORCE MOBILIZATION/DEMOBILIZATION, WORKFORCE LEVELING, WORKFORCE SKILL-MIX, AND OTHER REMEDIATION/DISPOSITION PROJECT EXECUTION PARAMETERS.

  6. Arizona/New Mexico Plateau Ecoregion: Chapter 26 in Status and trends of land change in the Western United States--1973 to 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruhlman, Jana; Gass, Leila; Middleton, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Situated between ecoregions of distinctly different topographies and climates, the Arizona/New Mexico Plateau Ecoregion represents a large area of approximately 192,869 km2 (74,467 mi2) that stretches across northern Arizona, central and northwestern New Mexico, and parts of southwestern Colorado; in addition, a small part extends into southeastern Nevada (fig. 1) (Omernik, 1987; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1997). Forested, mountainous terrain borders the ecoregion on the northeast (Southern Rockies Ecoregion) and southwest (Arizona/New Mexico Mountains Ecoregion). Warmer and drier climates exist to the south (Chihuahuan Deserts Ecoregion) and west (Mojave Basin and Range Ecoregion). The semiarid grasslands of the western Great Plains are to the east (Southwestern Tablelands Ecoregion), and the tablelands of the Colorado Plateau in Utah and western Colorado lie to the north (Colorado Plateaus Ecoregion). The Arizona/New Mexico Plateau Ecoregion occupies a significant portion of the southern half of the Colorado Plateau.

  7. Episodic incision of the Colorado River in Glen Canyon, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garvin, C.D.; Hanks, T.C.; Finkel, R.C.; Heimsath, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    Incision rates of the Colorado River are integral to understanding the development of the Colorado Plateau. Here we calculate episodic incision rates of the Colorado River based on absolute ages of two levels of Quaternary deposits adjacent to Glen Canyon, Utah, along the north flank of Navajo Mountain. Minimum surface ages are determined by a combination of cosmogenic radionuclide surface exposure ages, uranium series and soil-development formation times. Bedrock incision rates of the Colorado River between c. 500 ka and c. 250 ka, and c. 250 ka to present are c. 0??4 m ka-1 and c. 0??7 m ka-1, respectively. These rates are more than double the rates reported in the Grand Canyon, suggesting that the Colorado River above Lees Ferry is out of equilibrium with the lower section of the river. We also determine incision rates of two tributaries to the Colorado River. Oak Creek and Bridge Creek flow off Navajo Mountain into Glen Canyon from the southeast. Oak Creek and Bridge Creek both have incision rates of c. 0??6 m ka-1 over the past c. 100 ka at points about 9 km away from the main stem of the Colorado River. Copyright ?? 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Geology of the central Mineral Mountains, Beaver County, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Sibbett, B.S.; Nielson, D.L.

    1980-03-01

    The Mineral Mountains are located in Beaver and Millard Counties, southwestern Utah. The range is a horst located in the transition zone between the Basin and Range and Colorado Plateau geologic provinces. A multiple-phase Tertiary pluton forms most of the range, with Paleozoic rocks exposed on the north and south and Precambrian metamorphic rocks on the west in the Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA (Known Geothermal Resource Area). Precambrian banded gneiss and Cambrian carbonate rocks have been intruded by foliated granodioritic to monzonitic rocks of uncertain age. The Tertiary pluton consists of six major phases of quartz monzonitic to leucocratic granitic rocks, two diorite stocks, and several more mafic units that form dikes. During uplift of the mountain block, overlying rocks and the upper part of the pluton were partially removed by denudation faulting to the west. The interplay of these low-angle faults and younger northerly trending Basin and Range faults is responsible for the structural control of the Roosevelt Hot Springs geothermal system. The structural complexity of the Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA is unique within the range, although the same tectonic style continues throughout the range. During the Quaternary, rhyolite volcanism was active in the central part of the range and basaltic volcanism occurred in the northern portion of the map area. The heat source for the geothermal system is probably related to the Quaternary rhyolite volcanic activity.

  9. Utah Article Delivery: A New Model for Consortial Resource Sharing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kochan, Carol A.; Lee, Daniel R.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the UTAD (Utah Article Delivery) Pilot Project, an innovative resource-sharing service that provides journal articles to the Utah higher education community, developed by the Utah Academic Library Consortium (UALC) in partnership with EBSCO Document Services. Highlights include goals, options considered, challenges, and evaluation. The…

  10. Morphological and genetic structuring in the Utah Lake sucker complex.

    PubMed

    Cole, D D; Mock, K E; Cardall, B L; Crowl, T A

    2008-12-01

    Population decline in the federally endangered June sucker (Chasmistes liorus), a lakesucker unique to Utah Lake, Utah, has been attributed in part to hybridization with the more widespread Utah sucker (Catostomus ardens). As a group, suckers in Utah Lake exhibit considerable external morphological variation. Meristic and morphological ambiguities, presumably the result of hybridization, create a continuum of intermediate forms between Chasmistes and Catostomus extremes and prevent definitive identification to species. Here we describe and evaluate the morphological and genetic variation in suckers in Utah Lake by comparing a morphological analysis with amplified fragment length polymorphism and microsatellite analyses. Suckers were morphologically differentiated using mouth characters associated with different feeding strategies: planktivory (June sucker) and benthivory (Utah sucker). Although we found no genetic evidence for a deep divergence between June and Utah morphs, significant, but slight population structuring accompanied the substantial morphological variation. Bayesian model-based genetic clustering analyses detected two sucker populations in Utah Lake; however, these clusters were not strongly concordant with morphological groupings or between marker systems. The suckers in Utah Lake present an interesting dilemma regarding conservation: should one conserve (breed and stock) a subset of the morphotypic variation in the Utah Lake sucker complex, focusing on the endangered June sucker morphotype, or should one conserve both June sucker and Utah sucker morphotypes in this complex, possibly maximizing evolutionary potential? We explore this question in the context of current genetic and morphological variation in the Utah Lake sucker complex as well as historical information on this complex and other lakesuckers. PMID:19067800

  11. 1. Photocopied from photo 25797, Engineering Dept., Utah Power and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopied from photo 25797, Engineering Dept., Utah Power and Light Co., Salt Lake City, Utah. 'WHEELON HYDRO-ELECTRIC PLANT (1725 KW) STATION, WEST PENSTOCK, 130 KV TRANSFORMERS AND SWITCHYARD AND EAST AND WEST CANALS. NOV 1914.' - Utah Sugar Company, Wheelon Hydoelectric Plant, Bear River, Fielding, Box Elder County, UT

  12. Utah Career Guide for Adults, 2000-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaine, Connie, Ed.

    This career guide provides Utah job seekers with information leading to job success. Section 1, Getting Started, provides suggestions for committing to a job search. Section 2, Utah Job Trends, identifies the fastest growing occupations or most openings; top 50 occupations; and new Utah jobs. Section 3, Self-Assessment, covers knowing oneself;…

  13. 76 FR 39434 - Notice of Utah's Resource Advisory Council (RAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-06

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Utah's Resource Advisory Council (RAC) AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Utah's Resource Advisory Council (RAC). SUMMARY: In accordance with... Park & Ride, and Friday, August 5, 2011, (8:30 a.m.--3:30 p.m.) in Salt Lake City, Utah. ADDRESSES:...

  14. Utah Educational Quality Indicators. The Sixth in the Report Series: "How Good Are Utah Public Schools." Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, David E.

    For nearly 20 years, Utah's Office of Education has been systematically monitoring the academic performance and other characteristics of Utah's students. This executive summary, an overview of the sixth major report since 1967, examines several measures describing educational quality in Utah schools. The first section covers students' achievement…

  15. Annual Report of the School Programs of Ballet West, the Hansen Planetarium, the Utah Opera Company, and the Utah Symphony.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Avery L.; And Others

    The document evaluates the impact of four special fine arts programs in Utah elementary schools, including presentations by the Utah Symphony, Ballet West, the Utah Opera Company, and the Hansen Planetarium. It is divided into two parts. Part I provides an introduction, brief descriptions of the method of the evaluation and basic statistical…

  16. Familial aggregation of Parkinson disease in Utah

    PubMed Central

    Savica, Rodolfo; Pulst, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe clustering of death from Parkinson disease (PD) in relatives in a large US study. Methods: We analyzed the Utah Population Database resource, which includes genealogy data of more than 2.7 million individuals linked to 519,061 individuals with a Utah death certificate (DC). We identified individuals whose DC included PD as a cause of death using ICD coding. In those individuals whose Utah DC listed PD as a cause of death, the relative risk (RR) of death with PD was determined among close and distant relatives using sex-, birth year–, and birthplace-specific rates. Results: We identified 4,031 individuals whose DC indicated PD. Among 18,127 first-degree relatives of probands with a Utah DC, the RR of death with PD was significantly increased (RR = 1.82, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.61–2.04). The RR of death with PD was also significantly increased among 40,546 second-degree relatives with a Utah DC (RR = 1.44, 95% CI 1.29–1.60) and among 93,398 third-degree relatives with a Utah DC (RR = 1.10, 95% CI 1.03–1.18). Conclusions: Significant evidence for excess familial clustering was observed for PD deaths. The excess familial clustering and the significantly elevated RRs for PD among close and distant relatives strongly support a genetic contribution to PD mortality. These results confirm and expand the results of previous studies of PD by quantifying the risk of PD death among more distant relatives. PMID:27123483

  17. Anaglyph, Salt Lake City, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The 2002 Winter Olympics are hosted by Salt Lake City at several venues within the city, in nearby cities, and within the adjacent Wasatch Mountains. This anaglyph image provides a stereoscopic map view of north central Utah that includes all of these Olympic sites. In the south, next to Utah Lake, Provo hosts the ice hockey competition. In the north, northeast of the Great Salt Lake, Ogden hosts curling and the nearby Snowbasin ski area hosts the downhill events. In between, southeast of the Great Salt Lake, Salt Lake City hosts the Olympic Village and the various skating events. Further east, across the Wasatch Mountains, the Park City ski resort hosts the bobsled, ski jumping, and snowboarding events. The Winter Olympics are always hosted in mountainous terrain. This view shows the dramatic landscape that makes the Salt Lake City region a world-class center for winter sports.

    The stereoscopic effect of this anaglyph was created by first draping a Landsat satellite image over a Shuttle Radar Topography Mission digital elevation model and then generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter.

    Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyzing the large and growing Landsat image archive, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM

  18. Utah coalbed gas exploration poised for growth

    SciTech Connect

    Petzet, G.A.

    1996-08-05

    Coalbed methane production in eastern Utah is growing despite a relaxed pace of exploratory drilling. Leasing has been active the past 2 years, but a delay in issuance of a federal environmental impact statement could retard drilling. Only 19 new wells began producing coalbed gas during 1995, but gas production increased from existing wells as dewatering progressed. The US Bureau of Land Management will allow limited exploration but no field development on federal lands until the EIS is completed, possibly as early as this month. The paper discusses production of coalbed methane in Utah.

  19. 1999 ESH&Q Liability Assessment Report of Envirocare of Utah, Inc. Clive, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Trump, D. E.; Vilord, C. E.

    1999-07-01

    This report contains the results of an environment, safety, health, and quality (ESH&Q) assessment of the treatment technologies and treatment-related operations that was conducted of Envirocare of Utah, Inc. (EOU). EOU is a lowlevel radioactive and mixed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)- regulated haz.ardous low-level radioactive waste (mixed low-level waste) treatment/disposal facility located near Clive, Utah. An ESH&Q assessment of the EOU Clive, Utah facility treatment technologies and related treatment operations was conducted in mid-April 1999. The assessment was required as part of the technical evaluation of proposals received by Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO) for modification of a mixed low-level radioactive waste disposal subcontract (No.K79-180572). The EOU Clive, Utah facility is proposed as a potential treatment/disposal facility for mixed low-level radioactive waste regulated under the RCRA and the Atomic Energy Act

  20. Paleogeographic controls of coal accumulation, Cretaceous Blackhawk Formation and Star Point Sandstone, Wasatch Plateau, Utah.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flores, R.M.; Blanchard, L.F.; Sanchez, J.D.; Marley, W.E.; Muldoon, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    Considers the paleogeographic controls affecting the accumulation of coals in delta-barrier-island complexes. Progradation, lateral shifting, and abandonment of these complexes created four major landward-thinning tongues.-from Authors

  1. Will Career Plateauing Become a Bigger Problem?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Christopher M.

    1983-01-01

    Though career plateauing can be put off, it can seldom be entirely avoided. Distinction is made between plateauing of the job content type and plateauing of the structural or organizational type. Primary solutions involve job enrichment, performance goal adjustments, lateral transfers, or modified standards of appraisal. (SSH)

  2. Lichens as indicators of elevated levels of environmental lead in Utah Valley, Utah. [Rhizoplaca melanophthalma

    SciTech Connect

    St. Clair, L.L.; Rushforth, S.R.; Newberry, C.C. )

    1990-01-01

    Utah Valley, Utah is a high elevation mountain valley with a moderate population and a large aged integrated steel mill. Fine particulate pollution (PM{sub 10}) levels in the valley are among the highest din the US, particularly during winter inversion periods. Utah Valley also has high levels of carbon monoxide. The local bureau of air quality monitored ambient air lead in Utah Valley for several years through the 1980s. Values as high as 1.35 g/m{sup 3} were noted from this monitoring. Such levels are 90% of the federal ambient air standard of 1.5 g/m{sup 3}. Lichens have long been recognized as bioindicators for heavy metals. Reports of high concentrations of lead in lichen thalli were common prior to the development and use of unleaded fuels. Since that time, lead concentrations in lichen thalli have generally decreased. Recent studies indicate lichen lead levels from clean air areas in the western US range from 10 to 25 ppm. Studies of the umbilicate saxicolous lichen Rhizoplaca melanophthalma in Utah Valley indicate lead levels between 188 and 200 ppm. Excess lead in Utah Valley likely originates from the steel mill and from the high number of vehicles still using leaded fuels.

  3. Selected hydrologic data for southern Utah and Goshen Valleys, Utah, 1890-1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stolp, B.J.; Drumiler, M.J.; Brooks, L.E.

    1993-01-01

    This report contains hydrologic data collected in southern Utah and Goshen Valleys from 1890 to 1992. Southern Utah and Goshen Valleys are south of Salt Lake City in Utah County, north-central Utah. The area is bounded on the east and south by the Wasarch Range, on the south by Long Ridge, on the west by the East Tintic Mountains and the Mosida Hills, and on the north by a line through about the middle of T. 7 S. Southern Utah Valley and Goshen Valley are divided by the northern tip of Long Ridge, West Mountain, and Utah Lake. The area is in the Basin and Range physiographic province and includes about 390 square miles. Hydrologic data presented include records of over 400 wells. drillers' logs for selected wells, water-level data from wells, well discharge, and chemical analyses of water from about 90 wells. Discharge, water temperature, and specific conductance of water are given for about 15 selected springs and drains, and for streams and canals.

  4. In Utah, Kids Get Video Homework Help.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, M. Larry; Green, David L.

    1986-01-01

    "Mathelps," produced by the Logan City (Utah) School District, is an hour-long interactive tutoring program aired on local cable television. Each broadcast features a mathematics concept followed by a brain-teaser contest, to which students phone in their solutions. (TE)

  5. The Utah Educational Technology Initiative: Evaluation Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mergendoller, John R.; And Others

    This report begins with an overview of the Utah Educational Technology Initiative (ETI) that describes the state's financial commitment to educational improvement through educational technology, the ETI allocation process, the requirement that school districts and colleges of education match ETI funds with locally-generated funds or in-kind…

  6. 77 FR 7229 - Utah Disaster #UT-00011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... ADMINISTRATION Utah Disaster UT-00011 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This... applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport Road.... Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street SW., Suite 6050, Washington, DC 20416....

  7. Bibliography of Utah radioactive occurrences. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Doelling, H.H.

    1983-07-01

    The references in this bibliography were assembled by reviewing published bibliographies of Utah geology, unpublished reports of the US Geological Survey and the Department of Energy, and various university theses. Each of the listings is cross-referenced by location and subject matter. This report is published in two volumes.

  8. Bibliography of Utah radioactive occurrences. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Doelling, H.H.

    1983-07-01

    The references in this bibliography were assembled by reviewing published bibliographies of Utah geology, unpublished reports of the US Geological Survey and the Department of Energy, and various university theses. Each of the listings is cross-referenced by location and subject matter. This report is published in two volumes.

  9. Flow properties of Utah shale oils

    SciTech Connect

    Seitzer, W.H.; Lovell, P.F.

    1981-12-01

    In a concentric cylinder viscometer, Utah shale oils have different characteristics, both at equilibrium flow and during start-up from rest, depending on whether the wax has crystallized as needles or spherulites. Compared with waxy crude oils, which are thixotropic, shale oil has the added rheological property of being antithixotropic. 7 refs.

  10. Increased Gonorrhea Cases - Utah, 2009-2014.

    PubMed

    Watson, Joanna; Carlile, Jerry; Dunn, Angela; Evans, Megan; Fratto, Erin; Hartsell, Joel; Meinor, Lynn; Mietchen, Matthew; Nakashima, Allyn

    2016-01-01

    Gonorrhea (caused by infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae) is the second most commonly reported notifiable disease in the United States (1). Left untreated, gonorrhea is associated with serious long-term adverse health effects, including pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy, and infertility. Infection also facilitates transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (2,3). Effective gonorrhea control relies upon early detection and effective antimicrobial treatment. To assess gonorrhea rate trends in Utah, the Utah Department of Health (UDOH) analyzed Utah National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (UT-NEDSS) data for the state during 2009-2014. After declining during 2009-2011, the statewide gonorrhea rate increased fivefold to 49 cases per 100,000 population in 2014. During 2009-2014, the proportion of cases among women increased from 21% to 39% (decreasing among males from 79% to 61%). Among male patients, the proportion who identified as men who have sex with men (MSM) decreased from 67% to 42%. These demographic changes suggest that increased heterosexual transmission of gonorrhea in Utah might be occurring. Health departments need to work with providers to ensure populations at high risk are being screened and properly treated for gonorrhea. Clinicians need to be aware of increases in the risk for infection among women and non-MSM males when making screening and testing decisions and educate their patients regarding gonorrhea transmission and prevention practices. PMID:27583786

  11. Utah Integrated Shop Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loveless, Austin G.

    To evaluate the Utah State Board of Education's Integrated Shop Program (ISP) for small rural high schools, 7 ISP schools in their 2nd year (1970-71) of the ISP were compared on 3 measures to 2 selected control schools (small rural high schools that offered vocational agricultural mechanics and industrial arts but did not offer formal courses in…

  12. 77 FR 54491 - Utah Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ... program in the January 21, 1981, Federal Register (46 FR 5899). You can also find later actions concerning... Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 944 Utah Regulatory Program AGENCY: Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement, Interior. ACTION: Proposed rule; public...

  13. Utah's First Joint Effort in Vocational Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprague, Richard F.

    1976-01-01

    Describes a tri-district program (in Utah's Granite, Jordan, and Murray school districts) to expand the health career program, which involved 62 field trips scouring the area's hospitals and health care centers, and student work experience opportunities, to expose students from 13 high schools to occupations beyond the traditional doctor and…

  14. Utah Work-Based Learning Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    This document presents materials to assist Utah school personnel who are initiating, implementing, or improving work-based learning opportunities for students. The document presents detailed guidelines for creating and maintaining work-based learning systems in schools and resource materials for improving existing work-based opportunities. Formal…

  15. 40 CFR 81.345 - Utah.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... purposes of 40 CFR part 51 subpart X. Utah—PM-10 Designated Area Designation Date Type Classification Date.... Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 81.346 see the List of CFR Sections Affected... AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.345 Utah....

  16. 40 CFR 81.345 - Utah.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... purposes of 40 CFR part 51 subpart X. Utah—PM-10 Designated Area Designation Date Type Classification Date... affecting § 81.346 see the List of CFR Sections Affected which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.345 Utah....

  17. 40 CFR 81.345 - Utah.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... is a maintenance area for the 1-hour NAAQS for purposes of 40 CFR part 51 subpart X. Utah—PM-10... otherwise noted. Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 81.345 see the List of CFR... AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.345 Utah....

  18. 40 CFR 81.345 - Utah.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... purposes of 40 CFR part 51 subpart X. Utah—PM-10 Designated Area Designation Date Type Classification Date... affecting § 81.346 see the List of CFR Sections Affected which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.345 Utah....

  19. Utah's Cane Creek horizontal play expanding

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.B.

    1991-08-12

    This paper reports on one of the U.S. horizontal plays that continues to gather steam in southern Utah. And because it is expanding in an environmentally sensitive area, development is being watched closely by the Bureau of Land Management and environmental groups. One operator planning a wildcat in the vicinity has been forced to postpone drilling for environmental reasons.

  20. 77 FR 67858 - Utah Disaster #UT-00021

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Utah Disaster UT-00021 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for...

  1. Utah Migrant Education Annual Summer Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    In 1993, Utah migrant education summer programs in 10 school districts provided education and support services to 2,045 children of seasonal and migrant farmworkers. Although the program is federally funded, school districts provided various support services, such as transportation, use of staff, availability of school buildings, availability of…

  2. Utah Statewide Educational Assessment 1978: General Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellison, Robert L.; And Others

    As part of Utah's 1978 statewide assessment, a number of tests were administered to over 4,000 fifth grade students from 64 elementary schools and over 2,000 eleventh graders from thirty high schools. This report presents the results in each of the areas tested: (1) intellectual maturity--measured by reading and mathematics achievement on the…

  3. Analytical results, mineralogical data, and sample locality map of stream-sediment, heavy-mineral-concentrate, and rock samples, from the Fremont Gorge (UT-050-221) and Fiddler Butte (UT-050-241) Wilderness Study Areas, Wayne and Garfield Counties, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Detra, D.E.; Erickson, M.S.; Kemp, W.M. III; Willson, W.R.

    1984-01-01

    This report presents the results of a geochemical and mineralogical survey of the Fremont Gorge and Fiddler Butte Wilderness Study Areas, Wayne and Garfield Counties, Utah. The Fremont Gorge and Fiddler Butte Wilderness Study Areas comprise about 265 mi/sup 2/ in Wayne and Garfield counties, Utah. The study areas are located along the Dirty Devil River just north of Utah State Highway 95 and along Sulphur Creek five miles east of Torrey, Utah. The area is comprised of flat lying sediments of the Henry Basin section which are Triassic to Holocene in age. The topographic relief in the study area is about 3000 ft (915 m) with a maximum elevation of 6900 ft (2100 m). The ground surface is a flat lying plateau which has been eroded to steep walled canyons by intermittent streams and one third order river. The climate is arid. 4 refs.

  4. Geologic Map of the Central Marysvale Volcanic Field, Southwestern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowley, Peter D.; Cunningham, Charles G.; Steven, Thomas A.; Workman, Jeremiah B.; Anderson, John J.; Theissen, Kevin M.

    2002-01-01

    The geologic map of the central Marysvale volcanic field, southwestern Utah, shows the geology at 1:100,000 scale of the heart of one of the largest Cenozoic volcanic fields in the Western United States. The map shows the area of 38 degrees 15' to 38 degrees 42'30' N., and 112 degrees to 112 degrees 37'30' W. The Marysvale field occurs mostly in the High Plateaus, a subprovince of the Colorado Plateau and structurally a transition zone between the complexly deformed Great Basin to the west and the stable, little-deformed main part of the Colorado Plateau to the east. The western part of the field is in the Great Basin proper. The volcanic rocks and their source intrusions in the volcanic field range in age from about 31 Ma (Oligocene) to about 0.5 Ma (Pleistocene). These rocks overlie sedimentary rocks exposed in the mapped area that range in age from Ordovician to early Cenozoic. The area has been deformed by thrust faults and folds formed during the late Mesozoic to early Cenozoic Sevier deformational event, and later by mostly normal faults and folds of the Miocene to Quaternary basin-range episode. The map revises and updates knowledge gained during a long-term U.S. Geological Survey investigation of the volcanic field, done in part because of its extensive history of mining. The investigation also was done to provide framework geologic knowledge suitable for defining geologic and hydrologic hazards, for locating hydrologic and mineral resources, and for an understanding of geologic processes in the area. A previous geologic map (Cunningham and others, 1983, U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Investigations Series I-1430-A) covered the same area as this map but was published at 1:50,000 scale and is obsolete due to new data. This new geologic map of the central Marysvale field, here published as U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Investigations Series I-2645-A, is accompanied by gravity and aeromagnetic maps of the same area and the same scale (Campbell and

  5. New constraints on Neogene uplift of the northern Colorado Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Wijk, J. W.; Raschilla, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Late Cretaceous Uinta Basin is located in northeastern Utah within the northern most portion of the Colorado Plateau. The basin's uplift and subsidence history and thermal evolution have impacted the maturity of source beds in the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation. Using measured data of the petroleum system of the Uinta Basin, we were able to constrain timing and amplitude of uplift of the northern Colorado Plateau. We used sixty wells in a basin modeling study of the Uinta Basin's thermal structure, tectonic history and petroleum system. The wells reached into basement, and four wells provided vitrinite reflectance measurements. Vitrinite reflectance is a measurement of the percentage of reflected light from a polished vitrinite sample. The percentage of reflected light is related to the temperature conditions the sample experienced during burial, and vitrinite reflectance is a maturity indicator that covers a broad temperature range from diagenesis through the latest stages of catagenesis and records the maximum temperature a rock experiences during its burial history All models were calibrated to measured data, including vitrinite reflectance and transformation ratios from Rock-Eval pyrolysis. The models predict that the heat flow ranges from 65 mW/m2 to 45 mW/m2 from south to north in the study area. Additionally, model calibration provides a means for estimating the amount of uplift and erosion in the Uinta Basin. Uplift predicted for the Uinta Basin ranges from ~2050 m to ~2200 m and started in the Late Miocene. Our models also predicted the maturity of the rich oil shales of the Parachute Creek Member.

  6. Climatic and limnologic setting of Bear Lake, Utah and Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dean, W.E.; Wurtsbaugh, W.A.; Lamarra, V.A.

    2009-01-01

    Bear Lake is a large alkaline lake on a high plateau on the Utah-Idaho border. The Bear River was partly diverted into the lake in the early twentieth century so that Bear Lake could serve as a reservoir to supply water for hydropower and irrigation downstream, which continues today. The northern Rocky Mountain region is within the belt of the strongest of the westerly winds that transport moisture during the winter and spring over coastal mountain ranges and into the Great Basin and Rocky Mountains. As a result of this dominant winter precipitation pattern, most of the water entering the lake is from snowmelt, but with net evaporation. The dominant solutes in the lake water are Ca 2+, Mg2+, and HCO32-, derived from Paleozoic carbonate rocks in the Bear River Range west of the lake. The lake is saturated with calcite, aragonite, and dolomite at all depths, and produces vast amounts of carbonate minerals. The chemistry of the lake has changed considerably over the past 100 years as a result of the diversion of Bear River. The net effect of the diversion was to dilute the lake water, especially the Mg2+ concentration. Bear Lake is oligotrophic and coprecipitation of phosphate with CaCO3 helps to keep productivity low. However, algal growth is colimited by nitrogen availability. Phytoplankton densities are low, with a mean summer chlorophyll a concentration of 0.4 mg L-1. Phytoplankton are dominated by diatoms, but they have not been studied extensively (but see Moser and Kimball, this volume). Zooplankton densities usually are low (<10 L-1) and highly seasonal, dominated by calanoid copepods and cladocera. Benthic invertebrate densities are extremely low; chironomid larvae are dominant at depths <30 m, and are partially replaced with ostracodes and oligochaetes in deeper water. The ostracode species in water depths >10 m are all endemic. Bear Lake has 13 species of fi sh, four of which are endemic. Copyright ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  7. Allogenic sedimentary components of Bear Lake, Utah and Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenbaum, J.G.; Dean, W.E.; Reynolds, R.L.; Reheis, M.C.

    2009-01-01

    Bear Lake is a long-lived lake filling a tectonic depression between the Bear River Range to the west and the Bear River Plateau to the east, and straddling the border between Utah and Idaho. Mineralogy, elemental geochemistry, and magnetic properties provide information about variations in provenance of allogenic lithic material in last-glacial-age, quartz-rich sediment in Bear Lake. Grain-size data from the siliciclastic fraction of late-glacial to Holocene carbonate-rich sediments provide information about variations in lake level. For the quartz-rich lower unit, which was deposited while the Bear River fl owed into and out of the lake, four source areas are recognized on the basis of modern fluvial samples with contrasting properties that reflect differences in bedrock geology and in magnetite content from dust. One of these areas is underlain by hematite-rich Uinta Mountain Group rocks in the headwaters of the Bear River. Although Uinta Mountain Group rocks make up a small fraction of the catchment, hematite-rich material from this area is an important component of the lower unit. This material is interpreted to be glacial fl our. Variations in the input of glacial flour are interpreted as having caused quasi-cyclical variations in mineralogical and elemental concentrations, and in magnetic properties within the lower unit. The carbonate-rich younger unit was deposited under conditions similar to those of the modern lake, with the Bear River largely bypassing the lake. For two cores taken in more than 30 m of water, median grain sizes in this unit range from ???6 ??m to more than 30 ??m, with the coarsest grain sizes associated with beach or shallow-water deposits. Similar grain-size variations are observed as a function of water depth in the modern lake and provide the basis for interpreting the core grain-size data in terms of lake level. Copyright ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  8. The Colorado Plateau III: integrating research and resources management for effective conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sogge, Mark K.

    2008-01-01

    Roughly centered on the Four Corners region of the southwestern United States, the Colorado Plateau covers an area of 130,000 square miles. The relatively high semi-arid province boasts nine national parks, sixteen national monuments, many state parks, and dozens of wilderness areas. With the highest concentration of parklands in North America and unique geological and ecological features, the area is of particular interest to researchers. Derived from the Eighth Biennial Conference of Research on the Colorado Plateau, this third volume in a series of research on the Colorado Plateau expands upon the previous two books. This volume focuses on the integration of science into resource management issues, summarizes what criteria make a successful collaborative effort, outlines land management concerns about drought, provides summaries of current biological, sociological, and archaeological research, and highlights current environmental issues in the Four Corner States of Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, and Utah. With broad coverage that touches on topics as diverse as historical aspects of pronghorn antelope movement patterns through calculating watershed prescriptions to the role of wind-blown sand in preserving archaeological sites on the Colorado River, this volume stands as a compendium of cuttingedge management-oriented research on the Colorado Plateau. The book also introduces, for the first time, tools that can be used to assist with collaboration efforts among landowners and managers who wish to work together toward preserving resources on the Colorado Plateau and offers a wealth of insights into land management questions for many readers, especially people interested in the natural history, biology, anthropology, wildlife, and cultural management issues of the region.

  9. Plateau uplift and climatic change

    SciTech Connect

    Ruddiman, W.F. ); Kutzbach, J.E. )

    1991-03-01

    The earth of 40 million years ago was a warm, wet place. Forests abounded; grasslands and deserts were rare. Then the planet began to cool. Regional climate extremes developed. Many causes have been postulated, including continental drift and diminishing atmospheric carbon dioxide. The authors offer a new theory: continental uplift created huge plateaus that altered circulation of the atmosphere. The two largest masses of high, rocky terrain in the Northern Hemisphere today are the area encompassing the Tibetan Plateau and Himalaya Mountains and the broad region of the American West centered on the Colorado Plateau. Geologic evidence indicates that these regions rose substantially during the past 40 million years. The authors focused their research on these plateaus.

  10. The Pajarito Plateau: a bibliography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mathien, Frances Joan; Allen, Craig D.; Steen, Charlie R.

    1993-01-01

    This bibliography is the result of two initially independent projects. As the consulting archaeologist at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Charlie R. Steen collected entries at the suggestion of the staff of the Environmental Surveillance Group of the Health, Safety, and Environmental Division, HSE-8. The primary purpose was to aid the staff in evaluating cultural resources on LANL lands. In addition to works that related to the archaeology and history of the area, Steen included notations of a few books and articles in other fields such as geology and natural history. It was hoped that they also would be of value to other organizations and to students of past human activities on the Pajarito Plateau. At the same time, the National Park Service (NPS) was planning a major survey of Bandelier National Monument (BNM). As part of this plan, the author was asked to prepare a background document that described research previously carried out in the area, including an annotated bibliography. Although the survey would be limited to the park boundaries, the larger Pajarito Plateau is a more logical study area from physiographic, environmental, and cultural perspectives; hence the focus was on this larger region. Mathien (1986) also included some references to natural resources studies, particularly those initiated by NPS within Bandelier National Monument. Both bibliographies were made available to Colleen Olinger and Beverly Larson of the Health and Environmental Services Group at Los Alamos. They realized that while neither was complete, each included entries missing from the other. Larson suggested the two bibliographies be combined. (At this time, Craig Allen was studying the landscape of the Jemez Mountains [Allen 1984c, 1989]. His investigations included much detailed information on natural resource studies and were added in 1991 and 1992.) To limit the scope of their work, Steen and Mathien had chosen their parameter: the Pajarito Plateau. Geographically, the

  11. 77 FR 1551 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-10

    ... proposed transportation corridor project (Provo Westside Connector) in Provo, Utah County in the State of... following highway project in the State of Utah: the Provo Westside Connector in Provo, Utah County,...

  12. A late Pleistocene tephra layer in the southern Great Basin and Colorado Plateau derived from Mono Craters, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madsen, D.B.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.; Thompson, R.S.

    2002-01-01

    A newly identified tephra in stratified deposits in southwestern Utah, dated ???14,000 14C yr B.P., may aid in correlating late Pleistocene deposits across parts of the southern Great Basin and west-central Colorado Plateau. Geochemical analyses of the ash suggest the tephra originated from Mono Craters, California, and most probably correlates with Wilson Creek ash #3. Because the ash is 2 mm thick ???550 km from its source, the event may have been larger than others correlated to Mono Craters eruptions. ?? 2002 University of Washington.

  13. Monuments of the Giza Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggles, Clive L. N.

    The colossal pyramids of the pharaohs Khufu (Cheops), Khafre (Chephren), and Menkaure (Mycerinus) have attracted a huge amount of astronomical interest over the years, both scholarly and popular. Less attention is usually given to the broader context of structures on the Giza Plateau. One of the most notorious ideas connecting the Giza Plateau with astronomy is that the three large pyramids are laid out on the ground so as to reflect the appearance of the three stars of Orion's Belt in the sky. This idea is unsupportable for several reasons but has succeeded in generating huge public interest. Of much greater serious interest is the fact that the three main pyramids were oriented cardinally to extraordinary precision, which raises the questions of why this was important and how it was achieved. Another idea that has attracted serious attention but also some confusion is that the orientations of some narrow shafts within Khufu's pyramid might have been deliberately aligned upon particular stars. The overall layout of monuments on the plateau may certainly have been designed so as to emphasize certain solar phenomena, for symbolic and ideological reasons relating to a dominant sun cult. It is also possible that it formed part of a wider cosmological "master plan" extending to other pyramids and temples up to 20 km distant.

  14. Status of the Southern Utah Observatory (SUO) 32" Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieda, David; Springer, R. Wayne; Gondolo, Paolo

    2007-10-01

    The University of Utah is building a new Astronomical Observatory at a high altitude site in Southern Utah. The Southern Utah Observatory (SUO) Telescope will be outfitted with a 32" R-C telescope manufactured by DFM, and will feature optical and IR focal plane instrumentation as well as capability for remote/robotic operations. In this talk, I will describe the status of SUO Telescope Project, including surveys of atmospheric seeing and night sky darkness measured at potential observatory locations.

  15. Water Resources Data, Utah, Water Year 1989

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ReMillard, M.D.; Herbert, L.R.; Sandberg, G.W.; Birdwell, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1989 water year for Utah consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water quality of ground water. This report contains discharge records for 185 gaging stations; stage and contents for 22 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 21 hydrologic stations and 217 wells; miscellaneous temperature measurements and field determinations for 147 stations; and water levels for 29 observations wells. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Utah.

  16. MAJOR OIL PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Utah oil fields have produced a total of 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 15 million barrels (2.4 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2000 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the first quarter of the first project year (July 1 through September 30, 2002). This work included producing general descriptions of Utah's major petroleum provinces, gathering field data, and analyzing best practices in the Utah Wyoming thrust belt. Major Utah oil reservoirs and/or source rocks are found in Devonian through Permian, Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Tertiary rocks. Stratigraphic traps include carbonate buildups and fluvial-deltaic pinchouts, and structural traps include basement-involved and detached faulted anticlines. Best practices used in Utah's oil fields consist of waterflood, carbon-dioxide flood, gas-injection, and horizontal drilling programs. Nitrogen injection and horizontal drilling

  17. Climate change and changes in sediment transport capacity in the Colorado Plateau, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milhous, R.T.

    2005-01-01

    Information is presented on changes in the sediment transport capacity of streams of the Colorado Plateau region of the United States. The changes in transport capacity may be due to changes in climate. Changes in the ability of three rivers in the Colorado Plateau to transport sediment were investigated (Paria River at Lees Ferry, Arizona; Sevier River at Hatch, Utah; and Little Colorado at Woodruff, Arizona) using an index to sediment transport potential (or capacity) of the rivers. The index is called a Sediment Transport Capacity Index (STCI). The parameters in the index are calibrated to measured sediment concentrations. Other investigators have postulated that there have been three climate regimes in the Colorado Plateau during the 20th century: 1905-1941, 1942-1977 and 1978-1998. Time series analyses of the STCI showed reasonably clearly that there was a change in the climate about 1941 and a high probability of a change about 1923-1929. The STCI time series for the Sevier River had the expected pattern because the STCI increased in the years following 1997 nearly to the pre-1942 values from lower 1942-1977 values. The Little Colorado River showed a similar pattern, but not nearly to the magnitude suggested by the change in precipitation. The STCI for the Paria River essentially did not change. Changes in sediment transport also are investigated in the lower San Juan River where alterations in the sediment balance of the river may be due to variations in the character of summer precipitation.

  18. Rangewide molecular structuring in the Utah sucker (Catostomus ardens).

    PubMed

    Mock, K E; Evans, R P; Crawford, M; Cardall, B L; Janecke, S U; Miller, M P

    2006-07-01

    The Utah sucker (Catostomus ardens) is endemic to the Bonneville Basin and the upper Snake River drainage in western North America, and is thought to hybridize with the federally endangered June sucker (Chasmistes liorus mictus) in Utah Lake (Bonneville Basin). Here we describe the discovery of a major subdivision in Utah suckers (4.5% mitochondrial sequence divergence) between the ancient Snake River drainage and the Bonneville Basin. This boundary has not previously been recognized in Utah suckers based on morphologic variation, but has been recently described in two endemic cyprinids in the region. Populations in valleys east of the Wasatch Mountains in Utah clustered with the Snake River populations, suggesting that these valleys may have had an ancient hydrologic connection to the Snake River. We also found evidence of population isolation within the Bonneville Basin, corresponding to two Pleistocene sub-basins of the ancient Lake Bonneville. In contrast, we found no molecular evidence for deep divergence between Utah suckers and June suckers in Utah Lake or for a history of hybridization between divergent lineages in that population, although we recognize that demographic events may have obscured this signal. These findings suggest that the morphological differences between Utah and June suckers in Utah Lake may be the result of strong, and relatively recent, ecological selection. In summary, morphological and molecular characters seem to vary along different axes in different portions of the range of this taxon, providing an interesting system for studying the contributions of neutral and adaptive variation to species diversity. PMID:16780436

  19. Maps showing distribution of tungsten in heavy-mineral concentrates, Richfield 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, William R.; Motooka, Jerry M.; McHugh, John B.

    1985-01-01

    These maps are part of a folio of maps of the Richfield 1° x 2 ° quadrangle, Utah, prepared under the Conterminuous United States Mineral Assessment Program. Other publications in this folio are listed in the selected references. Located in west-central Utah, the Richfield quadrangle covers the eastern part of the Plioche-Marysvale igneous and mineral belt, which extends from the vicinity of Plioche in southeastern Nevada east-northeastward for 250 km (155 mi) into central Utah. The western two-thirds of the Richfield quadrangle is in the Basin and Range province and the eastern third is in the High Plateaus of Utah, a subprovince of the Colorado Plateau. Bedrock in the northern part of the Richfield quadrangle consists predominantly of latest Precambrian and Paleozoic sedimentary strata that were thrust eastward during the Sevier orogeny in Cretaceous time onto an autochthon of Mesozoic sedimentary rocks in the eastern part of the quadrangle. The southern part of the quadrangle is largely underlain by Oligocene and younger volcanic rocks and related intrusions. Extensional tectonism in late Cenozoic time broke the bedrock terrane into a series of north-trending fault blocks; the uplifted mountain areas were deeply eroded and the resulting debris deposited in the adjacent basins. Most of the mineral deposits in the Pioche-Marysvale mineral belt were formed during igneous activity in middle and late Cenozoic time. The regional sampling program was designed to define broad geochemical patterns and trends which can be utilized along with geologic and geophysical data to assess the mineral resource potential for this quadrangle. These maps of the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle show the regional distributions of copper in two fractions of heavy-mineral concentrates of drainage sediments.

  20. Maps showing distribution of copper in heavy-mineral concentrates, Richfield 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, William R.; Motooka, Jerry M.; McHugh, John B.

    1985-01-01

    These maps are part of a folio of maps of the Richfield 1° x 2 ° quadrangle, Utah, prepared under the Conterminuous United States Mineral Assessment Program. Other publications in this folio are listed in the selected references. Located in west-central Utah, the Richfield quadrangle covers the eastern part of the Plioche-Marysvale igneous and mineral belt, which extends from the vicinity of Plioche in southeastern Nevada east-northeastward for 250 km (155 mi) into central Utah. The western two-thirds of the Richfield quadrangle is in the Basin and Range province and the eastern third is in the High Plateaus of Utah, a subprovince of the Colorado Plateau. Bedrock in the northern part of the Richfield quadrangle consists predominantly of latest Precambrian and Paleozoic sedimentary strata that were thrust eastward during the Sevier orogeny in Cretaceous time onto an autochthon of Mesozoic sedimentary rocks in the eastern part of the quadrangle. The southern part of the quadrangle is largely underlain by Oligocene and younger volcanic rocks and related intrusions. Extensional tectonism in late Cenozoic time broke the bedrock terrane into a series of north-trending fault blocks; the uplifted mountain areas were deeply eroded and the resulting debris deposited in the adjacent basins. Most of the mineral deposits in the Pioche-Marysvale mineral belt were formed during igneous activity in middle and late Cenozoic time. The regional sampling program was designed to define broad geochemical patterns and trends which can be utilized along with geologic and geophysical data to assess the mineral resource potential for this quadrangle. These maps of the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle show the regional distributions of copper in two fractions of heavy-mineral concentrates of drainage sediments.

  1. Maps showing distribution of thorium in heavy-mineral concentrates, Richfield 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, William R.; Motooka, Jerry M.; McHugh, John B.

    1985-01-01

    These maps are part of a folio of maps of the Richfield 1° x 2 ° quadrangle, Utah, prepared under the Conterminuous United States Mineral Assessment Program. Other publications in this folio are listed in the selected references. Located in west-central Utah, the Richfield quadrangle covers the eastern part of the Plioche-Marysvale igneous and mineral belt, which extends from the vicinity of Plioche in southeastern Nevada east-northeastward for 250 km (155 mi) into central Utah. The western two-thirds of the Richfield quadrangle is in the Basin and Range province and the eastern third is in the High Plateaus of Utah, a subprovince of the Colorado Plateau. Bedrock in the northern part of the Richfield quadrangle consists predominantly of latest Precambrian and Paleozoic sedimentary strata that were thrust eastward during the Sevier orogeny in Cretaceous time onto an autochthon of Mesozoic sedimentary rocks in the eastern part of the quadrangle. The southern part of the quadrangle is largely underlain by Oligocene and younger volcanic rocks and related intrusions. Extensional tectonism in late Cenozoic time broke the bedrock terrane into a series of north-trending fault blocks; the uplifted mountain areas were deeply eroded and the resulting debris deposited in the adjacent basins. Most of the mineral deposits in the Pioche-Marysvale mineral belt were formed during igneous activity in middle and late Cenozoic time. The regional sampling program was designed to define broad geochemical patterns and trends which can be utilized along with geologic and geophysical data to assess the mineral resource potential for this quadrangle. These maps of the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle show the regional distributions of copper in two fractions of heavy-mineral concentrates of drainage sediments.

  2. BOX-DEATH HOLLOW ROADLESS AREA, UTAH.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weir, Gordon W.; Lane, Michael

    1984-01-01

    Geologic mapping, geochemical sampling, and a search for prospects and mineralized rock in the Box-Death Hollow Roadless Area, Utah indicate that there is little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources in the area. Additional exploratory drilling by industry seems warranted if wells elsewhere in the region find oil or gas in strata as yet untested in the Box-Death Hollow Roadless Area.

  3. Environmental Report Utah State Prison Geothermal Project

    SciTech Connect

    1980-03-01

    This environmental report assesses the potential impact of developing a geothermal resource for space heating at the Utah State Prison. Wells will be drilled on prison property for production and for injection to minimize reservoir depletion and provide for convenient disposal of cooled fluid. The most significant environmental concerns are the proper handling of drilling muds during well drilling and the disposal of produced water during well testing. These problems will be handled by following currently accepted practices to reduce the potential risks.

  4. Geothermal energy and its potential. [Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Berge, C.W.

    1980-06-01

    A brief review of geothermal energy and its potential as a future energy source is presented. The type of geothermal systems and their geologic occurrence is discussed, and the Phillips Petroleum Company's exploration and drilling programs in the Roosevelt Hot Springs area in parts of Iron, Beaver, and Millard Counties, Utah are detailed. A section on the rock behavior and mechanical properties of rocks in the Roosevelt Hot Springs area is included. (JMT)

  5. Reconnaissance of the hydrothermal resources of Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Rush, F.E.

    1983-01-01

    Geologic factors in the Basin and Range province in Utah are more favorable for the occurrence of geothermal resources than in other areas on the Colorado Plateaus or in the Middle Rocky Mountains. These geologic factors are principally crustal extension and crustal thinning during the last 17 million years. Basalts as young as 10,000 years have been mapped in the area. High-silica volcanic and intrusive rocks of Quaternary age can be used to locate hydrothermal convection systems. Drilling for hot, high-silica, buried rock bodies is most promising in the areas of recent volcanic activity. Southwestern Utah has more geothermal potential than other parts of the Basin and Range province in Utah. The Roosevelt Hot Springs area, the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale area, and the area to the north as far as 60 kilometers from them probably have the best potential for geothermal development for generation of electricity. Other areas with estimated reservoir temperatures greater than 150/sup 0/C are Thermo, Monroe, Red Hill (in the Monroe-Joseph Known Geothermal Resource Area), Joseph Hot Springs, and the Newcastle area. The rates of heat and water discharge are high at Crater, Meadow, and Hatton Hot Springs, but estimated reservoir temperatures there are less than 150/sup 0/C. Additional exploration is needed to define the potential in three additional areas in the Escalante Desert. 28 figs., 18 tabs.

  6. PLATEAU IRIS SYNDROME--CASE SERIES.

    PubMed

    Feraru, Crenguta Ioana; Pantalon, Anca Delia; Chiselita, Dorin; Branisteanu, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Plateau iris is characterized by closing the anterior chamber angle due to a large ciliary body or due to its anterior insertion that alters the position of iris periphery in respect to the trabecular meshwork. There are two aspects that need to be differentiated: plateau iris configuration and plateau iris syndrome. The first describes a situation when the iris root is flat and the anterior chamber is not shallow, the latter refers to a post laser iridotomy condition in which a patent iridotomy has removed the relative pupillary block, but goniscopically confirmed angle closure recurs without central shallowing of the anterior chamber. Isolated plateau iris syndrome is rare compared to plateau iris configuration. We hereby present two case reports of plateau iris syndrome in young patients who came to an ophthalmologic consult by chance. PMID:26978890

  7. Tectonic impact on the dynamics of CO2-rich fluid migration in Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadine, E. Z.; Jean Luc, F.; Remy, D.; Battani, A.; Olivier, V.

    2009-12-01

    With the objective to rank the first order parameters acting in the long term CO2 storage, IFP is developing an integrated study based on the analytical results around the natural silici-clastic analogue of the Colorado Plateau in Utah. What are the dominant parameters which governed the fluid/gas migration in front of the Sevier fold-and-thrust Belt, particularly the CO2-enriched ones? Several sites have been investigated in Utah and Idaho provinces; in the Colorado Plateau, East and in front of the Sevier fold-and-thrust belt, as well as in the Basin & Range geological province North and South West of Salt Lake city (Sevier basin). As a first site selection, three distinct structural provinces have been analysed depending on their seal/reservoir characteristics for confinement: the Green River leaking area (Utah), where large WNW-ESE faults (Salt Wash, Little Wash F...) show several water, oil and gas (CO2, HC) seepages; the Basin & Range province (Utah & Idaho provinces) where low-angle normal faults are seismically active (leaking locally); and the Canyonlands zone (Utah), south of the Moab fault, where the system is well confined. The migration pathways used by composite gas and particularly CO2-enriched fluids (in the Green River area) combined with a reducing agent are locally easily recognisable by the bleaching effect where some reservoir levels or the faults pathways have been flushed. The architecture of the paleo and active fluid migration network can thus be mapped. As a second selective ranking, natural gas have been sampled either from oil/gas producing wells in the Moab area and Ferron Valley, or from natural seepages along leaking fault sections or from geysers along the Green-River fault system. The results, based on noble gas isotope analyses (Battani et al, AGU fall meeting 2009) show that 3 distinct provinces can be "isolated", either marked by the occurrence of mantle-derived CO2, or mixed mantle/crustal CO2 signature of varying ratio. How to

  8. MAJOR OIL PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

    2003-04-01

    Utah oil fields have produced a total of 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 15 million barrels (2.4 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2000 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the second quarter of the first project year (October 1 through December 31, 2002). This work included (1) gathering field and pipeline data to produce a digital oil and gas field and pipeline map, and (2) Uinta Basin well database compilation. The oil and gas field map will help to delineate the various oil plays to be described later in the project. The map will also identify CO{sub 2} resources, and will be useful in the planning and economic evaluation of best practices using CO{sub 2} to flood mature oil reservoirs. The play descriptions will be enhanced with the updated oil and gas pipeline map. It can be used to plan economic evaluation of exploration activities and field development, particularly if H

  9. MAJOR OIL PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; Craig D. Morgan; Roger L. Bon

    2003-07-01

    Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the third quarter of the first project year (January 1 through March 31, 2003). This work included gathering field data and analyzing best practices in the eastern Uinta Basin, Utah, and the Colorado portion of the Paradox Basin. Best practices used in oil fields of the eastern Uinta Basin consist of conversion of all geophysical well logs into digital form, running small fracture treatments, fingerprinting oil samples from each producing zone, running spinner surveys biannually, mapping each producing zone, and drilling on 80-acre (32 ha) spacing. These practices ensure that induced fractures do not extend vertically out of the intended zone, determine the percentage each zone contributes to the overall

  10. MAJOR OIL PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas C. Chidsey; Craig D. Morgan; Kevin McClure; Grant C. Willis

    2003-09-01

    Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the fourth quarter of the first project year (April 1 through June 30, 2003). This work included describing outcrop analogs to the Jurassic Nugget Sandstone and Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation, the major oil producers in the thrust belt and Paradox Basin, respectively. Production-scale outcrop analogs provide an excellent view, often in three dimensions, of reservoir-facies characteristics and boundaries contributing to the overall heterogeneity of reservoir rocks. They can be used as a ''template'' for evaluation of data from conventional core, geophysical and petrophysical logs, and seismic surveys. The Nugget Sandstone was deposited in an extensive dune field that extended from Wyoming to Arizona. Outcrop

  11. 40 CFR 282.94 - Utah State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Utah obtains approval for the revised requirements pursuant to....94 Section 282.94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.94 Utah...

  12. 40 CFR 282.94 - Utah State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Utah obtains approval for the revised requirements pursuant to....94 Section 282.94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.94 Utah...

  13. 40 CFR 282.94 - Utah State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Utah obtains approval for the revised requirements pursuant to....94 Section 282.94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.94 Utah...

  14. 40 CFR 282.94 - Utah State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Utah obtains approval for the revised requirements pursuant to....94 Section 282.94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.94 Utah...

  15. 40 CFR 282.94 - Utah State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Utah obtains approval for the revised requirements pursuant to....94 Section 282.94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.94 Utah...

  16. 75 FR 12562 - Central Utah Project Completion Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-16

    ... THE UTAH RECLAMATION MITIGATION AND CONSERVATION COMMISSION Central Utah Project Completion Act AGENCY... Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), with public involvement, for the Provo River Delta Restoration Project. The restoration project is a recovery action within the approved species recovery plan. DATES:...

  17. Spatial Relative Risk Patterns of Autism Spectrum Disorders in Utah

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakian, Amanda V.; Bilder, Deborah A.; Coon, Hilary; McMahon, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Heightened areas of spatial relative risk for autism spectrum disorders (ASD), or ASD hotspots, in Utah were identified using adaptive kernel density functions. Children ages four, six, and eight with ASD from multiple birth cohorts were identified by the Utah Registry of Autism and Developmental Disabilities. Each ASD case was gender-matched to…

  18. Twice Considered: Charter Schools and Student Achievement in Utah

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ni, Yongmei; Rorrer, Andrea K.

    2012-01-01

    A relatively small state, Utah presents an interesting case to study charter schools given its friendly policy environment and its significant growth in charter school enrollment. Based on longitudinal student-level data from 2004 to 2009, this paper utilizes two approaches to evaluate the Utah charter school effectiveness: (a) hierarchical linear…

  19. Telepractice Services at Sound Beginnings at Utah State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaiser, Kristina M.; Edwards, Marge; Behl, Diane; Munoz, Karen F.

    2012-01-01

    The Utah State University Sound Beginnings program originated in 2007 as a laboratory school to serve children with hearing loss from birth to age 6 years old living in Northern Utah. Sound Beginnings offers an interdisciplinary listening and spoken language educational option for families through the following services: toddler and preschool…

  20. Five-Year Projected Utah School District Building Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    Utah and its school districts share the responsibility for providing adequate school facilities, including developing feasible alternatives to new construction. School facilities are financed primarily with local property taxes supplemented with limited state aid. During summer 1982, Utah's 40 school districts projected their highest priority…

  1. Utah Youth Risk Behavior Survey Results, 1991, 1993 & 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    This report describes results from the 1995 Utah Youth Risk Behavior Survey of Utah's high school students and compares results to selected 1991 and 1993 results. The 76-item survey was identical to the national survey, though it omitted questions about sexual behavior. It examined unintentional and intentional injuries; tobacco, alcohol, and…

  2. Cancer mortality and radioactive fallout in southwestern Utah.

    PubMed

    Machado, S G; Land, C E; McKay, F W

    1987-01-01

    Cancer mortality was compared between a three-county region in southwestern Utah and the remainder of Utah in an investigation of reported excess cancer risks associated with residence in southwestern Utah during the period of above-ground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. Because most of the fallout in southwestern Utah was deposited during 1953-1957, comparisons were limited to persons born before 1958, and deaths from leukemia and bone cancer during 1955-1980 and from other cancers during 1964-1980. There was no excess risk of cancer mortality in southwestern Utah, for single or grouped sites, with the single exception of leukemia which showed statistically significant odds ratios of 1.45 based on 62 deaths at all ages, and 2.84 based on nine deaths at ages 0-14. The finding for childhood leukemia was based on different time periods and geographic comparisons from those of two earlier studies in which no such excess was found. Mortality from all cancer sites combined was significantly lower in southwestern Utah than in the remainder of the state, even after adjustment for the higher proportion of (lower risk) Mormons in southwestern Utah. The present results, including the positive association for leukemia, are inconsistent with the high excess risks reported by Johnson (JAMA 1984;251:230-6) based on an interview survey of cancer incidence among long-term Mormon residents of southwestern Utah. PMID:3788954

  3. Major Oil Plays in Utah and Vicinity

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas C. Chidsey; Craig D. Morgan; Kevin McClure; Douglas A. Sprinkel; Roger L. Bon; Hellmut H. Doelling

    2003-12-31

    Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; locations of major oil pipelines; identification and discussion of land-use constraints; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play. This report covers research activities for the sixth quarter of the project (October 1 through December 31, 2003). This work included describing outcrop analogs for the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone and Mississippian Leadville Limestone, major oil producers in the thrust belt and Paradox Basin, respectively, and analyzing best practices used in the southern Green River Formation play of the Uinta Basin. Production-scale outcrop analogs provide an excellent view of reservoir petrophysics, facies characteristics, and boundaries contributing to the overall heterogeneity of reservoir rocks. They can be used as a ''template'' for evaluation of data from conventional core, geophysical and petrophysical logs, and seismic surveys. In the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province, the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone produces from subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the low-porosity limestone beds are extensively fractured and sealed

  4. Vertical tectonics of the High Plateau region, Manihiki Plateau, Western Pacific, from seismic stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Huirong-Anita; Stock, Joann M.; Clayton, Robert; Luyendyk, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    The Manihiki Plateau is an elevated oceanic volcanic plateau that was formed mostly in Early Cretaceous time by hotspot activity. We analyze new seismic reflection data acquired on cruise KIWI 12 over the High Plateau region in the southeast of the plateau, to look for direct evidence of the location of the heat source and the timing of uplift, subsidence and faulting. These data are correlated with previous seismic reflection lines from cruise CATO 3, and with the results at DSDP Site 317 at the northern edge of the High Plateau. Seven key reflectors are identified from the seismic reflection profiles and the resulting isopach maps show local variations in thickness in the southeastern part of the High Plateau, suggesting a subsidence (cooling) event in this region during Late Cretaceous and up to Early Eocene time. We model this as a hotspot, active and centered on the High Plateau area during Early Cretaceous time in a near-ridge environment. The basement and Early Cretaceous volcaniclastic layers were formed by subaerial and shallow-water eruption due to the volcanic activity. After that, the plateau experienced erosion. The cessation of hotspot activity and subsequent heat loss by Late Cretaceous time caused the plateau to subside rapidly. The eastern and southern portions of the High Plateau were rifted away following the cessation of hot spot activity. As the southeastern portion of the High Plateau was originally higher and above the calcium carbonate compensation depth, it accumulated more sediments than the surrounding plateau regions. Apparently coeval with the rapid subsidence of the plateau are normal faults found at the SE edge of the plateau. Since Early Eocene time, the plateau subsided to its present depth without significant deformation.

  5. Preliminary maps showing ground-water resources in the Lower Colorado River region, Arizona, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, S.G.

    1976-01-01

    This atlas was prepared to meet the need for information on the areal distribution, quantity, and availability of ground water in the lower Colorado River region, an area of about 140,000 square miles in parts of Arizona, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah. The lower Colorado River region is divided into three water provinces--the Basin and Range lowlands province, the Plateau uplands province, and the Central highlands province. The annual precipitation in the region ranges from 3 inches near Yuma, Ariz., to as much as 35 inches on the highest peaks, such as those of the Chiricahua Mountains in Arizona. The precipitation in the lowlands ranges from about 10 to 12 inches per year. In the Basin and Range lowlands the hydraulic conductivity of the aquifers can be as much as 130 feet per day. In the Plateau uplands province most of the groundwater occurs in three multiple-aquifer systems. For the most part, the multiple-aquifer systems do not transmit water readily, and the hydraulic conductivity generally is less than 1.3 feet per day. The Central highlands province is a mountainous area that separates the Plateau uplands from the Basin and Range lowlands in most of the lower Colorado region. The principal discharge area for ground water in the highlands occurs along the base of the Mogollon Rim. (Woodard-USGS)

  6. Child Care and Utah's Economy: Making the Connection. A Special Utah KIDS COUNT Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah Children, Salt Lake City.

    Recent growth in high technology and substantial entrepreneurial activity in Utah has resulted in an economic boom in different regions of the state. This boom has led to economic prosperity for many, but also economic decline for others, and subsequent increasing economic inequality throughout the state. This special KIDS COUNT report presents an…

  7. 78 FR 35181 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Utah; Revisions to Utah...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-12

    ... action on R307-1-1 in this action. See 73 FR 51222 (September 2, 2008). Utah's September 15, 2006... 73 FR 51222; (2) added a new section R307-401 (Notice of Intent and Approval Order); \\2\\ (3) added a... Values'' and ``Significant''. In 73 FR 51222 (September 2, 2008), EPA incorporated by reference UAC...

  8. Utah Guidance and Toolkit for Student Learning Objectives: Instructions and Materials. Utah SLOs. Updated

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This document is intended to help teachers understand and create Student Learning Objectives (SLOs). This resource is a practical guide intended to provide clarity to a complex but worthwhile task. This resource may also be used by administrators for professional learning. As Utah moves toward providing a "Model for Measuring Educator…

  9. 76 FR 69296 - University of Utah, University of Utah TRIGA Nuclear Reactor, Notice of Issuance of Renewed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ... published in the Federal Register on July 21, 2011 (76 FR 43733-43737). The NRC received no request for a..., 2011 (76 FR 60091-60094), and concluded that renewal of the facility operating license will not have a... COMMISSION University of Utah, University of Utah TRIGA Nuclear Reactor, Notice of Issuance of...

  10. A History of Bookmobile Library Service in the State of Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Val L.

    There are four library systems in Utah which provide bookmobile library service; the Salt Lake County Library, Salt Lake City Library, San Juan County Library and Utah State Library Commission. This study is limited to bookmobile library service in Utah and to librarians who first began library service. The history of bookmobiles in Utah began in…

  11. 78 FR 43225 - Utah Resource Advisory Council Meeting/Conference Call

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ... Bureau of Land Management Utah Resource Advisory Council Meeting/Conference Call AGENCY: Bureau of Land...) Utah Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will host a meeting/conference call. DATES: The Utah RAC will host...: Those attending in person must meet at the BLM, Utah State Office, 440 West 200 South, Salt Lake...

  12. 78 FR 70960 - Utah Resource Advisory Council Meeting/Conference Call

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-27

    ... Bureau of Land Management Utah Resource Advisory Council Meeting/Conference Call AGENCY: Bureau of Land... Policy and Management Act, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Utah Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will... BLM Utah State Office, 440 West 200 South, Salt Lake City, Utah, in the Monument Conference Room...

  13. Utah System of Higher Education Data Book (Supplement to Operating Budget Request) 1998-99.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Board of Higher Education, Salt Lake City.

    This report provides detailed statistical data on the Utah System of Higher Education (USHE), including institution-specific data on the system's four universities and five community colleges. The institutions include the University of Utah, Utah State University, Weber State University, Southern Utah University, Snow College, Dixie College,…

  14. The Utah education network: a collaborative model.

    PubMed Central

    Peay, W J; Hess, S H; Sharp, E M

    1994-01-01

    High-speed data communications networks are transforming the operations, services, and roles of libraries. While the installation of the physical network is often the focus of activity, the administrative and political issues are, in fact, fundamental. For libraries to participate in and influence the development of networks, building new partnerships has proven to be an effective strategy. This paper describes the use of this strategy in the development of the Utah Education Network. This participation is essential if libraries are to take full advantage of the technologies and to ensure that networks reflect the fundamental values of the profession. PMID:7841911

  15. REACTIVE MULTIPHASE BEHAVIOR OF CO2 IN SALINE AQUIFERS BENEATH THE COLORADO PLATEAU

    SciTech Connect

    R.G. Allis; J. Moore; S. White

    2003-10-21

    Field and laboratory investigations of naturally occurring CO{sub 2}-reservoirs are being conducted to determine the characteristics of potential seal and reservoir units and the extent of the interactions that occur between the host rocks and the CO{sub 2} charged fluids. Efforts have focused on the Farnham Dome field, located in central Utah, and the Springerville-St. Johns field in Arizona and New Mexico. The Springerville-St. Johns field is particularly significant because of the presence of extensive travertine deposits that document release of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere. CO{sub 2} accumulations at both fields occur in sedimentary rocks typical of CO{sub 2} reservoirs occurring on the Colorado Plateau. The main achievements during this quarter were: (1) a soil gas flux survey at the Springerville-St Johns field, (2) collection of some soil gas for chemical and isotopic analysis from this field, and (3) collection of travertine samples from an elevation range of over 1000 feet (330 m) for dating the time span of carbonate-saturated spring outflow at this field. Analytical results and interpretations are still in progress. When available they will allow contrast with soil gas measurements from Farnham Dome natural CO{sub 2} field in central Utah, which were reported in the previous quarterly report.

  16. Map showing distribution of molybdenum in stream-sediment samples, Richfield 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, William R.; Motooka, Jerry M.; McHugh, John B.

    1990-01-01

    This map of the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle, Utah, shows the regional distribution of molybdenum in the less-than-0.180-mm (minus-80-mesh) fraction of stream-sediments. It is part of a folio of maps of the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle, Utah, prepared under the Conterminuous United States Mineral Assessment Program. Other published geochemical maps in this folio are listed in the references (this publication). The Richfield quadrangle is located in west-central Utah and includes the eastern part of the Pioche-Marysvale igneous and mineral belt, which extends from the vicinity of Pioche in southeastern Nevada, east-northeastward for 155 miles into central Utah. The western two-thirds of the Richfield quadrangle is part of the Basin and Range province, whereas the eastern third is part of the High Plateaus of Utah, a subprovince of the Colorado Plateau. Bedrock in the northern part of the Richfield quadrangle consists predominantly of Late Proterozoic and Paleozoic sedimentary strata that were thrust eastward during the Sevier orogeny in Cretaceous time onto an autochthon of Mesozoic sedimentary rocks located in the eastern part of the quadrangle. The southern part of the quadrangle is largely underlain by Oligocene and younger volcanic rocks and related intrusions. Extensional tectonism in late Cenozoic time broke the bedrock terrain into a series of north-trending fault blocks; the uplifted mountain areas were eroded to various degrees and the resulting debris was deposited in adjacent basins. Most of the mineral deposits in the Pioche-Marysvale mineral belt were formed as a result of igneous activity in the middle and late Cenozoic time. A more complete description of the geology and a mineral-resource appraisal of the Richfield quadrangle appears in Steven and Morris (1984 and 1987). The regional sampling program was designed to define broad geochemical patterns and trends that can be utilized along with geological and geophysical data to assess the mineral

  17. Map showing distribution of thorium in stream-sediment samples, Richfield 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, William R.; Motooka, Jerry M.; McHugh, John B.

    1990-01-01

    This map of the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle, Utah, shows the regional distribution of thorium in the less-than-0.180-mm (minus-80-mesh) fraction of stream-sediments. It is part of a folio of maps of the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle, Utah, prepared under the Conterminuous United States Mineral Assessment Program. Other published geochemical maps in this folio are listed in the references (this publication). The Richfield quadrangle is located in west-central Utah and includes the eastern part of the Pioche-Marysvale igneous and mineral belt, which extends from the vicinity of Pioche in southeastern Nevada, east-northeastward for 155 miles into central Utah. The western two-thirds of the Richfield quadrangle is part of the Basin and Range province, whereas the eastern third is part of the High Plateaus of Utah, a subprovince of the Colorado Plateau. Bedrock in the northern part of the Richfield quadrangle consists predominantly of Late Proterozoic and Paleozoic sedimentary strata that were thrust eastward during the Sevier orogeny in Cretaceous time onto an autochthon of Mesozoic sedimentary rocks located in the eastern part of the quadrangle. The southern part of the quadrangle is largely underlain by Oligocene and younger volcanic rocks and related intrusions. Extensional tectonism in late Cenozoic time broke the bedrock terrain into a series of north-trending fault blocks; the uplifted mountain areas were eroded to various degrees and the resulting debris was deposited in adjacent basins. Most of the mineral deposits in the Pioche-Marysvale mineral belt were formed as a result of igneous activity in the middle and late Cenozoic time. A more complete description of the geology and a mineral-resource appraisal of the Richfield quadrangle appears in Steven and Morris (1984 and 1987). The regional sampling program was designed to define broad geochemical patterns and trends that can be utilized along with geological and geophysical data to assess the mineral

  18. Flora of the Orange Cliffs of Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Shultz, L.M.; Neely, E.E.; Tuhy, J.S.

    1987-04-30

    The Orange Cliffs area, an area rich in oil sands deposits and defined here as part of the Colorado Plateau floristic province, harbors approximately 209 species in 123 genera and 49 families. Because of the potential of exploitation of the oil sands deposits in the area, a species checklist was made and a discussion of physical and floristic aspects of the region is given here. The flora is compared statistically to the San Rafael Swell flora, which is also a subset of the Colorado Plateau. They define six vegetation types and three edaphic communities; these are described and mapped. Of eleven endemic plant species in the Orange Cliffs, three are local and rare. Sites for Astragalus nidularius, A. moencoppensis, and Xylorhiza glabriuscula var. linearifolia are discussed and mapped. 24 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  19. Plateau borders of smectic liquid crystalline films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trittel, Torsten; Aldred, Ruth; Stannarius, Ralf

    2011-06-01

    We investigate the geometrical properties of Plateau borders in an arrangement of connected smectic A free standing films. The geometry is chosen such that a circular Plateau border surrounds a planar smectic film and connects it with two smectic catenoids. It is demonstrated that, similar to soap films, the smectic film geometry can be described by a negative line tension of the circular contact region. Thus, the equilibrium angle between the films depends upon the liquid content in this region, and with increasing liquid content, deviations from Plateau's rule are observed. The experimental results are qualitatively comparable to soap films. A possible origin of slight quantitative differences is discussed.

  20. Plateau effects on diurnal circulation patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Reiter, E.R.; Tang, M.

    1984-04-01

    The diurnal variation of 850 mb heights, the detailed distribution of which could be assessed by the inclusion of surface data, and of resultant winds over, and in the vicinity of, the Great Basin reveals clearly a plateau-wind circulation during summer. This circulation reverses between day and night and appears to include the low-level jet stream over Texas and Oklahoma, as well as the time of occurrence of thunderstorms. This plateau circulation system interacts with local mountain-valley breeze systems. The thickness of the daytime inflow and nighttime outflow layer over the plateau is approximately 2 km. 19 references, 11 figures, 1 table.

  1. Evaluating the Relationship Between Seismicity and Subsurface Well Activity in Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajoie, L. J.; Bennett, S. E. K.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the relationship between seismicity and subsurface well activity is crucial to evaluating the seismic hazard of transient, non-tectonic seismicity. Several studies have demonstrated correlations between increased frequency of earthquake occurrence and the injection/production of fluids (e.g. oil, water) in nearby subsurface wells in intracontinental settings (e.g. Arkansas, Colorado, Ohio, Oklahoma, Texas). Here, we evaluate all earthquake magnitudes for the past 20-30 years across the diverse seismotectonic settings of Utah. We explore earthquakes within 5 km and subsequent to completion dates of oil and gas wells. We compare seismicity rates prior to well establishment with rates after well establishment in an attempt to discriminate between natural and anthropogenic earthquakes in areas of naturally high background seismicity. In a few central Utah locations, we find that the frequency of shallow (0-10 km) earthquakes increased subsequent to completion of gas wells within 5 km, and at depths broadly similar to bottom hole depths. However, these regions typically correspond to mining regions of the Wasatch Plateau, complicating our ability to distinguish between earthquakes related to either well activity or mining. We calculate earthquake density and well density and compare their ratio (earthquakes per area/wells per area) with several published metrics of seismotectonic setting. Areas with a higher earthquake-well ratio are located in relatively high strain regions (determined from GPS) associated with the Intermountain Seismic Belt, but cannot be attributed to any specific Quaternary-active fault. Additionally, higher ratio areas do not appear to coincide with anomalously high heat flow values, where rocks are typically thermally weakened. Incorporation of timing and volume data for well injection/production would allow for more robust temporal statistical analysis and hazard analysis.

  2. Recruiting Quality Majors: New York High School Students Experience the Geology of Southern Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colberg, M. R.; Eves, R. L.; Lohrengel, C. F.

    2003-12-01

    Southern Utah University (SUU), Division of Geosciences, is faced with seriously increased competition for students within its traditional recruiting area, the direct result of nearby two-year institutions expanding their missions to four-year roles. Because of this increased competition, it is obvious that students must be recruited from new source areas. Research indicates that New York State has one of the most outstanding high school Earth Science programs in the United States, and it became a target area for recruiting quality students to the SUU geoscience program. Located in the Colorado Plateau to Basin and Range transition zone, SUU is situated in one of the most spectacular and diverse geologic regions in the world. SUU is surrounded by classic southwestern geologic exposures and extensive public lands. In order to use this resource to its maximum advantage, a one-week field program was arranged that would accommodate a maximum of 30 students from New York high schools. The target audience is comprised of juniors and seniors who have participated in an Earth science course, and have expressed an interest in a geoscience career. The field program provides students with a positive learning experience, and stresses basic geologic concepts while utilizing the stunning regional geology of southern Utah as an outdoor classroom. Students receive transferable college credit for participation. To make contact with potential participants, a letter was sent to high school principals requesting the name(s) of the earth sciences teacher(s) in the school. The response was limited (apparently principals do not forward materials to faculty members). However, there was sufficient response to conduct a field experience during late July, 2003. This initial offering was extremely successful and received positive reviews from all participants. The final results of this pilot offering are not yet known, but we are convinced that enrollment of students into SUU's program will

  3. 40Ar/39Ar age and chemistry of manganese mineralization in the Moab and Lisbon fault systems, southeastern Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Marjorie A.; Parry, William T.; Petersen, Erich U.; Hall, Chris M.

    2001-04-01

    Diagenetic iron and manganese mineralization is associated with the Moab and Lisbon faults and is an important indicator of fluid flow in Jurassic Navajo Sandstone of southeastern Utah. Reducing brines originating from the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation (with or without hydrocarbons) mobilized disseminated iron and manganese in the Jurassic sandstones and mixed with shallow, oxygenated groundwater to precipitate both iron and manganese mineralization. Mineralization consists of colliform and concretionary hematite, pyrolusite, and cryptomelane-hollandite that contains 1.33 2.12 wt% K. The 40Ar/39Ar dating of vacuum-encapsulated cryptomelane yields age estimates of 25 20 Ma, indicating mineralization coincident with either a Colorado Plateau uplift episode or La Sal Mountains volcanism.

  4. [Hypoxic adaptation of the hearts of plateau zokor (Myospalax baileyi) and plateau pika (Ochotona curzoniae)].

    PubMed

    Qi, Xin-Zhang; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Zhu, Shi-Hai; Rao, Xin-Feng; Wei, Lian; Wei, Deng-Bang

    2008-06-25

    Plateau zokor (Myospalax baileyi) and plateau pika (Ochotona curzniae) are native to the Qinghai-Tibet plateau. To study their adaptive mechanisms, the ratios of heart weight to body weight (HW/BW) and right to left ventricular plus septum weights [RV/(LV+S)] were determined; the microvessel density (MVD) of cardiac muscle were measured by immunohistochemical staining; the numerical density on area (N(A)), volume density (V(V)), specific surface (δ), and surface density (S(V)) of mitochondria were obtained by microscopy and stereology; the contents of myoglobin (Mb) and lactic acid (LD), and the activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in cardiac muscle were analyzed by spectrophotometer. The results showed that the HW/BW of plateau zokor [(4.55±0.26)%] and plateau pika [(4.41±0.38)%] was significantly greater than that of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat [(3.44±0.41)%] (P<0.05), but the RV/(LV+S) [(22.04±1.98)%, (25.53±3.41)%] was smaller than that of SD rats [(44.23±3.87)%] (P<0.05). The MVD and N(A) of cardiac muscle were 1688.631±250.253 and 0.768±0.123 in SD rat, 2002.888±367.466 and 0.868±0.159 in plateau pika and 2 990.643±389.888 and 1.012±0.133 in plateau zokor. The V(V) of mitochondria in plateau zokor (0.272±0.045) was significantly lower than that in plateau pika (0.343±0.039) and SD rat (0.321±0.048) (P<0.05), while the δ of mitochondria in plateau zokor (9.409±1.238) was higher than that in plateau pika (6.772±0.892) and SD rat (7.287±1.373) (P<0.05). The S(V) of mitochondria in plateau pika (2.322±0.347) was not obviously different from that in plateau zokor (2.468±0.380) and SD rat (2.227±0.377), but that in plateau zokor was significantly higher than that in SD rat (P<0.05). The contents of Mb in cardiac muscle of plateau zokor [(763.33±88.73) nmol/g] and plateau pika [(765.96±28.47) nmol/g] were significantly higher than that of SD rat [(492.38±72.14) nmol/g] (P<0.05), the content of LD in plateau zokor [(0.57±0.06) mmol/L] was

  5. Plug in to the Utah Library Network, Reach Out to the World. Utah Library Network and Internet Training Handbook [for DOS]. Information Forum Publication #7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinwand, Louis; And Others

    This manual is designed to assist public libraries in Utah in their use of the Internet. Many of the examples used were created specifically to explain the use of products that the Utah Library Network provides for public libraries in Utah. The introduction provides background history and general information about the Internet and general…

  6. Career Plateauing: Implications for Career Development Specialists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiner, Andrew; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Reaction to career plateaus depends on the employee's resources as well as the organization's response. Counseling, training and development, job enrichment, and other activities can minimize the stressful effects of involuntary plateauing. (SK)

  7. Seismic Characterization of Coal-Mining Seismicity in Utah for CTBT Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Arabasz, W J; Pechmann, J C

    2001-03-01

    Underground coal mining (down to {approx}0.75 km depth) in the contiguous Wasatch Plateau (WP) and Book Cliffs (BC) mining districts of east-central Utah induces abundant seismicity that is monitored by the University of Utah regional seismic network. This report presents the results of a systematic characterization of mining seismicity (magnitude {le} 4.2) in the WP-BC region from January 1978 to June 2000-together with an evaluation of three seismic events (magnitude {le} 4.3) associated with underground trona mining in southwestern Wyoming during January-August 2000. (Unless specified otherwise, magnitude implies Richter local magnitude, M{sub L}.) The University of Utah Seismograph Stations (UUSS) undertook this cooperative project to assist the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in research and development relating to monitoring the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). The project, which formally began February 28, 1998, and ended September 1, 2000, had three basic objectives: (1) Strategically install a three-component broadband digital seismic station in the WP-BC region to ensure the continuous recording of high-quality waveform data to meet the long-term needs of LLNL, UUSS, and other interested parties, including the international CTBT community. (2) Determine source mechanisms--to the extent that available source data and resources allowed--for comparative seismic characterization of stress release in mines versus earthquakes in the WP-BC study region. (3) Gather and report to LLNL local information on mine operations and associated seismicity, including ''ground truth'' for significant events. Following guidance from LLNL's Technical Representative, the focus of Objective 2 was changed slightly to place emphasis on three mining-related events that occurred in and near the study area after the original work plan had been made, thus posing new targets of opportunity. These included: a magnitude 3.8 shock that occurred

  8. Dispersal of large branchiopod cysts: Potential movement by wind from potholes on the Colorado Plateau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graham, T.B.; Wirth, D.

    2008-01-01

    Wind is suspected to be a primary dispersal mechanism for large branchiopod cysts on the Colorado Plateau. We used a wind tunnel to investigate wind velocities capable of moving pothole sediment and cysts from intact and disturbed surfaces. Material moved in the wind tunnel was trapped in filters; cysts were separated from sediment and counted. Undisturbed sediment moved at velocities as low as 5.9 m s-1 (12.3 miles h-1). A single all-terrain vehicle (ATV) track increased the sediment mass collected 10-fold, with particles moving at a wind velocity of only 4.2 m s-1 (8.7 miles h-1). Cysts were recovered from every wind tunnel trial. Measured wind velocities are representative of low-wind speeds measured near Moab, Utah. Wind can move large numbers of cysts to and from potholes on the Colorado Plateau. Our results indicate that large branchiopod cysts move across pothole basins at low-wind speeds; additional work is needed to establish velocities at which cysts move between potholes. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  9. Coal assessment and coal quality characterization of the Colorado Plateau area

    SciTech Connect

    Affolter, R.H.; Brownfield, M.E.; Biewick, L.H.; Kirschbaum, M.A.

    1998-12-31

    The goal of the Colorado Plateau Coal Assessment project is to provide an overview of the geologic setting, distribution, resources, and quality of Cretaceous coal in the Colorado Plateau and southernmost Green River Basin. Resources will be estimated by applying restrictions such as coal thickness and depth and will be categorized by land ownership. In some areas these studies will also delineate areas where coal mining may be restricted because of land use, industrial, social, or environmental factors. Emphasis will be placed on areas where the coal is owned or managed by the Federal Government. This assessment, which is part of the US Geological Survey`s National Coal Assessment Program, is different from previous coal assessments in that the major emphasis will be placed on coals that can provide energy for the next few decades. The data is also being collected and stored in digital format that can be updated when new pertinent information becomes available. This study is being completed in cooperation with the US Bureau of Land Management, the US Forest Service, Arizona Geological Survey, Colorado Geological Survey, New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, and the Utah Geological Survey.

  10. Prioritizing High-Temperature Geothermal Resources in Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blackett, R.E.; Brill, T.C.; Sowards, G.M.

    2002-01-01

    The Utah Geological Survey and the Utah Energy Office recently released geothermal resource information for Utah as a "digital atlas." We are now expanding this project to include economic analyses of selected geothermal sites and previously unavailable resource information. The enhancements to the digital atlas will include new resource, demographic, regulatory, economic, and other information to allow analyses of economic factors for comparing and ranking geothermal resource sites in Utah for potential electric power development. New resource information includes temperature gradient and fluid chemistry data, which was previously proprietary. Economic analyses are based upon a project evaluation model to assess capital and operating expenses for a variety of geothermal powerplant configuration scenarios. A review of legal and institutional issues regarding geothermal development coupled with water development will also be included.

  11. Respiratory disease in Utah coal miners

    SciTech Connect

    Rom, W.N.; Kanner, R.E.; Renzetti, A.D. Jr.; Shigeoka, J.W.; Barkman, H.W.; Nichols, M.; Turner, W.A.; Coleman, M.; Wright, W.E.

    1981-04-01

    Two hundred forty-two Utah underground coal miners volunteered to participate in a respiratory disease study. They were an older group (mean, 56 years of age) and had spent a mean of 29 years in the coal-mining industry. The prevalence of chronic bronchitis was 57%, and that of coal worker's pneumoconiosis, 25%; only one worker had progressive massive fibrosis. Significant impairment of pulmonary function was found among those with a history of cigarette smoking. Chronic bronchitis or coal worker's pneumoconiosis among nonsmokers did not impair pulmonary function. There was a significant association among the nonsmokers between increasing exposure to coal dust and coal worker's pneumoconiosis, but not for changes in pulmonary function. Coal mine dust had a significant influence in causing the symptom complex of chronic cough and sputum production, and coal worker's pneumoconiosis.

  12. Respiratory disease in Utah coal miners

    SciTech Connect

    Rom, W.N.; Kanner, R.E.; Renzetti, A.D. Jr.; Shigeoka, J.W.; Barkman, H.W.; Nichols, M.; Turner, W.A.; Coleman, M.; Wright, W.E.

    1981-04-01

    Two hundred forty-two Utah underground coal miners volunteered to participate in a respiratory disease study. They were an older group (mean, 56 years of age) and had spent a mean of 29 years in the coal-mining industry. The prevalence of chronic bronchitis was 57%, and that of coal worker's pneumoconiosis, 25%; only one worker had progressive massive fibrosis. Significant impairment of pulmonary function was found among those with a history of cigarette smoking. Chronic bronchitis or coal worker's penumoconiosis among nonsmokers did not impair pulmonary function. There was a significant association among the nonsmokers between increasing exposure to coal dust and coal worker's pneumoconiosis, but not for changes in pulmonary function. Coal mine dust had a significant influence in causing the symptom complex of chronic cough and sputum production, and coal worker's pneumoconiosis.

  13. Yellow Canary uranium deposits, Daggett County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilmarth, Verl Richard

    1953-01-01

    The Yellow Canary uranium deposit is on the west side of Red Creek Canyon in the northern part of the Uinta Mountains, Daggett County, Utah. Two claims have been developed by means of an adit, three opencuts, and several hundred feet of bulldozer trenches. No uranium ore has been produced from this deposit. The deposit is in the pre-Cambrian Red Creek quartzite. This formation is composed of intercalated beds of quartzite, hornblendite, garnet schist, staurolite schist, and quartz-mica schist and is intruded by dioritic dikes. A thick unit of highly fractured white quartzite near the top of the formation contains tyuyamunite as coatings on fracture surfaces. The tyuyamunite is associated with carnotite, volborthite, iron oxides, azurite, malachite, brochantite, and hyalite. The uranium and vanadium minerals are probably alteration products of primary minerals. The uranium content of 15 samples from this property ranged from 0.000 to 0.57 percent.

  14. Assessment of geothermal resources at Newcastle, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blackett, Robert E.; Shubat, Michael A.; Chapman, David S.; Forster, Craig B.; Schlinger, Charles M.

    1989-01-01

    Integrated geology, geophysics, and geochemistry studies in the Newcastle area of southwest Utah are used to develop a conceptual geologic model of a blind, moderate-temperature hydrothermal system. Studies using 12 existing and 12 new, thermal gradient test holes, in addition to geologic mapping, gravity surveys, and other investigations have helped define the thermal regime. Preliminary results indicate that the up-flow region is located near the west-facing escarpment of an adjacent mountain range, probably related to the bounding range-front fault. Chemical geothermometers suggest equilibration temperatures ranging from 140??C to 170??C. The highest temperature recorded in the system is 130??C from an exploration well drilled by the Unocal Corporation.

  15. US hydropower resource assessment for Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Francfort, J.E.

    1993-12-01

    The Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the hydropower development potential in this country. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. The HES measures the potential hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a dBASE menu-driven software application that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report details the resource assessment results for the state of Utah.

  16. Infiltration of unconsumed irrigation water in Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brothers, William C.; Thiros, Susan A.

    1991-01-01

    The ground-water hydrology of Panguitch Valley and adjacent areas, south-central Utah, was studied during 1988-90. One objective of the study was to measure ground-water recharge from infiltration of unconsumed irrigation water. Water-level and soil-moisture data were used to estimate travel times for water moving down through the soil profile, and to compare quantities of water reaching the water table after application of flood and sprinkler irrigation. During this study, estimates of travel times from land surface to the water table ranged from 11 days in June 1989 to 2 days in September 1989. Estimates of irrigation water recharging the ground-water system ranged from 25 to 75 percent of the water applied to the flood-irrigated field. Virtually no recharge was apparent for the sprinkler-irrigated field.

  17. MAJOR PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY

    SciTech Connect

    Craig D. Morgan; Thomas C. Chidsey

    2003-11-01

    Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land-use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the first quarter of the second project year (July 1 through September 30, 2003). This work included (1) describing the Conventional Southern Uinta Basin Play, subplays, and outcrop reservoir analogs of the Uinta Green River Conventional Oil and Gas Assessment Unit (Eocene Green River Formation), and (2) technology transfer activities. The Conventional Oil and Gas Assessment Unit can be divided into plays having a dominantly southern sediment source (Conventional Southern Uinta Basin Play) and plays having a dominantly northern sediment source (Conventional Northern Uinta Basin Play). The Conventional Southern Uinta Basin Play is divided into six subplays: (1) conventional Uteland Butte interval, (2) conventional

  18. Environmental assessment overview, Davis Canyon site, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Davis Canyon site in Utah as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Davis Canyon site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Davis Canyon site is in the Paradox Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Davis Canyon site is not disqualified under the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Davis Canyon site as one of five sites suitable for characterization. 3 figs.

  19. Energy Efficient Buildings, Salt Lake County, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, Kimberly

    2012-04-30

    Executive Summary Salt Lake County's Solar Photovoltaic Project - an unprecedented public/private partnership Salt Lake County is pleased to announce the completion of its unprecedented solar photovoltaic (PV) installation on the Calvin R. Rampton Salt Palace Convention Center. This 1.65 MW installation will be one the largest solar roof top installations in the country and will more than double the current installed solar capacity in the state of Utah. Construction is complete and the system will be operational in May 2012. The County has accomplished this project using a Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) financing model. In a PPA model a third-party solar developer will finance, develop, own, operate, and maintain the solar array. Salt Lake County will lease its roof, and purchase the power from this third-party under a long-term Power Purchase Agreement contract. In fact, this will be one of the first projects in the state of Utah to take advantage of the recent (March 2010) legislation which makes PPA models possible for projects of this type. In addition to utilizing a PPA, this solar project will employ public and private capital, Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants (EECBG), and public/private subsidized bonds that are able to work together efficiently because of the recent stimulus bill. The project also makes use of recent changes to federal tax rules, and the recent re-awakening of private capital markets that make a significant public-private partnership possible. This is an extremely innovative project, and will mark the first time that all of these incentives (EECBG grants, Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds, New Markets tax credits, investment tax credits, public and private funds) have been packaged into one project. All of Salt Lake County's research documents and studies, agreements, and technical information is available to the public. In addition, the County has already shared a variety of information with the public through webinars

  20. Intraplate volcanism at the edges of the Colorado Plateau sustained by shear-driven upwelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballmer, M. D.; Conrad, C. P.; Smith, E. I.; Johnsen, R. L.

    2012-12-01

    amplified as soon as the pockets are intermittently trapped at the edge of a plateau, shuts off as they tunnel beneath the thick plateau's root, and is revived as they rise up on the opposite side. Our models predict that these two main melting stages on either side of the plateau evolve laterally for each individual pocket: they move obliquely to the direction of asthenospheric shear in a manner that depends on the geometry of the plateau. This behavior implies systematic geochemical trends of magmatism parallel to the edge of the plateau for pockets that contain multiple lithologies (e.g., pyroxenite in addition to peridotite). We compare these trends, as well as the predicted volumes and geographical patterns of volcanism, to those observed for Neogene basaltic volcanism around the edges of the Colorado Plateau. For example, geochemical trends along the western edge of the Colorado Plateau in southern Utah indicate an increasing lithospheric signature in magmatism towards the NE (i.e., in the direction of mantle flow). We conclude that SDU may indeed be relevant for relating sublithospheric topography, mantle flow, and mantle heterogeneity to the origin of intraplate volcanism in several continental areas of the world.

  1. Major Oil Plays In Utah And Vicinity

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Chidsey

    2007-12-31

    Utah oil fields have produced over 1.33 billion barrels (211 million m{sup 3}) of oil and hold 256 million barrels (40.7 million m{sup 3}) of proved reserves. The 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m3) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. However, in late 2005 oil production increased, due, in part, to the discovery of Covenant field in the central Utah Navajo Sandstone thrust belt ('Hingeline') play, and to increased development drilling in the central Uinta Basin, reversing the decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming can continue this new upward production trend. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios include descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; locations of major oil pipelines; identification and discussion of land-use constraints; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary recovery techniques for each play. The most prolific oil reservoir in the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province is the eolian, Jurassic Nugget Sandstone, having produced over 288 million barrels (46 million m{sup 3}) of oil and 5.1 trillion cubic feet (145 billion m{sup 3}) of gas. Traps form on discrete subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the depositionally heterogeneous Nugget is also extensively fractured. Hydrocarbons in Nugget reservoirs were generated from subthrust Cretaceous source rocks. The seals for the producing horizons are overlying argillaceous and gypsiferous beds in the

  2. Hydrology of Alkali Creek and Castle Valley Ridge coal-lease tracts, central Utah, and potential effects of coal mining

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seiler, R.L.; Baskin, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    The Alkali Creek coal-lease tract includes about 2,150 acres in the Book Cliffs coal field in central Utah, and the Castle Valley Ridge coal-lease tract includes about 3,360 acres in the Wasatch Plateau coal field, also in central Utah. Both the Alkali Creek and Castle Valley Ridge coal-lease tracts are near areas where coal is currently (1987) mined by underground methods from the Cretaceous Blackhawk Formation. The Alkali Creek and Castle Valley Ridge areas have intermittent streams in which flow after snowmelt runoff is locally sustained into midsummer by springflow. The only perennial stream is South Fork Corner Canyon Creek in the Castle Valley Ridge area. Peak flow in both areas generally is from snowmelt runoff; however, peak flow from thunderstorm runoff in the Alkali Creek area can exceed that from snowmelt runoff. Estimated annual source-area sediment yield was 0.5 acre-ft/sq mi in the Alkali Creek lease tract and it was 0.3 acre-ft/sq mi in the Castle Valley Ridge lease tract. Groundwater in the Alkali Creek area occurs in perched aquifers in the Flagstaff Limestone and in other formations above the coal-bearing Blackhawk Formation. The principal source of recharge to the aquifers is snowmelt on outcrops. Faults may be major conduits and control the movement of groundwater. Groundwater discharges at formation contacts, between zones of differing permeability within a formation, near faults and into mines. Water sampled from 13 springs in the Alkali Creek area contained dissolved solids at concentrations ranging from 273 to 5,210 mg/L. Water sampled from 17 springs in the Castle Valley Ridge area contained dissolved solids at concentrations ranging from 208 to 579 mg/L. The composition of water from a recently abandoned part of an active mine the Wasatch Plateau closely resembles that of water discharging from a nearby mine that has been abandoned for more than 30 years. Mining of the Alkali Creek and Castle Valley Ridge coal-lease tracts likely will

  3. University of Utah, Energy Commercialization Center

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, James

    2014-01-17

    During the Energy Commercialization Center’s (ECC) three years in operation, the only thing constant was change. The world of commercialization and cleantech evolved significantly during the time the ECC was formed and operating, including: the availability of cleantech funding lessoned, the growth of incubators and accelerators skyrocketed, the State of Utah created an office dedicated to energy development, the University of Utah was both praised and criticized for its success in commercialization, and the Federal government temporarily shut down. During the three-year grant there were three principle investigators on the grant, as well as three directors for the University’s Commercialization Office. Change can be hard for an organization,but as we instruct the companies we support, “Fail fast and fail often, because it is the fastest path to success.” Although there were some unanticipated challenges along the way, the local ecosystem is stronger because of the ECC’s efforts. Perhaps the greatest lesson learned was the importance of aligned incentives between key stakeholders in the commercialization process and the need for resources at the company and individual entrepreneur levels. The universities have systems and incentives to commercialize technologies, but creating value and companies generally rest with the individuals and entrepreneurs. Unfortunately the ECC was unable to create a viable mechanism to transfer the commercialization process that successfully aligned incentives and achieve a more effective ecosystem within the Rocky Mountain West. However, the ECC was successful in adding value to the individual ecosystems, and connecting national resources to regional and local needs. Regarding the ECC’s effectiveness in developing a cleantech commercialization ecosystem, initial inroads and relationships were established with key stakeholders. However, incentives, perceived or real competition, differences in commercialization processes, and

  4. New Exploration of Kerguelen Plateau Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vially, R.; Roest, W. R.; Loubrieu, B.; Courreges, E.; Lecomte, J.; Patriat, M.; Pierre, D.; Schaming, M.; Schmitz, J.

    2008-12-01

    France ratified the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea in 1996, and has since undertaken an ambitious program of bathymetric and seismic data acquisition (EXTRAPLAC Program) to support claims for the extension of the legal continental shelf, in accordance with Article 76 of this convention. For this purpose, three oceanographic surveys took place on board of the R/V Marion Dufresne II on the Kerguelen Plateau, in Southern Indian Ocean: MD137-Kergueplac1 (February 2004), MD150-Kergueplac2 (October 2005) and MD165-Kergueplac3 (January 2008), operated by the French Polar Institute. Thus, more than 20 000 km of multibeam bathymetric, magnetic and gravimetric profiles, and almost 6 000 km of seismic profiles where acquired during a total of 62 days of survey in the study area. Ifremer's "rapid seismic" system was used, comprised of 4 guns and a 24 trace digital streamer, operated at speeds up to 10 knots. In addition to its use for the Extraplac Program, the data set issued from these surveys gives the opportunity to improve our knowledge of the structure of the Kerguelen Plateau and more particularly of its complex margins. In this poster, we will show the high resolution bathymetry (200 m) data set, that allows us to specify the irregular morphology of the sea floor in the north Kerguelen Plateau, characterised by ridges and volcanoes chains, radial to the plateau, that intersect the oceanic basin on the NE edge of the Kerguelen Plateau. We will also show magnetic and gravity data, which help us to understand the setting up of the oceanic plateau and the kinematics reconstructions. The seismic profiles show that the acoustic basement of the plateau is not much tectonised, and displays a very smooth texture, clearly contrasting it from typical oceanic basement. Both along the edge of the plateau as in the abyssal plain, sediments have variable thicknesses. The sediments on the margin of the plateau are up to 1200 meters thick and display irregular

  5. Cluster growth modeling of plateau erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, Colin P.

    1994-01-01

    The pattern of erosion of a plateau along an escarpment may be modeled usng cluster growth techniques, recently popularized in models of drainage network evolution. If erosion on the scarp takes place in discrete events at rates subject to local substrate strength, the whole range of behavior is described by a combination of three cluster growth mechanisms: invasion percolation, Eden growth and diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA). These model the relative importance of preexisting substrate strength, background weathering, and seepage weathering and erosion respectively. The rate of seepage processes is determined by the efflux of groundwater at the plateau margin, which in turn is determined by the pressure field in the plateau aquifer. If this process acted alone, it would produce erosion patterns in the form of Laplacian fractals, with groundwater recharge from a distant source, or Poissionian fractals, with groundwater recharge uniform over the plateau. DLA is used to mimic the Laplacian or Poissonian potential field and the corresponding seepage growth process. The scaling structure of clusters grown by pure DLA, invasion percolation, or Eden growth is well known; this study presents a model which combines all three growth mechanisms for the first time. Mixed growth processes create clusters with different scaling properties and morphologies over distinct length scale ranges, and this is demonstrable in natural examples of plateau erosion.

  6. Biogeochemical and ecological impacts of livestock grazing in semi-arid southeastern Utah, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fernandez, D.P.; Neff, J.C.; Reynolds, R.L.

    2008-01-01

    Relatively few studies have examined the ecological and biogeochemical effects of livestock grazing in southeastern Utah. In this study, we evaluated how grazing has affected soil organic carbon and nitrogen to a depth of 50 cm in grasslands located in relict and actively-grazed sites in the Canyonlands physiographic section of the Colorado Plateau. We also evaluated differences in plant ground cover and the spatial distribution of soil resources. Results show that areas used by domestic livestock have 20% less plant cover and 100% less soil organic carbon and nitrogen compared to relict sites browsed by native ungulates. In actively grazed sites, domestic livestock grazing also appears to lead to clustered, rather than random, spatial distribution of soil resources. Magnetic susceptibility, a proxy for soil stability in this region, suggests that grazing increases soil erosion leading to an increase in the area of nutrient-depleted bare ground. Overall, these results, combined with previous studies in the region, suggest that livestock grazing affects both plant cover and soil fertility with potential long-term implications for the sustainability of grazing operations in this semi-arid landscape. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Origin and structural implications of upper Miocene rhyolites in Kingston Canyon, Piute County, Utah.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowley, P.D.; Steven, T.A.; Mehnert, H.H.

    1981-01-01

    Kingston Canyon is one of the deepest antecedent canyons in the High Plateaus subprovince of the Colorado Plateaus. Here the E Fork of the Sevier River flows westward transversely across the gently E tilted Sevier Plateau, which is developed on a basin-range fault block uplifted more than 1500m along the Sevier fault zone on the W. Upper Tertiary rhyolites, uncommon in SW Utah, occur both on the northern rim and in the bottom of Kingston Canyon. Those on the northern rim consist of lava flows and volcanic domes of the rhyolite of Forshea Mountain, dated by K/Ar methods at 7.6Ma old. Those in the bottom of Kingston Canyon, the rhyolite of Phonolite Hill, are especially well exposed and provide spectacular examples of a pyroclastic cone whose base is about at river level and a steep-sided volcanic dome emplaced into and through these deposits. The pyroclastic deposits, formerly 500 or more metres thick, consist of airfall, mudflow, and ash-flow(?) material of rhyolite and foreign lithic fragments especially olivine basalt. The dome consists of flow-banded, mostly devitrified rhyolite as much as 500m thick; it has been dated by K/Ar methods at 5.4Ma. In addition to the rhyolites, a dome and lava-flow complex, the rhyodacite of Dry Lake, occurs near the northern rim and is considered to postdate the rhyolite of Forshea Mountain and predate the rhyolite of Phonolite Hill. -from Authors

  8. Active salt deformation and rapid, transient incision along the Colorado River near Moab, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jochems, Andrew P.; Pederson, Joel L.

    2015-04-01

    In certain settings, erosion is driven by and balanced with tectonic uplift, but the evolution of many landscapes is dominated by other factors such as geologic substrate, drainage history, and transient incision. The Colorado Plateau is an example where these controls are debated and where salt deformation is hypothesized to be locally active and driven by differential unloading, although this is unconfirmed and unquantified in most places. We use luminescence-dated Colorado River terraces upstream of Moab, Utah, to quantify rates of salt-driven subsidence and uplift at the local scale. Active deformation in the study area is also supported by patterns of concavity along tributary drainages crossing salt structures. Subsidence in Professor Valley at a time-averaged rate of ~500 m/Myr (meters/million years) is superimposed upon rapid bedrock incision rates that increase from ~600 to ~900 m/Myr upstream through the study area. Such high rates are unexpected given the absence of sources of regional tectonic uplift here. Instead, the incision rate pattern across the greater area is consistent with a transient signal, perhaps still from ancient drainage integration through Grand Canyon far downstream, and then amplified by unloading at both the broad regional scale and at the local canyon scale.

  9. Comparing and interpreting three-dimensional fabric results, Henry Mountains porphyry, Utah, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsman, E.; Ketcham, R. A.

    2006-12-01

    We compare and interpret results of several rock fabric analysis techniques, as applied to samples of plagioclase-hornblende porphyry from a well-exposed small intrusion in the Henry Mountains of southern Utah, U.S.A. The fabric analysis techniques considered include field measurements of phenocryst shape-preferred orientation, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility, anisotropy of anhysteric remanent magnetization, high- resolution X-ray computed tomography, and three-dimensional shape-preferred orientation calculated from two- dimensional image analysis. The exceptional exposure of the studied intrusion allows us to confidently infer magma flow kinematics and to estimate the minimum amount of shear strain accommodated by the magma during emplacement. Our study therefore provides an important contrast to most studies, in which flow kinematics and magmatic strain are inferred from rock fabric in incompletely exposed intrusions. We find that observed fabric orientations often closely mimic local intrusion geometry, making it difficult to infer general magmatic flow kinematics from fabric near contacts. At each analysis location, orientation results from each technique generally agree but fabric shape and magnitude parameters vary widely between techniques. Fabric shape may therefore not provide useful information about flow kinematics (e.g. constrictional vs. flattening flow). Similarly, fabric magnitudes plateau at moderate values and do not provide a useful strain gauge. Because each technique provides unique information, it is invariably beneficial to use more than one fabric analysis technique. Failure to check results from one technique against those from another can results in misinterpretation of intrusion flow kinematics.

  10. Map showing distribution of bismuth and cadmium in stream-sediment samples, Richfield 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, William R.; Motooka, Jerry M.; McHugh, John B.

    1990-01-01

    This map of the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle shows the regional distribution of bismuth and cadimum in the less-than-0.180-mm (minus-80-mesh) fraction of stream sediments. It is part of a folio of maps of the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle, Utah, prepared under the Conterminuous United States Mineral Assessment Program. Other published geochemical maps in this folio are listed in the references (this publication). The Richfield quadrangle is located in west-central Utah and includes the eastern part of the Pioche-Marysvale igneous and mineral belt, which extends from the vicinity of Pioche in southeastern Nevada, east-northeastward for 155 miles into central Utah. The western two-thirds of the Richfield quadrangle is part of the Basin and Range province, whereas the eastern third is part of the High Plateaus of Utah, a subprovince of the Colorado Plateau. Bedrock in the northern part of the Richfield quadrangle consists predominantly of Late Proterozoic and Paleozoic sedimentary strata that were thrust eastward during the Sevier orogeny in Cretaceous time onto an autochthon of Mesozoic sedimentary rocks located in the eastern part of the quadrangle. The southern part of the quadrangle is largely underlain by Oligocene and younger volcanic rocks and related intrusions. Extensional tectonism in late Cenozoic time broke the bedrock terrain into a series of north-trending fault blocks; the uplifted mountain areas were eroded to various degrees and the resulting debris was deposited in adjacent basins. Most of the mineral deposits in the Pioche-Marysvale mineral belt were formed as a result of igneous activity in the middle and late Cenozoic time. A more complete description of the geology and a mineral-resource appraisal of the Richfield quadrangle appears in Steven and Morris (1984 and 1987). The regional sampling program was designed to define broad geochemical patterns and trends that can be utilized along with geological and geophysical data to assess the mineral

  11. Map showing distribution of barium in stream-sediment samples, Richfield 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, William R.; Motooka, Jerry M.; McHugh, John B.

    1990-01-01

    This map of the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle shows the regional distribution of barium in the less-than-0.180-mm (minus-80-mesh) fraction of stream sediments. It is part of a folio of maps of the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle, Utah, prepared under the Conterminuous United States Mineral Assessment Program. Other published geochemical maps in this folio are listed in the references (this publication). The Richfield quadrangle is located in west-central Utah and includes the eastern part of the Pioche-Marysvale igneous and mineral belt, which extends from the vicinity of Pioche in southeastern Nevada, east-northeastward for 155 miles into central Utah. The western two-thirds of the Richfield quadrangle is part of the Basin and Range province, whereas the eastern third is part of the High Plateaus of Utah, a subprovince of the Colorado Plateau. Bedrock in the northern part of the Richfield quadrangle consists predominantly of Late Proterozoic and Paleozoic sedimentary strata that were thrust eastward during the Sevier orogeny in Cretaceous time onto an autochthon of Mesozoic sedimentary rocks located in the eastern part of the quadrangle. The southern part of the quadrangle is largely underlain by Oligocene and younger volcanic rocks and related intrusions. Extensional tectonism in late Cenozoic time broke the bedrock terrain into a series of north-trending fault blocks; the uplifted mountain areas were eroded to various degrees and the resulting debris was deposited in adjacent basins. Most of the mineral deposits in the Pioche-Marysvale mineral belt were formed as a result of igneous activity in the middle and late Cenozoic time. A more complete description of the geology and a mineral-resource appraisal of the Richfield quadrangle appears in Steven and Morris (1984 and 1987). The regional sampling program was designed to define broad geochemical patterns and trends that can be utilized along with geological and geophysical data to assess the mineral

  12. 78 FR 23290 - Notice of Utah's Resource Advisory Council Conference Call Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-18

    ... Land Management's (BLM) Utah Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will host a conference call meeting. DATES: The Utah RAC will host a conference call meeting Thursday, May 16, 2013, from 10:00 a.m.-noon,...

  13. 77 FR 64825 - Notice of Utah's Recreation Resource Advisory Council Conference Call Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-23

    ... Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act, the Utah Recreation Resource Advisory Council (RecRAC) will host.... DATES: The Utah RecRAC will host a conference call meeting Monday, November 19, 2012, from 2:00...

  14. The Hikurangi Plateau: Tectonic Ricochet and Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, David; Moresi, Louis; Betts, Peter; Whittaker, Joanne

    2015-04-01

    80 million years between interactions with different subduction systems provided time for the Hikurangi Plateau and Pacific Ocean lithosphere to cool, densify and strengthen. Neogene subduction of the Hikurangi Plateau occurring orthogonal to its Cretaceous predecessor, provides a unique opportunity to explore how changes to the physical properties of oceanic lithosphere affect subduction dynamics. We used Underworld to build mechanically consistent collision models to understand the dynamics of the two Hikurangi collisions. The Hikurangi Plateau is a ~112 Ma, 15km thick oceanic plateau that has been entrained by subduction zones immediately preceding the final break-up of Eastern Gondwana and currently within the active Hikurangi Margin. We explore why attempted subduction of the plateau has resulted in vastly different dynamics on two separate occasions. Slab break-off occured during the collision with Gondwana, currently there is apparent subduction of the plateau underneath New Zealand. At ~100Ma the young, hot Hikurangi Plateau, positively buoyant with respect to the underlying mantle, impacted a Gondwana Margin under rapid extension after the subduction of an mid-ocean ridge 10-15Ma earlier. Modelling of plateaus within young oceanic crust indicates that subduction of the thickened crust was unlikely to occur. Frontal accretion of the plateau and accompanying slab break-off is expected to have occured rapidly after its arrival. The weak, young slab was susceptible to lateral propagation of the ~1500 km window opened by the collision, and break-off would have progressed along the subduction zone inhibiting the "step-back" of the trench seen in older plates. Slab break-off coincided with a world-wide reorganisation of plate velocites, and orogenic collapse along the Gondwana margin characterised by rapid extension and thinning of the over-riding continental plate from ~60 to 30km. Following extension, Zealandia migrated to the NW until the Miocene allowing the

  15. Compartment syndrome after tibial plateau fracture☆

    PubMed Central

    Pitta, Guilherme Benjamin Brandão; dos Santos, Thays Fernanda Avelino; dos Santos, Fernanda Thaysa Avelino; da Costa Filho, Edelson Moreira

    2014-01-01

    Fractures of the tibial plateau are relatively rare, representing around 1.2% of all fractures. The tibia, due to its subcutaneous location and poor muscle coverage, is exposed and suffers large numbers of traumas, not only fractures, but also crush injuries and severe bruising, among others, which at any given moment, could lead compartment syndrome in the patient. The case is reported of a 58-year-old patient who, following a tibial plateau fracture, presented compartment syndrome of the leg and was submitted to decompressive fasciotomy of the four right compartments. After osteosynthesis with internal fixation of the tibial plateau using an L-plate, the patient again developed compartment syndrome. PMID:26229779

  16. HANFORD SITE CENTRAL PLATEAU CLEANUP COMPLETION STRATEGY

    SciTech Connect

    BERGMAN TB

    2011-01-14

    Cleanup of the Hanford Site is a complex and challenging undertaking. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a comprehensive vision for completing Hanford's cleanup mission including transition to post-cleanup activities. This vision includes 3 principle components of cleanup: the {approx}200 square miles ofland adjacent to the Columbia River, known as the River Corridor; the 75 square miles of land in the center of the Hanford Site, where the majority of the reprocessing and waste management activities have occurred, known as the Central Plateau; and the stored reprocessing wastes in the Central Plateau, the Tank Wastes. Cleanup of the River Corridor is well underway and is progressing towards completion of most cleanup actions by 2015. Tank waste cleanup is progressing on a longer schedule due to the complexity of the mission, with construction of the largest nuclear construction project in the United States, the Waste Treatment Plant, over 50% complete. With the progress on the River Corridor and Tank Waste, it is time to place increased emphasis on moving forward with cleanup of the Central Plateau. Cleanup of the Hanford Site has been proceeding under a framework defmed in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). In early 2009, the DOE, the State of Washington Department of Ecology, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency signed an Agreement in Principle in which the parties recognized the need to develop a more comprehensive strategy for cleanup of the Central Plateau. DOE agreed to develop a Central Plateau Cleanup Completion Strategy as a starting point for discussions. This DOE Strategy was the basis for negotiations between the Parties, discussions with the State of Oregon, the Hanford Advisory Board, and other Stakeholder groups (including open public meetings), and consultation with the Tribal Nations. The change packages to incorporate the Central Plateau Cleanup Completion Strategy were signed by

  17. Tectonomagmatic Associations on the Central Andean Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Silva, S. L.; Viramonte, J. G.

    2012-12-01

    The Neogene evolution of the Central Andes is characterized by a strong association between plate convergence, mountain building and plateau formation, and magmatism. Plateau uplift by crustal shortening and thickening in the lower crust is broadly coincident with large scale silicic magmatism defined by the Neogene Central Andean ignimbrite province. Of particular interest here are the spatiotemporal correlations between silicic magmatism and tectonic evolution of the Altiplano-Puna plateau. Although magmatism is driven by the subduction-related flux from mantle to crust, the shift to "crustal" magmatism as indicated by elevated crustal isotopic indices after ~10Ma suggests a link between crustal thickening, plateau formation and silicic magmatism. In particular, elevated geotherms associated with crustal thickening and enhanced mantle flux associated with lithospheric delamination may have played a role in thermally preparing the Central Andean crust for enhanced silicic magma production during the extensive Neogene ignimbrite flare-up. Emplacement of these magmas in the upper crust throughout the Neogene may have fuelled a period of significant interaction between magmatism and tectonism on the plateau. With particular reference to the 21° to 24°S segment of the Central Andes, spatial and structural coincidence of calderas of the Altiplano Puna Volcanic Complex with the NW-SE striking Calama-Olacapata-El Toro fault zone suggests significant tectonomagmatic interaction. Location of calderas suggest that these regional faults focused magma intrusion and storage, while spatially and temporally correlated eruption pulses connote a tectonic control. Indeed, current thermomechanical models of magma chamber development and eruption triggering promote a role for external triggering of "perched" upper crustal magma chambers. This might have been achieved by melt-enhanced deformation, or alternatively, significant uplift (~1km) associated with the development of large

  18. Environmental assessment: Davis Canyon site, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Davis Canyon site in Utah as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Davis Canyon site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EA. The Davis Canyon site is in the Paradox Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considering for the first repository. This setting contains one other potentially acceptable site -- the Lavender Canyon site. Although the Lavender Canyon site is suitable for site characterization, the DOE has concluded that the Davis Canyon site is the preferred site in the Paradox Basin. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Davis Canyon site is not disqualified under the guidelines. Furthermore, the DOE has found that the site is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Davis Canyon site as one of five sites suitable for characterization.

  19. Human Rabies - Wyoming and Utah, 2015.

    PubMed

    Harrist, Alexia; Styczynski, Ashley; Wynn, DonRaphael; Ansari, Safdar; Hopkin, Justin; Rosado-Santos, Harry; Baker, JoDee; Nakashima, Allyn; Atkinson, Annette; Spencer, Melanie; Dean, Debbie; Teachout, Leslie; Mayer, Jeanmarie; Condori, Rene E; Orciari, Lillian; Wadhwa, Ashutosh; Ellison, James; Niezgoda, Michael; Petersen, Brett; Wallace, Ryan; Musgrave, Karl

    2016-01-01

    In September 2015, a Wyoming woman was admitted to a local hospital with a 5-day history of progressive weakness, ataxia, dysarthria, and dysphagia. Because of respiratory failure, she was transferred to a referral hospital in Utah, where she developed progressive encephalitis. On day 8 of hospitalization, the patient's family told clinicians they recalled that, 1 month before admission, the woman had found a bat on her neck upon waking, but had not sought medical care. The patient's husband subsequently had contacted county invasive species authorities about the incident, but he was not advised to seek health care for evaluation of his wife's risk for rabies. On October 2, CDC confirmed the patient was infected with a rabies virus variant that was enzootic to the silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans). The patient died on October 3. Public understanding of rabies risk from bat contact needs to be improved; cooperation among public health and other agencies can aid in referring persons with possible bat exposure for assessment of rabies risk. PMID:27253630

  20. Possible uranium mineralization, Mineral Mountains, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, W. Roger; McHugh, John B.; Ficklin, Walter H.

    1979-01-01

    The Mineral Mountains block in west-central Utah is a horst whose core stands structurally high relative to all nearby basin-and-range fault blocks. Rocks of the Mineral Mountains range from Precambrian to Quaternary in age, but mostly consist of Tertiary granitic rocks. The range lies with the Wah Wah-Tusher mineral belt. Lead, silver, gold, and tungsten have been mined commercially. During a geochemical survey conducted in the summer of 1978, 30 water samples and 29 stream-sediment samples were collected from the Mineral Mountains area. The interpretation of simple plots of uranium concentrations and the results of a Q-mode factor analysis indicate that potential exists for uranium mineral deposits within the Mineral Mountains. The most favorable areas are in the granitic pluton near its contacts with sedimentary and metamorphic rocks. The most likely source of the uranium anomalies is uraninite-bearing epigenic veins along faults and fractures within the pluton. Three hypothetical models are proposed to account for the uranium mineralization.

  1. Environmental assessment: Davis Canyon site, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Davis Canyon site in Utah as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high- level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Davis Canyon site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EA. The Davis Canyon site is in the Paradox Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. This setting contains one other potentially acceptable site -- the Lavender Canyon site. Although the Lavender Canyon site is suitable for site characterization, the DOE has concluded that the Davis Canyon site is the preferred site in the Paradox Basin. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Davis Canyon site is not disqualified under the guidelines. Furthermore, the DOE has found that the site is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Davis Canyon site as one of the five sites suitable for characterization.

  2. BIRDSEYE, NEPHI, AND SANTAQUIN ROADLESS AREAS, UTAH.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorensen, Martin L.; Korzeb, Stanley L.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a mineral-resource appraisal of the Birdseye, Nephi, And Santaquin Roadless Areas in Utah indicate several areas with probable or substantiated mineral-resource potential. The Eva mine in the Santaquin Roadless Area contains small, demonstrated resources of lead-zinc-silver ore. A probable resource potential for lead, zinc, and silver deposits exists in the area around the Eva mine, and elsewhere in the Birdseye, Nephi, and Santaquin Roadless Areas where Mississipian and Cambrian carbonate rocks occur. A substantiated potential for gypsum is recognized in the southwest corner of the Nephi Roadless Area and a probable resource potential in adjacent areas underlain by the Jurassic Arapien Shale. There are limestone resources for use in cement and smelter flux in the Nephi and Santaquin Roadless Areas, but similar limestone occurs abundantly outside the area. The potential for oil and gas resources cannot be assessed from available data. There are no indications of coal or geothermal resources in the roadless areas.

  3. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Escalante Quadrangle, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, F.; Campbell, J.A.; Franczyk, K.J.; Lupe, R.D.

    1982-09-01

    Seven areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits meet the minimum size and grade requirements of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation of the US Department of Energy in the Escalante 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ Quadrangle, South-Central Utah. Five areas identified in the Late Jurassic Salt Wash Member of the Morrison Formation are: the Henry Mountains mineral belt, and the Bitter Creek, Cat Pasture, Carcass Canyon, and Fiftymile Point areas. The evaluation of these areas was based on the presence of the following features: fluvial sandstones deposited by low-energy streams; actively subsiding synclines; paleostream transport directions approximately perpendicular to the trend of the paleofolds; presence of favorable gray lacustrine mudstone; and known uranium occurrences associated with the favorable gray mudstones. Four favorable areas identified in the Late Triassic Chinle Formation are the White Canyon-Elk Ridge, Dirty Devil-Orange Cliffs, Monument Valley, and the Greater Circle Cliffs subareas. These areas were identified as favorable on the basis of the sandstone-to-shale ratio for the Chinle Formation, and the geographic distribution of the Petrified Forest Member of the Chinle.

  4. Natural vibration dynamics of Rainbow Bridge, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. R.; Thorne, M. S.; Wood, J. R.; Doyle, S.; Stanfield, E.; White, B.

    2015-12-01

    We measured resonant frequencies of Rainbow Bridge, Utah, one of the world's longest rock spans, during a field experiment recording ambient vibration data. Measurements were generated over 20 hours on March 23-24, 2015 using two broadband three-component seismometers placed on the bridge, and compared to concurrent data from nearby reference stations 20 and 220 m distant. We identified seven distinct modes of vibration for Rainbow Bridge between 1 and 6 Hz. Data for each resonant frequency was then analyzed to determine the frequency-dependent polarization vector in an attempt to clarify mode shapes; e.g. the fundamental mode represents out-of-plane horizontal flexure. We compared experimental data to results of 3D numerical modal analysis, using a new photogrammetric model of Rainbow Bridge generated in this study imported into COMSOL Multiphysics. Results compare well with measured data for seven of the first eight modeled modes, matching vibrational frequencies and polarization orientations generally within 10%. Only predicted mode 6 was not explicitly apparent in our experimental data. Large site-to-reference spectral ratios resolved from experimental data indicate high amplification on the bridge as compared to nearby bedrock.

  5. Runoff conditions in Utah for water year 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cordova, Jeffrey T.; Angeroth, Cory E.

    2012-01-01

    In May 2011, the snowpack conditions in the mountains of central and northern Utah had emergency planners and water managers preparing for levels of runoff similar to the record year of 1983. The SNOwpack TELemetry (SNOTEL) records from the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) reported that the amount of water contained in the snowpack in May 2011 was greater than it was in either May of 1983 or 2005. Despite the above average snowpack,which lasted into the summer of 2011, runoff from snowmelt in 2011 did not create the widespread damage observed in 1983 and 2005. Cooler than normal temperatures resulted in slower snowmelt rates, which produced a prolonged and elevated runoff. Annual streamflow for water year 2011 was well above average, but few records of peak streamflow were set. The increase in water-surface elevation of Great Salt Lake was also above average. Ten streamgages in central and northern Utah, with records spanning greater than 20 years, have been selected to highlight the runoff conditions in Utah during water year 2011. Streamflow on the Duchesne River near Randlett, Utah, and on the Bear River near Utah-Wyoming state line is affected by several upstream diversions. These two streamgages were included in the analysis because their streamflow records have shown responses to spring snowmelt. The annual streamflow in all 10 of these streamgages was greater than 150 percent of average, and 3 streamgages set new records for total annual streamflow in water year 2011. One streamgage set a new peak streamflow record.

  6. Insufficiency fractures of the tibial plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Manco, L.G.; Schneider, R.; Pavlov, H.

    1983-06-01

    An insufficiency fracture of the tibial plateau may be the cause of knee pain in patients with osteoporosis. The diagnosis is usually not suspected until a bone scan is done, as initial radiographs are often negative or inconclusive and clinical findings are nonspecific and may simulate osteoarthritis or spontaneous osteonecrosis. In five of 165 patients referred for bone scans due to nontraumatic knee pain, a characteristic pattern of intense augmented uptake of radionuclide confined to the tibial plateau led to a presumptive diagnosis of insufficiency fracture, later confirmed on radiographs.

  7. 40 CFR 272.2251 - Utah State-Administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Utah § 272.2251 Utah State... Utah regulations cited in this paragraph are incorporated by reference as part of the hazardous waste... approved by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR Part...

  8. 40 CFR 272.2251 - Utah State-Administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Utah § 272.2251 Utah State... Utah regulations cited in this paragraph are incorporated by reference as part of the hazardous waste... approved by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR Part...

  9. 40 CFR 272.2251 - Utah State-Administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Utah § 272.2251 Utah State... Utah regulations cited in this paragraph are incorporated by reference as part of the hazardous waste... approved by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR Part...

  10. 40 CFR 272.2251 - Utah State-Administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Utah § 272.2251 Utah State... Utah regulations cited in this paragraph are incorporated by reference as part of the hazardous waste... approved by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR Part...

  11. 40 CFR 272.2251 - Utah State-Administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Utah § 272.2251 Utah State... Utah regulations cited in this paragraph are incorporated by reference as part of the hazardous waste... approved by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR Part...

  12. 33 CFR 110.127a - Lake Powell, Utah-Arizona.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lake Powell, Utah-Arizona. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.127a Lake Powell, Utah-Arizona. (a) Castel Butte, Utah. That portion of Lake Powell inclosed by the shore and a line connecting the...

  13. 33 CFR 110.127a - Lake Powell, Utah-Arizona.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lake Powell, Utah-Arizona. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.127a Lake Powell, Utah-Arizona. (a) Castel Butte, Utah. That portion of Lake Powell inclosed by the shore and a line connecting the...

  14. 33 CFR 110.127a - Lake Powell, Utah-Arizona.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lake Powell, Utah-Arizona. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.127a Lake Powell, Utah-Arizona. (a) Castel Butte, Utah. That portion of Lake Powell inclosed by the shore and a line connecting the...

  15. 33 CFR 110.127a - Lake Powell, Utah-Arizona.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lake Powell, Utah-Arizona. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.127a Lake Powell, Utah-Arizona. (a) Castel Butte, Utah. That portion of Lake Powell inclosed by the shore and a line connecting the...

  16. 77 FR 17565 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Transportation Improvements in Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-26

    ... West Project) in Draper, Salt Lake County in the State of Utah. These actions grant licenses, permits... in the State of Utah: The Bangerter 600 West Project in Draper, Salt Lake County, Utah, project... Railroad (UPRR) line at about 900 West in the city of Draper in Salt Lake County. The Selected...

  17. 75 FR 52551 - Notice of Utah's Resource Advisory Council (RAC) Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Utah's Resource Advisory Council (RAC) Meeting AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Utah's Resource Advisory Council (RAC) Meeting. SUMMARY: In... Advisory Council (RAC) will meet as indicated below. DATES: The Utah RAC will meet Monday, September...

  18. 33 CFR 110.127a - Lake Powell, Utah-Arizona.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lake Powell, Utah-Arizona. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.127a Lake Powell, Utah-Arizona. (a) Castel Butte, Utah. That portion of Lake Powell inclosed by the shore and a line connecting the...

  19. 78 FR 2434 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Natural History Museum of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-11

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Natural History Museum of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Natural History Museum of Utah has... may contact the Natural History Museum of Utah. Repatriation of the human remains and...

  20. 76 FR 28074 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Utah Museum of Natural History, Salt Lake City, UT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Utah Museum of Natural History, Salt Lake City, UT... inventory of human remains in the possession and control of the Utah Museum of Natural History, Salt Lake... remains was made by the Utah Museum of Natural History professional staff and a report sent...

  1. 78 FR 2430 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Natural History Museum of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-11

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Natural History Museum of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Natural History Museum of Utah has... may contact the Natural History Museum of Utah. Repatriation of the human remains and...

  2. 30 CFR 944.20 - Approval of Utah abandoned mine plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Approval of Utah abandoned mine plan. 944.20 Section 944.20 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Utah abandoned mine plan. The Utah Abandoned Mine Plan, as submitted on February 9, 1983, and...

  3. 30 CFR 944.20 - Approval of Utah abandoned mine plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Approval of Utah abandoned mine plan. 944.20 Section 944.20 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Utah abandoned mine plan. The Utah Abandoned Mine Plan, as submitted on February 9, 1983, and...

  4. 30 CFR 944.20 - Approval of Utah abandoned mine plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval of Utah abandoned mine plan. 944.20 Section 944.20 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Utah abandoned mine plan. The Utah Abandoned Mine Plan, as submitted on February 9, 1983, and...

  5. 30 CFR 944.20 - Approval of Utah abandoned mine plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Approval of Utah abandoned mine plan. 944.20 Section 944.20 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Utah abandoned mine plan. The Utah Abandoned Mine Plan, as submitted on February 9, 1983, and...

  6. Climatological characteristics and orographic enhancement of lake-effect precipitation over eastern Lake Ontario and the Tug Hill Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veals, Peter Gregory

    The Tug Hill Plateau of upstate New York rises approximately 500 m above Lake Ontario, observes frequent (often heavy) lake-effect snowfall, and is one of the snowiest regions in the eastern United States. This work presents a climatology of lake-effect precipitation created using data from the KTYX WSR-88D radar situated atop the plateau. Base reflectivity imagery was manually examined to identify lake-effect periods (LEPs) during each cool season (16 Sep--15 May) from 16 Sep 2001--15 May 2014. The most active months for lake effect in this region are December and January. There is a tendency for LEPs to begin within a few hours before and after sunset in the spring and fall, with no such diurnal signal observed in the winter. Correspondingly, lake effect is slightly more frequent at night than during the day. Overall, the diurnal variability is weaker than found over smaller bodies of water such as the Great Salt Lake of Utah. Classification of events by morphological type revealed that broad coverage and long-lake-axis-parallel (LLAP) account for ~72% and ~24% of lake-effect hours, respectively. The diurnal signal for broad coverage (LLAP) events was less (more) pronounced than for LEPs in general. The near-shore areas south and east of Lake Ontario receive the most frequent lake-effect precipitation. The Tug Hill Plateau produces a strong orographic signal, with an echo frequency maximum on the western (typically windward) slope. Data from cooperative observer (COOP) sites and the Snow Data Assimilation System (SNODAS) corroborate these radar-derived results. The `broadening' of high echo frequency over the Tug Hill Plateau, as well as the existence of the lake-orographic morphology, may point to inland/orographic intensification and generation of precipitation during some LEPs.

  7. Analysis of Neogene deformation between Beaver, Utah, and Barstow, California: suggestions for altering the extensional paradigm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, R. Ernest; Beard, L. Sue; Mankinen, Edward A.; Hillhouse, John W.

    2013-01-01

    For more than two decades, the paradigm of large-magnitude (~250 km), northwest-directed (~N70°W) Neogene extensional lengthening between the Colorado Plateau and Sierra Nevada at the approximate latitude of Las Vegas has remained largely unchallenged, as has the notion that the strain integrates with coeval strains in adjacent regions and with plate-boundary strain. The paradigm depends on poorly constrained interconnectedness of extreme-case lengthening estimated at scattered localities within the region. Here we evaluate the soundness of the inferred strain interconnectedness over an area reaching 600 km southwest from Beaver, Utah, to Barstow, California, and conclude that lengthening is overestimated in most areas and, even if the estimates are valid, lengthening is not interconnected in a way that allows for published versions of province-wide summations. We summarize Neogene strike slip in 13 areas distributed from central Utah to Lake Mead. In general, left-sense shear and associated structures define a broad zone of translation approximately parallel to the eastern boundary of the Basin and Range against the Colorado Plateau, a zone we refer to as the Hingeline shear zone. Areas of steep-axis rotation (ranging to 2500 km2) record N-S shortening rather than unevenly distributed lengthening. In most cases, the rotational shortening and extension-parallel folds and thrusts are coupled to, or absorb, strike slip, thus providing valuable insight into how the discontinuous strike-slip faults are simply parts of a broad zone of continuous strain. The discontinuous nature of strike slip and the complex mixture of extensional, contractional, and steep-axis rotational structures in the Hingeline shear zone are similar to those in the Walker Lane belt in the west part of the Basin and Range, and, together, the two record southward displacement of the central and northern Basin and Range relative to the adjacent Colorado Plateau. Understanding this province

  8. The Use 0f AVIRIS Imagery To Assess Clay Mineralogy And Debris-Flow Potential In Cataract Canyon, Utah: A Preliminary Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudd, Lawrence; Merenyi, Erzsebet

    2004-01-01

    Worldwide debris flows destroy property and take human lives every year (Costa, 1984). As a result of extensive property damage and loss of life there is a pressing need to go beyond just describing the nature and extent of debris flows as they occur. Most of the research into debris-flow initiation has centered on rainfall, slope angle, and existing debris-flow deposits (Costa and Wieczorek, 1987). The factor of source lithology has been recently addressed by studies in the sedimentary terranes of Grand Canyon (Webb et al., 1996; Griffiths et al., 1996) and on the Colorado Plateau as a whole.3 On the Colorado Plateau shales dominated by kaolinite and illite clays are significantly more likely to be recent producers of debris-flows than are shales in which smectite clays dominate.3 Establishing the location of shales and colluvial deposits containing kaolinite and illite clays in sedimentary terranes on the Colorado Plateau is essential to predicting where debris flows are likely to occur. AVIRIS imagery can be used to distinguish between types of clay minerals (Chabrillat et al., 2001), providing the basis for surface-materials maps. The ultimate product of this study will be a model that can be used to estimate the debris-flow hazard in Cataract Canyon, Utah. This model will be based on GIS overlay analysis of debris-flow initiation factor maps, including surface-materials maps derived from AVIRIS data.

  9. Holocene cold events on the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mischke, Steffen; Zhang, Chengjun

    2010-06-01

    A lake sediment core from the eastern Tibetan Plateau was investigated by multi-proxy geochemical, sedimentological and magnetic analyses and its age determined using 14C AMS dating in an approach to use short-lived climate periods for a spatial assessment of the Holocene climate history on the Tibetan Plateau. Six cold events were identified from the Lake Ximencuo record which occurred between 10.3-10.0, 7.9-7.4, 5.9-5.5, 4.2-2.8, 1.7-1.3 and 0.6-0.1 cal ka BP. A comparison with previously published Holocene records from lake and peat sections, ice cores and glacial remains of the Tibetan Plateau revealed that the cold event starting around 4.2 cal ka BP had the most significant and widespread impact on almost all of the examined sites. This cold event lasted about a millennium in the western and central part of the Tibetan Plateau and possibly several hundred years longer at some sites in its eastern realm. The cold event inferred between 7.9 and 7.4 cal ka BP from Lake Ximencuo was recorded at a number of sites on the eastern Tibetan Plateau too and probably corresponds to a cold event identified around 8.2 cal ka BP at the sites on the western and central Tibetan Plateau. The coincidence with the 8.2 ka event of the North Atlantic region implies that the latter exerted a significant environmental impact on the Tibetan Plateau too. The cold spell between 10.3 and 10.0 cal ka BP was recorded at some marginal sites of the Tibetan Plateau but had apparently a less significant environmental impact. The more irregular pattern of cold events between about 7 cal ka BP and the onset of the cold event after 4.2 cal ka BP might be related to the catchment-specific response of the lake sediment and peat accumulation to the termination of the Holocene 'climatic optimum' on the Tibetan Plateau. The final two cold events between 1.7 and 1.3 cal ka BP and in the last several hundred years representing the Little Ice Age are more widely seen on the Tibetan Plateau although they

  10. Dung, diet, and the paleoenvironment of the extinct shrub-ox ( Euceratherium collinum) on the Colorado Plateau, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kropf, Manny; Mead, Jim I.; Scott Anderson, R.

    2007-01-01

    Fossil remains of Euceratherium collinum (extinct shrub-ox) have been found throughout North America, including the Grand Canyon. Recent finds from the Escalante River Basin in southern Utah further extend the animal's range into the heart of the Colorado Plateau. E. collinum teeth and a metapodial condyle (foot bone) have been recovered in association with large distinctively shaped dung pellets, a morphology similar to a 'Hershey's Kiss' (HK), from a late Pleistocene dung layer in Bechan Cave. HK dung pellets have also been recovered from other alcoves in the Escalante River Basin including Willow and Fortymile canyons. Detailed analyses of the HK pellets confirmed them to be E. collinum and indicate a browser-type diet dominated (> 95%) by trees and shrubs: Artemisia tridentata (big sagebrush), Acacia sp. (acacia), Quercus (oak), and Chrysothamnus (rabbit brush). The retrieval of spring and fall pollen suggests E. collinum was a year-round resident in the Escalante River Basin.

  11. Hydrology of the Price River basin, Utah, with emphasis on selected coal-field areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waddell, Kidd M.; Dodge, J.E.; Darby, D.W.; Theobald, S.M.

    1986-01-01

    Data obtained during a hydrologic study of the Price River basin, Utah, are used to describe seasonal variations of flow of springs, relation between ground water and surface water, hydraulic properties of the ground-water reservoir, ground-water recharge and discharge, flood characteristics of streams, mineralogic composition and depositional rates of sediments, nutrient and inorganic loading in streams and Scofield Reservoir, and water budgets for selected basins. Additional study and monitoring are needed to detect possible hydrologic changes caused by coal mining. Much of the ground-water discharge from the Star Point Sandstone in the Mesaverde Group in the Wasatch Plateau occurs along faults. In the Book Cliffs, where faulting is less extensive, most of the ground-water discharge is from the Flagstaff Limestone. The Flagstaff Limestone is greatly diffusive, has a small storage coefficient, and contains water which is perched. Springs issuing from the Star Point Sandstone in the Mud Creek drainage (Wasatch Plateau) had recession indexes greater than 365 days per log cycle. Springs issuing at higher altitudes from the Colton Formation and the Flagstaff Limestone in the Soldier Creek area (Book Cliffs) have great seasonal variability, with recession indexes ranging from 24 to 115 days per log cycle. Estimated transmissivities in the Soldier Creek area ranged from 0.003 foot squared per day in the lower part of the Castlegate Sandstone to 0.07 foot squared per day in the Price River Formation. Seepage from the Star Point Sandstone is the major contributor to base flow of the stream in Eccles Canyon (Wasatch Plateau). Gains of as much as 230 gallons per minute occurred near a fault zone which crosses Eccles Canyon at the junction with South Fork Canyon. The potentiometric surface of water in the Blackhawk Formation in the Wasatch Plateau (Mud Creek drainage) and the Book Cliffs (Soldier Creek area) generally is above the coal zones, and dewatering will be necessary

  12. Geothermal assessment of a portion of the Escalante Valley, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Klauk, R.H.; Gourley, C.

    1983-12-01

    In February 1981, the Utah geological and Mineral Survey (UGMS) contracted with the Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the geothermal potential of an area proposed for a possible Missile Experimental (MX) operations base in the Escalante Valley region of Utah. Exploration techniques employed included a temperature survey, chemical analysis of springs and wells, and temperature-depth measurements in holes of opportunity. The highest water temperatures recorded in the area, with the exceptions of a 60/sup 0/C (140/sup 0/F) geothermal exploration hole and Thermo Hot Springs (42 to 78/sup 0/C or 108 to 172/sup 0/F), were 27 and 28/sup 0/C (81 and 82/sup 0/F) at two wells located northwest of Zane, Utah.

  13. Plateauing as an Occupational Phenomenon among Teachers and Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milstein, Mike M.

    The intent of this paper is to clarify the meaning of the "plateauing" of educators and its effects as a unique form of career stall. Initial definitions are followed by a summary of a presentation of and literature on plateauing and some preliminary findings about the extent of plateauing among educators and how they try to cope with it. Three…

  14. 78 FR 6832 - Notice of Mailing Address Change for the Utah State Office, Salt Lake City, UT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Mailing Address Change for the Utah State Office, Salt Lake City, UT... of Land Management (BLM), Utah State Office, in Salt Lake City, Utah, will be changing from P.O. Box 45155-0155 to 440 West 200 South, Suite 500, Salt Lake City, Utah 84101-1345. The proposed date will...

  15. Central Tibetan Meso-Tethyan oceanic plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai-Jun; Xia, Bin; Zhang, Yu-Xiu; Liu, Wei-Liang; Zeng, Lu; Li, Jian-Feng; Xu, Li-Feng

    2014-12-01

    We report the occurrences of the remnants of a Meso-Tethyan oceanic plateau, encompassing an area of ~ 2 × 105 km2 in central Tibet. The plateau remnants include large volumes of pillow basalt formed largely by emergent to subaerial eruption, minor ultramafic intrusives and cumulates, exotic blocks of limestone, radiolarian chert, graywacke, and shale. Isotopic and paleontological dating suggest two major plateau eruptive events at 193-173 Ma and at 128-104 Ma, respectively. The basalts are characterized by enrichment of incompatible elements and a wide range of Sr-Nd isotope composition (initial εNd from -3.71 to + 7.9, initial 87Sr/86Sr from 0.703927 to 0.707618). The trace element and Sr-Nd isotopic data suggest that these basalts are of affinity with those from the Kerguelen and Tethyan plumes, indicative of a plume mantle upwelling origin with involvement of continental material. The wholesale obduction of the Meso-Tethyan oceanic plateau, along with the dismembered normal oceanic crustal fragments, over the Tibetan continental crust could have given rise to perhaps 2 km elevation of central Tibet during the Late Cretaceous.

  16. Structure and sedimentary history of Exmouth Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Exon, N.F.; Williamson, P.E.; Von Rad, U.

    1989-03-01

    The large, deep-water Exmouth Plateau off northwestern Australia has been actively explored for petroleum, and a giant gas accumulation has been found. Data from industry and research institutions have established its geological framework. The plateau has a basement of continental crust that was thinned and extended in the Permian. This is overlain by 10 km of Phanerozoic strata, with an average of more than 3 km of Triassic, about 1 km of Jurassic/Cretaceous, and 0.5 km of Cenozoic strata. The plateau separated from other parts of the northern margin of Gondwanaland in the Mesozoic. Latest Triassic and Jurassic rifting formed large north-northeast-trending fault blocks; in the Oxfordian a microcontinent drifted away to the northwest, forming the plateau's northern margin. The other margins developed in the Neocomian as Greater India separated from Australia - the western margin by rifting and the southern by shearing. Terrigenous input declined greatly at that time. This old continental margin, with its relatively thin Mesozoic and Cenozoic sediments, was selected by the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) for comprehensive and fully integrated sedimentologic, biostratigraphic, paleobathymetric, and subsidence studies.

  17. A Standard Atmosphere of the Antarctic Plateau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahesh, Ashwin; Lubin, Dan

    2004-01-01

    Climate models often rely on standard atmospheres to represent various regions; these broadly capture the important physical and radiative characteristics of regional atmospheres, and become benchmarks for simulations by researchers. The high Antarctic plateau is a significant region of the earth for which such standard atmospheres are as yet unavailable. Moreover, representative profiles from atmospheres over other regions of the planet, including &om the northern high latitudes, are not comparable to the atmosphere over the Antarctic plateau, and are therefore only of limited value as substitutes in climate models. Using data from radiosondes, ozonesondes and satellites along with other observations from South Pole station, typical seasonal atmospheric profiles for the high plateau are compiled. Proper representations of rapidly changing ozone concentrations (during the ozone hole) and the effect of surface elevation on tropospheric temperatures are discussed. The differences between standard profiles developed here and the most similar standard atmosphere that already exists - namely, the Arctic Winter profile - suggest that these new profiles will be extremely useful to make accurate representations of the atmosphere over the high plateau.

  18. Mud volcanism at the Manihiki-Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorf, H. )

    1990-06-01

    In February 1987 a complex of mud volcanoes was discovered on the northeastern edge of the Manihiki-Plateau during a cruise of R/V MOANA WAVE. Forty out of about 100 cones coalesce to form an edifice about 25 km in diameter, 1,900 m high, rising from a plateau depth of 3,200 m. SeaMARC II side-scan images suggest radial fluid sediment flow from the center of this feature. Recent foraminiferal ooze was cored from a satellite cone. One dredge haul from the summit of the edifice recovered burrowed limestone with embedded Middle Eocene foraminifera. It suggests that parts of the sedimentary basement cover of the Manihiki Plateau have been mobilized together with pore fluids and moved upward. The causes of the movement as well as its mechanism, however, remain unknown because of the lack of direct measurements. There is a likelihood that overpressured methane, generated from organic carbon-rich sediments, acts as driving force. Therefore, BGR submitted a proposal to the Federal Ministry of Research and Technology (BMFT) to investigate the mud volcano complex and reference area with the most relevant outcropping sedimentary sequence of the northeastern Manihiki Plateau in detail. The preliminary results from these investigations carried out with R/V SONNE in spring of 1990 are presented.

  19. Stereo Pair, Salt Lake City, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The 2002 Winter Olympics are hosted by Salt Lake City at several venues within the city, in nearby cities, and within the adjacent Wasatch Mountains. This image pair provides a stereoscopic map view of north central Utah that includes all of these Olympic sites. In the south, next to Utah Lake, Provo hosts the ice hockey competition. In the north, northeast of the Great Salt Lake, Ogden hosts curling and the nearby Snowbasin ski area hosts the downhill events. In between, southeast of the Great Salt Lake, Salt Lake City hosts the Olympic Village and the various skating events. Further east, across the Wasatch Mountains, the Park City ski resort hosts the bobsled, ski jumping, and snowboarding events. The Winter Olympics are always hosted in mountainous terrain. This view shows the dramatic landscape that makes the Salt Lake City region a world-class center for winter sports.

    This stereoscopic image was generated by draping a Landsat satellite image over a Shuttle Radar Topography Mission digital elevation model. Two differing perspectives were then calculated, one for each eye. They can be seen in 3-D by viewing the left image with the right eye and the right image with the left eye (cross-eyed viewing or by downloading and printing the image pair and viewing them with a stereoscope. When stereoscopically merged, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of Earth's surface in its full three dimensions.

    Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyzing the large and growing Landsat image archive, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture

  20. An update of Utah State University's GAS activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Megill, L. R.

    1986-01-01

    The highlights of the Utah State University's participation in the space program are listed. Proposed experiments include: a study of the velocity of a bubble in water under the influence of a temperature gradient; reflight of an experiment on surface tension driven convective flow; surface waves in zero-G; crystallization in zero-G (vapor phase and liquid phase); bio gas generation; and penicillum growth; study of undamped oscillations in a vacuum and zero-G. The effect that spinoffs have had on the Utah State University were discussed.

  1. Environmental assessment: Davis Canyon site, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Davis Canyon site in Utah as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Davis Canyon site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EA. The Davis Canyon site is in the Paradox Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. This setting contains one other potentially acceptable site -- the Lavender Canyon site. Although the Lavender Canyon site is suitable for site characterization, the DOE has concluded that the Davis Canyon site is the preferred site in the Paradox Basin. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Davis Canyon site is not disqualified under the guidelines. Furthermore, the DOE has fond that the site is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Davis Canyon site as one of five sites suitable for characterization. 181 figs., 175 tabs.

  2. Chemical evolution of coal mine drainage in a non-acid producing environment, Wasatch Plateau, Utah, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, A. L.; Petersen, E. C.; Kravits, C.

    2000-09-01

    The causes and problems of coal mine drainage, particularly acid mine drainage, in the Eastern and Interior Coal Provinces of the United States are well documented. West of the Mississippi River, where coal mines account for about 45% of total US coal production and where acid mine drainage is rare, the chemical evolution of coal mine drainage is less well documented and understood. In this investigation, we have used solute and isotopic compositions of non-evolved inflow groundwater and evolved mine discharge water to quantify the chemical evolution of mine discharge water in a western underground coal mine. Water enters the mine from fractures and roof bolt holes, which intercept groundwater in the overlying rock. Carbon-14, and 3H data indicate that these waters recharged between 12,000 and 19,500 years ago. The TDS and solute compositions of roof drip waters are spatially zoned and TDS concentrations range from about 300 to 550 mg l -1. After the water encounters minerals and other substances in the mine, the chemical differences between various mine regions become more pronounced and the TDS of mine drainage water increases to about 850 mg l -1. The TDS of mine drainage is related to water-rock ratios. Mine drainage issuing from the older mined areas, where water-rock ratios are low, has the greatest TDS. Geochemical and isotopic mass balance calculations were performed to quantify chemical reactions in the mine, and to identify sources contributing to the TDS of mine drainage. Chemical reaction pathways evaluated include pyrite oxidation, dissolution of native and rock dust gypsum, dissolution of calcite and dolomite, precipitation of calcite, ion exchange, precipitation of iron hydroxide, and organic decomposition of mining machine emulsion fluid. Solute and isotopic mass transfer reaction calculations demonstrate that the oxidation of pyrite triggers a series of cascading in-mine chemical reactions that are the primary cause of the elevated TDS of mine drainage relative to the TDS of roof-drip water. Pyrite oxidation does not result in acid drainage because of the buffering effect of abundant carbonate minerals. Dissolution of gypsum, both native and gypsum dust previously used as rock dust, is also a significant contributor of SO 42-. Ion exchange of Ca 2+ on the sodium zeolite analcime, which occurs in the coal, accounts for an increase in Na + concentrations. Oxidation of fugitive longwall emulsion fluid produces abundant CO 2(g) some of which indirectly affect the TDS of mine drainage.

  3. Map showing distribution of cadmium and antimony in the nonmagnetic fraction of heavy-mineral concentrates, Richfield 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, William R.; Motooka, Jerry M.; McHugh, John B.

    1990-01-01

    This map of the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle, Utah, shows the regional distribution of cadmium and antimony in the nonmagnetic fraction of drainage-sediment samples. It is part of a folio of maps of the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle, Utah, prepared under the Conterminuous United States Mineral Assessment Program. Other published geochemical maps in this folio are listed in the references (this publication). The Richfield quadrangle is located in west-central Utah and includes the eastern part of the Pioche-Marysvale igneous and mineral belt, which extends from the vicinity of Pioche in southeastern Nevada, east-northeastward for 155 miles into central Utah. The western two-thirds of the Richfield quadrangle is part of the Basin and Range province, whereas the eastern third is part of the High Plateaus of Utah, a subprovince of the Colorado Plateau. Bedrock in the northern part of the Richfield quadrangle consists predominantly of Late Proterozoic and Paleozoic sedimentary strata that were thrust eastward during the Sevier orogeny in Cretaceous time onto an autochthon of Mesozoic sedimentary rocks located in the eastern part of the quadrangle. The southern part of the quadrangle is largely underlain by Oligocene and younger volcanic rocks and related intrusions. Extensional tectonism in late Cenozoic time broke the bedrock terrain into a series of north-trending fault blocks; the uplifted mountain areas were eroded to various degrees and the resulting debris was deposited in adjacent basins. Most of the mineral deposits in the Pioche-Marysvale mineral belt were formed as a result of igneous activity in the middle and late Cenozoic time. A more complete description of the geology and a mineral-resource appraisal of the Richfield quadrangle appears in Steven and Morris (1984 and 1987). The regional sampling program was designed to define broad geochemical patterns and trends that can be utilized along with geological and geophysical data to assess the mineral

  4. Shield volcanism and lithospheric structure beneath the Tharsis plateau, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blasius, K. R.; Cutts, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    The heights of four great shield volcanoes, when interpreted as reflecting the local hydrostatic head on a common source of upwelling magma, provide significant constraints on models of lithospheric structure beneath the Tharsis plateau. If Bouguer gravity anomalies are modeled in terms of a variable thickness crust, and a two-component (crust/mantle) earth-like structure is assumed for the Martian lithosphere, the derived model lithosphere beneath the Tharsis plateau has the following properties: (1) the upper low-density 'crustal' component is thickened beneath the Tharsis plateau; (2) the lower high-density 'mantle' component is thinned beneath the Tharsis plateau; and (3) there is a net gradient on the base of the Martian lithosphere directed downward away from beneath the summit of the Tharsis plateau. A long history of magmatic intrusion is hypothesized to have been the cause of the updoming of the Tharsis plateau and the maintenance of the plateau in a state of only partial compensation.

  5. Geothermal studies at the University of Utah Research Institute

    SciTech Connect

    1988-07-01

    The University of Utah Research Institute (WRI) is a self-supporting corporation organized in December 1972 under the Utah Non-Profit Corporation Association Act. Under its charter, the Institute is separate in its operations and receives no direct financial support from either the University of Utah or the State of Utah. The charter includes provisions for WRI to conduct both public and proprietary scientific work for governmental agencies, academic institutions, private industry, and individuals. WRI is composed of five divisions, shown in Figure 1: the Earth Science Laboratory (ESL), the Environmental Studies Laboratory (EVSL), the Center for Remote Sensing and Cartography (CRSC), the Engineering Technology Laboratory (ETL) and the Atmospheric Physics Laboratory (APL). The Earth Science Laboratory has a staff of geologists, geochemists and geophysicists who have a broad range of experience in geothermal research and field projects as well as in mineral and petroleum exploration. The Environmental Studies Laboratory offers a variety of technical services and research capabilities in the areas of air quality and visibility, acid precipitation, surface and groundwater contamination, and environmentally caused stress in vegetation. The Center for Remote Sensing and Cartography offers applied research and services with a full range of remote sensing and mapping capability, including satellite and airborne imagery processing and interpretation. The Engineering Technology Laboratory is currently studying the interaction of the human body with electromagnetic radiation. The Atmospheric Physics Laboratory is developing hygroscopic droplet growth theory and orographic seeding models for dispersal of fog.

  6. MILLARD COUNTY, UTAH, DRINKING WATER ARSENIC COHORT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assembly of the cohort is based on historic membership records of members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (LDS) in an area of Millard County, Utah, which is located in the central western part of the state. Personal information including name, birth date, town ...

  7. MILLARD COUNTY, UTAH DRINKING WATER ARSENIC COHORT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cohort members: Assembly of the cohort is based on historic membership records of members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (LDS) in an area of Millard County, Utah which is located in the central western part of the state. Personal information including name, bi...

  8. Information Profiles of Indian Reservations in Arizona, Nevada, and Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Phoenix, AZ.

    Based on information provided by Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Agency Offices and by the Indian Health Service, this publication provides profiles of 46 Indian reservations located in Arizona, Nevada, and Utah. These profiles include data on reservations that are: (1) located partially or totally in the adjoining States of Oregon, California,…

  9. 76 FR 10043 - Utah; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-23

    ... of Response and Recovery, Federal Emergency Management Agency, 500 C Street, SW., Washington, DC... of assistance may be added after the State has adopted an approved Standard State Mitigation Plan... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Utah; Major Disaster and Related Determinations...

  10. DRINKING WATER ARSENIC IN UTAH: A COHORT MORTALITY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The association of drinking water arsenic and mortality outcome was investigated in a cohort of residents from Millard County, Utah. Median drinking water arsenic concentrations for selected study towns ranged from 14 to 166 ppb and were from public and private samples collected ...

  11. Utah Migrant Education Annual Summer Evaluation Report, 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    Basic educational statistics, data on academic gains, and summaries of program observations are included in this evaluation of Utah's Migrant Education programs. The overview notes that 11 districts of a possible 40 in the state participated in the program in 1986, with 10 summer-only and 1 year-round program. Background information explains the…

  12. VIEW FROM MAIN ENTRANCE ROAD SWITCHBACKS FACING EAST. UTAH HIGHWAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM MAIN ENTRANCE ROAD SWITCHBACKS FACING EAST. UTAH HIGHWAY 191 VISIBLE AT RIGHT, PARK MAINTENANCE FACILITY IN FOREGROUND - Arches National Park Main Entrance Road, Beginning at U.S. Highway 191, approximately 6 miles north of Moab, Moab, Grand County, UT

  13. 3. VIEW FROM MAIN ENTRANCE ROAD SWITCHBACKS FACING EAST. UTAH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW FROM MAIN ENTRANCE ROAD SWITCHBACKS FACING EAST. UTAH HIGHWAY 191 VISIBLE AT RIGHT, PARK MAINTENANCE FACILITY IN FOREGROUND. - Arches National Park Main Entrance Road, Beginning at U.S. Highway 191, approximately 6 miles north of Moab, Moab, Grand County, UT

  14. IMPROVING THE PROFICIENCY OF MECHANICAL ACTIVITIES PERFORMED BY UTAH'S AGRICULTURALISTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JARRETT, VON H.

    THE MAJOR PURPOSES OF THIS STUDY WERE TO--(1) IMPROVE THE CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL MECHANICS FOR THE PREPARATION OF VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE TEACHERS AT UTAH STATE UNIVERSITY, (2) SERVE AS A GUIDE IN CHANGING AND DEVELOPING FUTURE COURSES IN AGRICULTURAL MECHANICS FOR ALL-DAY STUDENTS, (3) DISCOVER THE NEEDS FOR INSERVICE TRAINING PROGRAMS, AND…

  15. Automated Authority Control at the Genealogical Society of Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clement, Charles R.

    This paper describes the development of an automated authority control system for the Genealogical Society of Utah, which has large holdings of microfilmed records from many nations, including civil registration, parish registers, local records, and census records. The key function of the library is the identification of people. From the…

  16. A Look at Early Language Learning in Utah

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Von Houton, Jacque Bott

    2013-01-01

    The state of Utah is leading the nation in a surge of new elementary language immersion programs. Their unprecedented growth of programs, over a four-year span, has been both intentional and systemic, taking advantage of a supportive base and promoting language learning as a way to increase economic benefits for the state. While math and science…

  17. 75 FR 2154 - Central Utah Project Completion Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-14

    ... Central Utah Project Completion Act AGENCY: Department of the Interior, Office of the Assistant Secretary... County Water Efficiency Project Recycled Water Project. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 102(2)(c) of the... Water Conservancy District are evaluating the impacts of the proposed project. This project...

  18. 75 FR 30421 - Central Utah Project Completion Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-01

    ... Central Utah Project Completion Act AGENCY: Department of the Interior, Office of the Assistant Secretary... with the Environmental Assessment for Wasatch County Water Efficiency Project Recycled Water Project... Environmental Assessment (EA) for the Wasatch County Water Efficiency Project Recycled Water Project....

  19. 75 FR 8393 - Central Utah Project Completion Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... Central Utah Project Completion Act AGENCY: Department of the Interior, Office of the Assistant Secretary... with the Environmental Assessment for the East Juab Water Efficiency Project--Phase II, Juab County... the Final Environmental Assessment (EA) for the East Juab Water Efficiency Project--Phase II,...

  20. Parental Attitudes Regarding School-Based Sexuality Education in Utah

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steadman, Mindy; Crookston, Benjamin; Page, Randy; Hall, Cougar

    2014-01-01

    Sexuality education programs can be broadly categorized as either risk-avoidance or risk-reduction approaches. Health educators in Utah public schools must teach a state mandated risk-avoidance curriculum which prohibits the advocacy or encouragement of contraception. Multiple national surveys indicate that parents prefer a risk-reduction approach…

  1. Utah: The Quest for Service and Resource Equity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Chip, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    Includes three reports that describe how Utah's government, libraries, and educational institutions at all levels are becoming more effective through the use of computer and telecommunications technology. Highlights include public library connectivity; public school networks that provide Internet access; and higher education technology and…

  2. Logging utilization: Utah, 1993. Forest Service resource bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    McLain, W.H.

    1997-05-01

    The report includes the results of a study of timber harvesting operations in Utah to derive factors used to estimate logging residue, growing-stock and sawtimber removals, diameter class distributions of harvests, and board-foot and cubic-foot conversions.

  3. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment for Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    This report presents existing workforce levels, training programs and career potentials and develops staffing level projections (1976-1982) based on available information for the State of Utah. The study concerns itself with the environmental pollution control areas of air, noise, potable water, pesticides, radiation, solid waste, wastewater, and…

  4. 77 FR 68801 - Utah; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-16

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Utah; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of the Presidential..., Disaster Legal Services; 97.034, Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA); 97.046, Fire Management...

  5. Information Profiles of Indian Reservations in Arizona, Nevada, & Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Phoenix, AZ.

    Based on information provided by Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Agency Offices and by the Indian Health Service, this publication provides profiles of 45 Indian reservations located in Arizona, Nevada, and Utah. These profiles include data on reservations located partially or totally in the adjoining states of Oregon, Idaho, California, and New…

  6. UTAH MANPOWER DEVELOPMENT AND TRAINING ACT (MDTA) SCHOOLS ASSESSMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GADDIS, G. WARREN

    BECAUSE LITTLE RELATED EXPERIENCE WAS AVAILABLE UPON WHICH TO FABRICATE THE MOST EFFICIENT PROGRAMS OF THE TWO FIRST MANPOWER DEVELOPMENT AND TRAINING ACT (MDTA) SPONSORED SCHOOLS OPENED IN UTAH IN 1965, THIS STUDY PROPOSED TO ASSESS THE PROGRAMS TO DETERMINE SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES, AND TO MAKE A SUBJECTIVE EVALUATION OF THE CURRICULAR STRENGTHS…

  7. Salary Schedule Information on Utah School Districts, 1982-83.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    This bulletin presents data on 1982-83 salary schedules for teachers and classified employees as furnished by Utah's 40 school districts. The salary schedules are presented for each district in tabular form and are broken down by job classifications and by step increments within those classifications. Formulas for calculating administrators'…

  8. 78 FR 2424 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-11

    ... November 7, 2005, are subject to processing costs on a case by case basis (43 CFR 3000.10(d)(1), (70 FR 58872, October 7, 2005). The processing cost rules implemented for coal LBAs at 43 CFR 3473.2(f) (70 FR... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Utah AGENCY: Bureau of Land...

  9. 76 FR 63951 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-14

    ... November 7, 2005, are subject to cost recovery on a case-by-case basis (See 43 CFR 3000.10(d)(1), 70 FR... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Utah AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of competitive coal lease sale. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that that...

  10. Utah Migrant Education Annual Summer Evaluation Report, 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, James R.; And Others

    In 1987 Utah's migrant education program provided educational services to 744 K-12 students in summer programs at 11 locations. Wide Range Achievement Tests (WRAT) pretests and posttests provide placement information and a measurement of achievement in the areas of reading, spelling, and arithmetic. Results indicate improvement in all areas, but…

  11. Utah System of Higher Education Data Book, 2002-2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah System of Higher Education, Salt Lake City.

    This report provides detailed statistical data on the Utah System of Higher Education (USHE), which includes 2 major research universities, 2 metropolitan/regional universities, 2 state colleges offering 4-year degrees, and 5 community colleges. Preliminary information includes a description of the USHE, a list of organization names, a list of…

  12. Utah Adult Education Services. Adult Education Report 1968-69.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Board of Education, Salt Lake City.

    Major purposes for the preparation of this report on public school adult education in Utah were: to provide the public with a description of achievements, trends, and needs, and with meaningful cost accounting information; to make comparisons and analyses of adult education by program, school district, and year; and to provide the adult education…

  13. A Schoolmarm All My Life: Personal Narratives from Frontier Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinkead, Joyce, Ed.

    This book presents edited versions of the personal narratives of 24 Mormon women who taught school in frontier Utah. Drawn primarily from the archives of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, the accounts detail the women's lives as Mormons, as pioneers, and as teachers and have been edited to focus on the education of women,…

  14. BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF UTAH VALLEY PARTICLES: A REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Utah Valley provided a unique opportunity to evaluate the health effects of particulate matter (PM) in humans. The area has had intermittently high particle levels with the principal point source being a steel mill. Due to a labor dispute, the mill was shut down. The closu...

  15. Tree ring records reconstruct streamflow variability in Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2014-02-01

    People in northern Utah, including Salt Lake City, depend on water stored as winter snow and delivered by mountain streams to populated areas. Climate models predict that in the near future, warmer temperatures will lead to a decrease in winter snow and streamflow in mountain streams, possibly leading to water shortages for the region.

  16. Higher Education Accounting Manual. Utah Coordinating Council of Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Coordinating Council of Higher Education, Salt Lake City.

    Recognition of a critical need for accurate and detailed information to refine the process of budgeting funds for higher education in Utah led to the preparation of this accounting manual for universities and colleges in the state. The manual presents guidelines for the uniform accounting and reporting of financial and statistical data, and is…

  17. Pre-K Standards (Guidelines): Utah State Office of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    This document presents standards created for parents, preschool teachers, and child care providers as they endeavor to develop the best learning environment for the 3- and 4-year-old children in Utah. The document is organized in six sections. Section 1 defines the elements of a positive learning environment related to the unique nature of each…

  18. Cataloging and Inventorying Instructional Materials in Utah Schools. Sixth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    This handbook is designed to assist Utah schools in cataloging instructional materials. It is recommended that it be used in all local school and district media programs. This sixth edition attempts to simplify cataloging while retaining the basic elements needed for locating materials. Following a brief introduction, the handbook is divided into…

  19. Status of Teacher Personnel in Utah, 1982-83.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Board of Education, Salt Lake City.

    This report, one of a series of studies of the supply of teachers, the demand for teachers, and the status of currently active teachers provides information on the status of teacher personnel in Utah: (1) total number of professional personnel; (2) ethnic and racial background; (3) certification and training; (4) professional experience; (5) age…

  20. Using UTAH PILOT To Teach Basic DIALOG Searching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Kathryn

    The popularity of DIALOG database searching causes problems when requestors do not understand how the service operates or how to fill out a search request. This report describes the implementation of a computer-aided instructional (CAI) program, which was developed using the UTAH PILOT programming language, to convey basic information about DIALOG…

  1. Education in Utah: A Call to Action. Addendum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Board of Education, Salt Lake City.

    Clarifications to recommendations made in the Utah Education Reform Committee report, "A Call to Action," are presented in this addendum. Earlier recommendations relating to teachers are revised and clarified and new ones relating to class size, teachers' duties, instructional materials, and the student-parent-school relationship are added.…

  2. Campylobacter jejuni Infections Associated with Raw Milk Consumption - Utah, 2014.

    PubMed

    Davis, Kenneth R; Dunn, Angela C; Burnett, Cindy; McCullough, Laine; Dimond, Melissa; Wagner, Jenni; Smith, Lori; Carter, Amy; Willardson, Sarah; Nakashima, Allyn K

    2016-01-01

    In May 2014, the Utah Public Health Laboratory (UPHL) notified the Utah Department of Health (UDOH) of specimens from three patients infected with Campylobacter jejuni yielding indistinguishable pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns. All three patients had consumed raw (unpasteurized and nonhomogenized) milk from dairy A. In Utah, raw milk sales are legal from farm to consumer with a sales permit from the Utah Department of Agriculture and Food (UDAF). Raw milk dairies are required to submit monthly milk samples to UDAF for somatic cell and coliform counts, both of which are indicators of raw milk contamination. Before this cluster's identification, dairy A's routine test results were within acceptable levels (<400,000 somatic cells/mL and <10 coliform colony forming units/mL). Subsequent enhanced testing procedures recovered C. jejuni, a fastidious organism, in dairy A raw milk; the isolate matched the cluster pattern. UDAF suspended dairy A's raw milk permit during August 4-October 1, and reinstated the permit when follow-up cultures were negative. Additional cases of C. jejuni infection were identified in October, and UDAF permanently revoked dairy A's permit to sell raw milk on December 1. During May 9-November 6, 2014, a total of 99 cases of C. jejuni infection were identified. Routine somatic cell and coliform counts of raw milk do not ensure its safety. Consumers should be educated that raw milk might be unsafe even if it meets routine testing standards. PMID:27031585

  3. Deployment of a Pair of 3 M telescopes in Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Finnegan, G.; Adams, B.; Butler, K.; Cardoza, J.; Colin, P.; Hui, C. M.; Kieda, D.; Kirkwood, D.; Kress, D.; Kress, M.; LeBohec, S.; McGuire, C.; Newbold, M.; Nunez, P.; Pham, K.

    2008-12-24

    Two 3 m telescopes are being installed in Grantsville Utah. They are intended for the testing of various approaches to the implementation of intensity interferometry using Cherenkov Telescopes in large arrays as receivers as well as for the testing of novel technology cameras and electronics for ground based gamma-ray astronomy.

  4. Homeless Children and Youth in Utah. 1992 Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    A study was done of the numbers and educational status of homeless children in the state of Utah in 1992. A survey was conducted using data provided by 31 shelters statewide and included children and youth who were provided shelter at any time during the year. The total count included 4,424 homeless children and youth in 1992. The largest…

  5. Homeless Children and Youth in Utah. 1991 Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    A study was done of the numbers and educational status of homeless children in the state of Utah in 1991. A survey was conducted using data provided by 31 shelters statewide and included children and youth who were provided shelter at any time during the year. The total count of 4,894 homeless children and youth, when corrected for general…

  6. Lead Toxicity and Iron Deficiency in Utah Migrant Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratcliffe, Stephen D.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Determines the frequency of presumptive iron deficiency and lead toxicity in 198 Utah migrant children, aged 9-72 months. There were no confirmed cases of lead toxicity. Thirteen percent of all children tested, and 30 percent of those aged 9-23 months, were iron deficient. Hematocrit determination is an insensitive screen for iron deficiency.…

  7. Salt Lake City, Utah, Winter 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The 2002 Winter Olympics are hosted by Salt Lake City at several venues within the city, in nearby cities, and within the adjacent Wasatch Mountains. This simulated natural color image presents a snowy, winter view of north central Utah that includes all of the Olympic sites. The image extends from Ogden in the north, to Provo in the south; and includes the snow-capped Wasatch Mountains and the eastern part of the Great Salt Lake.

    This image was acquired on February 8, 2001 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, along-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal

  8. PLATEAUING COSMIC RAY DETECTORS TO ACHIEVE OPTIMUM OPERATING VOLTAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Knoff, E.N.; Peterson, R.S.

    2008-01-01

    Through QuarkNet, students across the country have access to cosmic ray detectors in their high school classrooms. These detectors operate using a scintillator material and a photomultiplier tube (PMT). A data acquisition (DAQ) board counts cosmic ray hits from the counters. Through an online e-Lab, students can analyze and share their data. In order to collect viable data, the PMTs should operate at their plateau voltages. In these plateau ranges, the number of counts per minute remains relatively constant with small changes in PMT voltage. We sought to plateau the counters in the test array and to clarify the plateauing procedure itself. In order to most effectively plateau the counters, the counters should be stacked and programmed to record the number of coincident hits as well as their singles rates. We also changed the threshold value that a signal must exceed in order to record a hit and replateaued the counters. For counter 1, counter 2, and counter 3, we found plateau voltages around 1V. The singles rate plateau was very small, while the coincidence plateau was very long. The plateau voltages corresponded to a singles rate of 700–850 counts per minute. We found very little effect of changing the threshold voltages. Our chosen plateau voltages produced good performance studies on the e-Lab. Keeping in mind the nature of the experiments conducted by the high school students, we recommend a streamlined plateauing process. Because changing the threshold did not drastically affect the plateau voltage or the performance study, students should choose a threshold value, construct plateau graphs, and analyze their data using a performance study. Even if the counters operate slightly off their plateau voltage, they should deliver good performance studies and return reliable results.

  9. Electron transport fluxes in potato plateau regime

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K.C.; Hazeltine, R.D.

    1997-12-01

    Electron transport fluxes in the potato plateau regime are calculated from the solutions of the drift kinetic equation and fluid equations. It is found that the bootstrap current density remains finite in the region close to the magnetic axis, although it decreases with increasing collision frequency. This finite amount of the bootstrap current in the relatively collisional regime is important in modeling tokamak startup with 100{percent} bootstrap current. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. A Study of the Utah Public School Finance System: Findings and Recommendations of the Utah School Finance Task Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    Equity effects of program growth and diversification on the Utah public education finance system are examined. The degree to which student and taxpayer equity are achieved by district formulas of the Minimum School Program are assessed by analysis of school-related taxation and spending over time, current distribution patterns of state support,…

  11. Measures of Child Well-Being in Utah, 2001. A Pledge to Our Children. Utah KIDS COUNT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haven, Terry, Ed.

    This KIDS COUNT report details statewide trends in the well-being of Utah's children. The statistical portrait is based on 26 indicators of children's well-being: (1) prenatal care; (2) low birth weight infants; (3) infant mortality; (4) child injury deaths; (5) unintentional injuries; (6) untreated tooth decay; (7) immunization rates; (8) suicide…

  12. Measures of Child Well-Being in Utah, 2002: Counting the Kids Who Count on Us. Utah KIDS COUNT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haven, Terry, Ed.

    This Kids Count report details statewide trends in the well-being of Utah's children. The statistical portrait is based on 29 indicators of children's well-being in five areas: (1) child health and safety (prenatal care, low birthweight, infant mortality, child injury deaths, injury-related hospital discharges, child abuse, childhood…

  13. Measures of Child Well-Being in Utah, 2003: Counting on a Better Future for Utah's Kids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haven, Terry, Ed.

    This Kids Count report examines statewide trends in the well-being of Utah's children. The statistical portrait is based on 28 indicators of children's well-being in five areas: (1) child health (prenatal care, low birth-weight births, infant mortality, child injury deaths, injury-related hospital discharges, child abuse, childhood immunizations,…

  14. Freshwater Biogeography and Limnological Evolution of the Tibetan Plateau - Insights from a Plateau-Wide Distributed Gastropod Taxon (Radix spp.)

    PubMed Central

    von Oheimb, Parm Viktor; Albrecht, Christian; Riedel, Frank; Du, Lina; Yang, Junxing; Aldridge, David C.; Bößneck, Ulrich; Zhang, Hucai; Wilke, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Background The Tibetan Plateau is not only the highest and largest plateau on earth; it is also home to numerous freshwater lakes potentially harbouring endemic faunal elements. As it remains largely unknown whether these lakes have continuously existed during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), questions arise as to whether taxa have been able to exist on the plateau since before the latest Pleistocene, from where and how often the plateau was colonized, and by which mechanisms organisms conquered remote high altitude lentic freshwater systems. In this study, species of the plateau-wide distributed freshwater gastropod genus Radix are used to answer these biogeographical questions. Methodology/Principal Findings Based on a broad spatial sampling of Radix spp. on the Tibetan Plateau, and phylogenetic analyses of mtDNA sequence data, three probably endemic and one widespread major Radix clade could be identified on the plateau. Two of the endemic clades show a remarkably high genetic diversity, indicating a relatively great phylogenetic age. Phylogeographical analyses of individuals belonging to the most widely distributed clade indicate that intra-plateau distribution cannot be explained by drainage-related dispersal alone. Conclusions/Significance Our study reveals that Radix spp. persisted throughout the LGM on the Tibetan Plateau. Therefore, we assume the continuous existence of suitable water bodies during that time. The extant Radix diversity on the plateau might have been caused by multiple colonization events combined with a relatively long intra-plateau evolution. At least one colonization event has a Palaearctic origin. In contrast to freshwater fishes, passive dispersal, probably by water birds, might be an important mechanism for conquering remote areas on the plateau. Patterns found in Radix spp. are shared with some terrestrial plateau taxa, indicating that Radix may be a suitable model taxon for inferring general patterns of biotic origin, dispersal and

  15. Site Selected for Colorado Plateau Coring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissman, John W.; Olsen, Paul E.; Kent, Dennis V.

    2010-04-01

    Colorado Plateau Coring Project Workshop, Phase 2: 100 Million Years of Climatic, Tectonic, and Biotic Evolution From Continental Coring; Albuquerque, New Mexico, 8-11 May 2009; A workshop was convened in New Mexico to plan for the Colorado Plateau Coring Project (CPCP) and identify the target site for initial coring. The giant continental and nearshore to shallow marine epicontinental basins of the American Southwest are particularly well exposed on the Colorado Plateau and its environs and contain a rich record of early Mesozoic (˜251-145 million years ago) strata. This time period was punctuated by two major mass extinctions and is notable for the evolutionary appearance of the modern biota and its apparent dramatic climate changes. Classic studies of these basins, their strata, and their fossils have made this sequence instrumental in framing the context for the early Mesozoic world. Ambiguities in temporal resolution, uncertainties in global correlations with other early Mesozoic strata, and major doubts about latitudinal position still hamper testing of competing climatic, biotic, and tectonic models for the evolution of western Pangea.

  16. Maps showing distribution of pH, copper, zinc, fluoride, uranium, molybdenum, arsenic, and sulfate in water, Richfield 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McHugh, J.B.; Miller, W.R.; Ficklin, W.H.

    1984-01-01

    These maps show the regional distribution of copper, zinc, arsenic, molybdenum, uranium, fluoride, sulfate, and pH in surface and ground water from the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle. This study supplements (Miller and others, 1984a-j) the regional drainage geochemical study done for the Richfield quadrangle under the U.S. Geological Survey’s Conterminuous United States Mineral Assessment Program (CUSMAP). Regional sampling was designed to define broad geochemical patterns and trends which can be used, along with geologic and geophysical data, to assess the mineral resource potential of the Richfield quadrangle. Analytical data used in compiling this report were published previously (McHugh and others, 1981). The Richfield quadrangle in west-central Utah covers the eastern part of the Pioche-Marysvale igneous and mineral belt that extends from the vicinity of Pioche in southeastern Nevada, east-northeastward for 250 km into central Utah. The western two-thirds of the Richfield quadrangle is in the Basin and Range Province, and the eastern third in the High Plateaus of Utah subprovince of the Colorado Plateau. Bedrock in the northern part of the Richfield quadrangle consists predominantly of latest Precambrian and Paleozoic sedimentary strata that were thrust eastward during the Sevier orogeny in Cretaceous time onto an autochthon of Mesozoic sedimentary rocks in the eastern part of the quadrangle. The southern part of the quadrangle is largely underlain by Oligocene and younger volcanic rocks and related intrusions. Extensional tectonism in late Cenozoic time broke the bedrock terrane into a series of north-trending fault blocks; the uplifted mountain areas were deeply eroded and the resulting debris deposited in the adjacent basins. Most of the mineral deposits in the Pioche-Marysvale mineral belt were formed during igneous activity in the middle and late Cenozoic time.

  17. Utah Valley University Field Station at Capitol Reef National Park: A Venue for Improved Student Learning and Retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, K.; Schultz, M.; Williams, B.; Gay, J.; Johnson, S.; Dunn, P.

    2015-12-01

    The unique geo-environment offered in Capitol Reef National Park and its surrounding areas has a long-standing history of inspiring geological scientific exploration. The Capitol Reef Field Station was established in 2008 as part of collaboration between the National Park and Utah Valley University in order to support teaching and research of the natural environment found within the park and on the Colorado Plateau. The facility itself situated deep within the park, well off any public road system offers state of the art alternative energy and sustainable construction and makes extensive use of passive heating and cooling, in order to maintain its status of being "off-grid." The field station is a 6200 square foot complex of classrooms and dormitories supporting university level education and field studies of the Colorado Plateau. The complex includes a classroom and dining area, professional kitchen, and two separate dormitories, which can sleep up to 24 overnight visitors, while the daytime usage can accommodate up to 40 visitors. The vision of the facility is to support teaching and research toward responsible, respectful, and sustainable stewardship of the natural world - including Interdisciplinary learning between arts and sciences Student internships and service learning in collaboration with the National Park Service Field-based scientific research (as well as inventorying and assessing Park ecosystems changes) Field training in scientific research Collaboration between National Park Service scientists and local, regional, and national institutions The park is situated at 38°N 249°E at elevations greater than 2000 m in Southern Utah. In contrast to the more famous neighboring sister parks such as Zion and Bryce Canyon National Parks, which are in relatively close proximity to large road systems and cities, Capitol Reef offers what is believed to be the darkest night sky in the US. The culmination of features creates an ideal location for studies of the

  18. Physical processes of shallow mafic dike emplacement near the San Rafael Swell, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Delaney, P.T.; Gartner, A.E.

    1997-01-01

    Some 200 shonkinite dikes, sills, and breccia bodies on the western Colorado Plateau of south-central Utah were intruded from approximately 3.7 to 4.6 Ma, contemporaneous with mafic volcanism along the nearby plateau margin. Thicknesses of dikes range to about 6 m; the log-normal mean thickness is 85 cm. Despite the excellent exposures of essentially all dikes in strata of the Jurassic San Rafael Group, their number is indeterminate from their outcrop and spacing because they are everywhere greatly segmented. By our grouping of almost 2000 dike segments, most dikes are less than 2 km in outcrop length; the longest is 9 km. Because the San Rafael magmas were primitive and probably ascended directly from the mantle, dike lengths in outcrop are much less than their heights. The present exposures probably lie along the irregular upper peripheries of dikes that lengthen and merge with depth. Orientations of steps on dike contacts record local directions of dike-fracture propagation; about half of the measurements plunge less than 30??, showing that lateral propagation at dike peripheries is as important as the vertical propagation ultimately responsible for ascent. The San Rafael dikes, now exposed after erosion of about 0.5-1.5 km, appear to thicken and shorten upward, probably because near-surface vesiculation enhanced magmatic driving pressures. Propagation likely ceased soon after the first dike segments began to feed nearby sills or vented to initiate small-volume eruptions. Most of the dikes are exposed in clastic strata of the Jurassic San Rafael Group. They probably acquired their strikes, however, while ascending along well-developed joints in massive sandstones of the underlying Glen Canyon Group. Rotation of far-field stresses during the emplacement interval cannot account for disparate strikes of the dikes, which vary through 110??, most lying between north and N25??W. Rather, the two regional horizontal principal stresses were probably nearly equal, and so

  19. Hikurangi Plateau: Crustal structure, rifted formation, and Gondwana subduction history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davy, Bryan; Hoernle, Kaj; Werner, Reinhard

    2008-07-01

    Seismic reflection profiles across the Hikurangi Plateau Large Igneous Province and adjacent margins reveal the faulted volcanic basement and overlying Mesozoic-Cenozoic sedimentary units as well as the structure of the paleoconvergent Gondwana margin at the southern plateau limit. The Hikurangi Plateau crust can be traced 50-100 km southward beneath the Chatham Rise where subduction cessation timing and geometry are interpreted to be variable along the margin. A model fit of the Hikurangi Plateau back against the Manihiki Plateau aligns the Manihiki Scarp with the eastern margin of the Rekohu Embayment. Extensional and rotated block faults which formed during the breakup of the combined Manihiki-Hikurangi plateau are interpreted in seismic sections of the Hikurangi Plateau basement. Guyots and ridge-like seamounts which are widely scattered across the Hikurangi Plateau are interpreted to have formed at 99-89 Ma immediately following Hikurangi Plateau jamming of the Gondwana convergent margin at ˜100 Ma. Volcanism from this period cannot be separately resolved in the seismic reflection data from basement volcanism; hence seamount formation during Manihiki-Hikurangi Plateau emplacement and breakup (125-120 Ma) cannot be ruled out. Seismic reflection data and gravity modeling suggest the 20-Ma-old Hikurangi Plateau choked the Cretaceous Gondwana convergent margin within 5 Ma of entry. Subsequent uplift of the Chatham Rise and slab detachment has led to the deposition of a Mesozoic sedimentary unit that thins from ˜1 km thickness northward across the plateau. The contrast with the present Hikurangi Plateau subduction beneath North Island, New Zealand, suggests a possible buoyancy cutoff range for LIP subduction consistent with earlier modeling.

  20. The crustal composition of the Falkland Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemt, Claudia; Jokat, Wilfried

    2015-04-01

    The Falkland Islands are situated in the South Atlantic Ocean 500 km east of Patagonia, South America. The islands are part of the Falkland Plateau, which stretches eastward for more than 1500 km. A bathymetric high, the Maurice Ewing Bank, terminates the plateau in the east. Until Late Jurassic the Falkland Islands were part of Gondwana and were located adjacent to the east coast of South Africa. While the Falkland Islands and Maurice Ewing Bank are proved to be of continental composition, the nature and structure of the Falkland Plateau's basement in between is debatable. The first crustal model derived from sonobuoy data contradicts an only recently published 3D-gravity model. To enhance the understanding of Gondwana break-up considering timing, geometry and amount of volcanism, further knowledge about the structure and thickness of the crust is inevitable. During the ANT-XXIX/5 Polarstern cruise seismic refraction measurements were conducted using Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) and Reftek land stations onshore of East Falkland. The OBS were deployed at 78 locations along an approximately 1500 km east-west stretching profile. For the western transect a P-wave velocity model is calculated using 2D-raytracing techniques. The results are presented in combination with potential field data showing the extension of the Falkland Islands basement, the continent-ocean transition zone and the crustal structure of the plateau. On the Falkland Plateau Basin sediment thickness is about 6 km with velocities ranging from 1.7 to 4.1 km/s in the upper part and about 4.7 km/s above basement. The crust is of oceanic composition with an igneous section that is considerably thicker than average oceanic crust (up to 17 km). The velocity structure in the upper crustal part is typical for layer 2 with a velocity gradient ranging from 5.4 km/s to 6.5 km/s and thicknesses between 1.5 km and 4 km. Layer 3 is about 14 km thick with a velocity gradient from 6.6 km/s to 7.6 km/s, which is

  1. Avian community responses to juniper woodland structure and thinning treatments on the Colorado Plateau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crow, Claire; van Riper, Charles, III

    2011-01-01

    We also studied responses of breeding birds to mechanical reduction of pinyon-juniper woodlands scattered across sagebrush steppe in 11 control and 9 treatment plots at Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Utah, in 2005 and 2006. We surveyed birds in 3.1-ha (7.6-acre) plots during the breeding season before and following treatment. Thinning in April 2006 removed a mean of 92 percent (standard error = 6.4 percent) of the live trees from treatment plots. Two of 14 species, Gray Vireo (Vireo vicinior) and Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater), were not detected after thinning. Shrub-nesting birds, including sagebrush specialist Brewer's Sparrow (Spizella breweri), increased in relative abundance in treatment areas compared to controls. However, some species may exhibit a time lag in response, and further changes in community composition and abundance could result. Our findings lend support to the concept that multiple small-scale fuels-reduction treatments, applied over the landscape, may provide the variety of successional stages needed to support a full assemblage of avian species in pinyon-juniper woodlands on the Colorado Plateau. Limiting scale and increasing precision of fuels-reduction projects in pinyon-juniper vegetation communities may maximize the benefits of management to both the pinyon-juniper and sagebrush steppe avian communities. We conclude that small-scale fuels-reduction treatments can benefit many bird species while reducing fire risk and restoring an ecological balance.

  2. A century of vegetation instability and resilience on the Colorado Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, A. E.; Duniway, M.; Miller, M. E.; Webb, R. H.; Belnap, J.

    2015-12-01

    Vegetation in dryland ecosystems is highly sensitive to changes in precipitation amount and timing. Globally, forecasted increases in climate aridity and variability in these regions are likely to alter vegetation dramatically. The Colorado Plateau (CP) is an important dryland ecoregion in the southwest United States for which drier and more variable conditions are forecast. The CP is characterized by moderate to high elevations, cold winters, and shallow soils. Vegetation across much of the CP has already undergone significant changes during the past century, that have been largely attributed to grazing intensity and multidecadal shifts in precipitation regime. Long-lived native tree and shrub species (Populus fremontii and Salix exigua) as well as non-natives (Tamarix chinensis and Eleaegnus angustifolia) have filled previously barren streambeds, shifted plant functional type dominance, and remote areas have been colonized by invasive annual plant species. These large shifts in plant functional type have changed leaf area, phenology, and net primary productivity in many habitats, consequently altering the magnitude and timing of evapotranspiration and soil drying. We combine 100 years of historic repeat photography with remote sensing and field observations from across southeastern Utah, USA, to build a model of local water balance with respect to state changes in vegetation, climate, and land use. This model will aid in understanding how vegetation changes influence water cycling, and how climatic and edaphic factors limit the scope of vegetation change.

  3. Phylogenetic and Morphological Diversity of Cyanobacteria in Soil Desert Crusts from the Colorado Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Pichel, Ferran; López-Cortés, Alejandro; Nübel, Ulrich

    2001-01-01

    We compared the community structures of cyanobacteria in four biological desert crusts from Utah's Colorado Plateau developing on different substrata. We analyzed natural samples, cultures, and cyanobacterial filaments or colonies retrieved by micromanipulation from field samples using microscopy, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. While microscopic analyses apparently underestimated the biodiversity of thin filamentous cyanobacteria, molecular analyses failed to retrieve signals for otherwise conspicuous heterocystous cyanobacteria with thick sheaths. The diversity found in desert crusts was underrepresented in currently available nucleotide sequence databases, and several novel phylogenetic clusters could be identified. Morphotypes fitting the description of Microcoleus vaginatus Gomont, dominant in most samples, corresponded to a tight phylogenetic cluster of probable cosmopolitan distribution, which was well differentiated from other cyanobacteria traditionally classified within the same genus. A new, diverse phylogenetic cluster, named “Xeronema,” grouped a series of thin filamentous Phormidium-like cyanobacteria. These were also ubiquitous in our samples and probably correspond to various botanical Phormidium and Schizothrix spp., but they are phylogenetically distant from thin filamentous cyanobacteria from other environments. Significant differences in community structure were found among soil types, indicating that soil characteristics may select for specific cyanobacteria. Gypsum crusts were most deviant from the rest, while sandy, silt, and shale crusts were relatively more similar among themselves. PMID:11282648

  4. Elevated Wintertime Ozone in Utah's Uinta Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R. S.; Moore, K. D.; Hill, S.; Harper, K.

    2011-12-01

    Seemingly anomalous elevated wintertime ozone (O3) levels were first observed in Wyoming's Upper Green River Basin (UGRB) in 2005 and have been recorded most in subsequent winters. While research continues, it has been hypothesized that the unacceptable levels are a unique combination of stagnant meteorology, enhanced insolation due to relatively high elevations and snow increased albedo, and abundant precursor sources owing to the region's recent rapid expansion of oil and gas exploration and production. The UGRB area has over 4,700 recorded gas/oil wells and sits mostly in rural Sublette County which has an estimated population of 7,925, an area of 12,644 km2, and a basin floor elevation around 2200 m asl, surrounded on three sides with mountains up to 4,200 km asl. Similarly, the Uinta Basin in northeastern Utah is a rural area prone to frequent low-level wintertime inversion episodes and persistent snow cover, with an expanding economy significantly based on gas and oil development and production (approximately 11,500 wells, with an estimated 17,000 more planned in the future years). The Basin lies primarily in Duchesne and Uintah Counties which have a combined population of approximately 51,200 and an area of about 19,982 km2. The floor of the Basin has a typical elevation around 1,560 m asl and is surrounded by mountains up to 4,120 m asl. Ambient measurements at four sites in the winter of 2009-2010 found many instances of ozone concentrations well above the current U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS; 75 ppb, 8-hr average, 4th highest value). To more fully characterize the behavior and geographical extent of the Uinta Basin's wintertime O3 issue, the Uintah Impact Mitigation Special Service District (UIMSSD) funded a study which included deploying 10 portable O3 monitors (2B Technologies, Inc., Model 205, Dual Beam) throughout the Basin. Furthermore, cooperative partners including the USEPA, BLM, UDAQ, NPS, and Golder Associates provided

  5. Geophysical constraints on the Virgin River Depression, Nevada, Utah, and Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langenheim, V.E.; Glen, J.M.; Jachens, R.C.; Dixon, G.L.; Katzer, T.C.; Morin, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    Gravity and aeromagnetic data provide insights into the subsurface lithology and structure of the Virgin River Depression (VRD) of Nevada, Utah, and Arizona. The gravity data indicate that the Quaternary and Tertiary sedimentary deposits hide a complex pre-Cenozoic surface. A north-northwest-trending basement ridge separates the Mesquite and Mormon basins, as evidenced by seismic-reflection, gravity, and aeromagnetic data. The Mesquite basin is very deep, reaching depths of 8?10 km. The Mormon basin reaches thicknesses of 5 km. Its northern margin is very steep and may be characterized by right steps, although this interpretation could change with additional gravity stations. Most of the young (Quaternary), small-displacement faults trend within 10? of due north and occur within the deeper parts of the Mesquite basin north of the Virgin River. South of the Virgin River, only a few, young, small-displacement faults are mapped; the trend of these faults is more northeasterly and parallels the basement topography and is distinct from that of the faults to the north. The Virgin River appears to follow the margin of the basin as it emerges from the plateau. The high-resolution aeromagnetic data outline the extent of shallow volcanic rocks in the Mesquite basin. The north-northwest alignment of volcanic rocks east of Toquop Wash appear to be structurally controlled because of faults imaged on seismic-reflection profiles and because the alignment is nearly perpendicular to the direction of Cenozoic extension. More buried volcanics likely exist to the north and east of the high-resolution aeromagnetic survey. Broader aeromagnetic anomalies beneath pre-Cenozoic basement in the Mormon Mountains and Tule Springs Hills reflect either Precambrian basement or Tertiary intrusions. These rocks are probably barriers to groundwater flow, except where fractured.

  6. Reconnaissance of uranium and copper deposits in parts of New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, Idaho, and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gott, Garland B.; Erickson, Ralph L.

    1952-01-01

    Because of the common association of uranium and copper in several of the commercial uranium deposits in the Colorado Plateau Province, a reconnaissance was made of several known deposits of copper disseminated through sandstone to determine whether they might be a source of uranium. In order to obtain more information regarding the relationship between copper, uranium and carbonaceous materials, some of the uraniferious asphaltrite deposits in the Shinarump conglomerate along the west flank of the San Rafael Swell were also investigated briefly. During this reconnaissance 18 deposits were examined in New Mexico, eight in Utah, two in Idaho, and one each in Wyoming and Colorado. No uranium deposits of commercial grade are associated with the copper deposits that were examined. The uraniferous asphaltites in the Shinarump conglomerate of Triassic age on the west flank of the San Rafael Swell, however, are promising from the standpoint of commercial uranium production. Spectrographic analyses of crude oil, asphalt, and bituminous shales show a rather consistent suite of trace metals including vanadium, nickel, copper, cobalt, chromium, lead zinc, and molybdenum. The similarity of the metal assemblage, including uranium of the San Rafael Swell asphaltites, to the metal assemblage in crude oil and other bituminous materials suggests that these metals were concentrated in the asphaltites from petroleum. However, the hypothesis that uranium minerals were already present before the hydrocarbons were introduced and that some sort of replacement or uranium minerals by carbon compounds was effected after the petroleum migrated into the uranium deposit should not be disregarded. The widespread association of uranium with asphaltic material suggests that it also may have been concentrated by some agency connected with the formation of petroleum. The problem of the association of uranium and other trace metals with hydrocarbons should be studied further both in the field and in

  7. Controls of bedrock geochemistry on soil and plant nutrients in Southeastern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neff, J.C.; Reynolds, R.; Sanford, R.L., Jr.; Fernandez, D.; Lamothe, P.

    2006-01-01

    The cold deserts of the Colorado Plateau contain numerous geologically and geochemically distinct sedimentary bedrock types. In the area near Canyonlands National Park in Southeastern Utah, geochemical variation in geologic substrates is related to the depositional environment with higher concentrations of Fe, Al, P, K, and Mg in sediments deposited in alluvial or marine environments and lower concentrations in bedrock derived from eolian sand dunes. Availability of soil nutrients to vegetation is also controlled by the formation of secondary minerals, particularly for P and Ca availability, which, in some geologic settings, appears closely related to variation of CaCO3 and Ca-phosphates in soils. However, the results of this study also indicate that P content is related to bedrock and soil Fe and Al content suggesting that the deposition history of the bedrock and the presence of P-bearing Fe and Al minerals, is important to contemporary P cycling in this region. The relation between bedrock type and exchangeable Mg and K is less clear-cut, despite large variation in bedrock concentrations of these elements. We examined soil nutrient concentrations and foliar nutrient concentration of grasses, shrubs, conifers, and forbs in four geochemically distinct field sites. All four of the functional plant groups had similar proportional responses to variation in soil nutrient availability despite large absolute differences in foliar nutrient concentrations and stoichiometry across species. Foliar P concentration (normalized to N) in particular showed relatively small variation across different geochemical settings despite large variation in soil P availability in these study sites. The limited foliar variation in bedrock-derived nutrients suggests that the dominant plant species in this dryland setting have a remarkably strong capacity to maintain foliar chemistry ratios despite large underlying differences in soil nutrient availability. ?? 2006 Springer Science

  8. Insights into the crustal structure and magmatic evolution of the High and Western Plateau of the Manihiki Plateau, Central Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochmuth, Katharina; Gohl, Karsten; Uenzelmann-Neben, Gabriele

    2014-05-01

    The Manihiki Plateau is a Large Igneous Province (LIP) located in the Central Pacific. It is assumed, that the formation of the Manihiki Plateau took place during the early Cretaceous in multiple volcanic stages as part of the "Super-LIP" Ontong-Java-Nui. The plateau consists of several sub-plateaus of which the Western Plateau und High Plateau are the largest. In addressing the plateau's magmatic evolutionary history, one of the key questions is whether all sub-plateaus experienced the same magmatic history or if distinct phases of igneous or tectonic processes led to its fragmentation. During the RV Sonne cruise SO-224 in 2012; we collected two deep crustal seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection lines, crossing the two main sub-plateaus. Modeling of P- and S-wave phases reveals the different crustal nature of both sub-plateaus. On the High Plateau, the 20 km thick crust is divided into four seismic units, interpreted to range from basaltic composition in the uppermost crust to peridotitic composition in the middle and lower crust. The Western Plateau on the other hand shows multiple rift structures and no indications of basalt flows. With a maximum of 17 km crustal thickness, the Western Plateau is also thinner than the High Plateau. The upper basement layers show relatively low P-wave velocities (3.0 - 5.0 km/s), which infers that on the Western Plateau these layers consist of volcanoclastic and carbonatic rocks rather than basaltic flow units. Later volcanic stages may be restricted to the High Plateau with a possible eastward trend in the center of volcanic activity. Extensive secondary volcanism does not seem to have occurred on the Western Plateau, and its later deformation is mainly caused by tectonic extension and rifting.

  9. Colorado Plateau magmatism and uplift by warming of heterogeneous lithosphere.

    PubMed

    Roy, Mousumi; Jordan, Thomas H; Pederson, Joel

    2009-06-18

    The forces that drove rock uplift of the low-relief, high-elevation, tectonically stable Colorado Plateau are the subject of long-standing debate. While the adjacent Basin and Range province and Rio Grande rift province underwent Cenozoic shortening followed by extension, the plateau experienced approximately 2 km of rock uplift without significant internal deformation. Here we propose that warming of the thicker, more iron-depleted Colorado Plateau lithosphere over 35-40 Myr following mid-Cenozoic removal of the Farallon plate from beneath North America is the primary mechanism driving rock uplift. In our model, conductive re-equilibration not only explains the rock uplift of the plateau, but also provides a robust geodynamic interpretation of observed contrasts between the Colorado Plateau margins and the plateau interior. In particular, the model matches the encroachment of Cenozoic magmatism from the margins towards the plateau interior at rates of 3-6 km Myr(-1) and is consistent with lower seismic velocities and more negative Bouguer gravity at the margins than in the plateau interior. We suggest that warming of heterogeneous lithosphere is a powerful mechanism for driving epeirogenic rock uplift of the Colorado Plateau and may be of general importance in plate-interior settings. PMID:19536263

  10. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Utah Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2007-08-01

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Utah Consumer's Guide provides Utah consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  11. Geology of Utah and Nevada by ERTS-1 imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, M. L.

    1973-01-01

    Repetitive ERTS-1 imagery covering Utah and Nevada is studied as an aid in structural geology, mineral exploration, and limnological and hydrological aspects. Limnological features of algal blooms and varying biological activities in Utah Lake and the Great Salt Lake are grossly evident on the imagery with more subtle details detected on the different bands. Major structural breaks, lineages, or trends are abundant throughout the area of study. The correlation of positive aeromagnetic anomalies with the trends suggests near surface intrusive bodies, not yet exposed at the surface, that can be tested for possible associated mineralization by collecting soil-gas at the surface which is analyzed for mercury that is (1) apparently associated with mineralization, (2) escapes as a vapor, and (3) can be readily measured in extremely low amounts of less than 1 ppb by absorption.

  12. Technical analysis of prospective photovoltaic systems in Utah.

    SciTech Connect

    Quiroz, Jimmy Edward; Cameron, Christopher P.

    2012-02-01

    This report explores the technical feasibility of prospective utility-scale photovoltaic system (PV) deployments in Utah. Sandia National Laboratories worked with Rocky Mountain Power (RMP), a division of PacifiCorp operating in Utah, to evaluate prospective 2-megawatt (MW) PV plants in different locations with respect to energy production and possible impact on the RMP system and customers. The study focused on 2-MW{sub AC} nameplate PV systems of different PV technologies and different tracking configurations. Technical feasibility was evaluated at three different potential locations in the RMP distribution system. An advanced distribution simulation tool was used to conduct detailed time-series analysis on each feeder and provide results on the impacts on voltage, demand, voltage regulation equipment operations, and flicker. Annual energy performance was estimated.

  13. Site Characteristics of Southern Utah Sites for Astronomical Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondolo, P.; Kieda, D.; Lebohec, S.; Martens, S. K.; Ricketts, P.; Springer, R. W.; Zimmer, C.

    2008-12-01

    The University of Utah has recently begun construction of a new 0.8 m optical/IR robotic telescope to be operated as a regional astronomy resource in the Intermountain West. The new Southern Utah Observatory (SUO) will require a high altitude (>3000 m) site with excellent atmospheric seeing, favorable weather conditions, and nearby infrastructure, including road, power, and high speed internet. We have explored six possible sites for the SUO telescope with favorable climate, night sky darkness and infrastructure. Since spring 2007, we have performed detailed measurements of atmospheric seeing at several of these sites, and have identified the preferred site for the SUO telescope at Frisco Peak, UT. Several large (1 sq. mile) areas of State Trust Land are nearby the new SUO telescope site. These large, flat areas may be excellent sites for large area, next generation Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACT) arrays such as AGIS or northern CTA.

  14. Utah healthcare system watches over Olympians and spectators.

    PubMed

    Rees, Tom

    2002-01-01

    For the first time in Olympic history, a single organization was tapped to provide medical services when Intermountain Health Care (IHC), Salt Lake City, was named for the 2002 Olympic and Paralympic Games in Utah. IHC, a charitable, community owned, integrated, not-for-profit healthcare system serving patients in Utah and Idaho, spent four years developing and implementing a plan to deliver medical services to both Olympians and spectators. Nearly 350 IHC doctors, nurses, physical therapists and other professionals donated their services for the Olympics without compensation as part of their not-for-profit mission. In addition, about 1,000 IHC employees applied to be general volunteers during the games. PMID:11915199

  15. Coccidioidomycosis among Workers at an Archeological Site, Northeastern Utah

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Stacie L.; Barton, Christine; Hajjeh, Rana A.; Lindsley, Mark D.; Warnock, David W.; Panackal, Anil A.; Shaffer, Joseph B.; Haddad, Maryam B.; Fisher, Frederick S.; Dennis, David T.; Morgan, Juliette

    2004-01-01

    In 2001, an outbreak of acute respiratory disease occurred among persons working at a Native American archeological site at Dinosaur National Monument in northeastern Utah. Epidemiologic and environmental investigations were undertaken to determine the cause of the outbreak. A clinical case was defined by the presence of at least two of the following symptoms: self-reported fever, shortness of breath, or cough. Ten workers met the clinical case definition; 9 had serologic confirmation of coccidioidomycosis, and 8 were hospitalized. All 10 were present during sifting of dirt through screens on June 19; symptoms began 9–12 days later (median 10). Coccidioidomycosis also developed in a worker at the site in September 2001. A serosurvey among 40 other Dinosaur National Monument workers did not find serologic evidence of recent infection. This outbreak documents a new endemic focus of coccidioidomycosis, extending northward its known geographic distribution in Utah by approximately 200 miles. PMID:15200853

  16. Spatial relative risk patterns of Autism Spectrum Disorders in Utah

    PubMed Central

    Bakian, Amanda V.; Bilder, Deborah; Coon, Hilary; McMahon, William

    2015-01-01

    Heightened areas of spatial relative risk for ASD, or ASD hotspots, in Utah were identified using adaptive kernel density functions. Children ages four, six and eight with ASD from multiple birth cohorts were identified by the Utah Registry of Autism and Developmental Disabilities (URADD). Each ASD case was gender-matched to 20 birth cohort controls. Demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of children born inside versus outside ASD hotspots were compared. ASD hotspots were found in the surveillance area for all but one birth cohort and age group sample; maximum relative risk in these hotspots ranged from 1.8 to 3.0. Associations were found between higher socioeconomic status (SES) and birth residence in an ASD hotspot in five out of six birth cohort and age group samples. PMID:25241009

  17. 75 FR 19338 - FM TABLE OF ALLOTMENTS, Milford, Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-14

    ...The Audio Division seeks comments on a petition filed by Canyon Media Group, LLC, authorized assignee of Station KCLS(FM), Channel 269C2, Pioche, Nevada, requesting the substitution of Channel 288C for vacant Channel 285C at Milford, Utah. The reference coordinates for Channel 288C at Milford are 38-31-11 NL and 113-17-07 WL, at a site 27.6 kilometers (17.2 miles) northwest of...

  18. Valuation of improved air quality in Utah County, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, C. Arden; Miner, F. Dean

    1988-05-01

    A contingent valuation approach was used to estimate maximum willingness-to-pay for improved air quality in Utah County. Respondents demonstrated a high rate of concern over poor air quality and averaged a willingness-to-pay of 37 per month per household. Noniterative openended questions were used successfully. No information bias was observed but benchmark values did influence bids. Willingness-to-pay for improved air quality was large for both sexes and across all income groups, ages, and occupations.

  19. Airborne infrared mineral mapping survey of Marysvale, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, W.; Chang, S. H.

    1982-01-01

    Infrared spectroradiometer survey results from flights over the Marysvale, Utah district show that hydrothermal alteration mineralogy can be mapped using very rapid and effective airborne techniques. The system detects alteration mineral absorption band intensities in the infrared spectral region with high sensitivity. The higher resolution spectral features and high spectral differences characteristic of the various clay and carbonate minerals are also readily identified by the instrument allowing the mineralogy to be mapped as well as the mineralization intensity.

  20. Lake Powell, SE Utah and NE Arizona, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Glen Canyon National Recreation Area with Lake Powell and Monument Valley in both SE Utah and NE Arizona (36.5N, 110.0W) are well known tourist areas in the southwest. Water from Lake Powell feeds the Colorado River before it rages through the Grand Canyon. The darker green areas indicate the high forested country of Navajo Mountain and Black Mesa in Arizona. Shadows from the many steep sided hills add a near three dimensional effect to the scene.

  1. Lead toxicity and iron deficiency in Utah migrant children

    SciTech Connect

    Ratcliffe, S.D.; Lee, J.; Lutz, L.J.; Woolley, F.R.; Baxter, S. ); Civish, F. ); Johnson, M. )

    1989-05-01

    The authors determined the frequency of presumptive iron deficiency and lead toxicity in 198 Utah migrant children, ages 9-72 months, during the summer of 1985. There were no confirmed cases of lead toxicity, 13% of those tested and 30% of the children ages 9-23 months were iron deficient. Hematocrit determinations accurately predicted iron deficiency in only 35% of the children confirmed to have this disorder via erythrocyte protoporphyrin screening.

  2. Addressing Climate Change Around the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joswiak, Meri; Yao, Tandong; Joswiak, Daniel

    2013-08-01

    Most noted for the Himalayas, the Third Pole region encompasses several vast and varied mountain ranges, totaling 100,000 square kilometers of ice. For more than 4 years, Third Pole Environment (TPE) research program scientists and collaborators from around the globe have been racing to reveal, predict, and mediate the effects of global climate change on the mountainous region centered around the Tibetan Plateau, known as "Asia's water tower" for its expansive ice cover whose sensitive environment regulates water flow to the biggest rivers in Asia.

  3. Oceanic Plateau Overview and Look Ahead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffin, M. F.

    2011-12-01

    Oceanic plateaus result from fundamental processes in the Earth's interior, and have been implicated as instigators of major worldwide environmental changes. Although the plate tectonics paradigm successfully explains volcanic activity on the Earth's surface associated with seafloor spreading and plate subduction, it does not elucidate the massive flood volcanism that produces oceanic plateaus. Temporal correlations between flood basalts and environmental phenomena such as mass extinctions and oceanic anoxic events (OAEs) are well documented, yet the underlying mechanisms causing these global catastrophes are only beginning to be grasped. Focused investigations of oceanic plateaus have targeted the two largest features globally, the ~120 Ma Ontong Java Plateau (Pacific Ocean) and ~120-95 Ma Kerguelen Plateau/Broken Ridge (Indian Ocean), and the ~145-130 Ma Shatsky Rise (Pacific Ocean). These three features constitute the only oceanic plateaus where igneous basement has been drilled at more than one site. Multiple models - plume, bolide impact, and upwelling eclogite - have been proposed for Ontong Java's origin. The feature correlates temporally with OAE-1a, and interpretation of Sr, Os, and Pb isotopic systems during the time of OAE-1a points to a close linkage between the two, with CO2, Fe, and trace metal emissions from the massive magmatism potentially triggering the event. The Kerguelen Plateau/Broken Ridge is a composite feature that includes flood basalts, depleted mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB)-related asthenosphere, and continental lithosphere. Models for the Shatsky Rise include mantle plume and fast seafloor spreading. Future studies of oceanic plateaus have the potential to transform our understanding of the Earth system through investigating: 1) magma (and hence mantle source) variability through times; 2) the nature of melting anomalies, i.e., compositional vs. thermal, that produce oceanic plateaus; 3) the precise durations of oceanic plateau events

  4. Going beyond Career Plateau: Using Professional Plateau To Account for Work Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Patrick Chang Boon

    2003-01-01

    Survey responses from 170 of 300 engineers working in Singapore revealed that significant variance in career satisfaction, job satisfaction, and turnover intentions was accounted for by professional plateau, the point at which individuals find their jobs unchallenging with few opportunities for professional development. (Contains 33 references.)…

  5. Geology of Utah and Nevada by ERTS imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Two ancient watercourses have been observed on ERTS-1 imagery. These lie in the Waterpocket Fold area, north of the Marble Canyon section of the Colorado River, in Arizona and Utah. A third old watercourse of interest is an ancient canyon of the Colorado and is located on image no. 1156-17260. Image no. 1051-17414 contains some very useful information concerning the hydrology, sedimentology, and biology of Great Salt Lake and Bear Lake in Utah. In Great Salt Lake, there is a sharp line between the portion of the lake north of the railroad causeway and that south of the causeway. There is a marked difference in salinity across the causeway, and this is reflected in different algal species. On the same image, sediment plumes in Bear Lake clearly delineate the circulation pattern, and provide excellent indications of bottom contours over much of the area. Image no. 1051-17420 contains part of Great Salt Lake and all of Utah Lake. The latter displays a very interesting surface pattern which is probably due to an algal bloom which has been swirled into a spiral by the circulation of the lake.

  6. Case study of underground-coal-mining productivity in Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Hannah, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    Reasons for the wide variance in productivity levels among underground-coal-mining firms in Utah are examined. Related objectives are to test the feasibility of relying on in-depth field research in the coal industry to clarify relationships and develop more-useful perspectives concerning productivity, to demonstrate in detail the considerable variance in productivity levels among firms, and to suggest more-useful hypotheses for further research. The methodology employed is a series of case studies of individual firms which include in-depth interviews, mine tours, and the collection of firm-specific data. Results indicate that, in the Utah case, the industrial-relations environment is the key to analyzing the determinants of productivity differences. However, this view of industrial relations encompasses more than the traditional area of labor-management relations. From the most-narrow perspective, it focuses on the impact on productivity of the differences in internal-labor-market organizations and functions in union and nonunion firms. From a broader perspective it includes such variables as the impact of the United Mine Workers of America on management philosophy, the work ethic and motivation of miners, and the impact of the size of the firm. The most general interpretation of the industrial-relations framework of analysis concerns the evolution of mine ownership patterns in Utah. The suggestion from this more historical view is that institutional forces have dictated the pattern of acquisition of union and nonunion coal operators.

  7. Evaluation of low-temperature geothermal potential in Utah and Goshen Valleys and adjacent areas, Utah. Part I. Gravity survey

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, D.A.; Cook, K.L.

    1983-04-01

    During 1980 and 1981 a total of 569 new gravity stations were taken in Utah and Goshen Valleys and adjacent areas, Utah. The new stations were combined with 530 other gravity stations taken in previous surveys which resulted in a compilation of 1099 stations which were used in this study. The additional surveys were undertaken to assist in the evaluation of the area for the possible development of geothermal resources by providing an interpreted structural framework by delineating faults, structural trends, intrusions, thickness of valley fill, and increased density of host rock. The gravity data are presented as (1) a complete Bouguer gravity anomaly map with a 2 mgal contour interval on a scale of 1:100,000 and (2) five generally east-trending gravity profiles. A geologic interpretation of the study area was made from the gravity map and from the interpretive geologic cross sections which were modeled along the gravity profiles.

  8. Preliminary investigation of the elemental variation and diagenesis of a tabular uranium deposit, La Sal Mine, San Juan County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, Robert A.; Campbell, John A.

    1976-01-01

    Ore in the La Sal mine, San Juan County, Utah, occurs as a typical tabular-type uranium deposit of the-Colorado Plateau. Uranium-vanadium occurs in the Salt Wash Member of the Jurassic Morrison Formation. Chemical and petrographic analyses were used to determine elemental variation and diagenetic aspects across the orebody. Vanadium is concentrated in the dark clay matrix, which constitutes visible ore. Uranium content is greater above the vanadium zone. Calcium, carbonate carbon, and lead show greater than fifty-fold increase across the ore zone, whereas copper and organic carbon show only a several-fold increase. Large molybdenum concentrations are present in and above the tabular layer, and large selenium concentrations occur below the uranium zone within the richest vanadium zone. Iron is enriched in the vanadium horizon. Chromium is depleted from above the ore and strongly enriched below. Elements that vary directly with the vanadium content include magnesium, iron, selenium, zirconium, strontium, titanium, lead, boron, yttrium, and scandium. The diagenetic sequence is as follows: (1) formation of secondary quartz overgrowths as cement; (2) infilling and lining of remaining pores with amber opaline material; (3) formation of vanadium-rich clay matrix, which has replaced overgrowths as well as quartz grains; (4) replacement of overgrowths and detrital grains by calcite; (5) infilling of pores with barite and the introduction of pyrite and marcasite.

  9. A petrographical and geochemical study of quartzose nodules, country rocks, and dike rocks from the Upheaval Dome structure, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koeberl, C.; Plescia, J.B.; Hayward, C.L.; Reimold, W.U.

    1999-01-01

    Upheaval Dome, in Canyonlands National Park, Utah, USA, is a unique structure on the Colorado Plateau. It has earlier been interpreted as an impact structure or as a pinched-off salt diapir. Some subrounded quartzose fragments were found in a ring depression near the eastern margin of the structure and, based on vesicularity and apparent flow structure, the fragments were interpreted by early researchers as 'impactites.' Our petrographic studies show no indication of a high-temperature history and are in agreement with a slow, low-temperature formation of the quartz nodules. Compositionally, the lag deposit samples are almost pure SiO2. They show no chemical similarity to any of the possible target rocks (e.g., Navajo Sandstone), from which they should have formed by melting if they were impactites. Instead, the samples have relatively high contents of elements that indicate fluid interaction (e.g., hydrothermal growth), such as As, Sb, Ba, and U, and show positive Ce anomalies. Thus, we interpret the 'lag deposit samples' as normal low-temperature (hydrothermally-grown?) quartz that show no indication of being impact-derived. In addition, a petrographic and geochemical analysis of a series of dike samples yielded no evidence for shock metamorphism or a meteoritic component.

  10. Physical, Chemical, Ecological, and Age Data and Trench Logs from Surficial Deposits at Hatch Point, Southeastern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldstein, Harland L.; Miller, Mark E.; Yount, James C.; Reheis, Marith C.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Belnap, Jayne; Lamothe, Paul J.; McGeehan, John P.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents data and describes the methodology for physical, chemical and ecological measurements of sediment, soil, and vegetation, as well as age determinations of surficial deposits at Hatch Point, Canyon Rims area, Colorado Plateau, southeastern Utah. The results presented in this report support a study that examines geomorphic and soil factors that may influence boundaries between shrubland and grassland ecosystems in the study area. Shrubland ecosystems dominated by sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) and grassland ecosystems dominated by native perennial grasses (for example, Hilaria jamesii and Sporabolis sp.) are high-priority conservation targets for the Federal Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and other resource managers because of their diversity, productivity, and vital importance as wildlife habitat. These ecosystems have been recognized as imperiled on a regional scale since at least the mid-1990s due to habitat loss (type conversions), land-use practices, and invasive exotic plants. In the Intermountain West, the exotic annual cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) is recognized as one of the most pervasive and serious threats to the health of native sagebrush and grassland ecosystems through effects on fire regimes and resource conditions experienced by native species.

  11. Abnormally high formation pressures, Potwar Plateau, Pakistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Shah, S.H.A.; Malik, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormally high formation pressures in the Potwar Plateau of north-central Pakistan are major obstacles to oil and gas exploration. Severe drilling problems associated with high pressures have, in some cases, prevented adequate evaluation of reservoirs and significantly increased drilling costs. Previous investigations of abnormal pressure in the Potwar Plateau have only identified abnormal pressures in Neogene rocks. We have identified two distinct pressure regimes in this Himalayan foreland fold and thrust belt basin: one in Neogene rocks and another in pre-Neogene rocks. Pore pressures in Neogene rocks are as high as lithostatic and are interpreted to be due to tectonic compression and compaction disequilibrium associated with high rates of sedimentation. Pore pressure gradients in pre-Neogene rocks are generally less than those in Neogene rocks, commonly ranging from 0.5 to 0.7 psi/ft (11.3 to 15.8 kPa/m) and are most likely due to a combination of tectonic compression and hydrocarbon generation. The top of abnormally high pressure is highly variable and doesn't appear to be related to any specific lithologic seal. Consequently, attempts to predict the depth to the top of overpressure prior to drilling are precluded.

  12. Episodic karstification, Edwards Plateau, central Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Kastning, E.H.

    1985-01-01

    The Edwards Plateau and Llano Basin of central Texas form one of the largest contiguous regions of karst in North America (>80,000 km/sup 2/). Solutional phenomena show that several major episodes of karstification are documentable from late Cambrian to Holocene. Relict landforms representing intervals of solutional activity correlate well with the accepted geomorphic chronology for central Texas. Secondary porosity are vertically controlled by lithology, topographic incision of streams, position of the potentiometric surface, and attitude of bedding. Areally, development of karst is strongly influenced by the extent, density, and orientation of fractures and by hydrodynamic characteristics such as points of recharge and discharge, degree of integration of groundwater flow paths, and hydraulic gradients. Early episodes of karstification correspond to intervals of subaerial exposure of carbonate rocks during marine regression or following regional uplift. Paleokarst is prevalent in the Paleozoic and Mesozoic sequences. Infilled dolines and solution-collapse breccias have been exhumed by extensive regional denudation during the Cenozoic Era. Subaerial conditions during the middle Cretaceous account for infilled solutional cavities within lower Cretaceous carbonate beds. The most extensive karstification began with regional uplift in the early Miocene. Enhanced relief along the Balcones escarpment promoted incision of streams, lowering of water tables, steepened hydraulic gradients, and increases in discharge. Caves at various-elevations attest to sequential dissection of the plateau during the late Quaternary.

  13. Dust emissions from unpaved roads on the Colorado Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duniway, M.; Flagg, C.; Belnap, J.

    2013-12-01

    On the Colorado Plateau, elevated levels of aeolian dust have become a major land management and policy concern due to its influence on climate, weather, terrestrial ecosystem dynamics, landscape development and fertility, melting of snow and ice, air quality, and human health. Most desert soil surfaces are stabilized by plants, rocks, and/or physical or biological soil crusts, but once disturbed, sediment production from these surfaces can increase dramatically. Road development and use is a common surface disturbing activity in the region. The extent and density of roads and road networks is rapidly increasing due to continued energy exploration, infrastructure development, and off-highway recreation activities. Though it is well known that unpaved roads produce dust, the relative contribution of dust from existing roads or the implications of future road development to regional dust loading is unknown. To address this need, we have initiated a multifaceted research effort to evaluating dust emissions from unpaved roads regionally. At 34 sites arranged across various road surfaces and soil textures in southeastern Utah, we are: 1) monitoring dust emissions, local wind conditions, and vehicle traffic and 2) evaluating fugitive dust potential using a portable wind tunnel and measuring road characteristics that affect dust production. We will then 3) develop a GIS-based model that integrates results from 1 & 2 to estimate potential dust contributions from current and future scenarios of regional road development. Passive, horizontal sediment traps were installed at three distances downwind from the road edge. One control trap was placed upwind of the samplers to account for local, non-road dust emissions. An electronic vehicle counter and anemometer were also installed at monitoring sites. Dust samples were collected every three months at fixed heights, 15 cm up to 100 cm above the soil surface, from March 2010 to the present. Threshold friction velocities (TFV

  14. Magmatism & lithospheric destruction along the Colorado Plateau margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendersky, C.; Plank, T.; Forsyth, D. W.; Hauri, E. H.; Lee, C.; Holtzman, B. K.

    2012-12-01

    The process of cratonic lithosphere deformation remains mysterious. The Colorado Plateau (CP), including its underlying lithosphere, has persisted for over a 1Ga, while in parts of the adjacent Basin and Range (B&R) Cenozoic extension has thinned the lithosphere by half. Today, extensional processes are focused in the transition zone between these two regions, which is defined by a region of volcanism and active faulting. We combine seismic tomography models from EarthScope data with melt thermobarometry from mafic scoria erupted in three volcanic fields since 100ka to investigate lithospheric deformation in this actively rifting area. Our sample locations lie along the western and southwestern margin of the CP and record different evolutionary stages in the process of lithosphere destruction via melt infiltration. For each volcanic area studied we use seismic profiles of shear wave velocities (Vs) with pressures and temperatures of mantle-melt equilibrium calculated using the Si and Mg thermobarometer (Lee et al 2009). The thermobarometric results depend highly on the water and Fe3+ content of the melts, which were constrained separately for each volcanic field. Magmatic water contents have been determined by ion-microprobe measurements of olivine hosted melt inclusions. Fe/ΣFe+3 ratios were estimated for each volcanic field via LA-ICP-MS analysis of V in olivine and whole rock compositions (Canil 2002). In the northernmost volcanic field, Black Rock (BRVF), Utah, melts are hot (consistent with mantle potential temperature (Tp) >1400°C), dry (≤1 wt% H2O), and have equilibrated at shallow depths (<70 km), within the seismic lid. Shear velocities in this lid, however, are anomalously slow (4.1 km/s), and the mantle beneath (Vs ~ 3.9 km/s), is the slowest in the B&R, coincident with the highest and most focused extension rates (Wasatch Fault Zone). Together, these observations support high mantle temperatures, inefficient melt extraction, and a weak lithosphere

  15. Fossil snail shells tell story about Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, JoAnna

    2014-09-01

    Ancient and modern snail shells have given scientists a unique look at the evolution of the Tibetan Plateau, confirming that parts of the plateau have actually lost elevation over time, despite its immense height. A new paper detailing the research was published on 29 August in the Geological Society of America Bulletin (doi:10.1130/B31000.1).

  16. Plateauing and Its Consequences for Educators and Educational Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milstein, Mike

    Plateauing is an individual's conviction that continued progress is impossible. This conviction occurs as a consequence of long periods of occupational stability. When practitioners doubt the probability of promotion or the importance of their work and find their work to be boring and redundant, they are exhibiting symptoms of plateauing rather…

  17. Thrusting on the Tibetan plateau within the last 5 Ma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Kevin; Lucas, Lynette

    1989-01-01

    The Lunpola basin, in the middle of the Tibetan plateau, contains about 4 km of nonmarine sediments deposited since early Cenozoic times. This remarkable structure, localized in the Bangong-Nujiang suture zone, has much to teach about how the plateau has developed. The strong evidence for young compression in the basin is emphasized.

  18. Tower mast of precipitation over the central Tibetan Plateau summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yunfei; Liu, Guosheng; Wu, Guoxiong; Yu, Rucong; Xu, Youping; Wang, Yu; Li, Rui; Liu, Qi

    2006-03-01

    Over the Tibetan Plateau, solar heating often produces strong convective instability in the atmosphere. Using 3 years (1998-2000) of Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar data, our investigations revealed a tower mast shape of precipitation over the Plateau in both height-longitude and height-latitude cross-sections. High rain rate center over the Plateau is located above 6km as a tower penetrating into the mid-troposphere against the nearby background, implying a unique latent heating source injecting directly to the middle atmosphere. Results indicate that there are more isolated rain cells over the Plateau than its nearby regions, and the strongest diurnal cycle of rainfall existing over the Plateau with a peak around 1600 and a valley around 0500 local time, indicating the dominance of convective clouds caused by solar heating. It is also found that the TRMM algorithm might have misclassified weak convections as stratiform rains.

  19. REACTIVE MULTIPHASE BEHAVIOR OF CO{sub 2} IN SALINE AQUIFERS BENEATH THE COLORADO PLATEAU

    SciTech Connect

    R.G. Allis; J. Moore; S. White

    2005-02-08

    Soil gas surveys have been carried out on the Colorado Plateau over areas with natural occurrences of CO{sub 2}. At Farnham Dome, Utah, and Springerville-St. Johns, Arizona, proven CO{sub 2} reservoirs occur at 600-800 m depth, but no anomalous soil gas CO{sub 2} flux was detected. Background CO{sub 2} fluxes of up to about 5 g m{sup -2} day{sup -1} were common in arid, poorly vegetated areas, and fluxes up to about 20 g m{sup -2} day{sup -1} were found at Springerville-St. Johns in heavily vegetated, wet ground adjacent to springs. These elevated fluxes are attributed to shallow root zone activity rather than to a deep upflow of CO{sub 2}. Localized areas of anomalously high CO{sub 2} gas flux ({approx} 100 g m{sup -2} day{sup -1}) were documented along the Little Grand Wash Fault Zone near Crystal Geyser, Utah and nearby in Ten Mile Graben, but those in Ten Mile Graben are not directly associated with the major faults. In both areas, features with a visible gas flux are present. Isotopic measurements on the CO{sub 2} gas confirm that it originated at depth. Evidence of widespread vein calcite at the surface at Farnham Dome and travertine deposits in the other areas suggests that there has been an outflow of CO{sub 2}-rich fluids in the past. 14C ages of pollen trapped in the travertine at Springerville-St. Johns record a period of CO{sub 2} leakage to the atmosphere between 887 {+-} 35 and 3219 {+-} 30 years BP. No travertine deposits appear to be currently forming. At Springerville-St. Johns, Crystal Geyser and Ten Mile Graben, there are significant outflows of high-bicarbonate water. Movement of CO{sub 2}-rich groundwaters may be the dominant mechanism controlling the mobility of CO{sub 2} today. The very localized nature of the soil gas anomalies, evidence of large scale discharge of CO{sub 2} over a very short period of time and the outflow of ground water containing dissolved CO{sub 2} will present challenges for effective, long term monitoring of CO{sub 2

  20. REACTIVE MULTIPHASE BEHAVIOR OF CO2 IN SALINE AQUIFERS BENEATH THE COLORADO PLATEAU

    SciTech Connect

    R.G. Allis; J. Moore; S. White

    2003-01-30

    Gas reservoirs developed within the Colorado Plateau and Southern Rocky Mountains region are natural laboratories for studying the factors that promote long-term storage of CO{sub 2}. They also provide sites for storing additional CO{sub 2} if it can be separated from the flue gases of coal-fired power plants in this part of the U.S.A. These natural reservoirs are developed primarily in sandstones and dolomites; shales, mudstones and anhydrite form seals. In many fields, stacked reservoirs are present, indicating that the gas has migrated up through the section. There are also geologically young travertine deposits at the surface, and CO{sub 2}-charged groundwater and springs in the vicinity of known CO{sub 2} occurrences. These near-surface geological and hydrological features also provide examples of the environmental effects of leakage of CO{sub 2} from reservoirs, and justify further study. During reporting period covered here (the first quarter of Year 3 of the project, i.e. October 1-December 31, 2002), the main achievements were: (1) Planning workshop for project participants as well as other Utah researchers involved in CO{sub 2} projects (22 October, 2002), and Utah Geological Survey, Salt Lake City; (2) Presentation of paper to special CO{sub 2} sequestration session at the Geological Society of America Annual Meeting, Denver, 29 October, 2002; (3) Presentation of paper to special CO{sub 2} sequestration session at the Fall Meeting of American Geophysical Union, San Francisco, 10 December, 2002; (4) Identification of dawsonite (sodium-aluminum carbonate) as a late stage mineral deposited in CO{sub 2} feedzone at Springerville, Arizona; (5) Successful matching of known physical constraints to flow beneath the Hunter cross section being used to simulate the effects of CO{sub 2} injection. In about 1000 years, most injected CO{sub 2} may be lost to the surface from the three shallowest reservoirs considered, assuming no reactive processes; and (6) Inclusion

  1. 75 FR 18877 - Notice of Invitation to Participate; Exploration for Coal in Utah License Application UTU-87041

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-13

    ... in Emery and Sevier Counties, Utah: T. 23 S., R. 5 E., SLM, Utah Sec. 1, all; Sec. 11, all; Sec. 12, all; Sec. 13, all; Sec. 14, all; T. 23 S., R. 6 E., SLM, Utah Sec. 6, lots 6 and 7, S\\1/2\\NE\\1/4\\,...

  2. 77 FR 24915 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revising the Proposed Special Rule for the Utah...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    ... current special rule for the Utah prairie dog on June 2, 2011 (76 FR 31906). It is our intent in this..., proposed rule (76 FR 31906) to revise the special rule for the Utah prairie dog, and (2) information... control of Utah prairie dogs. The previous special rules (49 FR 22330, May 29, 1984; 56 FR 27438, June...

  3. 76 FR 68523 - Utah Southern Railroad Company, LLC-Change in Operators Exemption-Iron Bull Railroad Company, LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-04

    ... Surface Transportation Board Utah Southern Railroad Company, LLC--Change in Operators Exemption--Iron Bull... of exemption under 49 CFR 1150.31 to change operators from Iron Bull Railroad Company (IBRC) to USRC... near Iron Springs, Utah, and milepost 14.7 at or near Iron Mountain, Utah, a distance of 14.6 miles...

  4. 76 FR 7845 - Public Water System Supervision Program Revision for the State of Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... Quality, Division of Drinking Water, Utah State Office Park--Building One, 195 North 1950 West, Salt Lake... AGENCY Public Water System Supervision Program Revision for the State of Utah AGENCY: Environmental... Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), 42 U.S.C. 300g-2, and 40 CFR 142.13, public notice is hereby given...

  5. Action Goals of the Utah State Board of Education, Commencing in 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Board of Education, Salt Lake City.

    Following consideration of many reports on the status of public education, the Utah State Board of Education announces its commitment to the reform of the content, processes, and standards of public education in Utah. The board sets as its primary goals the attainment of excellence in education and the improvement of productivity. The reform will…

  6. The role of salt in the structural development of central Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Witkind, Irving J.

    1994-01-01

    Multiple episodes of diapirism, probably salt generated, have determined the structural pattern of central Utah. The causative salt and other evaporites are integral components of the Arapien Shale of Middle Jurassic age, one of the most unusual stratigraphic units in central Utah.

  7. Knowledge Assessment of Food Safety Managers in Utah and Its Implications on the Exam and Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nummer, Brian A.; Guy, Stanley M.; Bentley, Joanne P. H.

    2010-01-01

    Food Safety Manager's Certification is offered through a state-local Extension partnership in Utah using an online course management system. Exams and course materials were created by an Extension Specialist at Utah State Univ. Extension Agents provide exam and curriculum facilitation in each county. This form of distance education enables access…

  8. The Impact of Competency-Based Teacher Education and Certification Programs in Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mouritsen, Roger C.

    Utah is a member of a nine-state consortium to study competency-based teacher education and certification programs. This paper presents an overview of the nationwide movement for competency-based teacher education, followed by a description of the situation in Utah. The State Board of Education is making an effort through the Teacher Education and…

  9. 77 FR 44544 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Utah; Determination of Clean Data...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Utah; Determination... area in Utah is currently attaining the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for particulate... certified, quality-assured ambient air monitoring data for the years 2009 through 2011. The State of...

  10. 76 FR 9770 - Utah Board of Water Resources Notice of Successive Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-22

    ... water intake would convey water from the Bureau of Reclamation's Lake Powell up to a high point within... Energy Regulatory Commission Utah Board of Water Resources Notice of Successive Preliminary Permit... February 1, 2011, the Utah Board of Water Resources filed an application for a successive...

  11. Utah State Library Division Library Services and Technology Act Five Year Plan, 2003-2007.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Library Div., Salt Lake City. Dept. of Community and Economic Development.

    This Utah State Library Division Five Year Plan for the Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) sets forth the principles, Division mission statement, needs, goals, evaluation plan, and programs for administering Utah's LSTA program from 2003-2007. Targets, programs and activities, and a schedule are presented for the following goals: (1)…

  12. 77 FR 25734 - Notice of Invitation To Participate in Coal Exploration License, Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-01

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Invitation To Participate in Coal Exploration License, Utah AGENCY... exploration of coal deposits owned by the United States of America in Sanpete County, Utah. DATES: The notice of invitation to participate in this coal exploration license was published once each week for...

  13. 76 FR 16808 - Notice of Invitation to Participate In Coal Exploration License, Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-25

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Invitation to Participate In Coal Exploration License, Utah AGENCY... exploration of coal deposits owned by the United States of America in Sevier County, Utah. DATES: The notice of invitation to participate in this coal exploration license was published, once each week for...

  14. Wellness Works: A Collaborative Program for Youth and Adults in Rural Utah

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shirley, Lindsey; Roark, Mark F.; Lewis, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Utah State University Cooperative Extension programming, provided through the historic land-grant system, is one method used to meet the needs of residents located in rural communities. Residents in a Central Utah county need Cooperative Extension programs to address the health and wellness of their rural community. According to the Utah…

  15. Library Skills, English 200/201. Merrill Library, Utah State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Univ., Logan. Merrill Library.

    This manual describes the library instruction program taken as a part of English 200/201 at Utah State University. This manual is meant to be read after completing Project FORE, a computer-assisted instruction program at Merrill Library (Utah State University). Project FORE and this manual review the skills needed to retrieve information on…

  16. Focus: A Forum on Teaching and Learning in Utah Community and Technical Colleges, Volume III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Don A., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    This collection of articles addresses various aspects of curriculum and instruction at Utah's community colleges. First, "Reflections on the Changing Role and Mission of Utah Community and Technical Colleges," by Don A. Carpenter, considers the colleges' role in meeting needs for comprehensiveness, "practical" general education, and curricular…

  17. Focus: A Forum on Teaching and Learning in Utah Community Colleges. Volume X, 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Don A., Ed.

    1992-01-01

    Designed as a forum on teaching and learning in Utah's two-year institutions, this annual publication issues a yearly call to faculty, administrators, students and others for papers on any matters of interest to Utah's community colleges. This 1992 issue of "Focus" includes the following articles: (1) "Videocassette as Text and Harbinger of…

  18. 77 FR 52108 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-28

    ... Hills Parkway in the city of St. George, Washington County, Utah. The project will include widening of... proposed highway project, State Route 18 (Bluff Street); from St. George Boulevard to Red Hills Parkway, in Washington County in the State of Utah. Those actions grant licenses, permits, and approvals for the...

  19. 78 FR 17748 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... MP 16 project in Washington County in the State of Utah. These actions grant approvals for the... and MP 16 in Washington County, Utah. The project consists of the following improvements: Constructing..., between Brigham Road and Dixie Drive, and between Washington Parkway and SR-9; removing the...

  20. 77 FR 17564 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-26

    ... Lake County in the State of Utah). These actions grant licenses, permits, and approvals for the project... of Utah: Cottonwood Street; 4500 South to Vine Street in Murray City, Salt Lake County, project..., Environmental Program Manager, Federal Highway Administration, 2520 West 4700 South, Suite 9A, Salt Lake...

  1. 77 FR 76069 - Notice of Proposed Class II Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease, Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-26

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Proposed Class II Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease, Utah... Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Management Act, Quinex Energy Corporation timely filed a petition for reinstatement of oil and gas lease UTU88055 for lands in Uintah County, Utah, and paid all required rentals...

  2. 77 FR 24978 - Notice of Proposed Class II Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Leases, Utah.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Proposed Class II Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Leases... Terminated Oil and Gas Leases, Utah. SUMMARY: In accordance with Title IV of the Federal Oil and Gas Royalty... leases UTU86505, UTU86506, and UTU86485 for lands in Iron County, Utah, and it was accompanied by...

  3. 78 FR 28240 - Call for Nominations for the Utah Resource Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ... Bureau of Land Management Call for Nominations for the Utah Resource Advisory Council AGENCY: Bureau of... nominations for upcoming vacancies on the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Utah Resource Advisory Council (RAC..., 440 West 200 South, Suite 500, Salt Lake City, UT 84101. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Sherry...

  4. 75 FR 64741 - Notice of Utah's Resource Advisory Council (RAC) Subcommittee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-20

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Utah's Resource Advisory Council (RAC) Subcommittee Meeting AGENCY.... Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management's (BLM) Utah Resource Advisory Council (RAC... floor conference room. ADDRESSES: The UDAF is located at 350 North Redwood Road, Salt Lake City,...

  5. 76 FR 72969 - Call for Nominations for the Utah Resource Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... Bureau of Land Management Call for Nominations for the Utah Resource Advisory Council AGENCY: Bureau of... nominations to fill one position on the Utah Resource Advisory Council (RAC) in category three... council is organized; representatives of academia who are employed in natural sciences; or the...

  6. 78 FR 53477 - Second Call for Nominations to the Utah Resource Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... Bureau of Land Management Second Call for Nominations to the Utah Resource Advisory Council AGENCY... Council (RAC), which has two positions with terms expiring on January 12, 2014. The RAC provides advice... Coordinator, BLM Utah State Office, 440 West 200 South, Suite 500, Salt Lake City, UT 84101. FOR...

  7. Utah Public Education Funding: The Fiscal Impact of School Choice. School Choice Issues in the State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aud, Susan

    2007-01-01

    This study examines Utah's funding system for public education and provides an analysis of the fiscal impact of allowing parents to use a portion of their child's state education funding to attend a school of their choice, public or private. Like many states, Utah is facing pressure to improve its system of public education funding. The state's…

  8. Focus: A Forum on Teaching and Learning in Utah Community and Technical Colleges, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Don A., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    A series of articles is presented on teaching and learning in Utah community and technical colleges. After an editorial comment by J. Marvin Higbee on the goals and purposes of the Utah Association of Community Colleges, V. Lowell Hansen discusses the role of the technical instructor in the information society of the 1980's. Next, Ace G.…

  9. 76 FR 66080 - Notice of Proposed Class II Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease, Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-25

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Proposed Class II Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease, Utah... Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Management Act, Bro Energy LLC timely filed a petition for reinstatement of oil and gas lease UTU85562 lands in Carbon County, Utah, accompanied by all required rentals...

  10. 33 CFR 110.127b - Flaming Gorge Lake, Wyoming-Utah.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Flaming Gorge Lake, Wyoming-Utah... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.127b Flaming Gorge Lake, Wyoming-Utah. (a) Buckboard Crossing, Wyo. That portion of Flaming Gorge Lake inclosed by the shore and a line connecting...

  11. Education on the Information Superhighway: UtahLINK Online Education Conquers the "World Wide Wait".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online Libraries and Microcomputers, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Discusses UtahLINK, the most widely connected state online education system in the United States, and SiteFIre, a server-resident software package that speeds up Web access and stores Web-site data directly in user-designated folders. Describes the instructional possibilities and benefits of using UtahLINK and SiteFire. (AEF)

  12. Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Pamala C.; Lucas, Robert G.

    2009-05-01

    The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the current Utah code, the 2006 IECC. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. A limited analysis of these changes resulted in estimated savings of $168 to $188 for an average new house in Utah at recent fuel prices.

  13. Focus: A Forum on Teaching and Learning in Utah Community and Technical Colleges, Volume V.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Don A., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Innovative programs at Utah community and technical colleges are described and other topics of interest to faculty, staff, and administrators are addressed in this collection of articles. The journal contains the following articles by Utah two-year college faculty members: (1) "Open Access and Academic Excellence at Dixie College," by Peter…

  14. Do You Really Want to Know? Elementary Music Personnel and Potential in Utah

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Loretta Niebur

    2015-01-01

    This is the second of two articles reporting the results of a study by the author regarding the status of elementary music education in the state of Utah. This article focuses on the qualifications of Utah's elementary music teachers (music certified, elementary classroom certified, artists-in-residence, volunteers, and paraprofessionals) and the…

  15. Training Interpreter Paraprofessionals to Assist in the Language Assessment of English Language Learners in Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoakum, Susie; Manuel-Dupont, Sonia

    1997-01-01

    Describes development of an interpreter paraprofessional (IP) program by Utah State University and Granite (Utah) school district in response to the unavailability of certified interpreters to assist in special education assessment of students who are English Language Learners. Stresses the importance of providing IPs with job-relevant training,…

  16. 33 CFR 110.127b - Flaming Gorge Lake, Wyoming-Utah.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Flaming Gorge Lake, Wyoming-Utah... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.127b Flaming Gorge Lake, Wyoming-Utah. (a) Buckboard Crossing, Wyo. That portion of Flaming Gorge Lake inclosed by the shore and a line connecting...

  17. The Impact of the Designing Education for the Future Project in Utah. Report of a Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Jay J.; Forsgren, Afton

    This report provides an assessment of the Utah State Board of Education's participation in an 8-State project to improve education. The report offers an evaluation of the status of education in Utah and recommends a practical blueprint for enabling the State to attain national leadership in educational achievement. The project was concerned…

  18. Baseline Survey of Educational Technology Access and Application in Southeastern Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyner, Kathleen; And Others

    Utah's Southeastern Education Service Center has devised a five-phase vision plan for improving the educational technology infrastructure in the southeastern region of the state. The fourth phase involves the creation of the Southeastern Utah Regional Wide Area Network (SURWAN), which will link all K-12 schools to the Internet by 1996. This…

  19. 75 FR 57288 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Utah Museum of Natural History, Salt Lake City, UT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-20

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Utah Museum of Natural History, Salt Lake City, UT... of Natural History, Salt Lake City, UT. The human remains and associated funerary objects were... Utah Museum of Natural History professional staff and a report sent to representatives of...

  20. Utah State Library Division. Library Services & Technology Act: Five Year Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Library, Salt Lake City.

    This five-year plan for the administration of Utah's Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) program contains the following sections: (1) principles; (2) assumptions; (3) the current scene of Utah libraries, including public libraries, academic libraries, school library media centers, and private and research libraries; (4) establishment of…

  1. A Course of Study for Social Studies in Utah. Elementary/Secondary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Walter D.

    This document contains the social studies curriculum for elementary and secondary schools in Utah. The curriculum was designed with the Utah State Board of Education's maturity goals as a focus. These goals relate to maturity in eight areas--intellectual, ethical/moral, spiritual, emotional, social and physical, environmental, aesthetic, and…

  2. 78 FR 34160 - Union Pacific Railroad Company-Abandonment Exemption-In Iron County, Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Union Pacific Railroad Company--Abandonment Exemption--In Iron County, Utah... of the line at milepost 31.83 in Cedar City, a total distance of 1.03 miles in Iron County, Utah...

  3. Annual Estimated Minimum School Program of Utah School Districts, 1984-85.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City. School Finance and Business Section.

    This bulletin presents both the statistical and financial data of the Estimated Annual State-Supported Minimum School Program for the 40 school districts of the State of Utah for the 1984-85 school year. It is published for the benefit of those interested in research into the minimum school programs of the various Utah school districts. A brief…

  4. Residence Exposure and Fertility Expectations of Young Mormon and Non-Mormon Women in Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toney, Michael B.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Compared fertility expectations of young non-Mormon females living in Utah (2.4 children) with those of young Mormon females in Utah (4.4 children). Findings suggest that residence in a high fertility area per se does not affect fertility and that Mormon/non-Mormon fertility differences are likely to persist into the foreseeable future. (BH)

  5. Skeletons, Boondoggles, and Success: Multicultural Education at the University of Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodrigues, Raymond J.

    Problems facing multicultural education, implications of these problems for teacher education, and the multicultural teacher education program at the University of Utah are described. Factors operating against multicultural education in Utah include the back to basics movement, the competency movement, the attack on bilingual education, the…

  6. Extension of the Yellowstone plateau, eastern Snake River Plain, and Owyhee plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, D.W.; Hackett, W.R.; Ore, H.T. )

    1990-11-01

    Formation of the late Cenozoic volcanic province comprising the Owyhee plateau, eastern Snake River Plain, and Yellowstone plateau has been accompanied by east-northeast-directed crustal extension. A new vector of 45 mm/yr, N56{degree}E for the migration of silicic volcanism across the volcanic province is calculated. If migration of volcanism reflects west-southwest continental drift over a mantle plume, a zone of crustal extension must separate the volcanic province from the more slowly moving North American craton. Space-time relations of basin fill in the adjacent Basin and Range province provide evidence for a zone of extension, about 125 km wide, coincident with and east of coeval silicic volcanism. Since 16 Ma, the zone of extension has migrated along with silicic volcanism, maintaining its position between the province and the unextended craton.

  7. Loess Plateau storage of Northeastern Tibetan Plateau-derived Yellow River sediment

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Junsheng; Stevens, Thomas; Rittner, Martin; Stockli, Daniel; Garzanti, Eduardo; Limonta, Mara; Bird, Anna; Andò, Sergio; Vermeesch, Pieter; Saylor, Joel; Lu, Huayu; Breecker, Daniel; Hu, Xiaofei; Liu, Shanpin; Resentini, Alberto; Vezzoli, Giovanni; Peng, Wenbin; Carter, Andrew; Ji, Shunchuan; Pan, Baotian

    2015-01-01

    Marine accumulations of terrigenous sediment are widely assumed to accurately record climatic- and tectonic-controlled mountain denudation and play an important role in understanding late Cenozoic mountain uplift and global cooling. Underpinning this is the assumption that the majority of sediment eroded from hinterland orogenic belts is transported to and ultimately stored in marine basins with little lag between erosion and deposition. Here we use a detailed and multi-technique sedimentary provenance dataset from the Yellow River to show that substantial amounts of sediment eroded from Northeast Tibet and carried by the river's upper reach are stored in the Chinese Loess Plateau and the western Mu Us desert. This finding revises our understanding of the origin of the Chinese Loess Plateau and provides a potential solution for mismatches between late Cenozoic terrestrial sedimentation and marine geochemistry records, as well as between global CO2 and erosion records. PMID:26449321

  8. Loess Plateau storage of Northeastern Tibetan Plateau-derived Yellow River sediment.

    PubMed

    Nie, Junsheng; Stevens, Thomas; Rittner, Martin; Stockli, Daniel; Garzanti, Eduardo; Limonta, Mara; Bird, Anna; Andò, Sergio; Vermeesch, Pieter; Saylor, Joel; Lu, Huayu; Breecker, Daniel; Hu, Xiaofei; Liu, Shanpin; Resentini, Alberto; Vezzoli, Giovanni; Peng, Wenbin; Carter, Andrew; Ji, Shunchuan; Pan, Baotian

    2015-01-01

    Marine accumulations of terrigenous sediment are widely assumed to accurately record climatic- and tectonic-controlled mountain denudation and play an important role in understanding late Cenozoic mountain uplift and global cooling. Underpinning this is the assumption that the majority of sediment eroded from hinterland orogenic belts is transported to and ultimately stored in marine basins with little lag between erosion and deposition. Here we use a detailed and multi-technique sedimentary provenance dataset from the Yellow River to show that substantial amounts of sediment eroded from Northeast Tibet and carried by the river's upper reach are stored in the Chinese Loess Plateau and the western Mu Us desert. This finding revises our understanding of the origin of the Chinese Loess Plateau and provides a potential solution for mismatches between late Cenozoic terrestrial sedimentation and marine geochemistry records, as well as between global CO2 and erosion records. PMID:26449321

  9. Position of the Triassic-Jurassic boundary and timing of the end-Triassic extinctions on land: Data from the Moenave Formation on the southern Colorado Plateau, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lucas, S.G.; Tanner, L.H.; Donohoo-Hurley, L.; Geissman, J.W.; Kozur, H.W.; Heckert, A.B.; Weems, R.E.

    2011-01-01

    Strata of the Moenave Formation on and adjacent to the southern Colorado Plateau in Utah-Arizona, U.S.A., represent one of the best known and most stratigraphically continuous, complete and fossiliferous terrestrial sections across the Triassic-Jurassic boundary. We present a synthesis of new biostratigraphic and magnetostratigraphic data collected from across the Moenave Formation outcrop belt, which extends from the St. George area in southwestern Utah to the Tuba City area in northern Arizona. These data include palynomorphs, conchostracans and vertebrate fossils (including footprints) and a composite polarity record based on four overlapping magnetostratigraphic sections. Placement of the Triassic-Jurassic boundary in strata of the Moenave Formation has long been imprecise and debatable, but these new data (especially the conchostracans) allow us to place the Triassic-Jurassic boundary relatively precisely in the middle part of the Whitmore Point Member of the Moenave Formation, stratigraphically well above the highest occurrence of crurotarsan body fossils or footprints. Correlation to marine sections based on this placement indicates that major terrestrial vertebrate extinctions preceded marine extinctions across the Triassic-Jurassic boundary and therefore were likely unrelated to the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) volcanism. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  10. Ecological aspects of the Jos Plateau, Nigeria*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, V. H.

    1972-01-01

    The Jos Plateau has an area of about 6 700 km2, lies at 1 280 m above sea level, and contains approximately 1 million inhabitants. Annual rainfall averaged 137 cm in the period 1965-68; in 1969 rainfall totalled 170 cm and lasted for a month longer than usual. The rural population is engaged in agriculture, tin mining, and cattle grazing. Animal life consists chiefly of domestic species; there are few large wild animals. Wild primates are apparently rare, although baboons and red patas monkeys are sometimes seen. Tree cover is restricted to small patches along streams and some hillsides; there are euphorbia hedges and scattered trees in rural communities and along roadsides. PMID:4538036

  11. Logarithmic correlations in quantum Hall plateau transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, Romain

    2015-07-01

    The critical behavior of quantum Hall transitions in two-dimensional disordered electronic systems can be described by a class of complicated, nonunitary conformal field theories with logarithmic correlations. The nature and the physical origin of these logarithmic correlation functions remain, however, mysterious. Using the replica trick and the underlying symmetries of these quantum critical points, we show here how to construct nonperturbatively disorder-averaged observables in terms of Green's functions that scale logarithmically at criticality. In the case of the spin quantum Hall transition, which may occur in disordered superconductors with spin-rotation symmetry and broken time reversal invariance, we argue that our results are compatible with an alternative approach based on supersymmetry. The generalization to the integer quantum Hall plateau transition is also discussed.

  12. Aeolian Sediments on the northeastern Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauch, G.; Lehmkuhl, F.

    2013-12-01

    The timing and spatial distribution of aeolian sediments on the northeastern Tibetan Plateau have gained increasing interest during the last decades. The formation of the aeolian deposits is often related to cold and dry climate conditions. However, further important parameters are the local geomorphological setting and sediment availability in the source areas of the sediments. Aeolian sediments including loess, sandy loess and sands are widespread in the catchment of the Donggi Cona on the northeastern Tibetan Plateau at around 4000 m asl. Detailed geomorphological mapping of the deposits and geochemical analyses of the sediments revealed varying sources throughout the Holocene. The timing of the sediment deposition is based on 43 OSL (optical stimulated luminescence) ages. Several phases of enhanced aeolian deposition took place during the Holocene. The accumulation of aeolian sands lasted from 10.5 until 7 ka. The main source area of these sands was a large alluvial fan. Parallel to the formation of the dunes loess was deposited on the adjacent slopes from 10.5 until 7.5 ka. These sediments most probably originate in the nearby Qaidam Basin. In contrast to the general linkage of aeolian sediments to dryer climate conditions formation of these aeolian deposits is related to wetter conditions due to a strengthening of the Asian Summer Monsoons. The wetter climate enhanced the trapping and continuous fixation of the aeolian sediments by vegetation. With the further strengthening of the Monsoon fluvial processes eroded the aeolian deposits at least until 6 ka. From about 3 ka to the present a reactivation of aeolian sands and the formation of new dunes took place. This reactivation is related to drier conditions on the north-eastern Tibetan Plateau. Additionally, an increased human influence might have enhanced the aeolian activity. Similar phases of enhanced aeolian activity have been documented in more than 170 available OSL ages from loess and aeolian sands in

  13. Plateau inflation in SUGRA-MSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Girish Kumar; Gupta, Gaveshna; Lambiase, Gaetano; Mohanty, Subhendra

    2016-09-01

    We explored a Higgs inflationary scenario in the SUGRA embedding of the MSSM in Einstein frame where the inflaton is contained in the SU (2) Higgs doublet. We include all higher order non-renormalizable terms to the MSSM superpotential and an appropriate Kähler potential which can provide slow-roll inflaton potential in the D-flat direction. In this model, a plateau-like inflation potential can be obtained if the imaginary part of the neutral Higgs acts as the inflaton. The inflationary predictions of this model are consistent with the latest CMB observations. The model represents a successful Higgs inflation scenario in the context of Supergravity and it is compatible with Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model.

  14. Geochemical Evolution of the Hikurangi Oceanic Plateau, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoernle, K.; Hauff, F.; Werner, R.; Mortimer, N.; van den Bogaard, P.; Geldmacher, J.; Garbe-Schoenberg, D.

    2004-12-01

    The Hikurangi oceanic plateau or large igneous province (LIP), located east of the North Island of New Zealand, covers an area of 350,000 km3 and is located at a depth of 2,500-3,500 b.s.l. The Hikurangi plateau was possibly connected to the Manihiki LIP (now located 3000 km to the north) but may have been separated by Cretaceous seafloor spreading at the Osbourn Trough (Billen and Stock, 2000, J. Geophys. Res., 106, 13481-13489). Therefore it may have formed part of the "greater Ontong Java Plateau event" (Coffin and Eldholm, Geology, 21, 515-51), the largest magmatic event preserved on Earth. During the R/V Sonne SO168 ZEALANDIA cruise, 77 dredge hauls containing igneous samples were recovered from the Hikurangi Plateau. Volcanic rocks were obtained from 1) the plateau basement along the 1 km high Rapuhia Scarp, 2) large guyot-type seamounts within the plateau, and 3) ridge-type seamounts associated with rifting of the NE plateau margin (Hoernle et al., 2004, EOS). The recovered plateau rocks range from basalts, dolerites and gabbros with tholeiitic and alkali basaltic to trachybasaltic compositions. The seamount volcanic rocks have more Si-undersaturated compositions than the plateau rocks and range from alkali basalts through mugearites to basanites through tephrites to nephelinites. The plateau basement rocks have flat rare earth element (REE) patterns similar to enriched mid-ocean-ridge basalt (MORB) and basement rocks from other oceanic LIPs, such as Manihiki, Ontong-Java and the Caribbean. The late-stage seamount lavas show enrichment in the light REE and all strongly to moderately incompatible elements, having incompatible element characteristics similar to the HIMU (high time-integrated U/Pb) component in ocean island basalts (OIB). Although the Pb isotopic composition has been extensively effected by seawater alteration, the freshest samples have enriched (EM-type) Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions similar to Ontong-Java and Manihiki basement rocks

  15. The deep structure of Venusian plateau highlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimm, Robert E.

    1994-01-01

    Magellan gravity data confirm that several of the large, tectonically deformed, plateau-like highlands on venus are shallowly compensated, most likely by crustal thickness variations. Apparent depths of isostatic compensation, computed in the spatial domain, range from 30 to 50 km for Alpha, Tellus, Ovda, and Thetis Regiones. Using a two-layer model for isostatic compensation, Alpha, Tellus, and Ovda are best represented as nearly completely compensated in crust that is regionally 20-40 km thick around these highlands, with little contribution from deeper mantle sources. In contrast to these three areas, a stronger regional gravity high associated with Thetis requires a significant upper mantle component to compensation. This is evident in the spectral admittance as a pronounced deep, long-wavelength anomaly. In the two-layer isostatic model, a broad, deeply compensated upland underlies a shallowly compensated central block of Thetis. If this deep component is interpreted as a thermal anomaly, the loci of maximum upwelling agree well with sites of recent extension. The plateau highlands are thus physiographically and isostatically equivalent to terrestrial continents, though probably not compositionally. They also share the record of a long tectonic history. The large regional gravity anomaly of Thetis indicates that active mantle proceses continue even beneath some areas (tessera) thought to be a relic of a former geological regime. The excellent agreement of modeled crustal thicknesses around Alpha, Tellus, and Ovda Regiones suggests that 20-40 km is a representative global value for the plains. Such a crust is thicker than previously estimated and about twice as thick as the expected thickness of crust produced at venusian spreading centers

  16. Surgical options for posterior tibial plateau fracture

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongwei; Wu, Lijun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate surgical methods and clinical effectiveness of posteromedial and posterolateral approaches for the posterior tibial plateau fracture. Method: 21 cases who received surgery through posterior approaches for the treatment of posterior tibial plateau fractures (PTPFs) were included. Results: 21 cases were subject to follow-up for 12-24 months (an average of 16.2 months). No cases developed incision inflammation, neurovascular injury, internal fixation loosening and breakage. All fractures were healed. No cases developed knee varus and valgus deformity and fracture dislocation. After surgery, Rasmussen score for knee joint functions was 13-30 points (a mean of 24.2). The results were excellent in 12 cases, good in 7 cases and fair in 2 cases. The percentage of excellent and good results was 90.5%. Rasmussen radiology score was 10-18 points (a mean of 15.6 points). The results were excellent in 13 cases, good in 7 cases and fair in 1 cases. The percentage of excellent and good results was 95.2%. 1 case had significant limited range of knee flexion and extension, which was improved after phase II release under arthroscopy combined with function exercise. 2 cases developed traumatic arthritis, which was relieved after intra-articular injection with sodium hyaluronate and oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Conclusion: The posteromedial and posterolateral approaches for PTPF is good for reduction and fixation of PTPF. The approaches have benefits such as clear exposure, convenient placement of internal fixation, less trauma and good clinical outcome. PMID:26885086

  17. Investigation of plateau basin crustal structures and thickening mechanisms in the northeastern margin of the Tibetan plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Shixu; Xu, Zhaofan; Liu, Zhi; Zhang, Jianshi; Liu, Baofeng; Lin, Jiyan; Guo, Wenbin

    2012-12-01

    This paper uses deep seismic sounding (DSS) data to contrast and analyze the crustal structures of three plateau basins (Songpan-Garze, Qaidam, Longzhong) in the northeastern margin of the Qinghai-Xizang (Tibetan) plateau, as well as two stable cratonic basins (Ordos, Sichuan) in its peripheral areas. Plateau basin crustal structures, lithological variations and crustal thickening mechanisms were investigated. The results show that, compared to the peripheral stable cratonic basins, the crystalline crusts of plateau basins in the northeastern margin are up to 10-15 km thicker, and the relative medium velocity difference is about 5% less. The medium velocity change in crustal layers of plateau basin indicates that the upper crust undergoes brittle deformation, whereas the lower crust deforms plastically with low velocity. The middle crust shows a brittle-to-plastic transition zone in this region. Thickening in the lower crust (about 5-10 km), and rheological characteristics that show low-medium velocity (relatively reduced by 7%), suggest that crustal thickening mainly takes place in lower crust in the northeastern margin of the Tibetan plateau. The crust along the northeastern margin shows evidence of wholesale block movement, and crustal shortening and thickening seem to be the main deformation features of this region. The GPS data show that the block motion modes and crustal thickening in the Tibetan plateau is closely related to the peripheral tectonic stress field and motion direction of the Indian plate. The Mani-Yushu-Xianshuihe fold belt along the boundary between the Qiangtang block and the Bayan Har block divides the different plateau thickening tectonic environments into the middle-western plateau, the northeastern margin and the southeastern plateau.

  18. Intrusive Rock Database for the Digital Geologic Map of Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nutt, C.J.; Ludington, Steve

    2003-01-01

    Digital geologic maps offer the promise of rapid and powerful answers to geologic questions using Geographic Information System software (GIS). Using modern GIS and database methods, a specialized derivative map can be easily prepared. An important limitation can be shortcomings in the information provided in the database associated with the digital map, a database which is often based on the legend of the original map. The purpose of this report is to show how the compilation of additional information can, when prepared as a database that can be used with the digital map, be used to create some types of derivative maps that are not possible with the original digital map and database. This Open-file Report consists of computer files with information about intrusive rocks in Utah that can be linked to the Digital Geologic Map of Utah (Hintze et al., 2000), an explanation of how to link the databases and map, and a list of references for the databases. The digital map, which represents the 1:500,000-scale Geologic Map of Utah (Hintze, 1980), can be obtained from the Utah Geological Survey (Map 179DM). Each polygon in the map has a unique identification number. We selected the polygons identified on the geologic map as intrusive rock, and constructed a database (UT_PLUT.xls) that classifies the polygons into plutonic map units (see tables). These plutonic map units are the key information that is used to relate the compiled information to the polygons on the map. The map includes a few polygons that were coded as intrusive on the state map but are largely volcanic rock; in these cases we note the volcanic rock names (rhyolite and latite) as used in the original sources Some polygons identified on the digital state map as intrusive rock were misidentified; these polygons are noted in a separate table of the database, along with some information about their true character. Fields may be empty because of lack of information from references used or difficulty in finding

  19. Radon-hazard potential the Beaver basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, C.E.

    1995-06-01

    Indoor-radon levels in the Beaver basin of southwestern Utah are the highest recorded to date in Utah, ranging from 17.5 to 495 picocuries per liter (pCi/L). Because the U.S. Environment Protection Agency considers indoor-radon levels above 4 pCi/L to represent a risk of lung cancer from long-term exposure, the Utah Geological Survey is preparing a radon-hazard-potential map for the area to help prioritize indoor testing and evaluate the need for radon-resistant construction. Radon is a chemically inert radioactive gas derived from the decay of uranium-238, which is commonly found in rocks and soils. Soil permeability, depth to ground water, and uranium/thorium content of source materials control the mobility and concentration of radon in the soil. Once formed, radon diffuses into the pore space of the soil and then to the atmosphere or into buildings by pressure-driven flow of air or additional diffusion. The Beaver basin has been a topographic and structural depression since late Miocene time. Paleocene to Miocene volcanic and igneous rocks border the basin. Uraniferous alluvial-fan, piedmont-slope, flood-plain, and lacustrine sediments derived from the surrounding volcanic rocks fill the basin. A soil-gas radon and ground radioactivity survey in the Beaver basin shows that soils have high levels of radon gas. In this survey, uranium concentrations range from 3 to 13 parts per million (ppm) and thorium concentrations range from 10 to 48 ppm. Radon concentrations in the soil gas ranged from 85 to 3,500 pCi/L. The highest concentrations of uranium, thorium, and radon gas and the highest radon-hazard-potential are in the well-drained permeable soils in the lower flood- plain deposits that underlie the city of Beaver.

  20. Particulate air pollution and daily mortality on Utah's Wasatch Front.

    PubMed Central

    Pope, C A; Hill, R W; Villegas, G M

    1999-01-01

    Reviews of daily time-series mortality studies from many cities throughout the world suggest that daily mortality counts are associated with short-term changes in particulate matter (PM) air pollution. One U.S. city, however, with conspicuously weak PM-mortality associations was Salt Lake City, Utah; however, relatively robust PM-mortality associations have been observed in a neighboring metropolitan area (Provo/Orem, Utah). The present study explored this apparent discrepancy by collecting, comparing, and analyzing mortality, pollution, and weather data for all three metropolitan areas on Utah's Wasatch Front region of the Wasatch Mountain Range (Ogden, Salt Lake City, and Provo/Orem) for approximately 10 years (1985-1995). Generalized additive Poisson regression models were used to estimate PM-mortality associations while controlling for seasonality, temperature, humidity, and barometric pressure. Salt Lake City experienced substantially more episodes of high PM that were dominated by windblown dust. When the data were screened to exclude obvious windblown dust episodes and when PM data from multiple monitors were used to construct an estimate of mean exposure for the area, comparable PM-mortality effects were estimated. After screening and by using constructed mean PM [less than/equal to] 10 microm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10) data, the estimated percent change in mortality associated with a 10-mg/m3 increase in PM10 (and 95% confidence intervals) for the three Wasatch Front metropolitan areas equaled approximately 1. 6% (0.3-2.9), 0.8% (0.3-1.3), and 1.0% (0.2-1.8) for the Ogden, Salt Lake City, and Provo/Orem areas, respectively. We conclude that stagnant air pollution episodes with higher concentrations of primary and secondary combustion-source particles were more associated with elevated mortality than windblown dust episodes with relatively higher concentrations of coarse crustal-derived particles. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:10379003

  1. Paleomagnetic dating of burial diagenesis in Mississippian carbonates, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumstein, Angela M.; Elmore, R. Douglas; Engel, Michael H.; Elliot, Crawford; Basu, Ankan

    2004-04-01

    The objective of this study is to test models for the origin of widespread secondary magnetizations in the Mississippian Deseret Limestone. The Delle Phosphatic Member of the Deseret Limestone is a source rock for hydrocarbons, and modeling studies indicate that it entered the oil window in the Early Cretaceous during the Sevier orogeny. Paleomagnetic and rock magnetic results from the Deseret Limestone and the stratigraphically equivalent Chainman Shale in central and western Utah indicate that the units contain two ancient magnetizations residing in magnetite. Burial temperatures are too low for the magnetizations to be thermoviscous in origin, and they are interpreted to be chemical remanent magnetizations (CRMs). Fold tests from western Utah indicate the presence of a prefolding Triassic to Jurassic CRM. Geochemical (87Sr/86Sr, δ13C, and δ18O) and petrographic analyses suggest that externally derived fluids did not alter these rocks. This CRM was acquired at the beginning of the oil window and is interpreted to be the result of burial diagenesis of organic matter. A second younger CRM in western central Utah is apparently postfolding and is probably Late Cretaceous to early Tertiary in age. On the basis of the thermal modeling, the timing overlaps with the oil window. These results are consistent with a connection between organic matter maturation and remagnetization. Modeling of the smectite-to-illite transformation in the Deseret Limestone suggests a mean age prior to acquisition of both CRMs, although the range for illitization overlaps with the Triassic to Jurassic CRM. The results of this study support the hypothesis that pervasive CRMs can be related to burial diagenetic processes. In addition, paleomagnetism can be used to determine the timing of such processes, which can benefit hydrocarbon exploration efforts.

  2. Evaluation of low-temperature geothermal potential in Utah and Goshen Valleys and adjacent areas, Utah. Part II. Water temperature and chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Klauk, R.H.; Davis, D.A.

    1984-12-01

    Geothermal reconnaissance techniques have identified five areas in Utah County warranting further investigation for low-temperature geothermal resources. One area in northern Utah Valley is along Utah Lake fault zone and includes Saratoga Hot Springs. Water temperatures within this area range from 21 to 43/sup 0/C. Common ion analyses as well as B and Li concentrations indicate waters sampled in this area are anomalous when compared to other samples from the same aquifer. Two other areas in southern Utah Valley also coincide with the Utah Lake fault zone. Common ion analyses, trace element concentrations, and C1/HCO/sub 3/ ratios distinguish these areas from all other waters in this valley. Temperatures within these southern areas range from 21 to 32/sup 0/C. All three thermal areas are possibly the result of deep circulation of meteoric water being warmed and subsequently migrating upward within the Utah Lake fault zone. The Castilla Hot Springs area has been expanded by this study to include a spring located 3 mi further up Spanish Fork Canyon near the Thistle earthflow. A temperature of 50/sup 0/C was recorded for this spring and chemistry is similar to Castilla. In Goshen Valley, the fifth geothermal area identified, measured temperatures range from 20 to 27/sup 0/C for some wells and springs. Chemical analyses, however, do not discern the location of low-temperature geothermal reservoirs. 18 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Eocene Tibetan plateau remnants preserved in the northwest Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Beek, Peter; van Melle, Jérémie; Guillot, Stéphane; Pêcher, Arnaud; Reiners, Peter W.; Nicolescu, Stefan; Latif, Mohammad

    2009-05-01

    The northwest Himalaya shows strongly contrasting relief. Deeply incised mountain ranges that are characterized by extremely rapid exhumation and some of the highest peaks in the world are in contrast with high-elevation, low-relief areas such as the Deosai plateau in northern Pakistan, which lies at an altitude of 4,000m. The origin and evolution of such plateau regions at the convergence of the most active continental collision in the world remain elusive. Here we report low-temperature thermochronology data from the Deosai plateau and use thermal history modelling to show that the plateau has undergone continuous slow denudation at rates below 250mMyr-1 for the past 35Myr at least. This finding suggests tectonic and morphologic stability of the plateau since at least Eocene times, only 15-20Myr after the onset of the India-Asia collision. Our work contradicts the hypothesis that widespread low-relief surfaces in the northwest Himalaya result from efficient kilometre-scale glacial erosion during Quaternary times. We show that similarly stable surfaces exist throughout the entire northwest Himalaya and share common morphologic characteristics and denudation histories, which are comparable to those of the western Tibetan plateau. Our results suggest that these surfaces are preserved remnants of an Eocene southwestern Tibetan plateau that was more extensive than today.

  4. Remote sensing and uranium exploration at Lisbon Valley, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conel, J. E.; Niesen, P. L.

    1981-01-01

    As part of the joint NASA-Geosat uranium test case program, aircraft-acquired multispectral scanner data are used to investigate the distribution of bleaching in Windgate sandstone exposed in Lisbon Valley anticline, Utah. It is noted that all of the large ore bodies contained in lower Chinle Triassic age or Cutler Permian age strata in this area lie beneath or closely adjacent to such bleached outcrops. The geographic coincidences reported here are seen as inviting renewed interest in speculation of a causal relation between occurrences of Mississippian-Pennsylvanian oil and gas in this area and of Triassic uranium accumulation and rock bleaching.

  5. A Quantitative Approach to Flash Flood Prediction in Southern Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurwitz, M. M.; Gibson, C. V.; Jackson, M.; McInerney, B.

    2005-05-01

    Flash flood monitoring and prediction is considered to be a critical part of National Weather Service (NWS) severe weather operations in the semi-arid western United States. The complex terrain and steep slopes in this area, combined with impervious rock and soils, can induce flash flooding with relatively light rainfall. This reduces the value of using the more common conceptual flash flood models developed for the central and eastern United States. Thus, forecasters at the NWS Weather Forecast Office in Salt Lake City, Utah, have relied on a locally developed conceptual model to predict the likelihood of flash flooding on a given day. Until this study, common practice was to assume that humid and unstable air combined with low wind speeds in the lower troposphere would yield rainfall conductive to flash flooding. A new approach to flash flood prediction, exploring the connection between atmospheric variables and flash flood reports, will increase situational awareness and provide forecasters with quantitative flash flood guidance. A record of historical flash floods in southern Utah was compiled to determine the frequency of events from 1959 to 2003. A complete data set, consisting of both historical flash flooding days and non-event days, was assembled. A trial of the 2003 three-month flash flood season assessed which variables and which dataset to use in studying the eight flash flood seasons from 1996 to 2003; the trial concluded that the best source of atmospheric data was a set of soundings from Flagstaff, Arizona, a location close to and generally upstream of southern Utah. Neural networks were used to determine the relationship between the atmospheric state and a particular day's flash flood severity. The final neural network used six input variables and a discretized output variable. Precipitable water, low-level relative humidity, convective available potential energy, the 500hPa height change between 12Z and 0Z the following day, and the previous day

  6. Source Analysis of the Crandall Canyon, Utah, Mine Collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Dreger, D S; Ford, S R; Walter, W R

    2008-02-28

    Analysis of seismograms from a magnitude 3.9 seismic event on August 6, 2007 in central Utah reveals an anomalous radiation pattern that is contrary to that expected for a tectonic earthquake, and which is dominated by an implosive component. The results show the seismic event is best modeled as a shallow underground collapse. Interestingly, large transverse surface waves require a smaller additional non-collapse source component that represents either faulting in the rocks above the mine workings or deformation of the medium surrounding the mine.

  7. EDITORIAL: Integrated assessments of environmental change on the Tibetan Plateau Integrated assessments of environmental change on the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Yongwei; Yao, Tandong

    2009-12-01

    The Tibetan Plateau is one of the Earth's most sensitive regions in responding to climate change due to its extremely high altitude and the presence of permafrost and glaciers. The cryosphere, biosphere and hydrosphere of the plateau have been undergoing significant changes. Due to the low human population density, environmental changes on the plateau are largely driven by natural processes. Thus, the plateau provides a unique and comprehensive site for global change studies. This focus issue on Climate Change on the Tibetan Plateau aims to address both paleo and recent environmental changes across the plateau to facilitate our understanding of this remote and under-studied area. We invited a wide spectrum of contributions to address climate change, permafrost degradation, glacier/snow/ice dynamics, lake dynamics, land- cover/land-use changes, and their interactions on the plateau. Collectively, the diverse contributions in this special issue are expected to present the recent advancement of the above topics and beyond. See the PDF for the full text of the editorial. Focus on Climate Change on the Tibetan Plateau Contents Does a weekend effect in diurnal temperature range exist in the eastern and central Tibetan Plateau? Qinglong You, Shichang Kang, Wolfgang-Albert Flügel, Arturo Sanchez-Lorenzo, Yuping Yan, Yanwei Xu and Jie Huang Diurnal variations of summertime precipitation over the Tibetan Plateau in relation to orographically-induced regional circulations Xiaodong Liu, Aijuan Bai and Changhai Liu Lake-level fluctuations since the Last Glaciation in Selin Co (lake), Central Tibet, investigated using optically stimulated luminescence dating of beach ridges Dewen Li, Yingkui Li, Baoqi Ma, Guocheng Dong, Liqiang Wang and Junxiang Zhao Recent changes in Imja Glacial Lake and its damming moraine in the Nepal Himalaya revealed by in situ surveys and multi-temporal ASTER imagery Koji Fujita, Akiko Sakai, Takayuki Nuimura, Satoru Yamaguchi and Rishi R Sharma Changes

  8. Drainage Evolution during the Uplift of the Central Anatolia Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocard, G. Y.; Meijers, M. J.; Willenbring, J. K.; Kaymakci, N.; Whitney, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    The Central Anatolian plateau formed in the past 8-6 Myrs, associated to a change in tectonic regime, from contraction to extensional escape tectonics. We have examined the response of the river drainage of Central Anatolia to the rise of the plateau uplift and to the formation of the Anatolian microplate, tracking changes in drainage organization. Anatolia experienced widespread rock uplift and erosion in the Late Oligocene, generating a narrow, steep, and quickly eroding mountain range above the future southern plateau margin. A regionally widespread marine transgression resulted from wholesale foundering of this orogen in Early Miocene time. Widespread planation surfaces overlapped by Miocene marine carbonates bevel this topography, indicating that relief had been reduced to a low elevation pedimented landscape by the end of the Middle Miocene. Plateau uplift initiated around 11 My ago in Eastern Anatolia; it was echoed in Central Anatolia by a short-lived phase of contraction and localized uplifts that predate escape tectonics and mark the beginning of the current topographic differentiation of the southern plateau margin. The through-going drainage network inherited disintegrated, and a vast zone of inward drainage formed at the location of the future plateau interior. Between 8 and 6 My, the southern plateau margin (i.e. the Tauride Mountains) emerged. δ18O analyses on lacustrine and pedogenic carbonates show that the southern plateau margin, if not the plateau interior, had experienced enough uplift by 5 My to generate a substantial rain shadow over the plateau interior. Being disconnected from the regional base level from the start, the plateau interior was able to rise without experiencing substantial dissection. It reconnected to all surrounding sediment sinks (Mediterranean Sea, Black Sea and Persian Gulf) over the past 5 My. We discuss the mechanisms that have driven this reconnection. Bottom-up processes of integration such as drainage divide retreat

  9. Central Plateau Cleanup at DOE's Hanford Site - 12504

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, Jonathan

    2012-07-01

    The discussion of Hanford's Central Plateau includes significant work in and around the center of the Hanford Site - located about 7 miles from the Columbia River. The Central Plateau is the area to which operations will be shrunk in 2015 when River Corridor cleanup is complete. This work includes retrieval and disposal of buried waste from miles of trenches; the cleanup and closure of massive processing canyons; the clean-out and demolition to 'slab on grade' of the high-hazard Plutonium Finishing Plant; installation of key groundwater treatment facilities to contain and shrink plumes of contaminated groundwater; demolition of all other unneeded facilities; and the completion of decisions about remaining Central Plateau waste sites. A stated goal of EM has been to shrink the footprint of active cleanup to less than 10 square miles by 2020. By the end of FY2011, Hanford will have reduced the active footprint of cleanup by 64 percent exceeding the goal of 49 percent. By 2015, Hanford will reduce the active footprint of cleanup by more than 90 percent. The remaining footprint reduction will occur between 2015 and 2020. The Central Plateau is a 75-square-mile region near the center of the Hanford Site including the area designated in the Hanford Comprehensive Land Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement (DOE 1999) and Record of Decision (64 FR 61615) as the Industrial-Exclusive Area, a rectangular area of about 20 square miles in the center of the Central Plateau. The Industrial-Exclusive Area contains the 200 East and 200 West Areas that have been used primarily for Hanford's nuclear fuel processing and waste management and disposal activities. The Central Plateau also encompasses the 200 Area CERCLA National Priorities List site. The Central Plateau has a large physical inventory of chemical processing and support facilities, tank systems, liquid and solid waste disposal and storage facilities, utility systems, administrative facilities, and groundwater monitoring

  10. Reactive Multiphase behavior of CO2 in Saline Aquifers beneath the Colorado Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    R. G. Allis; J. Moore; S. White

    2002-06-30

    Gas reservoirs developed within the Colorado Plateau and Southern Rocky Mountains region are natural laboratories for studying the factors that promote long-term storage of CO{sub 2}. They also provide sites for storing additional CO{sub 2} if it can be separated from the flue gases of coal-fired power plants in this part of the U.S.A. These natural reservoirs are developed primarily in sandstones and dolomites; shales, mudstones and anhydrite form seals. In many fields, stacked reservoirs are present, indicating that the gas has migrated up through the section. There are also geologically young travertine deposits at the surface, and CO{sub 2}-charged groundwater and springs in the vicinity of known CO{sub 2} occurrences. These near-surface geological and hydrological features also provide examples of the environmental effects of leakage of CO{sub 2} from reservoirs, and justify further study. During reporting period covered here (the second quarter of Year 2 of the project, i.e. January 1-March 31, 2002), the main achievements were: (1) Field trips to the central Utah and eastern Arizona travertine areas to collect data and water samples to support study of surface CO{sub 2}-rich fluid leakage in these two areas. (2) Partial completion of a manuscript on natural analogues CO{sub 2} leakage from subsurface reservoirs. The remaining section on the chemistry of the fluids is in progress. (3) Improvements to CHEMTOUGH code to incorporate kinetic effects on reaction progress. (4) Submission of two abstracts (based on the above work) to the topical session at the upcoming GSA meeting in Denver titled ''Experimental, Field, and Modeling Studies of Geological Carbon Sequestration''. (5) Submission of paper to upcoming GGHT-6 conference in Kyoto. Co-PI S. White will attend this conference, and will also be involved in three other papers.

  11. Avian community responses to vegetation structure within chained and hand-cut pinyon-juniper woodlands on the Colorado Plateau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Riper, Charles, III; Crow, Claire

    2012-01-01

    We investigated relationships between breeding birds and vegetation characteristics in fuels-reduction treatment areas within pinyon-juniper woodlands at locations over the Colorado Plateau. The goal of this study was to document differences in avian community responses to two types of pinyon-juniper fuels-reduction treatments (chained vs. hand-cut), relative to control sites. We selected 73 vegetation plots in southern Utah and northern Arizona, of which 33 had been previously thinned by handcutting or chaining, and 40 control plots in untreated pinyon-juniper woodlands. At the 73 locations we documented vegetation structure and counted birds within 3.1 ha circular plots during the 2005 and 2006 breeding seasons. We focused in particular on the effects of fuels-reduction treatments to 16 bird species that are considered pinyon-juniper obligates. We found that density of pinyon pines was the most important variable in predicting bird species richness in all treatments and at control sites. Abundance of Brewer’s Sparrow (Spizella breweri) was negatively related to chained, but positively related to hand cut areas. Vesper Sparrow (Poocetes graminius) abundance was negatively related to both chaining and handcutting. Within 16 pinyon-juniper obligate bird species, abundance of five was positively related to pinyon-pine density, while two were positively related to juniper density. These responses, along with other bird-vegetation relationships influenced by treatment type, need to be considered by land managers when planning fuels reduction treatments in pinyon-juniper woodland habitat in the Colorado Plateau.

  12. Fish Lake, Utah - shallow seismic investigation of a lake-filled high-altitude graben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, M. S.; Oliviera-Manna, M.; Bailey, C.; Marchetti, D. W.; Brunelle, A.; Abbott, M. B.; Larsen, D. J.; Stoner, J. S.; Grimm, E. C.; Donovan, J.; Anderson, L.; Power, M. J.; Chavez, V.; Carter, V.; Hart, I.

    2015-12-01

    Fish Lake formed in a portion of the 20-km x 2.5-km wide NE-SW trending graben within the High Plateaus of Utah, on the border between the Basin and Range to the west and the Canyon Lands east. This presentation focuses on the shallow seismic stratigraphic architecture of the lake. Marchetti et al. (this meeting) focuses details of a shallow core collected in 2014. With a lake surface at 2700m, avg. depth of 27m (max 37m), the lake is flanked NW by a 15° slope up to a formerly glaciated Hightop plateau (3545m) and is bound to the SE by a 30° NW facing slope off the Mytoge crest (3050m). The drainage basin is 74 km2 with ~75% of the catchment draining the Hightop from four distinct streams. Pelican Canyon (glaciated) and Doctor Canyon (unglaciated) provide most drainage into the basin, with Bowery and Twin creeks draining only the slope. These streams flow through organic-rich meadows at the edge of the lake. Only one small stream drains NW into the lake from the small Crater Lakes graben (2850m) off the Mytoge. Bathymetric surveys in the lake highlight a submerged moraine to the NE, a gently sloping bottom that reaches maximum depth off the steep wall to the SE, and small delta-form features off each of the creeks on the NW edge. Chirp seismic surveys (2-16 kHz) consistently penetrate the upper 40-m (up to ~55m). The oldest visible reflectors rise into the submerged moraine to the NE, ending in a complex set of truncated and discontinuous beds eluding to soft sediment push at the front of the glacier. Along the edge near the creeks to the NW, multiple sets of downlapping reflectors, gas pockets, and chaotic beds with lobate tops define what we interpret as deltaic deposition, possible lower lake levels with marsh systems, and slope failures. The majority of the lake is underlain by flat-lying reflectors that bound sedimentary packages spanning the entirety of the basin interior. The uppermost layers have recently been cored where seismic reflectors are continuous

  13. The Paleoflood Record of the Upper Colorado River near Moab, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenbaum, N.; Harden, T.; Baker, V. R.; Weisheit, J. S.; Cline, M. L.; Halevi, R.; Dohrenwend, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    The paleoflood record of the Upper Colorado River was reconstructed 17 km upstream of the town of Moab, Utah (drainage area about 62,470 km2) using paleostage indicaters. The 4.5 km long study reach is a bedrock canyon incised some 300-350 m into the sandstone of the Colorado Plateau with a general gradient of 0.0004. The largest floods documented at the Cisco gauging station (1914-2011) - 30 km upstream, is the historical 1884 flood - 3540 m3s-1, the 1917 flood - 2175 m3s-1 and the 1984 flood - 1990 m3s-1. The paleostage indicators in the form of slackwater deposits and driftwood lines at this site are up to 15 m above the summer water discharge of July 2005 (425 m3 s-1). The detailed paleoflood stratigraphy was performed using a series of 14 pits across the SWD relict with a depth of up to 2 m. Dating of the paleoflood deposits include 14 OSL ages and 4 radiocarbon ages of wooden debris and charcoal. The canyon and channel geometry was reconstructed using a field survey of 24 cross sections during 2005. In 2010 a complementary survey of the underwater channel geometry using a sonar was conducted. Water surface profiles, peak discharges and hydraulic analyses where preformed using HECRAS hydraulic program. The water surface profiles were calibrated using the observed water levels of the floods of 25-26.5.2005 - 1140 m3s-1 and the 25-26 June 2011 - 260 m3s-1. The results indicate evidence of about 40 floods that occurred during the last 2140 +/- 220 years. The flow regime for the high-magnitude floods is subcritical and the canyon is relatively narrow, therefore the peak discharges are very sensitive to Manning`s n roughness coefficient. Due to the very low gradient the discharge results are also sensitive to the initial boundary conditions downstream. The peak discharges range from about 1600 m3s-1 and up to between 8,500 and 10,500 m3s-1 depending on the Manning n. At least 2 floods in this record exceeded the conservative value (8500 m3s-1) which is higher than

  14. Brittle-ductile shear zone formation in the McKim Limestone: eastern Monument Upwarp, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyum, S.; Pollard, D. D.

    2011-12-01

    The McKim Limestone is part of a regressive, marine sedimentary sequence of strata that was deposited in the Pennsylvanian to Permian periods. It is well-exposed across large portions of Raplee anticline and Comb monocline; a pair of kilometer-scale folds that mark the Monument Upwarp of the Colorado Plateau in southeastern Utah. Two conjugate sets of echelon vein arrays, with complementary echelon pressure solution seam arrays, occur as bed-perpendicular, systematic deformation features in the 1-3 m thick McKim Limestone unit. Based on large vein to vein array angles, large vein aperture to length ratios, and the presence of vein-perpendicular pressure solution seams, these structures are interpreted to have developed within localized, brittle-ductile shear zones. Topics of debate among structural geologists regarding the formation mechanism of echelon veins include the initiation mode of vein segments (tensile or shear), the relative age between shear zone initiation and vein formation, the interpretation of strain within a shear zone, and the development of sigmoidal veins as being indicative of rotation. These concepts often are founded on geometric observations and kinematic models of deformation (e.g. simple shear) that are independent of the constitutive properties of the rock, are not constrained by the equations of motion, and do not honor the boundary conditions on the vein surfaces. Here we show a more realistic representation of brittle-ductile shear zone formation by introducing numerical models that consider the mechanical properties of limestone, are constrained by the equations of motion, and explicitly define the vein surfaces and their boundary conditions. The commercial finite element software, Abaqus FEA, is used to investigate the deformed geometry of model echelon vein arrays as a function of the remotely applied stress, the initial geometry of the vein arrays, and the constitutive properties of the solid. These geometric patterns are compared

  15. Drug Poisoning Deaths according to Ethnicity in Utah.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Ray M; Hedin, Riley J; Fondario, Anna; Sloan, Arielle A; Hanson, Carl L

    2013-01-01

    This study characterizes drug-related deaths according to ethnicity in Utah during 2005-2010, based on data from the Utah Violent Death Reporting System (UTVDRS). Hispanics made up 12.1% (12.5% male and 11.7% female) of deaths. The most frequently identified drugs among decedents were opiates, then illicit drugs, benzodiazepines, over-the-counter medication, and antidepressants. Death rates for each drug were significantly greater in non-Hispanics than Hispanics. Most decedents used a combination of drugs. For each combination, rates were significantly greater for non-Hispanics than Hispanics, with an exception for opiates and illicit drugs combined, where there was no significant difference. Approximately 79% of non-Hispanics and 65% of Hispanics had one or more of the selected problems (e.g., mental, physical, or crisis related). Rates for each combination of problems were significantly greater in non-Hispanics, with the exception of crisis. Hispanics were less affected by the rise in prescription drug abuse. Hispanic decedents had a greater proportion of illegal drugs, consistent with it being more difficult to obtain prescription drugs. Hispanic decedents were less likely to have physical and mental health problems, which may be related to a smaller chance of diagnosis of such problems through the healthcare system. PMID:24826359

  16. Drug Poisoning Deaths according to Ethnicity in Utah

    PubMed Central

    Merrill, Ray M.; Hedin, Riley J.; Fondario, Anna; Sloan, Arielle A.; Hanson, Carl L.

    2013-01-01

    This study characterizes drug-related deaths according to ethnicity in Utah during 2005–2010, based on data from the Utah Violent Death Reporting System (UTVDRS). Hispanics made up 12.1% (12.5% male and 11.7% female) of deaths. The most frequently identified drugs among decedents were opiates, then illicit drugs, benzodiazepines, over-the-counter medication, and antidepressants. Death rates for each drug were significantly greater in non-Hispanics than Hispanics. Most decedents used a combination of drugs. For each combination, rates were significantly greater for non-Hispanics than Hispanics, with an exception for opiates and illicit drugs combined, where there was no significant difference. Approximately 79% of non-Hispanics and 65% of Hispanics had one or more of the selected problems (e.g., mental, physical, or crisis related). Rates for each combination of problems were significantly greater in non-Hispanics, with the exception of crisis. Hispanics were less affected by the rise in prescription drug abuse. Hispanic decedents had a greater proportion of illegal drugs, consistent with it being more difficult to obtain prescription drugs. Hispanic decedents were less likely to have physical and mental health problems, which may be related to a smaller chance of diagnosis of such problems through the healthcare system. PMID:24826359

  17. Genetic structure of the Utah Mormons: isonymy analysis.

    PubMed

    Jorde, L B; Morgan, K

    1987-03-01

    Isonymy analysis is reported for a sample of 188,895 marriages extracted from the Utah Genealogical Database. Inbreeding rates estimated by isonymy are low, ranging from 0.005 for the earliest marriage cohort (1800-1809) to 0.0008 in the most recent cohort (1950-1959). The inbreeding values decrease considerably through time, but they are consistently higher than inbreeding values estimated from pedigrees. Several explanations are offered for this, including polyphyletism of surnames and the presence of Scandinavian patronyms in this population. Random isonymy between subdivisions is also compared with random kinship estimated from migration matrices. In terms of within-subdivision kinship, the two approaches yield similar results. However, the results are quite dissimilar for between-subdivision kinship. This reflects the recent and nonrandom settlement of Utah by different ethnic groups with different surname distributions. In later time periods, the correlations between the two types of kinship estimates increase, showing that migration patterns (which are strongly determined by geographic distance) exert an increasing influence on the distribution of surnames. Logistic regression is performed on a subset of marriages (n = 88,202), using isonymous vs. nonisonymous marriage as the dependent variable. The independent variables are year of marriage, geographic distance between husband's and wife's birthplaces, endogamous vs. exogamous marriage, and population sizes of husband's and wife's birthplaces. Year of marriage and geographic distance are shown to be significant independent predictors of isonymous marriage. PMID:3578499

  18. Respiratory hospital admissions associated with PM10 pollution in Utah, Salt Lake, and Cache Valleys

    SciTech Connect

    Pope CA, I.I.I. )

    1991-03-01

    This study assessed the association between respiratory hospital admissions and PM10 pollution in Utah, Salt Lake, and Cache valleys during April 1985 through March 1989. Utah and Salt Lake valleys had high levels of PM10 pollution that violated both the annual and 24-h standards issued by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Much lower PM10 levels occurred in the Cache Valley. Utah Valley experienced the intermittent operation of its primary source of PM10 pollution: an integrated steel mill. Bronchitis and asthma admissions for preschool-age children were approximately twice as frequent in Utah Valley when the steel mill was operating versus when it was not. Similar differences were not observed in Salt Lake or Cache valleys. Even though Cache Valley had higher smoking rates and lower temperatures in winter than did Utah Valley, per capita bronchitis and asthma admissions for all ages were approximately twice as high in Utah Valley. During the period when the steel mill was closed, differences in per capita admissions between Utah and Cache valleys narrowed considerably. Regression analysis also demonstrated a statistical association between respiratory hospital admissions and PM10 pollution. The results suggest that PM10 pollution plays a role in the incidence and severity of respiratory disease.

  19. THE LONG-LIVED UV ''PLATEAU'' OF SN 2012aw

    SciTech Connect

    Bayless, Amanda J.; Roming, Peter W. A.; Pritchard, Tyler A.; Kuin, Paul; Brown, Peter J.; Botticella, Maria Teresa; Dall'Ora, Massimo; Frey, Lucille H.; Even, Wesley; Fryer, Chris L.; Maund, Justyn R.; Fraser, Morgan

    2013-02-10

    Observations with the Swift UV Optical Telescope have unambiguously uncovered for the first time a long-lived, UV ''plateau'' in a Type II-P supernova (SN). Although this flattening in slope is hinted at in a few other SNe, due to its proximity and minimal line-of-sight extinction, SN 2012aw has afforded the first opportunity to clearly observe this UV plateau. The observations of SN 2012aw revealed all Swift UV and u-band light curves initially declined rapidly, but 27 days after the explosion the light curves flattened. Some possible sources of the UV plateau are the same thermal process that causes the optical plateau, heating from radioactive decay, or a combination of both processes.

  20. Incision into the eastern Andean Plateau during Pliocene cooling.

    PubMed

    Lease, Richard O; Ehlers, Todd A

    2013-08-16

    Canyon incision into mountain topography is commonly used as a proxy for surface uplift driven by tectonic or geodynamic processes, but climatic changes can also instigate incision. The ~1250-kilometer (km)-long eastern margin of the Andean Plateau hosts a series of 1.5- to 2.5-km-deep canyons that cross major deformation zones. Using (U-Th)/He thermochronology, we document a transition from Miocene faulting to Pliocene canyon incision across the northeastern plateau margin. Regionally, widespread Pliocene incision into the eastern plateau margin is concurrent with a shift in global climate from early Pliocene warmth to late Pliocene cooling. Enhanced moisture transport onto the Andean Plateau driven by sea surface temperature changes during cooling is the likely pacemaker for canyon incision. PMID:23950534

  1. Comparison of ground-based measurements of natural radiation to airborne radiation survey data on transects from coastal California to the Colorado Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffer, P. W.; Hernández, L.; Messina, P.; Dearaujo, J.; Li, A.; Hicks, A.; White, L.

    2008-12-01

    Natural gamma radiation measurements were collected with a hand-held Geiger counter at nearly 400 locations on two general transects across the southwestern United States. The data are used to provide ground-truth comparison to published airborne radiation surveys of the region. The first transect was collected by high school students in the SF-ROCKS program at San Francisco State University in the summer of 2008 starting in San Francisco. Data were collected across the Sierra Nevada Range on I-80, and across Highway 50 in Nevada, and I-70 in Utah. Data were collected in and around Great Basin, Arches, Capitol Reef, Bryce, and Zion National Parks, and Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. A second transect extends from San José, California to Flagstaff, Arizona and includes the Mojave National Reserve, Death Valley region, and locations throughout the Navajo Reservation region in northern Arizona and western New Mexico. Radiation data (with GPS reference) were collected from all the major sedimentary rock formations and igneous rocks of the Colorado Plateau and from many igneous and metamorphic rocks throughout the Great Basin and southern California deserts. Anomalously high localized levels were noted in selected sedimentary units associated with uranium exploration targets in the Colorado Plateau region, and in caverns and rock fissures where radon gas (and accumulation of derivative fission products) are the inferred sources.

  2. Orogenic plateau growth in the Zagros of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Mark; Blanc, Eric; Saville, Christopher

    2010-05-01

    This paper concerns how Turkish-Iranian plateau grows by incorporating the Zagros fold and thrust belt. The plateau's tectonic boundary can be defined as the limit of significant seismogenic thrusting, which occurs close to the regional 1 km elevation contour. The geomorphic boundary is less distinct, but occurs northeast of the limit of active thrusting, because of a time lag during which mountainous relief converts to the subdued plateau geomorphology. Most of the High Zagros and ~25,000 km2 of the Zagros Simple Folded Zone behave as part of the plateau. The Dezful Embayment is a low strain zone in the western Zagros Simple Folded Zone, implying locally strong basement. Deformation is correspondingly more intense northeast of the Embayment, where the highest elevations and steepest slopes in the Zagros occur. As a consequence of the Embayment, lateral plateau growth is more limited in the western Zagros than the east (Fars). A more uniform structure across the Fars region has produced a lower orogenic taper, and a wider region of the Zagros behaves as part of the Turkish-Iranian plateau. Climatic variation along the Zagros is likely to act as a positive feedback on this tectonic variation, although the rates are not well-constrained. Relatively high orographic precipitation northeast of the Dezful Embayment promotes exhumation. The more arid climate in the Fars region should subdue exhumation, implying quicker crustal thickening and elevation for any given shortening. This enhances lateral plateau growth. Regional plateau elevations >1 km may relate to underlying warm and partially molten mantle.

  3. Continental crust beneath the Agulhas Plateau, Southwest Indian Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Tucholke, B.E.; Houtz, R.E.; Barrett, D.M.

    1981-05-10

    The Agulhas Plateau lies 500 km off the Cape of Good Hope in the southwestern Indian Ocean. Acoustic basement beneath the northern one third of this large, aseismic structural high has rugged morphology, but basement in the south is anomalously smooth, excepting a 30- to 90-km-wide zone with irregular relief that trends south-southwest through the center of the plateau. Seismic refraction profiles across the southern plateau indicate that the zone of irregular acoustic basement overlies thickened oceanic crust and that continental crust, locally thinned and intruded by basalts, underlies several regions of smooth acoustic basement. Recovery of quartzo-feldspathic gneisses in dredge hauls confirms the presence of continental crust. The smoothness of acoustic basement probably results from erosion (perhaps initially subaerial) of topographic highs with depositions and cementation of debris in ponds to form high-velocity beds. Basalt flows and sills also may contribute locally to form smooth basement. The rugged basement of the northern plateau appears to be of oceanic origin. A plate reconstruction to the time of initial opening of the South Atlantic places the continental part of the southern plateau adjacent to the southern edge of the Falkland Plateau, and both abut the western Mozambique Ridge. Both the Agulhas and Falkland plateaus were displaced westward during initial rifting in the Early Cretaceous. Formation of an RRR triple junction at the northern edge of the Agulhas continental fragment during middle Cretaceous time may explain the origin of the rugged, thickened oceanic crust beneath plateau as well as the apparent extension of the continental crust and intrusion of basaltic magmas beneath the southern plateau.

  4. (U-Th)/He dating and chemistry of diagenetic Fe- and Mn-oxides in Mesozoic sandstones of the Colorado Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiners, P. W.; Chan, M. A.; Evenson, N.

    2013-12-01

    Diagenetic mobilization and redeposition of solutes by groundwater in sedimentary rocks commonly concentrates Fe- and Mn-oxides into concretions and other types of local cement-mineral masses. Remarkable examples come from Mesozoic sandstones of the Colorado Plateau, where ancient groundwater flow produced locally abundant pipes, cones, sheets, and spheroidal concretions defined by high concentrations of hematite, goethite, and Mn-oxides. These diagenetic oxides provide striking analogies to similar features on Mars that have also been interpreted as indicators of ancient groundwater flow. Despite their potential for understanding fluid migration, diagenesis, and Martian hydrogeology, the origin and significance of these concretionary features are still poorly understood. A fundamental limitation to our understanding is a huge lack of temporal constraints on their age of formation and possible subsequent modification. To better understand the history and compositions of these features we measured (U-Th)/He ages and trace element compositions of 75 diagenetic Fe- and Mn-oxide samples from a dozen locations in northern Arizona and southern Utah, and performed step-heating He diffusion experiments on Fe- and Mn-oxide samples. We find (U-Th)/He ages ranging from 0.2 to 25 Ma, with the majority of ages between 0.3 and 5 Ma. One sample of Mn-oxide from near Moab, Utah yields a reproducible (U-Th)/He age of 2.36 × 0.09 Ma (1σ, n=5). Small hematite-dominated concretions from SW Utah and another hematite cement from SE Utah are consistently the oldest, reaching ages of 25 Ma, near the 40Ar/39Ar step-heating plateau observed in Mn oxides by Chan et al. (2001). Other samples, including goethite-dominated Moqui marbles from the Paria Plateau, and Fe- and mixed Fe-Mn-oxides from various areas are mostly Plio-Pleistocene. The range of ages and compositions is not easily explained by a wide range of formation ages, nor by diffusive loss of He from unretentive domains. Instead

  5. Blowing Snow Over the Antarctic Plateau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahesh, Ashwin; Eager, Rebecca; Campbell, James R.; Spinhirne, James D.

    2002-01-01

    Studies of blowing snow over Antarctica have been limited greatly by the remoteness and harsh conditions of the region. Space-based observations are also of lesser value than elsewhere, given the similarities between ice clouds and snow-covered surfaces, both at infrared and visible wavelengths. It is only in recent years that routine ground-based observation programs have acquired sufficient data to overcome the gap in our understanding of surface blowing snow. In this paper, observations of blowing snow from visual observers' records as well as ground-based spectral and lidar programs at South Pole station are analyzed to obtain the first climatology of blowing snow over the Antarctic plateau. Occurrence frequencies, correlation with wind direction and speed, typical layer heights, as well as optical depths are determined. Blowing snow is seen in roughly one third of the visual observations and occurs under a narrow range of wind directions. The near-surface layers typically a few hundred meters thick emit radiances similar to those from thin clouds. Because blowing snow remains close to the surface and is frequently present, it will produce small biases in space-borne altimetry; these must be properly estimated and corrected.

  6. Dendroclimatic reconstructions for the southern Colorado plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, J.S.; Funkhouser, G.S.

    1995-09-01

    A geographical network of climate sensitive tree-ring chronologies consisting of 25 archaeological sequences and two bristlecone pine series provides the basis for high resolution reconstructions of low and high frequency climatic variability on the southern Colorado Plateau over the last 1,500 years. Qualitative and quantitative dendroclimatic analyses of these data produce annual retrodictions of yearly and seasonal precipitation and summer Palmer Drought Severity Indices for each station and reconstructions of regional scale patterns in climatic variability. These reconstructions provide detailed information on climatic fluctuations that affected biotic and human populations as well as long-term baseline data for evaluating present-day climate and estimating future climatic trends. When integrated with other measures of past environmental variability, these reconstructions specify periods of favorable and unfavorable environmental conditions that would have affected past human populations of the region. The severest degradation, which occurred between A.D. 1250 and 1450, probably was causally related to numerous cultural changes that occurred at the end of the l3th century including the Anasazi abandonment of the Four Comers area. Projecting environmental patterns that characterized the last two millennia into the future indicates potential hazards to long term uranium mill waste disposal and containment and the potential and limitations of environmental restoration.

  7. Composition of Syrtis Major volcanic plateau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mustard, John F.; Erard, S.; Bibring, Jean-Pierre; Langevin, Yves; Head, James W.; Pieters, Carle M.

    1991-01-01

    Syrtis Major, a low-relief volcanic shield centered near 295 degrees 10 degrees N, is an old, well-preserved and exposed volcanic region on Mars which formed at the end of the heavy bombardment period. The composition of these volcanic materials has importance for understanding the thermal and chemical history of Mars. Imaging spectrometer data of the Syrtis Major volcanic plateau are used in this analysis to identify major compositional components. First and second order even channel reflectance spectra between 0.77 and 2.55 microns from four broad classes of materials on Syrtis Major are given. For the volcanic materials, there are three primary classes characterized by albedo, slope, and shape of the 10 micron band. To emphasize the latter, straight line continua were removed from each spectral segment and replotted in another figure. Each spectrum shows a band minima near 0.96 microns and 2.15 microns indicative of pyroxene mineral absorptions. Comparison of these band minima with studies of pyroxene reflectance spectra suggests that the pyroxenes in the volcanics of Syrtis Major are high calcium pyroxene with a Ca/(Mg+Fe+Ca) ratio of 0.2 to 0.3. The most likely pyroxene is an augite.

  8. Does the climate warming hiatus exist over the Tibetan Plateau?

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Anmin; Xiao, Zhixiang

    2015-01-01

    The surface air temperature change over the Tibetan Plateau is determined based on historical observations from 1980 to 2013. In contrast to the cooling trend in the rest of China, and the global warming hiatus post-1990s, an accelerated warming trend has appeared over the Tibetan Plateau during 1998–2013 (0.25 °C decade−1), compared with that during 1980–1997 (0.21 °C decade−1). Further results indicate that, to some degree, such an accelerated warming trend might be attributable to cloud–radiation feedback. The increased nocturnal cloud over the northern Tibetan Plateau would warm the nighttime temperature via enhanced atmospheric back-radiation, while the decreased daytime cloud over the southern Tibetan Plateau would induce the daytime sunshine duration to increase, resulting in surface air temperature warming. Meanwhile, the in situ surface wind speed has recovered gradually since 1998, and thus the energy concentration cannot explain the accelerated warming trend over the Tibetan Plateau after the 1990s. It is suggested that cloud–radiation feedback may play an important role in modulating the recent accelerated warming trend over the Tibetan Plateau. PMID:26329678

  9. Does the climate warming hiatus exist over the Tibetan Plateau?

    PubMed

    Duan, Anmin; Xiao, Zhixiang

    2015-01-01

    The surface air temperature change over the Tibetan Plateau is determined based on historical observations from 1980 to 2013. In contrast to the cooling trend in the rest of China, and the global warming hiatus post-1990s, an accelerated warming trend has appeared over the Tibetan Plateau during 1998-2013 (0.25 °C decade(-1)), compared with that during 1980-1997 (0.21 °C decade(-1)). Further results indicate that, to some degree, such an accelerated warming trend might be attributable to cloud-radiation feedback. The increased nocturnal cloud over the northern Tibetan Plateau would warm the nighttime temperature via enhanced atmospheric back-radiation, while the decreased daytime cloud over the southern Tibetan Plateau would induce the daytime sunshine duration to increase, resulting in surface air temperature warming. Meanwhile, the in situ surface wind speed has recovered gradually since 1998, and thus the energy concentration cannot explain the accelerated warming trend over the Tibetan Plateau after the 1990s. It is suggested that cloud-radiation feedback may play an important role in modulating the recent accelerated warming trend over the Tibetan Plateau. PMID:26329678

  10. Investigations of the gravity profile below the Tibetan plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, W. B.; Han, J. C.

    2012-04-01

    Scientists pay great attention to the structure and dynamics of the Tibetan plateau due to the fact that it is a natural experiment site for geoscience studies. The gravity profiles below the Tibetan plateau with successive high-accuracy play more and more significant role in studying the structure and evolution of the Tibetan plateau. This study focuses on determining the inner gravity field of the Tibetan plateau until to the depth of D and interpret possible mechanism of the gravity profile below the Tibetan plateau, especially reinvestigating the isostasy problem (Pratt hypothesis and Airy hypothesis). The inner gravity field below the Tibetan plateau is determined based on a simple technique (i.e. a combination of Newtonian integral, downward continuation of gravity field, and "remove-restore" scheme) and the following datasets: the external Earth gravitational model EGM2008 and the digital topographic model DTM2006.0 released by NGA (National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, USA), and the crust density distribution model CRUST2.0 released by NGS (National Geological Survey, USA). This study is supported by Natural Science Foundation China (grant No.40974015; No.41174011).

  11. The Inception of the Colorado Plateau Coring Project: Filling the Triassic Geochronologic Gap and Providing a Continuous Record of Continental Environmental Change in Western Equatorial Pangea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissman, J. W.; Olsen, P. E.; Kent, D. V.; Irmis, R. B.; Gehrels, G. E.; Mundil, R.; Parker, W.; Bachmann, G. H.; Kurschner, W. M.; Sha, J.

    2014-12-01

    properties, including XRF data. The core will then be transported to the Rutgers University for sampling. The planning team is contemplating Phase Two options (e.g., the Middle to Lower Triassic marine-influenced section west of the Colorado Plateau (St. George, Utah) area or the Upper Triassic to Lower Jurassic sequence in the Comb Ridge area (Bluff, Utah)).

  12. Microsatellite primers in Agave utahensis (Asparagaceae), a keystone species in the Mojave Desert and Colorado Plateau1

    PubMed Central

    Byers, Charlee; Maughan, Peter J.; Clouse, Jared; Stewart, J. Ryan

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Utah agave (Agave utahensis) and its putative subspecies, A. utahensis subsp. kaibabensis and A. utahensis subsp. utahensis, are keystone species of the Mojave Desert and Colorado Plateau in the southwestern United States. Here we developed microsatellite markers to study population structure and genetic diversity of the two subspecies of A. utahensis. • Methods and Results: We analyzed 22,386 454-pyrosequencing large contigs (>400 bp), derived from a genome reduction experiment consisting of A. utahensis accessions, for putative microsatellites. The use of unique multiplex barcodes for each of the Agave accessions allowed for the identification of putatively polymorphic microsatellites based solely on sequence alignment analysis. We report the characteristics of 11 polymorphic microsatellite loci based on a panel of 104 individuals from the two subspecies. The number of alleles per locus varied from three to eight, with an average of 5.5 alleles per locus. Observed and expected heterozygosity values ranged from 0.038 to 0.777 and 0.038 to 0.707, respectively. • Conclusions: The microsatellites identified here will be invaluable for future studies of population structure, polyploidy, and genetic diversity across the species. PMID:25225631

  13. Space Radar Image of Salt Lake City, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This radar image of Salt Lake City, Utah, illustrates the different land use patterns that are present in the Utah Valley. Salt Lake City lies between the shores of the Great Salt Lake (the dark area on the left side of the image) and the Wasatch Front Range (the mountains in the upper half of the image). The Salt Lake City area is of great interest to urban planners because of the combination of lake, valley and alpine environments that coexist in the region. Much of the southern shore of the Great Salt Lake is a waterfowl management area. The green grid pattern in the right center of the image is Salt Lake City and its surrounding communities. The Salt Lake City airport is visible as the brown rectangle near the center of the image. Interstate Highway 15 runs from the middle right edge to the upper left of the image. The bright white patch east of Interstate 15 is the downtown area, including Temple Square and the state capitol. The University of Utah campus is the yellowish area that lies at the base of the mountains, east of Temple Square. The large reservoir in the lower left center is a mine tailings pond. The semi-circular feature in the mountains at the bottom edge of the image is the Kennecott Copper Mine. The area shown is 60 kilometers by 40 kilometers (37 miles by 25 miles) and is centered at 40.6 degrees north latitude, 112.0 degrees west longitude. North is toward the upper left. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on April 10, 1994. The colors in this image represent the following radar channels and polarizations: red is L-band, horizontally transmitted and received; green is L-band, horizontally transmitted and vertically received; and blue is C-band, horizontally transmitted and vertically received. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program.

  14. A Precambrian-Cambrian oil play in southern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Lillis, P.G.; Palacas, J.G.; Warden, A.

    1995-06-01

    The potential of the Precambrian Chuar Group as a petroleum source rock in southern Utah and northern Arizona resulted in the drilling of two wildcat wells in 1994. Both wells penetrated the Cambrian Tapeats Sandstone (the target reservoir rock) and presumably Precambrian rocks. The first well, Burnett Federal 36-1, was drilled east of Kanab, Utah (sec.36, T.34S., R.3W.) to a total depth of 5,365 ft and encountered Precambrian (?) reddish-brown sedimentary rocks at 4,790 ft. The Tapeats Sandstone had live oil shows and minor CO{sub 2} (?) gas shows. The second well, BHP Federal 28-1, was drilled near Capitol Reef (sec.28, T.33S., R.7E.) to a total depth of 6,185 ft and encountered the Tapeats Sandstone at 5,922 ft and Precambrian (?) phyllite at 6,125 ft. The upper Paleozoic rocks had abundant live oil/tar shows, and the Cambrian Bright Angel Shale and Tapeats Sandstone had numerous oil shows. There were no gas shows in the well except for a large CO{sub 2} gas kick in the Tapeats Sandstone. A drill-stem test from 5,950 to 6,185 ft yielded mostly CO{sub 2} (92%) and nitrogen gas (6%) and minor amounts of helium, argon, hydrogen, and methane. The {delta}{sup 13}C of the CO{sub 2} is -3.9 per mil PDB. The chemical composition of the extracted oil in the Cambrian sandstones is significantly different than oils produced from the Upper Valley field (upper Paleozoic reservoirs) and the tar sands that are widespread throughout southern and central Utah. However, the oil composition is similar in several aspects to the composition of some of the Precambrian Chuar Group bitumen extracts from the Grand Canyon area in Arizona. The encouraging features of both wells are the good reservoir characteristics and oil shows in the Tapeats Sandstone. In the BHP well the oil appears to be a new oil type, possibly derived from Precambrian or Cambrian source rocks.

  15. Eocene Tibetan Plateau remnants preserved in the Northwest Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Beek, P. A.; van Melle, J.; Guillot, S.; Pêcher, A.; Reiners, P. W.; Nicolescu, S.; Latif, M.

    2009-04-01

    The northwest Himalaya shows strongly contrasting relief, opposing deeply incised mountain ranges characterized by extremely rapid exhumation and some of the highest peaks in the world (i.e., the Karakorum range and Nanga Parbat massif) to high-elevation, low-relief areas such as the 4000-m high Deosai plateau in northern Pakistan and the 5000-m high Tso Morari in Indian Ladakh. The origin and evolution of such plateau regions in the syntaxis of the most active continental collision in the world remain elusive. Here, we report the first low-temperature thermochronology (apatite fission-track, apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He) data from the Deosai plateau and use thermal history modelling to show that it has undergone continuous slow (≤ 200 m/Myr) denudation and has thus remained tectonically stable for the last 35 Myr at least. The inferred history of constant slow denudation of the plateau contradicts the hypothesis that widespread low-relief surfaces in the northwest Himalaya result from efficient, km-scale glacial erosion during Quaternary times; such erosion would have been recorded as a phase of rapid recent denudation that is not observed in the data. Slow continuous denudation since Eocene times, i.e. only 15-20 Myr after the onset of India-Asia collision implies that the Deosai plateau surface developed early in the Himalayan history and limits the phase of orogenic relief growth in the Ladakh-Kohistan arc to the early Paleogene. Although thermochronology data do not directly record surface uplift, the simplest explanation for the inferred constant denudation rates is that the plateau had reached its present-day elevation already during the Eocene, as a later phase of surface uplift would have triggered an erosional response that would have been recorded by the thermochronology data. We use morphological analyses to characterise such plateaux and identify them at the scale of the entire northwest Himalaya and compare our thermochronological data with

  16. Quality characterization of western Cretaceous coal from the Colorado Plateau as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Coal Resource Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect

    Affolter, R.H.; Brownfield, M.E.

    1999-07-01

    The goal of the Colorado Plateau Coal Assessment program is to provide an overview of the geologic setting, distribution, resources, and quality of Cretaceous coal in the Colorado Plateau. This assessment, which is part of the US Geological Survey's National Coal Resource Assessment Program, is different from previous coal assessments in that the major emphasis is placed on coals that are most likely to provide energy over the next few decades. The data is also being collected and stored in digital format that can be updated as new information becomes available. Environmental factors may eventually control how coal will be mined, and determine to what extent measures will be implemented to reduce trace element emissions. In the future, increased emphasis will also be placed on coal combustion products and the challenges of waste product disposal or utilization. Therefore, coal quality characterization is an important aspect of the coal assessment program in that it provides important data that will influence future utilization of this resource. The Colorado Plateau study is being completed in cooperation with the US Bureau of Land Management, US Forest Service, Arizona Geological Survey, Colorado Geological Survey, New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, and the Utah Geological Survey. Restrictions on coal thickness and overburden will be applied to the resource calculations and the resources will be categorized by land ownership. In some areas these studies will also delineate areas where coal mining may be restricted because of land use, industrial, social, or environmental factors. Emphasis is being placed on areas where the coal is controlled by the Federal Government.

  17. Exploring the cliff retreat response to base level change using SFM photogrammetry and cosmogenic 36Cl, Coal Cliffs, Utah, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, C.; Ward, D.

    2015-12-01

    The retreat of cliffbands is an important erosional process within the relatively undeformed sedimentary layers of the Colorado Plateau. Many iconic cliff landforms, including those of Monument Valley and Grand Canyon, are maintained by the interaction of these different rock types. A several kilometer thickness of incised sandstone and shale formations allow this region to act as a natural laboratory for studying the effects of variable lithologies on landscape evolution. Cliffband morphology and retreat on the plateau are controlled by several factors that may vary over time and space, including lithology, rate and distribution of rockfall debris, bedrock structure, baselevel, and climate. The relative importance of each factor in setting rates of cliff retreat are not entirely clear. Because regional headwaters are commonly sourced at cliff bases, these landforms are often the final and slowest areas to respond to baselevel changes, allowing rockfall and other local stochastic processes to overwhelm the erosional response to a baselevel forcing. The roles of these processes are difficult to assess because very few measurements of retreat rates over geomorphic timescales (103-106 years) have been produced, and thus changes in cliffband position through time have only been constrained by inferences made from the regional erosional history. Here, we control for climate and rock type by focusing on a continuous, 40-kilometer section of the lithologically consistent Coal Cliffs in Emery County, Utah. This area presents several natural experiments illustrating cliffband response to different forcings, including relict surfaces reflecting a baselevel change, drainage divides across which the adjustment to base level change may be asynchronous, a zone wherein the caprock layer has been removed by backscarp erosion, and a generally continuous gradient in cliff height from 50 to >200 meters along the cliffline. We employ terrestrial Cl36 exposure dating on terraces, talus

  18. Paleomagnetic Data From Ontong Java Plateau are Anomalous ˜ Did the Plateau Form on Another Plate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sager, W. W.

    2004-12-01

    A recent study of Ocean Drilling Program basalt core paleomagnetic data from Ontong Java Plateau (OJP) found paleolatitudes that disagree with previous estimates of the Early Cretaceous Pacific APWP, a result attributed to poor quality of data used in prior pole calculations [Riisager, P., S. Hall, M. Antretter, X. Zhao, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 208, p. 235, 2003]. My compilation of paleomagnetic data from Cretaceous Pacific basalt cores drilled by the Deep Sea Drilling Project and Ocean Drilling Program shows that paleocolatitude data in of ages 118-129 Ma display greater scatter than other age bins. The only factor that allows this data group to be coherently subdivided is whether or not the coring site is located on OJP. Without OJP data, paleocolatitude scatter is much less and gives a similar pole position (48.9° N, 327.1° E, N=40) to data in the 110-118 Ma interval. Data from the plateau give a pole that is 15° farther north (64.9° N, 323.4° E; N=37), indistinguishable from late Jurassic and earliest Cretaceous skewness poles. The OJP and non-OJP poles are distinct at the 95% confidence level despite having indistinguishable mean ages of 121.6 ±1.1 Ma (OJP) and 123.4 ±4.1 (non-OJP). Because Ontong Java Plateau data come from 6 different sites spread over the northern plateau, tectonic tilting is not a likely explanation for the difference. Also unlikely are systematic errors such as incomplete averaging of secular variation (large number of independent magnetic units sampled), inaccurate radiometric dates (many high quality dates), or inadequate paleomagnetic techniques (detailed studies by several different investigators). Rapid true polar wander does not seem a plausible explanation because global true polar wander curves have a different trend. Perhaps the simplest explanation is the one often used when anomalous data are found within a plate: the anomalous region had a different history of tectonic drift. In this scenario, OJP formed on a separate

  19. The controversial age of Kilimanjaro's plateau glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uglietti, Chiara; Zapf, Alexander; Szidat, Sönke; Salazar, Gary; Hardy, Doug; Schwikowski, Margit

    2015-04-01

    Interpreting climate signals contained in natural archives requires a precise chronology. Radiocarbon analysis can be a powerful tool for dating high-altitude ice cores, especially for the lowermost segments for which ice flow-induced thinning limits the counting of annual layers. Radiocarbon dating has been applied to ice cores containing sufficient organic material, which is a limiting factor to the wider application of this technique. We present a novel radiocarbon dating approach using carbonaceous aerosols enclosed in the ice to help resolve the debate about the age of the Kilimanjaro's plateau glaciers. Paleoclimate reconstructions based on six ice cores drilled in 2000 assigned a basal age of 11'700 years. A recent study claims recurring cycles of waxing and waning controlled primarily by atmospheric moisture and an absence of the ice bodies was suggested for 1200 AD. The Kilimanjaro ice fields are subject to rapid areal shrinkage and thinning and are expected to disappear within several decades. Resolving the controversy of the time frame for the extinction of the Kilimanjaro ice might have wide implications for the understanding of the natural climate variability in the tropics. A stratigraphic sequence of samples from the exposed vertical ice cliffs at the margins of the Northern Ice Field (NIF) was collected in 2011. A total of 45 horizontal short cores (50 cm length) were extracted from 22 horizons characterized by varying micro-particle concentrations. Additionally, 3 samples were taken from the glacier surface to investigate a potential age offset. All samples were shipped frozen to Paul Scherrer Institute, decontaminated in a cold room by removing the outer layer (0.3 mm) and by rinsing the samples with ultra-pure water. The insoluble carbonaceous particles were filtrated by using freshly preheated quartz fibre filters. Procedural blanks were estimated using artificial ice blocks of frozen ultra-pure water treated as real ice samples and were

  20. Aftershock Decay Rates in the Iranian Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ommi, S.; Zafarani, H.; Zare, M.

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by the desire to have more information following the occurrence of damaging events, the main purpose of this article is to study aftershock sequence parameters in the Iranian plateau. To this end, the catalogue of the Iranian earthquakes between 2002 to the end of 2013 has been collected and homogenized among which 15 earthquakes have been selected to study their aftershock decay rates. For different tectonic provinces, the completeness magnitudes ( M c) of the earthquake catalogue have been calculated in different time intervals. Also, the M c variability in spatial and temporal windows has been determined for each selected event. For major Iranian earthquakes, catalogue of aftershocks has been collected thanks to three declustering methods: first, the classical windowing method of Gardner and Knopoff (Bull Seismol Soc Am 64:1363-1367, 1974); second, a modified version of this using spatial windowing based on the Wells and Coppersmith (Bull Seismol Soc Am 84:974-1002, 1994) relations; and third, the Burkhard and Grünthal (Swiss J Geosci 102:149-188, 2009) scheme. Effects of the temporal windows also have been investigated using the time periods of 1 month, 100 days, and 1 year in the declustering method of Gardner and Knopoff (Bull Seismol Soc Am 64:1363-1367, 1974). In the next step, the modified Omori law coefficients have been calculated for the 15 selected earthquakes. The calibrated regional generic model describing the temporal and magnitude distribution of aftershocks is of interest for time-dependent seismic hazard forecasts. The regional characteristics of the aftershock decay rates have been studied for the selected Iranian earthquakes in the Alborz, Zagros and Central Iran regions considering their different seismotectonics regimes. However, due to the lack of sufficient data, no results have been reported for the Kopeh-Dagh and Makran seismotectonic regions.

  1. Aftershock Decay Rates in the Iranian Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ommi, S.; Zafarani, H.; Zare, M.

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by the desire to have more information following the occurrence of damaging events, the main purpose of this article is to study aftershock sequence parameters in the Iranian plateau. To this end, the catalogue of the Iranian earthquakes between 2002 to the end of 2013 has been collected and homogenized among which 15 earthquakes have been selected to study their aftershock decay rates. For different tectonic provinces, the completeness magnitudes (M c) of the earthquake catalogue have been calculated in different time intervals. Also, the M c variability in spatial and temporal windows has been determined for each selected event. For major Iranian earthquakes, catalogue of aftershocks has been collected thanks to three declustering methods: first, the classical windowing method of uc(Gardner) and uc(Knopoff) (Bull Seismol Soc Am 64:1363-1367, 1974); second, a modified version of this using spatial windowing based on the uc(Wells) and uc(Coppersmith) (Bull Seismol Soc Am 84:974-1002, 1994) relations; and third, the uc(Burkhard) and uc(Grünthal) (Swiss J Geosci 102:149-188, 2009) scheme. Effects of the temporal windows also have been investigated using the time periods of 1 month, 100 days, and 1 year in the declustering method of uc(Gardner) and uc(Knopoff) (Bull Seismol Soc Am 64:1363-1367, 1974). In the next step, the modified Omori law coefficients have been calculated for the 15 selected earthquakes. The calibrated regional generic model describing the temporal and magnitude distribution of aftershocks is of interest for time-dependent seismic hazard forecasts. The regional characteristics of the aftershock decay rates have been studied for the selected Iranian earthquakes in the Alborz, Zagros and Central Iran regions considering their different seismotectonics regimes. However, due to the lack of sufficient data, no results have been reported for the Kopeh-Dagh and Makran seismotectonic regions.

  2. Utah State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    The Utah State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Utah. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Utah. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Utah.

  3. 78 FR 70960 - Utah Resource Advisory Council/Recreation Resource Advisory Council Meeting/Conference Call

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-27

    ... Advisory Council (RAC)/Recreation Resource Advisory Council (RRAC) will host a meeting/conference call. DATES: The Utah RAC/RRAC will host a meeting/conference call on Friday, Jan. 10, 2014, from 8:00...

  4. Utah Marbles and Mars Blueberries: Comparitive Terrestrial Analogs for Hematite Concretions on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, M. A.; Beitler, B.; Parry, W. T.; Ormö, J.; Komatsu, G.

    2005-03-01

    Compelling comparisons show why Utah iron oxide-cemented "marbles" are a good analog for Mars hematite "blueberries". Terrestrial examples offer valuable models for interpreting the diagenetic history and importance of water on Mars.

  5. Origin of Theater-headed Tributaries to Escalante and Glen Canyons, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, R. P.; Fortezzo, C. M.; Tooth, S. E.; Howard, A. D.; Zimbelman, J. R.; Barnhart, C. J.; Benthem, A. J.; Brown, C. C.; Parsons, R. A.

    2009-03-01

    Theater-headed tributaries to Glen Canyon, Utah, are important analogs to martian valley networks. Our field study suggests a hybrid model involving seepage weathering of Navajo sandstone, sheet fracturing, and transport of debris by flash floods.

  6. 78 FR 4341 - Approval, Disapproval and Promulgation of State Implementation Plans; State of Utah; Regional...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-22

    ... the Federal Register on December 14, 2012 (77 FR 74355), the following corrections are made: 1. On... State of Utah on May 26, 2011 that addresses regional haze. The final rule preamble inadvertently...

  7. "Built-in" Merchandising Principles Prove Highly Effective for New University of Utah Bookstore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neal, Colin; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The University of Utah bookstore's expansion incorporated a number of features that have proved valuable, including the single-level floor design, creative signs, movable floor fixtures, removable shelving, and see-through book display units. (LBH)

  8. Geochemical Results from EuroGeoMars MDRS Utah 2009 Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borst, A.; Peters, S.; Foing, B. H.; Stoker, C.; Wendt, L.; Gross, C.; Zavaleta, J.; Sarrazin, P.; Blake, D.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Boche-Sauvan, L.; Page, J.; McKay, C.; Batenburg, P.; Drijkoningen, G.; Slob, E.; Poulakis, P.; Visentin, G.; Noroozi, A.; Gill, E.; Guglielmi, M.; Freire, M.; Walker, R.; Sabbatini, M.; Pletser, V.; Monaghan, E.; Ernst, R.; Oosthoek, J.; Mahapatra, P.; Wills, D.; Thiel, C.; Lebreton, J. P.; Zegers, T.; Chicarro, A.; Koschny, D.; Vago, J.; Svedhem, H.; Davies, G.; Westenberg, A.; Edwards, J.; Exogeolab Team; Eurogeomars Team

    2010-03-01

    We report on the geochemistry investigations during the EuroGeoMars Campaign at the MDRS station in Utah. A total of ~150 samples from different lithologies were analyzed using advanced and miniaturized instruments (XRF, Raman and spectrometers).

  9. 76 FR 46805 - Notice of Utah Adoption by Reference of the Pesticide Container Containment Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Notice of Utah Adoption by Reference of the Pesticide Container Containment Rule AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice is provided to formally...

  10. Deep resistivity structure in southwestern Utah and its geothermal significance

    SciTech Connect

    Wannamaker, P.E.; Ward, S.H.; Hohmann, G.W.; Sill, W.R.

    1983-02-01

    Magnetotelluric (MT) measurements in southwestern Utah have yielded a model of resistivity structure in this area to a depth of about 100 km. The MT observations are strongly affected by Great Basin graben sedimentary fill, which constitutes conductive upper-crustal lateral inhomogeneity and requires simulation using two- and three-dimensional modeling algorithms before deeper portions of the resistivity section can be resolved. Included in the model is a layer of low resistivity (20 ..cap omega..-m) residing from 35 to 65 km depth. Sensitivity tests of the data to the structure weigh strongly against the top of this layer being as shallow as 25 km and against the conductivity and thickness of the layer being highly correlated. No intra-crustal low-resistivity layer is indicated by the MT data.

  11. Seepage study of Mapleton Lateral Canal near Mapleton, Utah, 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilkowske, Chris D.; Phillips, Jeff V.

    2004-01-01

    A study was conducted during the summer of 2003 on Mapleton Lateral Canal near Mapleton, Utah, to determine gain or loss of flow in the canal from seepage. Measurements were made in May, June, July, and September of 2003. The uppermost reach of the canal had an apparent average loss of 2.6 cubic feet per second. The next reach downstream showed an apparent average gain of 1.4 cubic feet per second. The next three downstream reaches had apparent average losses of 2.4, 2.5, and 2.7 cubic feet per second. The apparent average net loss from the canal was 8.8 cubic feet per second, or a loss of 30 percent of the total discharge measured at the head of the canal.

  12. Concretions in Exhumed Channels Near Hanksville Utah: Implications for Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Jonathan; Stoker, Carol R.

    2011-01-01

    The landscape near Hanksville, Utah, contains a diversity of Mars analogue features. These included segmented and inverted anatasomosing palaeochannels exhumed from the Late Jurassic Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation that hosts abundant small carbonate concretions. The exhumed and inverted channels closely resemble many seen on the surface of Mars in satellite imagery and which may be visited by surface missions in the near future. The channels contain a wealth of palaeo-environmental information, but intrinsically difficult terrain would make their study challenging on Mars. We show that an unexhumed channel feature can be detected geophysically, this may allow their study in more easily accessed terrain. The concretions morphologically and in their surface expression parallel the haematite blue berries that are strewn across the surface of Meridiani Planum on Mars. They are best developed in poorly cemented medium to coarse channel sandstones and appear to have formed early in the diagenetic history.

  13. Style and timing of frontal structures, thrust belt, Central Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, T.F.

    1985-07-01

    The Cordilleran fold and thrust belt in central Utah may be divided into a western belt of Precambrian to lower Mesozoic strata shortened above ramp-style thrust faults and an eastern belt of folded middle to upper Mesozoic rocks. Shortening in the eastern foldbelt occurred above a bedding-plane thrust fault system that terminates within a thick section of Jurassic shale, siltstone, and anhydrite. Demonstrable synthrusting deposits within the region are late Early to Late Cretaceous in age. The age of synorogenic deposits and structural relations of postorogenic strata indicate that deformation was complete by the close of the Cretaceous or early Paleocene, and support a thrust mechanism for much of the folding in the region.

  14. Source analysis of the Crandall Canyon, Utah, mine collapse.

    PubMed

    Dreger, Douglas S; Ford, Sean R; Walter, William R

    2008-07-11

    Analysis of seismograms from a magnitude 3.9 seismic event on 6 August 2007 in central Utah reveals an anomalous radiation pattern that is contrary to that expected for a tectonic earthquake and which is dominated by an implosive component. The results show that the seismic event is best modeled as a shallow underground collapse. Interestingly, large transverse surface waves require a smaller additional noncollapse source component that might represent either faulting in the rocks above the mine workings or deformation of the medium surrounding the mine. Seismic moment tensor results for nuclear explosions, explosion and other mining cavity collapses, and tectonic earthquakes are compared, and the separation of the different populations indicates that the seismic moment tensor may be used for source-type discrimination. PMID:18621662

  15. Seismic activity in the Sunnyside mining district, Utah, during 1967

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, Barton K.; Dunrud, C. Richard; Hernandez, Jerome

    1969-01-01

    A seismic monitoring network near Sunnyside, Utah, consisting of a triangular array of seismometer stations that encompasses most of the mine workings in the district, recorded over 50,000 local earth tremors during 1967. About 540 of the tremors were of sufficient magnitude to be accurately located. Most of these were located within 2-3 miles of mine workings and were also near known or suspected faults. The district-wide seismic activity generally consisted of two different patterns--a periodic increase in the daily number of tremors at weekly intervals, and also a less regular and longer term increase and decrease of seismic activity that occurred over a period of weeks or even months. The shorter and more regular pattern can be correlated with the mine work week and seems to result from mining. The longer term activity, however, does not correlate with known mining causes sad therefore seems to be .caused by natural stresses.

  16. Evaluation of flexible pavement crack sealing methods used in Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belangie, M. C.; Anderson, D. I.

    1981-01-01

    Criteria to improve the effectiveness of Utah's flexible pavements crack sealing practice were studied. Field measurements, in-depth interviews questionaires were used. Findings indicate that flexible pavement cracking is a significant problem in the Far West, Rocky Mountains, Great Lakes and New England. Choice of materials is effected by storage requirements and equipment available. Prepackaging of materials designed for crack sealing has resulted in improvements in control of mix and material properties. Low temperature and freeze thaw cycles significantly effect the amount of thermal cracking and the performance of crack sealant. Ductile sealants, such as Crumb rubber/asphalt cement mixes, in combination with routing appear to offer substantial gains in sealant life and performance.

  17. It's About Time for Autism Reform Legislation in Utah.

    PubMed

    Shiozawa, Brian J

    2015-05-01

    On 3 April 2014, Governor Gary Herbert signed into law a health insurance reform bill that requires private insurers to cover autism therapy. Specifically, SB57 requires state-regulated health plans to cover applied behavior analysis (ABA) therapy. While early diagnosis and intervention can reduce the long-term cost of autism, families are finding themselves bankrupt in order to pay for ABA therapy. Currently, 37 states, and the District of Columbia have enacted insurance reform laws. Ensuring that children with autism receive proper therapy is a serious public health issue. Utah was right to pass reform legislation because it properly benefits and safeguards the interests of affected children in promoting their well-being and participation in society. PMID:25395093

  18. Utah State University's T2 ODV mobility analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Morgan E.; Bahl, Vikas; Wood, Carl G.

    2000-07-01

    In response to ultra-high maneuverability vehicle requirements, Utah State University (USU) has developed an autonomous vehicle with unique mobility and maneuverability capabilities. This paper describes a study of the mobility of the USU T2 Omni-Directional Vehicle (ODV). The T2 vehicle is a mid-scale (625 kg), second-generation ODV mobile robot with six independently driven and steered wheel assemblies. The six wheel, independent steering system is capable of unlimited steering rotation, presenting a unique solution to enhanced vehicle mobility requirements. This mobility study focuses on energy consumption in three basic experiments, comparing two modes of steering: Ackerman and ODV. The experiments are all performed on the same vehicle without any physical changes to the vehicle itself, providing a direct comparison these two steering methodologies. A computer simulation of the T2 mechanical and control system dynamics is described.

  19. Satellite microwave observations of the Utah Great Salt Lake Desert

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Dellwig, L. F.; Schmugge, T. J.

    1975-01-01

    Microwave data acquired over the Great Salt Lake Desert by sensors aboard Skylab and Nimbus 5 indicate that microwave emission and backscatter were strongly influenced by contributions from subsurface layers of sediment saturated with brine. This phenomenon was observed by Skylab's S-194 radiometer operating at 1.4 GHz, S-193 RADSCAT (Radiometer-Scatterometer) operating at 13.9 GHz and the Nimbus 5 ESMR (Electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer) operating at 19.35 GHz. The availability of ESMR data over an 18 month period allowed an investigation of temporal variations. Aircraft 1.4 GHz radiometer data acquired two days after one of the Skylab passes confirm the satellites observations. Data from the ESMR revealed similar responses over the Bolivian deserts, which have geologic features similar to those of the Utah desert.

  20. Final report for Utah State's SciDAC CEMM contribution

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Eric Held

    2008-05-13

    This document represents a summary of work carried out at Utah State University in conjunction with the Center for Extended Magnetohyrodynamic Modeling (CEMM). The principal investigator, Dr. Eric Held, was aided in this work by two former graduate students, Drs. John James and Michael Addae-Kagyah, who completed their PhD's while being partially funded by CEMM monies. In addtion, Dr. Jeong-Young Ji, a postdoctoral researcher and Mukta Sharma, a graduate student were supported. The work associated with this grant focused on developing an efficient, hybrid fluid/kinetic model for fusion plasmas. Specifically, expressions for the parallel heat fluxes and stresses in magnetized plasmas were implemented and exercised in the NIMROD plasma fluid code.