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Sample records for kappa-opioid receptor signaling

  1. Kappa-opioid receptor signaling and brain reward function

    PubMed Central

    Bruijnzeel, Adrie W.

    2009-01-01

    The dynorphin-like peptides have profound effects on the state of the brain reward system and human and animal behavior. The dynorphin-like peptides affect locomotor activity, food intake, sexual behavior, anxiety-like behavior, and drug intake. Stimulation of kappa-opioid receptors, the endogenous receptor for the dynorphin-like peptides, inhibits dopamine release in the striatum (nucleus accumbens and caudate putamen) and induces a negative mood state in humans and animals. The administration of drugs of abuse increases the release of dopamine in the striatum and mediates the concomitant release of dynorphin-like peptides in this brain region. The reviewed studies suggest that chronic drug intake leads to an upregulation of the brain dynorphin system in the striatum and in particular in the dorsal part of the striatum/caudate putamen. This might inhibit drug-induced dopamine release and provide protection against the neurotoxic effects of high dopamine levels. After the discontinuation of chronic drug intake these neuroadaptations remain unopposed which has been suggested to contribute to the negative emotional state associated with drug withdrawal and increased drug intake. Kappa-opioid receptor agonists have also been shown to inhibit calcium channels. Calcium channel inhibitors have antidepressant-like effects and inhibit the release of norepinephrine. This might explain that in some studies kappa-opioid receptor agonists attenuate nicotine and opioid withdrawal symptomatology. A better understanding of the role of dynorphins in the regulation of brain reward function might contribute to the development of novel treatments for mood disorders and other disorders that stem from a dysregulation of the brain reward system. PMID:19804796

  2. Supersensitive Kappa Opioid Receptors Promotes Ethanol Withdrawal-Related Behaviors and Reduce Dopamine Signaling in the Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Jamie H.; Karkhanis, Anushree N.; Chen, Rong; Gioia, Dominic; Lopez, Marcelo F.; Becker, Howard C.; McCool, Brian A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic ethanol exposure reduces dopamine transmission in the nucleus accumbens, which may contribute to the negative affective symptoms associated with ethanol withdrawal. Kappa opioid receptors have been implicated in withdrawal-induced excessive drinking and anxiety-like behaviors and are known to inhibit dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. The effects of chronic ethanol exposure on kappa opioid receptor-mediated changes in dopamine transmission at the level of the dopamine terminal and withdrawal-related behaviors were examined. Methods: Five weeks of chronic intermittent ethanol exposure in male C57BL/6 mice were used to examine the role of kappa opioid receptors in chronic ethanol-induced increases in ethanol intake and marble burying, a measure of anxiety/compulsive-like behavior. Drinking and marble burying were evaluated before and after chronic intermittent ethanol exposure, with and without kappa opioid receptor blockade by nor-binaltorphimine (10mg/kg i.p.). Functional alterations in kappa opioid receptors were assessed using fast scan cyclic voltammetry in brain slices containing the nucleus accumbens. Results: Chronic intermittent ethanol-exposed mice showed increased ethanol drinking and marble burying compared with controls, which was attenuated with kappa opioid receptor blockade. Chronic intermittent ethanol-induced increases in behavior were replicated with kappa opioid receptor activation in naïve mice. Fast scan cyclic voltammetry revealed that chronic intermittent ethanol reduced accumbal dopamine release and increased uptake rates, promoting a hypodopaminergic state of this region. Kappa opioid receptor activation with U50,488H concentration-dependently decreased dopamine release in both groups; however, this effect was greater in chronic intermittent ethanol-treated mice, indicating kappa opioid receptor supersensitivity in this group. Conclusions: These data suggest that the chronic intermittent ethanol-induced increase

  3. Kappa Opioid Receptor Agonist and Brain Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Chunhua, Chen; Chunhua, Xi; Megumi, Sugita; Renyu, Liu

    2014-01-01

    Opioid receptors, especially Kappa opioid receptor (KOR) play an important role in the pathophysiological process of cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury. Previously accepted KOR agonists activity has included anti-nociception, cardiovascular, anti-pruritic, diuretic, and antitussive effects, while compelling evidence from various ischemic animal models indicate that KOR agonist have neuroprotective effects through various mechanisms. In this review, we aimed to demonstrate the property of KOR agonist and its role in global and focal cerebral ischemia. Based on current preclinical research, the KOR agonists may be useful as a neuroprotective agent. The recent discovery of salvinorin A, highly selective non-opioid KOR agonist, offers a new tool to study the role of KOR in brain HI injury and the protective effects of KOR agonist. The unique pharmacological profile of salvinorin A along with the long history of human usage provides its high candidacy as a potential alternative medication for brain HI injury. PMID:25574482

  4. Semisynthetic Neoclerodanes as Kappa Opioid Receptor Probes

    PubMed Central

    Lovell, Kimberly M.; Vasiljevik, Tamara; Araya, Juan J.; Lozama, Anthony; Prevatt-Smith, Katherine M.; Day, Victor W.; Dersch, Christina M.; Rothman, Richard B.; Butelman, Eduardo R.; Kreek, Mary Jeanne; Prisinzano, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Modification of the furan ring of salvinorin A (1), the main active component of Salvia divinorum, has resulted in novel neoclerodane diterpenes with opioid receptor affinity and activity. Conversion of the furan ring to an aldehyde at the C-12 position (5) has allowed for the synthesis of analogues with new carbon-carbon bonds at that position. Previous methods for forming these bonds, such as Grignard and Stille conditions, have met with limited success. We report a palladium catalyzed Liebeskind-Srogl cross-coupling reaction of a thioester and a boronic acid that occurs at neutral pH and ambient temperature to produce ketone analogs at C-12. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported usage of the Liebeskind-Srogl reaction to diversify a natural product scaffold. We also describe a one-step protocol for the conversion of 1 to 12-epi-1 (3) through microwave irradiation. Previously, this synthetically challenging process has required multiple steps. Additionally, we report in this study that alkene 9 and aromatic analogues 12, 19, 23, 25, and 26 were discovered to retain affinity and selectivity at kappa opioid receptors (KOP). Finally, we report that the furan-2-yl analog of 1 (31) has similar affinity to 1. Collectively, these findings suggest that different aromatic groups appended directly to the decalin core may be well tolerated by KOP receptors, and may generate further ligands with affinity and activity at KOP receptors. PMID:22464684

  5. Synaptic localization of. kappa. opioid receptors in guinea pig neostriatum

    SciTech Connect

    Jomary, C.; Beaudet, A. ); Gairin, J.E. )

    1992-01-15

    Distribution of {kappa} opioid receptors was examined by EM radioautography in sections of guinea pig neostriatum with the selective {sup 125}I-labeled dynorphin analog (D-Pro{sup 10})dynorphin-(1-11). Most specifically labeled binding sites were found by probability circle analysis to be associated with neuronal membrane appositions. Because of limitations in resolution of the method, the radioactive sources could not be ascribed directly to either one of the apposed plasma membranes. Nevertheless, three lines of evidence favored a predominant association of ligand with dendrites of intrinsic striatal neurons: (1) the high frequency with which labeled interfaces implicated a dendrite, (2) the enrichment of dendrodendritic interfaces, and (3) the occurrence of dendritic profiles labeled at several contact points along their plasma membranes. A small proportion of labeled sites was associated with axo-axonic interfaces, which may subserve the {kappa} opioid-induced regulation of presynaptic dopamine and acetylcholine release documented in guinea pig neostriatum. These results support the hypothesis that in mammalian brain {kappa} opioid receptors are conformationally and functionally distinct from {mu} and {delta} types.

  6. The Kappa Opioid Receptor: From Addiction to Depression, and Back

    PubMed Central

    Lalanne, Laurence; Ayranci, Gulebru; Kieffer, Brigitte L.; Lutz, Pierre-Eric

    2014-01-01

    Comorbidity is a major issue in psychiatry that notably associates with more severe symptoms, longer illness duration, and higher service utilization. Therefore, identifying key clusters of comorbidity and exploring the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms represent important steps toward improving mental health care. In the present review, we focus on the frequent association between addiction and depression. In particular, we summarize the large body of evidence from preclinical models indicating that the kappa opioid receptor (KOR), a member of the opioid neuromodulatory system, represents a central player in the regulation of both reward and mood processes. Current data suggest that the KOR modulates overlapping neuronal networks linking brainstem monoaminergic nuclei with forebrain limbic structures. Rewarding properties of both drugs of abuse and natural stimuli, as well as the neurobiological effects of stressful experiences, strongly interact at the level of KOR signaling. In addiction models, activity of the KOR is potentiated by stressors and critically controls drug-seeking and relapse. In depression paradigms, KOR signaling is responsive to a variety of stressors, and mediates despair-like responses. Altogether, the KOR represents a prototypical substrate of comorbidity, whereby life experiences converge upon common brain mechanisms to trigger behavioral dysregulation and increased risk for distinct but interacting psychopathologies. PMID:25538632

  7. Purification and mass spectrometric analysis of the kappa opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Wannemacher, Kenneth M; Terskiy, Alexandra; Bian, Shengjie; Yadav, Prem N; Li, Hong; Howells, Richard D

    2008-09-16

    A clonal human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cell line was established that stably expressed the rat kappa-opioid receptor (rKOR) with a FLAG epitope at the amino terminus. The Kd for [3H]diprenorphine was 1.1+/-0.2 nM, and the Bmax was 2.6+/-0.4 pmol/mg. Dynorphin A (1-13), U69,593 and naloxone competitively inhibited [3H]diprenorphine binding with Ki values of 2.0, 18 and 18 nM, respectively, in good agreement with previously reported affinities for the unmodified receptor. U69,593 stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding in a concentration-dependent manner and caused phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, indicating that the activated epitope-tagged receptor triggered appropriate signaling pathways. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated that two immunoreactive receptor species with apparent molecular masses of 42 and 52 kDa were expressed. Previous studies indicated that the 42 kDa protein was localized intracellularly and was a precursor of the 52 kDa receptor, which was present at the cell surface. rKOR was extracted from transfected HEK 293 cell membranes with n-dodecyl-beta-D-maltopyranoside. Sequential use of wheat germ agglutinin chromatography, Sephacryl S300 gel filtration chromatography, anti-FLAG immunoaffinity chromatography and SDS/PAGE permitted purification of the 52 kDa receptor. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was used to identify peptides derived from rKOR following sequential in-gel digestion with trypsin and cyanogen bromide. Eighteen rKOR peptides were detected, corresponding to 27.1% coverage of the receptor. Precursor-selective MS/MS confirmed the identity of most of these peptides. In addition, we have identified heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) as a rKOR-interacting protein. PMID:18656460

  8. Stimulation of peripheral Kappa opioid receptors inhibits inflammatory hyperalgesia via activation of the PI3Kγ/AKT/nNOS/NO signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In addition to their central effects, opioids cause peripheral analgesia. There is evidence showing that peripheral activation of kappa opioid receptors (KORs) inhibits inflammatory pain. Moreover, peripheral μ-opioid receptor (MOR) activation are able to direct block PGE2-induced ongoing hyperalgesia However, this effect was not tested for KOR selective activation. In the present study, the effect of the peripheral activation of KORs on PGE2-induced ongoing hyperalgesia was investigated. The mechanisms involved were also evaluated. Results Local (paw) administration of U50488 (a selective KOR agonist) directly blocked, PGE2-induced mechanical hyperalgesia in both rats and mice. This effect was reversed by treating animals with L-NMMA or N-propyl-L-arginine (a selective inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase, nNOS), suggesting involvement of the nNOS/NO pathway. U50488 peripheral effect was also dependent on stimulation of PI3Kγ/AKT because inhibitors of these kinases also reduced peripheral antinociception induced by U50488. Furthermore, U50488 lost its peripheral analgesic effect in PI3Kγ null mice. Observations made in vivo were confirmed after incubation of dorsal root ganglion cultured neurons with U50488 produced an increase in the activation of AKT as evaluated by western blot analyses of its phosphorylated form. Finally, immunofluorescence of DRG neurons revealed that KOR-expressing neurons also express PI3Kγ (≅ 43%). Conclusions The present study indicates that activation of peripheral KORs directly blocks inflammatory hyperalgesia through stimulation of the nNOS/NO signaling pathway which is probably stimulated by PI3Kγ/AKT signaling. This study extends a previously study of our group suggesting that PI3Kγ/AKT/nNOS/NO is an important analgesic pathway in primary nociceptive neurons. PMID:22316281

  9. Kappa-opioid receptor signaling in the striatum as a potential modulator of dopamine transmission in cocaine dependence.

    PubMed

    Trifilieff, Pierre; Martinez, Diana

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine addiction is accompanied by a decrease in striatal dopamine signaling, measured as a decrease in dopamine D2 receptor binding as well as blunted dopamine release in the striatum. These alterations in dopamine transmission have clinical relevance, and have been shown to correlate with cocaine-seeking behavior and response to treatment for cocaine dependence. However, the mechanisms contributing to the hypodopaminergic state in cocaine addiction remain unknown. Here we review the positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies showing alterations in D2 receptor binding potential and dopamine transmission in cocaine abusers and their significance in cocaine-seeking behavior. Based on animal and human studies, we propose that the kappa receptor/dynorphin system, because of its impact on dopamine transmission and upregulation following cocaine exposure, could contribute to the hypodopaminergic state reported in cocaine addiction, and could thus be a relevant target for treatment development. PMID:23760592

  10. Cloning and pharmacological characterization of a rat kappa opioid receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Meng, F; Xie, G X; Thompson, R C; Mansour, A; Goldstein, A; Watson, S J; Akil, H

    1993-01-01

    A full-length cDNA was isolated from a rat striatal library by using low-stringency screening with two PCR fragments, one spanning transmembrane domains 3-6 of the mouse delta opioid receptor and the other unidentified but homologous to the mouse delta receptor from rat brain. The novel cDNA had a long open reading frame encoding a protein of 380 residues with 59% identity to the mouse delta receptor and topography consistent with a seven-helix guanine nucleotide-binding protein-coupled receptor. COS-1 cells transfected with the coding region of this clone showed high-affinity binding to kappa opioid receptor-selective ligands such as dynorphin A and U-50,488 and also nonselective opioid ligands such as bremazocine, ethylketocyclazocine, and naloxone. Not bound at all (or bound with low affinity) were dynorphin A-(2-13), enantiomers of naloxone and levophanol [i.e., (+)-naloxone and dextrorphan], and selective mu and delta opioid receptor ligands. Activation of the expressed receptor by kappa receptor agonists led to inhibition of cAMP. Finally, in situ hybridization revealed a mRNA distribution in rat brain that corresponded well to the distribution of binding sites labeled with kappa-selective ligands. These observations indicate that we have cloned a cDNA encoding a rat kappa receptor of the kappa 1 subtype. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8234341

  11. Does the kappa opioid receptor system contribute to pain aversion?

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, Catherine M.; Taylor, Anna M. W.; Cook, Christopher; Ong, Edmund; Morón, Jose A.; Evans, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    The kappa opioid receptor (KOR) and the endogenous peptide-ligand dynorphin have received significant attention due the involvement in mediating a variety of behavioral and neurophysiological responses, including opposing the rewarding properties of drugs of abuse including opioids. Accumulating evidence indicates this system is involved in regulating states of motivation and emotion. Acute activation of the KOR produces an increase in motivational behavior to escape a threat, however, KOR activation associated with chronic stress leads to the expression of symptoms indicative of mood disorders. It is well accepted that KOR can produce analgesia and is engaged in chronic pain states including neuropathic pain. Spinal studies have revealed KOR-induced analgesia in reversing pain hypersensitivities associated with peripheral nerve injury. While systemic administration of KOR agonists attenuates nociceptive sensory transmission, this effect appears to be a stress-induced effect as anxiolytic agents, including delta opioid receptor agonists, mitigate KOR agonist-induced analgesia. Additionally, while the role of KOR and dynorphin in driving the dysphoric and aversive components of stress and drug withdrawal has been well characterized, how this system mediates the negative emotional states associated with chronic pain is relatively unexplored. This review provides evidence that dynorphin and the KOR system contribute to the negative affective component of pain and that this receptor system likely contributes to the high comorbidity of mood disorders associated with chronic neuropathic pain. PMID:25452729

  12. D3 dopamine and kappa opioid receptor alterations in human brain of cocaine-overdose victims.

    PubMed

    Mash, D C; Staley, J K

    1999-06-29

    Cocaine is thought to be addictive because chronic use leads to molecular adaptations within the mesolimbic dopamine (DA) circuitry, which affects motivated behavior and emotion. Although the reinforcing effects of cocaine are mediated primarily by blockade of DA uptake, reciprocal signaling between DA and endogenous opioids has important implications for understanding cocaine dependence. We have used in vitro autoradiography and ligand binding to map D3 DA and kappa opioid receptors in the human brains of cocaine-overdose victims. The number of D3 binding sites was increased one-to threefold over the nucleus accumbens and ventromedial sectors of the caudate and putamen from cocaine-overdose victims, as compared to age-matched and drug-free control subjects. D3 receptor/cyclophilin mRNA ratios in the nucleus accumbens were increased sixfold in cocaine-overdose victims over control values, suggesting that cocaine exposure also affects the expression of D3 receptor mRNA. The number of kappa opioid receptors in the nucleus accumbens and other corticolimbic areas from cocaine fatalities was increased twofold as compared to control values. Cocaine-overdose victims exhibiting preterminal excited delirium had a selective upregulation of kappa receptors measured also in the amygdala. Understanding the complex regulatory profiles of DA and opioid synaptic markers that occur with chronic misuse of cocaine may suggest multitarget strategies for treating cocaine dependence. PMID:10415668

  13. Localization of the kappa opioid receptor gene to human chromosome band 8q11. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Kazuki; Takeda, Jun; Bell, G.I.; Espinosa, R.; Le Beau, M.M. )

    1994-02-01

    Using the cloned mouse kappa opioid receptor cDNA clone as a probe, screened a human genomic library and isolated a clone containing part of the human kappa opioid receptor gene (OPRK1), designated [lambda]hSR4-1. To determine the chromosomal localization of OPRK1, [lambda]hSR4-1 DNA was labeled with biotin by nick-translation in the presence of bio-11-dUTP and hybridized to human metaphase cells prepared from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes as described previously. Hybridization of the OPRK1-specific probe [lambda]hSR4-1 DNA to normal human metaphase chromosomes resulted in specific labeling only of chromosome 8. Specific labeling of 8q11 was observed on all 4 (6 cells), 3 (9 cells), 2 (9 cells), or 1 (1 cell) chromatid of the chromosome 8 homologs in 25 cells examined. Of 72 signals observed, 70 were located at 8q11. 1 signal was located at 7q11 and at 12p11. In most cells, the signal on 8q was located at 8q11.2. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  14. The orexin 1 receptor modulates kappa opioid receptor function via a JNK-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Robinson, James D; McDonald, Patricia H

    2015-07-01

    The orexin 1 receptor (OX1R) and the kappa opioid receptor (KOR) are two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) previously demonstrated to play important roles in modulating the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse such as cocaine. Using cells heterologously expressing both receptors, we investigated whether OX1R can regulate the function of KOR and vice versa. Activation of OX1R was found to attenuate agonist-activated KOR-mediated inhibition of cAMP production. In contrast, agonist-activated KOR-mediated β-arrestin recruitment and p38 activation were enhanced in the presence of activated OX1R. These effects are independent of OX1R internalization but are blocked in the presence of the JNK inhibitor SP-600125. OX1R signaling does not affect ligand binding by KOR. Taken together, these data suggest that OX1R signaling can modulate KOR function in a JNK-dependent manner, promoting preferential signaling of KOR via β-arrestin/p38 rather than Gαi. Conversely, Gαq coupling of OX1R is unaffected by activation of KOR, suggesting that this crosstalk is unidirectional. Given that KOR Gαi-mediated signaling events and β-arrestin-mediated signaling events are thought to promote distinct cellular responses and physiological outcomes downstream of KOR activation, this mechanism may have important implications on the behavioral effects of KOR activity. PMID:25857454

  15. Regional differences in mu and kappa opioid receptor G-protein activation in brain in male and female prairie voles.

    PubMed

    Martin, T J; Sexton, T; Kim, S A; Severino, A L; Peters, C M; Young, L J; Childers, S R

    2015-12-17

    Prairie voles are unusual mammals in that, like humans, they are capable of forming socially monogamous pair bonds, display biparental care, and engage in alloparental behaviors. Both mu and kappa opioid receptors are involved in behaviors that either establish and maintain, or result from pair bond formation in these animals. Mu and kappa opioid receptors both utilize inhibitory G-proteins in signal transduction mechanisms, however the efficacy by which these receptor subtypes stimulate G-protein signaling across the prairie vole neuraxis is not known. Utilizing [(35)S]GTPγS autoradiography, we characterized the efficacy of G-protein stimulation in coronal sections throughout male and female prairie vole brains by [D-Ala2,NMe-Phe4,Gly-ol5]-enkephalin (DAMGO) and U50,488H, selective mu and kappa opioid agonists, respectively. DAMGO stimulation was highest in the forebrain, similar to that found with other rodent species. U-50,488H produced greater stimulation in prairie voles than is typically seen in mice and rats, particularly in select forebrain areas. DAMGO produced higher stimulation in the core versus the shell of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in females, while the distribution of U-50,488H stimulation was the opposite. There were no gender differences for U50,488H stimulation of G-protein activity across the regions examined, while DAMGO stimulation was greater in sections from females compared to those from males for NAc core, entopeduncular nucleus, and hippocampus. These data suggest that the kappa opioid system may be more sensitive to manipulation in prairie voles compared to mice and rats, and that female prairie voles may be more sensitive to mu agonists in select brain regions than males. PMID:26523979

  16. Kappa Opioid Receptors Mediate where Fear Is Expressed Following Extinction Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Sindy; Richardson, Rick; McNally, Gavan P.

    2011-01-01

    Six experiments used a within-subjects renewal design to examine the involvement of kappa opioid receptors (KORs) in regulating the expression and recovery of extinguished fear. Rats were trained to fear a tone conditioned stimulus (CS) via pairings with foot shock in a distinctive context (A). This was followed by extinction training of the CS in…

  17. Maturational alterations in constitutive activity of medial prefrontal cortex kappa-opioid receptors in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Sirohi, Sunil; Walker, Brendan M

    2015-11-01

    Opioid receptors can display spontaneous agonist-independent G-protein signaling (basal signaling/constitutive activity). While constitutive κ-opioid receptor (KOR) activity has been documented in vitro, it remains unknown if KORs are constitutively active in native systems. Using [(35) S] guanosine 5'-O-[gamma-thio] triphosphate coupling assay that measures receptor functional state, we identified the presence of medial prefrontal cortex KOR constitutive activity in young rats that declined with age. Furthermore, basal signaling showed an age-related decline and was insensitive to neutral opioid antagonist challenge. Collectively, the present data are first to demonstrate age-dependent alterations in the medial prefrontal cortex KOR constitutive activity in rats and changes in the constitutive activity of KORs can differentially impact KOR ligand efficacy. These data provide novel insights into the functional properties of the KOR system and warrant further consideration of KOR constitutive activity in normal and pathophysiological behavior. Opioid receptors exhibit agonist-independent constitutive activity; however, kappa-opioid receptor (KOR) constitutive activity has not been demonstrated in native systems. Our results confirm KOR constitutive activity in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) that declines with age. With the ability to presynaptically inhibit multiple neurotransmitter systems in the mPFC, maturational or patho-logical alterations in constitutive activity could disrupt corticofugal glutamatergic pyramidal projection neurons mediating executive function. Regulation of KOR constitutive activity could serve as a therapeutic target to treat compromised executive function. PMID:26257334

  18. Development of Functionally Selective, Small Molecule Agonists at Kappa Opioid Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lei; Lovell, Kimberly M.; Frankowski, Kevin J.; Slauson, Stephen R.; Phillips, Angela M.; Streicher, John M.; Stahl, Edward; Schmid, Cullen L.; Hodder, Peter; Madoux, Franck; Cameron, Michael D.; Prisinzano, Thomas E.; Aubé, Jeffrey; Bohn, Laura M.

    2013-01-01

    The kappa opioid receptor (KOR) is widely expressed in the CNS and can serve as a means to modulate pain perception, stress responses, and affective reward states. Therefore, the KOR has become a prominent drug discovery target toward treating pain, depression, and drug addiction. Agonists at KOR can promote G protein coupling and βarrestin2 recruitment as well as multiple downstream signaling pathways, including ERK1/2 MAPK activation. It has been suggested that the physiological effects of KOR activation result from different signaling cascades, with analgesia being G protein-mediated and dysphoria being mediated through βarrestin2 recruitment. Dysphoria associated with KOR activation limits the therapeutic potential in the use of KOR agonists as analgesics; therefore, it may be beneficial to develop KOR agonists that are biased toward G protein coupling and away from βarrestin2 recruitment. Here, we describe two classes of biased KOR agonists that potently activate G protein coupling but weakly recruit βarrestin2. These potent and functionally selective small molecule compounds may prove to be useful tools for refining the therapeutic potential of KOR-directed signaling in vivo. PMID:24187130

  19. Modulation of pre- and postsynaptic dopamine D2 receptor function by the selective kappa-opioid receptor agonist U69593.

    PubMed

    Acri, J B; Thompson, A C; Shippenberg, T

    2001-03-15

    The repeated administration of selective kappa-opioid receptor agonists prevents the locomotor activation produced by acute cocaine administration and the development of cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization. Previous studies have shown that dopamine (DA) D2 autoreceptors modulate the synthesis and release of DA in the striatum. Evidence that kappa agonist treatment downregulates DA D2 receptors in this same brain region has recently been obtained. Accordingly, the present studies were undertaken to examine the influence of repeated kappa-opioid receptor agonist administration on pre- and postsynaptic DA D2 receptor function in the dorsal striatum using pre- and postsynaptic receptor-selective doses of quinpirole. Rats were injected once daily with the selective kappa-opioid receptor agonist U69593 (0.16-0.32 mg/kg s.c.) or vehicle for 3 days. Microdialysis studies assessing basal and quinpirole-evoked (0.05 mg/kg s.c.) DA levels were conducted 2 days later. Basal and quinpirole-stimulated locomotor activity were assessed in a parallel group of animals. The no-net flux method of quantitative microdialysis revealed no effect of U69593 on basal DA dynamics, in that extracellular DA concentration and extraction fraction did not differ in control and U69593-treated animals. Acute administration of quinpirole significantly decreased striatal DA levels in control animals, but in animals treated with U69593, the inhibitory effects of quinpirole were significantly reduced. Quinpirole produced a dose-related increase in locomotor activity in control animals, and this effect was significantly attenuated in U69593-treated animals. These data reveal that prior repeated administration of a selective kappa-opioid receptor agonist attenuates quinpirole-induced alterations in DA neurotransmission and locomotor activity. These results suggest that both pre- and postsynaptic striatal DA D2 receptors may be downregulated following repeated kappa-opioid receptor agonist

  20. Analgesia produced by exposure to 2450-MHz radiofrequency radiation (RFR) is mediated by brain mu- and kappa-opioid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Salomon, G.; Park, E.J.; Quock, R.M. )

    1992-02-26

    This study was conducted to identify the opioid receptor subtype(s) responsible for RFR-induced analgesia. Male Swiss Webster mice, 20-25 g, were exposed to 20 mW/cm{sup 2} RFR in a 2,450-MHz waveguide system for 10 min, then tested 15 min later in the abdominal constriction paradigm which detects {mu}- and {kappa}-opioid activity. Immediately following RFR exposure, different groups of mice were pretreated intracerebroventricularly with different opioid receptor blockers with selectivity for {mu}- or {kappa}-opioid receptors. Results show that RFR-induced analgesia was attenuated by higher but not lower doses of the non-selective antagonist naloxone, but the selective {mu}-opioid antagonist {beta}-funaltrexamine and by the selective {kappa}-opioid antagonist norbinaltorphimine. RFR-induced analgesia was also reduced by subcutaneous pretreatment with 5.0 mg/kg of the {mu}-/{kappa}-opioid antagonist({minus})-5,9-diethyl-{alpha}-5,9-dialkyl-2{prime}-hydroxy-6,7-benzomorphan(MR-2266). These findings suggest that RFR-induced analgesia may be mediated by both {mu}- and {kappa}-opioid mechanisms.

  1. Kappa opioid receptors stimulate phosphoinositide turnover in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Periyasamy, S.; Hoss, W. )

    1990-01-01

    The effects of various subtype-selective opioid agonists and antagonists on the phosphoinositide (PI) turnover response were investigated in the rat brain. The {kappa}-agonists U-50,488H and ketocyclazocine produced a concentration-dependent increase in the accumulation of IP's in hippocampal slices. The other {kappa}-agonists Dynorphin-A (1-13) amide, and its protected analog D(Ala){sup 2}-dynorphin-A (1-13) amide also produced a significant increase in the formation of ({sup 3}H)-IP's, whereas the {mu}-selective agonists (D-Ala{sup 2}-N-Me-Phe{sup 4}-Gly{sup 5}-ol)-enkephalin and morphine and the {delta}-selective agonist (D-Pen{sup 2,5})-enkephalin were ineffective. The increase in IP's formation elicited by U-50,488H was partially antagonized by naloxone and more completely antagonized by the {kappa}-selective antagonists nor-binaltorphimine and MR 2266. The formation of IP's induced by U-50,488H varies with the regions of the brain used, being highest in hippocampus and amygdala, and lowest in striatum and pons-medullar. The results indicate that brain {kappa}- but neither {mu}- nor {delta}- receptors are coupled to the PI turnover response.

  2. Early-Life Social Isolation Stress Increases Kappa Opioid Receptor Responsiveness and Downregulates the Dopamine System.

    PubMed

    Karkhanis, Anushree N; Rose, Jamie H; Weiner, Jeffrey L; Jones, Sara R

    2016-08-01

    Chronic early-life stress increases vulnerability to alcoholism and anxiety disorders during adulthood. Similarly, rats reared in social isolation (SI) during adolescence exhibit augmented ethanol intake and anxiety-like behaviors compared with group housed (GH) rats. Prior studies suggest that disruption of dopamine (DA) signaling contributes to SI-associated behaviors, although the mechanisms underlying these alterations are not fully understood. Kappa opioid receptors (KORs) have an important role in regulating mesolimbic DA signaling, and other kinds of stressors have been shown to augment KOR function. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that SI-induced increases in KOR function contribute to the dysregulation of NAc DA and the escalation in ethanol intake associated with SI. Our ex vivo voltammetry experiments showed that the inhibitory effects of the kappa agonist U50,488 on DA release were significantly enhanced in the NAc core and shell of SI rats. Dynorphin levels in NAc tissue were observed to be lower in SI rats. Microdialysis in freely moving rats revealed that SI was also associated with reduced baseline DA levels, and pretreatment with the KOR antagonist nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI) increased DA levels selectively in SI subjects. Acute ethanol elevated DA in SI and GH rats and nor-BNI pretreatment augmented this effect in SI subjects, while having no effect on ethanol-stimulated DA release in GH rats. Together, these data suggest that KORs may have increased responsiveness following SI, which could lead to hypodopaminergia and contribute to an increased drive to consume ethanol. Indeed, SI rats exhibited greater ethanol intake and preference and KOR blockade selectively attenuated ethanol intake in SI rats. Collectively, the findings that nor-BNI reversed SI-mediated hypodopaminergic state and escalated ethanol intake suggest that KOR antagonists may represent a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of alcohol use disorders, particularly

  3. Functional selectivity of kappa opioid receptor agonists in peripheral sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Jamshidi, Raehannah J; Jacobs, Blaine A; Sullivan, Laura C; Chavera, Teresa A; Saylor, Rachel M; Prisinzano, Thomas E; Clarke, William P; Berg, Kelly A

    2015-11-01

    Activation of kappa opioid receptors (KORs) expressed by peripheral sensory neurons that respond to noxious stimuli (nociceptors) can reduce neurotransmission of pain stimuli from the periphery to the central nervous system. We have previously shown that the antinociception dose-response curve for peripherally restricted doses of the KOR agonist (-)-(trans)-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-N-[2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)cyclohexyl]benzeneacetamide (U50488) has an inverted U shape. Here, we found that the downward phase of the U50488 dose-response curve was blocked by an inhibitor of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation U0126. Local administration of the selective KOR agonist salvinorin A (Sal-A), also resulted in an inverted U-shaped curve; however, the downward phase was insensitive to U0126. By contrast, inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) partially blocked the downward phase of the dose-response curve to Sal-A, suggesting a role for JNK. In cultures of peripheral sensory neurons, U50488 and Sal-A inhibited adenylyl cyclase activity with similar efficacies; however, their ability to activate ERK and JNK differed. Whereas U50488 activated ERK but not JNK, Sal-A activated JNK but not ERK. Moreover, although both U50488 and Sal-A produced homologous desensitization, desensitization to U50488 was blocked by inhibition of ERK activation, whereas desensitization to Sal-A was blocked by inhibition of JNK. Substitution of an ethoxymethyl ether for the C2 position acetyl group of Sal-A reduced stimulation of JNK, prevented desensitization by ethoxymethyl ether for the C2 position acetyl group of Sal-A, and resulted in a monotonic antinociception dose-response curve. Collectively, these data demonstrate the functional selectivity of KOR ligands for signaling in peripheral sensory neurons, which results in differential effects on behavioral responses in vivo. PMID:26297384

  4. kappa opioid receptors in human microglia downregulate human immunodeficiency virus 1 expression.

    PubMed Central

    Chao, C C; Gekker, G; Hu, S; Sheng, W S; Shark, K B; Bu, D F; Archer, S; Bidlack, J M; Peterson, P K

    1996-01-01

    Microglial cells, the resident macrophages of the brain, play an important role in the neuropathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), and recent studies suggest that opioid peptides regulate the function of macrophages from somatic tissues. We report herein the presence of kappa opioid receptors (KORs) in human fetal microglia and inhibition of HIV-1 expression in acutely infected microglial cell cultures treated with KOR ligands. Using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and sequencing analyses, we found that mRNA for the KOR was constitutively expressed in microglia and determined that the nucleotide sequence of the open reading frame was identical to that of the human brain KOR gene. The expression of KOR in microglial cells was confirmed by membrane binding of [3H]U69,593, a kappa-selective ligand, and by indirect immunofluorescence. Treatment of microglial cell cultures with U50,488 or U69,593 resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of expression of the monocytotropic HIV-1 SF162 strain. This antiviral effect of the kappa ligands was blocked by the specific KOR antagonist, nor-binaltrophimine. These findings suggest that kappa opioid agonists have immunomodulatory activity in the brain, and that these compounds could have potential in the treatment of HIV-1-associated encephalopathy. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:8755601

  5. Kappa Opioid Receptor-Induced Aversion Requires p38 MAPK Activation in VTA Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ehrich, Jonathan M.; Messinger, Daniel I.; Knakal, Cerise R.; Kuhar, Jamie R.; Schattauer, Selena S.; Bruchas, Michael R.; Zweifel, Larry S.; Kieffer, Brigitte L.; Phillips, Paul E.M.

    2015-01-01

    The endogenous dynorphin-κ opioid receptor (KOR) system encodes the dysphoric component of the stress response and controls the risk of depression-like and addiction behaviors; however, the molecular and neural circuit mechanisms are not understood. In this study, we report that KOR activation of p38α MAPK in ventral tegmental (VTA) dopaminergic neurons was required for conditioned place aversion (CPA) in mice. Conditional genetic deletion of floxed KOR or floxed p38α MAPK by Cre recombinase expression in dopaminergic neurons blocked place aversion to the KOR agonist U50,488. Selective viral rescue by wild-type KOR expression in dopaminergic neurons of KOR−/− mice restored U50,488-CPA, whereas expression of a mutated form of KOR that could not initiate p38α MAPK activation did not. Surprisingly, while p38α MAPK inactivation blocked U50,488-CPA, p38α MAPK was not required for KOR inhibition of evoked dopamine release measured by fast scan cyclic voltammetry in the nucleus accumbens. In contrast, KOR activation acutely inhibited VTA dopaminergic neuron firing, and repeated exposure attenuated the opioid response. This adaptation to repeated exposure was blocked by conditional deletion of p38α MAPK, which also blocked KOR-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the inwardly rectifying potassium channel (GIRK) subunit Kir3.1 in VTA dopaminergic neurons. Consistent with the reduced response, GIRK phosphorylation at this amino terminal tyrosine residue (Y12) enhances channel deactivation. Thus, contrary to prevailing expectations, these results suggest that κ opioid-induced aversion requires regulation of VTA dopaminergic neuron somatic excitability through a p38α MAPK effect on GIRK deactivation kinetics rather than by presynaptically inhibiting dopamine release. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Kappa opioid receptor (KOR) agonists have the potential to be effective, nonaddictive analgesics, but their therapeutic utility is greatly limited by adverse effects on mood

  6. Central kappa opioid receptor-evoked changes in renal function in conscious rats: participation of renal nerves.

    PubMed

    Kapusta, D R; Obih, J C

    1993-10-01

    The present investigations examined the cardiovascular and renal responses produced by central nervous system stimulation of kappa opioid receptors by the selective kappa opioid receptor agonist, U-50488H, in conscious Sprague-Dawley rats. Administration of U-50488H (1 microgram total) into the lateral cerebroventricle produced a profound diuretic and antinatriuretic response. In addition, concurrent with the decrease in urinary sodium excretion, i.c.v. U-50488H elicited an increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity. The increases in urine flow rate and renal sympathetic nerve activity and the decrease in urinary sodium excretion produced by U-50488H were completely prevented in rats that had undergone pretreatment with the selective kappa opioid receptor antagonist, nor-binaltorphimine. In contrast, in animals that had undergone irreversible mu opioid receptor blockade with the selective mu opioid receptor antagonist, beta-funaltrexamine, central U-50488H administration elicited similar diuretic and antinatriuretic responses as observed in intact naive animals. In further studies, the antinatriuretic response produced by i.c.v. U-50488H was completely abolished in rats that had undergone chronic bilateral renal denervation, a technique used to remove the influence of the renal sympathetic nerves. Glomerular filtration rates and effective renal plasma flows were not altered by i.c.v. administration of U-50488H in intact or renal denervated animals. Together, these studies provide evidence for the role of central kappa opioid receptor mechanisms in the regulation of urinary sodium and water excretion. Moreover, these studies indicate that the changes in renal sodium handling produced by central kappa opioid agonists result from an action of these compounds to modulate sympathetic neural outflow to the kidneys. PMID:8229746

  7. Neuroprotective actions of GR89696, a highly potent and selective kappa-opioid receptor agonist.

    PubMed Central

    Birch, P. J.; Rogers, H.; Hayes, A. G.; Hayward, N. J.; Tyers, M. B.; Scopes, D. I.; Naylor, A.; Judd, D. B.

    1991-01-01

    1. The effect of a novel, highly potent and selective kappa-opioid receptor agonist, GR89696, has been evaluated in two animal models of cerebral ischaemia: transient bilateral carotid artery occlusion in the Mongolian gerbil and permanent, unilateral middle cerebral artery occlusion in the mouse. 2. In the Mongolian gerbil model, administration of GR89696 (3 to 30 micrograms kg-1, s.c.), immediately before and at 4 h after insult, produced a dose-dependent reduction in the hippocampal CA1 neuronal cell loss resulting from a 7-min bilateral carotid occlusion. Similar effects were obtained with two other kappa-agonists, GR86014 (1 mgkg-1, s.c.) and GR91272 (1 mgkg-1, s.c.). The neuroprotective effect of GR89696 was completely blocked by prior administration of the opioid receptor antagonist, naltrexone, at 10 mgkg-1, s.c. Repeated post-treatment with GR89696 (100 micrograms kg-1, s.c.) or GR44821 (10 mgkg-1, s.c.) was also effective in protecting completely the hippocampal CA1 neurones from ischaemia-induced neurodegeneration. 3. In the permanent, unilateral middle cerebral artery occlusion model in the mouse, repeated administration of GR89696 at 300 micrograms kg-1, s.c. produced a 50% reduction in cerebrocortical infarct volume. In these experiments GR89696 was dosed 5 min, 4, 8, 12, 16, 20 and 24 h after occlusion on the first day and then three times daily for the next three days. GR89696 (300 micrograms kg-1) also produced a significant 35% reduction in infarct volume in this model when the initiation of dosing was delayed for 6 h after the insult. 4. The results indicate that the potent kappa-opioid receptor agonist, GR89696, is neuroprotective in both global and focal cerebral ischaemia models and suggest that, with this class of compound, there may be a considerable time window for pharmacological intervention. PMID:1657267

  8. Effects of the kappa opioid receptor antagonist MR-2266-BS on the acquisition of ethanol preference

    SciTech Connect

    Sandi, C.; Borrell, J.; Guaza, C. )

    1990-01-01

    Using a paradigm by which rats forced to drink a weak ethanol solution develop ethanol preference in consecutive retention testing days, the effects of the administration of the kappa opioid antagonist MR-2266-BS, prior to or after the forced ethanol session, were studied. Pre-conditioning subcutaneous (s.c.) administration of 1 mg/kg of MR-2266-BS induced a decrease in subsequent ethanol consumption without significantly modifying the acquisition of ethanol preference. Post-conditioning administration of MR-2266-BS induced both a dose-dependent reduction in ethanol consumption and in preference throughout the three following days. The results of the present study provide further support of the involvement of kappa-type opioids on drinking behavior, and suggest that kappa receptors may be involved in the consumption and development of preference to ethanol.

  9. Prodynorphin, proenkephalin and kappa opioid receptor mRNA responses to acute "binge" cocaine.

    PubMed

    Spangler, R; Zhou, Y; Maggos, C E; Schlussman, S D; Ho, A; Kreek, M J

    1997-02-01

    Previous studies showed that preprodynorphin (ppDyn) mRNA increases in caudate-putamen while kappa opioid receptor (KOR) mRNA decreases in substantia nigra after 3 and 14 days "binge" cocaine. To further characterize opioid mRNA responses, rats were administered: saline; 1 day cocaine followed by 1 day saline; 1 day cocaine; or 2 days cocaine. ppDyn mRNA in caudate-putamen increased in both groups receiving cocaine on the final day compared to groups receiving saline. Preproenkephalin (ppEnk) mRNA in caudate-putamen increased, and KOR mRNA in substantia nigra decreased, after 2 days of cocaine. Thus ppDyn mRNA is elevated acutely by cocaine, while ppEnk and KOR mRNAs show a significant response only on the second day of "binge" cocaine. PMID:9030708

  10. Modulation of the behavioral and neurochemical effects of psychostimulants by kappa-opioid receptor systems.

    PubMed

    Shippenberg, T S; Chefer, V I; Zapata, A; Heidbreder, C A

    2001-06-01

    The repeated, intermittent use of cocaine and other drugs of abuse produces profound and often long-lasting alterations in behavior and brain chemistry. It has been suggested that these consequences of drug use play a critical role in drug craving and relapse to addiction. This article reviews the effects of psychostimulant administration on dopaminergic and excitatory amino acid neurotransmission in brain regions comprising the brain's motive circuit and provides evidence that the activation of endogenous kappa-opioid receptor systems in these regions opposes the behavioral and neurochemical consequences of repeated drug use. The role of this opioid system in mediating alterations in mood and affect that occur during abstinence from repeated psychostimulant use are also discussed. PMID:11458540

  11. The crystal structure of a bimorphinan with highly selective kappa opioid receptor antagonist activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbańczyk-Lipkowska, Zofia; Etter, Margaret C.; Lipkowski, Andrzej W.; Portoghese, Philip S.

    1987-07-01

    The crystal structure of the dihydrobromide heptahydrate of nor-binaltorphimine (17, 17'-bis(cyclopropylmethyl)-6,6',7,7'-tetrahydro-4,5α: 4',5'α-diepoxy-6,6'-imino[7,7' bimorphinan]-3,3',14,14'-tetraol)is presented. This structure is the first reported structure of a rigid bivalent opioid ligand. Two morphinan pharmacophores are connected by a rigid spacer, the pyrrole ring. The nor-binaltorphimine structure itself shows unique, high selectivity as a kappa opioid receptor antagonist. Crystal data: P3 2, Z = 3, a = b = 20.223 (4), c = 9.541(7) Å, α = β = 90°, γ = 120°; R = 0.079 (1765 reflections, Fobs > 1σ( F)).

  12. Distribution of kappa opioid receptors in the brain of young and old male rats

    SciTech Connect

    Maggi, R.; Limonta, P.; Dondi, D.; Martini, L.; Piva, F. )

    1989-01-01

    The experiments to be described have been designed in order to: (a) provide new information on the concentrations of opioid kappa receptors in different regions of the brain of the male rats; and (b) to analyze whether the density of brain kappa receptors might be modified by the process of aging. The concentration of kappa receptors was investigated in the hypothalamus, amygdala, mesencephalon, corpus striatum, hippocampus, thalamus, frontal poles, anterior and posterior cortex collected from male rats of 2 and 19 months of age. {sup 3}H-bremazocine (BRZ) was used as the ligand of kappa receptors, after protection of mu and delta receptors respectively with dihydromorphine and d-ala-d-leu-enkephalin. The results obtained show that: (1) in young male rats, the number of kappa opioid receptors is different in the various brain areas examined. (2) Aging exerts little influence on the number of kappa receptors in the majority of the brain structures considered. However in the amygdala and in the thalamus the number of kappa receptors was increased in old animals.

  13. Activation of kappa-opioid receptor as a method for prevention of ischemic and reperfusion arrhythmias: role of protein kinase C and K(ATP) channels.

    PubMed

    Lishmanov, A Yu; Maslov, L N; Lasukova, T V; Crawford, D; Wong, T M

    2007-02-01

    Intravenous pretreatment with kappa-opioid receptor antagonist (-)-U-50,488 (1 mg/kg) improved heart resistance to the arrhythmogenic effect of coronary occlusion and reperfusion. Selective kappa1-opioid receptor antagonist norbinaltorphimine and nonselective blocker of peripheral opioid receptors methylnaloxone abolished this antiarrhythmic effect. Preliminary blockade of protein kinase C with chelerythrine or inhibition of ATP-dependent K+ channels (K(ATP) channels) with glybenclamide abolished the antiarrhythmic effect of kappa-opioid receptor activation. Selective inhibitor of sarcolemmal K(ATP) channels did not modulate the kappa-opioid receptor-mediated increase in cardiac electrical stability. Our results suggest that protein kinase C and mitochondrial K(ATP) channels play an important role in the antiarrhythmic effect associated with activation of peripheral kappa-opioid receptors. PMID:17970197

  14. Differential Stability of the Crystallographic Interfaces of Mu- and Kappa-Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Jennifer M.; Filizola, Marta

    2014-01-01

    The recent mu-opioid receptor (MOPr) and kappa-opioid receptor (KOPr) crystal structures have inspired hypotheses of physiologically relevant dimerization contacts, specifically: a closely packed interface involving transmembrane (TM) helices TM5 and TM6, and a less compact interface, involving TM1, TM2, and helix 8 (H8). While the former was only found in MOPr crystals, similar arrangements of the latter were identified for both KOPr and MOPr. The relevance of these interfaces outside of a crystal lattice is called into question by the possibility that they might be influenced by the specific crystallization conditions. In this study, we have employed umbrella sampling molecular dynamics simulations of coarse-grained representations of the interacting MOPr or KOPr crystallographic structures, in the absence of the T4 lysozyme, and in an explicit lipid-water environment, to determine the strength of receptor dimerization at the different crystallographic interfaces. We note that the shape of the interface plays a dominant role in the strength of the interaction, and the pattern of contacting residues defines the shape of the potential of mean force. This information can be used to guide experiments aimed at exploring the role of dimerization in opioid receptor function. PMID:24651466

  15. Structure of the human [kappa]-opioid receptor in complex with JDTic

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Huixian; Wacker, Daniel; Mileni, Mauro; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Vardy, Eyal; Liu, Wei; Thompson, Aaron A.; Huang, Xi-Ping; Carroll, F. Ivy; Mascarella, S. Wayne; Westkaemper, Richard B.; Mosier, Philip D.; Roth, Bryan L.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2013-04-25

    Opioid receptors mediate the actions of endogenous and exogenous opioids on many physiological processes, including the regulation of pain, respiratory drive, mood, and - in the case of {kappa}-opioid receptor ({kappa}-OR) - dysphoria and psychotomimesis. Here we report the crystal structure of the human {kappa}-OR in complex with the selective antagonist JDTic, arranged in parallel dimers, at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution. The structure reveals important features of the ligand-binding pocket that contribute to the high affinity and subtype selectivity of JDTic for the human {kappa}-OR. Modelling of other important {kappa}-OR-selective ligands, including the morphinan-derived antagonists norbinaltorphimine and 5'-guanidinonaltrindole, and the diterpene agonist salvinorin A analogue RB-64, reveals both common and distinct features for binding these diverse chemotypes. Analysis of site-directed mutagenesis and ligand structure-activity relationships confirms the interactions observed in the crystal structure, thereby providing a molecular explanation for {kappa}-OR subtype selectivity, and essential insights for the design of compounds with new pharmacological properties targeting the human {kappa}-OR.

  16. Docking and free energy perturbation studies of ligand binding in the kappa opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Goldfeld, Dahlia A; Murphy, Robert; Kim, Byungchan; Wang, Lingle; Beuming, Thijs; Abel, Robert; Friesner, Richard A

    2015-01-22

    The kappa opioid receptor (KOR) is an important target for pain and depression therapeutics that lack harmful and addictive qualities of existing medications. We present a model for the binding of morphinan ligands and JDTic to the JDTic/KOR crystal structure based on an atomic level description of the water structure within its active site. The model contains two key interaction motifs that are supported by experimental evidence. The first is the formation of a salt bridge between the ligand and Asp 138(3.32) in transmembrane domain (TM) 3. The second is the stabilization by the ligand of two high energy, isolated, and ice-like waters near TM5 and TM6. This model is incorporated via energetic terms into a new empirical scoring function, WScore, designed to assess interactions between ligands and localized water in a binding site. Pairing WScore with the docking program Glide discriminates known active KOR ligands from large sets of decoy molecules much better than Glide's older generation scoring functions, SP and XP. We also use rigorous free energy perturbation calculations to provide evidence for the proposed mechanism of interaction between ligands and KOR. The molecular description of ligand binding in KOR should provide a good starting point for future drug discovery efforts for this receptor. PMID:25395044

  17. Ventral hippocampal kappa opioid receptors mediate the renewal of fear following extinction in the rat.

    PubMed

    Cole, Sindy; Richardson, Rick; McNally, Gavan P

    2013-01-01

    The hippocampus is part of a neural network which regulates the renewal of fear following extinction. Both the ventral (VH) and dorsal (DH) hippocampus have been shown to be necessary for renewal, however the critical receptors and neurotransmitters mediating these contributions are poorly understood. One candidate mechanism is the kappa opioid receptor (KOR) system, which has been implicated in fear learning and anxiety. Here we examined the effect of the KOR antagonist norbinaltorphamine hydrochloride (norBNI), infused into either the VH or DH, on the renewal of extinguished fear. We found that an infusion of norBNI into the VH significantly reduced the relapse of fear on test compared to that seen in saline controls (Experiment 1), while similar infusions of norBNI into the DH had no effect on renewal (Experiment 2). These findings show that hippocampal KORs are involved in fear renewal and also identify a dissociation in the contribution of VH and DH KORs to the expression of renewed fear. PMID:23675405

  18. Ventral Hippocampal Kappa Opioid Receptors Mediate the Renewal of Fear following Extinction in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Sindy; Richardson, Rick; McNally, Gavan P.

    2013-01-01

    The hippocampus is part of a neural network which regulates the renewal of fear following extinction. Both the ventral (VH) and dorsal (DH) hippocampus have been shown to be necessary for renewal, however the critical receptors and neurotransmitters mediating these contributions are poorly understood. One candidate mechanism is the kappa opioid receptor (KOR) system, which has been implicated in fear learning and anxiety. Here we examined the effect of the KOR antagonist norbinaltorphamine hydrochloride (norBNI), infused into either the VH or DH, on the renewal of extinguished fear. We found that an infusion of norBNI into the VH significantly reduced the relapse of fear on test compared to that seen in saline controls (Experiment 1), while similar infusions of norBNI into the DH had no effect on renewal (Experiment 2). These findings show that hippocampal KORs are involved in fear renewal and also identify a dissociation in the contribution of VH and DH KORs to the expression of renewed fear. PMID:23675405

  19. NMR structure and dynamics of the agonist dynorphin peptide bound to the human kappa opioid receptor

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Casey; White, Kate L.; Doncescu, Nathalie; Didenko, Tatiana; Roth, Bryan L.; Czaplicki, Georges; Stevens, Raymond C.; Wüthrich, Kurt; Milon, Alain

    2015-01-01

    The structure of the dynorphin (1–13) peptide (dynorphin) bound to the human kappa opioid receptor (KOR) has been determined by liquid-state NMR spectroscopy. 1H and 15N chemical shift variations indicated that free and bound peptide is in fast exchange in solutions containing 1 mM dynorphin and 0.01 mM KOR. Radioligand binding indicated an intermediate-affinity interaction, with a Kd of ∼200 nM. Transferred nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy was used to determine the structure of bound dynorphin. The N-terminal opioid signature, YGGF, was observed to be flexibly disordered, the central part of the peptide from L5 to R9 to form a helical turn, and the C-terminal segment from P10 to K13 to be flexibly disordered in this intermediate-affinity bound state. Combining molecular modeling with NMR provided an initial framework for understanding multistep activation of a G protein-coupled receptor by its cognate peptide ligand. PMID:26372966

  20. Antidepressant-like Effects of Buprenorphine are Mediated by Kappa Opioid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Falcon, Edgardo; Browne, Caroline A; Leon, Rosa M; Fleites, Vanessa C; Sweeney, Rachel; Kirby, Lynn G; Lucki, Irwin

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies have identified potential antidepressant effects of buprenorphine (BPN), a drug with high affinity for mu opioid receptor (MORs) and kappa opioid receptors (KORs) and some affinity at delta opioid receptor (DOR) and opioid receptor-like 1 (ORL-1) receptors. Therefore, these studies examined which opioid receptors were involved in BPN's effects on animal behavior tests sensitive to antidepressant drugs. The acute effects of BPN were tested in the forced swim test (FST) using mice with genetic deletion of individual opioid receptors or after pharmacological blockade of receptors. For evaluating the effects of BPN on chronic stress, separate groups of mice were exposed to unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS) for 3 weeks and treated with BPN for at least 7 days before behavioral assessment and subsequent measurement of Oprk1, Oprm1, and Pdyn mRNA expression in multiple brain regions. BPN did not reduce immobility in mice with KOR deletion or after pretreatment with norbinaltorphimine, even though desipramine remained effective. In contrast, BPN reduced immobility in MOR and DOR knockout mice and in mice pretreated with the ORL-1 antagonist JTC-801. UCMS reduced sucrose preference, decreased time in the light side of the light/dark box, increased immobility in the FST and induced region-specific alterations in Oprk1, Oprm1, and PDYN mRNA expression in the frontal cortex and striatum. All of these changes were normalized following BPN treatment. The KOR was identified as a key player mediating the effects of BPN in tests sensitive to antidepressant drugs in mice. These studies support further development of BPN as a novel antidepressant. PMID:26979295

  1. Structure-Activity Relationships of the Peptide Kappa Opioid Receptor Antagonist Zyklophin.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Anand A; Murray, Thomas F; Aldrich, Jane V

    2015-11-25

    The dynorphin (Dyn) A analogue zyklophin ([N-benzyl-Tyr(1)-cyclo(d-Asp(5),Dap(8))]dynorphin A(1-11)NH2) is a kappa opioid receptor (KOR)-selective antagonist in vitro, is active in vivo, and antagonizes KOR in the CNS after systemic administration. Hence, we synthesized zyklophin analogues to explore the structure-activity relationships of this peptide. The synthesis of selected analogues required modification to introduce the N-terminal amino acid due to poor solubility and/or to avoid epimerization of this residue. Among the N-terminal modifications, the N-phenethyl and N-cyclopropylmethyl substitutions resulted in analogues with the highest KOR affinities. Pharmacological results for the alanine-substituted analogues indicated that Phe(4) and Arg(6), but interestingly not the Tyr(1) phenol, are important for zyklophin's KOR affinity and that Arg(7) was important for KOR antagonist activity. In the GTPγS assay, while all of the cyclic analogues exhibited negligible KOR efficacy, the N-cyclopropylmethyl-Tyr(1) and N-benzyl-Phe(1) analogues were 28- and 11-fold more potent KOR antagonists, respectively, than zyklophin. PMID:26491810

  2. Kappa Opioid Receptors on Dopaminergic Neurons Are Necessary for Kappa-Mediated Place Aversion

    PubMed Central

    Chefer, Vladimir I; Bäckman, Cristina M; Gigante, Eduardo D; Shippenberg, Toni S

    2013-01-01

    Kappa-opioid receptor (KOR) agonists have dysphoric properties in humans and are aversive in rodents. This has been attributed to the activation of KORs within the mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system. However, the role of DA in KOR-mediated aversion and stress remains divisive as recent studies have suggested that activation of KORs on serotonergic neurons may be sufficient to mediate aversive behaviors. To address this question, we used conditional knock-out (KO) mice with KORs deleted on DA neurons (DATCre/wt/KORloxp/loxp, or DATCre-KOR KO). In agreement with previous findings, control mice (DATCre/wt/KORwt/wt or WT) showed conditioned place aversion (CPA) to the systemically administered KOR agonist U69,593. In contrast, DATCre-KOR KO mice did not exhibit CPA with this same agonist. In addition, in vivo microdialysis showed that systemic U69,593 decreased overflow of DA in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in WT mice, but had no effect in DATCre-KOR KO mice. Intra- ventral tegmental area (VTA) delivery of KORs using an adeno-associated viral gene construct, resulted in phenotypic rescue of the KOR-mediated NAc DA response and aversive behavior in DATCre-KOR KO animals. These results provide evidence that KORs on VTA DA neurons are necessary to mediate KOR-mediated aversive behavior. Therefore, our data, along with recent findings, suggest that the neuronal mechanisms of KOR-mediated aversive behavior may include both dopaminergic and serotonergic components. PMID:23921954

  3. Synthesis and Evaluation of [11C]LY2795050 as a Novel Kappa Opioid Receptor Antagonist Radiotracer for PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ming-Qiang; Nabulsi, Nabeel; Kim, Su Jin; Tomasi, Giampaolo; Lin, Shu-fei; Mitch, Charles; Quimby, Steven; Barth, Vanessa; Rash, Karen; Masters, John; Navarro, Antonio; Seest, Eric; Morris, Evan E.; Carson, Richard E.; Huang, Yiyun

    2013-01-01

    Kappa opioid receptors (KOR) are believed to be involved in the pathophysiology of depression, anxiety disorders, drug abuse and alcoholism. To date, only one tracer, the kappa opioid receptor agonist [11C]GR103545, has been reported to be able to image KOR in primates. The goal of the present study was to synthesize the selective KOR antagonist [11C]LY2795050 and evaluate its potential as a PET tracer to image KOR in vivo. METHODS In vitro binding affinity of LY2795050 was measured in radioligand competition binding assays. Ex vivo experiments were conducted using microdosing of the unlabelled ligand in Sprague-Dawley rats, as well as wild-type and KOR knock-out mice, to assess the ligand’s potential as a tracer candidate. Imaging experiments with [11C]LY2795050 in monkeys were carried out on the Focus-220 PET scanner with arterial blood input function measurement. Binding parameters were determined with kinetic modeling analysis. RESULTS LY2795050 displays full antagonist activity and high binding affinity and selectivity for KOR. Microdosing studies in rodents and ex vivo analysis of tissue concentrations with LC/MS/MS identified LY2795050 as an appropriate tracer candidate able to provide specific binding signals in vivo. [11C]LY2795050 was prepared in an average yield of 12% and >99% radiochemical purity. In rhesus monkeys, [11C]LY2795050 displayed a moderate rate of peripheral metabolism, with ∼40% of parent compound remaining at 30 min postinjection. In the brain, [11C]LY2795050 displayed fast uptake kinetics (regional activity peak times < 20 min) and an uptake pattern consistent with the distribution of KOR in primates. Pretreatment with naloxone (1 mg/kg, iv) resulted in a uniform distribution of radioactivity. Further, specific binding of [11C]LY2795050 was reduced by the selective KOR antagonist LY2456302 in a dose-dependent manner. CONCLUSION [11C]LY2795050 displayed favorable pharmacokinetic properties and binding profiles in vivo, and therefore

  4. Determining Pharmacological Selectivity of the Kappa Opioid Receptor Antagonist LY2456302 Using Pupillometry as a Translational Biomarker in Rat and Human

    PubMed Central

    Witcher, Jennifer W.; Lowe, Stephen L.; Gonzales, Celedon R.; Weller, Mary Ann; Bell, Robert L.; Hart, John C.; Need, Anne B.; McKinzie, Jamie H.; Statnick, Michael A.; Suico, Jeffrey G.; McKinzie, David L.; Tauscher-Wisniewski, Sitra; Mitch, Charles H.; Stoltz, Randall R.; Wong, Conrad J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Selective kappa opioid receptor antagonism is a promising experimental strategy for the treatment of depression. The kappa opioid receptor antagonist, LY2456302, exhibits ~30-fold higher affinity for kappa opioid receptors over mu opioid receptors, which is the next closest identified pharmacology. Methods: Here, we determined kappa opioid receptor pharmacological selectivity of LY2456302 by assessing mu opioid receptor antagonism using translational pupillometry in rats and humans. Results: In rats, morphine-induced mydriasis was completely blocked by the nonselective opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (3mg/kg, which produced 90% mu opioid receptor occupancy), while 100 and 300mg/kg LY2456302 (which produced 56% and 87% mu opioid receptor occupancy, respectively) only partially blocked morphine-induced mydriasis. In humans, fentanyl-induced miosis was completely blocked by 50mg naltrexone, and LY2456302 dose-dependently blocked miosis at 25 and 60mg (minimal-to-no blockade at 4–10mg). Conclusions: We demonstrate, for the first time, the use of translational pupillometry in the context of receptor occupancy to identify a clinical dose of LY2456302 achieving maximal kappa opioid receptor occupancy without evidence of significant mu receptor antagonism. PMID:25637376

  5. Dynorphin activation of kappa opioid receptor reduces neuronal excitability in the paraventricular nucleus of mouse thalamus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiheng; Tang, Yamei; Tao, Huai; Li, Cunyan; Zhang, Xianghui; Liu, Yong

    2015-10-01

    It has been reported that kappa opioid receptor (KOR) is expressed in the paraventricular nucleus of thalamus (PVT), a brain region associated with arousal, drug reward and stress. Although intra-PVT infusion of KOR agonist was found to inhibit drug-seeking behavior, it is still unclear whether endogenous KOR agonists directly regulate PVT neuron activity. Here, we investigated the effect of the endogenous KOR agonist dynorphin-A (Dyn-A) on the excitability of mouse PVT neurons at different developmental ages. We found Dyn-A strongly inhibited PVT neurons through a direct postsynaptic hyperpolarization. Under voltage-clamp configuration, Dyn-A evoked an obvious outward current in majority of neurons tested in anterior PVT (aPVT) but only in minority of neurons in posterior PVT (pPVT). The Dyn-A current was abolished by KOR antagonist nor-BNI, Ba(2+) and non-hydrolyzable GDP analogue GDP-β-s, indicating that Dyn-A activates KOR and opens G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels in PVT neurons. More interestingly, by comparing Dyn-A currents in aPVT neurons of mice at various ages, we found Dyn-A evoked significant larger current in aPVT neurons from mice around prepuberty and early puberty stage. In addition, KOR activation by Dyn-A didn't produce obvious desensitization, while mu opioid receptor (MOR) activation induced obvious desensitization of mu receptor itself and also heterologous desensitization of KOR in PVT neurons. Together, our findings indicate that Dyn-A activates KOR and inhibits aPVT neurons in mice at various ages especially around puberty, suggesting a possible role of KOR in regulating aPVT-related brain function including stress response and drug-seeking behavior during adolescence. PMID:26056031

  6. Galpha-subunits differentially alter the conformation and agonist affinity of kappa-opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Yan, Feng; Mosier, Philip D; Westkaemper, Richard B; Roth, Bryan L

    2008-02-12

    Although ligand-induced conformational changes in G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are well-documented, there is little direct evidence for G protein-induced changes in GPCR conformation. To investigate this possibility, the effects of overexpressing Galpha-subunits (Galpha16 or Galphai2) with the kappa-opioid receptor (KOR) were examined. The changes in KOR conformation were subequently examined via the substituted cysteine accessibility method (SCAM) in transmembrane domains 6 (TM6) and 7 (TM7) and extracellular loop 2 (EL2). Significant conformational changes were observed on TM7, the extracellular portion of TM6, and EL2. Seven SCAM-sensitive residues (S3107.33, F3147.37, and I3167.39 to Y3207.43) on TM7 presented a cluster pattern when the KOR was exposed to baseline amounts of G protein, and additional residues became sensitive upon overexpression of various G proteins. In TM7, S3117.34 and N3267.49 were found to be sensitive in Galpha16-overexpressed cells and Y3137.36, N3227.45, S3237.46, and L3297.52 in Galphai2-overexpressed cells. In addition, the degree of sensitivity for various TM7 residues was augmented, especially in Galphai2-overexpressed cells. A similar phenomenon was also observed for residues in TM6 and EL2. In addition to an enhanced sensitivity of certain residues, our findings also indicated that a slight rotation was predicted to occur in the upper part of TM7 upon G protein overexpression. These relatively modest conformational changes engendered by G protein overexpression had both profound and differential effects on the abilities of agonists to bind to KOR. These data are significant because they demonstrate that Galpha-subunits differentially modulate the conformation and agonist affinity of a prototypical GPCR. PMID:18205395

  7. Kappa Opioid Receptor-Mediated Dysregulation of GABAergic Transmission in the Central Amygdala in Cocaine Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Kallupi, Marsida; Wee, Sunmee; Edwards, Scott; Whitfield, Tim W.; Oleata, Christopher S.; Luu, George; Schmeichel, Brooke E.; Koob, George F.; Roberto, Marisa

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies have demonstrated an enhanced dynorphin/kappa-opioid receptor (KOR) system following repeated cocaine exposure, but few reports have focused on neuroadaptations within the central amygdala (CeA). Methods We identified KOR-related physiological changes in the CeA following escalation of cocaine self-administration in rats. We used in vitro slice electrophysiological (intracellular and whole-cell recordings) methods to assess whether differential cocaine access in either 1h (short access, ShA) or 6h (long access, LgA) sessions induced plasticity at CeA GABAergic synapses, or altered the sensitivity of these synapses to KOR agonism (U50488) or antagonism (nor-BNI). We then determined the functional effects of CeA KOR blockade in cocaine-related behaviors. Results Baseline evoked GABAergic transmission was enhanced in the CeA from ShA and LgA rats compared to cocaine-naïve rats. Acute cocaine (1 uM) application significantly decreased GABA release in all groups (naïve, ShA, and LgA rats). Application of U50488 (1 uM) significantly decreased GABAergic transmission in the CeA from naïve rats, but increased it in LgA rats. Conversely, nor-BNI (200 nM) significantly increased GABAergic transmission in the CeA from naïve rats, but decreased it in LgA rats. Nor-BNI did not alter the acute cocaine-induced inhibition of GABAergic responses. Finally, CeA microinfusion of nor-BNI blocked cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization and attenuated the heightened anxiety-like behavior observed during withdrawal from chronic cocaine exposure in the defensive burying paradigm. Conclusion Together these data demonstrate that CeA dynorphin/KOR systems are dysregulated following excessive cocaine exposure and suggest KOR antagonism as a viable therapeutic strategy for cocaine addiction. PMID:23751206

  8. The kappa opioid receptor antagonist JDTic attenuates alcohol seeking and withdrawal anxiety.

    PubMed

    Schank, Jesse R; Goldstein, Andrea L; Rowe, Kelly E; King, Courtney E; Marusich, Julie A; Wiley, Jenny L; Carroll, F Ivy; Thorsell, Annika; Heilig, Markus

    2012-05-01

    The role of kappa-opioid receptors (KOR) in the regulation of alcohol-related behaviors is not completely understood. For example, alcohol consumption has been reported to increase following treatment with KOR antagonists in rats, but was decreased in mice with genetic deletion of KOR. Recent studies have further suggested that KOR antagonists may selectively decrease alcohol self-administration in rats following a history of dependence. We assessed the effects of the KOR antagonist JDTic on alcohol self-administration, reinstatement of alcohol seeking induced by alcohol-associated cues or stress, and acute alcohol withdrawal-induced anxiety ('hangover anxiety'). JDTic dose-dependently reversed hangover anxiety when given 48 hours prior to testing, a time interval corresponding to the previously demonstrated anxiolytic efficacy of this drug. In contrast, JDTic decreased alcohol self-administration and cue-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking when administered 2 hours prior to testing, but not at longer pre-treatment times. For comparison, we determined that the prototypical KOR antagonist nor-binaltorphimine can suppress self-administration of alcohol at 2 hours pre-treatment time, mimicking our observations with JDTic. The effects of JDTic were behaviorally specific, as it had no effect on stress-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking, self-administration of sucrose, or locomotor activity. Further, we demonstrate that at a 2 hours pre-treatment time JDTic antagonized the antinociceptive effects of the KOR agonist U50,488H but had no effect on morphine-induced behaviors. Our results provide additional evidence for the involvement of KOR in regulation of alcohol-related behaviors and provide support for KOR antagonists, including JDTic, to be evaluated as medications for alcoholism. PMID:22515275

  9. Investigation of the role of βarrestin2 in kappa opioid receptor modulation in a mouse model of pruritus.

    PubMed

    Morgenweck, Jenny; Frankowski, Kevin J; Prisinzano, Thomas E; Aubé, Jeffrey; Bohn, Laura M

    2015-12-01

    The kappa opioid receptor (KOR) is involved in mediating pruritus; agonists targeting this receptor have been used to treat chronic intractable itch. Conversely, antagonists induce an itch response at the site of injection. As a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), the KOR has potential for signaling via G proteins and βarrestins, however, it is not clear which of these pathways are involved in the KOR modulation of itch. In this study asked whether the actions of KOR in pruritus involve βarrestins by using βarrestin2 knockout (βarr2-KO) mice as well as a recently described biased KOR agonist that biases receptor signaling toward G protein pathways over βarrestin2 recruitment. We find that the KOR antagonists nor-binaltorphimine (NorBNI) and 5'-guanidinonaltrindole (5'GNTI) induce acute pruritus in C57BL/6J mice, with reduced effects in KOR-KO mice. βArr2-KO mice display less of a response to KOR antagonist-induced itch compared to wild types, however no genotype differences are observed from chloroquine phosphate (CP)-induced itch, suggesting that the antagonists may utilize a KOR-βarrestin2 dependent mechanism. The KOR agonist U50,488H was equally effective in both WT and βarr2-KO mice in suppressing CP-induced itch. Furthermore, the G protein biased agonist, Isoquinolinone 2.1 was as effective as U50,488H in suppressing the itch response induced by KOR antagonist NorBNI or CP in C57BL/6J mice. Together these data suggest that the antipruritic effects of KOR agonists may not require βarrestins. PMID:26318102

  10. Characterization and visualization of rat and guinea pig brain. kappa. opioid receptors: Evidence for. kappa. sub 1 and. kappa. sub 2 opioid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Zukin, R.S.; Eghbali, M.; Olive, D.; Unterwald, E.M.; Tempel, A. )

    1988-06-01

    {kappa} opioid receptors ({kappa} receptors) have been characterized in homogenates of guinea pig and rat brain under in vitro binding conditions. {kappa} receptors were labeled by using the tritiated prototypic {kappa} opioid ethylketocyclazocine under conditions in which {mu} and {delta} opioid binding was suppressed. In the case of guinea pig brain membranes, a single population of high-affinity {kappa} opioid receptor sites was observed. In contrast, in the case of rat brain, two populations of {kappa} sites were observed. To test the hypothesis that the high- and low-affinity {kappa} sites represent two distinct {kappa} receptor subtypes, a series of opioids were tested for their abilities to compete for binding to the two sites. U-69,593 and Cambridge 20 selectively displaced the high-affinity {kappa} site in both guinea pig and rat tissue, but were inactive at the rat-brain low-affinity site. Other {kappa} opioid drugs competed for binding to both sites, but with different rank orders of potency. Quantitative light microscopy in vitro autoradiography was used to visualize the neuroanatomical pattern of {kappa} receptors in rat and guinea pig brain. The distribution patterns of the two {kappa} receptor subtypes of rat brain were clearly different. Collectively, these data provide direct evidence for the presence of two {kappa} receptor subtypes; the U-69,593-sensitive, high-affinity {kappa}{sub 1} site predominates in guinea pig brain, and the U-69,593-insensitive, low-affinity {kappa}{sub 2} site predominates in rat brain.

  11. Sex Differences in Kappa Opioid Receptor Function and Their Potential Impact on Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Chartoff, Elena H.; Mavrikaki, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral, biological, and social sequelae that lead to drug addiction differ between men and women. Our efforts to understand addiction on a mechanistic level must include studies in both males and females. Stress, anxiety, and depression are tightly linked to addiction, and whether they precede or result from compulsive drug use depends on many factors, including biological sex. The neuropeptide dynorphin (DYN), an endogenous ligand at kappa opioid receptors (KORs), is necessary for stress-induced aversive states and is upregulated in the brain after chronic exposure to drugs of abuse. KOR agonists produce signs of anxiety, fear, and depression in laboratory animals and humans, findings that have led to the hypothesis that drug withdrawal-induced DYN release is instrumental in negative reinforcement processes that drive addiction. However, these studies were almost exclusively conducted in males. Only recently is evidence available that there are sex differences in the effects of KOR activation on affective state. This review focuses on sex differences in DYN and KOR systems and how these might contribute to sex differences in addictive behavior. Much of what is known about how biological sex influences KOR systems is from research on pain systems. The basic molecular and genetic mechanisms that have been discovered to underlie sex differences in KOR function in pain systems may apply to sex differences in KOR function in reward systems. Our goals are to discuss the current state of knowledge on how biological sex contributes to KOR function in the context of pain, mood, and addiction and to explore potential mechanisms for sex differences in KOR function. We will highlight evidence that the function of DYN-KOR systems is influenced in a sex-dependent manner by: polymorphisms in the prodynorphin (pDYN) gene, genetic linkage with the melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R), heterodimerization of KORs and mu opioid receptors (MORs), and gonadal hormones. Finally, we

  12. Acute intermittent morphine increases preprodynorphin and kappa opioid receptor mRNA levels in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, X M; Zhou, Y; Spangler, R; Ho, A; Han, J S; Kreek, M J

    1999-03-20

    We determined the effects of morphine on mRNA levels for the opioid ligands preprodynorphin (PPD) and preproenkephalin (PPE) and the kappa opioid receptor (KOR). Rats received six injections of morphine (6.25 mg/kg/injection) every 2 h, and were sacrificed 30 min later. mRNA levels were measured in brain tissue after removal of the cortex, cerebellum and brainstem. There were increases in PPD and KOR mRNA levels (P<0.05 and P<0.005, respectively), with no alteration of PPE. These alterations in the kappa/dynorphin system may counter morphine-induced effects on the brain. PMID:10095091

  13. Post-Stress Block of Kappa Opioid Receptors Rescues Long-Term Potentiation of Inhibitory Synapses and Prevents Reinstatement of Cocaine Seeking

    PubMed Central

    Polter, Abigail M.; Bishop, Rachel A.; Briand, Lisa A.; Graziane, Nicholas M.; Pierce, R. Christopher; Kauer, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) of the brain are an important site of convergence of drugs and stress. We previously identified a form of long-term potentiation of GABAergic synapses on these neurons (LTPGABA). Our studies have shown that exposure to acute stress blocks this LTP, and that reversal of the block of LTPGABA is correlated with prevention of stress-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to cold-water swim stress. Midbrain slices were prepared following stress, and whole-cell patch clamp recordings of IPSCs were performed from VTA dopamine neurons. Antagonists of glucocorticoid and kappa opioid receptors were administered at varying time points after stress. Additionally, the ability of a post-stress kappa antagonist to block FSS-induced reinstatement of cocaine self-administration was tested. Results We report that an acute stressor blocks LTPGABA for five days after stress through a transient activation of glucocorticoid receptors and more lasting contribution of kappa opioid receptors. Pharmacological block of kappa opioid receptors beginning as late as 4 days after stress has occurred can reverse the block of LTPGABA. Furthermore, post-stress administration of a kappa opioid antagonist prevents reinstatement of cocaine-seeking. Conclusions Our results show that a brief stressor can cause days-long changes in the reward circuitry and reveal roles for glucocorticoid and kappa opioid receptors as mediators of the lasting effects of stress on synaptic plasticity. These results indicate that kappa opioid receptor antagonists reverse the neuroadaptations underlying stress-induced drug-seeking behavior and may be useful in the treatment of cocaine addiction. PMID:24957331

  14. Kappa-opioid receptor from human placenta: hydrodynamic characteristics and evidence for its association with a G protein

    SciTech Connect

    Porthe, G.; Frances, B.; Verrier, B.; Cros, J.; Meunier J.C.

    1988-01-01

    The kappa nature of opioid binding sites in a brush border membrane (BBM) fraction from human placenta has been confirmed: these sites display considerably higher apparent affinity for the kappa selective ligand U-50488 than they do for the ..mu.. and delta selective ligands enkephalin and enkephalyl-Thr, respectively. Two lines of evidence indicated that the placental kappa opioid receptor is capable of interacting with a guanine nucleotide regulatory (G) protein: (i) equilibrium binding of the angonist /sup 3/H-etorphine in the BBM fraction was clearly inhibited by 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p), especially in the presence of Na/sup +/ ions while binding of the antagonist /sup 3/H-diprenorphine was significantly less so and (ii) the sedimentation velocity of the kappa opioid receptor was decreased down to about 10 S when the BBM fraction was prelabeled with radioligand in the presence of Gpp(NH)p prior to its solubilization with digitonin. The G protein that mediates the effect of Gpp(NH)p might be neither G/sub s/ nor G/sub i/ since no adenylate cyclase activity could be demonstrated in the BBM fraction from human placenta.

  15. Activity profiles of dalargin and its analogues in mu-, delta- and kappa-opioid receptor selective bioassays.

    PubMed

    Pencheva, N; Pospisek, J; Hauzerova, L; Barth, T; Milanov, P

    1999-10-01

    1. To elucidate the structural features ensuring action of [D-Ala2, Leu5]-enkephalyl-Arg (dalargin), a series of dalargin analogues were tested for their effectiveness in depressing electrically-evoked contractions of the guinea-pig myenteric plexus-longitudinal muscle preparations (mu- and kappa-opioid receptors) and the vasa deferentia of the hamster (delta-opioid receptors), mouse (mu-, delta- and kappa-opioid receptors), rat (similar to mu-opioid receptors) and rabbit (kappa-opioid receptors). The naloxone KB values in the myenteric plexus were also obtained. 2. [L-Ala2]-dalargin was 19 times less potent than dalargin, and its pharmacological activity was peptidase-sensitive. The ratio of delta-activity to mu-activity for [L-Ala2]-dalargin was 6.78, and KB was 7.9 nM. This emphasizes the role that D-configuration of Ala2 plays in determining the active folding of dalargin molecule as well as in conferring resistance to peptidases. 3. [Met5]-dalargin was equipotent to dalargin in the myenteric plexus, but was more potent in the vasa deferentia of hamster and mouse (KB=5.5 nM). Leu5 and the interdependence of Leu5 and D-Ala2 are of importance for the selectivity of dalargin for mu-opioid receptors. 4. Dalarginamide was more potent and selective for mu-opioid receptors than dalargin, whilst dalarginethylamide, though equipotent to dalarginamide in the myenteric plexus, was more potent at delta-opioid receptors (KB=5.0 nM). [D-Phe4]-dalarginamide and N-Me-[D-Phe4]-dalarginamide were inactive indicating the contribution of L-configuration of Phe4 to the pharmacological potency of dalargin. 5. N-Me-[L-Phe4]-dalarginamide possessed the highest potency and selectivity for mu-opioid receptors (the ratio of delta-activity to mu-activity was 0.00053; KB=2.6 nM). The CONH2 terminus combined with the N-methylation of L-Phe4 increased the potency and selectivity of dalargin for mu-opioid receptors. PMID:10516634

  16. Human native kappa opioid receptor functions not predicted by recombinant receptors: Implications for drug design.

    PubMed

    Broad, John; Maurel, Damien; Kung, Victor W S; Hicks, Gareth A; Schemann, Michael; Barnes, Michael R; Kenakin, Terrence P; Granier, Sébastien; Sanger, Gareth J

    2016-01-01

    If activation of recombinant G protein-coupled receptors in host cells (by drugs or other ligands) has predictive value, similar data must be obtained with native receptors naturally expressed in tissues. Using mouse and human recombinant κ opioid receptors transfected into a host cell, two selectively-acting compounds (ICI204448, asimadoline) equi-effectively activated both receptors, assessed by measuring two different cell signalling pathways which were equally affected without evidence of bias. In mouse intestine, naturally expressing κ receptors within its nervous system, both compounds also equi-effectively activated the receptor, inhibiting nerve-mediated muscle contraction. However, whereas ICI204448 acted similarly in human intestine, where κ receptors are again expressed within its nervous system, asimadoline was inhibitory only at very high concentrations; instead, low concentrations of asimadoline reduced the activity of ICI204448. This demonstration of species-dependence in activation of native, not recombinant κ receptors may be explained by different mouse/human receptor structures affecting receptor expression and/or interactions with intracellular signalling pathways in native environments, to reveal differences in intrinsic efficacy between receptor agonists. These results have profound implications in drug design for κ and perhaps other receptors, in terms of recombinant-to-native receptor translation, species-dependency and possibly, a need to use human, therapeutically-relevant, not surrogate tissues. PMID:27492592

  17. Human native kappa opioid receptor functions not predicted by recombinant receptors: Implications for drug design

    PubMed Central

    Broad, John; Maurel, Damien; Kung, Victor W. S.; Hicks, Gareth A.; Schemann, Michael; Barnes, Michael R.; Kenakin, Terrence P.; Granier, Sébastien; Sanger, Gareth J.

    2016-01-01

    If activation of recombinant G protein-coupled receptors in host cells (by drugs or other ligands) has predictive value, similar data must be obtained with native receptors naturally expressed in tissues. Using mouse and human recombinant κ opioid receptors transfected into a host cell, two selectively-acting compounds (ICI204448, asimadoline) equi-effectively activated both receptors, assessed by measuring two different cell signalling pathways which were equally affected without evidence of bias. In mouse intestine, naturally expressing κ receptors within its nervous system, both compounds also equi-effectively activated the receptor, inhibiting nerve-mediated muscle contraction. However, whereas ICI204448 acted similarly in human intestine, where κ receptors are again expressed within its nervous system, asimadoline was inhibitory only at very high concentrations; instead, low concentrations of asimadoline reduced the activity of ICI204448. This demonstration of species-dependence in activation of native, not recombinant κ receptors may be explained by different mouse/human receptor structures affecting receptor expression and/or interactions with intracellular signalling pathways in native environments, to reveal differences in intrinsic efficacy between receptor agonists. These results have profound implications in drug design for κ and perhaps other receptors, in terms of recombinant-to-native receptor translation, species-dependency and possibly, a need to use human, therapeutically-relevant, not surrogate tissues. PMID:27492592

  18. Cocaine alters mu but not delta or kappa opioid receptor-stimulated in situ [35S]GTPgammaS binding in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Joseph A; Niculescu, Michelle; Unterwald, Ellen M

    2003-01-01

    Chronic cocaine administration produces alterations in mu and kappa opioid receptor density as well as striatal and accumbens opioid-regulated adenylyl cyclase activity, suggesting a psychostimulant responsive interaction between opioidergic and dopaminergic systems. Stimulation of G-protein-coupled opioid receptors inhibits adenylyl cyclase production of cyclic AMP. The present study employed in situ [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding to measure opioid receptor-stimulated activation of G-proteins in response to acute and chronic cocaine exposure. Male Fischer rats received acute (1 or 3 days) or chronic (14 days) binge pattern cocaine administration. Three and 14 days of cocaine injections resulted in greater increases in the ability of the mu receptor agonist DAMGO to stimulate [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding in both the core and the shell of the nucleus accumbens, all regions of the caudate putamen and the cingulate cortex compared with saline-matched controls. The greatest increases in DAMGO-stimulated [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding were observed in the dorsal areas of the caudate putamen in animals that received 14 days of cocaine. No significant changes in delta (DPDPE), or kappa (dynorphin A(1-17)) receptor-stimulated [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding were found in any brain region in response to cocaine administration. These results demonstrate that binge pattern cocaine administration induce changes in mu but not delta or kappa opioid receptor-mediated G-protein activity. This study provides support for the hypothesis that the addictive properties of both psychostimulants and opiates may share common neurochemical signaling substrates. PMID:12422370

  19. Kappa-opioid-receptor agonists modulate the renal excretion of water and electrolytes in anaesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Ashton, N; Balment, R J; Blackburn, T P

    1990-01-01

    1. Subcutaneous injection of the kappa-opioid agonists U50,488 (10 mg kg-1) and tifluadom (3.5 mg kg-1) into Inactin-anaesthetized, saline-infused rats was associated with a diuresis, antinatriuresis and antikaliuresis which lasted for up to 2 h. A high (5 mg kg-1), but not low (0.1 mg kg-1), dose of naloxone blocked the renal effects of U50,488. 2. U50,488 administration in anaesthetized, vasopressin-deficient Brattleboro DI rats was associated with an attenuated diuresis, though the antinatriuretic response remained intact. 3. The diuretic action of U50,488 was associated with an increase in glomerular filtration rate while fractional fluid reabsorption remained steady. In contrast, fractional sodium and potassium reabsorption were increased. 4. These data suggest that kappa-opioid agonists alter renal handling of both water and electrolytes. This appears to be mediated by two separate mechanisms: increased fluid loss largely reflects altered glomerular events while the fall in electrolyte excretion results from altered tubular handling. PMID:2158834

  20. An Improved Antagonist Radiotracer for the Kappa Opioid Receptor: Synthesis and Characterization of 11C-LY2459989

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ming-Qiang; Kim, Su Jin; Holden, Daniel; Lin, Shu-fei; Need, Anne; Rash, Karen; Barth, Vanessa; Mitch, Charles; Navarro, Antonio; Kapinos, Michael; Maloney, Kathleen; Ropchan, Jim; Carson, Richard E.; Huang, Yiyun

    2016-01-01

    The kappa opioid receptors (KOR) are implicated in a number of neuropsychiatric diseases and addictive disorders. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) with radioligands provides a means to image the KOR in vivo and investigate its function in health and disease. The purpose of this study was to develop the selective KOR antagonist 11C-LY2459989 as a PET radioligand and characterize its imaging performance in non-human primates. Methods LY2459989 was synthesized and assayed for in vitro binding to opioid receptors. Ex vivo studies in rodents were conducted to assess its potential as a tracer candidate. 11C-LY2459989 was synthesized by reaction of its iodophenyl precursor with 11C-cyanide followed by partial hydrolysis of the resulting 11C-cyanophenyl intermediate. Imaging experiments with 11C-LY2459989 were carried out in rhesus monkeys with arterial input function measurement. Imaging data were analyzed with kinetic models to derive in vivo binding parameters. Results LY2459989 is a full antagonist with high binding affinity and selectivity for KOR (Ki = 0.18, 7.68, and 91.3 nM, respectively, for κ, μ, and δ receptors). Ex vivo studies in rats indicated LY2459989 as an appropriate tracer candidate with high specific binding signals, and confirmed its KOR binding selectivity in vivo. 11C-LY2459989 was synthesized in high radiochemical purity and good specific activity. In rhesus monkeys, 11C-LY2459989 displayed a fast rate of peripheral metabolism. Similarly, 11C-LY2459989 displayed fast uptake kinetics in the brain and an uptake pattern consistent with the distribution of KOR in primates. Pretreatment with naloxone (1 mg/kg, i.v.) resulted in a uniform distribution of radioactivity in the brain. Further, specific binding of 11C-LY2459989 was dose-dependently reduced by the selective KOR antagonist LY2456302 and the unlabeled LY2459989. Regional binding potential (BPND) values derived from the multilinear analysis method (MA1), as a measure of in vivo specific

  1. (/sup 3/H)Ethylketocyclazocine binding to mouse brain membranes: evidence for a kappa opioid receptor type

    SciTech Connect

    Garzon, J.; Sanchez-Blazquez, P.; Lee, N.M.

    1984-10-01

    The binding of the putative kappa agonist ethylketocyclazocine (EKC) to synaptosomal membranes of mouse brain was studied. This benzomorphan was able to bind to different opioid receptors. A portion of this binding was not inhibited by the agonist naloxone, even at high concentrations (10 microM). This population of receptors, to which opioate alkaloids and opiod peptides display very low affinity, is probably the sigma receptor. Another class of binding sites was identified by the simultaneous addition of the selective agonists Sandoz FK-33824 and D-Ala2-D-Leu5-enkephalin, which blocked the access of EKC to mu and delta opioid receptors, respectively, leaving a portion of naloxone-displaceable benzomorphan binding still detectable. Analysis of this remaining binding revealed a small population of receptors of high affinity, the kappa receptor. Therefore, EKC binds to the mu, delta, kappa and sigma receptors in the mouse brain, with similar affinities for the mu and kappa (0.22 and 0.15 nM). These results confirm the existence of a kappa opioid receptor type in the mouse brain.

  2. Functional Stability of the Human Kappa Opioid Receptor Reconstituted in Nanodiscs Revealed by a Time-Resolved Scintillation Proximity Assay.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Randi Westh; Wang, Xiaole; Golab, Agnieszka; Bornert, Olivier; Oswald, Christine; Wagner, Renaud; Martinez, Karen Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Long-term functional stability of isolated membrane proteins is crucial for many in vitro applications used to elucidate molecular mechanisms, and used for drug screening platforms in modern pharmaceutical industry. Compared to soluble proteins, the understanding at the molecular level of membrane proteins remains a challenge. This is partly due to the difficulty to isolate and simultaneously maintain their structural and functional stability, because of their hydrophobic nature. Here we show, how scintillation proximity assay can be used to analyze time-resolved high-affinity ligand binding to membrane proteins solubilized in various environments. The assay was used to establish conditions that preserved the biological function of isolated human kappa opioid receptor. In detergent solution the receptor lost high-affinity ligand binding to a radiolabelled ligand within minutes at room temperature. After reconstitution in Nanodiscs made of phospholipid bilayer the half-life of high-affinity ligand binding to the majority of receptors increased 70-fold compared to detergent solubilized receptors-a level of stability that is appropriate for further downstream applications. Time-resolved scintillation proximity assay has the potential to screen numerous conditions in parallel to obtain high levels of stable and active membrane proteins, which are intrinsically unstable in detergent solution, and with minimum material consumption. PMID:27035823

  3. 3D modeling, ligand binding and activation studies of the cloned mouse delta, mu; and kappa opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Filizola, M; Laakkonen, L; Loew, G H

    1999-11-01

    Refined 3D models of the transmembrane domains of the cloned delta, mu and kappa opioid receptors belonging to the superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) were constructed from a multiple sequence alignment using the alpha carbon template of rhodopsin recently reported. Other key steps in the procedure were relaxation of the 3D helix bundle by unconstrained energy optimization and assessment of the stability of the structure by performing unconstrained molecular dynamics simulations of the energy optimized structure. The results were stable ligand-free models of the TM domains of the three opioid receptors. The ligand-free delta receptor was then used to develop a systematic and reliable procedure to identify and assess putative binding sites that would be suitable for similar investigation of the other two receptors and GPCRs in general. To this end, a non-selective, 'universal' antagonist, naltrexone, and agonist, etorphine, were used as probes. These ligands were first docked in all sites of the model delta opioid receptor which were sterically accessible and to which the protonated amine of the ligands could be anchored to a complementary proton-accepting residue. Using these criteria, nine ligand-receptor complexes with different binding pockets were identified and refined by energy minimization. The properties of all these possible ligand-substrate complexes were then examined for consistency with known experimental results of mutations in both opioid and other GPCRs. Using this procedure, the lowest energy agonist-receptor and antagonist-receptor complexes consistent with these experimental results were identified. These complexes were then used to probe the mechanism of receptor activation by identifying differences in receptor conformation between the agonist and the antagonist complex during unconstrained dynamics simulation. The results lent support to a possible activation mechanism of the mouse delta opioid receptor similar to that recently

  4. Sex-related differences in mechanical nociception and antinociception produced by mu- and kappa-opioid receptor agonists in rats.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Andrew C; Smith, Eric S; Picker, Mitchell J

    2002-10-01

    Previous studies indicate that in antinociceptive procedures employing thermal, chemical and electrical stimuli, opioids are generally more potent in male than female rodents. The purpose of the present study was to examine nociception and opioid antinociception in male and female rats using a mechanical nociceptive stimulus. Results indicated that males had a higher threshold for nociception, and in tests in which a constant pressure was applied to the hindpaw, the paw withdrawal latencies were consistently longer in males. Opioids with activity at the mu receptor, including levorphanol, morphine, dezocine, buprenorphine, butorphanol and nalbuphine, were generally more potent and/or effective in males. In contrast, sex differences were not consistently observed with the kappa-opioid receptor agonists spiradoline, (5,7,8b)-N-methyl-N[2-1(1-pyrrolidinyl),1-oxaspiro[4,5]dec-8-yl benzeneacetamide (U69593), trans-(+/-)-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-[2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-cyclohexyl]benzeneacetamide (U50488), enadoline, ethylketocyclazocine, and nalorphine. These findings suggest that males and females differ in their responsiveness to mechanical nociception and that sex differences in sensitivity to kappa-, but not mu-, opioid receptor agonists are specific to certain nociceptive stimulus modalities. PMID:12354566

  5. Functional Stability of the Human Kappa Opioid Receptor Reconstituted in Nanodiscs Revealed by a Time-Resolved Scintillation Proximity Assay

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Randi Westh; Wang, Xiaole; Golab, Agnieszka; Bornert, Olivier; Oswald, Christine; Wagner, Renaud; Martinez, Karen Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Long-term functional stability of isolated membrane proteins is crucial for many in vitro applications used to elucidate molecular mechanisms, and used for drug screening platforms in modern pharmaceutical industry. Compared to soluble proteins, the understanding at the molecular level of membrane proteins remains a challenge. This is partly due to the difficulty to isolate and simultaneously maintain their structural and functional stability, because of their hydrophobic nature. Here we show, how scintillation proximity assay can be used to analyze time-resolved high-affinity ligand binding to membrane proteins solubilized in various environments. The assay was used to establish conditions that preserved the biological function of isolated human kappa opioid receptor. In detergent solution the receptor lost high-affinity ligand binding to a radiolabelled ligand within minutes at room temperature. After reconstitution in Nanodiscs made of phospholipid bilayer the half-life of high-affinity ligand binding to the majority of receptors increased 70-fold compared to detergent solubilized receptors—a level of stability that is appropriate for further downstream applications. Time-resolved scintillation proximity assay has the potential to screen numerous conditions in parallel to obtain high levels of stable and active membrane proteins, which are intrinsically unstable in detergent solution, and with minimum material consumption. PMID:27035823

  6. Neuroanatomical patterns of the mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors of rat brain as determined by quantitative in vitro autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Tempel, A.; Zukin, R.S.

    1987-06-01

    Highly specific radioligands and quantitative autoradiography reveal strikingly different neuroanatomical patterns for the mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors of rat brain. The mu receptors are most densely localized in patches in the striatum, layers I and III of the cortex, the pyramidal cell layer of the hippocampal formation, specific nuclei of the thalamus, the pars reticulata of the substantia nigra, the interpeduncular nucleus, and the locus coeruleus. In contrast, delta receptors are highly confined, exhibiting selective localization in layers I, II, and VIa of the neocortex, a diffuse pattern in the striatum, and moderate concentration in the pars reticulata of the substantia nigra and in the interpeduncular nucleus. delta receptors are absent in most other brain structures. This distribution is unexpected in that the enkephalins, the putative endogenous ligands of the delta receptor, occur essentially throughout the brain. The kappa receptors of rat brain exhibit a third pattern distinct from that of the mu and delta receptors. kappa receptors occur at low density in patches in the striatum and at particularly high density in the nucleus accumbens, along the pyramidal and molecular layers of the hippocampus, in the granular cell layer of the dentate gyrus, specific midline nuclei of the thalamus, and hindbrain regions. kappa receptors appear to be uniformly distributed across regions in the neocortex with the exception of layer III, which revealed only trace levels of binding. An important conclusion of the present study is that delta receptors occur at high density only in the forebrain and in two midbrain structures, whereas mu and kappa receptors exhibit discrete patterns in most major brain regions.

  7. Attenuation of cannabinoid-induced inhibition of medullary dorsal horn neurons by a kappa-opioid receptor antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Okada-Ogawa, Akiko; Kurose, Masayuki; Meng, Ian D.

    2010-01-01

    The kappa-opioid receptor (KOR) antagonist norbinaltorphimine (nor-BNI) attenuates behavioral antinociception produced by spinal administration of the cannabinoid receptor agonist delta-9-tetrahydorcannabinol (THC). The present study examined the ability of nor-BNI to prevent cannabinoid-induced inhibition of medullary dorsal horn (MDH) nociceptive neurons and antinociception produced by the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN-2). Extracellular, single unit recordings of lamina I and lamina V MDH neurons was performed in urethane anesthetized rats. Heat-evoked activity was measured before and after local brainstem application of nor-BNI or vehicle followed by WIN-2. In both lamina I and lamina V neurons, prior application of nor-BNI prevented the inhibition of heat-evoked activity by WIN-2. In separate experiments, the contribution of KOR to cannabinoid-induced increases in heat-evoked head withdrawal latencies was assessed in lightly urethane-anesthetized rats. Antinociception produced by intrathecal administration of WIN-2 and THC was attenuated by prior administration of nor-BNI. In contrast, antinociception produced by the cannabinoid CP55940 remained unaffected by prior administration of nor-BNI. These results indicate that cannabinoid inhibition of nociceptive reflexes produced by WIN-2 and THC may result from inhibition of dorsal horn neurons through a KOR-dependent mechanism. PMID:20807519

  8. Salvinorin A, a kappa-opioid receptor agonist hallucinogen: pharmacology and potential template for novel pharmacotherapeutic agents in neuropsychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Butelman, Eduardo R.; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    Salvinorin A is a potent hallucinogen, isolated from the ethnomedical plant Salvia divinorum. Salvinorin A is a selective high efficacy kappa-opioid receptor (KOPr) agonist, and thus implicates the KOPr system and its endogenous agonist ligands (the dynorphins) in higher functions, including cognition and perceptual effects. Salvinorin A is the only selective KOPr ligand to be widely available outside research or medical settings, and salvinorin A-containing products have undergone frequent non-medical use. KOPr/dynorphin systems in the brain are known to be powerful counter-modulatory mechanisms to dopaminergic function, which is important in mood and reward engendered by natural and chemical reinforcers (including drugs of abuse). KOPr activation (including by salvinorin A) can thus cause aversion and anhedonia in preclinical models. Salvinorin A is also a completely new scaffold for medicinal chemistry approaches, since it is a non-nitrogenous neoclerodane, unlike other known opioid ligands. Ongoing efforts have the goal of discovering novel semi-synthetic salvinorin analogs with potential KOPr-mediated pharmacotherapeutic effects (including partial agonist or biased agonist effects), with a reduced burden of undesirable effects associated with salvinorin A. PMID:26441647

  9. Effect of the selective kappa-opioid receptor antagonist JDTic on nicotine antinociception, reward, and withdrawal in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, K. J.; Negus, S. S.; Damaj, M. I.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Several lines of evidence support a role for the endogenous opioid system in mediating behaviors associated with drug dependence. Specifically, recent findings suggest that the kappa-opioid receptor (KOR) may play a role in aspects of nicotine dependence, which contribute to relapse and continued tobacco smoking. Objective The objective of this study is to determine the involvement of the KOR in the initial behavioral responses of nicotine, nicotine reward, and nicotine withdrawal using the highly selective KOR antagonist JDTic. JDTic doses of 1, 4, 8, or 16 mg/kg were administered subcutaneously (s.c.) 18 h prior to nicotine treatment. Results JDTic dose-dependently blocked acute nicotine-induced antinociception in the tail-flick but not the hot-plate test and did not significantly attenuate morphine’s antinociceptive effect in either the tail-flick or hot-plate test. Furthermore, JDTic (8 and 16 mg/kg, s.c.) failed to block the expression of nicotine reward as measured by the conditioned place preference model. In contrast, JDTic and the KOR antagonist norBNI attenuated the expression of both the physical (somatic signs and hyperalgesia) and affective (anxiety-related behavior and conditioned place aversion) nicotine withdrawal signs. Conclusions Our findings clearly show that the KOR is involved in mediating the withdrawal aspects of nicotine dependence. The results from this study suggest that blockade of the KOR by selective KOR antagonists may be useful smoking cessation pharmacotherapies. PMID:20232057

  10. Effect of the kappa-opioid receptor agonist, U69593, on reinstatement of extinguished amphetamine self-administration behavior.

    PubMed

    Schenk, S; Partridge, B

    2001-04-01

    Previous research has indicated that pretreatment with the kappa-opioid receptor agonist, U69593, decreased the ability of experimenter-administered cocaine to reinstate extinguished cocaine self-administration behavior. This effect was specific to cocaine-produced drug seeking since U69593 failed to attenuate the ability of experimenter-administered amphetamine to reinstate extinguished cocaine self-administration behavior. One possibility is that U69593 selectively attenuates the behavioral effects of the drug that was originally self-administered. In order to test this hypothesis, the present study examined the effect of U69593 (0.0 or 0.32 mg/kg) on the reinstatement of extinguished amphetamine self-administration behavior produced by experimenter-administered injections of cocaine and amphetamine. Following extinction of amphetamine self-administration (0.04 mg/kg/infusion) the ability of cocaine (0.0, 5.0, 10.0 or 20.0 mg/kg) or amphetamine (0.0, 0.3, 1.0 or 3.0 mg/kg) to reinstate extinguished self-administration behavior was measured. Both drugs reinstated extinguished responding and the reinstatement was attenuated by pretreatment with U69593. The data indicate that the ability of U69593 to decrease drug seeking is not restricted to subjects experienced with cocaine self-administration. Self-administration history does, however, determine the effect of U69593 on amphetamine-produced drug seeking. PMID:11526958

  11. Salvinorin A inhibits colonic transit and neurogenic ion transport in mice by activating kappa-opioid and cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Fichna, J; Schicho, R; Andrews, C N; Bashashati, M; Klompus, M; McKay, D M; Sharkey, K A; Zjawiony, J K; Janecka, A; Storr, M A

    2009-12-01

    The major active ingredient of the plant Salvia divinorum, salvinorin A (SA) has been used to treat gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. As the action of SA on the regulation of colonic function is unknown, our aim was to examine the effects of SA on mouse colonic motility and secretion in vitro and in vivo. The effects of SA on GI motility were studied using isolated preparations of colon, which were compared with preparations from stomach and ileum. Colonic epithelial ion transport was evaluated using Ussing chambers. Additionally, we studied GI motility in vivo by measuring colonic propulsion, gastric emptying, and upper GI transit. Salvinorin A inhibited contractions of the mouse colon, stomach, and ileum in vitro, prolonged colonic propulsion and slowed upper GI transit in vivo. Salvinorin A had no effect on gastric emptying in vivo. Salvinorin A reduced veratridine-, but not forskolin-induced epithelial ion transport. The effects of SA on colonic motility in vitro were mediated by kappa-opioid receptors (KORs) and cannabinoid (CB) receptors, as they were inhibited by the antagonists nor-binaltorphimine (KOR), AM 251 (CB(1) receptor) and AM 630 (CB(2) receptor). However, in the colon in vivo, the effects were largely mediated by KORs. The effects of SA on veratridine-mediated epithelial ion transport were inhibited by nor-binaltorphimine and AM 630. Salvinorin A slows colonic motility in vitro and in vivo and influences neurogenic ion transport. Due to its specific regional action, SA or its derivatives may be useful drugs in the treatment of lower GI disorders associated with increased GI transit and diarrhoea. PMID:19650775

  12. Kappa Opioid Receptor Activation of p38 MAPK Is GRK3- and Arrestin-dependent in Neurons and Astrocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Bruchas, Michael R.; Macey, Tara A.; Lowe, Janet D.; Chavkin, Charles

    2007-01-01

    AtT-20 cells expressing the wild-type kappa opioid receptor (KOR) increased phospho-p38 MAPK following treatment with the kappa agonist U50,488. The increase was blocked by the kappa antagonist norbinaltorphimine and not evident in untransfected cells. In contrast, U50,488 treatment of AtT-20 cells expressing KOR having alanine substituted for serine-369 (KSA) did not increase phospho-p38. Phosphorylation of serine 369 in the KOR carboxyl terminus by G-protein receptor kinase 3 (GRK3) was previously shown to be required for receptor desensitization, and the results suggest that p38 MAPK activation by KOR may require arrestin recruitment. This hypothesis was tested by transfecting arrestin3-(R170E), a dominant positive form of arrestin that does not require receptor phosphorylation for activation. AtT-20 cells expressing both KSA and arrestin3-(R170E) responded to U50,488 treatment with an increase in phospho-p38 consistent with the hypothesis. Primary cultured astrocytes (glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive) and neurons (γ-aminobutyric acid-positive) isolated from mouse striata also responded to U50,488 by increasing phospho-p38 immunolabeling. p38 activation was not evident in either striatal astrocytes or neurons isolated from KOR knock-out mice or GRK3 knock-out mice. Astrocytes pretreated with small interfering RNA for arrestin3 were also unable to activate p38 in response to U50,488 treatment. Furthermore, in striatal neurons, the kappa-mediated phospho-p38 labeling was colocalized with arrestin3. These findings suggest that KOR may activate p38 MAPK in brain by a GRK3 and arrestin-dependent mechanism. PMID:16648139

  13. Role of mu, delta and kappa opioid receptors in ethanol-reinforced operant responding in infant rats

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-Morales, Roberto Sebastián; Spear, Norman E.; Nizhnikov, Michael E.; Molina, Juan Carlos; Abate, Paula

    2012-01-01

    We recently observed that naloxone, a non-specific opioid antagonist, attenuated operant responding to ethanol in infant rats. Through the use of an operant conditioning technique, we aimed to analyze the specific participation of mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors on ethanol reinforcement during the second postnatal week. In Experiment 1, infant rats (PDs 14–17) were trained to obtain 5, 7.5, 10, or 15% ethanol, by operant nose-poking. Experiment 2 tested blood ethanol levels (BELs) attained by operant behavior. In Experiment 3, at PDs16–18, rats received CTOP (mu antagonist: 0.1 or 1.0 mg/kg), naltrindole (delta antagonist: 1.0 or 5.0 mg/kg) or saline before training. In Experiment 4, rats received nor-binaltorphimine (kappa antagonist: 10.0 or 30.0 mg/kg, a single injection after completion of PD15 operant training), spiradoline mesylate (kappa agonist: 1.0 or 5.0 mg/kg; at PDs16–18) or saline (PDs16–18), before the conditioning. Experiment 5 and 6 assessed possible side effects of opioid drugs in locomotor activity (LA) and conditioned taste aversion (CTA). Ethanol at 7.5 and 10% promoted the highest levels of operant responding. BELs were 12–15 mg/dl. In Experiment 3 naltrindole (dose response effect) and CTOP (the lowest dose) were effective in decreasing operant responding. Nor-binaltorphimine at 10.0 mg/kg and spiradoline at 5.0 mg/kg also blocked ethanol responding. The effects of opioid drugs on ethanol reinforcement cannot be explained by effects on LA or CTA. Even though particular aspects of each opioid receptor require further testing, a fully functional opioid system seems to be necessary for ethanol reinforcement, during early ontogeny. PMID:22789403

  14. Morphine induces mesangial cell proliferation and glomerulopathy via kappa-opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Weber, Marc L; Farooqui, Mariya; Nguyen, Julia; Ansonoff, Michael; Pintar, John E; Hebbel, Robert P; Gupta, Kalpna

    2008-06-01

    Morphine sulfate (MS) stimulates mesangial cell (MC) proliferation, a process central to development of glomerular disease. The purpose of this study was to examine whether specific opioid receptors (OR) and signal transducer and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling are associated with MS-induced MC proliferation. C57Bl/6J and OR-specific knockout (KO) mice were treated for up to 6 wk with PBS, MS (0.7-2.14 mg/kg), naloxone (equimolar to MS), or MS+naloxone (n = 6 per group). Glomerular volume and expression of PCNA, Thy1, and ED1/CD68 were analyzed in kidney sections. Cell proliferation and STAT3 phosphorylation were analyzed by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) ELISA and Western blot, respectively, in MCs in vitro. MS treatment led to enlarged kidneys and glomerulopathy and naloxone reversed these effects. MS treatment increased glomerular volume in both mu-OR (MOR) KO and delta-OR (DOR) KO mice, but not in kappa-OR (KOR) KO mice. To ascertain that MS-induced glomerulopathy in vivo was due to MC proliferation, we further examined the OR-specific effects of MS in MCs in vitro. MS-induced MC proliferation in vitro was inhibited by KOR-specific nor-BNI, but not by DOR or MOR-specific antagonists naltrindol or CTOP, respectively. KOR-specific agonist U50488H stimulated proliferation of MCs, but DOR-specific agonist DPDPE and MOR-specific agonist DAMGO did not. MS failed to stimulate proliferation of MCs from KOR KO mice. MS and KOR agonists induced STAT3 phosphorylation, and STAT3 inhibitor blocked KOR agonist-induced MC proliferation. We show that MS stimulates glomerulopathy and MC proliferation via KOR and STAT3 signaling. PMID:18385270

  15. Relative Timing Between Kappa Opioid Receptor Activation and Cocaine Determines the Impact on Reward and Dopamine Release.

    PubMed

    Chartoff, Elena H; Ebner, Shayla R; Sparrow, Angela; Potter, David; Baker, Phillip M; Ragozzino, Michael E; Roitman, Mitchell F

    2016-03-01

    Negative affective states can increase the rewarding value of drugs of abuse and promote drug taking. Chronic cocaine exposure increases levels of the neuropeptide dynorphin, an endogenous ligand at kappa opioid receptors (KOR) that suppresses dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and elicits negative affective states upon drug withdrawal. However, there is evidence that the effects of KOR activation on affective state are biphasic: immediate aversive effects are followed by delayed increases in reward. The impact of KOR-induced affective states on reward-related effects of cocaine over time is not known. We hypothesize that the initial aversive effects of KOR activation increase, whereas the delayed rewarding effects decrease, the net effects of cocaine on reward and dopamine release. We treated rats with cocaine at various times (15 min to 48 h) after administration of the selective KOR agonist salvinorin A (salvA). Using intracranial self-stimulation and fast scan cyclic voltammetry, we found that cocaine-induced increases in brain stimulation reward and evoked dopamine release in the NAc core were potentiated when cocaine was administered within 1 h of salvA, but attenuated when administered 24 h after salvA. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to show that KOR and prodynorphin mRNA levels were decreased in the NAc, whereas tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter mRNA levels and tissue dopamine content were increased in the ventral tegmental area 24 h post-salvA. These findings raise the possibility that KOR activation-as occurs upon withdrawal from chronic cocaine-modulates vulnerability to cocaine in a time-dependent manner. PMID:26239494

  16. Differential effects of K+ channel blockers on antinociception induced by alpha 2-adrenoceptor, GABAB and kappa-opioid receptor agonists.

    PubMed Central

    Ocaña, M.; Baeyens, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of several K+ channel blockers (sulphonylureas, 4-aminopyridine and tetraethylammonium) on the antinociception induced by clonidine, baclofen and U50,488H were evaluated by use of a tail flick test in mice. 2. Clonidine (0.125-2 mg kg-1, s.c.) induced a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect. The ATP-dependent K+ (KATP) channel blocker gliquidone (4-8 micrograms/mouse, i.c.v.) produced a dose-dependent displacement to the right of the clonidine dose-response line, but neither 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) (25-250 ng/mouse, i.c.v.) nor tetraethylammonium (TEA) (10-20 micrograms/mouse, i.c.v.) significantly modified clonidine-induced antinociception. 3. The order of potency of sulphonylureas in antagonizing clonidine-induced antinociception was gliquidone > glipizide > glibenclamide > tolbutamide, which is the same order of potency as these drugs block KATP channels in neurones of the CNS. 4. Baclofen (2-16 mg kg-1, s.c.) also induced a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect. Both 4-AP (2.5-25 ng/mouse, i.c.v.) and TEA (10-20 micrograms/mouse, i.c.v.) dose-dependently antagonized baclofen antinociception, producing a displacement to the right of the baclofen dose-response line. However, gliquidone (8-16 micrograms/mouse, i.c.v.) did not significantly modify the baclofen effect. 5. None of the K+ channel blockers tested (gliquidone, 8-16 micrograms/mouse; 4-AP, 25-250 ng/mouse and TEA, 10-20 micrograms/mouse, i.c.v.), significantly modified the antinociception induced by U50,488H (8 mg kg-1, s.c.). 6. These results suggest that the opening of K+ channels is involved in the antinociceptive effect of alpha 2 and GABAB, but not kappa-opioid, receptor agonists.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7905339

  17. Redefinition of the human kappa opioid receptor gene (OPRK1) structure and association of haplotypes with opiate addiction.

    PubMed

    Yuferov, Vadim; Fussell, David; LaForge, K Steven; Nielsen, David A; Gordon, Derek; Ho, Ann; Leal, Suzanne M; Ott, Jurg; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2004-12-01

    The kappa opioid receptor (KOR) plays a role in stress responsivity, opiate withdrawal and responses to cocaine. KOR activation by its endogenous ligand dynorphin A(1-17) decreases basal and drug-induced striatal levels of dopamine. The complete structure of the human KOR gene (hOPRK1) has not been previously determined. This study: (i) characterized the genomic structure of the hOPRK1 gene; (ii) identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the hOPRK1 gene; and (iii) investigated possible associations of these variants with vulnerability to develop heroin addiction. Analysis of 5'-RACE cDNA clones revealed the presence of a novel exon 1 ranging in length from 167 to 251 nucleotides in the 5' 5'-untranslated region of the hOPRK1 mRNA. We found that the hOPRK1 gene has four major exons and three introns, similar to rodent OPRK1 genes. Direct sequencing of amplified DNA containing all four exons and intron 1 of the hOPRK1 gene were evaluated for polymorphisms in 291 subjects (145 former heroin addicts and 146 controls). Twelve SNPs were identified, nine novel variants and three previously reported SNPs. Using logistic regression with opioid dependence as the dependent variable, the 36G>T SNP exhibited a point-wise significant association (P = 0.016) with disease status. The number of haplotypes seen in the three ethnic groups were nine, six and five for African-Americans, Caucasians, and Hispanics, respectively, with corresponding significance levels for differences in haplotype frequencies between cases and controls of P = 0.0742, 0.1015 and 0.0041. Combining ethnicities by Fisher's method yields an empirical significance level of P = 0.0020. PMID:15608558

  18. Comparison of [Dmt1]DALDA and DAMGO in binding and G protein activation at mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guo-Min; Qian, Xuanxuan; Schiller, Peter W; Szeto, Hazel H

    2003-12-01

    [Dmt1]DALDA (H-Dmt-d-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH2; Dmt = 2',6'-dimethyltyrosine) binds with high affinity and selectivity to the mu opioid receptor and is a surprisingly potent and long-acting analgesic, especially after intrathecal administration. In an attempt to better understand the unique pharmacological profile of [Dmt1]DALDA, we have prepared [3H][Dmt1]DALDA and compared its binding properties with that of [3H]DAMGO ([d-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly5-ol]-enkephalin). Kinetic studies revealed rapid association of [3H][Dmt1]DALDA when incubated with mouse brain membranes (K+1 = 0.155 nM(-1) min(-1)). Dissociation of [3H][Dmt1]DALDA was also rapid (K(-1) = 0.032 min(-1)) and indicated binding to a single site. [3H][Dmt1]DALDA binds with very high affinity to human mu opioid receptor (hMOR) (Kd = 0.199 nM), and Kd and Bmax were reduced by sodium but not Gpp(NH)p [guanosine 5'-(beta,gamma-imido)triphosphate]. Similar Kd values were obtained in brain and spinal cord tissues and SH-SY5Y cells. The hMOR:hDOR (human delta opioid receptor) selectivity of [Dmt1]DALDA ( approximately 10,000) is 8-fold higher than DAMGO. However, [Dmt1]DALDA is less selective than DAMGO against hKOR (human kappa opioid receptor) (26-versus 180-fold). The Ki values for a number of opioid ligands were generally higher when determined by competitive displacement binding against [3H][Dmt1]DALDA compared with [3H]DAMGO, with the exception of Dmt1-substituted peptide analogs. All Dmt1 analogs showed much higher affinity for the mu receptor than corresponding Tyr1 analogs. [35S]GTPgammaS (guanosine 5'-O -(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate) binding showed that [Dmt1]DALDA and DAMGO are full agonists at hMOR and hDOR but are only partial agonists at hKOR. The very high affinity and selectivity of [3H][Dmt1]DALDA for the mu receptor, together with its very low nonspecific binding (10-15%) and metabolic stability, make [3H][Dmt1]DALDA an ideal radioligand for labeling mu receptors. PMID:14534366

  19. Effect of sodium ion on the affinity of naloxone for the kappa opioid receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Cheney, B.V.; Lahti, R.A.

    1987-03-16

    Several investigators have observed that sodium ion enhances the binding of naloxone to opioid receptors. This effect has generally been attributed to allosteric modulation of the state of the mu receptor. However, a recent claim has been made that the enhancement does not involve a change in the mu receptor, but instead occurs because naloxone becomes a more kappa-specific drug when sodium ion is present in high concentration. Since the claim was not based on experimental evidence from binding studies involving known high-affinity kappa ligands, the authors have investigated the competition of naloxone for the kappa site using (/sup 3/H)U-69593 as the marker for receptor binding. Assays were carried out in the presence and absence of 100 mM NaCl. The results of the study indicate that sodium ion does not increase the affinity of naloxone or U-69593 for the kappa receptor. 9 references, 1 figure.

  20. Differential regulation of. mu. , delta, kappa opioid receptors by Mn/sup + +/

    SciTech Connect

    Szuecs, M.; Oetting, G.M.; Coscia, C.J.

    1986-03-05

    Differential effects of Mn/sup + +/ on three opioid receptor subtypes of rat brain membranes were evaluated. Concentration dependency studies performed with 0.05-20 mM Mn/sup + +/ revealed that only the delta receptors are stimulated at any concentration. The binding of 1 nM /sup 3/H-DAGO was not stimulated by low concentrations (< 1mM) of Mn/sup + +/, and was significantly inhibited at higher concentrations (40% at 20 mM). 1 nM /sup 3/H-EKC (+100nM DAGO and 100nM DADLE) binding was inhibited by Mn/sup + +/ in the entire concentration range. While regulation of ..mu.. receptor binding did not change during postnatal development, delta and kappa binding displayed a pronounced developmental time-dependency. Kappa sites were hardly affected by Mn/sup + +/ at day 5, and adult levels of inhibition were reached only after the third week postnatal. In contrast, 1 nM /sup 3/H-DADLE (+10nM DAGO) binding was most sensitive to Mn/sup + +/ on day 5 after birth (100% stimulation with 5-20 mM). The ED/sub 50/ of Mn/sup + +/ stimulation was unchanged during maturation. These immature delta sites displayed a similar extent of Mn/sup + +/ reversal of Gpp(NH)p inhibition as seen in microsomes, which represent a good model of N/sub i/-uncoupled receptors. These data suggest that ..mu.., delta and kappa receptors are differently coupled to N/sub i/. Moreover, a second divalent cation binding site, in addition to that on N/sub i/ might exist for delta receptors.

  1. Salvinorin A analogs and other kappa opioid receptor compounds as treatments for cocaine abuse

    PubMed Central

    Kivell, Bronwyn M; Ewald, Amy WM; Prisinzano, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    Acute activation of κ opioid receptors produces anti-addictive effects by regulating dopamine levels in the brain. Unfortunately, classic κ opioid agonists have undesired side effects such as sedation, aversion and depression which restrict their clinical use. Salvinorin A (Sal A), a novel κ opioid receptor agonist extracted from the plant Salvia divinorum, has been identified as a potential therapy for drug abuse and addiction. Here, we review the preclinical effects of Sal A in comparison with traditional κ opioid agonists and several new analogues. Sal A retains the anti-addictive properties of traditional κ opioid receptors agonists with several improvements including reduced side effects. However, the rapid metabolism of Sal A makes it undesirable for clinical development. In an effort to improve the pharmacokinetics and tolerability of this compound, κ opioid receptor agonists based on the structure of Sal A have been synthesized. While work in this field is still in progress, several analogues with improved pharmacokinetic profiles have been shown to have anti-addiction effects. While in its infancy, it is clear that these compounds hold promise for the future development of anti-addiction therapeutics. PMID:24484985

  2. Involvement of the kappa-opioid receptor in the anxiogenic-like effect of CP 55,940 in male rats.

    PubMed

    Marín, S; Marco, E; Biscaia, M; Fernández, B; Rubio, M; Guaza, C; Schmidhammer, H; Viveros, M P

    2003-02-01

    We have studied the possible interaction between three selective opioid-receptor antagonists, nor-binaltorphimine (NB: kappa) (5 mg/kg), cyprodime (CY: mu) (10 mg/kg) and naltrindole (NTI: delta) (1 mg/kg), and the cannabinoid receptor agonist CP 55,940, in the modulation of anxiety (plus-maze) and adrenocortical activity (serum corticosterone levels by radioimmunoassay) in male rats. The holeboard was used to evaluate motor activity and directed exploration. CP 55,940 (75 microg/kg, but not 10 microg/kg) induced an anxiogenic-like effect, which was antagonised by NB. The other effects of CP 55,940 (75 microg/kg), a decreased holeboard activity and stimulation of adrenocortical activity, were not antagonised by any of the three opioid receptor antagonists. CY and NTI, when administered alone, induced marked reductions in motor activity, anxiogenic-like effects and stimulation of adrenocortical activity. The selective kappa-opioid receptor antagonist NB, on its own, did not modify the level of anxiety but stimulated adrenocortical activity. We provide the first pharmacological evidence about the involvement of the kappa-opioid receptor in the anxiogenic-like effect of CP 55,940. PMID:12543231

  3. Kappa opioid receptor activation alleviates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and promotes oligodendrocyte-mediated remyelination

    PubMed Central

    Du, Changsheng; Duan, Yanhui; Wei, Wei; Cai, Yingying; Chai, Hui; Lv, Jie; Du, Xiling; Zhu, Jian; Xie, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by autoimmune damage to the central nervous system. All the current drugs for MS target the immune system. Although effective in reducing new lesions, they have limited effects in preventing the progression of disability. Promoting oligodendrocyte-mediated remyelination and recovery of neurons are the new directions of MS therapy. The endogenous opioid system, consisting of MOR, DOR, KOR and their ligands, has been suggested to participate in the pathogenesis of MS. However, the exact receptor and mechanism remain elusive. Here we show that genetic deletion of KOR exacerbates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, whereas activating KOR with agonists alleviates the symptoms. KOR does not affect immune cell differentiation and function. Instead, it promotes oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination both in vitro and in vivo. Our study suggests that targeting KOR might be an intriguing way to develop new MS therapies that may complement the existing immunosuppressive approaches. PMID:27040771

  4. Kappa opioid receptor activation alleviates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and promotes oligodendrocyte-mediated remyelination.

    PubMed

    Du, Changsheng; Duan, Yanhui; Wei, Wei; Cai, Yingying; Chai, Hui; Lv, Jie; Du, Xiling; Zhu, Jian; Xie, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by autoimmune damage to the central nervous system. All the current drugs for MS target the immune system. Although effective in reducing new lesions, they have limited effects in preventing the progression of disability. Promoting oligodendrocyte-mediated remyelination and recovery of neurons are the new directions of MS therapy. The endogenous opioid system, consisting of MOR, DOR, KOR and their ligands, has been suggested to participate in the pathogenesis of MS. However, the exact receptor and mechanism remain elusive. Here we show that genetic deletion of KOR exacerbates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, whereas activating KOR with agonists alleviates the symptoms. KOR does not affect immune cell differentiation and function. Instead, it promotes oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination both in vitro and in vivo. Our study suggests that targeting KOR might be an intriguing way to develop new MS therapies that may complement the existing immunosuppressive approaches. PMID:27040771

  5. Differential effects of LY235959, a competitive antagonist of the NMDA receptor on kappa-opioid receptor agonist induced responses in mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, H N; Thorat, S N

    1997-02-01

    The effects of the competitive antagonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, LY235959, were determined on the analgesic and hypothermic effects as well as on the development of tolerance to these effects of U-50,488H, a kappa-opioid receptor agonist in mice and rats. In the mouse, a single injection of LY235959 given 10 min prior to U-50,488H did not modify the analgesic action of the latter. Similarly, chronic administration of LY235959 twice a day for 4 days did not modify U-50,488H-induced analgesia in mice. Repeated pretreatment of mice with LY235959 dose-dependently attenuated the development of tolerance to the analgesic actions of U-50,488H. In the rat, LY235959 by itself produced a significant analgesia and prior treatment of rats with LY235959 enhanced the analgesic action of U-50,488H. Similar effects were seen with the hypothermic action. Pretreatment of rats with LY235959 attenuated the development of tolerance to the analgesic but not to the hypothermic action of U-50,488H. These results provide evidence that LY235959 produces differential actions on nociception and thermic responses by itself and when given acutely with U-50,488H in mice and rats. However, when the animals are pretreated with LY235959, similar inhibitory effects are observed on the development of tolerance to the analgesic action of U-50,488H in both the species. These studies demonstrate an involvement of the NMDA receptor in the development of kappa-opioid tolerance and suggest that the biochemical consequences of an opioid's interaction with the opioid receptor are not the only factors that contribute to the acute and chronic actions of opioid analgesic drugs. PMID:9045999

  6. Autoradiographic localization of supraspinal kappa-opioid receptors with (/sup 125/I-Tyr1, D-Pro10)dynorphin A-(1-11)

    SciTech Connect

    Jomary, C.; Gairin, J.E.; Cros, J.; Meunier, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    (/sup 125/I-Tyr1, D-Pro10)dynorphin A-(1-11) (/sup 125/I-DP-DYN), an opioid peptide analogue that has previously been shown to be kappa selective, displays specific, saturable, and high-affinity (Kd = 0.3 nM) binding in slide-mounted sections from nerve tissue. We have used /sup 125/I-DPDYN to autoradiographically visualize supraspinal kappa-opioid receptor sites in rats, guinea pigs, and rabbits. The autoradiographic dispositions of /sup 125/I-DPDYN in sections from cerebellum are clearly different in guinea pig and rabbit, suggesting that kappa receptors have different functions in this organ of the two species. Autoradiograms from /sup 125/I-DPDYN-labeled brain sections also reveal major species differences, in particular in thalamus, which is densely labeled in rabbit and considerably less so in rat and guinea pig. The data show that /sup 125/I-DPDYN is a useful probe to visualize kappa-opioid receptor sites in nerve tissue sections directly and rapidly.

  7. Effects of orally-bioavailable short-acting kappa opioid receptor-selective antagonist LY2456302 on nicotine withdrawal in mice.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Kia J; Jackson, Asti; Carroll, F Ivy; Damaj, M Imad

    2015-10-01

    Kappa opioid receptor (KOR) signaling has been implicated in mediating behavioral and biochemical effects associated with drug dependence. The most commonly used KOR antagonists, norbinaltorphimine (norBNI) and (3R)-7-Hydroxy-N{(1S)-1-{[(3R,4R)-4-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-3,4-dimethyl-1-piperidinyl]methyl}-2-methylpropyl}-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-3-isoquinoline-carboxamide (JDTic), have provided a wealth of information in this area; however, the delayed onset and long-lasting effects of these antagonists complicate experimental design and interpretation of results, and make them less than ideal for clinical studies. Initial studies with the recently developed KOR antagonist, LY2456302, show that the compound is a short acting, high-affinity, selective KOR antagonist with therapeutic potential for mood disorders and ethanol use in animal models, and is well tolerated in humans. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the effectiveness of LY2456302 in alleviating the nicotine withdrawal syndrome in mice. Mice were chronically treated with nicotine for 14 days and physical and affective nicotine withdrawal signs were measured using a spontaneous nicotine withdrawal model and conditioned place aversion (CPA) following pre-treatment with LY2456302, administered orally. Vehicle treated nicotine withdrawn mice displayed significant anxiety-related behavior, somatic signs, hyperalgesia, and CPA. Similar to previous studies with norBNI and JDTic, LY2456302 alleviated the nicotine withdrawal syndrome, as evidenced by decreased expression of nicotine withdrawal induced anxiety-related behavior, somatic signs, and CPA, and increased hotplate latency in nicotine withdrawn mice following pre-treatment. Given the current results, and with its favorable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile, LY2456302 may be a useful therapeutic agent for treatment of multiple aspects of the nicotine withdrawal syndrome. PMID:26044637

  8. Depressive-like effects of the kappa opioid receptor agonist salvinorin A are associated with decreased phasic dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Ebner, Stephanie R.; Roitman, Mitchell F.; Potter, David N.; Rachlin, Anna B.; Chartoff, Elena H.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Kappa opioid receptors (KORs) have been implicated in depressive-like states associated with chronic administration of drugs of abuse and stress. Although KOR agonists decrease dopamine in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), KOR modulation of phasic dopamine release in the core and shell subregions of the NAc—which have distinct roles in reward processing—remains poorly understood. Objectives Studies were designed to examine whether the time course of effects of KOR activation on phasic dopamine release in the NAc core or shell are similar to effects on motivated behavior. Methods The effect of systemic administration of the KOR agonist salvinorin A (salvA)—at a dose (2.0 mg/kg) previously determined to have depressive-like effects—was measured on electrically evoked phasic dopamine release in the NAc core or shell of awake and behaving rats using fast scan cyclic voltammetry. In parallel, the effects of salvA on intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) and sucrose-reinforced responding were assessed. For comparison, a threshold dose of salvA (0.25 mg/kg) was also tested. Results The active, but not threshold, dose of salvA significantly decreased phasic dopamine release without affecting dopamine reuptake in the NAc core and shell. SalvA increased ICSS thresholds and significantly lowered breakpoint on the progressive ratio schedule, indicating a decrease in motivation. The time course of the KOR-mediated decrease in dopamine in the core was qualitatively similar to the effects on motivated behavior. Conclusions These data suggest that the effects of KOR activation on motivation are due, in part, to inhibition of phasic dopamine signaling in the NAc core. PMID:20372879

  9. The kappa opioid receptor agonist U-50488 blocks Ca2+ channels in a voltage-and G protein-independent manner in sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Bassil; Ruiz-Velasco, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives Kappa opioid receptor (κ-OR) activation is known to play a role in analgesia and central sedation. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of the κ-OR agonist, U-50488 (an arylacetamide), on Ca2+ channel currents and the signaling proteins involved in acutely isolated rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons expressing the putative promoter region of the tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant Na+ channel (NaV 1.8) that is known to be involved in pain transmission. Methods Acutely isolated rat DRG neurons were transfected with cDNA coding for enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), whose expression is driven by the Nav 1.8 promoter region. Thereafter, the whole-cell variant of the patch-clamp technique was employed to record Ca2+ channel currents in neurons expressing EGFP. Results Exposure of EGFP-expressing DRG neurons to U-50488 (0.3 to 40 μM) led to voltage-independent inhibition of the Ca2+ channel currents. The modulation of the Ca2+ currents did not appear to be mediated by the Gα protein subfamilies: Gαi/o, Gαs, Gαq/11, Gα14 and Gαz. Furthermore, dialysis of the hydrolysis-resistant GDP analog, GDP-β-S (1 mM), did not affect the U-50488-mediated blocking effect, ruling out involvement of other G protein subunits. Finally, U-50488 (20 μM) blocked Ca2+ channels heterologously expressed in HeLa cells that do not express κ-OR. Conclusion These results suggest that the antinociceptive actions mediated by U-50488 are likely due to both a direct block of Ca2+ channels in sensory neurons as well as G protein modulation of Ca2+ currents via κ-OR-expressing neurons. PMID:23222359

  10. Design, Syntheses, and Biological Evaluation of 14-Heteroaromatic Substituted Naltrexone Derivatives: Pharmacological Profile Switch from Mu Opioid Receptor Selectivity to Mu/Kappa Opioid Receptor Dual Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yunyun; Zaidi, Saheem A.; Elbegdorj, Orgil; Aschenbach, Lindsey C. K.; Li, Guo; Stevens, David L.; Scoggins, Krista L.; Dewey, William L.; Selley, Dana E.; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Based on a mu opioid receptor (MOR) homology model and the “isosterism” concept, three generations of 14-heteroaromatically substituted naltrexone derivatives were designed, synthesized, and evaluated as potential MOR selective ligands. The first generation ligands appeared to be MOR selective, whereas the second and the third generation ones showed MOR/kappa opioid receptor (KOR) dual selectivity. Docking of ligands 2 (MOR selective) and 10 (MOR/KOR dual selective) to the three opioid receptor crystal structures revealed a non-conserved residue facilitated “hydrogen bonding network” that could be responsible for their distinctive selectivity profiles. The MOR/KOR dual selective ligand 10 showed no agonism and acted as a potent antagonist in the tail flick assay. It also produced less severe opioid withdrawal symptoms than naloxone in morphine dependent mice. In conclusion, ligand 10 may serve as a novel lead compound to develop MOR/KOR dual selective ligands, which might possess unique therapeutic value for opioid addiction treatment. PMID:24144240

  11. CoMFA Analyses of C-2 Position Salvinorin A Analogs at the Kappa-Opioid Receptor Provides Insights into Epimer Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    McGovern, Donna L.; Mosier, Philip D.; Roth, Bryan L.; Westkaemper, Richard B.

    2010-01-01

    The highly potent and kappa-opioid receptor (KOR)-selective hallucinogen salvinorin A and selected analogs have been analyzed using the 3D quantitative structure-affinity relationship technique Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) in an effort to derive a statistically significant and predictive model of salvinorin affinity at the KOR and to provide additional statistical support for the validity of previously proposed structure-based interaction models. Two CoMFA models of salvinorin A analogs substituted at the C-2 position are presented. Separate models were developed based on the radioligand used in the kappa-opioid binding assay, [3H]diprenorphine or [125I]6β-iodo-3,14-dihydroxy-17-cyclopropylmethyl-4,5α-epoxymorphinan ([125I]IOXY). For each dataset, three methods of alignment were employed: a receptor-docked alignment derived from the structure-based docking algorithm GOLD, another from the ligand-based alignment algorithm FlexS, and a rigid realignment of the poses from the receptor-docked alignment. The receptor-docked alignment produced statistically superior results compared to either the FlexS alignment or the realignment in both datasets. The [125I]IOXY set (Model 1) and [3H]diprenorphine set (Model 2) gave q2 values of 0.592 and 0.620, respectively, using the receptor-docked alignment, and both models produced similar CoMFA contour maps that reflected the stereoelectronic features of the receptor model from which they were derived. Each model gave significantly predictive CoMFA statistics (Model 1 PSET r2 = 0.833; Model 2 PSET r2 = 0.813). Based on the CoMFA contour maps, a binding mode was proposed for amine-containing salvinorin A analogs that provides a rationale for the observation that the β-epimers (R-configuration) of protonated amines at the C-2 position have a higher affinity than the corresponding β-epimers (S-configuration). PMID:20083418

  12. Nascent structure-activity relationship study of a diastereomeric series of kappa opioid receptor antagonists derived from CJ-15,208.

    PubMed

    Dolle, Roland E; Michaut, Mathieu; Martinez-Teipel, Blanca; Seida, Pamela R; Ajello, Christopher W; Muller, Alison L; DeHaven, Robert N; Carroll, Patrick J

    2009-07-01

    Cyclic tetrapeptide c[Phe-pro-Phe-trp] 2, a diastereomer of CJ-15,208 (1), was identified as a potent dual kappa/mu opioid receptor antagonist devoid of delta opioid receptor affinity against cloned human receptors: K(i) (2)=3.8nM (kappa), 30nM (mu); IC(50) ([(35)S]GTPgammaS binding)=140nM (kappa), 21nM (mu). The d-tryptophan residue rendered 2 ca. eightfold and fourfold more potent at kappa and mu, respectively, than the corresponding l-configured tryptophan in the natural product 1. Phe analogs 3-10, designed to probe the effect of substituents on receptor affinity and selectivity, possessed K(i) values ranging from 14 to 220nM against the kappa opioid receptor with mu/kappa ratios of 0.45-3.0. An alanine scan of 2 yielded c[Ala-pro-Phe-trp] 12, an analog equipotent to 2. Agents 2 and 12 were pure antagonists in vitro devoid of agonist activity. Ac-pro-Phe-trp-Phe-NH(2)16 and Ac-Phe-trp-Phe-pro-NH(2)17 two of the eight possible acyclic peptides derived from 1 and 2, were selective, modestly potent mu ligands: K(i) (16)=340nM (mu); K(i) (17)=360nM (mu). PMID:19464172

  13. Differential involvement of ventral tegmental mu, delta and kappa opioid receptors in modulation of basal mesolimbic dopamine release: in vivo microdialysis studies.

    PubMed

    Devine, D P; Leone, P; Pocock, D; Wise, R A

    1993-09-01

    In vivo microdialysis was used to assess the involvement of ventral tegmental area (VTA) mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors in modulation of basal extracellular ventral striatal dopamine (DA) and DA-metabolite concentrations. Independent groups of chloral hydrate-anesthetized rats were given VTA microinjections of selective opioid agonists, and extracellular ventral striatal DA and DA-metabolite concentrations were assayed using HPLC. VTA microinjections of [D-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4-Gly5-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO; a mu agonist) and [D-Pen2, D-Pen5]-enkephalin (DDDPE; a delta agonist) each caused dose-orderly increases in ventral striatal DA and DA-metabolite concentrations. The effective concentrations of DPDPE were 100- to 1000-fold higher than the effective concentrations of DAMGO. VTA microinjections of (trans-(dl)-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-N-[2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)cyclo-hexyl]- benzeneacetamide) methane sulfonate hydrate (U-50,488H); a kappa agonist) failed to alter ventral striatal DA concentrations at any dose tested, but subsequent systemic injections significantly decreased DA and DA-metabolite concentrations. Pretreatment with VTA microinjections of 17-cyclopropylmethyl-6,7-dehydro-4,5-epoxy-3,14-dihydroxy-6,7,2',3'- indolmorphinan hydrochloride (naltrindole; a delta antagonist) (delta antagonist) antagonized VTA DPDPE-mediated increases in ventral striatal DA and DA-metabolite concentrations but failed to antagonize VTA DAMGO-mediated increases. Pretreatment with D-Pen-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 (CTOP; a mu antagonist) antagonized VTA DAMGO-mediated increases but failed to antagonize VTA DPDPE-mediated increases. Thus both mu and delta receptor agonist appear capable of increasing ventral striatal DA and DA-metabolite concentrations through selective actions on their preferred class of opioid receptors in the VTA. The increases in ventral striatal DA and DA-metabolite concentrations that are seen after systemic treatment with kappa opioid agonists appear not to

  14. The kappa-opioid receptor antagonist, nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI), decreases morphine withdrawal and the consequent conditioned place aversion in rats.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, John E; Verhaak, Allison M S; Schierberl, Kathryn C

    2015-04-15

    Much data suggest that the binding of dynorphin-like peptides to kappa-opioid receptors (KORs) during the administration of and withdrawal from a variety of addictive drugs is aversive and serves to limit the reinforcing properties of those drugs and to enhance tolerance, withdrawal, and the probability of stress-induced relapse. In this study, we examined the role of KORs in mediating opioid withdrawal and its aversive consequences in rats. We found that selective blockade of KORs by i.p. administration of 20mg/kg nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI) 5h prior to naltrexone-precipitated withdrawal in morphine-dependent rats decreased feces excreted during a 30-min withdrawal session. More critically, this injection of nor-BNI decreased the subsequent conditioned place aversion (CPA) for the withdrawal chamber 2 days later. The subsequent finding that administration of nor-BNI 2h following withdrawal did not affect the CPA 2 days later suggested that nor-BNI reduced the CPA in the prior experiment because it reduced the aversive effects of withdrawal, not because it reduced the aversive/anxiogenic effects of the withdrawal chamber at the time of CPA testing. These data indicate that the binding of dynorphin-like peptides to KORs during opioid withdrawal serves to enhance withdrawal and its aversive consequences and suggest that selective KOR antagonists may be useful in reducing these aversive effects and consequent relapse. PMID:25591478

  15. Kinetic modeling of (11)C-LY2795050, a novel antagonist radiotracer for PET imaging of the kappa opioid receptor in humans.

    PubMed

    Naganawa, Mika; Zheng, Ming-Qiang; Nabulsi, Nabeel; Tomasi, Giampaolo; Henry, Shannan; Lin, Shu-Fei; Ropchan, Jim; Labaree, David; Tauscher, Johannes; Neumeister, Alexander; Carson, Richard E; Huang, Yiyun

    2014-11-01

    (11)C-LY2795050 is a novel kappa opioid receptor (KOR) antagonist tracer for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The purpose of this first-in-human study was to determine the optimal kinetic model for analysis of (11)C-LY2795050 imaging data. Sixteen subjects underwent baseline scans and blocking scans after oral naltrexone. Compartmental modeling and multilinear analysis-1 (MA1) were applied using the arterial input functions. Two-tissue compartment model and MA1 were found to be the best models to provide reliable measures of binding parameters. The rank order of (11)C-LY2795050 distribution volume (VT) matched the known regional KOR densities in the human brain. Blocking scans with naltrexone indicated no ideal reference region for (11)C-LY2795050. Three methods for calculation of the nondisplaceable distribution volume (VND) were assessed: (1) individual VND estimated from naltrexone occupancy plots, (2) mean VND across subjects, and (3) a fixed fraction of cerebellum VT. Approach (3) produced the lowest intersubject variability in the calculation of binding potentials (BPND, BPF, and BPP). Therefore, binding potentials of (11)C-LY2795050 can be determined if the specific binding fraction in the cerebellum is presumed to be unchanged by diseases and experimental conditions. In conclusion, results from the present study show the suitability of (11)C-LY2795050 to image and quantify KOR in humans. PMID:25182664

  16. Kinetic modeling of 11C-LY2795050, a novel antagonist radiotracer for PET imaging of the kappa opioid receptor in humans

    PubMed Central

    Naganawa, Mika; Zheng, Ming-Qiang; Nabulsi, Nabeel; Tomasi, Giampaolo; Henry, Shannan; Lin, Shu-Fei; Ropchan, Jim; Labaree, David; Tauscher, Johannes; Neumeister, Alexander; Carson, Richard E; Huang, Yiyun

    2014-01-01

    11C-LY2795050 is a novel kappa opioid receptor (KOR) antagonist tracer for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The purpose of this first-in-human study was to determine the optimal kinetic model for analysis of 11C-LY2795050 imaging data. Sixteen subjects underwent baseline scans and blocking scans after oral naltrexone. Compartmental modeling and multilinear analysis-1 (MA1) were applied using the arterial input functions. Two-tissue compartment model and MA1 were found to be the best models to provide reliable measures of binding parameters. The rank order of 11C-LY2795050 distribution volume (VT) matched the known regional KOR densities in the human brain. Blocking scans with naltrexone indicated no ideal reference region for 11C-LY2795050. Three methods for calculation of the nondisplaceable distribution volume (VND) were assessed: (1) individual VND estimated from naltrexone occupancy plots, (2) mean VND across subjects, and (3) a fixed fraction of cerebellum VT. Approach (3) produced the lowest intersubject variability in the calculation of binding potentials (BPND, BPF, and BPP). Therefore, binding potentials of 11C-LY2795050 can be determined if the specific binding fraction in the cerebellum is presumed to be unchanged by diseases and experimental conditions. In conclusion, results from the present study show the suitability of 11C-LY2795050 to image and quantify KOR in humans. PMID:25182664

  17. Effect of kappa-opioid receptor agonists U69593, U50488H, spiradoline and salvinorin A on cocaine-induced drug-seeking in rats

    PubMed Central

    Morani, Aashish S.; Kivell, Bronwyn; Prisinzano, Thomas E.; Schenk, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Our previous work indicated that pretreatment with the selective kappa opioid receptor (KOPr) agonist, U69593, attenuated the ability of priming injections of cocaine to reinstate extinguished cocaine-seeking behavior. The present study expanded these initial tests to include other traditional KOPr agonists, U50488H, spiradoline (SPR), and salvinorin A (Sal A), an active constituent of the plant Salvia divinorum. Following acquisition and stabilization of cocaine self-administration, cocaine-produced drug-seeking was measured. This test was conducted in a single day and comprised an initial phase of self-administration, followed by a phase of extinguished responding. The final phase examined reinstatement of extinguished cocaine self-administration followed by a priming injection of cocaine (20.0 mg/kg, intraperitoneal (I.P.)) in combination with the various KOPr agonists. Cocaine-induced drug-seeking was attenuated by pretreatment with U69593 (0.3 mg/kg, subcutaneous (S.C.)), U50488H (30.0 mg/kg, I.P.), SPR (1.0, 3.0 mg/kg, I.P.) and Sal A (0.3, 1.0 mg/kg, I.P.). Sal A (0.3, 1.0 mg/kg, I.P.) had no effect on operant responding to obtain sucrose reinforcement or on cocaine induced hyperactivity. These findings show that Sal A, like other traditional KOPr agonists attenuates cocaine-induced drug seeking behavior. PMID:19747933

  18. Characterization of kappa opioid receptor mediated, dynorphin-stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding in mouse striatum for the evaluation of selective KOR ligands in an endogenous setting.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lei; Stahl, Edward L; Lovell, Kimberly M; Frankowski, Kevin J; Prisinzano, Thomas E; Aubé, Jeffrey; Bohn, Laura M

    2015-12-01

    Differential modulation of kappa opioid receptor (KOR) signaling has been a proposed strategy for developing therapies for drug addiction and depression by either activating or blocking this receptor. Hence, there have been significant efforts to generate ligands with diverse pharmacological properties including partial agonists, antagonists, allosteric modulators as well as ligands that selectively activate some pathways while not engaging others (biased agonists). It is becoming increasingly evident that G protein coupled receptor signaling events are context dependent and that what may occur in cell based assays may not be fully indicative of signaling events that occur in the naturally occurring environment. As new ligands are developed, it is important to assess their signaling capacity in relevant endogenous systems in comparison to the performance of endogenous agonists. Since KOR is considered the cognate receptor for dynorphin peptides we have evaluated the selectivity profiles of dynorphin peptides in wild-type (WT), KOR knockout (KOR-KO), and mu opioid receptor knockout (MOR-KO) mice using [35S]GTPγS binding assay in striatal membrane preparations. We find that while the small molecule KOR agonist U69,593, is very selective for KOR, dynorphin peptides promiscuously stimulate G protein signaling in striatum. Furthermore, our studies demonstrate that norBNI and 5'GNTI are highly nonselective antagonists as they maintain full potency and efficacy against dynorphin signaling in the absence of KOR. Characterization of a new KOR antagonist, which may be more selective than NorBNI and 5'GNTI, is presented using this approach. PMID:26160155

  19. Effects of a post-shock injection of the kappa opioid receptor antagonist norbinaltorphimine (norBNI) on fear and anxiety in rats.

    PubMed

    Rogala, Benjamin; Li, Yonghui; Li, Sa; Chen, Xiaoyu; Kirouac, Gilbert J

    2012-01-01

    Exposure of rats to footshocks leads to an enduring behavioral state involving generalized fear responses and avoidance. Recent evidence suggests that the expression of negative emotional behaviors produced by a stressor is in part mediated by dynorphin and its main receptor, the kappa opioid receptor (KOR). The purpose of this study was to determine if a subcutaneous injection of the long-acting KOR antagonist norbinaltorphimine (norBNI; 15.0 and 30.0 mg/kg) given 2 days after an acute exposure of rats to footshooks (5×2 s episodes of 1.5 mA delivered over 5 min) attenuates the expression of lasting fear and anxiety. We report that exposure of rats to acute footshock produced long-lasting (>4 weeks) fear (freezing) and anxiety (avoidance of an open area in the defensive withdrawal test). The 30 mg dose of norBNI attenuated the fear expressed when shock rats were placed in the shock context at Day 9 but not Day 27 post-shock. The same dose of norBNI had no effect on the expression of generalized fear produced when shock rats were placed in a novel chamber at Days 8 and 24. In contrast, the 30 mg dose of norBNI produced consistent anxiolytic effects in shock and nonshock rats. First, the 30 mg dose was found to decrease the latency to enter the open field in the defensive withdrawal test done 30 days after the shock exposure. Second, the same high dose also had anxiolytic effects in both nonshock and shock rats as evidence by a decrease in the mean time spent in the withdrawal box. The present study shows that systemic injection of the KOR antagonist norBNI had mixed effect on fear. In contrast, norBNI had an anxiolytic effect which included the attenuation of the enhanced avoidance of a novel area produced by a prior shock experience. PMID:23166745

  20. Ablation of kappa-opioid receptors from brain dopamine neurons has anxiolytic-like effects and enhances cocaine-induced plasticity.

    PubMed

    Van't Veer, Ashlee; Bechtholt, Anita J; Onvani, Sara; Potter, David; Wang, Yujun; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan; Schütz, Günther; Chartoff, Elena H; Rudolph, Uwe; Cohen, Bruce M; Carlezon, William A

    2013-07-01

    Brain kappa-opioid receptors (KORs) are implicated in states of motivation and emotion. Activation of KORs negatively regulates mesolimbic dopamine (DA) neurons, and KOR agonists produce depressive-like behavioral effects. To further evaluate how KOR function affects behavior, we developed mutant mice in which exon 3 of the KOR gene (Oprk1) was flanked with Cre-lox recombination (loxP) sites. By breeding these mice with lines that express Cre-recombinase (Cre) in early embryogenesis (EIIa-Cre) or only in DA neurons (dopamine transporter (DAT)-Cre), we developed constitutive KOR knockouts (KOR(-/-)) and conditional knockouts that lack KORs in DA-containing neurons (DAT-KOR(lox/lox)). Autoradiography demonstrated complete ablation of KOR binding in the KOR(-/-) mutants, and reduced binding in the DAT-KOR(lox/lox) mutants. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qPCR) studies confirmed that KOR mRNA is undetectable in the constitutive mutants and reduced in the midbrain DA systems of the conditional mutants. Behavioral characterization demonstrated that these mutant lines do not differ from controls in metrics, including hearing, vision, weight, and locomotor activity. Whereas KOR(-/-) mice appeared normal in the open field and light/dark box tests, DAT-KOR(lox/lox) mice showed reduced anxiety-like behavior, an effect that is broadly consistent with previously reported effects of KOR antagonists. Sensitization to the locomotor-stimulating effects of cocaine appeared normal in KOR(-/-) mutants, but was exaggerated in DAT-KOR(lox/lox) mutants. Increased sensitivity to cocaine in the DAT-KOR(lox/lox) mutants is consistent with a role for KORs in negative regulation of DA function, whereas the lack of differences in the KOR(-/-) mutants suggests compensatory adaptations after constitutive receptor ablation. These mouse lines may be useful in future studies of KOR function. PMID:23446450

  1. Prenatal exposure to vanilla or alcohol induces crawling after these odors in the neonate rat: The role of mu and kappa opioid receptor systems.

    PubMed

    Gaztañaga, Mirari; Aranda-Fernández, P Ezequiel; Chotro, M Gabriela

    2015-09-01

    Rat fetuses can perceive chemosensory stimuli derived from their mother's diet, and they may learn about those stimuli. In previous studies we have observed that prenatal exposure to alcohol during the last days of gestation increases the acceptance and liking of an alcohol flavor in infant and adolescent rats. While these results were not found after prenatal exposure to vanilla, cineole or anise, suggesting that the pharmacological properties of alcohol, mediated by the opioid system, underlie the effects observed with this drug. Considering that other studies report enhanced acceptance of non-alcohol flavors experienced prenatally when subjects were tested before infancy, we explore the possibility of observing similar results if testing 1-day old rats exposed prenatally to vanilla. Using an "odor-induced crawling" testing procedure, it was observed that neonates exposed prenatally to vanilla or alcohol crawl for a longer distance towards the experienced odor than to other odors or than control pups. Blocking mu, but not kappa opioid receptors, reduced the attraction of vanilla odor to neonates exposed to vanilla in utero, while the response to alcohol in pups exposed prenatally to this drug was affected by both antagonists. Results confirm that exposure to a non-alcohol odor enhances postnatal responses to it, observable soon after birth, while also suggesting that the mu opioid receptor system plays an important role in generating this effect. The results also imply that with alcohol exposure, the prenatal opioid system is wholly involved, which could explain the longer retention of the enhanced attraction to alcohol following prenatal experience with the drug. PMID:25554482

  2. C7β-methyl analogues of the orvinols: the discovery of kappa opioid antagonists with nociceptin/orphanin FQ peptide (NOP) receptor partial agonism and low, or zero, efficacy at mu opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Cueva, Juan Pablo; Roche, Christopher; Ostovar, Mehrnoosh; Kumar, Vinod; Clark, Mary J; Hillhouse, Todd M; Lewis, John W; Traynor, John R; Husbands, Stephen M

    2015-05-28

    Buprenorphine is a successful analgesic and treatment for opioid abuse, with both activities relying on its partial agonist activity at mu opioid receptors. However, there is substantial interest in its activities at the kappa opioid and nociceptin/orphanin FQ peptide receptors. This has led to an interest in developing compounds with a buprenorphine-like pharmacological profile but with lower efficacy at mu opioid receptors. The present article describes aryl ring analogues of buprenorphine in which the standard C20-methyl group has been moved to the C7β position, resulting in ligands with the desired profile. In particular, moving the methyl group has resulted in far more robust kappa opioid antagonist activity than seen in the standard orvinol series. Of the compounds synthesized, a number, including 15a, have a profile of interest for the development of drug abuse relapse prevention therapies or antidepressants and others (e.g., 8c), as analgesics with a reduced side-effect profile. PMID:25898137

  3. C7β-Methyl Analogues of the Orvinols: The Discovery of Kappa Opioid Antagonists with Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ Peptide (NOP) Receptor Partial Agonism and Low, or Zero, Efficacy at Mu Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Buprenorphine is a successful analgesic and treatment for opioid abuse, with both activities relying on its partial agonist activity at mu opioid receptors. However, there is substantial interest in its activities at the kappa opioid and nociceptin/orphanin FQ peptide receptors. This has led to an interest in developing compounds with a buprenorphine-like pharmacological profile but with lower efficacy at mu opioid receptors. The present article describes aryl ring analogues of buprenorphine in which the standard C20-methyl group has been moved to the C7β position, resulting in ligands with the desired profile. In particular, moving the methyl group has resulted in far more robust kappa opioid antagonist activity than seen in the standard orvinol series. Of the compounds synthesized, a number, including 15a, have a profile of interest for the development of drug abuse relapse prevention therapies or antidepressants and others (e.g., 8c), as analgesics with a reduced side-effect profile. PMID:25898137

  4. Effects of the kappa opioid receptor antagonist nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI) on cocaine versus food choice and extended-access cocaine intake in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Hutsell, Blake A; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C; Negus, Sidney Stevens; Banks, Matthew L

    2016-03-01

    The dynorphin/kappa opioid receptor (KOR) system has been implicated as one potential neurobiological modulator of the abuse-related effects of cocaine and as a potential target for medications development. This study determined effects of the KOR antagonist nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI) on cocaine self-administration under a novel procedure that featured two daily components: (1) a 2-hour 'choice' component (9:00-11:00 am) when monkeys could choose between food pellets and cocaine injections (0-0.1 mg/kg per injection, intravenous) and (2) a 20-hour 'extended-access' component (noon to 8:00 am) when cocaine (0.1 mg/kg per injection) was available under a fixed-ratio schedule to promote high daily cocaine intakes. Rhesus monkeys (n = 4) were given 14 days of exposure to the choice + extended-access procedure then treated with nor-BNI (3.2 or 10.0 mg/kg, intramuscular), and cocaine choice and extended-access cocaine intake were evaluated for an additional 14 days. Consistent with previous studies, cocaine maintained both a dose-dependent increase in cocaine choice during choice components and a high level of cocaine intake during extended-access components. Neither 3.2 nor 10 mg/kg nor-BNI significantly altered cocaine choice or extended-access cocaine intake. In two additional monkeys, nor-BNI also had no effect on cocaine choice or extended-access cocaine intake when it was administered at the beginning of exposure to the extended-access components. Overall, these results do not support a major role for the dynorphin/KOR system in modulating cocaine self-administration under these conditions in non-human primates nor do they support the clinical utility of KOR antagonists as a pharmacotherapeutic strategy for cocaine addiction. PMID:25581305

  5. Renal responses produced by microinjection of the kappa opioid receptor agonist, U50-488H, into sites within the rat lamina terminalis.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Cynthia; Fortepiani, Lourdes; Nguyen, Tin; Rangel, Yolanda; Strong, Randy; Gottlieb, Helmut B

    2015-03-01

    Activation of central kappa opioid receptors (KOR) has been demonstrated to produce marked free water diuresis with a concurrent increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). This study investigated the cardiovascular (CV) and renal effects evoked by central activation of KOR in two lamina terminalis sites, the median preoptic area (MPA) and anterolateral division of the bed nuclei of the stria terminalis (BST). Rats anesthetized with urethane alpha-chloralose were instrumented to record mean arterial pressure, heart rate, RSNA, and urine output (V). Rats were infused with isotonic saline (25 μL/min) and urine samples were collected during two 10-min control periods and six consecutive 10-min experimental periods following microinjection of vehicle, U50-448H (U50, KOR agonist) alone or norbinaltorphimine (nor-BNI, KOR antagonist) plus U50. Microinjection of U50 into the BST increased V (peak at 30 min, 84.8 ± 12.9 μL/min) as compared to its respective control, vehicle, or nor-BNI plus U50. This diuretic effect occurred without any significant changes in CV parameters, RSNA, or urinary sodium excretion. In contrast, U50 injection into the MPA significantly increased RSNA (peak at 20 mins: 129 ± 9.9) without increasing the other parameters. This study demonstrated novel sites through which activation of KOR selectively increases V and RSNA. The ability of U50 to increase V without affecting sodium excretion and RSNA raises the possibility that LT neurons could be an important substrate through which drugs targeting KOR could selectively facilitate water excretion in sodium-retaining diseases such as congestive heart failure. PMID:26038693

  6. Renal responses produced by microinjection of the kappa opioid receptor agonist, U50-488H, into sites within the rat lamina terminalis

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Cynthia; Fortepiani, Lourdes; Nguyen, Tin; Rangel, Yolanda; Strong, Randy; Gottlieb, Helmut B

    2015-01-01

    Activation of central kappa opioid receptors (KOR) has been demonstrated to produce marked free water diuresis with a concurrent increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). This study investigated the cardiovascular (CV) and renal effects evoked by central activation of KOR in two lamina terminalis sites, the median preoptic area (MPA) and anterolateral division of the bed nuclei of the stria terminalis (BST). Rats anesthetized with urethane alpha-chloralose were instrumented to record mean arterial pressure, heart rate, RSNA, and urine output (V). Rats were infused with isotonic saline (25 μL/min) and urine samples were collected during two 10-min control periods and six consecutive 10-min experimental periods following microinjection of vehicle, U50-448H (U50, KOR agonist) alone or norbinaltorphimine (nor-BNI, KOR antagonist) plus U50. Microinjection of U50 into the BST increased V (peak at 30 min, 84.8 ± 12.9 μL/min) as compared to its respective control, vehicle, or nor-BNI plus U50. This diuretic effect occurred without any significant changes in CV parameters, RSNA, or urinary sodium excretion. In contrast, U50 injection into the MPA significantly increased RSNA (peak at 20 mins: 129 ± 9.9) without increasing the other parameters. This study demonstrated novel sites through which activation of KOR selectively increases V and RSNA. The ability of U50 to increase V without affecting sodium excretion and RSNA raises the possibility that LT neurons could be an important substrate through which drugs targeting KOR could selectively facilitate water excretion in sodium-retaining diseases such as congestive heart failure. PMID:26038693

  7. Test-retest reproducibility of binding parameters in humans with 11C-LY2795050, an antagonist PET radiotracer for the kappa opioid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Naganawa, Mika; Zheng, Ming-Qiang; Henry, Shannan; Nabulsi, Nabeel; Lin, Shu-Fei; Ropchan, Jim; Labaree, David; Najafzadeh, Soheila; Kapinos, Michael; Tauscher, Johannes; Neumeister, Alexander; Carson, Richard E.; Huang, Yiyun

    2015-01-01

    11C-LY2795050 is a new antagonist PET radioligand for the kappa opioid receptor (KOR). In this study, we assessed the reproducibility of the binding parameters of 11C-LY2795050 in healthy human subjects. Methods Sixteen healthy subjects (11 men, 5 women) underwent two separate 90-min PET scans with arterial input function and plasma free fraction measurements. The two-tissue compartment model and multilinear analysis-1 were applied to calculate five outcome measures in 14 brain regions: distribution volume (VT), distribution volume normalized by plasma free fraction (VT/fP), and three binding potentials (BPND, BPP, BPF). Since KOR is distributed ubiquitously throughout the brain, there are no suitable reference regions. We used a fixed fraction of individual cerebellum VT value as the non-displaceable distribution volume VND (= VT CER/1.17). The relative and absolute test-retest variability and intra-class correlation coefficient were evaluated for the outcome measures of 11C-LY2795050. Results The test-retest variability of 11C-LY2795050 for VT was ≤ 10% in all regions, and 12% in the amygdala. For binding potentials (BPND and BPP), the test-retest variability was good in regions of moderate and high KOR density (BPND > 0.4) and poor in regions of low density. Correction by fP (VT/fP or BPF) did not improve the test-retest performance. Conclusion Our results suggest that quantification of 11C-LY2795050 imaging is reproducible and reliable in the regions with moderate and high KOR density. Therefore we conclude that this first antagonist radiotracer is highly useful for PET studies of KOR. PMID:25593119

  8. Effects of the kappa-opioid receptor agonist, U69593, on the development of sensitization and on the maintenance of cocaine self-administration.

    PubMed

    Schenk, S; Partridge, B; Shippenberg, T S

    2001-04-01

    Previous studies showed that prior administration of kappa-opioid agonists decreased the development of sensitization to some of the behavioral effects of cocaine. The present study sought to determine whether the development of sensitization to cocaine's reinforcing effects was also sensitive to antagonism by kappa-opioid agonists. During a pretreatment phase, the kappa-opioid agonist, U69593 (0.0 or 0.32 mg/kg) was administered prior to (1) 2 daily injections of cocaine (0.0 or 20.0 mg/kg), or (2) cocaine or saline administered via a yoking procedure. Cocaine pretreatment decreased the latency to acquisition of cocaine self-administration. However, prior administration of U69593 during the pretreatment phase failed to attenuate the development of this sensitized response to cocaine's reinforcing effect. In other groups, the effect of acute U69593 pretreatment on the maintenance of cocaine self-administration was examined during a 10 hr session. During training and testing, a stimulus was associated with each self-administered cocaine infusion for one group whereas responding of another group was reinforced by a cocaine infusion alone. On the test day, pretreatment with U69593 (0.32 mg/kg) decreased responding during each hour of the 10 hr session for the group that was reinforced with cocaine plus the cocaine-associated stimulus. U69593 failed to produce a long-lasting disruption of cocaine self-administration for rats that were trained and tested without the cocaine-associated stimulus. These data suggest that the acquisition and maintenance of cocaine self-administration are differentially sensitive to manipulations of kappa-opioid systems. Further, the disruption of cocaine self-administration by U69593 may be due to interactions with mechanisms that underlie facilitative effects of stimuli that have been associated with self-administered cocaine infusions. PMID:11182539

  9. Novel fluoroalkyl derivatives of selective kappa opioid receptor antagonist JDTic: Design, synthesis, pharmacology and molecular modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Sébastien; Colloc'h, Nathalie; Perrio, Cécile

    2015-01-27

    Novel N- and O-fluoroalkyl derivatives of the highly potent KOR antagonist JDTic were designed and synthesized. Their opioid receptor properties were compared in both in vitro binding assays and modeling approach. All compounds displayed nanomolar affinities for KOR. The fluoropropyl derivatives were more active than their fluoroethyl analogues. N-Fluoroalkylation was preferable to O-alkylation to keep a selective KOR binding. Compared to JDTic, the N-fluoropropyl derivative 2 bound to KOR with an only 4-fold lower affinity and a higher selectivity relative to MOR and DOR [Ki(κ) = 1.6 nM; Ki(μ)/Ki(κ) = 12; Ki(δ)/Ki(κ) = 159 for 2versus Ki(κ) = 0.42 nM; Ki(μ)/Ki(κ) = 9; Ki(δ)/Ki(κ) = 85 for JDTic]. Modeling studies based on the crystal structure of the JDTic/KOR complex revealed that fluorine atom in ligand 2 was involved in specific KOR binding. Ligand 2 was concluded to merit further development for KOR exploration. PMID:25513968

  10. Two short-acting kappa opioid receptor antagonists (zyklophin and LY2444296) exhibited different behavioral effects from the long-acting antagonist norbinaltorphimine in mouse anxiety tests.

    PubMed

    Huang, Peng; Yakovleva, Tatyana; Aldrich, Jane V; Tunis, Julia; Parry, Christopher; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan

    2016-02-26

    Prototypical long-acting kappa opioid receptor (KOPR) antagonists [e.g., norbinaltorphimine (norBNI)] have been reported to exert anxiolytic-like effects in several commonly used anxiety tests in rodents including the novelty-induced hypophagia (NIH) and elevated plus maze (EPM) tests. It remains unknown if the short-acting KOPR antagonists (e.g., zyklophin and LY2444296) have similar effects. In this study effects of zyklophin and LY2444296 (s.c.) were investigated in the NIH and EPM tests in mice 1h post-injection and compared with norBNI (i.p.) 48h post-administration. In the NIH test, zyklophin at 3 and 1mg/kg, but not 0.3mg/kg, or LY2444296 at 30mg/kg decreased the latency of palatable food consumption in novel cages, but had no effect in training cages, similar to norBNI (10mg/kg). Zyklophin at 3 or 1mg/kg increased or had a trend of increasing the amount of palatable food consumption in novel cages, with no effects in training cages, further indicating its anxiolytic-like effect, but norBNI (10mg/kg) and LY2444296 (30mg/kg) did not. In the EPM test, norBNI (10mg/kg) increased open arm time and % open arm entries or time, but zyklophin at all three doses and LY2444296 (30mg/kg) had no effects. In addition, zyklophin at 3mg/kg increased numbers of close and total arm entries on EPM, suggesting increased activity; however, norBNI and LY2444296 had no effects on close and total arm entries. Thus, all three KOPR antagonists had anxiolytic-like effects in the NIH test. However, only the long-acting one (norBNI), but not the short-acting ones (zyklophin and LY2444296), demonstrated anti-anxiety like effects in the EPM test. It remains to be investigated if the differences are due to the differences in their durations of action and/or pharmacodynamic properties. PMID:26780565

  11. Stress-Induced Enhancement of Ethanol Intake in C57BL/6J Mice with a History of Chronic Ethanol Exposure: Involvement of Kappa Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Rachel I.; Lopez, Marcelo F.; Becker, Howard C.

    2016-01-01

    Our laboratory has previously demonstrated that daily forced swim stress (FSS) prior to ethanol drinking sessions facilitates enhanced ethanol consumption in mice with a history of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) vapor exposure without altering ethanol intake in air-exposed controls. Because both stress and chronic ethanol exposure have been shown to activate the dynorphin/kappa opioid receptor (KOR) system, the present study was designed to explore a potential role for KORs in modulating stress effects on ethanol consumption in the CIE model of dependence and relapse drinking. After stable baseline ethanol intake was established in adult male C57BL/6J mice, subjects received chronic intermittent exposure (16 h/day × 4 days/week) to ethanol vapor (CIE group) or air (CTL group). Weekly cycles of inhalation exposure were alternated with 5-day limited access drinking tests (1 h access to 15% ethanol). Experiment 1 compared effects of daily FSS and KOR activation on ethanol consumption. CIE and CTL mice were either exposed to FSS (10 min), the KOR agonist U50,488 (5 mg/kg), or a vehicle injection (non-stressed condition) prior to each daily drinking session during test weeks. FSS selectively increased drinking in CIE mice. U50,488 mimicked this effect in CIE mice, but also increased drinking in CTL mice. Experiment 2 assessed effects of KOR blockade on stress-induced drinking in CIE and CTL mice. Stressed and non-stressed mice were administered the short-acting KOR antagonist LY2444296 (0 or 5 mg/kg) 30 min prior to each drinking session during test weeks. FSS selectively increased ethanol consumption in CIE mice, an effect that was abolished by LY2444296 pretreatment. In Experiment 3, CIE and CTL mice were administered one of four doses of U50,488 (0, 1.25, 2.5, 5.0 mg/kg) 1 h prior to each daily drinking test (in lieu of FSS). All doses of U50,488 increased ethanol consumption in both CIE and CTL mice. The U50,488-induced increase in drinking was blocked by LY

  12. Safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic evaluation of single- and multiple-ascending doses of a novel kappa opioid receptor antagonist LY2456302 and drug interaction with ethanol in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Stephen L; Wong, Conrad J; Witcher, Jennifer; Gonzales, Celedon R; Dickinson, Gemma L; Bell, Robert L; Rorick-Kehn, Linda; Weller, MaryAnn; Stoltz, Randall R; Royalty, Jane; Tauscher-Wisniewski, Sitra

    2014-09-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that selective antagonism of kappa opioid receptors may provide therapeutic benefit in the treatment of major depressive disorder, anxiety disorders, and substance use disorders. LY2456302 is a high-affinity, selective kappa opioid antagonist that demonstrates >30-fold functional selectivity over mu and delta opioid receptors. The safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics (PK) of LY2456302 were investigated following single oral doses (2-60 mg), multiple oral doses (2, 10, and 35 mg), and when co-administered with ethanol. Plasma concentrations of LY2456302 were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Safety analyses were conducted on all enrolled subjects. LY2456302 doses were well-tolerated with no clinically significant findings. No safety concerns were seen on co-administration with ethanol. No evidence for an interaction between LY2456302 and ethanol on cognitive-motor performance was detected. LY2456302 displayed rapid oral absorption and a terminal half-life of approximately 30-40 hours. Plasma exposure of LY2456302 increased proportionally with increasing doses and reached steady state after 6-8 days of once-daily dosing. Steady-state PK of LY2456302 were not affected by coadministration of a single dose of ethanol. No clinically important changes in maximum concentration (Cmax ) or AUC of ethanol (in the presence of LY2456302) were observed. PMID:24619932

  13. Sex Differences in Kappa Opioid Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Rasakham, Khampaseuth; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    In recent years it has become apparent that sex is a major factor involved in modulating the pharmacological effects of exogenous opioids. The kappa opioid receptor (KOPR) system is a potential therapeutic target for pain, mood disorders and addiction. In humans mixed KOPR/MOPR ligands have been found to produce greater analgesia in women than men. In contrast, in animals, selective KOPR agonists have been found to produce greater antinociceptive effects in males than females. Collectively, the studies indicate that the direction and magnitude of sex differences of KOPR-mediated antinociception/analgesia are dependent on species, strain, ligand and pain model examined. Of interest, and less studied, is whether sex differences in other KOPR-mediated effects exist. In the studies conducted thus far, greater effects of KOPR agonists in males have been found in neuroprotection against stroke and suppression of food intake behavior. On the other hand, greater effects of KOPR agonists were found in females in mediation of prolactin release. In modulation of drugs of abuse, sex differences in KOPR effects were observed but appear to be dependent on the drug examined. The mechanism(s) underlying sex differences in KOPR-mediated effects may be mediated by sex chromosomes, gonadal hormonal influence on organization (circuitry) and/or acute hormonal influence on KOPR expression, distribution and localization. In light of the diverse pharmacology of KOPR we discuss the need for future studies characterizing the sexual dimorphism of KOPR neural circuitry and in examining other behaviors and processes that are modulated by the KOPR. PMID:20951148

  14. Neuroanatomical and neuropharmacological study of opioid pathways in the mesencephalic tectum: effect of mu(1)- and kappa-opioid receptor blockade on escape behavior induced by electrical stimulation of the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Osaki, M Y; Castellan-Baldan, L; Calvo, F; Carvalho, A D; Felippotti, T T; de Oliveira, R; Ubiali, W A; Paschoalin-Maurin, T; Elias-Filho, D H; Motta, V; da Silva, L A; Coimbra, N C

    2003-12-01

    Deep layers of the superior colliculus (DLSC), the dorsal and ventral periaqueductal gray matter (PAG), and inferior colliculus (IC) are midbrain structures involved in the generation of defensive behavior. beta-Endorphin and Leu-enkephalin are some neurotransmitters that may modulate such behavior in mammals. Light microscopy immunocytochemistry with streptavidin method was used for the localization of the putative cells of defensive behavior with antibodies for endogenous opioids in rat brainstem. Midbrain structures showed positive neurons to beta-endorphin and Leu-enkephalin in similar distributions in the experimental animals, but we also noted the presence of varicose fibers positive to endogenous opioids in the PAG. Neuroanatomical techniques showed varicose fibers from the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus to ventral aspects of the PAG, at more caudal levels. Naloxonazine and nor-binaltorphimine, competitive antagonists that block mu(1)- and kappa-opioid receptors, were then used in the present work to investigate the involvement of opioid peptide neural system in the control of the fear-induced reactions evoked by electrical stimulation of the neural substrates of the inferior colliculus. The fear-like responses were measured by electrical stimulation of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus, eliciting the escape behavior, which is characterized by vigorous running and jumping. Central administration of opioid antagonists (2.5 microg/0.2 microl and 5.0 microg/0.2 microl) was performed in non-anesthetized animals (Rattus norvegicus), and the behavioral manifestations of fear were registered after 10 min, 2 h, and 24 h of the pretreatment. Naloxonazine caused an increase of the defensive threshold, as compared to control, suggesting an antiaversive effect of the antagonism on mu(1)-opioid receptor. This finding was corroborated with central administration of nor-binaltorphimine, which also induced a decrease of the fear-like responses

  15. A select set of opioid ligands induce up-regulation by promoting the maturation and stability of the rat kappa-opioid receptor in human embryonic kidney 293 cells.

    PubMed

    Wannemacher, Kenneth M; Yadav, Prem N; Howells, Richard D

    2007-11-01

    Ligand-induced regulation of the rat kappa-opioid receptor (rKOR) was investigated in human embryonic kidney 293 cells stably expressing the FLAG-tagged rKOR. Incubation of rKOR cells with naltrexone for 24 h increased the B(max) >3-fold, with no change in the affinity of [(3)H]diprenorphine. Two immunoreactive receptor species were present in cell lysates: naltrexone treatment caused a >3-fold increase in the 52-kDa species while decreasing the level of the 42-kDa species. Dynorphin(1-13), U69,593 [(5alpha,7alpha,8beta)-(+)-N-methyl-N-(7-[1-pyrrolidinyl]-1-oxaspiro[4,5]dec-8-yl)benzeneacetamide], or salvinorin A [2S,4aR,6aR,7R,9S,10aS, 10bR)-9-(acetyloxy)-2-(3-furanyl)dodecahydro-6a,10b-dimethyl-4,10-dioxo-2H-naphtho[2,1c]pyran-7-carboxylic acid methyl ester] treatment did not alter the level of immunoreactive rKOR protein, whereas etorphine, cyclazocine, naloxone, and naloxone methiodide increased the 52-kDa and decreased the 42-kDa rKOR bands. Receptor up-regulation was associated with an increase in the number of cell surface receptors and a 2-fold increase in the E(max) for guanosine 5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate binding. Glycosidase digestion indicated that the 52- and 42-kDa receptors contained complex and high-mannose N-glycans, respectively, Pulse-chase analysis and glycosidase digestion sensitivities suggested that the 42-kDa rKOR species was a precursor of the 52-kDa species. Naltrexone did not alter rKOR mRNA levels or translational efficiency, and rKOR up-regulation was not inhibited by cycloheximide. Brefeldin A caused accumulation of intracellular rKOR intermediates, and coincubation with naltrexone increased the levels of the brefeldin-induced species significantly. These results suggest that select opioid ligands up-regulate rKOR by enhancing the rate of receptor folding and maturation and by protecting the receptor from degradation, resulting in an increase in the number of rKOR binding sites, immunoreactive protein, and functional receptors

  16. Behavioral stress may increase the rewarding valence of cocaine-associated cues through a dynorphin/kappa-opioid receptor-mediated mechanism without affecting associative learning or memory retrieval mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Abigail G; Li, Shuang; Chavkin, Charles

    2010-08-01

    Stress exposure increases the risk of addictive drug use in human and animal models of drug addiction by mechanisms that are not completely understood. Mice subjected to repeated forced swim stress (FSS) before cocaine develop significantly greater conditioned place preference (CPP) for the drug-paired chamber than unstressed mice. Analysis of the dose dependency showed that FSS increased both the maximal CPP response and sensitivity to cocaine. To determine whether FSS potentiated CPP by enhancing associative learning mechanisms, mice were conditioned with cocaine in the absence of stress, then challenged after association was complete with the kappa-opioid receptor (KOR) agonist U50,488 or repeated FSS, before preference testing. Mice challenged with U50,488 60 min before CPP preference testing expressed significantly greater cocaine-CPP than saline-challenged mice. Potentiation by U50,488 was dose and time dependent and blocked by the KOR antagonist norbinaltorphimine (norBNI). Similarly, mice subjected to repeated FSS before the final preference test expressed significantly greater cocaine-CPP than unstressed controls, and FSS-induced potentiation was blocked by norBNI. Novel object recognition (NOR) performance was not affected by U50,488 given 60 min before assay, but was impaired when given 15 min before NOR assay, suggesting that KOR activation did not potentiate CPP by facilitating memory retrieval or expression. The results from this study show that the potentiation of cocaine-CPP by KOR activation does not result from an enhancement of associative learning mechanisms and that stress may instead enhance the rewarding valence of cocaine-associated cues by a dynorphin-dependent mechanism. PMID:20445500

  17. Discovery of N-{4-[(3-Hydroxyphenyl)-3-methylpiperazin-1-yl]methyl-2-methylpropyl}-4-phenoxybenzamide Analogues as Selective Kappa Opioid Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Kormos, Chad M.; Jin, Chunyang; Cueva, Juan Pablo; Runyon, Scott P; Thomas, James B.; Brieaddy, Lawrence E.; Mascarella, S. Wayne; Navarro, Hernán A.; Gilmour, Brian P.; Carroll, F. Ivy

    2013-01-01

    There is continuing interest in the discovery and development of new κ opioid receptor antagonists. We recently reported that N-substituted 3-methyl-4-(3-hydroxyphenyl)piperazines were a new class of opioid receptor antagonists. In this study we report the syntheses of two piperazine JDTic-like analogues. Evaluation of the two compounds in an in vitro [35S]GTPγS binding assay showed that neither compound showed the high potency and κ opioid receptor selectivity of JDTic. A library of compounds using the core scaffold 21 was synthesized and tested for their ability to inhibit [35S]GTPγS binding stimulated by the selective κ opioid agonist U69,593. These studies led to N-[(1S)-1-{[(3S)-4-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-3-methylpiperazin-1-yl]methyl}-2-methylpropyl]-4-phenoxybenzamide (11a), a compound that showed good κ opioid receptor antagonist properties. An SAR study based on 11a provided 28 novel analogues. Evaluation of these 28 compounds in the [35S]GTPγS binding assay showed that several of the analogues were potent and selective κ opioid receptor antagonists. PMID:23651437

  18. Evaluation of the Agonist PET Radioligand [11C]GR103545 to Image Kappa Opioid Receptor in Humans: Kinetic Model Selection, Test-Retest Reproducibility and Receptor Occupancy by the Antagonist PF-04455242

    PubMed Central

    Naganawa, Mika; Jacobsen, Leslie K.; Zheng, Ming-Qiang; Lin, Shu-Fei; Banerjee, Anindita; Byon, Wonkyung; Weinzimmer, David; Tomasi, Giampaolo; Nabulsi, Nabeel; Grimwood, Sarah; Badura, Lori L.; Carson, Richard E.; McCarthy, Timothy J.; Huang, Yiyun

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Kappa opioid receptors (KOR) are implicated in several brain disorders. In this report, a first-in-human Positron Emission Tomography (PET) study was conducted with the potent and selective KOR agonist tracer, [11C]GR103545, to determine an appropriate kinetic model for analysis of PET imaging data and assess the test-retest reproducibility of model-derived binding parameters. The non-displaceable distribution volume (VND) was estimated from a blocking study with naltrexone. In addition, KOR occupancy of PF-04455242, a selective KOR antagonist that is active in preclinical models of depression, was also investigated. Methods For determination of a kinetic model and evaluation of test-retest reproducibility, 11 subjects were scanned twice with [11C]GR103545. Seven subjects were scanned before and 75 min after oral administration of naltrexone (150 mg). For the KOR occupancy study, six subjects were scanned at baseline and 1.5 h and 8 h after an oral dose of PF-04455242 (15 mg, n = 1 and 30 mg, n = 5). Metabolite-corrected arterial input functions were measured and all scans were 150 min in duration. Regional time-activity curves (TACs) were analyzed with 1- and 2-tissue compartment models (1TC and 2TC) and the multilinear analysis (MA1) method to derive regional volume of distribution (VT). Relative test-retest variability (TRV), absolute test-retest variability (aTRV) and intra-class coefficient (ICC) were calculated to assess test-retest reproducibility of regional VT. Occupancy plots were computed for blocking studies to estimate occupancy and VND. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of PF-04455242 was determined from occupancies and drug concentrations in plasma. [11C]GR103545 in vivo KD was also estimated. Results Regional TACs were well described by the 2TC model and MA1. However, 2TC VT was sometimes estimated with high standard error. Thus MA1 was the model of choice. Test-retest variability was ~15%, depending on the outcome

  19. Michael Acceptor Approach to the Design of New Salvinorin A-based High Affinity Ligands for the Kappa-Opioid Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Polepally, Prabhakar R.; Huben, Krzysztof; Vardy, Eyal; Setola, Vincent; Mosier, Philip D.; Roth, Bryan L.; Zjawiony, Jordan K.

    2014-01-01

    The neoclerodane diterpenoid salvinorin A is a major secondary metabolite isolated from the psychoactive plant Salvia divinorum. Salvinorin A has been shown to have high affinity and selectivity for the κ-opioid receptor (KOR). To study the ligand–receptor interactions that occur between salvinorin A and the KOR, a new series of salvinorin A derivatives bearing potentially reactive Michael acceptor functional groups at C-2 was synthesized and used to probe the salvinorin A binding site. The κ-, δ-, and μ-opioid receptor (KOR, DOR and MOR, respectively) binding affinities and KOR efficacies were measured for the new compounds. Although none showed wash-resistant irreversible binding, most of them showed high affinity for the KOR, and some exhibited dual affinity to KOR and MOR. Molecular modeling techniques based on the recently-determined crystal structure of the KOR combined with results from mutagenesis studies, competitive binding, functional assays and structure–activity relationships, and previous salvinorin A–KOR interaction models were used to identify putative interaction modes of the new compounds with the KOR and MOR. PMID:25193297

  20. 125I-DPDYN, monoiodo(D-Pro10)dynorphin(1-11): a highly radioactive and selective probe for the study of kappa opioid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Gairin, J.E.; Jomary, C.; Pradayrol, L.; Cros, J.; Meunier, J.C.

    1986-02-13

    The mono- and diiodinated derivatives of the kappa-selective ligand (D-Pro10)dynorphin(1-11), DPDYN, were prepared. Their binding properties at the three opioid receptor types (mu, delta and kappa) were examined and compared to those of the parent peptide. The monoiodo derivative shows a general although moderate decrease in affinity and retains high kappa selectivity (KI mu/KI kappa = 48 and KI delta/KI kappa = 140). The binding properties of the diiodo derivative are found to be dramatically decreased. Radioiodination of DPDYN leads to the monoiodinated peptide with high specific activity (700-800 Ci/mmol). In guinea-pig cerebellum membranes, a kappa-specific tissue, (125I)-labelled monoiodo(D-Pro10)dynorphin(1-11), 125I-DPDYN, interacts specifically and reversibly with a single class of binding sites (Bmax = 118 fmol/mg protein) with a high affinity (KD = 0.12 nM from equilibrium experiments, 0.18 nM from kinetics studies). Therefore, because of its high specific radioactivity, high affinity and reasonably good selectivity, 125I-DPDYN designates itself as the probe of the k-opioid receptor type.

  1. Distinct Effects of Nalmefene on Dopamine Uptake Rates and Kappa Opioid Receptor Activity in the Nucleus Accumbens Following Chronic Intermittent Ethanol Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Jamie H.; Karkhanis, Anushree N.; Steiniger-Brach, Björn; Jones, Sara R.

    2016-01-01

    The development of pharmacotherapeutics that reduce relapse to alcohol drinking in patients with alcohol dependence is of considerable research interest. Preclinical data support a role for nucleus accumbens (NAc) κ opioid receptors (KOR) in chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure-induced increases in ethanol intake. Nalmefene, a high-affinity KOR partial agonist, reduces drinking in at-risk patients and relapse drinking in rodents, potentially due to its effects on NAc KORs. However, the effects of nalmefene on accumbal dopamine transmission and KOR function are poorly understood. We investigated the effects of nalmefene on dopamine transmission and KORs using fast scan cyclic voltammetry in NAc brain slices from male C57BL/6J mice following five weeks of CIE or air exposure. Nalmefene concentration-dependently reduced dopamine release similarly in air and CIE groups, suggesting that dynorphin tone may not be present in brain slices. Further, nalmefene attenuated dopamine uptake rates to a greater extent in brain slices from CIE-exposed mice, suggesting that dopamine transporter-KOR interactions may be fundamentally altered following CIE. Additionally, nalmefene reversed the dopamine-decreasing effects of a maximal concentration of a KOR agonist selectively in brain slices of CIE-exposed mice. It is possible that nalmefene may attenuate withdrawal-induced increases in ethanol consumption by modulation of dopamine transmission through KORs. PMID:27472317

  2. "DAKLI": a multipurpose ligand with high affinity and selectivity for dynorphin (kappa opioid) binding sites.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, A; Nestor, J J; Naidu, A; Newman, S R

    1988-01-01

    We describe a synthetic ligand, "DAKLI" (Dynorphin A-analogue Kappa LIgand), related to the opioid peptide dynorphin A. A single reactive amino group at the extended carboxyl terminus permits various reporter groups to be attached, such as 125I-labeled Bolton-Hunter reagent, fluorescein isothiocyanate, or biotin. These derivatives have high affinity and selectivity for the dynorphin (kappa opioid) receptor. An incidental finding is that untreated guinea pig brain membranes have saturable avidin binding sites. PMID:2902630

  3. Kappa Opioids, Salvinorin A and Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, George T.; Manzella, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Opioids are traditionally associated with pain, analgesia and drug abuse. It is now clear, however, that the opioids are central players in mood. The implications for mood disorders, particularly clinical depression, suggest a paradigm shift from the monoamine neurotransmitters to the opioids either alone or in interaction with monoamine neurons. We have a special interest in dynorphin, the last of the major endogenous opioids to be isolated and identified. Dynorphin is derived from the Greek word for power, dynamis, which hints at the expectation that the neuropeptide held for its discoverers. Yet, dynorphin and its opioid receptor subtype, kappa, has always taken a backseat to the endogenous b-endorphin and the exogenous morphine that both bind the mu opioid receptor subtype. That may be changing as the dynorphin/ kappa system has been shown to have different, often opposite, neurophysiological and behavioral influences. This includes major depressive disorder (MDD). Here, we have undertaken a review of dynorphin/ kappa neurobiology as related to behaviors, especially MDD. Highlights include the unique features of dynorphin and kappa receptors and the special relation of a plant-based agonist of the kappa receptor salvinorin A. In addition to acting as a kappa opioid agonist, we conclude that salvinorin A has a complex pharmacologic profile, with potential additional mechanisms of action. Its unique neurophysiological effects make Salvinorina A an ideal candidate for MDD treatment research. PMID:26903446

  4. Mu- and kappa-opioids induce the differentiation of embryonic stem cells to neural progenitors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunhae; Clark, Amy L; Kiss, Alexi; Hahn, Jason W; Wesselschmidt, Robin; Coscia, Carmine J; Belcheva, Mariana M

    2006-11-01

    Growth factors, hormones, and neurotransmitters have been implicated in the regulation of stem cell fate. Since various neural precursors express functional neurotransmitter receptors, which include G protein-coupled receptors, it is anticipated that they are involved in cell fate decisions. We detected mu-opioid receptor (MOR-1) and kappa-opioid receptor (KOR-1) expression and immunoreactivity in embryonic stem (ES) cells and in retinoic acid-induced ES cell-derived, nestin-positive, neural progenitors. Moreover, these G protein-coupled receptors are functional, since [D-Ala(2),MePhe(4),Gly-ol(5)]enkephalin, a MOR-selective agonist, and U69,593, a KOR-selective agonist, induce a sustained activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling throughout a 24-h treatment period in undifferentiated, self-renewing ES cells. Both opioids promote limited proliferation of undifferentiated ES cells via the ERK/MAP kinase signaling pathway. Importantly, biochemical and immunofluorescence data suggest that [D-Ala(2),MePhe(4),Gly-ol(5)]enkephalin and U69,593 divert ES cells from self-renewal and coax the cells to differentiate. In retinoic acid-differentiated ES cells, opioid-induced signaling features a biphasic ERK activation profile and an opioid-induced, ERK-independent inhibition of proliferation in these neural progenitors. Collectively, the data suggest that opioids may have opposite effects on ES cell self-renewal and ES cell differentiation and that ERK activation is only required by the latter. Finally, opioid modulation of ERK activity may play an important role in ES cell fate decisions by directing the cells to specific lineages. PMID:16954126

  5. Multipurpose ligand, DAKLI (Dynorphin A-analogue Kappa LIgand), with high affinity and selectivity for dynorphin (. kappa. opioid) binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, A.; Nestor, J.J. Jr.; Naidu, A.; Newman, S.R. )

    1988-10-01

    The authors describe a synthetic ligand, DALKI (Dynorphin A-analogue Kappa LIgand), related to the opioid peptide dynorphin A. A single reactive amino group at the extended carboxyl terminus permits various reporter groups to be attached, such as {sup 125}I-labeled Bolton-Hunter reagent, fluorescein isothiocyanate, or biotin. These derivatives have high affinity and selectivity for the dynorphin ({kappa} opioid) receptor. An incidental finding is that untreated guinea pig brain membranes have saturable avidin binding sites.

  6. Antagonism of kappa opioid mediated effects in the rat by cyclo(Leu-Gly)

    SciTech Connect

    Bhargava, H.N.; Ramarao, P. )

    1989-01-01

    The effect of cyclo(Leu-Gly) on U-50,488H- induced pharmacological actions was determined in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of U-50,488H to rats produced analgesia (tail-flick) and increased urinary output. Cyclo (Leu-Gly) antagonized the analgesic response to U-50,488H. A dose of 10 mg/kg (i.p.) of U-50,488H increased the spontaneous urinary output which was anatagonized by cyclo (Leu-Gly). To determine whether cyclo (Leu-Gly) was acting as a kappa-opioid receptor antagonist, the effect of cyclo (Leu-Gly) on the binding of ({sup 3}H) ethylketocyclazoncine (EKC) to membranes of rat cerebral cortex and spinal cord was determined. The IC{sub 50} values of cyclo(Leu-Gly) in displacing ({sup 3}H)EKC from its binding sites in cortex and spinal cord were 1.44 and 0.40 mM, respectively. Chronic administration of U-50,488H for 4 days induced tolerance to its analgesic effect. The latter was not affected by cyclo(Leu-Gly) given once a day for 4 days. It is concluded that cyclo(Leu-Gly) antagonizes acute actions of U-50,488H and that such effects of cyclo(Leu-Gly) are not mediated via a direct action on kappa-opioid receptors.

  7. Quantitative analysis of multiple kappa-opioid receptors by selective and nonselective ligand binding in guinea pig spinal cord: Resolution of high and low affinity states of the kappa 2 receptors by a computerized model-fitting technique

    SciTech Connect

    Tiberi, M.; Magnan, J. )

    1990-05-01

    The binding characteristics of selective and nonselective opioids have been studied in whole guinea pig spinal cord, using a computer fitting method to analyze the data obtained from saturation and competition studies. The delineation of specific binding sites labeled by the mu-selective opioid (3H)D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly-ol5-enkephalin (Kd = 2.58 nM, R = 4.52 pmol/g of tissue) and by the delta-selective opioid (3H)D-Pen2, D-Pen5-enkephalin (Kd = 2.02 nM, R = 1.47 pmol/g of tissue) suggests the presence of mu and delta-receptors in the spinal cord tissue. The presence of kappa receptors was probed by the kappa-selective opioid (3H)U69593 (Kd = 3.31 nM, R = 2.00 pmol/g of tissue). The pharmacological characterization of the sites labeled by (3H)U69593 confirms the assumption that this ligand discriminates kappa receptors in guinea pig spinal cord. The benzomorphan (3H)ethylketazocine labels a population of receptors with one homogeneous affinity state (Kd = 0.65 nM, R = 7.39 pmol/g of tissue). The total binding capacity of this ligand was not different from the sum of the binding capacities of mu, delta-, and kappa-selective ligands. Under mu- and delta-suppressed conditions, (3H)ethylketazocine still binds to receptors with one homogeneous affinity state (Kd = 0.45 nM, R = 1.69 pmol/g of tissue). Competition studies performed against the binding of (3H)ethylketazocine under these experimental conditions reveal that the pharmacological profile of the radiolabeled receptors is similar to the profile of the kappa receptors labeled with (3H)U69593. Saturation studies using the nonselective opioid (3H)bremazocine demonstrate that this ligand binds to spinal cord membranes with heterogeneous affinities (Kd1 = 0.28 nM, R1 = 7.91 pmol/g of tissue; Kd2 = 3.24 nM, R2 = 11.2 pmol/g of tissue).

  8. Effects of ketoprofen, morphine, and kappa opioids on pain-related depression of nesting in mice.

    PubMed

    Negus, S Stevens; Neddenriep, Bradley; Altarifi, Ahmad A; Carroll, F Ivy; Leitl, Michael D; Miller, Laurence L

    2015-06-01

    Pain-related functional impairment and behavioral depression are diagnostic indicators of pain and targets for its treatment. Nesting is an innate behavior in mice that may be sensitive to pain manipulations and responsive to analgesics. The goal of this study was to develop and validate a procedure for evaluation of pain-related depression of nesting in mice. Male ICR mice were individually housed and tested in their home cages. On test days, a 5- × 5-cm Nestlet was subdivided into 6 pieces, the pieces were evenly distributed on the cage floor, and Nestlet consolidation was quantified during 100-minute sessions. Baseline nesting was stable within and between subjects, and nesting was depressed by 2 commonly used inflammatory pain stimuli (intraperitoneal injection of dilute acid; intraplantar injection of complete Freund adjuvant). Pain-related depression of nesting was alleviated by drugs from 2 classes of clinically effective analgesics (the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ketoprofen and the μ-opioid receptor agonist morphine) but not by a drug from a class that has failed to yield effective analgesics (the centrally acting kappa opioid agonist U69,593). Neither ketoprofen nor morphine alleviated depression of nesting by U69,593, which suggests that ketoprofen and morphine effects were selective for pain-related depression of nesting. In contrast to ketoprofen and morphine, the kappa opioid receptor antagonist JDTic blocked depression of nesting by U69,593 but not by acid or complete Freund adjuvant. These results support utility of this procedure to assess expression and treatment of pain-related depression in mice. PMID:25827812

  9. A G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) in red: live cell imaging of the kappa opioid receptor-tdTomato fusion protein (KOPR-tdT) in neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Peng; Chiu, Yi-Ting; Chen, Chongguang; Wang, Yujun; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In contrast to green fluorescent protein and variants (GFPs), red fluorescent proteins (RFPs) have rarely been employed for generation of GPCR fusion proteins, likely because of formation of aggregates and cell toxicity of some RFPs. Among all the RFPs available, tdTomato (tdT), one of the non-aggregating RFP, has the highest brightness score (about 3 times that of eGFP) and unsurpassed photostability. Methods We fused tdT to the KOPR C-terminus. The KOPR-tdT cDNA construct was transfected into Neuro2A mouse neuroblastoma cell line (Neuro2A cells) and rat cortical primary neurons for characterization of pharmacological properties and imaging studies on KOPR trafficking. Results KOPR-tdT retained KOPR properties (cell surface expression, ligand binding, agonist-induced signaling and internalization) when expressed in Neuro2A cells and rat primary cortical neurons. Live cell imaging of KOPR-tdT enables visualization of time course of agonist-induced internalization of KOPR in real time for 60 min, without photobleaching and apparent cell toxicity. U50,488H-induced KOPR internalization occurred as early as 4 min and plateaued at about 30 min. A unique pattern of internalized KOPR in processes of primary neurons was induced by U50,488H. Discussion tdT is an alternative to, or even a better tool than, GFPs for fusing to GPCR for trafficking studies, because tdT has higher brightness and thus better resolution and less photobleaching problems due to reduced laser power used. It also has advantages associated with its longer-wavelength emission including spectral separation from autofluorescence and GFPs, reduced cell toxicity the laser may impose, and greater tissue penetration. These advantages of tdT over GPFs may be critical for live cell imaging studies of GPCRs in vitro and for studying GPCRs in vivo because of their low abundance. PMID:23856011

  10. Exposure to chronic mild stress prevents kappa opioid-mediated reinstatement of cocaine and nicotine place preference.

    PubMed

    Al-Hasani, Ream; McCall, Jordan G; Bruchas, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Stress increases the risk of drug abuse, causes relapse to drug seeking, and potentiates the rewarding properties of both nicotine and cocaine. Understanding the mechanisms by which stress regulates the rewarding properties of drugs of abuse provides valuable insight into potential treatments for drug abuse. Prior reports have demonstrated that stress causes dynorphin release, activating kappa opioid receptors (KOR) in monoamine circuits resulting in both potentiation and reinstatement of cocaine and nicotine conditioned place preference. Here we report that kappa opioid-dependent reinstatement of cocaine and nicotine place preference is reduced when the mice are exposed to a randomized chronic mild stress (CMS) regime prior to training in a conditioned place preference-reinstatement paradigm. The CMS schedule involves seven different stressors (removal of nesting for 24 h, 5 min forced swim stress at 15°C, 8 h food and water deprivation, damp bedding overnight, white noise, cage tilt, and disrupted home cage lighting) rotated over a 3-week period. This response is KOR-selective, as CMS does not protect against cocaine or nicotine drug-primed reinstatement. This protection from reinstatement is also observed following sub-chronic social defeat stress, where each mouse is placed in an aggressor mouse home cage for a period of 20 min over 5 days. In contrast, a single acute stressor resulted in a potentiation of KOR-induced reinstatement, as previously reported. Prior studies have shown that stress alters sensitivity to opioids and prior stress can influence the pharmacodynamics of the opioid receptor system. Together, these findings suggest that exposure to different forms of stress may cause a dysregulation of kappa opioid circuitry and that changes resulting from mild stress can have protective and adaptive effects against drug relapse. PMID:23964239

  11. Development of a robust, sensitive and selective liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay for the quantification of the novel macrocyclic peptide kappa opioid receptor antagonist [D-Trp]CJ-15,208 in plasma and application to an initial pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Khaliq, Tanvir; Williams, Todd D; Senadheera, Sanjeewa N; Aldrich, Jane V

    2016-08-15

    Selective kappa opioid receptor (KOR) antagonists may have therapeutic potential as treatments for substance abuse and mood disorders. Since [D-Trp]CJ-15,208 (cyclo[Phe-d-Pro-Phe-d-Trp]) is a novel potent KOR antagonist in vivo, it is imperative to evaluate its pharmacokinetic properties to assist the development of analogs as potential therapeutic agents, necessitating the development and validation of a quantitative method for determining its plasma levels. A method for quantifying [D-Trp]CJ-15,208 was developed employing high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in mouse plasma. Sample preparation was accomplished through a simple one-step protein precipitation method with acetonitrile, and [D-Trp]CJ-15,208 analyzed following HPLC separation on a Hypersil BDS C8 column. Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM), based on the transitions m/z 578.1→217.1 and 245.0, was specific for [D-Trp]CJ-15,208, and MRM based on the transition m/z 566.2→232.9 was specific for the internal standard without interference from endogenous substances in blank mouse plasma. The assay was linear over the concentration range 0.5-500ng/mL with a mean r(2)=0.9987. The mean inter-day accuracy and precision for all calibration standards were 93-118% and 8.9%, respectively. The absolute recoveries were 85±6% and 81±9% for [D-Trp]CJ-15,208 and the internal standard, respectively. The analytical method had excellent sensitivity with a lower limit of quantification of 0.5ng/mL using a sample volume of 20μL. The method was successfully applied to an initial pharmacokinetic study of [D-Trp]CJ-15,208 following intravenous administration to mice. PMID:27318293

  12. Distribution of mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptor binding sites in the brain of the one-day-old domestic chick (Gallus domesticus): An in vitro quantitative autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Csillag, A.; Bourne, R.C.; Stewart, M.G. )

    1990-12-15

    Three highly specific opioid ligands--(D-Ala2,Gly-ol)-enkephalin (DAGO) for mu (mu) receptor sites, (D-Pen2,D-Pen5)-enkephalin (DPDPE) for delta (delta) sites, and U-69593 for kappa (kappa) sites--were used to determine the regional distribution of the three major subtypes of opioid receptor binding sites in the brains of 1-day-old domestic chicks by the technique of quantitative receptor autoradiography. While there was a degree of heterogeneity in the binding levels of each of the ligands, some notable similarities existed in the binding of the mu and kappa ligands in several forebrain regions, and in the optic tectum of the midbrain where mu and delta binding was very high. In the forebrain there was a high level of binding of mu and kappa ligands in the hyperstriatum, and for the mu ligand there was a very distinct lamination of binding sites in hyperstriatum accessorium, intercalatum supremum, dorsale and ventrale. Levels of binding of the mu and kappa ligands were also high in nucleus basalis, and (for mu only) in the neostriatum. The distribution of binding of the delta specific ligand in the forebrain showed marked differences to that of mu and kappa, being particularly low in the hyperstriatum and neostriatum. Very high levels of labelling of delta binding sites were, however, found in the nucleus rotundus. Binding of the three ligands was generally low or absent in the cerebellum and medulla, apart from a distinct labelling of the granule cell layer by the mu-ligand. A kinetic analysis was made of the binding of the three ligands to whole forebrain sections using scintillation counting methods.

  13. Reduction of lipopolysaccharide-induced interleukin-6 production by the kappa opioid U50,488 in a mouse monocyte-like cell line.

    PubMed

    Parkhill, Amy L; Bidlack, Jean M

    2006-06-01

    Several studies demonstrate that opioids modulate the immune response via opioid receptors expressed directly on the immune cells themselves. Recently, it has been suggested that the kappa opioid system has a modulatory role in various inflammatory diseases including rheumatoid arthritis. This modulation may occur via changes in cytokine secretion by monocyte-derived cells. To further study this opioid-immune relationship, we stimulated P388D1 cells, a mouse monocyte-like cell line, with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the presence or absence of the kappa opioid-selective ligand, U50,488. Pretreatment with U50,488 significantly reduced LPS-stimulated interleukin-6 (IL-6) production as measured by ELISA. This effect was mediated by the kappa opioid receptor, because nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI), a kappa-selective antagonist, blocked this inhibition. It is likely that this reduction of IL-6 protein by U50,488 treatment is attributed to decreases in IL-6 mRNA. RT-PCR experiments demonstrated that U50,488 treatment significantly reduced the LPS-mediated increase in IL-6 mRNA and that this effect was also blocked by nor-BNI. Understanding the mechanism behind the reduction of proinflammatory cytokine production by opioids may lead to the development of more effective therapeutics for inflammatory diseases. PMID:16644488

  14. Zyklophin, a short-acting kappa opioid antagonist, induces scratching in mice

    PubMed Central

    DiMattio, K.M.; Yakovleva, T.V.; Aldrich, J.V.; Cowan, A.; Liu-Chen, L.Y.

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown previously that norbinaltorphimine (norBNI) and 5΄-guanidinonaltrindole (5΄-GNTI), long-acting kappa opioid receptor (KOPR) antagonists, cause frenzied scratching in mice [1;2]. In the current study, we examined if zyklophin, a short-acting cyclic peptide KOPR antagonist, also elicited scratching behavior. When injected s.c. in the nape of the neck of male Swiss-Webster mice, zyklophin at doses of 0.1, 0.3 and 1 mg/kg induced dose-related hindleg scratching of the neck between 3 and 15 min after injection. Pretreating mice with norBNI (20 mg/kg, i.p.) at 18–20 hr before challenge with zyklophin (0.3 mg/kg) did not markedly affect scratching. Additionally, KOPR −/− mice given 0.3 mg/kg of zyklophin displayed similar levels of scratching as wild-type animals. The absence of KOPR in KOPR −/− mice was confirmed with ex vivo radioligand binding using [3H]U69,593. Taken together, our data suggest that the presence of kappa receptors is not required for the excessive scratching caused by zyklophin. Thus, zyklophin, similar to the structurally different KOPR antagonist 5΄-GNTI, appears to act at other targets to elicit scratching and potentially the sensation of itch. PMID:24503508

  15. Major Depressive Disorder and Kappa Opioid Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Sun, Huijiao; Chen, Hao; Yang, Xicheng; Xiao, Li; Liu, Renyu; Shao, Liming; Qiu, Zhuibai

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a common psychiatric disease worldwide. The clinical use of tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs)/serotonin–norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRIs) for this condition have been widely accepted, but they were challenged by unacceptable side-effects, potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) or slow onset/lack of efficacy. The endogenous opioid system is involved in stress and emotion regulatory processes and its role in MDD has been implicated. Although several KOR antagonists including JDTic and PF-04455242 were discontinued in early clinical trials, ALKS 5461 and CERC-501(LY-2456302) survived and entered into Phase-III and Phase-II trials, respectively. Considering the efficacy and safety of early off-label use of buprenorphine in the management of the treatment-resistant depression (TRD), it will be not surprising to predict the potential success of ALKS 5461 (a combination of buprenorphine and ALKS-33) in the near future. Moreover, CERC-501 will be expected to be available as monotherapy or adjuvant therapy with other first-line antidepressants in the treatment of TRD, if ongoing clinical trials continue to provide positive benefit-risk profiles. Emerging new researches might bring more drug candidates targeting the endogenous opioid system to clinical trials to address current challenges in MDD treatment in clinical practice. PMID:27213169

  16. Interaction of CRF and kappa opioid systems on GABAergic neurotransmission in the mouse central amygdala.

    PubMed

    Kang-Park, Maenghee; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Roberts, Amanda J; Siggins, George R; Moore, Scott D

    2015-11-01

    The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and kappa-opioid receptor (KOR) systems are both implicated in stress-related behaviors and drug dependence. Although previous studies suggest that antagonism of each system blocks aspects of experimental models of drug dependence, the possible interaction between these systems at the neuronal level has not been completely examined. We used an in vitro brain slice preparation to investigate the interaction of these two peptide systems on inhibitory neurotransmission in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA). Application of exogenous CRF increased the mean frequency of GABAergic miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSC) by 20.2%, suggesting an increase in presynaptic GABA release. Although the pharmacological blockade of KORs by norBNI alone did not significantly affect mIPSC frequency, it significantly enhanced the effect of CRF (by 43.9%, P = 0.02). Similarly, the CRF effects in slices from KOR knockout (KO) mice (84.0% increase) were significantly greater than in wild-type (WT) mice (24.6%, P = 0.01), although there was no significant difference in baseline mIPSC frequency between slices from KOR KO and WT mice. The increase in CRF action in the presence of norBNI was abolished by a CRF-1 receptor antagonist but was unaffected by a CRF-2 receptor antagonist. We hypothesize that CRF facilitates the release of an endogenous ligand for KORs and that subsequent activation of KOR receptors modulates presynaptic effects of CRF in CeA. These results suggest that potential pharmacotherapies aimed at neurobehavioral and addictive disorders may need to involve both the KOR/dynorphin and the CRF systems in CeA. PMID:26350161

  17. Biochemical and functional interactions of a selective kappa opioid agonist with calcium

    SciTech Connect

    VonVoigtlander, P.F.; Ochoa, M.C.; Lewis, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The discovery of the selective kappa opioid receptor agonist, U-50488H, has provided a tool for the study of the mechanisms and function of the kappa receptor-effector. We have investigated the interactions of this compound with calcium in several biochemical and functional studies to assess the involvement of calcium mechanisms in the kappa receptor-linked effector. In rat brain synaptosomes, U-50488H attenuated the uptake of /sup 45/Ca++ induced by K+ (40 mM) depolarization. This effect was concentration-related (U-50488H 10(-5) to 10(-7) M), was apparent in short (8-second) but not longer (1-minute) term incubations, and did not occur in the presence of a non-polarizing concentration (5.6 mM) of K+. Naloxone (10(-7) M) did not block this effect of U-50488H (10(-6) M), and higher concentrations (10(-5) M) alone blocked calcium uptake. We have found that the binding of the depolarizing amino acid analog, kainic acid, is enhanced by CaCl2. U-50488H (10(-4) to 10(-6) M) blocks this enhancement of /sup 3/H-kainic acid binding in vitro and also blocks the in vivo effects of kainic acid. In mice, intravenous injection of kainic acid causes scratching, convulsions, and death, depending on the dose administered. U-50488H blocks all of these effects (ED50 = 4.5 mg/kg for antagonism of convulsions induced by 27.5 mg/kg kainic acid). The convulsions induced by intracerebroventricularly administered kainic acid are also blocked by U-50488H as are those induced by similarly administered Bay K 8644, a calcium channel activator. All of these anticonvulsant effects of U-50488H were antagonized by naltrexone. Together these data indicate that the kappa agonist U-50488H has functionally relevant interactions with depolarization-related Ca++ mechanisms in the central nervous system.

  18. Diuretic effect of bremazocine, a kappa-opioid with central and peripheral sites of action.

    PubMed

    Salas, S P; Roblero, J; Ureta, H; Huidobro-Toro, J P

    1989-09-01

    Intracerebroventricular or i.p. injections of bremazocine produced a dose-dependent diuretic response and increased glomerular filtration rate in hydrated as well as in nonhydrated rats. The potency and magnitude of the bremazocine-induced diuresis were more pronounced in the nonhydrated group of rats. That bremazocine has a central component of action is deduced from the fact that 0.1 microgram of the opioid administered centrally caused a significant increase in urine output; proportionally, larger doses of bremazocine were required to produce the same diuretic effect when the drug was administered parenterally. Bremazocine did not change the total amount of urinary Na+ and K+ as compared to the saline controls; it increased significantly the free water clearance. The bremazocine-induced diuresis was antagonized in a competitive fashion by 10 mg/kg of naloxone giving further support to the notion that the mechanism of action of bremazocine involves activation of kappa-opioid receptors. Bremazocine injected i.v. to nonanesthetized rats increased mean systemic blood pressure in a dose-dependent manner; the pressor action of the opiate was blocked and prevented by 1 mg/kg of naloxone. In contrast, i.c.v. administration of bremazocine did not change mean systemic blood pressure but produced a dose-related increase in urine output. To determine whether in addition to a central site bremazocine also activates a renal mechanism, experiments were performed in the isolated perfused rat kidney. Bremazocine (0.15-2.5 microM) caused a dose-dependent diuretic response and a significant rise in perfusion pressure as well as in glomerular filtration rate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2550625

  19. Early postnatal stress alters place conditioning to both mu- and kappa-opioid agonists.

    PubMed

    Michaels, Clifford C; Holtzman, Stephen G

    2008-04-01

    Clinical literature has established a link between early childhood incidents of neglect and trauma and adult problems with substance abuse. In rats, such early life stress has been modeled using a maternal separation (MS) paradigm in which rat pups were removed from their mothers for a few hours daily during the first two postnatal weeks. In this study, we used the MS model to investigate the effects of early postnatal stress on place conditioning to both mu- and kappa-opioid agonists in male and female Long-Evans rats. Offspring of both rearing conditions [MS or nonhandled (NH)] were conditioned using a biased procedure to saline, the mu-opioid agonist morphine (3.0, 5.6, and 10 mg/kg s.c.), or the kappa-opioid agonist spiradoline (0.3, 1.0, and 3.0 mg/kg) for 3 days, followed by a drug-free place-conditioning test 24 h later. Saline was administered in the morning, 30 min before confinement in one compartment, whereas morphine or spiradoline was administered in a similar manner 6 h later in the opposite compartment. MS offspring spent significantly more time in the morphine-paired compartment than NH offspring, indicating a greater place preference for the mu-opioid agonist. In the case of spiradoline, NH offspring spent significantly less time in the spiradoline-paired compartment, indicating a greater aversion to the kappa-opioid agonist in these animals than in MS offspring. These findings indicate that early postnatal stress can significantly alter the rewarding or aversive value of mu- and kappa-opioid agonists when measured using place conditioning. PMID:18203949

  20. GR94839, a kappa-opioid agonist with limited access to the central nervous system, has antinociceptive activity.

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, H.; Birch, P. J.; Harrison, S. M.; Palmer, E.; Manchee, G. R.; Judd, D. B.; Naylor, A.; Scopes, D. I.; Hayes, A. G.

    1992-01-01

    1. The pharmacological profile of GR94839, a kappa-opioid agonist with limited access to the central nervous system, has been investigated. Its antinociceptive activity has been compared with that of GR103545, a centrally-penetrating kappa-agonist and ICI204448, the previously described peripherally-selective kappa-agonist. 2. GR94839 was a potent agonist in the rabbit vas deferens in vitro assay for kappa-opioid receptors (IC50: 1.4 +/- 0.3 nM; n = 6), but had limited activity at mu- or delta-opioid receptors. 3. In the mouse abdominal constriction test, GR94839 was 238 fold more potent when given i.c.v. (ED50: 0.008 (0.004-0.029) mg kg-1; n = 18) than when s.c. (ED50: 1.9 (0.7-3.1) mg kg-1; n = 30). In comparison, GR103545 was equipotent when given i.c.v. or s.c. 4. After intravenous administration, the maximum plasma to brain concentration-ratio attained by GR94839 was 18 compared with 2 for GR85571, a structurally-related kappa-agonist that is centrally-penetrating. 5. GR94839 inhibited the 2nd phase of the rat formalin response at doses 7 fold lower than those required to inhibit the 1st phase (ED50 vs 1st phase: 10.2 (6.7-17.1) mg kg-1, s.c.; ED50 vs 2nd phase: 1.4 (1.0-1.8) mg kg-1, s.c.; n = 18). GR103545 was equipotent against the two phases. 6. Intraplantar administration of the opioid antagonists, norbinaltorphimine (100 micrograms) or naltrexone (1 microgram), reversed the antinociceptive effect of systemic GR94839 (3 mg kg-1, s.c.) against the 2nd phase of the formalin response and intraplantar injection of GR94839 (30-100 micrograms) selectively inhibited the 2nd phase.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1327387

  1. Characterization of kappa opioid binding using dynorphin A1-13 and U69,593 in the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Devlin, T.; Shoemaker, W.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Previous studies of kappa opioid binding sites have suggested heterogeneous binding to this class of opioid receptors. To further investigate kappa receptor heterogeneity, we analyzed the binding properties of various kappa-selective ligands in rat brain homogenates. Displacement assays were carried out using (3H)bremazocine in the presence of various displacing ligands under mu and delta receptor-blocked conditions. Homologous displacement of (3H)bremazocine produced shallow displacement which best fit a two-site model of drug-receptor interaction. Dynorphin A1-13 and U69,593 exhibited similar biphasic displacement of (3H)bremazocine. Maximal displacement by these ligands, however, represented only approximately 55% of total (3H)bremazocine binding, which suggests the existence of a third component of (3H)bremazocine binding. Biphasic displacement by dynorphin A1-13 was detected in tissue throughout the brain and the spinal cord, whereas the dynorphin-resistant component of (3H)bremazocine binding was uniquely absent in the spinal cord. U50,488H, tifluadom and ethylketocyclazocine appeared to displace from additional, dynorphin-insensitive sites, as their maximal displacement exceeded that seen with either dynorphin A1-13 or U69,593. These results strongly suggest the existence of at least three components of non-mu, non-delta (3H)bremazocine binding in the rat brain: two with differential affinity for dynorphin A1-13 and U69-593 (kappa-1 and kappa-2 sites), and a third (termed here R1) that was further resolved into two binding sites by bremazocine. Preliminary analysis of the R1 component using naloxone revealed one high-affinity site, which may be opiate in nature, and a second site whose binding properties closely resemble those of the sigma receptor described by others.

  2. Engineered G protein coupled receptors reveal independent regulation of internalization, desensitization and acute signaling

    PubMed Central

    Scearce-Levie, Kimberly; Lieberman, Michael D; Elliott, Heather H; Conklin, Bruce R

    2005-01-01

    Background The physiological regulation of G protein-coupled receptors, through desensitization and internalization, modulates the length of the receptor signal and may influence the development of tolerance and dependence in response to chronic drug treatment. To explore the importance of receptor regulation, we engineered a series of Gi-coupled receptors that differ in signal length, degree of agonist-induced internalization, and ability to induce adenylyl cyclase superactivation. All of these receptors, based on the kappa opioid receptor, were modified to be receptors activated solely by synthetic ligands (RASSLs). This modification allows us to compare receptors that have the same ligands and effectors, but differ only in desensitization and internalization. Results Removal of phosphorylation sites in the C-terminus of the RASSL resulted in a mutant that was resistant to internalization and less prone to desensitization. Replacement of the C-terminus of the RASSL with the corresponding portion of the mu opioid receptor eliminated the induction of AC superactivation, without disrupting agonist-induced desensitization or internalization. Surprisingly, removal of phosphorylation sites from this chimera resulted in a receptor that is constitutively internalized, even in the absence of agonist. However, the receptor still signals and desensitizes in response to agonist, indicating normal G-protein coupling and partial membrane expression. Conclusions These studies reveal that internalization, desensitization and adenylyl cyclase superactivation, all processes that decrease chronic Gi-receptor signals, are independently regulated. Furthermore, specific mutations can radically alter superactivation or internalization without affecting the efficacy of acute Gi signaling. These mutant RASSLs will be useful for further elucidating the temporal dynamics of the signaling of G protein-coupled receptors in vitro and in vivo. PMID:15707483

  3. Enantioselective kappa opioid binding sites on the macrophage cell line, P388d sub 1

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, D.J.J.; Blalock, J.E. ); DeCosta, B.R.; Jacobson, A.E.; Rice, K.C. )

    1991-01-01

    A kappa opioid binding site has been characterized on the macrophage cell line, P388d{sub 1}, using the kappa selective affinity ligand, ({sup 3H}(1S,2S)-(-)-trans-2-isothiocyanato-N-methyl-N-(2-(1-phrrolidinyl) cyclohexyl) benzeneacetamide ((-)BD166). The kappa site has a relative molecular mass (Mr) of 38,000 under nonreducing conditions and 42,000 under reducing conditions. Moreover, it exhibits enantioselectivity in that 1S,2S-(-)-trans-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-N-(2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)cyclohexyl) benzeneacetamide ((-)-U-50,488) blocks ({sup 3}H)95{alpha},7{alpha},8{beta})-(-)-N-methyl-N-(7-(1- pyrrolidinyl)-1-oxaspiro-(4,5)-dec-8-yl)benzeneacetamide (U-69,593) binding to P388d{sub 1} cells with an IC{sub 50} = 7.0 nM whereas 1R,2R-(+)-trans-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-N-(2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)cyclohexyl) benzeneacetamide ((+)U-50,488) blocks ({sup 3}H)U-69,593 binding to P388d{sub 1} cells with an IC{sub 50} = 700 nM.

  4. MGM-9 [(E)-methyl 2-(3-ethyl-7a,12a-(epoxyethanoxy)-9-fluoro-1,2,3,4,6,7,12,12b-octahydro-8-methoxyindolo[2,3-a]quinolizin-2-yl)-3-methoxyacrylate], a derivative of the indole alkaloid mitragynine: a novel dual-acting mu- and kappa-opioid agonist with potent antinociceptive and weak rewarding effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kenjiro; Takayama, Hiromitsu; Narita, Minoru; Nakamura, Atsushi; Suzuki, Masami; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Murayama, Toshihiko; Wongseripipatana, Sumphan; Misawa, Kaori; Kitajima, Mariko; Tashima, Kimihito; Horie, Syunji

    2008-08-01

    Mitragynine is a major indole alkaloid isolated from the Thai medicinal plant Mitragyna speciosa that has opium-like properties, although its chemical structure is quite different from that of morphine. We attempted to develop novel analgesics derived from mitragynine, and thus synthesized the ethylene glycol-bridged and C10-fluorinated derivative of mitragynine, MGM-9 [(E)-methyl 2-(3-ethyl-7a,12a-(epoxyethanoxy)-9-fluoro-1,2,3,4,6,7,12,12b-octahydro-8-methoxyindolo[2,3-a]quinolizin-2-yl)-3-methoxyacrylate]. We hypothesized that a dual-acting mu- and kappa-opioid agonist could produce potent antinociceptive effects with fewer rewarding effects compared with mu agonists. In this study, MGM-9 exhibited high affinity for mu- and kappa-opioid receptors with Ki values of 7.3 and 18 nM, respectively. MGM-9 showed a potent opioid agonistic effect, and its effects were meditated by mu- and kappa-opioid receptor mechanisms in in vitro assays. Subcutaneous and oral administration of MGM-9 produced potent antinociceptive effects in mouse tail-flick, hot-plate, and writhing tests. When administered orally, the antinociceptive effect of MGM-9 was seven to 22 times more potent than that of morphine. The antinociceptive effects of MGM-9 were mediated by both mu- and kappa-opioid receptors. Subcutaneous administration of MGM-9 twice daily for 5 days led to antinociceptive tolerance. In the gastrointestinal transit study, MGM-9 inhibited gastrointestinal transit, but its effect was weaker than that of morphine at equi-antinociceptive doses. Furthermore, MGM-9 induced less hyperlocomotion and fewer rewarding effects than morphine. The rewarding effect of MGM-9 was blocked by a mu antagonist and enhanced by a kappa antagonist. Taken together, the results suggest that MGM-9 is a promising novel analgesic that has a stronger antinociceptive effect and weaker adverse effects than morphine. PMID:18550129

  5. Direct evidence for the involvement of the mesolimbic kappa-opioid system in the morphine-induced rewarding effect under an inflammatory pain-like state.

    PubMed

    Narita, Minoru; Kishimoto, Yayoi; Ise, Yuya; Yajima, Yoshinori; Misawa, Kaoru; Suzuki, Tsutomu

    2005-01-01

    Recent clinical studies have demonstrated that when morphine is used to control pain in cancer patients, psychological dependence is not a major concern. The present study was undertaken to ascertain the modulation of psychological dependence on morphine under a chronic pain-like state in rats. The prototypical mu-opioid receptor agonist morphine (8 mg/kg, i.p.) induced a dose-dependent place preference. In the present study, we found that an inflammatory pain-like state following formalin injection significantly suppressed the morphine-induced rewarding effect. This effect was almost reversed by s.c. pretreatment with the kappa-opioid receptor antagonist nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI, 5 mg/kg). Furthermore, the morphine-induced increase in dopamine (DA) turnover in the limbic forebrain was significantly inhibited by treatment with formalin. This inhibition was also suppressed by pretreatment with nor-BNI. In addition, in vivo microdialysis studies clearly showed that the morphine-induced increase in the extracellular levels of DA and its metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid, in the nucleus accumbens (N.Acc.) was significantly decreased in rats that had been pretreated with formalin. This effect was in turn reversed by the microinjection of a specific dynorphin A antibody into the N.Acc. These findings suggest that the inflammatory pain-like state induced by formalin injection may have caused a sustained activation of the kappa-opioidergic system within the N.Acc., resulting in suppression of the morphine-induced rewarding effect in rats. The present study provides further evidence of the clinical usefulness of morphine in patients suffering from severe pain. PMID:15257306

  6. Synergistic antidepressant-like effects between a kappa opioid antagonist (LY2444296) and a delta opioid agonist (ADL5859) in the mouse forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Huang, Peng; Tunis, Julia; Parry, Christopher; Tallarida, Ronald; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan

    2016-06-15

    Kappa opioid (KOP) receptor antagonists and delta opioid (DOP) receptor agonists have antidepressant-like effects in animal tests and may be useful for treatment-resistant depression in humans. In this study, we examined whether the combination of a KOP receptor antagonist and a DOP receptor agonist would produce a better than additive effect (i.e. synergy). LY2444296 is a short-acting selective nonpeptide KOP receptor antagonist. ADL5859 is a selective nonpeptide DOP receptor agonist which does not produce seizures and EEG disturbances. Each compound and combinations of the two were examined in the forced swim test (FST) one h post injection, a screening test for antidepressant-like effect, in male adult C57BL/6J mice (Jackson Lab). LY2444296 [subcutaneous (s.c.) injection] at 10 and 30mg/kg, but not 3mg/kg, significantly decreased immobility time in a dose-dependent manner. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of ADL5859 also reduced immobility time dose-dependently at doses of 3 and 10mg/kg, but not at 1mg/kg. An analysis was conducted using the method of Tallarida and Raffa (2010), which employed dose equivalence. The relative potency of the drugs was determined to be LY2444296: ADL5859=1:0.28, which was the dose ratio for combination studies. Six combinations of the two compounds were tested in mice at a fixed dose ratio. We found that LY2444296 and ADL5859 yielded significant synergistic effects for the antidepressant-like effect at the combined dose ranging from 3.84mg/kg to 9.0mg/kg. ADL5859 (10mg/kg), LY2444296 (30mg/kg) and their combined dose (3.84mg/kg) had no effects on locomotor activities. Since the two drugs have distinct pharmacological profiles, such a synergism will allow use of lower doses of both drugs to achieve desired antidepressant effects with fewer side effects. PMID:27044434

  7. Signals and Receptors.

    PubMed

    Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Lu, Benson; Evans, Ron; Gutkind, J Silvio

    2016-04-01

    Communication between cells in a multicellular organism occurs by the production of ligands (proteins, peptides, fatty acids, steroids, gases, and other low-molecular-weight compounds) that are either secreted by cells or presented on their surface, and act on receptors on, or in, other target cells. Such signals control cell growth, migration, survival, and differentiation. Signaling receptors can be single-span plasma membrane receptors associated with tyrosine or serine/threonine kinase activities, proteins with seven transmembrane domains, or intracellular receptors. Ligand-activated receptors convey signals into the cell by activating signaling pathways that ultimately affect cytosolic machineries or nuclear transcriptional programs or by directly translocating to the nucleus to regulate transcription. PMID:27037414

  8. Putative Kappa Opioid Heteromers As Targets for Developing Analgesics Free of Adverse Effects

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    It is now generally recognized that upon activation by an agonist, β-arrestin associates with G protein-coupled receptors and acts as a scaffold in creating a diverse signaling network that could lead to adverse effects. As an approach to reducing side effects associated with κ opioid agonists, a series of β-naltrexamides 3–10 was synthesized in an effort to selectively target putative κ opioid heteromers without recruiting β-arrestin upon activation. The most potent derivative 3 (INTA) strongly activated KOR-DOR and KOR-MOR heteromers in HEK293 cells. In vivo studies revealed 3 to produce potent antinociception, which, when taken together with antagonism data, was consistent with the activation of both heteromers. 3 was devoid of tolerance, dependence, and showed no aversive effect in the conditioned place preference assay. As immunofluorescence studies indicated no recruitment of β-arrestin2 to membranes in coexpressed KOR-DOR cells, this study suggests that targeting of specific putative heteromers has the potential to identify leads for analgesics devoid of adverse effects. PMID:24978316

  9. Signaling by Sensory Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Julius, David; Nathans, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Sensory systems detect small molecules, mechanical perturbations, or radiation via the activation of receptor proteins and downstream signaling cascades in specialized sensory cells. In vertebrates, the two principal categories of sensory receptors are ion channels, which mediate mechanosensation, thermosensation, and acid and salt taste; and G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which mediate vision, olfaction, and sweet, bitter, and umami tastes. GPCR-based signaling in rods and cones illustrates the fundamental principles of rapid activation and inactivation, signal amplification, and gain control. Channel-based sensory systems illustrate the integration of diverse modulatory signals at the receptor, as seen in the thermosensory/pain system, and the rapid response kinetics that are possible with direct mechanical gating of a channel. Comparisons of sensory receptor gene sequences reveal numerous examples in which gene duplication and sequence divergence have created novel sensory specificities. This is the evolutionary basis for the observed diversity in temperature- and ligand-dependent gating among thermosensory channels, spectral tuning among visual pigments, and odorant binding among olfactory receptors. The coding of complex external stimuli by a limited number of sensory receptor types has led to the evolution of modality-specific and species-specific patterns of retention or loss of sensory information, a filtering operation that selectively emphasizes features in the stimulus that enhance survival in a particular ecological niche. The many specialized anatomic structures, such as the eye and ear, that house primary sensory neurons further enhance the detection of relevant stimuli. PMID:22110046

  10. Neuropharmacology of the naturally occurring kappa-opioid hallucinogen salvinorin A.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Christopher W; Rothman, Richard B; Prisinzano, Thomas E

    2011-06-01

    Salvia divinorum is a perennial sage native to Oaxaca, Mexico, that has been used traditionally in divination rituals and as a treatment for the "semimagical" disease panzón de borrego. Because of the intense "out-of-body" experiences reported after inhalation of the pyrolized smoke, S. divinorum has been gaining popularity as a recreational hallucinogen, and the United States and several other countries have regulated its use. Early studies isolated the neoclerodane diterpene salvinorin A as the principal psychoactive constituent responsible for these hallucinogenic effects. Since the finding that salvinorin A exerts its potent psychotropic actions through the activation of KOP receptors, there has been much interest in elucidating the underlying mechanisms behind its effects. These effects are particularly remarkable, because 1) salvinorin A is the first reported non-nitrogenous opioid receptor agonist, and 2) its effects are not mediated by the 5-HT(2A) receptor, the classic target of hallucinogens such as lysergic acid diethylamide and mescaline. Rigorous investigation into the structural features of salvinorin A responsible for opioid receptor affinity and selectivity has produced numerous receptor probes, affinity labels, and tools for evaluating the biological processes responsible for its observed psychological effects. Salvinorin A has therapeutic potential as a treatment for pain, mood and personality disorders, substance abuse, and gastrointestinal disturbances, and suggests that nonalkaloids are potential scaffolds for drug development for aminergic G-protein coupled receptors. PMID:21444610

  11. Evaluation of the Mu and Kappa Opioid Actions of Butorphanol in Humans Through Differential Naltrexone Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, S. L.; Chausmer, A. E.; Strain, E. C.; Bigelow, G. E.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale Butorphanol exerts activity at mu, kappa and delta opiate receptors in rats and monkeys but produces predominant mu-like effects in humans. Objectives To determine if the kappa receptor-mediated actions of butorphanol could be unmasked or enhanced by giving it in combination with naltrexone, an opioid antagonist with higher affinity for mu versus kappa receptors. Methods Ten healthy adult inpatient volunteers (8 M, 2 F), with opioid abuse histories, completed this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study. Naltrexone (0, 1, 3, 10 or 30 mg, p.o.) was administered 1 hr before butorphanol (0, 6 or 12 mg/70 kg, i.m.) during 15 test sessions. An array of physiological (e.g., vital signs, urine output, subject- and observer-rated measures was collected before and for 4 hr after drug administration. Results Naltrexone alone produced no direct effects. Butorphanol alone produced typical mu-, but not kappa-, related physiological effects (e.g., miosis, respiratory depression) and produced mood and drug effects considered typical of both mu (e.g., “liking,” “good drug effects”) and kappa agonists (e.g., increases in perceptual disturbances). Naltrexone pretreatment led to significant butorphanol-induced diuresis (i.e., increased urine output and decreased urine osmolality). Naltrexone generally produced a dose-dependent blockade of these subjective responses. Conclusion These data suggest that naltrexone antagonism unveiled the kappaergic activity of butorphanol as measured by diuresis, while subjective responses generally attributed to mu versus kappa receptors were not dissociable. Moreover, these data demonstrate that butorphanol exerts physiologically relevant kappa agonist activity at these supraanalgesic doses in humans. PMID:17909753

  12. Olfactory receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Gabriela; Simoes de Souza, Fabio Marques

    2016-01-01

    The guanine nucleotide protein (G protein)-coupled receptors (GPCRs) superfamily represents the largest class of membrane protein in the human genome. More than a half of all GPCRs are dedicated to interact with odorants and are termed odorant-receptors (ORs). Linda Buck and Richard Axel, the Nobel Prize laureates in physiology or medicine in 2004, first cloned and characterized the gene family that encode ORs, establishing the foundations to the understanding of the molecular basis for odor recognition. In the last decades, a lot of progress has been done to unravel the functioning of the sense of smell. This chapter gives a general overview of the topic of olfactory receptor signaling and reviews recent advances in this field. PMID:26928542

  13. Differential effects of exercise on brain opioid receptor binding and activation in rats.

    PubMed

    Arida, Ricardo Mario; Gomes da Silva, Sérgio; de Almeida, Alexandre Aparecido; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Zavala-Tecuapetla, Cecilia; Brand, Serge; Rocha, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Physical exercise stimulates the release of endogenous opioid peptides supposed to be responsible for changes in mood, anxiety, and performance. Exercise alters sensitivity to these effects that modify the efficacy at the opioid receptor. Although there is evidence that relates exercise to neuropeptide expression in the brain, the effects of exercise on opioid receptor binding and signal transduction mechanisms downstream of these receptors have not been explored. Here, we characterized the binding and G protein activation of mu opioid receptor, kappa opioid receptor or delta opioid receptor in several brain regions following acute (7 days) and chronic (30 days) exercise. As regards short- (acute) or long-term effects (chronic) of exercise, overall, higher opioid receptor binding was observed in acute-exercise animals and the opposite was found in the chronic-exercise animals. The binding of [(35) S]GTPγS under basal conditions (absence of agonists) was elevated in sensorimotor cortex and hippocampus, an effect more evident after chronic exercise. Divergence of findings was observed for mu opioid receptor, kappa opioid receptor, and delta opioid receptor receptor activation in our study. Our results support existing evidence of opioid receptor binding and G protein activation occurring differentially in brain regions in response to diverse exercise stimuli. We characterized the binding and G protein activation of mu, kappa, and delta opioid receptors in several brain regions following acute (7 days) and chronic (30 days) exercise. Higher opioid receptor binding was observed in the acute exercise animal group and opposite findings in the chronic exercise group. Higher G protein activation under basal conditions was noted in rats submitted to chronic exercise, as visible in the depicted pseudo-color autoradiograms. PMID:25330347

  14. Evolution of Cytokine Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Liongue, Clifford; Sertori, Robert; Ward, Alister C

    2016-07-01

    Cytokines represent essential mediators of cell-cell communication with particularly important roles within the immune system. These secreted factors are produced in response to developmental and/or environmental cues and act via cognate cytokine receptors on target cells, stimulating specific intracellular signaling pathways to facilitate appropriate cellular responses. This review describes the evolution of cytokine receptor signaling, focusing on the class I and class II receptor families and the downstream JAK-STAT pathway along with its key negative regulators. Individual components generated over a long evolutionary time frame coalesced to form an archetypal signaling pathway in bilateria that was expanded extensively during early vertebrate evolution to establish a substantial "core" signaling network, which has subsequently undergone limited diversification within discrete lineages. The evolution of cytokine receptor signaling parallels that of the immune system, particularly the emergence of adaptive immunity, which has likely been a major evolutionary driver. PMID:27317733

  15. Signaling from axon guidance receptors.

    PubMed

    Bashaw, Greg J; Klein, Rüdiger

    2010-05-01

    Determining how axon guidance receptors transmit signals to allow precise pathfinding decisions is fundamental to our understanding of nervous system development and may suggest new strategies to promote axon regeneration after injury or disease. Signaling mechanisms that act downstream of four prominent families of axon guidance cues--netrins, semaphorins, ephrins, and slits--have been extensively studied in both invertebrate and vertebrate model systems. Although details of these signaling mechanisms are still fragmentary and there appears to be considerable diversity in how different guidance receptors regulate the motility of the axonal growth cone, a number of common themes have emerged. Here, we review recent insights into how specific receptors for each of these guidance cues engage downstream regulators of the growth cone cytoskeleton to control axon guidance. PMID:20452961

  16. Eph Receptor Signaling and Ephrins

    PubMed Central

    Lisabeth, Erika M.; Falivelli, Giulia; Pasquale, Elena B.

    2013-01-01

    The Eph receptors are the largest of the RTK families. Like other RTKs, they transduce signals from the cell exterior to the interior through ligand-induced activation of their kinase domain. However, the Eph receptors also have distinctive features. Instead of binding soluble ligands, they generally mediate contact-dependent cell–cell communication by interacting with surface-associated ligands—the ephrins—on neighboring cells. Eph receptor–ephrin complexes emanate bidirectional signals that affect both receptor- and ephrin-expressing cells. Intriguingly, ephrins can also attenuate signaling by Eph receptors coexpressed in the same cell. Additionally, Eph receptors can modulate cell behavior independently of ephrin binding and kinase activity. The Eph/ephrin system regulates many developmental processes and adult tissue homeostasis. Its abnormal function has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer. Thus, Eph receptors represent promising therapeutic targets. However, more research is needed to better understand the many aspects of their complex biology that remain mysterious. PMID:24003208

  17. Peripheral antagonistic action of trimebutine and kappa opioid substances on acoustic stress-induced gastric motor inhibition in dogs.

    PubMed

    Gué, M; Pascaud, X; Hondé, C; Junien, J L; Buéno, L

    1988-01-27

    The effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.), intravenous (i.v.) and oral (p.o.) administration of trimebutine on the gastric motor inhibition induced by acoustic stress were investigated in fasted dogs fitted with strain-gauge transducers on the antrum and proximal jejunum. Started 40-50 min after the last migrating motor complex, a 1 h acoustic stress delayed by 111% the occurrence of the next gastric migrating motor complex without affecting the jejunal motor pattern. This inhibition of gastric migrating motor complex induced by acoustic stress was abolished by previous p.o. administration of trimebutine (1 mg/kg) but not by its i.v. (0.1 mg/kg) or i.c.v. (0.01 mg/kg) injection. The trimebutine blockade of gastric motor alterations induced by acoustic stress was suppressed after previous i.v. treatment with MR 2266 (0.3 mg/kg) but was unaffected by naloxone (0.3 mg/kg). Furthermore oral administration of U-50488H (10 micrograms/kg) and ethylketocyclazocine (10 micrograms/kg) respectively abolished and reduced the acoustic stress-induced delay of the occurrence of the gastric migrating motor complex. We concluded that trimebutine is able to antagonize the gastric motor disturbances induced in dogs by acoustic stress, probably by acting selectively on peripheral kappa receptors located in the wall of the proximal gut and directly stimulated from a mucosal site. PMID:2895010

  18. Dose-related Behavioral, Subjective, Endocrine and Psychophysiological Effects Of the Kappa Opioid Agonist Salvinorin A in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Ranganathan, Mohini; Schnakenberg, Ashley; Skosnik, Patrick D.; Cohen, Bruce; Pittman, Brian; Sewell, R. Andrew; D’Souza, Deepak Cyril

    2012-01-01

    Background Salvia divinorum (Salvia) is an increasingly popular recreational drug amongst adolescents and young adults. Its primary active ingredient, Salvinorin A (SA), a highly selective agonist at the kappa opiate receptor (KOR), is believed to be one of the most potent naturally occurring hallucinogens. However, there is little experimental data on the effects of SA in humans. Methods In a 3-day, double-blind, randomized, crossover, counterbalanced study, the behavioral, subjective, cognitive, psychophysiological and endocrine effects of 0 mg, 8 mg and 12 mg of inhaled SA were characterized in 10 healthy individuals who had previously used Salvia. Results SA produced psychotomimetic effects and perceptual alterations including dissociative and somaesthetic effects, increased plasma cortisol and prolactin and reduced resting EEG spectral power. SA administration was associated with a rapid increase of its levels in the blood. SA did not produce euphoria, cognitive deficits or changes in vital signs. The effects were transient and not dose-related. SA administration was very well tolerated without acute or delayed adverse effects. Conclusions SA produced a wide range of transient effects in healthy subjects. The perceptual altering effects and lack of euphoric effects would explain its intermittent use pattern. Such a profile would also suggest a low addictive potential similar to other hallucinogens and consistent with KOR agonism. Further work is warranted to carefully characterize a full spectrum of its effects in humans, to elucidate the underlying mechanisms involved and to explore the basis for individual variability in its effects. PMID:22817868

  19. Spatial organization of transmembrane receptor signalling

    PubMed Central

    Bethani, Ioanna; Skånland, Sigrid S; Dikic, Ivan; Acker-Palmer, Amparo

    2010-01-01

    The spatial organization of transmembrane receptors is a critical step in signal transduction and receptor trafficking in cells. Transmembrane receptors engage in lateral homotypic and heterotypic cis-interactions as well as intercellular trans-interactions that result in the formation of signalling foci for the initiation of different signalling networks. Several aspects of ligand-induced receptor clustering and association with signalling proteins are also influenced by the lipid composition of membranes. Thus, lipid microdomains have a function in tuning the activity of many transmembrane receptors by positively or negatively affecting receptor clustering and signal transduction. We review the current knowledge about the functions of clustering of transmembrane receptors and lipid–protein interactions important for the spatial organization of signalling at the membrane. PMID:20717138

  20. Paired inhibitory and activating receptor signals.

    PubMed

    Taylor, L S; Paul, S P; McVicar, D W

    2000-01-01

    The immunological literature has become inundated with reports regarding paired inhibitory receptors. Paired inhibitory receptor systems are highly conserved families that contain receptors involved in either cellular inhibition or activation. In most cases the paired putative biochemical antagonists are co-expressed on a given cell and thought to bind similar, if not identical, ligands making their biological role difficult to understand. Examples of these systems include immunoglobulin (Ig)-like receptors (Killer Ig Receptors, Immunoglobulin-like Transcripts/Leukocyte Ig-like Receptors/Monocyte Macrophage Ig Receptors, and Paired Ig-like Receptors), and type II lectin-like receptor systems (NKG2 and Ly49). General characteristics of these inhibitory receptors include a cytoplasmic immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM). The ITIM is phosphorylated upon engagement and recruits protein tyrosine phosphatases that dephosphorylate cellular substrates that would otherwise mediate activation. In contrast, the activating receptors of these pairs use charged residues within their transmembrane domains to associate with various signal transduction chains including the gamma chain of the receptor for the Fc portion of IgE, DAP12 or DAP10. Once phosphorylated, these chains direct the signal transduction cascade resulting in cellular activation. Here we review the signaling of several paired systems and present the current models for their signal transduction cascades. PMID:11258418

  1. Absolute Ligand Discrimination by Dimeric Signaling Receptors.

    PubMed

    Fathi, Sepehr; Nayak, Chitra R; Feld, Jordan J; Zilman, Anton G

    2016-09-01

    Many signaling pathways act through shared components, where different ligand molecules bind the same receptors or activate overlapping sets of response regulators downstream. Nevertheless, different ligands acting through cross-wired pathways often lead to different outcomes in terms of the target cell behavior and function. Although a number of mechanisms have been proposed, it still largely remains unclear how cells can reliably discriminate different molecular ligands under such circumstances. Here we show that signaling via ligand-induced receptor dimerization-a very common motif in cellular signaling-naturally incorporates a mechanism for the discrimination of ligands acting through the same receptor. PMID:27602720

  2. Orexin/hypocretin receptor signalling cascades

    PubMed Central

    Kukkonen, JP; Leonard, CS

    2014-01-01

    Orexin (hypocretin) peptides and their two known G-protein-coupled receptors play essential roles in sleep–wake control and powerfully influence other systems regulating appetite/metabolism, stress and reward. Consequently, drugs that influence signalling by these receptors may provide novel therapeutic opportunities for treating sleep disorders, obesity and addiction. It is therefore critical to understand how these receptors operate, the nature of the signalling cascades they engage and their physiological targets. In this review, we evaluate what is currently known about orexin receptor signalling cascades, while a sister review (Leonard & Kukkonen, this issue) focuses on tissue-specific responses. The evidence suggests that orexin receptor signalling is multifaceted and is substantially more diverse than originally thought. Indeed, orexin receptors are able to couple to members of at least three G-protein families and possibly other proteins, through which they regulate non-selective cation channels, phospholipases, adenylyl cyclase, and protein and lipid kinases. In the central nervous system, orexin receptors produce neuroexcitation by postsynaptic depolarization via activation of non-selective cation channels, inhibition of K+ channels and activation of Na+/Ca2+ exchange, but they also can stimulate the release of neurotransmitters by presynaptic actions and modulate synaptic plasticity. Ca2+ signalling is also prominently influenced by these receptors, both via the classical phospholipase C−Ca2+ release pathway and via Ca2+ influx, mediated by several pathways. Upon longer-lasting stimulation, plastic effects are observed in some cell types, while others, especially cancer cells, are stimulated to die. Thus, orexin receptor signals appear highly tunable, depending on the milieu in which they are operating. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Orexin Receptors. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10

  3. Expression and Localization of Opioid Receptors in Male Germ Cells and the Implication for Mouse Spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gianzo, Marta; Urizar-Arenaza, Itziar; Casis, Luis; Irazusta, Jon; Subirán, Nerea

    2016-01-01

    The presence of endogenous opioid peptides in different testicular cell types has been extensively characterized and provides evidence for the participation of the opioid system in the regulation of testicular function. However, the exact role of the opioid system during the spermatogenesis has remained controversial since the presence of the mu-, delta- and kappa-opioid receptors in spermatogenic cells was yet to be demonstrated. Through a combination of quantitative real-time PCR, immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry approaches, we report for the first time the presence of active mu-, delta- and kappa-opioid receptors in mouse male germ cells. They show an exposition time-dependent response to opioid agonist, hence suggesting their active involvement in spermatogenesis. Our results contribute to understanding the role of the opioid receptors in the spermatogenesis and could help to develop new strategies to employ the opioid system as a biochemical tool for the diagnosis and treatment of male infertility. PMID:27031701

  4. Mycobacterial signaling through toll-like receptors

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Joyoti; Shin, Dong-Min; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2012-01-01

    Studies over the past decade have helped to decipher molecular networks dependent on Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, in mycobacteria-infected macrophages. Stimulation of TLRs by mycobacteria and their antigenic components rapidly induces intracellular signaling cascades involved in the activation of nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, which play important roles in orchestrating proinflammatory responses and innate defense through generation of a variety of antimicrobial effector molecules. Recent studies have provided evidence that mycobacterial TLR-signaling cross talks with other intracellular antimicrobial innate pathways, the autophagy process and functional vitamin D receptor (VDR) signaling. In this article we describe recent advances in the recognition, responses, and regulation of mycobacterial signaling through TLRs. PMID:23189273

  5. Estrogen receptor signaling during vertebrate development

    PubMed Central

    Bondesson, Maria; Hao, Ruixin; Lin, Chin-Yo; Williams, Cecilia; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen receptors are expressed and their cognate ligands produced in all vertebrates, indicative of important and conserved functions. Through evolution estrogen has been involved in controlling reproduction, affecting both the development of reproductive organs and reproductive behavior. This review broadly describes the synthesis of estrogens and the expression patterns of aromatase and the estrogen receptors, in relation to estrogen functions in the developing fetus and child. We focus on the role of estrogens for development of reproductive tissues, as well as non-reproductive effects on the developing brain. We collate data from human, rodent, bird and fish studies and highlight common and species-specific effects of estrogen signaling on fetal development. Morphological malformations originating from perturbed estrogen signaling in estrogen receptor and aromatase knockout mice are discussed, as well as the clinical manifestations of rare estrogen receptor alpha and aromatase gene mutations in humans. PMID:24954179

  6. Histamine receptor signaling in energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Tabarean, Iustin V

    2016-07-01

    Histamine modulates several aspects of energy homeostasis. By activating histamine receptors in the hypothalamus the bioamine influences thermoregulation, its circadian rhythm, energy expenditure and feeding. These actions are brought about by activation of different histamine receptors and/or the recruitment of distinct neural pathways. In this review we describe the signaling mechanisms activated by histamine in the hypothalamus, the evidence for its role in modulating energy homeostasis as well as recent advances in the understanding of the cellular and neural network mechanisms involved. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Histamine Receptors'. PMID:26107117

  7. Receptor signaling clusters in the immune synapse

    PubMed Central

    Dustin, Michael L.; Groves, Jay T.

    2014-01-01

    Signaling processes between various immune cells involve large scale spatial reorganization of receptors and signaling molecules within the cell-cell junction. These structures, now collectively referred to as immune synapses, interleave physical and mechanical processes with the cascades of chemical reactions that constitute signal transduction systems. Molecular level clustering, spatial exclusion, and long range directed transport are all emerging as key regulatory mechanisms. The study of these processes is drawing researchers from physical sciences to join the effort and represents a rapidly growing branch of biophysical chemistry. Recent advances in the physical and quantitative analysis of signaling within the immune synapses will be reviewed here. PMID:22404679

  8. Autocrine endocannabinoid signaling through CB1 receptors potentiates OX1 orexin receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Jäntti, Maria H; Putula, Jaana; Turunen, Pauli M; Näsman, Johnny; Reijonen, Sami; Lindqvist, Christer; Kukkonen, Jyrki P

    2013-03-01

    It has been proposed that OX(1) orexin receptors and CB(1) cannabinoid receptors can form heteromeric complexes, which affect the trafficking of OX(1) receptors and potentiate OX(1) receptor signaling to extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). We have recently shown that OX(1) receptor activity releases high levels of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG), suggesting an alternative route for OX(1)-CB(1) receptor interaction in signaling, for instance, in retrograde synaptic transmission. In the current study, we set out to investigate this possibility utilizing recombinant Chinese hamster ovary K1 cells. 2-AG released from OX(1) receptor-expressing cells acted as a potent paracrine messenger stimulating ERK activity in neighboring CB(1) receptor-expressing cells. When OX(1) and CB(1) receptors were expressed in the same cells, OX(1) stimulation-induced ERK phosphorylation and activity were strongly potentiated. The potentiation but not the OX(1) response as such was fully abolished by specific inhibition of CB(1) receptors or the enzyme responsible for 2-AG generation, diacylglycerol lipase (DAGL). Although the results do not exclude the previously proposed OX(1)-CB(1) heteromerization, they nevertheless unequivocally identify DAGL-dependent 2-AG generation as the pivotal determinant of the OX(1)-CB(1) synergism and thus suggest a functional rather than a molecular interaction of OX(1) and CB(1) receptors. PMID:23233488

  9. LPA receptor signaling: pharmacology, physiology, and pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Yung, Yun C.; Stoddard, Nicole C.; Chun, Jerold

    2014-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a small ubiquitous lipid found in vertebrate and nonvertebrate organisms that mediates diverse biological actions and demonstrates medicinal relevance. LPA’s functional roles are driven by extracellular signaling through at least six 7-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors. These receptors are named LPA1–6 and signal through numerous effector pathways activated by heterotrimeric G proteins, including Gi/o, G12/13, Gq, and Gs. LPA receptor-mediated effects have been described in numerous cell types and model systems, both in vitro and in vivo, through gain- and loss-of-function studies. These studies have revealed physiological and pathophysiological influences on virtually every organ system and developmental stage of an organism. These include the nervous, cardiovascular, reproductive, and pulmonary systems. Disturbances in normal LPA signaling may contribute to a range of diseases, including neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders, pain, cardiovascular disease, bone disorders, fibrosis, cancer, infertility, and obesity. These studies underscore the potential of LPA receptor subtypes and related signaling mechanisms to provide novel therapeutic targets. PMID:24643338

  10. Complexity of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Signal Processing

    PubMed Central

    Volinsky, Natalia; Kholodenko, Boris N.

    2013-01-01

    Our knowledge of molecular mechanisms of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling advances with ever-increasing pace. Yet our understanding of how the spatiotemporal dynamics of RTK signaling control specific cellular outcomes has lagged behind. Systems-centered experimental and computational approaches can help reveal how overlapping networks of signal transducers downstream of RTKs orchestrate specific cell-fate decisions. We discuss how RTK network regulatory structures, which involve the immediate posttranslational and delayed transcriptional controls by multiple feed forward and feedback loops together with pathway cross talk, adapt cells to the combinatorial variety of external cues and conditions. This intricate network circuitry endows cells with emerging capabilities for RTK signal processing and decoding. We illustrate how mathematical modeling facilitates our understanding of RTK network behaviors by unraveling specific systems properties, including bistability, oscillations, excitable responses, and generation of intricate landscapes of signaling activities. PMID:23906711

  11. Signaling through G protein coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins (Gα, Gβ/Gγ subunits) constitute one of the most important components of cell signaling cascade. G Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) perceive many extracellular signals and transduce them to heterotrimeric G proteins, which further transduce these signals intracellular to appropriate downstream effectors and thereby play an important role in various signaling pathways. GPCRs exist as a superfamily of integral membrane protein receptors that contain seven transmembrane α-helical regions, which bind to a wide range of ligands. Upon activation by a ligand, the GPCR undergoes a conformational change and then activate the G proteins by promoting the exchange of GDP/GTP associated with the Gα subunit. This leads to the dissociation of Gβ/Gγ dimer from Gα. Both these moieties then become free to act upon their downstream effectors and thereby initiate unique intracellular signaling responses. After the signal propagation, the GTP of Gα-GTP is hydrolyzed to GDP and Gα becomes inactive (Gα-GDP), which leads to its re-association with the Gβ/Gγ dimer to form the inactive heterotrimeric complex. The GPCR can also transduce the signal through G protein independent pathway. GPCRs also regulate cell cycle progression. Till to date thousands of GPCRs are known from animal kingdom with little homology among them, but only single GPCR has been identified in plant system. The Arabidopsis GPCR was reported to be cell cycle regulated and also involved in ABA and in stress signaling. Here I have described a general mechanism of signal transduction through GPCR/G proteins, structure of GPCRs, family of GPCRs and plant GPCR and its role. PMID:19826234

  12. Toll-Like Receptor Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Takumi; Kawai, Taro

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play crucial roles in the innate immune system by recognizing pathogen-associated molecular patterns derived from various microbes. TLRs signal through the recruitment of specific adaptor molecules, leading to activation of the transcription factors NF-κB and IRFs, which dictate the outcome of innate immune responses. During the past decade, the precise mechanisms underlying TLR signaling have been clarified by various approaches involving genetic, biochemical, structural, cell biological, and bioinformatics studies. TLR signaling appears to be divergent and to play important roles in many aspects of the innate immune responses to given pathogens. In this review, we describe recent progress in our understanding of TLR signaling regulation and its contributions to host defense. PMID:25309543

  13. Estradiol signaling via sequestrable surface receptors.

    PubMed

    Benten, W P; Stephan, C; Lieberherr, M; Wunderlich, F

    2001-04-01

    Estradiol (E(2))-signaling is widely considered to be exclusively mediated through the transcription-regulating intracellular estrogen receptor (ER) alpha and ERbeta. The aim of this study was to investigate transcription-independent E(2)-signaling in mouse IC-21 macrophages. E(2) and E(2)-BSA induce a rapid rise in the intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) of Fura-2 loaded IC-21 cells as examined by spectrofluorometry. These changes in [Ca(2+)](i) can be inhibited by pertussis toxin, but not by the ER-blockers tamoxifen and raloxifene. The E(2)-signaling initiated at the plasma membrane is mediated through neither ERalpha nor ERbeta, but rather through a novel G protein-coupled membrane E(2)-receptor as revealed by RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. A special feature of this E(2)-receptor is its sequestration upon agonist stimulation. Sequestration depends on energy and temperature, and it proceeds through a clathrin- and caveolin-independent pathway. PMID:11250949

  14. NOD-Like Receptor Signaling in Cholesteatoma

    PubMed Central

    Leichtle, Anke; Klenke, Christin; Ebmeyer, Joerg; Daerr, Markus; Bruchhage, Karl-Ludwig; Hoffmann, Anna Sophie; Ryan, Allen F.; Wollenberg, Barbara; Sudhoff, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Background. Cholesteatoma is a destructive process of the middle ear resulting in erosion of the surrounding bony structures with consequent hearing loss, vestibular dysfunction, facial paralysis, or intracranial complications. The etiopathogenesis of cholesteatoma is controversial but is associated with recurrent ear infections. The role of intracellular innate immune receptors, the NOD-like receptors, and their associated signaling networks was investigated in cholesteatoma, since mutations in NOD-like receptor-related genes have been implicated in other chronic inflammatory disorders. Results. The expression of NOD2 mRNA and protein was significantly induced in cholesteatoma compared to the external auditory canal skin, mainly located in the epithelial layer of cholesteatoma. Microarray analysis showed significant upregulation for NOD2, not for NOD1, TLR2, or TLR4 in cholesteatoma. Moreover, regulation of genes in an interaction network of the NOD-adaptor molecule RIPK2 was detected. In addition to NOD2, NLRC4, and PYCARD, the downstream molecules IRAK1 and antiapoptotic regulator CFLAR showed significant upregulation, whereas SMAD3, a proapoptotic inducer, was significantly downregulated. Finally, altered regulation of inflammatory target genes of NOD signaling was detected. Conclusions. These results indicate that the interaction of innate immune signaling mediated by NLRs and their downstream target molecules is involved in the etiopathogenesis and growth of cholesteatoma. PMID:25922834

  15. Corazonin receptor signaling in ecdysis initiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Joon; Spalovská-Valachová, Ivana; Cho, Kook-Ho; Zitnanova, Inka; Park, Yoonseong; Adams, Michael E; Zitnan, Dusan

    2004-04-27

    Corazonin is a highly conserved neuropeptide hormone of wide-spread occurrence in insects yet is associated with no universally recognized function. After discovery of the corazonin receptor in Drosophila, we identified its ortholog in the moth, Manduca sexta, as a prelude to physiological studies. The corazonin receptor cDNA in M. sexta encodes a protein of 436 amino acids with seven putative transmembrane domains and shares common ancestry with its Drosophila counterpart. The receptor exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity for corazonin when expressed in Xenopus oocytes (EC(50) approximately 200 pM) or Chinese hamster ovary cells (EC(50) approximately 75 pM). Northern blot analysis locates the receptor in peripheral endocrine Inka cells, the source of preecdysis- and ecdysis-triggering hormones. Injection of corazonin into pharate larvae elicits release of these peptides from Inka cells, which induce precocious preecdysis and ecdysis behaviors. In vitro exposure of isolated Inka cells to corazonin (25-100 pM) induces preecdysis- and ecdysis-triggering hormone secretion. Using corazonin receptor as a biosensor, we show that corazonin concentrations in the hemolymph 20 min before natural preecdysis onset range from 20 to 80 pM and then decline over the next 30-40 min. These findings support the role of corazonin signaling in initiation of the ecdysis behavioral sequence. We propose a model for peptide-mediated interactions between Inka cells and the CNS underlying this process in insect development. PMID:15096620

  16. MOR Is Not Enough: Identification of Novel mu-Opioid Receptor Interacting Proteins Using Traditional and Modified Membrane Yeast Two-Hybrid Screens

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jay; Wong, Victoria; Kittanakom, Saranya; Ferraro, Thomas N.; Stagljar, Igor; Levenson, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The mu-opioid receptor (MOR) is the G-protein coupled receptor primarily responsible for mediating the analgesic and rewarding properties of opioid agonist drugs such as morphine, fentanyl, and heroin. We have utilized a combination of traditional and modified membrane yeast two-hybrid screening methods to identify a cohort of novel MOR interacting proteins (MORIPs). The interaction between the MOR and a subset of MORIPs was validated in pulldown, co-immunoprecipitation, and co-localization studies using HEK293 cells stably expressing the MOR as well as rodent brain. Additionally, a subset of MORIPs was found capable of interaction with the delta and kappa opioid receptors, suggesting that they may represent general opioid receptor interacting proteins (ORIPS). Expression of several MORIPs was altered in specific mouse brain regions after chronic treatment with morphine, suggesting that these proteins may play a role in response to opioid agonist drugs. Based on the known function of these newly identified MORIPs, the interactions forming the MOR signalplex are hypothesized to be important for MOR signaling and intracellular trafficking. Understanding the molecular complexity of MOR/MORIP interactions provides a conceptual framework for defining the cellular mechanisms of MOR signaling in brain and may be critical for determining the physiological basis of opioid tolerance and addiction. PMID:23840749

  17. Death Receptor 5 Signaling Promotes Hepatocyte Lipoapoptosis*

    PubMed Central

    Cazanave, Sophie C.; Mott, Justin L.; Bronk, Steven F.; Werneburg, Nathan W.; Fingas, Christian D.; Meng, X. Wei; Finnberg, Niklas; El-Deiry, Wafik S.; Kaufmann, Scott H.; Gores, Gregory J.

    2011-01-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis is characterized by hepatic steatosis, elevated levels of circulating free fatty acids (FFA), endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and hepatocyte lipoapoptosis. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) death receptor 5 (DR5) is significantly elevated in patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, and steatotic hepatocytes demonstrate increased sensitivity to TRAIL-mediated cell death. Nonetheless, a role for TRAIL and/or DR5 in mediating lipoapoptotic pathways is unexplored. Here, we examined the contribution of DR5 death signaling to lipoapoptosis by free fatty acids. The toxic saturated free fatty acid palmitate induces an increase in DR5 mRNA and protein expression in Huh-7 human hepatoma cells leading to DR5 localization into lipid rafts, cell surface receptor clustering with subsequent recruitment of the initiator caspase-8, and ultimately cellular demise. Lipoapoptosis by palmitate was not inhibited by a soluble human recombinant DR5-Fc chimera protein suggesting that DR5 cytotoxic signaling is ligand-independent. Hepatocytes from murine TRAIL receptor knock-out mice (DR−/−) displayed reduced palmitate-mediated lipotoxicity. Likewise, knockdown of DR5 or caspase-8 expression by shRNA technology attenuated palmitate-induced Bax activation and apoptosis in Huh-7 cells, without altering induction of ER stress markers. Similar observations were verified in other cell models. Finally, knockdown of CHOP, an ER stress-mediated transcription factor, reduced DR5 up-regulation and DR5-mediated caspase-8 activation upon palmitate treatment. Collectively, these results suggest that ER stress-induced CHOP activation by palmitate transcriptionally up-regulates DR5, likely resulting in ligand-independent cytotoxic signaling by this death receptor. PMID:21941003

  18. TAM Receptor Signaling in Immune Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Rothlin, Carla V.; Carrera-Silva, Eugenio A.; Bosurgi, Lidia; Ghosh, Sourav

    2015-01-01

    The TAM receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs)—TYRO3, AXL, and MERTK—together with their cognate agonists GAS6 and PROS1 play an essential role in the resolution of inflammation. Deficiencies in TAM signaling have been associated with chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Three processes regulated by TAM signaling may contribute, either independently or collectively, to immune homeostasis: the negative regulation of the innate immune response, the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, and the restoration of vascular integrity. Recent studies have also revealed the function of TAMs in infectious diseases and cancer. Here, we review the important milestones in the discovery of these RTKs and their ligands and the studies that underscore the functional importance of this signaling pathway in physiological immune settings and disease. PMID:25594431

  19. Receptors signaling gravity orientation in an insect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, H. B.

    1982-01-01

    Displacement in any direction from primary orientation is found to evoke tonic activity from at least one of the four interneurons of a certain type of burrowing cockroach; the receptive field for each interneuron is slightly more than a quadrant. The receptive field of each interneuron is found to be the same as the row of receptors providing the input. Displacement about the least stable axis (0-180 deg) or roll, on the one hand, and the most stable axis (90-270 deg) or pitch, on the other, is found to be unambiguously signaled by pairs of interneurons. Indications are obtained that receptors in the lateral row drive a giant interneuron in a contralateral connective and those in the medial row drive one in an ipsilateral connective.

  20. Cell signaling by receptor-tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Lemmon, Mark A.; Schlessinger, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Recent structural studies of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) have revealed unexpected diversity in the mechanisms of their activation by growth factor ligands. Strategies for inducing dimerization by ligand binding are surprisingly diverse, as are mechanisms that couple this event to activation of the intracellular tyrosine kinase domains. As our understanding of these details becomes increasingly sophisticated, it provides an important context for therapeutically countering the effects of pathogenic RTK mutations in cancer and other diseases. Much remains to be learned, however, about the complex signaling networks downstream from RTKs and how alterations in these networks are translated into cellular responses. PMID:20602996

  1. Research Resources for Nuclear Receptor Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Neil J

    2016-08-01

    Nuclear receptor (NR) signaling pathways impact cellular function in a broad variety of tissues in both normal physiology and disease states. The complex tissue-specific biology of these pathways is an enduring impediment to the development of clinical NR small-molecule modulators that combine therapeutically desirable effects in specific target tissues with suppression of off-target effects in other tissues. Supporting the important primary research in this area is a variety of web-based resources that assist researchers in gaining an appreciation of the molecular determinants of the pharmacology of a NR pathway in a given tissue. In this study, selected representative examples of these tools are reviewed, along with discussions on how current and future generations of tools might optimally adapt to the future of NR signaling research. PMID:27216565

  2. Nutritional Signaling via Free Fatty Acid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Junki; Hasegawa, Sae; Kasubuchi, Mayu; Ichimura, Atsuhiko; Nakajima, Akira; Kimura, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    Excess energy is stored primarily as triglycerides, which are mobilized when demand for energy arises. Dysfunction of energy balance by excess food intake leads to metabolic diseases, such as obesity and diabetes. Free fatty acids (FFAs) provided by dietary fat are not only important nutrients, but also contribute key physiological functions via FFA receptor (FFAR)-mediated signaling molecules, which depend on FFAs' carbon chain length and the ligand specificity of the receptors. Functional analyses have revealed that FFARs are critical for metabolic functions, such as peptide hormone secretion and inflammation, and contribute to energy homeostasis. In particular, recent studies have shown that the administration of selective agonists of G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 40 and GPR120 improved glucose metabolism and systemic metabolic disorders. Furthermore, the anti-inflammation and energy metabolism effects of short chain FAs have been linked to the activation of GPR41 and GPR43. In this review, we summarize recent progress in research on FFAs and their physiological roles in the regulation of energy metabolism. PMID:27023530

  3. Signal transduction by the growth hormone receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, M.J.; Rowlinson, S.W.; Clarkson, R.W.

    1994-12-31

    It has been proposed that dimerization of identical receptor subunits by growth hormone (GH) is the mechanism of signal transduction across the cell membrane. We present here data with analogs of porcine GH (pGH), with GH receptors (GHR) mutated in the dimerization domain and with monoclonal antibodies to the GHR which indicate that dimerization is necessary but not sufficient for transduction. We also report nuclear uptake of GH both in vivo and in vitro, along with nuclear localization of the receptor and GH-binding protein (GHBP). This suggests that GH acts directly at the nucleus, and one possible target for this action is a rapid increase in transcription of C/EBP delta seen in 3T3-F442A cells in response to GH. This tyrosine kinase-dependent event may be an archetype for induction of other immediate early gene transcription factors which then interact to determine the programming of the subsequent transcriptional response to GH. 29 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. Nutritional Signaling via Free Fatty Acid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Junki; Hasegawa, Sae; Kasubuchi, Mayu; Ichimura, Atsuhiko; Nakajima, Akira; Kimura, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    Excess energy is stored primarily as triglycerides, which are mobilized when demand for energy arises. Dysfunction of energy balance by excess food intake leads to metabolic diseases, such as obesity and diabetes. Free fatty acids (FFAs) provided by dietary fat are not only important nutrients, but also contribute key physiological functions via FFA receptor (FFAR)-mediated signaling molecules, which depend on FFAs’ carbon chain length and the ligand specificity of the receptors. Functional analyses have revealed that FFARs are critical for metabolic functions, such as peptide hormone secretion and inflammation, and contribute to energy homeostasis. In particular, recent studies have shown that the administration of selective agonists of G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 40 and GPR120 improved glucose metabolism and systemic metabolic disorders. Furthermore, the anti-inflammation and energy metabolism effects of short chain FAs have been linked to the activation of GPR41 and GPR43. In this review, we summarize recent progress in research on FFAs and their physiological roles in the regulation of energy metabolism. PMID:27023530

  5. Molecular Mechanisms of Opioid Receptor-Dependent Signaling and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hasani, Ream; Bruchas, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Opioid receptors have been targeted for the treatment of pain and related disorders for thousands of years, and remain the most widely used analgesics in the clinic. Mu (μ), kappa (κ), and delta (δ) opioid receptors represent the originally classified receptor subtypes, with opioid receptor like-1 (ORL1) being the least characterized. All four receptors are G-protein coupled, and activate inhibitory G-proteins. These receptors form homo- and hetereodimeric complexes, signal to kinase cascades, and scaffold a variety of proteins. In this review, we discuss classical mechanisms and developments in understanding opioid tolerance, opioid receptor signaling, and highlight advances in opioid molecular pharmacology, behavioral pharmacology, and human genetics. We put into context how opioid receptor signaling leads to the modulation of behavior with the potential for therapeutic intervention. Finally, we conclude that there is a continued need for more translational work on opioid receptors in vivo. PMID:22020140

  6. Molecular Signaling Pathways Behind the Biological Effects of Salvia Species Diterpenes in Neuropharmacology and Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Akaberi, M; Iranshahi, M; Mehri, S

    2016-06-01

    The genus Salvia, from the Lamiaceae family, has diverse biological properties that are primarily attributable to their diterpene contents. There is no comprehensive review on the molecular signaling pathways of these active components. In this review, we investigated the molecular targets of bioactive Salvia diterpenes responsible for the treatment of nervous and cardiovascular diseases. The effects on different pathways, including apoptosis signaling, oxidative stress phenomena, the accumulation of amyloid beta plaques, and tau phosphorylation, have all been considered to be mechanisms of the anti-Alzheimer properties of Salvia diterpenes. Additionally, effects on the benzodiazepine and kappa opioid receptors and neuroprotective effects are noted as neuropharmacological properties of Salvia diterpenes, including tanshinone IIA, salvinorin A, cryptotanshinone, and miltirone. Tanshinone IIA, as the primary diterpene of Salvia miltiorrhiza, has beneficial activities in heart diseases because of its ability to scavenge free radicals and its effects on transcription factors, such as nuclear transcription factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Additionally, tanshinone IIA has also been proposed to have cardioprotective properties including antiarrhythmic activities and effects on myocardial infarction. With respect to the potential therapeutic effects of Salvia diterpenes, comprehensive clinical trials are warranted to evaluate these valuable molecules as lead compounds. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26988179

  7. Receptor signaling integration by TRP channelsomes.

    PubMed

    Mori, Yasuo; Kajimoto, Taketoshi; Nakao, Akito; Takahashi, Nobuaki; Kiyonaka, Shigeki

    2011-01-01

    Homologues of transient receptor potential (TRP) genes encode a variety of cation channels, most of which conduct Ca(2+) across the plasma membrane. TRP proteins interact with a variety of proteins and other biologically important factors, such as second messengers, and thereby form "channelsomes", most of which function as Ca(2+) signalsomes. Activation mechanisms and final outputs are exquisitely incorporated in the signaling system of TRP channelsomes. In this study, we discuss the channelsomes of TRPC3, TRPC5, and TRPM2, which show unique molecular interactions and modulations of activation. Comparative studies of these specific TRP channelsomes should aid the determination of general rules that govern the formation and regulation of channelsomes and signalsomes. PMID:21290307

  8. Antigen receptor signaling: integration of protein tyrosine kinase functions.

    PubMed

    Tamir, I; Cambier, J C

    1998-09-17

    Antigen receptors on T and B cells function to transduce signals leading to a variety of biologic responses minimally including antigen receptor editing, apoptotic death, developmental progression, cell activation, proliferation and survival. The response to antigen depends upon antigen affinity and valence, involvement of coreceptors in signaling and differentiative stage of the responding cell. The requirement that these receptors integrate signals that drive an array of responses may explain their evolved structural complexity. Antigen receptors are composed of multiple subunits compartmentalized to provide antigen recognition and signal transduction function. In lieu of on-board enzymatic activity these receptors rely on associated Protein Tyrosine Kinases (PTKs) for their signaling function. By aggregating the receptors, and hence their appended PTKs, antigens induce PTK transphosphorylation, activating them to phosphorylate the receptor within conserved motifs termed Immunoreceptor Tyrosine-based Activation Motifs (ITAMs) found in transducer subunits. The tyrosyl phosphorylated ITAMs then interact with Src Homology 2 (SH2) domains within the PTKs leading to their further activation. As receptor phosphorylation is amplified, other effectors, such as Shc, dock by virtue of SH2 binding, and serve, in-turn, as substrates for these PTKs. This sequence of events not only provides a signal amplification mechanism by combining multiple consecutive steps with positive feedback, but also allows for signal diversification by differential recruitment of effectors that provide access to distinct parallel downstream signaling pathways. The subject of antigen receptor signaling has been recently reviewed in depth (DeFranco, 1997; Kurosaki, 1997). Here we discuss the biochemical basis of antigen receptor signal transduction, using the B cell receptor (BCR) as a paradigm, with specific emphasis on the involved PTKs. We review several specific mechanisms by which responses

  9. NOP receptor mediates anti-analgesia induced by agonist-antagonist opioids.

    PubMed

    Gear, R W; Bogen, O; Ferrari, L F; Green, P G; Levine, J D

    2014-01-17

    Clinical studies have shown that agonist-antagonist opioid analgesics that produce their analgesic effect via action on the kappa-opioid receptor, produce a delayed-onset anti-analgesia in men but not women, an effect blocked by co-administration of a low dose of naloxone. We now report the same time-dependent anti-analgesia and its underlying mechanism in an animal model. Using the Randall-Selitto paw-withdrawal assay in male rats, we found that nalbuphine, pentazocine, and butorphanol each produced analgesia during the first hour followed by anti-analgesia starting at ∼90min after administration in males but not females, closely mimicking its clinical effects. As observed in humans, co-administration of nalbuphine with naloxone in a dose ratio of 12.5:1 blocked anti-analgesia but not analgesia. Administration of the highly selective kappa-opioid receptor agonist U69593 produced analgesia without subsequent anti-analgesia, and confirmed by the failure of the selective kappa antagonist nor-binaltorphimine to block nalbuphine-induced anti-analgesia, indicating that anti-analgesia is not mediated by kappa-opioid receptors. We therefore tested the role of other receptors in nalbuphine anti-analgesia. Nociceptin/orphanin FQ (NOP) and sigma-1 and sigma-2 receptors were chosen on the basis of their known anti-analgesic effects and receptor binding studies. The selective NOP receptor antagonists, JTC801, and J-113397, but not the sigma receptor antagonist, BD 1047, antagonized nalbuphine anti-analgesia. Furthermore, the NOP receptor agonist NNC 63-0532 produced anti-analgesia with the same delay in onset observed with the three agonist-antagonists, but without producing preceding analgesia and this anti-analgesia was also blocked by naloxone. These results strongly support the suggestion that clinically used agonist-antagonists act at the NOP receptor to produce anti-analgesia. PMID:24188792

  10. The opioid receptor selectivity for trimebutine in isolated tissues experiments and receptor binding studies.

    PubMed

    Kaneto, H; Takahashi, M; Watanabe, J

    1990-07-01

    Differences of affinity to and selectivity for trimebutine between peripheral and central opioid receptors have been investigated. Trimebutine inhibited electrically induced contraction of guinea-pig ileum (GPI) and mouse vas deferens (MVD) but not of rabbit vas deferens, and the inhibition was antagonized by naloxone and, to lesser extent, by nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI). The pA2 values for morphine and trimebutine with naloxone were higher than the values for these compounds with nor-BNI in both GPI and MVD preparations. GPI preparations incubated with a high concentration of morphine or trimebutine developed tolerance; however, there was no cross-tolerance between them, suggesting difference in the underlying mechanisms. In mouse and guinea-pig brain homogenate trimebutine was about 1/13 as potent as morphine to displace the [3H]naloxone binding, while it has no appreciable affinity for kappa-opioid receptors in [3H]U-69593, a selective kappa-receptor agonist. These results suggest that trimebutine, showing its low affinity to opioid receptors, possesses mu-receptor selective properties rather than those of kappa-opioid receptor in the peripheral tissues and in the central brain homogenate. PMID:1963196

  11. Biased and G Protein-Independent Signaling of Chemokine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Steen, Anne; Larsen, Olav; Thiele, Stefanie; Rosenkilde, Mette M.

    2014-01-01

    Biased signaling or functional selectivity occurs when a 7TM-receptor preferentially activates one of several available pathways. It can be divided into three distinct forms: ligand bias, receptor bias, and tissue or cell bias, where it is mediated by different ligands (on the same receptor), different receptors (with the same ligand), or different tissues or cells (for the same ligand–receptor pair). Most often biased signaling is differentiated into G protein-dependent and β-arrestin-dependent signaling. Yet, it may also cover signaling differences within these groups. Moreover, it may not be absolute, i.e., full versus no activation. Here we discuss biased signaling in the chemokine system, including the structural basis for biased signaling in chemokine receptors, as well as in class A 7TM receptors in general. This includes overall helical movements and the contributions of micro-switches based on recently published 7TM crystals and molecular dynamics studies. All three forms of biased signaling are abundant in the chemokine system. This challenges our understanding of “classic” redundancy inevitably ascribed to this system, where multiple chemokines bind to the same receptor and where a single chemokine may bind to several receptors – in both cases with the same functional outcome. The ubiquitous biased signaling confers a hitherto unknown specificity to the chemokine system with a complex interaction pattern that is better described as promiscuous with context-defined roles and different functional outcomes in a ligand-, receptor-, or cell/tissue-defined manner. As the low number of successful drug development plans implies, there are great difficulties in targeting chemokine receptors; in particular with regard to receptor antagonists as anti-inflammatory drugs. Un-defined and putative non-selective targeting of the complete cellular signaling system could be the underlying cause of lack of success. Therefore, biased ligands could be the solution

  12. Stress Regulates Endocannabinoid-CB1 Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hillard, Cecilia J.

    2014-01-01

    The CB1 cannabinoid receptor is a G protein coupled receptor that is widely expressed throughout the brain. The endogenous ligands for the CB1 receptor (endocannabinoids) are N-arachidonylethanolamine and 2-arachidonoylglycerol; together the endocannabinoids and CB1R subserve activity dependent, retrograde inhibition of neurotransmitter release in the brain. Deficiency of CB1 receptor signaling is associated with anhedonia, anxiety, and persistence of negative memories. CB1 receptor-endocannabinoid signaling is activated by stress and functions to buffer or dampen the behavioral and endocrine effects of acute stress. Its role in regulation of neuronal responses is more complex. Chronic variable stress exposure reduces endocannabinoid-CB1 receptor signaling and it is hypothesized that the resultant deficiency in endocannabinoid signaling contributes to the negative consequences of chronic stress. On the other hand, repeated exposure to the same stress can sensitize CB1 receptor signaling, resulting in dampening of the stress response. Data are reviewed that support the hypothesis that CB1 receptor signaling is stress responsive and that maintaining robust endocannabinoid/CB1 receptor signaling provides resilience against the development of stress-related pathologies. PMID:24882055

  13. Sweet Taste Receptor Signaling Network: Possible Implication for Cognitive Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Welcome, Menizibeya O.; Mastorakis, Nikos E.; Pereverzev, Vladimir A.

    2015-01-01

    Sweet taste receptors are transmembrane protein network specialized in the transmission of information from special “sweet” molecules into the intracellular domain. These receptors can sense the taste of a range of molecules and transmit the information downstream to several acceptors, modulate cell specific functions and metabolism, and mediate cell-to-cell coupling through paracrine mechanism. Recent reports indicate that sweet taste receptors are widely distributed in the body and serves specific function relative to their localization. Due to their pleiotropic signaling properties and multisubstrate ligand affinity, sweet taste receptors are able to cooperatively bind multiple substances and mediate signaling by other receptors. Based on increasing evidence about the role of these receptors in the initiation and control of absorption and metabolism, and the pivotal role of metabolic (glucose) regulation in the central nervous system functioning, we propose a possible implication of sweet taste receptor signaling in modulating cognitive functioning. PMID:25653876

  14. Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas: Opening Access to the Biology of Nuclear Receptor Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Becnel, Lauren B; Darlington, Yolanda F; Ochsner, Scott A; Easton-Marks, Jeremy R; Watkins, Christopher M; McOwiti, Apollo; Kankanamge, Wasula H; Wise, Michael W; DeHart, Michael; Margolis, Ronald N; McKenna, Neil J

    2015-01-01

    Signaling pathways involving nuclear receptors (NRs), their ligands and coregulators, regulate tissue-specific transcriptomes in diverse processes, including development, metabolism, reproduction, the immune response and neuronal function, as well as in their associated pathologies. The Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA) is a Consortium focused around a Hub website (www.nursa.org) that annotates and integrates diverse 'omics datasets originating from the published literature and NURSA-funded Data Source Projects (NDSPs). These datasets are then exposed to the scientific community on an Open Access basis through user-friendly data browsing and search interfaces. Here, we describe the redesign of the Hub, version 3.0, to deploy "Web 2.0" technologies and add richer, more diverse content. The Molecule Pages, which aggregate information relevant to NR signaling pathways from myriad external databases, have been enhanced to include resources for basic scientists, such as post-translational modification sites and targeting miRNAs, and for clinicians, such as clinical trials. A portal to NURSA's Open Access, PubMed-indexed journal Nuclear Receptor Signaling has been added to facilitate manuscript submissions. Datasets and information on reagents generated by NDSPs are available, as is information concerning periodic new NDSP funding solicitations. Finally, the new website integrates the Transcriptomine analysis tool, which allows for mining of millions of richly annotated public transcriptomic data points in the field, providing an environment for dataset re-use and citation, bench data validation and hypothesis generation. We anticipate that this new release of the NURSA database will have tangible, long term benefits for both basic and clinical research in this field. PMID:26325041

  15. Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas: Opening Access to the Biology of Nuclear Receptor Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Becnel, Lauren B.; Darlington, Yolanda F.; Ochsner, Scott A.; Easton-Marks, Jeremy R.; Watkins, Christopher M.; McOwiti, Apollo; Kankanamge, Wasula H.; Wise, Michael W.; DeHart, Michael; Margolis, Ronald N.; McKenna, Neil J.

    2015-01-01

    Signaling pathways involving nuclear receptors (NRs), their ligands and coregulators, regulate tissue-specific transcriptomes in diverse processes, including development, metabolism, reproduction, the immune response and neuronal function, as well as in their associated pathologies. The Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA) is a Consortium focused around a Hub website (www.nursa.org) that annotates and integrates diverse ‘omics datasets originating from the published literature and NURSA-funded Data Source Projects (NDSPs). These datasets are then exposed to the scientific community on an Open Access basis through user-friendly data browsing and search interfaces. Here, we describe the redesign of the Hub, version 3.0, to deploy “Web 2.0” technologies and add richer, more diverse content. The Molecule Pages, which aggregate information relevant to NR signaling pathways from myriad external databases, have been enhanced to include resources for basic scientists, such as post-translational modification sites and targeting miRNAs, and for clinicians, such as clinical trials. A portal to NURSA’s Open Access, PubMed-indexed journal Nuclear Receptor Signaling has been added to facilitate manuscript submissions. Datasets and information on reagents generated by NDSPs are available, as is information concerning periodic new NDSP funding solicitations. Finally, the new website integrates the Transcriptomine analysis tool, which allows for mining of millions of richly annotated public transcriptomic data points in the field, providing an environment for dataset re-use and citation, bench data validation and hypothesis generation. We anticipate that this new release of the NURSA database will have tangible, long term benefits for both basic and clinical research in this field. PMID:26325041

  16. Assay of TRPV1 Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Moriello, Aniello Schiano; De Petrocellis, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 ion channel (TRPV1) is a non-selective ligand-gated cation channel. It is an integrator of a wide variety of exogenous and endogenous physical and chemical stimuli, including capsaicin, noxious heat (>42 °C), and protons (pH < 5.2). TRPV1 is expressed predominantly in primary sensory neurons involved in pain sensation, but also in other neuronal cell types, in the plasma membrane of different non-neuronal cells such as immune cells, keratinocytes, smooth muscle cells, and in the urothelium. Some of these cell types are involved in inflammation. When activated, TRPV1 leads to the gating of cations, including Ca(2+), thus generating changes in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. Calcium ions play fundamental roles in many cellular processes, virtually in all cells. The use of Ca(2+) fluorescent indicators is a tool for monitoring intracellular Ca(2+) concentration.In this chapter, we describe a method for recording and monitoring Ca(2+) signals through the single wavelength fluorescent indicator Fluo-4 acetoxymethyl (AM), and the ratiometric fluorescent indicator Fura-2 AM in HEK-293 cells transfected with TRPV1 and other TRP channels. TRPV1 pharmacological modulation may potentially represent a strategy for the control of pain and inflammatory conditions in a variety of diseases and injury states. PMID:27245892

  17. Comparative analyses of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Ishii, Shoichi; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi; Kagawa, Nao; Katoh, Kazutaka

    2015-06-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid mediator that activates G protein-coupled LPA receptors to exert fundamental cellular functions. Six LPA receptor genes have been identified in vertebrates and are classified into two subfamilies, the endothelial differentiation genes (edg) and the non-edg family. Studies using genetically engineered mice, frogs, and zebrafish have demonstrated that LPA receptor-mediated signaling has biological, developmental, and pathophysiological functions. Computational analyses have also identified several amino acids (aa) critical for LPA recognition by human LPA receptors. This review focuses on the evolutionary aspects of LPA receptor-mediated signaling by comparing the aa sequences of vertebrate LPA receptors and LPA-producing enzymes; it also summarizes the LPA receptor-dependent effects commonly observed in mouse, frog, and fish. PMID:25732591

  18. Structural mechanism for signal transduction in RXR nuclear receptor heterodimers

    PubMed Central

    Kojetin, Douglas J.; Matta-Camacho, Edna; Hughes, Travis S.; Srinivasan, Sathish; Nwachukwu, Jerome C.; Cavett, Valerie; Nowak, Jason; Chalmers, Michael J.; Marciano, David P.; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Shulman, Andrew I.; Rance, Mark; Griffin, Patrick R.; Bruning, John B.; Nettles, Kendall W.

    2015-01-01

    A subset of nuclear receptors (NRs) function as obligate heterodimers with retinoid X receptor (RXR), allowing integration of ligand-dependent signals across the dimer interface via an unknown structural mechanism. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, x-ray crystallography and hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry, here we show an allosteric mechanism through which RXR co-operates with a permissive dimer partner, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ, while rendered generally unresponsive by a non-permissive dimer partner, thyroid hormone (TR) receptor. Amino acid residues that mediate this allosteric mechanism comprise an evolutionarily conserved network discovered by statistical coupling analysis (SCA). This SCA network acts as a signalling rheostat to integrate signals between dimer partners, ligands and coregulator-binding sites, thereby affecting signal transmission in RXR heterodimers. These findings define rules guiding how NRs integrate two ligand-dependent signalling pathways into RXR heterodimer-specific responses. PMID:26289479

  19. [Opioid receptors and their selective ligands].

    PubMed

    Piestrzeniewicz, Mariola Katarzyna; Fichna, Jakub; Michna, Jakub; Janecka, Anna

    2006-01-01

    Opioid receptors (micro, delta, and kappa) belong to a large family of G protein-coupled receptors and play an important physiological role. Stimulation of these receptors triggers analgesic effects and affects the function of gastrointestinal tract. The discovery of opioid peptides, which are endogenous ligands of opioid receptors, including delta-selective enkephalins, kappa-selective dynorphins, and micro-selective endomorphins, initiated their structure-activity relationship studies. For the last 30 years, hundreds of analogs of opioid peptides have been synthesized in an effort to obtain the compounds more active, selective, and resistant to biodegradation than the endogenous ligands. Different unnatural amino acids, as well as cyclisation procedures, leading to conformationaly restricted analogs, were employed. All these modifications resulted in obtaining very selective agonists and antagonists with high affinity at micro-, dlta-, and kappa-opioid receptors, which are extremely useful tools in further studies on the pharmacology of opioid receptors in a mammalian organism. PMID:17201067

  20. Dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton mediates receptor cross talk: An emerging concept in tuning receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mattila, Pieta K.; Batista, Facundo D.

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence implicates the actin cytoskeleton in the control of receptor signaling. This may be of particular importance in the context of immune receptors, such as the B cell receptor, where dysregulated signaling can result in autoimmunity and malignancy. Here, we discuss the role of the actin cytoskeleton in controlling receptor compartmentalization, dynamics, and clustering as a means to regulate receptor signaling through controlling the interactions with protein partners. We propose that the actin cytoskeleton is a point of integration for receptor cross talk through modulation of protein dynamics and clustering. We discuss the implication of this cross talk via the cytoskeleton for both ligand-induced and low-level constitutive (tonic) signaling necessary for immune cell survival. PMID:26833785

  1. Angiotensin Receptors: Structure, Function, Signaling and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Khuraijam Dhanachandra; Karnik, Sadashiva S

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensinogen – a serpin family protein predominantly produced by the liver is systematically processed by proteases of the Renin Angiotensin system (RAS) generating hormone peptides. Specific cell surface receptors for at least three distinct angiotensin peptides produce distinct cellular signals that regulate system-wide physiological response to RAS. Two well characterized receptors are angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1 receptor) and type 2 receptor (AT2 receptor). They respond to the octapeptide hormone angiotensin II. The oncogene product MAS is a putative receptor for Ang (1–7). While these are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), the in vivo angiotensin IV binding sites may be type 2 transmembrane proteins. These four receptors together regulate cardiovascular, hemodynamic, neurological, renal, and endothelial functions; as well as cell proliferation, survival, matrix-cell interactions and inflammation. Angiotensin receptors are important therapeutic targets for several diseases. Thus, researchers and pharmaceutical companies are focusing on drugs targeting AT1 receptor than AT2 receptor, MAS and AngIV binding sites. AT1 receptor blockers are the cornerstone of current treatment for hypertension, heart failure, renal failure and many types of vascular diseases including atherosclerosis, aortic aneurism and Marfan syndrome. PMID:27512731

  2. Orexin/hypocretin receptor signalling: a functional perspective

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, C S; Kukkonen, J P

    2014-01-01

    Multiple homeostatic systems are regulated by orexin (hypocretin) peptides and their two known GPCRs. Activation of orexin receptors promotes waking and is essential for expression of normal sleep and waking behaviour, with the sleep disorder narcolepsy resulting from the absence of orexin signalling. Orexin receptors also influence systems regulating appetite/metabolism, stress and reward, and are found in several peripheral tissues. Nevertheless, much remains unknown about the signalling pathways and targets engaged by native receptors. In this review, we integrate knowledge about the orexin receptor signalling capabilities obtained from studies in expression systems and various native cell types (as presented in Kukkonen and Leonard, this issue of British Journal of Pharmacology) with knowledge of orexin signalling in different tissues. The tissues reviewed include the CNS, the gastrointestinal tract, the pituitary gland, pancreas, adrenal gland, adipose tissue and the male reproductive system. We also summarize the findings in different native and recombinant cell lines, especially focusing on the different cascades in CHO cells, which is the most investigated cell line. This reveals that while a substantial gap exists between what is known about orexin receptor signalling and effectors in recombinant systems and native systems, mounting evidence suggests that orexin receptor signalling is more diverse than originally thought. Moreover, rather than being restricted to orexin receptor ‘overexpressing’ cells, this signalling diversity may be utilized by native receptors in a site-specific manner. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Orexin Receptors. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-2 PMID:23848055

  3. M1 muscarinic receptor signaling in mouse hippocampus and cortex.

    PubMed

    Porter, Amy C; Bymaster, Frank P; DeLapp, Neil W; Yamada, Masahisa; Wess, Jürgen; Hamilton, Susan E; Nathanson, Neil M; Felder, Christian C

    2002-07-19

    The five subtypes (M1-M5) of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors signal through G(alpha)(q) or G(alpha)(i)/G(alpha)(o). M1, M3 and M5 receptors couple through G(alpha)(q) and function predominantly as postsynaptic receptors in the central nervous system. M1 and M3 receptors are localized to brain regions involved in cognition, such as hippocampus and cortex, but their relative contribution to function has been difficult to ascertain due to the lack of subtype specific ligands. A functional and genetic approach was used to identify the predominant muscarinic receptor subtype(s) mediating responses in mouse hippocampus and cortex, as well as the relative degree of spare muscarinic receptors in hippocampus. The nonselective muscarinic agonist oxotremorine-M stimulated G(alpha)(q)/11-specific GTP-gamma-35S binding in a concentration dependent manner with a Hill slope near unity in wild type mouse hippocampus and cortex. Muscarinic receptor stimulated G(alpha)(q)/11-specific GTP-gamma-35S binding was virtually abolished in both the hippocampus and cortex of M1 receptor knockout (KO) mice. In contrast, there was no loss of signaling in M3 receptor KO mice in either brain region. Muscarinic receptor reserve in wildtype mouse hippocampus was measured by Furchgott analysis after partial receptor alkylation with propylbenzylcholine mustard. Occupation of just 15% of the M1 receptors in mouse hippocampus was required for maximal efficacy of oxotremorine-M-stimulated GTP-gamma-35S binding indicating a substantial level of spare receptors. These findings support a role for the M1 receptor subtype as the primary G(alpha)(q)/11-coupled muscarinic receptor in mouse hippocampus and cortex. PMID:12106668

  4. The Proto-oncogene SET Interacts with Muscarinic Receptors and Attenuates Receptor Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Violaine; Guidry, Jessie; Gettys, Thomas W.; Tobin, Andrew B.; Lanier, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors mediate cell responses to extra-cellular stimuli and likely function in the context of a larger signal transduction complex. Utilizing the third intracellular loop of a G protein-coupled receptor in glutathione S-transfer-ase pulldown assays from rat brain lysates coupled with high sensitivity detection methods and subsequent functional studies, we report the identification of SET as a regulator of muscarinic receptor signaling. SET is a putative oncogene reported to inhibit protein phosphatase 2A and regulate gene transcription. SET binds the carboxyl region of the M3-muscarinic receptor i3 loop, and endogenous SET co-immunoprecipitates with intact M3 muscarinic receptor expressed in cells. Small interfering RNA knockdown of endogenous SET in Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing the M3 muscarinic receptor augmented receptor-mediated mobilization of intracellular calcium by ∼35% with no change in agonist EC50, indicating that interaction of SET with the M3 muscarinic receptor reduces its signaling capacity. SET knockdown had no effect on the mobilization of intracellular calcium by the P2-purinergic receptor, ionomycin, or a direct activator of phospholipase C, indicating a specific regulation of M3 muscarinic receptor signaling. These data provide expanded functionality for SET and a previously unrecognized mechanism for regulation of GPCR signaling capacity. PMID:17065150

  5. Progesterone receptor signalling in retinal photoreceptor neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Alice C Wyse; Roche, Sarah L; Byrne, Ashleigh M; Ruiz-Lopez, Ana M; Cotter, Thomas G

    2016-01-01

    'Norgestrel', a synthetic form of the female hormone progesterone has been identified as potential drug candidate for the treatment of the degenerative eye disease retinitis pigmentosa. However, to date, no work has looked at the compound's specific cellular target. Therefore, this study aimed to identify the receptor target of Norgestrel and begin to examine its potential mechanism of action in the retina. In this work, we identify and characterize the expression of progesterone receptors present in the C57 wild type and rd10 mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa. Classical progesterone receptors A and B (PR A/B), progesterone receptor membrane components 1 and 2 (PGRMC1, PGRMC2) and membrane progesterone receptors α, β and γ were found to be expressed. All receptors excluding PR A/B were also found in the 661W photoreceptor cell line. PGRMC1 is a key regulator of apoptosis and its expression is up-regulated in the degenerating rd10 mouse retina. Activated by Norgestrel through nuclear trafficking, siRNA knock down of PGRMC1 abrogated the protective properties of Norgestrel on damaged photoreceptors. Furthermore, specific inhibition of PGRMC1 by AG205 blocked Norgestrel-induced protection in stressed retinal explants. Therefore, we conclude that PGRMC1 is crucial to the neuroprotective effects of Norgestrel on stressed photoreceptors. The synthetic progestin 'Norgestrel' has been identified as a potential therapeutic for the treatment of Retinitis Pigmentosa, a degenerative eye disease. However, the mechanism behind this neuroprotection is currently unknown. In this work, we identify 'Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component 1' as the major progesterone receptor eliciting the protective effects of Norgestrel, both in vitro and ex vivo. This furthers our understanding of Norgestrel's molecular mechanism, which we hope will help bring Norgestrel one step closer to the clinic. PMID:26447367

  6. Receptor tyrosine kinases: mechanisms of activation and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Stevan R.; Miller, W. Todd

    2008-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are essential components of signal transduction pathways that mediate cell-to-cell communication. These single-pass transmembrane receptors, which bind polypeptide ligands — mainly growth factors — play key roles in processes such as cellular growth, differentiation, metabolism and motility. Recent progress has been achieved towards an understanding of the precise (and varied) mechanisms by which RTKs are activated by ligand binding and by which signals are propagated from the activated receptors to downstream targets in the cell. PMID:17306972

  7. Interdependent epidermal growth factor receptor signalling and trafficking.

    PubMed

    Jones, Sylwia; Rappoport, Joshua Z

    2014-06-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) signalling regulates diverse cellular functions, promoting cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, cell growth and survival. EGFR signalling is critical during embryogenesis, in particular in epithelial development, and disruption of the EGFR gene results in epithelial immaturity and perinatal death. EGFR signalling also functions during wound healing responses through accelerating wound re-epithelialisation, inducing cell migration, proliferation and angiogenesis. Upregulation of EGFR signalling is often observed in carcinomas and has been shown to promote uncontrolled cell proliferation and metastasis. Therefore aberrant EGFR signalling is a common target for anticancer therapies. Various reports indicate that EGFR signalling primarily occurs at the plasma membrane and EGFR degradation following endocytosis greatly attenuates signalling. Other studies argue that EGFR internalisation is essential for complete activation of downstream signalling cascades and that endosomes can serve as signalling platforms. The aim of this review is to discuss current understanding of intersection between EGFR signalling and trafficking. PMID:24681003

  8. Dopamine D2-like receptor signaling suppresses human osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hanami, Kentaro; Nakano, Kazuhisa; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Okada, Yosuke; Yamaoka, Kunihiro; Kubo, Satoshi; Kondo, Masahiro; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2013-09-01

    Dopamine, a major neurotransmitter, transmits signals via five different seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors termed D1 to D5. Although the relevance of neuroendocrine system to bone metabolism has been emerging, the precise effects of dopaminergic signaling upon osteoclastogenesis remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that human monocyte-derived osteoclast precursor cells express all dopamine-receptor subtypes. Dopamine and dopamine D2-like receptor agonists such as pramipexole and quinpirole reduced the formation of TRAP-positive multi-nucleated cells, cathepsin K mRNA expression, and pit formation area in vitro. These inhibitory effects were reversed by pre-treatment with a D2-like receptor antagonist haloperidol or a Gαi inhibitor pertussis toxin, but not with the D1-like receptor antagonist SCH-23390. Dopamine and dopamine D2-like receptor agonists, but not a D1-like receptor agonist, suppressed intracellular cAMP concentration as well as RANKL-meditated induction of c-Fos and NFATc1 mRNA expression in human osteoclast precursor cells. Finally, the dopamine D2-like receptor agonist suppressed LPS-induced osteoclast formation in murine bone marrow culture ex vivo. These findings indicate that dopaminergic signaling plays an important role in bone homeostasis via direct effects upon osteoclast differentiation and further suggest that the clinical use of neuroleptics is likely to affect bone mass. PMID:23631878

  9. β-Adrenergic Receptor Signaling in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Braadland, Peder Rustøen; Ramberg, Håkon; Grytli, Helene Hartvedt; Taskén, Kristin Austlid

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced sympathetic signaling, often associated with obesity and chronic stress, is increasingly acknowledged as a contributor to cancer aggressiveness. In prostate cancer, intact sympathetic nerves are critical for tumor formation, and sympathectomy induces apoptosis and blocks tumor growth. Perineural invasion, involving enrichment of intra-prostatic nerves, is frequently observed in prostate cancer and is associated with poor prognosis. β2-adrenergic receptor (ADRB2), the most abundant receptor for sympathetic signals in prostate luminal cells, has been shown to regulate trans-differentiation of cancer cells to neuroendocrine-like cells and to affect apoptosis, angiogenesis, epithelial–mesenchymal transition, migration, and metastasis. Epidemiologic studies have shown that use of β-blockers, inhibiting β-adrenergic receptor activity, is associated with reduced prostate cancer-specific mortality. In this review, we aim to present an overview on how β-adrenergic receptor and its downstream signaling cascade influence the development of aggressive prostate cancer, primarily through regulating neuroendocrine differentiation. PMID:25629002

  10. Identification of opioid receptor subtypes in antinociceptive actions of supraspinally-administered mitragynine in mice.

    PubMed

    Thongpradichote, S; Matsumoto, K; Tohda, M; Takayama, H; Aimi, N; Sakai, S; Watanabe, H

    1998-01-01

    Mitragynine (MG), a major alkaloidal constituent extracted from the plant Mitragyna speciosa Korth, is known to exert an opioid-like activity. Our previous study showed the involvement of opioid systems in the antinociceptive activity of MG in the tail-pinch and hot-plate tests in mice. In the present study, to clarify the opioid receptor subtypes involved in the antinociceptive action of MG, we investigated the effects of selective antagonists for mu-, delta- and kappa- opioid receptors on antinociception caused by the intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of MG in the tail-pinch and hot-plate tests in mice. The coadministration of a selective mu-opioid antagonist, cyprodime (1-10 microg, i.c.v.) and the pretreatment with a selective mu1-opioid antagonist naloxonazine (1-3 microg, i.c.v.) significantly antagonized the antinociceptive activities of MG (10 microg, i.c.v.) and morphine (MOR, 3 microg, i.c.v.) in the tail-pinch and hot-plate tests. Naltrindole (1-5 ng, i.c.v.), a selective delta-opioid antagonist, also blocked the effects of MG (10 microg, i.c.v.) without affecting MOR (3 microg, i.c.v.) antinociception. Nor-binaltorphimine, a selective kappa-opioid antagonist, significantly attenuated MG (10 microg, i.c.v.) antinociception in the tail-pinch test but not in the hot-plate test at the dose (1 microg, i.c.v.) that antagonized the antinociceptive effects of the selective kappa-opioid agonist U50,488H in both tests, while it had no effect on MOR antinociception in either tests. These results suggest that antinociception caused by i.c.v. MG is dominantly mediated by mu- and delta-opioid receptor subtypes, and that the selectivity of MG for the supraspinal opioid receptor subtypes differs from that of MOR in mice. PMID:9585164

  11. MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF RECEPTOR KINASE ACTION IN BRASSINOSTEROID SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development and require an active BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE 1 (BRI1) and BRI1-ASSOCIATED RECEPTOR KINASE 1 (BAK1) for hormone perception and signal transduction. To examine early events in BR signaling, we used co-immunoprecipita...

  12. Recognition of Bacterial Signal Peptides by Mammalian Formyl Peptide Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bufe, Bernd; Schumann, Timo; Kappl, Reinhard; Bogeski, Ivan; Kummerow, Carsten; Podgórska, Marta; Smola, Sigrun; Hoth, Markus; Zufall, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are G-protein-coupled receptors that function as chemoattractant receptors in innate immune responses. Here we perform systematic structure-function analyses of FPRs from six mammalian species using structurally diverse FPR peptide agonists and identify a common set of conserved agonist properties with typical features of pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Guided by these results, we discover that bacterial signal peptides, normally used to translocate proteins across cytoplasmic membranes, are a vast family of natural FPR agonists. N-terminally formylated signal peptide fragments with variable sequence and length activate human and mouse FPR1 and FPR2 at low nanomolar concentrations, thus establishing FPR1 and FPR2 as sensitive and broad signal peptide receptors. The vomeronasal receptor mFpr-rs1 and its sequence orthologue hFPR3 also react to signal peptides but are much more narrowly tuned in signal peptide recognition. Furthermore, all signal peptides examined here function as potent activators of the innate immune system. They elicit robust, FPR-dependent calcium mobilization in human and mouse leukocytes and trigger a range of classical innate defense mechanisms, such as the production of reactive oxygen species, metalloprotease release, and chemotaxis. Thus, bacterial signal peptides constitute a novel class of immune activators that are likely to contribute to mammalian immune defense against bacteria. This evolutionarily conserved detection mechanism combines structural promiscuity with high specificity and enables discrimination between bacterial and eukaryotic signal sequences. With at least 175,542 predicted sequences, bacterial signal peptides represent the largest and structurally most heterogeneous class of G-protein-coupled receptor agonists currently known for the innate immune system. PMID:25605714

  13. Inhibition of mu and delta opioid receptor ligand binding by the peptide aldehyde protease inhibitor, leupeptin.

    PubMed

    Christoffers, Keith H; Khokhar, Arshia; Chaturvedi, Kirti; Howells, Richard D

    2002-04-15

    We reported recently that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is involved in agonist-induced down regulation of mu and delta opioid receptors [J. Biol. Chem. 276 (2001) 12345]. While evaluating the effects of various protease inhibitors on agonist-induced opioid receptor down regulation, we observed that while the peptide aldehyde, leupeptin (acetyl-L-Leucyl-L-Leucyl-L-Arginal), did not affect agonist-induced down regulation, leupeptin at submillimolar concentrations directly inhibited radioligand binding to opioid receptors. In this study, the inhibitory activity of leupeptin on radioligand binding was characterized utilizing human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cell lines expressing transfected mu, delta, or kappa opioid receptors. The rank order of potency for leupeptin inhibition of [3H]bremazocine binding to opioid receptors was mu > delta > kappa. In contrast to the effect of leupeptin, the peptide aldehyde proteasome inhibitor, MG 132 (carbobenzoxy-L-Leucyl-L-Leucyl-L-Leucinal), had significantly less effect on bremazocine binding to mu, delta, or kappa opioid receptors. We propose that leupeptin inhibits ligand binding by reacting reversibly with essential sulfhydryl groups that are necessary for high-affinity ligand/receptor interactions. PMID:11853866

  14. TAM Receptors in Leukemia: Expression, Signaling, and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Brandão, Luis; Migdall-Wilson, Justine; Eisenman, Kristen; Graham, Douglas K.

    2016-01-01

    In the past 30 years there has been remarkable progress in the treatment of leukemia and lymphoma. However, current treatments are largely ineffective against relapsed leukemia and, in the case of pediatric patients, are often associated with severe long-term toxicities. Thus, there continues to be a critical need for the development of effective biologically targeted therapies. The TAM family of receptor tyrosine kinases—Tyro3, Axl, and Mer—plays an important role in normal hematopoiesis, including natural killer cell maturation, macrophage function, and platelet activation and signaling. Furthermore, TAM receptor activation leads to upregulation of pro-survival and proliferation signaling pathways, and aberrant TAM receptor expression contributes to cancer development, including myeloid and lymphoid leukemia. This review summarizes the role of TAM receptors in leukemia. We outline TAM receptor expression patterns in different forms of leukemia, describe potential mechanisms leading to their overexpression, and delineate the signaling pathways downstream of receptor activation that have been implicated in leukemogenesis. Finally, we discuss the current research focused on inhibitors against these receptors in an effort to develop new therapeutic strategies for leukemia. PMID:22150307

  15. Insulin glulisine: insulin receptor signaling characteristics in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hennige, Anita M; Lehmann, Rainer; Weigert, Cora; Moeschel, Klaus; Schäuble, Myriam; Metzinger, Elisabeth; Lammers, Reiner; Häring, Hans-Ulrich

    2005-02-01

    In recent years, recombinant DNA technology has been used to design insulin molecules that overcome the limitations of regular insulin in mealtime supplementation. However, safety issues have been raised with these alternatives, as the alteration of the three-dimensional structure may alter the interaction with the insulin and/or IGF-I receptors and therefore lead to the activation of alternate metabolic as well as mitogenic signaling pathways. It is therefore essential to carefully study acute and long-term effects in a preclinical state, as insulin therapy is meant to be a lifelong treatment. In this study, we determined in vivo the insulin receptor signaling characteristics activated by insulin glulisine (Lys(B3), Glu(B29)) at the level of insulin receptor phosphorylation, insulin receptor substrate phosphorylation, and downstream signaling elements such as phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase, AKT, and mitogen-activated protein kinase. C57BL/6 mice were injected with insulin glulisine or regular insulin and Western blot analysis was performed for liver and muscle tissue. The extent and time course of insulin receptor phosphorylation and activation of downstream signaling elements after insulin glulisine treatment was similar to that of human regular insulin in vivo. Moreover, insulin signaling in hypothalamic tissue determined by PI 3-kinase activity was comparable. Therefore, insulin glulisine may be a useful tool for diabetes treatment. PMID:15677493

  16. Prolactin receptor and signal transduction to milk protein genes

    SciTech Connect

    Djiane, J.; Daniel, N.; Bignon, C.

    1994-06-01

    After cloning of the mammary gland prolactin (PRL) receptor cDNA, a functional assay was established using co-transfection of PRL receptor cDNA together with a milk protein promoter/chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) construct in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Different mutants of the PRL receptor were tested in this CAT assay to delimit the domains in the receptor necessary for signal transduction to milk protein genes. In CHO cells stably transfected with PRL receptor cDNA, high numbers of PRL receptor are expressed. By metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation, expressed PRL receptor was identified as a single species of 100 kDa. Using these cells, we analyzed the effects of PRL on intracellular free Ca{sup ++} concentration. PRL stimulates Ca{sup ++} entry and induces secondary Ca{sup ++} mobilization. The entry of Ca{sup ++} is a result of an increase in K{sup +} conductance that hyperpolarizes the membranes. We have also analyzed tyrosine phosphorylation induced by PRL. In CHO cells stably transfected with PRL receptor cDNA, PRL induced a very rapid and transient tyrosine phosphorylation of a 100-kDa protein which is most probably the PRL receptor. The same finding was obtained in mammary membranes after PRL injection to lactating rabbits. Whereas tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and lavendustin were without effect, PRL stimulation of milk protein gene promoters was partially inhibited by 2 {mu}M herbimycin in CHO cells co-transfected with PRL receptor cDNA and the {Beta} lactoglobulin CAT construct. Taken together these observations indicate that the cytoplasmic domain of the PRL receptor interacts with one or several tyrosine kinases, which may represent early postreceptor events necessary for PRL signal transduction to milk protein genes. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Redox-dependent regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Heppner, David E; van der Vliet, Albert

    2016-08-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent cell signaling represents a unique feature of multicellular organisms, and is important in regulation of cell differentiation and specialized cell functions. Multicellular organisms also contain a diverse family of NADPH oxidases (NOXs) that have been closely linked with tyrosine kinase-based cell signaling and regulate tyrosine phosphorylation via reversible oxidation of cysteine residues that are highly conserved within many proteins involved in this signaling pathway. An example of redox-regulated tyrosine kinase signaling involves the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a widely studied receptor system with diverse functions in normal cell biology as well as pathologies associated with oxidative stress such as cancer. The purpose of this Graphical Redox Review is to highlight recently emerged concepts with respect to NOX-dependent regulation of this important signaling pathway. PMID:26722841

  18. Redox-dependent regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Heppner, David E.; van der Vliet, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent cell signaling represents a unique feature of multicellular organisms, and is important in regulation of cell differentiation and specialized cell functions. Multicellular organisms also contain a diverse family of NADPH oxidases (NOXs) that have been closely linked with tyrosine kinase-based cell signaling and regulate tyrosine phosphorylation via reversible oxidation of cysteine residues that are highly conserved within many proteins involved in this signaling pathway. An example of redox-regulated tyrosine kinase signaling involves the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a widely studied receptor system with diverse functions in normal cell biology as well as pathologies associated with oxidative stress such as cancer. The purpose of this Graphical Redox Review is to highlight recently emerged concepts with respect to NOX-dependent regulation of this important signaling pathway. PMID:26722841

  19. Receptor downregulation and desensitization enhance the information processing ability of signaling receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Shankaran, Harish; Wiley, H. S.; Resat, Haluk

    2007-11-09

    The activation of cell surface receptors in addition to initiating signaling events also triggers regulatory processes that restrict the duration of signaling. Acute attenuation of signaling can be accomplished either via ligand-induced internalization of receptors (receptor downregulation) or via ligand-induced receptor desensitization. These phenomena have traditionally been viewed in the context of “adaptation” wherein the receptor system enters a refractory state in the presence of sustained ligand stimuli and thereby prevents the cell from “over-responding” to the ligand. Here we use the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) as model systems to respectively examine the effects of downregulation and desensitization on the ability of signaling receptors to decode time-varying ligand stimuli. We show that downregulation and desensitization mechanisms can lead to tight and efficient input-output coupling thereby ensuring synchronous processing of ligand inputs. Frequency response analysis indicates that upstream elements of the EGFR and GPCR networks behave like low-pass filters. Receptor downregulation and desensitization increase the filter bandwidth thereby enabling the receptor systems to decode inputs in a wider frequency range. Further, system-theoretic analysis reveals that the receptor systems are analogous to classical mechanical over-damped oscillators. This analogy enables us to describe downregulation and desensitization as phenomena that make the systems more resilient in responding to ligand perturbations thereby improving the stability of the system resting state. We hypothesize that, in addition to serving as mechanisms for adaptation, receptor downregulation and desensitization play a critical role in temporal information processing.

  20. Soluble interleukin-1 receptor--reverse signaling in innate immunoregulation.

    PubMed

    Spörri, B; Bickel, M; Dobbelaere, D; Machado, J; Lottaz, D

    2001-03-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) is one of the most important proinflammatory cytokines, regulating immunological and inflammatory processes. It induces a very efficient and self-amplifying cytokine-network. The action of IL-1 must, therefore, be under tight control. Soluble IL-1 receptor was thought to be an efficient negative regulator of the IL-1 signaling system. However, recent studies in vitro and in vivo demonstrate that soluble IL-1 receptor can act as an agonist as well, inducing intracellular signaling events. This feature of soluble IL-1 receptor adds a new level of complexity to our understanding of ligand-receptor cross-talk and cell-to-cell communication. PMID:11312116

  1. Evolution of retinoic acid receptors and retinoic acid signaling.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Mazariegos, Juliana; Schubert, Michael; Laudet, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a vitamin A-derived morphogen controlling important developmental processes in vertebrates, and more generally in chordates, including axial patterning and tissue formation and differentiation. In the embryo, endogenous RA levels are controlled by RA synthesizing and degrading enzymes and the RA signal is transduced by two retinoid receptors: the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and the retinoid X receptor (RXR). Both RAR and RXR are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors and mainly act as heterodimers to activate the transcription of target genes in the presence of their ligand, all-trans RA. This signaling pathway was long thought to be a chordate innovation, however, recent findings of gene homologs involved in RA signaling in the genomes of a wide variety of non-chordate animals, including ambulacrarians (sea urchins and acorn worms) and lophotrochozoans (annelids and mollusks), challenged this traditional view and suggested that the RA signaling pathway might have a more ancient evolutionary origin than previously thought. In this chapter, we discuss the evolutionary history of the RA signaling pathway, and more particularly of the RARs, which might have experienced independent gene losses and duplications in different animal lineages. In sum, the available data reveal novel insights into the origin of the RA signaling pathway as well as into the evolutionary history of the RARs. PMID:24962881

  2. NADPH Oxidases and Angiotensin II Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Abel Martin; Griendling, Kathy K.

    2010-01-01

    Over the last decade many studies have demonstrated the importance of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by NADPH oxidases in angiotensin II (Ang II) signaling, as well as a role for ROS in the development of different diseases in which Ang II is a central component. In this review, we summarize the mechanism of activation of NADPH oxidases by Ang II and describe the molecular targets of ROS in Ang II signaling in the vasculature, kidney and brain. We also discuss the effects of genetic manipulation of NADPH oxidase function on the physiology and pathophysiology of the renin angiotensin system. PMID:19059306

  3. Receptors and signalling mechanisms in the procoagulant response of platelets.

    PubMed

    Heemskerk, J W; Siljander, P R; Bevers, E M; Farndale, R W; Lindhout, T

    2000-09-01

    Platelets in an advanced stage of activation change from coagulation-inactive to coagulation-promoting cells. This procoagulant response is characterised by exposure of aminophospholipids, such as phosphatidylserine, to the platelet surface and by formation of microvesicles. Under specific conditions, when both signalling and adhesive platelet receptors are occupied, collagen and also thrombin are able to trigger this response. Thus, platelets express high coagulation-promoting activity only after interacting with multiple receptors. PMID:11083453

  4. Nuclear bile acid signaling through the farnesoid X receptor.

    PubMed

    Mazuy, Claire; Helleboid, Audrey; Staels, Bart; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2015-05-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are amphipathic molecules produced from cholesterol by the liver. Expelled from the gallbladder upon meal ingestion, BAs serve as fat solubilizers in the intestine. BAs are reabsorbed in the ileum and return via the portal vein to the liver where, together with nutrients, they provide signals to coordinate metabolic responses. BAs act on energy and metabolic homeostasis through the activation of membrane and nuclear receptors, among which the nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is an important regulator of several metabolic pathways. Highly expressed in the liver and the small intestine, FXR contributes to BA effects on metabolism, inflammation and cell cycle control. The pharmacological modulation of its activity has emerged as a potential therapeutic strategy for liver and metabolic diseases. This review highlights recent advances regarding the mechanisms by which the BA sensor FXR contributes to global signaling effects of BAs, and how FXR activity may be regulated by nutrient-sensitive signaling pathways. PMID:25511198

  5. CSF-1 Receptor Signaling in Myeloid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, E. Richard; Chitu, Violeta

    2014-01-01

    The CSF-1 receptor (CSF-1R) is activated by the homodimeric growth factors colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) and interleukin-34 (IL-34). It plays important roles in development and in innate immunity by regulating the development of most tissue macrophages and osteoclasts, of Langerhans cells of the skin, of Paneth cells of the small intestine, and of brain microglia. It also regulates the differentiation of neural progenitor cells and controls functions of oocytes and trophoblastic cells in the female reproductive tract. Owing to this broad tissue expression pattern, it plays a central role in neoplastic, inflammatory, and neurological diseases. In this review we summarize the evolution, structure, and regulation of expression of the CSF-1R gene. We review, the structures of CSF-1, IL-34, and the CSF-1R and the mechanism of ligand binding to and activation of the receptor. We further describe the pathways regulating macrophage survival, proliferation, differentiation, and chemotaxis downstream from the CSF-1R. PMID:24890514

  6. Drosophila Vps4 promotes Epidermal growth factor receptor signaling independently of its role in receptor degradation

    PubMed Central

    Legent, Kevin; Liu, Hui Hua; Treisman, Jessica E.

    2015-01-01

    Endocytic trafficking of signaling receptors is an important mechanism for limiting signal duration. Components of the Endosomal Sorting Complexes Required for Transport (ESCRT), which target ubiquitylated receptors to intra-lumenal vesicles (ILVs) of multivesicular bodies, are thought to terminate signaling by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and direct it for lysosomal degradation. In a genetic screen for mutations that affect Drosophila eye development, we identified an allele of Vacuolar protein sorting 4 (Vps4), which encodes an AAA ATPase that interacts with the ESCRT-III complex to drive the final step of ILV formation. Photoreceptors are largely absent from Vps4 mutant clones in the eye disc, and even when cell death is genetically prevented, the mutant R8 photoreceptors that develop fail to recruit surrounding cells to differentiate as R1-R7 photoreceptors. This recruitment requires EGFR signaling, suggesting that loss of Vps4 disrupts the EGFR pathway. In imaginal disc cells mutant for Vps4, EGFR and other receptors accumulate in endosomes and EGFR target genes are not expressed; epistasis experiments place the function of Vps4 at the level of the receptor. Surprisingly, Vps4 is required for EGFR signaling even in the absence of Shibire, the Dynamin that internalizes EGFR from the plasma membrane. In ovarian follicle cells, in contrast, Vps4 does not affect EGFR signaling, although it is still essential for receptor degradation. Taken together, these findings indicate that Vps4 can promote EGFR activity through an endocytosis-independent mechanism. PMID:25790850

  7. Commentary: IL-4 and IL-13 receptors and signaling.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Sarah M; Heller, Nicola M

    2015-09-01

    Interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13 were discovered approximately 30years ago and were immediately linked to allergy and atopic diseases. Since then, new roles for IL-4 and IL-13 and their receptors in normal gestation, fetal development and neurological function and in the pathogenesis of cancer and fibrosis have been appreciated. Studying IL-4/-13 and their receptors has revealed important clues about cytokine biology and led to the development of numerous experimental therapeutics. Here we aim to highlight new discoveries and consolidate concepts in the field of IL-4 and IL-13 structure, receptor regulation, signaling and experimental therapeutics. PMID:26187331

  8. Receptor downregulation and desensitization enhance the information processing ability of signalling receptors

    PubMed Central

    Shankaran, Harish; Wiley, H Steven; Resat, Haluk

    2007-01-01

    Background In addition to initiating signaling events, the activation of cell surface receptors also triggers regulatory processes that restrict the duration of signaling. Acute attenuation of signaling can be accomplished either via ligand-induced internalization of receptors (endocytic downregulation) or via ligand-induced receptor desensitization. These phenomena have traditionally been viewed in the context of adaptation wherein the receptor system enters a refractory state in the presence of sustained ligand stimuli and thereby prevents the cell from over-responding to the ligand. Here we use the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) as model systems to respectively examine the effects of downregulation and desensitization on the ability of signaling receptors to decode time-varying ligand stimuli. Results Using a mathematical model, we show that downregulation and desensitization mechanisms can lead to tight and efficient input-output coupling thereby ensuring synchronous processing of ligand inputs. Frequency response analysis indicates that upstream elements of the EGFR and GPCR networks behave like low-pass filters with the system being able to faithfully transduce inputs below a critical frequency. Receptor downregulation and desensitization increase the filter bandwidth thereby enabling the receptor systems to decode inputs in a wider frequency range. Further, system-theoretic analysis reveals that the receptor systems are analogous to classical mechanical over-damped systems. This analogy enables us to metaphorically describe downregulation and desensitization as phenomena that make the systems more resilient in responding to ligand perturbations thereby improving the stability of the system resting state. Conclusion Our findings suggest that in addition to serving as mechanisms for adaptation, receptor downregulation and desensitization can play a critical role in temporal information processing. Furthermore

  9. Assembly and localization of Toll-like receptor signalling complexes.

    PubMed

    Gay, Nicholas J; Symmons, Martyn F; Gangloff, Monique; Bryant, Clare E

    2014-08-01

    Signal transduction by the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) is central to host defence against many pathogenic microorganisms and also underlies a large burden of human disease. Thus, the mechanisms and regulation of signalling by TLRs are of considerable interest. In this Review, we discuss the molecular basis for the recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns, the nature of the protein complexes that mediate signalling, and the way in which signals are regulated and integrated at the level of allosteric assembly, post-translational modification and subcellular trafficking of the components of the signalling complexes. These fundamental molecular mechanisms determine whether the signalling output leads to a protective immune response or to serious pathologies such as sepsis. A detailed understanding of these processes at the molecular level provides a rational framework for the development of new drugs that can specifically target pathological rather than protective signalling in inflammatory and autoimmune disease. PMID:25060580

  10. New Insights into How Trafficking Regulates T Cell Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Jieqiong; Rossy, Jérémie; Deng, Qiji; Pageon, Sophie V.; Gaus, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    There is emerging evidence that exocytosis plays an important role in regulating T cell receptor (TCR) signaling. The trafficking molecules involved in lytic granule (LG) secretion in cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) have been well-studied due to the immune disorder known as familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHLH). However, the knowledge of trafficking machineries regulating the exocytosis of receptors and signaling molecules remains quite limited. In this review, we summarize the reported trafficking molecules involved in the transport of the TCR and downstream signaling molecules to the cell surface. By combining this information with the known knowledge of LG exocytosis and general exocytic trafficking machinery, we attempt to draw a more complete picture of how the TCR signaling network and exocytic trafficking matrix are interconnected to facilitate T cell activation. This also highlights how membrane compartmentalization facilitates the spatiotemporal organization of cellular responses that are essential for immune functions. PMID:27508206

  11. Activating Receptor Signals Drive Receptor Diversity in Developing Natural Killer Cells.

    PubMed

    Freund, Jacquelyn; May, Rebecca M; Yang, Enjun; Li, Hongchuan; McCullen, Matthew; Zhang, Bin; Lenvik, Todd; Cichocki, Frank; Anderson, Stephen K; Kambayashi, Taku

    2016-08-01

    It has recently been appreciated that NK cells exhibit many features reminiscent of adaptive immune cells. Considerable heterogeneity exists with respect to the ligand specificity of individual NK cells and as such, a subset of NK cells can respond, expand, and differentiate into memory-like cells in a ligand-specific manner. MHC I-binding inhibitory receptors, including those belonging to the Ly49 and KIR families, are expressed in a variegated manner, which creates ligand-specific diversity within the NK cell pool. However, how NK cells determine which inhibitory receptors to express on their cell surface during a narrow window of development is largely unknown. In this manuscript, we demonstrate that signals from activating receptors are critical for induction of Ly49 and KIR receptors during NK cell development; activating receptor-derived signals increased the probability of the Ly49 bidirectional Pro1 promoter to transcribe in the forward versus the reverse direction, leading to stable expression of Ly49 receptors in mature NK cells. Our data support a model where the balance of activating and inhibitory receptor signaling in NK cells selects for the induction of appropriate inhibitory receptors during development, which NK cells use to create a diverse pool of ligand-specific NK cells. PMID:27500644

  12. Activating Receptor Signals Drive Receptor Diversity in Developing Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Freund, Jacquelyn; May, Rebecca M.; Li, Hongchuan; McCullen, Matthew; Zhang, Bin; Lenvik, Todd; Cichocki, Frank; Anderson, Stephen K.; Kambayashi, Taku

    2016-01-01

    It has recently been appreciated that NK cells exhibit many features reminiscent of adaptive immune cells. Considerable heterogeneity exists with respect to the ligand specificity of individual NK cells and as such, a subset of NK cells can respond, expand, and differentiate into memory-like cells in a ligand-specific manner. MHC I-binding inhibitory receptors, including those belonging to the Ly49 and KIR families, are expressed in a variegated manner, which creates ligand-specific diversity within the NK cell pool. However, how NK cells determine which inhibitory receptors to express on their cell surface during a narrow window of development is largely unknown. In this manuscript, we demonstrate that signals from activating receptors are critical for induction of Ly49 and KIR receptors during NK cell development; activating receptor-derived signals increased the probability of the Ly49 bidirectional Pro1 promoter to transcribe in the forward versus the reverse direction, leading to stable expression of Ly49 receptors in mature NK cells. Our data support a model where the balance of activating and inhibitory receptor signaling in NK cells selects for the induction of appropriate inhibitory receptors during development, which NK cells use to create a diverse pool of ligand-specific NK cells. PMID:27500644

  13. Orphan receptor IL-17RD regulates Toll-like receptor signalling via SEFIR/TIR interactions.

    PubMed

    Mellett, Mark; Atzei, Paola; Bergin, Ronan; Horgan, Alan; Floss, Thomas; Wurst, Wolfgang; Callanan, John J; Moynagh, Paul N

    2015-01-01

    Receptor families of the innate immune response engage in 'cross-talk' to tailor optimal immune responses against invading pathogens. However, these responses are subject to multiple levels of regulation to keep in check aberrant inflammatory signals. Here, we describe a role for the orphan receptor interleukin-17 receptor D (IL-17RD) in negatively regulating Toll-like receptor (TLR)-induced responses. Deficiency of IL-17RD expression in cells leads to enhanced pro-inflammatory signalling and gene expression in response to TLR stimulation, and Il17rd(-/-) mice are more susceptible to TLR-induced septic shock. We demonstrate that the intracellular Sef/IL-17R (SEFIR) domain of IL-17RD targets TIR adaptor proteins to inhibit TLR downstream signalling thus revealing a paradigm involving cross-regulation of members of the IL-17R and TLR families. PMID:25808990

  14. The phosphatidylserine receptor TIM-4 does not mediate direct signaling.

    PubMed

    Park, Daeho; Hochreiter-Hufford, Amelia; Ravichandran, Kodi S

    2009-02-24

    Engulfment of apoptotic cells is an active process coordinated by receptors on phagocytes and ligands on apoptotic cells [1]. Phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) is a key ligand on apoptotic cells, and recently three PtdSer recognition receptors have been identified, namely, TIM-4, BAI1, and Stabilin-2 [1-6]. Whereas BAI1 is dependent on the ELMO1/Dock180/Rac signaling module, and Stablilin-2 appears to use the intracellular adaptor GULP [2, 3, 7], little is known about how TIM-4 transduces signals downstream of PtdSer recognition [8]. To test the role of known engulfment signaling pathways in TIM-4-mediated engulfment, we used a combination of dominant-negative mutants, knockdown of specific signaling proteins, and knockout cell lines. TIM-4 appears to be largely independent of the two known engulfment signaling pathways [7, 9-17], yet the TIM-4-mediated uptake is inhibited by cytoskeleton disrupting drugs. Remarkably, a version of TIM-4 lacking its cytoplasmic tail promoted corpse uptake via PtdSer recognition. Moreover, replacement of the transmembrane region of TIM-4 with a glycophosphatidylinositol anchor still promoted engulfment comparable to wild-type TIM-4. Thus, the transmembrane region and cytoplasmic tail of TIM-4 are dispensable for apoptotic cell engulfment, and we propose that TIM-4 is a PtdSer tethering receptor without any direct signaling of its own. PMID:19217291

  15. Diverse FGF receptor signaling controls astrocyte specification and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Kyungjun; Song, Mi-Ryoung

    2010-05-07

    During CNS development, pluripotency neuronal progenitor cells give rise in succession to neurons and glia. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), a major signal that maintains neural progenitors in the undifferentiated state, is also thought to influence the transition from neurogenesis to gliogenesis. Here we present evidence that FGF receptors and underlying signaling pathways transmit the FGF-2 signals that regulate astrocyte specification aside from its mitogenic activity. Application of FGF-2 to cortical progenitors suppressed neurogenesis whereas treatment with an FGFR antagonist in vitro promoted neurogenesis. Introduction of chimeric FGFRs with mutated tyrosine residues into cortical progenitors and drug treatments to specifically block individual downstream signaling pathways revealed that the overall activity of FGFR rather than individual autophosphorylation sites is important for delivering signals for glial specification. In contrast, a signal for cell proliferation by FGFR was mainly delivered by MAPK pathway. Together our findings indicate that FGFR activity promotes astrocyte specification in the developing CNS.

  16. Interfering with interferon receptor sorting and trafficking: impact on signaling.

    PubMed

    Claudinon, Julie; Monier, Marie-Noëlle; Lamaze, Christophe

    2007-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) and their receptors (IFN-Rs) play fundamental roles in a multitude of biological functions. Many articles and reviews emphasize that the JAK/STAT machinery is obligatory for relay of the information transmitted by IFNs after binding to their cognate receptors at the plasma membrane. In contrast, very few studies have addressed the endocytosis and the intracellular trafficking of IFN-Rs, the immediate step following IFN binding. However, recent findings have shed light on the importance of IFN-R sorting and trafficking in the control of IFN signaling. Thus, IFN-Rs can be included in the growing family of signaling receptors for which regulation of biological activity critically involves endocytosis and trafficking. PMID:17493737

  17. The multiple facets of opioid receptor function: implications for addiction

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Pierre-Eric; Kieffer, Brigitte L.

    2013-01-01

    Addiction is characterized by altered reward processing, disrupted emotional responses and poor decision-making. Beyond a central role in drug reward, increasing evidence indicate that opioid receptors are more generally involved in all these processes. Recent studies establish the mu opioid receptor as a main player in social reward, which attracts increasing attention in psychiatric research. There is growing interest in blocking the kappa opioid receptor to prevent relapse, and alleviate the negative affect of withdrawal. The delta opioid receptor emerges as a potent mood enhancer, whose involvement in addiction is less clear. All three opioid receptors are likely implicated in addiction-depression comorbidity, and understanding of their roles in cognitive deficits associated to drug abuse is only beginning. PMID:23453713

  18. The mechanisms of HAMP-mediated signaling in transmembrane receptors.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Hedda U; Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanislaw; Mondéjar, Laura García; Hulko, Michael; Hantke, Klaus; Martin, Jörg; Schultz, Joachim E; Zeth, Kornelius; Lupas, Andrei N; Coles, Murray

    2011-03-01

    HAMP domains mediate signal transduction in over 7500 enzyme-coupled receptors represented in all kingdoms of life. The HAMP domain of the putative archaeal receptor Af1503 has a parallel, dimeric, four-helical coiled coil structure, but with unusual core packing, related to canonical packing by concerted axial rotation of the helices. This has led to the gearbox model for signal transduction, whereby the alternate packing modes correspond to signaling states. Here we present structures of a series of Af1503 HAMP variants. We show that substitution of a conserved small side chain within the domain core (A291) for larger residues induces a gradual transition in packing mode, involving both changes in helix rotation and bundle shape, which are most prominent at the C-terminal, output end of the domain. These are correlated with activity and ligand response in vitro and in vivo by incorporating Af1503 HAMP into mycobacterial adenylyl cyclase assay systems. PMID:21397188

  19. General, kappa, delta and mu opioid receptor antagonists mediate feeding elicited by the GABA-B agonist baclofen in the ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens shell in rats: reciprocal and regional interactions.

    PubMed

    Miner, Patricia; Shimonova, Lyudmila; Khaimov, Arthur; Borukhova, Yaffa; Ilyayeva, Ester; Ranaldi, Robert; Bodnar, Richard J

    2012-03-14

    administration in the VTA or NACs was also preceded by administration of NTX (0.1, 1, 5 μg, 0.5 h), BFNA (0.4, 4 μg, 24 h), NBNI (0.6, 6 μg, 0.5 h) or NTI (0.4, 4 μg, 0.5 h) into the other site with intake measured 1, 2 and 4 h after agonist treatment. VTA NTX significantly reduced NACs baclofen-induced feeding. Correspondingly, NACs NTX significantly reduced VTA baclofen-induced feeding, indicating a robust and bidirectional general opioid and GABA-B receptor feeding interaction. Whereas the high, but not low VTA BFNA dose reduced NACs baclofen-induced feeding, NACs BFNA failed to affect VTA baclofen-induced feeding, indicating a unidirectional mu opioid and GABA-B receptor feeding interaction. Whereas VTA NBNI at both doses reduced NACs baclofen-induced feeding, the high, but not low NACs NBNI dose significantly reduced VTA baclofen-induced feeding, indicating a bidirectional kappa opioid and GABA-B receptor feeding interaction. Whereas VTA NTI only transiently reduced NACs baclofen-induced feeding, NACs NTI failed to affect VTA baclofen-induced feeding, indicating a weak unidirectional delta opioid and GABA-B receptor interaction. Whereas administration of NTX or BFNA into the NACs or VTA marginally reduced spontaneous food intake, NBNI or NTI into the same sites failed to alter food intake alone. Therefore, the present study suggests that GABA employs a distributed brain network in mediating its ingestive effects that is dependent upon intact opioid receptor signaling with kappa opioid receptors more involved than mu and delta opioid receptors underlying these regional effects. An alternative hypothesis to be considered is that these effects could be the sum of two independent drug effects (opioid antagonists decreasing and baclofen increasing food intake). PMID:22305145

  20. Activation of signalling by the activin receptor complex.

    PubMed Central

    Attisano, L; Wrana, J L; Montalvo, E; Massagué, J

    1996-01-01

    Activin exerts its effects by simultaneously binding to two types of p rotein serine/threonine kinase receptors, each type existing in various isoforms. Using the ActR-IB and ActR-IIB receptor isoforms, we have investigated the mechanism of activin receptor activation. ActR-IIB are phosphoproteins with demonstrable affinity for each other. However, activin addition strongly promotes an interaction between these two proteins. Activin binds directly to ActR-IIB, and this complex associates with ActR-IB, which does not bind ligand on its own. In the resulting complex, ActR-IB becomes hyperphosphorylated, and this requires the kinase activity of ActR-IIB. Mutation of conserved serines and threonines in the GS domain, a region just upstream of the kinase domain in ActR-IB, abrogates both phosphorylation and signal propagation, suggesting that this domain contains phosphorylation sites required for signalling. ActR-IB activation can be mimicked by mutation of Thr-206 to aspartic acid, which yields a construct, ActR-IB(T206D), that signals in the absence of ligand. Furthermore, the signalling activity of this mutant construct is undisturbed by overexpression of a dominant negative kinase-defective ActR-IIB construct, indicating that ActR-IB(T206D) can signal independently of ActR-IIB. The evidence suggests that ActR-IIB acts as a primary activin receptor and ActR-IB acts as a downstream transducer of activin signals. PMID:8622651

  1. Potency enhancement of the κ-opioid receptor antagonist probe ML140 through sulfonamide constraint utilizing a tetrahydroisoquinoline motif.

    PubMed

    Frankowski, Kevin J; Slauson, Stephen R; Lovell, Kimberly M; Phillips, Angela M; Streicher, John M; Zhou, Lei; Whipple, David A; Schoenen, Frank J; Prisinzano, Thomas E; Bohn, Laura M; Aubé, Jeffrey

    2015-07-15

    Optimization of the sulfonamide-based kappa opioid receptor (KOR) antagonist probe molecule ML140 through constraint of the sulfonamide nitrogen within a tetrahydroisoquinoline moiety afforded a marked increase in potency. This strategy, when combined with additional structure-activity relationship exploration, has led to a compound only six-fold less potent than norBNI, a widely utilized KOR antagonist tool compound, but significantly more synthetically accessible. The new optimized probe is suitably potent for use as an in vivo tool to investigate the therapeutic potential of KOR antagonists. PMID:25593096

  2. Phase separation of signaling molecules promotes T cell receptor signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaolei; Ditlev, Jonathon A; Hui, Enfu; Xing, Wenmin; Banjade, Sudeep; Okrut, Julia; King, David S; Taunton, Jack; Rosen, Michael K; Vale, Ronald D

    2016-04-29

    Activation of various cell surface receptors triggers the reorganization of downstream signaling molecules into micrometer- or submicrometer-sized clusters. However, the functional consequences of such clustering have been unclear. We biochemically reconstituted a 12-component signaling pathway on model membranes, beginning with T cell receptor (TCR) activation and ending with actin assembly. When TCR phosphorylation was triggered, downstream signaling proteins spontaneously separated into liquid-like clusters that promoted signaling outputs both in vitro and in human Jurkat T cells. Reconstituted clusters were enriched in kinases but excluded phosphatases and enhanced actin filament assembly by recruiting and organizing actin regulators. These results demonstrate that protein phase separation can create a distinct physical and biochemical compartment that facilitates signaling. PMID:27056844

  3. Platelet receptors and signaling in the dynamics of thrombus formation

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, José; Lozano, María Luisa; Navarro-Núñez, Leyre; Vicente, Vicente

    2009-01-01

    Hemostasis and pathological thrombus formation are dynamic processes that require a co-ordinated series of events involving platelet membrane receptors, bidirectional intracellular signals, and release of platelet proteins and inflammatory substances. This review aims to summarize current knowledge in the key steps in the dynamics of thrombus formation, with special emphasis on the crucial participation of platelet receptors and signaling in this process. Initial tethering and firm adhesion of platelets to the exposed subendothelium is mediated by glycoprotein (GP) Ib/IX/V complex and collagen receptors, GP VI and α2β1 integrin, in the platelet surface, and by VWF and fibrillar collagen in the vascular site. Interactions between these elements are largely influenced by flow and trigger signaling events that reinforce adhesion and promote platelet activation. Thereafter, soluble agonists, ADP, thrombin, TxA2, produced/released at the site of vascular injury act in autocrine and paracrine mode to amplify platelet activation and to recruit circulating platelets to the developing thrombus. Specific interactions of these agonists with their G-protein coupled receptors generate inside-out signaling leading to conformational activation of integrins, in particular αIIbβ3, increasing their ligand affinity. Binding of αIIbβ3 to its ligands, mainly fibrinogen, supports processes such as clot retraction and platelet aggregation. Stabilization of thrombi is supported by the late wave of signaling events promoted by close contact between aggregated platelets. The best known contact-dependent signaling is outside-in signaling through αIb β3, but new ones are being clarified such as those mediated by interaction of Eph receptors with ephrins, or by Sema 4D and Gas-6 binding to their receptors. Finally, newly identified mechanisms appear to control thrombus growth, including back-shifting of activated integrins and actuation of compensatory molecules such as ESAM or PECAM-1

  4. Sigma 1 receptor modulation of G-protein-coupled receptor signaling: potentiation of opioid transduction independent from receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Felix J; Kovalyshyn, Ivanka; Burgman, Maxim; Neilan, Claire; Chien, Chih-Cheng; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2010-04-01

    sigma Ligands modulate opioid actions in vivo, with agonists diminishing morphine analgesia and antagonists enhancing the response. Using human BE(2)-C neuroblastoma cells that natively express opioid receptors and human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells transfected with a cloned mu opioid receptor, we now demonstrate a similar modulation of opioid function, as assessed by guanosine 5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate ([(35)S]GTP gamma S) binding, by sigma(1) receptors. sigma Ligands do not compete opioid receptor binding. Administered alone, neither sigma agonists nor antagonists significantly stimulated [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding. Yet sigma receptor selective antagonists, but not agonists, shifted the EC(50) of opioid-induced stimulation of [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding by 3- to 10-fold to the left. This enhanced potency was seen without a change in the efficacy of the opioid, as assessed by the maximal stimulation of [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding. sigma(1) Receptors physically associate with mu opioid receptors, as shown by coimmunoprecipitation studies in transfected HEK cells, implying a direct interaction between the proteins. Thus, sigma receptors modulate opioid transduction without influencing opioid receptor binding. RNA interference knockdown of sigma(1) in BE(2)-C cells also potentiated mu opioid-induced stimulation of [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding. These modulatory actions are not limited to mu and delta opioid receptors. In mouse brain membrane preparations, sigma(1)-selective antagonists also potentiated both opioid receptor and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated stimulation of [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding, suggesting a broader role for sigma receptors in modulating G-protein-coupled receptor signaling. PMID:20089882

  5. σ1 Receptor Modulation of G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling: Potentiation of Opioid Transduction Independent from Receptor Binding

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Felix J.; Kovalyshyn, Ivanka; Burgman, Maxim; Neilan, Claire; Chien, Chih-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    σ Ligands modulate opioid actions in vivo, with agonists diminishing morphine analgesia and antagonists enhancing the response. Using human BE(2)-C neuroblastoma cells that natively express opioid receptors and human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells transfected with a cloned μ opioid receptor, we now demonstrate a similar modulation of opioid function, as assessed by guanosine 5′-O-(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate ([35S]GTPγS) binding, by σ1 receptors. σ Ligands do not compete opioid receptor binding. Administered alone, neither σ agonists nor antagonists significantly stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding. Yet σ receptor selective antagonists, but not agonists, shifted the EC50 of opioid-induced stimulation of [35S]GTPγS binding by 3- to 10-fold to the left. This enhanced potency was seen without a change in the efficacy of the opioid, as assessed by the maximal stimulation of [35S]GTPγS binding. σ1 Receptors physically associate with μ opioid receptors, as shown by coimmunoprecipitation studies in transfected HEK cells, implying a direct interaction between the proteins. Thus, σ receptors modulate opioid transduction without influencing opioid receptor binding. RNA interference knockdown of σ1 in BE(2)-C cells also potentiated μ opioid-induced stimulation of [35S]GTPγS binding. These modulatory actions are not limited to μ and δ opioid receptors. In mouse brain membrane preparations, σ1-selective antagonists also potentiated both opioid receptor and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated stimulation of [35S]GTPγS binding, suggesting a broader role for σ receptors in modulating G-protein-coupled receptor signaling. PMID:20089882

  6. Heterogeneity of epidermal growth factor receptor signalling networks in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Furnari, Frank B.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Cavenee, Webster K.; Mischel, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    As tumours evolve, the daughter cells of the initiating cell often become molecularly heterogeneous and develop different functional properties and therapeutic vulnerabilities. In glioblastoma (GBM), a lethal form of brain cancer, the heterogeneous expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) poses a substantial challenge for the effective use of EGFR-targeted therapies. Understanding the mechanisms that cause EGFR heterogeneity in GBM should provide better insights into how they, and possibly other amplified receptor tyrosine kinases, affect cellular signalling, metabolism and drug resistance. PMID:25855404

  7. Noribogaine is a G-protein biased κ-opioid receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Maillet, Emeline L; Milon, Nicolas; Heghinian, Mari D; Fishback, James; Schürer, Stephan C; Garamszegi, Nandor; Mash, Deborah C

    2015-12-01

    Noribogaine is the long-lived human metabolite of the anti-addictive substance ibogaine. Noribogaine efficaciously reaches the brain with concentrations up to 20 μM after acute therapeutic dose of 40 mg/kg ibogaine in animals. Noribogaine displays atypical opioid-like components in vivo, anti-addictive effects and potent modulatory properties of the tolerance to opiates for which the mode of action remained uncharacterized thus far. Our binding experiments and computational simulations indicate that noribogaine may bind to the orthosteric morphinan binding site of the opioid receptors. Functional activities of noribogaine at G-protein and non G-protein pathways of the mu and kappa opioid receptors were characterized. Noribogaine was a weak mu antagonist with a functional inhibition constants (Ke) of 20 μM at the G-protein and β-arrestin signaling pathways. Conversely, noribogaine was a G-protein biased kappa agonist 75% as efficacious as dynorphin A at stimulating GDP-GTP exchange (EC50=9 μM) but only 12% as efficacious at recruiting β-arrestin, which could contribute to the lack of dysphoric effects of noribogaine. In turn, noribogaine functionally inhibited dynorphin-induced kappa β-arrestin recruitment and was more potent than its G-protein agonistic activity with an IC50 of 1 μM. This biased agonist/antagonist pharmacology is unique to noribogaine in comparison to various other ligands including ibogaine, 18-MC, nalmefene, and 6'-GNTI. We predict noribogaine to promote certain analgesic effects as well as anti-addictive effects at effective concentrations>1 μM in the brain. Because elevated levels of dynorphins are commonly observed and correlated with anxiety, dysphoric effects, and decreased dopaminergic tone, a therapeutically relevant functional inhibition bias to endogenously released dynorphins by noribogaine might be worthy of consideration for treating anxiety and substance related disorders. PMID:26302653

  8. Molecular Control of δ-Opioid Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Fenalti, Gustavo; Giguere, Patrick M.; Katritch, Vsevolod; Huang, Xi-Ping; Thompson, Aaron A.; Cherezov, Vadim; Roth, Bryan L.; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Opioids represent widely prescribed and abused medications, although their signal transduction mechanisms are not well understood. Here we present the 1.8Å high-resolution crystal structure of the human δ-opioid receptor (δ-OR), revealing the presence and fundamental role of a sodium ion mediating allosteric control of receptor functional selectivity and constitutive activity. The distinctive δ-OR sodium ion site architecture is centrally located in a polar interaction network in the 7-transmembrane bundle core, with the sodium ion stabilizing a reduced agonist affinity state, and thereby modulating signal transduction. Site-directed mutagenesis and functional studies reveal that changing the allosteric sodium site residue Asn131 to alanine or valine augments constitutive arrestin-ergic signaling. Asp95Ala, Asn310Ala, and Asn314Ala mutations transform classical δ-opioid antagonists like naltrindole into potent β-arrestin-biased agonists. The data establish the molecular basis for allosteric sodium ion control in opioid signaling, revealing that sodium-coordinating residues act as “efficacy-switches” at a prototypic G protein-coupled receptor. PMID:24413399

  9. Adiponectin Receptor Signaling on Dendritic Cells Blunts Antitumor Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Peng H.; Tyrrell, Helen E.J.; Gao, Liquan; Xu, Danmei; Quan, Jianchao; Gill, Dipender; Rai, Lena; Ding, Yunchuan; Plant, Gareth; Chen, Yuan; Xue, John Z.; Handa, Ashok I.; Greenall, Michael J.; Walsh, Kenneth; Xue, Shao-An

    2015-01-01

    Immune escape is a fundamental trait of cancer. Dendritic cells (DC) that interact with T cells represent a crucial site for the development of tolerance to tumor antigens, but there remains incomplete knowledge about how DC-tolerizing signals evolve during tumorigenesis. In this study, we show that DCs isolated from patients with metastatic or locally advanced breast cancer express high levels of the adiponectin receptors AdipoR1 and AdipoR2, which are sufficient to blunt antitumor immunity. Mechanistic investigations of ligand–receptor interactions on DCs revealed novel signaling pathways for each receptor. AdipoR1 stimulated IL10 production by activating the AMPK and MAPKp38 pathways, whereas AdipoR2 modified inflammatory processes by activating the COX-2 and PPARγ pathways. Stimulation of these pathways was sufficient to block activation of NF-κB in DC, thereby attenuating their ability to stimulate antigen-specific T-cell responses. Together, our findings reveal novel insights into how DC-tolerizing signals evolve in cancer to promote immune escape. Furthermore, by defining a critical role for adiponectin signaling in this process, our work suggests new and broadly applicable strategies for immunometabolic therapy in patients with cancer. PMID:25261236

  10. Early signaling dynamics of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Raven J; Gajadhar, Aaron S; Swenson, Eric J; Rothenberg, Daniel A; Curran, Timothy G; White, Forest M

    2016-03-15

    Despite extensive study of the EGF receptor (EGFR) signaling network, the immediate posttranslational changes that occur in response to growth factor stimulation remain poorly characterized; as a result, the biological mechanisms underlying signaling initiation remain obscured. To address this deficiency, we have used a mass spectrometry-based approach to measure system-wide phosphorylation changes throughout the network with 10-s resolution in the 80 s after stimulation in response to a range of eight growth factor concentrations. Significant changes were observed on proteins far downstream in the network as early as 10 s after stimulation, indicating a system capable of transmitting information quickly. Meanwhile, canonical members of the EGFR signaling network fall into clusters with distinct activation patterns. Src homology 2 domain containing transforming protein (Shc) and phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) phosphorylation levels increase rapidly, but equilibrate within 20 s, whereas proteins such as Grb2-associated binder-1 (Gab1) and SH2-containing tyrosine phosphatase (SHP2) show slower, sustained increases. Proximity ligation assays reveal that Shc and Gab1 phosphorylation patterns are representative of separate timescales for physical association with the receptor. Inhibition of phosphatases with vanadate reveals site-specific regulatory mechanisms and also uncovers primed activating components in the network, including Src family kinases, whose inhibition affects only a subset of proteins within the network. The results presented highlight the complexity of signaling initiation and provide a window into exploring mechanistic hypotheses about receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) biology. PMID:26929352