These are representative sample records from Science.gov related to your search topic.
For comprehensive and current results, perform a real-time search at Science.gov.
1

Kennedy's Disease  

MedlinePLUS

NINDS Kennedy's Disease Information Page Synonym(s): Bulbospinal Muscular Atrophy, X-Linked Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy Table of Contents (click ... is being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Kennedy's Disease? Kennedy's disease is an inherited motor neuron disease ...

2

BIODIVERSIDAD FUNGOSA EN LA MARCHITEZ DEL CHILE Y ALGUNOS FACTORES INVOLUCRADOS, EN TLACOTEPEC DE JOSÉ MANZO, EL VERDE, PUEBLA FUNGI BIODIVERSITY ON PEPPER WILT, AND SOME RELATED FACTORS, IN TLACOTEPEC DE JOSÉ MANZO, EL VERDE, PUEBLA  

Microsoft Academic Search

En Tlacotepec de José Manzo, el Verde, Pue., la marchitez del chile ha causado pérdidas (70% a total) del cultivo. Los hongos Fusarium spp., Macrophomina spp., Phytophthora capsici., Pythium spp., Rhizoctonia solani., y Sclerotium rolfsii, causan marchitez y perdida en producción. El objetivo de este estudio fue identificar, por su morfología y caracterización molecular, a los hongos causantes de marchitez;

Enrique González-Pérez; María J. Yáñez-Morales; Víctor Santiago-Santiago; Ángel Montero-Pineda

3

Interview with Kathleen Blee  

E-print Network

, ethical and methodological issues that can come up, and we also know that you’ve done work in gender and research in appalachia and race weaves itself through all of those things. Can you start by describing the evolution of your interests and your... or that might bring kind of intense emotions to the table? 27 Interview with Kathleen Blee Blee: there are two issues. one is relevant not just to racist groups, but to any groups that have a violent agenda, especially one that identifies researchers...

Decker, Stephanie Kristine

2007-01-01

4

Kathleen Franz Department of History  

E-print Network

Kathleen Franz Department of History American University 4400 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Washington, DC: American cultural history, 1876-1939, popular culture, the history of technology, material and visual in American Studies, Magna Cum Laude Employment Associate Professor and Director of Public History American

Lansky, Joshua

5

A photonic wall pressure sensor for fluid mechanics applications M. Manzo, T. Ioppolo, U. K. Ayaz, V. LaPenna, and M. V. tgen  

E-print Network

of beams into bossed diaphragm for a high sensitivity and overload micro pressure sensor Rev. Sci. InstrumA photonic wall pressure sensor for fluid mechanics applications M. Manzo, T. Ioppolo, U. K. Ayaz sensor for pressure monitoring in a minute package J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 19, 353 (2001); 10

�tügen, Volkan

6

Kathleen Dean Moore Featured Banquet Speaker  

E-print Network

Kathleen Dean Moore Featured Banquet Speaker Northwest Scientific Association Annual Meeting March there will be a banquet (buffet style) starting at 6:30 PM in the Columbia Room of the University Place Hotel. The fee

7

KENNEDY CENTER CELEBRATION ANNIVERSARY OF KENNEDY SPACE  

E-print Network

of music. Welcome to this program that celebrates the wonderful legacy left by President John F. Kennedy 50 on us to pursue exploration as a unified nation, and envision the benefits of exploration for Earth, who has outlined an urgent national need to out-innovate, out-educate, and out-build our #12

Waliser, Duane E.

8

Kennedy's Disease Association  

MedlinePLUS

Kennedy's Disease Association A Public Benefit, Non-Profit Organization Register GTranslate GTranslate Javascript is required to use GTranslate multilingual website and translation delivery network Select Language English Afrikaans Albanian Arabic Armenian ...

9

About Kennedy's Disease: Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

Kennedy's Disease Association A Public Benefit, Non-Profit Organization Register GTranslate GTranslate Javascript is required to use GTranslate multilingual website and translation delivery network Close "I attended a KDA Conference. Personally ...

10

Corps Lakes Gateway M. Kathleen Perales  

E-print Network

1 Corps Lakes Gateway M. Kathleen Perales NRM Gateway Project Leader September 30, 2003 2 Agenda · Purpose of Visitor Pages · Overview of National, State, and Lake pages · Understanding the data · How Pages · Supporting Recreation.Gov · Consistent Recreation information across all Lakes ­ with geographic

US Army Corps of Engineers

11

environment+ Victor S. Kennedy  

E-print Network

on Sea Ice 32 IV. Effects of Global Climate Change on Coral Reefs 33 A. Predicted Changes, including estuaries, coral reefs, and the open ocean. Report authors, Drs. Victor Kennedy, Robert Twilley for resources may face local or global extinction. · Changes in precipitation and sea-level rise will have

12

Marcus A. Louie & Kathleen M. Carley Carnegie Mellon University  

E-print Network

Marcus A. Louie & Kathleen M. Carley Carnegie Mellon University mlouie@andrew.cmu.edu, kathleen measures. Contact: Marcus A. Louie Department of Engineering and Public Policy Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Tel: 1-412-268-3940 Fax: 1-412-268-3938 Email: mlouie@andrew.cmu.edu Key Words

Sadeh, Norman M.

13

Kennedy Space Center Payload Processing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews the payload processing functions at Kennedy Space Center. It details some of the payloads processed at KSC, the typical processing tasks, the facilities available for processing payloads, and the capabilities and customer services that are available.

Lawson, Ronnie; Engler, Tom; Colloredo, Scott; Zide, Alan

2011-01-01

14

Kennedy Space Center Design Visualization  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Perform simulations of ground operations leading up to launch at Kennedy Space Center and Vandenberg Air Force Base in CA since 1987. We use 3D Laser Scanning, Modeling and Simulations to verify that operations are feasible, efficient and safe.

Humeniuk, Bob

2013-01-01

15

Exploring the Meaning of "Welcoming Communities" Dr. Anne Marie Sullivan, Kathleen Ring and Savanna Harris  

E-print Network

Exploring the Meaning of "Welcoming Communities" Dr. Anne Marie Sullivan, Kathleen Ring and Savanna in Newfoundland and Labrador Final Report Prepared by: Dr. Anne Marie Sullivan and Kathleen Ring Savanna

deYoung, Brad

16

Perspectives of Kennedy's disease.  

PubMed

Kennedy's disease, also known as bulbospinal muscular atrophy (BSMA), is a rare, adult-onset, X-linked, recessive trinucleotide, polyglutamine (poly-G) disorder, caused by expansion of an unstable CAG-tandem-repeat in exon 1 of the androgen-receptor (AR) gene on chromosome Xq11-12. Poly-Q-expanded AR accumulates in nuclei, undergoes fragmentation and initiates degeneration and loss of motor neurons and dorsal root ganglia. Phenotypically, patients present with weakness and wasting of the facial, bulbar and extremity muscles, sensory disturbances, and endocrinological disturbances, such as gynecomastia and reduced fertility. In the limb muscles weakness and wasting may be symmetric or asymmetric, proximal or distal, or may predominate at the lower or upper limb muscles. There may be mild to severe hyper-CK-emia, elevated testosterone or other sexual hormones, abnormal motor and sensory nerve conduction studies, and neuropathic or rarely myopathic alterations on muscle biopsy. BSMA is diagnosed if the number of CAG-repeats exceeds 40. No causal therapy is available but symptomatic therapy may be beneficial for weakness, tremor, endocrinological abnormalities, muscle cramps, respiratory failure, or dysphagia. The course is slowly progressive and the ability to walk lost only late in life. Only few patients require ventilatory support and life expectancy is only slightly compromised. PMID:20846673

Finsterer, J

2010-11-15

17

Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Among 2011's many accomplishments, we safely retired the Space Shuttle Program after 30 incredible years; completed the International Space Station and are taking steps to enable it to reach its full potential as a multi-purpose laboratory; and helped to expand scientific knowledge with missions like Aquarius, GRAIL, and the Mars Science Laboratory. Responding to national budget challenges, we are prioritizing critical capabilities and divesting ourselves of assets no longer needed for NASA's future exploration programs. Since these facilities do not have to be maintained or demolished, the government saves money. At the same time, our commercial partners save money because they do not have to build new facilities. It is a win-win for everyone. Moving forward, 2012 will be even more historically significant as we celebrate the 50th Anniversary of Kennedy Space Center. In the coming year, KSC will facilitate commercial transportation to low-Earth orbit and support the evolution of the Space Launch System and Orion crew vehicle as they ready for exploration missions, which will shape how human beings view the universe. While NASA's Vision is to lead scientific and technological advances in aeronautics and space for a Nation on the frontier of discovery KSC's vision is to be the world's preeminent launch complex for government and commercial space access, enabling the world to explore and work in space. KSC's Mission is to safely manage, develop, integrate, and sustain space systems through partnerships that enable innovative, diverse access to space and inspires the Nation's future explorers.

Griffin, Amanda

2012-01-01

18

Kennedy at Rice University  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

President Kennedy speaks before a crowd of 35,000 people at Rice University in the football field. The following are excerpts from his speech. ' ...We set sail on his new sea because there is a new knowledge to begained, and new rights to be won, and they must be won and used for the progress of all people. Whether it will become a force for good or ill depends on man, and only if the United States occupies a position of pre-eminence can we help decide whether this new ocean will be a sea of peace or a new terrifying theater of war. But I do say space can be explored and mastered without feeding the fires of war, without repeating the mistakes that man has made with extending his wirt around this globe of ours. There is no strife, no prejudice, no national conflict in outer space as yet. Its conquest deserves the best of all mankind, and its opportunity for peaceful cooperation may never come again. But why, some say the Moon? Why choose this as our goal? And they may well ask, why climb the highest mountain? Why 35 years ago why fly the Atlantic? Why does Rice play Texas? We choose to go to the Moon, we choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one in which we attend to win, and the others , too.'

1962-01-01

19

Kennedy at Rice University  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

President Kennedy speaks before a crowd of 35,000 people at Rice University in the football field. The following are excerpts from his speech. ' ...We set sail on his new sea because there is a new knowledge to be gained, and new rights to be won, and they must be won and used for the progress of all people. ...Whether it will become a force for good or ill depends on man, and only if the United States occupies a position of pre-eminence can we help decide whether this new ocean will be a sea of peace or a new terrifying theater of war. But I do say space can be explored and mastered without feeding the fires of war, without repeating the mistakes that man has made with extending his writ around this globe of ours. ...There is no strife, no prejudice, no national conflict in outer space as yet. Its conquest deserves the best of all mankind, and its opportunity for peaceful cooperation may never come again. But why, some say the Moon? Why choose this as our goal? And they may well ask, why climb the highest mountian? Why - 35 years ago - why fly the Atlantic? Why does Rice play Texas? We choose to go to the Moon, we choose to go to the Moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one in which we intend to win, and the others too.'

1962-01-01

20

K. M. Carley August 22, 2008 Kathleen Mary Carley  

E-print Network

-- Programmer/Consultant INTERESTS Kathleen M. Carley's research combines cognitive science, social networks are dynamic network analysis, computational social and organization theory, adaptation and of Social and Organizational Systems. http://www.casos.cs.cmu.edu/ 1/1997 Invited Professor, Universite

21

Kathleen Franz Associate Professor and Director of Public History  

E-print Network

Kathleen Franz Associate Professor and Director of Public History Department of History, American 1999 in American Civilization Fields of specialization: American cultural history, 1876-1939, popular culture, the history of technology, material and visual culture, and public history. The University

Lansky, Joshua

22

Maze Busters: Carrie Miyoshi Macfarlane & Kathleen Sheehan--Harvard University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Even if one is equipped with an MLS, the 11 libraries that comprise the Harvard College Library can be pretty daunting. That is why Carrie Miyoshi Macfarlane and Kathleen Sheehan created Threading the Maze. The online publication is presented to students in expository writing, the one course all undergraduates must take. "This highly effective…

Library Journal, 2004

2004-01-01

23

Plasma Physics John F. Kennedy  

E-print Network

v v v v v Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory N 278 95 1 95 18 NEW YORK John F. Kennedy Int Campus/ Sayre Drive Sign PPPLSayre Dr. Location: Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory James Forrestal Campus U.S. Route #1 North at Sayre Drive Plainsboro, NJ 08536 Mailing Address: Princeton Plasma Physics

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

24

At the Vanderbilt Kennedy Center,  

E-print Network

to William Spickard, an 8-year- old student with Down syndrome she was tutoring. McDermott, a graduate to endow a Vanderbilt Kennedy Reading Clinic scholarship fund for students with Down syndrome, Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome--may provide important information for understanding the processes

Sarkar, Nilanjan

25

Muscle matters in Kennedy's disease.  

PubMed

Polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor causes Kennedy's disease. Two recent reports, Cortes et al. (2014) in this issue of Neuron and Lieberman et al. (2014) in Cell Reports, raise the possibility that targeting expression of the mutant protein in skeletal muscle, instead of the nervous system, may mitigate manifestations of this disorder. PMID:24742452

Rinaldi, Carlo; Bott, Laura C; Fischbeck, Kenneth H

2014-04-16

26

[Kennedy's disease--case report].  

PubMed

Kennedy's disease or spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a rare neurological illness inherited recessively, linked with chromosome X. The first symptoms appear in the adult age and result from degeneration of both motor and sensory neurons. The disease begins differently, thus causing diagnostic mistakes. In our case the symptoms suggested discopathy, therefore the patient was operated on L5-S1 discopathy, which did not improve lower limb muscle strength. This entailed further diagnostic work-up. The EMG (needle) examination showed widespread chronic denervation with reinnervation in the muscles of the limbs. The genetic examination revealed increased number of CAG(45) trinucleotide repeats, thus confirming a suspicion of Kennedy's disease. PMID:15997639

Tomczykiewicz, Kazimierz; Wrodycka, Beata; Su?ek, Anna

2005-03-01

27

Kennedy Space Center exercise program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Fitness Program began in Feb. 1993. The program is managed by the Biomedical Operations and Research Office and operated by the Bionetics Corporation. The facilities and programs are offered to civil servants, all contractors, temporary duty assignment (TDY) participants, and retirees. All users must first have a medical clearance. A computer-generated check-in system is used to monitor participant usage. Various aspects of the program are discussed.

Hoffman, Cristy

1993-01-01

28

78 FR 6173 - Diana Del Grosso, Ray Smith, Joseph Hatch, Cheryl Hatch, Kathleen Kelley, Andrew Wilklund, and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Transportation Board [Docket No. FD 35652] Diana Del Grosso, Ray Smith, Joseph Hatch, Cheryl Hatch, Kathleen Kelley, Andrew...to a petition filed on August 1, 2012, by Diana Del Grosso, Ray Smith, Joseph Hatch, Cheryl Hatch, Kathleen Kelley,...

2013-01-29

29

In Tribute: Senator Edward M. Kennedy, Friend of NIH  

MedlinePLUS

... Contents Sen. Edward Kennedy (r) confers with Dr. Francis Collins, who was then director of the National ... emotionally disadvantaged. Paying tribute to Kennedy, NIH Director Francis S. Collins said, "Sen. Kennedy was an amazing man— ...

30

Kennedy Space Center Spaceport Analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Until the Shuttle Atlantis' final landing on July 21, 2011, Kennedy Space Center (KSC) served as NASA's main spaceport, which is a launch and landing facility for rockets and spacecraft that are attempting to enter orbit. Many of the facilities at KSC were created to assist the Shuttle Program. One of the most important and used facilities is the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), This was the main landing area for the return of the shuttle after her mission in space. · However, the SLF has also been used for a number of other projects including straight-line testing by Gibbs Racing, weather data collection by NOAA, and an airfield for the KSC helicopters. This runway is three miles long with control tower at midfield and a fire department located at the end in care of an emergency. This facility, which was part of the great space race, will continue to be used for historical events as Kennedy begins to commercialize its facilities. KSC continues to be an important spaceport to the government, and it will transform into an important spaceport for the commercial industry as well. During my internship at KSC's Center Planning and Development Directorate, I had the opportunity to be a part of the negotiation team working on the agreement for Space Florida to control the Shuttle Landing Facility. This gave me the opportunity to learn about all the changes that are occurring here at Kennedy Space Center. Through various meetings, I discovered the Master Plan and its focus is to transform the existing facilities that were primarily used for the Shuttle Program, to support government operations and commercial flights in the future. This. idea is also in a new strategic business plan and completion of a space industry market analysis. All of these different documentations were brought to my attention and I. saw how they came together in the discussions of transitioning the SLF to a commercial operator, Space Florida. After attending meetings and partaking in discussions for the SLF Agreement, I formed the idea of a Spaceport Analysis as my over internship project. As previously stated, I had the opportunity to sit in on the market analysis meetings and read through the analysis itself. I suggested the creation of a Strengths Weaknesses Opportunities Threats (SWOT) analysis, which allows an individual to see an overview of the company's strengths and weaknesses alongside any industry opportunities and threats. After discussions with the lead writer of the new strategic business plan and getting approval, I took the action upon myself and created the Kennedy Space Center SWOT Analysis.

Wary, Samantha A.

2013-01-01

31

Manzo's Language Shaping Paradigm (LSP).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A teaching strategy has been devised to teach students how to value their own thoughts and experiences. Secondary purposes of the strategy are to help students deal with their own identities, to improve their general language and essay writing abilities, and to heighten their appreciation of the writing of others. The seven steps of the teaching…

Manzo, A. V.; Sherk, J. K.

32

Kennedy Space Center polygeneration facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This is a report on the status of the polygeneration feasibility study conducted by the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Polygeneration is an innovative approach to reducing cost per flight for the Shuttle by reducing propellant and other costs. Cost of LH2 is expected to be adversely affected by sharp increases in natural gas pricing as well as other costs such as electricity and transportation. The polygeneration concept is to produce liquid hydrogen (LH2) for the Shuttle and gaseous nitrogen (GN2), electricity and thermal energy to meet KSC requirements by means of an integrated coal gasification plant. Conclusions of the initial feasibility study will be presented as well as the status of on-going activities.

Gutkowski, G. P.

1984-01-01

33

Kennedy's disease: pathogenesis and clinical approaches.  

PubMed

Kennedy's disease, also known as spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, is a progressive degenerative condition affecting lower motor neurons. It is one of nine neurodegenerative disorders caused by a polyglutamine repeat expansion. Affecting only men, Kennedy's disease is the only one of these conditions that follows an X-linked mode of inheritance. The causative protein in Kennedy's disease, with a polyglutamine expansion residing in the first N-terminal domain, is the androgen receptor. Research in this field has made significant advances in recent years, and with the increased understanding of pathogenic mechanisms, feasible approaches to treatments are being investigated. In Kennedy's disease research, the most significant issue to emerge recently is the role of androgens in exacerbating the disease process. On the basis of animal experiments, a viable hypothesis is that higher circulating levels of androgens in men could trigger the degeneration of motor neurons causing this disease, and that lower levels in heterozygous and homozygous women are protective. This is a major issue, as treatment of individuals affected by Kennedy's disease with testosterone has been considered a reasonable therapy by some neurologists. The rationale behind this approach relates to the fact that Kennedy's disease is accompanied by mild androgen insensitivity. It was therefore believed that treatment with high doses of testosterone might compensate for this loss of androgen action, with the added benefit of preventing muscle wasting. The current review provides an overview of recent advances in the field of Kennedy's disease research, including approaches to treatment. PMID:15151675

Greenland, K J; Zajac, J D

2004-05-01

34

Kennedy NOW! - Duration: 2:44.  

NASA Video Gallery

In this edition of Kennedy Now!, find out about accelerating preparations for an Orion flight test next year, along with a robotic miner under development. Also see the robotic craft designed and b...

35

President Kennedy's Speech at Rice University  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This video tape presents unedited film footage of President John F. Kennedy's speech at Rice University, Houston, Texas, September 12, 1962. The speech expresses the commitment of the United States to landing an astronaut on the Moon.

1988-01-01

36

John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum is housed in a gorgeous building designed by noted architect I.M. Pei. For those who can't make it to Boston to visit, the associated website is full of relevant information about President Kennedy's life, speeches, presidency, and legacy. This section of the site is dedicated to seven interesting interactive exhibits, including "We Choose The Moon," "The President's Desk," and "White House Diary." In "The President's Desk," visitors can explore Kennedy's work space. This exhibit includes items from his travels, like the famous coconut he carved after his ship, the PT-109, was attacked off the Solomon Islands. The "We Choose The Moon" area contains archival photos and footage describing how President Kennedy helped lead the quest to land a manned spacecraft on the moon. The "White House Diary" takes visitors on an interactive tour through each day of the Kennedy presidency, highlighting the speeches, meetings, conferences, and other activities that commanded his time in office.

37

Health services at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Comprehensive occupational health services are provided to approximately 17,000 workers at the Kennedy Space Center and an additional 6000 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. These areas cover about 120,000 acres encompassing part of the Merritt Island Wild Life Refuge and wetlands which are the habitat of numerous endangered and protected species of wildlife. The services provided at the Kennedy Space Center optimally assure a safe and healthy working environment for the employees engaged in the preparation and launching of this country's Space Shuttle and other important space exploration programs.

Ferguson, E. B.; Humbert, P.; Long, I. D.; Tipton, D. A.

1992-01-01

38

WILDLIFE - ALLIGATOR BEGINS TO CROSS KENNEDY PARKWAY  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Harold O'Connor, manager of the Merritt Island Wildlife Refuge, watches a 10-foot-long alligator inch its way toward a busy highway at the Kennedy Space Center. O'Connor, aided by assistant Jerome Carroll, not shown, guided the large gator to safety in a nearby pond, several miles south of the Vehicle Assembly Building, in background. The Apollo 12 astronauts will be launched no earlier than November 14, 1969, from the Kennedy Space Center on the Nation's second manned lunar landing mission.

1969-01-01

39

WRITTEN STATEMENT OF DAVID M. KENNEDY  

E-print Network

in the Deepwater Horizon BP oil spill response effort. My name is David Kennedy, I am the Assistant Administrator. The Deepwater Horizon BP oil spill, the largest accidental oil spill in history, is only the most recent example for the Deepwater Horizon BP oil spill, successes and challenges of the Deepwater Horizon NRDA, and the current

40

WRITTEN STATEMENT OF DAVID M. KENNEDY  

E-print Network

in the response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. My name is David Kennedy and I am the Acting Assistant to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill from the beginning, providing coordinated scientific services when and where the critical roles NOAA serves during oil spills and the importance of our contributions to protect and restore

41

Failure Analysis at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

History has shown that failures occur in every engineering endeavor, and what we learn from those failures contributes to the knowledge base to safely complete future missions. The necessity of failure analysis is at its apex at the end of one aged program and at the beginning of a new and untested program. The information that we gain through failure analysis corrects the deficiencies in the current vehicle to make the next generation of vehicles more efficient and safe. The Failure Analysis and Materials Evaluation Branch in the Materials Science Division at the Kennedy Space Center performs metallurgical, mechanical, electrical, and non-metallic materials failure analyses and accident investigations on both flight hardware and ground support equipment for the Space Shuttle, International Space Station, Constellation, and Launch Services Programs. This paper will explore a variety of failure case studies at the Kennedy Space Center and the lessons learned that can be applied in future programs.

Salazar, Victoria L.; Wright, M. Clara

2010-01-01

42

Sensor Applications at Kennedy Space Center (KSC)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Transducers used at KSC (Kennedy Space Center), in support of processing and launch of flight vehicles and payloads, are designed and tested to meet specific program requirements. Any equipment, transducer or support instrumentation in direct contact or in support to flight vehicle operations is considered ground support equipment (GSE) and required to meet strict program requirements (i.e. Space Shuttle Program, Space Station Program, Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicles, etc.) Transducers used in KSC applications are based on commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) transducers and sensors. In order to fully meet KSC requirements, these transducers evolve from standard COTS to modified COTS. The Transducer and Data Acquisition Group of the Instrumentation Branch at Kennedy Space Center is responsible for providing the technical expertise as well as qualification-testing capability to transform these COTS transducers in modified COTS suitable for use around flight hardware.

Perotti, Jose M.; Eckhoff, Anthony J.; Voska, N. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

43

Kennedy Space Center Launch and Landing Support  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The presentations describes Kennedy Space Center (KSC) payload processing, facilities and capabilities, and research development and life science experience. Topics include launch site processing, payload processing, key launch site processing roles, leveraging KSC experience, Space Station Processing Facility and capabilities, Baseline Data Collection Facility, Space Life Sciences Laboratory and capabilities, research payload development, International Space Station research flight hardware, KSC flight payload history, and KSC life science expertise.

Wahlberg, Jennifer

2010-01-01

44

Kennedy Space Center network documentation system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Kennedy Space Center Network Documentation System (KSC NDS) is being designed and implemented by NASA and the KSC contractor organizations to provide a means of network tracking, configuration, and control. Currently, a variety of host and client platforms are in use as a result of each organization having established its own network documentation system. The solution is to incorporate as many existing 'systems' as possible in the effort to consolidate and standardize KSC-wide documentation.

Lohne, William E.; Schuerger, Charles L.

1995-01-01

45

Kennedy Space Center environmental health program  

SciTech Connect

The Kennedy Space Center's environmental health organization is responsible for programs which assure its employees a healthful workplace under diverse and varied working conditions. These programs encompass the disciplines of industrial hygiene, radiation protection (health physics), and environmental sanitation/pollution control. Activities range from the routine, such as normal office work, to the highly specialized, such as the processing of highly toxic and hazardous materials.

Marmaro, G.M.; Cardinale, M.A.; Summerfield, B.R.; Tipton, D.A. (Medical and Environmental Health Office, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Cocoa Beach, FL (United States))

1992-08-01

46

Kennedy Space Center environmental health program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Kennedy Space Center's environmental health organization is responsible for programs which assure its employees a healthful workplace under diverse and varied working conditions. These programs encompass the disciplines of industrial hygiene, radiation protection (health physics), and environmental sanitation/pollution control. Activities range from the routine, such as normal office work, to the highly specialized, such as the processing of highly toxic and hazardous materials.

Marmaro, G. M.; Cardinale, M. A.; Summerfield, B. R.; Tipton, D. A.

1992-01-01

47

Induction brazing at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A description of the joint design, materials, equipment, qualification testing, inspection methods, and applications involved in performing induction brazing on hyperbolic propellants tubing at Kennedy Space Center. Induction brazing is a form of brazing in which the energy is transmitted to the workpiece by electrical induction; the eddy currents generated in the metal produce heat by resistance losses. Since induction heating is fast and highly localized, undesirable heat effects are minimized and the resulting braze is of high quality.

Clautice, W. E.

1974-01-01

48

John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Moving into a two-room apartment near the State House in Boston in 1946, many people wondered aloud how this bright, yet somewhat retiring, young man would do in the rough and tumble world of Boston politics. That 29-year old happened to be John F. Kennedy, and he would win his first campaign that year, as he made his way to the U.S. House of Representatives. He would of course become President of the United States, and later be assassinated in the fall of 1963 in Dallas. His presidential library and museum occupy one of the loveliest vistas afforded any presidential library, as they lie on Columbia Point along Bostonâ??s waterfront. For those who canâ??t make a direct visit to the Bay State, this website provides a fine virtual experience. The site includes historical timelines of Kennedyâ??s life (along with those of other members of his family), along with an interactive White House diary feature, which offers detailed information on what Kennedy did on every day of his presidency. Interestingly enough, the Ernest Hemingway archive is also housed at the Kennedy Presidential Library, so visitors can also learn about their holdings and view selected digitized materials.

49

Influence of the Laurentian Great Lakes on Regional Climate1 Michael Notaro, Kathleen Holman8  

E-print Network

1 Influence of the Laurentian Great Lakes on Regional Climate1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Michael Notaro, Kathleen #12;2 Abstract47 48 The influence of the Laurentian Great Lakes on climate is assessed by comparing of the diurnal cycle and annual cycle of air temperature. The53 impacts of the Great Lakes on the regional

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

50

UNDERGRADUATE JOURNAL IN NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY Professor Mark Hersam, editor; Kathleen Cook, managing editor  

E-print Network

UNDERGRADUATE JOURNAL IN NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY Professor Mark Hersam, editor; Kathleen journal dedicated to nanoscience and nanotechnology. Aspiring authors went through a peer-review process in nanotechnology will be increased nationwide and readers will be encouraged to participate in such programs

Shull, Kenneth R.

51

Global Mapping of Cyber Attacks Ghita Mezzour, L. Richard Carley, Kathleen M. Carley  

E-print Network

Global Mapping of Cyber Attacks Ghita Mezzour, L. Richard Carley, Kathleen M. Carley October 2014. The cyber-attack data used in the paper is accessible through the WINE infrastructure using reference WINE;Keywords: intrusion detection, anti-virus, socio-technical factors, cyber security, empirical study #12

52

Information Technology and Knowledge Distribution in C3 Kathleen M. Carley  

E-print Network

Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA 15123 craigs@andrew.cmu.edu Citation: Kathleen M. Carley, 2002 and Decision Sciences Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA 15123 craigs@andrew.cmu.edu Abstract This paper and Decision Sciences and H.J. Heinz III School of Policy and Management Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh

Sadeh, Norman M.

53

Analysis of Thermal Conductivity in Composite H.T. Banks and Kathleen L. Bihari  

E-print Network

Analysis of Thermal Conductivity in Composite Adhesives H.T. Banks and Kathleen L. Bihari Center: 919 515-1636 email: htbanks@eos.ncsu.edu Abstract Thermally conductive composite adhesives. These composite adhesives are formed when a #12;ller particle of high conductivity is added to a base adhesive

54

Automatic speech recognition in the diagnosis of primary progressive aphasia Kathleen Fraser1  

E-print Network

Automatic speech recognition in the diagnosis of primary progressive aphasia Kathleen Fraser1 participants with semantic dementia (SD), progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA), and healthy con- trols. We of the clas- sifiers. Index Terms: automatic speech recognition, classification, pro- gressive aphasia 1

Penn, Gerald

55

Using text and acoustic features to diagnose progressive aphasia and its Kathleen C. Fraser1  

E-print Network

Using text and acoustic features to diagnose progressive aphasia and its subtypes Kathleen C.Rochon@utoronto.ca Abstract This paper presents experiments in automatically diagnosing primary progressive aphasia (PPA) and two of its subtypes, semantic dementia (SD) and progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA), from

Penn, Gerald

56

Wetlands of the Fraser Lowland, 1989: An I.nventmy Kathleen Moore  

E-print Network

Wetlands of the Fraser Lowland, 1989: An I.nventmy Peggy Ward Kathleen Moore GIS Applications Ron. Wetlands of the Fraser Lowland, 1989: An Inventory. Technical Report Series No. 146. Canadian Wiidlife report. ... 111 #12;ABSTRACT The remaining wetlands of the Fraser Lowland provide vital habitat for large

57

78 FR 28276 - Operating Limitations at John F. Kennedy International Airport  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...FAA-2007-29320] Operating Limitations at John F. Kennedy International Airport AGENCY...amends the Order Limiting Operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK) that...Transparency for LaGuardia Airport, John F. Kennedy International Airport, and...

2013-05-14

58

Selectional restrictions in natural language sentence generation Raymond Kozlowski, Kathleen F. McCoy, and K. VijayShanker  

E-print Network

Selectional restrictions in natural language sentence generation Raymond Kozlowski, Kathleen F. Mc selectional restrictions can be naturally incorporated into our generation architecture and our notion of a lexico­ grammatical resource. Keywords: Natural language generation, Selectional restrictions, Lexical

McCoy, Kathleen F.

59

Selectional restrictions in natural language sentence generation Raymond Kozlowski, Kathleen F. McCoy, and K. Vijay-Shanker  

E-print Network

Selectional restrictions in natural language sentence generation Raymond Kozlowski, Kathleen F. Mc selectional restrictions can be naturally incorporated into our generation architecture and our notion of a lexico- grammatical resource. Keywords: Natural language generation, Selectional restrictions, Lexical

McCoy, Kathleen F.

60

Ground winds for Kennedy Space Center, Florida (1978 version)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Ground level runway wind statistics are presented for the Kennedy Space Center, Florida area. Crosswind, headwind, tailwind, and headwind reversal percentage frequencies are given with respect to month and hour for the Kennedy Space Center Space Shuttle runway. This document supersedes NASA CR-128995 and should be used in place of it.

Johnson, D. L.; Brown, S. C.

1978-01-01

61

Photocopy of drawing. VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING. NASA John F. Kennedy ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing. VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING. NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 79K06740, NASA, November 1975. SPACE & WEIGHT ALLOCATION, ORBITER PATH IN TRANSFER AISLE. Sheet 6 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Vehicle Assembly Building, VAB Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

62

CURRICULUM VITAE: THEODORE KENNEDY Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center  

E-print Network

. Kennedy, T.A. and S.E. Hobbie. Salt cedar invasion (Tamarix ramosissima) alters organic matter dynamics. PUBLICATIONS: Kennedy, T.A., J.C. Finlay, and S.E. Hobbie. Eradication of invasive saltcedar (Tamarix ramosissima) along a desert springbrook increases native fish density. Ecological Applications in press

Lovich, Jeffrey E.

63

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October, 1963. LCC TRANSVERSE SECTIONS AA & BB. Sheet 29-45 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

64

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October, 1963. VOLUME 29, LAUNCH CONTROL CENTER (LCC) TITLE AND LOCATION SHEET. Sheet 29-01 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

65

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October, 1963. VOLUME 14, HIGH BAY ? ARCHITECTURAL, TITLE SHEET. Sheet 14-01 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Vehicle Assembly Building, VAB Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

66

My Summer Internship at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During my summer internship at Kennedy Space Center, I worked on several projects with my mentor Grace Johnson in the Education Programs Office. My primary project was the CubeSat project in which my job was to help mentor Merritt Island High School students in the building of a CubeSat. CubeSats are picosatellites that are used to carry out auxiliary missions; they "piggy back" into orbit on launch vehicles launching primary missions. CubeSats come in the sizes of 1U (10 by 10 by 10 cm) 2U (1Ux2) and 3U (1Ux3). The Cube Sats are housed in a protective deploying device called a Poly Picosatellite Orbital Deplored (P-POD). I also participated in a Balloon Workshop with the MIHS students. This was an intense 4-day project in which we constructed a balloon satellite equipped with a camera whose main goal was to obtain video images of the curvature of the earth at high altitudes and relay it back down to our ground station. I also began developing my own science research program for minority serving institutions to be implemented when funding becomes available. In addition to the projects that I completed during my internship, I got the opportunity to go on various tours of the technological facilities here at Kennedy Space Center.

Philpott, Hobert Leon

2011-01-01

67

Failure Analysis at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

History has shown that failures occur in every engineering endeavor, and what we learn from those failures contributes to the knowledge base to safely complete future missions. The necessity of failure analysis is at its apex at the end of one aged program (i.e. Shuttle) and at the beginning of a new and untested program (i.e. Constellation). The information that we gain through failure analysis corrects the deficiencies in the current vehicle to make the next generation of vehicles more efficient and safe. The Failure Analysis and Materials Evaluation section in the Materials Science Division at the Kennedy Space Center performs metallurgical, mechanical, electrical, and non-metallic failure analysis and accident investigations on both flight hardware and ground support equipment (GSE) for the Shuttle, International Space Station, Constellation, and Launch Services Programs. This presentation will explore a variety of failure case studies at KSC and the lessons learned that can be applied in future programs.

Salazar, Victoria L.; Wright, Clara

2010-01-01

68

KLASS: Kennedy Launch Academy Simulation System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Software provides access to many sophisticated scientific instrumentation (Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), a Light Microscope, a Scanning Probe Microscope (covering Scanning Tunneling, Atomic Force, and Magnetic Force microscopy), and an Energy Dispersive Spectrometer for the SEM). Flash animation videos explain how each of the instruments work. Videos on how they are used at NASA and the sample preparation. Measuring and labeling tools provided with each instrument. Hands on experience of controlling the virtual instrument to conduct investigations, much like the real scientists at NASA do. Very open architecture. Open source on SourceForge. Extensive use of XML Target audience is high school and entry-level college students. "Many beginning students never get closer to an electron microscope than the photos in their textbooks. But anyone can get a sense of what the instrument can do by downloading this simulator from NASA's Kennedy Space Center." Science Magazine, April 8th, 2005

Garner, Lesley C.

2007-01-01

69

Kennedy NOW! May 2013 - Duration: 1:47.  

NASA Video Gallery

In this edition of Kennedy NOW! see the progress NASA's Commercial Crew Program partners are making to get astronauts launching into low-Earth orbit atop American-made rockets and spacecraft. Find ...

70

ROBERT E. KENNEDY LIBRARY SPECIAL COLLECTIONS & UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES  

E-print Network

ROBERT E. KENNEDY LIBRARY SPECIAL COLLECTIONS & UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES CALIFORNIA POLYTECHNIC STATE Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, hereby transfers to the Cal Poly University Archives the following materials: The University Archives will care for, house, and administer these materials

Sze, Lawrence

71

ROBERT E. KENNEDY LIBRARY SPECIAL COLLECTIONS & UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES  

E-print Network

ROBERT E. KENNEDY LIBRARY SPECIAL COLLECTIONS & UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES CALIFORNIA POLYTECHNIC STATE be accessible to all persons qualified to use the Special Collections and University Archives subject of materials considered inappropriate for retention in the Special Collections & University Archives Department

Sze, Lawrence

72

About Kennedy's Disease: Genetic Counseling and Inheritance Issues  

MedlinePLUS

Kennedy's Disease Association A Public Benefit, Non-Profit Organization Register GTranslate GTranslate Javascript is required to use GTranslate multilingual website and translation delivery network Close "Surfing the internet I found the ...

73

Human Spaceflight: The Kennedy Legacy - Duration: 3:39.  

NASA Video Gallery

On May 25, 1961, just weeks after the first American astronaut flew, President John F. Kennedy put NASA on a bold path, challenging the nation to do what was then impossible -- send a man to the mo...

74

Kennedy Space Center's Partnership with Graftel Incorporated  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has recently partnered with Graftel Incorporated under an exclusive license agreement for the manufacture and sale of the Smart Current Signature Sensor. The Smart Current Signature Sensor and software were designed and developed to be utilized on any application using solenoid valves. The system monitors the electrical and mechanical health of solenoids by comparing the electrical current profile of each solenoid actuation to a typical current profile and reporting deviation from its learned behavior. The objective of this partnership with Graftel is for them to develop the technology into a hand-held testing device for their customer base in the Nuclear Power Industry. The device will be used to perform diagnostic testing on electromechanical valves used in Nuclear Power plants. Initially, Graftel plans to have working units within the first year of license in order to show customers and allow them to put purchase requests into their next year's budget. The subject technology under discussion was commercialized by the Kennedy Space Center Technology Programs and Partnerships Office, which patented the technology and licensed it to Graftel, Inc., a company providing support, instrumentation, and calibration services to the nuclear community and private sector for over 10 years. For the nuclear power industry, Graftel designs, manufacturers, and calibrates a full line of testing instrumentation. Grafters smart sensors have been in use in the United States since 1993 and have proved to decrease set-up time and test durations. The project was funded by Non-Destructive Engineering, and it is felt that this technology will have more emphasis on future vehicles. Graftel plans to market the Current Signature Sensor to the Electric Utility industry. Graftel currently supplies product and services to the Nuclear Power Industry in the United States as well as internationally. Product and services sold are used in non-destructive testing for valves, penetrations and other applications. Graftel also supplies testing services to an industrial customer base. The customer base includes 90 percent of the U.S. Nuclear plants and plants in Brazil, Europe, and Asia. Graftel works internationally with two representative groups and employees and has ten people at the principle location and a group of contract engineers around the country.

Dunn, Carol Anne

2010-01-01

75

Klinefelter's syndrome associated with progressive muscular atrophy simulating Kennedy's disease.  

PubMed

Kennedy's disease, an X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, is characterized by loss of lower motor neurons. Mild sensory deficits, gynecomastia and infertility may be observed. Klinefelter's syndrome is a variation of sex chromosome disorder characterized by hypogonadism, gynecomastia and azoospermia, and the most frequent karyotype is XXY. A 55-year-old man who presented with slowly progressive and diffuse neurogenic muscle atrophy without bulbar or sensory symptoms. He also had Klinefelter's syndrome. Genetic study of Kennedy's disease was normal. Our patient differs from those with Kennedy's disease in the absence of bulbar and sensory symptoms. It is suggested that the X chromosome plays an important role in the biology of motor neurons. PMID:22919202

Caballero, Pedro Enrique Jiménez

2012-07-01

76

A Postdoc's Guide to Paternity Leave By Kathleen Flint Ehm, National Postdoctoral Association; Amelia Linnemann, University of Wisconsin-Madison;  

E-print Network

institution to institution and often with source of postdoctoral funding. Typically the differences involvePage | 1 A Postdoc's Guide to Paternity Leave By Kathleen Flint Ehm, National Postdoctoral Postdoctoral Association Developed as part of the National Postdoctoral Association's NPA ADVANCE project

77

Infographics Retrieval: A New Methodology Zhuo Li, Sandra Carberry, Hui Fang*, Kathleen F. McCoy, and Kelly Peterson  

E-print Network

Infographics Retrieval: A New Methodology Zhuo Li, Sandra Carberry, Hui Fang*, Kathleen F. Mc a new methodology that hypothesizes information needs from user queries and retrieves infographics based (infographics), such as the one in Figure 1, are effective visual representations of complex information

Carberry, Sandra

78

Water Dynamics in Water/DMSO Binary Mixtures Daryl B. Wong, Kathleen P. Sokolowsky, Musa I. El-Barghouthi,  

E-print Network

Water Dynamics in Water/DMSO Binary Mixtures Daryl B. Wong, Kathleen P. Sokolowsky, Musa I. El (DMSO)/ water solutions with a wide range of water concentrations are studied using polarization even at very low water concentrations that are associated with water- water and water-DMSO hydrogen

Fayer, Michael D.

79

Using statistical parsing to detect agrammatic aphasia Kathleen C. Fraser1, Graeme Hirst1, Jed A. Meltzer2,  

E-print Network

Using statistical parsing to detect agrammatic aphasia Kathleen C. Fraser1, Graeme Hirst1, Jed A@research.baycrest.org {jennifer-mack-0,ckthom}@northwestern.edu Abstract Agrammatic aphasia is a serious language impairment which features can be used to train a classifier to accurately predict whether or not an individual has aphasia

Toronto, University of

80

American Alligator Research on the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews the research conducted at the Kennedy Space Center on the American Alligator. The objectives of the research were to establish life history baseline at the Kennedy Space Center and at the Merit Island National Wildlife Reserve (MINWR). Some of the factors that were examined are: nesting success, movement patterns, and population structure. Another objective was to determine the overall health of the alligator population, by analyzing blood and tissue chemistry, and urine analysis. A third objective was to compare alligators at KSC/MINWR to the statewide population. Some of the results are shown in charts and graphs.

Lowers, Russell H.

2010-01-01

81

[Kennedy disease in Peru: first cases with molecular diagnosis].  

PubMed

Kennedy's disease is an X-linked recessive disorder with onset in adulthood, characterized by progressive degeneration of spinal motor neurons due to a dynamic mutation in the androgen receptor gene. We report three families (five cases) characterized by progressive weakness involving both limbs and bulbar muscles, atrophy, tremor, cramps and endocrinologic disturbances; the neurophysiological studies demonstrated second motor neuron impairment. The molecular analysis identified abnormal CAG repeats expansion in the androgen receptor gene (AR) in all cases. Clinical features were consistent with other previous reports. These are the first Peruvian cases of Kennedy's disease with confirmed molecular diagnosis. PMID:23949524

Gómez-Calero, Víctor; Cornejo-Olivas, Mario; Ortega, Olimpio; Marca, Victoria; Lindo-Samanamud, Saúl; Flores, Martha; Torres-Ramírez, Luis; Mazzetti, Pilar

2013-04-01

82

["Jaw drop" as an atypical manifestation of Kennedy's disease].  

PubMed

Kennedy's disease, or spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), is an inherited X-linked degenerative disorder characterised by slowly progressive proximal limb weakness, bulbar weakness, fasciculations, signs of androgen insensitivity and characteristic EMG findings. The disease is caused by a trinucleotide (CAG) repeat in the androgen receptor gene. We describe a patient with atypical symptoms who was initially misdiagnosed after presenting with weakness of mm. masseter and mm. temporales that caused his jaw to hang open. The initial diagnosis was suspicion of myasthenia gravis or ALS. Genetic testing later confirmed the diagnosis of Kennedy's disease. PMID:16138977

Larsen, Katja; Smith, Torben Aagaard

2005-08-29

83

Clinical and electrophysiological features in Chinese patients with Kennedy's disease.  

PubMed

Kennedy's disease is a X-linked neuromuscular disorder caused by an expanded trinucleotide repeat in the androgen receptor gene. To ascertain the clinical diagnosis of Kennedy's disease in a Chinese population, we used a rapid, accurate PCR-based sizing method for the CAG repeat allelotype. The clinical and electrophysiological features of affected patients are described. The CAG repeats ranged from 43 to 53 and were inversely correlated with the age of onset (r = -0.63; P < 0.005). PMID:15297006

Hui, A C F; Cheung, P T; Tang, A S Y; Fu, M; Wong, L; Kay, R

2004-09-01

84

Improved Kennedy-Thorndike experiment to test special relativity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A modern version of the Kennedy-Thorndike experiment was carried out by searching for sidereal variations between the frequency of a laser locked to an I2 reference line and a laser locked to the resonance frequency of a highly stable cavity. No variations were found at the level of 2 x 10 to the -12th. This represents a 300-fold improvement over the original Kennedy-Thorndike experiment and allows the Lorentz transformations to be deduced entirely from experiment at an accuracy level of 70 ppm.

Hils, Dieter; Hall, J. L.

1990-01-01

85

78 FR 70839 - Day of Remembrance for President John F. Kennedy  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...9060--Day of Remembrance for President John F. Kennedy Executive Order 13654--Establishing...2013 Day of Remembrance for President John F. Kennedy By the President of the United...soaring but sober idealism, President John F. Kennedy had called a generation...

2013-11-26

86

3 CFR 8403 - Proclamation 8403 of August 26, 2009. Death of Senator Edward M. Kennedy  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...August 26, 2009. Death of Senator Edward M. Kennedy 8403 Proclamation 8403 Presidential...2009 Proc. 8403 Death of Senator Edward M. KennedyBy the President of the United States...America A Proclamation Senator Edward M. Kennedy was not only one of...

2010-01-01

87

76 FR 18620 - Operating Limitations at John F. Kennedy International Airport  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...FAA-2007-29320] Operating Limitations at John F. Kennedy International Airport AGENCY...amends the Order Limiting Operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK) that...Management Rule for LaGuardia Airport, John F. Kennedy International Airport, and...

2011-04-04

88

77 FR 43805 - Gull Hazard Reduction Program at John F. Kennedy International Airport; Record of Decision  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...APHIS-2006-0035] Gull Hazard Reduction Program at John F. Kennedy International Airport; Record...the Gull Hazard Reduction Program at John F. Kennedy International Airport. DATES...populations and land uses in and around the John F. Kennedy International Airport. This...

2012-07-26

89

General view of runway 33 at the Kennedy Space Center ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

General view of runway 33 at the Kennedy Space Center looking at the ground support equipment and the aft and port side of the Orbiter Discovery as the orbiter is undergoing post flight processing and preparations to be towed to the Orbiter Processing Facility. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

90

General view of runway 33 at the Kennedy Space Center ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

General view of runway 33 at the Kennedy Space Center looking at the ground support equipment and the port side of the Orbiter Discovery as the orbiter is undergoing post flight processing and preparations to be towed to the Orbiter Processing Facility. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

91

General view of runway 33 at the Kennedy Space Center ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

General view of runway 33 at the Kennedy Space Center looking at the ground support equipment and the aft and starboard side of the Orbiter Discovery as the orbiter is undergoing post flight processing and preparations to be towed to the Orbiter Processing Facility. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

92

THE EMERGENCE OF PHONETIC STRUCTURE*' Michael Studdert-Kennedy+  

E-print Network

THE EMERGENCE OF PHONETIC STRUCTURE*' Michael Studdert-Kennedy+ Abstract. To explain the unique corresponding to phonetic segments are not to be found in the signal, consonants and vowels were said carries no message: it carries informat~on concerning its source. The message, that is, the phonetic

93

NCERA-101 Station Report from Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This is our annual report to the North Central Extension Research Activity, which is affiliated with the USDA and Land Grant University Agricultural Experiment Stations. I have been a member of this committee for 25 years. The presentation will be given by Dr. Gioia Massa, Kennedy Space Center

Massa, Gioia D.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

2014-01-01

94

Operant Strategies with Delinquents at the Kennedy Youth Center.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes a portion of the Kennedy Youth Center program concerned with motivating previously intractable sociopathic youths in the academic and industrial arts schools. Male delinquents considered uneducable in traditional education programs, have been advanced two years in the one year they spent as participants in the differential…

Wotkiewicz, Helen; Minor, John A.

95

Rare association of antisynthetase syndrome and Kennedy's disease.  

PubMed

Antisynthetase syndrome is a type of Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathy (IIM) associated with anti-Jo1 antibody. Kennedy's disease or X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a rare neuromuscular disease. We describe the case report of a 53-year-old man who presented with proximal muscle weakness and a history of bilateral hand tremor. Initial physical examination demonstrated "mechanic's hands", Raynaud's phenomenon, having elevated creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase levels and anti-Jo1 antibody positivity. His muscle biopsy demonstrated inflammatory infiltrate characteristic of IIM. Considering these findings, we reached the diagnosis of antisynthetase syndrome and commenced immunosuppressive therapy. On follow-up examination, he had developed dysphagia, and his tremor had worsened. His electroneurogram result was characteristic of Kennedy's disease, and the genetic test result showed an allele with 44 CAG repeat expansion in the androgen receptor gene of the X chromosome. This confirmed that in addition to antisynthetase syndrome, he also had Kennedy's disease. This patient now receives immunology and neurology follow-up. His symptoms have improved with low dose corticosteroids, propranolol for tremor, vitamin B supplementation, and physiotherapy. This article presents a rare case report of a patient with concurrent antisynthetase syndrome and Kennedy's disease, both of which lead to elevated creatine kinase levels and muscle weakness, thus, underpinning the importance of careful follow-up of patients with IIM and maintaining an open mind to other diagnoses when faced with refractory and/or new symptoms. PMID:18592136

Szabo, Nora; Lukacs, Szilveszter; Gunasekera, Wiranthi; Danko, Katalin

2008-10-01

96

December 2014 Vol. 1 No. 9 Kennedy Space Center's  

E-print Network

Canaveral Air Force Station, SpaceX CRS-5 will deliver cargo and crew supplies to the International Space the International Space Station. The spacecraft will re-enter Earth's atmosphere at close to 20,000 mph. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER'S SPACEPORT MAGAZINE HistoryTechnologyMARS Solar SystemEducation International Space

Waliser, Duane E.

97

Reconceptualizing John F. Kennedy's chronic low back pain.  

PubMed

When the medical records for John Fitzgerald Kennedy were made public, it became clear that the 35th President of the United States suffered greatly from a series of medical illnesses from the time he was a toddler until his assassination in November of 1963. Aside from having Addison disease, no condition seemed to cause him more distress than did his chronic low back pain. A number of surgical procedures to address the presumed structural cause of the pain resulted in little relief and increased disability. Later, a conservative program, including trigger point injections and exercises, provided modest benefit. Herein, the mechanisms underlying his pain are evaluated based on more contemporary pain research. This reconceptualizing of John Fitzgerald Kennedy's pain could serve as a model for other cases where the main cause of the pain is presumed to be located in the periphery. PMID:23900054

Pinals, Robert S; Hassett, Afton L

2013-01-01

98

John F. Kennedy School of Government Politics Research Group  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Politics Research Group of the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University has created this site, which contains working papers from faculty seminars and research workshops. Abstracts and full-text versions are both available. Some titles include: "Little Theatre: Committees in Congress," "Are Lawyers Liars? The Argument of Redescription," "Securing Subsidiarity: Legitimacy and the Allocation of Governing Authority," and "Managing Technology Policy at the White House."

1998-01-01

99

Child's Letter to President John F. Kennedy about Physical Fitness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

On March 3, 1963, nine-year-old Jack Chase of Torrance, California, wrote a letter to President John F. Kennedy. In his single-page note, featured in this article, Jack described his plans for staying physically fit. He said he would walk to school, the store, and the library "because I know a strong boy makes a strong man and a strong man makes a…

McNatt, Missy

2009-01-01

100

Corrosion Activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report documents summer faculty fellow efforts in the corrosion test bed at the NASA Kennedy Space Center. During the summer of 2002 efforts were concentrated on three activities: a short course on corrosion control for KSC personnel, evaluation of commercial wash additives used for corrosion control on Army aircraft, and improvements in the testing of a new cathodic protection system under development at KSC.

Heidersbach, Robert H.

2002-01-01

101

NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center environmental impact statement  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The probable total impact of the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) operations on the environment is discussed in terms of launch operations emissions and environmental quality. A schedule of planned launches through 1973 is included with a description of the systems for eliminating harmful emissions during launch operations. The effects of KSC on wild life and environmental quality are discussed along with the irreversible and irretrievable commitments of natural resources.

1971-01-01

102

Nowcasting for Space Shuttle Landings at Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

Space shuttle launches and landings at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) are subject to strict weather-related launch commit criteria and landing weather flight rules. Complex launch commit criteria and end-of-mission landing weather flight rules demand very accurate forecasts and nowcasts (short-term forecasts of less than 2 h) of cloud, wind, visibility, precipitation, turbulence, and thunderstorms prior to shuttle launches and landings.The

William H. Bauman III; Steven Businger

1996-01-01

103

Kennedy disease misdiagnosed as polymyositis: a case report  

PubMed Central

Background Polymyositis is an immune-mediated myopathy with clinical features of proximal muscle weakness. Dysphagia and neck flexor weakness can develop along with respiratory muscle weakness as the disease progresses. Kennedy disease or X-linked spinobulbar muscular atrophy is a rare X-linked recessive disorder with clinical features of slowly progressive atrophy and weakness of limb and bulbar muscles. These two disorders may have overlapping clinical manifestations. Case presentation We present the case of a 52-year-old Filipino man with chronic weakness involving his proximal muscle groups who carried the diagnosis of polymyositis and was refractory to multiple immunomodulatory therapies. Further neurologic examination and history taking along with selective serologic and electrodiagnostic studies instead confirmed the diagnosis of Kennedy disease. Conclusions Distinction between polymyositis and Kennedy disease may be difficult given the potential overlapping clinical manifestations. However, with careful neurological history taking, examination, and selective serologic plus electrodiagnostic investigations the correct diagnosis may be made, thus sparing the patient ineffective therapy. One must always be sure of the diagnosis of polymyositis before it’s classified as refractory. PMID:24073646

2013-01-01

104

Preliminary geological investigation of AIS data at Mary Kathleen, Queensland, Australia  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS) was flown over granitic, volcanic, and calc-silicate terrain around the Mary Kathleen Uranium Mine in Queensland, in a test of its mineralocial mapping capabilities. An analysis strategy and restoration and enhancement techniques were developed to process the 128 band AIS data. A preliminary analysis of one of three AIS flight lines shows that the data contains considerable spectral variation but that it is also contaminated by second-order leakage of radiation from the near-infrared region. This makes the recognition of expected spectral absorption shapes very difficult. The effect appears worst in terrains containing considerable vegetation. Techniques that try to predict this supplementary radiation coupled with the log residual analytical technique show that expected mineral absorption spectra can be derived. The techniques suggest that with additional refinement correction procedures, the Australian AIS data may be revised. Application of the log residual analysis method has proved very successful on the cuprite, Nevada data set, and for highlighting the alunite, linite, and SiOH mineralogy.

Huntington, J. F.; Green, A. A.; Craig, M. D.; Cocks, T. D.

1986-01-01

105

Advanced Life Support Project: Crop Experiments at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Crop production systems provide bioregenerative technologies to complement human crew life support requirements on long duration space missions. Kennedy Space Center has lead NASA's research on crop production systems that produce high value fresh foods, provide atmospheric regeneration, and perform water processing. As the emphasis on early missions to Mars has developed, our research focused on modular, scalable systems for transit missions, which can be developed into larger autonomous, bioregenerative systems for subsequent surface missions. Components of these scalable systems will include development of efficient light generating or collecting technologies, low mass plant growth chambers, and capability to operate in the high energy background radiation and reduced atmospheric pressures of space. These systems will be integrated with air, water, and thermal subsystems in an operational system. Extensive crop testing has been done for both staple and salad crops, but limited data is available on specific cultivar selection and breadboard testing to meet nominal Mars mission profiles of a 500-600 day surface mission. The recent research emphasis at Kennedy Space Center has shifted from staple crops, such as wheat, soybean and rice, toward short cycle salad crops such as lettuce, onion, radish, tomato, pepper, and strawberry. This paper will review the results of crop experiments to support the Exploration Initiative and the ongoing development of supporting technologies, and give an overview of capabilities of the newly opened Space Life Science (SLS) Lab at Kennedy Space Center. The 9662 square m (104,000 square ft) SLS Lab was built by the State of Florida and supports all NASA research that had been performed in Hanger-L. In addition to NASA research, the SLS Lab houses the Florida Space Research Institute (FSRI), responsible for co-managing the facility, and the University of Florida (UF) has established the Space Agriculture and Biotechnology Research and Education (SABRE) Center with several faculty.

Sager, John C.; Stutte, Gary W.; Wheeler, Raymond M.; Yorio, Neil

2004-01-01

106

Strategic Project Management at the NASA Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes Project Management at NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) from a strategic perspective. It develops the historical context of the agency and center's strategic planning process and illustrates how now is the time for KSC to become a center which has excellence in project management. The author describes project management activities at the center and details observations on those efforts. Finally the author describes the Strategic Project Management Process Model as a conceptual model which could assist KSC in defining an appropriate project management process system at the center.

Lavelle, Jerome P.

2000-01-01

107

77 FR 68196 - Orders Limiting Operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport, LaGuardia Airport, and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Docket No. FAA-2012-1191] Orders Limiting Operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport, LaGuardia Airport, and Newark...requirement to use Operating Authorizations (slots) at John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK), LaGuardia...

2012-11-15

108

76 FR 19517 - Orders Limiting Scheduled Operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport, LaGuardia Airport...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...FAA-2011-0248] Orders Limiting Scheduled Operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport, LaGuardia Airport, and Newark...Airport (DCA) and Operating Authorizations (slots) at John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK), LaGuardia...

2011-04-07

109

75 FR 9017 - Orders Limiting Scheduled Operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport, LaGuardia Airport...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Aviation Administration Orders Limiting Scheduled Operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport, LaGuardia Airport and Newark...Airport (DCA) and Operating Authorizations (slots) at John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK), LaGuardia...

2010-02-26

110

Moral leadership in civil rights: An evaluation of John F. Kennedy  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the early 1960s, national attention began to be focused on the civil rights struggle in the United States. The freedom rides, sit?ins, and the 1963 march on Washington forced the issue of human rights into the public consciousness in an unprecedented way. Several of John F. Kennedy's critics maintain that Kennedy did not serve as a moral leader in

Robert E. Gilbert

1989-01-01

111

The rhetoric of American decline: Paul Kennedy, conservatives, and the solvency debate  

Microsoft Academic Search

HE DEBATE OVER the ascent and decline of an American empire be­ gan in earnest with the 1987 publication of Yale Historian Paul Kennedy's book, The Rise and Fall ofthe Great Powers. This book, cou­ pled with Kennedy's numerous public appearances, editorials and reviews, and an extensive article in TheAtlantic, set forth an extremely volatile argument about the erosion of

Kenneth S. Zagacki

1992-01-01

112

System Engineering Processes at Kennedy Space Center for Development of the SLS and Orion Launch Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

There are over 40 subsystems being developed for the future SLS and Orion Launch Systems at Kennedy Space Center. These subsystems developed at the Kennedy Space Center Engineering Directorate follow a comprehensive design process which requires several different product deliverables during each phase of each of the subsystems. This Paper describes this process and gives an example of where the process has been applied.

Schafer, Eric J.

2012-01-01

113

Winners of the First 1960 Televised Presidential Debate between Kennedy and Nixon.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews the events, studies, and comments (from 1960 to the present) regarding the controversial question of who won the first 1960 televised debate between John F. Kennedy and Richard M. Nixon. Supports the view that, for television viewers, Kennedy was the winner, whereas radio listeners gave Nixon the edge. (SR)

Kraus, Sidney

1996-01-01

114

Discovery: Under the Microscope at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA) is known for discovery, exploration, and advancement of knowledge. Since the days of Leeuwenhoek, microscopy has been at the forefront of discovery and knowledge. No truer is that statement than today at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), where microscopy plays a major role in contamination identification and is an integral part of failure analysis. Space exploration involves flight hardware undergoing rigorous "visually clean" inspections at every step of processing. The unknown contaminants that are discovered on these inspections can directly impact the mission by decreasing performance of sensors and scientific detectors on spacecraft and satellites, acting as micrometeorites, damaging critical sealing surfaces, and causing hazards to the crew of manned missions. This talk will discuss how microscopy has played a major role in all aspects of space port operations at KSC. Case studies will highlight years of analysis at the Materials Science Division including facility and payload contamination for the Navigation Signal Timing and Ranging Global Positioning Satellites (NA VST AR GPS) missions, quality control monitoring of monomethyl hydrazine fuel procurement for launch vehicle operations, Shuttle Solids Rocket Booster (SRB) foam processing failure analysis, and Space Shuttle Main Engine Cut-off (ECO) flight sensor anomaly analysis. What I hope to share with my fellow microscopists is some of the excitement of microscopy and how its discoveries has led to hardware processing, that has helped enable the successful launch of vehicles and space flight missions here at Kennedy Space Center.

Howard, Philip M.

2013-01-01

115

Birthplace of John F. Kennedy: Home of the Boy Who Would Be President. Teaching with Historic Places.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This lesson is based on the John F. Kennedy National Historic Site (Massachusetts), the birthplace of President John F. Kennedy. The lesson can be used as a biographical study, an introduction to the Kennedy presidency and the turbulent sixties, or as part of a unit on post-World War II U.S. history. Primary and secondary sources are included for…

Obleschuk, Leslie C.

116

John F. Kennedy Space Center's Chemochromic Hypergol Sensors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) seeks partne rs interested in the commercial application of the Chemochromic Hyper gol Sensors technology. NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is soliciti ng licensees for this innovative technology. The Chemochromic Hypergo l Sensors technology consists of chemochromic pigments incorporated i nto various matrices (e.g., tapes, sheets, injection molded parts, fi bers). When placed near strategic locations such as piping and contai ner valves, seams, and joints, these sensors provide an instantaneous , distinct color change from yellow to black indicating the presence of hypergols at the leak location. The chemochromic pigments can be incorporated into fibers used to make fabrics for personal protective equipment as well as into badge holders for use as a point leak detector. These affordable, easily replaceable sensors provide the capabil ity to visually monitor leak-prone locations and personnel working i n those areas on a continuous basis for the presence of dangerous hyp ergols.

Nichols, James D.

2012-01-01

117

Profile of Ambulance Runs at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has four onsite ambulances staffed with Paramedics at two fire stations that respond to 911 Emergency Medical System (EMS) medical dispatches. These ambulances serve over 22,000 NASA, military, government, and contractor employees in an area of approximately 520 square miles. Included in this coverage are several public areas such as beaches, a wildlife refuge and a popular Visitor Center. Reports are filled out on each patient encountered. However. the only element tracked has been the ambulance response time. Now that reports are filed electronically, it is possible to enter them into an electronic database for analysis. Data analyses reveal trends and assist in better allocation of resources.

Scarpa, Philip J.

1999-01-01

118

Report on Advanced Life Support Activities at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Plant studies at Kennedy Space Center last year focused on selecting cultivars of lettuce, tomato, and pepper for further testing as crops for near-term space flight applications. Other testing continued with lettuce, onion, and radish plants grown at different combinations of light (PPF), temperature, and CO2 concentration. In addition, comparisons of mixed versus mono culture approaches for vegetable production were studied. Water processing testing focused on the development and testing of a rotating membrane bioreactor to increase oxygen diffusion levels for reducing total organic carbon levels and promoting nitrification. Other testing continued to study composting testing for food wastes (NRA grant) and the use of supplemental green light with red/blue LED lighting systems for plant production (NRC fellowship).

Wheeler, Raymond M.

2004-01-01

119

Energy Management Programs at the John F. Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Energy Management internship over the summer of 2011 involved a series of projects related to energy management on the John. F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This internship saved KSC $14.3 million through budgetary projections, saved KSC $400,000 through implementation of the recycling program, updated KSC Environmental Management System's (EMS) water and energy-related List of Requirements (LoR) which changed 25.7% of the list, provided a incorporated a 45% design review of the Ordnance Operations Facility (OOF) which noted six errors within the design plans, created a certification system and timeline for implementation regarding compliance to the federal Guiding Principles, and gave off-shore wind as the preferred alternative to on-site renewable energy generation.

Huang, Jeffrey H.

2011-01-01

120

Kennedy's Biomedical Laboratory Makes Multi-Tasking Look Easy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

If it is one thing that Florida has in abundance, it is sunshine and with that sunshine heat and humidity. For workers at the Kennedy Space Center that have to work outside in the heat and humidity, heat exhaustion/stroke is a real possibility. It might help people to know that Kennedy's Biomedical Laboratory has been testing some new Koolvests(Trademark) that can be worn underneath SCAPE suits. They have also been working on how to block out high noise levels; in fact, Don Doerr, chief of the Biomedical Lab, says, "The most enjoyable aspect is knowing that the Biomedical Lab and the skills of its employees have been used to support safe space flight, not only for the astronaut flight crew, but just as important for the ground processing personnel as well." The NASA Biomedical Laboratory has existed in the John F. Kennedy's Operations and Checkout Building since the Apollo Program. The primary mission of this laboratory has been the biomedical support to major, manned space programs that have included Apollo, Apollo-Soyuz, Skylab, and Shuttle. In this mission, the laboratory has been responsible in accomplishing much of the technical design, planning, provision, fabrication, and maintenance of flight and ground biomedical monitoring instrumentation. This includes the electronics in the launch flight suit and similar instrumentation systems in the spacecraft. (Note: The Lab checked out the system for STS-128 at Pad A using Firing room 4 and ground support equipment in the lab.) During Apollo, there were six engineers and ten technicians in the facility. This has evolved today to two NASA engineers and two NASA technicians, a Life Science Support contract physiologist and part-time support from an LSSC nurse and physician. Over the years, the lab has enjoyed collaboration with outside agencies and investigators. These have included on-site support to the Ames Research Center bed rest studies (seven years) and the European Space Agency studies in Toulouse, France (two years). The lab has also actively collaborated with the US Army Institute for Surgical Research, the USAF School of Aerospace Medicine, and the USN Naval Experimental Diving Unit. Because the lab often evaluates various forms of commercial-off-the-shelf life support equipment, the laboratory works closely with private companies, both domestic and foreign. The European companies seem to be more proactive and participatory with the advancement of personal protective equipment. Because these companies have viewed the space program's unique need for advanced forms of personal protective equipment, some have responded with new designs based on the prediction that these advances will soon find markets in the commercial sector. Using much of the same skills and equipment, the laboratory also addresses physiological testing of humans by supporting flight experiments and personnel involved with ground processing. While Johnson Space Center is primarily responsible for flight experiments, the Kennedy's Biomedical Lab provides the local support. However, as stated above, there are many challenges facing KSC workers that gain the attention of this lab in the measurement of the problem and the selection and testing of countermeasures. These include respiratory protection, whole body suits, hearing protection and heat stress, among many others.

Dunn, Carol Anne

2009-01-01

121

Applications of Meteorological Tower Data at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Members of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) design and operation communities rely on meteorological information collected at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), located near Cape Canaveral, Florida, to correctly apply the ambient environment to various tasks. The Natural Environments Branch/EV44, located at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, is responsible for providing its NASA customers with meteorological data using various climatological data sources including balloons, surface stations, aircraft, hindcast models, and meteorological towers. Of the many resources available within the KSC region, meteorological towers are preferred for near-surface applications because they record data at regular, frequent intervals over an extensive period of record at a single location. This paper discusses the uses of data measured at several different meteorological towers for a common period of record and how the data can be applied to various engineering decisions for the new Constellation Program Ares and Orion space vehicles.

Altino, Karen M.; Barbre, Robert E., Jr.

2009-01-01

122

Aircraft measurements of electrified clouds at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The space-vehicle launch commit criteria for weather and atmospheric electrical conditions in us at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy Space Center (KSC) have been made restrictive because of the past difficulties that have arisen when space vehicles have triggered lightning discharge after their launch during cloudy weather. With the present ground-base instrumentation and our limited knowledge of cloud electrification process over this region of Florida, it has not been possible to provide a quantitative index of safe launching conditions. During the fall of 1988, a Schweizer 845 airplane equipped to measure electric field and other meteorological parameters flew over KSC in a program to study clouds defined in the existing launch restriction criteria. All aspects of this program are addressed including planning, method, and results. A case study on the November 4, 1988 flight is also presented.

Jones, J. J.; Winn, W. P.; Hunyady, S. J.; Moore, C. B.; Bullock, J. W.

1990-01-01

123

Latest Development in Advanced Sensors at Kennedy Space Center (KSC)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Inexpensive space transportation system must be developed in order to make spaceflight more affordable. To achieve this goal, there is a need to develop inexpensive smart sensors to allow autonomous checking of the health of the vehicle and associated ground support equipment, warn technicians or operators of an impending problem and facilitate rapid vehicle pre-launch operations. The Transducers and Data Acquisition group at Kennedy Space Center has initiated an effort to study, research, develop and prototype inexpensive smart sensors to accomplish these goals. Several technological challenges are being investigated and integrated in this project multi-discipline sensors; self-calibration, health self-diagnosis capabilities embedded in sensors; advanced data acquisition systems with failure prediction algorithms and failure correction (self-healing) capabilities.

Perotti, Jose M.; Eckhoff, Anthony J.; Voska, N. (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

124

Lightning Protection and Instrumentation at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lightning is a natural phenomenon, but can be dangerous. Prevention of lightning is a physical impossibility and total protection requires compromises on costs and effects, therefore prediction and measurements of the effects that might be produced by iightn:ing is a most at locat:ions where people or sensitive systems and equipment are exposed. This is the case of the launching pads for the Space Shuttle at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. This report summarizes lightring phenomena with a brief explanation of lightning generation and lightning activity as related to KSC. An analysis of the instrumentation used at the launching pads for measurements of lightning effects with alternatives to improve the protection system and up-grade the actual instrumentation system is indicated.

Colon, Jose L.

2005-01-01

125

Caring Is Activism: Black Southern Womanist Teachers Theorizing and the Careers of Kathleen Crosby and Bertha Maxwell-Roddey, 1946-1986  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article, based on archival research and oral interviews, examines the personal and professional impact of desegregation on African American teachers in an urban southern setting by focusing on the life stories of two public school teachers, Kathleen Crosby and Bertha Maxwell-Roddey. Both taught in segregated schools, helped to desegregate…

Ramsey, Sonya

2012-01-01

126

77 FR 12855 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Hyatt Regency Bethesda, One Bethesda Metro Center, 7400 Wisconsin Avenue Bethesda, MD 20814. Contact Person: Michele C. Hindi-Alexander, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Division of Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National...

2012-03-02

127

76 FR 27651 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Hotel Bethesda, (Formerly Holiday Inn Select), 8120 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20814. Contact Person: Michele C. Hindi-Alexander, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Division of Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute...

2011-05-12

128

78 FR 10185 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Institutes of Health, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Rockville, MD 20852. Contact Person: Michele C. Hindi-Alexander, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Division of Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National...

2013-02-13

129

78 FR 29371 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Institutes of Health, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Rockville, MD 20852. Contact Person: Michele C. Hindi-Alexander, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Division of Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National...

2013-05-20

130

78 FR 55754 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Hotel Bethesda, (Formerly Holiday Inn Select), 8120 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20814. Contact Person: Michele C. Hindi-Alexander, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Division of Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National...

2013-09-11

131

77 FR 28888 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Bethesda North Marriott Hotel and Conference Center, 5701 Marinelli Road, Bethesda, MD 20852. Contact Person: Michele C. Hindi-Alexander, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Division of Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National...

2012-05-16

132

75 FR 7485 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Embassy Suites at the Chevy Chase Pavilion, 4300 Military Road, NW., Washington, DC 20015. Contact Person: Michele C. Hindi-Alexander, PhD, Division of Scientific Review, National Institutes of Health, Eunice Kennedy Shriver, National...

2010-02-19

133

75 FR 31800 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Embassy Suites at the Chevy Chase Pavilion, 4300 Military Road, NW., Washington, DC 20015. Contact Person: Michele C. Hindi-Alexander, PhD, Division of Scientific Review, National Institutes of Health, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National...

2010-06-04

134

77 FR 62246 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Institutes of Health, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Rockville, MD 20852. Contact Person: Michele C. Hindi-Alexander, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Division of Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National...

2012-10-12

135

77 FR 33474 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...applications. Place: Hilton Washington/Rockville, 1750 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852. Contact Person: Michele C. Hindi-Alexander, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Division of Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National...

2012-06-06

136

77 FR 61419 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Bethesda North Marriott Hotel and Conference Center, 5701 Marinelli Road, Bethesda, MD 20852. Contact Person: Michele C. Hindi-Alexander, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Division of Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National...

2012-10-09

137

77 FR 5035 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Embassy Suites at the Chevy Chase Pavilion, 4300 Military Road NW., Washington, DC 20015. Contact Person: Michele C. Hindi-Alexander, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Division of Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National...

2012-02-01

138

75 FR 29354 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Embassy Suites at the Chevy Chase Pavilion, 4300 Military Road, NW., Washington, DC 20015. Contact Person: Michele C. Hindi-Alexander, PhD, Division of Scientific Review, National Institutes of Health, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National...

2010-05-25

139

78 FR 57399 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Embassy Suites at the Chevy Chase Pavilion, 4300 Military Road, NW., Washington, DC 20015. Contact Person: Michele C. Hindi-Alexander, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Division of Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National...

2013-09-18

140

The evolution of electronic tracking, optical, telemetry, and command systems at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A history is presented of the major electronic tracking, optical, telemetry, and command systems used at ETR in support of Apollo-Saturn and its forerunner vehicles launched under the jurisdiction of the Kennedy Space Center and its forerunner organizations.

Mcmurran, W. R. (editor)

1973-01-01

141

The Ironist and Hypocrite as Presidential Symbols: A Nixon-Kennedy Analog.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the self-disparaging ironist and the hypocrite as symbols of power in contemporary American politics. Contrasts the presidential images of Richard Nixon and John Kennedy who exemplify, respectively, hypocritical and ironical power-holders. (PD)

Kaufer, David S.

1979-01-01

142

President Obama and Family Arrive at Kennedy Space Center - Duration: 3:10.  

NASA Video Gallery

President Obama, accompanied by First Lady Michelle Obama and their two daughters, arrive aboard Air Force One at the Cape Canaveral AFS near NASAâ??s Kennedy Space Center at approximately 2 p.m. E...

143

Kennedy Space Center Wakes STS-135 Crew - Duration: 2:22.  

NASA Video Gallery

The Flight Day 13 wakeup music was "Fanfare for the Common Man" by Aaron Copland played for Commander Chris Ferguson. It was followed by a prerecorded message from Kennedy Space Center employees. K...

144

Views of the Challenger after landing at Kennedy to end shuttle mission 41-B  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Safing operations on the Space Shuttle Challenger are underway in the scene on the runway at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) landing facility. The orbiter is surrounded by trucks and personnel preparing it for the return to its hanger.

1984-01-01

145

Station Astronaut Suni Williams Reflects on President Kennedy's Challenge - Duration: 1:33.  

NASA Video Gallery

President Kennedy vowed that we shall not see space governed by a hostile flag of conquest but by a banner of freedom and peace. The International Space Station has become the very embodiment of th...

146

Use of epidural anaesthesia for surgery in a patient with Kennedy's disease.  

PubMed

Use of neuraxial block in a patient with motor neuron disease is controversial. We describe the anaesthetic management by epidural anaesthesia of a patient with Kennedy's disease, a rare lower motor neuron disease characterized by progressive weakness and wasting of limbs and bulbar muscles. The perioperative course was uneventful, and there was no exacerbation of neurologic signs or symptoms. We suggest that a patient with Kennedy's disease may be successfully managed by epidural anaesthesia for surgical internal urethrotomy. PMID:14742338

Okamoto, E; Nitahara, K; Yasumoto, M; Higa, K

2004-03-01

147

Space Radar Image of Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This is an X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar image spanning an area of about 20 kilometers by 40 kilometers (12 miles by 25 miles) of the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. At the top right are cloud-like structures which indicate rain. X-SAR is able to image heavy rainfall. The Atlantic Ocean is at the upper right. The shuttle landing strip is seen at the top left of the image. The Vertical Assembly Building, the Orbiter Processing Facility and other associated buildings are seen as a white area to the right and just above the end of the shuttle strip. The shuttle launch pads are the two white areas near the top center of the image. The Banana River shows up as a large black area running north to south to the right of the image. The Indian River is on the left side of the image. Just above the image center is a cluster of white spots which are the major buildings of the Kennedy Space Center industrial area. This was the location of the reflector array that was constructed to form the letters 'KSC' by the KSC payload team. The data for these KSC images were taken on orbit 81 of the space shuttle Endeavour on the fourth day of the SIR-C/X-SAR mission. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft und Raumfahrt e.V.(DLR), the major partner in science, operations and data processing of X-SAR.

1999-01-01

148

Internship at NASA Kennedy Space Center's Cryogenic Test laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is known for hosting all of the United States manned rocket launches as well as many unmanned launches at low inclinations. Even though the Space Shuttle recently retired, they are continuing to support unmanned launches and modifying manned launch facilities. Before a rocket can be launched, it has to go through months of preparation, called processing. Pieces of a rocket and its payload may come in from anywhere in the nation or even the world. The facilities all around the center help integrate the rocket and prepare it for launch. As NASA prepares for the Space Launch System, a rocket designed to take astronauts beyond Low Earth Orbit throughout the solar system, technology development is crucial for enhancing launch capabilities at the KSC. The Cryogenics Test Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center greatly contributes to cryogenic research and technology development. The engineers and technicians that work there come up with new ways to efficiently store and transfer liquid cryogens. NASA has a great need for this research and technology development as it deals with cryogenic liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen for rocket fuel, as well as long term space flight applications. Additionally, in this new era of space exploration, the Cryogenics Test Laboratory works with the commercial sector. One technology development project is the Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) Ground Operations Demonstration Unit (GODU). LH2 GODU intends to demonstrate increased efficiency in storing and transferring liquid hydrogen during processing, loading, launch and spaceflight of a spacecraft. During the Shuttle Program, only 55% of hydrogen purchased was used by the Space Shuttle Main Engines. GODU's goal is to demonstrate that this percentage can be increased to 75%. Figure 2 shows the GODU layout when I concluded my internship. The site will include a 33,000 gallon hydrogen tank (shown in cyan) with a heat exchanger inside the hydrogen tank attached to a refrigerator capable of removing 850 Watts at 20 Kelvin (shown in green). The refrigerator and most of its supporting equipment will be kept in a standard shipping container (shown in pink). Currently, GODU is in the fabrication process and some of the large components have already been purchased.

Holland, Katherine

2013-01-01

149

After nineteen years, the last trove of secret Kennedy tapes is released to the public  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

New Air Force One tapes give insight on Kennedy deathhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-16821363Last of secret Kennedy tapes releasedhttp://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-kennedy-tapes-20120125,0,6198450.storyPost JFK Assassination Air Force One Flight Deck Recordinghttp://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/GPO-NARA-JFK-ASSASSINATION-AUDIO/content-detail.htmlThe President John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Collectionhttp://www.archives.gov/research/jfk/The National Security Archive: The Cuban Missile Crisis, 1962: Audio Clips (iTunes)http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/nsa/cuba_mis_cri/audio.htmJFK 50 Years: Celebrate the past to awaken the futurehttp://www.jfk50.org/In the last three months of his presidency, John F. Kennedy dedicated a dam in Heber Springs, Arkansas, signed the Partial Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, and spoke with his advisers about the War on Poverty preparations for 1964. During this period, many hours of tapes secretly recorded Kennedy's interactions with his advisers, his family, and others, on a variety of topics including domestic policy and the space race. The John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum in Boston has reviewed and released over 248 hours of taped meetings and 12 hours of phone conversation since 1993. Not until this past week, however, were the final 45 hours of tapes from the final months of Kennedy's presidency released. Many historians and members of the public have been eagerly waiting to listen to them. Those who have heard the tapes thus far have remarked that the tapes demonstrate Kennedy's facility with a wide array of policy concerns. In one session, after hearing vastly different stories from top aides who had traveled to South Vietnam to assess the country, Kennedy remarks, "You both went to the same country?" The last meeting was taped on November 20th, 1963, two days before he was assassinated in Dallas.The first link takes visitors to a piece from this Tuesday's BBC News about the tapes that document the minutes on Air Force One immediately after President Kennedy's assassination. The second link leads to a Los Angeles Times article from last Tuesday, which discusses a larger selection of tapes. The third link leads to the previously mentioned Air Force One audio tape that was released this week. Moving on, the fourth link whisks users away to the President John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Collection, which is maintained by the National Archives. First-time visitors to the Collection page should start by perusing the FAQ area, as it is quite helpful. The fifth link takes interested parties to the very well-known and fascinating audio tapes of President Kennedy talking about the Cuban Missile Crisis with Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara, Secretary of State Dean Rusk, and his brother, Attorney General Robert Kennedy. The last link leads to a great site celebrating the 50th anniversary of President Kennedy's inauguration and his legacy in the arenas of foreign diplomacy, the arts, and civil rights.

Grinnell, Max

2012-02-03

150

Shaping NASA's Kennedy Space Center Safety for the Future  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

With the completion of the Space Shuttle Program, the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) safety function will be required to evolve beyond the single launch vehicle launch site focus that has held prominence for almost fifty years. This paper will discuss how that evolution is taking place. Specifically, we will discuss the future of safety as it relates to a site that will have multiple, very disparate, functions. These functions will include new business; KSC facilities not under the control of NASA; traditional payload and launch vehicle processing; and, operations conducted by NASA personnel, NASA contractors or a combination of both. A key element in this process is the adaptation of the current KSC set of safety requirements into a multi-faceted set that can address each of the functions above, while maintaining our world class safety environment. One of the biggest challenges that will be addressed is how to protect our personnel and property without dictating how other Non-NASA organizations protect their own employees and property. The past history of KSC Safety will be described and how the lessons learned from previous programs will be applied to the future. The lessons learned from this process will also be discussed as information for other locations that may undergo such a transformation.

Kirkpatrick, Paul; McDaniel, Laura; Smith, Maynette

2011-01-01

151

Acid rain at Kennedy Space Center, Florida - Recent observations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the period July, 1977 to September, 1979, rainfall was collected in the vicinity of the Kennedy Space Center and subjected to appropriate chemical analysis for purposes of characterization of general composition and acidity. Results obtained form the basis for future comparisons, should significant alteration of the chemical composition of rain occur during the space shuttle era. Acidity extremes calculated on a monthly basis from event samples collected from five sites within a 200 sq km area varied from pH 5.1 in November, 1977, and April, 1978 to pH 4.3 in July, 1978 and July, 1979. Weighted average pH for the entire period was 4.55. Acidity was due to the presence of sulfuric and nitric acids. The mole ratio of excess SO4(-2):NO3(-) was typically greater than one. Monthly weighted average Cl(-) concentrations ranged from 20-240 micromoles/liter. The Cl(-):Na(+) ratio was slightly lower than that present in sea water.

Madsen, B. C.

1981-01-01

152

EASE/ACCESS ground processing at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Payload Management and Operations Directorate is responsible for the processing of Space Shuttle payloads. The KSC responsibilities begin prior to hardware arrival at the launch site and extend until the experiments are returned to the investigators after the flight. The KSC involvement with the integration and checkout of payloads begins with participation in experiment, Mission Peculiar Equipment (MPE), and integrated payload design reviews. This involvement also includes participation in assembly and testing of flight hardware at the appropriate design center, university, or private corporation. Once the hardware arrives at the launch site, KSC personnel install the experiments and MPE onto a carrier in the Operations and Checkout (O & C) building. Following integration, the payload is functionally tested and then installed into the orbiter. After the mission, the payload is removed from the orbiter, deintegrated in the O & C building, and the experiments are turned over to the mission manager. One of the many payloads process at KSC consisted of two space construction experiments: the Experimental Assembly of Structures in Extravehicular Activity (EASE) and the Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structures (ACCESS). The details of EASE/ACCESS integration, testing, and deintegration are addressed and how this mission can serve as a guide for future space construction payloads is discussed.

Moates, Deborah J.; Villamil, Ana M.

1987-01-01

153

Advances in Materials Research: An Internship at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

My time at Kennedy Space Center. was spent immersing myself in research performed in the Materials Science Division of the Engineering Directorate. My Chemical Engineering background provided me the ability to assist in many different projects ranging from tensile testing of composite materials to making tape via an extrusion process. However, I spent the majority of my time on the following three projects: (1) testing three different materials to determine antimicrobial properties; (2) fabricating and analyzing hydrogen sensing tapes that were placed at the launch pad for STS-133 launch; and (3) researching molten regolith electrolysis at KSC to prepare me for my summer internship at MSFC on a closely related topic. This paper aims to explain, in detail, what I have learned about these three main projects. It will explain why this research is happening and what we are currently doing to resolve the issues. This paper will also explain how the hard work and experiences that I have gained as an intern have provided me with the next big step towards my career at NASA.

Barrios, Elizabeth A.; Roberson, Luke B.

2011-01-01

154

Restoration and analysis of amateur movies from the Kennedy assassination  

SciTech Connect

Much of the evidence concerning the assassination of President Kennedy comes from amateur movies of the presidential motorcade. Two of the most revealing movies are those taken by the photographers Zapruder and Nix. Approximately 180 frames of the Zapruder film clearly show the general relation of persons in the presidential limousine. Many of the frames of interest were blurred by focus problems or by linear motion. The method of cepstral analysis was used to quantitatively measure the blur, followed by maximum a posteriori (MAP) restoration. Descriptions of these methods, complete with before-and-after examples from selected frames are given. The frames were then available for studies of facial expressions, hand motions, etc. Numerous allegations charge that multiple gunmen played a role in an assassination plot. Multispectral analyses, adapted from studies of satellite imagery, show no evidence of an alleged rifle in the Zapruder film. Lastly, frame-averaging is used to reduce the noise in the Nix movie prior to MAP restoration. The restoration of the reduced-noise average frame more clearly shows that at least one of the alleged gunmen is only the light-and-shadow pattern beneath the trees.

Breedlove, J.R.; Cannon, T.M.; Janney, D.H.; Kruger, R.P.; Trussell, H.J.

1980-01-01

155

Kennedy Space Center processing of Shuttle small payloads  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

There are many steps involved in preparing a payload for a mission into space on the Space Shuttle. Operations at the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) are the last of those steps for the hardware before the payload is launched. To assure a successful and efficient KSC processing flow, a great deal of planning between the Robert H. Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and KSC personnel is required before the payload arrives at KSC. After arrival, pre-flight operations occur between payload personnel, GSFC personnel, and KSC personnel for integration of the payload into its carrier (if required), in preparation for installation into a Orbiter. Once installed into an Orbiter, final test(s), checkout, and close-out of the payload is performed by GSFC and KSC personnel before launch. Mission support varies depending on the payload flying, but once the mission is complete and the Orbiter has returned to KSC, post-flight operations begin. This usually involves a reverse flow of the pre-flight operations. KSC operations conclude when the payload, its ground support equipment (GSE), and personnel depart KSC. A list of lessons learned is generated at the end of each payload flow, to avoid repeating the same mistakes (if any) for the next payload or for multiple repeat flights of the same payload. Always monitored are planned changes that may affect the payloads, GSE, KSC facilities, payload personnel, GSFC personnel, and/or KSC personnel.

Haddad, Michael E.

1993-01-01

156

Dementia of frontal lobe type in Kennedy's disease.  

PubMed

The pathomorphological correlate of Kennedy's disease (KD) is a degeneration of spinal and bulbar alpha-motor neurons. The disease is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the first exon of the X-chromosomal androgene receptor gene. Contrary to the common belief that cognitive disorders in motor neuron diseases (MND) are either rare or only mild, there is now an increasing number of case reports on dementia in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In ALS, dementia of the frontal lobe type (frontotemporal dementia, FTD) seems to be the characteristic pattern. However, in KD cognitive dysfunction has not been studied systematically. Here we present a case with clinical characteristics of FTD in a patient with genetically confirmed KD. It remains speculative whether there is an association between KD and FTD comparable to a genetic linkage between ALS and FTD, which has been proposed in recent years. However, we suggest that cognitive dysfunction may be more common in KD than reported until today. PMID:16319030

Kessler, H; Prudlo, J; Kraft, S; Supprian, T

2005-12-01

157

Industrial Engineering Lifts Off at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

When the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) began the Space Shuttle Program, it did not have an established industrial engineering (IE) capability for several probable reasons. For example, it was easy for some managers to dismiss IE principles as being inapplicable at NASA's John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC). When NASA was formed by the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958, most industrial engineers worked in more traditional factory environments. The primary emphasis early in the shuttle program, and during previous human space flight programs such as Mercury and Apollo, was on technical accomplishments. Industrial engineering is sometimes difficult to explain in NASA's highly technical culture. IE is different in many ways from other engineering disciplines because it is devoted to process management and improvement, rather than product design. Images of clipboards and stopwatches still come to the minds of many people when the term industrial engineering is mentioned. The discipline of IE has only recently begun to gain acceptance and understanding in NASA. From an IE perspective today, the facilities used for flight hardware processing at KSC are NASA's premier factories. The products of these factories are among the most spectacular in the world: safe and successful launches of shuttles and expendable vehicles that carry tremendous payloads into space.

Barth, Tim

1998-01-01

158

Analysis of rapidly developing fog at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Space Shuttle landings at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) are of special concern to NASA's landing community because of Florida's rapidly changing weather conditions. Since a large number of Shuttle landing attempts occur in the morning hours (just after sunrise) fog and stratus development are a problem. The deorbit burn decision for a landing at KSC is typically made 90 minutes before Shuttle touchdown. In that 90 minutes weather conditions can change very rapidly. Fog to the west of KSC an advect in and reduce visibility to less than 7 miles. The most important difference between Shuttle and normal aircraft landings is that the Shuttle has no go-around capability requiring a forecast with little room for error. To help guard against rapidly changing weather conditions, flight rules have been developed as guidelines for all landings. This paper concerns fog development that would affect less than 7-statue mile visibility rule which is in effect for End-Of-Mission (EOM) Shuttle landings at KSC (Rule 4-64(A)). Data used for this analysis included hourly surface observations at the X68 Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) and upper-air observations form the CCAFS (Cape Canaveral Air Force Station-72794) rawinsonde site for the five year period, 1986 to 1990. This investigation focused on rapidly developing fog or stratus that developed between decision time and landing.

Wheeler, Mark M.

1993-01-01

159

Kennedy space center cardiovascular disease risk reduction program evaluation  

PubMed Central

This program evaluation examined the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) Risk Reduction Program which aims to identify CVD risk factors and reduce these risk factors through health education phone counseling. High risk participants (those having two or more elevated lipid values) are identified from monthly voluntary CVD screenings and counseled. Phone counseling consists of reviewing lab values with the participant, discussing dietary fat intake frequency using an intake questionnaire, and promoting the increase in exercise frequency. The participants are followed-up at two-months and five-months for relevant metrics including blood pressure, weight, body mass index (BMI), total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, dietary fat intake, and exercise frequency. Data for three years of the KSC CVD Program included 366 participants, average age of 49 years, 75% male, and 25% female. For those with complete two and five month follow-up data, significant baseline to two-month follow-up comparisons included decreases in systolic blood pressure (p = 0.03); diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.002); total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and dietary fat intake (all three at p < 0.0001) as well as a significant increase in exercise frequency (p = 0.04). Significant baseline to five-month follow-up comparisons included decreases in triglycerides (p = 0.05); and total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and dietary intake (all three at p < 0.0001). These program evaluation results indicate that providing brief phone health education counseling and information at the worksite to high risk CVD participants may impact CVD risk factors. PMID:18561517

Calderon, Kristine S; Smallwood, Charles; Tipton, David A

2008-01-01

160

Airborne measurements of cloud forming nuclei and aerosol particles at Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results of airborne measurements of the sizes and concentrations of aerosol particles, ice nuclei, and cloud condensation nuclei that were taken at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, are presented along with a detailed description of the instrumentation and measuring capabilities of the University of Washington airborne measuring facility (Douglas B-23). Airborne measurements made at Ft. Collins, Colorado, and Little Rock, Arkansas, during the ferry of the B-23 are presented. The particle concentrations differed significantly between the clean air over Ft. Collins and the hazy air over Little Rock and Kennedy Space Center. The concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei over Kennedy Space Center were typical of polluted eastern seaboard air. Three different instruments were used to measure ice nuclei: one used filters to collect the particles, and the others used optical and acoustical methods to detect ice crystals grown in portable cloud chambers. A comparison of the ice nucleus counts, which are in good agreement, is presented.

Radke, L. F.; Langer, G.; Hindman, E. E., II

1978-01-01

161

Baseline meteorological soundings for parametric environmental investigations at Kennedy Space Center and Vandenberg Air Force Base  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Meteorological soundings representative of the atmospheric environment at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida and Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, are presented. Synthetic meteorological soundings at Kennedy Space Center, including fall, spring, and a sea breeze, and at Vandenberg Air Force Base (sea breeze with low and high level inversion and stationary upper level troughs) are shown. Soundings of frontal passages are listed. The Titan launch soundings at Kennedy Space Center present a wide range of meteorological conditions, both seasonal and time of day variations. The meteorological data input of altitude, wind speed, wind direction, temperature, and pressure may be used as meteorological inputs for the NASA/MSFC Multilayer Diffusion Model or other models to obtain quantitative estimates of effluent concentrations associated with the potential emission of major combustion products in the lower atmosphere to simulate actual launches of space vehicles. The Titan launch soundings are also of value in terms of rocket effluent measurements for analysis purposes.

Susko, M.; Stephens, J. B.

1976-01-01

162

Innovative Partnerships Program Accomplishments: 2009-2010 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This document reports on the accomplishments of the Innovative Partnerships Program during the two years of 2009 and 2010. The mission of the Innovative Partnerships Program is to provide leveraged technology alternatives for mission directorates, programs, and projects through joint partnerships with industry, academia, government agencies, and national laboratories. As outlined in this accomplishments summary, the IPP at NASA's Kennedy Space Center achieves this mission via two interdependent goals: (1) Infusion: Bringing external technologies and expertise into Kennedy to benefit NASA missions, programs, and projects (2) Technology Transfer: Spinning out space program technologies to increase the benefits for the nation's economy and humanity

Makufka, David

2010-01-01

163

Trade study: Liquid hydrogen transportation - Kennedy Space Center. [cost and operational effectivenss of shipping methods.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Cryogenic transportation methods for providing liquid hydrogen requirements are examined in support of shuttle transportation system launch operations at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, during the time frames 1982-1991 in terms of cost and operational effectiveness. Transportation methods considered included sixteen different options employing mobile semi-trailer tankers, railcars, barges and combinations of each method. The study concludes that the most effective method of delivering liquid hydrogen from the vendor production facility in New Orleans to Kennedy Space Center includes maximum utilization of existing mobile tankers and railcars supplemented by maximum capacity mobile tankers procured incrementally in accordance with shuttle launch rates actually achieved.

Gray, D. J.

1978-01-01

164

Kennedy's disease phenotype with positive genetic study for Kugelberg-Welander's disease: case report.  

PubMed

We described a patient with clinical findings from Kennedy's disease and positive genetic study for Kugelberg-Welander's disease. A 24 years old man with negative family history presented with progressive spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy and gynecomastia at the age of 14. He was clinically diagnosed as having Kennedy's disease. However, a genetic study performed later was found to be negative for this disease and was positive for Kugelberg-Welander's disease, with deletion of the exons 7 and 8 in the "survival of motor neuron" gene. PMID:16100985

Trentin, Ana P; Scola, Rosana H; Teive, Hélio A G; Raskin, Salmo; Germiniani, Francisco M B; Werneck, Lineu C

2005-06-01

165

Highlighting Kathleen Green and Mario Delmar, guest editors of special issue (part 2): junctional targets of skin and heart disease.  

PubMed

Cell Communication and Adhesion has been fortunate to enlist two pioneers of epidermal and cardiac cell junctions, Kathleen Green and Mario Delmar, as Guest Editors of a two part series on junctional targets of skin and heart disease. Part 2 of this series begins with an overview from Dipal Patel and Kathy Green comparing epidermal desmosomes to cardiac area composita junctions, and surveying the pathogenic mechanisms resulting from mutations in their components in heart disease. This is followed by a review from David Kelsell on the role of desmosomal mutation in inherited syndromes involving skin fragility. Agnieszka Kobeliak discusses how structural deficits in the epidermal barrier intersect with the NFkB signaling pathway to induce inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. Farah Sheikh reviews the specialized junctional components in cardiomyocytes of the cardiac conduction system and Robert Gourdie discusses how molecular complexes between sodium channels and gap junction proteins within the perijunctional microdomains within the intercalated disc facilitate conduction. Glenn Radice evaluates the role of N-cadherin in heart. Andre Kleber and Chris Chen explore new approaches to study junctional mechanotransduction in vitro with a focus on the effects of connexin ablation and the role of cadherins, respectively. To complement this series of reviews, we have interviewed Werner Franke, whose systematic documentation the tissue-specific complexity of desmosome composition and pioneering discovery of the cardiac area composita junction greatly facilitated elucidation of the role of desmosomal components in the pathophysiology of human heart disease. PMID:24854768

Cowin, Pamela

2014-06-01

166

"A Time of Shame and Sorrow": Robert F. Kennedy and the American Jeremiad.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the rhetorical function of the modern American jeremiad as a means to restore social harmony in a time of crisis. Analyzes Robert F. Kennedy's response to the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. Reveals the strengths and limitations of the jeremiad as a response to social crisis. (SR)

Murphy, John M.

1990-01-01

167

Metallacarborane-Based Metal-Organic Framework with a Complex Robert D. Kennedy,  

E-print Network

of this is the family of isoreticular zinc(II)-based MOFs, known as the IRMOF series. This family, which containsMetallacarborane-Based Metal-Organic Framework with a Complex Topology Robert D. Kennedy, Daniel J(III) bis(dicarbollide)- based bis(isophthalic acid) anion was synthesized as a tetraphenylphosphonium salt

168

NASA Headquarters/Kennedy Space Center: Organization and Small Spacecraft Launch Services  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objectives of the Kennedy Space Center's (KSC) Expendable Launch Vehicles (ELV) Program are to provide safe, reliable, cost effective ELV launches, maximize customer satisfaction, and perform advanced payload processing capability development. Details are given on the ELV program organization, products and services, foreign launch vehicle policy, how to get a NASA launch service, and some of the recent NASA payloads.

Sierra, Albert; Beddel, Darren

1999-01-01

169

Prospects for an advanced Kennedy-Thorndike experiment in low Earth orbit  

E-print Network

We discuss the potential for a small space mission to perform an advanced Kennedy-Thorndike test of Special Relativity using the large and rapid velocity modulation available in low Earth orbit. An improvement factor of ~100 over present ground results is expected, with an additional factor of 10 possible using more advanced technology.

J. A. Lipa; S. Buchman; S. Saraf; J. Zhou; A. Alfauwaz; J. Conklin; G. D. Cutler; R. L. Byer

2012-03-18

170

John F. Kennedy's Civil Rights Discourse: The Evolution from "Principled Bystander" to Public Advocate.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Argues that President John F. Kennedy's civil rights discourse evidences an important evolutionary pattern marking a transition from legal argument to moral argument. Highlights two speeches as exemplars of this change. Asserts that this analysis is useful in the study of contemporary presidential discourse during times of domestic crisis. (MM)

Goldzwig, Steven R.; Dionisopoulos, George N.

1989-01-01

171

"Free at Last": Kennedy, King, and the Meaning of Liberty in the Disability Rights Movement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a direct link connecting President Kennedy and Martin Luther King, Jr., to the causes of liberty, consent, choice, the least restrictive environment, and genuine community presence for people with intellectual and related developmental disabilities. This article connects the meaning of liberty in those civil rights movements to the…

Turnbull, H. Rutherford, III

2012-01-01

172

A New Lightning Instrumentation System for Pad 39B at the Kennedy Space Center Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph presentation describes a new lightning instrumentation system for pad 39B at Kennedy Space Center Florida. The contents include: 1) Background; 2) Instrumentation; 3) Meteorological Instrumentation; and 4) Lessons learned. A presentation of the data acquired at Camp Blanding is also shown.

Mata, C. T.; Rakov, V. A.

2011-01-01

173

Space shuttle solid rocket booster processing and recovery operations at Kennedy Space Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the processing and recovery operations at Kennedy Space Center as applied to the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster. The introductory portion covers the overall Space Shuttle launch vehicle with a description of the Solid Rocket Boosters and explanations of their functions. Processing operations begin with the arrival of the new or refurbished Solid Rocket Motor segments by

W. J. Dickinson

1975-01-01

174

Single-Qubit Operations with the Nitrogen-Vacancy Center T. A. Kennedy1  

E-print Network

for different samples. For high-pressure, high-temperature synthetic diamonds, the high concentrationSingle-Qubit Operations with the Nitrogen-Vacancy Center in Diamond T. A. Kennedy1 ) (a), F. T Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375, USA (b) Apollo Diamond, Sherbourne, MA 01770, USA (Received May

Hart, Gus

175

CELL LINEAGE PROJECTIONS IN LOW DIMENSIONAL SPACES Sabina Pfister*, Colette Dehay**, Henry Kennedy**, Rodney Douglas*  

E-print Network

CELL LINEAGE PROJECTIONS IN LOW DIMENSIONAL SPACES Sabina Pfister*, Colette Dehay**, Henry Kennedy**, Rodney Douglas* *Institute of Neuroinformatics, UNI/ETH, Zürich, Switzerland **Stem-cell and Brain@ini.phys.ethz.ch ABSTRACT Cortical neurogenesis is a complex process during which dividing cells have the ability to acquire

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

176

Views of the Challenger landing at Kennedy to end shuttle mission 41-B  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The space shuttle Challenger makes the first landing on the Kennedy Space Center's (KSC) landing facility. Its nose gear has not yet touched down in this scene. Some bits of fog are also visible (27154); Rear view of the Challenger making its landing at KSC (27155).

1984-01-01

177

“A time of shame and sorrow”: Robert F. Kennedy and the American jeremiad  

Microsoft Academic Search

Robert F. Kennedy's response to the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. offers the opportunity to examine the rhetorical function of the modern American jeremiad. This essay argues that, while the jeremiad works well in the epideictic task of restoring social harmony in a time of crisis, it also operates as a rhetoric of social control. It precludes a close

John M. Murphy

1990-01-01

178

Fire and safety materials utilization at the John F. Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The special needs of the Kennedy Space Center in the area of protective garments for personnel engaged in hazardous emergency operations are discussed. The materials used in the protective clothing and the specialized applications of various materials are described. It is concluded that Nomex is the best general purpose nonflammable material for protective clothing.

Reynolds, J. R.

1971-01-01

179

2013-2014 Student/Academic Calendar Kennedy Krieger High School  

E-print Network

2013-2014 Student/Academic Calendar Kennedy Krieger High School 3825 Greenspring Avenue Baltimore, MD 21211 Phone for the High School: 443-923-7800 1 4 July 2013 First day of summer program for 11 month students (no school on Fridays) 4th of July ­ No School For Students 1 26 August 2013 Last Day

Pevsner, Jonathan

180

75 FR 2149 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Health, 6100 Executive Boulevard, Room 5B01, Rockville, MD 20852 (Telephone Conference Call) Contact Person: Michele C. Hindi-Alexander, PhD, Division of Scientific Review, National Institutes of Health, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National...

2010-01-14

181

76 FR 71987 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Hyatt Regency Bethesda, One Bethesda Metro Center, 7400 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20814. Contact Person: Michele C. Hindi-Alexander, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Division Of Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National...

2011-11-21

182

Research and technology: 1994 annual report of the John F. Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As the NASA Center responsible for assembly, checkout, servicing, launch, recovery, and operational support of Space Transportation System elements and payloads, the John F. Kennedy Space Center is placing increasing emphasis on its advanced technology development program. This program encompasses the efforts of the Engineering Development Directorate laboratories, most of the KSC operations contractors, academia, and selected commercial industries - all working in a team effort within their own areas of expertise. This edition of the Kennedy Space Center Research and Technology 1994 Annual Report covers efforts of all these contributors to the KSC advanced technology development program, as well as our technology transfer activities. The Technology Programs and Commercialization Office (DE-TPO), (407) 867-3017, is responsible for publication of this report and should be contacted for any desired information regarding the advanced technology program.

1994-01-01

183

Research and technology 1987 annual report of the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As the NASA Center responsible for assembly, checkout, servicing, launch, recovery, and operational support of Space Transportation System elements and payloads, Kennedy Space Center is placing increasing emphasis on the Center's research and technology program. In addition to strengthening those areas of engineering and operations technology that contribute to safer, more efficient, and more economical execution of our current mission, we are developing the technological tools needed to execute the Center's mission relative to future programs. The Engineering Development Directorate encompasses most of the laboratories and other Center resources that are key elements of research and technology program implementation, and is responsible for implementation of the majority of the projects of this Kennedy Space Center 1987 Annual Report.

1987-01-01

184

Reducing the turnaround time for the Shuttle Orbiter main propulsion system at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents steps currently being implemented to reduce the processing time of the Orbiter Main Propulsion System. Given the projected increase in launch rates of the Space Transportation System (STS) in the operational era, average turnaround time from arrival at Kennedy Space Center to subsequent launch will have to be significantly reduced. In many STS flows to date, a pacing system has been the Main Propulsion System consisting of the three Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME's) and the Main Propulsion Subsystem (MPS) connecting the SSME's to the Orbiter/ground and Orbiter/External Tank interfaces. This paper summarizes procedural, hardware, software, and requirements changes being incorporated at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) to reduce the processing time required for the MPS/SSME systems. Specific examples from each category are cited to illustrate the impact of the improvements on MPS/SSME processing.

Bilardo, V. J., Jr.

1983-01-01

185

A Bayesian analysis of two probability models describing thunderstorm activity at Cape Kennedy, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A Bayesian analysis of the two discrete probability models, the negative binomial and the modified negative binomial distributions, which have been used to describe thunderstorm activity at Cape Kennedy, Florida, is presented. The Bayesian approach with beta prior distributions is compared to the classical approach which uses a moment method of estimation or a maximum-likelihood method. The accuracy and simplicity of the Bayesian method is demonstrated.

Williford, W. O.; Hsieh, P.; Carter, M. C.

1974-01-01

186

Kennedy Space Center: Constellation Program Electrical Ground Support Equipment Research and Development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is NASA's spaceport, launching rockets into space and leading important human spaceflight research. This spring semester, I worked at KSC on Constellation Program electrical ground support equipment through NASA's Undergraduate Student Research Program (USRP). This report includes a discussion of NASA, KSC, and my individual research project. An analysis of Penn State's preparation of me for an internship and my overall impressions of the Penn State and NASA internship experience conclude the report.

McCoy, Keegan

2010-01-01

187

A New Approach for Management of Kennedy's Class I Condition Using Dental Implants: A Case Report.  

PubMed

Replacement of multiple missing teeth mainly in the Kennedy's class I and class II condition is a challenge for the clinician and the patient in terms of retention, masticatory efficiency, esthetics, comfort and importantly economics. Here, a case using implants in the distal denture bearing area with ball attachments and fabricating a cast partial denture over it utilizing the best of all benefits has been presented. PMID:24293924

Praveen, M; Chandra Sekar, A; Saxena, Aarti; Gautam Kumar, A

2012-12-01

188

FACTS AND FIGURES 20132014 HARvARD KENNEDy SCHool mISSIoN  

E-print Network

FACTS AND FIGURES 2013­2014 HARvARD KENNEDy SCHool mISSIoN To train exceptional public leaders.hks.harvard.edu/about/contact www.hks.harvard.edu/facts $65.2 expenses t $148.9 (in millions) employee benefits scholarships.3 DAvID T. EllwooD, DEAN FISCAl FACTS fy 2013 DEGREES mASTER'S DEGREES Approximately 1,051 full

189

The Turning Point: Perceptions and Policies Concerning Communist China during the Kennedy Years  

E-print Network

to gain the means to terrorize his neighbors and threaten the United States. Rather than disagree, in the aftermath of the Cuban Missile Crisis, Kennedy chose to stoke the flames, comparing Mao to Hitler and contrasting him with the newly reasonable... Vienna summit, the building of the Berlin Wall, and most of all the Cuban Missile Crisis was intriguing in its own right. That this heightened assessment of the Chinese threat coincided with increasing calls in the United States to improve relations...

Crean, Jeffrey 1977-

2012-11-13

190

KathleenMcAleer  

Cancer.gov

Skip to Main Content CCR Home | About CCR | CCR Intranet Main Navigation Home Profiles Research Newsworthy References Special Interest Groups Training Main Links Psycho-Oncology Home Profiles Research Publications Newsworthy/Resources References Special

191

BOSTON COLLEGE Kathleen Sullivan  

E-print Network

's Interdisciplinary Affective Science Laboratory. Her research is on the psychology and neuroscience of emotion. She Psychological Association, the Association for Psychological Science, and the Society for Personality and Social

Huang, Jianyu

192

Voltage profile program for the Kennedy Space Center electric power distribution system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Kennedy Space Center voltage profile program computes voltages at all busses greater than 1 Kv in the network under various conditions of load. The computation is based upon power flow principles and utilizes a Newton-Raphson iterative load flow algorithm. Power flow conditions throughout the network are also provided. The computer program is designed for both steady state and transient operation. In the steady state mode, automatic tap changing of primary distribution transformers is incorporated. Under transient conditions, such as motor starts etc., it is assumed that tap changing is not accomplished so that transformer secondary voltage is allowed to sag.

1976-01-01

193

The influence of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby on William Kennedy's Legs  

E-print Network

and could talk a little Hamlet, because he'd played Laertes once in school" (34). Jack is also described by his books: "Three items caught my eye on the small bookshelf otherwise full of Zane Grey and James Oliver Curwood items: a copy of Rabelais...) C . ~( a in I (H ' d f De rtment) ((I' Katherine E. K lly (Member) Tom Green (Member) August 1989 ABSTRACT The Influence of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsb on William Kennedy's ~Le s. (August 19891 Susan Bolet Egenolf, B. A. , Rice...

Egenolf, Susan Bolet

2012-06-07

194

Lightning source locations from VHF radiation data for a flash at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Three dimensional locations are presented for the VHF (30-50 MHz) radiation sources generated by a three-stroke lightning flash at the Kennedy Space Center. The locations were obtained by calculating the difference in time of arrival (DTOA) of radiated pulses at four ground stations. A computer-implemented multiple time series analysis was used in calculating DTOA data. The locations of the approximately 48,000 sequential VHF sources are compared with wide band electric-field records to provide a better understanding of the physics of lightning discharge.

Rustan, P. L.; Uman, M. A.; Childers, D. G.; Beasley, W. H.; Lennon, C. L.

1980-01-01

195

Kennedy Space Center Next Gen Site: Routine, Affordable Access to Space  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Next Gen Site, operated by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration at Kennedy Space Center, is investigating ways of making space travel more routine and affordable. The site offers many reports on the Vision Spaceport Partnership, the Highly Reusable Space Transportation Project, Space Solar Power, and Space Transportation System Affordability. A map of Cape Canaveral highlights each launch pad, and you can see information on each one by clicking on it. Related Info Including X-Vehicles is a section with background on several experimental projects and has links to sites that examine different aspects of design and planning for easier access to space.

1997-01-01

196

Texture Modification of the Shuttle Landing Facility Runway at the NASA Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes the test procedures and the selection criteria used in selecting the best runway surface texture modification at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to reduce Orbiter tire wear. The new runway surface may ultimately result in an increase of allowable crosswinds for launch and landing operations. The modification allows launch and landing operations in 20-kt crosswinds if desired. This 5-kt increase over the previous 15-kt limit drastically increases landing safety and the ability to make on-time launches to support missions where space station rendezvous is planned.

Daugherty, Robert H.; Yager, Thomas J.

1996-01-01

197

Educational Applications of Astronomy & Space Flight Operations at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Within two years, the Kennedy Space Center will complete a total redesign of NASA's busiest Visitor's Center. Three million visitors per year will be witness to a new program focused on expanding the interests of the younger public in NASA's major space programs, in space operations, and in astronomy. This project, being developed through the Visitor's Center director, a NASA faculty fellow, and the Visitor's Center contractor, is centered on the interaction between NASA programs, the visiting youth, and their parents. The goal of the Center's program is to provide an appealing learning experience for teens and pre teens using stimulating displays and interactive exhibits that are also educational.

Erickson, L. K.

1999-09-01

198

A Case Study: Using Delmia at Kennedy Space Center to Support NASA's Constellation Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The presentation examines the use of Delmia (Digital Enterprise Lean Manufacturing Interactive Application) for digital simulation in NASA's Constellation Program. Topics include an overview of the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Design Visualization Group tasks, NASA's Constellation Program, Ares 1 ground processing preliminary design review, and challenges and how Delmia is used at KSC, Challenges include dealing with large data sets, creating and maintaining KSC's infrastructure, gathering customer requirements and meeting objectives, creating life-like simulations, and providing quick turn-around on varied products,

Kickbusch, Tracey; Humeniuk, Bob

2010-01-01

199

Space shuttle operations at the NASA Kennedy Space Center: the role of emergency medicine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Division of Emergency Medicine at the University of Florida coordinates a unique program with the NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) to provide emergency medical support (EMS) for the United States Space Transportation System. This report outlines the organization of the KSC EMS system, training received by physicians providing medical support, logistic and operational aspects of the mission, and experiences of team members. The participation of emergency physicians in support of manned space flight represents another way that emergency physicians provide leadership in prehospital care and disaster management.

Rodenberg, H.; Myers, K. J.

1995-01-01

200

The use of sugammadex in a patient with Kennedy's disease under general anesthesia  

PubMed Central

Kennedy's disease (KD), also known as spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, is a rare, X-linked recessive, neurodegenerative disorder of the lower motor neurons characterized by progressive bulbar and appendicle muscular atrophy. Here we report a case of a 62-year-old male patient with KD, weighing 70 kg and 173 cm tall, was scheduled for frontal sinusectomy due to sinusitis. General anesthesia was induced through propofol 80 mg, remifentanil 0.25 ?g/kg/min and 40 mg rocuronium. We were successfully able to use a sugammadex on a patient suffering from KD in order to reverse rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade. PMID:25191203

Takeuchi, Risa; Hoshijima, Hiroshi; Doi, Katsushi; Nagasaka, Hiroshi

2014-01-01

201

The use of sugammadex in a patient with Kennedy's disease under general anesthesia.  

PubMed

Kennedy's disease (KD), also known as spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, is a rare, X-linked recessive, neurodegenerative disorder of the lower motor neurons characterized by progressive bulbar and appendicle muscular atrophy. Here we report a case of a 62-year-old male patient with KD, weighing 70 kg and 173 cm tall, was scheduled for frontal sinusectomy due to sinusitis. General anesthesia was induced through propofol 80 mg, remifentanil 0.25 ?g/kg/min and 40 mg rocuronium. We were successfully able to use a sugammadex on a patient suffering from KD in order to reverse rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade. PMID:25191203

Takeuchi, Risa; Hoshijima, Hiroshi; Doi, Katsushi; Nagasaka, Hiroshi

2014-07-01

202

Space Shuttle Challenger landing at Kennedy Space Center at end of STS 41-G  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle Challenger lands at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) at the end of the STS 41-G mission. The main landing gear has already touched down in this view, but the nose gear is still in the air (90232); Front view through tall grass of the Challenger making its landing at KSC (90233); Close-up side view of the Challenger making its landing at KSC (90234); Aerial view of the Challenger making its final approach to the runway to land at KSC (90235).

1984-01-01

203

USBI Booster Production Company's Hazardous Waste Management Program at the Kennedy Space Center, FL  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In response to the hazardous-waste generating processes associated with the launch of the Space Shuttle, a hazardous waste management plan has been developed. It includes waste recycling, product substitution, waste treatment, and waste minimization at the source. Waste material resulting from the preparation of the nonmotor segments of the solid rocket boosters include waste paints (primer, topcoats), waste solvents (methylene chloride, freon, acetone, toluene), waste inorganic compounds (aluminum anodizing compound, fixer), and others. Ways in which these materials are contended with at the Kennedy Space Center are discussed.

Venuto, Charles

1987-01-01

204

Normal probabilities for Cape Kennedy wind components: Monthly reference periods for all flight azimuths. Altitudes 0 to 70 kilometers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This document replaces Cape Kennedy empirical wind component statistics which are presently being used for aerospace engineering applications that require component wind probabilities for various flight azimuths and selected altitudes. The normal (Gaussian) distribution is presented as an adequate statistical model to represent component winds at Cape Kennedy. Head-, tail-, and crosswind components are tabulated for all flight azimuths for altitudes from 0 to 70 km by monthly reference periods. Wind components are given for 11 selected percentiles ranging from 0.135 percent to 99,865 percent for each month. Results of statistical goodness-of-fit tests are presented to verify the use of the Gaussian distribution as an adequate model to represent component winds at Cape Kennedy, Florida.

Falls, L. W.

1973-01-01

205

National Security Action Memoranda: Document Images From The Presidential Papers of John Fitzgerald Kennedy National Security Files  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The John F. Kennedy Library has posted the National Security Action Memoranda of the Kennedy administration, written either by the President himself or his National Security Advisor McGeorge Bundy. Topics of the memorandums include policy for Cuba, forces in Vietnam, reconnaissance flights over Russia, NATO, South Africa policy, CIA support of "certain activities," and many others. The copies are presented in photographed facsimile, and many of the more sensitive memorandums have been "sanitized," i.e., have portions deleted. A few of the memorandums are still classified and therefore not yet available. In November of 1998, the library released a huge quantity of taped recordings of Kennedy's consultations (see the November 27, 1998 Scout Report).

206

Reflections on working for Senator Edward Kennedy, a vital ally in the effort to improve mental health access and care.  

PubMed

The author worked as a health policy fellow in the office of Senator Edward M. Kennedy in 1999. These reflections on that experience provide a description of the ambience of working on health policy issues in the US Congress, how the author utilized his community psychiatric knowledge and skills to assist in the process of developing and promoting various health and mental health related issues, and what it was like working in the Kennedy office. In the wake of his death, the Senator's long and influential career and especially his role in advancing health and mental health access and care improvement cannot be overstated. PMID:20091425

Pollack, David A

2010-04-01

207

Mutations disrupting the Kennedy phosphatidylcholine pathway in humans with congenital lipodystrophy and fatty liver disease.  

PubMed

Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is the major glycerophospholipid in eukaryotic cells and is an essential component in all cellular membranes. The biochemistry of de novo PC synthesis by the Kennedy pathway is well established, but less is known about the physiological functions of PC. We identified two unrelated patients with defects in the Kennedy pathway due to biallellic loss-of-function mutations in phosphate cytidylyltransferase 1 alpha (PCYT1A), the rate-limiting enzyme in this pathway. The mutations lead to a marked reduction in PCYT1A expression and PC synthesis. The phenotypic consequences include some features, such as severe fatty liver and low HDL cholesterol levels, that are predicted by the results of previously reported liver-specific deletion of murine Pcyt1a. Both patients also had lipodystrophy, severe insulin resistance, and diabetes, providing evidence for an additional and essential role for PCYT1A-generated PC in the normal function of white adipose tissue and insulin action. PMID:24889630

Payne, Felicity; Lim, Koini; Girousse, Amandine; Brown, Rebecca J; Kory, Nora; Robbins, Ann; Xue, Yali; Sleigh, Alison; Cochran, Elaine; Adams, Claire; Dev Borman, Arundhati; Russel-Jones, David; Gorden, Phillip; Semple, Robert K; Saudek, Vladimir; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Walther, Tobias C; Barroso, Inês; Savage, David B

2014-06-17

208

Mutations disrupting the Kennedy phosphatidylcholine pathway in humans with congenital lipodystrophy and fatty liver disease  

PubMed Central

Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is the major glycerophospholipid in eukaryotic cells and is an essential component in all cellular membranes. The biochemistry of de novo PC synthesis by the Kennedy pathway is well established, but less is known about the physiological functions of PC. We identified two unrelated patients with defects in the Kennedy pathway due to biallellic loss-of-function mutations in phosphate cytidylyltransferase 1 alpha (PCYT1A), the rate-limiting enzyme in this pathway. The mutations lead to a marked reduction in PCYT1A expression and PC synthesis. The phenotypic consequences include some features, such as severe fatty liver and low HDL cholesterol levels, that are predicted by the results of previously reported liver-specific deletion of murine Pcyt1a. Both patients also had lipodystrophy, severe insulin resistance, and diabetes, providing evidence for an additional and essential role for PCYT1A-generated PC in the normal function of white adipose tissue and insulin action. PMID:24889630

Payne, Felicity; Lim, Koini; Girousse, Amandine; Brown, Rebecca J.; Kory, Nora; Robbins, Ann; Xue, Yali; Sleigh, Alison; Cochran, Elaine; Adams, Claire; Dev Borman, Arundhati; Russel-Jones, David; Gorden, Phillip; Semple, Robert K.; Saudek, Vladimir; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Walther, Tobias C.; Barroso, Inês; Savage, David B.

2014-01-01

209

Are cognitive and behavioural deficits a part of the clinical picture in Kennedy's disease? A case study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two years prior to diagnosis of Kennedy's disease (KD), a 53-year-old man began experiencing neurological symptoms, including nasal speech, postural tremor, tremor in the upper extremities, and muscle weakness. Genetic analysis revealed 46 CAG repeats in the androgen receptor gene. The patient's altered social conduct and complaints of forgetfulness led to a neuropsychological assessment. A mild impairment in visuospatial and

Dagmara Mirowska-Guzel; Joanna Seniów; Anna Su?ek; Marcin Le?niak; Anna Cz?onkowska

2009-01-01

210

CONCENTRATION UNCERTAINTY PRINCIPLES FOR SIGNALS ON THE UNIT SPHERE Zubair Khalid, Salman Durrani, Parastoo Sadeghi and Rodney A. Kennedy  

E-print Network

CONCENTRATION UNCERTAINTY PRINCIPLES FOR SIGNALS ON THE UNIT SPHERE Zubair Khalid, Salman Durrani.kennedy}@anu.edu.au ABSTRACT The uncertainty principle is an important and powerful tool, with many applications in signal processing. This paper presents two concentration uncertainty principles for signals on the sphere which

Durrani, Salman

211

The Language of the Liberal Consensus: John F. Kennedy, Technical Reason, and the "New Economics" at Yale University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

On June 11, 1962, President John F. Kennedy addressed the economy at Yale University. This essay explains the symbolic charge of his economic rhetoric, a persuasive campaign that enjoyed considerable success and marked the first time that a president took explicit responsibility for the nation's economic performance. I argue that the president…

Murphy, John W.

2004-01-01

212

Commercialization of Kennedy Space Center Instrumentation Developed to Improve Safety, Reliability, Cost Effectiveness of Space Shuttle Processing, Launch, and Landing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Priorities and achievements of the Kennedy Space Center (KSF) Instrumentation Laboratories in improving operational safety and decreasing processing costs associated with the Shuttle vehicle are addressed. Technologies that have been or are in the process of technology transfer are reviewed, and routes by which commercial concerns can obtain licenses to other KSF Instrumentation Laboratory technologies are discussed.

Helms, William R.; Starr, Stanley O.

1997-01-01

213

Compiling Fortran D for MIMD DistributedMemory Machines Seema Hiranandani Ken Kennedy ChauWen Tseng  

E-print Network

Compiling Fortran D for MIMD Distributed­Memory Machines Seema Hiranandani Ken Kennedy Chau­Wen Tseng Department of Computer Science Rice University Houston, TX 77251­1892 Abstract Fortran D, a version of Fortran extended with data decomposition specifications, is designed to pro­ vide a machine

Tseng, Chau-Wen

214

Nov. 16, 2012 Vol. 52, No. 23 John F. Kennedy Space Center -America's gateway to the universe  

E-print Network

's CST-100 will take up residency inside C3PF and the adjacent Space Shuttle Main Engine Facility's space shuttles like a glove is tran- sitioning to make room for a new fleet of low-Earth orbit bound of Spaceport News, we highlighted the handover of space shuttleAtlantis from NASAto the Kennedy Space Center

215

Letters from George Washington and Samuel Cabble, and Speeches by Franklin D. Roosevelt and John F. Kennedy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author uses several primary sources to demonstrate that George Washington, Samuel Cabble, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and John F. Kennedy stated their awareness of contemporary challenges, but looked to the future with hope and optimism. When they envisioned the future, their words indicated that they did not just imagine it, but…

Potter, Lee Ann

2008-01-01

216

3 CFR 9060 - Proclamation 9060 of November 21, 2013. Day of Remembrance for President John F. Kennedy  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...mourned the loss of an extraordinary...years as President of the United States, John F. Kennedy weathered some of the most perilous...must advance human rights here at home. During...proposed a civil rights bill that called for...

2014-01-01

217

Human Systems Engineering for Launch processing at Kennedy Space Center (KSC)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Launch processing at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is primarily accomplished by human users of expensive and specialized equipment. In order to reduce the likelihood of human error, to reduce personal injuries, damage to hardware, and loss of mission the design process for the hardware needs to include the human's relationship with the hardware. Just as there is electrical, mechanical, and fluids, the human aspect is just as important. The focus of this presentation is to illustrate how KSC accomplishes the inclusion of the human aspect in the design using human centered hardware modeling and engineering. The presentations also explain the current and future plans for research and development for improving our human factors analysis tools and processes.

Henderson, Gena; Stambolian, Damon B.; Stelges, Katrine

2012-01-01

218

Environmental Assessment for Central Campus Complex John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This Environmental Assessment addresses the Proposed Action to consolidate multiple facilities in the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Industrial Area by constructing two new buildings in the existing headquarters area between NASA Parkway, 3rd Street, C Avenue, and D Avenue. Under the Proposed Action, the historic Headquarters Building will be demolished and a new building will be constructed closer to the Operations and Checkout Building by centering it on D A venue (Hunton Brady Architects, P A and Jones Edmunds and Associates, Inc. 2011). This option was selected from a group of 15 initial sketches as the most viable option during a Central Campus Complex Siting Study completed in February 2011. A No-Action Alternative is also presented in which no demolition or construction of new facilities would occur. Implementing the Proposed Action will have major impacts to cultural resources, while the remaining environmental impacts will be minor.

Dankert, Donald

2013-01-01

219

A Diagnostic Analysis of the Kennedy Space Center LDAR Network. 2; Cross-Sensor Studies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Range dependencies in total (intracloud and cloud-to-ground) lightning observed by the Kennedy Space Center Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) network are established through cross-comparison with other lightning sensors. Using total lightning observed by the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS), LDAR flash detection efficiency is shown to remain above 90% out to 90-100 km range, and to be below 25% at 200 km range. LDAR VHF source location error distributions are also determined as a function of range, and are found to be asymmetric with first moments increasing roughly as range squared. Range normalization schemes for total VHF source density are tested and shown to yield significant (up to 50%) skill improvements over uncorrected data, when compared with National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) ground flash counts at hourly, daily, monthly and climatological time scales.

Boccippio, D. J.; Heckman, S.; Goodman, S. J.

1999-01-01

220

A Diagnostic Analysis of the Kennedy Space Center LDAR Network 2. Cross-Sensor Studies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Range dependencies in total (intracloud and cloud to ground) lightning observed by the Kennedy Space Center Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) network are established through cross comparison with other lightning sensors. Using total lightning observed from space by the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS), MAR flash detection efficiency is shown to remain above 90% out to 90-100 km range, and to be below 25% at 200 km range. MAR VHF source location error distributions are also determined as a function of range and are found to be asymmetric with standard deviation increasing roughly as r 2 . Range normalization schemes for total VHF source density are tested and shown to yield significant improvements in correlation with National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) ground flash density at hourly, daily, monthly, and climatological timescales (up to 50% over uncorrected source densities using an exponential-in-range correction factor with 40-50 km e-folding scale).

Boccippio, D. J.; Heckman, S.; Goodman, S. J.

2001-01-01

221

X-linked bulbospinomuscular atrophy (Kennedy's disease) masquerading as lead neuropathy.  

PubMed

A 43-year-old male was referred by a veterinarian who evaluated his dog for a seizure and suspected a toxic lead exposure for both. He refurbished houses, removing old paint, and complained of decreased cognition, fatigue, and muscle cramps. He had a depressed affect, postural tremor, right arm weakness with partial denervation on EMG, and borderline-low sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) amplitudes. A mild anemia and elevated serum and urine lead levels supported a diagnosis of lead neuropathy. Chelation therapy increased urine lead excretion without symptomatic improvement. His brother worked part-time with him and developed similar findings, but also had difficulty chewing, dysphagia, perioral twitching, gynecomastia, and multifocal denervation of extremity and facial muscles. His lead levels were not elevated, but an androgen receptor mutation identified on the X chromosome for both brothers confirmed the diagnosis of X-linked bulbospinomuscular atrophy (Kennedy's disease). PMID:8170488

Albers, J W; Bromberg, M B

1994-04-01

222

A New Comprehensive Lightning Instrumentation System for Pad 39B at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new comprehensive lightning instrumentation system has been designed for Launch Complex 39B at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. This new instrumentation system includes the synchronized recording of six high-speed video cameras, currents through the nine downconductors of the new lightning protection system, four B-dot, 3-axis measurement stations, and five D-dot stations composed of two antennas each. The instrumentation system is composed of centralized transient recorders and digitizers that located close to the sensors in the field. The sensors and transient recorders communicate via optical fiber. The transient recorders are triggered by the B-dot sensors, the E-dot sensors, or the current through the downlead conductors. The high-speed cameras are triggered by the transient recorders when the latter perceives a qualified trigger.

Mata, Carlos T.; Rakov, Vladimir A.; Mata, Angel G.; Bonilla Tatiana; Navedo, Emmanuel; Snyder, Gary P.

2010-01-01

223

Analysis and Assessment of Peak Lightning Current Probabilities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This technical memorandum presents a summary by the Electromagnetics and Aerospace Environments Branch at the Marshall Space Flight Center of lightning characteristics and lightning criteria for the protection of aerospace vehicles. Probability estimates are included for certain lightning strikes (peak currents of 200, 100, and 50 kA) applicable to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Shuttle at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, during rollout, on-pad, and boost/launch phases. Results of an extensive literature search to compile information on this subject are presented in order to answer key questions posed by the Space Shuttle Program Office at the Johnson Space Center concerning peak lightning current probabilities if a vehicle is hit by a lightning cloud-to-ground stroke. Vehicle-triggered lightning probability estimates for the aforementioned peak currents are still being worked. Section 4.5, however, does provide some insight on estimating these same peaks.

Johnson, D. L.; Vaughan, W. W.

1999-01-01

224

Large-Scale Cryogenic Testing of Launch Vehicle Ground Systems at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The development of a new launch vehicle to support NASA's future exploration plans requires significant redesign and upgrade of Kennedy Space Center's (KSC) launch pad and ground support equipment systems. In many cases, specialized test equipment and systems will be required to certify the function of the new system designs under simulated operational conditions, including propellant loading. This paper provides an overview of the cryogenic test infrastructure that is in place at KSC to conduct development and qualification testing that ranges from the component level to the integrated-system level. An overview of the major cryogenic test facilities will be provided, along with a detailed explanation of the technology focus area for each facility

Ernst, E. W.; Sass, J. P.; Lobemeyer, D. A.; Sojourner, S. J.; Hatfield, W. H.; Rewinkel, D. A.

2007-01-01

225

Space shuttle solid rocket booster processing and recovery operations at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes the processing and recovery operations at Kennedy Space Center as applied to the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster. The introductory portion covers the overall Space Shuttle launch vehicle with a description of the Solid Rocket Boosters and explanations of their functions. Processing operations begin with the arrival of the new or refurbished Solid Rocket Motor segments by rail cars from the manufacturer. Segment buildup is performed on the Mobile Launch Platform, and the completed major booster elements are functionally tested prior to their integration with other prime elements that comprise a complete Shuttle launch vehicle. The recovery operations following launch include Solid Rocket Booster separation, parachute deployment, splashdown, and the activities associated with retrieval of the reusable components of the Solid Rocket Boosters. Subsequently, the paper describes the processing required to thoroughly clean the retrieved items, the disassembly activities, and refurbishment steps planned for restoration of the hardware components to usable condition.

Dickinson, W. J.

1975-01-01

226

Aircraft measurements of electrified clouds at Kennedy Space Center, part 3  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Flights made by the Special Purpose Test Vehicle for Atmospheric Research (SPTVAR) airplane during a second deployment to Florida during the summer of 1989 are discussed. The findings based on the data gathered are presented. The progress made during the second year of the project is discussed. The summer 1989 study was carried out with the support and guidance of Col. John Madura, Commander of Detachment 11, 2nd Weather Squadron, USAF, at Patrick Air Force Base (PAFB) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The project goals were to develop and demonstrate techniques for measuring the electric field aloft and locating regions of charge during flight within and near clouds; to characterize the electric conditions that are presently identified as a threat to space launch vehicles; and to study the correlation between the electric field aloft and that at Kennedy Space Center's ground-based electric field mill array for a variety of electrified clouds.

Jones, J. J.; Winn, W. P.; Hunyady, S. J.; Moore, C. B.; Bullock, J. W.; Fleischhacker, P.

1990-01-01

227

Kennedy's disease: clinical significance of tandem repeats in the androgen receptor.  

PubMed

Kennedy's disease (KD) or spinobulbar muscular atrophy is a hereditary X-linked, progressive neurodegenerative condition caused by an expansion of the CAG triplet repeat in the first exon of the androgen receptor gene. The phenotype in its full form is only expressed in males and presents as weakness and wasting of the upper and lower limbs and bulbar muscles associated with absent reflexes. Sensory disturbances are present. Various endocrine abnormalities including decreased fertility and gynecomastia are common and amongst the first features of KD. Animal models of KD have demonstrated improvement on withdrawal of testosterone, indicating that this agonist of the androgen receptor is required for the toxic effect. Potential therapies based on testosterone withdrawal in humans have shown some promise, but efficacy remains to be proven. Potential clinical factors, pathogenesis and future approaches to therapy are reviewed in this chapter. PMID:23560310

Zajac, Jeffrey D; Fui, Mark Ng Tang

2012-01-01

228

The assassination of the late President John F. Kennedy. An academician's thoughts.  

PubMed

Another look is taken at the murder case of the late President John F. Kennedy. The overall pattern established by various investigations should force any reasonable person to conclude that a conspiracy of greater or lesser proportions did exist. The actors in that conspiracy have not been identified. The role of Lee Harvey Oswald in the event is still obscure. The art and science of pathology, in this case, failed the nation. Federal agencies were incompetent and possibly criminally negligent in their handling of the case. The fact that more than a single gunman was involved in the murder seems indubitable. Scientists, as scientists, have contributed all that they can to resolving the case. Suppression, modification, and destruction of evidence crucial to the case by those having it in custody have been completed so effectively that one esteemed historian has asserted, "at least some of those responsible for the murder of a President of the United States got away with it." PMID:3524198

Wilber, C G

1986-03-01

229

STS-68 747 SCA Ferry Flight Takeoff for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle Columbia, atop NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), taking off for the Kennedy Space Center shortly after its landing on 12 October 1994, at Edwards, California, to complete mission STS-68. Columbia was being ferried from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, to Air Force Plant 42, Palmdale, California, where it will undergo six months of inspections, modifications, and systems upgrades. The STS-68 11-day mission was devoted to radar imaging of Earth's geological features with the Space Radar Laboratory. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site with Dryden remaining as the principal alternate landing site.

1994-01-01

230

Insects, vegetation, and the control of laughing gulls (Larus atricilla) at Kennedy International Airport, New York  

USGS Publications Warehouse

1. In response to a purported 'bird-strike problem' at J.F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City, we examined short (5 cm) and long (45 cm) grass heights as gull deterrents, in a randomized-block experiment. 2. Vegetative cover, numbers of adult insects and of larval beetles (suspected on-airport food of the gulls) were sampled in the six-block, 36-plot study area, as well as gut contents of adult and downy young gulls in the immediately adjacent colony in the Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge. 3. We found that (i) Oriental beetle larvae were the most numerous and concentrated in one experimental block; (ii) beetle larvae numbers were uncorrelated with grass height; (iii) adult beetles were also uncorrelated with grass height; (iv) laughing gulls were distributed across blocks irrespective of percentage cover; (v) within blocks, laughing gulls were selecting short grass and avoiding long grass plots; (vi) laughing gull numbers were positively associated with numbers of Oriental beetle larvae; (vii) adult laughing gulls on the airport were eating lower-nutrition food of terrestrial origin (74-83% adult beetles, mostly Oriental plus green June and ground beetles); (viii) on the other hand, gull chicks in the adjacent breeding colony were being fed more easily digested, higher-protein food of marine origin (86-88% fishes, crustacea and molluscs); (ix) laughing gulls on the airport were taking their adult beetles only in short-grass plots, ignoring large numbers in adjacent long grass; (x) during the summer, on-airport gulls shifted from performing largely maintenance activities on pavement to feeding actively for beetles on newly mown short grass, the change coinciding with adult beetle emergence; (xi) standing water on the airport attracted significantly more gulls than dry areas all summer long. 4. We recommend a series of ecologically compatible, but aggressive habitat management actions for controlling laughing gulls on Kennedy Airport by rendering the airport unattractive to them, notably by implementing an airport-wide programme of long-grass encouragement, draining standing water and improving runoff in water-collecting areas, and controlling beetles. 5. We conclude by outlining the necessity for airport-wide bird, vegetation and habitat management programmes fully integrated into airport operation and planning activities.

Buckley, P.A.; McCarthy, M.

1994-01-01

231

Spearhead echo and downburst near the approach end of a John F. Kennedy Airport runway, New York City  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Radar echoes of a storm at John F. Kennedy International Airport are examined. Results regarding the phenomena presented suggest the existence of downburst cells. These cells are characterized by spearhead echoes. About 2% of the echoes in the New York area were spearhead echoes. The detection and identification of downburst cells, their potential hazard to approaching and landing aircraft, and communication of this information to the pilots of those aircraft are discussed.

Fujita, T. T.

1976-01-01

232

A preliminary study of environmental parameters associated with the feasibility of a polygeneration plant at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The feasibility of a polygeneration plant at Kennedy Space Center was studied. Liquid hydrogen and gaseous nitrogen are the two principal products in consideration. Environmental parameters (air quality, water quality, biological diversity and hazardous waste disposal) necessary for the feasibility study were investigated. A National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) project flow sheet was to be formulated for the environmental impact statement. Water quality criteria for Florida waters were to be established.

Barnes, G. D.

1982-01-01

233

Structural Analysis Peer Review for the Static Display of the Orbiter Atlantis at the Kennedy Space Center Visitors Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Mr. Christopher Miller with the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) NASA Safety & Mission Assurance (S&MA) office requested the NASA Engineering and Safety Center's (NESC) technical support on March 15, 2012, to review and make recommendations on the structural analysis being performed for the Orbiter Atlantis static display at the KSC Visitor Center. The principal focus of the assessment was to review the engineering firm's structural analysis for lifting and aligning the orbiter and its static display configuration

Minute, Stephen A.

2013-01-01

234

Metabolic Interactions between the Lands Cycle and the Kennedy Pathway of Glycerolipid Synthesis in Arabidopsis Developing Seeds[W  

PubMed Central

It has been widely accepted that the primary function of the Lands cycle is to provide a route for acyl remodeling to modify fatty acid (FA) composition of phospholipids derived from the Kennedy pathway. Lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase (LPCAT) is an evolutionarily conserved key enzyme in the Lands cycle. In this study, we provide direct evidence that the Arabidopsis thaliana LPCATs, LPCAT1 and LPCAT2, participate in the Lands cycle in developing seeds. In spite of a substantially reduced initial rate of nascent FA incorporation into phosphatidylcholine (PC), the PC level in the double mutant lpcat1 lpcat2-2 remained unchanged. LPCAT deficiency triggered a compensatory response of de novo PC synthesis and a concomitant acceleration of PC turnover that were attributable at least in part to PC deacylation. Acyl-CoA profile analysis revealed complicated metabolic alterations rather than merely reduced acyl group shuffling from PC in the mutant. Shifts in FA stereo-specific distribution in triacylglycerol of the mutant seed suggested a preferential retention of saturated acyl chains at the stereospecific numbering (sn)-1 position from PC and likely a channeling of lysophosphatidic acid, derived from PC, into the Kennedy pathway. Our study thus illustrates an intricate relationship between the Lands cycle and the Kennedy pathway. PMID:23150634

Wang, Liping; Shen, Wenyun; Kazachkov, Michael; Chen, Guanqun; Chen, Qilin; Carlsson, Anders S.; Stymne, Sten; Weselake, Randall J.; Zou, Jitao

2012-01-01

235

Legacy and Emergence of Spaceport Technology Development at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has a long and successful legacy in the checkout and launch of missiles and space vehicles. These operations have become significantly more complex, and their evolution has driven the need for many technology developments. Unanticipated events have also underscored the need for a local, highly responsive technology development and testing capability. This evolution is briefly described, as well as the increasing level of technology capability at KSC. The importance of these technologies in achieving past national space goals suggests that the accomplishment of low-cost and reliable access to space will depend critically upon KSC's future success in developing spaceport technologies. This paper concludes with a description KSC's current organizational approach and major thrust areas in technology development. The first phase of our historical review focuses on the development and testing of field- deployable short- and intermediate-range ballistic missiles (1953 to 1958). These vehicles are later pressed into service as space launchers. The second phase involves the development of large space lift vehicles culminating in the Saturn V launches (1959 to 1975). The third phase addresses the development and operations of the partially reusable launch vehicle, Space Shuttle (1976 to 2000). In the current era, KSC is teaming with the U.S. Air Force (AF), industry, academia, and other partners to identify and develop Spaceport and Range Technologies necessary to achieve national space goals of lower-cost and higher-reliability space flight.

Starr, Stanley; Voska, Ned (Technical Monitor)

2003-01-01

236

Crop Production for Advanced Life Support Systems - Observations From the Kennedy Space Center Breadboard Project  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The use of plants for bioregenerative life support for space missions was first studied by the US Air Force in the 1950s and 1960s. Extensive testing was also conducted from the 1960s through the 1980s by Russian researchers located at the Institute of Biophysics in Krasnoyarsk, Siberia, and the Institute for Biomedical Problems in Moscow. NASA initiated bioregenerative research in the 1960s (e.g., Hydrogenomonas) but this research did not include testing with plants until about 1980, with the start of the Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) Program. The NASA CELSS research was carried out at universities, private corporations, and NASA field centers, including Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The project at KSC began in 1985 and was called the CELSS Breadboard Project to indicate the capability for plugging in and testing various life support technologies; this name has since been dropped but bioregenerative testing at KSC has continued to the present under the NASA s Advanced Life Support (ALS) Program. A primary objective of the KSC testing was to conduct pre-integration tests with plants (crops) in a large, atmospherically closed test chamber called the Biomass Production Chamber (BPC). Test protocols for the BPC were based on observations and growing procedures developed by university investigators, as well as procedures developed in plant growth chamber studies at KSC. Growth chamber studies to support BPC testing focused on plant responses to different carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, different spectral qualities from various electric lamps, and nutrient film hydroponic culture techniques.

Wheeler, R. M.; Sager, J. C.; Prince, R. P.; Knott, W. M.; Mackowiak, C. L.; Stutte, G. W.; Yorio, N. C.; Ruffe, L. M.; Peterson, B. V.; Goins, G. D.

2003-01-01

237

Quality Control Algorithms for the Kennedy Space Center 50-Megahertz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Winds Database  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents the process used by the Marshall Space Flight Center Natural Environments Branch (EV44) to quality control (QC) data from the Kennedy Space Center's 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler for use in vehicle wind loads and steering commands. The database has been built to mitigate limitations of using the currently archived databases from weather balloons. The DRWP database contains wind measurements from approximately 2.7-18.6 km altitude at roughly five minute intervals for the August 1997 to December 2009 period of record, and the extensive QC process was designed to remove spurious data from various forms of atmospheric and non-atmospheric artifacts. The QC process is largely based on DRWP literature, but two new algorithms have been developed to remove data contaminated by convection and excessive first guess propagations from the Median Filter First Guess Algorithm. In addition to describing the automated and manual QC process in detail, this paper describes the extent of the data retained. Roughly 58% of all possible wind observations exist in the database, with approximately 100 times as many complete profile sets existing relative to the EV44 balloon databases. This increased sample of near-continuous wind profile measurements may help increase launch availability by reducing the uncertainty of wind changes during launch countdown

Barbre, Robert E., Jr.

2012-01-01

238

Summary of 1987 and 1988 manatee aerial surveys at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Aerial surveys of manatees conducted since 1977 at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) have provided a very useful and cost effective monitoring tool in the assessment of abundance and distribution of manatees in the northern Banana River. Data collected in the mid 1980's as part of the KSC Environmental Monitoring Program indicated that the numbers of manatees utilizing the northern Banana River had increased dramatically from earlier years and that the animals appeared to have changed their distribution patterns within the area as well (Provancha and Provancha 1988). United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and Florida Department of Natural Resources (FLDNR) conducted bimonthly aerial surveys in 1986 for the entire Florida east coast. Their data clearly show that the Banana River has the highest concentration of manatees during the non-winter months when compared to all other segments of the east coast surveys (B. Wiegle/FLDNR, unpublished data). They further show that, in spring, an average of 71 percent of the manatees in Brevard county were located in the Banana River. During that period 85 percent of the animals were north of the NASA Causeway (State Road (SR) 402) in the KSC security zone. These data indicate the importance of the KSC waters to the Florida east coast manatee population. We reinitiated KSC surveys in 1987 to document distributions and numbers of manatees during the spring influx. Aerial censuses were continued throughout the year in 1988 and this report provides a summary of our findings for the two years.

Provancha, Jane A.; Provancha, Mark J.

1989-01-01

239

Habitat model for the Florida Scrub Jay on John F. Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Florida Scrub Jay is endemic to Florida. The John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) provides habitat for one of the three largest populations of the Florida Scrub Jay. This threatened bird occupies scrub, slash pine flatwoods, disturbed scrub, and coastal strand on KSC. Densities of Florida Scrub Jays were shown to vary with habitat characteristics but not necessarily with vegetation type. Relationships between Florida Scrub Jay densities and habitat characteristics were used to develop a habitat model to provide a tool to compare alternative sites for new facilities and to quantify environmental impacts. This model is being tested using long term demographic studies of colorbanded Florida Scrub Jays. Optimal habitat predicted by the model has greater than or equal to 50 percent of the shrub canopy comprised of scrub oaks, 20-50 percent open space or scrub oak vegetation within 100 m of a ruderal edge, less than or equal to 15 percent pine canopy cover, a shrub height of 120-170 cm, and is greater than or equal to 100 m from a forest. This document reviews life history, social behavior, food, foraging habitat, cover requirements, characteristics of habitat on KSC, and habitat preferences of the Florida Scrub Jay. Construction of the model and its limitations are discussed.

Breininger, David R.

1992-01-01

240

An Overview of My Internship with the Ecological Program at John F. Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During my internship with Innovative Health Applications, I participated in numerous longterm research projects involving the study of various plant and animal life at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). I observed the monitoring of nesting sea turtles. I learned about the transfer of egg clutches from the northern Gulf Coast in an effort to help the hatchlings avoid the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. I gained knowledge of tracking the movements of important sport fish and sharks in this area using a hydro-acoustic tag and receiver system. This effort included routinely taking water quality data at multiple sites around KSC. Alligator population and nesting assessments was another part of my internship. I observed the biologists take morphometric measurements, blood, urine and tissue samples from alligators found in KSC waterways. I assisted in taking photosynthesis and reflectance measurements on various scrub oaks and palmettos. I participated in Florida Scrub-Jay surveys in an effort to monitor their population trends and was involved in Southeastern beach mouse trapping and identification. I also assisted in seagrass surveys monitoring the health of the seagrass beds.

Owen, Samantha

2010-01-01

241

A 20 Year Lifecycle Study for Launch Facilities at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The lifecycle cost analysis was based on corrosion costs for the Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complexes and Mobile Launch Platforms. The first step in the study involved identifying the relevant assets that would be included. Secondly, the identification and collection of the corrosion control cost data for the selected assets was completed. Corrosion control costs were separated into four categories. The sources of cost included the NASA labor for civil servant personnel directly involved in overseeing and managing corrosion control of the assets, United Space Alliance (USA) contractual requirements for performing planned corrosion control tasks, USA performance of unplanned corrosion control tasks, and Testing and Development. Corrosion control operations performed under USA contractual requirements were the most significant contributors to the total cost of corrosion. The operations include the inspection of the pad, routine maintenance of the pad, medium and large scale blasting and repainting activities, and the repair and replacement of structural metal elements. Cost data was collected from the years between 2001 and 2007. These costs were then extrapolated to future years to calculate the 20 year lifecycle costs.

Kolody, Mark R.; Li. Wenyan; Hintze, Paul E.; Calle, Luz-Marina

2009-01-01

242

Strain Distribution in a Kennedy Class I Implant Assisted Removable Partial Denture under Various Loading Conditions  

PubMed Central

Purpose. This in vitro study investigates how unilateral and bilateral occlusal loads are transferred to an implant assisted removable partial denture (IARPD). Materials and Methods. A duplicate model of a Kennedy class I edentulous mandibular arch was made and then a conventional removable partial denture (RPD) fabricated. Two Straumann implants were placed in the second molar region, and the prosthesis was modified to accommodate implant retained ball attachments. Strain gages were incorporated into the fitting surface of both the framework and acrylic to measure microstrain (?Strain). The IARPD was loaded to 120Ns unilaterally and bilaterally in three different loading positions. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS version 18.0 (SPSS, Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) with an alpha level of 0.05 to compare the maximum ?Strain values of the different loading conditions. Results. During unilateral and bilateral loading the maximum ?Strain was predominantly observed in a buccal direction. As the load was moved anteriorly the ?Strain increased in the mesial area. Unilateral loading resulted in a twisting of the structure and generated a strain mismatch between the metal and acrylic surfaces. Conclusions. Unilateral loading created lateral and vertical displacement of the IARPD. The curvature of the dental arch resulted in a twisting action which intensified as the unilateral load was moved anteriorly. PMID:23737788

Shahmiri, Reza; Aarts, John M.; Bennani, Vincent; Swain, Michael V.

2013-01-01

243

Trace element release from estuarine sediments of South Mosquito Lagoon near Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Analytical partitioning of four trace metals in estuarine sediments collected from eight sites in South Mosquito Lagoon near Kennedy Space Center, in terms of four different categories was accomplished using four different extraction techniques. The concentrations of the four trace metals, Zn, Mn, Cd, and Cu, released in interstitial water extract, 1 N ammonium acetate extract, conc. HCl extract and fusion extract of sediments as well as their concentrations in water samples collected from the same location were determined using flame atomic absorption technique. From the analytical results the percentages of total amount of each metal distributed among four different categories, interstitial water phase, acetate extractable, acid extractable and detrital crystalline material, were determined. Our results suggest that analytical partitioning of trace metals in estuarine sediments may be used to study the mechanism of incorporation of trace metals with sediments from natural waters. A correlation between the seasonal variation in the concentration of acetate extractable trace metals in the sediment and similar variation in their concentration in water was observed. A mechanism for the release of trace metals from estuarine sediments to natural water is also suggested.

Menon, M. P.; Ghuman, G. S.; Emeh, C. O.

1979-01-01

244

Physical, anthropometrical, and body composition characteristics of workers at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

At the Kennedy Space Center, workers are often exposed to cardiovascular and muscular stress in job-related activities which may require a high level of physical fitness in order to safely complete the work task. Similar tasks will be performed at other launch and landing facilities and in space for the Space Station. One such category includes workers who handle toxic propellants and must wear Self-Contained Atmospheric Protective Ensembles (SCAPE) that can weigh 56 lbs. with the air pack. These suits provide a significant physical challenge to many of the workers in terms of carrying this load while moving about and performing work. Furthermore, under some conditions, there is a significant thermal stress. The physical characteristics of these workers are, therefore, of consequence. The purpose of this study was to analyze the anthropometry, body composition, strength, power, endurance, flexibility, aerobic fitness, and blood variables of a representative sample of male KSC SCAPE workers and to compare them with characteristics of other male workers at KSC (total population N=110). Three separate comparisons were made.

Lasley, M. L.

1985-01-01

245

An Occupational Performance Test Validation Program for Fire Fighters at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We evaluated performance of a modified Combat Task Test (CTT) and of standard fitness tests in 20 male subjects to assess the prediction of occupational performance standards for Kennedy Space Center fire fighters. The CTT consisted of stair-climbing, a chopping simulation, and a victim rescue simulation. Average CTT performance time was 3.61 +/- 0.25 min (SEM) and all CTT tasks required 93% to 97% maximal heart rate. By using scores from the standard fitness tests, a multiple linear regression model was fitted to each parameter: the stairclimb (r(exp 2) = .905, P less than .05), the chopping performance time (r(exp 2) = .582, P less than .05), the victim rescue time (r(exp 2) = .218, P = not significant), and the total performance time (r(exp 2) = .769, P less than .05). Treadmill time was the predominant variable, being the major predictor in two of four models. These results indicated that standardized fitness tests can predict performance on some CTT tasks and that test predictors were amenable to exercise training.

Schonfeld, Brian R.; Doerr, Donald F.; Convertino, Victor A.

1990-01-01

246

Minor cognitive disturbances in X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, Kennedy's disease.  

PubMed

Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), Kennedy's disease, is an adult-onset hereditary neurodegenerative disorder, associated predominantly with a lower motor neuron syndrome and eventually endocrine and sensory disturbances. In contrast to other motor neuron diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the impairment of cognition in SBMA is not well documented. We conducted a systematic cross-sectional neuropsychological study in order to investigate cognition in SBMA patients more thoroughly. We investigated 20 genetically proven SBMA patients compared to 20 age- and education-matched control subjects using a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery, measuring executive functioning, attention, memory and visuospatial abilities. The SBMA patients performed significantly worse than healthy controls in three sub-tests in the executive and attention domains. This low performance was in the working memory (digit span backward task), verbal fluency category (single letter fluency task) and memory storage capacity (digit span forward task). No disturbances were detected in other cognitive domains. The impairments were subclinical and not relevant to the patients' everyday functioning. In addition, no correlations were found between cognitive scores and the CAG repeat length. In conclusion, we found minor cognitive disturbances in patients with SBMA, which could indicate subtle frontal lobe dysfunction. These findings extend our neurobiological understanding of SBMA. PMID:24200287

Kasper, Elisabeth; Wegrzyn, Martin; Marx, Ivo; Korp, Christin; Kress, Wolfram; Benecke, Reiner; Teipel, Stefan J; Prudlo, Johannes

2014-03-01

247

Mapping analysis and planning system for the John F. Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Environmental management, impact assessment, research and monitoring are multidisciplinary activities which are ideally suited to incorporate a multi-media approach to environmental problem solving. Geographic information systems (GIS), simulation models, neural networks and expert-system software are some of the advancing technologies being used for data management, query, analysis and display. At the 140,000 acre John F. Kennedy Space Center, the Advanced Software Technology group has been supporting development and implementation of a program that integrates these and other rapidly evolving hardware and software capabilities into a comprehensive Mapping, Analysis and Planning System (MAPS) based in a workstation/local are network environment. An expert-system shell is being developed to link the various databases to guide users through the numerous stages of a facility siting and environmental assessment. The expert-system shell approach is appealing for its ease of data access by management-level decision makers while maintaining the involvement of the data specialists. This, as well as increased efficiency and accuracy in data analysis and report preparation, can benefit any organization involved in natural resources management.

Hall, C. R.; Barkaszi, M. J.; Provancha, M. J.; Reddick, N. A.; Hinkle, C. R.; Engel, B. A.; Summerfield, B. R.

1994-01-01

248

Quantum computational universality of Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki states beyond the honeycomb lattice  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Universal quantum computation can be achieved by simply performing single-spin measurements on a highly entangled resource state, such as cluster states. The family of Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki (AKLT) states has recently been explored; for example, the spin-1 AKLT chain can be used to simulate single-qubit gate operations on a single qubit, and the spin-3/2 two-dimensional AKLT state on the honeycomb lattice can be used as a universal resource. However, it is unclear whether such universality is a coincidence for the specific state or a shared feature in all two-dimensional AKLT states. Here we consider the family of spin-3/2 AKLT states on various trivalent Archimedean lattices and show that in addition to the honeycomb lattice, the spin-3/2 AKLT states on the square octagon (4,82) and the “cross” (4,6,12) lattices are also universal resource, whereas the AKLT state on the “star” (3,122) lattice is likely not due to geometric frustration.

Wei, Tzu-Chieh

2013-12-01

249

Flora and threatened and endangered plants of John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The vascular flora of the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) area was first studied in the 1970's. Nomenclatural and taxonomic changes as well as additional collections required revision of this list. The revised list includes 1045 taxa of which 850 are native and 195 are introduced. This appears to be a substantial proportion of the regional flora. Forty six taxa are endemic or nearly endemic to Florida, a level of endemism that appears high for the east coast of central Florida. Seventy three taxa (69 native) are listed as threatened, endangered, or of special concern on Federal or state lists. Taxa of special concern occur in all major habitats, but many are restricted to hammocks and hardwood swamps that constitute a minor proportion of the terrestrial vegetation. For some of these taxa, populations on KSC appear to be important for their regional and global survival. The bryophyte flora of the KSC area include 23 mosses and 20 liverworts and hornworts. The lichen flora is currently unknown.

Schmalzer, Paul A.; Hinkle, C. Ross

1990-01-01

250

Polymorphic CAG repeat length in the androgen receptor gene and association with neurodegeneration in a heterozygous female carrier of Kennedy's disease.  

PubMed

Kennedy's disease (spinobulbar muscular atrophy) is an X-linked form of motor neuron disease affecting adult males carrying a CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion within the androgen receptor gene. While expression of Kennedy's disease is thought to be confined to males carrying the causative mutation, subclinical manifestations have been reported in a few female carriers of the disease. The reasons that females are protected from the disease are not clear, especially given that all other diseases caused by CAG expansions display dominant expression. In the current study, we report the identification of a heterozygote female carrying the Kennedy's disease mutation who was clinically diagnosed with motor neuron disease. We describe analysis of CAG repeat number in this individual as well as 33 relatives within the pedigree, including two male carriers of the Kennedy's mutation. The female heterozygote carried one expanded allele of the androgen receptor gene with CAG repeats numbering in the Kennedy's disease range (44 CAGs),with the normal allele numbering in the uppernormal range (28 CAGs). The subject has two sons, one of whom carries the mutant allele of the gene and has been clinically diagnosed with Kennedy's disease, whilst the other son carries the second allele of the gene with CAGs numbering in the upper normal range and displays a normal phenotype. This coexistence of motor neuron disease and the presence of one expanded allele and one allele at the upper limit of the normal range may be a coincidence. However, we hypothesize that the expression of the Kennedy's disease mutation combined with a second allele with a large but normal CAG repeat sequence may have contributed to the motor neuron degeneration displayed in the heterozygote female and discuss the possible reasons for phenotypic expression in particular individuals. PMID:14999487

Greenland, Karen J; Beilin, Jonathan; Castro, Julian; Varghese, Paul N; Zajac, Jeffrey D

2004-01-01

251

Shuttle Atlantis Returning to Kennedy Space Center after 10-Month Refurbishment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle Atlantis rides on the back of one of NASA's Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft en route from California to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site with Dryden remaining as the principal alternate landing site.

1998-01-01

252

Shuttle Atlantis Returning to Kennedy Space Center after 10 Month Refurbishment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A look-down view on the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis piggy-backed on top of one of NASA's Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) as it departs California for the Kennedy Space Center, Florida in September 1998. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site with Dryden remaining as the principal alternate landing site.

1998-01-01

253

Shuttle Endeavour Mated to 747 SCA Takeoff for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft No. 911, with the space shuttle orbiter Endeavour securely mounted atop its fuselage, begins the ferry flight from Rockwell's Plant 42 at Palmdale, California, where the orbiter was built, to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. At Kennedy, the space vehicle was processed and launched on orbital mission STS-49, which landed at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, 16 May 1992. NASA 911, the second modified 747 that went into service in November 1990, has special support struts atop the fuselage and internal strengthening to accommodate the added weight of the orbiters. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now

1991-01-01

254

STS-66 Atlantis 747 SCA Ferry Flight Morning Takeoff for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The space shuttle Atlantis atop NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) during takeoff for a return ferry flight to the Kennedy Space Center from Edwards, California. The STS-66 mission was dedicated to the third flight of the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science-3 (ATLAS-3), part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program. The astronauts also deployed and retrieved a free-flying satellite designed to study the middle and lower thermospheres and perform a series of experiments covering life sciences research and microgravity processing. The landing was at 7:34 a.m. (PST) 14 November 1994, after being waved off from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, due to adverse weather. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shutt

1994-01-01

255

Shuttle Endeavour Mated to 747 SCA Taxi to Runway for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft No. 911, with the space shuttle orbiter Endeavour securely mounted atop its fuselage, taxies to the runway to begin the ferry flight from Rockwell's Plant 42 at Palmdale, California, where the orbiter was built, to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. At Kennedy, the space vehicle was processed and launched on orbital mission STS-49, which landed at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, 16 May 1992. NASA 911, the second modified 747 that went into service in November 1990, has special support struts atop the fuselage and internal strengthening to accommodate the added weight of the orbiters. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site

1991-01-01

256

STS-35 Leaves Dryden on 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) Bound for Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The first rays of the morning sun light up the side of NASA's Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) as it departs for the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, with the orbiter from STS-35 attached to its back. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site with Dryden remaining as the principal alternate landing site.

1990-01-01

257

Shuttle Atlantis Returning to Kennedy Space Center after 10-Month Refurbishment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis, framed by the California mountains, as it rides on the back of one of NASA's Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) en route from California to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site with Dryden remaining as the principal alternate landing site.

1998-01-01

258

Shuttle Atlantis Returning to Kennedy Space Center after 10 Month Refurbishment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis is seen here in flight on the back of one of NASA's Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) as it departs California for the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site with Dryden remaining as the principal alternate landing site.

1998-01-01

259

TRW Ships NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory To Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two U.S. Air Force C-5 Galaxy transport planes carrying the observatory and its ground support equipment landed at Kennedy's Space Shuttle Landing Facility at 2:40 p.m. EST this afternoon. REDONDO BEACH, CA.--(Business Wire)--Feb. 4, 1999--TRW has shipped NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory ("Chandra") to the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), in Florida, in preparation for a Space Shuttle launch later this year. The 45-foot-tall, 5-ton science satellite will provide astronomers with new information on supernova remnants, the surroundings of black holes, and other celestial phenomena that produce vast quantities of X-rays. Cradled safely in the cargo hold of a tractor-trailer rig called the Space Cargo Transportation System (SCTS), NASA's newest space telescope was ferried on Feb. 4 from Los Angeles International Airport to KSC aboard an Air Force C-5 Galaxy transporter. The SCTS, an Air Force container, closely resembles the size and shape of the Shuttle cargo bay. Over the next few months, Chandra will undergo final tests at KSC and be mated to a Boeing-provided Inertial Upper Stage for launch aboard Space Shuttle Columbia. A launch date for the Space Shuttle STS-93 mission is expected to be announced later this week. The third in NASA's family of Great Observatories that includes the Hubble Space Telescope and the TRW-built Compton Gamma Ray observatory, Chandra will use the world's most powerful X-ray telescope to allow scientists to "see" and monitor cosmic events that are invisible to conventional optical telescopes. Chandra's X-ray images will yield new insight into celestial phenomena such as the temperature and extent of gas clouds that comprise clusters of galaxies and the superheating of gas and dust particles as they swirl into black holes. A TRW-led team that includes the Eastman Kodak Co., Raytheon Optical Systems Inc., and Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. designed and built the Chandra X-ray Observatory for NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory will manage the Chandra science mission for NASA from the Chandra X-ray Observatory Center in Cambridge, Mass. TRW has been developing scientific, communications and environmental satellite systems for NASA since 1958. In addition to building the Chandra X-ray Observatory, the company is currently developing the architectures and technologies needed to implement several of NASA's future space science missions, including the Next Generation Space Telescope, the Space Inteferometry Mission, both part of NASA's Origins program, and Constellation-X, the next major NASA X-ray mission after Chandra. Article courtesy of TRW. TRW news releases are available on the corporate Web site: http://www.trw.com.

1999-04-01

260

Crop production data for bioregenerative life support: Observations from testing at NASA's Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

NASA s Biomass Production Chamber BPC at Kennedy Space Center was decommissioned ca 1998 but in the preceding decade several crop tests were conducted that have not been reported in the open literature These included monoculture studies with wheat soybean potato and tomato For each of these studies 20 m 2 of crops were grown in an atmospherically closed chamber 113 m 3 vol using a nutrient film hydroponic technique along with elevated CO 2 1000 or 1200 mu mol mol -1 Canopy light PAR levels ranged from 30 to 85 mol m -2 d -1 depending on the crop and selected photoperiod Total biomass DM productivities reached 40 g m -2 d -1 for wheat 16 g m -2 d -1 for soybean 33 g m -2 d -1 for potato and 20 g m -2 d -1 for tomato Edible biomass DM productivities reached 13 g m -2 d -1 for wheat 6 g m -2 d -1 for soybean 20 g m -2 d -1 for potato and 10 g m -2 d -1 for tomato The highest radiation use efficiencies for biomass were 0 60 g DM mol -1 PAR for wheat 0 50 g mol -1 for soybean 0 95 g mol -1 for potato and 0 51 g mol -1 for tomato The highest radiation use efficiencies for edible biomass were 0 22 g DM mol -1 for wheat 0 18 g mol -1 for soybean 0 58 g mol -1 for potato and 0 25 g mol -1 for tomato Use of transplanting cycles or spacing techniques to reduce open gaps between plants early in growth would have improved productivities and radiation use efficiencies for soybeans potatoes and

Wheeler, R. M.; Mackowiak, C. L.; Stutte, G. W.; Yorio, N. C.; Ruffe, L. M.; Sager, J. C.; Knott, W. M.

261

Effectiveness of an existing estuarine no-take fish sanctuary within the Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Approximately 22% of the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, have been closed to public access and fishing since 1962. These closed areas offer an opportunity to test the effectiveness of 'no-take' sanctuaries by analyzing two replicated estuarine areas. Areas open and closed to fishing were sampled from November 1986 to January 1990 with 653 random trammel-net sets, each enclosing 3,721 m2. Samples from no-fishing areas had significantly (P < 0.05) greater abundance and larger fishes than fished areas. Relative abundance (standardized catch per unit effort, CPUE) in protected areas (6.4 fish/set) was 2.6 times greater than in the fished areas (2.4 fish/set) for total game fish, 2.4 times greater for spotted seatrout Cynoscion nebulosus, 6.3 times greater for red drum Sciaenops ocellatus, 12.8 times greater for black drum Pogonias cromis, 5.3 times greater for common snook Centropomus undecimalis, and 2.6 times greater for striped mullet Mugil cephalus. Fishing had the primary effect on CPUE, independent of habitat and other environmental factors. Salinity and depth were important secondary factors affecting CPUE, followed by season or month, and temperature. The importance of specific factors varied with each species. Median and maximum size of red drum, spotted seatrout, black drum, and striped mullet were also significantly greater in the unfished areas. More and larger fish of spawning age were observed in the unfished areas for red drum, spotted seatrout, and black drum. Tagging studies documented export of important sport fish from protected areas to fished areas.

Johnson, D.R.; Funicelli, N.A.; Bohnsack, J.A.

1999-01-01

262

Kennedy Space Center: Creating a Spaceport Reality from the Dreams of Many  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On December 17, 1903, Orville Wright piloted the first powered airplane only 20 feet above the ground near Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The flight lasted 12 seconds and covered 120 feet. Who would have guessed that the bizarre looking contraption developed by brothers in the bicycle business would lay the ground work eventually resulting in over a million passengers moved daily in a sky filled with the contrails of jets flying at over 30,000 feet in elevation and over 500 miles per hour. Similarly, who would have guessed that the destructive nature of V-2 rockets of Germany would spark the genesis of spaceflight to explore our solar system and beyond? Yet the interest in using the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) continues to grow. Potential customers have expressed interest in KSC as a location for testing new rocket engines, servicing the world's largest airborne launching platform for drop-launch rockets, developing multi-use launch platforms that permit diverse customers to use the same launch platform, developing new spacecraft, and implementing advanced modifications for lifting 150 metric ton payloads to low earth orbit. The multitude of customers has grown and with this growth comes a need to provide a command, control, communication, and range infrastructure that maximizes flexibility and reconfigurability to address a much more frequent launch rate of diverse vehicles and spacecraft. The Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) Program Office at KSC is embarking upon these developments to realize the dream of a robust spaceport. Many unique technical trade studies have been completed or are underway to successfully transition KSC into a multi-user customer focused spaceport. Like the evolution of the airplane, GSDO is working to transform KSC infrastructures that will turn once unthinkable space opportunities into a reality for today.

Gray, James A.; Colloredo, Scott

2012-01-01

263

Calculating the Lightning Protection System Downconductors' Grounding Resistance at Launch Complex 39B, Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new Lightning Protection System (LPS) was designed and built at Launch Complex 39B (LC39B), at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, which consists of a catenary wire system (at a height of about 181 meters above ground level) supported by three insulators installed atop three towers in a triangular configuration. Nine downconductors (each about 250 meters long) are connected to the catenary wire system. Each downconductor is connected to a 7.62-meter-radius circular counterpoise conductor with six equally spaced, 6-meter-long vertical grounding rods. Grounding requirements at LC39B call for all underground and aboveground metallic piping, enclosures, raceways, and cable trays, within 7.62 meters of the counterpoise, to be bonded to the counterpoise, which results in a complex interconnected grounding system, given the many metallic piping, raceways, and cable trays that run in multiple directions around LC39B. The complexity of this grounding system makes the fall-of-potential method, which uses multiple metallic rods or stakes, unsuitable for measuring the grounding impedances of the downconductors. To calculate the grounding impedance of the downconductors, an Earth Ground Clamp (EGC) (a stakeless device for measuring grounding impedance) and an Alternative Transient Program (ATP) model of the LPS are used. The EGC is used to measure the loop impedance plus the grounding impedance of each downconductor, and the ATP model is used to calculate the loop impedance of each downconductor circuit. The grounding resistance of the downconductors is then calculated by subtracting the ATP calculated loop impedances from the EGC measurements.

Mata, Carlos T.; Mata, Angel G.

2012-01-01

264

NASA's Corrosion Technology Laboratory at the Kennedy Space Center: Anticipating, Managing, and Preventing Corrosion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Corrosion is the degradation of a material that results from its interaction with the environment. The marine environment at NASAs Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has been documented by ASM International (formerly American Society for Metals) as the most corrosive in the United States. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive conditions at the launch pads were rendered even more severe by the 70 tons of highly corrosive hydrochloric acid that were generated by the solid rocket boosters. Numerous failures at the launch pads are caused by corrosion.The structural integrity of ground infrastructure and flight hardware is critical to the success, safety, cost, and sustainability of space missions. As a result of fifty years of experience with launch and ground operations in a natural marine environment that is highly corrosive, NASAs Corrosion Technology Laboratory at KSC is a major source of corrosion control expertise in the launch and other environments. Throughout its history, the Laboratory has evolved from what started as an atmospheric exposure facility near NASAs launch pads into a world-wide recognized capability that provides technical innovations and engineering services in all areas of corrosion for NASA and external customers.This presentation will provide a historical overview of the role of NASAs Corrosion Technology in anticipating, managing, and preventing corrosion. One important challenge in managing and preventing corrosion involves the detrimental impact on humans and the environment of what have been very effective corrosion control strategies. This challenge has motivated the development of new corrosion control technologies that are more effective and environmentally friendly. Strategies for improved corrosion protection and durability can have a huge impact on the economic sustainability of human spaceflight operations.

Calle, Luz Marina

2014-01-01

265

Exploration of the Theoretical Physical Capacity of the John F. Kennedy International Airport Runway System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A design study was completed to explore the theoretical physical capacity (TPC) of the John F. Kennedy International Airport (KJFK) runway system for a northflow configuration assuming impedance-free (to throughput) air traffic control functionality. Individual runways were modeled using an agent-based, airspace simulation tool, the Airspace Concept Evaluation System (ACES), with all runways conducting both departures and arrivals on a first-come first-served (FCFS) scheduling basis. A realistic future flight schedule was expanded to 3.5 times the traffic level of a selected baseline day, September 26, 2006, to provide a steady overdemand state for KJFK runways. Rules constraining departure and arrival operations were defined to reflect physical limits beyond which safe operations could no longer be assumed. Safety buffers to account for all sources of operational variability were not included in the TPC estimate. Visual approaches were assumed for all arrivals to minimize inter-arrival spacing. Parallel runway operations were assumed to be independent based on lateral spacing distances. Resulting time intervals between successive airport operations were primarily constrained by same-runway and then by intersecting-runway spacing requirements. The resulting physical runway capacity approximates a theoretical limit that cannot be exceeded without modifying runway interaction assumptions. Comparison with current KJFK operational limits for a north-flow runway configuration indicates a substantial throughput gap of approximately 48%. This gap may be further analyzed to determine which part may be feasibly bridged through the deployment of advanced systems and procedures, and which part cannot, because it is either impossible or not cost-effective to control. Advanced systems for bridging the throughput gap may be conceptualized and simulated using this same experimental setup to estimate the level of gap closure achieved.

Neitzke, Kurt W.; Guerreiro, Nelson M.

2014-01-01

266

Institutional environmental impact statement (space shuttle development and operations) amendment no. 1. [space shuttle operations at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Data are presented to support the environmental impact statement on space shuttle actions at Kennedy Space Center. Studies indicate that land use to accommodate space shuttle operations may have the most significant impact. The impacts on air, water and noise quality are predicted to be less on the on-site environment. Considerations of operating modes indicate that long and short term land use will not affect wildlife productivity. The potential for adverse environmental impact is small and such impacts will be local, short in duration, controllable, and environmentally acceptable.

1973-01-01

267

Dry heat effects on survival of indigenous soil particle microflora and particle viability studies of Kennedy Space Center soil  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Research efforts were concentrated on attempts to obtain data concerning the dry heat resistance of particle microflora in Kennedy Space Center soil samples. The in situ dry heat resistance profiles at selected temperatures for the aggregate microflora on soil particles of certain size ranges were determined. Viability profiles of older soil samples were compared with more recently stored soil samples. The effect of increased particle numbers on viability profiles after dry heat treatment was investigated. These soil particle viability data for various temperatures and times provide information on the soil microflora response to heat treatment and are useful in making selections for spacecraft sterilization cycles.

Ruschmeyer, O. R.; Pflug, I. J.; Gove, R.; Heisserer, Y.

1975-01-01

268

A remote camera at Launch Pad 39B, at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), recorded this profile view of  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-75 LAUNCH VIEW --- A remote camera at Launch Pad 39B, at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), recorded this profile view of the Space Shuttle Columbia as it cleared the tower to begin the mission. The liftoff occurred on schedule at 3:18:00 p.m. (EST), February 22, 1996. Onboard Columbia for the scheduled two-week mission were astronauts Andrew M. Allen, commander; Scott J. Horowitz, pilot; Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, payload commander; and astronauts Maurizio Cheli, Jeffrey A. Hoffman and Claude Nicollier, along with payload specialist Umberto Guidioni. Cheli and Nicollier represent the European Space Agency (ESA), while Guidioni represents the Italian Space Agency (ASI).

1996-01-01

269

Biodiversity and Ecology of Amphibians and Reptiles of the Kennedy Space Center: 1998 Close-Out Report to NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since 1992, there have been researchers have been studying the population ecology and conservation biology of the amphibians and reptiles of the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) This research is an outgrowth of my Master's work in the late 1970's under Lew Ehrhart at UCF. The primary emphasis of our studies are (1) examination of long-term changes in the abundance of amphibians and reptile populations, (2) occurrence and effects of Upper Respiratory Tract Disease (URTD) in gopher tortoises (Gopherus polyphemus), and (3) ecological studies of selected species.

Sigel, Richard A.

1999-01-01

270

Creating Processes Associated with Providing Government Goods and Services Under the Commercial Space Launch Act at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has decided to write its agreements under the Commercial Space Launch Act (CSLA) authority to cover a broad range of categories of support that KSC could provide to our commercial partner. Our strategy was to go through the onerous process of getting the agreement in place once and allow added specificity and final cost estimates to be documented on a separate Task Order Request (TOR). This paper is written from the implementing engineering team's perspective. It describes how we developed the processes associated with getting Government support to our emerging commercial partners, such as SpaceX and reports on our success to date.

Letchworth, Janet F.

2011-01-01

271

Are cognitive and behavioural deficits a part of the clinical picture in Kennedy's disease? A case study.  

PubMed

Two years prior to diagnosis of Kennedy's disease (KD), a 53-year-old man began experiencing neurological symptoms, including nasal speech, postural tremor, tremor in the upper extremities, and muscle weakness. Genetic analysis revealed 46 CAG repeats in the androgen receptor gene. The patient's altered social conduct and complaints of forgetfulness led to a neuropsychological assessment. A mild impairment in visuospatial and visuoconstructive abilities, visual short-term memory, and a personality disorder were detected. Although cognition and behaviour in KD are typically normal, our findings suggest that the disease may cause mild cognitive and behavioural changes as part of the disease's clinical manifestation. PMID:19343581

Mirowska-Guzel, Dagmara; Seniow, Joanna; Su?ek, Anna; Le?niak, Marcin; Cz?onkowska, Anna

2009-08-01

272

NASA Delays Shipment of X-Ray Telescope to Kennedy Space Center to Allow Additional Testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

NASA announced today it will delay shipment of the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) from the prime contractor, TRW Space and Electronics Group, Redondo Beach, CA, to Kennedy Space Center, FL. The postponement, made following a review by NASA and TRW, will allow additional time for TRW to complete testing of the observatory and to replace an electrical switching box. AXAF had been scheduled for shipment later this month to meet a Jan. 21, 1999, launch date. NASA also has directed a review of AXAF, by NASA Chief Engineer Dr. Daniel Mulville to be completed by mid-January 1999. A new shipment date and a new launch date will be confirmed after the review. "We think it's prudent to wait to see what the review will tell us before we set shipment and launch dates, so we don't expect to ship AXAF before that. It was a difficult decision, but we evaluated a number of options for handling the remaining work, and selected the one that will give us the most assurance of successfully completing the work," said Kenneth Ledbetter, Director of the Mission and Payload Division of the Office of Space Science, NASA Headquarters. The remaining testing includes trouble-shooting and de-bugging some elements of the ground test and flight software. In addition, testing will be done to verify changes made to the flight software. "Our priority remains the safe and successful launch of a world-class observatory, which has been thoroughly tested and meets all requirements," said Fred Wojtalik, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Observatory Projects Office manager in Huntsville, AL. Marshall manages development of the observatory for the Office of Space Science. Once in orbit, the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of a variety of high-energy objects to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. The observatory will not only help to probe these mysteries, but also will serve as a unique tool to study detailed physics in a laboratory that cannot be replicated here on Earth -- the universe itself.

1998-10-01

273

Forecasting Cool Season Daily Peak Winds at Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The expected peak wind speed for the day is an important element in the daily 24-Hour and Weekly Planning Forecasts issued by the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) for planning operations at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). The morning outlook for peak speeds also begins the warning decision process for gusts ^ 35 kt, ^ 50 kt, and ^ 60 kt from the surface to 300 ft. The 45 WS forecasters have indicated that peak wind speeds are a challenging parameter to forecast during the cool season (October-April). The 45 WS requested that the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) develop a tool to help them forecast the speed and timing of the daily peak and average wind, from the surface to 300 ft on KSC/CCAFS during the cool season. The tool must only use data available by 1200 UTC to support the issue time of the Planning Forecasts. Based on observations from the KSC/CCAFS wind tower network, surface observations from the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), and CCAFS upper-air soundings from the cool season months of October 2002 to February 2007, the AMU created multiple linear regression equations to predict the timing and speed of the daily peak wind speed, as well as the background average wind speed. Several possible predictors were evaluated, including persistence, the temperature inversion depth, strength, and wind speed at the top of the inversion, wind gust factor (ratio of peak wind speed to average wind speed), synoptic weather pattern, occurrence of precipitation at the SLF, and strongest wind in the lowest 3000 ft, 4000 ft, or 5000 ft. Six synoptic patterns were identified: 1) surface high near or over FL, 2) surface high north or east of FL, 3) surface high south or west of FL, 4) surface front approaching FL, 5) surface front across central FL, and 6) surface front across south FL. The following six predictors were selected: 1) inversion depth, 2) inversion strength, 3) wind gust factor, 4) synoptic weather pattern, 5) occurrence of precipitation at the SLF, and 6) strongest wind in the lowest 3000 ft. The forecast tool was developed as a graphical user interface with Microsoft Excel to help the forecaster enter the variables, and run the appropriate regression equations. Based on the forecaster's input and regression equations, a forecast of the day's peak and average wind is generated and displayed. The application also outputs the probability that the peak wind speed will be ^ 35 kt, 50 kt, and 60 kt.

Barrett, Joe, III; Short, David; Roeder, William

2008-01-01

274

Kennedy H, Dehay C (2012) Self-organization and interareal networks in the primate cortex. Prog Brain Res 195:341-360. Self-organization and interareal networks in the primate cortex  

E-print Network

Kennedy H, Dehay C (2012) Self-organization and interareal networks in the primate cortex. Prog Brain Res 195:341-360. Self-organization and interareal networks in the primate cortex Henry Kennedy. In primates, including humans, the outer subventricular zone (OSVZ), a primate-specific germinal zone

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

275

Recommendations for Safe Separation Distances from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) Using a Heat-Flux-Based Analytical Approach (Abridged)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was requested to provide computational modeling to support the establishment of a safe separation distance surrounding the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The two major objectives of the study were 1) establish a methodology based on thermal flux to determine safe separation distances from the Kennedy Space Center's (KSC's) Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) with large numbers of solid propellant boosters containing hazard division 1.3 classification propellants, in case of inadvertent ignition; and 2) apply this methodology to the consideration of housing eight 5-segment solid propellant boosters in the VAB. The results of the study are contained in this report.

Cragg, Clinton H.; Bowman, Howard; Wilson, John E.

2011-01-01

276

Two different pathways of phosphatidylcholine synthesis, the Kennedy Pathway and the Lands Cycle, differentially regulate cellular triacylglycerol storage.  

PubMed

BackgroundLipids are stored within cells in lipid droplets (LDs). They consist of a core of neutral lipids surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids, predominantly phosphatidylcholine (PC). LDs are very dynamic and can rapidly change in size upon lipid uptake or release. These dynamics require a fast adaptation of LD surface. We have recently shown that two Lands cycle PC synthesizing enyzmes, LPCAT1 and LPCAT2 can localize to the LD surface.ResultsHere, we show that knock-down of both enzymes leads to an increase in LD size without changes in the total amount of neutral lipids, while interference with the de-novo Kennedy pathway PC biosynthesis is associated with changes in triacylglyceride synthesis. We show that function of LPCAT1 and 2 is conserved in Drosophila melanogaster by the ortholog CG32699. Furthermore we demonstrate that modulation of the LD pool by LPCAT1 influences the release of lipoprotein from liver cells.ConclusionActivity of the Kennedy pathway regulates the balance between phospholipids and neutral lipids, while the Lands cycle regulates lipid droplet size by regulating surface availability and influencing surface to volume ratio. Differences in lipid droplet size may account for differences in lipid dynamics and be relevant to understand lipid overload diseases. PMID:25491198

Moessinger, Christine; Klizaite, Kristina; Steinhagen, Almut; Philippou-Massier, Julia; Shevchenko, Andrej; Hoch, Michael; Ejsing, Christer S; Thiele, Christoph

2014-12-10

277

STS-76 - Being Prepared for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center via SCA 747 Aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Moonrise over Atlantis: following the STS-76 dawn landing at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on 31 March 1996, NASA 905, one of two modified Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, was prepared to ferry Atlantis back to the Kennedy Space Center, FL. Delivery of Altlantis to Florida was delayed until 11 April 1996, due to an engine warning light that appeared shortly after take off on April 6. The SCA #905 returned to Edwards only minutes after departure. The right inboard engine #3 was exchanged and the 747 with Atlantis atop was able to depart for Davis-Monthan Air Force Base for a refueling stop. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site

1996-01-01

278

STS-76 - Being Prepared for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center via SCA 747 Aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Moonrise over Atlantis following the STS-76 dawn landing at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on 31 March 1996. NASA 905, one of two modified Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), was readied to ferry Atlantis back to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Delivery of Atlantis to Florida was delayed until 11 April 1996, due to an engine warning light that appeared shortly after take off on 6 April. The SCA #905 returned to Edwards with Atlantis attached only minutes after departure. The right inboard engine #3 was exchanged and the 747 with Atlantis atop was able to depart for Davis-Monthan Air Force Base for a refueling stop. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florid

1996-01-01

279

Remote sensing at the NASA Kennedy Space Center: a perspective from the ground up  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper provides an overview of ground based operational remote sensing activities that enable a broad range of missions at the Eastern Range (ER), which includes the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and U.S. Air Force Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). Many types of sensors are in use by KSC and across the ER. We examine remote sensors for winds, lightning and electric fields, precipitation and storm hazards. These sensors provide data that are used in real-time to evaluate launch commit criteria during space launches, major ground processing operations in preparation for space launches, issuing weather warnings/watches/advisories to protect over 25,000 people and facilities worth over $20 billion, and routine weather forecasts. The data from these sensors are archived to focus NASA launch vehicle design studies, to develop forecast techniques, and for incident investigation. The wind sensors include the 50-MHz and 915-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profilers (DRWP) and the Doppler capability of the weather surveillance radars. The atmospheric electricity sensors include lightning aloft detectors, cloud-to-ground lightning detectors, and surface electric field mills. The precipitation and storm hazards sensors include weather surveillance radars. Next, we discuss a new type of remote sensor that may lead to better tracking of near-Earth asteroids versus current capabilities. The Ka Band Objects Observation and Monitoring (KaBOOM) is a phased array of three 12 meter (m) antennas being built as a technology demonstration for a future radar system that could be used to track deep-space objects such as asteroids. Transmissions in the Ka band allow for wider bandwidth than at lower frequencies, but the signals are also far more susceptible to de-correlation from turbulence in the troposphere, as well as attenuation due to water vapor, which is plentiful in the Central Florida atmosphere. If successful, KaBOOM will have served as the pathfinder for a larger and more capable instrument that will enable tracking 15 m asteroids up to 72 million kilometers (km) away, about half the distance to the Sun and five times further than we can track today. Finally, we explore the use of Site Test Interferometers (STI) as atmospheric sensors. The STI antennas continually observe signals emitted by geostationary satellites and produce measurements of the phase difference between the received signals. STIs are usually located near existing or candidate antenna array sites to statistically characterize atmospheric phase delay fluctuation effects for the site. An STI measures the fluctuations in the difference of atmospheric delay from an extraterrestrial source to two or more points on the Earth. There is a three-element STI located at the KaBOOM site at KSC.

Huddleston, Lisa H.; Roeder, William P.; Morabito, David D.; D'Addario, Larry R.; Morgan, Jennifer G.; Barbré, Robert E.; Decker, Ryan K.; Geldzahler, Barry; Seibert, Mark A.; Miller, Michael J.

2014-10-01

280

Forecasting Lightning at Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) developed a set of statistical forecast equations that provide a probability of lightning occurrence on Kennedy Space Center (KSC) I Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) for the day during the warm season (May September). The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) forecasters at CCAFS in Florida include a probability of lightning occurrence in their daily 24-hour and weekly planning forecasts, which are briefed at 1100 UTC (0700 EDT). This information is used for general scheduling of operations at CCAFS and KSC. Forecasters at the Spaceflight Meteorology Group also make thunderstorm forecasts for the KSC/CCAFS area during Shuttle flight operations. Much of the current lightning probability forecast at both groups is based on a subjective analysis of model and observational data. The objective tool currently available is the Neumann-Pfeffer Thunderstorm Index (NPTI, Neumann 1971), developed specifically for the KSCICCAFS area over 30 years ago. However, recent studies have shown that 1-day persistence provides a better forecast than the NPTI, indicating that the NPTI needed to be upgraded or replaced. Because they require a tool that provides a reliable estimate of the daily thunderstorm probability forecast, the 45 WS forecasters requested that the AMU develop a new lightning probability forecast tool using recent data and more sophisticated techniques now possible through more computing power than that available over 30 years ago. The equation development incorporated results from two research projects that investigated causes of lightning occurrence near KSCICCAFS and over the Florida peninsula. One proved that logistic regression outperformed the linear regression method used in NPTI, even when the same predictors were used. The other study found relationships between large scale flow regimes and spatial lightning distributions over Florida. Lightning, probabilities based on these flow regimes were used as candidate predictors in the equation development. Fifteen years (1 989-2003) of warm season data were used to develop the forecast equations. The data sources included a local network of cloud-to-ground lightning sensors called the Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS), 1200 UTC Florida synoptic soundings, and the 1000 UTC CCAFS sounding. Data from CGLSS were used to determine lightning occurrence for each day. The 1200 UTC soundings were used to calculate the synoptic-scale flow regimes and the 1000 UTC soundings were used to calculate local stability parameters, which were used as candidate predictors of lightning occurrence. Five logistic regression forecast equations were created through careful selection and elimination of the candidate predictors. The resulting equations contain five to six predictors each. Results from four performance tests indicated that the equations showed an increase in skill over several standard forecasting methods, good reliability, an ability to distinguish between non-lightning and lightning days, and good accuracy measures and skill scores. Given the overall good performance the 45 WS requested that the equations be transitioned to operations and added to the current set of tools used to determine the daily lightning probability of occurrence.

Lambert, Winfred; Wheeler, Mark; Roeder, William

2005-01-01

281

Dynamic Structure of a Protein Hydrogel: A Solid-State NMR Study S. B. Kennedy, E. R. deAzevedo, W. A. Petka, and T. P. Russell  

E-print Network

Dynamic Structure of a Protein Hydrogel: A Solid-State NMR Study S. B. Kennedy, E. R. deAzevedo, W used to study the dynamic structure of a genetically engineered multidomain protein hydrogel CODEX experiment. The motion is rigid-body in nature with a correlation time of about 80 ms at room

Hong, Mei

282

Simulating Dead Wood in the Coast Range of Oregon Rebecca S.H. Kennedy1,2 and Keith A. Olsen3  

E-print Network

Simulating Dead Wood in the Coast Range of Oregon Rebecca S.H. Kennedy1,2 and Keith A. Olsen3 1-Growth; for descriptions see Ohmann and Gregory 2002) for the range of current dead wood amounts and potential management-group selection during model runs by matching total dead wood volume and snag volume criteria for each level we

283

LONDON ARISTOTLE'S RHETORIC AND THE PSYCHOLOGY OF PRACTICAL ETHICS Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal Vol. 10, No. 4, 287305 2000 by The Johns Hopkins University Press  

E-print Network

LONDON · ARISTOTLE'S RHETORIC AND THE PSYCHOLOGY OF PRACTICAL ETHICS [ 287 ] Kennedy Institute Amenable to Reason: Aristotle's Rhetoric and the Moral Psychology of Practical Ethics ABSTRACT that Aristotle articulates in his Rhetoric and this has important implications for the way we understand

Spirtes, Peter

284

Gold(I)-Catalyzed Conia-Ene Reaction of -Ketoesters with Alkynes Joshua J. Kennedy-Smith, Steven T. Staben, and F. Dean Toste*  

E-print Network

Gold(I)-Catalyzed Conia-Ene Reaction of -Ketoesters with Alkynes Joshua J. Kennedy-Smith, Steven T(I) complexes as catalysts. Carbon-carbon bond formation promoted by homogeneous gold catalysts is extremely did not proceed to completion even after a day at room temperature (entry 1). On the other hand, gold

Toste, Dean

285

John Steinbeck: "The Pearl," Adapted by Warren Frost and Dramatized for the Kennedy Center by Nick Olcott. Cue Sheet for Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This performance guide is designed for teachers to use with students before and after a performance of "The Pearl" by John Steinbeck, adapted by Warren Frost and dramatized for the Kennedy Center by Nick Olcott. It is in the form of a Director's Notebook--a scrapbook/journal of clippings, memos, lists, illustrations, notes, and other items--to…

Carr, John C.

286

The Distribution of Cloud to Ground Lightning Strike Intensities and Associated Magnetic Inductance Fields Near the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lightning strike location and peak current are monitored operationally in the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) area by the Cloud to Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS). The present study compiles ten years worth of CGLSS data into a database of near strikes. Using shuffle launch platform LP39A as a convenient central point, all strikes recorded within a 20-mile radius for the period of record O R ) from January 1, 1993 to December 31,2002 were included in the subset database. Histograms and cumulative probability curves are produced for both strike intensity (peak current, in kA) and the corresponding magnetic inductance fields (in A/m). Results for the full POR have application to launch operations lightning monitoring and post-strike test procedures.

Burns, Lee; Decker, Ryan

2005-01-01

287

Remote measurement utilizing NASA's scanning laser Doppler systems. Volume 1. Laser Doppler wake vortex tracking at Kennedy Airport  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Test operations of the Scanning Laser Doppler System (SLDS) at Kennedy International Airport (KIA) during August 1974 through June 1975 are reported. A total of 1,619 data runs was recorded with a totally operational system during normal landing operations at KIA. In addition, 53 data runs were made during cooperative flybys with the C880 for a grand total of 1672 recorded vortex tracks. Test crews were in attendance at KIA for 31 weeks, of which 25 weeks were considered operational and the other six were packing, unpacking, setup and check out. Although average activity equates to 67 recorded landing operations per week, two periods of complete runway inactivity spanned 20 days and 13 days, respectively. The operation frequency therefore averaged about 88 operations per week.

Krause, M. C.; Wilson, D. J.; Howle, R. E.; Edwards, B. B.; Craven, C. E.; Jetton, J. L.

1976-01-01

288

A Climatological Study of Cloud to Ground Lightning Strikes in the Vicinity of the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lightning strike location and peak current are monitored operationally in the Kennedy Space Center (KSC)/Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) area by the Cloud to Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS). The present study compiles ten years of CGLSS data into a climatological database of all strikes recorded within a 20-mile radius of space shuttle launch platform LP39A, which serves as a convenient central point. The period of record (POR) for the database runs from January 1, 1993 to December 31, 2002. Histograms and cumulative probability curves are produced to determine the distribution of occurrence rates for the spectrum of strike intensities (given in kA). Further analysis of the database provides a description of both seasonal and interannual variations in the lightning distribution.

Burns, Lee; Decker, Ryan

2004-01-01

289

Modifications to the Objective Lightning Probability Forecast Tool at Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) includes the probability of lightning occurrence in their 24-Hour and Weekly Planning Forecasts, briefed at 0700 EDT for daily operations planning on Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and CCAFS. This forecast is based on subjective analyses of model and observational data and output from an objective tool developed by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU). This tool was developed over two phases (Lambert and Wheeler 2005, Lambert 2007). It consists of five equations, one for each warm season month (May-Sep), that calculate the probability of lightning occurrence for the day and a graphical user interface (GUI) to display the output. The Phase I and II equations outperformed previous operational tools by a total of 56%. Based on this success, the 45 WS tasked the AMU with Phase III to improve the tool further.

Crawford, Winifred; Roeder, William

2010-01-01

290

Aircraft measurements of electrified clouds at Kennedy Space Center. Part 2: Case study: 4 November 1988 (88309)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the fall of 1988, a Schweizer airplane equipped to measure electric field and other meteorological parameters flew over Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in a program to study clouds defined in the existing launch restriction criteria. A case study is presented of a single flight over KSC on November 4, 1988. This flight was chosen for two reasons: (1) the clouds were weakly electrified, and no lightning was reported during the flight; and (2) electric field mills in the surface array at KSC indicated field strengths greater than 3 kV/m, yet the aircraft flying directly over them at an altitude of 3.4 km above sea level measured field strengths of less than 1.6 kV/m. A weather summary, sounding description, record of cloud types, and an account of electric field measurements are included.

Jones, J. J.; Winn, W. P.; Hunyady, S. J.; Moore, C. B.; Bullock, J. W.

1990-01-01

291

Calculating the Lightning Protection System Downconductors' Grounding Resistance at Launch Complex 39B, Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new Lightning Protection System (LPS) was designed and built at Launch Complex 39B (LC39B), at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Florida, which consists of a catenary wire system (at a height of about 181 meters above ground level) supported by three insulation installed atop three towers in a triangular configuration. Nine downconductors (each about 250 meters long) are connected to the catenary wire system. Each downconductor is connected to a 7.62-meter-radius circular counterpoise conductor with six equally spaced. 6-meter-1ong vertical grounding rods. Grounding requirements at LC39B call for all underground and above ground metallic piping. enclosures, raceways. and. cable trays. within 7.62 meters of. counterpoise, to be bonded to the counterpoise, which results in a complex interconnected grounding system, given the many metallic piping, raceways and cable trays that run in multiple directions around LC39B.

Mata, Carlos; Mata, Angel

2011-01-01

292

Revised Flora and List of Threatened and Endangered Plants for the John F. Kennedy Space Center Area, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The vascular flora of the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) area was first studied in the 1970's, and the list was revised in 1990. Nomenclatural and taxonomic changes as well as additional collections required a revision of this list. The revised list includes 1024 taxa of which 803 are native and 221 are introduced. This appears to be a substantial proportion of the regional flora. Fifty taxa are endemic or nearly endemic, a level of endemism that appears high for the east coast of Florida. Of the 221 introduced plants, twenty-six are Category I invasive exotics and fifteen are Category II invasive exotics. Thirty-eight taxa are listed as threatened, endangered, or of special concern on state lists. For some of these taxa, populations on KSC appear to be important for their regional and global survival. The bryophyte flora of the KSC area includes 23 mosses and 20 liverworts and hornworts. The lichen flora is currently unknown.

Schmalzer, Paul A.; Foster, Tammy E.; Duncan, Brean W.; Quincy, Charles (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

293

STS-76 - SCA 747 Aircraft Takeoff for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft leaves the runway with the Shuttle Atlantis on its back. Following the STS-76 dawn landing at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on 31 March 1996. NASA 905, one of two modified 747's, was prepared to ferry Atlantis back to the Kennedy Space Center, FL. Delivery of Altlantis to Florida was delayed until 11 April 1996, due to an engine warning light that appeared shortly after take off on 6 April. The SCA #905 returned to Edwards with Atlantis aboard only minutes after departure. The right inboard engine #3 was exchanged and the 747 with Atlantis atop was able to depart for Davis-Monthan Air Force Base for a refueling stop. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttl

1996-01-01

294

STS-76 - Being Prepared for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center via SCA 747 Aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Moonrise over Atlantis: the space shuttle Atlantis receives post-flight servicing in the Mate-Demate Device (MDD), following its landing at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, 31 March 1996. Once servicing was complete, one of NASA's two 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, No. 905, was readied to ferry Atlantis back to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Delivery of Atlantis to Florida was delayed until 11 April 1996, due to an engine warning light that appeared shortly after take off on April 6. The SCA returned to Edwards only minutes after departure. The right inboard engine #3 was exchanged, and the 747 with Atlantis atop was able to depart 11 April for Davis-Monthan Air Force Base for a refueling stop. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the

1996-01-01

295

Find a Healthcare Professional  

MedlinePLUS

... 2001644|||-73.7287787|||Dr. Elie M. Abemayor|||91 Smith Ave|||Mt Kisco|||10549|||NY|||(914) 241.9026||||||, ... html||| 364775552|||39.0985878|||-77.1921146|||Kathleen Kennedy-Smith, CRNP|||14955 Shady Grove Rd|||Rockville|||20850|||MD|||( ...

296

A Continuation of Base-Line Studies for Environmentally Monitoring Space Transportation Systems at John F. Kennedy Space Center. Volume 3, Part 1: Ichthyological Survey of Lagoonal Waters. [Indian River lagoon system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Ichthyological species in the Indian River lagoonal system likely to be affected by NASA's aerospace activities at the Kennedy Space Center were surveyed. The importance of the fish found to inhabit the waters in the area is analyzed.

Snelson, F. F., Jr.

1980-01-01

297

Providing operational guidance for the development of sea breeze thunderstorms at the Kennedy Space Center - An experiment using a mesoscale numerical model  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The effectiveness of a mesoscale numerical model to provide improved local forecast guidance is evaluated with respect to sea breeze convection storms at the Kennedy Space Center. The model and operational forecast guidance production are described. A case study is presented for sea breeze convection storms and lightning events on July 1, 1986. It is found that the mesoscale numerical model outperforms purely subjective predictions of sea breeze convection. The range of applications for the model are considered.

Lyons, Walter A.; Moon, Dennis A.; Keen, Cecil S.; Schuh, Jerome A.; Pielke, Roger A.

1988-01-01

298

Assessment and forecasting of lightning potential and its effect on launch operations at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and John F. Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lightning plays a pivotal role in the operation decision process for space and ballistic launches at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy Space Center. Lightning forecasts are the responsibility of Detachment 11, 4th Weather Wing's Cape Canaveral Forecast Facility. These forecasts are important to daily ground processing as well as launch countdown decisions. The methodology and equipment used to forecast lightning are discussed. Impact on a recent mission is summarized.

Weems, J.; Wyse, N.; Madura, J.; Secrist, M.; Pinder, C.

1991-01-01

299

Synoptic and Mesoscale Forcing of Convective Activity Over Cape Canaveral during Easterly Flow and Nowcasting for Space Shuttle Landings at Kennedy Space Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

Space Shuttle landings at Kennedy Space Center are subject to strict weather related landing flight rules. Landing rules demand very accurate nowcast (short-term forecasts of less than 2 h) of cloud, wind, visibility, precipitation, turbulence, and lightning at the Shuttle launches and landings. Challenges to U.S. Air Force forecasters at Cape Canaveral Air Station and National Weather Service\\/Spaceflight Meteorology Group

William Henry Bauman III

1995-01-01

300

[Augmented anterior cruciate ligament replacement with the Kennedy-LAD (ligament augmentation device)--long term outcome].  

PubMed

The ligament augmentation device (Kennedy-LAD) is used to protect tendon grafts during the posttransplantation decrease in strength in anterior cruciate ligament (acl) reconstructions. The augmentation with the LAD is based on the concept of load sharing. Since 1983 we used the LAD in acl-reconstructions in 856 patients. In 63 cases we had to treat complications like infection (8), recurrent effusions (21), arthrofibrosis (34). The overall results are good with respect to stability, regain of strength and sports activity. In 73 cases resurgery was necessary because of synovitis (7), LAD-rupture due to re-injury (9), fatigue-rupture of the LAD (22), meniscal tears (35), 2.7 +/- 2.3 years (range: 2 months to 10 years) after LAD implantation. Modern techniques in acl reconstruction lead to comparable results without synthetic augmentation. Therefore, we now recommend the use of a LAD only in cases of repeated acl replacement with week tendon grafts, to avoid an allograft. PMID:9816660

Riel, K A

1998-01-01

301

An Objective Verification of the North American Mesoscale Model for Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) Launch Weather Officers use the 12-km resolution North American Mesoscale (NAM) model (MesoNAM) text and graphical product forecasts extensively to support launch weather operations. However, the actual performance of the model at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) has not been measured objectively. In order to have tangible evidence of model performance, the 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit to conduct a detailed statistical analysis of model output compared to observed values. The model products are provided to the 45 WS by ACTA, Inc. and include hourly forecasts from 0 to 84 hours based on model initialization times of 00, 06, 12 and 18 UTC. The objective analysis compared the MesoNAM forecast winds, temperature and dew point, as well as the changes in these parameters over time, to the observed values from the sensors in the KSC/CCAFS wind tower network. Objective statistics will give the forecasters knowledge of the model's strength and weaknesses, which will result in improved forecasts for operations.

Bauman, William H., III

2010-01-01

302

Kennedy Space Center's NASA/Contractor Team-Centered Total Quality Management Seminar: Results, methods, and lessons learned  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It is apparent to everyone associated with the Nation's aeronautics and space programs that the challenge of continuous improvement can be reasonably addressed only if NASA and its contractors act together in a fully integrated and cooperative manner that transcends the traditional boundaries of proprietary interest. It is, however, one thing to assent to the need for such integration and cooperation; it is quite another thing to undertake the hard tasks of turning such a need into action. Whatever else total quality management is, it is fundamentally a team-centered and team-driven process of continuous improvement. The introduction of total quality management at KSC, therefore, has given the Center a special opportunity to translate the need for closer integration and cooperation among all its organizations into specific initiatives. One such initiative that NASA and its contractors have undertaken at KSC is a NASA/Contractor team-centered Total Quality Management Seminar. It is this seminar which is the subject of this paper. The specific purposes of this paper are to describe the following: Background, development, and evolution of Kennedy Space Center's Total Quality Management Seminar; Special characteristics of the seminar; Content of the seminar; Meaning and utility of a team-centered design for TQM training; Results of the seminar; Use that one KSC contractor, EG&G Florida, Inc. has made of the seminar in its Total Quality Management initiative; and Lessons learned.

Kinlaw, Dennis C.; Eads, Jeannette

1992-01-01

303

Two-dimensional Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki state on the honeycomb lattice is a universal resource for quantum computation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Universal quantum computation can be achieved by simply performing single-qubit measurements on a highly entangled resource state. Resource states can arise from ground states of carefully designed two-body interacting Hamiltonians. This opens up an appealing possibility of creating them by cooling. The family of Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki (AKLT) states are the ground states of particularly simple Hamiltonians with high symmetry, and their potential use in quantum computation gives rise to a new research direction. Expanding on our prior work [T.-C. Wei, I. Affleck, and R. Raussendorf, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.106.070501 106, 070501 (2011)], we give a detailed analysis to explain why the spin-3/2 AKLT state on a two-dimensional honeycomb lattice is a universal resource for measurement-based quantum computation. Along the way, we also provide an alternative proof that the 1D spin-1 AKLT state can be used to simulate arbitrary one-qubit unitary gates. Moreover, we connect the quantum computational universality of 2D random graph states to their percolation property and show that these states whose graphs are in the supercritical (i.e., percolated) phase are also universal resources for measurement-based quantum computation.

Wei, Tzu-Chieh; Affleck, Ian; Raussendorf, Robert

2012-09-01

304

An Objective Verification of the North American Mesoscale Model for Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) Launch Weather Officers (LWO's) use the 12-km resolution North American Mesoscale (NAM) model (MesoNAM) text and graphical product forecasts extensively to support launch weather operations. However, the actual performance of the model at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) has not been measured objectively. In order to have tangible evidence of model performance, the 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU; Bauman et ai, 2004) to conduct a detailed statistical analysis of model output compared to observed values. The model products are provided to the 45 WS by ACTA, Inc. and include hourly forecasts from 0 to 84 hours based on model initialization times of 00, 06, 12 and 18 UTC. The objective analysis compared the MesoNAM forecast winds, temperature (T) and dew pOint (T d), as well as the changes in these parameters over time, to the observed values from the sensors in the KSC/CCAFS wind tower network shown in Table 1. These objective statistics give the forecasters knowledge of the model's strengths and weaknesses, which will result in improved forecasts for operations.

Bauman, William H., III

2010-01-01

305

Gemcitabine diphosphate choline is a major metabolite linked to the Kennedy pathway in pancreatic cancer models in vivo  

PubMed Central

Background: The modest benefits of gemcitabine (dFdC) therapy in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are well documented, with drug delivery and metabolic lability cited as important contributing factors. We have used a mouse model of PDAC: KRASG12D; p53R172H; pdx-Cre (KPC) that recapitulates the human disease to study dFdC intra-tumoural metabolism. Methods: LC-MS/MS and NMR were used to measure drug and physiological analytes. Cytotoxicity was assessed by the Sulphorhodamine B assay. Results: In KPC tumour tissue, we identified a new, Kennedy pathway-linked dFdC metabolite (gemcitabine diphosphate choline (GdPC)) present at equimolar amounts to its precursor, the accepted active metabolite gemcitabine triphosphate (dFdCTP). Utilising additional subcutaneous PDAC tumour models, we demonstrated an inverse correlation between GdPC/dFdCTP ratios and cytidine triphosphate (CTP). In tumour homogenates in vitro, CTP inhibited GdPC formation from dFdCTP, indicating competition between CTP and dFdCTP for CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (CCT). As the structure of GdPC precludes entry into cells, potential cytotoxicity was assessed by stimulating CCT activity using linoleate in KPC cells in vitro, leading to increased GdPC concentration and synergistic growth inhibition after dFdC addition. Conclusions: GdPC is an important element of the intra-tumoural dFdC metabolic pathway in vivo. PMID:24874484

Bapiro, T E; Frese, K K; Courtin, A; Bramhall, J L; Madhu, B; Cook, N; Neesse, A; Griffiths, J R; Tuveson, D A; Jodrell, D I; Richards, F M

2014-01-01

306

Developing a Peak Wind Probability Forecast Tool for Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This conference presentation describes the development of a peak wind forecast tool to assist forecasters in determining the probability of violating launch commit criteria (LCC) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) in east-central Florida. The peak winds are an important forecast element for both the Space Shuttle and Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) programs. The LCC define specific peak wind thresholds for each launch operation that cannot be exceeded in order to ensure the safety of the vehicle. The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) has found that peak winds are a challenging parameter to forecast, particularly in the cool season months of October through April. Based on the importance of forecasting peak winds, the 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to develop a short-range peak-wind forecast tool to assist in forecasting LCC violations. The tool will include climatologies of the 5-minute mean and peak winds by month, hour, and direction, and probability distributions of the peak winds as a function of the 5-minute mean wind speeds.

Lambert, WInifred; Roeder, William

2007-01-01

307

X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (Kennedy's disease) with long-term electrophysiological evaluation: case report.  

PubMed

X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy or Kennedy's disease is an adult-onset motor neuronopathy caused by a CAG repeat expansion within the first exon of an androgen receptor gene. We report the case of a 66-year-old man, previously diagnosed with motor neuron disease (MND), who presented acute and reversible left vocal fold (dysphonia) and pharyngeal paresis, followed by a slowly progressive weakness and also bouts of weakness, wasting and fasciculation on tongue, masseter, face, pharyngeal, and some proximal more than distal upper limb muscles, associated to bilateral hand tremor and mild gynecomastia. There were 5 electroneuromyography exams between 1989 and 2003 that revealed chronic reinnervation, some fasciculations (less than clinically observed) and rare fibrillation potentials, and slowly progressive sensory nerve action potentials (SNAP) abnormality, leading to absent/low amplitude potentials. PCR techniques of DNA analysis showed an abnormal number of CAG repeats, found to be 44 (normal 11-34). Our case revealed an acute and asymmetric clinical presentation related to bulbar motoneurons; low amplitude/absent SNAP with mild asymmetry; a sub-clinical or subtle involvement of proximal/distal muscles of both upper and lower limbs; and a probable evolution with bouts of acute dennervation, followed by an efficient reinnervation. PMID:15830083

Kouyoumdjian, João Aris; Morita, Maria da Penha Ananias; Araújo, Rogério Gayer Machado de

2005-03-01

308

Summary of 2011 Direct and Nearby Lightning Strikes to Launch Complex 39B, Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A Lightning Protection System (LPS) was designed and built at Launch Complex 39B (LC39B), at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida in 2009. This LPS was instrumented with comprehensive meteorological and lightning data acquisition systems that were deployed from late 2010 until mid 2011. The first direct strikes to the LPS were recorded in March of 2011, when a limited number of sensors had been activated. The lightning instrumentation system detected a total of 70 nearby strokes and 19 direct strokes to the LPS, 2 of the 19 direct strokes to the LPS had two simultaneous ground attachment points (in both instances one channel terminated on the LPS and the other on the nearby ground). Additionally, there are more unaccounted nearby strokes seen on video records for which limited data was acquired either due to the distance of the stroke or the settings of the data acquisition system. Instrumentation deployment chronological milestones, a summary of lightning strikes (direct and nearby), high speed video frames, downconductor currents, and dH/dt and dE/dt typical waveforms for direct and nearby strokes are presented.

Mata, C.T.; Mata, A.G.

2012-01-01

309

Locating rocket triggered lightning using the LLP lightning locating system at the NASA Kennedy Space Center. [Lightning Location and Protection  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Five rocket-triggered cloud-to-ground lightning flashes were detected by the operational lightning-locating system at the NASA Kennedy Space Center on August 17, 1984. The locating system, which was designed to detect natural lightning, detected at least 2 and as many as 6 strokes in the triggered flashes, suggesting that some of the strokes in the triggered lightning had signal-amplitude and waveshape characteristics similar to natural lightning. However, not all triggered strokes were detected, indicating that some strokes were atypical in nature. Since the ground-strike points of the triggered flashes were known quite precisely, the accuracy of the lightning-locating system was also evaluated. The three direction finders were found to have a mean bearing accuracy of + or - 0.5-0.6 deg. The distance errors of the real-time position solutions of the locating system on the triggered flashes were in the range of 195-770 m, with a mean of 480 m.

Maier, M. W.; Jafferis, W.

1985-01-01

310

Environmental systems and management activities on the Kennedy Space Center, Merritt Island, Florida: results of a modeling workshop  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In the early 1960's, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) began purchasing 140,000 acres on Merritt Island, Florida, in order to develop a center for space exploration. Most of this land was acquired to provide a safety and security buffer around NASA facilities. NASA, as the managing agency for the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), is responsible for preventing or controlling environmental pollution from the Federal facilities and activities at the Space Center and is committed to use all practicable means to protect and enhance the quality of the surrounding environment. The Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1963 when management authority for undeveloped lands at KSC was transferred to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. In addition to manage for 11 Federally-listed threatened and endangered species and other resident and migratory fish and wildlife populations, the Refuge has comanagement responsibility for 19,000 acres of mosquito control impoundments and 2,500 acres of citrus groves. The Canaveral National Seashore was developed in 1975 when management of a portion of the coastal lands was transferred from NASA to the National Park Service. This multiagency jurisdiction on Merritt Island has resulted in a complex management environment. The modeling workshop described in this report was conducted May 21-25, 1984, at the Kennedy Space Center to: (1) enhance communication among the agencies with management responsibilities on Merritt Island; (2) integrate available information concerning the development, management, and ecology of Merritt Island; and (3) identify key research and monitoring needs associated with the management and use of the island's resources. The workshop was structured around the formulation of a model that would simulate primary management and use activities on Merritt Island and their effects on upland, impoundment, and estuarine vegetation and associated wildlife. The simulation model is composed of four connected submodels. The Uplands submodel calculates changes in acres and structural components of vegetation communities resulting from succession, fire, facilities development, and shuttle launch depositions, as well as the quantity and quality of surface runoff and aquifer input to an impoundment and an estuary. The Impoundment submodel next determines water quality and quantity and changes in vegetation resulting from water level manipulation and prescribed burning. The Estuary submodel than determines water quality parameters and acres of seagrass beds. Finally, the Wildlife submodel calculates habitat suitability indices for key species of interest, based on vegetation conditions in the uplands and impoundments and on several hydrologic parameters. The model represents a hypothetical management unit with 2,500 acres of uplands, a 600-acre impoundment, and a 1,500-acre section of estuary. Two management scenarios were run to analyze model behavior. The scenarios differ in the frequency of shuttle launches and prescribed burning, the extent of facilities development, the amount of land disposed waste material applied, and the nature and timing of impoundment water level control. Early in a model development project, the process of building the model is usually of greater benefit than the model itself. The model building process stimulates interaction among agencies, assists in integrating existing information, and helps identify research needs. These benefits usually accrue even in the absence of real predictive power in the resulting model. Open communication occurs among the Federal, State, and local agencies involved with activities on Merritt Island and the agencies have a cooperative working relationship. The workshop provided an opportunity for all of these agencies to meet at one time and have focused discussions on the key environmental and multiagency resource management issues. The workshop framework helped to integrate information and assumptions from a number of disciplines and agencies. This integration occurred in the computer simulation m

Hamilton, David B.; Andrews, Austin K.; Auble, Gregor T.; Ellison, Richard A.; Farmer, Adrian H.; Roelle, James E.

1985-01-01

311

The Kennedy Krieger Independence Scales–Spina Bifida Version: A Measure of Executive Components of Self-Management  

PubMed Central

Purpose/Objective Successful implementation of functional self-care skills depends upon adequate executive functioning; however, many scales assessing adaptive skills do not address the inherent executive burden of these tasks. This omission is especially relevant for individuals with spina bifida, for whom medical self-care tasks impose a significant burden requiring initiation and prospective memory. The Kennedy Krieger Independence Scales–Spina Bifida Version (KKIS–SB) is a caregiver-reported measure designed to address this gap; it assesses skills for managing both typical and spina bifida-related daily self-care demands, with a focus on the timely and independent initiation of adaptive skills. Research Method/Design Parents of 100 youth and young adults with spina bifida completed the KKIS–SB. Exploratory factor analysis and Pearson's correlations were used to assess the factor structure, reliability, and construct validity of the KKIS–SB. Results The scale demonstrates excellent internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = .891). Exploratory factor analysis yielded four factors, explaining 65.1% of the total variance. Two primary subscales were created, initiation of routines and prospective memory, which provide meaningful clinical information regarding management of a variety of typical (e.g., get up on time, complete daily hygiene routines on time) and spina bifida-specific self-care tasks (e.g., begin self-catheterization on time, perform self-examination for pressure sores). Conclusions/Implications Based upon internal consistency estimates and correlations with measures of similar constructs, initial data suggest good preliminary reliability and validity of the KKIS–SB. PMID:23438006

Jacobson, Lisa A.; Tarazi, Reem A.; McCurdy, Mark D.; Schultz, Scott; Levey, Eric; Mahone, E. Mark; Zabel, T. Andrew

2014-01-01

312

Use of ground penetrating radar for determination of water table depth and subsurface soil characteristics at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sustainable use and management of natural resources require strategic responses using non-destructive tools to provide spatial and temporal data for decision making. Experiments conducted at John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) demonstrate ground penetrating radar (GPR) can provide high-resolution images showing depth to water tables. GPR data at KSC were acquired using a MALÅ Rough Terrain 100 MHz Antenna. Data indicate strong correlation (R2=0.80) between measured water table depth (shallow monitoring wells and soil auger) and GPR estimated depth. The study demonstrated the use of GPR to detect Holocene and Pleistocene depositional environments such as Anastasia Formation that consists of admixtures of sand, shell and coquinoid limestone at a depth of 20-25 ft. This corresponds well with the relatively strong reflections from 7.5 to 13 m (125-215 ns) in GPR images. Interpretations derived from radar data coupled with other non-GPR data (wells data and soil auger data) will aid in the understanding of climate change impacts due to sea level rise on the scrub vegetation composition at KSC. Climate change is believed to have a potentially significant impact potential on near coastal ground water levels and associated water table depth. Understanding the impacts of ground water levels changes will, in turn, lead to improved conceptual conservation efforts and identifications of climate change adaptation concepts related to the recovery of the Florida scrub jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens) and other endangered or threatened species which are directly dependent on a healthy near coastal scrub habitat. Transfer of this inexpensive and non-destructive technology to other areas at KSC, Florida, and to other countries, may prove useful in the development of future conservation programs.

Hengari, Gideon M.; Hall, Carlton R.; Kozusko, Tim J.; Bostater, Charles R.

2013-10-01

313

Quality-Controlled Wind Data from the Kennedy Space Center 915 Megahertz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Network  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA) Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has installed a five-instrument 915-Megahertz (MHz) Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) system that records atmospheric wind profile properties. The purpose of these profilers is to fill data gaps between the top of the KSC wind tower network and the lowest measurement altitude of the KSC 50-MHz DRWP. The 915-MHz DRWP system has the capability to generate three-dimensional wind data outputs from approximately 150 meters (m) to 6,000 m at roughly 15-minute (min) intervals. NASA s long-term objective is to combine the 915-MHz and 50-MHz DRWP systems to create complete vertical wind profiles up to 18,300 m to be used in trajectory and loads analyses of space vehicles and by forecasters on day-of-launch (DOL). This analysis utilizes automated and manual quality control (QC) processes to remove erroneous and unrealistic wind data returned by the 915-MHz DRWP system. The percentage of data affected by each individual QC check in the period of record (POR) (i.e., January to April 2006) was computed, demonstrating the variability in the amount of data affected by the QC processes. The number of complete wind profiles available at given altitude thresholds for each profiler in the POR was calculated and outputted graphically, followed by an assessment of the number of complete wind profiles available for any profiler in the POR. A case study is also provided to demonstrate the QC process on a day of a known weather event.

Dryden, Rachel L.

2011-01-01

314

Measurement of Insulation Compaction in the Cryogenic Fuel Tanks at Kennedy Space Center by Fast/Thermal Neutron Techniques  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The liquid hydrogen and oxygen cryogenic storage tanks at John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) use expanded perlite as thermal insulation. Th ere is evidence that some of the perlite has compacted over time, com promising the thermal performance and possibly also structural integr ity of the tanks. Therefore an Non-destructive Testing (NDT) method for measuring the perlite density or void fraction is urgently needed. Methods based on neutrons are good candidates because they can readil y penetrate through the 1.75 cm outer steel shell and through the ent ire 120 cm thickness of the perlite zone. Neutrons interact with the nuclei of materials to produce characteristic gamma rays which are the n detected. The gamma ray signal strength is proportional to the atom ic number density. Consequently, if the perlite is compacted then the count rates in the individual peaks in the gamma ray spectrum will i ncrease. Perlite is a feldspathic volcanic rock made up of the major elements Si, AI, Na, K and 0 along with some water. With commercially available portable neutron generators it is possible to produce simul taneously fluxes of neutrons in two energy ranges: fast (14 MeV) and thermal (25 meV). Fast neutrons produce gamma rays by inelastic scatt ering which is sensitive to Fe and O. Thermal neutrons produce gamma rays by radiative capture in prompt gamma neutron activation (PGNA) and this is sensitive to Si, AI, Na, Kand H. Thus the two energy ranges produce complementary information. The R&D program has three phases: numerical simulations of neutron and gamma ray transport with MCNP s oftware, evaluation of the system in the laboratory on test articles and finally mapping of the perlite density in the cryogenic tanks at KSC. The preliminary MCNP calculations have shown that the fast/therma l neutron NDT method is capable of distinguishing between expanded an d compacted perlite with excellent statistics.

Livingston, R. A.; Schweitzer, J. S.; Parsons, Ann M.; Arens, Ellen E.

2010-01-01

315

Biochemical characterization of the initial steps of the Kennedy pathway in Trypanosoma brucei: the ethanolamine and choline kinases  

PubMed Central

Ethanolamine and choline are major components of the trypanosome membrane phospholipids, in the form of GPEtn (glycerophosphoethanolamine) and GPCho (glycerophosphocholine). Ethanolamine is also found as an integral component of the GPI (glycosylphosphatidylinositol) anchor that is required for membrane attachment of cell-surface proteins, most notably the variant-surface glycoproteins. The de novo synthesis of GPEtn and GPCho starts with the generation of phosphoethanolamine and phosphocholine by ethanolamine and choline kinases via the Kennedy pathway. Database mining revealed two putative C/EKs (choline/ethanolamine kinases) in the Trypanosoma brucei genome, which were cloned, overexpressed, purified and characterized. TbEK1 (T. brucei ethanolamine kinase 1) was shown to be catalytically active as an ethanolamine-specific kinase, i.e. it had no choline kinase activity. The Km values for ethanolamine and ATP were found to be 18.4±0.9 and 219±29 ?M respectively. TbC/EK2 (T. brucei choline/ethanolamine kinase 2), on the other hand, was found to be able to phosphorylate both ethanolamine and choline, even though choline was the preferred substrate, with a Km 80 times lower than that of ethanolamine. The Km values for choline, ethanolamine and ATP were 31.4±2.6 ?M, 2.56±0.31 mM and 20.6±1.96 ?M respectively. Further substrate specificity analysis revealed that both TbEK1 and TbC/EK2 were able to tolerate various modifications at the amino group, with the exception of a quaternary amine for TbEK1 (choline) and a primary amine for TbC/EK2 (ethanolamine). Both enzymes recognized analogues with substituents on C-2, but substitutions on C-1 and elongations of the carbon chain were not well tolerated. PMID:18489261

Gibellini, Federica; Hunter, William N.; Smith, Terry K.

2008-01-01

316

A study of LC-39 cryogenic systems. Part 1: A study of the vacuum insulated transfer lines at Kennedy Space Center. Part 2: Cooldown pressure surges  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The vacuum liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen transfer lines at Kennedy Space Center were studied to evaluate the feasibility of using a condensing gas such as CO2 inside the vacuum spaces to achieve a condensing-vacuum. The study indicates that at ambient temperature, a maximum vacuum hyphen space pressure of 4000 microns is acceptable for the LH2 transfer lines. In addition, the cooldown procedures for the 14-inch cross-country liquid oxygen line was studied using a simplified mathematical model. Preliminary cooldown times are presented for various heat leak rates to the line and for two vent configurations.

Ludtke, P. R.; Voth, R. O.

1971-01-01

317

A continuation of base-line studies for environmentally monitoring space transportation systems at John F. Kennedy Space Center. Executive summary  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Studies conducted in and around John F. Kennedy Space Center, Merrit Island, Florida were designed to establish baseline conditions for various attributes of the biotic and abiotic environment. Features were described and quantitatively measured. Certain condition were found to be appropriate for the detection and assessment of possible environmental perturbations caused by future NASA activities. These include plant communities, mammal populations, rainfall chemistry, fish populations, and the status of rare and endangered species. On the basis of statistical analysis of quantitative data and logistic considerations, it was possible to refine the kinds and amounts of measurements needed to evaluate perturbations in selected environmental components.

Stout, I. J.

1980-01-01

318

Development of a climatological data base to help forecast cloud cover conditions for shuttle landings at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle is an extremely weather sensitive vehicle with very restrictive constraints for both launches and landings. The most important difference between Shuttle and normal aircraft landings is that the Shuttle has no go-around capability once it begins its decent into the earth's atmosphere. The de-orbit burn decision is generally made approximately 90 minutes before landing requiring a forecast with little room for error. Because of the Shuttle's rapid re-entry to earth, the pilot must be able to see all runway and visual navigation aids from high altitude to land the Shuttle. In addition, the heat resistant tiles which are used to protect the Shuttle during its re-entry into the earth's atmosphere are extremely sensitive to any type of precipitation. Extensive damage to these tiles could occur if the Shuttle passes through any cloud that contains precipitation size particles. To help guard against changing weather conditions or any type of weather problems that might occur prior to landing, flight rules have been developed as guidelines for all landings. Although the rules vary depending on the location of the landing (Kennedy Space Center or Edwards AFB), length of mission, and weight of vehicle, most of the rules can be condensed into 4 major groupings. These are: (1) Cloud ceilings should not be less than 3048 m (10,000 feet), (2) Visibility should not be less than 13 km (7 nm), (3) Cross-wind no greater than 5-8 m/s (10-15 knots); and (4) No showers or thunderstorms at or within 56 km (30 nm) of the Shuttle Landing Facility. This study consisted of developing a climatological database of the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) surface observations and performing an analysis of observed conditions one and two hours subsequent to given conditions at the SLF to help analyze the 0.2 cloud cover rule. Particular emphasis was placed on Shuttle landing weather violations and the amounts of cloud cover below 3048 m (10,000 ft.). This analysis has helped to determine the best and worst times to land the Shuttle at KSC. In addition, nomograms have been developed to help forecasters make cloud cover forecasts for End of Mission (EOM) and Return to Launch Site (RTLS) at KSC. Results of categorizing this data by month, season, time of day, and surface and upper-air wind direction are presented.

Atchison, M. Kevin

1993-01-01

319

University Housing Kirsten Kennedy  

E-print Network

Administrative Assistant Darryl Davis Director of Business & Information Services Terry Perkins Director Coordinator StephanieMiller Business Manager Rachel McKeown Staff Accountant #12;Facility Operations 3 TerryPerkins Supervisor - Columbia Hall & Capstone SallyGownes Custodial Supervisor - McBryde & Quads Frances

Almor, Amit

320

Shuttle Atlantis in Mate-Demate Device Being Loaded onto SCA-747 for Return to Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This photo shows a night view of the orbiter Atlantis being loaded onto one of NASA's Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site with Dryden remaining as the principal alternate landing site.

1996-01-01

321

Spin-orbit coupling and spin Hall effect for neutral atoms without spin-flips Colin J. Kennedy, Georgios A. Siviloglou, Hirokazu Miyake, William Cody Burton, and Wolfgang Ketterle  

E-print Network

Spin-orbit coupling and spin Hall effect for neutral atoms without spin-flips Colin J. Kennedy spin-orbit coupling and the spin Hall effect for neutral atoms in optical lattices without relying on near resonant laser light to couple different spin states. The spin-orbit coupling is created

322

The 2006 Kennedy Space Center Range Reference Atmosphere Model Validation Study and Sensitivity Analysis to the Performance of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Space Shuttle Vehicle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Range Reference Atmosphere (RRA) is a statistical model that summarizes wind and thermodynamic atmospheric variability from surface to 70 km. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Space Shuttle program, which launches from KSC, utilizes the KSC RRA data to evaluate environmental constraints on various aspects of the vehicle during ascent. An update to the KSC RRA was recently completed. As part of the update, the Natural Environments Branch at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) conducted a validation study and a comparison analysis to the existing KSC RRA database version 1983. Assessments to the Space Shuttle vehicle ascent profile characteristics were performed by JSC/Ascent Flight Design Division to determine impacts of the updated model to the vehicle performance. Details on the model updates and the vehicle sensitivity analyses with the update model are presented.

Burns, Lee; Decker, Ryan; Harrington, Brian; Merry, Carl

2008-01-01

323

Analysis of vector wind change with respect to time for Cape Kennedy, Florida: Wind aloft profile change vs. time, phase 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Wind vector change with respect to time at Cape Kennedy, Florida, is examined according to the theory of multivariate normality. The joint distribution of the four variables represented by the components of the wind vector at an initial time and after a specified elapsed time is hypothesized to be quadravariate normal; the fourteen statistics of this distribution, calculated from fifteen years of twice daily Rawinsonde data are presented by monthly reference periods for each month from 0 to 27 km. The hypotheses that the wind component changes with respect to time is univariate normal, the joint distribution of wind component changes is bivariate normal, and the modulus of vector wind change is Rayleigh, has been tested by comparison with observed distributions. Statistics of the conditional bivariate normal distributions of vector wind at a future time given the vector wind at an initial time are derived. Wind changes over time periods from one to five hours, calculated from Jimsphere data, are presented.

Adelfang, S. I.

1977-01-01

324

Evaluation of the Performance Characteristics of CGLSS II and U.S. NLDN Using Ground-Truth Data from Launch Complex 398, Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new comprehensive lightning instrumentation system has been designed for Launch Complex 39B (LC39B) at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. This new instrumentation system includes six synchronized high-speed video cameras, current sensors installed on the nine downcouductors of the new lightning protection system (LPS) for LC39B; four dH/dt, 3-axis measurement stations; and five dE/dt stations composed of two antennas each. The LPS received 8 direct lightning strikes (a total of 19 strokes) from March 31 through December 31, 2011. The measured peak currents and locations are compared to those reported by the CGLSS 11 and the NLDN. Results of comparison are presented and analyzed in this paper.

Mata, Carlos T.; Mata, Angel G.; Rakov, V. A.; Nag, A.; Saul, Jon

2012-01-01

325

Evaluation of the Performance Characteristics of CGLSS II and U.S. NLDN Using Ground-Truth Dalta from Launch Complex 398, Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new comprehensive lightning instrumentation system has been designed for Launch Complex 39B (LC39B) at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. This new instrumentation system includes seven synchronized high-speed video cameras, current sensors installed on the nine downconductors of the new lightning protection system (LPS) for LC39B; four dH/dt, 3-axis measurement stations; and five dE/dt stations composed of two antennas each. The LPS received 8 direct lightning strikes (a total of 19 strokes) from March 31 through December 31 2011. The measured peak currents and locations are compared to those reported by the Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS II) and the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN). Results of comparison are presented and analyzed in this paper.

Mata, C. T.; Mata, A. G.; Rakov, V. A.; Nag, A.; Saul, J.

2012-01-01

326

Justice and fairness in the Kennedy Krieger Institute lead paint study: the ethics of public health research on less expensive, less effective interventions.  

PubMed

The Kennedy Krieger lead paint study stirred controversial questions about whether research designed to develop less expensive interventions that are not as effective as existing treatments can be ethically warranted. Critics questioned the social value of such research and alleged that it sanctions a double standard, exploits participants, and is complicit in perpetuating the social injustice. In response, we demonstrate the propriety of conducting research on interventions that can be extended to the population in need by stipulating the limited conditions in which it is ethically warranted and providing fair terms of participation. We contend that the failure to conduct such research causes greater harm, because it deprives disadvantaged populations of the benefits of imminent incremental improvements in their health conditions. PMID:16571697

Buchanan, David R; Miller, Franklin G

2006-05-01

327

An aerial radiological survey of the Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and surrounding area, Titusville, Florida: Date of survey: October 1985  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey of the entire Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) was performed during the period 9 through 23 October 1985. This survey was conducted in three parts. First, a low resolution, low sensitivity background survey was performed that encompassed the entire KSC and CCAFS area. Next, two smaller, high resolution, high sensitivity surveys were conducted: the first focused on Launch Complexes 39A and 39B, and the second on the Shuttle Landing Facility. The areas encompassed by the surveys were 200, 5.5, and 8.5 square miles (500, 14, and 22 sq km), respectively. The purpose of these surveys was to provide information useful for an emergency response to a radiological accident. Results of the background survey are presented as isoradiation contour maps of both total exposure rate and man-made gross count superimposed on a mosaic of recent aerial photographs. Results of the two small, detailed surveys are also presented as an isoradiation contour map of exposure rate on the aerial photograph base. These data were evaluated to establish sensitivity limits for mapping the presence of plutonium-238. Natural background exposure rates at the Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station are very low, generally ranging from 4 to 6.5 microroentgens per hour (..mu..R/h) and less than 4 ..mu..R/h in wet areas. However, exposure rates in developed areas were observed to be higher due to the importation of construction materials not characteristic of the area. 8 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Not Available

1988-01-01

328

Shuttle Endevour Loaded onto SCA-747 Exiting the Mate-Demate Device for Return to Kennedy Space Cent  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle Endeavout rests atop NASA's Shuttle Carrier Aircraft in the Mate-Demate Device (MDD) at the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, shortly before being ferried back to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Endeavour landed at 1:57 p.m. (PDT) May 16, 1992, marking the completion of the new orbiter's first mission in space during which the crew of seven rendezvoused with the Intelsat VI satellite, attached a booster motor, and redeployed it into a high geosynchronous orbit. Endeavour and its crew were launched on a planned 7-day mission 7 May 1992, but the landing was delayed two days to allow extra time to rescue Intelsat and complete space station assembly techniques originally planned. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden

1992-01-01

329

Tool for Forecasting Cool-Season Peak Winds Across Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The expected peak wind speed for the day is an important element in the daily morning forecast for ground and space launch operations at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) must issue forecast advisories for KSC/CCAFS when they expect peak gusts for >= 25, >= 35, and >= 50 kt thresholds at any level from the surface to 300 ft. In Phase I of this task, the 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to develop a cool-season (October - April) tool to help forecast the non-convective peak wind from the surface to 300 ft at KSC/CCAFS. During the warm season, these wind speeds are rarely exceeded except during convective winds or under the influence of tropical cyclones, for which other techniques are already in use. The tool used single and multiple linear regression equations to predict the peak wind from the morning sounding. The forecaster manually entered several observed sounding parameters into a Microsoft Excel graphical user interface (GUI), and then the tool displayed the forecast peak wind speed, average wind speed at the time of the peak wind, the timing of the peak wind and the probability the peak wind will meet or exceed 35, 50 and 60 kt. The 45 WS customers later dropped the requirement for >= 60 kt wind warnings. During Phase II of this task, the AMU expanded the period of record (POR) by six years to increase the number of observations used to create the forecast equations. A large number of possible predictors were evaluated from archived soundings, including inversion depth and strength, low-level wind shear, mixing height, temperature lapse rate and winds from the surface to 3000 ft. Each day in the POR was stratified in a number of ways, such as by low-level wind direction, synoptic weather pattern, precipitation and Bulk Richardson number. The most accurate Phase II equations were then selected for an independent verification. The Phase I and II forecast methods were compared using an independent verification data set. The two methods were compared to climatology, wind warnings and advisories issued by the 45 WS, and North American Mesoscale (NAM) model (MesoNAM) forecast winds. The performance of the Phase I and II methods were similar with respect to mean absolute error. Since the Phase I data were not stratified by precipitation, this method's peak wind forecasts had a large negative bias on days with precipitation and a small positive bias on days with no precipitation. Overall, the climatology methods performed the worst while the MesoNAM performed the best. Since the MesoNAM winds were the most accurate in the comparison, the final version of the tool was based on the MesoNAM winds. The probability the peak wind will meet or exceed the warning thresholds were based on the one standard deviation error bars from the linear regression. For example, the linear regression might forecast the most likely peak speed to be 35 kt and the error bars used to calculate that the probability of >= 25 kt = 76%, the probability of >= 35 kt = 50%, and the probability of >= 50 kt = 19%. The authors have not seen this application of linear regression error bars in any other meteorological applications. Although probability forecast tools should usually be developed with logistic regression, this technique could be easily generalized to any linear regression forecast tool to estimate the probability of exceeding any desired threshold . This could be useful for previously developed linear regression forecast tools or new forecast applications where statistical analysis software to perform logistic regression is not available. The tool was delivered in two formats - a Microsoft Excel GUI and a Tool Command Language/Tool Kit (Tcl/Tk) GUI in the Meteorological Interactive Data Display System (MIDDS). The Microsoft Excel GUI reads a MesoNAM text file containing hourly forecasts from 0 to 84 hours, from one model run (00 or 12 UTC). The GUI then displays e peak wind speed, average wind speed, and the probability the peak wind wil

Barrett, Joe H., III; Roeder, William P.

2010-01-01

330

Destabilizing Dynamic Covert Networks Kathleen M. Carley  

E-print Network

. Additional support on measures was provided under the Darpa project on INSIGHT (Interpreting Network, Darpa, the National Science Foundation or the U.S. government. Many thanks to Connie Fournelle these groups. This problem is further compounded by the vast quantities of, yet incomplete, information. What

Sadeh, Norman M.

331

Destabilizing Terrorist Networks Kathleen M. Carley  

E-print Network

Architecture under the direction of Bill Vaughn. Additional support on measures was provided under the Darpa as representing the official policies, either expressed or implied, of the Office of Naval Research, Darpa and possible erroneous. What is needed is a set of tools and an approach to assessing destabilization

Sadeh, Norman M.

332

Destabilizing Dynamic Covert Networks Kathleen M. Carley  

E-print Network

support on measures was provided under the Darpa project on INSIGHT (Stands for: Interpreting Network, yet incomplete, information. What is needed is a set of tools and an approach to assessing Network Analysis and Grant No. 1681.12.1140053 on Adaptive Architecture, DARPA, the NSF under the IGERT

Sadeh, Norman M.

333

Destabilizing Terrorist Networks Kathleen M. Carley  

E-print Network

. Additional support on measures was provided under the Darpa project on INSIGHT (Interpreting Network of Naval Research, Darpa, the National Science Foundation or the U.S. government. Many thanks to Connie and structure of these networks, such, information is incomplete and possible erroneous. What is needed is a set

Sadeh, Norman M.

334

Kathleen Gough Compiled by Wayne Murdoch (1992)  

E-print Network

this period -- Kerala, India (1947-1949) and the Tanjore District, India (1950-1953) -- forms the basis for most of her subsequent published work. In fact, it was following her return trips to India in 1976 books include: Ten Times More Beautiful: The Rebuilding of Vietnam (1978), Rural Society in Southeast

Handy, Todd C.

335

KATHLEEN O'REILLY Assistant Professor  

E-print Network

Participation in a Rajasthan (India) Drinking Water Supply Project." University of Iowa 1996 M.S. Geography "The are not contractors": professionalizing the interactive service work of NGOs in Rajasthan, India. Economic Geography." in Rajasthan in the new millennium: History, Polity, Society, Culture, Religion and Economy, Surjit Singh

336

KATHLEEN O'REILLY September 2011  

E-print Network

Participation in a Rajasthan (India) Drinking Water Supply Project." University of Iowa 1996 M.S. Geography "The in Rajasthan, India. Economic Geography 87(2): 207-226. #12;K. O'Reilly 2 2010 OReilly, K. and R. Dhanju. "Your in water supply: An example from Rajasthan." Development in Practice. 20th Anniversary issue, 20

337

SPRING 2012 Associate Professor Kathleen Alexander commutes  

E-print Network

work be of service," Alexander said. "Nothing is more compelling than a problem that truly needs on the rise, we must find ways other than agriculture to help people escape poverty," Alexander said. "The buffalo harbor the pathogen that causes brucellosis, a disease that appears to have been largely

Virginia Tech

338

MCNP Simulations of Measurement of Insulation Compaction in the Cryogenic Rocket Fuel Tanks at Kennedy Space Center by Fast/Thermal Neutron Techniques  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

MCNP simulations have been run to evaluate the feasibility of using a combination of fast and thermal neutrons as a nondestructive method to measure of the compaction of the perlite insulation in the liquid hydrogen and oxygen cryogenic storage tanks at John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Perlite is a feldspathic volcanic rock made up of the major elements Si, AI, Na, K and 0 along with some water. When heated it expands from four to twenty times its original volume which makes it very useful for thermal insulation. The cryogenic tanks at Kennedy Space Center are spherical with outer diameters of 69-70 feet and lined with a layer of expanded perlite with thicknesses on the order of 120 cm. There is evidence that some of the perlite has compacted over time since the tanks were built 1965, affecting the thermal properties and possibly also the structural integrity of the tanks. With commercially available portable neutron generators it is possible to produce simultaneously fluxes of neutrons in two energy ranges: fast (14 Me V) and thermal (25 me V). The two energy ranges produce complementary information. Fast neutrons produce gamma rays by inelastic scattering, which is sensitive to Fe and O. Thermal neutrons produce gamma rays by prompt gamma neutron activation (PGNA) and this is sensitive to Si, Al, Na, K and H. The compaction of the perlite can be measured by the change in gamma ray signal strength which is proportional to the atomic number densities of the constituent elements. The MCNP simulations were made to determine the magnitude of this change. The tank wall was approximated by a I-dimensional slab geometry with an 11/16" outer carbon steel wall, an inner stainless wall and 120 cm thick perlite zone. Runs were made for cases with expanded perlite, compacted perlite or with various void fractions. Runs were also made to simulate the effect of adding a moderator. Tallies were made for decay-time analysis from t=0 to 10 ms; total detected gamma-rays; detected gamma-rays from thermal neutron reactions d. detected gamma-rays from non-thermal neutron reactions and total detected gamma-rays as a function of depth into the annulus volume. These indicated a number of possible independent metrics of perlite compaction. For example the count rate for perlite elements increased from 3600 to 8500 cps for an increase in perlite density from 6 lbs/lcf to 16.5 lbs/cf. Thus the MCNP simulations have confirmed the feasibility of using neutron methods to map the compaction of perlite in the walls of the cryogenic tanks.

Livingston, R. A.; Schweitzer, J. S.; Parsons, A. M.; Arens, E. E.

2010-01-01

339

Peak Wind Forecasts for the Launch-Critical Wind Towers on Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Phase IV  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This final report describes the development of a peak wind forecast tool to assist forecasters in determining the probability of violating launch commit criteria (LCC) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). The peak winds arc an important forecast clement for both the Space Shuttle and Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) programs. The LCC define specific peak wind thresholds for each launch operation that cannot be exceeded in order to ensure the safety of the vehicle. The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) has found that peak winds are a challenging parameter to forecast, particularly in the cool season months of October through April. Based on the importance of forecasting peak winds, the 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to update the statistics in the current peak-wind forecast tool to assist in forecasting LCC violations. The tool includes onshore and offshore flow climatologies of the 5-minute mean and peak winds and probability distributions of the peak winds as a function of the 5-minute mean wind speeds.

Crawford, Winifred

2011-01-01

340

A Five-year Performance Study of Low VOC Coatings over Zinc Thermal Spray for the Protection of Carbon Steel at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The launch facilities at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) are located approximately 1000 feet from the Atlantic Ocean where they are exposed to salt deposits, high humidity, high UV degradation, and acidic exhaust from solid rocket boosters. These assets are constructed from carbon steel, which requires a suitable coating to provide long-term protection to reduce corrosion and its associated costs. While currently used coating systems provide excellent corrosion control performance, they are subject to occupational, safety, and environmental regulations at the Federal and State levels that limit their use. Many contain high volatile organic compounds (VOCs), hazardous air pollutants, and other hazardous materials. Hazardous waste from coating operations include vacuum filters, zinc dust, hazardous paint related material, and solid paint. There are also worker safety issues such as exposure to solvents and isocyanates. To address these issues, top-coated thermal spray zinc coating systems were investigated as a promising environmentally friendly corrosion protection for carbon steel in an acidic launch environment. Additional benefits of the combined coating system include a long service life, cathodic protection to the substrate, no volatile contaminants, and high service temperatures. This paper reports the results of a performance based study to evaluate low VOC topcoats (for thermal spray zinc coatings) on carbon steel for use in a space launch environment.

Kolody, Mark R.; Curran, Jerome P.; Calle, Luz Marina

2014-01-01

341

Future Expansion of the Lightning Surveillance System at the Kennedy Space Center and the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, USA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and the Air Force Eastern Range (ER) use data from two cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning detection networks, the Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS) and the U.S. National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN), and a volumetric mapping array, the lightning detection and ranging II (LDAR II) system: These systems are used to monitor and characterize lightning that is potentially hazardous to launch or ground operations and hardware. These systems are not perfect and both have documented missed lightning events when compared to the existing lightning surveillance system at Launch Complex 39B (LC39B). Because of this finding it is NASA's plan to install a lightning surveillance system around each of the active launch pads sharing site locations and triggering capabilities when possible. This paper shows how the existing lightning surveillance system at LC39B has performed in 2011 as well as the plan for the expansion around all active pads.

Mata, C. T.; Wilson, J. G.

2012-01-01

342

Analysis of Wading Bird use of Impounded Wetland Habitat on the Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, 1987-1998  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report summarizes results of the first eleven years of monthly aerial surveys of wading bird use of foraging habitats within impoundments on the Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. Some impoundments were used much more heavily by wading birds than were others. Analysis suggests that an increase in interspersion of open water and vegetated habitats is preferred foraging habitat. Many wading bird species increased their use of vegetated habitat in Fall and Winter when impoundments were flooded. The mean number of wading birds per survey was greatest during the Pre-nesting and Nesting seasons, declined during Post-nesting season, and was lowest during Winter when water levels within impoundments were high. During these times, shallow habitat along the IRL shoreline provided alternative habitats for wading birds. Various measures of monthly precipitation and impoundment water level were well correlated with the numbers of wading birds observed. Numbers of nesting attempts was steady during the study period, with the exception of an unusually high number of attempts in 1990. White Ibis accounted for over half of all wading bird nests counted. The mean number of nests per colony decreased during the study period, and the number of individual colonies increased.

Stolen, Eric D.; Breininger, David R.; Smith, Rebecca B.; Quincy, Charlie (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

343

An evaluation of rain chemistry data for the John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida and the University of Central Florida, Orlando  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Concern over the effects of Space Shuttle launches prompted the initiation of a rather intense environmental monitoring program. The program included a precipitation monitoring network with 13 precipitation collection sites which were operated for various time periods to baseline precipitation chemistry at the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC). One additional site was also established as a remote background site on the Univ. of Central Florida (UCF) campus. One of the 13 sites was converted to a National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) station. Collections and analyses of samples were performed using a number of methodologies during the monitoring period. An evaluation of the data for comparability and utility for acid rain research was performed using the anion/cation, measured conductivity, calculated conductivity, Cl/Na, and Mg/Na ratios. Data collected at all KSC sites between 1977 and 1981, from 1983 to 1985 at the NADP site and at UCF to 1985 are comparable and appropriate for determining acid rain trends. Examination of those comparable data showed a fairly stable pH between 1977 and 1982 and an increase of 0.2 pH units which was observed as an incremental increase between 1982 and 1983 at KSC and UCF.

Madsen, Brooks C.; Dreschel, Thomas W.; Hinkle, C. Ross

1986-01-01

344

Feasibility study for measurement of insulation compaction in the cryogenic rocket fuel storage tanks at Kennedy Space Center by fast/thermal neutron techniques  

SciTech Connect

The liquid hydrogen and oxygen cryogenic storage tanks at John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) use expanded perlite as thermal insulation. Some of the perlite may have compacted over time, compromising the thermal performance and also the structural integrity of the tanks. Neutrons can readily penetrate through the 1.75 cm outer steel shell and through the entire 120 cm thick perlite zone. Neutrons interactions with materials produce characteristic gamma rays which are then detected. In compacted perlite the count rates in the individual peaks in the gamma ray spectrum will increase. Portable neutron generators can produce neutron simultaneous fluxes in two energy ranges: fast (14 MeV) and thermal (25 meV). Fast neutrons produce gamma rays by inelastic scattering which is sensitive to Si, Al, Fe and O. Thermal neutrons produce gamma rays by radiative capture in prompt gamma neutron activation (PGNA), which is sensitive to Si, Al, Na, K and H among others. The results of computer simulations using the software MCNP and measurements on a test article suggest that the most promising approach would be to operate the system in time-of-flight mode by pulsing the neutron generator and observing the subsequent die away curve in the PGNA signal.

Livingston, R. A. [Materials Science and Engineering Dept., U. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Schweitzer, J. S. [Physics Dept., U. of Connecticut, Storrs (United States); Parsons, A. M. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt (United States); Arens, E. E. [John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL (United States)

2014-02-18

345

A review of falconry as a bird control technique with recommendations for use at the Shuttle Landing Facility, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Falconry has been proposed as a method of reducing the bird/aircraftstrike hazard, in addition to current bird control techniques, at the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, U.S. Bird control programs using falconry have been employed at a number of military and commercial airfields in the U.S., Canada, and Europe. Most falconry programs have been discontinued. In most situations, falconry did not prove cost effective when compared to alternative bird control techniques. Available literature and documents, as well as several raptor specialists and military personnel, suggest that falconry may be useful only against certain problem species and when other bird control methods have been proven inadequate. Because many of the most commonly used falcons are protected species, acquisition of falcons will complicate their use in bird control programs. Many avian species found at the SLF are federally and state protected or of conservation concern, therefore, environmental impacts may also result from the use of falcons.

Larson, Vickie L.; Rowe, Sean P.; Breininger, David R.; Yosef, Reuven

1994-01-01

346

Endangered and potentially endangered wildlife on John F. Kennedy Space Center and faunal integrity as a goal for maintaining biological diversity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Buffer zones for space operations provide for a wildlife diversity unsurpassed among most federal facilities in the continental U.S. demonstrating the coexistence possible with one of man's greatest technological achievements. This document ranks 119 resident or migratory wildlife species that are endangered or declining. The ranking system herein was based on species' vulnerability to extinction and the relevance of Kennedy Space Center (KSC) for maintaining populations in the U.S. and Florida. One amphibian, 19 reptiles, 80 birds, and 19 mammals were considered endangered or declining. KSC is an integral area for regional species diversity being the focus of the Merritt Island/Cape Canaveral/Turnbull Ecosystem which is part of the Indian River Lagoon watershed, an estuary of national significance. Many species that use this system also use the nearby St. Johns River Basin ecosystem. These two ecosystems are biological corridors between temperate Carolinian and tropical/subtropical Caribbean biotic provinces. Threats to biological diversity on KSC were also reviewed. Traditional environmental assessments, resulting from environmental regulation guidelines, focus on environmental contaminants and habitat lost due to construction. However, this review suggested that small population sizes, isolation of populations, ecosystem and habitat fragmentation, road mortality, and other edge effects may represent more critical threats to biological diversity than the traditional topics.

Breininger, David R.; Barkaszi, Mary JO; Smith, Rebecca B.; Oddy, Donna M.; Provancha, Jane A.

1994-01-01

347

Surface wind convergence as a short-term predictor of cloud-to-ground lightning at Kennedy Space Center: A four-year summary and evaluation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since 1986, USAF forecasters at NASA-Kennedy have had available a surface wind convergence technique for use during periods of convective development. In Florida during the summer, most of the thunderstorm development is forced by boundary layer processes. The basic premise is that the life cycle of convection is reflected in the surface wind field beneath these storms. Therefore the monitoring of the local surface divergence and/or convergence fields can be used to determine timing, location, longevity, and the lightning hazards which accompany these thunderstorms. This study evaluates four years of monitoring thunderstorm development using surface wind convergence, particularly the average over the area. Cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning is related in time and space with surface convergence for 346 days during the summers of 1987 through 1990 over the expanded wind network at KSC. The relationships are subdivided according to low level wind flow and midlevel moisture patterns. Results show a one in three chance of CG lightning when a convergence event is identified. However, when there is no convergence, the chance of CG lightning is negligible.

Watson, Andrew I.; Holle, Ronald L.; Lopez, Raul E.; Nicholson, James R.

1991-01-01

348

A Conservation Strategy for the Florida Scrub-Jay on John F. Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge: An Initial Scientific Basis for Recovery  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Florida Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens) is an indicator of ecosystem integrity of Florida scrub, an endangered ecosystem that requires frequent fire. One of the largest populations of this federally threatened species occurs on John F. Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. Population trends were predicted using population modeling and field data on reproduction and survival of Florida Scrub-Jays collected from 1988 - 1995. Analyses of historical photography indicated that habitat suitability has been declining for 30 years. Field data and computer simulations suggested that the population declined by at least 40% and will decline by another 40% in 1 0 years, if habitat management is not greatly intensified. Data and computer simulations suggest that habitat suitability cannot deviate greatly from optimal for the jay population to persist. Landscape trajectories of vegetation structure, responsible for declining habitat suitability, are associated with the disruption of natural fire regimes. Prescribed fire alone can not reverse the trajectories. A recovery strategy was developed, based on studies of Florida Scrub-Jays and scrub vegetation. A reserve design was formulated based on conservation science principles for scrub ecosystems. The strategy emphasizes frequent fire to restore habitat, but includes mechanical tree cutting for severely degraded areas. Pine thinning across large areas can produce rapid increases in habitat quality. Site-specific strategies will need to be developed, monitored, and modified to achieve conditions suitable for population persistence.

Breininger, D. R.; Larson, V. L.; Schaub, R.; Duncan, B. W.; Schmalzer, P. A.; Oddy, D. M.; Smith, R. B.; Adrian, F.; Hill, H., Jr.

1996-01-01

349

Objective Lightning Forecasting at Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station using Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System Data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) at Cape Canaveral Air-Force Station (CCAFS)ln Florida issues a probability of lightning occurrence in their daily 24-hour and weekly planning forecasts. This information is used for general planning of operations at CCAFS and Kennedy Space Center (KSC). These facilities are located in east-central Florida at the east end of a corridor known as 'Lightning Alley', an indication that lightning has a large impact on space-lift operations. Much of the current lightning probability forecast is based on a subjective analysis of model and observational data and an objective forecast tool developed over 30 years ago. The 45 WS requested that a new lightning probability forecast tool based on statistical analysis of more recent historical warm season (May-September) data be developed in order to increase the objectivity of the daily thunderstorm probability forecast. The resulting tool is a set of statistical lightning forecast equations, one for each month of the warm season, that provide a lightning occurrence probability for the day by 1100 UTC (0700 EDT) during the warm season.

Lambert, Winfred; Wheeler, Mark; Roeder, William

2005-01-01

350

Examination of metals from aerospace-related activity in surface water samples from sites surrounding the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida.  

PubMed

Metal contamination from Space Shuttle launch activity was examined using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy in a two-tier study sampling surface water collected from several sites at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and associated Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge in east central Florida. The primary study examined both temporal changes in baseline metal concentrations (19 metals) in surface water (1996 to 2009, 11 sites) samples collected at specific long-term monitoring sites and metal deposition directly associated with Space Shuttle launch activity at two Launch Complexes (LC39A and LC39B). A secondary study examined metal concentrations at additional sites and increased the amount of elements measured to 48 elements. Our examination places a heavy focus on those metals commonly associated with launch operations (e.g., Al, Fe, Mn, and Zn), but a brief discussion of other metals (As, Cu, Mo, Ni, and Pb) is also included. While no observable accumulation of metals occurred during the time period of the study, the data obtained postlaunch demonstrated a dramatic increase for Al, Fe, Mn, and Zn. Comparing overall trends between the primary and secondary baseline surface water concentrations, elevated concentrations were generally observed at sampling stations located near the launch complexes and from sites isolated from major water systems. While there could be several natural and anthropogenic sources for metal deposition at KSC, the data in this report indicate that shuttle launch events are a significant source. PMID:24738662

Bowden, John A; Cantu, Theresa M; Scheidt, Douglas M; Lowers, Russell H; Nocito, Brian A; Young, Vaneica Y; Guillette, Louis J

2014-05-01

351

Feasibility study for measurement of insulation compaction in the cryogenic rocket fuel storage tanks at Kennedy Space Center by fast/thermal neutron techniques  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The liquid hydrogen and oxygen cryogenic storage tanks at John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) use expanded perlite as thermal insulation. Some of the perlite may have compacted over time, compromising the thermal performance and also the structural integrity of the tanks. Neutrons can readily penetrate through the 1.75 cm outer steel shell and through the entire 120 cm thick perlite zone. Neutrons interactions with materials produce characteristic gamma rays which are then detected. In compacted perlite the count rates in the individual peaks in the gamma ray spectrum will increase. Portable neutron generators can produce neutron simultaneous fluxes in two energy ranges: fast (14 MeV) and thermal (25 meV). Fast neutrons produce gamma rays by inelastic scattering which is sensitive to Si, Al, Fe and O. Thermal neutrons produce gamma rays by radiative capture in prompt gamma neutron activation (PGNA), which is sensitive to Si, Al, Na, K and H among others. The results of computer simulations using the software MCNP and measurements on a test article suggest that the most promising approach would be to operate the system in time-of-flight mode by pulsing the neutron generator and observing the subsequent die away curve in the PGNA signal.

Livingston, R. A.; Schweitzer, J. S.; Parsons, A. M.; Arens, E. E.

2014-02-01

352

Role of androgen receptor polyQ chain elongation in Kennedy's disease and use of natural osmolytes as potential therapeutic targets.  

PubMed

Instability of CAG triplet repeat encoding polyglutamine (polyQ) stretches in the gene for target protein has been implicated as a putative mechanism in several inherited neurodegenerative diseases. Expansion of polyQ chain length in the androgen receptor (AR) causes spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) or Kennedy's disease. Although the mechanisms underlying gain-of-neurotoxic function are not completely understood, suggested pathological mechanisms of SBMA involve the formation of AR nuclear and cytoplasmic aggregates, a characteristic feature of patients with SBMA. The fact that certain AR coactivators are sequestered into the nuclear inclusions in SBMA possibly through protein-protein interactions supports the notion that AR transcriptional dysregulation may be a potential pathological mechanism leading to SBMA. AR conformational states associated with aberrant polyQ tract also modulate the interaction of AR with several coactivators. In many cases, such diseases can be treated through protein replacement therapy; however, because recombinant proteins do not cross the blood-brain barrier, the effectiveness of such therapies is limited in case of neurodegenerative diseases that warrant alternative therapeutic approaches. Among different approaches, inhibiting protein aggregation with small molecules that can stimulate protein folding and reverse aggregation are the most promising ones. Thus, naturally occurring osmolytes or "chemical chaperones" that can easily cross the blood-brain barrier and stabilize the functional form of a mutated protein by shifting the folding equilibrium away from degradation and/or aggregation is a useful therapeutic approach. In this review, we discuss the role of polyQ chain length extension in the pathophysiology of SBMA and the use of osmolytes as potential therapeutic tool. PMID:23024039

Kumar, Raj

2012-11-01

353

Kathleen F. McCoy 1 Kathleen F. McCoy  

E-print Network

Science and Engineering Laboratories, University of Delaware and the duPont Hospital for Children and the A.I.duPont Institute (on sabbatical from Department of Computer and Information Sciences). #12

McCoy, Kathleen F.

354

Home > Editorials & Opinions > Bud Kennedy BUD KENNEDY RSS Mobile Newsletters  

E-print Network

those roots and is newly anointed "The American Dream City." Arlington's new slogan repositions the old success and opportunity for all. "Arlington really hasn't had a brand," said Jay Warren, the city sports capital of America." The new slogan and video reposition Arlington for the next round of reporters

Chiao, Jung-Chih

355

Objective Lightning Forecasting at Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Force Station using Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System Data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) forecasters at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) in Florida include a probability of thunderstorm occurrence in their daily morning briefings. This information is used by personnel involved in determining the possibility of violating Launch Commit Criteria, evaluating Flight Rules for the Space Shuttle, and daily planning for ground operation activities on Kennedy Space Center (KSC)/CCAFS. Much of the current lightning probability forecast is based on a subjective analysis of model and observational data. The forecasters requested that a lightning probability forecast tool based on statistical analysis of historical warm-season (May - September) data be developed in order to increase the objectivity of the daily thunderstorm probability forecast. The tool is a set of statistical lightning forecast equations that provide a lightning occurrence probability for the day by 1100 UTC (0700 EDT) during the warm season. This study used 15 years (1989-2003) of warm season data to develop the objective forecast equations. The local CCAFS 1000 UTC sounding was used to calculate stability parameters for equation predictors. The Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS) data were used to determine lightning occurrence for each day. The CGLSS data have been found to be more reliable indicators of lightning in the area than surface observations through local informal analyses. This work was based on the results from two earlier research projects. Everitt (1999) used surface observations and rawinsonde data to develop logistic regression equations that forecast the daily thunderstorm probability at CCAFS. The Everitt (1999) equations showed an improvement in skill over the Neumann-Pfeffer thunderstorm index (Neumann 1971), which uses multiple linear regression, and also persistence and climatology forecasts. Lericos et al. (2002) developed lightning distributions over the Florida peninsula based on specific flow regimes. The flow regimes were inferred from the average wind direction in the 1000-700 mb layer at Miami (MIA), Tampa (TBW), and Jacksonville (JAX), Florida, and the lightning data were from the National Lightning Detection Network. The results suggested that the daily flow regime may be an important predictor of lightning occurrence on KSC/CCAFS.

Lambert, Winifred; Wheeler, Mark

2004-01-01

356

TESTIMONY OF DAVID M. KENNEDY  

E-print Network

, such as coral reefs. Many of these habitats serve as the basis of marine ecosystems and are critical in or ingestion of marine debris. It can scour, break, smother, or otherwise damage important marine habitat

357

Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute  

E-print Network

not only make life difficult for people who have autism, but also take a toll on their families the information needed to "build" a person. Genes are hereditary, meaning parents pass genes on to their children inappropriate ways, or having very specific and inflexible ways of arranging items People with autism might have

Rau, Don C.

358

Kennedy Space Center: Swamp Works  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

When I began my internship with the Granular Mechanics and Regolith Operations laboratory (GMRO), also known as Swamp Works, I was given the unique opportunity to shadow many teams working on various projects, and decide what projects I wanted to take part in. Before I go into details of my experiences at Swamp Works, I would like to take a moment to explain what I discovered Swamp Works to be. Swamp Works is a family of hardworking, dedicated, and driven people from various backgrounds and skill sets. These people all work to advance technologies and make science fiction science fact through means of rapid prototyping. They support and encourage failure as an option when learning new things, as long as lesson learned from said failure. In fact, their motto states "Fail, Fast, Forward." What this means is, not if but when one fails he or she must do so quickly and spring forward from the failure so that his or her progress is not delayed. With this acceptance, it provided me the confidence to dive into a multitude of projects working in various fields and with a wide range of skill sets. The first project I joined was Badger. My motivation for taking on this project was the opportunity I would have to obtain valuable experience working with 3D modeling and 3D printing technologies. Badger was a digging apparatus to be used in a highly dusty environment in a material known as Regolith. Regolith is a scientific term for the dirt or top soil found on planetary bodies. Regolith contains a large quantity of sediments less than lOppm and as a result poses a challenge of keeping it out of any cracks and crevices. Furthermore, regolith can create high levels of electrostatic energy, which can prove damaging to sensitive electrical hardware. With these characteristics in mind, I decided to take on the task of designing and manufacturing a dust proof cover for the sensitive electrical hardware. When I began this project, I did not have the slightest idea as to how to use 3D modeling software or a means of manufacturing a viable product. As I went along with variants of the design, I became very proficient with a 3D modeling program known as CREO 2.0. Upon completion of my 3D design, I then had the task of manufacturing and having, in my hands, a usable model. To do this I had to work with additive printing technologies also known as 3D printing. Through my experiences working with Badger, I realized that 3D modeling is the focal point in much of engineering. With this in mind, I have embraced this fact and decided to further my experience with this software so that I may become a more valuable asset to any firm later in my career. Mid-way through work with Badger, I picked up another project in which I found much interest. I ha the opportunity to work side by side with a materials and composites guru in manufacturing carbon composite coupons (test strips) for performing stress, strain, and sheer analysis on. Being from a surfing, kiteboarding, and other water sport background I have always been interested in board design. With this in mind, it is no wonder why I found interest in such a project. I had the opportunity to refine Mold preparatory, composite layup, and composite curing techniques. Following manufacturing of these composite strips, I then performed various stress tests and logged my results. With these results, future teams could create lighter, stronger, and more cost effective composite structures for use in varieties of applications. After my experiences with materials and composites testing, I have obtained crucial appreciation for detailed documentation and analysis that material sciences involve. However, as interesting as composite materials testing has been, I do not feel this is where my future career lies. Another, more on the side, project I have been involved in is building a 626 cubic foot regolith containment chamber for doing full scale testing of robotic systems. This chamber is built of high strength aluminum scaffold materials, 80/20, and massive panels of Lexan. Once the chamber is complete

DeFilippo, Anthony Robert

2013-01-01

359

WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF DAVID KENNEDY  

E-print Network

ON INSULAR AFFAIRS, OCEANS, AND WILDLIFE COMMITTEE ON NATURAL RESOURCES U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES October to manage and conserve ocean and coastal resources, NOAA's Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management development with environmental conservation and manage ocean and coastal resources for the benefit of current

360

Statistical Analysis of Model Data for Operational Space Launch Weather Support at Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The 12-km resolution North American Mesoscale (NAM) model (MesoNAM) is used by the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) Launch Weather Officers at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) to support space launch weather operations. The 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit to conduct an objective statistics-based analysis of MesoNAM output compared to wind tower mesonet observations and then develop a an operational tool to display the results. The National Centers for Environmental Prediction began running the current version of the MesoNAM in mid-August 2006. The period of record for the dataset was 1 September 2006 - 31 January 2010. The AMU evaluated MesoNAM hourly forecasts from 0 to 84 hours based on model initialization times of 00, 06, 12 and 18 UTC. The MesoNAM forecast winds, temperature and dew point were compared to the observed values of these parameters from the sensors in the KSC/CCAFS wind tower network. The data sets were stratified by model initialization time, month and onshore/offshore flow for each wind tower. Statistics computed included bias (mean difference), standard deviation of the bias, root mean square error (RMSE) and a hypothesis test for bias = O. Twelve wind towers located in close proximity to key launch complexes were used for the statistical analysis with the sensors on the towers positioned at varying heights to include 6 ft, 30 ft, 54 ft, 60 ft, 90 ft, 162 ft, 204 ft and 230 ft depending on the launch vehicle and associated weather launch commit criteria being evaluated. These twelve wind towers support activities for the Space Shuttle (launch and landing), Delta IV, Atlas V and Falcon 9 launch vehicles. For all twelve towers, the results indicate a diurnal signal in the bias of temperature (T) and weaker but discernable diurnal signal in the bias of dewpoint temperature (T(sub d)) in the MesoNAM forecasts. Also, the standard deviation of the bias and RMSE of T, T(sub d), wind speed and wind direction indicated the model error increased with the forecast period all four parameters. The hypothesis testing uses statistics to determine the probability that a given hypothesis is true. The goal of using the hypothesis test was to determine if the model bias of any of the parameters assessed throughout the model forecast period was statistically zero. For th is dataset, if this test produced a value >= -1 .96 or <= 1.96 for a data point, then the bias at that point was effectively zero and the model forecast for that point was considered to have no error. A graphical user interface (GUI) was developed so the 45 WS would have an operational tool at their disposal that would be easy to navigate among the multiple stratifications of information to include tower locations, month, model initialization times, sensor heights and onshore/offshore flow. The AMU developed the GUI using HyperText Markup Language (HTML) so the tool could be used in most popular web browsers with computers running different operating systems such as Microsoft Windows and Linux.

Bauman, William H., III

2010-01-01

361

KATHLEEN MCGUIRE Cancer biology of human T cells  

E-print Network

-cell Leukemia Virus, HTLV-1, is the etiologic agent of Adult T cell Leukemia Lymphoma or ATL. This virus has ATF-2 which appears to be active in HTLV-1 infected cells, may be responsible for the transformed-2 in HTLV- 1-mediated carcinogenesis. Interleukin 2 (IL-2) stimulation of primary and HTLV-1

Segall, Anca

362

________________________________________________________________________The MIND Institute__________________ Kathleen Angkustsiri, M.D.  

E-print Network

are Related to Panic/Agoraphobia symptoms in children with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome/VCFS. Poster in neurodevelopmental disorders including autism spectrum disorders, chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS in children with autism spectrum disorders, behavioral characteristics of children with 22q11.2DS

Nguyen, Danh

363

Intra-organizational Computation and Complexity Kathleen M. Carley  

E-print Network

for organizational theory. To increase the specificity and value of our theories we will need to take into account are networks, and information technology plays a key role as an interactive agents. #12;Intra-organizational from the level of specificity and predictive richness that is necessary for organizational theory

Sadeh, Norman M.

364

Information Security: The Human Perspective Kathleen M. Carley  

E-print Network

and draws on recent research in information systems, organizational theory, sociology, social psychology resource records, and organizational accounting information. Recent cases of industrial espionage all point of the new program in information security at the Heinz School, a new course - "Organizational Management

Sadeh, Norman M.

365

Estimating Vulnerabilities in Large Covert Networks Kathleen M. Carley  

E-print Network

by the Office of Naval Research (ONR), United States Navy Grant No. N00014-02-10973 on Dynamic Network Analysis the direction of Bill Vaughn. Additional support was provided by the DOD and NSF MKIDS program. #12;1 Estimating" in the network. To an extent, this is right. However, it belies the difficulty of "connecting the dots" in terms

Sadeh, Norman M.

366

KATHLEEN WU 228 Devonshire Lane, Madison, CT, 06443 (203) 671-6704 kathleen.wu@yale.edu  

E-print Network

samples to determine sugar (HPLC-RI) and organic acid (HPLC-UV) concentrations Pfefferle Lab, Research Office Suite (Intermediate), C++ (Working knowledge) Lab Analysis: FT-IR, 1 H NMR, HPLC, Temperature

Firoozabadi, Abbas

367

Preventing the First Cesarean Delivery: Summary of a Joint Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, and American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Workshop  

PubMed Central

With over one-third of pregnancies in the United States being delivered by cesarean and the growing knowledge of morbidities associated with repeat cesarean deliveries, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists convened a workshop to address the concept of preventing the first cesarean. The available information on maternal and fetal factors, labor management and induction, and non-medical factors leading to the first cesarean were reviewed as well as the implications of the first cesarean on future reproductive health. Key points were identified to assist with reduction in cesarean rates including that labor induction should be performed primarily for medical indication; if done for non-medical indications, the gestational age should be at least 39 weeks or more and the cervix should be favorable, especially in the nulliparous patient. Review of the current literature demonstrates the importance of adhering to appropriate definitions for failed induction and arrest of labor progress. The diagnosis of “failed induction” should only be made after an adequate attempt. Adequate time for normal latent and active phases of the first stage, and for the second stage, should be allowed, as long as the maternal and fetal conditions permit. The adequate time for each of these stages appears to be longer than traditionally estimated. Operative vaginal delivery is an acceptable birth method when indicated, and can safely prevent cesarean delivery. Given the progressively declining use, it is critical that training and experience in operative vaginal delivery is facilitated and encouraged. When discussing the first cesarean with a patient, counseling should include its effect on future reproductive health. PMID:23090537

Spong, Catherine Y.; Berghella, Vincenzo; Wenstrom, Katharine D.; Mercer, Brian M.; Saade, George R.

2012-01-01

368

Evaluation of the Performance Characteristics of the CGLSS and NLDN Systems Based on Two Years of Ground-Truth Data from Launch Complex 39B, Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

From May 2011 through July 2013, the lightning instrumentation at Launch Complex 39B (LC39B) at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, has obtained high-speed video records and field change waveforms (dE/dt and three-axis dH/dt) for 54 negative polarity return strokes whose strike termination locations and times are known with accuracy of the order of 10 m or less and 1 µs, respectively. A total of 18 strokes terminated directly to the LC39B lighting protection system (LPS), which contains three 181 m towers in a triangular configuration, an overhead catenary wire system on insulating masts, and nine down conductors. An additional 9 strokes terminated on the 106 m lightning protection mast of Launch Complex 39A (LC39A), which is located about 2.7 km southeast of LC39B. The remaining 27 return strokes struck either on the ground or attached to low-elevation grounded objects within about 500 m of the LC39B LPS. Leader/return stroke sequences were imaged at 3200 frames/sec by a network of six Phantom V310 high-speed video cameras. Each of the three towers on LC39B had two high-speed cameras installed at the 147 m level with overlapping fields of view of the center of the pad. The locations of the strike points of 54 return strokes have been compared to time-correlated reports of the Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS) and the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN), and the results of this comparison will be presented and discussed.

Mata, Carlos T.; Hill, Jonathan D.; Mata, Angel G.; Cummins, Kenneth L.

2014-01-01

369

The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program: Fisheries  

E-print Network

Aquaculture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Habitat Aquaculture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Habitat Aquaculture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 VI. COMPLETED

370

The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program: Fisheries  

E-print Network

Aquaculture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Habitat Aquaculture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Habitat Quality and Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Aquaculture

371

The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program: Fisheries  

E-print Network

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Aquaculture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Aquaculture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Aquaculture

372

Educational quotients : Robert F. Kennedy Middle School  

E-print Network

When architects talk of 'smart buildings' they are usually referring to the same old ones with the addition of simple prosthetics such as light sensors and small electric motors. Their smartness is invariably limited to ...

Kim, Paul Hyun, 1971-

2002-01-01

373

Every five years, the Kennedy Center  

E-print Network

) to be supported as one of fourteen national Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities Research Centers been renewed for 2004-2009. The Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities Research Training and editor of The American Journal on Mental Retardation, talks by graduates, and a look back on the historic

Sarkar, Nilanjan

374

Kennedy Space Center ITC-1 Internship Overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As an intern for Priscilla Elfrey in the ITC-1 department, I was involved in many activities that have helped me to develop many new skills. I supported four different projects during my internship, which included the Center for Life Cycle Design (CfLCD), SISO Space Interoperability Smackdown, RTI Teacher Mentor Program, and the Discrete Event Simulation Integrated Visualization Environment Team (DIVE). I provided the CfLCD with web based research on cyber security initiatives involving simulation, education for young children, cloud computing, Otronicon, and Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education initiatives. I also attended STEM meetings regarding simulation courses, and educational course enhancements. To further improve the SISO Simulation event, I provided observation feedback to the technical advisory board. I also helped to set up a chat federation for HLA. The third project involved the RTI Teacher Mentor program, which I helped to organize. Last, but not least, I worked with the DIVE team to develop new software to help visualize discrete event simulations. All of these projects have provided experience on an interdisciplinary level ranging from speech and communication to solving complex problems using math and science.

Ni, Marcus

2011-01-01

375

Black Feminist Politics from Kennedy to Clinton  

Microsoft Academic Search

Taking an interdisciplinary approach, this book analyzes Black women's involvement in American political life, focusing on what they did to gain political power between 1961 and 2001, and why, in many cases, they did not succeed. Harris demonstrates that Black women have tried to gain centrality through their participation in Presidential Commissions, Black feminist organizations, theatrical productions, film adaptations of

Duchess Harris

2009-01-01

376

Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Mishap Response Plan  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KSC Medical Operations, in exercising the KSC Psychological Triage Plan, provided crewmember family support following notification of the Columbia accident. KSC Medical Operations also provided field support in working with FEMA and EPA to assure adequate occupational medicine and environmental health care of KSC workers. In addition, the development of policy and procedures for handling and clearing biohazardous debris material in the KSC reconstruction hangar was prepared and implemented.

Scarpa, Philip

2005-01-01

377

IMPACT | Research from Harvard Kennedy School 79 John F. Kennedy Street  

E-print Network

that are authentic to their own personality and that fit the norms and culture of their organizational environment's team leader. This enabled her to leverage the social capital of a higher status organizational actor, but it also framed her as embedded in mutually support- ive organizational relationships." "What

378

Solutions Remediate Contaminated Groundwater  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the Apollo Program, NASA workers used chlorinated solvents to clean rocket engine components at launch sites. These solvents, known as dense non-aqueous phase liquids, had contaminated launch facilities to the point of near-irreparability. Dr. Jacqueline Quinn and Dr. Kathleen Brooks Loftin of Kennedy Space Center partnered with researchers from the University of Central Florida's chemistry and engineering programs to develop technology capable of remediating the area without great cost or further environmental damage. They called the new invention Emulsified Zero-Valent Iron (EZVI). The groundwater remediation compound is cleaning up polluted areas all around the world and is, to date, NASA's most licensed technology.

2010-01-01

379

QUALITY OF OCR FOR DEGRADED TEXT IMAGES Roger T. Hartley, Kathleen Crumpton  

E-print Network

physical degradation. 2. the original was produced on a manual typewriter, so the individual characters can show variations in pressure and position. 3. the original is a carbon copy produced on a typewriter. 4

Hartley, Roger

380

VViirrggiinniiaa 44--HH FFaasshhiioonn RReevvuuee//CCllootthhiinngg RReeccoorrdd Specialist: Kathleen Jamison, Authors: Pat Bathe, & Betsy Campbell*  

E-print Network

date Age as of September 30 of the current 4-H year Phone County/City Extension District Years in 4-H Years in Clothing Projects Years in Fashion Revue 4-H Clothing and Textile Project currently enrolled in PUBLICATION 346-1472003 18 USC 707 *Extension Specialist, 4-H Youth Development, Virginia Tech; 4-H Volunteer

Liskiewicz, Maciej

381

Assessment of Undergraduate Research Linda Rueckert (Northeastern Illinois University) and Kathleen Morgan (Wheaton College MA)  

E-print Network

information literacy among undergraduates: A discussion of the literature and the University of California Teachers. San Franscisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Publ. Astin, A.W., Banta, T.W., Cross, K.P., El-Khwas, E., Ewell

382

Kathleen Mears Memorial Lecture: personal accountability: your key to survival in health care reform.  

PubMed

Over the past thirty years the rising cost of healthcare has produced changes in reimbursement strategies. Continually, pressures are placed on the practitioners to reduce the length of the patient hospital stay and provide services in a high quality, risk free, cost effective manner. Following the implementation of diagnostic related groups (DRGs) in the 1980s and Managed Care in the 1990s we are now faced with embracing and surviving the Affordable Health Care Act-H.R.3590 (HHS 2013) that is linking reimbursement to quality outcomes. In short, financial constraints in the funding of health care will once more alter the patterns of delivery and challenge the practitioners to maintain superior care. As Neurodiagnostic Professionals this new reform offers another opportunity to review our process of care and the Neurodiagnostic labs role in the delivery of healthcare. For success, close examination of routine workflows, recognizing and solving existing delivery limitations, developing team care coordination, and increasing the neurodiagnostic professionals profile within the work environment will be required. Embracing your role in this overall process will most likely demand more paperwork, changing protocols, learning and implementing new policies, accepting new work schedules, implementing new quality standards, and pursuing additional education or credentials. Unlike never before more emphasis will be placed on measuring and reporting on the quality of the care we deliver in our labs, intensive care units, and operating rooms. PMID:25351032

Galloway, Sabrina G

2014-09-01

383

Taking Time to Structure Discourse: Pronoun Generation Beyond Accessibility Kathleen F. McCoy  

E-print Network

was sufficiently accessible so as to make its resolution easy. We found that such an explanation does not seem to gener- ating coherent discourses. While there has been some work on generating appropriate referring to a discourse entity that is highly prominent (accessible). How- ever, a study of naturally occurring texts

McCoy, Kathleen F.

384

15. COLLOCATIONS Kathleen R. McKeown and Dragomir R. Radev  

E-print Network

during the process of word selection. In this chapter, we first overview the linguistic and lexicographic University, New York {kathy,radev}@cs.columbia.edu This chapter describes a class of word groups that lies between idioms and free word combinations. Idiomatic expressions are those in which the semantics

Radev, Dragomir R.

385

Kathleen M. Smits, Ph.D., P.E. Colorado School of Mines  

E-print Network

Force Base, VA F/A-22 Fighter Aircraft Liaison and Project Engineer, Captain, U.S Air Force - Dec 2001 Base Weapons Safety Award of the year 2003 F/A-22 Site Activation Task Force (SATAF) semi-annual award at Austin (1999-2000) Masters of Science, Civil Engineering ­ Water Resources focus United States Air Force

386

Kathleen M. Smits, Ph.D., P.E. Colorado School of Mines  

E-print Network

soil through integrated modeling of atmospheric boundary layer and shallow subsurface. Water Resour different atmospheric boundary conditions. Water Resour Res., in review. Sakaki, T., K. M. Smits, 2014

387

A review of "Protestant Autobiography in the Seventeenth Century Anglophone World" by Kathleen Lynch  

E-print Network

;#28;#19;#29; con?icted relationship with the politics of conversion. Lynch consid- ers two dierent kinds of conversions (from one church to another, and from life to death) in her reading of Donne?s Pseudo-Martyr (#16; #17;#12;) and Devotions upon Emergent...

Wells, Marion A.

2013-01-01

388

Kathleen M. Smits, Ph.D., P.E. Colorado School of Mines  

E-print Network

, Colorado School of Mines 2008 Outstanding Student Paper Award in Hydrology, AGU Fall Meeting 2007 Base Weapons Safety Award of the year 2003 F/A-22 Site Activation Task Force (SATAF) semi-annual award of American Geophysical Union (AGU), American Society of Civil Engineer (ASCE), Society of American Military

389

PULCE Pad: Pressure Ulcer Detection System Sivaranjani Balan, Kathleen Bates, Stacey Lee, Zeinab Mohamed  

E-print Network

Clinical Need Description of Market Pressure ulcers, more commonly known as bedsores, develop due to local this from being an effective method of detection. PULCE uses temperature and pressure changes associated were estimated assuming 1000 pads would be manufactured. The product costs do not include labor costs

McGaughey, Alan

390

View of Kennedy Plaza, Burnside Park & Financial District  

Microsoft Academic Search

According to Jordy, Walker and Gillette’s Industrial National Bank Building (1926-8) is still Providence’s finest skyscraper as it is a “superbly Art Deco culmination of the Providence skyline in a major example of a setback.” Though stepped buildings in New York City had been architects' solution for Manhattan's strict zoning regarding adequate light and air, facing no such restrictions in

Chet Smolski; Howard Ben Tre

1994-01-01

391

From Kennedy, to Beyond: Growing Plants in Space  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronauts cannot have their cake and eat it too, but what about growing a salad and eating it? As NASA continues to push the envelope on Space exploration and inhabitance the need for a fresh food source becomes more vital. The Life Support team at NASA is using a system developed by ORBITEC the VEGGIE, in which astronauts aboard the ISS, and potentially the Moon and Mars, will be capable of growing food. The introduction of plants not only gives astronauts a means of independently supplying food, but also recreation, oxygen replenishment and psychological benefits. The plants were grown in "pillows", the system used for growing plants within the VEGGIE. This test included 4 types of media mixtures that are composed of a clay based media called Arcilite and Fafard #2, which is a peat moss-based media ( <1 mm Arcilite, 1-2 mm of Arcilite, 1:1 <1 mm & 1-2 mm mixture and 1:1 Arcilite & Fafard mixture). Currently, 3 lettuce cultivars are being grown in 4 mixtures of media. Tests were being conducted to see which form of media has the ratio of best growth and least amount of microbes that are harmful. That is essential because a person's body becomes more susceptible to illness when they leave Earth. As a result, test must be conducted on the "pillow" system to assess the levels of microbial activity. The cultivars were tested at different stages during their growing process for microbes. Datum show that the mix of Fafard and Arcilite had the best growth, but also the most microbes. This was due to the fact that Fafard is an organic substance so it contains material necessary for microbes to live. Data suggest that the <1 mm Arcilite has an acceptable amount of growth and a lower level of microbes, because it is non-organic.

Flemming, Cedric, II; Seck, Sokhana A.; Massa, Gioia D.; Hummerick, Mary E.; Wheeler, Raymond

2012-01-01

392

Research and technology at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Cryogenic engineering, hypergolic engineering, hazardous warning, structures and mechanics, computer sciences, communications, meteorology, technology applications, safety engineering, materials analysis, biomedicine, and engineering management and training aids research are reviewed.

1983-01-01

393

John F. Kennedy School of Government Harvard University  

E-print Network

. The project seeks to disseminate policy-relevant information on how to align science and technology missions growth. First, advances in science and technology worldwide offer African countries new tools needed is to review major advances in science, technology and engineering and identify their potential for use

Kammen, Daniel M.

394

Conversion: Kennedy Plan to Change Research Priorities Approved  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the main import of Senate Bill 32 which includes measures to assist the retraining and employment of scientists and engineers and broadens the purposes of the National Science Foundation by creating the Civil Science Systems Administration. (AL)

Shapley, Deborah

1972-01-01

395

John F. Kennedy Space Center's Wireless Hang Angle Instrumentation System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The technology is a high-precision, wireless inclinometer. The system was designed for monitoring the suspension angle of the Orbiter vehicle during loading onto the Solid Rocket Boosters of the Space Shuttle. Originally, operators manually measured the alignment of the Orbiter with a hand-held inclinometer on a nonrigid surface. The measurement was open to interpretation by the loader. If the Orbiter is misaligned, it can crush ball joints and delay the loading while repairs are made. With this system, the Orbiter can be loaded without damage and without manual measurement.

Kohler, Jeff

2009-01-01

396

Kennedy Educate to Innovate (KETI) Microgravity Powerpoint Presentation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of this presentation is to define and explain microgravity and show how microgravity can help students learn about the phenomena of the world. The presentation is designed to provide teachers of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics at many levels with a foundation in microgravity science and applications.

2011-01-01

397

Memorandum about the First Nixon-Kennedy Debate  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

On the morning of September 1, 1960, Herb Klein and Pierre Salinger met in the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, D.C., to discuss the details of what would be the first televised presidential debate. Klein was press secretary for Republican candidate Vice President Richard Nixon and Salinger was press secretary for Democratic candidate Senator John…

Rosenbaum, David L.

2010-01-01

398

Rocketry, Kennedy Educate to Innovate (KETI) PowerPoint Presentation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This is a series of lecture notes about rocketry aimed at a general audience. It reviews some of the basic physics, briefly discussing Newton's Laws of motion and how they relate to rocketry, and the history of rocketry. The two basic types of rockets are discussed. Lastly, the occupations that are available in rocketry are reviewed.

Davila, Dina

2010-01-01

399

In the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space  

E-print Network

. The external tank carries the fuel that will be used by a trio of space shuttle main engines to lift Atlantis into orbit for its STS-125 mission. All three of the main engines were tested at NASA's John C. Stennis Space was tested March 26, 2004. The engines will burn for eight and one-half minutes as Atlantis roars into space

400

Small-fiber involvement in spinobulbar muscular atrophy (Kennedy's disease).  

PubMed

We assessed the involvement of cutaneous innervation in two subjects with a molecularly confirmed diagnosis of spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) using antidromic nerve conduction studies, quantitative sensory testing, and sweat tests, as well as immunohistochemical techniques and confocal microscopy of glabrous and hairy skin biopsy. Both patients showed a marked reduction in amplitude of sensory action potentials and moderate or severe abnormalities of tactile thresholds and mechanical pain perception. A severe reduction of sweat drops on the Silastic imprint test and a widespread loss of small myelinated and unmyelinated fibers in hairy skin were also observed. Fiber loss involved either somatic or autonomic fibers and did not show any distal-proximal gradient. These results, together with loss of Meissner corpuscles and their large myelinated afferent fibers in glabrous skin, confirmed the extensive involvement of sensory neurons of large and small size and revealed an autonomic skin denervation in SBMA. PMID:17691102

Manganelli, Fiore; Iodice, Valeria; Provitera, Vincenzo; Pisciotta, Chiara; Nolano, Maria; Perretti, Anna; Santoro, Lucio

2007-12-01

401

Bulbar and spinal muscular atrophy (Kennedy's disease): a review.  

PubMed

Bulbar and spinal muscular atrophy (BSMA) is an adult-onset, X-linked recessive trinucleotide, polyglutamine disorder, caused by expansion of a polymorphic CAG tandem-repeat in exon 1 of the androgen-receptor (AR) gene on chromosome Xq11-12. Pathogenetically, mutated AR accumulates in nuclei and cytoplasm of motor neurons, resulting in their degeneration and loss. Phenotypically, patients present with amyotrophic, proximal or distal weakness and wasting of the facial, bulbar and limb muscles, occasionally sensory disturbances, and endocrinologic disturbances, such as androgen resistance, gynecomastia, elevated testosterone or progesterone, and reduced fertility. There may be mild hyper-CK-emia, abnormal motor and sensory nerve conduction studies, and neuropathic and myopathic alterations on muscle biopsy. The golden standard for diagnosing BSMA is genetic analysis, demonstrating a CAG-repeat number >40. No causal therapy is available, but symptomatic therapy should be provided for tremor, endocrinologic abnormalities, sensory disturbances, or muscle cramps. The course is slowly progressive, the ability to walk lost only late in life, only few patients require ventilatory support, and life expectancy only slightly reduced. PMID:19405197

Finsterer, J

2009-05-01

402

CHRISTINA MARIE KENNEDY DEPARTMENT OF PLANT SCIENCES & LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE  

E-print Network

and extinction risk for fishes of the Sonoran Desert (Dr. William Fagan Lab). September 2003­September 2004 Environmental Law Institute (ELI), Washington, DC Science & Policy Analyst Supported Biodiversity, Wetlands

Fagan, William

403

September 2014 Vol. 1 No. 6 Kennedy Space Center's  

E-print Network

: No Earlier Than Sep. 19 -- 2:38 a.m. EDT Mission: SpaceX 4 Commercial Resupply Services flight with ISS-RapidScat Description: Launching from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., SpaceX-4 will deliver cargo and crew Description: Launching on an Antares rocket from Wallops Flight Facility, Orbital-3 will deliver cargo

404

Kennedy Educate to Innovate (KETI) Aeronautics PowerPoint Presentation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews some fundamental features of aeronautics. It is designed to introduce students to aeronautics and to engage them in Science Technology Education and Mathematics (STEM). It reviews the history of airflight, the aircraft components and their interaction with the forces that make flight possible (i.e. lift, weight drag and thrust), and the interaction of the components that create aircraft movements (roll, pitch and yaw)

Davila, Dina

2010-01-01

405

Chloride-Sensitive Fluorescent Indicators Chris D. Geddes, Kathleen Apperson, Jan Karolin, and David J. S. Birch1  

E-print Network

is the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis. Few diseases can be so readily diagnosed as cystic fibrosis, which , compared to non-cystic fibrosis patients, 40 mmol L 1 (2). Hence, chloride-sensitive fluorescence, there has been a shift toward genotype determination for cystic fibrosis (4). Previously, chloride

Strathclyde, University of

406

Four Current Meter Models Compared in Strong Currents in Drake Passage D. RANDOLPH WATTS, MAUREEN A. KENNELLY, KATHLEEN A. DONOHUE,  

E-print Network

Four Current Meter Models Compared in Strong Currents in Drake Passage D. RANDOLPH WATTS, MAUREEN A February 2013, in final form 11 June 2013) ABSTRACT Seven current meters representing four models: two vector-measuring current meters (VMCMs), two Aanderaa recording current meter (RCM) 11s, two

Rhode Island, University of

407

Identifying Important Features for Graph Retrieval Zhuo Li and Sandra Carberry and Hui Fang* and Kathleen F. McCoy  

E-print Network

Infographics, such as bar charts and line graphs, occur often in popular media and are a rich knowledge source the retrieval of information graphics. Our work is the first to directly tackle the retrieval of infographics are applied on a large set of features to develop several models for infographics retrieval. Evaluation

Carberry, Sandra

408

Trust, Protocol, Gender, and Power in Interwar British Biomedical Research: Kathleen Chevassut and the “Germ” of Multiple Sclerosis  

PubMed Central

In March 1930, reports of the discovery of an organism causative of multiple sclerosis circulated in the British press. At the same time, news of a therapeutically efficacious vaccine also reached the ears of neurologists and patients afflicted with the debilitating degenerative disease. It was soon shown that no organism had been discovered. The events leading up to this ultimately painful episode reveal many of the central problems created when social conventions and a sense of decorum scripted received understanding of good scientific practice rather than actual regulatory frameworks. In the absence of such frameworks, few means were present to censor inappropriate scientific conduct. This story thus provides a window into an emergent world of state-sponsored biomedical research; a world where recrimination, gossip, misogyny, uncertainty, exaggeration, and dreams and delusions of scientific and therapeutic progress were collapsed together. PMID:20478897

Casper, Stephen T.

2011-01-01

409

Error Profiling: Toward a Model of English Acquisition for Deaf Lisa N. Michaud and Kathleen F. McCoy  

E-print Network

at higher levels, this should provide insight into the order of acquisition of English grammatical forms. 1; Michaud et al., 2001). Its primary function is to tutor deaf students on their written English. EssentialError Profiling: Toward a Model of English Acquisition for Deaf Learners Lisa N. Michaud

McCoy, Kathleen F.

410

Propagation of Kuroshio Extension Meanders between 143 and 149E KAREN L. TRACEY, D. RANDOLPH WATTS, AND KATHLEEN A. DONOHUE  

E-print Network

wavelength ahead of the upper meander. Subsequently, as the upper and deep features moved past each otherPropagation of Kuroshio Extension Meanders between 143º and 149ºE KAREN L. TRACEY, D. RANDOLPH. Downstream-propagating meanders with periods of 3­60 days were always present between June 2004 and September

Rhode Island, University of

411

Modulation of Neuronal Activity by Glial Cells in the Retina Eric A. Newman and Kathleen R. Zahs  

E-print Network

, inhibitory neurotransmitter antagonists, as well as 6-Nitro-7-sulphamoylbenzo[f]quinoxaline-2,3-dione (NBQX of neuronal activity associated with glial Ca2 waves, suggesting that inhibition is mediated by inhibitory al., 1992). The waves can be initiated by mechanical stimuli or application of neurotransmitters

Newman, Eric A.

412

Arlington National Cemetery Website  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Despite the overly loud version of the Irish ditty, Kathleen Mavourneen, which greets visitors to this homepage, this site is an important resource of information about the Arlington National Cemetery. Developed and maintained by Michael Patterson (the son of a former United States Army officer), the site contains dozens of links to a number of thematic sections, including those that offer a detailed history of the grounds, and several nice sections on the various memorials located within Arlington. One particularly nice document available here is a 1929 history of the cemetery written by Enoch Aquila Chase. Other historical documents of note are also located on the site, including stereographic photographs of Arlington Cemetery and a National Geographic article on the Cemetery from 1928. The site also includes several nice audio selections from various persons buried on the grounds, including Robert F. Kennedy's remarks about the late Martin Luther King Jr. [KMG

2000-01-01

413

75 FR 54891 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...discussed will include data acquisition, data management, and informatics systems; and continued discussions regarding qualification...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and...

2010-09-09

414

Fog tests performed at Kennedy Space Center on Kodak film type 101-05  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Based on the tests which were conducted, the fogging exhibited by the Kodak 101-05 glass plates when used in the Skylab S-183 experiment carrousels is a chemical fog caused by an outgassing within the carrousel. Testing has not yet been able to determine which chemical causes the fog or just what can be done to eliminate the problem.

Weinstein, M. S.

1973-01-01

415

ADDITIONAL QUESTIONS BY SENATOR KENNEDY AND ANSWERS BY DR. JEFFREYHARRIS FORTHE WRITTEN RECORD  

E-print Network

in cigarette prices would be necessary, by itself, to reduce the percentage of underage smokers to the target-smoking campaign reduced the proportion of daily underage smokers to 16 percent, then a $1.15-per-pack increase

Seager, Sara

416

76 FR 13650 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: March 8, 2011. Jennifer S. Spaeth,...

2011-03-14

417

76 FR 20695 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: April 7, 2011. Jennifer S. Spaeth,...

2011-04-13

418

78 FR 21382 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: April 4, 2013. Michelle Trout, Program...

2013-04-10

419

77 FR 17080 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: March 19, 2012. Jennifer S. Spaeth,...

2012-03-23

420

77 FR 27468 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: May 4, 2012. Jennifer S. Spaeth, Director,...

2012-05-10

421

76 FR 64092 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: October 6, 2011. Jennifer S. Spaeth,...

2011-10-17

422

77 FR 8271 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: February 7, 2012. Jennifer S. Spaeth,...

2012-02-14

423

76 FR 69747 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Child Health and Human Development; Special Emphasis Panel; Infertility Treatment, Child Growth and Development to age Three Years...Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of...

2011-11-09

424

76 FR 19999 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: April 5, 2011. Jennifer S. Spaeth,...

2011-04-11

425

77 FR 24973 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: April 19, 2012. Jennifer S. Spaeth,...

2012-04-26

426

78 FR 33427 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: May 29, 2013. Michelle Trout, Program...

2013-06-04

427

77 FR 60447 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: September 27, 2012. Michelle Trout, Program...

2012-10-03

428

77 FR 29675 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD); Notice of...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment program, National Institutes of Health, HHS). [[Page 29676

2012-05-18

429

75 FR 62549 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: October 5, 2010. Jennifer S. Spaeth,...

2010-10-12

430

75 FR 21005 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: April 16, 2010. Jennifer Spaeth, Director,...

2010-04-22

431

76 FR 61720 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: September 28, 2011. Jennifer S. Spaeth,...

2011-10-05

432

76 FR 28995 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: May 13, 2011. Jennifer S. Spaeth, Director,...

2011-05-19

433

77 FR 12860 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: February 24, 2012. Jennifer S. Spaeth,...

2012-03-02

434

78 FR 66752 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS). Dated: October 31, 2013. Michelle Trout, Program...

2013-11-06

435

76 FR 59707 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: September 21, 2011. Jennifer S. Spaeth,...

2011-09-27

436

75 FR 5601 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: January 27, 2010. Jennifer Spaeth, Director,...

2010-02-03

437

76 FR 37133 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: June 20, 2011. Jennifer S. Spaeth,...

2011-06-24

438

77 FR 19677 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: March 26, 2012. Jennifer S. Spaeth,...

2012-04-02

439

76 FR 61719 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: September 28, 2011. Jennifer S. Spaeth,...

2011-10-05

440

78 FR 18998 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: March 22, 2013. Michelle Trout, Program...

2013-03-28

441

78 FR 17419 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: March 15, 2013. Michelle Trout, Program...

2013-03-21

442

76 FR 69746 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: November 3, 2011. Jennifer S. Spaeth,...

2011-11-09

443

76 FR 5593 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: January 25, 2011. Jennifer S. Spaeth,...

2011-02-01

444

77 FR 12599 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: February 22, 2012 . Jennifer S. Spaeth,...

2012-03-01

445

77 FR 34393 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: June 4, 2012. Jennifer S. Spaeth, Director,...

2012-06-11

446

75 FR 8974 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: February 19, 2010. Jennifer Spaeth,...

2010-02-26

447

77 FR 39712 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) [[Page 39713

2012-07-05

448

77 FR 19676 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: March 27, 2012. Jennifer S. Spaeth,...

2012-04-02

449

75 FR 36662 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: June 22, 2010. Jennifer Spaeth, Director,...

2010-06-28

450

76 FR 37821 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: June 20, 2011. Jennifer S. Spaeth,...

2011-06-28

451

75 FR 55807 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: September 8, 2010. Jennifer S. Spaeth,...

2010-09-14

452

77 FR 26020 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: April 26, 2012. Jennifer S. Spaeth,...

2012-05-02

453

76 FR 37132 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: June 20, 2011. Jennifer S. Spaeth,...

2011-06-24

454

75 FR 30046 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: May 24, 2010. Jennifer Spaeth, Director,...

2010-05-28

455

76 FR 71985 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: November 15, 2011. Jennifer S. Spaeth,...

2011-11-21

456

76 FR 30733 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: May 20, 2011. Jennifer S. Spaeth, Director,...

2011-05-26

457

77 FR 64817 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: October 17, 2012. Michelle Trout, Program...

2012-10-23

458

78 FR 12767 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: February 15, 2013. Michelle Trout, Program...

2013-02-25

459

76 FR 67469 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: October 26, 2011. Jennifer S. Spaeth,...

2011-11-01

460

76 FR 72957 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: November 17, 2011. Jennifer S. Spaeth,...

2011-11-28

461

77 FR 12604 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: February 17, 2012. Jennifer S. Spaeth,...

2012-03-01

462

75 FR 52763 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: August 23, 2010. Jennifer S. Spaeth,...

2010-08-27

463

75 FR 3741 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: January 14, 2010. Jennifer Spaeth, Director,...

2010-01-22

464

76 FR 26736 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: May 3, 2011. Jennifer S. Spaeth, Director,...

2011-05-09

465

76 FR 5594 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: January 25, 2011. Jennifer S. Spaeth,...

2011-02-01

466

75 FR 68366 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: November 1, 2010. Jennifer S. Spaeth,...

2010-11-05

467

77 FR 69641 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: November 14, 2012. Michelle Trout, Program...

2012-11-20

468

78 FR 37232 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...risk and epigenetic differences among children conceives by infertility. Date: July 1, 2013. Time: 1:00 p.m. to 5:00...Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of...

2013-06-20

469

78 FR 11660 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute Of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: February 12, 2013. Michelle Trout, Program...

2013-02-19

470

Stress Studies at Kennedy Space Center: a Backward and Forward Look  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Possible relationships between occupational and other stresses on ischemic heart disease are explored. Three procedures were used: (1) double master 2-step test, (2) dynamic ECG technique using avionics equipment, and (3) submaximal stress testing with Marco bicycle ergometer.

Decker, A. I.

1971-01-01

471

76 FR 20358 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; Folic Acid/Zinc Sulfate Supplementation, Semen Quality, and Ovulation Induction/IVF Outcomes. Date: April 12, 2011. Time: 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate concept review. [[Page...

2011-04-12

472

Concorde noise-induced building vibrations: John F. Kennedy International Airport  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Outdoor and indoor noise levels resulting from aircraft flyovers and certain nonaircraft events were recorded at eight homesites and a school along with the associated vibration levels in the walls, windows, and floors at these test sites. Limited subjective tests were conducted to examine the human detection and annoyance thresholds for building vibration and rattle caused by aircraft noise. Both vibration and rattle were detected subjectively in several houses for some operations of both the Concorde and subsonic aircraft. Seated subjects more readily detected floor vibrations than wall or window vibrations. Aircraft noise generally caused more window vibrations than common nonaircraft events such as walking and closing doors. Nonaircraft events and aircraft flyovers resulted in comparable wall vibration levels, while floor vibrations were generally greater for nonaircraft events than for aircraft flyovers. The relationship between structural vibration and aircraft noise is linear, with vibration levels being accurately predicted from overall sound pressure levels (OASPL) measured near the structure. Relatively high levels of structural vibration measured during Concorde operations are due more to higher OASPL levels than to unique Concorde-source characteristics.

Mayes, W. H.; Stephens, D. G.; Deloach, R.; Cawthorn, J. M.; Holmes, H. K.; Lewis, R. B.; Holliday, B. G.; Ward, D. W.; Miller, W. T.

1978-01-01

473

Reference Management Methodologies for Large Structural Models at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

There have been many challenges associated with modeling some of NASA KSC's largest structures. Given the size of the welded structures here at KSC, it was critically important to properly organize model struc.ture and carefully manage references. Additionally, because of the amount of hardware to be installed on these structures, it was very important to have a means to coordinate between different design teams and organizations, check for interferences, produce consistent drawings, and allow for simple release processes. Facing these challenges, the modeling team developed a unique reference management methodology and model fidelity methodology. This presentation will describe the techniques and methodologies that were developed for these projects. The attendees will learn about KSC's reference management and model fidelity methodologies for large structures. The attendees will understand the goals of these methodologies. The attendees will appreciate the advantages of developing a reference management methodology.

Jones, Corey; Bingham, Ryan; Schmidt, Rick

2011-01-01

474

Cost benefits of advanced software: A review of methodology used at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

To assist rational investments in advanced software, a formal, explicit, and multi-perspective cost-benefit analysis methodology is proposed. The methodology can be implemented through a six-stage process which is described and explained. The current practice of cost-benefit analysis at KSC is reviewed in the light of this methodology. The review finds that there is a vicious circle operating. Unsound methods lead to unreliable cost-benefit estimates. Unreliable estimates convince management that cost-benefit studies should not be taken seriously. Then, given external demands for cost-benefit estimates, management encourages software enginees to somehow come up with the numbers for their projects. Lacking the expertise needed to do a proper study, courageous software engineers with vested interests use ad hoc and unsound methods to generate some estimates. In turn, these estimates are unreliable, and the cycle continues. The proposed methodology should help KSC to break out of this cycle.

Joglekar, Prafulla N.

1993-01-01

475

Jet Propulsion Laboratory/Kennedy Space Center telerobotic inspection and manipulation demonstration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The goal of this effort is to demonstrate telerobotic inspection and mainpulation of space shuttle payloads in the presence of substantial communications time delays between the operator station and the robotic work space. The processing of space shuttle payloads provides a variety of tasks which are typical of both space shuttle ground operations and Space Station in-flight operations, and communications time delays are inevitable in space operations where the operator station will be light-seconds away from the telerobot. With this demonstration we hope to show the efficacy and safety of robotic technology for ground and space operations. Our approach is to develop an experimental telerobotic system with the remote sensing, actuation and reflex portions located at KSC in Florida, while the operator control station will be located at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in California. The JPL portion of the system includes a high-level operator interface, intelligent spatial planning and machine vision, while the KSC portion includes the robot arm, end effectors, cameras and proximity sensors, and the necessary control and communications computers and software. The communications between JPL and KSC are over a limited-bandwidth network channel (19200 baud) with unpredictable and unrepeatable time delays. In FY89 we integrated a basic version of the robotic, communications, and computer hardware, and we developed the software to perform an operator-supervised inspection of a PAM-D satellite upper stage rocket motor and its shuttle support cradle. The demonstration, though severely limited by the bulk of the available computer arm, showed the potential of telerobotics for inspection tasks. In the future, we plan to develop additional capabilities which will allow manipulation tasks to be performed, including removal of dust covers and lens caps, insertion of connectors and batteries, and installation of payload objects.

Wilcox, Brian; Davis, Leon

1990-01-01

476

Objective Lightning Probability Forecasting for Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Phase IV  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As with the previous year, the past year of this award has been productive and a number of important results and refereed publications either submitted or published. Some of our research results are discussed here and a list the papers submitted or published in the past year is provided. Besides our original model of an outer heliosheath source for the IBEX "ribbon" we have continued to explore alternative possibilities and further our understanding of this very complex region, especially in light of the possibility raised by the IBEX results that suggest the possibility of a 1-shock model.

Bauman, William H., III; Crawford, Winifred C.

2012-01-01

477

History of Command and Control at KSC: Kennedy Engineering Academy Series  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Agenda for this presentation is: Evolution of Command and Control (C&C), C&C history, Launch Processing System overview, Core System Overview, Checkout & Launch Control System, Overview and Commercial-Off-The-Shelf guidelines

Hurt, George Richard

2007-01-01

478

75 FR 62547 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; Pelvic Floor Disorders Network (PDFN) and PDFN Data Coordinating Centers. Date: November 5, 2010. Time: 8 a.m. to 5...

2010-10-12

479

78 FR 23771 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Panel 1 RO1 HD078139-01/Ronald M. Lazar, Ph.D. Date: May 2, 2013. Time: 3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Agenda...MD 20852, (Telephone Conference Call). Contact Person: Anne Krey, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer,...

2013-04-22

480

Network model and short circuit program for the Kennedy Space Center electric power distribution system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Assumptions made and techniques used in modeling the power network to the 480 volt level are discussed. Basic computational techniques used in the short circuit program are described along with a flow diagram of the program and operational procedures. Procedures for incorporating network changes are included in this user's manual.

1976-01-01

481

77 FR 5036 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; Safety and efficacy of interventions to prevent iron deficiency in regions with malaria: An individual patient based meta-analysis. Date: February 15, 2012. Time: 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Agenda: To...

2012-02-01

482

Short-term forecasting of lightning based on the surface wind field at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Cloud-to-ground lightning is related in time and space to surface convergence for 244 days during the summer over a 790 sqkm network. The method uses surface convergence, particularly the average over the area, to identify the potential for new, local thunderstorm growth, and can be used to specify the likely time and location of lightning during the life cycle of the convection. A threshold of 0.0000075/sec change in divergence is used to define a convergence event, and a separation of 30 min between flashes defines a lightning event. Time intervals are found to be on the order of 1 hr from beginning convergence to first flash, and (CH110) 2 hr from beginning convergence to the end of lightning. Major differences between the convergence-lightning relationships based on low-level mean onshore and offshore flow are noted.

Watson, Andrew I.; Lopez, Raul E.; Ortiz, Robert; Holle, Ronald L.

1987-01-01

483

Applications of Modeling and Simulation for Flight Hardware Processing at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Boeing Design Visualization Group (DVG) is responsible for the creation of highly-detailed representations of both on-site facilities and flight hardware using computer-aided design (CAD) software, with a focus on the ground support equipment (GSE) used to process and prepare the hardware for space. Throughout my ten weeks at this center, I have had the opportunity to work on several projects: the modification of the Multi-Payload Processing Facility (MPPF) High Bay, weekly mapping of the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) floor layout, kinematics applications for the Orion Command Module (CM) hatches, and the design modification of the Ares I Upper Stage hatch for maintenance purposes. The main goal of each of these projects was to generate an authentic simulation or representation using DELMIA V5 software. This allowed for evaluation of facility layouts, support equipment placement, and greater process understanding once it was used to demonstrate future processes to customers and other partners. As such, I have had the opportunity to contribute to a skilled team working on diverse projects with a central goal of providing essential planning resources for future center operations.

Marshall, Jennifer L.

2010-01-01

484

78 FR 13359 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; Global Partnership for Social Science AIDS Research (R24). Date: March 21-22...Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of...

2013-02-27

485

75 FR 8978 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; ``Diversity Partnership''. Date: March 15, 2010. Time: 8 a.m. to 6 p...Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of...

2010-02-26

486

77 FR 69642 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant...Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel...Institute of Child Health And Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive...

2012-11-20

487

78 FR 10184 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant...Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; Reproductive...Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive...

2013-02-13

488

76 FR 25699 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting Pursuant...National Advisory Child Health and Human Development Council. The meeting will be...National Advisory Child Health and Human Development Council. Date: June 2,...

2011-05-05