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1

Approximate mode filtering Kathleen E. Wage  

E-print Network

Approximate mode filtering Kathleen E. Wage November 2004 Proceedings of the 38th Asilomar component of this work in other works must be obtained from the IEEE. #12;Approximate mode filtering email: kwage@gmu.edu Abstract-- Normal modes, the eigenfunctions of the ocean waveguide, are useful

Wage, Kathleen

2

Inhibiting Adaptation 1 Kathleen M. Carley  

E-print Network

Inhibiting Adaptation 1 Kathleen M. Carley Social and Decision Sciences and H.J. Heinz III School forces or coalition forces, the "organization" must be adaptive. Unanticipated changes in mission to create forces that can respond rapidly, accurately and can readily adapt to new situations. Over the past

Sadeh, Norman M.

3

Kennedy's Disease Association  

MedlinePLUS

Kennedy's Disease Association A Public Benefit, Non-Profit Organization Register GTranslate GTranslate Javascript is required to use GTranslate multilingual website and translation delivery network Select Language English Afrikaans Albanian Arabic Armenian ...

4

Marcus A. Louie & Kathleen M. Carley Carnegie Mellon University  

E-print Network

Marcus A. Louie & Kathleen M. Carley Carnegie Mellon University mlouie@andrew.cmu.edu, kathleen measures. Contact: Marcus A. Louie Department of Engineering and Public Policy Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Tel: 1-412-268-3940 Fax: 1-412-268-3938 Email: mlouie@andrew.cmu.edu Key Words

Sadeh, Norman M.

5

Information Security: The Human Perspective Kathleen M. Carley  

E-print Network

Security: The Human Perspective Kathleen M. Carley Abstract For many organizations, information security organizations be designed to reduce their vulnerability to information errors from a human perspective? As partInformation Security: The Human Perspective Kathleen M. Carley August 2000 Direct all

Sadeh, Norman M.

6

EMPLOYMENT OVERVIEW HARVARD KENNEDY SCHOOL  

E-print Network

EMPLOYMENT OVERVIEW HARVARD KENNEDY SCHOOL CAREER ADVANCEMENT 617-495-1161t career_advancement@hks.harvard.edut www.hks.harvard.edu/careert Class of 2013 HARVARD KENNEDY SCHOOL CLASS OF 2013 EMPLOYMENT OVERVIEWt Office of Career Advancement (oca) employed a variety of data collection techniques including an exit

7

The Kennedy Myth and American Politics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the John F. Kennedy legend and his ability as an image maker. Characterizes Kennedy's presidency in terms of pragmatic idealism. Says Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson closed out the New and Fair Deal reforms but left no social or economic transformation. Claims Kennedy's disavowal of ideological rigidity ended the power of the Democratic…

Parmet, Herbert S.

1990-01-01

8

Kennedy Space Center Design Visualization  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Perform simulations of ground operations leading up to launch at Kennedy Space Center and Vandenberg Air Force Base in CA since 1987. We use 3D Laser Scanning, Modeling and Simulations to verify that operations are feasible, efficient and safe.

Humeniuk, Bob

2013-01-01

9

Kennedy Space Center Payload Processing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews the payload processing functions at Kennedy Space Center. It details some of the payloads processed at KSC, the typical processing tasks, the facilities available for processing payloads, and the capabilities and customer services that are available.

Lawson, Ronnie; Engler, Tom; Colloredo, Scott; Zide, Alan

2011-01-01

10

Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Among 2011's many accomplishments, we safely retired the Space Shuttle Program after 30 incredible years; completed the International Space Station and are taking steps to enable it to reach its full potential as a multi-purpose laboratory; and helped to expand scientific knowledge with missions like Aquarius, GRAIL, and the Mars Science Laboratory. Responding to national budget challenges, we are prioritizing critical capabilities and divesting ourselves of assets no longer needed for NASA's future exploration programs. Since these facilities do not have to be maintained or demolished, the government saves money. At the same time, our commercial partners save money because they do not have to build new facilities. It is a win-win for everyone. Moving forward, 2012 will be even more historically significant as we celebrate the 50th Anniversary of Kennedy Space Center. In the coming year, KSC will facilitate commercial transportation to low-Earth orbit and support the evolution of the Space Launch System and Orion crew vehicle as they ready for exploration missions, which will shape how human beings view the universe. While NASA's Vision is to lead scientific and technological advances in aeronautics and space for a Nation on the frontier of discovery KSC's vision is to be the world's preeminent launch complex for government and commercial space access, enabling the world to explore and work in space. KSC's Mission is to safely manage, develop, integrate, and sustain space systems through partnerships that enable innovative, diverse access to space and inspires the Nation's future explorers.

Griffin, Amanda

2012-01-01

11

Kennedy & Castro: The Secret History  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Released to coincide with the 40th anniversary of the assassination of John F. Kennedy, this intriguing electronic briefing book (presented by the National Security Archive at George Washington University), contains an audio tape of the late President Kennedy discussing the possibility of a clandestine meeting with Fidel Castro in Havana (just several weeks before Kennedy's death). Along with this six-minute audio recording, visitors will find other key documents related to the story, including several top secret White House memoranda, a CIA briefing paper, and brief profiles of the various characters who played a role in these matters. As National Security Archive senior analyst Peter Kornbluh remarked, "The documents show that JFK clearly wanted to change the framework of hostile U.S. relations with Cuba. His assassination, at the very moment this initiative was coming to fruition, leaves a major 'what if' in the ensuing history of the U.S. conflict with Cuba."

12

Kathleen England watches her image transmitted to shuttle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Kathleen England watches her image transmitted to her husband in the shuttle via the Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment (SAREX). Looking on are amateur radio operators employed at JSC: Gil Carman (WA5NOM); Lou McFaddin (WSDIO), and Candy Torres (KASUKJ).

1985-01-01

13

Kathleen England watches her image transmitted to shuttle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Kathleen England (foreground and on monitor) watches her image transmitted to her husband in the shuttle via the Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment (SAREX). Looking on are amateur radio operators employed at JSC: Gil Carman (WA5NOM); Lou McFaddin (WSDIO), and Candy Torres (KASUKJ).

1985-01-01

14

Irving H. Wiesenfeld and Kathleen L. Miller Graduate Fellowships  

E-print Network

-endemic countries. Through the fellowship, awards of up to $5,000 will be made to qualified individuals. Past by a panel of CEND faculty members and awards will be announced in March 2014. To apply, email the following Irving H. Wiesenfeld and Kathleen L. Miller Graduate Fellowships 2014 CEND Graduate Fellowships

15

Kathleen A. Burke Laboratory Medical Technologist at SHS since 2009  

E-print Network

of Medical Technology ­ Cottage Hospital, Santa Barbara, California Graduation and Completion of InternshipKathleen A. Burke Laboratory Medical Technologist at SHS since 2009 Educational Background · School Employment/Professional Background · Laboratory Medical Technologist at SHS since 2009 · Mercy Medical Center

Tullos, Desiree

16

Kinematic Calibration of Six-Axis Robots Kathleen English  

E-print Network

´esent´es. Introduction: Calibration is essential for robot manufacturing systems largely because of the robotKinematic Calibration of Six-Axis Robots Kathleen English Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering¨at Leoben, Austria Abstract: In this paper an approach to the kinematic calibration of serial robots

Hayes, John

17

Maze Busters: Carrie Miyoshi Macfarlane & Kathleen Sheehan--Harvard University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Even if one is equipped with an MLS, the 11 libraries that comprise the Harvard College Library can be pretty daunting. That is why Carrie Miyoshi Macfarlane and Kathleen Sheehan created Threading the Maze. The online publication is presented to students in expository writing, the one course all undergraduates must take. "This highly effective…

Library Journal, 2004

2004-01-01

18

A Biography of Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This teaching guide consists of a biography of Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy (Onassis), the wife of President John F. Kennedy, the 35th President of the United States and questions for students to answer after reading the biography. The guide contains activities, such as playing the role of an inquiring camera girl (Mrs. Kennedy's first job in…

Weidman, Lisa K. Menendez

19

TESTIMONY OF DAVID M. KENNEDY  

E-print Network

ON THE JAPAN TSUNAMI MARINE DEBRIS AND NOAA EFFORTS TO ADDRESS IT BEFORE THE SENATE COMMITTEE ON COMMERCE surrounding marine debris generated by the devastating Japan tsunami. My name is David Kennedy, Assistant." Marine debris, which can be anything from lost or abandoned fishing gear and vessels, to plastics of any

20

Plasma Physics John F. Kennedy  

E-print Network

v v v v v Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory N 278 95 1 95 18 NEW YORK John F. Kennedy Int Campus/ Sayre Drive Sign PPPLSayre Dr. Location: Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory James Forrestal Campus U.S. Route #1 North at Sayre Drive Plainsboro, NJ 08536 Mailing Address: Princeton Plasma Physics

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

21

Contaminant dispersion at the rehabilitated Mary Kathleen uranium mine, Australia  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study reports on the transfer of contaminants from waste rock dumps and mineralised ground into soils, sediments, waters\\u000a and plants at the rehabilitated Mary Kathleen uranium mine in semi-arid northwest Queensland. Numerous waste rock dumps were\\u000a partly covered with benign soil and the open pit mine was allowed to flood. The mineralised and waste calc-silicate rock in\\u000a the open

B. G. Lottermoser; P. M. Ashley; M. T. Costelloe

2005-01-01

22

Kennedy Space Center exercise program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Fitness Program began in Feb. 1993. The program is managed by the Biomedical Operations and Research Office and operated by the Bionetics Corporation. The facilities and programs are offered to civil servants, all contractors, temporary duty assignment (TDY) participants, and retirees. All users must first have a medical clearance. A computer-generated check-in system is used to monitor participant usage. Various aspects of the program are discussed.

Hoffman, Cristy

1993-01-01

23

78 FR 6173 - Diana Del Grosso, Ray Smith, Joseph Hatch, Cheryl Hatch, Kathleen Kelley, Andrew Wilklund, and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Transportation Board [Docket No. FD 35652] Diana Del Grosso, Ray Smith, Joseph Hatch, Cheryl Hatch, Kathleen Kelley, Andrew Wilklund...petition filed on August 1, 2012, by Diana Del Grosso, Ray Smith, Joseph Hatch, Cheryl Hatch, Kathleen Kelley, Andrew...

2013-01-29

24

Douglas Fisher, Kathleen Merrigan and Robert Goodman Report to the New Jersey State Board of Agriculture  

E-print Network

and Natural Resources Robert M. Goodman hosted USDA Deputy Secretary Kathleen Merrigan during a visit to NewDouglas Fisher, Kathleen Merrigan and Robert Goodman Report to the New Jersey State Board Jersey on October 14. Merrigan was accompanied by New Jersey Secretary of Agriculture Douglas Fisher

Goodman, Robert M.

25

76 FR 43896 - Safety Zone; Kathleen Whelan Wedding Fireworks, Lake St. Clair, Grosse Pointe Farms, MI  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Kathleen Whelan Wedding Fireworks, Lake St. Clair, Grosse Pointe...St. Clair during the Kathleen Whelan Wedding Fireworks. DATES: This rule is effective...private party is holding a land based wedding that will include fireworks launched...

2011-07-22

26

Kennedy Space Center Spaceport Analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Until the Shuttle Atlantis' final landing on July 21, 2011, Kennedy Space Center (KSC) served as NASA's main spaceport, which is a launch and landing facility for rockets and spacecraft that are attempting to enter orbit. Many of the facilities at KSC were created to assist the Shuttle Program. One of the most important and used facilities is the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), This was the main landing area for the return of the shuttle after her mission in space. · However, the SLF has also been used for a number of other projects including straight-line testing by Gibbs Racing, weather data collection by NOAA, and an airfield for the KSC helicopters. This runway is three miles long with control tower at midfield and a fire department located at the end in care of an emergency. This facility, which was part of the great space race, will continue to be used for historical events as Kennedy begins to commercialize its facilities. KSC continues to be an important spaceport to the government, and it will transform into an important spaceport for the commercial industry as well. During my internship at KSC's Center Planning and Development Directorate, I had the opportunity to be a part of the negotiation team working on the agreement for Space Florida to control the Shuttle Landing Facility. This gave me the opportunity to learn about all the changes that are occurring here at Kennedy Space Center. Through various meetings, I discovered the Master Plan and its focus is to transform the existing facilities that were primarily used for the Shuttle Program, to support government operations and commercial flights in the future. This. idea is also in a new strategic business plan and completion of a space industry market analysis. All of these different documentations were brought to my attention and I. saw how they came together in the discussions of transitioning the SLF to a commercial operator, Space Florida. After attending meetings and partaking in discussions for the SLF Agreement, I formed the idea of a Spaceport Analysis as my over internship project. As previously stated, I had the opportunity to sit in on the market analysis meetings and read through the analysis itself. I suggested the creation of a Strengths Weaknesses Opportunities Threats (SWOT) analysis, which allows an individual to see an overview of the company's strengths and weaknesses alongside any industry opportunities and threats. After discussions with the lead writer of the new strategic business plan and getting approval, I took the action upon myself and created the Kennedy Space Center SWOT Analysis.

Wary, Samantha A.

2013-01-01

27

KENNEDY KRIEGER INSTITUTE, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES  

E-print Network

of the consolidated financial statements, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, we considerKENNEDY KRIEGER INSTITUTE, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES Consolidated Financial Statements June 30, 2013 financial statements of Kennedy Krieger Institute, Inc. and Subsidiaries (the "Institute"), which comprise

Pevsner, Jonathan

28

Kennedy Space Center polygeneration facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This is a report on the status of the polygeneration feasibility study conducted by the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Polygeneration is an innovative approach to reducing cost per flight for the Shuttle by reducing propellant and other costs. Cost of LH2 is expected to be adversely affected by sharp increases in natural gas pricing as well as other costs such as electricity and transportation. The polygeneration concept is to produce liquid hydrogen (LH2) for the Shuttle and gaseous nitrogen (GN2), electricity and thermal energy to meet KSC requirements by means of an integrated coal gasification plant. Conclusions of the initial feasibility study will be presented as well as the status of on-going activities.

Gutkowski, G. P.

1984-01-01

29

Christopher Kennedy ckennedy@syr.edu  

E-print Network

: Interpretation of Fiction; CAS 101: First-Year Forum. BOOKS #12;Ennui Prophet, prose poems, BOA Editions, Ltd City Solo." Faultline (Summer, 2010). Kennedy, Christopher. "My Dream Sombrero." Faultline (Summer

Segraves, Kari A.

30

Kennedy NOW! - Duration: 2 minutes, 44 seconds.  

NASA Video Gallery

In this edition of Kennedy Now!, find out about accelerating preparations for an Orion flight test next year, along with a robotic miner under development. Also see the robotic craft designed and b...

31

Kennedy Now! - Duration: 2:04.  

NASA Video Gallery

2013 roared out of the blocks at NASA's Kennedy Space Center as launch teams oversaw liftoffs from both coasts. The Florida-based center also continued its work prepping payloads bound for the Inte...

32

Kennedy NOW! May 2013 - Duration: 107 seconds.  

NASA Video Gallery

In this edition of Kennedy NOW! see the progress NASA's Commercial Crew Program partners are making to get astronauts launching into low-Earth orbit atop American-made rockets and spacecraft. Find ...

33

John F. Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The John F. Kennedy Space Center, America's spaceport, is located along Florida's eastern shore on Cape Canaveral. Established as NASA's Launch Operations Center on July 1, 1962, the center has been the site of launching all U.S. human space flight missions, from the early days of Project Mercury to the space shuttle and the next generation of vehicles. In addition, the center is home to NASA's Launch Services Program, which coordinates all expendable vehicle launches carrying a NASA payload.

With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

Size: 32.6 by 51.2 kilometers (20.2 by 32.2 miles) Location: 28.6 degrees North latitude, 80.6 degrees West longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 3, 2, and 1 Original Data Resolution: 15 meters (49.2 feet) Dates Acquired: April 26, 2006

2006-01-01

34

John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum is housed in a gorgeous building designed by noted architect I.M. Pei. For those who can't make it to Boston to visit, the associated website is full of relevant information about President Kennedy's life, speeches, presidency, and legacy. This section of the site is dedicated to seven interesting interactive exhibits, including "We Choose The Moon," "The President's Desk," and "White House Diary." In "The President's Desk," visitors can explore Kennedy's work space. This exhibit includes items from his travels, like the famous coconut he carved after his ship, the PT-109, was attacked off the Solomon Islands. The "We Choose The Moon" area contains archival photos and footage describing how President Kennedy helped lead the quest to land a manned spacecraft on the moon. The "White House Diary" takes visitors on an interactive tour through each day of the Kennedy presidency, highlighting the speeches, meetings, conferences, and other activities that commanded his time in office.

35

DIRECTOR OF HOUSING AND RESIDENCE LIFE Dean Kennedy  

E-print Network

DIRECTOR OF HOUSING AND RESIDENCE LIFE Dean Kennedy BUSINESS MANAGER Stacy Shaul Larry St.Pierre Maria Lara Randy West Jacqueline Robbins Don Kennedy Larry Irons George Burris Maurice Hamlin Tobias Looser Travis Soder

Barrash, Warren

36

Foster Kennedy Syndrome Due to Meningioma Growth during Pregnancy  

PubMed Central

Tumors of the olfactory groove may cause unilateral optic atrophy with contralateral papilledema and anosmia (Foster Kennedy syndrome). We describe a case of a young pregnant woman with Foster Kennedy syndrome due to an olfactory groove meningioma. PMID:24273529

Rodríguez-Porcel, Federico; Hughes, Ian; Anderson, Douglas; Lee, John; Biller, José

2013-01-01

37

Health services at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Comprehensive occupational health services are provided to approximately 17,000 workers at the Kennedy Space Center and an additional 6000 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. These areas cover about 120,000 acres encompassing part of the Merritt Island Wild Life Refuge and wetlands which are the habitat of numerous endangered and protected species of wildlife. The services provided at the Kennedy Space Center optimally assure a safe and healthy working environment for the employees engaged in the preparation and launching of this country's Space Shuttle and other important space exploration programs.

Ferguson, E. B.; Humbert, P.; Long, I. D.; Tipton, D. A.

1992-01-01

38

WILDLIFE - ALLIGATOR BEGINS TO CROSS KENNEDY PARKWAY  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Harold O'Connor, manager of the Merritt Island Wildlife Refuge, watches a 10-foot-long alligator inch its way toward a busy highway at the Kennedy Space Center. O'Connor, aided by assistant Jerome Carroll, not shown, guided the large gator to safety in a nearby pond, several miles south of the Vehicle Assembly Building, in background. The Apollo 12 astronauts will be launched no earlier than November 14, 1969, from the Kennedy Space Center on the Nation's second manned lunar landing mission.

1969-01-01

39

Q & A with Kathleen M. Reilly, Author of "Planet Earth: 25 Environmental Projects You Can Build Yourself"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents an interview with Kathleen M. Reilly, author of "Planet Earth: 25 Environmental Projects You Can Build Yourself." Environmental awareness needs to begin in childhood, and, through this book, Kathleen M. Reilly encourages children to learn about ecology and ecosystems to begin conservation early in their lives. Children ages 9…

Curriculum Review, 2008

2008-01-01

40

Columbia returning to Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space shuttle orbiter Columbia returns to the shuttle landing facility atop NASA 905, a modified 747, following a cross country flight from the Dryden Flight Research Facility. The Kennedy Space Center alternative photo number is 108-KSC-82PC-1328.

1982-01-01

41

WRITTEN STATEMENT OF DAVID M. KENNEDY  

E-print Network

in the Deepwater Horizon BP oil spill response effort. My name is David Kennedy, I am the Assistant Administrator. The Deepwater Horizon BP oil spill, the largest accidental oil spill in history, is only the most recent example to the Gulf Coast and the Nation as a whole from the BP oil spill. NOAA and our co-trustees have been working

42

Kennedy Space Center Annual Report, FY 1997  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has a nearly 40-year tradition of excellence in processing and launching space vehicles and their payloads. The Center's outstanding record of achievements in America's space program has earned it an honored place in history and an essential role in the present; KSC also intends to play a vital part in the future of space exploration.

1997-01-01

43

KENNEDY KRIEGER INSTITUTE, INC. AND AFFILIATES  

E-print Network

misstatement of the combined financial statements, whether due to fraud or error. In making those riskKENNEDY KRIEGER INSTITUTE, INC. AND AFFILIATES Combined Financial Statements June 30, 2014 and 2013 to Combined Financial Statements 7-33 Report of Independent Auditors on Accompanying Combining Information 34

Pevsner, Jonathan

44

WRITTEN STATEMENT OF DAVID M. KENNEDY  

E-print Network

in the response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. My name is David Kennedy and I am the Acting Assistant lost their lives in the explosion and sinking of the Deepwater Horizon platform. NOAA's mission in the Deepwater Horizon response and natural resource damage assessment process, observations related to the Gulf

45

John F. Kennedy School and Community Center.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Located near an existing neighborhood health clinic, the John F. Kennedy School and Community Center provides a neighborhood base for numerous educational, health, and social agencies. The middle school can accommodate over 1,000 students in grades six through eight. The community center fills the need for civic and social organizations often…

Atlanta Public Schools, GA.

46

The Kennedy Center's Coming of Age.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the history of the John F. Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development at the Peabody College of Vanderbilt University, which focuses its research on problems related to mental retardation. The center is unique among 12 federally funded Mental Retardation Research Centers because it is exclusively identified with a college of…

Baumeister, Alfred A.

1996-01-01

47

Denis V. F. Kennedy Department of Politics  

E-print Network

Denis V. F. Kennedy Department of Politics Washington and Lee University Holekamp Hall 003, Lexington, VA 24450 | 612-242-3791 | kennedyd@wlu.edu EDUCATION 2012 Ph.D. in Political Science, University of Minnesota Subfields: International Relations, Political Theory Dissertation: "Codified Compassion: Politics

Marsh, David

48

Kennedy family upset over assassination video game  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Forty-one years ago Camelot ended with the assassination of President John F. Kennedy while he rode in a motorcade in downtown Dallas. During the past four decades, hundreds of persons have attempted to offer their interpretations and understanding of the events of that tragic day. While the Kennedy family has generally refrained from commenting on the less academic and objective investigations into the death of the President, there has been one recent development that has understandably garnered severe criticism. This development happens to be an online video game titled "JFK Reloaded" that allows visitors to recreate the three shots fired at President Kennedy's car from the Texas School Book Depository. While a representative for the Glasgow-based firm responsible for this game noted that the game might "stimulate a younger generation of players to take an interest in this fascinating episode of American history", many others were quick to respond to this questionable notion. A spokesman for Senator Edward Kennedy called the video game "despicable" and noted presidential historian G. Calvin MacKenzie of Colby College remarked that "Aside from being in incredibly bad taste, the idea of marketing it as an educational tool seems to stretch the notion of education beyond belief."The first link leads to a news article from this Monday's Boston Herald that talks about the reaction to the release of this video game. The second link will take visitors to a rather intriguing discussion of the game by Clive Thompson, writing in the online publication Slate. The third link leads to the JFK Assassination Records page provided by the National Archives & Records Administration, where visitors can read the complete Warren Commission Report and peruse other helpful documents. The fourth link will take users to the website for the John F. Kennedy Library and Museum located in Boston. Here visitors can learn about the actual building (designed by noted modernist I.M. Pei), look through resources for students, and learn about the library's holdings. The fifth link leads to the text and audio version of one of Kennedy's most well-remembered speeches, where he addressed the people of West Berlin and stated, "Today, in the world of freedom, the proudest boast is 'Ich bin ein Berliner'". The final link leads to a special feature from CNN where the president's interpreter, Robert H. Lochner, recalls helping Kennedy learn that phrase for that particular address.

49

Research and technology at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As the NASA Center responsible for assembly, checkout, servicing, launch, recovery, and operational support of Space Transportation System elements and payloads, Kennedy Space Center is placing increasing emphasis on the Center's research and technology program. In addition to strengthening those areas of engineering and operations technology that contribute to safer, more efficient, and more economical execution of current mission, the technical tools are developed needed to execute Center's mission relative to future programs. The Engineering Development Directorate encompasses most of the laboratories and other Center resources that are key elements of research and technology program implementation and is responsible for implementation of the majority of the projects in this Kennedy Space Center 1989 Annual Report.

1989-01-01

50

Failure Analysis at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

History has shown that failures occur in every engineering endeavor, and what we learn from those failures contributes to the knowledge base to safely complete future missions. The necessity of failure analysis is at its apex at the end of one aged program and at the beginning of a new and untested program. The information that we gain through failure analysis corrects the deficiencies in the current vehicle to make the next generation of vehicles more efficient and safe. The Failure Analysis and Materials Evaluation Branch in the Materials Science Division at the Kennedy Space Center performs metallurgical, mechanical, electrical, and non-metallic materials failure analyses and accident investigations on both flight hardware and ground support equipment for the Space Shuttle, International Space Station, Constellation, and Launch Services Programs. This paper will explore a variety of failure case studies at the Kennedy Space Center and the lessons learned that can be applied in future programs.

Salazar, Victoria L.; Wright, M. Clara

2010-01-01

51

Kennedy Space Center environmental health program.  

PubMed

The Kennedy Space Center's environmental health organization is responsible for programs which assure its employees a healthful workplace under diverse and varied working conditions. These programs encompass the disciplines of industrial hygiene, radiation protection (health physics), and environmental sanitation/pollution control. Activities range from the routine, such as normal office work, to the highly specialized, such as the processing of highly toxic and hazardous materials. PMID:1402776

Marmaro, G M; Cardinale, M A; Summerfield, B R; Tipton, D A

1992-08-01

52

Induction brazing at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A description of the joint design, materials, equipment, qualification testing, inspection methods, and applications involved in performing induction brazing on hyperbolic propellants tubing at Kennedy Space Center. Induction brazing is a form of brazing in which the energy is transmitted to the workpiece by electrical induction; the eddy currents generated in the metal produce heat by resistance losses. Since induction heating is fast and highly localized, undesirable heat effects are minimized and the resulting braze is of high quality.

Clautice, W. E.

1974-01-01

53

Kennedy Space Center Launch and Landing Support  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The presentations describes Kennedy Space Center (KSC) payload processing, facilities and capabilities, and research development and life science experience. Topics include launch site processing, payload processing, key launch site processing roles, leveraging KSC experience, Space Station Processing Facility and capabilities, Baseline Data Collection Facility, Space Life Sciences Laboratory and capabilities, research payload development, International Space Station research flight hardware, KSC flight payload history, and KSC life science expertise.

Wahlberg, Jennifer

2010-01-01

54

Kennedy Space Center network documentation system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Kennedy Space Center Network Documentation System (KSC NDS) is being designed and implemented by NASA and the KSC contractor organizations to provide a means of network tracking, configuration, and control. Currently, a variety of host and client platforms are in use as a result of each organization having established its own network documentation system. The solution is to incorporate as many existing 'systems' as possible in the effort to consolidate and standardize KSC-wide documentation.

Lohne, William E.; Schuerger, Charles L.

1995-01-01

55

Kennedy Space Center environmental health program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Kennedy Space Center's environmental health organization is responsible for programs which assure its employees a healthful workplace under diverse and varied working conditions. These programs encompass the disciplines of industrial hygiene, radiation protection (health physics), and environmental sanitation/pollution control. Activities range from the routine, such as normal office work, to the highly specialized, such as the processing of highly toxic and hazardous materials.

Marmaro, G. M.; Cardinale, M. A.; Summerfield, B. R.; Tipton, D. A.

1992-01-01

56

John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Moving into a two-room apartment near the State House in Boston in 1946, many people wondered aloud how this bright, yet somewhat retiring, young man would do in the rough and tumble world of Boston politics. That 29-year old happened to be John F. Kennedy, and he would win his first campaign that year, as he made his way to the U.S. House of Representatives. He would of course become President of the United States, and later be assassinated in the fall of 1963 in Dallas. His presidential library and museum occupy one of the loveliest vistas afforded any presidential library, as they lie on Columbia Point along Bostonâ??s waterfront. For those who canâ??t make a direct visit to the Bay State, this website provides a fine virtual experience. The site includes historical timelines of Kennedyâ??s life (along with those of other members of his family), along with an interactive White House diary feature, which offers detailed information on what Kennedy did on every day of his presidency. Interestingly enough, the Ernest Hemingway archive is also housed at the Kennedy Presidential Library, so visitors can also learn about their holdings and view selected digitized materials.

57

Wetlands of the Fraser Lowland, 1989: An I.nventmy Kathleen Moore  

E-print Network

Wetlands of the Fraser Lowland, 1989: An I.nventmy Peggy Ward Kathleen Moore GIS Applications Ron. Wetlands of the Fraser Lowland, 1989: An Inventory. Technical Report Series No. 146. Canadian Wiidlife report. ... 111 #12;ABSTRACT The remaining wetlands of the Fraser Lowland provide vital habitat for large

58

Information Technology and Knowledge Distribution in C3 Kathleen M. Carley  

E-print Network

Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA 15123 craigs@andrew.cmu.edu Citation: Kathleen M. Carley, 2002 and Decision Sciences Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA 15123 craigs@andrew.cmu.edu Abstract This paper and Decision Sciences and H.J. Heinz III School of Policy and Management Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh

Sadeh, Norman M.

59

Influence of the Laurentian Great Lakes on Regional Climate1 Michael Notaro, Kathleen Holman8  

E-print Network

1 Influence of the Laurentian Great Lakes on Regional Climate1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Michael Notaro, Kathleen #12;2 Abstract47 48 The influence of the Laurentian Great Lakes on climate is assessed by comparing of the diurnal cycle and annual cycle of air temperature. The53 impacts of the Great Lakes on the regional

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

60

L-R: Kathleen Morgan, Jasmine Hall Ratliff of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and Peter Gillies  

E-print Network

, Nutrition, and Health (IFNH) at Rutgers University sponsored the 11th Children's Health Summit on December 3 and physical activity in children and youth. Kathleen Morgan (chair, FCHS) welcomed the full capacity audience among children, aged three to 18 years, in five New Jersey cities, including all three host cities

Goodman, Robert M.

61

A Scottish Ecopoetics: Feminism and Environmentalism in the Works of Kathleen Jamie and Valerie Gillies  

Microsoft Academic Search

:The article examines the ongoing attempts of contemporary Scottish poets Kathleen Jamie (1962-) and Valerie Gillies (1948-) to develop a feminist and environmentalist nature poetry that re-envisions the connection between nature and humanity. These poets' artistic journeys have led them from traditional print-page poetry to challenging multimedia art forms that combine the visual and the written word, as in Jamie's

Laura Severin

2011-01-01

62

A Scottish Ecopoetics: Feminism and Environmentalism in the Works of Kathleen Jamie and Valerie Gillies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The article examines the ongoing attempts of contemporary Scottish poets Kathleen Jamie (1962-) and Valerie Gillies (1948-) to develop a feminist and environmentalist nature poetry that re-envisions the connection between nature and humanity. These poets' artistic journeys have led them from traditional print-page poetry to challenging multimedia art forms that combine the visual and the written word, as in Jamie's

Laura Severin

2011-01-01

63

PULCE Pad: Pressure Ulcer Detection System Sivaranjani Balan, Kathleen Bates, Stacey Lee, Zeinab Mohamed  

E-print Network

PULCE Pad: Pressure Ulcer Detection System Sivaranjani Balan, Kathleen Bates, Stacey Lee, Zeinab Clinical Need Description of Market Pressure ulcers, more commonly known as bedsores, develop due to local in the US are such that an estimated 2.5 million cases of pressure ulcers are reported each year

McGaughey, Alan

64

The Kennedy Report: Commission Evaluates High School Journalism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents excerpts from the report of the Kennedy Commission of Inquiry into High School Journalism, concentrating on censorship, minority participation, journalism education, established media, and censorship issues.

Heintz, Ann

1974-01-01

65

Selectional restrictions in natural language sentence generation Raymond Kozlowski, Kathleen F. McCoy, and K. VijayShanker  

E-print Network

Selectional restrictions in natural language sentence generation Raymond Kozlowski, Kathleen F. Mc selectional restrictions can be naturally incorporated into our generation architecture and our notion of a lexico­ grammatical resource. Keywords: Natural language generation, Selectional restrictions, Lexical

McCoy, Kathleen F.

66

Selectional restrictions in natural language sentence generation Raymond Kozlowski, Kathleen F. McCoy, and K. Vijay-Shanker  

E-print Network

Selectional restrictions in natural language sentence generation Raymond Kozlowski, Kathleen F. Mc selectional restrictions can be naturally incorporated into our generation architecture and our notion of a lexico- grammatical resource. Keywords: Natural language generation, Selectional restrictions, Lexical

McCoy, Kathleen F.

67

78 FR 28276 - Operating Limitations at John F. Kennedy International Airport  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Operating Limitations at John F. Kennedy International Airport AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...Limiting Operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK) that published on January...LaGuardia Airport, John F. Kennedy International Airport, and Newark Liberty...

2013-05-14

68

76 FR 18620 - Operating Limitations at John F. Kennedy International Airport  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Operating Limitations at John F. Kennedy International Airport AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...Limiting Operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK) that published on January...LaGuardia Airport, John F. Kennedy International Airport, and Newark Liberty...

2011-04-04

69

75 FR 34643 - Atlantic Ocean Off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; Restricted Area  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...CFR Part 334 Atlantic Ocean Off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; Restricted...Atlantic Ocean off the coast of the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida...334.525 Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL;...

2010-06-18

70

77 FR 43805 - Gull Hazard Reduction Program at John F. Kennedy International Airport; Record of Decision  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Gull Hazard Reduction Program at John F. Kennedy International Airport; Record...Gull Hazard Reduction Program at John F. Kennedy International Airport. DATES...and land uses in and around the John F. Kennedy International Airport. This...

2012-07-26

71

75 FR 8570 - Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; Restricted Area  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...CFR Part 334 Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; Restricted...Atlantic Ocean off the coast of the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida...334.525 Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL;...

2010-02-25

72

DIRECTOR OF HOUSING AND RESIDENCE LIFE Dean Kennedy  

E-print Network

DIRECTOR OF HOUSING AND RESIDENCE LIFE Dean Kennedy BUSINESS MANAGER Rebecca Young ASSISTANT Hittle Cynthia Gage Gene Conyers James Draine Rene Robin Stacy Shaul Maria Lara Randy West Jacqueline Robbins Don Kennedy Larry Irons George Burris Tobias Looser Travis Soden Voanna Ward Sean Leonard CUSTOMER

Barrash, Warren

73

Ground winds for Kennedy Space Center, Florida (1978 version)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Ground level runway wind statistics are presented for the Kennedy Space Center, Florida area. Crosswind, headwind, tailwind, and headwind reversal percentage frequencies are given with respect to month and hour for the Kennedy Space Center Space Shuttle runway. This document supersedes NASA CR-128995 and should be used in place of it.

Johnson, D. L.; Brown, S. C.

1978-01-01

74

Photocopy of drawing. VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING. NASA John F. Kennedy ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing. VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING. NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 79K06740, NASA, November 1975. SPACE & WEIGHT ALLOCATION, ORBITER PATH IN TRANSFER AISLE. Sheet 6 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Vehicle Assembly Building, VAB Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

75

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October, 1963. VOLUME 29, LAUNCH CONTROL CENTER (LCC) TITLE AND LOCATION SHEET. Sheet 29-01 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

76

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October, 1963. VOLUME 14, HIGH BAY ? ARCHITECTURAL, TITLE SHEET. Sheet 14-01 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Vehicle Assembly Building, VAB Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

77

The Kennedy Center: An Integral Component of the Vanderbilt Community.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the work of the John F. Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development, which for three decades has promoted interdisciplinary research on developmental disabilities. The paper describes how the Kennedy Center is an integral part of both the educational community and the surrounding civic community at the Peabody College of Vanderbilt…

Burish, Thomas G.

1996-01-01

78

Research Training at the John F. Kennedy Center.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development at Peabody College of Vanderbilt University emphasizes research on mental retardation and human development; there is a parallel commitment to research training for undergraduate, graduate, and postdoctoral candidates. This article reviews the history of the Kennedy Center's research training,…

MacLean, William E., Jr.; Warren, Steven F.

1996-01-01

79

My Summer Internship at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During my summer internship at Kennedy Space Center, I worked on several projects with my mentor Grace Johnson in the Education Programs Office. My primary project was the CubeSat project in which my job was to help mentor Merritt Island High School students in the building of a CubeSat. CubeSats are picosatellites that are used to carry out auxiliary missions; they "piggy back" into orbit on launch vehicles launching primary missions. CubeSats come in the sizes of 1U (10 by 10 by 10 cm) 2U (1Ux2) and 3U (1Ux3). The Cube Sats are housed in a protective deploying device called a Poly Picosatellite Orbital Deplored (P-POD). I also participated in a Balloon Workshop with the MIHS students. This was an intense 4-day project in which we constructed a balloon satellite equipped with a camera whose main goal was to obtain video images of the curvature of the earth at high altitudes and relay it back down to our ground station. I also began developing my own science research program for minority serving institutions to be implemented when funding becomes available. In addition to the projects that I completed during my internship, I got the opportunity to go on various tours of the technological facilities here at Kennedy Space Center.

Philpott, Hobert Leon

2011-01-01

80

KLASS: Kennedy Launch Academy Simulation System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Software provides access to many sophisticated scientific instrumentation (Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), a Light Microscope, a Scanning Probe Microscope (covering Scanning Tunneling, Atomic Force, and Magnetic Force microscopy), and an Energy Dispersive Spectrometer for the SEM). Flash animation videos explain how each of the instruments work. Videos on how they are used at NASA and the sample preparation. Measuring and labeling tools provided with each instrument. Hands on experience of controlling the virtual instrument to conduct investigations, much like the real scientists at NASA do. Very open architecture. Open source on SourceForge. Extensive use of XML Target audience is high school and entry-level college students. "Many beginning students never get closer to an electron microscope than the photos in their textbooks. But anyone can get a sense of what the instrument can do by downloading this simulator from NASA's Kennedy Space Center." Science Magazine, April 8th, 2005

Garner, Lesley C.

2007-01-01

81

Failure Analysis at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

History has shown that failures occur in every engineering endeavor, and what we learn from those failures contributes to the knowledge base to safely complete future missions. The necessity of failure analysis is at its apex at the end of one aged program (i.e. Shuttle) and at the beginning of a new and untested program (i.e. Constellation). The information that we gain through failure analysis corrects the deficiencies in the current vehicle to make the next generation of vehicles more efficient and safe. The Failure Analysis and Materials Evaluation section in the Materials Science Division at the Kennedy Space Center performs metallurgical, mechanical, electrical, and non-metallic failure analysis and accident investigations on both flight hardware and ground support equipment (GSE) for the Shuttle, International Space Station, Constellation, and Launch Services Programs. This presentation will explore a variety of failure case studies at KSC and the lessons learned that can be applied in future programs.

Salazar, Victoria L.; Wright, Clara

2010-01-01

82

Welding at the Kennedy Space Center.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Brief description of the nature of the mechanical equipment at a space launch complex from a welding viewpoint. including an identification of the major welding applications used in the construction of this complex. The role played by welding in the ground support equipment is noted, including the welded structures and systems required in the vehicle assembly building, the mobile launchers, transporters, mobile service structure, launch pad and launch site, the propellants system, the pneumatics system, and the environmental control system. The welding processes used at the Kennedy Space Center are reviewed, and a particularly detailed account is given of the design and fabrication of the liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen storage spheres and piping. Finally, the various methods of testing and inspecting the storage spheres are cited.

Clautice, W. E.

1973-01-01

83

Kennedy Space Center ocean beach erosion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dune barrier erosion and possible breakthrough due to storm and hurricane wave activity is studied near Mosquito Lagoon, in Kennedy Space Center property. The results of a geological as well as hydrodynamic appraisal of the problem area indicate that no inlet has existed across the dune barrier since 500 A.D., and that there is little likelihood of a possible breakthrough inlet remaining open permanently, primarily because the relatively shallow lagoon does not contain enough volume of water to maintain an inlet between the ocean and the lagoon. It is therefore recommended that only minimal measures, such as closing up the man-made passes across the dunes, be carried out to ensure continuation of the action of natural beach maintaining processes.

Mehta, A. J.; Obrien, M. P.

1973-01-01

84

Kennedy Space Center Medical Operations and Medical Kit  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews the emergency medical operations at Kennedy Space center, the KSC launch and landing contingency modes, the triage site, the medical kit, and the medications available.

Scarpa, Philip

2011-01-01

85

Human Spaceflight: The Kennedy Legacy - Duration: 3 minutes, 39 seconds.  

NASA Video Gallery

On May 25, 1961, just weeks after the first American astronaut flew, President John F. Kennedy put NASA on a bold path, challenging the nation to do what was then impossible -- send a man to the mo...

86

September 2014 Vol. 1 No. 6 Kennedy Space Center's  

E-print Network

encourages kids to play along in adventure of rocketry 14Kennedy prepping for 50 more years of American of the four "Swarmies" robots stand in front of the bar code markers they will track as they roll over rough

87

Radar Nowcasting of Total Lightning over the Kennedy Space Center  

E-print Network

The NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is situated along the east coast of central Florida, where a high frequency of lightning occurs annually. Although cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning forecasting using radar echoes has been thoroughly analyzed, few...

Seroka, Gregory Nicholas

2011-08-08

88

About Kennedy's Disease: Genetic Counseling and Inheritance Issues  

MedlinePLUS

Kennedy's Disease Association A Public Benefit, Non-Profit Organization Register GTranslate GTranslate Javascript is required to use GTranslate multilingual website and translation delivery network Close "This is one SUPER organization and ...

89

ROBERT E. KENNEDY LIBRARY SPECIAL COLLECTIONS & UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES  

E-print Network

ROBERT E. KENNEDY LIBRARY SPECIAL COLLECTIONS & UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES CALIFORNIA POLYTECHNIC STATE Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, hereby transfers to the Cal Poly University Archives the following materials: The University Archives will care for, house, and administer these materials

Sze, Lawrence

90

ROBERT E. KENNEDY LIBRARY SPECIAL COLLECTIONS & UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES  

E-print Network

ROBERT E. KENNEDY LIBRARY SPECIAL COLLECTIONS & UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES CALIFORNIA POLYTECHNIC STATE be accessible to all persons qualified to use the Special Collections and University Archives subject of materials considered inappropriate for retention in the Special Collections & University Archives Department

Sze, Lawrence

91

Laser Scanning and Simulation at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We perform simulations of ground operations leading up launch at Kennedy Space Center and Vandenberg Air Force Base in CA. We use Laser Scanning, Modeling and Simulations to make sure operations are feasible, efficient, and safe.

Kickbusch, Tracey E.

2012-01-01

92

Microfilmed Records in the John Fitzgerald Kennedy Library.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the planning and implementation of a program to acquire copies of personal papers and federal records for deposit in the John F. Kennedy Library. The current status of the library's microfilm collections is described. (nine references) (MES)

Whealan, Ronald E.

1988-01-01

93

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA John F. Kennedy ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October 1963. VERTICAL ASSEMBLY BUILDING, LOW BAY, SECTIONS J-J, K-K, & L-L. Sheet 33-32 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Vehicle Assembly Building, VAB Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

94

A review of "Making Science Social: The Conferences of Theophraste Renaudot 1633-1642" by Kathleen Wellman.  

E-print Network

is an important and instructive work. Kathleen Wellman. Making Science Social: The Conferences of Th?ophraste Renaudot 1633-1642. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2003. xviii + 461 pp. + 4 illus. $39.95. Review by KAROL K. WEAVER, SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY.... Kathleen Wellman?s Making Science Social: The Conferences of Th?ophraste Renaudot 1633-1642 traces the history of the seven- teenth-century conferences led by Th?ophraste Renaudot to eluci- date the characteristics of early seventeenth-century science...

Karol K. Weaver

2004-01-01

95

President Kennedy in Dallas: Dealey Plaza memorialized  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The assassination of US President John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963 transformed the US political landscape as well as the trajectory of subsequent world history. The venue of that tragic event in Dallas was Dealey Plaza, encompassing the "grassy knoll" and the adjacent book-depository and courthouse buildings. For the past forty years the site has undergone a series of conservation/preservation projects in order to make it more suitable for those visiting either in homage or out of curiosity. One such project concerned the deterioration of ironwork within the "Old Red Courthouse". The building architect noted that both stairway railings and floor-support trusses were corroding and deteriorating at accelerating rates. In most situations of this sort the iron would be sandblasted and repainted. However, in this instance sandblasting was inappropriate due to environmental concerns and logistical limitations. Furthermore, historical authenticity criteria dictated that the metal be preserved with its original unpainted finish. In order to avoid excessive floor loading (in this fragile old building) and the generation significant environmental air pollution (within urban Dallas) the general contractor (Avery Mays, Inc.) opted to evaluate photonic divestment. Both laser cleaning and laser glazing were assessed for efficacy and cost effectiveness. Xenon-flashlamp irradiation was evaluated both with and without citric acid augmentation. Citric acid matrix-assisted flashlamp treatment was selected for the preservation of the courthouse ironwork. This decision was based on three advantages over laser treatments: higher speed and cost effectiveness, preservation of the historic "Oliver Foundry" logo markings, and the chemical passivation and rust resistance of the final surface patina.

Asmus, John F.

2007-07-01

96

Surface-water hydrology at three coal-refuse disposal sites in southern Illinois: Staunton 1, New Kathleen, and Superior  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hydrologic data were collected and analyzed for three coal refuse disposal sites in southern Illinois. The disposal sites were associated with underground mines and consisted of piles of coarse waste (gob) and slurry areas where fine waste rejected from coal washing was deposited. Prereclamation data were available for the Superior washer site in Macoupin County and the New Kathleen site

L. M. Mele; P. F. Prodan

1983-01-01

97

Water Dynamics in Water/DMSO Binary Mixtures Daryl B. Wong, Kathleen P. Sokolowsky, Musa I. El-Barghouthi,  

E-print Network

Water Dynamics in Water/DMSO Binary Mixtures Daryl B. Wong, Kathleen P. Sokolowsky, Musa I. El (DMSO)/ water solutions with a wide range of water concentrations are studied using polarization even at very low water concentrations that are associated with water- water and water-DMSO hydrogen

Fayer, Michael D.

98

President Kennedy, Vice President Johnson and Dr. von Braun at Redstone Airfield  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

President John F. Kennedy, Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson and Marshall Space Flight Center Director Dr. Wernher von Braun at the Redstone Arsenal Airfield, September 11, 1962. Kennedy and Johnson visited the Marshall Center to tour national space facilities.

1962-01-01

99

33 CFR 334.525 - Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space...DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.525 Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space...41.189? W. (b) The regulation. (1) The...

2013-07-01

100

33 CFR 334.525 - Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space...DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.525 Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space...41.189? W. (b) The regulation. (1) The...

2014-07-01

101

American Alligator Research on the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews the research conducted at the Kennedy Space Center on the American Alligator. The objectives of the research were to establish life history baseline at the Kennedy Space Center and at the Merit Island National Wildlife Reserve (MINWR). Some of the factors that were examined are: nesting success, movement patterns, and population structure. Another objective was to determine the overall health of the alligator population, by analyzing blood and tissue chemistry, and urine analysis. A third objective was to compare alligators at KSC/MINWR to the statewide population. Some of the results are shown in charts and graphs.

Lowers, Russell H.

2010-01-01

102

Improved Kennedy-Thorndike experiment to test special relativity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A modern version of the Kennedy-Thorndike experiment was carried out by searching for sidereal variations between the frequency of a laser locked to an I2 reference line and a laser locked to the resonance frequency of a highly stable cavity. No variations were found at the level of 2 x 10 to the -12th. This represents a 300-fold improvement over the original Kennedy-Thorndike experiment and allows the Lorentz transformations to be deduced entirely from experiment at an accuracy level of 70 ppm.

Hils, Dieter; Hall, J. L.

1990-01-01

103

General view from the Launch Pad at Kennedy Space Center ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

General view from the Launch Pad at Kennedy Space Center looking at the Rotating Service Structure, the Fixed Service Structure and the Mobile Launch Platform with the Shuttle Stack Assembly atop and being prepared for launch. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

104

December 2014 Vol. 1 No. 9 Kennedy Space Center's  

E-print Network

Canaveral Air Force Station, SpaceX CRS-5 will deliver cargo and crew supplies to the International Space the International Space Station. The spacecraft will re-enter Earth's atmosphere at close to 20,000 mphDecember 2014 Vol. 1 No. 9 Kennedy Space Center's National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Waliser, Duane E.

105

NCERA-101 Station Report from Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This is our annual report to the North Central Extension Research Activity, which is affiliated with the USDA and Land Grant University Agricultural Experiment Stations. I have been a member of this committee for 25 years. The presentation will be given by Dr. Gioia Massa, Kennedy Space Center

Massa, Gioia D.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

2014-01-01

106

John Stewart Kennedy and the City of Glasgow Bank  

Microsoft Academic Search

being certain American securities with a par value of more than $5,000,000, the liquidators of the City of Glasgow Bank asked J.S. Kennedy & Co. to rep- resent them. At its liquidation the City of Glasgow Bank owned, among other American assets, securities of the Western Union Railroad Company (not to be confused with the Western Union Telegraph Company), which

Saul Engelbourg

107

CURRICULUM VITAE: THEODORE KENNEDY Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center  

E-print Network

CURRICULUM VITAE: THEODORE KENNEDY Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center United States/RESEARCH: 2/05 - present. Aquatic Ecologist, Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center, USGS, Flagstaff.S. 1/03 - 3/04. Postdoctoral researcher, Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center,USGS, Flagstaff

Lovich, Jeffrey E.

108

Kennedy and Achilles: A Classical Approach on Political Science.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Uses the careers of President John F. Kennedy and the legendary Greek hero Achilles to explore the intersections among mythological status, public perception, and leadership. Observes fascinating parallels between both men and their roles as soldiers, generational representatives, and martyred heroes. (MJP)

Nelson, Michael

1996-01-01

109

Beyond Enhancement: The Kennedy Center's Commitment to Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Asserts that exposure to high-quality arts performances with accompanying educational experiences enlivens teaching and learning. Maintains that few schools have taken advantage of opportunities provided by arts-presenting institutions. Describes resources from the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. (CFR)

Gordon, Derek E.; Stoner, Scott D.

1995-01-01

110

No Religious Test: A Letter to Candidate John F. Kennedy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides background material for teaching Article Four of the United States Constitution. Suggests activities using primary documents in order to teach lessons on religious tests. The document chosen is a letter to John F. Kennedy from a citizen written in September 1960. Document may be reproduced for use in the classroom. (KO)

Mueller, Jean West; Schamel, Wynell Burroughs

1988-01-01

111

Relation of Questions and Answers in Kennedy's Press Conferences.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Analyzes the questions posed by reporters and the answers given by President John F. Kennedy in his formal press conferences. Concludes that questions that followed the rules for interviewing set forth by experts produced better answers than those that did not follow rules. (FL)

Ostman, Ronald E.; And Others

1981-01-01

112

Kathleen Heiden, PhD Merchandising and Consumer Studies, School of Human Ecology, College of Applied & Natural Sciences  

E-print Network

Kathleen Heiden, PhD Merchandising and Consumer Studies, School of Human Ecology, College.9 Summer 2012 HEC 257: Survey of Human Ecology 3/0 29 100 N/A HEC 406: Special Problems in HEC 3/0 3 100 N.6 Fall 2011 HEC 257: Survey of Human Ecology 3/0 37 100 3.2 MCS 219: Textiles 3/0 13 100 3.6 MCS 220

Selmic, Sandra

113

History of Reliability and Quality Assurance at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This Kennedy Historical Document (KHD) provides a unique historical perspective of the organizational and functional responsibilities for the manned and un-manned programs at Kennedy Space Center, Florida. As systems become more complex and hazardous, the attention to detailed planning and execution continues to be a challenge. The need for a robust reliability and quality assurance program will always be a necessity to ensure mission success. As new space missions are defined and technology allows for continued access to space, these programs cannot be compromised. The organizational structure that has provided the reliability and quality assurance functions for both the manned and unmanned programs has seen many changes since the first group came to Florida in the 1950's. The roles of government and contractor personnel have changed with each program and organizational alignment has changed based on that responsibility. The organizational alignment of the personnel performing these functions must ensure independent assessment of the processes.

Childers, Frank M.

2004-01-01

114

Reconceptualizing John F. Kennedy's chronic low back pain.  

PubMed

When the medical records for John Fitzgerald Kennedy were made public, it became clear that the 35th President of the United States suffered greatly from a series of medical illnesses from the time he was a toddler until his assassination in November of 1963. Aside from having Addison disease, no condition seemed to cause him more distress than did his chronic low back pain. A number of surgical procedures to address the presumed structural cause of the pain resulted in little relief and increased disability. Later, a conservative program, including trigger point injections and exercises, provided modest benefit. Herein, the mechanisms underlying his pain are evaluated based on more contemporary pain research. This reconceptualizing of John Fitzgerald Kennedy's pain could serve as a model for other cases where the main cause of the pain is presumed to be located in the periphery. PMID:23900054

Pinals, Robert S; Hassett, Afton L

2013-01-01

115

General view inside of the Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

General view inside of the Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy Space Center looking at the pair of Solid Rocket Boosters mounted on the Mobile Launch Platform and attached to the External Tank (ET). The Orbiter will be attached to the ET on the side opposite to the side in this view. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

116

Birds of Swale Marshes on John F. Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Birds were surveyed in several isolated freshwater wetlands on John F. Kennedy Space Center to determine species composition and the importance of these wet- lands to birds. The Red-winged Blackbird and Green-backed Heron were the two most abundant breeders in the swale marshes. The Common Yellowthroat was the most common winter resident but was rare in summer. These marshes are important features within landscapes dominated by uplands particularly because of their significance to amphibians and reptiles.

Breininger, David R.

1992-01-01

117

NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center environmental impact statement  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The probable total impact of the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) operations on the environment is discussed in terms of launch operations emissions and environmental quality. A schedule of planned launches through 1973 is included with a description of the systems for eliminating harmful emissions during launch operations. The effects of KSC on wild life and environmental quality are discussed along with the irreversible and irretrievable commitments of natural resources.

1971-01-01

118

Child's Letter to President John F. Kennedy about Physical Fitness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

On March 3, 1963, nine-year-old Jack Chase of Torrance, California, wrote a letter to President John F. Kennedy. In his single-page note, featured in this article, Jack described his plans for staying physically fit. He said he would walk to school, the store, and the library "because I know a strong boy makes a strong man and a strong man makes a…

McNatt, Missy

2009-01-01

119

Improved Kennedy-Thorndike experiment to test special relativity  

Microsoft Academic Search

A modern version of the Kennedy-Thorndike experiment was carried out by searching for sidereal variations between the frequency of a laser locked to an I2 reference line and a laser locked to the resonance frequency of a highly stable cavity. No variations were found at the level of 2 x 10 to the -12th. This represents a 300-fold improvement over

Dieter Hils; J. L. Hall

1990-01-01

120

Nowcasting for Space Shuttle Landings at Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

Space shuttle launches and landings at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) are subject to strict weather-related launch commit criteria and landing weather flight rules. Complex launch commit criteria and end-of-mission landing weather flight rules demand very accurate forecasts and nowcasts (short-term forecasts of less than 2 h) of cloud, wind, visibility, precipitation, turbulence, and thunderstorms prior to shuttle launches and landings.The

William H. Bauman III; Steven Businger

1996-01-01

121

John F. Kennedy School of Government Politics Research Group  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Politics Research Group of the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University has created this site, which contains working papers from faculty seminars and research workshops. Abstracts and full-text versions are both available. Some titles include: "Little Theatre: Committees in Congress," "Are Lawyers Liars? The Argument of Redescription," "Securing Subsidiarity: Legitimacy and the Allocation of Governing Authority," and "Managing Technology Policy at the White House."

1998-01-01

122

Corrosion Activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report documents summer faculty fellow efforts in the corrosion test bed at the NASA Kennedy Space Center. During the summer of 2002 efforts were concentrated on three activities: a short course on corrosion control for KSC personnel, evaluation of commercial wash additives used for corrosion control on Army aircraft, and improvements in the testing of a new cathodic protection system under development at KSC.

Heidersbach, Robert H.

2002-01-01

123

Kennedy Library Releases Largest Quantity of JFK Recordings  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

On November 24, the John F. Kennedy Library and Museum in Boston, MA made available for researchers "more than 37 hours of recordings of President Kennedy's meetings, conversations, phone calls and dictation," the largest ever single release of tape-recorded material by the Library. The recordings were made from 1962 to 1963 and include conversations between the President and his advisors on a number of issues, such as the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, Cuba, Berlin, Egypt, and the Soviet Union. Also included are a number of dictabelt recordings of telephone conversations with former Presidents Herbert Hoover, Harry Truman, and Dwight Eisenhower after the Cuban Missile Crisis and dictation made by Kennedy following the overthrow and assassination of South Vietnamese President Ngo Dinh Diem in November 1963. The site offers ten sample RealPlayer recordings of varying length, on a variety of topics. For potential researchers of the tapes, the most valuable resource at the site is a lengthy finding aid and detailed recording logs in .pdf format. Information is also provided on how to purchase the recordings and finding guide.

124

System Engineering Processes at Kennedy Space Center for Development of SLS and Orion Launch Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

There are over 40 subsystems being developed for the future SLS and Orion Launch Systems at Kennedy Space Center. These subsystems are developed at the Kennedy Space Center Engineering Directorate. The Engineering Directorate at Kennedy Space Center follows a comprehensive design process which requires several different product deliverables during each phase of each of the subsystems. This Presentation describes this process with examples of where the process has been applied.

Schafer, Eric; Stambolian, Damon; Henderson, Gena

2013-01-01

125

Multi-Element Integrated Project Planning at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This presentation demonstrates how the ASRC Scheduling team developed working practices to support multiple NASA and ASRC Project Managers using the enterprise capabilities of Primavera P6 and P6 Web Access. This work has proceeded as part of Kennedy Ground Systems' preparation for its transition from the Shuttle Program to the Constellation Program. The presenters will cover Primavera's enterprise-class capabilities for schedule development, integrated critical path analysis, and reporting, as well as advanced Primavera P6 Web Access tools and techniques for communicating project status.

Mullon, Robert

2008-01-01

126

Aerial view of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This Shuttle/Gantry mockup and Post Show Dome anchor the northeast corner of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. The Astronaut Memorial is located just above. Sprawling across 70 acres on Florida's Space Coast, the complex is located off State Road 405, NASA Parkway, six miles inside the Space Center entrance. The building at the upper left is the Theater Complex. Other exhibits and buildings on the site are the Center for Space Education, Cafeteria, Space Flight Exhibit Building, Souvenir Sales Building, Spaceport Central, Ticket Pavilion and Center for Space Education.

1998-01-01

127

Climate of the Kennedy Space Center and vicinity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Climate plays a large role in determining the biota of a region. Summary data are presented for climate variables of ecological importance including precipitation, temperature, evapotranspiration, wind, isolation, lightning, and humidity. The John F. Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, and surrounding area are sampled intensively for climatic conditions; data are presented for the barrier island, Merritt Island, and the mainland, which represents the range of conditions in the local area. Climatic figures, database listings, and historic data (pre-1931) are presented in the appendix.

Mailander, Joseph L.

1990-01-01

128

Strategic Project Management at the NASA Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes Project Management at NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) from a strategic perspective. It develops the historical context of the agency and center's strategic planning process and illustrates how now is the time for KSC to become a center which has excellence in project management. The author describes project management activities at the center and details observations on those efforts. Finally the author describes the Strategic Project Management Process Model as a conceptual model which could assist KSC in defining an appropriate project management process system at the center.

Lavelle, Jerome P.

2000-01-01

129

Kennedy Space Center Coronary Heart Disease Risk Screening Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the number one cause of death in the U.S. It is a likely cause of death and disability in the lives of employees at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) as well. The KSC Biomedical Office used a multifactorial formula developed by the Framingham Heart Study to calculate CHD risk probabilities for individuals in a segment of the KSC population who require medical evaluation for job certification. Those individuals assessed to have a high risk probability will be targeted for intervention.

Tipton, David A.; Scarpa, Philip J.

1999-01-01

130

77 FR 68196 - Orders Limiting Operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport, LaGuardia Airport, and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...FAA-2012-1191] Orders Limiting Operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport, LaGuardia Airport, and Newark...requirement to use Operating Authorizations (slots) at John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK), LaGuardia...

2012-11-15

131

75 FR 9017 - Orders Limiting Scheduled Operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport, LaGuardia Airport...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Administration Orders Limiting Scheduled Operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport, LaGuardia Airport and Newark...Airport (DCA) and Operating Authorizations (slots) at John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK), LaGuardia...

2010-02-26

132

76 FR 19517 - Orders Limiting Scheduled Operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport, LaGuardia Airport...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...FAA-2011-0248] Orders Limiting Scheduled Operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport, LaGuardia Airport, and Newark...Airport (DCA) and Operating Authorizations (slots) at John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK), LaGuardia...

2011-04-07

133

33 CFR 334.525 - Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; restricted area...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.525 Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; restricted area....

2012-07-01

134

33 CFR 334.525 - Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; restricted area...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.525 Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; restricted area....

2010-07-01

135

33 CFR 334.525 - Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; restricted area...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.525 Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; restricted area....

2011-07-01

136

A pentadic analysis of senator Edward Kennedy's address to the people of massachusetts, July 25, 1969  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using Kenneth Burke's concept of the pentad as the principal tool for content analysis? an examination was made of Senator Edward Kennedy's address of July 25, 1969. That analysis suggests that the speech depicted Kennedy as the victim of a scene he could not control and as the potential victim of other agents, the people of Masachusetts.

David A. Ling

1970-01-01

137

A Biography of John F. Kennedy: The 35th President of the United States.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This teaching guide consists of a biography of the 35th President of the United States, John Fitzgerald Kennedy, as well as a set of five worksheets to accompany the biography. The worksheets, which are based on the reading, are intended to help students in grades 3-5 reinforce their knowledge of the life and presidency of John Kennedy, while at…

Weidman, Lisa Menendez; Shea, Ellen

138

A Caring and Competent Society Revisited: The John F. Kennedy Center at 30.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the development of the Kennedy Center for Research and Human Development at Peabody College of Vanderbilt University, which is renowned for outstanding training of researchers and for its work in the field of mental retardation. Discusses Kennedy Center researchers, the Center's philosophy, the Center's research, and the Center's role in…

Thompson, Travis

1996-01-01

139

John F. Kennedy and Constitutionalism, Democracy and Human Rights in Latin America: Promise and Performance.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Summarizes the sometimes confusing and contradictory efforts of the John F. Kennedy administration to encourage the development of democratic political processes in Latin America. Although sincere, Kennedy's efforts often were stymied by resistance from the local power structure and his own Central Intelligence Agency. Eventually, anti-communist…

Rabe, Stephen G.

1995-01-01

140

"A Tour of the White House with Mrs. John F. Kennedy": An International Special Event.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This critique of "A Tour of the White House with Mrs. John F. Kennedy," a television program produced by CBS following completion of the White House restoration project to show the changes made, begins by discussing the relationships of the President and Mrs. Kennedy with the media, and the First Lady's involvement in the restoration project.…

Watson, Mary Ann

141

John F. Kennedy and Vietnam: The Historical Record Versus the Revisionists.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Criticizes the current historical interpretation (promoted by Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. and Oliver Stone) that President John F. Kennedy intended to withdraw from Vietnam if elected to a second term. Maintains that the preponderance of historical evidence suggests that Kennedy intended to exit Vietnam only after a military victory. (MJP)

Turner, Thomas R.

1995-01-01

142

Winners of the First 1960 Televised Presidential Debate between Kennedy and Nixon.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews the events, studies, and comments (from 1960 to the present) regarding the controversial question of who won the first 1960 televised debate between John F. Kennedy and Richard M. Nixon. Supports the view that, for television viewers, Kennedy was the winner, whereas radio listeners gave Nixon the edge. (SR)

Kraus, Sidney

1996-01-01

143

"We Face a Moral Crisis:" John F. Kennedy's Commitment to Civil Rights, June 11, 1963.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Traces the slow, incremental journey of President John F. Kennedy from a cautious supporter of civil rights to an ardent advocate. Until his June 11, 1963 televised presidential address, Kennedy's commitment to civil rights was weakened by his desire to avoid political conflict with southern democrats. (MJP)

Lyons, Thomas T.

1995-01-01

144

Discovery: Under the Microscope at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA) is known for discovery, exploration, and advancement of knowledge. Since the days of Leeuwenhoek, microscopy has been at the forefront of discovery and knowledge. No truer is that statement than today at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), where microscopy plays a major role in contamination identification and is an integral part of failure analysis. Space exploration involves flight hardware undergoing rigorous "visually clean" inspections at every step of processing. The unknown contaminants that are discovered on these inspections can directly impact the mission by decreasing performance of sensors and scientific detectors on spacecraft and satellites, acting as micrometeorites, damaging critical sealing surfaces, and causing hazards to the crew of manned missions. This talk will discuss how microscopy has played a major role in all aspects of space port operations at KSC. Case studies will highlight years of analysis at the Materials Science Division including facility and payload contamination for the Navigation Signal Timing and Ranging Global Positioning Satellites (NA VST AR GPS) missions, quality control monitoring of monomethyl hydrazine fuel procurement for launch vehicle operations, Shuttle Solids Rocket Booster (SRB) foam processing failure analysis, and Space Shuttle Main Engine Cut-off (ECO) flight sensor anomaly analysis. What I hope to share with my fellow microscopists is some of the excitement of microscopy and how its discoveries has led to hardware processing, that has helped enable the successful launch of vehicles and space flight missions here at Kennedy Space Center.

Howard, Philip M.

2013-01-01

145

Birthplace of John F. Kennedy: Home of the Boy Who Would Be President. Teaching with Historic Places.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This lesson is based on the John F. Kennedy National Historic Site (Massachusetts), the birthplace of President John F. Kennedy. The lesson can be used as a biographical study, an introduction to the Kennedy presidency and the turbulent sixties, or as part of a unit on post-World War II U.S. history. Primary and secondary sources are included for…

Obleschuk, Leslie C.

146

Dr. Kathleen Drew-Baker, "Mother of the Sea", a Manchester scientist celebrated each year for half a century in Japan.  

PubMed

2013 marks the 50th annual Drew festival in Uto City, Japan, celebrating the work of University of Manchester botanist, Dr. Kathleen Drew-Baker. Her insight into the reproductive biology of algae was the key to efficient farming of the seaweed "nori" which is a familiar component of Japanese food. PMID:23943287

Harris, Constance; Matsuda, Kazuhiko; Sattelle, David B

2013-09-01

147

Caring Is Activism: Black Southern Womanist Teachers Theorizing and the Careers of Kathleen Crosby and Bertha Maxwell-Roddey, 1946-1986  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article, based on archival research and oral interviews, examines the personal and professional impact of desegregation on African American teachers in an urban southern setting by focusing on the life stories of two public school teachers, Kathleen Crosby and Bertha Maxwell-Roddey. Both taught in segregated schools, helped to desegregate…

Ramsey, Sonya

2012-01-01

148

Energy Management Programs at the John F. Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Energy Management internship over the summer of 2011 involved a series of projects related to energy management on the John. F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This internship saved KSC $14.3 million through budgetary projections, saved KSC $400,000 through implementation of the recycling program, updated KSC Environmental Management System's (EMS) water and energy-related List of Requirements (LoR) which changed 25.7% of the list, provided a incorporated a 45% design review of the Ordnance Operations Facility (OOF) which noted six errors within the design plans, created a certification system and timeline for implementation regarding compliance to the federal Guiding Principles, and gave off-shore wind as the preferred alternative to on-site renewable energy generation.

Huang, Jeffrey H.

2011-01-01

149

Lightning Protection and Instrumentation at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lightning is a natural phenomenon, but can be dangerous. Prevention of lightning is a physical impossibility and total protection requires compromises on costs and effects, therefore prediction and measurements of the effects that might be produced by iightn:ing is a most at locat:ions where people or sensitive systems and equipment are exposed. This is the case of the launching pads for the Space Shuttle at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. This report summarizes lightring phenomena with a brief explanation of lightning generation and lightning activity as related to KSC. An analysis of the instrumentation used at the launching pads for measurements of lightning effects with alternatives to improve the protection system and up-grade the actual instrumentation system is indicated.

Colon, Jose L.

2005-01-01

150

Applications of Meteorological Tower Data at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Members of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) design and operation communities rely on meteorological information collected at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), located near Cape Canaveral, Florida, to correctly apply the ambient environment to various tasks. The Natural Environments Branch/EV44, located at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, is responsible for providing its NASA customers with meteorological data using various climatological data sources including balloons, surface stations, aircraft, hindcast models, and meteorological towers. Of the many resources available within the KSC region, meteorological towers are preferred for near-surface applications because they record data at regular, frequent intervals over an extensive period of record at a single location. This paper discusses the uses of data measured at several different meteorological towers for a common period of record and how the data can be applied to various engineering decisions for the new Constellation Program Ares and Orion space vehicles.

Altino, Karen M.; Barbre, Robert E., Jr.

2009-01-01

151

Aerial view of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, shown in this aerial view looking south, sprawls across 70 acres on Florida's Space Coast. It is located off State Road 405, NASA Parkway, six miles inside the Space Center entrance. SR 405 can be seen at the bottom of the photo. Just above the roadway, from left, can be seen the Shuttle/Gantry mockup, the Post Show Dome, the Astronaut Memorial, and to the far right, the Center for Space Education. Behind the Memorial are a cluster of buildings that include the Theater Complex, Cafeteria, Space Flight Exhibit Building, Souvenir Sales Building, Spaceport Central, and Ticket Pavilion. At the upper right of the site is a display of rockets that have played a significant role in the growth of the space program. Parking lots span the width of the complex on the south side.

1998-01-01

152

Aerial view of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, shown in this aerial view looking east, sprawls across 70 acres on Florida's Space Coast. It is located off State Road 405, NASA Parkway, six miles inside the Space Center entrance. SR 405 can be seen at the top left of the photo. In the foreground is the display of rockets that have played a significant role in the growth of the space program. Just above that, left to right, can be seen the Theater Complex, Space Flight Exhibit Building and Spaceport Central. Other buildings clustered at the center are the Cafeteria, Souvenir Sales Building, and Ticket Pavilion. To the left of the Theater Complex are the Astronaut Memorial, the Post Show Dome, and the Shuttle/Gantry mockup. Not seen in the photo is the Center for Space Education.

1998-01-01

153

Aerial view of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center, shown in this aerial view looking northwest, sprawls across 70 acres on Florida's Space Coast and is located off State Road 405, NASA Parkway, six miles inside the Space Center entrance. SR 405 can be seen at the top of the photo (left to right). Just below the roadway, from left, can be seen the Center for Space Education, the Theater Complex, Astronaut Memorial, the Post Show Dome, and Shuttle/Gantry mockup. In front of the theater complex are a cluster of buildings that include the Cafeteria, Space Flight Exhibit Building, Souvenir Sales Building, Spaceport Central, and Ticket Pavilion. At the left of the complex are various rockets that have played a significant role in the growth of the space program. Beyond the roadway can be seen the Banana River.

1998-01-01

154

Aerial view of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center, shown in this aerial view looking south, sprawls across 70 acres on Florida's Space Coast , and is located off State Road 405, NASA Parkway, six miles inside the Space Center entrance. SR 405 can be seen at the bottom of the photo. Just above the roadway, from left can be seen the Shuttle/Gantry mockup; the Post Show Dome; the Astronaut Memorial; and to the far right, the Center for Space Education. Behind the Memorial are a cluster of buildings that include the Theater Complex, Cafeteria, Space Flight Exhibit Building, Souvenir Sales Building, Spaceport Central, and Ticket Pavilion. At the upper right are various rockets that have played a significant role in the growth of the space program.

1998-01-01

155

Aircraft measurements of electrified clouds at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The space-vehicle launch commit criteria for weather and atmospheric electrical conditions in us at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy Space Center (KSC) have been made restrictive because of the past difficulties that have arisen when space vehicles have triggered lightning discharge after their launch during cloudy weather. With the present ground-base instrumentation and our limited knowledge of cloud electrification process over this region of Florida, it has not been possible to provide a quantitative index of safe launching conditions. During the fall of 1988, a Schweizer 845 airplane equipped to measure electric field and other meteorological parameters flew over KSC in a program to study clouds defined in the existing launch restriction criteria. All aspects of this program are addressed including planning, method, and results. A case study on the November 4, 1988 flight is also presented.

Jones, J. J.; Winn, W. P.; Hunyady, S. J.; Moore, C. B.; Bullock, J. W.

1990-01-01

156

Kennedy's Biomedical Laboratory Makes Multi-Tasking Look Easy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

If it is one thing that Florida has in abundance, it is sunshine and with that sunshine heat and humidity. For workers at the Kennedy Space Center that have to work outside in the heat and humidity, heat exhaustion/stroke is a real possibility. It might help people to know that Kennedy's Biomedical Laboratory has been testing some new Koolvests(Trademark) that can be worn underneath SCAPE suits. They have also been working on how to block out high noise levels; in fact, Don Doerr, chief of the Biomedical Lab, says, "The most enjoyable aspect is knowing that the Biomedical Lab and the skills of its employees have been used to support safe space flight, not only for the astronaut flight crew, but just as important for the ground processing personnel as well." The NASA Biomedical Laboratory has existed in the John F. Kennedy's Operations and Checkout Building since the Apollo Program. The primary mission of this laboratory has been the biomedical support to major, manned space programs that have included Apollo, Apollo-Soyuz, Skylab, and Shuttle. In this mission, the laboratory has been responsible in accomplishing much of the technical design, planning, provision, fabrication, and maintenance of flight and ground biomedical monitoring instrumentation. This includes the electronics in the launch flight suit and similar instrumentation systems in the spacecraft. (Note: The Lab checked out the system for STS-128 at Pad A using Firing room 4 and ground support equipment in the lab.) During Apollo, there were six engineers and ten technicians in the facility. This has evolved today to two NASA engineers and two NASA technicians, a Life Science Support contract physiologist and part-time support from an LSSC nurse and physician. Over the years, the lab has enjoyed collaboration with outside agencies and investigators. These have included on-site support to the Ames Research Center bed rest studies (seven years) and the European Space Agency studies in Toulouse, France (two years). The lab has also actively collaborated with the US Army Institute for Surgical Research, the USAF School of Aerospace Medicine, and the USN Naval Experimental Diving Unit. Because the lab often evaluates various forms of commercial-off-the-shelf life support equipment, the laboratory works closely with private companies, both domestic and foreign. The European companies seem to be more proactive and participatory with the advancement of personal protective equipment. Because these companies have viewed the space program's unique need for advanced forms of personal protective equipment, some have responded with new designs based on the prediction that these advances will soon find markets in the commercial sector. Using much of the same skills and equipment, the laboratory also addresses physiological testing of humans by supporting flight experiments and personnel involved with ground processing. While Johnson Space Center is primarily responsible for flight experiments, the Kennedy's Biomedical Lab provides the local support. However, as stated above, there are many challenges facing KSC workers that gain the attention of this lab in the measurement of the problem and the selection and testing of countermeasures. These include respiratory protection, whole body suits, hearing protection and heat stress, among many others.

Dunn, Carol Anne

2009-01-01

157

John F. Kennedy Space Center's Chemochromic Hypergol Sensors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) seeks partne rs interested in the commercial application of the Chemochromic Hyper gol Sensors technology. NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is soliciti ng licensees for this innovative technology. The Chemochromic Hypergo l Sensors technology consists of chemochromic pigments incorporated i nto various matrices (e.g., tapes, sheets, injection molded parts, fi bers). When placed near strategic locations such as piping and contai ner valves, seams, and joints, these sensors provide an instantaneous , distinct color change from yellow to black indicating the presence of hypergols at the leak location. The chemochromic pigments can be incorporated into fibers used to make fabrics for personal protective equipment as well as into badge holders for use as a point leak detector. These affordable, easily replaceable sensors provide the capabil ity to visually monitor leak-prone locations and personnel working i n those areas on a continuous basis for the presence of dangerous hyp ergols.

Nichols, James D.

2012-01-01

158

The assassination of John F. Kennedy: revisiting the medical data.  

PubMed

Doubt continues to surround the assassination of President Kennedy to this day. Unfortunately, the controversy was not diminished by the multiple commissions and panels that were convened to investigate it. This was in large part because these various panels continued to propagate much of the confusion and lack of precision that plagued the initial medical reports, and introduced some new confusion of their own. Much of this controversy was driven by incomplete information, poor documentation and analysis, and the puzzling decision to withhold key medical evidence both from investigators and the public. However, the preponderance of evidence does show that the single-shooter, three-bullet theory is plausible both medically and scientifically. PMID:24165615

Rohrich, Rod J; Nagarkar, Purushottam; Stokes, Mike; Weinstein, Aaron

2013-11-01

159

Surface-water hydrology at three coal-refuse disposal sites in southern Illinois: Staunton 1, New Kathleen, and Superior  

SciTech Connect

Hydrologic data were collected and analyzed for three coal refuse disposal sites in southern Illinois. The disposal sites were associated with underground mines and consisted of piles of coarse waste (gob) and slurry areas where fine waste rejected from coal washing was deposited. Prereclamation data were available for the Superior washer site in Macoupin County and the New Kathleen site in Perry County. Post-reclamation data were available for the Staunton 1 site in Macoupin County and the New Kathleen site. Data analyzed from each phase (i.e., pre- or post-reclamation) were limited to one year. Storm event runoff coefficients were calculated for each site. Average runoff coefficients were compared for sites within the same reclamation phase to determine the effects of topographical parameters such as gob pile slope and percentage of drainage basin covered by the gob pile. Average runoff coefficients were then compared for pre- and post-reclamation data. Multiple regression analyses were performed on rainfall-runoff data for each site to determine the significance of independent variables other than rainfall in determining runoff. A generalized regression equation corrected data for topographical differences and included only those independent variables that were significant at all sites. Regression coefficients were compared for pre- and post-reclamation sites. The results of rainfall-runoff analysis indicate that the runoff coefficient increases because of reclamation. It is hypothesized that this effect is due to the placement of a soil cover that is less permeable than gob or slurry and occurs despite reduction in slope and the establishment of vegetation.

Mele, L.M.; Prodan, P.F.

1983-04-01

160

Atlantis Reaches New Home at Kennedy - Duration: 3 minutes, 14 seconds.  

NASA Video Gallery

Space shuttle Atlantis completed its 10-mile journey to its new home at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex on Nov. 2, 2012. The shuttle, riding atop a specialized 76-wheel transporter, was mo...

161

Kennedy Space Center Now on Google Street View! - Duration: 61 seconds.  

NASA Video Gallery

NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida boasts amazing views typically seen only by employees and astronauts. Now space enthusiasts around the world can take a virtual walk through the transfer aisl...

162

Station Astronaut Suni Williams Reflects on President Kennedy's Challenge - Duration: 93 seconds.  

NASA Video Gallery

President Kennedy vowed that we shall not see space governed by a hostile flag of conquest but by a banner of freedom and peace. The International Space Station has become the very embodiment of th...

163

Who Guards the Guardians? Ian Kennedy, Bioethics and the ‘Ideology of Accountability’ in British Medicine  

PubMed Central

Summary This article charts the history of bioethics in Britain through the work of the academic lawyer Ian Kennedy. From the late 1970s, Kennedy claimed that external oversight, which he termed ‘bioethics’, was needed to make medicine accountable to patients and the public. I believe these arguments provide a window onto the historical factors that generated the demand for bioethics, and help us determine why it became influential in recent decades. I detail how Kennedy's argument resonated with the Conservative enthusiasm for audit and consumer choice in the 1980s. Contrary to traditional portrayals of bioethics as a critique of medicine, I also show that Kennedy promised it would benefit doctors by improving decision making and maintaining public confidence. This analysis reframes bioethics as an important constituent of the ‘audit society’: fulfilling the neo-liberal demand for oversight and the medical demand for legitimacy.

Wilson, Duncan

2012-01-01

164

A study of the characteristics of thunderstorm cessation at the NASA Kennedy Space Center  

E-print Network

A lightning summary was developed for a 100xlOO kilometer area centered at the NASA Kennedy Space Center. Spatial and temporal patterns, and first stroke peak currents were analyzed from 1986-1995, Three thunderstorms were chosen due...

Hinson, Michael Shawn

1997-01-01

165

The evolution of electronic tracking, optical, telemetry, and command systems at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A history is presented of the major electronic tracking, optical, telemetry, and command systems used at ETR in support of Apollo-Saturn and its forerunner vehicles launched under the jurisdiction of the Kennedy Space Center and its forerunner organizations.

Mcmurran, W. R. (editor)

1973-01-01

166

President Obama and Family Arrive at Kennedy Space Center - Duration: 3:10.  

NASA Video Gallery

President Obama, accompanied by First Lady Michelle Obama and their two daughters, arrive aboard Air Force One at the Cape Canaveral AFS near NASAâ??s Kennedy Space Center at approximately 2 p.m. E...

167

Views of the Challenger after landing at Kennedy to end shuttle mission 41-B  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Safing operations on the Space Shuttle Challenger are underway in the scene on the runway at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) landing facility. The orbiter is surrounded by trucks and personnel preparing it for the return to its hanger.

1984-01-01

168

Kennedy Space Center Wakes STS-135 Crew - Duration: 2:22.  

NASA Video Gallery

The Flight Day 13 wakeup music was "Fanfare for the Common Man" by Aaron Copland played for Commander Chris Ferguson. It was followed by a prerecorded message from Kennedy Space Center employees. K...

169

76 FR 40737 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel, Children's Research, Institute For...

2011-07-11

170

76 FR 43334 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel, Children in Rural Poverty. Date:...

2011-07-20

171

77 FR 58855 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; Child Health Research Career...

2012-09-24

172

76 FR 40737 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel, Child Health Research Career...

2011-07-11

173

Internship at NASA Kennedy Space Center's Cryogenic Test laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is known for hosting all of the United States manned rocket launches as well as many unmanned launches at low inclinations. Even though the Space Shuttle recently retired, they are continuing to support unmanned launches and modifying manned launch facilities. Before a rocket can be launched, it has to go through months of preparation, called processing. Pieces of a rocket and its payload may come in from anywhere in the nation or even the world. The facilities all around the center help integrate the rocket and prepare it for launch. As NASA prepares for the Space Launch System, a rocket designed to take astronauts beyond Low Earth Orbit throughout the solar system, technology development is crucial for enhancing launch capabilities at the KSC. The Cryogenics Test Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center greatly contributes to cryogenic research and technology development. The engineers and technicians that work there come up with new ways to efficiently store and transfer liquid cryogens. NASA has a great need for this research and technology development as it deals with cryogenic liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen for rocket fuel, as well as long term space flight applications. Additionally, in this new era of space exploration, the Cryogenics Test Laboratory works with the commercial sector. One technology development project is the Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) Ground Operations Demonstration Unit (GODU). LH2 GODU intends to demonstrate increased efficiency in storing and transferring liquid hydrogen during processing, loading, launch and spaceflight of a spacecraft. During the Shuttle Program, only 55% of hydrogen purchased was used by the Space Shuttle Main Engines. GODU's goal is to demonstrate that this percentage can be increased to 75%. Figure 2 shows the GODU layout when I concluded my internship. The site will include a 33,000 gallon hydrogen tank (shown in cyan) with a heat exchanger inside the hydrogen tank attached to a refrigerator capable of removing 850 Watts at 20 Kelvin (shown in green). The refrigerator and most of its supporting equipment will be kept in a standard shipping container (shown in pink). Currently, GODU is in the fabrication process and some of the large components have already been purchased.

Holland, Katherine

2013-01-01

174

Space Radar Image of Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This is an X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar image spanning an area of about 20 kilometers by 40 kilometers (12 miles by 25 miles) of the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. At the top right are cloud-like structures which indicate rain. X-SAR is able to image heavy rainfall. The Atlantic Ocean is at the upper right. The shuttle landing strip is seen at the top left of the image. The Vertical Assembly Building, the Orbiter Processing Facility and other associated buildings are seen as a white area to the right and just above the end of the shuttle strip. The shuttle launch pads are the two white areas near the top center of the image. The Banana River shows up as a large black area running north to south to the right of the image. The Indian River is on the left side of the image. Just above the image center is a cluster of white spots which are the major buildings of the Kennedy Space Center industrial area. This was the location of the reflector array that was constructed to form the letters 'KSC' by the KSC payload team. The data for these KSC images were taken on orbit 81 of the space shuttle Endeavour on the fourth day of the SIR-C/X-SAR mission. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft und Raumfahrt e.V.(DLR), the major partner in science, operations and data processing of X-SAR.

1999-01-01

175

After nineteen years, the last trove of secret Kennedy tapes is released to the public  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

New Air Force One tapes give insight on Kennedy deathhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-16821363Last of secret Kennedy tapes releasedhttp://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-kennedy-tapes-20120125,0,6198450.storyPost JFK Assassination Air Force One Flight Deck Recordinghttp://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/GPO-NARA-JFK-ASSASSINATION-AUDIO/content-detail.htmlThe President John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Collectionhttp://www.archives.gov/research/jfk/The National Security Archive: The Cuban Missile Crisis, 1962: Audio Clips (iTunes)http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/nsa/cuba_mis_cri/audio.htmJFK 50 Years: Celebrate the past to awaken the futurehttp://www.jfk50.org/In the last three months of his presidency, John F. Kennedy dedicated a dam in Heber Springs, Arkansas, signed the Partial Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, and spoke with his advisers about the War on Poverty preparations for 1964. During this period, many hours of tapes secretly recorded Kennedy's interactions with his advisers, his family, and others, on a variety of topics including domestic policy and the space race. The John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum in Boston has reviewed and released over 248 hours of taped meetings and 12 hours of phone conversation since 1993. Not until this past week, however, were the final 45 hours of tapes from the final months of Kennedy's presidency released. Many historians and members of the public have been eagerly waiting to listen to them. Those who have heard the tapes thus far have remarked that the tapes demonstrate Kennedy's facility with a wide array of policy concerns. In one session, after hearing vastly different stories from top aides who had traveled to South Vietnam to assess the country, Kennedy remarks, "You both went to the same country?" The last meeting was taped on November 20th, 1963, two days before he was assassinated in Dallas.The first link takes visitors to a piece from this Tuesday's BBC News about the tapes that document the minutes on Air Force One immediately after President Kennedy's assassination. The second link leads to a Los Angeles Times article from last Tuesday, which discusses a larger selection of tapes. The third link leads to the previously mentioned Air Force One audio tape that was released this week. Moving on, the fourth link whisks users away to the President John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Collection, which is maintained by the National Archives. First-time visitors to the Collection page should start by perusing the FAQ area, as it is quite helpful. The fifth link takes interested parties to the very well-known and fascinating audio tapes of President Kennedy talking about the Cuban Missile Crisis with Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara, Secretary of State Dean Rusk, and his brother, Attorney General Robert Kennedy. The last link leads to a great site celebrating the 50th anniversary of President Kennedy's inauguration and his legacy in the arenas of foreign diplomacy, the arts, and civil rights.

Grinnell, Max

2012-02-03

176

Constitutive Soil Properties for Mason Sand and Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Accurate soil models are required for numerical simulations of land landings for the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). This report provides constitutive material models for two soil conditions at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and four conditions of Mason Sand. The Mason Sand is the test sand for LaRC s drop tests and swing tests of the Orion. The soil models are based on mechanical and compressive behavior observed during geotechnical laboratory testing of remolded soil samples. The test specimens were reconstituted to measured in situ density and moisture content. Tests included: triaxial compression, hydrostatic compression, and uniaxial strain. A fit to the triaxial test results defines the strength envelope. Hydrostatic and uniaxial tests define the compressibility. The constitutive properties are presented in the format of LSDYNA Material Model 5: Soil and Foam. However, the laboratory test data provided can be used to construct other material models. The soil models are intended to be specific to the soil conditions they were tested at. The two KSC models represent two conditions at KSC: low density dry sand and high density in-situ moisture sand. The Mason Sand model was tested at four conditions which encompass measured conditions at LaRC s drop test site.

Thomas, Michael A.; Chitty, Daniel E.

2011-01-01

177

Constitutive Soil Properties for Unwashed Sand and Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Accurate soil models are required for numerical simulations of land landings for the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle. This report provides constitutive material models for one soil, unwashed sand, from NASA Langley's gantry drop test facility and three soils from Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The four soil models are based on mechanical and compressive behavior observed during geotechnical laboratory testing of remolded soil samples. The test specimens were reconstituted to measured in situ density and moisture content. Tests included: triaxial compression, hydrostatic compression, and uniaxial strain. A fit to the triaxial test results defines the strength envelope. Hydrostatic and uniaxial tests define the compressibility. The constitutive properties are presented in the format of LS-DYNA Material Model 5: Soil and Foam. However, the laboratory test data provided can be used to construct other material models. The four soil models are intended to be specific to the soil conditions discussed in the report. The unwashed sand model represents clayey sand at high density. The KSC models represent three distinct coastal sand conditions: low density dry sand, high density in-situ moisture sand, and high density flooded sand. It is possible to approximate other sands with these models, but the results would be unverified without geotechnical tests to confirm similar soil behavior.

Thomas, Michael A.; Chitty, Daniel E.; Gildea, Martin L.; T'Kindt, Casey M.

2008-01-01

178

Acid rain at Kennedy Space Center, Florida - Recent observations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the period July, 1977 to September, 1979, rainfall was collected in the vicinity of the Kennedy Space Center and subjected to appropriate chemical analysis for purposes of characterization of general composition and acidity. Results obtained form the basis for future comparisons, should significant alteration of the chemical composition of rain occur during the space shuttle era. Acidity extremes calculated on a monthly basis from event samples collected from five sites within a 200 sq km area varied from pH 5.1 in November, 1977, and April, 1978 to pH 4.3 in July, 1978 and July, 1979. Weighted average pH for the entire period was 4.55. Acidity was due to the presence of sulfuric and nitric acids. The mole ratio of excess SO4(-2):NO3(-) was typically greater than one. Monthly weighted average Cl(-) concentrations ranged from 20-240 micromoles/liter. The Cl(-):Na(+) ratio was slightly lower than that present in sea water.

Madsen, B. C.

1981-01-01

179

Nowcasting for Space Shuttle Landings at Kennedy Space Center, Florida.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Space shuttle launches and landings at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) are subject to strict weather-related launch commit criteria and landing weather flight rules. Complex launch commit criteria and end-of-mission landing weather flight rules demand very accurate forecasts and nowcasts (short-term forecasts of less than 2 h) of cloud, wind, visibility, precipitation, turbulence, and thunderstorms prior to shuttle launches and landings.The challenges to the National Weather Service Spaceflight Meteorology Group forecasters at Johnson Space Center to nowcast and forecast for space shuttle landings and evaluate the landing weather flight rules are discussed. This paper focuses on the forecasts and nowcasts required for a normal end-of-mission and three scenarios for abort landings of a space shuttle at KSC. Specific weather requirements for a potential emergency landing are the dominant cause of weather-related delays to space shuttle launches. Some examples of meteorological techniques and technologies in support of space shuttle landing operations are reviewed. Research to improve nowcasting convective activity in the Cape Canaveral vicinity is discussed, and the particular forecast problem associated with landing a space shuttle during easterly flow regimes is addressed.

Bauman, William H., III; Businger, Steven

1996-10-01

180

EASE/ACCESS ground processing at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Payload Management and Operations Directorate is responsible for the processing of Space Shuttle payloads. The KSC responsibilities begin prior to hardware arrival at the launch site and extend until the experiments are returned to the investigators after the flight. The KSC involvement with the integration and checkout of payloads begins with participation in experiment, Mission Peculiar Equipment (MPE), and integrated payload design reviews. This involvement also includes participation in assembly and testing of flight hardware at the appropriate design center, university, or private corporation. Once the hardware arrives at the launch site, KSC personnel install the experiments and MPE onto a carrier in the Operations and Checkout (O & C) building. Following integration, the payload is functionally tested and then installed into the orbiter. After the mission, the payload is removed from the orbiter, deintegrated in the O & C building, and the experiments are turned over to the mission manager. One of the many payloads process at KSC consisted of two space construction experiments: the Experimental Assembly of Structures in Extravehicular Activity (EASE) and the Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structures (ACCESS). The details of EASE/ACCESS integration, testing, and deintegration are addressed and how this mission can serve as a guide for future space construction payloads is discussed.

Moates, Deborah J.; Villamil, Ana M.

1987-01-01

181

Oceanic Storm Characteristics Off the Kennedy Space Center Coast  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Natural cloud-to-ground lightning may behave differently depending on the characteristics of the attachment mediums, including the peak current (inferred from radiation fields) and the number of ground strike locations per flash. Existing literature has raised issues over the yea"rs on the behavior of lightning over ocean terrain and these phenomena are not yet well understood. To investigate lightning characteristics over differing terrain we will obtain identical observations over adjacent land and ocean regions during both clear air and thunderstorm periods comparing the electric field behavior over these various terrains. For this, a 3-meter NOAA buoy moored 20NM off the coast of the Kennedy Space Center was instrumented with an electric field mill and New Mexico Tech's slow antenna to measure the electric fields aloft and compared to the existing on-shore electric field mill suite of 31 sensors and a coastal slow antenna. New Mexico Tech's Lightning Mapping Array and the Eastern Range Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System, along with the network of high-speed cameras being used to capture cloud-to-ground lightning strikes over the terrain regions to identify a valid data set and verify the electric fields. This is an on-going project with the potential for significant impact on the determination of lightning risk to objects on the ground. This presentation will provide results and instrumentation progress to date.

Wilson, J.; Simpson, A. A.; Cummins, K. L.; Kiriazes, J. J.; Brown, R. G.; Mata, C. T.

2014-01-01

182

Shaping NASA's Kennedy Space Center Safety for the Future  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

With the completion of the Space Shuttle Program, the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) safety function will be required to evolve beyond the single launch vehicle launch site focus that has held prominence for almost fifty years. This paper will discuss how that evolution is taking place. Specifically, we will discuss the future of safety as it relates to a site that will have multiple, very disparate, functions. These functions will include new business; KSC facilities not under the control of NASA; traditional payload and launch vehicle processing; and, operations conducted by NASA personnel, NASA contractors or a combination of both. A key element in this process is the adaptation of the current KSC set of safety requirements into a multi-faceted set that can address each of the functions above, while maintaining our world class safety environment. One of the biggest challenges that will be addressed is how to protect our personnel and property without dictating how other Non-NASA organizations protect their own employees and property. The past history of KSC Safety will be described and how the lessons learned from previous programs will be applied to the future. The lessons learned from this process will also be discussed as information for other locations that may undergo such a transformation.

Kirkpatrick, Paul; McDaniel, Laura; Smith, Maynette

2011-01-01

183

Radiological dose assessments at the Kennedy Space Center  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the application of an atmospheric transport and diffusion model for launch window and safety risk assessment studies in support of the Galileo (which is scheduled for the October/November 1989 period) and Ulysses (scheduled for {approximately}1 yr after Galileo) missions at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The model is resident in the EMERGE software system developed by NUS Corporation and modified for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to provide real-time and safety analyses report support for the launches. The application is unique in that the model accommodates the varied amount of meteorological data at KSC and Cape Canaveral and includes a site-specific algorithm to account for local-scale circulations. This paper focuses on the Galileo mission application, including discussions of the use of the meteorological data available at KSC, integration of the EMERGE sea-breeze algorithm, and examples of real-time and safety analyses report assessments. The Galileo spacecraft is to be launched toward Jupiter using the space shuttle.

Firstenberg, H.; Jubach, R.; Bartram, B.; Vaughan, F.

1989-01-01

184

Kennedy Space Center processing of Shuttle small payloads  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There are many steps involved in preparing a payload for a mission into space on the Space Shuttle. Operations at the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) are the last of those steps for the hardware before the payload is launched. To assure a successful and efficient KSC processing flow, a great deal of planning between the Robert H. Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and KSC personnel is required before the payload arrives at KSC. After arrival, pre-flight operations occur between payload personnel, GSFC personnel, and KSC personnel for integration of the payload into its carrier (if required), in preparation for installation into a Orbiter. Once installed into an Orbiter, final test(s), checkout, and close-out of the payload is performed by GSFC and KSC personnel before launch. Mission support varies depending on the payload flying, but once the mission is complete and the Orbiter has returned to KSC, post-flight operations begin. This usually involves a reverse flow of the pre-flight operations. KSC operations conclude when the payload, its ground support equipment (GSE), and personnel depart KSC. A list of lessons learned is generated at the end of each payload flow, to avoid repeating the same mistakes (if any) for the next payload or for multiple repeat flights of the same payload. Always monitored are planned changes that may affect the payloads, GSE, KSC facilities, payload personnel, GSFC personnel, and/or KSC personnel.

Haddad, Michael E.

1993-10-01

185

Astro-1 Payloads Integration at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This photograph was taken during the integration of the Astro-1 mission payloads at the Kennedy Space Center on March 20, 1990, showing the Broad Band X-Ray Telescope (BBXRT) at the left, as three telescopes for the Astro-1 Observatory are settled into the Orbiter Columbia payload bay. Above Earth's atmospheric interference, Astro-1 would make precise measurements of objects such as planets, stars, and galaxies in relatively small fields of view and would observe and measure ultraviolet radiation from celestial objects. The Astro-1 used a Spacelab pallet system with an instrument pointing system and a cruciform structure for bearing the three ultraviolet instruments mounted in a parallel configuration. The three instruments were: The Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT), which was designed to obtain far-ultraviolet spectroscopic data from white dwarfs, emission nebulae, active galaxies, and quasars; the Wisconsin Ultraviolet Photo-Polarimeter Experiment (WUPPE) which was to study polarized ultraviolet light from magnetic white dwarfs, binary stars, reflection nebulae, and active galaxies; and the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT), which was to record photographic images in ultraviolet light of galaxies, star clusters, and nebulae. The star trackers that supported the instrument pointing system, were also mounted on the cruciform. Also in the payload bay was the Broad Band X-Ray Telescope (BBXRT), which was designed to obtain high-resolution x-ray spectra from stellar corona, x-ray binary stars, active galactic nuclei, and galaxy clusters. Managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center, the Astro-1 observatory was launched aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Columbia (STS-35) on December 2, 1990.

1990-01-01

186

Kennedy space center cardiovascular disease risk reduction program evaluation  

PubMed Central

This program evaluation examined the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) Risk Reduction Program which aims to identify CVD risk factors and reduce these risk factors through health education phone counseling. High risk participants (those having two or more elevated lipid values) are identified from monthly voluntary CVD screenings and counseled. Phone counseling consists of reviewing lab values with the participant, discussing dietary fat intake frequency using an intake questionnaire, and promoting the increase in exercise frequency. The participants are followed-up at two-months and five-months for relevant metrics including blood pressure, weight, body mass index (BMI), total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, dietary fat intake, and exercise frequency. Data for three years of the KSC CVD Program included 366 participants, average age of 49 years, 75% male, and 25% female. For those with complete two and five month follow-up data, significant baseline to two-month follow-up comparisons included decreases in systolic blood pressure (p = 0.03); diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.002); total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and dietary fat intake (all three at p < 0.0001) as well as a significant increase in exercise frequency (p = 0.04). Significant baseline to five-month follow-up comparisons included decreases in triglycerides (p = 0.05); and total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and dietary intake (all three at p < 0.0001). These program evaluation results indicate that providing brief phone health education counseling and information at the worksite to high risk CVD participants may impact CVD risk factors. PMID:18561517

Calderon, Kristine S; Smallwood, Charles; Tipton, David A

2008-01-01

187

Oceanic Storm Characteristics off the Kennedy Space Center Coast  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Natural cloud-to-ground lightning may behave differently depending on the characteristics of the attachment mediums, including the peak current (inferred from radiation fields) and the number of ground strike locations per flash. Existing literature has raised questions over the years on these characteristics of lightning over oceans, and the behaviors are not yet well understood. To investigate this we will obtain identical electric field observations over adjacent land and ocean regions during both clear air and thunderstorm periods. Oceanic observations will be obtained using a 3-meter NOAA buoy that has been instrumented with a Campbell Scientific electric field mill and New Mexico Techs slow antenna, to measure the electric fields aloft. We are currently obtaining measurements from this system on-shore at the Florida coast, to calibrate and better understand the behavior of the system in elevated-field environments. Sometime during winter 2013, this system will be moored 20NM off the coast of the Kennedy Space Center. Measurements from this system will be compared to the existing on-shore electric field mill suite of 31 sensors and a coastal slow antenna. Supporting observations will be provided by New Mexico Techs Lightning Mapping Array, the Eastern Range Cloud to Ground Lightning Surveillance System, and the National Lightning Detection Network. An existing network of high-speed cameras will be used to capture cloud-to-ground lightning strikes over the terrain regions to identify a valid data set for analysis. This on-going project will demonstrate the value of off-shore electric field measurements for safety-related decision making at KSC, and may improve our understanding of relative lightning risk to objects on the ground vs. ocean. This presentation will provide an overview of this new instrumentation, and a summary of our progress to date.

Wilson, J. G.; Simpson, A. A.; Cummins, K. L.; Kiriazes, J. J.; Brown, R. G.; Mata, C. T.

2014-01-01

188

Airborne measurements of cloud forming nuclei and aerosol particles at Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results of airborne measurements of the sizes and concentrations of aerosol particles, ice nuclei, and cloud condensation nuclei that were taken at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, are presented along with a detailed description of the instrumentation and measuring capabilities of the University of Washington airborne measuring facility (Douglas B-23). Airborne measurements made at Ft. Collins, Colorado, and Little Rock, Arkansas, during the ferry of the B-23 are presented. The particle concentrations differed significantly between the clean air over Ft. Collins and the hazy air over Little Rock and Kennedy Space Center. The concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei over Kennedy Space Center were typical of polluted eastern seaboard air. Three different instruments were used to measure ice nuclei: one used filters to collect the particles, and the others used optical and acoustical methods to detect ice crystals grown in portable cloud chambers. A comparison of the ice nucleus counts, which are in good agreement, is presented.

Radke, L. F.; Langer, G.; Hindman, E. E., II

1978-01-01

189

Kennedy Space Center Coronary Heart Disease Risk Screening Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The number one cause of death in the U.S. is coronary heart disease (CHD). It is probably a major cause of death and disability in the lives of employees at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) as well. The KSC Biomedical Office used a multifactorial mathematical formula from the Framingham Heart Study to calculate CHD risk probabilities for individuals in a segment of the KSC population that required medical evaluation for job certification. Those assessed to be high-risk probabilities will be targeted for intervention. Every year, several thousand KSC employees require medical evaluations for job related certifications. Most medical information for these evaluations is gathered on-site at one of the KSC or Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) medical clinics. The formula used in the Framingham Heart Study allows calculation of a person's probability of acquiring CHD within 10 years. The formula contains the following variables: Age, Diabetes, Smoking, Left Ventricular Hypertrophy, Blood Pressure (Systolic or Diastolic), Cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol. The formula is also gender specific. It was used to calculate the 10-year probabilities of CHD in KSC employees who required medical evaluations for job certifications during a one-year time frame. This KSC population was profiled and CHD risk reduction interventions could be targeted to those at high risk. Population risk could also be periodically reevaluated to determine the effectiveness of intervention. A 10-year CHD risk probability can be calculated for an individual quite easily while gathering routine medical information. An employee population's CHD risk probability can be profiled graphically revealing high risk segments of the population which can be targeted for risk reduction intervention. The small audience of NASA/contractor physicians, nurses and exercise/fitness professionals at the breakout session received the lecture very well. Approximately one third indicated by a show of hands that they would be interested in implementing a similar program at their NASA Center. Questions were asked pertaining to standardization for age, the validity of using the idealized male values also for the female population, and indications of the screening test's sensitivity and specificity.

Tipton, David A.; Scarpa, Philip J.

1999-01-01

190

Innovative Partnerships Program Accomplishments: 2009-2010 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This document reports on the accomplishments of the Innovative Partnerships Program during the two years of 2009 and 2010. The mission of the Innovative Partnerships Program is to provide leveraged technology alternatives for mission directorates, programs, and projects through joint partnerships with industry, academia, government agencies, and national laboratories. As outlined in this accomplishments summary, the IPP at NASA's Kennedy Space Center achieves this mission via two interdependent goals: (1) Infusion: Bringing external technologies and expertise into Kennedy to benefit NASA missions, programs, and projects (2) Technology Transfer: Spinning out space program technologies to increase the benefits for the nation's economy and humanity

Makufka, David

2010-01-01

191

Nanoscale fluoro-immuno assays with lanthanide oxide nanoparticles I.M. Kennedy*a  

E-print Network

Nanoscale fluoro-immuno assays with lanthanide oxide nanoparticles I.M. Kennedy*a , M. Koivunenb ABSTRACT The use of polystyrene nanoparticles with europium chelate has been demonstrated as fluorescent reporters in an immunoassay for atrazine. The limit of detection with the nanoparticles was similar

Hammock, Bruce D.

192

Emergency Medical Operations at Kennedy Space Center in Support of Space Shuttle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The unique environment of the Kennedy Space Center includes a wide variety of industrial processes culminating in launch and spaceflight. Many are potentially hazardous to the work force and the astronauts. Technology, planning, training, and quality control are utilized to prevent contingencies and expedite response should a contingency occur.

Myers, K. Jeffrey; Tipton, David A.; Woodard, Daniel; Long, Irene D.

1992-01-01

193

Network Infrastructure Improvements at Gemini James R. Wright, Tod Fujioka and Jim Kennedy  

E-print Network

two grants for use in improving the network infrastructures in Hawaii and in Chile. 2. THE PARTNERSHIPNetwork Infrastructure Improvements at Gemini James R. Wright, Tod Fujioka and Jim Kennedy Gemini NSF grants to be used for enhancing the network connectivity in Hawaii and in Chile. We discuss our

194

Identifying and responding to customer needs at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Patient Questionnaire Program at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has been in place for several years. It has helped to identify customer perceptions and needs. The questionnaire is presented and the survey results are discussed with respect to total quality management.

Ferguson, E. B.

1993-01-01

195

Identifying and responding to customer needs at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Patient Questionnaire Program at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has been in place for several years. It has helped to identify customer perceptions and needs. The questionnaire is presented and the survey results are discussed with respect to total quality management.

Ferguson, E. B.

1993-07-01

196

Apollo 10 roll out to Pad B, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The 353-ft tall Apollo 10 (Spacecraft 106/Lunar Module 4/Saturn 505) space vehicle leaves the Vehicle Assembly Building on its way to Pad B, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center. The Saturn V stack and its mobile launch tower are atop a huge crawler-transporter.

1969-01-01

197

NASA Headquarters/Kennedy Space Center: Organization and Small Spacecraft Launch Services  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objectives of the Kennedy Space Center's (KSC) Expendable Launch Vehicles (ELV) Program are to provide safe, reliable, cost effective ELV launches, maximize customer satisfaction, and perform advanced payload processing capability development. Details are given on the ELV program organization, products and services, foreign launch vehicle policy, how to get a NASA launch service, and some of the recent NASA payloads.

Sierra, Albert; Beddel, Darren

1999-01-01

198

"Free at Last": Kennedy, King, and the Meaning of Liberty in the Disability Rights Movement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a direct link connecting President Kennedy and Martin Luther King, Jr., to the causes of liberty, consent, choice, the least restrictive environment, and genuine community presence for people with intellectual and related developmental disabilities. This article connects the meaning of liberty in those civil rights movements to the…

Turnbull, H. Rutherford, III

2012-01-01

199

Toward New Human Rights: The Social Policies of the Kennedy and Johnson Administrations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The social programs of the Kennedy and Johnson Administrations which were designed to extend basic rights to all citizens and to develop new social rights for those in need are examined in this book of papers presented at a conference. The initiation and development of the various programs are described and analyzed by scholars and policy makers.…

Warner, David C., Ed.

200

A New Lightning Instrumentation System for Pad 39B at the Kennedy Space Center Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph presentation describes a new lightning instrumentation system for pad 39B at Kennedy Space Center Florida. The contents include: 1) Background; 2) Instrumentation; 3) Meteorological Instrumentation; and 4) Lessons learned. A presentation of the data acquired at Camp Blanding is also shown.

Mata, C. T.; Rakov, V. A.

2011-01-01

201

People Who Led to Me: Linked Writing using Adrienne Kennedy's "People Who Led to My Plays."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Develops a college-level writing assignment using Adrienne Kennedy's autobiography, a multisectioned list poem. Discusses why the personal list poem is appealing and how lists--a simple but generative form--work well for students. States that students wrote a succession of paragraphs about people in their lives who had influenced them. Gives…

Brown, Lee Ann

1997-01-01

202

The ethanolamine branch of the Kennedy pathway is essential in the bloodstream form of Trypanosoma brucei  

PubMed Central

Phosphatidylethanolamine (GPEtn), a major phospholipid component of trypanosome membranes, is synthesized de novo from ethanolamine through the Kennedy pathway. Here the composition of the GPEtn molecular species in the bloodstream form of Trypanosoma brucei is determined, along with new insights into phospholipid metabolism, by in vitro and in vivo characterization of a key enzyme of the Kennedy pathway, the cytosolic ethanolamine-phosphate cytidylyltransferase (TbECT). Gene knockout indicates that TbECT is essential for growth and survival, thus highlighting the importance of the Kennedy pathway for the pathogenic stage of the African trypanosome. Phosphatiylserine decarboxylation, a potential salvage pathway, does not appear to be active in cultured bloodstream form T. brucei, and it is not upregulated even when the Kennedy pathway is disrupted. In vivo metabolic labelling and phospholipid composition analysis by ESI-MS/MS of the knockout cells confirmed a significant decrease in GPEtn species, as well as changes in the relative abundance of other phospholipid species. Reduction in GPEtn levels had a profound influence on the morphology of the mutants and it compromised mitochondrial structure and function, as well as glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor biosynthesis. TbECT is therefore genetically validated as a potential drug target against the African trypanosome. PMID:19555461

Gibellini, Federica; Hunter, William N; Smith, Terry K

2009-01-01

203

Views of the Challenger landing at Kennedy to end shuttle mission 41-B  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The space shuttle Challenger makes the first landing on the Kennedy Space Center's (KSC) landing facility. Its nose gear has not yet touched down in this scene. Some bits of fog are also visible (27154); Rear view of the Challenger making its landing at KSC (27155).

1984-01-01

204

Determinants of public reactions to Concorde test flights at the John F. Kennedy International Airport  

Microsoft Academic Search

Detailed noise measurements from early Concorde test flights together with community characteristics data from the US Census Bureau were used to explain monthly complaint patterns arising from neighborhoods surrounding the John F. Kennedy International Airport. Consistent with an earlier study, the number of complaints per aircraft movement positively varied with average loudness of the flights. Complaints were more common during

Winai Wongsurawat

2007-01-01

205

The Turning Point: Perceptions and Policies Concerning Communist China during the Kennedy Years  

E-print Network

When analyzing the policies of the John F. Kennedy administration towards the People’s Republic of China, previous historians have focused on the lack of substantive change, emphasizing the continuity of action with the prior polices of the Dwight D...

Crean, Jeffrey 1977-

2012-11-13

206

Bringing the John F. Kennedy Library into the Classroom. Profiles of Promise 45.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document describes how a presidential library and its resources can be used in the classroom. The John F. Kennedy Library attempts to reach three publics: the senior-level scholars; the general public; and teachers and educators interested in bringing the resources to the classroom. The library contains a variety of resources including…

Hawke, Sharryl

207

Tight Site. John F. Kennedy Recreational Center, Cleveland, Ohio; P/A Building Cost Analysis 2  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the John F. Kennedy Recreation Center, Cleveland, Ohio, which combines the recreational and athletic requirements of three distinct clients on a confined parcel of land. This building cost analysis is the second in a series. (See EA 503 949). Other related articles are EA 503 950-951, EA 504 571-572, and EA 504 578. (Author/MF)

Progressive Architecture, 1973

1973-01-01

208

Real-time particulate fallout contamination monitoring technology development at NASA Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two separate real-time particulate fallout monitoring instruments have been developed by the contamination monitoring Laboratory at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center. These instruments monitor particular fallout contamination deposition rates in cleanrooms and allow certification of cleanliness levels as well as proactive protection of valuable flight hardware.

Mogan, Paul A.; Schwindt, Chris J.

1998-10-01

209

College Football and Public Crisis: Appropriate Actions and Justifications after the Kennedy Assassination.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper contends that domestic response to John F. Kennedy's assassination took two basic forms in the United States: active crisis management and retreat. According to the paper, while government, churches, and the media engaged in active crisis management, businesses and schools closed, and the public retreated to mourn rather than to…

Brown, Robert S.

210

John F. Kennedy's Civil Rights Discourse: The Evolution from "Principled Bystander" to Public Advocate.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Argues that President John F. Kennedy's civil rights discourse evidences an important evolutionary pattern marking a transition from legal argument to moral argument. Highlights two speeches as exemplars of this change. Asserts that this analysis is useful in the study of contemporary presidential discourse during times of domestic crisis. (MM)

Goldzwig, Steven R.; Dionisopoulos, George N.

1989-01-01

211

"A Watchman on the Walls of World Freedom": The International Crisis Speaking of John F. Kennedy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The primary goal of presidential crisis rhetoric appears to be the unification of the people of the United States in support of presidential policy. John F. Kennedy's crisis speaking corresponded both to his conceptions of presidential leadership and to those of the people. If the President of the United States is seen as the personification of…

Kahl, Mary L.

212

Fire and safety materials utilization at the John F. Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The special needs of the Kennedy Space Center in the area of protective garments for personnel engaged in hazardous emergency operations are discussed. The materials used in the protective clothing and the specialized applications of various materials are described. It is concluded that Nomex is the best general purpose nonflammable material for protective clothing.

Reynolds, J. R.

1971-01-01

213

GEO 101N General geology Kathleen M. Harper (Pre or co) with any geo course below 130 GEO 101N General geology TBA Pre or co with any geo course below 131  

E-print Network

W. or GEO 101N General geology Kathleen M. Harper (Pre or co) with any geo course below 130 GEO 101N General geology TBA Pre or co with any geo course below 131 GEO 102N General geology Laboratory TA TBA none GEO 207 Geological Hazards and Disasters Pre - min C in any 100-level geosciences course

Vonessen, Nikolaus

214

77 FR 14600 - Pricing for 2012 Kennedy Half-Dollar Bags and Rolls, Bronze Medals, the First Spouse Bronze Medal...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY United States Mint Pricing for 2012 Kennedy Half-Dollar...and the Birth Set AGENCY: United States Mint, Department of the Treasury. ACTION...SUMMARY: The United States Mint is announcing 2012 pricing for...

2012-03-12

215

AMBIGUITY FUNCTION AND WIGNER DISTRIBUTION ON THE SPHERE Zubair Khalid, Salman Durrani, Parastoo Sadeghi and Rodney A. Kennedy  

E-print Network

AMBIGUITY FUNCTION AND WIGNER DISTRIBUTION ON THE SPHERE Zubair Khalid, Salman Durrani, Parastoo, Australia. Email: {zubair.khalid, salman.durrani, parastoo.sadeghi, rodney.kennedy}@anu.edu.au ABSTRACT

Durrani, Salman

216

ON THE CHOICE OF WINDOW FOR SPATIAL SMOOTHING OF SPHERICAL DATA Zubair Khalid, Rodney A. Kennedy and Salman Durrani  

E-print Network

and Salman Durrani Research School of Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia Email: {zubair.khalid, rodney.kennedy, salman.durrani}@anu.edu.au ABSTRACT This paper investigates

Durrani, Salman

217

75 FR 39031 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel, Child Health Research Career...

2010-07-07

218

Research and technology 1987 annual report of the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As the NASA Center responsible for assembly, checkout, servicing, launch, recovery, and operational support of Space Transportation System elements and payloads, Kennedy Space Center is placing increasing emphasis on the Center's research and technology program. In addition to strengthening those areas of engineering and operations technology that contribute to safer, more efficient, and more economical execution of our current mission, we are developing the technological tools needed to execute the Center's mission relative to future programs. The Engineering Development Directorate encompasses most of the laboratories and other Center resources that are key elements of research and technology program implementation, and is responsible for implementation of the majority of the projects of this Kennedy Space Center 1987 Annual Report.

1987-01-01

219

Research and technology: 1994 annual report of the John F. Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As the NASA Center responsible for assembly, checkout, servicing, launch, recovery, and operational support of Space Transportation System elements and payloads, the John F. Kennedy Space Center is placing increasing emphasis on its advanced technology development program. This program encompasses the efforts of the Engineering Development Directorate laboratories, most of the KSC operations contractors, academia, and selected commercial industries - all working in a team effort within their own areas of expertise. This edition of the Kennedy Space Center Research and Technology 1994 Annual Report covers efforts of all these contributors to the KSC advanced technology development program, as well as our technology transfer activities. The Technology Programs and Commercialization Office (DE-TPO), (407) 867-3017, is responsible for publication of this report and should be contacted for any desired information regarding the advanced technology program.

1994-01-01

220

Research and Technology at the John F. Kennedy Space Center 1993  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As the NASA Center responsible for assembly, checkout, servicing, launch, recovery, and operational support of Space Transportation System elements and payloads, the John F. Kennedy Space Center is placing increasing emphasis on its advanced technology development program. This program encompasses the efforts of the Engineering Development Directorate laboratories, most of the KSC operations contractors, academia, and selected commercial industries - all working in a team effort within their own areas of expertise. This edition of the Kennedy Space Center Research and Technology 1993 Annual Report covers efforts of all these contributors to the KSC advanced technology development program, as well as our technology transfer activities. Major areas of research include material science, advanced software, industrial engineering, nondestructive evaluation, life sciences, atmospheric sciences, environmental technology, robotics, and electronics and instrumentation.

1993-01-01

221

STS-30 Magellan spacecraft processing at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) SAEF-2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Magellan spacecraft is hoisted from the transport trailer of the Payload Environmental Transportation System (PETS) to the floor of the clean room in the Space Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF-2) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Clean-suited technicians guide Magellan into place. The spacecraft, destined for unprecedented studies of Venusian topographic features, will be deployed by the crew of NASA's STS-30 mission in April 1989. View provided by KSC with alternate number KSC-88PC-1084.

1989-01-01

222

Kennedy Space Center: Constellation Program Electrical Ground Support Equipment Research and Development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is NASA's spaceport, launching rockets into space and leading important human spaceflight research. This spring semester, I worked at KSC on Constellation Program electrical ground support equipment through NASA's Undergraduate Student Research Program (USRP). This report includes a discussion of NASA, KSC, and my individual research project. An analysis of Penn State's preparation of me for an internship and my overall impressions of the Penn State and NASA internship experience conclude the report.

McCoy, Keegan

2010-01-01

223

Lightning Source Locations From VHF Radiation Data for a Flash at Kennedy Space Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

A comprehensive study of a three-stroke lightning flash that struck the 150-m weather tower at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) was recently reported by Uman et al. (1978). Here we supplement that study by presenting three-dimensional of the sources of VHF (30-50 MHz) radiation generated by the KSC flash. These locations were obtained by measuring with the KSC lightning detection and

P. L. Rustan; M. A. Uman; D. G. Childers; W. H. Beasley; C. L. Lennon

1980-01-01

224

Lightning source locations from VHF radiation data for a flash at Kennedy Space Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

A comprehensive study of a three-stroke lightning flash that struck the 150-m weather tower at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) was recently reported by Uman et al. (1978). Here we supplement that study by presenting three-dimensional locations of the sources of VHF (30-50 MHz) radiation generated by the KSC flash. These locations were obtained by measuring with the KSC lightning detection

P. L. Rustan; M. A. Uman; D. G. Childers; W. H. Beasley; C. L. Lennon

1980-01-01

225

[Diagnostic pitfalls of pseudo-foster kennedy syndrome - a case report].  

PubMed

To the outpatient facility of the Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty Hospital Brno, Czech Republic, E.U., was in June 2013 referred a 24 years old man with the suspicion of Foster Kennedy syndrome. On the fundus examinations, the findings were in correlation with the symptoms of this syndrome: slightly pale optic disc of the right eye and edema with the anterior extension of the optic nerve head of the left eye. The perimetric examination revealed bilateral visual fields defects, mainly in the nasal parts of the visual fields which is not typical for this syndrome. The native magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination was negative. Due to the suspicion of pathologic finding in the visual pathway area, the blood levels of pituitary gland hormones were examined and revealed elevated prolactin levels. In the indicated MRI examination with contrast, in the revised reading, a suspicious microadenoma of the pituitary gland was detected. Due to the atypical changes in the perimetric examinations, other possible causes of visual fields defects as coincidence of multiple, each other independent pathologies (neuritis or neuropathy of the optic nerve, neuromyelitis optica (Devic disease), Lebers hereditary optic neuritis (LHON) etc.) to exclude or to confirm the Pseudo-Foster Kennedy syndrome were taken into account. The patient is regularly followed up at our outpatient facility as well as at the outpatient facility of the Department of Neurosurgery, where, until now, the follow up only was recommended. The diagnosis of this case was, until now, set as Pseudo- Foster Kennedy syndrome, with unclarified cause of the clinical findings.K?ú?ové slová: Pseudo-Foster Kennedy syndrome, papilledema, prolactinoma, microadenoma. PMID:25640236

Michalec, M; Vlková, E; Matušková, V; Vysloužilová, D; Michalcová, L

2014-12-01

226

Boston College Kathleen Sullivan  

E-print Network

Gulag," produced by Boston College filmmakers John Michalczyk and Ronald Marsh along with Sy Rotter Rotter of the Foundation for Moral Courage. To contact Michalczyk, call 617-552-3895 or email michalcj

Huang, Jianyu

227

Kathleen Castro's biography  

Cancer.gov

Skip to Main Content at the National Institutes of Health | www.cancer.gov Print Page E-mail Page Search: Please wait while this form is being loaded.... Home Browse by Resource Type Browse by Area of Research Research Networks Funding Information About

228

Interview with Kathleen Blee  

E-print Network

in my work after that. I was doing a project on labor and militancy in the 1920s — following up on my dissertation research — and I was in the new york public archives where I came across a brochure in favor of women’s suffrage pub - lished by the Ku... Klux Klan. It changed my research direction. I got interested in why the Klan would have supported the women’s suffrage movement and I started doing some digging. I found that there had been a women’s Klan in the 1920s. at the time, I thought I had...

Decker, Stephanie Kristine

2007-01-01

229

Cyclic sedimentation in the shallow marine Upper Permian Kennedy Group, Carnarvon Basin, Western Australia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Upper Permian Kennedy Group of the Carnarvon Basin, Western Australia, was deposited while the Merlinleigh Sub-basin was undergoing thermal subsidence, and the global climate was warming from the Carboniferous-Permian glaciation to the Mesozoic Greenhouse conditions. The Kennedy Group comprises siliciclastic sedimentary rocks, dominated by sandstones in the lower part, with coarsening-up cycles from mudstones to very coarse sandstones and granule conglomerates in the upper part. Cycles were observed and logged in the field, and although many types of cycles were found, three main motifs describe most of the cycles. Cycle motifs are defined based on the dominance of the various facies: Mooka motif cycles are dominated by fine-grained and bioturbated facies (interpreted as deposition during relative sea-level highstand) with only thin laminated or cross-bedded sandstones (interpreted as deposited during relative sea-level fall); Binthalya motif cycles are dominated by laminated and cross-bedded sandstones; and Coolkilya motif cycles consist of alternating laminated and bioturbated beds. A hierarchy of cycles was observed in the field, and this correlated well with spectral analysis of logged parameters. Spectral analysis of section log data and data sets corrected for the effects of compaction and sedimentation rates detected regular cyclicity. Geochronology of the Kennedy Group is not well enough constrained to allow the cycle periods in time to be calculated, but ratios of the different scale cycle thicknesses correlate well with ratios of the Milankovitch orbital cycles that have been calculated for the Permian. The presence of regular cyclicity and even bed thicknesses across large distances are not consistent with tectonic or autocyclic models of cycle formation. The cycles are more likely to have been caused by fluctuating eustatic sea levels, perhaps enhanced by changing amounts or seasonality of precipitation. Both sea levels and climatic fluctuations would ultimately be controlled by the Milankovitch orbital cycles.

Lever, Helen

2004-11-01

230

Voltage profile program for the Kennedy Space Center electric power distribution system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Kennedy Space Center voltage profile program computes voltages at all busses greater than 1 Kv in the network under various conditions of load. The computation is based upon power flow principles and utilizes a Newton-Raphson iterative load flow algorithm. Power flow conditions throughout the network are also provided. The computer program is designed for both steady state and transient operation. In the steady state mode, automatic tap changing of primary distribution transformers is incorporated. Under transient conditions, such as motor starts etc., it is assumed that tap changing is not accomplished so that transformer secondary voltage is allowed to sag.

1976-01-01

231

USBI Booster Production Company's Hazardous Waste Management Program at the Kennedy Space Center, FL  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In response to the hazardous-waste generating processes associated with the launch of the Space Shuttle, a hazardous waste management plan has been developed. It includes waste recycling, product substitution, waste treatment, and waste minimization at the source. Waste material resulting from the preparation of the nonmotor segments of the solid rocket boosters include waste paints (primer, topcoats), waste solvents (methylene chloride, freon, acetone, toluene), waste inorganic compounds (aluminum anodizing compound, fixer), and others. Ways in which these materials are contended with at the Kennedy Space Center are discussed.

Venuto, Charles

1987-01-01

232

STS-30 Magellan spacecraft is unpacked at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) SAEF-2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

At the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) inside the Space Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF-2) (planetary checkout facility), the cover of the Payload Environmental Transportation System (PETS) is removed so that the Magellan spacecraft can be hoisted from the PETS trailer to the clean room floor. Clean-suited technicians guide the cover above plastic-wrapped spacecraft using rope. The spacecraft, destined for unprecedented studies of the Venusian topographic features, is to be deployed by the crew of NASA STS-30 mission in April 1989. View provided by KSC with alternate number KSC-88PC-1083.

1989-01-01

233

STS-30 Magellan spacecraft processing at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) SAEF-2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Clean-suited technicians attach mobility castors (ground handling cart) to Magellan spacecraft in the Space Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF-2) at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The castors will allow the spacecraft to be moved within the clean room of the SAEF-2 planetary spacecraft checkout facility. The spacecraft has just been hoisted from the transport trailer of the Payload Environmental Transportation System (PETS). Magellan, destined for unprecedented studies of Venusian topographic features, will be deployed by the crew of NASA's STS-30 mission in April 1989. View provided by KSC with alternate number KSC-88PC-1086.

1989-01-01

234

Lightning source locations from VHF radiation data for a flash at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Three dimensional locations are presented for the VHF (30-50 MHz) radiation sources generated by a three-stroke lightning flash at the Kennedy Space Center. The locations were obtained by calculating the difference in time of arrival (DTOA) of radiated pulses at four ground stations. A computer-implemented multiple time series analysis was used in calculating DTOA data. The locations of the approximately 48,000 sequential VHF sources are compared with wide band electric-field records to provide a better understanding of the physics of lightning discharge.

Rustan, P. L.; Uman, M. A.; Childers, D. G.; Beasley, W. H.; Lennon, C. L.

1980-01-01

235

Downwind hazard calculations for space shuttle launches at Kennedy Space Center and Vandenberg Air Force Base  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The quantitative estimates are presented of pollutant concentrations associated with the emission of the major combustion products (HCl, CO, and Al2O3) to the lower atmosphere during normal launches of the space shuttle. The NASA/MSFC Multilayer Diffusion Model was used to obtain these calculations. Results are presented for nine sets of typical meteorological conditions at Kennedy Space Center, including fall, spring, and a sea-breeze condition, and six sets at Vandenberg AFB. In none of the selected typical meteorological regimes studied was a 10-min limit of 4 ppm exceeded.

Susko, M.; Hill, C. K.; Kaufman, J. W.

1974-01-01

236

USBI Booster Production Company's Hazardous Waste Management Program at the Kennedy Space Center, FL  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In response to the hazardous-waste generating processes associated with the launch of the Space Shuttle, a hazardous waste management plan has been developed. It includes waste recycling, product substitution, waste treatment, and waste minimization at the source. Waste material resulting from the preparation of the nonmotor segments of the solid rocket boosters include waste paints (primer, topcoats), waste solvents (methylene chloride, freon, acetone, toluene), waste inorganic compounds (aluminum anodizing compound, fixer), and others. Ways in which these materials are contended with at the Kennedy Space Center are discussed.

Venuto, Charles

1987-05-01

237

A Case Study: Using Delmia at Kennedy Space Center to Support NASA's Constellation Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The presentation examines the use of Delmia (Digital Enterprise Lean Manufacturing Interactive Application) for digital simulation in NASA's Constellation Program. Topics include an overview of the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Design Visualization Group tasks, NASA's Constellation Program, Ares 1 ground processing preliminary design review, and challenges and how Delmia is used at KSC, Challenges include dealing with large data sets, creating and maintaining KSC's infrastructure, gathering customer requirements and meeting objectives, creating life-like simulations, and providing quick turn-around on varied products,

Kickbusch, Tracey; Humeniuk, Bob

2010-01-01

238

The influence of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby on William Kennedy's Legs  

E-print Network

rogue and an outlaw, but from the perspective of ~Le 's (sic) rather jaded narrator, his defense lawyer Marcus Gorman, Legs is a picaresque saint and but another version of 'the Great' Jay Gatsby" (375). In her interview Kay Bonetti asks Kennedy... on Halloween, "the unruly night when grace is always in short supply and the old and new dead walk about in the land. " It reaches a climax on All Saints' Day and ends on All Souls' Day, where the events of the novel correspond with the day's liturgy (Hunt...

Egenolf, Susan Bolet

1989-01-01

239

The use of sugammadex in a patient with Kennedy's disease under general anesthesia  

PubMed Central

Kennedy's disease (KD), also known as spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, is a rare, X-linked recessive, neurodegenerative disorder of the lower motor neurons characterized by progressive bulbar and appendicle muscular atrophy. Here we report a case of a 62-year-old male patient with KD, weighing 70 kg and 173 cm tall, was scheduled for frontal sinusectomy due to sinusitis. General anesthesia was induced through propofol 80 mg, remifentanil 0.25 ?g/kg/min and 40 mg rocuronium. We were successfully able to use a sugammadex on a patient suffering from KD in order to reverse rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade. PMID:25191203

Takeuchi, Risa; Hoshijima, Hiroshi; Doi, Katsushi; Nagasaka, Hiroshi

2014-01-01

240

Educational Applications of Astronomy & Space Flight Operations at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Within two years, the Kennedy Space Center will complete a total redesign of NASA's busiest Visitor's Center. Three million visitors per year will be witness to a new program focused on expanding the interests of the younger public in NASA's major space programs, in space operations, and in astronomy. This project, being developed through the Visitor's Center director, a NASA faculty fellow, and the Visitor's Center contractor, is centered on the interaction between NASA programs, the visiting youth, and their parents. The goal of the Center's program is to provide an appealing learning experience for teens and pre teens using stimulating displays and interactive exhibits that are also educational.

Erickson, L. K.

1999-09-01

241

Kennedy Space Center Next Gen Site: Routine, Affordable Access to Space  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Next Gen Site, operated by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration at Kennedy Space Center, is investigating ways of making space travel more routine and affordable. The site offers many reports on the Vision Spaceport Partnership, the Highly Reusable Space Transportation Project, Space Solar Power, and Space Transportation System Affordability. A map of Cape Canaveral highlights each launch pad, and you can see information on each one by clicking on it. Related Info Including X-Vehicles is a section with background on several experimental projects and has links to sites that examine different aspects of design and planning for easier access to space.

242

Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) Hand Cleaning Solvent Replacement at Kennedy Space Center (KSC)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

At Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Thiokol Corporation provides the engineering to assemble and prepare the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) for launch. This requires hand cleaning over 86 surfaces including metals, adhesives, rubber and electrical insulations, various painted surfaces and thermal protective materials. Due to the phase-out of certain ozone depleting chemical (ODC) solvents, all RSRM hand wipe operations being performed at KSC using l,l,1-trichloroethane (TCA) were eliminated. This presentation summarizes the approach used and the data gathered in the effort to eliminate TCA from KSC hand wipe operations.

Keen, Jill M.; DeWeese, Darrell C.; Key, Leigh W.

1997-01-01

243

Space Shuttle Challenger landing at Kennedy Space Center at end of STS 41-G  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle Challenger lands at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) at the end of the STS 41-G mission. The main landing gear has already touched down in this view, but the nose gear is still in the air (90232); Front view through tall grass of the Challenger making its landing at KSC (90233); Close-up side view of the Challenger making its landing at KSC (90234); Aerial view of the Challenger making its final approach to the runway to land at KSC (90235).

1984-01-01

244

National Security Action Memoranda: Document Images From The Presidential Papers of John Fitzgerald Kennedy National Security Files  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The John F. Kennedy Library has posted the National Security Action Memoranda of the Kennedy administration, written either by the President himself or his National Security Advisor McGeorge Bundy. Topics of the memorandums include policy for Cuba, forces in Vietnam, reconnaissance flights over Russia, NATO, South Africa policy, CIA support of "certain activities," and many others. The copies are presented in photographed facsimile, and many of the more sensitive memorandums have been "sanitized," i.e., have portions deleted. A few of the memorandums are still classified and therefore not yet available. In November of 1998, the library released a huge quantity of taped recordings of Kennedy's consultations (see the November 27, 1998 Scout Report).

245

Normal probabilities for Cape Kennedy wind components: Monthly reference periods for all flight azimuths. Altitudes 0 to 70 kilometers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This document replaces Cape Kennedy empirical wind component statistics which are presently being used for aerospace engineering applications that require component wind probabilities for various flight azimuths and selected altitudes. The normal (Gaussian) distribution is presented as an adequate statistical model to represent component winds at Cape Kennedy. Head-, tail-, and crosswind components are tabulated for all flight azimuths for altitudes from 0 to 70 km by monthly reference periods. Wind components are given for 11 selected percentiles ranging from 0.135 percent to 99,865 percent for each month. Results of statistical goodness-of-fit tests are presented to verify the use of the Gaussian distribution as an adequate model to represent component winds at Cape Kennedy, Florida.

Falls, L. W.

1973-01-01

246

Paper No. 11.05 1 A Half Century of Tapered-Pile Usage at the John F. Kennedy International Airport  

E-print Network

Paper No. 11.05 1 A Half Century of Tapered-Pile Usage at the John F. Kennedy International Airport piles have been the deep foundation of choice ever since construction of and at the well-known John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFKIA) in New York City began in the late 1940s. Timber piles were used

Horvath, John S.

247

Reflections on working for Senator Edward Kennedy, a vital ally in the effort to improve mental health access and care.  

PubMed

The author worked as a health policy fellow in the office of Senator Edward M. Kennedy in 1999. These reflections on that experience provide a description of the ambience of working on health policy issues in the US Congress, how the author utilized his community psychiatric knowledge and skills to assist in the process of developing and promoting various health and mental health related issues, and what it was like working in the Kennedy office. In the wake of his death, the Senator's long and influential career and especially his role in advancing health and mental health access and care improvement cannot be overstated. PMID:20091425

Pollack, David A

2010-04-01

248

Mutations disrupting the Kennedy phosphatidylcholine pathway in humans with congenital lipodystrophy and fatty liver disease  

PubMed Central

Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is the major glycerophospholipid in eukaryotic cells and is an essential component in all cellular membranes. The biochemistry of de novo PC synthesis by the Kennedy pathway is well established, but less is known about the physiological functions of PC. We identified two unrelated patients with defects in the Kennedy pathway due to biallellic loss-of-function mutations in phosphate cytidylyltransferase 1 alpha (PCYT1A), the rate-limiting enzyme in this pathway. The mutations lead to a marked reduction in PCYT1A expression and PC synthesis. The phenotypic consequences include some features, such as severe fatty liver and low HDL cholesterol levels, that are predicted by the results of previously reported liver-specific deletion of murine Pcyt1a. Both patients also had lipodystrophy, severe insulin resistance, and diabetes, providing evidence for an additional and essential role for PCYT1A-generated PC in the normal function of white adipose tissue and insulin action. PMID:24889630

Payne, Felicity; Lim, Koini; Girousse, Amandine; Brown, Rebecca J.; Kory, Nora; Robbins, Ann; Xue, Yali; Sleigh, Alison; Cochran, Elaine; Adams, Claire; Dev Borman, Arundhati; Russel-Jones, David; Gorden, Phillip; Semple, Robert K.; Saudek, Vladimir; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Walther, Tobias C.; Barroso, Inês; Savage, David B.

2014-01-01

249

Mutations disrupting the Kennedy phosphatidylcholine pathway in humans with congenital lipodystrophy and fatty liver disease.  

PubMed

Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is the major glycerophospholipid in eukaryotic cells and is an essential component in all cellular membranes. The biochemistry of de novo PC synthesis by the Kennedy pathway is well established, but less is known about the physiological functions of PC. We identified two unrelated patients with defects in the Kennedy pathway due to biallellic loss-of-function mutations in phosphate cytidylyltransferase 1 alpha (PCYT1A), the rate-limiting enzyme in this pathway. The mutations lead to a marked reduction in PCYT1A expression and PC synthesis. The phenotypic consequences include some features, such as severe fatty liver and low HDL cholesterol levels, that are predicted by the results of previously reported liver-specific deletion of murine Pcyt1a. Both patients also had lipodystrophy, severe insulin resistance, and diabetes, providing evidence for an additional and essential role for PCYT1A-generated PC in the normal function of white adipose tissue and insulin action. PMID:24889630

Payne, Felicity; Lim, Koini; Girousse, Amandine; Brown, Rebecca J; Kory, Nora; Robbins, Ann; Xue, Yali; Sleigh, Alison; Cochran, Elaine; Adams, Claire; Dev Borman, Arundhati; Russel-Jones, David; Gorden, Phillip; Semple, Robert K; Saudek, Vladimir; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Walther, Tobias C; Barroso, Inês; Savage, David B

2014-06-17

250

[X-linked recessive bulbospinal muscular atrophy (Kennedy's disease). A family study].  

PubMed

Kennedy's disease is a rare type of motor neuron disease with a sex-linked recessive trait. DNA studies show a mutation at the androgen receptor gene on the long arm of X chromosome (Xq 11-12) with expanded CAG triplets (more than 347 repeats). We present three patients and one carrier among ten patients of a four generation family with clinical phenotype of the disease. The patients' ages ranged from 50 to 60 years with symptomatology usually beginning around 30 years of age. Patients had gynecomastia, testicular atrophy, muscular weakness, fasciculation, amyotrophy, absent deep tendon reflexes and postural tremor. PCR techniques of DNA analysis showed expanded size of CAG repeats on Xq 11-12 in all the three patients and in the carrier asymptomatic woman. This is the first Brazilian family with genetic molecular diagnosis of Kennedy's disease. This disease must be included in the differential diagnosis of motor neuron disease since it has a distinct prognosis and genetic counseling is mandatory to the carriers. PMID:9850762

Kaimen-Maciel, D R; Medeiros, M; Clímaco, V; Kelian, G R; da Silva, L S; de Souza, M M; Raskin, S

1998-09-01

251

Kennedy's Disease  

MedlinePLUS

... of a group of disorders called lower motor neuron disorders (which involve disruptions in the transmission of nerve cell signals in the brain to nerve cells in the brain stem and spinal cord). Onset of the disease is ...

252

The Language of the Liberal Consensus: John F. Kennedy, Technical Reason, and the "New Economics" at Yale University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

On June 11, 1962, President John F. Kennedy addressed the economy at Yale University. This essay explains the symbolic charge of his economic rhetoric, a persuasive campaign that enjoyed considerable success and marked the first time that a president took explicit responsibility for the nation's economic performance. I argue that the president…

Murphy, John W.

2004-01-01

253

Profiles in Courage Simulations: Based on President John F. Kennedy's Pulitzer Prize Book. ETC Simulations Number Four.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book presents simulation activities for the eight profiles of U.S. Senators presented in John F. Kennedy's "Profiles in Courage." Intended for student involvement, the simulations require student research and practice in order to carry out the designated roles. The simulations and role play are designed to actively involve the students in…

Hostrop, Richard W.

254

Kennedy, Sheila S., God and Country: America in Red Waco, Texas: Baylor University Press, 2007, 254 pp  

E-print Network

and fundamentally incompatible religious paradigms, which she labels the ``Enlightenment'' and ``Puritan''. Proponents of the Enlightenment paradigm tend to emphasize the importance of culture and social structure in the Enlightenment or Puritan paradigms. Kennedy argues that both worldviews flourished in early America due

Colorado at Boulder, University of

255

CONCENTRATION UNCERTAINTY PRINCIPLES FOR SIGNALS ON THE UNIT SPHERE Zubair Khalid, Salman Durrani, Parastoo Sadeghi and Rodney A. Kennedy  

E-print Network

CONCENTRATION UNCERTAINTY PRINCIPLES FOR SIGNALS ON THE UNIT SPHERE Zubair Khalid, Salman Durrani.kennedy}@anu.edu.au ABSTRACT The uncertainty principle is an important and powerful tool, with many applications in signal processing. This paper presents two concentration uncertainty principles for signals on the sphere which

Durrani, Salman

256

ON THE DELIBERATE CENTRALITY OF AN INVISIBLE HAND: REPLY TO GAVIN KENNEDY, RYAN HANLEY AND CRAIG SMITH  

Microsoft Academic Search

We previously showed that ‘led by an invisible hand’ was physically central in original editions of The Theory of Moral Sentiments and The Wealth of Nations. We suggested that Adam Smith did that deliberately. Three authors commented on our paper, Gavin Kennedy, Ryan Hanley and Craig Smith. In this article we reply to their comments.

Daniel B. Klein; Brandon Lucas

2011-01-01

257

Nov. 16, 2012 Vol. 52, No. 23 John F. Kennedy Space Center -America's gateway to the universe  

E-print Network

Spaceport News Inside this issue... Astrobotics Page 3Page 2 Space energy Page 5 The future of LEO Page 7 of By Rebecca Regan Spaceport News "Special Event for Com- munities with Populations of 500,000 or more." "What of Spaceport News, we highlighted the handover of space shuttleAtlantis from NASAto the Kennedy Space Center

258

U. S.-U. S. S. R. Space Exploration and Technology, John F. Kennedy, and the Press.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Debates and policies in the late 1950s and early 1960s regarding the United States-Soviet space race are described in this paper, and an analysis is presented of press coverage of President John F. Kennedy's public statements regarding space technology and exploration. The first sections of the paper present a selected space chronology from 1957…

Babcock, William A.; Ostman, Ronald E.

259

Letters from George Washington and Samuel Cabble, and Speeches by Franklin D. Roosevelt and John F. Kennedy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author uses several primary sources to demonstrate that George Washington, Samuel Cabble, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and John F. Kennedy stated their awareness of contemporary challenges, but looked to the future with hope and optimism. When they envisioned the future, their words indicated that they did not just imagine it, but…

Potter, Lee Ann

2008-01-01

260

Argument Schemes and the Construction of Social Reality: John F. Kennedy's Address to the Houston Ministerial Association.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

States that John F. Kennedy, in his 1960 speech to Houston ministers, convinced many voters that, as a Catholic president, he would act independently of the Catholic Church in matters such as federal aid to schools, human reproduction, and religious tolerance. Analyzes arguments he used to distance himself from the Vatican and align himself with…

Warnick, Barbara

1996-01-01

261

The Plain Dealer High School Newspaper Workshop Program. John F. Kennedy and West Technical High Schools, 1994-1995.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Plain Dealer High School Newspaper Workshop was a pilot program created to introduce minority high school students (although not limited to minority students) to career opportunities in the newspaper business. Forty-four students from the Cleveland Public Schools' John F. Kennedy and West Technical High School participated in the 9-week…

Cleveland Public Schools, OH.

262

Environmental Assessment for Central Campus Complex John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This Environmental Assessment addresses the Proposed Action to consolidate multiple facilities in the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Industrial Area by constructing two new buildings in the existing headquarters area between NASA Parkway, 3rd Street, C Avenue, and D Avenue. Under the Proposed Action, the historic Headquarters Building will be demolished and a new building will be constructed closer to the Operations and Checkout Building by centering it on D A venue (Hunton Brady Architects, P A and Jones Edmunds and Associates, Inc. 2011). This option was selected from a group of 15 initial sketches as the most viable option during a Central Campus Complex Siting Study completed in February 2011. A No-Action Alternative is also presented in which no demolition or construction of new facilities would occur. Implementing the Proposed Action will have major impacts to cultural resources, while the remaining environmental impacts will be minor.

Dankert, Donald

2013-01-01

263

A New Comprehensive Lightning Instrumentation System for Pad 39B at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new comprehensive lightning instrumentation system has been designed for Launch Complex 39B at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. This new instrumentation system includes the synchronized recording of six high-speed video cameras, currents through the nine downconductors of the new lightning protection system, four B-dot, 3-axis measurement stations, and five D-dot stations composed of two antennas each. The instrumentation system is composed of centralized transient recorders and digitizers that located close to the sensors in the field. The sensors and transient recorders communicate via optical fiber. The transient recorders are triggered by the B-dot sensors, the E-dot sensors, or the current through the downlead conductors. The high-speed cameras are triggered by the transient recorders when the latter perceives a qualified trigger.

Mata, Carlos T.; Rakov, Vladimir A.; Mata, Angel G.; Bonilla Tatiana; Navedo, Emmanuel; Snyder, Gary P.

2010-01-01

264

Analysis and Assessment of Peak Lightning Current Probabilities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This technical memorandum presents a summary by the Electromagnetics and Aerospace Environments Branch at the Marshall Space Flight Center of lightning characteristics and lightning criteria for the protection of aerospace vehicles. Probability estimates are included for certain lightning strikes (peak currents of 200, 100, and 50 kA) applicable to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Shuttle at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, during rollout, on-pad, and boost/launch phases. Results of an extensive literature search to compile information on this subject are presented in order to answer key questions posed by the Space Shuttle Program Office at the Johnson Space Center concerning peak lightning current probabilities if a vehicle is hit by a lightning cloud-to-ground stroke. Vehicle-triggered lightning probability estimates for the aforementioned peak currents are still being worked. Section 4.5, however, does provide some insight on estimating these same peaks.

Johnson, D. L.; Vaughan, W. W.

1999-01-01

265

Human Systems Engineering for Launch processing at Kennedy Space Center (KSC)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Launch processing at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is primarily accomplished by human users of expensive and specialized equipment. In order to reduce the likelihood of human error, to reduce personal injuries, damage to hardware, and loss of mission the design process for the hardware needs to include the human's relationship with the hardware. Just as there is electrical, mechanical, and fluids, the human aspect is just as important. The focus of this presentation is to illustrate how KSC accomplishes the inclusion of the human aspect in the design using human centered hardware modeling and engineering. The presentations also explain the current and future plans for research and development for improving our human factors analysis tools and processes.

Henderson, Gena; Stambolian, Damon B.; Stelges, Katrine

2012-01-01

266

Research and Technology 1998 Annual Report of the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As the NASA Center responsible for preparing and launching space missions, the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is placing increasing emphasis on its advanced technology development program. This program encompasses the efforts of the entire KSC team, consisting of Government and contractor personnel, working in partnership with academic institutions and commercial industry. This edition of the KSC Research and Technology 1998 Annual Report covers the efforts of these contributors to the KSC advanced technology development program, as well as our technology transfer activities. The following research areas are covered: Life Sciences; Mechanical Engineering; Environmental Engineering; Advanced Software; Atmospheric Science; Materials Science; Nondestructive Evaluation; Process/Industrial Engineering; Automation and Robotics; and Electronics and Instrumentation.

1998-01-01

267

Large-Scale Cryogenic Testing of Launch Vehicle Ground Systems at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The development of a new launch vehicle to support NASA's future exploration plans requires significant redesign and upgrade of Kennedy Space Center's (KSC) launch pad and ground support equipment systems. In many cases, specialized test equipment and systems will be required to certify the function of the new system designs under simulated operational conditions, including propellant loading. This paper provides an overview of the cryogenic test infrastructure that is in place at KSC to conduct development and qualification testing that ranges from the component level to the integrated-system level. An overview of the major cryogenic test facilities will be provided, along with a detailed explanation of the technology focus area for each facility

Ernst, E. W.; Sass, J. P.; Lobemeyer, D. A.; Sojourner, S. J.; Hatfield, W. H.; Rewinkel, D. A.

2007-01-01

268

Research and Technology: 2003 Annual Report of the John F Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is America's Spaceport Technology Center. The KSC technology development program encompasses the efforts of the entire KSC team, consisting of Government and contractor personnel, working in partnership with academic institutions and commercial industry. KSC's assigned mission areas are space launch operations and spaceport and range technologies. KSC's technology development customers include current space transportation programs, future space transportation programs / initiatives, and enabling technical programs. The KSC Research and Technology 2003 Annual Report encompasses the efforts of contributors to the KSC advanced technology development program and KSC technology transfer activities. Dr. Dave Bartine, KSC Chief Technologist, (321) 867-7069, is responsible for publication of this report and should be contacted for any desired information regarding KSC's research and technology development activities.

2003-01-01

269

Thunderstorm currents and lightning charges at the NASA Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Kennedy Space Center, (KSC) and the U.S. Air Force are currently operating an extensive network of ground-based electric-field mills in order to detect atmospheric electrical hazards to ground operations, launches, and landings of spacecraft. Over the past 10 years, the University of Arizona has utilized data provided by this network, and other instrumentation, to investigate the electrical structure of thunderstorms and lightning in Florida. Recent analyses have included estimates of the Maxwell current density that thunderstorms produce at the ground and computations of the locations and magnitudes of lightning-caused changes in the cloud charge distribution. This work is reviewed, and an example of how thunderstorm current patterns and lightning charges develop in both space and time is presented.

Krider, E. P.; Maier, L. M.; Blakeslee, R. J.

1985-01-01

270

Determinations of microbial loads associated with microscopic-size particles of Kennedy Space Center soil  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Plate counts for six fractions of Kennedy Space Center soil provided estimates of aerobic, mesophilic, heterotrophic, and microbial loads on single soil particles. Analyses included unheated particles, particles subjected to wet heat at 80 C for 20 min, and particles subjected to dry heat at 110 C for 1 hr. Unheated particles yielded mean counts ranging from 6 colonies per particle for the smallest (44-53 microns) soil fraction to approximately 55 colonies per particle for the largest size (105-125 microns) soil fraction tested. Mean counts for heat-resistant forms ranged from 2 colonies per particle for the smaller particles to 12-15 colonies for the largest particles analyzed.

Ruschmeyer, O. R.; Pflug, I. J.

1977-01-01

271

Aircraft measurements of electrified clouds at Kennedy Space Center, part 3  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Flights made by the Special Purpose Test Vehicle for Atmospheric Research (SPTVAR) airplane during a second deployment to Florida during the summer of 1989 are discussed. The findings based on the data gathered are presented. The progress made during the second year of the project is discussed. The summer 1989 study was carried out with the support and guidance of Col. John Madura, Commander of Detachment 11, 2nd Weather Squadron, USAF, at Patrick Air Force Base (PAFB) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The project goals were to develop and demonstrate techniques for measuring the electric field aloft and locating regions of charge during flight within and near clouds; to characterize the electric conditions that are presently identified as a threat to space launch vehicles; and to study the correlation between the electric field aloft and that at Kennedy Space Center's ground-based electric field mill array for a variety of electrified clouds.

Jones, J. J.; Winn, W. P.; Hunyady, S. J.; Moore, C. B.; Bullock, J. W.; Fleischhacker, P.

1990-01-01

272

Wiltech Component Cleaning and Refurbishment Facility CFC Elimination Plan at NASA Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Wiltech Component Cleaning & Refurbishment Facility (WT-CCRF) at NASA Kennedy Space Center performs precision cleaning on approximately 200,000 metallic and non metallic components every year. WT-CCRF has developed a CFC elimination plan consisting of aqueous cleaning and verification and an economical dual solvent strategy for alternative solvent solution. Aqueous Verification Methodologies were implemented two years ago on a variety of Ground Support Equipment (GSE) components and sampling equipment. Today, 50% of the current workload is verified using aqueous methods and 90% of the total workload is degreased aqueously using, Zonyl and Brulin surfactants in ultrasonic baths. An additional estimated 20% solvent savings could be achieved if the proposed expanded use of aqueous methods are approved. Aqueous cleaning has shown to be effective, environmentally friendly and economical (i.e.. cost of materials, equipment, facilities and labor).

Williamson, Steve; Aman, Bob; Aurigema, Andrew; Melendez, Orlando

1999-01-01

273

Environmental monitoring and research at the John F. Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Biomedical Operations and Research Office at the NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center has been supporting environmental monitoring and research since the mid-1970s. Program elements include monitoring of baseline conditions to document natural variability in the ecosystem, assessments of operations and construction of new facilities, and ecological research focusing on wildlife habitat associations. Information management is centered around development of a computerized geographic information system that incorporates remote sensing and digital image processing technologies along with traditional relational data base management capabilities. The proactive program is one in which the initiative is to anticipate potential environmental concerns before they occur and, by utilizing in-house expertise, develop impact minimization or mitigation strategies to reduce environmental risk.

Hall, C. R.; Hinkle, C. R.; Knott, W. M.; Summerfield, B. R.

1992-01-01

274

ON THE CONSTRUCTION OF LOW-PASS FILTERS ON THE UNIT SPHERE Zubair Khalid, Salman Durrani, Rodney A. Kennedy and Parastoo Sadeghi  

E-print Network

ON THE CONSTRUCTION OF LOW-PASS FILTERS ON THE UNIT SPHERE Zubair Khalid, Salman Durrani, Rodney A, Australia. Email: {zubair.khalid, salman.durrani, rodney.kennedy, parastoo.sadeghi}@anu.edu.au ABSTRACT

Durrani, Salman

275

STS-68 747 SCA Ferry Flight Takeoff for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle Columbia, atop NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), taking off for the Kennedy Space Center shortly after its landing on 12 October 1994, at Edwards, California, to complete mission STS-68. Columbia was being ferried from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, to Air Force Plant 42, Palmdale, California, where it will undergo six months of inspections, modifications, and systems upgrades. The STS-68 11-day mission was devoted to radar imaging of Earth's geological features with the Space Radar Laboratory. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site with Dryden remaining as the principal alternate landing site.

1994-01-01

276

Spearhead echo and downburst near the approach end of a John F. Kennedy Airport runway, New York City  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Radar echoes of a storm at John F. Kennedy International Airport are examined. Results regarding the phenomena presented suggest the existence of downburst cells. These cells are characterized by spearhead echoes. About 2% of the echoes in the New York area were spearhead echoes. The detection and identification of downburst cells, their potential hazard to approaching and landing aircraft, and communication of this information to the pilots of those aircraft are discussed.

Fujita, T. T.

1976-01-01

277

A preliminary study of environmental parameters associated with the feasibility of a polygeneration plant at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The feasibility of a polygeneration plant at Kennedy Space Center was studied. Liquid hydrogen and gaseous nitrogen are the two principal products in consideration. Environmental parameters (air quality, water quality, biological diversity and hazardous waste disposal) necessary for the feasibility study were investigated. A National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) project flow sheet was to be formulated for the environmental impact statement. Water quality criteria for Florida waters were to be established.

Barnes, G. D.

1982-01-01

278

Structural Analysis Peer Review for the Static Display of the Orbiter Atlantis at the Kennedy Space Center Visitors Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Mr. Christopher Miller with the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) NASA Safety & Mission Assurance (S&MA) office requested the NASA Engineering and Safety Center's (NESC) technical support on March 15, 2012, to review and make recommendations on the structural analysis being performed for the Orbiter Atlantis static display at the KSC Visitor Center. The principal focus of the assessment was to review the engineering firm's structural analysis for lifting and aligning the orbiter and its static display configuration

Minute, Stephen A.

2013-01-01

279

Procedure for the selection of materials for use in oxygen systems at the John F. Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes tests used at the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in the material selection procedure for evaluating materials suitable for use in oxygen systems. Special attention is given to the basic selection criteria for materials used in oxygen enriched environments. The flow chart for the material selection procedure is presented, and information that must be supplied by vendors requesting batch/lot certification support from KSC is given.

Bryan, Coleman J.; Olsen, Melvin G.

1988-01-01

280

Metabolic Interactions between the Lands Cycle and the Kennedy Pathway of Glycerolipid Synthesis in Arabidopsis Developing Seeds[W  

PubMed Central

It has been widely accepted that the primary function of the Lands cycle is to provide a route for acyl remodeling to modify fatty acid (FA) composition of phospholipids derived from the Kennedy pathway. Lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase (LPCAT) is an evolutionarily conserved key enzyme in the Lands cycle. In this study, we provide direct evidence that the Arabidopsis thaliana LPCATs, LPCAT1 and LPCAT2, participate in the Lands cycle in developing seeds. In spite of a substantially reduced initial rate of nascent FA incorporation into phosphatidylcholine (PC), the PC level in the double mutant lpcat1 lpcat2-2 remained unchanged. LPCAT deficiency triggered a compensatory response of de novo PC synthesis and a concomitant acceleration of PC turnover that were attributable at least in part to PC deacylation. Acyl-CoA profile analysis revealed complicated metabolic alterations rather than merely reduced acyl group shuffling from PC in the mutant. Shifts in FA stereo-specific distribution in triacylglycerol of the mutant seed suggested a preferential retention of saturated acyl chains at the stereospecific numbering (sn)-1 position from PC and likely a channeling of lysophosphatidic acid, derived from PC, into the Kennedy pathway. Our study thus illustrates an intricate relationship between the Lands cycle and the Kennedy pathway. PMID:23150634

Wang, Liping; Shen, Wenyun; Kazachkov, Michael; Chen, Guanqun; Chen, Qilin; Carlsson, Anders S.; Stymne, Sten; Weselake, Randall J.; Zou, Jitao

2012-01-01

281

John F. Kennedy, Jr., speaks to the media at KSC's HBO premiere 'From the Earth to the Moon.'  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

John F. Kennedy, Jr., editor-in-chief of George Magazine, speaks with members of the national media at the Home Box Office (HBO) and Imagine Entertainment premiere of the 12-part miniseries 'From the Earth to the Moon' at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The series was filmed in part on location at KSC and dramatizes the human aspects of NASA's efforts to launch Americans to the Moon. The miniseries highlights NASA's Apollo program and the events leading up to and including the six successful missions to the Moon. A special 500-seat theater was constructed next to the Apollo/Saturn V Center for the KSC premiere showing. Speakers at the event included KSC Director Roy Bridges (at right); Jeff Bewkes, chairman and CEO for HBO; and John F. Kennedy, Jr. Also attending the event, which featured the episode entitled '1968,' were Buzz Aldrin, Apollo 11 astronaut, and Al Worden, Apollo 15 astronaut. The original miniseries event, created for HBO by actor Tom Hanks and Imagine Entertainment, will premiere on HBO beginning April 5, 1998.

1998-01-01

282

John F. Kennedy, Jr., speaks to invited guests at KSC's HBO premiere 'From the Earth to the Moon.'  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

John F. Kennedy, Jr., editor-in-chief of George Magazine, greets invited guests at the Home Box Office (HBO) and Imagine Entertainment premiere of the 12-part miniseries 'From the Earth to the Moon' at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The series was filmed in part on location at KSC and dramatizes the human aspects of NASA's efforts to launch Americans to the Moon. The miniseries highlights NASA's Apollo program and the events leading up to and including the six successful missions to the Moon. A special 500- seat theater was constructed next to the Apollo/Saturn V Center for the KSC premiere showing. Speakers at the event included KSC Director Roy Bridges (at right); Jeff Bewkes, chairman and CEO for HBO; and John F. Kennedy, Jr. Also attending the event, which featured the episode entitled '1968,' were Buzz Aldrin, Apollo 11 astronaut, and Al Worden, Apollo 15 astronaut. The original miniseries event, created for HBO by actor Tom Hanks and Imagine Entertainment, will premiere on HBO beginning April 5, 1998.

1998-01-01

283

An Overview of My Internship with the Ecological Program at John F. Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During my internship with Innovative Health Applications, I participated in numerous longterm research projects involving the study of various plant and animal life at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). I observed the monitoring of nesting sea turtles. I learned about the transfer of egg clutches from the northern Gulf Coast in an effort to help the hatchlings avoid the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. I gained knowledge of tracking the movements of important sport fish and sharks in this area using a hydro-acoustic tag and receiver system. This effort included routinely taking water quality data at multiple sites around KSC. Alligator population and nesting assessments was another part of my internship. I observed the biologists take morphometric measurements, blood, urine and tissue samples from alligators found in KSC waterways. I assisted in taking photosynthesis and reflectance measurements on various scrub oaks and palmettos. I participated in Florida Scrub-Jay surveys in an effort to monitor their population trends and was involved in Southeastern beach mouse trapping and identification. I also assisted in seagrass surveys monitoring the health of the seagrass beds.

Owen, Samantha

2010-01-01

284

Habitat model for the Florida Scrub Jay on John F. Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Florida Scrub Jay is endemic to Florida. The John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) provides habitat for one of the three largest populations of the Florida Scrub Jay. This threatened bird occupies scrub, slash pine flatwoods, disturbed scrub, and coastal strand on KSC. Densities of Florida Scrub Jays were shown to vary with habitat characteristics but not necessarily with vegetation type. Relationships between Florida Scrub Jay densities and habitat characteristics were used to develop a habitat model to provide a tool to compare alternative sites for new facilities and to quantify environmental impacts. This model is being tested using long term demographic studies of colorbanded Florida Scrub Jays. Optimal habitat predicted by the model has greater than or equal to 50 percent of the shrub canopy comprised of scrub oaks, 20-50 percent open space or scrub oak vegetation within 100 m of a ruderal edge, less than or equal to 15 percent pine canopy cover, a shrub height of 120-170 cm, and is greater than or equal to 100 m from a forest. This document reviews life history, social behavior, food, foraging habitat, cover requirements, characteristics of habitat on KSC, and habitat preferences of the Florida Scrub Jay. Construction of the model and its limitations are discussed.

Breininger, David R.

1992-01-01

285

Geology, geohydrology, and soils of NASA, Kennedy Space Center: A review  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Sediments underlying Kennedy Space Center (KSC) have accumulated in alternating periods of deposition and erosion since the Eocene. Surface sediments are of Pleistocene and Recent ages. Fluctuating sea levels with the alternating glacial-interglacial cycles have shaped the formation of the barrier island. Merritt Island is an older landscape whose formation may have begun as much as 240,000 years ago, although most of the surface sediments are not that old. Cape Canaveral probably dates from less than 7,000 years B.P. (before present) as does the barrier strip separating Mosquito Lagoon from the Atlantic Ocean. Merritt Island and Cape Canaveral have been shaped by progradational processes but not continuously so, while the Mosquito Lagoon barrier has been migrating landward. Deep acquifers beneath KSC are recharged inland but are highly mineralized in the coastal region and interact little with surface vegetation. The Surficial acquifer has formed in the Pleistocene and Recent deposits and is recharged by local rainfall. Sand ridges in the center of Merritt Island are important to its recharge.

Schmalzer, Paul A.; Hinkle, C. Ross

1990-01-01

286

An Occupational Performance Test Validation Program for Fire Fighters at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We evaluated performance of a modified Combat Task Test (CTT) and of standard fitness tests in 20 male subjects to assess the prediction of occupational performance standards for Kennedy Space Center fire fighters. The CTT consisted of stair-climbing, a chopping simulation, and a victim rescue simulation. Average CTT performance time was 3.61 +/- 0.25 min (SEM) and all CTT tasks required 93% to 97% maximal heart rate. By using scores from the standard fitness tests, a multiple linear regression model was fitted to each parameter: the stairclimb (r(exp 2) = .905, P less than .05), the chopping performance time (r(exp 2) = .582, P less than .05), the victim rescue time (r(exp 2) = .218, P = not significant), and the total performance time (r(exp 2) = .769, P less than .05). Treadmill time was the predominant variable, being the major predictor in two of four models. These results indicated that standardized fitness tests can predict performance on some CTT tasks and that test predictors were amenable to exercise training.

Schonfeld, Brian R.; Doerr, Donald F.; Convertino, Victor A.

1990-01-01

287

Physical, anthropometrical, and body composition characteristics of workers at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

At the Kennedy Space Center, workers are often exposed to cardiovascular and muscular stress in job-related activities which may require a high level of physical fitness in order to safely complete the work task. Similar tasks will be performed at other launch and landing facilities and in space for the Space Station. One such category includes workers who handle toxic propellants and must wear Self-Contained Atmospheric Protective Ensembles (SCAPE) that can weigh 56 lbs. with the air pack. These suits provide a significant physical challenge to many of the workers in terms of carrying this load while moving about and performing work. Furthermore, under some conditions, there is a significant thermal stress. The physical characteristics of these workers are, therefore, of consequence. The purpose of this study was to analyze the anthropometry, body composition, strength, power, endurance, flexibility, aerobic fitness, and blood variables of a representative sample of male KSC SCAPE workers and to compare them with characteristics of other male workers at KSC (total population N=110). Three separate comparisons were made.

Lasley, M. L.

1985-01-01

288

Soil, Groundwater, Surface Water, and Sediments of Kennedy Space Center, Florida: Background Chemical and Physical Characteristics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This study documented background chemical composition of soils, groundwater, surface; water, and sediments of Kennedy Space Center. Two hundred soil samples were collected, 20 each in 10 soil classes. Fifty-one groundwater wells were installed in 4 subaquifers of the Surficial Aquifer and sampled; there were 24 shallow, 16 intermediate, and 11 deep wells. Forty surface water and sediment samples were collected in major watershed basins. All samples were away from sites of known contamination. Samples were analyzed for organochlorine pesticides, aroclors, chlorinated herbicides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), total metals, and other parameters. All aroclors (6) were below detection in all media. Some organochlorine pesticides were detected at very low frequencies in soil, sediment, and surface water. Chlorinated herbicides were detected at very low frequencies in soil and sediments. PAH occurred in low frequencies in soiL, shallow groundwater, surface water, and sediments. Concentrations of some metals differed among soil classes, with subaquifers and depths, and among watershed basins for surface water but not sediments. Most of the variation in metal concentrations was natural, but agriculture had increased Cr, Cu, Mn, and Zn.

Shmalzer, Paul A.; Hensley, Melissa A.; Mota, Mario; Hall, Carlton R.; Dunlevy, Colleen A.

2000-01-01

289

Summary of 1987 and 1988 manatee aerial surveys at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Aerial surveys of manatees conducted since 1977 at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) have provided a very useful and cost effective monitoring tool in the assessment of abundance and distribution of manatees in the northern Banana River. Data collected in the mid 1980's as part of the KSC Environmental Monitoring Program indicated that the numbers of manatees utilizing the northern Banana River had increased dramatically from earlier years and that the animals appeared to have changed their distribution patterns within the area as well (Provancha and Provancha 1988). United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and Florida Department of Natural Resources (FLDNR) conducted bimonthly aerial surveys in 1986 for the entire Florida east coast. Their data clearly show that the Banana River has the highest concentration of manatees during the non-winter months when compared to all other segments of the east coast surveys (B. Wiegle/FLDNR, unpublished data). They further show that, in spring, an average of 71 percent of the manatees in Brevard county were located in the Banana River. During that period 85 percent of the animals were north of the NASA Causeway (State Road (SR) 402) in the KSC security zone. These data indicate the importance of the KSC waters to the Florida east coast manatee population. We reinitiated KSC surveys in 1987 to document distributions and numbers of manatees during the spring influx. Aerial censuses were continued throughout the year in 1988 and this report provides a summary of our findings for the two years.

Provancha, Jane A.; Provancha, Mark J.

1989-01-01

290

Strain Distribution in a Kennedy Class I Implant Assisted Removable Partial Denture under Various Loading Conditions  

PubMed Central

Purpose. This in vitro study investigates how unilateral and bilateral occlusal loads are transferred to an implant assisted removable partial denture (IARPD). Materials and Methods. A duplicate model of a Kennedy class I edentulous mandibular arch was made and then a conventional removable partial denture (RPD) fabricated. Two Straumann implants were placed in the second molar region, and the prosthesis was modified to accommodate implant retained ball attachments. Strain gages were incorporated into the fitting surface of both the framework and acrylic to measure microstrain (?Strain). The IARPD was loaded to 120Ns unilaterally and bilaterally in three different loading positions. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS version 18.0 (SPSS, Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) with an alpha level of 0.05 to compare the maximum ?Strain values of the different loading conditions. Results. During unilateral and bilateral loading the maximum ?Strain was predominantly observed in a buccal direction. As the load was moved anteriorly the ?Strain increased in the mesial area. Unilateral loading resulted in a twisting of the structure and generated a strain mismatch between the metal and acrylic surfaces. Conclusions. Unilateral loading created lateral and vertical displacement of the IARPD. The curvature of the dental arch resulted in a twisting action which intensified as the unilateral load was moved anteriorly. PMID:23737788

Shahmiri, Reza; Aarts, John M.; Bennani, Vincent; Swain, Michael V.

2013-01-01

291

Mapping analysis and planning system for the John F. Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Environmental management, impact assessment, research and monitoring are multidisciplinary activities which are ideally suited to incorporate a multi-media approach to environmental problem solving. Geographic information systems (GIS), simulation models, neural networks and expert-system software are some of the advancing technologies being used for data management, query, analysis and display. At the 140,000 acre John F. Kennedy Space Center, the Advanced Software Technology group has been supporting development and implementation of a program that integrates these and other rapidly evolving hardware and software capabilities into a comprehensive Mapping, Analysis and Planning System (MAPS) based in a workstation/local are network environment. An expert-system shell is being developed to link the various databases to guide users through the numerous stages of a facility siting and environmental assessment. The expert-system shell approach is appealing for its ease of data access by management-level decision makers while maintaining the involvement of the data specialists. This, as well as increased efficiency and accuracy in data analysis and report preparation, can benefit any organization involved in natural resources management.

Hall, C. R.; Barkaszi, M. J.; Provancha, M. J.; Reddick, N. A.; Hinkle, C. R.; Engel, B. A.; Summerfield, B. R.

1994-01-01

292

Legacy and Emergence of Spaceport Technology Development at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has a long and successful legacy in the checkout and launch of missiles and space vehicles. These operations have become significantly more complex, and their evolution has driven the need for many technology developments. Unanticipated events have also underscored the need for a local, highly responsive technology development and testing capability. This evolution is briefly described, as well as the increasing level of technology capability at KSC. The importance of these technologies in achieving past national space goals suggests that the accomplishment of low-cost and reliable access to space will depend critically upon KSC's future success in developing spaceport technologies. This paper concludes with a description KSC's current organizational approach and major thrust areas in technology development. The first phase of our historical review focuses on the development and testing of field- deployable short- and intermediate-range ballistic missiles (1953 to 1958). These vehicles are later pressed into service as space launchers. The second phase involves the development of large space lift vehicles culminating in the Saturn V launches (1959 to 1975). The third phase addresses the development and operations of the partially reusable launch vehicle, Space Shuttle (1976 to 2000). In the current era, KSC is teaming with the U.S. Air Force (AF), industry, academia, and other partners to identify and develop Spaceport and Range Technologies necessary to achieve national space goals of lower-cost and higher-reliability space flight.

Starr, Stanley; Voska, Ned (Technical Monitor)

2003-01-01

293

50 Years of Electronic Check Out and Launch Systems at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

When NASA was created in 1958 one of the elements incorporated into this new agency was the Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) in Huntsville, AL and its subordinate Missile Firing Laboratory (MFL) in Cape Canaveral. Under NASA, the MFL became the Launch Operations Directorate of the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, but expanding operations in the build up to Apollo dictated that it be given the status of a full fledged Center in July, 1 962[ 1]. The next year it was renamed the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KS C) after the president whose vision transformed its first decade of operation. The ABMA was under the technical leadership of Dr. Werner Von Braun. The MEL was run by his deputy Dr. Kurt Debus, an electrical engineer whose experience in the field began in the early days of V-2 testing in war time Germany. In 1952 a group led by Debus arrived in Cape Canaveral to begin test launches of the new Redstone missile [2]. During the 50's, The MFL built several launch complexes and tested the Redstone, Jupiter and Jupiter C missiles. This small experienced team of engineers and technicians formed the seed from which has grown the KSC team of today. This article briefly reviews the evolution of the KSC electronic technologies for integration, check-out and launch of space vehicles and payloads during NASA's first 50 years.

Starr, Stanley O.

2007-01-01

294

Flora and threatened and endangered plants of John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The vascular flora of the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) area was first studied in the 1970's. Nomenclatural and taxonomic changes as well as additional collections required revision of this list. The revised list includes 1045 taxa of which 850 are native and 195 are introduced. This appears to be a substantial proportion of the regional flora. Forty six taxa are endemic or nearly endemic to Florida, a level of endemism that appears high for the east coast of central Florida. Seventy three taxa (69 native) are listed as threatened, endangered, or of special concern on Federal or state lists. Taxa of special concern occur in all major habitats, but many are restricted to hammocks and hardwood swamps that constitute a minor proportion of the terrestrial vegetation. For some of these taxa, populations on KSC appear to be important for their regional and global survival. The bryophyte flora of the KSC area include 23 mosses and 20 liverworts and hornworts. The lichen flora is currently unknown.

Schmalzer, Paul A.; Hinkle, C. Ross

1990-01-01

295

Kennedy Space Center's Command and Control System - "Toasters to Rocket Ships"  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews the history of the development of the command and control system at Kennedy Space Center. From a system that could be brought to Florida in the trunk of a car in the 1950's. Including the development of larger and more complex launch vehicles with the Apollo program where human launch controllers managed the launch process with a hardware only system that required a dedicated human interface to perform every function until the Apollo vehicle lifted off from the pad. Through the development of the digital computer that interfaced with ground launch processing systems with the Space Shuttle program. Finally, showing the future control room being developed to control the missions to return to the moon and Mars, which will maximize the use of Commercial-Off-The Shelf (COTS) hardware and software which was standards based and not tied to a single vendor. The system is designed to be flexible and adaptable to support the requirements of future spacecraft and launch vehicles.

Lougheed, Kirk; Mako, Cheryle

2011-01-01

296

Relationships between coronary heart disease risk factors and serum ionized calcium in Kennedy Space Center Cohort  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Kennedy Space Center (KSC) employees are reported to be at high risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). Risk factors for CHD include high serum total cholesterol levels, low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC), elevated triglyceride, smoking, inactivity, high blood pressure, being male, and being older. Higher dietary and/or serum calcium Ca(++) may be related to a lower risk for CHD. Fifty men and 37 women participated. Subjects were tested in the morning after fasting 12 hours. Information relative to smoking and exercise habits was obtained; seated blood pressures were measured; and blood drawn. KCS men had higher risk values than KCS women as related to HDLC, triglycerides, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure. Smoking and nonsmoking groups did not differ for other risk factors or for serum Ca(++) levels. Exercise and sedentary groups differed in total cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Serum Ca(++) levels were related to age, increasing with age in the sedentary group and decreasing in the exercisers, equally for men and women. It is concluded that these relationships may be significant to the risk of CHD and/or the risk of bone demineralization in an aging population.

Goodwin, Lisa Ann; Frey, Mary Anne Bassett; Merz, Marion P.; Alford, William R.

1987-01-01

297

Quality Control Algorithms for the Kennedy Space Center 50-Megahertz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Winds Database  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents the process used by the Marshall Space Flight Center Natural Environments Branch (EV44) to quality control (QC) data from the Kennedy Space Center's 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler for use in vehicle wind loads and steering commands. The database has been built to mitigate limitations of using the currently archived databases from weather balloons. The DRWP database contains wind measurements from approximately 2.7-18.6 km altitude at roughly five minute intervals for the August 1997 to December 2009 period of record, and the extensive QC process was designed to remove spurious data from various forms of atmospheric and non-atmospheric artifacts. The QC process is largely based on DRWP literature, but two new algorithms have been developed to remove data contaminated by convection and excessive first guess propagations from the Median Filter First Guess Algorithm. In addition to describing the automated and manual QC process in detail, this paper describes the extent of the data retained. Roughly 58% of all possible wind observations exist in the database, with approximately 100 times as many complete profile sets existing relative to the EV44 balloon databases. This increased sample of near-continuous wind profile measurements may help increase launch availability by reducing the uncertainty of wind changes during launch countdown

Barbre, Robert E., Jr.

2012-01-01

298

Quantum computational universality of Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki states beyond the honeycomb lattice  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Universal quantum computation can be achieved by simply performing single-spin measurements on a highly entangled resource state, such as cluster states. The family of Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki (AKLT) states has recently been explored; for example, the spin-1 AKLT chain can be used to simulate single-qubit gate operations on a single qubit, and the spin-3/2 two-dimensional AKLT state on the honeycomb lattice can be used as a universal resource. However, it is unclear whether such universality is a coincidence for the specific state or a shared feature in all two-dimensional AKLT states. Here we consider the family of spin-3/2 AKLT states on various trivalent Archimedean lattices and show that in addition to the honeycomb lattice, the spin-3/2 AKLT states on the square octagon (4,82) and the “cross” (4,6,12) lattices are also universal resource, whereas the AKLT state on the “star” (3,122) lattice is likely not due to geometric frustration.

Wei, Tzu-Chieh

2013-12-01

299

Crop Production for Advanced Life Support Systems - Observations From the Kennedy Space Center Breadboard Project  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The use of plants for bioregenerative life support for space missions was first studied by the US Air Force in the 1950s and 1960s. Extensive testing was also conducted from the 1960s through the 1980s by Russian researchers located at the Institute of Biophysics in Krasnoyarsk, Siberia, and the Institute for Biomedical Problems in Moscow. NASA initiated bioregenerative research in the 1960s (e.g., Hydrogenomonas) but this research did not include testing with plants until about 1980, with the start of the Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) Program. The NASA CELSS research was carried out at universities, private corporations, and NASA field centers, including Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The project at KSC began in 1985 and was called the CELSS Breadboard Project to indicate the capability for plugging in and testing various life support technologies; this name has since been dropped but bioregenerative testing at KSC has continued to the present under the NASA s Advanced Life Support (ALS) Program. A primary objective of the KSC testing was to conduct pre-integration tests with plants (crops) in a large, atmospherically closed test chamber called the Biomass Production Chamber (BPC). Test protocols for the BPC were based on observations and growing procedures developed by university investigators, as well as procedures developed in plant growth chamber studies at KSC. Growth chamber studies to support BPC testing focused on plant responses to different carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, different spectral qualities from various electric lamps, and nutrient film hydroponic culture techniques.

Wheeler, R. M.; Sager, J. C.; Prince, R. P.; Knott, W. M.; Mackowiak, C. L.; Stutte, G. W.; Yorio, N. C.; Ruffe, L. M.; Peterson, B. V.; Goins, G. D.

2003-01-01

300

A Peak Wind Probability Forecast Tool for Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This conference abstract describes the development of a peak wind forecast tool to assist forecasters in determining the probability of violating launch commit criteria (LCC) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) in east-central Florida. The peak winds are an important forecast element for both the Space Shuttle and Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) programs. The LCC define specific peak wind thresholds for each launch operation that cannot be exceeded in order to ensure the safety of the vehicle. The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) has found that peak winds are a challenging parameter to forecast, particularly in the cool season months of October through April. Based on the importance of forecasting peak winds, the 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to develop a short-range peak-wind forecast tool to assist in forecasting LCC violatioas.The tool will include climatologies of the 5-minute mean end peak winds by month, hour, and direction, and probability distributions of the peak winds as a function of the 5-minute mean wind speeds.

Crawford, Winifred; Roeder, William

2008-01-01

301

TRW Ships NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory To Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two U.S. Air Force C-5 Galaxy transport planes carrying the observatory and its ground support equipment landed at Kennedy's Space Shuttle Landing Facility at 2:40 p.m. EST this afternoon. REDONDO BEACH, CA.--(Business Wire)--Feb. 4, 1999--TRW has shipped NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory ("Chandra") to the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), in Florida, in preparation for a Space Shuttle launch later this year. The 45-foot-tall, 5-ton science satellite will provide astronomers with new information on supernova remnants, the surroundings of black holes, and other celestial phenomena that produce vast quantities of X-rays. Cradled safely in the cargo hold of a tractor-trailer rig called the Space Cargo Transportation System (SCTS), NASA's newest space telescope was ferried on Feb. 4 from Los Angeles International Airport to KSC aboard an Air Force C-5 Galaxy transporter. The SCTS, an Air Force container, closely resembles the size and shape of the Shuttle cargo bay. Over the next few months, Chandra will undergo final tests at KSC and be mated to a Boeing-provided Inertial Upper Stage for launch aboard Space Shuttle Columbia. A launch date for the Space Shuttle STS-93 mission is expected to be announced later this week. The third in NASA's family of Great Observatories that includes the Hubble Space Telescope and the TRW-built Compton Gamma Ray observatory, Chandra will use the world's most powerful X-ray telescope to allow scientists to "see" and monitor cosmic events that are invisible to conventional optical telescopes. Chandra's X-ray images will yield new insight into celestial phenomena such as the temperature and extent of gas clouds that comprise clusters of galaxies and the superheating of gas and dust particles as they swirl into black holes. A TRW-led team that includes the Eastman Kodak Co., Raytheon Optical Systems Inc., and Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. designed and built the Chandra X-ray Observatory for NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory will manage the Chandra science mission for NASA from the Chandra X-ray Observatory Center in Cambridge, Mass. TRW has been developing scientific, communications and environmental satellite systems for NASA since 1958. In addition to building the Chandra X-ray Observatory, the company is currently developing the architectures and technologies needed to implement several of NASA's future space science missions, including the Next Generation Space Telescope, the Space Inteferometry Mission, both part of NASA's Origins program, and Constellation-X, the next major NASA X-ray mission after Chandra. Article courtesy of TRW. TRW news releases are available on the corporate Web site: http://www.trw.com.

1999-04-01

302

Shuttle Atlantis Returning to Kennedy Space Center after 10-Month Refurbishment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis, framed by the California mountains, as it rides on the back of one of NASA's Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) en route from California to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site with Dryden remaining as the principal alternate landing site.

1998-01-01

303

Shuttle Atlantis Returning to Kennedy Space Center after 10-Month Refurbishment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle Atlantis rides on the back of one of NASA's Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft en route from California to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site with Dryden remaining as the principal alternate landing site.

1998-01-01

304

STS-35 Leaves Dryden on 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) Bound for Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The first rays of the morning sun light up the side of NASA's Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) as it departs for the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, with the orbiter from STS-35 attached to its back. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site with Dryden remaining as the principal alternate landing site.

1990-01-01

305

Shuttle Atlantis Returning to Kennedy Space Center after 10 Month Refurbishment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis is seen here in flight on the back of one of NASA's Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) as it departs California for the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site with Dryden remaining as the principal alternate landing site.

1998-01-01

306

Shuttle Atlantis Returning to Kennedy Space Center after 10 Month Refurbishment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A look-down view on the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis piggy-backed on top of one of NASA's Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) as it departs California for the Kennedy Space Center, Florida in September 1998. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site with Dryden remaining as the principal alternate landing site.

1998-01-01

307

STS-66 Atlantis 747 SCA Ferry Flight Morning Takeoff for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The space shuttle Atlantis atop NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) during takeoff for a return ferry flight to the Kennedy Space Center from Edwards, California. The STS-66 mission was dedicated to the third flight of the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science-3 (ATLAS-3), part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program. The astronauts also deployed and retrieved a free-flying satellite designed to study the middle and lower thermospheres and perform a series of experiments covering life sciences research and microgravity processing. The landing was at 7:34 a.m. (PST) 14 November 1994, after being waved off from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, due to adverse weather. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shutt

1994-01-01

308

Analysis of Possible Explosions at Kennedy Space Center Due to Spontaneous Ignition of Hypergolic Propellants  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Constellation Program plan currently calls for the replacement of the Space Shuttle with the ARES I & V spacecraft and booster vehicles to send astronauts to the moon and beyond. Part of the ARES spacecraft is the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), which includes the Crew Module (CM) and Service Module (SM). The Orion CM's main propulsion system and supplies are provided by the SM. The SM is to be processed off line and moved to the Vehicle Assembly Building (V AB) for stacking to the first stage booster motors prior to ARES move to the launch pad. The new Constellation Program philosophy to process in this manner has created a major task for the KSC infrastructure in that conventional QD calculations are no longer viable because of the location of surrounding facilities near the VAB and the Multi Purpose Processing Facility (MPPF), where the SM will be serviced with nearly 18,000 pounds of hypergolic propellants. The Multi-Payload Processing Facility (MPPF) complex, constructed by NASA in 1994, is located just off E Avenue south of the Operations and Checkout (O&C) building in the Kennedy Space Center industrial area. The MPPF includes a high bay and a low bay. The MPPF high bay is 40.2 m (132 ft) long x 18.9 m (60 ft) wide with a ceiling height of 18.9 m (62 ft). The low bay is a 10.4 m (34 ft) long x 10.4 m (34 ft) wide processing area and has a ceiling height of6.1 m (20 ft). The MPPF is currently used to process non-hazardous payloads. Engineering Analysis Inc. (EAI), under contract with ASRC Aerospace, Inc. in conjunction with the Explosive Safety Office, NASA, Kennedy Space Center (KSC), has carried out an analysis of the effects of explosions at KSC in or near various facilities produced by the spontaneous ignition ofhypergolic fuel stored in the CEV SM. The facilities considered included (1) Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) (2) Multi-Payload Processing Facility (MPPF) (3) Canister Rotation Facility (CRF) Subsequent discussion deals with the MPPF analysis. Figure 1 provides a view of the MPPF from the northwest. An interior view ofthe facility is shown in Figure 2. The study was concerned with both blast hazards and hazardous fragments which exceed existing safety standards, as described in Section 2.0. The analysis included both blast and fragmentation effects and was divided into three parts as follows: (1) blast (2) primary fragmentation (3) secondary fragmentation Blast effects are summarized in Section 3.0, primary fragmentation in Section 4.0, and secondary fragmentation (internal and external) in Section 5.0. Conclusions are provided in Section 6.0, while references cited are included in Section 7.0. A more detailed description of the entire study is available in a separate document.

Brown, Stephen

2010-01-01

309

Developing empirical lightning cessation forecast guidance for the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Kennedy Space Center in east Central Florida is one of the few locations in the country that issues lightning advisories. These forecasts are vital to the daily operations of the Space Center and take on even greater significance during launch operations. The U.S. Air Force's 45th Weather Squadron (45WS), who provides forecasts for the Space Center, has a good record of forecasting the initiation of lightning near their locations of special concern. However, the remaining problem is knowing when to cancel a lightning advisory. Without specific scientific guidelines detailing cessation activity, the Weather Squadron must keep advisories in place longer than necessary to ensure the safety of personnel and equipment. This unnecessary advisory time costs the Space Center millions of dollars in lost manpower each year. This research presents storm and environmental characteristics associated with lightning cessation that then are utilized to create lightning cessation guidelines for isolated thunderstorms for use by the 45WS during the warm season months of May through September. The research uses data from the Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) network at the Kennedy Space Center, which can observe intra-cloud and portions of cloud-to-ground lightning strikes. Supporting data from the Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS), radar observations from the Melbourne WSR-88D, and Cape Canaveral morning radiosonde launches also are included. Characteristics of 116 thunderstorms comprising our dataset are presented. Most of these characteristics are based on LDAR-derived spark and flash data and have not been described previously. In particular, the first lightning activity is quantified as either cloud-to-ground (CG) or intra-cloud (IC). Only 10% of the storms in this research are found to initiate with a CG strike. Conversely, only 16% of the storms end with a CG strike. Another characteristic is the average horizontal extent of all the flashes comprising a storm. Our average is 12-14 km, while the greatest flash extends 26 km. Comparisons between the starting altitude of the median and last flashes of a storm are analyzed, with only 37% of the storms having a higher last flash initiating altitude. Additional observations are made of the total lightning flash rate, percentage of CG to IC lightning, trends of individual flash initiation altitudes versus the average initiation altitude, the average inter-flash time distribution, and time series of inter-flash times. Five schemes to forecast lightning cessation are developed and evaluated. 100 of the 116 storms were randomly selected as the dependent sample, while the remaining 16 storms were used for verification. The schemes included a correlation and regression tree analysis, multiple linear regression, trends of storm duration, trend of the altitude of the greatest reflectivity to the time of the final flash, and a percentile scheme. Surprisingly, the percentile method was found to be the most effective technique and the simplest. The inclusion of real time storm parameters is found to have little effect on the results, suggesting that different forecast predictors, such as microphysical data from polarimetric radar, will be necessary to produce improved skill. When the percentile method used a confidence level of 99.5%, it successfully maintained lightning advisories for all 16 independent storms on which the schemes were tested. Since the computed wait time was 25 min, compared to the 45WS' most conservative and accurate wait time of 30 min, the percentile method saves 5 min for each advisory. This 5 min of savings safely shortens the Weather Squadron's advisories and saves money. Additionally, these results are the first to evaluate the 30/30 rule that is used commonly. The success of the percentile method is surprising since it out performs more complex procedures involving correlation and regression tree analysis and regression schemes. These more sophisticated statistical analyses were expected to perform better since they include more predictors in t

Stano, Geoffrey T.

310

Calculating the Lightning Protection System Downconductors' Grounding Resistance at Launch Complex 39B, Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new Lightning Protection System (LPS) was designed and built at Launch Complex 39B (LC39B), at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, which consists of a catenary wire system (at a height of about 181 meters above ground level) supported by three insulators installed atop three towers in a triangular configuration. Nine downconductors (each about 250 meters long) are connected to the catenary wire system. Each downconductor is connected to a 7.62-meter-radius circular counterpoise conductor with six equally spaced, 6-meter-long vertical grounding rods. Grounding requirements at LC39B call for all underground and aboveground metallic piping, enclosures, raceways, and cable trays, within 7.62 meters of the counterpoise, to be bonded to the counterpoise, which results in a complex interconnected grounding system, given the many metallic piping, raceways, and cable trays that run in multiple directions around LC39B. The complexity of this grounding system makes the fall-of-potential method, which uses multiple metallic rods or stakes, unsuitable for measuring the grounding impedances of the downconductors. To calculate the grounding impedance of the downconductors, an Earth Ground Clamp (EGC) (a stakeless device for measuring grounding impedance) and an Alternative Transient Program (ATP) model of the LPS are used. The EGC is used to measure the loop impedance plus the grounding impedance of each downconductor, and the ATP model is used to calculate the loop impedance of each downconductor circuit. The grounding resistance of the downconductors is then calculated by subtracting the ATP calculated loop impedances from the EGC measurements.

Mata, Carlos T.; Mata, Angel G.

2012-01-01

311

Texture Modification of the Shuttle Landing Facility Runway at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes the test procedures and the criteria used in selecting an effective runway-surface-texture modification at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to reduce Orbiter tire wear. The new runway surface may ultimately result in an increase of allowable crosswinds for launch and landing operations. The modification allows launch and landing operations in 20-knot crosswinds, if desired. This 5-knot increase over the previous 15-knot limit drastically increases landing safety and the ability to make on-time launches to support missions in which Space Station rendezvous are planned. The paper presents the results of an initial (1988) texture modification to reduce tire spin-up wear and then describes a series of tests that use an instrumented ground-test vehicle to compare tire friction and wear characteristics, at small scale, of proposed texture modifications placed into the SLF runway surface itself. Based on these tests, three candidate surfaces were chosen to be tested at full-scale by using a highly modified and instrumented transport aircraft capable of duplicating full Orbiter landing profiles. The full-scale Orbiter tire testing revealed that tire wear could be reduced approximately by half with either of two candidates. The texture-modification technique using a Humble Equipment Company Skidabrader(trademark) shotpeening machine proved to be highly effective, and the entire SLF runway surface was modified in September 1994. The extensive testing and evaluation effort that preceded the selection of this particular surface-texture-modification technique is described herein.

Daugherty, Robert H.; Yager, Thomas J.

1997-01-01

312

NASA's Corrosion Technology Laboratory at the Kennedy Space Center: Anticipating, Managing, and Preventing Corrosion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Corrosion is the degradation of a material that results from its interaction with the environment. The marine environment at NASAs Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has been documented by ASM International (formerly American Society for Metals) as the most corrosive in the United States. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive conditions at the launch pads were rendered even more severe by the 70 tons of highly corrosive hydrochloric acid that were generated by the solid rocket boosters. Numerous failures at the launch pads are caused by corrosion.The structural integrity of ground infrastructure and flight hardware is critical to the success, safety, cost, and sustainability of space missions. As a result of fifty years of experience with launch and ground operations in a natural marine environment that is highly corrosive, NASAs Corrosion Technology Laboratory at KSC is a major source of corrosion control expertise in the launch and other environments. Throughout its history, the Laboratory has evolved from what started as an atmospheric exposure facility near NASAs launch pads into a world-wide recognized capability that provides technical innovations and engineering services in all areas of corrosion for NASA and external customers.This presentation will provide a historical overview of the role of NASAs Corrosion Technology in anticipating, managing, and preventing corrosion. One important challenge in managing and preventing corrosion involves the detrimental impact on humans and the environment of what have been very effective corrosion control strategies. This challenge has motivated the development of new corrosion control technologies that are more effective and environmentally friendly. Strategies for improved corrosion protection and durability can have a huge impact on the economic sustainability of human spaceflight operations.

Calle, Luz Marina

2014-01-01

313

Kennedy Space Center: Creating a Spaceport Reality from the Dreams of Many  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On December 17, 1903, Orville Wright piloted the first powered airplane only 20 feet above the ground near Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The flight lasted 12 seconds and covered 120 feet. Who would have guessed that the bizarre looking contraption developed by brothers in the bicycle business would lay the ground work eventually resulting in over a million passengers moved daily in a sky filled with the contrails of jets flying at over 30,000 feet in elevation and over 500 miles per hour. Similarly, who would have guessed that the destructive nature of V-2 rockets of Germany would spark the genesis of spaceflight to explore our solar system and beyond? Yet the interest in using the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) continues to grow. Potential customers have expressed interest in KSC as a location for testing new rocket engines, servicing the world's largest airborne launching platform for drop-launch rockets, developing multi-use launch platforms that permit diverse customers to use the same launch platform, developing new spacecraft, and implementing advanced modifications for lifting 150 metric ton payloads to low earth orbit. The multitude of customers has grown and with this growth comes a need to provide a command, control, communication, and range infrastructure that maximizes flexibility and reconfigurability to address a much more frequent launch rate of diverse vehicles and spacecraft. The Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) Program Office at KSC is embarking upon these developments to realize the dream of a robust spaceport. Many unique technical trade studies have been completed or are underway to successfully transition KSC into a multi-user customer focused spaceport. Like the evolution of the airplane, GSDO is working to transform KSC infrastructures that will turn once unthinkable space opportunities into a reality for today.

Gray, James A.; Colloredo, Scott

2012-01-01

314

Kennedy, the early sixties, and visitation by the angel of death.  

PubMed

The inaugural issue of Pathologia Veterinaria in 1964 contained the first detailed account of lesions in aborted fetuses following natural, experimental, and postvaccinal infection with bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1). The article, written by pathologists Kennedy and Richards, described diagnostic gross and histologic features in 13 bovine fetuses. The authors provided clinical and epidemiologic features of 1 postvaccination outbreak, including the absence of clinical signs in infected dams and the propensity for abortions to occur after 6 months' gestation. Subsequent field and experimental studies corroborated and expanded these observations. As a result of this and later reports, veterinarians became alert to the association between infectious bovine rhinotracheitis and abortion, including the risks of exposing pregnant cattle to live vaccinal BoHV-1. Methods were developed to corroborate a morphologic diagnosis of herpetic abortion in cattle, including immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry, and polymerase chain reaction methods. Outbreaks of postvaccinal BoHV-1 abortion in the United States began to be reported with apparently increased frequency in the early 2000s. This coincided with licensure in 2003 of modified live BoHV-1 vaccines intended for use in pregnant cattle, which are now sold by 3 manufacturers. Ten recent herd episodes of postvaccinal BoHV-1 abortion are reported. All 10 BoHV-1 isolates had single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) profiles previously identified in a group of BoHV-1 isolates that contains vaccine strains, based on a BoHV-1 SNP classification system. They lacked SNP features typical of those in characterized field-type strains of BoHV-1. PMID:25362101

O'Toole, D; Chase, C C L; Miller, M M; Campen, H Van

2014-11-01

315

Exploration of the Theoretical Physical Capacity of the John F. Kennedy International Airport Runway System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A design study was completed to explore the theoretical physical capacity (TPC) of the John F. Kennedy International Airport (KJFK) runway system for a northflow configuration assuming impedance-free (to throughput) air traffic control functionality. Individual runways were modeled using an agent-based, airspace simulation tool, the Airspace Concept Evaluation System (ACES), with all runways conducting both departures and arrivals on a first-come first-served (FCFS) scheduling basis. A realistic future flight schedule was expanded to 3.5 times the traffic level of a selected baseline day, September 26, 2006, to provide a steady overdemand state for KJFK runways. Rules constraining departure and arrival operations were defined to reflect physical limits beyond which safe operations could no longer be assumed. Safety buffers to account for all sources of operational variability were not included in the TPC estimate. Visual approaches were assumed for all arrivals to minimize inter-arrival spacing. Parallel runway operations were assumed to be independent based on lateral spacing distances. Resulting time intervals between successive airport operations were primarily constrained by same-runway and then by intersecting-runway spacing requirements. The resulting physical runway capacity approximates a theoretical limit that cannot be exceeded without modifying runway interaction assumptions. Comparison with current KJFK operational limits for a north-flow runway configuration indicates a substantial throughput gap of approximately 48%. This gap may be further analyzed to determine which part may be feasibly bridged through the deployment of advanced systems and procedures, and which part cannot, because it is either impossible or not cost-effective to control. Advanced systems for bridging the throughput gap may be conceptualized and simulated using this same experimental setup to estimate the level of gap closure achieved.

Neitzke, Kurt W.; Guerreiro, Nelson M.

2014-01-01

316

Biodiversity and Ecology of Amphibians and Reptiles of the Kennedy Space Center: 1998 Close-Out Report to NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since 1992, there have been researchers have been studying the population ecology and conservation biology of the amphibians and reptiles of the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) This research is an outgrowth of my Master's work in the late 1970's under Lew Ehrhart at UCF. The primary emphasis of our studies are (1) examination of long-term changes in the abundance of amphibians and reptile populations, (2) occurrence and effects of Upper Respiratory Tract Disease (URTD) in gopher tortoises (Gopherus polyphemus), and (3) ecological studies of selected species.

Sigel, Richard A.

1999-01-01

317

STS-41 Discovery lifts off from Launch Complex 39 at the Kennedy Space Center to begin a four-day  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-41 Discovery lifts off from Launch Complex 39 at the Kennedy Space Center to begin a four-day mission in space for its five-man crew. Onboard the spacecraft were Astronauts Richard N. Richards, Robert D Cabana, William M Sheperd, Bruce E. Melnick and Thomas D. Akers. Lift off was at 7:47 a.m. EDT on oct 6, 1990. A feww hours after this photo was made, the crewmembers released the Ulysses spacecraft onits way to a long-awaited mission.

1991-01-01

318

Saturn V Vehicle for Apollo 4 at the Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This is a view of the the first test flight of the Saturn V vehicle (SA-501) at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) launch complex 39A, awaiting the scheduled launch on November 9, 1967. Designated as Apollo 4, this mission was the first launch of the Saturn V launch vehicle. Objectives of the unmanned Apollo 4 test flight were to obtain flight information on launch vehicle and spacecraft structural integrity and compatibility, flight loads, stage separation, and subsystems operation including testing of restart of the S-IVB stage, and to evaluate the Apollo command module heat shield.

1967-01-01

319

Saturn V Vehicle for Apollo 4 at the Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This is an image of the first test flight of a giant Saturn V rocket for the Apollo 4 mission at the Kennedy Space Center's launch complex 39A, photographed at the dawn of November 8 during the pre-launch alert. Designated as Apollo 4, this mission was the first launch of the Saturn V launch vehicle. Objectives of the unmanned Apollo 4 test flight were to obtain flight information on launch vehicle and spacecraft structural integrity and compatibility, flight loads, stage separation, and subsystems operation including testing of restart of the S-IVB stage, and to evaluate the Apollo command module heat shield.

1967-01-01

320

Institutional environmental impact statement (space shuttle development and operations) amendment no. 1. [space shuttle operations at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Data are presented to support the environmental impact statement on space shuttle actions at Kennedy Space Center. Studies indicate that land use to accommodate space shuttle operations may have the most significant impact. The impacts on air, water and noise quality are predicted to be less on the on-site environment. Considerations of operating modes indicate that long and short term land use will not affect wildlife productivity. The potential for adverse environmental impact is small and such impacts will be local, short in duration, controllable, and environmentally acceptable.

1973-01-01

321

Creating Processes Associated with Providing Government Goods and Services Under the Commercial Space Launch Act at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has decided to write its agreements under the Commercial Space Launch Act (CSLA) authority to cover a broad range of categories of support that KSC could provide to our commercial partner. Our strategy was to go through the onerous process of getting the agreement in place once and allow added specificity and final cost estimates to be documented on a separate Task Order Request (TOR). This paper is written from the implementing engineering team's perspective. It describes how we developed the processes associated with getting Government support to our emerging commercial partners, such as SpaceX and reports on our success to date.

Letchworth, Janet F.

2011-01-01

322

Development and implementation of a scrub habitat compensation plan for Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Kennedy Space Center (KSC), located on Merritt Island on the east coast of central Florida, is one of three remaining major populations of the Florida Scrub Jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens coerulescens), listed as threatened by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) since 1987. Construction of new facilities by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) on KSC over the next five years has the potential to impact up to 193 ac (78.1 ha) of Scrub Jay habitat. Under an early consultation process with the Endangered Species Office of the USFWS, NASA agreed to a compensation plan for loss of Scrub Jay habitat. The compensation plan required NASA to restore or create scrub on KSC at a 2:1 ratio for that lost. The compensation plan emphasized restoration of scrub habitat that is of marginal or declining suitability to Scrub Jays because it has remained unburned. Although prescribed burning has been conducted by the USFWS Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge (MINWR) for more than ten years, significant areas of scrub remain unburned because they have been excluded from fire management units or because landscape fragmentation and a period of fire suppression allowed scrub to reach heights and diameters that are fire resistant. For such areas, mechanical cutting followed by prescribed burning was recommended for restoration. A second part of the restoration plan is an experimental study of scrub reestablishment (i.e., creation) on abandoned, well drained agricultural sites by planting scrub oaks and other scrub plants. The compensation plan identified 260 ac (105 ha) of scrub restoration in four areas and a 40 ac (16 ha) scrub creation site. Monitoring of restoration sites required under the plan included: establishing permanent vegetation sample transects before treatment and resampling annually for ten years after treatment, and color banding Scrub Jays to determine territories prior to treatment followed by monitoring reproductive success and survival for ten years after treatment. Monitoring scrub creation sites included determining survival of planted material for five years and establishing permanent transects to follow vegetation development for ten years after planting. Scrub Jay monitoring of creation sites is incorporated with that of adjacent restoration sites.

Schmalzer, Paul A.; Breininger, David R.; Adrian, Frederic W.; Schaub, Ron; Duncan, Brean W.

1994-01-01

323

NASA Delays Shipment of X-Ray Telescope to Kennedy Space Center to Allow Additional Testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

NASA announced today it will delay shipment of the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) from the prime contractor, TRW Space and Electronics Group, Redondo Beach, CA, to Kennedy Space Center, FL. The postponement, made following a review by NASA and TRW, will allow additional time for TRW to complete testing of the observatory and to replace an electrical switching box. AXAF had been scheduled for shipment later this month to meet a Jan. 21, 1999, launch date. NASA also has directed a review of AXAF, by NASA Chief Engineer Dr. Daniel Mulville to be completed by mid-January 1999. A new shipment date and a new launch date will be confirmed after the review. "We think it's prudent to wait to see what the review will tell us before we set shipment and launch dates, so we don't expect to ship AXAF before that. It was a difficult decision, but we evaluated a number of options for handling the remaining work, and selected the one that will give us the most assurance of successfully completing the work," said Kenneth Ledbetter, Director of the Mission and Payload Division of the Office of Space Science, NASA Headquarters. The remaining testing includes trouble-shooting and de-bugging some elements of the ground test and flight software. In addition, testing will be done to verify changes made to the flight software. "Our priority remains the safe and successful launch of a world-class observatory, which has been thoroughly tested and meets all requirements," said Fred Wojtalik, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Observatory Projects Office manager in Huntsville, AL. Marshall manages development of the observatory for the Office of Space Science. Once in orbit, the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of a variety of high-energy objects to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. The observatory will not only help to probe these mysteries, but also will serve as a unique tool to study detailed physics in a laboratory that cannot be replicated here on Earth -- the universe itself.

1998-10-01

324

Forecasting Cool Season Daily Peak Winds at Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The expected peak wind speed for the day is an important element in the daily 24-Hour and Weekly Planning Forecasts issued by the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) for planning operations at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). The morning outlook for peak speeds also begins the warning decision process for gusts ^ 35 kt, ^ 50 kt, and ^ 60 kt from the surface to 300 ft. The 45 WS forecasters have indicated that peak wind speeds are a challenging parameter to forecast during the cool season (October-April). The 45 WS requested that the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) develop a tool to help them forecast the speed and timing of the daily peak and average wind, from the surface to 300 ft on KSC/CCAFS during the cool season. The tool must only use data available by 1200 UTC to support the issue time of the Planning Forecasts. Based on observations from the KSC/CCAFS wind tower network, surface observations from the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), and CCAFS upper-air soundings from the cool season months of October 2002 to February 2007, the AMU created multiple linear regression equations to predict the timing and speed of the daily peak wind speed, as well as the background average wind speed. Several possible predictors were evaluated, including persistence, the temperature inversion depth, strength, and wind speed at the top of the inversion, wind gust factor (ratio of peak wind speed to average wind speed), synoptic weather pattern, occurrence of precipitation at the SLF, and strongest wind in the lowest 3000 ft, 4000 ft, or 5000 ft. Six synoptic patterns were identified: 1) surface high near or over FL, 2) surface high north or east of FL, 3) surface high south or west of FL, 4) surface front approaching FL, 5) surface front across central FL, and 6) surface front across south FL. The following six predictors were selected: 1) inversion depth, 2) inversion strength, 3) wind gust factor, 4) synoptic weather pattern, 5) occurrence of precipitation at the SLF, and 6) strongest wind in the lowest 3000 ft. The forecast tool was developed as a graphical user interface with Microsoft Excel to help the forecaster enter the variables, and run the appropriate regression equations. Based on the forecaster's input and regression equations, a forecast of the day's peak and average wind is generated and displayed. The application also outputs the probability that the peak wind speed will be ^ 35 kt, 50 kt, and 60 kt.

Barrett, Joe, III; Short, David; Roeder, William

2008-01-01

325

Kennedy H, Dehay C (2012) Self-organization and interareal networks in the primate cortex. Prog Brain Res 195:341-360. Self-organization and interareal networks in the primate cortex  

E-print Network

Kennedy H, Dehay C (2012) Self-organization and interareal networks in the primate cortex. Prog Brain Res 195:341-360. Self-organization and interareal networks in the primate cortex Henry Kennedy. In primates, including humans, the outer subventricular zone (OSVZ), a primate-specific germinal zone

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

326

Recommendations for Safe Separation Distances from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) Using a Heat-Flux-Based Analytical Approach (Abridged)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was requested to provide computational modeling to support the establishment of a safe separation distance surrounding the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The two major objectives of the study were 1) establish a methodology based on thermal flux to determine safe separation distances from the Kennedy Space Center's (KSC's) Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) with large numbers of solid propellant boosters containing hazard division 1.3 classification propellants, in case of inadvertent ignition; and 2) apply this methodology to the consideration of housing eight 5-segment solid propellant boosters in the VAB. The results of the study are contained in this report.

Cragg, Clinton H.; Bowman, Howard; Wilson, John E.

2011-01-01

327

Transcriptional Profile of Muscle following Acute Induction of Symptoms in a Mouse Model of Kennedy's Disease/Spinobulbar Muscular Atrophy  

PubMed Central

Background Kennedy’s disease/Spinobulbar muscular atrophy (KD/SBMA) is a degenerative neuromuscular disease affecting males. This disease is caused by polyglutamine expansion mutations of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. Although KD/SBMA has been traditionally considered a motor neuron disease, emerging evidence points to a central etiological role of muscle. We previously reported a microarray study of genes differentially expressed in muscle of three genetically unique mouse models of KD/SBMA but were unable to detect those which are androgen-dependent or are associated with onset of symptoms. Methodology/Principal Findings In the current study we examined the time course and androgen-dependence of transcriptional changes in the HSA-AR transgenic (Tg) mouse model, in which females have a severe phenotype after acute testosterone treatment. Using microarray analysis we identified differentially expressed genes at the onset and peak of muscle weakness in testosterone-treated Tg females. We found both transient and persistent groups of differentially expressed genes and analysis of gene function indicated functional groups such as mitochondrion, ion and nucleotide binding, muscle development, and sarcomere maintenance. Conclusions/Significance By comparing the current results with those from the three previously reported models we were able to identify KD/SBMA candidate genes that are androgen dependent, and occur early in the disease process, properties which are promising for targeted therapeutics. PMID:25719894

Halievski, Katherine; Mo, Kaiguo; Westwood, J. Timothy; Monks, Douglas A.

2015-01-01

328

STS-76 - Being Prepared for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center via SCA 747 Aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Moonrise over Atlantis following the STS-76 dawn landing at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on 31 March 1996. NASA 905, one of two modified Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), was readied to ferry Atlantis back to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Delivery of Atlantis to Florida was delayed until 11 April 1996, due to an engine warning light that appeared shortly after take off on 6 April. The SCA #905 returned to Edwards with Atlantis attached only minutes after departure. The right inboard engine #3 was exchanged and the 747 with Atlantis atop was able to depart for Davis-Monthan Air Force Base for a refueling stop. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florid

1996-01-01

329

STS-76 - Being Prepared for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center via SCA 747 Aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Moonrise over Atlantis: following the STS-76 dawn landing at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on 31 March 1996, NASA 905, one of two modified Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, was prepared to ferry Atlantis back to the Kennedy Space Center, FL. Delivery of Altlantis to Florida was delayed until 11 April 1996, due to an engine warning light that appeared shortly after take off on April 6. The SCA #905 returned to Edwards only minutes after departure. The right inboard engine #3 was exchanged and the 747 with Atlantis atop was able to depart for Davis-Monthan Air Force Base for a refueling stop. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site

1996-01-01

330

Kathleen Franz Department of History  

E-print Network

exhibition tracing the history of business, innovation and consumption in the United States from 1770 to 2010 in American Studies, Civic Education Project Chernivtsi State University, Chernivtsi, Ukraine August 1994 of Pennsylvania Press, 2005. Paper edition, spring 2011. "The Open Road: Automobility and Racial Uplift

Lansky, Joshua

331

Dr. Kathleen Hill Associate Professor  

E-print Network

;10 Eukaryotic Genomes Protein packaged Membrane compartmentalized Genome Genome Animal Cell #12;11 Mitochondrial DNA is not protein packaged Eukaryotic Cell: Genome is contained in separate cell compartment #12;7 Viruses are "nonliving" and have the greatest diversity in genome types ssDNA dsDNA ssRNA dsRNA single

Kari, Lila

332

Forecasting Lightning at Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) developed a set of statistical forecast equations that provide a probability of lightning occurrence on Kennedy Space Center (KSC) I Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) for the day during the warm season (May September). The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) forecasters at CCAFS in Florida include a probability of lightning occurrence in their daily 24-hour and weekly planning forecasts, which are briefed at 1100 UTC (0700 EDT). This information is used for general scheduling of operations at CCAFS and KSC. Forecasters at the Spaceflight Meteorology Group also make thunderstorm forecasts for the KSC/CCAFS area during Shuttle flight operations. Much of the current lightning probability forecast at both groups is based on a subjective analysis of model and observational data. The objective tool currently available is the Neumann-Pfeffer Thunderstorm Index (NPTI, Neumann 1971), developed specifically for the KSCICCAFS area over 30 years ago. However, recent studies have shown that 1-day persistence provides a better forecast than the NPTI, indicating that the NPTI needed to be upgraded or replaced. Because they require a tool that provides a reliable estimate of the daily thunderstorm probability forecast, the 45 WS forecasters requested that the AMU develop a new lightning probability forecast tool using recent data and more sophisticated techniques now possible through more computing power than that available over 30 years ago. The equation development incorporated results from two research projects that investigated causes of lightning occurrence near KSCICCAFS and over the Florida peninsula. One proved that logistic regression outperformed the linear regression method used in NPTI, even when the same predictors were used. The other study found relationships between large scale flow regimes and spatial lightning distributions over Florida. Lightning, probabilities based on these flow regimes were used as candidate predictors in the equation development. Fifteen years (1 989-2003) of warm season data were used to develop the forecast equations. The data sources included a local network of cloud-to-ground lightning sensors called the Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS), 1200 UTC Florida synoptic soundings, and the 1000 UTC CCAFS sounding. Data from CGLSS were used to determine lightning occurrence for each day. The 1200 UTC soundings were used to calculate the synoptic-scale flow regimes and the 1000 UTC soundings were used to calculate local stability parameters, which were used as candidate predictors of lightning occurrence. Five logistic regression forecast equations were created through careful selection and elimination of the candidate predictors. The resulting equations contain five to six predictors each. Results from four performance tests indicated that the equations showed an increase in skill over several standard forecasting methods, good reliability, an ability to distinguish between non-lightning and lightning days, and good accuracy measures and skill scores. Given the overall good performance the 45 WS requested that the equations be transitioned to operations and added to the current set of tools used to determine the daily lightning probability of occurrence.

Lambert, Winfred; Wheeler, Mark; Roeder, William

2005-01-01

333

Remote sensing at the NASA Kennedy Space Center: a perspective from the ground up  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper provides an overview of ground based operational remote sensing activities that enable a broad range of missions at the Eastern Range (ER), which includes the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and U.S. Air Force Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). Many types of sensors are in use by KSC and across the ER. We examine remote sensors for winds, lightning and electric fields, precipitation and storm hazards. These sensors provide data that are used in real-time to evaluate launch commit criteria during space launches, major ground processing operations in preparation for space launches, issuing weather warnings/watches/advisories to protect over 25,000 people and facilities worth over $20 billion, and routine weather forecasts. The data from these sensors are archived to focus NASA launch vehicle design studies, to develop forecast techniques, and for incident investigation. The wind sensors include the 50-MHz and 915-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profilers (DRWP) and the Doppler capability of the weather surveillance radars. The atmospheric electricity sensors include lightning aloft detectors, cloud-to-ground lightning detectors, and surface electric field mills. The precipitation and storm hazards sensors include weather surveillance radars. Next, we discuss a new type of remote sensor that may lead to better tracking of near-Earth asteroids versus current capabilities. The Ka Band Objects Observation and Monitoring (KaBOOM) is a phased array of three 12 meter (m) antennas being built as a technology demonstration for a future radar system that could be used to track deep-space objects such as asteroids. Transmissions in the Ka band allow for wider bandwidth than at lower frequencies, but the signals are also far more susceptible to de-correlation from turbulence in the troposphere, as well as attenuation due to water vapor, which is plentiful in the Central Florida atmosphere. If successful, KaBOOM will have served as the pathfinder for a larger and more capable instrument that will enable tracking 15 m asteroids up to 72 million kilometers (km) away, about half the distance to the Sun and five times further than we can track today. Finally, we explore the use of Site Test Interferometers (STI) as atmospheric sensors. The STI antennas continually observe signals emitted by geostationary satellites and produce measurements of the phase difference between the received signals. STIs are usually located near existing or candidate antenna array sites to statistically characterize atmospheric phase delay fluctuation effects for the site. An STI measures the fluctuations in the difference of atmospheric delay from an extraterrestrial source to two or more points on the Earth. There is a three-element STI located at the KaBOOM site at KSC.

Huddleston, Lisa H.; Roeder, William P.; Morabito, David D.; D'Addario, Larry R.; Morgan, Jennifer G.; Barbré, Robert E.; Decker, Ryan K.; Geldzahler, Barry; Seibert, Mark A.; Miller, Michael J.

2014-10-01

334

Volume 4 Issue 4 www.nasa.gov/centers/stennis April 2009 Space shuttle Atlantis sits at Launch Pad 39A at Kennedy Space  

E-print Network

39A at Kennedy Space Center in Florida, ready to begin its STS-125 mission to service the Hubble Space Telescope. Atlantis is scheduled to fly May 12, begin- ning a final 11-day mission to the space Command and Data Handling Unit for Hubble. Astronauts will install the unit on the telescope, removing

335

LONDON ARISTOTLE'S RHETORIC AND THE PSYCHOLOGY OF PRACTICAL ETHICS Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal Vol. 10, No. 4, 287305 2000 by The Johns Hopkins University Press  

E-print Network

LONDON · ARISTOTLE'S RHETORIC AND THE PSYCHOLOGY OF PRACTICAL ETHICS [ 287 ] Kennedy Institute Amenable to Reason: Aristotle's Rhetoric and the Moral Psychology of Practical Ethics ABSTRACT that Aristotle articulates in his Rhetoric and this has important implications for the way we understand

Spirtes, Peter

336

Cella Energy Limited, a spinout company from STFC, is to set up a new facility at NASA's iconic Kennedy Space Center (NASA KSC) after a new round of  

E-print Network

Cella Energy Limited, a spinout company from STFC, is to set up a new facility at NASA's iconic force in alternative energy. We will continue leveraging our financing relationships to help companies Kennedy Space Center (NASA KSC) after a new round of funding led by a $1million investment by Space

337

Gold(I)-Catalyzed Conia-Ene Reaction of -Ketoesters with Alkynes Joshua J. Kennedy-Smith, Steven T. Staben, and F. Dean Toste*  

E-print Network

Gold(I)-Catalyzed Conia-Ene Reaction of -Ketoesters with Alkynes Joshua J. Kennedy-Smith, Steven T(I) complexes as catalysts. Carbon-carbon bond formation promoted by homogeneous gold catalysts is extremely did not proceed to completion even after a day at room temperature (entry 1). On the other hand, gold

Toste, Dean

338

Curiosity at Kennedy Space Center My name is David Gruel and I'm the Assembly Test and Launch Operations Manager for the  

E-print Network

Curiosity at Kennedy Space Center My name is David Gruel and I'm the Assembly Test and Launch Curiosity safe as all the heat is generated as we actually make our way through the Martian atmosphere. Behind me is the descent stage. The descent stage is the jet pack that safely gets Curiosity down

339

Modifications to the Objective Lightning Probability Forecast Tool at Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) includes the probability of lightning occurrence in their 24-Hour and Weekly Planning Forecasts, briefed at 0700 EDT for daily operations planning on Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and CCAFS. This forecast is based on subjective analyses of model and observational data and output from an objective tool developed by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU). This tool was developed over two phases (Lambert and Wheeler 2005, Lambert 2007). It consists of five equations, one for each warm season month (May-Sep), that calculate the probability of lightning occurrence for the day and a graphical user interface (GUI) to display the output. The Phase I and II equations outperformed previous operational tools by a total of 56%. Based on this success, the 45 WS tasked the AMU with Phase III to improve the tool further.

Crawford, Winifred; Roeder, William

2010-01-01

340

Calculating the Lightning Protection System Downconductors' Grounding Resistance at Launch Complex 39B, Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new Lightning Protection System (LPS) was designed and built at Launch Complex 39B (LC39B), at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Florida, which consists of a catenary wire system (at a height of about 181 meters above ground level) supported by three insulation installed atop three towers in a triangular configuration. Nine downconductors (each about 250 meters long) are connected to the catenary wire system. Each downconductor is connected to a 7.62-meter-radius circular counterpoise conductor with six equally spaced. 6-meter-1ong vertical grounding rods. Grounding requirements at LC39B call for all underground and above ground metallic piping. enclosures, raceways. and. cable trays. within 7.62 meters of. counterpoise, to be bonded to the counterpoise, which results in a complex interconnected grounding system, given the many metallic piping, raceways and cable trays that run in multiple directions around LC39B.

Mata, Carlos; Mata, Angel

2011-01-01

341

Saturn V Vehicle for Apollo 4 at the Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This is a view of the the first test flight of the Saturn V vehicle (SA-501) at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) launch complex 39A. The thrust chambers of the first stage's five engines extend into the 45-foot-square hole in the mobile launcher platform. Until liftoff, the flames impinged downward onto a flame deflector that diverted the blast lengthwise in the flame trench. Here, a flame deflector, coated with a black ceramic, is in place below the opening, while a yellow (uncoated) spare deflector rests on its track in the background. It took a tremendous flow of water (28,000 gallons per minute) to cool the flame deflector and trench. The Apollo 4 was launched on November 9, 1967 from KSC.

1967-01-01

342

The Distribution of Cloud to Ground Lightning Strike Intensities and Associated Magnetic Inductance Fields Near the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lightning strike location and peak current are monitored operationally in the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) area by the Cloud to Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS). The present study compiles ten years worth of CGLSS data into a database of near strikes. Using shuffle launch platform LP39A as a convenient central point, all strikes recorded within a 20-mile radius for the period of record O R ) from January 1, 1993 to December 31,2002 were included in the subset database. Histograms and cumulative probability curves are produced for both strike intensity (peak current, in kA) and the corresponding magnetic inductance fields (in A/m). Results for the full POR have application to launch operations lightning monitoring and post-strike test procedures.

Burns, Lee; Decker, Ryan

2005-01-01

343

Aircraft measurements of electrified clouds at Kennedy Space Center. Part 2: Case study: 4 November 1988 (88309)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the fall of 1988, a Schweizer airplane equipped to measure electric field and other meteorological parameters flew over Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in a program to study clouds defined in the existing launch restriction criteria. A case study is presented of a single flight over KSC on November 4, 1988. This flight was chosen for two reasons: (1) the clouds were weakly electrified, and no lightning was reported during the flight; and (2) electric field mills in the surface array at KSC indicated field strengths greater than 3 kV/m, yet the aircraft flying directly over them at an altitude of 3.4 km above sea level measured field strengths of less than 1.6 kV/m. A weather summary, sounding description, record of cloud types, and an account of electric field measurements are included.

Jones, J. J.; Winn, W. P.; Hunyady, S. J.; Moore, C. B.; Bullock, J. W.

1990-01-01

344

Remote measurement utilizing NASA's scanning laser Doppler systems. Volume 1. Laser Doppler wake vortex tracking at Kennedy Airport  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Test operations of the Scanning Laser Doppler System (SLDS) at Kennedy International Airport (KIA) during August 1974 through June 1975 are reported. A total of 1,619 data runs was recorded with a totally operational system during normal landing operations at KIA. In addition, 53 data runs were made during cooperative flybys with the C880 for a grand total of 1672 recorded vortex tracks. Test crews were in attendance at KIA for 31 weeks, of which 25 weeks were considered operational and the other six were packing, unpacking, setup and check out. Although average activity equates to 67 recorded landing operations per week, two periods of complete runway inactivity spanned 20 days and 13 days, respectively. The operation frequency therefore averaged about 88 operations per week.

Krause, M. C.; Wilson, D. J.; Howle, R. E.; Edwards, B. B.; Craven, C. E.; Jetton, J. L.

1976-01-01

345

Update to the Lightning Probability Forecast Equations at Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This conference presentation describes the improvement of a set of lightning probability forecast equations that are used by the 45th Weather Squadron forecasters for their daily 1100 UTC (0700 EDT) weather briefing during the warm season months of May-September. This information is used for general scheduling of operations at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy Space Center. Forecasters at the Spaceflight Meteorology Group also make thunderstorm forecasts during Shuttle flight operations. Five modifications were made by the Applied Meteorology Unit: increased the period of record from 15 to 17 years, changed the method of calculating the flow regime of the day, calculated a new optimal layer relative humidity, used a new smoothing technique for the daily climatology, and used a new valid area. The test results indicated that the modified equations showed and increase in skill over the current equations, good reliability, and an ability to distinguish between lightning and non-lightning days.

Lambert, Winifred; Roeder, William

2007-01-01

346

Update to the Lightning Probability Forecast Equations at Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This conference presentation describes the improvement of a set of lightning probability forecast equations that are used by the 45th Weather Squadron forecasters for their daily 1100 UTC (0700 EDT) weather briefing during the warm season months of May- September. This information is used for general scheduling of operations at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy Space Center. Forecasters at the Spaceflight Meteorology Group also make thunderstorm forecasts during Shuttle flight operations. Five modifications were made by the Applied Meteorology Unit: increased the period of record from 15 to 17 years, changed the method of calculating the flow regime of the day, calculated a new optimal layer relative humidity, used a new smoothing technique for the daily climatology, and used a new valid area. The test results indicated that the modified equations showed and increase in skill over the current equations, good reliability, and an ability to distinguish between lightning and non-lightning days.

Lambert, Winifred; Roeder, William

2007-01-01

347

Revised Flora and List of Threatened and Endangered Plants for the John F. Kennedy Space Center Area, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The vascular flora of the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) area was first studied in the 1970's, and the list was revised in 1990. Nomenclatural and taxonomic changes as well as additional collections required a revision of this list. The revised list includes 1024 taxa of which 803 are native and 221 are introduced. This appears to be a substantial proportion of the regional flora. Fifty taxa are endemic or nearly endemic, a level of endemism that appears high for the east coast of Florida. Of the 221 introduced plants, twenty-six are Category I invasive exotics and fifteen are Category II invasive exotics. Thirty-eight taxa are listed as threatened, endangered, or of special concern on state lists. For some of these taxa, populations on KSC appear to be important for their regional and global survival. The bryophyte flora of the KSC area includes 23 mosses and 20 liverworts and hornworts. The lichen flora is currently unknown.

Schmalzer, Paul A.; Foster, Tammy E.; Duncan, Brean W.; Quincy, Charles (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

348

A Custom Robotic System for Inspecting HEPA Filters in the Payload Changeout Room at the NASA Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this paper, the prime objective is to describe a custom 4-dof (degree-of-freedom) robotic arm capable of autonomously or telerobotically performing systematic HEPA filter inspection and certification in the Shuttle Launch Pad Payload Changeout Rooms (PCR's) on pads A and B at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. This HEPA filter inspection robot (HFIR) has been designed to be easily deployable and is equipped with the necessary sensory devices, control hardware, software and man-machine interfaces needed to implement HEPA filter inspection reliably and efficiently without damaging the filters or colliding with existing PCR structures or filters. The main purpose of the HFIR is to implement an automated positioning system to move special inspection sensors in pre-defined or manual patterns for the purpose of verifying filter integrity and efficiency. This will ultimately relieve NASA Payload Operations from significant problems associated with time, cost and personnel safety, impacts realized during non-automated PCR HFIR filter certification.

Spencer, James E., Jr.; Looney, Joe

1994-01-01

349

The perfect haze: Scientists link 1999 U.S. pollution episode to midwest aerosol plumes and Kennedy plane crash  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The crash of John F Kennedy Jrs single-engine Piper Saratoga airplane in the waters off of Marthas Vineyard, Massachusetts, on July 16, 1999, prompted round-the-clock, global media coverage. Cameras panned the waters as the search began the following day, Saturday Pundits at first commented on the likelihood of survival of the late U.S. president's son, who piloted the plane, and the passengers—his wife and sister-in-law. Television screens displayed the projected, hour-and-one-half, nighttime flight path east from New Jersey As the tragedy unfolded, coverage focused on speculation about the cause of the crash. News analysts repeatedly mentioned that haze attributed to summertime heat and high humidity levels may have sharply reduced visibility during the flight.

Showstack, Randy

350

STS-76 - SCA 747 Aircraft Takeoff for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft leaves the runway with the Shuttle Atlantis on its back. Following the STS-76 dawn landing at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on 31 March 1996. NASA 905, one of two modified 747's, was prepared to ferry Atlantis back to the Kennedy Space Center, FL. Delivery of Altlantis to Florida was delayed until 11 April 1996, due to an engine warning light that appeared shortly after take off on 6 April. The SCA #905 returned to Edwards with Atlantis aboard only minutes after departure. The right inboard engine #3 was exchanged and the 747 with Atlantis atop was able to depart for Davis-Monthan Air Force Base for a refueling stop. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttl

1996-01-01

351

STS-76 - Being Prepared for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center via SCA 747 Aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Moonrise over Atlantis: the space shuttle Atlantis receives post-flight servicing in the Mate-Demate Device (MDD), following its landing at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, 31 March 1996. Once servicing was complete, one of NASA's two 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, No. 905, was readied to ferry Atlantis back to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Delivery of Atlantis to Florida was delayed until 11 April 1996, due to an engine warning light that appeared shortly after take off on April 6. The SCA returned to Edwards only minutes after departure. The right inboard engine #3 was exchanged, and the 747 with Atlantis atop was able to depart 11 April for Davis-Monthan Air Force Base for a refueling stop. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the

1996-01-01

352

A Continuation of Base-Line Studies for Environmentally Monitoring Space Transportation Systems at John F. Kennedy Space Center. Volume 3, Part 1: Ichthyological Survey of Lagoonal Waters. [Indian River lagoon system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Ichthyological species in the Indian River lagoonal system likely to be affected by NASA's aerospace activities at the Kennedy Space Center were surveyed. The importance of the fish found to inhabit the waters in the area is analyzed.

Snelson, F. F., Jr.

1980-01-01

353

A continuation of base-line studies for environmentally monitoring Space Transportation Systems at John F. Kennedy Space Center. Volume 2: Chemical studies of rainfall and soil analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The results of a study which was designed to monitor, characterize, and evaluate the chemical composition of precipitation (rain) which fell at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida (KSC) during the period July 1977 to March 1979 are reported. Results which were obtained from a soil sampling and associated chemical analysis are discussed. The purpose of these studies was to determine the environmental perturbations which might be caused by NASA space activities.

Madsen, B. C.

1980-01-01

354

Managing Birds and Controlling Aircraft in the Kennedy Airport–Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge Complex: The Need for Hard Data and Soft Opinions  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the 1980s, the exponential growth of laughing gull (Larus atricilla) colonies, from 15 to about 7600 nests in 1990, in the Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge and a correlated increase in the bird-strike\\u000a rate at nearby John F. Kennedy International Airport (New York City) led to a controversy between wildlife and airport managers\\u000a over the elimination of the colonies. In

KEVIN M. BROWN; R. MICHAEL ERWIN; MILO E. RICHMOND; P. A. BUCKLEY; JOHN T. TANACREDI; DAVE AVRIN

2001-01-01

355

Studies on the toxic elements and organic degradation products in aquatic bodies and sediments around Kennedy Space Center (KSC) South Mosquito lagoon  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A compilation was put together of research work performed on the aquatic systems around Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The report includes a brief description of the study area, field data and analytical results of all the samples collected during the five visits to KSC up to December 17, 1977. The aquatic area selected for the study is the Southern part of Mosquito Lagoon which extends from the Haulover Canal to the dead end boundary of this lagoon southwards.

Ghuman, G. S.; Menon, M. P.; Emeh, C. O.

1978-01-01

356

Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 89-344-2157, Wiltech of Florida, Inc. , Kennedy Space Center, Florida, Rothe Development, Inc. , Johnson Space Center, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

In response to a request from the International Association of Machinists and Allied Workers Union, an evaluation was made of possible hazardous exposures to 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane (76131) (FC-113) during the cleaning of aerospace component parts at Wiltech of Florida (SIC-3471), located at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, and Rothe Development (SIC-3471) at Johnson Space Center, Texas. A total of 31

T. F. Bloom; G. M. Egeland

1991-01-01

357

Studies on the toxic elements and organic degradation products in aquatic bodies and sediments around Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Haulover Canal and Mosquito Lagoon  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The work during the first year ending September, 1975, is reported. Indian River, Haulover Canal, Mosquito Lagoon, and other aquatic areas of discharge around Kennedy Space Center (KSC) were studied. The presentation and interpretation of data on water and sediment samples collected from Haulover Canal and Mosquito Lagoon are included. The field and laboratory data are presented and tentative conclusions were drawn in the various aspects of the study. An attempt was made to correlate the physical, chemical, and biological parameters.

Ghuman, G. S.; Menon, M. P.; Emeh, C. O.

1975-01-01

358

Synoptic and Mesoscale Forcing of Convective Activity Over Cape Canaveral during Easterly Flow and Nowcasting for Space Shuttle Landings at Kennedy Space Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

Space Shuttle landings at Kennedy Space Center are subject to strict weather related landing flight rules. Landing rules demand very accurate nowcast (short-term forecasts of less than 2 h) of cloud, wind, visibility, precipitation, turbulence, and lightning at the Shuttle launches and landings. Challenges to U.S. Air Force forecasters at Cape Canaveral Air Station and National Weather Service\\/Spaceflight Meteorology Group

William Henry Bauman III

1995-01-01

359

Assessment and forecasting of lightning potential and its effect on launch operations at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and John F. Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lightning plays a pivotal role in the operation decision process for space and ballistic launches at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy Space Center. Lightning forecasts are the responsibility of Detachment 11, 4th Weather Wing's Cape Canaveral Forecast Facility. These forecasts are important to daily ground processing as well as launch countdown decisions. The methodology and equipment used to forecast lightning are discussed. Impact on a recent mission is summarized.

Weems, J.; Wyse, N.; Madura, J.; Secrist, M.; Pinder, C.

1991-01-01

360

Kennedy Space Center's NASA/Contractor Team-Centered Total Quality Management Seminar: Results, methods, and lessons learned  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It is apparent to everyone associated with the Nation's aeronautics and space programs that the challenge of continuous improvement can be reasonably addressed only if NASA and its contractors act together in a fully integrated and cooperative manner that transcends the traditional boundaries of proprietary interest. It is, however, one thing to assent to the need for such integration and cooperation; it is quite another thing to undertake the hard tasks of turning such a need into action. Whatever else total quality management is, it is fundamentally a team-centered and team-driven process of continuous improvement. The introduction of total quality management at KSC, therefore, has given the Center a special opportunity to translate the need for closer integration and cooperation among all its organizations into specific initiatives. One such initiative that NASA and its contractors have undertaken at KSC is a NASA/Contractor team-centered Total Quality Management Seminar. It is this seminar which is the subject of this paper. The specific purposes of this paper are to describe the following: Background, development, and evolution of Kennedy Space Center's Total Quality Management Seminar; Special characteristics of the seminar; Content of the seminar; Meaning and utility of a team-centered design for TQM training; Results of the seminar; Use that one KSC contractor, EG&G Florida, Inc. has made of the seminar in its Total Quality Management initiative; and Lessons learned.

Kinlaw, Dennis C.; Eads, Jeannette

1992-01-01

361

Locating rocket triggered lightning using the LLP lightning locating system at the NASA Kennedy Space Center. [Lightning Location and Protection  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Five rocket-triggered cloud-to-ground lightning flashes were detected by the operational lightning-locating system at the NASA Kennedy Space Center on August 17, 1984. The locating system, which was designed to detect natural lightning, detected at least 2 and as many as 6 strokes in the triggered flashes, suggesting that some of the strokes in the triggered lightning had signal-amplitude and waveshape characteristics similar to natural lightning. However, not all triggered strokes were detected, indicating that some strokes were atypical in nature. Since the ground-strike points of the triggered flashes were known quite precisely, the accuracy of the lightning-locating system was also evaluated. The three direction finders were found to have a mean bearing accuracy of + or - 0.5-0.6 deg. The distance errors of the real-time position solutions of the locating system on the triggered flashes were in the range of 195-770 m, with a mean of 480 m.

Maier, M. W.; Jafferis, W.

1985-01-01

362

Summary of 2011 Direct and Nearby Lightning Strikes to Launch Complex 39B, Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A Lightning Protection System (LPS) was designed and built at Launch Complex 39B (LC39B), at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida in 2009. This LPS was instrumented with comprehensive meteorological and lightning data acquisition systems that were deployed from late 2010 until mid 2011. The first direct strikes to the LPS were recorded in March of 2011, when a limited number of sensors had been activated. The lightning instrumentation system detected a total of 70 nearby strokes and 19 direct strokes to the LPS, 2 of the 19 direct strokes to the LPS had two simultaneous ground attachment points (in both instances one channel terminated on the LPS and the other on the nearby ground). Additionally, there are more unaccounted nearby strokes seen on video records for which limited data was acquired either due to the distance of the stroke or the settings of the data acquisition system. Instrumentation deployment chronological milestones, a summary of lightning strikes (direct and nearby), high speed video frames, downconductor currents, and dH/dt and dE/dt typical waveforms for direct and nearby strokes are presented.

Mata, C.T.; Mata, A.G.

2012-01-01

363

An Objective Verification of the North American Mesoscale Model for Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) Launch Weather Officers use the 12-km resolution North American Mesoscale (NAM) model (MesoNAM) text and graphical product forecasts extensively to support launch weather operations. However, the actual performance of the model at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) has not been measured objectively. In order to have tangible evidence of model performance, the 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit to conduct a detailed statistical analysis of model output compared to observed values. The model products are provided to the 45 WS by ACTA, Inc. and include hourly forecasts from 0 to 84 hours based on model initialization times of 00, 06, 12 and 18 UTC. The objective analysis compared the MesoNAM forecast winds, temperature and dew point, as well as the changes in these parameters over time, to the observed values from the sensors in the KSC/CCAFS wind tower network. Objective statistics will give the forecasters knowledge of the model's strength and weaknesses, which will result in improved forecasts for operations.

Bauman, William H., III

2010-01-01

364

Developing Empirical Lightning Cessation Forecast Guidance for the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This research addresses the 45th Weather Squadron's (45WS) need for improved guidance regarding lightning cessation at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy Space Center (KSC). KSC's Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) network was the primary observational tool to investigate both cloud-to-ground and intracloud lightning. Five statistical and empirical schemes were created from LDAR, sounding, and radar parameters derived from 116 storms. Four of the five schemes were unsuitable for operational use since lightning advisories would be canceled prematurely, leading to safety risks to personnel. These include a correlation and regression tree analysis, three variants of multiple linear regression, event time trending, and the time delay between the greatest height of the maximum dBZ value to the last flash. These schemes failed to adequately forecast the maximum interval, the greatest time between any two flashes in the storm. The majority of storms had a maximum interval less than 10 min, which biased the schemes toward small values. Success was achieved with the percentile method (PM) by separating the maximum interval into percentiles for the 100 dependent storms.

Stano, Geoffrey T.; Fuelberg, Henry E.; Roeder, William P.

2010-01-01

365

Kennedy Space Center's NASA/Contractor Team-Centered Total Quality Management Seminar: Results, methods, and lessons learned  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is apparent to everyone associated with the Nation's aeronautics and space programs that the challenge of continuous improvement can be reasonably addressed only if NASA and its contractors act together in a fully integrated and cooperative manner that transcends the traditional boundaries of proprietary interest. It is, however, one thing to assent to the need for such integration and cooperation; it is quite another thing to undertake the hard tasks of turning such a need into action. Whatever else total quality management is, it is fundamentally a team-centered and team-driven process of continuous improvement. The introduction of total quality management at KSC, therefore, has given the Center a special opportunity to translate the need for closer integration and cooperation among all its organizations into specific initiatives. One such initiative that NASA and its contractors have undertaken at KSC is a NASA/Contractor team-centered Total Quality Management Seminar. It is this seminar which is the subject of this paper. The specific purposes of this paper are to describe the following: Background, development, and evolution of Kennedy Space Center's Total Quality Management Seminar; Special characteristics of the seminar; Content of the seminar; Meaning and utility of a team-centered design for TQM training; Results of the seminar; Use that one KSC contractor, EG&G Florida, Inc. has made of the seminar in its Total Quality Management initiative; and Lessons learned.

Kinlaw, Dennis C.; Eads, Jeannette

366

Results of the radiological survey at Kennedy Park, Money and Sidney Streets, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ062)  

SciTech Connect

Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally {sup 232}Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, Kennedy Park, Money and Sidney Streets, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ062), was conducted during 1986 and 1987. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Foley, R.D.; Cottrell, W.D.; Floyd, L.M.

1989-07-01

367

Ground cloud hydrogen chloride measurements from three Titan launches at the Kennedy Space Center during 1978 and 1979  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Total hydrogen chloride and gaseous hydrogen chloride concentrations were measured in the exhaust cloud produced at three Titan 3 launches at the Kennedy Space Center in March 1978, December 1978, and November 1979 to determine the degree of hydrogen chloride partitioning in a solid rocket exhaust cloud between gaseous hydrogen chloride and hydrochloric acid aerosol as a function of ambient relative humidity. Moderately low relative humidity conditions were present during a daytime launch on Mar 25, 1978, and high relative humidity conditions were present during a nighttime launch on December 13, 1978. Gaseous hydrogen chloride concentrations and meteorological data, as a function of time after launch, are presented. Hydrogen chloride is present in both the gaseous and aerosol phase in the exhaust cloud. Total HCl concentrations ranged from 18 parts per million by volume (ppm) several minutes after launch down to 1 ppm after the cloud stabilization period, depending on the meteorological conditions. Gaseous HCl concentrations ranged from 2 to 3 ppm several minutes after launch to less than 1 ppm after cloud stabilization. These measured concentrations indicated significant HCl aerosol formation.

Seabacher, D. I.; Lee, R. B., III; Mathis, J. J.

1980-01-01

368

Temporal, Spatial, and Diurnal Patterns in Avian Activity at the Shuttle Landing Facility, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Spatial and temporal patterns in bird abundance within the five-mile airspace at the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) on John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, USA were investigated for purposes of quantifying Bird Aircraft Strike Hazards (BASH). The airspace is surrounded by the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge (MINWR) which provides habitat for approximately 331 resident and migratory bird species. Potential bird strike hazards were greatest around sunrise and sunset for most avian taxonomic groups, including wading birds, most raptors, pelicans, gulls/terns, shorebirds, and passerines. Turkey Vultures and Black Vultures were identified as a primary threat to aircraft operations and were represented in 33% of the samples. Diurnal vulture activity varied seasonally with the development of air thermals in the airspace surrounding the SLF. Variation in the presence and abundance of migratory species was shown for American Robins, swallows, and several species of shorebirds. Analyses of bird activities provides for planning of avionics operations during periods of low-dsk and allows for risk minimization measures during periods of high-risk.

Larson, Vickie L.; Rowe, Sean P.; Breininger, David R.

1997-01-01

369

Gemcitabine diphosphate choline is a major metabolite linked to the Kennedy pathway in pancreatic cancer models in vivo  

PubMed Central

Background: The modest benefits of gemcitabine (dFdC) therapy in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are well documented, with drug delivery and metabolic lability cited as important contributing factors. We have used a mouse model of PDAC: KRASG12D; p53R172H; pdx-Cre (KPC) that recapitulates the human disease to study dFdC intra-tumoural metabolism. Methods: LC-MS/MS and NMR were used to measure drug and physiological analytes. Cytotoxicity was assessed by the Sulphorhodamine B assay. Results: In KPC tumour tissue, we identified a new, Kennedy pathway-linked dFdC metabolite (gemcitabine diphosphate choline (GdPC)) present at equimolar amounts to its precursor, the accepted active metabolite gemcitabine triphosphate (dFdCTP). Utilising additional subcutaneous PDAC tumour models, we demonstrated an inverse correlation between GdPC/dFdCTP ratios and cytidine triphosphate (CTP). In tumour homogenates in vitro, CTP inhibited GdPC formation from dFdCTP, indicating competition between CTP and dFdCTP for CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (CCT). As the structure of GdPC precludes entry into cells, potential cytotoxicity was assessed by stimulating CCT activity using linoleate in KPC cells in vitro, leading to increased GdPC concentration and synergistic growth inhibition after dFdC addition. Conclusions: GdPC is an important element of the intra-tumoural dFdC metabolic pathway in vivo. PMID:24874484

Bapiro, T E; Frese, K K; Courtin, A; Bramhall, J L; Madhu, B; Cook, N; Neesse, A; Griffiths, J R; Tuveson, D A; Jodrell, D I; Richards, F M

2014-01-01

370

[Augmented anterior cruciate ligament replacement with the Kennedy-LAD (ligament augmentation device)--long term outcome].  

PubMed

The ligament augmentation device (Kennedy-LAD) is used to protect tendon grafts during the posttransplantation decrease in strength in anterior cruciate ligament (acl) reconstructions. The augmentation with the LAD is based on the concept of load sharing. Since 1983 we used the LAD in acl-reconstructions in 856 patients. In 63 cases we had to treat complications like infection (8), recurrent effusions (21), arthrofibrosis (34). The overall results are good with respect to stability, regain of strength and sports activity. In 73 cases resurgery was necessary because of synovitis (7), LAD-rupture due to re-injury (9), fatigue-rupture of the LAD (22), meniscal tears (35), 2.7 +/- 2.3 years (range: 2 months to 10 years) after LAD implantation. Modern techniques in acl reconstruction lead to comparable results without synthetic augmentation. Therefore, we now recommend the use of a LAD only in cases of repeated acl replacement with week tendon grafts, to avoid an allograft. PMID:9816660

Riel, K A

1998-01-01

371

An Objective Verification of the North American Mesoscale Model for Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) Launch Weather Officers (LWO's) use the 12-km resolution North American Mesoscale (NAM) model (MesoNAM) text and graphical product forecasts extensively to support launch weather operations. However, the actual performance of the model at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) has not been measured objectively. In order to have tangible evidence of model performance, the 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU; Bauman et ai, 2004) to conduct a detailed statistical analysis of model output compared to observed values. The model products are provided to the 45 WS by ACTA, Inc. and include hourly forecasts from 0 to 84 hours based on model initialization times of 00, 06, 12 and 18 UTC. The objective analysis compared the MesoNAM forecast winds, temperature (T) and dew pOint (T d), as well as the changes in these parameters over time, to the observed values from the sensors in the KSC/CCAFS wind tower network shown in Table 1. These objective statistics give the forecasters knowledge of the model's strengths and weaknesses, which will result in improved forecasts for operations.

Bauman, William H., III

2010-01-01

372

Use of ground penetrating radar for determination of water table depth and subsurface soil characteristics at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sustainable use and management of natural resources require strategic responses using non-destructive tools to provide spatial and temporal data for decision making. Experiments conducted at John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) demonstrate ground penetrating radar (GPR) can provide high-resolution images showing depth to water tables. GPR data at KSC were acquired using a MALÅ Rough Terrain 100 MHz Antenna. Data indicate strong correlation (R2=0.80) between measured water table depth (shallow monitoring wells and soil auger) and GPR estimated depth. The study demonstrated the use of GPR to detect Holocene and Pleistocene depositional environments such as Anastasia Formation that consists of admixtures of sand, shell and coquinoid limestone at a depth of 20-25 ft. This corresponds well with the relatively strong reflections from 7.5 to 13 m (125-215 ns) in GPR images. Interpretations derived from radar data coupled with other non-GPR data (wells data and soil auger data) will aid in the understanding of climate change impacts due to sea level rise on the scrub vegetation composition at KSC. Climate change is believed to have a potentially significant impact potential on near coastal ground water levels and associated water table depth. Understanding the impacts of ground water levels changes will, in turn, lead to improved conceptual conservation efforts and identifications of climate change adaptation concepts related to the recovery of the Florida scrub jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens) and other endangered or threatened species which are directly dependent on a healthy near coastal scrub habitat. Transfer of this inexpensive and non-destructive technology to other areas at KSC, Florida, and to other countries, may prove useful in the development of future conservation programs.

Hengari, Gideon M.; Hall, Carlton R.; Kozusko, Tim J.; Bostater, Charles R.

2013-10-01

373

4000 Feet of shortening with the Kennedy coal bed duplex at McClure, Cumberland overthrust block, SW VA  

SciTech Connect

Area balancing of a coal bed duplex developed within the lower Pennsylvanian Norton Fm reveals an approximate shortening of 4,000 feet along an upper level detachment within the Pine Mtn thrust system at McClure, VA. The Kennedy coal bed was examined along a railway cut for nearly 500 feet where an original thickness of 0.6 feet of coal is increased to over 7 feet. The thickened section is characterized by chaotic folding, but local segments exhibit well developed piggyback thrusting. The coal bed duplex mimics larger scale duplex structures, although extensional structures are also observed and seem to relate to the rigidity of the overlying thrust sheet. For most of the 490 foot outcrop measured, an upper and a lower level of piggyback stacking delineates a floor, roof and mid-level thrust system. The mid-level thrust is often folded and faulted, indicating episodic movement on all the faults. Thickness of the repeated coal bed increases gradually northward along the cut, but locally the upper level of thrust slices are missing. These voids are filled by gouge and indicate that once the roof thrust has attained a certain height, that level is maintained and attests to the rigidity of the overlying thrust sheet. Coalbed duplexes may have a profound effect on resource thickness and contribute to roof control problems in SW VA mines. They are also important because such intense shortening has previously been unrecognized at this level of the Pine Mtn thrust system and should be accounted for in reconstructing cross sections and calculating regional shortening.

Morgan, S.; Henika, W.S. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States) Dept. of Geological Sciences)

1994-03-01

374

Quality-Controlled Wind Data from the Kennedy Space Center 915 Megahertz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Network  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA) Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has installed a five-instrument 915-Megahertz (MHz) Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) system that records atmospheric wind profile properties. The purpose of these profilers is to fill data gaps between the top of the KSC wind tower network and the lowest measurement altitude of the KSC 50-MHz DRWP. The 915-MHz DRWP system has the capability to generate three-dimensional wind data outputs from approximately 150 meters (m) to 6,000 m at roughly 15-minute (min) intervals. NASA s long-term objective is to combine the 915-MHz and 50-MHz DRWP systems to create complete vertical wind profiles up to 18,300 m to be used in trajectory and loads analyses of space vehicles and by forecasters on day-of-launch (DOL). This analysis utilizes automated and manual quality control (QC) processes to remove erroneous and unrealistic wind data returned by the 915-MHz DRWP system. The percentage of data affected by each individual QC check in the period of record (POR) (i.e., January to April 2006) was computed, demonstrating the variability in the amount of data affected by the QC processes. The number of complete wind profiles available at given altitude thresholds for each profiler in the POR was calculated and outputted graphically, followed by an assessment of the number of complete wind profiles available for any profiler in the POR. A case study is also provided to demonstrate the QC process on a day of a known weather event.

Dryden, Rachel L.

2011-01-01

375

Measurement of Insulation Compaction in the Cryogenic Fuel Tanks at Kennedy Space Center by Fast/Thermal Neutron Techniques  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The liquid hydrogen and oxygen cryogenic storage tanks at John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) use expanded perlite as thermal insulation. Th ere is evidence that some of the perlite has compacted over time, com promising the thermal performance and possibly also structural integr ity of the tanks. Therefore an Non-destructive Testing (NDT) method for measuring the perlite density or void fraction is urgently needed. Methods based on neutrons are good candidates because they can readil y penetrate through the 1.75 cm outer steel shell and through the ent ire 120 cm thickness of the perlite zone. Neutrons interact with the nuclei of materials to produce characteristic gamma rays which are the n detected. The gamma ray signal strength is proportional to the atom ic number density. Consequently, if the perlite is compacted then the count rates in the individual peaks in the gamma ray spectrum will i ncrease. Perlite is a feldspathic volcanic rock made up of the major elements Si, AI, Na, K and 0 along with some water. With commercially available portable neutron generators it is possible to produce simul taneously fluxes of neutrons in two energy ranges: fast (14 MeV) and thermal (25 meV). Fast neutrons produce gamma rays by inelastic scatt ering which is sensitive to Fe and O. Thermal neutrons produce gamma rays by radiative capture in prompt gamma neutron activation (PGNA) and this is sensitive to Si, AI, Na, Kand H. Thus the two energy ranges produce complementary information. The R&D program has three phases: numerical simulations of neutron and gamma ray transport with MCNP s oftware, evaluation of the system in the laboratory on test articles and finally mapping of the perlite density in the cryogenic tanks at KSC. The preliminary MCNP calculations have shown that the fast/therma l neutron NDT method is capable of distinguishing between expanded an d compacted perlite with excellent statistics.

Livingston, R. A.; Schweitzer, J. S.; Parsons, Ann M.; Arens, Ellen E.

2010-01-01

376

Quantification of hydrochloric acid and particulate deposition resulting from space shuttle launches at John F. Kennedy space center, Florida, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Observations of damage to vegetation, acute reductions in surface water pH, and kills of small fish prompted the Biomedical Operations and Research Office at the John F. Kennedy Space Center to initiate intensive environmental evaluations of possible acute and long-term chronic impacts that may be produced by repeated launches of the space shuttle. An important step in this evaluation was the identification of deposition patterns and the quantification of ecosystem loading rates of exhaust constituents from the solid rocket motors (SRMs) in the area of the launch pad. These constituents are primarily aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and hydrochloric acid (HCl). During three launches of the space transportation system (STS-11, 13, and 14) up to 100 bulk deposition collectors, 83 mm in diameter containing 100 ml of deionized water, were deployed in a grid pattern covering 12.6 ha north of launch pad 39-A. Estimates of HCl and particulate deposition levels were made based on laboratory measurements of items entrained in the collectors. Captured particulates consisted of a variety of items including Al2O3, sand grains, sea shell fragments, paint chips, and other debris ablated from the launch pad surface by the initial thrust of the SRMs. Estimated ranges of HCl and particulate deposition in the study area were 0-127 g/m2 and 0-246 g/m2, respectively. Deposition patterns were highly influenced by wind speed and direction. These measurements indicate that, under certain meteorological conditions, up to 7.1 × 103 kg of particulates and 3.4 × 103 kg of HCl can be deposited to the near-field environment beyond the launch pad perimeter fence.

Dreschel, Thomas W.; Hall, Carlton R.

1990-07-01

377

Light-induced rotation of dye-doped liquid crystal droplets C. Manzo, D. Paparo, and L. Marrucci*  

E-print Network

crystal induced by circularly and elliptically polarized laser light. The droplets are dispersed in water to be strongly enhanced in light-absorbing dye-doped materials, the question arises whether a similar enhancement of freedom of matter. Our result provides also direct experimental proof of the existence of a photo- induced

Marrucci, Lorenzo

378

Optical Spin-to-Orbital Angular Momentum Conversion in Inhomogeneous Anisotropic Media L. Marrucci,* C. Manzo, and D. Paparo  

E-print Network

Optical Spin-to-Orbital Angular Momentum Conversion in Inhomogeneous Anisotropic Media L. Marrucci angular momentum carried by a circularly polarized light beam is converted into orbital angular momentum carrying a well defined value of the orbital angular momentum can be written as Er; ' E0r expim', where r

Marrucci, Lorenzo

379

A study of LC-39 cryogenic systems. Part 1: A study of the vacuum insulated transfer lines at Kennedy Space Center. Part 2: Cooldown pressure surges  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The vacuum liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen transfer lines at Kennedy Space Center were studied to evaluate the feasibility of using a condensing gas such as CO2 inside the vacuum spaces to achieve a condensing-vacuum. The study indicates that at ambient temperature, a maximum vacuum hyphen space pressure of 4000 microns is acceptable for the LH2 transfer lines. In addition, the cooldown procedures for the 14-inch cross-country liquid oxygen line was studied using a simplified mathematical model. Preliminary cooldown times are presented for various heat leak rates to the line and for two vent configurations.

Ludtke, P. R.; Voth, R. O.

1971-01-01

380

A continuation of base-line studies for environmentally monitoring space transportation systems at John F. Kennedy Space Center. Executive summary  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Studies conducted in and around John F. Kennedy Space Center, Merrit Island, Florida were designed to establish baseline conditions for various attributes of the biotic and abiotic environment. Features were described and quantitatively measured. Certain condition were found to be appropriate for the detection and assessment of possible environmental perturbations caused by future NASA activities. These include plant communities, mammal populations, rainfall chemistry, fish populations, and the status of rare and endangered species. On the basis of statistical analysis of quantitative data and logistic considerations, it was possible to refine the kinds and amounts of measurements needed to evaluate perturbations in selected environmental components.

Stout, I. J.

1980-01-01

381

A review of "The Jesuits II: Cultures, Sciences and the Arts" edited by J. W. O’Malley, G. A. Bailey, S. J. Harris, and T. F. Kennedy  

E-print Network

, and T. Frank Kennedy, eds.. The Jesuits II: Cultures, Sciences and the Arts, 1540-1773. Toronto: Toronto University Press, 2006. xxxvi + 905pp. $100.00. Review by Jo n a t h a n wr i g h t , ha r t l e p o o l , Un i t e d Ki n g d o m... As with an earlier volume by the same editorial team (The Jesuits: Cultures, Sciences and the Arts, 1540-1773. Toronto: Toronto University Press, 1999), the present work derives from an academic conference (this time held at Boston College in 2002) dedicated...

Wright, Jonathan

2008-01-01

382

Quantification of hydrochloric acid and particulate deposition resulting from Space Shuttle launches at John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida, U.S.A.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results are presented from studies designed to identify deposition patterns and quantify the ecosystem loading rates of exhaust constituents (which are primarily Al2O3 and HCl) from the Space Shuttle solid rocket motors in the area of the Kennedy Space Center launch pad. Results of measurements indicate that, under certain meteorological conditions, as much as 7.1 x 10 exp 3 kg of particulates and 3.4 x 10 exp 3 kg HCL can be deposited to the near-field environment beyond the launch pad perimeter fence during one STS launch.

Dreschel, Thomas W.; Hall, Carlton R.

1990-01-01

383

Development of a climatological data base to help forecast cloud cover conditions for shuttle landings at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle is an extremely weather sensitive vehicle with very restrictive constraints for both launches and landings. The most important difference between Shuttle and normal aircraft landings is that the Shuttle has no go-around capability once it begins its decent into the earth's atmosphere. The de-orbit burn decision is generally made approximately 90 minutes before landing requiring a forecast with little room for error. Because of the Shuttle's rapid re-entry to earth, the pilot must be able to see all runway and visual navigation aids from high altitude to land the Shuttle. In addition, the heat resistant tiles which are used to protect the Shuttle during its re-entry into the earth's atmosphere are extremely sensitive to any type of precipitation. Extensive damage to these tiles could occur if the Shuttle passes through any cloud that contains precipitation size particles. To help guard against changing weather conditions or any type of weather problems that might occur prior to landing, flight rules have been developed as guidelines for all landings. Although the rules vary depending on the location of the landing (Kennedy Space Center or Edwards AFB), length of mission, and weight of vehicle, most of the rules can be condensed into 4 major groupings. These are: (1) Cloud ceilings should not be less than 3048 m (10,000 feet), (2) Visibility should not be less than 13 km (7 nm), (3) Cross-wind no greater than 5-8 m/s (10-15 knots); and (4) No showers or thunderstorms at or within 56 km (30 nm) of the Shuttle Landing Facility. This study consisted of developing a climatological database of the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) surface observations and performing an analysis of observed conditions one and two hours subsequent to given conditions at the SLF to help analyze the 0.2 cloud cover rule. Particular emphasis was placed on Shuttle landing weather violations and the amounts of cloud cover below 3048 m (10,000 ft.). This analysis has helped to determine the best and worst times to land the Shuttle at KSC. In addition, nomograms have been developed to help forecasters make cloud cover forecasts for End of Mission (EOM) and Return to Launch Site (RTLS) at KSC. Results of categorizing this data by month, season, time of day, and surface and upper-air wind direction are presented.

Atchison, M. Kevin

1993-01-01

384

A four-year summertime microburst climatology and relationship between microbursts and cloud-to ground lightning flash rate for the NASA Kennedy Space Center, Florida: 1995-1998  

E-print Network

A FOUR-YEAR SUMMERTIME MICROBURST CLIMATOLOGY AND RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MICROBURSTS AND CLOUD-TO GROUND LIGHTNING FLASH RATE FOR THE NASA KENNEDY SPACE CENTER FLORIDA: 1995-199$ A Thesis by NEIL THOMAS SANGER Submitted to the Office... AND CLOUD-TO-GROUND LIGHTNING FLASH RATE FOR THE NASA KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLORIDA: 1995-1998 A Thesis by NEIL THOMAS SANGER Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved...

Sanger, Neil Thomas

1999-01-01

385

About Kennedy's Disease: Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... guys with the same problem. All of a sudden I was not alone, and also the information ... males and carrier females. Detects CAG triplet repeat expansion in the androgen receptor gene. Copyright © 2010-2014 ...

386

environment+ Victor S. Kennedy  

E-print Network

habitats that support a wealth of marine wildlife. They also provide humans with a wide variety of goods global climate change during the 21st century. Such climate change will create novel challenges

387

Kennedy Shriver Institute of  

E-print Network

, 1981 B.S.: (Biology) Virginia Union University, 1965 RESEARCH INTERESTS Delineating how inflamma- tory and the woman who managed the blood bank that I am where I am today. That work experience led me to private the child, the house work, the business trips, the lectures, the grant writing; and in doing so, was able

Bandettini, Peter A.

388

Shuttle Atlantis in Mate-Demate Device Being Loaded onto SCA-747 for Return to Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This photo shows a night view of the orbiter Atlantis being loaded onto one of NASA's Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site with Dryden remaining as the principal alternate landing site.

1996-01-01

389

Multimedia Information eXchange for I-NET, Inc. at the Kennedy Space Center: A continuing study of the application of worldwideweb technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Multimedia Information eXchange (MIX) is a multimedia information system that accommodates multiple data types and provides consistency across platforms. Information from all over the world can be accessed quickly and efficiently with the Internet-based system. I-NET's MIX uses the World Wide Web and Mosaic graphical user interface. Mosaic is available on all platforms used at I-NET's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) facilities. Key information system design concepts and benefits are reviewed. The MIX system also defines specific configuration and helper application parameters to ensure consistent operations across the entire organization. Guidelines and procedures for other areas of importance in information systems design are also addressed. Areas include: code of ethics, content, copyright, security, system administration, and support.

Metcalf, David

1995-01-01

390

Experimental measurements of the ground cloud growth during the 11 February 1974, Titan-Centaur launch at Kennedy Space Center. [(measurement of rocket exhaust from rocket launching)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Titan-Centaur was launched from Kennedy Space Center on February 11, 1974 at 0948 eastern daylight time. Ground level effluent measurements were obtained from the solid rocket motors for comparison with NASA diffusion models for predicting effluent ground level concentrations and cloud behavior. The results obtained provide a basis for an evaluation of such key model inputs such as cloud rise rate, stabilization altitude, crosswind growth, volume expansion, and cloud trajectory. Ground level effluent measurements were limited because of changing meteorological conditions, incorrect instrument location, and operational problems. Based on the measurement results, operational changes are defined. Photographs of the ground exhaust clouds are shown. The chemical composition of the exhaust gases was analyzed and is given.

Stewart, R. B.; Sentell, R. J.; Gregory, G. L.

1976-01-01

391

Analysis of vector wind change with respect to time for Cape Kennedy, Florida: Wind aloft profile change vs. time, phase 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Wind vector change with respect to time at Cape Kennedy, Florida, is examined according to the theory of multivariate normality. The joint distribution of the four variables represented by the components of the wind vector at an initial time and after a specified elapsed time is hypothesized to be quadravariate normal; the fourteen statistics of this distribution, calculated from fifteen years of twice daily Rawinsonde data are presented by monthly reference periods for each month from 0 to 27 km. The hypotheses that the wind component changes with respect to time is univariate normal, the joint distribution of wind component changes is bivariate normal, and the modulus of vector wind change is Rayleigh, has been tested by comparison with observed distributions. Statistics of the conditional bivariate normal distributions of vector wind at a future time given the vector wind at an initial time are derived. Wind changes over time periods from one to five hours, calculated from Jimsphere data, are presented.

Adelfang, S. I.

1977-01-01

392

The 2006 Kennedy Space Center Range Reference Atmosphere Model Validation Study and Sensitivity Analysis to the Performance of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Space Shuttle Vehicle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Range Reference Atmosphere (RRA) is a statistical model that summarizes wind and thermodynamic atmospheric variability from surface to 70 km. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Space Shuttle program, which launches from KSC, utilizes the KSC RRA data to evaluate environmental constraints on various aspects of the vehicle during ascent. An update to the KSC RRA was recently completed. As part of the update, the Natural Environments Branch at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) conducted a validation study and a comparison analysis to the existing KSC RRA database version 1983. Assessments to the Space Shuttle vehicle ascent profile characteristics were performed by JSC/Ascent Flight Design Division to determine impacts of the updated model to the vehicle performance. Details on the model updates and the vehicle sensitivity analyses with the update model are presented.

Burns, Lee; Decker, Ryan; Harrington, Brian; Merry, Carl

2008-01-01

393

Evaluation of the Performance Characteristics of CGLSS II and U.S. NLDN Using Ground-Truth Data from Launch Complex 398, Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new comprehensive lightning instrumentation system has been designed for Launch Complex 39B (LC39B) at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. This new instrumentation system includes six synchronized high-speed video cameras, current sensors installed on the nine downcouductors of the new lightning protection system (LPS) for LC39B; four dH/dt, 3-axis measurement stations; and five dE/dt stations composed of two antennas each. The LPS received 8 direct lightning strikes (a total of 19 strokes) from March 31 through December 31, 2011. The measured peak currents and locations are compared to those reported by the CGLSS 11 and the NLDN. Results of comparison are presented and analyzed in this paper.

Mata, Carlos T.; Mata, Angel G.; Rakov, V. A.; Nag, A.; Saul, Jon

2012-01-01

394

Evaluation of the Performance Characteristics of CGLSS II and U.S. NLDN Using Ground-Truth Dalta from Launch Complex 398, Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new comprehensive lightning instrumentation system has been designed for Launch Complex 39B (LC39B) at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. This new instrumentation system includes seven synchronized high-speed video cameras, current sensors installed on the nine downconductors of the new lightning protection system (LPS) for LC39B; four dH/dt, 3-axis measurement stations; and five dE/dt stations composed of two antennas each. The LPS received 8 direct lightning strikes (a total of 19 strokes) from March 31 through December 31 2011. The measured peak currents and locations are compared to those reported by the Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS II) and the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN). Results of comparison are presented and analyzed in this paper.

Mata, C. T.; Mata, A. G.; Rakov, V. A.; Nag, A.; Saul, J.

2012-01-01

395

SPRING 2012 Associate Professor Kathleen Alexander commutes  

E-print Network

rural Botswana residents develop strategies to coexist with wild animals. "With wildlife conflicts and consume it -- at risk for infection. "Brucellosis spreads from animals to humans, and the buffalo bears the links between humans and animals as they influence water quality and, in turn, how water quality affects

Virginia Tech

396

KATHLEEN O'REILLY Assistant Professor  

E-print Network

69(3):xx In press, expected 2011 OReilly, K. "Modern Water for Modern Women: Questioning of American Geographers. 97(3):613-634. 2006 OReilly, K. ",,Traditional Women, ,,Modern Water: Linking Gender and Commodification in Rajasthan, India." Geoforum. 37:958-972. 2006 OReilly, K. "Women Fieldworkers and the Politics

397

KATHLEEN O'REILLY September 2011  

E-print Network

. "Resolving a Gendered Paradox: Women's Participation and the NGO boom in north India," in The NGO Boom, 2011 OReilly, K. "Modern Water for Modern Women: Questioning the relationship between gender of American Geographers. 97(3):613-634. 2006 OReilly, K. ",,Traditional Women, ,,Modern Water: Linking Gender

398

Name: Kathleen Barbosa Hometown: Helena, MO  

E-print Network

. Maybe the speech is the start of the next civil rights movement or just a standing ovation in your class majors become more comfortable speaking. Finish this sentence: A great speech can... ...start a movement

Gering, Jon C.

399

George N.Bennett Kathleen Beckingham  

E-print Network

.Parry Michael Stern Charles R.Stewart PROFESSORS EMERITI Jorge Awapara James Wayne Campbell Graham Palmer James B.Walker ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Bonnie Bartel Michael C.Gustin Edward P.Nikonowicz Pernilla Wittung Siemann ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Nat Holland Michael Kohn Lisa Meffert LECTURER/LABORATORY COORDINATOR Barry

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

400

Brian Cope, Chair Kathleen DiDomenico  

E-print Network

the Caribbean and U.S. Latino), and Hispanic Linguistics. The department strongly recommends that students take of Hispanic peoples in the USA. Students interested in Spanish as prepara- tion for a career in international the student placed, and of the Department Chair. · Transfer Credit for the College's Foreign Language

Wilson, Mark A.

401

Brian Cope, Chair Kathleen DiDomenico  

E-print Network

the Caribbean and U.S. Latino), and Hispanic Linguistics. The department strongly recommends that students take the student placed, and of the Department Chair. · Transfer Credit for the College's Foreign Language is designed to lead students to develop a critical understanding of cultural difference in a variety

Wilson, Mark A.

402

Curriculum Vitae Kathleen John-Alder, ASLA  

E-print Network

Landscapes Statement of Research Interests: My research examines the transformative role of ecology Case Studies of Land and Water Dynamics in the Peri-Urban Metropolitan District" The Architects Newspaper Exhibition Review Manahatta/Manhattan, Museum of the City of New York 2009 "Through Virgin Eyes

Goodman, Robert M.

403

Tool for Forecasting Cool-Season Peak Winds Across Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The expected peak wind speed for the day is an important element in the daily morning forecast for ground and space launch operations at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) must issue forecast advisories for KSC/CCAFS when they expect peak gusts for >= 25, >= 35, and >= 50 kt thresholds at any level from the surface to 300 ft. In Phase I of this task, the 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to develop a cool-season (October - April) tool to help forecast the non-convective peak wind from the surface to 300 ft at KSC/CCAFS. During the warm season, these wind speeds are rarely exceeded except during convective winds or under the influence of tropical cyclones, for which other techniques are already in use. The tool used single and multiple linear regression equations to predict the peak wind from the morning sounding. The forecaster manually entered several observed sounding parameters into a Microsoft Excel graphical user interface (GUI), and then the tool displayed the forecast peak wind speed, average wind speed at the time of the peak wind, the timing of the peak wind and the probability the peak wind will meet or exceed 35, 50 and 60 kt. The 45 WS customers later dropped the requirement for >= 60 kt wind warnings. During Phase II of this task, the AMU expanded the period of record (POR) by six years to increase the number of observations used to create the forecast equations. A large number of possible predictors were evaluated from archived soundings, including inversion depth and strength, low-level wind shear, mixing height, temperature lapse rate and winds from the surface to 3000 ft. Each day in the POR was stratified in a number of ways, such as by low-level wind direction, synoptic weather pattern, precipitation and Bulk Richardson number. The most accurate Phase II equations were then selected for an independent verification. The Phase I and II forecast methods were compared using an independent verification data set. The two methods were compared to climatology, wind warnings and advisories issued by the 45 WS, and North American Mesoscale (NAM) model (MesoNAM) forecast winds. The performance of the Phase I and II methods were similar with respect to mean absolute error. Since the Phase I data were not stratified by precipitation, this method's peak wind forecasts had a large negative bias on days with precipitation and a small positive bias on days with no precipitation. Overall, the climatology methods performed the worst while the MesoNAM performed the best. Since the MesoNAM winds were the most accurate in the comparison, the final version of the tool was based on the MesoNAM winds. The probability the peak wind will meet or exceed the warning thresholds were based on the one standard deviation error bars from the linear regression. For example, the linear regression might forecast the most likely peak speed to be 35 kt and the error bars used to calculate that the probability of >= 25 kt = 76%, the probability of >= 35 kt = 50%, and the probability of >= 50 kt = 19%. The authors have not seen this application of linear regression error bars in any other meteorological applications. Although probability forecast tools should usually be developed with logistic regression, this technique could be easily generalized to any linear regression forecast tool to estimate the probability of exceeding any desired threshold . This could be useful for previously developed linear regression forecast tools or new forecast applications where statistical analysis software to perform logistic regression is not available. The tool was delivered in two formats - a Microsoft Excel GUI and a Tool Command Language/Tool Kit (Tcl/Tk) GUI in the Meteorological Interactive Data Display System (MIDDS). The Microsoft Excel GUI reads a MesoNAM text file containing hourly forecasts from 0 to 84 hours, from one model run (00 or 12 UTC). The GUI then displays e peak wind speed, average wind speed, and the probability the peak wind wil

Barrett, Joe H., III; Roeder, William P.

2010-01-01

404

Shuttle Endevour Loaded onto SCA-747 Exiting the Mate-Demate Device for Return to Kennedy Space Cent  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle Endeavout rests atop NASA's Shuttle Carrier Aircraft in the Mate-Demate Device (MDD) at the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, shortly before being ferried back to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Endeavour landed at 1:57 p.m. (PDT) May 16, 1992, marking the completion of the new orbiter's first mission in space during which the crew of seven rendezvoused with the Intelsat VI satellite, attached a booster motor, and redeployed it into a high geosynchronous orbit. Endeavour and its crew were launched on a planned 7-day mission 7 May 1992, but the landing was delayed two days to allow extra time to rescue Intelsat and complete space station assembly techniques originally planned. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden

1992-01-01

405

MCNP Simulations of Measurement of Insulation Compaction in the Cryogenic Rocket Fuel Tanks at Kennedy Space Center by Fast/Thermal Neutron Techniques  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

MCNP simulations have been run to evaluate the feasibility of using a combination of fast and thermal neutrons as a nondestructive method to measure of the compaction of the perlite insulation in the liquid hydrogen and oxygen cryogenic storage tanks at John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Perlite is a feldspathic volcanic rock made up of the major elements Si, AI, Na, K and 0 along with some water. When heated it expands from four to twenty times its original volume which makes it very useful for thermal insulation. The cryogenic tanks at Kennedy Space Center are spherical with outer diameters of 69-70 feet and lined with a layer of expanded perlite with thicknesses on the order of 120 cm. There is evidence that some of the perlite has compacted over time since the tanks were built 1965, affecting the thermal properties and possibly also the structural integrity of the tanks. With commercially available portable neutron generators it is possible to produce simultaneously fluxes of neutrons in two energy ranges: fast (14 Me V) and thermal (25 me V). The two energy ranges produce complementary information. Fast neutrons produce gamma rays by inelastic scattering, which is sensitive to Fe and O. Thermal neutrons produce gamma rays by prompt gamma neutron activation (PGNA) and this is sensitive to Si, Al, Na, K and H. The compaction of the perlite can be measured by the change in gamma ray signal strength which is proportional to the atomic number densities of the constituent elements. The MCNP simulations were made to determine the magnitude of this change. The tank wall was approximated by a I-dimensional slab geometry with an 11/16" outer carbon steel wall, an inner stainless wall and 120 cm thick perlite zone. Runs were made for cases with expanded perlite, compacted perlite or with various void fractions. Runs were also made to simulate the effect of adding a moderator. Tallies were made for decay-time analysis from t=0 to 10 ms; total detected gamma-rays; detected gamma-rays from thermal neutron reactions d. detected gamma-rays from non-thermal neutron reactions and total detected gamma-rays as a function of depth into the annulus volume. These indicated a number of possible independent metrics of perlite compaction. For example the count rate for perlite elements increased from 3600 to 8500 cps for an increase in perlite density from 6 lbs/lcf to 16.5 lbs/cf. Thus the MCNP simulations have confirmed the feasibility of using neutron methods to map the compaction of perlite in the walls of the cryogenic tanks.

Livingston, R. A.; Schweitzer, J. S.; Parsons, A. M.; Arens, E. E.

2010-01-01

406

A continuation of base-line studies for environmentally monitoring space transportation systems at John F. Kennedy Space Center. Volume 3, part 2: Ichthyological studies, sailfin molly reproduction study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The applicability of monitoring populations of Poccilia latipinna (sailfin molly) and its reproductive efforts as reliable indicators of environmental effects of aerospace activities in the Kennedy Space Center area was investigated. Results show that the sailfin molly experiences drastic fluctuations in population and reproductive success and is not an appropriate factor for monitoring to establish perturbations of the environment due to space transportation system related activities.

Snelson, F. F., Jr.

1980-01-01

407

A Conservation Strategy for the Florida Scrub-Jay on John F. Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge: An Initial Scientific Basis for Recovery  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Florida Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens) is an indicator of ecosystem integrity of Florida scrub, an endangered ecosystem that requires frequent fire. One of the largest populations of this federally threatened species occurs on John F. Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. Population trends were predicted using population modeling and field data on reproduction and survival of Florida Scrub-Jays collected from 1988 - 1995. Analyses of historical photography indicated that habitat suitability has been declining for 30 years. Field data and computer simulations suggested that the population declined by at least 40% and will decline by another 40% in 1 0 years, if habitat management is not greatly intensified. Data and computer simulations suggest that habitat suitability cannot deviate greatly from optimal for the jay population to persist. Landscape trajectories of vegetation structure, responsible for declining habitat suitability, are associated with the disruption of natural fire regimes. Prescribed fire alone can not reverse the trajectories. A recovery strategy was developed, based on studies of Florida Scrub-Jays and scrub vegetation. A reserve design was formulated based on conservation science principles for scrub ecosystems. The strategy emphasizes frequent fire to restore habitat, but includes mechanical tree cutting for severely degraded areas. Pine thinning across large areas can produce rapid increases in habitat quality. Site-specific strategies will need to be developed, monitored, and modified to achieve conditions suitable for population persistence.

Breininger, D. R.; Larson, V. L.; Schaub, R.; Duncan, B. W.; Schmalzer, P. A.; Oddy, D. M.; Smith, R. B.; Adrian, F.; Hill, H., Jr.

1996-01-01

408

Analysis of Wading Bird use of Impounded Wetland Habitat on the Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, 1987-1998  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report summarizes results of the first eleven years of monthly aerial surveys of wading bird use of foraging habitats within impoundments on the Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. Some impoundments were used much more heavily by wading birds than were others. Analysis suggests that an increase in interspersion of open water and vegetated habitats is preferred foraging habitat. Many wading bird species increased their use of vegetated habitat in Fall and Winter when impoundments were flooded. The mean number of wading birds per survey was greatest during the Pre-nesting and Nesting seasons, declined during Post-nesting season, and was lowest during Winter when water levels within impoundments were high. During these times, shallow habitat along the IRL shoreline provided alternative habitats for wading birds. Various measures of monthly precipitation and impoundment water level were well correlated with the numbers of wading birds observed. Numbers of nesting attempts was steady during the study period, with the exception of an unusually high number of attempts in 1990. White Ibis accounted for over half of all wading bird nests counted. The mean number of nests per colony decreased during the study period, and the number of individual colonies increased.

Stolen, Eric D.; Breininger, David R.; Smith, Rebecca B.; Quincy, Charlie (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

409

An evaluation of rain chemistry data for the John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida and the University of Central Florida, Orlando  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Concern over the effects of Space Shuttle launches prompted the initiation of a rather intense environmental monitoring program. The program included a precipitation monitoring network with 13 precipitation collection sites which were operated for various time periods to baseline precipitation chemistry at the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC). One additional site was also established as a remote background site on the Univ. of Central Florida (UCF) campus. One of the 13 sites was converted to a National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) station. Collections and analyses of samples were performed using a number of methodologies during the monitoring period. An evaluation of the data for comparability and utility for acid rain research was performed using the anion/cation, measured conductivity, calculated conductivity, Cl/Na, and Mg/Na ratios. Data collected at all KSC sites between 1977 and 1981, from 1983 to 1985 at the NADP site and at UCF to 1985 are comparable and appropriate for determining acid rain trends. Examination of those comparable data showed a fairly stable pH between 1977 and 1982 and an increase of 0.2 pH units which was observed as an incremental increase between 1982 and 1983 at KSC and UCF.

Madsen, Brooks C.; Dreschel, Thomas W.; Hinkle, C. Ross

1986-01-01

410

Objective Lightning Forecasting at Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station using Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System Data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) at Cape Canaveral Air-Force Station (CCAFS)ln Florida issues a probability of lightning occurrence in their daily 24-hour and weekly planning forecasts. This information is used for general planning of operations at CCAFS and Kennedy Space Center (KSC). These facilities are located in east-central Florida at the east end of a corridor known as 'Lightning Alley', an indication that lightning has a large impact on space-lift operations. Much of the current lightning probability forecast is based on a subjective analysis of model and observational data and an objective forecast tool developed over 30 years ago. The 45 WS requested that a new lightning probability forecast tool based on statistical analysis of more recent historical warm season (May-September) data be developed in order to increase the objectivity of the daily thunderstorm probability forecast. The resulting tool is a set of statistical lightning forecast equations, one for each month of the warm season, that provide a lightning occurrence probability for the day by 1100 UTC (0700 EDT) during the warm season.

Lambert, Winfred; Wheeler, Mark; Roeder, William

2005-01-01

411

Future Expansion of the Lightning Surveillance System at the Kennedy Space Center and the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, USA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and the Air Force Eastern Range (ER) use data from two cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning detection networks, the Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS) and the U.S. National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN), and a volumetric mapping array, the lightning detection and ranging II (LDAR II) system: These systems are used to monitor and characterize lightning that is potentially hazardous to launch or ground operations and hardware. These systems are not perfect and both have documented missed lightning events when compared to the existing lightning surveillance system at Launch Complex 39B (LC39B). Because of this finding it is NASA's plan to install a lightning surveillance system around each of the active launch pads sharing site locations and triggering capabilities when possible. This paper shows how the existing lightning surveillance system at LC39B has performed in 2011 as well as the plan for the expansion around all active pads.

Mata, C. T.; Wilson, J. G.

2012-01-01

412

Peak Wind Forecasts for the Launch-Critical Wind Towers on Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Phase IV  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This final report describes the development of a peak wind forecast tool to assist forecasters in determining the probability of violating launch commit criteria (LCC) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). The peak winds arc an important forecast clement for both the Space Shuttle and Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) programs. The LCC define specific peak wind thresholds for each launch operation that cannot be exceeded in order to ensure the safety of the vehicle. The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) has found that peak winds are a challenging parameter to forecast, particularly in the cool season months of October through April. Based on the importance of forecasting peak winds, the 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to update the statistics in the current peak-wind forecast tool to assist in forecasting LCC violations. The tool includes onshore and offshore flow climatologies of the 5-minute mean and peak winds and probability distributions of the peak winds as a function of the 5-minute mean wind speeds.

Crawford, Winifred

2011-01-01

413

Statistical Short-Range Guidance for Peak Wind Forecasts on Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Phase III  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This final report describes the development of a peak wind forecast tool to assist forecasters in determining the probability of violating launch commit criteria (LCC) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). The peak winds are an important forecast element for both the Space Shuttle and Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) programs. The LCC define specific peak wind thresholds for each launch operation that cannot be exceeded in order to ensure the safety of the vehicle. The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) has found that peak winds are a challenging parameter to forecast, particularly in the cool season months of October through April. Based on the importance of forecasting peak winds, the 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to develop a short-range peak-wind forecast tool to assist in forecasting LCC violations.The tool includes climatologies of the 5-minute mean and peak winds by month, hour, and direction, and probability distributions of the peak winds as a function of the 5-minute mean wind speeds.

Crawford, Winifred

2010-01-01

414

Quantum computational universality of the Cai-Miyake-Duer-Briegel two-dimensional quantum state from Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki quasichains  

SciTech Connect

Universal quantum computation can be achieved by simply performing single-qubit measurements on a highly entangled resource state, such as cluster states. Cai, Miyake, Duer, and Briegel recently constructed a ground state of a two-dimensional quantum magnet by combining multiple Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki quasichains of mixed spin-3/2 and spin-1/2 entities and by mapping pairs of neighboring spin-1/2 particles to individual spin-3/2 particles [Phys. Rev. A 82, 052309 (2010)]. They showed that this state enables universal quantum computation by single-spin measurements. Here, we give an alternative understanding of how this state gives rise to universal measurement-based quantum computation: by local operations, each quasichain can be converted to a one-dimensional cluster state and entangling gates between two neighboring logical qubits can be implemented by single-spin measurements. We further argue that a two-dimensional cluster state can be distilled from the Cai-Miyake-Duer-Briegel state.

Wei, Tzu-Chieh [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z1 (Canada); C. N. Yang Institute for Theoretical Physics, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794-3840 (United States); Raussendorf, Robert [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Kwek, Leong Chuan [Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore and National Institute of Education and Institute of Advanced Studies, Nanyang Technological University, 1 Nanyang Walk (Singapore)

2011-10-15

415

Surface wind convergence as a short-term predictor of cloud-to-ground lightning at Kennedy Space Center: A four-year summary and evaluation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since 1986, USAF forecasters at NASA-Kennedy have had available a surface wind convergence technique for use during periods of convective development. In Florida during the summer, most of the thunderstorm development is forced by boundary layer processes. The basic premise is that the life cycle of convection is reflected in the surface wind field beneath these storms. Therefore the monitoring of the local surface divergence and/or convergence fields can be used to determine timing, location, longevity, and the lightning hazards which accompany these thunderstorms. This study evaluates four years of monitoring thunderstorm development using surface wind convergence, particularly the average over the area. Cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning is related in time and space with surface convergence for 346 days during the summers of 1987 through 1990 over the expanded wind network at KSC. The relationships are subdivided according to low level wind flow and midlevel moisture patterns. Results show a one in three chance of CG lightning when a convergence event is identified. However, when there is no convergence, the chance of CG lightning is negligible.

Watson, Andrew I.; Holle, Ronald L.; Lopez, Raul E.; Nicholson, James R.

1991-01-01

416

Endangered and potentially endangered wildlife on John F. Kennedy Space Center and faunal integrity as a goal for maintaining biological diversity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Buffer zones for space operations provide for a wildlife diversity unsurpassed among most federal facilities in the continental U.S. demonstrating the coexistence possible with one of man's greatest technological achievements. This document ranks 119 resident or migratory wildlife species that are endangered or declining. The ranking system herein was based on species' vulnerability to extinction and the relevance of Kennedy Space Center (KSC) for maintaining populations in the U.S. and Florida. One amphibian, 19 reptiles, 80 birds, and 19 mammals were considered endangered or declining. KSC is an integral area for regional species diversity being the focus of the Merritt Island/Cape Canaveral/Turnbull Ecosystem which is part of the Indian River Lagoon watershed, an estuary of national significance. Many species that use this system also use the nearby St. Johns River Basin ecosystem. These two ecosystems are biological corridors between temperate Carolinian and tropical/subtropical Caribbean biotic provinces. Threats to biological diversity on KSC were also reviewed. Traditional environmental assessments, resulting from environmental regulation guidelines, focus on environmental contaminants and habitat lost due to construction. However, this review suggested that small population sizes, isolation of populations, ecosystem and habitat fragmentation, road mortality, and other edge effects may represent more critical threats to biological diversity than the traditional topics.

Breininger, David R.; Barkaszi, Mary JO; Smith, Rebecca B.; Oddy, Donna M.; Provancha, Jane A.

1994-01-01

417

A review of falconry as a bird control technique with recommendations for use at the Shuttle Landing Facility, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Falconry has been proposed as a method of reducing the bird/aircraftstrike hazard, in addition to current bird control techniques, at the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, U.S. Bird control programs using falconry have been employed at a number of military and commercial airfields in the U.S., Canada, and Europe. Most falconry programs have been discontinued. In most situations, falconry did not prove cost effective when compared to alternative bird control techniques. Available literature and documents, as well as several raptor specialists and military personnel, suggest that falconry may be useful only against certain problem species and when other bird control methods have been proven inadequate. Because many of the most commonly used falcons are protected species, acquisition of falcons will complicate their use in bird control programs. Many avian species found at the SLF are federally and state protected or of conservation concern, therefore, environmental impacts may also result from the use of falcons.

Larson, Vickie L.; Rowe, Sean P.; Breininger, David R.; Yosef, Reuven

1994-01-01

418

Feasibility study for measurement of insulation compaction in the cryogenic rocket fuel storage tanks at Kennedy Space Center by fast/thermal neutron techniques  

SciTech Connect

The liquid hydrogen and oxygen cryogenic storage tanks at John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) use expanded perlite as thermal insulation. Some of the perlite may have compacted over time, compromising the thermal performance and also the structural integrity of the tanks. Neutrons can readily penetrate through the 1.75 cm outer steel shell and through the entire 120 cm thick perlite zone. Neutrons interactions with materials produce characteristic gamma rays which are then detected. In compacted perlite the count rates in the individual peaks in the gamma ray spectrum will increase. Portable neutron generators can produce neutron simultaneous fluxes in two energy ranges: fast (14 MeV) and thermal (25 meV). Fast neutrons produce gamma rays by inelastic scattering which is sensitive to Si, Al, Fe and O. Thermal neutrons produce gamma rays by radiative capture in prompt gamma neutron activation (PGNA), which is sensitive to Si, Al, Na, K and H among others. The results of computer simulations using the software MCNP and measurements on a test article suggest that the most promising approach would be to operate the system in time-of-flight mode by pulsing the neutron generator and observing the subsequent die away curve in the PGNA signal.

Livingston, R. A. [Materials Science and Engineering Dept., U. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Schweitzer, J. S. [Physics Dept., U. of Connecticut, Storrs (United States); Parsons, A. M. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt (United States); Arens, E. E. [John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL (United States)

2014-02-18

419

A Five-year Performance Study of Low VOC Coatings over Zinc Thermal Spray for the Protection of Carbon Steel at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The launch facilities at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) are located approximately 1000 feet from the Atlantic Ocean where they are exposed to salt deposits, high humidity, high UV degradation, and acidic exhaust from solid rocket boosters. These assets are constructed from carbon steel, which requires a suitable coating to provide long-term protection to reduce corrosion and its associated costs. While currently used coating systems provide excellent corrosion control performance, they are subject to occupational, safety, and environmental regulations at the Federal and State levels that limit their use. Many contain high volatile organic compounds (VOCs), hazardous air pollutants, and other hazardous materials. Hazardous waste from coating operations include vacuum filters, zinc dust, hazardous paint related material, and solid paint. There are also worker safety issues such as exposure to solvents and isocyanates. To address these issues, top-coated thermal spray zinc coating systems were investigated as a promising environmentally friendly corrosion protection for carbon steel in an acidic launch environment. Additional benefits of the combined coating system include a long service life, cathodic protection to the substrate, no volatile contaminants, and high service temperatures. This paper reports the results of a performance based study to evaluate low VOC topcoats (for thermal spray zinc coatings) on carbon steel for use in a space launch environment.

Kolody, Mark R.; Curran, Jerome P.; Calle, Luz Marina

2014-01-01

420

A Sounding-based Severe Weather Tool to Support Daily Operations at Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

People and property at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) are at risk when severe weather occurs. Strong winds, hail and tornadoes can injure individuals and cause costly damage to structures if not properly protected. NASA's Launch Services Program and Ground Systems Development and Operations Program and other KSC programs use the daily and weekly severe weather forecasts issued by the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) to determine if they need to limit an activity such as working on gantries, or protect property such as a vehicle on a pad. The 45 WS requested the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) develop a warm season (May-September) severe weather tool for use in the Meteorological Interactive Data Display System (MIDDS) based on the late morning, 1500 UTC (1100 local time), CCAFS (XMR) sounding. The 45 WS frequently makes decisions to issue a severe weather watch and other severe weather warning support products to NASA and the 45th Space Wing in the late morning, after the 1500 UTC sounding. The results of this work indicate that certain stability indices based on the late morning XMR soundings can depict differences between days with reported severe weather and days with no reported severe weather. The AMU determined a frequency of reported severe weather for the stability indices and implemented an operational tool in MIDDS.

Bauman, William H.; Roeder, William P.

2014-01-01

421

Reproductive Ecology Of The Florida Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma Coerulescens) On John F. Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge: A Long-Term Study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

From 1988 to 2002 we studied the breeding ecology of Florida Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma coerulescens) on John F. Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. We examined phenology, clutch size, hatching failure rates, fledgling production, nest success, predation rates, sources egg and nestling mortality, and the effects of helpers on these measures. Nesting phenology was similar among sites. Mean clutch size at Titan was significantly larger than at HC or T4. Pairs with helpers did not produce larger clutches than pairs without helpers. Fledgling production at T4 was significantly greater than at HC and similar to Titan. Pairs with helpers at HC produced significantly more fledglings than pairs without helpers; helpers did not influence fledgling production at the other sites. Nest success at HC and Titan was low, 19% and 32% respectively. Nest success at T4 was 48% and was significantly greater than at HC. Average predation rates at all sites increased with season progression. Predation rates at all sight rose sharply by early June. The main cause of nest failure at all sites was predation, 93%.

Carter, Geoffry M.; Breininger, David R.; Larson, Vicky L.; Oddy, Donna M.; Smith, Rebecca B.; Stolen, Eric D.

2005-01-01

422

Feasibility study for measurement of insulation compaction in the cryogenic rocket fuel storage tanks at Kennedy Space Center by fast/thermal neutron techniques  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The liquid hydrogen and oxygen cryogenic storage tanks at John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) use expanded perlite as thermal insulation. Some of the perlite may have compacted over time, compromising the thermal performance and also the structural integrity of the tanks. Neutrons can readily penetrate through the 1.75 cm outer steel shell and through the entire 120 cm thick perlite zone. Neutrons interactions with materials produce characteristic gamma rays which are then detected. In compacted perlite the count rates in the individual peaks in the gamma ray spectrum will increase. Portable neutron generators can produce neutron simultaneous fluxes in two energy ranges: fast (14 MeV) and thermal (25 meV). Fast neutrons produce gamma rays by inelastic scattering which is sensitive to Si, Al, Fe and O. Thermal neutrons produce gamma rays by radiative capture in prompt gamma neutron activation (PGNA), which is sensitive to Si, Al, Na, K and H among others. The results of computer simulations using the software MCNP and measurements on a test article suggest that the most promising approach would be to operate the system in time-of-flight mode by pulsing the neutron generator and observing the subsequent die away curve in the PGNA signal.

Livingston, R. A.; Schweitzer, J. S.; Parsons, A. M.; Arens, E. E.

2014-02-01

423

A Comparison of the Automated Meteorological Profiling System High Resolution Flight Element to the Kennedy Space Center 50 MHz Doppler Wind Profiler  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Wind profile measurement and the simulation of aerodynamic loads on a launch vehicle play an important role in determining launch capability and post launch assessment of the vehicle's performance. To date, all United States range certified wind profile measurement systems have been based on balloon tracking. Since the 1960's, the standard used by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Air Force at the Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) for detailed wind profile measurements has been the radar tracked, aerodynamically stabilized Jimsphere balloon system. Currently, the Air Force is nearing certification and operational implementation of the Automated Meteorological Profiling System (AMPS) at CCAS and Vandenburg Air Force Base (VAFB). AMPS uses the Global Positioning System for tracking the Jimsphere balloon. It is anticipated that the AMPS/Jimsphere, named the High Resolution Flight Element (HRFE), will have equivalent, or better resolution than the radar tracked Jimsphere, especially when the balloon is far downrange, at a low elevation angle. By the 1980's, the development of Doppler Wind Profilers (DWP) had become sufficiently advanced to justify an experimental measurement program at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). In 1989 a 50 MHz DWP was installed at KSC. In principal, the 50 MHz DWP has the capability to track the evolution of wind profile dynamics within 5 minutes of a launch. Because of fundamental differences in the measurement technique, there is a significant time and space differential between 50 MHz DWP and HRFE wind profiles. This paper describes a study to quantify these differences from a sample of 50 MHz DWP/HRFE pairs obtained during the AMPS certification test program.

Roberts, Barry C.; Leahy, Frank

2000-01-01

424

Thermal Performance of Biological Substance Systems in Vitro Under Static and Dynamic Conditions at the Cryogenic Test Laboratory, NASA Kennedy Space Center, USA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A unique research program, including a comprehensive study of thermal performance at cryogenic vacuum insulation systems, was performed at the NASA Kennedy Space Center. The main goal was to develop a new soft vacuum system (from 1 torr to 10 torr) that provides an intermediate level of performance (k-value below 4.8 mW/m-K). Liquid nitrogen boil-off methods were used to test conventional materials, novel materials, and certain combinations. The test articles included combinations of aluminum foil, fiberglass paper, polyester fabric, silica aerogel composite blanket, fumed silica, silica aerogel powder, and syntactic foam. A new LCI system was developed at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory. This system performs exceptionally well at soft vacuum levels and nearly as good as an MLI at high vacuum levels. Apparent thermal conductivities for the LCI range from 2 mW/m-K at soft vacuum to 0.1 mW/m-K at high vacuum. Several cryostats were designed, constructed, and calibrated by the Cryogenics Test Laboratory at KSC NASA as part of this research program. The cryostat test apparatus is a liquid nitrogen boil-off calorimeter system for direct measurement of the apparent thermal conductivity at a fixed vacuum level between 5 x 10(exp -5) and 760 torr. The apparatus is also used for transient measurements of temperature profiles. The development of efficient, robust cryogenic insulation systems has been a targeted area of research for a number of years. Improved methods of characterization, testing, and evaluation of complex biological substance systems for cryosurgery and cryobiology are the focus of this paper.

Augustynowicz, S. D.; Fesmire, James E.; Steinrock, T. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

425

A Summary of Ambient Air at John F. Kennedy Space Center with a Comparison to Data from the Florida Statewide Monitoring Network (1983-1992)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The EPA criteria air pollutants were monitored at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) since 1983 to comply the prevention of significant deterioration requirements under the Clean Air Act amendments passed by Congress in 1977 and 1990. Monitoring results show that monthly maximum 24-hour total suspended particulates decreased from 144.6 micograms/cu m in 1988 to 73.0 micrograms/cu m in 1991 and increased to 149.3 micrograms/cu m in 1992. Inhalable particulates increased from 56.1 gg/M3 in 1983 to 131.4 micrograms/cu m in 1988, and then decreased to 38.5 micrograms/cu m in 1992. Sulfur dioxide monthly maximum 24-hour average concentrations decreased each year from 135.2 micrograms/cu m in 1983 to 33.8 micrograms/cu m in 1992. Nitrogen dioxide concentrations increased from 5.1 micrograms/cu m in 1983 to 5.9 micrograms/cu m in 1988, then decreased to 4.5 micrograms/cu m in 1992. Carbon monoxide annual average concentrations decreased from 6.2 micrograms/cu m in 1983 to 1.1 micrograms/cu m in 1988, and increased to 1.2 micrograms/cu m in 1992. Ozone maximum 1-hour concentrations increased from 98 parts per billion (ppb) in 1983 to 134 ppb in 1989, and then decreased to 80 ppb in 1992. Total annual rainfall ranged from 37.47 inches to 57.47 inches and shows a 6.6 percent increase over this same ten year period.

Drese, John H.

1997-01-01

426

Workstation-Based Real-Time Mesoscale Modeling Designed for Weather Support to Operations at the Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes the capabilities and operational utility of a version of the Mesoscale Atmospheric Simulation System (MASS) that has been developed to support operational weather forecasting at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS). The implementation of local, mesoscale modeling systems at KSC/CCAS is designed to provide detailed short-range (less than 24 h) forecasts of winds, clouds, and hazardous weather such as thunderstorms. Short-range forecasting is a challenge for daily operations, and manned and unmanned launches since KSC/CCAS is located in central Florida where the weather during the warm season is dominated by mesoscale circulations like the sea breeze. For this application, MASS has been modified to run on a Stardent 3000 workstation. Workstation-based, real-time numerical modeling requires a compromise between the requirement to run the system fast enough so that the output can be used before expiration balanced against the desire to improve the simulations by increasing resolution and using more detailed physical parameterizations. It is now feasible to run high-resolution mesoscale models such as MASS on local workstations to provide timely forecasts at a fraction of the cost required to run these models on mainframe supercomputers. MASS has been running in the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) at KSC/CCAS since January 1994 for the purpose of system evaluation. In March 1995, the AMU began sending real-time MASS output to the forecasters and meteorologists at CCAS, Spaceflight Meteorology Group (Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas), and the National Weather Service (Melbourne, Florida). However, MASS is not yet an operational system. The final decision whether to transition MASS for operational use will depend on a combination of forecaster feedback, the AMU's final evaluation results, and the life-cycle costs of the operational system.

Manobianco, John; Zack, John W.; Taylor, Gregory E.

1996-01-01

427

The 29 July 1994 Merritt Island, Fl Microburst: A Case Study Intercomparing Kennedy Space Center Three-Dimensional Lightning Data (LDAR) and WSR-88D Radar Data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Many researchers have shown that the development and evolution of electrical discharges within convective clouds is fundamentally related to the growth and dynamics of precipitation particles aloft. In the presence of strong updrafts above the freezing level collisions among mixed-phase particles (i.e., hail. ice, supercooled water) promote the necessary charge separation needed to initiate intra-cloud lightning. A precipitation core that descends below the freezing level is often accompanied by a change in the electrical structure of the cloud. Consequently, more Cloud-to-Ground (CG) than Intra-Cloud (IC) lightning flashes appear. Descending precipitation cores can also play a significant role in the evolution of mesoscale features at the surface (e.g., microbursts, downbursts) because of latent heat and mass loading effects of water and ice. For this reason, some believe that lightning and microbursts are fundamentally linked by the presence of ice particles in thunderstorms. Several radar and lightning studies of microburst thunderstorms from COHMEX in 1986 showed that the peak IC lightning systematically occurred ten minutes before the onset of a microburst. In contrast, most CG lightning occurred at the time of the microburst. Many of the preceding studies have been done using high-resolution research radars and experimental lightning detection systems in focused field projects. In addition, these studies could only determine the vertical origin or occurrence of IC lightning, and not a true three-dimensional representation. Currently, the WSR-88D radar system and a real-time, state-of-the-art lightning system (LDAR) at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida provide an opportunity to extend these kinds of studies in a more meaningful operational setting.

Hoffert, Steven G.; Pearce, Matt L.

1996-01-01

428

Home > Editorials & Opinions > Bud Kennedy BUD KENNEDY RSS Mobile Newsletters  

E-print Network

a letter Submit a Cheer or Jeer Arlington's `American Dream' comes in all colors Posted Wednesday, Jun. 25 those roots and is newly anointed "The American Dream City." Arlington's new slogan repositions the old from immigrant families, represent "the true American dream story." "Arlington has these different

Chiao, Jung-Chih

429

Objective Lightning Forecasting at Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Force Station using Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System Data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) forecasters at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) in Florida include a probability of thunderstorm occurrence in their daily morning briefings. This information is used by personnel involved in determining the possibility of violating Launch Commit Criteria, evaluating Flight Rules for the Space Shuttle, and daily planning for ground operation activities on Kennedy Space Center (KSC)/CCAFS. Much of the current lightning probability forecast is based on a subjective analysis of model and observational data. The forecasters requested that a lightning probability forecast tool based on statistical analysis of historical warm-season (May - September) data be developed in order to increase the objectivity of the daily thunderstorm probability forecast. The tool is a set of statistical lightning forecast equations that provide a lightning occurrence probability for the day by 1100 UTC (0700 EDT) during the warm season. This study used 15 years (1989-2003) of warm season data to develop the objective forecast equations. The local CCAFS 1000 UTC sounding was used to calculate stability parameters for equation predictors. The Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS) data were used to determine lightning occurrence for each day. The CGLSS data have been found to be more reliable indicators of lightning in the area than surface observations through local informal analyses. This work was based on the results from two earlier research projects. Everitt (1999) used surface observations and rawinsonde data to develop logistic regression equations that forecast the daily thunderstorm probability at CCAFS. The Everitt (1999) equations showed an improvement in skill over the Neumann-Pfeffer thunderstorm index (Neumann 1971), which uses multiple linear regression, and also persistence and climatology forecasts. Lericos et al. (2002) developed lightning distributions over the Florida peninsula based on specific flow regimes. The flow regimes were inferred from the average wind direction in the 1000-700 mb layer at Miami (MIA), Tampa (TBW), and Jacksonville (JAX), Florida, and the lightning data were from the National Lightning Detection Network. The results suggested that the daily flow regime may be an important predictor of lightning occurrence on KSC/CCAFS.

Lambert, Winifred; Wheeler, Mark

2004-01-01

430

At the Vanderbilt Kennedy Center,  

E-print Network

, and a mother of two young boys, one a "somewhat challenging sleeper" and the other a "star sleeper." The "star Rosemergy Continued on page 2 Number 10 Fall 2005 Vanderbilt University Continued on page 2 Dr. Malow's son multidisciplinary research collaborations, examining the relationship of sleep and sleep disorders to a variety

Sarkar, Nilanjan

431

WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF DAVID KENNEDY  

E-print Network

of these programs include the Coastal Management Program, the Coral Reef Conservation Program, the Coastal AND COASTAL ZONE MANAGEMENT NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION U.S DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE and Coastal Zone Management at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Thank you

432

Kennedy Space Center: Swamp Works  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

When I began my internship with the Granular Mechanics and Regolith Operations laboratory (GMRO), also known as Swamp Works, I was given the unique opportunity to shadow many teams working on various projects, and decide what projects I wanted to take part in. Before I go into details of my experiences at Swamp Works, I would like to take a moment to explain what I discovered Swamp Works to be. Swamp Works is a family of hardworking, dedicated, and driven people from various backgrounds and skill sets. These people all work to advance technologies and make science fiction science fact through means of rapid prototyping. They support and encourage failure as an option when learning new things, as long as lesson learned from said failure. In fact, their motto states "Fail, Fast, Forward." What this means is, not if but when one fails he or she must do so quickly and spring forward from the failure so that his or her progress is not delayed. With this acceptance, it provided me the confidence to dive into a multitude of projects working in various fields and with a wide range of skill sets. The first project I joined was Badger. My motivation for taking on this project was the opportunity I would have to obtain valuable experience working with 3D modeling and 3D printing technologies. Badger was a digging apparatus to be used in a highly dusty environment in a material known as Regolith. Regolith is a scientific term for the dirt or top soil found on planetary bodies. Regolith contains a large quantity of sediments less than lOppm and as a result poses a challenge of keeping it out of any cracks and crevices. Furthermore, regolith can create high levels of electrostatic energy, which can prove damaging to sensitive electrical hardware. With these characteristics in mind, I decided to take on the task of designing and manufacturing a dust proof cover for the sensitive electrical hardware. When I began this project, I did not have the slightest idea as to how to use 3D modeling software or a means of manufacturing a viable product. As I went along with variants of the design, I became very proficient with a 3D modeling program known as CREO 2.0. Upon completion of my 3D design, I then had the task of manufacturing and having, in my hands, a usable model. To do this I had to work with additive printing technologies also known as 3D printing. Through my experiences working with Badger, I realized that 3D modeling is the focal point in much of engineering. With this in mind, I have embraced this fact and decided to further my experience with this software so that I may become a more valuable asset to any firm later in my career. Mid-way through work with Badger, I picked up another project in which I found much interest. I ha the opportunity to work side by side with a materials and composites guru in manufacturing carbon composite coupons (test strips) for performing stress, strain, and sheer analysis on. Being from a surfing, kiteboarding, and other water sport background I have always been interested in board design. With this in mind, it is no wonder why I found interest in such a project. I had the opportunity to refine Mold preparatory, composite layup, and composite curing techniques. Following manufacturing of these composite strips, I then performed various stress tests and logged my results. With these results, future teams could create lighter, stronger, and more cost effective composite structures for use in varieties of applications. After my experiences with materials and composites testing, I have obtained crucial appreciation for detailed documentation and analysis that material sciences involve. However, as interesting as composite materials testing has been, I do not feel this is where my future career lies. Another, more on the side, project I have been involved in is building a 626 cubic foot regolith containment chamber for doing full scale testing of robotic systems. This chamber is built of high strength aluminum scaffold materials, 80/20, and massive panels of Lexan. Once the chamber is complete

DeFilippo, Anthony Robert

2013-01-01

433

John F. Kennedy Executive Orders  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The 214 Executive Orders signed by the 35th President have been scanned and converted to HTML by Maria E. Schieda of the University of Michigan School of Information. These include the orders to establish the Peace Corps (E.O. 10924), to establish the President's Committee on Equal Employment (E.O. 10925), and emergency instructions to government agencies during the Cuban Missile Crisis (E.O. 11051, 11058, 11087-11095). The collection is indexed by date, keyword, number, and title.

Kennedy, John F. (John Fitzgerald), 1917-1963.

434

Validation and development of existing and new RAOB-based warm-season convective wind forecasting tools for Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using a 15-year (1995 to 2009) climatology of 1500 UTC warm-season (May through September) rawinsonde observation (RAOB) data from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) Skid Strip (KXMR) and 5 minute wind data from 36 wind towers on CCAFS and Kennedy Space Center (KSC), several convective wind forecasting techniques currently employed by the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) were evaluated. Present forecasting methods under evaluation include examining the vertical equivalent potential temperature (theta e) profile, vertical profiles of wind spend and direction, and several wet downburst forecasting indices. Although previous research found that currently used wet downburst forecasting methods showed little promise for forecasting convective winds, it was carried out with a very small sample, limiting the reliability of the results. Evaluation versus a larger 15-year dataset was performed to truly assess the forecasting utility of these methods in the central Florida warm-season convective environment. In addition, several new predictive analytic based forecast methods for predicting the occurrence of warm-season convection and its associated wind gusts were developed and validated. This research was performed in order to help the 45 WS better forecast not only which days are more likely to produce convective wind gusts, but also to better predict which days are more likely to yield warning criteria wind events of 35 knots or greater, should convection be forecasted. Convective wind forecasting is a very challenging problem that requires new statistically based modeling techniques since conventional meteorologically based methods do not perform well. New predictive analytic based forecasting methods were constructed using R statistical software and incorporate several techniques including multiple linear regression, logistic regression, multinomial logistic regression, classification and regression trees (CART), and ensemble CART using bootstrapping. All of these techniques except the ensemble CART methods were built with data from the 1995 to 2007 warm-seasons and validated with a separate independent dataset from the 2008 and 2009 warm-seasons. Ensemble CART models were built using randomly selected data from the 1995 to 2009 RAOB dataset and validated with data not used in constructing the models. Three different ensemble CART algorithms including the random forests, bagging, and boosting algorithms were tested to find the best performing model. Quantitative verification results suggest that the presently used convection and wet downburst forecasting techniques do not show much operational promise. As such, it is not recommended that the 45 WS use vertical profiles of thetae, wind speed, or wind direction to make specific predictions for which days are likely to produce convection or warning threshold wind gusts. None of the wet downburst indices used displayed much potential either. Although, the linear regression based predictive analytic models do not perform too well, CART based models perform better, especially those that utilize a binary response variable. Of the new techniques, the ensemble CART models displayed the most promise with the boosting algorithm showing nearly perfect results for predicting which days would produce convection and which days would produce warning threshold winds should convection be predicted.

McCue, Mitchell Hollis

435

Statistical Analysis of Model Data for Operational Space Launch Weather Support at Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The 12-km resolution North American Mesoscale (NAM) model (MesoNAM) is used by the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) Launch Weather Officers at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) to support space launch weather operations. The 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit to conduct an objective statistics-based analysis of MesoNAM output compared to wind tower mesonet observations and then develop a an operational tool to display the results. The National Centers for Environmental Prediction began running the current version of the MesoNAM in mid-August 2006. The period of record for the dataset was 1 September 2006 - 31 January 2010. The AMU evaluated MesoNAM hourly forecasts from 0 to 84 hours based on model initialization times of 00, 06, 12 and 18 UTC. The MesoNAM forecast winds, temperature and dew point were compared to the observed values of these parameters from the sensors in the KSC/CCAFS wind tower network. The data sets were stratified by model initialization time, month and onshore/offshore flow for each wind tower. Statistics computed included bias (mean difference), standard deviation of the bias, root mean square error (RMSE) and a hypothesis test for bias = O. Twelve wind towers located in close proximity to key launch complexes were used for the statistical analysis with the sensors on the towers positioned at varying heights to include 6 ft, 30 ft, 54 ft, 60 ft, 90 ft, 162 ft, 204 ft and 230 ft depending on the launch vehicle and associated weather launch commit criteria being evaluated. These twelve wind towers support activities for the Space Shuttle (launch and landing), Delta IV, Atlas V and Falcon 9 launch vehicles. For all twelve towers, the results indicate a diurnal signal in the bias of temperature (T) and weaker but discernable diurnal signal in the bias of dewpoint temperature (T(sub d)) in the MesoNAM forecasts. Also, the standard deviation of the bias and RMSE of T, T(sub d), wind speed and wind direction indicated the model error increased with the forecast period all four parameters. The hypothesis testing uses statistics to determine the probability that a given hypothesis is true. The goal of using the hypothesis test was to determine if the model bias of any of the parameters assessed throughout the model forecast period was statistically zero. For th is dataset, if this test produced a value >= -1 .96 or <= 1.96 for a data point, then the bias at that point was effectively zero and the model forecast for that point was considered to have no error. A graphical user interface (GUI) was developed so the 45 WS would have an operational tool at their disposal that would be easy to navigate among the multiple stratifications of information to include tower locations, month, model initialization times, sensor heights and onshore/offshore flow. The AMU developed the GUI using HyperText Markup Language (HTML) so the tool could be used in most popular web browsers with computers running different operating systems such as Microsoft Windows and Linux.

Bauman, William H., III

2010-01-01

436

CDP-choline:1,2-diacylglycerol cholinephosphotransferase 1 The authors would like to dedicate this review to Eugene Kennedy and his co-workers whose seminal obervations and careful scientific experimentation provided the basis for the work desribed in this review. 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cholinephosphotransferase transfers a phosphocholine moiety from CDP-choline to diacylglycerol thus forming phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) and CMP. This reaction defines the ultimate step in the Kennedy pathway for the genesis of de novo synthesized PtdCho. Hence, the intracellular location of cholinephosphotransferase identifies both the site from which de novo synthesized PtdCho is transported to other organelles and the site from which it

Christopher R McMaster; Robert M. Bell

1997-01-01

437

Computational Approaches to Sociological Theorizing Kathleen M. Carley  

E-print Network

with providing a description of society at a particular point in time. Rather, they are in the business and Johnson, 1988; 1990; McPhail and Tucker, 1990), and the fundamental nature of the social agent (Carley techniques include logic modeling (e.g., Skvoretz, and Fararo, 1989; 1994), mathematical modeling (Lave

Sadeh, Norman M.

438

Kathleen R. McKeown Address Dept. of Computer Science  

E-print Network

July 2011 to present. Columbia University. Vice Dean for Research, School of Engineering and Applied Fellow Honors Columbia Great Teacher Award, 2010. Anita Borg Woman of Vision Award for Innovation, 2010 Computer Science Conference), Sydney, Australia; PACLING-93, Vancouver, British Columbia. NSF Faculty Award

Yang, Junfeng

439

Kathleen Bardovi-Harlig & Maria-Thereza Bastos Indiana University  

E-print Network

by the Intensive English Program with reading, writing, grammar, and listening components, plus TOEFL cut-off score (Bardovi-Harlig, 2009) Participants: 123 learners at 4 levels of enrollment in the Intensive English been in the U.S.? 2. How much time do you think you spend talking to native speakers of English when

Indiana University

440

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Alenka Lovy-Wheeler Kathleen L. Wilsen  

E-print Network

showers, are recessed in the wall on the 1st and 2nd floors of the east-west hallways in Ghausi Hall. Read, encircle and cover the spill with absorbent material until the liquid is absorbed. Do not flush with water. Neutralize strong acids with sodium #12;Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering Lab Guide & Chemical

Baskin, Tobias

441

________________________________________________________________________The MIND Institute__________________ Kathleen Angkustsiri, M.D.  

E-print Network

in neurodevelopmental disorders including autism spectrum disorders, chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS in children with autism spectrum disorders, behavioral characteristics of children with 22q11.2DS, and clinical trials. Publications Angkustsiri K and Simon TJ: Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome, Hansen RL

Nguyen, Danh

442

Kathleen Franz Associate Professor and Director of Public History  

E-print Network

State University, Chernivtsi, Ukraine August 1994 - May 1995 Fellowships and Awards Teaching, University award for building research into teaching. Faculty Research Award, American University Spring 2006 of Technology. Fall 2002. Competitive fellowship awarded for work on the history of invention. #12;Merit Award

Lansky, Joshua

443

The Samuel and Kathleen Barone Family Endowed Scholarship APPLICATION  

E-print Network

: The College of Nursing offers scholarships to students based on academic performance and need. The deadline is presented to a student who has demonstrated an ongoing commitment to the field of nursing while maintaining: housing, transportation, etc.) ITEM: COST: List the types (scholarships, grants, loans, parental

Garfunkel, Eric

444

ROBERT MCNAB AND KATHLEEN BAILEY MANUSCRIPT 2: DEFINING CORRUPTION  

E-print Network

the argument that corruption and violent conflict point to the failure of public governance rule sets (Andvig, 2008), then the discussion of corruption and irregular warfare must take place within a governance of the government and if it is incompetent (or corrupt) then this strengthens the hand of the insurgent (Galula

445

Curriculum Vitae for: Laura Kathleen Baumgartner, Ph.D.  

E-print Network

-Doctorate Research, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO May 2006 to Present ­ Studying microbial diversity of air. The course presented fundamentals of microbiology, biochemistry and microbial ecology in the context), Coastal Pollution and Bioremediation (MARN 382), and Marine Microbiology (MARN 236). Teaching Assistant

Pace, Norman

446

Intra-organizational Computation and Complexity Kathleen M. Carley  

E-print Network

and H. J. Heinz III School of Policy and Management Carnegie Mellon University Running Head: Intra-organizational-linear multi-agent system conclusions such as: history matters, organizational behavior and form is path this perspective, organizational behavior results form the actions of heterogeneous actors, the boundaries between

Sadeh, Norman M.

447

KATHLEEN WU 228 Devonshire Lane, Madison, CT, 06443 (203) 671-6704 kathleen.wu@yale.edu  

E-print Network

Climate & Energy Institute (YCEI) Energy Scholar Relevant Coursework: Freshman Organic Chemistry and accompanying lab, Computing for Scientists and Engineers, Physical Chemistry, Advanced Organic Chemistry Lab (TPO) and MS Center for Green Chemistry & Green Engineering, Research assistant Spring 2012 Prepared

Firoozabadi, Abbas

448

Evaluation of the Performance Characteristics of the CGLSS and NLDN Systems Based on Two Years of Ground-Truth Data from Launch Complex 39B, Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

From May 2011 through July 2013, the lightning instrumentation at Launch Complex 39B (LC39B) at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, has obtained high-speed video records and field change waveforms (dE/dt and three-axis dH/dt) for 54 negative polarity return strokes whose strike termination locations and times are known with accuracy of the order of 10 m or less and 1 µs, respectively. A total of 18 strokes terminated directly to the LC39B lighting protection system (LPS), which contains three 181 m towers in a triangular configuration, an overhead catenary wire system on insulating masts, and nine down conductors. An additional 9 strokes terminated on the 106 m lightning protection mast of Launch Complex 39A (LC39A), which is located about 2.7 km southeast of LC39B. The remaining 27 return strokes struck either on the ground or attached to low-elevation grounded objects within about 500 m of the LC39B LPS. Leader/return stroke sequences were imaged at 3200 frames/sec by a network of six Phantom V310 high-speed video cameras. Each of the three towers on LC39B had two high-speed cameras installed at the 147 m level with overlapping fields of view of the center of the pad. The locations of the strike points of 54 return strokes have been compared to time-correlated reports of the Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS) and the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN), and the results of this comparison will be presented and discussed.

Mata, Carlos T.; Hill, Jonathan D.; Mata, Angel G.; Cummins, Kenneth L.

2014-01-01

449

Preventing the First Cesarean Delivery: Summary of a Joint Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, and American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Workshop  

PubMed Central

With over one-third of pregnancies in the United States being delivered by cesarean and the growing knowledge of morbidities associated with repeat cesarean deliveries, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists convened a workshop to address the concept of preventing the first cesarean. The available information on maternal and fetal factors, labor management and induction, and non-medical factors leading to the first cesarean were reviewed as well as the implications of the first cesarean on future reproductive health. Key points were identified to assist with reduction in cesarean rates including that labor induction should be performed primarily for medical indication; if done for non-medical indications, the gestational age should be at least 39 weeks or more and the cervix should be favorable, especially in the nulliparous patient. Review of the current literature demonstrates the importance of adhering to appropriate definitions for failed induction and arrest of labor progress. The diagnosis of “failed induction” should only be made after an adequate attempt. Adequate time for normal latent and active phases of the first stage, and for the second stage, should be allowed, as long as the maternal and fetal conditions permit. The adequate time for each of these stages appears to be longer than traditionally estimated. Operative vaginal delivery is an acceptable birth method when indicated, and can safely prevent cesarean delivery. Given the progressively declining use, it is critical that training and experience in operative vaginal delivery is facilitated and encouraged. When discussing the first cesarean with a patient, counseling should include its effect on future reproductive health. PMID:23090537

Spong, Catherine Y.; Berghella, Vincenzo; Wenstrom, Katharine D.; Mercer, Brian M.; Saade, George R.

2012-01-01

450

Kennedy Space Center - "America's Gateway to Space"  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KSC fits into the overall NASA vision and mission by moving forward so that what we do and learn will benefit all here on Earth. In January of last year, KSC revised its Mission and Vision statements to articulate our identity as we align with this new direction the Agency is heading. Currently KSC is endeavoring to form partnerships with industry, , Government, and academia, utilizing institutional assets and technical capabilities to support current and future m!issions. With a goal of safe, low-cost, and readily available access to space, KSC seeks to leverage emerging industries to initiate development of a new space launch system, oversee the development of a multipurpose crew vehicle, and assist with the efficient and timely evolution of commercial crew transportation capabilities. At the same time, KSC is pursuing modernizing the Center's infrastructure and creating a multi-user launch complex with increased onsite processing and integration capabilities.

Petro, Janet; Chevalier, Mary Ann; Hurst, Chery

2011-01-01

451

Every five years, the Kennedy Center  

E-print Network

) to be supported as one of fourteen national Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities Research Centers been renewed for 2004-2009. The Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities Research Training and editor of The American Journal on Mental Retardation, talks by graduates, and a look back on the historic

Sarkar, Nilanjan

452

Kennedy Space Center ITC-1 Internship Overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As an intern for Priscilla Elfrey in the ITC-1 department, I was involved in many activities that have helped me to develop many new skills. I supported four different projects during my internship, which included the Center for Life Cycle Design (CfLCD), SISO Space Interoperability Smackdown, RTI Teacher Mentor Program, and the Discrete Event Simulation Integrated Visualization Environment Team (DIVE). I provided the CfLCD with web based research on cyber security initiatives involving simulation, education for young children, cloud computing, Otronicon, and Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education initiatives. I also attended STEM meetings regarding simulation courses, and educational course enhancements. To further improve the SISO Simulation event, I provided observation feedback to the technical advisory board. I also helped to set up a chat federation for HLA. The third project involved the RTI Teacher Mentor program, which I helped to organize. Last, but not least, I worked with the DIVE team to develop new software to help visualize discrete event simulations. All of these projects have provided experience on an interdisciplinary level ranging from speech and communication to solving complex problems using math and science.

Ni, Marcus

2011-01-01

453

The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program: Fisheries  

E-print Network

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Aquaculture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Aquaculture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Aquaculture

454

The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program: Fisheries  

E-print Network

Aquaculture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Habitat Aquaculture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Habitat Aquaculture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 VI. COMPLETED

455

The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program: Fisheries  

E-print Network

Aquaculture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Habitat Aquaculture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Habitat Quality and Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Aquaculture

456

Kennedy Space Center Environmental Health Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Topic considered include: environmental health services; health physics; ionizing radiation; pollution control; contamination investigations; natural resources; surface water; health hazard evaluations; combustion gas; launch support; asbestos; hazardous noise; and ventilation.

Creech, Joanne W.

1997-01-01

457

Electric Vehicles at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The story of how the transportation office began by introducing low speed electric cars (LSEV) to the fleet managers and employees. This sparked and interest in purchasing some of these LSEV and the usage on KSC. Transportation was approached by a vender of High Speed Electric Vehicle (HSEV) we decided to test the HSEV to see if they would meet our fleet vehicle needs. Transportation wrote a Space Act Agreement (SAA) for the loan of three Lithium Powered Electric vehicles for a one year test. The vehicles have worked very well and we have extended the test for another year. The use of HSEV has pushed for an independent Electric Vehicle Study to be performed to consider ways to effectively optimize the use of electric vehicles in replacement of gasoline vehicles in the KSC vehicle fleet. This will help the center to move closer to meeting the Executive Order 13423.

Chesson, Bruce E.

2007-01-01

458

Educational quotients : Robert F. Kennedy Middle School  

E-print Network

When architects talk of 'smart buildings' they are usually referring to the same old ones with the addition of simple prosthetics such as light sensors and small electric motors. Their smartness is invariably limited to ...

Kim, Paul Hyun, 1971-

2002-01-01

459

Black Feminist Politics from Kennedy to Clinton  

Microsoft Academic Search

Taking an interdisciplinary approach, this book analyzes Black women's involvement in American political life, focusing on what they did to gain political power between 1961 and 2001, and why, in many cases, they did not succeed. Harris demonstrates that Black women have tried to gain centrality through their participation in Presidential Commissions, Black feminist organizations, theatrical productions, film adaptations of

Duchess Harris

2009-01-01

460

Linda J Bilmes 79 John F Kennedy Street, Harvard Kennedy School  

E-print Network

; Indonesia civil service training; Womens' leadership program. Bi-annual Programs: Lead budgeting workshops and execution, procurement, human resources, civil rights, security, small business development, minority extensive work in Eastern Europe, Russia, South America. COMMISSION ON INTER-AMERICAN INVESTMENT, WASHINGTON

Liu, X. Shirley

461

IMPACT | Research from Harvard Kennedy School 79 John F. Kennedy Street  

E-print Network

that are authentic to their own personality and that fit the norms and culture of their organizational environment's team leader. This enabled her to leverage the social capital of a higher status organizational actor, but it also framed her as embedded in mutually support- ive organizational relationships." "What

462

Solutions Remediate Contaminated Groundwater  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the Apollo Program, NASA workers used chlorinated solvents to clean rocket engine components at launch sites. These solvents, known as dense non-aqueous phase liquids, had contaminated launch facilities to the point of near-irreparability. Dr. Jacqueline Quinn and Dr. Kathleen Brooks Loftin of Kennedy Space Center partnered with researchers from the University of Central Florida's chemistry and engineering programs to develop technology capable of remediating the area without great cost or further environmental damage. They called the new invention Emulsified Zero-Valent Iron (EZVI). The groundwater remediation compound is cleaning up polluted areas all around the world and is, to date, NASA's most licensed technology.

2010-01-01

463

Assessment of Undergraduate Research Linda Rueckert (Northeastern Illinois University) and Kathleen Morgan (Wheaton College MA)  

E-print Network

). The relationship of undergraduate research participation to graduate and professional education pursuit, J.A. (1984). Effects of an undergraduate research course on cognitive development. Nursing Research). A comparison of interteaching and lecture in the college classroom. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 39

464

Biosynthesis of dystroglycan: processing of a precursor propeptide Kathleen H. Holta  

E-print Network

demonstrate that the precursor propeptide is glycosylated and that blockade of asparagine-linked (N-linked) glycosylation did not prevent the cleavage of the dystroglycan precursor peptide. However, inhibition of N-linked glycosylation results in aberrant traffick- ing of the KK- and LL-dystroglycan subunits to the plasma membrane

Campbell, Kevin P.

465

Statement by Dr. Kathleen C. Bailey before the Senate Armed Services Committee  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the personal views of the author on the subject of the proposed Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC). She addresses here concerns about the national security issues which could result from ratification of this convention. She argues the convention alone is not likely to curtail production or availability of such items on the world market because of the relatively low cost. The treaty could thus put the country in a position less likely to protect itself, or adequately deal with such a threat.

Bailey, K.C.

1994-08-16

466

BOUNCING BACK: RECOVERY MECHANISMS OF COVERT MAKSIM TSVETOVAT AND KATHLEEN M. CARLEY  

E-print Network

if it resulted in the network being separated into disconnected subparts. However, the real-world covert networks able to quickly recover from the damage caused by the isolation. In this paper, we show that cellular covert networks use transactive memory and other latent resources as a mechanism for recovery from events

Sadeh, Norman M.

467

Kathleen M. Smits, Ph.D., P.E. Colorado School of Mines  

E-print Network

, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering 2004 Air Combat Command Honor Award and Merit Award Engineers (SAME), Association of Environmental Engineering and Science Professors (AEESP). Society of Women

468

Kathleen M. Smits, Ph.D., P.E. Colorado School of Mines  

E-print Network

, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering 2004 Air Combat Command Honor Award and Merit Award Engineering and Science Professors (AEESP). Society of Women in Engineering (SWE), Tau Beta Pi. PEER REVIEWED

469

Exploring the Meaning of "Welcoming Communities" Dr. Anne Marie Sullivan, Kathleen Ring and Savanna Harris  

E-print Network

associated with its aging population and population decline, but this region has had limited success 1 All authors are members of the School of Human Kinetics & Recreation at Memorial University faces low birth rates and an aging population with a high number of baby boomers ready to retire

deYoung, Brad

470

Optimal Robot Localization in Trees Rudolf Fleischer \\Lambday Kathleen Romanik zx Sven Schuierer --k  

E-print Network

of the localization strategy. In many tasks of autonomous mobile robots it is assumed that the robot has a map of its, of a robot finding its position on a map, is an important task for autonomous mobile robots. It has ap­ plications in numerous areas of robotics rang­ ing from aerial photography to autonomous ve­ hicle

Fleischer, Rudolf

471

Kathleen Mears Memorial Lecture: personal accountability: your key to survival in health care reform.  

PubMed

Over the past thirty years the rising cost of healthcare has produced changes in reimbursement strategies. Continually, pressures are placed on the practitioners to reduce the length of the patient hospital stay and provide services in a high quality, risk free, cost effective manner. Following the implementation of diagnostic related groups (DRGs) in the 1980s and Managed Care in the 1990s we are now faced with embracing and surviving the Affordable Health Care Act-H.R.3590 (HHS 2013) that is linking reimbursement to quality outcomes. In short, financial constraints in the funding of health care will once more alter the patterns of delivery and challenge the practitioners to maintain superior care. As Neurodiagnostic Professionals this new reform offers another opportunity to review our process of care and the Neurodiagnostic labs role in the delivery of healthcare. For success, close examination of routine workflows, recognizing and solving existing delivery limitations, developing team care coordination, and increasing the neurodiagnostic professionals profile within the work environment will be required. Embracing your role in this overall process will most likely demand more paperwork, changing protocols, learning and implementing new policies, accepting new work schedules, implementing new quality standards, and pursuing additional education or credentials. Unlike never before more emphasis will be placed on measuring and reporting on the quality of the care we deliver in our labs, intensive care units, and operating rooms. PMID:25351032

Galloway, Sabrina G

2014-09-01

472

Kathleen A. Byrnes, Ph.D. The University of Texas at Dallas  

E-print Network

Returns Program, Plano, Texas. + Assessment and counseling of adults in individual and group settings-term Care. Amberton University, Dallas, Texas. Master of Arts in Counseling Baylor University, Waco, Texas. Master of Science in Gerontology Baylor University, Waco, Texas Bachelor of Arts in Psychology License

O'Toole, Alice J.

473

S. Kathleen Krach, Ph.D. 3224 LeBron Road  

E-print Network

Intellectual Assessment Scales (RIAS) Using the Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Cognitive Ability, Third Edition (WJ Assessment Metrics (ANAM) and Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Ability: A Concurrent Validity Study PUBLICATIONS: PEER REVIEWED Krach, S. K. (2010). Book Review: Essentials of WAIS-IV assessment. Journal

Ahmad, Sajjad

474

Using text and acoustic features to diagnose progressive aphasia and its Kathleen C. Fraser1  

E-print Network

, Toronto, Canada 2 Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, Toronto, Canada 3 Department of Speech) and two of its subtypes, semantic dementia (SD) and progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA), from primarily affects the language areas of the brain. It has two main subtypes: semantic dementia (SD), which

Penn, Gerald

475

Kathleen M. Smits, Ph.D., P.E. Colorado School of Mines  

E-print Network

United States Air Force Academy (1995-1999) Bachelors of Science, Environmental Engineering PROFESSIONAL by graduating first in major PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS Licensed Professional Engineer (Civil Engineering), State of America Journal Member of American Geophysical Union (AGU), American Society of Civil Engineer (ASCE

476

Automatic speech recognition in the diagnosis of primary progressive aphasia Kathleen Fraser1  

E-print Network

participants with semantic dementia (SD), progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA), and healthy con- trols. We (PNFA), in which speech is hesitant and ef- fortful, and semantic dementia (SD), in which speech is flu for patients and their families, as well as for evaluation of efficacy in drug trials (as potentially disease

Penn, Gerald

477

BOSTONIA WinterSpring 2013 WinterSpring 2013 BOSTONIAPHOTOGRAPH BY KATHLEEN DOOHER  

E-print Network

girlfriend "is single." An 11-year-old's text to her crush goes viral. An overly possessive 14-year for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), risk factors for teens in unhealthy relationships include alcohol, or stalking first experienced partner violence between the ages of 11 and 17. Nicole Daley helps young teens

Goldberg, Bennett

478

A review of "Protestant Autobiography in the Seventeenth Century Anglophone World" by Kathleen Lynch  

E-print Network

it in her introduction: ?#2;e spiritual experience was a narrated apprehension of an ontological state: I am saved? (#18;#15;). #2;e book surveys the contested uses of such spiritual experiences, arguing that because ?experience is not a historically...

Wells, Marion A.

2013-01-01

479

CALCULUS REVISITED: AN INTRODUCTORY COURSE IN K. GRACE KENNEDY  

E-print Network

algorithms into a computer. Mathematicians need to know how to code because many real world problems (both of teaching students elementary programming and a deeper understanding of the principle concepts of calculus. (3) Learning to use the technology is a valuable skill in the students' field. Teaching students how

Bigelow, Stephen