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1

Kathleen Grace Kennedy Curriculum Vitae  

E-print Network

Kathleen Grace Kennedy Curriculum Vitae Department of Mathematics 6607 South Hall Phone: University and Paris. All coursework completed in French. 1 of 3 Kathleen Grace Kennedy #12;Research Activity "A Optimization Problem with a Surprisingly Simple Solution" Drinen, K. G. Kennedy, W. M. Priestley. Amer. Math

Akhmedov, Azer

2

TEACHING PHILOSOPHY STATEMENT KATHLEEN GRACE KENNEDY  

E-print Network

to listen and engage her students as tremendous strengths. Excellent communicator of mathematics and a very learning by having students do mathematics in class is essential to building this confidence. Learning how I was trying to drop the class. Many students are surprised to learn that differential equations

Bigelow, Stephen

3

Kathleen O'Brien.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an interview with Kathleen O'Brien, vice president of university services at the University of Minnesota. Discusses her goals for making the school an institutional benchmark for architecture and facilities management. (EV)

LeFevre, Camille

2003-01-01

4

Kennedy's Disease  

MedlinePLUS

... Kennedy's Disease? Kennedy's disease is an inherited motor neuron disease that affects males. It is one of a group of disorders called lower motor neuron disorders (which involve disruptions in the transmission of ...

5

Kathleen Franz Department of History  

E-print Network

Kathleen Franz Department of History American University 4400 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Washington, DC: American cultural history, 1876-1939, popular culture, the history of technology, material and visual in American Studies, Magna Cum Laude Employment Associate Professor and Director of Public History American

Lansky, Joshua

6

Kennedy Now!  

NASA Video Gallery

2013 roared out of the blocks at NASA's Kennedy Space Center as launch teams oversaw liftoffs from both coasts. The Florida-based center also continued its work prepping payloads bound for the Inte...

7

Kennedy NOW!  

NASA Video Gallery

In this edition of Kennedy Now!, find out about accelerating preparations for an Orion flight test next year, along with a robotic miner under development. Also see the robotic craft designed and b...

8

KENNEDY CENTER CELEBRATION ANNIVERSARY OF KENNEDY SPACE  

E-print Network

KENNEDY CENTER CELEBRATION 50TH ANNIVERSARY OF KENNEDY SPACE SPEECH TO CONGRESS May 25, 2011 Thank of music. Welcome to this program that celebrates the wonderful legacy left by President John F. Kennedy 50 of innovation and inspiration for the world. #12;I was a teenager when President Kennedy delivered his charge

Waliser, Duane E.

9

environment+ Victor S. Kennedy  

E-print Network

environment+ + + + Victor S. Kennedy UN IVERS I T Y OF MARY LAN D Robert R. Twilley UN IVERS I T Y climate change #12;#12;Prepared for the Pew Center on Global Climate Change by Victor S. Kennedy UN IVERS, including estuaries, coral reefs, and the open ocean. Report authors, Drs. Victor Kennedy, Robert Twilley

10

Vanderbilt Kennedy Center Orientation  

E-print Network

2013-14 Vanderbilt Kennedy Center Orientation Manual A Guide to History, Programs, Procedures, and Training #12;Page | 1 Welcome to the Vanderbilt Kennedy Center! You may be here because you are a new Kennedy Center is an exciting, innovative organization where caring, compassion, professional expertise

Sarkar, Nilanjan

11

About Kennedy's Disease: Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

Kennedy's Disease Association A Public Benefit, Non-Profit Organization Register GTranslate GTranslate Javascript is required to use ... KDA Newsletters Memorials Symptoms Print Email Medical Term: Definition: Neurological: Bulbar Signs The Bulbar muscles are those ...

12

Kennedy NOW! May 2013  

NASA Video Gallery

In this edition of Kennedy NOW! see the progress NASA's Commercial Crew Program partners are making to get astronauts launching into low-Earth orbit atop American-made rockets and spacecraft. Find ...

13

Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews the importance of the Kennedy Space Center both in terms to the economy of Florida and to spaceflight. It reviews the general NASA direction,the challenges of the coming year and the accomplishments.

Simpkins, Patrick A.

2010-01-01

14

WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF DAVID KENNEDY  

E-print Network

WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF DAVID KENNEDY ACTING DEPUTY ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR FOR OCEAN SERVICES of the Subcommittee. My name is David Kennedy, and I am the Acting Deputy Assistant Administrator for Ocean Services

15

At the Vanderbilt Kennedy Center,  

E-print Network

At the Vanderbilt Kennedy Center, we don't stop at the bench to bedside concept. To community has, their paths rarely cross. We don't accept this standard operating proce- dure at the Vanderbilt Kennedy Center Disorders Center. She is an associate professor of neurology, a Vanderbilt Kennedy Center investigator

Sarkar, Nilanjan

16

Mr Kennedy and consumerism  

PubMed Central

I welcome Mr Kennedy's general approach, but query whether the concept of consumerism is so closely applicable to medical care as he maintains. However, in particular aspects, especially the handling of complaints, his criticisms echo those made by the Patients Association. Finally, I detect some ground for hope in the more enlightened attitude creeping in to the eduction of the medical student. PMID:7334491

Ackroyd, Dame Elizabeth

1981-01-01

17

Kathleen Franz Associate Professor and Director of Public History  

E-print Network

Kathleen Franz Associate Professor and Director of Public History Department of History, American 1999 in American Civilization Fields of specialization: American cultural history, 1876-1939, popular culture, the history of technology, material and visual culture, and public history. The University

Lansky, Joshua

18

Adaptive Organizations and Emergent Forms Kathleen M. Carley  

E-print Network

of production and the technologies involved. Yet, many modern organizations trade in knowledge not just goods1 Adaptive Organizations and Emergent Forms Kathleen M. Carley Carnegie Mellon #12;1 Abstract Over time organizations change and coordinate personnel in new ways. Such changes may be precipitated

Sadeh, Norman M.

19

Adaptive Organizations and Emergent Forms Kathleen M. Carley  

E-print Network

to the process of production and the technologies involved. Yet, many modern organizations trade in knowledge1 Adaptive Organizations and Emergent Forms Kathleen M. Carley Carnegie Mellon #12;1 Abstract Over time organizations change and coordinate personnel in new ways. Such changes may be precipitated

Sadeh, Norman M.

20

Maze Busters: Carrie Miyoshi Macfarlane & Kathleen Sheehan--Harvard University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Even if one is equipped with an MLS, the 11 libraries that comprise the Harvard College Library can be pretty daunting. That is why Carrie Miyoshi Macfarlane and Kathleen Sheehan created Threading the Maze. The online publication is presented to students in expository writing, the one course all undergraduates must take. "This highly effective…

Library Journal, 2004

2004-01-01

21

Kathleen England watches her image transmitted to shuttle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Kathleen England watches her image transmitted to her husband in the shuttle via the Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment (SAREX). Looking on are amateur radio operators employed at JSC: Gil Carman (WA5NOM); Lou McFaddin (WSDIO), and Candy Torres (KASUKJ).

1985-01-01

22

Kathleen England watches her image transmitted to shuttle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Kathleen England (foreground and on monitor) watches her image transmitted to her husband in the shuttle via the Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment (SAREX). Looking on are amateur radio operators employed at JSC: Gil Carman (WA5NOM); Lou McFaddin (WSDIO), and Candy Torres (KASUKJ).

1985-01-01

23

KENNEDY KRIEGER INSTITUTE, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES  

E-print Network

KENNEDY KRIEGER INSTITUTE, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES Consolidated Financial Statements June 30, 2013 of Directors of Kennedy Krieger Institute, Inc. and Subsidiaries We have audited the accompanying consolidated financial statements of Kennedy Krieger Institute, Inc. and Subsidiaries (the "Institute"), which comprise

Pevsner, Jonathan

24

EMPLOYMENT OVERVIEW HARVARD KENNEDY SCHOOL  

E-print Network

EMPLOYMENT OVERVIEW HARVARD KENNEDY SCHOOL CAREER ADVANCEMENT 617-495-1161t career_advancement@hks.harvard.edut www.hks.harvard.edu/careert Class of 2013 HARVARD KENNEDY SCHOOL CLASS OF 2013 EMPLOYMENT OVERVIEWt Office of Career Advancement (oca) employed a variety of data collection techniques including an exit

25

Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute  

E-print Network

N I C H D Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Autism and Genes The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), part's building blocks. Proteins make up the structure of your organs and tissues; they are also needed

Rau, Don C.

26

Human Spaceflight: The Kennedy Legacy  

NASA Video Gallery

On May 25, 1961, just weeks after the first American astronaut flew, President John F. Kennedy put NASA on a bold path, challenging the nation to do what was then impossible -- send a man to the mo...

27

Kennedy Space Center Design Visualization  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Perform simulations of ground operations leading up to launch at Kennedy Space Center and Vandenberg Air Force Base in CA since 1987. We use 3D Laser Scanning, Modeling and Simulations to verify that operations are feasible, efficient and safe.

Humeniuk, Bob

2013-01-01

28

Kennedy Space Center Multimedia Gallery  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Kennedy Space Center Multimedia Gallery provides a wide assortment of photographs and videos related to its numerous missions throughout the years. This user-friendly database allows visitors to search by keyword, type of media, time period, and category. Visitors can find materials for space shuttles, projects and missions, expendable launch vehicles, education, and much more. Through the countless multimedia, users can discover the many great endeavors undertaken by the Kennedy Space Center.

29

78 FR 6173 - Diana Del Grosso, Ray Smith, Joseph Hatch, Cheryl Hatch, Kathleen Kelley, Andrew Wilklund, and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...35652] Diana Del Grosso, Ray Smith, Joseph Hatch, Cheryl Hatch, Kathleen Kelley...2012, by Diana Del Grosso, Ray Smith, Joseph Hatch, Cheryl Hatch, Kathleen Kelley...23, 2013. By the Board, Rachel D. Campbell, Director, Office of Proceedings....

2013-01-29

30

Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Among 2011's many accomplishments, we safely retired the Space Shuttle Program after 30 incredible years; completed the International Space Station and are taking steps to enable it to reach its full potential as a multi-purpose laboratory; and helped to expand scientific knowledge with missions like Aquarius, GRAIL, and the Mars Science Laboratory. Responding to national budget challenges, we are prioritizing critical capabilities and divesting ourselves of assets no longer needed for NASA's future exploration programs. Since these facilities do not have to be maintained or demolished, the government saves money. At the same time, our commercial partners save money because they do not have to build new facilities. It is a win-win for everyone. Moving forward, 2012 will be even more historically significant as we celebrate the 50th Anniversary of Kennedy Space Center. In the coming year, KSC will facilitate commercial transportation to low-Earth orbit and support the evolution of the Space Launch System and Orion crew vehicle as they ready for exploration missions, which will shape how human beings view the universe. While NASA's Vision is to lead scientific and technological advances in aeronautics and space for a Nation on the frontier of discovery KSC's vision is to be the world's preeminent launch complex for government and commercial space access, enabling the world to explore and work in space. KSC's Mission is to safely manage, develop, integrate, and sustain space systems through partnerships that enable innovative, diverse access to space and inspires the Nation's future explorers.

Griffin, Amanda

2012-01-01

31

76 FR 43896 - Safety Zone; Kathleen Whelan Wedding Fireworks, Lake St. Clair, Grosse Pointe Farms, MI  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...during the Kathleen Whelan Wedding Fireworks. DATES: This rule...party is holding a land based wedding that will include fireworks...launching of the Kathleen Whelan Wedding Fireworks Display. The safety...an assessment of potential costs and benefits under...

2011-07-22

32

Kennedy & Castro: The Secret History  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Released to coincide with the 40th anniversary of the assassination of John F. Kennedy, this intriguing electronic briefing book (presented by the National Security Archive at George Washington University), contains an audio tape of the late President Kennedy discussing the possibility of a clandestine meeting with Fidel Castro in Havana (just several weeks before Kennedy's death). Along with this six-minute audio recording, visitors will find other key documents related to the story, including several top secret White House memoranda, a CIA briefing paper, and brief profiles of the various characters who played a role in these matters. As National Security Archive senior analyst Peter Kornbluh remarked, "The documents show that JFK clearly wanted to change the framework of hostile U.S. relations with Cuba. His assassination, at the very moment this initiative was coming to fruition, leaves a major 'what if' in the ensuing history of the U.S. conflict with Cuba."

33

The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program: Fisheries  

E-print Network

The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program: Fisheries Research and Development REPORT 1999 August 1 on the Saltonstall-Kennedy (S-K) Grant Program, administered by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS

34

The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program: Fisheries  

E-print Network

The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program: Fisheries Research and Development REPORT 1998 August 1 on the Saltonstall-Kennedy (S-K) Grant Program, administered by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS

35

Donald Kennedy Donald Kennedy is the Bing Professor of Environmental Science and  

E-print Network

Donald Kennedy Donald Kennedy is the Bing Professor of Environmental Science and President emeritus. Kennedy took a 2 1/2 year leave to serve as Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and membership on the World Food and Nutrition Study. Following his return to Stanford in 1979, Dr. Kennedy

Sonnenburg, Justin L.

36

KENNEDY KRIEGER INSTITUTE GUEST RELATIONS & VOLUNTEER SERVICES  

E-print Network

KENNEDY KRIEGER INSTITUTE GUEST RELATIONS & VOLUNTEER SERVICES Thank you for expressing interest in volunteering at Kennedy Krieger Institute. Volunteers need to be 16 years or older. If you are 18 years to complete. The completed packet, along with two letters of recommendation should be mailed to: Kennedy

Pevsner, Jonathan

37

On a question of Cooper and Kennedy  

E-print Network

On a question of Cooper and Kennedy@rsmb.tuwien.ac.at In [2], Cooper and Kennedy note the following: If xn = axn-1 + bxn-2 + cxn. Kennedy. Proof of a result by Jarden by generalizing* * a proof of Carlitz. Fibonacci Quarterly, 33

Prodinger, Helmut

38

Every five years, the Kennedy Center  

E-print Network

Every five years, the Vanderbilt Kennedy Center competes with major research universities (MRDDRCs). We are proud to announce that this NICHD "center grant" to the Vanderbilt Kennedy Center has Program Directors--Front row: Craig Kennedy (1998-present), H. Carl Haywood (1968-1970), Penny Brooks

Sarkar, Nilanjan

39

The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program: Fisheries  

E-print Network

1 The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program: Fisheries Research and Development REPORT 2001 August 1 OF CONTENTS I. INTRODUCTION II. BACKGROUND III. PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program OF FY 2001 S-K APPLICATIONS RECEIVED #12;5 I. INTRODUCTION This report to Congress on the Saltonstall-Kennedy

40

Kennedy Krieger Institute, Inc. and Subsidiaries  

E-print Network

Kennedy Krieger Institute, Inc. and Subsidiaries Reports on Federal Awards in Accordance with OMB Circular A-133 June 30, 2012 Federal Entity Identification Number 52-1524965 #12;Kennedy Krieger Institute of Directors of Kennedy Krieger Institute, Inc. and Subsidiaries: In our opinion, the accompanying consolidated

Pevsner, Jonathan

41

Kennedy Krieger Institute, Inc. and Subsidiaries  

E-print Network

Kennedy Krieger Institute, Inc. and Subsidiaries Reports on Federal Awards in Accordance with OMB Circular A-133 June 30, 2013 Federal Entity Identification Number 52-1524965 #12;Kennedy Krieger Institute;Independent Auditor's Report To the Board of Directors of Kennedy Krieger Institute, Inc. and Subsidiaries

Pevsner, Jonathan

42

The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program  

E-print Network

The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program: Fisheries Research and Development REPORT 2003 DEPARTMENT, 2003 #12;The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program: Fisheries Research and Development Report 2003 August 1 #12;The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program: Fisheries Research and Development REPORT 2003 August 1

43

A Biography of Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This teaching guide consists of a biography of Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy (Onassis), the wife of President John F. Kennedy, the 35th President of the United States and questions for students to answer after reading the biography. The guide contains activities, such as playing the role of an inquiring camera girl (Mrs. Kennedy's first job in…

Weidman, Lisa K. Menendez

44

KENNEDY KRIEGER INSTITUTE, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES  

E-print Network

KENNEDY KRIEGER INSTITUTE, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES Consolidated Financial Statements June 30, 2012 of Directors of Kennedy Krieger Institute, Inc. and Subsidiaries In our opinion, the accompanying consolidated present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidated financial position of Kennedy Krieger Institute

Pevsner, Jonathan

45

Plasma Physics John F. Kennedy  

E-print Network

v v v v v Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory N 278 95 1 95 18 NEW YORK John F. Kennedy Int Campus/ Sayre Drive Sign PPPLSayre Dr. Location: Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory James Forrestal Campus U.S. Route #1 North at Sayre Drive Plainsboro, NJ 08536 Mailing Address: Princeton Plasma Physics

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

46

Muscle matters in Kennedy's disease.  

PubMed

Polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor causes Kennedy's disease. Two recent reports, Cortes et al. (2014) in this issue of Neuron and Lieberman et al. (2014) in Cell Reports, raise the possibility that targeting expression of the mutant protein in skeletal muscle, instead of the nervous system, may mitigate manifestations of this disorder. PMID:24742452

Rinaldi, Carlo; Bott, Laura C; Fischbeck, Kenneth H

2014-04-16

47

UNDERGRADUATE JOURNAL IN NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY Professor Mark Hersam, editor; Kathleen Cook, managing editor  

E-print Network

UNDERGRADUATE JOURNAL IN NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY Professor Mark Hersam, editor; Kathleen journal dedicated to nanoscience and nanotechnology. Aspiring authors went through a peer-review process fashioned after professional journals around the country. They gained valuable educational experience

Shull, Kenneth R.

48

Justice Kennedy and Gay Marriage  

Microsoft Academic Search

A lawsuit challenging California?s gay marriage ban, Proposition 8, on 14th Amendment grounds, is headed to the Supreme Court. Justice Sotomayor's ascendancy notwithstanding, Justice Kennedy will be the Court?s pivotal vote in this case. His opinion in Lawrence invalidated anti-sodomy statutes under the 14th Amendment, yet he expressly distinguished such laws from gay marriage bans, leaving them an open issue

Martin Carcieri

49

Kennedy Space Center exercise program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Fitness Program began in Feb. 1993. The program is managed by the Biomedical Operations and Research Office and operated by the Bionetics Corporation. The facilities and programs are offered to civil servants, all contractors, temporary duty assignment (TDY) participants, and retirees. All users must first have a medical clearance. A computer-generated check-in system is used to monitor participant usage. Various aspects of the program are discussed.

Hoffman, Cristy

1993-01-01

50

Kennedy’s disease: a triplet repeat disorder or a motor neuron disease?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two definite genetic causes of adult motor neuron degeneration have been identified to date: CAG repeat expansion in the androgen receptor gene in Kennedy’s disease and point mutations in the SOD1 gene, encoding the enzyme, Cu\\/Zn superoxide dismutase, in some familial forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Although both have unrelated genetic causes, Kennedy’s disease and SOD1-linked amyotrophic lateral sclerosis share

Jean-Marc Gallo

2001-01-01

51

IMPACT | Research from Harvard Kennedy School 79 John F. Kennedy Street  

E-print Network

, the role of gender in something as basic as negotiation for a higher salary is still a big issueIMPACT | Research from Harvard Kennedy School 79 John F. Kennedy Street Cambridge, Massachusetts quarterly by the Office of Communications and Public Affairs at Harvard Kennedy School. Editor: Robert O

52

Kennedy Space Center Spaceport Analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Until the Shuttle Atlantis' final landing on July 21, 2011, Kennedy Space Center (KSC) served as NASA's main spaceport, which is a launch and landing facility for rockets and spacecraft that are attempting to enter orbit. Many of the facilities at KSC were created to assist the Shuttle Program. One of the most important and used facilities is the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), This was the main landing area for the return of the shuttle after her mission in space. · However, the SLF has also been used for a number of other projects including straight-line testing by Gibbs Racing, weather data collection by NOAA, and an airfield for the KSC helicopters. This runway is three miles long with control tower at midfield and a fire department located at the end in care of an emergency. This facility, which was part of the great space race, will continue to be used for historical events as Kennedy begins to commercialize its facilities. KSC continues to be an important spaceport to the government, and it will transform into an important spaceport for the commercial industry as well. During my internship at KSC's Center Planning and Development Directorate, I had the opportunity to be a part of the negotiation team working on the agreement for Space Florida to control the Shuttle Landing Facility. This gave me the opportunity to learn about all the changes that are occurring here at Kennedy Space Center. Through various meetings, I discovered the Master Plan and its focus is to transform the existing facilities that were primarily used for the Shuttle Program, to support government operations and commercial flights in the future. This. idea is also in a new strategic business plan and completion of a space industry market analysis. All of these different documentations were brought to my attention and I. saw how they came together in the discussions of transitioning the SLF to a commercial operator, Space Florida. After attending meetings and partaking in discussions for the SLF Agreement, I formed the idea of a Spaceport Analysis as my over internship project. As previously stated, I had the opportunity to sit in on the market analysis meetings and read through the analysis itself. I suggested the creation of a Strengths Weaknesses Opportunities Threats (SWOT) analysis, which allows an individual to see an overview of the company's strengths and weaknesses alongside any industry opportunities and threats. After discussions with the lead writer of the new strategic business plan and getting approval, I took the action upon myself and created the Kennedy Space Center SWOT Analysis.

Wary, Samantha A.

2013-01-01

53

Sanders, J. E.; Merguerian, Charles; Such, Russell; Carbone, Kathryn, Currington, Kathleen; Eshaghoff, Tania; and Levine, Jessica, 1996a, Bellvale Mountain, NY: isoclinal,  

E-print Network

Sanders, J. E.; Merguerian, Charles; Such, Russell; Carbone, Kathryn, Currington, Kathleen: Sanders, J. E.; Merguerian, Charles; Such, Russell; Carbone, Kathryn, Currington, Kathleen; Eshaghoff reverse fault along the SE limb (abs.): Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, v. 28, no

Merguerian, Charles

54

2. GENERAL STREET VIEW LOOKING WEST ON KENNEDY ST. FROM ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. GENERAL STREET VIEW LOOKING WEST ON KENNEDY ST. FROM INTERSECTION OF SOUTH CONVENT AVE. AND WEST KENNEDY ST. - Barrio Libre, West Kennedy & West Seventeenth Streets, Meyer & Convent Avenues, Tucson, Pima County, AZ

55

3. GENERAL STREET VIEW LOOKING WEST ON KENNEDY FROM JUST ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. GENERAL STREET VIEW LOOKING WEST ON KENNEDY FROM JUST SOUTH OF SOUTH CONVENT AVE. AND WEST KENNEDY ST. - Barrio Libre, West Kennedy & West Seventeenth Streets, Meyer & Convent Avenues, Tucson, Pima County, AZ

56

About Kennedy's Disease: Genetic Counseling and Inheritance Issues  

MedlinePLUS

Kennedy's Disease Association A Public Benefit, Non-Profit Organization Register GTranslate GTranslate Javascript is required to use ... 93614 (559) 658-5950 Main Menu Home About Kennedy's Disease What is Kennedy's Disease Symptoms Common Misdiagnosis ...

57

ROBERT E. KENNEDY LIBRARY SPECIAL COLLECTIONS & UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES  

E-print Network

ROBERT E. KENNEDY LIBRARY SPECIAL COLLECTIONS & UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES CALIFORNIA POLYTECHNIC STATE ____________________________________________________________________________ Staff Signature for the Kennedy Library Date California Polytechnic State University San Luis Obispo

Sze, Lawrence

58

Travel Alert from Kennedy Krieger Institute Detour Alert  

E-print Network

Travel Alert from Kennedy Krieger Institute Detour Alert: Effective June 18, 2014 Garage Detour will be closed from the Kennedy Krieger garage entrance eastbound to Wolfe Street. Kennedy Krieger staff allow extra time when traveling to Kennedy Krieger Institute for your appointment. We are all born

Pevsner, Jonathan

59

Wetlands of the Fraser Lowland, 1989: An I.nventmy Kathleen Moore  

E-print Network

Wetlands of the Fraser Lowland, 1989: An I.nventmy Peggy Ward Kathleen Moore GIS Applications Ron. Wetlands of the Fraser Lowland, 1989: An Inventory. Technical Report Series No. 146. Canadian Wiidlife report. ... 111 #12;ABSTRACT The remaining wetlands of the Fraser Lowland provide vital habitat for large

60

PULCE Pad: Pressure Ulcer Detection System Sivaranjani Balan, Kathleen Bates, Stacey Lee, Zeinab Mohamed  

E-print Network

PULCE Pad: Pressure Ulcer Detection System Sivaranjani Balan, Kathleen Bates, Stacey Lee, Zeinab Clinical Need Description of Market Pressure ulcers, more commonly known as bedsores, develop due to local in the US are such that an estimated 2.5 million cases of pressure ulcers are reported each year

McGaughey, Alan

61

L-R: Kathleen Morgan, Jasmine Hall Ratliff of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and Peter Gillies  

E-print Network

L-R: Kathleen Morgan, Jasmine Hall Ratliff of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and Peter Gillies of Agriculture display Peter Gillies (founding director, IFNH) challenged FCHS and its summit partners to hold, headed by Gillies, are underway. In 2008, Rutgers received an initial four-year, $10 million grant from

Goodman, Robert M.

62

Context Effects in Musicians with Absolute Pitch Kathleen R. Agres & Dr. Lori L. Holt  

E-print Network

models of speech perception is explaining the effect of context on speech identification. AcousticContext Effects in Musicians with Absolute Pitch Kathleen R. Agres & Dr. Lori L. Holt Psychology tones and one of pure tones. Every perfect Western pitch was presented 5 times. Listeners identified

Holt, Lori L.

63

6 Global Change and Mycorrhizal Fungi Matthias C. Rillig, Kathleen K. Treseder, Michael F. Allen  

E-print Network

6 Global Change and Mycorrhizal Fungi Matthias C. Rillig, Kathleen K. Treseder, Michael F. Allen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 000 6.2.1 What is Global Change? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 000 6.2.2 Rationale for Considering Mycorrhiza in Global Change Biology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 000 6.3 Global Change

Treseder, Kathleen K.

64

RAPID ETHNOGRAPHIC ASSESSMENT: DATA-TO-MODEL Kathleen M. Carley1  

E-print Network

to be able to rapidly assess and understand key aspects of the underlying culture, identify key actors, hotRAPID ETHNOGRAPHIC ASSESSMENT: DATA-TO-MODEL Kathleen M. Carley1 Michael Lanham, Michael Martin quantities of textual data, assess the underlying situation, and identify changes early on. A human

Sadeh, Norman M.

65

PRESIDENT KENNEDY AND OFFICIALS VIEW GEMINI SPACECRAFT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

President Kennedy with sunglasses, Senator G. C. Smathers (D- Fla.), George Low, NASA; Mr. James Webb, NASA, Astronaut Gordon Cooper, Astronaut Gus Grissom, Mr. M. G. Preston, MSC-Manager Fla. Operations, viewing Gemini S/C #1.

1963-01-01

66

Rt Hon Charles Kennedy MP Born in Inverness in 1959, Charles Kennedy was brought up and educated just outside Fort  

E-print Network

Rt Hon Charles Kennedy MP Rector Born in Inverness in 1959, Charles Kennedy was brought up. Charles Kennedy was elected the UK Liberal Democrats' Party President, the equivalent of party chairman of the Party in January 2006. In September 2007 Charles Kennedy was unanimously elected President

Glasgow, University of

67

FALL 2002 PHILOSOPHY ELECTIVES PL 193 01 Chinese Classical Philosophy  

E-print Network

://fmwww.bc.edu/pl/courses/fall2002.html #12;Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement Starting from the general introduction Services and Health Care David Manzo Th 4 30--5 KathleenHirsch PL23301 39 VALUES/SOCSERV/HLTH CARE TH4 30-7 DavidManzo PL25901 3271 PERSP

Huang, Jianyu

68

An Information-Theoretic Account of Musical Expectation and Memory Kat Agres (kathleen.agres@eecs.qmul.ac.uk)  

E-print Network

An Information-Theoretic Account of Musical Expectation and Memory Kat Agres (kathleen listeners demonstrated poor overall memory performance, the IT properties significantly impacted on musical memory. Keywords: Music cognition; information theory; computational approach; predictive models

Pearce, Marcus T.

69

John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum is housed in a gorgeous building designed by noted architect I.M. Pei. For those who can't make it to Boston to visit, the associated website is full of relevant information about President Kennedy's life, speeches, presidency, and legacy. This section of the site is dedicated to seven interesting interactive exhibits, including "We Choose The Moon," "The President's Desk," and "White House Diary." In "The President's Desk," visitors can explore Kennedy's work space. This exhibit includes items from his travels, like the famous coconut he carved after his ship, the PT-109, was attacked off the Solomon Islands. The "We Choose The Moon" area contains archival photos and footage describing how President Kennedy helped lead the quest to land a manned spacecraft on the moon. The "White House Diary" takes visitors on an interactive tour through each day of the Kennedy presidency, highlighting the speeches, meetings, conferences, and other activities that commanded his time in office.

70

Tailings dam seepage at the rehabilitated Mary Kathleen uranium mine, Australia  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study reports on the seepage of metals, metalloids and radionuclides from the Mary Kathleen uranium mill tailings repository. Since rehabilitation in the 1980s, the capped tailings have developed a stratified hydrochemistry, with acid (pH 3.7), saline, metal-rich (Fe, Mn, Ni, U±As, Pb, Zn), oxygenated (1.05 mg L?1 DO), radioactive waters in the upper tailings pile and near-neutral pH (pH

B. G. Lottermoser; P. M. Ashley

2005-01-01

71

Ground winds for Kennedy Space Center, Florida, 1979 revision  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Revised ground-level runway wind statistics for the Kennedy Space Center, Florida area are presented. Crosswind, headwind, tailwind, and headwind reversal percentage frequencies are given with respect to month and hour for the Kennedy Space Center Space Shuttle runway.

Johnson, D. L.; Brown, S. C.

1979-01-01

72

A DIAGRAMMATIC MULTIVARIATE ALEXANDER INVARIANT K. GRACE KENNEDY  

E-print Network

A DIAGRAMMATIC MULTIVARIATE ALEXANDER INVARIANT OF TANGLES K. GRACE KENNEDY Abstract. Recently it generalizes easily to tangles with 1 #12;2 K. GRACE KENNEDY more than one unclosed strand. In this paper, we

Bigelow, Stephen

73

PRESIDENTIAL RHETORIC AND LEADERSHIP FROM KENNEDY TO THE PRESENT  

E-print Network

PRESIDENTIAL RHETORIC AND LEADERSHIP FROM KENNEDY TO THE PRESENT THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 12TH , 9:00AM, Washington Post Joseph Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor, Harvard Kennedy School

Grishok, Alla

74

CALCULUS REVISITED: AN INTRODUCTORY COURSE IN K. GRACE KENNEDY  

E-print Network

CALCULUS REVISITED: AN INTRODUCTORY COURSE IN MATLAB K. GRACE KENNEDY When beginning to think about of programming language. 1 #12;2 K. GRACE KENNEDY · the relationship between secant lines, the tangent line

Bigelow, Stephen

75

John F. Kennedy School of Government Harvard University  

E-print Network

John F. Kennedy School of Government Harvard University Faculty Research Working Papers Series not necessarily reflect those of the John F. Kennedy School of Government or Harvard University. All works posted Research Program for Digital Government Center for Business and Government John F. Kennedy School

Schweik, Charles M.

76

Voting, Vote Capture & Vote Counting Kennedy School of Government  

E-print Network

Voting, Vote Capture & Vote Counting Symposium June 2004 Kennedy School of Government Harvard The following document was developed by Jean Camp, Allan Friedman and Warigia Bowman of the Kennedy School based and the Kennedy School of Government. A gift to support #12;2 Summary Best Practices Rebecca Mercuri's work

Camp, L. Jean

77

The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program: Fisheries Research and Development  

E-print Network

The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program: Fisheries Research and Development Report 2009 August 1 Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program: Fisheries Research and Development REPORT 2009 August 1, 2009 U.............................................. 81 #12;4 I. INTRODUCTION This Report to Congress on the Saltonstall-Kennedy (S-K) Grant Program

78

Kennedy Krieger institute Aviso sobre prcticas de privacidad  

E-print Network

Kennedy Krieger institute Aviso sobre prácticas de privacidad El presente aviso describe cómo puede nacemos con gran potencial. ¿No deberíamos tener todos la oportunidad de alcanzarlo? Kennedy Krieger Privacidad del Kennedy Krieger Institute como se explica al final de este aviso. También esta disponible en

Pevsner, Jonathan

79

ROBERT E. KENNEDY LIBRARY SPECIAL COLLECTIONS & UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES  

E-print Network

ROBERT E. KENNEDY LIBRARY SPECIAL COLLECTIONS & UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES CALIFORNIA POLYTECHNIC STATE to the Kennedy Library, California Polytechnic State University, all legal title, including any attendant rights to the terms and conditions,if any, stated below. The Kennedy Library may use its discretion in disposing

Sze, Lawrence

80

A Harvard Kennedy School Perspective www.hks.harvard.edu  

E-print Network

DIVERSITY experience A Harvard Kennedy School Perspective www.hks.harvard.edu ASK WHAT YOU CAN DO #12;WELCOME The Harvard Kennedy School's mission is to educate outstanding public leaders and produce to the Kennedy School and how they are using their time here to channel their idealism and develop their next

81

The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program: Fisheries Research and Development  

E-print Network

The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program: Fisheries Research and Development Report 2002 August 1, Pascagoula, MS Cover Photo Credits: DOC/NOAA Photo Library #12;#12;The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program This report to Congress on the Saltonstall-Kennedy (S-K) Grant Program, administered by the National Marine

82

Voting, Vote Capture & Vote Counting Kennedy School of Government  

E-print Network

Voting, Vote Capture & Vote Counting Symposium June 2004 Kennedy School of Government Harvard The following document was written by Jean Camp, Allan Friedman and Warigia Bowman of the Kennedy School based for the Symposium was provided by the National Science Foundation and the Kennedy School of Government. A gift

Camp, L. Jean

83

FRANCIS E. KENNEDY, JR. Professor of Engineering Home Address  

E-print Network

RESUME FRANCIS E. KENNEDY, JR. Professor of Engineering Home Address: Thayer School of Engineering/643-6048 Tel: 603/646-2094 Fax: 603/646-3856 e-mail: francis.kennedy@dartmouth.edu PERSONAL DATA Born, Thailand; Visiting Lecturer #12;Francis E. Kennedy, Jr. 2 Resume MILITARY EXPERIENCE May 1965-May 1967

84

The Kennedy Center's Coming of Age.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the history of the John F. Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development at the Peabody College of Vanderbilt University, which focuses its research on problems related to mental retardation. The center is unique among 12 federally funded Mental Retardation Research Centers because it is exclusively identified with a college of…

Baumeister, Alfred A.

1996-01-01

85

Kennedy Space Center Annual Report, FY 1997  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has a nearly 40-year tradition of excellence in processing and launching space vehicles and their payloads. The Center's outstanding record of achievements in America's space program has earned it an honored place in history and an essential role in the present; KSC also intends to play a vital part in the future of space exploration.

1997-01-01

86

John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Moving into a two-room apartment near the State House in Boston in 1946, many people wondered aloud how this bright, yet somewhat retiring, young man would do in the rough and tumble world of Boston politics. That 29-year old happened to be John F. Kennedy, and he would win his first campaign that year, as he made his way to the U.S. House of Representatives. He would of course become President of the United States, and later be assassinated in the fall of 1963 in Dallas. His presidential library and museum occupy one of the loveliest vistas afforded any presidential library, as they lie on Columbia Point along BostonâÂÂs waterfront. For those who canâÂÂt make a direct visit to the Bay State, this website provides a fine virtual experience. The site includes historical timelines of KennedyâÂÂs life (along with those of other members of his family), along with an interactive White House diary feature, which offers detailed information on what Kennedy did on every day of his presidency. Interestingly enough, the Ernest Hemingway archive is also housed at the Kennedy Presidential Library, so visitors can also learn about their holdings and view selected digitized materials.

87

Kennedy family upset over assassination video game  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Forty-one years ago Camelot ended with the assassination of President John F. Kennedy while he rode in a motorcade in downtown Dallas. During the past four decades, hundreds of persons have attempted to offer their interpretations and understanding of the events of that tragic day. While the Kennedy family has generally refrained from commenting on the less academic and objective investigations into the death of the President, there has been one recent development that has understandably garnered severe criticism. This development happens to be an online video game titled "JFK Reloaded" that allows visitors to recreate the three shots fired at President Kennedy's car from the Texas School Book Depository. While a representative for the Glasgow-based firm responsible for this game noted that the game might "stimulate a younger generation of players to take an interest in this fascinating episode of American history", many others were quick to respond to this questionable notion. A spokesman for Senator Edward Kennedy called the video game "despicable" and noted presidential historian G. Calvin MacKenzie of Colby College remarked that "Aside from being in incredibly bad taste, the idea of marketing it as an educational tool seems to stretch the notion of education beyond belief."The first link leads to a news article from this Monday's Boston Herald that talks about the reaction to the release of this video game. The second link will take visitors to a rather intriguing discussion of the game by Clive Thompson, writing in the online publication Slate. The third link leads to the JFK Assassination Records page provided by the National Archives & Records Administration, where visitors can read the complete Warren Commission Report and peruse other helpful documents. The fourth link will take users to the website for the John F. Kennedy Library and Museum located in Boston. Here visitors can learn about the actual building (designed by noted modernist I.M. Pei), look through resources for students, and learn about the library's holdings. The fifth link leads to the text and audio version of one of Kennedy's most well-remembered speeches, where he addressed the people of West Berlin and stated, "Today, in the world of freedom, the proudest boast is 'Ich bin ein Berliner'". The final link leads to a special feature from CNN where the president's interpreter, Robert H. Lochner, recalls helping Kennedy learn that phrase for that particular address.

88

Research and technology at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As the NASA Center responsible for assembly, checkout, servicing, launch, recovery, and operational support of Space Transportation System elements and payloads, Kennedy Space Center is placing increasing emphasis on the Center's research and technology program. In addition to strengthening those areas of engineering and operations technology that contribute to safer, more efficient, and more economical execution of current mission, the technical tools are developed needed to execute Center's mission relative to future programs. The Engineering Development Directorate encompasses most of the laboratories and other Center resources that are key elements of research and technology program implementation and is responsible for implementation of the majority of the projects in this Kennedy Space Center 1989 Annual Report.

1989-01-01

89

Sensor Applications at Kennedy Space Center (KSC)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Transducers used at KSC (Kennedy Space Center), in support of processing and launch of flight vehicles and payloads, are designed and tested to meet specific program requirements. Any equipment, transducer or support instrumentation in direct contact or in support to flight vehicle operations is considered ground support equipment (GSE) and required to meet strict program requirements (i.e. Space Shuttle Program, Space Station Program, Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicles, etc.) Transducers used in KSC applications are based on commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) transducers and sensors. In order to fully meet KSC requirements, these transducers evolve from standard COTS to modified COTS. The Transducer and Data Acquisition Group of the Instrumentation Branch at Kennedy Space Center is responsible for providing the technical expertise as well as qualification-testing capability to transform these COTS transducers in modified COTS suitable for use around flight hardware.

Perotti, Jose M.; Eckhoff, Anthony J.; Voska, N. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

90

Failure Analysis at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

History has shown that failures occur in every engineering endeavor, and what we learn from those failures contributes to the knowledge base to safely complete future missions. The necessity of failure analysis is at its apex at the end of one aged program and at the beginning of a new and untested program. The information that we gain through failure analysis corrects the deficiencies in the current vehicle to make the next generation of vehicles more efficient and safe. The Failure Analysis and Materials Evaluation Branch in the Materials Science Division at the Kennedy Space Center performs metallurgical, mechanical, electrical, and non-metallic materials failure analyses and accident investigations on both flight hardware and ground support equipment for the Space Shuttle, International Space Station, Constellation, and Launch Services Programs. This paper will explore a variety of failure case studies at the Kennedy Space Center and the lessons learned that can be applied in future programs.

Salazar, Victoria L.; Wright, M. Clara

2010-01-01

91

Kennedy Space Center environmental health program  

SciTech Connect

The Kennedy Space Center's environmental health organization is responsible for programs which assure its employees a healthful workplace under diverse and varied working conditions. These programs encompass the disciplines of industrial hygiene, radiation protection (health physics), and environmental sanitation/pollution control. Activities range from the routine, such as normal office work, to the highly specialized, such as the processing of highly toxic and hazardous materials.

Marmaro, G.M.; Cardinale, M.A.; Summerfield, B.R.; Tipton, D.A. (Medical and Environmental Health Office, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Cocoa Beach, FL (United States))

1992-08-01

92

Kennedy Space Center environmental health program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Kennedy Space Center's environmental health organization is responsible for programs which assure its employees a healthful workplace under diverse and varied working conditions. These programs encompass the disciplines of industrial hygiene, radiation protection (health physics), and environmental sanitation/pollution control. Activities range from the routine, such as normal office work, to the highly specialized, such as the processing of highly toxic and hazardous materials.

Marmaro, G. M.; Cardinale, M. A.; Summerfield, B. R.; Tipton, D. A.

1992-01-01

93

Kennedy Space Center network documentation system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Kennedy Space Center Network Documentation System (KSC NDS) is being designed and implemented by NASA and the KSC contractor organizations to provide a means of network tracking, configuration, and control. Currently, a variety of host and client platforms are in use as a result of each organization having established its own network documentation system. The solution is to incorporate as many existing 'systems' as possible in the effort to consolidate and standardize KSC-wide documentation.

Lohne, William E.; Schuerger, Charles L.

1995-01-01

94

A review of "Making Science Social: The Conferences of Theophraste Renaudot 1633-1642" by Kathleen Wellman.  

E-print Network

is an important and instructive work. Kathleen Wellman. Making Science Social: The Conferences of Th?ophraste Renaudot 1633-1642. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2003. xviii + 461 pp. + 4 illus. $39.95. Review by KAROL K. WEAVER, SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY.... Kathleen Wellman?s Making Science Social: The Conferences of Th?ophraste Renaudot 1633-1642 traces the history of the seven- teenth-century conferences led by Th?ophraste Renaudot to eluci- date the characteristics of early seventeenth-century science...

Karol K. Weaver

2004-01-01

95

STUDY GUIDE FOR 3C K. GRACE KENNEDY  

E-print Network

STUDY GUIDE FOR 3C K. GRACE KENNEDY Spring 2009 Contents 1. Introduction 1 1.1. When we can find equations (DE's). (1) What is a differential equation? 1 #12;2 K. GRACE KENNEDY (2) What is a solution statement of Picard's Theorem? #12;4 K. GRACE KENNEDY 1.2. When you don't or can't find a solution

Bigelow, Stephen

96

Water Dynamics in Water/DMSO Binary Mixtures Daryl B. Wong, Kathleen P. Sokolowsky, Musa I. El-Barghouthi,  

E-print Network

Water Dynamics in Water/DMSO Binary Mixtures Daryl B. Wong, Kathleen P. Sokolowsky, Musa I. El (DMSO)/ water solutions with a wide range of water concentrations are studied using polarization even at very low water concentrations that are associated with water- water and water-DMSO hydrogen

Fayer, Michael D.

97

Estrogen increases the taste threshold for sucrose in rats Kathleen S. Curtis *, Jennifer M. Stratford, Robert J. Contreras  

E-print Network

Estrogen increases the taste threshold for sucrose in rats Kathleen S. Curtis *, Jennifer M, the preference for sweet foods may involve estrogen-mediated changes in response to the taste of sweets. Our estrogen than when given the oil vehicle. These findings suggest that estrogen decreases the preference

Hull, Elaine

98

NSF GK-12 Urban Educators Program Mariah Judd and Kathleen Marrs (and current GK-12 Fellows and Teachers)  

E-print Network

NSF GK-12 Urban Educators Program Mariah Judd and Kathleen Marrs (and current GK-12 Fellows and Teachers) Department of Biology, School of Science, IUPUI The IUPUI NSF GK-12 Urban Educators program-12. The largest activity of this project involves GK-12 Fellows working with STEM teachers to bring inquiry

Zhou, Yaoqi

99

Kathleen Heiden, PhD Merchandising and Consumer Studies, School of Human Ecology, College of Applied & Natural Sciences  

E-print Network

Kathleen Heiden, PhD Merchandising and Consumer Studies, School of Human Ecology, College 2013 MCS 208: Introduction to the Merchandising Industry 3/0 21 90 3.7 MCS 268: Product Development 2.9 MCS 298: Field Study Tour in MCS I 1/0 16 100 N/A MCS 308: Merchandise Buying and Management 3/0 13

Selmic, Sandra

100

Welding at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Welding plays a major role in the design, manufacture, and construction of the ground support equipment at the Kennedy Space Center. Three applications of welding are described, i.e., an example of the structural welding of a girder in a mobile launcher (presently designated mobile launcher platform), an example of the repair welding of crawler/transporter shoes, and an example of the welding of the liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen storage spheres and vacuum jacketed piping in the propellants system. This welding technology was developed during the Apollo and earlier programs. It is now being applied to the Space Shuttle.

Clautice, W. E.

1976-01-01

101

My Summer Internship at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During my summer internship at Kennedy Space Center, I worked on several projects with my mentor Grace Johnson in the Education Programs Office. My primary project was the CubeSat project in which my job was to help mentor Merritt Island High School students in the building of a CubeSat. CubeSats are picosatellites that are used to carry out auxiliary missions; they "piggy back" into orbit on launch vehicles launching primary missions. CubeSats come in the sizes of 1U (10 by 10 by 10 cm) 2U (1Ux2) and 3U (1Ux3). The Cube Sats are housed in a protective deploying device called a Poly Picosatellite Orbital Deplored (P-POD). I also participated in a Balloon Workshop with the MIHS students. This was an intense 4-day project in which we constructed a balloon satellite equipped with a camera whose main goal was to obtain video images of the curvature of the earth at high altitudes and relay it back down to our ground station. I also began developing my own science research program for minority serving institutions to be implemented when funding becomes available. In addition to the projects that I completed during my internship, I got the opportunity to go on various tours of the technological facilities here at Kennedy Space Center.

Philpott, Hobert Leon

2011-01-01

102

75 FR 54897 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health...personal privacy. Name of Committee: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health...Division of Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child...

2010-09-09

103

For Immediate Release --Monday, April 28, 2014 Sharron (Susie) Kennedy appointed University of  

E-print Network

For Immediate Release -- Monday, April 28, 2014 Sharron (Susie) Kennedy of Governors has approved the appointment of Sharron (Susie) Kennedy as the University's Registrar. Kennedy is currently the registrar at Lethbridge College where she

Seldin, Jonathan P.

104

75 FR 61765 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health...personal privacy. Name of Committee: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health...Division of Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child...

2010-10-06

105

CURRICULUM VITAE: THEODORE KENNEDY Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center  

E-print Network

. Kennedy, T.A. and S.E. Hobbie. Salt cedar invasion (Tamarix ramosissima) alters organic matter dynamics. PUBLICATIONS: Kennedy, T.A., J.C. Finlay, and S.E. Hobbie. Eradication of invasive saltcedar (Tamarix ramosissima) along a desert springbrook increases native fish density. Ecological Applications in press

Lovich, Jeffrey E.

106

Photocopy of drawing. VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING. NASA John F. Kennedy ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing. VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING. NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 79K06740, NASA, November 1975. SPACE & WEIGHT ALLOCATION, ORBITER PATH IN TRANSFER AISLE. Sheet 6 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Vehicle Assembly Building, VAB Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

107

In Tribute: Senator Edward M. Kennedy, Friend of NIH  

MedlinePLUS

... renaming the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) in Shriver's honor. Senator Edward M. Kennedy, Friend of NIH "… deep compassion for those in need." Senator Edward M. Kennedy (D-MA) died of brain cancer on August 25, 2009. Throughout his 47 ...

108

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October, 1963. LCC FLOOR 4, LEVEL 57?-0?, AREA ?P?. Sheet 29-41 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North , Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

109

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October, 1963. LCC TRANSVERSE SECTIONS AA & BB. Sheet 29-45 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North , Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

110

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October, 1963. LCC FLOOR 3, LEVEL 38?-0?, AREA ?R?. Sheet 29-40 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North , Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

111

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October, 1963. LCC TRANSVERSE SECTION AT LIEF ROOM AND VISITOR?S GALLERY VESTIBULE. Sheet 29-50 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North , Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

112

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October, 1963. VOLUME 29, LAUNCH CONTROL CENTER (LCC) TITLE AND LOCATION SHEET. Sheet 29-01 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North , Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

113

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October, 1963. LCC ELEVATIONS. Sheet 29-44 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North , Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

114

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October, 1963. LCC FLOOR 3, LEVEL 38?-0?, AREA ?R?. Sheet 29-42 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North , Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

115

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October, 1963. LCC FLOOR 3, LEVEL 38?-0?, AREA ?P?. Sheet 29-39 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North , Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

116

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October, 1963. LCC SECTIONS & DETAILS AT FLOOR 3 NORTH WALL WINDOWS. Sheet 29-53 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North , Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

117

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October, 1963. LCC DETAILS OF POWER OPERATED LOUVERS. Sheet 29-54 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North , Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

118

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October, 1963. LCC SECTIONS & DETAILS AT NORTH EXTERIOR WALL OF FIRING ROOMS. Sheet 29-52 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North , Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

119

Kennedy, Khrushchev, and the test ban  

SciTech Connect

Drawing on the records he held as Chairman of the AEC and records of W. Averill Harriman, who led the US negotiating team, Seaborg describes the gradual establishment of a level of trust between Kennedy and Khruschev which began with the peaceful resolution of the Cuban missile crisis. The Limited Test Ban Treaty of 1963 outlawed all but underground testing of nuclear weapons. It was a major diplomatic step toward ensuring stability in the arms race, moderating its costs, preventing proliferation, and reducing levels of radioactive fallout. Seaborg describes the negotiations and the treaty signing. He concludes with the plea for a comprehensive test ban and the note that The hour is late. Let us hope not too late. The text of the treaty appears in the appendix. 93 references.

Seaborg, G.T.

1981-01-01

120

Kennedy Space Center ocean beach erosion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dune barrier erosion and possible breakthrough due to storm and hurricane wave activity is studied near Mosquito Lagoon, in Kennedy Space Center property. The results of a geological as well as hydrodynamic appraisal of the problem area indicate that no inlet has existed across the dune barrier since 500 A.D., and that there is little likelihood of a possible breakthrough inlet remaining open permanently, primarily because the relatively shallow lagoon does not contain enough volume of water to maintain an inlet between the ocean and the lagoon. It is therefore recommended that only minimal measures, such as closing up the man-made passes across the dunes, be carried out to ensure continuation of the action of natural beach maintaining processes.

Mehta, A. J.; Obrien, M. P.

1973-01-01

121

Failure Analysis at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

History has shown that failures occur in every engineering endeavor, and what we learn from those failures contributes to the knowledge base to safely complete future missions. The necessity of failure analysis is at its apex at the end of one aged program (i.e. Shuttle) and at the beginning of a new and untested program (i.e. Constellation). The information that we gain through failure analysis corrects the deficiencies in the current vehicle to make the next generation of vehicles more efficient and safe. The Failure Analysis and Materials Evaluation section in the Materials Science Division at the Kennedy Space Center performs metallurgical, mechanical, electrical, and non-metallic failure analysis and accident investigations on both flight hardware and ground support equipment (GSE) for the Shuttle, International Space Station, Constellation, and Launch Services Programs. This presentation will explore a variety of failure case studies at KSC and the lessons learned that can be applied in future programs.

Salazar, Victoria L.; Wright, Clara

2010-01-01

122

1. VIEW NORTHNORTHEAST OF CARRIER JOHN F. KENNEDY (JFK) IN ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. VIEW NORTH-NORTHEAST OF CARRIER JOHN F. KENNEDY (JFK) IN DRYDOCK NO. 5 FOR SERVICE LIFE EXTENSION PROGRAM (SLEP). - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Dry Dock No. 5, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

123

Kennedy Space Center Now on Google Street View!  

NASA Video Gallery

NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida boasts amazing views typically seen only by employees and astronauts. Now space enthusiasts around the world can take a virtual walk through the transfer aisl...

124

THE INCORPORATION OF DEMOCRACY: JUSTICE KENNEDY'S PHILOSOPHY OF POLITICAL  

E-print Network

in this discourse.6 On January 21, 2010, the Supreme Court decided Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission,71783 THE INCORPORATION OF DEMOCRACY: JUSTICE KENNEDY'S PHILOSOPHY OF POLITICAL PARTICIPATION of Corporations .............................................................. 1790 III. THE ROLE OF JUSTICE

Finzi, Adrien

125

CHRISTINA MARIE KENNEDY DEPARTMENT OF PLANT SCIENCES & LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE  

E-print Network

­7483 (MOBILE) AREAS OF INTEREST Conservation biology, community and landscape ecology, ornithology agricultural regions and to test the roles of landscape composition versus configuration on pollinationCHRISTINA MARIE KENNEDY DEPARTMENT OF PLANT SCIENCES & LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE UNIVERSITY

Fagan, William

126

September 2014 Vol. 1 No. 6 Kennedy Space Center's  

E-print Network

FOR EXPLORATION PAGE 38 KENNEDY PREPPING FOR NEXT 50 YEARS OF U.S. SPACEFLIGHT PAGE 14 #12;SPACEPORT Magazine 3 spaceflight 21Hydrogen leak detection tape earns R&D award 26Flight test preparations draw on Launch Services

127

Kennedy Space Center Medical Operations and Medical Kit  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews the emergency medical operations at Kennedy Space center, the KSC launch and landing contingency modes, the triage site, the medical kit, and the medications available.

Scarpa, Philip

2011-01-01

128

Memorial at PLDI for Ken Kennedy Good evening. My name is Kathryn McKinley and I was Ken Kennedy's 20th PhD student.  

E-print Network

Memorial at PLDI for Ken Kennedy Opening Good evening. My name is Kathryn McKinley and I was Ken Kennedy's 20th PhD student. Ken was a creative, influential, and prolific researcher. Would you do me Academy of Engineering, Ken Kennedy Sr., a retired Brigadier General in the Army Corps of Engineers

McKinley, Kathryn S.

129

78 FR 23943 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health...programs and projects conducted by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health...med)Sci, Scientific Director, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child...

2013-04-23

130

Endeavour is Delivered to the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft No. 911, with the space shuttle orbiter Endeavour securely mounted atop its fuselage, taxies to the runway to begin the ferry flight from Rockwell's Plant 42 at Palmdale, California, where the orbiter was built, to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. At Kennedy, the space vehicle was processed and launched on orbital mission STS-49, which landed at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, May 16 1992. NASA 911, the second modified 747 that went into service in November 1990, has special support struts atop the fuselage and internal strengthening to accommodate the added weight of the orbiters.

1961-01-01

131

33 CFR 334.525 - Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; restricted...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.525 Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL;...

2012-07-01

132

33 CFR 334.525 - Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; restricted...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.525 Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL;...

2013-07-01

133

33 CFR 334.525 - Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; restricted...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.525 Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL;...

2010-07-01

134

33 CFR 334.525 - Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; restricted...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.525 Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL;...

2011-07-01

135

77 FR 12855 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development...Scientific Review Officer, Division of Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human...

2012-03-02

136

77 FR 5031 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development...Review Officer, Division of Scientific Review, OD, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human...

2012-02-01

137

Mechanisms of faulting in and around Caloris basin, Mercury Patrick J. Kennedy,1  

E-print Network

Mechanisms of faulting in and around Caloris basin, Mercury Patrick J. Kennedy,1 Andrew M. Freed,1 a test of this prediction and more generally of the models developed here. Citation: Kennedy, P. J., A. M

Freed, Andrew

138

Growing up Kennedy: The Role of Medical Ailments in the Life of JFK, 1920-1957  

Microsoft Academic Search

As a result of the opening of new materials at the John F. Kennedy Library relating to John F. Kennedy’s medical problems, we have a better understanding of the specific nature of those ailments, how they were treated, and how he responded to them. Most important, this study focuses on how his medical problems affected his relationship with his parents,

James N. Giglio

2006-01-01

139

Kennedy Krieger Institute is committed to the privacy and confidentiality of your medical  

E-print Network

Kennedy Krieger Institute is committed to the privacy and confidentiality of your medical, or by contacting the Kennedy Krieger Institute Privacy Officer as explained at the end of this notice. It also have. The revised notice will be available online at kennedykrieger.org. Kennedy Krieger's Notice

Pevsner, Jonathan

140

Peter M. Vitousek Martin J. Kennedy Louis A. Derry Oliver A. Chadwick  

E-print Network

Peter M. Vitousek á Martin J. Kennedy Louis A. Derry á Oliver A. Chadwick Weathering versus et al. 1996). Recently, Kennedy et al. (1998) used Sr isotopes to evaluate the contribution: +1-650-7251856 M.J. Kennedy1 Earth Systems Science, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095

Kennedy, Martin J.

141

A Word from the Director Frank S. Pidcock, MD, Vice President of Rehabilitation at Kennedy Krieger  

E-print Network

A Word from the Director Frank S. Pidcock, MD, Vice President of Rehabilitation at Kennedy Krieger at Kennedy Krieger Institute, leads an innovative team that is investigating and refining the way patients injury programs at Kennedy Krieger Institute. Watch for future issues of Neurorehabilitation Updates

Pevsner, Jonathan

142

A Depth Controlling Strategy for Strongly Typed Evolutionary Programming Claire J. Kennedy  

E-print Network

A Depth Controlling Strategy for Strongly Typed Evolutionary Programming Claire J. Kennedy Department of Computer Science University of Bristol Bristol BS8 1UB, U.K. kennedy@cs.bris.ac.uk Christophe is that of STEPS - Strongly Typed Evolutionary Programming Sys- tem (Kennedy and Giraud-Carrier 1999). STEPS

Fernandez, Thomas

143

77 FR 43805 - Gull Hazard Reduction Program at John F. Kennedy International Airport; Record of Decision  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Gull Hazard Reduction Program at John F. Kennedy International Airport; Record of Decision...Gull Hazard Reduction Program at John F. Kennedy International Airport. DATES: Effective...and land uses in and around the John F. Kennedy International Airport. This action...

2012-07-26

144

On the Optimality of Allen and Kennedy's Algorithm for Parallelism Extraction in Nested Loops  

E-print Network

On the Optimality of Allen and Kennedy's Algorithm for Parallelism Extraction in Nested Loops Alain is that Allen and Kennedy's algorithm is optimal when dependences are approximated by dependence levels and Kennedy's algorithm, as long as dependence level is the only information available. 1 Introduction Many

Vivien, Frédéric

145

Economic Impact Assessment of the Proposed Commercial Vertical Launch Complex at Kennedy Space Center  

E-print Network

i Economic Impact Assessment of the Proposed Commercial Vertical Launch Complex at Kennedy Space Corporation, Kennedy Space Center, Florida Thomas J. Stevens, Alan W. Hodges *, W. David Mulkey and Mohammad of the Proposed Commercial Vertical Launch Complex at Kennedy Space Center Executive Summary The purpose

Florida, University of

146

Supplementary details on Bayesian Calibration of Computer Marc C. Kennedy and Anthony O'Hagan  

E-print Network

Supplementary details on Bayesian Calibration of Computer Models Marc C. Kennedy and Anthony O in the Bayesian calibration methods of Kennedy and O'Hagan (2000), and we present a further example using data with the concepts and notation of Kennedy and O'Hagan (2000). We begin by deriving the posterior distribution

O'Hagan, Tony

147

On the optimality of Allen and Kennedy's algorithm for parallelism extraction in nested loops  

E-print Network

On the optimality of Allen and Kennedy's algorithm for parallelism extraction in nested loops Alain. The result of this paper is that Allen and Kennedy's algorithm is optimal when dependences are approximated found by Allen and Kennedy's algorithm, as long as dependence level is the only information available

Vivien, Frédéric

148

Get Away Special (GAS) Kennedy Space Center (KSC) user handbook  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Information is provided for originators of Get Away Special Space Shuttle payloads. The information covers the following: pre-arrival preparations, shipping of payload and ground support equipment, travel, arrival at Kennedy Space Center, what to expect, facilities, viewing the launch, press briefings, gas field operations process, public tours, and do's and don'ts.

1986-01-01

149

BIRDS OF SWALE MARSHES ON JOHN F. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER  

Microsoft Academic Search

Birds were surveyed in several isolated freshwater wetlands on John F. Kennedy Space Center to determine species composition and the importance of these wet- lands to birds. The Red-winged Blackbird and Green-backed Heron were the two most abundant breeders in the swale marshes. The Common Yellowthroat was the most common winter resident but was rare in summer. These marshes are

DAVID R. BREININGER

150

Kennedy and Achilles: A Classical Approach on Political Science.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Uses the careers of President John F. Kennedy and the legendary Greek hero Achilles to explore the intersections among mythological status, public perception, and leadership. Observes fascinating parallels between both men and their roles as soldiers, generational representatives, and martyred heroes. (MJP)

Nelson, Michael

1996-01-01

151

THE EMERGENCE OF PHONETIC STRUCTURE*' Michael Studdert-Kennedy+  

E-print Network

THE EMERGENCE OF PHONETIC STRUCTURE*' Michael Studdert-Kennedy+ Abstract. To explain the unique structure, emerges from the peculiar relation between the source and the listener, as a human and as a speaker of a particular language. This approach, like its predecessor and like much recent work in child

152

Light Tides and the Kennedy-Thorndike experiments  

E-print Network

We model the system Earth-Moon-Sun from the point of view of a frame of reference co-moving with the Earth and we derive a detailed prediction of the outcome of future Kennedy-Thorndike's type experiments to be seen as light tides.

Ll. Bel

2004-04-30

153

A Virtual Environment-Based Paradigm for Improving Attention in TBI Assaf Y. Dvorkin, Felise S. Zollman, Kathleen Beck, Eric Larson and James L. Patton, Member, IEEE  

E-print Network

. Zollman, Kathleen Beck, Eric Larson and James L. Patton, Member, IEEE Abstract--Attention deficits are one and Rehabilitation, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL USA (e-mail: elarson@ric.org). J. L. Patton Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA (e-mail: j-patton

154

History of Reliability and Quality Assurance at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This Kennedy Historical Document (KHD) provides a unique historical perspective of the organizational and functional responsibilities for the manned and un-manned programs at Kennedy Space Center, Florida. As systems become more complex and hazardous, the attention to detailed planning and execution continues to be a challenge. The need for a robust reliability and quality assurance program will always be a necessity to ensure mission success. As new space missions are defined and technology allows for continued access to space, these programs cannot be compromised. The organizational structure that has provided the reliability and quality assurance functions for both the manned and unmanned programs has seen many changes since the first group came to Florida in the 1950's. The roles of government and contractor personnel have changed with each program and organizational alignment has changed based on that responsibility. The organizational alignment of the personnel performing these functions must ensure independent assessment of the processes.

Childers, Frank M.

2004-01-01

155

Reconceptualizing John F. Kennedy's chronic low back pain.  

PubMed

When the medical records for John Fitzgerald Kennedy were made public, it became clear that the 35th President of the United States suffered greatly from a series of medical illnesses from the time he was a toddler until his assassination in November of 1963. Aside from having Addison disease, no condition seemed to cause him more distress than did his chronic low back pain. A number of surgical procedures to address the presumed structural cause of the pain resulted in little relief and increased disability. Later, a conservative program, including trigger point injections and exercises, provided modest benefit. Herein, the mechanisms underlying his pain are evaluated based on more contemporary pain research. This reconceptualizing of John Fitzgerald Kennedy's pain could serve as a model for other cases where the main cause of the pain is presumed to be located in the periphery. PMID:23900054

Pinals, Robert S; Hassett, Afton L

2013-01-01

156

Corrosion Activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report documents summer faculty fellow efforts in the corrosion test bed at the NASA Kennedy Space Center. During the summer of 2002 efforts were concentrated on three activities: a short course on corrosion control for KSC personnel, evaluation of commercial wash additives used for corrosion control on Army aircraft, and improvements in the testing of a new cathodic protection system under development at KSC.

Heidersbach, Robert H.

2002-01-01

157

The postmortem examination of President Kennedy is invalid: the evidence.  

PubMed

This paper proves that President Kennedy's postmortem examination is a sham. The sham nature of the presidential autopsy is based upon several findings incompatible with human anatomy, practice of medicine and Newton's second law "an object acted upon by a constant force will move with constant acceleration in the direction of the force". We review the autopsy report and other assassination evidence and demonstrate that the postmortem examination is invalid. PMID:18718721

Salerian, Alen J

2008-10-01

158

John F. Kennedy School of Government Politics Research Group  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Politics Research Group of the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University has created this site, which contains working papers from faculty seminars and research workshops. Abstracts and full-text versions are both available. Some titles include: "Little Theatre: Committees in Congress," "Are Lawyers Liars? The Argument of Redescription," "Securing Subsidiarity: Legitimacy and the Allocation of Governing Authority," and "Managing Technology Policy at the White House."

1998-01-01

159

NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center environmental impact statement  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The probable total impact of the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) operations on the environment is discussed in terms of launch operations emissions and environmental quality. A schedule of planned launches through 1973 is included with a description of the systems for eliminating harmful emissions during launch operations. The effects of KSC on wild life and environmental quality are discussed along with the irreversible and irretrievable commitments of natural resources.

1971-01-01

160

Child's Letter to President John F. Kennedy about Physical Fitness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

On March 3, 1963, nine-year-old Jack Chase of Torrance, California, wrote a letter to President John F. Kennedy. In his single-page note, featured in this article, Jack described his plans for staying physically fit. He said he would walk to school, the store, and the library "because I know a strong boy makes a strong man and a strong man makes a…

McNatt, Missy

2009-01-01

161

Kennedy Library Releases Largest Quantity of JFK Recordings  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

On November 24, the John F. Kennedy Library and Museum in Boston, MA made available for researchers "more than 37 hours of recordings of President Kennedy's meetings, conversations, phone calls and dictation," the largest ever single release of tape-recorded material by the Library. The recordings were made from 1962 to 1963 and include conversations between the President and his advisors on a number of issues, such as the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, Cuba, Berlin, Egypt, and the Soviet Union. Also included are a number of dictabelt recordings of telephone conversations with former Presidents Herbert Hoover, Harry Truman, and Dwight Eisenhower after the Cuban Missile Crisis and dictation made by Kennedy following the overthrow and assassination of South Vietnamese President Ngo Dinh Diem in November 1963. The site offers ten sample RealPlayer recordings of varying length, on a variety of topics. For potential researchers of the tapes, the most valuable resource at the site is a lengthy finding aid and detailed recording logs in .pdf format. Information is also provided on how to purchase the recordings and finding guide.

162

Online Algorithms for Factorization-Based Structure from Motion Ryan Kennedy  

E-print Network

Online Algorithms for Factorization-Based Structure from Motion Ryan Kennedy University of Pennsylvania Laura Balzano University of Michigan Stephen J. Wright University of Wisconsin Camillo J. Taylor

Taylor, Camillo J.

163

Kennedy Space Center Coronary Heart Disease Risk Screening Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the number one cause of death in the U.S. It is a likely cause of death and disability in the lives of employees at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) as well. The KSC Biomedical Office used a multifactorial formula developed by the Framingham Heart Study to calculate CHD risk probabilities for individuals in a segment of the KSC population who require medical evaluation for job certification. Those individuals assessed to have a high risk probability will be targeted for intervention.

Tipton, David A.; Scarpa, Philip J.

1999-01-01

164

Multi-Element Integrated Project Planning at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This presentation demonstrates how the ASRC Scheduling team developed working practices to support multiple NASA and ASRC Project Managers using the enterprise capabilities of Primavera P6 and P6 Web Access. This work has proceeded as part of Kennedy Ground Systems' preparation for its transition from the Shuttle Program to the Constellation Program. The presenters will cover Primavera's enterprise-class capabilities for schedule development, integrated critical path analysis, and reporting, as well as advanced Primavera P6 Web Access tools and techniques for communicating project status.

Mullon, Robert

2008-01-01

165

University of Florida lightning research at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A variety of basic and applied research programs are being conducted at the Kennedy Space Center. As an example of this research, the paper describes the University of Florida program to characterize the electric and magnetic fields of lightning and the coupling of those fields to utility power lines. Specifically, detailed consideration is given to the measurements of horizontal and vertical electric fields made during the previous three summers at KSC and the simultaneous measurements of the voltages on a 500 m test line made during the past two summers at KSC. Theory to support these measurements is also presented.

Uman, Martin A.; Thomson, Ewen M.

1987-01-01

166

Strategic Project Management at the NASA Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes Project Management at NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) from a strategic perspective. It develops the historical context of the agency and center's strategic planning process and illustrates how now is the time for KSC to become a center which has excellence in project management. The author describes project management activities at the center and details observations on those efforts. Finally the author describes the Strategic Project Management Process Model as a conceptual model which could assist KSC in defining an appropriate project management process system at the center.

Lavelle, Jerome P.

2000-01-01

167

Highlighting Kathleen Green and Mario Delmar, guest editors of special issue (part 2): junctional targets of skin and heart disease.  

PubMed

Cell Communication and Adhesion has been fortunate to enlist two pioneers of epidermal and cardiac cell junctions, Kathleen Green and Mario Delmar, as Guest Editors of a two part series on junctional targets of skin and heart disease. Part 2 of this series begins with an overview from Dipal Patel and Kathy Green comparing epidermal desmosomes to cardiac area composita junctions, and surveying the pathogenic mechanisms resulting from mutations in their components in heart disease. This is followed by a review from David Kelsell on the role of desmosomal mutation in inherited syndromes involving skin fragility. Agnieszka Kobeliak discusses how structural deficits in the epidermal barrier intersect with the NFkB signaling pathway to induce inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. Farah Sheikh reviews the specialized junctional components in cardiomyocytes of the cardiac conduction system and Robert Gourdie discusses how molecular complexes between sodium channels and gap junction proteins within the perijunctional microdomains within the intercalated disc facilitate conduction. Glenn Radice evaluates the role of N-cadherin in heart. Andre Kleber and Chris Chen explore new approaches to study junctional mechanotransduction in vitro with a focus on the effects of connexin ablation and the role of cadherins, respectively. To complement this series of reviews, we have interviewed Werner Franke, whose systematic documentation the tissue-specific complexity of desmosome composition and pioneering discovery of the cardiac area composita junction greatly facilitated elucidation of the role of desmosomal components in the pathophysiology of human heart disease. PMID:24854768

Cowin, Pamela

2014-06-01

168

A pentadic analysis of senator Edward Kennedy's address to the people of massachusetts, July 25, 1969  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using Kenneth Burke's concept of the pentad as the principal tool for content analysis? an examination was made of Senator Edward Kennedy's address of July 25, 1969. That analysis suggests that the speech depicted Kennedy as the victim of a scene he could not control and as the potential victim of other agents, the people of Masachusetts.

David A. Ling

1970-01-01

169

"A Tour of the White House with Mrs. John F. Kennedy": An International Special Event.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This critique of "A Tour of the White House with Mrs. John F. Kennedy," a television program produced by CBS following completion of the White House restoration project to show the changes made, begins by discussing the relationships of the President and Mrs. Kennedy with the media, and the First Lady's involvement in the restoration project.…

Watson, Mary Ann

170

Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development  

E-print Network

Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Scientific Vision this change is hampered by lack of organizational structure and public support. In addition, mechanisms within the purview of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Rau, Don C.

171

75 FR 34643 - Atlantic Ocean Off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; Restricted Area  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Corps of Engineers 33 CFR Part 334 Atlantic Ocean Off John F. Kennedy Space Center...establishing a new restricted area in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of the John F...read as follows: Sec. 334.525 Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space...

2010-06-18

172

Single-Qubit Operations with the Nitrogen-Vacancy Center T. A. Kennedy1  

E-print Network

Single-Qubit Operations with the Nitrogen-Vacancy Center in Diamond T. A. Kennedy1 ) (a), F. T-202-767-2917; Fax: +1-202-767-1165; e-mail: kennedy@bloch.nrl.navy.mil *) Present address: NIST, Boulder CO, USA

Hart, Gus

173

A Biography of John F. Kennedy: The 35th President of the United States.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This teaching guide consists of a biography of the 35th President of the United States, John Fitzgerald Kennedy, as well as a set of five worksheets to accompany the biography. The worksheets, which are based on the reading, are intended to help students in grades 3-5 reinforce their knowledge of the life and presidency of John Kennedy, while at…

Weidman, Lisa Menendez; Shea, Ellen

174

75 FR 8570 - Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; Restricted Area  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...334 Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; Restricted Area AGENCY...Ocean off the coast of the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida. The KSC is the...facility for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and they need...

2010-02-25

175

SLEPIAN SPATIAL-SPECTRAL CONCENTRATION ON THE BALL ZUBAIR KHALID, RODNEY A. KENNEDY, AND JASON D. MCEWEN  

E-print Network

SLEPIAN SPATIAL-SPECTRAL CONCENTRATION ON THE BALL ZUBAIR KHALID, RODNEY A. KENNEDY, AND JASON D.khalid@anu.edu.au, rod- ney.kennedy@anu.edu.au Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Surrey RH5 6

McEwen, Jason

176

CONCENTRATION UNCERTAINTY PRINCIPLES FOR SIGNALS ON THE UNIT SPHERE Zubair Khalid, Salman Durrani, Parastoo Sadeghi and Rodney A. Kennedy  

E-print Network

, Parastoo Sadeghi and Rodney A. Kennedy Research School of Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia. Email: {zubair.khalid, salman.durrani, parastoo.sadeghi, rodney.kennedy

Durrani, Salman

177

77 FR 38271 - Voluntary Termination of Foreign-Trade Subzone 33B Verosol USA, Inc. Kennedy Township, Allegheny...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Termination of Foreign-Trade Subzone 33B Verosol USA, Inc. Kennedy Township, Allegheny County, PA Pursuant to the authority...Foreign-Trade Subzone 33B at the Verosol USA, Inc., plant in Kennedy Township, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania (Board Order...

2012-06-27

178

STUDY GUIDE FOR 34A K. GRACE KENNEDY WITH HELP FROM DR. SHU'S F08 34A STUDENTS  

E-print Network

STUDY GUIDE FOR 34A K. GRACE KENNEDY WITH HELP FROM DR. SHU'S F08 34A STUDENTS Fall 2008 Contents 1 Property, FOIL. "Multiplication distributes over addition and subtraction." 1 #12;2 K. GRACE KENNEDY

Bigelow, Stephen

179

Birthplace of John F. Kennedy: Home of the Boy Who Would Be President. Teaching with Historic Places.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This lesson is based on the John F. Kennedy National Historic Site (Massachusetts), the birthplace of President John F. Kennedy. The lesson can be used as a biographical study, an introduction to the Kennedy presidency and the turbulent sixties, or as part of a unit on post-World War II U.S. history. Primary and secondary sources are included for…

Obleschuk, Leslie C.

180

Radar Nowcasting of Total Lightning over the Kennedy Space Center GREGORY N. SEROKA,* RICHARD E. ORVILLE, AND COURTNEY SCHUMACHER  

E-print Network

Radar Nowcasting of Total Lightning over the Kennedy Space Center GREGORY N. SEROKA,* RICHARD E-derived predictors of total lightning over the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Four years (2006­ 09) of summer (June houses the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and its critical daily operations. While examining storms over

181

Liquid hydrogen production and economics for NASA Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Detailed economic analyses for the production of liquid hydrogen used to power the Space Shuttle are presented. The hydrogen production and energy needs of the NASA Kennedy Space Center are reviewed, and steam reformation, polygeneration, and electrolysis for liquid hydrogen production are examined on an equal economic basis. The use of photovoltaics as an electrolysis power source is considered. The 1985 present worth is calculated based on life cycle costs over a 21-year period beginning with full operation in 1990. Two different sets of escalation, inflation, and discount rates are used, with revenue credit being given for energy or other products of the hydrogen production process. The results show that the economic analyses are very dependent on the escalation rates used. The least net present value is found for steam reformation of natural gas, while the best net present value is found for the electrolysis process which includes the phasing of photovoltaics.

Block, D. L.

1985-12-01

182

Profile of Ambulance Runs at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has four onsite ambulances staffed with Paramedics at two fire stations that respond to 911 Emergency Medical System (EMS) medical dispatches. These ambulances serve over 22,000 NASA, military, government, and contractor employees in an area of approximately 520 square miles. Included in this coverage are several public areas such as beaches, a wildlife refuge and a popular Visitor Center. Reports are filled out on each patient encountered. However. the only element tracked has been the ambulance response time. Now that reports are filed electronically, it is possible to enter them into an electronic database for analysis. Data analyses reveal trends and assist in better allocation of resources.

Scarpa, Philip J.

1999-01-01

183

Lightning Protection and Instrumentation at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lightning is a natural phenomenon, but can be dangerous. Prevention of lightning is a physical impossibility and total protection requires compromises on costs and effects, therefore prediction and measurements of the effects that might be produced by iightn:ing is a most at locat:ions where people or sensitive systems and equipment are exposed. This is the case of the launching pads for the Space Shuttle at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. This report summarizes lightring phenomena with a brief explanation of lightning generation and lightning activity as related to KSC. An analysis of the instrumentation used at the launching pads for measurements of lightning effects with alternatives to improve the protection system and up-grade the actual instrumentation system is indicated.

Colon, Jose L.

2005-01-01

184

John F. Kennedy Space Center's Chemochromic Hypergol Sensors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) seeks partne rs interested in the commercial application of the Chemochromic Hyper gol Sensors technology. NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is soliciti ng licensees for this innovative technology. The Chemochromic Hypergo l Sensors technology consists of chemochromic pigments incorporated i nto various matrices (e.g., tapes, sheets, injection molded parts, fi bers). When placed near strategic locations such as piping and contai ner valves, seams, and joints, these sensors provide an instantaneous , distinct color change from yellow to black indicating the presence of hypergols at the leak location. The chemochromic pigments can be incorporated into fibers used to make fabrics for personal protective equipment as well as into badge holders for use as a point leak detector. These affordable, easily replaceable sensors provide the capabil ity to visually monitor leak-prone locations and personnel working i n those areas on a continuous basis for the presence of dangerous hyp ergols.

Nichols, James D.

2012-01-01

185

Latest Development in Advanced Sensors at Kennedy Space Center (KSC)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Inexpensive space transportation system must be developed in order to make spaceflight more affordable. To achieve this goal, there is a need to develop inexpensive smart sensors to allow autonomous checking of the health of the vehicle and associated ground support equipment, warn technicians or operators of an impending problem and facilitate rapid vehicle pre-launch operations. The Transducers and Data Acquisition group at Kennedy Space Center has initiated an effort to study, research, develop and prototype inexpensive smart sensors to accomplish these goals. Several technological challenges are being investigated and integrated in this project multi-discipline sensors; self-calibration, health self-diagnosis capabilities embedded in sensors; advanced data acquisition systems with failure prediction algorithms and failure correction (self-healing) capabilities.

Perotti, Jose M.; Eckhoff, Anthony J.; Voska, N. (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

186

Report on Advanced Life Support Activities at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Plant studies at Kennedy Space Center last year focused on selecting cultivars of lettuce, tomato, and pepper for further testing as crops for near-term space flight applications. Other testing continued with lettuce, onion, and radish plants grown at different combinations of light (PPF), temperature, and CO2 concentration. In addition, comparisons of mixed versus mono culture approaches for vegetable production were studied. Water processing testing focused on the development and testing of a rotating membrane bioreactor to increase oxygen diffusion levels for reducing total organic carbon levels and promoting nitrification. Other testing continued to study composting testing for food wastes (NRA grant) and the use of supplemental green light with red/blue LED lighting systems for plant production (NRC fellowship).

Wheeler, Raymond M.

2004-01-01

187

Applications of Meteorological Tower Data at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Members of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) design and operation communities rely on meteorological information collected at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), located near Cape Canaveral, Florida, to correctly apply the ambient environment to various tasks. The Natural Environments Branch/EV44, located at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, is responsible for providing its NASA customers with meteorological data using various climatological data sources including balloons, surface stations, aircraft, hindcast models, and meteorological towers. Of the many resources available within the KSC region, meteorological towers are preferred for near-surface applications because they record data at regular, frequent intervals over an extensive period of record at a single location. This paper discusses the uses of data measured at several different meteorological towers for a common period of record and how the data can be applied to various engineering decisions for the new Constellation Program Ares and Orion space vehicles.

Altino, Karen M.; Barbre, Robert E., Jr.

2009-01-01

188

Space Radar Image of Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This is an X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar image spanning an area of about 20 kilometers by 40 kilometers (12 miles by 25 miles) of the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. At the top right are cloud-like structures which indicate rain. X-SAR is able to image heavy rainfall. The Atlantic Ocean is at the upper right. The shuttle landing strip is seen at the top left of the image. The Vertical Assembly Building, the Orbiter Processing Facility and other associated buildings are seen as a white area to the right and just above the end of the shuttle strip. The shuttle launch pads are the two white areas near the top center of the image. The Banana River shows up as a large black area running north to south to the right of the image. The Indian River is on the left side of the image. Just above the image center is a cluster of white spots which are the major buildings of the Kennedy Space Center industrial area. This was the location of the reflector array that was constructed to form the letters 'KSC' by the KSC payload team. The data for these KSC images were taken on orbit 81 of the space shuttle Endeavour on the fourth day of the SIR-C/X-SAR mission. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft und Raumfahrt e.V.(DLR), the major partner in science, operations and data processing of X-SAR.

1999-01-01

189

Internship at NASA Kennedy Space Center's Cryogenic Test laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is known for hosting all of the United States manned rocket launches as well as many unmanned launches at low inclinations. Even though the Space Shuttle recently retired, they are continuing to support unmanned launches and modifying manned launch facilities. Before a rocket can be launched, it has to go through months of preparation, called processing. Pieces of a rocket and its payload may come in from anywhere in the nation or even the world. The facilities all around the center help integrate the rocket and prepare it for launch. As NASA prepares for the Space Launch System, a rocket designed to take astronauts beyond Low Earth Orbit throughout the solar system, technology development is crucial for enhancing launch capabilities at the KSC. The Cryogenics Test Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center greatly contributes to cryogenic research and technology development. The engineers and technicians that work there come up with new ways to efficiently store and transfer liquid cryogens. NASA has a great need for this research and technology development as it deals with cryogenic liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen for rocket fuel, as well as long term space flight applications. Additionally, in this new era of space exploration, the Cryogenics Test Laboratory works with the commercial sector. One technology development project is the Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) Ground Operations Demonstration Unit (GODU). LH2 GODU intends to demonstrate increased efficiency in storing and transferring liquid hydrogen during processing, loading, launch and spaceflight of a spacecraft. During the Shuttle Program, only 55% of hydrogen purchased was used by the Space Shuttle Main Engines. GODU's goal is to demonstrate that this percentage can be increased to 75%. Figure 2 shows the GODU layout when I concluded my internship. The site will include a 33,000 gallon hydrogen tank (shown in cyan) with a heat exchanger inside the hydrogen tank attached to a refrigerator capable of removing 850 Watts at 20 Kelvin (shown in green). The refrigerator and most of its supporting equipment will be kept in a standard shipping container (shown in pink). Currently, GODU is in the fabrication process and some of the large components have already been purchased.

Holland, Katherine

2013-01-01

190

The evolution of electronic tracking, optical, telemetry, and command systems at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A history is presented of the major electronic tracking, optical, telemetry, and command systems used at ETR in support of Apollo-Saturn and its forerunner vehicles launched under the jurisdiction of the Kennedy Space Center and its forerunner organizations.

Mcmurran, W. R. (editor)

1973-01-01

191

Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development  

E-print Network

Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Implementing of preterm birth Interventions for autism 10 factors "health disadvantage" Microbiome on child development/fetus Social/behavioral dimensions of contraception Pharmaceutics for brain recovery Microbial content

Rau, Don C.

192

78 FR 28276 - Operating Limitations at John F. Kennedy International Airport  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK) that published on January 18, 2008...the number of arrivals and departures at JFK during the peak afternoon demand period...April 2000, the HDR's applicability to JFK operations terminated as of January...

2013-05-14

193

76 FR 63932 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...National Institutes of Health, Building 31, 9000 Rockville Pike, Room 2A48, Bethesda, MD 20892. Contact Person: Constantine A. Stratakis, MD, D(med)Sci, Scientific Director, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health...

2011-10-14

194

75 FR 71449 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...National Institutes of Health, Building 31, 9000 Rockville Pike, Room 2A48, Bethesda, MD 20892. Contact Person: Constantine A. Stratakis, MD, Acting Scientific Director, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human...

2010-11-23

195

76 FR 20694 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...National Institutes of Health, Building 31, Room 2A46, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892. Contact Person: Constantine A. Stratakis, MD, Acting Scientific Director, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human...

2011-04-13

196

A study of the characteristics of thunderstorm cessation at the NASA Kennedy Space Center  

E-print Network

A lightning summary was developed for a 100xlOO kilometer area centered at the NASA Kennedy Space Center. Spatial and temporal patterns, and first stroke peak currents were analyzed from 1986-1995, Three thunderstorms were chosen due...

Hinson, Michael Shawn

2012-06-07

197

Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development  

E-print Network

Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Scientific Vision and structure for the conference as well as the expertise of the invited participants were all developed

Rau, Don C.

198

Fire-scar formation and compartmentalization in Kevin T. Smith and Elaine Kennedy Sutherland  

E-print Network

Fire-scar formation and compartmentalization in oak Kevin T. Smith and Elaine Kennedy Sutherland in April 1995 and 1997 scarred Quercus prinus L. and Q. velutina Lam. Low-intensity fires scorched bark

199

75 FR 16151 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Committee: National Children's Study Advisory Committee...pertaining to the National Children's Study Communications...Secretary, National Children's Study, Eunice Kennedy...Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100...

2010-03-31

200

75 FR 54891 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Committee: National Children's Study Advisory Committee...National Institutes of Health, Building 31, 31...Secretary, National Children's Study, Eunice Kennedy...Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100...

2010-09-09

201

77 FR 58855 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; Child Health Research Career...

2012-09-24

202

76 FR 40737 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel, Children's Research, Institute For...

2011-07-11

203

76 FR 40737 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel, Child Health Research Career...

2011-07-11

204

76 FR 14673 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting Pursuant...Executive Secretary, National Children's Study, Eunice Kennedy...Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100...

2011-03-17

205

76 FR 43334 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel, Children in Rural Poverty. Date:...

2011-07-20

206

'Where are your intelligent mothers to come from?': marriage and family in the scientific career of Dame Kathleen Lonsdale FRS (1903-71).  

PubMed

Although she was one of the most successful female scientists in twentieth-century Britain, the X-ray crystallographer Kathleen Yardley Lonsdale (1903-71) has received relatively little attention from historians of science. This paper, based on material from the recently opened Dame Kathleen Lonsdale Papers, argues that Lonsdale's scientific career was shaped in particular ways by her identity not just as a woman, but as a married woman and a mother. When interacting with her scientific colleagues, Lonsdale frequently had to confront the assumption that married women should not pursue scientific careers, an attitude shaped by British concerns about reasserting traditional gender roles after the World Wars I and II. Furthermore, although Lonsdale's husband, Thomas, was an ardent supporter of her career, in the early 1930s Lonsdale left research temporarily to care for her small children. Her desire to work from home during this period led her to pursue one of her most significant scientific projects: the creation of crystallographic reference tables. Lonsdale's own experiences, and those of her female students, led her to focus on issues of marriage and family when she began speaking and writing about women in science during the late 1960s. PMID:19579358

Baldwin, Melinda

2009-03-20

207

Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki State on a Honeycomb Lattice is a Universal Quantum Computational Resource  

E-print Network

Universal quantum computation can be achieved by simply performing single-qubit measurements on a highly entangled resource state, such as cluster states. The family of Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki states has recently been intensively explored and shown to provide restricted computation. Here, we show that the two-dimensional Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki state on a honeycomb lattice is a universal resource for measurement-based quantum computation.

Tzu-Chieh Wei; Ian Affleck; Robert Raussendorf

2011-02-24

208

System engineering processes at Kennedy Space Center for development of SLS and Orion Launch Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There are over 40 subsystems being developed for the future SLS and Orion Launch Systems at Kennedy Space Center. These subsystems developed at the Kennedy Space Center Engineering Directorate follow a comprehensive design process which requires several different product deliverables during each phase of each of the subsystems. This Paper describes this process and gives an example of a subsystem where this systems engineering process has been applied.

Schafer, Eric J.; Henderson, Gena; Stambolian, Damon

209

Oceanic Storm Characteristics Off the Kennedy Space Center Coast  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Natural cloud-to-ground lightning may behave differently depending on the characteristics of the attachment mediums, including the peak current (inferred from radiation fields) and the number of ground strike locations per flash. Existing literature has raised issues over the yea"rs on the behavior of lightning over ocean terrain and these phenomena are not yet well understood. To investigate lightning characteristics over differing terrain we will obtain identical observations over adjacent land and ocean regions during both clear air and thunderstorm periods comparing the electric field behavior over these various terrains. For this, a 3-meter NOAA buoy moored 20NM off the coast of the Kennedy Space Center was instrumented with an electric field mill and New Mexico Tech's slow antenna to measure the electric fields aloft and compared to the existing on-shore electric field mill suite of 31 sensors and a coastal slow antenna. New Mexico Tech's Lightning Mapping Array and the Eastern Range Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System, along with the network of high-speed cameras being used to capture cloud-to-ground lightning strikes over the terrain regions to identify a valid data set and verify the electric fields. This is an on-going project with the potential for significant impact on the determination of lightning risk to objects on the ground. This presentation will provide results and instrumentation progress to date.

Wilson, J.; Simpson, A. A.; Cummins, K. L.; Kiriazes, J. J.; Brown, R. G.; Mata, C. T.

2014-01-01

210

Advances in Materials Research: An Internship at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

My time at Kennedy Space Center. was spent immersing myself in research performed in the Materials Science Division of the Engineering Directorate. My Chemical Engineering background provided me the ability to assist in many different projects ranging from tensile testing of composite materials to making tape via an extrusion process. However, I spent the majority of my time on the following three projects: (1) testing three different materials to determine antimicrobial properties; (2) fabricating and analyzing hydrogen sensing tapes that were placed at the launch pad for STS-133 launch; and (3) researching molten regolith electrolysis at KSC to prepare me for my summer internship at MSFC on a closely related topic. This paper aims to explain, in detail, what I have learned about these three main projects. It will explain why this research is happening and what we are currently doing to resolve the issues. This paper will also explain how the hard work and experiences that I have gained as an intern have provided me with the next big step towards my career at NASA.

Barrios, Elizabeth A.; Roberson, Luke B.

2011-01-01

211

A Kennedy Space Center implementation of IEEE 1451  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To meet the demand for more reliable sensory data, longer sensor calibration cycles, and more useful information for operators at NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC), NASA's Instrumentation Branch and ASRC's Advanced Electronics and Technology Development Laboratory at the KSC are developing custom intelligent sensors based on the IEEE 1451 family of smart-sensor standards. The KSC intelligent sensors are known as Smart Networked Elements (SNEs), and each SNE includes transducers and their associated Transducer Electronic Data Sheets (TEDS), signal conditioning, analog-to-digital conversion, software algorithms for performing health checks on the data, and a network connection for sending data to other SNEs and higher-level systems. The development of the SNE has led to the definition of custom architectures, protocols, IEEE 1451 implementations, and TEDS, which are presented in this paper. The IEEE 1451 standards describe the architecture, message formats, software objects, and communication protocols within the smart sensor. Because of the standard's complexity, KSC has simplified the IEEE 1451 architecture and narrowed the scope of software objects to be included in the SNE to create a "light" IEEE 1451 implementation, and has used the manufacturer-defined TEDS to customize the SNE with health indicators. Furthermore, KSC has developed a protocol that allows the SNEs to communicate over an Ethernet network while reducing bandwidth requirements.

Oostdyk, Rebecca L.; Mata, Carlos T.; Perotti, José M.; Lucena, Angel R.; Mullenix, Pamela A.

2006-05-01

212

Radiological dose assessments at the Kennedy Space Center  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the application of an atmospheric transport and diffusion model for launch window and safety risk assessment studies in support of the Galileo (which is scheduled for the October/November 1989 period) and Ulysses (scheduled for {approximately}1 yr after Galileo) missions at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The model is resident in the EMERGE software system developed by NUS Corporation and modified for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to provide real-time and safety analyses report support for the launches. The application is unique in that the model accommodates the varied amount of meteorological data at KSC and Cape Canaveral and includes a site-specific algorithm to account for local-scale circulations. This paper focuses on the Galileo mission application, including discussions of the use of the meteorological data available at KSC, integration of the EMERGE sea-breeze algorithm, and examples of real-time and safety analyses report assessments. The Galileo spacecraft is to be launched toward Jupiter using the space shuttle.

Firstenberg, H.; Jubach, R.; Bartram, B.; Vaughan, F.

1989-01-01

213

A Diagnostic Analysis of the Kennedy Space Center LDAR Network  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The performance characteristics of the Kennedy Space Center Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) network are investigated at medium-far range (50-300 km). A 19 month noise-filtered sample of LDAR observations is examined, from which it is determined that the "climatological" VHF source density as observed by LDAR falls off approximately 10 dB every 71 km of ground range from the network centroid. The underlying vertical distribution of LDAR sources is approximately normally distributed with a mean of 9 km and a standard deviation of 2.7 km, implying that loss of below-horizon sources has a negligible effect on column-integrated source densities within 200 km ground range. At medium to far ranges, location errors are primarily radial and have a slightly asymmetric distribution whose first moment increases as r(exp 2). A range calibration derived from these results is used to normalize source density maps on monthly, daily and hourly time scales and yields significant improvements in correlation with NLDN ground strike densities.

Boccippio, Dennis J.; Heckman, G.; Goodman, Steven

1999-01-01

214

After nineteen years, the last trove of secret Kennedy tapes is released to the public  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

New Air Force One tapes give insight on Kennedy deathhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-16821363Last of secret Kennedy tapes releasedhttp://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-kennedy-tapes-20120125,0,6198450.storyPost JFK Assassination Air Force One Flight Deck Recordinghttp://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/GPO-NARA-JFK-ASSASSINATION-AUDIO/content-detail.htmlThe President John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Collectionhttp://www.archives.gov/research/jfk/The National Security Archive: The Cuban Missile Crisis, 1962: Audio Clips (iTunes)http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/nsa/cuba_mis_cri/audio.htmJFK 50 Years: Celebrate the past to awaken the futurehttp://www.jfk50.org/In the last three months of his presidency, John F. Kennedy dedicated a dam in Heber Springs, Arkansas, signed the Partial Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, and spoke with his advisers about the War on Poverty preparations for 1964. During this period, many hours of tapes secretly recorded Kennedy's interactions with his advisers, his family, and others, on a variety of topics including domestic policy and the space race. The John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum in Boston has reviewed and released over 248 hours of taped meetings and 12 hours of phone conversation since 1993. Not until this past week, however, were the final 45 hours of tapes from the final months of Kennedy's presidency released. Many historians and members of the public have been eagerly waiting to listen to them. Those who have heard the tapes thus far have remarked that the tapes demonstrate Kennedy's facility with a wide array of policy concerns. In one session, after hearing vastly different stories from top aides who had traveled to South Vietnam to assess the country, Kennedy remarks, "You both went to the same country?" The last meeting was taped on November 20th, 1963, two days before he was assassinated in Dallas.The first link takes visitors to a piece from this Tuesday's BBC News about the tapes that document the minutes on Air Force One immediately after President Kennedy's assassination. The second link leads to a Los Angeles Times article from last Tuesday, which discusses a larger selection of tapes. The third link leads to the previously mentioned Air Force One audio tape that was released this week. Moving on, the fourth link whisks users away to the President John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Collection, which is maintained by the National Archives. First-time visitors to the Collection page should start by perusing the FAQ area, as it is quite helpful. The fifth link takes interested parties to the very well-known and fascinating audio tapes of President Kennedy talking about the Cuban Missile Crisis with Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara, Secretary of State Dean Rusk, and his brother, Attorney General Robert Kennedy. The last link leads to a great site celebrating the 50th anniversary of President Kennedy's inauguration and his legacy in the arenas of foreign diplomacy, the arts, and civil rights.

Grinnell, Max

2012-02-03

215

BOSTON COLLEGE Kathleen Sullivan  

E-print Network

general scientific society, and publisher of the journal, Science. AAAS was founded in 1848, and includes the largest paid circulation of any peer-reviewed general science journal in the world, with an estimated.edu BOSTON COLLEGE PSYCHOLOGY PROF. LISA FELDMAN BARRETT NAMED 2008 AAAS FELLOW CHESTNUT HILL, MA (12

Huang, Jianyu

216

Boston College Kathleen Sullivan  

E-print Network

the current government's attempt to whitewash the past and resurrect the image of Stalin. #12;The film was co been seen on public television and in film festivals. His films explore issues of social justice

Huang, Jianyu

217

KathleenMcAleer  

Cancer.gov

Skip to Main Content CCR Home | About CCR | CCR Intranet Main Navigation Home Profiles Research Newsworthy References Special Interest Groups Training Main Links Psycho-Oncology Home Profiles Research Publications Newsworthy/Resources References Special

218

Interview with Kathleen Blee  

E-print Network

. people will tell you things that are completely against their interest to say. nd so I now feel a greater burden to protect people from doing that. now I’m more likely to say, ‘I want to make sure that you don’t tell me things that you’re going... interviewing and ethnography practices changed after interviewing people you don’t sympathize with? Blee: that’s a great question! when I started, I thought I would go back to a classic feminist interviewing style, like being sympa - thetic to informants...

Decker, Stephanie Kristine

2007-01-01

219

HKS Community StandardS, PoliCieS, and requirementS 120132014 HARVARD KENNEDY SCHOOL STUDENT HANDBOOK  

E-print Network

;12013­2014 HARVARD KENNEDY SCHOOL STUDENT HANDBOOK office of the Registrar 124 Mt. auburn street, suite 165 hks, and regulations. the kennedy school of Government therefore reserves the right at any time to make changes, whichInG aRound 20 l eveRythInG else 20 the fIne pRInt 24 fInanCIal MatteRs #12;22013­2014 HARVARD KENNEDY

220

Kennedy Space Center Coronary Heart Disease Risk Screening Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The number one cause of death in the U.S. is coronary heart disease (CHD). It is probably a major cause of death and disability in the lives of employees at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) as well. The KSC Biomedical Office used a multifactorial mathematical formula from the Framingham Heart Study to calculate CHD risk probabilities for individuals in a segment of the KSC population that required medical evaluation for job certification. Those assessed to be high-risk probabilities will be targeted for intervention. Every year, several thousand KSC employees require medical evaluations for job related certifications. Most medical information for these evaluations is gathered on-site at one of the KSC or Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) medical clinics. The formula used in the Framingham Heart Study allows calculation of a person's probability of acquiring CHD within 10 years. The formula contains the following variables: Age, Diabetes, Smoking, Left Ventricular Hypertrophy, Blood Pressure (Systolic or Diastolic), Cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol. The formula is also gender specific. It was used to calculate the 10-year probabilities of CHD in KSC employees who required medical evaluations for job certifications during a one-year time frame. This KSC population was profiled and CHD risk reduction interventions could be targeted to those at high risk. Population risk could also be periodically reevaluated to determine the effectiveness of intervention. A 10-year CHD risk probability can be calculated for an individual quite easily while gathering routine medical information. An employee population's CHD risk probability can be profiled graphically revealing high risk segments of the population which can be targeted for risk reduction intervention. The small audience of NASA/contractor physicians, nurses and exercise/fitness professionals at the breakout session received the lecture very well. Approximately one third indicated by a show of hands that they would be interested in implementing a similar program at their NASA Center. Questions were asked pertaining to standardization for age, the validity of using the idealized male values also for the female population, and indications of the screening test's sensitivity and specificity.

Tipton, David A.; Scarpa, Philip J.

1999-01-01

221

Airborne measurements of cloud forming nuclei and aerosol particles at Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results of airborne measurements of the sizes and concentrations of aerosol particles, ice nuclei, and cloud condensation nuclei that were taken at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, are presented along with a detailed description of the instrumentation and measuring capabilities of the University of Washington airborne measuring facility (Douglas B-23). Airborne measurements made at Ft. Collins, Colorado, and Little Rock, Arkansas, during the ferry of the B-23 are presented. The particle concentrations differed significantly between the clean air over Ft. Collins and the hazy air over Little Rock and Kennedy Space Center. The concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei over Kennedy Space Center were typical of polluted eastern seaboard air. Three different instruments were used to measure ice nuclei: one used filters to collect the particles, and the others used optical and acoustical methods to detect ice crystals grown in portable cloud chambers. A comparison of the ice nucleus counts, which are in good agreement, is presented.

Radke, L. F.; Langer, G.; Hindman, E. E., II

1978-01-01

222

The influence of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby on William Kennedy's Legs  

E-print Network

THE INFLUENCE OF F. SCOTT FITZGERALD' S THE GREAT GATSBY ON WILLIAM KENNEDY'8 LEGS A Thesis by SUSAN BOLET EGENOLF Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF ARTS August 1989 Major Subject: English THE INFLUENCE OF F. SCOTT FITZGERALD'S THE GREAT GATSBY ON WILLIAM KENNEDY'S LEGS A Thesis by SUSAN BOLET EGENOLF Approved as to style and content by: g~-' I / Lar y J. R nolds ( ir of mmittee...

Egenolf, Susan Bolet

2012-06-07

223

Kennedy, Sheila S., God and Country: America in Red Waco, Texas: Baylor University Press, 2007, 254 pp  

E-print Network

about issues such as abortion, gun control, the definition of marriage, immi- gration reform nature of American conflict. In part 1, Kennedy puts forth a daunting problem definition. She argues for sound public policy. Kennedy's conception of religion refers to how individuals construct meaning

Colorado at Boulder, University of

224

A Comparison of MERRA and NARR Reanalyses with the DOE ARM SGP Data AARON D. KENNEDY, XIQUAN DONG, AND BAIKE XI  

E-print Network

A Comparison of MERRA and NARR Reanalyses with the DOE ARM SGP Data AARON D. KENNEDY, XIQUAN DONG and their underlying models are Corresponding author address: Mr. Aaron Kennedy, Depart- ment of Atmospheric Sciences

Dong, Xiquan

225

Volume 4 Issue 4 www.nasa.gov/centers/stennis April 2009 Space shuttle Atlantis sits at Launch Pad 39A at Kennedy Space  

E-print Network

39A at Kennedy Space Center in Florida, ready to begin its STS-125 mission to service the Hubble at Kennedy Space Center, where the data collected at Stennis was used in determining that Discovery was `Go

226

Cella Energy Limited, a spinout company from STFC, is to set up a new facility at NASA's iconic Kennedy Space Center (NASA KSC) after a new round of  

E-print Network

Kennedy Space Center (NASA KSC) after a new round of funding led by a $1million investment by Space Innovations Club This issue: 1 Space Florida invest, to land Cella at Kennedy Space Centre 2 European Space at Kennedy Space Centre Image: Credit: Cella Energy 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Cella Energy's Chief Scientific Officer

227

PRINT PAGES 1-19, ONLY Thank you for expressing interest in volunteering at Kennedy Krieger Institute. We are looking forward to  

E-print Network

PRINT PAGES 1- 19, ONLY Thank you for expressing interest in volunteering at Kennedy Krieger with two letters of recommendation to: Kennedy Krieger Institute, Guest Relations & Volunteer Services to the man and said, "I made a difference to that one." ­ Anonymous #12;KENNEDY KRIEGER INSTITUTE VOLUNTEER

Pevsner, Jonathan

228

Surface to 90 km winds for Kennedy Space Center, Florida, and Vandenberg AFB, California  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Bivariate normal wind statistics for a 90 degree flight azimuth, from 0 through 90 km altitude, for Kennedy Space Center, Florida, and Vandenberg AFB, California are presented. Wind probability distributions and statistics for any rotation of axes can be computed from the five given parameters.

Johnson, D. L.; Brown, S. C.

1979-01-01

229

Fire and safety materials utilization at the John F. Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The special needs of the Kennedy Space Center in the area of protective garments for personnel engaged in hazardous emergency operations are discussed. The materials used in the protective clothing and the specialized applications of various materials are described. It is concluded that Nomex is the best general purpose nonflammable material for protective clothing.

Reynolds, J. R.

1971-01-01

230

College Football and Public Crisis: Appropriate Actions and Justifications after the Kennedy Assassination.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper contends that domestic response to John F. Kennedy's assassination took two basic forms in the United States: active crisis management and retreat. According to the paper, while government, churches, and the media engaged in active crisis management, businesses and schools closed, and the public retreated to mourn rather than to…

Brown, Robert S.

231

Mathematics 3C Summer 2009 Worksheet 5, August 20th, TA Grace Kennedy  

E-print Network

having a concentration of 2 grams of salt per liter of water is entering a 200-liter vat of fresh water at 5 liters per minute. The salt water mixes in with the fresh water and the brine exits by a funnelMathematics 3C Summer 2009 Worksheet 5, August 20th, TA Grace Kennedy NAME: 1. Suppose salt water

Akhmedov, Azer

232

Identifying and responding to customer needs at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Patient Questionnaire Program at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has been in place for several years. It has helped to identify customer perceptions and needs. The questionnaire is presented and the survey results are discussed with respect to total quality management.

Ferguson, E. B.

1993-01-01

233

"A Watchman on the Walls of World Freedom": The International Crisis Speaking of John F. Kennedy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The primary goal of presidential crisis rhetoric appears to be the unification of the people of the United States in support of presidential policy. John F. Kennedy's crisis speaking corresponded both to his conceptions of presidential leadership and to those of the people. If the President of the United States is seen as the personification of…

Kahl, Mary L.

234

Astronaut Charles Conrad discusses x-rays with medical team at Cape Kennedy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., (dark shirt), pilot for Gemini 5 space flight, discusses x-rays with members of the medical team at Cape Kennedy. Left to right are: Dr. Eugene Tubbs; Astronaut Conrad; Dr. Charles A. Berry, Chief, Center Medical Programs, Manned Spacecraft Center; and (seated) Dr. Robert Moser, Medical Monitor with the U.S. Army.

1965-01-01

235

Emergency medical operations at Kennedy Space Center in support of space shuttle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The unique environment of the Kennedy Space Center includes a wide variety of industrial processes culminating in launch and spaceflight. Many are potentially hazardous to the work force and the astronauts. Technology, planning, training, and quality control are utilized to prevent contingencies and expedite response should a contingency occur.

Myers, K. J.; Tipton, D. A.; Woodard, D.; Long, I. D.

1992-01-01

236

Prospects for an advanced Kennedy-Thorndike experiment in low Earth orbit  

E-print Network

We discuss the potential for a small space mission to perform an advanced Kennedy-Thorndike test of Special Relativity using the large and rapid velocity modulation available in low Earth orbit. An improvement factor of ~100 over present ground results is expected, with an additional factor of 10 possible using more advanced technology.

J. A. Lipa; S. Buchman; S. Saraf; J. Zhou; A. Alfauwaz; J. Conklin; G. D. Cutler; R. L. Byer

2012-03-18

237

Tight Site. John F. Kennedy Recreational Center, Cleveland, Ohio; P/A Building Cost Analysis 2  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the John F. Kennedy Recreation Center, Cleveland, Ohio, which combines the recreational and athletic requirements of three distinct clients on a confined parcel of land. This building cost analysis is the second in a series. (See EA 503 949). Other related articles are EA 503 950-951, EA 504 571-572, and EA 504 578. (Author/MF)

Progressive Architecture, 1973

1973-01-01

238

The Transformation of Federal Education Policy: The Kennedy and Johnson Years.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Archive-based historical analysis brings a perspective to policy studies that is lacking in individual case studies. The recently opened Kennedy and Johnson archives facilitate an internal analysis of the evolution of education policy formulation in the 1960s from the perspective of the executive branch. The central thread of continuity for such…

Graham, Hugh Davis

239

CELL LINEAGE PROJECTIONS IN LOW DIMENSIONAL SPACES Sabina Pfister*, Colette Dehay**, Henry Kennedy**, Rodney Douglas*  

E-print Network

CELL LINEAGE PROJECTIONS IN LOW DIMENSIONAL SPACES Sabina Pfister*, Colette Dehay**, Henry Kennedy**, Rodney Douglas* *Institute of Neuroinformatics, UNI/ETH, ZĂĽrich, Switzerland **Stem-cell and Brain@ini.phys.ethz.ch ABSTRACT Cortical neurogenesis is a complex process during which dividing cells have the ability to acquire

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

240

FARFIELD ARRAY WEIGHT REDESIGN FOR NEARFIELD BEAMFORMING Thushara D. Abhayapala Rodney A. Kennedy  

E-print Network

FARFIELD ARRAY WEIGHT REDESIGN FOR NEARFIELD BEAMFORMING Thushara D. Abhayapala Rodney A. Kennedy, both of these methods do not accurately achieve the desired response over all angles. Other related) a relationship between nearfield response and farfield response of a same theoretical continuous sensor based

Abhayapala, Thushara D.

241

A Journal for Adrienne Kennedy (after People Who Led to My Plays)  

Microsoft Academic Search

To make oneself an artist is difficult in any society. But when your society's cultural traditions actively discourage and devalue you, the challenge is enormous and the emotional cost is great. Adrienne Kennedy wanted to be a major writer at a time when America's literary culture took little or no interest in African-American writers of either sex or in women

Margo Jefferson

2012-01-01

242

Educational Applications of Astronomy & Space Flight Operations at the Kennedy Space Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

Within two years, the Kennedy Space Center will complete a total redesign of NASA's busiest Visitor's Center. Three million visitors per year will be witness to a new program focused on expanding the interests of the younger public in NASA's major space programs, in space operations, and in astronomy. This project, being developed through the Visitor's Center director, a NASA

L. K. Erickson

1999-01-01

243

STS 41-G crew leaves orbiter after landing at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS 41-G crew leaves the orbiter after landing at Kennedy Space Center at the end of their mission. Astronaut Robert Crippen shakes hands with George W.S. Abbey, Director of JSC's Flight Crew Operations, while the other crewmembers wait behind him. They are Jon McBride, David Leestma, Sally K. Ride, Kathryn Sullivan, Marc Garneau and Paul Scully-Power.

1984-01-01

244

The Center on Civic Literacy Sheila Kennedy, JD; Erin Braun; Nichole Davis; Michael Marsala  

E-print Network

The Center on Civic Literacy Sheila Kennedy, JD; Erin Braun; Nichole Davis; Michael Marsala IUPUI, SPEA Indiana University ­ Purdue University Indianapolis Abstract The Center for Civic Literacy Board. Web. 27 Mar. 2012. http://www.nagb.org/civics/statement-quigley.htm The Center for Civic Literacy

Zhou, Yaoqi

245

Preliminary economic analysis of aquifer winter-chill storage at the John F. Kennedy airport  

Microsoft Academic Search

A conceptual design was formulated in conjuction with a cost analysis to determine the feasibility of retrofitting the present John F. Kennedy (JFK) airport air-conditioning system with an aquifer cold water storage system. It appears technically feasible to chill and store aquifer water at the airport site during the winter months for later air-conditioning use. However, the economic analysis shows

E. C. Fox; J. F. Thomas

1979-01-01

246

N E W S R E L E A S E Kerry Kennedy  

E-print Network

distributed to 10,000 high schools and colleges. Her most recent book is Being Catholic Now, a collection of essays written by well-known Catholics, discussing their faith and what it means to their lives in contemporary American society. Kennedy served as executive director, and is now on the board of directors

Akhmedov, Azer

247

John F. Kennedy's Birthplace. A Presidential Home in History and Memory.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this Historic Resource Study is to provide a scholarly understanding of the historical significance of the Kennedy birthplace that will inform and guide the park managers in the future treatment and interpretation of the site. It traces a d...

A. von Hoffman

2004-01-01

248

Nanoscale fluoro-immuno assays with lanthanide oxide nanoparticles I.M. Kennedy*a  

E-print Network

Nanoscale fluoro-immuno assays with lanthanide oxide nanoparticles I.M. Kennedy*a , M. Koivunenb ABSTRACT The use of polystyrene nanoparticles with europium chelate has been demonstrated as fluorescent reporters in an immunoassay for atrazine. The limit of detection with the nanoparticles was similar

Hammock, Bruce D.

249

2013-2014 Student/Academic Calendar Kennedy Krieger High School  

E-print Network

2013-2014 Student/Academic Calendar Kennedy Krieger High School 3825 Greenspring Avenue Baltimore, MD 21211 Phone for the High School: 443-923-7800 1 4 July 2013 First day of summer program for 11 month students (no school on Fridays) 4th of July ­ No School For Students 1 26 August 2013 Last Day

Pevsner, Jonathan

250

A New Lightning Instrumentation System for Pad 39B at the Kennedy Space Center Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph presentation describes a new lightning instrumentation system for pad 39B at Kennedy Space Center Florida. The contents include: 1) Background; 2) Instrumentation; 3) Meteorological Instrumentation; and 4) Lessons learned. A presentation of the data acquired at Camp Blanding is also shown.

Mata, C. T.; Rakov, V. A.

2011-01-01

251

ADDITIONAL QUESTIONS BY SENATOR KENNEDY AND ANSWERS BY DR. JEFFREYHARRIS FORTHE WRITTEN RECORD  

E-print Network

, you testified that tobacco sellers could raise cigarette prices even higher without exceeding: SENATE JUDICIARY COMMITTEE HEARINGS ON THE "PROPOSED GLOBAL TOBACCO SETTLEMENT: WHO BENEFITS?" AUGUST 4, 1997 Q (Senator Kennedy): Dr. Harris, you have testified that the proposed global tobacco settlement

Seager, Sara

252

The Kennedy School's Human Resource Department is located at 124 Mount Auburn, suite 240 in Cambridge, MA, just a few minutes walking distance from the main campus. When you  

E-print Network

Directions The Kennedy School's Human Resource Department is located at 124 Mount Auburn, suite 240 to 124 Mount Auburn. Walking from the Harvard Square Subway Station: The Kennedy School is a quick walk John F. Kennedy St. and continue down the street for three blocks. The Kennedy School is on the corner

253

77 FR 14600 - Pricing for 2012 Kennedy Half-Dollar Bags and Rolls, Bronze Medals, the First Spouse Bronze Medal...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY United States Mint Pricing for 2012 Kennedy Half-Dollar...and the Birth Set AGENCY: United States Mint, Department of the Treasury. ACTION...SUMMARY: The United States Mint is announcing 2012 pricing for...

2012-03-12

254

77 FR 24973 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Place: National Institutes of Health, Building 31, 31 Center Drive, Room 2A48, Bethesda, MD 20892. Contact Person: Constantine A. Stratakis, MD, D(med)Sci, Scientific Director, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health...

2012-04-26

255

77 FR 64815 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Place: National Institutes of Health, Building 31, 31 Center Drive, Room 2A48, Bethesda, MD 20892. Contact Person: Constantine A. Stratakis, MD, D(med)Sci, Scientific Director, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health...

2012-10-23

256

78 FR 63995 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Place: National Institutes of Health, Building 31, Room 2A48, 31 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892. Contact Person: Constantine A. Stratakis, MD, D(med)Sci, Scientific Director, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health...

2013-10-25

257

75 FR 36431 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Committee: National Children's Study Advisory Committee...National Institutes of Health. Natcher Building...Secretary, National Children's Study, Eunice Kennedy...Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100...

2010-06-25

258

75 FR 39031 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel, Child Health Research Career...

2010-07-07

259

Reducing the turnaround time for the Shuttle Orbiter main propulsion system at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents steps currently being implemented to reduce the processing time of the Orbiter Main Propulsion System. Given the projected increase in launch rates of the Space Transportation System (STS) in the operational era, average turnaround time from arrival at Kennedy Space Center to subsequent launch will have to be significantly reduced. In many STS flows to date, a pacing system has been the Main Propulsion System consisting of the three Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME's) and the Main Propulsion Subsystem (MPS) connecting the SSME's to the Orbiter/ground and Orbiter/External Tank interfaces. This paper summarizes procedural, hardware, software, and requirements changes being incorporated at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) to reduce the processing time required for the MPS/SSME systems. Specific examples from each category are cited to illustrate the impact of the improvements on MPS/SSME processing.

Bilardo, V. J., Jr.

1983-01-01

260

STS-30 Magellan spacecraft processing at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) SAEF-2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Magellan spacecraft is hoisted from the transport trailer of the Payload Environmental Transportation System (PETS) to the floor of the clean room in the Space Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF-2) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Clean-suited technicians guide Magellan into place. The spacecraft, destined for unprecedented studies of Venusian topographic features, will be deployed by the crew of NASA's STS-30 mission in April 1989. View provided by KSC with alternate number KSC-88PC-1084.

1989-01-01

261

Clinton signs Kassebaum-Kennedy bill--reduces barriers to health insurance.  

PubMed

In August, President Clinton signed the Health Insurance Reform Act of 1966. The bill, generally called the Kassebaum-Kennedy Bill, is an important first step in increasing access to health insurance coverage for 25 million people. The bill limits preexisting exclusion waiting periods, places mental health coverage on a par with physical health care insurance, and will establish a pilot program to study the benefits of Medical Savings Accounts. PMID:11367430

Owens, M B

1996-01-01

262

Kennedy Space Center: Constellation Program Electrical Ground Support Equipment Research and Development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is NASA's spaceport, launching rockets into space and leading important human spaceflight research. This spring semester, I worked at KSC on Constellation Program electrical ground support equipment through NASA's Undergraduate Student Research Program (USRP). This report includes a discussion of NASA, KSC, and my individual research project. An analysis of Penn State's preparation of me for an internship and my overall impressions of the Penn State and NASA internship experience conclude the report.

McCoy, Keegan

2010-01-01

263

A preliminary evaluation of short-term thunderstorm forecasting using surface winds at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In 1987 NASA expanded its surface wind network onto the mainland west of Kennedy Space Center, increasing the network area from nearly 800 sq km to over 1600 sq km. Here, the results of this expansion are reported using three years of wind and lightning information collected during June, July, August, and September of 1987, 1988, and 1989. The divergence-lightning relationships and the importance of wind direction are addressed, and the verification is summarized.

Watson, Andrew I.; Holle, Ronald L.; Lopez, Raul E.; Nicholson, James R.

1990-01-01

264

Living room pilgrimages: Television's cyclical commemoration of the assassination anniversary of John F. Kennedy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Visually and verbally, through dramatic narratives, the U.S. American mass media lead the public on pilgrimages, journeys of devotion and consecration, in commemoration of the anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. This paper examines and offers an explanation of these cyclical mass?mediated ritual dramas. Specifically, 14 news specials and documentaries (ranging from 1–4 hours each in length),

Leah R. Vande Berg

1995-01-01

265

Paving the road to peace: John F. Kennedy's American University address  

E-print Network

and replacing it with communistic tyranny. Robert L. Ivie offers an interesting analysis of the rhetorical structuring of the Soviet threat: Freedom is portrayed as weak, &agile, and feminine ? as vulnerable to disease and rape. The price of &eedom... can be found in Cold War Rhetoric: Strategy, Metaphor, and Ideology, by Martin J. Medhurst, Robert L. Ivie, Philip Wander, and Robert L. Scott. In this volume, Medhurst explores an example of Kennedy's presidential rhetoric in the chapter entitled...

Joyce, Kelly J

2012-06-07

266

The Turning Point: Perceptions and Policies Concerning Communist China during the Kennedy Years  

E-print Network

to gain the means to terrorize his neighbors and threaten the United States. Rather than disagree, in the aftermath of the Cuban Missile Crisis, Kennedy chose to stoke the flames, comparing Mao to Hitler and contrasting him with the newly reasonable... Vienna summit, the building of the Berlin Wall, and most of all the Cuban Missile Crisis was intriguing in its own right. That this heightened assessment of the Chinese threat coincided with increasing calls in the United States to improve relations...

Crean, Jeffrey 1977-

2012-11-13

267

Hubble Space Telescope (HST) preflight processing at Kennedy Space Center VPF  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Hubble Space Telescope (HST) undergoes preflight processing at Kennedy Space Center's (KSC's) Vertical Processing Facility (VPF). Clean-suited technicians look on as the HST, positioned in a ground handling support cradle is raised from a horizontal to a vertical position via an overhead crane. The closed and plastic-covered aperature door is at the top of the HST with the solar arrays (SAs) and high gain antennas (HGAs) stowed along the Support System Module (SSM) forward shell.

1989-01-01

268

Application of Markov chain theory to ASTP natural environment launch criteria at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

To aid the planning of the Apollo Soyuz Test Program (ASTP), certain natural environment statistical relationships are presented, based on Markov theory and empirical counts. The practical results are in terms of conditional probability of favorable and unfavorable launch conditions at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). They are based upon 15 years of recorded weather data which are analyzed under a set of natural environmental launch constraints. Three specific forecasting problems were treated: (1) the length of record of past weather which is useful to a prediction; (2) the effect of persistence in runs of favorable and unfavorable conditions; and (3) the forecasting of future weather in probabilistic terms.

Graves, M. E.; Perlmutter, M.

1974-01-01

269

STS-30 Magellan spacecraft is unpacked at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) SAEF-2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

At the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) inside the Space Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF-2) (planetary checkout facility), the cover of the Payload Environmental Transportation System (PETS) is removed so that the Magellan spacecraft can be hoisted from the PETS trailer to the clean room floor. Clean-suited technicians guide the cover above plastic-wrapped spacecraft using rope. The spacecraft, destined for unprecedented studies of the Venusian topographic features, is to be deployed by the crew of NASA STS-30 mission in April 1989. View provided by KSC with alternate number KSC-88PC-1083.

1989-01-01

270

STS-30 Magellan spacecraft processing at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) SAEF-2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Clean-suited technicians attach mobility castors (ground handling cart) to Magellan spacecraft in the Space Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF-2) at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The castors will allow the spacecraft to be moved within the clean room of the SAEF-2 planetary spacecraft checkout facility. The spacecraft has just been hoisted from the transport trailer of the Payload Environmental Transportation System (PETS). Magellan, destined for unprecedented studies of Venusian topographic features, will be deployed by the crew of NASA's STS-30 mission in April 1989. View provided by KSC with alternate number KSC-88PC-1086.

1989-01-01

271

The use of sugammadex in a patient with Kennedy's disease under general anesthesia  

PubMed Central

Kennedy's disease (KD), also known as spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, is a rare, X-linked recessive, neurodegenerative disorder of the lower motor neurons characterized by progressive bulbar and appendicle muscular atrophy. Here we report a case of a 62-year-old male patient with KD, weighing 70 kg and 173 cm tall, was scheduled for frontal sinusectomy due to sinusitis. General anesthesia was induced through propofol 80 mg, remifentanil 0.25 ?g/kg/min and 40 mg rocuronium. We were successfully able to use a sugammadex on a patient suffering from KD in order to reverse rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade.

Takeuchi, Risa; Hoshijima, Hiroshi; Doi, Katsushi; Nagasaka, Hiroshi

2014-01-01

272

Downwind hazard calculations for space shuttle launches at Kennedy Space Center and Vandenberg Air Force Base  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The quantitative estimates are presented of pollutant concentrations associated with the emission of the major combustion products (HCl, CO, and Al2O3) to the lower atmosphere during normal launches of the space shuttle. The NASA/MSFC Multilayer Diffusion Model was used to obtain these calculations. Results are presented for nine sets of typical meteorological conditions at Kennedy Space Center, including fall, spring, and a sea-breeze condition, and six sets at Vandenberg AFB. In none of the selected typical meteorological regimes studied was a 10-min limit of 4 ppm exceeded.

Susko, M.; Hill, C. K.; Kaufman, J. W.

1974-01-01

273

Space shuttle operations at the NASA Kennedy Space Center: the role of emergency medicine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Division of Emergency Medicine at the University of Florida coordinates a unique program with the NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) to provide emergency medical support (EMS) for the United States Space Transportation System. This report outlines the organization of the KSC EMS system, training received by physicians providing medical support, logistic and operational aspects of the mission, and experiences of team members. The participation of emergency physicians in support of manned space flight represents another way that emergency physicians provide leadership in prehospital care and disaster management.

Rodenberg, H.; Myers, K. J.

1995-01-01

274

Educational Applications of Astronomy & Space Flight Operations at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Within two years, the Kennedy Space Center will complete a total redesign of NASA's busiest Visitor's Center. Three million visitors per year will be witness to a new program focused on expanding the interests of the younger public in NASA's major space programs, in space operations, and in astronomy. This project, being developed through the Visitor's Center director, a NASA faculty fellow, and the Visitor's Center contractor, is centered on the interaction between NASA programs, the visiting youth, and their parents. The goal of the Center's program is to provide an appealing learning experience for teens and pre teens using stimulating displays and interactive exhibits that are also educational.

Erickson, L. K.

1999-09-01

275

Texture Modification of the Shuttle Landing Facility Runway at the NASA Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes the test procedures and the selection criteria used in selecting the best runway surface texture modification at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to reduce Orbiter tire wear. The new runway surface may ultimately result in an increase of allowable crosswinds for launch and landing operations. The modification allows launch and landing operations in 20-kt crosswinds if desired. This 5-kt increase over the previous 15-kt limit drastically increases landing safety and the ability to make on-time launches to support missions where space station rendezvous is planned.

Daugherty, Robert H.; Yager, Thomas J.

1996-01-01

276

USBI Booster Production Company's Hazardous Waste Management Program at the Kennedy Space Center, FL  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In response to the hazardous-waste generating processes associated with the launch of the Space Shuttle, a hazardous waste management plan has been developed. It includes waste recycling, product substitution, waste treatment, and waste minimization at the source. Waste material resulting from the preparation of the nonmotor segments of the solid rocket boosters include waste paints (primer, topcoats), waste solvents (methylene chloride, freon, acetone, toluene), waste inorganic compounds (aluminum anodizing compound, fixer), and others. Ways in which these materials are contended with at the Kennedy Space Center are discussed.

Venuto, Charles

1987-01-01

277

Distributions of eight meteorological variables at Cape Kennedy, Florida and Vandenberg Air Force Base, California  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Extreme values, median values, and nine percentile values are tabulated for eight meteorological variables at Cape Kennedy, Florida and at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. The variables are temperature, relative humidity, station pressure, water vapor pressure, water vapor mixing ratio, density, and enthalpy. For each month eight hours are tabulated, namely, 0100, 0400, 0700, 1000, 1300, 1600, 1900, and 2200 local time. These statistics are intended for general use for the space shuttle design trade-off analysis and are not to be used for specific design values.

Graves, M. E.; King, R. L.; Brown, S. C.

1973-01-01

278

Hubble Space Telescope (HST) preflight processing at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Hubble Space Telescope (HST), mounted in a ground handling support cradle, is lifted into vertical position in the Vertical Processing Facility (VPF) as work begins at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) to process the 94-inch primary mirror telescope for launch on Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, on space shuttle mission STS-31 in March 1990. Clean-suited technicians operate the overhead crane and monitor the procedure from below. The closed and plastic-covered aperature door is partially visible at the top of the frame. Visible on HST Support System Module (SSM) are the grapple fixtures and the stowed solar arrays (SAs) and high-gain antennas (HGAs).

1989-01-01

279

National Security Action Memoranda: Document Images From The Presidential Papers of John Fitzgerald Kennedy National Security Files  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The John F. Kennedy Library has posted the National Security Action Memoranda of the Kennedy administration, written either by the President himself or his National Security Advisor McGeorge Bundy. Topics of the memorandums include policy for Cuba, forces in Vietnam, reconnaissance flights over Russia, NATO, South Africa policy, CIA support of "certain activities," and many others. The copies are presented in photographed facsimile, and many of the more sensitive memorandums have been "sanitized," i.e., have portions deleted. A few of the memorandums are still classified and therefore not yet available. In November of 1998, the library released a huge quantity of taped recordings of Kennedy's consultations (see the November 27, 1998 Scout Report).

2001-01-01

280

Mutations disrupting the Kennedy phosphatidylcholine pathway in humans with congenital lipodystrophy and fatty liver disease.  

PubMed

Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is the major glycerophospholipid in eukaryotic cells and is an essential component in all cellular membranes. The biochemistry of de novo PC synthesis by the Kennedy pathway is well established, but less is known about the physiological functions of PC. We identified two unrelated patients with defects in the Kennedy pathway due to biallellic loss-of-function mutations in phosphate cytidylyltransferase 1 alpha (PCYT1A), the rate-limiting enzyme in this pathway. The mutations lead to a marked reduction in PCYT1A expression and PC synthesis. The phenotypic consequences include some features, such as severe fatty liver and low HDL cholesterol levels, that are predicted by the results of previously reported liver-specific deletion of murine Pcyt1a. Both patients also had lipodystrophy, severe insulin resistance, and diabetes, providing evidence for an additional and essential role for PCYT1A-generated PC in the normal function of white adipose tissue and insulin action. PMID:24889630

Payne, Felicity; Lim, Koini; Girousse, Amandine; Brown, Rebecca J; Kory, Nora; Robbins, Ann; Xue, Yali; Sleigh, Alison; Cochran, Elaine; Adams, Claire; Dev Borman, Arundhati; Russel-Jones, David; Gorden, Phillip; Semple, Robert K; Saudek, Vladimir; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Walther, Tobias C; Barroso, Inęs; Savage, David B

2014-06-17

281

Kathleen S. KnightKathleen S. Knight United States  

E-print Network

discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability of discrimination, write to USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC

282

Bay of Pigs and Cuban Missile Crisis: Presidential Decision-Making and Its Effect on Military Employment During the Kennedy Administration.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study investigates the methods by which President John F. Kennedy arrived at decisions to deploy the military in the conduct of foreign policy. Specifically, the events covered are the Bay of Pigs, which represents the nadir of Kennedy's foreign poli...

M. E. Falcon

1993-01-01

283

Paper No. 11.05 1 A Half Century of Tapered-Pile Usage at the John F. Kennedy International Airport  

E-print Network

Paper No. 11.05 1 A Half Century of Tapered-Pile Usage at the John F. Kennedy International Airport piles have been the deep foundation of choice ever since construction of and at the well-known John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFKIA) in New York City began in the late 1940s. Timber piles were used

Horvath, John S.

284

Curriculum Vitae Kathleen Cushing Weathers  

E-print Network

, 1983 Albion College, Albion, Michigan B.A., English (cum laude), 1978 Professional Experience Primary Studies, Bates College, Lewiston, ME 2008-present Research Director, Lake Sunapee Station, Sunapee, NH, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 2004-2007 Graduate Faculty, University of Maine, Orono, ME 2004-2005 Visiting

285

Kathleen M. Byington Vice President  

E-print Network

Executive and International Comp/Benefits/ Special Projects Patricia Ilowite Director HUMAN RESOURCE/AA/Diversity Joseph Smith Executive Director Work/Life Strategies, Benefits, Staff Compensation Mary Di Administration Support Services John Jensen Director Operations and Maintenance Gary Viola Director Budget

Weber, David J.

286

Prof. Dr. Stephan Bierling, Fifty Years after the Shots Heard Around the World: A Critical Reassessment of John F. Kennedy and His Presidency 30.01.2014 EvaSys Auswertung Seite 1  

E-print Network

Reassessment of John F. Kennedy and His Presidency 30.01.2014 EvaSys Auswertung Seite 1 Prof. Dr. Stephan Bierling Fifty Years after the Shots Heard Around the World: A Critical Reassessment of John F. Kennedy. Kennedy and His Presidency 30.01.2014 EvaSys Auswertung Seite 2 Der Inhalt dieser Veranstaltung ist auf

Schubart, Christoph

287

Letters from George Washington and Samuel Cabble, and Speeches by Franklin D. Roosevelt and John F. Kennedy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author uses several primary sources to demonstrate that George Washington, Samuel Cabble, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and John F. Kennedy stated their awareness of contemporary challenges, but looked to the future with hope and optimism. When they envisioned the future, their words indicated that they did not just imagine it, but…

Potter, Lee Ann

2008-01-01

288

S-Band Dual-Polarization Radar Observations of Winter Storms PATRICK C. KENNEDY AND STEVEN A. RUTLEDGE  

E-print Network

S-Band Dual-Polarization Radar Observations of Winter Storms PATRICK C. KENNEDY AND STEVEN A­Illinois State Water Survey (CSU­CHILL) system during four significant winter storms in northeastern Colorado a microwave scattering model indicate that populations of highly oblate ice particles with moderate bulk

Rutledge, Steven

289

S-Band Dual Polarization Radar Observations of Winter Storms Patrick C. Kennedy and Steven A. Rutledge  

E-print Network

the probable existence of KDP-producing ice crystals in these observed winter storms. 2. Overview1 S-Band Dual Polarization Radar Observations of Winter Storms Patrick C. Kennedy and Steven A wavelength CSU-CHILL system during four significant winter storms in northeastern Colorado. It was found

Rutledge, Steven

290

Identifying maximal rigid components in bearing-based localization Ryan Kennedy, Kostas Daniilidis, Oleg Naroditsky and Camillo J. Taylor  

E-print Network

Identifying maximal rigid components in bearing-based localization Ryan Kennedy, Kostas Daniilidis, Oleg Naroditsky and Camillo J. Taylor Abstract-- We present an approach for sensor network lo by nodes h, i, j and k is a rigid set of triangular constraints while node is connected rigidly

Taylor, Camillo J.

291

The Language of the Liberal Consensus: John F. Kennedy, Technical Reason, and the "New Economics" at Yale University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

On June 11, 1962, President John F. Kennedy addressed the economy at Yale University. This essay explains the symbolic charge of his economic rhetoric, a persuasive campaign that enjoyed considerable success and marked the first time that a president took explicit responsibility for the nation's economic performance. I argue that the president…

Murphy, John W.

2004-01-01

292

Determinations of microbial loads associated with microscopic-size particles of Kennedy Space Center soil  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Plate counts for six fractions of Kennedy Space Center soil provided estimates of aerobic, mesophilic, heterotrophic, and microbial loads on single soil particles. Analyses included unheated particles, particles subjected to wet heat at 80 C for 20 min, and particles subjected to dry heat at 110 C for 1 hr. Unheated particles yielded mean counts ranging from 6 colonies per particle for the smallest (44-53 microns) soil fraction to approximately 55 colonies per particle for the largest size (105-125 microns) soil fraction tested. Mean counts for heat-resistant forms ranged from 2 colonies per particle for the smaller particles to 12-15 colonies for the largest particles analyzed.

Ruschmeyer, O. R.; Pflug, I. J.

1977-01-01

293

Large-Scale Cryogenic Testing of Launch Vehicle Ground Systems at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The development of a new launch vehicle to support NASA's future exploration plans requires significant redesign and upgrade of Kennedy Space Center's (KSC) launch pad and ground support equipment systems. In many cases, specialized test equipment and systems will be required to certify the function of the new system designs under simulated operational conditions, including propellant loading. This paper provides an overview of the cryogenic test infrastructure that is in place at KSC to conduct development and qualification testing that ranges from the component level to the integrated-system level. An overview of the major cryogenic test facilities will be provided, along with a detailed explanation of the technology focus area for each facility

Ernst, E. W.; Sass, J. P.; Lobemeyer, D. A.; Sojourner, S. J.; Hatfield, W. H.; Rewinkel, D. A.

2007-01-01

294

Mathematical model for adaptive control system of ASEA robot at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The dynamic properties and the mathematical model for the adaptive control of the robotic system presently under investigation at Robotic Application and Development Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center are discussed. NASA is currently investigating the use of robotic manipulators for mating and demating of fuel lines to the Space Shuttle Vehicle prior to launch. The Robotic system used as a testbed for this purpose is an ASEA IRB-90 industrial robot with adaptive control capabilities. The system was tested and it's performance with respect to stability was improved by using an analogue force controller. The objective of this research project is to determine the mathematical model of the system operating under force feedback control with varying dynamic internal perturbation in order to provide continuous stable operation under variable load conditions. A series of lumped parameter models are developed. The models include some effects of robot structural dynamics, sensor compliance, and workpiece dynamics.

Zia, Omar

1989-01-01

295

A New Comprehensive Lightning Instrumentation System for Pad 39B at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new comprehensive lightning instrumentation system has been designed for Launch Complex 39B at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. This new instrumentation system includes the synchronized recording of six high-speed video cameras, currents through the nine downconductors of the new lightning protection system, four B-dot, 3-axis measurement stations, and five D-dot stations composed of two antennas each. The instrumentation system is composed of centralized transient recorders and digitizers that located close to the sensors in the field. The sensors and transient recorders communicate via optical fiber. The transient recorders are triggered by the B-dot sensors, the E-dot sensors, or the current through the downlead conductors. The high-speed cameras are triggered by the transient recorders when the latter perceives a qualified trigger.

Mata, Carlos T.; Rakov, Vladimir A.; Mata, Angel G.; Bonilla Tatiana; Navedo, Emmanuel; Snyder, Gary P.

2010-01-01

296

Wiltech Component Cleaning and Refurbishment Facility CFC Elimination Plan at NASA Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Wiltech Component Cleaning & Refurbishment Facility (WT-CCRF) at NASA Kennedy Space Center performs precision cleaning on approximately 200,000 metallic and non metallic components every year. WT-CCRF has developed a CFC elimination plan consisting of aqueous cleaning and verification and an economical dual solvent strategy for alternative solvent solution. Aqueous Verification Methodologies were implemented two years ago on a variety of Ground Support Equipment (GSE) components and sampling equipment. Today, 50% of the current workload is verified using aqueous methods and 90% of the total workload is degreased aqueously using, Zonyl and Brulin surfactants in ultrasonic baths. An additional estimated 20% solvent savings could be achieved if the proposed expanded use of aqueous methods are approved. Aqueous cleaning has shown to be effective, environmentally friendly and economical (i.e.. cost of materials, equipment, facilities and labor).

Williamson, Steve; Aman, Bob; Aurigema, Andrew; Melendez, Orlando

1999-01-01

297

Environmental Assessment for Central Campus Complex John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This Environmental Assessment addresses the Proposed Action to consolidate multiple facilities in the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Industrial Area by constructing two new buildings in the existing headquarters area between NASA Parkway, 3rd Street, C Avenue, and D Avenue. Under the Proposed Action, the historic Headquarters Building will be demolished and a new building will be constructed closer to the Operations and Checkout Building by centering it on D A venue (Hunton Brady Architects, P A and Jones Edmunds and Associates, Inc. 2011). This option was selected from a group of 15 initial sketches as the most viable option during a Central Campus Complex Siting Study completed in February 2011. A No-Action Alternative is also presented in which no demolition or construction of new facilities would occur. Implementing the Proposed Action will have major impacts to cultural resources, while the remaining environmental impacts will be minor.

Dankert, Donald

2013-01-01

298

The meteorological monitoring system for the Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) are involved in many weather-sensitive operations. Manned and unmanned vehicle launches, which occur several times each year, are obvious example of operations whose success and safety are dependent upon favorable meteorological conditions. Other operations involving NASA, Air Force, and contractor personnel, including daily operations to maintain facilities, refurbish launch structures, prepare vehicles for launch, and handle hazardous materials, are less publicized but are no less weather-sensitive. The Meteorological Monitoring System (MMS) is a computer network which acquires, processes, disseminates, and monitors near real-time and forecast meteorological information to assist operational personnel and weather forecasters with the task of minimizing the risk to personnel, materials, and the surrounding population. CLIPS has been integrated into the MMS to provide quality control analysis and data monitoring. This paper describes aspects of the MMS relevant to CLIPS including requirements, actual implementation details, and results of performance testing.

Dianic, Allan V.

1994-01-01

299

Environmental monitoring and research at the John F. Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Biomedical Operations and Research Office at the NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center has been supporting environmental monitoring and research since the mid-1970s. Program elements include monitoring of baseline conditions to document natural variability in the ecosystem, assessments of operations and construction of new facilities, and ecological research focusing on wildlife habitat associations. Information management is centered around development of a computerized geographic information system that incorporates remote sensing and digital image processing technologies along with traditional relational data base management capabilities. The proactive program is one in which the initiative is to anticipate potential environmental concerns before they occur and, by utilizing in-house expertise, develop impact minimization or mitigation strategies to reduce environmental risk.

Hall, C. R.; Hinkle, C. R.; Knott, W. M.; Summerfield, B. R.

1992-01-01

300

Spectral gaps of Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki Hamiltonians using tensor network methods  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using exact diagonalization and tensor network techniques, we compute the gap for the Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki (AKLT) Hamiltonian in one and two spatial dimensions. Tensor network methods are used to extract physical properties directly in the thermodynamic limit, and we support these results using finite-size scalings from exact diagonalization. Studying the AKLT Hamiltonian perturbed by an external field, we show how to obtain an accurate value of the gap of the original AKLT Hamiltonian from the field value at which the ground state verifies e0<0, which is a quantum critical point. With the tensor network renormalization group methods we provide direct evidence of a finite gap in the thermodynamic limit for the AKLT models in the one-dimensional chain and two-dimensional hexagonal and square lattices. This method can be applied generally to Hamiltonians with rotational symmetry, and we also show results beyond the AKLT model.

Garcia-Saez, Artur; Murg, Valentin; Wei, Tzu-Chieh

2013-12-01

301

Research and Technology 1998 Annual Report of the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As the NASA Center responsible for preparing and launching space missions, the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is placing increasing emphasis on its advanced technology development program. This program encompasses the efforts of the entire KSC team, consisting of Government and contractor personnel, working in partnership with academic institutions and commercial industry. This edition of the KSC Research and Technology 1998 Annual Report covers the efforts of these contributors to the KSC advanced technology development program, as well as our technology transfer activities. The following research areas are covered: Life Sciences; Mechanical Engineering; Environmental Engineering; Advanced Software; Atmospheric Science; Materials Science; Nondestructive Evaluation; Process/Industrial Engineering; Automation and Robotics; and Electronics and Instrumentation.

1998-01-01

302

A Diagnostic Analysis of the Kennedy Space Center LDAR Network. 2; Cross-Sensor Studies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Range dependencies in total (intracloud and cloud-to-ground) lightning observed by the Kennedy Space Center Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) network are established through cross-comparison with other lightning sensors. Using total lightning observed by the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS), LDAR flash detection efficiency is shown to remain above 90% out to 90-100 km range, and to be below 25% at 200 km range. LDAR VHF source location error distributions are also determined as a function of range, and are found to be asymmetric with first moments increasing roughly as range squared. Range normalization schemes for total VHF source density are tested and shown to yield significant (up to 50%) skill improvements over uncorrected data, when compared with National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) ground flash counts at hourly, daily, monthly and climatological time scales.

Boccippio, D. J.; Heckman, S.; Goodman, S. J.

1999-01-01

303

A Diagnostic Analysis of the Kennedy Space Center LDAR Network 2. Cross-Sensor Studies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Range dependencies in total (intracloud and cloud to ground) lightning observed by the Kennedy Space Center Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) network are established through cross comparison with other lightning sensors. Using total lightning observed from space by the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS), MAR flash detection efficiency is shown to remain above 90% out to 90-100 km range, and to be below 25% at 200 km range. MAR VHF source location error distributions are also determined as a function of range and are found to be asymmetric with standard deviation increasing roughly as r 2 . Range normalization schemes for total VHF source density are tested and shown to yield significant improvements in correlation with National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) ground flash density at hourly, daily, monthly, and climatological timescales (up to 50% over uncorrected source densities using an exponential-in-range correction factor with 40-50 km e-folding scale).

Boccippio, D. J.; Heckman, S.; Goodman, S. J.

2001-01-01

304

Analysis and Assessment of Peak Lightning Current Probabilities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This technical memorandum presents a summary by the Electromagnetics and Aerospace Environments Branch at the Marshall Space Flight Center of lightning characteristics and lightning criteria for the protection of aerospace vehicles. Probability estimates are included for certain lightning strikes (peak currents of 200, 100, and 50 kA) applicable to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Shuttle at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, during rollout, on-pad, and boost/launch phases. Results of an extensive literature search to compile information on this subject are presented in order to answer key questions posed by the Space Shuttle Program Office at the Johnson Space Center concerning peak lightning current probabilities if a vehicle is hit by a lightning cloud-to-ground stroke. Vehicle-triggered lightning probability estimates for the aforementioned peak currents are still being worked. Section 4.5, however, does provide some insight on estimating these same peaks.

Johnson, D. L.; Vaughan, W. W.

1999-01-01

305

STS-68 747 SCA Ferry Flight Takeoff for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle Columbia, atop NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), taking off for the Kennedy Space Center shortly after its landing on 12 October 1994, at Edwards, California, to complete mission STS-68. Columbia was being ferried from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, to Air Force Plant 42, Palmdale, California, where it will undergo six months of inspections, modifications, and systems upgrades. The STS-68 11-day mission was devoted to radar imaging of Earth's geological features with the Space Radar Laboratory. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site with Dryden remaining as the principal alternate landing site.

1994-01-01

306

Spearhead echo and downburst near the approach end of a John F. Kennedy Airport runway, New York City  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Radar echoes of a storm at John F. Kennedy International Airport are examined. Results regarding the phenomena presented suggest the existence of downburst cells. These cells are characterized by spearhead echoes. About 2% of the echoes in the New York area were spearhead echoes. The detection and identification of downburst cells, their potential hazard to approaching and landing aircraft, and communication of this information to the pilots of those aircraft are discussed.

Fujita, T. T.

1976-01-01

307

The perfect haze: Scientists link 1999 U.S. pollution episode to midwest aerosol plumes and Kennedy plane crash  

Microsoft Academic Search

The crash of John F Kennedy Jrs single-engine Piper Saratoga airplane in the waters off of Marthas Vineyard, Massachusetts, on July 16, 1999, prompted round-the-clock, global media coverage. Cameras panned the waters as the search began the following day, Saturday Pundits at first commented on the likelihood of survival of the late U.S. president's son, who piloted the plane, and

Randy Showstack

2000-01-01

308

Structural Analysis Peer Review for the Static Display of the Orbiter Atlantis at the Kennedy Space Center Visitors Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Mr. Christopher Miller with the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) NASA Safety & Mission Assurance (S&MA) office requested the NASA Engineering and Safety Center's (NESC) technical support on March 15, 2012, to review and make recommendations on the structural analysis being performed for the Orbiter Atlantis static display at the KSC Visitor Center. The principal focus of the assessment was to review the engineering firm's structural analysis for lifting and aligning the orbiter and its static display configuration

Minute, Stephen A.

2013-01-01

309

An Overview of My Internship with the Ecological Program at John F. Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During my internship with Innovative Health Applications, I participated in numerous longterm research projects involving the study of various plant and animal life at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). I observed the monitoring of nesting sea turtles. I learned about the transfer of egg clutches from the northern Gulf Coast in an effort to help the hatchlings avoid the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. I gained knowledge of tracking the movements of important sport fish and sharks in this area using a hydro-acoustic tag and receiver system. This effort included routinely taking water quality data at multiple sites around KSC. Alligator population and nesting assessments was another part of my internship. I observed the biologists take morphometric measurements, blood, urine and tissue samples from alligators found in KSC waterways. I assisted in taking photosynthesis and reflectance measurements on various scrub oaks and palmettos. I participated in Florida Scrub-Jay surveys in an effort to monitor their population trends and was involved in Southeastern beach mouse trapping and identification. I also assisted in seagrass surveys monitoring the health of the seagrass beds.

Owen, Samantha

2010-01-01

310

Physical, anthropometrical, and body composition characteristics of workers at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

At the Kennedy Space Center, workers are often exposed to cardiovascular and muscular stress in job-related activities which may require a high level of physical fitness in order to safely complete the work task. Similar tasks will be performed at other launch and landing facilities and in space for the Space Station. One such category includes workers who handle toxic propellants and must wear Self-Contained Atmospheric Protective Ensembles (SCAPE) that can weigh 56 lbs. with the air pack. These suits provide a significant physical challenge to many of the workers in terms of carrying this load while moving about and performing work. Furthermore, under some conditions, there is a significant thermal stress. The physical characteristics of these workers are, therefore, of consequence. The purpose of this study was to analyze the anthropometry, body composition, strength, power, endurance, flexibility, aerobic fitness, and blood variables of a representative sample of male KSC SCAPE workers and to compare them with characteristics of other male workers at KSC (total population N=110). Three separate comparisons were made.

Lasley, M. L.

1985-01-01

311

Habitat model for the Florida Scrub Jay on John F. Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Florida Scrub Jay is endemic to Florida. The John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) provides habitat for one of the three largest populations of the Florida Scrub Jay. This threatened bird occupies scrub, slash pine flatwoods, disturbed scrub, and coastal strand on KSC. Densities of Florida Scrub Jays were shown to vary with habitat characteristics but not necessarily with vegetation type. Relationships between Florida Scrub Jay densities and habitat characteristics were used to develop a habitat model to provide a tool to compare alternative sites for new facilities and to quantify environmental impacts. This model is being tested using long term demographic studies of colorbanded Florida Scrub Jays. Optimal habitat predicted by the model has greater than or equal to 50 percent of the shrub canopy comprised of scrub oaks, 20-50 percent open space or scrub oak vegetation within 100 m of a ruderal edge, less than or equal to 15 percent pine canopy cover, a shrub height of 120-170 cm, and is greater than or equal to 100 m from a forest. This document reviews life history, social behavior, food, foraging habitat, cover requirements, characteristics of habitat on KSC, and habitat preferences of the Florida Scrub Jay. Construction of the model and its limitations are discussed.

Breininger, David R.

1992-01-01

312

Relationships between coronary heart disease risk factors and serum ionized calcium in Kennedy Space Center Cohort  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Kennedy Space Center (KSC) employees are reported to be at high risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). Risk factors for CHD include high serum total cholesterol levels, low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC), elevated triglyceride, smoking, inactivity, high blood pressure, being male, and being older. Higher dietary and/or serum calcium Ca(++) may be related to a lower risk for CHD. Fifty men and 37 women participated. Subjects were tested in the morning after fasting 12 hours. Information relative to smoking and exercise habits was obtained; seated blood pressures were measured; and blood drawn. KCS men had higher risk values than KCS women as related to HDLC, triglycerides, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure. Smoking and nonsmoking groups did not differ for other risk factors or for serum Ca(++) levels. Exercise and sedentary groups differed in total cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Serum Ca(++) levels were related to age, increasing with age in the sedentary group and decreasing in the exercisers, equally for men and women. It is concluded that these relationships may be significant to the risk of CHD and/or the risk of bone demineralization in an aging population.

Goodwin, Lisa Ann; Frey, Mary Anne Bassett; Merz, Marion P.; Alford, William R.

1987-01-01

313

Quality Control Algorithms for the Kennedy Space Center 50-Megahertz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Winds Database  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents the process used by the Marshall Space Flight Center Natural Environments Branch (EV44) to quality control (QC) data from the Kennedy Space Center's 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler for use in vehicle wind loads and steering commands. The database has been built to mitigate limitations of using the currently archived databases from weather balloons. The DRWP database contains wind measurements from approximately 2.7-18.6 km altitude at roughly five minute intervals for the August 1997 to December 2009 period of record, and the extensive QC process was designed to remove spurious data from various forms of atmospheric and non-atmospheric artifacts. The QC process is largely based on DRWP literature, but two new algorithms have been developed to remove data contaminated by convection and excessive first guess propagations from the Median Filter First Guess Algorithm. In addition to describing the automated and manual QC process in detail, this paper describes the extent of the data retained. Roughly 58% of all possible wind observations exist in the database, with approximately 100 times as many complete profile sets existing relative to the EV44 balloon databases. This increased sample of near-continuous wind profile measurements may help increase launch availability by reducing the uncertainty of wind changes during launch countdown

Barbre, Robert E., Jr.

2012-01-01

314

Trace element release from estuarine sediments of South Mosquito Lagoon near Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Analytical partitioning of four trace metals in estuarine sediments collected from eight sites in South Mosquito Lagoon near Kennedy Space Center, in terms of four different categories was accomplished using four different extraction techniques. The concentrations of the four trace metals, Zn, Mn, Cd, and Cu, released in interstitial water extract, 1 N ammonium acetate extract, conc. HCl extract and fusion extract of sediments as well as their concentrations in water samples collected from the same location were determined using flame atomic absorption technique. From the analytical results the percentages of total amount of each metal distributed among four different categories, interstitial water phase, acetate extractable, acid extractable and detrital crystalline material, were determined. Our results suggest that analytical partitioning of trace metals in estuarine sediments may be used to study the mechanism of incorporation of trace metals with sediments from natural waters. A correlation between the seasonal variation in the concentration of acetate extractable trace metals in the sediment and similar variation in their concentration in water was observed. A mechanism for the release of trace metals from estuarine sediments to natural water is also suggested.

Menon, M. P.; Ghuman, G. S.; Emeh, C. O.

1979-01-01

315

Strain Distribution in a Kennedy Class I Implant Assisted Removable Partial Denture under Various Loading Conditions  

PubMed Central

Purpose. This in vitro study investigates how unilateral and bilateral occlusal loads are transferred to an implant assisted removable partial denture (IARPD). Materials and Methods. A duplicate model of a Kennedy class I edentulous mandibular arch was made and then a conventional removable partial denture (RPD) fabricated. Two Straumann implants were placed in the second molar region, and the prosthesis was modified to accommodate implant retained ball attachments. Strain gages were incorporated into the fitting surface of both the framework and acrylic to measure microstrain (?Strain). The IARPD was loaded to 120Ns unilaterally and bilaterally in three different loading positions. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS version 18.0 (SPSS, Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) with an alpha level of 0.05 to compare the maximum ?Strain values of the different loading conditions. Results. During unilateral and bilateral loading the maximum ?Strain was predominantly observed in a buccal direction. As the load was moved anteriorly the ?Strain increased in the mesial area. Unilateral loading resulted in a twisting of the structure and generated a strain mismatch between the metal and acrylic surfaces. Conclusions. Unilateral loading created lateral and vertical displacement of the IARPD. The curvature of the dental arch resulted in a twisting action which intensified as the unilateral load was moved anteriorly. PMID:23737788

Shahmiri, Reza; Aarts, John M.; Bennani, Vincent; Swain, Michael V.

2013-01-01

316

An Occupational Performance Test Validation Program for Fire Fighters at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We evaluated performance of a modified Combat Task Test (CTT) and of standard fitness tests in 20 male subjects to assess the prediction of occupational performance standards for Kennedy Space Center fire fighters. The CTT consisted of stair-climbing, a chopping simulation, and a victim rescue simulation. Average CTT performance time was 3.61 +/- 0.25 min (SEM) and all CTT tasks required 93% to 97% maximal heart rate. By using scores from the standard fitness tests, a multiple linear regression model was fitted to each parameter: the stairclimb (r(exp 2) = .905, P less than .05), the chopping performance time (r(exp 2) = .582, P less than .05), the victim rescue time (r(exp 2) = .218, P = not significant), and the total performance time (r(exp 2) = .769, P less than .05). Treadmill time was the predominant variable, being the major predictor in two of four models. These results indicated that standardized fitness tests can predict performance on some CTT tasks and that test predictors were amenable to exercise training.

Schonfeld, Brian R.; Doerr, Donald F.; Convertino, Victor A.

1990-01-01

317

Flora and threatened and endangered plants of John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The vascular flora of the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) area was first studied in the 1970's. Nomenclatural and taxonomic changes as well as additional collections required revision of this list. The revised list includes 1045 taxa of which 850 are native and 195 are introduced. This appears to be a substantial proportion of the regional flora. Forty six taxa are endemic or nearly endemic to Florida, a level of endemism that appears high for the east coast of central Florida. Seventy three taxa (69 native) are listed as threatened, endangered, or of special concern on Federal or state lists. Taxa of special concern occur in all major habitats, but many are restricted to hammocks and hardwood swamps that constitute a minor proportion of the terrestrial vegetation. For some of these taxa, populations on KSC appear to be important for their regional and global survival. The bryophyte flora of the KSC area include 23 mosses and 20 liverworts and hornworts. The lichen flora is currently unknown.

Schmalzer, Paul A.; Hinkle, C. Ross

1990-01-01

318

A Peak Wind Probability Forecast Tool for Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This conference abstract describes the development of a peak wind forecast tool to assist forecasters in determining the probability of violating launch commit criteria (LCC) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) in east-central Florida. The peak winds are an important forecast element for both the Space Shuttle and Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) programs. The LCC define specific peak wind thresholds for each launch operation that cannot be exceeded in order to ensure the safety of the vehicle. The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) has found that peak winds are a challenging parameter to forecast, particularly in the cool season months of October through April. Based on the importance of forecasting peak winds, the 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to develop a short-range peak-wind forecast tool to assist in forecasting LCC violatioas.The tool will include climatologies of the 5-minute mean end peak winds by month, hour, and direction, and probability distributions of the peak winds as a function of the 5-minute mean wind speeds.

Crawford, Winifred; Roeder, William

2008-01-01

319

Crop Production for Advanced Life Support Systems - Observations From the Kennedy Space Center Breadboard Project  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The use of plants for bioregenerative life support for space missions was first studied by the US Air Force in the 1950s and 1960s. Extensive testing was also conducted from the 1960s through the 1980s by Russian researchers located at the Institute of Biophysics in Krasnoyarsk, Siberia, and the Institute for Biomedical Problems in Moscow. NASA initiated bioregenerative research in the 1960s (e.g., Hydrogenomonas) but this research did not include testing with plants until about 1980, with the start of the Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) Program. The NASA CELSS research was carried out at universities, private corporations, and NASA field centers, including Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The project at KSC began in 1985 and was called the CELSS Breadboard Project to indicate the capability for plugging in and testing various life support technologies; this name has since been dropped but bioregenerative testing at KSC has continued to the present under the NASA s Advanced Life Support (ALS) Program. A primary objective of the KSC testing was to conduct pre-integration tests with plants (crops) in a large, atmospherically closed test chamber called the Biomass Production Chamber (BPC). Test protocols for the BPC were based on observations and growing procedures developed by university investigators, as well as procedures developed in plant growth chamber studies at KSC. Growth chamber studies to support BPC testing focused on plant responses to different carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, different spectral qualities from various electric lamps, and nutrient film hydroponic culture techniques.

Wheeler, R. M.; Sager, J. C.; Prince, R. P.; Knott, W. M.; Mackowiak, C. L.; Stutte, G. W.; Yorio, N. C.; Ruffe, L. M.; Peterson, B. V.; Goins, G. D.

2003-01-01

320

Kennedy Space Center's Command and Control System - "Toasters to Rocket Ships"  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews the history of the development of the command and control system at Kennedy Space Center. From a system that could be brought to Florida in the trunk of a car in the 1950's. Including the development of larger and more complex launch vehicles with the Apollo program where human launch controllers managed the launch process with a hardware only system that required a dedicated human interface to perform every function until the Apollo vehicle lifted off from the pad. Through the development of the digital computer that interfaced with ground launch processing systems with the Space Shuttle program. Finally, showing the future control room being developed to control the missions to return to the moon and Mars, which will maximize the use of Commercial-Off-The Shelf (COTS) hardware and software which was standards based and not tied to a single vendor. The system is designed to be flexible and adaptable to support the requirements of future spacecraft and launch vehicles.

Lougheed, Kirk; Mako, Cheryle

2011-01-01

321

Quantum computational universality of Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki states beyond the honeycomb lattice  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Universal quantum computation can be achieved by simply performing single-spin measurements on a highly entangled resource state, such as cluster states. The family of Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki (AKLT) states has recently been explored; for example, the spin-1 AKLT chain can be used to simulate single-qubit gate operations on a single qubit, and the spin-3/2 two-dimensional AKLT state on the honeycomb lattice can be used as a universal resource. However, it is unclear whether such universality is a coincidence for the specific state or a shared feature in all two-dimensional AKLT states. Here we consider the family of spin-3/2 AKLT states on various trivalent Archimedean lattices and show that in addition to the honeycomb lattice, the spin-3/2 AKLT states on the square octagon (4,82) and the “cross” (4,6,12) lattices are also universal resource, whereas the AKLT state on the “star” (3,122) lattice is likely not due to geometric frustration.

Wei, Tzu-Chieh

2013-12-01

322

Topology and criticality in the resonating Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki loop spin liquid states  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We exploit a natural projected entangled-pair state (PEPS) representation for the resonating Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki loop (RAL) state. By taking advantage of PEPS-based analytical and numerical methods, we characterize the RAL states on various two-dimensional lattices. On square and honeycomb lattices, these states are critical since the dimer-dimer correlations decay as a power law. On the kagome lattice, the RAL state has exponentially decaying correlation functions, supporting the scenario of a gapped spin liquid. We provide further evidence that the RAL state on the kagome lattice is a Z2 spin liquid, by identifying the four topological sectors and computing the topological entropy. Furthermore, we construct a one-parameter family of PEPS states interpolating between the RAL state and a short-range resonating valence bond state and find a critical point, consistent with the fact that the two states belong to two different phases. We also perform a variational study of the spin-1 kagome Heisenberg model using this one-parameter PEPS.

Li, Wei; Yang, Shuo; Cheng, Meng; Liu, Zheng-Xin; Tu, Hong-Hao

2014-05-01

323

Topology and Criticality in Resonating Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki loop Spin Liquid States  

E-print Network

We exploit a natural Projected Entangled-Pair State (PEPS) representation for the resonating Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki loop (RAL) state. By taking advantage of PEPS-based analytical and numerical methods, we characterize the RAL states on various two-dimensional lattices. On square and honeycomb lattices, these states are critical since the dimer-dimer correlations decay as a power law. On kagome lattice, the RAL state has exponentially decaying correlation functions, supporting the scenario of a gapped spin liquid. We provide further evidence that the RAL state on the kagome lattice is a $\\mathbb{Z}_2$ spin liquid, by identifying the four topological sectors and computing the topological entropy. Furthermore, we construct a one-parameter family of PEPS states interpolating between the RAL state and a short-range Resonating Valence Bond state and find a critical point, consistent with the fact that the two states belong to two different phases. We also perform a variational study of the spin-1 kagome Heisenberg model using this one-parameter PEPS.

Wei Li; Shuo Yang; Meng Cheng; Zheng-Xin Liu; Hong-Hao Tu

2013-12-13

324

Soil, Groundwater, Surface Water, and Sediments of Kennedy Space Center, Florida: Background Chemical and Physical Characteristics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This study documented background chemical composition of soils, groundwater, surface; water, and sediments of Kennedy Space Center. Two hundred soil samples were collected, 20 each in 10 soil classes. Fifty-one groundwater wells were installed in 4 subaquifers of the Surficial Aquifer and sampled; there were 24 shallow, 16 intermediate, and 11 deep wells. Forty surface water and sediment samples were collected in major watershed basins. All samples were away from sites of known contamination. Samples were analyzed for organochlorine pesticides, aroclors, chlorinated herbicides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), total metals, and other parameters. All aroclors (6) were below detection in all media. Some organochlorine pesticides were detected at very low frequencies in soil, sediment, and surface water. Chlorinated herbicides were detected at very low frequencies in soil and sediments. PAH occurred in low frequencies in soiL, shallow groundwater, surface water, and sediments. Concentrations of some metals differed among soil classes, with subaquifers and depths, and among watershed basins for surface water but not sediments. Most of the variation in metal concentrations was natural, but agriculture had increased Cr, Cu, Mn, and Zn.

Shmalzer, Paul A.; Hensley, Melissa A.; Mota, Mario; Hall, Carlton R.; Dunlevy, Colleen A.

2000-01-01

325

A Diagnostic Analysis of the Kennedy Space Center LDAR Network. 1; Data Characteristics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An analytic framework is developed in which to analyze climatological VHF (66 MHz) radiation measurements taken by the Kennedy Space Center Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) network. A 19 month noise-filtered sample of LDAR observations is examined using this framework. It is found that the climatological impulsive VHF source density as observed by LDAR falls off approximately 10 dB every 71 km of ground range away from the network centroid (a 31 km e-folding scale). The underlying vertical distribution of impulsive VHF sources is approximately normally distributed with a mean altitude of 9 km and a standard deviation of 2.7 km; this implies that the loss of below-horizon sources has a negligible effect on column-integrated source densities within a 200 km ground range. At medium to far ranges, location errors are primarily radial and have a slightly asymmetric distribution whose standard deviation increases as r(exp 2). Error moments estimated from observed lightning are significantly higher than those from aircraft-based signal generator or analytic estimates. LDAR bulk flash detection efficiency is predicted to be above 90% to 94-113 km range from the network centroid and to fall below 10% at ranges greater than 200-240 km.

Boccippio, D. J.; Heckman, S.; Goodman, S. J.

2001-01-01

326

Geology, geohydrology, and soils of NASA, Kennedy Space Center: A review  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Sediments underlying Kennedy Space Center (KSC) have accumulated in alternating periods of deposition and erosion since the Eocene. Surface sediments are of Pleistocene and Recent ages. Fluctuating sea levels with the alternating glacial-interglacial cycles have shaped the formation of the barrier island. Merritt Island is an older landscape whose formation may have begun as much as 240,000 years ago, although most of the surface sediments are not that old. Cape Canaveral probably dates from less than 7,000 years B.P. (before present) as does the barrier strip separating Mosquito Lagoon from the Atlantic Ocean. Merritt Island and Cape Canaveral have been shaped by progradational processes but not continuously so, while the Mosquito Lagoon barrier has been migrating landward. Deep acquifers beneath KSC are recharged inland but are highly mineralized in the coastal region and interact little with surface vegetation. The Surficial acquifer has formed in the Pleistocene and Recent deposits and is recharged by local rainfall. Sand ridges in the center of Merritt Island are important to its recharge.

Schmalzer, Paul A.; Hinkle, C. Ross

1990-01-01

327

Analysis of Possible Explosions at Kennedy Space Center Due to Spontaneous Ignition of Hypergolic Propellants  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Constellation Program plan currently calls for the replacement of the Space Shuttle with the ARES I & V spacecraft and booster vehicles to send astronauts to the moon and beyond. Part of the ARES spacecraft is the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), which includes the Crew Module (CM) and Service Module (SM). The Orion CM's main propulsion system and supplies are provided by the SM. The SM is to be processed off line and moved to the Vehicle Assembly Building (V AB) for stacking to the first stage booster motors prior to ARES move to the launch pad. The new Constellation Program philosophy to process in this manner has created a major task for the KSC infrastructure in that conventional QD calculations are no longer viable because of the location of surrounding facilities near the VAB and the Multi Purpose Processing Facility (MPPF), where the SM will be serviced with nearly 18,000 pounds of hypergolic propellants. The Multi-Payload Processing Facility (MPPF) complex, constructed by NASA in 1994, is located just off E Avenue south of the Operations and Checkout (O&C) building in the Kennedy Space Center industrial area. The MPPF includes a high bay and a low bay. The MPPF high bay is 40.2 m (132 ft) long x 18.9 m (60 ft) wide with a ceiling height of 18.9 m (62 ft). The low bay is a 10.4 m (34 ft) long x 10.4 m (34 ft) wide processing area and has a ceiling height of6.1 m (20 ft). The MPPF is currently used to process non-hazardous payloads. Engineering Analysis Inc. (EAI), under contract with ASRC Aerospace, Inc. in conjunction with the Explosive Safety Office, NASA, Kennedy Space Center (KSC), has carried out an analysis of the effects of explosions at KSC in or near various facilities produced by the spontaneous ignition ofhypergolic fuel stored in the CEV SM. The facilities considered included (1) Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) (2) Multi-Payload Processing Facility (MPPF) (3) Canister Rotation Facility (CRF) Subsequent discussion deals with the MPPF analysis. Figure 1 provides a view of the MPPF from the northwest. An interior view ofthe facility is shown in Figure 2. The study was concerned with both blast hazards and hazardous fragments which exceed existing safety standards, as described in Section 2.0. The analysis included both blast and fragmentation effects and was divided into three parts as follows: (1) blast (2) primary fragmentation (3) secondary fragmentation Blast effects are summarized in Section 3.0, primary fragmentation in Section 4.0, and secondary fragmentation (internal and external) in Section 5.0. Conclusions are provided in Section 6.0, while references cited are included in Section 7.0. A more detailed description of the entire study is available in a separate document.

Brown, Stephen

2010-01-01

328

Developing empirical lightning cessation forecast guidance for the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Kennedy Space Center in east Central Florida is one of the few locations in the country that issues lightning advisories. These forecasts are vital to the daily operations of the Space Center and take on even greater significance during launch operations. The U.S. Air Force's 45th Weather Squadron (45WS), who provides forecasts for the Space Center, has a good record of forecasting the initiation of lightning near their locations of special concern. However, the remaining problem is knowing when to cancel a lightning advisory. Without specific scientific guidelines detailing cessation activity, the Weather Squadron must keep advisories in place longer than necessary to ensure the safety of personnel and equipment. This unnecessary advisory time costs the Space Center millions of dollars in lost manpower each year. This research presents storm and environmental characteristics associated with lightning cessation that then are utilized to create lightning cessation guidelines for isolated thunderstorms for use by the 45WS during the warm season months of May through September. The research uses data from the Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) network at the Kennedy Space Center, which can observe intra-cloud and portions of cloud-to-ground lightning strikes. Supporting data from the Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS), radar observations from the Melbourne WSR-88D, and Cape Canaveral morning radiosonde launches also are included. Characteristics of 116 thunderstorms comprising our dataset are presented. Most of these characteristics are based on LDAR-derived spark and flash data and have not been described previously. In particular, the first lightning activity is quantified as either cloud-to-ground (CG) or intra-cloud (IC). Only 10% of the storms in this research are found to initiate with a CG strike. Conversely, only 16% of the storms end with a CG strike. Another characteristic is the average horizontal extent of all the flashes comprising a storm. Our average is 12-14 km, while the greatest flash extends 26 km. Comparisons between the starting altitude of the median and last flashes of a storm are analyzed, with only 37% of the storms having a higher last flash initiating altitude. Additional observations are made of the total lightning flash rate, percentage of CG to IC lightning, trends of individual flash initiation altitudes versus the average initiation altitude, the average inter-flash time distribution, and time series of inter-flash times. Five schemes to forecast lightning cessation are developed and evaluated. 100 of the 116 storms were randomly selected as the dependent sample, while the remaining 16 storms were used for verification. The schemes included a correlation and regression tree analysis, multiple linear regression, trends of storm duration, trend of the altitude of the greatest reflectivity to the time of the final flash, and a percentile scheme. Surprisingly, the percentile method was found to be the most effective technique and the simplest. The inclusion of real time storm parameters is found to have little effect on the results, suggesting that different forecast predictors, such as microphysical data from polarimetric radar, will be necessary to produce improved skill. When the percentile method used a confidence level of 99.5%, it successfully maintained lightning advisories for all 16 independent storms on which the schemes were tested. Since the computed wait time was 25 min, compared to the 45WS' most conservative and accurate wait time of 30 min, the percentile method saves 5 min for each advisory. This 5 min of savings safely shortens the Weather Squadron's advisories and saves money. Additionally, these results are the first to evaluate the 30/30 rule that is used commonly. The success of the percentile method is surprising since it out performs more complex procedures involving correlation and regression tree analysis and regression schemes. These more sophisticated statistical analyses were expected to perform better since they include more predictors in t

Stano, Geoffrey T.

329

Shuttle Endeavour Mated to 747 SCA Takeoff for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft No. 911, with the space shuttle orbiter Endeavour securely mounted atop its fuselage, begins the ferry flight from Rockwell's Plant 42 at Palmdale, California, where the orbiter was built, to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. At Kennedy, the space vehicle was processed and launched on orbital mission STS-49, which landed at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, 16 May 1992. NASA 911, the second modified 747 that went into service in November 1990, has special support struts atop the fuselage and internal strengthening to accommodate the added weight of the orbiters. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now

1991-01-01

330

Shuttle Endeavour Mated to 747 SCA Taxi to Runway for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft No. 911, with the space shuttle orbiter Endeavour securely mounted atop its fuselage, taxies to the runway to begin the ferry flight from Rockwell's Plant 42 at Palmdale, California, where the orbiter was built, to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. At Kennedy, the space vehicle was processed and launched on orbital mission STS-49, which landed at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, 16 May 1992. NASA 911, the second modified 747 that went into service in November 1990, has special support struts atop the fuselage and internal strengthening to accommodate the added weight of the orbiters. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site

1991-01-01

331

STS-66 Atlantis 747 SCA Ferry Flight Morning Takeoff for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The space shuttle Atlantis atop NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) during takeoff for a return ferry flight to the Kennedy Space Center from Edwards, California. The STS-66 mission was dedicated to the third flight of the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science-3 (ATLAS-3), part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program. The astronauts also deployed and retrieved a free-flying satellite designed to study the middle and lower thermospheres and perform a series of experiments covering life sciences research and microgravity processing. The landing was at 7:34 a.m. (PST) 14 November 1994, after being waved off from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, due to adverse weather. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shutt

1994-01-01

332

STS-35 Leaves Dryden on 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) Bound for Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The first rays of the morning sun light up the side of NASA's Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) as it departs for the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, with the orbiter from STS-35 attached to its back. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site with Dryden remaining as the principal alternate landing site.

1990-01-01

333

Shuttle Atlantis Returning to Kennedy Space Center after 10-Month Refurbishment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis, framed by the California mountains, as it rides on the back of one of NASA's Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) en route from California to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site with Dryden remaining as the principal alternate landing site.

1998-01-01

334

Shuttle Atlantis Returning to Kennedy Space Center after 10-Month Refurbishment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle Atlantis rides on the back of one of NASA's Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft en route from California to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site with Dryden remaining as the principal alternate landing site.

1998-01-01

335

Shuttle Atlantis Returning to Kennedy Space Center after 10 Month Refurbishment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis is seen here in flight on the back of one of NASA's Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) as it departs California for the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site with Dryden remaining as the principal alternate landing site.

1998-01-01

336

Shuttle Atlantis Returning to Kennedy Space Center after 10 Month Refurbishment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A look-down view on the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis piggy-backed on top of one of NASA's Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) as it departs California for the Kennedy Space Center, Florida in September 1998. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site with Dryden remaining as the principal alternate landing site.

1998-01-01

337

Exploration of the Theoretical Physical Capacity of the John F. Kennedy International Airport Runway System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A design study was completed to explore the theoretical physical capacity (TPC) of the John F. Kennedy International Airport (KJFK) runway system for a northflow configuration assuming impedance-free (to throughput) air traffic control functionality. Individual runways were modeled using an agent-based, airspace simulation tool, the Airspace Concept Evaluation System (ACES), with all runways conducting both departures and arrivals on a first-come first-served (FCFS) scheduling basis. A realistic future flight schedule was expanded to 3.5 times the traffic level of a selected baseline day, September 26, 2006, to provide a steady overdemand state for KJFK runways. Rules constraining departure and arrival operations were defined to reflect physical limits beyond which safe operations could no longer be assumed. Safety buffers to account for all sources of operational variability were not included in the TPC estimate. Visual approaches were assumed for all arrivals to minimize inter-arrival spacing. Parallel runway operations were assumed to be independent based on lateral spacing distances. Resulting time intervals between successive airport operations were primarily constrained by same-runway and then by intersecting-runway spacing requirements. The resulting physical runway capacity approximates a theoretical limit that cannot be exceeded without modifying runway interaction assumptions. Comparison with current KJFK operational limits for a north-flow runway configuration indicates a substantial throughput gap of approximately 48%. This gap may be further analyzed to determine which part may be feasibly bridged through the deployment of advanced systems and procedures, and which part cannot, because it is either impossible or not cost-effective to control. Advanced systems for bridging the throughput gap may be conceptualized and simulated using this same experimental setup to estimate the level of gap closure achieved.

Neitzke, Kurt W.; Guerreiro, Nelson M.

2014-01-01

338

Kennedy Space Center: Creating a Spaceport Reality from the Dreams of Many  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On December 17, 1903, Orville Wright piloted the first powered airplane only 20 feet above the ground near Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The flight lasted 12 seconds and covered 120 feet. Who would have guessed that the bizarre looking contraption developed by brothers in the bicycle business would lay the ground work eventually resulting in over a million passengers moved daily in a sky filled with the contrails of jets flying at over 30,000 feet in elevation and over 500 miles per hour. Similarly, who would have guessed that the destructive nature of V-2 rockets of Germany would spark the genesis of spaceflight to explore our solar system and beyond? Yet the interest in using the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) continues to grow. Potential customers have expressed interest in KSC as a location for testing new rocket engines, servicing the world's largest airborne launching platform for drop-launch rockets, developing multi-use launch platforms that permit diverse customers to use the same launch platform, developing new spacecraft, and implementing advanced modifications for lifting 150 metric ton payloads to low earth orbit. The multitude of customers has grown and with this growth comes a need to provide a command, control, communication, and range infrastructure that maximizes flexibility and reconfigurability to address a much more frequent launch rate of diverse vehicles and spacecraft. The Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) Program Office at KSC is embarking upon these developments to realize the dream of a robust spaceport. Many unique technical trade studies have been completed or are underway to successfully transition KSC into a multi-user customer focused spaceport. Like the evolution of the airplane, GSDO is working to transform KSC infrastructures that will turn once unthinkable space opportunities into a reality for today.

Gray, James A.; Colloredo, Scott

2012-01-01

339

The analysis of rapidly developing fog at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report documents fog precursors and fog climatology at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Florida from 1986 to 1990. The major emphasis of this report focuses on rapidly developing fog events that would affect the less than 7-statute mile visibility rule for End-Of-Mission (EOM) Shuttle landing at KSC (Rule 4-64(A)). The Applied Meteorology Unit's (AMU's) work is to: develop a data base for study of fog associated weather conditions relating to violations of this landing constraint; develop forecast techniques or rules-of-thumb to determine whether or not current conditions are likely to result in an acceptable condition at landing; validate the forecast techniques; and transition techniques to operational use. As part of the analysis the fog events were categorized as either advection, pre-frontal or radiation. As a result of these analyses, the AMU developed a fog climatological data base, identified fog precursors and developed forecaster tools and decision trees. The fog climatological analysis indicates that during the fog season (October to April) there is a higher risk for a visibility violation at KSC during the early morning hours (0700 to 1200 UTC), while 95 percent of all fog events have dissipated by 1600 UTC. A high number of fog events are characterized by a westerly component to the surface wind at KSC (92 percent) and 83 percent of the fog events had fog develop west of KSC first (up to 2 hours). The AMU developed fog decision trees and forecaster tools that would help the forecaster identify fog precursors up to 12 hours in advance. Using the decision trees as process tools ensures the important meteorological data are not overlooked in the forecast process. With these tools and a better understanding of fog formation in the local KSC area, the Shuttle weather support forecaster should be able to give the Launch and Flight Directors a better KSC fog forecast with more confidence.

Wheeler, Mark M.; Atchison, Michael K.; Schumann, Robin; Taylor, Greg E.; Yersavich, Ann; Warburton, John D.

1994-01-01

340

Texture Modification of the Shuttle Landing Facility Runway at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes the test procedures and the criteria used in selecting an effective runway-surface-texture modification at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to reduce Orbiter tire wear. The new runway surface may ultimately result in an increase of allowable crosswinds for launch and landing operations. The modification allows launch and landing operations in 20-knot crosswinds, if desired. This 5-knot increase over the previous 15-knot limit drastically increases landing safety and the ability to make on-time launches to support missions in which Space Station rendezvous are planned. The paper presents the results of an initial (1988) texture modification to reduce tire spin-up wear and then describes a series of tests that use an instrumented ground-test vehicle to compare tire friction and wear characteristics, at small scale, of proposed texture modifications placed into the SLF runway surface itself. Based on these tests, three candidate surfaces were chosen to be tested at full-scale by using a highly modified and instrumented transport aircraft capable of duplicating full Orbiter landing profiles. The full-scale Orbiter tire testing revealed that tire wear could be reduced approximately by half with either of two candidates. The texture-modification technique using a Humble Equipment Company Skidabrader(trademark) shotpeening machine proved to be highly effective, and the entire SLF runway surface was modified in September 1994. The extensive testing and evaluation effort that preceded the selection of this particular surface-texture-modification technique is described herein.

Daugherty, Robert H.; Yager, Thomas J.

1997-01-01

341

Crop production data for bioregenerative life support: Observations from testing at NASA's Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

NASA s Biomass Production Chamber BPC at Kennedy Space Center was decommissioned ca 1998 but in the preceding decade several crop tests were conducted that have not been reported in the open literature These included monoculture studies with wheat soybean potato and tomato For each of these studies 20 m 2 of crops were grown in an atmospherically closed chamber 113 m 3 vol using a nutrient film hydroponic technique along with elevated CO 2 1000 or 1200 mu mol mol -1 Canopy light PAR levels ranged from 30 to 85 mol m -2 d -1 depending on the crop and selected photoperiod Total biomass DM productivities reached 40 g m -2 d -1 for wheat 16 g m -2 d -1 for soybean 33 g m -2 d -1 for potato and 20 g m -2 d -1 for tomato Edible biomass DM productivities reached 13 g m -2 d -1 for wheat 6 g m -2 d -1 for soybean 20 g m -2 d -1 for potato and 10 g m -2 d -1 for tomato The highest radiation use efficiencies for biomass were 0 60 g DM mol -1 PAR for wheat 0 50 g mol -1 for soybean 0 95 g mol -1 for potato and 0 51 g mol -1 for tomato The highest radiation use efficiencies for edible biomass were 0 22 g DM mol -1 for wheat 0 18 g mol -1 for soybean 0 58 g mol -1 for potato and 0 25 g mol -1 for tomato Use of transplanting cycles or spacing techniques to reduce open gaps between plants early in growth would have improved productivities and radiation use efficiencies for soybeans potatoes and

Wheeler, R. M.; Mackowiak, C. L.; Stutte, G. W.; Yorio, N. C.; Ruffe, L. M.; Sager, J. C.; Knott, W. M.

342

Effectiveness of an existing estuarine no-take fish sanctuary within the Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Approximately 22% of the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, have been closed to public access and fishing since 1962. These closed areas offer an opportunity to test the effectiveness of 'no-take' sanctuaries by analyzing two replicated estuarine areas. Areas open and closed to fishing were sampled from November 1986 to January 1990 with 653 random trammel-net sets, each enclosing 3,721 m2. Samples from no-fishing areas had significantly (P < 0.05) greater abundance and larger fishes than fished areas. Relative abundance (standardized catch per unit effort, CPUE) in protected areas (6.4 fish/set) was 2.6 times greater than in the fished areas (2.4 fish/set) for total game fish, 2.4 times greater for spotted seatrout Cynoscion nebulosus, 6.3 times greater for red drum Sciaenops ocellatus, 12.8 times greater for black drum Pogonias cromis, 5.3 times greater for common snook Centropomus undecimalis, and 2.6 times greater for striped mullet Mugil cephalus. Fishing had the primary effect on CPUE, independent of habitat and other environmental factors. Salinity and depth were important secondary factors affecting CPUE, followed by season or month, and temperature. The importance of specific factors varied with each species. Median and maximum size of red drum, spotted seatrout, black drum, and striped mullet were also significantly greater in the unfished areas. More and larger fish of spawning age were observed in the unfished areas for red drum, spotted seatrout, and black drum. Tagging studies documented export of important sport fish from protected areas to fished areas.

Johnson, D. R.; Funicelli, N. A.; Bohnsack, J. A.

1999-01-01

343

A Diagnostic Analysis of the Kennedy Space Center LDAR Network. 1; Data Characteristics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An analytical framework is developed in which to analyze climatological VHF (66 MHz) radiation measurements taken by the Kennedy Space Center Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) network. A 19-month noise-filtered sample of LDAR observations is examined using this framework. It is found that the climatological VHF source density as observed by LDAR falls off approximately 10 dB every 71 km of ground range away from the network centroid (a 31 km e-folding scale). From this framework it is inferred that the underlying source distribution is likely inverse exponential in amplitude, with a log-slope of 126-147 mW(sup -1/2). The underlying vertical distribution of VHF sources is approximately normally distributed with a mean altitude of 9 km and a standard deviation of 2.7 km; this implies that the loss of below-horizon sources has a negligible effect on column-integrated source densities within 200 km ground range. At medium to far ranges, location errors are primarily radial and have a slightly asymmetric distribution whose first moment increases as range squared. Error moments estimated from observed lightning are significantly higher than those from aircraft-based signal generator or analytic solution estimates, suggesting that timing errors arising from poor signal identification and discrimination may dominate over timing errors arising from nominal sensor resolution. The VHF source properties of individual LDAR-observed flashes are computed and an analytic expression for flash detection efficiency vs. range is derived. This reveals nearly constant flash detection efficiency to 80-94 km range from the network centroid.

Boccippio, D. J.; Heckman, S.; Goodman, S. J.

1999-01-01

344

Harvard UniversityJohn f. kennedy J U S T C A T E R I N GJ U S T C A T E R I N G  

E-print Network

Harvard UniversityJohn f. kennedy school of government J U S T C A T E R I N GJ U S T C A T E R I N G h a r v a r d u n i v e r s i t y 102401_SODEXHO_Cover 4/9/07 2:28 PM Page 2 #12;John f. kennedy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $30.00 #12;University John f. kennedy school of government 3 Breakfast The Continental

345

Creating Processes Associated with Providing Government Goods and Services Under the Commercial Space Launch Act at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has decided to write its agreements under the Commercial Space Launch Act (CSLA) authority to cover a broad range of categories of support that KSC could provide to our commercial partner. Our strategy was to go through the onerous process of getting the agreement in place once and allow added specificity and final cost estimates to be documented on a separate Task Order Request (TOR). This paper is written from the implementing engineering team's perspective. It describes how we developed the processes associated with getting Government support to our emerging commercial partners, such as SpaceX and reports on our success to date.

Letchworth, Janet F.

2011-01-01

346

Biodiversity and Ecology of Amphibians and Reptiles of the Kennedy Space Center: 1998 Close-Out Report to NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since 1992, there have been researchers have been studying the population ecology and conservation biology of the amphibians and reptiles of the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) This research is an outgrowth of my Master's work in the late 1970's under Lew Ehrhart at UCF. The primary emphasis of our studies are (1) examination of long-term changes in the abundance of amphibians and reptile populations, (2) occurrence and effects of Upper Respiratory Tract Disease (URTD) in gopher tortoises (Gopherus polyphemus), and (3) ecological studies of selected species.

Sigel, Richard A.

1999-01-01

347

Institutional environmental impact statement (space shuttle development and operations) amendment no. 1. [space shuttle operations at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Data are presented to support the environmental impact statement on space shuttle actions at Kennedy Space Center. Studies indicate that land use to accommodate space shuttle operations may have the most significant impact. The impacts on air, water and noise quality are predicted to be less on the on-site environment. Considerations of operating modes indicate that long and short term land use will not affect wildlife productivity. The potential for adverse environmental impact is small and such impacts will be local, short in duration, controllable, and environmentally acceptable.

1973-01-01

348

Development and implementation of a scrub habitat compensation plan for Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Kennedy Space Center (KSC), located on Merritt Island on the east coast of central Florida, is one of three remaining major populations of the Florida Scrub Jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens coerulescens), listed as threatened by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) since 1987. Construction of new facilities by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) on KSC over the next five years has the potential to impact up to 193 ac (78.1 ha) of Scrub Jay habitat. Under an early consultation process with the Endangered Species Office of the USFWS, NASA agreed to a compensation plan for loss of Scrub Jay habitat. The compensation plan required NASA to restore or create scrub on KSC at a 2:1 ratio for that lost. The compensation plan emphasized restoration of scrub habitat that is of marginal or declining suitability to Scrub Jays because it has remained unburned. Although prescribed burning has been conducted by the USFWS Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge (MINWR) for more than ten years, significant areas of scrub remain unburned because they have been excluded from fire management units or because landscape fragmentation and a period of fire suppression allowed scrub to reach heights and diameters that are fire resistant. For such areas, mechanical cutting followed by prescribed burning was recommended for restoration. A second part of the restoration plan is an experimental study of scrub reestablishment (i.e., creation) on abandoned, well drained agricultural sites by planting scrub oaks and other scrub plants. The compensation plan identified 260 ac (105 ha) of scrub restoration in four areas and a 40 ac (16 ha) scrub creation site. Monitoring of restoration sites required under the plan included: establishing permanent vegetation sample transects before treatment and resampling annually for ten years after treatment, and color banding Scrub Jays to determine territories prior to treatment followed by monitoring reproductive success and survival for ten years after treatment. Monitoring scrub creation sites included determining survival of planted material for five years and establishing permanent transects to follow vegetation development for ten years after planting. Scrub Jay monitoring of creation sites is incorporated with that of adjacent restoration sites.

Schmalzer, Paul A.; Breininger, David R.; Adrian, Frederic W.; Schaub, Ron; Duncan, Brean W.

1994-01-01

349

STS-76 - Being Prepared for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center via SCA 747 Aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Moonrise over Atlantis: following the STS-76 dawn landing at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on 31 March 1996, NASA 905, one of two modified Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, was prepared to ferry Atlantis back to the Kennedy Space Center, FL. Delivery of Altlantis to Florida was delayed until 11 April 1996, due to an engine warning light that appeared shortly after take off on April 6. The SCA #905 returned to Edwards only minutes after departure. The right inboard engine #3 was exchanged and the 747 with Atlantis atop was able to depart for Davis-Monthan Air Force Base for a refueling stop. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site

1996-01-01

350

STS-76 - Being Prepared for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center via SCA 747 Aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Moonrise over Atlantis following the STS-76 dawn landing at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on 31 March 1996. NASA 905, one of two modified Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), was readied to ferry Atlantis back to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Delivery of Atlantis to Florida was delayed until 11 April 1996, due to an engine warning light that appeared shortly after take off on 6 April. The SCA #905 returned to Edwards with Atlantis attached only minutes after departure. The right inboard engine #3 was exchanged and the 747 with Atlantis atop was able to depart for Davis-Monthan Air Force Base for a refueling stop. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florid

1996-01-01

351

Recommendations for Safe Separation Distances from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) Using a Heat-Flux-Based Analytical Approach (Abridged)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was requested to provide computational modeling to support the establishment of a safe separation distance surrounding the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The two major objectives of the study were 1) establish a methodology based on thermal flux to determine safe separation distances from the Kennedy Space Center's (KSC's) Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) with large numbers of solid propellant boosters containing hazard division 1.3 classification propellants, in case of inadvertent ignition; and 2) apply this methodology to the consideration of housing eight 5-segment solid propellant boosters in the VAB. The results of the study are contained in this report.

Cragg, Clinton H.; Bowman, Howard; Wilson, John E.

2011-01-01

352

New York Airports Data Package Number 3, John F. Kennedy International Airport, La Guardia Airport. Airport Improvement Task Force Delay Studies.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The New York Data Package No. 3 contains preliminary Data Package No. 3 for John F. Kennedy International (JFK) and LaGuardia (LGA) Airports for use during the fourth New York Task Force Meeting on October 17, 1978. Attachment A contains the results of th...

1978-01-01

353

Simulating Dead Wood in the Coast Range of Oregon Rebecca S.H. Kennedy1,2 and Keith A. Olsen3  

E-print Network

Simulating Dead Wood in the Coast Range of Oregon Rebecca S.H. Kennedy1,2 and Keith A. Olsen3 1-Growth; for descriptions see Ohmann and Gregory 2002) for the range of current dead wood amounts and potential management-group selection during model runs by matching total dead wood volume and snag volume criteria for each level we

354

Gold(I)-Catalyzed Conia-Ene Reaction of -Ketoesters with Alkynes Joshua J. Kennedy-Smith, Steven T. Staben, and F. Dean Toste*  

E-print Network

Gold(I)-Catalyzed Conia-Ene Reaction of -Ketoesters with Alkynes Joshua J. Kennedy-Smith, Steven T(I) complexes as catalysts. Carbon-carbon bond formation promoted by homogeneous gold catalysts is extremely did not proceed to completion even after a day at room temperature (entry 1). On the other hand, gold

Toste, Dean

355

On the resolution and tolerance of cognitive inconsistency in a natural-occurring event: Attitudes and beliefs following the Senator Edward M. Kennedy incident  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reports data obtained from a 12-item questionnaire relating beliefs about the event in which Senator Edward M. Kennedy delayed approximately 10 hr. in reporting an automobile accident involving a fatality and attitude change toward the Senator. For the major portion of the items, evidence of consistency was found between attitude change and beliefs; however, a sizable percentage of respondents who

Irwin Silverman

1971-01-01

356

John Steinbeck: "The Pearl," Adapted by Warren Frost and Dramatized for the Kennedy Center by Nick Olcott. Cue Sheet for Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This performance guide is designed for teachers to use with students before and after a performance of "The Pearl" by John Steinbeck, adapted by Warren Frost and dramatized for the Kennedy Center by Nick Olcott. It is in the form of a Director's Notebook--a scrapbook/journal of clippings, memos, lists, illustrations, notes, and other items--to…

Carr, John C.

357

LONDON ARISTOTLE'S RHETORIC AND THE PSYCHOLOGY OF PRACTICAL ETHICS Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal Vol. 10, No. 4, 287305 2000 by The Johns Hopkins University Press  

E-print Network

of Ethics Journal Vol. 10, No. 4, 287­305 © 2000 by The Johns Hopkins University Press Alex John LondonLONDON · ARISTOTLE'S RHETORIC AND THE PSYCHOLOGY OF PRACTICAL ETHICS [ 287 ] Kennedy Institute Amenable to Reason: Aristotle's Rhetoric and the Moral Psychology of Practical Ethics ABSTRACT

Spirtes, Peter

358

Creation of Laguerre-Gaussian laser modes using diffractive optics Sharon A. Kennedy, Matthew J. Szabo, Hilary Teslow, James Z. Porterfield, and E. R. I. Abraham  

E-print Network

Creation of Laguerre-Gaussian laser modes using diffractive optics Sharon A. Kennedy, Matthew J October 2002 Diffractive optics are used to create low- and high-order Laguerre-Gaussian LG beams from ) and one high-order (LG1 2 ) Laguerre-Gaussian mode. Modeling the LG1 2 beam as a superposition of LG modes

Abraham, Eric

359

The Distribution of Cloud to Ground Lightning Strike Intensities and Associated Magnetic Inductance Fields Near the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lightning strike location and peak current are monitored operationally in the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) area by the Cloud to Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS). The present study compiles ten years worth of CGLSS data into a database of near strikes. Using shuffle launch platform LP39A as a convenient central point, all strikes recorded within a 20-mile radius for the period of record O R ) from January 1, 1993 to December 31,2002 were included in the subset database. Histograms and cumulative probability curves are produced for both strike intensity (peak current, in kA) and the corresponding magnetic inductance fields (in A/m). Results for the full POR have application to launch operations lightning monitoring and post-strike test procedures.

Burns, Lee; Decker, Ryan

2005-01-01

360

Aircraft measurements of electrified clouds at Kennedy Space Center. Part 2: Case study: 4 November 1988 (88309)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the fall of 1988, a Schweizer airplane equipped to measure electric field and other meteorological parameters flew over Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in a program to study clouds defined in the existing launch restriction criteria. A case study is presented of a single flight over KSC on November 4, 1988. This flight was chosen for two reasons: (1) the clouds were weakly electrified, and no lightning was reported during the flight; and (2) electric field mills in the surface array at KSC indicated field strengths greater than 3 kV/m, yet the aircraft flying directly over them at an altitude of 3.4 km above sea level measured field strengths of less than 1.6 kV/m. A weather summary, sounding description, record of cloud types, and an account of electric field measurements are included.

Jones, J. J.; Winn, W. P.; Hunyady, S. J.; Moore, C. B.; Bullock, J. W.

1990-01-01

361

Remote measurement utilizing NASA's scanning laser Doppler systems. Volume 1. Laser Doppler wake vortex tracking at Kennedy Airport  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Test operations of the Scanning Laser Doppler System (SLDS) at Kennedy International Airport (KIA) during August 1974 through June 1975 are reported. A total of 1,619 data runs was recorded with a totally operational system during normal landing operations at KIA. In addition, 53 data runs were made during cooperative flybys with the C880 for a grand total of 1672 recorded vortex tracks. Test crews were in attendance at KIA for 31 weeks, of which 25 weeks were considered operational and the other six were packing, unpacking, setup and check out. Although average activity equates to 67 recorded landing operations per week, two periods of complete runway inactivity spanned 20 days and 13 days, respectively. The operation frequency therefore averaged about 88 operations per week.

Krause, M. C.; Wilson, D. J.; Howle, R. E.; Edwards, B. B.; Craven, C. E.; Jetton, J. L.

1976-01-01

362

The perfect haze: Scientists link 1999 U.S. pollution episode to midwest aerosol plumes and Kennedy plane crash  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The crash of John F Kennedy Jrs single-engine Piper Saratoga airplane in the waters off of Marthas Vineyard, Massachusetts, on July 16, 1999, prompted round-the-clock, global media coverage. Cameras panned the waters as the search began the following day, Saturday Pundits at first commented on the likelihood of survival of the late U.S. president's son, who piloted the plane, and the passengers—his wife and sister-in-law. Television screens displayed the projected, hour-and-one-half, nighttime flight path east from New Jersey As the tragedy unfolded, coverage focused on speculation about the cause of the crash. News analysts repeatedly mentioned that haze attributed to summertime heat and high humidity levels may have sharply reduced visibility during the flight.

Showstack, Randy

363

Modifications to the Objective Lightning Probability Forecast Tool at Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) includes the probability of lightning occurrence in their 24-Hour and Weekly Planning Forecasts, briefed at 0700 EDT for daily operations planning on Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and CCAFS. This forecast is based on subjective analyses of model and observational data and output from an objective tool developed by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU). This tool was developed over two phases (Lambert and Wheeler 2005, Lambert 2007). It consists of five equations, one for each warm season month (May-Sep), that calculate the probability of lightning occurrence for the day and a graphical user interface (GUI) to display the output. The Phase I and II equations outperformed previous operational tools by a total of 56%. Based on this success, the 45 WS tasked the AMU with Phase III to improve the tool further.

Crawford, Winifred; Roeder, William

2010-01-01

364

Entanglement spectra of the q-deformed Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki model and matrix product states  

E-print Network

We exactly calculate the reduced density matrix of matrix product states (MPS). Our compact result enables one to perform analytic studies of entanglement in MPS. In particular, we consider the MPS ground states of two anisotropic spin chains. One is a q-deformed Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki (AKLT) model and the other is a general spin-1 quantum antiferromagnet with nearest-neighbor interactions. Our analysis shows how anisotropy affects entanglement on different continuous parameter manifolds. We also construct an effective boundary spin model that describes a block of spins in the ground state of the q-deformed AKLT Hamiltonian. The temperature of this effective model is given in terms of the deformation parameter q.

Raul A. Santos; Francis N. C. Paraan; Vladimir E. Korepin; Andreas Klümper

2011-12-02

365

Calculating the Lightning Protection System Downconductors' Grounding Resistance at Launch Complex 39B, Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new Lightning Protection System (LPS) was designed and built at Launch Complex 39B (LC39B), at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Florida, which consists of a catenary wire system (at a height of about 181 meters above ground level) supported by three insulation installed atop three towers in a triangular configuration. Nine downconductors (each about 250 meters long) are connected to the catenary wire system. Each downconductor is connected to a 7.62-meter-radius circular counterpoise conductor with six equally spaced. 6-meter-1ong vertical grounding rods. Grounding requirements at LC39B call for all underground and above ground metallic piping. enclosures, raceways. and. cable trays. within 7.62 meters of. counterpoise, to be bonded to the counterpoise, which results in a complex interconnected grounding system, given the many metallic piping, raceways and cable trays that run in multiple directions around LC39B.

Mata, Carlos; Mata, Angel

2011-01-01

366

STS-76 - Being Prepared for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center via SCA 747 Aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Moonrise over Atlantis: the space shuttle Atlantis receives post-flight servicing in the Mate-Demate Device (MDD), following its landing at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, 31 March 1996. Once servicing was complete, one of NASA's two 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, No. 905, was readied to ferry Atlantis back to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Delivery of Atlantis to Florida was delayed until 11 April 1996, due to an engine warning light that appeared shortly after take off on April 6. The SCA returned to Edwards only minutes after departure. The right inboard engine #3 was exchanged, and the 747 with Atlantis atop was able to depart 11 April for Davis-Monthan Air Force Base for a refueling stop. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the

1996-01-01

367

STS-76 - SCA 747 Aircraft Takeoff for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft leaves the runway with the Shuttle Atlantis on its back. Following the STS-76 dawn landing at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on 31 March 1996. NASA 905, one of two modified 747's, was prepared to ferry Atlantis back to the Kennedy Space Center, FL. Delivery of Altlantis to Florida was delayed until 11 April 1996, due to an engine warning light that appeared shortly after take off on 6 April. The SCA #905 returned to Edwards with Atlantis aboard only minutes after departure. The right inboard engine #3 was exchanged and the 747 with Atlantis atop was able to depart for Davis-Monthan Air Force Base for a refueling stop. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttl

1996-01-01

368

A continuation of base-line studies for environmentally monitoring Space Transportation Systems at John F. Kennedy Space Center. Volume 2: Chemical studies of rainfall and soil analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The results of a study which was designed to monitor, characterize, and evaluate the chemical composition of precipitation (rain) which fell at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida (KSC) during the period July 1977 to March 1979 are reported. Results which were obtained from a soil sampling and associated chemical analysis are discussed. The purpose of these studies was to determine the environmental perturbations which might be caused by NASA space activities.

Madsen, B. C.

1980-01-01

369

Studies on the toxic elements and organic degradation products in aquatic bodies and sediments around Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Haulover Canal and Mosquito Lagoon  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The work during the first year ending September, 1975, is reported. Indian River, Haulover Canal, Mosquito Lagoon, and other aquatic areas of discharge around Kennedy Space Center (KSC) were studied. The presentation and interpretation of data on water and sediment samples collected from Haulover Canal and Mosquito Lagoon are included. The field and laboratory data are presented and tentative conclusions were drawn in the various aspects of the study. An attempt was made to correlate the physical, chemical, and biological parameters.

Ghuman, G. S.; Menon, M. P.; Emeh, C. O.

1975-01-01

370

Managing Birds and Controlling Aircraft in the Kennedy Airport–Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge Complex: The Need for Hard Data and Soft Opinions  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the 1980s, the exponential growth of laughing gull (Larus atricilla) colonies, from 15 to about 7600 nests in 1990, in the Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge and a correlated increase in the bird-strike\\u000a rate at nearby John F. Kennedy International Airport (New York City) led to a controversy between wildlife and airport managers\\u000a over the elimination of the colonies. In

KEVIN M. BROWN; R. MICHAEL ERWIN; MILO E. RICHMOND; P. A. BUCKLEY; JOHN T. TANACREDI; DAVE AVRIN

2001-01-01

371

Assessment and forecasting of lightning potential and its effect on launch operations at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and John F. Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lightning plays a pivotal role in the operation decision process for space and ballistic launches at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy Space Center. Lightning forecasts are the responsibility of Detachment 11, 4th Weather Wing's Cape Canaveral Forecast Facility. These forecasts are important to daily ground processing as well as launch countdown decisions. The methodology and equipment used to forecast lightning are discussed. Impact on a recent mission is summarized.

Weems, J.; Wyse, N.; Madura, J.; Secrist, M.; Pinder, C.

1991-01-01

372

George N.Bennett Kathleen Beckingham  

E-print Network

Sullender HUXLEY FELLOWS Anne Danielson-François Saara DeWalt FACULTY FELLOWS Kevin Foster William Rogers PROFESSORS EMERITI Frank M.Fisher,Jr. Stephen Subtelny ADJUNCT FACULTY Nancy Greig Steve Pennings Biosciences

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

373

KATHLEEN O'REILLY September 2011  

E-print Network

.D. Geography "Creating Contradictions, Recreating Women: Struggles over Meanings and Spaces of Womens. "Resolving a Gendered Paradox: Women's Participation and the NGO boom in north India," in The NGO Boom and dissemination." Human Organization 69(3):285-294. 2010 O'Reilly, K. "Combining sanitation and womens empowerment

374

KATHLEEN O'REILLY Assistant Professor  

E-print Network

.D. Geography "Creating Contradictions, Recreating Women: Struggles over Meanings and Spaces of Womens, editor. Jaipur: Rawat. #12;K. O'Reilly 2 2010 O'Reilly, K. "Combining sanitation and womens empowerment and Commodification in Rajasthan, India." Geoforum. 37:958-972. 2006 OReilly, K. "Women Fieldworkers and the Politics

375

Destabilizing Terrorist Networks Kathleen M. Carley  

E-print Network

Analysis of Social and Organizational Systems at Carnegie Mellon University (http. Their structure is distinct from the organizations that most people in western culture are used to dealing with of tools and an approach to assessing destabilization strategies in a decision context that takes

Sadeh, Norman M.

376

Destabilizing Terrorist Networks Kathleen M. Carley  

E-print Network

for Computational Analysis of Social and Organizational Systems at Carnegie Mellon University (http culture are used to dealing with. In particular, they tend to be more cellular and distributed. As such and possible erroneous. What is needed is a set of tools and an approach to assessing destabilization

Sadeh, Norman M.

377

SPRING 2012 Associate Professor Kathleen Alexander commutes  

E-print Network

rural Botswana residents develop strategies to coexist with wild animals. "With wildlife conflicts projects in Botswana twice a year. The wildlife ecologist and veterinarian lived in the African nation most of her adult life, focusing on infectious disease, natural resources sustainability, human-wildlife

Virginia Tech

378

Locating rocket triggered lightning using the LLP lightning locating system at the NASA Kennedy Space Center. [Lightning Location and Protection  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Five rocket-triggered cloud-to-ground lightning flashes were detected by the operational lightning-locating system at the NASA Kennedy Space Center on August 17, 1984. The locating system, which was designed to detect natural lightning, detected at least 2 and as many as 6 strokes in the triggered flashes, suggesting that some of the strokes in the triggered lightning had signal-amplitude and waveshape characteristics similar to natural lightning. However, not all triggered strokes were detected, indicating that some strokes were atypical in nature. Since the ground-strike points of the triggered flashes were known quite precisely, the accuracy of the lightning-locating system was also evaluated. The three direction finders were found to have a mean bearing accuracy of + or - 0.5-0.6 deg. The distance errors of the real-time position solutions of the locating system on the triggered flashes were in the range of 195-770 m, with a mean of 480 m.

Maier, M. W.; Jafferis, W.

1985-01-01

379

Kennedy Space Center's NASA/Contractor Team-Centered Total Quality Management Seminar: Results, methods, and lessons learned  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It is apparent to everyone associated with the Nation's aeronautics and space programs that the challenge of continuous improvement can be reasonably addressed only if NASA and its contractors act together in a fully integrated and cooperative manner that transcends the traditional boundaries of proprietary interest. It is, however, one thing to assent to the need for such integration and cooperation; it is quite another thing to undertake the hard tasks of turning such a need into action. Whatever else total quality management is, it is fundamentally a team-centered and team-driven process of continuous improvement. The introduction of total quality management at KSC, therefore, has given the Center a special opportunity to translate the need for closer integration and cooperation among all its organizations into specific initiatives. One such initiative that NASA and its contractors have undertaken at KSC is a NASA/Contractor team-centered Total Quality Management Seminar. It is this seminar which is the subject of this paper. The specific purposes of this paper are to describe the following: Background, development, and evolution of Kennedy Space Center's Total Quality Management Seminar; Special characteristics of the seminar; Content of the seminar; Meaning and utility of a team-centered design for TQM training; Results of the seminar; Use that one KSC contractor, EG&G Florida, Inc. has made of the seminar in its Total Quality Management initiative; and Lessons learned.

Kinlaw, Dennis C.; Eads, Jeannette

1992-01-01

380

Surface wind convergence as a short-term predictor of cloud-to-ground lightning at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Cloud-to-ground lightning is a significant forecast problem at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. In this study, cloud-to-ground lightning is related in time and space to surface convergence for 244 days during the convective seasons of 1985 and 1986 over a 790 sq-km network at KSC. The method uses surface convergence, particularly the average over the area, to identify the potential for new, local thunderstorm growth, and it can be used to specify the likely time and location of lightning during the life cycle of the convection. A threshold of 75 x 10 to the -6th/s change in divergence is the main criterion used to define a convergence event, and a set of flashes less than 30 min apart defines a lightning event. Time intervals are found from the study to be approximately 1 h from beginning convergence to first flash, and another hour to the end of lightning. The influences of low-level winds and midlevel moisture in determining the location and intensity of convection are discussed. This is the first known dynamically-based forecast method for lightning prediction. The technique, currently in use at KSC, has been shown to be a systematic, quantitative tool for predicting lightning onset in situations where conventional analysis tools such as radar and satellite are limited.

Watson, Andrew I.; Holle, Ronald L.; Lopez, Raul E.; Ortiz, Robert; Nicholson, James R.

1991-01-01

381

Temporal, Spatial, and Diurnal Patterns in Avian Activity at the Shuttle Landing Facility, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Spatial and temporal patterns in bird abundance within the five-mile airspace at the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) on John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, USA were investigated for purposes of quantifying Bird Aircraft Strike Hazards (BASH). The airspace is surrounded by the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge (MINWR) which provides habitat for approximately 331 resident and migratory bird species. Potential bird strike hazards were greatest around sunrise and sunset for most avian taxonomic groups, including wading birds, most raptors, pelicans, gulls/terns, shorebirds, and passerines. Turkey Vultures and Black Vultures were identified as a primary threat to aircraft operations and were represented in 33% of the samples. Diurnal vulture activity varied seasonally with the development of air thermals in the airspace surrounding the SLF. Variation in the presence and abundance of migratory species was shown for American Robins, swallows, and several species of shorebirds. Analyses of bird activities provides for planning of avionics operations during periods of low-dsk and allows for risk minimization measures during periods of high-risk.

Larson, Vickie L.; Rowe, Sean P.; Breininger, David R.

1997-01-01

382

Vector wind and vector wind shear models 0 to 27 km altitude for Cape Kennedy, Florida, and Vandenberg AFB, California  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The techniques are presented to derive several statistical wind models. The techniques are from the properties of the multivariate normal probability function. Assuming that the winds can be considered as bivariate normally distributed, then (1) the wind components and conditional wind components are univariate normally distributed, (2) the wind speed is Rayleigh distributed, (3) the conditional distribution of wind speed given a wind direction is Rayleigh distributed, and (4) the frequency of wind direction can be derived. All of these distributions are derived from the 5-sample parameter of wind for the bivariate normal distribution. By further assuming that the winds at two altitudes are quadravariate normally distributed, then the vector wind shear is bivariate normally distributed and the modulus of the vector wind shear is Rayleigh distributed. The conditional probability of wind component shears given a wind component is normally distributed. Examples of these and other properties of the multivariate normal probability distribution function as applied to Cape Kennedy, Florida, and Vandenberg AFB, California, wind data samples are given. A technique to develop a synthetic vector wind profile model of interest to aerospace vehicle applications is presented.

Smith, O. E.

1976-01-01

383

Developing Empirical Lightning Cessation Forecast Guidance for the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This research addresses the 45th Weather Squadron's (45WS) need for improved guidance regarding lightning cessation at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy Space Center (KSC). KSC's Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) network was the primary observational tool to investigate both cloud-to-ground and intracloud lightning. Five statistical and empirical schemes were created from LDAR, sounding, and radar parameters derived from 116 storms. Four of the five schemes were unsuitable for operational use since lightning advisories would be canceled prematurely, leading to safety risks to personnel. These include a correlation and regression tree analysis, three variants of multiple linear regression, event time trending, and the time delay between the greatest height of the maximum dBZ value to the last flash. These schemes failed to adequately forecast the maximum interval, the greatest time between any two flashes in the storm. The majority of storms had a maximum interval less than 10 min, which biased the schemes toward small values. Success was achieved with the percentile method (PM) by separating the maximum interval into percentiles for the 100 dependent storms.

Stano, Geoffrey T.; Fuelberg, Henry E.; Roeder, William P.

2010-01-01

384

Summary of 2011 Direct and Nearby Lightning Strikes to Launch Complex 39B, Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A Lightning Protection System (LPS) was designed and built at Launch Complex 39B (LC39B), at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida in 2009. This LPS was instrumented with comprehensive meteorological and lightning data acquisition systems that were deployed from late 2010 until mid 2011. The first direct strikes to the LPS were recorded in March of 2011, when a limited number of sensors had been activated. The lightning instrumentation system detected a total of 70 nearby strokes and 19 direct strokes to the LPS, 2 of the 19 direct strokes to the LPS had two simultaneous ground attachment points (in both instances one channel terminated on the LPS and the other on the nearby ground). Additionally, there are more unaccounted nearby strokes seen on video records for which limited data was acquired either due to the distance of the stroke or the settings of the data acquisition system. Instrumentation deployment chronological milestones, a summary of lightning strikes (direct and nearby), high speed video frames, downconductor currents, and dH/dt and dE/dt typical waveforms for direct and nearby strokes are presented.

Mata, C.T.; Mata, A.G.

2012-01-01

385

Two-dimensional Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki state on the honeycomb lattice is a universal resource for quantum computation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Universal quantum computation can be achieved by simply performing single-qubit measurements on a highly entangled resource state. Resource states can arise from ground states of carefully designed two-body interacting Hamiltonians. This opens up an appealing possibility of creating them by cooling. The family of Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki (AKLT) states are the ground states of particularly simple Hamiltonians with high symmetry, and their potential use in quantum computation gives rise to a new research direction. Expanding on our prior work [T.-C. Wei, I. Affleck, and R. Raussendorf, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.106.070501 106, 070501 (2011)], we give a detailed analysis to explain why the spin-3/2 AKLT state on a two-dimensional honeycomb lattice is a universal resource for measurement-based quantum computation. Along the way, we also provide an alternative proof that the 1D spin-1 AKLT state can be used to simulate arbitrary one-qubit unitary gates. Moreover, we connect the quantum computational universality of 2D random graph states to their percolation property and show that these states whose graphs are in the supercritical (i.e., percolated) phase are also universal resources for measurement-based quantum computation.

Wei, Tzu-Chieh; Affleck, Ian; Raussendorf, Robert

2012-09-01

386

Quantum computational universality of spin-3/2 Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki states beyond the honeycomb lattice  

E-print Network

Universal quantum computation can be achieved by simply performing single-spin measurements on a highly entangled resource state, such as cluster states. The family of Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki (AKLT) states has recently been explored; for example, the spin-1 AKLT chain can be used to simulate single-qubit gate operations on a single qubit, and the spin-3/2 two-dimensional AKLT state on the honeycomb lattice can be used as a universal resource. However, it is unclear whether such universality is a coincidence for the specific state or a shared feature in all two-dimensional AKLT states. Here we consider the family of spin-3/2 AKLT states on various trivalent Archimedean lattices and show that in addition to the honeycomb lattice, the spin-3/2 AKLT states on the square octagon $(4,8^2)$ and the `cross' $(4,6,12)$ lattices are also universal resource, whereas the AKLT state on the `star' $(3,12^2)$ lattice is likely not due to geometric frustration.

Tzu-Chieh Wei

2013-06-06

387

Environmental systems and management activities on the Kennedy Space Center, Merritt Island, Florida: results of a modeling workshop  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In the early 1960's, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) began purchasing 140,000 acres on Merritt Island, Florida, in order to develop a center for space exploration. Most of this land was acquired to provide a safety and security buffer around NASA facilities. NASA, as the managing agency for the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), is responsible for preventing or controlling environmental pollution from the Federal facilities and activities at the Space Center and is committed to use all practicable means to protect and enhance the quality of the surrounding environment. The Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1963 when management authority for undeveloped lands at KSC was transferred to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. In addition to manage for 11 Federally-listed threatened and endangered species and other resident and migratory fish and wildlife populations, the Refuge has comanagement responsibility for 19,000 acres of mosquito control impoundments and 2,500 acres of citrus groves. The Canaveral National Seashore was developed in 1975 when management of a portion of the coastal lands was transferred from NASA to the National Park Service. This multiagency jurisdiction on Merritt Island has resulted in a complex management environment. The modeling workshop described in this report was conducted May 21-25, 1984, at the Kennedy Space Center to: (1) enhance communication among the agencies with management responsibilities on Merritt Island; (2) integrate available information concerning the development, management, and ecology of Merritt Island; and (3) identify key research and monitoring needs associated with the management and use of the island's resources. The workshop was structured around the formulation of a model that would simulate primary management and use activities on Merritt Island and their effects on upland, impoundment, and estuarine vegetation and associated wildlife. The simulation model is composed of four connected submodels. The Uplands submodel calculates changes in acres and structural components of vegetation communities resulting from succession, fire, facilities development, and shuttle launch depositions, as well as the quantity and quality of surface runoff and aquifer input to an impoundment and an estuary. The Impoundment submodel next determines water quality and quantity and changes in vegetation resulting from water level manipulation and prescribed burning. The Estuary submodel than determines water quality parameters and acres of seagrass beds. Finally, the Wildlife submodel calculates habitat suitability indices for key species of interest, based on vegetation conditions in the uplands and impoundments and on several hydrologic parameters. The model represents a hypothetical management unit with 2,500 acres of uplands, a 600-acre impoundment, and a 1,500-acre section of estuary. Two management scenarios were run to analyze model behavior. The scenarios differ in the frequency of shuttle launches and prescribed burning, the extent of facilities development, the amount of land disposed waste material applied, and the nature and timing of impoundment water level control. Early in a model development project, the process of building the model is usually of greater benefit than the model itself. The model building process stimulates interaction among agencies, assists in integrating existing information, and helps identify research needs. These benefits usually accrue even in the absence of real predictive power in the resulting model. Open communication occurs among the Federal, State, and local agencies involved with activities on Merritt Island and the agencies have a cooperative working relationship. The workshop provided an opportunity for all of these agencies to meet at one time and have focused discussions on the key environmental and multiagency resource management issues. The workshop framework helped to integrate information and assumptions from a number of disciplines and agencies. This integration occurred in the computer simulation m

Hamilton, David B.; Andrews, Austin K.; Auble, Gregor T.; Ellison, Richard A.; Farmer, Adrian H.; Roelle, James E.

1985-01-01

388

Quality-Controlled Wind Data from the Kennedy Space Center 915 Megahertz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Network  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA) Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has installed a five-instrument 915-Megahertz (MHz) Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) system that records atmospheric wind profile properties. The purpose of these profilers is to fill data gaps between the top of the KSC wind tower network and the lowest measurement altitude of the KSC 50-MHz DRWP. The 915-MHz DRWP system has the capability to generate three-dimensional wind data outputs from approximately 150 meters (m) to 6,000 m at roughly 15-minute (min) intervals. NASA s long-term objective is to combine the 915-MHz and 50-MHz DRWP systems to create complete vertical wind profiles up to 18,300 m to be used in trajectory and loads analyses of space vehicles and by forecasters on day-of-launch (DOL). This analysis utilizes automated and manual quality control (QC) processes to remove erroneous and unrealistic wind data returned by the 915-MHz DRWP system. The percentage of data affected by each individual QC check in the period of record (POR) (i.e., January to April 2006) was computed, demonstrating the variability in the amount of data affected by the QC processes. The number of complete wind profiles available at given altitude thresholds for each profiler in the POR was calculated and outputted graphically, followed by an assessment of the number of complete wind profiles available for any profiler in the POR. A case study is also provided to demonstrate the QC process on a day of a known weather event.

Dryden, Rachel L.

2011-01-01

389

Measurement of Insulation Compaction in the Cryogenic Fuel Tanks at Kennedy Space Center by Fast/Thermal Neutron Techniques  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The liquid hydrogen and oxygen cryogenic storage tanks at John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) use expanded perlite as thermal insulation. Th ere is evidence that some of the perlite has compacted over time, com promising the thermal performance and possibly also structural integr ity of the tanks. Therefore an Non-destructive Testing (NDT) method for measuring the perlite density or void fraction is urgently needed. Methods based on neutrons are good candidates because they can readil y penetrate through the 1.75 cm outer steel shell and through the ent ire 120 cm thickness of the perlite zone. Neutrons interact with the nuclei of materials to produce characteristic gamma rays which are the n detected. The gamma ray signal strength is proportional to the atom ic number density. Consequently, if the perlite is compacted then the count rates in the individual peaks in the gamma ray spectrum will i ncrease. Perlite is a feldspathic volcanic rock made up of the major elements Si, AI, Na, K and 0 along with some water. With commercially available portable neutron generators it is possible to produce simul taneously fluxes of neutrons in two energy ranges: fast (14 MeV) and thermal (25 meV). Fast neutrons produce gamma rays by inelastic scatt ering which is sensitive to Fe and O. Thermal neutrons produce gamma rays by radiative capture in prompt gamma neutron activation (PGNA) and this is sensitive to Si, AI, Na, Kand H. Thus the two energy ranges produce complementary information. The R&D program has three phases: numerical simulations of neutron and gamma ray transport with MCNP s oftware, evaluation of the system in the laboratory on test articles and finally mapping of the perlite density in the cryogenic tanks at KSC. The preliminary MCNP calculations have shown that the fast/therma l neutron NDT method is capable of distinguishing between expanded an d compacted perlite with excellent statistics.

Livingston, R. A.; Schweitzer, J. S.; Parsons, Ann M.; Arens, Ellen E.

2010-01-01

390

A study of LC-39 cryogenic systems. Part 1: A study of the vacuum insulated transfer lines at Kennedy Space Center. Part 2: Cooldown pressure surges  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The vacuum liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen transfer lines at Kennedy Space Center were studied to evaluate the feasibility of using a condensing gas such as CO2 inside the vacuum spaces to achieve a condensing-vacuum. The study indicates that at ambient temperature, a maximum vacuum hyphen space pressure of 4000 microns is acceptable for the LH2 transfer lines. In addition, the cooldown procedures for the 14-inch cross-country liquid oxygen line was studied using a simplified mathematical model. Preliminary cooldown times are presented for various heat leak rates to the line and for two vent configurations.

Ludtke, P. R.; Voth, R. O.

1971-01-01

391

Detection of topological symmetry in the one-dimensional Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki model of integer spin with ultracold spinor atoms in optical lattices  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A scheme is proposed for detection of the topology in the one-dimensional Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki model, based on ultracold spinor atomic gas in an optical lattice. For this purpose, a global operation O( ?) is introduced with respect to the breaking of spinrotational symmetry. Consequently, the topology can be manifested unambiguously by identifying the special values of ? where the expectation value of the global operator with degenerate ground states is vanishing. Furthermore, experimentally ? can be detected readily by the interference of ultracold atomic gases. This scheme can be implemented readily in experiment since it does not need the addressing of individual atoms or the probing of a boundary.

Cui, HaiTao; Yang, Gui; Tian, JunLong

2013-11-01

392

Effect of a Shore-Oblique Ridge on Beach and Bar Morphodynamics at Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Processes linking beach and bar response to external wave forcing are poorly understood where spatial complexities, such as inner shelf shoals, are present. At NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Cape Canaveral, Florida, two persistant surfzone sand bars occur in a region that also includes cape-associated shoals and multiple shore-oblique ridges at depths below the fair-weather wave base of sediment transport. These features transform incoming deep-water waves, redistributing the spatial pattern of wave energy along- and cross-shore. To observe beach and sandbar response in this complex environment we have collected and georectified hourly beach images at KSC since April 2010. Comparisons of imagery to monthly differential GPS surveys reveal that a double-bar system, with ~25-50 m spacing between crests, has persisted over the last 2 years. Welding of the inner and outer bars occurs intermittently. The preferred welding location coincides with a dune overwash area that has been an erosion hotspot (EHS) over the last decade. Strong nor'easter activity in November 2011 activated wave breaking across a large (~10 km long, ~500 m wide, ~5 m tall) shore-oblique subaqueous ridge that intersects the nearshore system at the EHS. Our observations allow testing of a hypothesis that the ridge controls nearshore morphodynamics through two mechanisms: 1) by focusing, dissipating, and shadowing wave energy, especially during storm events and 2) by providing a sediment source to the nearshore system. The former mechanism is supported through image and survey analysis that shows beach and bar behavior differ updrift and downdrift of the ridge-beach intersection. Three ADCPs were deployed during the early 2010-2011 and late 2011-2012 winter nor'easter seasons to measure wave transformation and current structures in this region. During the most recent deployment, an instrument on the ridge's leeward side was nearly completely buried, yet measured bottom currents (< 50 cm/s) do not imply that significant sediment transport should occur. Rather, we hypothesize that wave breaking over the ridge entrained sediment that was subsequently deposited on the leeward side. This finding suggests that the ridge is mobile and may be a source of sediment to the dynamic nearshore system.

Kline, S. W.; Adams, P. N.; Plant, N. G.; MacKenzie, R. A.; Jaeger, J. M.

2012-12-01

393

Development of a climatological data base to help forecast cloud cover conditions for shuttle landings at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle is an extremely weather sensitive vehicle with very restrictive constraints for both launches and landings. The most important difference between Shuttle and normal aircraft landings is that the Shuttle has no go-around capability once it begins its decent into the earth's atmosphere. The de-orbit burn decision is generally made approximately 90 minutes before landing requiring a forecast with little room for error. Because of the Shuttle's rapid re-entry to earth, the pilot must be able to see all runway and visual navigation aids from high altitude to land the Shuttle. In addition, the heat resistant tiles which are used to protect the Shuttle during its re-entry into the earth's atmosphere are extremely sensitive to any type of precipitation. Extensive damage to these tiles could occur if the Shuttle passes through any cloud that contains precipitation size particles. To help guard against changing weather conditions or any type of weather problems that might occur prior to landing, flight rules have been developed as guidelines for all landings. Although the rules vary depending on the location of the landing (Kennedy Space Center or Edwards AFB), length of mission, and weight of vehicle, most of the rules can be condensed into 4 major groupings. These are: (1) Cloud ceilings should not be less than 3048 m (10,000 feet), (2) Visibility should not be less than 13 km (7 nm), (3) Cross-wind no greater than 5-8 m/s (10-15 knots); and (4) No showers or thunderstorms at or within 56 km (30 nm) of the Shuttle Landing Facility. This study consisted of developing a climatological database of the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) surface observations and performing an analysis of observed conditions one and two hours subsequent to given conditions at the SLF to help analyze the 0.2 cloud cover rule. Particular emphasis was placed on Shuttle landing weather violations and the amounts of cloud cover below 3048 m (10,000 ft.). This analysis has helped to determine the best and worst times to land the Shuttle at KSC. In addition, nomograms have been developed to help forecasters make cloud cover forecasts for End of Mission (EOM) and Return to Launch Site (RTLS) at KSC. Results of categorizing this data by month, season, time of day, and surface and upper-air wind direction are presented.

Atchison, M. Kevin

1993-01-01

394

Kennedy's Disease Association  

MedlinePLUS

... KD. The progress made by current research on animal models of KD and by therapeutic trials gives ... onset “X” linked inherited disease with symptoms usually beginning to appear between the ages of 30 and ...

395

Kennedy Shriver Institute of  

E-print Network

as a blood bank technician at the Medi- cal College of Virginia in Richmond. It is because of that job, intellectual disabilities, population issues, reproductive biology, contraception, pregnancy, and medical of my research career, but also know that discoveries in the laboratory and insights gained

Bandettini, Peter A.

396

Kathleen A. Dore Kathleen Dore currently serves as senior advisor to  

E-print Network

to joining Canwest, Dore was a cable television executive at New York-based Rainbow Media, where she served as president, Entertainment Services, for cable networks AMC (American Movie Classics), IFC (Independent Film- winning series, Inside the Actors Studio and Queer Eye for the Straight Guy. She led Bravo

Anstreicher, Kurt M.

397

Kathleen F. McCoy 1 Kathleen F. McCoy  

E-print Network

Artificial Intelligence, Natural Language Generation and Understanding, Discourse Phenomena, Rehabilitation and Information Science, University of Pennsylvania, 1985. Thesis title: "Correcting Object-Related Misconceptions and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR). May 2000-June 2009 Director, Center for Applied Science and Engineering

McCoy, Kathleen F.

398

Kathleen A. Minette Kathleen (Kate) Minette is presently senior vice president,  

E-print Network

, Owatonna, Minn., and more than 20 performance scoring sites across the United States. Prior to assuming (chair elect 2013), and the United Way of Johnson County. She currently chairs the board of Waypoint Services (families and children) in Cedar Rapids. She just completed two terms on the Theatre Cedar Rapids

Anstreicher, Kurt M.

399

Shuttle Atlantis in Mate-Demate Device Being Loaded onto SCA-747 for Return to Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This photo shows a night view of the orbiter Atlantis being loaded onto one of NASA's Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site with Dryden remaining as the principal alternate landing site.

1996-01-01

400

Kennedy, T.A., J.C. Finlay, S.E. Hobbie. August 7, 2002. "Exotic saltcedar alters the resource base in a spring-fed desert stream food web." Ecological Society of  

E-print Network

Kennedy, T.A., J.C. Finlay, S.E. Hobbie. August 7, 2002. "Exotic saltcedar alters the resource base in a spring-fed desert stream food web." Ecological Society of America, Annual Meeting, Tucson, Arizona downstream temperature gradient. However, a dense stand of exotic salt cedar mid-reach shades Jackrabbit

Lovich, Jeffrey E.

401

The 2006 Kennedy Space Center Range Reference Atmosphere Model Validation Study and Sensitivity Analysis to the Performance of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Space Shuttle Vehicle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Range Reference Atmosphere (RRA) is a statistical model that summarizes wind and thermodynamic atmospheric variability from surface to 70 km. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Space Shuttle program, which launches from KSC, utilizes the KSC RRA data to evaluate environmental constraints on various aspects of the vehicle during ascent. An update to the KSC RRA was recently completed. As part of the update, the Natural Environments Branch at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) conducted a validation study and a comparison analysis to the existing KSC RRA database version 1983. Assessments to the Space Shuttle vehicle ascent profile characteristics were performed by JSC/Ascent Flight Design Division to determine impacts of the updated model to the vehicle performance. Details on the model updates and the vehicle sensitivity analyses with the update model are presented.

Burns, Lee; Decker, Ryan; Harrington, Brian; Merry, Carl

2008-01-01

402

Experimental measurements of the ground cloud growth during the 11 February 1974, Titan-Centaur launch at Kennedy Space Center. [(measurement of rocket exhaust from rocket launching)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Titan-Centaur was launched from Kennedy Space Center on February 11, 1974 at 0948 eastern daylight time. Ground level effluent measurements were obtained from the solid rocket motors for comparison with NASA diffusion models for predicting effluent ground level concentrations and cloud behavior. The results obtained provide a basis for an evaluation of such key model inputs such as cloud rise rate, stabilization altitude, crosswind growth, volume expansion, and cloud trajectory. Ground level effluent measurements were limited because of changing meteorological conditions, incorrect instrument location, and operational problems. Based on the measurement results, operational changes are defined. Photographs of the ground exhaust clouds are shown. The chemical composition of the exhaust gases was analyzed and is given.

Stewart, R. B.; Sentell, R. J.; Gregory, G. L.

1976-01-01

403

Justice and Fairness in the Kennedy Krieger Institute Lead Paint Study: the Ethics of Public Health Research on Less Expensive, Less Effective Interventions  

PubMed Central

The Kennedy Krieger lead paint study stirred controversial questions about whether research designed to develop less expensive interventions that are not as effective as existing treatments can be ethically warranted. Critics questioned the social value of such research and alleged that it sanctions a double standard, exploits participants, and is complicit in perpetuating the social injustice. In response, we demonstrate the propriety of conducting research on interventions that can be extended to the population in need by stipulating the limited conditions in which it is ethically warranted and providing fair terms of participation. We contend that the failure to conduct such research causes greater harm, because it deprives disadvantaged populations of the benefits of imminent incremental improvements in their health conditions. PMID:16571697

Buchanan, David R.; Miller, Franklin G.

2006-01-01

404

Evaluation of the Performance Characteristics of CGLSS II and U.S. NLDN Using Ground-Truth Dalta from Launch Complex 398, Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new comprehensive lightning instrumentation system has been designed for Launch Complex 39B (LC39B) at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. This new instrumentation system includes seven synchronized high-speed video cameras, current sensors installed on the nine downconductors of the new lightning protection system (LPS) for LC39B; four dH/dt, 3-axis measurement stations; and five dE/dt stations composed of two antennas each. The LPS received 8 direct lightning strikes (a total of 19 strokes) from March 31 through December 31 2011. The measured peak currents and locations are compared to those reported by the Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS II) and the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN). Results of comparison are presented and analyzed in this paper.

Mata, C. T.; Mata, A. G.; Rakov, V. A.; Nag, A.; Saul, J.

2012-01-01

405

Tool for Forecasting Cool-Season Peak Winds Across Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The expected peak wind speed for the day is an important element in the daily morning forecast for ground and space launch operations at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) must issue forecast advisories for KSC/CCAFS when they expect peak gusts for >= 25, >= 35, and >= 50 kt thresholds at any level from the surface to 300 ft. In Phase I of this task, the 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to develop a cool-season (October - April) tool to help forecast the non-convective peak wind from the surface to 300 ft at KSC/CCAFS. During the warm season, these wind speeds are rarely exceeded except during convective winds or under the influence of tropical cyclones, for which other techniques are already in use. The tool used single and multiple linear regression equations to predict the peak wind from the morning sounding. The forecaster manually entered several observed sounding parameters into a Microsoft Excel graphical user interface (GUI), and then the tool displayed the forecast peak wind speed, average wind speed at the time of the peak wind, the timing of the peak wind and the probability the peak wind will meet or exceed 35, 50 and 60 kt. The 45 WS customers later dropped the requirement for >= 60 kt wind warnings. During Phase II of this task, the AMU expanded the period of record (POR) by six years to increase the number of observations used to create the forecast equations. A large number of possible predictors were evaluated from archived soundings, including inversion depth and strength, low-level wind shear, mixing height, temperature lapse rate and winds from the surface to 3000 ft. Each day in the POR was stratified in a number of ways, such as by low-level wind direction, synoptic weather pattern, precipitation and Bulk Richardson number. The most accurate Phase II equations were then selected for an independent verification. The Phase I and II forecast methods were compared using an independent verification data set. The two methods were compared to climatology, wind warnings and advisories issued by the 45 WS, and North American Mesoscale (NAM) model (MesoNAM) forecast winds. The performance of the Phase I and II methods were similar with respect to mean absolute error. Since the Phase I data were not stratified by precipitation, this method's peak wind forecasts had a large negative bias on days with precipitation and a small positive bias on days with no precipitation. Overall, the climatology methods performed the worst while the MesoNAM performed the best. Since the MesoNAM winds were the most accurate in the comparison, the final version of the tool was based on the MesoNAM winds. The probability the peak wind will meet or exceed the warning thresholds were based on the one standard deviation error bars from the linear regression. For example, the linear regression might forecast the most likely peak speed to be 35 kt and the error bars used to calculate that the probability of >= 25 kt = 76%, the probability of >= 35 kt = 50%, and the probability of >= 50 kt = 19%. The authors have not seen this application of linear regression error bars in any other meteorological applications. Although probability forecast tools should usually be developed with logistic regression, this technique could be easily generalized to any linear regression forecast tool to estimate the probability of exceeding any desired threshold . This could be useful for previously developed linear regression forecast tools or new forecast applications where statistical analysis software to perform logistic regression is not available. The tool was delivered in two formats - a Microsoft Excel GUI and a Tool Command Language/Tool Kit (Tcl/Tk) GUI in the Meteorological Interactive Data Display System (MIDDS). The Microsoft Excel GUI reads a MesoNAM text file containing hourly forecasts from 0 to 84 hours, from one model run (00 or 12 UTC). The GUI then displays e peak wind speed, average wind speed, and the probability the peak wind wil

Barrett, Joe H., III; Roeder, William P.

2010-01-01

406

Shuttle Endevour Loaded onto SCA-747 Exiting the Mate-Demate Device for Return to Kennedy Space Cent  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle Endeavout rests atop NASA's Shuttle Carrier Aircraft in the Mate-Demate Device (MDD) at the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, shortly before being ferried back to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Endeavour landed at 1:57 p.m. (PDT) May 16, 1992, marking the completion of the new orbiter's first mission in space during which the crew of seven rendezvoused with the Intelsat VI satellite, attached a booster motor, and redeployed it into a high geosynchronous orbit. Endeavour and its crew were launched on a planned 7-day mission 7 May 1992, but the landing was delayed two days to allow extra time to rescue Intelsat and complete space station assembly techniques originally planned. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden

1992-01-01

407

Managing birds and controlling aircraft in the kennedy airport-jamaica bay wildlife refuge complex: the need for hard data and soft opinions.  

PubMed

During the 1980s, the exponential growth of laughing gull (Larus atricilla) colonies, from 15 to about 7600 nests in 1990, in the Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge and a correlated increase in the bird-strike rate at nearby John F. Kennedy International Airport (New York City) led to a controversy between wildlife and airport managers over the elimination of the colonies. In this paper, we review data to evaluate if: (1) the colonies have increased the level of risk to the flying public; (2) on-colony population control would reduce the presence of gulls, and subsequently bird strikes, at the airport; and (3) all on-airport management alternatives have been adequately implemented. Since 1979, most (2987, 87%) of the 3444 bird strikes (number of aircraft struck) were actually bird carcasses found near runways (cause of death unknown but assumed to be bird strikes by definition). Of the 457 pilot-reported strikes (mean = 23 +/- 6 aircraft/yr, N = 20 years), 78 (17%) involved laughing gulls. Since a gull-shooting program was initiated on airport property in 1991, over 50,000 adult laughing gulls have been killed and the number of reported bird strikes involving laughing gulls has declined from 6.9 +/- 2.9 (1983-1990) to 2.6 +/- 1.3 (1991-1998) aircraft/yr; nongull reported bird strikes, however, have more than doubled (6.4 +/- 2.6, 1983-1990; 14.9 +/- 5.1, 1991-1998). We found no evidence to indicate that on-colony management would yield a reduction of bird strikes at Kennedy Airport. Dietary and mark-recapture studies suggest that 60%-90% of the laughing gulls collected on-airport were either failed breeders and/or nonbreeding birds. We argue that the Jamaica Bay laughing gull colonies, the only ones in New York State, should not be managed at least until all on-airport management alternatives have been properly implemented and demonstrated to be ineffective at reducing bird strikes, including habitat alterations and increasing the capability of the bird control unit to eliminate bird flocks on-airport using nonlethal bird dispersal techniques. Because the gull-shooting program may be resulting in a nonsustainable regional population of laughing gulls (>30% decline), we also recommend that attempts be made to initiate an experimental colony elsewhere on Long Island to determine if colony relocation is a feasible management option. PMID:11443385

Brown, K M; Erwin, R M; Richmond, M E; Buckley, P A; Tanacredi, J T; Avrin, D

2001-08-01

408

Analysis of Wading Bird use of Impounded Wetland Habitat on the Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, 1987-1998  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report summarizes results of the first eleven years of monthly aerial surveys of wading bird use of foraging habitats within impoundments on the Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. Some impoundments were used much more heavily by wading birds than were others. Analysis suggests that an increase in interspersion of open water and vegetated habitats is preferred foraging habitat. Many wading bird species increased their use of vegetated habitat in Fall and Winter when impoundments were flooded. The mean number of wading birds per survey was greatest during the Pre-nesting and Nesting seasons, declined during Post-nesting season, and was lowest during Winter when water levels within impoundments were high. During these times, shallow habitat along the IRL shoreline provided alternative habitats for wading birds. Various measures of monthly precipitation and impoundment water level were well correlated with the numbers of wading birds observed. Numbers of nesting attempts was steady during the study period, with the exception of an unusually high number of attempts in 1990. White Ibis accounted for over half of all wading bird nests counted. The mean number of nests per colony decreased during the study period, and the number of individual colonies increased.

Stolen, Eric D.; Breininger, David R.; Smith, Rebecca B.; Quincy, Charlie (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

409

Feasibility study for measurement of insulation compaction in the cryogenic rocket fuel storage tanks at Kennedy Space Center by fast/thermal neutron techniques  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The liquid hydrogen and oxygen cryogenic storage tanks at John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) use expanded perlite as thermal insulation. Some of the perlite may have compacted over time, compromising the thermal performance and also the structural integrity of the tanks. Neutrons can readily penetrate through the 1.75 cm outer steel shell and through the entire 120 cm thick perlite zone. Neutrons interactions with materials produce characteristic gamma rays which are then detected. In compacted perlite the count rates in the individual peaks in the gamma ray spectrum will increase. Portable neutron generators can produce neutron simultaneous fluxes in two energy ranges: fast (14 MeV) and thermal (25 meV). Fast neutrons produce gamma rays by inelastic scattering which is sensitive to Si, Al, Fe and O. Thermal neutrons produce gamma rays by radiative capture in prompt gamma neutron activation (PGNA), which is sensitive to Si, Al, Na, K and H among others. The results of computer simulations using the software MCNP and measurements on a test article suggest that the most promising approach would be to operate the system in time-of-flight mode by pulsing the neutron generator and observing the subsequent die away curve in the PGNA signal.

Livingston, R. A.; Schweitzer, J. S.; Parsons, A. M.; Arens, E. E.

2014-02-01

410

The implementation and evaluation of the Emergency Response Dose Assessment System (ERDAS) at Cape Canaveral Air Station/Kennedy Space Center  

SciTech Connect

NASA and the Air Force at Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Station (KSC/CCAS) are attempting to upgrade and improve their capabilities for emergency response dispersion modeling and mesoscale meteorological forecasting. Their goal is to improve short range forecasts (up to 24 hours) for phenomena such as thunderstorms and sea breezes and to more accurately predict toxic diffusion concentrations in case of hazardous spills. To assist NASA and the Air Force in achieving this goal, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) has been evaluating the Emergency Response Dose Assessment System (ERDAS). ERDAS is a prototype software and hardware system configured to produce routine mesoscale meteorological forecasts and enhanced dispersion estimates on an operational basis for the KSC/CCAS region. ERDAS includes two major software systems which is run and accessed through a graphical user interface. The first software system is the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS), a three-dimensional, multiple nested grid prognostic mesoscale model. The second software system is the Hybrid Particle and Concentration Transport (HYPACT) model, a pollutant trajectory and concentration model. ERDAS also runs the Rocket Exhaust Effluent Diffusion Model (REEDM). This paper describes the system, the model evaluation, the process of transitioning ERDAS from a research project to an operational system, and also presents the results of the launch case studies.

Evans, R.J. [ENSCO, Inc., Melbourne, FL (United States). Applied Meteorology Unit; Tremback, C.J.; Lyons, W.A. [MRC/ASTER, Ft. Collins, CO (United States)

1996-12-31

411

Reproductive Ecology Of The Florida Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma Coerulescens) On John F. Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge: A Long-Term Study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

From 1988 to 2002 we studied the breeding ecology of Florida Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma coerulescens) on John F. Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. We examined phenology, clutch size, hatching failure rates, fledgling production, nest success, predation rates, sources egg and nestling mortality, and the effects of helpers on these measures. Nesting phenology was similar among sites. Mean clutch size at Titan was significantly larger than at HC or T4. Pairs with helpers did not produce larger clutches than pairs without helpers. Fledgling production at T4 was significantly greater than at HC and similar to Titan. Pairs with helpers at HC produced significantly more fledglings than pairs without helpers; helpers did not influence fledgling production at the other sites. Nest success at HC and Titan was low, 19% and 32% respectively. Nest success at T4 was 48% and was significantly greater than at HC. Average predation rates at all sites increased with season progression. Predation rates at all sight rose sharply by early June. The main cause of nest failure at all sites was predation, 93%.

Carter, Geoffry M.; Breininger, David R.; Larson, Vicky L.; Oddy, Donna M.; Smith, Rebecca B.; Stolen, Eric D.

2005-01-01

412

Objective Lightning Forecasting at Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station using Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System Data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) at Cape Canaveral Air-Force Station (CCAFS)ln Florida issues a probability of lightning occurrence in their daily 24-hour and weekly planning forecasts. This information is used for general planning of operations at CCAFS and Kennedy Space Center (KSC). These facilities are located in east-central Florida at the east end of a corridor known as 'Lightning Alley', an indication that lightning has a large impact on space-lift operations. Much of the current lightning probability forecast is based on a subjective analysis of model and observational data and an objective forecast tool developed over 30 years ago. The 45 WS requested that a new lightning probability forecast tool based on statistical analysis of more recent historical warm season (May-September) data be developed in order to increase the objectivity of the daily thunderstorm probability forecast. The resulting tool is a set of statistical lightning forecast equations, one for each month of the warm season, that provide a lightning occurrence probability for the day by 1100 UTC (0700 EDT) during the warm season.

Lambert, Winfred; Wheeler, Mark; Roeder, William

2005-01-01

413

An evaluation of rain chemistry data for the John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida and the University of Central Florida, Orlando  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Concern over the effects of Space Shuttle launches prompted the initiation of a rather intense environmental monitoring program. The program included a precipitation monitoring network with 13 precipitation collection sites which were operated for various time periods to baseline precipitation chemistry at the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC). One additional site was also established as a remote background site on the Univ. of Central Florida (UCF) campus. One of the 13 sites was converted to a National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) station. Collections and analyses of samples were performed using a number of methodologies during the monitoring period. An evaluation of the data for comparability and utility for acid rain research was performed using the anion/cation, measured conductivity, calculated conductivity, Cl/Na, and Mg/Na ratios. Data collected at all KSC sites between 1977 and 1981, from 1983 to 1985 at the NADP site and at UCF to 1985 are comparable and appropriate for determining acid rain trends. Examination of those comparable data showed a fairly stable pH between 1977 and 1982 and an increase of 0.2 pH units which was observed as an incremental increase between 1982 and 1983 at KSC and UCF.

Madsen, Brooks C.; Dreschel, Thomas W.; Hinkle, C. Ross

1986-01-01

414

Surface wind convergence as a short-term predictor of cloud-to-ground lightning at Kennedy Space Center: A four-year summary and evaluation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since 1986, USAF forecasters at NASA-Kennedy have had available a surface wind convergence technique for use during periods of convective development. In Florida during the summer, most of the thunderstorm development is forced by boundary layer processes. The basic premise is that the life cycle of convection is reflected in the surface wind field beneath these storms. Therefore the monitoring of the local surface divergence and/or convergence fields can be used to determine timing, location, longevity, and the lightning hazards which accompany these thunderstorms. This study evaluates four years of monitoring thunderstorm development using surface wind convergence, particularly the average over the area. Cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning is related in time and space with surface convergence for 346 days during the summers of 1987 through 1990 over the expanded wind network at KSC. The relationships are subdivided according to low level wind flow and midlevel moisture patterns. Results show a one in three chance of CG lightning when a convergence event is identified. However, when there is no convergence, the chance of CG lightning is negligible.

Watson, Andrew I.; Holle, Ronald L.; Lopez, Raul E.; Nicholson, James R.

1991-01-01

415

Monthly and annual percentage levels of wind speed differences computed by using FPS-16 radar/Jimsphere wind profile data from Cape Kennedy, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The percentage levels of wind speed differences are presented computed from sequential FPS-16 radar/Jimsphere wind profiles. The results are based on monthly profiles obtained from December 1964 to July 1970 at Cape Kennedy, Florida. The profile sequences contain a series of three to ten Jimspheres released at approximately 1.5-hour intervals. The results given are the persistence analysis of wind speed difference at 1.5-hour intervals to a maximum time interval of 12 hours. The monthly percentage of wind speed differences and the annual percentage of wind speed differences are tabulated. The percentage levels are based on the scalar wind speed changes calculated over an altitude interval of approximately 50 meters and printed out every 25 meters as a function of initial wind speed within each five-kilometer layer from near sea level to 20 km. In addition, analyses were made of the wind speed difference for the 0.2 to 1 km layer as an aid for studies associated with take-off and landing of the space shuttle.

Susko, M.; Kaufman, J. W.

1973-01-01

416

A Conservation Strategy for the Florida Scrub-Jay on John F. Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge: An Initial Scientific Basis for Recovery  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Florida Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens) is an indicator of ecosystem integrity of Florida scrub, an endangered ecosystem that requires frequent fire. One of the largest populations of this federally threatened species occurs on John F. Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. Population trends were predicted using population modeling and field data on reproduction and survival of Florida Scrub-Jays collected from 1988 - 1995. Analyses of historical photography indicated that habitat suitability has been declining for 30 years. Field data and computer simulations suggested that the population declined by at least 40% and will decline by another 40% in 1 0 years, if habitat management is not greatly intensified. Data and computer simulations suggest that habitat suitability cannot deviate greatly from optimal for the jay population to persist. Landscape trajectories of vegetation structure, responsible for declining habitat suitability, are associated with the disruption of natural fire regimes. Prescribed fire alone can not reverse the trajectories. A recovery strategy was developed, based on studies of Florida Scrub-Jays and scrub vegetation. A reserve design was formulated based on conservation science principles for scrub ecosystems. The strategy emphasizes frequent fire to restore habitat, but includes mechanical tree cutting for severely degraded areas. Pine thinning across large areas can produce rapid increases in habitat quality. Site-specific strategies will need to be developed, monitored, and modified to achieve conditions suitable for population persistence.

Breininger, D. R.; Larson, V. L.; Schaub, R.; Duncan, B. W.; Schmalzer, P. A.; Oddy, D. M.; Smith, R. B.; Adrian, F.; Hill, H., Jr.

1996-01-01

417

Future Expansion of the Lightning Surveillance System at the Kennedy Space Center and the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, USA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and the Air Force Eastern Range (ER) use data from two cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning detection networks, the Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS) and the U.S. National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN), and a volumetric mapping array, the lightning detection and ranging II (LDAR II) system: These systems are used to monitor and characterize lightning that is potentially hazardous to launch or ground operations and hardware. These systems are not perfect and both have documented missed lightning events when compared to the existing lightning surveillance system at Launch Complex 39B (LC39B). Because of this finding it is NASA's plan to install a lightning surveillance system around each of the active launch pads sharing site locations and triggering capabilities when possible. This paper shows how the existing lightning surveillance system at LC39B has performed in 2011 as well as the plan for the expansion around all active pads.

Mata, C. T.; Wilson, J. G.

2012-01-01

418

Quantum computational universality of the Cai-Miyake-Dür-Briegel 2D quantum state from Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki quasichains  

E-print Network

Universal quantum computation can be achieved by simply performing single-qubit measurements on a highly entangled resource state, such as cluster states. Cai, Miyake, D\\"ur, and Briegel recently constructed a ground state of a two-dimensional quantum magnet by combining multiple Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki quasichains of mixed spin-3/2 and spin-1/2 entities and by mapping pairs of neighboring spin-1/2 particles to individual spin-3/2 particles [Phys. Rev. A 82, 052309 (2010)]. They showed that this state enables universal quantum computation by single-spin measurements. Here, we give an alternative understanding of how this state gives rise to universal measurement-based quantum computation: by local operations, each quasichain can be converted to a 1D cluster state and entangling gates between two neighboring logical qubits can be implemented by single-spin measurements. We further argue that a 2D cluster state can be distilled from the Cai-Miyake-D\\"ur-Briegel state.

Tzu-Chieh Wei; Robert Raussendorf; Leong Chuan Kwek

2011-05-27

419

Calculated maximum Hl ground-level concentrations downwind from launch pad aborts of the space shuttle and Titan 3 C vehicles at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A quantitative assessment is described of the potential environmental hazard posed by the atmospheric release of HCl resulting from the burning of solid propellant during two hypothetical on-pad aborts of the Titan 3 C and space shuttle vehicles at Kennedy Space Center. In one pad-abort situation, it is assumed that the cases of the two solid-propellant engines are ruptured and the burning propellant falls to the ground in the immediate vicinity of the launch pad where it continues to burn for 5 minutes. In the other pad-abort situation considered, one of the two solid engines on each vehicle is assumed to ignite and burn at the normal rate while the vehicle remains on the launch pad. Calculations of maximum HCl ground-level concentration for the above on-pad abort situations were made using the computerized NASA/MSFC multilayer diffusion models in conjunction with appropriate meteorological and source inputs. Three meteorological regimes are considered-fall, spring, and afternoon sea-breeze. Source inputs for the hazard calculations were developed. The principal result of the calculations is that maximum ground-level HCl concentrations at distances greater than 1 kilometer from the launch pad are less than 3 parts per million in all cases considered.

Dumbauld, R. K.; Bjorklund, J. R.

1972-01-01

420

Endangered and potentially endangered wildlife on John F. Kennedy Space Center and faunal integrity as a goal for maintaining biological diversity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Buffer zones for space operations provide for a wildlife diversity unsurpassed among most federal facilities in the continental U.S. demonstrating the coexistence possible with one of man's greatest technological achievements. This document ranks 119 resident or migratory wildlife species that are endangered or declining. The ranking system herein was based on species' vulnerability to extinction and the relevance of Kennedy Space Center (KSC) for maintaining populations in the U.S. and Florida. One amphibian, 19 reptiles, 80 birds, and 19 mammals were considered endangered or declining. KSC is an integral area for regional species diversity being the focus of the Merritt Island/Cape Canaveral/Turnbull Ecosystem which is part of the Indian River Lagoon watershed, an estuary of national significance. Many species that use this system also use the nearby St. Johns River Basin ecosystem. These two ecosystems are biological corridors between temperate Carolinian and tropical/subtropical Caribbean biotic provinces. Threats to biological diversity on KSC were also reviewed. Traditional environmental assessments, resulting from environmental regulation guidelines, focus on environmental contaminants and habitat lost due to construction. However, this review suggested that small population sizes, isolation of populations, ecosystem and habitat fragmentation, road mortality, and other edge effects may represent more critical threats to biological diversity than the traditional topics.

Breininger, David R.; Barkaszi, Mary JO; Smith, Rebecca B.; Oddy, Donna M.; Provancha, Jane A.

1994-01-01

421

A Sounding-based Severe Weather Tool to Support Daily Operations at Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

People and property at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) are at risk when severe weather occurs. Strong winds, hail and tornadoes can injure individuals and cause costly damage to structures if not properly protected. NASA's Launch Services Program and Ground Systems Development and Operations Program and other KSC programs use the daily and weekly severe weather forecasts issued by the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) to determine if they need to limit an activity such as working on gantries, or protect property such as a vehicle on a pad. The 45 WS requested the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) develop a warm season (May-September) severe weather tool for use in the Meteorological Interactive Data Display System (MIDDS) based on the late morning, 1500 UTC (1100 local time), CCAFS (XMR) sounding. The 45 WS frequently makes decisions to issue a severe weather watch and other severe weather warning support products to NASA and the 45th Space Wing in the late morning, after the 1500 UTC sounding. The results of this work indicate that certain stability indices based on the late morning XMR soundings can depict differences between days with reported severe weather and days with no reported severe weather. The AMU determined a frequency of reported severe weather for the stability indices and implemented an operational tool in MIDDS.

Bauman, William H.; Roeder, William P.

2014-01-01

422

Workstation-Based Real-Time Mesoscale Modeling Designed for Weather Support to Operations at the Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes the capabilities and operational utility of a version of the Mesoscale Atmospheric Simulation System (MASS) that has been developed to support operational weather forecasting at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS). The implementation of local, mesoscale modeling systems at KSC/CCAS is designed to provide detailed short-range (less than 24 h) forecasts of winds, clouds, and hazardous weather such as thunderstorms. Short-range forecasting is a challenge for daily operations, and manned and unmanned launches since KSC/CCAS is located in central Florida where the weather during the warm season is dominated by mesoscale circulations like the sea breeze. For this application, MASS has been modified to run on a Stardent 3000 workstation. Workstation-based, real-time numerical modeling requires a compromise between the requirement to run the system fast enough so that the output can be used before expiration balanced against the desire to improve the simulations by increasing resolution and using more detailed physical parameterizations. It is now feasible to run high-resolution mesoscale models such as MASS on local workstations to provide timely forecasts at a fraction of the cost required to run these models on mainframe supercomputers. MASS has been running in the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) at KSC/CCAS since January 1994 for the purpose of system evaluation. In March 1995, the AMU began sending real-time MASS output to the forecasters and meteorologists at CCAS, Spaceflight Meteorology Group (Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas), and the National Weather Service (Melbourne, Florida). However, MASS is not yet an operational system. The final decision whether to transition MASS for operational use will depend on a combination of forecaster feedback, the AMU's final evaluation results, and the life-cycle costs of the operational system.

Manobianco, John; Zack, John W.; Taylor, Gregory E.

1996-01-01

423

The 29 July 1994 Merritt Island, Fl Microburst: A Case Study Intercomparing Kennedy Space Center Three-Dimensional Lightning Data (LDAR) and WSR-88D Radar Data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Many researchers have shown that the development and evolution of electrical discharges within convective clouds is fundamentally related to the growth and dynamics of precipitation particles aloft. In the presence of strong updrafts above the freezing level collisions among mixed-phase particles (i.e., hail. ice, supercooled water) promote the necessary charge separation needed to initiate intra-cloud lightning. A precipitation core that descends below the freezing level is often accompanied by a change in the electrical structure of the cloud. Consequently, more Cloud-to-Ground (CG) than Intra-Cloud (IC) lightning flashes appear. Descending precipitation cores can also play a significant role in the evolution of mesoscale features at the surface (e.g., microbursts, downbursts) because of latent heat and mass loading effects of water and ice. For this reason, some believe that lightning and microbursts are fundamentally linked by the presence of ice particles in thunderstorms. Several radar and lightning studies of microburst thunderstorms from COHMEX in 1986 showed that the peak IC lightning systematically occurred ten minutes before the onset of a microburst. In contrast, most CG lightning occurred at the time of the microburst. Many of the preceding studies have been done using high-resolution research radars and experimental lightning detection systems in focused field projects. In addition, these studies could only determine the vertical origin or occurrence of IC lightning, and not a true three-dimensional representation. Currently, the WSR-88D radar system and a real-time, state-of-the-art lightning system (LDAR) at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida provide an opportunity to extend these kinds of studies in a more meaningful operational setting.

Hoffert, Steven G.; Pearce, Matt L.

1996-01-01

424

Role of androgen receptor polyQ chain elongation in Kennedy's disease and use of natural osmolytes as potential therapeutic targets.  

PubMed

Instability of CAG triplet repeat encoding polyglutamine (polyQ) stretches in the gene for target protein has been implicated as a putative mechanism in several inherited neurodegenerative diseases. Expansion of polyQ chain length in the androgen receptor (AR) causes spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) or Kennedy's disease. Although the mechanisms underlying gain-of-neurotoxic function are not completely understood, suggested pathological mechanisms of SBMA involve the formation of AR nuclear and cytoplasmic aggregates, a characteristic feature of patients with SBMA. The fact that certain AR coactivators are sequestered into the nuclear inclusions in SBMA possibly through protein-protein interactions supports the notion that AR transcriptional dysregulation may be a potential pathological mechanism leading to SBMA. AR conformational states associated with aberrant polyQ tract also modulate the interaction of AR with several coactivators. In many cases, such diseases can be treated through protein replacement therapy; however, because recombinant proteins do not cross the blood-brain barrier, the effectiveness of such therapies is limited in case of neurodegenerative diseases that warrant alternative therapeutic approaches. Among different approaches, inhibiting protein aggregation with small molecules that can stimulate protein folding and reverse aggregation are the most promising ones. Thus, naturally occurring osmolytes or "chemical chaperones" that can easily cross the blood-brain barrier and stabilize the functional form of a mutated protein by shifting the folding equilibrium away from degradation and/or aggregation is a useful therapeutic approach. In this review, we discuss the role of polyQ chain length extension in the pathophysiology of SBMA and the use of osmolytes as potential therapeutic tool. PMID:23024039

Kumar, Raj

2012-11-01

425

Thermal Performance of Biological Substance Systems in Vitro Under Static and Dynamic Conditions at the Cryogenic Test Laboratory, NASA Kennedy Space Center, USA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A unique research program, including a comprehensive study of thermal performance at cryogenic vacuum insulation systems, was performed at the NASA Kennedy Space Center. The main goal was to develop a new soft vacuum system (from 1 torr to 10 torr) that provides an intermediate level of performance (k-value below 4.8 mW/m-K). Liquid nitrogen boil-off methods were used to test conventional materials, novel materials, and certain combinations. The test articles included combinations of aluminum foil, fiberglass paper, polyester fabric, silica aerogel composite blanket, fumed silica, silica aerogel powder, and syntactic foam. A new LCI system was developed at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory. This system performs exceptionally well at soft vacuum levels and nearly as good as an MLI at high vacuum levels. Apparent thermal conductivities for the LCI range from 2 mW/m-K at soft vacuum to 0.1 mW/m-K at high vacuum. Several cryostats were designed, constructed, and calibrated by the Cryogenics Test Laboratory at KSC NASA as part of this research program. The cryostat test apparatus is a liquid nitrogen boil-off calorimeter system for direct measurement of the apparent thermal conductivity at a fixed vacuum level between 5 x 10(exp -5) and 760 torr. The apparatus is also used for transient measurements of temperature profiles. The development of efficient, robust cryogenic insulation systems has been a targeted area of research for a number of years. Improved methods of characterization, testing, and evaluation of complex biological substance systems for cryosurgery and cryobiology are the focus of this paper.

Augustynowicz, S. D.; Fesmire, James E.; Steinrock, T. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

426

A Summary of Ambient Air at John F. Kennedy Space Center with a Comparison to Data from the Florida Statewide Monitoring Network (1983-1992)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The EPA criteria air pollutants were monitored at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) since 1983 to comply the prevention of significant deterioration requirements under the Clean Air Act amendments passed by Congress in 1977 and 1990. Monitoring results show that monthly maximum 24-hour total suspended particulates decreased from 144.6 micograms/cu m in 1988 to 73.0 micrograms/cu m in 1991 and increased to 149.3 micrograms/cu m in 1992. Inhalable particulates increased from 56.1 gg/M3 in 1983 to 131.4 micrograms/cu m in 1988, and then decreased to 38.5 micrograms/cu m in 1992. Sulfur dioxide monthly maximum 24-hour average concentrations decreased each year from 135.2 micrograms/cu m in 1983 to 33.8 micrograms/cu m in 1992. Nitrogen dioxide concentrations increased from 5.1 micrograms/cu m in 1983 to 5.9 micrograms/cu m in 1988, then decreased to 4.5 micrograms/cu m in 1992. Carbon monoxide annual average concentrations decreased from 6.2 micrograms/cu m in 1983 to 1.1 micrograms/cu m in 1988, and increased to 1.2 micrograms/cu m in 1992. Ozone maximum 1-hour concentrations increased from 98 parts per billion (ppb) in 1983 to 134 ppb in 1989, and then decreased to 80 ppb in 1992. Total annual rainfall ranged from 37.47 inches to 57.47 inches and shows a 6.6 percent increase over this same ten year period.

Drese, John H.

1997-01-01

427

Home > Editorials & Opinions > Bud Kennedy BUD KENNEDY RSS Mobile Newsletters  

E-print Network

a letter Submit a Cheer or Jeer Arlington's `American Dream' comes in all colors Posted Wednesday, Jun. 25 those roots and is newly anointed "The American Dream City." Arlington's new slogan repositions the old from immigrant families, represent "the true American dream story." "Arlington has these different

Chiao, Jung-Chih

428

Peter Gault Kennedy CURRICULUM VITAE  

E-print Network

State College Athletic Scholarship 1995 The Evergreen State College Foundation Scholarship Awards: 2000 The Evergreen State College, Olympia, WA Research Interests: The effect of plant-fungal symbioses on plant fellowship, Field Museum, Chicago, IL 1999 The Evergreen State College research grant 1995-1999 The Evergreen

Bruns, Tom

429

Kennedy Space Center: Swamp Works  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

When I began my internship with the Granular Mechanics and Regolith Operations laboratory (GMRO), also known as Swamp Works, I was given the unique opportunity to shadow many teams working on various projects, and decide what projects I wanted to take part in. Before I go into details of my experiences at Swamp Works, I would like to take a moment to explain what I discovered Swamp Works to be. Swamp Works is a family of hardworking, dedicated, and driven people from various backgrounds and skill sets. These people all work to advance technologies and make science fiction science fact through means of rapid prototyping. They support and encourage failure as an option when learning new things, as long as lesson learned from said failure. In fact, their motto states "Fail, Fast, Forward." What this means is, not if but when one fails he or she must do so quickly and spring forward from the failure so that his or her progress is not delayed. With this acceptance, it provided me the confidence to dive into a multitude of projects working in various fields and with a wide range of skill sets. The first project I joined was Badger. My motivation for taking on this project was the opportunity I would have to obtain valuable experience working with 3D modeling and 3D printing technologies. Badger was a digging apparatus to be used in a highly dusty environment in a material known as Regolith. Regolith is a scientific term for the dirt or top soil found on planetary bodies. Regolith contains a large quantity of sediments less than lOppm and as a result poses a challenge of keeping it out of any cracks and crevices. Furthermore, regolith can create high levels of electrostatic energy, which can prove damaging to sensitive electrical hardware. With these characteristics in mind, I decided to take on the task of designing and manufacturing a dust proof cover for the sensitive electrical hardware. When I began this project, I did not have the slightest idea as to how to use 3D modeling software or a means of manufacturing a viable product. As I went along with variants of the design, I became very proficient with a 3D modeling program known as CREO 2.0. Upon completion of my 3D design, I then had the task of manufacturing and having, in my hands, a usable model. To do this I had to work with additive printing technologies also known as 3D printing. Through my experiences working with Badger, I realized that 3D modeling is the focal point in much of engineering. With this in mind, I have embraced this fact and decided to further my experience with this software so that I may become a more valuable asset to any firm later in my career. Mid-way through work with Badger, I picked up another project in which I found much interest. I ha the opportunity to work side by side with a materials and composites guru in manufacturing carbon composite coupons (test strips) for performing stress, strain, and sheer analysis on. Being from a surfing, kiteboarding, and other water sport background I have always been interested in board design. With this in mind, it is no wonder why I found interest in such a project. I had the opportunity to refine Mold preparatory, composite layup, and composite curing techniques. Following manufacturing of these composite strips, I then performed various stress tests and logged my results. With these results, future teams could create lighter, stronger, and more cost effective composite structures for use in varieties of applications. After my experiences with materials and composites testing, I have obtained crucial appreciation for detailed documentation and analysis that material sciences involve. However, as interesting as composite materials testing has been, I do not feel this is where my future career lies. Another, more on the side, project I have been involved in is building a 626 cubic foot regolith containment chamber for doing full scale testing of robotic systems. This chamber is built of high strength aluminum scaffold materials, 80/20, and massive panels of Lexan. Once the chamber is complete

DeFilippo, Anthony Robert

2013-01-01

430

TESTIMONY OF DAVID M. KENNEDY  

E-print Network

as, "any persistent solid material that is manufactured or processed and directly or indirectly. For example, crab pots and nets can continue to capture fish ­ something we refer to as "ghost fishing

431

Kennedy Space Center: Swamp Works.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

When I began my internship with the Granular Mechanics and Regolith Operations laboratory (GMRO), also known as Swamp Works, I was given the unique opportunity to shadow many teams working on various projects, and decide what projects I wanted to take par...

A. R. DeFilippo

2013-01-01

432

NASA Kennedy Space Center RESOLVE  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Numerous studies have shown that the use of space resources to manufacture propellant and consumables can significantly reduce the launch mass of space exploration beyond earth orbit. Even the Moon. which has no atmosphere, is rich in resources that can theoretically be harvested. A series of lunar missions over the last 20 years has shown an unexpected resource on the Moon. There is evidence that water ice and other volatiles useful for the production of propellant are located at the lunar poles, though most of it is located within permanently shadowed craters where accessing these resources is challenging.

Coan, Mary R.

2013-01-01

433

Information Security: The Human Perspective Kathleen M. Carley  

E-print Network

resource records, and organizational accounting information. Recent cases of industrial espionage all point, cognitive science and computer science. At the theoretical level, the course is tied together by the concept

Sadeh, Norman M.

434

Information Security: The Human Perspective Kathleen M. Carley  

E-print Network

), CASOS ­ the center for Computational Analysis of Social and Organizational Systems at Carnegie Mellon resource records, and organizational accounting information. Recent cases of industrial espionage all point

Sadeh, Norman M.

435

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Alenka Lovy-Wheeler Kathleen L. Wilsen  

E-print Network

fringe in the apex and finely dispersed longitudinal filaments in the shank are con- sistent features and participate in cell elongation. More recently, evidence has emerged that actin polymerization also (Gibbon et al. 1999; Vidali et al. 2001), supporting the idea that actin polymerization is essential

Baskin, Tobias

436

Kathleen Bardovi-Harlig & Maria-Thereza Bastos Indiana University  

E-print Network

a week #12;2 3. (a) Do you use English with other International students? Yes No (b) If `yes,' How often Program (Level 3, 35; Level 4, 31; Level 5, 32, Level 6, 25); 49 NS (35 Peers, 14 ESL Teachers) Aural

Indiana University

437

Alice Borden Compiled by Kathleen Barlee and Laurenda Daniells (1982)  

E-print Network

instruction through university professor of early childhood education. The fonds is divided in eight series Series o Correspondence Series o Play School Series o Literary Productions Series o Printed Material (1961-1963). Thereafter, she served as a professor in the Faculty of Education until 1970. Scope

Handy, Todd C.

438

KATHLEEN WU 228 Devonshire Lane, Madison, CT, 06443 (203) 671-6704 kathleen.wu@yale.edu  

E-print Network

hydrocarbon fuels as a heat sink Prepared and analyzed catalyst samples by Temperature-Programmed Oxidation (TPO) and MS Center for Green Chemistry & Green Engineering, Research assistant Spring 2012 Prepared

Firoozabadi, Abbas

439

Kathleen Blake Yancey Kathleen Blake Yancey, Kellogg W. Hunt Professor of English and Distinguished Research Professor, directs  

E-print Network

Charlotte, where she directed the UNC Charlotte site of the National Writing Project. She was awarded the Ph Colleges and Universities' (AAC&U) VALUE project focused on electronic portfolios. She has just been/National Coalition for Electronic Portfolio Research, which takes as its purpose inquiry into the effects

Holland, Jeffrey

440

Validation and development of existing and new RAOB-based warm-season convective wind forecasting tools for Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using a 15-year (1995 to 2009) climatology of 1500 UTC warm-season (May through September) rawinsonde observation (RAOB) data from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) Skid Strip (KXMR) and 5 minute wind data from 36 wind towers on CCAFS and Kennedy Space Center (KSC), several convective wind forecasting techniques currently employed by the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) were evaluated. Present forecasting methods under evaluation include examining the vertical equivalent potential temperature (theta e) profile, vertical profiles of wind spend and direction, and several wet downburst forecasting indices. Although previous research found that currently used wet downburst forecasting methods showed little promise for forecasting convective winds, it was carried out with a very small sample, limiting the reliability of the results. Evaluation versus a larger 15-year dataset was performed to truly assess the forecasting utility of these methods in the central Florida warm-season convective environment. In addition, several new predictive analytic based forecast methods for predicting the occurrence of warm-season convection and its associated wind gusts were developed and validated. This research was performed in order to help the 45 WS better forecast not only which days are more likely to produce convective wind gusts, but also to better predict which days are more likely to yield warning criteria wind events of 35 knots or greater, should convection be forecasted. Convective wind forecasting is a very challenging problem that requires new statistically based modeling techniques since conventional meteorologically based methods do not perform well. New predictive analytic based forecasting methods were constructed using R statistical software and incorporate several techniques including multiple linear regression, logistic regression, multinomial logistic regression, classification and regression trees (CART), and ensemble CART using bootstrapping. All of these techniques except the ensemble CART methods were built with data from the 1995 to 2007 warm-seasons and validated with a separate independent dataset from the 2008 and 2009 warm-seasons. Ensemble CART models were built using randomly selected data from the 1995 to 2009 RAOB dataset and validated with data not used in constructing the models. Three different ensemble CART algorithms including the random forests, bagging, and boosting algorithms were tested to find the best performing model. Quantitative verification results suggest that the presently used convection and wet downburst forecasting techniques do not show much operational promise. As such, it is not recommended that the 45 WS use vertical profiles of thetae, wind speed, or wind direction to make specific predictions for which days are likely to produce convection or warning threshold wind gusts. None of the wet downburst indices used displayed much potential either. Although, the linear regression based predictive analytic models do not perform too well, CART based models perform better, especially those that utilize a binary response variable. Of the new techniques, the ensemble CART models displayed the most promise with the boosting algorithm showing nearly perfect results for predicting which days would produce convection and which days would produce warning threshold winds should convection be predicted.

McCue, Mitchell Hollis

441

Fetal imaging: Executive summary of a Joint Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, American College of Radiology, Society for Pediatric Radiology, and Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound Fetal Imaging Workshop.  

PubMed

Given that practice variation exists in the frequency and performance of ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging in pregnancy, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development hosted a workshop to address indications for ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging in pregnancy, to discuss when and how often these studies should be performed, to consider recommendations for optimizing yield and cost-effectiveness and to identify research opportunities. This article is the executive summary of the workshop. PMID:24793721

Reddy, Uma M; Abuhamad, Alfred Z; Levine, Deborah; Saade, George R

2014-05-01

442

Preventing the First Cesarean Delivery: Summary of a Joint Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, and American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Workshop  

PubMed Central

With over one-third of pregnancies in the United States being delivered by cesarean and the growing knowledge of morbidities associated with repeat cesarean deliveries, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists convened a workshop to address the concept of preventing the first cesarean. The available information on maternal and fetal factors, labor management and induction, and non-medical factors leading to the first cesarean were reviewed as well as the implications of the first cesarean on future reproductive health. Key points were identified to assist with reduction in cesarean rates including that labor induction should be performed primarily for medical indication; if done for non-medical indications, the gestational age should be at least 39 weeks or more and the cervix should be favorable, especially in the nulliparous patient. Review of the current literature demonstrates the importance of adhering to appropriate definitions for failed induction and arrest of labor progress. The diagnosis of “failed induction” should only be made after an adequate attempt. Adequate time for normal latent and active phases of the first stage, and for the second stage, should be allowed, as long as the maternal and fetal conditions permit. The adequate time for each of these stages appears to be longer than traditionally estimated. Operative vaginal delivery is an acceptable birth method when indicated, and can safely prevent cesarean delivery. Given the progressively declining use, it is critical that training and experience in operative vaginal delivery is facilitated and encouraged. When discussing the first cesarean with a patient, counseling should include its effect on future reproductive health. PMID:23090537

Spong, Catherine Y.; Berghella, Vincenzo; Wenstrom, Katharine D.; Mercer, Brian M.; Saade, George R.

2012-01-01

443

Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Mishap Response Plan  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KSC Medical Operations, in exercising the KSC Psychological Triage Plan, provided crewmember family support following notification of the Columbia accident. KSC Medical Operations also provided field support in working with FEMA and EPA to assure adequate occupational medicine and environmental health care of KSC workers. In addition, the development of policy and procedures for handling and clearing biohazardous debris material in the KSC reconstruction hangar was prepared and implemented.

Scarpa, Philip

2005-01-01

444

Kennedy Space Center Environmental Health Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Topic considered include: environmental health services; health physics; ionizing radiation; pollution control; contamination investigations; natural resources; surface water; health hazard evaluations; combustion gas; launch support; asbestos; hazardous noise; and ventilation.

Creech, Joanne W.

1997-01-01

445

Kennedy Space Center ITC-1 Internship Overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As an intern for Priscilla Elfrey in the ITC-1 department, I was involved in many activities that have helped me to develop many new skills. I supported four different projects during my internship, which included the Center for Life Cycle Design (CfLCD), SISO Space Interoperability Smackdown, RTI Teacher Mentor Program, and the Discrete Event Simulation Integrated Visualization Environment Team (DIVE). I provided the CfLCD with web based research on cyber security initiatives involving simulation, education for young children, cloud computing, Otronicon, and Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education initiatives. I also attended STEM meetings regarding simulation courses, and educational course enhancements. To further improve the SISO Simulation event, I provided observation feedback to the technical advisory board. I also helped to set up a chat federation for HLA. The third project involved the RTI Teacher Mentor program, which I helped to organize. Last, but not least, I worked with the DIVE team to develop new software to help visualize discrete event simulations. All of these projects have provided experience on an interdisciplinary level ranging from speech and communication to solving complex problems using math and science.

Ni, Marcus

2011-01-01

446

Vanderbilt Kennedy Ctr One Magnolia Circle  

E-print Network

THAVES PIERCE AVE CHILDREN'S WAY DIXIE PL. CAPERS AVE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF NASHVILLE MEDICALC ENTER DR 23 SCARRITT PL 19THAVES SCARRITT BENNETT 1 2 4 5 7 8 3 18THAVES MEDICAL CTR EAST (MCE) 10 HORTON AVE 9 1810

Bordenstein, Seth

447

Educational quotients : Robert F. Kennedy Middle School  

E-print Network

When architects talk of 'smart buildings' they are usually referring to the same old ones with the addition of simple prosthetics such as light sensors and small electric motors. Their smartness is invariably limited to ...

Kim, Paul Hyun, 1971-

2002-01-01

448

Kennedy Space Center - "America's Gateway to Space"  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KSC fits into the overall NASA vision and mission by moving forward so that what we do and learn will benefit all here on Earth. In January of last year, KSC revised its Mission and Vision statements to articulate our identity as we align with this new direction the Agency is heading. Currently KSC is endeavoring to form partnerships with industry, , Government, and academia, utilizing institutional assets and technical capabilities to support current and future m!issions. With a goal of safe, low-cost, and readily available access to space, KSC seeks to leverage emerging industries to initiate development of a new space launch system, oversee the development of a multipurpose crew vehicle, and assist with the efficient and timely evolution of commercial crew transportation capabilities. At the same time, KSC is pursuing modernizing the Center's infrastructure and creating a multi-user launch complex with increased onsite processing and integration capabilities.

Petro, Janet; Chevalier, Mary Ann; Hurst, Chery

2011-01-01

449

WRITTEN STATEMENT OF DAVID M. KENNEDY  

E-print Network

in the Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) process following oil spills and the importance of our status of restoration efforts. NOAA's Natural Resource Damage Assessment Role NOAA has several critical for protecting, assessing, and restoring the public's coastal and marine natural resources when they are impacted

450

WRITTEN STATEMENT OF DAVID M. KENNEDY  

E-print Network

in the Deepwater Horizon response and natural resource damage assessment process, observations related to the Gulf conducts a joint Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) with co-trustees to assess and restore natural? BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITEE ON INSULAR AFFAIRS, OCEANS, AND WILDLIFE COMMITTEE ON NATURAL RESOURCES U.S. HOUSE

451

Black Feminist Politics from Kennedy to Clinton  

Microsoft Academic Search

Taking an interdisciplinary approach, this book analyzes Black women's involvement in American political life, focusing on what they did to gain political power between 1961 and 2001, and why, in many cases, they did not succeed. Harris demonstrates that Black women have tried to gain centrality through their participation in Presidential Commissions, Black feminist organizations, theatrical productions, film adaptations of

Duchess Harris

2009-01-01

452

Collegiate 4-H Advisors: Matt Kennedy  

E-print Network

of Agricultural Sciences and Forestry with a established GPA of 3.25 can be accepted. As of now, we have 30 an active role in the develop- ment of their members through social and educational activities, the better assist with. We do a Valentine's Day Round- up where we make valentines along with the kids from Children

Tullos, Desiree

453

The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program: Fisheries  

E-print Network

, 2000 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Norman Y. Mineta, Secretary National Oceanic and Atmospheric . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Aquaculture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Aquaculture

454

Denis V. F. Kennedy Department of Politics  

E-print Network

Stein, and Laura Thaut), Report for the conference on "Religion, Secularism, and Humanitarianism "Religion and Humanitarianism: Floating Boundaries in a Globalizing World" (with Michael Barnett, Janice

Marsh, David

455

Linda J Bilmes 79 John F Kennedy Street, Harvard Kennedy School  

E-print Network

Executive Fellows program (senior federal government officials, GS-14 - SES); Mexican officials program; Indonesia civil service training; Womens' leadership program. Bi-annual Programs: Lead budgeting workshops extensive work in Eastern Europe, Russia, South America. COMMISSION ON INTER-AMERICAN INVESTMENT, WASHINGTON

Liu, X. Shirley

456

S. Kathleen Krach, Ph.D. 3224 LeBron Road  

E-print Network

Metrics processing efficiency and reading achievement. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 24, 459 Assessment of the Learner ­ Second Edition: Diagnostic Assessment for Reading and Writing. In the Mental disorder. In E. Fletcher-Janzen & C. R. Reynolds (Eds.). Childhood Disorders: Diagnostic desk reference

Ahmad, Sajjad

457

BOSTONIA WinterSpring 2013 WinterSpring 2013 BOSTONIAPHOTOGRAPH BY KATHLEEN DOOHER  

E-print Network

-old accuses his girlfriend of cheating. Most adults, especially parents, would insist these kids are too young Daley doesn't judge. She works to give 11- to 14-year-olds the skills to keep their relationships invited teenagers to rate the relationship healthiness and unhealthiness of popular song lyrics

Goldberg, Bennett

458

Kathleen A. Byrnes, Ph.D. The University of Texas at Dallas  

E-print Network

Education, Pre-Health Professional Development, Geriatric Healthcare, Health Career Exploration, Health Care Internship, U.S. Healthcare System for Clinicians. + Conduct ongoing presentations for prospective, Health Professions Independent Study, Health Careers Exploration, U.S. Healthcare System for Clinicians

O'Toole, Alice J.

459

Modeling Culturally Authentic Style Shifting with Virtual Justine Cassell Kathleen Geraghty Berto Gonzalez John Borland  

E-print Network

behavior, we found that children shift dialects and ways of using their body depending on social context Euro American children score, on average, 24 points above the basic skill level in science while Berto Gonzalez John Borland Center for Technology and Social Behavior Northwestern University, Evanston

Cassell, Justine

460

Biosynthesis of dystroglycan: processing of a precursor propeptide Kathleen H. Holta  

E-print Network

-linked) glycosylation did not prevent the cleavage of the dystroglycan precursor peptide. However, inhibition of N-linked glycosylation results in aberrant traffick- ing of the KK- and LL-dystroglycan subunits to the plasma membrane of dystroglycan mutations that cause muscular dystrophy in humans. However, dystro- glycan structure and function

Campbell, Kevin P.

461

Individual differences in time perspective predict autonoetic experience Kathleen M. Arnold a,  

E-print Network

.elsevier.com/locate/concog #12;Might there exist a similar variation within the population of healthy young adults? That is, do, Zimbardo & Boyd, 1999) was admin- istered to 133 undergraduate students, who also rated phenomenological-experiencing the event, but not ten other rated properties less related to autonoetic consciousness. Ă? 2011 Elsevier Inc

McDermott, Kathleen

462

A Methodology for Extending Focusing Linda Z. Suri and Kathleen F. McCoy  

E-print Network

­ cusing research (Focusing: [Sid79], [Car87]; centering: [GJW83], [BFP87], [Wal89], [Kam86], [WIC92]), [Bre93], [Kam93], [KPP93], [Lin93], [HT93], [Wal93]; and PUNDIT: [Dah86], [PDS + 86], [DB90]), did

McCoy, Kathleen F.

463

A Methodology for Extending Focusing Linda Z. Suri and Kathleen F. McCoy  

E-print Network

research Focusing: Sid79 , Car87 ; centering: GJW83 , BFP87 , Wal89 , Kam86 , WIC92 , Bre93 , Kam93 , KPP93 , Lin93 , HT93 , Wal93 ; and PUNDIT: Dah86 , PDS+86 , DB90 , did not explicitlyand or adequately address

McCoy, Kathleen F.

464

Laura Kathleen Potter potter44@live.unc.edu Prof. Jeremy Marzuola PID#720318602  

E-print Network

/ChartierBracketology.pdf. 2 "Colley's Bias Free College Football Ranking Method: The Colley Matrix Explained." Colley's Bias 24, 2014 Ranking Sports Teams Using the Colley Matrix Method Linear algebra and the need to solve algebra has proven incredibly helpful in ranking sports teams overall and within conferences

Marzuola, Jeremy

465

Kathleen M. Smits, Ph.D., P.E. Colorado School of Mines  

E-print Network

Science Society of America Journal Member of American Geophysical Union (AGU), American Society of Civil Engineer (ASCE), the International Society of Porous Media (InterPore), Society of American Military

466

Kathleen M. Smits, Ph.D., P.E. Colorado School of Mines  

E-print Network

for the Facility Design of F/A-22 Aircraft Hangars and the Low Observable Composite Repair Facility 2004 U.S Air Force Base, VA F/A-22 Fighter Aircraft Liaison and Project Engineer, Captain, U.S Air Force - Dec 2001

467

Kathleen M. Smits, Ph.D., P.E. Colorado School of Mines  

E-print Network

Colorado School of Mines (2007-2010) Doctor of Philosophy, Environmental Science and Engineering Air Force Reserves Sept 2010- Nov 2011 Department of Environmental Science and Engineering Colorado/AWARDS 2011 CH2MHill Graduate Student of the Year Award, Environmental Science and Engineering, Colorado

468

AutoMap User's Guide 2007 Kathleen M. Carley, Dave Columbus, Matt DeReno,  

E-print Network

.............................................................................................. 11 Social Network Analysis (SNA:................................................................................................. 14 Social Network Analysis (SNA

Sadeh, Norman M.

469

Extraction of Spatio-Temporal Data for Social Judith Gelernter, Dong Cao, Kathleen M. Carley  

E-print Network

of the mined data to perform social network analysis. Keywords: Social network analysis, text mining of a two-mode, people-by- location network. Social network analysis uses advanced mathematical techniques of the social network analysis software, ORA, centrality is the nearness of an entity to all other entities

Shamos, Michael I.

470

Social Network Change Detection Ian A. McCulloh and Kathleen M. Carley  

E-print Network

Control, CUSUM, Al-Qaeda, IkeNet, Terrorism #12;iii Abstract Changes in observed social networks may of al Qaeda based on open source data. The results indicate that this approach is able to detect change ........................................................ 5 Al Qaeda Communications Network

Sadeh, Norman M.

471

Social Network Change Detection Ian A. McCulloh Kathleen M. Carley  

E-print Network

of al Qaeda based on open source data. The results indicate that this approach is able to detect change-3890 #12;Keywords: Social Networks, Change Detection, Statistical Process Control, CUSUM, Al-Qaeda, Ike

Sadeh, Norman M.

472

Kathleen A. Langan. “Striking a Balance: Effective Use of Facebook in an Academic Libraries  

Microsoft Academic Search

As one of the fastest growing social networking sites, Facebook presents librarians with a prime opportunity to engage academic library patrons. A survey of 136 users at Western Michigan University (WMU) measured the effectiveness of Facebook as a marketing, reference, and instruction tool. It also measured user comfort and satisfaction with a library's presence on Facebook. The majority of respondents

Kathleen Langan; Dianna Sachs; Ed eckel

2011-01-01

473

Influence of the Laurentian Great Lakes on Regional Climate1 Michael Notaro, Kathleen Holman8  

E-print Network

and an increase in surface downward55 shortwave radiation flux during summer due to diminished atmospheric International Centre for Theoretical Physics Regional Climate Model Version 4. The Great51 Lakes dampen

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

474

Variables, Decisions, and Scripting in Construct Brian R. Hirshman and Kathleen M. Carley  

E-print Network

University Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Center for the Computational Analysis of Social and Organizational Systems to the incorporation of cultural knowledge in adaptive adversary models), and the National Science Foundation (SES cultural modeling of the adversary). Further support was provided by CASOS - the Center for Computational

475

Basic Lessons in *ORA and Automap 2009 Kathleen M. Carley, Mike Bigrigg, Jeff Reminga,  

E-print Network

of Social and Organizational Systems CASOS Technical Report1 1 This work was supported by the ONR N00014-06-1-0104, the AFOSR for "Computational Modeling of Cultural Dimensions in Adversary Organization (MURI)", the ARL for Assessing C2 structures, the DOD, and the NSF IGERT 9972762 in CASOS. Additional support was provided

Sadeh, Norman M.

476

ORA User's Guide 2013 Kathleen M. Carley, Jrgen Pfeffer, Jeff Reminga,  

E-print Network

and Organizational Systems (CASOS) of the School of Computer Science (SCS) at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU by the Office of Naval Research MURI ­ A Structural Approach to the Incorporation of Cultural Knowledge Socio- Cultural Modeling (N000140811223); Office of Naval Research - CATNET: Competitive Adaptation

Sadeh, Norman M.

477

ORA User's Guide 2008 Kathleen M. Carley, Dave Columbus, Matt DeReno,  

E-print Network

University Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Center for the Computational Analysis of Social and Organizational Systems This work was supported by the ONR N00014-06-1-0104, the AFOSR for Computational Modeling of Cultural Dimensions in Adversary Organization (MURI), the ARL for Assessing C2 structures, the DOD, and the NSF IGERT

478

ORA User's Guide 2009 Kathleen M. Carley, Jeff Reminga, Jon Storrick, and  

E-print Network

Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Center for the Computational Analysis of Social and Organizational Systems CASOS This work was supported by the ONR N00014-06-1-0104, the AFOSR for Computational Modeling of Cultural Dimensions in Adversary Organization (MURI), the ARL for Assessing C2 structures, the DOD, and the NSF IGERT

479

A review of "Protestant Autobiography in the Seventeenth Century Anglophone World" by Kathleen Lynch  

E-print Network

on #3;ve English poets, Anne Southwell, Anne Bradstreet, Katherine Philips, Anne Finch, and Mary Monck, thus covering #3;gures from the seventeenth to early eighteenth centuries. Dedicating a chapter to each of these women, Wright contextualizes... on #3;ve English poets, Anne Southwell, Anne Bradstreet, Katherine Philips, Anne Finch, and Mary Monck, thus covering #3;gures from the seventeenth to early eighteenth centuries. Dedicating a chapter to each of these women, Wright contextualizes...

Wells, Marion A.

2013-01-01

480

Phase diagram of iron, revised-core temperatures Thomas J. Ahrens, Kathleen G. Holland,1  

E-print Network

) experiments at calculated shock temperatures of 2775 ± 160 K. This single crossing of the g-liquid boundary temperatures require the occurrence of yet another sub-solidus phase along the principal Hugoniot at $200 GPa the measured temperature. [7] The variation in the target temperature along the center line was calculated

Stewart, Sarah T.

481

Solutions Remediate Contaminated Groundwater  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the Apollo Program, NASA workers used chlorinated solvents to clean rocket engine components at launch sites. These solvents, known as dense non-aqueous phase liquids, had contaminated launch facilities to the point of near-irreparability. Dr. Jacqueline Quinn and Dr. Kathleen Brooks Loftin of Kennedy Space Center partnered with researchers from the University of Central Florida's chemistry and engineering programs to develop technology capable of remediating the area without great cost or further environmental damage. They called the new invention Emulsified Zero-Valent Iron (EZVI). The groundwater remediation compound is cleaning up polluted areas all around the world and is, to date, NASA's most licensed technology.

2010-01-01

482

From Kennedy, to Beyond: Growing Plants in Space  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronauts cannot have their cake and eat it too, but what about growing a salad and eating it? As NASA continues to push the envelope on Space exploration and inhabitance the need for a fresh food source becomes more vital. The Life Support team at NASA is using a system developed by ORBITEC the VEGGIE, in which astronauts aboard the ISS, and potentially the Moon and Mars, will be capable of growing food. The introduction of plants not only gives astronauts a means of independently supplying food, but also recreation, oxygen replenishment and psychological benefits. The plants were grown in "pillows", the system used for growing plants within the VEGGIE. This test included 4 types of media mixtures that are composed of a clay based media called Arcilite and Fafard #2, which is a peat moss-based media ( <1 mm Arcilite, 1-2 mm of Arcilite, 1:1 <1 mm & 1-2 mm mixture and 1:1 Arcilite & Fafard mixture). Currently, 3 lettuce cultivars are being grown in 4 mixtures of media. Tests were being conducted to see which form of media has the ratio of best growth and least amount of microbes that are harmful. That is essential because a person's body becomes more susceptible to illness when they leave Earth. As a result, test must be conducted on the "pillow" system to assess the levels of microbial activity. The cultivars were tested at different stages during their growing process for microbes. Datum show that the mix of Fafard and Arcilite had the best growth, but also the most microbes. This was due to the fact that Fafard is an organic substance so it contains material necessary for microbes to live. Data suggest that the <1 mm Arcilite has an acceptable amount of growth and a lower level of microbes, because it is non-organic.

Flemming, Cedric, II; Seck, Sokhana A.; Massa, Gioia D.; Hummerick, Mary E.; Wheeler, Raymond

2012-01-01

483

Rocketry, Kennedy Educate to Innovate (KETI) PowerPoint Presentation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This is a series of lecture notes about rocketry aimed at a general audience. It reviews some of the basic physics, briefly discussing Newton's Laws of motion and how they relate to rocketry, and the history of rocketry. The two basic types of rockets are discussed. Lastly, the occupations that are available in rocketry are reviewed.

Davila, Dina

2010-01-01

484

Radar Nowcasting of Total Lightning over the Kennedy Space Center  

E-print Network

to CSI was 25 dBZ at -20?C, while the best reflectivity at isothermal predictor for IC was 25 dBZ at -15?C. Meanwhile, the best VII predictor of CG lightning was the 30th percentile (0.840 kg m-2), while the best VII predictor of IC was the 5th... (CSI) for the five best dBZ group predictors of CG lightning............................................................................................ 47 20 Critical Success Index (CSI) for the six best dBZ group predictors of IC lightning...

Seroka, Gregory Nicholas

2011-08-08

485

The Cuban Missile Crisis: Was Kennedy's Way the Best Way?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The traditional interpretation of the Cuban missile crisis is held by nearly all of the participants in the crisis, as well as by many contemporary observers, including numerous journalists and political scientists of the 1960s and 1970s. For the most part, the traditionalists form a cohesive interpretation, with nearly all traditional writers agreeing on at least three basic issues.

Lisa A. Erb

1989-01-01

486

Math 3B/3C Syllabus SIMS Program, Grace Kennedy  

E-print Network

and a waste of your grader's time.) · In college, you should not only learn how to solve math problems, howBWork and written work is to help you learn how to fill in the gaps of an entirely electronic system. Once the school year starts, all homework will be electronic. Academic Integrity : From a module during our TA

Akhmedov, Azer

487

Math 3B/3C Syllabus SIMS Program, Grace Kennedy  

E-print Network

. (Not doing so is an honor code violation and a waste of your grader's time.) Webwork : · http electronic system once the school year starts and all homework is electronic. Academic Integrity : From

Akhmedov, Azer

488

John F. Kennedy School of Government Harvard University  

E-print Network

ICa 1. Agriculture And economic growth The current global economic crisis, rising food prices. Persistent food shortages are now be- ing compounded by new threats arising from climate change. But Africa their income from farming. Most policy interventions have focused on "food security", a term that is used

Kammen, Daniel M.

489

Memorandum about the First Nixon-Kennedy Debate  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

On the morning of September 1, 1960, Herb Klein and Pierre Salinger met in the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, D.C., to discuss the details of what would be the first televised presidential debate. Klein was press secretary for Republican candidate Vice President Richard Nixon and Salinger was press secretary for Democratic candidate Senator John…

Rosenbaum, David L.

2010-01-01

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