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1

Kathleen O'Brien.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an interview with Kathleen O'Brien, vice president of university services at the University of Minnesota. Discusses her goals for making the school an institutional benchmark for architecture and facilities management. (EV)

LeFevre, Camille

2003-01-01

2

Kennedy Now!  

NASA Video Gallery

2013 roared out of the blocks at NASA's Kennedy Space Center as launch teams oversaw liftoffs from both coasts. The Florida-based center also continued its work prepping payloads bound for the Inte...

3

Kennedy's Disease Association  

MedlinePLUS

... MORE Will my child be born with this DNA defect? It takes an enormous amount of money ... Links About Kennedy's Disease What is Kennedy's Disease DNA Testing Frequently Asked Questions Doctors familiar with Kennedy's ...

4

Kathleen England watches her image transmitted to shuttle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Kathleen England (foreground and on monitor) watches her image transmitted to her husband in the shuttle via the Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment (SAREX). Looking on are amateur radio operators employed at JSC: Gil Carman (WA5NOM); Lou McFaddin (WSDIO), and Candy Torres (KASUKJ).

1985-01-01

5

Kathleen England watches her image transmitted to shuttle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Kathleen England watches her image transmitted to her husband in the shuttle via the Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment (SAREX). Looking on are amateur radio operators employed at JSC: Gil Carman (WA5NOM); Lou McFaddin (WSDIO), and Candy Torres (KASUKJ).

1985-01-01

6

78 FR 6173 - Diana Del Grosso, Ray Smith, Joseph Hatch, Cheryl Hatch, Kathleen Kelley, Andrew Wilklund, and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Transportation Board [Docket No. FD 35652] Diana Del Grosso, Ray Smith, Joseph Hatch, Cheryl Hatch, Kathleen Kelley, Andrew Wilklund...petition filed on August 1, 2012, by Diana Del Grosso, Ray Smith, Joseph Hatch, Cheryl Hatch, Kathleen Kelley, Andrew...

2013-01-29

7

76 FR 43896 - Safety Zone; Kathleen Whelan Wedding Fireworks, Lake St. Clair, Grosse Pointe Farms, MI  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Kathleen Whelan Wedding Fireworks, Lake St. Clair, Grosse Pointe...St. Clair during the Kathleen Whelan Wedding Fireworks. DATES: This rule is effective...private party is holding a land based wedding that will include fireworks launched...

2011-07-22

8

Kennedy NOW! May 2013  

NASA Video Gallery

In this edition of Kennedy NOW! see the progress NASA's Commercial Crew Program partners are making to get astronauts launching into low-Earth orbit atop American-made rockets and spacecraft. Find ...

9

Kennedy Presents Award to Gilruth  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Former President John F. Kennedy presents Dr. Robert R. Gilruth Director of the Manned Spacecraft Center, Houston, Texas with the Medal for Distinguished Federal Civil Service. The ceremony took place on the White House Lawn. In attendance were second from left to right: Astronaut, Alan Sheppard Astronaut, John Glenn Dr. Robert R. Gilruth NASA Administrator, James Webb President John F. Kennedy

1962-01-01

10

Profiles of Counseling Pioneers: A Visit with Kathleen and Gilbert Wrenn.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Profiles the lives of Gilbert Wrenn, a "pioneer" of the counseling profession, and his wife, Kathleen. Shares the story of the Wrenns' life together since 1926 as an inspiration to counselors of couples and clients who are trying to cope in an increasingly complex world. (Author/GCP)

Maples, Mary Finn; Maples, Newsom Battle

1999-01-01

11

The Kennedy Myth and American Politics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the John F. Kennedy legend and his ability as an image maker. Characterizes Kennedy's presidency in terms of pragmatic idealism. Says Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson closed out the New and Fair Deal reforms but left no social or economic transformation. Claims Kennedy's disavowal of ideological rigidity ended the power of the Democratic…

Parmet, Herbert S.

1990-01-01

12

Kennedy Space Center Payload Processing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews the payload processing functions at Kennedy Space Center. It details some of the payloads processed at KSC, the typical processing tasks, the facilities available for processing payloads, and the capabilities and customer services that are available.

Lawson, Ronnie; Engler, Tom; Colloredo, Scott; Zide, Alan

2011-01-01

13

Kennedy Space Center Design Visualization  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Perform simulations of ground operations leading up to launch at Kennedy Space Center and Vandenberg Air Force Base in CA since 1987. We use 3D Laser Scanning, Modeling and Simulations to verify that operations are feasible, efficient and safe.

Humeniuk, Bob

2013-01-01

14

About Kennedy's Disease: KD Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... MORE Will my child be born with this DNA defect? It takes an enormous amount of money ... Genetic Counseling/Inheritance Common Misdiagnosis Frequently Asked Questions DNA Testing and Labs Doctors Familiar with Kennedy's Disease ...

15

Human Spaceflight: The Kennedy Legacy  

NASA Video Gallery

On May 25, 1961, just weeks after the first American astronaut flew, President John F. Kennedy put NASA on a bold path, challenging the nation to do what was then impossible -- send a man to the mo...

16

Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Among 2011's many accomplishments, we safely retired the Space Shuttle Program after 30 incredible years; completed the International Space Station and are taking steps to enable it to reach its full potential as a multi-purpose laboratory; and helped to expand scientific knowledge with missions like Aquarius, GRAIL, and the Mars Science Laboratory. Responding to national budget challenges, we are prioritizing critical capabilities and divesting ourselves of assets no longer needed for NASA's future exploration programs. Since these facilities do not have to be maintained or demolished, the government saves money. At the same time, our commercial partners save money because they do not have to build new facilities. It is a win-win for everyone. Moving forward, 2012 will be even more historically significant as we celebrate the 50th Anniversary of Kennedy Space Center. In the coming year, KSC will facilitate commercial transportation to low-Earth orbit and support the evolution of the Space Launch System and Orion crew vehicle as they ready for exploration missions, which will shape how human beings view the universe. While NASA's Vision is to lead scientific and technological advances in aeronautics and space for a Nation on the frontier of discovery KSC's vision is to be the world's preeminent launch complex for government and commercial space access, enabling the world to explore and work in space. KSC's Mission is to safely manage, develop, integrate, and sustain space systems through partnerships that enable innovative, diverse access to space and inspires the Nation's future explorers.

Griffin, Amanda

2012-01-01

17

Kennedy at Rice University  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

President Kennedy speaks before a crowd of 35,000 people at Rice University in the football field. The following are excerpts from his speech. ' ...We set sail on his new sea because there is a new knowledge to be gained, and new rights to be won, and they must be won and used for the progress of all people. ...Whether it will become a force for good or ill depends on man, and only if the United States occupies a position of pre-eminence can we help decide whether this new ocean will be a sea of peace or a new terrifying theater of war. But I do say space can be explored and mastered without feeding the fires of war, without repeating the mistakes that man has made with extending his writ around this globe of ours. ...There is no strife, no prejudice, no national conflict in outer space as yet. Its conquest deserves the best of all mankind, and its opportunity for peaceful cooperation may never come again. But why, some say the Moon? Why choose this as our goal? And they may well ask, why climb the highest mountian? Why - 35 years ago - why fly the Atlantic? Why does Rice play Texas? We choose to go to the Moon, we choose to go to the Moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one in which we intend to win, and the others too.'

1962-01-01

18

Kennedy at Rice University  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

President Kennedy speaks before a crowd of 35,000 people at Rice University in the football field. The following are excerpts from his speech. ' ...We set sail on his new sea because there is a new knowledge to begained, and new rights to be won, and they must be won and used for the progress of all people. Whether it will become a force for good or ill depends on man, and only if the United States occupies a position of pre-eminence can we help decide whether this new ocean will be a sea of peace or a new terrifying theater of war. But I do say space can be explored and mastered without feeding the fires of war, without repeating the mistakes that man has made with extending his wirt around this globe of ours. There is no strife, no prejudice, no national conflict in outer space as yet. Its conquest deserves the best of all mankind, and its opportunity for peaceful cooperation may never come again. But why, some say the Moon? Why choose this as our goal? And they may well ask, why climb the highest mountain? Why 35 years ago why fly the Atlantic? Why does Rice play Texas? We choose to go to the Moon, we choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one in which we attend to win, and the others , too.'

1962-01-01

19

Lightning at Kennedy Space Center.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (KSC/CCAFS) area borders the area of highest frequency of thunderstorms in the United States (Fig. 11). Since the majority of the thunderstorms occur in the summer months, lightning frequencies in ...

W. C. Gibbons, B. F. Boyd, W. Jafferis

1985-01-01

20

A Biography of Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This teaching guide consists of a biography of Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy (Onassis), the wife of President John F. Kennedy, the 35th President of the United States and questions for students to answer after reading the biography. The guide contains activities, such as playing the role of an inquiring camera girl (Mrs. Kennedy's first job in…

Weidman, Lisa K. Menendez

21

Kennedy Space Center exercise program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Fitness Program began in Feb. 1993. The program is managed by the Biomedical Operations and Research Office and operated by the Bionetics Corporation. The facilities and programs are offered to civil servants, all contractors, temporary duty assignment (TDY) participants, and retirees. All users must first have a medical clearance. A computer-generated check-in system is used to monitor participant usage. Various aspects of the program are discussed.

Hoffman, Cristy

1993-01-01

22

Justice Kennedy and Gay Marriage  

Microsoft Academic Search

A lawsuit challenging California?s gay marriage ban, Proposition 8, on 14th Amendment grounds, is headed to the Supreme Court. Justice Sotomayor's ascendancy notwithstanding, Justice Kennedy will be the Court?s pivotal vote in this case. His opinion in Lawrence invalidated anti-sodomy statutes under the 14th Amendment, yet he expressly distinguished such laws from gay marriage bans, leaving them an open issue

Martin Carcieri

23

Kennedy Space Center Spaceport Analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Until the Shuttle Atlantis' final landing on July 21, 2011, Kennedy Space Center (KSC) served as NASA's main spaceport, which is a launch and landing facility for rockets and spacecraft that are attempting to enter orbit. Many of the facilities at KSC were created to assist the Shuttle Program. One of the most important and used facilities is the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), This was the main landing area for the return of the shuttle after her mission in space. · However, the SLF has also been used for a number of other projects including straight-line testing by Gibbs Racing, weather data collection by NOAA, and an airfield for the KSC helicopters. This runway is three miles long with control tower at midfield and a fire department located at the end in care of an emergency. This facility, which was part of the great space race, will continue to be used for historical events as Kennedy begins to commercialize its facilities. KSC continues to be an important spaceport to the government, and it will transform into an important spaceport for the commercial industry as well. During my internship at KSC's Center Planning and Development Directorate, I had the opportunity to be a part of the negotiation team working on the agreement for Space Florida to control the Shuttle Landing Facility. This gave me the opportunity to learn about all the changes that are occurring here at Kennedy Space Center. Through various meetings, I discovered the Master Plan and its focus is to transform the existing facilities that were primarily used for the Shuttle Program, to support government operations and commercial flights in the future. This. idea is also in a new strategic business plan and completion of a space industry market analysis. All of these different documentations were brought to my attention and I. saw how they came together in the discussions of transitioning the SLF to a commercial operator, Space Florida. After attending meetings and partaking in discussions for the SLF Agreement, I formed the idea of a Spaceport Analysis as my over internship project. As previously stated, I had the opportunity to sit in on the market analysis meetings and read through the analysis itself. I suggested the creation of a Strengths Weaknesses Opportunities Threats (SWOT) analysis, which allows an individual to see an overview of the company's strengths and weaknesses alongside any industry opportunities and threats. After discussions with the lead writer of the new strategic business plan and getting approval, I took the action upon myself and created the Kennedy Space Center SWOT Analysis.

Wary, Samantha A.

2013-01-01

24

Surface-water hydrology at three coal-refuse disposal sites in southern Illinois: Staunton 1, New Kathleen, and Superior  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hydrologic data were collected and analyzed for three coal refuse disposal sites in southern Illinois. The disposal sites were associated with underground mines and consisted of piles of coarse waste (gob) and slurry areas where fine waste rejected from coal washing was deposited. Prereclamation data were available for the Superior washer site in Macoupin County and the New Kathleen site

L. M. Mele; P. F. Prodan

1983-01-01

25

In Tribute: Senator Edward M. Kennedy, Friend of NIH  

MedlinePLUS

... Sen. Edward Kennedy (r) confers with Dr. Francis Collins, who was then director of the National Center ... disadvantaged. Paying tribute to Kennedy, NIH Director Francis S. Collins said, "Sen. Kennedy was an amazing man—a ...

26

Justice Kennedy's Libertarian Revolution: Lawrence v. Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

This brief article explains why Lawrence v. Texas could be a revolutionary case if the Supreme Court follows Justice Kennedy's reasoning in the future. As in Planned Parenthood v. Casey, Justice Kennedy finds a statute to be unconstitutional, not because it infringes a right to privacy (which is mentioned but once), but because it infringes \\

Randy E. Barnett

2003-01-01

27

Kennedy Space Center polygeneration facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This is a report on the status of the polygeneration feasibility study conducted by the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Polygeneration is an innovative approach to reducing cost per flight for the Shuttle by reducing propellant and other costs. Cost of LH2 is expected to be adversely affected by sharp increases in natural gas pricing as well as other costs such as electricity and transportation. The polygeneration concept is to produce liquid hydrogen (LH2) for the Shuttle and gaseous nitrogen (GN2), electricity and thermal energy to meet KSC requirements by means of an integrated coal gasification plant. Conclusions of the initial feasibility study will be presented as well as the status of on-going activities.

Gutkowski, G. P.

1984-01-01

28

Kennedy's disease: pathogenesis and clinical approaches.  

PubMed

Kennedy's disease, also known as spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, is a progressive degenerative condition affecting lower motor neurons. It is one of nine neurodegenerative disorders caused by a polyglutamine repeat expansion. Affecting only men, Kennedy's disease is the only one of these conditions that follows an X-linked mode of inheritance. The causative protein in Kennedy's disease, with a polyglutamine expansion residing in the first N-terminal domain, is the androgen receptor. Research in this field has made significant advances in recent years, and with the increased understanding of pathogenic mechanisms, feasible approaches to treatments are being investigated. In Kennedy's disease research, the most significant issue to emerge recently is the role of androgens in exacerbating the disease process. On the basis of animal experiments, a viable hypothesis is that higher circulating levels of androgens in men could trigger the degeneration of motor neurons causing this disease, and that lower levels in heterozygous and homozygous women are protective. This is a major issue, as treatment of individuals affected by Kennedy's disease with testosterone has been considered a reasonable therapy by some neurologists. The rationale behind this approach relates to the fact that Kennedy's disease is accompanied by mild androgen insensitivity. It was therefore believed that treatment with high doses of testosterone might compensate for this loss of androgen action, with the added benefit of preventing muscle wasting. The current review provides an overview of recent advances in the field of Kennedy's disease research, including approaches to treatment. PMID:15151675

Greenland, K J; Zajac, J D

2004-05-01

29

BRIEFING OF PRESIDENT KENNEDY BY MAJ. PETRONE  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Mr. Thornycroft, Robert McNamara, Sec. of Defense, General Davis, Commander Atlantic Missile Range, President John F. Kennedy, Dr. Kurt Debus, Directory of Launch Operations Center. This group was briefed by Maj. R. Petrone, NASA, on the Saturn program

1962-01-01

30

President Kennedy's Speech at Rice University  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This video tape presents unedited film footage of President John F. Kennedy's speech at Rice University, Houston, Texas, September 12, 1962. The speech expresses the commitment of the United States to landing an astronaut on the Moon.

1988-01-01

31

Atlantis Reaches New Home at Kennedy  

NASA Video Gallery

Space shuttle Atlantis completed its 10-mile journey to its new home at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex on Nov. 2, 2012. The shuttle, riding atop a specialized 76-wheel transporter, was mo...

32

Kennedy Space Center Network Documentation System.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Kennedy Space Center Network Documentation System (KSC NDS) is being designed and implemented by NASA and the KSC contractor organizations to provide a means of network tracking, configuration, and control. Currently, a variety of host and client plat...

W. E. Lohne C. L. Schuerger

1995-01-01

33

About Kennedy's Disease: Genetic Counseling/Inheritance  

MedlinePLUS

... MORE Will my child be born with this DNA defect? It takes an enormous amount of money ... Genetic Counseling/Inheritance Common Misdiagnosis Frequently Asked Questions DNA Testing and Labs Doctors Familiar with Kennedy's Disease ...

34

Kennedy Space Center Wakes STS-135 Crew  

NASA Video Gallery

The Flight Day 13 wakeup music was "Fanfare for the Common Man" by Aaron Copland played for Commander Chris Ferguson. It was followed by a prerecorded message from Kennedy Space Center employees. K...

35

John F. Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The John F. Kennedy Space Center, America's spaceport, is located along Florida's eastern shore on Cape Canaveral. Established as NASA's Launch Operations Center on July 1, 1962, the center has been the site of launching all U.S. human space flight missions, from the early days of Project Mercury to the space shuttle and the next generation of vehicles. In addition, the center is home to NASA's Launch Services Program, which coordinates all expendable vehicle launches carrying a NASA payload.

With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

Size: 32.6 by 51.2 kilometers (20.2 by 32.2 miles) Location: 28.6 degrees North latitude, 80.6 degrees West longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 3, 2, and 1 Original Data Resolution: 15 meters (49.2 feet) Dates Acquired: April 26, 2006

2006-01-01

36

John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum is housed in a gorgeous building designed by noted architect I.M. Pei. For those who can't make it to Boston to visit, the associated website is full of relevant information about President Kennedy's life, speeches, presidency, and legacy. This section of the site is dedicated to seven interesting interactive exhibits, including "We Choose The Moon," "The President's Desk," and "White House Diary." In "The President's Desk," visitors can explore Kennedy's work space. This exhibit includes items from his travels, like the famous coconut he carved after his ship, the PT-109, was attacked off the Solomon Islands. The "We Choose The Moon" area contains archival photos and footage describing how President Kennedy helped lead the quest to land a manned spacecraft on the moon. The "White House Diary" takes visitors on an interactive tour through each day of the Kennedy presidency, highlighting the speeches, meetings, conferences, and other activities that commanded his time in office.

37

Health services at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Comprehensive occupational health services are provided to approximately 17,000 workers at the Kennedy Space Center and an additional 6000 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. These areas cover about 120,000 acres encompassing part of the Merritt Island Wild Life Refuge and wetlands which are the habitat of numerous endangered and protected species of wildlife. The services provided at the Kennedy Space Center optimally assure a safe and healthy working environment for the employees engaged in the preparation and launching of this country's Space Shuttle and other important space exploration programs.

Ferguson, E. B.; Humbert, P.; Long, I. D.; Tipton, D. A.

1992-01-01

38

Foster Kennedy Syndrome Due to Meningioma Growth during Pregnancy  

PubMed Central

Tumors of the olfactory groove may cause unilateral optic atrophy with contralateral papilledema and anosmia (Foster Kennedy syndrome). We describe a case of a young pregnant woman with Foster Kennedy syndrome due to an olfactory groove meningioma.

Rodriguez-Porcel, Federico; Hughes, Ian; Anderson, Douglas; Lee, John; Biller, Jose

2013-01-01

39

Kennedy Space Center Annual Report, FY 1997  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has a nearly 40-year tradition of excellence in processing and launching space vehicles and their payloads. The Center's outstanding record of achievements in America's space program has earned it an honored place in history and an essential role in the present; KSC also intends to play a vital part in the future of space exploration.

1997-01-01

40

Columbia returning to Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space shuttle orbiter Columbia returns to the shuttle landing facility atop NASA 905, a modified 747, following a cross country flight from the Dryden Flight Research Facility. The Kennedy Space Center alternative photo number is 108-KSC-82PC-1328.

1982-01-01

41

John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Moving into a two-room apartment near the State House in Boston in 1946, many people wondered aloud how this bright, yet somewhat retiring, young man would do in the rough and tumble world of Boston politics. That 29-year old happened to be John F. Kennedy, and he would win his first campaign that year, as he made his way to the U.S. House of Representatives. He would of course become President of the United States, and later be assassinated in the fall of 1963 in Dallas. His presidential library and museum occupy one of the loveliest vistas afforded any presidential library, as they lie on Columbia Point along BostonâÂÂs waterfront. For those who canâÂÂt make a direct visit to the Bay State, this website provides a fine virtual experience. The site includes historical timelines of KennedyâÂÂs life (along with those of other members of his family), along with an interactive White House diary feature, which offers detailed information on what Kennedy did on every day of his presidency. Interestingly enough, the Ernest Hemingway archive is also housed at the Kennedy Presidential Library, so visitors can also learn about their holdings and view selected digitized materials.

42

Kennedy family upset over assassination video game  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Forty-one years ago Camelot ended with the assassination of President John F. Kennedy while he rode in a motorcade in downtown Dallas. During the past four decades, hundreds of persons have attempted to offer their interpretations and understanding of the events of that tragic day. While the Kennedy family has generally refrained from commenting on the less academic and objective investigations into the death of the President, there has been one recent development that has understandably garnered severe criticism. This development happens to be an online video game titled "JFK Reloaded" that allows visitors to recreate the three shots fired at President Kennedy's car from the Texas School Book Depository. While a representative for the Glasgow-based firm responsible for this game noted that the game might "stimulate a younger generation of players to take an interest in this fascinating episode of American history", many others were quick to respond to this questionable notion. A spokesman for Senator Edward Kennedy called the video game "despicable" and noted presidential historian G. Calvin MacKenzie of Colby College remarked that "Aside from being in incredibly bad taste, the idea of marketing it as an educational tool seems to stretch the notion of education beyond belief."The first link leads to a news article from this Monday's Boston Herald that talks about the reaction to the release of this video game. The second link will take visitors to a rather intriguing discussion of the game by Clive Thompson, writing in the online publication Slate. The third link leads to the JFK Assassination Records page provided by the National Archives & Records Administration, where visitors can read the complete Warren Commission Report and peruse other helpful documents. The fourth link will take users to the website for the John F. Kennedy Library and Museum located in Boston. Here visitors can learn about the actual building (designed by noted modernist I.M. Pei), look through resources for students, and learn about the library's holdings. The fifth link leads to the text and audio version of one of Kennedy's most well-remembered speeches, where he addressed the people of West Berlin and stated, "Today, in the world of freedom, the proudest boast is 'Ich bin ein Berliner'". The final link leads to a special feature from CNN where the president's interpreter, Robert H. Lochner, recalls helping Kennedy learn that phrase for that particular address.

43

Failure Analysis at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

History has shown that failures occur in every engineering endeavor, and what we learn from those failures contributes to the knowledge base to safely complete future missions. The necessity of failure analysis is at its apex at the end of one aged program and at the beginning of a new and untested program. The information that we gain through failure analysis corrects the deficiencies in the current vehicle to make the next generation of vehicles more efficient and safe. The Failure Analysis and Materials Evaluation Branch in the Materials Science Division at the Kennedy Space Center performs metallurgical, mechanical, electrical, and non-metallic materials failure analyses and accident investigations on both flight hardware and ground support equipment for the Space Shuttle, International Space Station, Constellation, and Launch Services Programs. This paper will explore a variety of failure case studies at the Kennedy Space Center and the lessons learned that can be applied in future programs.

Salazar, Victoria L.; Wright, M. Clara

2010-01-01

44

Research and technology at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As the NASA Center responsible for assembly, checkout, servicing, launch, recovery, and operational support of Space Transportation System elements and payloads, Kennedy Space Center is placing increasing emphasis on the Center's research and technology program. In addition to strengthening those areas of engineering and operations technology that contribute to safer, more efficient, and more economical execution of current mission, the technical tools are developed needed to execute Center's mission relative to future programs. The Engineering Development Directorate encompasses most of the laboratories and other Center resources that are key elements of research and technology program implementation and is responsible for implementation of the majority of the projects in this Kennedy Space Center 1989 Annual Report.

1989-01-01

45

Kennedy Space Center network documentation system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Kennedy Space Center Network Documentation System (KSC NDS) is being designed and implemented by NASA and the KSC contractor organizations to provide a means of network tracking, configuration, and control. Currently, a variety of host and client platforms are in use as a result of each organization having established its own network documentation system. The solution is to incorporate as many existing 'systems' as possible in the effort to consolidate and standardize KSC-wide documentation.

Lohne, William E.; Schuerger, Charles L.

1995-01-01

46

Kennedy Space Center Launch and Landing Support  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The presentations describes Kennedy Space Center (KSC) payload processing, facilities and capabilities, and research development and life science experience. Topics include launch site processing, payload processing, key launch site processing roles, leveraging KSC experience, Space Station Processing Facility and capabilities, Baseline Data Collection Facility, Space Life Sciences Laboratory and capabilities, research payload development, International Space Station research flight hardware, KSC flight payload history, and KSC life science expertise.

Wahlberg, Jennifer

2010-01-01

47

Kennedy Space Center environmental health program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Kennedy Space Center's environmental health organization is responsible for programs which assure its employees a healthful workplace under diverse and varied working conditions. These programs encompass the disciplines of industrial hygiene, radiation protection (health physics), and environmental sanitation/pollution control. Activities range from the routine, such as normal office work, to the highly specialized, such as the processing of highly toxic and hazardous materials.

Marmaro, G. M.; Cardinale, M. A.; Summerfield, B. R.; Tipton, D. A.

1992-01-01

48

Induction brazing at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A description of the joint design, materials, equipment, qualification testing, inspection methods, and applications involved in performing induction brazing on hyperbolic propellants tubing at Kennedy Space Center. Induction brazing is a form of brazing in which the energy is transmitted to the workpiece by electrical induction; the eddy currents generated in the metal produce heat by resistance losses. Since induction heating is fast and highly localized, undesirable heat effects are minimized and the resulting braze is of high quality.

Clautice, W. E.

1974-01-01

49

An Aggressive Sphenoid Wing Meningioma Causing Foster Kennedy Syndrome  

PubMed Central

Foster Kennedy syndrome is a rare neurological condition with ophthalmic significance that can manifest as acute visual loss. It is classically characterised by unilateral optic nerve atrophy and contralateral papilledema resulting from an intracranial neoplasm. Physicians should consider Foster Kennedy syndrome in patients who present with visual loss and who have a history of intracranial neoplasm. In addition to ophthalmologic examination, neuroimaging is essential for the diagnosis of Foster Kennedy syndrome.

Walia, Harpreet S.; Grumbine, F. Lawson; Sawhney, Gagan K.; Risner, David S.; Palejwala, Neal V.; Emanuel, Matthew E.; Walia, Sandeep S.

2012-01-01

50

An aggressive sphenoid wing meningioma causing foster kennedy syndrome.  

PubMed

Foster Kennedy syndrome is a rare neurological condition with ophthalmic significance that can manifest as acute visual loss. It is classically characterised by unilateral optic nerve atrophy and contralateral papilledema resulting from an intracranial neoplasm. Physicians should consider Foster Kennedy syndrome in patients who present with visual loss and who have a history of intracranial neoplasm. In addition to ophthalmologic examination, neuroimaging is essential for the diagnosis of Foster Kennedy syndrome. PMID:22666616

Walia, Harpreet S; Grumbine, F Lawson; Sawhney, Gagan K; Risner, David S; Palejwala, Neal V; Emanuel, Matthew E; Walia, Sandeep S

2012-01-01

51

The Kennedy Report: Commission Evaluates High School Journalism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents excerpts from the report of the Kennedy Commission of Inquiry into High School Journalism, concentrating on censorship, minority participation, journalism education, established media, and censorship issues.

Heintz, Ann

1974-01-01

52

Pseudo-pseudo-Foster Kennedy syndrome.  

PubMed

An 80-year-old woman presented with a classic story and findings of an anterior ischemic optic neuropathy in her left eye. Her right eye had slow and progressive decreased vision, ostensibly secondary to a cataract. However, the right eye showed slight temporal pallor of the optic disc and a superior temporal field defect was found. Her radiologic exam showed a tuberculum sella meningioma extending into the right optic canal compressing the right optic nerve. Two diseases, ischemic optic neuropathy and meningioma, in one patient may be termed a pseudo-pseudo-Foster Kennedy syndrome. PMID:2972751

Gelwan, M J; Seidman, M; Kupersmith, M J

1988-03-01

53

My Summer Internship at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During my summer internship at Kennedy Space Center, I worked on several projects with my mentor Grace Johnson in the Education Programs Office. My primary project was the CubeSat project in which my job was to help mentor Merritt Island High School students in the building of a CubeSat. CubeSats are picosatellites that are used to carry out auxiliary missions; they "piggy back" into orbit on launch vehicles launching primary missions. CubeSats come in the sizes of 1U (10 by 10 by 10 cm) 2U (1Ux2) and 3U (1Ux3). The Cube Sats are housed in a protective deploying device called a Poly Picosatellite Orbital Deplored (P-POD). I also participated in a Balloon Workshop with the MIHS students. This was an intense 4-day project in which we constructed a balloon satellite equipped with a camera whose main goal was to obtain video images of the curvature of the earth at high altitudes and relay it back down to our ground station. I also began developing my own science research program for minority serving institutions to be implemented when funding becomes available. In addition to the projects that I completed during my internship, I got the opportunity to go on various tours of the technological facilities here at Kennedy Space Center.

Philpott, Hobert Leon

2011-01-01

54

75 FR 62549 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH,...

2010-10-12

55

77 FR 10759 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD); Notice...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Dates...

2012-02-23

56

76 FR 18620 - Operating Limitations at John F. Kennedy International Airport  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Operating Limitations at John F. Kennedy International Airport AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...Limiting Operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK) that published on January...LaGuardia Airport, John F. Kennedy International Airport, and Newark Liberty...

2011-04-04

57

78 FR 28276 - Operating Limitations at John F. Kennedy International Airport  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Operating Limitations at John F. Kennedy International Airport AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...Limiting Operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK) that published on January...LaGuardia Airport, John F. Kennedy International Airport, and Newark Liberty...

2013-05-14

58

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October, 1963. LCC SECTIONS & DETAILS AT NORTH EXTERIOR WALL OF FIRING ROOMS. Sheet 29-52 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North , Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

59

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October, 1963. LCC TRANSVERSE SECTION AT LIEF ROOM AND VISITOR?S GALLERY VESTIBULE. Sheet 29-50 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North , Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

60

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October, 1963. LCC FLOOR 3, LEVEL 38?-0?, AREA ?P?. Sheet 29-39 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North , Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

61

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October, 1963. LCC DETAILS OF POWER OPERATED LOUVERS. Sheet 29-54 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North , Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

62

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October, 1963. LCC FLOOR 3, LEVEL 38?-0?, AREA ?R?. Sheet 29-42 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North , Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

63

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October, 1963. LCC FLOOR 3, LEVEL 38?-0?, AREA ?R?. Sheet 29-40 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North , Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

64

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October, 1963. LCC TRANSVERSE SECTIONS AA & BB. Sheet 29-45 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North , Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

65

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October, 1963. LCC FLOOR 4, LEVEL 57?-0?, AREA ?P?. Sheet 29-41 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North , Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

66

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October, 1963. VOLUME 29, LAUNCH CONTROL CENTER (LCC) TITLE AND LOCATION SHEET. Sheet 29-01 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North , Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

67

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October, 1963. LCC ELEVATIONS. Sheet 29-44 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North , Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

68

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October, 1963. LCC SECTIONS & DETAILS AT FLOOR 3 NORTH WALL WINDOWS. Sheet 29-53 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North , Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

69

A mimic of the "exact diagnostic sign" of Foster Kennedy.  

PubMed

We observed a patient with bilateral nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy presenting with gradual loss of vision in the right eye and initially asymptomatic disk swelling in the left. This atypical picture may create diagnostic difficulty, since sudden visual loss, the major distinguishing feature between Foster Kennedy's original syndrome and "pseudo-Foster Kennedy syndrome" of ischemic optic neuropathy, is lacking. PMID:4037601

Lepore, F E; Yarian, D L

1985-07-01

70

The Vanderbilt Kennedy Center and the Mental Retardation Research Centers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Kennedy Center at Peabody College of Vanderbilt University is one of 12 Mental Retardation Research Centers (MRRCs) constructed by the federal government. Several major discoveries in mental retardation have come from MRCCs. The Kennedy Center is unique in its focus on education integrated with a university and medical school environment,…

Alexander, Duane

1996-01-01

71

Pituitary adenoma presenting as the Foster-Kennedy syndrome.  

PubMed Central

A 27-year-old man presented to the casualty department with visual failure. Clinically he demonstrated the Foster-Kennedy syndrome. Computed tomography revealed a large space-occupying lesion which was subsequently shown to be a pituitary adenoma. The literature is reviewed and possible mechanisms of the Foster-Kennedy syndrome are discussed. Images

Ruben, S; Elston, J; Hayward, R

1992-01-01

72

Failure Analysis at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

History has shown that failures occur in every engineering endeavor, and what we learn from those failures contributes to the knowledge base to safely complete future missions. The necessity of failure analysis is at its apex at the end of one aged program (i.e. Shuttle) and at the beginning of a new and untested program (i.e. Constellation). The information that we gain through failure analysis corrects the deficiencies in the current vehicle to make the next generation of vehicles more efficient and safe. The Failure Analysis and Materials Evaluation section in the Materials Science Division at the Kennedy Space Center performs metallurgical, mechanical, electrical, and non-metallic failure analysis and accident investigations on both flight hardware and ground support equipment (GSE) for the Shuttle, International Space Station, Constellation, and Launch Services Programs. This presentation will explore a variety of failure case studies at KSC and the lessons learned that can be applied in future programs.

Salazar, Victoria L.; Wright, Clara

2010-01-01

73

Kennedy Space Center ocean beach erosion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dune barrier erosion and possible breakthrough due to storm and hurricane wave activity is studied near Mosquito Lagoon, in Kennedy Space Center property. The results of a geological as well as hydrodynamic appraisal of the problem area indicate that no inlet has existed across the dune barrier since 500 A.D., and that there is little likelihood of a possible breakthrough inlet remaining open permanently, primarily because the relatively shallow lagoon does not contain enough volume of water to maintain an inlet between the ocean and the lagoon. It is therefore recommended that only minimal measures, such as closing up the man-made passes across the dunes, be carried out to ensure continuation of the action of natural beach maintaining processes.

Mehta, A. J.; Obrien, M. P.

1973-01-01

74

When did Ray Kennedy's Parkinson's disease begin?  

PubMed

Ray Kennedy's Parkinson's disease probably began during his distinguished career as a professional soccer player at least 10 years before the first unequivocal physical signs and 14 years before the diagnosis was finally made, when he was 35-years old. Early prodromal symptoms included intermittent subtle disturbances of movement and posture affecting the right arm and leg, mild facial immobility, episodes of profound malaise and lack of energy, inner feelings of tremulousness, excessive unprovoked bouts of perspiration, and accompanying feelings of heat. Abnormalities of movement in the right arm can be seen in video footage of soccer games up to 8 years before his disability came to medical attention. Many of his premorbid personality traits are characteristic of those believed to be associated with the subsequent development of the malady. At least in some patients with Parkinson's disease, the search for instigating aetiological factors should focus 10-20 years before the cardinal signs can be recognised with certainty. PMID:1584235

Lees, A J

1992-01-01

75

KLASS: Kennedy Launch Academy Simulation System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Software provides access to many sophisticated scientific instrumentation (Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), a Light Microscope, a Scanning Probe Microscope (covering Scanning Tunneling, Atomic Force, and Magnetic Force microscopy), and an Energy Dispersive Spectrometer for the SEM). Flash animation videos explain how each of the instruments work. Videos on how they are used at NASA and the sample preparation. Measuring and labeling tools provided with each instrument. Hands on experience of controlling the virtual instrument to conduct investigations, much like the real scientists at NASA do. Very open architecture. Open source on SourceForge. Extensive use of XML Target audience is high school and entry-level college students. "Many beginning students never get closer to an electron microscope than the photos in their textbooks. But anyone can get a sense of what the instrument can do by downloading this simulator from NASA's Kennedy Space Center." Science Magazine, April 8th, 2005

Garner, Lesley C.

2007-01-01

76

Highlighting Kathleen Green and Mario Delmar, Guest Editors of Special Issue (part 2): Junctional Targets of Skin and Heart Disease.  

PubMed

Abstract Cell Communication and Adhesion has been fortunate to enlist two pioneers of epidermal and cardiac cell junctions, Kathleen Green and Mario Delmar, as Guest Editors of a two part series on junctional targets of skin and heart disease. Part 2 of this series begins with an overview from Dipal Patel and Kathy Green comparing epidermal desmosomes to cardiac area composita junctions, and surveying the pathogenic mechanisms resulting from mutations in their components in heart disease. This is followed by a review from David Kelsell on the role of desmosomal mutation in inherited syndromes involving skin fragility. Agnieszka Kobeliak discusses how structural deficits in the epidermal barrier intersect with the NFkB signaling pathway to induce inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. Farah Sheikh reviews the specialized junctional components in cardiomyocytes of the cardiac conduction system and Robert Gourdie discusses how molecular complexes between sodium channels and gap junction proteins within the perijunctional microdomains within the intercalated disc facilitate conduction. Glenn Radice evaluates the role of N-cadherin in heart. Andre Kleber and Chris Chen explore new approaches to study junctional mechanotransduction in vitro with a focus on the effects of connexin ablation and the role of cadherins, respectively. To complement this series of reviews, we have interviewed Werner Franke, whose systematic documentation the tissue-specific complexity of desmosome composition and pioneering discovery of the cardiac area composita junction greatly facilitated elucidation of the role of desmosomal components in the pathophysiology of human heart disease. PMID:24854768

Cowin, Pamela

2014-06-01

77

Kennedy Space Center's Partnership with Graftel Incorporated  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has recently partnered with Graftel Incorporated under an exclusive license agreement for the manufacture and sale of the Smart Current Signature Sensor. The Smart Current Signature Sensor and software were designed and developed to be utilized on any application using solenoid valves. The system monitors the electrical and mechanical health of solenoids by comparing the electrical current profile of each solenoid actuation to a typical current profile and reporting deviation from its learned behavior. The objective of this partnership with Graftel is for them to develop the technology into a hand-held testing device for their customer base in the Nuclear Power Industry. The device will be used to perform diagnostic testing on electromechanical valves used in Nuclear Power plants. Initially, Graftel plans to have working units within the first year of license in order to show customers and allow them to put purchase requests into their next year's budget. The subject technology under discussion was commercialized by the Kennedy Space Center Technology Programs and Partnerships Office, which patented the technology and licensed it to Graftel, Inc., a company providing support, instrumentation, and calibration services to the nuclear community and private sector for over 10 years. For the nuclear power industry, Graftel designs, manufacturers, and calibrates a full line of testing instrumentation. Grafters smart sensors have been in use in the United States since 1993 and have proved to decrease set-up time and test durations. The project was funded by Non-Destructive Engineering, and it is felt that this technology will have more emphasis on future vehicles. Graftel plans to market the Current Signature Sensor to the Electric Utility industry. Graftel currently supplies product and services to the Nuclear Power Industry in the United States as well as internationally. Product and services sold are used in non-destructive testing for valves, penetrations and other applications. Graftel also supplies testing services to an industrial customer base. The customer base includes 90 percent of the U.S. Nuclear plants and plants in Brazil, Europe, and Asia. Graftel works internationally with two representative groups and employees and has ten people at the principle location and a group of contract engineers around the country.

Dunn, Carol Anne

2010-01-01

78

President Obama and Family Arrive at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Video Gallery

President Obama, accompanied by First Lady Michelle Obama and their two daughters, arrive aboard Air Force One at the Cape Canaveral AFS near NASAâ??s Kennedy Space Center at approximately 2 p.m. E...

79

Laser Scanning and Simulation at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We perform simulations of ground operations leading up launch at Kennedy Space Center and Vandenberg Air Force Base in CA. We use Laser Scanning, Modeling and Simulations to make sure operations are feasible, efficient, and safe.

Kickbusch, Tracey E.

2012-01-01

80

Microfilmed Records in the John Fitzgerald Kennedy Library.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the planning and implementation of a program to acquire copies of personal papers and federal records for deposit in the John F. Kennedy Library. The current status of the library's microfilm collections is described. (nine references) (MES)

Whealan, Ronald E.

1988-01-01

81

Station Astronaut Suni Williams Reflects on President Kennedy's Challenge  

NASA Video Gallery

President Kennedy vowed that we shall not see space governed by a hostile flag of conquest but by a banner of freedom and peace. The International Space Station has become the very embodiment of th...

82

Kennedy Space Center Medical Operations and Medical Kit  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews the emergency medical operations at Kennedy Space center, the KSC launch and landing contingency modes, the triage site, the medical kit, and the medications available.

Scarpa, Philip

2011-01-01

83

16. Historic American Buildings Survey Mr. Kennedy, Draftsman 1910 WORKING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

16. Historic American Buildings Survey Mr. Kennedy, Draftsman 1910 WORKING DRAWING OF DETAIL OF LOBBY CEILING AND WALL CONSTRUCTION From the Collection of the Shreve Memorial Library - U.S. Post Office & Courthouse, Marshall & Texas Streets, Shreveport, Caddo Parish, LA

84

13. Historic American Buildings Survey Mr. Kennedy, Draftsman 1910 WORKING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

13. Historic American Buildings Survey Mr. Kennedy, Draftsman 1910 WORKING DRAWING OF SOUTHEAST ELEVATION From the Collection of the Shreve Memorial Library - U.S. Post Office & Courthouse, Marshall & Texas Streets, Shreveport, Caddo Parish, LA

85

KathleenMcAleer  

Cancer.gov

Skip to Main Content CCR Home | About CCR | CCR Intranet Main Navigation Home Profiles Research Newsworthy References Special Interest Groups Training Main Links Psycho-Oncology Home Profiles Research Publications Newsworthy/Resources References Special

86

Kathleen Castro's biography  

Cancer.gov

Skip to Main Content at the National Institutes of Health | www.cancer.gov Print Page E-mail Page Search: Please wait while this form is being loaded.... Home Browse by Resource Type Browse by Area of Research Research Networks Funding Information About

87

Improved Kennedy-Thorndike experiment to test special relativity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A modern version of the Kennedy-Thorndike experiment was carried out by searching for sidereal variations between the frequency of a laser locked to an I2 reference line and a laser locked to the resonance frequency of a highly stable cavity. No variations were found at the level of 2 x 10 to the -12th. This represents a 300-fold improvement over the original Kennedy-Thorndike experiment and allows the Lorentz transformations to be deduced entirely from experiment at an accuracy level of 70 ppm.

Hils, Dieter; Hall, J. L.

1990-01-01

88

Endeavour is Delivered to the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft No. 911, with the space shuttle orbiter Endeavour securely mounted atop its fuselage, taxies to the runway to begin the ferry flight from Rockwell's Plant 42 at Palmdale, California, where the orbiter was built, to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. At Kennedy, the space vehicle was processed and launched on orbital mission STS-49, which landed at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, May 16 1992. NASA 911, the second modified 747 that went into service in November 1990, has special support struts atop the fuselage and internal strengthening to accommodate the added weight of the orbiters.

1961-01-01

89

Space Radar Laboratory photos taken at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Radar Laboratory-1 (SRL-1) is being transferred from the payload canister transporter into the payload bay of the Space Shuttle Endeavour. It is to be flown on the STS-59 mission. The Kennedy Space Center alternative photo number is KSC-94PC-323 (30392); In the south Level IV stand of the Operations and Checkout Building low bay, the SRL-1 antenna is being placed atop a pallet which holds the antenna electronics. The Kennedy Space Center alternative photo number is KSC-93PC-1493 (30393).

1994-01-01

90

76 FR 65516 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Notice of...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development, including...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH,...

2011-10-21

91

33 CFR 165.701 - Vicinity, Kennedy Space Center, Merritt Island, Florida-security zone.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Vicinity, Kennedy Space Center, Merritt Island, Florida-security zone. 165.701...Vicinity, Kennedy Space Center, Merritt Island, Floridaâsecurity zone. (a) The water...80°40â²30â³ W., on Merritt Island. From this position, the line...

2013-07-01

92

77 FR 19677 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH,...

2012-04-02

93

76 FR 71985 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health And Human Development, NIH,...

2011-11-21

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75 FR 30046 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Initial Review...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH,...

2010-05-28

95

77 FR 17080 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH,...

2012-03-23

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77 FR 49000 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH,...

2012-08-15

97

76 FR 5593 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH,...

2011-02-01

98

76 FR 26736 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH,...

2011-05-09

99

76 FR 28995 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Initial Review...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH...

2011-05-19

100

76 FR 72957 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health And Human Development, NIH,...

2011-11-28

101

76 FR 37821 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Special...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH,...

2011-06-28

102

77 FR 69641 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH,...

2012-11-20

103

76 FR 10382 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH,...

2011-02-24

104

78 FR 29375 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH,...

2013-05-20

105

75 FR 55807 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Initial Review...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH,...

2010-09-14

106

76 FR 30733 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Initial Review...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH,...

2011-05-26

107

78 FR 44576 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH,...

2013-07-24

108

76 FR 69747 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Special...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH,...

2011-11-09

109

78 FR 57399 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH,...

2013-09-18

110

75 FR 36662 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH,...

2010-06-28

111

75 FR 7484 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH,...

2010-02-19

112

76 FR 69746 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH,...

2011-11-09

113

78 FR 70309 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH,...

2013-11-25

114

77 FR 12599 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health And Human Development, NIH,...

2012-03-01

115

78 FR 17419 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH,...

2013-03-21

116

77 FR 64817 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH,...

2012-10-23

117

77 FR 43096 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH,...

2012-07-23

118

77 FR 5031 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Initial Review...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH,...

2012-02-01

119

77 FR 19676 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH,...

2012-04-02

120

33 CFR 334.525 - Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; restricted...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.525 Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL;...

2013-07-01

121

33 CFR 334.525 - Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; restricted...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.525 Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL;...

2010-07-01

122

Puppet Revolutionary: An Interview with John E. Kennedy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides an interview with John E. Kennedy that focuses on topics such as his childhood interest in creating puppets, his puppetry career, and his workshop called Character Lab 2000. Provides a lesson for students 8-years-old and older on how to create a pencil head rabbit puppet. (CMK)

Gamble, Harriet

2000-01-01

123

No Religious Test: A Letter to Candidate John F. Kennedy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides background material for teaching Article Four of the United States Constitution. Suggests activities using primary documents in order to teach lessons on religious tests. The document chosen is a letter to John F. Kennedy from a citizen written in September 1960. Document may be reproduced for use in the classroom. (KO)

Mueller, Jean West; Schamel, Wynell Burroughs

1988-01-01

124

Radiological dose assessments at the Kennedy Space Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses the application of an atmospheric transport and diffusion model for launch window and safety risk assessment studies in support of the Galileo (which is scheduled for the October\\/November 1989 period) and Ulysses (scheduled for â¼1 yr after Galileo) missions at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The model is resident in the EMERGE software system developed by NUS

H. Firstenberg; R. Jubach; B. Bartram; F. Vaughan

1989-01-01

125

Birds of Swale Marshes on John F. Kennedy Space Center.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Birds were surveyed in several isolated freshwater wetlands on John F. Kennedy Space Center to determine species composition and the importance of these wetlands to birds. The Red-winged Blackbird and Green-backed Heron were the two most abundant breeders...

D. R. Breininger

1992-01-01

126

NCERA-101 Station Report from Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This is our annual report to the North Central Extension Research Activity, which is affiliated with the USDA and Land Grant University Agricultural Experiment Stations. I have been a member of this committee for 25 years. The presentation will be given by Dr. Gioia Massa, Kennedy Space Center

Massa, Gioia D.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

2014-01-01

127

Federal Human Resource Policy: From Kennedy to Clinton.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The antipoverty initiatives of the Kennedy and Johnson administrations were essentially continued and given increased funding during the Nixon, Ford, and Carter administrations. The Reagan and Bush administrations marked the regression of many employment, training, and welfare programs. Employment and training issues were given high priority…

Levitan, Sar A.; Mangum, Garth L.

128

A Kennedy receiver for optical Quadrature Phase Shift Keying  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The principles employed by Kennedy in the design of his binary receiver are extended to M-ary PSK signals. An implementable Kennedy receiver for Quadrature Phase Shift Keying signals, that uses polarization multiplexing to distribute the signal and the local oscillator to the various detectors while minimizing the need for path stabilization, is proposed and analyzed. It is shown that this Kennedy receiver can surpass the sensitivity of an ideal homodyne receiver by more than 0.8 dB for QPSK signals for Bit Error Rates used in standard communications. The performance of the QPSK receiver is analyzed in detail with the systemic impairments that would be expected in a real system, including imperfect detectors, phase noise, amplitude noise, polarization-related noise, and optical noise. It is shown that the use of photon-number resolving detectors in the receiver helps mitigate the effects of the impairments, and allow the Kennedy receiver for QPSK to operate at error rates lower than an ideal homodyne receiver even in the presence of impairments. Dolinar's receiver for binary signals is extended to M-ary PSK, showing that feedforward receivers can approach Helstroms bound, far exceeding the sensitivity of a homodyne receiver. Finally, the performance of the extended Dolinar receiver is considered in the presence of impairments, showing that it may be possible to implement a receiver that surpasses the sensitivity of a homodyne receiver using available optical components.

Kosloski, Jon T.

129

Analysis of Rapidly Developing Fog at the Kennedy Space Center.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report documents fog precursors and fog climatology at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Florida from 1986 to 1990. The major emphasis of this report focuses on rapidly developing fog events that would affect the less than 7-statute mile visibility rule for...

M. M. Wheeler M. K. Atchison R. Schumann G. E. Taylor A. Yersavich

1994-01-01

130

77 FR 43805 - Gull Hazard Reduction Program at John F. Kennedy International Airport; Record of Decision  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...APHIS-2006-0035] Gull Hazard Reduction Program at John F. Kennedy International Airport; Record...for the Gull Hazard Reduction Program at John F. Kennedy International Airport. DATES...populations and land uses in and around the John F. Kennedy International Airport....

2012-07-26

131

History of Reliability and Quality Assurance at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This Kennedy Historical Document (KHD) provides a unique historical perspective of the organizational and functional responsibilities for the manned and un-manned programs at Kennedy Space Center, Florida. As systems become more complex and hazardous, the attention to detailed planning and execution continues to be a challenge. The need for a robust reliability and quality assurance program will always be a necessity to ensure mission success. As new space missions are defined and technology allows for continued access to space, these programs cannot be compromised. The organizational structure that has provided the reliability and quality assurance functions for both the manned and unmanned programs has seen many changes since the first group came to Florida in the 1950's. The roles of government and contractor personnel have changed with each program and organizational alignment has changed based on that responsibility. The organizational alignment of the personnel performing these functions must ensure independent assessment of the processes.

Childers, Frank M.

2004-01-01

132

Birds of Swale Marshes on John F. Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Birds were surveyed in several isolated freshwater wetlands on John F. Kennedy Space Center to determine species composition and the importance of these wet- lands to birds. The Red-winged Blackbird and Green-backed Heron were the two most abundant breeders in the swale marshes. The Common Yellowthroat was the most common winter resident but was rare in summer. These marshes are important features within landscapes dominated by uplands particularly because of their significance to amphibians and reptiles.

Breininger, David R.

1992-01-01

133

Child's Letter to President John F. Kennedy about Physical Fitness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

On March 3, 1963, nine-year-old Jack Chase of Torrance, California, wrote a letter to President John F. Kennedy. In his single-page note, featured in this article, Jack described his plans for staying physically fit. He said he would walk to school, the store, and the library "because I know a strong boy makes a strong man and a strong man makes a…

McNatt, Missy

2009-01-01

134

Kennedy and Shepard in Washington D.C.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

President John F. Kennedy congratulates astronaut Alan B. Shepard, Jr., the first American in space, on his historic May 5th, 1961 ride in the Freedom 7 spacecraft and presents him with the NASA Distinguished Service Award. The ceremony took place on the White House lawn. Shepard's wife, Louise (left in white dress and hat), and his mother were in attendance as well as the other six Mercury astronauts and NASA officals, some visible in the background.

1961-01-01

135

A Kennedy-Thorndike experiment using LLR data  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have analyzed data from Lunar Laser Ranging to determine the combination \\/vb?1??0?1\\/vb of Robertson-Mansouri-Sexl parameters of special relativity. In such a Kennedy-Thorndike experiments we obtained a realistic upper limit for this combination of 1.5 × 10?4 only a factor of two or so worse than that obtained with modern laser techniques in the laboratory.

J. Müller; M. H. Soffel

1995-01-01

136

Corrosion Activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report documents summer faculty fellow efforts in the corrosion test bed at the NASA Kennedy Space Center. During the summer of 2002 efforts were concentrated on three activities: a short course on corrosion control for KSC personnel, evaluation of commercial wash additives used for corrosion control on Army aircraft, and improvements in the testing of a new cathodic protection system under development at KSC.

Heidersbach, Robert H.

2002-01-01

137

A Kennedy-Thorndike experiment using LLR data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have analyzed data from Lunar Laser Ranging to determine the combination / vb?1- ?0-1/ vb of Robertson-Mansouri-Sexl parameters of special relativity. In such a Kennedy-Thorndike experiments we obtained a realistic upper limit for this combination of 1.5 × 10 -4 only a factor of two or so worse than that obtained with modern laser techniques in the laboratory.

Müller, J.; Soffel, M. H.

1995-02-01

138

System Engineering Processes at Kennedy Space Center for Development of SLS and Orion Launch Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

There are over 40 subsystems being developed for the future SLS and Orion Launch Systems at Kennedy Space Center. These subsystems are developed at the Kennedy Space Center Engineering Directorate. The Engineering Directorate at Kennedy Space Center follows a comprehensive design process which requires several different product deliverables during each phase of each of the subsystems. This Presentation describes this process with examples of where the process has been applied.

Schafer, Eric; Stambolian, Damon; Henderson, Gena

2013-01-01

139

University of Florida lightning research at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A variety of basic and applied research programs are being conducted at the Kennedy Space Center. As an example of this research, the paper describes the University of Florida program to characterize the electric and magnetic fields of lightning and the coupling of those fields to utility power lines. Specifically, detailed consideration is given to the measurements of horizontal and vertical electric fields made during the previous three summers at KSC and the simultaneous measurements of the voltages on a 500 m test line made during the past two summers at KSC. Theory to support these measurements is also presented.

Uman, Martin A.; Thomson, Ewen M.

1987-01-01

140

Climate of the Kennedy Space Center and vicinity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Climate plays a large role in determining the biota of a region. Summary data are presented for climate variables of ecological importance including precipitation, temperature, evapotranspiration, wind, isolation, lightning, and humidity. The John F. Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, and surrounding area are sampled intensively for climatic conditions; data are presented for the barrier island, Merritt Island, and the mainland, which represents the range of conditions in the local area. Climatic figures, database listings, and historic data (pre-1931) are presented in the appendix.

Mailander, Joseph L.

1990-01-01

141

Kennedy Axis V: Clinimetric properties assessed by mental health nurses.  

PubMed

The Kennedy Axis V is a routine outcome measurement instrument which can assist the assessment of the short-term risk for violence and other adverse patient outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the interrater reliability and clinical utility of the instrument when used by mental health nurses in daily care of patients with mental illness. This cross-sectional study was conducted in inpatient and outpatient adult psychiatric care units and in one adolescent inpatient unit at a university hospital in the Netherlands. Interrater reliability was measured based on the independent scores of two different nurses for the same patients. The clinical utility of the instrument was evaluated by means of a clinical utility questionnaire. To gain a deeper understanding of rating difficulties at the adolescent unit, additional data were collected in two focus group interviews. The overall results revealed a substantial level of agreement between nurses (intraclass correlation coefficient and Pearson 0.79). Some rating challenges were identified, including difficulties with scoring the instrument and using tailor-made interventions related to the scores. These challenges can be resolved using refined training and implementation strategies. When the Kennedy Axis V is accompanied by a solid implementation strategy in adult mental health care, the instrument can be used for short-term risk assessment and thereby contribute in efforts to reduce violence, suicide, self-harm, severe self-neglect, and enhanced objectivity in clinical decision-making. PMID:23211020

Faay, Margo D M; van de Sande, Roland; Gooskens, Floor; Hafsteinsdóttir, Thóra B

2013-10-01

142

Discovery: Under the Microscope at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA) is known for discovery, exploration, and advancement of knowledge. Since the days of Leeuwenhoek, microscopy has been at the forefront of discovery and knowledge. No truer is that statement than today at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), where microscopy plays a major role in contamination identification and is an integral part of failure analysis. Space exploration involves flight hardware undergoing rigorous "visually clean" inspections at every step of processing. The unknown contaminants that are discovered on these inspections can directly impact the mission by decreasing performance of sensors and scientific detectors on spacecraft and satellites, acting as micrometeorites, damaging critical sealing surfaces, and causing hazards to the crew of manned missions. This talk will discuss how microscopy has played a major role in all aspects of space port operations at KSC. Case studies will highlight years of analysis at the Materials Science Division including facility and payload contamination for the Navigation Signal Timing and Ranging Global Positioning Satellites (NA VST AR GPS) missions, quality control monitoring of monomethyl hydrazine fuel procurement for launch vehicle operations, Shuttle Solids Rocket Booster (SRB) foam processing failure analysis, and Space Shuttle Main Engine Cut-off (ECO) flight sensor anomaly analysis. What I hope to share with my fellow microscopists is some of the excitement of microscopy and how its discoveries has led to hardware processing, that has helped enable the successful launch of vehicles and space flight missions here at Kennedy Space Center.

Howard, Philip M.

2013-01-01

143

A Biography of John F. Kennedy: The 35th President of the United States.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This teaching guide consists of a biography of the 35th President of the United States, John Fitzgerald Kennedy, as well as a set of five worksheets to accompany the biography. The worksheets, which are based on the reading, are intended to help students in grades 3-5 reinforce their knowledge of the life and presidency of John Kennedy, while at…

Weidman, Lisa Menendez; Shea, Ellen

144

Moral leadership in civil rights: An evaluation of John F. Kennedy  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the early 1960s, national attention began to be focused on the civil rights struggle in the United States. The freedom rides, sit?ins, and the 1963 march on Washington forced the issue of human rights into the public consciousness in an unprecedented way. Several of John F. Kennedy's critics maintain that Kennedy did not serve as a moral leader in

Robert E. Gilbert

1989-01-01

145

John F. Kennedy and Constitutionalism, Democracy and Human Rights in Latin America: Promise and Performance.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Summarizes the sometimes confusing and contradictory efforts of the John F. Kennedy administration to encourage the development of democratic political processes in Latin America. Although sincere, Kennedy's efforts often were stymied by resistance from the local power structure and his own Central Intelligence Agency. Eventually, anti-communist…

Rabe, Stephen G.

1995-01-01

146

A case of Foster Kennedy syndrome without frontal lobe or anterior cranial fossa involvement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Foster Kennedy syndrome is a very rare syndrome which includes ipsilateral optic atrophy and central scotoma, anosmia, contralateral papilledema, and, occasionally, ipsilateral proptosis. A large frontal lobe, olfactory groove, or medial third sphenoidal wing tumor, usually a meningioma, creates this syndrome. In this report, the author presents a case of metastastic cerebral tumor with Foster Kennedy syndrome but without frontal

Ahmet Yildizhan

1992-01-01

147

Handmaids' Tales of Washington Power: The Abject and the Real Kennedy White House  

Microsoft Academic Search

A considerable amount of academic attention has been paid to John Kennedy and to his group of advisors during the Cuban missile crisis. Next to no attention has been accorded other bodies of the Kennedy White House that had daily access to a President's most private moments and possibly to his important deliberations. Drawing on Richard Reeves' account of President

CHRISTINE SYLVESTER

1998-01-01

148

System Engineering Processes at Kennedy Space Center for Development of the SLS and Orion Launch Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

There are over 40 subsystems being developed for the future SLS and Orion Launch Systems at Kennedy Space Center. These subsystems developed at the Kennedy Space Center Engineering Directorate follow a comprehensive design process which requires several different product deliverables during each phase of each of the subsystems. This Paper describes this process and gives an example of where the process has been applied.

Schafer, Eric J.

2012-01-01

149

75 FR 34643 - Atlantic Ocean Off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; Restricted Area  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Corps of Engineers 33 CFR Part 334 Atlantic Ocean Off John F. Kennedy Space Center...establishing a new restricted area in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of the John F...read as follows: Sec. 334.525 Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space...

2010-06-18

150

75 FR 8570 - Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; Restricted Area  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Corps of Engineers 33 CFR Part 334 Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center...establish a new restricted area in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of the John F...read as follows: Sec. 334.525 Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space...

2010-02-25

151

77 FR 32652 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH,...

2012-06-01

152

75 FR 78717 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Initial Review...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development, 6100...

2010-12-16

153

75 FR 35077 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Initial Review...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 6100...

2010-06-21

154

78 FR 69857 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to...NCMRR, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute, of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, DHHS, 6100...

2013-11-21

155

78 FR 13363 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Initial Review...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health And Human Development, NIH,...

2013-02-27

156

Lightning Protection and Instrumentation at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lightning is a natural phenomenon, but can be dangerous. Prevention of lightning is a physical impossibility and total protection requires compromises on costs and effects, therefore prediction and measurements of the effects that might be produced by iightn:ing is a most at locat:ions where people or sensitive systems and equipment are exposed. This is the case of the launching pads for the Space Shuttle at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. This report summarizes lightring phenomena with a brief explanation of lightning generation and lightning activity as related to KSC. An analysis of the instrumentation used at the launching pads for measurements of lightning effects with alternatives to improve the protection system and up-grade the actual instrumentation system is indicated.

Colon, Jose L.

2005-01-01

157

Applications of Meteorological Tower Data at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Members of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) design and operation communities rely on meteorological information collected at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), located near Cape Canaveral, Florida, to correctly apply the ambient environment to various tasks. The Natural Environments Branch/EV44, located at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, is responsible for providing its NASA customers with meteorological data using various climatological data sources including balloons, surface stations, aircraft, hindcast models, and meteorological towers. Of the many resources available within the KSC region, meteorological towers are preferred for near-surface applications because they record data at regular, frequent intervals over an extensive period of record at a single location. This paper discusses the uses of data measured at several different meteorological towers for a common period of record and how the data can be applied to various engineering decisions for the new Constellation Program Ares and Orion space vehicles.

Altino, Karen M.; Barbre, Robert E., Jr.

2009-01-01

158

Kennedy's Biomedical Laboratory Makes Multi-Tasking Look Easy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

If it is one thing that Florida has in abundance, it is sunshine and with that sunshine heat and humidity. For workers at the Kennedy Space Center that have to work outside in the heat and humidity, heat exhaustion/stroke is a real possibility. It might help people to know that Kennedy's Biomedical Laboratory has been testing some new Koolvests(Trademark) that can be worn underneath SCAPE suits. They have also been working on how to block out high noise levels; in fact, Don Doerr, chief of the Biomedical Lab, says, "The most enjoyable aspect is knowing that the Biomedical Lab and the skills of its employees have been used to support safe space flight, not only for the astronaut flight crew, but just as important for the ground processing personnel as well." The NASA Biomedical Laboratory has existed in the John F. Kennedy's Operations and Checkout Building since the Apollo Program. The primary mission of this laboratory has been the biomedical support to major, manned space programs that have included Apollo, Apollo-Soyuz, Skylab, and Shuttle. In this mission, the laboratory has been responsible in accomplishing much of the technical design, planning, provision, fabrication, and maintenance of flight and ground biomedical monitoring instrumentation. This includes the electronics in the launch flight suit and similar instrumentation systems in the spacecraft. (Note: The Lab checked out the system for STS-128 at Pad A using Firing room 4 and ground support equipment in the lab.) During Apollo, there were six engineers and ten technicians in the facility. This has evolved today to two NASA engineers and two NASA technicians, a Life Science Support contract physiologist and part-time support from an LSSC nurse and physician. Over the years, the lab has enjoyed collaboration with outside agencies and investigators. These have included on-site support to the Ames Research Center bed rest studies (seven years) and the European Space Agency studies in Toulouse, France (two years). The lab has also actively collaborated with the US Army Institute for Surgical Research, the USAF School of Aerospace Medicine, and the USN Naval Experimental Diving Unit. Because the lab often evaluates various forms of commercial-off-the-shelf life support equipment, the laboratory works closely with private companies, both domestic and foreign. The European companies seem to be more proactive and participatory with the advancement of personal protective equipment. Because these companies have viewed the space program's unique need for advanced forms of personal protective equipment, some have responded with new designs based on the prediction that these advances will soon find markets in the commercial sector. Using much of the same skills and equipment, the laboratory also addresses physiological testing of humans by supporting flight experiments and personnel involved with ground processing. While Johnson Space Center is primarily responsible for flight experiments, the Kennedy's Biomedical Lab provides the local support. However, as stated above, there are many challenges facing KSC workers that gain the attention of this lab in the measurement of the problem and the selection and testing of countermeasures. These include respiratory protection, whole body suits, hearing protection and heat stress, among many others.

Dunn, Carol Anne

2009-01-01

159

Aircraft measurements of electrified clouds at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The space-vehicle launch commit criteria for weather and atmospheric electrical conditions in us at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy Space Center (KSC) have been made restrictive because of the past difficulties that have arisen when space vehicles have triggered lightning discharge after their launch during cloudy weather. With the present ground-base instrumentation and our limited knowledge of cloud electrification process over this region of Florida, it has not been possible to provide a quantitative index of safe launching conditions. During the fall of 1988, a Schweizer 845 airplane equipped to measure electric field and other meteorological parameters flew over KSC in a program to study clouds defined in the existing launch restriction criteria. All aspects of this program are addressed including planning, method, and results. A case study on the November 4, 1988 flight is also presented.

Jones, J. J.; Winn, W. P.; Hunyady, S. J.; Moore, C. B.; Bullock, J. W.

1990-01-01

160

John F. Kennedy Space Center's Chemochromic Hypergol Sensors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) seeks partne rs interested in the commercial application of the Chemochromic Hyper gol Sensors technology. NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is soliciti ng licensees for this innovative technology. The Chemochromic Hypergo l Sensors technology consists of chemochromic pigments incorporated i nto various matrices (e.g., tapes, sheets, injection molded parts, fi bers). When placed near strategic locations such as piping and contai ner valves, seams, and joints, these sensors provide an instantaneous , distinct color change from yellow to black indicating the presence of hypergols at the leak location. The chemochromic pigments can be incorporated into fibers used to make fabrics for personal protective equipment as well as into badge holders for use as a point leak detector. These affordable, easily replaceable sensors provide the capabil ity to visually monitor leak-prone locations and personnel working i n those areas on a continuous basis for the presence of dangerous hyp ergols.

Nichols, James D.

2012-01-01

161

Energy Management Programs at the John F. Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Energy Management internship over the summer of 2011 involved a series of projects related to energy management on the John. F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This internship saved KSC $14.3 million through budgetary projections, saved KSC $400,000 through implementation of the recycling program, updated KSC Environmental Management System's (EMS) water and energy-related List of Requirements (LoR) which changed 25.7% of the list, provided a incorporated a 45% design review of the Ordnance Operations Facility (OOF) which noted six errors within the design plans, created a certification system and timeline for implementation regarding compliance to the federal Guiding Principles, and gave off-shore wind as the preferred alternative to on-site renewable energy generation.

Huang, Jeffrey H.

2011-01-01

162

Pseudo-Foster Kennedy Syndrome due to unilateral optic nerve hypoplasia: a case report  

PubMed Central

Introduction Pseudo-Foster Kennedy Syndrome is described as unilateral optic disc swelling with contralateral optic atrophy in the absence of an intracranial mass causing compression of the optic nerve. This occurs typically due to bilateral sequential optic neuritis or ischaemic optic neuropathy. Case Presentation We describe a case of pseudo-Foster Kennedy Syndrome in a two year old boy with unilateral papilloedema due to a congenital optic disc anomaly in one eye preventing transmission of raised intracranial pressure to the optic nerve. Conclusion From our findings we conclude that congenital optic nerve hypoplasia is a cause of pseudo-Foster Kennedy Syndrome.

Bansal, Shveta; Dabbs, Timothy; Long, Vernon

2008-01-01

163

Internship at NASA Kennedy Space Center's Cryogenic Test laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is known for hosting all of the United States manned rocket launches as well as many unmanned launches at low inclinations. Even though the Space Shuttle recently retired, they are continuing to support unmanned launches and modifying manned launch facilities. Before a rocket can be launched, it has to go through months of preparation, called processing. Pieces of a rocket and its payload may come in from anywhere in the nation or even the world. The facilities all around the center help integrate the rocket and prepare it for launch. As NASA prepares for the Space Launch System, a rocket designed to take astronauts beyond Low Earth Orbit throughout the solar system, technology development is crucial for enhancing launch capabilities at the KSC. The Cryogenics Test Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center greatly contributes to cryogenic research and technology development. The engineers and technicians that work there come up with new ways to efficiently store and transfer liquid cryogens. NASA has a great need for this research and technology development as it deals with cryogenic liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen for rocket fuel, as well as long term space flight applications. Additionally, in this new era of space exploration, the Cryogenics Test Laboratory works with the commercial sector. One technology development project is the Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) Ground Operations Demonstration Unit (GODU). LH2 GODU intends to demonstrate increased efficiency in storing and transferring liquid hydrogen during processing, loading, launch and spaceflight of a spacecraft. During the Shuttle Program, only 55% of hydrogen purchased was used by the Space Shuttle Main Engines. GODU's goal is to demonstrate that this percentage can be increased to 75%. Figure 2 shows the GODU layout when I concluded my internship. The site will include a 33,000 gallon hydrogen tank (shown in cyan) with a heat exchanger inside the hydrogen tank attached to a refrigerator capable of removing 850 Watts at 20 Kelvin (shown in green). The refrigerator and most of its supporting equipment will be kept in a standard shipping container (shown in pink). Currently, GODU is in the fabrication process and some of the large components have already been purchased.

Holland, Katherine

2013-01-01

164

PRESIDENT KENNEDY IS BRIEFED BY ASTRONAUT WALTER SCHIRRA AT COMPLEX 14 DURING TOUR OF CAPE CANAVERAL  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

President John F. Kennedy is briefed by Astronaut Walter Schirra at Complex 14. The full MA-8 configuration that Schirra is scheduled to fly, a six-orbit mission, was displayed to the President, Vice President and Space Committee.

1962-01-01

165

78 FR 6127 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...National Institutes of Health, 5635 Fishers Lane Conference Center, Rockville, MD 20852. Contact Person: Kate Winseck, MSW, Executive Secretary, National Children's Study, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human...

2013-01-29

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77 FR 16845 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting  

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2012-03-22

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77 FR 59199 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting  

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2012-09-26

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76 FR 59415 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting  

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2011-09-26

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77 FR 37424 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting  

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2012-06-21

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76 FR 77544 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting  

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2011-12-13

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76 FR 15330 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting  

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2011-03-21

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75 FR 9910 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

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2010-03-04

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2010-03-15

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77 FR 37421 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

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2012-06-21

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75 FR 49500 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

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2010-08-13

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2010-02-03

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2013-03-06

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77 FR 27471 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development Notice of Closed...  

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2012-05-10

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75 FR 31799 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

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2010-06-04

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76 FR 15330 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

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2011-03-21

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75 FR 71449 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

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2010-11-23

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76 FR 63932 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

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2011-10-14

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76 FR 20694 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

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2011-04-13

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76 FR 55076 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development Notice of Meeting  

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2011-09-06

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2010-03-04

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2012-03-02

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2012-03-08

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2012-01-11

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2013-05-10

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2013-03-28

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2013-07-05

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2010-12-27

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2012-09-24

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2012-07-05

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2011-07-11

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2011-08-16

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2011-05-05

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2010-03-15

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77 FR 76057 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD); Notice of...  

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2012-12-26

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75 FR 52763 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting  

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2010-08-27

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2011-07-11

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2011-06-24

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2012-05-18

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2010-04-22

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2013-08-19

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75 FR 8974 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

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2010-02-26

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78 FR 37233 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute Of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

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2013-06-20

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2012-03-23

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77 FR 52338 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD); Notice of...  

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2012-08-29

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78 FR 37232 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting  

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2013-06-20

211

Who Guards the Guardians? Ian Kennedy, Bioethics and the 'Ideology of Accountability' in British Medicine  

PubMed Central

Summary This article charts the history of bioethics in Britain through the work of the academic lawyer Ian Kennedy. From the late 1970s, Kennedy claimed that external oversight, which he termed ‘bioethics’, was needed to make medicine accountable to patients and the public. I believe these arguments provide a window onto the historical factors that generated the demand for bioethics, and help us determine why it became influential in recent decades. I detail how Kennedy's argument resonated with the Conservative enthusiasm for audit and consumer choice in the 1980s. Contrary to traditional portrayals of bioethics as a critique of medicine, I also show that Kennedy promised it would benefit doctors by improving decision making and maintaining public confidence. This analysis reframes bioethics as an important constituent of the ‘audit society’: fulfilling the neo-liberal demand for oversight and the medical demand for legitimacy.

Wilson, Duncan

2012-01-01

212

Relationships between Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors and Serum Ionized Calcium in Kennedy Space Center Cohort.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Kennedy Space Center (KSC) employees are reported to be at high risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). Risk factors for CHD include high serum total cholesterol levels, low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC), elevated triglyceride, smok...

L. A. Goodwin M. A. B. Frey M. P. Merz W. R. Alford

1987-01-01

213

Report of the President's Commission on the Assassination of President John F. Kennedy.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

President Lyndon B. Johnson, by Executive Order No. 11130 dated November 29, 1963, created this Commission to investigate the assassination on November 22, 1963, of John Fitzgerald Kennedy, the 35th President of the United States. The President directed t...

1964-01-01

214

78 FR 11660 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute Of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute Of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis...Review, National Institute of Child Health, and Human Development,...

2013-02-19

215

Metropolitan Aircraft Noise Abatement Policy Study, John F. Kennedy International Airport, New York, New York.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report considers alternative measures, or combinations of measures, to provide relief from aircraft noise in affected communities around John F. Kennedy International Airport, and offers recommendations for reducing aircraft-noise problems. A study wa...

1970-01-01

216

The evolution of electronic tracking, optical, telemetry, and command systems at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A history is presented of the major electronic tracking, optical, telemetry, and command systems used at ETR in support of Apollo-Saturn and its forerunner vehicles launched under the jurisdiction of the Kennedy Space Center and its forerunner organizations.

Mcmurran, W. R. (editor)

1973-01-01

217

Shaping NASA's Kennedy Space Center Safety for the Future  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

With the completion of the Space Shuttle Program, the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) safety function will be required to evolve beyond the single launch vehicle launch site focus that has held prominence for almost fifty years. This paper will discuss how that evolution is taking place. Specifically, we will discuss the future of safety as it relates to a site that will have multiple, very disparate, functions. These functions will include new business; KSC facilities not under the control of NASA; traditional payload and launch vehicle processing; and, operations conducted by NASA personnel, NASA contractors or a combination of both. A key element in this process is the adaptation of the current KSC set of safety requirements into a multi-faceted set that can address each of the functions above, while maintaining our world class safety environment. One of the biggest challenges that will be addressed is how to protect our personnel and property without dictating how other Non-NASA organizations protect their own employees and property. The past history of KSC Safety will be described and how the lessons learned from previous programs will be applied to the future. The lessons learned from this process will also be discussed as information for other locations that may undergo such a transformation.

Kirkpatrick, Paul; McDaniel, Laura; Smith, Maynette

2011-01-01

218

Oceanic Storm Characteristics Off the Kennedy Space Center Coast  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Natural cloud-to-ground lightning may behave differently depending on the characteristics of the attachment mediums, including the peak current (inferred from radiation fields) and the number of ground strike locations per flash. Existing literature has raised issues over the yea"rs on the behavior of lightning over ocean terrain and these phenomena are not yet well understood. To investigate lightning characteristics over differing terrain we will obtain identical observations over adjacent land and ocean regions during both clear air and thunderstorm periods comparing the electric field behavior over these various terrains. For this, a 3-meter NOAA buoy moored 20NM off the coast of the Kennedy Space Center was instrumented with an electric field mill and New Mexico Tech's slow antenna to measure the electric fields aloft and compared to the existing on-shore electric field mill suite of 31 sensors and a coastal slow antenna. New Mexico Tech's Lightning Mapping Array and the Eastern Range Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System, along with the network of high-speed cameras being used to capture cloud-to-ground lightning strikes over the terrain regions to identify a valid data set and verify the electric fields. This is an on-going project with the potential for significant impact on the determination of lightning risk to objects on the ground. This presentation will provide results and instrumentation progress to date.

Wilson, J.; Simpson, A. A.; Cummins, K. L.; Kiriazes, J. J.; Brown, R. G.; Mata, C. T.

2014-01-01

219

Constitutive Soil Properties for Mason Sand and Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Accurate soil models are required for numerical simulations of land landings for the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). This report provides constitutive material models for two soil conditions at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and four conditions of Mason Sand. The Mason Sand is the test sand for LaRC s drop tests and swing tests of the Orion. The soil models are based on mechanical and compressive behavior observed during geotechnical laboratory testing of remolded soil samples. The test specimens were reconstituted to measured in situ density and moisture content. Tests included: triaxial compression, hydrostatic compression, and uniaxial strain. A fit to the triaxial test results defines the strength envelope. Hydrostatic and uniaxial tests define the compressibility. The constitutive properties are presented in the format of LSDYNA Material Model 5: Soil and Foam. However, the laboratory test data provided can be used to construct other material models. The soil models are intended to be specific to the soil conditions they were tested at. The two KSC models represent two conditions at KSC: low density dry sand and high density in-situ moisture sand. The Mason Sand model was tested at four conditions which encompass measured conditions at LaRC s drop test site.

Thomas, Michael A.; Chitty, Daniel E.

2011-01-01

220

Constitutive Soil Properties for Unwashed Sand and Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Accurate soil models are required for numerical simulations of land landings for the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle. This report provides constitutive material models for one soil, unwashed sand, from NASA Langley's gantry drop test facility and three soils from Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The four soil models are based on mechanical and compressive behavior observed during geotechnical laboratory testing of remolded soil samples. The test specimens were reconstituted to measured in situ density and moisture content. Tests included: triaxial compression, hydrostatic compression, and uniaxial strain. A fit to the triaxial test results defines the strength envelope. Hydrostatic and uniaxial tests define the compressibility. The constitutive properties are presented in the format of LS-DYNA Material Model 5: Soil and Foam. However, the laboratory test data provided can be used to construct other material models. The four soil models are intended to be specific to the soil conditions discussed in the report. The unwashed sand model represents clayey sand at high density. The KSC models represent three distinct coastal sand conditions: low density dry sand, high density in-situ moisture sand, and high density flooded sand. It is possible to approximate other sands with these models, but the results would be unverified without geotechnical tests to confirm similar soil behavior.

Thomas, Michael A.; Chitty, Daniel E.; Gildea, Martin L.; T'Kindt, Casey M.

2008-01-01

221

Restoration and analysis of amateur movies from the Kennedy assassination  

SciTech Connect

Much of the evidence concerning the assassination of President Kennedy comes from amateur movies of the presidential motorcade. Two of the most revealing movies are those taken by the photographers Zapruder and Nix. Approximately 180 frames of the Zapruder film clearly show the general relation of persons in the presidential limousine. Many of the frames of interest were blurred by focus problems or by linear motion. The method of cepstral analysis was used to quantitatively measure the blur, followed by maximum a posteriori (MAP) restoration. Descriptions of these methods, complete with before-and-after examples from selected frames are given. The frames were then available for studies of facial expressions, hand motions, etc. Numerous allegations charge that multiple gunmen played a role in an assassination plot. Multispectral analyses, adapted from studies of satellite imagery, show no evidence of an alleged rifle in the Zapruder film. Lastly, frame-averaging is used to reduce the noise in the Nix movie prior to MAP restoration. The restoration of the reduced-noise average frame more clearly shows that at least one of the alleged gunmen is only the light-and-shadow pattern beneath the trees.

Breedlove, J.R.; Cannon, T.M.; Janney, D.H.; Kruger, R.P.; Trussell, H.J.

1980-01-01

222

A Kennedy Space Center implementation of IEEE 1451  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To meet the demand for more reliable sensory data, longer sensor calibration cycles, and more useful information for operators at NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC), NASA's Instrumentation Branch and ASRC's Advanced Electronics and Technology Development Laboratory at the KSC are developing custom intelligent sensors based on the IEEE 1451 family of smart-sensor standards. The KSC intelligent sensors are known as Smart Networked Elements (SNEs), and each SNE includes transducers and their associated Transducer Electronic Data Sheets (TEDS), signal conditioning, analog-to-digital conversion, software algorithms for performing health checks on the data, and a network connection for sending data to other SNEs and higher-level systems. The development of the SNE has led to the definition of custom architectures, protocols, IEEE 1451 implementations, and TEDS, which are presented in this paper. The IEEE 1451 standards describe the architecture, message formats, software objects, and communication protocols within the smart sensor. Because of the standard's complexity, KSC has simplified the IEEE 1451 architecture and narrowed the scope of software objects to be included in the SNE to create a "light" IEEE 1451 implementation, and has used the manufacturer-defined TEDS to customize the SNE with health indicators. Furthermore, KSC has developed a protocol that allows the SNEs to communicate over an Ethernet network while reducing bandwidth requirements.

Oostdyk, Rebecca; Mata, Carlos T.; Perotti, José M.; Lucena, Angel R.; Mullenix, Pamela

2006-06-01

223

Industrial Engineering Lifts Off at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

When the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) began the Space Shuttle Program, it did not have an established industrial engineering (IE) capability for several probable reasons. For example, it was easy for some managers to dismiss IE principles as being inapplicable at NASA's John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC). When NASA was formed by the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958, most industrial engineers worked in more traditional factory environments. The primary emphasis early in the shuttle program, and during previous human space flight programs such as Mercury and Apollo, was on technical accomplishments. Industrial engineering is sometimes difficult to explain in NASA's highly technical culture. IE is different in many ways from other engineering disciplines because it is devoted to process management and improvement, rather than product design. Images of clipboards and stopwatches still come to the minds of many people when the term industrial engineering is mentioned. The discipline of IE has only recently begun to gain acceptance and understanding in NASA. From an IE perspective today, the facilities used for flight hardware processing at KSC are NASA's premier factories. The products of these factories are among the most spectacular in the world: safe and successful launches of shuttles and expendable vehicles that carry tremendous payloads into space.

Barth, Tim

1998-01-01

224

A case of Foster Kennedy syndrome without frontal lobe or anterior cranial fossa involvement.  

PubMed

Foster Kennedy syndrome is a very rare syndrome which includes ipsilateral optic atrophy and central scotoma, anosmia, contralateral papilledema, and, occasionally, ipsilateral proptosis. A large frontal lobe, olfactory groove, or medial third sphenoidal wing tumor, usually a meningioma, creates this syndrome. In this report, the author presents a case of metastatic cerebral tumor with Foster Kennedy syndrome but without frontal lobe or anterior cranial fossa involvement. PMID:1635628

Yildizhan, A

1992-01-01

225

After nineteen years, the last trove of secret Kennedy tapes is released to the public  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

New Air Force One tapes give insight on Kennedy deathhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-16821363Last of secret Kennedy tapes releasedhttp://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-kennedy-tapes-20120125,0,6198450.storyPost JFK Assassination Air Force One Flight Deck Recordinghttp://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/GPO-NARA-JFK-ASSASSINATION-AUDIO/content-detail.htmlThe President John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Collectionhttp://www.archives.gov/research/jfk/The National Security Archive: The Cuban Missile Crisis, 1962: Audio Clips (iTunes)http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/nsa/cuba_mis_cri/audio.htmJFK 50 Years: Celebrate the past to awaken the futurehttp://www.jfk50.org/In the last three months of his presidency, John F. Kennedy dedicated a dam in Heber Springs, Arkansas, signed the Partial Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, and spoke with his advisers about the War on Poverty preparations for 1964. During this period, many hours of tapes secretly recorded Kennedy's interactions with his advisers, his family, and others, on a variety of topics including domestic policy and the space race. The John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum in Boston has reviewed and released over 248 hours of taped meetings and 12 hours of phone conversation since 1993. Not until this past week, however, were the final 45 hours of tapes from the final months of Kennedy's presidency released. Many historians and members of the public have been eagerly waiting to listen to them. Those who have heard the tapes thus far have remarked that the tapes demonstrate Kennedy's facility with a wide array of policy concerns. In one session, after hearing vastly different stories from top aides who had traveled to South Vietnam to assess the country, Kennedy remarks, "You both went to the same country?" The last meeting was taped on November 20th, 1963, two days before he was assassinated in Dallas.The first link takes visitors to a piece from this Tuesday's BBC News about the tapes that document the minutes on Air Force One immediately after President Kennedy's assassination. The second link leads to a Los Angeles Times article from last Tuesday, which discusses a larger selection of tapes. The third link leads to the previously mentioned Air Force One audio tape that was released this week. Moving on, the fourth link whisks users away to the President John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Collection, which is maintained by the National Archives. First-time visitors to the Collection page should start by perusing the FAQ area, as it is quite helpful. The fifth link takes interested parties to the very well-known and fascinating audio tapes of President Kennedy talking about the Cuban Missile Crisis with Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara, Secretary of State Dean Rusk, and his brother, Attorney General Robert Kennedy. The last link leads to a great site celebrating the 50th anniversary of President Kennedy's inauguration and his legacy in the arenas of foreign diplomacy, the arts, and civil rights.

Grinnell, Max

2012-02-03

226

Oceanic Storm Characteristics off the Kennedy Space Center Coast  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Natural cloud-to-ground lightning may behave differently depending on the characteristics of the attachment mediums, including the peak current (inferred from radiation fields) and the number of ground strike locations per flash. Existing literature has raised questions over the years on these characteristics of lightning over oceans, and the behaviors are not yet well understood. To investigate this we will obtain identical electric field observations over adjacent land and ocean regions during both clear air and thunderstorm periods. Oceanic observations will be obtained using a 3-meter NOAA buoy that has been instrumented with a Campbell Scientific electric field mill and New Mexico Techs slow antenna, to measure the electric fields aloft. We are currently obtaining measurements from this system on-shore at the Florida coast, to calibrate and better understand the behavior of the system in elevated-field environments. Sometime during winter 2013, this system will be moored 20NM off the coast of the Kennedy Space Center. Measurements from this system will be compared to the existing on-shore electric field mill suite of 31 sensors and a coastal slow antenna. Supporting observations will be provided by New Mexico Techs Lightning Mapping Array, the Eastern Range Cloud to Ground Lightning Surveillance System, and the National Lightning Detection Network. An existing network of high-speed cameras will be used to capture cloud-to-ground lightning strikes over the terrain regions to identify a valid data set for analysis. This on-going project will demonstrate the value of off-shore electric field measurements for safety-related decision making at KSC, and may improve our understanding of relative lightning risk to objects on the ground vs. ocean. This presentation will provide an overview of this new instrumentation, and a summary of our progress to date.

Wilson, J. G.; Simpson, A. A.; Cummins, K. L.; Kiriazes, J. J.; Brown, R. G.; Mata, C. T.

2014-01-01

227

Kennedy Space Center Cardiovascular Disease Risk Reduction Program evaluation.  

PubMed

This program evaluation examined the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) Risk Reduction Program which aims to identify CVD risk factors and reduce these risk factors through health education phone counseling. High risk participants (those having two or more elevated lipid values) are identified from monthly voluntary CVD screenings and counseled. Phone counseling consists of reviewing lab values with the participant, discussing dietary fat intake frequency using an intake questionnaire, and promoting the increase in exercise frequency. The participants are followed-up at two-months and five-months for relevant metrics including blood pressure, weight, body mass index (BMI), total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, dietary fat intake, and exercise frequency. Data for three years of the KSC CVD Program included 366 participants, average age of 49 years, 75% male, and 25% female. For those with complete two and five month follow-up data, significant baseline to two-month follow-up comparisons included decreases in systolic blood pressure (p = 0.03); diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.002); total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and dietary fat intake (all three at p < 0.0001) as well as a significant increase in exercise frequency (p = 0.04). Significant baseline to five-month follow-up comparisons included decreases in triglycerides (p = 0.05); and total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and dietary intake (all three at p < 0.0001). These program evaluation results indicate that providing brief phone health education counseling and information at the worksite to high risk CVD participants may impact CVD risk factors. PMID:18561517

Calderon, Kristine S; Smallwood, Charles; Tipton, David A

2008-01-01

228

Kennedy space center cardiovascular disease risk reduction program evaluation  

PubMed Central

This program evaluation examined the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) Risk Reduction Program which aims to identify CVD risk factors and reduce these risk factors through health education phone counseling. High risk participants (those having two or more elevated lipid values) are identified from monthly voluntary CVD screenings and counseled. Phone counseling consists of reviewing lab values with the participant, discussing dietary fat intake frequency using an intake questionnaire, and promoting the increase in exercise frequency. The participants are followed-up at two-months and five-months for relevant metrics including blood pressure, weight, body mass index (BMI), total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, dietary fat intake, and exercise frequency. Data for three years of the KSC CVD Program included 366 participants, average age of 49 years, 75% male, and 25% female. For those with complete two and five month follow-up data, significant baseline to two-month follow-up comparisons included decreases in systolic blood pressure (p = 0.03); diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.002); total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and dietary fat intake (all three at p < 0.0001) as well as a significant increase in exercise frequency (p = 0.04). Significant baseline to five-month follow-up comparisons included decreases in triglycerides (p = 0.05); and total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and dietary intake (all three at p < 0.0001). These program evaluation results indicate that providing brief phone health education counseling and information at the worksite to high risk CVD participants may impact CVD risk factors.

Calderon, Kristine S; Smallwood, Charles; Tipton, David A

2008-01-01

229

Airborne measurements of cloud forming nuclei and aerosol particles at Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results of airborne measurements of the sizes and concentrations of aerosol particles, ice nuclei, and cloud condensation nuclei that were taken at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, are presented along with a detailed description of the instrumentation and measuring capabilities of the University of Washington airborne measuring facility (Douglas B-23). Airborne measurements made at Ft. Collins, Colorado, and Little Rock, Arkansas, during the ferry of the B-23 are presented. The particle concentrations differed significantly between the clean air over Ft. Collins and the hazy air over Little Rock and Kennedy Space Center. The concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei over Kennedy Space Center were typical of polluted eastern seaboard air. Three different instruments were used to measure ice nuclei: one used filters to collect the particles, and the others used optical and acoustical methods to detect ice crystals grown in portable cloud chambers. A comparison of the ice nucleus counts, which are in good agreement, is presented.

Radke, L. F.; Langer, G.; Hindman, E. E., II

1978-01-01

230

Innovative Partnerships Program Accomplishments: 2009-2010 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This document reports on the accomplishments of the Innovative Partnerships Program during the two years of 2009 and 2010. The mission of the Innovative Partnerships Program is to provide leveraged technology alternatives for mission directorates, programs, and projects through joint partnerships with industry, academia, government agencies, and national laboratories. As outlined in this accomplishments summary, the IPP at NASA's Kennedy Space Center achieves this mission via two interdependent goals: (1) Infusion: Bringing external technologies and expertise into Kennedy to benefit NASA missions, programs, and projects (2) Technology Transfer: Spinning out space program technologies to increase the benefits for the nation's economy and humanity

Makufka, David

2010-01-01

231

Trade study: Liquid hydrogen transportation - Kennedy Space Center. [cost and operational effectivenss of shipping methods.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Cryogenic transportation methods for providing liquid hydrogen requirements are examined in support of shuttle transportation system launch operations at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, during the time frames 1982-1991 in terms of cost and operational effectiveness. Transportation methods considered included sixteen different options employing mobile semi-trailer tankers, railcars, barges and combinations of each method. The study concludes that the most effective method of delivering liquid hydrogen from the vendor production facility in New Orleans to Kennedy Space Center includes maximum utilization of existing mobile tankers and railcars supplemented by maximum capacity mobile tankers procured incrementally in accordance with shuttle launch rates actually achieved.

Gray, D. J.

1978-01-01

232

NASA Headquarters/Kennedy Space Center: Organization and Small Spacecraft Launch Services  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objectives of the Kennedy Space Center's (KSC) Expendable Launch Vehicles (ELV) Program are to provide safe, reliable, cost effective ELV launches, maximize customer satisfaction, and perform advanced payload processing capability development. Details are given on the ELV program organization, products and services, foreign launch vehicle policy, how to get a NASA launch service, and some of the recent NASA payloads.

Sierra, Albert; Beddel, Darren

1999-01-01

233

Conceptual metaphor and embodied structures of meaning: A reply to Kennedy and Vervaeke  

Microsoft Academic Search

J. M. Kennedy and J. Vervaeke argue that my view of the bodily and imaginative basis of meaning commits me to a mistaken reductionism and to the erroneous view that metaphors actually impose structure on the target domain. I explain the sense in which image schemas are central to the bodily grounding of meaning, although in a way that is

Mark Johnson

1993-01-01

234

The ethanolamine branch of the Kennedy pathway is essential in the bloodstream form of Trypanosoma brucei  

PubMed Central

Phosphatidylethanolamine (GPEtn), a major phospholipid component of trypanosome membranes, is synthesized de novo from ethanolamine through the Kennedy pathway. Here the composition of the GPEtn molecular species in the bloodstream form of Trypanosoma brucei is determined, along with new insights into phospholipid metabolism, by in vitro and in vivo characterization of a key enzyme of the Kennedy pathway, the cytosolic ethanolamine-phosphate cytidylyltransferase (TbECT). Gene knockout indicates that TbECT is essential for growth and survival, thus highlighting the importance of the Kennedy pathway for the pathogenic stage of the African trypanosome. Phosphatiylserine decarboxylation, a potential salvage pathway, does not appear to be active in cultured bloodstream form T. brucei, and it is not upregulated even when the Kennedy pathway is disrupted. In vivo metabolic labelling and phospholipid composition analysis by ESI-MS/MS of the knockout cells confirmed a significant decrease in GPEtn species, as well as changes in the relative abundance of other phospholipid species. Reduction in GPEtn levels had a profound influence on the morphology of the mutants and it compromised mitochondrial structure and function, as well as glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor biosynthesis. TbECT is therefore genetically validated as a potential drug target against the African trypanosome.

Gibellini, Federica; Hunter, William N; Smith, Terry K

2009-01-01

235

John F. Kennedy National Historic Site General Management Plan Support: Transportation Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The John Fitzgerald Kennedy National Historic Site (JOFI), operated by the National Park Service (NPS) is located in the Town of Brookline, Massachusetts. The site is a three-story, nine-room dwelling (c. 1909) that served as the first family home of Jose...

A. Biton D. Spiller F. Fisher M. Clark

2010-01-01

236

Emergency medical operations at Kennedy Space Center in support of space shuttle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The unique environment of the Kennedy Space Center includes a wide variety of industrial processes culminating in launch and spaceflight. Many are potentially hazardous to the work force and the astronauts. Technology, planning, training, and quality control are utilized to prevent contingencies and expedite response should a contingency occur.

Myers, K. J.; Tipton, D. A.; Woodard, D.; Long, I. D.

1992-01-01

237

Voltage Profile Program for the Kennedy Space Center Electric Power Distribution System.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Kennedy Space Center voltage profile program computes voltages at all busses greater than 1 Kv in the network under various conditions of load. The computation is based upon power flow principles and utilizes a Newton-Raphson iterative load flow algor...

1976-01-01

238

Toward New Human Rights: The Social Policies of the Kennedy and Johnson Administrations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The social programs of the Kennedy and Johnson Administrations which were designed to extend basic rights to all citizens and to develop new social rights for those in need are examined in this book of papers presented at a conference. The initiation and development of the various programs are described and analyzed by scholars and policy makers.…

Warner, David C., Ed.

239

Surface to 90 km winds for Kennedy Space Center, Florida, and Vandenberg AFB, California  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Bivariate normal wind statistics for a 90 degree flight azimuth, from 0 through 90 km altitude, for Kennedy Space Center, Florida, and Vandenberg AFB, California are presented. Wind probability distributions and statistics for any rotation of axes can be computed from the five given parameters.

Johnson, D. L.; Brown, S. C.

1979-01-01

240

Identifying and responding to customer needs at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Patient Questionnaire Program at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has been in place for several years. It has helped to identify customer perceptions and needs. The questionnaire is presented and the survey results are discussed with respect to total quality management.

Ferguson, E. B.

1993-01-01

241

Analysis of complex wind regimes at Kennedy Space Center for radiological assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Galileo and Ulysses will be launched from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) during October 1989 and October 1990, respectively. These deep-space probes will contain a radioactive thermoelectric generator as a power source. An accidental breach of the containment vessel housing the generator could cause a leak of radioactive material to the atmosphere. If this occurred, the radioactive cloud would move

G. E. Taylor; C. R. Parks; M. K. Atchison

1989-01-01

242

Eye Movements and Non-Canonical Reading: Comments on Kennedy and Pynte (2008)  

PubMed Central

Kennedy and Pynte (2008) presented data that they suggested pose problems for models of eye movement control in reading in which words are encoded serially. They focus on situations in which pairs of words are fixated out of order (i.e., the first word is skipped and the second fixated prior to a regression back to the first word). We strongly disagree with their claims and contest their arguments. We argue that their data set was obtained selectively and the events they believe are problematic do not occur frequently during reading. Furthermore, we do not consider that Kennedy and Pynte’s arguments pose serious difficulties for serial models of reading such as E-Z Reader.

Rayner, Keith; Pollatsek, Alexander; Liversedge, Simon P.; Reichle, Erik D.

2009-01-01

243

Research and technology: 1994 annual report of the John F. Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As the NASA Center responsible for assembly, checkout, servicing, launch, recovery, and operational support of Space Transportation System elements and payloads, the John F. Kennedy Space Center is placing increasing emphasis on its advanced technology development program. This program encompasses the efforts of the Engineering Development Directorate laboratories, most of the KSC operations contractors, academia, and selected commercial industries - all working in a team effort within their own areas of expertise. This edition of the Kennedy Space Center Research and Technology 1994 Annual Report covers efforts of all these contributors to the KSC advanced technology development program, as well as our technology transfer activities. The Technology Programs and Commercialization Office (DE-TPO), (407) 867-3017, is responsible for publication of this report and should be contacted for any desired information regarding the advanced technology program.

1994-01-01

244

Research and Technology at the John F. Kennedy Space Center 1993  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As the NASA Center responsible for assembly, checkout, servicing, launch, recovery, and operational support of Space Transportation System elements and payloads, the John F. Kennedy Space Center is placing increasing emphasis on its advanced technology development program. This program encompasses the efforts of the Engineering Development Directorate laboratories, most of the KSC operations contractors, academia, and selected commercial industries - all working in a team effort within their own areas of expertise. This edition of the Kennedy Space Center Research and Technology 1993 Annual Report covers efforts of all these contributors to the KSC advanced technology development program, as well as our technology transfer activities. Major areas of research include material science, advanced software, industrial engineering, nondestructive evaluation, life sciences, atmospheric sciences, environmental technology, robotics, and electronics and instrumentation.

1993-01-01

245

77 FR 9674 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Doubletree Hotel Bethesda, (Formerly Holiday Inn Select), 8120 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20814. Contact Person: Rita Anand, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Division Of Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of...

2012-02-17

246

77 FR 5029 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...grant applications. Place: Doubletree Hotel Bethesda, 8120 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20814. Contact Person: Rita Anand, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer Division of Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child...

2012-02-01

247

78 FR 63995 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Place: National Institutes of Health, Building 31, Room 2A48, 31 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892. Contact Person: Constantine A. Stratakis, MD, D(med)Sci, Scientific Director, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health...

2013-10-25

248

77 FR 64815 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Place: National Institutes of Health, Building 31, 31 Center Drive, Room 2A48, Bethesda, MD 20892. Contact Person: Constantine A. Stratakis, MD, D(med)Sci, Scientific Director, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health...

2012-10-23

249

77 FR 24973 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Place: National Institutes of Health, Building 31, 31 Center Drive, Room 2A48, Bethesda, MD 20892. Contact Person: Constantine A. Stratakis, MD, D(med)Sci, Scientific Director, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health...

2012-04-26

250

Climate Analysis of Lightning Launch Commit Criteria for Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

We have conducted climate analyses of natural lightning activity at Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (KSC/CCAFS). These analyses were conducted to improve forecasts of lightning related hazards for, and the planning of, space vehi...

E. C. Muller

2010-01-01

251

75 FR 34461 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis...Review, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 6100...

2010-06-17

252

77 FR 33751 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis...Review, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 6100...

2012-06-07

253

75 FR 1067 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice...meeting of the National Advisory Child Health and Human Development Council...of Committee: National Advisory Child Health and Human Development...

2010-01-08

254

75 FR 32488 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development [[Page...Emphasis Panel, Maintenance of Child Health and Developmental Data...

2010-06-08

255

75 FR 39031 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel, Child Health Research Career Development...

2010-07-07

256

75 FR 27796 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice...meeting of the National Advisory Child Health and Human Development Council...of Committee: National Advisory Child Health and Human Development...

2010-05-18

257

Spearhead Echo and Downburst Near the Approach End of a John F. Kennedy Airport Runway, New York City.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This research paper provides detailed information on the 'downburst cells' which occurred on the John F. Kennedy International runway during a thunderstorm in the New York City area on June 24, 1975. This weather condition interrupted 14 consecutive landi...

T. T. Fujita

1976-01-01

258

PRESIDENT KENNEDY TOURS CAPE CANAVERAL FACILITIES WITH DR. KURT H. DEBUS  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

President Kennedy and Dr. Kurt Debus head for the car that will take them on a tour of our Nation's space facilities. The President, Vice President, and the Space Committee are among those being briefed at four locations on our space program. The tour includes Marshall Space Flight Center at Huntsville, Alabama, Atlantic Missile Range, Manned Space Flight Center, Houston, Texas, and McDonnell Aircraft at St. Louis, Mo.

1962-01-01

259

Lightning source locations from VHF radiation data for a flash at Kennedy Space Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

A comprehensive study of a three-stroke lightning flash that struck the 150-m weather tower at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) was recently reported by Uman et al. (1978). Here we supplement that study by presenting three-dimensional locations of the sources of VHF (30-50 MHz) radiation generated by the KSC flash. These locations were obtained by measuring with the KSC lightning detection

P. L. Rustan; M. A. Uman; D. G. Childers; W. H. Beasley; C. L. Lennon

1980-01-01

260

Lightning Source Locations From VHF Radiation Data for a Flash at Kennedy Space Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

A comprehensive study of a three-stroke lightning flash that struck the 150-m weather tower at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) was recently reported by Uman et al. (1978). Here we supplement that study by presenting three-dimensional of the sources of VHF (30-50 MHz) radiation generated by the KSC flash. These locations were obtained by measuring with the KSC lightning detection and

P. L. Rustan; M. A. Uman; D. G. Childers; W. H. Beasley; C. L. Lennon

1980-01-01

261

An analysis of maximum horizontal wind speeds recorded since 1961 at Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Tabulations of maximum horizontal wind speed values are reported that were recorded at the Kennedy Space Center. Maximum wind speeds were recorded during the eight hurricanes which have affected the area--Cleo in August 1964 through Agnes in June 1972. Detailed tabulations and frequency distributions of daily maximum horizontal wind speeds recorded at NASA's 150 m ground tower facility at nine levels from December 1965 through March 1970 are also included.

Alexander, M. B.

1978-01-01

262

STS-30 Magellan spacecraft processing at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) SAEF-2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Magellan spacecraft is hoisted from the transport trailer of the Payload Environmental Transportation System (PETS) to the floor of the clean room in the Space Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF-2) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Clean-suited technicians guide Magellan into place. The spacecraft, destined for unprecedented studies of Venusian topographic features, will be deployed by the crew of NASA's STS-30 mission in April 1989. View provided by KSC with alternate number KSC-88PC-1084.

1989-01-01

263

A preliminary evaluation of short-term thunderstorm forecasting using surface winds at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In 1987 NASA expanded its surface wind network onto the mainland west of Kennedy Space Center, increasing the network area from nearly 800 sq km to over 1600 sq km. Here, the results of this expansion are reported using three years of wind and lightning information collected during June, July, August, and September of 1987, 1988, and 1989. The divergence-lightning relationships and the importance of wind direction are addressed, and the verification is summarized.

Watson, Andrew I.; Holle, Ronald L.; Lopez, Raul E.; Nicholson, James R.

1990-01-01

264

Lightning source locations from VHF radiation data for a flash at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Three dimensional locations are presented for the VHF (30-50 MHz) radiation sources generated by a three-stroke lightning flash at the Kennedy Space Center. The locations were obtained by calculating the difference in time of arrival (DTOA) of radiated pulses at four ground stations. A computer-implemented multiple time series analysis was used in calculating DTOA data. The locations of the approximately 48,000 sequential VHF sources are compared with wide band electric-field records to provide a better understanding of the physics of lightning discharge.

Rustan, P. L.; Uman, M. A.; Childers, D. G.; Beasley, W. H.; Lennon, C. L.

1980-01-01

265

Space shuttle operations at the NASA Kennedy Space Center: the role of emergency medicine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Division of Emergency Medicine at the University of Florida coordinates a unique program with the NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) to provide emergency medical support (EMS) for the United States Space Transportation System. This report outlines the organization of the KSC EMS system, training received by physicians providing medical support, logistic and operational aspects of the mission, and experiences of team members. The participation of emergency physicians in support of manned space flight represents another way that emergency physicians provide leadership in prehospital care and disaster management.

Rodenberg, H.; Myers, K. J.

1995-01-01

266

Texture Modification of the Shuttle Landing Facility Runway at the NASA Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes the test procedures and the selection criteria used in selecting the best runway surface texture modification at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to reduce Orbiter tire wear. The new runway surface may ultimately result in an increase of allowable crosswinds for launch and landing operations. The modification allows launch and landing operations in 20-kt crosswinds if desired. This 5-kt increase over the previous 15-kt limit drastically increases landing safety and the ability to make on-time launches to support missions where space station rendezvous is planned.

Daugherty, Robert H.; Yager, Thomas J.

1996-01-01

267

Educational Applications of Astronomy & Space Flight Operations at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Within two years, the Kennedy Space Center will complete a total redesign of NASA's busiest Visitor's Center. Three million visitors per year will be witness to a new program focused on expanding the interests of the younger public in NASA's major space programs, in space operations, and in astronomy. This project, being developed through the Visitor's Center director, a NASA faculty fellow, and the Visitor's Center contractor, is centered on the interaction between NASA programs, the visiting youth, and their parents. The goal of the Center's program is to provide an appealing learning experience for teens and pre teens using stimulating displays and interactive exhibits that are also educational.

Erickson, L. K.

1999-09-01

268

Application of Markov chain theory to ASTP natural environment launch criteria at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

To aid the planning of the Apollo Soyuz Test Program (ASTP), certain natural environment statistical relationships are presented, based on Markov theory and empirical counts. The practical results are in terms of conditional probability of favorable and unfavorable launch conditions at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). They are based upon 15 years of recorded weather data which are analyzed under a set of natural environmental launch constraints. Three specific forecasting problems were treated: (1) the length of record of past weather which is useful to a prediction; (2) the effect of persistence in runs of favorable and unfavorable conditions; and (3) the forecasting of future weather in probabilistic terms.

Graves, M. E.; Perlmutter, M.

1974-01-01

269

Voltage profile program for the Kennedy Space Center electric power distribution system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Kennedy Space Center voltage profile program computes voltages at all busses greater than 1 Kv in the network under various conditions of load. The computation is based upon power flow principles and utilizes a Newton-Raphson iterative load flow algorithm. Power flow conditions throughout the network are also provided. The computer program is designed for both steady state and transient operation. In the steady state mode, automatic tap changing of primary distribution transformers is incorporated. Under transient conditions, such as motor starts etc., it is assumed that tap changing is not accomplished so that transformer secondary voltage is allowed to sag.

1976-01-01

270

Meteorological regimes for the classification of aerospace air quality predictions for NASA-Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A method is described for developing a statistical air quality assessment for the launch of an aerospace vehicle from the Kennedy Space Center in terms of existing climatological data sets. The procedure can be refined as developing meteorological conditions are identified for use with the NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center Rocket Exhaust Effluent Diffusion (REED) description. Classical climatological regimes for the long range analysis can be narrowed as the synoptic and mesoscale structure is identified. Only broad synoptic regimes are identified at this stage of analysis. As the statistical data matrix is developed, synoptic regimes will be refined in terms of the resulting eigenvectors as applicable to aerospace air quality predictions.

Stephens, J. B.; Sloan, J. C.

1976-01-01

271

STS-30 Magellan spacecraft processing at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) SAEF-2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Clean-suited technicians attach mobility castors (ground handling cart) to Magellan spacecraft in the Space Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF-2) at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The castors will allow the spacecraft to be moved within the clean room of the SAEF-2 planetary spacecraft checkout facility. The spacecraft has just been hoisted from the transport trailer of the Payload Environmental Transportation System (PETS). Magellan, destined for unprecedented studies of Venusian topographic features, will be deployed by the crew of NASA's STS-30 mission in April 1989. View provided by KSC with alternate number KSC-88PC-1086.

1989-01-01

272

STS-30 Magellan spacecraft is unpacked at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) SAEF-2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

At the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) inside the Space Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF-2) (planetary checkout facility), the cover of the Payload Environmental Transportation System (PETS) is removed so that the Magellan spacecraft can be hoisted from the PETS trailer to the clean room floor. Clean-suited technicians guide the cover above plastic-wrapped spacecraft using rope. The spacecraft, destined for unprecedented studies of the Venusian topographic features, is to be deployed by the crew of NASA STS-30 mission in April 1989. View provided by KSC with alternate number KSC-88PC-1083.

1989-01-01

273

Short-term forecasting of thunderstorms at Kennedy Space Center, based on the surface wind field  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Techniques incorporating wind convergence that can be used for the short-term prediction of thunderstorm development are described. With these techniques, the convergence signal is sensed by the wind network array 15 to 90 min before actual storm development. Particular attention is given to the convergence cell technique (which has been applied at the Kennedy Space Center) where each convective region is analyzed independently. It is noted that, while the monitoring of areal and cellular convergence can be used to help locate the seeds of developing thunderstorms and pinpoint the lightning threat areas, this forecasting aid cannot be used in isolation.

Watson, Andrew I.; Lopez, Raul E.; Holle, Ronald L.; Daugherty, John R.; Ortiz, Robert

1989-01-01

274

USBI Booster Production Company's Hazardous Waste Management Program at the Kennedy Space Center, FL  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In response to the hazardous-waste generating processes associated with the launch of the Space Shuttle, a hazardous waste management plan has been developed. It includes waste recycling, product substitution, waste treatment, and waste minimization at the source. Waste material resulting from the preparation of the nonmotor segments of the solid rocket boosters include waste paints (primer, topcoats), waste solvents (methylene chloride, freon, acetone, toluene), waste inorganic compounds (aluminum anodizing compound, fixer), and others. Ways in which these materials are contended with at the Kennedy Space Center are discussed.

Venuto, Charles

1987-01-01

275

Kennedy's Disease  

MedlinePLUS

... Atrophy, X-Linked Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) What ... their teens to their 70s. Early symptoms include tremor of the outstretched hands, muscle cramps with exertion, ...

276

Normal probabilities for Cape Kennedy wind components: Monthly reference periods for all flight azimuths. Altitudes 0 to 70 kilometers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This document replaces Cape Kennedy empirical wind component statistics which are presently being used for aerospace engineering applications that require component wind probabilities for various flight azimuths and selected altitudes. The normal (Gaussian) distribution is presented as an adequate statistical model to represent component winds at Cape Kennedy. Head-, tail-, and crosswind components are tabulated for all flight azimuths for altitudes from 0 to 70 km by monthly reference periods. Wind components are given for 11 selected percentiles ranging from 0.135 percent to 99,865 percent for each month. Results of statistical goodness-of-fit tests are presented to verify the use of the Gaussian distribution as an adequate model to represent component winds at Cape Kennedy, Florida.

Falls, L. W.

1973-01-01

277

National Security Action Memoranda: Document Images From The Presidential Papers of John Fitzgerald Kennedy National Security Files  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The John F. Kennedy Library has posted the National Security Action Memoranda of the Kennedy administration, written either by the President himself or his National Security Advisor McGeorge Bundy. Topics of the memorandums include policy for Cuba, forces in Vietnam, reconnaissance flights over Russia, NATO, South Africa policy, CIA support of "certain activities," and many others. The copies are presented in photographed facsimile, and many of the more sensitive memorandums have been "sanitized," i.e., have portions deleted. A few of the memorandums are still classified and therefore not yet available. In November of 1998, the library released a huge quantity of taped recordings of Kennedy's consultations (see the November 27, 1998 Scout Report).

2001-01-01

278

Synchronization of the acoustic evidence in the assassination of President Kennedy.  

PubMed

We have revisited the acoustic evidence in the Kennedy assassination--recordings of the two Dallas police radio channels upon which our original NRC report (Ramsey NF et al., Report of the Committee on Ballistic Acoustics. National Research Council (US). Washington: National Academy Press, 1982. Posted at http://www.nap.edu/catalog/10264.html) was based--in response to the assertion by DB Thomas (Echo correlation analysis and the acoustic evidence in the Kennedy assassination revisited. Science and Justice 2001; 41: 21-32) that alleged gunshot sounds (on Channel 1), apparently recorded from a motorcycle officer's stuck-open microphone, occur at the exact time of the assassination (as established by emergency communications on Channel 2). We have critically reviewed these two publications, and have performed additional analyses. In particular we have used recorded 60 Hz hum and correlation methods to obtain accurate speed calibrations for recordings made on both channels, cepstral analysis to seek instances of repeated segments during playback of Channel 2 (which could result from groove jumping), and spectrographic and correlation methods to analyze instances of putative crosstalk used to synchronize the two channels. This paper identifies serious errors in the Thomas paper and corrects errors in the NRC report. We reaffirm the earlier conclusion of the NRC report that the alleged "shot" sounds were recorded approximately one minute after the assassination. PMID:16686272

Linsker, R; Garwin, R L; Chernoff, H; Horowitz, P; Ramsey, N F

2005-01-01

279

[X-linked recessive bulbospinal muscular atrophy (Kennedy's disease). A family study].  

PubMed

Kennedy's disease is a rare type of motor neuron disease with a sex-linked recessive trait. DNA studies show a mutation at the androgen receptor gene on the long arm of X chromosome (Xq 11-12) with expanded CAG triplets (more than 347 repeats). We present three patients and one carrier among ten patients of a four generation family with clinical phenotype of the disease. The patients' ages ranged from 50 to 60 years with symptomatology usually beginning around 30 years of age. Patients had gynecomastia, testicular atrophy, muscular weakness, fasciculation, amyotrophy, absent deep tendon reflexes and postural tremor. PCR techniques of DNA analysis showed expanded size of CAG repeats on Xq 11-12 in all the three patients and in the carrier asymptomatic woman. This is the first Brazilian family with genetic molecular diagnosis of Kennedy's disease. This disease must be included in the differential diagnosis of motor neuron disease since it has a distinct prognosis and genetic counseling is mandatory to the carriers. PMID:9850762

Kaimen-Maciel, D R; Medeiros, M; Clímaco, V; Kelian, G R; da Silva, L S; de Souza, M M; Raskin, S

1998-09-01

280

Mutations disrupting the Kennedy phosphatidylcholine pathway in humans with congenital lipodystrophy and fatty liver disease.  

PubMed

Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is the major glycerophospholipid in eukaryotic cells and is an essential component in all cellular membranes. The biochemistry of de novo PC synthesis by the Kennedy pathway is well established, but less is known about the physiological functions of PC. We identified two unrelated patients with defects in the Kennedy pathway due to biallellic loss-of-function mutations in phosphate cytidylyltransferase 1 alpha (PCYT1A), the rate-limiting enzyme in this pathway. The mutations lead to a marked reduction in PCYT1A expression and PC synthesis. The phenotypic consequences include some features, such as severe fatty liver and low HDL cholesterol levels, that are predicted by the results of previously reported liver-specific deletion of murine Pcyt1a. Both patients also had lipodystrophy, severe insulin resistance, and diabetes, providing evidence for an additional and essential role for PCYT1A-generated PC in the normal function of white adipose tissue and insulin action. PMID:24889630

Payne, Felicity; Lim, Koini; Girousse, Amandine; Brown, Rebecca J; Kory, Nora; Robbins, Ann; Xue, Yali; Sleigh, Alison; Cochran, Elaine; Adams, Claire; Dev Borman, Arundhati; Russel-Jones, David; Gorden, Phillip; Semple, Robert K; Saudek, Vladimir; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Walther, Tobias C; Barroso, Inês; Savage, David B

2014-06-17

281

Bay of Pigs and Cuban Missile Crisis: Presidential Decision-Making and Its Effect on Military Employment During the Kennedy Administration.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study investigates the methods by which President John F. Kennedy arrived at decisions to deploy the military in the conduct of foreign policy. Specifically, the events covered are the Bay of Pigs, which represents the nadir of Kennedy's foreign poli...

M. E. Falcon

1993-01-01

282

The Language of the Liberal Consensus: John F. Kennedy, Technical Reason, and the "New Economics" at Yale University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

On June 11, 1962, President John F. Kennedy addressed the economy at Yale University. This essay explains the symbolic charge of his economic rhetoric, a persuasive campaign that enjoyed considerable success and marked the first time that a president took explicit responsibility for the nation's economic performance. I argue that the president…

Murphy, John W.

2004-01-01

283

Letters from George Washington and Samuel Cabble, and Speeches by Franklin D. Roosevelt and John F. Kennedy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author uses several primary sources to demonstrate that George Washington, Samuel Cabble, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and John F. Kennedy stated their awareness of contemporary challenges, but looked to the future with hope and optimism. When they envisioned the future, their words indicated that they did not just imagine it, but…

Potter, Lee Ann

2008-01-01

284

U. S.-U. S. S. R. Space Exploration and Technology, John F. Kennedy, and the Press.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Debates and policies in the late 1950s and early 1960s regarding the United States-Soviet space race are described in this paper, and an analysis is presented of press coverage of President John F. Kennedy's public statements regarding space technology and exploration. The first sections of the paper present a selected space chronology from 1957…

Babcock, William A.; Ostman, Ronald E.

285

Commercialization of Kennedy Space Center Instrumentation Developed to Improve Safety, Reliability, Cost Effectiveness of Space Shuttle Processing, Launch, and Landing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Priorities and achievements of the Kennedy Space Center (KSF) Instrumentation Laboratories in improving operational safety and decreasing processing costs associated with the Shuttle vehicle are addressed. Technologies that have been or are in the process of technology transfer are reviewed, and routes by which commercial concerns can obtain licenses to other KSF Instrumentation Laboratory technologies are discussed.

Helms, William R.; Starr, Stanley O.

1997-01-01

286

Profiles in Courage Simulations: Based on President John F. Kennedy's Pulitzer Prize Book. ETC Simulations Number Four.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book presents simulation activities for the eight profiles of U.S. Senators presented in John F. Kennedy's "Profiles in Courage." Intended for student involvement, the simulations require student research and practice in order to carry out the designated roles. The simulations and role play are designed to actively involve the students in…

Hostrop, Richard W.

287

Argument Schemes and the Construction of Social Reality: John F. Kennedy's Address to the Houston Ministerial Association.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

States that John F. Kennedy, in his 1960 speech to Houston ministers, convinced many voters that, as a Catholic president, he would act independently of the Catholic Church in matters such as federal aid to schools, human reproduction, and religious tolerance. Analyzes arguments he used to distance himself from the Vatican and align himself with…

Warnick, Barbara

1996-01-01

288

A New Comprehensive Lightning Instrumentation System for Pad 39B at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new comprehensive lightning instrumentation system has been designed for Launch Complex 39B at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. This new instrumentation system includes the synchronized recording of six high-speed video cameras, currents through the nine downconductors of the new lightning protection system, four B-dot, 3-axis measurement stations, and five D-dot stations composed of two antennas each. The instrumentation system is composed of centralized transient recorders and digitizers that located close to the sensors in the field. The sensors and transient recorders communicate via optical fiber. The transient recorders are triggered by the B-dot sensors, the E-dot sensors, or the current through the downlead conductors. The high-speed cameras are triggered by the transient recorders when the latter perceives a qualified trigger.

Mata, Carlos T.; Rakov, Vladimir A.; Mata, Angel G.; Bonilla Tatiana; Navedo, Emmanuel; Snyder, Gary P.

2010-01-01

289

Environmental monitoring and research at the John F. Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Biomedical Operations and Research Office at the NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center has been supporting environmental monitoring and research since the mid-1970s. Program elements include monitoring of baseline conditions to document natural variability in the ecosystem, assessments of operations and construction of new facilities, and ecological research focusing on wildlife habitat associations. Information management is centered around development of a computerized geographic information system that incorporates remote sensing and digital image processing technologies along with traditional relational data base management capabilities. The proactive program is one in which the initiative is to anticipate potential environmental concerns before they occur and, by utilizing in-house expertise, develop impact minimization or mitigation strategies to reduce environmental risk.

Hall, C. R.; Hinkle, C. R.; Knott, W. M.; Summerfield, B. R.

1992-01-01

290

Research and Technology: 2003 Annual Report of the John F Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is America's Spaceport Technology Center. The KSC technology development program encompasses the efforts of the entire KSC team, consisting of Government and contractor personnel, working in partnership with academic institutions and commercial industry. KSC's assigned mission areas are space launch operations and spaceport and range technologies. KSC's technology development customers include current space transportation programs, future space transportation programs / initiatives, and enabling technical programs. The KSC Research and Technology 2003 Annual Report encompasses the efforts of contributors to the KSC advanced technology development program and KSC technology transfer activities. Dr. Dave Bartine, KSC Chief Technologist, (321) 867-7069, is responsible for publication of this report and should be contacted for any desired information regarding KSC's research and technology development activities.

2003-01-01

291

Safety considerations involved in testing, checkout and launch operations at Cape Kennedy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper concerns itself with identifying safety problems associated with launch operations conducted during preparations for manned space flights at Cape Kennedy. This includes transportation and assembly of large space vehicles in the Vehicle Assembly Building, rollout to Launch Pad 39, test, checkout, and the launch countdown. Under these broad categories, the risks of fuel and oxidizer loading, installation of pyrotechnics, and similar hazardous operations are discussed. The many aspects for fire and rescue requirements are examined. These encompass the water deluge systems on the Mobile Service Structure and the Mobile Launcher, the insulated fire and rescue tractor, slide wire escape system, fire proximity suits, self-contained breathing apparatus and emergency cutting tools. In addition, written procedures for tests, emergencies, rescue and backout, as well as certification of personnel and TV monitoring of the launch system are detailed.-

Bolger, P. H.; Boyes, W.

1973-01-01

292

[Prospect of the Advanced Life Support Program Breadboard Project at Kennedy Space Center in USA].  

PubMed

The Breadboard Project at Kennedy Space Center in NASA of USA was focused on the development of the bioregenerative life support components, crop plants for water, air, and food production and bioreactors for recycling of wastes. The keystone of the Breadboard Project was the Biomass Production Chamber (BPC), which was supported by 15 environmentally controlled chambers and several laboratory facilities holding a total area of 2150 m2. In supporting the Advanced Life Support Program (ALS Program), the Project utilizes these facilities for large-scale testing of components and development of required technologies for human-rated test-beds at Johnson Space Center in NASA, in order to enable a Lunar and a Mars mission finally. PMID:11808572

Guo, S S; Ai, W D

2001-04-01

293

Determinations of microbial loads associated with microscopic-size particles of Kennedy Space Center soil  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Plate counts for six fractions of Kennedy Space Center soil provided estimates of aerobic, mesophilic, heterotrophic, and microbial loads on single soil particles. Analyses included unheated particles, particles subjected to wet heat at 80 C for 20 min, and particles subjected to dry heat at 110 C for 1 hr. Unheated particles yielded mean counts ranging from 6 colonies per particle for the smallest (44-53 microns) soil fraction to approximately 55 colonies per particle for the largest size (105-125 microns) soil fraction tested. Mean counts for heat-resistant forms ranged from 2 colonies per particle for the smaller particles to 12-15 colonies for the largest particles analyzed.

Ruschmeyer, O. R.; Pflug, I. J.

1977-01-01

294

Large-Scale Cryogenic Testing of Launch Vehicle Ground Systems at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The development of a new launch vehicle to support NASA's future exploration plans requires significant redesign and upgrade of Kennedy Space Center's (KSC) launch pad and ground support equipment systems. In many cases, specialized test equipment and systems will be required to certify the function of the new system designs under simulated operational conditions, including propellant loading. This paper provides an overview of the cryogenic test infrastructure that is in place at KSC to conduct development and qualification testing that ranges from the component level to the integrated-system level. An overview of the major cryogenic test facilities will be provided, along with a detailed explanation of the technology focus area for each facility

Ernst, E. W.; Sass, J. P.; Lobemeyer, D. A.; Sojourner, S. J.; Hatfield, W. H.; Rewinkel, D. A.

2007-01-01

295

Research and Technology 1998 Annual Report of the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As the NASA Center responsible for preparing and launching space missions, the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is placing increasing emphasis on its advanced technology development program. This program encompasses the efforts of the entire KSC team, consisting of Government and contractor personnel, working in partnership with academic institutions and commercial industry. This edition of the KSC Research and Technology 1998 Annual Report covers the efforts of these contributors to the KSC advanced technology development program, as well as our technology transfer activities. The following research areas are covered: Life Sciences; Mechanical Engineering; Environmental Engineering; Advanced Software; Atmospheric Science; Materials Science; Nondestructive Evaluation; Process/Industrial Engineering; Automation and Robotics; and Electronics and Instrumentation.

1998-01-01

296

Insects, vegetation, and the control of laughing gulls (Larus atricilla) at Kennedy International Airport, New York  

USGS Publications Warehouse

1. In response to a purported 'bird-strike problem' at J.F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City, we examined short (5 cm) and long (45 cm) grass heights as gull deterrents, in a randomized-block experiment. 2. Vegetative cover, numbers of adult insects and of larval beetles (suspected on-airport food of the gulls) were sampled in the six-block, 36-plot study area, as well as gut contents of adult and downy young gulls in the immediately adjacent colony in the Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge. 3. We found that (i) Oriental beetle larvae were the most numerous and concentrated in one experimental block; (ii) beetle larvae numbers were uncorrelated with grass height; (iii) adult beetles were also uncorrelated with grass height; (iv) laughing gulls were distributed across blocks irrespective of percentage cover; (v) within blocks, laughing gulls were selecting short grass and avoiding long grass plots; (vi) laughing gull numbers were positively associated with numbers of Oriental beetle larvae; (vii) adult laughing gulls on the airport were eating lower-nutrition food of terrestrial origin (74-83% adult beetles, mostly Oriental plus green June and ground beetles); (viii) on the other hand, gull chicks in the adjacent breeding colony were being fed more easily digested, higher-protein food of marine origin (86-88% fishes, crustacea and molluscs); (ix) laughing gulls on the airport were taking their adult beetles only in short-grass plots, ignoring large numbers in adjacent long grass; (x) during the summer, on-airport gulls shifted from performing largely maintenance activities on pavement to feeding actively for beetles on newly mown short grass, the change coinciding with adult beetle emergence; (xi) standing water on the airport attracted significantly more gulls than dry areas all summer long. 4. We recommend a series of ecologically compatible, but aggressive habitat management actions for controlling laughing gulls on Kennedy Airport by rendering the airport unattractive to them, notably by implementing an airport-wide programme of long-grass encouragement, draining standing water and improving runoff in water-collecting areas, and controlling beetles. 5. We conclude by outlining the necessity for airport-wide bird, vegetation and habitat management programmes fully integrated into airport operation and planning activities.

Buckley, P. A.; McCarthy, M.

1994-01-01

297

Workstation-Based Real-Time Mesoscale Modeling Designed for Weather Support to Operations at the Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Station.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper describes the capabilities and operational utility of a version of the Mesoscale Atmospheric Simulation System (MASS) that has been developed to support operational weather forecasting at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air St...

J. Manobianco J. W. Zack G. E. Taylor

1996-01-01

298

National Institute of Justice John B. Pickett Fellowship in Criminal Justice Policy and Management at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In 1992, the National Institute of Justice established the John B. Pickett Fellowship in Criminal Justice Policy and Management at the Kennedy School of Government. The Fellowship was created in memory of John Pickett, NIJs first Director of Planning and ...

2003-01-01

299

Procedure for the selection of materials for use in oxygen systems at the John F. Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes tests used at the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in the material selection procedure for evaluating materials suitable for use in oxygen systems. Special attention is given to the basic selection criteria for materials used in oxygen enriched environments. The flow chart for the material selection procedure is presented, and information that must be supplied by vendors requesting batch/lot certification support from KSC is given.

Bryan, Coleman J.; Olsen, Melvin G.

1988-01-01

300

Developing empirical lightning cessation forecast guidance for the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy Space Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research addresses the 45th Weather Squadron's (45WS) need for improved guidance regarding lightning cessation at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy Space Center (KSC). KSC's Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) network was the primary observational tool to investigate both cloud-to-ground and intracloud lightning. Five statistical and empirical schemes were created from LDAR, sounding, and radar parameters derived from

Geoffrey T. Stano; Henry E. Fuelberg; William P. Roeder

2010-01-01

301

Spearhead echo and downburst near the approach end of a John F. Kennedy Airport runway, New York City  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Radar echoes of a storm at John F. Kennedy International Airport are examined. Results regarding the phenomena presented suggest the existence of downburst cells. These cells are characterized by spearhead echoes. About 2% of the echoes in the New York area were spearhead echoes. The detection and identification of downburst cells, their potential hazard to approaching and landing aircraft, and communication of this information to the pilots of those aircraft are discussed.

Fujita, T. T.

1976-01-01

302

A preliminary study of environmental parameters associated with the feasibility of a polygeneration plant at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The feasibility of a polygeneration plant at Kennedy Space Center was studied. Liquid hydrogen and gaseous nitrogen are the two principal products in consideration. Environmental parameters (air quality, water quality, biological diversity and hazardous waste disposal) necessary for the feasibility study were investigated. A National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) project flow sheet was to be formulated for the environmental impact statement. Water quality criteria for Florida waters were to be established.

Barnes, G. D.

1982-01-01

303

Structural Analysis Peer Review for the Static Display of the Orbiter Atlantis at the Kennedy Space Center Visitors Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Mr. Christopher Miller with the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) NASA Safety & Mission Assurance (S&MA) office requested the NASA Engineering and Safety Center's (NESC) technical support on March 15, 2012, to review and make recommendations on the structural analysis being performed for the Orbiter Atlantis static display at the KSC Visitor Center. The principal focus of the assessment was to review the engineering firm's structural analysis for lifting and aligning the orbiter and its static display configuration

Minute, Stephen A.

2013-01-01

304

Arthropods of a semi-natural grassland in an urban environment: the John F. Kennedy International Airport, New York  

Microsoft Academic Search

Semi-natural grassland habitat fragments, such as those found on airports, might be important for arthropod conservation and\\u000a biodiversity in urban ecosystems. The objectives of this study were to: (1) describe the arthropod communities present within\\u000a the grasslands on the John F. Kennedy International Airport and (2) assess spatial and temporal variation in those arthropod\\u000a communities. We collected arthropods using a

Lisa Kutschbach-Brohl; Brian E. Washburn; Glen E. Bernhardt; Richard B. Chipman; Laura C. Francoeur

2010-01-01

305

Legacy and Emergence of Spaceport Technology Development at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has a long and successful legacy in the checkout and launch of missiles and space vehicles. These operations have become significantly more complex, and their evolution has driven the need for many technology developments. Unanticipated events have also underscored the need for a local, highly responsive technology development and testing capability. This evolution is briefly described, as well as the increasing level of technology capability at KSC. The importance of these technologies in achieving past national space goals suggests that the accomplishment of low-cost and reliable access to space will depend critically upon KSC's future success in developing spaceport technologies. This paper concludes with a description KSC's current organizational approach and major thrust areas in technology development. The first phase of our historical review focuses on the development and testing of field- deployable short- and intermediate-range ballistic missiles (1953 to 1958). These vehicles are later pressed into service as space launchers. The second phase involves the development of large space lift vehicles culminating in the Saturn V launches (1959 to 1975). The third phase addresses the development and operations of the partially reusable launch vehicle, Space Shuttle (1976 to 2000). In the current era, KSC is teaming with the U.S. Air Force (AF), industry, academia, and other partners to identify and develop Spaceport and Range Technologies necessary to achieve national space goals of lower-cost and higher-reliability space flight.

Starr, Stanley; Voska, Ned (Technical Monitor)

2003-01-01

306

Trace element release from estuarine sediments of South Mosquito Lagoon near Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Analytical partitioning of four trace metals in estuarine sediments collected from eight sites in South Mosquito Lagoon near Kennedy Space Center, in terms of four different categories was accomplished using four different extraction techniques. The concentrations of the four trace metals, Zn, Mn, Cd, and Cu, released in interstitial water extract, 1 N ammonium acetate extract, conc. HCl extract and fusion extract of sediments as well as their concentrations in water samples collected from the same location were determined using flame atomic absorption technique. From the analytical results the percentages of total amount of each metal distributed among four different categories, interstitial water phase, acetate extractable, acid extractable and detrital crystalline material, were determined. Our results suggest that analytical partitioning of trace metals in estuarine sediments may be used to study the mechanism of incorporation of trace metals with sediments from natural waters. A correlation between the seasonal variation in the concentration of acetate extractable trace metals in the sediment and similar variation in their concentration in water was observed. A mechanism for the release of trace metals from estuarine sediments to natural water is also suggested.

Menon, M. P.; Ghuman, G. S.; Emeh, C. O.

1979-01-01

307

A Diagnostic Analysis of the Kennedy Space Center LDAR Network. 1; Data Characteristics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An analytic framework is developed in which to analyze climatological VHF (66 MHz) radiation measurements taken by the Kennedy Space Center Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) network. A 19 month noise-filtered sample of LDAR observations is examined using this framework. It is found that the climatological impulsive VHF source density as observed by LDAR falls off approximately 10 dB every 71 km of ground range away from the network centroid (a 31 km e-folding scale). The underlying vertical distribution of impulsive VHF sources is approximately normally distributed with a mean altitude of 9 km and a standard deviation of 2.7 km; this implies that the loss of below-horizon sources has a negligible effect on column-integrated source densities within a 200 km ground range. At medium to far ranges, location errors are primarily radial and have a slightly asymmetric distribution whose standard deviation increases as r(exp 2). Error moments estimated from observed lightning are significantly higher than those from aircraft-based signal generator or analytic estimates. LDAR bulk flash detection efficiency is predicted to be above 90% to 94-113 km range from the network centroid and to fall below 10% at ranges greater than 200-240 km.

Boccippio, D. J.; Heckman, S.; Goodman, S. J.

2001-01-01

308

Kennedy Space Center's Command and Control System - "Toasters to Rocket Ships"  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews the history of the development of the command and control system at Kennedy Space Center. From a system that could be brought to Florida in the trunk of a car in the 1950's. Including the development of larger and more complex launch vehicles with the Apollo program where human launch controllers managed the launch process with a hardware only system that required a dedicated human interface to perform every function until the Apollo vehicle lifted off from the pad. Through the development of the digital computer that interfaced with ground launch processing systems with the Space Shuttle program. Finally, showing the future control room being developed to control the missions to return to the moon and Mars, which will maximize the use of Commercial-Off-The Shelf (COTS) hardware and software which was standards based and not tied to a single vendor. The system is designed to be flexible and adaptable to support the requirements of future spacecraft and launch vehicles.

Lougheed, Kirk; Mako, Cheryle

2011-01-01

309

Soil, Groundwater, Surface Water, and Sediments of Kennedy Space Center, Florida: Background Chemical and Physical Characteristics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This study documented background chemical composition of soils, groundwater, surface; water, and sediments of Kennedy Space Center. Two hundred soil samples were collected, 20 each in 10 soil classes. Fifty-one groundwater wells were installed in 4 subaquifers of the Surficial Aquifer and sampled; there were 24 shallow, 16 intermediate, and 11 deep wells. Forty surface water and sediment samples were collected in major watershed basins. All samples were away from sites of known contamination. Samples were analyzed for organochlorine pesticides, aroclors, chlorinated herbicides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), total metals, and other parameters. All aroclors (6) were below detection in all media. Some organochlorine pesticides were detected at very low frequencies in soil, sediment, and surface water. Chlorinated herbicides were detected at very low frequencies in soil and sediments. PAH occurred in low frequencies in soiL, shallow groundwater, surface water, and sediments. Concentrations of some metals differed among soil classes, with subaquifers and depths, and among watershed basins for surface water but not sediments. Most of the variation in metal concentrations was natural, but agriculture had increased Cr, Cu, Mn, and Zn.

Shmalzer, Paul A.; Hensley, Melissa A.; Mota, Mario; Hall, Carlton R.; Dunlevy, Colleen A.

2000-01-01

310

Summary of 1987 and 1988 manatee aerial surveys at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Aerial surveys of manatees conducted since 1977 at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) have provided a very useful and cost effective monitoring tool in the assessment of abundance and distribution of manatees in the northern Banana River. Data collected in the mid 1980's as part of the KSC Environmental Monitoring Program indicated that the numbers of manatees utilizing the northern Banana River had increased dramatically from earlier years and that the animals appeared to have changed their distribution patterns within the area as well (Provancha and Provancha 1988). United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and Florida Department of Natural Resources (FLDNR) conducted bimonthly aerial surveys in 1986 for the entire Florida east coast. Their data clearly show that the Banana River has the highest concentration of manatees during the non-winter months when compared to all other segments of the east coast surveys (B. Wiegle/FLDNR, unpublished data). They further show that, in spring, an average of 71 percent of the manatees in Brevard county were located in the Banana River. During that period 85 percent of the animals were north of the NASA Causeway (State Road (SR) 402) in the KSC security zone. These data indicate the importance of the KSC waters to the Florida east coast manatee population. We reinitiated KSC surveys in 1987 to document distributions and numbers of manatees during the spring influx. Aerial censuses were continued throughout the year in 1988 and this report provides a summary of our findings for the two years.

Provancha, Jane A.; Provancha, Mark J.

1989-01-01

311

A Peak Wind Probability Forecast Tool for Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This conference abstract describes the development of a peak wind forecast tool to assist forecasters in determining the probability of violating launch commit criteria (LCC) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) in east-central Florida. The peak winds are an important forecast element for both the Space Shuttle and Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) programs. The LCC define specific peak wind thresholds for each launch operation that cannot be exceeded in order to ensure the safety of the vehicle. The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) has found that peak winds are a challenging parameter to forecast, particularly in the cool season months of October through April. Based on the importance of forecasting peak winds, the 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to develop a short-range peak-wind forecast tool to assist in forecasting LCC violatioas.The tool will include climatologies of the 5-minute mean end peak winds by month, hour, and direction, and probability distributions of the peak winds as a function of the 5-minute mean wind speeds.

Crawford, Winifred; Roeder, William

2008-01-01

312

50 Years of Electronic Check Out and Launch Systems at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

When NASA was created in 1958 one of the elements incorporated into this new agency was the Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) in Huntsville, AL and its subordinate Missile Firing Laboratory (MFL) in Cape Canaveral. Under NASA, the MFL became the Launch Operations Directorate of the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, but expanding operations in the build up to Apollo dictated that it be given the status of a full fledged Center in July, 1 962[ 1]. The next year it was renamed the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KS C) after the president whose vision transformed its first decade of operation. The ABMA was under the technical leadership of Dr. Werner Von Braun. The MEL was run by his deputy Dr. Kurt Debus, an electrical engineer whose experience in the field began in the early days of V-2 testing in war time Germany. In 1952 a group led by Debus arrived in Cape Canaveral to begin test launches of the new Redstone missile [2]. During the 50's, The MFL built several launch complexes and tested the Redstone, Jupiter and Jupiter C missiles. This small experienced team of engineers and technicians formed the seed from which has grown the KSC team of today. This article briefly reviews the evolution of the KSC electronic technologies for integration, check-out and launch of space vehicles and payloads during NASA's first 50 years.

Starr, Stanley O.

2007-01-01

313

An Occupational Performance Test Validation Program for Fire Fighters at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We evaluated performance of a modified Combat Task Test (CTT) and of standard fitness tests in 20 male subjects to assess the prediction of occupational performance standards for Kennedy Space Center fire fighters. The CTT consisted of stair-climbing, a chopping simulation, and a victim rescue simulation. Average CTT performance time was 3.61 +/- 0.25 min (SEM) and all CTT tasks required 93% to 97% maximal heart rate. By using scores from the standard fitness tests, a multiple linear regression model was fitted to each parameter: the stairclimb (r(exp 2) = .905, P less than .05), the chopping performance time (r(exp 2) = .582, P less than .05), the victim rescue time (r(exp 2) = .218, P = not significant), and the total performance time (r(exp 2) = .769, P less than .05). Treadmill time was the predominant variable, being the major predictor in two of four models. These results indicated that standardized fitness tests can predict performance on some CTT tasks and that test predictors were amenable to exercise training.

Schonfeld, Brian R.; Doerr, Donald F.; Convertino, Victor A.

1990-01-01

314

Topology and criticality in the resonating Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki loop spin liquid states  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We exploit a natural projected entangled-pair state (PEPS) representation for the resonating Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki loop (RAL) state. By taking advantage of PEPS-based analytical and numerical methods, we characterize the RAL states on various two-dimensional lattices. On square and honeycomb lattices, these states are critical since the dimer-dimer correlations decay as a power law. On the kagome lattice, the RAL state has exponentially decaying correlation functions, supporting the scenario of a gapped spin liquid. We provide further evidence that the RAL state on the kagome lattice is a Z2 spin liquid, by identifying the four topological sectors and computing the topological entropy. Furthermore, we construct a one-parameter family of PEPS states interpolating between the RAL state and a short-range resonating valence bond state and find a critical point, consistent with the fact that the two states belong to two different phases. We also perform a variational study of the spin-1 kagome Heisenberg model using this one-parameter PEPS.

Li, Wei; Yang, Shuo; Cheng, Meng; Liu, Zheng-Xin; Tu, Hong-Hao

2014-05-01

315

Habitat model for the Florida Scrub Jay on John F. Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Florida Scrub Jay is endemic to Florida. The John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) provides habitat for one of the three largest populations of the Florida Scrub Jay. This threatened bird occupies scrub, slash pine flatwoods, disturbed scrub, and coastal strand on KSC. Densities of Florida Scrub Jays were shown to vary with habitat characteristics but not necessarily with vegetation type. Relationships between Florida Scrub Jay densities and habitat characteristics were used to develop a habitat model to provide a tool to compare alternative sites for new facilities and to quantify environmental impacts. This model is being tested using long term demographic studies of colorbanded Florida Scrub Jays. Optimal habitat predicted by the model has greater than or equal to 50 percent of the shrub canopy comprised of scrub oaks, 20-50 percent open space or scrub oak vegetation within 100 m of a ruderal edge, less than or equal to 15 percent pine canopy cover, a shrub height of 120-170 cm, and is greater than or equal to 100 m from a forest. This document reviews life history, social behavior, food, foraging habitat, cover requirements, characteristics of habitat on KSC, and habitat preferences of the Florida Scrub Jay. Construction of the model and its limitations are discussed.

Breininger, David R.

1992-01-01

316

Geology, geohydrology, and soils of NASA, Kennedy Space Center: A review  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Sediments underlying Kennedy Space Center (KSC) have accumulated in alternating periods of deposition and erosion since the Eocene. Surface sediments are of Pleistocene and Recent ages. Fluctuating sea levels with the alternating glacial-interglacial cycles have shaped the formation of the barrier island. Merritt Island is an older landscape whose formation may have begun as much as 240,000 years ago, although most of the surface sediments are not that old. Cape Canaveral probably dates from less than 7,000 years B.P. (before present) as does the barrier strip separating Mosquito Lagoon from the Atlantic Ocean. Merritt Island and Cape Canaveral have been shaped by progradational processes but not continuously so, while the Mosquito Lagoon barrier has been migrating landward. Deep acquifers beneath KSC are recharged inland but are highly mineralized in the coastal region and interact little with surface vegetation. The Surficial acquifer has formed in the Pleistocene and Recent deposits and is recharged by local rainfall. Sand ridges in the center of Merritt Island are important to its recharge.

Schmalzer, Paul A.; Hinkle, C. Ross

1990-01-01

317

Physical, anthropometrical, and body composition characteristics of workers at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

At the Kennedy Space Center, workers are often exposed to cardiovascular and muscular stress in job-related activities which may require a high level of physical fitness in order to safely complete the work task. Similar tasks will be performed at other launch and landing facilities and in space for the Space Station. One such category includes workers who handle toxic propellants and must wear Self-Contained Atmospheric Protective Ensembles (SCAPE) that can weigh 56 lbs. with the air pack. These suits provide a significant physical challenge to many of the workers in terms of carrying this load while moving about and performing work. Furthermore, under some conditions, there is a significant thermal stress. The physical characteristics of these workers are, therefore, of consequence. The purpose of this study was to analyze the anthropometry, body composition, strength, power, endurance, flexibility, aerobic fitness, and blood variables of a representative sample of male KSC SCAPE workers and to compare them with characteristics of other male workers at KSC (total population N=110). Three separate comparisons were made.

Lasley, M. L.

1985-01-01

318

Quality Control Algorithms for the Kennedy Space Center 50-Megahertz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Winds Database  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents the process used by the Marshall Space Flight Center Natural Environments Branch (EV44) to quality control (QC) data from the Kennedy Space Center's 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler for use in vehicle wind loads and steering commands. The database has been built to mitigate limitations of using the currently archived databases from weather balloons. The DRWP database contains wind measurements from approximately 2.7-18.6 km altitude at roughly five minute intervals for the August 1997 to December 2009 period of record, and the extensive QC process was designed to remove spurious data from various forms of atmospheric and non-atmospheric artifacts. The QC process is largely based on DRWP literature, but two new algorithms have been developed to remove data contaminated by convection and excessive first guess propagations from the Median Filter First Guess Algorithm. In addition to describing the automated and manual QC process in detail, this paper describes the extent of the data retained. Roughly 58% of all possible wind observations exist in the database, with approximately 100 times as many complete profile sets existing relative to the EV44 balloon databases. This increased sample of near-continuous wind profile measurements may help increase launch availability by reducing the uncertainty of wind changes during launch countdown

Barbre, Robert E., Jr.

2012-01-01

319

Mapping analysis and planning system for the John F. Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Environmental management, impact assessment, research and monitoring are multidisciplinary activities which are ideally suited to incorporate a multi-media approach to environmental problem solving. Geographic information systems (GIS), simulation models, neural networks and expert-system software are some of the advancing technologies being used for data management, query, analysis and display. At the 140,000 acre John F. Kennedy Space Center, the Advanced Software Technology group has been supporting development and implementation of a program that integrates these and other rapidly evolving hardware and software capabilities into a comprehensive Mapping, Analysis and Planning System (MAPS) based in a workstation/local are network environment. An expert-system shell is being developed to link the various databases to guide users through the numerous stages of a facility siting and environmental assessment. The expert-system shell approach is appealing for its ease of data access by management-level decision makers while maintaining the involvement of the data specialists. This, as well as increased efficiency and accuracy in data analysis and report preparation, can benefit any organization involved in natural resources management.

Hall, C. R.; Barkaszi, M. J.; Provancha, M. J.; Reddick, N. A.; Hinkle, C. R.; Engel, B. A.; Summerfield, B. R.

1994-01-01

320

A 20 Year Lifecycle Study for Launch Facilities at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The lifecycle cost analysis was based on corrosion costs for the Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complexes and Mobile Launch Platforms. The first step in the study involved identifying the relevant assets that would be included. Secondly, the identification and collection of the corrosion control cost data for the selected assets was completed. Corrosion control costs were separated into four categories. The sources of cost included the NASA labor for civil servant personnel directly involved in overseeing and managing corrosion control of the assets, United Space Alliance (USA) contractual requirements for performing planned corrosion control tasks, USA performance of unplanned corrosion control tasks, and Testing and Development. Corrosion control operations performed under USA contractual requirements were the most significant contributors to the total cost of corrosion. The operations include the inspection of the pad, routine maintenance of the pad, medium and large scale blasting and repainting activities, and the repair and replacement of structural metal elements. Cost data was collected from the years between 2001 and 2007. These costs were then extrapolated to future years to calculate the 20 year lifecycle costs.

Kolody, Mark R.; Li. Wenyan; Hintze, Paul E.; Calle, Luz-Marina

2009-01-01

321

Nitrogen dynamics in the CELSS Breadboard facility at Kennedy Space Center.  

PubMed

For the past 9 years, the Breadboard Project at Kennedy Space Center has studied the feasibility of using crop plants in bioregenerative life support systems for long-duration space missions. Nitrogen (N) has been emphasized in nutrient balance studies because it is a major plant nutrient, undergoes biogenic and abiogenic transformations, and is often limiting to plant growth under field conditions. Nitrogen budgets have been calculated from experimental results to quantify utilization and losses associated with specific crop production systems. The Breadboard Project has recently completed a 418-day potato crop study using recycled nutrient solution to evaluate the impact of continuous production on life support functions. A continuous production system is desirable in maintaining N balance within a solution because crop uptake rates vary dramatically depending upon the stage of crop development. Strategies for recycling N using biological techniques (e.g., biomass degradation with microbial bioreactors) have required that the production system be modified to distribute inputs more evenly over time. Recovery of N is dependent on the form of N entering the bioreactor and the desired output. Aerobic and anaerobic bioreactors for the recovery of N from waste streams and its transformation into a form usable by higher plants are being designed and tested. PMID:11539163

Stutte, G W

1996-01-01

322

John F. Kennedy, Jr., speaks to the media at KSC's HBO premiere 'From the Earth to the Moon.'  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

John F. Kennedy, Jr., editor-in-chief of George Magazine, speaks with members of the national media at the Home Box Office (HBO) and Imagine Entertainment premiere of the 12-part miniseries 'From the Earth to the Moon' at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The series was filmed in part on location at KSC and dramatizes the human aspects of NASA's efforts to launch Americans to the Moon. The miniseries highlights NASA's Apollo program and the events leading up to and including the six successful missions to the Moon. A special 500-seat theater was constructed next to the Apollo/Saturn V Center for the KSC premiere showing. Speakers at the event included KSC Director Roy Bridges (at right); Jeff Bewkes, chairman and CEO for HBO; and John F. Kennedy, Jr. Also attending the event, which featured the episode entitled '1968,' were Buzz Aldrin, Apollo 11 astronaut, and Al Worden, Apollo 15 astronaut. The original miniseries event, created for HBO by actor Tom Hanks and Imagine Entertainment, will premiere on HBO beginning April 5, 1998.

1998-01-01

323

John F. Kennedy, Jr., speaks to invited guests at KSC's HBO premiere 'From the Earth to the Moon.'  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

John F. Kennedy, Jr., editor-in-chief of George Magazine, greets invited guests at the Home Box Office (HBO) and Imagine Entertainment premiere of the 12-part miniseries 'From the Earth to the Moon' at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The series was filmed in part on location at KSC and dramatizes the human aspects of NASA's efforts to launch Americans to the Moon. The miniseries highlights NASA's Apollo program and the events leading up to and including the six successful missions to the Moon. A special 500- seat theater was constructed next to the Apollo/Saturn V Center for the KSC premiere showing. Speakers at the event included KSC Director Roy Bridges (at right); Jeff Bewkes, chairman and CEO for HBO; and John F. Kennedy, Jr. Also attending the event, which featured the episode entitled '1968,' were Buzz Aldrin, Apollo 11 astronaut, and Al Worden, Apollo 15 astronaut. The original miniseries event, created for HBO by actor Tom Hanks and Imagine Entertainment, will premiere on HBO beginning April 5, 1998.

1998-01-01

324

Shuttle Endeavour Mated to 747 SCA Taxi to Runway for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft No. 911, with the space shuttle orbiter Endeavour securely mounted atop its fuselage, taxies to the runway to begin the ferry flight from Rockwell's Plant 42 at Palmdale, California, where the orbiter was built, to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. At Kennedy, the space vehicle was processed and launched on orbital mission STS-49, which landed at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, 16 May 1992. NASA 911, the second modified 747 that went into service in November 1990, has special support struts atop the fuselage and internal strengthening to accommodate the added weight of the orbiters. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site

1991-01-01

325

Shuttle Endeavour Mated to 747 SCA Takeoff for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft No. 911, with the space shuttle orbiter Endeavour securely mounted atop its fuselage, begins the ferry flight from Rockwell's Plant 42 at Palmdale, California, where the orbiter was built, to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. At Kennedy, the space vehicle was processed and launched on orbital mission STS-49, which landed at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, 16 May 1992. NASA 911, the second modified 747 that went into service in November 1990, has special support struts atop the fuselage and internal strengthening to accommodate the added weight of the orbiters. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now

1991-01-01

326

Analysis of Possible Explosions at Kennedy Space Center Due to Spontaneous Ignition of Hypergolic Propellants  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Constellation Program plan currently calls for the replacement of the Space Shuttle with the ARES I & V spacecraft and booster vehicles to send astronauts to the moon and beyond. Part of the ARES spacecraft is the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), which includes the Crew Module (CM) and Service Module (SM). The Orion CM's main propulsion system and supplies are provided by the SM. The SM is to be processed off line and moved to the Vehicle Assembly Building (V AB) for stacking to the first stage booster motors prior to ARES move to the launch pad. The new Constellation Program philosophy to process in this manner has created a major task for the KSC infrastructure in that conventional QD calculations are no longer viable because of the location of surrounding facilities near the VAB and the Multi Purpose Processing Facility (MPPF), where the SM will be serviced with nearly 18,000 pounds of hypergolic propellants. The Multi-Payload Processing Facility (MPPF) complex, constructed by NASA in 1994, is located just off E Avenue south of the Operations and Checkout (O&C) building in the Kennedy Space Center industrial area. The MPPF includes a high bay and a low bay. The MPPF high bay is 40.2 m (132 ft) long x 18.9 m (60 ft) wide with a ceiling height of 18.9 m (62 ft). The low bay is a 10.4 m (34 ft) long x 10.4 m (34 ft) wide processing area and has a ceiling height of6.1 m (20 ft). The MPPF is currently used to process non-hazardous payloads. Engineering Analysis Inc. (EAI), under contract with ASRC Aerospace, Inc. in conjunction with the Explosive Safety Office, NASA, Kennedy Space Center (KSC), has carried out an analysis of the effects of explosions at KSC in or near various facilities produced by the spontaneous ignition ofhypergolic fuel stored in the CEV SM. The facilities considered included (1) Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) (2) Multi-Payload Processing Facility (MPPF) (3) Canister Rotation Facility (CRF) Subsequent discussion deals with the MPPF analysis. Figure 1 provides a view of the MPPF from the northwest. An interior view ofthe facility is shown in Figure 2. The study was concerned with both blast hazards and hazardous fragments which exceed existing safety standards, as described in Section 2.0. The analysis included both blast and fragmentation effects and was divided into three parts as follows: (1) blast (2) primary fragmentation (3) secondary fragmentation Blast effects are summarized in Section 3.0, primary fragmentation in Section 4.0, and secondary fragmentation (internal and external) in Section 5.0. Conclusions are provided in Section 6.0, while references cited are included in Section 7.0. A more detailed description of the entire study is available in a separate document.

Brown, Stephen

2010-01-01

327

STS-66 Atlantis 747 SCA Ferry Flight Morning Takeoff for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The space shuttle Atlantis atop NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) during takeoff for a return ferry flight to the Kennedy Space Center from Edwards, California. The STS-66 mission was dedicated to the third flight of the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science-3 (ATLAS-3), part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program. The astronauts also deployed and retrieved a free-flying satellite designed to study the middle and lower thermospheres and perform a series of experiments covering life sciences research and microgravity processing. The landing was at 7:34 a.m. (PST) 14 November 1994, after being waved off from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, due to adverse weather. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shutt

1994-01-01

328

Find a Healthcare Professional  

MedlinePLUS

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329

Calculating the Lightning Protection System Downconductors' Grounding Resistance at Launch Complex 39B, Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new Lightning Protection System (LPS) was designed and built at Launch Complex 39B (LC39B), at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, which consists of a catenary wire system (at a height of about 181 meters above ground level) supported by three insulators installed atop three towers in a triangular configuration. Nine downconductors (each about 250 meters long) are connected to the catenary wire system. Each downconductor is connected to a 7.62-meter-radius circular counterpoise conductor with six equally spaced, 6-meter-long vertical grounding rods. Grounding requirements at LC39B call for all underground and aboveground metallic piping, enclosures, raceways, and cable trays, within 7.62 meters of the counterpoise, to be bonded to the counterpoise, which results in a complex interconnected grounding system, given the many metallic piping, raceways, and cable trays that run in multiple directions around LC39B. The complexity of this grounding system makes the fall-of-potential method, which uses multiple metallic rods or stakes, unsuitable for measuring the grounding impedances of the downconductors. To calculate the grounding impedance of the downconductors, an Earth Ground Clamp (EGC) (a stakeless device for measuring grounding impedance) and an Alternative Transient Program (ATP) model of the LPS are used. The EGC is used to measure the loop impedance plus the grounding impedance of each downconductor, and the ATP model is used to calculate the loop impedance of each downconductor circuit. The grounding resistance of the downconductors is then calculated by subtracting the ATP calculated loop impedances from the EGC measurements.

Mata, Carlos T.; Mata, Angel G.

2012-01-01

330

A Diagnostic Analysis of the Kennedy Space Center LDAR Network. 1; Data Characteristics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An analytical framework is developed in which to analyze climatological VHF (66 MHz) radiation measurements taken by the Kennedy Space Center Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) network. A 19-month noise-filtered sample of LDAR observations is examined using this framework. It is found that the climatological VHF source density as observed by LDAR falls off approximately 10 dB every 71 km of ground range away from the network centroid (a 31 km e-folding scale). From this framework it is inferred that the underlying source distribution is likely inverse exponential in amplitude, with a log-slope of 126-147 mW(sup -1/2). The underlying vertical distribution of VHF sources is approximately normally distributed with a mean altitude of 9 km and a standard deviation of 2.7 km; this implies that the loss of below-horizon sources has a negligible effect on column-integrated source densities within 200 km ground range. At medium to far ranges, location errors are primarily radial and have a slightly asymmetric distribution whose first moment increases as range squared. Error moments estimated from observed lightning are significantly higher than those from aircraft-based signal generator or analytic solution estimates, suggesting that timing errors arising from poor signal identification and discrimination may dominate over timing errors arising from nominal sensor resolution. The VHF source properties of individual LDAR-observed flashes are computed and an analytic expression for flash detection efficiency vs. range is derived. This reveals nearly constant flash detection efficiency to 80-94 km range from the network centroid.

Boccippio, D. J.; Heckman, S.; Goodman, S. J.

1999-01-01

331

Texture Modification of the Shuttle Landing Facility Runway at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes the test procedures and the criteria used in selecting an effective runway-surface-texture modification at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to reduce Orbiter tire wear. The new runway surface may ultimately result in an increase of allowable crosswinds for launch and landing operations. The modification allows launch and landing operations in 20-knot crosswinds, if desired. This 5-knot increase over the previous 15-knot limit drastically increases landing safety and the ability to make on-time launches to support missions in which Space Station rendezvous are planned. The paper presents the results of an initial (1988) texture modification to reduce tire spin-up wear and then describes a series of tests that use an instrumented ground-test vehicle to compare tire friction and wear characteristics, at small scale, of proposed texture modifications placed into the SLF runway surface itself. Based on these tests, three candidate surfaces were chosen to be tested at full-scale by using a highly modified and instrumented transport aircraft capable of duplicating full Orbiter landing profiles. The full-scale Orbiter tire testing revealed that tire wear could be reduced approximately by half with either of two candidates. The texture-modification technique using a Humble Equipment Company Skidabrader(trademark) shotpeening machine proved to be highly effective, and the entire SLF runway surface was modified in September 1994. The extensive testing and evaluation effort that preceded the selection of this particular surface-texture-modification technique is described herein.

Daugherty, Robert H.; Yager, Thomas J.

1997-01-01

332

Crop production data for bioregenerative life support: Observations from testing at NASA's Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

NASA s Biomass Production Chamber BPC at Kennedy Space Center was decommissioned ca 1998 but in the preceding decade several crop tests were conducted that have not been reported in the open literature These included monoculture studies with wheat soybean potato and tomato For each of these studies 20 m 2 of crops were grown in an atmospherically closed chamber 113 m 3 vol using a nutrient film hydroponic technique along with elevated CO 2 1000 or 1200 mu mol mol -1 Canopy light PAR levels ranged from 30 to 85 mol m -2 d -1 depending on the crop and selected photoperiod Total biomass DM productivities reached 40 g m -2 d -1 for wheat 16 g m -2 d -1 for soybean 33 g m -2 d -1 for potato and 20 g m -2 d -1 for tomato Edible biomass DM productivities reached 13 g m -2 d -1 for wheat 6 g m -2 d -1 for soybean 20 g m -2 d -1 for potato and 10 g m -2 d -1 for tomato The highest radiation use efficiencies for biomass were 0 60 g DM mol -1 PAR for wheat 0 50 g mol -1 for soybean 0 95 g mol -1 for potato and 0 51 g mol -1 for tomato The highest radiation use efficiencies for edible biomass were 0 22 g DM mol -1 for wheat 0 18 g mol -1 for soybean 0 58 g mol -1 for potato and 0 25 g mol -1 for tomato Use of transplanting cycles or spacing techniques to reduce open gaps between plants early in growth would have improved productivities and radiation use efficiencies for soybeans potatoes and

Wheeler, R. M.; Mackowiak, C. L.; Stutte, G. W.; Yorio, N. C.; Ruffe, L. M.; Sager, J. C.; Knott, W. M.

333

Exploration of the Theoretical Physical Capacity of the John F. Kennedy International Airport Runway System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A design study was completed to explore the theoretical physical capacity (TPC) of the John F. Kennedy International Airport (KJFK) runway system for a northflow configuration assuming impedance-free (to throughput) air traffic control functionality. Individual runways were modeled using an agent-based, airspace simulation tool, the Airspace Concept Evaluation System (ACES), with all runways conducting both departures and arrivals on a first-come first-served (FCFS) scheduling basis. A realistic future flight schedule was expanded to 3.5 times the traffic level of a selected baseline day, September 26, 2006, to provide a steady overdemand state for KJFK runways. Rules constraining departure and arrival operations were defined to reflect physical limits beyond which safe operations could no longer be assumed. Safety buffers to account for all sources of operational variability were not included in the TPC estimate. Visual approaches were assumed for all arrivals to minimize inter-arrival spacing. Parallel runway operations were assumed to be independent based on lateral spacing distances. Resulting time intervals between successive airport operations were primarily constrained by same-runway and then by intersecting-runway spacing requirements. The resulting physical runway capacity approximates a theoretical limit that cannot be exceeded without modifying runway interaction assumptions. Comparison with current KJFK operational limits for a north-flow runway configuration indicates a substantial throughput gap of approximately 48%. This gap may be further analyzed to determine which part may be feasibly bridged through the deployment of advanced systems and procedures, and which part cannot, because it is either impossible or not cost-effective to control. Advanced systems for bridging the throughput gap may be conceptualized and simulated using this same experimental setup to estimate the level of gap closure achieved.

Neitzke, Kurt W.; Guerreiro, Nelson M.

2014-01-01

334

The analysis of rapidly developing fog at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report documents fog precursors and fog climatology at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Florida from 1986 to 1990. The major emphasis of this report focuses on rapidly developing fog events that would affect the less than 7-statute mile visibility rule for End-Of-Mission (EOM) Shuttle landing at KSC (Rule 4-64(A)). The Applied Meteorology Unit's (AMU's) work is to: develop a data base for study of fog associated weather conditions relating to violations of this landing constraint; develop forecast techniques or rules-of-thumb to determine whether or not current conditions are likely to result in an acceptable condition at landing; validate the forecast techniques; and transition techniques to operational use. As part of the analysis the fog events were categorized as either advection, pre-frontal or radiation. As a result of these analyses, the AMU developed a fog climatological data base, identified fog precursors and developed forecaster tools and decision trees. The fog climatological analysis indicates that during the fog season (October to April) there is a higher risk for a visibility violation at KSC during the early morning hours (0700 to 1200 UTC), while 95 percent of all fog events have dissipated by 1600 UTC. A high number of fog events are characterized by a westerly component to the surface wind at KSC (92 percent) and 83 percent of the fog events had fog develop west of KSC first (up to 2 hours). The AMU developed fog decision trees and forecaster tools that would help the forecaster identify fog precursors up to 12 hours in advance. Using the decision trees as process tools ensures the important meteorological data are not overlooked in the forecast process. With these tools and a better understanding of fog formation in the local KSC area, the Shuttle weather support forecaster should be able to give the Launch and Flight Directors a better KSC fog forecast with more confidence.

Wheeler, Mark M.; Atchison, Michael K.; Schumann, Robin; Taylor, Greg E.; Yersavich, Ann; Warburton, John D.

1994-01-01

335

Kennedy Space Center: Creating a Spaceport Reality from the Dreams of Many  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On December 17, 1903, Orville Wright piloted the first powered airplane only 20 feet above the ground near Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The flight lasted 12 seconds and covered 120 feet. Who would have guessed that the bizarre looking contraption developed by brothers in the bicycle business would lay the ground work eventually resulting in over a million passengers moved daily in a sky filled with the contrails of jets flying at over 30,000 feet in elevation and over 500 miles per hour. Similarly, who would have guessed that the destructive nature of V-2 rockets of Germany would spark the genesis of spaceflight to explore our solar system and beyond? Yet the interest in using the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) continues to grow. Potential customers have expressed interest in KSC as a location for testing new rocket engines, servicing the world's largest airborne launching platform for drop-launch rockets, developing multi-use launch platforms that permit diverse customers to use the same launch platform, developing new spacecraft, and implementing advanced modifications for lifting 150 metric ton payloads to low earth orbit. The multitude of customers has grown and with this growth comes a need to provide a command, control, communication, and range infrastructure that maximizes flexibility and reconfigurability to address a much more frequent launch rate of diverse vehicles and spacecraft. The Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) Program Office at KSC is embarking upon these developments to realize the dream of a robust spaceport. Many unique technical trade studies have been completed or are underway to successfully transition KSC into a multi-user customer focused spaceport. Like the evolution of the airplane, GSDO is working to transform KSC infrastructures that will turn once unthinkable space opportunities into a reality for today.

Gray, James A.; Colloredo, Scott

2012-01-01

336

Dry heat effects on survival of indigenous soil particle microflora and particle viability studies of Kennedy Space Center soil  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Research efforts were concentrated on attempts to obtain data concerning the dry heat resistance of particle microflora in Kennedy Space Center soil samples. The in situ dry heat resistance profiles at selected temperatures for the aggregate microflora on soil particles of certain size ranges were determined. Viability profiles of older soil samples were compared with more recently stored soil samples. The effect of increased particle numbers on viability profiles after dry heat treatment was investigated. These soil particle viability data for various temperatures and times provide information on the soil microflora response to heat treatment and are useful in making selections for spacecraft sterilization cycles.

Ruschmeyer, O. R.; Pflug, I. J.; Gove, R.; Heisserer, Y.

1975-01-01

337

Creating Processes Associated with Providing Government Goods and Services Under the Commercial Space Launch Act at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has decided to write its agreements under the Commercial Space Launch Act (CSLA) authority to cover a broad range of categories of support that KSC could provide to our commercial partner. Our strategy was to go through the onerous process of getting the agreement in place once and allow added specificity and final cost estimates to be documented on a separate Task Order Request (TOR). This paper is written from the implementing engineering team's perspective. It describes how we developed the processes associated with getting Government support to our emerging commercial partners, such as SpaceX and reports on our success to date.

Letchworth, Janet F.

2011-01-01

338

Biodiversity and Ecology of Amphibians and Reptiles of the Kennedy Space Center: 1998 Close-Out Report to NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since 1992, there have been researchers have been studying the population ecology and conservation biology of the amphibians and reptiles of the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) This research is an outgrowth of my Master's work in the late 1970's under Lew Ehrhart at UCF. The primary emphasis of our studies are (1) examination of long-term changes in the abundance of amphibians and reptile populations, (2) occurrence and effects of Upper Respiratory Tract Disease (URTD) in gopher tortoises (Gopherus polyphemus), and (3) ecological studies of selected species.

Sigel, Richard A.

1999-01-01

339

[Prosthetic rehabilitation by removable prostheses with distribution of force by means of wires in Kennedy 4th class cases].  

PubMed

Prosthetic rehabilitation in cases of Kennedy class 4th, particularly when the from gap is extensive, presents problems of both aesthetic (lack of front teeth) and functional nature that are not easy to solve. On one side a mixed dental and mucosa support must be obtained while on the other over-loading of the abutment teeth must be avoided by distributing force axially and unformly. This is done by using a special type of prosthesis described here where force is distributed by means of wires. Cases treated like this and followed up have shown positive results as regards both clinical and mechanical results. PMID:372784

Pezzoli, M; Borio, P S

1978-01-01

340

Forecasting Cool Season Daily Peak Winds at Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The expected peak wind speed for the day is an important element in the daily 24-Hour and Weekly Planning Forecasts issued by the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) for planning operations at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). The morning outlook for peak speeds also begins the warning decision process for gusts ^ 35 kt, ^ 50 kt, and ^ 60 kt from the surface to 300 ft. The 45 WS forecasters have indicated that peak wind speeds are a challenging parameter to forecast during the cool season (October-April). The 45 WS requested that the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) develop a tool to help them forecast the speed and timing of the daily peak and average wind, from the surface to 300 ft on KSC/CCAFS during the cool season. The tool must only use data available by 1200 UTC to support the issue time of the Planning Forecasts. Based on observations from the KSC/CCAFS wind tower network, surface observations from the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), and CCAFS upper-air soundings from the cool season months of October 2002 to February 2007, the AMU created multiple linear regression equations to predict the timing and speed of the daily peak wind speed, as well as the background average wind speed. Several possible predictors were evaluated, including persistence, the temperature inversion depth, strength, and wind speed at the top of the inversion, wind gust factor (ratio of peak wind speed to average wind speed), synoptic weather pattern, occurrence of precipitation at the SLF, and strongest wind in the lowest 3000 ft, 4000 ft, or 5000 ft. Six synoptic patterns were identified: 1) surface high near or over FL, 2) surface high north or east of FL, 3) surface high south or west of FL, 4) surface front approaching FL, 5) surface front across central FL, and 6) surface front across south FL. The following six predictors were selected: 1) inversion depth, 2) inversion strength, 3) wind gust factor, 4) synoptic weather pattern, 5) occurrence of precipitation at the SLF, and 6) strongest wind in the lowest 3000 ft. The forecast tool was developed as a graphical user interface with Microsoft Excel to help the forecaster enter the variables, and run the appropriate regression equations. Based on the forecaster's input and regression equations, a forecast of the day's peak and average wind is generated and displayed. The application also outputs the probability that the peak wind speed will be ^ 35 kt, 50 kt, and 60 kt.

Barrett, Joe, III; Short, David; Roeder, William

2008-01-01

341

Development and implementation of a scrub habitat compensation plan for Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Kennedy Space Center (KSC), located on Merritt Island on the east coast of central Florida, is one of three remaining major populations of the Florida Scrub Jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens coerulescens), listed as threatened by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) since 1987. Construction of new facilities by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) on KSC over the next five years has the potential to impact up to 193 ac (78.1 ha) of Scrub Jay habitat. Under an early consultation process with the Endangered Species Office of the USFWS, NASA agreed to a compensation plan for loss of Scrub Jay habitat. The compensation plan required NASA to restore or create scrub on KSC at a 2:1 ratio for that lost. The compensation plan emphasized restoration of scrub habitat that is of marginal or declining suitability to Scrub Jays because it has remained unburned. Although prescribed burning has been conducted by the USFWS Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge (MINWR) for more than ten years, significant areas of scrub remain unburned because they have been excluded from fire management units or because landscape fragmentation and a period of fire suppression allowed scrub to reach heights and diameters that are fire resistant. For such areas, mechanical cutting followed by prescribed burning was recommended for restoration. A second part of the restoration plan is an experimental study of scrub reestablishment (i.e., creation) on abandoned, well drained agricultural sites by planting scrub oaks and other scrub plants. The compensation plan identified 260 ac (105 ha) of scrub restoration in four areas and a 40 ac (16 ha) scrub creation site. Monitoring of restoration sites required under the plan included: establishing permanent vegetation sample transects before treatment and resampling annually for ten years after treatment, and color banding Scrub Jays to determine territories prior to treatment followed by monitoring reproductive success and survival for ten years after treatment. Monitoring scrub creation sites included determining survival of planted material for five years and establishing permanent transects to follow vegetation development for ten years after planting. Scrub Jay monitoring of creation sites is incorporated with that of adjacent restoration sites.

Schmalzer, Paul A.; Breininger, David R.; Adrian, Frederic W.; Schaub, Ron; Duncan, Brean W.

1994-01-01

342

Recommendations for Safe Separation Distances from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) Using a Heat-Flux-Based Analytical Approach (Abridged)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was requested to provide computational modeling to support the establishment of a safe separation distance surrounding the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The two major objectives of the study were 1) establish a methodology based on thermal flux to determine safe separation distances from the Kennedy Space Center's (KSC's) Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) with large numbers of solid propellant boosters containing hazard division 1.3 classification propellants, in case of inadvertent ignition; and 2) apply this methodology to the consideration of housing eight 5-segment solid propellant boosters in the VAB. The results of the study are contained in this report.

Cragg, Clinton H.; Bowman, Howard; Wilson, John E.

2011-01-01

343

Forecasting Lightning at Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) developed a set of statistical forecast equations that provide a probability of lightning occurrence on Kennedy Space Center (KSC) I Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) for the day during the warm season (May September). The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) forecasters at CCAFS in Florida include a probability of lightning occurrence in their daily 24-hour and weekly planning forecasts, which are briefed at 1100 UTC (0700 EDT). This information is used for general scheduling of operations at CCAFS and KSC. Forecasters at the Spaceflight Meteorology Group also make thunderstorm forecasts for the KSC/CCAFS area during Shuttle flight operations. Much of the current lightning probability forecast at both groups is based on a subjective analysis of model and observational data. The objective tool currently available is the Neumann-Pfeffer Thunderstorm Index (NPTI, Neumann 1971), developed specifically for the KSCICCAFS area over 30 years ago. However, recent studies have shown that 1-day persistence provides a better forecast than the NPTI, indicating that the NPTI needed to be upgraded or replaced. Because they require a tool that provides a reliable estimate of the daily thunderstorm probability forecast, the 45 WS forecasters requested that the AMU develop a new lightning probability forecast tool using recent data and more sophisticated techniques now possible through more computing power than that available over 30 years ago. The equation development incorporated results from two research projects that investigated causes of lightning occurrence near KSCICCAFS and over the Florida peninsula. One proved that logistic regression outperformed the linear regression method used in NPTI, even when the same predictors were used. The other study found relationships between large scale flow regimes and spatial lightning distributions over Florida. Lightning, probabilities based on these flow regimes were used as candidate predictors in the equation development. Fifteen years (1 989-2003) of warm season data were used to develop the forecast equations. The data sources included a local network of cloud-to-ground lightning sensors called the Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS), 1200 UTC Florida synoptic soundings, and the 1000 UTC CCAFS sounding. Data from CGLSS were used to determine lightning occurrence for each day. The 1200 UTC soundings were used to calculate the synoptic-scale flow regimes and the 1000 UTC soundings were used to calculate local stability parameters, which were used as candidate predictors of lightning occurrence. Five logistic regression forecast equations were created through careful selection and elimination of the candidate predictors. The resulting equations contain five to six predictors each. Results from four performance tests indicated that the equations showed an increase in skill over several standard forecasting methods, good reliability, an ability to distinguish between non-lightning and lightning days, and good accuracy measures and skill scores. Given the overall good performance the 45 WS requested that the equations be transitioned to operations and added to the current set of tools used to determine the daily lightning probability of occurrence.

Lambert, Winfred; Wheeler, Mark; Roeder, William

2005-01-01

344

Calculating the Lightning Protection System Downconductors' Grounding Resistance at Launch Complex 39B, Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new Lightning Protection System (LPS) was designed and built at Launch Complex 39B (LC39B), at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Florida, which consists of a catenary wire system (at a height of about 181 meters above ground level) supported by three insulation installed atop three towers in a triangular configuration. Nine downconductors (each about 250 meters long) are connected to the catenary wire system. Each downconductor is connected to a 7.62-meter-radius circular counterpoise conductor with six equally spaced. 6-meter-1ong vertical grounding rods. Grounding requirements at LC39B call for all underground and above ground metallic piping. enclosures, raceways. and. cable trays. within 7.62 meters of. counterpoise, to be bonded to the counterpoise, which results in a complex interconnected grounding system, given the many metallic piping, raceways and cable trays that run in multiple directions around LC39B.

Mata, Carlos; Mata, Angel

2011-01-01

345

The Distribution of Cloud to Ground Lightning Strike Intensities and Associated Magnetic Inductance Fields Near the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lightning strike location and peak current are monitored operationally in the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) area by the Cloud to Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS). The present study compiles ten years worth of CGLSS data into a database of near strikes. Using shuffle launch platform LP39A as a convenient central point, all strikes recorded within a 20-mile radius for the period of record O R ) from January 1, 1993 to December 31,2002 were included in the subset database. Histograms and cumulative probability curves are produced for both strike intensity (peak current, in kA) and the corresponding magnetic inductance fields (in A/m). Results for the full POR have application to launch operations lightning monitoring and post-strike test procedures.

Burns, Lee; Decker, Ryan

2005-01-01

346

Modifications to the Objective Lightning Probability Forecast Tool at Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) includes the probability of lightning occurrence in their 24-Hour and Weekly Planning Forecasts, briefed at 0700 EDT for daily operations planning on Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and CCAFS. This forecast is based on subjective analyses of model and observational data and output from an objective tool developed by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU). This tool was developed over two phases (Lambert and Wheeler 2005, Lambert 2007). It consists of five equations, one for each warm season month (May-Sep), that calculate the probability of lightning occurrence for the day and a graphical user interface (GUI) to display the output. The Phase I and II equations outperformed previous operational tools by a total of 56%. Based on this success, the 45 WS tasked the AMU with Phase III to improve the tool further.

Crawford, Winifred; Roeder, William

2010-01-01

347

Aircraft measurements of electrified clouds at Kennedy Space Center. Part 2: Case study: 4 November 1988 (88309)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the fall of 1988, a Schweizer airplane equipped to measure electric field and other meteorological parameters flew over Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in a program to study clouds defined in the existing launch restriction criteria. A case study is presented of a single flight over KSC on November 4, 1988. This flight was chosen for two reasons: (1) the clouds were weakly electrified, and no lightning was reported during the flight; and (2) electric field mills in the surface array at KSC indicated field strengths greater than 3 kV/m, yet the aircraft flying directly over them at an altitude of 3.4 km above sea level measured field strengths of less than 1.6 kV/m. A weather summary, sounding description, record of cloud types, and an account of electric field measurements are included.

Jones, J. J.; Winn, W. P.; Hunyady, S. J.; Moore, C. B.; Bullock, J. W.

1990-01-01

348

Update to the Lightning Probability Forecast Equations at Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This conference presentation describes the improvement of a set of lightning probability forecast equations that are used by the 45th Weather Squadron forecasters for their daily 1100 UTC (0700 EDT) weather briefing during the warm season months of May- September. This information is used for general scheduling of operations at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy Space Center. Forecasters at the Spaceflight Meteorology Group also make thunderstorm forecasts during Shuttle flight operations. Five modifications were made by the Applied Meteorology Unit: increased the period of record from 15 to 17 years, changed the method of calculating the flow regime of the day, calculated a new optimal layer relative humidity, used a new smoothing technique for the daily climatology, and used a new valid area. The test results indicated that the modified equations showed and increase in skill over the current equations, good reliability, and an ability to distinguish between lightning and non-lightning days.

Lambert, Winifred; Roeder, William

2007-01-01

349

Update to the Lightning Probability Forecast Equations at Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This conference presentation describes the improvement of a set of lightning probability forecast equations that are used by the 45th Weather Squadron forecasters for their daily 1100 UTC (0700 EDT) weather briefing during the warm season months of May-September. This information is used for general scheduling of operations at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy Space Center. Forecasters at the Spaceflight Meteorology Group also make thunderstorm forecasts during Shuttle flight operations. Five modifications were made by the Applied Meteorology Unit: increased the period of record from 15 to 17 years, changed the method of calculating the flow regime of the day, calculated a new optimal layer relative humidity, used a new smoothing technique for the daily climatology, and used a new valid area. The test results indicated that the modified equations showed and increase in skill over the current equations, good reliability, and an ability to distinguish between lightning and non-lightning days.

Lambert, Winifred; Roeder, William

2007-01-01

350

Remote measurement utilizing NASA's scanning laser Doppler systems. Volume 1. Laser Doppler wake vortex tracking at Kennedy Airport  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Test operations of the Scanning Laser Doppler System (SLDS) at Kennedy International Airport (KIA) during August 1974 through June 1975 are reported. A total of 1,619 data runs was recorded with a totally operational system during normal landing operations at KIA. In addition, 53 data runs were made during cooperative flybys with the C880 for a grand total of 1672 recorded vortex tracks. Test crews were in attendance at KIA for 31 weeks, of which 25 weeks were considered operational and the other six were packing, unpacking, setup and check out. Although average activity equates to 67 recorded landing operations per week, two periods of complete runway inactivity spanned 20 days and 13 days, respectively. The operation frequency therefore averaged about 88 operations per week.

Krause, M. C.; Wilson, D. J.; Howle, R. E.; Edwards, B. B.; Craven, C. E.; Jetton, J. L.

1976-01-01

351

[Prosthetic rehabilitation by means of removable dentures with wires for the distribution of forces in Kennedy class 2a and 2a modification 1].  

PubMed

Prosthetic rehabilitation of unilateral distal edentulism (Kennedy class 2) and its combination with intercalated absence on the other side (class 2, modification 1) is discussed. Success obtained in a series of 29 cases followed for 9 yr using a removable prosthesis is described. This solved the difficult problems involved by employing metal wires to distribute the forces axially on the abutment teeth and over the unilateral edentulous ridge, thus creating a mixed dental and mucosal support. PMID:329096

Pezzoli, M; Borio, P S

1977-01-01

352

Studies on the toxic elements and organic degradation products in aquatic bodies and sediments around Kennedy Space Center (KSC) South Mosquito lagoon  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A compilation was put together of research work performed on the aquatic systems around Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The report includes a brief description of the study area, field data and analytical results of all the samples collected during the five visits to KSC up to December 17, 1977. The aquatic area selected for the study is the Southern part of Mosquito Lagoon which extends from the Haulover Canal to the dead end boundary of this lagoon southwards.

Ghuman, G. S.; Menon, M. P.; Emeh, C. O.

1978-01-01

353

Gemcitabine diphosphate choline is a major metabolite linked to the Kennedy pathway in pancreatic cancer models in vivo  

PubMed Central

Background: The modest benefits of gemcitabine (dFdC) therapy in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are well documented, with drug delivery and metabolic lability cited as important contributing factors. We have used a mouse model of PDAC: KRASG12D; p53R172H; pdx-Cre (KPC) that recapitulates the human disease to study dFdC intra-tumoural metabolism. Methods: LC-MS/MS and NMR were used to measure drug and physiological analytes. Cytotoxicity was assessed by the Sulphorhodamine B assay. Results: In KPC tumour tissue, we identified a new, Kennedy pathway-linked dFdC metabolite (gemcitabine diphosphate choline (GdPC)) present at equimolar amounts to its precursor, the accepted active metabolite gemcitabine triphosphate (dFdCTP). Utilising additional subcutaneous PDAC tumour models, we demonstrated an inverse correlation between GdPC/dFdCTP ratios and cytidine triphosphate (CTP). In tumour homogenates in vitro, CTP inhibited GdPC formation from dFdCTP, indicating competition between CTP and dFdCTP for CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (CCT). As the structure of GdPC precludes entry into cells, potential cytotoxicity was assessed by stimulating CCT activity using linoleate in KPC cells in vitro, leading to increased GdPC concentration and synergistic growth inhibition after dFdC addition. Conclusions: GdPC is an important element of the intra-tumoural dFdC metabolic pathway in vivo.

Bapiro, T E; Frese, K K; Courtin, A; Bramhall, J L; Madhu, B; Cook, N; Neesse, A; Griffiths, J R; Tuveson, D A; Jodrell, D I; Richards, F M

2014-01-01

354

An Objective Verification of the North American Mesoscale Model for Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) Launch Weather Officers (LWO's) use the 12-km resolution North American Mesoscale (NAM) model (MesoNAM) text and graphical product forecasts extensively to support launch weather operations. However, the actual performance of the model at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) has not been measured objectively. In order to have tangible evidence of model performance, the 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU; Bauman et ai, 2004) to conduct a detailed statistical analysis of model output compared to observed values. The model products are provided to the 45 WS by ACTA, Inc. and include hourly forecasts from 0 to 84 hours based on model initialization times of 00, 06, 12 and 18 UTC. The objective analysis compared the MesoNAM forecast winds, temperature (T) and dew pOint (T d), as well as the changes in these parameters over time, to the observed values from the sensors in the KSC/CCAFS wind tower network shown in Table 1. These objective statistics give the forecasters knowledge of the model's strengths and weaknesses, which will result in improved forecasts for operations.

Bauman, William H., III

2010-01-01

355

Pseudo-Foster Kennedy syndrome in a patient with anterior ischemic optic neuropathy and a nonbasal glioma.  

PubMed

A 49-year-old woman with a 6-year history of headaches was found to have a pale right optic disc with narrowed retinal arterioles and a congested left optic disc. Her visual acuity was 20/20 in each eye with normal visual fields in May 1983. These findings were attributed to a previous attack of non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION). She had a normal neurologic examination and a normal head computed tomographic (CT) scan performed 2 years prior to her initial ophthalmologic evaluation. She was followed over the next 2 years without change in her fundus examination. In December 1987, after a generalized tonic-clonic seizure, she was found to have a large right frontoparietal mass without direct impingement on the optic nerves, or chiasm on neuroradiological studies. At this time she developed marked papilledema in the left eye with a pale optic disc in the right eye remaining unchanged. Histopathological diagnosis of malignant glioma was made. Two diseases, ischemic optic neuropathy and glioma, in one patient represents a bizarre example of the pseudo-Foster Kennedy syndrome. PMID:2144536

Limaye, S R; Adler, J

1990-09-01

356

Summary of 2011 Direct and Nearby Lightning Strikes to Launch Complex 39B, Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A Lightning Protection System (LPS) was designed and built at Launch Complex 39B (LC39B), at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida in 2009. This LPS was instrumented with comprehensive meteorological and lightning data acquisition systems that were deployed from late 2010 until mid 2011. The first direct strikes to the LPS were recorded in March of 2011, when a limited number of sensors had been activated. The lightning instrumentation system detected a total of 70 nearby strokes and 19 direct strokes to the LPS, 2 of the 19 direct strokes to the LPS had two simultaneous ground attachment points (in both instances one channel terminated on the LPS and the other on the nearby ground). Additionally, there are more unaccounted nearby strokes seen on video records for which limited data was acquired either due to the distance of the stroke or the settings of the data acquisition system. Instrumentation deployment chronological milestones, a summary of lightning strikes (direct and nearby), high speed video frames, downconductor currents, and dH/dt and dE/dt typical waveforms for direct and nearby strokes are presented.

Mata, C.T.; Mata, A.G.

2012-01-01

357

Kennedy Space Center's NASA/Contractor Team-Centered Total Quality Management Seminar: Results, methods, and lessons learned  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It is apparent to everyone associated with the Nation's aeronautics and space programs that the challenge of continuous improvement can be reasonably addressed only if NASA and its contractors act together in a fully integrated and cooperative manner that transcends the traditional boundaries of proprietary interest. It is, however, one thing to assent to the need for such integration and cooperation; it is quite another thing to undertake the hard tasks of turning such a need into action. Whatever else total quality management is, it is fundamentally a team-centered and team-driven process of continuous improvement. The introduction of total quality management at KSC, therefore, has given the Center a special opportunity to translate the need for closer integration and cooperation among all its organizations into specific initiatives. One such initiative that NASA and its contractors have undertaken at KSC is a NASA/Contractor team-centered Total Quality Management Seminar. It is this seminar which is the subject of this paper. The specific purposes of this paper are to describe the following: Background, development, and evolution of Kennedy Space Center's Total Quality Management Seminar; Special characteristics of the seminar; Content of the seminar; Meaning and utility of a team-centered design for TQM training; Results of the seminar; Use that one KSC contractor, EG&G Florida, Inc. has made of the seminar in its Total Quality Management initiative; and Lessons learned.

Kinlaw, Dennis C.; Eads, Jeannette

1992-01-01

358

Developing a Peak Wind Probability Forecast Tool for Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This conference presentation describes the development of a peak wind forecast tool to assist forecasters in determining the probability of violating launch commit criteria (LCC) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) in east-central Florida. The peak winds are an important forecast element for both the Space Shuttle and Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) programs. The LCC define specific peak wind thresholds for each launch operation that cannot be exceeded in order to ensure the safety of the vehicle. The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) has found that peak winds are a challenging parameter to forecast, particularly in the cool season months of October through April. Based on the importance of forecasting peak winds, the 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to develop a short-range peak-wind forecast tool to assist in forecasting LCC violations. The tool will include climatologies of the 5-minute mean and peak winds by month, hour, and direction, and probability distributions of the peak winds as a function of the 5-minute mean wind speeds.

Lambert, WInifred; Roeder, William

2007-01-01

359

Gemcitabine diphosphate choline is a major metabolite linked to the Kennedy pathway in pancreatic cancer models in vivo.  

PubMed

Background:The modest benefits of gemcitabine (dFdC) therapy in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are well documented, with drug delivery and metabolic lability cited as important contributing factors. We have used a mouse model of PDAC: KRAS(G12D); p53(R172H); pdx-Cre (KPC) that recapitulates the human disease to study dFdC intra-tumoural metabolism.Methods:LC-MS/MS and NMR were used to measure drug and physiological analytes. Cytotoxicity was assessed by the Sulphorhodamine B assay.Results:In KPC tumour tissue, we identified a new, Kennedy pathway-linked dFdC metabolite (gemcitabine diphosphate choline (GdPC)) present at equimolar amounts to its precursor, the accepted active metabolite gemcitabine triphosphate (dFdCTP). Utilising additional subcutaneous PDAC tumour models, we demonstrated an inverse correlation between GdPC/dFdCTP ratios and cytidine triphosphate (CTP). In tumour homogenates in vitro, CTP inhibited GdPC formation from dFdCTP, indicating competition between CTP and dFdCTP for CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (CCT). As the structure of GdPC precludes entry into cells, potential cytotoxicity was assessed by stimulating CCT activity using linoleate in KPC cells in vitro, leading to increased GdPC concentration and synergistic growth inhibition after dFdC addition.Conclusions:GdPC is an important element of the intra-tumoural dFdC metabolic pathway in vivo. PMID:24874484

Bapiro, T E; Frese, K K; Courtin, A; Bramhall, J L; Madhu, B; Cook, N; Neesse, A; Griffiths, J R; Tuveson, D A; Jodrell, D I; Richards, F M

2014-07-15

360

Temporal, Spatial, and Diurnal Patterns in Avian Activity at the Shuttle Landing Facility, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Spatial and temporal patterns in bird abundance within the five-mile airspace at the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) on John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, USA were investigated for purposes of quantifying Bird Aircraft Strike Hazards (BASH). The airspace is surrounded by the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge (MINWR) which provides habitat for approximately 331 resident and migratory bird species. Potential bird strike hazards were greatest around sunrise and sunset for most avian taxonomic groups, including wading birds, most raptors, pelicans, gulls/terns, shorebirds, and passerines. Turkey Vultures and Black Vultures were identified as a primary threat to aircraft operations and were represented in 33% of the samples. Diurnal vulture activity varied seasonally with the development of air thermals in the airspace surrounding the SLF. Variation in the presence and abundance of migratory species was shown for American Robins, swallows, and several species of shorebirds. Analyses of bird activities provides for planning of avionics operations during periods of low-dsk and allows for risk minimization measures during periods of high-risk.

Larson, Vickie L.; Rowe, Sean P.; Breininger, David R.

1997-01-01

361

An analysis of maximum vertical gusts recorded at NASA's 150-meter ground winds tower facility at Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A statistical summary is presented of vertical wind speed data recorded at NASA's 150-Meter Ground Winds Tower Facility on Merritt Island, Kennedy Space Center, Florida. One year of continuous around-the-clock vertical wind speed measurements processed by the Automatic Data Acquisition System (ADAS) is classified as a function of tower level (10, 18, 60, and 150 meters) and period of reference day, month, season: winter (October through March) and summer (April through September), and annual. Intensity, frequency, time of occurrence, prevailing conditions, etc., of the daily maximum vertical gusts (i.e., updraft and downdraft) are determined. The results are compared with the vertical gusts associated with the daily maximum horizontal gust. The intent of this summarization of vertical wind speed data is to provide a general description of wind flow in the lower 150 meters of the atmosphere for the identification of hazards involved in wind shear encounters relative to ascent and descent of the Space Shuttle and conventional aircraft.

Alexander, M. B.

1977-01-01

362

Measurement of Insulation Compaction in the Cryogenic Fuel Tanks at Kennedy Space Center by Fast/Thermal Neutron Techniques  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The liquid hydrogen and oxygen cryogenic storage tanks at John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) use expanded perlite as thermal insulation. Th ere is evidence that some of the perlite has compacted over time, com promising the thermal performance and possibly also structural integr ity of the tanks. Therefore an Non-destructive Testing (NDT) method for measuring the perlite density or void fraction is urgently needed. Methods based on neutrons are good candidates because they can readil y penetrate through the 1.75 cm outer steel shell and through the ent ire 120 cm thickness of the perlite zone. Neutrons interact with the nuclei of materials to produce characteristic gamma rays which are the n detected. The gamma ray signal strength is proportional to the atom ic number density. Consequently, if the perlite is compacted then the count rates in the individual peaks in the gamma ray spectrum will i ncrease. Perlite is a feldspathic volcanic rock made up of the major elements Si, AI, Na, K and 0 along with some water. With commercially available portable neutron generators it is possible to produce simul taneously fluxes of neutrons in two energy ranges: fast (14 MeV) and thermal (25 meV). Fast neutrons produce gamma rays by inelastic scatt ering which is sensitive to Fe and O. Thermal neutrons produce gamma rays by radiative capture in prompt gamma neutron activation (PGNA) and this is sensitive to Si, AI, Na, Kand H. Thus the two energy ranges produce complementary information. The R&D program has three phases: numerical simulations of neutron and gamma ray transport with MCNP s oftware, evaluation of the system in the laboratory on test articles and finally mapping of the perlite density in the cryogenic tanks at KSC. The preliminary MCNP calculations have shown that the fast/therma l neutron NDT method is capable of distinguishing between expanded an d compacted perlite with excellent statistics.

Livingston, R. A.; Schweitzer, J. S.; Parsons, Ann M.; Arens, Ellen E.

2010-01-01

363

Negativity for two blocks in the one-dimensional spin-1 Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki model  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we compute the entanglement, as quantified by negativity, between two blocks of length L{sub A} and L{sub B}, separated by L sites in the one-dimensional spin-1 Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki (AKLT) model. We took the model with two different boundary conditions. We consider the case of N spin-1 particles in the bulk and one spin-1/2 particle at each boundary, which constitute a unique ground state, and the case of just spin 1, even at the end of the chain, where the degeneracy of the ground state is 4. In both scenarios we made a partition consisting of two blocks A and B, containing L{sub A} and L{sub B} sites, respectively. The separation of these two blocks is L. In both cases we explicitly obtain the reduced density matrix of the blocks A and B. We prove that the negativity in the first case vanishes identically for L{>=}1, while in the second scenario it may approach a constant value N=1/2 for each degenerate eigenstate depending on the way one constructs these eigenstates. However, as there is some freedom in constructing these eigenstates, vanishing entanglement is also possible in the latter case. Additionally, we also compute the entanglement between noncomplementary blocks in the case of periodic boundary conditions for the spin-1 AKLT model for which there is a unique ground state. Even in this case, we find that the negativity of separated blocks of spins is zero.

Santos, Raul A.; Korepin, V.; Bose, Sougato [C. N. Yang Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-3840 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

2011-12-15

364

Microarray Analysis of Gene Expression by Skeletal Muscle of Three Mouse Models of Kennedy Disease/Spinal Bulbar Muscular Atrophy  

PubMed Central

Background Emerging evidence implicates altered gene expression within skeletal muscle in the pathogenesis of Kennedy disease/spinal bulbar muscular atrophy (KD/SBMA). We therefore broadly characterized gene expression in skeletal muscle of three independently generated mouse models of this disease. The mouse models included a polyglutamine expanded (polyQ) AR knock-in model (AR113Q), a polyQ AR transgenic model (AR97Q), and a transgenic mouse that overexpresses wild type AR solely in skeletal muscle (HSA-AR). HSA-AR mice were included because they substantially reproduce the KD/SBMA phenotype despite the absence of polyQ AR. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed microarray analysis of lower hindlimb muscles taken from these three models relative to wild type controls using high density oligonucleotide arrays. All microarray comparisons were made with at least 3 animals in each condition, and only those genes having at least 2-fold difference and whose coefficient of variance was less than 100% were considered to be differentially expressed. When considered globally, there was a similar overlap in gene changes between the 3 models: 19% between HSA-AR and AR97Q, 21% between AR97Q and AR113Q, and 17% between HSA-AR and AR113Q, with 8% shared by all models. Several patterns of gene expression relevant to the disease process were observed. Notably, patterns of gene expression typical of loss of AR function were observed in all three models, as were alterations in genes involved in cell adhesion, energy balance, muscle atrophy and myogenesis. We additionally measured changes similar to those observed in skeletal muscle of a mouse model of Huntington's Disease, and to those common to muscle atrophy from diverse causes. Conclusions/Significance By comparing patterns of gene expression in three independent models of KD/SBMA, we have been able to identify candidate genes that might mediate the core myogenic features of KD/SBMA.

Mo, Kaiguo; Razak, Zak; Rao, Pengcheng; Yu, Zhigang; Adachi, Hiroaki; Katsuno, Masahisa; Sobue, Gen; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Westwood, J. Timothy; Monks, D. Ashley

2010-01-01

365

Quality-Controlled Wind Data from the Kennedy Space Center 915 Megahertz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Network  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA) Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has installed a five-instrument 915-Megahertz (MHz) Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) system that records atmospheric wind profile properties. The purpose of these profilers is to fill data gaps between the top of the KSC wind tower network and the lowest measurement altitude of the KSC 50-MHz DRWP. The 915-MHz DRWP system has the capability to generate three-dimensional wind data outputs from approximately 150 meters (m) to 6,000 m at roughly 15-minute (min) intervals. NASA s long-term objective is to combine the 915-MHz and 50-MHz DRWP systems to create complete vertical wind profiles up to 18,300 m to be used in trajectory and loads analyses of space vehicles and by forecasters on day-of-launch (DOL). This analysis utilizes automated and manual quality control (QC) processes to remove erroneous and unrealistic wind data returned by the 915-MHz DRWP system. The percentage of data affected by each individual QC check in the period of record (POR) (i.e., January to April 2006) was computed, demonstrating the variability in the amount of data affected by the QC processes. The number of complete wind profiles available at given altitude thresholds for each profiler in the POR was calculated and outputted graphically, followed by an assessment of the number of complete wind profiles available for any profiler in the POR. A case study is also provided to demonstrate the QC process on a day of a known weather event.

Dryden, Rachel L.

2011-01-01

366

A continuation of base-line studies for environmentally monitoring space transportation systems at John F. Kennedy Space Center. Executive summary  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Studies conducted in and around John F. Kennedy Space Center, Merrit Island, Florida were designed to establish baseline conditions for various attributes of the biotic and abiotic environment. Features were described and quantitatively measured. Certain condition were found to be appropriate for the detection and assessment of possible environmental perturbations caused by future NASA activities. These include plant communities, mammal populations, rainfall chemistry, fish populations, and the status of rare and endangered species. On the basis of statistical analysis of quantitative data and logistic considerations, it was possible to refine the kinds and amounts of measurements needed to evaluate perturbations in selected environmental components.

Stout, I. J.

1980-01-01

367

A study of LC-39 cryogenic systems. Part 1: A study of the vacuum insulated transfer lines at Kennedy Space Center. Part 2: Cooldown pressure surges  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The vacuum liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen transfer lines at Kennedy Space Center were studied to evaluate the feasibility of using a condensing gas such as CO2 inside the vacuum spaces to achieve a condensing-vacuum. The study indicates that at ambient temperature, a maximum vacuum hyphen space pressure of 4000 microns is acceptable for the LH2 transfer lines. In addition, the cooldown procedures for the 14-inch cross-country liquid oxygen line was studied using a simplified mathematical model. Preliminary cooldown times are presented for various heat leak rates to the line and for two vent configurations.

Ludtke, P. R.; Voth, R. O.

1971-01-01

368

Effect of a Shore-Oblique Ridge on Beach and Bar Morphodynamics at Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Processes linking beach and bar response to external wave forcing are poorly understood where spatial complexities, such as inner shelf shoals, are present. At NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Cape Canaveral, Florida, two persistant surfzone sand bars occur in a region that also includes cape-associated shoals and multiple shore-oblique ridges at depths below the fair-weather wave base of sediment transport. These features transform incoming deep-water waves, redistributing the spatial pattern of wave energy along- and cross-shore. To observe beach and sandbar response in this complex environment we have collected and georectified hourly beach images at KSC since April 2010. Comparisons of imagery to monthly differential GPS surveys reveal that a double-bar system, with ~25-50 m spacing between crests, has persisted over the last 2 years. Welding of the inner and outer bars occurs intermittently. The preferred welding location coincides with a dune overwash area that has been an erosion hotspot (EHS) over the last decade. Strong nor'easter activity in November 2011 activated wave breaking across a large (~10 km long, ~500 m wide, ~5 m tall) shore-oblique subaqueous ridge that intersects the nearshore system at the EHS. Our observations allow testing of a hypothesis that the ridge controls nearshore morphodynamics through two mechanisms: 1) by focusing, dissipating, and shadowing wave energy, especially during storm events and 2) by providing a sediment source to the nearshore system. The former mechanism is supported through image and survey analysis that shows beach and bar behavior differ updrift and downdrift of the ridge-beach intersection. Three ADCPs were deployed during the early 2010-2011 and late 2011-2012 winter nor'easter seasons to measure wave transformation and current structures in this region. During the most recent deployment, an instrument on the ridge's leeward side was nearly completely buried, yet measured bottom currents (< 50 cm/s) do not imply that significant sediment transport should occur. Rather, we hypothesize that wave breaking over the ridge entrained sediment that was subsequently deposited on the leeward side. This finding suggests that the ridge is mobile and may be a source of sediment to the dynamic nearshore system.

Kline, S. W.; Adams, P. N.; Plant, N. G.; MacKenzie, R. A.; Jaeger, J. M.

2012-12-01

369

Evaluation of the Performance Characteristics of CGLSS II and U.S. NLDN Using Ground-Truth Dalta from Launch Complex 398, Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new comprehensive lightning instrumentation system has been designed for Launch Complex 39B (LC39B) at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. This new instrumentation system includes seven synchronized high-speed video cameras, current sensors installed on the nine downconductors of the new lightning protection system (LPS) for LC39B; four dH/dt, 3-axis measurement stations; and five dE/dt stations composed of two antennas each. The LPS received 8 direct lightning strikes (a total of 19 strokes) from March 31 through December 31 2011. The measured peak currents and locations are compared to those reported by the Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS II) and the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN). Results of comparison are presented and analyzed in this paper.

Mata, C. T.; Mata, A. G.; Rakov, V. A.; Nag, A.; Saul, J.

2012-01-01

370

The 2006 Kennedy Space Center Range Reference Atmosphere Model Validation Study and Sensitivity Analysis to the Performance of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Space Shuttle Vehicle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Range Reference Atmosphere (RRA) is a statistical model that summarizes wind and thermodynamic atmospheric variability from surface to 70 km. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Space Shuttle program, which launches from KSC, utilizes the KSC RRA data to evaluate environmental constraints on various aspects of the vehicle during ascent. An update to the KSC RRA was recently completed. As part of the update, the Natural Environments Branch at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) conducted a validation study and a comparison analysis to the existing KSC RRA database version 1983. Assessments to the Space Shuttle vehicle ascent profile characteristics were performed by JSC/Ascent Flight Design Division to determine impacts of the updated model to the vehicle performance. Details on the model updates and the vehicle sensitivity analyses with the update model are presented.

Burns, Lee; Decker, Ryan; Harrington, Brian; Merry, Carl

2008-01-01

371

Multimedia Information eXchange for I-NET, Inc. at the Kennedy Space Center: A continuing study of the application of worldwideweb technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Multimedia Information eXchange (MIX) is a multimedia information system that accommodates multiple data types and provides consistency across platforms. Information from all over the world can be accessed quickly and efficiently with the Internet-based system. I-NET's MIX uses the World Wide Web and Mosaic graphical user interface. Mosaic is available on all platforms used at I-NET's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) facilities. Key information system design concepts and benefits are reviewed. The MIX system also defines specific configuration and helper application parameters to ensure consistent operations across the entire organization. Guidelines and procedures for other areas of importance in information systems design are also addressed. Areas include: code of ethics, content, copyright, security, system administration, and support.

Metcalf, David

1995-01-01

372

Experimental measurements of the ground cloud growth during the 11 February 1974, Titan-Centaur launch at Kennedy Space Center. [(measurement of rocket exhaust from rocket launching)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Titan-Centaur was launched from Kennedy Space Center on February 11, 1974 at 0948 eastern daylight time. Ground level effluent measurements were obtained from the solid rocket motors for comparison with NASA diffusion models for predicting effluent ground level concentrations and cloud behavior. The results obtained provide a basis for an evaluation of such key model inputs such as cloud rise rate, stabilization altitude, crosswind growth, volume expansion, and cloud trajectory. Ground level effluent measurements were limited because of changing meteorological conditions, incorrect instrument location, and operational problems. Based on the measurement results, operational changes are defined. Photographs of the ground exhaust clouds are shown. The chemical composition of the exhaust gases was analyzed and is given.

Stewart, R. B.; Sentell, R. J.; Gregory, G. L.

1976-01-01

373

Analysis of vector wind change with respect to time for Cape Kennedy, Florida: Wind aloft profile change vs. time, phase 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Wind vector change with respect to time at Cape Kennedy, Florida, is examined according to the theory of multivariate normality. The joint distribution of the four variables represented by the components of the wind vector at an initial time and after a specified elapsed time is hypothesized to be quadravariate normal; the fourteen statistics of this distribution, calculated from fifteen years of twice daily Rawinsonde data are presented by monthly reference periods for each month from 0 to 27 km. The hypotheses that the wind component changes with respect to time is univariate normal, the joint distribution of wind component changes is bivariate normal, and the modulus of vector wind change is Rayleigh, has been tested by comparison with observed distributions. Statistics of the conditional bivariate normal distributions of vector wind at a future time given the vector wind at an initial time are derived. Wind changes over time periods from one to five hours, calculated from Jimsphere data, are presented.

Adelfang, S. I.

1977-01-01

374

Justice and Fairness in the Kennedy Krieger Institute Lead Paint Study: the Ethics of Public Health Research on Less Expensive, Less Effective Interventions  

PubMed Central

The Kennedy Krieger lead paint study stirred controversial questions about whether research designed to develop less expensive interventions that are not as effective as existing treatments can be ethically warranted. Critics questioned the social value of such research and alleged that it sanctions a double standard, exploits participants, and is complicit in perpetuating the social injustice. In response, we demonstrate the propriety of conducting research on interventions that can be extended to the population in need by stipulating the limited conditions in which it is ethically warranted and providing fair terms of participation. We contend that the failure to conduct such research causes greater harm, because it deprives disadvantaged populations of the benefits of imminent incremental improvements in their health conditions.

Buchanan, David R.; Miller, Franklin G.

2006-01-01

375

Tool for Forecasting Cool-Season Peak Winds Across Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The expected peak wind speed for the day is an important element in the daily morning forecast for ground and space launch operations at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) must issue forecast advisories for KSC/CCAFS when they expect peak gusts for >= 25, >= 35, and >= 50 kt thresholds at any level from the surface to 300 ft. In Phase I of this task, the 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to develop a cool-season (October - April) tool to help forecast the non-convective peak wind from the surface to 300 ft at KSC/CCAFS. During the warm season, these wind speeds are rarely exceeded except during convective winds or under the influence of tropical cyclones, for which other techniques are already in use. The tool used single and multiple linear regression equations to predict the peak wind from the morning sounding. The forecaster manually entered several observed sounding parameters into a Microsoft Excel graphical user interface (GUI), and then the tool displayed the forecast peak wind speed, average wind speed at the time of the peak wind, the timing of the peak wind and the probability the peak wind will meet or exceed 35, 50 and 60 kt. The 45 WS customers later dropped the requirement for >= 60 kt wind warnings. During Phase II of this task, the AMU expanded the period of record (POR) by six years to increase the number of observations used to create the forecast equations. A large number of possible predictors were evaluated from archived soundings, including inversion depth and strength, low-level wind shear, mixing height, temperature lapse rate and winds from the surface to 3000 ft. Each day in the POR was stratified in a number of ways, such as by low-level wind direction, synoptic weather pattern, precipitation and Bulk Richardson number. The most accurate Phase II equations were then selected for an independent verification. The Phase I and II forecast methods were compared using an independent verification data set. The two methods were compared to climatology, wind warnings and advisories issued by the 45 WS, and North American Mesoscale (NAM) model (MesoNAM) forecast winds. The performance of the Phase I and II methods were similar with respect to mean absolute error. Since the Phase I data were not stratified by precipitation, this method's peak wind forecasts had a large negative bias on days with precipitation and a small positive bias on days with no precipitation. Overall, the climatology methods performed the worst while the MesoNAM performed the best. Since the MesoNAM winds were the most accurate in the comparison, the final version of the tool was based on the MesoNAM winds. The probability the peak wind will meet or exceed the warning thresholds were based on the one standard deviation error bars from the linear regression. For example, the linear regression might forecast the most likely peak speed to be 35 kt and the error bars used to calculate that the probability of >= 25 kt = 76%, the probability of >= 35 kt = 50%, and the probability of >= 50 kt = 19%. The authors have not seen this application of linear regression error bars in any other meteorological applications. Although probability forecast tools should usually be developed with logistic regression, this technique could be easily generalized to any linear regression forecast tool to estimate the probability of exceeding any desired threshold . This could be useful for previously developed linear regression forecast tools or new forecast applications where statistical analysis software to perform logistic regression is not available. The tool was delivered in two formats - a Microsoft Excel GUI and a Tool Command Language/Tool Kit (Tcl/Tk) GUI in the Meteorological Interactive Data Display System (MIDDS). The Microsoft Excel GUI reads a MesoNAM text file containing hourly forecasts from 0 to 84 hours, from one model run (00 or 12 UTC). The GUI then displays e peak wind speed, average wind speed, and the probability the peak wind wil

Barrett, Joe H., III; Roeder, William P.

2010-01-01

376

MCNP Simulations of Measurement of Insulation Compaction in the Cryogenic Rocket Fuel Tanks at Kennedy Space Center by Fast/Thermal Neutron Techniques  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

MCNP simulations have been run to evaluate the feasibility of using a combination of fast and thermal neutrons as a nondestructive method to measure of the compaction of the perlite insulation in the liquid hydrogen and oxygen cryogenic storage tanks at John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Perlite is a feldspathic volcanic rock made up of the major elements Si, AI, Na, K and 0 along with some water. When heated it expands from four to twenty times its original volume which makes it very useful for thermal insulation. The cryogenic tanks at Kennedy Space Center are spherical with outer diameters of 69-70 feet and lined with a layer of expanded perlite with thicknesses on the order of 120 cm. There is evidence that some of the perlite has compacted over time since the tanks were built 1965, affecting the thermal properties and possibly also the structural integrity of the tanks. With commercially available portable neutron generators it is possible to produce simultaneously fluxes of neutrons in two energy ranges: fast (14 Me V) and thermal (25 me V). The two energy ranges produce complementary information. Fast neutrons produce gamma rays by inelastic scattering, which is sensitive to Fe and O. Thermal neutrons produce gamma rays by prompt gamma neutron activation (PGNA) and this is sensitive to Si, Al, Na, K and H. The compaction of the perlite can be measured by the change in gamma ray signal strength which is proportional to the atomic number densities of the constituent elements. The MCNP simulations were made to determine the magnitude of this change. The tank wall was approximated by a I-dimensional slab geometry with an 11/16" outer carbon steel wall, an inner stainless wall and 120 cm thick perlite zone. Runs were made for cases with expanded perlite, compacted perlite or with various void fractions. Runs were also made to simulate the effect of adding a moderator. Tallies were made for decay-time analysis from t=0 to 10 ms; total detected gamma-rays; detected gamma-rays from thermal neutron reactions d. detected gamma-rays from non-thermal neutron reactions and total detected gamma-rays as a function of depth into the annulus volume. These indicated a number of possible independent metrics of perlite compaction. For example the count rate for perlite elements increased from 3600 to 8500 cps for an increase in perlite density from 6 lbs/lcf to 16.5 lbs/cf. Thus the MCNP simulations have confirmed the feasibility of using neutron methods to map the compaction of perlite in the walls of the cryogenic tanks.

Livingston, R. A.; Schweitzer, J. S.; Parsons, A. M.; Arens, E. E.

2010-01-01

377

Managing birds and controlling aircraft in the Kennedy Airport-Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge complex: the need for hard data and soft opinions  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During the 1980s, the exponential growth of laughing gull (Larus atrfcilla) colonies, from 15 to about 7600 nests in 1990, in the Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge and a correlated increase in the bird-strike rate at nearby John F. Kennedy International Airport (New York City) led to a controversy between wildlife and airport managers over the elimination of the colonies. In this paper, we review data to evaluate if: (1) the colonies have increased the level of risk to the flying public; (2) on-colony population control would reduce the presence of gulls, and subsequently bird strikes, at the airport; and (3) all on-airport management alternatives have been adequately implemented. Since 1979, most (2987, 87%) of the 3444 bird strikes (number of aircraft struck) were actually bird carcasses found near runways (cause of death unknown but assumed to be bird strikes by definition). Of the 457 pilot-reported strikes (mean = 23 + 6 aircraft/yr, N = 20 years), 78 (17%) involved laughing gulls. Since a gull-shooting program was initiated on airport property in 1991, over 50,000 adult laughing gulls have been killed and the number of reported bird strikes involving laughing gulls has declined from 6.9 + 2.9 (1983-1990) to 2.8 + 1.3 (1991-1998) aircraft/yr; nongull reported bird strikes, however, have more than doubled (6.4 + 2.6, 1983-1990; 14.9 + 5.1, 1991-1998). We found no evidence to indicate that on-colony management would yield a reduction of bird strikes at Kennedy Airport. Dietary and mark-recapture studies suggest that 60%-90% of the laughing gulls collected on-airport were either failed breeders and/or nonbreeding birds. We argue that the Jamaica Bay laughing gull colonies, the only ones in New York State, should not be managed at least until all on-airport management alternatives have been properly implemented and demonstrated to be ineffective at reducing bird strikes, including habitat alterations and increasing the capability of the bird control unit to eliminate bird flocks on-airport using nonlethal bird dispersal techniques. Because the gull-shooting program may be resulting in a nonsustainable regional population of laughing gulls (>30% decline), we also recommend that attempts be made to initiate an experimental colony elsewhere on Long Island to determine if colony relocation is a feasible management option.

Brown, K. M.; Erwin, R.M.; Richmond, M.E.; Buckley, P.A.; Tanacredi, J.T.; Avrin, D.

2001-01-01

378

A continuation of base-line studies for environmentally monitoring space transportation systems at John F. Kennedy Space Center. Volume 3, part 2: Ichthyological studies, sailfin molly reproduction study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The applicability of monitoring populations of Poccilia latipinna (sailfin molly) and its reproductive efforts as reliable indicators of environmental effects of aerospace activities in the Kennedy Space Center area was investigated. Results show that the sailfin molly experiences drastic fluctuations in population and reproductive success and is not an appropriate factor for monitoring to establish perturbations of the environment due to space transportation system related activities.

Snelson, F. F., Jr.

1980-01-01

379

Analysis of Wading Bird use of Impounded Wetland Habitat on the Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, 1987-1998  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report summarizes results of the first eleven years of monthly aerial surveys of wading bird use of foraging habitats within impoundments on the Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. Some impoundments were used much more heavily by wading birds than were others. Analysis suggests that an increase in interspersion of open water and vegetated habitats is preferred foraging habitat. Many wading bird species increased their use of vegetated habitat in Fall and Winter when impoundments were flooded. The mean number of wading birds per survey was greatest during the Pre-nesting and Nesting seasons, declined during Post-nesting season, and was lowest during Winter when water levels within impoundments were high. During these times, shallow habitat along the IRL shoreline provided alternative habitats for wading birds. Various measures of monthly precipitation and impoundment water level were well correlated with the numbers of wading birds observed. Numbers of nesting attempts was steady during the study period, with the exception of an unusually high number of attempts in 1990. White Ibis accounted for over half of all wading bird nests counted. The mean number of nests per colony decreased during the study period, and the number of individual colonies increased.

Stolen, Eric D.; Breininger, David R.; Smith, Rebecca B.; Quincy, Charlie (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

380

Statistical Short-Range Guidance for Peak Wind Forecasts on Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Phase III  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This final report describes the development of a peak wind forecast tool to assist forecasters in determining the probability of violating launch commit criteria (LCC) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). The peak winds are an important forecast element for both the Space Shuttle and Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) programs. The LCC define specific peak wind thresholds for each launch operation that cannot be exceeded in order to ensure the safety of the vehicle. The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) has found that peak winds are a challenging parameter to forecast, particularly in the cool season months of October through April. Based on the importance of forecasting peak winds, the 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to develop a short-range peak-wind forecast tool to assist in forecasting LCC violations.The tool includes climatologies of the 5-minute mean and peak winds by month, hour, and direction, and probability distributions of the peak winds as a function of the 5-minute mean wind speeds.

Crawford, Winifred

2010-01-01

381

Peak Wind Forecasts for the Launch-Critical Wind Towers on Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Phase IV  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This final report describes the development of a peak wind forecast tool to assist forecasters in determining the probability of violating launch commit criteria (LCC) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). The peak winds arc an important forecast clement for both the Space Shuttle and Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) programs. The LCC define specific peak wind thresholds for each launch operation that cannot be exceeded in order to ensure the safety of the vehicle. The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) has found that peak winds are a challenging parameter to forecast, particularly in the cool season months of October through April. Based on the importance of forecasting peak winds, the 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to update the statistics in the current peak-wind forecast tool to assist in forecasting LCC violations. The tool includes onshore and offshore flow climatologies of the 5-minute mean and peak winds and probability distributions of the peak winds as a function of the 5-minute mean wind speeds.

Crawford, Winifred

2011-01-01

382

Reproductive Ecology Of The Florida Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma Coerulescens) On John F. Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge: A Long-Term Study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

From 1988 to 2002 we studied the breeding ecology of Florida Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma coerulescens) on John F. Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. We examined phenology, clutch size, hatching failure rates, fledgling production, nest success, predation rates, sources egg and nestling mortality, and the effects of helpers on these measures. Nesting phenology was similar among sites. Mean clutch size at Titan was significantly larger than at HC or T4. Pairs with helpers did not produce larger clutches than pairs without helpers. Fledgling production at T4 was significantly greater than at HC and similar to Titan. Pairs with helpers at HC produced significantly more fledglings than pairs without helpers; helpers did not influence fledgling production at the other sites. Nest success at HC and Titan was low, 19% and 32% respectively. Nest success at T4 was 48% and was significantly greater than at HC. Average predation rates at all sites increased with season progression. Predation rates at all sight rose sharply by early June. The main cause of nest failure at all sites was predation, 93%.

Carter, Geoffry M.; Breininger, David R.; Larson, Vicky L.; Oddy, Donna M.; Smith, Rebecca B.; Stolen, Eric D.

2005-01-01

383

A Conservation Strategy for the Florida Scrub-Jay on John F. Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge: An Initial Scientific Basis for Recovery  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Florida Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens) is an indicator of ecosystem integrity of Florida scrub, an endangered ecosystem that requires frequent fire. One of the largest populations of this federally threatened species occurs on John F. Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. Population trends were predicted using population modeling and field data on reproduction and survival of Florida Scrub-Jays collected from 1988 - 1995. Analyses of historical photography indicated that habitat suitability has been declining for 30 years. Field data and computer simulations suggested that the population declined by at least 40% and will decline by another 40% in 1 0 years, if habitat management is not greatly intensified. Data and computer simulations suggest that habitat suitability cannot deviate greatly from optimal for the jay population to persist. Landscape trajectories of vegetation structure, responsible for declining habitat suitability, are associated with the disruption of natural fire regimes. Prescribed fire alone can not reverse the trajectories. A recovery strategy was developed, based on studies of Florida Scrub-Jays and scrub vegetation. A reserve design was formulated based on conservation science principles for scrub ecosystems. The strategy emphasizes frequent fire to restore habitat, but includes mechanical tree cutting for severely degraded areas. Pine thinning across large areas can produce rapid increases in habitat quality. Site-specific strategies will need to be developed, monitored, and modified to achieve conditions suitable for population persistence.

Breininger, D. R.; Larson, V. L.; Schaub, R.; Duncan, B. W.; Schmalzer, P. A.; Oddy, D. M.; Smith, R. B.; Adrian, F.; Hill, H., Jr.

1996-01-01

384

The Gibbs energy formulation of ?, ?, and liquid Fe 2SiO 4 using Grover, Getting, and Kennedy's empirical relation between volume and bulk modulus  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The empirical linear relation between the volume and logarithm of bulk modulus of metals, discovered by Grover, Getting, and Kennedy is taken as the basis for our equation of state. Recently, we have shown that we can use this equation of state to make accurate predictions of thermochemical and thermophysical properties at high pressure and high temperatures for MgO and the polymorphs of Mg 2SiO 4. Using the available experimental information, the equation of state is applied to the two polymorphs and the liquid form of Fe 2SiO 4 to develop a consistent dataset of their thermodynamic properties in the temperature range between 150 and 2500 K and pressure range between 1 bar 13 GPa. Using thermodynamic methods we are able to discriminate experimental data from different sources. The results presented here are compared with results obtained with modern databases. For (Mg 1 - x,Fe x) 2SiO 4 solid solutions around a pyrolitic composition, we conclude that bulk sound velocity is not a strong discriminator in selecting Gibbs energy formulations for Fe 2SiO 4 using one database versus another. This is in contrast to what we found for Mg 2SiO 4.

Jacobs, Michel H. G.; de Jong, Bernard H. W. S.; Oonk, Harry A. J.

2001-11-01

385

The Gibbs energy formulation of the ?, ?, and ? forms of Mg2SiO4 using Grover, Getting and Kennedy's empirical relation between volume and bulk modulus  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The empirical linear relation between volume and logarithm of bulk modulus of a material, discovered by Grover, Getting and Kennedy is taken as the basis for our equation of state. Using the latest experimental information on the adiabatic bulk modulus, the equation of state is applied to the three polymorphs of Mg2SiO4 to develop a consistent dataset of their thermodynamic properties in the temperature range of 200-2273K and a pressure range of 0.1MPa-30GPa. The results imply that the bulk sound velocity contrast (v?-v?)/v? increases with temperature along the ?-? phase boundary and reaches the value 8.9% at 13.5GPa, a pressure equivalent to 410km depth in the Earth. The bulk sound velocity contrast (v?-v?)/v? decreases with temperature along the ?-? phase boundary and becomes less than 0.7% at temperatures and pressures equivalent to those associated with the 520-km seismic discontinuity in the Earth.

Jacobs, M. H. G.; Oonk, H. A. J.

386

Objective Lightning Forecasting at Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station using Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System Data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) at Cape Canaveral Air-Force Station (CCAFS)ln Florida issues a probability of lightning occurrence in their daily 24-hour and weekly planning forecasts. This information is used for general planning of operations at CCAFS and Kennedy Space Center (KSC). These facilities are located in east-central Florida at the east end of a corridor known as 'Lightning Alley', an indication that lightning has a large impact on space-lift operations. Much of the current lightning probability forecast is based on a subjective analysis of model and observational data and an objective forecast tool developed over 30 years ago. The 45 WS requested that a new lightning probability forecast tool based on statistical analysis of more recent historical warm season (May-September) data be developed in order to increase the objectivity of the daily thunderstorm probability forecast. The resulting tool is a set of statistical lightning forecast equations, one for each month of the warm season, that provide a lightning occurrence probability for the day by 1100 UTC (0700 EDT) during the warm season.

Lambert, Winfred; Wheeler, Mark; Roeder, William

2005-01-01

387

Surface wind convergence as a short-term predictor of cloud-to-ground lightning at Kennedy Space Center: A four-year summary and evaluation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since 1986, USAF forecasters at NASA-Kennedy have had available a surface wind convergence technique for use during periods of convective development. In Florida during the summer, most of the thunderstorm development is forced by boundary layer processes. The basic premise is that the life cycle of convection is reflected in the surface wind field beneath these storms. Therefore the monitoring of the local surface divergence and/or convergence fields can be used to determine timing, location, longevity, and the lightning hazards which accompany these thunderstorms. This study evaluates four years of monitoring thunderstorm development using surface wind convergence, particularly the average over the area. Cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning is related in time and space with surface convergence for 346 days during the summers of 1987 through 1990 over the expanded wind network at KSC. The relationships are subdivided according to low level wind flow and midlevel moisture patterns. Results show a one in three chance of CG lightning when a convergence event is identified. However, when there is no convergence, the chance of CG lightning is negligible.

Watson, Andrew I.; Holle, Ronald L.; Lopez, Raul E.; Nicholson, James R.

1991-01-01

388

A Sounding-based Severe Weather Tool to Support Daily Operations at Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

People and property at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) are at risk when severe weather occurs. Strong winds, hail and tornadoes can injure individuals and cause costly damage to structures if not properly protected. NASA's Launch Services Program and Ground Systems Development and Operations Program and other KSC programs use the daily and weekly severe weather forecasts issued by the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) to determine if they need to limit an activity such as working on gantries, or protect property such as a vehicle on a pad. The 45 WS requested the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) develop a warm season (May-September) severe weather tool for use in the Meteorological Interactive Data Display System (MIDDS) based on the late morning, 1500 UTC (1100 local time), CCAFS (XMR) sounding. The 45 WS frequently makes decisions to issue a severe weather watch and other severe weather warning support products to NASA and the 45th Space Wing in the late morning, after the 1500 UTC sounding. The results of this work indicate that certain stability indices based on the late morning XMR soundings can depict differences between days with reported severe weather and days with no reported severe weather. The AMU determined a frequency of reported severe weather for the stability indices and implemented an operational tool in MIDDS.

Bauman, William H.; Roeder, William P.

2014-01-01

389

Feasibility study for measurement of insulation compaction in the cryogenic rocket fuel storage tanks at Kennedy Space Center by fast/thermal neutron techniques  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The liquid hydrogen and oxygen cryogenic storage tanks at John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) use expanded perlite as thermal insulation. Some of the perlite may have compacted over time, compromising the thermal performance and also the structural integrity of the tanks. Neutrons can readily penetrate through the 1.75 cm outer steel shell and through the entire 120 cm thick perlite zone. Neutrons interactions with materials produce characteristic gamma rays which are then detected. In compacted perlite the count rates in the individual peaks in the gamma ray spectrum will increase. Portable neutron generators can produce neutron simultaneous fluxes in two energy ranges: fast (14 MeV) and thermal (25 meV). Fast neutrons produce gamma rays by inelastic scattering which is sensitive to Si, Al, Fe and O. Thermal neutrons produce gamma rays by radiative capture in prompt gamma neutron activation (PGNA), which is sensitive to Si, Al, Na, K and H among others. The results of computer simulations using the software MCNP and measurements on a test article suggest that the most promising approach would be to operate the system in time-of-flight mode by pulsing the neutron generator and observing the subsequent die away curve in the PGNA signal.

Livingston, R. A.; Schweitzer, J. S.; Parsons, A. M.; Arens, E. E.

2014-02-01

390

Quantum computational universality of the Cai-Miyake-Duer-Briegel two-dimensional quantum state from Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki quasichains  

SciTech Connect

Universal quantum computation can be achieved by simply performing single-qubit measurements on a highly entangled resource state, such as cluster states. Cai, Miyake, Duer, and Briegel recently constructed a ground state of a two-dimensional quantum magnet by combining multiple Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki quasichains of mixed spin-3/2 and spin-1/2 entities and by mapping pairs of neighboring spin-1/2 particles to individual spin-3/2 particles [Phys. Rev. A 82, 052309 (2010)]. They showed that this state enables universal quantum computation by single-spin measurements. Here, we give an alternative understanding of how this state gives rise to universal measurement-based quantum computation: by local operations, each quasichain can be converted to a one-dimensional cluster state and entangling gates between two neighboring logical qubits can be implemented by single-spin measurements. We further argue that a two-dimensional cluster state can be distilled from the Cai-Miyake-Duer-Briegel state.

Wei, Tzu-Chieh [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z1 (Canada); C. N. Yang Institute for Theoretical Physics, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794-3840 (United States); Raussendorf, Robert [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Kwek, Leong Chuan [Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore and National Institute of Education and Institute of Advanced Studies, Nanyang Technological University, 1 Nanyang Walk (Singapore)

2011-10-15

391

An analysis of maximum horizontal wind speeds and associated parameters recorded at NASA's 150-Meter Ground Winds Tower facility at Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Continuous horizontal wind speed measurements were processed and classified as a function of tower level (10, 18, 60, and 150 meters) and period of reference day, month, season: winter (October through March) and summer (April through September), and annual. Tabulations were made of the daily maximum horizontal wind speed, time of ocurrence, and five associated parameters: mean horizontal wind speed, maximum vertical gusts (i.e., updraft and downdraft), and mean and instantaneous directions. Analyses using these data included means, extremes, standard deviations, and frequency distributions. Comparisons of intensity of maximum horizontal wind speeds determined in this year of data are made with maximum values recorded at Kennedy Space Center during another non-hurricane-occurrence year (1967) and with values during 1966 through 1972 when six hurricanes affected the area after the Ground Winds Tower facility became operational. Wind flow in the lowest 150 meters of the atmosphere was measured for the identification of hazards involved in wind shear encounter relative to ascent and descent of the space shuttle and conventional aircraft.

Alexander, M. B.

1978-01-01

392

Calculated maximum Hl ground-level concentrations downwind from launch pad aborts of the space shuttle and Titan 3 C vehicles at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A quantitative assessment is described of the potential environmental hazard posed by the atmospheric release of HCl resulting from the burning of solid propellant during two hypothetical on-pad aborts of the Titan 3 C and space shuttle vehicles at Kennedy Space Center. In one pad-abort situation, it is assumed that the cases of the two solid-propellant engines are ruptured and the burning propellant falls to the ground in the immediate vicinity of the launch pad where it continues to burn for 5 minutes. In the other pad-abort situation considered, one of the two solid engines on each vehicle is assumed to ignite and burn at the normal rate while the vehicle remains on the launch pad. Calculations of maximum HCl ground-level concentration for the above on-pad abort situations were made using the computerized NASA/MSFC multilayer diffusion models in conjunction with appropriate meteorological and source inputs. Three meteorological regimes are considered-fall, spring, and afternoon sea-breeze. Source inputs for the hazard calculations were developed. The principal result of the calculations is that maximum ground-level HCl concentrations at distances greater than 1 kilometer from the launch pad are less than 3 parts per million in all cases considered.

Dumbauld, R. K.; Bjorklund, J. R.

1972-01-01

393

Examination of Metals from Aerospace-Related Activity in Surface Water Samples from Sites Surrounding the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida.  

PubMed

Metal contamination from Space Shuttle launch activity was examined using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy in a two-tier study sampling surface water collected from several sites at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and associated Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge in east central Florida. The primary study examined both temporal changes in baseline metal concentrations (19 metals) in surface water (1996 to 2009, 11 sites) samples collected at specific long-term monitoring sites and metal deposition directly associated with Space Shuttle launch activity at two Launch Complexes (LC39A and LC39B). A secondary study examined metal concentrations at additional sites and increased the amount of elements measured to 48 elements. Our examination places a heavy focus on those metals commonly associated with launch operations (e.g., Al, Fe, Mn, and Zn), but a brief discussion of other metals (As, Cu, Mo, Ni, and Pb) is also included. While no observable accumulation of metals occurred during the time period of the study, the data obtained postlaunch demonstrated a dramatic increase for Al, Fe, Mn, and Zn. Comparing overall trends between the primary and secondary baseline surface water concentrations, elevated concentrations were generally observed at sampling stations located near the launch complexes and from sites isolated from major water systems. While there could be several natural and anthropogenic sources for metal deposition at KSC, the data in this report indicate that shuttle launch events are a significant source. PMID:24738662

Bowden, John A; Cantu, Theresa M; Scheidt, Douglas M; Lowers, Russell H; Nocito, Brian A; Young, Vaneica Y; Guillette, Louis J

2014-05-01

394

Topology of the C-terminal tail of HIV-1 gp41: differential exposure of the Kennedy epitope on cell and viral membranes.  

PubMed

The C-terminal tail (CTT) of the HIV-1 gp41 envelope (Env) protein is increasingly recognized as an important determinant of Env structure and functional properties, including fusogenicity and antigenicity. While the CTT has been commonly referred to as the "intracytoplasmic domain" based on the assumption of an exclusive localization inside the membrane lipid bilayer, early antigenicity studies and recent biochemical analyses have produced a credible case for surface exposure of specific CTT sequences, including the classical "Kennedy epitope" (KE) of gp41, leading to an alternative model of gp41 topology with multiple membrane-spanning domains. The current study was designed to test these conflicting models of CTT topology by characterizing the exposure of native CTT sequences and substituted VSV-G epitope tags in cell- and virion-associated Env to reference monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Surface staining and FACS analysis of intact, Env-expressing cells demonstrated that the KE is accessible to binding by MAbs directed to both an inserted VSV-G epitope tag and the native KE sequence. Importantly, the VSV-G tag was only reactive when inserted into the KE; no reactivity was observed in cells expressing Env with the VSV-G tag inserted into the LLP2 domain. In contrast to cell-surface expressed Env, no binding of KE-directed MAbs was observed to Env on the surface of intact virions using either immune precipitation or surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. These data indicate apparently distinct CTT topologies for virion- and cell-associated Env species and add to the case for a reconsideration of CTT topology that is more complex than currently envisioned. PMID:21151874

Steckbeck, Jonathan D; Sun, Chengqun; Sturgeon, Timothy J; Montelaro, Ronald C

2010-01-01

395

The 29 July 1994 Merritt Island, Fl Microburst: A Case Study Intercomparing Kennedy Space Center Three-Dimensional Lightning Data (LDAR) and WSR-88D Radar Data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Many researchers have shown that the development and evolution of electrical discharges within convective clouds is fundamentally related to the growth and dynamics of precipitation particles aloft. In the presence of strong updrafts above the freezing level collisions among mixed-phase particles (i.e., hail. ice, supercooled water) promote the necessary charge separation needed to initiate intra-cloud lightning. A precipitation core that descends below the freezing level is often accompanied by a change in the electrical structure of the cloud. Consequently, more Cloud-to-Ground (CG) than Intra-Cloud (IC) lightning flashes appear. Descending precipitation cores can also play a significant role in the evolution of mesoscale features at the surface (e.g., microbursts, downbursts) because of latent heat and mass loading effects of water and ice. For this reason, some believe that lightning and microbursts are fundamentally linked by the presence of ice particles in thunderstorms. Several radar and lightning studies of microburst thunderstorms from COHMEX in 1986 showed that the peak IC lightning systematically occurred ten minutes before the onset of a microburst. In contrast, most CG lightning occurred at the time of the microburst. Many of the preceding studies have been done using high-resolution research radars and experimental lightning detection systems in focused field projects. In addition, these studies could only determine the vertical origin or occurrence of IC lightning, and not a true three-dimensional representation. Currently, the WSR-88D radar system and a real-time, state-of-the-art lightning system (LDAR) at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida provide an opportunity to extend these kinds of studies in a more meaningful operational setting.

Hoffert, Steven G.; Pearce, Matt L.

1996-01-01

396

A Comparison of the Automated Meteorological Profiling System High Resolution Flight Element to the Kennedy Space Center 50 MHz Doppler Wind Profiler  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Wind profile measurement and the simulation of aerodynamic loads on a launch vehicle play an important role in determining launch capability and post launch assessment of the vehicle's performance. To date, all United States range certified wind profile measurement systems have been based on balloon tracking. Since the 1960's, the standard used by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Air Force at the Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) for detailed wind profile measurements has been the radar tracked, aerodynamically stabilized Jimsphere balloon system. Currently, the Air Force is nearing certification and operational implementation of the Automated Meteorological Profiling System (AMPS) at CCAS and Vandenburg Air Force Base (VAFB). AMPS uses the Global Positioning System for tracking the Jimsphere balloon. It is anticipated that the AMPS/Jimsphere, named the High Resolution Flight Element (HRFE), will have equivalent, or better resolution than the radar tracked Jimsphere, especially when the balloon is far downrange, at a low elevation angle. By the 1980's, the development of Doppler Wind Profilers (DWP) had become sufficiently advanced to justify an experimental measurement program at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). In 1989 a 50 MHz DWP was installed at KSC. In principal, the 50 MHz DWP has the capability to track the evolution of wind profile dynamics within 5 minutes of a launch. Because of fundamental differences in the measurement technique, there is a significant time and space differential between 50 MHz DWP and HRFE wind profiles. This paper describes a study to quantify these differences from a sample of 50 MHz DWP/HRFE pairs obtained during the AMPS certification test program.

Roberts, Barry C.; Leahy, Frank

2000-01-01

397

Workstation-Based Real-Time Mesoscale Modeling Designed for Weather Support to Operations at the Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes the capabilities and operational utility of a version of the Mesoscale Atmospheric Simulation System (MASS) that has been developed to support operational weather forecasting at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS). The implementation of local, mesoscale modeling systems at KSC/CCAS is designed to provide detailed short-range (less than 24 h) forecasts of winds, clouds, and hazardous weather such as thunderstorms. Short-range forecasting is a challenge for daily operations, and manned and unmanned launches since KSC/CCAS is located in central Florida where the weather during the warm season is dominated by mesoscale circulations like the sea breeze. For this application, MASS has been modified to run on a Stardent 3000 workstation. Workstation-based, real-time numerical modeling requires a compromise between the requirement to run the system fast enough so that the output can be used before expiration balanced against the desire to improve the simulations by increasing resolution and using more detailed physical parameterizations. It is now feasible to run high-resolution mesoscale models such as MASS on local workstations to provide timely forecasts at a fraction of the cost required to run these models on mainframe supercomputers. MASS has been running in the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) at KSC/CCAS since January 1994 for the purpose of system evaluation. In March 1995, the AMU began sending real-time MASS output to the forecasters and meteorologists at CCAS, Spaceflight Meteorology Group (Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas), and the National Weather Service (Melbourne, Florida). However, MASS is not yet an operational system. The final decision whether to transition MASS for operational use will depend on a combination of forecaster feedback, the AMU's final evaluation results, and the life-cycle costs of the operational system.

Manobianco, John; Zack, John W.; Taylor, Gregory E.

1996-01-01

398

Thermal Performance of Biological Substance Systems in Vitro Under Static and Dynamic Conditions at the Cryogenic Test Laboratory, NASA Kennedy Space Center, USA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A unique research program, including a comprehensive study of thermal performance at cryogenic vacuum insulation systems, was performed at the NASA Kennedy Space Center. The main goal was to develop a new soft vacuum system (from 1 torr to 10 torr) that provides an intermediate level of performance (k-value below 4.8 mW/m-K). Liquid nitrogen boil-off methods were used to test conventional materials, novel materials, and certain combinations. The test articles included combinations of aluminum foil, fiberglass paper, polyester fabric, silica aerogel composite blanket, fumed silica, silica aerogel powder, and syntactic foam. A new LCI system was developed at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory. This system performs exceptionally well at soft vacuum levels and nearly as good as an MLI at high vacuum levels. Apparent thermal conductivities for the LCI range from 2 mW/m-K at soft vacuum to 0.1 mW/m-K at high vacuum. Several cryostats were designed, constructed, and calibrated by the Cryogenics Test Laboratory at KSC NASA as part of this research program. The cryostat test apparatus is a liquid nitrogen boil-off calorimeter system for direct measurement of the apparent thermal conductivity at a fixed vacuum level between 5 x 10(exp -5) and 760 torr. The apparatus is also used for transient measurements of temperature profiles. The development of efficient, robust cryogenic insulation systems has been a targeted area of research for a number of years. Improved methods of characterization, testing, and evaluation of complex biological substance systems for cryosurgery and cryobiology are the focus of this paper.

Augustynowicz, S. D.; Fesmire, James E.; Steinrock, T. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

399

A Summary of Ambient Air at John F. Kennedy Space Center with a Comparison to Data from the Florida Statewide Monitoring Network (1983-1992)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The EPA criteria air pollutants were monitored at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) since 1983 to comply the prevention of significant deterioration requirements under the Clean Air Act amendments passed by Congress in 1977 and 1990. Monitoring results show that monthly maximum 24-hour total suspended particulates decreased from 144.6 micograms/cu m in 1988 to 73.0 micrograms/cu m in 1991 and increased to 149.3 micrograms/cu m in 1992. Inhalable particulates increased from 56.1 gg/M3 in 1983 to 131.4 micrograms/cu m in 1988, and then decreased to 38.5 micrograms/cu m in 1992. Sulfur dioxide monthly maximum 24-hour average concentrations decreased each year from 135.2 micrograms/cu m in 1983 to 33.8 micrograms/cu m in 1992. Nitrogen dioxide concentrations increased from 5.1 micrograms/cu m in 1983 to 5.9 micrograms/cu m in 1988, then decreased to 4.5 micrograms/cu m in 1992. Carbon monoxide annual average concentrations decreased from 6.2 micrograms/cu m in 1983 to 1.1 micrograms/cu m in 1988, and increased to 1.2 micrograms/cu m in 1992. Ozone maximum 1-hour concentrations increased from 98 parts per billion (ppb) in 1983 to 134 ppb in 1989, and then decreased to 80 ppb in 1992. Total annual rainfall ranged from 37.47 inches to 57.47 inches and shows a 6.6 percent increase over this same ten year period.

Drese, John H.

1997-01-01

400

Objective Lightning Forecasting at Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Force Station using Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System Data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) forecasters at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) in Florida include a probability of thunderstorm occurrence in their daily morning briefings. This information is used by personnel involved in determining the possibility of violating Launch Commit Criteria, evaluating Flight Rules for the Space Shuttle, and daily planning for ground operation activities on Kennedy Space Center (KSC)/CCAFS. Much of the current lightning probability forecast is based on a subjective analysis of model and observational data. The forecasters requested that a lightning probability forecast tool based on statistical analysis of historical warm-season (May - September) data be developed in order to increase the objectivity of the daily thunderstorm probability forecast. The tool is a set of statistical lightning forecast equations that provide a lightning occurrence probability for the day by 1100 UTC (0700 EDT) during the warm season. This study used 15 years (1989-2003) of warm season data to develop the objective forecast equations. The local CCAFS 1000 UTC sounding was used to calculate stability parameters for equation predictors. The Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS) data were used to determine lightning occurrence for each day. The CGLSS data have been found to be more reliable indicators of lightning in the area than surface observations through local informal analyses. This work was based on the results from two earlier research projects. Everitt (1999) used surface observations and rawinsonde data to develop logistic regression equations that forecast the daily thunderstorm probability at CCAFS. The Everitt (1999) equations showed an improvement in skill over the Neumann-Pfeffer thunderstorm index (Neumann 1971), which uses multiple linear regression, and also persistence and climatology forecasts. Lericos et al. (2002) developed lightning distributions over the Florida peninsula based on specific flow regimes. The flow regimes were inferred from the average wind direction in the 1000-700 mb layer at Miami (MIA), Tampa (TBW), and Jacksonville (JAX), Florida, and the lightning data were from the National Lightning Detection Network. The results suggested that the daily flow regime may be an important predictor of lightning occurrence on KSC/CCAFS.

Lambert, Winifred; Wheeler, Mark

2004-01-01

401

Kennedy Space Center: Swamp Works  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

When I began my internship with the Granular Mechanics and Regolith Operations laboratory (GMRO), also known as Swamp Works, I was given the unique opportunity to shadow many teams working on various projects, and decide what projects I wanted to take part in. Before I go into details of my experiences at Swamp Works, I would like to take a moment to explain what I discovered Swamp Works to be. Swamp Works is a family of hardworking, dedicated, and driven people from various backgrounds and skill sets. These people all work to advance technologies and make science fiction science fact through means of rapid prototyping. They support and encourage failure as an option when learning new things, as long as lesson learned from said failure. In fact, their motto states "Fail, Fast, Forward." What this means is, not if but when one fails he or she must do so quickly and spring forward from the failure so that his or her progress is not delayed. With this acceptance, it provided me the confidence to dive into a multitude of projects working in various fields and with a wide range of skill sets. The first project I joined was Badger. My motivation for taking on this project was the opportunity I would have to obtain valuable experience working with 3D modeling and 3D printing technologies. Badger was a digging apparatus to be used in a highly dusty environment in a material known as Regolith. Regolith is a scientific term for the dirt or top soil found on planetary bodies. Regolith contains a large quantity of sediments less than lOppm and as a result poses a challenge of keeping it out of any cracks and crevices. Furthermore, regolith can create high levels of electrostatic energy, which can prove damaging to sensitive electrical hardware. With these characteristics in mind, I decided to take on the task of designing and manufacturing a dust proof cover for the sensitive electrical hardware. When I began this project, I did not have the slightest idea as to how to use 3D modeling software or a means of manufacturing a viable product. As I went along with variants of the design, I became very proficient with a 3D modeling program known as CREO 2.0. Upon completion of my 3D design, I then had the task of manufacturing and having, in my hands, a usable model. To do this I had to work with additive printing technologies also known as 3D printing. Through my experiences working with Badger, I realized that 3D modeling is the focal point in much of engineering. With this in mind, I have embraced this fact and decided to further my experience with this software so that I may become a more valuable asset to any firm later in my career. Mid-way through work with Badger, I picked up another project in which I found much interest. I ha the opportunity to work side by side with a materials and composites guru in manufacturing carbon composite coupons (test strips) for performing stress, strain, and sheer analysis on. Being from a surfing, kiteboarding, and other water sport background I have always been interested in board design. With this in mind, it is no wonder why I found interest in such a project. I had the opportunity to refine Mold preparatory, composite layup, and composite curing techniques. Following manufacturing of these composite strips, I then performed various stress tests and logged my results. With these results, future teams could create lighter, stronger, and more cost effective composite structures for use in varieties of applications. After my experiences with materials and composites testing, I have obtained crucial appreciation for detailed documentation and analysis that material sciences involve. However, as interesting as composite materials testing has been, I do not feel this is where my future career lies. Another, more on the side, project I have been involved in is building a 626 cubic foot regolith containment chamber for doing full scale testing of robotic systems. This chamber is built of high strength aluminum scaffold materials, 80/20, and massive panels of Lexan. Once the chamber is complete

DeFilippo, Anthony Robert

2013-01-01

402

John F. Kennedy Executive Orders  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The 214 Executive Orders signed by the 35th President have been scanned and converted to HTML by Maria E. Schieda of the University of Michigan School of Information. These include the orders to establish the Peace Corps (E.O. 10924), to establish the President's Committee on Equal Employment (E.O. 10925), and emergency instructions to government agencies during the Cuban Missile Crisis (E.O. 11051, 11058, 11087-11095). The collection is indexed by date, keyword, number, and title.

Kennedy, John F. (John Fitzgerald), 1917-1963.

1997-01-01

403

Validation and development of existing and new RAOB-based warm-season convective wind forecasting tools for Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using a 15-year (1995 to 2009) climatology of 1500 UTC warm-season (May through September) rawinsonde observation (RAOB) data from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) Skid Strip (KXMR) and 5 minute wind data from 36 wind towers on CCAFS and Kennedy Space Center (KSC), several convective wind forecasting techniques currently employed by the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) were evaluated. Present forecasting methods under evaluation include examining the vertical equivalent potential temperature (theta e) profile, vertical profiles of wind spend and direction, and several wet downburst forecasting indices. Although previous research found that currently used wet downburst forecasting methods showed little promise for forecasting convective winds, it was carried out with a very small sample, limiting the reliability of the results. Evaluation versus a larger 15-year dataset was performed to truly assess the forecasting utility of these methods in the central Florida warm-season convective environment. In addition, several new predictive analytic based forecast methods for predicting the occurrence of warm-season convection and its associated wind gusts were developed and validated. This research was performed in order to help the 45 WS better forecast not only which days are more likely to produce convective wind gusts, but also to better predict which days are more likely to yield warning criteria wind events of 35 knots or greater, should convection be forecasted. Convective wind forecasting is a very challenging problem that requires new statistically based modeling techniques since conventional meteorologically based methods do not perform well. New predictive analytic based forecasting methods were constructed using R statistical software and incorporate several techniques including multiple linear regression, logistic regression, multinomial logistic regression, classification and regression trees (CART), and ensemble CART using bootstrapping. All of these techniques except the ensemble CART methods were built with data from the 1995 to 2007 warm-seasons and validated with a separate independent dataset from the 2008 and 2009 warm-seasons. Ensemble CART models were built using randomly selected data from the 1995 to 2009 RAOB dataset and validated with data not used in constructing the models. Three different ensemble CART algorithms including the random forests, bagging, and boosting algorithms were tested to find the best performing model. Quantitative verification results suggest that the presently used convection and wet downburst forecasting techniques do not show much operational promise. As such, it is not recommended that the 45 WS use vertical profiles of thetae, wind speed, or wind direction to make specific predictions for which days are likely to produce convection or warning threshold wind gusts. None of the wet downburst indices used displayed much potential either. Although, the linear regression based predictive analytic models do not perform too well, CART based models perform better, especially those that utilize a binary response variable. Of the new techniques, the ensemble CART models displayed the most promise with the boosting algorithm showing nearly perfect results for predicting which days would produce convection and which days would produce warning threshold winds should convection be predicted.

McCue, Mitchell Hollis

404

Statistical Analysis of Model Data for Operational Space Launch Weather Support at Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The 12-km resolution North American Mesoscale (NAM) model (MesoNAM) is used by the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) Launch Weather Officers at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) to support space launch weather operations. The 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit to conduct an objective statistics-based analysis of MesoNAM output compared to wind tower mesonet observations and then develop a an operational tool to display the results. The National Centers for Environmental Prediction began running the current version of the MesoNAM in mid-August 2006. The period of record for the dataset was 1 September 2006 - 31 January 2010. The AMU evaluated MesoNAM hourly forecasts from 0 to 84 hours based on model initialization times of 00, 06, 12 and 18 UTC. The MesoNAM forecast winds, temperature and dew point were compared to the observed values of these parameters from the sensors in the KSC/CCAFS wind tower network. The data sets were stratified by model initialization time, month and onshore/offshore flow for each wind tower. Statistics computed included bias (mean difference), standard deviation of the bias, root mean square error (RMSE) and a hypothesis test for bias = O. Twelve wind towers located in close proximity to key launch complexes were used for the statistical analysis with the sensors on the towers positioned at varying heights to include 6 ft, 30 ft, 54 ft, 60 ft, 90 ft, 162 ft, 204 ft and 230 ft depending on the launch vehicle and associated weather launch commit criteria being evaluated. These twelve wind towers support activities for the Space Shuttle (launch and landing), Delta IV, Atlas V and Falcon 9 launch vehicles. For all twelve towers, the results indicate a diurnal signal in the bias of temperature (T) and weaker but discernable diurnal signal in the bias of dewpoint temperature (T(sub d)) in the MesoNAM forecasts. Also, the standard deviation of the bias and RMSE of T, T(sub d), wind speed and wind direction indicated the model error increased with the forecast period all four parameters. The hypothesis testing uses statistics to determine the probability that a given hypothesis is true. The goal of using the hypothesis test was to determine if the model bias of any of the parameters assessed throughout the model forecast period was statistically zero. For th is dataset, if this test produced a value >= -1 .96 or <= 1.96 for a data point, then the bias at that point was effectively zero and the model forecast for that point was considered to have no error. A graphical user interface (GUI) was developed so the 45 WS would have an operational tool at their disposal that would be easy to navigate among the multiple stratifications of information to include tower locations, month, model initialization times, sensor heights and onshore/offshore flow. The AMU developed the GUI using HyperText Markup Language (HTML) so the tool could be used in most popular web browsers with computers running different operating systems such as Microsoft Windows and Linux.

Bauman, William H., III

2010-01-01

405

Statement by Dr. Kathleen C. Bailey before the Senate Armed Services Committee  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the personal views of the author on the subject of the proposed Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC). She addresses here concerns about the national security issues which could result from ratification of this convention. She argues the convention alone is not likely to curtail production or availability of such items on the world market because of the relatively low cost. The treaty could thus put the country in a position less likely to protect itself, or adequately deal with such a threat.

Bailey, K.C.

1994-08-16

406

CDP-choline:1,2-diacylglycerol cholinephosphotransferase 1 The authors would like to dedicate this review to Eugene Kennedy and his co-workers whose seminal obervations and careful scientific experimentation provided the basis for the work desribed in this review. 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cholinephosphotransferase transfers a phosphocholine moiety from CDP-choline to diacylglycerol thus forming phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) and CMP. This reaction defines the ultimate step in the Kennedy pathway for the genesis of de novo synthesized PtdCho. Hence, the intracellular location of cholinephosphotransferase identifies both the site from which de novo synthesized PtdCho is transported to other organelles and the site from which it

Christopher R McMaster; Robert M. Bell

1997-01-01

407

Preventing the First Cesarean Delivery: Summary of a Joint Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, and American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Workshop  

PubMed Central

With over one-third of pregnancies in the United States being delivered by cesarean and the growing knowledge of morbidities associated with repeat cesarean deliveries, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists convened a workshop to address the concept of preventing the first cesarean. The available information on maternal and fetal factors, labor management and induction, and non-medical factors leading to the first cesarean were reviewed as well as the implications of the first cesarean on future reproductive health. Key points were identified to assist with reduction in cesarean rates including that labor induction should be performed primarily for medical indication; if done for non-medical indications, the gestational age should be at least 39 weeks or more and the cervix should be favorable, especially in the nulliparous patient. Review of the current literature demonstrates the importance of adhering to appropriate definitions for failed induction and arrest of labor progress. The diagnosis of “failed induction” should only be made after an adequate attempt. Adequate time for normal latent and active phases of the first stage, and for the second stage, should be allowed, as long as the maternal and fetal conditions permit. The adequate time for each of these stages appears to be longer than traditionally estimated. Operative vaginal delivery is an acceptable birth method when indicated, and can safely prevent cesarean delivery. Given the progressively declining use, it is critical that training and experience in operative vaginal delivery is facilitated and encouraged. When discussing the first cesarean with a patient, counseling should include its effect on future reproductive health.

Spong, Catherine Y.; Berghella, Vincenzo; Wenstrom, Katharine D.; Mercer, Brian M.; Saade, George R.

2012-01-01

408

Kennedy Space Center Environmental Health Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Topic considered include: environmental health services; health physics; ionizing radiation; pollution control; contamination investigations; natural resources; surface water; health hazard evaluations; combustion gas; launch support; asbestos; hazardous noise; and ventilation.

Creech, Joanne W.

1997-01-01

409

Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Mishap Response Plan  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KSC Medical Operations, in exercising the KSC Psychological Triage Plan, provided crewmember family support following notification of the Columbia accident. KSC Medical Operations also provided field support in working with FEMA and EPA to assure adequate occupational medicine and environmental health care of KSC workers. In addition, the development of policy and procedures for handling and clearing biohazardous debris material in the KSC reconstruction hangar was prepared and implemented.

Scarpa, Philip

2005-01-01

410

Electric Vehicles at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The story of how the transportation office began by introducing low speed electric cars (LSEV) to the fleet managers and employees. This sparked and interest in purchasing some of these LSEV and the usage on KSC. Transportation was approached by a vender of High Speed Electric Vehicle (HSEV) we decided to test the HSEV to see if they would meet our fleet vehicle needs. Transportation wrote a Space Act Agreement (SAA) for the loan of three Lithium Powered Electric vehicles for a one year test. The vehicles have worked very well and we have extended the test for another year. The use of HSEV has pushed for an independent Electric Vehicle Study to be performed to consider ways to effectively optimize the use of electric vehicles in replacement of gasoline vehicles in the KSC vehicle fleet. This will help the center to move closer to meeting the Executive Order 13423.

Chesson, Bruce E.

2007-01-01

411

77 FR 24452 - Foreign Ownership Policies  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...griboff@fcc.gov; (4) Kathleen Collins, Attorney-Advisor, Policy Division...Washington, DC 20554; email: kathleen.collins@fcc.gov. Filings and comments are...FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Kathleen Collins, Attorney-Advisor, Policy...

2012-04-24

412

The John F. Kennedy High School Work-Study Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mentally retarded high school students engage in actual life experience in a downtown former nightclub to gain simulated experience in areas such as kitchen-restaurant skills and crafts before community job placement.

Alper, Sandy; And Others

1973-01-01

413

Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) Activities at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) goals are to develop and integrate the technologies which can provide a continuous, intelligent, and adaptive health state of a vehicle and use this information to improve safety and reduce the costs of operations.

Fox, Jack

2000-01-01

414

Kennedy Educate to Innovate (KETI) Hubble Powerpoint Presentation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The presentation describes the Hubble Space Telescope and it's contributions to astronomy. Also discussed are the James Webb Space Telescope and the kinds of careers that relate to STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) that students can pursue in fields related to space telescopes.

Paglialonga, Jessica

2011-01-01

415

CELSS Breadboard Project at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The CELSS Breadboard Project is described, noting that it was initiated to study aspects of a CELSS for long-term space missions. Topics for extensive investigation included air and water regeneration, engineering control, and food production. The many options available for growing food crops in commercial plant growth chambers were investigated and the best of this information was translated to the Biomass Production Chamber (BPC). The chamber contains 20 sq m of crop growing area under 96 400 W HPS lamps; sixteen 0.25 sq m plant growth trays used on each of four growing shelves for a total of 64 trays; and one 256-L nutrient solution reservoir with the appropriate continuous-flow, thin-film plumbing for each shelf. A heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning system maintains atmospheric conditions and serves to distribute oxygen and carbon dioxide and maintain pressure at 12 mm of water. The control and monitoring subsystem, which uses a programmable logic controller, manages the BPC subsystems.

Prince, R. P.; Knott, W. M., III

1989-01-01

416

Memorandum about the First Nixon-Kennedy Debate  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

On the morning of September 1, 1960, Herb Klein and Pierre Salinger met in the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, D.C., to discuss the details of what would be the first televised presidential debate. Klein was press secretary for Republican candidate Vice President Richard Nixon and Salinger was press secretary for Democratic candidate Senator John…

Rosenbaum, David L.

2010-01-01

417

Kennedy Educate to Innovate (KETI) Space Food Powerpoint Presentation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An overview of the science related to the development of production of space food is presented for school students. Students are acquainted with careers in food science, nutrition, dietetics, microbiology, and astrobiology.

Paglialonga, Jessica

2011-01-01

418

Kennedy Space Center Orion Processing Team Planning for Ground Operations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Topics in this presentation are: Constellation Ares I/Orion/Ground Ops Elements Orion Ground Operations Flow Orion Operations Planning Process and Toolset Overview, including: 1 Orion Concept of Operations by Phase 2 Ops Analysis Capabilities Overview 3 Operations Planning Evolution 4 Functional Flow Block Diagrams 5 Operations Timeline Development 6 Discrete Event Simulation (DES) Modeling 7 Ground Operations Planning Document Database (GOPDb) Using Operations Planning Tools for Operability Improvements includes: 1 Kaizen/Lean Events 2 Mockups 3 Human Factors Analysis

Letchworth, Gary; Schlierf, Roland

2011-01-01

419

From Kennedy, to Beyond: Growing Plants in Space  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronauts cannot have their cake and eat it too, but what about growing a salad and eating it? As NASA continues to push the envelope on Space exploration and inhabitance the need for a fresh food source becomes more vital. The Life Support team at NASA is using a system developed by ORBITEC the VEGGIE, in which astronauts aboard the ISS, and potentially the Moon and Mars, will be capable of growing food. The introduction of plants not only gives astronauts a means of independently supplying food, but also recreation, oxygen replenishment and psychological benefits. The plants were grown in "pillows", the system used for growing plants within the VEGGIE. This test included 4 types of media mixtures that are composed of a clay based media called Arcilite and Fafard #2, which is a peat moss-based media ( <1 mm Arcilite, 1-2 mm of Arcilite, 1:1 <1 mm & 1-2 mm mixture and 1:1 Arcilite & Fafard mixture). Currently, 3 lettuce cultivars are being grown in 4 mixtures of media. Tests were being conducted to see which form of media has the ratio of best growth and least amount of microbes that are harmful. That is essential because a person's body becomes more susceptible to illness when they leave Earth. As a result, test must be conducted on the "pillow" system to assess the levels of microbial activity. The cultivars were tested at different stages during their growing process for microbes. Datum show that the mix of Fafard and Arcilite had the best growth, but also the most microbes. This was due to the fact that Fafard is an organic substance so it contains material necessary for microbes to live. Data suggest that the <1 mm Arcilite has an acceptable amount of growth and a lower level of microbes, because it is non-organic.

Flemming, Cedric, II; Seck, Sokhana A.; Massa, Gioia D.; Hummerick, Mary E.; Wheeler, Raymond

2012-01-01

420

Applied Physics Lab Kennedy Space Center: Recent Contributions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The mission of the Applied Physics Lab is: (1) Develop and deliver novel sensors and devices to support KSC mission operations. (2) Analyze operational issues and recommend or deliver practical solutions. (3) Apply physics to the resolution of long term space flight issues that affect space port operation on Earth or on other planets.

Starr, Stan; Youngquist, Robert

2006-01-01

421

Protection coordination of the Kennedy Space Center electric distribution network  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A computer technique is described for visualizing the coordination and protection of any existing system of devices and settings by plotting the tripping characteristics of the involved devices on a common basis. The program determines the optimum settings of a given set of protective devices and configuration in the sense of the best expected coordinated operation of these devices. Subroutines are given for simulating time versus current characteristics of the different relays, circuit breakers, and fuses in the system; coordination index computation; protection checks; plotting; and coordination optimation.

1976-01-01

422

John F. Kennedy Space Center's Wireless Hang Angle Instrumentation System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The technology is a high-precision, wireless inclinometer. The system was designed for monitoring the suspension angle of the Orbiter vehicle during loading onto the Solid Rocket Boosters of the Space Shuttle. Originally, operators manually measured the alignment of the Orbiter with a hand-held inclinometer on a nonrigid surface. The measurement was open to interpretation by the loader. If the Orbiter is misaligned, it can crush ball joints and delay the loading while repairs are made. With this system, the Orbiter can be loaded without damage and without manual measurement.

Kohler, Jeff

2009-01-01

423

Research and technology at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Cryogenic engineering, hypergolic engineering, hazardous warning, structures and mechanics, computer sciences, communications, meteorology, technology applications, safety engineering, materials analysis, biomedicine, and engineering management and training aids research are reviewed.

1983-01-01

424

Film Catalog. John F. Kennedy Space Center. 1987.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teachers from the United States and several other countries have access to the film library system of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). This catalog contains the titles and abstracts for over 150 films that are available from NASA on topics regarding space flight, meteorology, astronomy, NASA programs, satellites, research,…

National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

425

Ambitious STS-7 mission to feature first landing at Kennedy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The STS-7 press briefing schedule, NASA select television schedule; launch preparations, countdown and liftoff; major countdown milestones; launch window; STS-7 flight sequence of events, landing timeline; STS-7 flight timeline; landing and post landing operations; flight objectives; Telesat's ANIK-C 2; PALAPA-B; STS-7 experiments; and spacecraft tracking and data network are presented.

Garrett, D.; Hess, M.; White, T.; Taylor, J.

1982-01-01

426

Evaluating Early Childhood Assessments: A Differential Analysis. In Blackwell Handbook of Early Childhood Development, edited by Kathleen McCartney and Deborah Phillips  

Microsoft Academic Search

Assessment is fundamentally a positive process that holds the potential for enhancing teaching and improving learning. This chapter provides an analytical discussion of the field by adhering to the National Education Goals Panel typology that categorizes four uses or roles for assessment in the preschool years: (1) identification, (2) instructional improvement, (3) program evaluation, and (4) accountability. The chapter also

Samuel J. Meisels; Sally Atkins-Burnett

2006-01-01

427

Facilitated vascular anastomoses: the one-shot device 1 1 Doctors Kirsch, Simpson, Nataf, and Zhu are consultants to the United States Surgical Corporation, and Mr Hinchliffe and Mr Manzo are research engineers employed by the United States Surgical Corporation. Doctor Anton has no financial or consultant relationship with the United States Surgical Corporation. This research was supported by funding from the United States Surgical Corporation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. A mechanical system for facilitating vascular anastomosis (end-to-side, end-to-end) is described that enables the rapid construction of nonpenetrated, compliant junctions. The instrument (United States Surgical One-Shot system) simultaneously applies either 10 or 12 nonpenetrating, arcuate-legged titanium clips to everted vessel or prosthetic conduit edges.Methods and Results. The instrument has been tested in animals (jugular and femoral vein jump grafts

Patrick Nataf; Peter Hinchliffe; Scott Manzo; James Simpson; Wolff M Kirsch; Yong Hua Zhu; Toomas Anton

1998-01-01

428

Environmental monitoring of Space Shuttle launches at Kennedy Space Center - The first ten years  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Space Shuttle launches produce local environmental effects through the generation of a launcher exhaust plume that in turn produces acidic depositions and acute vegetation damage in the near-field environment; fish kills have also been noted in the lagoon or impoundment near each of the launch pads. Repeated launches lead to cumulative changes in plant community composition and structure, and temporary decreases in pH due to acidification increases metal availability in soil microcosms and surface waters. Direct effects on terrestrial fauna include the mortality of birds, mammals, amphibians, and reptiles in the near-field area.

Schmalzer, Paul A.; Hall, Carlton R.; Hinkle, C. R.; Duncan, Brean W.; Knott, William M., III; Summerfield, Burton R.

1993-01-01

429

Objective Lightning Probability Forecasting for Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Five logistic regression equations were created that predict the probability of cloud-to-ground lightning occurrence for the day in the KSC/CCAFS area for each month in the warm season. These equations integrated the results from several studies over recent years to improve thunderstorm forecasting at KSC/CCAFS. All of the equations outperform persistence, which is known to outperform NPTI, the current objective tool used in 45 WS lightning forecasting operations. The equations also performed well in other tests. As a result, the new equations will be added to the current set of tools used by the 45 WS to determine the probability of lightning for their daily planning forecast. The results from these equations are meant to be used as first-guess guidance when developing the lightning probability forecast for the day. They provide an objective base from which forecasters can use other observations, model data, consultation with other forecasters, and their own experience to create the final lightning probability for the 1100 UTC briefing.

Lambert, Winifred; Wheeler, Mark

2005-01-01

430

77 FR 12860 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel, Autism Centers of Excellence: Centers. Date: March 28-29, 2012. Time: 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Agenda: To review and...

2012-03-02

431

Objective Lightning Probability Forecasting for Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Phase III  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The AMU created new logistic regression equations in an effort to increase the skill of the Objective Lightning Forecast Tool developed in Phase II (Lambert 2007). One equation was created for each of five sub-seasons based on the daily lightning climatology instead of by month as was done in Phase II. The assumption was that these equations would capture the physical attributes that contribute to thunderstorm formation more so than monthly equations. However, the SS values in Section 5.3.2 showed that the Phase III equations had worse skill than the Phase II equations and, therefore, will not be transitioned into operations. The current Objective Lightning Forecast Tool developed in Phase II will continue to be used operationally in MIDDS. Three warm seasons were added to the Phase II dataset to increase the POR from 17 to 20 years (1989-2008), and data for October were included since the daily climatology showed lightning occurrence extending into that month. None of the three methods tested to determine the start of the subseason in each individual year were able to discern the start dates with consistent accuracy. Therefore, the start dates were determined by the daily climatology shown in Figure 10 and were the same in every year. The procedures used to create the predictors and develop the equations were identical to those in Phase II. The equations were made up of one to three predictors. TI and the flow regime probabilities were the top predictors followed by 1-day persistence, then VT and Ll. Each equation outperformed four other forecast methods by 7-57% using the verification dataset, but the new equations were outperformed by the Phase II equations in every sub-season. The reason for the degradation may be due to the fact that the same sub-season start dates were used in every year. It is likely there was overlap of sub-season days at the beginning and end of each defined sub-season in each individual year, which could very well affect equation performance.

Crawford, Winifred C.

2010-01-01

432

Objective Lightning Probability Forecasting for Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Phase IV  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As with the previous year, the past year of this award has been productive and a number of important results and refereed publications either submitted or published. Some of our research results are discussed here and a list the papers submitted or published in the past year is provided. Besides our original model of an outer heliosheath source for the IBEX "ribbon" we have continued to explore alternative possibilities and further our understanding of this very complex region, especially in light of the possibility raised by the IBEX results that suggest the possibility of a 1-shock model.

Bauman, William H., III; Crawford, Winifred C.

2012-01-01

433

75 FR 12245 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; Human Capital Interventions Across Childhood and Adolescence. Date: April 6, 2010. Time: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place:...

2010-03-15

434

76 FR 13650 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; Human Capital Interventions Across Childhood and Adolescence. Date: April 5, 2011. Time: 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications....

2011-03-14

435

Cost benefits of advanced software: A review of methodology used at Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

To assist rational investments in advanced software, a formal, explicit, and multi-perspective cost-benefit analysis methodology is proposed. The methodology can be implemented through a six-stage process which is described and explained. The current practice of cost-benefit analysis at KSC is reviewed in the light of this methodology. The review finds that there is a vicious circle operating. Unsound methods lead to unreliable cost-benefit estimates. Unreliable estimates convince management that cost-benefit studies should not be taken seriously. Then, given external demands for cost-benefit estimates, management encourages software enginees to somehow come up with the numbers for their projects. Lacking the expertise needed to do a proper study, courageous software engineers with vested interests use ad hoc and unsound methods to generate some estimates. In turn, these estimates are unreliable, and the cycle continues. The proposed methodology should help KSC to break out of this cycle.

Joglekar, Prafulla N.

1993-01-01

436

Biofuels and certification. A workshop at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. Summary report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Liquid biofuels can provide a substitute for fossil fuels in the transportation sector. Many countries have mandated the use of biofuels, by creating targets for their use. If not implemented with care, however, actions that increase biofuel production can put upward pressure on food prices, increase greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and exacerbate degradation of land, forest, and water sources. A

Charan Devereaux; Henry Lee

2009-01-01

437

STS payload ground handling mechanism at John F. Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The payload ground handling mechanism (PGHM), which lifts payloads out of the payload canister that brings them to the launch pad, is described. The PGHM then loads the payloads into the orbiter through the open payload bay doors. The challenge was to provide this capability in time for space shuttle mission 31-A. Meeting this STS requirement was considerably more challenging than using the stacking method for loading payloads on top of expendable vehicles. The new mechanism and its main features are discussed.

Cassisi, V.; Tatem, B. C., Jr.

1985-01-01

438

John F. Kennedy Space Center's Technology Development and Application 2006-2007 Report  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Topics covered include: Reversible Chemochromic Hydrogen Detectors; Determining Trajectory of Triboelectrically Charged Particles, Using Discrete Element Modeling; Using Indium Tin Oxide To Mitigate Dust on Viewing Ports; High-Performance Polyimide Powder Coatings; Controlled-Release Microcapsules for Smart Coatings for Corrosion Applications; Aerocoat 7 Replacement Coatings; Photocatalytic Coatings for Exploration and Spaceport Design; New Materials for the Repair of Polyimide Electrical Wire Insulation; Commodity-Free Calibration; Novel Ice Mitigation Methods; Crack Offset Measurement With the Projected Laser Target Device; New Materials for Structural Composites and Protective Coatings; Fire Chemistry Testing of Spray-On Foam Insulation (SOFI); Using Aerogel-Based Insulation Material To Prevent Foam Loss on the Liquid-Hydrogen Intertank; Particle Ejection and Levitation Technology (PELT); Electrostatic Characterization of Lunar Dust; Numerical Analysis of Rocket Exhaust Cratering; RESOLVE Projects: Lunar Water Resource Demonstration and Regolith Volatile Characterization; Tribocharging Lunar Soil for Electrostatic Beneficiation; Numerically Modeling the Erosion of Lunar Soil by Rocket Exhaust Plumes; Trajectory Model of Lunar Dust Particles; Using Lunar Module Shadows To Scale the Effects of Rocket Exhaust Plumes; Predicting the Acoustic Environment Induced by the Launch of the Ares I Vehicle; Measuring Ultrasonic Acoustic Velocity in a Thin Sheet of Graphite Epoxy Composite; Hail Size Distribution Mapping; Launch Pad 39 Hail Monitor Array System; Autonomous Flight Safety System - Phase III; The Photogrammetry Cube; Bird Vision System; Automating Range Surveillance Through Radio Interferometry and Field Strength Mapping Techniques; Next-Generation Telemetry Workstation; GPS Metric Tracking Unit; and Space-Based Range.

2008-01-01

439

The physiological cost of wearing the propellant handler's ensemble at the Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The potential for exposure to toxins used in the propulsion systems of spacecraft dictates the use of a whole body protective suit, the Propellant Handler's Ensemble (PHE) during preflight preparation and launching. The weight, structure, and operating parameters of the PHE may be expected to have a significant impact upon the metabolic, cardiovascular, and thermal responses of the user, especially during ambient temperature extremes and high workload situations. Four male subjects participated in tests in -7, 23, and 43 C (20, 74, and 110 F) environments in two versions of the PHE, the autonomous backpack (BP) and the hoseline (HL) supplied configuration. Measurements included heart rate (HR) rectal temperature, four skin temperatures, oxygen (O2), and carbon dioxide (CO2) in the helmet area, interior suit temperature, and suit pressure. Exercise metabolism was estimated from HR, PHE weight, and treadmill speed and grade. The HR responses between each PHE configuration were not statistically different. As a percentage of HR maximum, the mean values were 79 percent (COLD), 84 percent (LAB), and 90 percent (HOT). Helmet O2 and CO2 levels were correlated with percent HR max (P less than 0.001). Rectal temperatures were similar for each PHE configuration, except in the HOT exposure where the BP version exceeded the HL configuration (P less than 0.05). In nearly every instance the HR was driven to moderately high levels, the supplied respiratory gases were not optimum, and thermal adversity was a primary stressor. Our findings suggest that medical and physical fitness standards, along with operational restrictions, should be imposed upon PHE users to avoid situations that could adversely affect the worker.

Schonfeld, Brian R.; Doerr, Donald F.; Tomaselli, Clare Marie

1990-01-01

440

Electrical enclosure hydrogen intrusion study. [purging Cape Kennedy Launch Complex 39  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As a cost savings measure for the space shuttle program, the feasibility of substituting dry air for nitrogen as the purge gas used to minimize the probability of fire and explosions which could erupt from propellant vapor (hydrogen) diffusion into the electrical enclosures at Launch Complex 39 was investigated. It was concluded that: (1) Hydrogen concentrations of approximately 1% were obtained in an electrical enclosure under design purge conditions. (2) Hydrogen concentrations exceeding the lower explosive limit, 4%, could probably be obtained within the enclosure under worst case conditions. (3) Most of the hydrogen intrusion into the enclosure probably occurred at the point with the shortest leak path, such as the door seal. (4) More stringent electrical enclosure design requirements should be imposed before air is using as a purge gas.

Welch, P. J.; Yantsios, J. N.

1979-01-01

441

Kennedy's Criminal Code Reform Bill and What It Doesn't Do for the Tribes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While the criminal reform bill, S.1722m, has great potential for straightening out the jurisdictional morass on Indian reservations, it is evading the more controversial issues. After describing past difficulties in determining criminal jurisdiction on tribal lands, this article discusses needed reforms and what is missing in the new law.…

Barsh, Russel Lawrence

1980-01-01

442

77 FR 69642 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

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2012-11-20

443

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2012-10-23

444

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2010-06-24

445

75 FR 68366 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

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2010-11-05

446

77 FR 69638 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

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2012-11-20

447

76 FR 11800 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

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2011-03-03

448

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2013-03-04

449

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2011-05-26

450

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2011-12-19

451

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2012-11-01

452

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2012-07-12

453

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2012-04-19

454

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2010-02-03

455

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2011-02-01

456

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2010-06-24

457

78 FR 23772 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

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2013-04-22

458

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2011-03-30

459

76 FR 76169 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development Notice of Meeting  

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2011-12-06

460

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2010-05-12

461

76 FR 53686 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

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2011-08-29

462

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2013-08-12

463

75 FR 62547 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

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2010-10-12

464

77 FR 73036 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

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2012-12-07

465

78 FR 14559 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

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2013-03-06

466

76 FR 35226 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting  

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...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes...National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting Pursuant...Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive...

2011-06-16

467

76 FR 7224 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

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2011-02-09

468

75 FR 65496 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

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2010-10-25

469

76 FR 12125 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

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2011-03-04

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2013-02-19

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2010-06-28

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2012-03-01

473

78 FR 11658 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting  

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2013-02-19

474

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2012-08-29

475

78 FR 18998 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting  

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2013-03-28

476

76 FR 68200 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

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2011-11-03

477

75 FR 12242 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

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2010-03-15

478

76 FR 64092 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

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2011-10-17

479

77 FR 40369 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

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2012-07-09

480

78 FR 14562 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

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2013-03-06

481

78 FR 12765 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development Notice of Closed...  

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2013-02-25

482

75 FR 54890 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

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2010-09-09

483

The evaluation of ASOS for the Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report documents the Applied Meteorology Unit's (AMU) evaluation of the effectiveness and utility of the Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) in terms of spaceflight operations and user requirements. In particular, the evaluation determines which of the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) observation requirements can be satisfied by ASOS. This report also includes a summary of ASOS' background, current configuration and specifications, system performance, and the possible concepts of operations for use of ASOS at the SLF. This evaluation stems from a desire by the Air Force to determine if ASOS units could be used to reduce the cost of SLF meteorological observations.

Yersavich, Ann; Wheeler, Mark; Taylor, Gregory; Schumann, Robin; Manobianco, John

1994-01-01

484

Quantity Distance for the Kennedy Space Center Vehicle Assembly Building for Solid Propellant Fueled Launchers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA KSC VAB was built to process Apollo launchers in the 1960's, and later adapted to process Space Shuttles. The VAB has served as a place to assemble solid rocket motors (5RM) and mate them to the vehicle's external fuel tank and Orbiter before rollout to the launch pad. As Space Shuttle is phased out, and new launchers are developed, the VAB may again be adapted to process these new launchers. Current launch vehicle designs call for continued and perhaps increased use of SRM segments; hence, the safe separation distances are in the process of being re-calculated. Cognizant NASA personnel and the solid rocket contractor have revisited the above VAB QD considerations and suggest that it may be revised to allow a greater number of motor segments within the VAB. This revision assumes that an inadvertent ignition of one SRM stack in its High Bay need not cause immediate and complete involvement of boosters that are part of a vehicle in adjacent High Bay. To support this assumption, NASA and contractor personnel proposed a strawman test approach for obtaining subscale data that may be used to develop phenomenological insight and to develop confidence in an analysis model for later use on full-scale situations. A team of subject matter experts in safety and siting of propellants and explosives were assembled to review the subscale test approach and provide options to NASA. Upon deliberations regarding the various options, the team arrived at some preliminary recommendations for NASA.

Stover, Steven; Diebler, Corey; Frazier, Wayne

2006-01-01

485

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2012-10-12

486

Environmental impact statement for the Kennedy Space Center, 1978 - 1979 revision  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The ongoing operation of KSC for expendable launch vehicles and automated spacecraft, continued development of facility capabilities, and the approved follow-on operations of the Space Transportation System and associated payloads are described. Emphasis is placed on the expendable launch vehicle and space shuttle traffic projected as of January, 1979. The maximum potential effect on the environment is addressed. Site specific environmental effects are summarized. It is indicated that all potential impacts will be localized, of short duration, controllable, and of minimum severity. The impact on land use, air and water quality, weather, and noise effects is covered.

1979-01-01

487

78 FR 44576 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel, Newborn Screening Transitional Research Network. Date: August 5, 2013. Time: 12:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Agenda: To...

2013-07-24

488

78 FR 14561 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; Genomic Sequencing and Newborn Screening Disorders. Date: April 3-4, 2013. Time: 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate...

2013-03-06