Sample records for kathleen kennedy manzo

  1. Kathleen Grace Kennedy Curriculum Vitae

    E-print Network

    Bigelow, Stephen

    Kathleen Grace Kennedy Curriculum Vitae Department of Mathematics 6607 South Hall Phone: University and Paris. All coursework completed in French. 1 of 3 Kathleen Grace Kennedy #12;Research Activity "A Optimization Problem with a Surprisingly Simple Solution" Drinen, K. G. Kennedy, W. M. Priestley. Amer. Math

  2. Kennedy's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    NINDS Kennedy's Disease Information Page Synonym(s): Bulbospinal Muscular Atrophy, X-Linked Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy Table of Contents ( ... is being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Kennedy's Disease? Kennedy's disease is an inherited motor neuron ...

  3. Kathleen O'Brien.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeFevre, Camille

    2003-01-01

    Presents an interview with Kathleen O'Brien, vice president of university services at the University of Minnesota. Discusses her goals for making the school an institutional benchmark for architecture and facilities management. (EV)

  4. Kennedy Homepage

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Kennedy Homepage: Senator Edward Kennedy's Web page, including links to information on issues of interest to the Senator, online resources available in and for Massachusetts, and other government information. Note that an election year freeze has been in effect since July 23, preventing any update of information until after the election on November 8, 1994.

  5. Organizational Adaptation Kathleen M. Carley

    E-print Network

    Sadeh, Norman M.

    Organizational Adaptation Kathleen M. Carley Dept. of Social and Decision Sciences Carnegie Mellon: Kathleen M. Carley, 1998, "Organizational Adaptation." Annals of Operations Research. 75: 25-47. #12;Organizational Adaptation A computational model of organizational adaptation in which change occurs at both

  6. Kathleen L. Petersen Curriculum Vit Contact Information

    E-print Network

    Kathleen L. Petersen Curriculum Vitæ Contact Information petersen@math.fsu.edu www.math Number One (with K. Baker) Internat. J. Math., 24 (2013), No. 06. #12;Kathleen L. Petersen Curriculum VitæKathleen L. Petersen Curriculum VitæKathleen L. Petersen Curriculum Vitæ 11. A Bombieri

  7. KENNEDY CENTER CELEBRATION ANNIVERSARY OF KENNEDY SPACE

    E-print Network

    Waliser, Duane E.

    KENNEDY CENTER CELEBRATION 50TH ANNIVERSARY OF KENNEDY SPACE SPEECH TO CONGRESS May 25, 2011 Thank of music. Welcome to this program that celebrates the wonderful legacy left by President John F. Kennedy 50 of innovation and inspiration for the world. #12;I was a teenager when President Kennedy delivered his charge

  8. Vanderbilt Kennedy Center Orientation

    E-print Network

    Sarkar, Nilanjan

    2013-14 Vanderbilt Kennedy Center Orientation Manual A Guide to History, Programs, Procedures, and Training #12;Page | 1 Welcome to the Vanderbilt Kennedy Center! You may be here because you are a new Kennedy Center is an exciting, innovative organization where caring, compassion, professional expertise

  9. Home > Editorials & Opinions > Bud Kennedy BUD KENNEDY RSS Mobile Newsletters

    E-print Network

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    Home > Editorials & Opinions > Bud Kennedy BUD KENNEDY RSS Mobile Newsletters Quick links: Submit BY BUD KENNEDY bud@star-telegram.com This definitely is not Gen. Robert E. Lee's Arlington. The Texas Sanders Bud Kennedy Richard Greene Cynthia M. Allen Arlington's `American Dream' comes in all colors | Bud

  10. Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpkins, Patrick A.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the importance of the Kennedy Space Center both in terms to the economy of Florida and to spaceflight. It reviews the general NASA direction,the challenges of the coming year and the accomplishments.

  11. WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF DAVID KENNEDY

    E-print Network

    WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF DAVID KENNEDY ACTING DEPUTY ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR FOR OCEAN SERVICES of the Subcommittee. My name is David Kennedy, and I am the Acting Deputy Assistant Administrator for Ocean Services

  12. Validating Computational Models Kathleen M. Carley

    E-print Network

    Sadeh, Norman M.

    Validating Computational Models Kathleen M. Carley Associate Professor of Sociology Department.S. government. #12;Validating Computational Models Abstract The use of computational models in the social fewer have an understanding of how to validate such models. And while many papers extort the relative

  13. Inhibiting Adaptation 1 Kathleen M. Carley

    E-print Network

    Sadeh, Norman M.

    Inhibiting Adaptation 1 Kathleen M. Carley Social and Decision Sciences and H.J. Heinz III School forces or coalition forces, the "organization" must be adaptive. Unanticipated changes in mission to create forces that can respond rapidly, accurately and can readily adapt to new situations. Over the past

  14. Peter Gault Kennedy CURRICULUM VITAE

    E-print Network

    Bruns, Tom

    Peter Gault Kennedy CURRICULUM VITAE Department of Plant and Microbial Biology pkennedy Plant Society research grant #12;Peter Kennedy, Curriculum Vitae 2 2000 Undergraduate research Networks Grant Meeting, UC Davis, CA #12;Peter Kennedy, Curriculum Vitae 3 Talks at scientific meetings

  15. Intra-organizational Computation and Complexity Kathleen M. Carley

    E-print Network

    Sadeh, Norman M.

    Intra-organizational Computation and Complexity Kathleen M. Carley Social and Decision Sciences H University Running Head: Intra-organizational Computation and Complexity Direct all correspondence to: Prof and Ranga Ramanujam. Citation: Kathleen M. Carley, 2002, "Intra-Organizational Computation and Complexity

  16. Information Security: The Human Perspective Kathleen M. Carley

    E-print Network

    Sadeh, Norman M.

    Information Security: The Human Perspective Kathleen M. Carley August 2000 Direct all, of the Office of Naval Research, the National Science Foundation or the U.S. government. #12;Information Security: The Human Perspective Kathleen M. Carley Abstract For many organizations, information security

  17. KENNEDY KRIEGER INSTITUTE, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

    E-print Network

    Pevsner, Jonathan

    KENNEDY KRIEGER INSTITUTE, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES Consolidated Financial Statements June 30, 2013 of Directors of Kennedy Krieger Institute, Inc. and Subsidiaries We have audited the accompanying consolidated financial statements of Kennedy Krieger Institute, Inc. and Subsidiaries (the "Institute"), which comprise

  18. Kennedy Space Center Payload Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Ronnie; Engler, Tom; Colloredo, Scott; Zide, Alan

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the payload processing functions at Kennedy Space Center. It details some of the payloads processed at KSC, the typical processing tasks, the facilities available for processing payloads, and the capabilities and customer services that are available.

  19. Kennedy Space Center Design Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humeniuk, Bob

    2013-01-01

    Perform simulations of ground operations leading up to launch at Kennedy Space Center and Vandenberg Air Force Base in CA since 1987. We use 3D Laser Scanning, Modeling and Simulations to verify that operations are feasible, efficient and safe.

  20. Kennedy Space Center Multimedia Gallery

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Kennedy Space Center Multimedia Gallery provides a wide assortment of photographs and videos related to its numerous missions throughout the years. This user-friendly database allows visitors to search by keyword, type of media, time period, and category. Visitors can find materials for space shuttles, projects and missions, expendable launch vehicles, education, and much more. Through the countless multimedia, users can discover the many great endeavors undertaken by the Kennedy Space Center.

  1. KATHLEEN MCGUIRE Cancer biology of human T cells

    E-print Network

    Segall, Anca

    KATHLEEN MCGUIRE Cancer biology of human T cells: studies on growth factor production, activity Publications: McGuire, K. L., V. E. Curtiss, E. L. Larson and W. A. Haseltine. 1993. Influence of human T

  2. Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    Among 2011's many accomplishments, we safely retired the Space Shuttle Program after 30 incredible years; completed the International Space Station and are taking steps to enable it to reach its full potential as a multi-purpose laboratory; and helped to expand scientific knowledge with missions like Aquarius, GRAIL, and the Mars Science Laboratory. Responding to national budget challenges, we are prioritizing critical capabilities and divesting ourselves of assets no longer needed for NASA's future exploration programs. Since these facilities do not have to be maintained or demolished, the government saves money. At the same time, our commercial partners save money because they do not have to build new facilities. It is a win-win for everyone. Moving forward, 2012 will be even more historically significant as we celebrate the 50th Anniversary of Kennedy Space Center. In the coming year, KSC will facilitate commercial transportation to low-Earth orbit and support the evolution of the Space Launch System and Orion crew vehicle as they ready for exploration missions, which will shape how human beings view the universe. While NASA's Vision is to lead scientific and technological advances in aeronautics and space for a Nation on the frontier of discovery KSC's vision is to be the world's preeminent launch complex for government and commercial space access, enabling the world to explore and work in space. KSC's Mission is to safely manage, develop, integrate, and sustain space systems through partnerships that enable innovative, diverse access to space and inspires the Nation's future explorers.

  3. Kennedy at Rice University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    President Kennedy speaks before a crowd of 35,000 people at Rice University in the football field. The following are excerpts from his speech. ' ...We set sail on his new sea because there is a new knowledge to be gained, and new rights to be won, and they must be won and used for the progress of all people. ...Whether it will become a force for good or ill depends on man, and only if the United States occupies a position of pre-eminence can we help decide whether this new ocean will be a sea of peace or a new terrifying theater of war. But I do say space can be explored and mastered without feeding the fires of war, without repeating the mistakes that man has made with extending his writ around this globe of ours. ...There is no strife, no prejudice, no national conflict in outer space as yet. Its conquest deserves the best of all mankind, and its opportunity for peaceful cooperation may never come again. But why, some say the Moon? Why choose this as our goal? And they may well ask, why climb the highest mountian? Why - 35 years ago - why fly the Atlantic? Why does Rice play Texas? We choose to go to the Moon, we choose to go to the Moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one in which we intend to win, and the others too.'

  4. Kennedy at Rice University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    President Kennedy speaks before a crowd of 35,000 people at Rice University in the football field. The following are excerpts from his speech. ' ...We set sail on his new sea because there is a new knowledge to begained, and new rights to be won, and they must be won and used for the progress of all people. Whether it will become a force for good or ill depends on man, and only if the United States occupies a position of pre-eminence can we help decide whether this new ocean will be a sea of peace or a new terrifying theater of war. But I do say space can be explored and mastered without feeding the fires of war, without repeating the mistakes that man has made with extending his wirt around this globe of ours. There is no strife, no prejudice, no national conflict in outer space as yet. Its conquest deserves the best of all mankind, and its opportunity for peaceful cooperation may never come again. But why, some say the Moon? Why choose this as our goal? And they may well ask, why climb the highest mountain? Why 35 years ago why fly the Atlantic? Why does Rice play Texas? We choose to go to the Moon, we choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one in which we attend to win, and the others , too.'

  5. The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program: Fisheries

    E-print Network

    The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program: Fisheries Research and Development REPORT 1998 August 1 on the Saltonstall-Kennedy (S-K) Grant Program, administered by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS

  6. Donald Kennedy Donald Kennedy is the Bing Professor of Environmental Science and

    E-print Network

    Sonnenburg, Justin L.

    Donald Kennedy Donald Kennedy is the Bing Professor of Environmental Science and President emeritus. Kennedy took a 2 1/2 year leave to serve as Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and membership on the World Food and Nutrition Study. Following his return to Stanford in 1979, Dr. Kennedy

  7. Kennedy Krieger Institute, Inc. and Subsidiaries

    E-print Network

    Pevsner, Jonathan

    Kennedy Krieger Institute, Inc. and Subsidiaries Reports on Federal Awards in Accordance with OMB Circular A-133 June 30, 2013 Federal Entity Identification Number 52-1524965 #12;Kennedy Krieger Institute;Independent Auditor's Report To the Board of Directors of Kennedy Krieger Institute, Inc. and Subsidiaries

  8. A Biography of Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weidman, Lisa K. Menendez

    This teaching guide consists of a biography of Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy (Onassis), the wife of President John F. Kennedy, the 35th President of the United States and questions for students to answer after reading the biography. The guide contains activities, such as playing the role of an inquiring camera girl (Mrs. Kennedy's first job in…

  9. Every five years, the Kennedy Center

    E-print Network

    Sarkar, Nilanjan

    Every five years, the Vanderbilt Kennedy Center competes with major research universities (MRDDRCs). We are proud to announce that this NICHD "center grant" to the Vanderbilt Kennedy Center has Program Directors--Front row: Craig Kennedy (1998-present), H. Carl Haywood (1968-1970), Penny Brooks

  10. KENNEDY KRIEGER INSTITUTE, INC. AND AFFILIATES

    E-print Network

    Pevsner, Jonathan

    KENNEDY KRIEGER INSTITUTE, INC. AND AFFILIATES Combined Financial Statements June 30, 2014 and 2013 #12;Kennedy Krieger Institute, Inc. and Affiliates Index June 30, 2014 and 2013 Page(s) Report of Kennedy Krieger Institute, Inc. and Affiliates We have audited the accompanying combined financial

  11. The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program: Fisheries

    E-print Network

    1 The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program: Fisheries Research and Development REPORT 2001 August 1 OF CONTENTS I. INTRODUCTION II. BACKGROUND III. PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program OF FY 2001 S-K APPLICATIONS RECEIVED #12;5 I. INTRODUCTION This report to Congress on the Saltonstall-Kennedy

  12. KENNEDY KRIEGER INSTITUTE, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

    E-print Network

    Pevsner, Jonathan

    KENNEDY KRIEGER INSTITUTE, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES Consolidated Financial Statements June 30, 2012 of Directors of Kennedy Krieger Institute, Inc. and Subsidiaries In our opinion, the accompanying consolidated present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidated financial position of Kennedy Krieger Institute

  13. On a question of Cooper and Kennedy

    E-print Network

    Prodinger, Helmut

    On a question of Cooper and Kennedy@rsmb.tuwien.ac.at In [2], Cooper and Kennedy note the following: If xn = axn-1 + bxn-2 + cxn. Kennedy. Proof of a result by Jarden by generalizing* * a proof of Carlitz. Fibonacci Quarterly, 33

  14. KENNEDY KRIEGER INSTITUTE GUEST RELATIONS & VOLUNTEER SERVICES

    E-print Network

    Pevsner, Jonathan

    KENNEDY KRIEGER INSTITUTE GUEST RELATIONS & VOLUNTEER SERVICES Thank you for expressing interest in volunteering at Kennedy Krieger Institute. Volunteers need to be 16 years or older. If you are 18 years to complete. The completed packet, along with two letters of recommendation should be mailed to: Kennedy

  15. Kennedy Krieger Institute, Inc. and Subsidiaries

    E-print Network

    Pevsner, Jonathan

    Kennedy Krieger Institute, Inc. and Subsidiaries Reports on Federal Awards in Accordance with OMB Circular A-133 June 30, 2012 Federal Entity Identification Number 52-1524965 #12;Kennedy Krieger Institute of Directors of Kennedy Krieger Institute, Inc. and Subsidiaries: In our opinion, the accompanying consolidated

  16. The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program

    E-print Network

    The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program: Fisheries Research and Development REPORT 2003 DEPARTMENT, 2003 #12;The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program: Fisheries Research and Development Report 2003 August 1 #12;The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program: Fisheries Research and Development REPORT 2003 August 1

  17. At the Vanderbilt Kennedy Center,

    E-print Network

    Sarkar, Nilanjan

    to William Spickard, an 8-year- old student with Down syndrome she was tutoring. McDermott, a graduate to endow a Vanderbilt Kennedy Reading Clinic scholarship fund for students with Down syndrome, Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome--may provide important information for understanding the processes

  18. Plasma Physics John F. Kennedy

    E-print Network

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    v v v v v Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory N 278 95 1 95 18 NEW YORK John F. Kennedy Int Campus/ Sayre Drive Sign PPPLSayre Dr. Location: Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory James Forrestal Campus U.S. Route #1 North at Sayre Drive Plainsboro, NJ 08536 Mailing Address: Princeton Plasma Physics

  19. Kathleen R. McKeown Address Dept. of Computer Science

    E-print Network

    Yang, Junfeng

    Kathleen R. McKeown Address Dept. of Computer Science Columbia Univ. New York, N.Y. 10027 20 Science January 2005 to present. Columbia University. Henry and Gertrude Rothschild Professor January 2003., Computer and Information Science, University of Pennsylvania, 1982 M.S., Computer and Information Science

  20. Information Security: The Human Perspective Kathleen M. Carley

    E-print Network

    Sadeh, Norman M.

    Information Security: The Human Perspective Kathleen M. Carley One of the major security problems, and miscommunication or misunderstandings. Information security is a system level problem and can only be adequately of the new program in information security at the Heinz School, a new course - "Organizational Management

  1. Contaminant dispersion at the rehabilitated Mary Kathleen uranium mine, Australia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. G. Lottermoser; P. M. Ashley; M. T. Costelloe

    2005-01-01

    This study reports on the transfer of contaminants from waste rock dumps and mineralised ground into soils, sediments, waters and plants at the rehabilitated Mary Kathleen uranium mine in semi-arid northwest Queensland. Numerous waste rock dumps were partly covered with benign soil and the open pit mine was allowed to flood. The mineralised and waste calc-silicate rock in the open

  2. Estimating Vulnerabilities in Large Covert Networks Kathleen M. Carley

    E-print Network

    Sadeh, Norman M.

    by the Office of Naval Research (ONR), United States Navy Grant No. N00014-02-10973 on Dynamic Network Analysis University Contact: Prof. Kathleen M. Carley Institute for Software Research International Carnegie Mellon difficult. Part of this difficulty stems from their covert nature. Social network analysis employs sets

  3. Kennedy Space Center Spaceport Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wary, Samantha A.

    2013-01-01

    Until the Shuttle Atlantis' final landing on July 21, 2011, Kennedy Space Center (KSC) served as NASA's main spaceport, which is a launch and landing facility for rockets and spacecraft that are attempting to enter orbit. Many of the facilities at KSC were created to assist the Shuttle Program. One of the most important and used facilities is the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), This was the main landing area for the return of the shuttle after her mission in space. · However, the SLF has also been used for a number of other projects including straight-line testing by Gibbs Racing, weather data collection by NOAA, and an airfield for the KSC helicopters. This runway is three miles long with control tower at midfield and a fire department located at the end in care of an emergency. This facility, which was part of the great space race, will continue to be used for historical events as Kennedy begins to commercialize its facilities. KSC continues to be an important spaceport to the government, and it will transform into an important spaceport for the commercial industry as well. During my internship at KSC's Center Planning and Development Directorate, I had the opportunity to be a part of the negotiation team working on the agreement for Space Florida to control the Shuttle Landing Facility. This gave me the opportunity to learn about all the changes that are occurring here at Kennedy Space Center. Through various meetings, I discovered the Master Plan and its focus is to transform the existing facilities that were primarily used for the Shuttle Program, to support government operations and commercial flights in the future. This. idea is also in a new strategic business plan and completion of a space industry market analysis. All of these different documentations were brought to my attention and I. saw how they came together in the discussions of transitioning the SLF to a commercial operator, Space Florida. After attending meetings and partaking in discussions for the SLF Agreement, I formed the idea of a Spaceport Analysis as my over internship project. As previously stated, I had the opportunity to sit in on the market analysis meetings and read through the analysis itself. I suggested the creation of a Strengths Weaknesses Opportunities Threats (SWOT) analysis, which allows an individual to see an overview of the company's strengths and weaknesses alongside any industry opportunities and threats. After discussions with the lead writer of the new strategic business plan and getting approval, I took the action upon myself and created the Kennedy Space Center SWOT Analysis.

  4. 2. GENERAL STREET VIEW LOOKING WEST ON KENNEDY ST. FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. GENERAL STREET VIEW LOOKING WEST ON KENNEDY ST. FROM INTERSECTION OF SOUTH CONVENT AVE. AND WEST KENNEDY ST. - Barrio Libre, West Kennedy & West Seventeenth Streets, Meyer & Convent Avenues, Tucson, Pima County, AZ

  5. 3. GENERAL STREET VIEW LOOKING WEST ON KENNEDY FROM JUST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. GENERAL STREET VIEW LOOKING WEST ON KENNEDY FROM JUST SOUTH OF SOUTH CONVENT AVE. AND WEST KENNEDY ST. - Barrio Libre, West Kennedy & West Seventeenth Streets, Meyer & Convent Avenues, Tucson, Pima County, AZ

  6. Manzo's Language Shaping Paradigm (LSP).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manzo, A. V.; Sherk, J. K.

    A teaching strategy has been devised to teach students how to value their own thoughts and experiences. Secondary purposes of the strategy are to help students deal with their own identities, to improve their general language and essay writing abilities, and to heighten their appreciation of the writing of others. The seven steps of the teaching…

  7. Contaminant dispersion at the rehabilitated Mary Kathleen uranium mine, Australia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. G. Lottermoser; P. M. Ashley; M. T. Costelloe

    2005-01-01

    This study reports on the transfer of contaminants from waste rock dumps and mineralised ground into soils, sediments, waters\\u000a and plants at the rehabilitated Mary Kathleen uranium mine in semi-arid northwest Queensland. Numerous waste rock dumps were\\u000a partly covered with benign soil and the open pit mine was allowed to flood. The mineralised and waste calc-silicate rock in\\u000a the open

  8. Kennedy Space Center polygeneration facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutkowski, G. P.

    1984-01-01

    This is a report on the status of the polygeneration feasibility study conducted by the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Polygeneration is an innovative approach to reducing cost per flight for the Shuttle by reducing propellant and other costs. Cost of LH2 is expected to be adversely affected by sharp increases in natural gas pricing as well as other costs such as electricity and transportation. The polygeneration concept is to produce liquid hydrogen (LH2) for the Shuttle and gaseous nitrogen (GN2), electricity and thermal energy to meet KSC requirements by means of an integrated coal gasification plant. Conclusions of the initial feasibility study will be presented as well as the status of on-going activities.

  9. Mitochondrial dysfunction in Kennedy’s disease: a new pharmacological target?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chong; Chen, Wei; Miao, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial impairment and elevated oxidative stress have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Kennedy’s disease. However, there is still no study describing the mitochondrial nutrient management in patients with Kennedy’s disease. Methods We assessed the clinical and electrophysiological features in a patient with Kennedy’s disease. This patient was diagnosed by genetic analysis. We also measured the plasma 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels of the patient and his family members using commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Treatment with intravenous L-carnitine (2 g/day) for the patient was started on admission, followed by two weeks. Results Routine laboratory tests revealed a severe elevation of creatine kinase (CK) (606.5 U/L; normal value: 15-170 U/L). Sequencing of the first exon of androgen receptor (AR) revealed an increased number of CAG repeat (50; the normal range from 10-36) in the patient. Plasma 8-OHdG level in the patient was relatively elevated (34.68±1.01 ng/mL) compared with the female carriers and non-carriers. Two weeks after L-carnitine treatment, we observed a reduction of approximately 40% in CK level (391 U/L) in the patient. Conclusions Oxidative stress resulting from mitochondrial dysfunction could be involved in Kennedy’s disease. Targeting the mitochondrial dysfunction in Kennedy’s disease may have significant therapeutic potential. PMID:25992365

  10. Travel Alert from Kennedy Krieger Institute Detour Alert

    E-print Network

    Pevsner, Jonathan

    Travel Alert from Kennedy Krieger Institute Detour Alert: Effective June 18, 2014 Garage Detour will be closed from the Kennedy Krieger garage entrance eastbound to Wolfe Street. Kennedy Krieger staff allow extra time when traveling to Kennedy Krieger Institute for your appointment. We are all born

  11. President Kennedy's Speech at Rice University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This video tape presents unedited film footage of President John F. Kennedy's speech at Rice University, Houston, Texas, September 12, 1962. The speech expresses the commitment of the United States to landing an astronaut on the Moon.

  12. Kennedy Now! - Duration: 2 minutes, 4 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    2013 roared out of the blocks at NASA's Kennedy Space Center as launch teams oversaw liftoffs from both coasts. The Florida-based center also continued its work prepping payloads bound for the Inte...

  13. Kennedy NOW! - Duration: 2 minutes, 44 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    In this edition of Kennedy Now!, find out about accelerating preparations for an Orion flight test next year, along with a robotic miner under development. Also see the robotic craft designed and b...

  14. Rt Hon Charles Kennedy MP Born in Inverness in 1959, Charles Kennedy was brought up and educated just outside Fort

    E-print Network

    Glasgow, University of

    Rt Hon Charles Kennedy MP Rector Born in Inverness in 1959, Charles Kennedy was brought up. Charles Kennedy was elected the UK Liberal Democrats' Party President, the equivalent of party chairman of the Party in January 2006. In September 2007 Charles Kennedy was unanimously elected President

  15. WILDLIFE - ALLIGATOR BEGINS TO CROSS KENNEDY PARKWAY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Harold O'Connor, manager of the Merritt Island Wildlife Refuge, watches a 10-foot-long alligator inch its way toward a busy highway at the Kennedy Space Center. O'Connor, aided by assistant Jerome Carroll, not shown, guided the large gator to safety in a nearby pond, several miles south of the Vehicle Assembly Building, in background. The Apollo 12 astronauts will be launched no earlier than November 14, 1969, from the Kennedy Space Center on the Nation's second manned lunar landing mission.

  16. Ground winds for Kennedy Space Center, Florida, 1979 revision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. L.; Brown, S. C.

    1979-01-01

    Revised ground-level runway wind statistics for the Kennedy Space Center, Florida area are presented. Crosswind, headwind, tailwind, and headwind reversal percentage frequencies are given with respect to month and hour for the Kennedy Space Center Space Shuttle runway.

  17. In Tribute: Senator Edward M. Kennedy, Friend of NIH

    MedlinePLUS

    ... please turn Javascript on. In Tribute: Senator Edward M. Kennedy, Friend of NIH Past Issues / Fall 2009 ... Human Development (NICHD) in Shriver's honor. Senator Edward M. Kennedy, Friend of NIH "… deep compassion for those ...

  18. PRESIDENTIAL RHETORIC AND LEADERSHIP FROM KENNEDY TO THE PRESENT

    E-print Network

    Grishok, Alla

    PRESIDENTIAL RHETORIC AND LEADERSHIP FROM KENNEDY TO THE PRESENT THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 12TH , 9:00AM, Washington Post Joseph Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor, Harvard Kennedy School

  19. CALCULUS REVISITED: AN INTRODUCTORY COURSE IN K. GRACE KENNEDY

    E-print Network

    Bigelow, Stephen

    CALCULUS REVISITED: AN INTRODUCTORY COURSE IN MATLAB K. GRACE KENNEDY When beginning to think about of programming language. 1 #12;2 K. GRACE KENNEDY · the relationship between secant lines, the tangent line

  20. A DIAGRAMMATIC MULTIVARIATE ALEXANDER INVARIANT K. GRACE KENNEDY

    E-print Network

    Bigelow, Stephen

    A DIAGRAMMATIC MULTIVARIATE ALEXANDER INVARIANT OF TANGLES K. GRACE KENNEDY Abstract. Recently it generalizes easily to tangles with 1 #12;2 K. GRACE KENNEDY more than one unclosed strand. In this paper, we

  1. THE INCORPORATION OF DEMOCRACY: JUSTICE KENNEDY'S PHILOSOPHY OF POLITICAL

    E-print Network

    Finzi, Adrien

    1783 THE INCORPORATION OF DEMOCRACY: JUSTICE KENNEDY'S PHILOSOPHY OF POLITICAL PARTICIPATION. The Incorporation of Democracy .............................................. 1806 V. IMPLICATIONS FOR CAMPAIGN

  2. Voting, Vote Capture & Vote Counting Kennedy School of Government

    E-print Network

    Camp, L. Jean

    Voting, Vote Capture & Vote Counting Symposium June 2004 Kennedy School of Government Harvard The following document was written by Jean Camp, Allan Friedman and Warigia Bowman of the Kennedy School based for the Symposium was provided by the National Science Foundation and the Kennedy School of Government. A gift

  3. Voting, Vote Capture & Vote Counting Kennedy School of Government

    E-print Network

    Camp, L. Jean

    Voting, Vote Capture & Vote Counting Symposium June 2004 Kennedy School of Government Harvard The following document was developed by Jean Camp, Allan Friedman and Warigia Bowman of the Kennedy School based and the Kennedy School of Government. A gift to support #12;2 Summary Best Practices Rebecca Mercuri's work

  4. CURRICULUM VITAE: THEODORE KENNEDY Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center

    E-print Network

    Lovich, Jeffrey E.

    CURRICULUM VITAE: THEODORE KENNEDY Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center United States. PUBLICATIONS: Kennedy, T.A., J.C. Finlay, and S.E. Hobbie. Eradication of invasive saltcedar (Tamarix. Kennedy, T.A. and S.E. Hobbie. Salt cedar invasion (Tamarix ramosissima) alters organic matter dynamics

  5. The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program: Fisheries Research and Development

    E-print Network

    The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program: Fisheries Research and Development Report 2009 August 1 Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program: Fisheries Research and Development REPORT 2009 August 1, 2009 U.............................................. 81 #12;4 I. INTRODUCTION This Report to Congress on the Saltonstall-Kennedy (S-K) Grant Program

  6. Saltonstall-Kennedy Application Checklist Am I eligible?

    E-print Network

    Saltonstall-Kennedy Application Checklist Am I eligible? You are eligible to apply under the Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program if: 1. You are a citizen or national of the United States; 2. You is "yes" to any of the above, you are eligible and can continue. Find the Saltonstall-Kennedy grant

  7. potentialpotentialpotentialA publication of Kennedy Krieger Institute Severe Behavior

    E-print Network

    Pevsner, Jonathan

    potentialpotentialpotentialA publication of Kennedy Krieger Institute TotheBrink andBack: Severe. For these families, Kennedy Krieger is often the place they turn to when hope is all but lost. In this issue, you'll read about families who came to Kennedy Krieger for the care they couldn't find anywhere else. When

  8. A Harvard Kennedy School Perspective www.hks.harvard.edu

    E-print Network

    DIVERSITY experience A Harvard Kennedy School Perspective www.hks.harvard.edu ASK WHAT YOU CAN DO #12;WELCOME The Harvard Kennedy School's mission is to educate outstanding public leaders and produce to the Kennedy School and how they are using their time here to channel their idealism and develop their next

  9. The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program: Fisheries Research and Development

    E-print Network

    The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program: Fisheries Research and Development Report 2002 August 1, Pascagoula, MS Cover Photo Credits: DOC/NOAA Photo Library #12;#12;The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program This report to Congress on the Saltonstall-Kennedy (S-K) Grant Program, administered by the National Marine

  10. FRANCIS E. KENNEDY, JR. Professor of Engineering Home Address

    E-print Network

    RESUME FRANCIS E. KENNEDY, JR. Professor of Engineering Home Address: Thayer School of Engineering/643-6048 Tel: 603/646-2094 Fax: 603/646-3856 e-mail: francis.kennedy@dartmouth.edu PERSONAL DATA Born, Thailand; Visiting Lecturer #12;Francis E. Kennedy, Jr. 2 Resume MILITARY EXPERIENCE May 1965-May 1967

  11. Columbia returning to Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Space shuttle orbiter Columbia returns to the shuttle landing facility atop NASA 905, a modified 747, following a cross country flight from the Dryden Flight Research Facility. The Kennedy Space Center alternative photo number is 108-KSC-82PC-1328.

  12. Kennedy Space Center Annual Report, FY 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has a nearly 40-year tradition of excellence in processing and launching space vehicles and their payloads. The Center's outstanding record of achievements in America's space program has earned it an honored place in history and an essential role in the present; KSC also intends to play a vital part in the future of space exploration.

  13. WRITTEN STATEMENT OF DAVID M. KENNEDY

    E-print Network

    in the response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. My name is David Kennedy and I am the Acting Assistant the critical roles NOAA serves during oil spills and the importance of our contributions to protect and restore's coastal natural resources when they are impacted by oil spills, hazardous substance releases, and impacts

  14. Research and technology at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    As the NASA Center responsible for assembly, checkout, servicing, launch, recovery, and operational support of Space Transportation System elements and payloads, Kennedy Space Center is placing increasing emphasis on the Center's research and technology program. In addition to strengthening those areas of engineering and operations technology that contribute to safer, more efficient, and more economical execution of current mission, the technical tools are developed needed to execute Center's mission relative to future programs. The Engineering Development Directorate encompasses most of the laboratories and other Center resources that are key elements of research and technology program implementation and is responsible for implementation of the majority of the projects in this Kennedy Space Center 1989 Annual Report.

  15. Kennedy Space Center Launch and Landing Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahlberg, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    The presentations describes Kennedy Space Center (KSC) payload processing, facilities and capabilities, and research development and life science experience. Topics include launch site processing, payload processing, key launch site processing roles, leveraging KSC experience, Space Station Processing Facility and capabilities, Baseline Data Collection Facility, Space Life Sciences Laboratory and capabilities, research payload development, International Space Station research flight hardware, KSC flight payload history, and KSC life science expertise.

  16. John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Moving into a two-room apartment near the State House in Boston in 1946, many people wondered aloud how this bright, yet somewhat retiring, young man would do in the rough and tumble world of Boston politics. That 29-year old happened to be John F. Kennedy, and he would win his first campaign that year, as he made his way to the U.S. House of Representatives. He would of course become President of the United States, and later be assassinated in the fall of 1963 in Dallas. His presidential library and museum occupy one of the loveliest vistas afforded any presidential library, as they lie on Columbia Point along Bostonâ??s waterfront. For those who canâ??t make a direct visit to the Bay State, this website provides a fine virtual experience. The site includes historical timelines of Kennedyâ??s life (along with those of other members of his family), along with an interactive White House diary feature, which offers detailed information on what Kennedy did on every day of his presidency. Interestingly enough, the Ernest Hemingway archive is also housed at the Kennedy Presidential Library, so visitors can also learn about their holdings and view selected digitized materials.

  17. Q & A with Kathleen M. Reilly, Author of "Planet Earth: 25 Environmental Projects You Can Build Yourself"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curriculum Review, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Kathleen M. Reilly, author of "Planet Earth: 25 Environmental Projects You Can Build Yourself." Environmental awareness needs to begin in childhood, and, through this book, Kathleen M. Reilly encourages children to learn about ecology and ecosystems to begin conservation early in their lives. Children ages 9…

  18. STUDY GUIDE FOR 3C K. GRACE KENNEDY

    E-print Network

    Bigelow, Stephen

    STUDY GUIDE FOR 3C K. GRACE KENNEDY Spring 2009 Contents 1. Introduction 1 1.1. When we can find equations (DE's). (1) What is a differential equation? 1 #12;2 K. GRACE KENNEDY (2) What is a solution statement of Picard's Theorem? #12;4 K. GRACE KENNEDY 1.2. When you don't or can't find a solution

  19. Contaminant dispersion at the rehabilitated Mary Kathleen uranium mine, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lottermoser, B. G.; Ashley, P. M.; Costelloe, M. T.

    2005-09-01

    This study reports on the transfer of contaminants from waste rock dumps and mineralised ground into soils, sediments, waters and plants at the rehabilitated Mary Kathleen uranium mine in semi-arid northwest Queensland. Numerous waste rock dumps were partly covered with benign soil and the open pit mine was allowed to flood. The mineralised and waste calc-silicate rock in the open pit and dumps has major (>1 wt%) Ca, Fe and Mg, minor (>1,000 ppm) Ce, La, Mn, P and S, subminor (>100 ppm) Ba, Cu, Th and U, and trace (<100 ppm) As, Ni, Pb, Y and Zn values. Consequently, chemical and physical weathering processes have acted on waste rock and on rock faces within the open pit, mobilising many elements and leading to their dispersion into soils, stream sediments, pit water and several plant species. Chemical dispersion is initiated by sulfide mineral breakdown, generation of sulfuric acid and formation of several soluble, transient sulfate minerals as evaporative efflorescent precipitates. Radiation doses associated with the open pit average 5.65 mSv year-1; waste dumps commonly have lower values, especially where soil-covered. Surface pit water is slightly acid, with high sulfate values accompanied by levels of U, Cu and Ni close to or above Australian water guideline values for livestock. Dispersion of U and related elements into soils and stream sediments occurs by physical (erosional) processes and from chemical precipitation. Plants growing in the mine void, on waste dumps and contaminated soil display evidence of biological uptake of U, LREE, Cu and Th and to a lesser degree of As, Ni, Pb, Y and Zn, with values being up to 1-2 orders of magnitude above background sites for the same species. Although rehabilitation procedures have been partly successful in reducing dispersion of U and related elements into the surrounding environment, it is apparent that 20 years after rehabilitation, there is significant physical and chemical mobility, including transfer into plants.

  20. 76 FR 63932 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-14

    ...SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health...programs and projects conducted by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health...med)Sci, Scientific Director, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child...

  1. For Immediate Release --Monday, April 28, 2014 Sharron (Susie) Kennedy appointed University of

    E-print Network

    Seldin, Jonathan P.

    For Immediate Release -- Monday, April 28, 2014 Sharron (Susie) Kennedy of Governors has approved the appointment of Sharron (Susie) Kennedy as the University's Registrar. Kennedy is currently the registrar at Lethbridge College where she

  2. 75 FR 54897 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-09

    ...SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health...personal privacy. Name of Committee: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health...Division of Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child...

  3. 75 FR 61765 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-06

    ...SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health...personal privacy. Name of Committee: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health...Division of Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child...

  4. 75 FR 71449 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-23

    ...SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health...programs and projects conducted by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health...Acting Scientific Director, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child...

  5. 76 FR 20694 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ...SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health...programs and projects conducted by Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health...Acting Scientific Director, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child...

  6. 75 FR 62549 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH,...

  7. 78 FR 28276 - Operating Limitations at John F. Kennedy International Airport

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ...FAA-2007-29320] Operating Limitations at John F. Kennedy International Airport AGENCY...amends the Order Limiting Operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK...and Transparency for LaGuardia Airport, John F. Kennedy International Airport,...

  8. 76 FR 18620 - Operating Limitations at John F. Kennedy International Airport

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ...FAA-2007-29320] Operating Limitations at John F. Kennedy International Airport AGENCY...amends the Order Limiting Operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK...Management Rule for LaGuardia Airport, John F. Kennedy International Airport,...

  9. Natural gas technologies at Kennedy Space Center

    SciTech Connect

    Sirmons, R.L.

    1997-06-01

    In 1994 Kennedy Space Center`s local gas distribution company (LDC), City Gas Company of Florida, undertook the construction of over 25 miles of high pressure natural gas piping to provide natural gas service to Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The Space Center, originally constructed in the 1960`s had used various grades of fuel oil throughout its history. But in the 1990`s concern about sulfur oxide emissions from hot water boilers, fuel spills, fuel prices, energy security, and federal mandates to use alternative fuels prompted KSC to investigate using natural gas as its primary fuel. Since completion of the pipeline in mid 1994, almost 4.5 million therms of natural gas have been used, displacing 2.9 million gallons of No. 2 fuel oil, and avoiding over 140 tons of air pollution. Another indicator of KSC`s effective switch to natural gas is that in 1993, KSC was by far the largest single consumer of petroleum fuel in NASA consuming 341 billion BTU`s, over 37% of all the petroleum fuel used by all NASA sites combined. In 1995, KSC petroleum fuel use had dropped to only 29 billion BTU`s while natural gas consumption was 308 billion BTU`s. These successes have encouraged KSC to explore other options for the use of natural gas at the Space Center. Under study at the present is natural gas cooling, fuel cells, and off road equipment fueling.

  10. My Summer Internship at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philpott, Hobert Leon

    2011-01-01

    During my summer internship at Kennedy Space Center, I worked on several projects with my mentor Grace Johnson in the Education Programs Office. My primary project was the CubeSat project in which my job was to help mentor Merritt Island High School students in the building of a CubeSat. CubeSats are picosatellites that are used to carry out auxiliary missions; they "piggy back" into orbit on launch vehicles launching primary missions. CubeSats come in the sizes of 1U (10 by 10 by 10 cm) 2U (1Ux2) and 3U (1Ux3). The Cube Sats are housed in a protective deploying device called a Poly Picosatellite Orbital Deplored (P-POD). I also participated in a Balloon Workshop with the MIHS students. This was an intense 4-day project in which we constructed a balloon satellite equipped with a camera whose main goal was to obtain video images of the curvature of the earth at high altitudes and relay it back down to our ground station. I also began developing my own science research program for minority serving institutions to be implemented when funding becomes available. In addition to the projects that I completed during my internship, I got the opportunity to go on various tours of the technological facilities here at Kennedy Space Center.

  11. Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October, 1963. LCC SECTIONS & DETAILS AT FLOOR 3 NORTH WALL WINDOWS. Sheet 29-53 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  12. Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October, 1963. VOLUME 29, LAUNCH CONTROL CENTER (LCC) TITLE AND LOCATION SHEET. Sheet 29-01 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  13. Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA John F. Kennedy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October 1963. VERTICAL ASSEMBLY BUILDING, HIGH BAY AREA, NORTH ELEVATION. Sheet 14-18 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Vehicle Assembly Building, VAB Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  14. Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA John F. Kennedy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October 1963. VERTICAL ASSEMBLY BUILDING, HIGH & LOW BAY, SECTION A-A. Sheet 33-25 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Vehicle Assembly Building, VAB Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  15. Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA John F. Kennedy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October 1963. VERTICAL ASSEMBLY BUILDING, HIGH BAY AREA, TRAVERSE SECTION C-C. Sheet 14-26 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Vehicle Assembly Building, VAB Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  16. Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October, 1963. LCC FLOOR 3, LEVEL 38?-0?, AREA ?R?. Sheet 29-42 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  17. Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA John F. Kennedy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October 1963. VERTICAL ASSEMBLY BUILDING, HIGH BAY AREA, SOUTH ELEVATION. Sheet 14-20 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Vehicle Assembly Building, VAB Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  18. Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA John F. Kennedy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October 1963. VERTICAL ASSEMBLY BUILDING, HIGH BAY AREA, LONGINTUDINAL SECTION N-N. Sheet 14-33 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Vehicle Assembly Building, VAB Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  19. Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October, 1963. LCC FLOOR 3, LEVEL 38?-0?, AREA ?P?. Sheet 29-39 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  20. Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October, 1963. LCC SECTIONS & DETAILS AT NORTH EXTERIOR WALL OF FIRING ROOMS. Sheet 29-52 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  1. Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October, 1963. LCC FLOOR 4, LEVEL 57?-0?, AREA ?P?. Sheet 29-41 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  2. Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October, 1963. LCC ELEVATIONS. Sheet 29-44 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  3. Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October, 1963. LCC TRANSVERSE SECTIONS AA & BB. Sheet 29-45 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  4. Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA John F. Kennedy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October 1963. VERTICAL ASSEMBLY BUILDING, HIGH BAY AREA, EAST ELEVATION. Sheet 14-19 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Vehicle Assembly Building, VAB Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  5. Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October, 1963. LCC FLOOR 3, LEVEL 38?-0?, AREA ?R?. Sheet 29-40 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  6. Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA John F. Kennedy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October 1963. VERTICAL ASSEMBLY BUILDING, HIGH & LOW BAY, SECTION F-F. Sheet 33-30 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Vehicle Assembly Building, VAB Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  7. Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October, 1963. LCC TRANSVERSE SECTION AT LIEF ROOM AND VISITOR?S GALLERY VESTIBULE. Sheet 29-50 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  8. Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October, 1963. VOLUME 14, HIGH BAY ? ARCHITECTURAL, TITLE SHEET. Sheet 14-01 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Vehicle Assembly Building, VAB Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  9. Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA John F. Kennedy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October 1963. VERTICAL ASSEMBLY BUILDING, HIGH BAY AREA, WEST ELEVATION. Sheet 14-17 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Vehicle Assembly Building, VAB Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  10. Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October, 1963. LCC DETAILS OF POWER OPERATED LOUVERS. Sheet 29-54 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  11. Justice Kennedy and Substantive Due Process: A Reinterpretation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Capper

    The paper attempts to explain what appears to be an inconsistency between Justice Anthony Kennedy's approach to substantive due process in the 2003 case Lawrence v. Texas, which invalidated Texas' homosexual sodomy statute, and his approach to substantive due process in the partial-birth abortion cases of Stenberg v. Carhart and Gonzales v. Carhart. A careful examination of Justice Kennedy's rhetoric

  12. John F. Kennedy School of Government Harvard University

    E-print Network

    Schweik, Charles M.

    John F. Kennedy School of Government Harvard University Faculty Research Working Papers Series not necessarily reflect those of the John F. Kennedy School of Government or Harvard University. All works posted University Eduard Hovy, University of Southern California Steven Kelman, Harvard University John Leslie King

  13. Automatic speech recognition in the diagnosis of primary progressive aphasia Kathleen Fraser1

    E-print Network

    Penn, Gerald

    Automatic speech recognition in the diagnosis of primary progressive aphasia Kathleen Fraser1 participants with semantic dementia (SD), progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA), and healthy con- trols. We of the clas- sifiers. Index Terms: automatic speech recognition, classification, pro- gressive aphasia 1

  14. Using text and acoustic features to diagnose progressive aphasia and its Kathleen C. Fraser1

    E-print Network

    Penn, Gerald

    Using text and acoustic features to diagnose progressive aphasia and its subtypes Kathleen C.Rochon@utoronto.ca Abstract This paper presents experiments in automatically diagnosing primary progressive aphasia (PPA) and two of its subtypes, semantic dementia (SD) and progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA), from

  15. Computational Analysis of Social and Organizational Systems1 Kathleen M. Carley

    E-print Network

    Sadeh, Norman M.

    intelligent adaptive agents. Each of these agents has organizational properties such as the need to actComputational Analysis of Social and Organizational Systems1 Kathleen M. Carley August 13, 2000 and the way individual, organizational, market, and policy decisions are made and evaluated. Computational

  16. Influence of the Laurentian Great Lakes on Regional Climate1 Michael Notaro, Kathleen Holman8

    E-print Network

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    1 Influence of the Laurentian Great Lakes on Regional Climate1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Michael Notaro, Kathleen #12;2 Abstract47 48 The influence of the Laurentian Great Lakes on climate is assessed by comparing of the diurnal cycle and annual cycle of air temperature. The53 impacts of the Great Lakes on the regional

  17. Kathleen Sullivan, Appellant, v. Meade Independent School District No. 101, et al., Appellee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Court of Appeals. Eighth Circuit.

    In this appeal from the United States District Court for the District of South Dakota, Kathleen Sullivan is the appellant; Meade Independent School District, No. 101, school board members, and school administrators, the appellees. The single, young elementary school teacher was discharged at midterm by the small, rural community's school board as…

  18. Localizing a Robot with Minimum Travel \\Lambda Gregory Dudek y Kathleen Romanik z Sue Whitesides x

    E-print Network

    of speed and accuracy, the robot should travel the mini­ mum distance necessary to determine its exactLocalizing a Robot with Minimum Travel \\Lambda Gregory Dudek y Kathleen Romanik z Sue Whitesides x Abstract We consider the problem of localizing a robot in a known environment modeled by a simple polygon P

  19. Analysis of Thermal Conductivity in Composite H.T. Banks and Kathleen L. Bihari

    E-print Network

    Analysis of Thermal Conductivity in Composite Adhesives H.T. Banks and Kathleen L. Bihari Center: 919 515-1636 email: htbanks@eos.ncsu.edu Abstract Thermally conductive composite adhesives a composite adhesive would aid in the design of an eÆcient thermally conductive composite adhesive

  20. Assessment of Undergraduate Research Linda Rueckert (Northeastern Illinois University) and Kathleen Morgan (Wheaton College MA)

    E-print Network

    . Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (San Francisco: An empirical study. Journal of College Student Development, 43, 614-631. Henry, C.M. (2005). Undergrad researchAssessment of Undergraduate Research Linda Rueckert (Northeastern Illinois University) and Kathleen

  1. Kathleen M. Smits, Ph.D., P.E. Colorado School of Mines

    E-print Network

    of Colorado Reviewer of papers for: Water Resources Research Vadose Zone Journal Soil Science SocietyKathleen M. Smits, Ph.D., P.E. Colorado School of Mines Dept. of Civil and Environmental Colorado School of Mines (2007-2010) Doctor of Philosophy, Environmental Science and Engineering

  2. L-R: Kathleen Morgan, Jasmine Hall Ratliff of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and Peter Gillies

    E-print Network

    Goodman, Robert M.

    L-R: Kathleen Morgan, Jasmine Hall Ratliff of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and Peter Gillies the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to establish the institute whose new home will be a four-story, 88 the quality of school meals by introducing more fruits and vegetables. Morgan welcomed Executive Dean Robert M

  3. Failure Analysis at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salazar, Victoria L.; Wright, Clara

    2010-01-01

    History has shown that failures occur in every engineering endeavor, and what we learn from those failures contributes to the knowledge base to safely complete future missions. The necessity of failure analysis is at its apex at the end of one aged program (i.e. Shuttle) and at the beginning of a new and untested program (i.e. Constellation). The information that we gain through failure analysis corrects the deficiencies in the current vehicle to make the next generation of vehicles more efficient and safe. The Failure Analysis and Materials Evaluation section in the Materials Science Division at the Kennedy Space Center performs metallurgical, mechanical, electrical, and non-metallic failure analysis and accident investigations on both flight hardware and ground support equipment (GSE) for the Shuttle, International Space Station, Constellation, and Launch Services Programs. This presentation will explore a variety of failure case studies at KSC and the lessons learned that can be applied in future programs.

  4. KLASS: Kennedy Launch Academy Simulation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, Lesley C.

    2007-01-01

    Software provides access to many sophisticated scientific instrumentation (Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), a Light Microscope, a Scanning Probe Microscope (covering Scanning Tunneling, Atomic Force, and Magnetic Force microscopy), and an Energy Dispersive Spectrometer for the SEM). Flash animation videos explain how each of the instruments work. Videos on how they are used at NASA and the sample preparation. Measuring and labeling tools provided with each instrument. Hands on experience of controlling the virtual instrument to conduct investigations, much like the real scientists at NASA do. Very open architecture. Open source on SourceForge. Extensive use of XML Target audience is high school and entry-level college students. "Many beginning students never get closer to an electron microscope than the photos in their textbooks. But anyone can get a sense of what the instrument can do by downloading this simulator from NASA's Kennedy Space Center." Science Magazine, April 8th, 2005

  5. Kennedy Space Center's Partnership with Graftel Incorporated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Carol Anne

    2010-01-01

    NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has recently partnered with Graftel Incorporated under an exclusive license agreement for the manufacture and sale of the Smart Current Signature Sensor. The Smart Current Signature Sensor and software were designed and developed to be utilized on any application using solenoid valves. The system monitors the electrical and mechanical health of solenoids by comparing the electrical current profile of each solenoid actuation to a typical current profile and reporting deviation from its learned behavior. The objective of this partnership with Graftel is for them to develop the technology into a hand-held testing device for their customer base in the Nuclear Power Industry. The device will be used to perform diagnostic testing on electromechanical valves used in Nuclear Power plants. Initially, Graftel plans to have working units within the first year of license in order to show customers and allow them to put purchase requests into their next year's budget. The subject technology under discussion was commercialized by the Kennedy Space Center Technology Programs and Partnerships Office, which patented the technology and licensed it to Graftel, Inc., a company providing support, instrumentation, and calibration services to the nuclear community and private sector for over 10 years. For the nuclear power industry, Graftel designs, manufacturers, and calibrates a full line of testing instrumentation. Grafters smart sensors have been in use in the United States since 1993 and have proved to decrease set-up time and test durations. The project was funded by Non-Destructive Engineering, and it is felt that this technology will have more emphasis on future vehicles. Graftel plans to market the Current Signature Sensor to the Electric Utility industry. Graftel currently supplies product and services to the Nuclear Power Industry in the United States as well as internationally. Product and services sold are used in non-destructive testing for valves, penetrations and other applications. Graftel also supplies testing services to an industrial customer base. The customer base includes 90 percent of the U.S. Nuclear plants and plants in Brazil, Europe, and Asia. Graftel works internationally with two representative groups and employees and has ten people at the principle location and a group of contract engineers around the country.

  6. Human Spaceflight: The Kennedy Legacy - Duration: 3 minutes, 39 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    On May 25, 1961, just weeks after the first American astronaut flew, President John F. Kennedy put NASA on a bold path, challenging the nation to do what was then impossible -- send a man to the mo...

  7. Laser Scanning and Simulation at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kickbusch, Tracey E.

    2012-01-01

    We perform simulations of ground operations leading up launch at Kennedy Space Center and Vandenberg Air Force Base in CA. We use Laser Scanning, Modeling and Simulations to make sure operations are feasible, efficient, and safe.

  8. ROBERT E. KENNEDY LIBRARY SPECIAL COLLECTIONS & UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES

    E-print Network

    Sze, Lawrence

    ROBERT E. KENNEDY LIBRARY SPECIAL COLLECTIONS & UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES CALIFORNIA POLYTECHNIC STATE Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, hereby transfers to the Cal Poly University Archives the following materials: The University Archives will care for, house, and administer these materials

  9. ROBERT E. KENNEDY LIBRARY SPECIAL COLLECTIONS & UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES

    E-print Network

    Sze, Lawrence

    ROBERT E. KENNEDY LIBRARY SPECIAL COLLECTIONS & UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES CALIFORNIA POLYTECHNIC STATE be accessible to all persons qualified to use the Special Collections and University Archives subject of materials considered inappropriate for retention in the Special Collections & University Archives Department

  10. Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA John F. Kennedy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October 1963. VERTICAL ASSEMBLY BUILDING, LOW BAY, SECTIONS J-J, K-K, & L-L. Sheet 33-32 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Vehicle Assembly Building, VAB Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  11. Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA John F. Kennedy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39. NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 203-100, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran, October 1963. VERTICAL ASSEMBLY BUILDING, HIGH AND LOW BAY AREA, MASTER PLAN FLOOR 1, LEVEL 0?:0?. Sheet 14-03 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Vehicle Assembly Building, VAB Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  12. N E W S R E L E A S E Kerry Kennedy

    E-print Network

    Akhmedov, Azer

    N E W S R E L E A S E Kerry Kennedy Speak Truth to Power Thursday, November 5 / 8:00 p.m. / Free UCSB Campbell Hall S U M M A R Y F A C T S · Kerry Kennedy is founder of the Robert F. Kennedy Center.wallock@cappscenter.ucsb.edu For immediate release: October 19, 2009 #12;2 Kerry Kennedy, founder of the Robert F. Kennedy Center and chair

  13. Memorial at PLDI for Ken Kennedy Good evening. My name is Kathryn McKinley and I was Ken Kennedy's 20th PhD student.

    E-print Network

    McKinley, Kathryn S.

    Memorial at PLDI for Ken Kennedy Opening Good evening. My name is Kathryn McKinley and I was Ken Kennedy's 20th PhD student. Ken was a creative, influential, and prolific researcher. Would you do me Academy of Engineering, Ken Kennedy Sr., a retired Brigadier General in the Army Corps of Engineers

  14. Kennedy Space Center Timing and Countdown Interface to Kennedy Ground Control Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, James C.

    2015-01-01

    Kennedy Ground Control System (KGCS) engineers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Kennedy Space Center (KSC) are developing a time-tagging process to enable reconstruction of the events during a launch countdown. Such a process can be useful in the case of anomalies or other situations where it is necessary to know the exact time an event occurred. It is thus critical for the timing information to be accurate. KGCS will synchronize all items with Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) obtained from the Timing and Countdown (T&CD) organization. Network Time Protocol (NTP) is the protocol currently in place for synchronizing UTC. However, NTP has a peak error that is too high for today's standards. Precision Time Protocol (PTP) is a newer protocol with a much smaller peak error. The focus of this project has been to implement a PTP solution on the network to increase timing accuracy while introducing and configuring the implementation of a firewall between T&CD and the KGCS network.

  15. 77 FR 64815 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-23

    ...SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health...programs and projects conducted by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health...med)Sci, Scientific Director, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child...

  16. 78 FR 23943 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-23

    ...SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health...programs and projects conducted by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health...med)Sci, Scientific Director, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child...

  17. 77 FR 14600 - Pricing for 2012 Kennedy Half-Dollar Bags and Rolls, Bronze Medals, the First Spouse Bronze Medal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-12

    ...TREASURY United States Mint Pricing for 2012 Kennedy Half-Dollar Bags and Rolls, Bronze...States Mint is announcing 2012 pricing for Kennedy Half-Dollar bags and rolls, bronze...Kennedy Half-Dollar...

  18. 78 FR 63995 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ...SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health...programs and projects conducted by the EUNICE KENNEDY SHRIVER NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH...med)Sci, Scientific Director, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child...

  19. 77 FR 24973 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    ...SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health...programs and projects conducted by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health...med)Sci, Scientific Director, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child...

  20. 80 FR 1273 - Slot Management and Transparency for LaGuardia Airport, John F. Kennedy International Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2015-01-08

    ...C. John F. Kennedy International Airport After...and Transparency for LaGuardia Airport, John F. Kennedy International Airport, and...follows: Subpart C--LaGuardia Airport, John F. Kennedy International Airport,...

  1. 76 FR 65516 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-21

    ...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Notice of...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development, including...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH,...

  2. American Alligator Research on the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowers, Russell H.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the research conducted at the Kennedy Space Center on the American Alligator. The objectives of the research were to establish life history baseline at the Kennedy Space Center and at the Merit Island National Wildlife Reserve (MINWR). Some of the factors that were examined are: nesting success, movement patterns, and population structure. Another objective was to determine the overall health of the alligator population, by analyzing blood and tissue chemistry, and urine analysis. A third objective was to compare alligators at KSC/MINWR to the statewide population. Some of the results are shown in charts and graphs.

  3. A review of "Making Science Social: The Conferences of Theophraste Renaudot 1633-1642" by Kathleen Wellman. 

    E-print Network

    Karol K. Weaver

    2004-01-01

    is an important and instructive work. Kathleen Wellman. Making Science Social: The Conferences of Th?ophraste Renaudot 1633-1642. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2003. xviii + 461 pp. + 4 illus. $39.95. Review by KAROL K. WEAVER, SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY.... Kathleen Wellman?s Making Science Social: The Conferences of Th?ophraste Renaudot 1633-1642 traces the history of the seven- teenth-century conferences led by Th?ophraste Renaudot to eluci- date the characteristics of early seventeenth-century science...

  4. 33 CFR 334.525 - Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; restricted...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.525 Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL;...

  5. 33 CFR 334.525 - Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; restricted...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.525 Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL;...

  6. 33 CFR 334.525 - Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; restricted...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.525 Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL;...

  7. VIEW OF KENNEDY AVIONICS TEST SET LABORATORY, ROOM NO. MM6, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF KENNEDY AVIONICS TEST SET LABORATORY, ROOM NO. MM6, FACING NORTH - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Vehicle Assembly Building, VAB Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  8. 76 FR 64092 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-17

    ...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development...Scientific Review Officer, Division of Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human...

  9. 76 FR 5594 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-01

    ...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development...Scientific Review Officer, Division of Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human...

  10. 77 FR 27468 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-10

    ...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development...Review Officer, Division of Scientific Review, OD, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human...

  11. Mechanisms of faulting in and around Caloris basin, Mercury Patrick J. Kennedy,1

    E-print Network

    Freed, Andrew

    Mechanisms of faulting in and around Caloris basin, Mercury Patrick J. Kennedy,1 Andrew M. Freed,1 a test of this prediction and more generally of the models developed here. Citation: Kennedy, P. J., A. M

  12. 76 FR 26736 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

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    ...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development...Scientific Review Officer, Division of Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human...

  13. 76 FR 69746 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

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    2011-11-09

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  14. 76 FR 59707 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

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    2011-09-27

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    2012-05-02

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  17. 75 FR 5601 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting

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    2010-02-03

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  18. 77 FR 24973 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

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  20. 76 FR 13650 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

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    2011-03-14

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  1. 78 FR 12767 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

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    2013-02-25

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  2. 77 FR 60447 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

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    2012-10-03

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  3. 77 FR 12855 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

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    2012-03-02

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  4. 76 FR 67469 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

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    2011-11-01

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  5. 77 FR 17080 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

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    2012-03-23

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  6. 75 FR 55807 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

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    2010-09-14

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  7. 77 FR 12599 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

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    2012-03-01

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  8. 75 FR 68366 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

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  9. 75 FR 36662 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

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    2010-06-28

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  10. President Kennedy, Vice President Johnson and Dr. von Braun at Redstone Airfield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    President John F. Kennedy, Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson and Marshall Space Flight Center Director Dr. Wernher von Braun at the Redstone Arsenal Airfield, September 11, 1962. Kennedy and Johnson visited the Marshall Center to tour national space facilities.

  11. 76 FR 71985 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

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  12. 77 FR 19676 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

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  13. 76 FR 5593 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

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  1. 76 FR 37821 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

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  2. 78 FR 17419 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

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    2013-07-24

    ...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH,...

  7. 77 FR 49000 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-15

    ...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH,...

  8. 78 FR 57399 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-18

    ...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH,...

  9. 77 FR 19677 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-02

    ...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH,...

  10. 76 FR 10382 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-24

    ...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH,...

  11. 76 FR 61719 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Initial Review...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH,...

  12. 75 FR 3741 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-22

    ...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 6100...

  13. 76 FR 28995 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-19

    ...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Initial Review...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH...

  14. Kennedy Krieger Institute is committed to the privacy and confidentiality of your medical

    E-print Network

    Pevsner, Jonathan

    Kennedy Krieger Institute is committed to the privacy and confidentiality of your medical, or by contacting the Kennedy Krieger Institute Privacy Officer as explained at the end of this notice. It also have. The revised notice will be available online at kennedykrieger.org. Kennedy Krieger's Notice

  15. Economic Impact Assessment of the Proposed Commercial Vertical Launch Complex at Kennedy Space Center

    E-print Network

    Florida, University of

    i Economic Impact Assessment of the Proposed Commercial Vertical Launch Complex at Kennedy Space Corporation, Kennedy Space Center, Florida Thomas J. Stevens, Alan W. Hodges *, W. David Mulkey and Mohammad of the Proposed Commercial Vertical Launch Complex at Kennedy Space Center Executive Summary The purpose

  16. At the Vanderbilt Kennedy Center, we place upon ourselves the responsibility of developing

    E-print Network

    Sarkar, Nilanjan

    At the Vanderbilt Kennedy Center, we place upon ourselves the responsibility of developing written often about the unique nature of our efforts at the Vanderbilt Kennedy Center in the context Development and are professors of special edu- cation. They founded and direct the Vanderbilt Kennedy Reading

  17. On the optimality of Allen and Kennedy's algorithm for parallelism extraction in nested loops

    E-print Network

    Vivien, Frédéric

    On the optimality of Allen and Kennedy's algorithm for parallelism extraction in nested loops Alain. The result of this paper is that Allen and Kennedy's algorithm is optimal when dependences are approximated found by Allen and Kennedy's algorithm, as long as dependence level is the only information available

  18. Supplementary details on Bayesian Calibration of Computer Marc C. Kennedy and Anthony O'Hagan

    E-print Network

    O'Hagan, Tony

    Supplementary details on Bayesian Calibration of Computer Models Marc C. Kennedy and Anthony O in the Bayesian calibration methods of Kennedy and O'Hagan (2000), and we present a further example using data with the concepts and notation of Kennedy and O'Hagan (2000). We begin by deriving the posterior distribution

  19. On the Optimality of Allen and Kennedy's Algorithm for Parallelism Extraction in Nested Loops

    E-print Network

    Vivien, Frédéric

    On the Optimality of Allen and Kennedy's Algorithm for Parallelism Extraction in Nested Loops Alain is that Allen and Kennedy's algorithm is optimal when dependences are approximated by dependence levels and Kennedy's algorithm, as long as dependence level is the only information available. 1 Introduction Many

  20. Light Tides and the Kennedy-Thorndike experiments

    E-print Network

    Ll. Bel

    2004-04-30

    We model the system Earth-Moon-Sun from the point of view of a frame of reference co-moving with the Earth and we derive a detailed prediction of the outcome of future Kennedy-Thorndike's type experiments to be seen as light tides.

  1. Kennedy Space Center processing of Shuttle small payloads

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael E. Haddad

    1993-01-01

    There are many steps involved in preparing a payload for a mission into space on the Space Shuttle. Operations at the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) are the last of those steps for the hardware before the payload is launched. To assure a successful and efficient KSC processing flow, a great deal of planning between the Robert H. Goddard

  2. September 2014 Vol. 1 No. 6 Kennedy Space Center's

    E-print Network

    for NASA's QuikScat Earth satellite to monitor ocean winds for climate research, weather predictions encourages kids to play along in adventure of rocketry 14Kennedy prepping for 50 more years of American Program's expertise 32Weather manager helped develop launch commit criteria 39Chief technologist leads

  3. A Kennedy Space Center implementation of IEEE 1451

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rebecca Oostdyk; Carlos T. Mata; José M. Perotti; Angel R. Lucena; Pamela Mullenix

    2006-01-01

    To meet the demand for more reliable sensory data, longer sensor calibration cycles, and more useful information for operators at NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC), NASA's Instrumentation Branch and ASRC's Advanced Electronics and Technology Development Laboratory at the KSC are developing custom intelligent sensors based on the IEEE 1451 family of smart-sensor standards. The KSC intelligent sensors are known as

  4. Radiological dose assessments at the Kennedy Space Center

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Firstenberg; R. Jubach; B. Bartram; F. Vaughan

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of an atmospheric transport and diffusion model for launch window and safety risk assessment studies in support of the Galileo (which is scheduled for the October\\/November 1989 period) and Ulysses (scheduled for â¼1 yr after Galileo) missions at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The model is resident in the EMERGE software system developed by NUS

  5. THE EMERGENCE OF PHONETIC STRUCTURE*' Michael Studdert-Kennedy+

    E-print Network

    THE EMERGENCE OF PHONETIC STRUCTURE*' Michael Studdert-Kennedy+ Abstract. To explain the unique corresponding to phonetic segments are not to be found in the signal, consonants and vowels were said carries no message: it carries informat~on concerning its source. The message, that is, the phonetic

  6. Automatic Data Layout for DistributedMemory KEN KENNEDY

    E-print Network

    Kremer, Ulrich

    Automatic Data Layout for Distributed­Memory Machines KEN KENNEDY Rice University and ULRICH KREMER, the data layout choice is the key intellectual challenge in writing an e#cient program in such languages. The performance of a data layout depends on the target compilation system, the target machine, the problem size

  7. Using statistical parsing to detect agrammatic aphasia Kathleen C. Fraser1, Graeme Hirst1, Jed A. Meltzer2,

    E-print Network

    Toronto, University of

    Using statistical parsing to detect agrammatic aphasia Kathleen C. Fraser1, Graeme Hirst1, Jed A@research.baycrest.org {jennifer-mack-0,ckthom}@northwestern.edu Abstract Agrammatic aphasia is a serious language impairment which features can be used to train a classifier to accurately predict whether or not an individual has aphasia

  8. Water Dynamics in Water/DMSO Binary Mixtures Daryl B. Wong, Kathleen P. Sokolowsky, Musa I. El-Barghouthi,

    E-print Network

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Water Dynamics in Water/DMSO Binary Mixtures Daryl B. Wong, Kathleen P. Sokolowsky, Musa I. El (DMSO)/ water solutions with a wide range of water concentrations are studied using polarization even at very low water concentrations that are associated with water- water and water-DMSO hydrogen

  9. Magnetic penetration depth in superconducting La2 xSrxCuO4 films Kathleen M. Paget

    E-print Network

    Magnetic penetration depth in superconducting La2 xSrxCuO4 films Kathleen M. Paget Department-1106 Received 30 January 1998 We have measured the magnetic penetration depth (T) in a series of superconducting examines the question through analysis of the magnetic penetration depth, (T). Penetration depth studies

  10. Kristen M. Kennedy, Ph.D. HUhttp://vitallongevity.utdallas.edu/directory/view/category/faculty/kristen-kennedy

    E-print Network

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    Doctor of Philosophy Track in Experimental Neuropsychology, G.P.A.: 4.0 Attended one year before transfer in Clinical Psychology, emphasis Neuropsychology Received May 2000, G.P.A.: 4.0 UThesisU: Establishing Test, Detroit, MI #12;Kristen M. Kennedy 2 Graduate Research Assistant Relocated the Neuropsychology of Aging

  11. History of Reliability and Quality Assurance at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childers, Frank M.

    2004-01-01

    This Kennedy Historical Document (KHD) provides a unique historical perspective of the organizational and functional responsibilities for the manned and un-manned programs at Kennedy Space Center, Florida. As systems become more complex and hazardous, the attention to detailed planning and execution continues to be a challenge. The need for a robust reliability and quality assurance program will always be a necessity to ensure mission success. As new space missions are defined and technology allows for continued access to space, these programs cannot be compromised. The organizational structure that has provided the reliability and quality assurance functions for both the manned and unmanned programs has seen many changes since the first group came to Florida in the 1950's. The roles of government and contractor personnel have changed with each program and organizational alignment has changed based on that responsibility. The organizational alignment of the personnel performing these functions must ensure independent assessment of the processes.

  12. John F. Kennedy School of Government Politics Research Group

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1998-01-01

    The Politics Research Group of the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University has created this site, which contains working papers from faculty seminars and research workshops. Abstracts and full-text versions are both available. Some titles include: "Little Theatre: Committees in Congress," "Are Lawyers Liars? The Argument of Redescription," "Securing Subsidiarity: Legitimacy and the Allocation of Governing Authority," and "Managing Technology Policy at the White House."

  13. General view inside of the Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view inside of the Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy Space Center looking at the pair of Solid Rocket Boosters mounted on the Mobile Launch Platform and attached to the External Tank (ET). The Orbiter will be attached to the ET on the side opposite to the side in this view. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  14. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center environmental impact statement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The probable total impact of the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) operations on the environment is discussed in terms of launch operations emissions and environmental quality. A schedule of planned launches through 1973 is included with a description of the systems for eliminating harmful emissions during launch operations. The effects of KSC on wild life and environmental quality are discussed along with the irreversible and irretrievable commitments of natural resources.

  15. Revised prediction (estimation) of Cape Kennedy, Florida, wind speed profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guttman, N. B.; Crutcher, H. L.

    1975-01-01

    The prediction of the wind profile maximum speed at Cape Kennedy, Florida, is made for any selected calendar data. The prediction is based on a normal probability distribution model with 15 years of smoothed input data and is static in the sense that no dynamic principles of persistence or synoptic features are considered. Comparison with similar predictions based on 6 years of data shows the same general pattern, but the variability decreased with the increase of sample size.

  16. Birds of Swale Marshes on John F. Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breininger, David R.

    1992-01-01

    Birds were surveyed in several isolated freshwater wetlands on John F. Kennedy Space Center to determine species composition and the importance of these wet- lands to birds. The Red-winged Blackbird and Green-backed Heron were the two most abundant breeders in the swale marshes. The Common Yellowthroat was the most common winter resident but was rare in summer. These marshes are important features within landscapes dominated by uplands particularly because of their significance to amphibians and reptiles.

  17. Child's Letter to President John F. Kennedy about Physical Fitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNatt, Missy

    2009-01-01

    On March 3, 1963, nine-year-old Jack Chase of Torrance, California, wrote a letter to President John F. Kennedy. In his single-page note, featured in this article, Jack described his plans for staying physically fit. He said he would walk to school, the store, and the library "because I know a strong boy makes a strong man and a strong man makes a…

  18. Improved Kennedy-Thorndike experiment to test special relativity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dieter Hils; J. L. Hall

    1990-01-01

    A modern version of the Kennedy-Thorndike experiment was carried out by searching for sidereal variations between the frequency of a laser locked to an I2 reference line and a laser locked to the resonance frequency of a highly stable cavity. No variations were found at the level of 2 x 10 to the -12th. This represents a 300-fold improvement over

  19. Corrosion Activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidersbach, Robert H.

    2002-01-01

    This report documents summer faculty fellow efforts in the corrosion test bed at the NASA Kennedy Space Center. During the summer of 2002 efforts were concentrated on three activities: a short course on corrosion control for KSC personnel, evaluation of commercial wash additives used for corrosion control on Army aircraft, and improvements in the testing of a new cathodic protection system under development at KSC.

  20. System Engineering Processes at Kennedy Space Center for Development of SLS and Orion Launch Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schafer, Eric; Stambolian, Damon; Henderson, Gena

    2013-01-01

    There are over 40 subsystems being developed for the future SLS and Orion Launch Systems at Kennedy Space Center. These subsystems are developed at the Kennedy Space Center Engineering Directorate. The Engineering Directorate at Kennedy Space Center follows a comprehensive design process which requires several different product deliverables during each phase of each of the subsystems. This Presentation describes this process with examples of where the process has been applied.

  1. 78 FR 6173 - Diana Del Grosso, Ray Smith, Joseph Hatch, Cheryl Hatch, Kathleen Kelley, Andrew Wilklund, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-29

    In response to a petition filed on August 1, 2012, by Diana Del Grosso, Ray Smith, Joseph Hatch, Cheryl Hatch, Kathleen Kelley, Andrew Wilklund, and Richard Kosiba (Petitioners), the Board is instituting a declaratory order proceeding under 49 U.S.C. 721 and 5 U.S.C. 554(e). Petitioners request that the Board declare that specific operations conducted in the town of Upton, Mass. (Town) at a bulk......

  2. Advanced Life Support Project: Crop Experiments at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sager, John C.; Stutte, Gary W.; Wheeler, Raymond M.; Yorio, Neil

    2004-01-01

    Crop production systems provide bioregenerative technologies to complement human crew life support requirements on long duration space missions. Kennedy Space Center has lead NASA's research on crop production systems that produce high value fresh foods, provide atmospheric regeneration, and perform water processing. As the emphasis on early missions to Mars has developed, our research focused on modular, scalable systems for transit missions, which can be developed into larger autonomous, bioregenerative systems for subsequent surface missions. Components of these scalable systems will include development of efficient light generating or collecting technologies, low mass plant growth chambers, and capability to operate in the high energy background radiation and reduced atmospheric pressures of space. These systems will be integrated with air, water, and thermal subsystems in an operational system. Extensive crop testing has been done for both staple and salad crops, but limited data is available on specific cultivar selection and breadboard testing to meet nominal Mars mission profiles of a 500-600 day surface mission. The recent research emphasis at Kennedy Space Center has shifted from staple crops, such as wheat, soybean and rice, toward short cycle salad crops such as lettuce, onion, radish, tomato, pepper, and strawberry. This paper will review the results of crop experiments to support the Exploration Initiative and the ongoing development of supporting technologies, and give an overview of capabilities of the newly opened Space Life Science (SLS) Lab at Kennedy Space Center. The 9662 square m (104,000 square ft) SLS Lab was built by the State of Florida and supports all NASA research that had been performed in Hanger-L. In addition to NASA research, the SLS Lab houses the Florida Space Research Institute (FSRI), responsible for co-managing the facility, and the University of Florida (UF) has established the Space Agriculture and Biotechnology Research and Education (SABRE) Center with several faculty.

  3. Space Shuttle cargo processing at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, W. H.

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses the various activities involved in processing the two basic types of cargo being prepared for launch by the Space Transportation System. An overview will be presented describing the independent processing systems used to ready the Spacelabs and other horizontal cargo as well as upper stages and other vertical cargo. The interrelationship of these two types of preparations with the main line Space Shuttle test and checkout operations will be shown. In the explanation of each process, the ground support equipment and facilities of the Kennedy Space Center are described.

  4. Climate of the Kennedy Space Center and vicinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mailander, Joseph L.

    1990-01-01

    Climate plays a large role in determining the biota of a region. Summary data are presented for climate variables of ecological importance including precipitation, temperature, evapotranspiration, wind, isolation, lightning, and humidity. The John F. Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, and surrounding area are sampled intensively for climatic conditions; data are presented for the barrier island, Merritt Island, and the mainland, which represents the range of conditions in the local area. Climatic figures, database listings, and historic data (pre-1931) are presented in the appendix.

  5. Facial rests for a Kennedy Class IV removable partial denture.

    PubMed

    Newton, J P; Quinn, D M; Sturrock, K C

    1989-01-01

    A technique is presented in which acrylic resin extensions from the labial surface of the anterior tissue base of a Kennedy Class IV removable partial denture are used as retentive elements to minimize motion around the axis of rotation. The labial rests, formed by extending the base material of the prosthesis onto the mesiobuccal surfaces of the anterior abutments, act as guiding planes, preventing rotation of the prosthesis. The rests also improve esthetics by covering the interdental spaces often found between the prosthesis and the abutment teeth. The technique has been used successfully with 26 patients over a 3-year period. PMID:2699423

  6. President Kennedy briefed on operation of Mercury Control Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    President John F. Kennedy being briefed on the operation of the Mercury Control Center at Cape Canaveral, Florida following the Mercury-Atlas 6 flight. MA-6 pilot John H. Glenn (partially obscured) conducts the tour. In the center to Glenn's left is Christopher C. Kraft, Jr., the MA-6 flight director and Chief of the Flight Operations Division at the Manned Spacecraft Center, Houston. Next to Kraft is Astronaut Alan R. Shepard Jr., pilot of the Mercury-Redstone 3 mission, the U.S. first manned space flight.

  7. Discovery: Under the Microscope at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Philip M.

    2013-01-01

    The National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA) is known for discovery, exploration, and advancement of knowledge. Since the days of Leeuwenhoek, microscopy has been at the forefront of discovery and knowledge. No truer is that statement than today at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), where microscopy plays a major role in contamination identification and is an integral part of failure analysis. Space exploration involves flight hardware undergoing rigorous "visually clean" inspections at every step of processing. The unknown contaminants that are discovered on these inspections can directly impact the mission by decreasing performance of sensors and scientific detectors on spacecraft and satellites, acting as micrometeorites, damaging critical sealing surfaces, and causing hazards to the crew of manned missions. This talk will discuss how microscopy has played a major role in all aspects of space port operations at KSC. Case studies will highlight years of analysis at the Materials Science Division including facility and payload contamination for the Navigation Signal Timing and Ranging Global Positioning Satellites (NA VST AR GPS) missions, quality control monitoring of monomethyl hydrazine fuel procurement for launch vehicle operations, Shuttle Solids Rocket Booster (SRB) foam processing failure analysis, and Space Shuttle Main Engine Cut-off (ECO) flight sensor anomaly analysis. What I hope to share with my fellow microscopists is some of the excitement of microscopy and how its discoveries has led to hardware processing, that has helped enable the successful launch of vehicles and space flight missions here at Kennedy Space Center.

  8. Single-Qubit Operations with the Nitrogen-Vacancy Center T. A. Kennedy1

    E-print Network

    Hart, Gus

    Single-Qubit Operations with the Nitrogen-Vacancy Center in Diamond T. A. Kennedy1 ) (a), F. T-202-767-2917; Fax: +1-202-767-1165; e-mail: kennedy@bloch.nrl.navy.mil *) Present address: NIST, Boulder CO, USA

  9. System Engineering Processes at Kennedy Space Center for Development of the SLS and Orion Launch Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schafer, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    There are over 40 subsystems being developed for the future SLS and Orion Launch Systems at Kennedy Space Center. These subsystems developed at the Kennedy Space Center Engineering Directorate follow a comprehensive design process which requires several different product deliverables during each phase of each of the subsystems. This Paper describes this process and gives an example of where the process has been applied.

  10. "Time,""Newsweek" and the Kennedys: A Study of Three Presidential Elections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedler, Fred; And Others

    A study was conducted to compare "Time" and "Newsweek" magazines' fairness and coverage in the various presidential campaigns of the three Kennedy brothers. Researchers examined every story the two magazines published about John Kennedy's primary campaign, beginning January 1, 1960, and ending with his nomination at the Democratic convention that…

  11. A Biography of John F. Kennedy: The 35th President of the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weidman, Lisa Menendez; Shea, Ellen

    This teaching guide consists of a biography of the 35th President of the United States, John Fitzgerald Kennedy, as well as a set of five worksheets to accompany the biography. The worksheets, which are based on the reading, are intended to help students in grades 3-5 reinforce their knowledge of the life and presidency of John Kennedy, while at…

  12. Partnering for a Solar Future at the John F. Kennedy Space Center

    E-print Network

    Partnering for a Solar Future at the John F. Kennedy Space Center NASA's efforts to generate an agreement that will see FPL build a 900-kilowatt photovoltaic solar power facility at Kennedy to support as a test bed for solar power technology that could be used on the surface of the moon and other planetary

  13. 77 FR 67824 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-14

    ...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development...Biological Sciences and Career Development, NCMRR, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human...

  14. 77 FR 38271 - Voluntary Termination of Foreign-Trade Subzone 33B Verosol USA, Inc. Kennedy Township, Allegheny...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ...Termination of Foreign-Trade Subzone 33B Verosol USA, Inc. Kennedy Township, Allegheny County, PA Pursuant to the authority...Foreign-Trade Subzone 33B at the Verosol USA, Inc., plant in Kennedy Township, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania (Board Order...

  15. CONCENTRATION UNCERTAINTY PRINCIPLES FOR SIGNALS ON THE UNIT SPHERE Zubair Khalid, Salman Durrani, Parastoo Sadeghi and Rodney A. Kennedy

    E-print Network

    Durrani, Salman

    , Parastoo Sadeghi and Rodney A. Kennedy Research School of Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia. Email: {zubair.khalid, salman.durrani, parastoo.sadeghi, rodney.kennedy

  16. STUDY GUIDE FOR 34A K. GRACE KENNEDY WITH HELP FROM DR. SHU'S F08 34A STUDENTS

    E-print Network

    Bigelow, Stephen

    STUDY GUIDE FOR 34A K. GRACE KENNEDY WITH HELP FROM DR. SHU'S F08 34A STUDENTS Fall 2008 Contents 1 Property, FOIL. "Multiplication distributes over addition and subtraction." 1 #12;2 K. GRACE KENNEDY

  17. SLEPIAN SPATIAL-SPECTRAL CONCENTRATION ON THE BALL ZUBAIR KHALID, RODNEY A. KENNEDY, AND JASON D. MCEWEN

    E-print Network

    McEwen, Jason

    SLEPIAN SPATIAL-SPECTRAL CONCENTRATION ON THE BALL ZUBAIR KHALID, RODNEY A. KENNEDY, AND JASON D.khalid@anu.edu.au, rod- ney.kennedy@anu.edu.au Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Surrey RH5 6

  18. 76 FR 9586 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-18

    ...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development...Scientific Review Officer, Division of Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human...

  19. 75 FR 78717 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-16

    ...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Initial Review...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development, 6100...

  20. 78 FR 13363 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Initial Review...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health And Human Development, NIH,...

  1. 78 FR 69857 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-21

    ...Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to...NCMRR, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute, of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, DHHS, 6100...

  2. 77 FR 32652 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-01

    ...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH,...

  3. 75 FR 35077 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Initial Review...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 6100...

  4. 76 FR 19517 - Orders Limiting Scheduled Operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport, LaGuardia Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-07

    ...FAA-2011-0248] Orders Limiting Scheduled Operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport, LaGuardia Airport, and Newark...National Airport (DCA) and Operating Authorizations (slots) at John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK), LaGuardia...

  5. 75 FR 9017 - Orders Limiting Scheduled Operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport, LaGuardia Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ...Aviation Administration Orders Limiting Scheduled Operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport, LaGuardia Airport and Newark...National Airport (DCA) and Operating Authorizations (slots) at John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK), LaGuardia...

  6. 77 FR 68196 - Orders Limiting Operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport, LaGuardia Airport, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-15

    ...Docket No. FAA-2012-1191] Orders Limiting Operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport, LaGuardia Airport, and Newark...the requirement to use Operating Authorizations (slots) at John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK), LaGuardia...

  7. Kennedy, Sheila S., God and Country: America in Red Waco, Texas: Baylor University Press, 2007, 254 pp

    E-print Network

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Kennedy, Sheila S., God and Country: America in Red and Blue Waco, Texas: Baylor University Press: America in Red and Blue, Sheila Kennedy of Indiana University's School of Public and Environmental Affairs of American perspectives, Kennedy outlines an alternative framework that she insists better captures the true

  8. Energy Management Programs at the John F. Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jeffrey H.

    2011-01-01

    The Energy Management internship over the summer of 2011 involved a series of projects related to energy management on the John. F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This internship saved KSC $14.3 million through budgetary projections, saved KSC $400,000 through implementation of the recycling program, updated KSC Environmental Management System's (EMS) water and energy-related List of Requirements (LoR) which changed 25.7% of the list, provided a incorporated a 45% design review of the Ordnance Operations Facility (OOF) which noted six errors within the design plans, created a certification system and timeline for implementation regarding compliance to the federal Guiding Principles, and gave off-shore wind as the preferred alternative to on-site renewable energy generation.

  9. The assassination of John F. Kennedy: revisiting the medical data.

    PubMed

    Rohrich, Rod J; Nagarkar, Purushottam; Stokes, Mike; Weinstein, Aaron

    2013-11-01

    Doubt continues to surround the assassination of President Kennedy to this day. Unfortunately, the controversy was not diminished by the multiple commissions and panels that were convened to investigate it. This was in large part because these various panels continued to propagate much of the confusion and lack of precision that plagued the initial medical reports, and introduced some new confusion of their own. Much of this controversy was driven by incomplete information, poor documentation and analysis, and the puzzling decision to withhold key medical evidence both from investigators and the public. However, the preponderance of evidence does show that the single-shooter, three-bullet theory is plausible both medically and scientifically. PMID:24165615

  10. Kennedy Space Center demographic and land use study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-10-07

    A Launch Area Demographic and Land Use Study has been performed for use with real-time accident analyses during launches of the space shuttle from Kennedy Space Center (KSC) at Cape Canaveral, Florida. The primary focus of the project has been to develop a safety analysis data base consisting of population, land use, and transportation information, and to incorporate the data base into the NUS Geographical Information System. The data can be readily modified to accommodate a variety of launch conditions as well as necessary updates of the data base in the future. This report contains descriptions of all data sources used, interpretation methods and process documentation, as well as a discussion of the data analysis and formatting for input into the GIS. All data used are presented in tabular and graphic form in the report, and are stored on computer tapes.

  11. Monte Carlo simulation of launchsite winds at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Queen, Eric M.; Moerder, Daniel D.; Warner, Michael S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper develops and validates an easily implemented model for simulating random horizontal wind profiles over the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) at Cape Canaveral, Florida. The model is intended for use in Monte Carlo launch vehicle simulations of the type employed in mission planning, where the large number of profiles needed for statistical fidelity of such simulation experiments makes the use of actual wind measurements impractical. The model is based on measurements made at KSC and represents vertical correlations by a decaying exponential model which is parameterized via least-squares parameter optimization against the sample data. The validity of the model is evaluated by comparing two Monte Carlo simulations of an asymmetric, heavy-lift launch vehicle. In the first simulation, the measured wind profiles are used, while in the second, the wind profiles are generated using the stochastic model. The simulations indicate that the use of either the measured or simulated wind field results in similar launch vehicle performance.

  12. Liquid hydrogen production and economics for NASA Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, D. L.

    1985-12-01

    Detailed economic analyses for the production of liquid hydrogen used to power the Space Shuttle are presented. The hydrogen production and energy needs of the NASA Kennedy Space Center are reviewed, and steam reformation, polygeneration, and electrolysis for liquid hydrogen production are examined on an equal economic basis. The use of photovoltaics as an electrolysis power source is considered. The 1985 present worth is calculated based on life cycle costs over a 21-year period beginning with full operation in 1990. Two different sets of escalation, inflation, and discount rates are used, with revenue credit being given for energy or other products of the hydrogen production process. The results show that the economic analyses are very dependent on the escalation rates used. The least net present value is found for steam reformation of natural gas, while the best net present value is found for the electrolysis process which includes the phasing of photovoltaics.

  13. Kennedy's Biomedical Laboratory Makes Multi-Tasking Look Easy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Carol Anne

    2009-01-01

    If it is one thing that Florida has in abundance, it is sunshine and with that sunshine heat and humidity. For workers at the Kennedy Space Center that have to work outside in the heat and humidity, heat exhaustion/stroke is a real possibility. It might help people to know that Kennedy's Biomedical Laboratory has been testing some new Koolvests(Trademark) that can be worn underneath SCAPE suits. They have also been working on how to block out high noise levels; in fact, Don Doerr, chief of the Biomedical Lab, says, "The most enjoyable aspect is knowing that the Biomedical Lab and the skills of its employees have been used to support safe space flight, not only for the astronaut flight crew, but just as important for the ground processing personnel as well." The NASA Biomedical Laboratory has existed in the John F. Kennedy's Operations and Checkout Building since the Apollo Program. The primary mission of this laboratory has been the biomedical support to major, manned space programs that have included Apollo, Apollo-Soyuz, Skylab, and Shuttle. In this mission, the laboratory has been responsible in accomplishing much of the technical design, planning, provision, fabrication, and maintenance of flight and ground biomedical monitoring instrumentation. This includes the electronics in the launch flight suit and similar instrumentation systems in the spacecraft. (Note: The Lab checked out the system for STS-128 at Pad A using Firing room 4 and ground support equipment in the lab.) During Apollo, there were six engineers and ten technicians in the facility. This has evolved today to two NASA engineers and two NASA technicians, a Life Science Support contract physiologist and part-time support from an LSSC nurse and physician. Over the years, the lab has enjoyed collaboration with outside agencies and investigators. These have included on-site support to the Ames Research Center bed rest studies (seven years) and the European Space Agency studies in Toulouse, France (two years). The lab has also actively collaborated with the US Army Institute for Surgical Research, the USAF School of Aerospace Medicine, and the USN Naval Experimental Diving Unit. Because the lab often evaluates various forms of commercial-off-the-shelf life support equipment, the laboratory works closely with private companies, both domestic and foreign. The European companies seem to be more proactive and participatory with the advancement of personal protective equipment. Because these companies have viewed the space program's unique need for advanced forms of personal protective equipment, some have responded with new designs based on the prediction that these advances will soon find markets in the commercial sector. Using much of the same skills and equipment, the laboratory also addresses physiological testing of humans by supporting flight experiments and personnel involved with ground processing. While Johnson Space Center is primarily responsible for flight experiments, the Kennedy's Biomedical Lab provides the local support. However, as stated above, there are many challenges facing KSC workers that gain the attention of this lab in the measurement of the problem and the selection and testing of countermeasures. These include respiratory protection, whole body suits, hearing protection and heat stress, among many others.

  14. John F. Kennedy Space Center's Chemochromic Hypergol Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, James D.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) seeks partne rs interested in the commercial application of the Chemochromic Hyper gol Sensors technology. NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is soliciti ng licensees for this innovative technology. The Chemochromic Hypergo l Sensors technology consists of chemochromic pigments incorporated i nto various matrices (e.g., tapes, sheets, injection molded parts, fi bers). When placed near strategic locations such as piping and contai ner valves, seams, and joints, these sensors provide an instantaneous , distinct color change from yellow to black indicating the presence of hypergols at the leak location. The chemochromic pigments can be incorporated into fibers used to make fabrics for personal protective equipment as well as into badge holders for use as a point leak detector. These affordable, easily replaceable sensors provide the capabil ity to visually monitor leak-prone locations and personnel working i n those areas on a continuous basis for the presence of dangerous hyp ergols.

  15. Internship at NASA Kennedy Space Center's Cryogenic Test laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is known for hosting all of the United States manned rocket launches as well as many unmanned launches at low inclinations. Even though the Space Shuttle recently retired, they are continuing to support unmanned launches and modifying manned launch facilities. Before a rocket can be launched, it has to go through months of preparation, called processing. Pieces of a rocket and its payload may come in from anywhere in the nation or even the world. The facilities all around the center help integrate the rocket and prepare it for launch. As NASA prepares for the Space Launch System, a rocket designed to take astronauts beyond Low Earth Orbit throughout the solar system, technology development is crucial for enhancing launch capabilities at the KSC. The Cryogenics Test Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center greatly contributes to cryogenic research and technology development. The engineers and technicians that work there come up with new ways to efficiently store and transfer liquid cryogens. NASA has a great need for this research and technology development as it deals with cryogenic liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen for rocket fuel, as well as long term space flight applications. Additionally, in this new era of space exploration, the Cryogenics Test Laboratory works with the commercial sector. One technology development project is the Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) Ground Operations Demonstration Unit (GODU). LH2 GODU intends to demonstrate increased efficiency in storing and transferring liquid hydrogen during processing, loading, launch and spaceflight of a spacecraft. During the Shuttle Program, only 55% of hydrogen purchased was used by the Space Shuttle Main Engines. GODU's goal is to demonstrate that this percentage can be increased to 75%. Figure 2 shows the GODU layout when I concluded my internship. The site will include a 33,000 gallon hydrogen tank (shown in cyan) with a heat exchanger inside the hydrogen tank attached to a refrigerator capable of removing 850 Watts at 20 Kelvin (shown in green). The refrigerator and most of its supporting equipment will be kept in a standard shipping container (shown in pink). Currently, GODU is in the fabrication process and some of the large components have already been purchased.

  16. Who Guards the Guardians? Ian Kennedy, Bioethics and the ‘Ideology of Accountability’ in British Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Duncan

    2012-01-01

    Summary This article charts the history of bioethics in Britain through the work of the academic lawyer Ian Kennedy. From the late 1970s, Kennedy claimed that external oversight, which he termed ‘bioethics’, was needed to make medicine accountable to patients and the public. I believe these arguments provide a window onto the historical factors that generated the demand for bioethics, and help us determine why it became influential in recent decades. I detail how Kennedy's argument resonated with the Conservative enthusiasm for audit and consumer choice in the 1980s. Contrary to traditional portrayals of bioethics as a critique of medicine, I also show that Kennedy promised it would benefit doctors by improving decision making and maintaining public confidence. This analysis reframes bioethics as an important constituent of the ‘audit society’: fulfilling the neo-liberal demand for oversight and the medical demand for legitimacy.

  17. Kennedy Space Center Wakes STS-135 Crew - Duration: 2 minutes, 22 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Flight Day 13 wakeup music was "Fanfare for the Common Man" by Aaron Copland played for Commander Chris Ferguson. It was followed by a prerecorded message from Kennedy Space Center employees. K...

  18. Kennedy Space Center Now on Google Street View! - Duration: 61 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida boasts amazing views typically seen only by employees and astronauts. Now space enthusiasts around the world can take a virtual walk through the transfer aisl...

  19. The evolution of electronic tracking, optical, telemetry, and command systems at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurran, W. R. (editor)

    1973-01-01

    A history is presented of the major electronic tracking, optical, telemetry, and command systems used at ETR in support of Apollo-Saturn and its forerunner vehicles launched under the jurisdiction of the Kennedy Space Center and its forerunner organizations.

  20. Atlantis Reaches New Home at Kennedy - Duration: 3 minutes, 14 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    Space shuttle Atlantis completed its 10-mile journey to its new home at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex on Nov. 2, 2012. The shuttle, riding atop a specialized 76-wheel transporter, was mo...

  1. 77 FR 28888 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-16

    ...Bethesda North Marriott Hotel and Conference Center, 5701 Marinelli Road, Bethesda, MD 20852. Contact Person: Michele C. Hindi-Alexander, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Division of Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National...

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    ...Embassy Suites at the Chevy Chase Pavilion, 4300 Military Road, NW., Washington, DC 20015. Contact Person: Michele C. Hindi-Alexander, PhD, Division of Scientific Review, National Institutes of Health, Eunice Kennedy Shriver, National...

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    ...Embassy Suites at the Chevy Chase Pavilion, 4300 Military Road, NW., Washington, DC 20015. Contact Person: Michele C. Hindi-Alexander, PhD, Division of Scientific Review, National Institutes of Health, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National...

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    ...Hotel Bethesda, (Formerly Holiday Inn Select), 8120 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20814. Contact Person: Michele C. Hindi-Alexander, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Division of Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National...

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    ...Institutes of Health, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Rockville, MD 20852. Contact Person: Michele C. Hindi-Alexander, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Division of Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National...

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    ...Embassy Suites at the Chevy Chase Pavilion, 4300 Military Road NW., Washington, DC 20015. Contact Person: Michele C. Hindi-Alexander, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Division of Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National...

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    2012-06-06

    ...applications. Place: Hilton Washington/Rockville, 1750 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852. Contact Person: Michele C. Hindi-Alexander, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Division of Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National...

  10. The Turning Point: Perceptions and Policies Concerning Communist China during the Kennedy Years 

    E-print Network

    Crean, Jeffrey 1977-

    2012-11-13

    When analyzing the policies of the John F. Kennedy administration towards the People’s Republic of China, previous historians have focused on the lack of substantive change, emphasizing the continuity of action with the ...

  11. A study of the characteristics of thunderstorm cessation at the NASA Kennedy Space Center

    E-print Network

    Hinson, Michael Shawn

    1997-01-01

    A lightning summary was developed for a 100xlOO kilometer area centered at the NASA Kennedy Space Center. Spatial and temporal patterns, and first stroke peak currents were analyzed from 1986-1995, Three thunderstorms were chosen due...

  12. 77 FR 8271 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

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    ...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Initial Review...Review, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH,...

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    2013-08-19

    ...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD...meeting of the National Advisory Child Health and Human Development Council...of Committee: National Advisory Child Health and Human Development...

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    ...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel, Child Health Research Career Development...

  1. 75 FR 12242 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

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    2010-08-27

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    2012-05-18

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    2011-07-20

    ...of Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel, Children in Rural Poverty. Date: August 9, 2011. Time: 9...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development,...

  17. Station Astronaut Suni Williams Reflects on President Kennedy's Challenge - Duration: 93 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    President Kennedy vowed that we shall not see space governed by a hostile flag of conquest but by a banner of freedom and peace. The International Space Station has become the very embodiment of th...

  18. FIVE STAR-FORMING CORES IN THE GALACTIC RING SURVEY: A MID-INFRARED STUDY Kathleen E. Kraemer,1,2,3

    E-print Network

    Clemens, Dan

    FIVE STAR-FORMING CORES IN THE GALACTIC RING SURVEY: A MID-INFRARED STUDY Kathleen E. Kraemer,1 the Galactic Ring Survey (GRS), in the mid- infrared with the MIRAC3 instrument. We obtained high spatial by extended emission on large scales (e20 ). The extended mid-infrared structure is well

  19. Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki State on a Honeycomb Lattice is a Universal Quantum Computational Resource

    E-print Network

    Tzu-Chieh Wei; Ian Affleck; Robert Raussendorf

    2011-02-24

    Universal quantum computation can be achieved by simply performing single-qubit measurements on a highly entangled resource state, such as cluster states. The family of Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki states has recently been intensively explored and shown to provide restricted computation. Here, we show that the two-dimensional Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki state on a honeycomb lattice is a universal resource for measurement-based quantum computation.

  20. Radiological dose assessments at the Kennedy Space Center

    SciTech Connect

    Firstenberg, H.; Jubach, R.; Bartram, B.; Vaughan, F.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of an atmospheric transport and diffusion model for launch window and safety risk assessment studies in support of the Galileo (which is scheduled for the October/November 1989 period) and Ulysses (scheduled for {approximately}1 yr after Galileo) missions at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The model is resident in the EMERGE software system developed by NUS Corporation and modified for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to provide real-time and safety analyses report support for the launches. The application is unique in that the model accommodates the varied amount of meteorological data at KSC and Cape Canaveral and includes a site-specific algorithm to account for local-scale circulations. This paper focuses on the Galileo mission application, including discussions of the use of the meteorological data available at KSC, integration of the EMERGE sea-breeze algorithm, and examples of real-time and safety analyses report assessments. The Galileo spacecraft is to be launched toward Jupiter using the space shuttle.

  1. Kennedy Space Center processing of Shuttle small payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, Michael E.

    1993-01-01

    There are many steps involved in preparing a payload for a mission into space on the Space Shuttle. Operations at the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) are the last of those steps for the hardware before the payload is launched. To assure a successful and efficient KSC processing flow, a great deal of planning between the Robert H. Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and KSC personnel is required before the payload arrives at KSC. After arrival, pre-flight operations occur between payload personnel, GSFC personnel, and KSC personnel for integration of the payload into its carrier (if required), in preparation for installation into a Orbiter. Once installed into an Orbiter, final test(s), checkout, and close-out of the payload is performed by GSFC and KSC personnel before launch. Mission support varies depending on the payload flying, but once the mission is complete and the Orbiter has returned to KSC, post-flight operations begin. This usually involves a reverse flow of the pre-flight operations. KSC operations conclude when the payload, its ground support equipment (GSE), and personnel depart KSC. A list of lessons learned is generated at the end of each payload flow, to avoid repeating the same mistakes (if any) for the next payload or for multiple repeat flights of the same payload. Always monitored are planned changes that may affect the payloads, GSE, KSC facilities, payload personnel, GSFC personnel, and/or KSC personnel.

  2. Oceanic Storm Characteristics Off the Kennedy Space Center Coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J.; Simpson, A. A.; Cummins, K. L.; Kiriazes, J. J.; Brown, R. G.; Mata, C. T.

    2014-01-01

    Natural cloud-to-ground lightning may behave differently depending on the characteristics of the attachment mediums, including the peak current (inferred from radiation fields) and the number of ground strike locations per flash. Existing literature has raised issues over the yea"rs on the behavior of lightning over ocean terrain and these phenomena are not yet well understood. To investigate lightning characteristics over differing terrain we will obtain identical observations over adjacent land and ocean regions during both clear air and thunderstorm periods comparing the electric field behavior over these various terrains. For this, a 3-meter NOAA buoy moored 20NM off the coast of the Kennedy Space Center was instrumented with an electric field mill and New Mexico Tech's slow antenna to measure the electric fields aloft and compared to the existing on-shore electric field mill suite of 31 sensors and a coastal slow antenna. New Mexico Tech's Lightning Mapping Array and the Eastern Range Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System, along with the network of high-speed cameras being used to capture cloud-to-ground lightning strikes over the terrain regions to identify a valid data set and verify the electric fields. This is an on-going project with the potential for significant impact on the determination of lightning risk to objects on the ground. This presentation will provide results and instrumentation progress to date.

  3. EASE/ACCESS ground processing at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moates, Deborah J.; Villamil, Ana M.

    1987-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Payload Management and Operations Directorate is responsible for the processing of Space Shuttle payloads. The KSC responsibilities begin prior to hardware arrival at the launch site and extend until the experiments are returned to the investigators after the flight. The KSC involvement with the integration and checkout of payloads begins with participation in experiment, Mission Peculiar Equipment (MPE), and integrated payload design reviews. This involvement also includes participation in assembly and testing of flight hardware at the appropriate design center, university, or private corporation. Once the hardware arrives at the launch site, KSC personnel install the experiments and MPE onto a carrier in the Operations and Checkout (O & C) building. Following integration, the payload is functionally tested and then installed into the orbiter. After the mission, the payload is removed from the orbiter, deintegrated in the O & C building, and the experiments are turned over to the mission manager. One of the many payloads process at KSC consisted of two space construction experiments: the Experimental Assembly of Structures in Extravehicular Activity (EASE) and the Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structures (ACCESS). The details of EASE/ACCESS integration, testing, and deintegration are addressed and how this mission can serve as a guide for future space construction payloads is discussed.

  4. Constitutive Soil Properties for Mason Sand and Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Michael A.; Chitty, Daniel E.

    2011-01-01

    Accurate soil models are required for numerical simulations of land landings for the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). This report provides constitutive material models for two soil conditions at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and four conditions of Mason Sand. The Mason Sand is the test sand for LaRC s drop tests and swing tests of the Orion. The soil models are based on mechanical and compressive behavior observed during geotechnical laboratory testing of remolded soil samples. The test specimens were reconstituted to measured in situ density and moisture content. Tests included: triaxial compression, hydrostatic compression, and uniaxial strain. A fit to the triaxial test results defines the strength envelope. Hydrostatic and uniaxial tests define the compressibility. The constitutive properties are presented in the format of LSDYNA Material Model 5: Soil and Foam. However, the laboratory test data provided can be used to construct other material models. The soil models are intended to be specific to the soil conditions they were tested at. The two KSC models represent two conditions at KSC: low density dry sand and high density in-situ moisture sand. The Mason Sand model was tested at four conditions which encompass measured conditions at LaRC s drop test site.

  5. A Kennedy Space Center implementation of IEEE 1451

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oostdyk, Rebecca L.; Mata, Carlos T.; Perotti, José M.; Lucena, Angel R.; Mullenix, Pamela A.

    2006-05-01

    To meet the demand for more reliable sensory data, longer sensor calibration cycles, and more useful information for operators at NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC), NASA's Instrumentation Branch and ASRC's Advanced Electronics and Technology Development Laboratory at the KSC are developing custom intelligent sensors based on the IEEE 1451 family of smart-sensor standards. The KSC intelligent sensors are known as Smart Networked Elements (SNEs), and each SNE includes transducers and their associated Transducer Electronic Data Sheets (TEDS), signal conditioning, analog-to-digital conversion, software algorithms for performing health checks on the data, and a network connection for sending data to other SNEs and higher-level systems. The development of the SNE has led to the definition of custom architectures, protocols, IEEE 1451 implementations, and TEDS, which are presented in this paper. The IEEE 1451 standards describe the architecture, message formats, software objects, and communication protocols within the smart sensor. Because of the standard's complexity, KSC has simplified the IEEE 1451 architecture and narrowed the scope of software objects to be included in the SNE to create a "light" IEEE 1451 implementation, and has used the manufacturer-defined TEDS to customize the SNE with health indicators. Furthermore, KSC has developed a protocol that allows the SNEs to communicate over an Ethernet network while reducing bandwidth requirements.

  6. Acid rain at Kennedy Space Center, Florida - Recent observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madsen, B. C.

    1981-01-01

    During the period July, 1977 to September, 1979, rainfall was collected in the vicinity of the Kennedy Space Center and subjected to appropriate chemical analysis for purposes of characterization of general composition and acidity. Results obtained form the basis for future comparisons, should significant alteration of the chemical composition of rain occur during the space shuttle era. Acidity extremes calculated on a monthly basis from event samples collected from five sites within a 200 sq km area varied from pH 5.1 in November, 1977, and April, 1978 to pH 4.3 in July, 1978 and July, 1979. Weighted average pH for the entire period was 4.55. Acidity was due to the presence of sulfuric and nitric acids. The mole ratio of excess SO4(-2):NO3(-) was typically greater than one. Monthly weighted average Cl(-) concentrations ranged from 20-240 micromoles/liter. The Cl(-):Na(+) ratio was slightly lower than that present in sea water.

  7. After nineteen years, the last trove of secret Kennedy tapes is released to the public

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Grinnell, Max

    2012-02-03

    New Air Force One tapes give insight on Kennedy deathhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-16821363Last of secret Kennedy tapes releasedhttp://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-kennedy-tapes-20120125,0,6198450.storyPost JFK Assassination Air Force One Flight Deck Recordinghttp://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/GPO-NARA-JFK-ASSASSINATION-AUDIO/content-detail.htmlThe President John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Collectionhttp://www.archives.gov/research/jfk/The National Security Archive: The Cuban Missile Crisis, 1962: Audio Clips (iTunes)http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/nsa/cuba_mis_cri/audio.htmJFK 50 Years: Celebrate the past to awaken the futurehttp://www.jfk50.org/In the last three months of his presidency, John F. Kennedy dedicated a dam in Heber Springs, Arkansas, signed the Partial Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, and spoke with his advisers about the War on Poverty preparations for 1964. During this period, many hours of tapes secretly recorded Kennedy's interactions with his advisers, his family, and others, on a variety of topics including domestic policy and the space race. The John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum in Boston has reviewed and released over 248 hours of taped meetings and 12 hours of phone conversation since 1993. Not until this past week, however, were the final 45 hours of tapes from the final months of Kennedy's presidency released. Many historians and members of the public have been eagerly waiting to listen to them. Those who have heard the tapes thus far have remarked that the tapes demonstrate Kennedy's facility with a wide array of policy concerns. In one session, after hearing vastly different stories from top aides who had traveled to South Vietnam to assess the country, Kennedy remarks, "You both went to the same country?" The last meeting was taped on November 20th, 1963, two days before he was assassinated in Dallas.The first link takes visitors to a piece from this Tuesday's BBC News about the tapes that document the minutes on Air Force One immediately after President Kennedy's assassination. The second link leads to a Los Angeles Times article from last Tuesday, which discusses a larger selection of tapes. The third link leads to the previously mentioned Air Force One audio tape that was released this week. Moving on, the fourth link whisks users away to the President John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Collection, which is maintained by the National Archives. First-time visitors to the Collection page should start by perusing the FAQ area, as it is quite helpful. The fifth link takes interested parties to the very well-known and fascinating audio tapes of President Kennedy talking about the Cuban Missile Crisis with Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara, Secretary of State Dean Rusk, and his brother, Attorney General Robert Kennedy. The last link leads to a great site celebrating the 50th anniversary of President Kennedy's inauguration and his legacy in the arenas of foreign diplomacy, the arts, and civil rights.

  8. Kennedy Space Center Cardiovascular Disease Risk Reduction Program evaluation.

    PubMed

    Calderon, Kristine S; Smallwood, Charles; Tipton, David A

    2008-01-01

    This program evaluation examined the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) Risk Reduction Program which aims to identify CVD risk factors and reduce these risk factors through health education phone counseling. High risk participants (those having two or more elevated lipid values) are identified from monthly voluntary CVD screenings and counseled. Phone counseling consists of reviewing lab values with the participant, discussing dietary fat intake frequency using an intake questionnaire, and promoting the increase in exercise frequency. The participants are followed-up at two-months and five-months for relevant metrics including blood pressure, weight, body mass index (BMI), total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, dietary fat intake, and exercise frequency. Data for three years of the KSC CVD Program included 366 participants, average age of 49 years, 75% male, and 25% female. For those with complete two and five month follow-up data, significant baseline to two-month follow-up comparisons included decreases in systolic blood pressure (p = 0.03); diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.002); total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and dietary fat intake (all three at p < 0.0001) as well as a significant increase in exercise frequency (p = 0.04). Significant baseline to five-month follow-up comparisons included decreases in triglycerides (p = 0.05); and total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and dietary intake (all three at p < 0.0001). These program evaluation results indicate that providing brief phone health education counseling and information at the worksite to high risk CVD participants may impact CVD risk factors. PMID:18561517

  9. Oceanic Storm Characteristics off the Kennedy Space Center Coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. G.; Simpson, A. A.; Cummins, K. L.; Kiriazes, J. J.; Brown, R. G.; Mata, C. T.

    2014-01-01

    Natural cloud-to-ground lightning may behave differently depending on the characteristics of the attachment mediums, including the peak current (inferred from radiation fields) and the number of ground strike locations per flash. Existing literature has raised questions over the years on these characteristics of lightning over oceans, and the behaviors are not yet well understood. To investigate this we will obtain identical electric field observations over adjacent land and ocean regions during both clear air and thunderstorm periods. Oceanic observations will be obtained using a 3-meter NOAA buoy that has been instrumented with a Campbell Scientific electric field mill and New Mexico Techs slow antenna, to measure the electric fields aloft. We are currently obtaining measurements from this system on-shore at the Florida coast, to calibrate and better understand the behavior of the system in elevated-field environments. Sometime during winter 2013, this system will be moored 20NM off the coast of the Kennedy Space Center. Measurements from this system will be compared to the existing on-shore electric field mill suite of 31 sensors and a coastal slow antenna. Supporting observations will be provided by New Mexico Techs Lightning Mapping Array, the Eastern Range Cloud to Ground Lightning Surveillance System, and the National Lightning Detection Network. An existing network of high-speed cameras will be used to capture cloud-to-ground lightning strikes over the terrain regions to identify a valid data set for analysis. This on-going project will demonstrate the value of off-shore electric field measurements for safety-related decision making at KSC, and may improve our understanding of relative lightning risk to objects on the ground vs. ocean. This presentation will provide an overview of this new instrumentation, and a summary of our progress to date.

  10. Astro-1 Payloads Integration at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This photograph was taken during the integration of the Astro-1 mission payloads at the Kennedy Space Center on March 20, 1990, showing the Broad Band X-Ray Telescope (BBXRT) at the left, as three telescopes for the Astro-1 Observatory are settled into the Orbiter Columbia payload bay. Above Earth's atmospheric interference, Astro-1 would make precise measurements of objects such as planets, stars, and galaxies in relatively small fields of view and would observe and measure ultraviolet radiation from celestial objects. The Astro-1 used a Spacelab pallet system with an instrument pointing system and a cruciform structure for bearing the three ultraviolet instruments mounted in a parallel configuration. The three instruments were: The Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT), which was designed to obtain far-ultraviolet spectroscopic data from white dwarfs, emission nebulae, active galaxies, and quasars; the Wisconsin Ultraviolet Photo-Polarimeter Experiment (WUPPE) which was to study polarized ultraviolet light from magnetic white dwarfs, binary stars, reflection nebulae, and active galaxies; and the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT), which was to record photographic images in ultraviolet light of galaxies, star clusters, and nebulae. The star trackers that supported the instrument pointing system, were also mounted on the cruciform. Also in the payload bay was the Broad Band X-Ray Telescope (BBXRT), which was designed to obtain high-resolution x-ray spectra from stellar corona, x-ray binary stars, active galactic nuclei, and galaxy clusters. Managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center, the Astro-1 observatory was launched aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Columbia (STS-35) on December 2, 1990.

  11. HKS Community StandardS, PoliCieS, and requirementS 120132014 HARVARD KENNEDY SCHOOL STUDENT HANDBOOK

    E-print Network

    ;12013­2014 HARVARD KENNEDY SCHOOL STUDENT HANDBOOK office of the Registrar 124 Mt. auburn street, suite 165 hks, and regulations. the kennedy school of Government therefore reserves the right at any time to make changes, whichInG aRound 20 l eveRythInG else 20 the fIne pRInt 24 fInanCIal MatteRs #12;22013­2014 HARVARD KENNEDY

  12. Kennedy Space Center Coronary Heart Disease Risk Screening Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tipton, David A.; Scarpa, Philip J.

    1999-01-01

    The number one cause of death in the U.S. is coronary heart disease (CHD). It is probably a major cause of death and disability in the lives of employees at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) as well. The KSC Biomedical Office used a multifactorial mathematical formula from the Framingham Heart Study to calculate CHD risk probabilities for individuals in a segment of the KSC population that required medical evaluation for job certification. Those assessed to be high-risk probabilities will be targeted for intervention. Every year, several thousand KSC employees require medical evaluations for job related certifications. Most medical information for these evaluations is gathered on-site at one of the KSC or Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) medical clinics. The formula used in the Framingham Heart Study allows calculation of a person's probability of acquiring CHD within 10 years. The formula contains the following variables: Age, Diabetes, Smoking, Left Ventricular Hypertrophy, Blood Pressure (Systolic or Diastolic), Cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol. The formula is also gender specific. It was used to calculate the 10-year probabilities of CHD in KSC employees who required medical evaluations for job certifications during a one-year time frame. This KSC population was profiled and CHD risk reduction interventions could be targeted to those at high risk. Population risk could also be periodically reevaluated to determine the effectiveness of intervention. A 10-year CHD risk probability can be calculated for an individual quite easily while gathering routine medical information. An employee population's CHD risk probability can be profiled graphically revealing high risk segments of the population which can be targeted for risk reduction intervention. The small audience of NASA/contractor physicians, nurses and exercise/fitness professionals at the breakout session received the lecture very well. Approximately one third indicated by a show of hands that they would be interested in implementing a similar program at their NASA Center. Questions were asked pertaining to standardization for age, the validity of using the idealized male values also for the female population, and indications of the screening test's sensitivity and specificity.

  13. The influence of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby on William Kennedy's Legs 

    E-print Network

    Egenolf, Susan Bolet

    1989-01-01

    THE INFLUENCE OF F. SCOTT FITZGERALD' S THE GREAT GATSBY ON WILLIAM KENNEDY'8 LEGS A Thesis by SUSAN BOLET EGENOLF Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF ARTS August 1989 Major Subject: English THE INFLUENCE OF F. SCOTT FITZGERALD'S THE GREAT GATSBY ON WILLIAM KENNEDY'S LEGS A Thesis by SUSAN BOLET EGENOLF Approved as to style and content by: g~-' I / Lar y J. R nolds ( ir of mmittee...

  14. A study of clear-air turbulence from detailed wind profiles over Cape Kennedy, Florida 

    E-print Network

    Blackburn, James Harvey

    1969-01-01

    A STUDY OF CLEAR-AIR TURBULENCE FROM DETAII. ED WIND PROFILES OVER CAPE KENNEDY, FLORIDA A Thesis by James Harvey Blackburn, Jr. Captain United States Air Force Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of ittee) (Head of Dep tment...) (Amber) (Member) May 1969 ABSTRACT A Study of Clear-Air Turbulence from Detailed Wind Profiles Over Cape Kennedy, Florida. James H. Blackburn, Jr. , B. S. , Texas A6N University Directed by: Dr. James R. Scoggins Clear-air turbulence (CAT...

  15. Innovative Partnerships Program Accomplishments: 2009-2010 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makufka, David

    2010-01-01

    This document reports on the accomplishments of the Innovative Partnerships Program during the two years of 2009 and 2010. The mission of the Innovative Partnerships Program is to provide leveraged technology alternatives for mission directorates, programs, and projects through joint partnerships with industry, academia, government agencies, and national laboratories. As outlined in this accomplishments summary, the IPP at NASA's Kennedy Space Center achieves this mission via two interdependent goals: (1) Infusion: Bringing external technologies and expertise into Kennedy to benefit NASA missions, programs, and projects (2) Technology Transfer: Spinning out space program technologies to increase the benefits for the nation's economy and humanity

  16. Paving the road to peace: John F. Kennedy's American University address

    E-print Network

    Joyce, Kelly J

    1997-01-01

    in the rhetoric of presidents Truman through Bush. This thesis follows the style and format of Rhetorica. Lynn Boyd Hinds and Theodore Windt note the beginnings of Cold War rhetoric in the uncertain times following World War II: At the end of World War II...'s presidency. While these works are too numerous to list here, some significant examples include Theodore Sorensen's Kennedy, Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr's A Thousand Days: John F. Kennedy in the White House, Herbert Parmet's JFK: The Presidency of John F...

  17. 69 FR 3950 - National Environmental Policy Act; International Space Research Park at the John F. Kennedy Space...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2004-01-27

    ...International Space Research Park at the John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida...Research Park (ISRP) at the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC...6500 Carole Ave., Port St. John, FL 32927, (321) 633-1867...Brevard Branch Library, 2121 S. Hopkins Ave., Titusville, FL...

  18. Volume 4 Issue 4 www.nasa.gov/centers/stennis April 2009 Space shuttle Atlantis sits at Launch Pad 39A at Kennedy Space

    E-print Network

    39A at Kennedy Space Center in Florida, ready to begin its STS-125 mission to service the Hubble at Kennedy Space Center, where the data collected at Stennis was used in determining that Discovery was `Go

  19. Cella Energy Limited, a spinout company from STFC, is to set up a new facility at NASA's iconic Kennedy Space Center (NASA KSC) after a new round of

    E-print Network

    Kennedy Space Center (NASA KSC) after a new round of funding led by a $1million investment by Space Innovations Club This issue: 1 Space Florida invest, to land Cella at Kennedy Space Centre 2 European Space at Kennedy Space Centre Image: Credit: Cella Energy 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Cella Energy's Chief Scientific Officer

  20. a publication of the byu david m. kennedy center for international studies bridgesa l u m n i m a g a z i n e

    E-print Network

    Martinez, Tony R.

    a publication of the byu david m. kennedy center for international studies #12;bridgesa l u m n i m PHOTOGRAPHERS BRADLEY H. SLADE CLARK GOLDSBERRY BECKY LEUNG Published by the David M. Kennedy Center-422-2652 kcpublications@byu.edu kennedy.byu.edu Special Feature Departments Lecture Spotlights Travel Recommended Reads

  1. Paper No. 11.05 1 A Half Century of Tapered-Pile Usage at the John F. Kennedy International Airport

    E-print Network

    Horvath, John S.

    Paper No. 11.05 1 A Half Century of Tapered-Pile Usage at the John F. Kennedy International Airport. Kennedy International Airport (JFKIA) in New York City began in the late 1940s. Timber piles were used the well-known John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFKIA, originally named New York International

  2. PRINT PAGES 1-19, ONLY Thank you for expressing interest in volunteering at Kennedy Krieger Institute. We are looking forward to

    E-print Network

    Pevsner, Jonathan

    PRINT PAGES 1- 19, ONLY Thank you for expressing interest in volunteering at Kennedy Krieger with two letters of recommendation to: Kennedy Krieger Institute, Guest Relations & Volunteer Services to the man and said, "I made a difference to that one." ­ Anonymous #12;KENNEDY KRIEGER INSTITUTE VOLUNTEER

  3. New Technology Demonstration Program, Kennedy Space Center, Hangar L Heat Pipe Project: Performance Evaluation Report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. E. Hancock; P. Reeves

    1999-01-01

    In December of 1996, heat pipe heat exchangers were installed on three air handlers at Hangar L at the Cape Canaveral Air Station, Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida. These retrofits were implemented with the intent to improve the dehumidification performance of the cooling systems, reduce the electric and steam energy required for reheating air, and reduce electric energy used

  4. Network localization from relative bearing measurements Ryan Kennedy and Camillo J. Taylor

    E-print Network

    Taylor, Camillo J.

    Network localization from relative bearing measurements Ryan Kennedy and Camillo J. Taylor Abstract-- We present an approach for 2D sensor network localization when only bearing measurements are able to take bearing measurements and cannot measure distances. This problem occurs, for example

  5. Educational Applications of Astronomy & Space Flight Operations at the Kennedy Space Center

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. K. Erickson

    1999-01-01

    Within two years, the Kennedy Space Center will complete a total redesign of NASA's busiest Visitor's Center. Three million visitors per year will be witness to a new program focused on expanding the interests of the younger public in NASA's major space programs, in space operations, and in astronomy. This project, being developed through the Visitor's Center director, a NASA

  6. ISOTROPIC NOISE MODELLING FOR NEARFIELD ARRAY PROCESSING Thushara D. Abhayapala Rodney A. Kennedy

    E-print Network

    Botea, Adi

    ISOTROPIC NOISE MODELLING FOR NEARFIELD ARRAY PROCESSING Thushara D. Abhayapala Rodney A. Kennedy applications. Specifically, any signal processing criterion based on farfield isotropic noise correlation can processing cri- terion based on isotropic type noise correlation to nearfield applications. In our simulation

  7. Surface to 90 km winds for Kennedy Space Center, Florida, and Vandenberg AFB, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. L.; Brown, S. C.

    1979-01-01

    Bivariate normal wind statistics for a 90 degree flight azimuth, from 0 through 90 km altitude, for Kennedy Space Center, Florida, and Vandenberg AFB, California are presented. Wind probability distributions and statistics for any rotation of axes can be computed from the five given parameters.

  8. A New Lightning Instrumentation System for Pad 39B at the Kennedy Space Center Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mata, C. T.; Rakov, V. A.

    2011-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes a new lightning instrumentation system for pad 39B at Kennedy Space Center Florida. The contents include: 1) Background; 2) Instrumentation; 3) Meteorological Instrumentation; and 4) Lessons learned. A presentation of the data acquired at Camp Blanding is also shown.

  9. Emergency Medical Operations at Kennedy Space Center in Support of Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, K. Jeffrey; Tipton, David A.; Woodard, Daniel; Long, Irene D.

    1992-01-01

    The unique environment of the Kennedy Space Center includes a wide variety of industrial processes culminating in launch and spaceflight. Many are potentially hazardous to the work force and the astronauts. Technology, planning, training, and quality control are utilized to prevent contingencies and expedite response should a contingency occur.

  10. 3 CFR 8403 - Proclamation 8403 of August 26, 2009. Death of Senator Edward M. Kennedy

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Kennedy was not only one of the greatest senators of our time, but one of the most accomplished Americans ever to serve our democracy. Over the past half-century, nearly every major piece of legislation that has advanced the civil rights,...

  11. NASA Headquarters/Kennedy Space Center: Organization and Small Spacecraft Launch Services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sierra, Albert; Beddel, Darren

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of the Kennedy Space Center's (KSC) Expendable Launch Vehicles (ELV) Program are to provide safe, reliable, cost effective ELV launches, maximize customer satisfaction, and perform advanced payload processing capability development. Details are given on the ELV program organization, products and services, foreign launch vehicle policy, how to get a NASA launch service, and some of the recent NASA payloads.

  12. Identifying and responding to customer needs at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, E. B.

    1993-01-01

    The Patient Questionnaire Program at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has been in place for several years. It has helped to identify customer perceptions and needs. The questionnaire is presented and the survey results are discussed with respect to total quality management.

  13. The Center on Civic Literacy Sheila Kennedy, JD; Erin Braun; Nichole Davis; Michael Marsala

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    The Center on Civic Literacy Sheila Kennedy, JD; Erin Braun; Nichole Davis; Michael Marsala IUPUI, SPEA Indiana University ­ Purdue University Indianapolis Abstract The Center for Civic Literacy Board. Web. 27 Mar. 2012. http://www.nagb.org/civics/statement-quigley.htm The Center for Civic Literacy

  14. A Kennedy Space Center implementation of IEEE 1451 networked smart sensors and lessons learned

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. L. Oostdyk; C. T. Mata; J. M. Perotti

    2006-01-01

    To meet the need for more specific and reliable information from ground support instrumentation systems and future spacecraft sensors and to support intelligent health management systems (IHMS), NASA's Instrumentation Branch and ASRC's Advanced Electronics and Technology Development Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) have consulted the IEEE 1451 family of smart-sensor standards to develop smart network elements (SNEs). SNEs provide

  15. National Aeronautics and Space Administration John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    E-print Network

    Christian, Eric

    launch vehicle engineering, safety and mission assurance, and mission management expertise to customers management, overall systems engineering and/or specific discipline expertise; e.g. mission assurance, flightNational Aeronautics and Space Administration John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida LSP-PLN-326

  16. Space shuttle solid rocket booster processing and recovery operations at Kennedy Space Center

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. J. Dickinson

    1975-01-01

    This paper describes the processing and recovery operations at Kennedy Space Center as applied to the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster. The introductory portion covers the overall Space Shuttle launch vehicle with a description of the Solid Rocket Boosters and explanations of their functions. Processing operations begin with the arrival of the new or refurbished Solid Rocket Motor segments by

  17. The Training of Black Sociologists: Tolbert H. Kennedy and Washington State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Gordon D.

    1980-01-01

    Appraises the success of Washington State University from l944-65 in the matter of training Black sociologists. Concludes that the university was able to produce so many Black sociologists because of the efforts of Tolbert H. Kennedy--administrator and professor. (DB)

  18. Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

    E-print Network

    Rau, Don C.

    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Scientific Vision, the workshop organizing group developed four thematic sessions focused on: 1) Improving methods to diagnose and manage childhood diseases as a model; 2) Neurodevelopmental disorders; 3) Rehabilitation of neurological

  19. Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

    E-print Network

    Rau, Don C.

    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Scientific Vision their roots in fetal and early childhood development. These include obesity, type II diabetes, insulin of health and disease have their origins in the critical windows of development, resolution ultimately falls

  20. Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

    E-print Network

    Rau, Don C.

    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Scientific Vision on research and practice. The focus was on development, from conception through adulthood, which means that the dynamic nature of change during childhood has to be a cornerstone for any research program

  1. Prosthodontic treatment for the Applegate-Kennedy class V partially edentulous patient

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arie Shifman; Zeev Ben-Ur

    1996-01-01

    Concomitant loss of a canine and adjacent teeth usually occurs in the maxilla as a result of trauma in youngsters with well-preserved dentition or as an outcome of surgical excision of a localized pathosis in that area. It is postulated that in Applegate-Kennedy class V partially edentulous situations, the remaining anterior teeth in the maxilla should not be used as

  2. Fire and safety materials utilization at the John F. Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    The special needs of the Kennedy Space Center in the area of protective garments for personnel engaged in hazardous emergency operations are discussed. The materials used in the protective clothing and the specialized applications of various materials are described. It is concluded that Nomex is the best general purpose nonflammable material for protective clothing.

  3. College Football and Public Crisis: Appropriate Actions and Justifications after the Kennedy Assassination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Robert S.

    This paper contends that domestic response to John F. Kennedy's assassination took two basic forms in the United States: active crisis management and retreat. According to the paper, while government, churches, and the media engaged in active crisis management, businesses and schools closed, and the public retreated to mourn rather than to…

  4. A study of the characteristics of thunderstorm cessation at the NASA Kennedy Space Center 

    E-print Network

    Hinson, Michael Shawn

    1997-01-01

    to their proximity to the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and examined for their end of storm characteristics. Radar echoes at the-100C and-200C temperature heights were associated with cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning strike locations from the National Lightning Detection...

  5. QMUL in Motion 5th September 2013 ClarkKennedy Lecture Theatre, Whitechapel

    E-print Network

    Roelleke, Thomas

    PROCESSING APPROACH Roya Haratian 3. IN VIVO MUSCLE TENDON JUNCTION TRACKING USING ULTRASOUND ALGORITHM. THE BIOMECHANICS OF RUNNING IN ATHLETES WITH PREVIOUS HAMSTRING INJURY Colm Daly 2. ARTIFICIAL CURIOSITY ClarkKennedy Lecture Theatre, Whitechapel 4. BEHAVIOUR OF THE ACHILLES TENDON INVIVO FOLLOWING

  6. The Kennedy School's Human Resource Department is located at 124 Mount Auburn, suite 240 in Cambridge, MA, just a few minutes walking distance from the main campus. When you

    E-print Network

    Directions The Kennedy School's Human Resource Department is located at 124 Mount Auburn, suite 240 to 124 Mount Auburn. Walking from the Harvard Square Subway Station: The Kennedy School is a quick walk John F. Kennedy St. and continue down the street for three blocks. The Kennedy School is on the corner

  7. 75 FR 2149 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-14

    ...Health, 6100 Executive Boulevard, Room 5B01, Rockville, MD 20852 (Telephone Conference Call) Contact Person: Michele C. Hindi-Alexander, PhD, Division of Scientific Review, National Institutes of Health, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National...

  8. 75 FR 1067 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-08

    ...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice...meeting of the National Advisory Child Health and Human Development Council...of Committee: National Advisory Child Health and Human Development...

  9. 77 FR 9674 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-17

    ...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis...Review, National Institute of Child Health, and Human Development,...

  10. 75 FR 27796 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-18

    ...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice...meeting of the National Advisory Child Health and Human Development Council...of Committee: National Advisory Child Health and Human Development...

  11. 75 FR 39031 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel, Child Health Research Career Development...

  12. 77 FR 33751 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-07

    ...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis...Review, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 6100...

  13. 75 FR 32488 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development [[Page...Emphasis Panel, Maintenance of Child Health and Developmental Data...

  14. The ParaScope Parallel Programming Environment Keith D. Cooper Mary W. Hall Robert T. Hood Ken Kennedy

    E-print Network

    McKinley, Kathryn S.

    . Wind tunnels have yielded to aerodynamic simulation. Automotive design relies on computer graphics by the Institute for Advanced Computer Studies, University of Maryland. Keith D. Cooper, Ken Kennedy, Kathryn S. Mc

  15. Research and Technology at the John F. Kennedy Space Center 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    As the NASA Center responsible for assembly, checkout, servicing, launch, recovery, and operational support of Space Transportation System elements and payloads, the John F. Kennedy Space Center is placing increasing emphasis on its advanced technology development program. This program encompasses the efforts of the Engineering Development Directorate laboratories, most of the KSC operations contractors, academia, and selected commercial industries - all working in a team effort within their own areas of expertise. This edition of the Kennedy Space Center Research and Technology 1993 Annual Report covers efforts of all these contributors to the KSC advanced technology development program, as well as our technology transfer activities. Major areas of research include material science, advanced software, industrial engineering, nondestructive evaluation, life sciences, atmospheric sciences, environmental technology, robotics, and electronics and instrumentation.

  16. An analysis of the variation of the shearing stresses and momentum exchange in the friction layer over Cape Kennedy, Florida

    E-print Network

    Bradham, John Harvin

    1970-01-01

    Kennedy, Florida. (January 1970) John 11. Bradham, B. S. , 1lniversity of South Carolina; Directed by: Dr. James R. Scoggins The method of geostrophic departure was employed in an analysis of t'ne variation of the shearing stresses and momentum... exchange coefficients in the friction layer over Cape Kennedy. FPS-16 radar/Jimsphere (RJ) wind profiles, rawinsonde (RW) data, and computations of geostrophic velocity were used in the analysis. The analysis was performed for five specific mean wind...

  17. Clinton signs Kassebaum-Kennedy bill--reduces barriers to health insurance.

    PubMed

    Owens, M B

    1996-01-01

    In August, President Clinton signed the Health Insurance Reform Act of 1966. The bill, generally called the Kassebaum-Kennedy Bill, is an important first step in increasing access to health insurance coverage for 25 million people. The bill limits preexisting exclusion waiting periods, places mental health coverage on a par with physical health care insurance, and will establish a pilot program to study the benefits of Medical Savings Accounts. PMID:11367430

  18. Living room pilgrimages: Television's cyclical commemoration of the assassination anniversary of John F. Kennedy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leah R. Vande Berg

    1995-01-01

    Visually and verbally, through dramatic narratives, the U.S. American mass media lead the public on pilgrimages, journeys of devotion and consecration, in commemoration of the anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. This paper examines and offers an explanation of these cyclical mass?mediated ritual dramas. Specifically, 14 news specials and documentaries (ranging from 1–4 hours each in length),

  19. Kennedy Space Center: Constellation Program Electrical Ground Support Equipment Research and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCoy, Keegan

    2010-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is NASA's spaceport, launching rockets into space and leading important human spaceflight research. This spring semester, I worked at KSC on Constellation Program electrical ground support equipment through NASA's Undergraduate Student Research Program (USRP). This report includes a discussion of NASA, KSC, and my individual research project. An analysis of Penn State's preparation of me for an internship and my overall impressions of the Penn State and NASA internship experience conclude the report.

  20. Paving the road to peace: John F. Kennedy's American University address 

    E-print Network

    Joyce, Kelly J

    1997-01-01

    under the absolute control of all nations. "" 24 Proposals for an agreement had, of course, been exchanged on both sides since the Conference on the Discontinuance of Nuclear Weapons Tests began in October 1958. Since that time, over 330 sessions... place on September 15, were conducted in laboratories and underground, The decision to resume tests had been a very hard one for the President, and in January 1962, Kennedy commented that the failure to develop a test ban agreement with the Soviets...

  1. View of debris assembled at the Kennedy Space Center from STS 51-L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Pieces of the external tank from the STS 51-L accident are assembled in a tent near the Logistics Facility at the Kennedy Space Center. Most of the pieces were recovered by the Coast Guard and Navy following the accident. The pieces were assembled so that the side which normally would face the Orbiter Challenger is in the center of the tent. The picture was taken from the right side of the rear of the tank facing toward the top.

  2. View of debris assembled at the Kennedy Space Center from STS 51-L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Large portion of the three main engines of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Challenger have been recovered from the floor of the Atlantic Ocean to the east of the Kennedy Space Center. They have been moved to a large storage building to the east of the Logistics Facility at Complex 39. Most of the pieces were recovered by the Coast Guard and Navy following the accident.

  3. 'Where are your intelligent mothers to come from?': marriage and family in the scientific career of Dame Kathleen Lonsdale FRS (1903-71).

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Melinda

    2009-03-20

    Although she was one of the most successful female scientists in twentieth-century Britain, the X-ray crystallographer Kathleen Yardley Lonsdale (1903-71) has received relatively little attention from historians of science. This paper, based on material from the recently opened Dame Kathleen Lonsdale Papers, argues that Lonsdale's scientific career was shaped in particular ways by her identity not just as a woman, but as a married woman and a mother. When interacting with her scientific colleagues, Lonsdale frequently had to confront the assumption that married women should not pursue scientific careers, an attitude shaped by British concerns about reasserting traditional gender roles after the World Wars I and II. Furthermore, although Lonsdale's husband, Thomas, was an ardent supporter of her career, in the early 1930s Lonsdale left research temporarily to care for her small children. Her desire to work from home during this period led her to pursue one of her most significant scientific projects: the creation of crystallographic reference tables. Lonsdale's own experiences, and those of her female students, led her to focus on issues of marriage and family when she began speaking and writing about women in science during the late 1960s. PMID:19579358

  4. Cyclic sedimentation in the shallow marine Upper Permian Kennedy Group, Carnarvon Basin, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lever, Helen

    2004-11-01

    The Upper Permian Kennedy Group of the Carnarvon Basin, Western Australia, was deposited while the Merlinleigh Sub-basin was undergoing thermal subsidence, and the global climate was warming from the Carboniferous-Permian glaciation to the Mesozoic Greenhouse conditions. The Kennedy Group comprises siliciclastic sedimentary rocks, dominated by sandstones in the lower part, with coarsening-up cycles from mudstones to very coarse sandstones and granule conglomerates in the upper part. Cycles were observed and logged in the field, and although many types of cycles were found, three main motifs describe most of the cycles. Cycle motifs are defined based on the dominance of the various facies: Mooka motif cycles are dominated by fine-grained and bioturbated facies (interpreted as deposition during relative sea-level highstand) with only thin laminated or cross-bedded sandstones (interpreted as deposited during relative sea-level fall); Binthalya motif cycles are dominated by laminated and cross-bedded sandstones; and Coolkilya motif cycles consist of alternating laminated and bioturbated beds. A hierarchy of cycles was observed in the field, and this correlated well with spectral analysis of logged parameters. Spectral analysis of section log data and data sets corrected for the effects of compaction and sedimentation rates detected regular cyclicity. Geochronology of the Kennedy Group is not well enough constrained to allow the cycle periods in time to be calculated, but ratios of the different scale cycle thicknesses correlate well with ratios of the Milankovitch orbital cycles that have been calculated for the Permian. The presence of regular cyclicity and even bed thicknesses across large distances are not consistent with tectonic or autocyclic models of cycle formation. The cycles are more likely to have been caused by fluctuating eustatic sea levels, perhaps enhanced by changing amounts or seasonality of precipitation. Both sea levels and climatic fluctuations would ultimately be controlled by the Milankovitch orbital cycles.

  5. Application of Markov chain theory to ASTP natural environment launch criteria at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, M. E.; Perlmutter, M.

    1974-01-01

    To aid the planning of the Apollo Soyuz Test Program (ASTP), certain natural environment statistical relationships are presented, based on Markov theory and empirical counts. The practical results are in terms of conditional probability of favorable and unfavorable launch conditions at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). They are based upon 15 years of recorded weather data which are analyzed under a set of natural environmental launch constraints. Three specific forecasting problems were treated: (1) the length of record of past weather which is useful to a prediction; (2) the effect of persistence in runs of favorable and unfavorable conditions; and (3) the forecasting of future weather in probabilistic terms.

  6. Space shuttle operations at the NASA Kennedy Space Center: the role of emergency medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodenberg, H.; Myers, K. J.

    1995-01-01

    The Division of Emergency Medicine at the University of Florida coordinates a unique program with the NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) to provide emergency medical support (EMS) for the United States Space Transportation System. This report outlines the organization of the KSC EMS system, training received by physicians providing medical support, logistic and operational aspects of the mission, and experiences of team members. The participation of emergency physicians in support of manned space flight represents another way that emergency physicians provide leadership in prehospital care and disaster management.

  7. Educational Applications of Astronomy & Space Flight Operations at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, L. K.

    1999-09-01

    Within two years, the Kennedy Space Center will complete a total redesign of NASA's busiest Visitor's Center. Three million visitors per year will be witness to a new program focused on expanding the interests of the younger public in NASA's major space programs, in space operations, and in astronomy. This project, being developed through the Visitor's Center director, a NASA faculty fellow, and the Visitor's Center contractor, is centered on the interaction between NASA programs, the visiting youth, and their parents. The goal of the Center's program is to provide an appealing learning experience for teens and pre teens using stimulating displays and interactive exhibits that are also educational.

  8. STS-30 Magellan spacecraft processing at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) SAEF-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Clean-suited technicians attach mobility castors (ground handling cart) to Magellan spacecraft in the Space Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF-2) at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The castors will allow the spacecraft to be moved within the clean room of the SAEF-2 planetary spacecraft checkout facility. The spacecraft has just been hoisted from the transport trailer of the Payload Environmental Transportation System (PETS). Magellan, destined for unprecedented studies of Venusian topographic features, will be deployed by the crew of NASA's STS-30 mission in April 1989. View provided by KSC with alternate number KSC-88PC-1086.

  9. Prosthodontic treatment for the Applegate-Kennedy class V partially edentulous patient.

    PubMed

    Shifman, A; Ben-Ur, Z

    1996-08-01

    Concomitant loss of a canine and adjacent teeth usually occurs in the maxilla as a result of trauma in youngsters with well-preserved dentition or as an outcome of surgical excision of a localized pathosis in that area. It is postulated that in Applegate-Kennedy class V partially edentulous situations, the remaining anterior teeth in the maxilla should not be used as abutments for removable partial dentures. The stability of the prosthesis is maintained by counterresisting the occlusal forces exerted on the restored arch-curve by use of a posteriorly directed path of placement for the prosthesis. PMID:8820816

  10. Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) Hand Cleaning Solvent Replacement at Kennedy Space Center (KSC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keen, Jill M.; DeWeese, Darrell C.; Key, Leigh W.

    1997-01-01

    At Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Thiokol Corporation provides the engineering to assemble and prepare the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) for launch. This requires hand cleaning over 86 surfaces including metals, adhesives, rubber and electrical insulations, various painted surfaces and thermal protective materials. Due to the phase-out of certain ozone depleting chemical (ODC) solvents, all RSRM hand wipe operations being performed at KSC using l,l,1-trichloroethane (TCA) were eliminated. This presentation summarizes the approach used and the data gathered in the effort to eliminate TCA from KSC hand wipe operations.

  11. Texture Modification of the Shuttle Landing Facility Runway at the NASA Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, Robert H.; Yager, Thomas J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the test procedures and the selection criteria used in selecting the best runway surface texture modification at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to reduce Orbiter tire wear. The new runway surface may ultimately result in an increase of allowable crosswinds for launch and landing operations. The modification allows launch and landing operations in 20-kt crosswinds if desired. This 5-kt increase over the previous 15-kt limit drastically increases landing safety and the ability to make on-time launches to support missions where space station rendezvous is planned.

  12. Normal probabilities for Cape Kennedy wind components: Monthly reference periods for all flight azimuths. Altitudes 0 to 70 kilometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falls, L. W.

    1973-01-01

    This document replaces Cape Kennedy empirical wind component statistics which are presently being used for aerospace engineering applications that require component wind probabilities for various flight azimuths and selected altitudes. The normal (Gaussian) distribution is presented as an adequate statistical model to represent component winds at Cape Kennedy. Head-, tail-, and crosswind components are tabulated for all flight azimuths for altitudes from 0 to 70 km by monthly reference periods. Wind components are given for 11 selected percentiles ranging from 0.135 percent to 99,865 percent for each month. Results of statistical goodness-of-fit tests are presented to verify the use of the Gaussian distribution as an adequate model to represent component winds at Cape Kennedy, Florida.

  13. Mutations disrupting the Kennedy phosphatidylcholine pathway in humans with congenital lipodystrophy and fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Payne, Felicity; Lim, Koini; Girousse, Amandine; Brown, Rebecca J; Kory, Nora; Robbins, Ann; Xue, Yali; Sleigh, Alison; Cochran, Elaine; Adams, Claire; Dev Borman, Arundhati; Russel-Jones, David; Gorden, Phillip; Semple, Robert K; Saudek, Vladimir; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Walther, Tobias C; Barroso, Inês; Savage, David B

    2014-06-17

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is the major glycerophospholipid in eukaryotic cells and is an essential component in all cellular membranes. The biochemistry of de novo PC synthesis by the Kennedy pathway is well established, but less is known about the physiological functions of PC. We identified two unrelated patients with defects in the Kennedy pathway due to biallellic loss-of-function mutations in phosphate cytidylyltransferase 1 alpha (PCYT1A), the rate-limiting enzyme in this pathway. The mutations lead to a marked reduction in PCYT1A expression and PC synthesis. The phenotypic consequences include some features, such as severe fatty liver and low HDL cholesterol levels, that are predicted by the results of previously reported liver-specific deletion of murine Pcyt1a. Both patients also had lipodystrophy, severe insulin resistance, and diabetes, providing evidence for an additional and essential role for PCYT1A-generated PC in the normal function of white adipose tissue and insulin action. PMID:24889630

  14. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Agency Introduction: The FY 2012 budget request for NASA is $18.7 billion, the FY 2010 enacted

    E-print Network

    1 Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Agency Introduction: The FY 2012 budget request for NASA is $18 objectives. NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is geographically located along the Florida east central the Apollo, Skylab and Space Shuttle Programs. The 21st Century Space Launch Complex Program at KSC

  15. Interview with Kathleen Blee

    E-print Network

    Decker, Stephanie Kristine

    2007-01-01

    should have anticipated, but didn’t. I started the project on the contemporary far right before the bombing of the oklahoma City federal building. that was when the number of people in these groups was probably at its height, since many of the groups... particularly scary to study, especially compared to how they became later. But after the oklahoma City bombing, there was a huge amount of federal scrutiny of these groups, because of timothy Mcveigh’s connection to racist militia groups. and the people who...

  16. Prof. Dr. Stephan Bierling, Fifty Years after the Shots Heard Around the World: A Critical Reassessment of John F. Kennedy and His Presidency 30.01.2014 EvaSys Auswertung Seite 1

    E-print Network

    Schubart, Christoph

    Reassessment of John F. Kennedy and His Presidency 30.01.2014 EvaSys Auswertung Seite 1 Prof. Dr. Stephan Bierling Fifty Years after the Shots Heard Around the World: A Critical Reassessment of John F. Kennedy. Kennedy and His Presidency 30.01.2014 EvaSys Auswertung Seite 2 Der Inhalt dieser Veranstaltung ist auf

  17. Identifying maximal rigid components in bearing-based localization Ryan Kennedy, Kostas Daniilidis, Oleg Naroditsky and Camillo J. Taylor

    E-print Network

    Taylor, Camillo J.

    Identifying maximal rigid components in bearing-based localization Ryan Kennedy, Kostas Daniilidis with these measurements is a variant of the bearing-based or angle-of-arrival sensor network localization problem. Note reference frame is given (for instance, when each agent has a compass), and when only relative bearing

  18. The Language of the Liberal Consensus: John F. Kennedy, Technical Reason, and the "New Economics" at Yale University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, John W.

    2004-01-01

    On June 11, 1962, President John F. Kennedy addressed the economy at Yale University. This essay explains the symbolic charge of his economic rhetoric, a persuasive campaign that enjoyed considerable success and marked the first time that a president took explicit responsibility for the nation's economic performance. I argue that the president…

  19. Profiles in Courage Simulations: Based on President John F. Kennedy's Pulitzer Prize Book. ETC Simulations Number Four.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hostrop, Richard W.

    This book presents simulation activities for the eight profiles of U.S. Senators presented in John F. Kennedy's "Profiles in Courage." Intended for student involvement, the simulations require student research and practice in order to carry out the designated roles. The simulations and role play are designed to actively involve the students in…

  20. The development of an organizational transition framework: the application of change models to the Kennedy Space Center

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Kotnour; S. Barton; J. Jennings

    1997-01-01

    Summary form only given. The contribution of the paper is a framework for organizational transitions involving both changes in mission\\/role and the number of personnel. The framework is an integration and extension of organizational models, best practices from the literature, interviews from senior executives who experienced significant organizational change, and issues and concerns identified by senior management at the Kennedy

  1. Commercialization of Kennedy Space Center Instrumentation Developed to Improve Safety, Reliability, Cost Effectiveness of Space Shuttle Processing, Launch, and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helms, William R.; Starr, Stanley O.

    1997-01-01

    Priorities and achievements of the Kennedy Space Center (KSF) Instrumentation Laboratories in improving operational safety and decreasing processing costs associated with the Shuttle vehicle are addressed. Technologies that have been or are in the process of technology transfer are reviewed, and routes by which commercial concerns can obtain licenses to other KSF Instrumentation Laboratory technologies are discussed.

  2. Androgen receptor gene (CAG)n repeat analysis in the differential diagnosis between Kennedy disease and other motoneuron disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Ferlini; M. C. Patrosso; M. Repetto; L. Merlini; A. Uncini; M. Ragno; R. Plasmati; S. Fini; P. Vezzoni; A. Forabosco

    1995-01-01

    An increase in the number of (CAG)n repeats in the first coding exon of the androgen receptor (AR) gene has been strongly associated with Kennedy disease (KD) (spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy). This is an X-linked hereditary disorder characterized by motoneuron degeneration occurring in adults together with gnecomastia and hyperestrogenemia. We have performed AR gene molecular analysis in several members

  3. Are cognitive and behavioural deficits a part of the clinical picture in Kennedy's disease? A case study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dagmara Mirowska-Guzel; Joanna Seniów; Anna Su?ek; Marcin Le?niak; Anna Cz?onkowska

    2009-01-01

    Two years prior to diagnosis of Kennedy's disease (KD), a 53-year-old man began experiencing neurological symptoms, including nasal speech, postural tremor, tremor in the upper extremities, and muscle weakness. Genetic analysis revealed 46 CAG repeats in the androgen receptor gene. The patient's altered social conduct and complaints of forgetfulness led to a neuropsychological assessment. A mild impairment in visuospatial and

  4. Quantification of hydrochloric acid and particulate deposition resulting from space shuttle launches at John F. Kennedy space center, Florida, USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas W. Dreschel; Carlton R. Hall

    1990-01-01

    Observations of damage to vegetation, acute reductions in surface water pH, and kills of small fish prompted the Biomedical Operations and Research Office at the John F. Kennedy Space Center to initiate intensive environmental evaluations of possible acute and long-term chronic impacts that may be produced by repeated launches of the space shuttle. An important step in this evaluation was

  5. Space shuttle solid rocket booster processing and recovery operations at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, W. J.

    1975-01-01

    This paper describes the processing and recovery operations at Kennedy Space Center as applied to the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster. The introductory portion covers the overall Space Shuttle launch vehicle with a description of the Solid Rocket Boosters and explanations of their functions. Processing operations begin with the arrival of the new or refurbished Solid Rocket Motor segments by rail cars from the manufacturer. Segment buildup is performed on the Mobile Launch Platform, and the completed major booster elements are functionally tested prior to their integration with other prime elements that comprise a complete Shuttle launch vehicle. The recovery operations following launch include Solid Rocket Booster separation, parachute deployment, splashdown, and the activities associated with retrieval of the reusable components of the Solid Rocket Boosters. Subsequently, the paper describes the processing required to thoroughly clean the retrieved items, the disassembly activities, and refurbishment steps planned for restoration of the hardware components to usable condition.

  6. A New Comprehensive Lightning Instrumentation System for Pad 39B at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mata, Carlos T.; Rakov, Vladimir A.; Mata, Angel G.; Bonilla Tatiana; Navedo, Emmanuel; Snyder, Gary P.

    2010-01-01

    A new comprehensive lightning instrumentation system has been designed for Launch Complex 39B at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. This new instrumentation system includes the synchronized recording of six high-speed video cameras, currents through the nine downconductors of the new lightning protection system, four B-dot, 3-axis measurement stations, and five D-dot stations composed of two antennas each. The instrumentation system is composed of centralized transient recorders and digitizers that located close to the sensors in the field. The sensors and transient recorders communicate via optical fiber. The transient recorders are triggered by the B-dot sensors, the E-dot sensors, or the current through the downlead conductors. The high-speed cameras are triggered by the transient recorders when the latter perceives a qualified trigger.

  7. Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki State on a Honeycomb Lattice from t2 g Orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch-Janusz, Maciej; Khomskii, D. I.; Sela, Eran

    2015-06-01

    The two-dimensional Affeck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki (AKLT) model on a honeycomb lattice has been shown to be a universal resource for quantum computation. In this valence bond solid, however, the spin interactions involve higher powers of the Heisenberg coupling (S?i.S?j)n, making these states seemingly unrealistic on bipartite lattices, where one expects a simple antiferromagnetic order. We show that those interactions can be generated by orbital physics in multiorbital Mott insulators. We focus on t2 g electrons on the honeycomb lattice and propose a physical realization of the spin-3 /2 AKLT state. We find a phase transition from the AKLT to the Néel state on increasing Hund's rule coupling, which is confirmed by density matrix renormalization group simulations. An experimental signature of the AKLT state consists of protected, free S =1 /2 spins on lattice vacancies, which may be detected in the spin susceptibility.

  8. Environmental Assessment for Central Campus Complex John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dankert, Donald

    2013-01-01

    This Environmental Assessment addresses the Proposed Action to consolidate multiple facilities in the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Industrial Area by constructing two new buildings in the existing headquarters area between NASA Parkway, 3rd Street, C Avenue, and D Avenue. Under the Proposed Action, the historic Headquarters Building will be demolished and a new building will be constructed closer to the Operations and Checkout Building by centering it on D A venue (Hunton Brady Architects, P A and Jones Edmunds and Associates, Inc. 2011). This option was selected from a group of 15 initial sketches as the most viable option during a Central Campus Complex Siting Study completed in February 2011. A No-Action Alternative is also presented in which no demolition or construction of new facilities would occur. Implementing the Proposed Action will have major impacts to cultural resources, while the remaining environmental impacts will be minor.

  9. Universal measurement-based quantum computation with spin-2 Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki states

    E-print Network

    Tzu-Chieh Wei; Robert Raussendorf

    2015-02-03

    We demonstrate that the spin-2 Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki (AKLT) state on the square lattice is a universal resource for the measurement-based quantum computation. Our proof is done by locally converting the AKLT to two-dimensional random planar graph states and by certifying that with high probability the resulting random graphs are in the supercritical phase of percolation using Monte Carlo simulations. One key enabling point is the exact weight formula that we derive for arbitrary measurement outcomes according to a spin-2 POVM on all spins. We also argue that the spin-2 AKLT state on the three-dimensional diamond lattice is a universal resource, the advantage of which would be the possibility of implementing fault-tolerant quantum computation with topological protection. In addition, as we deform the AKLT Hamiltonian, there is a finite region that the ground state can still support a universal resource before making a transition in its quantum computational power.

  10. Spectral gaps of Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki Hamiltonians using tensor network methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Saez, Artur; Murg, Valentin; Wei, Tzu-Chieh

    2013-12-01

    Using exact diagonalization and tensor network techniques, we compute the gap for the Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki (AKLT) Hamiltonian in one and two spatial dimensions. Tensor network methods are used to extract physical properties directly in the thermodynamic limit, and we support these results using finite-size scalings from exact diagonalization. Studying the AKLT Hamiltonian perturbed by an external field, we show how to obtain an accurate value of the gap of the original AKLT Hamiltonian from the field value at which the ground state verifies e0<0, which is a quantum critical point. With the tensor network renormalization group methods we provide direct evidence of a finite gap in the thermodynamic limit for the AKLT models in the one-dimensional chain and two-dimensional hexagonal and square lattices. This method can be applied generally to Hamiltonians with rotational symmetry, and we also show results beyond the AKLT model.

  11. Research and Technology: 2003 Annual Report of the John F Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is America's Spaceport Technology Center. The KSC technology development program encompasses the efforts of the entire KSC team, consisting of Government and contractor personnel, working in partnership with academic institutions and commercial industry. KSC's assigned mission areas are space launch operations and spaceport and range technologies. KSC's technology development customers include current space transportation programs, future space transportation programs / initiatives, and enabling technical programs. The KSC Research and Technology 2003 Annual Report encompasses the efforts of contributors to the KSC advanced technology development program and KSC technology transfer activities. Dr. Dave Bartine, KSC Chief Technologist, (321) 867-7069, is responsible for publication of this report and should be contacted for any desired information regarding KSC's research and technology development activities.

  12. The meteorological monitoring system for the Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dianic, Allan V.

    1994-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) are involved in many weather-sensitive operations. Manned and unmanned vehicle launches, which occur several times each year, are obvious example of operations whose success and safety are dependent upon favorable meteorological conditions. Other operations involving NASA, Air Force, and contractor personnel, including daily operations to maintain facilities, refurbish launch structures, prepare vehicles for launch, and handle hazardous materials, are less publicized but are no less weather-sensitive. The Meteorological Monitoring System (MMS) is a computer network which acquires, processes, disseminates, and monitors near real-time and forecast meteorological information to assist operational personnel and weather forecasters with the task of minimizing the risk to personnel, materials, and the surrounding population. CLIPS has been integrated into the MMS to provide quality control analysis and data monitoring. This paper describes aspects of the MMS relevant to CLIPS including requirements, actual implementation details, and results of performance testing.

  13. Meteorological forecasting for emergency preparedness and response at the Kennedy Space Center of Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.L.; Albritton, J.R.; Ermak, D.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hodur, R.; Liou, C.S. [Naval Research Laboratory, Monterey, CA (United States)

    1995-10-13

    The NORAPS model has been used to simulate the motion of Hurricane Erin over Florida. A triplynested grid was used to capture the meteorological features which span from regional to local scales with the highest resolution nest centered at the Kennedy Space Center area. The simulated storm track agreed remarkably well with the observed path of the hurricane. There was also good qualitative agreement between the computed surface precipitation pattern and observations based on radar signatures. Although the validity of the Kuo- type cumulus parameterization scheme used in the model was marginal and even questionable on the finest resolution (4 km) nest, the simulated results were nevertheless qualitatively reasonable. The results generated by NORAPS from the simulation of such a numerical challenging meteorological event were very encouraging. Our next step is to use the meteorological information from the model to provide wind fields for dispersion model simulations of potential atmospheric releases.

  14. Large-Scale Cryogenic Testing of Launch Vehicle Ground Systems at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ernst, E. W.; Sass, J. P.; Lobemeyer, D. A.; Sojourner, S. J.; Hatfield, W. H.; Rewinkel, D. A.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a new launch vehicle to support NASA's future exploration plans requires significant redesign and upgrade of Kennedy Space Center's (KSC) launch pad and ground support equipment systems. In many cases, specialized test equipment and systems will be required to certify the function of the new system designs under simulated operational conditions, including propellant loading. This paper provides an overview of the cryogenic test infrastructure that is in place at KSC to conduct development and qualification testing that ranges from the component level to the integrated-system level. An overview of the major cryogenic test facilities will be provided, along with a detailed explanation of the technology focus area for each facility

  15. Aircraft measurements of electrified clouds at Kennedy Space Center, part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. J.; Winn, W. P.; Hunyady, S. J.; Moore, C. B.; Bullock, J. W.; Fleischhacker, P.

    1990-01-01

    Flights made by the Special Purpose Test Vehicle for Atmospheric Research (SPTVAR) airplane during a second deployment to Florida during the summer of 1989 are discussed. The findings based on the data gathered are presented. The progress made during the second year of the project is discussed. The summer 1989 study was carried out with the support and guidance of Col. John Madura, Commander of Detachment 11, 2nd Weather Squadron, USAF, at Patrick Air Force Base (PAFB) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The project goals were to develop and demonstrate techniques for measuring the electric field aloft and locating regions of charge during flight within and near clouds; to characterize the electric conditions that are presently identified as a threat to space launch vehicles; and to study the correlation between the electric field aloft and that at Kennedy Space Center's ground-based electric field mill array for a variety of electrified clouds.

  16. Environmental monitoring and research at the John F. Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, C. R.; Hinkle, C. R.; Knott, W. M.; Summerfield, B. R.

    1992-01-01

    The Biomedical Operations and Research Office at the NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center has been supporting environmental monitoring and research since the mid-1970s. Program elements include monitoring of baseline conditions to document natural variability in the ecosystem, assessments of operations and construction of new facilities, and ecological research focusing on wildlife habitat associations. Information management is centered around development of a computerized geographic information system that incorporates remote sensing and digital image processing technologies along with traditional relational data base management capabilities. The proactive program is one in which the initiative is to anticipate potential environmental concerns before they occur and, by utilizing in-house expertise, develop impact minimization or mitigation strategies to reduce environmental risk.

  17. Human Systems Engineering for Launch processing at Kennedy Space Center (KSC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Gena; Stambolian, Damon B.; Stelges, Katrine

    2012-01-01

    Launch processing at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is primarily accomplished by human users of expensive and specialized equipment. In order to reduce the likelihood of human error, to reduce personal injuries, damage to hardware, and loss of mission the design process for the hardware needs to include the human's relationship with the hardware. Just as there is electrical, mechanical, and fluids, the human aspect is just as important. The focus of this presentation is to illustrate how KSC accomplishes the inclusion of the human aspect in the design using human centered hardware modeling and engineering. The presentations also explain the current and future plans for research and development for improving our human factors analysis tools and processes.

  18. Altered RNA splicing contributes to skeletal muscle pathology in Kennedy disease knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhigang; Wang, Adrienne M; Robins, Diane M; Lieberman, Andrew P

    2009-01-01

    Here, we used a mouse model of Kennedy disease, a degenerative disorder caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the androgen receptor (AR) gene, to explore pathways leading to cellular dysfunction. We demonstrate that male mice containing a targeted Ar allele with 113 CAG repeats (AR113Q mice) exhibit hormone- and glutamine length-dependent missplicing of Clcn1 RNA in skeletal muscle. Changes in RNA splicing are associated with increased expression of the RNA-binding protein CUGBP1. Furthermore, we show that skeletal muscle denervation in the absence of a repeat expansion leads to increased CUGBP1 expression. However, this induction of CUGBP1 is not sufficient to alter Clcn1 RNA splicing, indicating that changes mediated by both denervation and AR113Q toxicity contribute to altered RNA processing. To test this notion directly, we exogenously expressed the AR in vitro and observed hormone-dependent changes in the splicing of pre-mRNAs from a human cardiac troponin T minigene. These effects were notably similar to changes mediated by RNA with expanded CUG tracts, but not CAG tracts, highlighting unanticipated similarities between CAG and CUG repeat diseases. The expanded glutamine AR also altered hormone-dependent splicing of a calcitonin/calcitonin gene-related peptide minigene, suggesting that toxicity of the mutant protein additionally affects RNA processing pathways that are distinct from those regulated by CUGBP1. Our studies demonstrate the occurrence of hormone-dependent alterations in RNA splicing in Kennedy disease models, and they indicate that these changes are mediated by both the cell-autonomous effects of the expanded glutamine AR protein and by alterations in skeletal muscle that are secondary to denervation. PMID:19692580

  19. STS-68 747 SCA Ferry Flight Takeoff for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Columbia, atop NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), taking off for the Kennedy Space Center shortly after its landing on 12 October 1994, at Edwards, California, to complete mission STS-68. Columbia was being ferried from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, to Air Force Plant 42, Palmdale, California, where it will undergo six months of inspections, modifications, and systems upgrades. The STS-68 11-day mission was devoted to radar imaging of Earth's geological features with the Space Radar Laboratory. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site with Dryden remaining as the principal alternate landing site.

  20. A preliminary study of environmental parameters associated with the feasibility of a polygeneration plant at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, G. D.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of a polygeneration plant at Kennedy Space Center was studied. Liquid hydrogen and gaseous nitrogen are the two principal products in consideration. Environmental parameters (air quality, water quality, biological diversity and hazardous waste disposal) necessary for the feasibility study were investigated. A National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) project flow sheet was to be formulated for the environmental impact statement. Water quality criteria for Florida waters were to be established.

  1. Structural Analysis Peer Review for the Static Display of the Orbiter Atlantis at the Kennedy Space Center Visitors Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minute, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    Mr. Christopher Miller with the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) NASA Safety & Mission Assurance (S&MA) office requested the NASA Engineering and Safety Center's (NESC) technical support on March 15, 2012, to review and make recommendations on the structural analysis being performed for the Orbiter Atlantis static display at the KSC Visitor Center. The principal focus of the assessment was to review the engineering firm's structural analysis for lifting and aligning the orbiter and its static display configuration

  2. Spearhead echo and downburst near the approach end of a John F. Kennedy Airport runway, New York City

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujita, T. T.

    1976-01-01

    Radar echoes of a storm at John F. Kennedy International Airport are examined. Results regarding the phenomena presented suggest the existence of downburst cells. These cells are characterized by spearhead echoes. About 2% of the echoes in the New York area were spearhead echoes. The detection and identification of downburst cells, their potential hazard to approaching and landing aircraft, and communication of this information to the pilots of those aircraft are discussed.

  3. Quantification of hydrochloric acid and particulate deposition resulting from space shuttle launches at John F. Kennedy space center, Florida, USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas W. Dreschel; Carlton R. Hall

    1990-01-01

    Observations of damage to vegetation, acute reductions in surface water pH, and kills of small fish prompted the Biomedical\\u000a Operations and Research Office at the John F. Kennedy Space Center to initiate intensive environmental evaluations of possible\\u000a acute and long-term chronic impacts that may be produced by repeated launches of the space shuttle. An important step in this\\u000a evaluation was

  4. Androgen-dependent pathology demonstrates myopathic contribution to the Kennedy disease phenotype in a mouse knock-in model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhigang; Dadgar, Nahid; Albertelli, Megan; Gruis, Kirsten; Jordan, Cynthia; Robins, Diane M; Lieberman, Andrew P

    2006-10-01

    Kennedy disease, a degenerative disorder characterized by androgen-dependent neuromuscular weakness, is caused by a CAG/glutamine tract expansion in the androgen receptor (Ar) gene. We developed a mouse model of Kennedy disease, using gene targeting to convert mouse androgen receptor (AR) to human sequence while introducing 113 glutamines. AR113Q mice developed hormone and glutamine length-dependent neuromuscular weakness characterized by the early occurrence of myopathic and neurogenic skeletal muscle pathology and by the late development of neuronal intranuclear inclusions in spinal neurons. AR113Q males unexpectedly died at 2-4 months. We show that this androgen-dependent death reflects decreased expression of skeletal muscle chloride channel 1 (CLCN1) and the skeletal muscle sodium channel alpha-subunit, resulting in myotonic discharges in skeletal muscle of the lower urinary tract. AR113Q limb muscles show similar myopathic features and express decreased levels of mRNAs encoding neurotrophin-4 and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor. These data define an important myopathic contribution to the Kennedy disease phenotype and suggest a role for muscle in non-cell autonomous toxicity of lower motor neurons. PMID:16981011

  5. Flora and threatened and endangered plants of John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmalzer, Paul A.; Hinkle, C. Ross

    1990-01-01

    The vascular flora of the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) area was first studied in the 1970's. Nomenclatural and taxonomic changes as well as additional collections required revision of this list. The revised list includes 1045 taxa of which 850 are native and 195 are introduced. This appears to be a substantial proportion of the regional flora. Forty six taxa are endemic or nearly endemic to Florida, a level of endemism that appears high for the east coast of central Florida. Seventy three taxa (69 native) are listed as threatened, endangered, or of special concern on Federal or state lists. Taxa of special concern occur in all major habitats, but many are restricted to hammocks and hardwood swamps that constitute a minor proportion of the terrestrial vegetation. For some of these taxa, populations on KSC appear to be important for their regional and global survival. The bryophyte flora of the KSC area include 23 mosses and 20 liverworts and hornworts. The lichen flora is currently unknown.

  6. Quality Control Algorithms for the Kennedy Space Center 50-Megahertz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Winds Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbre, Robert E., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the process used by the Marshall Space Flight Center Natural Environments Branch (EV44) to quality control (QC) data from the Kennedy Space Center's 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler for use in vehicle wind loads and steering commands. The database has been built to mitigate limitations of using the currently archived databases from weather balloons. The DRWP database contains wind measurements from approximately 2.7-18.6 km altitude at roughly five minute intervals for the August 1997 to December 2009 period of record, and the extensive QC process was designed to remove spurious data from various forms of atmospheric and non-atmospheric artifacts. The QC process is largely based on DRWP literature, but two new algorithms have been developed to remove data contaminated by convection and excessive first guess propagations from the Median Filter First Guess Algorithm. In addition to describing the automated and manual QC process in detail, this paper describes the extent of the data retained. Roughly 58% of all possible wind observations exist in the database, with approximately 100 times as many complete profile sets existing relative to the EV44 balloon databases. This increased sample of near-continuous wind profile measurements may help increase launch availability by reducing the uncertainty of wind changes during launch countdown

  7. Geology, geohydrology, and soils of NASA, Kennedy Space Center: A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmalzer, Paul A.; Hinkle, C. Ross

    1990-01-01

    Sediments underlying Kennedy Space Center (KSC) have accumulated in alternating periods of deposition and erosion since the Eocene. Surface sediments are of Pleistocene and Recent ages. Fluctuating sea levels with the alternating glacial-interglacial cycles have shaped the formation of the barrier island. Merritt Island is an older landscape whose formation may have begun as much as 240,000 years ago, although most of the surface sediments are not that old. Cape Canaveral probably dates from less than 7,000 years B.P. (before present) as does the barrier strip separating Mosquito Lagoon from the Atlantic Ocean. Merritt Island and Cape Canaveral have been shaped by progradational processes but not continuously so, while the Mosquito Lagoon barrier has been migrating landward. Deep acquifers beneath KSC are recharged inland but are highly mineralized in the coastal region and interact little with surface vegetation. The Surficial acquifer has formed in the Pleistocene and Recent deposits and is recharged by local rainfall. Sand ridges in the center of Merritt Island are important to its recharge.

  8. An Overview of My Internship with the Ecological Program at John F. Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Samantha

    2010-01-01

    During my internship with Innovative Health Applications, I participated in numerous longterm research projects involving the study of various plant and animal life at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). I observed the monitoring of nesting sea turtles. I learned about the transfer of egg clutches from the northern Gulf Coast in an effort to help the hatchlings avoid the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. I gained knowledge of tracking the movements of important sport fish and sharks in this area using a hydro-acoustic tag and receiver system. This effort included routinely taking water quality data at multiple sites around KSC. Alligator population and nesting assessments was another part of my internship. I observed the biologists take morphometric measurements, blood, urine and tissue samples from alligators found in KSC waterways. I assisted in taking photosynthesis and reflectance measurements on various scrub oaks and palmettos. I participated in Florida Scrub-Jay surveys in an effort to monitor their population trends and was involved in Southeastern beach mouse trapping and identification. I also assisted in seagrass surveys monitoring the health of the seagrass beds.

  9. Quantum computational universality of Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki states beyond the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tzu-Chieh

    2014-03-01

    Universal quantum computation can be achieved by simply performing single-spin measurements on a highly entangled resource state, such as cluster states. The family of Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki (AKLT) states has recently been explored; for example, the spin-1 AKLT chain can be used to simulate single-qubit gate operations on a single qubit, and the spin-3/2 two-dimensional AKLT state on the honeycomb lattice can be used as a universal resource. However, it is unclear whether such universality is a coincidence for the specific state or a shared feature in all two-dimensional AKLT states. Here we consider the family of spin-3/2 AKLT states on various trivalent Archimedean lattices and show that in addition to the honeycomb lattice, the spin-3/2 AKLT states on the square octagon (4 ,82) and the `cross' (4 , 6 , 12) lattices are also universal resources, whereas the AKLT state on the `star' (3 ,122) lattice is likely not due to geometric frustration. Ref. T.-C. Wei, arXiv:1306.1420.

  10. Topology and Criticality in Resonating Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki loop Spin Liquid States

    E-print Network

    Wei Li; Shuo Yang; Meng Cheng; Zheng-Xin Liu; Hong-Hao Tu

    2014-05-12

    We exploit a natural Projected Entangled-Pair State (PEPS) representation for the resonating Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki loop (RAL) state. By taking advantage of PEPS-based analytical and numerical methods, we characterize the RAL states on various two-dimensional lattices. On square and honeycomb lattices, these states are critical since the dimer-dimer correlations decay as a power law. On kagome lattice, the RAL state has exponentially decaying correlation functions, supporting the scenario of a gapped spin liquid. We provide further evidence that the RAL state on the kagome lattice is a $\\mathbb{Z}_2$ spin liquid, by identifying the four topological sectors and computing the topological entropy. Furthermore, we construct a one-parameter family of PEPS states interpolating between the RAL state and a short-range Resonating Valence Bond state and find a critical point, consistent with the fact that the two states belong to two different phases. We also perform a variational study of the spin-1 kagome Heisenberg model using this one-parameter PEPS.

  11. Topology and criticality in the resonating Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki loop spin liquid states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Yang, Shuo; Cheng, Meng; Liu, Zheng-Xin; Tu, Hong-Hao

    2014-05-01

    We exploit a natural projected entangled-pair state (PEPS) representation for the resonating Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki loop (RAL) state. By taking advantage of PEPS-based analytical and numerical methods, we characterize the RAL states on various two-dimensional lattices. On square and honeycomb lattices, these states are critical since the dimer-dimer correlations decay as a power law. On the kagome lattice, the RAL state has exponentially decaying correlation functions, supporting the scenario of a gapped spin liquid. We provide further evidence that the RAL state on the kagome lattice is a Z2 spin liquid, by identifying the four topological sectors and computing the topological entropy. Furthermore, we construct a one-parameter family of PEPS states interpolating between the RAL state and a short-range resonating valence bond state and find a critical point, consistent with the fact that the two states belong to two different phases. We also perform a variational study of the spin-1 kagome Heisenberg model using this one-parameter PEPS.

  12. Crop Production for Advanced Life Support Systems - Observations From the Kennedy Space Center Breadboard Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, R. M.; Sager, J. C.; Prince, R. P.; Knott, W. M.; Mackowiak, C. L.; Stutte, G. W.; Yorio, N. C.; Ruffe, L. M.; Peterson, B. V.; Goins, G. D.

    2003-01-01

    The use of plants for bioregenerative life support for space missions was first studied by the US Air Force in the 1950s and 1960s. Extensive testing was also conducted from the 1960s through the 1980s by Russian researchers located at the Institute of Biophysics in Krasnoyarsk, Siberia, and the Institute for Biomedical Problems in Moscow. NASA initiated bioregenerative research in the 1960s (e.g., Hydrogenomonas) but this research did not include testing with plants until about 1980, with the start of the Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) Program. The NASA CELSS research was carried out at universities, private corporations, and NASA field centers, including Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The project at KSC began in 1985 and was called the CELSS Breadboard Project to indicate the capability for plugging in and testing various life support technologies; this name has since been dropped but bioregenerative testing at KSC has continued to the present under the NASA s Advanced Life Support (ALS) Program. A primary objective of the KSC testing was to conduct pre-integration tests with plants (crops) in a large, atmospherically closed test chamber called the Biomass Production Chamber (BPC). Test protocols for the BPC were based on observations and growing procedures developed by university investigators, as well as procedures developed in plant growth chamber studies at KSC. Growth chamber studies to support BPC testing focused on plant responses to different carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, different spectral qualities from various electric lamps, and nutrient film hydroponic culture techniques.

  13. Analysis of complex wind regimes at Kennedy Space Center for radiological assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.E.; Parks, C.R.; Atchison, M.K.

    1989-01-01

    Galileo and Ulysses will be launched from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) during October 1989 and October 1990, respectively. These deep-space probes will contain a radioactive thermoelectric generator as a power source. An accidental breach of the containment vessel housing the generator could cause a leak of radioactive material to the atmosphere. If this occurred, the radioactive cloud would move with the prevailing wind flow pattern and pose a serious health threat to all in its path. Since the KSC/Cape Canaveral (KSC/CC) area of Florida is located in a coastal environment with several different land/water interfaces, complex low-level wind circulation patterns exist throughout the year. Thus, if any transport and diffusion model is to correctly predict the movement of effluent near KSC, it must be able to accurately portray the characteristics of the land/sea breeze flow pattern. To evaluate models used at KSC, the KSC Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (KABLE) has been designed to provide a data set to better define the characteristics of these mesoscale circulations. Data collection for KABLE occurred from November 1, 1988, to October 31, 1989. This paper presents analyses for 1 day during November 1988 that demonstrate the complexity of the local meteorological conditions at KSC/CC. The NUS Corporation has used these data and empirical sea breeze parameters to evaluate their Emergency Dose Assessment System, EMERGE.

  14. Soil, Groundwater, Surface Water, and Sediments of Kennedy Space Center, Florida: Background Chemical and Physical Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shmalzer, Paul A.; Hensley, Melissa A.; Mota, Mario; Hall, Carlton R.; Dunlevy, Colleen A.

    2000-01-01

    This study documented background chemical composition of soils, groundwater, surface; water, and sediments of Kennedy Space Center. Two hundred soil samples were collected, 20 each in 10 soil classes. Fifty-one groundwater wells were installed in 4 subaquifers of the Surficial Aquifer and sampled; there were 24 shallow, 16 intermediate, and 11 deep wells. Forty surface water and sediment samples were collected in major watershed basins. All samples were away from sites of known contamination. Samples were analyzed for organochlorine pesticides, aroclors, chlorinated herbicides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), total metals, and other parameters. All aroclors (6) were below detection in all media. Some organochlorine pesticides were detected at very low frequencies in soil, sediment, and surface water. Chlorinated herbicides were detected at very low frequencies in soil and sediments. PAH occurred in low frequencies in soiL, shallow groundwater, surface water, and sediments. Concentrations of some metals differed among soil classes, with subaquifers and depths, and among watershed basins for surface water but not sediments. Most of the variation in metal concentrations was natural, but agriculture had increased Cr, Cu, Mn, and Zn.

  15. An Occupational Performance Test Validation Program for Fire Fighters at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonfeld, Brian R.; Doerr, Donald F.; Convertino, Victor A.

    1990-01-01

    We evaluated performance of a modified Combat Task Test (CTT) and of standard fitness tests in 20 male subjects to assess the prediction of occupational performance standards for Kennedy Space Center fire fighters. The CTT consisted of stair-climbing, a chopping simulation, and a victim rescue simulation. Average CTT performance time was 3.61 +/- 0.25 min (SEM) and all CTT tasks required 93% to 97% maximal heart rate. By using scores from the standard fitness tests, a multiple linear regression model was fitted to each parameter: the stairclimb (r(exp 2) = .905, P less than .05), the chopping performance time (r(exp 2) = .582, P less than .05), the victim rescue time (r(exp 2) = .218, P = not significant), and the total performance time (r(exp 2) = .769, P less than .05). Treadmill time was the predominant variable, being the major predictor in two of four models. These results indicated that standardized fitness tests can predict performance on some CTT tasks and that test predictors were amenable to exercise training.

  16. Kennedy's disease: caspase cleavage of the androgen receptor is a crucial event in cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ellerby, L M; Hackam, A S; Propp, S S; Ellerby, H M; Rabizadeh, S; Cashman, N R; Trifiro, M A; Pinsky, L; Wellington, C L; Salvesen, G S; Hayden, M R; Bredesen, D E

    1999-01-01

    X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), Kennedy's disease, is a degenerative disease of the motor neurons that is associated with an increase in the number of CAG repeats encoding a polyglutamine stretch within the androgen receptor (AR). Recent work has demonstrated that the gene products associated with open reading frame triplet repeat expansions may be substrates for the cysteine protease cell death executioners, the caspases. However, the role that caspase cleavage plays in the cytotoxicity associated with expression of the disease-associated alleles is unknown. Here, we report the first conclusive evidence that caspase cleavage is a critical step in cytotoxicity; the expression of the AR with an expanded polyglutamine stretch enhances its ability to induce apoptosis when compared with the normal AR. The AR is cleaved by a caspase-3 subfamily protease at Asp146, and this cleavage is increased during apoptosis. Cleavage of the AR at Asp146 is critical for the induction of apoptosis by AR, as mutation of the cleavage site blocks the ability of the AR to induce cell death. Further, mutation of the caspase cleavage site at Asp146 blocks the ability of the SBMA AR to form perinuclear aggregates. These studies define a fundamental role for caspase cleavage in the induction of neural cell death by proteins displaying expanded polyglutamine tracts, and therefore suggest a strategy that may be useful to treat neurodegenerative diseases associated with polyglutamine repeat expansions. PMID:9886069

  17. Relationships between coronary heart disease risk factors and serum ionized calcium in Kennedy Space Center Cohort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Lisa Ann; Frey, Mary Anne Bassett; Merz, Marion P.; Alford, William R.

    1987-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center (KSC) employees are reported to be at high risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). Risk factors for CHD include high serum total cholesterol levels, low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC), elevated triglyceride, smoking, inactivity, high blood pressure, being male, and being older. Higher dietary and/or serum calcium Ca(++) may be related to a lower risk for CHD. Fifty men and 37 women participated. Subjects were tested in the morning after fasting 12 hours. Information relative to smoking and exercise habits was obtained; seated blood pressures were measured; and blood drawn. KCS men had higher risk values than KCS women as related to HDLC, triglycerides, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure. Smoking and nonsmoking groups did not differ for other risk factors or for serum Ca(++) levels. Exercise and sedentary groups differed in total cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Serum Ca(++) levels were related to age, increasing with age in the sedentary group and decreasing in the exercisers, equally for men and women. It is concluded that these relationships may be significant to the risk of CHD and/or the risk of bone demineralization in an aging population.

  18. Mapping analysis and planning system for the John F. Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, C. R.; Barkaszi, M. J.; Provancha, M. J.; Reddick, N. A.; Hinkle, C. R.; Engel, B. A.; Summerfield, B. R.

    1994-01-01

    Environmental management, impact assessment, research and monitoring are multidisciplinary activities which are ideally suited to incorporate a multi-media approach to environmental problem solving. Geographic information systems (GIS), simulation models, neural networks and expert-system software are some of the advancing technologies being used for data management, query, analysis and display. At the 140,000 acre John F. Kennedy Space Center, the Advanced Software Technology group has been supporting development and implementation of a program that integrates these and other rapidly evolving hardware and software capabilities into a comprehensive Mapping, Analysis and Planning System (MAPS) based in a workstation/local are network environment. An expert-system shell is being developed to link the various databases to guide users through the numerous stages of a facility siting and environmental assessment. The expert-system shell approach is appealing for its ease of data access by management-level decision makers while maintaining the involvement of the data specialists. This, as well as increased efficiency and accuracy in data analysis and report preparation, can benefit any organization involved in natural resources management.

  19. A Peak Wind Probability Forecast Tool for Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Winifred; Roeder, William

    2008-01-01

    This conference abstract describes the development of a peak wind forecast tool to assist forecasters in determining the probability of violating launch commit criteria (LCC) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) in east-central Florida. The peak winds are an important forecast element for both the Space Shuttle and Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) programs. The LCC define specific peak wind thresholds for each launch operation that cannot be exceeded in order to ensure the safety of the vehicle. The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) has found that peak winds are a challenging parameter to forecast, particularly in the cool season months of October through April. Based on the importance of forecasting peak winds, the 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to develop a short-range peak-wind forecast tool to assist in forecasting LCC violatioas.The tool will include climatologies of the 5-minute mean end peak winds by month, hour, and direction, and probability distributions of the peak winds as a function of the 5-minute mean wind speeds.

  20. Legacy and Emergence of Spaceport Technology Development at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, Stanley; Voska, Ned (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has a long and successful legacy in the checkout and launch of missiles and space vehicles. These operations have become significantly more complex, and their evolution has driven the need for many technology developments. Unanticipated events have also underscored the need for a local, highly responsive technology development and testing capability. This evolution is briefly described, as well as the increasing level of technology capability at KSC. The importance of these technologies in achieving past national space goals suggests that the accomplishment of low-cost and reliable access to space will depend critically upon KSC's future success in developing spaceport technologies. This paper concludes with a description KSC's current organizational approach and major thrust areas in technology development. The first phase of our historical review focuses on the development and testing of field- deployable short- and intermediate-range ballistic missiles (1953 to 1958). These vehicles are later pressed into service as space launchers. The second phase involves the development of large space lift vehicles culminating in the Saturn V launches (1959 to 1975). The third phase addresses the development and operations of the partially reusable launch vehicle, Space Shuttle (1976 to 2000). In the current era, KSC is teaming with the U.S. Air Force (AF), industry, academia, and other partners to identify and develop Spaceport and Range Technologies necessary to achieve national space goals of lower-cost and higher-reliability space flight.

  1. Shuttle Atlantis Returning to Kennedy Space Center after 10-Month Refurbishment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Atlantis rides on the back of one of NASA's Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft en route from California to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site with Dryden remaining as the principal alternate landing site.

  2. Shuttle Atlantis Returning to Kennedy Space Center after 10-Month Refurbishment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis, framed by the California mountains, as it rides on the back of one of NASA's Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) en route from California to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site with Dryden remaining as the principal alternate landing site.

  3. Shuttle Atlantis Returning to Kennedy Space Center after 10 Month Refurbishment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A look-down view on the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis piggy-backed on top of one of NASA's Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) as it departs California for the Kennedy Space Center, Florida in September 1998. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site with Dryden remaining as the principal alternate landing site.

  4. Shuttle Atlantis Returning to Kennedy Space Center after 10 Month Refurbishment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis is seen here in flight on the back of one of NASA's Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) as it departs California for the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site with Dryden remaining as the principal alternate landing site.

  5. STS-35 Leaves Dryden on 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) Bound for Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The first rays of the morning sun light up the side of NASA's Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) as it departs for the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, with the orbiter from STS-35 attached to its back. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site with Dryden remaining as the principal alternate landing site.

  6. STS-66 Atlantis 747 SCA Ferry Flight Morning Takeoff for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The space shuttle Atlantis atop NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) during takeoff for a return ferry flight to the Kennedy Space Center from Edwards, California. The STS-66 mission was dedicated to the third flight of the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science-3 (ATLAS-3), part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program. The astronauts also deployed and retrieved a free-flying satellite designed to study the middle and lower thermospheres and perform a series of experiments covering life sciences research and microgravity processing. The landing was at 7:34 a.m. (PST) 14 November 1994, after being waved off from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, due to adverse weather. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shutt

  7. Assessing Sea Level Rise Impacts on the Surficial Aquifer in the Kennedy Space Center Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, H.; Wang, D.; Hagen, S. C.; Medeiros, S. C.; Warnock, A. M.; Hall, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    Global sea level rise in the past century due to climate change has been seen at an average rate of approximately 1.7-2.2 mm per year, with an increasing rate over the next century. The increasing SLR rate poses a severe threat to the low-lying land surface and the shallow groundwater system in the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, resulting in saltwater intrusion and groundwater induced flooding. A three-dimensional groundwater flow and salinity transport model is implemented to investigate and evaluate the extent of floods due to rising water table as well as saltwater intrusion. The SEAWAT model is chosen to solve the variable-density groundwater flow and salinity transport governing equations and simulate the regional-scale spatial and temporal evolution of groundwater level and chloride concentration. The horizontal resolution of the model is 50 m, and the vertical domain includes both the Surficial Aquifer and the Floridan Aquifer. The numerical model is calibrated based on the observed hydraulic head and chloride concentration. The potential impacts of sea level rise on saltwater intrusion and groundwater induced flooding are assessed under various sea level rise scenarios. Based on the simulation results, the potential landward movement of saltwater and freshwater fringe is projected. The existing water supply wells are examined overlaid with the projected salinity distribution map. The projected Surficial Aquifer water tables are overlaid with data of high resolution land surface elevation, land use and land cover, and infrastructure to assess the potential impacts of sea level rise. This study provides useful tools for decision making on ecosystem management, water supply planning, and facility management.

  8. The analysis of rapidly developing fog at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Mark M.; Atchison, Michael K.; Schumann, Robin; Taylor, Greg E.; Yersavich, Ann; Warburton, John D.

    1994-01-01

    This report documents fog precursors and fog climatology at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Florida from 1986 to 1990. The major emphasis of this report focuses on rapidly developing fog events that would affect the less than 7-statute mile visibility rule for End-Of-Mission (EOM) Shuttle landing at KSC (Rule 4-64(A)). The Applied Meteorology Unit's (AMU's) work is to: develop a data base for study of fog associated weather conditions relating to violations of this landing constraint; develop forecast techniques or rules-of-thumb to determine whether or not current conditions are likely to result in an acceptable condition at landing; validate the forecast techniques; and transition techniques to operational use. As part of the analysis the fog events were categorized as either advection, pre-frontal or radiation. As a result of these analyses, the AMU developed a fog climatological data base, identified fog precursors and developed forecaster tools and decision trees. The fog climatological analysis indicates that during the fog season (October to April) there is a higher risk for a visibility violation at KSC during the early morning hours (0700 to 1200 UTC), while 95 percent of all fog events have dissipated by 1600 UTC. A high number of fog events are characterized by a westerly component to the surface wind at KSC (92 percent) and 83 percent of the fog events had fog develop west of KSC first (up to 2 hours). The AMU developed fog decision trees and forecaster tools that would help the forecaster identify fog precursors up to 12 hours in advance. Using the decision trees as process tools ensures the important meteorological data are not overlooked in the forecast process. With these tools and a better understanding of fog formation in the local KSC area, the Shuttle weather support forecaster should be able to give the Launch and Flight Directors a better KSC fog forecast with more confidence.

  9. Exploration of the Theoretical Physical Capacity of the John F. Kennedy International Airport Runway System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neitzke, Kurt W.; Guerreiro, Nelson M.

    2014-01-01

    A design study was completed to explore the theoretical physical capacity (TPC) of the John F. Kennedy International Airport (KJFK) runway system for a northflow configuration assuming impedance-free (to throughput) air traffic control functionality. Individual runways were modeled using an agent-based, airspace simulation tool, the Airspace Concept Evaluation System (ACES), with all runways conducting both departures and arrivals on a first-come first-served (FCFS) scheduling basis. A realistic future flight schedule was expanded to 3.5 times the traffic level of a selected baseline day, September 26, 2006, to provide a steady overdemand state for KJFK runways. Rules constraining departure and arrival operations were defined to reflect physical limits beyond which safe operations could no longer be assumed. Safety buffers to account for all sources of operational variability were not included in the TPC estimate. Visual approaches were assumed for all arrivals to minimize inter-arrival spacing. Parallel runway operations were assumed to be independent based on lateral spacing distances. Resulting time intervals between successive airport operations were primarily constrained by same-runway and then by intersecting-runway spacing requirements. The resulting physical runway capacity approximates a theoretical limit that cannot be exceeded without modifying runway interaction assumptions. Comparison with current KJFK operational limits for a north-flow runway configuration indicates a substantial throughput gap of approximately 48%. This gap may be further analyzed to determine which part may be feasibly bridged through the deployment of advanced systems and procedures, and which part cannot, because it is either impossible or not cost-effective to control. Advanced systems for bridging the throughput gap may be conceptualized and simulated using this same experimental setup to estimate the level of gap closure achieved.

  10. NASA's Corrosion Technology Laboratory at the Kennedy Space Center: Anticipating, Managing, and Preventing Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion is the degradation of a material that results from its interaction with the environment. The marine environment at NASAs Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has been documented by ASM International (formerly American Society for Metals) as the most corrosive in the United States. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive conditions at the launch pads were rendered even more severe by the 70 tons of highly corrosive hydrochloric acid that were generated by the solid rocket boosters. Numerous failures at the launch pads are caused by corrosion.The structural integrity of ground infrastructure and flight hardware is critical to the success, safety, cost, and sustainability of space missions. As a result of fifty years of experience with launch and ground operations in a natural marine environment that is highly corrosive, NASAs Corrosion Technology Laboratory at KSC is a major source of corrosion control expertise in the launch and other environments. Throughout its history, the Laboratory has evolved from what started as an atmospheric exposure facility near NASAs launch pads into a world-wide recognized capability that provides technical innovations and engineering services in all areas of corrosion for NASA and external customers.This presentation will provide a historical overview of the role of NASAs Corrosion Technology in anticipating, managing, and preventing corrosion. One important challenge in managing and preventing corrosion involves the detrimental impact on humans and the environment of what have been very effective corrosion control strategies. This challenge has motivated the development of new corrosion control technologies that are more effective and environmentally friendly. Strategies for improved corrosion protection and durability can have a huge impact on the economic sustainability of human spaceflight operations.

  11. Texture Modification of the Shuttle Landing Facility Runway at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, Robert H.; Yager, Thomas J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the test procedures and the criteria used in selecting an effective runway-surface-texture modification at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to reduce Orbiter tire wear. The new runway surface may ultimately result in an increase of allowable crosswinds for launch and landing operations. The modification allows launch and landing operations in 20-knot crosswinds, if desired. This 5-knot increase over the previous 15-knot limit drastically increases landing safety and the ability to make on-time launches to support missions in which Space Station rendezvous are planned. The paper presents the results of an initial (1988) texture modification to reduce tire spin-up wear and then describes a series of tests that use an instrumented ground-test vehicle to compare tire friction and wear characteristics, at small scale, of proposed texture modifications placed into the SLF runway surface itself. Based on these tests, three candidate surfaces were chosen to be tested at full-scale by using a highly modified and instrumented transport aircraft capable of duplicating full Orbiter landing profiles. The full-scale Orbiter tire testing revealed that tire wear could be reduced approximately by half with either of two candidates. The texture-modification technique using a Humble Equipment Company Skidabrader(trademark) shotpeening machine proved to be highly effective, and the entire SLF runway surface was modified in September 1994. The extensive testing and evaluation effort that preceded the selection of this particular surface-texture-modification technique is described herein.

  12. Dry heat effects on survival of indigenous soil particle microflora and particle viability studies of Kennedy Space Center soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruschmeyer, O. R.; Pflug, I. J.; Gove, R.; Heisserer, Y.

    1975-01-01

    Research efforts were concentrated on attempts to obtain data concerning the dry heat resistance of particle microflora in Kennedy Space Center soil samples. The in situ dry heat resistance profiles at selected temperatures for the aggregate microflora on soil particles of certain size ranges were determined. Viability profiles of older soil samples were compared with more recently stored soil samples. The effect of increased particle numbers on viability profiles after dry heat treatment was investigated. These soil particle viability data for various temperatures and times provide information on the soil microflora response to heat treatment and are useful in making selections for spacecraft sterilization cycles.

  13. Institutional environmental impact statement (space shuttle development and operations) amendment no. 1. [space shuttle operations at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Data are presented to support the environmental impact statement on space shuttle actions at Kennedy Space Center. Studies indicate that land use to accommodate space shuttle operations may have the most significant impact. The impacts on air, water and noise quality are predicted to be less on the on-site environment. Considerations of operating modes indicate that long and short term land use will not affect wildlife productivity. The potential for adverse environmental impact is small and such impacts will be local, short in duration, controllable, and environmentally acceptable.

  14. Creating Processes Associated with Providing Government Goods and Services Under the Commercial Space Launch Act at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Letchworth, Janet F.

    2011-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has decided to write its agreements under the Commercial Space Launch Act (CSLA) authority to cover a broad range of categories of support that KSC could provide to our commercial partner. Our strategy was to go through the onerous process of getting the agreement in place once and allow added specificity and final cost estimates to be documented on a separate Task Order Request (TOR). This paper is written from the implementing engineering team's perspective. It describes how we developed the processes associated with getting Government support to our emerging commercial partners, such as SpaceX and reports on our success to date.

  15. Forecasting Cool Season Daily Peak Winds at Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joe, III; Short, David; Roeder, William

    2008-01-01

    The expected peak wind speed for the day is an important element in the daily 24-Hour and Weekly Planning Forecasts issued by the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) for planning operations at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). The morning outlook for peak speeds also begins the warning decision process for gusts ^ 35 kt, ^ 50 kt, and ^ 60 kt from the surface to 300 ft. The 45 WS forecasters have indicated that peak wind speeds are a challenging parameter to forecast during the cool season (October-April). The 45 WS requested that the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) develop a tool to help them forecast the speed and timing of the daily peak and average wind, from the surface to 300 ft on KSC/CCAFS during the cool season. The tool must only use data available by 1200 UTC to support the issue time of the Planning Forecasts. Based on observations from the KSC/CCAFS wind tower network, surface observations from the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), and CCAFS upper-air soundings from the cool season months of October 2002 to February 2007, the AMU created multiple linear regression equations to predict the timing and speed of the daily peak wind speed, as well as the background average wind speed. Several possible predictors were evaluated, including persistence, the temperature inversion depth, strength, and wind speed at the top of the inversion, wind gust factor (ratio of peak wind speed to average wind speed), synoptic weather pattern, occurrence of precipitation at the SLF, and strongest wind in the lowest 3000 ft, 4000 ft, or 5000 ft. Six synoptic patterns were identified: 1) surface high near or over FL, 2) surface high north or east of FL, 3) surface high south or west of FL, 4) surface front approaching FL, 5) surface front across central FL, and 6) surface front across south FL. The following six predictors were selected: 1) inversion depth, 2) inversion strength, 3) wind gust factor, 4) synoptic weather pattern, 5) occurrence of precipitation at the SLF, and 6) strongest wind in the lowest 3000 ft. The forecast tool was developed as a graphical user interface with Microsoft Excel to help the forecaster enter the variables, and run the appropriate regression equations. Based on the forecaster's input and regression equations, a forecast of the day's peak and average wind is generated and displayed. The application also outputs the probability that the peak wind speed will be ^ 35 kt, 50 kt, and 60 kt.

  16. STS-76 - Being Prepared for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center via SCA 747 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Moonrise over Atlantis: following the STS-76 dawn landing at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on 31 March 1996, NASA 905, one of two modified Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, was prepared to ferry Atlantis back to the Kennedy Space Center, FL. Delivery of Altlantis to Florida was delayed until 11 April 1996, due to an engine warning light that appeared shortly after take off on April 6. The SCA #905 returned to Edwards only minutes after departure. The right inboard engine #3 was exchanged and the 747 with Atlantis atop was able to depart for Davis-Monthan Air Force Base for a refueling stop. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site

  17. STS-76 - Being Prepared for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center via SCA 747 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Moonrise over Atlantis following the STS-76 dawn landing at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on 31 March 1996. NASA 905, one of two modified Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), was readied to ferry Atlantis back to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Delivery of Atlantis to Florida was delayed until 11 April 1996, due to an engine warning light that appeared shortly after take off on 6 April. The SCA #905 returned to Edwards with Atlantis attached only minutes after departure. The right inboard engine #3 was exchanged and the 747 with Atlantis atop was able to depart for Davis-Monthan Air Force Base for a refueling stop. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florid

  18. Transcriptional Profile of Muscle following Acute Induction of Symptoms in a Mouse Model of Kennedy's Disease/Spinobulbar Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Halievski, Katherine; Mo, Kaiguo; Westwood, J. Timothy; Monks, Douglas A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Kennedy’s disease/Spinobulbar muscular atrophy (KD/SBMA) is a degenerative neuromuscular disease affecting males. This disease is caused by polyglutamine expansion mutations of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. Although KD/SBMA has been traditionally considered a motor neuron disease, emerging evidence points to a central etiological role of muscle. We previously reported a microarray study of genes differentially expressed in muscle of three genetically unique mouse models of KD/SBMA but were unable to detect those which are androgen-dependent or are associated with onset of symptoms. Methodology/Principal Findings In the current study we examined the time course and androgen-dependence of transcriptional changes in the HSA-AR transgenic (Tg) mouse model, in which females have a severe phenotype after acute testosterone treatment. Using microarray analysis we identified differentially expressed genes at the onset and peak of muscle weakness in testosterone-treated Tg females. We found both transient and persistent groups of differentially expressed genes and analysis of gene function indicated functional groups such as mitochondrion, ion and nucleotide binding, muscle development, and sarcomere maintenance. Conclusions/Significance By comparing the current results with those from the three previously reported models we were able to identify KD/SBMA candidate genes that are androgen dependent, and occur early in the disease process, properties which are promising for targeted therapeutics. PMID:25719894

  19. Remote sensing at the NASA Kennedy Space Center: a perspective from the ground up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huddleston, Lisa H.; Roeder, William P.; Morabito, David D.; D'Addario, Larry R.; Morgan, Jennifer G.; Barbré, Robert E.; Decker, Ryan K.; Geldzahler, Barry; Seibert, Mark A.; Miller, Michael J.

    2014-10-01

    This paper provides an overview of ground based operational remote sensing activities that enable a broad range of missions at the Eastern Range (ER), which includes the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and U.S. Air Force Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). Many types of sensors are in use by KSC and across the ER. We examine remote sensors for winds, lightning and electric fields, precipitation and storm hazards. These sensors provide data that are used in real-time to evaluate launch commit criteria during space launches, major ground processing operations in preparation for space launches, issuing weather warnings/watches/advisories to protect over 25,000 people and facilities worth over $20 billion, and routine weather forecasts. The data from these sensors are archived to focus NASA launch vehicle design studies, to develop forecast techniques, and for incident investigation. The wind sensors include the 50-MHz and 915-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profilers (DRWP) and the Doppler capability of the weather surveillance radars. The atmospheric electricity sensors include lightning aloft detectors, cloud-to-ground lightning detectors, and surface electric field mills. The precipitation and storm hazards sensors include weather surveillance radars. Next, we discuss a new type of remote sensor that may lead to better tracking of near-Earth asteroids versus current capabilities. The Ka Band Objects Observation and Monitoring (KaBOOM) is a phased array of three 12 meter (m) antennas being built as a technology demonstration for a future radar system that could be used to track deep-space objects such as asteroids. Transmissions in the Ka band allow for wider bandwidth than at lower frequencies, but the signals are also far more susceptible to de-correlation from turbulence in the troposphere, as well as attenuation due to water vapor, which is plentiful in the Central Florida atmosphere. If successful, KaBOOM will have served as the pathfinder for a larger and more capable instrument that will enable tracking 15 m asteroids up to 72 million kilometers (km) away, about half the distance to the Sun and five times further than we can track today. Finally, we explore the use of Site Test Interferometers (STI) as atmospheric sensors. The STI antennas continually observe signals emitted by geostationary satellites and produce measurements of the phase difference between the received signals. STIs are usually located near existing or candidate antenna array sites to statistically characterize atmospheric phase delay fluctuation effects for the site. An STI measures the fluctuations in the difference of atmospheric delay from an extraterrestrial source to two or more points on the Earth. There is a three-element STI located at the KaBOOM site at KSC.

  20. Dynamic Structure of a Protein Hydrogel: A Solid-State NMR Study S. B. Kennedy, E. R. deAzevedo, W. A. Petka, and T. P. Russell

    E-print Network

    Hong, Mei

    Dynamic Structure of a Protein Hydrogel: A Solid-State NMR Study S. B. Kennedy, E. R. deAzevedo, W used to study the dynamic structure of a genetically engineered multidomain protein hydrogel, a de- tailed understanding of the molecular structure and dynamics of the gel network is important

  1. Thunderstorm characteristics of cloud-to-ground lightning at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida: a study of lightning initiation signatures as indicated by Doppler radar

    E-print Network

    Gremillion, Michael Shane

    1998-01-01

    A sum-nary of lightning characteristics was developed for the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC). From-n a 1989-1996 data set, the spatial patterns, temporal patterns, and first stroke mean peak current were analyzed. Forty five thunderstorms were...

  2. A Comparison of MERRA and NARR Reanalyses with the DOE ARM SGP Data AARON D. KENNEDY, XIQUAN DONG, AND BAIKE XI

    E-print Network

    Dong, Xiquan

    A Comparison of MERRA and NARR Reanalyses with the DOE ARM SGP Data AARON D. KENNEDY, XIQUAN DONG from the Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) and the North American biases oc- curring during the spring upwelling and summer downwelling periods. Although NARR and MERRA

  3. Curiosity at Kennedy Space Center My name is David Gruel and I'm the Assembly Test and Launch Operations Manager for the

    E-print Network

    Curiosity at Kennedy Space Center My name is David Gruel and I'm the Assembly Test and Launch Curiosity safe as all the heat is generated as we actually make our way through the Martian atmosphere. Behind me is the descent stage. The descent stage is the jet pack that safely gets Curiosity down

  4. Kathleen S. KnightKathleen S. Knight United States

    E-print Network

    Northern Research Station Ash Seed Collection:Ash Seed Collection: Slingshot MethodSlingshot Method General seed collection: slingshot method. Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-70. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department

  5. A Custom Robotic System for Inspecting HEPA Filters in the Payload Changeout Room at the NASA Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, James E., Jr.; Looney, Joe

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, the prime objective is to describe a custom 4-dof (degree-of-freedom) robotic arm capable of autonomously or telerobotically performing systematic HEPA filter inspection and certification in the Shuttle Launch Pad Payload Changeout Rooms (PCR's) on pads A and B at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. This HEPA filter inspection robot (HFIR) has been designed to be easily deployable and is equipped with the necessary sensory devices, control hardware, software and man-machine interfaces needed to implement HEPA filter inspection reliably and efficiently without damaging the filters or colliding with existing PCR structures or filters. The main purpose of the HFIR is to implement an automated positioning system to move special inspection sensors in pre-defined or manual patterns for the purpose of verifying filter integrity and efficiency. This will ultimately relieve NASA Payload Operations from significant problems associated with time, cost and personnel safety, impacts realized during non-automated PCR HFIR filter certification.

  6. Revised Flora and List of Threatened and Endangered Plants for the John F. Kennedy Space Center Area, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmalzer, Paul A.; Foster, Tammy E.; Duncan, Brean W.; Quincy, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The vascular flora of the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) area was first studied in the 1970's, and the list was revised in 1990. Nomenclatural and taxonomic changes as well as additional collections required a revision of this list. The revised list includes 1024 taxa of which 803 are native and 221 are introduced. This appears to be a substantial proportion of the regional flora. Fifty taxa are endemic or nearly endemic, a level of endemism that appears high for the east coast of Florida. Of the 221 introduced plants, twenty-six are Category I invasive exotics and fifteen are Category II invasive exotics. Thirty-eight taxa are listed as threatened, endangered, or of special concern on state lists. For some of these taxa, populations on KSC appear to be important for their regional and global survival. The bryophyte flora of the KSC area includes 23 mosses and 20 liverworts and hornworts. The lichen flora is currently unknown.

  7. STS-76 - Being Prepared for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center via SCA 747 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Moonrise over Atlantis: the space shuttle Atlantis receives post-flight servicing in the Mate-Demate Device (MDD), following its landing at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, 31 March 1996. Once servicing was complete, one of NASA's two 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, No. 905, was readied to ferry Atlantis back to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Delivery of Atlantis to Florida was delayed until 11 April 1996, due to an engine warning light that appeared shortly after take off on April 6. The SCA returned to Edwards only minutes after departure. The right inboard engine #3 was exchanged, and the 747 with Atlantis atop was able to depart 11 April for Davis-Monthan Air Force Base for a refueling stop. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the

  8. STS-76 - SCA 747 Aircraft Takeoff for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA's Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft leaves the runway with the Shuttle Atlantis on its back. Following the STS-76 dawn landing at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on 31 March 1996. NASA 905, one of two modified 747's, was prepared to ferry Atlantis back to the Kennedy Space Center, FL. Delivery of Altlantis to Florida was delayed until 11 April 1996, due to an engine warning light that appeared shortly after take off on 6 April. The SCA #905 returned to Edwards with Atlantis aboard only minutes after departure. The right inboard engine #3 was exchanged and the 747 with Atlantis atop was able to depart for Davis-Monthan Air Force Base for a refueling stop. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttl

  9. Studies on the toxic elements and organic degradation products in aquatic bodies and sediments around Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Haulover Canal and Mosquito Lagoon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghuman, G. S.; Menon, M. P.; Emeh, C. O.

    1975-01-01

    The work during the first year ending September, 1975, is reported. Indian River, Haulover Canal, Mosquito Lagoon, and other aquatic areas of discharge around Kennedy Space Center (KSC) were studied. The presentation and interpretation of data on water and sediment samples collected from Haulover Canal and Mosquito Lagoon are included. The field and laboratory data are presented and tentative conclusions were drawn in the various aspects of the study. An attempt was made to correlate the physical, chemical, and biological parameters.

  10. Studies on the toxic elements and organic degradation products in aquatic bodies and sediments around Kennedy Space Center (KSC) South Mosquito lagoon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghuman, G. S.; Menon, M. P.; Emeh, C. O.

    1978-01-01

    A compilation was put together of research work performed on the aquatic systems around Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The report includes a brief description of the study area, field data and analytical results of all the samples collected during the five visits to KSC up to December 17, 1977. The aquatic area selected for the study is the Southern part of Mosquito Lagoon which extends from the Haulover Canal to the dead end boundary of this lagoon southwards.

  11. [Prosthetic rehabilitation by means of removable dentures with wires for the distribution of forces in Kennedy class 2a and 2a modification 1].

    PubMed

    Pezzoli, M; Borio, P S

    1977-01-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation of unilateral distal edentulism (Kennedy class 2) and its combination with intercalated absence on the other side (class 2, modification 1) is discussed. Success obtained in a series of 29 cases followed for 9 yr using a removable prosthesis is described. This solved the difficult problems involved by employing metal wires to distribute the forces axially on the abutment teeth and over the unilateral edentulous ridge, thus creating a mixed dental and mucosal support. PMID:329096

  12. Assessment and forecasting of lightning potential and its effect on launch operations at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and John F. Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weems, J.; Wyse, N.; Madura, J.; Secrist, M.; Pinder, C.

    1991-01-01

    Lightning plays a pivotal role in the operation decision process for space and ballistic launches at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy Space Center. Lightning forecasts are the responsibility of Detachment 11, 4th Weather Wing's Cape Canaveral Forecast Facility. These forecasts are important to daily ground processing as well as launch countdown decisions. The methodology and equipment used to forecast lightning are discussed. Impact on a recent mission is summarized.

  13. Gemcitabine diphosphate choline is a major metabolite linked to the Kennedy pathway in pancreatic cancer models in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bapiro, T E; Frese, K K; Courtin, A; Bramhall, J L; Madhu, B; Cook, N; Neesse, A; Griffiths, J R; Tuveson, D A; Jodrell, D I; Richards, F M

    2014-01-01

    Background: The modest benefits of gemcitabine (dFdC) therapy in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are well documented, with drug delivery and metabolic lability cited as important contributing factors. We have used a mouse model of PDAC: KRASG12D; p53R172H; pdx-Cre (KPC) that recapitulates the human disease to study dFdC intra-tumoural metabolism. Methods: LC-MS/MS and NMR were used to measure drug and physiological analytes. Cytotoxicity was assessed by the Sulphorhodamine B assay. Results: In KPC tumour tissue, we identified a new, Kennedy pathway-linked dFdC metabolite (gemcitabine diphosphate choline (GdPC)) present at equimolar amounts to its precursor, the accepted active metabolite gemcitabine triphosphate (dFdCTP). Utilising additional subcutaneous PDAC tumour models, we demonstrated an inverse correlation between GdPC/dFdCTP ratios and cytidine triphosphate (CTP). In tumour homogenates in vitro, CTP inhibited GdPC formation from dFdCTP, indicating competition between CTP and dFdCTP for CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (CCT). As the structure of GdPC precludes entry into cells, potential cytotoxicity was assessed by stimulating CCT activity using linoleate in KPC cells in vitro, leading to increased GdPC concentration and synergistic growth inhibition after dFdC addition. Conclusions: GdPC is an important element of the intra-tumoural dFdC metabolic pathway in vivo. PMID:24874484

  14. Quantum computational universality of spin-3/2 Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki states beyond the honeycomb lattice

    E-print Network

    Tzu-Chieh Wei

    2013-12-07

    Universal quantum computation can be achieved by simply performing single-spin measurements on a highly entangled resource state, such as cluster states. The family of Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki (AKLT) states has recently been explored; for example, the spin-1 AKLT chain can be used to simulate single-qubit gate operations on a single qubit, and the spin-3/2 two-dimensional AKLT state on the honeycomb lattice can be used as a universal resource. However, it is unclear whether such universality is a coincidence for the specific state or a shared feature in all two-dimensional AKLT states. Here we consider the family of spin-3/2 AKLT states on various trivalent Archimedean lattices and show that in addition to the honeycomb lattice, the spin-3/2 AKLT states on the square octagon $(4,8^2)$ and the `cross' $(4,6,12)$ lattices are also universal resource, whereas the AKLT state on the `star' $(3,12^2)$ lattice is likely not due to geometric frustration.

  15. Summary of 2011 Direct and Nearby Lightning Strikes to Launch Complex 39B, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mata, C.T.; Mata, A.G.

    2012-01-01

    A Lightning Protection System (LPS) was designed and built at Launch Complex 39B (LC39B), at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida in 2009. This LPS was instrumented with comprehensive meteorological and lightning data acquisition systems that were deployed from late 2010 until mid 2011. The first direct strikes to the LPS were recorded in March of 2011, when a limited number of sensors had been activated. The lightning instrumentation system detected a total of 70 nearby strokes and 19 direct strokes to the LPS, 2 of the 19 direct strokes to the LPS had two simultaneous ground attachment points (in both instances one channel terminated on the LPS and the other on the nearby ground). Additionally, there are more unaccounted nearby strokes seen on video records for which limited data was acquired either due to the distance of the stroke or the settings of the data acquisition system. Instrumentation deployment chronological milestones, a summary of lightning strikes (direct and nearby), high speed video frames, downconductor currents, and dH/dt and dE/dt typical waveforms for direct and nearby strokes are presented.

  16. Small negative cloud-to-ground lightning reports at the NASA Kennedy Space Center and Air Force Eastern Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Jennifer G.; Cummins, Kenneth L.; Krider, E. Philip

    2009-12-01

    The NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Air Force Eastern Range (ER) use data from two cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning detection networks, the Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS) and the U.S. National Lightning Detection Network™ (NLDN), and a volumetric lightning mapping array, the Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) system, to monitor and characterize lightning that is potentially hazardous to launch or ground operations. Data obtained from these systems during June-August 2006 have been examined to check the classification of small, negative CGLSS reports that have an estimated peak current, ?Ip? less than 7 kA, and to determine the smallest values of Ip that are produced by first strokes, by subsequent strokes that create a new ground contact (NGC), and by subsequent strokes that remain in a preexisting channel (PEC). The results show that within 20 km of the KSC-ER, 21% of the low-amplitude negative CGLSS reports were produced by first strokes, with a minimum Ip of -2.9 kA; 31% were by NGCs, with a minimum Ip of -2.0 kA; and 14% were by PECs, with a minimum Ip of -2.2 kA. The remaining 34% were produced by cloud pulses or lightning events that we were not able to classify.

  17. Developing a Peak Wind Probability Forecast Tool for Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, WInifred; Roeder, William

    2007-01-01

    This conference presentation describes the development of a peak wind forecast tool to assist forecasters in determining the probability of violating launch commit criteria (LCC) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) in east-central Florida. The peak winds are an important forecast element for both the Space Shuttle and Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) programs. The LCC define specific peak wind thresholds for each launch operation that cannot be exceeded in order to ensure the safety of the vehicle. The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) has found that peak winds are a challenging parameter to forecast, particularly in the cool season months of October through April. Based on the importance of forecasting peak winds, the 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to develop a short-range peak-wind forecast tool to assist in forecasting LCC violations. The tool will include climatologies of the 5-minute mean and peak winds by month, hour, and direction, and probability distributions of the peak winds as a function of the 5-minute mean wind speeds.

  18. Vector wind and vector wind shear models 0 to 27 km altitude for Cape Kennedy, Florida, and Vandenberg AFB, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, O. E.

    1976-01-01

    The techniques are presented to derive several statistical wind models. The techniques are from the properties of the multivariate normal probability function. Assuming that the winds can be considered as bivariate normally distributed, then (1) the wind components and conditional wind components are univariate normally distributed, (2) the wind speed is Rayleigh distributed, (3) the conditional distribution of wind speed given a wind direction is Rayleigh distributed, and (4) the frequency of wind direction can be derived. All of these distributions are derived from the 5-sample parameter of wind for the bivariate normal distribution. By further assuming that the winds at two altitudes are quadravariate normally distributed, then the vector wind shear is bivariate normally distributed and the modulus of the vector wind shear is Rayleigh distributed. The conditional probability of wind component shears given a wind component is normally distributed. Examples of these and other properties of the multivariate normal probability distribution function as applied to Cape Kennedy, Florida, and Vandenberg AFB, California, wind data samples are given. A technique to develop a synthetic vector wind profile model of interest to aerospace vehicle applications is presented.

  19. Results of the radiological survey at Kennedy Park, Money and Sidney Streets, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ062)

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, R.D.; Cottrell, W.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-07-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally {sup 232}Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, Kennedy Park, Money and Sidney Streets, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ062), was conducted during 1986 and 1987. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Kennedy Space Center's NASA/Contractor Team-Centered Total Quality Management Seminar: Results, methods, and lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinlaw, Dennis C.; Eads, Jeannette

    It is apparent to everyone associated with the Nation's aeronautics and space programs that the challenge of continuous improvement can be reasonably addressed only if NASA and its contractors act together in a fully integrated and cooperative manner that transcends the traditional boundaries of proprietary interest. It is, however, one thing to assent to the need for such integration and cooperation; it is quite another thing to undertake the hard tasks of turning such a need into action. Whatever else total quality management is, it is fundamentally a team-centered and team-driven process of continuous improvement. The introduction of total quality management at KSC, therefore, has given the Center a special opportunity to translate the need for closer integration and cooperation among all its organizations into specific initiatives. One such initiative that NASA and its contractors have undertaken at KSC is a NASA/Contractor team-centered Total Quality Management Seminar. It is this seminar which is the subject of this paper. The specific purposes of this paper are to describe the following: Background, development, and evolution of Kennedy Space Center's Total Quality Management Seminar; Special characteristics of the seminar; Content of the seminar; Meaning and utility of a team-centered design for TQM training; Results of the seminar; Use that one KSC contractor, EG&G Florida, Inc. has made of the seminar in its Total Quality Management initiative; and Lessons learned.

  1. Kennedy Space Center's NASA/Contractor Team-Centered Total Quality Management Seminar: Results, methods, and lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinlaw, Dennis C.; Eads, Jeannette

    1992-01-01

    It is apparent to everyone associated with the Nation's aeronautics and space programs that the challenge of continuous improvement can be reasonably addressed only if NASA and its contractors act together in a fully integrated and cooperative manner that transcends the traditional boundaries of proprietary interest. It is, however, one thing to assent to the need for such integration and cooperation; it is quite another thing to undertake the hard tasks of turning such a need into action. Whatever else total quality management is, it is fundamentally a team-centered and team-driven process of continuous improvement. The introduction of total quality management at KSC, therefore, has given the Center a special opportunity to translate the need for closer integration and cooperation among all its organizations into specific initiatives. One such initiative that NASA and its contractors have undertaken at KSC is a NASA/Contractor team-centered Total Quality Management Seminar. It is this seminar which is the subject of this paper. The specific purposes of this paper are to describe the following: Background, development, and evolution of Kennedy Space Center's Total Quality Management Seminar; Special characteristics of the seminar; Content of the seminar; Meaning and utility of a team-centered design for TQM training; Results of the seminar; Use that one KSC contractor, EG&G Florida, Inc. has made of the seminar in its Total Quality Management initiative; and Lessons learned.

  2. Locating rocket triggered lightning using the LLP lightning locating system at the NASA Kennedy Space Center. [Lightning Location and Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maier, M. W.; Jafferis, W.

    1985-01-01

    Five rocket-triggered cloud-to-ground lightning flashes were detected by the operational lightning-locating system at the NASA Kennedy Space Center on August 17, 1984. The locating system, which was designed to detect natural lightning, detected at least 2 and as many as 6 strokes in the triggered flashes, suggesting that some of the strokes in the triggered lightning had signal-amplitude and waveshape characteristics similar to natural lightning. However, not all triggered strokes were detected, indicating that some strokes were atypical in nature. Since the ground-strike points of the triggered flashes were known quite precisely, the accuracy of the lightning-locating system was also evaluated. The three direction finders were found to have a mean bearing accuracy of + or - 0.5-0.6 deg. The distance errors of the real-time position solutions of the locating system on the triggered flashes were in the range of 195-770 m, with a mean of 480 m.

  3. Androgen receptor gene (CAG)n repeat analysis in the differential diagnosis between Kennedy disease and other motoneuron disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Ferlini, A.; Patrosso, M.C.; Repetto, M. [Instituto di Tecnologie Biomediche Avanzate CNR, Milano (Italy)] [and others

    1995-01-02

    An increase in the number of (CAG)n repeats in the first coding exon of the androgen receptor (AR) gene has been strongly associated with Kennedy disease (KD) (spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy). This is an X-linked hereditary disorder characterized by motoneuron degeneration occurring in adults together with gnecomastia and hyperestrogenemia. We have performed AR gene molecular analysis in several members of a large family with KD as well as in 26 sporadic patients suffering from heterogeneous motoneuron disease (MND). An increase in the length of the (CAG)n repeats was detected, as expected, in all the affected males and in obligatory carrier females, some of which had minor signs of lower motoneuron involvement. There was only one possible exception, one young male with initial signs of the disease, who had an apparent normal length allele. An increased pathological allele was also found in 3 patients with MND. This indicates that the analysis of (CAG)n repeats of the AR gene plays a role in the differential diagnosis of this heterogeneous group of neurological diseases. 25 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. An Objective Verification of the North American Mesoscale Model for Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William H., III

    2010-01-01

    The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) Launch Weather Officers (LWO's) use the 12-km resolution North American Mesoscale (NAM) model (MesoNAM) text and graphical product forecasts extensively to support launch weather operations. However, the actual performance of the model at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) has not been measured objectively. In order to have tangible evidence of model performance, the 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU; Bauman et ai, 2004) to conduct a detailed statistical analysis of model output compared to observed values. The model products are provided to the 45 WS by ACTA, Inc. and include hourly forecasts from 0 to 84 hours based on model initialization times of 00, 06, 12 and 18 UTC. The objective analysis compared the MesoNAM forecast winds, temperature (T) and dew pOint (T d), as well as the changes in these parameters over time, to the observed values from the sensors in the KSC/CCAFS wind tower network shown in Table 1. These objective statistics give the forecasters knowledge of the model's strengths and weaknesses, which will result in improved forecasts for operations.

  5. Developing Empirical Lightning Cessation Forecast Guidance for the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stano, Geoffrey T.; Fuelberg, Henry E.; Roeder, William P.

    2010-01-01

    This research addresses the 45th Weather Squadron's (45WS) need for improved guidance regarding lightning cessation at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy Space Center (KSC). KSC's Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) network was the primary observational tool to investigate both cloud-to-ground and intracloud lightning. Five statistical and empirical schemes were created from LDAR, sounding, and radar parameters derived from 116 storms. Four of the five schemes were unsuitable for operational use since lightning advisories would be canceled prematurely, leading to safety risks to personnel. These include a correlation and regression tree analysis, three variants of multiple linear regression, event time trending, and the time delay between the greatest height of the maximum dBZ value to the last flash. These schemes failed to adequately forecast the maximum interval, the greatest time between any two flashes in the storm. The majority of storms had a maximum interval less than 10 min, which biased the schemes toward small values. Success was achieved with the percentile method (PM) by separating the maximum interval into percentiles for the 100 dependent storms.

  6. Quality-Controlled Wind Data from the Kennedy Space Center 915 Megahertz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryden, Rachel L.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA) Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has installed a five-instrument 915-Megahertz (MHz) Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) system that records atmospheric wind profile properties. The purpose of these profilers is to fill data gaps between the top of the KSC wind tower network and the lowest measurement altitude of the KSC 50-MHz DRWP. The 915-MHz DRWP system has the capability to generate three-dimensional wind data outputs from approximately 150 meters (m) to 6,000 m at roughly 15-minute (min) intervals. NASA s long-term objective is to combine the 915-MHz and 50-MHz DRWP systems to create complete vertical wind profiles up to 18,300 m to be used in trajectory and loads analyses of space vehicles and by forecasters on day-of-launch (DOL). This analysis utilizes automated and manual quality control (QC) processes to remove erroneous and unrealistic wind data returned by the 915-MHz DRWP system. The percentage of data affected by each individual QC check in the period of record (POR) (i.e., January to April 2006) was computed, demonstrating the variability in the amount of data affected by the QC processes. The number of complete wind profiles available at given altitude thresholds for each profiler in the POR was calculated and outputted graphically, followed by an assessment of the number of complete wind profiles available for any profiler in the POR. A case study is also provided to demonstrate the QC process on a day of a known weather event.

  7. Negativity for two blocks in the one-dimensional spin-1 Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki model

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, Raul A.; Korepin, V.; Bose, Sougato [C. N. Yang Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-3840 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-15

    In this paper we compute the entanglement, as quantified by negativity, between two blocks of length L{sub A} and L{sub B}, separated by L sites in the one-dimensional spin-1 Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki (AKLT) model. We took the model with two different boundary conditions. We consider the case of N spin-1 particles in the bulk and one spin-1/2 particle at each boundary, which constitute a unique ground state, and the case of just spin 1, even at the end of the chain, where the degeneracy of the ground state is 4. In both scenarios we made a partition consisting of two blocks A and B, containing L{sub A} and L{sub B} sites, respectively. The separation of these two blocks is L. In both cases we explicitly obtain the reduced density matrix of the blocks A and B. We prove that the negativity in the first case vanishes identically for L{>=}1, while in the second scenario it may approach a constant value N=1/2 for each degenerate eigenstate depending on the way one constructs these eigenstates. However, as there is some freedom in constructing these eigenstates, vanishing entanglement is also possible in the latter case. Additionally, we also compute the entanglement between noncomplementary blocks in the case of periodic boundary conditions for the spin-1 AKLT model for which there is a unique ground state. Even in this case, we find that the negativity of separated blocks of spins is zero.

  8. Developing empirical lightning cessation forecast guidance for the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stano, Geoffrey T.; Fuelberg, Henry E.; Roeder, William P.

    2010-05-01

    This research addresses the 45th Weather Squadron's (45WS) need for improved guidance regarding lightning cessation at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy Space Center (KSC). KSC's Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) network was the primary observational tool to investigate both cloud-to-ground and intracloud lightning. Five statistical and empirical schemes were created from LDAR, sounding, and radar parameters derived from 116 storms. Four of the five schemes were unsuitable for operational use since lightning advisories would be canceled prematurely, leading to safety risks to personnel. These include a correlation and regression tree analysis, three variants of multiple linear regression, event time trending, and the time delay between the greatest height of the maximum dBZ value to the last flash. These schemes failed to adequately forecast the maximum interval, the greatest time between any two flashes in the storm. The majority of storms had a maximum interval less than 10 min, which biased the schemes toward small values. Success was achieved with the percentile method (PM) by separating the maximum interval into percentiles for the 100 dependent storms. PM provides additional confidence to the 45WS forecasters, and a modified version was incorporated into their forecast procedures starting in the summer of 2008. This inclusion has resulted in ˜5-10 min time savings. Last, an experimental regression variant scheme using non-real-time predictors produced precise results but prematurely ended advisories. This precision suggests that obtaining these parameters in real time may provide useful added information to the PM scheme.

  9. Detection of topological symmetry in the one-dimensional Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki model of integer spin with ultracold spinor atoms in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, HaiTao; Yang, Gui; Tian, JunLong

    2013-11-01

    A scheme is proposed for detection of the topology in the one-dimensional Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki model, based on ultracold spinor atomic gas in an optical lattice. For this purpose, a global operation O( ?) is introduced with respect to the breaking of spinrotational symmetry. Consequently, the topology can be manifested unambiguously by identifying the special values of ? where the expectation value of the global operator with degenerate ground states is vanishing. Furthermore, experimentally ? can be detected readily by the interference of ultracold atomic gases. This scheme can be implemented readily in experiment since it does not need the addressing of individual atoms or the probing of a boundary.

  10. A continuation of base-line studies for environmentally monitoring space transportation systems at John F. Kennedy Space Center. Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stout, I. J.

    1980-01-01

    Studies conducted in and around John F. Kennedy Space Center, Merrit Island, Florida were designed to establish baseline conditions for various attributes of the biotic and abiotic environment. Features were described and quantitatively measured. Certain condition were found to be appropriate for the detection and assessment of possible environmental perturbations caused by future NASA activities. These include plant communities, mammal populations, rainfall chemistry, fish populations, and the status of rare and endangered species. On the basis of statistical analysis of quantitative data and logistic considerations, it was possible to refine the kinds and amounts of measurements needed to evaluate perturbations in selected environmental components.

  11. A review of "The Jesuits II: Cultures, Sciences and the Arts" edited by J. W. O’Malley, G. A. Bailey, S. J. Harris, and T. F. Kennedy 

    E-print Network

    Wright, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    , and T. Frank Kennedy, eds.. The Jesuits II: Cultures, Sciences and the Arts, 1540-1773. Toronto: Toronto University Press, 2006. xxxvi + 905pp. $100.00. Review by Jo n a t h a n wr i g h t , ha r t l e p o o l , Un i t e d Ki n g d o m... As with an earlier volume by the same editorial team (The Jesuits: Cultures, Sciences and the Arts, 1540-1773. Toronto: Toronto University Press, 1999), the present work derives from an academic conference (this time held at Boston College in 2002) dedicated...

  12. A study of LC-39 cryogenic systems. Part 1: A study of the vacuum insulated transfer lines at Kennedy Space Center. Part 2: Cooldown pressure surges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludtke, P. R.; Voth, R. O.

    1971-01-01

    The vacuum liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen transfer lines at Kennedy Space Center were studied to evaluate the feasibility of using a condensing gas such as CO2 inside the vacuum spaces to achieve a condensing-vacuum. The study indicates that at ambient temperature, a maximum vacuum hyphen space pressure of 4000 microns is acceptable for the LH2 transfer lines. In addition, the cooldown procedures for the 14-inch cross-country liquid oxygen line was studied using a simplified mathematical model. Preliminary cooldown times are presented for various heat leak rates to the line and for two vent configurations.

  13. Real-Time Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station High-resolution Model Implementation and Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, Jaclyn; Watson, Leela R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Launch Services Program, Ground Systems Development and Operations, Space Launch System and other programs at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) use the daily and weekly weather forecasts issued by the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) as decision tools for their day-to-day and launch operations on the Eastern Range (ER). Examples include determining if they need to limit activities such as vehicle transport to the launch pad, protect people, structures or exposed launch vehicles given a threat of severe weather, or reschedule other critical operations. The 45 WS uses numerical weather prediction models as a guide for these weather forecasts, particularly the Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA) 1.67 km Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Considering the 45 WS forecasters' and Launch Weather Officers' (LWO) extensive use of the AFWA model, the 45 WS proposed a task at the September 2013 Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) Tasking Meeting requesting the AMU verify this model. Due to the lack of archived model data available from AFWA, verification is not yet possible. Instead, the AMU proposed to implement and verify the performance of an ER version of the high-resolution WRF Environmental Modeling System (EMS) model configured by the AMU (Watson 2013) in real time. Implementing a real-time version of the ER WRF-EMS would generate a larger database of model output than in the previous AMU task for determining model performance, and allows the AMU more control over and access to the model output archive. The tasking group agreed to this proposal; therefore the AMU implemented the WRF-EMS model on the second of two NASA AMU modeling clusters. The AMU also calculated verification statistics to determine model performance compared to observational data. Finally, the AMU made the model output available on the AMU Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System II (AWIPS II) servers, which allows the 45 WS and AMU staff to customize the model output display on the AMU and Range Weather Operations (RWO) AWIPS II client computers and conduct real-time subjective analyses.

  14. Effect of a Shore-Oblique Ridge on Beach and Bar Morphodynamics at Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, S. W.; Adams, P. N.; Plant, N. G.; MacKenzie, R. A.; Jaeger, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Processes linking beach and bar response to external wave forcing are poorly understood where spatial complexities, such as inner shelf shoals, are present. At NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Cape Canaveral, Florida, two persistant surfzone sand bars occur in a region that also includes cape-associated shoals and multiple shore-oblique ridges at depths below the fair-weather wave base of sediment transport. These features transform incoming deep-water waves, redistributing the spatial pattern of wave energy along- and cross-shore. To observe beach and sandbar response in this complex environment we have collected and georectified hourly beach images at KSC since April 2010. Comparisons of imagery to monthly differential GPS surveys reveal that a double-bar system, with ~25-50 m spacing between crests, has persisted over the last 2 years. Welding of the inner and outer bars occurs intermittently. The preferred welding location coincides with a dune overwash area that has been an erosion hotspot (EHS) over the last decade. Strong nor'easter activity in November 2011 activated wave breaking across a large (~10 km long, ~500 m wide, ~5 m tall) shore-oblique subaqueous ridge that intersects the nearshore system at the EHS. Our observations allow testing of a hypothesis that the ridge controls nearshore morphodynamics through two mechanisms: 1) by focusing, dissipating, and shadowing wave energy, especially during storm events and 2) by providing a sediment source to the nearshore system. The former mechanism is supported through image and survey analysis that shows beach and bar behavior differ updrift and downdrift of the ridge-beach intersection. Three ADCPs were deployed during the early 2010-2011 and late 2011-2012 winter nor'easter seasons to measure wave transformation and current structures in this region. During the most recent deployment, an instrument on the ridge's leeward side was nearly completely buried, yet measured bottom currents (< 50 cm/s) do not imply that significant sediment transport should occur. Rather, we hypothesize that wave breaking over the ridge entrained sediment that was subsequently deposited on the leeward side. This finding suggests that the ridge is mobile and may be a source of sediment to the dynamic nearshore system.

  15. Video Based Observations of Event-Driven Behavior of Double Barred Nearshore Bathymetry at Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, S. W.; Adams, P. N.; Plant, N. G.; MacKenzie, R. A.; Jaeger, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    The link between external forcing (i.e. waves, tides) and nearshore geomorphology has been extensively studied along bathymetrically simple coasts, resulting in models that tie geomorphic response to physical processes. However, the mechanisms controlling nearshore beach and bar morphodynamics are poorly understood when spatial complexities, such as inner shelf shoals, are present. At Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Cape Canaveral, Florida, a series of surfzone sand bars occur in an area that also includes shore-oblique storm ridges as well as cape-associated shoals. These features transform the incoming deep-water swell, redistributing the spatial pattern of wave energy delivery alongshore. The resulting longshore sediment transport gradients cause erosional hotspots to emerge under specific offshore wave conditions. Further, the deep-water wave climate itself varies in magnitude between typical winter (monthly mean HS = ~2 m) and summer (monthly mean HS = ~1 m) conditions as well as individual storm events (hourly mean HS up to 10 m) lasting hours or days. An autonomous camera has been collecting hourly beach images at KSC since April 2010. Georectified images are used to observe beach and sandbar morphology and have been compared to monthly differential GPS surveys to calibrate the camera-derived spatial measurements and quantify potential systematic errors. Comparison of extracted hourly shoreline and bar positions and their movement reveal that the nearshore bathymetry responds to varied forcing over both seasonal (months to years) and event (hours to days) time scales. A stable double bar system with ~25 to 50 m spacing between crests was found over the observation period, even in response to large (hourly mean HS = ~5 m) deep-water wave events and typically elevated winter waves (monthly mean HS = ~2 m). The shoreline responded to inner bar oscillations with in-phase movement of the same magnitude. The outer bar migrated further shoreward than the inner bar (~100 m versus ~50 m cross-shore fluctuations) and repeatedly, albeit temporarily, welded to the inner bar. Interestingly, the alongshore location of these welds tends to coincide with a dune overwash area that has been a critical erosion hotspot over the last decade. This finding suggests that the bars control onshore morphology by 1) focusing wave energy to provide consistent wave break locations and/or 2) interrupting alongshore currents between the bars that transport sediment. The association of these bar patterns and the larger-scale offshore features will be discussed.

  16. Development of a climatological data base to help forecast cloud cover conditions for shuttle landings at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atchison, M. Kevin

    1993-01-01

    The Space Shuttle is an extremely weather sensitive vehicle with very restrictive constraints for both launches and landings. The most important difference between Shuttle and normal aircraft landings is that the Shuttle has no go-around capability once it begins its decent into the earth's atmosphere. The de-orbit burn decision is generally made approximately 90 minutes before landing requiring a forecast with little room for error. Because of the Shuttle's rapid re-entry to earth, the pilot must be able to see all runway and visual navigation aids from high altitude to land the Shuttle. In addition, the heat resistant tiles which are used to protect the Shuttle during its re-entry into the earth's atmosphere are extremely sensitive to any type of precipitation. Extensive damage to these tiles could occur if the Shuttle passes through any cloud that contains precipitation size particles. To help guard against changing weather conditions or any type of weather problems that might occur prior to landing, flight rules have been developed as guidelines for all landings. Although the rules vary depending on the location of the landing (Kennedy Space Center or Edwards AFB), length of mission, and weight of vehicle, most of the rules can be condensed into 4 major groupings. These are: (1) Cloud ceilings should not be less than 3048 m (10,000 feet), (2) Visibility should not be less than 13 km (7 nm), (3) Cross-wind no greater than 5-8 m/s (10-15 knots); and (4) No showers or thunderstorms at or within 56 km (30 nm) of the Shuttle Landing Facility. This study consisted of developing a climatological database of the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) surface observations and performing an analysis of observed conditions one and two hours subsequent to given conditions at the SLF to help analyze the 0.2 cloud cover rule. Particular emphasis was placed on Shuttle landing weather violations and the amounts of cloud cover below 3048 m (10,000 ft.). This analysis has helped to determine the best and worst times to land the Shuttle at KSC. In addition, nomograms have been developed to help forecasters make cloud cover forecasts for End of Mission (EOM) and Return to Launch Site (RTLS) at KSC. Results of categorizing this data by month, season, time of day, and surface and upper-air wind direction are presented.

  17. Kennedy Shriver Institute of

    E-print Network

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    as a blood bank technician at the Medi- cal College of Virginia in Richmond. It is because of that job, intellectual disabilities, population issues, reproductive biology, contraception, pregnancy, and medical of my research career, but also know that discoveries in the laboratory and insights gained

  18. University Housing Kirsten Kennedy

    E-print Network

    Almor, Amit

    Director of Construction & Renovation Joe Fortune Director of Administration #12;Business & InformationJohnson Custodial Supervisor - Horseshoe, Maxcy & Preston WillieAnnRobinson Custodial Supervisor - Bates House, Bates West & Roost Pam Romeo Custodial Supervisor - Carolina Gardens & Cliff Apartments #12;Assessment 6

  19. Shuttle Atlantis in Mate-Demate Device Being Loaded onto SCA-747 for Return to Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This photo shows a night view of the orbiter Atlantis being loaded onto one of NASA's Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site with Dryden remaining as the principal alternate landing site.

  20. Legislative Side-By-side for The AEEG Act of Congressmen Kennedy and Hinojosa. WIA I and II & Related. To Advance the Recommendations of the National Commission On Adult Literacy and "Reach Higher, America"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Advancement of Adult Literacy (NJ1), 2009

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to help advance the recommendations of the National Commission on Adult Literacy, for the Adult Education and Economic Growth Act under development by Congressmen Patrick Kennedy and Reuben Hinojosa. Current law is compared to National Commission amendments in such areas as: Adult and Dislocated Worker Employment and…

  1. Emergent infinite-randomness fixed points from the extensive random bipartitions of the spin-1 Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki topological state

    E-print Network

    Min Lu; Rajesh Narayanan; Xin Wan; Guang-Ming Zhang

    2015-02-07

    Quantum entanglement under an extensive bipartition can reveal the critical boundary theory of a topological phase in the parameter space. In this study we demonstrate that the infinite-randomness fixed point for spin-1/2 degrees of freedom can emerge from an extensive random bipartition of the spin-1 Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki chain. The nested entanglement entropy of the ground state of the reduced density matrix exhibits a logarithmic scaling with an effective central charge $\\tilde{c} = 0.72 \\pm 0.02 \\approx \\ln 2$. We further discuss, in the language of bulk quantum entanglement, how to understand all phase boundaries and the surrounding Griffiths phases for the antiferromagnetic Heisenberg spin-1 chain with quenched disorder and dimerization.

  2. Analysis of vector wind change with respect to time for Cape Kennedy, Florida: Wind aloft profile change vs. time, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelfang, S. I.

    1977-01-01

    Wind vector change with respect to time at Cape Kennedy, Florida, is examined according to the theory of multivariate normality. The joint distribution of the four variables represented by the components of the wind vector at an initial time and after a specified elapsed time is hypothesized to be quadravariate normal; the fourteen statistics of this distribution, calculated from fifteen years of twice daily Rawinsonde data are presented by monthly reference periods for each month from 0 to 27 km. The hypotheses that the wind component changes with respect to time is univariate normal, the joint distribution of wind component changes is bivariate normal, and the modulus of vector wind change is Rayleigh, has been tested by comparison with observed distributions. Statistics of the conditional bivariate normal distributions of vector wind at a future time given the vector wind at an initial time are derived. Wind changes over time periods from one to five hours, calculated from Jimsphere data, are presented.

  3. The 2006 Kennedy Space Center Range Reference Atmosphere Model Validation Study and Sensitivity Analysis to the Performance of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Space Shuttle Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Lee; Decker, Ryan; Harrington, Brian; Merry, Carl

    2008-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Range Reference Atmosphere (RRA) is a statistical model that summarizes wind and thermodynamic atmospheric variability from surface to 70 km. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Space Shuttle program, which launches from KSC, utilizes the KSC RRA data to evaluate environmental constraints on various aspects of the vehicle during ascent. An update to the KSC RRA was recently completed. As part of the update, the Natural Environments Branch at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) conducted a validation study and a comparison analysis to the existing KSC RRA database version 1983. Assessments to the Space Shuttle vehicle ascent profile characteristics were performed by JSC/Ascent Flight Design Division to determine impacts of the updated model to the vehicle performance. Details on the model updates and the vehicle sensitivity analyses with the update model are presented.

  4. Evaluation of the Performance Characteristics of CGLSS II and U.S. NLDN Using Ground-Truth Dalta from Launch Complex 398, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mata, C. T.; Mata, A. G.; Rakov, V. A.; Nag, A.; Saul, J.

    2012-01-01

    A new comprehensive lightning instrumentation system has been designed for Launch Complex 39B (LC39B) at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. This new instrumentation system includes seven synchronized high-speed video cameras, current sensors installed on the nine downconductors of the new lightning protection system (LPS) for LC39B; four dH/dt, 3-axis measurement stations; and five dE/dt stations composed of two antennas each. The LPS received 8 direct lightning strikes (a total of 19 strokes) from March 31 through December 31 2011. The measured peak currents and locations are compared to those reported by the Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS II) and the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN). Results of comparison are presented and analyzed in this paper.

  5. Multimedia Information eXchange for I-NET, Inc. at the Kennedy Space Center: A continuing study of the application of worldwideweb technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, David

    1995-01-01

    Multimedia Information eXchange (MIX) is a multimedia information system that accommodates multiple data types and provides consistency across platforms. Information from all over the world can be accessed quickly and efficiently with the Internet-based system. I-NET's MIX uses the World Wide Web and Mosaic graphical user interface. Mosaic is available on all platforms used at I-NET's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) facilities. Key information system design concepts and benefits are reviewed. The MIX system also defines specific configuration and helper application parameters to ensure consistent operations across the entire organization. Guidelines and procedures for other areas of importance in information systems design are also addressed. Areas include: code of ethics, content, copyright, security, system administration, and support.

  6. Evaluation of the Performance Characteristics of CGLSS II and U.S. NLDN Using Ground-Truth Data from Launch Complex 398, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mata, Carlos T.; Mata, Angel G.; Rakov, V. A.; Nag, A.; Saul, Jon

    2012-01-01

    A new comprehensive lightning instrumentation system has been designed for Launch Complex 39B (LC39B) at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. This new instrumentation system includes six synchronized high-speed video cameras, current sensors installed on the nine downcouductors of the new lightning protection system (LPS) for LC39B; four dH/dt, 3-axis measurement stations; and five dE/dt stations composed of two antennas each. The LPS received 8 direct lightning strikes (a total of 19 strokes) from March 31 through December 31, 2011. The measured peak currents and locations are compared to those reported by the CGLSS 11 and the NLDN. Results of comparison are presented and analyzed in this paper.

  7. An aerial radiological survey of the Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and surrounding area, Titusville, Florida: Date of survey: October 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    An aerial radiological survey of the entire Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) was performed during the period 9 through 23 October 1985. This survey was conducted in three parts. First, a low resolution, low sensitivity background survey was performed that encompassed the entire KSC and CCAFS area. Next, two smaller, high resolution, high sensitivity surveys were conducted: the first focused on Launch Complexes 39A and 39B, and the second on the Shuttle Landing Facility. The areas encompassed by the surveys were 200, 5.5, and 8.5 square miles (500, 14, and 22 sq km), respectively. The purpose of these surveys was to provide information useful for an emergency response to a radiological accident. Results of the background survey are presented as isoradiation contour maps of both total exposure rate and man-made gross count superimposed on a mosaic of recent aerial photographs. Results of the two small, detailed surveys are also presented as an isoradiation contour map of exposure rate on the aerial photograph base. These data were evaluated to establish sensitivity limits for mapping the presence of plutonium-238. Natural background exposure rates at the Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station are very low, generally ranging from 4 to 6.5 microroentgens per hour (..mu..R/h) and less than 4 ..mu..R/h in wet areas. However, exposure rates in developed areas were observed to be higher due to the importation of construction materials not characteristic of the area. 8 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Shuttle Endevour Loaded onto SCA-747 Exiting the Mate-Demate Device for Return to Kennedy Space Cent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Endeavout rests atop NASA's Shuttle Carrier Aircraft in the Mate-Demate Device (MDD) at the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, shortly before being ferried back to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Endeavour landed at 1:57 p.m. (PDT) May 16, 1992, marking the completion of the new orbiter's first mission in space during which the crew of seven rendezvoused with the Intelsat VI satellite, attached a booster motor, and redeployed it into a high geosynchronous orbit. Endeavour and its crew were launched on a planned 7-day mission 7 May 1992, but the landing was delayed two days to allow extra time to rescue Intelsat and complete space station assembly techniques originally planned. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden

  9. Managing birds and controlling aircraft in the Kennedy Airport-Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge complex: the need for hard data and soft opinions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, K.M.; Erwin, R.M.; Richmond, M.E.; Buckley, P.A.; Tanacredi, J.T.; Avrin, D.

    2001-01-01

    During the 1980s, the exponential growth of laughing gull (Larus atrfcilla) colonies, from 15 to about 7600 nests in 1990, in the Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge and a correlated increase in the bird-strike rate at nearby John F. Kennedy International Airport (New York City) led to a controversy between wildlife and airport managers over the elimination of the colonies. In this paper, we review data to evaluate if: (1) the colonies have increased the level of risk to the flying public; (2) on-colony population control would reduce the presence of gulls, and subsequently bird strikes, at the airport; and (3) all on-airport management alternatives have been adequately implemented. Since 1979, most (2987, 87%) of the 3444 bird strikes (number of aircraft struck) were actually bird carcasses found near runways (cause of death unknown but assumed to be bird strikes by definition). Of the 457 pilot-reported strikes (mean = 23 + 6 aircraft/yr, N = 20 years), 78 (17%) involved laughing gulls. Since a gull-shooting program was initiated on airport property in 1991, over 50,000 adult laughing gulls have been killed and the number of reported bird strikes involving laughing gulls has declined from 6.9 + 2.9 (1983-1990) to 2.8 + 1.3 (1991-1998) aircraft/yr; nongull reported bird strikes, however, have more than doubled (6.4 + 2.6, 1983-1990; 14.9 + 5.1, 1991-1998). We found no evidence to indicate that on-colony management would yield a reduction of bird strikes at Kennedy Airport. Dietary and mark-recapture studies suggest that 60%-90% of the laughing gulls collected on-airport were either failed breeders and/or nonbreeding birds. We argue that the Jamaica Bay laughing gull colonies, the only ones in New York State, should not be managed at least until all on-airport management alternatives have been properly implemented and demonstrated to be ineffective at reducing bird strikes, including habitat alterations and increasing the capability of the bird control unit to eliminate bird flocks on-airport using nonlethal bird dispersal techniques. Because the gull-shooting program may be resulting in a nonsustainable regional population of laughing gulls (>30% decline), we also recommend that attempts be made to initiate an experimental colony elsewhere on Long Island to determine if colony relocation is a feasible management option.

  10. MCNP Simulations of Measurement of Insulation Compaction in the Cryogenic Rocket Fuel Tanks at Kennedy Space Center by Fast/Thermal Neutron Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingston, R. A.; Schweitzer, J. S.; Parsons, A. M.; Arens, E. E.

    2010-01-01

    MCNP simulations have been run to evaluate the feasibility of using a combination of fast and thermal neutrons as a nondestructive method to measure of the compaction of the perlite insulation in the liquid hydrogen and oxygen cryogenic storage tanks at John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Perlite is a feldspathic volcanic rock made up of the major elements Si, AI, Na, K and 0 along with some water. When heated it expands from four to twenty times its original volume which makes it very useful for thermal insulation. The cryogenic tanks at Kennedy Space Center are spherical with outer diameters of 69-70 feet and lined with a layer of expanded perlite with thicknesses on the order of 120 cm. There is evidence that some of the perlite has compacted over time since the tanks were built 1965, affecting the thermal properties and possibly also the structural integrity of the tanks. With commercially available portable neutron generators it is possible to produce simultaneously fluxes of neutrons in two energy ranges: fast (14 Me V) and thermal (25 me V). The two energy ranges produce complementary information. Fast neutrons produce gamma rays by inelastic scattering, which is sensitive to Fe and O. Thermal neutrons produce gamma rays by prompt gamma neutron activation (PGNA) and this is sensitive to Si, Al, Na, K and H. The compaction of the perlite can be measured by the change in gamma ray signal strength which is proportional to the atomic number densities of the constituent elements. The MCNP simulations were made to determine the magnitude of this change. The tank wall was approximated by a I-dimensional slab geometry with an 11/16" outer carbon steel wall, an inner stainless wall and 120 cm thick perlite zone. Runs were made for cases with expanded perlite, compacted perlite or with various void fractions. Runs were also made to simulate the effect of adding a moderator. Tallies were made for decay-time analysis from t=0 to 10 ms; total detected gamma-rays; detected gamma-rays from thermal neutron reactions d. detected gamma-rays from non-thermal neutron reactions and total detected gamma-rays as a function of depth into the annulus volume. These indicated a number of possible independent metrics of perlite compaction. For example the count rate for perlite elements increased from 3600 to 8500 cps for an increase in perlite density from 6 lbs/lcf to 16.5 lbs/cf. Thus the MCNP simulations have confirmed the feasibility of using neutron methods to map the compaction of perlite in the walls of the cryogenic tanks.

  11. A continuation of base-line studies for environmentally monitoring space transportation systems at John F. Kennedy Space Center. Volume 3, part 2: Ichthyological studies, sailfin molly reproduction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snelson, F. F., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The applicability of monitoring populations of Poccilia latipinna (sailfin molly) and its reproductive efforts as reliable indicators of environmental effects of aerospace activities in the Kennedy Space Center area was investigated. Results show that the sailfin molly experiences drastic fluctuations in population and reproductive success and is not an appropriate factor for monitoring to establish perturbations of the environment due to space transportation system related activities.

  12. KATHLEEN O'REILLY September 2011

    E-print Network

    : the Dialogic Production of Gendered Development Spaces in Rajasthan, India." Annals of the Association and Gender Studies Program 2006-2011 Assistant Professor, Department of Geography, Texas A&M University 2004 OReilly, K. "Development is Seductive." Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers Forthcoming

  13. Name: Kathleen Barbosa Hometown: Helena, MO

    E-print Network

    Gering, Jon C.

    . Either way, words have power. My most embarrassing public speaking moment: Once in high school I forgot people, and the public speaking process fascinates me. Finish this sentence: A great speech can... ...change your views on the world! My most embarrassing public speaking moment: When I was giving a speech

  14. KATHLEEN O'REILLY Assistant Professor

    E-print Network

    , Gillian Ice, ed. Press TBA. Forthcoming OReilly, K. "Resolving a Gendered Paradox: Women's Participation: the Dialogic Production of Gendered Development Spaces in Rajasthan, India." Annals of the Association

  15. Approximate mode filtering Kathleen E. Wage

    E-print Network

    Wage, Kathleen

    email: kwage@gmu.edu Abstract-- Normal modes, the eigenfunctions of the ocean waveguide, are useful by using the approximate modeshapes are analyzed. I. INTRODUCTION Normal modes are the eigenfunctions of this paper applies Miller and Good's approach to generate modes for the ocean waveguide and examines

  16. CURRICULUM VITAE Name: Kathleen Greive Morgan

    E-print Network

    Guenther, Frank

    )-353-7567 E-mail: kmorgan@bu.edu Place of Birth: Dayton, Ohio Education: 1972 B.S., Chemistry, College of Mount St. Joseph, Cincinnati 1976 Ph.D., Pharmacology, University of Cincinnati, College of Medicine: Research Fellowships: 1976-1977 Mayo Foundation Fellow, Department of Physiology, Mayo Medical School 1977-1979

  17. A Five-year Performance Study of Low VOC Coatings over Zinc Thermal Spray for the Protection of Carbon Steel at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolody, Mark R.; Curran, Jerome P.; Calle, Luz Marina

    2014-01-01

    The launch facilities at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) are located approximately 1000 feet from the Atlantic Ocean where they are exposed to salt deposits, high humidity, high UV degradation, and acidic exhaust from solid rocket boosters. These assets are constructed from carbon steel, which requires a suitable coating to provide long-term protection to reduce corrosion and its associated costs. While currently used coating systems provide excellent corrosion control performance, they are subject to occupational, safety, and environmental regulations at the Federal and State levels that limit their use. Many contain high volatile organic compounds (VOCs), hazardous air pollutants, and other hazardous materials. Hazardous waste from coating operations include vacuum filters, zinc dust, hazardous paint related material, and solid paint. There are also worker safety issues such as exposure to solvents and isocyanates. To address these issues, top-coated thermal spray zinc coating systems were investigated as a promising environmentally friendly corrosion protection for carbon steel in an acidic launch environment. Additional benefits of the combined coating system include a long service life, cathodic protection to the substrate, no volatile contaminants, and high service temperatures. This paper reports the results of a performance based study to evaluate low VOC topcoats (for thermal spray zinc coatings) on carbon steel for use in a space launch environment.

  18. Results of the radiological survey at the Firemen's Memorial Park and Fire Hall No. 2, Garibaldi Avenue and Kennedy Drive, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ066)

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Crutcher, J.W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1989-08-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally {sup 232}Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of the gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, the Firemen's Memorial Park and Fire Hall 2, Garibaldi Avenue and Kennedy Drive, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ066) was conducted during 1987. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 4 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. A review of falconry as a bird control technique with recommendations for use at the Shuttle Landing Facility, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Vickie L.; Rowe, Sean P.; Breininger, David R.; Yosef, Reuven

    1994-01-01

    Falconry has been proposed as a method of reducing the bird/aircraftstrike hazard, in addition to current bird control techniques, at the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, U.S. Bird control programs using falconry have been employed at a number of military and commercial airfields in the U.S., Canada, and Europe. Most falconry programs have been discontinued. In most situations, falconry did not prove cost effective when compared to alternative bird control techniques. Available literature and documents, as well as several raptor specialists and military personnel, suggest that falconry may be useful only against certain problem species and when other bird control methods have been proven inadequate. Because many of the most commonly used falcons are protected species, acquisition of falcons will complicate their use in bird control programs. Many avian species found at the SLF are federally and state protected or of conservation concern, therefore, environmental impacts may also result from the use of falcons.

  20. Surface wind convergence as a short-term predictor of cloud-to-ground lightning at Kennedy Space Center: A four-year summary and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew I.; Holle, Ronald L.; Lopez, Raul E.; Nicholson, James R.

    1991-01-01

    Since 1986, USAF forecasters at NASA-Kennedy have had available a surface wind convergence technique for use during periods of convective development. In Florida during the summer, most of the thunderstorm development is forced by boundary layer processes. The basic premise is that the life cycle of convection is reflected in the surface wind field beneath these storms. Therefore the monitoring of the local surface divergence and/or convergence fields can be used to determine timing, location, longevity, and the lightning hazards which accompany these thunderstorms. This study evaluates four years of monitoring thunderstorm development using surface wind convergence, particularly the average over the area. Cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning is related in time and space with surface convergence for 346 days during the summers of 1987 through 1990 over the expanded wind network at KSC. The relationships are subdivided according to low level wind flow and midlevel moisture patterns. Results show a one in three chance of CG lightning when a convergence event is identified. However, when there is no convergence, the chance of CG lightning is negligible.