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  1. International trends in health science librarianship part 14: East Africa (Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda).

    PubMed

    Gathoni, Nasra; Kamau, Nancy; Nannozi, Judith; Singirankabo, Marcel

    2015-06-01

    This is the 14th in a series of articles exploring international trends in health science librarianship in the 21st century. This is the second of four articles pertaining to different regions in the African continent. The present issue focuses on countries in East Africa (Kenya, Uganda and Rwanda). The next feature column will investigate trends in West Africa. JM. PMID:25943971

  2. East African Rift Valley, Kenya

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This rare, cloud free view of the East African Rift Valley, Kenya (1.5N, 35.5E) shows a clear view of the Turkwell River Valley, an offshoot of the African REift System. The East African Rift is part of a vast plate fracture which extends from southern Turkey, through the Red Sea, East Africa and into Mozambique. Dark green patches of forests are seen along the rift margin and tea plantations occupy the cooler higher ground.

  3. Improving Early-Grade Literacy in East Africa: Experimental Evidence from Kenya and Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Adrienne M.; McEwan, Patrick J.; Ngware, Moses; Oketch, Moses

    2014-01-01

    Primary school enrollments have increased rapidly in sub-Saharan Africa, spurring concerns about low levels of learning. We analyze field experiments in Kenya and Uganda that assessed whether the Reading to Learn intervention, implemented by the Aga Khan Foundation in both countries, improved early-grade literacy as measured by common assessments.…

  4. East Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image shows the East African nations of Ethiopia, Eritrea, and Somalia, as well as portions of Kenya, Sudan, Yemen, and Saudi Arabia. Dominating the scene are the green Ethiopian Highlands. With altitudes as high as 4,620 meters (15,157 feet), the highlands pull moisture from the arid air, resulting in relatively lush vegetation. In fact, coffee-one of the world's most prized crops-originated here. To the north (above) the highlands is Eritrea, which became independent in 1993. East (right) of Ethiopia is Somalia, jutting out into the Indian Ocean. The Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) captured this true-color image on November 29, 2000. Provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  5. Distribution of Glycerol Diakyl Glycerol Tetraethers in Surface Soil and Crater Lake Sediments from Mount Kenya, East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omuombo, C.; Huguet, A.; Olago, D.; Williamson, D.

    2013-12-01

    Glycerol diakyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs), a palaeoclimate proxy based on the relative abundance of lipids produced by archaea and bacteria, is gaining wide acceptance for the determination of past temperature and pH conditions. This study looks at the spatial distribution and abundance of GDGTs in soil and sediment samples along an altitudinal transect from 3 crater lakes of Mt. Kenya (Lake Nkunga, Sacred Lake and Lake Rutundu) ranging in elevation from 1700m - 3080m above sea level. GDGTs were extracted with solvents and then analysed using high performance liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (HPLC/APCI-MS). Mean annual air temperature and pH were estimated based on the relative abundance of the different branched GDGTs, i.e. on the MBT (Methylation index of Branched Tetraethers) and CBT (Cyclization ratio of Branched Tetraethers) indices. Substantial amount of GDGTs were detected in both soil and sediment samples. In addition, branched GDGT distribution was observed to vary with altitude. These results highlight the importance of quantifying the branched GDGTs to understand the environmental parameters controlling the distribution of these lipids. The MBT/CBT proxy is a promising tool to infer palaeotemperatures and characterize the climate events of the past millennia in equatorial east Africa.

  6. Antibodies to Neospora caninum in wild animals from Kenya, East Africa.

    PubMed

    Ferroglio, E; Wambwa, E; Castiello, M; Trisciuoglio, A; Prouteau, A; Pradere, E; Ndungu, S; De Meneghi, D

    2003-12-01

    The prevalence of antibodies to Neospora caninum was examined in six wild Artiodactyla species, and in five wild Carnivora species from Kenya. Blood sera (104 wild ungulates from Marula Estates (MEs), and 31 wild carnivores from Masai-Mara reserve and from other wildlife areas in northern and Southern Kenya), were screened using a Neospora agglutination test (NAT), with a twofold dilution (1:40-1:320 titres). Presence of NAT antibodies to N. caninun is reported here for the first time in zebra (Equus burchelli), eland (Taurotragus oryx), African buffalo (Syncerus caffer), Thompson gazelle (Gazella thompsoni), impala (Aepyceros melampus), warthog (Phacochoerus aethiopicus), spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta) and in free-ranging cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus). At 1:80 dilution, prevalence was 61.5% in eland, 58.5% in zebra, 19.2% in Thompson gazelle, 33.3% in warthog, 50% in African buffalo, 30% in lion (Panthera leo), 20% in cheetah, and 33.3% in spotted hyena. Antibodies up to 1:320 titre were detected in eland (38.4%), zebra (19.5%), Thompson gazelle (3.8%) and lion (5%). Amongst herbivores, sero-prevalence was significantly (P<0.05) higher, at all dilutions, in "grazer/digger" species (e.g. eland and zebra) than in non-"grazer/digger" species (e.g. impala and Thompson gazelle). No antibodies to N. caninum were found in two leopards (Panthera pardus) and one serval (Felis serval). Our results indicates a steady presence of N. caninum in wild mammals from Kenya. The hypothesis of a sylvatic cycle of N. caninum could be suggested, but more data are needed to verify the hypothesis, as to evaluate the role of N. caninum infection on the dynamics of wild animals population in the study area. PMID:14651874

  7. Influenza in East Africa

    PubMed Central

    Montefiore, D.; Drozdov, S. G.; Kafuko, G. W.; Fayinka, O. A.; Soneji, A.

    1970-01-01

    Very little information is available concerning the frequency of influenza in East Africa. Following recent outbreaks of influenza in Uganda, that were due to the A2/Hong Kong/68 virus, it was considered useful to obtain information relating to the prevalence of infection due to this virus and to the current strain of influenza B virus, not only in Uganda but also in the neighbouring territories of Kenya and Tanzania. The results of serological testing of sera showed that widespread outbreaks of influenza A2/Hong Kong/68 infection had occurred recently in all three territories, while there was evidence of sporadic infection in all territories by the current influenza B strain. Despite the favourable climate of East Africa, it is evident that widespread outbreaks of influenza can occur, and these may arise during the period of the year when influenza is rare in countries with temperate climates. Influenza can easily spread to other countries via air travellers to and from East Africa. PMID:5312523

  8. Sediment infill within rift basins: Facies distribution and effects of deformation: Examples from the Kenya and Tanganyika Rifts, East Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Tiercelin, J.J.; Lezzar, K.E. ); Richert, J.P. )

    1994-07-01

    Oil is known from lacustrine basins of the east African rift. The geology of such basins is complex and different depending on location in the eastern and western branches. The western branch has little volcanism, leading to long-lived basins, such as Lake Tanganyika, whereas a large quantity of volcanics results in the eastern branch characterized by ephemeral basins, as the Baringo-Bogoria basin in Kenya. The Baringo-Bogoria basin is a north-south half graben formed in the middle Pleistocene and presently occupied by the hypersaline Lake Bogoria and the freshwater Lake Baringo. Lake Bogoria is fed by hot springs and ephemeral streams controlled by grid faults bounding the basin to the west. The sedimentary fill is formed by cycles of organic oozes having a good petroleum potential and evaporites. On the other hand, and as a consequence of the grid faults, Lake Baringo is fed by permanent streams bringing into the basin large quantities of terrigenous sediments. Lake Tanganyika is a meromictic lake 1470 m deep and 700 km long, of middle Miocene age. It is subdivided into seven asymmetric half grabens separated by transverse ridges. The sedimentary fill is thick and formed by organic oozes having a very good petroleum potential. In contrast to Bogoria, the lateral distribution of organic matter is characterized by considerable heterogeneity due to the existence of structural blocks or to redepositional processes.

  9. Onset of uplift and environmental change in East Africa: paleoaltimetry constraints from a 17 Ma beaked whale fossil from northern Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wichura, H.; Jacobs, L. L.; Strecker, M. R.; Lin, A. S.; Polcyn, M. J.; Manthi, F. K.; Winkler, D. A.; Clemens, M.

    2014-12-01

    Deciphering the timing and magnitude of vertical crustal motions is key to understanding the impact of tectonic uplift on changes in atmospheric circulation, rainfall, and environmental conditions. Uplift of the East African Plateau (EAP) of Kenya has been linked to mantle processes, but paleoaltimetry data are still too scarce to unambiguously constrain plateau evolution and subsequent vertical motions associated with late Cenozoic rifting. Here we assess the fossil remains of a beaked whale (Ziphiidae) from the Turkana region of Kenya, 700 km inland from the present-day coastline of the Indian Ocean. The whale fossil was found at an elevation of 650 m and helps constraining the uplift of the northeastern flanks of the EAP. The Kenyan ziphiid was discovered in fluvio-lacustrine sediments of the extensional Oligo-Miocene Lokichar basin (Mead, 1975) along with terrestrial mammals and freshwater mollusks below a basalt dated at 17.1 ± 1.0 Ma (Boschetto et al., 1992). The unifying characteristics of riverine occurrences of modern marine mammals include sufficient discharge in low-gradient rivers to maintain pathways deep enough to facilitate migration, and the absence of shallow bedrock, rapids and waterfalls. The most likely route, which may have had these characteristics is a fluvial corridor controlled by thermal subsidence of the Cretaceous Anza Rift, which once linked extensional processes in Central and East Africa with the continental margin. The fossil locality and analogies with present-day occurrences of marine mammals in terrestrial realms suggest that the ziphiid stranded slightly above sea level. In combination with 13.5. Ma phonolite flows that utilized eastward-directed drainages away from the EAP the fossil find thus provides the older of only two empirical paleoelevation points that constrain the onset of uplift of the EAP to the interval between approximately 17 and 13 Ma. Topographic uplift of the EAP induced paleoclimatic change from a low-elevation humid environment to highly variable, much drier conditions, which altered biotic communities and drove evolution in East Africa, including that of primates.

  10. Early- to Mid-Holocene hydroclimate shifts in tropical East Africa: the multi-proxy sediment record from Lake Rutundu, Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Cort, Gijs; Creutz, Mike; Barao, Lucia; Conley, Daniel; Haug, Gerald; Bodé, Samuel; Blaauw, Maarten; Engstrom, Dan; Verschuren, Dirk

    2015-04-01

    Following the generally arid conditions of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), a large part of the African continent experienced the Early to Mid-Holocene as a much more humid period than today. This so-called African Humid Period (AHP) coincided with high summertime insolation over the Northern Hemisphere subtropics, causing invigorated monsoons to create moist conditions over the northern parts of the continent. Similarly, equatorial and even low-latitude southeastern Africa experienced a wetter climate due to the post-glacial increase in atmospheric greenhouse gasses ultimately leading to altered Atlantic and Indian Ocean monsoon dynamics. The timing and abruptness of the onset and ending of the AHP in the different regions of the continent have been the subject of major discussion. On the other hand, shorter-lived climate fluctuations within the AHP have received much less attention, due to a scarcity of well-dated, high-resolution African paleoclimate records spanning the entire Holocene. In this study we used the sediment record of Lake Rutundu, a high-altitude crater lake on Mount Kenya, to document multidecadal to millennial-scale hydroclimate variability on the East African equator from the LGM to the present. A multiproxy approach combining core-surface scanning techniques (magnetic susceptibility, X-ray fluorescence) and close-interval bulk-sediment analyses (organic matter and biogenic Si content, grain size, organic ?15N and ?13C) resulted in a high-resolution record firmly anchored in time by an age model based on 210Pb dating and sixteen calibrated radiocarbon ages. This new Lake Rutundu hydroclimate record confirms that moister conditions following the LGM returned to East Africa ca.16 kyr BP, and it contains a perfectly timed Younger Dryas episode (12.8-11.5 kyr BP) of intermittent drought. We find that the Early- to Mid-Holocene period, which in African records is often described as uniformly wet, was in fact punctuated by three distinct, century-scale drought episodes. The first of these provides robust evidence that the 8.2 kyr cooling event, well-known from high northern latitudes, impacted tropical East Africa's moisture balance as well. The two other drought episodes, centered at c.6.5 and 5.5 kyr BP, punctuate the mid-Holocene drying which eventually ended the AHP in this region around 4 kyr BP.

  11. Palynological evidence of climate change and land degradation in the Lake Baringo area, Kenya, East Africa, since AD 1650

    E-print Network

    Liu, Kam-biu

    , reveal a largely dry environment in the East African region since AD 1650. The dry environment is punctuated by a succession of centennial- to decadal-scale wet and dry episodes, disjointed by sharp transitions, including two intense dry episodes that led to drying of the lake at ca. AD 1650 and AD 1720

  12. Late Cenozoic Moisture History of East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trauth, M. H.; Maslin, M. A.; Deino, A.; Strecker, M. R.

    2004-12-01

    Evidence from fluvio-lacustrine sediments in ten separate basins in the Ethiopian and Kenya rifts suggests there were three protracted humid periods during the Late Cenozoic; at 2.7 - 2.5, 1.9 - 1.7, and 1.1 - 0.9 million years before present. These wet periods are coeval with known increases of aridity in parts of North West and North East Africa, indicating significant regional shifts in African climate. These three East African wet periods correspond to major global climatic changes as well as maxima in eccentricity and thus precession, suggesting a combined global and local causation. These climatic changes were important for the speciation and dispersal of mammals and hominids in East Africa as it implies that key steps in human evolution occurred during relatively humid periods in a region containing extensive deep lakes.

  13. Paleoenvironmental context of the Middle Stone Age record from Karungu, Lake Victoria Basin, Kenya, and its implications for human and faunal dispersals in East Africa.

    PubMed

    Faith, J Tyler; Tryon, Christian A; Peppe, Daniel J; Beverly, Emily J; Blegen, Nick; Blumenthal, Scott; Chritz, Kendra L; Driese, Steven G; Patterson, David

    2015-06-01

    The opening and closing of the equatorial East African forest belt during the Quaternary is thought to have influenced the biogeographic histories of early modern humans and fauna, although precise details are scarce due to a lack of archaeological and paleontological records associated with paleoenvironmental data. With this in mind, we provide a description and paleoenvironmental reconstruction of the Late Pleistocene Middle Stone Age (MSA) artifact- and fossil-bearing sediments from Karungu, located along the shores of Lake Victoria in western Kenya. Artifacts recovered from surveys and controlled excavations are typologically MSA and include points, blades, and Levallois flakes and cores, as well as obsidian flakes similar in geochemical composition to documented sources near Lake Naivasha (250 km east). A combination of sedimentological, paleontological, and stable isotopic evidence indicates a semi-arid environment characterized by seasonal precipitation and the dominance of C4 grasslands, likely associated with a substantial reduction in Lake Victoria. The well-preserved fossil assemblage indicates that these conditions are associated with the convergence of historically allopatric ungulates from north and south of the equator, in agreement with predictions from genetic observations. Analysis of the East African MSA record reveals previously unrecognized north-south variation in assemblage composition that is consistent with episodes of population fragmentation during phases of limited dispersal potential. The grassland-associated MSA assemblages from Karungu and nearby Rusinga Island are characterized by a combination of artifact types that is more typical of northern sites. This may reflect the dispersal of behavioral repertoires-and perhaps human populations-during a paleoenvironmental phase dominated by grasslands. PMID:25883052

  14. Regions. [Africa, Middle East].

    PubMed

    1985-03-01

    This discussion of population focuses on the regions of Africa and the Middle East. In South Africa more white women are working but fewer black women work. The overall result is that the percentage of women who work is declining. Marita de Beer, research liaison executive at the South African Advertising Research Foundation, reports that the female population grew by 31% in the past 10 years while the number of working women has grown by only 11%. Among blacks the female population rose by 36%, but the number of workers among them declined by about 1%. Married women are among the fastest growing groups of working women in South Africa. The most recent estimate of the population of Nigeria is 92 million. According to Professor Vremudia Diejomaoh, Nigeria's population will probably reach 155 million by 2000 with 33% living in urban areas. In Saudi Arabia the Pan Arab Research Center recently completed a census of retail outlets in 3 metropolitan areas: Jeddah, Riyadh, and Dammam. The types of outlets surveyed include large supermarkets, small supermarkets, groceries with and without deep freeze, tobacco shops, meat shop/delis, small cafeterias, large restaurants/hotels, cosmetics shops or perfumeries, camera stores, toy shops, pharmacies, watch and gift shop, newsstands, department store, and appliance outlets. Using the Census of Retail Outlets as a base, Pan Arab Research Center also has a new distribution audit system that will cover 500 outlets. By plotting Arab countries according to their population policies and their current growth rates, it is possible to project where the middle class will grow fastest in the Arab world. The countries that have declining growth rates and strong population programs designed to encourage lower fertility rates among women are Egypt, Tunisia, Morocco, Algeria, and Lebanon. The countries most likely to have a better per capita distribution of resources within this decade are those where governments encourage reductions in fertility, thereby enabling the growth of population to fall in line with the growth of resources. PMID:12339913

  15. East African and Kuunga Orogenies in Tanzania - South Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, H.; Hauzenberger, C. A.; Tenczer, V.

    2012-04-01

    Tanzania and southern Kenya hold a key position for reconstructing Gondwana consolidation because here different orogen belts with different tectonic styles interfere. The older, ca. 650-620 Ma East African Orogeny resulted from the amalgamation of arc terranes in the northern Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS) and continental collision between East African pieces and parts of the Azania terrane in the south (Collins and Pisarevsky, 2005). The change form arc suturing to continental collision settings is found in southern Kenya where southernmost arcs of the ANS conjoin with thickened continental margin suites of the Eastern Granulite Belt. The younger ca. 570-530 Ma Kuunga orogeny heads from the Damara - Zambesi - Irumide Belts (De Waele et al., 2006) over Tanzania - Mozambique to southern India and clashes with the East African orogen in southern-central Tanzania. Two transitional orogen settings may be defined, (1) that between island arcs and inverted passive continental margin within the East African Orogen and, (2) that between N-S trending East African and W-E trending Kuungan orogenies. The Neoproterozoic island arc suites of SE-Kenya are exposed as a narrow stripe between western Azania and the Eastern Granulite belt. This suture is a steep, NNW stretched belt that aligns roughly with the prominent southern ANS shear zones that converge at the southern tip of the ANS (Athi and Aswa shear zones). Oblique convergence resulted in low-vorticity sinstral shear during early phases of deformation. Syn-magmatic and syn-tectonic textures are compatible with deformation at granulite metamorphic conditions and rocks exhumed quickly during ongoing transcurrent motion. The belt is typified as wrench tectonic belt with horizontal northwards flow of rocks within deeper portions of an island arc. The adjacent Eastern Granulite Nappe experienced westward directed, subhorizontal, low-vorticity, high temperature flow at partly extreme metamorphic conditions (900°C, 1.2 to 1.4 GPa) (Fritz et al., 2009). Majority of data suggest an anticlockwise P-T loop and prolonged, slow cooling at deep crustal levels without significant exhumation. Isobaric cooling is explained by horizontal flow with rates faster than thermal equilibration of the lower crust. Those settings are found in domains of previously thinned lithosphere such as extended passive margins. Such rheolgically weak plate boundaries do not produce self-sustaining one-sided subduction but large areas of magmatic underplating that enable melt enhanced lateral flow of the lower crust. Western Granulites deformed by high-vorticity westwards thrusting at c. 550 Ma (Kuunga orogeny). Rocks exhibit clockwise P-T paths and experienced significant exhumation during isothermal decompression. Overprint between Kuungan structures and 620 Ma East African fabrics resulted in complex interference pattern within the Eastern Granulites. The three orogen portions that converge in Tanzania / Southern Kenya have different orogen styles. The southern ANS formed by transcurrent deformation of an island arc root; the Eastern Granulites by lower crustal channelized flow of a hot inverted passive margin; the Western Granulites by lower to mid crustal stacking of old and cold crustal fragments. Collins, A.S., Pisarevsky, S.A. (2005). Amalgamating eastern Gondwana: The evolution of the Circum-Indian Orogens. Earth-Science Reviews, 71, 229-270. De Waele, B., Kampunzu, A.B., Mapani, B.S.E., Tembo, F. (2006). The Mesoproterozoic Irumide belt of Zambia. Journal of African Earth Sciences, 46, 36-70 Fritz, H., Tenczer, V., Hauzenberger, C., Wallbrecher, E., Muhongo, S. (2009). Hot granulite nappes — Tectonic styles and thermal evolution of the Proterozoic granulite belts in East Africa. Tectonophysics, 477, 160-173.

  16. East Africa continental margins

    SciTech Connect

    Bosellini, A.

    1986-01-01

    New well data from Somalia, together with the history of sea-floor spreading in the Indian Ocean derived from magnetic anomalies, show that the East African margins from latitude 15/sup 0/S into the Gulf of Aden comprise four distinct segments that formed successively by the southward drift of Madagascar from Somalia during the Middle to Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous, by the northeastward drift of India along the Owen Transform during the Late Cretaceous and Paleocene, and by the opening of the Gulf of Aden during the Neogene.

  17. A Scientific note on Varroa mites found in East Africa; Threat or Opportunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Varroa mites have devastated Apis mellifera L. honeybee populations wherever they co-occur around the world, yet in East Africa these mites may have finally met their match. Varroa destructor Anderson and Truman (Acari:Varroidae) was found in Kenya and Tanzania for the first time in early 2009, but...

  18. Assessing the status of food safety management systems for fresh produce production in East Africa: evidence from certified green bean farms in Kenya and noncertified hot pepper farms in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Nanyunja, J; Jacxsens, L; Kirezieva, K; Kaaya, A N; Uyttendaele, M; Luning, P A

    2015-06-01

    The farms of fresh produce farmers are major sources of food contamination by microbiological organisms and chemical pesticides. In view of their choice for farming practices, producers are influenced by food safety requirements. This study analyzes the role of food safety standard certification toward the maturity of food safety management systems (FSMS) in the primary production of fresh produce. Kenya and Uganda are two East African countries that export green beans and hot peppers, respectively, to the European Union but have contrasting features in terms of agricultural practices and certification status. In the fresh produce chain, a diagnostic instrument for primary production was used to assess context factors, core control and assurance activities, and system output to measure the performance of FSMS for certified green bean farms in Kenya and noncertified hot pepper farms in Uganda. Overall, our findings show that in Uganda, noncertified hot pepper farms revealed only a "basic level of control and assurance" activities in their FSMS, which was not satisfactory, because no insight into potential pesticide microbial contamination was presented by these farmers. On the other hand, certified green bean farms in Kenya had an "average level of control and assurance," providing insight into the delivered food safety and quality by the farmers. Farm size did not impact the maturity level of FSMS. This study confirms the role played by food safety standard certification toward the maturity of FSMS implemented in developing countries and demonstrates the possibility of Ugandan farms to upgrade agricultural practices in the fresh produce sector. PMID:26038896

  19. The alternative of Chinese aid in Africa : impacts of China's development strategy through Chinese aid, finance, and firms in Kenya

    E-print Network

    Mullin, Deborah Wei

    2009-01-01

    This thesis examines the differences of Chinese and Western aid implementation and its effects in Africa though the case study of Chinese aid and finance for road development in Kenya. Today, Kenya receives tangible benefits ...

  20. Reduced interannual rainfall variability in East Africa during the last ice age.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Christian; Haug, Gerald H; Timmermann, Axel; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Brauer, Achim; Sigman, Daniel M; Cane, Mark A; Verschuren, Dirk

    2011-08-01

    Interannual rainfall variations in equatorial East Africa are tightly linked to the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), with more rain and flooding during El Niño and droughts in La Niña years, both having severe impacts on human habitation and food security. Here we report evidence from an annually laminated lake sediment record from southeastern Kenya for interannual to centennial-scale changes in ENSO-related rainfall variability during the last three millennia and for reductions in both the mean rate and the variability of rainfall in East Africa during the Last Glacial period. Climate model simulations support forward extrapolation from these lake sediment data that future warming will intensify the interannual variability of East Africa's rainfall. PMID:21817050

  1. Alex Leahey, `06 Marigat, Kenya

    E-print Network

    Kenya in East Africa . Marigat is a small town in the Baringo District of the Great Rift Valley about four hours from the fast pace and conveniences of a city like Nairobi; many people in Kenya didn't know, running water, plumbing, etc. What the people of Marigat may have lacked in materials, though, they more

  2. Predictability of rainy season onset and cessation in east Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, B.-M.

    2012-04-01

    PREDICTABILITY OF RAINY SEASONS ONSET AND CESSATION IN EAST AFRICA Boyard-Micheau Joseph, joseph.boyard-micheau@u-bourgogne.fr Camberlin Pierre, Kenya and northern Tanzania mainly display bimodal rainfall regimes, which are controlled by the annual migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone on both sides of the equator. In the low-income, semi-arid areas, food security is highly dependent on cereal yields (maize, millet and sorghum). Vulnerability is aggravated by the fact that these crops are mostly rainfed, and rely on the performance of the two, relatively brief rainy seasons. This performance depends on a combination of several rainy season characteristics, or rainfall descriptors, such as the onset and cessation dates of the rains, the frequency of rainy days, their intensity and the occurrence of wet/dry spells. The prediction of these descriptors some time (>15 days) before the real onset of the rainy season can be seen as a useful tool to help in the establishment of agricultural adaptation strategies. The main objective consists to understand linkages between regional variability of these rainfall descriptors and global modes of the climate system, in order to set up efficient predictive tools based on Model Output Statistics (MOS). The rainfall descriptors are computed from daily rainfall data collected for the period 1961-2001 from the Kenya Meteorological Department, the IGAD Climate Prediction and Application Center and the Tanzania Meteorological Agency. An initial spatial coherence analysis assesses the potential predictability of each descriptor, permitting eventually to eliminate those which are not spatially coherent, on the assumption that low spatial coherence denotes low potential predictability. Rainfall in East Africa simulated by a 24-ensemble member of the ECHAM 4.5 atmospheric general circulation model is compared with observations, to test the reproducibility of the rainfall descriptors. Canonical Correlation Analysis is next used to find predictor variables, exploring successively the synchronous and lagged relationships between the rainfall descriptors and the main modes of the climate system, including those already known to affect East Africa rainfall such as El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Indian Ocean dipole (IOD). Candidate climatic fields include sea surface temperature, geopotential height and moisture fluxes at lower (850 hPa), mid (500 hPa) and higher (200 hPa) tropospheric levels.

  3. Arrive alive: road safety in Kenya and South Africa.

    PubMed

    Lamont, Mark; Lee, Rebekah

    2015-04-01

    This article is among the first historical considerations of road safety in Africa. It argues that race and class, as colonial dualisms, analytically frame two defining moments in the development of African automobility and its infrastructure-"Africanization" in the first decade of Kenya's political independence from Britain, 1963-75, and democratization in postapartheid South Africa. We argue that recent road safety interventions in both countries exemplify an "epidemiological turn" influenced by public health constructions of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. African states' framing of road safety in behaviorist terms has obscured larger debates around redressing the historical legacies of racialized access to roads and the technopolitics of African automobility. Civic involvement in road safety initiatives has tended to be limited, although the specter of road carnage has entered into the public imagination, largely through the death of high profile Africans. However, some African road users continue to pursue alternative, and often culturally embedded, strategies to mitigate the dangers posed by life "on the road." PMID:26005088

  4. The upper mantle shear wave velocity structure of East Africa derived from Rayleigh wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donnell, J.; Nyblade, A.; Adams, A. N.; Weeraratne, D. S.; Mulibo, G.; Tugume, F.

    2012-12-01

    An expanded model of the three-dimensional shear wave velocity structure of the upper mantle beneath East Africa has been developed using data from the latest phases of the AfricaArray East African Seismic Experiment in conjunction with data from preceding studies. The combined dataset consists of 331 events recorded on a total of 95 seismic stations spanning Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Zambia and Malawi. In this latest study, 149 events were used to determine fundamental mode Rayleigh wave phase velocities at periods ranging from 20 to 182 seconds using the two-plane-wave method. These were subsequently combined with the similarly processed published measurements and inverted for an updated upper mantle three-dimensional shear wave velocity model. Newly imaged features include a substantial fast anomaly in eastern Zambia that may have exerted a controlling influence on the evolution of the Western Rift Branch. Furthermore, there is a suggestion that the Eastern Rift Branch trends southeastward offshore eastern Tanzania.

  5. Diabetes in Sub-Saharan Africa: Kenya, Mali, Mozambique, Nigeria, South Africa and Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Mario; Alla, Sridevi

    2008-01-01

    Until a few years ago, a limited number of epidemiologists or public health experts mentioned the words “diabetes.” As new lifestyles, imported dietary practices, and globalization take roots in the developing world, as Africa is, today, diabetes and its complications are considered an epidemic in Africa, compelling African governments to start paying more attention to its impact as thousands of Africans run the risk of dying young. The potential severity of diabetes is such that some epidemiologists predict that its economic impact and death toll will surpass the ravages of HIV and AIDS in the near future. On the African sub-continent, present literature and the work of the World Diabetes Foundation have highlighted three countries, namely, Mali, Mozambique, and Zambia. However, the conditions in South Africa, Kenya, and Nigeria, some of the most developed areas of the continent, provide a clue to how people are coping and how governments are responding to diabetes and its full impact. This study is, therefore, a meta-summary of the incidence and prevalence of today's emerging silent killer or diabetes in Sub-Saharan Africa. The theme is that time is running out for Africa and that, as was for HIV/AIDS, by the time the governments wake up and stop denying the catastrophic potential of the epidemic, diabetes will simply overwhelm the continent's resources, and the world will witness the death of millions of Africans. The last section is a call for action against diabetes in terms of advocacy, promotion of awareness, and public health policies that empower people to diabetes self-management. PMID:20165596

  6. Late Cenozoic Moisture History of East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trauth, Martin H.; Maslin, Mark A.; Deino, Alan; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2005-09-01

    Lake sediments in 10 Ethiopian, Kenyan, and Tanzanian rift basins suggest that there were three humid periods at 2.7 to 2.5 million years ago (Ma), 1.9 to 1.7 Ma, and 1.1 to 0.9 Ma, superimposed on the longer-term aridification of East Africa. These humid periods correlate with increased aridity in northwest and northeast Africa and with substantial global climate transitions. These episodes could have had important impacts on the speciation and dispersal of mammals and hominins, because a number of key events, such as the origin of the genus Homo and the evolution of the species Homo erectus, took place in this region during that time.

  7. Learning To Compete: Education, Training & Enterprise in Ghana, Kenya & South Africa. Education Research Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afenyadu, Dela; King, Kenneth; McGrath, Simon; Oketch, Henry; Rogerson, Christian; Visser, Kobus

    A multinational, multidisciplinary team examined the impact of globalization on education, training, and small and medium sized enterprise development in Ghana, Kenya, and South Africa. The study focused on the following issues: developing a learner-led competitiveness approach; building learning enterprises; education for microenterprises and…

  8. Rainfall and drought in equatorial east Africa during the past 1,100 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschuren, Dirk; Laird, Kathleen R.; Cumming, Brian F.

    2000-01-01

    Knowledge of natural long-term rainfall variability is essential for water-resource and land-use management in sub-humid regions of the world. In tropical Africa, data relevant to determining this variability are scarce because of the lack of long instrumental climate records and the limited potential of standard high-resolution proxy records such as tree rings and ice cores. Here we present a decade-scale reconstruction of rainfall and drought in equatorial east Africa over the past 1,100 years, based on lake-level and salinity fluctuations of Lake Naivasha (Kenya) inferred from three different palaeolimnological proxies: sediment stratigraphy and the species compositions of fossil diatom and midge assemblages. Our data indicate that, over the past millennium, equatorial east Africa has alternated between contrasting climate conditions, with significantly drier climate than today during the `Medieval Warm Period' (~ AD 1000-1270) and a relatively wet climate during the `Little Ice Age' (~ AD 1270-1850) which was interrupted by three prolonged dry episodes. We also find strong chronological links between the reconstructed history of natural long-term rainfall variation and the pre-colonial cultural history of east Africa, highlighting the importance of a detailed knowledge of natural long-term rainfall fluctuations for sustainable socio-economic development.

  9. PVO / NGO initiatives, Africa. Kenya AIDS League Group.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    The Kenya AIDS League Group is a community based organization established in October 1994. Its main goals and objectives are to offer hardship funds for people living with HIV/AIDS and to create awareness of HIV/AIDS among the broader community. A team of 42 volunteers is engaged in information and education campaigns on HIV/AIDS. Project activities include counseling youth on STDs and visiting schools and homes to reach adolescents with HIV/AIDS prevention methods. On home visits, volunteers speak with both teenagers and their parents. Volunteers conduct outreach with groups of college students, social workers, sex workers, and street children. Income generation projects sponsored by the league are beginning to benefit people living with HIV/AIDS. For more information, please contact: Hillary S. Maloba, Kenya AIDS League Group, PO Box 731, Mumias, Kenya. PMID:12290913

  10. East African Soil Erosion Recorded in a 300 Year old Coral Colony From Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, R. B.; Fleitmann, D.; McCulloch, M.; Mudelsee, M.; Vuille, M.; McClanahan, T.; Cole, J.; Eggins, S.

    2006-12-01

    Soil erosion threatens the food security of 2.6 billion people worldwide. The situation is particularly dire in East and Sub-Saharan Africa where per capita food production has declined over the past 45 years. Erosion and the resultant loss of fertile soil is a key socio-economic and ecological problem in Kenya, affecting all sectors of its economy and damaging marine and terrestrial ecosystems. The temporal pattern of soil erosion is almost unknown and currently only sparse and rather anecdotal information exists. To aid in filling this gap of knowledge, we present a 300-year long Barium record from two Kenyan coral colonies (Porites sp., 3°15'S, 40°9' E; Malindi Marine National Park) that documents a dynamic history of soil erosion in the Sabaki river drainage basin. To reconstruct Sabaki River sediment flux to the Malindi coral reef Ba/Ca ratios were measured in the skeleton of two Porites colonies (Mal 96-1 and Mal 95-3). Well-developed annual bands allow us to develop annually precise chronologies. Ba/Ca ratios were measured in core Mal 96-1 at continuous 40 ?m intervals (~400 to 500 samples yr-1) using laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA- ICP-MS). To test for reproducibility and accuracy of the Mal 96-1 Ba/Ca profile, coral core Mal 95-3 was analyzed at lower resolution (1 to 12 samples yr-1) using discrete micro-drill sampling and isotope dilution ICP-MS. The close similarity between both coral Ba/Ca profiles, in absolute values as well as general pattern, underscores the accuracy of the LA-ICP-MS technique and adds confidence to our interpretation of the 300 year long Mal 96-1 Ba/Ca profile. The Ba/Ca coral proxy record shows that while the sediment flux from the Sabaki River is nearly constant between 1700 and 1900, a continuous rise in sediment flux is observed since 1900, reflecting steadily increasing demographic pressure on land use. The peak in suspended sediment load and hence soil erosion recorded at the Malindi reef occurred between 1974 and 1980 where there is a five to tenfold increase relative to natural levels. This is attributed to the combined effects of dramatically increasing population, unregulated land use, deforestation and severe droughts in the early 1970s. It is concluded that despite laudable attempts to instigate soil conservation measures, it is unlikely that in Kenya there will be a sustainable reduction in soil erosion without a significant improvement in socio-economic conditions.

  11. Developing High-resolution Soil Database for Regional Crop Modeling in East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, E.; Ines, A. V. M.

    2014-12-01

    The most readily available soil data for regional crop modeling in Africa is the World Inventory of Soil Emission potentials (WISE) dataset, which has 1125 soil profiles for the world, but does not extensively cover countries Ethiopia, Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania in East Africa. Another dataset available is the HC27 (Harvest Choice by IFPRI) in a gridded format (10km) but composed of generic soil profiles based on only three criteria (texture, rooting depth, and organic carbon content). In this paper, we present a development and application of a high-resolution (1km), gridded soil database for regional crop modeling in East Africa. Basic soil information is extracted from Africa Soil Information Service (AfSIS), which provides essential soil properties (bulk density, soil organic carbon, soil PH and percentages of sand, silt and clay) for 6 different standardized soil layers (5, 15, 30, 60, 100 and 200 cm) in 1km resolution. Soil hydraulic properties (e.g., field capacity and wilting point) are derived from the AfSIS soil dataset using well-proven pedo-transfer functions and are customized for DSSAT-CSM soil data requirements. The crop model is used to evaluate crop yield forecasts using the new high resolution soil database and compared with WISE and HC27. In this paper we will present also the results of DSSAT loosely coupled with a hydrologic model (VIC) to assimilate root-zone soil moisture. Creating a grid-based soil database, which provides a consistent soil input for two different models (DSSAT and VIC) is a critical part of this work. The created soil database is expected to contribute to future applications of DSSAT crop simulation in East Africa where food security is highly vulnerable.

  12. Dust Over East Africa and Israel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This scene shows a large cloud of dust blowing from northeastern Africa across Egypt, the Sinai Peninsula, over Israel and into the Middle East region on March 19, 2002. It is actually a composite image from two data sources. The true-color image of the surface was made using Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data. A false-color representation of Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) measurements of aerosol index was overlain to show the extent of the dust cloud. The aerosol index is a measure of how much ultraviolet light is absorbed by the aerosol particles within the atmosphere, and is approximately equal to the optical depth. Red areas indicate high aerosol index values and correspond to the most dense portions of the dust cloud. Yellows and greens are moderately high values. The TOMS reflectivity data shows that there were relatively few clouds in the area that day. While TOMS cannot see through clouds, the aerosol index value for clouds is zero, so that any small clouds in the region would be ignored, while still detecting the aerosols between and above the clouds.

  13. Reconstructing the origin and dispersal patterns of village chickens across East Africa: insights from autosomal markers

    PubMed Central

    Mwacharo, J M; Nomura, K; Hanada, H; Han, J L; Amano, T; Hanotte, O

    2013-01-01

    Unravelling the genetic history of any livestock species is central to understanding the origin, development and expansion of agricultural societies and economies. Domestic village chickens are widespread in Africa. Their close association with, and reliance on, humans for long-range dispersal makes the species an important biological marker in tracking cultural and trading contacts between human societies and civilizations across time. Archaezoological and linguistic evidence suggest a complex history of arrival and dispersion of the species on the continent, with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) D-loop analysis revealing the presence of five distinct haplogroups in East African village chickens. It supports the importance of the region in understanding the history of the species and indirectly of human interactions. Here, through a detailed analysis of 30 autosomal microsatellite markers genotyped in 657 village chickens from four East African countries (Kenya, Uganda, Ethiopia and Sudan), we identify three distinct autosomal gene pools (I, II and III). Gene pool I is predominantly found in Ethiopia and Sudan, while II and III occur in both Kenya and Uganda. A gradient of admixture for gene pools II and III between the Kenyan coast and Uganda's hinterland (P = 0.001) is observed, while gene pool I is clearly separated from the other two. We propose that these three gene pools represent genetic signatures of separate events in the history of the continent that relate to the arrival and dispersal of village chickens and humans across the region. Our results provide new insights on the history of chicken husbandry which has been shaped by terrestrial and maritime contacts between ancient and modern civilizations in Asia and East Africa. PMID:23611649

  14. Mshindi Kablanketi Dry Bean for East Africa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mshindi’ was derived from the single cross ‘Rojo’ x ‘Kablanketi’ made in Dec-Jan 1992-93. Mshindi was previously tested under the experimental number EG 21. Mshindi is Swahili for “Winner”. Mshindi out-yielded the check Kenya in 10 of 12 trials and had an overall yield advantage of 117%. Mshindi ha...

  15. Connecting Science and Stakeholders for Improved Drought and Crop Productivity Assessments in East Africa: Early Lessons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granger, S. L.; Macharia, D.; Andreadis, K.; Das, N. N.

    2014-12-01

    Agriculture is the 'backbone' of the economies in East Africa and is dominated by smallholder farms that are mainly rain-fed and highly vulnerable to climate change, variability, and drought. However the region lacks access to developed, reliable, and effective data and analysis to guide planning for agriculture and drought mitigation. Advances in remote sensing technologies and associated tools enable the collection and quantitative analysis of observations over large geographic regions. As such, data from remote sensing platforms have become a critical tool in developed countries for climate adaptation, water resources management, drought planning and mitigation, and agriculture. Yet barriers remain in Africa due to cost (even as costs decline), issues of sustainability, and lack of capacity and expertise. A shift must be facilitated at the policy maker and practitioner level to adopt or incorporate remote sensing observations and analysis to make better, more informed decisions for drought and agricultural management and planning. Based on an on-going NASA-USAID SERVIR East Africa Drought and Crop Productivity project, recent experience is presented to illustrate best practices and lessons learned in transitioning NASA Earth Science research results to decision making in Kenya through capacity building.

  16. The diversity, distribution and feeding behavior of solifuges (arachnida; solifugae) in Kenya

    E-print Network

    Reddick, Kristie Lynn

    2009-05-15

    Little is known of the diversity of solifuges in East Africa or their habitat preferences and feeding biologies. A survey was undertaken to improve our understanding of the diversity and distribution of solifuges in Kenya ...

  17. Distal tephras of the eastern Lake Victoria basin, equatorial East Africa: correlations, chronology and a context for early modern humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blegen, Nick; Tryon, Christian A.; Faith, J. Tyler; Peppe, Daniel J.; Beverly, Emily J.; Li, Bo; Jacobs, Zenobia

    2015-08-01

    The tephrostratigraphic framework for Pliocene and Early Pleistocene paleoanthropological sites in East Africa has been well established through nearly 50 years of research, but a similarly comprehensive framework is lacking for the Middle and particularly the Late Pleistocene. We provide the first detailed regional record of Late Pleistocene tephra deposits associated with artifacts or fossils from the Lake Victoria basin of western Kenya. Correlations of Late Pleistocene distal tephra deposits from the Wasiriya beds on Rusinga Island, the Waware beds on Mfangano Island and deposits near Karungu, mainland Kenya, are based on field stratigraphy coupled with 916 electron microprobe analyses of eleven major and minor element oxides from 50 samples. At least eight distinct distal tephra deposits are distinguished, four of which are found at multiple localities spanning >60 km over an approximately north to south transect. New optically stimulated luminescence dates help to constrain the Late Pleistocene depositional ages of these deposits. Our correlation and characterization of volcaniclastic deposits expand and refine the current stratigraphy of the eastern Lake Victoria basin. This provides the basis for relating fossil- and artifact-bearing sediments and a framework for ongoing geological, archaeological and paleontological studies of Late Pleistocene East Africa, a crucial time period for human evolution and dispersal within and out of Africa.

  18. A new species of Alhajarmyia Stuckenberg (Diptera: Vermileonidae), the first wormlion fly described from East Africa and its biogeographical implications.

    PubMed

    Swart, Vaughn R; Kirk-Spriggs, Ashley H; Copeland, Robert S

    2015-01-01

    A second species of the genus Alhajarmyia Stuckenberg (A. stuckenbergi Swart, Kirk-Spriggs & Copeland, sp. n.), is described and figured, from the Eastern Arc Mountains of Kenya (Kasigau Mountain and Taita Hills), being the first vermileonid recorded from East Africa. The species is shown to differ from its congener, A. umbraticola (Stuckenberg & Fisher), described from Oman in the Arabian Peninsula, based on external characters including male and female terminalia. An identification key is provided together with distribution maps for the two species, and biogeographical aspects are discussed. PMID:26624725

  19. Evaluation of the Distribution and Impacts of Parasites, Pathogens, and Pesticides on Honey Bee (Apis mellifera) Populations in East Africa

    PubMed Central

    Frazier, James; Torto, Baldwyn; Baumgarten, Tracey; Kilonzo, Joseph; Kimani, James Ng'ang'a; Mumoki, Fiona; Masiga, Daniel; Tumlinson, James; Grozinger, Christina

    2014-01-01

    In East Africa, honey bees (Apis mellifera) provide critical pollination services and income for small-holder farmers and rural families. While honey bee populations in North America and Europe are in decline, little is known about the status of honey bee populations in Africa. We initiated a nationwide survey encompassing 24 locations across Kenya in 2010 to evaluate the numbers and sizes of honey bee colonies, assess the presence of parasites (Varroa mites and Nosema microsporidia) and viruses, identify and quantify pesticide contaminants in hives, and assay for levels of hygienic behavior. Varroa mites were present throughout Kenya, except in the remote north. Levels of Varroa were positively correlated with elevation, suggesting that environmental factors may play a role in honey bee host-parasite interactions. Levels of Varroa were negatively correlated with levels of hygienic behavior: however, while Varroa infestation dramatically reduces honey bee colony survival in the US and Europe, in Kenya Varroa presence alone does not appear to impact colony size. Nosema apis was found at three sites along the coast and one interior site. Only a small number of pesticides at low concentrations were found. Of the seven common US/European honey bee viruses, only three were identified but, like Varroa, were absent from northern Kenya. The number of viruses present was positively correlated with Varroa levels, but was not correlated with colony size or hygienic behavior. Our results suggest that Varroa, the three viruses, and Nosema have been relatively recently introduced into Kenya, but these factors do not yet appear to be impacting Kenyan bee populations. Thus chemical control for Varroa and Nosema are not necessary for Kenyan bees at this time. This study provides baseline data for future analyses of the possible mechanisms underlying resistance to and the long-term impacts of these factors on African bee populations. PMID:24740399

  20. Concentrations, distribution, sources and risk assessment of organohalogenated contaminants in soils from Kenya, Eastern Africa.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hongwei; Qi, Yueling; Zhang, Di; Li, Qing X; Wang, Jun

    2016-02-01

    The organohalogenated contaminants (OCs) including 12 organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), 7 indicator polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and 7 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were determined in soils collected from Kenya, Eastern Africa. The total OCPs fell in the range of n.d-49.74 ?g kg(-1) dry weight (dw), which was dominated by DDTs and endosulfan. Identification of pollution sources indicated new input of DDTs for malaria control in Kenya. The total PCBs ranged from n.d. to 55.49 ?g kg(-1) dw, dominated by penta- and hexa-PCBs, probably associated with the leakage of obsolete transformer oil. The soils were less contaminated by PBDEs, ranging from 0.19 to 35.64 ?g kg(-1) dw. The predominant PBDE congeners were penta-, tri- or tetra-BDEs, varying among different sampling sites. Risk assessment indicated potential human health risks posed by OCs in soils from Kenya, with PCBs as the most contributing pollutants. The local authorities are recommended to make best efforts on management of OC pollution, particularly from DDTs and PCBs to meet the requirement of Stockholm Convention. PMID:26686059

  1. 76 FR 55456 - The Trade and Investment Partnership for the Middle East and North Africa

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ... TRADE REPRESENTATIVE The Trade and Investment Partnership for the Middle East and North Africa AGENCY..., 2011, speech on recent developments in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, the President... Middle East and North Africa Trade'' in the ``Type comment & Upload file:'' field on...

  2. Pluralistic Modelling Approaches to Simulating Climate-Land Change Interactions in East Africa

    E-print Network

    1 Pluralistic Modelling Approaches to Simulating Climate- Land Change Interactions in East Africa@purdue.edu Keywords: Land use, climate change, expert systems, role playing games, qualitative models, East Africa to understand how climate change impacts changes in land use in East Africa. A role playing game model has been

  3. Epidemiology of cardiovascular diseases in Africa with special reference to Kenya: an overview.

    PubMed

    Lore, W

    1993-06-01

    At the beginning of this century, high blood pressure was virtually non-existent among the indigenous Kenyans. This phenomenon of normotension continued until the Second World War following which the Kenyan African began to exhibit progressive rise in blood pressure which was age-related. Similar changes were observed in Uganda at the same time. From about 25 years ago, high blood pressure became established in Kenya and the neighbouring countries, in particular Uganda. These trends have been observed in West Africa notably Ghana, Nigeria, Cote d'Ivoire and also in Cameroon and Zaire in the Central African region. Consumption of sodium salt and alcohol, psychological stress, obesity, physical inactivity and other dietary factors are thought to play important aetiologic role in the genesis of primary hypertension in the susceptible individuals. Low blood pressure communities still exist scattered all over the world, where blood pressure does not seem to rise with age. In Africa these have been observed in Kenya, Nigeria, Zaire and Kalahari Desert. They also exist in Pacific island, Australia, South America and elsewhere. Rural-urban migration coupled with acculturation and modernization trends have some relationship with the development of high blood pressure as observed in Kenyan and Ghanian epidemiologic studies. PMID:8261957

  4. CEDPA Africa Office honors Kenya M.P. Phoebe Asiyo, WIM 1.

    PubMed

    Kairu, M

    1993-10-01

    The discussion highlights the accomplishments of Phoebe Asiyo, who was an alumna of the first Women in Management (WIM) workshops of CEDPA Africa and a Member of Parliament from Western Kenya. Phoebe Asiyo was honored by over 100 guests at a CEDPA Africa Regional Office reception in Nairobi. CEDPA's president remarked that the Honorable Mrs. Asiyo had worked very hard on women's issues in her lifetime with enthusiasm, fresh ideas, and challenges to continue working with and for women. Mrs. Asiyo was elected to Parliament in 1992 as one of six other women after involvement in the Kenya campaign for democracy. Since independence, the number of women legislators has been the highest. Her legislative efforts were encouraged and sustained by involvement in the 1978 WIM workshop, after which she was elected to Parliament (1980). Between 1980 and 1988, there were only two women members: (Mrs. Asiyo and another). Between 1988 and 1992, Mrs. Asiyo served as ambassador to UNIFEM, the UN Development Fund for Women. Mrs. Asiyo considers that women's contribution to political life has been to provide the kind of leadership that empowers and enables the poor and grassroots communities to take control of their lives and their communities. Leaders in power are held accountable for their impact on an impoverished population, with new standards initiated by women. This type of leadership leads to long-term betterment in living conditions. PMID:12345285

  5. Reducing the Burden of Cancer in East Africa

    Cancer.gov

    The mission of CGH is to advance global cancer research, build expertise, and leverage resources across nations to reduce cancer deaths worldwide. To carry out that mission, we facilitate the sharing of knowledge and expertise. CGH's latest effort, the East Africa Cancer Control Leadership Forum, carried out this mission by helping African partners develop their own individual cancer control programs.

  6. Towards an integrated soil moisture drought monitor for East Africa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drought in East Africa is a recurring phenomenon with significant humanitarian impacts. Given the steep climatic gradients, topographic contrasts, general data scarcity, and, in places, political instability that characterize the region, there is a need for spatially distributed, remotely derived mo...

  7. Aspects of Education in the Middle East and North Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Colin, Ed.; Levers, Lila Zia

    2007-01-01

    The chapters in this volume do not represent the whole of the Middle East and North Africa, as such a collection would have been too large for one volume. Rather, the selection here is intended to present different perspectives on a range of educational issues, relevant to a particular focus or country, or common to a number of countries in the…

  8. Our University: Ethnicity, Higher Education and the Quest for State Legitimacy in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munene, Ishmael I.

    2012-01-01

    In East Africa, no other country has witnessed as great a surge in university institutions as Kenya. The intent of this paper is to explore the persistence of the ethnic configurations in the surge of higher education in Kenya, within the context of the country's history. Outlining the major flashpoints in the country's history will be…

  9. Regional Initiatives in Support of Surveillance in East Africa: The East Africa Integrated Disease Surveillance Network (EAIDSNet) Experience

    PubMed Central

    Ope, Maurice; Sonoiya, Stanley; Kariuki, James; Mboera, Leonard E.G.; Gandham, Ramana N.V.; Schneidman, Miriam; Kimura, Mwihaki

    2013-01-01

    The East African Integrated Disease Surveillance Network (EAIDSNet) was formed in response to a growing frequency of cross-border malaria outbreaks in the 1990s and a growing recognition that fragmented disease interventions, coupled with weak laboratory capacity, were making it difficult to respond in a timely manner to the outbreaks of malaria and other infectious diseases. The East Africa Community (EAC) partner states, with financial support from the Rockefeller Foundation, established EAIDSNet in 2000 to develop and strengthen the communication channels necessary for integrated cross-border disease surveillance and control efforts. The objective of this paper is to review the regional EAIDSNet initiative and highlight achievements and challenges in its implementation. Major accomplishments of EAIDSNet include influencing the establishment of a Department of Health within the EAC Secretariat to support a regional health agenda; successfully completing a regional field simulation exercise in pandemic influenza preparedness; and piloting a web-based portal for linking animal and human health disease surveillance. The strategic direction of EAIDSNet was shaped, in part, by lessons learned following a visit to the more established Mekong Basin Disease Surveillance (MBDS) regional network. Looking to the future, EAIDSNet is collaborating with the East, Central and Southern Africa Health Community (ECSA-HC), EAC partner states, and the World Health Organization to implement the World Bank-funded East Africa Public Health Laboratory Networking Project (EAPHLNP). The network has also begun lobbying East African countries for funding to support EAIDSNet activities. PMID:23362409

  10. The development of the East African Rift system in north-central Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackman, B. D.; Charsley, T. J.; Key, R. M.; Wilkinson, A. F.

    1990-11-01

    Between 1980 and 1986 geological surveying to produce maps on a scale of 1:250,000 was completed over an area of over 100,000 km 2 in north-central Kenya, bounded by the Equator, the Ethiopian border and longitudes 36° and 38 °E. The Gregory Rift, much of which has the structure of an asymmetric half-graben, is the most prominent component of the Cenozoic multiple rift system which extends up to 200 km to the east and for about 100 km to the west, forming the Kenya dome. On the eastern shoulder and fringes two en echelon arrays of late Tertiary to Quaternary multicentre shields can be recognized: to the south is the Aberdares-Mount Kenya-Nyambeni Range chain and, to the north the clusters of Mount Kulal, Asie, Huri Hills and Marsabit, with plateau lavas and fissure vents south of Marsabit in the Laisamis area. The Gregory Rift terminates at the southern end of Lake Turkana. Further north the rift system splays: the arcuate Kinu Sogo fault zone forms an offset link with the central Ethiopian Rift system. In the rifts of north-central Kenya volcanism, sedimentation and extensional tectonics commenced and have been continuous since the late Oligocene. Throughout this period the Elgeyo Fault acted as a major bounding fault. A comparative study of the northern and eastern fringes of the Kenya dome with the axial graben reinforces the impression of regional E-W asymmetry. Deviations from the essential N-trend of the Gregory Rift reflect structural weaknesses in the underlying Proterozoic basement, the Mozambique Orogenic Belt: thus south of Lake Baringo the swing to the southeast parallels the axes of the ca. 620 Ma phase folds. Secondary faults associated with this flexure have created a "shark tooth" array, an expression of en echelon offsets of the eastern margin of the Gregory Rift in a transtensional stress regime: hinge zones where major faults intersect on the eastern shoulder feature intense box faulting and ramp structures which have counterparts in the rift system in southern Ethiopia. The NE- and ENE-trending fissures of the eastern fringes of the Kenya dome, notably in the Meru-Nyambeni areaand in the Huri and Marsabit shields, parallel late orogenic structures dated at around 580-480 Ma. Alkaline trends characterize the petrochemistry of the Cenozoic volcanics: In the Gregory Rift, voluminous Miocene alkali basalts, associated with hawaiite/mugearite lavas, define a trend culminating in the Miocene flood phonolites of the eastern shoulderand in the trachyphonolites, trachytes and peralkaline rhyolites, with associated pyroclastics, in central volcanoes such as Korosi, Paka and Silali. Such trends may manifest in the products of a single volcanic centre, also regionally on a broadly cyclic basis. On the eastern flanks of the Kenya dome the flood phonolites are less evident, but the same alkaline trends dominate the lava sequences, supplemented by nephelinitic extrusives in parts of the Nyambeni Range and in the Laisamis area. Results from recent seismicity surveys in the Laisamis area indicate that crustal extension may be currently active on the eastern fringes of the Kenya dome, but manifest at greater depths than in the axial Gregory Rift-Lake Turkana zone: a correlation is suggested with the ultra-alkaline petrochemistry of some of the eastern multicentre shields.

  11. Emerging diseases of Africa and the Middle East.

    PubMed

    Rweyemamu, M; Paskin, R; Benkirane, A; Martin, V; Roeder, P; Wojciechowski, K

    2000-01-01

    The term "emerging diseases" has been used recently to refer to different scenarios, all of which indicate changes in the dynamics of disease in the population. Of the OIE List A diseases, major changes have been experienced with rinderpest, peste des petit ruminants (PPR), contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP), foot-and-mouth disease, African swine fever, lumpy skin disease, and Rift Valley fever. Rinderpest represents a success story of the 1990s, thanks to the programs of the Pan African Rinderpest Campaign (PARC). The situation has changed from that of the 1980s when rinderpest was widespread throughout most of Tropical Africa and the Middle East. PPR is a disease that has become of increasing importance throughout Tropical Africa and the Middle East. CBPP, which had previously been reduced to sporadic incidence within endemic areas, invaded new areas, causing heavy mortality. African swine fever has extended to West Africa and to Madagascar, in both regions resulting in heavy losses. Climatic changes in both East and West Africa were associated with an upsurge of Rift Valley fever. Deficiencies in national veterinary services have contributed to failures in early detection and response; in many regions investigation and diagnosis services have deteriorated. The continuing structural adjustment program for national veterinary services will need to take into account their transformation from providers of services (e.g., vaccinations, medicines) to inspection and quality assurance services. Surveillance, early warning, and disease emergency preparedness will need to be pursued more vigorously in Africa and the Middle East as vital components of national veterinary services. PMID:11193683

  12. A 17-My-old whale constrains onset of uplift and climate change in east Africa

    PubMed Central

    Wichura, Henry; Lin, Andrew; Polcyn, Michael J.; Manthi, Fredrick K.; Winkler, Dale A.; Strecker, Manfred R.; Clemens, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Timing and magnitude of surface uplift are key to understanding the impact of crustal deformation and topographic growth on atmospheric circulation, environmental conditions, and surface processes. Uplift of the East African Plateau is linked to mantle processes, but paleoaltimetry data are too scarce to constrain plateau evolution and subsequent vertical motions associated with rifting. Here, we assess the paleotopographic implications of a beaked whale fossil (Ziphiidae) from the Turkana region of Kenya found 740 km inland from the present-day coastline of the Indian Ocean at an elevation of 620 m. The specimen is ?17 My old and represents the oldest derived beaked whale known, consistent with molecular estimates of the emergence of modern strap-toothed whales (Mesoplodon). The whale traveled from the Indian Ocean inland along an eastward-directed drainage system controlled by the Cretaceous Anza Graben and was stranded slightly above sea level. Surface uplift from near sea level coincides with paleoclimatic change from a humid environment to highly variable and much drier conditions, which altered biotic communities and drove evolution in east Africa, including that of primates. PMID:25775586

  13. A 17-My-old whale constrains onset of uplift and climate change in east Africa.

    PubMed

    Wichura, Henry; Jacobs, Louis L; Lin, Andrew; Polcyn, Michael J; Manthi, Fredrick K; Winkler, Dale A; Strecker, Manfred R; Clemens, Matthew

    2015-03-31

    Timing and magnitude of surface uplift are key to understanding the impact of crustal deformation and topographic growth on atmospheric circulation, environmental conditions, and surface processes. Uplift of the East African Plateau is linked to mantle processes, but paleoaltimetry data are too scarce to constrain plateau evolution and subsequent vertical motions associated with rifting. Here, we assess the paleotopographic implications of a beaked whale fossil (Ziphiidae) from the Turkana region of Kenya found 740 km inland from the present-day coastline of the Indian Ocean at an elevation of 620 m. The specimen is ? 17 My old and represents the oldest derived beaked whale known, consistent with molecular estimates of the emergence of modern strap-toothed whales (Mesoplodon). The whale traveled from the Indian Ocean inland along an eastward-directed drainage system controlled by the Cretaceous Anza Graben and was stranded slightly above sea level. Surface uplift from near sea level coincides with paleoclimatic change from a humid environment to highly variable and much drier conditions, which altered biotic communities and drove evolution in east Africa, including that of primates. PMID:25775586

  14. What are the constraints and opportunities for HIVST scale-up in Africa? Evidence from Kenya, Malawi and South Africa

    PubMed Central

    van Rooyen, Heidi; Tulloch, Olivia; Mukoma, Wanjiru; Makusha, Tawanda; Chepuka, Lignet; Knight, Lucia C; Peck, Roger B; Lim, Jeanette M; Muturi, Nelly; Chirwa, Ellen; Taegtmeyer, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction HIV self-testing (HIVST) has the potential to increase uptake of HIV testing among untested populations in sub-Saharan Africa and is on the brink of scale-up. However, it is unclear to what extent HIVST would be supported by stakeholders, what policy frameworks are in place and how variations between contexts might influence country-preparedness for scale-up. This qualitative study assessed the perceptions of HIVST among stakeholders in three sub-Saharan countries. Methods Fifty-four key informant interviews were conducted in Kenya (n=16), Malawi (n=26) and South Africa (n=12) with government policy makers, academics, activists, donors, procurement specialists, laboratory practitioners and health providers. A thematic analysis was conducted in each country and a common coding framework allowed for inter-country analysis to identify common and divergent themes across contexts. Results Respondents welcomed the idea of an accurate, easy-to-use, rapid HIV self-test which could increase testing across all populations. High-risk groups, such as men, Men who have sex with men (MSM), couples and young people in particular, could be targeted through a range of health facility and community-based distribution points. HIVST is already endorsed in Kenya, and political support for scale-up exists in South Africa and Malawi. However, several caveats remain. Further research, policy and ensuing guidelines should consider how to regulate, market and distribute HIVST, ensure quality assurance of tests and human rights, and critically, link testing to appropriate support and treatment services. Low literacy levels in some target groups would also need context-specific consideration before scale up. World Health Organization (WHO) policy and regulatory frameworks are needed to guide the process in those areas which are new or specific to self-testing. Conclusions Stakeholders in three HIV endemic sub-Saharan countries felt that HIVST will be an important complement to existing community and facility-based testing approaches if accompanied by the same essential components of any HIV testing service, including access to accurate information and linkages to care. While there is an increasingly positive global policy environment regarding HIVST, several implementation and social challenges limit scale-up. There is a need for further research to provide contextual and operational evidence that addresses concerns and contributes to normative WHO guidance. PMID:25797344

  15. One Health: Lessons Learned from East Africa.

    PubMed

    Travis, Dominic A; Chapman, David W; Craft, Meggan E; Deen, John; Farnham, MacDonald W; Garcia, Carolyn; Hueston, William D; Kock, Richard; Mahero, Michael; Mugisha, Lawrence; Nzietchueng, Serge; Nutter, Felicia B; Olson, Debra; Pekol, Amy; Pelican, Katharine M; Robertson, Cheryl; Rwego, Innocent B

    2014-02-01

    Africa is faced with many of the most daunting challenges of our time. It comprises roughly 15% of the world's human population, and most of its countries are perpetually ranked "Low" on the United Nations' Human Development Index. On the other hand, Africa has arguably the largest proportion of intact natural ecosystems, biodiversity, and sociocultural capital and the lowest impact on global warming of any continent. Thus, African leaders are faced with competing demands and values among a multitude of complex issues, such as high human population growth, extreme poverty, food insecurity, land use policy, climate change, and biodiversity conservation. In this context, building sustainable national systems for human and/or animal health is one of the grand challenges of this generation. Today's complex global health and development challenges require long-term commitment and a range of approaches that are too broad for any one discipline, institution, or country to implement on its own. The One Health concept recognizes the interconnectedness of global health issues and, as such, promotes the importance of and need for international, interdisciplinary, and cross-sectoral communication and collaboration at local, national, and international levels. By taking advantage of natural cultural tendencies for shared leadership, resource allocation, and community values, African leaders are currently proactively demonstrating the principles of One Health, and thus becoming a model for this global vision. And by focusing on partnerships rather than donor-recipient relationships, they are fostering the development of shared priorities and are increasingly driving their own health agenda to fulfill their own needs. PMID:26082115

  16. Protected areas: mixed success in conserving East Africa's evergreen forests.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, Marion; Burgess, Neil D; Swetnam, Ruth D; Platts, Philip J; Willcock, Simon; Marchant, Robert

    2012-01-01

    In East Africa, human population growth and demands for natural resources cause forest loss contributing to increased carbon emissions and reduced biodiversity. Protected Areas (PAs) are intended to conserve habitats and species. Variability in PA effectiveness and 'leakage' (here defined as displacement of deforestation) may lead to different trends in forest loss within, and adjacent to, existing PAs. Here, we quantify spatial variation in trends of evergreen forest coverage in East Africa between 2001 and 2009, and test for correlations with forest accessibility and environmental drivers. We investigate PA effectiveness at local, landscape and national scales, comparing rates of deforestation within park boundaries with those detected in park buffer zones and in unprotected land more generally. Background forest loss (BFL) was estimated at -9.3% (17,167 km(2)), but varied between countries (range: -0.9% to -85.7%; note: no BFL in South Sudan). We document high variability in PA effectiveness within and between PA categories. The most successful PAs were National Parks, although only 26 out of 48 parks increased or maintained their forest area (i.e. Effective parks). Forest Reserves (Ineffective parks, i.e. parks that lose forest from within boundaries: 204 out of 337), Nature Reserves (six out of 12) and Game Parks (24 out of 26) were more likely to lose forest cover. Forest loss in buffer zones around PAs exceeded background forest loss, in some areas indicating leakage driven by Effective National Parks. Human pressure, forest accessibility, protection status, distance to fires and long-term annual rainfall were highly significant drivers of forest loss in East Africa. Some of these factors can be addressed by adjusting park management. However, addressing close links between livelihoods, natural capital and poverty remains a fundamental challenge in East Africa's forest conservation efforts. PMID:22768074

  17. Climate and Land Use Change Processes in East Africa While some regions of East Africa are being preserved as natural areas, others, including the

    E-print Network

    Climate and Land Use Change Processes in East Africa While some regions of East Africa are being of the project is to establish the mechanisms that determine how climate and land use (primarily in the human-mediated realm, but also land use change through natural processes) interact with each other and possibly

  18. Fission-track dating of pumice from the KBS Tuff, East Rudolf, Kenya

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hurford, A.J.; Gleadow, A.J.W.; Naeser, C.W.

    1976-01-01

    Fission-track dating of zircon separated from two pumice samples from the KBS Tuff in the Koobi Fora Formation, in Area 131, East Rudolf, Kenya, gives an age of 2.44??0.08 Myr for the eruption of the pumice. This result is compatible with the previously published K-Ar and 40Ar/ 39Ar age spectrum estimate of 2.61??0.26 Myr for the KBS Tuff in Area 105, but differs from the more recently published K-Ar date of 1.82??0.04 Myr for the KBS Tuff in Area 131. This study does not support the suggestion that pumice cobbles of different ages occur in the KBS Tuff. ?? 1976 Nature Publishing Group.

  19. Bacillary Angiomatosis Masquerading as Kaposi’s Sarcoma in East Africa

    PubMed Central

    Forrestel, A. K.; Naujokas, A.; Martin, J. N.; Maurer, T. A.; McCalmont, T. H.; Laker-Opwonya, M. O.; Mulyowa, G.; Busakhala, N.; Amerson, Erin H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Bacillary angiomatosis (BA) is a rare manifestation of infection caused by Bartonella species, which leads to vasoproliferative lesions of skin and other organs. Bacillary angiomatosis affects individuals with advanced HIV disease or other immunocompromised individuals. In sub-Saharan Africa, despite the high prevalence of HIV infection and documentation of the causative Bartonella species in humans, mammalian hosts, and arthropod vectors, BA has only rarely been described. Methods Three adult patients from Uganda and Kenya with deep purple dome-shaped papules or nodules of the skin underwent punch biopsies for histopathologic diagnosis. The biopsies of all 3 patients were sent to a local pathologist as well as to a dermatopathologist at the University of California, San Francisco. Results All 3 patients were clinically suspected to have Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS), and local pathologists had interpreted the lesions as KS in 2 of the cases and nonspecific inflammation in the third. Histologic examination by dermatopathologists in the United States revealed nodular dermal proliferations of irregular capillaries lined by spindled to epithelioid endothelial cells. The surrounding stroma contained a mixed inflammatory infiltrate with lymphocytes, eosinophils, and neutrophils. Extracellular deposits of pale amphophilic granular material were noted in the surrounding stroma. A Warthin-Starry stain highlighted clumps of bacilli, confirming the diagnosis of BA. Conclusions These 3 cases, to our knowledge, are the first reports of BA in East Africa in the biomedical literature. Each had been originally incorrectly diagnosed as KS. We speculate BA is underdiagnosed and underreported in resource-poor regions, such as sub- Saharan Africa, that have high endemic rates of HIV infection. PMID:24718378

  20. Protected Areas: Mixed Success in Conserving East Africa’s Evergreen Forests

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, Marion; Burgess, Neil D.; Swetnam, Ruth D.; Platts, Philip J.; Willcock, Simon; Marchant, Robert

    2012-01-01

    In East Africa, human population growth and demands for natural resources cause forest loss contributing to increased carbon emissions and reduced biodiversity. Protected Areas (PAs) are intended to conserve habitats and species. Variability in PA effectiveness and ‘leakage’ (here defined as displacement of deforestation) may lead to different trends in forest loss within, and adjacent to, existing PAs. Here, we quantify spatial variation in trends of evergreen forest coverage in East Africa between 2001 and 2009, and test for correlations with forest accessibility and environmental drivers. We investigate PA effectiveness at local, landscape and national scales, comparing rates of deforestation within park boundaries with those detected in park buffer zones and in unprotected land more generally. Background forest loss (BFL) was estimated at ?9.3% (17,167 km2), but varied between countries (range: ?0.9% to ?85.7%; note: no BFL in South Sudan). We document high variability in PA effectiveness within and between PA categories. The most successful PAs were National Parks, although only 26 out of 48 parks increased or maintained their forest area (i.e. Effective parks). Forest Reserves (Ineffective parks, i.e. parks that lose forest from within boundaries: 204 out of 337), Nature Reserves (six out of 12) and Game Parks (24 out of 26) were more likely to lose forest cover. Forest loss in buffer zones around PAs exceeded background forest loss, in some areas indicating leakage driven by Effective National Parks. Human pressure, forest accessibility, protection status, distance to fires and long-term annual rainfall were highly significant drivers of forest loss in East Africa. Some of these factors can be addressed by adjusting park management. However, addressing close links between livelihoods, natural capital and poverty remains a fundamental challenge in East Africa’s forest conservation efforts. PMID:22768074

  1. Ahmed Glaucoma Valve Implant: Experience in East Africa

    PubMed Central

    Kiage, D.O.; Gradin, D.; Gichuhi, S.; Damji, K.F.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To describe short term outcomes of Ahmed Glaucoma Valve [AGV] implantation in East African patients. Materials and Methods: In this multi-center retrospective case series we reviewed eyes of Black African patients with refractory glaucoma, treated consecutively with Ahmed Glaucoma Valve implantation, in two centers in Kenya between January 2006 and October 2007. Results: About 25 cases including 18 [72%] pediatric eyes and seven [28%] adult eyes were identified. Results have been presented with a median follow-up of two months with inter-quartile range [IQR] of one to 12 months. intraocular pressure [IOP] was reduced from a mean of 36.4 mmHg preoperatively to 16.7 mmHg and glaucoma medications were lowered from a mean of 1.32 before surgery to 0.2 after surgery. The success rate during short term follow-up was 79%. The mean visual acuity dropped slightly from 6/18 pre-operatively to 6/24. There was only one major complication of an extruded, infected valve in a child. Conclusions: The Ahmed Valve Implant is safe and effective in lowering IOP for the short term in pediatric and adult East African patients with refractory glaucoma. Further studies with more patients and longer term follow-up are needed in this population. PMID:20142983

  2. International energy outlook. Volume 1. Mideast, Far East, and Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    The developing nations of the Mideast, Far East, and Africa face a bleaker - and more-complicated - energy picture than that of the West. Rapid industrial and agricultural expansion in the region severely drains already-inadequate energy systems. Energy-importing countries find they must diversify and develop indigenous resources, but often lack the technical known-how to do so. Volume 1 is a compilation of official US government intelligence reports examining the way 22 countries in the Mideast, Far East, and Africa are responding to the energy problems. The countries covered are: Algeria, Australia, Burma, China, Egypt, Gabon, India, Indonesia, Ivory Coast, Japan, Korea, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Mozambique, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Sudan, Taiwan, Tunisia and Turkey. The range and detail of country reports vary, due to availability of reports. Although the book details current energy situations, its main emphasis is on the future, including estimates of future production and consumption, and descriptions of energy development plans. Some of the countries in this region are fortunate to have petrochemical resources, while electric energy expansion is crucial to national development in all. Coal will be filling the gap left by diminishing oil supplies. 61 tables.

  3. Landscape feedbacks, Climate Change, and Food Production Risk in East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, N.; Pijanowski, B.; Lofgren, B.; Alagarswamy, G.

    2008-12-01

    Land Cover/ Land Use Change (LCLUC) and climate change due to elevated levels of greenhouse gases (GHG) both exert strong influence over agricultural production in developing countries. In addition, LCLUC is a first-order climate forcing capable of mitigating or exacerbating GHG effects on climate. LCLUC and GHG forcings that alter climate may then in turn influence agricultural systems, thereby creating a feedback to LCLUC. These human-land-climate interactions are complex- particularly in heterogeneous landscapes like East Africa- where subsistence farming and highly variable growing season conditions are excellent for investigating the nature and magnitude of these interactions. Here we present results of a sensitivity test exploring these feedbacks in Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Rwanda, and Burundi. First, we assess the impacts of "aggressive" agricultural expansion and generally warmer, wetter boundary conditions due to large increases in GHG for 2050-2059 using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). These results are contrasted to simulations conducted for 2000- 2009 conditions. Second, we examine simulated changes in agricultural yield using the process-based crop model CERES-Maize; we use maize as a proxy for all East African agricultural productivity. These simulated yields are imported into the Land Transformation Model (LTM), which, informed by socioeconomic constraints, develops a new projection of land cover under the new yield conditions. Third, by comparing the original "aggressive" landscape with the new yield-feedback landscape, we show areas exhibiting sensitivity to LCLUC under elevated GHG conditions. Although this is a mere sensitivity test, we can identify areas prone to potential food production disturbances. These sensitive areas, while unlikely to see climate and landscape changes this dramatic, can serve as "canaries in the coal mine" for predicting larger changes in East African food production. Additionally, we discuss key challenges of propagating error in coupling these systems.

  4. 2H/1H composition of soil n-alkanes along two altitudinal transects in East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffinet, Sarah; Huguet, Arnaud; Pedentchouk, Nikolai; Omuombo, Christine; Williamson, David; Bergonzini, Laurent; Wagner, Thomas; Derenne, Sylvie

    2015-04-01

    Long chains n-alkanes are components of terrestrial plant leaf waxes that are ubiquitously found in geological archives. They have been extensively used to track environmental and ecological variations in the past, notably changes in vegetation communities. Recent analytical developments led to the possibility of measuring their deuterium to hydrogen isotopic ratio (?2Hwax). This parameter is suggested to be linked to hydrogen isotope ratio of precipitations (?2Hp). In 2008, Jia et al. proposed to use soil derived ?2 Hwax as a paleoelevation proxy since precipitations are known to get more depleted in deuterium with altitude. They found a linear correlation (R2 0.73) between ?2Hwax in surface soils and altitude along Mt. Gongga (China). Since then, the correlation between ?2Hwax and ?2Hp was shown for several other altitudinal transects. Contrary to these previous observations, however, no trend with altitude was observed in East Africa along an altitudinal gradient in Mt. Kilimanjaro (North eastern, Tanzania, Peterse et al., 2009 and Zech et al., 2014). What is the reason for this absence of trend? Is it because of a difference between African and Asian soils? Or is it specific to Mt. Kilimanjaro? To get an insight into this problem, we determined ?2Hwax in 41 surface soils sampled along two altitudinal transects: from 500 to 2800 m in Mt. Rungwe (South-western Tanzania) and from 1897 to 3268 m in Mt. Kenya (Central Kenya). The goal of the study was to further investigate the conditions of applicability of this proxy in East Africa. A correlation between soil derived ?2Hwax and altitude was observed along Mt. Kenya (?2Hwax=20.2*ALT-88.0, R2=0.51) but not along Mt. Rungwe - similarly to Mt. Kilimanjaro (Peterse et al., 2009; Zech et al., 2014). This contrast between Mt. Kenya on one hand and Mts. Rungwe and Kilimanjaro on the other hand may be explained by differences in topography. These results highlight the complexity of the signal recorded by ?2H, and particularly soil ?2Hwax with regard to its use as a paleoelevation proxy. References: Jia, G., et al. 2008, Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 72. Peterse, F., 2009, Biogeosciences 6. Zech, M. et al., 2014, Biogeosciences Discussions 11.

  5. Holocene Monsoon variability in East Africa: a marine perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romahn, S.; Mackensen, A.; Groeneveld, J.; Pätzold, J.

    2012-12-01

    The processes that control past monsoon variability in the East African Tropics during the Holocene are poorly understood. Especially the role of Sea Surface Temperatures (SST) controlling East African Rainfall on millennial timescales, as it is observed on decadal timescales, is currently intensely debated. In addition, it has been suggested recently that the longitudinal migration of the Congo Air Boundary (CAB) modulates East African precipitation on a regional scale as well [Tierney et al., 2011]. Here, we present a high-resolution marine sediment record for the past 12 kyrs from offshore Tanzania, close to the Rufiji River delta, to contribute to the current debate from a marine point of view. We reconstructed past SST and ?18Oseawater, derived from planktic foraminiferal Mg/Ca and ?18O, and past Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) variations, derived from planktic foraminiferal Ba/Ca-ratios. In the vicinity of river deltas, Ba/Ca-ratios have potential to record precipitation changes in the rivers' catchment area. Our records show that East African precipitation, derived from Ba/Ca-ratios, roughly varies in concert with Indian Ocean SST, suggesting higher Indian Ocean SST to be an important prerequisite for stronger precipitation, and hence an intense monsoon episode in East Africa. We calculated the difference (?SST) between our record of Indian Ocean SST and SST of the tropical Atlantic [Weldeab et al., 2005], showing that ?SST variability resembles the isotopic pattern of the Kilimanjaro ice core record [Thompson et al., 2002]. We suggest this to be the consequence of a longitudinal movement of the CAB over the African Continent, changing the trajectory of Indian Ocean moisture into the continent and therefore affecting the ?18O of the East African rainout. Thompson, L. G., et al. (2002), Kilimanjaro Ice Core Records: Evidence of Holocene Climate Change in Tropical Africa, Science, 298, 589-593. Tierney, J. E., et al. (2011), Late Quaternary behavior of the East African monsoon and the importance of the Congo Air Boundary, Quaternary Science Reviews, 30, 798-807. Weldeab, S., et al. (2005), Holocene African droughts relate to eastern equatorial Atlantic cooling, Geology, 33, 981 -984.

  6. The 17 Ma old Turkana beaked whale fossil: new paleoaltimetry constraints for uplift and environmental change in East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wichura, Henry; Jacobs, Louis L.; Strecker, Manfred R.; Lin, Andrew; Polcyn, Michael J.; Manthi, Fredrick K.; Winkler, Dale A.; Matthew, Clemens

    2015-04-01

    Timing and magnitude of vertical motions of the Earth's crust is key to evaluate the impact of tectonic processes on changes in atmospheric circulation patterns, rainfall, and environmental conditions. The East African Plateau (EAP) is a major topographic feature that fundamentally impacts the patterns of the Indian-African Monsoon and the eastward transport of air masses from the Congo Basin. Uplift of the EAP in Kenya has been linked to mantle processes, but due to the lack of reliable palaeoaltimetric data it has been challenging to unambiguously constrain plateau evolution, vertical motions associated with late Cenozoic rifting of the East African Rift System, and ensuing environmental change. We explored the fossil remains of a beaked whale (Ziphiidae) from the Turkana region in the northern Kenya Rift, 700 km inland from the present-day coastline of the Indian Ocean. The whale fossil, preserved near sea level, was discovered at an elevation of 620 m and thus constrains the uplift of the northeastern flanks of the EAP. The Kenyan ziphiid was discovered in fluvio-lacustrine sediments of the extensional Oligo-Miocene Lokichar basin (Mead, 1975) along with terrestrial mammals and freshwater molluscs below a basalt dated at 17.1 ± 1.0 Ma (Boschetto et al., 1992). The unifying characteristics of riverine occurrences of modern marine mammals include sufficient discharge in low-gradient rivers to maintain pathways deep enough to facilitate migration, and the absence of shallow bedrock, rapids, and waterfalls. The most likely route, which may have had these characteristics is a fluvial corridor controlled by protracted thermal subsidence of the Cretaceous Anza Rift, which once linked extensional processes in Central and East Africa with the continental margin of northeastern Africa. The fossil locality and analogies with present-day occurrences of marine mammals in terrestrial realms suggest that the ziphiid stranded slightly above sea level. In combination with Miocene lava flows that utilized eastward-directed drainages away from the EAP the fossil find thus provides the older of only two empirical palaeoelevation points that constrain the onset of uplift of the EAP to the interval between approximately 17 and 13 Ma. Our results show that topographic uplift of the EAP is a viable mechanism that induced palaeoclimatic change from a low-elevation humid environment to highly variable, much drier conditions, which altered biotic communities and drove evolution in East Africa, including that of primates.

  7. Mineral facilities of Africa and the Middle East

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eros, J.M.; Candelario-Quintana, Luissette

    2006-01-01

    This map displays over 1,500 mineral facilities in Africa and the Middle East. The mineral facilities include mines, plants, mills, or refineries of aluminum, cement, coal, copper, diamond, gold, iron and steel, nickel, platinum-group metals, salt, and silver, among others. The data used in this poster were compiled from multiple sources, including the 2004 USGS Minerals Yearbook (Africa and Middle East volume), Minerals Statistics and Information from the USGS Web site (http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/), and data collected by USGS minerals information country specialists. Data reflect the most recent published table of industry structure for each country. Other sources include statistical publications of individual countries, annual reports and press releases of operating companies, and trade journals. Due to the sensitivity of some energy commodity data, the quality of these data should be evaluated on a country-by-country basis. Additional information and explanation is available from the country specialists. See Table 1 for general information about each mineral facility site including country, location and facility name, facility type, latitude, longitude, mineral commodity, mining method, main operating company, status, capacity, and units.

  8. Evaluating Downscaling Methods for Seasonal Climate Forecasts over East Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, J. Brent; Robertson, Franklin R.; Bosilovich, Michael; Lyon, Bradfield; Funk, Chris

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. National Multi-Model Ensemble seasonal forecasting system is providing hindcast and real-time data streams to be used in assessing and improving seasonal predictive capacity. The NASA / USAID SERVIR project, which leverages satellite and modeling-based resources for environmental decision making in developing nations, is focusing on the evaluation of NMME forecasts specifically for use in impact modeling within hub regions including East Africa, the Hindu Kush-Himalayan (HKH) region and Mesoamerica. One of the participating models in NMME is the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS5). This work will present an intercomparison of downscaling methods using the GEOS5 seasonal forecasts of temperature and precipitation over East Africa. The current seasonal forecasting system provides monthly averaged forecast anomalies. These anomalies must be spatially downscaled and temporally disaggregated for use in application modeling (e.g. hydrology, agriculture). There are several available downscaling methodologies that can be implemented to accomplish this goal. Selected methods include both a non-homogenous hidden Markov model and an analogue based approach. A particular emphasis will be placed on quantifying the ability of different methods to capture the intermittency of precipitation within both the short and long rain seasons. Further, the ability to capture spatial covariances will be assessed. Both probabilistic and deterministic skill measures will be evaluated over the hindcast period

  9. Evaluating Downscaling Methods for Seasonal Climate Forecasts over East Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Franklin R.; Roberts, J. Brent; Bosilovich, Michael; Lyon, Bradfield

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. National Multi-Model Ensemble seasonal forecasting system is providing hindcast and real-time data streams to be used in assessing and improving seasonal predictive capacity. The NASA / USAID SERVIR project, which leverages satellite and modeling-based resources for environmental decision making in developing nations, is focusing on the evaluation of NMME forecasts specifically for use in impact modeling within hub regions including East Africa, the Hindu Kush-Himalayan (HKH) region and Mesoamerica. One of the participating models in NMME is the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS5). This work will present an intercomparison of downscaling methods using the GEOS5 seasonal forecasts of temperature and precipitation over East Africa. The current seasonal forecasting system provides monthly averaged forecast anomalies. These anomalies must be spatially downscaled and temporally disaggregated for use in application modeling (e.g. hydrology, agriculture). There are several available downscaling methodologies that can be implemented to accomplish this goal. Selected methods include both a non-homogenous hidden Markov model and an analogue based approach. A particular emphasis will be placed on quantifying the ability of different methods to capture the intermittency of precipitation within both the short and long rain seasons. Further, the ability to capture spatial covariances will be assessed. Both probabilistic and deterministic skill measures will be evaluated over the hindcast period.

  10. Chapter 5: Policies on Free Primary and Secondary Education in East Africa--Retrospect and Prospect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oketch, Moses; Rolleston, Caine

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews the evolution of education policies in the East African region in a historical context. The focus is on the formulation of policies for access to primary and secondary education in Kenya, Uganda, and Tanzania since their independence in the 1960s. The three countries have common characteristics and historical backgrounds. For…

  11. Palaeoenvironmental perspectives for sustainable development in East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchant, R.; Finch, J.; Kinyanjui, R.; Muiruri, V.; Mumbi, C.; Platts, P. J.; Rucina, S.

    2010-05-01

    East African ecosystems are shaped by long-term interaction with changing climate, human population, fire and wildlife. There remains today a strong connection between people and ecosystems, a relationship that is being strained by the rapidly developing and growing East African population, and their associated resource needs. Predicted climatic and atmospheric change will further impact on ecosystems culminating in a host of challenges for their management and sustainable development, further compounded by a backdrop of political, land tenure and economic constraints. Given the many direct and indirect benefits that ecosystems provide to surrounding human populations, understanding how they have changed over time and space deserves a special place on the ecosystem management agenda. Such a perspective can only be derived from a palaeoecology, particularly where there is high resolution, both through time and across space. The East African palaeoecological archive is reviewed, in particular to assess how it can meet this need. Although there remain crucial gaps, the number of palaeoecological archives from East Africa growing rapidly, some employing new and novel techniques to trace past ecosystem response to climate change. When compared to the archaeological record it is possible to disentangle human from climate change impacts, and how the former interacts with major environmental changes such as increased use of fire, changing herbivore densities and increased atmospheric CO2 concentration. With this multi-dimensional perspective of environmental change impacts it is imperative that our understanding of past human-ecosystem interactions are considered to impart effective long term management strategies; such an approach will enhance possibilities for a sustainable future for East African ecosystems and maximise the livelihoods of the populations that rely on them.

  12. Existing capacity to manage pharmaceuticals and related commodities in East Africa: an assessment with specific reference to antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Waako, Paul J; Odoi-adome, Richard; Obua, Celestino; Owino, Erisa; Tumwikirize, Winnie; Ogwal-okeng, Jasper; Anokbonggo, Willy W; Matowe, Lloyd; Aupont, Onesky

    2009-01-01

    Background East African countries have in the recent past experienced a tremendous increase in the volume of antiretroviral drugs. Capacity to manage these medicines in the region remains limited. Makerere University, with technical assistance from the USAID supported Rational Pharmaceutical Management Plus (RPM Plus) Program of Management Sciences for Health (MSH) established a network of academic institutions to build capacity for pharmaceutical management in the East African region. The initiative includes institutions from Uganda, Tanzania, Kenya and Rwanda and aims to improve access to safe, effective and quality-assured medicines for the treatment of HIV/AIDS, TB and Malaria through spearheading in-country capacity. The initiative conducted a regional assessment to determine the existing capacity for the management of antiretroviral drugs and related commodities. Methods Heads and implementing workers of fifty HIV/AIDS programs and institutions accredited to offer antiretroviral services in Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania and Rwanda were key informants in face-to-face interviews guided by structured questionnaires. The assessment explored categories of health workers involved in the management of ARVs, their knowledge and practices in selection, quantification, distribution and use of ARVs, nature of existing training programs, training preferences and resources for capacity building. Results Inadequate human resource capacity including, inability to select, quantify and distribute ARVs and related commodities, and irrational prescribing and dispensing were some of the problems identified. A competence gap existed in all the four countries with a variety of healthcare professionals involved in the supply and distribution of ARVs. Training opportunities and resources for capacity development were limited particularly for workers in remote facilities. On-the-job training and short courses were the preferred modes of training. Conclusion There is inadequate capacity for managing medicines and related commodities in East Africa. There is an urgent need for training in aspects of pharmaceutical management to different categories of health workers. Skills building activities that do not take healthcare workers from their places of work are preferred. PMID:19272134

  13. Astronomy in the Middle East and North Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athem Alsabti, Abdul

    2015-08-01

    Recent turbulent events in the Middle East and North Africa have influenced all aspects of life. Education in general, including astronomy, teaching and research has all been greatly affected. In this presentation, the current situation regarding astronomy in this region is reviewed in detail. This is based on visits made to Tunisia and Algeria recently on behalf of the IAU and other visits to Iraq, Qatar, Egypt and Jordan in recent years, as well as on discussions and communications with astronomers, officials and astronomical and educational institutes in the region. Discussions have also been established with astronomers from Iran, Oman and Morocco. Ideas and proposals will be presented on the best ways for the IAU and the international academic community to help under these circumstances.

  14. A spring forward for hominin evolution in East Africa.

    PubMed

    Cuthbert, Mark O; Ashley, Gail M

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater is essential to modern human survival during drought periods. There is also growing geological evidence of springs associated with stone tools and hominin fossils in the East African Rift System (EARS) during a critical period for hominin evolution (from 1.8 Ma). However it is not known how vulnerable these springs may have been to climate variability and whether groundwater availability may have played a part in human evolution. Recent interdisciplinary research at Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania, has documented climate fluctuations attributable to astronomic forcing and the presence of paleosprings directly associated with archaeological sites. Using palaeogeological reconstruction and groundwater modelling of the Olduvai Gorge paleo-catchment, we show how spring discharge was likely linked to East African climate variability of annual to Milankovitch cycle timescales. Under decadal to centennial timescales, spring flow would have been relatively invariant providing good water resource resilience through long droughts. For multi-millennial periods, modelled spring flows lag groundwater recharge by 100 s to 1000 years. The lag creates long buffer periods allowing hominins to adapt to new habitats as potable surface water from rivers or lakes became increasingly scarce. Localised groundwater systems are likely to have been widespread within the EARS providing refugia and intense competition during dry periods, thus being an important factor in natural selection and evolution, as well as a vital resource during hominin dispersal within and out of Africa. PMID:25207544

  15. A Spring Forward for Hominin Evolution in East Africa

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbert, Mark O.; Ashley, Gail M.

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater is essential to modern human survival during drought periods. There is also growing geological evidence of springs associated with stone tools and hominin fossils in the East African Rift System (EARS) during a critical period for hominin evolution (from 1.8 Ma). However it is not known how vulnerable these springs may have been to climate variability and whether groundwater availability may have played a part in human evolution. Recent interdisciplinary research at Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania, has documented climate fluctuations attributable to astronomic forcing and the presence of paleosprings directly associated with archaeological sites. Using palaeogeological reconstruction and groundwater modelling of the Olduvai Gorge paleo-catchment, we show how spring discharge was likely linked to East African climate variability of annual to Milankovitch cycle timescales. Under decadal to centennial timescales, spring flow would have been relatively invariant providing good water resource resilience through long droughts. For multi-millennial periods, modelled spring flows lag groundwater recharge by 100 s to 1000 years. The lag creates long buffer periods allowing hominins to adapt to new habitats as potable surface water from rivers or lakes became increasingly scarce. Localised groundwater systems are likely to have been widespread within the EARS providing refugia and intense competition during dry periods, thus being an important factor in natural selection and evolution, as well as a vital resource during hominin dispersal within and out of Africa. PMID:25207544

  16. Contrasting long-term records of biomass burning in wet and dry savannas of equatorial East Africa.

    PubMed

    Colombaroli, Daniele; Ssemmanda, Immaculate; Gelorini, Vanessa; Verschuren, Dirk

    2014-09-01

    Rainfall controls fire in tropical savanna ecosystems through impacting both the amount and flammability of plant biomass, and consequently, predicted changes in tropical precipitation over the next century are likely to have contrasting effects on the fire regimes of wet and dry savannas. We reconstructed the long-term dynamics of biomass burning in equatorial East Africa, using fossil charcoal particles from two well-dated lake-sediment records in western Uganda and central Kenya. We compared these high-resolution (5 years/sample) time series of biomass burning, spanning the last 3800 and 1200 years, with independent data on past hydroclimatic variability and vegetation dynamics. In western Uganda, a rapid (<100 years) and permanent increase in burning occurred around 2170 years ago, when climatic drying replaced semideciduous forest by wooded grassland. At the century time scale, biomass burning was inversely related to moisture balance for much of the next two millennia until ca. 1750 ad, when burning increased strongly despite regional climate becoming wetter. A sustained decrease in burning since the mid20th century reflects the intensified modern-day landscape conversion into cropland and plantations. In contrast, in semiarid central Kenya, biomass burning peaked at intermediate moisture-balance levels, whereas it was lower both during the wettest and driest multidecadal periods of the last 1200 years. Here, burning steadily increased since the mid20th century, presumably due to more frequent deliberate ignitions for bush clearing and cattle ranching. Both the observed historical trends and regional contrasts in biomass burning are consistent with spatial variability in fire regimes across the African savanna biome today. They demonstrate the strong dependence of East African fire regimes on both climatic moisture balance and vegetation, and the extent to which this dependence is now being overridden by anthropogenic activity. PMID:24677504

  17. Design and descriptive epidemiology of the Infectious Diseases of East African Livestock (IDEAL) project, a longitudinal calf cohort study in western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a widely recognised lack of baseline epidemiological data on the dynamics and impacts of infectious cattle diseases in east Africa. The Infectious Diseases of East African Livestock (IDEAL) project is an epidemiological study of cattle health in western Kenya with the aim of providing baseline epidemiological data, investigating the impact of different infections on key responses such as growth, mortality and morbidity, the additive and/or multiplicative effects of co-infections, and the influence of management and genetic factors. A longitudinal cohort study of newborn calves was conducted in western Kenya between 2007-2009. Calves were randomly selected from all those reported in a 2 stage clustered sampling strategy. Calves were recruited between 3 and 7 days old. A team of veterinarians and animal health assistants carried out 5-weekly, clinical and postmortem visits. Blood and tissue samples were collected in association with all visits and screened using a range of laboratory based diagnostic methods for over 100 different pathogens or infectious exposures. Results The study followed the 548 calves over the first 51 weeks of life or until death and when they were reported clinically ill. The cohort experienced a high all cause mortality rate of 16% with at least 13% of these due to infectious diseases. Only 307 (6%) of routine visits were classified as clinical episodes, with a further 216 reported by farmers. 54% of calves reached one year without a reported clinical episode. Mortality was mainly to east coast fever, haemonchosis, and heartwater. Over 50 pathogens were detected in this population with exposure to a further 6 viruses and bacteria. Conclusion The IDEAL study has demonstrated that it is possible to mount population based longitudinal animal studies. The results quantify for the first time in an animal population the high diversity of pathogens a population may have to deal with and the levels of co-infections with key pathogens such as Theileria parva. This study highlights the need to develop new systems based approaches to study pathogens in their natural settings to understand the impacts of co-infections on clinical outcomes and to develop new evidence based interventions that are relevant. PMID:24000820

  18. Molecular detection and genetic characterization of kobuviruses and astroviruses in asymptomatic local pigs in East Africa.

    PubMed

    Amimo, Joshua O; Okoth, Edward; Junga, Joseph O; Ogara, William O; Njahira, Moses N; Wang, Qiuhong; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Saif, Linda J; Djikeng, Appolinaire

    2014-06-01

    In this study, swine fecal specimens (n = 251) collected from nursing and weaned piglets raised under smallholder production systems were screened for the presence of kobuviruses by RT-PCR. Porcine kobuviruses were detected in 13.1 % (33/251) of the samples. We demonstrated that porcine kobuvirus infections exist in indigenous pigs in Kenya and Uganda and that the prevalence was higher in young piglets than older pigs: nursing piglets (15 %), post-weaning (3-month-old) pigs (17 %), 4-month-old pigs (10 %). Genetic analysis of the partial RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) region (690 nt) revealed that kobuviruses circulating in East Africa are diverse, sharing nucleotide sequence identities ranging from 89.7 to 99.1 % and 88 to 92.3 % among them and with known porcine kobuviruses, respectively. The nucleotide sequence identities between our kobuvirus strains and those of human, bovine and canine kobuviruses were 69.4-70.7 %, 73.1-74.4 % and 67-70.7 %, respectively. Additionally, upon sequencing selected samples that showed consistent 720-bp RT-PCR bands while using the same primer set, we detected porcine astroviruses in our samples belonging to type 2 and type 3 mamastroviruses. To our knowledge, this study reports the first detection and molecular analysis of both porcine kobuviruses and astroviruses in an African region. Further studies are required to determine the role of these viruses in gastrointestinal infections of pigs in this region and to determine the genetic diversity of the circulating strains to develop accurate diagnostic tools and implement appropriate control strategies. PMID:24327095

  19. Molecular detection and genetic characterization of kobuviruses and astroviruses in asymptomatic local pigs in East Africa

    PubMed Central

    Okoth, Edward; Junga, Joseph O.; Ogara, William O.; Njahira, Moses N.; Wang, Qiuhong; Vlasova, Anastasia N.; Djikeng, Appolinaire

    2014-01-01

    In this study, swine fecal specimens (n = 251) collected from nursing and weaned piglets raised under smallholder production systems were screened for the presence of kobuviruses by RT-PCR. Porcine kobuviruses were detected in 13.1 % (33/251) of the samples. We demonstrated that porcine kobuvirus infections exist in indigenous pigs in Kenya and Uganda and that the prevalence was higher in young piglets than older pigs: nursing piglets (15 %), post-weaning (3-month-old) pigs (17 %), 4-month-old pigs (10 %). Genetic analysis of the partial RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) region (690 nt) revealed that kobuviruses circulating in East Africa are diverse, sharing nucleotide sequence identities ranging from 89.7 to 99.1 % and 88 to 92.3 % among them and with known porcine kobuviruses, respectively. The nucleotide sequence identities between our kobuvirus strains and those of human, bovine and canine kobuviruses were 69.4-70.7 %, 73.1-74.4 % and 67-70.7 %, respectively. Additionally, upon sequencing selected samples that showed consistent 720-bp RT-PCR bands while using the same primer set, we detected porcine astroviruses in our samples belonging to type 2 and type 3 mamastroviruses. To our knowledge, this study reports the first detection and molecular analysis of both porcine kobuviruses and astroviruses in an African region. Further studies are required to determine the role of these viruses in gastrointestinal infections of pigs in this region and to determine the genetic diversity of the circulating strains to develop accurate diagnostic tools and implement appropriate control strategies. PMID:24327095

  20. Responding to the Gender and Education Millennium Development Goals in South Africa and Kenya: Reflections on Education Rights, Gender Equality, Capabilities and Global Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unterhalter, Elaine; North, Amy

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores understandings of gender equality and education and the nature of global goal and target setting, drawing on empirical data collected in central and local government departments in Kenya and South Africa reflecting on their implementation of Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 1, concerned with poverty, MDG 2, concerned with…

  1. Energy system development in Africa : the case of grid and off-grid power in Kenya

    E-print Network

    Steel, Katherine Deaton

    2008-01-01

    This research used a combination of a grounded theory approach and system dynamics to study the electric power system in Kenya and to model the feedback at work in the development of the system. The ethnographic study ...

  2. Night Pass over Central Africa and the Middle East - Duration: 20 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video over Central Africa and the Middle East was taken by the crew of Expedition 29 aboard the International Space Station. This sequence of shots was taken on Oct. 1, 2011, from 21:20:24 to ...

  3. A Spring Forward for Human Evolution in East Africa?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuthbert, M. O.; Ashley, G. M.

    2014-12-01

    The current consensus is that humans evolved in Africa and then migrated in waves to other parts of the world starting as early as 2 Ma. The climate was both cooling and drying. One of the major unknowns connected with human survival in this climatically turbulent environment is the availability of resources, particularly water. A growing body of geological evidence shows an association between springs, stone tools and hominin fossils at a number of sites in the East African Rift System (EARS) during a critical period for hominin evolution (from 1.8 Ma). The springs may have been vulnerable to climate variability, thus the role that groundwater availability may have played in human evolution and migration to other continents is not known. Using palaeogeological reconstruction and groundwater modelling of the paleo-catchment of one such EARS site, Olduvai Gorge (3°S), we show how spring discharge was likely linked to climate variability of annual to Milankovitch cycle timescales. Under decadal to centennial timescales, spring flow would have been relatively invariant providing good water resource resilience through long droughts. For multi-millennial periods, modelled spring flows lag groundwater recharge by 100s to 1000 years. Our results show how groundwater would have provided 'drought proof' water supply and habitats during arid phases as potable surface water from rivers or lakes became increasingly scarce. Localized groundwater systems are likely to have been widespread within the EARS providing refugia and intense competition during dry periods. Thus, springs and associated wetlands may have been important factors in natural selection and evolution, as well as a vital resource during dispersal within and out of Africa. While further exploration is needed to test the geographical extent of groundwater use by early humans, we propose that groundwater flow systems produced in the EARS played a significant role in the evolution and dispersal of early humans.

  4. High-temperature environments of human evolution in East Africa based on bond ordering in paleosol carbonates

    PubMed Central

    Passey, Benjamin H.; Levin, Naomi E.; Cerling, Thure E.; Brown, Francis H.; Eiler, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Many important hominid-bearing fossil localities in East Africa are in regions that are extremely hot and dry. Although humans are well adapted to such conditions, it has been inferred that East African environments were cooler or more wooded during the Pliocene and Pleistocene when this region was a central stage of human evolution. Here we show that the Turkana Basin, Kenya—today one of the hottest places on Earth—has been continually hot during the past 4 million years. The distribution of 13C-18O bonds in paleosol carbonates indicates that soil temperatures during periods of carbonate formation were typically above 30 °C and often in excess of 35 °C. Similar soil temperatures are observed today in the Turkana Basin and reflect high air temperatures combined with solar heating of the soil surface. These results are specific to periods of soil carbonate formation, and we suggest that such periods composed a large fraction of integrated time in the Turkana Basin. If correct, this interpretation has implications for human thermophysiology and implies a long-standing human association with marginal environments. PMID:20534500

  5. Potential of Gdgts as Temperature Proxies Along Altitudinal Transects in East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffinet, Sarah; Huguet, Arnaud; Omuombo, Christine; Williamson, David; Fosse, Céline; Anquetil, Christine; Derenne, Sylvie

    2014-05-01

    Glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) are lipids of high molecular weight and include the isoprenoid GDGTs (iGDGTs) produced by Archaea and the branched GDGTs (brGDGTs) produced by unknown bacteria. Several indices were developed to describe the relationship between GDGT distribution and environmental parameters: the TEX86 (tetraether index of tetraethers consisting of 86 carbons), based on the relative abundances of iGDGTs in sediments, and the MBT (methylation index of branched tetraethers) and CBT (cyclisation ratio of branched tetraethers), based on the relative abundance of brGDGTs in soils. The TEX86 was shown to correlate well with water surface temperature, and the MBT and CBT with mean annual air temperature (MAAT) and soil pH. The GDGTs are increasingly used as temperature proxies. In this study, 41 surface soils were sampled along two altitudinal transects, from 500 to 2800 meters in Mount Rungwe (South western, Tanzania) and from 1897 to 3268 meters in Mount Kenya (Central Kenya). MAAT was reconstructed along the two transects using the MBT/CBT proxies. A linear correlation between the MBT/CBT-derived temperatures and the altitude (R2=0.83) was obtained by combining results of the two transects. The reconstructed temperature lapse rate (0.5 ° C/100 m) was consistent with the one determined from temperature measurements at six altitudes. These results show that the MBT/CBT is a suitable and robust temperature proxy in East Africa. In Mt. Rungwe soil samples, the TEX86 index, which was mainly used to reconstruct water surface temperatures until now, was found to vary linearly with altitude (R2=0.50). Such a relationship between TEX86 and altitude in organic soils has also been recently noticed in Mt. Xiangpi, China (Liu et al., 2013; R2=0.68). The adiabatic cooling of air with altitude could explain the TEX86 variation with altitude. If such a relationship is confirmed, the use of the TEX86 as a temperature proxy could be extended to soil environments. However, a lower correlation between TEX86 and altitude was observed for Mt. Kenya samples, implying that the environmental factors affecting the TEX86 values should be further investigated. Moreover, a given TEX86 value was shown to correspond to a much higher altitude (ca. 1800 m higher) for Mt. Xiangpi soils (Liu et al., 2013) than for Mt. Rungwe samples, suggesting that the geographical origin of the soils could also impact the TEX86 values. Therefore, a better understanding of the environmental mechanisms controlling the iGDGTs distribution in soils is needed prior any application of the TEX86 as a temperature proxy in these environments. REFERENCES Liu, W., Wang, H., Zhang, C.L., Liu, Z., He, Y., 2013. Organic Geochemistry 57, 76-83.

  6. Long-term variability and rainfall control of savanna fire regimes in equatorial East Africa

    E-print Network

    Hu, Feng Sheng

    Long-term variability and rainfall control of savanna fire regimes in equatorial East Africa D A V Abstract Fires burning the vast grasslands and savannas of Africa significantly influence the global carbon regimes. To examine climate­vegetation­fire linkages in dry savanna, we conducted macroscopic

  7. Learning from Logframes: Reflections on Three Educational Development Projects in East and Southern Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harley, Ken

    2005-01-01

    Against a backdrop of the importance of project evaluation in Africa, and the centrality of the project logical framework (logframes) to project evaluation, this paper reflects on experiences arising from evaluations of three educational development projects in East and Southern Africa. Each of these projects had a strong teacher development…

  8. Role of land surface processes in monsoon development: East Asia and West Africa

    E-print Network

    Xue, Yongkang

    in the premonsoon season, and an important east Asian monsoon feature, the abrupt monsoon northward jumpRole of land surface processes in monsoon development: East Asia and West Africa Yongkang Xue,1,2 H and West African monsoon development and are among the most important mechanisms governing the development

  9. Smart Boards to Chalkboards: Professional Development for Early Childhood Teachers in Rural East Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Jeanne

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the teaching strategies of early childhood development teachers in rural East Africa. Teams of early childhood educators from the United States presented professional development conferences for East African Early Childhood Development teachers during the summers of 2007 and 2008. The conferences introduced…

  10. Forecast and Validation of the Rift Valley fever outbreak in East Africa: 2006-2007

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background The instantaneous occurrence of El Nino / Southern Oscillation (ENSO) warm events and anomalous warming of the equatorial western Indian Ocean (WIO) are associated with elevated and widespread rainfall over East Africa. Such, sustained, heavy rainfall in East is associated with the emerg...

  11. Development of grasslands and savannas in East Africa during the Neogene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serling, T. E.

    1992-03-01

    The development of savanna-type grasslands is a relatively recent phenomena in East Africa. The stable carbon isotopic composition of paleosol carbonates from fossil localities in East Africa show that C 4 vegetation was present by amout 8-9 Ma but made up only a relatively small proportion of the total biomass. Although the proportion of C 4 vegetation increased in the Pliocene and Pleistocene there is no evidence for the development of virtually pure C 4 grasslands, as is characterized by tropical grasslands today, until Middle Pleistocene times. This has important implications concerning the evolution of mammals in Africa, including hominids.

  12. Drought-associated chikungunya emergence along coastal East Africa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epidemics of chikungunya fever, an Aedes spp.-borne viral disease, affected hundreds of thousands of people in western Indian Ocean islands and India during 2005--2006. The initial outbreaks occurred in coastal Kenya (Lamu, then Mombasa) in 2004. We investigated ecoclimatic conditions associated wit...

  13. Noncommunicable Diseases In East Africa: Assessing The Gaps In Care And Identifying Opportunities For Improvement.

    PubMed

    Siddharthan, Trishul; Ramaiya, Kaushik; Yonga, Gerald; Mutungi, Gerald N; Rabin, Tracy L; List, Justin M; Kishore, Sandeep P; Schwartz, Jeremy I

    2015-09-01

    The prevalence of noncommunicable diseases in East Africa is rising rapidly. Although the epidemiologic, demographic, and nutritional transitions are well under way in low-income countries, investment and attention in these countries remain focused largely on communicable diseases. We discuss existing infrastructure in communicable disease management as well as linkages between noncommunicable and communicable diseases in East Africa. We describe gaps in noncommunicable disease management within the health systems in this region. We also discuss deficiencies in addressing noncommunicable diseases from basic science research and medical training to health services delivery, public health initiatives, and access to essential medications in East Africa. Finally, we highlight the role of collaboration among East African governments and civil society in addressing noncommunicable diseases, and we advocate for a robust primary health care system that focuses on the social determinants of health. PMID:26355052

  14. Hypovitaminosis D in the Middle East and North Africa

    PubMed Central

    Bassil, Darina; Rahme, Maya; Hoteit, Maha; Fuleihan, Ghada El-Hajj

    2013-01-01

    Background: The Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region registers some of the highest rates of hypovitaminosis D worldwide.   Aim: We systematically reviewed the prevalence of hypovitaminosis D, rickets and osteomalacia, their predictors and impact on major outcomes, in the region. Methods: Medline, Pubmed and Embase search engines, entering keywords and concepts, combined with individual countries of interest, were used. Search was limited years 2000–2012; and review articles were used for the period preceding year 2000. Results: Rickets and osteomalacia still occur in this sunny region. Hypovitaminosis D prevails, with rates varying 30–90%, considering a desirable serum 25 hydroxy-vitamin D [25(OH)D] of 20 ng/ml. Advancing age, female gender, multi-parity, clothing style, season, socio-economic status and urban living are recognized predictors of hypovitaminosis D in adults. Prolonged breastfeeding without vitamin D supplementation and low dietary calcium intake are the recognized risk factors for rickets and hypovitaminosis D in children.. Associations with pain score and disease activity in rheumatologic disorders, viral load and interleukins in hepatitis C, BMI, lipids and insulin sensitivity, blood pressure, heart failure and mortality are described. Sun exposure in adults decreased prevalence of metabolic syndrome in one study. Few randomized vitamin D trials revealed that the majority of mothers or children failed to achieve a desirable 25(OH)D level, even with doses by far exceeding current recommendations. A trial in adolescent girls reveals substantial bone and lean mass increments. Conclusion: Hypovitaminosis D is prevalent in MENA. The lack of populations based studies, gaps in studies in infants, pre-pubertal children and pregnant women, hinder the development of region specific guidelines and constitute a major obstacle to impact this chronic and most often subclinical disease. PMID:24194968

  15. Results of cataract surgery in young children in east Africa

    PubMed Central

    Yorston, D.; Wood, M.; Foster, A.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Cataract is the leading cause of blindness in children in east Africa. The results of surgery are poor, partly because of inadequate correction of aphakia.?METHODS—A retrospective survey of 118 eyes in 71 children with bilateral cataract. All eyes had implantation of an IOL at the time of cataract surgery. The average age at surgery was 3.5 years. 28 patients(39%) were less than 2 years old at the time of surgery on their first eye.?RESULTS—Preoperatively, 75.4% of eyes and 76.1% of patients were blind. A follow up of at least 3 months was available in 91 (77.1%) eyes. In these eyes, 44% had a latest corrected vision of 6/18 or better and 91.2% had a latest corrected vision of 6/60 or better. Eyes with zonular cataract, and eyes operated after the age of 2 years were more likely to obtain a vision of 6/18 or better. 3.3% of eyes and 1.8% of patients had an acuity of less than 3/60. Nystagmus was present in 42.3% of patients before surgery. In those patients followed up for a minimum of 6 months, 10.2% still had nystagmus. The most frequent complication was severe fibrinous uveitis, which occurred in 36 (30.5%) eyes. 62 (52.5%) eyes had a posterior capsulotomy at the time of cataract extraction. Of the remaining 56 eyes, 20 (35.7%) had so far required a posterior capsulotomy. The leading cause of poor visual outcome was amblyopia. Two patients developed severe complications related to the intraocular lens.?CONCLUSIONS—Insertion of a lens implant at the time of cataract extraction appears to be well tolerated in the short term, and may offer significant advantages in an African setting.?? PMID:11222328

  16. High Prevalence of Rickettsia africae Variants in Amblyomma variegatum Ticks from Domestic Mammals in Rural Western Kenya: Implications for Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Maina, Alice N.; Jiang, Ju; Omulo, Sylvia A.; Cutler, Sally J.; Ade, Fredrick; Ogola, Eric; Feikin, Daniel R.; Njenga, M. Kariuki; Cleaveland, Sarah; Mpoke, Solomon; Ng'ang'a, Zipporah; Breiman, Robert F.; Knobel, Darryn L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Tick-borne spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsioses are emerging human diseases caused by obligate intracellular Gram-negative bacteria of the genus Rickettsia. Despite being important causes of systemic febrile illnesses in travelers returning from sub-Saharan Africa, little is known about the reservoir hosts of these pathogens. We conducted surveys for rickettsiae in domestic animals and ticks in a rural setting in western Kenya. Of the 100 serum specimens tested from each species of domestic ruminant 43% of goats, 23% of sheep, and 1% of cattle had immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to the SFG rickettsiae. None of these sera were positive for IgG against typhus group rickettsiae. We detected Rickettsia africae–genotype DNA in 92.6% of adult Amblyomma variegatum ticks collected from domestic ruminants, but found no evidence of the pathogen in blood specimens from cattle, goats, or sheep. Sequencing of a subset of 21 rickettsia-positive ticks revealed R. africae variants in 95.2% (20/21) of ticks tested. Our findings show a high prevalence of R. africae variants in A. variegatum ticks in western Kenya, which may represent a low disease risk for humans. This may provide a possible explanation for the lack of African tick-bite fever cases among febrile patients in Kenya. PMID:25325312

  17. Astronomy Developments and Site Testing in East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, D. A. H.

    2015-04-01

    Two astronomical site testing initiatives are beginning in both Kenya and Ethiopia, with the aim of selecting suitable locations in those countries for initially modest sized (1-2m) optical telescopes. The first project, in Kenya, has to date involved a study of existing meteorological satellite data, from which potential sites have been selected for further studies (see paper by Graham et al. in these proceedings). A similar program of astronomical site testing, including using DIMMs, will begin later in 2014 in the Lalibela region of northern Ethiopia, at three potential sites ranging in altitude from ?3600 to 4500 m. In parallel to this, the Entoto Observatory and Research Centre (EO), comprising twin 1-m alt-az telescopes, has been established at Mt. Entoto, on the outskirts of Addis Ababa, and science operations are due to begin in early 2015.

  18. The Influence of European Pollution on Ozone in the Near East and Northern Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, B. N.; West, J. J.; Yoshida, Y.; Fiore, A. M.; Ziemke, J. R.

    2008-01-01

    We present a modeling study of the long-range transport of pollution from Europe, showing that European emissions regularly elevate surface ozone by as much as 20 ppbv in summer in northern Africa and the Near East. European emissions cause 50-150 additional violations per year (i.e. above those that would occur without European pollution) of the European health standard for ozone (8-h average greater than 120 micrograms per cubic meters or approximately 60 ppbv) in northern Africa and the Near East. We estimate that European ozone pollution is responsible for 50 000 premature mortalities globally each year, of which the majority occurs outside of Europe itself, including 37% (19 000) in northern Africa and the Near East. Much of the pollution from Europe is exported southward at low altitudes in summer to the Mediterranean Sea, northern Africa and the Near East, regions with favorable photochemical environments for ozone production. Our results suggest that assessments of the human health benefits of reducing ozone precursor emissions in Europe should include effects outside of Europe, and that comprehensive planning to improve air quality in northern Africa and the Near East likely needs to address European emissions.

  19. Cardiovascular Risk Factor Burden in Africa and the Middle East: The Africa Middle East Cardiovascular Epidemiological (ACE) Study

    PubMed Central

    Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi A.; Omar, Mohamed I.; Raal, Frederick J.; Rashed, Wafa; Hamoui, Omar; Kane, Abdoul; Alami, Mohamed; Abreu, Paula; Mashhoud, Walid M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Increased urbanization in the developing world parallels a rising burden of chronic diseases. Developing countries account for ?80% of global cardiovascular (CV) deaths, but contribute a paucity of systematic epidemiological data on CV risk factors. Objective To estimate the prevalence of CV risk factors in rural and urban cohorts attending general practice clinics in the Africa and Middle East (AfME) region. Methods In a cross-sectional epidemiological study, the presence of CV risk factors (hypertension, diabetes mellitus (diabetes), dyslipidemia, obesity, smoking and abdominal obesity) were evaluated in stable adult outpatients attending general practice primary care clinics. A rural population was defined as isolated (>50 km or lack of easy access to commuter transportation) from urban centers. Results 4,378 outpatients were systematically recruited from 94 clinics across 14 AfME countries. Mean age was 46±14 years and 52% of outpatients were female. A high prevalence of dyslipidemia (70%) and abdominal obesity (68%) were observed, followed by hypertension (43%) and diabetes (25%). The vast majority of outpatients (92%) had at least one modifiable CV risk factor, many (74%) had more than one, and half (53%) had 3 or more. These findings were observed in both genders and across urban and rural centers. Among outpatients with pre-existing hypertension or dyslipidemia, many were not at their target blood pressure or LDL-cholesterol goals. Conclusion Cardiovascular risk factors are highly prevalent among relatively young, stable outpatients attending general practice clinics across AfME. The findings support opportunistic screening for CV risk factors whenever outpatients visit a general practitioner and provide an opportunity for early identification and management of CV risk factors, including lifestyle interventions. PMID:25090638

  20. U-series Chronology of volcanoes in the Central Kenya Peralkaline Province, East African Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negron, L. M.; Ma, L.; Deino, A.; Anthony, E. Y.

    2012-12-01

    We are studying the East African Rift System (EARS) in the Central Kenya Peralkaline Province (CKPP), and specifically the young volcanoes Mt. Suswa, Longonot, and Menengai. Ar dates by Al Deino on K-feldspar phenocrysts show a strong correlation between older Ar ages and decreasing 230Th/232Th, which we interpret to reflect the age of eruption. This system has been the subject of recent research done by several UTEP alumni including Antony Wamalwa using potential field and magnetotelluric (MT) data to identify and characterize fractures and hydrothermal fluids. Also research on geochemical modeling done by John White, Vanessa Espejel and Peter Omenda led to the hypothesis of possible disequilibrium in these young, mainly obsidian samples in their post eruptive history. A pilot study of 8 samples, (also including W-2a USGS standard and a blank) establish the correlation that was seen between the ages found by Deino along with the 230/232Th ratios. All 8 samples from Mt. Suswa showed a 234U/238U ratio of (1) which indicates secular equilibrium or unity and that these are very fresh samples with no post-eruptive decay or leaching of U isotopes. The pilot set was comprised of four samples from the ring-trench group (RTG) with ages ranging from 7ka-present, two samples from the post-caldera stage ranging from 31-10ka, one sample from the syn-caldera stage dated at 41ka, and one sample from the pre-caldera stage dated at 112ka. The young RTG had a 230/232Th fractionation ratio of 0.8 ranging to the older pre-caldera stage with a 230/232Th ratio of 0.6. From this current data and research of 14C ages by Nick Rogers, the data from Longonot volcano was also similar to the 230/232Th ratio we found. Rogers' data places Longonot volcano ages to be no more than 20ka with the youngest samples also roughly around 0.8 disequilibrium. These strong correlations between the pilot study done for Mt. Suswa, 40Ar ages by Deino, along with 14C ages from Rogers have led to the exploration of present U-series data set of the youngest samples from the rest of the CKPP volcanoes including: Menengai, more from Longonot, and Olkaria. And since it is observed that there is the presence of lateral migration along an axial dike swarm that has operated in other parts of the EARS, we have chosen to run samples from the adjacent mafic fields of Elmenteita, Tandamara, and Ndabibi to see if there is a trend in the correlation of the 230/232Th ratios at the time of eruption as well as observing how close these samples get to unity. This would answer questions as to whether similar 230/232Th ratios imply that the mafic fields feed the calderas.

  1. Anomalously wet and dry rainy seasons in Equatorial East Africa and associated differences in intra-seasonal characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippon, N.; Camberlin, P.; Moron, V.; Boyard-Micheau, J.

    2015-10-01

    Differences between anomalously wet and dry rainy seasons over the period 1961-2001 in Equatorial East Africa (Kenya, northern Tanzania) are studied at local scale using a 53 rain-gauge network and analysing six intra-seasonal characteristics (ISCs): the onset and end dates, the wet spells number and length, daily mean rainfall amount and the dry spells length. As compared to anomalously dry Long Rains, anomalously wet ones record earlier onsets, more wet spells with higher daily mean rainfall amounts (above 14 mm/day). For the Short Rains, the end date is also widely modulated across the rain gauge network, and daily mean rainfall amounts above (below) 10 mm/day are more (less) frequent during anomalously wet (dry) seasons. The differences in the number, length and daily mean rainfall amount of wet spells between anomalously wet and anomalously dry rainy seasons is also analysed in an ensemble of 24 sea surface temperature-forced runs of the ECHAM4.5 Atmospheric General Circulation Model. For the Long Rains, results are inconsistent between runs which suggests a lack of reproducibility of the ISCs in the model. For the Short Rains, the ISCs distributions between anomalously wet and anomalously dry years are significantly different in most of the runs/locations. In particular, daily mean rainfall amounts above 8 mm/day are more (less) frequent in the model during anomalously wet (dry) years.

  2. A Revised Holocene History of Lake Kivu, East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Votava, J. E.; Johnson, T. C.; Hecky, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    The great lakes of the East African Rift valley are a vast chain of lakes formed in a region of active tectonics. These large, deep lakes are relatively old and many (e.g. Tanganyika, Malawi, and Turkana) have greatly influenced our understanding of terrestrial, tropical East African paleoclimate. Lake Kivu (max depth, 485m) sits at the heart of these rift lakes, north of Lake Tanganyika between the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Rwanda (roughly 250 km west of Lake Victoria). At over 1,400 meters in elevation, this 2,060 km2 mesotrophic lake has a complex stratification regime imposed by hydrothermal springs and deep waters supersaturated at STP in CO2 and CH4 gasses. The active Virunga Volcanoes to the north of the lake supply heated, high-salinity waters below 280 meters water depth maintaining the modern crenogenic meromixis. Based on detailed studies of diatom assemblages and bulk sedimentology, previous workers have suggested this hydrothermal activity began roughly 5,000 years BP. Unfortunately, dating and stratigraphic correlations of these original cores from the 1970 Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution's expedition have been problematic. Here we offer an improved chronology and new carbonate analyses from cores recovered in 2012 and 2013. Our AMS radiocarbon ages come from six terrigeneous macrofossils spanning the last 9,100 years (cal BP). These ages suggest a rather high sedimentation rate on the order of 70cm/kyr, and hence, our 8 m-long core provides us with a high-resolution lake history for the past 10,000 years. Most notable over the past 5,000 years in the lake history is the repeated onset and cessation of carbonate deposition, punctuated by organic-rich intervals. Earlier studies of the Woods Hole cores placed the onset of carbonate deposition at ca. 11,000 years BP suggesting changes in lake hydrology (i.e. closed to open), while the abrupt cessation of carbonate was dated at ca. 5,000 years BP and attributed to the beginning of significant hydrothermal activity in the lake. However our new chronology places these events much younger with the first major onset of carbonate deposition occurring around 4,300 years BP and ceasing ca. 2,700 years BP. Indeed much of central and northern Africa began to dry out at this time, following the African Humid Period ca. 15,000 to 5,000 years BP. Arid conditions could certainly favor carbonate precipitation and hence our revised ages of deposition agree well with regional paleoclimate studies. This new age model opens up the carbonate record of Lake Kivu for reinterpretation. We are investigating the extent to which the carbonate signal is influenced by internal changes and hydrothermal activity or by climate.

  3. Multiple co-circulating HIV-1 subtypes in the Middle East and North Africa

    PubMed Central

    Rolland, Morgane; Modjarrad, Kayvon

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 incidence has been increasing more rapidly in the Middle East and North Africa than in any other global region. Despite this trend, HIV epidemiology in the region remains poorly defined. We conducted an analysis of 3284 publicly available HIV-1 sequences from 15 countries in the Middle East and North Africa to better characterize the regional epidemic. A phylogenetic tree based on the reverse transcriptase gene revealed a complex mosaic of diverse HIV subtypes and circulating recombinant forms across the region. PMID:26091303

  4. Integrating diverse methods to understand climateland interactions in East Africa

    E-print Network

    Change and Earth Observations, 209 Manly Miles Building, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI and the Center for Global Change and Earth Observations, 116 Geography Building, Michigan State University, East The questions of how land use change affects climate, and how climate change affects land use, require

  5. Some Like It Hot: The Influence and Implications of Climate Change on Coffee Berry Borer (Hypothenemus hampei) and Coffee Production in East Africa

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Fernando E.; Davis, Aaron; Borgemeister, Christian; Chabi-Olaye, Adenirin

    2011-01-01

    The negative effects of climate change are already evident for many of the 25 million coffee farmers across the tropics and the 90 billion dollar (US) coffee industry. The coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei), the most important pest of coffee worldwide, has already benefited from the temperature rise in East Africa: increased damage to coffee crops and expansion in its distribution range have been reported. In order to anticipate threats and prioritize management actions for H. hampei we present here, maps on future distributions of H. hampei in coffee producing areas of East Africa. Using the CLIMEX model we relate present-day insect distributions to current climate and then project the fitted climatic envelopes under future scenarios A2A and B2B (for HADCM3 model). In both scenarios, the situation with H. hampei is forecasted to worsen in the current Coffea arabica producing areas of Ethiopia, the Ugandan part of the Lake Victoria and Mt. Elgon regions, Mt. Kenya and the Kenyan side of Mt. Elgon, and most of Rwanda and Burundi. The calculated hypothetical number of generations per year of H. hampei is predicted to increase in all C. arabica-producing areas from five to ten. These outcomes will have serious implications for C. arabica production and livelihoods in East Africa. We suggest that the best way to adapt to a rise of temperatures in coffee plantations could be via the introduction of shade trees in sun grown plantations. The aims of this study are to fill knowledge gaps existing in the coffee industry, and to draft an outline for the development of an adaptation strategy package for climate change on coffee production. An abstract in Spanish is provided as Abstract S1. PMID:21935419

  6. Geopolitical influences on German development policies in Africa and AIDS policies in Kenya 

    E-print Network

    Bachmann, Veit

    2009-06-02

    -abiding. Many African countries do not fulfill those conditions. Extremely high prevalence rates of HIV/AIDS in Africa severely undermine social structure, economic development and political stability and thus contribute to state failure. State failure...

  7. Chemistry and chronology of magmatic processes, Central Kenya Peralkaline province, East African Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, E.; Deino, A. L.; White, J. C.; Omenda, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    We report here a synthesis of the geochemistry of magma evolution correlated with 40Ar/39Ar, 14 C, and U-series chronology for volcanoes in the Central Kenya Peralkaline Province (CKPP). The volcanic centers - Menengai, Eburru, Olkaria, Longonot, and Suswa - are at the apex of the Kenya Dome, and consist of trachyte, phonolite, comendite, and pantellerite. These volcanic centers are within the graben of the EARS and are characterized by a shield-building phase followed by caldera collapse and subsequent post-caldera eruptions. Geochemical modeling demonstrates that the magmas are the result of fractional crystallization of alkali basaltic magmas and magma mixing. Longonot and Suswa have the most chronologic data -14 C, Ar/Ar and U-series - and they show that the youngest eruptions have 230 Th/232Th of 0.8, which was inherited from the magma system prior to eruption. Subsequent changes in 230 Th/232 Th are due to post-eruptive decay of 230 Th and correlate well with 14 C and Ar/Ar.

  8. Muslims in East Africa Develop Their Own Higher-Education Options.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Useem, Andrea

    1999-01-01

    Private Islamic universities are increasing in East Africa, where higher education is increasingly privatized and diversified. The progressive scholars behind the trend are seeking opportunities for dynamic encounters between Islam and modern secular disciplines. The model is the 11-year-old Islamic University in Uganda, which is now attempting to…

  9. Lessons from Mount Kilimanjaro: Schooling, Community, and Gender in East Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stambach, Amy

    This book presents an ethnographic study of a school and community in East Africa. It focuses on the role school plays in the development of the children's identity and relationships to their parents and community, and in the development of the region. At issue here are the competing influences of Western modernity and the cultural traditions of…

  10. Investigating Students' Behavioural Intention to Adopt and Use Mobile Learning in Higher Education in East Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mtebe, Joel S.; Raisamo, Roope

    2014-01-01

    Recent penetration of mobile technologies and its services in East Africa has provided a new platform for institutions to widen access to education through mobile learning. Mobile technologies provide learners with flexibility and ubiquity to learn anytime and anywhere via wireless Internet. However, far too little research has been conducted to…

  11. Revolution and Journalism Higher Education in the Middle East/North Africa Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schafer, Shaun T.

    2012-01-01

    The disruptions brought by the Arab Spring revolutions in the Middle East/North Africa (MENA) region in 2010-2011 created a series of personal and professional challenges for those involved in higher education in journalism in the region. This research uses narrative inquiry to examine the impact revolution had on a group of educators in the MENA…

  12. Evaluation of Snap Bean Genotypes Combining Rust Resistance and Heat Tolerance Traits in East Africa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The major biotic and abiotic constraints to snap bean production in East Africa include diseases such as common bean rust (caused by Uromyces appendiculatus) and high ambient temperatures that cause heat stress. Rust resistant snap beans that perform well under both cool and hot agro-ecological cond...

  13. A multivariate approach for persistence-based drought prediction: Application to the 20102011 East Africa drought

    E-print Network

    AghaKouchak, Amir

    A multivariate approach for persistence-based drought prediction: Application to the 2010­2011 East Africa drought Amir AghaKouchak Center for Hydrometeorology and Remote Sensing, Department of Civil-2175, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Available online 2 October 2014 Keywords: Drought

  14. Traditional Music of East Africa: Experiencing "Ngoma" in Tanzania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Karen

    2014-01-01

    The concept of ngoma is present throughout Eastern and Southern Africa. Ngoma refers to the tradition of expression via music, drumming, dance, and storytelling. History, values, education, and even identity can be transmitted between generations. This article traces the experiences of a music teacher from the United States traveling and studying…

  15. High-elevation amplification of warming since the Last Glacial Maximum in East Africa: New perspectives from biomarker paleotemperature reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loomis, S. E.; Russell, J. M.; Kelly, M. A.; Eggermont, H.; Verschuren, D.

    2013-12-01

    Tropical lapse rate variability on glacial/interglacial time scales has been hotly debated since the publication of CLIMAP in 1976. Low-elevation paleotemperature reconstructions from the tropics have repeatedly shown less warming from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) to present than reconstructions from high elevations, leading to widespread difficulty in estimating the true LGM-present temperature change in the tropics. This debate is further complicated by the fact that most paleotemperature estimates from high elevations in the tropics are derived from pollen- and moraine-based reconstructions of altitudinal shifts in vegetation belts and glacial equilibrium line altitudes (ELAs). These traditional approaches rely on the assumption that lapse rates have remained constant through time. However, this assumption is problematic in the case of the LGM, when pervasive tropical aridity most likely led to substantial changes in lapse rates. Glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) can be used to reconstruct paleotemperatures independent of hydrological changes, making them the ideal proxy to reconstruct high elevation temperature change and assess lapse rate variability through time. Here we present two new equatorial paleotemperature records from high elevations in East Africa (Lake Rutundu, Mt. Kenya and Lake Mahoma, Rwenzori Mountains, Uganda) based on branched GDGTs. Our record from Lake Rutundu shows deglacial warming starting near 17 ka and a mid-Holocene thermal maximum near 5 ka. The overall amplitude of warming in the Lake Rutundu record is 6.8×1.0°C from the LGM to the present, with mid-Holocene temperatures 1.6×0.9°C warmer than modern. Our record from Lake Mahoma extends back to 7 ka and shows similar temperature trends to our record from Lake Rutundu, indicating similar temporal resolution of high-elevation temperature change throughout the region. Combining these new records with three previously published GDGT temperature records from different elevations in East Africa (Sacred Lake, Lake Tanganyika, and Lake Malawi), we are able to reconstruct a continuous record of lapse rates and freezing level heights (FLHs) back to the LGM. We find that tropical lapse rates have varied widely over the last 22 ky, with the largest (lowest) lapse rate (FLH) around the LGM, while the smallest (highest) lapse rate (FLH) occurs during the mid-Holocene, confirming the amplification of warming at high altitudes between the LGM and present. These lapse rate and FLH reconstructions match records of regional hydrological variability, confirming the importance of glacial/interglacial humidity variations on altitudinal temperature gradients in the tropics. Furthermore, the FLH record largely matches records of tropical glacier ELA changes, indicating that warming from LGM-present was likely amplified at high altitudes throughout the tropics.

  16. Institutional Research in Emerging Countries of Southern Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East and North Africa: Global Frameworks and Local Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lange, Lis; Saavedra, F. Mauricio; Romano, Jeanine

    2013-01-01

    This chapter presents a synthesis of the conceptualization and practice of institutional research (IR) in higher education (HE) in emerging countries across Southern Africa, Latin America and the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) regions. The chapter contextualizes the growing need for IR in these regions, identifies problems and challenges…

  17. Integrating Ubunifu, informal science, and community innovations in science classrooms in East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semali, Ladislaus M.; Hristova, Adelina; Owiny, Sylvia A.

    2015-10-01

    This study examines the relationship between informal science and indigenous innovations in local communities in which students matured. The discussion considers methods for bridging the gap that exists between parents' understanding of informal science (Ubunifu) and what students learn in secondary schools in Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda. In an effort to reconcile the difference between students' lived experiences and Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) taught in classrooms, this study presents an experiential iSPACES instructional model as an example of curriculum integration in science classrooms. The culmination is presentation of lessons learned from history, including Africa's unique contributions to science, theory, and indigenous innovations, in the hope that these lessons can spur the development of new instructional practices, standards, curriculum materials, professional and community development, and dialogue among nations.

  18. East African soil erosion recorded in a 300 year old coral colony from Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleitmann, Dominik; Dunbar, Robert B.; McCulloch, Malcolm; Mudelsee, Manfred; Vuille, Mathias; McClanahan, Tim R.; Cole, Julia E.; Eggins, Stephen

    2007-02-01

    Soil erosion is a key socio-economic and environmental problem in Kenya, which has been poorly documented due to the lack of long, continuous records. Here we present Ba/Ca records from Porites corals from the Malindi coral reef documenting the flux of suspended sediment from the Sabaki River with a sub-weekly resolution for the last 300 years. While sediment flux from the Sabaki River is almost constant between 1700 and 1900, a continuous rise in sediment flux is observed since 1900, first due to British settlements and afterwards due to steadily increasing demographic pressure on land use. The peak in suspended sediment load and hence soil erosion occurred between 1974 and 1980 when there is a five to tenfold increase relative to natural levels. This is attributed to the combined effects of dramatically increasing population, unregulated land use, deforestation and severe droughts in the early 1970's. We conclude that despite laudable attempts to instigate soil conservation measures, it is unlikely that there will be a sustainable reduction in soil erosion without a significant improvement in socio-economic conditions.

  19. Climate change as a draw bridge between Africa and the Middle East

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issar, Arie S.

    2010-07-01

    Since the very beginning of the human race, the Middle East served as a bridge between Africa-where our species first evolved-and the rest of the world. The passage over this bridge opened and closed with the global fluctuations of climate. The first glacial periods at the beginning of the Quaternary caused the greenhouse of equatorial Africa to become less hospitable, while making the desert belt of the Middle East more humid, green, and thus passable. Flint tools found along the shores of dried up lakes and swamps in the Negev Desert provide evidence that members of the first wave, Homo erectus, as well as the last wave, Homo sapiens, camped there en route to all the other continents.

  20. The Sexual Risk Context among the FEM-PrEP Study Population in Bondo, Kenya and Pretoria, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Headley, Jennifer; Lemons, Ansley; Corneli, Amy; Agot, Kawango; Ahmed, Khatija; Wang, Meng; Odhiambo, Jacob; Skhosana, Joseph; Tharaldson, Jenae; Van Damme, Lut; MacQueen, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Background Incidence rates in the FEM-PrEP and VOICE trials demonstrate that women from diverse sub-Saharan African communities continue to be at substantial HIV risk. Objective To describe and compare the sexual risk context of the study population from two FEM-PrEP trial sites–Bondo, Kenya, and Pretoria, South Africa. Methods At baseline we collected information about demographics, sexual behaviors, and partnership beliefs through quantitative questionnaires with all participants (Bondo, n?=?720; Pretoria, n?=?750). To explore the sexual risk context, we also conducted qualitative, semi-structured interviews with HIV-negative participants randomly selected at several time points (Bondo, n?=?111; Pretoria, n?=?69). Results Demographics, sexual behavior, and partnership beliefs varied significantly between the sites. Bondo participants were generally older, had fewer years of schooling, and were more likely to be employed and married compared to Pretoria participants. Bondo participants were more likely to report multiple partners and not knowing whether their partner had HIV than Pretoria participants. A significantly higher percentage of Bondo participants reported engaging in sex without a condom with their primary and other partners compared to Pretoria participants. We found a borderline association between participants who reported not using condoms in the 4 weeks prior to baseline and lower risk of HIV infection, and no association between having more than one sexual partner at baseline and HIV infection. Discussion Despite significantly different demographics, sexual behaviors, and partnership beliefs, many women in the FEM-PrEP trial were at risk of acquiring HIV as demonstrated by the sites’ high HIV incidence. Though gender dynamics differed between the populations, they appear to play a critical role in women’s sexual practices. The findings highlight different ways women from diverse contexts may be at-risk for HIV and the importance of providing HIV prevention options that are both effective and feasible given personal and social circumstances. PMID:25229403

  1. Food and water security scenarios for East Africa over next 20 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, S.; Funk, C. C.; Verdin, J. P.; Peters-Lidard, C. D.

    2013-12-01

    Broad areas of East Africa face chronic water and agricultural insecurity. Over the last decade, the region has experienced frequent drought events leading to food security emergencies and even famine in Somalia in 2011. The impact of these drought events, associated with recent declines in rainfall during major growing seasons, has been particularly severe due to the high vulnerability of subsistence agricultural and pastoralist livelihoods, rapid population growth, and the limited availability of resources for agricultural development and climate change adaptation. The Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) is a United States Agency for International Development (USAID) funded activity that brings together international, regional and national partners to provide timely and rigorous early warning and food security information in Africa and other regions of the developing world. To assist USAID with planning agricultural development strategies over the next ten years in East Africa, FEWS NET is partnering with climate scientists and adaptation specialists at regional institutions to study and assess future changes in precipitation and temperature in light of global climate change, natural climate variability, and their related impacts on agricultural and water security in the region. The overarching objective of this study is to provide future scenarios of food and water security (as estimated by trends in soil moisture, evapotranspiration, and runoff) for East Africa. We do so by following two approaches: Constructed Analogs and the Composite Delta Method. In the first approach we downscaled climate projections (precipitation and temperature projections) of long-term Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase-5 (CMIP5) experiments over (a) historical (1850-2005) and (b) Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5 (2006-2030) periods. Current climate is characterized by two ENSO modes, the intensity of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, and the strength of the Indo-Pacific warming signal (IPWS). These modes are used in conjunction with CMIP5-estimates of IPWS to project 2030 climate conditions. In the second approach we use the much simpler Composite Delta Method to generate climate projections. Future climate projections are generated by simply altering the mean observed climate to match the mean climate of the climate model projections. Projections of precipitation and temperature from both approaches were then used to drive NASA's FEWS NET Land Data Assimilation System (FLDAS) to simulate the hydrologic variables most relevant to agriculture and water security: runoff, soil moisture and evapotranspiration. These outputs inform 2030 food and water security scenarios for East Africa. Finally we also investigate the impact of precipitation versus temperature changes on agriculture and water security in East Africa. We do so by keeping either one of those forcings constant while using the actual projections of the other variable to generate projections of hydrologic variables as described above.

  2. The Hydroclimate of East Africa: Seasonal cycle, Decadal Variability, and Human-induced Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenchang

    The hydroclimate of East Africa shows distinctive variabilities on seasonal to decadal time scales and poses a great challenge to climatologists attempting to project its response to anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs). Increased frequency and intensity of droughts over East Africa in recent decades raise the question of whether the drying trend will continue into the future. To address this question, we first examine the decadal variability of the East African rainfall during March--May (MAM, the major rainy season in East Africa) and assess how well a series of models simulate the observed features. Observational results show that the drying trend during MAM is associated with decadal natural variability of sea surface temperature (SST) variations over the Pacific Ocean. The multimodel mean of the SST-forced, Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) AMIP experiment models reproduces both the climatological annual cycle and the drying trend in recent decades. The fully coupled models from the CMIP5 historical experiment, however, have systematic errors in simulating the East African rainfall annual cycle by underestimating the MAM rainfall while overestimating the October--December (OND, the second rainy season in East Africa) rainfall. The multimodel mean of the historical coupled runs of the MAM rainfall anomalies, which is the best estimate of the radiatively-forced change, shows a weak wetting trend associated with anthropogenic forcing. However, the SST anomaly pattern associated with the MAM rainfall has large discrepancies with the observations. The errors in simulating the East African hydroclimate with coupled models raise questions about how reliable model projections of future East African climate are. This motivates a fundamental study of why East African climate is the way it is and why coupled models get it wrong. East African hydroclimate is characterized by a dry annual mean climatology compared to other deep tropical land areas and a bimodal annual cycle with the major rainy season during MAM (often called the ``long rains'' by local people) and the second during OND (the "short rains"). To explore these distinctive features, we use the ERA-Interim Re-Analysis data to analyze the associated annual cycles of atmospheric convective stability, circulation and moisture budget. The atmosphere over East Africa is found to be convectively stable, in general, year-round but with an annual cycle dominated by the surface moist static energy (MSE), which is in phase with the precipitation annual cycle. Throughout the year, the atmospheric circulation is dominated by a pattern of convergence near the surface, divergence in the lower troposphere and convergence again at upper levels. Consistently, the convergence of the vertically integrated moisture flux is mostly negative across the year, but becomes weakly positive in the two rainy seasons. It is suggested the semi-arid/arid climate in East Africa and its bimodal rainfall annual cycle can be explained by the ventilation mechanism, in which the atmospheric convective stability over East Africa is controlled by the import of low MSE air from the relatively cool Indian Ocean off the coast and the cold winter hemisphere. During the rainy seasons, however, the off-coast SST increases (and is warmest during the long rains season) and the northerly or southerly weakens, and consequently the air imported into East Africa becomes less stable. The MSE framework is then applied to study the coupling-induced bias of the East African rainfall annual cycle often found in CMIP3/5 coupled models that overestimates the OND rainfall and underestimates the MAM rainfall, by comparing the historical (coupled) and the AMIP runs (SST-forced) for each model. It is found that a warm north and cold south SST bias over the Indian Ocean induced in coupled models is responsible for the dry MAM rainfall bias over East Africa while the ocean dynamics induced warm west and cold east SST bias over the Indian Ocean contributes to the wet OND rainfall bias in

  3. Skill Assessment of National Multi-Model Ensemble Forecasts for Seasonal Drought Prediction in East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, S.; Hoell, A.; Roberts, J. B.; Funk, C. C.; Robertson, F. R.

    2014-12-01

    The increasing food and water demands of East Africa's growing population are stressing the region's inconsistent water resources and rain-fed agriculture. As recently as 2011, part of this region underwent one of the worst famine events in its history. Timely and skillful drought forecasts at a seasonal scale for this region can inform better water and agro-pastoral management decisions, support optimal allocation of the region's water resources, and mitigate socio-economic losses incurred by droughts. However, seasonal drought prediction in this region faces several challenges including lack of skillful seasonal rainfall forecasts. The National Multi-model Ensemble (NMME); a state-of-the-art dynamical climate forecast system is potentially a promising tool for drought prediction in this region. The NMME incorporates climate forecasts from 6+ fully coupled dynamical models resulting in 100+ forecasts ensemble members. Recent studies have indicated that in general NMME offers improvement over forecasts from any of the individual model. However, thus far the skill of NMME for forecasting rainfall in a vulnerable region like East Africa has largely been unexplored. In this presentation we report findings of a comprehensive analysis that examines the strength and weakness of NMME in forecasting rainfall at seasonal scale in East Africa for all three of the prominent seasons of the region. (i.e. March-April-May, July-August-September, and October-November-December). Additionally we describe a hybrid approach that combines statistical method with NMME forecasts to improve rainfall forecast skill in the region when raw NMME forecasts skill is lacking. This approach uses constructed analog method to improve NMME's March-April-May rainfall forecast skill in East Africa.

  4. Vegetation Change in East Africa Under the Influence of Tectonic Uplift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fer, I.; Tietjen, B.; Jeltsch, F.; Trauth, M. H.

    2014-12-01

    Today, when we look at the tropical latitudes all around the world, we see rainforests more or less everywhere, except the easternmost parts of tropical East Africa. Why do the environmental conditions elsewhere in the tropics support the rainforest biomes but not in East Africa? The suggested explanation for this is the progressive tectonic uplift of the region. The uplift of eastern African topography, together with the changes in Earth's orbital forcing, resulted in the aridification of the region over the past 10 million years. It follows that there must have been rainforest environments in tropical East Africa before the uplift began and there is evidence to support this claim. Then, it raises the questions about how extensive these forests were, when and under which environmental conditions they started to fragment and grasslands took over. To address these questions we ran a dynamic vegetation model under experimental scenarios with varying precipitation, temperature and atmospheric CO2 concentration values. Our results show that even an increase of rainfall by 100% with respect to present-day conditions is not enough by itself for sustaining forest biomes at the easternmost parts of tropical East Africa. Within the range of atmospheric CO2 concentrations estimated for the late Miocene (9 Ma) [250-320 ppmv], decrease in temperature must also accompany the increase in rainfall to support the woody vegetation. Although an increase in arboreal cover at the expense of herbaceous vegetation could clearly be simulated all over the region, a continuous forest cover was only established at the south of the equator which fragmented with the decreasing rainfall and increasing temperatures in the region.

  5. Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of four East Africa Geologic Provinces

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brownfield, Michael E.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Klett, Timothy R.; Cook, Troy A.; Pollastro, Richard M.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.

    2012-01-01

    Four geologic provinces along the east coast of Africa recently were assessed for undiscovered, technically recoverable oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids resources as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) World Oil and Gas Assessment. Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the USGS estimated mean volumes of 27.6 billion barrels of oil, 441.1 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and 13.77 billion barrels of natural gas liquids.

  6. Seasonal drought forecast system for food-insecure regions of East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Shraddhanand; McNally, Amy; Husak, Greg; Funk, Chris

    2014-05-01

    In East Africa, agriculture is mostly rainfed and hence sensitive to interannual rainfall variability, and the increasing food and water demands of a growing population place further stresses on the water resources of this region. Skillful seasonal agricultural drought forecasts for this region can inform timely water and agricultural management decisions, support the proper allocation of the region's water resources, and help mitigate socio-economic losses. Here we describe the development and implementation of a seasonal drought forecast system that is being used for providing seasonal outlooks of agricultural drought in East Africa. We present a test case of the evaluation and applicability of this system for March-April-May growing season over equatorial East Africa (latitude 20 south to 80 North and 360 E to 460E) that encompasses one of the most food insecure and climatically and socio-economically vulnerable regions in East Africa. This region experienced famine as recently as in 2011. The system described here combines advanced satellite and re-analysis as well as station-based long term and real-time observations (e.g. NASA's TRMM, Infra-red remote sensing, Climate Forecast System Reanalysis), state-of-the-art dynamical climate forecast system (NCEP's Climate Forecast System Verison-2) and large scale land surface models (e.g. Variable Infiltration Capacity, NASA's Land Information System) to provide forecasts of seasonal rainfall, soil moisture and Water Requirement Satisfaction Index (WRSI) throughout the season - with an emphasis on times when water is the most critical: start of season/planting and the mid-season/crop reproductive phase. Based on the hindcast assessment of this system, we demonstrate the value of this approach to the US Agency for International Development (USAID)'s efforts to mitigate future losses of lives and economic losses by allowing a proactive approach of drought management that includes early warning and timely action.

  7. Control of schistosome-transmitting snails in Kenya by the North American crayfish Procambarus clarkii.

    PubMed

    Hofkin, B V; Mkoji, G M; Koech, D K; Loker, E S

    1991-09-01

    Snail-transmitted trematode parasites such as schistosomes and liver flukes assume considerable medical and veterinary significance in tropical Africa. We have observed a strong negative association between the presence of medically important pulmonate snails and the crayfish Procambarus clarkii in freshwater habitats in Kenya. This crayfish, introduced into Kenya around 1970, readily consumes these snails in the laboratory. Field enclosure experiments indicate that crayfish exert a significant negative impact on the abundance of Biomphalaria pfeifferi, the intermediate host of the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni. It is likely that P. clarkii will continue to spread naturally in Kenya and that schistosome-transmitting snails will be excluded or reduced in numbers where crayfish are present. Procambarus clarkii may represent an alternative, biological means of snail control in East Africa. PMID:1928568

  8. Examining the impact of climate change and variability on sweet potatoes in East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ddumba, S. D.; Andresen, J.; Moore, N. J.; Olson, J.; Snapp, S.; Winkler, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    Climate change is one of the biggest challenges to food security for the rapidly increasing population of East Africa. Rainfall is becoming more variable and temperatures are rising, consequently leading to increased occurrence of droughts and floods, and, changes in the timing and length of growing seasons. These changes have serious implications on crop production with the greatest impact likely to be on C4 crops such as cereals compared to C3 crops such as root tubers. Sweet potatoes is one the four most important food crops in East Africa owing to its high nutrition and calorie content, and, high tolerance to heat and drought, but little is known about how the crop will be affected by climate change. This study identifies the major climatic constraints to sweet potato production and examines the impact of projected future climates on sweet potato production in East Africa during the next 10 to 30 years. A process-based Sweet POTato COMputer Simulation (SPOTCOMS) model is used to assess four sweet potato cultivars; Naspot 1, Naspot 10, Naspot 11 and SPK 004-Ejumula. This is work in progress but preliminary results from the crop modeling experiments and the strength and weakness of the crop model will be presented.

  9. Neonatal Mortality Risk Associated with Preterm Birth in East Africa, Adjusted by Weight for Gestational Age: Individual Participant Level Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Marchant, Tanya; Willey, Barbara; Katz, Joanne; Clarke, Siân; Kariuki, Simon; ter Kuile, Feiko; Lusingu, John; Ndyomugyenyi, Richard; Schmiegelow, Christentze; Watson-Jones, Deborah; Armstrong Schellenberg, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Background Low birth weight and prematurity are amongst the strongest predictors of neonatal death. However, the extent to which they act independently is poorly understood. Our objective was to estimate the neonatal mortality risk associated with preterm birth when stratified by weight for gestational age in the high mortality setting of East Africa. Methods and Findings Members and collaborators of the Malaria and the MARCH Centers, at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, were contacted and protocols reviewed for East African studies that measured (1) birth weight, (2) gestational age at birth using antenatal ultrasound or neonatal assessment, and (3) neonatal mortality. Ten datasets were identified and four met the inclusion criteria. The four datasets (from Uganda, Kenya, and two from Tanzania) contained 5,727 births recorded between 1999–2010. 4,843 births had complete outcome data and were included in an individual participant level meta-analysis. 99% of 445 low birth weight (<2,500 g) babies were either preterm (<37 weeks gestation) or small for gestational age (below tenth percentile of weight for gestational age). 52% of 87 neonatal deaths occurred in preterm or small for gestational age babies. Babies born <34 weeks gestation had the highest odds of death compared to term babies (odds ratio [OR] 58.7 [95% CI 28.4–121.4]), with little difference when stratified by weight for gestational age. Babies born 34–36 weeks gestation with appropriate weight for gestational age had just three times the likelihood of neonatal death compared to babies born term, (OR 3.2 [95% CI 1.0–10.7]), but the likelihood for babies born 34–36 weeks who were also small for gestational age was 20 times higher (OR 19.8 [95% CI 8.3–47.4]). Only 1% of babies were born moderately premature and small for gestational age, but this group suffered 8% of deaths. Individual level data on newborns are scarce in East Africa; potential biases arising due to the non-systematic selection of the individual studies, or due to the methods applied for estimating gestational age, are discussed. Conclusions Moderately preterm babies who are also small for gestational age experience a considerably increased likelihood of neonatal death in East Africa. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary. PMID:22904691

  10. STS-55 Earth observation of Lake Natron, Tanzania, East Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    STS-55 Earth observation taken aboard Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, shows Lake Natron in Tansania, in the 35-mile-wide East African Rift Valley. This lake is surrounded by sodium carbonate volcanoes. Through erosion, these salts of volcanic origin are transported into the rift valley lakes. The various shades of bright red reflecting from the lake result from the water chemistry and biotic blooms. The white spots in the lakebed are drying soda salts. The depth and circulation of the water in the southern end of the lake cause it to appear dark blue rather than bright red. In the repeated photographs of this lake from orbit, we have seen the extent and intensity of its colors fluctuate seasonally. In this photograph, the biotic activity appears to be at a peak. Such a large extent of red-colored water was not present in the photos taken from STS-56, just a few days before (04-10-93).

  11. When to Randomize: Lessons from Independent Impact Evaluation of Reading to Learn (RtL) Programme to Improve Literacy and Numeracy in Kenya and Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oketch, Moses; Ngware, Moses; Mutisya, Maurice; Kassahun, Admassu; Abuya, Benta; Musyoka, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In East Africa, there is great effort directed toward ensuring that there is learning and value for money invested in universal education policies initiated over the past decade. Kenya and Uganda are two countries that typify this effort. The effort includes the work of research organisations such as Uwezo, which assess learning levels; RTI, which…

  12. Continental rift evolution: From rift initiation to incipient break-up in the Main Ethiopian Rift, East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corti, Giacomo

    2009-09-01

    The Main Ethiopian Rift is a key sector of the East African Rift System that connects the Afar depression, at Red Sea-Gulf of Aden junction, with the Turkana depression and Kenya Rift to the South. It is a magmatic rift that records all the different stages of rift evolution from rift initiation to break-up and incipient oceanic spreading: it is thus an ideal place to analyse the evolution of continental extension, the rupture of lithospheric plates and the dynamics by which distributed continental deformation is progressively focused at oceanic spreading centres. The first tectono-magmatic event related to the Tertiary rifting was the eruption of voluminous flood basalts that apparently occurred in a rather short time interval at around 30 Ma; strong plateau uplift, which resulted in the development of the Ethiopian and Somalian plateaus now surrounding the rift valley, has been suggested to have initiated contemporaneously or shortly after the extensive flood-basalt volcanism, although its exact timing remains controversial. Voluminous volcanism and uplift started prior to the main rifting phases, suggesting a mantle plume influence on the Tertiary deformation in East Africa. Different plume hypothesis have been suggested, with recent models indicating the existence of deep superplume originating at the core-mantle boundary beneath southern Africa, rising in a north-northeastward direction toward eastern Africa, and feeding multiple plume stems in the upper mantle. However, the existence of this whole-mantle feature and its possible connection with Tertiary rifting are highly debated. The main rifting phases started diachronously along the MER in the Mio-Pliocene; rift propagation was not a smooth process but rather a process with punctuated episodes of extension and relative quiescence. Rift location was most probably controlled by the reactivation of a lithospheric-scale pre-Cambrian weakness; the orientation of this weakness (roughly NE-SW) and the Late Pliocene (post 3.2 Ma)-recent extensional stress field generated by relative motion between Nubia and Somalia plates (roughly ESE-WNW) suggest that oblique rifting conditions have controlled rift evolution. However, it is still unclear if these kinematical boundary conditions have remained steady since the initial stages of rifting or the kinematics has changed during the Late Pliocene or at the Pliocene-Pleistocene boundary. Analysis of geological-geophysical data suggests that continental rifting in the MER evolved in two different phases. An early (Mio-Pliocene) continental rifting stage was characterised by displacement along large boundary faults, subsidence of rift depression with local development of deep (up to 5 km) asymmetric basins and diffuse magmatic activity. In this initial phase, magmatism encompassed the whole rift, with volcanic activity affecting the rift depression, the major boundary faults and limited portions of the rift shoulders (off-axis volcanism). Progressive extension led to the second (Pleistocene) rifting stage, characterised by a riftward narrowing of the volcano-tectonic activity. In this phase, the main boundary faults were deactivated and extensional deformation was accommodated by dense swarms of faults (Wonji segments) in the thinned rift depression. The progressive thinning of the continental lithosphere under constant, prolonged oblique rifting conditions controlled this migration of deformation, possibly in tandem with the weakening related to magmatic processes and/or a change in rift kinematics. Owing to the oblique rifting conditions, the fault swarms obliquely cut the rift floor and were characterised by a typical right-stepping arrangement. Ascending magmas were focused by the Wonji segments, with eruption of magmas at surface preferentially occurring along the oblique faults. As soon as the volcano-tectonic activity was localised within Wonji segments, a strong feedback between deformation and magmatism developed: the thinned lithosphere was strongly modified by the extensive magma intrusion and extension was facilitated

  13. Sunspots, El Niño, and the levels of Lake Victoria, East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stager, J. Curt; Ruzmaikin, Alexander; Conway, Declan; Verburg, Piet; Mason, Peter J.

    2007-08-01

    An association of high sunspot numbers with rises in the level of Lake Victoria, East Africa, has been the focus of many investigations and vigorous debate during the last century. In this paper, we show that peaks in the ~11-year sunspot cycle were accompanied by Victoria level maxima throughout the 20th century, due to the occurrence of positive rainfall anomalies ~1 year before solar maxima. Similar patterns also occurred in at least five other East African lakes, which indicates that these sunspot-rainfall relationships were broadly regional in scale. Although irradiance fluctuations associated with the sunspot cycle are weak, their effects on tropical rainfall could be amplified through interactions with sea surface temperatures and atmospheric circulation systems, including ENSO. If this Sun-rainfall relationship persists in the future, then sunspot cycles can be used for long-term prediction of precipitation anomalies and associated outbreaks of insect-borne disease in much of East Africa. In that case, unusually wet rainy seasons and Rift Valley Fever epidemics should occur a year or so before the next solar maximum, which is expected to occur in 2011-2012 AD.

  14. A survey of Simulium control in Africa.

    PubMed

    BROWN, A W

    1962-01-01

    It has become possible to control or even eradicate the Simulium fly vectors of Onchocerca volvulus, the causative organism of onchocerciasis. There are two vectors in Africa-namely, S. damnosum, characteristic of the rivers of West Africa, and S. neavei, which breeds on the carapaces of crabs in the streams of East Africa. The use of DDT applied to the water at a concentration as low as 0.1 p.p.m. for 30 minutes eliminates the larvae of Simulium. Such larvicidal methods have eradicated S. neavei from western Kenya and virtually eradicated S. damnosum from the Victoria Nile in Uganda. Excellent control sufficient to render the transmission of onchocerciasis almost negligible has been obtained at Léopoldville (Republic of the Congo) and in circumscribed areas in southern Chad, Northern Nigeria, and Sierra Leone. The following survey describes operational research on Simulium control carried out in Kenya, Uganda, the Congo, Chad, Nigeria, Ghana, Upper Volta and Sierra Leone. PMID:14015908

  15. Policies on Free Primary and Secondary Education in East Africa: A Review of the Literature. Create Pathways to Access. Research Monograph No. 10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oketch, Moses O.; Rolleston, Caine M.

    2007-01-01

    Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda are among the countries in Sub-Saharan Africa which have recently implemented policies for free primary education, motivated in part by renewed democratic accountability following the re-emergence of multi-party politics in the 1990s. However, it is not the first time that the goal of expanding primary education has been…

  16. Littoral sedimentation of rift lakes: an illustrated overview from the modern to Pliocene Lake Turkana (East African Rift System, Kenya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Mathieu; Nutz, Alexis

    2015-04-01

    Existing depositional models for rift lakes can be summarized as clastics transported by axial and lateral rivers, then distributed by fan-deltas and/or deltas into a standing water body which is dominated by settling of fine particles, and experiencing occasional coarser underflows. Even if known from paleolakes and modern lakes, reworking of clastics by alongshore drift, waves and storms are rarely considered in depositional models. However, if we consider the lake Turkana Basin (East African Rift System, Kenya) it is obvious that this vision is incomplete. Three representative time slices are considered here: the modern Lake Turkana, the Megalake Turkana which developed thanks to the African Humid Period (Holocene), and the Plio-Pleistocene highstand episodes of paleolake Turkana (Nachukui, Shungura and Koobi Fora Formations, Omo Group). First, remarkable clastic morphosedimentary structures such as beach ridges, spits, washover fans, lagoons, or wave-dominated deltas are very well developed along the shoreline of modern lake Turkana, suggesting strong hydrodynamics responsible for a major reworking of the fluvial-derived clastics all along the littoral zone (longshore and cross-shore transport) of the lake. Similarly, past hydrodynamics are recorded from prominent raised beach ridges and spits, well-preserved all around the lake, above its present water-level (~360 m asl) and up to ~455 m. These large-scale clastic morphosedimentary structures also record the maximum extent of Megalake Turkana during the African Humid Period, as well as its subsequent regression forced by the end of the Holocene climatic optimum. Several hundreds of meters of fluvial-deltaic-lacustrine deposits spanning the Pliocene-Pleistocene are exposed in the Turkana basin thanks to tectonic faulting. These deposits are world famous for their paleontological and archeological content that documents the very early story of Mankind. They also preserve several paleolake highstand episodes with typical sedimentary facies and structures/bodies reflecting important littoral hydrodynamics distributed from the backshore up to the lower shoreface zones. As a consequence, this preliminary overview from the Lake Turkana Basin, suggests that littoral hydrodynamics are important processes of erosion, transport an redeposition of clastics in rift lakes, and should thus be considered in the next generation of depositional models.

  17. Mosaic maternal ancestry in the Great Lakes region of East Africa.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Verónica; Pala, Maria; Salas, Antonio; Álvarez-Iglesias, Vanesa; Amorim, António; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Carracedo, Ángel; Clarke, Douglas J; Hill, Catherine; Mormina, Maru; Shaw, Marie-Anne; Dunne, David W; Pereira, Rui; Pereira, Vânia; Prata, Maria João; Sánchez-Diz, Paula; Rito, Teresa; Soares, Pedro; Gusmão, Leonor; Richards, Martin B

    2015-09-01

    The Great Lakes lie within a region of East Africa with very high human genetic diversity, home of many ethno-linguistic groups usually assumed to be the product of a small number of major dispersals. However, our knowledge of these dispersals relies primarily on the inferences of historical, linguistics and oral traditions, with attempts to match up the archaeological evidence where possible. This is an obvious area to which archaeogenetics can contribute, yet Uganda, at the heart of these developments, has not been studied for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation. Here, we compare mtDNA lineages at this putative genetic crossroads across 409 representatives of the major language groups: Bantu speakers and Eastern and Western Nilotic speakers. We show that Uganda harbours one of the highest mtDNA diversities within and between linguistic groups, with the various groups significantly differentiated from each other. Despite an inferred linguistic origin in South Sudan, the data from the two Nilotic-speaking groups point to a much more complex history, involving not only possible dispersals from Sudan and the Horn but also large-scale assimilation of autochthonous lineages within East Africa and even Uganda itself. The Eastern Nilotic group also carries signals characteristic of West-Central Africa, primarily due to Bantu influence, whereas a much stronger signal in the Western Nilotic group suggests direct West-Central African ancestry. Bantu speakers share lineages with both Nilotic groups, and also harbour East African lineages not found in Western Nilotic speakers, likely due to assimilating indigenous populations since arriving in the region ~3000 years ago. PMID:26188410

  18. Current kinematics and dynamics of Africa and the East African Rift System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamps, D. S.; Flesch, L. M.; Calais, E.; Ghosh, A.

    2014-06-01

    Although the East African Rift System (EARS) is an archetype continental rift, the forces driving its evolution remain debated. Some contend buoyancy forces arising from gravitational potential energy (GPE) gradients within the lithosphere drive rifting. Others argue for a major role of the diverging mantle flow associated with the African Superplume. Here we quantify the forces driving present-day continental rifting in East Africa by (1) solving the depth averaged 3-D force balance equations for 3-D deviatoric stress associated with GPE, (2) inverting for a stress field boundary condition that we interpret as originating from large-scale mantle tractions, (3) calculating dynamic velocities due to lithospheric buoyancy forces, lateral viscosity variations, and velocity boundary conditions, and (4) calculating dynamic velocities that result from the stress response of horizontal mantle tractions acting on a viscous lithosphere in Africa and surroundings. We find deviatoric stress associated with lithospheric GPE gradients are ˜8-20 MPa in EARS, and the minimum deviatoric stress resulting from basal shear is ˜1.6 MPa along the EARS. Our dynamic velocity calculations confirm that a force contribution from GPE gradients alone is sufficient to drive Nubia-Somalia divergence and that additional forcing from horizontal mantle tractions overestimates surface kinematics. Stresses from GPE gradients appear sufficient to sustain present-day rifting in East Africa; however, they are lower than the vertically integrated strength of the lithosphere along most of the EARS. This indicates additional processes are required to initiate rupture of continental lithosphere, but once it is initiated, lithospheric buoyancy forces are enough to maintain rifting.

  19. Seasonal Drought Prediction in East Africa: Can National Multi-Model Ensemble Forecasts Help?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shukla, Shraddhanand; Roberts, J. B.; Funk, Christopher; Robertson, F. R.; Hoell, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The increasing food and water demands of East Africa's growing population are stressing the region's inconsistent water resources and rain-fed agriculture. As recently as in 2011 part of this region underwent one of the worst famine events in its history. Timely and skillful drought forecasts at seasonal scale for this region can inform better water and agro-pastoral management decisions, support optimal allocation of the region's water resources, and mitigate socio-economic losses incurred by droughts. However seasonal drought prediction in this region faces several challenges. Lack of skillful seasonal rainfall forecasts; the focus of this presentation, is one of those major challenges. In the past few decades, major strides have been taken towards improvement of seasonal scale dynamical climate forecasts. The National Centers for Environmental Prediction's (NCEP) National Multi-model Ensemble (NMME) is one such state-of-the-art dynamical climate forecast system. The NMME incorporates climate forecasts from 6+ fully coupled dynamical models resulting in 100+ ensemble member forecasts. Recent studies have indicated that in general NMME offers improvement over forecasts from any single model. However thus far the skill of NMME for forecasting rainfall in a vulnerable region like the East Africa has been unexplored. In this presentation we report findings of a comprehensive analysis that examines the strength and weakness of NMME in forecasting rainfall at seasonal scale in East Africa for all three of the prominent seasons for the region. (i.e. March-April-May, July-August-September and October-November- December). Simultaneously we also describe hybrid approaches; that combine statistical approaches with NMME forecasts; to improve rainfall forecast skill in the region when raw NMME forecasts lack in skill.

  20. Seasonal Drought Prediction in East Africa: Can National Multi-Model Ensemble Forecasts Help?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shukla, Shraddhanand; Roberts, J. B.; Funk, Christopher; Robertson, F. R.; Hoell, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The increasing food and water demands of East Africa's growing population are stressing the region's inconsistent water resources and rain-fed agriculture. As recently as in 2011 part of this region underwent one of the worst famine events in its history. Timely and skillful drought forecasts at seasonal scale for this region can inform better water and agro-pastoral management decisions, support optimal allocation of the region's water resources, and mitigate socio-economic losses incurred by droughts. However seasonal drought prediction in this region faces several challenges. Lack of skillful seasonal rainfall forecasts; the focus of this presentation, is one of those major challenges. In the past few decades, major strides have been taken towards improvement of seasonal scale dynamical climate forecasts. The National Centers for Environmental Prediction's (NCEP) National Multi-model Ensemble (NMME) is one such state-of-the-art dynamical climate forecast system. The NMME incorporates climate forecasts from 6+ fully coupled dynamical models resulting in 100+ ensemble member forecasts. Recent studies have indicated that in general NMME offers improvement over forecasts from any single model. However thus far the skill of NMME for forecasting rainfall in a vulnerable region like the East Africa has been unexplored. In this presentation we report findings of a comprehensive analysis that examines the strength and weakness of NMME in forecasting rainfall at seasonal scale in East Africa for all three of the prominent seasons for the region. (i.e. March-April-May, July-August-September and October-November- December). Simultaneously we also describe hybrid approaches; that combine statistical approaches with NMME forecasts; to improve rainfall forecast skill in the region when raw NMME forecasts lack in skill.

  1. HIV Surveillance and Epidemic Profile in the Middle East and North Africa

    PubMed Central

    Shawky, Sherine; Soliman, Cherif; Kassak, Kassem M.; Oraby, Doaa; El-Khoury, Danielle; Kabore, Inoussa

    2011-01-01

    Summary HIV infection is the most devastating infection that has emerged in the recent history. The risk of being infected can be associated with both individual’s knowledge and behavior and community vulnerability influenced by cultural norms, laws, politics, and social practices. Despite that the countries in the Middle East and North Africa have succeeded in keeping low the HIV epidemic rates, the number of identified infected cases are increasing. Since the appearance of the first AIDS cases, all the national authorities devoted their efforts to abort the epidemic in its early stages. The rate of new HIV infections across the Middle East and North Africa region are not at an alarming level, but the need for a concerted effort from nation-states and nongovernmental organizations to stem the spread of the virus across the region is vital. Most countries of the region have put in place better information systems to track the HIV epidemic, yet the passive HIV/AIDS reporting remains the cornerstone in the HIV surveillance systems. Several countries still believe that their current strategies are optimal to the HIV status within their territories and that their national strategies are appropriate to their low epidemic status that is not expected to grow. Additionally, these countries fear that establishing an HIV national program to survey risk behaviors may be perceived as an approval of these behaviors that are culturally and religiously unacceptable. This background article aims to summarize the HIV surveillance strategies and epidemic profile in 17 Arab countries in the Middle East and North Africa. The article, also, displays the national surveillance system and the epidemic profile in Egypt and Lebanon as models for the region. This information aims to provide useful insights that may help the national authorities in finding out the best surveillance strategies that allow merging and collecting biological and risk data which is an integral part of their efforts to fight the HIV epidemic in the region. PMID:19553783

  2. The importance of choice in the rollout of ARV-based prevention to user groups in Kenya and South Africa: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Natasha; Evens, Emily M; Tolley, Elizabeth E; Brelsford, Kate; Mackenzie, Caroline; Milford, Cecilia; Smit, Jennifer A; Kimani, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Stakeholders continue to discuss the appropriateness of antiretroviral-based pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV prevention among sub-Saharan African and other women. In particular, women need formulations they can adhere to given that effectiveness has been found to correlate with adherence. Evidence from family planning shows that contraceptive use, continuation and adherence may be increased by expanding choices. To explore the potential role of choice in women's use of HIV prevention methods, we conducted a secondary analysis of research with female sex workers (FSWs) and men and women in serodiscordant couples (SDCs) in Kenya, and adolescent and young women in South Africa. Our objective here is to present their interest in and preferences for PrEP formulations – pills, gel and injectable. Methods In this qualitative study, in Kenya we conducted three focus groups with FSWs, and three with SDCs. In South Africa, we conducted two focus groups with adolescent girls, and two with young women. All focus groups were audio-recorded, transcribed and translated into English as needed. We structurally and thematically coded transcripts using a codebook and QSR NVivo 9.0; generated code reports; and conducted inductive thematic analysis to identify major trends and themes. Results All groups expressed strong interest in PrEP products. In Kenya, FSWs said the products might help them earn more money, because they would feel safer accepting more clients or having sex without condoms for a higher price. SDCs said the products might replace condoms and reanimate couples’ sex lives. Most sex workers and SDCs preferred an injectable because it would last longer, required little intervention and was private. In South Africa, adolescent girls believed it would be possible to obtain the products more privately than condoms. Young women were excited about PrEP but concerned about interactions with alcohol and drug use, which often precede sex. Adolescents did not prefer a particular formulation but noted benefits and limitations of each; young women's preferences also varied. Conclusions The circumstances and preferences of sub-Saharan African women are likely to vary within and across groups and to change over time, highlighting the importance of choice in HIV prevention methods. PMID:25224616

  3. Fluoride in groundwater in selected villages in Eritrea (North East Africa).

    PubMed

    Srikanth, R; Viswanatham, K S; Kahsai, Fikremariam; Fisahatsion, Abraham; Asmellash, Micheal

    2002-04-01

    A study was undertaken to estimate fluoride content in the groundwater in certain parts of rural Eritrea. North-East Africa, along the River Anseba. Standard procedure was adopted for fluoride detection. Results indicate elevated concentration of fluoride in groundwater. The highest concentration was found to be 3.73 mg L(-1), well above the safety level for consumption. Geological basis for the high concentration of high fluoride has been established; it is presumed to be the pegmatite intrusion hosted by a granitic batholith. Extensive dental fluorosis has been observed in the population exposed to drinking water of high fluoride content. PMID:12002285

  4. A survey of Echinococcus species in wild carnivores and livestock in East Africa.

    PubMed

    Hüttner, Marion; Siefert, Ludwig; Mackenstedt, Ute; Romig, Thomas

    2009-09-01

    We examined 71 faecal samples of carnivores from Queen Elizabeth National Park (QENP), Uganda, for eggs of Echinococcus species. Thirty-nine faecal samples contained taeniid eggs. For species diagnosis, DNA was isolated from a total of 1984 individual taeniid eggs. To differentiate eggs of Echinococcus felidis from other taeniid taxa (including the closely related Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto), a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)-PCR of the mitochondrial nad1 gene was developed. As the faecal samples were taken from the environment, the host species was determined for all samples, except for one, by RFLP-PCR of the cob gene. Seven hundred and ninety-one of the 1984 eggs yielded a suitable PCR product. E. felidis was present in 34 of 47 samples from lions, none of 18 samples from leopards, and one of five samples from spotted hyenas. No Echinococcus taxon other than E. felidis was found, but three samples from lions contained eggs of Taenia regis. Two hydatid cysts of warthog origin from QENP were available for this study; molecular examination showed that one belonged to E. felidis, the other to E. granulosus (G1 strain). As a comparison of methods demonstrated that molecular diagnostic tools used for previous surveys of Echinococcus isolates in eastern Africa are not suitable to discriminate between E. felidis and E. granulosus sensu stricto, we re-examined 412 hydatid cyst samples of human, sheep, cattle, camel and goat origin from Kenya. Previous results were confirmed, as E. granulosus sensu stricto and Echinococcus canadensis G6/7 strain, but no E. felidis was found among these samples. In conclusion, we provide evidence that E. felidis is a frequent parasite of lions in Uganda, and possibly also occurs in hyenas. Additionally, we show that warthogs interact as intermediate hosts for E. felidis. We did not find evidence that E. felidis is present in eastern Africa outside conservation areas. PMID:19275902

  5. Correlation of Pliocene and Pleistocene tephra layers between the Turkana Basin of East Africa and the Gulf of Aden

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, F.H.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.; Meyer, C.E.; Haileab, B.

    1992-01-01

    Electron-microprobe analyses of glass shards from volcanic ash in Pliocene and Pleistocene deep-sea sediments in the Gulf of Aden and the Somali Basin demonstrate that most of the tephra layers correlate with tephra layers known on land in the Turkana Basin of northern Kenya and southern Ethiopia. Previous correlations are reviewed, and new correlations proposed. Together these data provide correlations between the deep-sea cores, and to the land-based sections at eight levels ranging in age from about 4 to 0.7 Ma. Specifically, we correlate the Moiti Tuff (???4.1 Ma) with a tephra layer at 188.6 m depth in DSDP hole 231 and with a tephra layer at 150 m depth in DSDP hole 241, the Wargolo Tuff with a tephra layer at 179.7 m in DSDP Hole 231 and with a tephra layer at 155.3 m depth in DSDP Hole 232, the Lomogol Tuff (defined here) with a tephra layer at 165 m in DSDP Hole 232A, the Lokochot Tuff with a tephra layer at 140.1 m depth in DSDP Hole 232, the Tulu Bor Tuff with a tephra layer at 160.8 m depth in DSDP Hole 231, the Kokiselei Tuff with a tephra layer at 120 m depth in DSDP Hole 231 and with a tephra layer at 90.3 m depth in DSDP Hole 232, the Silbo Tuff (0.74 Ma) with a tephra layer at 35.5 m depth in DSDP Hole 231 and possibly with a tephra layer at 10.9 m depth in DSDP Hole 241. We also present analyses of other tephra from the deep sea cores for which correlative units on land are not yet known. The correlated tephra layers provide eight chronostratigraphic horizons that make it possible to temporally correlate paleoecological and paleoclimatic data between the terrestrial and deep-sea sites. Such correlations may make it possible to interpret faunal evolution in the Lake Turkana basin and other sites in East Africa within a broader regional or global paleoclimatic context. ?? 1992.

  6. A literature review: the role of the private sector in the production of nurses in India, Kenya, South Africa and Thailand

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The demand for nurses is growing and has not yet been met in most developing countries, including India, Kenya, South Africa, and Thailand. Efforts to increase the capacity for production of professional nurses, equitable distribution and better retention have been given high strategic priority. This study examines the supply of, demand for, and policy environment of private nurse production in four selected countries. Methods A scoping systematic review was undertaken to assess the evidence for the role of private sector involvement in the production of nurses in India, Kenya, South Africa, and Thailand. An electronic database search was performed, and grey literature was also captured from the websites of Human Resources for Health (HRH)-related organizations and networks. The articles were reviewed and selected according to relevancy. Results The review found that despite very different ratios of nurses to population ratios and differing degrees of international migration, there was a nursing shortage in all four countries which were struggling to meet growing demand. All four countries saw the private sector play an increasing role in nurse production. Policy responses varied from modifying regulation and accreditation schemes in Thailand, to easing regulation to speed up nurse production and recruitment in India. There were concerns about the quality of nurses being produced in private institutions. Conclusion Strategies must be devised to ensure that private nursing graduates serve public health needs of their populations. There must be policy coherence between producing nurses for export and ensuring sufficient supply to meet domestic needs, in particular in under-served areas. This study points to the need for further research in particular assessing the contributions made by the private sector to nurse production, and to examine the variance in quality of nurses produced. PMID:23587128

  7. Population-Based Incidence of Typhoid Fever in an Urban Informal Settlement and a Rural Area in Kenya: Implications for Typhoid Vaccine Use in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Breiman, Robert F.; Cosmas, Leonard; Njuguna, Henry; Audi, Allan; Olack, Beatrice; Ochieng, John B.; Wamola, Newton; Bigogo, Godfrey M.; Awiti, George; Tabu, Collins W.; Burke, Heather; Williamson, John; Oundo, Joseph O.; Mintz, Eric D.; Feikin, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    Background High rates of typhoid fever in children in urban settings in Asia have led to focus on childhood immunization in Asian cities, but not in Africa, where data, mostly from rural areas, have shown low disease incidence. We set out to compare incidence of typhoid fever in a densely populated urban slum and a rural community in Kenya, hypothesizing higher rates in the urban area, given crowding and suboptimal access to safe water, sanitation and hygiene. Methods During 2007-9, we conducted population-based surveillance in Kibera, an urban informal settlement in Nairobi, and in Lwak, a rural area in western Kenya. Participants had free access to study clinics; field workers visited their homes biweekly to collect information about acute illnesses. In clinic, blood cultures were processed from patients with fever or pneumonia. Crude and adjusted incidence rates were calculated. Results In the urban site, the overall crude incidence of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) bacteremia was 247 cases per 100,000 person-years of observation (pyo) with highest rates in children 5–9 years old (596 per 100,000 pyo) and 2–4 years old (521 per 100,000 pyo). Crude overall incidence in Lwak was 29 cases per 100,000 pyo with low rates in children 2–4 and 5–9 years old (28 and 18 cases per 100,000 pyo, respectively). Adjusted incidence rates were highest in 2–4 year old urban children (2,243 per 100,000 pyo) which were >15-fold higher than rates in the rural site for the same age group. Nearly 75% of S. Typhi isolates were multi-drug resistant. Conclusions This systematic urban slum and rural comparison showed dramatically higher typhoid incidence among urban children <10 years old with rates similar to those from Asian urban slums. The findings have potential policy implications for use of typhoid vaccines in increasingly urban Africa. PMID:22276105

  8. Why Did Abolishing Fees Not Increase Public School Enrollment in Kenya? Africa Growth Initiative. Working Paper 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bold, Tessa; Kimenyi, Mwangi S.; Mwabu, Germano; Sandefur, Justin

    2013-01-01

    A large empirical literature has shown that user fees significantly deter public service utilization in developing countries. While most of these results reflect partial equilibrium analysis, we find that the nationwide abolition of public school fees in Kenya in 2003 led to no increase in net public enrollment rates, but rather a dramatic shift…

  9. Status report of propagation models: Middle East and North Africa (S5.3)

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, C.A.; Patton, H.J.; Goldstein, P.

    1995-11-01

    An improved understanding of the influence that tectonic structure has on regional seismic phases is needed to improve the current performance of regional discriminants and their transportability to the Middle East and North Africa. In the case that the crustal structure can be approximated by a flat layered laterally invariant medium, layer-cake reflectivity modeling can be used to obtain an accurate representation of regional phases. However, a laterally heterogeneous crust is just as common as a layered cake structure and in this case large variations in regional phase amplitudes are not uncommon. For instance, it has been shown that rough surface topography and undulations in the Moho can cause the transfer of energy between various surface wave modes and between surface waves and body waves greatly increasing the potential variability of seismic phases. Larger scale structure such as thickening or thinning of the crust can also greatly affect phase propagation. In some instances, changes between different tectonic regions such as that which occurs at a continental-oceanic boundary can completely block phases such as Lg rendering certain discriminants useless. In addition to structure along the path, lateral structure and free surface topography near the source and receiver can cause complex scattering effects with strong directional, frequency, and near-field effects. Given that the Middle East and North Africa cross many different tectonic boundaries, the authors are using numerical propagation models to understand how the relevant tectonic features affect the propagation of primary discriminant phases.

  10. A proposed drainage evolution model for Central Africa—Did the Congo flow east?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankiewicz, Jacek; de Wit, Maarten J.

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the origin of Sub-Saharan biodiversity requires knowing the history of the region's paleo-ecosystems. As water is essential for sustaining of life, the evolving geometry of river basins often have influence on local speciation. With this in mind, we analyse drainage patterns in Central and East Africa. Evidence from marine fossils suggests the Congo Basin was submerged for much of the Cretaceous, and after being uplifted drained eastwards through a paleo-Congo river towards the Indian Ocean. Two remnant peneplains in the Congo Basin are interpreted as evidence that this basin was tectonically stable on at least two occasions in the past. The lower peneplain is interpreted as the base level of the drainage pattern that had its outlet in Tanzania, at the present Rufiji Delta that was once over 500 km wide. The Luangwa, today a tributary of the Zambezi river, was a part of this drainage network. This pattern was subsequently disrupted by uplift associated with the East African Rifting in the Oligocene-Eocene (30-40 Ma). The resulting landlocked system was captured in the Miocene (5-15 Ma) by short rivers draining into the Atlantic Ocean, producing the drainage pattern of Central Africa seen today.

  11. Distinct subspecies or phenotypic plasticity? Genetic and morphological differentiation of mountain honey bees in East Africa

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Karl; Schöning, Caspar; Otte, Marianne; Kinuthia, Wanja; Hasselmann, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Identifying the forces shaping intraspecific phenotypic and genotypic divergence are of key importance in evolutionary biology. Phenotypic divergence may result from local adaptation or, especially in species with strong gene flow, from pronounced phenotypic plasticity. Here, we examine morphological and genetic divergence among populations of the western honey bee Apis mellifera in the topographically heterogeneous East African region. The currently accepted “mountain refugia hypothesis” states that populations living in disjunct montane forests belong to a different lineage than those in savanna habitats surrounding these forests. We obtained microsatellite data, mitochondrial sequences, and morphometric data from worker honey bees collected from feral colonies in three montane forests and corresponding neighboring savanna regions in Kenya. Honey bee colonies from montane forests showed distinct worker morphology compared with colonies in savanna areas. Mitochondrial sequence data did not support the existence of the two currently accepted subspecies. Furthermore, analyses of the microsatellite data with a Bayesian clustering method did not support the existence of two source populations as it would be expected under the mountain refugia scenario. Our findings suggest that phenotypic plasticity rather than distinct ancestry is the leading cause behind the phenotypic divergence observed between montane forest and savanna honey bees. Our study thus corroborates the idea that high gene flow may select for increased plasticity. PMID:24223262

  12. The Earliest Hominid Migration out of Africa and Near East Colonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ron, H.; Levi, S.; Porat, N.

    2001-12-01

    It is generally accepted that Central East Africa was the springboard for hominid evolution in the latest Miocene or Early Pliocene. However the timing and pathways of migrations from Africa to Eurasia are still debatable. The only certain land bridge and main route between Africa and Eurasia since the Late Pliocene-Early Pleistocene is the Levantine Corridor. This is evident in some of the most ancient remains of early hominids and tools outside Africa in the Middle East. The study of Lower Paleolithic sites in this region and in the neighboring area sheds some light on several potential migration and colonization events. The determination of ages of the prehistoric sites is crucial for any study of early human migration events, but it is also the most difficult data to recover. The typo-technological studies yield only relative age, and so do sequences of raised Pleistocene beaches, marine deposits, river terraces and paleo-lake formations. The scarcity of volcanic ash deposits excludes radiometric dating. Israel located at the Levantine Corridor yields a wealth of prehistoric findings and sites. We combine paleomagnetic and thermoluminescence measurements as dating tools. This new combination yields high quality, surprising results. Several preliminary paleomagnetic studies of lake deposits, cave deposits and soil sequences in well known sites in Israel such as the Erk-El Ahmar formation, and the Lower Paleolithic Tabun Cave in Mount Carmel, the Evron Quarry in northern Israel, and Rochama site in southern Israel. We conclude that the part of Erk-El-Ahmar Formation, which bears core-choppers and flakes, identified as typical Oldowan tools were deposited about 1.7-2.0 Ma. We found that the Rochama and Evron sites are located in soil sequences, several meters below the 0.78 Ma Brunhes-Matuyama boundary. Based on continuous soil accumulation rates and pedogenesis processes the age of these sites is about 1 Ma. This new data provides the first constraint for the 1 Ma and older hominid colonization along the Levantine Corridor, offering a glimpse at the first journey out of Africa.

  13. Building Capacity for Production of Gridded Precipitation Products in the East Africa Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budde, M. E.; Verdin, J. P.; Galu, G.; Magadzire, T.; Pedreros, D. H.; Funk, C. C.; Husak, G. J.; Peterson, P.; Landsfeld, M. F.; White, L.

    2014-12-01

    The Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) participates in the Group on Earth Observations' Global Agricultural Monitoring (GEOGLAM) activity in a number of ways. Recently, important progress has been made in meeting the need for improved precipitation data sets in East Africa. This has been done through capacity building activities with national meteorological and hydrological services (NMHS) in the region, carried out in partnership with the IGAD Climate Prediction and Applications Center (ICPAC), and with support from the WMO Office for Eastern and Southern Africa. Through a series of regional gatherings and individual country workshops, scientists from the NMHS have been introduced to the Climate Hazards Group Infrared Precipitation with Stations (CHIRPS) rainfall data set and the GeoCLIM software tool. The CHIRPS data set was developed by USGS and the University of California, Santa Barbara, by blending NOAA geostationary thermal infrared imagery with station observations, using robust geostatistical methods. The core data set consists of pentadal (5-daily) accumulations from 1981-2014 at 0.05 degree spatial resolution, between +/- 50 degrees latitude. The GeoCLIM software can operate on the CHIRPS to map the Standardized Precipitation Index, trends, anomalies, isohyets, and other types of spatio-temporal features. It can also produce new gridded rainfall data sets by geostatistical blending of station observations with existing rainfall grids. NMHS scientists have applied this latter capability to produce best-available national and regional gridded rainfall time-series for 1981-2014 for the East Africa Community (EAC). These data are a fundamental resource for the USAID-EAC climate change adaptation project known by the acronym PREPARED. They incorporate a larger and more complete collection of station observations than ever before. Further work is ongoing at the NMHS to take advantage of the data management capabilities of GeoCLIM, and incorporate its use into ongoing monitoring operations.

  14. Chronology of Quaternary glaciations in East Africa Timothy M. Shanahan *, Marek Zreda

    E-print Network

    Zreda, Marek

    in situ cosmogenic 36 Cl measured in 122 boulders from moraines on Mount Kenya and Kilimanjaro. The oldest are in calendar years, cal. kyr or cal. yr). On Mount Kenya, the oldest moraines give ages of 355^420 kyr (Liki I) and 255^285 kyr (Teleki). Given the uncertainty in our 36 Cl ages, the Liki I moraine may correspond

  15. [Sociocultural aspects of albinism in Sub-Saharan Africa: mutilations and ritual murders committed in east Africa (Burundi and Tanzania)].

    PubMed

    Aquaron, R; Djatou, M; Kamdem, L

    2009-10-01

    This report presents an overview of the many sociocultural prejudices confronting albinos and their parents in Sub-Saharan Africa at each stage of life (infancy, adolescence, and adulthood). The birth of an albino child to two black parents has always been an enigma for African peoples. French-speaking and English-speaking populations in Central, East and South African countries have invented numerous myths to account for this event. Albinos are believed to possess good and evil magical powers. On the white magic side, some organs are believed to confer luck, health, and prosperity. For this reason albinos in Tanzania and Burundi are still in 2008 prey to ritual murders and mutilations to obtain various body parts such as arms, legs, and genitals for preparation of amulets. This barbaric and iniquitous practice has been severely condemned by authorities in both countries as well as by the European Parliament. To end these atrocities disseminating accurate medical information explaining the genetic basis of albinism will be necessary to eliminate ignorance and superstition. PMID:20025171

  16. Hot granulite nappes — Tectonic styles and thermal evolution of the Proterozoic granulite belts in East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Harald; Tenczer, Veronika; Hauzenberger, Christoph; Wallbrecher, Eckart; Muhongo, Sospeter

    2009-11-01

    A section through the Neoproterozoic Mozambique Belt of Tanzania exposes western foreland (Archaean Tanzania Craton and Palaeoproterozoic Usagaran Belt), marginal (Western Granulites) and eastern, internal (Eastern Granulites) portions of the orogen. The assembly of granulite nappes at ca. 620 Ma displays westward emplacement along an eastward deepening basal decollement and forward propagation of thrusts, climbing from the deep crust to the surface. This goes along with eastward increase of syntectonic temperatures, derived from prevalent deformation mechanisms, and eastward decrease of the kinematic vorticity number. Distinctly different pressure - temperature paths with a branch of isothermal decompression (ITD) in Western Granulites and isobaric cooling (IBC) in Eastern Granulites reflect residence times of rocks within lower crustal levels. Western Granulites, exhumed rapidly at the orogen margin, display ITD and non-coaxial fabrics. Eastern Granulites in the internal orogen portions escaped from rapid exhumation and show IBC and co-axial flow fabrics. The vertical variation of structural elements, i.e. basement — cover relations within the Eastern Granulites, shows decoupling between lower and middle crust with horizontal west — east stretching in the basement and horizontal west — east shortening in the cover. A model of hot fold nappes [Beaumont, C., Nguyen, M.H., Jamieson, R.A., Ellis, S., 2006. Crustal flow modes in large hot orogens. In: Law, R.D., Searle, M.P., Godin, L., (eds). Channel Flow, Ductile Extrusion and Exhumation in Continental Collision Zones. Geological Society, London, Special Publications. vol. 268, 91-145] is adopted to explain flow diversity in the deep crust. The lower crust represented by Eastern Granulite basement flowed coaxially outwards (westward) in response to thickened crust and elevated gravitational forces, supported by a melt-weakened, viscous channel at the crustal base. Horizontal flow with rates faster than thermal equilibration gave rise to isobaric cooling. Simultaneously the mid crust (Eastern Granulite cover) was shortened when hot fold nappes moved along upward climbing thrust planes. Western Granulites preserved isothermal decompression through exhumation by thrusting and coeval erosion at the orogen front. Two different styles define the Neoproterozoic East African Orogen between northern Egypt and southern Mozambique. The Arabian Nubian Shield in the north is classified as small and cold orogen in which thin — skinned thrusting was associated with lateral extrusion. The Central Mozambique Belt in Tanzania/Southern Kenya is classified as large and hot orogen characterized by thick-skinned thrusting and assembly of large granulite nappes.

  17. Southern hemisphere tropical climate over the past 145ka: Results of the Lake Malawi Scientific Drilling Project, East Africa

    E-print Network

    Scientific Drilling Project, East Africa 1. Background to scientific drilling on Lake Malawi The suggestion by the limnogeology community. Lake drilling has now matured into an important means of recovering paleoclimate time the world. The Lake Malawi Scientific Drilling Project was one of the first proposed, and emerged from

  18. Contrasting long-term records of biomass burning in wet and dry savannas of equatorial East Africa

    E-print Network

    Tinner, Willy

    Contrasting long-term records of biomass burning in wet and dry savannas of equatorial East Africa savanna ecosystems through impacting both the amount and flammability of plant biomass, and consequently on the fire regimes of wet and dry savannas. We reconstructed the long-term dynamics of biomass burning

  19. Strategies for Female Education in the Middle East and North Africa. Learning for the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rihani, May; Prather, Cynthia J.

    This paper is designed to assist education planners and policymakers in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region to identify a range of strategic options to increase the access and retention of girls in the education system. It provides a review of materials relating to the status of female education in the MENA region, statistical data on…

  20. A Human Economy: A "Third Way" for the Future of Young People in the Middle East and North Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaalouk, Malak

    2014-01-01

    This paper looks at the vulnerability of today's youth worldwide, with a particular focus on the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), where the proportion of citizens aged 12-24 is particularly high at one-third of the total population. Cursed with poor education and few work opportunities, the youth unemployment rate has risen to 50 per cent…

  1. Multi-environment selection of small sieve snap beans reduces production constraints in East Africa and subtropical regions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common bean rust caused by Uromyces appendiculatus, and heat stress lower the yield and quality of snap beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in East Africa. Four snap bean breeding lines previously selected for broad-spectrum rust resistance (involving Ur-4 and Ur-11 rust genes) and heat tolerance followin...

  2. A Comprehensive Review of the Status of Early Childhood Development in the Middle East and North Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khattab, Mohammad Salih

    This report reviews the status of early childhood education (ECE) programs in UNICEF's Middle East and North Africa region. The report compiles information about ECE programs in 18 countries based on a questionnaire sent to UNICEF country offices and other sources. The introduction sets out the economic and social rationales for investing in early…

  3. 11.4 CLIP: CLIMATE-LAND INTERACTION PROJECT--INVESTIGATING HUMAN-CLIMATE INTERACTIONS IN EAST AFRICA

    E-print Network

    11.4 CLIP: CLIMATE-LAND INTERACTION PROJECT--INVESTIGATING HUMAN-CLIMATE INTERACTIONS IN EAST population, and a distinct climatic chal- lenge. Conflict sometimes occurs both between and within tribal to have significant effects on climate in other parts of Africa, leading to feedback between vegetation

  4. U.S. Students Study Abroad in the Middle East/North Africa: Factors Influencing Growing Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane-Toomey, Cara K.; Lane, Shannon R.

    2013-01-01

    The political events of the last decade and the Arab Spring have made it more important than ever for Americans to understand the language, culture, and history of the Middle East/North Africa (MENA) region. Study abroad is one important method that can significantly increase American students' understanding of the Arabic language and the…

  5. The Quality of Secondary Education in the Middle East and North Africa: What Can We Learn from TIMSS' Results?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouhlila, Donia Smaali

    2011-01-01

    Research on educational quality has been scarce in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, whereas the debates over educational quality date from 1966 in the USA with the Coleman Report. Fortunately TIMSS (Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study) starts to fill this gap by providing data on students' achievement and for many…

  6. The East Africa Oligocene intertrappean beds: Regional distribution, depositional environments and Afro/Arabian mammal dispersals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbate, Ernesto; Bruni, Piero; Ferretti, Marco Peter; Delmer, Cyrille; Laurenzi, Marinella Ada; Hagos, Miruts; Bedri, Omar; Rook, Lorenzo; Sagri, Mario; Libsekal, Yosief

    2014-11-01

    The extensive outpouring of the Oligocene Trap basalts over eastern Africa and western Arabia was interrupted by a period of quiescence marked by the deposition of terrestrial sediments. These so-called intertrappean beds are often lignitiferous and yield recurrent floras and faunas, sometimes represented by endemic mammals. We intended to highlight the peculiar features of these sedimentary intercalations using a large-scale approach including eastern Africa and the western Arabian peninsula. Starting from a new mapping in the Eritrean highland, the intertrappean beds resulted a continuous level that was a few tens of meters thick and traceable for some tens of kilometers. They consist of fluvial red, green and gray mudstones and siltstones with subordinate channelized pebbly sandstones, and lignite seams. Two new 40Ar-39Ar datings constraint the age of the intertrappean beds between 29.0 Ma and 23.6 Ma. The outcrops near Mendefera have yielded the remains of two proboscidean families, the Deinotheriidae and the Gomphoteriidae. The morphological grade of the two Mendefera proboscideans would suggest a more derived stage than that of representatives of the same families from other Oligocene African sites (e.g., Chilga, Ethiopia). An Oligocene age could be inferred for them. The occurrence of the genus Prodeinotherium at Mai Gobro possibly represents the first occurrence of this taxon, while the Gomphotheirum sp. might represent the oldest occurrence of this taxon in Africa before its dispersal towards Asia and Europe. Proboscideans have also been found in the lowland intertrappean beds of Dogali near Massawa. These sediments were contiguous with the Eritrean highland intertrappean beds during the Oligocene, but are now tectonically displaced from them by two thousand meters of vertical topographical distance. Dogali is also known for the occurrence of possible Deinotheriidae remains and the primitive elephantoid Eritreum. Entering the Ethiopian highland, an inspection of the Agere Selam (Mekele) intertrappean beds revealed the occurrence of lacustrine limestones and diatomites, which were contrastingly quite subordinate with respect to the fine clastic sediments found in the nearby Amba Alaji area. Further south, the intertrappean section in the Jema valley (100 km north of Addis Ababa and close to the Blue Nile gorge) is 120 m thick with predominant clastic sediments and a few diatomites at the top. Literature information from 35 additional sites, including northern Kenya, Yemen, Sudan and Saudi Arabia sections, confirms the fluvial and lacustrine depositional environment of the intertrappean beds, underlines the interest in their mammal fauna (Chilga, Losodok), and reports exploitable coal seams for some of them. As for the vegetal landscape in which the intertrappean beds were deposited, pollen and plant analysis results indicative of a tropical wet forest, similar to that of present-day western Africa. Another common feature of the intertrappean beds is their relatively limited thickness, averaging a few tens of meters, but reaching a few hundred meters in graben-related basins, such as Delbi Moye in southern Ethiopia. In most cases only thin, lens-shaped successions were deposited above the hummocky topography of their volcanic substratum, commonly unaffected by significant faulting. An average duration of the intertrappean beds is from one to three million years. This time interval is commonly matched by a few tens (or more rarely, hundreds) of meters of sediments left over after erosive episodes or depositional starvation. As to the lateral continuity of the intertrappean beds, the present-day outcrops show large differences: from some tens of kilometers in the Mendefera area, to a few tens of kilometres in the Jema valley, and to a few hundreds meters in the Agere Selam (Mekele) area. Even if it is difficult to quantify the original size of the sedimentation areas, it nevertheless proves that the intertrappean basins exceed thousands of square kilometers in only a single case (Mendefera), but were quite restricte

  7. Comparative SWOT analysis of strategic environmental assessment systems in the Middle East and North Africa region.

    PubMed

    Rachid, G; El Fadel, M

    2013-08-15

    This paper presents a SWOT analysis of SEA systems in the Middle East North Africa region through a comparative examination of the status, application and structure of existing systems based on country-specific legal, institutional and procedural frameworks. The analysis is coupled with the multi-attribute decision making method (MADM) within an analytical framework that involves both performance analysis based on predefined evaluation criteria and countries' self-assessment of their SEA system through open-ended surveys. The results show heterogenous status with a general delayed progress characterized by varied levels of weaknesses embedded in the legal and administrative frameworks and poor integration with the decision making process. Capitalizing on available opportunities, the paper highlights measures to enhance the development and enactment of SEA in the region. PMID:23648267

  8. 'Deadly gonorrhoea': history, collective memory and early HIV epidemiology in East Central Africa.

    PubMed

    Kuhanen, Jan

    2015-01-01

    This article combines local oral reminiscences with recent epidemiological literature to sketch a historical context around the onset and expansion of the HIV-1 epidemic in southern Uganda and north-western Tanzania. The local historical imagination has associated the appearance of AIDS in two ways. First, with specific socio-economic structures and circumstances common in the region since the 1960s and their enhancement during the 1970s due to economic changes at national and global levels. Second, the epidemic is associated with changes in the epidemiological situation. Local perspectives are supported by recent phylogenetic research and circumstantial historical evidence, on the basis of which a hypothesis on the expansion of HIV-1 in East Central Africa (southern Uganda, north-western Tanzania, Rwanda) is presented. PMID:25920987

  9. Mycotoxin occurrence in commodities, feeds and feed ingredients sourced in the Middle East and Africa

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, I.; Handl, J.; Binder, E.M.

    2011-01-01

    Between February and October 2009, 324 grain, feed and feed commodity samples were sourced directly at animal farms or feed production sites in Middle East and Africa and tested for the presence of A- and B-trichothecenes, zearalenone, fumonisins, aflatoxins and ochratoxin A, or for selected groups of mycotoxins only. Samples were analyzed after clean-up by immunoaffinity or solid-phase extraction followed by HPLC with derivatization where appropriate and fluorescence, UV or mass spectrometric detection. The percentage of positive samples of B-trichothecenes ranged from 0 to 87% of tested samples. The prevalence of fumonisins in the different countries was >50% in most cases. Zearalenone was present in tested commodities from all countries except three. The presence of aflatoxin in analyzed samples varied from 0 to 94%. Ochratoxin A was present in 67% of samples in Sudan and in 100% of Nigerian samples. No A-trichothecenes were found in this survey. PMID:24786003

  10. Silent Epidemic of Depression in Women in the Middle East and North Africa Region

    PubMed Central

    Eloul, Liyam; Ambusaidi, Aamal; Al-Adawi, Samir

    2009-01-01

    Background: As the world is being gripped by economic depression, international psychological epidemiologists have amassed evidence to suggest that psychological depression and its variants are becoming leading contributors to the global burden of disease with the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region being no exception. Aim: The main aim of the present discourse, based on a review of the available literature, is to discuss critically whether women in the MENA region have a higher rate of psychological depression than those in other parts of the globe. Result: From the present synthesis, it emerges that the rate of depression may not be necessarily unique to the region. Conclusion: Although no society has totally overcome the marginalisation and lack of empowerment of women, in order to come to grips to this complex issue more vigorously designed epidemiological studies, using taxonomies that are standardised for cross-cultural populations, are needed to quantify the psychological functioning of women. PMID:21509269

  11. Modification and implementation of NCCN guidelines on lymphomas in the Middle East and North Africa region.

    PubMed

    Bazarbachi, Ali; Azim, Hamdy A; Alizadeh, Hussain; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Barista, Ibrahim; Chaudhri, Naeem A; Fahed, Zahira; Fahmy, Omar A; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir; Khalaf, Mohamed H; Khatib, Sami; Kutoubi, Aghiad; Paydas, Semra; Elayoubi, Hanadi Rafii; Zaatari, Ghazi; Zawam, Hamdy M; Zelenetz, Andrew D

    2010-07-01

    In the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, cancer has many epidemiologic and clinical features that are different from those in the rest of the world. Additionally, the region has a relatively young population and large disparities in the availability of resources at diagnostic and treatment levels. A critical need exists for regional guidelines on cancer care, including those for lymphoid malignancies. A panel of lymphoma experts from MENA reviewed the 2009 version of the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) on Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma and Hodgkin Lymphoma and suggested modifications for the region that were discussed with the United States NCCN Lymphoma Panels. This article presents the consensus recommendations. PMID:20697129

  12. Accuracy of teleseismic event locations in the Middle East and North Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, J.J.

    1996-12-04

    Seismic characterization at the regional level requires accurate determination of phases and travel times for many combinations of stations and events. An important consideration in the process is the accuracy of event locations. The LLNL Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Research Program is currently working on data from the Middle East and North Africa, where seismic station coverage is relatively sparse and ``ground truth`` seismic source information is practically nonexistent. In this report the investigator use after shock studies as a source of local ground truth. He evaluates teleseismic location accuracy by comparing hypocenters determined by local networks with those determined teleseismically [e.g. the International Seismological Center (ISC) and the National Earthquake Information Center (NEIC)]. Epicentral locations, origin times, and depth determinations of events from three aftershocks studies (Algeria, Armenia, and Iran) and one local network study (Iran) are compared with ISC and NEIC locations for the same events. The key parameter for the ISC locations is the number of observations used in the location determination. For more than 40-50 observations, the agreement rapidly diminishes and ISC locations can differ from local determinations by as much as 80 km or more. Events in Iran show a distinct bias of ISC location errors toward the northeast; events in Armenia and Algeria show no directional bias. This study shows that only events with ISC M{sub b} {gt} 4.4-4.5 or NEIS M{sub b} {gt} 4.7-4. should be used for compiling travel time information from teleseismic bulletins in the Middle East/North Africa region when locations from the NEIC and ISC bulletins are used.

  13. Holocene precipitation and thermal coherence at Lakes Albert and Victoria, East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berke, M. A.; Johnson, T. C.; Werne, J. P.; Grice, K.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.

    2011-12-01

    New molecular proxy records of temperature and rainfall from lacustrine sedimentary archives are helping to constrain the tropical response to global climate change and elucidate possible forcing mechanisms during the latest Pleistocene and Holocene in East Africa. It is often noted that tropical ecosystems are more sensitive to perturbations in rainfall than in temperature, due to the limited thermal range of tropical climate, however coincident shifts would likely enhance climate response to regional variability. Furthermore, on shorter time scales, patterns of moisture balance and temperature are often linked in East Africa. Here we present new records of rainfall from Lakes Albert and Victoria, using compound specific ?D from terrestrial leaf waxes, and compare these trends to TEX86 paleotemperature records in order to assess the coherence between tropical precipitation and temperature. Our results indicate generally synchronous shifts at these sites, roughly in-phase with regional climate behavior during this interval. A high resolution climate history at Lake Albert highlights a significant multi-stage cool and arid excursion characteristic of the last deglaciation, beginning ~13.8 ka and ending rapidly at ~11.5 ka and marked by a ~55% D-enrichment and 3°C cooling, linking this tropical region to high latitude climate events. The molecular perspective on the climate surrounding Lake Victoria indicates a warm, humid interval peaking at 10-9 ka, and subsequent gradual cooling and drying over the remainder of the Holocene, exhibiting shifts of ~40% in ?D and ~5°C, and thus showing a strong correlation to summer insolation. Palynological and ?13C biomarker evidence from these sites indicate significant, but not coinciding, shifts in aspects of the terrestrial vegetation ecosystem that are not well understood. Both regions support a linkage between high latitude and equatorial African climate systems, with likely teleconnections to the Indian monsoon system.

  14. Regulating the for-profit private health sector: lessons from East and Southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Jane E

    2015-03-01

    International evidence shows that, if poorly regulated, the private health sector may lead to distortions in the type, quantity, distribution, quality and price of health services, as well as anti-competitive behaviour. This article provides an overview of legislation governing the for-profit private health sector in East and Southern Africa. It identifies major implementation problems and suggests strategies Ministries of Health could adopt to regulate the private sector more effectively and in line with key public health objectives. This qualitative study was based on a document review of existing legislation in the region, and seven semi-structured interviews with individuals selected purposively on the basis of their experience in policymaking and legislation. Legislation was categorized according to its objectives and the level at which it operates. A thematic content analysis was conducted on interview transcripts. Most legislation focuses on controlling the entry of health professionals and organizations into the market. Most countries have not developed adequate legislation around behaviour following entry. Generally the type and quality of services provided by private practitioners and facilities are not well-regulated or monitored. Even where there is specific health insurance regulation, provisions seldom address open enrolment, community rating and comprehensive benefit packages (except in South Africa). There is minimal control of prices. Several countries are updating and improving legislation although, in most cases, this is without the benefit of an overarching policy on the private sector, or reference to wider public health objectives. Policymakers in the East and Southern African region need to embark on a programme of action to strengthen regulatory frameworks and instruments in relation to private health care provision and insurance. They should not underestimate the power of the private health sector to undermine efforts for increased regulation. Consequently they should conduct careful stakeholder analyses and build alliances to help drive through reform. PMID:25759457

  15. Surgical Efficiencies and Quality in the Performance of Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision (VMMC) Procedures in Kenya, South Africa, Tanzania, and Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Rech, Dino; Bertrand, Jane T.; Thomas, Nicholas; Farrell, Margaret; Reed, Jason; Frade, Sasha; Samkange, Christopher; Obiero, Walter; Agot, Kawango; Mahler, Hally; Castor, Delivette; Njeuhmeli, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Introduction This analysis explores the association between elements of surgical efficiency in voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC), quality of surgical technique, and the amount of time required to conduct VMMC procedures in actual field settings. Efficiency outcomes are defined in terms of the primary provider’s time with the client (PPTC) and total elapsed operating time (TEOT). Methods Two serial cross-sectional surveys of VMMC sites were conducted in Kenya, Republic of South Africa, Tanzania and Zimbabwe in 2011 and 2012. Trained clinicians observed quality of surgical technique and timed 9 steps in the VMMC procedure. Four elements of efficiency (task-shifting, task-sharing [of suturing], rotation among multiple surgical beds, and use of electrocautery) and quality of surgical technique were assessed as explanatory variables. Mann Whitney and Kruskal Wallis tests were used in the bivariate analysis and linear regression models for the multivariate analyses to test the relationship between these five explanatory variables and two outcomes: PPTC and TEOT. The VMMC procedure TEOT and PPTC averaged 23–25 minutes and 6–15 minutes, respectively, across the four countries and two years. The data showed time savings from task-sharing in suturing and use of electrocautery in South Africa and Zimbabwe (where task-shifting is not authorized). After adjusting for confounders, results demonstrated that having a secondary provider complete suturing and use of electrocautery reduced PPTC. Factors related to TEOT varied by country and year, but task-sharing of suturing and/or electrocautery were significant in two countries. Quality of surgical technique was not significantly related to PPTC or TEOT, except for South Africa in 2012 where higher quality was associated with lower TEOT. Conclusions SYMMACS data confirm the efficiency benefits of task-sharing of suturing and use of electrocautery for decreasing TEOT. Reduced TEOT and PPTC in high volume setting did not result in decreased quality of surgical care. PMID:24802412

  16. Gender, ageing and carework in East and Southern Africa: A review.

    PubMed

    Schatz, Enid; Seeley, Janet

    2015-12-01

    An estimated 58 million persons aged 60-plus live in sub-Saharan Africa; by 2050 that number will rise sharply to 215 million. Older Africans traditionally get care in their old age from the middle generation. But in East and Southern Africa, HIV has hollowed out that generation, leaving many older persons to provide care for their children's children without someone to care for him or herself in old age. Simultaneously, the burden of disease among older persons is changing in this region. The result is a growing care deficit. This article examines the existing literature on care for and by older persons in this region, highlighting understudied aspects of older persons' experiences of ageing and care - including the positive impacts of carework, variation in the region and the role of resilience and pensions. We advance a conceptual framework of gendered identities - for both men and women - and intergenerational social exchange to help focus and understand the complex interdependent relationships around carework, which are paramount in addressing the needs of older persons in the current care deficit in this region, and the Global South more generally. PMID:25947225

  17. Mineral deposit formation in Phanerozoic sedimentary basins of north-east Africa: the contribution of weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germann, Klaus; Schwarz, Torsten; Wipki, Mario

    1994-12-01

    The intra- and epicontinental basins in north-east Africa (Egypt, Sudan) bear ample evidence of weathering processes repeatedly having contributed to the formation of mineral deposits throughout the Phanerozoic. The relict primary weathering mantle of Pan-African basement rocks consists of kaolinitic saprolite, laterite (in places bauxitic) and iron oxide crust. On the continent, the reaccumulation of eroded weathering-derived clay minerals (mainly kaolinite) occurred predominantly in fluvio-lacustrine environments, and floodplain and coastal plain deposits. Iron oxides, delivered from ferricretes, accumulated as oolitic ironstones in continental and marine sediments. Elements leached from weathering profiles accumulated in continental basins forming silcrete and alunite or in the marine environment contributing to the formation of attapulgite/saprolite and phosphorites. The Early Paleozoic Tawiga bauxitic laterite of northern Sudan gives a unique testimony of high latitude lateritic weathering under global greenhouse conditions. It formed in close spatial and temporal vicinity to the Late Ordovician glaciation in north Africa. The record of weathering products is essentially complete for the Late Cretaceous/Early Tertiary. From the continental sources in the south to the marine sinks in the north, an almost complete line of lateritic and laterite-derived deposits of bauxitic kaolin, kaolin, iron oxides and phosphates is well documented.

  18. Absence of kdr resistance alleles in the Union of the Comoros, East Africa

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoosook; Olson, Natalie; Yamasaki, Youki; Chang, Allison; Marsden, Clare; Ouledi, Ahmed; Lanzaro, Gregory; Cornel, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Knockdown resistance ( kdr) and CYP9K1 genotypes were detected by a MOLDI-TOF based SNP genotyping assay (Sequenom iPLEX) in samples of Anopheles gambiae collected at 13 sites throughout the Union of the Comoros and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania during February and March 2011. All A. gambiae specimens collected in the Comoros were homozygous for the susceptible kdr alleles (+/+) while 96% of A. gambiae from Dar es Salaam were homozygous for the East African kdr resistant genotype (E/E). In contrast, all specimens from Dar es Salaam and the Comoros were homozygous for the cyp3 allele (c3/c3) at the CYP9K1 locus; the locus has been implicated in metabolic resistance against pyrethroid insecticides in West Africa. All specimens had typical A. gambiae genotypes for SNPs within the divergence Islands on all three chromosomes. Although further spatial and temporal studies are needed, the distribution of kdr genotypes between the Comoros and Tanzania further supports isolation of the Comoros populations from A. gambiae populations on mainland Africa . PMID:26339473

  19. Emergence of virulence to SrTmp in the Ug99 race group of wheat stem rust, Puccinia graminis f.sp. tritici in Africa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Ug99 race (TTKSK) of wheat stem rust was first detected in Uganda in 1998, and since then seven additional variants have been reported, i.e., TTKSF, TTKST, TTTSK, TTKSP, PTKSK, PTKST, and TTKSF+. In this study, 84 stem rust samples from the 2014 surveys of wheat fields in east Africa (Kenya, 9; ...

  20. Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion across Northern Africa, Southern Europe and the Middle East

    SciTech Connect

    McNamara, D.E.; Walter, W.R.

    1997-07-15

    THis report presents preliminary results from a large scale study of surface wave group velocity dispersion throughout Northern Africa, the Mediterranean, Southern Europe and the Middle East. Our goal is to better define the 3D lithospheric shear-wave velocity structure within this region by improving the resolution of global surface wave tomographic studies. We hope to accomplish this goal by incorporating regional data at relatively short periods (less than 40 sec), into the regionalization of lateral velocity variation. Due to the sparse distributions of stations and earthquakes throughout the region (Figure 1) we have relied on data recorded at both teleseismic and regions; distances. Also, to date we have concentrated on Rayleigh wave group velocity measurements since valuable measurements can be made without knowledge of the source. In order to obtain Rayleigh wave group velocity throughout the region, vertical component teleseismic and regional seismograms were gathered from broadband, 3-component, digital MEDNET, GEOSCOPE and IRIS stations plus the portable PASSCAL deployment in Saudi Arabia. Figure 1 shows the distribution of earthquakes (black circles) and broadband digital seismic stations (white triangles) throughout southern Europe, the middle east and northern Africa used in this study. The most seismicly active regions of northern Africa are the Atlas mountains of Morocco and Algeria as well as the Red Sea region to the east. Significant seismicity also occurs in the Mediterranean, southern Europe and throughout the high mountains and plateaus of the middle-east. To date, over 1300 seismograms have been analyzed to determine the individual group velocities of 10-150 second Rayleigh waves. Travel times, for each period, are then inverted in a back projection tomographic method in order to determine the lateral group velocity variation throughout the region. These results are preliminary, however, Rayleigh wave group velocity maps for a range of periods (10-95 sec) are presented and initial interpretations are discussed. Significant lateral group velocity variation is apparent at all periods. In general, shorted periods (10-45 sec) are sensitive to crustal structure as seen by the relatively low velocities associated with large sedimentary features (eastern Arabian shield, Persian Gulf, Eastern Mediterranean, Caspian Sea). At longer periods (50-95 sec), Rayleigh waves are most sensitive to topography on the Moho and upper mantle shear-wave velocity structure. This is observed in the group velocity maps as low velocities associated with features such as the Zagros Mountains, Iranian Plateau and the Red Sea. Analysis will eventually be expanded to include Love wave group and phase velocity. Knowledge of the lateral variation of group velocity and phase velocity will allow us to invert for shear velocity at each grid point. A detailed regionalization of shear-wave velocity will potentially lower the threshold for Ms determinations and improve event location capabilities throughout the region. Better Ms estimates and locations will improve our ability to reliably monitor the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT).

  1. Using information communication technologies to increase the institutional capacity of local health organisations in Africa: a case study of the Kenya Civil Society Portal for Health

    PubMed Central

    Juma, Charles; Sundsmo, Aaron; Maket, Boniface; Powell, Richard; Aluoch, Gilbert

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Achieving the healthcare components of the United Nations’ Millennium Development Goals is significantly premised on effective service delivery by civil society organisations (CSOs). However, many CSOs across Africalack the necessary capacity to perform this role robustly. This paper reports on an evaluation of the use, and perceived impact, of aknowledge management tool upon institutional strengthening among CSOs working in Kenya's health sector. Methods Three methods were used: analytics data; user satisfaction surveys; and a furtherkey informant survey. Results Satisfaction with the portal was consistently high, with 99% finding the quality and relevance of the content very good or good for institutional strengthening standards, governance, and planning and resource mobilisation. Critical facilitators to the success of knowledge management for CSO institutional strengthening were identified as people/culture (developed resources and organisational narratives) and technology (easily accessible, enabling information exchange, tools/resources available, access to consultants/partners). Critical barriers were identified as people/culture (database limitations, materials limitations, and lack of active users), and process (limited access, limited interactions, and limited approval process). Conclusion This pilot study demonstrated the perceived utility of a web-based knowledge management portal among developing nations’ CSOs, with widespread satisfaction across multiple domains, which increased over time. Providing increased opportunities for collective mutual learning, promoting a culture of data use for decision making, and encouraging all health organisations to be learning institutions should be a priority for those interested in promoting sustainable long-term solutions for Africa. PMID:26401217

  2. A seasonal agricultural drought forecast system for food-insecure regions of East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, S.; McNally, A.; Husak, G.; Funk, C.

    2014-03-01

    The increasing food and water demands of East Africa's growing population are stressing the region's inconsistent water resources and rain-fed agriculture. More accurate seasonal agricultural drought forecasts for this region can inform better water and agricultural management decisions, support optimal allocation of the region's water resources, and mitigate socio-economic losses incurred by droughts and floods. Here we describe the development and implementation of a seasonal agricultural drought forecast system for East Africa (EA) that provides decision support for the Famine Early Warning Systems Network's science team. We evaluate this forecast system for a region of equatorial EA (2° S to 8° N, and 36° to 46° E) for the March-April-May growing season. This domain encompasses one of the most food insecure, climatically variable and socio-economically vulnerable regions in EA, and potentially the world: this region has experienced famine as recently as 2011. To assess the agricultural outlook for the upcoming season our forecast system simulates soil moisture (SM) scenarios using the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrologic model forced with climate scenarios for the upcoming season. First, to show that the VIC model is appropriate for this application we forced the model with high quality atmospheric observations and found that the resulting SM values were consistent with the Food and Agriculture Organization's (FAO's) Water Requirement Satisfaction Index (WRSI), an index used by FEWS NET to estimate crop yields. Next we tested our forecasting system with hindcast runs (1993-2012). We found that initializing SM forecasts with start-of-season (5 March) SM conditions resulted in useful SM forecast skill (> 0.5 correlation) at 1-month, and in some cases at 3 month lead times. Similarly, when the forecast was initialized with mid-season (i.e. 5 April) SM conditions the skill until the end-of-season improved. This shows that early-season rainfall is critical for end-of-season outcomes. Finally we show that, in terms of forecasting spatial patterns of SM anomalies, the skill of this agricultural drought forecast system is generally greater (> 0.8 correlation) during drought years. This means that this system might be particularity useful for identifying the events that present the greatest risk to the region.

  3. A seasonal agricultural drought forecast system for food-insecure regions of East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, S.; McNally, A.; Husak, G.; Funk, C.

    2014-10-01

    The increasing food and water demands of East Africa's growing population are stressing the region's inconsistent water resources and rain-fed agriculture. More accurate seasonal agricultural drought forecasts for this region can inform better water and agropastoral management decisions, support optimal allocation of the region's water resources, and mitigate socioeconomic losses incurred by droughts and floods. Here we describe the development and implementation of a seasonal agricultural drought forecast system for East Africa (EA) that provides decision support for the Famine Early Warning Systems Network's (FEWS NET) science team. We evaluate this forecast system for a region of equatorial EA (2° S-8° N, 36-46° E) for the March-April-May (MAM) growing season. This domain encompasses one of the most food-insecure, climatically variable, and socioeconomically vulnerable regions in EA, and potentially the world; this region has experienced famine as recently as 2011. To produce an "agricultural outlook", our forecast system simulates soil moisture (SM) scenarios using the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrologic model forced with climate scenarios describing the upcoming season. First, we forced the VIC model with high-quality atmospheric observations to produce baseline soil moisture (SM) estimates (here after referred as SM a posteriori estimates). These compared favorably (correlation = 0.75) with the water requirement satisfaction index (WRSI), an index that the FEWS NET uses to estimate crop yields. Next, we evaluated the SM forecasts generated by this system on 5 March and 5 April of each year between 1993 and 2012 by comparing them with the corresponding SM a posteriori estimates. We found that initializing SM forecasts with start-of-season (SOS) (5 March) SM conditions resulted in useful SM forecast skill (> 0.5 correlation) at 1-month and, in some cases, 3-month lead times. Similarly, when the forecast was initialized with midseason (i.e., 5 April) SM conditions, the skill of forecasting SM estimates until the end-of-season improved (correlation > 0.5 over several grid cells). We also found these SM forecasts to be more skillful than the ones generated using the Ensemble Streamflow Prediction (ESP) method, which derives its hydrologic forecast skill solely from the knowledge of the initial hydrologic conditions. Finally, we show that, in terms of forecasting spatial patterns of SM anomalies, the skill of this agricultural drought forecast system is generally greater (> 0.8 correlation) during drought years (when standardized anomaly of MAM precipitation is below 0). This indicates that this system might be particularity useful for identifying drought events in this region and can support decision-making for mitigation or humanitarian assistance.

  4. Holocene shelf sedimentation patterns off equatorial East Africa constrained by climatic and sea-level changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiting; Rendle-Bühring, Rebecca; Meyer, Inka; Henrich, Rüdiger

    2016-01-01

    Equatorial East Africa experienced significant variations in paleoclimatic and paleoceanographic conditions during the Holocene. These environmental changes influenced sedimentation patterns on the continental shelf. To date, however, little is known about the sediment source, its transport to, and deposition on, the Tanzanian shelf. This paper presents a new high-resolution Holocene sedimentary record off northeast Tanzania (equatorial East Africa) and provides insights into how sedimentation patterns responded to climatic and oceanographic changes during the Holocene. Based on grain-size distribution patterns and mineral assemblages, three types of shelf sediments were identified: Type I (fine-grained terrigenous sediment) is dominated by clay minerals that originated from continental weathering; Type II (coarse-grained terrigenous sediment) is mainly composed of feldspar and quartz, derived from reworking of pre-existing deposits; and Type III (biogenic marine sediment), with low- and high-magnesium calcite, was produced by marine carbonate-secreting organisms. The high input of Type I sediment during the early Holocene (10-8 cal kyr BP) was caused by river mouth bypassing. This supply-dominated regime was controlled by intense river discharge and subsequent resuspension of mud in shelf settings, responding to the humid climate in the hinterland and sea-level rise with low rate off Tanzania. The first occurrence of Type II sediments was around 8 cal kyr BP and dominated when sedimentation rates lowered. This accommodation-dominated regime was caused by shoreface bypassing due to an arid climate and sea-level highstand. Type III sediments increased significantly from the early to late Holocene, resulting from the weakening dilution effect of the terrigenous component. The sedimentation pattern on the Tanzanian shelf shifted from allochthonous to autochthonous sedimentation constrained by climatic changes and relative sea-level fluctuations at the end of the early Holocene. Our results also suggest that, with respect to sea-level rise, high sedimentation rate on the continental shelf could be caused by high terrigenous sediment input as a result of a dynamic interplay between the shelf topography and humid climatic conditions inland.

  5. A seasonal agricultural drought forecast system for food-insecure regions of East Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shukla, Shraddhanand; McNally, Amy; Husak, Gregory; Funk, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

     The increasing food and water demands of East Africa's growing population are stressing the region's inconsistent water resources and rain-fed agriculture. More accurate seasonal agricultural drought forecasts for this region can inform better water and agricultural management decisions, support optimal allocation of the region's water resources, and mitigate socio-economic losses incurred by droughts and floods. Here we describe the development and implementation of a seasonal agricultural drought forecast system for East Africa (EA) that provides decision support for the Famine Early Warning Systems Network's science team. We evaluate this forecast system for a region of equatorial EA (2° S to 8° N, and 36° to 46° E) for the March-April-May growing season. This domain encompasses one of the most food insecure, climatically variable and socio-economically vulnerable regions in EA, and potentially the world: this region has experienced famine as recently as 2011. To assess the agricultural outlook for the upcoming season our forecast system simulates soil moisture (SM) scenarios using the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrologic model forced with climate scenarios for the upcoming season. First, to show that the VIC model is appropriate for this application we forced the model with high quality atmospheric observations and found that the resulting SM values were consistent with the Food and Agriculture Organization's (FAO's) Water Requirement Satisfaction Index (WRSI), an index used by FEWS NET to estimate crop yields. Next we tested our forecasting system with hindcast runs (1993–2012). We found that initializing SM forecasts with start-of-season (5 March) SM conditions resulted in useful SM forecast skill (> 0.5 correlation) at 1-month, and in some cases at 3 month lead times. Similarly, when the forecast was initialized with mid-season (i.e. 5 April) SM conditions the skill until the end-of-season improved. This shows that early-season rainfall is critical for end-of-season outcomes. Finally we show that, in terms of forecasting spatial patterns of SM anomalies, the skill of this agricultural drought forecast system is generally greater (> 0.8 correlation) during drought years. This means that this system might be particularity useful for identifying the events that present the greatest risk to the region.

  6. Drivers of actual evapotranspiration and runoff in East Africa during the mid-Holocene: assessments from an ecosystem model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fer, Istem; Jeltsch, Florian; Tietjen, Britta; Trauth, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the evolution and response of the hydrological cycle under changing climate is of vital importance for human populations all around the world. Especially so in regions like East Africa, where society largely depends on the availability of water and the hydrologic conditions are highly sensitive to changes in the distribution and amount of precipitation. In this endeavor, studying past hydrological changes provides us realistic scenarios and data to better understand and predict the extent of the future hydrological changes. However while studying the past, paleovegetation, which plays a pivotal role in the paleo-hydrological cycle, is difficult to determine from fossil pollen records as pollen data can provide very limited information on spatial distribution and composition of the vegetation cover. Here ecosystem models driven by paleo-climate conditions can provide spatially-extensive information on the coupled dynamics of past vegetation and hydrological measures such as actual evapotranspiration (AET), potential evapotranspiration (PET) and runoff. In this study, we looked at AET and runoff estimates of an ecosystem model as these are important elements of water transfer in the hydrological cycle and critical for water balance calculations. We applied the ecosystem model, LPJ-GUESS, for present-day with data from Climatic Research Unit CRU TS3.20 climate dataset, and for mid-Holocene (6 kyrs BP) with data from an atmosphere-ocean coupled global climate model EC-Earth. Climate data for both periods were downscaled to a 10 arc min resolution in order to better resolve the impacts of the complex topography on vegetation distribution, AET and runoff. Comparison of the simulated AET and runoff values for East Africa, show similar patterns as annual AET estimates for the period 1961-1990 by Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), and with the observed runoff data from Cogley (1998), respectively. Comparison of simulated present-day and mid-Holocene AET values suggests an increase in AET over north-eastern parts of East Africa, especially over Sudan region and Kenyan Rift during the mid-Holocene whereas a decrease in AET during the mid-Holocene over south-southeastern parts of East Africa. On the other hand, comparison of simulated present-day and mid-Holocene runoff values suggests an increase of runoff in north-eastern parts, especially along the East African Rift and decreased runoff in the southern parts of East Africa during the mid-Holocene.

  7. Climate-disease connections: Rift Valley Fever in Kenya

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anyamba, A.; Linthicum, K. J.; Tucker, C. J.

    2001-01-01

    All known Rift Valley fever(RVF) outbreaks in Kenya from 1950 to 1998 followed periods of abnormally high rainfall. On an interannual scale, periods of above normal rainfall in East Africa are associated with the warm phase of the El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon. Anomalous rainfall floods mosquito-breeding habitats called dambos, which contain transovarially infected mosquito eggs. The eggs hatch Aedes mosquitoes that transmit the RVF virus preferentially to livestock and to humans as well. Analysis of historical data on RVF outbreaks and indicators of ENSO (including Pacific and Indian Ocean sea surface temperatures and the Southern Oscillation Index) indicates that more than three quarters of the RVF outbreaks have occurred during warm ENSO event periods. Mapping of ecological conditions using satellite normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data show that areas where outbreaks have occurred during the satellite recording period (1981-1998) show anomalous positive departures in vegetation greenness, an indicator of above-normal precipitation. This is particularly observed in arid areas of East Africa, which are predominantly impacted by this disease. These results indicate a close association between interannual climate variability and RVF outbreaks in Kenya.

  8. A multivariate approach for persistence-based drought prediction: Application to the 2010-2011 East Africa drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AghaKouchak, Amir

    2015-07-01

    The 2011 East Africa drought caused dire situations across several countries and led to a widespread and costly famine in the region. Numerous dynamic and statistical drought prediction models have been used for providing drought information and/or early warning. The concept of Ensemble Streamflow Prediction (ESP) has been successfully applied to univariate drought indicators (e.g., the Standardized Precipitation Index) for seasonal drought prediction. In this study, we outline a framework for using the ESP concept for multivariate, multi-index drought prediction. We employ the recently developed Multivariate Standardized Drought Index (MSDI), which integrates precipitation and soil moisture for describing drought. In this approach, the ESP concept is first used to predict the seasonal changes to precipitation and soil moisture. Then, the MSDI is estimated based on the joint probability of the predicted accumulated precipitation and soil moisture as composite (multi-index) drought information. Given its probabilistic nature, the presented model offers both a measure of drought severity and probability of drought occurrence. The suggested model is tested for part of the 2011 East Africa drought using monthly precipitation and soil moisture data obtained from the NASA Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA-Land). The results indicate that the suggested multi-index predictions are consistent with the observation. Furthermore, the results emphasize the potential application of the model for probabilistic drought early warning in East Africa.

  9. Geology and Nonfuel Mineral Deposits of Africa and the Middle East

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Cliff D.; Schulz, Klaus J.; Doebrich, Jeff L.; Orris, Greta; Denning, Paul D.; Kirschbaum, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    A nation's endowment of nonfuel mineral resources, relative to the world's endowment, is a fundamental consideration in decisions related to a nation's economic and environmental well being and security. Knowledge of the worldwide abundance, distribution, and general geologic setting of mineral commodities provides a framework within which a nation can make decisions about economic development of its own resources, and the economic and environmental consequences of those decisions, in a global perspective. The information in this report is part of a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) endeavor to evaluate the global endowment of both identified and undiscovered nonfuel mineral resources. The results will delineate areas of the world that are geologically permissive for the occurrence of undiscovered selected nonfuel mineral resources together with estimates of the quantity and quality of the resources. The results will be published as a series of regional reports; this one provides basic data on the identified resources and geologic setting, together with a brief appraisal of the potential for undiscovered mineral resources in Africa and the Middle East. Additional information, such as production statistics, economic factors that affect the mineral industries of the region, and historical information, is available in U.S. Geological Survey publications such as the Minerals Yearbook and the annual Mineral Commodity Summaries (available at http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals).

  10. Climate variability and conflict risk in East Africa, 1990–2009

    PubMed Central

    O’Loughlin, John; Witmer, Frank D. W.; Linke, Andrew M.; Laing, Arlene; Gettelman, Andrew; Dudhia, Jimy

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies concerning the possible relationship between climate trends and the risks of violent conflict have yielded contradictory results, partly because of choices of conflict measures and modeling design. In this study, we examine climate–conflict relationships using a geographically disaggregated approach. We consider the effects of climate change to be both local and national in character, and we use a conflict database that contains 16,359 individual geolocated violent events for East Africa from 1990 to 2009. Unlike previous studies that relied exclusively on political and economic controls, we analyze the many geographical factors that have been shown to be important in understanding the distribution and causes of violence while also considering yearly and country fixed effects. For our main climate indicators at gridded 1° resolution (?100 km), wetter deviations from the precipitation norms decrease the risk of violence, whereas drier and normal periods show no effects. The relationship between temperature and conflict shows that much warmer than normal temperatures raise the risk of violence, whereas average and cooler temperatures have no effect. These precipitation and temperature effects are statistically significant but have modest influence in terms of predictive power in a model with political, economic, and physical geographic predictors. Large variations in the climate–conflict relationships are evident between the nine countries of the study region and across time periods. PMID:23090992

  11. Polyphase Neoproterozoic orogenesis within the east Africa- Antarctica orogenic belt in central and northern Madagascar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Key, R.M.; Pitfield, P.E.J.; Thomas, Ronald J.; Goodenough, K.M.; Waele, D.; Schofield, D.I.; Bauer, W.; Horstwood, M.S.A.; Styles, M.T.; Conrad, J.; Encarnacion, J.; Lidke, D.J.; O'connor, E. A.; Potter, C.; Smith, R.A.; Walsh, G.J.; Ralison, A.V.; Randriamananjara, T.; Rafahatelo, J.-M.; Rabarimanana, M.

    2011-01-01

    Our recent geological survey of the basement of central and northern Madagascar allowed us to re-evaluate the evolution of this part of the East Africa-Antarctica Orogen (EAAO). Five crustal domains are recognized, characterized by distinctive lithologies and histories of sedimentation, magmatism, deformation and metamorphism, and separated by tectonic and/or unconformable contacts. Four consist largely of Archaean metamorphic rocks (Antongil, Masora and Antananarivo Cratons, Tsaratanana Complex). The fifth (Bemarivo Belt) comprises Proterozoic meta-igneous rocks. The older rocks were intruded by plutonic suites at c. 1000 Ma, 820-760 Ma, 630-595 Ma and 560-520 Ma. The evolution of the four Archaean domains and their boundaries remains contentious, with two end-member interpretations evaluated: (1) all five crustal domains are separate tectonic elements, juxtaposed along Neoproterozoic sutures and (2) the four Archaean domains are segments of an older Archaean craton, which was sutured against the Bemarivo Belt in the Neoproterozoic. Rodinia fragmented during the early Neoproterozoic with intracratonic rifts that sometimes developed into oceanic basins. Subsequent Mid- Neoproterozoic collision of smaller cratonic blocks was followed by renewed extension and magmatism. The global 'Terminal Pan-African' event (560-490 Ma) finally stitched together the Mid-Neoproterozoic cratons to form Gondwana. ?? The Geological Society of London 2011.

  12. Shoreline recovery from storms on the east coast of Southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbella, S.; Stretch, D. D.

    2012-01-01

    Episodic extreme waves due to sea storms can cause severe coastal erosion. The recovery times of such events are important for the analysis of risk and coastal vulnerability. The recovery period of a storm damaged coastline represents a time when the coastline is most vulnerable and nearby infrastructure is at the greatest risk. We propose that identification of the beach recovery period can be used as a coastal management tool when determining beach usage. As a case study, we analyse 37 yr of beach profile data on the east coast of South Africa. Considering beach length and cross-sectional area, we establish a global recovery period and rate and identify the physical characteristics of the coastlines that either accelerate or retard recovery. The beaches in the case study were found to take an average of two years to recover at a rate of approximately 90 m3 m-1 yr-1. Beach profiles with vegetated dunes recovered faster than urbanized beaches. Perpendicular beach structures have both positive and negative effects on beach recovery. Coastlines with rock outcrops in the surf zone tend to recover slowly and long-term sediment loss was identified in cases where storm damaged beaches have not recovered to pre-erosion levels.

  13. Sexual and bodily rights as human rights in the Middle East and North Africa.

    PubMed

    Ercevik Amado, Liz

    2004-05-01

    A regional workshop on sexual and bodily rights as human rights in the Middle East and North Africa was held in Malta in 2003, attended by 22 NGO representatives from Jordan, Egypt, Lebanon, Palestine, Tunisia, Morocco, Algeria, Turkey, Pakistan and USA. The meeting aimed to develop strategies for overcoming human rights violations in the region with reference to law and social and political practices. Session topics included sexuality and gender identity; sexuality and sexual health; sexuality and comparative penal law; sexual rights in international documents; advocacy and lobbying. Sexual rights, sexual health and education, sexual violence and adolescent sexuality were explored in depth, including taboos and emerging trends. Specific areas of concern included marital rape, early marriages, temporary marriages, sexual orientation, premarital and extramarital sexuality, honour crimes, female genital mutilation, unmarried mothers, adolescent sexuality, unwanted pregnancies and safe abortion, sexuality in education and health services. An analysis of civil codes, penal codes and personal status codes indicated a clear imperative for legal reform. Participants heard about efforts to promote the right to sexual orientation which have already been initiated in Lebanon, Turkey and Tunisia. Networking within the region and with counterparts in other regions in comparable situations and conditions was deemed essential. PMID:15242219

  14. Improving water use in agriculture. Experiences in the Middle East and North Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Tuijl, W.V.

    1993-08-01

    As water becomes more scarce, many countries are under pressure to conserve water, especially in the agricultural sector. This paper examines strategies that save water in river basins, irrigation projects, and on farms throughout the Middle East and North Africa. Countries elsewhere can use these suggestions in their own water conservation strategies. Improved surface irrigation techniques and micro-irrigation systems are evaluated. These systems use sprinkler, drip/trickle, or micro-spray methods. The author reviews the preliminary work that is needed to install modern irrigation technologies. He describes the role that governments must play to improve the infrastructure and institutions that affect water use. He also provides detailed case studies of efficient irrigation practices in Cyprus, Israel, and Jordan. These case studies describe the conditions that made better irrigation technology a necessity. They look at ways to plan for development, management, and utilization of water in the face of growing demand. Key topics include how to oversee water rights, adopt essential land reforms, and install a graduated system of water pricing and allocation. The study also recommends projects in water conservation and research.

  15. Cost of Illness Due to Typhoid Fever in Pemba, Zanzibar, East Africa

    PubMed Central

    Piatti, Moritz; Ley, Benedikt; Deen, Jacqueline; Thriemer, Kamala; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Salehjiddawi, Mohammad; Busch, Clara Jana-Lui; Schmied, Wolfgang H.; Ali, Said Mohammed; The Typhoid Economic Study Group (GiDeok Pak, Leon R. Ochiai, Mahesh K. Puri, Na Yoon Chang, Thomas F. Wierzba, and John D. Clemens)

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to estimate the economic burden of typhoid fever in Pemba, Zanzibar, East Africa. This study was an incidence-based cost-of-illness analysis from a societal perspective. It covered new episodes of blood culture-confirmed typhoid fever in patients presenting at the outpatient or inpatient departments of three district hospitals between May 2010 and December 2010. Cost of illness was the sum of direct costs and costs for productivity loss. Direct costs covered treatment, travel, and meals. Productivity costs were loss of income by patients and caregivers. The analysis included 17 episodes. The mean age of the patients, was 23 years (range=5-65, median=22). Thirty-five percent were inpatients, with a mean of 4.75 days of hospital stay (range=3-7, median=4.50). The mean cost for treatment alone during hospital care was US$ 21.97 at 2010 prices (US$ 1=1,430.50 Tanzanian Shilling?TSH). The average societal cost was US$ 154.47 per typhoid episode. The major expenditure was productivity cost due to lost wages of US$ 128.02 (83%). Our results contribute to the further economic evaluation of typhoid fever vaccination in Zanzibar and other sub-Saharan African countries. PMID:25395900

  16. Climate variability and conflict risk in East Africa, 1990-2009.

    PubMed

    O'Loughlin, John; Witmer, Frank D W; Linke, Andrew M; Laing, Arlene; Gettelman, Andrew; Dudhia, Jimy

    2012-11-01

    Recent studies concerning the possible relationship between climate trends and the risks of violent conflict have yielded contradictory results, partly because of choices of conflict measures and modeling design. In this study, we examine climate-conflict relationships using a geographically disaggregated approach. We consider the effects of climate change to be both local and national in character, and we use a conflict database that contains 16,359 individual geolocated violent events for East Africa from 1990 to 2009. Unlike previous studies that relied exclusively on political and economic controls, we analyze the many geographical factors that have been shown to be important in understanding the distribution and causes of violence while also considering yearly and country fixed effects. For our main climate indicators at gridded 1° resolution (~100 km), wetter deviations from the precipitation norms decrease the risk of violence, whereas drier and normal periods show no effects. The relationship between temperature and conflict shows that much warmer than normal temperatures raise the risk of violence, whereas average and cooler temperatures have no effect. These precipitation and temperature effects are statistically significant but have modest influence in terms of predictive power in a model with political, economic, and physical geographic predictors. Large variations in the climate-conflict relationships are evident between the nine countries of the study region and across time periods. PMID:23090992

  17. Evaluation of MODIS surrogates for meteorological humidity data in east Africa.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shengpan; Moore, Nathan J; Messina, Joseph P; Wu, Jiaping

    2013-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing technology has shown promising results in characterizing the environment in which plants and animals thrive. Remote sensing scientists, biologists, and epidemiologists are adopting remotely sensed imagery to compensate for the paucity of weather information measured by weather stations. With measured humidity from three stations as baselines, our study reveals that Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and atmosphere saturation deficits at the 780 hPa pressure level (D MODIS), both of which were derived from the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor, were significantly correlated with station saturation deficits (D stn)(?r? = 0.42-0.63, p < 0.001). These metrics have the potential to estimate saturation deficits over east Africa. Four to nine days of lags were found in the NDVI responding to D stn. For the daily estimations of D stn, D MODIS had a better performance than the NDVI. However, both of them poorly explained the variances in daily D stn using simple regression models (adj. R (2) = 0.17-0.39). When the estimation temporal scale was changed to 16-day, their performances were similar, and both were better than daily estimations. For D stn estimations at coarser geographic scales, given that many factors such as soil, vegetation, slope, aspect, and wind speed might complicate the NDVI response lags and model construction, D MODIS is more favourable as a proxy of the saturation deficit over ground due to its simple relationship with D stn. PMID:23956475

  18. Evaluation ofthe Middle East and North Africa Land Data Assimilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolten, John D.; Rodell, Matthew; Zaitchik, Benjamin; Ozdogan, Mutlu; Anderson, Martha; Bergaoui, Karim B.; Khalaf, Adla J.; McDonnell, Rachael A.

    2012-01-01

    The Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region is dominated by dry, warm deserts, areas of dense population, and inefficient use of fresh water resources. Due to the scarcity, high intensity, and short duration of rainfall in the MENA, the region is prone to hydro climatic extremes that are realized by devastating floods and times of drought. However, given its widespread water stress and the considerable demand for water, the MENA remains relatively poorly monitored. This is due in part to the shortage of meteorological observations and the lack of data sharing between nations. As a result, the accurate monitoring of the dynamics of the water cycle in the MENA is difficult. The Land Data Assimilation System for the MENA region (MENA LDAS) has been developed to provide regional, gridded fields of hydrological states and fluxes relevant for water resources assessments. As an extension of the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS), the MENA LDAS was designed to aid in the identification and evaluation of regional hydrological anomalies by synergistically combining the physically-based Catchment Land Surface Model (CLSM) with observations from several independent data products including soil-water storage variations from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) and irrigation intensity derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). In this fashion, we estimate the mean and seasonal cycle of the water budget components across the MENA.

  19. Preliminary maps of crustal thickness and regional seismic phases for the Middle East and North Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, J.J.

    1995-09-06

    As part of the development of regional seismic discrimination methods for the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) the author is building a database of information related to seismic propagation and crustal structure as well as associated geologic-tectonic and geophysical data. He hopes to use these data to construct and test models of regional seismic propagation and evaluate various detection/discrimination scenarios. To date, the database has been developed by building on a list of references for MENA provided by the Institute for the Study of the Continents (INSTOC) at Cornell University. To this list the author has added an equal number of references resulting from his own literature search which has emphasized papers dealing with seismicity and regional and teleseismic phase data. This paper represents an initial attempt to consolidate some of the information from the database into a form useful to researchers modeling regional seismic waveforms. The information compiled in this report is supplemental to the INSTOC database and has not been compiled anywhere else. What follows is a series of maps which illustrate the spatial variation of seismic phase velocities and crustal thickness. The text identifies the sources of information used in the map preparation. Data for the compilation of these maps has come from an initial search of the database as it presently exists and is not intended to be exhaustive. The author hopes that this initial exercise will help to identify areas and types of data that are deficient and help to focus future data gathering activities.

  20. Treated Wastewater's Potential for Improving Water and Food Security in the Middle East and North Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dare, A. E.

    2014-12-01

    The Middle East and North Africa (MENA) contains just 1% of the world's freshwater; however, even in the very arid countries of the Gulf region, high quality treated wastewater rarely sees a productive use. As countries deal with growing populations and strive for increased food security, freshwater alone cannot be relied upon to meet these demands. This research identifies best practices from the MENA for reusing treated wastewater in agricultural production, and calculates the potential of treated wastewater for increasing food production in select countries. Drawing upon both published and original treated wastewater quality data for locations in the MENA, the annual volume of treated wastewater produced, and crop water demands, estimates for potential crop production from treated wastewater are calculated. The volume of wastewater treated annually is equivalent to 10-40% of agricultural withdrawals in most MENA countries. Irrigation by treated wastewater has significant potential to impact water and food security by reducing agricultural water withdrawals and increasing domestic food production. Such initiatives require application of best management practices, such as transparent monitoring and evaluation of reuse projects for public and environmental health risks, and support from both farmers and policy makers.

  1. Bilharziasis survey in British West and East Africa, Nyasaland, and the Rhodesias*

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Dyson M.

    1956-01-01

    The author, in his capacity as a WHO consultant, undertook a survey of bilharziasis in British West and East Africa and Nyasaland during 1950-51. The information thus obtained has been revised and brought up to date and is recorded in the present article together with similar observations on Northern Rhodesia, which was not visited, and on Southern Rhodesia, the author's own country. In Part I, each country is dealt with in turn. The history of the disease and the findings of field surveys are reviewed, and, wherever possible, personal observations have been included. The fact that the information is of a scanty and incomplete nature is an indication that further local studies in all areas are badly needed. In Part II an attempt is made to survey the situation from the point of view of the various aspects of the subjects—methods of obtaining morbidity data, intensity of infection, effects of the disease on human health, treatment, and the molluscan vectors. PMID:13383363

  2. Aerial applications of insecticides for tsetse fly control in East Africa

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C. W.

    1969-01-01

    Since 1948, research has progressed in East Africa on the control of tsetse flies by aeria, applications of insecticides. Initial experiments proved that residual spray treatments were ineffective while repeated applications of coarse aerosols gave promising fly mortalities. In recent years, with the development of more toxic insecticides used in conjunction with improved thermal exhaust equipment and modified rotary atomizers, sprays with fine aerosol characteristics have been produced at considerably reduced cost. Aerial applications of aerosols are confined to early morning and late afternoon when weather conditions are stable, but large areas can be treated during these short intervals, and the technique is efficient and economical. Control of tsetse flies has been good; where complete isolation of an area has been possible, eradication has been achieved. It would be economically worth while to assess the possibility of increasing spray swath widths, and also to continue with research into the biological effectiveness of pyrethrum, primarily because of its absolute safety in use. There is a need for a simple method for the determination of tsetse fly populations in woodland and savanna habitats. Finally, it is recommended that the results of research to date should be brought more forcefully to the attention of government bodies and commercial airspray operators so that the techniques be more fully exploited. PMID:5308701

  3. Aerosol Transport Over Equatorial Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, C. K.; Tyson, P. D.; Annegarn, H. J.; Kinyua, A. M.; Piketh, S.; King, M.; Helas, G.

    1999-01-01

    Long-range and inter-hemispheric transport of atmospheric aerosols over equatorial Africa has received little attention so far. Most aerosol studies in the region have focussed on emissions from rain forest and savanna (both natural and biomass burning) and were carried out in the framework of programs such as DECAFE (Dynamique et Chimie Atmospherique en Foret Equatoriale) and FOS (Fires of Savanna). Considering the importance of this topic, aerosols samples were measured in different seasons at 4420 meters on Mt Kenya and on the equator. The study is based on continuous aerosol sampling on a two stage (fine and coarse) streaker sampler and elemental analysis by Particle Induced X-ray Emission. Continuous samples were collected for two seasons coinciding with late austral winter and early austral spring of 1997 and austral summer of 1998. Source area identification is by trajectory analysis and sources types by statistical techniques. Major meridional transports of material are observed with fine-fraction silicon (31 to 68 %) in aeolian dust and anthropogenic sulfur (9 to 18 %) being the major constituents of the total aerosol loading for the two seasons. Marine aerosol chlorine (4 to 6 %), potassium (3 to 5 %) and iron (1 to 2 %) make up the important components of the total material transport over Kenya. Minimum sulfur fluxes are associated with recirculation of sulfur-free air over equatorial Africa, while maximum sulfur concentrations are observed following passage over the industrial heartland of South Africa or transport over the Zambian/Congo Copperbelt. Chlorine is advected from the ocean and is accompanied by aeolian dust recirculating back to land from mid-oceanic regions. Biomass burning products are transported from the horn of Africa. Mineral dust from the Sahara is transported towards the Far East and then transported back within equatorial easterlies to Mt Kenya. This was observed during austral summer and coincided with the dying phase of 1997/98 El Nino.

  4. Early hominin diet included diverse terrestrial and aquatic animals 1.95 Ma in East Turkana, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Braun, David R.; Harris, John W. K.; Levin, Naomi E.; McCoy, Jack T.; Herries, Andy I. R.; Bamford, Marion K.; Bishop, Laura C.; Richmond, Brian G.; Kibunjia, Mzalendo

    2010-01-01

    The manufacture of stone tools and their use to access animal tissues by Pliocene hominins marks the origin of a key adaptation in human evolutionary history. Here we report an in situ archaeological assemblage from the Koobi Fora Formation in northern Kenya that provides a unique combination of faunal remains, some with direct evidence of butchery, and Oldowan artifacts, which are well dated to 1.95 Ma. This site provides the oldest in situ evidence that hominins, predating Homo erectus, enjoyed access to carcasses of terrestrial and aquatic animals that they butchered in a well-watered habitat. It also provides the earliest definitive evidence of the incorporation into the hominin diet of various aquatic animals including turtles, crocodiles, and fish, which are rich sources of specific nutrients needed in human brain growth. The evidence here shows that these critical brain-growth compounds were part of the diets of hominins before the appearance of Homo ergaster/erectus and could have played an important role in the evolution of larger brains in the early history of our lineage. PMID:20534571

  5. Agricultural Early Warning Informing Humanitarian Response in East Africa for 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husak, G. J.; Funk, C. C.

    2012-12-01

    Long rains during the March-April-May (MAM) 2011 growing season were a failure for much of the Greater Horn of Africa. These conditions resulted in severe food shortages, with the Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) estimating that 12.4 million people were in need of food assistance in Kenya, Somalia, Ethiopia and Djibouti. Heading into the 2012 season, La Niña conditions, an exceptionally strong western-to-central Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) gradient, and warm SSTs in the eastern Indian Ocean foretold further dryness, compounding the difficulties faced by the already vulnerable populations of this region. In an effort to assess the potential for greater food insecurity in the region, FEWS NET scientists attempted to quantify the likelihood of a dry event. This work used satellite rainfall estimates with a 13-year rainfall history. Weights were assigned to previous years based on the similarity of existing SST conditions to those of previous years in the rainfall record. Scenarios were created by randomly combining dekadal rainfall from the historical record, in accordance with the weights. This bootstrapping resulted in a suite of simulations which could be used to identify the likelihood of specific rainfall outcomes. Areal averages of each simulation were used in the analysis. Analysis of the Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC) rainfall record, a gridded rainfall product based on available station data, showed that the mean rainfall value for the time period of the satellite data for this region was only about 80% of the 30-year mean. The bootstrapped scenarios were corrected for this bias during the period of the satellite record. Results were expressed as percent of average rather than in absolute rainfall amounts, to account for biases in the satellite products as well as variability in spatial amounts. The results showed that during a normal year the interquartile range is typically 80-120% of normal. However, using the weighted scenarios based on February SSTs, the interquartile range shifted to 75-105% of normal. As the season progressed, March turned out to be exceptionally dry, with a lack of onset of rains for much of the region. This delayed start to the season allowed for the combination of satellite estimates for the start of March to be combined with scenarios to look ahead to end-of-season values. By the end of March, combining estimated 2012 rains with the scenarios built before the season resulted in the interquartile range for expected outcomes dropping to 60-85% of normal. This information was relayed to FEWS NET food security analysts and used in a special report, highlighting the potential for crisis in the region. In April, this forecasting effort, combined with FEWS NET's extensive monitoring activities, helped motivate allocation of an additional $50M in food aid from the U.S. government. This presentation examines the climate conditions associated with MAM drought in the eastern sector of the Greater Horn, reviews the techniques behind the 2012 forecasts, and analyzes the actual outcome for the region. Methods for improving the work to more accurately reflect the variability and future directions and applications will be discussed.

  6. Ash from the Toba supereruption in Lake Malawi shows no volcanic winter in East Africa at 75 ka

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Christine S.; Chorn, Ben T.; Johnson, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    The most explosive volcanic event of the Quaternary was the eruption of Mt. Toba, Sumatra, 75,000 y ago, which produced voluminous ash deposits found across much of the Indian Ocean, Indian Peninsula, and South China Sea. A major climatic downturn observed within the Greenland ice cores has been attributed to the cooling effects of the ash and aerosols ejected during the eruption of the Youngest Toba Tuff (YTT). These events coincided roughly with a hypothesized human genetic bottleneck, when the number of our species in Africa may have been reduced to near extinction. Some have speculated that the demise of early modern humans at that time was due in part to a dramatic climate shift triggered by the supereruption. Others have argued that environmental conditions would not have been so severe to have such an impact on our ancestors, and furthermore, that modern humans may have already expanded beyond Africa by this time. We report an observation of the YTT in Africa, recovered as a cryptotephra layer in Lake Malawi sediments, >7,000 km west of the source volcano. The YTT isochron provides an accurate and precise age estimate for the Lake Malawi paleoclimate record, which revises the chronology of past climatic events in East Africa. The YTT in Lake Malawi is not accompanied by a major change in sediment composition or evidence for substantial temperature change, implying that the eruption did not significantly impact the climate of East Africa and was not the cause of a human genetic bottleneck at that time. PMID:23630269

  7. Expanding access to off-grid rural electrification in Africa: An analysis of community-based micro-grids in Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirubi, Charles Gathu

    Community micro-grids have played a central role in increasing access to off-grid rural electrification (RE) in many regions of the developing world, notably South Asia. However, the promise of community micro-grids in sub-Sahara Africa remains largely unexplored. My study explores the potential and limits of community micro-grids as options for increasing access to off-grid RE in sub-Sahara Africa. Contextualized in five community micro-grids in rural Kenya, my study is framed through theories of collective action and combines qualitative and quantitative methods, including household surveys, electronic data logging and regression analysis. The main contribution of my research is demonstrating the circumstances under which community micro-grids can contribute to rural development and the conditions under which individuals are likely to initiate and participate in such projects collectively. With regard to rural development, I demonstrate that access to electricity enables the use of electric equipment and tools by small and micro-enterprises, resulting in significant improvement in productivity per worker (100--200% depending on the task at hand) and a corresponding growth in income levels in the order of 20--70%, depending on the product made. Access to electricity simultaneously enables and improves delivery of social and business services from a wide range of village-level infrastructure (e.g. schools, markets, water pumps) while improving the productivity of agricultural activities. Moreover, when local electricity users have an ability to charge and enforce cost-reflective tariffs and electricity consumption is closely linked to productive uses that generate incomes, cost recovery is feasible. By their nature---a new technology delivering highly valued services by the elites and other members, limited local experience and expertise, high capital costs---community micro-grids are good candidates for elite-domination. Even so, elite control does not necessarily lead to elite capture. Experiences from different micro-grid settings illustrate the manner in which a coincidence of interest between the elites and the rest of members and access to external support can create incentives and mechanisms to enable community-wide access to scarce services, hence mitigating elite capture. Moreover, access to external support was found to increase the likelihood of participation for the relatively poor households. The policy-relevant message from this research is two-fold. In rural areas with suitable sites for micro-hydro power, the potential for community micro-grids appear considerable to the extent that this option would seem to represent "the road not taken" as far as policies and initiatives aimed at expanding RE are concerned in Kenya and other African countries with comparable settings. However, local participatory initiatives not complimented by external technical assistance run a considerable risk of locking rural households into relatively more costly and poor-quality services. By taking advantage of existing and/or building a dense network of local organizations, including micro-finance agencies, the government and development partners can make available to local communities the necessary support---financial, technical or regulatory---essential for efficient design of micro-grids in addition to facilitating equitable distribution of electricity benefits.

  8. Understanding Models of Palliative Care Delivery in Sub-Saharan Africa: Learning From Programs in Kenya and Malawi.

    PubMed

    Downing, Julia; Grant, Liz; Leng, Mhoira; Namukwaya, Elizabeth

    2015-09-01

    The need for palliative care has never been greater. From being significantly present in only five African countries in 2004, palliative care is now delivered in nearly 50% of African countries; however, less than 5% of people in need receive it. To scale-up palliative care, we need greater knowledge about how different models of palliative care work within different health systems. A case study evaluation was undertaken in Kenya and Malawi to define the models used, contextualize them, and identify challenges, best practices, and transferable lessons for scale-up. Visits were made to seven sites and, using an audit tool, data were collected from program staff, hospital staff, and local stakeholders, and care observed as appropriate. Three models of palliative care service delivery were identified, which supports the existing literature, that is, specialist, district hospital level, and community level. However, in looking further, findings show that the major determinants for each model were a set of philosophical questions and assumptions underpinning each and influencing staff and patient decision-making, planning, and allocation of resources. The health system structure and the beliefs about palliative care determined, and were determined most by, referrals, the patient journey, the centeredness of the model, and role definition and training. The models are also closely associated with the physical setting of services. Understanding how the services have developed because of, and indeed despite the geographical setting and the system level, provides us with a different set of indicators of program structure incorporated into the three models. The analysis of models provides pointers to future planning for palliative care. PMID:25936938

  9. Health and Demographic Surveillance System in the Western and Coastal Areas of Kenya: An Infrastructure for Epidemiologic Studies in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Satoshi; K’opiyo, James; Kiche, Ibrahim; Wanyua, Sheru; Goto, Kensuke; Tanaka, Junichi; Changoma, Mwatasa; Ndemwa, Morris; Komazawa, Osuke; Karama, Mohamed; Moji, Kazuhiko; Shimada, Masaaki

    2012-01-01

    Background The Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS) is a longitudinal data collection process that systematically and continuously monitors population dynamics for a specified population in a geographically defined area that lacks an effective system for registering demographic information and vital events. Methods HDSS programs have been run in 2 regions in Kenya: in Mbita district in Nyanza province and Kwale district in Coast Province. The 2 areas have different disease burdens and cultures. Vital events were obtained by using personal digital assistants and global positioning system devices. Additional health-related surveys have been conducted bimonthly using various PDA-assisted survey software. Results The Mbita HDSS covers 55 929 individuals, and the Kwale HDSS covers 42 585 individuals. In the Mbita HDSS, the life expectancy was 61.0 years for females and 57.5 years for males. Under-5 mortality was 91.5 per 1000 live births, and infant mortality was 47.0 per 1000 live births. The total fertility rate was 3.7 per woman. Data from the Kwale HDSS were not available because it has been running for less than 1 year at the time of this report. Conclusions Our HDSS programs are based on a computer-assisted survey system that provides a rapid and flexible data collection platform in areas that lack an effective basic resident registration system. Although the HDSS areas are not representative of the entire country, they provide a base for several epidemiologic and social study programs, and for practical community support programs that seek to improve the health of the people in these areas. PMID:22374366

  10. Motivations for Reducing Other HIV Risk-Reduction Practices if Taking Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis: Findings from a Qualitative Study Among Women in Kenya and South Africa.

    PubMed

    Corneli, Amy; Namey, Emily; Ahmed, Khatija; Agot, Kawango; Skhosana, Joseph; Odhiambo, Jacob; Guest, Greg

    2015-09-01

    Findings from a survey conducted among women at high risk for HIV in Bondo, Kenya, and Pretoria, South Africa, demonstrated that a substantial proportion would be inclined to reduce their use of other HIV risk-reduction practices if they were taking pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). To explore the motivations for their anticipated behavior change, we conducted qualitative interviews with 60 women whose survey responses suggested they would be more likely to reduce condom use or have sex with a new partner if they were taking PrEP compared to if they were not taking PrEP. Three interrelated themes were identified: (1) "PrEP protects"--PrEP was perceived as an effective HIV prevention method that replaced the need for condoms; (2) condoms were a source of conflict in relationships, and PrEP would provide an opportunity to resolve or avoid this conflict; and (3) having sex without a condom or having sex with a new partner was necessary for receiving material goods and financial assistance--PrEP would provide reassurance in these situations. Many believed that PrEP alone would be a sufficient HIV risk-reduction strategy. These findings suggest that participants' HIV risk-reduction intentions, if they were to use PrEP, were based predominately on their understanding of the high efficacy of PrEP and their experiences with the limitations of condoms. Enhanced counseling is needed to promote informed decision making and to ensure overall sexual health for women using PrEP for HIV prevention, particularly with respect to the prevention of pregnancy and other sexually transmitted infections when PrEP is used alone. PMID:26196411

  11. Early initiation of antiretroviral treatment: Challenges in the Middle East and North Africa

    PubMed Central

    Sardashti, Sara; Samaei, Mehrnoosh; Firouzeh, Mona Mohammadi; Mirshahvalad, Seyed Ali; Pahlaviani, Fatemeh Golsoorat; SeyedAlinaghi, SeyedAhmad

    2015-01-01

    New World Health Organization guidelines recommend the initiation of antiretroviral treatment (ART) for asymptomatic patients with CD4+ T-cell counts of ? 500 cells/mm3. Substantial reduction of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission is addressed as a major public health outcome of this new approach. Middle East and North Africa (MENA), known as the area of controversies in terms of availability of comprehensive data, has shown concentrated epidemics among most of it’s at risk population groups. Serious challenges impede the applicability of new guidelines in the MENA Region. Insufficient resources restrict ART coverage to less than 14%, while only one fourth of the countries had reportable data on patients’ CD4 counts at the time of diagnosis. Clinical guidelines need to be significantly modified to reach practical utility, and surveillance systems have not yet been developed in many countries of MENA. Based on available evidence in several countries people who inject drugs and men who have sex with men are increasingly vulnerable to HIV and viral hepatitis, while their sexual partners - either female sex workers or women in monogamous relationships with high-risk men - are potential bridging populations that are not appropriately addressed by regional programs. Research to monitor the response to ART among the mentioned groups are seriously lacking, while drug resistant HIV strains and limited information on adherence patterns to treatment regimens require urgent recognition by health policymakers. Commitment to defined goals in the fight against HIV, development of innovative methods to improve registration and reporting systems, monitoring and evaluation of current programs followed by cost-effective modifications are proposed as effective steps to be acknowledged by National AIDS Programs of the countries of MENA Region. PMID:25964878

  12. Regional nitrogen budget of the Lake Victoria Basin, East Africa: syntheses, uncertainties and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Minghua; Brandt, Patric; Pelster, David; Rufino, Mariana C.; Robinson, Timothy; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus

    2014-10-01

    Using the net anthropogenic nitrogen input (NANI) approach we estimated the N budget for the Lake Victoria Basin in East Africa. The NANI of the basin ranged from 887 to 3008 kg N km-2 yr-1 (mean: 1827 kg N km-2 yr-1) for the period 1995-2000. The net nitrogen release at basin level is due primarily to livestock and human consumption of feed and foods, contributing between 69% and 85%. Atmospheric oxidized N deposition contributed approximately 14% to the NANI of the Lake Victoria Basin, while either synthetic N fertilizer imports or biological N fixations only contributed less than 6% to the regional NANI. Due to the low N imports of feed and food products (<20 kg N km-2 yr-1), nitrogen release to the watershed must be derived from the mining of soil N stocks. The fraction of riverine N export to Lake Victoria accounted for 16%, which is much lower than for watersheds located in Europe and USA (25%). A significant reduction of the uncertainty of our N budget estimate for Lake Victoria Basin would be possible if better data on livestock systems and riverine N export were available. Our study indicates that at present soil N mining is the main source of nitrogen in the Lake Victoria Basin. Thus, sustainable N management requires increasing agricultural N inputs to guarantee food security and rehabilitation and protection of soils to minimize environmental costs. Moreover, to reduce N pollution of the lake, improving management of human and animal wastes needs to be carefully considered in future.

  13. Additional results on palaeomagnetic stratigraphy of the Koobi Fora Formation, east of Lake Turkana (Lake Rudolf), Kenya

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hillhouse, J.W.; Ndombi, J.W.M.; Cox, A.; Brock, A.

    1977-01-01

    The magnetostratigraphy of the hominid-bearing sediments exposed east of Lake Turkana has been strengthened by new palaeomagnetic results. Ages obtained from several tuffs by the 40Ar/39Ar method suggest an approxmate match between the observed magnetozones and the geomagnetic polarity time scale; however, the palaeomagnetic results are also compatible with a younger chronology suggested by conventional K-Ar dating of the KBS Tuff. ?? 1977 Nature Publishing Group.

  14. Progress in measles control--Kenya 2002-2007.

    PubMed

    2007-09-21

    In 2000, countries represented by the World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Office for Africa established a goal to reduce, by the end of 2005, measles mortality to 50% of the 506,000 deaths from measles estimated in 1999. Strategies adopted included strengthening routine vaccination, providing a second opportunity for measles vaccination through supplemental immunization activities (SIAs), monitoring disease trends, and improving measles case management. In Kenya, an east African country with a population estimated at 33.4 million in 2005, the Kenya Expanded Programme on Immunization (KEPI) in the Ministry of Health began implementing these strategies in 2002 with a wide age range catch-up SIA and reduced the number of reported measles cases by >99%, from 11,304 in 2001 to 20 in 2004. A follow-up SIA, initially scheduled for July 2005, was postponed to 2006 to include concurrent distribution of long-lasting insecticide-treated bednets (LLINs). This report documents progress made in reducing measles morbidity and mortality in Kenya and describes the consequences of a large measles outbreak, beginning in September 2005, on the integrated measles follow-up SIA. PMID:17882128

  15. Serological Evidence of MERS-CoV Antibodies in Dromedary Camels (Camelus dromedaries) in Laikipia County, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Deem, Sharon L.; Fèvre, Eric M.; Kinnaird, Margaret; Browne, A. Springer; Muloi, Dishon; Godeke, Gert-Jan; Koopmans, Marion; Reusken, Chantal B.

    2015-01-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a recently identified virus causing severe viral respiratory illness in people. Little is known about the reservoir in the Horn of Africa. In Kenya, where no human MERS cases have been reported, our survey of 335 dromedary camels, representing nine herds in Laikipia County, showed a high seroprevalence (46.9%) to MERS-CoV antibodies. Between herd differences were present (14.3%– 82.9%), but was not related to management type or herd isolation. Further research should focus on identifying similarity between MERS-CoV viral isolates in Kenya and clinical isolates from the Middle East and elsewhere. PMID:26473733

  16. Analogy between natural gas found in lakes of rift valley system of east Africa and its allied gas in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuta, O.

    1984-09-01

    The Afar triangle in northeastern Ethiopia is where the Red Sea rift, the Carlsberg Ridge of the Indian Ocean, and the Rift Valley system of east Africa meet. In 1979, J. Welhan and H. Craig reported that hydrothermal vents at 21/sup 0/N, on the East Pacific Rise, are discharging turbid waters. Mixtures of the plumes with ambient seawater contain significant amounts of dissolved H/sub 2/ and CH/sub 4/ as well as mantel-derived /sup 3/He-rich helium. The /sup 3/He//sup 4/He ratios of rock samples obtained earlier by J. Lupton and H. Craig from the Mid-Oceanic Ridge, including the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and the east Pacific Rise, are extremely high at an almost constant value of (1.3 +/- 0.2) x 10/sup -5/, which they defined as the MOR-type helium. However, the deep brines of the Red Sea contain about 1,000 times more methane than normal seawater does, according to Gold and Soter in 1980. Much evidence leads us to believe that large amounts of /sup 3/He-rich helium-bearing natural gas have been gushing out in many places of the Rift Valley of east Africa for a long time. In 1980, Gold and Soter stated that Lake Kivu, which occupies part of the East African rift valley, contains 50 million tons of dissolved methane for which there is no adequate microbial source. The Japanese Islands began to separate from the Asian continent during the early Miocene. The early Miocene was characterized by intensive volcanic activity that produced large amounts of pyroclastics and other volcanic rocks, generally called green tuff in Japan. It has been suggested that oil and gas in green tuff is derived from the upper mantle.

  17. Aerosol characterization in Northern Africa, Northeastern Atlantic, Mediterranean Basin and Middle East from direct-sun AERONET observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basart, S.; Pérez, C.; Cuevas, E.; Baldasano, J. M.; Gobbi, G. P.

    2009-03-01

    We provide an atmospheric aerosol characterization for North Africa, Northeastern Atlantic, Mediterranean and Middle East based on the analysis of quality-assured direct-sun observations of 39 stations of the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) which include at least an annual cycle within the 1994-2007 period. We extensively test and apply the recently introduced graphical method of Gobbi and co-authors in order to track and discriminate different aerosol types and quantify the contribution of mineral dust. The method relies on the combined analysis of the Ångstrøm exponent (?) and its spectral curvature. Plotting data in these coordinates allows to infer aerosol fine mode size (Rf) and fractional contribution (?) to total Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) and separate AOD growth due to fine-mode aerosol humidification and/or coagulation from AOD growth due to the increase in coarse particles or cloud contamination. Our results confirm the robustness of this graphical method. Large mineral dust is the most important constituent in Northern Africa and Middle East; and under specific meteorological conditions, its transport to Europe is observed from spring to autumn. Small pollution particles are abundant in sites close to urban and industrial areas of Continental and Eastern Europe and Middle East; as well as, important contributions of biomass burning are observed in the sub-Sahel region in winter. Dust is usually found to mix with these fine, pollution aerosols.

  18. Professional Travel in Kenya The Republic of Kenya is a country in East Africa, lying along the Indian Ocean at the equator. It is

    E-print Network

    Chen, Deming

    /women do not shake hands with members of the opposite sex. · Avoid touching or patting children on the head and kids, but not about a person's husband or wife directly. · Personal interests and hobbies, many Kenyans enjoy soccer, for example. Topics of conversation to avoid during casual exchanges · Do not discuss sex

  19. Lake Naivasha, Kenya

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    If you live in Europe and buy roses, there is a good chance that they were grown in Kenya specifically, in one of the colossal greenhouses that blot out the once wild shores of Lake Naivasha, 90km north-west of Nairobi. Some 25% of Europe's cut flowers come from Kenya. After a tentative start in the 1980s the industry is now the country's third-largest foreign-currency earner, bringing in $120m a year. But the recent violence in Kenya is having a major impact on the flower growers. A local trade union says 3,000 of the 30,000 workers employed in Naivasha's flower farms have abandoned their jobs. Kenya emerged as a flower power when Israel scaled down its own industry. It has since lost business to neighboring Ethiopia, which offers tax breaks and better security, but Naivasha's perfect intensity of sunlight and days of near-constant length should keep it on top.

    The ASTER image was acquired February 2, 2008, covers an area of 25 x 26.6 km, and is located near 0.8 degrees south latitude, 36.4 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  20. Multilingual Education in Kenya: Debunking the Myths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orwenjo, Daniel Ochieng

    2012-01-01

    Arguments that have been advanced against multilingual education in Kenya and Africa in general are not new. Most post-colonial African governments have stuck to the pre-colonial education policies which have no relevance to the present day Africa and were, at best, guided by the interests of the colonial power. Unfortunately, most of the claims…

  1. Isotopic evidence for neogene hominid paleoenvironments in the Kenya Rift Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Kingston, J.D.; Hill, A. ); Marino, B.D. )

    1994-05-13

    Bipedality, the definitive characteristic of the earliest hominids, has been regarded as an adaptive response to a transition from forested to more-open habitats in East Africa sometime between 12 million and 5 million years ago. Analyses of the stable carbon isotopic composition ([delta][sup 13]C) of paleosol carbonate and organic matter from the Tugen Hills succession in Kenya indicate that a heterogeneous environment with a mix of C3 and C4 plants has persisted for the last 15.5 million years. Open grasslands at no time dominated this portion of the rift valley. The observed [delta][sup 13]C values offer no evidence for a shift from more-closed C3 environments to C4 grasslands habitats. If hominids evolved in East Africa during the Late Miocene, they did so in an ecologically diverse setting.

  2. Isotopic Evidence for Neogene Hominid Paleoenvironments in the Kenya Rift Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingston, John D.; Marino, Bruno D.; Hill, Andrew

    1994-05-01

    Bipedality, the definitive characteristic of the earliest hominids, has been regarded as an adaptive response to a transition from forested to more-open habitats in East Africa sometime between 12 million and 5 million years ago. Analyses of the stable carbon isotopic composition (?13C) of paleosol carbonate and organic matter from the Tugen Hills succession in Kenya indicate that a heterogeneous environment with a mix of C3 and C4 plants has persisted for the last 15.5 million years. Open grasslands at no time dominated this portion of the rift valley. The observed ?13C values offer no evidence for a shift from more-closed C3 environments to C4 grassland habitats. If hominids evolved in East Africa during the Late Miocene, they did so in an ecologically diverse setting.

  3. The Role of Economic Development in Curriculum Development Process in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Call for New Approach to Socioeconomic Development in Africa with a Special Reference to Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odiemo, Luke Okunya

    2008-01-01

    The main hypothesis here is that the notion of economic and social development has been misconceived by most stakeholders in matters of development. This misconception is the main cause of underdevelopment in Kenya, which leads to all the reasons most authors and commentators have given to explain Kenya's situation. Therefore, it is only possible…

  4. Climate change or urbanization? Impacts on a traditional coffee production system in East Africa over the last 80 years.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Juliana; Setamou, Mamoudou; Muchugu, Eric; Chabi-Olaye, Adenirin; Jaramillo, Alvaro; Mukabana, Joseph; Maina, Johnson; Gathara, Simon; Borgemeister, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Global environmental changes (GEC) such as climate change (CC) and climate variability have serious impacts in the tropics, particularly in Africa. These are compounded by changes in land use/land cover, which in turn are driven mainly by economic and population growth, and urbanization. These factors create a feedback loop, which affects ecosystems and particularly ecosystem services, for example plant-insect interactions, and by consequence agricultural productivity. We studied effects of GEC at a local level, using a traditional coffee production area in greater Nairobi, Kenya. We chose coffee, the most valuable agricultural commodity worldwide, as it generates income for 100 million people, mainly in the developing world. Using the coffee berry borer, the most serious biotic threat to global coffee production, we show how environmental changes and different production systems (shaded and sun-grown coffee) can affect the crop. We combined detailed entomological assessments with historic climate records (from 1929-2011), and spatial and demographic data, to assess GEC's impact on coffee at a local scale. Additionally, we tested the utility of an adaptation strategy that is simple and easy to implement. Our results show that while interactions between CC and migration/urbanization, with its resultant landscape modifications, create a feedback loop whereby agroecosystems such as coffee are adversely affected, bio-diverse shaded coffee proved far more resilient and productive than coffee grown in monoculture, and was significantly less harmed by its insect pest. Thus, a relatively simple strategy such as shading coffee can tremendously improve resilience of agro-ecosystems, providing small-scale farmers in Africa with an easily implemented tool to safeguard their livelihoods in a changing climate. PMID:23341884

  5. Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martz, Carlton

    2001-01-01

    This publication explores issues related to Africa. It examines the U.S. response to the Barbary pirate states (Morocco, Algiers, Tunis, Tripoli) in the early 19th century; the current AIDS crisis in Africa; and 14th century Mali and other Islamic lands through the eyes of Ibn Battuta, who traveled throughout the Muslim world. Each article…

  6. Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Happel, Sue; Loeb, Joyce

    Although the activities in this unit are designed primarily for students in the intermediate grades, the document's text, illustrations, and bibliographic references are suitable for anyone interested in learning about Africa. Following a brief introduction and map work, the document is arranged into six sections. Section 1 traces Africa's history…

  7. A pterodactyloid pterosaur from the Upper Cretaceous Lapurr sandstone, West Turkana, Kenya.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Patrick M; Sertich, Joseph J W; Manthi, Fredrick K

    2011-03-01

    An isolated pterosaurian caudal cervical (~ postcervical) vertebra was recovered from the Upper Cretaceous Lapurr sandstone of West Turkana, northwestern Kenya. The vertebral centrum is short, wide, and dorsoventrally compressed. Although the specimen is lightly built similar to most pterosaurs, it is here referred to Pterodactyloidea and tentatively to the Azhdarchidae in that it lacks pneumatic features on both the centrum and neural arch. This represents one of the few pterosaurs recovered from the entirety of Afro-Arabia, the first pterosaur recovered from the Cretaceous of East Africa, and, significantly, a specimen that was recovered from fluvial deposits rather than the near-shore marine setting typical of most pterosaur discoveries. PMID:21437388

  8. A geographic information system on the potential distribution and abundance of Fasciola hepatica and F. gigantica in east Africa based on Food and Agriculture Organization databases.

    PubMed

    Malone, J B; Gommes, R; Hansen, J; Yilma, J M; Slingenberg, J; Snijders, F; Nachtergaele, F; Ataman, E

    1998-07-31

    An adaptation of a previously developed climate forecast computer model and digital agroecologic database resources available from FAO for developing countries were used to develop a geographic information system risk assessment model for fasciolosis in East Africa, a region where both F. hepatica and F. gigantica occur as a cause of major economic losses in livestock. Regional F. hepatica and F. gigantica forecast index maps were created. Results were compared to environmental data parameters, known life cycle micro-environment requirements and to available Fasciola prevalence survey data and distribution patterns reported in the literature for each species (F. hepatica above 1200 m elevation, F. gigantica below 1800 m, both at 1200-1800 m). The greatest risk, for both species, occurred in areas of extended high annual rainfall associated with high soil moisture and surplus water, with risk diminishing in areas of shorter wet season and/or lower temperatures. Arid areas were generally unsuitable (except where irrigation, water bodies or floods occur) due to soil moisture deficit and/or, in the case of F. hepatica, high average annual mean temperature >23 degrees C. Regions in the highlands of Ethiopia and Kenya were identified as unsuitable for F. gigantica due to inadequate thermal regime, below the 600 growing degree days required for completion of the life cycle in a single year. The combined forecast index (F. hepatica+F. gigantica) was significantly correlated to prevalence data available for 260 of the 1220 agroecologic crop production system zones (CPSZ) and to average monthly normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) values derived from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) sensor on board the NOAA polar-orbiting satellites. For use in Fasciola control programs, results indicate that monthly forecast parameters, developed in a GIS with digital agroecologic zone databases and monthly climate databases, can be used to define the distribution range of the two Fasciola species, regional variations in intensity and seasonal transmission patterns at different sites. Results further indicate that many of the methods used for crop productivity models can also be used to define the potential distribution and abundance of parasites. PMID:9735915

  9. Agriculture, Education, and Rural Transformation: With Particular Reference to East Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liebenow, J. Gus

    Independence for Africa has not resulted in the expected economic development of industrialization. Mineral-poor states in Africa must rely on limited prosperity coming from an expansion of agricultural commodities. The problem is that despite the prevalence of an agriculture economic base, most African leaders are committed to industrial…

  10. A review of mercury in Lake Victoria, East Africa: implications for human and ecosystem health.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Linda; Dixon, D G; Hecky, R E

    2003-01-01

    Lake Victoria, East Africa, has been the site of many recent studies measuring mercury (Hg) concentrations in water, fish, sediment, soil, and humans. Most of these studies were motivated by concerns about Hg contamination from processing of gold ore on the southern shores. Total Hg (THg) concentrations in fish were usually below permissible World Health Organization (WHO) concentrations and international marketing limits and do not threaten the lucrative export industry. Nile perch 3-10 kg and most >10 kg had THg concentrations above the WHO threshold concentrations for at-risk groups (200 ng/g). Elevated THg concentrations in large Nile perch are not of major concern because Nile perch are rarely consumed by the people living on Lake Victoria and very large Nile perch are becoming increasingly rare in catches. Water THg concentrations were below Canadian drinking water guidelines but were elevated relative to those in the northern Great Lakes. Sediment and soil THg concentrations were within inter-national guidelines and are comparable to those in northern latitudes but are lower than those in the Amazon basin. Biomass burning and soil erosion are estimated to be the major sources of THg for the lake and probably constitute a larger source of THg than gold mining in Tanzania.THg concentrations in urine and hair from human volunteers indicate that while gold miners and frequent skin-bleaching cream users are at risk of inorganic mercury poisoning, the rest of the population, including fishermen, is not. Human exposure assessments demonstrated that fish consumption and soil geophagy constitute major sources of THg for humans, but the total estimated daily intake of THg was below the Health Canada tolerable daily intake (TDI) limits. The use of beauty creams containing high inorganic Hg concentrations, however, caused the estimated THg exposure to exceed the TDI. The high THg content in the hair of regular cream users supports this assessment. The nutritional benefits of fish and soil geophagy outweigh the risk of THg poisoning. Still, due to the importance of those natural items as a THg source to humans, as well as the changing nature of Lake Victoria, regular monitoring and risk assessments need to be carried out in the Lake Victoria catchment. PMID:12775518

  11. Sustainable Electricity and Water for Europe, Middle East and North Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller-Steinhagen, H.; Trieb, F.

    2009-04-01

    Sufficient supply of energy and water are among the key requirements for a sustainable development of nations. Both depend strongly on energy carriers such as oil, gas, coal and uranium which have limited availability and a negative impact on the environment during their use. Within the framework of a series of detailed studies, conventional and renewable energy sources available for electricity production and desalination in Europe, North Africa and the Middle East (EU-MENA) have been analysed. Scenarios have been developed for a sustainable electricity supply based on increased plant and user efficiency, and an accelerated introduction of renewable energy sources. Even if all potential exclusion criteria are applied and only those technologies are considered which will become economically competitive within the next decades, a potential has been identified which exceeds the present electricity demand by orders of magnitude. Solar energy is, in this context, the by far largest resource which will most economically be exploited in centralised solar thermal power plants. In combination with heat storage, these power plants can provide bulk and peak electricity, and can be combined with thermal or reverse osmosis desalination plants. At present, solar thermal power plants with a total capacity exceeding 10 GW are in operation or under construction in Abu Dhabi, Algeria, Egypt, Iran, Israel, Italy, Morocco, Spain and the USA. Ultimately, the increasing electricity demand of EU-MENA can only be secured in conjunction with the required climate and resource protection targets, if all renewable energy sources are exploited where appropriate, and conversion and user efficiency are increased. To utilise the enormous energy resources of the Mediterranean countries, high voltage direct current power lines will have to be built, linking the most abundant and economic resources with the load centres in the North. With electricity losses below 10% over a distance of 3000 km, HVDC lines may provide up to 15% of the total European electricity demand by 2050. For the MENA region, this scenario will provide most promising opportunities: in addition to the export of electricity replacing revenues from dwindling oil and gas resources, solar thermal power plants will provide a major share of their own electricity demands at competitive costs and will provide fresh water by seawater desalination, the latter becoming an urgent requirement over the next decades. This presentation outlines the assumptions and results of the studies which have been performed by an international consortium for 50 EU-MENA countries, as well as the technological and economic implications of the suggested scenario.

  12. Occupational exposure to roadway emissions and inside informal settlements in sub-Saharan Africa: A pilot study in Nairobi, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Nicole S.; Gatari, Michael; Yan, Beizhan; Chillrud, Steven N.; Bouhamam, Kheira; Kinneym, Patrick L.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies examine urban air pollution in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), yet urbanization rates there are among the highest in the world. In this study, we measured 8-hr average occupational exposure levels of fine particulate matter (PM2.5), black carbon (BC), ultra violet active-particulate matter (UV-PM), and trace elements for individuals who worked along roadways in Nairobi, specifically bus drivers, garage workers, street vendors, and women who worked inside informal settlements. We found BC and re-suspended dust were important contributors to PM2.5 levels for all study populations, particularly among bus drivers, while PM2.5 exposure levels for garage workers, street vendors, and informal settlement residents were not statistically different from each other. We also found a strong signal for biomass emissions and trash burning, which is common in Nairobi’s low-income areas and open-air garages. These results suggest that the large portion of urban residents in SSA who walk along roadways would benefit from air quality regulations targeting roadway emissions from diesel vehicles, dust, and trash burning. This is the first study to measure occupational exposure to urban air pollution in SSA and results imply that roadway emissions are a serious public health concern. PMID:26034383

  13. Occupational exposure to roadway emissions and inside informal settlements in sub-Saharan Africa: A pilot study in Nairobi, Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Nicole S.; Gatari, Michael; Yan, Beizhan; Chillrud, Steven N.; Bouhamam, Kheira; Kinney, Patrick L.

    2015-06-01

    Few studies examine urban air pollution in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), yet urbanization rates there are among the highest in the world. In this study, we measured 8-hr average occupational exposure levels of fine particulate matter (PM2.5), black carbon (BC), ultra violet active-particulate matter (UV-PM), and trace elements for individuals who worked along roadways in Nairobi, specifically bus drivers, garage workers, street vendors, and women who worked inside informal settlements. We found BC and re-suspended dust were important contributors to PM2.5 levels for all study populations, particularly among bus drivers, while PM2.5 exposure levels for garage workers, street vendors, and informal settlement residents were not statistically different from each other. We also found a strong signal for biomass emissions and trash burning, which is common in Nairobi's low-income areas and open-air garages. These results suggest that the large portion of urban residents in SSA who walk along roadways would benefit from air quality regulations targeting roadway emissions from diesel vehicles, dust, and trash burning. This is the first study to measure occupational exposure to urban air pollution in SSA and results imply that roadway emissions are a serious public health concern.

  14. The changing pattern of imported malaria in British visitors to Kenya 1987-1990.

    PubMed Central

    Pryce, D I; Behrens, R H; Bradley, D J

    1993-01-01

    Following a sudden increase of imported malaria from Kenya in December 1989-January 1990, an investigation was set up to identify risk factors for travellers' malaria. A questionnaire asking for details of travel patterns and compliance with prophylaxis was sent to cases reported over the 6-month Kenyan winter period. Quarterly malaria attack rates between January 1987 and June 1991 were calculated and linked to meteorological conditions in Mombasa. The number of travellers to Kenya has doubled in the 4 years studied and the quarterly rates varied 4-fold over this period. There was no clear seasonal pattern of malaria in travellers, nor was there any clear relation of malaria to coastal rainfall. Compliance with chemoprophylaxis was poor, with only 16% of cases using currently advised regimens. While the annual malaria attack rate per 10,000 travellers decreased by 37% over the study period, the total numbers of malaria cases imported from Kenya rose by 61%, reflecting the increase in the numbers of travellers to the region. As the popularity of East Africa as a tourist destination continues to increase, Kenya will remain an important and significant source of malaria imported into the UK. PMID:8459379

  15. Astronomical Site Testing Initiatives in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, David A. H.; Graham, Edward; Vaughan, Richard; Belay, Solomon; Biressa, Tolu

    2015-08-01

    Two astronomical site testing initiatives are beginning in both Kenya and Ethiopia, with the aim of selecting suitable locations in those countries for modest sized (1-2m) optical telescopes.The first project, in Kenya, has initially involved a desk-top study of ~30 years of low resolution (~80 km) meteorological satellite data from the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (so called “ERA-reanalysis” data). This was later supplemented by ~2 years of higher resolution (~12 km) United Kingdom Met Office Limited Area Model for Africa (“Africa-LAM”) data, kindly made available by the British Atmospheric Data Centre (BADC).The analysis looked at cloud cover, aerosol distribution, integrated water vapour and wind conditions, On the basis of this study, we determined a number of regions in the north of Kenya, east of the Rift Valley, which show promise as potential observatory sites. We are now in the process of installing Automatic Weather Stations (AWS) at 3 selected sites (~2000-2700 m altitude) to begin monitoring meteorological conditions over the next few years. It is eventually hoped to supplement this study with instrumentation to allow the measurement of sky brightness, local cloud cover and seeing (e.g. with a DIMM system).A similar program of astronomical site testing is due to start in 2015 in the Lalibela region of northern Ethiopia, at three potential dark sky sites with expected relatively low cloud cover, ranging in altitude from ~3600 to 4100 m.

  16. A single lineage in early Pleistocene Homo: size variation continuity in early Pleistocene Homo crania from East Africa and Georgia.

    PubMed

    Van Arsdale, Adam P; Wolpoff, Milford H

    2013-03-01

    The relationship between Homo habilis and early African Homo erectus has been contentious because H. habilis was hypothesized to be an evolutionary stage between Australopithecus and H. erectus, more than a half-century ago. Recent work re-dating key African early Homo localities and the discovery of new fossils in East Africa and Georgia provide the opportunity for a productive re-evaluation of this topic. Here, we test the hypothesis that the cranial sample from East Africa and Georgia represents a single evolutionary lineage of Homo spanning the approximately 1.9-1.5 Mya time period, consisting of specimens attributed to H. habilis and H. erectus. To address issues of small sample sizes in each time period, and uneven representation of cranial data, we developed a novel nonparametric randomization technique based on the variance in an index of pairwise difference from a broad set of fossil comparisons. We fail to reject the hypothesis of a single lineage this period by identifying a strong, time-dependent pattern of variation throughout the sequence. These results suggest the need for a reappraisal of fossil evidence from other regions within this time period and highlight the critical nature of the Plio-Pleistocene boundary for understanding the early evolution of the genus Homo. PMID:23461332

  17. Prospects and challenges in the introduction of human papillomavirus vaccines in the extended Middle East and North Africa region.

    PubMed

    Jumaan, Aisha O; Ghanem, Soha; Taher, Jalaa; Braikat, Mhammed; Al Awaidy, Salah; Dbaibo, Ghassan S

    2013-12-30

    The development of effective and safe human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines provides a great opportunity to prevent a devastating disease, cervical cancer, and a host of other related diseases. However, the introduction of these vaccines has been slow in the Extended Middle East and North Africa (EMENA) region. Only one country has introduced the vaccine and few countries plan HPV vaccine introduction in the coming 5 years. Several factors influence the slow uptake in the region, including financial constraints, weak infrastructure for adolescent vaccine delivery, competition with high priority vaccines, and lack of reliable data on the burden of HPV disease. Other barriers include cultural and religious sensitivities, as the vaccines are offered to prevent a sexually transmitted disease in young girls. Recommendations to enhance HPV vaccine introduction in EMENA countries include establishing a regional joint vaccine procurement program, enhancing the adolescent vaccination platform, documenting the burden of cervical cancer, strengthening local National Immunization Technical Advisory Groups and designing Information, Education and Communication material that address cultural concerns. This article forms part of a regional report entitled "Comprehensive Control of HPV Infections and Related Diseases in the Extended Middle East and North Africa Region" Vaccine Volume 31, Supplement 6, 2013. Updates of the progress in the field are presented in a separate monograph entitled "Comprehensive Control of HPV Infections and Related Diseases" Vaccine Volume 30, Supplement 5, 2012. PMID:24331821

  18. Seismicity of the Earth 1900-2013 East African Rift

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayes, Gavin P.; Jones, Eric S.; Stadler, Timothy J.; Barnhart, William D.; McNamara, Daniel E.; Benz, Harley M.; Furlong, Kevin P.; Villaseñor, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Rifting in East Africa is not all coeval; volcanism and faulting have been an ongoing phenomenon on the continent since the Eocene (~45 Ma). The rifting began in northern East Africa, and led to the separation of the Nubia (Africa) and Arabia plates in the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden, and in the Lake Turkana area at the Kenya-Ethiopia border. A Paleogene mantle superplume beneath East Africa caused extension within the Nubia plate, as well as a first order topographic high known as the African superswell which now includes most of the eastern and southern sectors of the Nubia plate. Widespread volcanism erupted onto much of the rising plateau in Ethiopia during the Eocene-Oligocene (45–29 Ma), with chains of volcanoes forming along the rift separating Africa and Arabia. Since the initiation of rifting in northeastern Africa, the system has propagated over 3,000 km to the south and southwest, and it experiences seismicity as a direct result of the extension and active magmatism.

  19. P-wave travel-time tomography reveals multiple mantle upwellings beneath the northern East-Africa Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, J. O. S.; Civiero, C.; Goes, S. D. B.; Ahmed, A.; Ayele, A.; Doubre, C.; Goitom, B.; Keir, D.; Kendall, M.; Leroy, S. D.; Ogubazghi, G.; Rumpker, G.; Stuart, G. W.

    2014-12-01

    The East African Rift (EAR) shows evidence for active magmatism from the eruption of flood basalts 30 Ma to active volcanism associated with rifting today. Mantle plumes have been invoked as the likely cause. However, the nature of mantle upwelling is debated, with proposed models ranging from a single broad plume, the African Superplume, connected to the LLSVP beneath Southern Africa, to multiple distinct sources of upwelling along the East-Africa Rift. We present a new relative travel-time tomography model that images detailed P-wave velocities below the northern East-African rift from the surface to lower mantle depths. Data comes from 439 stations that cover the area from Tanzania to Saudi Arabia. The aperture of the integrated dataset allows us to image for the first time low-velocity structures of ~ 100-km length scales down to depths of 900 km beneath this region. Our images provide evidence of at least two separate low-velocity structures with a diameter of ~200 km that continue through the transition zone and into the lower mantle: the first, and most pronounced, is beneath the Afar Depression, which extends to at least 900 km depth and a second is located beneath the Main Ethiopian Rift that extends to at least 750 km. Taking into account seismic sensitivity to temperature and thermally controlled phase boundary topography, we interpret these features as multiple focused upwellings from below the transition zone with excess temperatures of ~ 100-150 K. Such temperatures are also fully consistent with previous petrological and other geophysical estimates. Furthermore, the separate structures could explain differences in geochemistry of erupted magmas along the rift zone, as well as the dynamic topography seen at the surface. Our findings thus support the involvement of multiple plumes in the evolution of the EAR and a direct connection between lower mantle features and the volcanism at the surface.

  20. Aerosol characterization in Northern Africa, Northeastern Atlantic, Mediterranean Basin and Middle East from direct-sun AERONET observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basart, S.; Pérez, C.; Cuevas, E.; Baldasano, J. M.; Gobbi, G. P.

    2009-11-01

    We provide an atmospheric aerosol characterization for North Africa, Northeastern Atlantic, Mediterranean and Middle East based on the analysis of quality-assured direct-sun observations of 39 stations of the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) which include at least an annual cycle within the 1994-2007 period. We extensively test and apply the recently introduced graphical method of Gobbi and co-authors to track and discriminate different aerosol types and quantify the contribution of mineral dust. The method relies on the combined analysis of the Ångström exponent (?) and its spectral curvature ??. Plotting data in these coordinates allows to infer aerosol fine mode radius (Rf) and fractional contribution (?) to total Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) and separate AOD growth due to fine-mode aerosol humidification and/or coagulation from AOD growth due to the increase in coarse particles or cloud contamination. Our results confirm the robustness of this graphical method. Large mineral dust is found to be the most important constituent in Northern Africa and Middle East. Under specific meteorological conditions, its transport to Southern Europe is observed from spring to autumn and decreasing with latitude. We observe "pure Saharan dust" conditions to show AOD>0.7 (ranging up to 5), ?<0.3 and ??<0 corresponding to ?<40% and (Rf)~0.13 ?m. Small pollution particles are abundant in sites close to urban and industrial areas of Continental and Eastern Europe and Middle East, as well as, important contributions of biomass burning are observed in the sub-Sahel region in winter. These small aerosols are associated to AOD<1, ?>1.5 and ??~-0.2 corresponding to ?>70% and Rf~0.13 ?m. Here, dust mixed with fine pollution aerosols shifts the observations to the region ?<0.75, in which the fine mode contribution is less than 40%.

  1. The episode of genetic drift defining the migration of humans out of Africa is derived from a large east African population size.

    PubMed

    Elhassan, Nuha; Gebremeskel, Eyoab Iyasu; Elnour, Mohamed Ali; Isabirye, Dan; Okello, John; Hussien, Ayman; Kwiatksowski, Dominic; Hirbo, Jibril; Tishkoff, Sara; Ibrahim, Muntaser E

    2014-01-01

    Human genetic variation particularly in Africa is still poorly understood. This is despite a consensus on the large African effective population size compared to populations from other continents. Based on sequencing of the mitochondrial Cytochrome C Oxidase subunit II (MT-CO2), and genome wide microsatellite data we observe evidence suggesting the effective size (Ne) of humans to be larger than the current estimates, with a foci of increased genetic diversity in east Africa, and a population size of east Africans being at least 2-6 fold larger than other populations. Both phylogenetic and network analysis indicate that east Africans possess more ancestral lineages in comparison to various continental populations placing them at the root of the human evolutionary tree. Our results also affirm east Africa as the likely spot from which migration towards Asia has taken place. The study reflects the spectacular level of sequence variation within east Africans in comparison to the global sample, and appeals for further studies that may contribute towards filling the existing gaps in the database. The implication of these data to current genomic research, as well as the need to carry out defined studies of human genetic variation that includes more African populations; particularly east Africans is paramount. PMID:24845801

  2. The Episode of Genetic Drift Defining the Migration of Humans out of Africa Is Derived from a Large East African Population Size

    PubMed Central

    Elnour, Mohamed Ali; Isabirye, Dan; Okello, John; Hussien, Ayman; Kwiatksowski, Dominic; Hirbo, Jibril; Tishkoff, Sara; Ibrahim, Muntaser E.

    2014-01-01

    Human genetic variation particularly in Africa is still poorly understood. This is despite a consensus on the large African effective population size compared to populations from other continents. Based on sequencing of the mitochondrial Cytochrome C Oxidase subunit II (MT-CO2), and genome wide microsatellite data we observe evidence suggesting the effective size (Ne) of humans to be larger than the current estimates, with a foci of increased genetic diversity in east Africa, and a population size of east Africans being at least 2-6 fold larger than other populations. Both phylogenetic and network analysis indicate that east Africans possess more ancestral lineages in comparison to various continental populations placing them at the root of the human evolutionary tree. Our results also affirm east Africa as the likely spot from which migration towards Asia has taken place. The study reflects the spectacular level of sequence variation within east Africans in comparison to the global sample, and appeals for further studies that may contribute towards filling the existing gaps in the database. The implication of these data to current genomic research, as well as the need to carry out defined studies of human genetic variation that includes more African populations; particularly east Africans is paramount. PMID:24845801

  3. Mapping crustal heterogeneity using Lg propagation efficiency throughout the Middle East, Mediterranean, Southern Europe and Northern Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McNamara, D.E.; Walter, W.R.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we describe a technique for mapping the lateral variation of Lg characteristics such as Lg blockage, efficient Lg propagation, and regions of very high attenuation in the Middle East, North Africa, Europe and the Mediterranean regions. Lg is used in a variety of seismological applications from magnitude estimation to identification of nuclear explosions for monitoring compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). These applications can give significantly biased results if the Lg phase is reduced or blocked by discontinuous structure or thin crust. Mapping these structures using quantitative techniques for determining Lg amplitude attenuation can break down when the phase is below background noise. In such cases Lg blockage and inefficient propagation zones are often mapped out by hand. With our approach, we attempt to visually simplify this information by imaging crustal structure anomalies that significantly diminish the amplitude of Lg. The visualization of such anomalies is achieved by defining a grid of cells that covers the entire region of interest. We trace Lg rays for each event/ station pair, which is simply the great circle path, and attribute to each cell a value equal to the maximum value of the Lg/P-coda amplitude ratio for all paths traversing that particular cell. The resulting map, from this empirical approach, is easily interpreted in terms of crustal structure and can successfully image small blockage features often missed by analysis of raypaths alone. This map can then be used to screen out events with blocked Lg prior to performing Q tomography, and to avoid using Lg-based methods of event identification for the CTBT in regions where they cannot work. For this study we applied our technique to one of the most tectonically complex regions on the earth. Nearly 9000 earthquake/station raypaths, traversing the vast region comprised of the Middle East, Mediterranean, Southern Europe and Northern Africa, have been analyzed. We measured the amplitude of Lg relative to the P-coda and mapped the lateral variation of Lg propagation efficiency. With the relatively dense coverage provided by the numerous crossing paths we are able to map out the pattern of crustal heterogeneity that gives rise to the observed character of Lg propagation. We observe that the propagation characteristics of Lg within the region of interest are very complicated but are readily correlated with the different tectonic environments within the region. For example, clear strong Lg arrivals are observed for paths crossing the stable continental interiors of Northern Africa and the Arabian Shield. In contrast, weakened to absent Lg is observed for paths crossing much of the Middle East, and Lg is absent for paths traversing the Mediterranean. Regions that block Lg transmission within the Middle East are very localized and include the Caspian Sea, the Iranian Plateau and the Red Sea. Resolution is variable throughout the region and strongly depends on the distribution of seismicity and recording stations. Lg propagation is best resolved within the Middle East where regions of crustal heterogeneity on the order of 100 km are imaged (e.g., South Caspian Sea and Red Sea). Crustal heterogeneity is resolvable but is poorest in seismically quiescent Northern Africa.

  4. Development of the roadmap and guidelines for the prevention and management of high blood pressure in Africa: Proceedings of the PASCAR Hypertension Task Force meeting: Nairobi, Kenya, 27 October 2014.

    PubMed

    Dzudie, A; Ojji, D; Anisiuba, B C; Abdou, B A; Cornick, R; Damasceno, A; Kane, A L; Mocumbi, A O; Mohamed, A; Nel, G; Ogola, E; Onwubere, B; Otieno, H; Rainer, B; Schutte, A; Ali, I T; Twagirumukiza, M; Poulter, N; Mayosi, B

    2015-01-01

    Africa has one of the fastest growing economies in the world. The economic changes are associated with a health transition characterised by a rise in cardiovascular risk factors and complications, which tend to affect the African population at their age of maximum productivity. Recent data from Africa have highlighted the increasing importance of high blood pressure in this region of the world. This condition is largely underdiagnosed and poorly treated, and therefore leads to stroke, renal and heart failure, and death. Henceforth, African countries are taking steps to develop relevant policies and programmes to address the issue of blood pressure and other cardiovascular risk factors in response to a call by the World Health Organisation (WHO) to reduce premature deaths from non-communicable diseases (NCDs) by 25% by the year 2025 (25 × 25). The World Heart Federation (WHF) has developed a roadmap for global implementation of the prevention and management of raised blood pressure using a health system approach to help realise the 25 × 25 goal set by the WHO. As the leading continental organisation of cardiovascular professionals, the Pan-African Society of Cardiology (PASCAR) aims to contextualise the roadmap framework of the WHF to the African continent through the PASCAR Taskforce on Hypertension. The Taskforce held a workshop in Kenya on 27 October 2014 to discuss a process by which effective prevention and control of hypertension in Africa may be achieved. It was agreed that a set of clinical guidelines for the management of hypertension are needed in Africa. The ultimate goal of this work is to develop a roadmap for implementation of the prevention and management of hypertension in Africa under the auspices of the WHF. PMID:25940121

  5. Do School Incentives and Accountability Measures Improve Skills in the Middle East and North Africa? The Cases of Jordan and Tunisia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafiq, M. Najeeb

    2011-01-01

    There is general agreement that skill-enhancing school reforms in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region are necessary for economic, political and social reasons. Using student-level data from Jordan and Tunisia, this study assesses the relationship between skills and the following school incentive and accountability measures: pedagogical…

  6. The Beginnings of Civilization in the Near East and Africa: Mesopotamia, Egypt, and Kush. Grade 6 Model Lesson for Unit II. California History-Social Science Course Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zachlod, Michelle, Ed.

    This model lesson for sixth graders about the beginnings of civilization in the Near East and Africa aims to have students focus on the cultural and geographical features of a region: landforms, climate, and vegetation. The lesson features three major topics: (1) Sumer and Mesopotamia, (2) Egypt, and (3) Kush. It addresses the uses and…

  7. LANDSAT image studies as applied to petroleum exploration in Kenya

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    The Chevron-Kenya oil license, acquired in 1972, covers an area at the north end of the Lamu Embayment. Immediately after acquisition, a photogeologic study of the area was made followed by a short field inspection. An interpretation of LANDSAT-1 images as a separate attempt to improve geological knowledge was completed. The method used in the image study, the multispectral characteristics of rock units and terrain, and the observed anomalous features as seen in the LANDSAT imagery are described. It was found that the study helped to define the relationship of the Lamu Embayment and its internal structure with surrounding regional features, such as the East Africa rifting, the Rudolf Trough, the Bur Acaba structural ridge, and the Ogaden Basin.

  8. Impediments to media communication of social change in family planning and reproductive health: experiences from East Africa.

    PubMed

    Kagurusi, Patrick T

    2013-09-01

    The media has been employed to increase uptake of Family Planning through behaviour change communication (BCC). Understanding the barriers encountered in effectively undertaking this function would increase the strategy's effectiveness. Sixty journalists from East Africa participated in trainings to enhance their BCC skills for Family Planning in which a qualitative study was nested to identify barriers to effective Family Planning BCC in the region's media. The barriers were observed to be insufficient BCC skills, journalists' conflict of interest, interests of media houses, inaccessible sources of family planning information, editorial ideologies and absence of commercially beneficial demand. Coupled with the historical ideologies of the media in the region, the observed barriers have precipitated ineffective family planning BCC in the regions media. Effective BCC for family planning in the regions media requires capacity building among practitioners and alignment of the concept to the media's and consumers' aspirations. PMID:24069769

  9. Nd and Sr isotope systematics of Shombole volcano, East Africa, and the links between nephelinites, phonolites, and carbonatites

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, K. ); Peterson, T. )

    1991-06-01

    Nd and Sr isotope compositions of nephelinites, carbonatites, and phonolites from Shombole, a Pliocene volcano in East Africa, show that the phonolites cannot be derived by simple fractional crystallization of nephelinite magma. For a given initial {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio, {sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd is lower in most phonolites than in the nephelinites and carbonatites. Interaction between nephelinitic magma and lower-crustal granulites can account for these differences. The similar ranges in isotopic composition of the carbonatites and nephelinites are consistent with repeated melting events involving heterogeneous mantle. The carbonatites could have formed by immiscibility with nephelinite magma or by direct partial melting of the same mantle source(s) as the nephelinites.

  10. Reference, Coherence and Complexity in Students' Academic Writing: Examples from Cameroon and East-Africa Corpus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmied, Josef; Nkemleke, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    This contribution discusses problems of students' academic writing in Africa. It sketches the wide field of English for Academic Purposes (EAP) and argues that reference, coherence and complexity are key concepts for evaluating student writing at university level. It uses material from African corpora to substantiate this claim and to illustrate…

  11. Food web structure and mercury transfer in two contrasting Ugandan highland crater lakes (East Africa)

    E-print Network

    Dhindsa, Rajinder

    Africa) L. Campbell1 *, R. E. Hecky2 , D. G. Dixon2 and L. J. Chapman3,4 1 School of Environmental, and the mesotrophic Lake Nkuruba that is still sur- rounded by intact forest. The food web structures in these two are abbreviated, with only one to two trophic levels from primary consumers. The Lake Saka biota had distinctively

  12. A Comparison of Information and Communication Technology Application in New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD) and Non-NEPAD Schools in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayere, Mildred A.; Odera, Florence Yukabet; Agak, John Odwar

    2010-01-01

    To date, less than ten percent of secondary schools in Kenya offer computer studies as a subject in the curriculum despite its perceived role in the nation's socio-economic development. The few schools that have an Information Communication Technology (ICT) programme limit the number of candidates who take up the subject, considering it a…

  13. Can Static Habitat Protection Encompass Critical Areas for Highly Mobile Marine Top Predators? Insights from Coastal East Africa.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Jorge, Sergi; Pereira, Thalia; Corne, Chloe; Wijtten, Zeno; Omar, Mohamed; Katello, Jillo; Kinyua, Mark; Oro, Daniel; Louzao, Maite

    2015-01-01

    Along the East African coast, marine top predators are facing an increasing number of anthropogenic threats which requires the implementation of effective and urgent conservation measures to protect essential habitats. Understanding the role that habitat features play on the marine top predator' distribution and abundance is a crucial step to evaluate the suitability of an existing Marine Protected Area (MPA), originally designated for the protection of coral reefs. We developed species distribution models (SDM) on the IUCN data deficient Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops aduncus) in southern Kenya. We followed a comprehensive ecological modelling approach to study the environmental factors influencing the occurrence and abundance of dolphins while developing SDMs. Through the combination of ensemble prediction maps, we defined recurrent, occasional and unfavourable habitats for the species. Our results showed the influence of dynamic and static predictors on the dolphins' spatial ecology: dolphins may select shallow areas (5-30 m), close to the reefs (< 500 m) and oceanic fronts (< 10 km) and adjacent to the 100 m isobath (< 5 km). We also predicted a significantly higher occurrence and abundance of dolphins within the MPA. Recurrent and occasional habitats were identified on large percentages on the existing MPA (47% and 57% using presence-absence and abundance models respectively). However, the MPA does not adequately encompass all occasional and recurrent areas and within this context, we propose to extend the MPA to incorporate all of them which are likely key habitats for the highly mobile species. The results from this study provide two key conservation and management tools: (i) an integrative habitat modelling approach to predict key marine habitats, and (ii) the first study evaluating the effectiveness of an existing MPA for marine mammals in the Western Indian Ocean. PMID:26186438

  14. Can Static Habitat Protection Encompass Critical Areas for Highly Mobile Marine Top Predators? Insights from Coastal East Africa

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Jorge, Sergi; Pereira, Thalia; Corne, Chloe; Wijtten, Zeno; Omar, Mohamed; Katello, Jillo; Kinyua, Mark; Oro, Daniel; Louzao, Maite

    2015-01-01

    Along the East African coast, marine top predators are facing an increasing number of anthropogenic threats which requires the implementation of effective and urgent conservation measures to protect essential habitats. Understanding the role that habitat features play on the marine top predator’ distribution and abundance is a crucial step to evaluate the suitability of an existing Marine Protected Area (MPA), originally designated for the protection of coral reefs. We developed species distribution models (SDM) on the IUCN data deficient Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops aduncus) in southern Kenya. We followed a comprehensive ecological modelling approach to study the environmental factors influencing the occurrence and abundance of dolphins while developing SDMs. Through the combination of ensemble prediction maps, we defined recurrent, occasional and unfavourable habitats for the species. Our results showed the influence of dynamic and static predictors on the dolphins’ spatial ecology: dolphins may select shallow areas (5-30 m), close to the reefs (< 500 m) and oceanic fronts (< 10 km) and adjacent to the 100m isobath (< 5 km). We also predicted a significantly higher occurrence and abundance of dolphins within the MPA. Recurrent and occasional habitats were identified on large percentages on the existing MPA (47% and 57% using presence-absence and abundance models respectively). However, the MPA does not adequately encompass all occasional and recurrent areas and within this context, we propose to extend the MPA to incorporate all of them which are likely key habitats for the highly mobile species. The results from this study provide two key conservation and management tools: (i) an integrative habitat modelling approach to predict key marine habitats, and (ii) the first study evaluating the effectiveness of an existing MPA for marine mammals in the Western Indian Ocean. PMID:26186438

  15. Holistic view to integrated climate change assessment and extreme weather adaptation in the Lake Victoria Basin East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutua, F.; Koike, T.

    2013-12-01

    Extreme weather events have been the leading cause of disasters and damage all over the world.The primary ingredient to these disasters especially floods is rainfall which over the years, despite advances in modeling, computing power and use of new data and technologies, has proven to be difficult to predict. Also, recent climate projections showed a pattern consistent with increase in the intensity and frequency of extreme events in the East African region.We propose a holistic integrated approach to climate change assessment and extreme event adaptation through coupling of analysis techniques, tools and data. The Lake Victoria Basin (LVB) in East Africa supports over three million livelihoods and is a valuable resource to five East African countries as a source of water and means of transport. However, with a Mesoscale weather regime driven by land and lake dynamics,extreme Mesoscale events have been prevalent and the region has been on the receiving end during anomalously wet years in the region. This has resulted in loss of lives, displacements, and food insecurity. In the LVB, the effects of climate change are increasingly being recognized as a significant contributor to poverty, by its linkage to agriculture, food security and water resources. Of particular importance are the likely impacts of climate change in frequency and intensity of extreme events. To tackle this aspect, this study adopted an integrated regional, mesoscale and basin scale approach to climate change assessment. We investigated the projected changes in mean climate over East Africa, diagnosed the signals of climate change in the atmosphere, and transferred this understanding to mesoscale and basin scale. Changes in rainfall were analyzed and similar to the IPCC AR4 report; the selected three General Circulation Models (GCMs) project a wetter East Africa with intermittent dry periods in June-August. Extreme events in the region are projected to increase; with the number of wet days exceeding the 90% percentile of 1981-2000 likely to increase by 20-40% in the whole region. We also focused on short-term weather forecasting as a step towards adapting to a changing climate. This involved dynamic downscaling of global weather forecasts to high resolution with a special focus on extreme events. By utilizing complex model dynamics, the system was able to reproduce the Mesoscale dynamics well, simulated the land/lake breeze and diurnal pattern but was inadequate in some aspects. The quantitative prediction of rainfall was inaccurate with overestimation and misplacement but with reasonable occurrence. To address these shortcomings we investigated the value added by assimilating Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) brightness temperature during the event. By assimilating 23GHz (sensitive to water) and 89GHz (sensitive to cloud) frequency brightness temperature; the predictability of an extreme rain weather event was investigated. The assimilation through a Cloud Microphysics Data Assimilation (CMDAS) into the weather prediction model considerably improved the spatial distribution of this event.

  16. Lake level change and total water discharge in East Africa Rift Valley from satellite-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Ayman A.; Jin, Shuanggen

    2014-06-01

    The measurement of total basin water discharge is important for understanding the hydrological and climatologic issues related to the water and energy cycles. Climatic extreme events are normal climatic occurrences in Africa. For example, extensive droughts are regular features in the last few decades in parts of East Africa, which suffers from a lack of in situ observations as well as a lack of regional hydrological models. In this study, multi-disciplinary different types of space-borne observations and global hydrological models are used to study total water discharge in the Great Rift Valley of East Africa (i.e. Lakes Victoria, Tanganyika, and Malawi) from January 2003 to December 2012. The data include the following: (1) total water storage (TWS) variations from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), (2) the lake level variations from Satellite Alimetric data, (3) rainfall from Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) products, (4) soil moisture from WaterGAP Global Hydrology Model (WGHM), and (5) water fluxes from Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS). Results show that a significant decline in the average lake level is found for all of the three lakes between 2003 and 2006. GRACE TWS variations of the whole basin area show the same pattern of variation as the average lake level variations estimated from Altimetric data. The TWS in the basin area of Lakes Victoria and Malawi is governed by the surface water stored in each lake itself, while for Lake Tanganyika, it is governed by both surface water and the soil moisture content in the basin area. Furthermore, the effect of rainfall on TWS is also studied. A phase lag of ~ 2 months is found between TRMM rainfall and GRACE TWS (generally, rainfall precedes the GRACE TWS) for the three lakes. In addition, the regional evapotranspiration ET is estimated from the water balance equation using GRACE land-water solutions, rainfall data from TRMM and runoff values obtained as a fraction of rainfall. It is found that the computed ET represents approximately 90% of the rainfall over the study region.

  17. Open system evolution of trachyte and phonolite magmas from the East Africa Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, E. Y.; Espejel, V.

    2011-12-01

    The Quaternary Suswa volcanic system consists of a large shield volcano that developed two nested summit calderas and erupted metaluminous to peralkaline trachyte and phonolite lavas and tuffs. Suswa is adjacent to the Greater Olkaria Volcanic Center, Longonot, Eburru, and Menengai volcanic systems, which erupted trachyte, comendite, and pantellerite. These volcanoes comprise the Central Kenya Peralkaline Province and are the site of active geothermal energy production and exploration. Mafic to intermediate lavas (Elementieta, Ndabibi, and Lolonito-Akira-Tandamara volcanic fields) lie in the rift floor between the shield volcanoes and occur as components of mixed magmas within the complexes. Suswa includes two suites of trachyte-phonolite lavas and tuffs. The first suite (C1) consists of lavas that built the original shield volcano and lavas and tuffs related to the formation of the first caldera; the second suite (C2) consists of lavas and tuffs erupted during and after the formation of the second caldera. Trachyte-carbonate immiscibility has been recorded in C1 ash flow units. The lavas and tuffs of the C2 suite are generally less peralkaline and more silica undersaturated than those of the C1 suite and did not share a common parental magma. Geochemical modeling precludes fractional crystallization as the sole process for Suswa magmas. Instead, assimilation of syenitic material (probably the crystal mush left over from C1 fractional crystallization), resorption, and mixing between the mafic to intermediate lavas satellite to the shield volcanoes have contributed to the composition and eruptive style of these volcanoes.

  18. Increasing Electricity Access in East Africa Solomon A. Asfaw, PhD

    E-print Network

    in power system planning studies (d) low consideration to the impact of national and regional electricity capita of most East African countries is very low relative to most other countries in the world. Current power sector development trends and 2030-generation capacity targets still leave the majority

  19. The evolving contribution of border faults and intra-rift faults in early-stage East African rifts: insights from the Natron (Tanzania) and Magadi (Kenya) basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muirhead, J.; Kattenhorn, S. A.; Dindi, E.; Gama, R.

    2013-12-01

    In the early stages of continental rifting, East African Rift (EAR) basins are conventionally depicted as asymmetric basins bounded on one side by a ~100 km-long border fault. As rifting progresses, strain concentrates into the rift center, producing intra-rift faults. The timing and nature of the transition from border fault to intra-rift-dominated strain accommodation is unclear. Our study focuses on this transitional phase of continental rifting by exploring the spatial and temporal evolution of faulting in the Natron (border fault initiation at ~3 Ma) and Magadi (~7 Ma) basins of northern Tanzania and southern Kenya, respectively. We compare the morphologies and activity histories of faults in each basin using field observations and remote sensing in order to address the relative contributions of border faults and intra-rift faults to crustal strain accommodation as rifting progresses. The ~500 m-high border fault along the western margin of the Natron basin is steep compared to many border faults in the eastern branch of the EAR, indicating limited scarp degradation by mass wasting. Locally, the escarpment shows open fissures and young scarps 10s of meters high and a few kilometers long, implying ongoing border fault activity in this young rift. However, intra-rift faults within ~1 Ma lavas are greatly eroded and fresh scarps are typically absent, implying long recurrence intervals between slip events. Rift-normal topographic profiles across the Natron basin show the lowest elevations in the lake-filled basin adjacent to the border fault, where a number of hydrothermal springs along the border fault system expel water into the lake. In contrast to Natron, a ~1600 m high, densely vegetated, border fault escarpment along the western edge of the Magadi basin is highly degraded; we were unable to identify evidence of recent rupturing. Rift-normal elevation profiles indicate the focus of strain has migrated away from the border fault into the rift center, where faults pervasively dissect 1.2-0.8 Ma trachyte lavas. Unlike Natron, intra-rift faults in the Magadi basin exhibit primarily steep, little-degraded fault scarps, implying greater activity than Natron intra-rift faults. Numerous fault-associated springs feed water into perennial Lake Magadi, which has no surface drainage input, yet survives despite a high evaporation rate that has created economically viable evaporite deposits. Calcite vein-filled joints are common along fault zones around Lake Magadi, as well as several cm veins around columnar joints that imply isotropic expansion of the fracture network under high pressures of CO2-rich fluids. Our work indicates that the locus of strain in this portion of the EAR transfers from the border fault to the center of the rift basin some time between 3 and 7 million years after rift initiation. This transition likely reflects the evolving respective roles of crustal flexure and magma budget in focusing strain, as well as the hydrothermal fluid budget along evolving fault zones.

  20. A GCM investigation of dust aerosol impact on the regional climate of North Africa and South/East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Y.; Xue, Y.; De Sales, F.; Liou, K. N.

    2015-06-01

    The climatic effects of dust aerosols in North Africa and South/East Asia have been investigated using an atmospheric general circulation model, NCEP/GCM/SSiB (Simplified Simple Biosphere Model) and the three-dimensional aerosol data simulated by the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model. GCM simulations show that due to the scattering and absorption of solar radiation by dust particles, surface temperature decreases over both regions, accompanied by a reduced sensible heat flux. However, precipitation responses are different in these two regions. Due to differences in dust location and the associated heating with respect to the rainfall band and circulation, the effect of dust could either enhance or suppress precipitation. Over the North Africa region where dust particles are mainly located to the north of rainfall band, heating of the air column by dust particles forces a stronger ascent motion over dust layers, which induces an anomalous subsidence (or a weakened upward motion) and suppressed cyclonic circulation to its south where precipitation reduces. Furthermore, both humidity and cloud decrease due to the heating in the middle troposphere (semi-direct effect). In South/East Asia, dust particles are located in the upper troposphere over the major rainfall band during the monsoon season, especially Southwest India and the coastal area of Bay of Bengal. Heating of the air column increases upward motion and strengthens cyclonic circulation. Humidity also increases due to the draw-in of the low level moist air. Therefore, cloud and precipitation increase over South/East Asia associated with dust effect. During the pre-monsoon season, when dust particles are located to the north of the monsoon rainfall band, the heating effect results in shifting precipitation northward. The heating of air column due to dust particles, not surface cooling, plays the major role in precipitation changes. The anomalous upward motion over dust regions will induce a subsidence to its south and subsequently reduce precipitation over that region. Therefore, the responses of circulation and precipitation to aerosol forcing depend on the relative location of dust aerosols with respect to rainfall band, which may explain the fact that contradictory results exist regarding whether the aerosol effect would enhance or suppress precipitation. The dust induced change in precipitation is actually more of redistribution rather than the simple action of increase or decrease.

  1. Along-dip variations of structural style in the Somali Basin deep-water fold and thrust belt (East Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruciani, Francesco; Rinaldo Barchi, Massimiliano

    2014-05-01

    Continental passive margins are place of extended slope-failure phenomena, which can lead to the formation of gravity-driven deep-water fold and thrust belts (DW-FTBs), in regions where no far-field compressional stress is active. These giant geological features, which are confined to the sedimentary section, consist of extensional-compressional linked systems detached over a common décollement, generally salt or shales. The continental passive margin of northern Kenya and southern Somalia is an excellent and relatively unexplored site for recognizing and understanding the DW-FTBs originated over a regional shale décollement. In this study we have interpreted a 2D seismic data-set of the 1980s, hosted by Marine Geoscience Data System at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University (http://www.marine-geo.org), and recently reprocessed by ENI, in order to investigate the structural style of a DW-FTB developed offshore of northern Kenya and southern Somalia (Somali Basin). This region records the oldest sedimentary section of the Indian Ocean since the breakup of Gondwana began in the Middle-Lower Jurassic separating Madagascar from Africa. From the Upper Cretaceous to at least the Lower Miocene, the margin has been characterized by gravitational collapse leading to the formation of a DW-FTB extending more than 400 km along-strike. The northern portion of the DW-FTB is about 150 km wide, whilst in the southern portion is few tens of km wide. We analysed the northern portion along a regional seismic section. Our study represents the first detailed structural interpretation of this DW-FTB since its discovery in the 1980s. The good quality of the available reprocessed seismic data has allowed us to identify remarkable along-dip variations in the structural style. The basal detachment constantly deepens landward, in agreement with a prevailing gravity-spreading deformation process (as in the case of the Niger Delta). On the seismic data are not visible, as expected, relevant extensional growth faults and normal faults, which can balance the significant amount of shortening of the compressional domain. We recognised four sectors, characterized by different structural styles and amount of shortening. Moving from the ocean towards the land, they are: i) a series of imbricate thrusts with basinward vergence, forming a critical taper; ii) basinward stacked horses forming a duplex-like system; iii) double verging, out-of syncline thrusts, transporting bowl-shaped syn-kinematic basins; and iv) symmetric, diapir-like detachment folds, likely cored by poorly compacted mobile shales. We hypothesise that these strong and often abrupt variations could be related to: i) lateral differences in the stratigraphy of the sedimentary successions involved in the deformation; ii) time and space variations of the sediment supply along the continental slope.

  2. Tectonics and Volcanism of East Africa as Seen Using Remote Sensing Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutt, Duncan John

    1996-01-01

    The East African Rift is the largest area of active continental geology. The tectonics of this area has been studied with remote sensing data, including AVHRR, Landsat MSS and TM, SPOT, and electronic still camera from Shuttle. Lineation trends have been compared to centers of volcanic and earthquake activity as well as the trends shown on existing geologic maps. Remote sensing data can be used effectively to reveal and analyze significant tectonic features in this area.

  3. Negligible effect of hydrogen content on plate strength in East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selway, Kate

    2015-07-01

    Continental rifting requires weak zones to exist within the strong continental plates. This weakening is thought to be induced primarily by high hydrogen contents and temperatures, as well as small grain size. An ideal location to test models of plate strength in situ is the East African Rift--the best exposed continental rift on Earth--which is forming adjacent to the unrifted Tanzanian Craton. Here I use magnetotelluric data to investigate electrical conductivity, and hence hydrogen content, across the East African Rift and Tanzanian Craton. The images show that the Tanzanian Craton is extremely rich in hydrogen, whereas the parts of the continent that are being rifted are anhydrous, suggesting that high hydrogen content does not systematically reduce plate strength. Earlier deformation events may have reduced the grain size of the continental lithosphere in the East African Rift compared to the Tanzanian Craton. I therefore suggest that the localization of rifting and repeated reactivation of deformed regions may not be due to hydrogen content and is instead controlled by small grain size.

  4. Rainfall consistently enhanced around the Gezira Scheme in East Africa due to irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alter, Ross E.; Im, Eun-Soon; Eltahir, Elfatih A. B.

    2015-10-01

    Land-use and land-cover changes have significantly modified regional climate patterns around the world. In particular, the rapid development of large-scale cropland irrigation over the past century has been investigated in relation to possible modification of regional rainfall. In regional climate simulations of the West African Sahel, hypothetical large-scale irrigation schemes inhibit rainfall over irrigated areas but enhance rainfall remotely. However, the simulated influence of large-scale irrigation schemes on precipitation patterns cannot be substantiated without direct comparison to observations. Here we present two complementary analyses: numerical simulations using a regional climate model over an actual, large-scale irrigation scheme in the East African Sahel--the Gezira Scheme--and observational analyses over the same area. The simulations suggest that irrigation inhibits rainfall over the Gezira Scheme and enhances rainfall to the east. Observational analyses of rainfall, temperature and streamflow in the same region support the simulated results. The findings are consistent with a mechanistic framework in which irrigation decreases surface air temperature, causing atmospheric subsidence over the irrigated area and clockwise wind anomalies (in background southwesterly winds) that increase upward vertical motion to the east. We conclude that irrigation development can consistently modify rainfall patterns in and around irrigated areas, warranting further examination of potential agricultural, hydrologic and economic implications.

  5. Development of an early warning system for extreme rainfall, surface inundation, and malaria in East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirt, C.; Jensen, K.; McDonald, K. C.; Ceccato, P.

    2013-12-01

    Malaria is a major health issue in Eastern Africa. In this study, we focus on rainfall and surface inundation, which are both major environmental factors in the transmission and contraction of the disease. We use the two alternative forced choice (2AFC) score and other comparative methods to analyze the efficacy of using a six-day lead precipitation forecast to predict extreme precipitation and inundation events by comparing these forecasts to historical, satellite-based precipitation and inundation observations. We also investigate the dynamics between observed surface inundation, rainfall, and malaria incidence rates in four districts of Eritrea.

  6. Relationship Transitions among Youth in Urban Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Shelley; Kabiru, Caroline; Mathur, Rohini

    2010-01-01

    The process of courtship and marriage in sub-Saharan Africa has changed remarkably. These changes, however, have received scant attention because recent research has focused on adolescent relationships' links to HIV/AIDS rather than to marriage. Drawing on detailed reports of 1,365 romantic and sexual partnerships from youths in Kisumu, Kenya, we…

  7. 18O 16O ratios in cherts associated with the saline lake deposits of East Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neil, J.R.; Hay, R.L.

    1973-01-01

    The cherts formed from sodium silicate precursors in East African saline, alkaline lakes have ??18O values ranging from 31.1 to 44.1. The ??18O values correlate in general with lake salinities as inferred from geologic evidence, indicating that most chert was formed from its precursor in contact with lake water trapped at the time of deposition. A few of the analyzed cherts probably formed in contact with dilute meteoric water. From the widely varying ??18O values we conclude that precursors were transformed to chert in fluids of widely varying salinity and aNa+/aH+ ratio. ?? 1973.

  8. Ground Truth, Magnitude Calibration and Regional Phase Propagation and Detection in the Middle East and Horn of Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Nyblade, A; Brazier, R; Adams, A; Park, Y; Rodgers, A; Al-Amri, A

    2007-07-08

    In this project, we are exploiting several seismic data sets to improve U.S. operational capabilities to monitor for low yield nuclear tests across the Middle East (including the Iranian Plateau, Zagros Mountains, Arabian Peninsula, Turkish Plateau, Gulf of Aqaba, Dead Sea Rift) and the Horn of Africa (including the northern part of the East African Rift, Afar Depression, southern Red Sea and Gulf of Aden). The data sets are being used to perform three related tasks. (1) We are determining moment tensors, moment magnitudes and source depths for regional events in the magnitude 3.0 to 6.0 range. (2) These events are being used to characterize high-frequency (0.5-16 Hz) regional phase attenuation and detection thresholds, especially from events in Iran recorded at stations across the Arabian Peninsula. (3) We are collecting location ground truth at GT5 (local) and GT20 (regional) levels for seismic events with M > 2.5, including source geometry information and source depths. Towards meeting these objectives, seismograms from earthquakes in the Zagros Mountains recorded at regional distances have been inverted for moment tensors, which have then been used to create synthetic seismograms to determine the source depths of the earthquakes via waveform matching. The source depths have been confirmed by modeling teleseismic depth phases recorded on GSN and IMS stations. Early studies of the distribution of seismicity in the Zagros region found evidence for earthquakes in the upper mantle. But subsequent relocations of teleseismic earthquakes suggest that source depths are generally much shallower, lying mainly within the upper crust. All of the regional events studied so far nucleated within the upper crust, and most of the events have thrust mechanisms. The source mechanisms for these events are being used to characterize high-frequency (0.5-16 Hz) regional phase attenuation and detection thresholds for broadband seismic stations in the Arabian Peninsula, including IMS stations and stations belonging to the Saudi Arabian National Digital Seismic Network. To improve event locations, source mechanisms and attenuation estimates, new regional P and S wave velocity models of the upper mantle under the Arabian Peninsula have also been developed using data from teleseismic events recorded at stations within the Arabian Peninsula and Horn of Africa. These models show slower-than-average velocities within the lithospheric mantle under the entire Arabian Shield. However, at sublithospheric mantle depths, the low velocity region appears to be localized beneath the western side of the Arabian Shield.

  9. Use of a crop climate modeling system to evaluate climate change adaptation practices: maize yield in East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, N. J.; Alagarswamy, G.; Andresen, J.; Olson, J.; Thornton, P.

    2013-12-01

    Sub Saharan African agriculture is dominated by small-scale farmers and is heavily depend on growing season precipitation. Recent studies indicate that anthropogenic- induced warming including the Indian Ocean sea surface significantly influences precipitation in East Africa. East Africa is a useful region to assess impacts of future climate because of its large rainfall gradient, large percentage of its area being sub-humid or semi-arid, complex climatology and topography, varied soils, and because the population is particularly vulnerable to shifts in climate. Agronomic adaptation practices most commonly being considered include include a shift to short season, drought resistant maize varieties, better management practices especially fertilizer use, and irrigation. The effectiveness of these practices with climate change had not previously been tested. We used the WorldClim data set to represent current climate and compared the current and future climate scenarios of 4 Global Climate Models (GCMs) including a wetter (CCSM) and drier (HadCM3) GCM downscaled to 6 km resolution. The climate data was then used in the process-based CERES maize crop model to simulate the current period (representing 1960- 1990) and change in future maize production (from 2000 to 2050s). The effectiveness of agronomic practices, including short duration maize variety, fertilizer use and irrigation, to reduce projected future yield losses due to climate change were simulated. The GCMs project an increase in maximum temperature during growing season ranging from 1.5 to 3°C. Changes in precipitation were dependent on the GCM, with high variability across different topographies land cover types and elevations. Projected warmer temperatures in the future scenarios accelerated plant development and led to a reduction in growing season length and yields even where moisture was sufficient Maize yield changes in 2050 relative to the historical period were highly varied, in excess of +/- 500 kg/ha in many areas. The simulated yield changes in the future were both spatially explicit and dependent on the GCM used. The effectiveness of agronomic practices was highly varied across the region depending on soil type, agro-ecological zone and projected climate change. The results have critical implications for agronomic research and policy. The study challenges using a ';one size fits all' approach in the identification of potential adaptation strategies. The goal is to use models to target local, optimized solutions as part of the broader need for impact assessments at coarser scales.

  10. Molecular records of climate variability and vegetation response since the Late Pleistocene in the Lake Victoria basin, East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berke, Melissa A.; Johnson, Thomas C.; Werne, Josef P.; Grice, Kliti; Schouten, Stefan; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2012-11-01

    New molecular proxies of temperature and hydrology are helping to constrain tropical climate change and elucidate possible forcing mechanisms during the Holocene. Here, we examine a ˜14,000 year record of climate variability from Lake Victoria, East Africa, the world's second largest freshwater lake by surface area. We determined variations in local hydroclimate using compound specific ?D of terrestrial leaf waxes, and compared these results to a new record of temperature utilizing the TEX86 paleotemperature proxy, based on aquatic Thaumarchaeotal membrane lipids. In order to assess the impact of changing climate on the terrestrial environment, we generated a record of compound specific ?13C from terrestrial leaf waxes, a proxy for ecosystem-level C3/C4 plant abundances, and compared the results to previously published pollen-inferred regional vegetation shifts. We observe a general coherence between temperature and rainfall, with a warm, wet interval peaking ˜10-9 ka and subsequent gradual cooling and drying over the remainder of the Holocene. These results, particularly those of rainfall, are in general agreement with other tropical African climate records, indicating a somewhat consistent view of climate over a wide region of tropical East Africa. The ?13C record from Lake Victoria leaf waxes does not appear to reflect changes in regional climate or vegetation. However, palynological analyses document an abrupt shift from a Poaceae (grasses)-dominated ecosystem during the cooler, arid late Pleistocene to a Moraceae-dominated (trees/shrubs) landscape during the warm, wet early Holocene. We theorize that these proxies are reflecting vegetation in different locations around Lake Victoria. Our results suggest a predominantly insolation-forced climate, with warm, wet conditions peaking at the maximum interhemispheric seasonal insolation contrast, likely intensifying monsoonal precipitation, while maximum aridity coincides with the rainy season insolation and the interhemispheric contrast gradient minima. We interpret a shift in conditions at the Younger Dryas to indicate a limited switch in insolation-dominated control on climate of the Lake Victoria region, to remote teleconnections with the coupled Atlantic and Pacific climate system.

  11. Simulation of synoptic and sub-synoptic phenomena over East Africa and Arabian Peninsula for current and future climate using a high resolution AGCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj, Jerry; Kunhu Bangalath, Hamza; Stenchikov, Georgiy

    2015-04-01

    Climate regimes of East Africa and Arabia are complex and are poorly understood. East Africa has large-scale tropical controls like major convergence zones and air streams. The region is in the proximity of two monsoons, north-east and south-west, and the humid and thermally unstable Congo air stream. The domain comprises regions with one, two, and three rainfall maxima, and the rainfall pattern over this region has high spatial variability. To explore the synoptic and sub-synoptic phenomena that drive the climate of the region we conducted climate simulations using a high resolution Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM), GFDL's High Resolution Atmospheric Model (HiRAM). Historic simulations (1975-2004) and future projections (2007-2050), with both RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 pathways, were performed according to CORDEX standard. The sea surface temperature (SST) was prescribed from the 2°x2.5° latitude-longitude resolution GFDL Earth System Model runs of IPCC AR5, as bottom boundary condition over the ocean. Our simulations were conducted at a horizontal grid spacing of 25 km, which is an ample resolution for regional climate simulation. In comparison with the regional models, global HiRAM has the advantage of accounting for two-way interaction between regional and global scale processes. Our initial results show that HiRAM simulations for historic period well reproduce the regional climate in East Africa and the Arabian Peninsula with their complex interplay of regional and global processes. Our future projections indicate warming and increased precipitation over the Ethiopian highlands and the Greater Horn of Africa. We found significant regional differences between RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 projections, e.g., west coast of the Arabian Peninsula, show anomalies of opposite signs in these two simulations.

  12. The ability of cultivars of sweetpotato in East Africa to 'revert' from Sweet potato feathery mottle virus infection.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Richard W; Wasswa, Peter; Tufan, Hale A

    2014-06-24

    Asymptomatic field plants are the normal source of the vine cuttings used as sweetpotato planting material in Africa. Previous and new tests of such East African material, mostly using the very sensitive method of graft inoculation to the indicator plant Ipomoea setosa, showed that a majority tested virus-negative. This was despite their never having undergone any science-based therapy. To investigate how this occurs, in a replicated greenhouse experiment, plants of susceptible cultivars from the USA and Peru and three resistant Ugandan cultivars were graft-inoculated with Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV), the commonest virus infecting sweetpotato. When the grafts were established, cuttings were taken, rooted and proved to be infected. The health status of each of these new plants was then followed over a 10-week period using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay. Most of the plants of the Ugandan cultivars eventually tested SPFMV-negative whereas those of the USA and Peru seldom did. Furthermore, in subsequent graft-inoculations of scions from the tip, top, middle and base of the vine of every plant to I. setosa plants, again, most of the scions of the Ugandan cultivars tested SPFMV-negative whereas those of the USA and Peru seldom did. These tests demonstrate the phenomenon of reversion in the Ugandan cultivars and can explain how most unprotected Ugandan sweetpotato field plants tested SPFMV-negative. PMID:24361352

  13. Characterizing the Effects of Irrigation in the Middle East and North Africa Using Remotely Sensed Vegetation and Water Cycle Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolten, John; Ozdogan, Mutlu; Beaudoing, Hiroko; Rodell, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    A majority of the countries in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region suffer from water scarcity due in part to widespread rainfall deficits, unprecedented levels of water demand, and the inefficient use of renewable freshwater resources. Since a majority of the water withdrawal in the MENA is used for irrigation, there is a desperate need for improved understanding of irrigation practices and agricultural water use in the region. Here, satellite-derived irrigation maps and crop-type agricultural data are applied to the Land Data Assimilation System for the MENA region (MENA LDAS), designed to provide regional, gridded fields of hydrological states and fluxes relevant for water resources assessments. Within MENA-LDAS, the Catchment Land Surface Model (CLSM) simulates the location, timing, and amount of water applied through agricultural irrigation practices over the region from 2002-2012. In addition to simulating the irrigation impact on evapotranspiration, soil moisture, and runoff, we also investigate regional changes in terrestrial water storage (TWS) observed from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) and simulated by CLSM.

  14. A human economy: A ``third way'' for the future of young people in the Middle East and North Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaalouk, Malak

    2014-06-01

    This paper looks at the vulnerability of today's youth worldwide, with a particular focus on the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), where the proportion of citizens aged 12-24 is particularly high at one-third of the total population. Cursed with poor education and few work opportunities, the youth unemployment rate has risen to 50 per cent in this region. There is a consequent lack of participation at all levels, and a large number of youth are showing symptoms of low self-esteem, frustration, anger and unrest. After discussing the outcomes of years of an inhuman economic system on a global level, this article points to a more humane and empowering path. The author argues that, instead of continuing with profit-oriented capitalism or relying on the informal sector, the co-operative way represents a third alternative to existing economic sectors within the dominant contemporary economic system. The article analyses the many benefits of this path for the realisation of a humane economy. In so doing, it touches on issues of equity and social protection. Finally, the article outlines what needs to be done if this is to be a viable solution for a human economy. While giving many examples of successful co-operative enterprises worldwide, the author singles out the MENA region as one which could also benefit from the new trends outlined.

  15. A Seasonal Air Transport Climatology for Kenya

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, C. K.; Tyson, P. D.; Annegarn, H.; Piketh, S.; Helas, G.

    1998-01-01

    A climatology of air transport to and from Kenya has been developed using kinematic trajectory modeling. Significant months for trajectory analysis have been determined from a classification of synoptic circulation fields. Five-point back and forward trajectory clusters to and from Kenya reveal that the transport corridors to Kenya are clearly bounded and well defined. Air reaching the country originates mainly from the Saharan region and northwestern Indian Ocean of the Arabian Sea in the northern hemisphere and from the Madagascan region of the Indian Ocean in the southern hemisphere. Transport from each of these source regions show distinctive annual cycles related to the northeasterly Asian monsoon and the southeasterly trade wind maximum over Kenya in May. The Saharan transport in the lower troposphere is at a maximum when the subtropical high over northern Africa is strongly developed in the boreal winter. Air reaching Kenya between 700 and 500 hPa is mainly from Sahara and northwest India Ocean flows in the months of January and March, which gives way to southwest Indian Ocean flow in May and November. In contrast, air reaching Kenya at 400 hPa is mainly from southwest Indian Ocean in January and March, which is replaced by Saharan transport in May and November. Transport of air from Kenya is invariant, both spatially and temporally, in the tropical easterlies to the Congo Basin and Atlantic Ocean in comparison to the transport to the country. Recirculation of air has also been observed, but on a limited and often local scale and not to the extent reported in southern Africa.

  16. Rainfall intensity and groundwater recharge: evidence from ground-based observations in East Africa (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, R. G.; Owor, M.; Kaponda, A.

    2013-12-01

    Global greenhouse-gas emissions serve to warm Africa more rapidly than the rest of the world. The intensification of precipitation that is associated with this warming, strongly influences terrestrial water budgets. This shift toward fewer but heavier rainfall events is expected to lead to more frequent and intense floods as well as more variable and lower soil moisture. However, its impact on groundwater recharge is unclear and in dispute. We review evidence from long (1 to 5 decades) time series of groundwater levels recorded in deeply weathered crystalline rock aquifers systems underlying land surfaces of low relief in Uganda and Tanzania. Borehole hydrographs consistently demonstrate a non-linear relationship between rainfall and recharge wherein heavy rainfalls exceeding a threshold contribute disproportionately to the recharge flux. Rapid responses observed in groundwater levels to rainfall events attest further to the importance of preferential pathways in enabling rain-fed recharge via soil macro-pores. Our results suggest that, in these environments, increased use of groundwater to offset periods of low surface flow and to supplement soil moisture through irrigation may prove a logical strategy to enhance regional water and food security.

  17. The dominant Anopheles vectors of human malaria in Africa, Europe and the Middle East: occurrence data, distribution maps and bionomic précis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This is the second in a series of three articles documenting the geographical distribution of 41 dominant vector species (DVS) of human malaria. The first paper addressed the DVS of the Americas and the third will consider those of the Asian Pacific Region. Here, the DVS of Africa, Europe and the Middle East are discussed. The continent of Africa experiences the bulk of the global malaria burden due in part to the presence of the An. gambiae complex. Anopheles gambiae is one of four DVS within the An. gambiae complex, the others being An. arabiensis and the coastal An. merus and An. melas. There are a further three, highly anthropophilic DVS in Africa, An. funestus, An. moucheti and An. nili. Conversely, across Europe and the Middle East, malaria transmission is low and frequently absent, despite the presence of six DVS. To help control malaria in Africa and the Middle East, or to identify the risk of its re-emergence in Europe, the contemporary distribution and bionomics of the relevant DVS are needed. Results A contemporary database of occurrence data, compiled from the formal literature and other relevant resources, resulted in the collation of information for seven DVS from 44 countries in Africa containing 4234 geo-referenced, independent sites. In Europe and the Middle East, six DVS were identified from 2784 geo-referenced sites across 49 countries. These occurrence data were combined with expert opinion ranges and a suite of environmental and climatic variables of relevance to anopheline ecology to produce predictive distribution maps using the Boosted Regression Tree (BRT) method. Conclusions The predicted geographic extent for the following DVS (or species/suspected species complex*) is provided for Africa: Anopheles (Cellia) arabiensis, An. (Cel.) funestus*, An. (Cel.) gambiae, An. (Cel.) melas, An. (Cel.) merus, An. (Cel.) moucheti and An. (Cel.) nili*, and in the European and Middle Eastern Region: An. (Anopheles) atroparvus, An. (Ano.) labranchiae, An. (Ano.) messeae, An. (Ano.) sacharovi, An. (Cel.) sergentii and An. (Cel.) superpictus*. These maps are presented alongside a bionomics summary for each species relevant to its control. PMID:21129198

  18. Late Quaternary hydrology in North Africa and the Near East (Hans Oeschger Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasse, Françoise

    2010-05-01

    The present-day arid-semiarid belt from North Africa to West Asia has experienced huge hydrological changes together with a long history of human civilisations. This belt straddles the boundary between a temperate domain (winter rains linked to the mid-latitude Westerlies), and a subtropical one (rare monsoonal summer precipitation). What are the timing and direction of major hydrological changes in these two domains ? How does the transitional zone migrate through time, and why ? How did human societies respond to changes in water availability ? These questions are addressed using records illustrating both long and short-term environmental changes. At the glacial-interglacial time scale, hydrological changes broadly follow the orbitally-induced Northern Hemisphere summer insolation, but with different regional expressions. In the winter rain domain, the best-dated records come from southern Levant : stable isotope records from speleothems in Israel (120-230 ka) show a remarkable consistency with those from the Eastern Mediterranean Sea(1,2), but the prominant role of rainfall amount or of moisture source isotopic composition on inland records is still debated (1-4); lake-level reconstructions in the Lisan-Dead Sea basin during the past 70 ka demonstrate higher winter rains during the last glacial period than during the Holocene (4,5). However, a new multi-proxy lacustrine record (230 ka) from northern Levant (Yammoûneh, Lebanon) shows relatively wet environments during interglacial periods(6,7), suggesting temporal changes in the NS climatic gradients over the Levantine region. Extratropical rainfalls apparently remained predominant over northern Sahara, with a major period of aquifer recharge during the Late Pleistocene(8). Conversely, south of about 25-22° N, the subtropical deserts experienced pluvial periods during interglacials, including the remarkable early-Mid Holocene wetting of the Saharan heart(8). Older pluvial periods, precisely dated in speleothems from Arabia(9) and inferred from lake archives and nearshore marine cores for the Sahara coincide with Marine Isotopic Stages 9, 7, 5.5 and 5.3. Stable isotope and vegetation data indicate that there, precipitation is of tropical origin as a result of an intensified monsoon and a northward migration of the Intertropical Convergence zone. These regional patterns are discussed in the light of general climatic models: roles of orbital forcing, extent/decrease of the northern ice sheet and marine ice, atmospheric content in greenhouse gases, large-scale atmospheric and oceanic circulation and related latitudinal shifts of major climatic belts. At a shorter time-scale, several abrupt changes can also be related to climatic events in high northern latitudes. Pronounced dry spells in the Lisan basin are correlated with Heinrich events(5). The Younger Dryas (YD) and the 8.2 ka events often coincide with arid intervals. During the Holocene, the best-resolved records suggest close relationships between solar activity, northern high-latitude temperature and rainfall intensity. The rapid Mid-Late Holocene aridification leading to modern climates affected both the temperate and subtropical domains. Its mechanisms have been intensively debated. To-date, the best explanations derive from a transient simulation of the North Africa aridification using a general circulation ocean-atmosphere-terrestrial ecosystem model(10); it suggests that the vegetation collapse in southern Sahara is driven by a gradual monsoonal climate response to orbital forcing, increased climate variability and precipitation threshold, rather than a positive vegetation feedback as previously suggested. Long and short-term hydrological changes have obviously induced adjustments or migrations of human societies. For exemple, in the Levant, the YD drought placed the sedentary hunter-gatherers Natufians under severe stress that they circumvented by two strategies : (i) people were forced to switch from a passive dependence on wild grains harvests to the first practices of agriculture; (ii) some populations mi

  19. Deltas of the Lake Malawi rift, east Africa: Seismic expression and exploration implications

    SciTech Connect

    Scholz, C.A.

    1995-11-01

    High-resolution, air-gun-sourced seismic reflection surveys over the offshore regions of five river deltas in Lake Malawi in the East African rift system reveal considerable variability in acoustic facies and stratigraphic architecture. This variability can largely be attributed to the influences of different structural settings, and to a lesser degree to high-amplitude (100-400 m) and high-frequency (1000 to 100,000 yr) fluctuations in lake level. Deltas on flexural and axial margins in the rift lake show well-developed progradational geometries. In contrast, a delta on a steep, accommodation zone margin distributes coarse sediments over a broad depositional apron, rather than concentrating sediment in discrete progradational lobes as on the other deltas. A large border fault margin river delta displays the most complex tectonic and stratigraphic architecture of all the deltas studied. It contains several delta-associated facies, including prograding clinoform packages, fan deltas stacked against a boundary fault, and extensive subaqueous fans. Flexural margin lowstand deltas may be the most prospective for hydrocarbon exploration due to their large, internally well-organized, progradational lobes and their close proximity to deep-water, high total organic carbon lacustrine source facies.

  20. A Predator from East Africa that Chooses Malaria Vectors as Preferred Prey

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Ximena J.; Jackson, Robert R.

    2006-01-01

    Background All vectors of human malaria, a disease responsible for more than one million deaths per year, are female mosquitoes from the genus Anopheles. Evarcha culicivora is an East African jumping spider (Salticidae) that feeds indirectly on vertebrate blood by selecting blood-carrying female mosquitoes as preferred prey. Methodology/Principal Findings By testing with motionless lures made from mounting dead insects in lifelike posture on cork discs, we show that E. culicivora selects Anopheles mosquitoes in preference to other mosquitoes and that this predator can identify Anopheles by static appearance alone. Tests using active (grooming) virtual mosquitoes rendered in 3-D animation show that Anopheles' characteristic resting posture is an important prey-choice cue for E. culicivora. Expression of the spider's preference for Anopheles varies with the spider's size, varies with its prior feeding condition and is independent of the spider gaining a blood meal. Conclusions/Significance This is the first experimental study to show that a predator of any type actively chooses Anopheles as preferred prey, suggesting that specialized predators having a role in the biological control of disease vectors is a realistic possibility. PMID:17205136

  1. Cenozoic vegetation, climate changes and hominid evolution in tropical Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnefille, Raymonde

    2010-07-01

    This paper reviews information on past vegetation of tropical Africa during the Cenozoic, focused upon the last 10 Ma, a time spanning hominid record in Central and East Africa. Summary of palaeobotanical data collected at terrestrial sites are compared with new results on the long term evolution of the continental vegetation zones documented from marine pollen record of two deep sea cores recovered from the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. Section 2 includes a summary of modern distribution of vegetation belts in the African continent and a synthesis of the results of both macrobotanical (fossil wood, leaves and fruits) and microbotanical (mainly pollen) studies presented according to time scale and geographical location. The main features emphasized by the palaeobotanical results are 1) seasonal vegetation and climate documented as soon as the Eocene in Tanzania 2) well diversified forests existing in northern West Ethiopia during the Oligocene 3) high temporal and spatial variabilities of forests composition during the Miocene when deciduous Legume woodland was documented in Ethiopia whereas wetter evergreen forests existed in Western Kenya 4) lack of evidence for an evergreen forest belt, continuous from Western Congo to East Africa. Section 3 presents new original pollen data recovered from a long core in the Gulf of Aden documenting large scale past vegetation changes in East Africa during the last 11 Ma. These results are discussed in comparison with a summarized long pollen sequence previously published from a marine core offshore the Niger delta. This comparison illustrates variations in geographical distribution of large vegetation zone at the continental scale, through time. In Section 4, vegetation changes registered during the last 10 Ma are discussed in relation with the results of isotopic studies and an updated presentation of hominids evolution in Africa. Several changes are shown in the marine records. An expansion of savanna/grassland is shown at 10 Ma in East Africa, 3 Ma earlier than in West Africa where it is documented at 7 Ma. At large geographical scale, this first increase in grass pollen simultaneously to forest increase in the marine records is interpreting as reflecting wetter conditions over the continent. Indeed, under global humid conditions, savanna could spread over the desert areas in the Northern and Eastern directions. A forest phase is well documented in West Africa between 7.5 and 7 Ma, but has not been shown in East Africa, mainly because of low resolution analysis of the DSDP East African record which needs further investigation for that period. A strong vegetation change took place between 6.3 and 6 Ma. It was marked by a trend of important decrease tree cover of the vegetation, simultaneous in West and East Africa. At that time, very arid conditions shown by scarce tree cover occurred over the whole tropical region. This happened before (or at) the early beginning of the Messinian crisis. Generally arid conditions coincide with the accepted timing for the Chimpanzee/hominid split, and record of Sahelanthropus tchadensis in Chad and Orrorin tugenensis in Kenya, although these fossils were found under locally wooded environment. The period from 6 to 4 Ma saw the appearance of Ardipithecus and diversification of Australopithecines occurring during a progressive increased tree cover in the broad-scale vegetation that culminated at 3.9 Ma, during A. anamensis time and before the first appearance of Australopithecus afarensis. Important variations in the vegetation occurred between 4 and 3 Ma, and many plant ecosystems were available to A.afarensis, a hominid which had a wide geographical distribution and persisted at Hadar under temporal climatic and environmental variability. The strongest and abrupt decline of forest pollen accompanied by an increase in the grass pollen was found at 2.7 Ma, more pronounced in the West than in East Africa. It was accompanied by a significant increase in C 4 grass proportions, well indicated in the Turkana region and likely explained by an increase in dry

  2. A Multi-Model Real Time Forecasting Prototype System in the Mara Basin (Kenya/Tanzania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrat-Capdevila, A.; Valdes, J. B.; Valdes, R.; Demaria, E. M.; Durcik, M.; Maitaria, K.; Roy, T.

    2013-12-01

    Remote sensing data and hydrologic models can respond to monitoring and forecasting needs in Africa and other poorly gauged regions. We present here the progress to date in developing a multi-model platform to provide hydrologic monitoring and forecasting using real time remote sensing observations. Satellite precipitation products such as CMORPH, TMPA (at 0.25° resolution) and PERSIANN-CCS (at 4km resolution) are used to force two models of different structure. One model is physically based and distributed, and the other is conceptual and lumped at the sub-basin level. The performance of both models is evaluated using different metrics, and the uncertainty in their predictions based on the errors incurred during the historical simulations period is computed. The models were compared and the potential increase in performance from using both models versus a single one will be assessed. This work provides insights into the advantages of a multi-model platform over a single model, with respect to different management and decision-making purposes. The methods were applied to the Mara Basin (Kenya/Tanzania), where growing human demands on water and land use are likely to alter significantly the hydrologic balance of the basin and the ecosystems that depend on it. These efforts are part of the Applied Sciences Team of the NASA SERVIR Program in collaboration with its East Africa Hub at the Regional Center for Mapping of Resources for Development (Nairobi,Kenya).

  3. Spatial-explicit modeling of social vulnerability to malaria in East Africa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite efforts in eradication and control, malaria remains a global challenge, particularly affecting vulnerable groups. Despite the recession in malaria cases, previously malaria free areas are increasingly confronted with epidemics as a result of changing environmental and socioeconomic conditions. Next to modeling transmission intensities and probabilities, integrated spatial methods targeting the complex interplay of factors that contribute to social vulnerability are required to effectively reduce malaria burden. We propose an integrative method for mapping relative levels of social vulnerability in a spatially explicit manner to support the identification of intervention measures. Methods Based on a literature review, a holistic risk and vulnerability framework has been developed to guide the assessment of social vulnerability to water-related vector-borne diseases (VBDs) in the context of changing environmental and societal conditions. Building on the framework, this paper applies spatially explicit modeling for delineating homogeneous regions of social vulnerability to malaria in eastern Africa, while taking into account expert knowledge for weighting the single vulnerability indicators. To assess the influence of the selected indicators on the final index a local sensitivity analysis is carried out. Results Results indicate that high levels of malaria vulnerability are concentrated in the highlands, where immunity within the population is currently low. Additionally, regions with a lack of access to education and health services aggravate vulnerability. Lower values can be found in regions with relatively low poverty, low population pressure, low conflict density and reduced contributions from the biological susceptibility domain. Overall, the factors characterizing vulnerability vary spatially in the region. The vulnerability index reveals a high level of robustness in regard to the final choice of input datasets, with the exception of the immunity indicator which has a marked impact on the composite vulnerability index. Conclusions We introduce a conceptual framework for modeling risk and vulnerability to VBDs. Drawing on the framework we modeled social vulnerability to malaria in the context of global change using a spatially explicit approach. The results provide decision makers with place-specific options for targeting interventions that aim at reducing the burden of the disease amongst the different vulnerable population groups. PMID:25127688

  4. Greening of the Sahara - a paleo perspective on the history of water in the Middle East and North Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Matthews, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Middle-East, mostly at its southern edge together with North Africa, the northern edge of the Sahara Desert, are located at the boundary between high- to-mid latitude and tropical-subtropical climate systems. The geographical duality of desert adjacent to Mediterranean-type climate regions played and still plays a major role on the water availability. Thanks to the number of important paleoclimate studies that been made on accurate dating of cave speleothems in Southern Arabia and Oman (Fleitmann et al., 2011) and in the northeast Sahara, the Negev Desert Israel (Vaks et al., 2010) and the study of sapropels in Eastern and central Mediterranean (Almogi-Labin et al., 2009; Osborne et al, 2008), it is clear that the region was graced with water during peak interglacials when the African monsoon and westerly storm/rainfall systems intensified. Northward penetration of the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone over the Arabian and African continents resulted in increased discharge of the Nile River and rivers that emerged from central Sahara into the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. Correspondingly, enhanced westerly wind activity led to an increase in rainfall from Atlantic-Mediterranean sources over the entire Mediterranean basin, which even penetrated south into the north-east corner of the Sahara Desert. The Saharo-Arabian Desert became narrower and climatic "windows" opened for the dispersal of hominids and animals out of the African continent at 250-239, 210-193, 138-120, 108-98, 87-84 and 10-6.5 ka BP, with severe dry conditions in between. Greening of the Sahara Desert at these intervals is supported also by various marine and terrestrial records, such as corals, lakes, tufa deposits and archeological findings. Dry conditions prevailed in the Sahara desert during glacials. This is in contrast to the climatic conditions in the Eastern Mediterranean coastal region and the Jordan Rift Valley (Bar-Matthews et al., 2003; Lisker et al., 2010), where water was available for humans and animals who enjoyed a variety of ecological niches for living (Frumkin et al., 2011). Almogi-Labin, A. et a.l (2009) Quat. Sci. Rev. 28, 2882-2896. Bar-Matthews, M. et al (2003 Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 67, 3181-99. Fleitmann, D. et al. (2011). Quat. Sci. Rev. 30, 783-787. Frumkin, et al. A. (2011). Jour. Human Evol. 60, 437-451 Lisker et al, (2010). Quat. Sci. Rev 29, 1201-1211. Osborne A.H. et al. (2008). Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 105, 16444-16447 Vaks et al. (2010). Quat. Sci. Rev. 29, 2647-2662.

  5. GROUND TRUTH, MAGNITUDE CALIBRATION AND REGIONAL PHASE PROPAGATION AND DETECTION IN THE MIDDLE EAST AND HORN OF AFRICA

    SciTech Connect

    Nyblade, A; Adams, A; Brazier, R; Park, Y; Rodgers, A

    2006-07-10

    In this project, we are exploiting unique and open source seismic data sets to improve seismic monitoring across the Middle East (including the Iranian Plateau, Zagros Mountains, Arabian Peninsula, Turkish Plateau, Gulf of Aqaba, Dead Sea Rift) and the Horn of Africa (including the northern part of the East African Rift, Afar Depression, southern Red Sea and Gulf of Aden). The data sets are being used to perform three related tasks. (1) We are determining moment tensors, moment magnitudes and source depths for regional events in the magnitude 3.0 to 6.0 range. (2) These events are being used to characterize high-frequency (0.5-16 Hz) regional phase attenuation and detection thresholds, especially from events in Iran recorded at stations across the Arabian Peninsula. (3) We are collecting location ground truth at GT5 (local) and GT20 (regional) levels for seismic events with M > 2.5, including source geometry information and source depths. In the first phase of this project, seismograms from earthquakes in the Zagros Mountains recorded at regional distances have been inverted for moment tensors, and source depths for the earthquakes have been determined via waveform matching. Early studies of the distribution of seismicity in the Zagros region found evidence for earthquakes in the upper mantle. But subsequent relocations of teleseismic earthquakes suggest that source depths are generally much shallower, lying mainly within the upper crust. Nine events with magnitudes between 5 and 6 have been studied so far. Source depths for six of the events are within the upper crust, and three are located within the lower crust. The uncertainty in the source depths of the lower crustal events allows for the possibility that some of them may have even nucleated within the upper mantle. Eight events have thrust mechanisms and one has a strike-slip mechanism. We also report estimates of three-dimensional P- and S-wave velocity structure of the upper mantle beneath the Arabian Peninsula obtained from travel time tomography. Travel time measurements were obtained using a data set provided by King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) for the Saudi Arabia National Digital Seismic Network. The network consists of 38 stations (27 broadband and 11 short period). We augmented the KACST data with delay times measured from permanent stations in the region and the 1995-7 Saudi Arabian PASSCAL Experiment. Tomographic images reveal a low velocity feature in the upper mantle stretching north-south beneath the central portion of the Arabian Shield.

  6. Seroprevalence of Infections with Dengue, Rift Valley Fever and Chikungunya Viruses in Kenya, 2007

    PubMed Central

    Ochieng, Caroline; Ahenda, Petronella; Vittor, Amy Y.; Nyoka, Raymond; Gikunju, Stella; Wachira, Cyrus; Waiboci, Lilian; Umuro, Mamo; Kim, Andrea A.; Nderitu, Leonard; Juma, Bonventure; Montgomery, Joel M.; Breiman, Robert F.; Fields, Barry

    2015-01-01

    Arthropod-borne viruses are a major constituent of emerging infectious diseases worldwide, but limited data are available on the prevalence, distribution, and risk factors for transmission in Kenya and East Africa. In this study, we used 1,091 HIV-negative blood specimens from the 2007 Kenya AIDS Indicator Survey (KAIS 2007) to test for the presence of IgG antibodies to dengue virus (DENV), chikungunya virus (CHIKV) and Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV).The KAIS 2007 was a national population-based survey conducted by the Government of Kenya to provide comprehensive information needed to address the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Antibody testing for arboviruses was performed on stored blood specimens from KAIS 2007 through a two-step sandwich IgG ELISA using either commercially available kits or CDC-developed assays. Out of the 1,091 samples tested, 210 (19.2%) were positive for IgG antibodies against at least one of the three arboviruses. DENV was the most common of the three viruses tested (12.5% positive), followed by RVFV and CHIKV (4.5% and 0.97%, respectively). For DENV and RVFV, the participant’s province of residence was significantly associated (P?.01) with seropositivity. Seroprevalence of DENV and RVFV increased with age, while there was no correlation between province of residence/age and seropositivity for CHIKV. Females had twelve times higher odds of exposure to CHIK as opposed to DENV and RVFV where both males and females had the same odds of exposure. Lack of education was significantly associated with a higher odds of previous infection with either DENV or RVFV (p <0.01). These data show that a number of people are at risk of arbovirus infections depending on their geographic location in Kenya and transmission of these pathogens is greater than previously appreciated. This poses a public health risk, especially for DENV. PMID:26177451

  7. The Tendaguru formation of southeastern Tanzania, East Africa: An alternating Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous palaeoenvironment of exceptional status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sames, B.

    2009-04-01

    Dinosaur remains have inspired considerable scientific interest in the Tendaguru formation of southeastern Tanzania during the 20th century; however, this formation is exceptional in many other respects. The Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous deposits of the Tendaguru formation in the southwestern Tethys are unique because they represent a marginal marine palaeoenvironment with nonmarine faunal and floral content. It is a threefold succession of marginal marine to terrestrial, carbonate-siliciclastic sediments with cyclic character, consisting of three transgressive-regressive cycles. Revisitation of the type locality (the Tendaguru, a hill approximately 60km northwest of the town of Lindi) by a German-Tanzanian expedition in summer 2000 (Heinrich et al., 2001) resulted in a new standard section (hitherto unpublished, the informal terminology is indicated by the use of lower case in Tendaguru formation), a refined environmental model (Aberhan et al., 2002) and many new insights towards its geology (with evidence of event-sedimentation, Bussert and Aberhan, 2004), biostratigraphy and a better understanding of the Tendaguru palaeo-ecosystems and the palaeoclimate. Within the scope of the designation of a new standard section at the type locality, calcareous microfossils (ostracods, charophytes) have been described to supplement the ongoing discussion about the age and palaeoecology of the Tendaguru formation (Sames, 2008). Although only a few unevenly distributed layers across the section produced calcareous microfossils, the results are very promising. A total of 40 ostracode and 2 charophyte taxa could be distinguished. The non-marine part of the ostracod fauna provides an important contribution to the documentation of Purbeck/Wealden-type nonmarine palaeoenvironments and its microfaunas and -floras previously unknown from East Africa. The marine faunal part belongs to a relatively endemic southern (Gondwana) fauna. Together with other fossil groups, the palaeoecological analysis of microfaunal and -floral assemblages confirms that the former subdivision of the Tendaguru formation into three non-marine intercalated with three marine layers should be recognised as generally only, because the formation is much more complex in detail. Application of calcareous microfossils has been demonstrated to make an important contribution to the interpretation of the Tendaguru formation's palaeoenvironment and is considered highly developable in the future. References: Aberhan, M., Bussert, R., Heinrich, W.-D., Schrank, E., Schultka, S., Sames, B., Kriwet, J. and Kapilima, S., 2002. Palaeoecology and depositional environments of the Tendaguru Beds (Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous, Tanzania). Mitteilungen aus dem Museum für Naturkunde in Berlin, Geowissenschaftliche Reihe, 5: 19-44. Bussert, R. and Aberhan, M., 2004. Storms and tsunamis: evidence of event sedimentation in the Late Jurassic Tendaguru Beds of southeastern Tanzania. Journal of African Earth Sciences, 39: 549-555. Heinrich, W.-D., Bussert, R., Aberhan, M., Hampe, O., Kapilima, S., Schrank, E., Schultka, S., Maier, G., Msaky, E., Sames, B. and Chami, R., 2001. The German-Tanzanian Tendaguru Expedition 2000. Mitteilungen aus dem Museum für Naturkunde Berlin, Geowissenschaftliche Reihe, 20: 223-237. Sames, B., 2008. Application of Ostracoda and Charophyta from the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous Tendaguru formation at Tendaguru, Tanzania (East Africa) - Biostratigraphy, Palaeobiogeography and Palaeoecology. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 264(3-4): 213-229.

  8. Neglected tropical diseases of the Middle East and North Africa: review of their prevalence, distribution, and opportunities for control.

    PubMed

    Hotez, Peter J; Savioli, Lorenzo; Fenwick, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) are highly endemic but patchily distributed among the 20 countries and almost 400 million people of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, and disproportionately affect an estimated 65 million people living on less than US$2 per day. Egypt has the largest number of people living in poverty of any MENA nation, while Yemen has the highest prevalence of people living in poverty. These two nations stand out for having suffered the highest rates of many NTDs, including the soil-transmitted nematode infections, filarial infections, schistosomiasis, fascioliasis, leprosy, and trachoma, although they should be recognized for recent measures aimed at NTD control. Leishmaniasis, especially cutaneous leishmaniasis, is endemic in Syria, Iran, Iraq, Libya, Morocco, and elsewhere in the region. Both zoonotic (Leishmania major) and anthroponotic (Leishmania tropica) forms are endemic in MENA in rural arid regions and urban regions, respectively. Other endemic zoonotic NTDs include cystic echinococcosis, fascioliasis, and brucellosis. Dengue is endemic in Saudi Arabia, where Rift Valley fever and Alkhurma hemorrhagic fever have also emerged. Great strides have been made towards elimination of several endemic NTDs, including lymphatic filariasis in Egypt and Yemen; schistosomiasis in Iran, Morocco, and Oman; and trachoma in Morocco, Algeria, Iran, Libya, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates. A particularly noteworthy achievement is the long battle waged against schistosomiasis in Egypt, where prevalence has been brought down by regular praziquantel treatment. Conflict and human and animal migrations are key social determinants in preventing the control or elimination of NTDs in the MENA, while local political will, strengthened international and intersectoral cooperative efforts for surveillance, mass drug administration, and vaccination are essential for elimination. PMID:22389729

  9. Topography, river network and recent fault activity at the margins of the Central Main Ethiopian Rift (East Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molin, Paola; Corti, Giacomo

    2015-11-01

    Along its length, the Main Ethiopian Rift (MER) in East Africa records a transition from early fault-dominated morphology in the South to axial magma assisted-rifting typical of continental break-up in the North. It is one of the few locations on Earth offering a complete picture of the evolution of continental rifting and thus provides a unique opportunity to directly analyze how the drainage network reorganizes under extensional tectonic forcing. In this paper we present a new analysis of the river network and relative landforms-complemented with a summary of recent geological data-at both rift margins of the Central MER, a key sector of the rift capturing the phase of drainage reorganization between incipient and mature rifting. This analysis shows that hydrography is strongly influenced by recent tectonics. Rectangular drainage patterns, windgaps, and lacustrine/swampy areas formed by structural dams document that the rivers are in continuous competition with fault activity. The irregular longitudinal profiles (with knickpoints/knickzones in correspondence with faults) also suggest that rivers are in a transient state of disequilibrium related to recent tectonic activity at rift margins, in agreement with previous geological and seismological data. A more regional analysis extended to the adjoining Northern and Southern MER indicates that rifting evolves from initial stages characterized by margins poorly incised by rivers with gentle channel gradients (except in correspondence with faults), to mature phases in which rift margins are highly incised by a well organized fluvial network composed by concave and steep rivers. Our regional analysis also indicates a stronger and/or more recent tectonic activity at the rift margins proceeding to the south, in line with previous models of rift development.

  10. Reproductive biology knowledge, and behaviour of teenagers in East, Central and Southern Africa: the Zimbabwe case study.

    PubMed

    Mbizvo, M T; Kasule, J; Gupta, V; Rusakaniko, S; Gumbo, J; Kinoti, S N; Mpanju-Shumbusho, W; Sebina-Zziwa; Mwateba, R; Padayachy, J

    1995-11-01

    Sexuality in the teenager is often complicated by unplanned/unwanted pregnancy, abortion and the risks of STDs including AIDS. There is therefore a need for improved understanding of factors affecting adolescent sexuality and the implementation of programmes designed to improve their knowledge, risk awareness and subsequent behavioural outcomes. A multicentre study of reproductive health knowledge and behaviour followed by a health education intervention was undertaken amongst teenagers in selected countries of East, Central and Southern Africa. Reported here are findings at baseline derived from the Zimbabwe component on reproductive biology knowledge and behavior. A self-administered questionnaire was used among 1 689 adolescent pupils drawn from rural, urban, co-education, single sex, boarding and day secondary schools in Zimbabwe. Correct knowledge on reproductive biology as measured by the meaning and interpretation of menstruation and wet dreams varied by school from 68 pc to 86 pc, with a significant trend (p < 0,01) based on level of education at baseline. The reported mean age at which menarche took place was 13,5 years +/- 1,3 (mean +/- SD). First coitus was reported to have taken place at the mean age of 12 years for boys and 13,6 years for girls. Seventeen pc of the adolescent pupils reported that they were sexually experienced and 33,2 had relationships. There were misconceptions reported on menstruation with 23 pc reporting that it was an illness. Peers, followed by magazines were the first sources of information on various aspects of reproductive biology, both of which might not provide the correct first information. Among pupils reporting that they were sexually experienced, the largest proportion (56 pc) had unprotected sex. The findings point to the need for targeting the adolescent pupils for information on reproductive biology and increased awareness on the risks of pregnancy, STDs and HIV. PMID:8932577

  11. Management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the Middle East and North Africa: results of the BREATHE study.

    PubMed

    Idrees, Majdy; Koniski, Marie-Louise; Taright, Samya; Shahrour, Naeem; Polatli, Mehmet; Ben Kheder, Ali; Alzaabi, Ashraf; Iraqi, Ghali; Khattab, Adel; Javed, Arshad; Rashid, Nauman; El Hasnaoui, Abdelkader

    2012-12-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a potentially severe chronic progressive respiratory condition requiring long-term treatment and frequently involving episodic hospitalisations to manage exacerbations. The objective of this analysis was to document diagnosis, evaluation, treatment and management of COPD-related respiratory symptoms in 1,392 subjects fulfilling an epidemiological definition of COPD identified in a general population sample of 62,086 individuals aged ? 40 years in ten countries in the Middle East and North Africa region (Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, Turkey and United Arab Emirates), together with Pakistan. 442 subjects (31.8%) claimed to have received a diagnosis of COPD from a physician and 287 (20.6%) had undergone spirometry in the previous year. Use of specific treatments for respiratory symptoms was reported by 218 subjects (15.7%). Use of inhaled long-acting bronchodilators together with corticosteroids (53 subjects; 3.8%) and use of oxygen therapy (31 subjects; 2.3%) was very low. 852 subjects (61.2%) had consulted a physician about their respiratory condition at least once in the previous year, with a mean number of consultations of 3.4 ± 3.6. Moreover, 284 subjects (20.4%) had been hospitalised overnight for their COPD, with a mean of 2.3 ± 3.7 hospitalisations per year. Use of all healthcare resources was significantly higher (p < 0.001) in subjects with CAT scores ? 10 than in those with scores < 10, and greater in those with exacerbations than in those without. In conclusion, COPD in the region is under-diagnosed, inadequately evaluated and inadequately treated. Nonetheless, COPD symptoms are responsible for considerable healthcare consumption, with high levels of physician consultation and hospitalisation. PMID:23290703

  12. The burden of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the Middle East and North Africa: results of the BREATHE study.

    PubMed

    Uzaslan, Esra; Mahboub, Bassam; Beji, Majed; Nejjari, Chakib; Tageldin, Mohamed Awad; Khan, Javaid Ahmed; Nafti, Salim; Obeidat, Nathir M; Sayiner, Abdullah; Wali, Siraj; Rashid, Nauman; El Hasnaoui, Abdelkader

    2012-12-01

    COPD is a progressive pulmonary disease which may have a profound impact on general health status and quality of life. This article presents data on the burden of COPD obtained from the BREATHE study in the Middle East, North Africa and Pakistan. This study was a large general population survey of COPD conducted in eleven countries of the region using a standardised methodology. A total of 62,086 subjects were screened, of whom 2,187 fulfilled the "epidemiological" definition of COPD. Data on symptoms, perceived disease severity, impact on work, limitations in activities and psychological distress were collected. 1,392 subjects were analysable of whom 661 (47.5%) reported experiencing an exacerbation of their respiratory condition, 49.4% reported comorbidities and 5.5% reported severe breathlessness as measured with the MRC breathlessness questionnaire. The degree of breathlessness, as well as the perceived severity, was correlated with the overall disease impact as measured with the COPD Assessment Test (p < 0.001). 374 subjects (28.4%) reported that their respiratory condition prevented them from working and this proportion rose to 47.8% in subjects who perceived their respiratory condition as severe. 47.9% of subjects reported difficulties in normal physical exertion, 37.5% in social activities and 31.7% in family activities. Psychological distress was reported by between 42.3% and 53.2% of subjects, depending on the item. In conclusion, the burden of COPD is important, and covers central aspects of daily life. For this reason, physicians should take time to discuss it with their patients, and ensure that the management strategy proposed addresses all their needs. PMID:23290704

  13. Distribution of COPD-related symptoms in the Middle East and North Africa: results of the BREATHE study.

    PubMed

    Tageldin, Mohamed Awad; Nafti, Salim; Khan, Javaid Ahmed; Nejjari, Chakib; Beji, Majed; Mahboub, Bassam; Obeidat, Nathir M; Uzaslan, Esra; Sayiner, Abdullah; Wali, Siraj; Rashid, Nauman; El Hasnaoui, Abdelkader

    2012-12-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. However, its epidemiology in many developing countries is poorly characterised. The objective of this analysis was to evaluate respiratory symptoms which could be COPD-related in a large sample of individuals aged ? 40 years in ten countries in the Middle East and North Africa (Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, Turkey and United Arab Emirates), together with Pakistan, using a standardised methodology. A random sample of 457,258 telephone numbers was contacted. A screening questionnaire was administered to each eligible participant, which included six questions relating to respiratory symptoms. Of 65,154 eligible subjects, 62,086 agreed to participate and 61,551 provided usable data. The age- and gender-adjusted prevalence of symptoms (persistent productive cough or breathlessness or both) was 14.3% [95% CI: 14.0-14.6%], ranging from 7.2% in UAE to 19.1% in Algeria. Symptoms were more frequent (p < 0.0001) in women (16.7%) than in men (12.2%). The adjusted prevalence of COPD according to the "epidemiological" definition (symptoms or diagnosis and cigarette use ? 10 pack · years) was 3.6% [95% CI: 3.5-3.7%] (range: 1.9% in UAE to 6.1% in Syria). COPD was more frequent (p < 0.0001) in men (5.2%) than in women (1.8%). The frequency of symptoms was significantly higher in cigarette smokers (p< 0.001), as well as in waterpipe users (p < 0.026). In conclusion, the prevalence of COPD in this region seems to be lower than that reported in industrialised countries. Under-reporting and risk factors other than smoking may contribute to this difference. PMID:23290701

  14. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and associated healthcare resource consumption in the Middle East and North Africa: the BREATHE study.

    PubMed

    Polatli, Mehmet; Ben Kheder, Ali; Wali, Siraj; Javed, Arshad; Khattab, Adel; Mahboub, Bassam; Iraqi, Ghali; Nejjari, Chakib; Taright, Samya; Koniski, Marie-Louise; Rashid, Nauman; El Hasnaoui, Abdelkader

    2012-12-01

    Data on COPD-related healthcare resources use are rarely documented in developing countries. This article presents data on COPD-related healthcare resource consumption in the Middle East, North Africa and Pakistan and addresses the association of this variable with illness severity. A large survey of COPD was conducted in eleven countries of the region, namely Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, Pakistan, Saudi-Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, Turkey and United Arab Emirates, using a standardised methodology. A total of 62,086 subjects were screened. This identified 2,187 subjects fulfilling the "epidemiological" definition of COPD. A detailed questionnaire was administered to document data on COPD-related healthcare consumption. Symptom severity was assessed using the COPD Assessment Test (CAT). 1,392 subjects were analysable. Physician consultations were the most frequently used healthcare resource, ranging from 43,118 [95% CI: 755-85,548] consultations in UAE to 4,276,800 [95% CI: 2,320,164-6,230,763] in Pakistan, followed by emergency room visits, ranging from 15,917 [95% CI: 0-34,807] visits in UAE to 683,697 [95% CI: 496,993-869,737] in Turkey and hospitalisations, ranging from 15,563 [95% CI: 7,911-23,215] in UAE to 476,674 [95% CI: 301,258-652,090] in Turkey. The use of each resource increased proportionally with the GOLD 2011 severity groups and was significantly (p < 0.0001) higher in subjects with more symptoms compared to those with lower symptoms and in subjects with exacerbations to those without exacerbations. The occurrence of exacerbations and the CAT score were independently associated with use of each healthcare resource. In conclusion, the BREATHE study revealed that physician consultation is the most frequently COPD-related healthcare resource used in the region. It showed that the deterioration of COPD symptoms and the frequency of exacerbations raised healthcare resource consumption. PMID:23290706

  15. Neglected Tropical Diseases of the Middle East and North Africa: Review of Their Prevalence, Distribution, and Opportunities for Control

    PubMed Central

    Hotez, Peter J.; Savioli, Lorenzo; Fenwick, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) are highly endemic but patchily distributed among the 20 countries and almost 400 million people of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, and disproportionately affect an estimated 65 million people living on less than US$2 per day. Egypt has the largest number of people living in poverty of any MENA nation, while Yemen has the highest prevalence of people living in poverty. These two nations stand out for having suffered the highest rates of many NTDs, including the soil-transmitted nematode infections, filarial infections, schistosomiasis, fascioliasis, leprosy, and trachoma, although they should be recognized for recent measures aimed at NTD control. Leishmaniasis, especially cutaneous leishmaniasis, is endemic in Syria, Iran, Iraq, Libya, Morocco, and elsewhere in the region. Both zoonotic (Leishmania major) and anthroponotic (Leishmania tropica) forms are endemic in MENA in rural arid regions and urban regions, respectively. Other endemic zoonotic NTDs include cystic echinococcosis, fascioliasis, and brucellosis. Dengue is endemic in Saudi Arabia, where Rift Valley fever and Alkhurma hemorrhagic fever have also emerged. Great strides have been made towards elimination of several endemic NTDs, including lymphatic filariasis in Egypt and Yemen; schistosomiasis in Iran, Morocco, and Oman; and trachoma in Morocco, Algeria, Iran, Libya, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates. A particularly noteworthy achievement is the long battle waged against schistosomiasis in Egypt, where prevalence has been brought down by regular praziquantel treatment. Conflict and human and animal migrations are key social determinants in preventing the control or elimination of NTDs in the MENA, while local political will, strengthened international and intersectoral cooperative efforts for surveillance, mass drug administration, and vaccination are essential for elimination. PMID:22389729

  16. Global versus local causes and health implications of high mercury concentrations in sharks from the east coast of South Africa.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Melissa A; Dean, Kylie; Hussey, Nigel E; Cliff, Geremy; Wintner, Sabine P; Dudley, Sheldon F J; Zungu, M Philip; Fisk, Aaron T

    2016-01-15

    Conservation concern regarding the overharvest of global shark populations for meat and fin consumption largely surrounds documented deleterious ecosystem effects, but may be further supported by improved knowledge of possibly high levels in their edible tissues (particularly meat) of the neurotoxin, methylmercury (CH3Hg). For many regions, however, little data exist on shark tissue Hg concentrations, and reasons for Hg variation within and among species or across regions are poorly understood. We quantified total Hg (THg) in 17 shark species (total n=283) from the east coast of South Africa, a top Hg emitter globally. Concentrations varied from means of around 0.1mgkg(-1) dry weight (dw) THg in hardnose smoothhound (Mustelus mosis) and whale (Rhincodon typus) sharks to means of over 10mgkg(-1) dw in shortfin mako (Isurus oxyrinchus), scalloped hammerhead (Sphyrna lewini), white (Carcharodon carcharias) and ragged-tooth (Carcharias taurus) sharks. These sharks had higher THg levels than conspecifics sampled from coastal waters of the North Atlantic and North, mid-, and South Pacific, and although sampling year and shark size may play a confounding role, this result suggests the potential importance of elevated local emissions. Values of THg showed strong, species-specific correlations with length, and nearly half the remaining variation was explained by trophic position (using nitrogen stable isotopes, ?(15)N), whereas measures of foraging habitat (using carbon stable isotopes, ?(13)C) were not significant. Mercury concentrations were above the regulatory guidelines for fish health effects and safe human consumption for 88% and 70% of species, respectively, suggesting on-going cause for concern for shark health, and human consumers of shark meat. PMID:26409147

  17. Mitochondrial DNA diversity in two ethnic groups in southeastern Kenya: perspectives from the northeastern periphery of the Bantu expansion

    PubMed Central

    Batai, Ken; Babrowski, Kara B.; Arroyo, Juan Pablo; Kusimba, Chapurukha M.; Williams, Sloan R.

    2013-01-01

    The Bantu languages are widely distributed throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Genetic research supports linguists and historians who argue that migration played an important role in the spread of this language family, but the genetic data also indicates a more complex process involving substantial gene flow with resident populations. In order to understand the Bantu expansion process in east Africa, mtDNA hypervariable region I variation in 352 individuals from the Taita and Mijikenda ethnic groups was analyzed, and we evaluated the interactions that took place between the Bantu- and non-Bantu-speaking populations in east Africa. The Taita and Mijikenda are Bantu-speaking agropastoralists from southeastern Kenya, at least some of whose ancestors probably migrated into the area as part of Bantu migrations that began around 3,000 BCE. Our analyses indicate that they show some distinctive differences that reflect their unique cultural histories. The Taita are genetically more diverse than the Mijikenda with larger estimates of genetic diversity. The Taita cluster with other east African groups, having high frequencies of haplogroups from that region, while the Mijikenda have high frequencies of central African haplogroups and cluster more closely with central African Bantu-speaking groups. The non-Bantu speakers who lived in southeastern Kenya before Bantu speaking groups arrived were at least partially incorporated into what are now Bantu-speaking Taita groups. In contrast, gene flow from non-Bantu speakers into the Mijikenda was more limited. These results suggest a more complex demographic history where the nature of Bantu and non-Bantu interactions varied throughout the area. PMID:23382080

  18. Carbon dioxide measurements in tropical east African biomes

    SciTech Connect

    Schnell, R.C.; Odh, S.A.; Njau, L.N.

    1981-06-20

    From January 1977 through May 1978 atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentrations were measured hourly and/or continuously at bimonthly intervals over periods varying from 5 to 8 days at 10 different locations in Kenya, East Africa. During each of these periods, at least two, and in some cases five, vertical profile measurements of CO/sub 2/ concentrations were conducted above different biomes. A large diurnal CO/sub 2/ periodicity was observed over land, with daytime drawdowns to 322 ppm and nighttime buildups to more than 400 ppm observed in savannah regions. In and around tropical rain forests, drawdowns to 310 ppm and buildups to more than 400 ppm were regularly observed. On the higher reaches of Mount Kenya, the diurnal CO/sub 2/ cycle was considerably reduced in amplitude, with variations in the range of 2-6 ppm throughout the 16-month study period. On sunny days, the drawdown of CO/sub 2/ was measurable to heights of at least 4000 m above ground level. Other CO/sub 2/ measurements in air over the Indian Ocean (to distances of up to 450 km upwind of the coast) produced fairly consistent concentrations of about 328.5 ppm which did not fluctuate diurnally. The weekly mean CO/sub 2/ concentrations over Kenya appear to have a bimodal structure, with minima occurring in July and January. On the basis of the data collected during the study it appears likely that regular observations at a high-altitude station on Mount Kenya, either with flask sampling or continuous analyzer measurements, are likely to yield data useful for estimates of CO/sub 2/ concentration backgrounds and trends. Also, there is strong evidence that Mount Kenya would be a good location to measure large-scale interhemispheric CO/sub 2/ exchanges and provide a unique base from which to study the effects of the tropical biome on biogeochemical phenomena. 20 references, 12 figures, 2 tables.

  19. China's Cooperation in Education and Training with Kenya: A Different Model?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    This is the first detailed study of the character and particularity of China's rapidly growing education and training cooperation with Kenya. Set against the 50-year history of Kenya's engagement with China, it pays special attention to the human resources targets of the Forum for China-Africa Cooperation (FOCAC) from 2000. It argues that the…

  20. A survey of psychosis risk symptoms in Kenya Daniel Mamaha,, Anne Mbwayob

    E-print Network

    A survey of psychosis risk symptoms in Kenya Daniel Mamaha,, Anne Mbwayob , Victoria Mutisob, there has not been any previous assessment of psychosis risk symptoms in the continent of Africa. Our study aimed to measure the prevalence of psychosis risk in a community sample in Nairobi, Kenya

  1. Male involvement for the Prevention of Mother-to-Child HIV Transmission: A Brief Review of Initiatives in East, West and Central Africa

    PubMed Central

    Dunlap, Julie; Foderingham, Nia; Bussell, Scottie; Wester, C. William; Audet, Carolyn M; Aliyu, Muktar H

    2015-01-01

    Current trends in HIV/AIDS research in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) highlight socially and culturally sensitive interventions that mobilize community members and resources for universal access to HIV prevention, treatment, and care services. These factors are particularly important when addressing the complex social and cultural nature of implementing services for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT). Across the globe approximately 34% fewer children were infected with HIV through the perinatal or breastfeeding route in 2011 (est. 330,000) than in 2001 (est. 500,000), but ongoing mother-to-child HIV transmission is concentrated in sub-Saharan Africa, where fully 90% of 2011 cases are estimated to have occurred. Recent literature suggests that PMTCT in Africa is optimized when interventions engage and empower community members, including male partners, to support program implementation and confront the social, cultural and economic barriers that facilitate continued vertical transmission of HIV. In resource-limited settings the feasibility and sustainability of PMTCT programs require innovative approaches to strengthening male engagement by leveraging lessons learned from successful initiatives in SSA. This review presents an overview of studies assessing barriers and facilitators of male participation in PMTCT and new interventions designed to increase male engagement in East, West and Central Africa from 2000–2013, and examines the inclusion of men in PMTCT programs through the lens of community and facility activities that promote the engagement and involvement of both men and women in transformative PMTCT initiatives. PMID:24633806

  2. Africa: Myth and Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Barbara B.

    1994-01-01

    Reports on the Third International Social Studies Conference held in Nairobi, Kenya, in 1994. Discusses democracy, educational reform efforts, and the importance of tourism to the Kenyan economy. Asserts that U.S. teachers must use accurate and nonstereotypical instructional materials in teaching about Africa. (CFR)

  3. Neotectonic faults and stress field in the East African Rift System around the Tanzanian Craton - A contribution to the seismotectonic map of Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delvaux, Damien; Macheyeki, Athanas Simon; Fernandes, Rui-Manuel; Ayele, Atalay; Meghraoui, Mustapha

    2015-04-01

    As a contribution to the UNESCO-IUGS IGCP 601 project "Seismotectonics and seismic hazards in Africa" and in preparation of the Seismotectonic Map of Africa, we compiled the neotectonic faults related to the East African Rift System around the Tanzanian craton. The initial aim was to identify and map the potentially active faults. Faults are usually defined as active when they show seismogenic displacement during the last 10,000 to 100,000 years, generally on the basis of paleoseismic investigation. In East Africa, however, very few faults have been studied by paleoseismic techniques and even fewer have known historical seismic activation. To address this issue, we mapped faults that show morphological indications of displacement. We used the SRTM DTM (90 and 30 m when available to us), with artificial shading as basis for identify neotectonic faults, in combination with existing data from geological maps, publications and reports, complemented by our own field observations. Thermal springs often occur along tectonically active faults. We use them to distinguish present-day faulting from other mapped faults as they are in most cases structurally controlled. In parallel, we used also the available focal mechanisms and geological fault-slip data to constrain the stress second-order stress field (at the scale of rift segments) and locally also the third-order stress field (at the local scale). All these elements are combined and compared with existing kinematic models for the East African Rift based on earthquake slip vectors, GPS measurements and geologic indicators. The comparison evidences some local discrepancies between the stress field and the direction of opening, probably due to the interactions between different rift segments, as in the Rukwa rift, Mbeya southern junction between the eastern and western rift branches, and in the Manyara-Natron area.

  4. Drying out the Nile? Regional Climate Change and Water Resources in East Africa with a focus on Lake Victoria and Lake Tana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottram, Ruth; Fox Maule, Cathrine; Thejll, Peter; Stendel, Martin; Drews, Martin; Davies, Sarah; Lamb, Henry

    2014-05-01

    The East African lakes Victoria and Tana are important local water resources for agriculture, fisheries and hydropower; they are also the main sources of the Nile. In this study we focus on the evaporative and evapotranspirative regimes of the hydrological basins for Lakes Tana and Victoria to determine how regional climate change under the A1B scenario is likely to affect the local and regional hydrology. We show results from a very high resolution (10km) simulation, where the state-of-the-art regional climate model (RCM) HIRHAM5 was driven by the global circulation model (GCM) ECHAM5 under the A1B scenario. Three time-slices have been investigated for present day (1980-1999), mid-century (2046-2065) and end of the 21st century (2080-2099) periods. Our analysis includes a comparison with a coarser 0.44o (~50 km) resolution run which demonstrates the importance of using high resolution (10km or higher) in RCM studies of this type to correctly simulate the seasonal and geographical characteristics of the present day east African monsoon system. The projections also indicate that climate change under the intermediate SRES A1B scenario is expected to cause more frequent failures of the East African rains with important consequences for the region and for the hydrology of the East African Lakes. This work introduces the proposed DACEA (Drivers of Aridity Change in East Africa) project which aims to investigate regional and global teleconnections that affect aridity in East Africa. Future work will combine climate palaeoproxies from Lake Tana and Lake Victoria with model experiments carried out with the EC-Earth coupled Ocean-Atmosphere General Circulation Model and downscaled to very high resolution with the RCM HIRHAM5 to determine regional and global scale influences on the African monsoon system. The HIRHAM5 simulations will be dynamically coupled to a regional hydrological model based on MIKE SHE, to evaluate the consequences and the feedback from the regional hydrology of the lake basins in terms of the East African rains.

  5. Psychometric evaluation of the COPD assessment test: data from the BREATHE study in the Middle East and North Africa region.

    PubMed

    Jones, Paul W; Shahrour, Naem; Nejjari, Chakib; Lahlou, Aicha; Doble, Adam; Rashid, Nauman; El Hasnaoui, Abdelkader

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the validity and performance of the Arabic and Turkish versions of the COPD Assessment Test (CAT) for evaluating the severity and impact of COPD symptoms. The data were obtained from the BREATHE study in the Middle East and North Africa region, a large general population survey of COPD conducted in ten countries of the region (Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, Turkey and United Arab Emirates), using a standardised methodology. A total of 62,086 subjects were screened, of whom a random sample of 5,681 subjects were administered the CAT by telephone. 5,639 evaluable questionnaires were recovered, representing a completion rate of 99%. In addition, the CAT was administered to an additional 833 subjects fulfilling the epidemiological diagnostic criteria for COPD. Mean scores in the general population were 6.99 ± 6.91 for the Arabic version and 9.88 ± 9.04 for the Turkish version. In patients with COPD, mean scores were 16.2 ± 9.1 and 20.9 ± 10.2 respectively. Scores were consistently higher in smokers than in non-smokers. In the general population, the proportion of respondents fulfilling criteria for COPD rose with higher CAT scores, and particularly above the 80th percentile, where 63% of COPD cases were to be found. This suggests that the CAT may be useful as a case-finding tool in the general population. In the COPD population, healthcare resource consumption rose linearly with CAT score above a threshold score of twenty, arguing in favour of the good criterion validity of the CAT. The internal consistency of the CAT was high (Cronbach's ? 0.85 for the Arabic and 0.86 for the Turkish versions) and the factorial structure was unidimensional. In conclusion, this study performed in Arabic and Turkish speaking populations confirms the utility and validity of the CAT as a simple tool to collect data on the severity and impact of COPD symptoms, and suggests that it may potentially be useful as a case-finding tool to identify people at risk for COPD in the general population. PMID:23290707

  6. Water-Isotopes (2H, 3H, 18O) to trace the source and timing of recharge in a fractured granite aquifer in Western Kenya, Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kralik, Martin; Whylidal, Stefan; Asunah, Francis; Sültenfuß, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    The Vihiga District in West Kenya North-West of Lake Victoria is one of the most densely populated areas in Kenya with 1033 person per square kilometer. To find the most suitable location of an own well for a Primary School in this district, springs, school wells and creeks were sampled in the surroundings to get information about the hydrological cycle in the area. The Waluka Primary school (0.02134°N, 34.64311°E) is situated on the northern slope of the Maragoli Hills 20 km to the North-West of the Nyanzan provincial capital of Kisumu at the eastern shore of Lake Victoria. The hilly relief varies between 1535 - 1675m. The yearly precipitation is between 1200-1600 mm/a (23°C mean temperature) with biannual rainy seasons in which the long rains are generally from March to May as the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) moves northwards, and the short rains are typically from October to December as the ITCZ retreats southwards. A lateritic soil covers a thin alteration zone above the Precambrian Maragoli-Granite (Saggerson, 1952). Water circulates either in the thin alteration zone or in fault zones cutting through the Precambrian granite. From discharge measurements of two springs and a creek at the end of the dry season (February 2012) a minimum discharge of ca. 10-20 L/s km2 (300-600 mm) can be estimated. The water is of the alkaline sulfate-nitrate type with low mineralization (70-150 ? S/cm, 25°C) and a low pH of about 5 to 6. The delta oxygen-18 and deuterium value ranges between -2.84 to -1.98 oand -8.5 to - 3.9 o(VSMOW). The deuterium excess ranges from 11.7-14.2 oThe water of one spring and well close to the school have a tritium content of 1.42 - 1.62 TU. All groundwater has a low arsenium, fluorine and uranium content, which had only a short soil passage. The relatively elevated, but not problematic content in nitrate (10 - 16 mg/L) probaly reflects the intensive agricultural activities in this area. As the mean ? 18O values during the rainy seasons are significantly lower (-3 to -4 o) than in the mean precipitation during the rest of the year (-2.5 to -1.9 o; Mwango, 2003) one can conclude that the main spring 'Anzaya' and the well in the Naboka Secondary School are recharged from deeper faults with water supplied more during the rainy season. The slightly higher d-excess of 13.4-14.2 ocompared to 11.7-12.6 oin the rest of the samples, indicates a somewhat higher recharge area of this two sites with water vapor recycled in the precipitation around the Liailhunuu peak (ca. 1675m). This effect is also supported by spring-water measurements at the Kilimanjaro (d-excess 13.4-6.6 o) 400 km SE. Similarily, the tritium content of 1.42 - 1.62 TU indicate that compared to a mean tritium content of 2 TU in the rain of this area (Mwango, 2003) the mean residence time can be in the range of recent to few years only.

  7. Armies of east and southern Africa fighting a guerrilla war with AIDS. Special report: AIDS and the military.

    PubMed

    Yeager, R

    1995-12-01

    AIDS prevention and care programs administered by the defense forces of Botswana, Kenya, Malawi, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe embody information, education, and communication, condom promotion, sexually transmitted disease (STD) control, safe blood supply, pre- and post-test counseling, and support for those afflicted. Rules of the UN peacekeeping operations are also observed: training in HIV prevention, testing prior to deployment, and no deployment of troops infected. The militaries' efforts are linked with the endeavors of national AIDS programs run by civilian government agencies and nongovernmental organizations. The various policies towards HIV-infected personnel usually employ discharge provisions only when the soldier is unable to perform his duties. Health education is part of the militaries' programs. In Malawi each unit in military school is educated about HIV/STD transmission and condom use. In Tanzania HIV-positive troops are counseled and those with symptoms are given a sick leave to prepare for retirement. The Ugandan Army operates nine health education centers that offer training and counseling. AIDS widows and orphans are cared for and their property rights are protected. In Zambia the military have trained HIV/AIDS counselors and HIV-positive persons are counseled and treated for up to seven years. In Zimbabwe, HIV-infected but fit servicemen continue service and are treated until death, while their dependents are cared for. Women are also included in the armies of these seven countries, but Malawi and Kenya restrict in-service marriages. Uganda and Zimbabwe have guidelines against sexual harassment and provide better living conditions for married couples. Only the Malawian Army tests all recruits for HIV prior to officer training. Botswana, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe have voluntary testing schemes, but reassessment is underway in Zambia where 25% of recruits are infected with HIV. The impact of HIV/AIDS can be reduced if a higher proportion of public health budgets is allocated to combat this epidemic. PMID:12319957

  8. Mortality disparities among groups participating in an East Africa surveying expedition: the Herbert Henry Austin expedition of 1900-1901.

    PubMed

    Imperato, Pascal James; Imperato, Gavin H; Imperato, Austin C

    2013-10-01

    In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, a number of European expeditions traveled to the region of Lake Rudolf, now largely in northern Kenya. Although diverse in intent, many of these were undertaken in the interests of furthering colonial territorial claims. In 1900-1901, Major Herbert Henry Austin led a British expedition down to the lake from Khartoum in the north. Of the 62 African, Arab, and European members of this expedition, only 18 (29 %) arrived at its final destination at Lake Baringo in Kenya. Because of a confluence of adverse climatic, social, and political conditions, the expedition ran short of food supplies when it arrived at the northern end of the lake in April 1901. For the next 4 months, the members of the expedition struggled down the west side of the lake and beyond. The greatest mortality (91 %) occurred among the 32 African transport drivers who were the most marginally nourished at the outset of the trip. The lowest mortality among the Africans on the expedition (15 %) occurred among the members of the Tenth Sudanese Rifles Battalion, who had an excellent nutritional status at the start of the expedition. Major Austin himself suffered from severe scurvy with retinal hemorrhages which left him partially blind in his right eye. An analysis of the mortality rates among the groups that participated in this expedition was undertaken. This revealed that poor nutritional status at the start of the trip was predictive of death from starvation. PMID:23943302

  9. Mapping Mantle Mixing and the Extent of Superplume Influence Using He-Ne-Ar-CO2-N2 Isotopes: The Case of the East Africa Rift System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, D. R.; Halldorsson, S. A.; Scarsi, P.; Castillo, P.; Abebe, T.; Kulongoski, J. T.

    2014-12-01

    Earth's mantle possesses distinct and variable volatile characteristics as sampled by magmatic activity in different tectonic environments. In general, trace element depleted mid-ocean ridge basalts, with low Sr and Pb isotope values (but high ?Nd and ?Hf), release mantle-derived noble gases characterised by 3He/4He ~8 ± 1RA, (21Ne/22Ne)ex ~0.06 and 40Ar/36Ar ? 10,000 with CO2 and N2 having ?13C~-5‰ and ?15N ~-5‰, respectively. In contrast, enriched intraplate lavas possess higher 3He/4He (up to 50RA), lower (21Ne/22Ne)ex ~0.035 and 40Ar/36Ar ? 10,000 with generally higher but variable ?13C and ?15N. These isotopic attributes of mantle-derived volatiles can be exploited to map the extent, and mixing characteristics, of enriched (plume) mantle with depleted asthenospheric mantle ± the effects of over-riding lithosphere and/or crust. The East African Rift System (EARS) is superimposed upon two massive plateaux - the Ethiopia and Kenya domes - regarded as geophysical manifestations of a superplume source, a huge thermochemical anomaly originated at the core-mantle boundary and providing dynamic support for the plateaux. We present new volatile isotopic and relative abundance data (on the same samples) for geothermal fluids (He-CO2-N2), lavas (He-Ne-Ar) and xenoliths (He-Ne-Ar-CO2-N2) which provide an unprecedented overview of the distribution of mantle volatiles of the Ethiopia Dome, from the Red Sea via the Afar region and Main Ethiopian Rift (MER) to the Turkana Depression. Notably, peaks in geothermal fluid 3He/4He (16RA) and ?15N (+6.5‰) are coincident within the MER but the maximum ?13C (-0.78‰) lies ~100 km to the south. Highs in 3He/4He (14RA), ?13C (~-1‰) and ?15N (+3.4‰) for mafic crystals occur in the Afar region ~ 500km to the north. We assess the significance of the off-set in these volatile isotope signals, for sampling volatile heterogeneity in the plume source and/or the relative sensitivity of different volatiles to admixture of plume- with asthenospheric and lithospheric mantle. These results are contrasted with volatile data from the Kenya Dome where the plume signal is muted and the lithospheric mantle exerts a stronger control on geothermal/lava volatile characteristics.

  10. Facing Kenya's energy predicament

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, P.; Shakow, D.

    1980-06-01

    Kenya's bleak economic future is not helped by its dependence on foreign oil and lack of fossil-fuel reserves. At a conference on Kenya's energy needs, held in May 1979, options for averting a fuel-food crisis were considered. Recognition of Kenya's resource poverty and the immediate need to establish wood-fuel production products, charcoal conversion, conservation projects, and a research agenda were the main themes of that conference and the bases for a Kenyan energy policy.

  11. Potential Applications of LANDSAT Data in Energy Management Associated with Kenya's Forests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maghenda, M. M.; Bloemer, H. L.; Brumfield, J. O.

    1982-01-01

    LANDSAT can be effectively used to monitor the extent and magnitude of forest cover change in Kenya in order to evaluate the potential for energy supply. Digital processing of LANDSAT data provides a reliable monitoring technique for forest resource management in Kenya. Data analysis was used to illustrate that Kenya's forests are indeed diminishing. A model used to make projections for the availability of fuelwood as an energy source is presented. The resulting figures imply that Kenya's forest will all but disappear around the end of the 20th century. Analysis of LANDSAT data for Mau East substantiates these alarming findings.

  12. HIV among People Who Inject Drugs in the Middle East and North Africa: Systematic Review and Data Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Mumtaz, Ghina R.; Weiss, Helen A.; Thomas, Sara L.; Riome, Suzanne; Setayesh, Hamidreza; Riedner, Gabriele; Semini, Iris; Tawil, Oussama; Akala, Francisca Ayodeji; Wilson, David; Abu-Raddad, Laith J.

    2014-01-01

    Background It is perceived that little is known about the epidemiology of HIV infection among people who inject drugs (PWID) in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). The primary objective of this study was to assess the status of the HIV epidemic among PWID in MENA by describing HIV prevalence and incidence. Secondary objectives were to describe the risk behavior environment and the HIV epidemic potential among PWID, and to estimate the prevalence of injecting drug use in MENA. Methods and Findings This was a systematic review following the PRISMA guidelines and covering 23 MENA countries. PubMed, Embase, regional and international databases, as well as country-level reports were searched up to December 16, 2013. Primary studies reporting (1) the prevalence/incidence of HIV, other sexually transmitted infections, or hepatitis C virus (HCV) among PWIDs; or (2) the prevalence of injecting or sexual risk behaviors, or HIV knowledge among PWID; or (3) the number/proportion of PWID in MENA countries, were eligible for inclusion. The quality, quantity, and geographic coverage of the data were assessed at country level. Risk of bias in predefined quality domains was described to assess the quality of available HIV prevalence measures. After multiple level screening, 192 eligible reports were included in the review. There were 197 HIV prevalence measures on a total of 58,241 PWID extracted from reports, and an additional 226 HIV prevalence measures extracted from the databases. We estimated that there are 626,000 PWID in MENA (range: 335,000–1,635,000, prevalence of 0.24 per 100 adults). We found evidence of HIV epidemics among PWID in at least one-third of MENA countries, most of which are emerging concentrated epidemics and with HIV prevalence overall in the range of 10%–15%. Some of the epidemics have however already reached considerable levels including some of the highest HIV prevalence among PWID globally (87.1% in Tripoli, Libya). The relatively high prevalence of sharing needles/syringes (18%–28% in the last injection), the low levels of condom use (20%–54% ever condom use), the high levels of having sex with sex workers and of men having sex with men (15%–30% and 2%–10% in the last year, respectively), and of selling sex (5%–29% in the last year), indicate a high injecting and sexual risk environment. The prevalence of HCV (31%–64%) and of sexually transmitted infections suggest high levels of risk behavior indicative of the potential for more and larger HIV epidemics. Conclusions Our study identified a large volume of HIV-related biological and behavioral data among PWID in the MENA region. The coverage and quality of the data varied between countries. There is robust evidence for HIV epidemics among PWID in multiple countries, most of which have emerged within the last decade and continue to grow. The lack of sufficient evidence in some MENA countries does not preclude the possibility of hidden epidemics among PWID in these settings. With the HIV epidemic among PWID in overall a relatively early phase, there is a window of opportunity for prevention that should not be missed through the provision of comprehensive programs, including scale-up of harm reduction services and expansion of surveillance systems. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:24937136

  13. Methanotrophy and chemoautotrophy within the redox gradient of a large and deep tropical lake (Lake Kivu, East Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morana, Cedric; Borges, Alberto V.; Darchambeau, François; Roland, Fleur; Montante, Laetitia; Descy, Jean-Pierre; Bouillon, Steven

    2014-05-01

    Lake Kivu (East Africa) is a large (2370 km2) and deep (maximum depth of 485 m) meromictic lake. Its vertical structure consists of an oxic and nutrient-poor mixed layer down to 70 m maximum, and a permanently anoxic monimolimnion rich in dissolved gases (methane and carbon dioxide) and inorganic nutrients. Seasonal variation of the vertical position of the oxic-anoxic interface is driven by contrasting precipitation and wind speed regimes between rainy (October-May) and dry (June-September) season, the latter being characterized by a deepening of the oxic zone, and an increased input of dissolved gases and inorganic nutrients. Our work aimed at quantifying methanotrophic and chemoautotrophic production within the redox gradient of Lake Kivu and identifying the micro-organisms involved in these processes using phospholipid-derived fatty acid markers and their carbon stable isotope composition. Our approach combined both natural stable isotope abundance analysis and 13C-labelling (13C-DIC ; 13C-CH4) experiments. Sampling was carried out at two stations in Lake Kivu during rainy (February 2012) and dry (September 2012) season conditions. Methanotrophic bacterial production rates were highly variable (from 0.1 to 7.0 ?mol C L-1 d-1), but maximum values were always observed at the oxic-anoxic interface when the CH4:O2 ratio varied between 0.1 and 10, suggesting that the majority of methane was oxidized aerobically. Furthermore, strong stable isotope labelling of monounsaturated C16 fatty acids indicate that active methane oxidizers were related to the group of type I aerobic methanotrophs (gammaproteobacteria). Despite the dominance of aerobic methane oxidation, significant methanotrophic bacterial production rates were found below the oxic-anoxic interface during the rainy season, indicating that at least a fraction of the upcoming methane may be oxidized anaerobically. This observation was further confirmed by the strong labelling at these depths of the 10Me16:0 fatty acid, biomarker for sulphate-reducing bacteria, the syntrophic partners of anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea. The methanotrophic bacterial growth efficiency (MBGE) was variable (2-50%), and inversely related to methane concentration. Maximum chemoautotrophic bacterial production rates were recorded well below the oxycline, in sulfidic waters. However, during the rainy season, significant dark C fixation rates were measured near the oxic-anoxic interface, in a nitracline where sulphide was absent, suggesting that another energy source was involved. Incorporation of labelled carbon in the 16:1?9c ; 16:1?7c and 18:1?7 fatty acids suggest that the active chemoautotrophic organisms belong to the phylum proteobacteria. Together, the vertically integrated methanotrophic and chemoautotrophic production rates were 31 mmol m-2 d-1 and 41 mmol-2 d-1 during the rainy and dry season, respectively. These values are comparable to the net phytoplanktonic production rates in Lake Kivu ranging between 12 and 160 mmol m-2 d-1 (on average 52 mmol m-2 d-1). Our results indicate that methanotrophs and chemoautotrophs contribute substantially to the carbon cycle in Lake Kivu.

  14. Meteorologic influences on Plasmodium falciparum malaria in the Highland Tea Estates of Kericho, Western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Shanks, G Dennis; Hay, Simon I; Stern, David I; Biomndo, Kimutai; Snow, Robert W

    2002-12-01

    Recent epidemics of Plasmodium falciparum malaria have been observed in high-altitude areas of East Africa. Increased malaria incidence in these areas of unstable malaria transmission has been attributed to a variety of changes including global warming. To determine whether the reemergence of malaria in western Kenya could be attributed to changes in meteorologic conditions, we tested for trends in a continuous 30-year monthly malaria incidence dataset (1966-1995) obtained from complete hospital registers at a Kenyan tea plantation. Contemporary monthly meteorologic data (1966-1995) that originated from the tea estate meteorologic station and from global climatology records were also tested for trends. We found that total hospital admissions (malaria and nonmalaria) remained unchanged while malaria admissions increased significantly during the period. We also found that all meteorologic variables showed no trends for significance, even when combined into a monthly suitability index for malaria transmission. We conclude that climate changes have not caused the highland malaria resurgence in western Kenya. PMID:12498655

  15. Trends and variability in East African rainfall and temperature observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seregina, Larisa; Ermert, Volker; Fink, Andreas H.; Pinto, Joaquim G.

    2014-05-01

    The economy of East Africa is highly dependent on agriculture, leading to a strong vulnerability of local society to fluctuations in seasonal rainfall amounts, including extreme events. Hence, the knowledge about the evolution of seasonal rainfall under future climate conditions is crucial. Rainfall regimes over East Africa are influenced by multiple factors, including two monsoon systems, several convergence zones and the Rift Valley lakes. In addition, local conditions, like topography, modulate the large-scale rainfall pattern. East African rainfall variability is also influenced by various teleconnections like the Indian Ocean Zonal Mode and El Niño Southern Oscillation. Regarding future climate projections, regional and global climate models partly disagree on the increase or decrease of East African rainfall. The specific aim of the present study is the acquirement of historic data from weather stations in East Africa (Kenya, Tanzania, Ruanda and Uganda), the use of gridded satellite (rainfall) products (ARC2 and TRMM), and three-dimensional atmospheric reanalysis (e.g., ERA-Interim) to quantify climate variability in the recent past and to understand its causes. Climate variability and trends, including changes in extreme events, are evaluated using ETCCDI climate change and standardized precipitation indices. These climate indices are determined in order to investigate the variability of temperature and rainfall and their trends with the focus on most recent decades. In the follow-up, statistical and dynamical analyses are conducted to quantify the local impact of pertinent large-scale modes of climate variability (Indian Ocean Zonal Mode, El Niño Southern Oscillation, Sea Surface Temperature of the Indian Ocean).

  16. Developing a Nursing Database System in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Patricia L; Vindigni, Stephen M; Arudo, John; Waudo, Agnes N; Kamenju, Andrew; Ngoya, Japheth; Oywer, Elizabeth O; Rakuom, Chris P; Salmon, Marla E; Kelley, Maureen; Rogers, Martha; St Louis, Michael E; Marum, Lawrence H

    2007-01-01

    Objective To describe the development, initial findings, and implications of a national nursing workforce database system in Kenya. Principal Findings Creating a national electronic nursing workforce database provides more reliable information on nurse demographics, migration patterns, and workforce capacity. Data analyses are most useful for human resources for health (HRH) planning when workforce capacity data can be linked to worksite staffing requirements. As a result of establishing this database, the Kenya Ministry of Health has improved capability to assess its nursing workforce and document important workforce trends, such as out-migration. Current data identify the United States as the leading recipient country of Kenyan nurses. The overwhelming majority of Kenyan nurses who elect to out-migrate are among Kenya's most qualified. Conclusions The Kenya nursing database is a first step toward facilitating evidence-based decision making in HRH. This database is unique to developing countries in sub-Saharan Africa. Establishing an electronic workforce database requires long-term investment and sustained support by national and global stakeholders. PMID:17489921

  17. What Do We Need To Live on Planet Earth? A Case Study of Traditional Rural Life in East Africa. A Curriculum Unit for History and Social Studies, Grades 2-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphey, Carol; Wallace, Kendra R.

    The unit focuses on the lifestyles of two social groups in East Africa: the traditional nomadic Masai and the traditional agrarian Kikuyu. The activities engage students in an exploration of the dynamic interactions between these people and the animals that share the same land. Activities include: (1) "Houses"; (2) "Elephants"; (3) "Who Gets To…

  18. Potential Impacts of Climate Change on Coupled Socioecological Systems in East Africa: The Case of the Chagga Agroforestry and Maasai Agropastoralism across the Greater Environments of Mount Kilimanjaro Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mwangi, M. N.

    2014-12-01

    The various types of rainfall-dependent coupled socioecological systems that conspicuously characterize mountain-environments across Africa, such as the Chagga homegardens, an intensive agroforestry system, constitute a major economic backbone to the local inhabitants. Similarly, agropastoralism that characterizes the adjoining rangelands of such mountain-environments, such as that practiced by the Maasai people of Kenya, in the northern plains that adjoins Mount Kilimanjaro, is major contributor to local food security. Both Chagga agroforestry and Maasai agropastoralism also contribute greatly to broader-scale economic sectors and respectively to sustainable utilization of rangeland and mountain-environment resources. Like similar coupled socioecological systems across Africa, the Chagga agroforestry and Maasai agropastoralism are being, and will continue to be affected by the changing climate. This study uses an integrated approach to explore the sustainability of Chagga homegardens, an intensive agroforestry system, in the southern slopes of Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania. Concurrently, the sustainability of the Maasai agropastoralism (a livelihood-diversification type) in the northern slopes of Mount Kilimanjaro and the adjoining plains in Kenya is explored. This explication is followed by conceptualization of the potential future of Chagga agroforestry and Maasai agropastoralism systems under diverse scenarios of climate change—and alongside simultaneous effects of cross-scale social and biophysical factors, processes, and their interactions—in an integrated model. The premise of this study is that coupled socioecological systems, such as Chagga agroforestry and Maasai agropastoralism, linked to and/or dependent on mountain environments and microclimates, are natural-laboratories. Apropos this last point, the two systems offer timely insight into how similar systems in different geographical locations are likely to be influenced by the continuously changing climate amidst simultaneously heightened permeation of global socioeconomic and sociopolitical change. This insight become important as climate-influenced agriculture and pastoralism and their various derivatives continues to dominant livelihood systems across Africa.

  19. Diet of Theropithecus from 4 to 1 Ma in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Cerling, Thure E.; Chritz, Kendra L.; Jablonski, Nina G.; Leakey, Meave G.; Manthi, Fredrick Kyalo

    2013-01-01

    Theropithecus was a common large-bodied primate that co-occurred with hominins in many Plio-Pleistocene deposits in East and South Africa. Stable isotope analyses of tooth enamel from T. brumpti (4.0–2.5 Ma) and T. oswaldi (2.0–1.0 Ma) in Kenya show that the earliest Theropithecus at 4 Ma had a diet dominated by C4 resources. Progressively, this genus increased the proportion of C4-derived resources in its diet and by 1.0 Ma, had a diet that was nearly 100% C4-derived. It is likely that this diet was comprised of grasses or sedges; stable isotopes cannot, by themselves, give an indication of the relative importance of leaves, seeds, or underground storage organs to the diet of this primate. Theropithecus throughout the 4- to 1-Ma time range has a diet that is more C4-based than contemporaneous hominins of the genera Australopithecus, Kenyanthropus, and Homo; however, Theropithecus and Paranthropus have similar proportions of C4-based resources in their respective diets. PMID:23733967

  20. A comparison of the heart and muscle total lipid and fatty acid profiles of nine large shark species from the east coast of South Africa.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Bruce; Sidell, Jonathan; Rhodes, Jeffrey; Cliff, Geremy

    2011-03-01

    We have assessed the fatty acid profiles of the hearts and different muscle tissues from nine large shark species (Carcharhinus limbatus (blacktip), Carcharhinus obscurus (dusky), Carcharhinus brevipinna (spinner), Carcharhinus leucas (Zambezi/bull), Galeocerdo cuvier (tiger), Sphyrna lewini (scalloped hammerhead), Sphyrna zygaena (smooth hammerhead), Carcharodon carcharias (great white) and Carcharias taurus (raggedtooth/grey nurse/sand tiger)) found off the east coast of South Africa. While there was generally little variation between the species, all species showed profiles rich in both n6 and n3 polyunsaturated fatty acids compared to terrestrial commercial meats that have low n3. Thus, utilizing skeletal muscle tissues from sharks caught as part of the bycatch when fishing for teleosts would avoid unnecessary wastage of a potentially valuable resource, with all the possible health benefits of high quality protein combined with balanced polyunsaturates, although contamination with high levels of metabolic wastes, such as urea, may be a negative consideration. PMID:20694746

  1. Performance on Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices by African, East Indian, and White Engineering Students in South Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rushton, J. Philippe; Skuy, Mervyn; Fridjhon, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Tested the hypothesis that the Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices test has the same construct validity in African university students that it does in non-African university students. Differences in results for 294 engineering students in South Africa show that differences are not attributable to cultural peculiarities of the test, but are a…

  2. Fish Assemblage Patterns as a Tool to Aid Conservation in the Olifants River Catchment (East), South Africa

    EPA Science Inventory

    South Africa has committed to address freshwater conservation at the catchment scale, using a combination of landscape-level and species-level features as surrogates of freshwater biodiversity. Here we examined fishes in the Olifants catchment, where multiple anthropogenic pressu...

  3. Prediction, Assessment of the Rift Valley fever Activity in East and Southern Africa 2006 - 2008 and Possible Vector Control Strategies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Historical outbreaks of Rift Valley fever (RVF) since the early 1950s have been associated with cyclical patterns of the El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon which results in elevated and widespread rainfall over the RVF endemic areas of Africa. Using satellite measurements of global and ...

  4. Prediction, Assessment of the Rift Valley Fever Activity in East and Southern Africa 2006 - 2008 and Possible Vector Control Strategies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Historical episodic outbreaks of Rift Valley fever (RVF) since the early 1950s have been associated with cyclical patterns (El Niño and La Niña) of El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon which results in elevated and widespread rainfall over the RVF endemic areas of Africa. Using satellite ...

  5. Preparing for the Rollout of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP): A Vignette Survey to Identify Intended Sexual Behaviors among Women in Kenya and South Africa if Using PrEP

    PubMed Central

    Corneli, Amy; Field, Samuel; Namey, Emily; Agot, Kawango; Ahmed, Khatija; Odhiambo, Jacob; Skhosana, Joseph; Guest, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Several clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in reducing HIV risk. One concern with introducing PrEP is whether users will engage in riskier sexual behaviors. Methods We assessed the effect that PrEP may have on sexual risk behaviors by administering a survey to 799 women in Bondo, Kenya, and Pretoria, South Africa. Participants were asked about their sexual behavior intentions twice — once as if they were taking PrEP and once as if they were not taking PrEP — within four risk situations (vignettes). They responded using a 5-point ordinal scale. We used a series of linear mixed effects models with an unstructured residual covariance matrix to estimate the between- and within-subject differences in the mean likelihood of engaging in risky sexual behavior across the PrEP and non-PrEP contexts. We also calculated the total percentage of participants who reported a greater likelihood of engaging in risky sexual behavior if taking PrEP than if not taking PrEP, by vignette. Results We found statistically significant differences in the mean likelihood of engaging in risky sexual behavior with the between-subject comparison (-0.17, p < 0.01) and with the within-subject comparison (-0.31, p < 0.001). Depending on the vignette, 27% to 40% of participants reported a greater likelihood of engaging in risky sexual behavior if taking PrEP than if not taking PrEP. Conclusions Our findings indicate that modest increases in risky sexual behavior could occur with PrEP. Although responses from the majority of participants suggest they would not be more likely to engage in risky sexual behavior if they took PrEP, a substantial proportion might. Programs rolling out PrEP should be prepared to assist similar women in making informed choices about reducing their risk of HIV and about their sexual health beyond HIV prevention. PMID:26056842

  6. Entrepreneurship and Socioeconomic Development in Africa: A Reality or Myth?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nafukho, Fredrick M.; Muyia, Machuma A. Helen

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the development of entrepreneurship education and training in Kenya as a strategic approach to addressing the unemployment problem among the school and university graduates in Kenya and Africa in general. Design/methodology/approach: The study adopted a critical review of the literature method to…

  7. Phytoliths Used to Investigate the Effects of the Indonesian Mount Toba Super-Eruption (~75 kyr) in East Africa: A Subdecadal Record from Lake Malawi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yost, C. L.; Cohen, A. S.

    2014-12-01

    The recent discovery of cryptotephra visually and chemically matched to the Youngest Toba Tuff (YTT, 75.0 ± 0.9 kyr) in Lake Malawi drill core sediments has spurred renewed interest in this period of time in East Africa. The YTT is the most recent and largest of the four Mount Toba eruptions, and is the only super-eruption to have taken place during the Quaternary. The timing of the YTT approximately coincides with a hypothesized human genetic bottleneck. Several climate models have proposed an episode of global cooling following the YTT; however, the magnitude and duration of the cooling is much debated, ranging from just a few degrees of cooling to a state of volcanic winter. Cored sediments from Lake Malawi provide an excellent record of local variability in the lake's watershed that may be linked to specific climatic events. To investigate the possible effects of the YTT in East Africa, we continuously sampled Lake Malawi drill core 2A-10H-2 at 2-4 mm (~6 yr) intervals above and below the first occurrence of the YTT. Poaceae phytoliths were grouped into plant functional types (C3, C4, xerophytic, mesophytic, arboreal, etc.), revealing mostly subtle changes in terrestrial vegetation over the ~400 yr time period examined. Abrupt increases in concentration values for phytoliths derived from riverine Podostemaceae plants appear to signal increased discharge from rivers draining the surrounding uplands. Perhaps most significant is the increasing trend in burned phytoliths and decreasing trend in tree phytoliths post-YTT. Although there appears to be a very weak cooling signal synchronous with the YTT, the most abrupt terrestrial vegetation changes appear to be better correlated with the deposition of a slightly older cryptotephra horizon derived from the local Rungwe Volcanic Province. A potential complication with this record is the existence of a turbidite pre-YTT that encompasses the Rungwe horizon.

  8. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the adult population within the Middle East and North Africa region: rationale and design of the BREATHE study.

    PubMed

    El Hasnaoui, Abdelkader; Rashid, Nauman; Lahlou, Aicha; Salhi, Hocine; Doble, Adam; Nejjari, Chakib

    2012-12-01

    The objective of the BREATHE study was to estimate the regional prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) symptoms within the general population in the Middle East/North Africa (MENA) region and to document risk factors, disease characteristics and management using a standardised methodology. This was an observational population-based survey performed in ten countries in the Middle East and North Africa (Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, Turkey and United Arab Emirates), together with Pakistan. A general population sample of 10,000 subjects ? 40 years of age in each country or zone was generated from random telephone numbers. Structured interviews were proposed by telephone. A screening questionnaire was administered to each subject collecting information on respiratory symptoms and smoking habits. Subjects with chronic bronchitis or breathlessness and smoking ? 10 pack · years fulfilled the epidemiological definition of COPD ("COPD" population). This population then completed a full disease questionnaire, the COPD Assessment Test (CAT) and a cost-of-disease questionnaire. A randomly selected sample was also assessed by spirometry. In all, 457,258 telephone numbers were generated and contact was established with 210,121 subjects, of whom 65,154 were eligible and 62,086 accepted to participate. The overall response rate was 74.2%. 2,187 (3.5%) subjects fulfilled the criteria for the "COPD" population. Evaluable spirometry data were obtained from 1,847 (14.2%) subjects to whom it was proposed. The BREATHE study has collected a large amount of information on COPD variables from a representative sample of the general population of countries in the MENA region, which can be compared with other regional COPD initiatives. PMID:23290702

  9. Pleistocene soil development and paleoenvironmental dynamics in East Africa: a multidisciplinary study of the Homo-bearing Aalat succession, Dandiero Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarciglia, Fabio; Mercatante, Giuseppe; Donato, Paola; Ghinassi, Massimiliano; Carnevale, Giorgio; Delfino, Massimo; Oms, Oriol; Papini, Mauro; Pavia, Marco; Sani, Federico; Rook, Lorenzo

    2015-04-01

    Pleistocene environmental changes in East Africa, largely documented by deep marine or lacustrine records correlated with inland high-resolution, Homo-bearing stratigraphic successions, have been so far interpreted as a major cause of faunal dispersal and human evolution. However, only few studies focused on reconstruction of paleoenvironmental dynamics from continental successions, given the usually poor continuity and extension of stratigraphic records. In this work we report on a multidisciplinary study of the Early to Middle Pleistocene sedimentary fill of the Dandiero Basin (Eritrean Danakil), a morpho-tectonic depression in the East African Rift System, which represents the only continental stratigraphy including human remains of Homo erectus/ergaster and abundant fossil vertebrates in the northernmost sector of this region. Sedimentological, pedological, volcanological and paleontological investigations were performed on the Aalat section, located in the northern part of the Dandiero Basin, as tools for an integrated reconstruction of the Early-Middle Pleistocene transition in East Africa. This section is almost 300 m thick and records repeated shifts from fluvial to deltaic and lacustrine depositional environments, as a response to local tectonic activity and climate changes. Sedimentary facies distribution and paleocurrent data show that sedimentation was controlled by a NS-trending axial drainage. Some tephra layers were identified both at the bottom and the top of the section, whereas two main fossiliferous layers were detected in its lower part. Terrestrial vertebrate faunas include a typical Early to Middle Pleistocene East African mammalian assemblage, where taxa characterized by strong water dependence prevail. Also the ichthyofauna is consistent with the shallow water fluvio-lacustrine paleobiotopes. High-quality paleomagnetic analyses, integrated with radiometric dating and vertebrate paleontology, allowed to substantiate the chronological constraints of the Aalat section to a time span approximately bracketed between the Jaramillo event (ca. 1.07-0.99 Ma) and the Matuyama-Brunhes magnetic field reversal (ca. 0.78 Ma). High rates of sedimentary aggradation can be estimated around 1 mm/a, coherently with a poor to moderate degree of soil development and evidence of soil truncation by erosion. Physico-chemical, mineralogical, geochemical and micromorphological analyses were carried out on selected soil samples. Weathering and pedogenetic features mainly consist of pedogenic structure, secondary carbonate accumulations (following carbonate leaching) and iron-oxide/hydroxide segregations, promoted by water infiltration under varying drainage conditions and/or seasonal contrast. The complex patterns of some petrocalcic horizons and rare rubified soils testify for occasionally longer geomorphic stability and non-deposition, which were more prone to pedogenesis. Our multidisciplinary study revealed that the Aalat section in the Dandiero Basin represents a promising continental archive of the main paleoenvironmental changes occurred during the Early-Middle Pleistocene transition in East Africa.

  10. Antimicrobial, Anthelmintic Activities and Characterisation of Functional Phenolic Acids of Achyranthes aspera Linn.: A Medicinal Plant Used for the Treatment of Wounds and Ringworm in East Africa

    PubMed Central

    Ndhlala, Ashwell R.; Ghebrehiwot, Habteab M.; Ncube, Bhekumthetho; Aremu, Adeyemi O.; Gruz, Ji?í; Šubrtová, Michaela; Doležal, Karel; du Plooy, Christian P.; Abdelgadir, Hafiz A.; Van Staden, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Achyranthes aspera Linn. (Amaranthaceae) commonly known as Prickly Chaff flower (English) is traditionally used for treating a number of ailments. Different parts of the plant are used in treating wounds and ringworm in East Africa and elsewhere for a number of ailments. In this study, leaf extracts of A. aspera collected from two different geographical locations (Ciaat, Eritrea and Ukulinga, South Africa) were evaluated for antibacterial, antifungal, anthelmintic activities and the plant characterized for functional phenolic acids as well as protein binding capacity. The pathogens used in the tests were, two Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae), two Gram-positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus), a filamentus yeast-like fungus (Candida albicans) and a free-living nematode (Caenorhabditis elegans). The water and acetone extracts of the samples collected from Ciaat exhibited good antibacterial, antifungal and anthelmintic activity (MIC < 1 mg/ml) except the water extract against E. coli which showed moderate activity. In contrast, the extracts collected from Ukulinga exhibited moderate to weak activities except for the acetone (aq.) extracts which had good activity against some of the tested organisms. UHPLC-MS/MS revealed variation in the levels of some functional phenolic compounds, with rutin, chlorogenic acid and genistein not being detected in the extracts from Ukulinga. The variation was also observed in the protein binding capacity, which could offer a predictive wound healing model. All extracts from plant samples collected at Ciaat expressed significant dominant potency compared to similar extracts from Ukulinga. PMID:26635604

  11. Variability of vitamins B1, B2 and minerals content in baobab (Adansonia digitata) leaves in East and West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Hyacinthe, Traoré; Charles, Parkouda; Adama, Korbo; Diarra, Compaoré-Sérémé; Dicko, Mamoudou H; Svejgaard, Jan J; Diawara, Bréhima

    2015-01-01

    The regional variability and age–age correlation on vitamin B1, vitamin B2 and minerals (Ca, Mg, P, K, Cu, Fe, Mn, Na, and Zn) concentration in baobab leaves were investigated. Baobab was cultivated from seeds from 11 countries including Benin, Burkina Faso, Kenya, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Niger, Tanzania, Togo, Senegal, and Sudan. Vitamins B1 and B2 content were assessed using microbiological VitaFast kits methods and minerals by atomic absorption and flame spectrometry methods. Overall, the results showed a higher content of vitamin B2 compared to vitamin B1 with the highest vitamin B2 content (1.04 ± 0.05 mg/100 g DM) from Senegal. The highest iron (Fe) content of 26.39 mg/100 g was found in baobab leaves from Mali. For age–age correlation, adult baobab leaves of Nankoun in Burkina Faso provided the highest calcium (Ca) content of 3373 mg/100 g. However, for provenance trial, young plants from three communities of Burkina Faso showed the highest calcium (Ca) and potassium (K) content. The study demonstrated that vitamins B1 and B2 and mineral contents in baobab leaves vary with the country and the age of the tree. Vitamin B1 content was higher in baobab leaves from ascendants compared to those from descendants, while in contrast vitamin B2 content was higher in the leaves from the descendants compared to their ascendants (mother tree). PMID:25649547

  12. Variability of vitamins B1, B2 and minerals content in baobab (Adansonia digitata) leaves in East and West Africa.

    PubMed

    Hyacinthe, Traoré; Charles, Parkouda; Adama, Korbo; Diarra, Compaoré-Sérémé; Dicko, Mamoudou H; Svejgaard, Jan J; Diawara, Bréhima

    2015-01-01

    The regional variability and age-age correlation on vitamin B1, vitamin B2 and minerals (Ca, Mg, P, K, Cu, Fe, Mn, Na, and Zn) concentration in baobab leaves were investigated. Baobab was cultivated from seeds from 11 countries including Benin, Burkina Faso, Kenya, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Niger, Tanzania, Togo, Senegal, and Sudan. Vitamins B1 and B2 content were assessed using microbiological VitaFast kits methods and minerals by atomic absorption and flame spectrometry methods. Overall, the results showed a higher content of vitamin B2 compared to vitamin B1 with the highest vitamin B2 content (1.04 ± 0.05 mg/100 g DM) from Senegal. The highest iron (Fe) content of 26.39 mg/100 g was found in baobab leaves from Mali. For age-age correlation, adult baobab leaves of Nankoun in Burkina Faso provided the highest calcium (Ca) content of 3373 mg/100 g. However, for provenance trial, young plants from three communities of Burkina Faso showed the highest calcium (Ca) and potassium (K) content. The study demonstrated that vitamins B1 and B2 and mineral contents in baobab leaves vary with the country and the age of the tree. Vitamin B1 content was higher in baobab leaves from ascendants compared to those from descendants, while in contrast vitamin B2 content was higher in the leaves from the descendants compared to their ascendants (mother tree). PMID:25649547

  13. Beginning with sustainable scale up in mind: initial results from a population, health and environment project in East Africa.

    PubMed

    Ghiron, Laura; Shillingi, Lucy; Kabiswa, Charles; Ogonda, Godfrey; Omimo, Antony; Ntabona, Alexis; Simmons, Ruth; Fajans, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Small-scale pilot projects have demonstrated that integrated population, health and environment approaches can address the needs and rights of vulnerable communities. However, these and other types of health and development projects have rarely gone on to influence larger policy and programme development. ExpandNet, a network of health professionals working on scaling up, argues this is because projects are often not designed with future sustainability and scaling up in mind. Developing and implementing sustainable interventions that can be applied on a larger scale requires a different mindset and new approaches to small-scale/pilot testing. This paper shows how this new approach is being applied and the initial lessons from its use in the Health of People and Environment in the Lake Victoria Basin Project currently underway in Uganda and Kenya. Specific lessons that are emerging are: 1) ongoing, meaningful stakeholder engagement has significantly shaped the design and implementation, 2) multi-sectoral projects are complex and striving for simplicity in the interventins is challenging, and 3) projects that address a sharply felt need experience substantial pressure for scale up, even before their effectiveness is established. Implicit in this paper is the recommendation that other projects would also benefit from applying a scale-up perspective from the outset. PMID:24908459

  14. Analysis of the summertime buildup of tropospheric ozone abundances over the Middle East and North Africa as observed

    E-print Network

    the boundary layer accounts for about 25% of the local Middle Eastern contribution to the ozone enhancementAnalysis of the summertime buildup of tropospheric ozone abundances over the Middle East and North transport model to interpret observations of tropospheric ozone from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer

  15. Coastal East Africa and the Western Indian Ocean: Long-Distance Trade, Empire, Migration, and Regional Unity, 1750-1970

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Erik

    2002-01-01

    In this article, the author looks closely at the recent history of the East African coast and the Swahili people who live there. In doing so he hopes to highlight the inadequacy of the area studies/continentalist approach to studying and teaching the Swahili and to propose a different way of considering their past. His contention is that one can…

  16. Changing Climate, Disrupted Livelihoods: The Case of Vulnerability of Nomadic Maasai Pastoralism to Recurrent Droughts in Kajiado District, Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mwangi, M. N.; Desanker, P. V.

    2007-12-01

    Pastoralism is practiced in all arid and semiarid lands (ASALs) of Africa. High interannual rainfall variability and degraded ecosystems characterize these ASALs and limits arable farming. Under these conditions, pastoralism has evolved as the most feasible livelihood system in ASALs, where total annual rainfall correlates with annual net primary productivity, especially grass. Maasai of East Africa are the largest group of nomadic pastoralists in Africa, with about two-thirds living in southern Kenya, mainly in Kajiado and Narok Districts. Maasai people of Kenya subsist by nomadic pastoralism. Nomads migrate with their livestock in search of natural pastures and water as climatic and environmental circumstances mandate. Successful migrations of nomadic pastoralists are being hampered by changing social and ecological factors both at local and broader scales. What is more, increased frequency and duration of drought constitute a major challenge with which the Maasai have to confront. Drought is a slow-developing phenomenon; therefore, it captures delayed attention. Nonetheless, the cumulative impacts of drought are more immense. Drought triggers catastrophic events that diminish adaptive capacity of inhabitants of these ASALs; this is conspicuous in Kajiado District where livestock productivity plummet as resource base erodes. What is more, global climate change is projected to intensify the occurrence, severity and duration of droughts in this region. Frequent droughts are likely to disrupt proper functioning of nomadic Maasai pastoralism. This study presents findings from an integrated research conducted in Kajiado District during the last two years. Spatiotemporal trends of drought, effects of drought on, and possible future of nomadic Maasai pastoralism are presented. This is informative to the Maasai pastoralists, policy makers and other actors in this sector. Most important, the study is contributes toward formulation of informed drought management strategies, which in turn may enhance adaptive capacity among the nomadic Maasai pastoralists.

  17. Rural culture and the conservation of Mackinders eagle owls (Bubo capensis mackinderi) in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Ogada, Darcy L

    2008-06-01

    The author describes her fieldwork studying a population of Mackinders eagle owls that live adjacent to small-scale farms in rural Kenya. Her study investigated the effects of farming practices on the diet and breeding ecology of the owls. She documented local people's attitudes toward owls since owls are taboo throughout Africa. She describes a typical day in the field, the community aspect of her project, her unique experiences studying owls in Kenya, and promotion of owl tourism. PMID:18689078

  18. Phylogenetic analysis of Bunyamwera and Ngari viruses (family Bunyaviridae, genus Orthobunyavirus) isolated in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Odhiambo, C; Venter, M; Lwande, O; Swanepoel, R; Sang, R

    2016-01-01

    Orthobunyaviruses, tri-segmented, negative-sense RNA viruses, have long been associated with mild to severe human disease in Africa, but not haemorrhagic fever. However, during a Rift Valley fever outbreak in East Africa in 1997-1998, Ngari virus was isolated from two patients and antibody detected in several others with haemorrhagic fever. The isolates were used to identify Ngari virus as a natural Orthobunyavirus reassortant. Despite their potential to reassort and cause severe human disease, characterization of orthobunyaviruses is hampered by paucity of genetic sequences. Our objective was to obtain complete gene sequences of two Bunyamwera virus and three Ngari virus isolates from recent surveys in Kenya and to determine their phylogenetic positioning within the Bunyamwera serogroup. Newly sequenced Kenyan Bunyamwera virus isolates clustered closest to a Bunyamwera virus isolate from the same locality and a Central African Republic isolate indicating that similar strains may be circulating regionally. Recent Kenyan Ngari isolates were closest to the Ngari isolates associated with the 1997-1998 haemorrhagic fever outbreak. We observed a temporal/geographical relationship among Ngari isolates in all three gene segments suggesting a geographical/temporal association with genetic diversity. These sequences in addition to earlier sequences can be used for future analyses of this neglected but potentially deadly group of viruses. PMID:26118981

  19. Are HIV Epidemics among Men Who Have Sex with Men Emerging in the Middle East and North Africa?: A Systematic Review and Data Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Mumtaz, Ghina; Hilmi, Nahla; McFarland, Willi; Kaplan, Rachel L.; Akala, Francisca Ayodeji; Semini, Iris; Riedner, Gabriele; Tawil, Oussama; Wilson, David; Abu-Raddad, Laith J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Men who have sex with men (MSM) bear a disproportionately higher burden of HIV infection than the general population. MSM in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) are a largely hidden population because of a prevailing stigma towards this type of sexual behavior, thereby limiting the ability to assess infection transmission patterns among them. It is widely perceived that data are virtually nonexistent on MSM and HIV in this region. The objective of this review was to delineate, for the first time, the evidence on the epidemiology of HIV among MSM in MENA. Methods and Findings This was a systematic review of all biological, behavioral, and other related data on HIV and MSM in MENA. Sources of data included PubMed (Medline), international organizations' reports and databases, country-level reports and databases including governmental and nongovernmental organization publications, and various other institutional documents. This review showed that onsiderable data are available on MSM and HIV in MENA. While HIV prevalence continues at low levels among different MSM groups, HIV epidemics appear to be emerging in at least few countries, with a prevalence reaching up to 28% among certain MSM groups. By 2008, the contribution of MSM transmission to the total HIV notified cases increased and exceeded 25% in several countries. The high levels of risk behavior (4–14 partners on average in the last six months among different MSM populations) and of biomarkers of risks (such as herpes simplex virus type 2 at 3%–54%), the overall low rate of consistent condom use (generally below 25%), the relative frequency of male sex work (20%–76%), and the substantial overlap with heterosexual risk behavior and injecting drug use suggest potential for further spread. Conclusions This systematic review and data synthesis indicate that HIV epidemics appear to be emerging among MSM in at least a few MENA countries and could already be in a concentrated state among several MSM groups. There is an urgent need to expand HIV surveillance and access to HIV testing, prevention, and treatment services in a rapidly narrowing window of opportunity to prevent the worst of HIV transmission among MSM in the Middle East and North Africa. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:21829329

  20. Caldera-structure relationships in Kenya - Observations from satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blodget, Herbert W.

    1991-01-01

    Maps were constructed showing lineaments displayed on four Landsat MSS images, to study volcanic-tectonic relationships in the Kenya segment of the Gregory or eastern sector of the East African rift system. Many of the mapped lineaments correlated well with fractures shown on geological maps. Selected lineaments, transverse to the rift trend, could be extrapolated to intersect rift faults at locations correlative with the locations of Kenya's seven volcanic calderas. The volcano-genetic difference between these intersections vs. similar intersections having no obvious relationship to any type of volcanic vent is not yet understood.

  1. Thermal and mechanical development of the East African Rift System

    E-print Network

    Ebinger, Cynthia Joan

    1988-01-01

    The deep basins, uplifted flanks, and volcanoes of the Western and Kenya rift systems have developed along the western and eastern margins of the 1300 km-wide East African plateau. Structural patterns deduced from field, ...

  2. Restricted Genetic Variation in Populations of Achatina (Lissachatina) fulica outside of East Africa and the Indian Ocean Islands Points to the Indian Ocean Islands as the Earliest Known Common Source

    PubMed Central

    Fontanilla, Ian Kendrich C.; Sta. Maria, Inna Mikaella P.; Garcia, James Rainier M.; Ghate, Hemant; Naggs, Fred; Wade, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    The Giant African Land Snail, Achatina (?=?Lissachatina) fulica Bowdich, 1822, is a tropical crop pest species with a widespread distribution across East Africa, the Indian subcontinent, Southeast Asia, the Pacific, the Caribbean, and North and South America. Its current distribution is attributed primarily to the introduction of the snail to new areas by Man within the last 200 years. This study determined the extent of genetic diversity in global A. fulica populations using the mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA gene. A total of 560 individuals were evaluated from 39 global populations obtained from 26 territories. Results reveal 18 distinct A. fulica haplotypes; 14 are found in East Africa and the Indian Ocean islands, but only two haplotypes from the Indian Ocean islands emerged from this region, the C haplotype, now distributed across the tropics, and the D haplotype in Ecuador and Bolivia. Haplotype E from the Philippines, F from New Caledonia and Barbados, O from India and Q from Ecuador are variants of the emergent C haplotype. For the non-native populations, the lack of genetic variation points to founder effects due to the lack of multiple introductions from the native range. Our current data could only point with certainty to the Indian Ocean islands as the earliest known common source of A. fulica across the globe, which necessitates further sampling in East Africa to determine the source populations of the emergent haplotypes. PMID:25203830

  3. Turbidite systems of lacustrine rift basins: Examples from the Lake Kivu and Lake Albert rifts, East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuewei; Scholz, Christopher A.

    2015-07-01

    The Holocene turbidite systems of Lake Kivu and the Pliocene turbidite systems of Lake Albert in the East African Rift were examined using high-resolution 2-D and 3-D seismic reflection data and sediment core information. Based on investigations of seismic facies and lithofacies, several key turbidity-flow depositional elements were observed, including channels, overbank levees with sediment waves, and depositional lobes. Analyses of the sources of the recent and ancient turbidite systems in these two extensional basins suggest that flood-induced hyperpycnal flows are important triggers of turbidity currents in lacustrine rift basins. From source to sink, sediment dispersal, facies distribution, and depositional thickness of the turbidite systems are strongly influenced by rift topography. The Lake Kivu and Lake Albert rifts serve as excellent analogues for understanding the sedimentary patterns of lacustrine turbidites in extensional basins.

  4. Development and Validation of Remote Sensing-Based Surface Inundation Products for Vector-Borne Disease Risk in East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, K.; McDonald, K. C.; Ceccato, P.; Schroeder, R.; Podest, E.

    2014-12-01

    The potential impact of climate variability and change on the spread of infectious disease is of increasingly critical concern to public health. Newly-available remote sensing datasets may be combined with predictive modeling to develop new capabilities to mitigate risks of vector-borne diseases such as malaria, leishmaniasis, and rift valley fever. We have developed improved remote sensing-based products for monitoring water bodies and inundation dynamics that have potential utility for improving risk forecasts of vector-borne disease epidemics. These products include daily and seasonal surface inundation based on the global mappings of inundated area fraction derived at the 25-km scale from active and passive microwave instruments ERS, QuikSCAT, ASCAT, and SSM/I data - the Satellite Water Microwave Product Series (SWAMPS). Focusing on the East African region, we present validation of this product using multi-temporal classification of inundated areas in this region derived from high resolution PALSAR (100m) and Landsat (30m) observations. We assess historical occurrence of malaria in the east African country of Eritrea with respect to the time series SWAMPS datasets, and we aim to construct a framework for use of these new datasets to improve prediction of future malaria risk in this region. This work is supported through funding from the NASA Applied Sciences Program, the NASA Terrestrial Ecology Program, and the NASA Making Earth System Data Records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) Program. This study is also supported and monitored by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) under Grant - CREST Grant # NA11SEC4810004. The statements contained within the manuscript/research article are not the opinions of the funding agency or the U.S. government, but reflect the authors' opinions. This work was conducted in part under the framework of the ALOS Kyoto and Carbon Initiative. ALOS PALSAR data were provided by JAXA EORC.

  5. Potential for human immunodeficiency virus parenteral transmission in the Middle East and North Africa: An analysis using hepatitis C virus as a proxy biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Mohamoud, Yousra A; Miller, F DeWolfe; Abu-Raddad, Laith J

    2014-01-01

    The Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region has endured several major events of infection parenteral transmission. Recent work has established the utility of using hepatitis C virus (HCV) as a proxy biomarker for assessing the epidemic potential for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) parenteral transmission. In this review, we use data on the prevalence of HCV infection antibody (seroprevalence) among general population and high risk population groups to assess the potential for HIV parenteral transmission in MENA. Relatively low prevalence of HCV infection in the general population groups was reported in most MENA countries indicating that parenteral HIV transmission at endemic levels does not appear to be a cause for concern. Nonetheless, there could be opportunities for localized HIV outbreaks and transmission of other blood-borne infections in some settings such as healthcare facilities. Though there have been steady improvements in safety measures related to parenteral modes of transmission in the region, these improvements have not been uniform across all countries. More precautions, including infection control training programs, surveillance systems for nosocomial infections and wider coverage and evaluation of hepatitis B virus immunization programs need to be implemented to avoid the unnecessary spread of HIV, HCV, and other blood-borne pathogens along the parenteral modes of transmission. PMID:25278675

  6. Generic along-strike segmentation of Afar normal faults, East Africa: Implications on fault growth and stress heterogeneity on seismogenic fault planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manighetti, I.; Caulet, C.; Barros, L.; Perrin, C.; Cappa, F.; Gaudemer, Y.

    2015-02-01

    Understanding how natural faults are segmented along their length can provide useful insights into fault growth processes, stress distribution on fault planes, and earthquake dynamics. We use cumulative displacement profiles to analyze the two largest scales of segmentation of ˜900 normal faults in Afar, East Africa. We build upon a prior study by Manighetti et al. (2009) and develop a new signal processing method aimed at recovering the number, position, displacement, and length of both the major (i.e., longest) and the subordinate, secondary segments within the faults. Regardless of their length, age, geographic location, total displacement, and slip rate, 90% of the faults contain two to five major segments, whereas more than 70% of these major segments are divided into two to four secondary segments. In each hierarchical rank of fault segmentation, most segments have a similar proportional length, whereas the number of segments slightly decreases with fault structural maturity. The along-strike segmentation of the Afar faults is thus generic at its two largest scales. We summarize published fault segment data on 42 normal, reverse, and strike-slip faults worldwide, and find a similar number (two to five) of major and secondary segments across the population. We suggest a fault growth scenario that might account for the generic large-scale segmentation of faults. The observation of a generic segmentation suggests that seismogenic fault planes are punctuated with a deterministic number of large stress concentrations, which are likely to control the initiation, arrest and hence extent and magnitude of earthquake ruptures.

  7. The resistance to human plasma of Trypanosoma brucei, T. rhodesiense and T. gambiense. II. Survey of strains from East Africa and Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Hawking, F

    1976-01-01

    Tests were made in vivo of the sensitivity or resistance to human plasma of many strains of polymorphic trypanosomes. Five strains of T. gambiense from Nigeria were tested and all were highly resistant. Fifteen strains of T. rhodesiense (isolated from man in East Africa) were tested and they showed great variation in their degree of resistance from high resistance (five strains) to only subresistance (two strains). Forty strains of T. brucei (isolated from animals or tsetse flies) were tested; 20 were sensitive, nine were doubtful (probably sensitive) and 10 were subresistant (i.e., probably only one of a million trypanosomes in them was resistant). One strain (ETAT 10, isolated from tsetse flies) was highly resistant. During this work, tests were made on 14 stains of T. brucei (isolated from animals or fly) which were recorded as having been tested on human volunteers. Six of these strains were sensitive to human plasma and none had infected volunteers. Seven strains were subresistant, and three had infected volunteers. One strain was highly resistant and had infected a laboratory worker. For practical purposes it is advisable to consider that if a strain of polymorphic trypanosomes is plasmasensitive, it is probably not infective for man; if a strain is at all plasma-resistant it is potentially infective for man; and if a strain is highly resistant then it is almost certainly infective for man. PMID:841655

  8. Biogeochemistry of a large and deep tropical lake (Lake Kivu, East Africa: insights from a stable isotope study covering an annual cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morana, C.; Darchambeau, F.; Roland, F. A. E.; Borges, A. V.; Muvundja, F.; Kelemen, Z.; Masilya, P.; Descy, J.-P.; Bouillon, S.

    2015-08-01

    During this study, we investigated the seasonal variability of the concentration and the stable isotope composition of several inorganic and organic matter (OM) reservoirs in the large, oligotrophic and deep tropical Lake Kivu (East Africa). Data were acquired over 1 year at a fortnightly temporal resolution. The ?13C signature of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) increased linearly with time during the rainy season, then suddenly decreased during the dry season due to vertical mixing with 13C-depleted DIC waters. The ?13C signature of the particulate organic carbon pool (POC) revealed the presence of a consistently abundant methanotrophic biomass in the oxycline throughout the year. We also noticed a seasonal shift during the dry season toward higher values in the ?15N of particulate nitrogen (PN) in the mixed layer and ?15N-PN was significantly related to the contribution of cyanobacteria to the phytoplankton assemblage, suggesting that rainy season conditions could be more favourable to atmospheric nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria. Finally, zooplankton were slightly enriched in 13C compared to the autochthonous POC pool, and the ?15N signature of zooplankton followed well the seasonal variability in ?15N-PN, consistently 3.0 ± 1.1 ‰ heavier than the PN pool. Together, ?13C and ?15N analysis suggests that zooplankton directly incorporate algal-derived OM in their biomass, and that they rely almost exclusively on this source of OM throughout the year in general agreement with the very low allochthonous OM inputs from rivers in Lake Kivu.

  9. Characterizing the Effects of Irrigation in the Middle East and North Africa Using Remotely-Sensed Vegetation and Water Cycle Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolten, J. D.; Ozdogan, M.; Beaudoing, H. K.; Rodell, M.

    2012-12-01

    A majority of the countries in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region suffer from water scarcity due in part to widespread rainfall deficits, unprecedented levels of water demand, and the inefficient use of renewable freshwater resources. Since a majority of the water withdrawal in the MENA is used for irrigation, there is a desperate need for improved understanding of irrigation practices and agricultural water use in the region. Here, satellite-derived irrigation maps and crop-type agricultural data are applied to the Land Data Assimilation System for the MENA region (MENA LDAS), designed to provide regional, gridded fields of hydrological states and fluxes relevant for water resources assessments. Within MENA-LDAS, the Catchment Land Surface Model (CLSM) simulates the location, timing, and amount of water applied through agricultural irrigation practices over the region from 2002-2012. In addition to simulating the irrigation impact on evapotranspiration, soil moisture, and runoff, we also investigate regional changes in terrestrial water storage (TWS) observed from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) and simulated by CLSM.

  10. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers and alternative flame retardants in air and precipitation samples from the northern Lake Victoria region, East Africa.

    PubMed

    Arinaitwe, Kenneth; Muir, Derek C G; Kiremire, Bernard T; Fellin, Phil; Li, Henrik; Teixeira, Camilla

    2014-01-01

    High volume air and precipitation samples were collected close to the shore of Lake Victoria at Entebbe, Uganda, between October 2008 and July 2010 inclusive. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and alternative flame retardants (AFRs) were analyzed by GC-MS. BDEs 47, 99, and 209 were the predominant PBDEs with mean concentrations (in air) of 9.84, 4.38, 8.27 pg m(-3) and mean fluxes in precipitation of 3.40, 6.23, and 7.82 ng m(-2) sample(-1), respectively. 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), and hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD), anti- and syn-Dechlorane plus were detected at levels comparable with those of PBDEs. Both PBDEs and AFRs in air generally increased from 2008 to 2010. Elevated PBDE concentrations in air were associated with slow moving low altitude air masses from the region immediately adjacent to the lake, while low concentrations were mostly associated with fast moving westerly and southwesterly air masses. Analysis of the octa- and nona-BDE profiles suggested photolysis and pyrolytic debromination of BDE-209 in the air samples. The highly halogenated and most abundant PBDEs and AFRs in air also predominated in precipitation samples. This is the first study to report flame retardants in high volume air samples and precipitation in Equatorial Africa. PMID:24400732

  11. On the Occurrence of Counter Equatorial Electrojet Over Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabiu, A. B.; O, F. O.; Uozumi, T.

    2014-12-01

    This study engaged year 2009 data of the horizontal component of the Earth's magnetic field obtained from four geomagnetic observatories in the East and West African meridians to study the occurrence of counter electrojet along the African longitudes: Ilorin (Nigeria: 4.68°E, 8.50°N; dip latitude, 1.82°S), Addis Ababa (Ethiopia: 38.77°E, 9.04°N; dip latitude, 0.18°N), Lagos (Nigeria: 3.27°E, 6.48°N; dip latitude 3.04°S), and Nairobi (Kenya: 36.48°E, 1.16°S; dip latitude 10.65°S). Data was obtained from the Magnetic Data Acquisition System (MAGDAS) installed and managed by the International Centre for Space Weather Science and Education (ICSWSE), Japan. The diurnal and seasonal distribution of the occurrence of CEJ at Ilorin (West Africa) and Addis Ababa (East Africa) were examined. It was observed that the occurrence of morning CEJ is much prevalent along the East African longitude (90%) than the West African longitude (80.9%), while the evening CEJ is dominant along the West African longitude (82.9%) than the East African longitude (50%). The longitudinal variability in the occurrence of CEJ along these longitudes is attributed to the differences in meridional currents, variation in the local electric field in the ionosphere, and the gravity wave associated vertical winds. The simultaneity and asymmetry in the occurrence of CEJ were also investigated. The morning simultaneity is maximum (100%) is maximum than the evening simultaneity. The occurrence of Asym-2 is much prevalent at both longitudes (41.3%) than asym-1 (4.9%).

  12. Initiatives: Kenya. Puppets say it better.

    PubMed

    Mworogo, P

    1996-04-01

    It is taboo in Africa to discuss sexual issues with strangers and even trained family planning providers often feel uncomfortable discussing reproductive health issues with groups of people, especially men. In the wake of the successful use of puppets to teach audiences in South Africa about AIDS, the Family Planning Association of Kenya used puppets to teach men about family planning, sexually transmitted diseases, and HIV/AIDS. Trained puppetry troops now perform regularly in Kenya at male-dominated institutions in Nakuru and Kakamega. The approach has proved highly effective in drawing crowds of men to listen to reproductive health information. Puppetry represents real life, but remains one step removed from the real world. As such, puppets can be used to break down racial, social, and political barriers and stereotypes; they can say more on controversial issues than can a live actor without offending the audience; and they are highly portable and adaptable. Puppets offer the viewer and listener a nonthreatening opportunity to look and laugh at themselves. PMID:12292576

  13. Seismic and aseismic deformation along the East African Rift System from a reanalysis of the GPS velocity field of Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Déprez, Aline; Doubre, Cécile; Masson, Frédéric; Ulrich, Patrice

    2013-06-01

    The improvement of the geodetic coverage within the African Plate over the last decade together with an extended GPS position time-series allows improved accuracy in determining the velocity field than prior geodetic studies. Using this new velocity field of the whole African continent, the best model proposed here remains consistent with previous studies including the existence of two small plates along the East African Rift System (EARS, Victoria and Rovuma). We focus specifically on the velocities along this plate boundary by estimating both the geodetic and the seismic moment rate. Whereas we use a scalar form of the Kostrov relation to calculate the geodetic moment rate, the seismic moment rate is obtained by integrating the cumulative truncated Gutenberg-Richter earthquake distribution of local events in the 39-yr-long worldwide catalogue, using a maximum likelihood method. This statistical method allows us to take into account the probable incompleteness of the existing catalogue and to assume the seismic moment rate calculated from this short catalogue to be representative of the long-term seismic deformation. The comparison of geodetic and seismic energy release sheds light on the variations of mechanical behaviour related to intracontinental extension along the EARS. The southward increase, observed along the rift, of the proportion of geodetic moment seismically accommodated suggests a significant control of the thermal structure associated with different states of rifting evolution.

  14. Laboratory Diagnostics Market in East Africa: A Survey of Test Types, Test Availability, and Test Prices in Kampala, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Lee F.; Elbireer, Ali; Jackson, J. Brooks; Amukele, Timothy K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Diagnostic laboratory tests are routinely defined in terms of their sensitivity, specificity, and ease of use. But the actual clinical impact of a diagnostic test also depends on its availability and price. This is especially true in resource-limited settings such as sub-Saharan Africa. We present a first-of-its-kind report of diagnostic test types, availability, and prices in Kampala, Uganda. Methods Test types (identity) and availability were based on menus and volumes obtained from clinical laboratories in late 2011 in Kampala using a standard questionnaire. As a measure of test availability, we used the Availability Index (AI). AI is the combined daily testing volumes of laboratories offering a given test, divided by the combined daily testing volumes of all laboratories in Kampala. Test prices were based on a sampling of prices collected in person and via telephone surveys in 2015. Findings Test volumes and menus were obtained for 95% (907/954) of laboratories in Kampala city. These 907 laboratories offered 100 different test types. The ten most commonly offered tests in decreasing order were Malaria, HCG, HIV serology, Syphilis, Typhoid, Urinalysis, Brucellosis, Stool Analysis, Glucose, and ABO/Rh. In terms of AI, the 100 tests clustered into three groups: high (12 tests), moderate (33 tests), and minimal (55 tests) availability. 50% and 36% of overall availability was provided through private and public laboratories, respectively. Point-of-care laboratories contributed 35% to the AI of high availability tests, but only 6% to the AI of the other tests. The mean price of the most commonly offered test types was $2.62 (range $1.83–$3.46). Interpretation One hundred different laboratory test types were in use in Kampala in late 2011. Both public and private laboratories were critical to test availability. The tests offered in point-of-care laboratories tended to be the most available tests. Prices of the most common tests ranged from $1.83-$3.46. PMID:26226183

  15. Beyond Policy and Language Choice: An Analysis of Texts in Four Instructional Contexts in East Africa. Special Studies in Comparative Education, Number Eighteen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mbuyi, Dennis M.

    This study compares the English and Swahili language texts used in the primary grades in Kenya and Tanzania in order to ascertain the role of language in determining the content of instruction and to relate the content of these texts to significant characteristics of governmental educational policy and the values underlying them. The introductory…

  16. South Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color image of South Africa was acquired on May 14, 2000, by NASA's Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, or MODIS. The image was produced using a combination of the sensor's 250-m and 500-m resolution visible wavelength bands. As part of the opening ceremony to begin the joint U.S.-South Africa SAFARI Field Experiment, NASA presented print copies of this image as GIFts to Dr. Ben Ngubane, Minister of Arts, Science and Technology, and Honorable Advocate Ngoaka Ramathlodi, Premier of the Northern Province, South Africa. The area shown in this image encompasses seven capital cities and a number of the region's distinctive geological features can be seen clearly. Toward the northern (top) central part of the image, the browns and tans comprise the Kalahari Desert of southern Botswana. The Tropic of Capricorn runs right through the heart of the Kalahari and the Botswanan capital city of Gaborone sits on the Limpopo River, southeast of the Kalahari. Along the western coastline of the continent is the country of Namibia, where the Namib Desert is framed against the sea by the Kaokoveld Mountains. The Namibian capital of Windhoek is obscured by clouds. Looking closely in the center of the image, the Orange River can be seen running from east to west, demarcating the boundary between Namibia and South Africa. On the southwestern corner of the continent is the hook-like Cape of Good Hope peninsula and Cape Town, the parliamentary capital of South Africa. Running west to east away from Cape Town are the Great Karroo Mountains. The shadow in this image conveys a sense of the very steep grade of the cliffs along the southern coast of South Africa. Port Elizabeth sits on the southeasternmost point of South Africa, and a large phytoplankton bloom can be seen in the water about 100 miles east of there. Moving northward along the east coast, the Drakensberg Mountains are visible. The two small nations of Lesotho and Swaziland are in this region, completely contained within South Africa's boundaries. In the upper righthand corner of the image is the Bay of Maputo, where sits Maputo, the capital of Mozambique. Fires are visible in the northeast corner of the image, near Maputo. Just north of Maputo is where the Limpopo River empties into the Indian Ocean. Tracing the Limpopo inland back toward the west, this river defines the northern boundary of South Africa with both Zimbabwe and Botswana. Johannesburg, the commercial capital of South Africa, can be seen as the greyish pixels in the northeastern region of the country. The country's legislative capital, Pretoria, is about 50 miles north of Johannesburg and 250 miles west of Maputo, in the heart of the Northern Province (formerly known as Transvaal). (Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Group, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center)

  17. Precessional forcing of lacustrine sedimentation in the late Cenozoic Chemeron Basin, Central Kenya Rift, and calibration of the Gauss/Matuyama boundary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deino, A.L.; Kingston, J.D.; Glen, J.M.; Edgar, R.K.; Hill, A.

    2006-01-01

    The fluviolacustrine sedimentary sequence of the Chemeron Formation exposed in the Barsemoi River drainage, Tugen Hills, Kenya, contains a package of five successive diatomite/fluvial cycles that record the periodic development of freshwater lakes within the axial portion of the Central Kenya Rift. The overwhelming abundance in the diatomite of planktonic species of the genera Aulacoseira and Stephanodiscus, and the virtual absence of benthic littoral diatoms and detrital material indicate areally extensive, deep lake systems. A paleomagnetic reversal stratigraphy has been determined and chronostratigraphic tie points established by 40Ar/39Ar dating of intercalated tuffs. The sequence spans the interval 3.1-2.35??Ma and bears a detailed record of the Gauss/Matuyama paleomagnetic transition. The 40Ar/39Ar age for this boundary of 2.589 ?? 0.003??Ma can be adjusted to concordance with the Astronomical Polarity Time Scale (APTS) on the basis of an independent calibration to 2.610??Ma, 29??kyr older than the previous APTS age. The diatomites recur at an orbital precessional interval of 23??kyr and are centered on a 400-kyr eccentricity maximum. It is concluded that these diatomite/fluvial cycles reflect a narrow interval of orbitally forced wet/dry climatic conditions that may be expressed regionally across East Africa. The timing of the lacustrine pulses relative to predicted insolation models favors origination of moisture from the northern Africa monsoon, rather than local circulation driven by direct equatorial insolation. This moisture event at 2.7-2.55??Ma, and later East African episodes at 1.9-1.7 and 1.1-0.9??Ma, are approximately coincident with major global climatic and oceanographic events. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Stable isotope paleoecology of Late Pleistocene Middle Stone Age humans from the Lake Victoria basin, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Nicole D; Fox, David L; McNulty, Kieran P; Faith, J Tyler; Peppe, Daniel J; Van Plantinga, Alex; Tryon, Christian A

    2015-05-01

    Paleoanthropologists have long argued that environmental pressures played a key role in human evolution. However, our understanding of how these pressures mediated the behavioral and biological diversity of early modern humans and their migration patterns within and out of Africa is limited by a lack of archaeological evidence associated with detailed paleoenvironmental data. Here, we present the first stable isotopic data from paleosols and fauna associated with Middle Stone Age (MSA) sites in East Africa. Late Pleistocene (?100-45 ka, thousands of years ago) sediments on Rusinga and Mfangano Islands in eastern Lake Victoria (Kenya) preserve a taxonomically diverse, non-analog faunal community associated with MSA artifacts. We analyzed the stable carbon and oxygen isotope composition of paleosol carbonate and organic matter and fossil mammalian tooth enamel, including the first analyses for several extinct bovids such as Rusingoryx atopocranion, Damaliscus hypsodon, and an unnamed impala species. Both paleosol carbonate and organic matter data suggest that local habitats associated with human activities were primarily riverine woodland ecosystems. However, mammalian tooth enamel data indicate that most large-bodied mammals consumed a predominantly C4 diet, suggesting an extensive C4 grassland surrounding these riverine woodlands in the region at the time. These data are consistent with other lines of paleoenvironmental evidence that imply a substantially reduced Lake Victoria at this time, and demonstrate that C4 grasslands were significantly expanded into equatorial Africa compared with their present distribution, which could have facilitated dispersal of human populations and other biotic communities. Our results indicate that early populations of Homo sapiens from the Lake Victoria region exploited locally wooded and well-watered habitats within a larger grassland ecosystem. PMID:25805041

  19. Prediction and characterization of novel epitopes of serotype A foot-and-mouth disease viruses circulating in East Africa using site-directed mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bari, Fufa Dawo; Parida, Satya; Asfor, Amin S.; Haydon, Daniel T.; Reeve, Richard; Paton, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Epitopes on the surface of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) capsid have been identified by monoclonal antibody (mAb) escape mutant studies leading to the designation of four antigenic sites in serotype A FMDV. Previous work focused on viruses isolated mainly from Asia, Europe and Latin America. In this study we report on the prediction of epitopes in African serotype A FMDVs and testing of selected epitopes using reverse genetics. Twenty-four capsid amino acid residues were predicted to be of antigenic significance by analysing the capsid sequences (n?=?56) using in silico methods, and six residues by correlating capsid sequence with serum–virus neutralization data. The predicted residues were distributed on the surface-exposed capsid regions, VP1–VP3. The significance of residue changes at eight of the predicted epitopes was tested by site-directed mutagenesis using a cDNA clone resulting in the generation of 12 mutant viruses involving seven sites. The effect of the amino acid substitutions on the antigenic nature of the virus was assessed by virus neutralization (VN) test. Mutations at four different positions, namely VP1-43, VP1-45, VP2-191 and VP3-132, led to significant reduction in VN titre (P value?=?0.05, 0.05, 0.001 and 0.05, respectively). This is the first time, to our knowledge, that the antigenic regions encompassing amino acids VP1-43 to -45 (equivalent to antigenic site 3 in serotype O), VP2-191 and VP3-132 have been predicted as epitopes and evaluated serologically for serotype A FMDVs. This identifies novel capsid epitopes of recently circulating serotype A FMDVs in East Africa. PMID:25614587

  20. Biogeochemistry of a large and deep tropical lake (Lake Kivu, East Africa): insights from a stable isotope study covering an annual cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morana, C.; Darchambeau, F.; Roland, F. A. E.; Borges, A. V.; Muvundja, F.; Kelemen, Z.; Masilya, P.; Descy, J.-P.; Bouillon, S.

    2014-12-01

    During this study, we investigated the seasonal variability of the concentration and the stable isotope composition of several inorganic and organic matter reservoirs in the large, oligotrophic and deep tropical Lake Kivu (East Africa). Data were acquired during one year at a fornightly temporal resolution. The ?13C signature of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) increased linearly with time during the rainy season, then suddenly decreased during the dry season due to vertical mixing with ?13C-depleted DIC waters. This pattern reflects the net autotrophic status of the mixed layer of Lake Kivu, contrary to the common observation that oligotrophic aquatic ecosystems tend to be net heterotrophic. The ?13C signature of the particulate organic carbon pool (POC) revealed the presence of a consistently abundant methanotrophic biomass in the oxycline throughout the year. We also noticed a seasonal shift during the dry season toward higher values in the ?15N of particulate nitrogen (PN) in the mixed layer and ?15N-PN was significantly related to the contribution of cyanobacteria to the phytoplankton assemblage, suggesting that rainy season conditions could be more favourable to atmospheric nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria. Finally, zooplankton were slightly enriched in ?13C compared to the autochtonous POC pool, and the ?15N signature of zooplankton followed well the seasonal variability in ?15N-PN, being consistently 3.0 ± 1.1‰ heavier than the PN pool. Together, ?13C and ?15N analysis suggests that zooplankton directly incorporate algal-derived organic matter in their biomass, and they would rely almost exclusively on this source of organic matter throughout the year in general agreement with the very low allochthonous organic matter inputs from rivers in Lake Kivu.

  1. Burden of Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases in Middle East and North Africa: Results of Global Burden of Diseases Study from 1990 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Sepanlou, Sadaf Ghajarieh; Malekzadeh, Fatemeh; Delavari, Farnaz; Naghavi, Mohsen; Forouzanfar, Mohammad Hossein; Moradi-Lakeh, Maziar; Malekzadeh, Reza; Poustchi, Hossein; Pourshams, Akram

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Gastrointestinal and liver diseases (GILDs) are major causes of death and disability in Middle East and North Africa (MENA). However, they have different patterns in countries with various geographical, cultural, and socio-economic status. We aimed to compare the burden of GILDs in Iran with its neighboring countries using the results of the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) Study in 2010. METHODS Classic metrics of GBD have been used including: age-standardized rates (ASRs) of death, years of life lost due to premature death (YLL), years of life lost due to disability (YLD), and disability adjusted life years (DALY). All countries neighboring Iran have been selected. In addition, all other countries classified in the MENA region were included. Five major groups of gastrointestinal and hepatic diseases were studied including: infections of gastrointestinal tract, gastrointestinal and pancreatobilliary cancers, acute hepatitis, cirrhosis, and other digestive diseases. RESULTS The overall burden of GILDs is highest in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Egypt. Diarrheal diseases have been replaced by gastrointestinal cancers and cirrhosis in most countries in the region. However, in a number of countries including Afghanistan, Pakistan, Turkmenistan, Egypt, and Yemen, communicable GILDs are still among top causes of mortality and morbidity in addition to non-communicable GILDs and cancers. These countries are experiencing the double burden. In Iran, burden caused by cancers of stomach and esophagus are considerably higher than other countries. Diseases that are mainly diagnosed in outpatient settings have not been captured by GBD. CONCLUSION Improving the infrastructure of health care system including cancer registries and electronic recording of outpatient care is a necessity for better surveillance of GILDs in MENA. In contrast to expensive treatment, prevention of most GILDs is feasible and inexpensive. The health care systems in the region can be strengthened for prevention and control PMID:26609348

  2. Carbon Cycling of Lake Kivu (East Africa): Net Autotrophy in the Epilimnion and Emission of CO2 to the Atmosphere Sustained by Geogenic Inputs

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Alberto V.; Morana, Cédric; Bouillon, Steven; Servais, Pierre; Descy, Jean-Pierre; Darchambeau, François

    2014-01-01

    We report organic and inorganic carbon distributions and fluxes in a large (>2000 km2) oligotrophic, tropical lake (Lake Kivu, East Africa), acquired during four field surveys, that captured the seasonal variations (March 2007–mid rainy season, September 2007–late dry season, June 2008–early dry season, and April 2009–late rainy season). The partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in surface waters of the main basin of Lake Kivu showed modest spatial (coefficient of variation between 3% and 6%), and seasonal variations with an amplitude of 163 ppm (between 579±23 ppm on average in March 2007 and 742±28 ppm on average in September 2007). The most prominent spatial feature of the pCO2 distribution was the very high pCO2 values in Kabuno Bay (a small sub-basin with little connection to the main lake) ranging between 11213 ppm and 14213 ppm (between 18 and 26 times higher than in the main basin). Surface waters of the main basin of Lake Kivu were a net source of CO2 to the atmosphere at an average rate of 10.8 mmol m?2 d?1, which is lower than the global average reported for freshwater, saline, and volcanic lakes. In Kabuno Bay, the CO2 emission to the atmosphere was on average 500.7 mmol m?2 d?1 (?46 times higher than in the main basin). Based on whole-lake mass balance of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) bulk concentrations and of its stable carbon isotope composition, we show that the epilimnion of Lake Kivu was net autotrophic. This is due to the modest river inputs of organic carbon owing to the small ratio of catchment area to lake surface area (2.15). The carbon budget implies that the CO2 emission to the atmosphere must be sustained by DIC inputs of geogenic origin from deep geothermal springs. PMID:25314144

  3. Using hepatitis C prevalence to estimate HIV epidemic potential among people who inject drugs in the Middle East and North Africa

    PubMed Central

    Mumtaz, Ghina R.; Weiss, Helen A.; Vickerman, Peter; Larke, Natasha; Abu-Raddad, Laith J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study is to understand the association between HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) among people who inject drugs (PWIDs) in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), and to estimate HIV epidemic potential among PWIDs using HCV prevalence. Design/methods: Using data from a systematic review of HIV and HCV among PWID in MENA, we conducted two analyses, stratified by HIV epidemic state: a meta-analysis of the risk ratio of HCV to HIV prevalence (RRHCV/HIV) using DerSimonian-Laird random-effects models, and multivariable linear regression predicting log HIV prevalence. The HCV-HIV association from both analyses was used to estimate HIV prevalence at endemic equilibrium. We compared predicted with current HIV prevalence to classify HIV epidemic potential at country-level as low, medium or high, using predefined criteria. Results: The review identified 88 HCV prevalence measures among PWID in MENA, of which 54 had a paired HIV prevalence measure. The pooled RRHCV/HIV were 16, 4 and 3 in low-level, emerging and established HIV epidemics, respectively. There was a significant linear relationship between HCV and HIV at endemic equilibrium (P?=?0.002). The predicted endemic HIV prevalence ranged between 8% (Tunisia) and 22% (Pakistan). Of the nine countries with data, five have high and three medium HIV epidemic potential. Only one country, Pakistan, appears to have reached saturation. Conclusion: HCV prevalence could be a predictor of future endemic HIV prevalence. In MENA, we predict that there will be further HIV epidemic growth among PWID. The proposed methodology can identify PWID populations that should be prioritized for HIV prevention interventions. PMID:26372281

  4. Distribution of body mass index among subjects with COPD in the Middle East and North Africa region: data from the BREATHE study

    PubMed Central

    Koniski, Marie-Louise; Salhi, Hocine; Lahlou, Aïcha; Rashid, Nauman; El Hasnaoui, Abdelkader

    2015-01-01

    Background Data describing the potential relationship between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and body mass index (BMI) are limited within the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. Objective To evaluate the distribution of BMI among subjects with COPD in the general population of the MENA region. Methods This study was a subanalysis of the BREATHE study, a cross-sectional survey of COPD conducted in the general population of ten countries in the MENA region and Pakistan. The study population consisted of subjects screened for COPD who documented their weight and height. A COPD questionnaire was administered to subjects who screened positively for COPD in order to collect data on patient characteristics, symptom severity, management and burden of disease, comorbidities, and health care resource utilization and data allowing calculation of the BMI. The COPD Assessment Test (CAT) was administered to those screened positively for COPD to collect data on the impact of respiratory symptoms. Results Nine hundred and ninety-six subjects with COPD, who completed the detailed COPD questionnaire and documented their weight and height, were included in this analysis. The mean BMI was 27.7±5.7 kg/m2. The proportion of COPD patients with a BMI ?25 kg/m2 is significantly higher than the proportion with a BMI <25 kg/m2 (64.6% [n=643] vs 35.4% [n=353], respectively; P<0.0001). There were no significant differences between the distribution of BMI, ages, sex, COPD symptoms, exacerbations, CAT scores, COPD-associated health care resource consumption, and GOLD severity groups. However, the occurrence of comorbidities such as diabetes and cardiovascular diseases seemed to be significantly associated with obese or morbidly obese status (P=0.02). Conclusion In the MENA region, the majority of COPD subjects were overweight or obese, and comorbidities such as diabetes or cardiovascular diseases are likely to be associated with COPD when BMI is in the obese or morbidly obese ranges. PMID:26346564

  5. Sources of core and intact branched tetraether membrane lipids in the lacustrine environment: Anatomy of Lake Challa and its catchment, equatorial East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckles, Laura K.; Weijers, Johan W. H.; Verschuren, Dirk; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2014-09-01

    The MBT/CBT palaeotemperature proxy uses the distribution of branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (brGDGTs), membrane lipids that are supposed to derive from soil bacteria, to reconstruct mean annual air temperature (MAAT). Applied successfully in coastal marine sediments, its extension to lake-sediment records with potentially high time resolution would greatly expand its utility. Over the last years, however, studies have indicated the presence of additional sources of brGDGTs within lake systems. To constrain the factors influencing the MBT/CBT palaeotemperature proxy in lakes, detailed investigation of brGDGT fluxes in a modern lake system is necessary to identify their potential sources. This study concentrates on Lake Challa, a permanently stratified crater lake in equatorial East Africa with limited catchment area. An almost 3-year time series of approximately monthly samples of settling particles, supplemented with a depth profile of suspended particulate matter (SPM) and sets of profundal surface-sediment and catchment soil samples, were analysed for both the ‘living’ intact polar lipids (IPLs) and ‘fossil’ core lipids (CLs) of GDGTs. We found that brGDGTs are produced in oxic, suboxic and anoxic zones of the water column, and in substantial amounts compared to influxes from catchment soils. Additional in situ production within the lake sediments is most probable, but cannot be definitely confirmed at this time. These lacustrine brGDGTs display a different response to temperature variation than soil-derived brGDGTs, signifying either a different physiological adaptation to changing conditions within the water column and/or a different composition of the respective bacterial communities. Using this specific relationship with temperature, a local calibration based on brGDGT distributions in SPM generates relatively accurate water temperature estimates from settling particles but fails for surface sediments.

  6. Metasomatized lithospheric mantle beneath Turkana depression in southern Ethiopia (the East Africa Rift): geochemical and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshesha, Daniel; Shinjo, Ryuichi; Matsumura, Risa; Chekol, Takele

    2011-11-01

    Mantle xenoliths entrained in Quaternary alkaline basalts from the Turkana Depression in southern Ethiopia (the East Africa Rift) were studied for their geochemical and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions to constrain the evolution of the lithosphere. The investigated mantle xenoliths are spinel lherzolites in composition with a protogranular texture. They can be classified into two types: anhydrous and hydrous spinel lherzolites; the latter group characterized by the occurrences of pargasite and phlogopite. The compositions of whole-rock basaltic component (CaO = 3.8-5.6 wt%, Al2O3 = 2.5-4.1 wt%, and MgO = 34.7-38.1 wt%), spinel (Cr# = 0.062-0.117, Al2O3 = 59.0-64.4 wt%) and clinopyroxene (Mg# = 88.4-91.7, Al2O3 = 5.2-6.7 wt%) indicate that the lherzolites are fertile and have not experienced significant partial melting. Both types are characterized by depleted 87Sr/86Sr (0.70180-0.70295) and high 143Nd/144Nd (0.51299-0.51348) with wide ranges of 206Pb/204Pb (17.86-19.68) isotopic compositions. The variations of geochemical and isotopic compositions can be explained by silicate metasomatism induced by different degree of magma infiltrations from ascending mantle plume. The thermobarometric estimations suggest that the spinel lherzolites were derived from depths of 50-70 km (15.6-22.2 kb) and entrained in the alkaline magma at 847-1,052°C. Most of the spinel lherzolites from this study record an elevated geotherm (60-90 mW/m2) that is related to the presence of rising mantle plume in an active tectonic setting. Sm-Nd isotopic systematic gives a mean TDM model age of 0.95 Ga, interpreted as the minimum depletion age of the subcontinental lithosphere beneath the region.

  7. Crustal structure and magmato-tectonic processes in an active rift (Asal-Ghoubbet, Afar, East Africa): 1. Insights from a 5-month seismological experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doubre, C.; Manighetti, I.; Dorbath, C.; Dorbath, L.; Jacques, E.; Delmond, J. C.

    2007-05-01

    We seek to characterize how magmatic and tectonic activities combine and interact during the continental rifting process. We address this question in two companion papers. In both, we analyze the seismicity that occurs in an active magmato-tectonic rift, Asal-Ghoubbet (East Africa), to identify the features and/or processes responsible for its activity. Here, we report results from a 5-month experiment that we conducted in the rift. Eleven seismometers were deployed to complement the eight-station permanent network. This allowed recording ˜400 earthquakes in the rift; 200 events could be well located (precision <40 m) and used in a tomographic inversion. Focal mechanisms were also determined for 71 events. The results show that current activity in the rift is mainly magmatically induced or accommodated. A ˜2-km-wide pipe of hot rock is evidenced below the central Fieale-Shark Bay volcanic complex, likely above a deeper (>5-6 km) magma reservoir. Most events concentrate at the roof of the pipe (at 3-4 km) and result from up and down slip ruptures on both the volcanic (ring) and tectonic faults that enclose the pipe at depth. The up and down motions are likely driven by pressure changes in the magma reservoir. Hence, although a few rift faults were associated with seismicity, most remained seismically silent during the experiment. In the companion paper, we analyze the seismic activity in the rift over the 23 years that followed its last rifting episode. This confirms the importance of the Fieale-Shark Bay plumbing system in the overall rift behavior.

  8. Impacts of climate variation on the length of the rainfall season: an analysis of spatial patterns in North-East South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabanda, Tibangayuka; Nenwiini, Shandukani

    2015-05-01

    This study examines the impacts of climate variation on the length of the rainfall season in the north-east South Africa (Vhembe District). We first demarcated the area into two major homogeneous rainfall zones namely humid and semi-arid using Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Then we determined the rainfall climatology of each zone in terms of rainfall onset and cessation in view of the emerging climate variation. Sixty years of rainfall data were examined, and a significant decreasing trend in rainfall was observed starting in the 1990s. Generally, the seasonal rainfall onset and cessation are changing, making the rainfall season length shorter. The rainfall characteristics are changing gradually in the humid zone, where it was found that there is a marked change in the onset dates between what it used to be before the 1990s and how it has been since. The rainfall season length has decreased by 50 days. Rainfall characteristics in the semi-arid zone are highly variable with a coefficient of variation (CV) of up to 39 %. Continuous significant decline (at the ?95 % level) since the mid-1990 suggests that the humid areas will continue to dry while the semi-arid might develop into arid zone. Significant changes were also detected in the cessation of rainfall. In general, the uncertainties and changes in rainfall characteristics add strain on farmers who are faced with the season of inconsistent rain and uncertainties in when to plant their crops. Under these circumstances, it is easy to see how rainfall variation can lead to crop failure and cause food insecurity in the district.

  9. Late Pan-African and early Mesozoic brittle compressions in East and Central Africa: lithospheric deformation within the Congo-Tanzania Cratonic area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delvaux, D.; Kipata, M. L.; Macheyeki, A. S.

    2012-04-01

    Tectonic reconstructions leading to the formation of the Central-African part of Gondwana have so far not much taken into account constraints provided by the evolution of brittle structures and related stress field. This is largely because little is known on continental brittle deformation in Equatorial Africa before the onset of the Mesozoic Central-African and Late Cenozoic East-African rifts. We present a synthesis of fault-kinematic data and paleostress inversion results from field surveys covering parts of Tanzania, Zambia and the Democratic Republic of Congo. It is based on investigations along the eastern margin of the Tanzanian craton, in the Ubendian belt between the Tanzanian craton and Bangweulu block, in the Lufilian Arc between the Kalahari and Congo cratons and along the Congo intracratonic basin. Paleostress tensors were computed for a substantial database by interactive stress tensor inversion and data subset separation, and the relative succession of major brittle events established. Two of them appear to be of regional importance and could be traced from one region to the other. The oldest one is the first brittle event recorded after the paroxysm of the Terminal Pan-African event that led to the amalgamation Gondwana at the Precambrian-Cambrian transition. It is related to compressional deformation with horizontal stress trajectories fluctuating from an E-W compression in Central Tanzania to NE-SW in the Ubende belt and Lufilian Arc. The second event is a transpressional inversion with a consistent NW-SE compression that we relate to the far-field effects of the active margin south of Gondwana during the late Triassic - early Jurassic.

  10. Multidisciplinary management of clear-cell renal cell carcinoma in Africa and the Middle East: current practice and recommendations for improvement

    PubMed Central

    Zekri, Jamal; Dreosti, Lydia M; Ghosn, Marwan; Hamada, Emad; Jaloudi, Mohamed; Khorshid, Ola; Larbaoui, Blaha

    2015-01-01

    The management of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has evolved considerably in recent years. This report represents the consensus of 22 relevant medical specialists from Africa and the Middle East region engaged in the management of RCC. Partial or radical nephrectomy is the standard of care for most patients with localized RCC. It is essential that patients are followed up appropriately after surgery to enable local and distant relapses to be identified and treated promptly. The treatment of advanced/metastatic disease has changed dramatically with the introduction of targeted therapies. Follow-up of these patients enables therapy optimization and assessment of response to treatment. There was universal agreement on the importance of management of RCC by a multidisciplinary team supported by a multidisciplinary tumor board. Barriers hindering this approach were identified. These included lack of awareness of the benefits of multidisciplinary team role, poor communication among relevant disciplines, time constraints, and specifics of private practice. Other challenges include shortage of expert specialists as urologists and oncologists and lack of local management guidelines in some countries. Solutions were proposed and discussed. Medical educational initiatives and awareness activities were highlighted as keys to encouraging cooperation between specialties to improve patients’ outcome. Establishing combined genitourinary cancer clinics and formal referral systems should encourage a culture of effective communication. Joining forces with professionals in peripheral areas and the private sector is likely to help standardize care. Sustained action will be required to ensure that all patients with RCC in the region benefit from up-to-date care. PMID:26251610

  11. Carbon cycling of Lake Kivu (East Africa): net autotrophy in the epilimnion and emission of CO2 to the atmosphere sustained by geogenic inputs.

    PubMed

    Borges, Alberto V; Morana, Cédric; Bouillon, Steven; Servais, Pierre; Descy, Jean-Pierre; Darchambeau, François

    2014-01-01

    We report organic and inorganic carbon distributions and fluxes in a large (>2000 km2) oligotrophic, tropical lake (Lake Kivu, East Africa), acquired during four field surveys, that captured the seasonal variations (March 2007-mid rainy season, September 2007-late dry season, June 2008-early dry season, and April 2009-late rainy season). The partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in surface waters of the main basin of Lake Kivu showed modest spatial (coefficient of variation between 3% and 6%), and seasonal variations with an amplitude of 163 ppm (between 579±23 ppm on average in March 2007 and 742±28 ppm on average in September 2007). The most prominent spatial feature of the pCO2 distribution was the very high pCO2 values in Kabuno Bay (a small sub-basin with little connection to the main lake) ranging between 11,213 ppm and 14,213 ppm (between 18 and 26 times higher than in the main basin). Surface waters of the main basin of Lake Kivu were a net source of CO2 to the atmosphere at an average rate of 10.8 mmol m(-2) d(-1), which is lower than the global average reported for freshwater, saline, and volcanic lakes. In Kabuno Bay, the CO2 emission to the atmosphere was on average 500.7 mmol m(-2) d(-1) (?46 times higher than in the main basin). Based on whole-lake mass balance of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) bulk concentrations and of its stable carbon isotope composition, we show that the epilimnion of Lake Kivu was net autotrophic. This is due to the modest river inputs of organic carbon owing to the small ratio of catchment area to lake surface area (2.15). The carbon budget implies that the CO2 emission to the atmosphere must be sustained by DIC inputs of geogenic origin from deep geothermal springs. PMID:25314144

  12. The current status of the Kenya Capsian

    E-print Network

    Wilshaw, Alex

    2015-01-01

    East Africa is home to a rich array of stone-tool traditions that span human prehistory. It is unsurprising, therefore, that the region attracted pioneer prehistorians in the early twentieth century, including L. S. B. Leakey, E. J. Wayland and T. P...

  13. Evolution of the Lake Victoria basin in the context of coeval rift initiation in East Africa: a 3D numerical model approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wichura, Henry; Quinteros, Javier; Melnick, Daniel; Brune, Sascha; Schwanghart, Wolfgang; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2015-04-01

    Over the last four years sedimentologic and thermochronologic studies in the western and eastern branches of the Cenozoic East African Rift System (EARS) have supported the notion of a broadly contemporaneous onset of normal faulting and rift-basin formation in both segments. These studies support previous interpretations based on geophysical investigations from which an onset of rifting during the Paleogene had been postulated. In light of these studies we explore the evolution of the Lake Victoria basin, a shallow, unfaulted sedimentary basin centered between both branches of the EARS and located in the interior of the East African Plateau (EAP). We quantify the fluvial catchment evolution of the Lake Victoria basin and assess the topographic response of African crust to the onset of rifting in both branches. Furthermore, we evaluate and localize the nature of strain and flexural rift-flank uplift in both branches. We use a 3D numerical forward model that includes nonlinear temperature- and stress-dependent elasto-visco-plastic rheology. The model is able to reproduce the flexural response of variably thick lithosphere to rift-related deformation processes such as lithospheric thinning and asthenospheric upwelling. The model domain covers the entire EAP and integrates extensional processes in a heterogeneous, yet cold and thick cratonic block (Archean Tanzania craton), which is surrounded by mechanically weaker Proterozoic mobile belts, which are characterized by thinner lithosphere ("thin spots"). The lower limits of the craton (170 km) and the mobile belts (120 km) are simulated by different depths of the 1300 °C lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. We assume a constant extension rate of 4 mm/a throughout the entire simulation of 30 Ma and neglect the effect of dynamic topography and magmatism. Even though the model setup is very simple and the resolution is not high enough to calculate realistic rift-flank uplift, it intriguingly reveals important topographic trends. The model shows that elevation differences of 120 to 180 m between the plateau interior and bordering rift shoulders are pronounced enough to form a closed basin after 6.5 Ma of extension. By that time the catchment area is already comparable to the present-day Lake Victoria catchment. Moreover, the final modeled topography, including 1000 m of dynamic and 500 m of pre-plume topography, yields a base basin elevation of 1110 m, which is also in good agreement with the present-day elevation of Lake Victoria. The combined effects of the formation of an extensive lacustrine depositional environment in the interior of the EAP after 6.5 Ma and rift-shoulder uplift may have forced far-reaching environmental impacts. These may have included the onset of the Lake Victoria microclimate, the influence of the basin and surrounding orographic barriers on precipitation patterns in East Africa, and the establishment of a unique flora and fauna.

  14. Emplacement of the middle Miocene Yatta lava flow, Kenya: implications for modeling long channelled lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wichura, H.; Bousquet, R.; Oberhansli, R.; Strecker, M. R.

    2010-12-01

    Knowledge of the conditions leading to the emplacement of the 13.51 Ma Yatta lava flow on the eastern shoulder of the Kenya Rift is crucial for our understanding of the topographic and structural evolution of this rift. We have investigated the emplacement of this flow using evidence from field observations combined with a novel method of modeling length-dominated lava flows along channels. The Yatta lava flow erupted as an individual flow from a single vent on the East African Plateau during an extensive phase of volcanism that occurred in mid-Miocene time prior to widespread extensional tectonism. The flow followed a river valley for a length of approximately 300 km, thus forming one of the longest phonolitic lava flows on Earth. In our modelling approach we combined a composition and temperature-dependent viscosity equation according to Hui and Zhang (2007), with empirical cooling and morphologic relationships. By using an average channel width and the known length of the Yatta lava flow, but varying the mean thickness and underlying topography, we were able to improve flow-rate calculations for the internal part of the lava, close to the front of the lava flow. Within this sector of the flow the motion of lava was treated in terms of a steady, uniform, and laminar flow, following a stepwise cooling from the eruption temperature to the temperature at the cessation of flow. We compared these relationships using eight different magma compositions, ranging from basalts to rhyolites. We find that the length-dominated Yatta lava-flow emplacement was rapid (~7 days), approximately isothermal (cooling at 0.71°C/km), and the result of high effusion rates (~7,900 m3/s). Our study reveals that lava-flow morphology, and particularly its length, are not a simple function of rheological properties and effusion rate, but is also affected by many other parameters. Small changes of H2O compounds in the lava chemistry can affect melt viscosity significantly and thus lava flow morphology. Furthermore, the slope angle or the mean lava-flow thickness ultimately controls the length of a lava flow within a channel. Our modeling results has important implications for the rifting history in East Africa, because they (1) confirm that high topography related to the updoming of the East African Plateau existed in middle Miocene time; (2) they show that updoming had resulted in the formation of a fluvial system that drained away from the Kenya Rift to the Indian Ocean; and (3) they support the notion that pronounced normal faulting was subsequent to the updoming and phonolite eruptions in the region which is now occupied by the rift.

  15. Molecular genetic analysis of virus isolates from wild and cultivated plants demonstrates that East Africa is a hotspot for the evolution and diversification of sweet potato feathery mottle virus.

    PubMed

    Tugume, Arthur K; Cuéllar, Wilmer J; Mukasa, Settumba B; Valkonen, Jari P T

    2010-08-01

    Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV, genus Potyvirus) is globally the most common pathogen of cultivated sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas; Convolvulaceae). Although more than 150 SPFMV isolates have been sequence-characterized from cultivated sweet potatos across the world, little is known about SPFMV isolates from wild hosts and the evolutionary forces shaping SPFMV population structures. In this study, 46 SPFMV isolates from 14 wild species of genera Ipomoea, Hewittia and Lepistemon (barcoded for the matK gene in this study) and 13 isolates from cultivated sweet potatoes were partially sequenced. Wild plants were infected with the EA, C or O strain, or co-infected with the EA and C strains of SPFMV. In East Africa, SPFMV populations in wild species and sweet potato were genetically undifferentiated, suggesting inter-host transmission of SPFMV. Globally, spatial diversification of the 178 isolates analysed was observed, strain EA being largely geographically restricted to East Africa. Recombination was frequently detected in the 6K2-VPg-NIaPro region of the EA strain, demonstrating a recombination 'hotspot'. Recombination between strains EA and C was rare, despite their frequent co-infections in wild plants, suggesting purifying selection against strain EA/C recombinants. Positive selection was predicted on 17 amino acids distributed over the entire coat protein in the globally distributed strain C, as compared to only four amino acids in the coat protein N-terminus of the EA strain. This selection implies a more recent introduction of the C strain and a higher adaptation of the EA strain to the local ecosystem. Thus, East Africa appears as a hotspot for evolution and diversification of SPFMV. PMID:20609081

  16. Seasonality of Cryptosporidium oocyst detection in surface waters of Meru, Kenya as determined by two isolation methods followed by PCR

    PubMed Central

    Muchiri, John M.; Ascolillo, Luke; Mugambi, Mutuma; Mutwiri, Titus; Ward, Honorine D.; Naumova, Elena N.; Egorov, Andrey I.; Cohen, Seth; Else, James G.; Griffiths, Jeffrey K.

    2009-01-01

    Meru, Kenya has watersheds which are shared by wildlife, humans and domesticated animals. These surface waters can be contaminated by the waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium. To quantify the seasonality and prevalence of Cryptosporidium in Meru regional surface waters, we used a calcium carbonate flocculation (CCF) and sucrose floatation method, and a filtration and immunomagnetic bead separation method, each of which used PCR for Cryptosporidium detection and genotyping. Monthly water samples were collected from January through June in 2003 and 2004, bracketing two April-May rainy seasons. We detected significant seasonality with 8 of 9 positive samples from May and June (p < 0.0014), which followed peak rainy season precipitation and includes some of the subsequent dry season. Six of 9 positive samples revealed C. parvum, and 3 contained C. andersoni. None contained C. hominis. Our results indicate that Meru surface waters are Cryptosporidium-contaminated at the end of rainy seasons, consistent with the timing of human infections reported by others from East Africa and contrasting with the onset of rainy season peak incidence reported from West Africa. PMID:18957776

  17. African Early Childhood Development Curriculum and Pedagogy for Turkana Nomadic Pastoralist Communities of Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng'asike, John T.

    2014-01-01

    Western conceptions of child development and the models of early education they engender predominantly shape services for young children in the first eight years of life all over Africa. This chapter brings a reconceptualist perspective to the critique of Kenya's continuing failure to ground early childhood programs and services in local…

  18. Incongruent HIV and tuberculosis co-dynamics in Kenya: Interacting epidemics monitor each other

    E-print Network

    Getz, Wayne M.

    Incongruent HIV and tuberculosis co-dynamics in Kenya: Interacting epidemics monitor each other of Anthropological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA g KNCV Tuberculosis Foundation, Parkstraat of declining HIV in Africa, while its tuberculosis (TB) numbers continue rising. We conducted a comparative

  19. Predicting East African spring droughts using Pacific and Indian Ocean sea surface temperature indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funk, C.; Hoell, A.; Shukla, S.; Bladé, I.; Liebmann, B.; Roberts, J. B.; Robertson, F. R.; Husak, G.

    2014-12-01

    In eastern East Africa (the southern Ethiopia, eastern Kenya and southern Somalia region), poor boreal spring (long wet season) rains in 1999, 2000, 2004, 2007, 2008, 2009, and 2011 contributed to severe food insecurity and high levels of malnutrition. Predicting rainfall deficits in this region on seasonal and decadal time frames can help decision makers implement disaster risk reduction measures while guiding climate-smart adaptation and agricultural development. Building on recent research that links more frequent East African droughts to a stronger Walker circulation, resulting from warming in the Indo-Pacific warm pool and an increased east-to-west sea surface temperature (SST) gradient in the western Pacific, we show that the two dominant modes of East African boreal spring rainfall variability are tied to SST fluctuations in the western central Pacific and central Indian Ocean, respectively. Variations in these two rainfall modes can thus be predicted using two SST indices - the western Pacific gradient (WPG) and central Indian Ocean index (CIO), with our statistical forecasts exhibiting reasonable cross-validated skill (rcv ? 0.6). In contrast, the current generation of coupled forecast models show no skill during the long rains. Our SST indices also appear to capture most of the major recent drought events such as 2000, 2009 and 2011. Predictions based on these simple indices can be used to support regional forecasting efforts and land surface data assimilations to help inform early warning and guide climate outlooks.

  20. Cost effectiveness of strategies to combat cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and tobacco use in sub-Saharan Africa and South East Asia: mathematical modelling study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the relative costs and health effects of interventions to combat cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and tobacco related disease in order to guide the allocation of resources in developing countries. Design Cost effectiveness analysis of 123 single or combined prevention and treatment strategies for cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and smoking by means of a lifetime population model. Setting Two World Health Organization sub-regions of the world: countries in sub-Saharan Africa with very high adult and high child mortality (AfrE) and countries in South East Asia with high adult and high child mortality (SearD). Data sources Demographic and epidemiological data were taken from the WHO databases of mortality and global burden of disease. Estimates of intervention coverage, effectiveness, and resource needs were drawn from clinical trials, observational studies, and treatment guidelines. Unit costs were taken from the WHO-CHOICE (Choosing Interventions that are Cost-Effective) price database. Main outcome measures Cost per disability adjusted life year (DALY) averted, expressed in international dollars ($Int) for the year 2005. Results Most of the interventions studied were considered highly cost effective, meaning they generate one healthy year of life at a cost of <$Int2000 (which is the gross domestic product per capita of the two regions considered here). Interventions that offer particularly good monetary value, and which could be considered for prioritised implementation or scale up, include demand reduction strategies of the Framework Convention for Tobacco Control (<$Int950 and <$Int200 per DALY averted in AfrE and SearD respectively); combination drug therapy for people with a >25% chance of experiencing a cardiovascular event over the next decade, either alone or together with specific multidrug regimens for the secondary prevention of post-acute ischaemic heart disease and stroke (<$Int150 and <$Int230 per DALY averted in AfrE and SearD respectively); and retinopathy screening and glycaemic control for patients with diabetes (<$Int2100 and <$Int950 per DALY averted in AfrE and SearD respectively). Conclusion This comparative economic assessment has identified a set of population-wide and individual strategies for prevention and control of cardiovascular disease that are inexpensive and cost effective in low resource settings. PMID:22389337

  1. Association between dietary pattern and risk of cardiovascular disease among adults in the Middle East and North Africa region: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Aljefree, Najlaa; Ahmed, Faruk

    2015-01-01

    Objective This paper reviews the evidence related to the association of dietary pattern with coronary heart disease (CHD), strokes, and the associated risk factors among adults in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. Methods A systematic review of published articles between January 1990 and March 2015 was conducted using Pro-Quest Public Health, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar. The term ‘dietary pattern’ refers to data derived from dietary pattern analyses and individual food component analyses. Results The search identified 15 studies. The available data in the MENA region showed that Western dietary pattern has been predominant among adults with fewer adherences to the traditional diet, such as the Mediterranean diet. The Western dietary pattern was found to be associated with an increased risk of dyslipidaemia, diabetes, metabolic syndrome (MetS), body mass index (BMI), and hypertension. The Mediterranean diet, labelled in two studies as ‘the traditional Lebanese diet’, was negatively associated with BMI, waist circumference (WC), and the risk of diabetes, while one study found no association between the Mediterranean diet and MetS. Two randomised controlled trials conducted in Iran demonstrated the effect of the dietary approach to stop hypertension (DASH) in reducing metabolic risk among patients with diabetes and MetS. Likewise, the consumption of dairy products was associated with decreased blood pressure and WC, while the intake of whole grains was associated with reduced WC. In addition, the high consumption of black tea was found to be associated with decreased serum lipids. The intake of fish, vegetable oils, and tea had a protective effect on CHD, whereas the intake of full-fat yoghurt and hydrogenated fats was associated with an increased risk of CHD. Conclusion There appears to be a significant association of Western dietary pattern with the increased risk of CHD, strokes, and associated risk factors among adults in the MENA region. Conversely, increased adherence to Mediterranean and/or DASH dietary patterns or their individual food components is associated with a decreased risk of CHD and the associated risk factors. Therefore, increasing awareness of the high burden of CHD and the associated risk factors is crucial, as well as the need for nutrition education programs to improve the knowledge among the MENA population regarding healthy diets and diet-related diseases. PMID:26088003

  2. Institutional capacity for health systems research in East and Central Africa schools of public health: enhancing capacity to design and implement teaching programs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The role of health systems research (HSR) in informing and guiding national programs and policies has been increasingly recognized. Yet, many universities in sub-Saharan African countries have relatively limited capacity to teach HSR. Seven schools of public health (SPHs) in East and Central Africa undertook an HSR institutional capacity assessment, which included a review of current HSR teaching programs. This study determines the extent to which SPHs are engaged in teaching HSR-relevant courses and assessing their capacities to effectively design and implement HSR curricula whose graduates are equipped to address HSR needs while helping to strengthen public health policy. Methods This study used a cross-sectional study design employing both quantitative and qualitative approaches. An organizational profile tool was administered to senior staff across the seven SPHs to assess existing teaching programs. A self-assessment tool included nine questions relevant to teaching capacity for HSR curricula. The analysis triangulates the data, with reflections on the responses from within and across the seven SPHs. Proportions and average of values from the Likert scale are compared to determine strengths and weaknesses, while themes relevant to the objectives are identified and clustered to elicit in-depth interpretation. Results None of the SPHs offer an HSR-specific degree program; however, all seven offer courses in the Master of Public Health (MPH) degree that are relevant to HSR. The general MPH curricula partially embrace principles of competency-based education. Different strengths in curricula design and staff interest in HSR at each SPH were exhibited but a number of common constraints were identified, including out-of-date curricula, face-to-face delivery approaches, inadequate staff competencies, and limited access to materials. Opportunities to align health system priorities to teaching programs include existing networks. Conclusions Each SPH has key strengths that can be leveraged to design and implement HSR teaching curricula. We propose networking for standardizing HSR curricula competencies, institutionalizing sharing of teaching resources, creating an HSR eLearning platform to expand access, regularly reviewing HSR teaching content to infuse competency-based approaches, and strengthening staff capacity to deliver such curricula. PMID:24888353

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus and viral hepatitis among high-risk groups: Understanding the knowledge gap in the Middle East and North Africa Region

    PubMed Central

    Melhem, Nada M; Rahhal, Nour; Charide, Rana; Kreidieh, Khalil; El-Khatib, Rolla

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To identify gaps in the existing knowledge on single, dual and triple infections of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region among men who have sex with men (MSMs), female sex workers (FSWs), injecting drug users (IDUs) and prisoners. METHODS: We performed an extensive literature search on articles published on the topic in the 25 countries of the MENA region. PubMed database was used as the main search engine. Case reports, case series, qualitative studies, editorials, commentaries, authors’ replies and animal studies were excluded. Original articles and reviews dealing with the prevalence of HIV, HBV and HCV and their co-infection were included. Data on population type, sample size, age and markers of infections were extracted from the relevant studies. RESULTS: HIV, HBV and HCV are blood-borne viruses with similar modes of transmission. The categories of people at high risk of acquiring HIV-1, HBV and HCV commonly include: MSMs, FSW and IDUs. It is well established that HIV-positive individuals co-infected with HBV or HCV suffer from liver pathology associated with morbidity and mortality. Moreover, HIV-infected individuals do not respond well to treatment for HBV or HCV and hence are at increased risk of hepatic toxicity. Consequently, co-infection of HIV-positive individuals with HBV and/or HCV is a global health problem of significant magnitude. Our review reveals the paucity of epidemiological data for key populations in many countries of the region. Limited number of studies exists in the MENA region on the status of HIV, HBV and HCV and their co-infections among prisoners, MSMs and FSWs. Evidence support the continued increase of the HIV epidemic among MSMs. In addition to the lack of studies on MSMs and FSWs in the MENA region, our review highlights the lack of data on the practices, characteristics, or the status of HIV infection and viral hepatitis among male sex workers selling or exchanging sex for money. CONCLUSION: The MENA countries are in urgent need of advanced research and strengthening of the data collection systems and reporting practices of these infections among key populations. PMID:26557955

  4. Analysis of genetic variability within Argulus japonicus from representatives of Africa, Middle East, and Asia revealed by sequences of three mitochondrial DNA genes.

    PubMed

    Wadeh, Hicham; Alsarakibi, Muhamd; Li, Guoqing

    2010-08-01

    This study investigated the genetic variability within fish louse Argulus japonicus (Crustacea: Branchiura) from Africa, Middle East, and Asia by polymerase chain reaction in three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) regions, namely, cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) and NADH dehydrogenase subunits 1 and 4 (nad1 and nad4). Six different sequences from a portion of the cox1 gene (pcox1) and a portion of the nad1 and nad4 genes (pnad1 and pnad4) for ten adult specimens from infected fish in China, Egypt, and Syria were amplified separately from individual and the amplicons were subjected to direct sequencing. A + T percentages were 68.8-69% for pcox1, 77.1-77.6% for pnad1, and 60.4-60.9% for pnad4. Among all the collected parasites, A. japonicus sequence variations were 0.0-1.9% for cox1, 0.0-2.3% for nad1, and 0.0-0.8% for nad4. In rivers, sequence variations among all individuals were 0.4-0.8% for cox1, 1.0-2.3% for nad1, and 0.4-0.8% for nad4, while sequence variations among all the collected parasites in fish farms were 0.6-1.9% for cox1, 0.0-1.7% for nad1, and 0.2-0.6% for nad4. The nad1 was the most variable gene among selected markers, while nad4 was a more conserved gene than cox1. All isolates of A. japonicus were sister to Argulus americanus in phylogenetic tree and they grouped together in one sub-clade, while isolates from China and Egypt fish farms were closely clustered together. However, moderate genetic drift and slight mutation could be observed among A. japonicus individuals. These findings demonstrated the convenience and attributes of the three selected mtDNA sequences for population genetic studies of A. japonicus where nad1 is a new and reliable marker to detect the sequence variation among A. japonicus individuals. PMID:20454804

  5. Modeling the distribution of the West Nile and Rift Valley Fever vector Culex pipiens in arid and semi-arid regions of the Middle East and North Africa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Middle East North Africa (MENA) region is under continuous threat of the re-emergence of West Nile virus (WNV) and Rift Valley Fever virus (RVF), two pathogens transmitted by the vector species Culex pipiens. Predicting areas at high risk for disease transmission requires an accurate model of vector distribution, however, most Cx. pipiens distribution modeling has been confined to temperate, forested habitats. Modeling species distributions across a heterogeneous landscape structure requires a flexible modeling method to capture variation in mosquito response to predictors as well as occurrence data points taken from a sufficient range of habitat types. Methods We used presence-only data from Egypt and Lebanon to model the population distribution of Cx. pipiens across a portion of the MENA that also encompasses Jordan, Syria, and Israel. Models were created with a set of environmental predictors including bioclimatic data, human population density, hydrological data, and vegetation indices, and built using maximum entropy (Maxent) and boosted regression tree (BRT) methods. Models were created with and without the inclusion of human population density. Results Predictions of Maxent and BRT models were strongly correlated in habitats with high probability of occurrence (Pearson’s r?=?0.774, r?=?0.734), and more moderately correlated when predicting into regions that exceeded the range of the training data (r?=?0.666,r?=?0.558). All models agreed in predicting high probability of occupancy around major urban areas, along the banks of the Nile, the valleys of Israel, Lebanon, and Jordan, and southwestern Saudi Arabia. The most powerful predictors of Cx. pipiens habitat were human population density (60.6% Maxent models, 34.9% BRT models) and the seasonality of the enhanced vegetation index (EVI) (44.7% Maxent, 16.3% BRT). Maxent models tended to be dominated by a single predictor. Areas of high probability corresponded with sites of independent surveys or previous disease outbreaks. Conclusions Cx. pipiens occurrence was positively associated with areas of high human population density and consistent vegetation cover, but was not significantly driven by temperature and rainfall, suggesting human-induced habitat change such as irrigation and urban infrastructure has a greater influence on vector distribution in this region than in temperate zones. PMID:24962735

  6. Invasive Salmonellosis in Kilifi, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Muthumbi, Esther; Morpeth, Susan C.; Ooko, Michael; Mwanzu, Alfred; Mwarumba, Salim; Mturi, Neema; Etyang, Anthony O.; Berkley, James A.; Williams, Thomas N.; Kariuki, Samuel; Scott, J. Anthony G.

    2015-01-01

    Background.?Invasive salmonelloses are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Africa, but the incidence and case fatality of each disease vary markedly by region. We aimed to describe the incidence, clinical characteristics, and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of invasive salmonelloses among children and adults in Kilifi, Kenya. Methods.?We analyzed integrated clinical and laboratory records for patients presenting to the Kilifi County Hospital between 1998 and 2014. We calculated incidence, and summarized clinical features and multidrug resistance. Results.?Nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) accounted for 10.8% and 5.8% of bacteremia cases in children and adults, respectively, while Salmonella Typhi accounted for 0.5% and 2.1%, respectively. Among 351 NTS isolates serotyped, 160 (45.6%) were Salmonella Enteritidis and 152 (43.3%) were Salmonella Typhimurium. The incidence of NTS in children aged <5 years was 36.6 per 100 000 person-years, being highest in infants aged <7 days (174/100 000 person-years). The overall incidence of NTS in children varied markedly by location and declined significantly during the study period; the pattern of dominance of the NTS serotypes also shifted from Salmonella Enteritidis to Salmonella Typhimurium. Risk factors for invasive NTS disease were human immunodeficiency virus infection, malaria, and malnutrition; the case fatality ratio was 22.1% (71/321) in children aged <5 years and 36.7% (11/30) in adults. Multidrug resistance was present in 23.9% (84/351) of NTS isolates and 46.2% (12/26) of Salmonella Typhi isolates. Conclusions.?In Kilifi, the incidence of invasive NTS was high, especially among newborn infants, but typhoid fever was uncommon. NTS remains an important cause of bacteremia in children <5 years of age. PMID:26449944

  7. Lagos Bat Virus in Kenya?

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmin, Ivan V.; Niezgoda, Michael; Franka, Richard; Agwanda, Bernard; Markotter, Wanda; Beagley, Janet C.; Urazova, Olga Y.; Breiman, Robert F.; Rupprecht, Charles E.

    2008-01-01

    During lyssavirus surveillance, 1,221 bats of at least 30 species were collected from 25 locations in Kenya. One isolate of Lagos bat virus (LBV) was obtained from a dead Eidolon helvum fruit bat. The virus was most similar phylogenetically to LBV isolates from Senegal (1985) and from France (imported from Togo or Egypt; 1999), sharing with these viruses 100% nucleoprotein identity and 99.8 to 100% glycoprotein identity. This genome conservancy across space and time suggests that LBV is well adapted to its natural host species and that populations of reservoir hosts in eastern and western Africa have sufficient interactions to share pathogens. High virus concentrations, in addition to being detected in the brain, were detected in the salivary glands and tongue and in an oral swab, suggesting that LBV is transmitted in the saliva. In other extraneural organs, the virus was generally associated with innervations and ganglia. The presence of infectious virus in the reproductive tract and in a vaginal swab implies an alternative opportunity for transmission. The isolate was pathogenic for laboratory mice by the intracerebral and intramuscular routes. Serologic screening demonstrated the presence of LBV-neutralizing antibodies in E. helvum and Rousettus aegyptiacus fruit bats. In different colonies the seroprevalence ranged from 40 to 67% and 29 to 46% for E. helvum and R. aegyptiacus, respectively. Nested reverse transcription-PCR did not reveal the presence of viral RNA in oral swabs of bats in the absence of brain infection. Several large bat roosts were identified in areas of dense human populations, raising public health concerns for the potential of lyssavirus infection. PMID:18305130

  8. Toward Improved Land Surface Initialization in Support of Regional WRF Forecasts at the Kenya Meteorological Department

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case. Jonathan; Mungai, John; Sakwa, Vincent; Kabuchanga, Eric; Zavodsky, Bradley T.; Limaye, Ashutosh S.

    2014-01-01

    Flooding and drought are two key forecasting challenges for the Kenya Meteorological Department (KMD). Atmospheric processes leading to excessive precipitation and/or prolonged drought can be quite sensitive to the state of the land surface, which interacts with the boundary layer of the atmosphere providing a source of heat and moisture. The development and evolution of precipitation systems are affected by heat and moisture fluxes from the land surface within weakly-sheared environments, such as in the tropics and sub-tropics. These heat and moisture fluxes during the day can be strongly influenced by land cover, vegetation, and soil moisture content. Therefore, it is important to represent the land surface state as accurately as possible in numerical weather prediction models. Enhanced regional modeling capabilities have the potential to improve forecast guidance in support of daily operations and high-end events over east Africa. KMD currently runs a configuration of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model in real time to support its daily forecasting operations, invoking the Nonhydrostatic Mesoscale Model (NMM) dynamical core. They make use of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration / National Weather Service Science and Training Resource Center's Environmental Modeling System (EMS) to manage and produce the WRF-NMM model runs on a 7-km regional grid over eastern Africa. Two organizations at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL, SERVIR and the Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center, have established a working partnership with KMD for enhancing its regional modeling capabilities. To accomplish this goal, SPoRT and SERVIR will provide experimental land surface initialization datasets and model verification capabilities to KMD. To produce a land-surface initialization more consistent with the resolution of the KMD-WRF runs, the NASA Land Information System (LIS) will be run at a comparable resolution to provide real-time, daily soil initialization data in place of interpolated Global Forecast System soil moisture and temperature data. Additionally, real-time green vegetation fraction data from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite will be incorporated into the KMD-WRF runs, once it becomes publicly available from the National Environmental Satellite Data and Information Service. Finally, model verification capabilities will be transitioned to KMD using the Model Evaluation Tools (MET) package, in order to quantify possible improvements in simulated temperature, moisture and precipitation resulting from the experimental land surface initialization. The transition of these MET tools will enable KMD to monitor model forecast accuracy in near real time. This presentation will highlight preliminary verification results of WRF runs over east Africa using the LIS land surface initialization.

  9. Mitochondrial haplotype-based identification of ethanol-preserved root-knot nematodes from Africa.

    PubMed

    Pagan, Chris; Coyne, Danny; Carneiro, Regina; Kariuki, George; Luambano, Nessie; Affokpon, Antoine; Williamson, Valerie M

    2015-03-01

    The asexual root-knot nematodes (RKNs) (Meloidogyne spp.) exemplified by Meloidogyne incognita are widespread and damaging pests in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide. Comparison of amplification products of two adjacent polymorphic regions of the mitochondrial genome using DNA extracts of characterized RKN strains, including 15 different species, indicate that several species are derived from the same or closely related female lineages. Nevertheless, M. javanica, M. enterolobii, M. incognita, and other key species could each be assigned unique mitochondrial haplotypes based on polymerase chain reaction fragment size and restriction cleavage patterns. M. arenaria isolates did not group as a single haplotype, consistent with other reports of diversity within this species. To test the utility of this assay, we characterized ethanol-preserved samples from 103 single-species isolates from four countries in sub-Saharan Africa (Benin, Nigeria, Kenya, and Tanzania). Mitochondrial haplotypes corresponding to M. javanica and M. incognita were the most prevalent. Samples from western Africa included several instances of M. enterolobii but this species was not detected in samples from East Africa. This protocol provides progress toward a standardized strategy for identification of RKN species from small, preserved samples and a rational starting point for classifying species present in regions where previous knowledge has been limited. PMID:25271352

  10. Antibodies against MERS Coronavirus in Dromedary Camels, Kenya, 1992–2013

    PubMed Central

    Corman, Victor M.; Jores, Joerg; Meyer, Benjamin; Younan, Mario; Liljander, Anne; Said, Mohammed Y.; Gluecks, Ilona; Lattwein, Erik; Bosch, Berend-Jan; Drexler, Jan Felix; Bornstein, Set; Müller, Marcel A.

    2014-01-01

    Dromedary camels are a putative source for human infections with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus. We showed that camels sampled in different regions in Kenya during 1992–2013 have antibodies against this virus. High densities of camel populations correlated with increased seropositivity and might be a factor in predicting long-term virus maintenance. PMID:25075637

  11. Hydatid disease in the Turkana District of Kenya. III. The significance of wild animals in the transmission of Echinococcus granulosus, with particular reference to Turkana and Masailand in Kenya.

    PubMed

    MacPherson, C N; Karstad, L; Stevenson, P; Arundel, J H

    1983-02-01

    The results are given of a study on the role of wildlife in the transmission of Echinococcus granulosus in the Turkana and Narok Districts of Kenya. A total of 76 wild carnivores belonging to three separate species was examined from Turkana District. Echinococcus adults were found in 11 of 38 silver-backed jackals (Canis mesomelas) and in six of 22 golden jackals (Canis aureus). This is the first record of golden jackals being infected with this parasite in Kenya. None of 16 spotted hyaenas (Crocuta crocuta) harboured the parasite. Morphological features of the parasites obtained from the jackals were compared with material obtained from dogs in the same area. No morphological differences were recorded when this material was compared with data reported by others, hence the Turkana material belonged to the single species E. granulosus. Three silver-backed jackals and three puppies (Canis familiaris) were successfully infected with protoscolices obtained from a hydatid cyst surgically removed from a Turkana patient. Three spotted hyaenas fed the same material failed to become infected. None of 152 wild herbivores of five species examined in Turkana harboured hydatid cysts. The natural jackal infections in this District are thought to be incidental and dependent on the continuance of the domestic cycle. The role of the Turkana themselves in the perpetuation of the cycle is discussed. Twenty-six wild herbivores of six species were examined for hydatid cysts, in Narok District; hydatids were found in three wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus) and a single topi (Damaliscus korrigum). The discovery of fertile cysts in wildebeest and the reported infections in lions (Panthera leo), Cape hunting dogs (Lycaon pictus) and silver-backed jackals, support previous evidence of the existence of a wildlife cycle in the Masailand and Serengeti regions of East Africa. The relationship of this cycle to the domestic cycle operating in the same area is unclear and requires further investigation. PMID:6882057

  12. Peoples of Africa, Topic 1. Africa South of the Sahara: A Program of Study for Secondary School Social Studies Students. (Teaching and Student Guides).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA. Project Africa.

    This teaching guide and student text for Project Africa's curriculum program, "Africa South of the Sahara," deal with how four typical contemporary African peoples acquired their present way of life: (1) the Hausa of Northern Nigeria, (2) the Kung Bushmen of the Kalahari Desert, (3) the Mech'a Galla of Ethiopa, and (4) the Kikuyu of Kenya.…

  13. Surgery in western Kenya.

    PubMed Central

    Branicki, F. J.

    1981-01-01

    Experience gained during 2 1/2 years' work as chief government surgeon for Nyanza Province, Kenya, is outlined. The wide variety of surgical conditions encountered and the problems posed in dealing with these by a chronic shortage of essential drugs, instruments, hospital facilities, and fully qualified staff are emphasised. It is suggested that at present the solution must lie in wider instruction in surgical techniques for general duties officers and clinical officers together with energetic community health, family planning, and preventive medicine programmes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. A Fig. 4 PMID:7271194

  14. Characteristics and patterns of use of emergency contraception among urban women in Nigeria and Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Gwendolyn; Keesbury, Jill; Speizer, Ilene

    2014-01-01

    Rates of emergency contraception (EC) use in sub-Saharan Africa are highest in Kenya and Nigeria, although little is understood about user characteristics and use dynamics in these countries. In order to better meet the emergency contraceptive needs of women, and contribute to the limited knowledge base on EC in Africa, this study examines a large, representative sample of EC users. It draws on data collected from household surveys that included 7,785 sexually experienced women in urban Kenya and 12,653 sexually experienced women in urban Nigeria. Bivariate and multivariate analyses found that among these urban women, knowledge of EC was higher than reported in other nationally representative surveys (58% in Kenya and 31% in Nigeria). About 12% of sexually-experienced women in Kenya and 6% in Nigeria ever used EC, although fewer women (less than 5%) reported using EC in the past one year. Recent users of EC were more likely to be in their twenties, unmarried, and more highly educated than never users or ever users of EC in both countries. Results contradict public perceptions of EC users as younger adolescents, and indicate the importance of strengthening EC provision in Africa, including targeting information and services to unmarried women and supporting private pharmacies in delivering quality EC services. PMID:24615575

  15. Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices (KAP) on Rift Valley Fever among Pastoralist Communities of Ijara District, North Eastern Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Abdi, Ismail H.; Affognon, Hippolyte D.; Wanjoya, Anthony K.; Onyango-Ouma, Washington; Sang, Rosemary

    2015-01-01

    Outbreaks of Rift Valley fever (RVF), a mosquito-borne viral zoonosis, have previously been associated with unusually heavy rainfall and extensive flooding. The disease is a serious public health problem in Africa and the Middle East, and is a potential global health threat. In Kenya, outbreaks of the disease have disproportionately affected impoverished pastoralist communities. This study sought to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) regarding RVF among the pastoralists of North Eastern Kenya, and to establish the determinants of KAP on RVF. A cross-sectional study involving 392 pastoralists living in Ijara district (Masalani and Ijara wards) was carried out using an interview questionnaire. All respondents interviewed (100%) had heard about RVF disease. They recognized that the disease is dangerous (99%), and had a positive attitude towards vaccination of animals (77%). However, few respondents knew that abortion (11%) and high mortality of young animals (10%) were key signs of RVF in animals. Very few (4%) use any form of protection when handling sick animals to avoid infection. Significant factors associated with knowledge were being in a household with a history of RVF infection (OR = 1.262, 95% CI = 1.099–1.447), having more livestock (OR = 1.285, 95% CI = 1.175–1.404) and the place of residence, Masalani (OR = 0.526, 95% CI = 0.480–0.576). Overall knowledge score on RVF was found to be a significant predictor of good preventive practice of the disease (OR = 1.073, 95% CI = 1.047–1.101). Despite the positive attitude that pastoralist communities have towards the prevention of RVF, there exist gaps in knowledge and good practices on the disease. Therefore there is need for public health education to address these gaps, and to identify and facilitate the removal of barriers to behavioural change related to the prevention of RVF. PMID:26566218

  16. Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices (KAP) on Rift Valley Fever among Pastoralist Communities of Ijara District, North Eastern Kenya.

    PubMed

    Abdi, Ismail H; Affognon, Hippolyte D; Wanjoya, Anthony K; Onyango-Ouma, Washington; Sang, Rosemary

    2015-11-01

    Outbreaks of Rift Valley fever (RVF), a mosquito-borne viral zoonosis, have previously been associated with unusually heavy rainfall and extensive flooding. The disease is a serious public health problem in Africa and the Middle East, and is a potential global health threat. In Kenya, outbreaks of the disease have disproportionately affected impoverished pastoralist communities. This study sought to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) regarding RVF among the pastoralists of North Eastern Kenya, and to establish the determinants of KAP on RVF. A cross-sectional study involving 392 pastoralists living in Ijara district (Masalani and Ijara wards) was carried out using an interview questionnaire. All respondents interviewed (100%) had heard about RVF disease. They recognized that the disease is dangerous (99%), and had a positive attitude towards vaccination of animals (77%). However, few respondents knew that abortion (11%) and high mortality of young animals (10%) were key signs of RVF in animals. Very few (4%) use any form of protection when handling sick animals to avoid infection. Significant factors associated with knowledge were being in a household with a history of RVF infection (OR = 1.262, 95% CI = 1.099-1.447), having more livestock (OR = 1.285, 95% CI = 1.175-1.404) and the place of residence, Masalani (OR = 0.526, 95% CI = 0.480-0.576). Overall knowledge score on RVF was found to be a significant predictor of good preventive practice of the disease (OR = 1.073, 95% CI = 1.047-1.101). Despite the positive attitude that pastoralist communities have towards the prevention of RVF, there exist gaps in knowledge and good practices on the disease. Therefore there is need for public health education to address these gaps, and to identify and facilitate the removal of barriers to behavioural change related to the prevention of RVF. PMID:26566218

  17. A survey of nurse-initiated and -managed antiretroviral therapy (NIMART) in practice, education, policy, and regulation in east, central, and southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Zuber, Alexandra; McCarthy, Carey F; Verani, Andre R; Msidi, Eleanor; Johnson, Carla

    2014-01-01

    In sub-Saharan Africa, nurses and midwives perform many HIV service delivery tasks, such as diagnosis of HIV and prescription of antiretroviral therapy (ART), which used to be the responsibility of physicians. While this task shifting is critical to scaling-up HIV services in Africa, the extent of HIV task shifting is not well understood. A survey of senior nursing leadership teams from 15 African countries was carried out to describe the extent of nurse-initiated and -managed antiretroviral therapy (NIMART) in practice, education, policy, and regulation. The survey took place at the African Health Professions Regulatory Collaborative meeting in Pretoria, South Africa, in June 2012. The findings indicated that NIMART is widely practiced and authorized in policy, but is not reinforced by regulation nor incorporated into preservice education. Further investment in policy, regulation, and pre-service education is needed to ensure sustainable, high quality ART service expansion through the region. PMID:24739661

  18. Growing a miracle in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Farruggia, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    A Kenyan woman, a retired nurse, and a nurse executive in America are miraculously led together to start a library in Kima, Kenya. Small beginnings grow into the Heather May-MashoodAbiola Children's Resource Centre (HEMAMA). Named after two infant children lost by the Kenyan woman and the nurse executive, HEMAMA is making a difference in the lives of children in the Kima, Kenya community. PMID:24282879

  19. East African soil erosion recorded in a 300 year old coral colony from Dominik Fleitmann,1,2

    E-print Network

    Vuille, Mathias

    East African soil erosion recorded in a 300 year old coral colony from Kenya Dominik Fleitmann,1; published 22 February 2007. [1] Soil erosion is a key socio-economic and environmental problem in Kenya on land use. The peak in suspended sediment load and hence soil erosion occurred between 1974 and 1980

  20. Early cercopithecid monkeys from the Tugen Hills, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Rossie, James B.; Gilbert, Christopher C.; Hill, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The modern Old World Monkeys (Superfamily Cercopithecoidea, Family Cercopithecidae) can be traced back into the late Miocene, but their origin and subsequent diversification is obscured by the scarcity of terrestrial fossil sites in Africa between 15 and 6 Ma. Here, we document the presence of cercopithecids at 12.5 Ma in the Tugen Hills of Kenya. These fossils add 3 My to the known antiquity of crown Cercopithecidae. The two specimens represent one or possibly two species of early colobine, and their morphology suggests that they were less folivorous than their modern relatives. PMID:23509250

  1. EXPLOITING CHEMICAL ECOLOGY FOR LIVELIHOOD IMPROVEMENT OF SMALL HOLDER FARMERS IN KENYA.

    PubMed

    Winter, E; Midega, C; Bruce, T; Hummel, H E; Langner, S S; Leithold, G; Khan, Z; Pickett, J

    2014-01-01

    "Push-Pull" is an inexpensive and eminently practical strategy designed for developing countries in order to exploit sound principles of chemical ecology for agricultural pest management. This strategy is specifically suitable for small holder farmers. Their experience can easily be integrated into existing farming practices in their immediate environment. "Push-pull" within one and a half decades became widely established and meanwhile is greatly beneficial to practitioners in East Africa, mainly Kenya. The classical push-pull approach used for applied plant-insect management was pioneered by Khan and Pickett (2000) and subsequent papers of Pickett (2003) and Khan et al. (2006, 2008). Relevant plant species explored so far were maize or sorghum intercropped with other East African plants (Desmodium spp. resp. Melinis minutiflora) possessing natural chemicals repellent resp. attractive for stem borer moths Chilo partellus (Lepidoptera), whereby Desmodium spp. was grown inside the maize rows while M. minutiflora surrounded it. Both simultaneous actions combined resulted in a significant decrease of stem borers in the area to be protected. A benefit to cost ratio of 2.5 was realized. Within a period of 15 years the number of subscribing farmers substantially increased from a few dozen to more than 80,000 in 2014. Two experiments along the paths of chemical ecology were undertaken between Sept 2012 and Feb 2013: One was designed to investigate if the legume D. intortum known to produce repellent volatiles against stem borer moths induces defence in Zea mays varieties. We looked at two open-pollinated farmers' varieties and two commercial hybrid varieties suspecting the farmers' varieties to be responsive rather than the hybrids. However, no defence induction was detected in this study so far. This could be explained by an insufficient production of defence inducing volatiles in leaves of D. intortum whereas flowers might produce a sufficient response. More detailed study is needed. A second approach made use of species-specific insect monitoring traps baited with highly specific female sex pheromones for attracting and monitoring destructive insect pests. The female sex pheromone (8-methyl-decane-2-ol propanoate) of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) (Western Corn Rootworm) is readily available as bait in the "Metcalf sticky cup trap" for trapping males, an extraordinarily sensitive technique for monitoring the presence or absence of male beetles in a given area. Li et al. (2006) had argued for the likelihood of easy immigration of this cosmopolitan maize pest into East Africa. Our results, however, so far indicate the absence of a local population in the area of Mbita, while not excluding its presence at Nairobi or Mombasa. Both investigations contribute to different aspects of Kenyan economic development and may be seen as two independent but complementary contributions towards livelihood improvement of small holder farmers in Kenya. PMID:26084106

  2. Strategies for Supporting Orphans and Vulnerable Children: An Exploratory Study of an Exemplary Model of Care in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mears, Melynda; Singletary, Jon; Rogers, Rob

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the extent to which programs in a religiously affiliated agency in Kenya incorporate 12 internationally sanctioned strategies for supporting orphans and vulnerable children in Sub-Saharan Africa (Olson, Knight, & Foster, 2006). The results indicated that all 12 strategies were being employed, though to varying…

  3. Rainfall variability over the East African coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamoyo, Majambo; Reason, Chris; Obura, David

    2015-04-01

    The coastal region of Kenya and Tanzania experiences two rainy seasons per year (October-November-December (OND) and March-April-May (MAM)) and has an economy that is highly dependent on and vulnerable to the amounts and timing of rainfall during these seasons. Most of the interannual variability in OND seasonal rainfall totals relate to El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) events. While these relationships are fairly well documented and understood, there is a relatively poor understanding of the timing and intensity of the rainfall during ENSO/IOD seasons. In an attempt to improve understanding on this topic, daily rainfall station data, dekad and seasonal satellite rainfall estimates and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) imagery are analyzed for two recent OND seasons with El Niño conditions. These are OND 2006 which was characterized by devastating floods over the region and 2009 when the magnitude and spatial extent of the above average rainfall patterns were smaller. Daily rainfall data for the Tanzanian coastal stations showed that Tanga and Dar es Salaam (north and central coast) experienced few dry spells and several relatively intense wet spells during OND 2006 whereas at Mtwara, on the south coast, there were two very intense wet spells and a number of dry spells during the season. In OND 2009, only the north coast (Tanga) experienced above average rainfall, comprised of three wet spells with the one about a month after the beginning of the season being very intense. These data highlight the complexity of the rainfall distributions in the coastal region. A shift of the Walker circulation over coastal East Africa with strong uplift there seemed to be responsible for the very wet conditions during OND 2006. The marine air mass being advected from the western tropical Indian Ocean towards East Africa contained more moisture than average. Similar, but weaker, horizontal circulation anomalies occurred in OND 2009 along with increased moisture over the coastal zone although there was no obvious shift in the Walker circulation in this season.

  4. Estimation of Mortality among HIV-infected people on antiretroviral therapy treatment in east Africa: a sampling based approach in an observational, multisite, cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Elvin H.; Odeny, Thomas A.; Lyamuya, Rita E.; Nakiwogga-Muwanga, Alice; Diero, Lameck; Bwana, Mwebesa; Muyindike, Winnie; Braitstein, Paula; Somi, Geoffrey R.; Kambugu, Andrew; Bukusi, Elizabeth A.; Wenger, Megan; Wools-Kaloustian, Kara K.; Glidden, David V.; Yiannoutsos, Constantin T.; Martin, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Background Mortality after initiation of antiretroviral treatment (ART) among HIV-infected patients in resource limited settings is a critical measure of the effectiveness and comparative effectiveness of the global public health response. Unknown outcomes due to high loss to follow-up (LTFU) preclude accurate accounting of deaths and limit our understanding of effectiveness. Methods We evaluated in HIV-infected adults on ART in 14 clinics in five settings in Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania using a sampling-based approach in which we intensively traced a random sample of lost patients (> 90 days late for last scheduled visit) and incorporated their vital status outcomes into analyses of the entire clinic population through probability-weighted survival analyses. Findings We followed 34,277 adults on ART from Mbarara and Kampala, Uganda; Eldoret and Kisumu, Kenya; and Morogoro, Tanzania. The median age was 35 years, 34% were men, and median pre-therapy CD4 count was 154 cells/?l. Overall 5,780 (17%) were LTFU, 991 (17%) were randomly selected for tracing and vital status was ascertained in 860 of 991 (87%). Incorporating outcomes among the lost increased estimated 3-year mortality from 3.9% (95% CI: 3.6%-4.2%) to 12.5% (95% CI: 11.8%-13.3%). The sample-corrected, unadjusted 3-year mortality across settings ranged from 7.2% in Mbarara to 23.6% in Morogoro. After adjustment for age, sex, pre-therapy CD4 value, and WHO stage, the sample-corrected hazard ratio comparing the setting with highest vs. lowest mortality was 2.2 (95% CI: 1.5-3.4) and the risk difference for death at 3 years was 11% (95% CI: 5.0%-17.7%). Interpretation A sampling based approach is widely feasible and important for understanding mortality after starting ART. After adjustment for measured biological drivers, mortality differs substantially across settings despite delivery of a similar clinical package of treatment. Implementation research to understand the systems, community, and patient behaviors driving these differences is urgently needed. PMID:26120593

  5. Epidemiology and clinical outcomes associated with Theileria parva in a cohort of East African short horn zebu calves. 

    E-print Network

    Jennings, Amy Elizabeth

    2013-11-29

    This thesis takes data from the Infectious Diseases of East African Livestock (IDEAL) project. The project was a longitudinal calf cohort study based in Western Kenya. Indigenous short horn zebu calves were recruited at ...

  6. Astronomy Landscape in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemaungani, Takalani

    2015-01-01

    The vision for astronomy in Africa is embedded in the African Space Policy of the African Union in early 2014. The vision is about positioning Africa as an emerging hub for astronomy sciences and facilities. Africa recognized the need to take advantage of its natural resource, the geographical advantage of the clear southern skies and pristine sites for astronomy. The Pan African University (PAU) initiative also presents an opportunity as a post-graduate training and research network of university nodes in five regions of Africa and supported by the African Union. The Southern African node based in South Africa concentrates on space sciences which also includes astronomy. The PAU aims to provide the opportunity for advanced graduate training and postgraduate research to high-performing African students. Objectives also include promoting mobility of students and teachers and harmonizing programs and degrees.A number of astronomy initiatives have burgeoned in the Southern African region and these include the Southern Africa Largest Optical Telescope (SALT), HESS (High Energy Stereoscopic System), the SKA (Square Kilometre Array) and the AVN (African Very Long Baseline Interferometer Network). There is a growing appetite for astronomy sciences in Africa. In East Africa, the astronomy community is well organized and is growing - the East African Astronomical society (EAAS) held its successful fourth annual conference since 2010 on 30 June to 04 July 2014 at the University of Rwanda. Centred around the 'Role of Astronomy in Socio-Economic Transformation,' this conference aimed at strengthening capacity building in Astronomy, Astrophysics and Space Science in general, while providing a forum for astronomers from the region to train young and upcoming scientists.

  7. A multi-year record of flux measurements in East Africa: coupling eddy-covariance with high-frequency water isotope observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, M.; Good, S. P.; Caylor, K. K.

    2012-12-01

    Semi-arid regions cover 40 percent of the terrestrial surface and are home to more than one billion people; yet, information on surface-atmospheric fluxes in dryland ecosystems remains limited. To help address this, we present observations of surface enery, water, and carbon fluxes in a mixed-savanna based on micrometerological data collected with an eddy covariance tower in Laikipa, Kenya from 2010-2012. The tower is equipped with an off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy system (ICOS), and the isotopic composition of atmospheric water vapor is sampled at 1 Hz. Using a cryogenic vacuum distillation system, liquid water is extracted from regularly collected plant and soil samples and is also analyzed with an ICOS system (coupled with a water vaporizer). The isotopic composition of water as it moves through soil-plant-atmosphere continuum and the surface-atmospheric fluxes are used to study complex interactions between hydrologic dynamics and ecosystem productivity. Using data from a well-above-average rainfall year in 2011 in comparison with the rest of the study period, we explore how rainfall variability influences carbon and water cycling in drylands through a seasonal and event-scale analysis of carbon and water fluxes.

  8. Analyses of Twelve New Whole Genome Sequences of Cassava Brown Streak Viruses and Ugandan Cassava Brown Streak Viruses from East Africa: Diversity, Supercomputing and Evidence for Further Speciation

    PubMed Central

    Ndunguru, Joseph; Sseruwagi, Peter; Tairo, Fred; Stomeo, Francesca; Maina, Solomon; Djinkeng, Appolinaire; Kehoe, Monica; Boykin, Laura M.

    2015-01-01

    Cassava brown streak disease is caused by two devastating viruses, Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV) and Ugandan cassava brown streak virus (UCBSV) which are frequently found infecting cassava, one of sub-Saharan Africa’s most important staple food crops. Each year these viruses cause losses of up to $100 million USD and can leave entire families without their primary food source, for an entire year. Twelve new whole genomes, including seven of CBSV and five of UCBSV were uncovered in this research, doubling the genomic sequences available in the public domain for these viruses. These new sequences disprove the assumption that the viruses are limited by agro-ecological zones, show that current diagnostic primers are insufficient to provide confident diagnosis of these viruses and give rise to the possibility that there may be as many as four distinct species of virus. Utilizing NGS sequencing technologies and proper phylogenetic practices will rapidly increase the solution to sustainable cassava production. PMID:26439260

  9. 40Ar/(39)Ar dating of the Kapthurin Formation, Baringo, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Deino, Alan L; McBrearty, Sally

    2002-01-01

    The(40)Ar/(39)Ar radiometric dating technique has been applied to tuffs and lavas of the Kapthurin Formation in the Tugen Hills, Kenya Rift Valley. Two variants of the(40)Ar/(39)Ar technique, single-crystal total fusion (SCTF) and laser incremental heating (LIH) have been employed to date five marker horizons within the formation: near the base, the Kasurein Basalt at 0.61+/-0.04 Ma; the Pumice Tuff at 0.543+/-0.004 Ma; the Upper Kasurein Basalt at 0.552+/-0.015 Ma; the Grey Tuff at 0.509+/-0.009 Ma; and within the upper part of the formation, the Bedded Tuff at 0.284+/-0.012 Ma. The new, precise radiometric age determination for the Pumice Tuff also provides an age for the widespread Lake Baringo Trachyte, since the Pumice Tuff is the early pyroclastic phase of this voluminous trachyte eruption. These results establish the age of fossil hominids KNM-BK 63-67 and KNM-BK 8518 at approximately 0.510-0.512 Ma, a significant finding given that few Middle Pleistocene hominids are radiometrically dated. The Kapthurin hominids are thus the near contemporaries of those from Bodo, Ethiopia and Tanzania. A flake and core industry from lacustrine sediments in the lower part of the formation is constrained by new dates of 0.55-0.52 Ma, a period during which the Acheulian industry, characterized by handaxes, is known throughout East Africa. Points, typical of the Middle Stone Age (MSA), are found in Kapthurin Formation sediments now shown to date to between 0.509+/-0.009 Ma and 0.284+/-0.012 Ma. This date exceeds previous estimates for the age of the MSA elsewhere in East Africa by 49 ka, and establishes the age of Acheulian to MSA transition for the region. Evidence of the use of the Levallois technique for the manufacture of both small flakes and biface preforms, the systematic production of blades, and the use and processing of red ochre also occurs in this interval. The presence of blades and red ochre at this depth is important as blades signify a high degree of technical competence and red ochre suggests symbolic behavior. PMID:11795974

  10. Educating for a Sustainable Future: Africa in Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barboza, Nathalie

    2000-01-01

    Examines population and environmental issues in sub-Saharan Africa and efforts to heighten awareness of the need for sustainable development and behavioral changes. Describes national initiatives in Kenya, Senegal, Nigeria, Benin, and Burkina Faso to incorporate education for sustainability into the schools, teacher education programs, and public…

  11. Half-precessional climate forcing of Indian Ocean monsoon dynamics on the East African equator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschuren, D.; Sinninghe Damste, J. S.; Moernaut, J.; Kristen, I.; Fagot, M.; Blaauw, M.; Haug, G. H.; Project Members, C.

    2008-12-01

    The EuroCLIMATE project CHALLACEA produced a detailed multi-proxy reconstruction of the climate history of equatorial East Africa, based on the sediment record of Lake Challa, a 4.2 km2, 92-m deep crater lake on the lower East slope of Mt. Kilimanjaro (Kenya/Tanzania). Relatively stable sedimentation dynamics over the past 25,000 years resulted in a unique combination of high temporal resolution, excellent radiometric (210Pb, 14C) age control, and confidence that recording parameters of the climatic proxy signals extracted from the sediment have remained constant through time. The equatorial (3 deg. S) location of our study site in East Africa, where seasonal migration of convective activity spans the widest latitude range worldwide, produced unique information on how varying rainfall contributions from the northeasterly and southeasterly Indian Ocean monsoons shaped regional climate history. The Challa proxy records for temperature (TEX86) and moisture balance (reflection-seismic stratigraphy and the BIT index of soil bacterial input) uniquely weave together tropical climate variability at orbital and shorter time scales. The temporal pattern of reconstructed moisture balance bears the clear signature of half- precessional insolation forcing of Indian Ocean monsoon dynamics, modified by northern-latitude influence on moisture-balance variation at millennial and century time scales. During peak glacial time (but not immediately before) and the Younger Dryas, NH ice sheet influences overrode local insolation influence on monsoon intensity. After the NH ice sheets had melted and a relatively stable interglacial temperature regime developed, precession-driven summer insolation became the dominant determinant of regional moisture balance, with anti-phased patterns of Holocene hydrological change in the northern and southern (sub)tropics, and a uniquely hybrid pattern on the East African equator. In the last 2-3000 years a series of multi-century droughts with links to high latitude climate variability exerted widespread influence across the African continent. In northern and western tropical Africa these drought episodes accentuated the late- Holocene drying trend; in southern tropical Africa they mitigated or aborted the trend to increasing monsoon rainfall prescribed by SH insolation forcing.

  12. A survey for Echinococcus spp. of carnivores in six wildlife conservation areas in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kagendo, D; Magambo, J; Agola, E L; Njenga, S M; Zeyhle, E; Mulinge, E; Gitonga, P; Mbae, C; Muchiri, E; Wassermann, M; Kern, P; Romig, T

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the presence of Echinococcus spp. in wild mammals of Kenya, 832 faecal samples from wild carnivores (lions, leopards, spotted hyenas, wild dogs and silver-backed jackals) were collected in six different conservation areas of Kenya (Meru, Nairobi, Tsavo West and Tsavo East National Parks, Samburu and Maasai Mara National Reserves). Taeniid eggs were found in 120 samples (14.4%). In total, 1160 eggs were isolated and further analysed using RFLP-PCR of the nad1 gene and sequencing. 38 of these samples contained eggs of Echinococcus spp., which were identified as either Echinococcus felidis (n=27) or Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto (n=12); one sample contained eggs from both taxa. E. felidis was found in faeces from lions (n=20) and hyenas (n=5) while E. granulosus in faeces from lions (n=8), leopards (n=1) and hyenas (n=3). The host species for two samples containing E. felidis could not be identified with certainty. As the majority of isolated eggs could not be analysed with the methods used (no amplification), we do not attempt to give estimates of faecal prevalences. Both taxa of Echinococcus were found in all conservation areas except Meru (only E. felidis) and Tsavo West (only E. granulosus). Host species identification for environmental faecal samples, based on field signs, was found to be unreliable. All samples with taeniid eggs were subjected to a confirmatory host species RLFP-PCR of the cytochrome B gene. 60% had been correctly identified in the field. Frequently, hyena faeces were mistaken for lion and vice versa, and none of the samples from jackals and wild dogs could be confirmed in the tested sub-sample. This is the first molecular study on the distribution of Echinococcus spp. in Kenyan wildlife. The presence of E. felidis is confirmed for lions and newly reported for spotted hyenas. Lions and hyenas are newly recognized hosts for E. granulosus s.s., while the role of leopards remains uncertain. These data provide the basis for further studies on the lifecycles and the possible link between wild and domestic cycles of cystic echinococcosis in eastern Africa. PMID:24732034

  13. High Rates of O’Nyong Nyong and Chikungunya Virus Transmission in Coastal Kenya

    PubMed Central

    LaBeaud, A. Desiree; Banda, Tamara; Brichard, Julie; Muchiri, Eric M.; Mungai, Peter L.; Mutuku, Francis M.; Borland, Erin; Gildengorin, Ginny; Pfeil, Sarah; Teng, Crystal Y.; Long, Kristin; Heise, Mark; Powers, Ann M.; Kitron, Uriel; King, Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) and o’nyong nyong virus (ONNV) are mosquito-borne alphaviruses endemic in East Africa that cause acute febrile illness and arthritis. The objectives of this study were to measure the seroprevalence of CHIKV and ONNV in coastal Kenya and link it to demographics and other risk factors. Methodology Demographic and exposure questionnaires were administered to 1,848 participants recruited from two village clusters (Milalani-Nganja and Vuga) in 2009. Sera were tested for alphavirus exposure using standardized CHIKV IgG ELISA protocols and confirmed with plaque reduction neutralization tests (PRNT). Logistic regression models were used to determine the variables associated with seropositivity. Weighted K test for global clustering of houses with alphavirus positive participants was performed for distance ranges of 50–1,000 meters, and G* statistic and kernel density mapping were used to identify locations of higher seroprevalence. Principal Findings 486 (26%) participants were seropositive by IgG ELISA. Of 443 PRNT confirmed positives, 25 samples (6%) were CHIKV+, 250 samples (56%) were ONNV+, and 168 samples (38%) had high titers for both. Age was significantly associated with seropositivity (OR 1.01 per year, 95% C.I. 1.00–1.01); however, younger adults were more likely to be seropositive than older adults. Males were less likely to be seropositive (p<0.05; OR 0.79, 95% C.I. 0.64–0.97). Adults who owned a bicycle (p<0.05; OR 1.37, 95% C.I. 1.00–1.85) or motor vehicle (p<0.05; OR 4.64, 95% C.I. 1.19–18.05) were more likely to be seropositive. Spatial analysis demonstrated hotspots of transmission within each village and clustering among local households in Milalani-Nganja, peaking at the 200–500m range. Conclusions/Significance Alphavirus exposure, particularly ONNV exposure, is common in coastal Kenya with ongoing interepidemic transmission of both ONNV and CHIKV. Women and adults were more likely to be seropositive. Household location may be a defining factor for the ecology of alphaviral transmission in this region. PMID:25658762

  14. Neogene desertification of Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senut, Brigitte; Pickford, Martin; Ségalen, Loïc

    2009-08-01

    Throughout the Neogene, the faunas and floras in Africa recorded global climatic changes. We present an overview of Neogene desertification in Africa by tracing stable isotopes in eggshells and mammalian enamel, by faunal (changes in hypsodonty, etc.) and floral changes in sequences at the latitudinal extremities of the continent and the equator. This work reveals that desertification started in the southwest ca 17-16 Ma, much earlier than the region of the present-day Sahara (ca 8-7 Ma) and long before the deserts in East Africa (Plio-Pleistocene). A consequence of this history is that animals and plants inhabiting the South of the continent had a long period of time in which to adapt to arid, unstable climatic conditions. When parts of East Africa became arid during the Late Miocene and Plio-Pleistocene, several of these lineages expanded northwards and occupied developing arid niches before local lineages could adapt. Several of the latter became extinct, while others withdrew westwards as the tropical forest diminished in extent. It is proposed that the history of desertification in Africa was related to that of the polar ice caps (Antarctic, Arctic).

  15. Mineral content of traditional leafy vegetables from western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Orech, F O; Christensen, D L; Larsen, T; Friis, H; Aagaard-Hansen, J; Estambale, B A

    2007-12-01

    Socio-economic changes that have taken place in Africa have influenced people's eating habits in both rural and urban set-ups. Most people prefer introduced foods to traditional foods, including plant foods whose consumption is widely regarded as a primitive culture manifesting poor lifestyles. However, recent studies on traditional plant foods have shown that some are highly nutritious; containing high levels of both vitamins and minerals. They also have potential as a remedy to counter food insecurity since most are well adapted to the local environment, enabling them to resist pests, drought and diseases. This paper describes the mineral (calcium, iron and zinc) contents in some 54 traditional vegetable species collected from Nyang'oma area of Bondo district, western Kenya. Atomic absorption spectroscopy was used to determine the mineral content. We found that most traditional leafy vegetables, domesticated and wild, generally contain higher levels of calcium, iron and zinc compared with the introduced varieties such as spinach (Spanacia oleracea), kale (Brassica oleracea var. acephala) and cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata). The results of this study could contribute towards identification, propagation and subsequent domestication and cultivation promotion of nutrient-rich and safe species within the farming systems of the local communities in Kenya, sub-Saharan Africa or elsewhere. PMID:17852510

  16. Calibration and application of the branched GDGT temperature proxy on East African lake sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loomis, Shannon E.; Russell, James M.; Ladd, Bethany; Street-Perrott, F. Alayne; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2012-12-01

    Branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (brGDGTs) are a novel proxy for mean annual air temperature (MAAT) and have the potential to be broadly applicable to climate reconstruction using lacustrine sediments. Several calibrations have been put forth relating brGDGT distributions to MAAT using a variety of linear regressions, including the methylation (MBT) and cyclization (CBT) indices of brGDGTs, the relative abundances of the major, non-cyclized brGDGTs (MbrGDGTs), and best subsets regression (BSR) of the fractional abundances of the nine most common brGDGTs. However, these calibrations have rarely been applied to lake sediment cores to reconstruct temperatures and test the applicability of this proxy as a paleothermometer. We present an expanded East African lakes surface sediment brGDGT dataset based upon 111 lakes and examine three methods of calibrating brGDGTs to MAAT. These methods include recalculations of the East African lake MBT/CBT calibration and MbrGDGTs calibrations, as well as a new stepwise forward selection (SFS) calibration that uses the four combined brGDGTs that explain the most variance in temperature in our calibration set. We apply these new calibrations as well as five previously published lacustrine brGDGT calibrations to the brGDGT distributions of our surface sediment dataset and a 48 kyr sediment core from Sacred Lake, Mt. Kenya, producing the first brGDGT temperature reconstruction available from a small tropical lake. We compare the reconstructed temperatures to previously published paleotemperature records from East Africa to help us assess the performance of the brGDGT calibrations. We find that the SFS calibration has a consistently low root mean squared error of prediction (RMSEP) over the entire range of MAAT, while the MBT/CBT and MbrGDGT calibrations have relatively large RMSEPs, particularly between lakes with similar temperatures but variable pH. This suggests that these techniques do not properly deconvolve the temperature and pH signals recorded in the distributions of the brGDGTs. We further find that only the SFS calibration produces a credible reconstructed temperature history from Sacred Lake when compared to other last glacial maximum paleotemperature estimates from East Africa. Thus, we advocate for the use of the SFS calibration when reconstructing paleotemperatures from brGDGTs in East Africa.

  17. Water and Productivity of Floodplain Grasslands: Exploring Linkages through Experimentations and Models in the Tana River Delta, Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leauthaud, C.; Musila, W.; Kergoat, L.; Hiernaux, P.; Manuela, G.; Duvail, S.

    2014-12-01

    Floodplain grasslands have one of the highest productivities of non-cultivated ecosystems on Earth. They procure a wide variety of benefits to human beings. In Eastern Africa, grasslands of Echinochloa stagnina are primordial for pastoralists as highly productive dry-season grazing zones. Regular flooding is a critical property in maintaining their productivity and resulting services. Yet, construction of hydrologic infrastructure modifies the flooding regime of rivers and the consequences on downstream floodplain grasslands need to be assessed. This presentation focuses on quantifying the productivity of the floodplain grasslands in the Tana River Delta, Kenya, in order to assess potential changes under varying flooding regimes. The interactions between growth and floods are explored firstly at an experimental site, then through the construction of a process-based plant growth model adapted to floodplain grasslands. The 15-month experiment consisted in quantifying daily growth rates under various rainfall, irrigation, cutting and flooding regimes . Floods increased growth rates three-folds, and high productivities were maintained after the floods. The cutting regime and contribution of non-flood water also influenced productivity. Modelling allowed exploring the underlying processes explaining such behaviour. In an exploratory endeavour, the productivity of the grassland at the ecosystem scale was assessed with the model for a variety of flood and non-flooded scenarios. Decreasing floods led to a drop in annual productivity that could have serious consequences for the livestock keeping activities of the zone. This research highlights the importance of floods in the maintenance of high productivities for a floodplain grassland typical of East Africa, and maybe of the Sahelian band. The model, once further validated, could be used on other floodplain grasslands, such as those of the Niger delta. Results for the Tana River Delta would need to be discussed with the stakeholders so that proper action can be taken.

  18. Mt. Elgon, Africa, Shaded Relief and Colored Height

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The striking contrast of geologic structures in Africa is shown in this shaded relief image of Mt. Elgon on the left and a section of the Great Rift Valley on the right.

    Mt. Elgon is a solitary extinct volcano straddling the border between Uganda and Kenya, and at 4,321 meters (14,178 feet) tall is the eighth highest mountain in Africa. It is positioned on the Pre-Cambriam bedrock of the Trans Nzoia Plateau, and is similar to other such volcanoes in East Africa in that it is associated with the formation of the Rift Valley. However one thing that sets Mt. Elgon apart is its age.

    Although there is no verifiable evidence of its earliest volcanic activity, Mt. Elgon is estimated to be at least 24 million years old, making it the oldest extinct volcano in East Africa. This presents a striking comparison to Mt. Kilimanjaro, the highest mountain in Africa at 5,895 meters (19,341 feet), which is just over one million years old. Judging by the diameter of its base, it is a common belief among geological experts that Mt. Elgon was once the highest mountains in Africa, however erosion has played a significant role in reducing the height to its present value.

    Juxtaposed with this impressive mountain is a section of the Great Rift Valley, a geological fault system that extends for about 4,830 kilometers (2,995 miles) from Syria to central Mozambique. Erosion has concealed some sections, but in some sections like that shown here, there are sheer cliffs several thousand feet high. The present configuration of the valley, which dates from the mid-Pleistocene epoch, results from a rifting process associated with thermal currents in the Earth's mantle.

    Two visualization methods were combined to produce the image: shading and color coding of topographic height. The shade image was derived by computing topographic slope in the northwest-southeast direction, so that northwest slopes appear bright and southeast slopes appear dark. Color coding is directly related to topographic height, with green at the lower elevations, rising through yellow and tan, to white at the highest elevations.

    Elevation data used in this image were acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect 3-D measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter (approximately 200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between NASA, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) of the U.S. Department of Defense and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, D.C.

    Location: 1 degree north latitude, 35 degrees east longitude Orientation: North toward the top, Mercator projection Size: 223 by 223 kilometers (138 by 138 miles) Image Data: shaded and colored SRTM elevation model Date Acquired: February 2000

  19. Land degradation and hydrological effects in the Mau Forest Complex of Kenya.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olang, L. O.; Kundu, P. M.

    2012-04-01

    The Mau Forest Complex is the largest riverine water tower in East Africa. The area is one of the main sources of the major rivers in Kenya. However, in the recent past, the ecological sustenance of the complex has been under severe threat due to massive deforestation and human induced socio-economic activities. There is thus the urgent need for comprehensive and consistent environmental change analysis to support management. In this study, the spatio-temporal land cover changes within the Mau Complex region was assessed through consistent classification of selected multispectral Landsat satellite images. A post-classification procedure employing the maximum-likelihood classifier was employed to discern the changes, and the accuracy of the classifications assessed from ground based information integrating indigenous knowledge obtained through participatory mapping techniques. Preliminary results of the study indicate significant land degradation, especially within the Eastern part of the Mau Forest Complex. Before 1986, the dominant pre-change land cover types were about 75% of forests, 12% of woodlands and 13% of farms. By 1989, the landscape had changed tremendously to about 60 % of forest and woodland and 40 % of agriculture and built-up area. Hydrologically, these changes have not only impaired the ability of the area to cleanse runoff based processes, but also amplified soil erosion and flooding processes leading to degradation of streams, lakes and other water bodies served by the complex. From the existing signatures, the Mau Forest Complex can be classified as highly vulnerable, considering the long term consequences of the degradation on the sustainability of the existing and important water resources. Keywords: Mau Complex, land cover change, satellite images, indigenous knowledge

  20. Recilia banda Kramer (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), a vector of Napier stunt phytoplasma in Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obura, Evans; Midega, Charles A. O.; Masiga, Daniel; Pickett, John A.; Hassan, Mohamed; Koji, Shinsaku; Khan, Zeyaur R.

    2009-10-01

    Napier grass ( Pennisetum purpureum) is the most important fodder crop in smallholder dairy production systems in East Africa, characterized by small zero-grazing units. It is also an important trap crop used in the management of cereal stemborers in maize in the region. However, production of Napier grass in the region is severely constrained by Napier stunt disease. The etiology of the disease is known to be a phytoplasma, 16SrXI strain. However, the putative insect vector was yet unknown. We sampled and identified five leafhopper and three planthopper species associated with Napier grass and used them as candidates in pathogen transmission experiments. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR), based on the highly conserved 16S gene, primed by P1/P6-R16F2n/R16R2 nested primer sets was used to diagnose phytoplasma on test plants and insects, before and after transmission experiments. Healthy plants were exposed for 60 days to insects that had fed on diseased plants and acquired phytoplasma. The plants were then incubated for another 30 days. Nested PCR analyses showed that 58.3% of plants exposed to Recilia banda Kramer (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) were positive for phytoplasma and developed characteristic stunt disease symptoms while 60% of R. banda insect samples were similarly phytoplasma positive. We compared the nucleotide sequences of the phytoplasma isolated from R. banda, Napier grass on which these insects were fed, and Napier grass infected by R. banda, and found them to be virtually identical. The results confirm that R. banda transmits Napier stunt phytoplasma in western Kenya, and may be the key vector of Napier stunt disease in this region.

  1. Report and policy brief from the 4th Africa Conference on Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research: innovations in access to prevention, treatment and care in HIV/AIDS, Kisumu, Kenya, 29 April - 3 May 2007.

    PubMed

    Setswe, G; Peltzer, K; Banyini, M; Skinner, D; Seager, J; Maile, S; Sedumedi, S; Gomis, D; van der Linde, I

    2007-08-01

    About 520 delegates from all over Africa and 21 countries attended the conference. This report and policy brief summarises the key findings and suggested policy options that emerged from rapporteur reports of conference proceedings including the following themes: (1) Orphans and vulnerable children, (2) Treatment, (3) Prevention, (4) Gender and male involvement, (5) Male circumcision, (6) People living with HIV/AIDS, (7) Food and nutrition, (8) Socioeconomics, and (9) Politics/policy. Two (11.8%) of the 17 OVC projects from the three countries were classified as best practice interventions. Of the 83 abstracts that were accepted at the conference, only 7 (8.4%) were dealing with antiretroviral therapy (ART). There has been tremendous effort by various organisations to provide information about prevention of HIV/AIDS. Information received by adolescents has been effective in increasing their knowledge, but without positive sexual behaviour change. The conference noted the contribution of gender discrimination and violence to the HIV epidemic and the different risks that men and women face in relation to the epidemic. Social scientists need to study the deep cultural meanings attached to male circumcision among different ethnic groups to be able to guide the debate on the latest biomedical findings on the protective effect of circumcision against HIV. Palliative care and support is crucial for coping among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in order to deal with medical and psychological issues. Results from several countries have helped researchers to explore alternative ways of examining poverty in the context of HIV and AIDS. Policy frameworks which are likely to succeed in combating HIV/AIDS need to be updated to cover issues of access, testing, disclosure and stigma. In general, the conference was successful in identifying innovations in access to prevention, treatment and care in HIV/AIDS. PMID:18071616

  2. Genomics of Adaptation to Multiple Concurrent Stresses: Insights from Comparative Transcriptomics of a Cichlid Fish from One of Earth's Most Extreme Environments, the Hypersaline Soda Lake Magadi in Kenya, East Africa.

    PubMed

    Kavembe, Geraldine D; Franchini, Paolo; Irisarri, Iker; Machado-Schiaffino, Gonzalo; Meyer, Axel

    2015-10-01

    The Magadi tilapia (Alcolapia grahami) is a cichlid fish that inhabits one of the Earth's most extreme aquatic environments, with high pH (~10), salinity (~60 % of seawater), high temperatures (~40 °C), and fluctuating oxygen regimes. The Magadi tilapia evolved several unique behavioral, physiological, and anatomical adaptations, some of which are constituent and thus retained in freshwater conditions. We conducted a transcriptomic analysis on A. grahami to study the evolutionary basis of tolerance to multiple stressors. To identify the adaptive regulatory changes associated with stress responses, we massively sequenced gill transcriptomes (RNAseq) from wild and freshwater-acclimated specimens of A. grahami. As a control, corresponding transcriptome data from Oreochromis leucostictus, a closely related freshwater species, were generated. We found expression differences in a large number of genes with known functions related to osmoregulation, energy metabolism, ion transport, and chemical detoxification. Over-representation of metabolism-related gene ontology terms in wild individuals compared to laboratory-acclimated specimens suggested that freshwater conditions greatly decrease the metabolic requirements of this species. Twenty-five genes with diverse physiological functions related to responses to water stress showed signs of divergent natural selection between the Magadi tilapia and its freshwater relative, which shared a most recent common ancestor only about four million years ago. The complete set of genes responsible for urea excretion was identified in the gill transcriptome of A. grahami, making it the only fish species to have a functional ornithine-urea cycle pathway in the gills-a major innovation for increasing nitrogenous waste efficiency. PMID:26345661

  3. Democrats and Donors: Studying Democratization in Africa 

    E-print Network

    Dorman, Sara Rich

    2004-01-01

    Since the late 1980s, political scientists, donors, and development workers in East and Southern Africa have devoted much time and resources to the question of ‘democratization’. Yet, it is not clear how this concept of ...

  4. Spatial analysis from remotely sensed observations of Congo basin of East African high Land to drain water using gravity for sustainable management of low laying Chad basin of Central Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modu, B.; Herbert, B.

    2014-11-01

    The Chad basin which covers an area of about 2.4 million kilometer square is one of the largest drainage basins in Africa in the centre of Lake Chad .This basin was formed as a result of rifting and drifting episode, as such it has no outlet to the oceans or seas. It contains large area of desert from the north to the west. The basin covers in part seven countries such as Chad, Nigeria, Central African Republic, Cameroun, Niger, Sudan and Algeria. It is named Chad basin because 43.9% falls in Chad republic. Since its formation, the basin continues to experienced water shortage due to the activities of Dams combination, increase in irrigations and general reduction in rainfall. Chad basin needs an external water source for it to be function at sustainable level, hence needs for exploitation of higher east African river basin called Congo basin; which covers an area of 3.7 million square km lies in an astride the equator in west-central Africa-world second largest river basin after Amazon. The Congo River almost pans around republic of Congo, the democratic republic of Congo, the Central African Republic, western Zambia, northern Angola, part of Cameroun, and Tanzania. The remotely sensed imagery analysis and observation revealed that Congo basin is on the elevation of 275 to 460 meters and the Chad basin is on elevation of 240 meters. This implies that water can be drained from Congo basin via headrace down to the Chad basin for the water sustainability.

  5. Africa: the emphasis is exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-15

    Individual country reports on drilling, oil and gas production, and petroleum exploration and reserves are given for Africa. Nigeria was the continent's largest oil producer in 1979, averaging 2.3 million bpd, followed closely by Libya with 2.07 million bpd. Algeria cut production of crude oil in 1979 to a level of 1,194,350 bpd, and increased gas production to 2031 mmcfd. In Egypt, the return of Israeli-occupied oil fields and a surge in productive capacity enabled production averaging 524,000 bpd. Brief country reports are included for Gabon, Angola, Republic of the Congo, Cameroun, Tunisia, Morocco, Zaire, Ivory Coast, Ghana, Niger, Chad, Republic of South Africa, Sudan, Tanzania, Equatorial Guinea, Seychelles Islands, Mauritania, Republic of Mali, Benin, Kenya, Madagascar, Botswana, Gambia, Mozambique, and Senegal.

  6. Spatial modelling and mapping of female genital mutilation in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) is still prevalent in several communities in Kenya and other areas in Africa, as well as being practiced by some migrants from African countries living in other parts of the world. This study aimed at detecting clustering of FGM/C in Kenya, and identifying those areas within the country where women still intend to continue the practice. A broader goal of the study was to identify geographical areas where the practice continues unabated and where broad intervention strategies need to be introduced. Methods The prevalence of FGM/C was investigated using the 2008 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey (KDHS) data. The 2008 KDHS used a multistage stratified random sampling plan to select women of reproductive age (15–49 years) and asked questions concerning their FGM/C status and their support for the continuation of FGM/C. A spatial scan statistical analysis was carried out using SaTScan™ to test for statistically significant clustering of the practice of FGM/C in the country. The risk of FGM/C was also modelled and mapped using a hierarchical spatial model under the Integrated Nested Laplace approximation approach using the INLA library in R. Results The prevalence of FGM/C stood at 28.2% and an estimated 10.3% of the women interviewed indicated that they supported the continuation of FGM. On the basis of the Deviance Information Criterion (DIC), hierarchical spatial models with spatially structured random effects were found to best fit the data for both response variables considered. Age, region, rural–urban classification, education, marital status, religion, socioeconomic status and media exposure were found to be significantly associated with FGM/C. The current FGM/C status of a woman was also a significant predictor of support for the continuation of FGM/C. Spatial scan statistics confirm FGM clusters in the North-Eastern and South-Western regions of Kenya (p Kenya is not yet over. There are still deep cultural and religious beliefs to be addressed in a bid to eradicate the practice. Interventions by government and other stakeholders must address these challenges and target the identified clusters. PMID:24661558

  7. Neurosurgery Education and Development program to treat hydrocephalus and to develop neurosurgery in Africa using mobile neuroendoscopic training.

    PubMed

    Piquer, José; Qureshi, Mubashir Mahmood; Young, Paul H; Dempsey, Robert J

    2015-06-01

    OBJECT A shortage of neurosurgeons and a lack of knowledge of neuroendoscopic management of hydrocephalus limits modern care in sub-Saharan Africa. Hence, a mobile teaching project for endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) procedures and a subsequent program to develop neurosurgery as a permanent specialty in Kenya and Zanzibar were created and sponsored by the Neurosurgery Education and Development (NED) Foundation and the Foundation for International Education in Neurological Surgery. The objective of this work was to evaluate the results of surgical training and medical care in both projects from 2006 to 2013. METHODS Two portable neuroendoscopy systems were purchased and a total of 38 ETV workshops were organized in 21 hospitals in 7 different countries. Additionally, 49 medical expeditions were dispatched to the Coast General Hospital in Mombasa, Kenya, and to the Mnazi Moja Hospital in Zanzibar. RESULTS From the first project, a total of 376 infants with hydrocephalus received surgery. Six-month follow-up was achieved in 22%. In those who received follow-up, ETV efficacy was 51%. The best success rates were achieved with patients 1 year of age or older with aqueductal stenosis (73%). The main causes of hydrocephalus were infection (56%) and spina bifida (23%). The mobile education program interacted with 72 local surgeons and 122 nurses who were trained in ETV procedures. The second project involved 49 volunteer neurosurgeons who performed a total of 360 nonhydrocephalus neurosurgical operations since 2009. Furthermore, an agreement with the local government was signed to create the Mnazi Mmoja NED Institute in Zanzibar. CONCLUSIONS Mobile endoscopic treatment of hydrocephalus in East Africa results in reasonable success rates and has also led to major developments in medicine, particularly in the development of neurosurgery specialty care sites. PMID:25745948

  8. WRF Simulation over the Eastern Africa by use of Land Surface Initialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakwa, V. N.; Case, J.; Limaye, A. S.; Zavodsky, B.; Kabuchanga, E. S.; Mungai, J.

    2014-12-01

    The East Africa region experiences severe weather events associated with hazards of varying magnitude. It receives heavy precipitation which leads to wide spread flooding and lack of sufficient rainfall in some parts results into drought. Cases of flooding and drought are two key forecasting challenges for the Kenya Meteorological Service (KMS). The source of heat and moisture depends on the state of the land surface which interacts with the boundary layer of the atmosphere to produce excessive precipitation or lack of it that leads to severe drought. The development and evolution of precipitation systems are affected by heat and moisture fluxes from the land surface within weakly-sheared environments, such as in the tropics and sub-tropics. These heat and moisture fluxes during the day can be strongly influenced by land cover, vegetation, and soil moisture content. Therefore, it is important to represent the land surface state as accurately as possible in numerical weather prediction models. Improved modeling capabilities within the region have the potential to enhance forecast guidance in support of daily operations and high-impact weather over East Africa. KMS currently runs a configuration of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model in real time to support its daily forecasting operations, invoking the Non-hydrostatic Mesoscale Model (NMM) dynamical core. They make use of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration / National Weather Service Science and Training Resource Center's Environmental Modeling System (EMS) to manage and produce the WRF-NMM model runs on a 7-km regional grid over Eastern Africa.SPoRT and SERVIR provide land surface initialization datasets and model verification tool. The NASA Land Information System (LIS) provide real-time, daily soil initialization data in place of interpolated Global Forecast System soil moisture and temperature data. Model verification is done using the Model Evaluation Tools (MET) package, in order to quantify possible improvements in simulated temperature, moisture and precipitation resulting from the experimental land surface initialization. These MET tools enable KMS to monitor model forecast accuracy in near real time. This study highlights verification results of WRF runs over East Africa using the LIS land surface initialization.

  9. Healthy Firms: Constraints to Growth among Private Health Sector Facilities in Ghana and Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Nicholas E.; Kopf, Daniel; Spreng, Connor P.; Yoong, Joanne; Sood, Neeraj

    2012-01-01

    Background Health outcomes in developing countries continue to lag the developed world, and many countries are not on target to meet the Millennium Development Goals. The private health sector provides much of the care in many developing countries (e.g., approximately 50 percent in Sub-Saharan Africa), but private providers are often poorly integrated into the health system. Efforts to improve health systems performance will need to include the private sector and increase its contributions to national health goals. However, the literature on constraints private health care providers face is limited. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyze data from a survey of private health facilities in Kenya and Ghana to evaluate growth constraints facing private providers. A significant portion of facilities (Ghana: 62 percent; Kenya: 40 percent) report limited access to finance as the most significant barrier they face; only a small minority of facilities report using formal credit institutions to finance day to day operations (Ghana: 6 percent; Kenya: 11 percent). Other important barriers include corruption, crime, limited demand for goods and services, and poor public infrastructure. Most facilities have paper-based rather than electronic systems for patient records (Ghana: 30 percent; Kenya: 22 percent), accounting (Ghana: 45 percent; Kenya: 27 percent), and inventory control (Ghana: 41 percent; Kenya: 24 percent). A majority of clinics in both countries report undertaking activities to improve provider skills and to monitor the level and quality of care they provide. However, only a minority of pharmacies report undertaking such activities. Conclusions/Significance The results suggest that improved access to finance and improving business processes especially among pharmacies would support improved contributions by private health facilities. These strategies might be complementary if providers are more able to take advantage of increased access to finance when they have the business processes in place for operating a successful business and health facility. PMID:22383944

  10. Bayesian analysis of zero inflated spatiotemporal HIV/TB child mortality data through the INLA and SPDE approaches: Applied to data observed between 1992 and 2010 in rural North East South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musenge, Eustasius; Chirwa, Tobias Freeman; Kahn, Kathleen; Vounatsou, Penelope

    2013-06-01

    Longitudinal mortality data with few deaths usually have problems of zero-inflation. This paper presents and applies two Bayesian models which cater for zero-inflation, spatial and temporal random effects. To reduce the computational burden experienced when a large number of geo-locations are treated as a Gaussian field (GF) we transformed the field to a Gaussian Markov Random Fields (GMRF) by triangulation. We then modelled the spatial random effects using the Stochastic Partial Differential Equations (SPDEs). Inference was done using a computationally efficient alternative to Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) called Integrated Nested Laplace Approximation (INLA) suited for GMRF. The models were applied to data from 71,057 children aged 0 to under 10 years from rural north-east South Africa living in 15,703 households over the years 1992-2010. We found protective effects on HIV/TB mortality due to greater birth weight, older age and more antenatal clinic visits during pregnancy (adjusted RR (95% CI)): 0.73(0.53;0.99), 0.18(0.14;0.22) and 0.96(0.94;0.97) respectively. Therefore childhood HIV/TB mortality could be reduced if mothers are better catered for during pregnancy as this can reduce mother-to-child transmissions and contribute to improved birth weights. The INLA and SPDE approaches are computationally good alternatives in modelling large multilevel spatiotemporal GMRF data structures.

  11. The Global Opioid Policy Initiative (GOPI) project to evaluate the availability and accessibility of opioids for the management of cancer pain in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean, and the Middle East: introduction and methodology.

    PubMed

    Cherny, N I; Cleary, J; Scholten, W; Radbruch, L; Torode, J

    2013-12-01

    Opioid analgesics are critical to the effective relief of cancer pain. Effective treatment is predicated on sound assessments, individually tailored analgesic therapy, and the availability and accessibility of the required medications. In some countries, pain relief is hampered by the lack of availability or barriers to the accessibility of opioid analgesics. As the follow-up to a successful project to evaluate the availability and accessibility of opioids and regulatory barriers in Europe, the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) and the European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC) undertook to expand their research to those parts of the world where data were lacking regarding these aspects of care, in particular Africa, Asia, the Middle East, Latin America and the Caribbean, and the states of India. This project has been undertaken in collaboration with the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC), the Pain and Policy Studies Group (PPSG) of the University of Wisconsin, and the World Health Organization (WHO), together with a consortium of 17 international oncology and palliative care societies. This article describes the study methodology. PMID:24436961

  12. Linking Remote Sensing Data and Energy Balance Models for a Scalable Agriculture Insurance System for sub-Saharan Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M. E.; Osgood, D. E.; McCarty, J. L.; Husak, G. J.; Hain, C.; Neigh, C. S. R.

    2014-12-01

    One of the most immediate and obvious impacts of climate change is on the weather-sensitive agriculture sector. Both local and global impacts on production of food will have a negative effect on the ability of humanity to meet its growing food demands. Agriculture has become more risky, particularly for farmers in the most vulnerable and food insecure regions of the world such as East Africa. Smallholders and low-income farmers need better financial tools to reduce the risk to food security while enabling productivity increases to meet the needs of a growing population. This paper will describe a recently funded project that brings together climate science, economics, and remote sensing expertise to focus on providing a scalable and sensor-independent remote sensing based product that can be used in developing regional rainfed agriculture insurance programs around the world. We will focus our efforts in Ethiopia and Kenya in East Africa and in Senegal and Burkina Faso in West Africa, where there are active index insurance pilots that can test the effectiveness of our remote sensing-based approach for use in the agriculture insurance industry. The paper will present the overall program, explain links to the insurance industry, and present comparisons of the four remote sensing datasets used to identify drought: the CHIRPS 30-year rainfall data product, the GIMMS 30-year vegetation data product from AVHRR, the ESA soil moisture ECV-30 year soil moisture data product, and a MODIS Evapotranspiration (ET) 15-year dataset. A summary of next year's plans for this project will be presented at the close of the presentation.

  13. Frost Monitoring and Forecasting Using MODIS Land Surface Temperature Data and a Numerical Weather Prediction Model Forecasts for Eastern Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kabuchanga, Eric; Flores, Africa; Malaso, Susan; Mungai, John; Sakwa, Vincent; Shaka, Ayub; Limaye, Ashutosh

    2014-01-01

    Frost is a major challenge across Eastern Africa, severely impacting agricultural farms. Frost damages have wide ranging economic implications on tea and coffee farms, which represent a major economic sector. Early monitoring and forecasting will enable farmers to take preventive actions to minimize the losses. Although clearly important, timely information on when to protect crops from freezing is relatively limited. MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST) data, derived from NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites, and 72-hr weather forecasts from the Kenya Meteorological Service's operational Weather Research Forecast model are enabling the Regional Center for Mapping of Resources for Development (RCMRD) and the Tea Research Foundation of Kenya to provide timely information to farmers in the region. This presentation will highlight an ongoing collaboration among the Kenya Meteorological Service, RCMRD, and the Tea Research Foundation of Kenya to identify frost events and provide farmers with potential frost forecasts in Eastern Africa.

  14. Frost monitoring and forecasting using MODIS Land Surface Temperature data and a Numerical Weather Prediction model forecasts for Eastern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limaye, A. S.; Kabuchanga, E. S.; Flores, A.; Mungai, J.; Sakwa, V. N.; Shaka, A.; Malaso, S.; Irwin, D.

    2014-12-01

    Frost is a major challenge across Eastern Africa, severely impacting agriculture. Frost damages have wide ranging economic implications on tea and coffee farms, which represent a major economic sector. Early monitoring and forecasting will enable farmers to take preventive actions to minimize the losses. Although clearly important, timely information on when to protect crops from freezing is relatively limited. MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST) data, derived from NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites, and 72-hr weather forecasts from the Kenya Meteorological Service's operational Weather Research Forecast model are enabling the Regional Center for Mapping of Resources for Development (RCMRD) and the Tea Research Foundation of Kenya to provide timely information to farmers in the region. This presentation will highlight an ongoing collaboration among the Kenya Meteorological Service, RCMRD, and the Tea Research Foundation of Kenya to identify frost events and provide farmers with potential frost forecasts in Eastern Africa.

  15. Using constructed analogs to improve the skill of National Multi-Model Ensemble March–April–May precipitation forecasts in equatorial East Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shukla, Shraddhanand; Funk, Christopher C.; Hoell, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    In this study we implement and evaluate a simple 'hybrid' forecast approach that uses constructed analogs (CA) to improve the National Multi-Model Ensemble's (NMME) March–April–May (MAM) precipitation forecasts over equatorial eastern Africa (hereafter referred to as EA, 2°S to 8°N and 36°E to 46°E). Due to recent declines in MAM rainfall, increases in population, land degradation, and limited technological advances, this region has become a recent epicenter of food insecurity. Timely and skillful precipitation forecasts for EA could help decision makers better manage their limited resources, mitigate socio-economic losses, and potentially save human lives. The 'hybrid approach' described in this study uses the CA method to translate dynamical precipitation and sea surface temperature (SST) forecasts over the Indian and Pacific Oceans (specifically 30°S to 30°N and 30°E to 270°E) into terrestrial MAM precipitation forecasts over the EA region. In doing so, this approach benefits from the post-1999 teleconnection that exists between precipitation and SSTs over the Indian and tropical Pacific Oceans (Indo-Pacific) and EA MAM rainfall. The coupled atmosphere-ocean dynamical forecasts used in this study were drawn from the NMME. We demonstrate that while the MAM precipitation forecasts (initialized in February) skill of the NMME models over the EA region itself is negligible, the ranked probability skill score of hybrid CA forecasts based on Indo-Pacific NMME precipitation and SST forecasts reach up to 0.45.

  16. Molecular types of Cryptococcus gattii/Cryptococcus neoformans species complex from clinical and environmental sources in Nairobi, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kangogo, Mourine; Bader, Oliver; Boga, Hamadi; Wanyoike, Wanjiru; Folba, Claudia; Worasilchai, Navaporn; Weig, Michael; Groß, Uwe; Bii, Christine C

    2015-11-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis infections cause high mortality rates among HIV-infected patients in Sub-Saharan Africa. The high incidences of cryptococcal infections may be attributed to common environmental sources which, if identified, could lead to institution of appropriate control strategies. To determine the genotypes of Cryptococcus gattii/C. neoformans- species complex from Nairobi, Kenya, 123 clinical and environmental isolates were characterised. Typing was done using orotidine monophosphate pyrophosphorylase (URA5) gene restriction fragment length polymorphism (URA5-RFLP). The majority of the isolates [105/123; 85.4%] were C. neoformans genotype (AFLPI/VNI) and 1.6% AFLP1A/VNB/VNII, whereas (13%) were C. gattii (AFLP4/VGI). This is the first report on the genotypes of C. gattii/C. neoformans species complex from clinical and environmental sources in Nairobi, Kenya and the isolation of C. gattii genotype AFLP4/VGI from the environment in Kenya. PMID:26404188

  17. Understanding farmers' intention and behavior regarding water conservation in the Middle-East and North Africa: a case study in Iran.

    PubMed

    Yazdanpanah, Masoud; Hayati, Dariush; Hochrainer-Stigler, Stefan; Zamani, Gholam Hosein

    2014-03-15

    There is a high risk of serious water shortages in Middle-East and North African countries. To decrease this threat water conservation strategies are gaining overall importance and one main focus is now on farmer's behavior. Among other dimensions it is assumed that normative issues play an important role in predicting environmental oriented intentions and actual actions. To empirically test the possible interactions the Theory of Planned Behavior was used, revised and expanded for the specific case on water management issues and applied to Iranian farmers. The results could not validate the TPB framework which emphasizes the importance of perceived behavioral control for intention and actual behavior and findings are much more in line with the Theory of Reasoned Action. Normative inclinations as well as perception of risk are found to be important for intention as well as actual water conservation behavior. Additionally, the importance and linkages of the dimensions are found to be different between sub-groups of farmers, especially between traditional water management farmers and those who already using advanced water management strategies. This raises the question if one-fits-all behavioral models are adequate for practical studies where sub-groups may very much differ in their actions. Still, our study suggests that in the context of water conservation, normative inclination is a key dimension and it may be useful to consider the role of positive, self-rewarding feelings for farmers when setting up policy measures in the region. PMID:24513405

  18. Detecting and quantifying the extent of desertification and its impact in the semi-arid Sub-Saharan Africa: A case study of the Upper East Region, Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owusu, Alex B.

    The semi-arid Sub-Saharan region of Africa is in a state of permanent instability at a variety of spatio-temporal momentum. Efforts at sustaining and managing this fragile but all-important ecosystem and its processes require collecting, storing and analyzing multispatial and temporal data that are accurate and continuously updated in terms of changes (degradation), types and magnitude of change. Remote sensing techniques based on multispectral satellite-acquired data (AVHRR, Landsat TM and ETM+) have demonstrated an immense potential as a means to detect, quantify, monitor and map these changes. However, much of what satellite sensors can detect and capture, especially in the form of vegetation index (NDVI), do not tell the entire story about land degradation. This research used multispectral remote sensing data from three sensors (AVHRR, Landsat TM, and ETM+ and IKONOS) to detect and quantify the spatio-temporal land degradation (desertification) to validate the local observation and perception of desertification. The study also analyzes data on crop production in search of evidence proving or disproving degradation in the semi-arid sahel-sudan savannah transitional vegetation zone of the UER, Ghana. Multispectral satellite-acquired NDVI, from AVHRR, Landsat TM & ETM+, show that vegetation greenness is on the ascendancy, although there are pockets (localized degradation) signs of severe land degradation; field evidence suggests that the increasing NDVI is caused by vegetation succession where locally adapted horsetail grasses have been displaced by environmentally efficient, short-lived, quick maturing and dense grasses due to excessive burning, rapid population growth and inappropriate development policies. Local people's perceptions, supported by crop production data, suggest extensive land degradation. Other evidence includes food insecurity, diseases, rainfall variability and land extensification to marginal lands. Convergence of evidence suggests that desertification has advanced in the area more than previously thought and that more focused, community-based effort would be needed to combat desertification and restore the ecosystem's integrity.

  19. Basic space sciences in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abiodun, Adigun Ade; Odingo, Richard S.

    Through space applications, a number of social and economic programmes in education, communications, agro-climatology, weather forecasting and remote sensing are being realized within the African continent. Regional and international organizations and agencies such as the African Remote Sensing Council, the Pan-African Telecommunication Union and the United Nations system have been instrumental in making Africa conscious of the impact and implications of space science and technology on its peoples. The above notwithstanding, discernible interests in space research, to date, in Africa, have been limited to the work on the solar system and on interplanetary matters including satellite tracking, and to the joint African-Indian proposal for the establishment of an International Institute for Space Sciences and Electronics (INISSE) and the construction, in Kenya, of a Giant Equatorial Radio Telescope (GERT). During this ``Transport and Communications Decade in Africa,'' Africa's basic space research efforts would need to initially focus on the appropriateness, modification and adaptation of existing technologies for African conditions with a view to providing economic, reliable and functional services for the continent. These should include elements of electronics, communications, structural and tooling industries, and upper-atmosphere research. The experience of and collaborative work with India, Brazil and Argentina, as well as the roles of African scientists, are examined.

  20. Prevalence and Correlates of HIV Infection among Street Boys in Kisumu, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Goldblatt, Ariella; Kwena, Zachary; Lahiff, Maureen; Agot, Kawango; Minnis, Alexandra; Prata, Ndola; Lin, Jessica; Bukusi, Elizabeth A.; Auerswald, Colette L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite their perceived vulnerability to HIV, East African street youth have been neglected in HIV prevention research. We examined HIV seroprevalence and correlates of HIV infection in a sample of male street youth in Kisumu, Kenya. Methods We enrolled a street-recruited sample of 13–21 year old street youth. Participants completed a survey followed by voluntary HIV counseling and testing. Survey items included demographics, homelessness history, survival activities, sexual behavior and substance use. We examined the relationship between predictor variables, markers of coercion and marginalization and HIV. Results The sample included 296 males. Survival activities included garbage picking (55%), helping market vendors (55%), begging (17%), and working as porters (46%) or domestic workers (4%). Forty-nine percent of participants reported at least weekly use of alcohol and 32% marijuana. Forty-six percent of participants reported lifetime inhalation of glue and 8% fuel. Seventy-nine percent of participants reported lifetime vaginal sex, 6% reported lifetime insertive anal sex and 8% reported lifetime receptive anal sex. Twelve (4.1%; 95% CI: 2.3–7.0) participants tested positive for HIV. Of those, all had been on the street for at least one year and all had engaged in vaginal sex. Occupations placing youth at particular risk of coercion by adults, including helping market vendors (prevalence ratio (PR) = 8.8; 95% CI: 1.2–67.5) and working as domestic workers (PR = 4.6; 95% CI: 1.1–19.0), were associated with HIV infection. Both insertive anal sex (PR = 10.2; 95% CI: 3.6–29.4) and receptive anal sex (PR = 3.9; 95% CI: 1.1–13.4) were associated with HIV infection. Drug use, begging, and garbage picking were not associated with HIV infection. Conclusions Although HIV prevalence in our sample of street youth is comparable to that of similarly-aged male youth in Nyanza Province, our findings highlight behavioral factors associated with HIV infection that offer opportunities for targeted prevention among street youth in East Africa. PMID:26461494

  1. Search for an astronomical site in Kenya (SASKYA) using climate reanalyses and high-resolution meteorological model data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Edward; Vaughan, Richard; Buckley, David A. H.; Tirima, Koi

    2015-03-01

    The goal of the Search for an Astronomical Site in Kenya (SASKYA) project is to identify the best possible site(s) in Kenya for astronomical optical observation, using ERA-interim climate reanalyses and high-resolution UK Met Office Africa Limited Area meteorological model (Africa-LAM) data. This initial search focusses on a selection of 13 candidate mountain peaks across Kenya. A mixture of 30 years (1981-2010) of relatively coarse-grained ERA-interim reanalyses data and 12 months' (2011-2012) of much higher resolution UK Met Office Africa-LAM data were used to determine the best possible sites. Cloud cover, precipitable water vapour (specific humidity), vertical velocity, aerosol loadings and wind data were analysed. The results confirm that many sites in Kenya are reasonably cloud free, with estimated photometric night fractions of possibly 50 % at the best sites. Significant seasonal inter-annual and inter-decadal variations in cloud cover can be expected, however. Average precipitable water vapour (PWV) values are uncomfortably high, but periods of much lower PWV can be expected during favourable conditions in the dry seasons. Long-term vertical velocities (as a proxy to determine areas of improved "seeing" conditions) indicate that good astronomical viewing conditions are likely to be dependent on the season and wind direction across Kenya. Finally, after full consideration of the climatological data, a trade-off is expected between the best possible site in climatological terms, and the practicalities of installing remote equipment in isolated, inaccessible areas with little or no infrastructure.

  2. Child Sexual Abuse in Tanzania and Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lalor, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Most research on child abuse in Tanzania and Kenya is unpublished in the international literature. The purpose of this paper is to examine the various commentaries and reports extant, toward an overview of the nature and frequency of child sexual abuse in Tanzania and Kenya. Methods: Contacts were made with academics, government…

  3. Girls' Attitudes towards Science in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chetcuti, Deborah A.; Kioko, Beriter

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated girls' attitudes towards science in Kenya. It was carried out with 120 girls from four secondary schools in the Eastern province of Kenya. These were an urban single-sex (SS) and co-educational (Co-Ed) school and a rural SS and Co-Ed school. Different schools were chosen in order to explore whether there are any differences…

  4. Multicentre studies of insecticide-treated durable wall lining in Africa and South-East Asia: entomological efficacy and household acceptability during one year of field use

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Indoor residual spraying (IRS) is a primary method of malaria vector control, but its potential impact is constrained by several inherent limitations: spraying must be repeated when insecticide residues decay, householders can tire of the annual imposition and campaign costs are recurrent. Durable lining (DL) can be considered an advanced form of long-lasting IRS where insecticide is gradually released from an aesthetically attractive wall lining material to provide vector control for several years. A multicentre trial was carried out in Equatorial Guinea, Ghana, Mali, South Africa and Vietnam to assess the feasibility, durability, bioefficacy and household acceptability of DL, compared to conventional IRS or insecticide-treated curtains (LLITCs), in a variety of operational settings. Methods This study was conducted in 220 households in traditional rural villages over 12-15 months. In all sites, rolls of DL were cut to fit house dimensions and fixed to interior wall surfaces (usually with nails and caps) by trained teams. Acceptability was assessed using a standardized questionnaire covering such topics as installation, exposure reactions, entomology, indoor environment, aesthetics and durability. Bioefficacy of interventions was evaluated using WHO cone bioassay tests at regular intervals throughout the year. Results The deltamethrin DL demonstrated little to no decline in bioefficacy over 12-15 months, supported by minimal loss of insecticide content. By contrast, IRS displayed a significant decrease in bioactivity by 6 months and full loss after 12 months. The majority of participants in DL households perceived reductions in mosquito density (93%) and biting (82%), but no changes in indoor temperature (83%). Among those households that wanted to retain the DL, 73% cited protective reasons, 20% expressed a desire to keep theirs for decoration and 7% valued both qualities equally. In Equatorial Guinea, when offered a choice of vector control product at the end of the trial (DL, IRS or LLITCs), DL consistently emerged as the most popular intervention regardless of the earlier household allocation. Conclusions Just as long-lasting insecticidal nets overcame several of the technical and logistical constraints associated with conventionally treated nets and then went to scale, this study demonstrates the potential of DL to sustain user compliance and overcome the operational challenges associated with IRS. PMID:23107112

  5. Very short-lived bromomethanes measured by the CARIBIC observatory over the North Atlantic, Africa and South-East Asia during 2009-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisher, A.; Oram, D. E.; Laube, J. C.; Mills, G. P.; van Velthoven, P.; Zahn, A.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.

    2013-11-01

    Short-lived organic brominated compounds make up a significant part (~20%) of the organic bromine budget in the atmosphere. Emissions of these compounds are highly variable and there are limited measurements, particularly in the extra-tropical upper troposphere/lower stratosphere and tropical troposphere. Measurements of five short-lived bromomethanes (VSLB) were made in air samples collected on the CARIBIC project aircraft over three flight routes; Germany to Venezuela/Columbia during 2009-2011, Germany to South Africa during 2010 and 2011 and Germany to Thailand/Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia during 2012 and 2013. In the tropical troposphere, as the most important entrance region to the stratosphere, we observe a total mean organic bromine derived from these compounds across all flights at 10-12 km altitude of 3.4 ± 1.5 ppt. Individual mean tropical tropospheric mixing ratios across all flights were 0.43, 0.74, 0.14, 0.23 and 0.11 ppt for CHBr3, CH2Br2, CHBr2Cl, CHBrCl2 and CH2BrCl respectively. The highest levels of VSLS-derived bromine (4.20 ± 0.56 ppt) were observed in flights between Bangkok and Kuala Lumpur indicating that the South China Sea is an important source region for these compounds. Across all routes, CHBr3 and CH2Br2 accounted for 34% (4.7-71) and 48% (14-73) respectively of total bromine derived from the analysed VSLB in the tropical mid-upper troposphere totalling 82% (54-89). In samples collected between Germany and Venezuela/Columbia, we find decreasing mean mixing ratios with increasing potential temperature in the extra-tropics. Tropical mean mixing ratios are higher than extra-tropical values between 340-350 K indicating that rapid uplift is important in determining mixing ratios in the lower tropical tropopause layer in the West Atlantic tropics. O3 was used as a tracer for stratospherically influenced air and we detect rapidly decreasing mixing ratios for all VSLB above ~100 ppb O3 corresponding to the extra-tropical tropopause layer.

  6. Bioinformatics in Africa: The Rise of Ghana?

    PubMed Central

    Karikari, Thomas K.

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, bioinformatics, an important discipline in the biological sciences, was largely limited to countries with advanced scientific resources. Nonetheless, several developing countries have lately been making progress in bioinformatics training and applications. In Africa, leading countries in the discipline include South Africa, Nigeria, and Kenya. However, one country that is less known when it comes to bioinformatics is Ghana. Here, I provide a first description of the development of bioinformatics activities in Ghana and how these activities contribute to the overall development of the discipline in Africa. Over the past decade, scientists in Ghana have been involved in publications incorporating bioinformatics analyses, aimed at addressing research questions in biomedical science and agriculture. Scarce research funding and inadequate training opportunities are some of the challenges that need to be addressed for Ghanaian scientists to continue developing their expertise in bioinformatics. PMID:26378921

  7. Coupling 2H and 18O biomarker results provides new insight into palaeohumidity changes in East Africa during the last glacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hepp, Johannes; Zech, Roland; Tuthorn, Mario; Glaser, Bruno; Rozanski, Kazimierz; Zech, Wolfgang; Zech, Michael

    2015-04-01

    We couple compound-specific ?2H results of leaf wax-derived n-alkanes with compound-specific ?18O results of hemicellulose-derived sugars extracted from the loess-paleosol-sequence Maundi (3° 10'27.5'S, 37° 31'05.8'E) located on the south-eastern slopes of Mt. Kilimanjaro at ~ 2780 m above sea level. This coupled biomarker approach allows inter alia establishing a ca. 100 ka record of the isotopic composition of leaf water. Accordingly, the deuterium-excess of leaf water may serve as a proxy for palaeohumidity. Furthermore, the coupled biomarker approach allows reconstructing the isotopic composition of palaeoprecipitation (by using the slope the local evaporation line derived from a simple Craig-Gordon model). Our results suggest that sedimentary ?2Hleaf-wax records should not be interpreted directly in terms of reflecting ?2Hprec because variable leaf water evaporative enrichment can strongly overprint the ?2Hprec signal. The Maundi ?2Hn-alkane record can be compared with ?2Hwax records from Lake Challa, Lake Tanganyika and Lake Malawi. Accordingly, the Maundi ?2Hn-alkane record is generally in good agreement with the Lake Challa and the Lake Tanganyika ?2Hwax records. However, a clear altitude effect can be seen in the ?2H records (Maundi: 2780 m a.s.l.; Lake Challa: 880 m a.s.l.; Lake Tanganyika: 773 m a.s.l.; Lake Malawi: 474 m a.s.l.). Moreover, the Maundi ?2Hn-alkane record reveals a clear smaller range compared to the other ?2Hwax records. Finally, especially the Lake Malawi ?2Hwax record reveals also clearly different features than the other available ?2Hwax records. These differences resulted in different interpretations of the ?2Hwax records (amount effect vs. source effect). Our coupled ?18Osugar and ?2Hn-alkane approach sheds new light into this discussion. In brief, reconstructed low deuterium-excessleaf-water values during the African Humid Period (AHP) indicate humid climatic conditions. By contrast, higher deuterium-excessleaf-water values indicate that arid climatic conditions prevailed during the Younger Dryas (YD), the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and during a mega drought period (MD) having occurred ~ 70-60 ka BP. Including the Maundi precipitation record in a circum pacific comparison may help to identify the drivers of past isotopic composition on east equatorial African precipitation.

  8. Causes of Late Pleistocene water level change in Lake Victoria, Equatorial East Africa, derived from clumped isotopes of land snails and fresh water mollusks. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaarur, S.; Affek, H. P.; Tryon, C.; Peppe, D. J.; Faith, J.

    2013-12-01

    Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry is based on the dependence of 13C-18O bond abundance in the carbonate lattice (measured as ?47) on the carbonate formation temperature. Most marine and freshwater biogenic carbonates are found to be in agreement with the clumped isotopes - temperature calibration. Clumped isotope thermometry is particularly useful in terrestrial environments where the interpretation of carbonate ?18O is limited due to difficulty in estimating the paleo-water isotopic composition. Clumped isotope-derived temperatures from land snails are generally higher than the ambient environmental temperatures, but show no evidence for disequilibrium. We attribute these higher body temperatures to snail eco-physiological adaptations through shell color, morphology, and behavior. We use the clumped isotope-derived temperatures in combination with shell ?18O to calculate snail body water ?18O composition. This parameter is interpreted as a paleo-hydrological indicator that reflects the isotopic composition of local precipitation modified by local evaporation. Rusinga and Mfangano Islands in Lake Victoria provide a unique opportunity to compare extant species of modern and fossil freshwater mollusks and land snails from the same location to examine lake paleo-hydrology. This location is particularly interesting as Lake Victoria itself is the main source of rain-water in the region such that the isotopic composition of land snail body water can be related back to the source waters. We combine clumped isotope and oxygen isotope measurements of both freshwater mollusks and land snails to examine the water balance of the lake, testing hypotheses about the mechanism of a significant rise in lake level in Lake Victoria ~35 - 40 ka BP. Outcrops of paleo-beach deposits ~18 m above the modern day lake level indicate high water stands at ~35-40 ka BP. Based on water balance models for Lake Victoria, an increase in lake level of this magnitude could be driven by local mean annual precipitation that is significantly greater than modern. However, this is inconsistent with regional climate reconstructions. This suggests that either lake level was controlled by non-climatic factors, or that local climate in the Lake Victoria basin was different than regional patterns of climate across eastern Africa. We use oxygen and clumped isotopes of modern and fossil shells (Corbicula sp., Melanoides sp. and Bellamya unicolor) from this 18 m beach outcrop on Mfangano Island to (1) compare with modern lake water ?18O values and (2) calculate paleo-water compositions. We combine these results with calculated snail body water ?18O composition (using oxygen and clumped isotopes) of land snails (Limicoloria cf. martensiana) from Rusinga and Mfangano Islands, to study hydrological changes of Lake Victoria. We use these data to evaluate the relative importance of climate change and tectonics as mechanisms for the Late Pleistocene expansion of Lake Victoria.

  9. History of the development of the East African Rift System: A series of interpreted maps through time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macgregor, Duncan

    2015-01-01

    This review paper presents a series of time reconstruction maps of the 'East African Rift System' ('EARS'), illustrating the progressive development of fault trends, subsidence, volcanism and topography. These maps build on previous basin specific interpretations and integrate released data from recent petroleum drilling. N-S trending EARS rifting commenced in the petroliferous South Lokichar Basin of northern Kenya in the Late Eocene to Oligocene, though there seem to be few further deep rifts of this age other than those immediately adjoining it. At various times during the Mid-Late Miocene, a series of small rifts and depressions formed between Ethiopia and Malawi, heralding the main regional rift subsidence phase and further rift propagation in the Plio-Pleistocene. A wide variation is thus seen in the ages of initiation of EARS basins, though the majority of fault activity, structural growth, subsidence, and associated uplift of East Africa seem to have occurred in the last 5-9 Ma, and particularly in the last 1-2 Ma. These perceptions are key to our understanding of the influence of the diverse tectonic histories on the petroleum prospectivity of undrilled basins.

  10. The value of milk in rangelands in Mandera County, Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngugi, Keziah; Ertsen, Maurits

    2015-04-01

    Lack of water over expansive regions in Greater Horn of Africa created the rangelands and rangelands created pastoralism. Pastoralism involve keeping of large livestock herds and movement in search of resources, mainly water, pasture, medicine and wild foods. Several studies have been done in the last century and findings pointed at pastoralism being primitive and unsustainable. It has been predicted it would die in the last century but in the rangelands, pastoralism lives on and it is resilient. This study is based in Mandera, a pastoralism county in Kenya that neighbors Ethiopia to the North and Somalia to the East. The study sought to investigate contribution of milk to pastoralism resilience. Interviews were conducted in the field among the pastoralists, women groups, transporters, traders, government officials and consumers of milk. These information was corroborated with actual field investigations in the expansive rangelands of Mandera County. Pastoralists rarely slaughter or sell their livestock even when the animals waste away during droughts. This is because they have been through such cycles before and observed livestock make tremendous recovery when the right conditions were restored. Rangelands lack infrastructure, there are no roads, schools, telephone or hospitals. Pastoralists diet is comprised of rice, wheat and milk. It was established milk was the main source of income among pastoralists in Mandera County. From milk, the pastoralists make income that is used to purchase the other foodstuffs. Milk is available on daily basis in large quantities owing to the large number of livestock. Unfortunately, every pastoralist household produce copious amounts of milk, thus no local demand and transport infrastructure is nonexistent, making sale of milk a near impossible task. The findings showed the pastoralists have established unique routes through which milk reach the markets in urban centers where demand is high. Urbanization sustain pastoralism. These routes are dynamic, just like pastoralism, far flung and use symbols to communicate with various handlers along the value chain. Consumers and producers don't meet, the need for any form of contact is eliminated through this mode of communication. Drawbacks were identified as lack of water and poor education standards that compromise on hygiene which affect public health. In addition, it takes several hours to move short distances in poor roads or using draught animals. This is further compounded by very hot temperatures that affect milk quality. Handling milk can be improved through vocational training on hygiene and proper handling of milk. On farm mobile cottage industries need to be considered to reach a broader market and boost the returns. Standard milk ferrying containers should be introduced as matter of urgency to improve milk safety. Further services and responsibilities for consumers to producers need to be identified and introduced to enhance the wellbeing of the pastoralists as current practices are in favour of the consumers.

  11. Incidence of WHO Stage 3 and 4 Events, Tuberculosis, and Mortality in Untreated, HIV-Infected Children Enrolling in Care Before 1 Year of Age: An Iedea (International Epidemiologic Databases To Evaluate AIDS) East Africa Regional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ciaranello, Andrea; Lu, Zhigang; Ayaya, Samuel; Losina, Elena; Musick, Beverly; Vreeman, Rachel; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Abrams, Elaine J.; Dillabaugh, Lisa; Doherty, Katie; Ssali, John; Yiannoutsos, Constantin T.; Wools-Kaloustian, Kara

    2014-01-01

    Background Few studies have reported CD4%- and age-stratified rates of WHO Stage 3 (WHO3) events, WHO Stage 4 (WHO4) events, tuberculosis (TB), and mortality in HIV-infected infants before initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods HIV-infected children enrolled before 1 year of age in the International Epidemiologic Databases to Evaluate AIDS (IeDEA) East Africa region (10/01/2002-11/30/2008) were included. We estimated incidence rates of earliest clinical event (WHO3, WHO4, and TB), prior to ART initiation per local guidelines, strati