Science.gov

Sample records for ketone reducing biocatalysts

  1. Engineering Cofactor Preference of Ketone Reducing Biocatalysts: A Mutagenesis Study on a γ-Diketone Reductase from the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Serving as an Example

    PubMed Central

    Katzberg, Michael; Skorupa-Parachin, Nàdia; Gorwa-Grauslund, Marie-Françoise; Bertau, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The synthesis of pharmaceuticals and catalysts more and more relies on enantiopure chiral building blocks. These can be produced in an environmentally benign and efficient way via bioreduction of prochiral ketones catalyzed by dehydrogenases. A productive source of these biocatalysts is the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, whose genome also encodes a reductase catalyzing the sequential reduction of the γ-diketone 2,5-hexanedione furnishing the diol (2S,5S)-hexanediol and the γ-hydroxyketone (5S)-hydroxy-2-hexanone in high enantio- as well as diastereoselectivity (ee and de >99.5%). This enzyme prefers NADPH as the hydrogen donating cofactor. As NADH is more stable and cheaper than NADPH it would be more effective if NADH could be used in cell-free bioreduction systems. To achieve this, the cofactor binding site of the dehydrogenase was altered by site-directed mutagenesis. The results show that the rational approach based on a homology model of the enzyme allowed us to generate a mutant enzyme having a relaxed cofactor preference and thus is able to use both NADPH and NADH. Results obtained from other mutants are discussed and point towards the limits of rationally designed mutants. PMID:20480039

  2. Stereoselective Reduction of Prochiral Ketones by Plant and Microbial Biocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Javidnia, K; Faghih-Mirzaei, E; Miri, R; Attarroshan, M; Zomorodian, K

    2016-01-01

    Chiral alcohols are the key chiral building blocks to many enantiomerically pure pharmaceuticals. The biocatalytic approach in asymmetric reduction of corresponding prochiral ketones to the preparation of these optically pure substances is one of the most promising routes. The stereoselective reduction of different kinds of prochiral ketones catalyzed by various plants and microorganisms was studied in this work. Benzyl acetoacetate, methyl 3-oxopentanoate, ethyl 3-oxopentanoate, and ethyl butyryl acetate were chosen as the model substrates for β-ketoesters. Benzoyl acetonitrile, 3-chloro propiophenone, and 1-acetyl naphthalene were chosen as aromatic aliphatic ketones. Finally, 2-methyl benzophenone and 4-chloro benzophenone were selected as diaryl ketones. Plant catalysis was conducted by Daucus carota, Brassica rapa, Brassica oleracea, Pastinaca sativa, and Raphnus sativus. For microbial catalysis, Aspergillus foetidus, Penicillum citrinum, Saccharomyces carlbergensis, Pichia fermentans, and Rhodotrula glutinis were chosen. Chiral alcohols were obtained in high yields and with optical purity. A superiority in the microorganisms' performance in the bioreduction of prochiral ketones was detected. Among microorganisms, Rhodotrula glutinis showed remarkable results with nearly all substrates and is proposed for future studies. PMID:27168684

  3. Stereoselective Reduction of Prochiral Ketones by Plant and Microbial Biocatalysts

    PubMed Central

    Javidnia, K.; Faghih-Mirzaei, E.; Miri, R.; Attarroshan, M.; Zomorodian, K.

    2016-01-01

    Chiral alcohols are the key chiral building blocks to many enantiomerically pure pharmaceuticals. The biocatalytic approach in asymmetric reduction of corresponding prochiral ketones to the preparation of these optically pure substances is one of the most promising routes. The stereoselective reduction of different kinds of prochiral ketones catalyzed by various plants and microorganisms was studied in this work. Benzyl acetoacetate, methyl 3-oxopentanoate, ethyl 3-oxopentanoate, and ethyl butyryl acetate were chosen as the model substrates for β-ketoesters. Benzoyl acetonitrile, 3-chloro propiophenone, and 1-acetyl naphthalene were chosen as aromatic aliphatic ketones. Finally, 2-methyl benzophenone and 4-chloro benzophenone were selected as diaryl ketones. Plant catalysis was conducted by Daucus carota, Brassica rapa, Brassica oleracea, Pastinaca sativa, and Raphnus sativus. For microbial catalysis, Aspergillus foetidus, Penicillum citrinum, Saccharomyces carlbergensis, Pichia fermentans, and Rhodotrula glutinis were chosen. Chiral alcohols were obtained in high yields and with optical purity. A superiority in the microorganisms' performance in the bioreduction of prochiral ketones was detected. Among microorganisms, Rhodotrula glutinis showed remarkable results with nearly all substrates and is proposed for future studies. PMID:27168684

  4. Diplogelasinospora grovesii IMI 171018 immobilized in polyurethane foam. An efficient biocatalyst for stereoselective reduction of ketones.

    PubMed

    Quezada, M A; Carballeira, J D; Sinisterra, J V

    2012-05-01

    Diplogelasinospora grovesii has been reported as a very active biocatalyst in the reduction of ketones. Along the text, the properties of this filamentous fungus as an immobilized catalyst are described. For this purpose, several immobilization supports as agar and polyurethane foam were tested. Experimental assays were also performed to test different co-substrates for the regeneration of the required enzyme cofactor. The fungus immobilized in polyurethane foam lead to the most stable and active catalyst. This derivative, using i-PrOH as co-substrate, could be reused at least 18 times without appreciable activity loss (>90% activity remains). Kinetic runs experiments shown that the reduction of cyclohexanone, selected as model substrate, followed a pseudo-first kinetic order and that the rate controlling step was the mass transfer through the cell wall. The deactivation kinetic constants were also determined. The reduction of different chiral ketones showed that the ketone reductase activity followed the Prelog's rule. PMID:22424921

  5. Immobilization of Acetobacter sp. CCTCC M209061 for efficient asymmetric reduction of ketones and biocatalyst recycling

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The bacterium Acetobacter sp. CCTCC M209061 is a promising whole-cell biocatalyst with exclusive anti-Prelog stereoselectivity for the reduction of prochiral ketones that can be used to make valuable chiral alcohols such as (R)-4-(trimethylsilyl)-3-butyn-2-ol. Although it has promising catalytic properties, its stability and reusability are relatively poor compared to other biocatalysts. Hence, we explored various materials for immobilizing the active cells, in order to improve the operational stability of biocatalyst. Results It was found that Ca-alginate give the best immobilized biocatalyst, which was then coated with chitosan to further improve its mechanical strength and swelling-resistance properties. Conditions were optimized for formation of reusable immobilized beads which can be used for repeated batch asymmetric reduction of 4′-chloroacetophenone. The optimized immobilized biocatalyst was very promising, with a specific activity of 85% that of the free-cell biocatalyst (34.66 μmol/min/g dw of cells for immobilized catalyst vs 40.54 μmol/min/g for free cells in the asymmetric reduction of 4′-chloroacetophenone). The immobilized cells showed better thermal stability, pH stability, solvent tolerance and storability compared with free cells. After 25 cycles reaction, the immobilized beads still retained >50% catalytic activity, which was 3.5 times higher than degree of retention of activity by free cells reused in a similar way. The cells could be recultured in the beads to regain full activity and perform a further 25 cycles of the reduction reaction. The external mass transfer resistances were negligible as deduced from Damkohler modulus Da < <1, and internal mass transfer restriction affected the reduction action but was not the principal rate-controlling step according to effectiveness factors η < 1 and Thiele modulus 0.3<∅ <1. Conclusions Ca-alginate coated with chitosan is a highly effective material for immobilization of

  6. [Verification of processing theory of "reducing ketone and dryness, and increasing ester and effect" for bran-fried atractylodes].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wen-Long; Wiu, Hui; Shan, Guo-Shun; Jia, Tian-Zhu

    2013-10-01

    We previously proposed the processing theory of "reducing ketone and dryness, and increasing ester and effect" for bran-fried atractylodes, and made a preliminary study. To further verify the science and rationality of the theory, we determined the changes in the content of atractylenolide I, II, III and atractylon in atractylodes after and before being fried with bran, in order to compare the effect of raw and bran-fried atractylodes on the water intake and urination in rats in this study. The effect of raw and bran-fried atractylodes on the content of four gastrointestinal hormones and two neurotransmitters in serum was observed in an attempt to verify the science and rationality the processing theory of "reducing ketone and dryness, and increasing ester and effect" for bran-fried atractylodes. PMID:24490560

  7. Monascus kaoliang CBS 302.78 immobilized in polyurethane foam using iso-propanol as co-substrate: Optimized immobilization conditions of a fungus as biocatalyst for the reduction of ketones.

    PubMed

    Quezada, M A; Carballeira, J D; Sinisterra, J V

    2009-03-01

    Monascus kaoliang was selected after a microbial screening as a highly active and selective whole cell catalyst for the reduction of ketones. In the present paper we describe the optimum growing conditions and an interesting immobilization procedure by adsorption in polyurethane foams (PUFs). This methodology is easy to perform and the immobilized catalyst is active, stable and reusable. The use of different co-substrates for cofactor regeneration was also tested and iso-propanol (i-PrOH) was found as the best co-substrate, as it leads to a catalyst reusable for 17 cycles, displaying better NADH regeneration properties than others e.g., glucose (10 cycles) or saccharose (6 cycles). The reduction of different prochiral ketones showed that the ketone reductase activity of this mould follows the Prelog's rule and kinetic experiments demonstrated that the process follows a pseudo-first kinetic order. PMID:19046879

  8. Raspberry Ketone

    MedlinePlus

    Raspberry ketone is a chemical from red raspberries, as well as kiwifruit, peaches, grapes, apples, other berries, vegetables such as rhubarb, and the bark of yew, maple, and pine trees. People take raspberry ketone by mouth for ...

  9. An unusual dehydratase acting on glycerate and a ketoreducatse stereoselectively reducing α-ketone in polyketide starter unit biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    He, Hai-Yan; Yuan, Hua; Tang, Man-Cheng; Tang, Gong-Li

    2014-10-13

    Polyketide synthases (PKSs) usually employ a ketoreductase (KR) to catalyze the reduction of a β-keto group, followed by a dehydratase (DH) that drives the dehydration to form a double bond between the α- and β-carbon atoms. Herein, a DH*-KR* involved in FR901464 biosynthesis was characterized: DH* acts on glyceryl-S-acyl carrier protein (ACP) to yield ACP-linked pyruvate; subsequently KR* reduces α-ketone that yields L-lactyl-S-ACP as starter unit for polyketide biosynthesis. Genetic and biochemical evidence was found to support a similar pathway that is involved in the biosynthesis of lankacidins. These results not only identified new PKS domains acting on different substrates, but also provided additional options for engineering the PKS starter pathway or biocatalysis. PMID:25160004

  10. Ketones urine test

    MedlinePlus

    Ketone bodies - urine; Urine ketones; Ketoacidosis - urine ketones test; Diabetic ketoacidosis - urine ketones test ... Urine ketones are usually measured as a "spot test." This is available in a test kit that ...

  11. Raspberry Ketone

    MedlinePlus

    Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely ... keep in mind that there is no reliable scientific evidence that raspberry ketone improves weight loss when ...

  12. Biocatalysts: Beautiful creatures

    SciTech Connect

    Saibi, Walid; Abdeljalil, Salma; Masmoudi, Khaled; Gargouri, Ali

    2012-09-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enzymes are vital tools. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bifunctional enzymes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Peculiar biocatalysts. -- Abstract: The chemical industry has come under increasing pressure to make chemical production more eco-friendly and independent to fossil resources. The development of industrial processes based on micro-organisms can especially help to eliminate the use or the generation of hazardous substances and can support the transition from dependence on fossil resources towards real sustainable and eco-safety industrial processes. The biocatalysts are the best solution given by nature that can be used to improve some biotechnological applications. In this research review, we report some peculiar properties of biocatalysts, implicated in a range of metabolic pathways and biotechnological tools.

  13. AKR1B10 induces cell resistance to daunorubicin and idarubicin by reducing C13 ketonic group

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Linlin; Shen Honglin; Huang Chenfei; Jing, Hongwu; Cao Deliang

    2011-08-15

    Daunorubicin, idarubicin, doxorubicin and epirubicin are anthracyclines widely used for the treatment of lymphoma, leukemia, and breast, lung, and liver cancers, but tumor resistance limits their clinical success. Aldo-keto reductase family 1 B10 (AKR1B10) is an NADPH-dependent enzyme overexpressed in liver and lung carcinomas. This study was aimed to determine the role of AKR1B10 in tumor resistance to anthracyclines. AKR1B10 activity toward anthracyclines was measured using recombinant protein. Cell resistance to anthracycline was determined by ectopic expression of AKR1B10 or inhibition by epalrestat. Results showed that AKR1B10 reduces C13-ketonic group on side chain of daunorubicin and idarubicin to hydroxyl forms. In vitro, AKR1B10 converted daunorubicin to daunorubicinol at V{sub max} of 837.42 {+-} 81.39 nmol/mg/min, K{sub m} of 9.317 {+-} 2.25 mM and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} of 3.24. AKR1B10 showed better catalytic efficiency toward idarubicin with V{sub max} at 460.23 {+-} 28.12 nmol/mg/min, K{sub m} at 0.461 {+-} 0.09 mM and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} at 35.94. AKR1B10 was less active toward doxorubicin and epirubicin with a C14-hydroxyl group. In living cells, AKR1B10 efficiently catalyzed reduction of daunorubicin (50 nM) and idarubicin (30 nM) to corresponding alcohols. Within 24 h, approximately 20 {+-} 2.7% of daunorubicin (1 {mu}M) or 23 {+-} 2.3% of idarubicin (1 {mu}M) was converted to daunorubicinol or idarubicinol in AKR1B10 expression cells compared to 7 {+-} 0.9% and 5 {+-} 1.5% in vector control. AKR1B10 expression led to cell resistance to daunorubicin and idarubicin, but inhibitor epalrestat showed a synergistic role with these agents. Together our data suggest that AKR1B10 participates in cellular metabolism of daunorubicin and idarubicin, resulting in drug resistance. These data are informative for the clinical use of idarubicin and daunorubicin. - Highlights: > This study defines enzyme activity of AKR1B10 protein towards daunorubicin, idarubicin

  14. Outrunning Nature: Directed Evolution of Superior Biocatalysts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodyer, Ryan; Chen, Wilfred; Zhao, Huimin

    2004-01-01

    The development of enzymes as biocatalysts for industrial use and the emergence of directed evolution in the invention of advanced biocatalysts are discussed and illustrated. Thus, directed evolution has bridged the functional gap between natural and specially designed biocatalysts.

  15. Asymmetric reduction of prochiral ketones to chiral alcohols catalyzed by plants tissue.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhong-Hua; Zeng, Rong; Yang, Gai; Wang, Yu; Li, Li-Zhen; Lv, Zao-Sheng; Yao, Man; Lai, Bin

    2008-09-01

    As an important organic compound, chiral alcohols are the key chiral building blocks to many single enantiomer pharmaceuticals. Asymmetric reduction of the corresponding prochiral ketones to produce the chiral alcohols by biocatalysis is one of the most promising routes. Asymmetric reduction of different kinds of non-natural prochiral ketones catalyzed by various plants tissue was studied in this work. Acetophenone, 4'-chloroacetophenone and ethyl 4-chloroacetoacetate were chosen as the model substrates for simple ketone, halogen-containing aromatic ketone and beta-ketoesters, respectively. Apple (Malus pumila), carrot (Daucus carota), cucumber (Cucumis sativus), onion (Allium cepa), potato (Soanum tuberosum), radish (Raphanus sativus) and sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) were chosen as the biocatalysts. It was found that these kinds of prochiral ketoness could be reduced by these plants tissue with high enantioselectivity. Both R- and S-form configuration chiral alcohols could be obtained. The e.e. and chemical yield could reach about 98 and 80% respectively for acetophenone and 4'-chloroacetophenone reduction reaction with favorable plant tissue. And the e.e. and yield for ethyl 4-chloroacetoacetate reduction reaction was about 91 and 45% respectively. PMID:18548304

  16. AKR1B10 Induces Cell Resistance to Daunorubicin and Idarubicin by Reducing C13 Ketonic Group

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Linlin; Shen, Honglin; Huang, Chenfei; Jing, Hongwu; Cao, Deliang

    2011-01-01

    Daunorubicin, idarubicin, doxorubicin and epirubicin are anthracyclines widely used for the treatment of lymphoma, leukemia, and breast, lung, and liver cancers, but tumor resistance limits their clinical success. Aldo-keto reductase family 1 B10 (AKR1B10) is an NADPH-dependent enzyme overexpressed in liver and lung carcinomas. This study was aimed to determine the role of AKR1B10 in tumor resistance to anthracyclines. AKR1B10 activity toward anthracyclines was measured using recombinant protein. Cell resistance to anthracycline was determined by ectopic expression of AKR1B10 or inhibition by epalrestat. Results showed that AKR1B10 reduces C13-ketonic group on side chain of daunorubicin and idarubicin to hydroxyl forms. In vitro, AKR1B10 converted daunorubicin to daunorubicinol at Vmax of 837.42±81.39 nmol/mg/min, Km of 9.317±2.25 mM and kcat/Km of 3.24. AKR1B10 showed better catalytic efficiency toward idarubicin with Vmax at 460.23±28.12 nmol/mg/min, Km at 0.461±0.09 mM and kcat/Km at 35.94. AKR1B10 was less active toward doxorubicin and epirubicin with a C14-hydroxyl group. In living cells, AKR1B10 efficiently catalyzed reduction of daunorubicin (50nM) and idarubicin (30nM) to corresponding alcohols. Within 24 hours, approximately 20±2.7% of daunorubicin (1μM) or 23±2.3% of idarubicin (1μM) was converted to daunorubicinol or idarubicinol in AKR1B10 expression cells compared to 7±0.9% and 5±1.5% in vector control. AKR1B10 expression led to cell resistance to daunorubicin and idarubicin, but inhibitor epalrestat showed a synergistic role with these agents. Together our data suggests that AKR1B10 participates in cellular metabolism of daunorubicin and idarubicin, resulting in drug resistance. These data are informative for the clinical use of idarubicin and daunorubicin. PMID:21640744

  17. Biocatalysts with enhanced inhibitor tolerance

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Shihui; Linger, Jeffrey; Franden, Mary Ann; Pienkos, Philip T.; Zhang, Min

    2015-12-08

    Disclosed herein are biocatalysts for the production of biofuels, including microorganisms that contain genetic modifications conferring tolerance to growth and fermentation inhibitors found in many cellulosic feedstocks. Methods of converting cellulose-containing materials to fuels and chemicals, as well as methods of fermenting sugars to fuels and chemicals, using these biocatalysts are also disclosed.

  18. Ketones blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ketones - serum; Nitroprusside test; Ketone bodies - serum; Ketones - blood ... A blood sample is needed. ... When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel slight ... there may be some throbbing or a slight bruise. This soon ...

  19. Biocatalyst development by directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Si, Tong; Zhao, Huimin

    2012-07-01

    Biocatalysis has emerged as a great addition to traditional chemical processes for production of bulk chemicals and pharmaceuticals. To overcome the limitations of naturally occurring enzymes, directed evolution has become the most important tool for improving critical traits of biocatalysts such as thermostability, activity, selectivity, and tolerance towards organic solvents for industrial applications. Recent advances in mutant library creation and high-throughput screening have greatly facilitated the engineering of novel and improved biocatalysts. This review provides an update of the recent developments in the use of directed evolution to engineer biocatalysts for practical applications. PMID:22310212

  20. Biocatalyst Development by Directed Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Si, Tong; Zhao, Huimin

    2012-01-01

    Biocatalysis has emerged as a great addition to traditional chemical processes for production of bulk chemicals and pharmaceuticals. To overcome the limitations of naturally occurring enzymes, directed evolution has become the most important tool for improving critical traits of biocatalysts such as thermostability, activity, selectivity, and tolerance towards organic solvents for industrial applications. Recent advances in mutant library creation and high-throughput screening have greatly facilitated the engineering of novel and improved biocatalysts. This review provides an update of the recent developments in the use of directed evolution to engineer biocatalysts for practical applications. PMID:22310212

  1. Mild Deoxygenation of Aromatic Ketones and Aldehydes over Pd/C Using Polymethylhydrosiloxane as the Reducing Agent**

    PubMed Central

    Volkov, Alexey; Gustafson, Karl P J; Tai, Cheuk-Wai; Verho, Oscar; Bäckvall, Jan-E; Adolfsson, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Herein, a practical and mild method for the deoxygenation of a wide range of benzylic aldehydes and ketones is described, which utilizes heterogeneous Pd/C as the catalyst together with the green hydride source, polymethylhydrosiloxane. The developed catalytic protocol is scalable and robust, as exemplified by the deoxygenation of ethyl vanillin, which was performed on a 30 mmol scale in an open-to-air setup using only 0.085 mol % Pd/C catalyst to furnish the corresponding deoxygenated product in 93 % yield within 3 hours at room temperature. Furthermore, the Pd/C catalyst was shown to be recyclable up to 6 times without any observable decrease in efficiency and it exhibited low metal leaching under the reaction conditions. PMID:25728614

  2. Fueling Performance: Ketones Enter the Mix.

    PubMed

    Egan, Brendan; D'Agostino, Dominic P

    2016-09-13

    Ketone body metabolites serve as alternative energy substrates during prolonged fasting, calorie restriction, or reduced carbohydrate (CHO) availability. Using a ketone ester supplement, Cox et al. (2016) demonstrate that acute nutritional ketosis alters substrate utilization patterns during exercise, reduces lactate production, and improves time-trial performance in elite cyclists. PMID:27626197

  3. Biocatalysts from alkaloid producing plants.

    PubMed

    Kries, Hajo; O'Connor, Sarah E

    2016-04-01

    Metabolic pathways leading to benzylisoquinoline and monoterpene indole alkaloids in plants are revealing remarkable new reactions. Understanding of the enzymes involved in alkaloid biosynthesis provides access to a variety of applications in biocatalysis and bioengineering. In chemo-enzymatic settings, plant biocatalysts can transform medically important scaffolds. Additionally, synthetic biologists are taking alkaloid pathways as templates to assemble pathways in microorganisms that are tailored to the needs of medicinal chemistry. In light of these many recent discoveries, it is expected that plants will continue to be a source of novel biocatalysts for the foreseeable future. PMID:26773811

  4. Rhodium-catalyzed Asymmetric Hydrogenation of α-Dehydroamino Ketones: A General Approach to Chiral α-amino Ketones.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wenchao; Wang, Qingli; Xie, Yun; Lv, Hui; Zhang, Xumu

    2016-01-01

    Rhodium/DuanPhos-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation of aliphatic α-dehydroamino ketones has been achieved and afforded chiral α-amino ketones in high yields and excellent enantioselectives (up to 99 % ee), which could be reduced further to chiral β-amino alcohols by LiAlH(tBuO)3 with good yields. This protocol provides a readily accessible route for the synthesis of chiral α-amino ketones and chiral β-amino alcohols. PMID:26425824

  5. A virus-based biocatalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carette, Noëlle; Engelkamp, Hans; Akpa, Eric; Pierre, Sebastien J.; Cameron, Neil R.; Christianen, Peter C. M.; Maan, Jan C.; Thies, Jens C.; Weberskirch, Ralf; Rowan, Alan E.; Nolte, Roeland J. M.; Michon, Thierry; van Hest, Jan C. M.

    2007-04-01

    Virus particles are probably the most precisely defined nanometre-sized objects that can be formed by protein self-assembly. Although their natural function is the storage and transport of genetic material, they have more recently been applied as scaffolds for mineralization and as containers for the encapsulation of inorganic compounds. The reproductive power of viruses has been used to develop versatile analytical methods, such as phage display, for the selection and identification of (bio)active compounds. To date, the combined use of self-assembly and reproduction has not been used for the construction of catalytic systems. Here we describe a self-assembled system based on a plant virus that has its coat protein genetically modified to provide it with a lipase enzyme. Using single-object and bulk catalytic studies, we prove that the virus-anchored lipase molecules are catalytically active. This anchored biocatalyst, unlike man-made supported catalysts, has the capability to reproduce itself in vivo, generating many independent catalytically active copies.

  6. Methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methyl Isobutyl Ketone ( MIBK ) ; CASRN 108 - 10 - 1 ; Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for

  7. Methyl ethyl ketone (MEK)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methyl ethyl ketone ( MEK ) ( CASRN 78 - 93 - 3 ) Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Nonc

  8. Ketone ester effects on metabolism and transcription

    PubMed Central

    Veech, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    Ketosis induced by starvation or feeding a ketogenic diet has widespread and often contradictory effects due to the simultaneous elevation of both ketone bodies and free fatty acids. The elevation of ketone bodies increases the energy of ATP hydrolysis by reducing the mitochondrial NAD couple and oxidizing the coenzyme Q couple, thus increasing the redox span between site I and site II. In contrast, metabolism of fatty acids leads to a reduction of both mitochondrial NAD and mitochondrial coenzyme Q causing a decrease in the ΔG of ATP hydrolysis. In contrast, feeding ketone body esters leads to pure ketosis, unaccompanied by elevation of free fatty acids, producing a physiological state not previously seen in nature. The effects of pure ketosis on transcription and upon certain neurodegenerative diseases make approach not only interesting, but of potential therapeutic value. PMID:24714648

  9. Improving immobilized biocatalysts by gel phase polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Kuu, W.Y.; Polack, J.A.

    1983-08-01

    A new method is presented for the treatment of gel-type supports, used for immobilizing microbial cells and enzymes, to obtain high mechanical strength. It is particularly useful for ethanol fermentation over gel beads containing immobilized viable cells, where the beads can be ruptured by gas production and the growth of cells within the gels. This method consists of treating agar or carrageenan gel with polyacrylamide to form a rigid support which retains the high catalytic activity characteristic of the untreated biocatalysts. The size and shape of the biocatalyst is unaffected by this treatment. The method involves the diffusion of acrylamide, N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide and BETA-dimethylaminopropionitrile (or N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine) into the preformed biocatalyst beads followed by the addition of an initiator to cause polymerization within the beads. Treated gels have been used for the continuous fermentation of glucose to ethanol in a packed column for over two months.

  10. Biocatalysts for biomass deconstruction from environmental genomics.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Zachary; Mewis, Keith; Strachan, Cameron; Hallam, Steven J

    2015-12-01

    Plant biomass offers a sustainable alternative to the energy and materials produced from fossil fuels. The industrial scale production or biorefining of fermentable sugars and aromatics from plant biomass is currently limited by the lack of cost effective and efficient biocatalysts. One potential solution to this problem is the discovery of biomass deconstructing biocatalysts from uncultivated microbial communities. Here we review recent progress in recovering such biological devices from environmental genomes and consider how this information can be used to build better biorefining ecosystems. PMID:26231123

  11. Outrunning Nature: Directed Evolution of Superior Biocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodyer, Ryan; Chen, Wilfred; Zhao, Huimin

    2004-01-01

    Driven by recent technical advances in genetic engineering and new societal needs, the use of enzymes and microorganisms as catalysts to synthesize chemicals and materials is rapidly expanding. One of the key technical drivers is the development of various directed evolution methods for biocatalyst discovery and optimization. Although it essentially replicates the Darwinian evolutionary processes in a test tube, directed evolution can create biocatalysts with better catalytic performance than Nature's own products within weeks or months rather than eons. In this article, both the technologies and applications of directed evolution in biocatalysis are discussed.

  12. The search for the ideal biocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Burton, Stephanie G; Cowan, Don A; Woodley, John M

    2002-01-01

    While the use of enzymes as biocatalysts to assist in the industrial manufacture of fine chemicals and pharmaceuticals has enormous potential, application is frequently limited by evolution-led catalyst traits. The advent of designer biocatalysts, produced by informed selection and mutation through recombinant DNA technology, enables production of process-compatible enzymes. However, to fully realize the potential of designer enzymes in industrial applications, it will be necessary to tailor catalyst properties so that they are optimal not only for a given reaction but also in the context of the industrial process in which the enzyme is applied. PMID:11753360

  13. Thermophilic Gram-Positive Biocatalysts for Biomass Conversion to Ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmugam, K.T.; Ingram, L.O.; Maupin-Furlow, J.A.; Preston, J.F.; Aldrich, H.C.

    2003-12-01

    isolates cluster with Bacillus coagulans although B. coagulans type strain, ATCC 7050, failed to utilize xylose as a carbon source. For successful production of ethanol from pyruvate, both pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) and alcohol dehydrogenase (AHD) need to be produced at optimal levels in these biocatalysts. A plasmid containing the S. ventriculi pdc gene and the adh gene from geobacillus stearothermophilus was constructed using plasmid pWH1520 that was successfully used for expression of pdc in B. megaterium. The resulting portable ethanol (PET) plasmid, pJAM423, was transformed into B. megaterium. After xylose induction, a significant fraction of cell cytoplasm was composed of the S. ventriculi PDC and G. stearothermophilus ADH proteins. In preliminary experiments, the amount of ethanol produced by b. megaterium with plasmid pJAM423 was about twice (20 mM) of the bacterium without the plasmid. These results show that the PET operon is functional in B. megaterium but high level ethanol production needs further genetic and metabolic engineering. A genetic transfer system for the second generation biocatalysts needs to be developed for transferring the plasmid pJAM423 and its derivatives for engineering these organisms for ethanol production from biomass derived sugars and cellulose to ethanol. One of the new biocatalysts, strain P4-102B was found to be transformable with plasmids and the method for introducing plasmid pJAM423 into this strain and expression of the encoded DNA is being optimized. These new second generation biocatalysts have the potential to reduce the cost of SSF by minimizing the amount of fungal cellulases, a significant cost component in the use of biomass as a renewable resource for production of fuels and chemicals.

  14. Recombinant DNA encoding a desulfurization biocatalyst

    DOEpatents

    Rambosek, J.; Piddington, C.S.; Kovacevich, B.R.; Young, K.D.; Denome, S.A.

    1994-10-18

    This invention relates to a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes which encode a biocatalyst capable of desulfurizing a fossil fuel which contains organic sulfur molecules. For example, the present invention encompasses a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes of a strain of Rhodococcus rhodochrous. 13 figs.

  15. Marine Biocatalysts: Enzymatic Features and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Trincone, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    In several recent reports related to biocatalysis the enormous pool of biodiversity found in marine ecosystems is considered a profitable natural reservoir for acquiring an inventory of useful biocatalysts. These enzymes are characterized by well-known habitat-related features such as salt tolerance, hyperthermostability, barophilicity and cold adaptivity. In addition, their novel chemical and stereochemical characteristics increase the interest of biocatalysis practitioners both in academia and research industry. In this review, starting from the analysis of these featuring habitat-related properties, important examples of marine enzymes in biocatalysis will be reported. Completion of this report is devoted to the analysis of novel chemical and stereochemical biodiversity offered by marine biocatalysts with particular emphasis on current or potential applications of these enzymes in chemical and pharmaceutical fields. The analysis of literature cited here and the many published patent applications concerning the use of marine enzymes supports the view that these biocatalysts are just waiting to be discovered, reflecting the importance of the marine environment. The potential of this habitat should be thoroughly explored and possibly the way to access useful biocatalysts should avoid destructive large-scale collections of marine biomass for enzyme production. These two aspects are day by day increasing in interest and a future increase in the use of marine enzymes in biocatalysis should be expected. PMID:21731544

  16. Recombinant DNA encoding a desulfurization biocatalyst

    DOEpatents

    Rambosek, John; Piddington, Chris S.; Kovacevich, Brian R.; Young, Kevin D.; Denome, Sylvia A.

    1994-01-01

    This invention relates to a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes which encode a biocatalyst capable of desulfurizing a fossil fuel which contains organic sulfur molecules. For example, the present invention encompasses a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes of a strain of Rhodococcus rhodochrous.

  17. Microbial biocatalyst developments to upgrade fossil fuels.

    PubMed

    Kilbane, John J

    2006-06-01

    Steady increases in the average sulfur content of petroleum and stricter environmental regulations concerning the sulfur content have promoted studies of bioprocessing to upgrade fossil fuels. Bioprocesses can potentially provide a solution to the need for improved and expanded fuel upgrading worldwide, because bioprocesses for fuel upgrading do not require hydrogen and produce far less carbon dioxide than thermochemical processes. Recent advances have demonstrated that biodesulfurization is capable of removing sulfur from hydrotreated diesel to yield a product with an ultra-low sulfur concentration that meets current environmental regulations. However, the technology has not yet progressed beyond laboratory-scale testing, as more efficient biocatalysts are needed. Genetic studies to obtain improved biocatalysts for the selective removal of sulfur and nitrogen from petroleum provide the focus of current research efforts. PMID:16678400

  18. Biocatalyst design for stability and specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Himmel, M.E.; Georgiou, G.

    1991-01-01

    This volume has been developed from a symposium sponsored by the Division of Biochemical Technology of the American Chemical Society at the Fourth Chemical Congress of North America (202nd National Meeting of the American Chemical Society), held in New York, New York, August 25-30, 1991. Papers included here relate to the development of biocatalysts, with an emphasis on the stability and specificity of the catalysts. Major topics of these papers include enzymes, biotechnology, protein engineering, and protein folding.

  19. Improving immobilized biocatalysts by gel phase polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Kuu, W.Y.; Polack, J.A.

    1983-08-01

    A new method is presented for the treatment of gel-type supports, used for immobilizing microbial cells and enzymes, to obtain high mechanical strength. It is particularly useful for ethanol fermentation over gel beads containing immobilized viable cells, where the beads can be ruptured by gas production and the growth of cells within the gels. This method consists of treating agar or carrageenan gel with polyacrylamide to form a rigid support which retains the high catalytic activity characteristic of the untreated biocatalysts. The size and shape of the biocatalyst is unaffected by this treatment. The method involves the diffusion of acrylamide, N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide and ..beta..-dimethylaminopropionitrile (or N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine) into the preformed biocatalyst beads followed by the addition of an initiator to cause polymerization within the beads. Treated gels have been used for the continuous fermentation of glucose to ethanol in a packed column for over two months. During this operation, the gel beads maintained their rigidity, and the maximum productivity was as high as 50 gh/sup -1/ L/sup -1/ gel. There was no appreciable decay of cell activity.

  20. Whole-cell biocatalysts for biodiesel fuel production.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, H; Hama, S; Tamalampudi, S; Noda, H

    2008-12-01

    Biodiesel fuel (BDF), which refers to fatty acid alkyl esters, has attracted considerable attention as an environmentally friendly alternative fuel for diesel engines. Alkali catalysis is widely applied for the commercial production of BDF. However, enzymatic transesterification offers considerable advantages, including reducing process operations in biodiesel fuel production and an easy separation of the glycerol byproduct. The high cost of the lipase enzyme is the main obstacle for a commercially feasible enzymatic production of biodiesel fuels. To reduce enzyme associated process costs, the immobilization of fungal mycelium within biomass support particles (BSPs) as well as expression of the lipase enzyme on the surface of yeast cells has been developed to generate whole-cell biocatalysts for industrial applications. PMID:18976825

  1. Ketone bodies as signaling metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Newman, John C.; Verdin, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, the ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate (βOHB) has been looked upon as a carrier of energy from liver to peripheral tissues during fasting or exercise. However, βOHB also signals via extracellular receptors and acts as an endogenous inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs). These recent findings support a model in which βOHB functions to link the environment, in this case the diet, and gene expression via chromatin modifications. Here, we review the regulation and functions of ketone bodies, the relationship between ketone bodies and calorie restriction, and the implications of HDAC inhibition by the ketone body βOHB in the modulation of metabolism, and diseases of aging. PMID:24140022

  2. Green organocatalytic α-hydroxylation of ketones.

    PubMed

    Voutyritsa, Errika; Theodorou, Alexis; Kokotos, Christoforos G

    2016-06-28

    An efficient and green method for the α-hydroxylation of substituted ketones has been developed. This method includes the in situ conversion of various ketones into the corresponding silyl enol ethers and their oxidation to the corresponding α-hydroxy ketones. Two protocols have been established leading either to protected α-hydroxy carbonyls or free α-hydroxy ketones. Both procedures are easy to follow and lead to good to high yields for a variety of ketones. PMID:26867154

  3. Intermolecular reductive coupling of esters with benzophenones by low-valent titanium: synthesis of diarylmethyl ketones revisited.

    PubMed

    Kise, Naoki; Sakurai, Toshihiko

    2015-04-01

    The reductive coupling of aliphatic esters with benzophenones by Zn-TiCl4 in THF gave two- and four-electron reduced products, diaryl(hydroxy)methyl ketones, and diarylmethyl ketones selectively by controlling the reaction conditions. In the reaction of aromatic esters with benzophenones, diarylmethyl ketones were obtained as the sole products. N-(Alkoxycarbonyl)-(S)-α-amino acid methyl esters gave optically active diphenylmethyl ketones by reduction with benzophenone. The obtained diphenylmethyl ketones were transformed to 4,5-cis-disubstituted oxazolidin-2-ones stereoselectively. PMID:25748528

  4. Use of microbial spores as a biocatalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Murata, Kousaku . Research Inst. for Food Science)

    1993-01-01

    Endospores of a bacterium Bacillus subtilis and ascospores of a yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae contained almost all the activities for the same enzymes as vegetative cells. The biotechnological potential of spores was studied by selecting adenosine 5[prime]-triphosphatase and alkaline phosphatase in bacterial and yeast spores, respectively, as model enzymes. The activity of both enzymes was efficiently expressed when the spores were treated by physical (sonication or electric field pulse) and chemical (organic solvents or detergents) methods. The yeast spores were immobilized in polyacrylamide gel without any appreciable loss of activity. The immobilized spores were packed in a column and used successfully for the continuous reactions of alkaline phosphatase and glyoxalase I. The microbial spores were confirmed to be promising as a biocatalyst for the production of useful chemicals in bioreactor systems.

  5. Archaeal Enzymes and Applications in Industrial Biocatalysts

    PubMed Central

    Littlechild, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Archaeal enzymes are playing an important role in industrial biotechnology. Many representatives of organisms living in “extreme” conditions, the so-called Extremophiles, belong to the archaeal kingdom of life. This paper will review studies carried by the Exeter group and others regarding archaeal enzymes that have important applications in commercial biocatalysis. Some of these biocatalysts are already being used in large scale industrial processes for the production of optically pure drug intermediates and amino acids and their analogues. Other enzymes have been characterised at laboratory scale regarding their substrate specificity and properties for potential industrial application. The increasing availability of DNA sequences from new archaeal species and metagenomes will provide a continuing resource to identify new enzymes of commercial interest using both bioinformatics and screening approaches. PMID:26494981

  6. Characterization of an Allylic/Benzyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase from Yokenella sp. Strain WZY002, an Organism Potentially Useful for the Synthesis of α,β-Unsaturated Alcohols from Allylic Aldehydes and Ketones

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Xiangxian; Wang, Yifang; Xiong, Bin; Wu, Tingting; Xie, Liping; Yu, Meilan

    2014-01-01

    A novel whole-cell biocatalyst with high allylic alcohol-oxidizing activities was screened and identified as Yokenella sp. WZY002, which chemoselectively reduced the C=O bond of allylic aldehydes/ketones to the corresponding α,β-unsaturated alcohols at 30°C and pH 8.0. The strain also had the capacity of stereoselectively reducing aromatic ketones to (S)-enantioselective alcohols. The enzyme responsible for the predominant allylic/benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase activity was purified to homogeneity and designated YsADH (alcohol dehydrogenase from Yokenella sp.), which had a calculated subunit molecular mass of 36,411 Da. The gene encoding YsADH was subsequently expressed in Escherichia coli, and the purified recombinant YsADH protein was characterized. The enzyme strictly required NADP(H) as a coenzyme and was putatively zinc dependent. The optimal pH and temperature for crotonaldehyde reduction were pH 6.5 and 65°C, whereas those for crotyl alcohol oxidation were pH 8.0 and 55°C. The enzyme showed moderate thermostability, with a half-life of 6.2 h at 55°C. It was robust in the presence of organic solvents and retained 87.5% of the initial activity after 24 h of incubation with 20% (vol/vol) dimethyl sulfoxide. The enzyme preferentially catalyzed allylic/benzyl aldehydes as the substrate in the reduction of aldehydes/ketones and yielded the highest activity of 427 U mg−1 for benzaldehyde reduction, while the alcohol oxidation reaction demonstrated the maximum activity of 79.9 U mg−1 using crotyl alcohol as the substrate. Moreover, kinetic parameters of the enzyme showed lower Km values and higher catalytic efficiency for crotonaldehyde/benzaldehyde and NADPH than for crotyl alcohol/benzyl alcohol and NADP+, suggesting the nature of being an aldehyde reductase. PMID:24509923

  7. Characterization of an allylic/benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase from Yokenella sp. strain WZY002, an organism potentially useful for the synthesis of α,β-unsaturated alcohols from allylic aldehydes and ketones.

    PubMed

    Ying, Xiangxian; Wang, Yifang; Xiong, Bin; Wu, Tingting; Xie, Liping; Yu, Meilan; Wang, Zhao

    2014-04-01

    A novel whole-cell biocatalyst with high allylic alcohol-oxidizing activities was screened and identified as Yokenella sp. WZY002, which chemoselectively reduced the C=O bond of allylic aldehydes/ketones to the corresponding α,β-unsaturated alcohols at 30°C and pH 8.0. The strain also had the capacity of stereoselectively reducing aromatic ketones to (S)-enantioselective alcohols. The enzyme responsible for the predominant allylic/benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase activity was purified to homogeneity and designated YsADH (alcohol dehydrogenase from Yokenella sp.), which had a calculated subunit molecular mass of 36,411 Da. The gene encoding YsADH was subsequently expressed in Escherichia coli, and the purified recombinant YsADH protein was characterized. The enzyme strictly required NADP(H) as a coenzyme and was putatively zinc dependent. The optimal pH and temperature for crotonaldehyde reduction were pH 6.5 and 65°C, whereas those for crotyl alcohol oxidation were pH 8.0 and 55°C. The enzyme showed moderate thermostability, with a half-life of 6.2 h at 55°C. It was robust in the presence of organic solvents and retained 87.5% of the initial activity after 24 h of incubation with 20% (vol/vol) dimethyl sulfoxide. The enzyme preferentially catalyzed allylic/benzyl aldehydes as the substrate in the reduction of aldehydes/ketones and yielded the highest activity of 427 U mg(-1) for benzaldehyde reduction, while the alcohol oxidation reaction demonstrated the maximum activity of 79.9 U mg(-1) using crotyl alcohol as the substrate. Moreover, kinetic parameters of the enzyme showed lower Km values and higher catalytic efficiency for crotonaldehyde/benzaldehyde and NADPH than for crotyl alcohol/benzyl alcohol and NADP(+), suggesting the nature of being an aldehyde reductase. PMID:24509923

  8. Stereoselective titanium-mediated aldol reactions of a chiral lactate-derived ethyl ketone with ketones.

    PubMed

    Alcoberro, Sandra; Gómez-Palomino, Alejandro; Solà, Ricard; Romea, Pedro; Urpí, Fèlix; Font-Bardia, Mercè

    2014-01-17

    Aldol reactions of titanium enolates of lactate-derived ethyl ketone 1 with other ketones proceed in a very efficient and stereocontrolled manner provided that a further equivalent of TiCl4 is added to the reacting mixture. The scope of these reactions encompasses simple ketones such as acetone or cyclohexanone as well as other ketones that contain potential chelating groups such as pyruvate esters or α- and β-hydroxy ketones. PMID:24372372

  9. THE USE OF LIVE BIOCATALYSTS FOR PESTICIDE DETOXIFICATION. (R823663)

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the past decade, numerous microorganisms capable of degrading pesticides have been isolated, and detoxification processes based on these live biocatalysts have been developed. Recently, novel detoxification strategies using genetically engineered microorganisms with extend...

  10. Obligate Role for Ketone Body Oxidation in Neonatal Metabolic Homeostasis*

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, David G.; d'Avignon, D. André; Wentz, Anna E.; Weber, Mary L.; Crawford, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    To compensate for the energetic deficit elicited by reduced carbohydrate intake, mammals convert energy stored in ketone bodies to high energy phosphates. Ketone bodies provide fuel particularly to brain, heart, and skeletal muscle in states that include starvation, adherence to low carbohydrate diets, and the neonatal period. Here, we use novel Oxct1−/− mice, which lack the ketolytic enzyme succinyl-CoA:3-oxo-acid CoA-transferase (SCOT), to demonstrate that ketone body oxidation is required for postnatal survival in mice. Although Oxct1−/− mice exhibit normal prenatal development, all develop ketoacidosis, hypoglycemia, and reduced plasma lactate concentrations within the first 48 h of birth. In vivo oxidation of 13C-labeled β-hydroxybutyrate in neonatal Oxct1−/− mice, measured using NMR, reveals intact oxidation to acetoacetate but no contribution of ketone bodies to the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Accumulation of acetoacetate yields a markedly reduced β-hydroxybutyrate:acetoacetate ratio of 1:3, compared with 3:1 in Oxct1+ littermates. Frequent exogenous glucose administration to actively suckling Oxct1−/− mice delayed, but could not prevent, lethality. Brains of newborn SCOT-deficient mice demonstrate evidence of adaptive energy acquisition, with increased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase α, increased autophagy, and 2.4-fold increased in vivo oxidative metabolism of [13C]glucose. Furthermore, [13C]lactate oxidation is increased 1.7-fold in skeletal muscle of Oxct1−/− mice but not in brain. These results indicate the critical metabolic roles of ketone bodies in neonatal metabolism and suggest that distinct tissues exhibit specific metabolic responses to loss of ketone body oxidation. PMID:21209089

  11. Biocatalysts and their small molecule products from metagenomic studies

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Hala A.; Feng, Zhiyang; Brady, Sean F.

    2012-01-01

    The vast majority of bacteria present in environmental samples have never been cultured and therefore they have not been available to exploit their ability to produce useful biocatalysts or collections of biocatalysts that can biosynthesize interesting small molecules. Metagenomic libraries constructed using DNA extracted directly from natural bacterial communities offer access to the genetic information present in the genomes of these as yet uncultured bacteria. This review highlights recent efforts to recover both discrete enzymes and small molecules from metagenomic libraries. PMID:22455793

  12. Understanding biocatalyst inhibition by carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Jarboe, Laura R; Royce, Liam A; Liu, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Carboxylic acids are an attractive biorenewable chemical in terms of their flexibility and usage as precursors for a variety of industrial chemicals. It has been demonstrated that such carboxylic acids can be fermentatively produced using engineered microbes, such as Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, like many other attractive biorenewable fuels and chemicals, carboxylic acids become inhibitory to these microbes at concentrations below the desired yield and titer. In fact, their potency as microbial inhibitors is highlighted by the fact that many of these carboxylic acids are routinely used as food preservatives. This review highlights the current knowledge regarding the impact that saturated, straight-chain carboxylic acids, such as hexanoic, octanoic, decanoic, and lauric acids can have on E. coli and S. cerevisiae, with the goal of identifying metabolic engineering strategies to increase robustness. Key effects of these carboxylic acids include damage to the cell membrane and a decrease of the microbial internal pH. Certain changes in cell membrane properties, such as composition, fluidity, integrity, and hydrophobicity, and intracellular pH are often associated with increased tolerance. The availability of appropriate exporters, such as Pdr12, can also increase tolerance. The effect on metabolic processes, such as maintaining appropriate respiratory function, regulation of Lrp activity and inhibition of production of key metabolites such as methionine, are also considered. Understanding the mechanisms of biocatalyst inhibition by these desirable products can aid in the engineering of robust strains with improved industrial performance. PMID:24027566

  13. Utilization of biocatalysts in cellulose waste minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.; Evans, B.R.

    1996-09-01

    Cellulose, a polymer of glucose, is the principal component of biomass and, therefore, a major source of waste that is either buried or burned. Examples of biomass waste include agricultural crop residues, forestry products, and municipal wastes. Recycling of this waste is important for energy conservation as well as waste minimization and there is some probability that in the future biomass could become a major energy source and replace fossil fuels that are currently used for fuels and chemicals production. It has been estimated that in the United States, between 100-450 million dry tons of agricultural waste are produced annually, approximately 6 million dry tons of animal waste, and of the 190 million tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) generated annually, approximately two-thirds is cellulosic in nature and over one-third is paper waste. Interestingly, more than 70% of MSW is landfilled or burned, however landfill space is becoming increasingly scarce. On a smaller scale, important cellulosic products such as cellulose acetate also present waste problems; an estimated 43 thousand tons of cellulose ester waste are generated annually in the United States. Biocatalysts could be used in cellulose waste minimization and this chapter describes their characteristics and potential in bioconversion and bioremediation processes.

  14. Ketone body metabolism and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, David G.; Schugar, Rebecca C.

    2013-01-01

    Ketone bodies are metabolized through evolutionarily conserved pathways that support bioenergetic homeostasis, particularly in brain, heart, and skeletal muscle when carbohydrates are in short supply. The metabolism of ketone bodies interfaces with the tricarboxylic acid cycle, β-oxidation of fatty acids, de novo lipogenesis, sterol biosynthesis, glucose metabolism, the mitochondrial electron transport chain, hormonal signaling, intracellular signal transduction pathways, and the microbiome. Here we review the mechanisms through which ketone bodies are metabolized and how their signals are transmitted. We focus on the roles this metabolic pathway may play in cardiovascular disease states, the bioenergetic benefits of myocardial ketone body oxidation, and prospective interactions among ketone body metabolism, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and atherosclerosis. Ketone body metabolism is noninvasively quantifiable in humans and is responsive to nutritional interventions. Therefore, further investigation of this pathway in disease models and in humans may ultimately yield tailored diagnostic strategies and therapies for specific pathological states. PMID:23396451

  15. EXTRACTION OF TETRAVALENT PLUTONIUM VALUES WITH METHYL ETHYL KETONE, METHYL ISOBUTYL KETONE ACETOPHENONE OR MENTHONE

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1961-08-01

    A process is described for extracting tetravalent plutonium from an aqueous acid solution with methyl ethyl ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone, or acetophenone and with the extraction of either tetravalent or hexavalent plutonium into menthone. (AEC)

  16. Lactobacillus casei as a biocatalyst for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Vinay-Lara, Elena; Wang, Song; Bai, Lina; Phrommao, Ekkarat; Broadbent, Jeff R; Steele, James L

    2016-09-01

    Microbial fermentation of sugars from plant biomass to alcohols represents an alternative to petroleum-based fuels. The optimal biocatalyst for such fermentations needs to overcome hurdles such as high concentrations of alcohols and toxic compounds. Lactic acid bacteria, especially lactobacilli, have high innate alcohol tolerance and are remarkably adaptive to harsh environments. This study assessed the potential of five Lactobacillus casei strains as biocatalysts for alcohol production. L. casei 12A was selected based upon its innate alcohol tolerance, high transformation efficiency and ability to utilize plant-derived carbohydrates. A 12A derivative engineered to produce ethanol (L. casei E1) was compared to two other bacterial biocatalysts. Maximal growth rate, maximal optical density and ethanol production were determined under conditions similar to those present during alcohol production from lignocellulosic feedstocks. L. casei E1 exhibited higher innate alcohol tolerance, better growth in the presence of corn stover hydrolysate stressors, and resulted in higher ethanol yields. PMID:27312380

  17. Apparatus for the production of gel beads containing a biocatalyst

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Charles D.; Scott, Timothy C.; Davison, Brian H.

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus for the large-scale and continuous production of gel beads containing a biocatalyst. The apparatus is a columnar system based on the chemical cross-linking of hydrocolloidal gels that contain and immobilize a biocatalyst, the biocatalyst being a microorganism or an enzyme. Hydrocolloidal gels, such as alginate, carrageenan, and a mixture of bone gelatin and modified alginate, provide immobilization matrices that can be used to entrap and retain the biocatalyst while allowing effective contact with substrates and release of products. Such immobilized biocatalysts are generally formulated into small spheres or beads that have high concentrations of the biocatalyst within the gel matrix. The columnar system includes a gel dispersion nozzle submerged in a heated non-interacting liquid, typically an organic liquid, that is immiscible with water to allow efficient formation of spherical gel droplets, the non-interacting liquid having a specific gravity that is less than water so that the gel droplets will fall through the liquid by the force of gravity. The heated non-interacting liquid is in direct contact with a chilled upflowing non-interacting liquid that will provide sufficient residence time for the gel droplets as they fall through the liquid so that they will be cooled below the gelling temperature and form solid spheres. The upflowing non-interacting liquid is in direct contact with an upflowing temperature-controlled aqueous solution containing the necessary chemicals for cross-linking or fixing of the gel beads to add the necessary stability. The flow rates of the two liquid streams can be varied to control the proper residence time in each liquid section to accommodate the production of gel beads of differing settling velocities. A valve is provided for continuous removal of the stabilized gel beads from the bottom of the column.

  18. Apparatus for the production of gel beads containing a biocatalyst

    DOEpatents

    Scott, C.D.; Scott, T.C.; Davison, B.H.

    1998-03-19

    An apparatus is described for the large-scale and continuous production of gel beads containing a biocatalyst. The apparatus is a columnar system based on the chemical cross-linking of hydrocolloidal gels that contain and immobilize a biocatalyst, the biocatalyst being a microorganism or an enzyme. Hydrocolloidal gels, such as alginate, carrageenan, and a mixture of bone gelatin and modified alginate, provide immobilization matrices that can be used to entrap and retain the biocatalyst while allowing effective contact with substrates and release of products. Such immobilized biocatalysts are generally formulated into small spheres or beads that have high concentrations of the biocatalyst within the gel matrix. The columnar system includes a gel dispersion nozzle submerged in a heated non-interacting liquid, typically an organic liquid, that is immiscible with water to allow efficient formation of spherical gel droplets, the non-interacting liquid having a specific gravity that is less than water so that the gel droplets will fall through the liquid by the force of gravity. The heated non-interacting liquid is in direct contact with a chilled upflowing non-interacting liquid that will provide sufficient residence time for the gel droplets as they fall through the liquid so that they will be cooled below the gelling temperature and form solid spheres. The upflowing non-interacting liquid is in direct contact with an upflowing temperature-controlled aqueous solution containing the necessary chemicals for cross-linking or fixing of the gel beads to add the necessary stability. The flow rates of the two liquid streams can be varied to control the proper residence time in each liquid section to accommodate the production of gel beads of differing settling velocities. A valve is provided for continuous removal of the stabilized gel beads from the bottom of the column. 1 fig.

  19. Reduction of exogenous ketones depends upon NADPH generated photosynthetically in cells of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC 7942

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Effective utilization of photosynthetic microorganisms as potential biocatalysts is favorable for the production of useful biomaterials and the reduction of atmospheric CO2. For example, biocatalytic transformations are used in the synthesis of optically active alcohols. We previously found that ketone reduction in cells of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC 7942 is highly enantioselective and remarkably enhanced under light illumination. In this study, the mechanism of light-enhanced ketone reduction was investigated in detail using several inhibitors of photosynthetic electron transport and of enzymes of the Calvin cycle. It is demonstrated that light intensity and photosynthesis inhibitors significantly affect the ketone reduction activity in Synechococcus. This indicates that the reduction correlates well with photosynthetic activity. Moreover, ketone reduction in Synechococcus specifically depends upon NADPH and not NADH. These results also suggest that cyanobacteria have the potential to be utilized as biocatalytic systems for direct usage of light energy in various applications such as syntheses of useful compounds and remediation of environmental pollutants. PMID:21906270

  20. Mild electrophilic trifluoromethylthiolation of ketones with trifluoromethanesulfanamide.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Zhang, Xuxue; Liang, Fang; Cao, Song

    2015-07-01

    A straightforward and convenient approach for trifluoromethylthiolation of various acyclic and cyclic ketones with PhNHSCF3 is described. The reaction proceeds smoothly in the presence of acetyl chloride at room temperature and affords α-trifluoromethylthiolated ketones in fair to good yields. PMID:26030292

  1. Effects of increased mechanical work by isolated perfused rat heart during production or uptake of ketone bodies. Assessment of mitochondrial oxidized to reduced free nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide ratios and oxaloacetate concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Opie, L H; Owen, P

    1975-01-01

    Metabolic effects of increased mechanical work were studied by comparing isolated pumping rat hearts perfused by the atrial-filling technique with aortic-perfused non-pumping hearts perfused by the technique of Langendorff. The initial medium usually contained glucose (11 mm) and palmitate (0.6 mm bound to 0.1 mm albumin). During increased heart work (comparing pumping with non-pumping hearts) the uptake of oxygen and glucose increased threefold, but that of free fatty acids was unchanged. Tissue contents of alpha-oxoglutarate, NH4+, malate, lactate, pyruvate and Pi rose with increased heart work, but contents of ATP, phosphocreatine and citrate fell. Ketone bodies were produced with a ratio of beta-hydroxybutyrate/acetoacetate of about 3:1 in both pumping and non-pumping hearts but with higher net production rates in non-pumping hearts. When ketone bodies were added in relatively high concentrations (total 4 mm) to a glucose (11 mm) medium the medium, ratios of beta-hydroxybutyrate/acetoacetate were not steady even after 60 min of perfusion. The validity of calculating mitochondrial free NAD+/NADH ratios from the tissue contents of the reactants of the glutamate dehydrogenase system or the beta-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase system is assessed. The activities of these enzymes are considerably less in the rat heart than in the rat liver, introducing reservations into the application to the heart of the principles used by Williamson et al. (1967) for calculation of mitochondrial free NAD+/NADH ratios of liver mitochondria... PMID:173281

  2. Stabilization by multipoint covalent attachment of a biocatalyst with polygalacturonase activity used for juice clarification.

    PubMed

    Ramírez Tapias, Yuly A; Rivero, Cintia W; Gallego, Fernando López; Guisán, José M; Trelles, Jorge A

    2016-10-01

    Derivatized-agarose supports are suitable for enzyme immobilization by different methods, taking advantage of different physical, chemical and biological conditions of the protein and the support. In this study, agarose particles were modified with MANAE, PEI and glyoxyl groups and evaluated to stabilize polygalacturonase from Streptomyces halstedii ATCC 10897. A new immobilized biocatalyst was developed using glyoxyl-agarose as support; it exhibited high performance in degrading polygalacturonic acid and releasing oligogalacturonides. Maximal enzyme activity was detected at 5h of reaction using 0.05g/mL of immobilized biocatalyst, which released 3mg/mL of reducing sugars and allowed the highest product yield conversion and increased stability. These results are very favorable for pectin degradation with reusability up to 18 successive reactions (90h) and application in juice clarification. Plum (4.7°Bx) and grape (10.6°Bx) juices were successfully clarified, increasing reducing sugars content and markedly decreasing turbidity and viscosity. PMID:27132847

  3. Ketones block amyloid entry and improve cognition in an Alzheimer's model.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun Xiang; Maalouf, Marwan; Han, Pengcheng; Zhao, Minglei; Gao, Ming; Dharshaun, Turner; Ryan, Christopher; Whitelegge, Julian; Wu, Jie; Eisenberg, David; Reiman, Eric M; Schweizer, Felix E; Shi, Jiong

    2016-03-01

    Sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) is responsible for 60%-80% of dementia cases, and the most opportune time for preventive intervention is in the earliest stage of its preclinical phase. As traditional mitochondrial energy substrates, ketone bodies (ketones, for short), beta-hydroxybutyrate, and acetoacetate, have been reported to provide symptomatic improvement and disease-modifying activity in epilepsy and neurodegenerative disorders. Recently, ketones are thought as more than just metabolites and also as endogenous factors protecting against AD. In this study, we discovered a novel neuroprotective mechanism of ketones in which they blocked amyloid-β 42, a pathologic hallmark protein of AD, entry into neurons. The suppression of intracellular amyloid-β 42 accumulation rescued mitochondrial complex I activity, reduced oxidative stress, and improved synaptic plasticity. Most importantly, we show that peripheral administration of ketones significantly reduced amyloid burden and greatly improved learning and memory ability in a symptomatic mouse model of AD. These observations provide us insights to understand and to establish a novel therapeutic use of ketones in AD prevention. PMID:26923399

  4. Metabolic reprogramming induced by ketone bodies diminishes pancreatic cancer cachexia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Aberrant energy metabolism is a hallmark of cancer. To fulfill the increased energy requirements, tumor cells secrete cytokines/factors inducing muscle and fat degradation in cancer patients, a condition known as cancer cachexia. It accounts for nearly 20% of all cancer-related deaths. However, the mechanistic basis of cancer cachexia and therapies targeting cancer cachexia thus far remain elusive. A ketogenic diet, a high-fat and low-carbohydrate diet that elevates circulating levels of ketone bodies (i.e., acetoacetate, β-hydroxybutyrate, and acetone), serves as an alternative energy source. It has also been proposed that a ketogenic diet leads to systemic metabolic changes. Keeping in view the significant role of metabolic alterations in cancer, we hypothesized that a ketogenic diet may diminish glycolytic flux in tumor cells to alleviate cachexia syndrome and, hence, may provide an efficient therapeutic strategy. Results We observed reduced glycolytic flux in tumor cells upon treatment with ketone bodies. Ketone bodies also diminished glutamine uptake, overall ATP content, and survival in multiple pancreatic cancer cell lines, while inducing apoptosis. A decrease in levels of c-Myc, a metabolic master regulator, and its recruitment on glycolytic gene promoters, was in part responsible for the metabolic phenotype in tumor cells. Ketone body-induced intracellular metabolomic reprogramming in pancreatic cancer cells also leads to a significantly diminished cachexia in cell line models. Our mouse orthotopic xenograft models further confirmed the effect of a ketogenic diet in diminishing tumor growth and cachexia. Conclusions Thus, our studies demonstrate that the cachectic phenotype is in part due to metabolic alterations in tumor cells, which can be reverted by a ketogenic diet, causing reduced tumor growth and inhibition of muscle and body weight loss. PMID:25228990

  5. Prospecting for Novel Biocatalysts in a Soil Metagenome

    PubMed Central

    Voget, S.; Leggewie, C.; Uesbeck, A.; Raasch, C.; Jaeger, K.-E.; Streit, W. R.

    2003-01-01

    The metagenomes of complex microbial communities are rich sources of novel biocatalysts. We exploited the metagenome of a mixed microbial population for isolation of more than 15 different genes encoding novel biocatalysts by using a combined cultivation and direct cloning strategy. A 16S rRNA sequence analysis revealed the presence of hitherto uncultured microbes closely related to the genera Pseudomonas, Agrobacterium, Xanthomonas, Microbulbifer, and Janthinobacterium. Total genomic DNA from this bacterial community was used to construct cosmid DNA libraries, which were functionally searched for novel enzymes of biotechnological value. Our searches in combination with cosmid sequencing resulted in identification of four clones encoding 12 putative agarase genes, most of which were organized in clusters consisting of two or three genes. Interestingly, nine of these agarase genes probably originated from gene duplications. Furthermore, we identified by DNA sequencing several other biocatalyst-encoding genes, including genes encoding a putative stereoselective amidase (amiA), two cellulases (gnuB and uvs080), an α-amylase (amyA), a 1,4-α-glucan branching enzyme (amyB), and two pectate lyases (pelA and uvs119). Also, a conserved cluster of two lipase genes was identified, which was linked to genes encoding a type I secretion system. The novel gene aguB was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the enzyme activities were determined. Finally, we describe more than 162 kb of DNA sequence that provides a strong platform for further characterization of this microbial consortium. PMID:14532085

  6. Solvation of Esters and Ketones in Supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Kajiya, Daisuke; Imanishi, Masayoshi; Saitow, Ken-ichi

    2016-02-01

    Vibrational Raman spectra for the C═O stretching modes of three esters with different functional groups (methyl, a single phenyl, and two phenyl groups) were measured in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2). The results were compared with Raman spectra for three ketones involving the same functional groups, measured at the same thermodynamic states in scCO2. The peak frequencies of the Raman spectra of these six solute molecules were analyzed by decomposition into the attractive and repulsive energy components, based on the perturbed hard-sphere theory. For all solute molecules, the attractive energy is greater than the repulsive energy. In particular, a significant difference in the attractive energies of the ester-CO2 and ketone-CO2 systems was observed when the methyl group is attached to the ester or ketone. This difference was significantly reduced in the solute systems with a single phenyl group and was completely absent in those with two phenyl groups. The optimized structures among the solutes and CO2 molecules based on quantum chemical calculations indicate that greater attractive energy is obtained for a system where the oxygen atom of the ester is solvated by CO2 molecules. PMID:26741296

  7. Reductions of aldehydes and ketones with a readily available N-heterocyclic carbene borane and acetic acid

    PubMed Central

    Lamm, Vladimir; Pan, Xiangcheng

    2013-01-01

    Summary Acetic acid promotes the reduction of aldehydes and ketones by the readily available N-heterocyclic carbene borane, 1,3-dimethylimidazol-2-ylidene borane. Aldehydes are reduced over 1–24 h at room temperature with 1 equiv of acetic acid and 0.5 equiv of the NHC-borane. Ketone reductions are slower but can be accelerated by using 5 equiv of acetic acid. Aldehydes can be selectively reduced in the presence of ketones. On a small scale, products are isolated by evaporation of the reaction mixture and direct chromatography. PMID:23616812

  8. Microbial production of natural raspberry ketone.

    PubMed

    Beekwilder, Jules; van der Meer, Ingrid M; Sibbesen, Ole; Broekgaarden, Mans; Qvist, Ingmar; Mikkelsen, Joern D; Hall, Robert D

    2007-10-01

    Raspberry ketone is an important compound for the flavour industry. It is frequently used in products such as soft drinks, sweets, puddings and ice creams. The compound can be produced by organic synthesis. Demand for "natural" raspberry ketone is growing considerably. However, this product is extremely expensive. Consequently, there is a remaining desire to better understand how raspberry ketone is synthesized in vivo, and which genes and enzymes are involved. With this information we will then be in a better position to design alternative production strategies such as microbial fermentation. This article focuses on the identification and application of genes potentially linked to raspberry ketone synthesis. We have isolated candidate genes from both raspberry and other plants, and these have been introduced into bacterial and yeast expression systems. Conditions have been determined that result in significant levels of raspberry ketone, up to 5 mg/L. These results therefore lay a strong foundation for a potentially renewable source of "natural" flavour compounds making use of plant genes. PMID:17722151

  9. Stereoselective Formation of Fully Substituted Ketone Enolates.

    PubMed

    Haimov, Elvira; Nairoukh, Zackaria; Shterenberg, Alexander; Berkovitz, Tiran; Jamison, Timothy F; Marek, Ilan

    2016-04-25

    The application of stereochemically defined acyclic fully substituted enolates of ketones to the enantioselective synthesis of quaternary carbon stereocenters would be highly valuable. Herein, we describe an approach leading to the formation of several new stereogenic centers through a combined metalation-addition of a carbonyl-carbamoyl transfer to reveal in situ stereodefined α,α-disubstituted enolates of ketone as a single stereoisomer. This approach could produce a series of aldol and Mannich products from enol carbamate with excellent diastereomeric ratios. PMID:27027778

  10. Thermostable Enzymes as Biocatalysts in the Biofuel Industry

    PubMed Central

    Yeoman, Carl J.; Han, Yejun; Dodd, Dylan; Schroeder, Charles M.; Mackie, Roderick I.

    2015-01-01

    Lignocellulose is the most abundant carbohydrate source in nature and represents an ideal renewable energy source. Thermostable enzymes that hydrolyze lignocellulose to its component sugars have significant advantages for improving the conversion rate of biomass over their mesophilic counterparts. We review here the recent literature on the development and use of thermostable enzymes for the depolymerization of lignocellulosic feedstocks for biofuel production. Furthermore, we discuss the protein structure, mechanisms of thermostability, and specific strategies that can be used to improve the thermal stability of lignocellulosic biocatalysts. PMID:20359453

  11. Evaluation of α,β-Unsaturated Ketones as Antileishmanial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, Miguel A.; Iniguez, Eva; Das, Umashankar; Beverley, Stephen M.; Herrera, Linda J.; Dimmock, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we assessed the antileishmanial activity of 126 α,β-unsaturated ketones. The compounds NC901, NC884, and NC2459 showed high leishmanicidal activity for both the extracellular (50% effective concentration [EC50], 456 nM, 1,122 nM, and 20 nM, respectively) and intracellular (EC50, 1,870 nM, 937 nM, and 625 nM, respectively) forms of Leishmania major propagated in macrophages, with little or no toxicity to mammalian cells. Bioluminescent imaging of parasite replication showed that all three compounds reduced the parasite burden in the murine model, with no apparent toxicity. PMID:25801571

  12. Batch conversion of methane to methanol using Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b as biocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In Yeub; Hur, Dong Hoon; Lee, Jae Hoon; Park, Chang-Ho; Chang, In Seop; Lee, Jin Won; Lee, Eun Yeol

    2015-03-01

    Recently, methane has attracted much attention as an alternative carbon feedstock since it is the major component of abundant shale and natural gas. In this work, we produced methanol from methane using whole cells of Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b as the biocatalyst. M. trichosporium OB3b was cultured on NMS medium with a supply of 7:3 air/methane ratio at 30°C. The optimal concentrations of various methanol dehydrogenase inhibitors such as potassium phosphate and EDTA were determined to be 100 and 0.5 mM, respectively, for an efficient production of methanol. Sodium formate (40 mM) as a reducing power source was added to enhance the conversion efficiency. A productivity of 49.0 mg/l·h, titer of 0.393 g methanol/l, and conversion of 73.8% (mol methanol/mol methane) were obtained under the optimized batch condition. PMID:25563419

  13. A model to assess the feasibility of shifting reaction equilibrium by acetone removal in the transamination of ketones using 2-propylamine.

    PubMed

    Tufvesson, Pär; Bach, Christian; Woodley, John M

    2014-02-01

    Acetone removal by evaporation has been proposed as a simple and cheap way to shift the equilibrium in the biocatalytic asymmetric synthesis of optically pure chiral amines, when 2-propylamine is used as the amine donor. However, dependent on the system properties, this may or may not be a suitable strategy. To avoid excessive laboratory work a model was used to assess the process feasibility. The results from the current study show that a simple model of the acetone removal dependence on temperature and sparging gas flowrate can be developed and fits the experimental data well. The model for acetone removal was then coupled to a simple model for biocatalyst kinetics and also for loss of substrate ketone by evaporation. The three models were used to simulate the effects of varying the critical process parameters and reaction equilibrium constants (K eq) as well as different substrate ketone volatilities (Henry's constant). The simulations were used to estimate the substrate losses and also the maximum yield that could be expected. The approach was seen to give a clear indication for which target amines the acetone evaporation strategy would be feasible and for which amines it would not. The study also shows the value of a modeling approach in conceptual process design prior to entering a biocatalyst screening or engineering program to assess the feasibility of a particular process strategy for a given target product. PMID:23904347

  14. The Conversion of Carboxylic Acids to Ketones: A Repeated Discovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, John W.; Wilson, Alan D.

    2004-01-01

    The conversion of carboxylic acids to ketones is a useful chemical transformation with a long history. Several chemists have claimed that they discovered the conversion of carboxylic acids to ketones yet in fact the reaction is actually known for centuries.

  15. Recent Developments in Chemical Synthesis with Biocatalysts in Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Potdar, Mahesh K; Kelso, Geoffrey F; Schwarz, Lachlan; Zhang, Chunfang; Hearn, Milton T W

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, a variety of ionic liquids have emerged as greener solvents for use in the chemical manufacturing industries. Their unique properties have attracted the interest of chemists worldwide to employ them as replacement for conventional solvents in a diverse range of chemical transformations including biotransformations. Biocatalysts are often regarded as green catalysts compared to conventional chemical catalysts in organic synthesis owing to their properties of low toxicity, biodegradability, excellent selectivity and good catalytic performance under mild reaction conditions. Similarly, a selected number of specific ionic liquids can be considered as greener solvents superior to organic solvents owing to their negligible vapor pressure, low flammability, low toxicity and ability to dissolve a wide range of organic and biological substances, including proteins. A combination of biocatalysts and ionic liquids thus appears to be a logical and promising opportunity for industrial use as an alternative to conventional organic chemistry processes employing organic solvents. This article provides an overview of recent developments in this field with special emphasis on the application of more sustainable enzyme-catalyzed reactions and separation processes employing ionic liquids, driven by advances in fundamental knowledge, process optimization and industrial deployment. PMID:26389873

  16. Engineering Cytochrome P450 Biocatalysts for Biotechnology, Medicine, and Bioremediation

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Santosh

    2009-01-01

    Importance of the field: Cytochrome P450 enzymes comprise a superfamily of heme monooxygenases that are of considerable interest for the: 1) synthesis of novel drugs and drug metabolites, 2) targeted cancer gene therapy, 3) biosensor design, and 4) bioremediation. However, their applications are limited because cytochrome P450, especially mammalian P450 enzymes, show a low turnover rate and stability, and require a complex source of electrons through cytochrome P450 reductase and NADPH. Areas covered in this review: In this review, we discuss the recent progress towards the use of P450 enzymes in a variety of above-mentioned applications. We also present alternate and cost-effective ways to perform P450-mediated reaction, especially using peroxides. Furthermore, we expand upon the current progress in P450 engineering approaches describing several recent examples that are utilized to enhance heterologous expression, stability, catalytic efficiency, and utilization of alternate oxidants. What the reader will gain: The review will provide a comprehensive knowledge in the design of P450 biocatalysts for potentially practical purposes. Finally, we provide a prospective on the future aspects of P450 engineering and its applications in biotechnology, medicine, and bioremediation. Take home message: Because of its wide applications, academic and pharmaceutical researchers, environmental scientists, and health care providers are expected to gain current knowledge and future prospects of the practical use of P450 biocatalysts. PMID:20064075

  17. 40 CFR 721.4925 - Methyl n-butyl ketone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Methyl n-butyl ketone. 721.4925... Substances § 721.4925 Methyl n-butyl ketone. (a) Chemical substance and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance methyl n-butyl ketone, CAS Number 591-78-6, is subject to...

  18. 40 CFR 721.4925 - Methyl n-butyl ketone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methyl n-butyl ketone. 721.4925... Substances § 721.4925 Methyl n-butyl ketone. (a) Chemical substance and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance methyl n-butyl ketone, CAS Number 591-78-6, is subject to...

  19. 40 CFR 721.4925 - Methyl n-butyl ketone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Methyl n-butyl ketone. 721.4925... Substances § 721.4925 Methyl n-butyl ketone. (a) Chemical substance and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance methyl n-butyl ketone, CAS Number 591-78-6, is subject to...

  20. 40 CFR 721.4925 - Methyl n-butyl ketone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Methyl n-butyl ketone. 721.4925... Substances § 721.4925 Methyl n-butyl ketone. (a) Chemical substance and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance methyl n-butyl ketone, CAS Number 591-78-6, is subject to...

  1. Nickel catalyzed α-arylation of ketones with aryltrimethylammonium triflates.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Wang, Zhong-Xia

    2016-08-21

    Nickel-catalyzed α-arylation of ketones involving aromatic C-N cleavage has been accomplished. Intermolecular coupling of aromatic ketones with a variety of aryltrimethylammonium triflates was achieved in the presence of Ni(COD)2, IPr·HCl, and LiOBu(t), giving α-arylated ketones in reasonable to excellent yields. PMID:27443786

  2. Vapor pressures and gas-film coefficients for ketones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.; Tai, D.Y.

    1987-01-01

    Comparison of handbook vapor pressures for seven ketones with more recent literature data showed large differences for four of the ketones. Gas-film coefficients for the volatilization of these ketones from water determined by two different methods were in reasonable agreement. ?? 1987.

  3. Relaxation behavior in model compounds of poly(aryl-ether-ketone-ketone) as revealed by dielectric spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezquerra, T. A.; Zolotukhin, M.; Privalko, V. P.; Baltá-Calleja, F. J.; Nequlqueo, G.; García, C.; de la Campa, J. G.; de Abajo, J.

    1999-05-01

    The relaxation behavior of a series of ether-ketone oligomers, considered as model compounds of poly(ether-ketone-ketone), was studied by means of dielectric spectroscopy. The dynamics of the α relaxation of ether-ketone model compounds as compared with that of poly(arylether-ketone-ketone) (PEKK) (50/50), shows up differences which can be attributed to the variation of inter- and intramolecular correlations with the chain length. Model compounds exhibit a nearly similar degree of cooperativity regardless the differences in Tg values. The PEKK (50/50) polymer exhibits stronger cooperativity than the oligomers suggesting that in poly(ether-ketone-ketone)s molecular motions above Tg extend to more than one monomeric unit.

  4. Activation of Acetone and Other Simple Ketones in Anaerobic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Heider, Johann; Schühle, Karola; Frey, Jasmin; Schink, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Acetone and other ketones are activated for subsequent degradation through carboxylation by many nitrate-reducing, phototrophic, and obligately aerobic bacteria. Acetone carboxylation leads to acetoacetate, which is subsequently activated to a thioester and degraded via thiolysis. Two different types of acetone carboxylases have been described, which require either 2 or 4 ATP equivalents as an energy supply for the carboxylation reaction. Both enzymes appear to combine acetone enolphosphate with carbonic phosphate to form acetoacetate. A similar but more complex enzyme is known to carboxylate the aromatic ketone acetophenone, a metabolic intermediate in anaerobic ethylbenzene metabolism in denitrifying bacteria, with simultaneous hydrolysis of 2 ATP to 2 ADP. Obligately anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria activate acetone to a four-carbon compound as well, but via a different process than bicarbonate- or CO2-dependent carboxylation. The present evidence indicates that either carbon monoxide or a formyl residue is used as a cosubstrate, and that the overall ATP expenditure of this pathway is substantially lower than in the known acetone carboxylase reactions. PMID:26958851

  5. Ketone-body utilization by homogenates of adult rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes-Cardozo, M.; Klein, W.

    1982-06-01

    The regulation of ketone-body metabolism and the quantitative importance of ketone bodies as lipid precursors in adult rat brain has been studied in vitro. Utilization of ketone bodies and of pyruvate by homogenates of adult rat brain was measured and the distribution of /sup 14/C from (3-/sup 14/C)ketone bodies among the metabolic products was analysed. The rate of ketone-body utilization was maximal in the presence of added Krebs-cycle intermediates and uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation. The consumption of acetoacetate was faster than that of D-3-hydroxybutyrate, whereas, pyruvate produced twice as much acetyl-CoA as acetoacetate under optimal conditions. Millimolar concentrations of ATP in the presence of uncoupler lowered the consumption of ketone bodies but not of pyruvate. Indirect evidence is presented suggesting that ATP interferes specifically with the mitochondrial uptake of ketone bodies. Interconversion of ketone bodies and the accumulation of acid-soluble intermediates (mainly citrate and glutamate) accounted for the major part of ketone-body utilization, whereas only a small part was oxidized to CO/sub 2/. Ketone bodies were not incorporated into lipids or protein. We conclude that adult rat-brain homogenates use ketone bodies exclusively for oxidative purposes.

  6. Extremely efficient hydroboration of ketones and aldehydes by copper carbene catalysis.

    PubMed

    Bagherzadeh, Sharareh; Mankad, Neal P

    2016-03-01

    A readily available copper carbene complex, (IPr)CuOtBu, catalyses the hydroboration of ketones and aldehydes even at very low catalyst loadings (0.1 mol%), in some cases with turnover frequencies exceeding 6000 h(-1). Carbonyl reduction occurs selectivitily in the presence of other reducible functional groups including alkenes, nitriles, esters, and alkyl chlorides. PMID:26871503

  7. [Effect of phenolic ketones on ethanol fermentation and cellular lipid composition of Pichia stipitis].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinlong; Cheng, Yichao; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Junjun; Chen, Tingting; Xu, Yong; Yong, Qiang; Yu, Shiyuan

    2016-02-01

    Lignin degradation products are toxic to microorganisms, which is one of the bottlenecks for fuel ethanol production. We studied the effects of phenolic ketones (4-hydroxyacetophenone, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-acetophenone and 4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxy-acetophenone) derived from lignin degradation on ethanol fermentation of xylose and cellular lipid composition of Pichia stipitis NLP31. Ethanol and the cellular fatty acid of yeast were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Results indicate that phenolic ketones negatively affected ethanol fermentation of yeast and the lower molecular weight phenolic ketone compound was more toxic. When the concentration of 4-hydroxyacetophenone was 1.5 g/L, at fermentation of 24 h, the xylose utilization ratio, ethanol yield and ethanol concentration decreased by 42.47%, 5.30% and 9.76 g/L, respectively, compared to the control. When phenolic ketones were in the medium, the ratio of unsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acids (UFA/SFA) of yeast cells was improved. When 1.5 g/L of three aforementioned phenolic ketones was added to the fermentation medium, the UFA/SFA ratio of yeast cells increased to 3.03, 3.06 and 3.61, respectively, compared to 2.58 of the control, which increased cell membrane fluidity and instability. Therefore, phenolic ketones can reduce the yeast growth, increase the UFA/SFA ratio of yeast and lower ethanol productivity. Effectively reduce or remove the content of lignin degradation products is the key to improve lignocellulose biorefinery. PMID:27382768

  8. A multipurpose immobilized biocatalyst with pectinase, xylanase and cellulase activities

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Sohel; Sharma, Aparna; Gupta, Munishwar Nath

    2007-01-01

    Background The use of immobilized enzymes for catalyzing various biotransformations is now a widely used approach. In recent years, cross-linked enzyme aggregates (CLEAs) have emerged as a novel and versatile biocatalyst design. The present work deals with the preparation of a CLEA from a commercial preparation, Pectinex™ Ultra SP-L, which contains pectinase, xylanase and cellulase activities. The CLEA obtained could be used for any of the enzyme activities. The CLEA was characterized in terms of kinetic parameters, thermal stability and reusability in the context of all the three enzyme activities. Results Complete precipitation of the three enzyme activities was obtained with n-propanol. When resulting precipitates were subjected to cross-linking with 5 mM glutaraldehyde, the three activities initially present (pectinase, xylanase and cellulase) were completely retained after cross-linking. The Vmax/Km values were increased from 11, 75 and 16 to 14, 80 and 19 in case of pectinase, xylanase and cellulase activities respectively. The thermal stability was studied at 50°C, 60°C and 70°C for pectinase, xylanase and cellulase respectively. Half-lives were improved from 17, 22 and 32 minutes to 180, 82 and 91 minutes for pectinase, xylanase and cellulase respectively. All three of the enzymes in CLEA could be reused three times without any loss of activity. Conclusion A single multipurpose biocatalyst has been designed which can be used for carrying out three different and independent reactions; 1) hydrolysis of pectin, 2) hydrolysis of xylan and 3) hydrolysis of cellulose. The preparation is more stable at higher temperatures as compared to the free enzymes. PMID:17880745

  9. Exploring the Mechanism of Biocatalyst Inhibition in Microbial Desulfurization

    PubMed Central

    Abin-Fuentes, Andres; Mohamed, Magdy El-Said; Wang, Daniel I. C.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial desulfurization, or biodesulfurization (BDS), of fuels is a promising technology because it can desulfurize compounds that are recalcitrant to the current standard technology in the oil industry. One of the obstacles to the commercialization of BDS is the reduction in biocatalyst activity concomitant with the accumulation of the end product, 2-hydroxybiphenyl (HBP), during the process. BDS experiments were performed by incubating Rhodococcus erythropolis IGTS8 resting-cell suspensions with hexadecane at 0.50 (vol/vol) containing 10 mM dibenzothiophene. The resin Dowex Optipore SD-2 was added to the BDS experiments at resin concentrations of 0, 10, or 50 g resin/liter total volume. The HBP concentration within the cytoplasm was estimated to decrease from 1,100 to 260 μM with increasing resin concentration. Despite this finding, productivity did not increase with the resin concentration. This led us to focus on the susceptibility of the desulfurization enzymes toward HBP. Dose-response experiments were performed to identify major inhibitory interactions in the most common BDS pathway, the 4S pathway. HBP was responsible for three of the four major inhibitory interactions identified. The concentrations of HBP that led to a 50% reduction in the enzymes' activities (IC50s) for DszA, DszB, and DszC were measured to be 60 ± 5 μM, 110 ± 10 μM, and 50 ± 5 μM, respectively. The fact that the IC50s for HBP are all significantly lower than the cytoplasmic HBP concentration suggests that the inhibition of the desulfurization enzymes by HBP is responsible for the observed reduction in biocatalyst activity concomitant with HBP generation. PMID:24096431

  10. Exploring the mechanism of biocatalyst inhibition in microbial desulfurization.

    PubMed

    Abin-Fuentes, Andres; Mohamed, Magdy El-Said; Wang, Daniel I C; Prather, Kristala L J

    2013-12-01

    Microbial desulfurization, or biodesulfurization (BDS), of fuels is a promising technology because it can desulfurize compounds that are recalcitrant to the current standard technology in the oil industry. One of the obstacles to the commercialization of BDS is the reduction in biocatalyst activity concomitant with the accumulation of the end product, 2-hydroxybiphenyl (HBP), during the process. BDS experiments were performed by incubating Rhodococcus erythropolis IGTS8 resting-cell suspensions with hexadecane at 0.50 (vol/vol) containing 10 mM dibenzothiophene. The resin Dowex Optipore SD-2 was added to the BDS experiments at resin concentrations of 0, 10, or 50 g resin/liter total volume. The HBP concentration within the cytoplasm was estimated to decrease from 1,100 to 260 μM with increasing resin concentration. Despite this finding, productivity did not increase with the resin concentration. This led us to focus on the susceptibility of the desulfurization enzymes toward HBP. Dose-response experiments were performed to identify major inhibitory interactions in the most common BDS pathway, the 4S pathway. HBP was responsible for three of the four major inhibitory interactions identified. The concentrations of HBP that led to a 50% reduction in the enzymes' activities (IC50s) for DszA, DszB, and DszC were measured to be 60 ± 5 μM, 110 ± 10 μM, and 50 ± 5 μM, respectively. The fact that the IC50s for HBP are all significantly lower than the cytoplasmic HBP concentration suggests that the inhibition of the desulfurization enzymes by HBP is responsible for the observed reduction in biocatalyst activity concomitant with HBP generation. PMID:24096431

  11. Synthesis and characterization of poly(ether ketone)s containing phosphorus and fluorine

    SciTech Connect

    Youngman, P.W.; Fitch, J.W.; Cassidy, P.E. |

    1996-10-01

    Because of the excellent properties exhibited by fluorinated poly(ether ketone)s, modifications were sought to further improve this polymer toward atomic oxygen resistance. For this purpose a phosphorous-containing monomer [bis(4-fluorophenyl)phenyl phosphine oxide] was synthesized and incorporated into a poly(ether ketone) backbone by reaction with 2,2-bis[4-(4-fluorobenzoyl)phenyl]hexafluoropropane in varying proportions with bisphenol AF to produce polymers with different amounts of the phosphine oxide repeating unit in the backbone. Colorless, film-forming materials were produced with a slight increase in Tg due to the phosphine oxide function. The incorporation of this moiety also resulted in a very small increase in the dielectric constant and an improved resistance to atomic oxygen ablation.

  12. Role of VMH ketone bodies in adjusting caloric intake to increased dietary fat content in DIO and DR rats.

    PubMed

    Le Foll, Christelle; Dunn-Meynell, Ambrose A; Miziorko, Henry M; Levin, Barry E

    2015-05-15

    The objective of this study was to determine the potential role of astrocyte-derived ketone bodies in regulating the early changes in caloric intake of diet induced-obese (DIO) versus diet-resistant (DR) rats fed a 31.5% fat high-energy (HE) diet. After 3 days on chow or HE diet, DR and DIO rats were assessed for their ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH) ketone bodies levels and neuronal ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMN) sensing using microdialysis coupled to continuous food intake monitoring and calcium imaging in dissociated neurons, respectively. DIO rats ate more than DR rats over 3 days of HE diet intake. On day 3 of HE diet intake, DR rats reduced their caloric intake while DIO rats remained hyperphagic. Local VMH astrocyte ketone bodies production was similar between DR and DIO rats during the first 6 h after dark onset feeding but inhibiting VMH ketone body production in DR rats on day 3 transiently returned their intake of HE diet to the level of DIO rats consuming HE diet. In addition, dissociated VMN neurons from DIO and DR rats were equally sensitive to the largely excitatory effects of β-hydroxybutyrate. Thus while DR rats respond to increased VMH ketone levels by decreasing their intake after 3 days of HE diet, this is not the case of DIO rats. These data suggest that DIO inherent leptin resistance prevents ketone bodies inhibitory action on food intake. PMID:25786485

  13. Iron-, Cobalt-, and Nickel-Catalyzed Asymmetric Transfer Hydrogenation and Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Ketones.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Yun; Yu, Shen-Luan; Shen, Wei-Yi; Gao, Jing-Xing

    2015-09-15

    exhibited extraordinary enantioselectivities when combined with iron(0) cluster Fe3(CO)12. A broad scope of ketones including aromatic, heteroaromatic, and β-ketoesters can be reduced smoothly with excellent enantioselectivities (up to 99% ee) approaching or exceeding those achievable with the noble metal catalysts. Notably, the chiral iron-based catalyst proved to be highly efficient for both ATH as well as AH of various ketones. Until now, such "universal" catalyst is very rare. Preliminary studies suggest that the AH reaction most likely involved iron particles as the active catalytic species. These research results point to a new direction in developing viable effective nonprecious metal catalysts for asymmetric reduction and probably for other asymmetric catalytic reactions as well. PMID:26301426

  14. Industrial Acetogenic Biocatalysts: A Comparative Metabolic and Genomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bengelsdorf, Frank R.; Poehlein, Anja; Linder, Sonja; Erz, Catarina; Hummel, Tim; Hoffmeister, Sabrina; Daniel, Rolf; Dürre, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Synthesis gas (syngas) fermentation by anaerobic acetogenic bacteria employing the Wood–Ljungdahl pathway is a bioprocess for production of biofuels and biocommodities. The major fermentation products of the most relevant biocatalytic strains (Clostridium ljungdahlii, C. autoethanogenum, C. ragsdalei, and C. coskatii) are acetic acid and ethanol. A comparative metabolic and genomic analysis using the mentioned biocatalysts might offer targets for metabolic engineering and thus improve the production of compounds apart from ethanol. Autotrophic growth and product formation of the four wild type (WT) strains were compared in uncontrolled batch experiments. The genomes of C. ragsdalei and C. coskatii were sequenced and the genome sequences of all four biocatalytic strains analyzed in comparative manner. Growth and product spectra (acetate, ethanol, 2,3-butanediol) of C. autoethanogenum, C. ljungdahlii, and C. ragsdalei were rather similar. In contrast, C. coskatii produced significantly less ethanol and its genome sequence lacks two genes encoding aldehyde:ferredoxin oxidoreductases (AOR). Comparative genome sequence analysis of the four WT strains revealed high average nucleotide identity (ANI) of C. ljungdahlii and C. autoethanogenum (99.3%) and C. coskatii (98.3%). In contrast, C. ljungdahlii WT and C. ragsdalei WT showed an ANI-based similarity of only 95.8%. Additionally, recombinant C. ljungdahlii strains were constructed that harbor an artificial acetone synthesis operon (ASO) consisting of the following genes: adc, ctfA, ctfB, and thlA (encoding acetoacetate decarboxylase, acetoacetyl-CoA:acetate/butyrate:CoA-transferase subunits A and B, and thiolase) under the control of thlA promoter (PthlA) from C. acetobutylicum or native pta-ack promoter (Ppta-ack) from C. ljungdahlii. Respective recombinant strains produced 2-propanol rather than acetone, due to the presence of a NADPH-dependent primary-secondary alcohol dehydrogenase that converts acetone to 2

  15. Industrial Acetogenic Biocatalysts: A Comparative Metabolic and Genomic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bengelsdorf, Frank R; Poehlein, Anja; Linder, Sonja; Erz, Catarina; Hummel, Tim; Hoffmeister, Sabrina; Daniel, Rolf; Dürre, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Synthesis gas (syngas) fermentation by anaerobic acetogenic bacteria employing the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway is a bioprocess for production of biofuels and biocommodities. The major fermentation products of the most relevant biocatalytic strains (Clostridium ljungdahlii, C. autoethanogenum, C. ragsdalei, and C. coskatii) are acetic acid and ethanol. A comparative metabolic and genomic analysis using the mentioned biocatalysts might offer targets for metabolic engineering and thus improve the production of compounds apart from ethanol. Autotrophic growth and product formation of the four wild type (WT) strains were compared in uncontrolled batch experiments. The genomes of C. ragsdalei and C. coskatii were sequenced and the genome sequences of all four biocatalytic strains analyzed in comparative manner. Growth and product spectra (acetate, ethanol, 2,3-butanediol) of C. autoethanogenum, C. ljungdahlii, and C. ragsdalei were rather similar. In contrast, C. coskatii produced significantly less ethanol and its genome sequence lacks two genes encoding aldehyde:ferredoxin oxidoreductases (AOR). Comparative genome sequence analysis of the four WT strains revealed high average nucleotide identity (ANI) of C. ljungdahlii and C. autoethanogenum (99.3%) and C. coskatii (98.3%). In contrast, C. ljungdahlii WT and C. ragsdalei WT showed an ANI-based similarity of only 95.8%. Additionally, recombinant C. ljungdahlii strains were constructed that harbor an artificial acetone synthesis operon (ASO) consisting of the following genes: adc, ctfA, ctfB, and thlA (encoding acetoacetate decarboxylase, acetoacetyl-CoA:acetate/butyrate:CoA-transferase subunits A and B, and thiolase) under the control of thlA promoter (P thlA ) from C. acetobutylicum or native pta-ack promoter (P pta-ack ) from C. ljungdahlii. Respective recombinant strains produced 2-propanol rather than acetone, due to the presence of a NADPH-dependent primary-secondary alcohol dehydrogenase that converts acetone to 2

  16. [Stability of whole cell biocatalyst for biodiesel production from renewable oils].

    PubMed

    Sun, Ting; Du, Wei; Liu, Dehua; Li, Wei; Zeng, Jing; Dai, Lingmei

    2009-09-01

    Lipase-mediated biodiesel production becomes increasingly important because of mild reaction conditions, pollution free during the process and easy product separation. Compared with traditional immobilized lipase, whole cell biocatalyst is promising for biodiesel production because it is easy to prepare and has higher enzyme activity recovery. Rhizopus oryzae IFO4697 can be used as the catalyst for biodiesel production. To further study the stability of the whole cell biocatalyst is extremely important for its further application on large scale. This paper focuses on the stability study of Rhizopus oryzae IFO4697 when used for the methanolysis of renewable oils for biodiesel production. The results showed that water content was important for achieving high catalytic activity and good stability of the biocatalyst. The optimum water content was found to be 5%-15%. Both particle size and desiccation methods showed no obvious effect on the stability of the biocatalyst. With GA cross-linking pretreatment, the stability of the biocatalyst could be improved significantly. When Rhizopus oryzae IFO4697 repeatedly used for next batch reaction, direct vacuum filtration was found to be a good way for the maintenance of good stability of the biocatalyst. Under the optimum reaction conditions, the methyl ester yield could keep over 80% during 20 repeated reaction batches. PMID:19938482

  17. Starch Biocatalyst Based on α-Amylase-Mg/Al-Layered Double Hydroxide Nanohybrids.

    PubMed

    Bruna, Felipe; Pereira, Marita G; Polizeli, Maria de Lourdes T M; Valim, João B

    2015-08-26

    The design of new biocatalysts through the immobilization of enzymes, improving their stability and reuse, plays a major role in the development of sustainable methodologies toward the so-called green chemistry. In this work, α-amylase (AAM) biocatalyst based on Mg3Al-layered double-hydroxide (LDH) matrix was successfully developed with the adsorption method. The adsorption process was studied and optimized as a function of time and enzyme concentration. The biocatalyst was characterized, and the mechanism of interaction between AAM and LDH, as well as the immobilization effects on the catalytic activity, was elucidated. The adsorption process was fast and irreversible, thus yielding a stable biohybrid material. The immobilized AAM partially retained its enzymatic activity, and the biocatalyst rapidly hydrolyzed starch in an aqueous solution with enhanced efficiency at intermediate loading values of ca. 50 mg/g of AAM/LDH. Multiple attachments through electrostatic interactions affected the conformation of the immobilized enzyme on the LDH surface. The biocatalyst was successfully stored in its dry form, retaining 100% of its catalytic activity. The results reveal the potential usefulness of a LDH compound as a support of α-amylase for the hydrolysis of starch that may be applied in industrial and pharmaceutical processes as a simple, environmentally friendly, and low-cost biocatalyst. PMID:26259168

  18. Characterization of biocatalysts prepared with Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase and different silica precursors, dried using aerogel and xerogel techniques.

    PubMed

    Barão, Carlos Eduardo; Daniel de Paris, Leandro; Dantas, João Henrique; Pereira, Matheus Mendonça; Filho, Lucio Cardozo; Ferreira de Castro, Heizir; Zanin, Gisella Maria; Faria de Moraes, Flavio; Faria Soares, Cleide Mara

    2014-01-01

    The use of lipases in industrial processes can result in products with high levels of purity and at the same time reduce pollutant generation and improve both selectivity and yields. In this work, lipase from Thermomyces lanuginosus was immobilized using two different techniques. The first involves the hydrolysis/polycondensation of a silica precursor (tetramethoxysilane (TMOS)) at neutral pH and ambient temperature, and the second one uses tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) as the silica precursor, involving the hydrolysis and polycondensation of the alkoxide in appropriate solvents. After immobilization, the enzymatic preparations were dried using the aerogel and xerogel techniques and then characterized in terms of their hydrolytic activities using a titrimetric method with olive oil and by the formation of 2-phenylethyl acetate in a transesterification reaction. The morphological properties of the materials were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, measurements of the surface area and pore size and volume, thermogravimetric analysis, and exploratory differential calorimetry. The results of the work indicate that the use of different silica precursors (TEOS or TMOS) and different drying techniques (aerogel or xerogel) can significantly affect the properties of the resulting biocatalyst. Drying with supercritical CO2 provided higher enzymatic activities and pore sizes and was therefore preferable to drying, using the xerogel technique. Thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry analyses revealed differences in behavior between the two biocatalyst preparations due to the compounds present. PMID:24078188

  19. Reversible covalent immobilization of Trametes villosa laccase onto thiolsulfinate-agarose: An insoluble biocatalyst with potential for decoloring recalcitrant dyes.

    PubMed

    Gioia, Larissa; Rodríguez-Couto, Susana; Menéndez, María Del Pilar; Manta, Carmen; Ovsejevi, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The development of a solid-phase biocatalyst based on the reversible covalent immobilization of laccase onto thiol-reactive supports (thiolsulfinate-agarose [TSI-agarose]) was performed. To achieve this goal, laccase-producing strains isolated from Eucalyptus globulus were screened and white rot fungus Trametes villosa was selected as the best strain for enzyme production. Reduction of disulfide bonds and introduction of "de novo" thiol groups in partially purified laccase were assessed to perform its reversible covalent immobilization onto thiol-reactive supports (TSI-agarose). Only the thiolation process dramatically improved the immobilization yield, from 0% for the native and reduced enzyme to 60% for the thiolated enzyme. Mild conditions for the immobilization process (pH 7.5 and 4°C) allowed the achievement of nearly 100% of coupling efficiency when low loads were applied. The kinetic parameters, pH, and thermal stabilities for the immobilized biocatalyst were similar to those for the native enzyme. After the first use and three consecutives reuses, the insoluble derivative kept more than 80% of its initial capacity for decolorizing Remazol Brilliant Blue R, showing its suitability for color removal from textile industrial effluents. The possibility of reusing the support was demonstrated by the reversibility of enzyme-support binding. PMID:25196324

  20. Intercalation of cyclic ketones into vanadyl phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Zima, Vitezslav . E-mail: vitezslav.zima@upce.cz; Melanova, Klara; Benes, Ludvik; Trchova, Miroslava; Dybal, Jiri

    2005-01-15

    Intercalation compounds of vanadyl phosphate with cyclic ketones (cyclopentanone, cyclohexanone, 4-methylcyclohexanone, and 1,4-cyclohexanedione) were prepared from corresponding propanol or ethanol intercalates by a molecular exchange. The intercalates prepared were characterized using powder X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis. The intercalates are stable in dry environment and decompose slowly in humid air. Infrared and Raman spectra indicate that carbonyl oxygens of the guest molecules are coordinated to the vanadium atoms of the host layers. The local structure and interactions in the cyclopentanone intercalate have been suggested on the basis of quantum chemical calculations.

  1. Bubble-free oxygenation of a bi-enzymatic system: effect on biocatalyst stability.

    PubMed

    Van Hecke, Wouter; Ludwig, Roland; Dewulf, Jo; Auly, Markus; Messiaen, Tom; Haltrich, Dietmar; Van Langenhove, Herman

    2009-01-01

    The effect of bubble-free oxygenation on the stability of a bi-enzymatic system with redox mediator regeneration for the conversion of lactose to lactobionic acid was investigated in a miniaturized reactor with bubbleless oxygenation. Earlier investigations of this biocatalytic oxidation have shown that the dispersive addition of oxygen can cause significant enzyme inactivation. In the process studied, the enzyme cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) oxidizes lactose at the C-1 position of the reducing sugar moiety to lactobionolactone, which spontaneously hydrolyzes to lactobionic acid. 2,2'-Azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt was used as electron acceptor for CDH and was continuously regenerated (reoxidized) by laccase, a blue multi-copper oxidase. Oxygen served as the terminal electron acceptor of the reaction and was fully reduced to water by laccase. The overall mass transfer coefficient of the miniaturized reactor was determined at 30 and 45 degrees C; conversions were conducted both in the reaction-limited and diffusion-limited regime to study catalyst inactivation. The bubbleless oxygenation was successful in avoiding gas/liquid interface inactivation. It was also shown that the oxidized redox mediator plays a key role in the inactivation mechanism of the biocatalysts unobserved during previous studies. PMID:18698649

  2. [Biocatalyst of redox mediators on the denitrification by Paracoccus versutus strain GW1].

    PubMed

    Li, Hai-Bo; Lian, Jing; Guo, Yan-Kai; Zhao, Li-Jun; Du, Hai-Feng; Yang, Jing-Liang; Guo, Jian-Bo

    2012-07-01

    The quinone respiration process of Paracoccus versutus strain GW1 was characterized and the effects of the four redox mediators on the denitrification process were studied. The experiment results suggested that quinones were utilized by Paracoccus versutus strain GW1 as electron acceptors in the respiratory chain and reduced to hydroquinone. Batch experiments were carried out to investigate the biocatalyst effect of redox mediators as catalyst on the denitrification process at 35 degrees C. All four redox mediators tested were able to enhance the nitrate removal efficiency and the denitrification efficiency by 1.14-1.63 fold and 1.12-2.02 fold, respectively. The accelerating effect from high to low was AQDS > 1,5-AQDS > AQS > alpha-AQS. In the presence of redox mediators, the stabilized ORP values in the nitrate decomposition process were reduced by 33-75 mV. The pH variations in denitrification with redox mediators showed similar tendency to that of the conventional nitrate removal process. In the concentration range of 0-0.32 mmol x L(-1), AQDS had the best accelerating effect and a linear correlation was found for the denitrification rate K and the AQDS concentration cAQDS. This study indicated that the application of redox mediators significantly improved the denitrification process by enhancing the decomposition rate. PMID:23002627

  3. [Novel Immobilized Biocatalyst for Microbiological Synthesis of Pharmaceutical Steroids].

    PubMed

    Andryushina, V A; Karpova, N V; Druzhinina, A V; Stytsenko, T S; Podorozhko, E A; Ryabev, A N; Lozinskii, V I

    2015-01-01

    The steroid-transforming activity of free and immobilized cells of Pimelobacter simplex VKPM As-1632 entrapped in an operationally stable macroporous polyvinyl alcohol cryogel was studied. It was shown that the macroporous matrix of the carrier did not create any diffusional limitations for steroid access to the cells or the removal of the transformation products from them. The optimal conditions for the hydrocortisone 1,2-dehydration into prednisolone by free and immobilized cells were elucidated. The immobilized biocatalyst was obtained in a granulated form and used in 32 successive cycles of steroid transformation. The average cycle duration was 45 min, and the prednisolone yield of during the first 20 cycles was 98%. It was established that the immobilized cells of the actinobacteria P. simplex retained high steroid-transforming activity over all of the transformation cycles. The physicochemical and diffusion characteristics of the polyvinyl alcohol gels and its granules were determined, and their high stability during repeated cycles of steroid transformation was shown. The results indicated that P. simplex immobilized cells represent an effective catalyst suitable for multiple use. Biomass consumption decreased upon its use, and product isolation, as well as culture storage, was much easier. PMID:26596083

  4. Fluidization characteristics of Biobone particles used for biocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, N.; Margaritis, A.; Briens, C.L.; Bergougnou, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    Liquid-solid fluidization characteristics of irregularly shaped Biobone particles were studied in a fluidized bioreactor column 2.35 m high and 0.1 m dia. The wet Biobone particles had a density of 1,890 kg/m{sup 3}. Two size ranges were studied: 1.70--2.36 mm and 1.25--2.36 mm. The Biobone is a natural cheap material composed of collagen, which is a strong protein structure, embedded with microcrystals of hydroxy apatite and calcium phosphate, and it is an excellent matrix of commercial importance used for the immobilization of enzymes, whole cells and other biocatalysts. Fluidization characteristics of Biobone particles, which include measurements of pressure drops, holdups, minimum fluidization velocities, particle entrainment, and residence time distributions at different water superficial velocities, are reported. Because of the highly irregular shape of Biobone particles, new fluidization behavior was observed, which was much different from the fluidization behavior of spherical particles reported in the literature. A new channeling index is proposed to quantify the channeling characteristics of fluidized Biobone particles, and a new parameter was developed to distinguish the transition between fixed and fluidized states of the Biobone particles. Fluidized bioreactor systems are used in bioprocessing for the production of high-value medicinal products, ethanol and beer production, food processing and beverage, wastewater treatment, and other environmental applications.

  5. Use of immobilised biocatalysts in the processing of cheese whey.

    PubMed

    Kosseva, Maria R; Panesar, Parmjit S; Kaur, Gurpreet; Kennedy, John F

    2009-12-01

    Food processing industry operations need to comply with increasingly more stringent environmental regulations related to the disposal or utilisation of by-products and wastes. These include growing restrictions on land spraying with agro-industrial wastes, and on disposal within landfill operations, and the requirements to produce end products that are stabilised and hygienic. Much of the material generated as wastes by the dairy processing industries contains components that could be utilised as substrates and nutrients in a variety of microbial/enzymatic processes, to give rise to added-value products. A good example of a waste that has received considerable attention as a source of added-value products is cheese whey. The carbohydrate reservoir of lactose (4-5%) in whey and the presence of other essential nutrients make it a good natural medium for the growth of microorganisms and a potential substrate for bioprocessing through microbial fermentation. Immobilised cell and enzyme technology has also been applied to whey bioconversion processes to improve the economics of such processes. This review focuses upon the elaboration of a range of immobilisation techniques that have been applied to produce valuable whey-based products. A comprehensive literature survey is also provided to illustrate numerous immobilisation procedures with particular emphasis upon lactose hydrolysis, and ethanol and lactic acid production using immobilised biocatalysts. PMID:19766668

  6. Efficient biocatalyst by encapsulating lipase into nanoporous gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xiaoyu; Liu, Xueying; Li, Yufei; Wu, Chao; Wang, Xia; Xu, Ping

    2013-04-01

    Lipases are one of the most important biocatalysts for biotechnological applications. Immobilization is an efficient method to increase the stability and reusability of lipases. In this study, nanoporous gold (NPG), a new kind of nanoporous material with tunable porosity and excellent biocompatibility, was employed as an effective support for lipase immobilization. The pore size of NPG and adsorption time played key roles in the construction of lipase-NPG biocomposites. The morphology and composition of NPG before and after lipase loading are verified using a scanning electron microscope, equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer. The resulting lipase-NPG biocomposites exhibited excellent catalytic activity and remarkable reusability. The catalytic activity of the lipase-NPG biocomposite with a pore size of 35 nm had no decrease after ten recycles. Besides, the lipase-NPG biocomposite exhibited high catalytic activity in a broader pH range and higher temperature than that of free lipase. In addition, the leaching of lipase from NPG could be prevented by matching the protein's diameter and pore size. Thus, the encapsulation of enzymes within NPG is quite useful for establishing new functions and will have wide applications for different chemical processes.

  7. Structural evolution and stability of sol gel biocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, L. E.; Knott, R. B.; Holden, P. J.; Pike, K. J.; Hanna, J. V.; Foster, L. J. R.; Bartlett, J. R.

    2006-11-01

    Immobilisation strategies for catalytic enzymes are important as they allow recovery and reuse of the biocatalysts. In this work, sol-gel matrices have been used to immobilise Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB), a commonly used industrial enzyme. The sol-gel bioencapsulate is produced through fluoride-catalysed hydrolysis of mixtures of tetramethylorthosilicate (TMOS) and methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMS) in the presence of CALB, yielding materials with controlled pore sizes and surface chemistries. Sol-gel matrices prolong the catalytic life and enhance the activity of CALB, although the molecular basis for this effect has yet to be elucidated due to the limitations of analytical techniques applied to date. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) allows such multi-component systems to be characterised through contrast matching. In the sol-gel bioencapsulate system at the contrast match point for silica, residual scattering intensity is due to the CALB and density fluctuations in the matrix. A SANS contrast variation series found the match point for the silica matrix, both with and without enzyme present, to be around 35%. The model presented here proposes a mechanism for the interaction between CALB and the surrounding sol-gel matrix, and the observed improvement in enzyme activity and matrix strength. Essentially, the inclusion of CALB modulates silicate speciation during evolution of the inorganic network, leading to associated variations in SANS contrast. The SANS protocol developed here may be applied more generally to other encapsulated enzyme systems.

  8. Effects of bioactive monoterpenic ketones on membrane organization. A langmuir film study.

    PubMed

    Mariani, María Elisa; Sánchez-Borzone, Mariela E; García, Daniel A

    2016-06-01

    The cyclic ketones, thujone and dihydrocarvone, are lipophilic components of essential oils extracted from different plants, which have proven insecticidal activity. The GABAA receptor is activated by the neurotransmitter GABA and is the action site of widely used neurotoxic pesticides. Many compounds that regulate GABAA receptor function interact with membrane lipids, causing changes in their physical properties and consequently, in the membrane dynamic characteristics that modulate receptor macromolecules. In the present study, the biophysical effects of thujone (a gabaergic reference compound) and dihydrocarvone (structurally very similar) were explored by using monomolecular films of DPPC as a model membrane system, to gain insight into membrane-drug interaction. The compression isotherms showed that both ketones expand the DPPC isotherms and increase membrane elasticity. They penetrate the monolayer but their permanence depends on the possibility of establishing molecular interactions with the film component, favored by defects present in the membrane at the phase transition. Finally, by using Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) as a complementary technique for direct visualization of the study films, we found that incorporating ketone seems to reduce molecular repulsion among phospholipid headgroups. Our results reinforce the notion that changes in membrane mechanics may be occurring in the presence of the assayed ketones, suggesting that their interaction with the receptor's surrounding membrane may modulate or affect its functionality, possibly as part of the mechanism of the bioactivity described for thujone and DHC. PMID:27174212

  9. The central role of ketones in reversible and irreversible hydrothermal organic functional group transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ziming; Gould, Ian R.; Williams, Lynda B.; Hartnett, Hilairy E.; Shock, Everett L.

    2012-12-01

    Studies of hydrothermal reactions involving organic compounds suggest complex, possibly reversible, reaction pathways that link functional groups from reduced alkanes all the way to oxidized carboxylic acids. Ketones represent a critical functional group because they occupy a central position in the reaction pathway, at the point where Csbnd C bond cleavage is required for the formation of the more oxidized carboxylic acids. The mechanisms for the critical bond cleavage reactions in ketones, and how they compete with other reactions are the focus of this experimental study. We studied a model ketone, dibenzylketone (DBK), in H2O at 300 °C and 70 MPa for up to 528 h. Product analysis was performed as a function of time at low DBK conversions to reveal the primary reaction pathways. Reversible interconversion between ketone, alcohol, alkene and alkane functional groups is observed in addition to formation of radical coupling products derived from irreversible Csbnd C and Csbnd H homolytic bond cleavage. The product distributions are time-dependent but the bond cleavage products dominate. The major products that accumulate at longer reaction times are toluene and larger, dehydrogenated structures that are initially formed by radical coupling. The hydrogen atoms generated by dehydrogenation of the coupling products are predominantly consumed in the formation of toluene. Even though bond cleavage products dominate, no carboxylic acids were observed on the timescale of the reactions under the chosen experimental conditions.

  10. Polyfluorinated. cap alpha. ,. beta. -unsaturated ketons

    SciTech Connect

    Latypov, R.R.; Belogai, V.D.; Pashkevich, K.I.

    1986-07-10

    The ..cap alpha..,..beta..-unsaturated ketones (..cap alpha..,..beta..-UK), particularly those groups containing fluoroalkyl groups, are of interest as highly reactive compounds having two nonequivalent electrophilic centers. In the present investigation, by boiling polyfluorinated aldehydes with methylketones in glacial acetic acid, they have obtained for the first time the polyfluorinated ..beta..-hydroxy-ketones, the dehydration of which has been used to synthesize the corresponding polyfluorinated ..cap alpha..,..beta..-UK, and their structure and reactions with the nucleophiles NH/sub 3/, PhNH/sub 2/, MeOH have been studied. In the PMR spectra of the ..cap alpha..,..beta..-UK (X)-(XVI) two doublets of triplets are observed at 6.9 and 7.9 ppm, caused by the spin-spin coupling of the olefin protons with the CF/sub 2/ group of the substituent. For ..cap alpha..,..beta..-UK, apart from the cis-trans isomerism relative to the C=C bond, a rotational isomerism is possible, caused by rotation around the C-C single bond. The presence in the IR spectra of absorption bands from nonplanar torsion-deformation vibrations of C-H for a double bond (nu = 975-980 cm/sup -1/) and the high value of the spin-spin coupling constant of the olefin protons (J/sub HH/ = 15 Hz) indicate unambiguously the transconfiguration of the olefin protons.

  11. Inborn errors of ketone body utilization.

    PubMed

    Hori, Tomohiro; Yamaguchi, Seiji; Shinkaku, Haruo; Horikawa, Reiko; Shigematsu, Yosuke; Takayanagi, Masaki; Fukao, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase (SCOT) deficiency and mitochondrial acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase (beta-ketothiolase or T2) deficiency are classified as autosomal recessive disorders of ketone body utilization characterized by intermittent ketoacidosis. Patients with mutations retaining no residual activity on analysis of expression of mutant cDNA are designated as severe genotype, and patients with at least one mutation retaining significant residual activity, as mild genotype. Permanent ketosis is a pathognomonic characteristic of SCOT-deficient patients with severe genotype. Patients with mild genotype, however, may not have permanent ketosis, although they may develop severe ketoacidotic episodes similar to patients with severe genotype. Permanent ketosis has not been reported in T2 deficiency. In T2-deficient patients with severe genotype, biochemical diagnosis is done on urinary organic acid analysis and blood acylcarnitine analysis to observe characteristic findings during both ketoacidosis and non-episodic conditions. In Japan, however, it was found that T2-deficient patients with mild genotype are common, and typical profiles were not identified on these analyses. Based on a clinical study of ketone body utilization disorders both in Japan and worldwide, we have developed guidelines for disease diagnosis and treatment. These diseases are treatable by avoiding fasting and by providing early infusion of glucose, which enable the patients to grow without sequelae. PMID:25559898

  12. Production of methyl-vinyl ketone from levulinic acid

    DOEpatents

    Dumesic, James A.; West; Ryan M.

    2011-06-14

    A method for converting levulinic acid to methyl vinyl ketone is described. The method includes the steps of reacting an aqueous solution of levulinic acid, over an acid catalyst, at a temperature of from room temperature to about 1100 K. Methyl vinyl ketone is thereby formed.

  13. 40 CFR 721.4925 - Methyl n-butyl ketone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Methyl n-butyl ketone. 721.4925 Section 721.4925 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4925 Methyl n-butyl ketone....

  14. 27 CFR 21.117 - Methyl isobutyl ketone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Methyl isobutyl ketone. 21.117 Section 21.117 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.117 Methyl isobutyl ketone. (a)...

  15. 27 CFR 21.117 - Methyl isobutyl ketone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Methyl isobutyl ketone. 21.117 Section 21.117 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.117 Methyl isobutyl ketone. (a)...

  16. 21 CFR 862.1435 - Ketones (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) test system is a device intended to identify ketones in urine and other body fluids. Identification of... Section 862.1435 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... acidity of body fluids) or ketosis (a condition characterized by increased production of ketone...

  17. 21 CFR 862.1435 - Ketones (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) test system is a device intended to identify ketones in urine and other body fluids. Identification of... Section 862.1435 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... acidity of body fluids) or ketosis (a condition characterized by increased production of ketone...

  18. 21 CFR 862.1435 - Ketones (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) test system is a device intended to identify ketones in urine and other body fluids. Identification of... Section 862.1435 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... acidity of body fluids) or ketosis (a condition characterized by increased production of ketone...

  19. 21 CFR 862.1435 - Ketones (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) test system is a device intended to identify ketones in urine and other body fluids. Identification of... Section 862.1435 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... acidity of body fluids) or ketosis (a condition characterized by increased production of ketone...

  20. 27 CFR 21.117 - Methyl isobutyl ketone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Methyl isobutyl ketone. 21.117 Section 21.117 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.117 Methyl isobutyl ketone. (a)...

  1. 27 CFR 21.117 - Methyl isobutyl ketone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Methyl isobutyl ketone. 21.117 Section 21.117 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.117 Methyl isobutyl ketone. (a)...

  2. IRIS TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF METHYL ETHYL KETONE (2003 Final)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is announcing the release of the final report, "Toxicological Review of Methyl Ethyl Ketone: in support of the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)". The updated Summary for Methyl Ethyl Ketone and accompanying Quickview have also been added to the IRIS Database.

  3. Decarboxylative dearomatization and mono-α-arylation of ketones.

    PubMed

    Mendis, Shehani N; Tunge, Jon A

    2016-06-01

    We report the first example of a palladium-catalyzed decarboxylative dearomatization reaction that occurs via Pd-π-benzyl intermediates. In fact, the Pd-catalyzed decarboxylative cross-coupling reaction of benzyl enol carbonates can lead to either the dearomatized alicyclic ketones or α-monoarylated ketone products depending on the catalyst and ligand employed. PMID:27229656

  4. Fatty acid-induced astrocyte ketone production and the control of food intake.

    PubMed

    Le Foll, Christelle; Levin, Barry E

    2016-06-01

    Obesity and Type 2 diabetes are major worldwide public health issues today. A relationship between total fat intake and obesity has been found. In addition, the mechanisms of long-term and excessive high-fat diet (HFD) intake in the development of obesity still need to be elucidated. The ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) is a major site involved in the regulation of glucose and energy homeostasis where "metabolic sensing neurons" integrate metabolic signals from the periphery. Among these signals, fatty acids (FA) modulate the activity of VMH neurons using the FA translocator/CD36, which plays a critical role in the regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis. During low-fat diet (LFD) intake, FA are oxidized by VMH astrocytes to fuel their ongoing metabolic needs. However, HFD intake causes VMH astrocytes to use FA to generate ketone bodies. We postulate that these astrocyte-derived ketone bodies are exported to neurons where they produce excess ATP and reactive oxygen species, which override CD36-mediated FA sensing and act as a signal to decrease short-term food intake. On a HFD, VMH astrocyte-produced ketones reduce elevated caloric intake to LFD levels after 3 days in rats genetically predisposed to resist (DR) diet-induced obesity (DIO), but not leptin-resistant DIO rats. This suggests that, while VMH ketone production on a HFD can contribute to protection from obesity, the inherent leptin resistance overrides this inhibitory action of ketone bodies on food intake. Thus, astrocytes and neurons form a tight metabolic unit that is able to monitor circulating nutrients to alter food intake and energy homeostasis. PMID:27122369

  5. Use of a whole-cell biocatalyst to produce biodiesel in a water-containing system.

    PubMed

    Jin, Guang; Bierma, Thomas J; Hamaker, Christopher G; Mucha, Raymond; Schola, Valeria; Stewart, Jeb; Wade, Caroline

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the use of a whole-cell biocatalyst to transesterify triglycerides, including high-Free Fatty Acid (FFA) waste greases, in a water-containing system. The whole-cell biocatalyst derived from Rhizopus oryzae (ATCC10260) was grown and reacted at room temperature without immobilization. The effectiveness of improving biodiesel yield through alteration of reaction temperature, additional alcohol, and additional transesterification reaction was also examined. Results showed that whole-cell biocatalyst was able to produce biodiesel with a yield of about 75% for virgin canola oil, 80% for waste vegetable oil and 55% for brown grease with a 72-hr transesterification reaction using no excess methanol. Elevating the reaction temperature to 35 degrees C significantly diminished the yield. An additional dose of methanol with another 24 hours of reaction time or a second 72-hr reaction resulted in biodiesel yield approaching 90% and only 3% residual glycerides (mono-, di- and tri-glycerides). These results suggest that whole-cell biocatalysts are able to transesterify waste oils or greases that are high in FFA and contain water. Brown (trap) grease and similar degraded or complex greases may be good candidates for further whole-cell biocatalyst research. PMID:19085591

  6. White biotechnology: State of the art strategies for the development of biocatalysts for biorefining.

    PubMed

    Heux, S; Meynial-Salles, I; O'Donohue, M J; Dumon, C

    2015-12-01

    White biotechnology is a term that is now often used to describe the implementation of biotechnology in the industrial sphere. Biocatalysts (enzymes and microorganisms) are the key tools of white biotechnology, which is considered to be one of the key technological drivers for the growing bioeconomy. Biocatalysts are already present in sectors such as the chemical and agro-food industries, and are used to manufacture products as diverse as antibiotics, paper pulp, bread or advanced polymers. This review proposes an original and global overview of highly complementary fields of biotechnology at both enzyme and microorganism level. A certain number of state of the art approaches that are now being used to improve the industrial fitness of biocatalysts particularly focused on the biorefinery sector are presented. The first part deals with the technologies that underpin the development of industrial biocatalysts, notably the discovery of new enzymes and enzyme improvement using directed evolution techniques. The second part describes the toolbox available by the cell engineer to shape the metabolism of microorganisms. And finally the last part focuses on the 'omic' technologies that are vital for understanding and guide microbial engineering toward more efficient microbial biocatalysts. Altogether, these techniques and strategies will undoubtedly help to achieve the challenging task of developing consolidated bioprocessing (i.e. CBP) readily available for industrial purpose. PMID:26303096

  7. Microscopic monitoring provides information on structure and properties during biocatalyst immobilization.

    PubMed

    Bidmanova, Sarka; Hrdlickova, Eva; Jaros, Josef; Ilkovics, Ladislav; Hampl, Ales; Damborsky, Jiri; Prokop, Zbynek

    2014-06-01

    Enzymes have a wide range of applications in different industries owing to their high specificity and efficiency. Immobilization is often used to improve biocatalyst properties, operational stability, and reusability. However, changes in the structure of biocatalysts during immobilization and under process conditions are still largely uncertain. Here, three microscopy techniques - bright-field, confocal and electron microscopy - were applied to determine the distribution and structure of an immobilized biocatalyst. Free enzyme (haloalkane dehalogenase), cross-linked enzyme aggregates (CLEAs) and CLEAs entrapped in polyvinyl alcohol lenses (lentikats) were used as model systems. Electron microscopy revealed that sonicated CLEAs underwent morphological changes that strongly correlated with increased catalytic activity compared to less structured, non-treated CLEAs. Confocal microscopy confirmed that loading of the biocatalyst was not the only factor affecting the catalytic activity of the lentikats. Confocal microscopy also showed a significant reduction in the pore size of lentikats exposed to 25% tetrahydrofuran and 50% dioxane. Narrow pores appeared to provide protection to CLEAs from the detrimental action of cosolvents, which significantly correlated with higher activity of CLEAs compared to free enzyme. The results showed that microscopy can provide valuable information about the structure and properties of a biocatalyst during immobilization and under process conditions. PMID:24639415

  8. A sulfonated poly (aryl ether ether ketone ketone) isomer: synthesis and DMFC performance

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yu Seung; Liu, Baijun; Hu, Wei; Jiang, Zhenhua; Robertson, Gilles; Guiver, Michael

    2009-01-01

    A sulfonated poly(aryl ether ether ketone ketone) (PEEKK) having a well-defined rigid homopolymer-like chemical structure was synthesized from a readily-prepared PEEKK post-sulfonation with concentrated sulfuric acid at room temperature within several hours. The polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) cast from the resulting polymer exhibited an excellent combination of thermal resistance, oxidative and dimensional stability, low methanol fuel permeability and high proton conductivity. Furthermore, membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were successfully fabricated and good direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) performance was observed. At 2 M MeOH feed, the current density at 0.5 V reached 165 mA/cm, which outperformed our reported analogues and eveluated Nafion membranes.

  9. Metal-Catalysed Transfer Hydrogenation of Ketones.

    PubMed

    Štefane, Bogdan; Požgan, Franc

    2016-04-01

    We highlight recent developments of catalytic transfer hydrogenation of ketones promoted by transition metals, while placing it within its historical context. Since optically active secondary alcohols are important building blocks in fine chemicals synthesis, the focus of this review is devoted to chiral catalyst types which are capable of inducing high stereoselectivities. Ruthenium complexes still represent the largest part of the catalysts, but other metals (e.g. Fe) are rapidly penetrating this field. While homogeneous transfer hydrogenation catalysts in some cases approach enzymatic performance, the interest in heterogeneous catalysts is constantly growing because of their reusability. Despite excellent activity, selectivity and compatibility of metal complexes with a variety of functional groups, no universal catalysts exist. Development of future catalyst systems is directed towards reaching as high as possible activity with low catalyst loadings, using "greener" conditions, and being able to operate under mild conditions and in a highly selective manner for a broad range of substrates. PMID:27573143

  10. Engineering of Bacterial Methyl Ketone Synthesis for Biofuels

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Ee-Been; Baidoo, Edward E. K.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2012-01-01

    We have engineered Escherichia coli to overproduce saturated and monounsaturated aliphatic methyl ketones in the C11 to C15 (diesel) range; this group of methyl ketones includes 2-undecanone and 2-tridecanone, which are of importance to the flavor and fragrance industry and also have favorable cetane numbers (as we report here). We describe specific improvements that resulted in a 700-fold enhancement in methyl ketone titer relative to that of a fatty acid-overproducing E. coli strain, including the following: (i) overproduction of β-ketoacyl coenzyme A (CoA) thioesters achieved by modification of the β-oxidation pathway (specifically, overexpression of a heterologous acyl-CoA oxidase and native FadB and chromosomal deletion of fadA) and (ii) overexpression of a native thioesterase (FadM). FadM was previously associated with oleic acid degradation, not methyl ketone synthesis, but outperformed a recently identified methyl ketone synthase (Solanum habrochaites MKS2 [ShMKS2], a thioesterase from wild tomato) in β-ketoacyl-CoA-overproducing strains tested. Whole-genome transcriptional (microarray) studies led to the discovery that FadM is a valuable catalyst for enhancing methyl ketone production. The use of a two-phase system with decane enhanced methyl ketone production by 4- to 7-fold in addition to increases from genetic modifications. PMID:22038610

  11. Biocatalytic anti-Prelog reduction of prochiral ketones with whole cells of Acetobacter pasteurianus GIM1.158

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Enantiomerically pure alcohols are important building blocks for production of chiral pharmaceuticals, flavors, agrochemicals and functional materials and appropriate whole-cell biocatalysts offer a highly enantioselective, minimally polluting route to these valuable compounds. At present, most of these biocatalysts follow Prelog’s rule, and thus the (S)-alcohols are usually obtained when the smaller substituent of the ketone has the lower CIP priority. Only a few anti-Prelog (R)-specific whole cell biocatalysts have been reported. In this paper, the biocatalytic anti-Prelog reduction of 2-octanone to (R)-2-octanol was successfully conducted with high enantioselectivity using whole cells of Acetobacter pasteurianus GIM1.158. Results Compared with other microorganisms investigated, Acetobacter pasteurianus GIM1.158 was shown to be more effective for the reduction reaction, affording much higher yield, product enantiomeric excess (e.e.) and initial reaction rate. The optimal temperature, buffer pH, co-substrate and its concentration, substrate concentration, cell concentration and shaking rate were 35°C, 5.0, 500 mmol/L isopropanol, 40 mmol/L, 25 mg/mL and 120 r/min, respectively. Under the optimized conditions, the maximum yield and the product e.e. were 89.5% and >99.9%, respectively, in 70 minutes. Compared with the best available data in aqueous system (yield of 55%), the yield of (R)-2-octanol was greatly increased. Additionally, the efficient whole-cell biocatalytic process was feasible on a 200-mL preparative scale and the chemical yield increased to 95.0% with the product e.e. being >99.9%. Moreover, Acetobacter pasteurianus GIM1.158 cells were proved to be capable of catalyzing the anti-Prelog bioreduction of other prochiral carbonyl compounds with high efficiency. Conclusions Via an effective increase in the maximum yield and the product e.e. with Acetobacter pasteurianus GIM1.158 cells, these results open the way to use of whole cells of

  12. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF THE NEW BIOCATALYST METHOD FOR BIODIESEL-FUEL BASED ON THE LIPASE PRODUCTION FUNGUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, Toshiro; Shimada, Miki; Toida, Jinichi

    This paper describes how to develop and evaluate a new biocatalyst method for biodiesel fuel based on the lipase production fungus. This method can convert waste vegetable oil into biodiesel fuel without alkaline waste fluid and byproducts (gly cerine). The main outcomes of this research were: (1) The biodiesel fuel can be manufactured from lipase production fungus (Rhizupus oryzae NBRC 9364). (2) The lipase activity can be enhanced by adding glucose and oil. (3) Phased addition of the methanol enhances the conversion rate of the biodiesel fuel (Maximum conversion rate is 85%). (4) The proposed method can improve vehicle exhaust emission and reduce byproducts (glycerine). We concluded that our proposed methods are effective for the production of biodiesel fuel from waste vegetable oil.

  13. [Major results of research and development of heterogenous biocatalysts for regenerated water clearing from harmful admixture].

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    The biological method of clearing atmospheric condensate in pressurized habitats exploits filters with a heterogenic biocatalyst produced by way of immobilizing harmless for human, animal and plant microoganisms on water-insoluble solid carrier--foam polyvinyl-formal (FPVF), and a hydrogen peroxide biofilter containing triacetate cellulose-immobilized catalase. Experience of forming an immobilized bacterial association as a polyenzyme system is particularly promising for development of advanced biotechnologies. Biocatalysts with expanded applicability can be manufactured using a FPVF-immobilized associative bacterial culture composed of Paracoccus denitrificans, Pseudomonas esterophilus and Methilopila capsulata. In aerobic condition at room temperature the heterogenic biocatalyst is capable to transform harmful organics in atmospheric condensate, e.g. methyl amine, ethyl acetate, acetic acid, ethanol and acetone into the end-products, i.e. carbon dioxide and water. Ammonia is consumed by 3 cultures as a source of nitrogen. PMID:23116037

  14. Xylanase Immobilized on Novel Multifunctional Hyperbranched Polyglycerol-Grafted Magnetic Nanoparticles: An Efficient and Robust Biocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Landarani-Isfahani, Amir; Taheri-Kafrani, Asghar; Amini, Mina; Mirkhani, Valiollah; Moghadam, Majid; Soozanipour, Asieh; Razmjou, Amir

    2015-08-25

    Although several strategies are now available for immobilization of enzymes to magnetic nanoparticles for bioapplications, little progresses have been reported on the use of dendritic or hyperbranched polymers for the same purpose. Herein, we demonstrated synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles supported hyperbranched polyglycerol (MNP/HPG) and a derivative conjugated with citric acid (MNP/HPG-CA) as unique and convenient nanoplatforms for immobilization of enzymes. Then, an important industrial enzyme, xylanase, was immobilized on the nanocarriers to produce robust biocatalysts. A variety of analytical tools were used to study the morphological, structural, and chemical properties of the biocatalysts. Additionally, the results of biocatalyst systems exhibited the substantial improvement of reactivity, reusability, and stability of xylanase due to this strategy, which might confer them a wider range of applications. PMID:26258956

  15. [Synthesis of diisooctyl adipate catalyzed by lipase-displaying Pichia pastoris whole-cell biocatalysts].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Na; Jin, Zi; Lin, Ying; Zheng, Suiping; Han, Shuangyan

    2013-07-01

    An enzyme-displaying yeast as a whole-cell biocatalyst is an alternative to immobilized enzyme, due to its low-cost preparation and simple recycle course. Here, lipase-displaying Pichia pastoris whole-cell was used as a biocatalyst to synthesize diisooctyl adipate in the non-aqueous system. The maximum productivity of diisooctyl adipate was obtained as 85.0% in a 10 mL reaction system. The yield could be reached as high as 97.8% when the reaction system was scaled up to 200 mL. The purity obtained is 98.2% after vacuum distillation. Thus, the lipase-displaying P. pastoris whole-cell biocatalyst was promising in commercial application for diisooctyl adipate synthesis in non-aqueous phase. PMID:24195369

  16. Apparatus and method for the production of gel beads containing a biocatalyst

    DOEpatents

    Scott, C.D.; Scott, T.C.; Davison, B.H.

    1998-01-27

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for the large-scale and continuous production of gel beads containing a biocatalyst. The apparatus is a columnar system based on the chemical cross-linking of hydrocolloidal gels that contain and immobilize a biocatalyst, the biocatalyst being a microorganism or an enzyme. Hydrocolloidal gels, such as alginate, carrageenan, and a mixture of bone gelatin and modified alginate, provide immobilization matrices that can be used to entrap and retain the biocatalyst while allowing effective contact with substrates and release of products. Such immobilized biocatalysts are generally formulated into small spheres or beads that have high concentrations of the biocatalyst within the gel matrix. The columnar system includes a gel dispersion nozzle submerged in a heated non-interacting liquid, typically an organic liquid, that is immiscible with water to allow efficient formation of spherical gel droplets, the non-interacting liquid having a specific gravity that is less than water so that the gel droplets will fall through the liquid by the force of gravity. The heated non-interacting liquid is in direct contact with a chilled upflowing non-interacting liquid that will provide sufficient residence time for the gel droplets as they fall through the liquid so that they will be cooled below the gelling temperature and form solid spheres. The upflowing non-interacting liquid is in direct contact with an upflowing temperature-controlled aqueous solution containing the necessary chemicals for cross-linking or fixing of the gel beads to add the necessary stability. The flow rates of the two liquid streams can be varied to control the proper residence time in each liquid section to accommodate the production of gel beads of differing settling velocities. A valve is provided for continuous removal of the stabilized gel beads from the bottom of the column. 1 fig.

  17. Apparatus and method for the production of gel beads containing a biocatalyst

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Charles D.; Scott, Timothy C.; Davison, Brian H.

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method for the large-scale and continuous production of gel beads containing a biocatalyst. The apparatus is a columnar system based on the chemical cross-linking of hydrocolloidal gels that contain and immobilize a biocatalyst, the biocatalyst being a microorganism or an enzyme. Hydrocolloidal gels, such as alginate, carrageenan, and a mixture of bone gelatin and modified alginate, provide immobilization matrices that can be used to entrap and retain the biocatalyst while allowing effective contact with substrates and release of products. Such immobilized biocatalysts are generally formulated into small spheres or beads that have high concentrations of the biocatalyst within the gel matrix. The columnar system includes a gel dispersion nozzle submerged in a heated non-interacting liquid, typically an organic liquid, that is immiscible with water to allow efficient formation of spherical gel droplets, the non-interacting liquid having a specific gravity that is less than water so that the gel droplets will fall through the liquid by the force of gravity. The heated non-interacting liquid is in direct contact with a chilled upflowing non-interacting liquid that will provide sufficient residence time for the gel droplets as they fall through the liquid so that they will be cooled below the gelling temperature and form solid spheres. The upflowing non-interacting liquid is in direct contact with an upflowing temperature-controlled aqueous solution containing the necessary chemicals for cross-linking or fixing of the gel beads to add the necessary stability. The flow rates of the two liquid streams can be varied to control the proper residence time in each liquid section to accommodate the production of gel beads of differing settling velocities. A valve is provided for continuous removal of the stabilized gel beads from the bottom of the column.

  18. Point-of-Care Glucose and Ketone Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Chong, Siew Kim; Reineke, Erica L

    2016-03-01

    Early and rapid identification of hypo- and hyperglycemia as well as ketosis is essential for the practicing veterinarian as these conditions can be life threatening and require emergent treatment. Point-of-care testing for both glucose and ketone is available for clinical use and it is important for the veterinarian to understand the limitations and potential sources of error with these tests. This article discusses the devices used to monitor blood glucose including portable blood glucose meters, point-of-care blood gas analyzers and continuous glucose monitoring systems. Ketone monitoring options discussed include the nitroprusside reagent test strips and the 3-β-hydroxybutyrate ketone meter. PMID:27451045

  19. Substrate-controlled Michael additions of chiral ketones to enones.

    PubMed

    Fàbregas, Mireia; Gómez-Palomino, Alejandro; Pellicena, Miquel; Reina, Daniel F; Romea, Pedro; Urpí, Fèlix; Font-Bardia, Mercè

    2014-12-01

    Substrate-controlled Michael additions of the titanium(IV) enolate of lactate-derived ketone 1 to acyclic α,β-unsaturated ketones in the presence of a Lewis acid (TiCl4 or SnCl4) provide the corresponding 2,4-anti-4,5-anti dicarbonyl compounds in good yields and excellent diastereomeric ratios. Likely, the nucleophilic species involved in such additions are bimetallic enolates that may add to enones through cyclic transition states. Finally, further studies indicate that a structurally related β-benzyloxy chiral ketone can also participate in such stereocontrolled conjugate additions. PMID:25423031

  20. Biocatalysts and methods for conversion of hemicellulose hydrolysates to biobased products

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, James F

    2015-03-31

    The invention relates to processes and biocatalysts for producing ethanol and other useful products from biomass and/or other materials. Initial processing of lignocellulosic biomass frequently yields methylglucuronoxylose (MeGAX) and related products which are resistant to further processing by common biocatalysts. Strains of Enterobacter asburiae are shown to be useful in bioprocessing of MeGAX and other materials into useful bioproducts such as ethanol, acetate, lactate, and many others. Genetic engineering may be used to enhance production of desired bioproducts.

  1. Coulometric generation of hydrogen ions by oxidation of mercury in methyl ethyl ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone and cyclohexanone.

    PubMed

    Mihajlović, R P; Joksimović, V M; Mihajlović, Lj V

    2003-11-01

    Mercury(II)-chloride reacts with anhydrous methyl ethyl ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone and cyclohexanone in a precise stoichiometry ratio (1:2), and weakly ionized compounds of mercury with ketones are formed and equivalent quantity of HCl is released. The application of a mercury anode for the quantitative generation of H(+) ions in 0.25 M sodium perchlorate in anhydrous methyl ethyl ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone and cyclohexanone has been investigated. Current/potentials curves for the solvents, titrated bases, indicator and mercury showed that in these solvents mercury is oxidized at potentials much more negative than those for the titrated bases and other components present in the solution. The protons generated in this way have been used for the titration of some organic bases, with either visual or potentiometric end-point detection. The oxidation of mercury in methyl ethyl ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone and cyclohexanone and the reaction of mercury ions with these solvents have been found to proceed with 100% current efficiency. PMID:18969192

  2. Discovery of a potent class I selective ketone histone deacetylase inhibitor with antitumor activity in vivo and optimized pharmacokinetic properties.

    PubMed

    Kinzel, Olaf; Llauger-Bufi, Laura; Pescatore, Giovanna; Rowley, Michael; Schultz-Fademrecht, Carsten; Monteagudo, Edith; Fonsi, Massimiliano; Gonzalez Paz, Odalys; Fiore, Fabrizio; Steinkühler, Christian; Jones, Philip

    2009-06-11

    The optimization of a potent, class I selective ketone HDAC inhibitor is shown. It possesses optimized pharmacokinetic properties in preclinical species, has a clean off-target profile, and is negative in a microbial mutagenicity (Ames) test. In a mouse xenograft model it shows efficacy comparable to that of vorinostat at a 10-fold reduced dose. PMID:19441846

  3. Enantioselective Reduction by Crude Plant Parts: Reduction of Benzofuran-2-yl Methyl Ketone with Carrot ("Daucus carota") Bits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravia, Silvana; Gamenara, Daniela; Schapiro, Valeria; Bellomo, Ana; Adum, Jorge; Seoane, Gustavo; Gonzalez, David

    2006-01-01

    The use of biocatalysis and biotransformations are important tools in green chemistry. The enantioselective reduction of a ketone by crude plant parts, using carrot ("Daucus carota") as the reducing agent is presented. The experiment introduces an example of a green chemistry procedure that can be tailored to fit in a regular laboratory session.…

  4. Synthesis and properties of poly(aryletherether ketone) and its` variants

    SciTech Connect

    Zhongwen Wu; Y. Min; Yubin Zheng

    1995-12-31

    Poly(ether-etherketone) (PEEK) and its variants were prepared by a nucleophilic aromatic substitution reaction. The inherent Viscosity of polymers can be controlled by adjusting the molar radio of monomers. In the synthesis, we found that the end-group choosing are very effected on the thermal stability of the polymers. Various properties of these polymers were investigated by TGA, DSC, and Wide-Angle X-ray. In this paper, we also reported a promising approaches toward reducing of processing temperature and crystallization rate by using a diphenol group involved PEEK copolymer, modifying of the glass temperature and melting point by the molar ratio of ether/ketone groups, verifying the crystallization rate and crystallinity by the substitution of para-phenyl for meta-phenyl in the PEEK main chain, and optimizing the morphology and mechanical properties by polymerization of poly(arylether-ether-ketone) and its` variants.

  5. Steric vs. electronic effects in the Lactobacillus brevis ADH-catalyzed bioreduction of ketones.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Cristina; Borzęcka, Wioleta; Sattler, Johann H; Kroutil, Wolfgang; Lavandera, Iván; Gotor, Vicente

    2014-01-28

    Lactobacillus brevis ADH (LBADH) is an alcohol dehydrogenase that is commonly employed to reduce alkyl or aryl ketones usually bearing a methyl, an ethyl or a chloromethyl as a small ketone substituent to the corresponding (R)-alcohols. Herein we have tested a series of 24 acetophenone derivatives differing in their size and electronic properties for their reduction employing LBADH. After plotting the relative activity against the measured substrate volumes we observed that apart from the substrate size other effects must be responsible for the activity obtained. Compared to acetophenone (100% relative activity), other small substrates such as propiophenone, α,α,α-trifluoroacetophenone, α-hydroxyacetophenone, and benzoylacetonitrile had relative activities lower than 30%, while medium-sized ketones such as α-bromo-, α,α-dichloro-, and α,α-dibromoacetophenone presented relative activities between 70% and 550%. Moreover, the comparison between the enzymatic activity and the obtained final conversions using an excess or just 2.5 equiv. of the hydrogen donor 2-propanol, denoted again deviations between them. These data supported that these hydrogen transfer (HT) transformations are mainly thermodynamically controlled. For instance, bulky α-halogenated derivatives could be quantitatively reduced by LBADH even employing 2.5 equiv. of 2-propanol independently of their kinetic values. Finally, we found good correlations between the IR absorption band of the carbonyl groups and the degrees of conversion obtained in these HT processes, making this simple method a convenient tool to predict the success of these transformations. PMID:24302226

  6. Oxidative acetoxylation of the silyl ethers of ketone enols

    SciTech Connect

    Brunovlenskaya, I.I.; Kusainova, K.M.; Kashin, A.K.

    1988-07-20

    The authors studied the reaction of (dicarboxyiodo)benzenes with the trimethylsilyl ethers of ketone enols having various structures. They also undertook a comparative investigation of the oxidation of these compounds with lead tetraacetate. The reaction of (diacetoxyiodo)benzene with the trimethylsilyl ethers of ketone enols takes place with retention of the (CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/Si group in two directions, i.e., substitution of the vinylic hydrogen or diacetoxylation of the double bond. The reaction can be used for the regioselective synthesis of /alpha/-acetoxy ketones, since the trimethylsilyl group is readily eliminated from the obtained products by the action of fluoride ion or boron trifluoride etherate with the formation of the corresponding substituted ketones.

  7. Copper/Manganese Cocatalyzed Oxidative Coupling of Vinylarenes with Ketones.

    PubMed

    Lan, Xing-Wang; Wang, Nai-Xing; Zhang, Wei; Wen, Jia-Long; Bai, Cui-Bing; Xing, Yalan; Li, Yi-He

    2015-09-18

    A novel copper/manganese cocatalyzed direct oxidative coupling of terminal vinylarenes with ketones via C(sp(3))-H bond functionalization following C-C bond formation has been developed using tert-butyl hydroperoxide as the radical initiator. Various ketones underwent a free-radical addition of terminal vinylarenes to give the corresponding 1,4-dicarbonyl products with excellent regioselectivity and efficiency through one step. A possible reaction mechanism has been proposed. PMID:26348870

  8. Rotational Spectroscopy of Methyl Vinyl Ketone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharenko, Olena; Motiyenko, R. A.; Aviles Moreno, Juan-Ramon; Huet, T. R.

    2015-06-01

    Methyl vinyl ketone, MVK, along with previously studied by our team methacrolein, is a major oxidation product of isoprene, which is one of the primary contributors to annual global VOC emissions. In this talk we present the analysis of the rotational spectrum of MVK recorded at room temperature in the 50 -- 650 GHz region using the Lille spectrometer. The spectroscopic characterization of MVK ground state will be useful in the detailed analysis of high resolution infrared spectra. Our study is supported by high level quantum chemical calculations to model the structure of the two stable s-trans and s-cis conformers and to obtain the harmonic force field parameters, internal rotation barrier heights, and vibrational frequencies. In the Doppler-limited spectra the splittings due to the internal rotation of methyl group are resolved, therefore for analysis of this molecule we used the Rho-Axis-Method Hamiltonian and RAM36 code to fit the rotational transitions. At the present time the ground state of two conformers is analyzed. Also we intend to study some low lying excited states. The analysis is in progress and the latest results will be presented. Support from the French Laboratoire d'Excellence CaPPA (Chemical and Physical Properties of the Atmosphere) through contract ANR-10-LABX-0005 of the Programme d'Investissements d'Avenir is acknowledged.

  9. Optimization of a whole-cell biocatalyst by employing genetically encoded product sensors inside nanolitre reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Andreas; Pellaux, René; Potot, Sébastien; Becker, Katja; Hohmann, Hans-Peter; Panke, Sven; Held, Martin

    2015-08-01

    Microcompartmentalization offers a high-throughput method for screening large numbers of biocatalysts generated from genetic libraries. Here we present a microcompartmentalization protocol for benchmarking the performance of whole-cell biocatalysts. Gel capsules served as nanolitre reactors (nLRs) for the cultivation and analysis of a library of Bacillus subtilis biocatalysts. The B. subtilis cells, which were co-confined with E. coli sensor cells inside the nLRs, converted the starting material cellobiose into the industrial product vitamin B2. Product formation triggered a sequence of reactions in the sensor cells: (1) conversion of B2 into flavin mononucleotide (FMN), (2) binding of FMN by a RNA riboswitch and (3) self-cleavage of RNA, which resulted in (4) the synthesis of a green fluorescent protein (GFP). The intensity of GFP fluorescence was then used to isolate B. subtilis variants that convert cellobiose into vitamin B2 with elevated efficiency. The underlying design principles of the assay are general and enable the development of similar protocols, which ultimately will speed up the optimization of whole-cell biocatalysts.

  10. Enzyme-based inverse opals: a facile and promising platform for fabrication of biocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanjun; Cui, Cuicui; Huang, Yan; Zhang, Xu; Gao, Jing

    2014-05-28

    A facile and promising approach was developed to fabricate enzyme-based 3D-ordered macroporous biocatalysts (enzyme-based inverse opals) by using the colloidal crystal templating method. Horseradish peroxidase- and amylase-based inverse opals were prepared, which verified that this method is suitable for various enzymes. PMID:24722982

  11. Simple enzymatic procedure for L-carnosine synthesis: whole-cell biocatalysis and efficient biocatalyst recycling.

    PubMed

    Heyland, Jan; Antweiler, Nicolai; Lutz, Jochen; Heck, Tobias; Geueke, Birgit; Kohler, Hans-Peter E; Blank, Lars M; Schmid, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    β-Peptides and their derivates are usually stable to proteolysis and have an increased half-life compared with α-peptides. Recently, β-aminopeptidases were described as a new enzyme class that enabled the enzymatic degradation and formation of β-peptides. As an alternative to the existing chemical synthesis routes, the aim of the present work was to develop a whole-cell biocatalyst for the synthesis and production of β-peptides using this enzymatic activity. For the optimization of the reaction system we chose the commercially relevant β,α-dipeptide L-carnosine (β-alanine-L-histidine) as model product. We were able to show that different recombinant yeast and bacteria strains, which overexpress a β-peptidase, could be used directly as whole-cell biocatalysts for the synthesis of L-carnosine. By optimizing relevant reaction conditions for the best-performing recombinant Escherichia coli strain, such as pH and substrate concentrations, we obtained high l-carnosine yields of up to 71%. Long-time as well as biocatalyst recycling experiments indicated a high stability of the developed biocatalyst for at least five repeated batches. Application of the recombinant E. coli in a fed-batch process enabled the accumulation of l-carnosine to a concentration of 3.7 g l(-1). PMID:21255308

  12. Kefir immobilized on corn grains as biocatalyst for lactic acid fermentation and sourdough bread making.

    PubMed

    Plessas, Stavros; Alexopoulos, Athanasios; Bekatorou, Argyro; Bezirtzoglou, Eugenia

    2012-12-01

    The natural mixed culture kefir was immobilized on boiled corn grains to produce an efficient biocatalyst for lactic acid fermentation with direct applications in food production, such as sourdough bread making. The immobilized biocatalyst was initially evaluated for its efficiency for lactic acid production by fermentation of cheese whey at various temperatures. The immobilized cells increased the fermentation rate and enhanced lactic acid production compared to free kefir cells. Maximum lactic acid yield (68.8 g/100 g) and lactic acid productivity (12.6 g/L per day) were obtained during fermentation by immobilized cells at 37 °C. The immobilized biocatalyst was then assessed as culture for sourdough bread making. The produced sourdough breads had satisfactory specific loaf volumes and good sensory characteristics. Specifically, bread made by addition of 60% w/w sourdough containing kefir immobilized on corn was more resistant regarding mould spoilage (appearance during the 11(th) day), probably due to higher lactic acid produced (2.86 g/Kg of bread) compared to the control samples. The sourdough breads made with the immobilized biocatalyst had aroma profiles similar to that of the control samples as shown by headspace SPME GC-MS analysis. PMID:23170776

  13. Optimization of a whole-cell biocatalyst by employing genetically encoded product sensors inside nanolitre reactors.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Andreas; Pellaux, René; Potot, Sébastien; Becker, Katja; Hohmann, Hans-Peter; Panke, Sven; Held, Martin

    2015-08-01

    Microcompartmentalization offers a high-throughput method for screening large numbers of biocatalysts generated from genetic libraries. Here we present a microcompartmentalization protocol for benchmarking the performance of whole-cell biocatalysts. Gel capsules served as nanolitre reactors (nLRs) for the cultivation and analysis of a library of Bacillus subtilis biocatalysts. The B. subtilis cells, which were co-confined with E. coli sensor cells inside the nLRs, converted the starting material cellobiose into the industrial product vitamin B2. Product formation triggered a sequence of reactions in the sensor cells: (1) conversion of B2 into flavin mononucleotide (FMN), (2) binding of FMN by a RNA riboswitch and (3) self-cleavage of RNA, which resulted in (4) the synthesis of a green fluorescent protein (GFP). The intensity of GFP fluorescence was then used to isolate B. subtilis variants that convert cellobiose into vitamin B2 with elevated efficiency. The underlying design principles of the assay are general and enable the development of similar protocols, which ultimately will speed up the optimization of whole-cell biocatalysts. PMID:26201745

  14. Novel Flow Sheet for Low Energy CO2 Capture Enabled by Biocatalyst Delivery System

    SciTech Connect

    Reardon, John; Shaffer, Alex; Vaysman, Vladimir

    2015-02-01

    This report documents a preliminary Techno-Economic Assessment (TEA) for processes utilizing Akermin’s second generation biocatalyst delivery system to enhance AKM24, a non- volatile salt solution for CO2 capture. Biocatalyst enhanced AKM24 offers the potential to reduce the cost of CO2 capture in flue gas applications due to its improved equilibrium and stoichiometric properties that result in double the absorption capacity relative to previously demonstrated biocatalyst enhanced solvents. The study assumes a new supercritical pulverized coal fired power plant with a net output of 550 MWe after 90% CO2 capture and uses the June 2011 cost basis (August 2012 update of Bituminous Baseline Study, or BBS). Power plant modeling, capital cost review, and economic calculations were provided by WorleyParsons. Rate-based CO2 capture process modeling and equipment sizing was performed by Akermin using AspenPlus® V8.4, customized to accurately predict thermodynamics, kinetics, and physical properties of the AKM-24 solvent based on available laboratory data. Equipment capital costs were estimated using Aspen Process Economic Analyzer™ which compared well with published baseline cost estimates. Quotes of equipment costs and power consumption for vacuum blower and CO2 compression equipment were also provided by Man Diesel & Turbo. Three process scenarios were examined for Akermin biocatalyst enhanced solvent systems including: Case-1A: an absorption-desorption system operated with a reboiler pressure of 0.16 bara (60°C); Case-2A: an absorption-desorption system with moderate vacuum assisted regeneration at 0.40 bara (80°C); and finally, Case-2B: a conventional absorption-desorption system with near atmospheric pressure regeneration at 1.07 bara (105°C). The estimated increases in cost of electricity (ICOE) for these cases were $58.1/MWh, $47.3/MWh and $46.4/MWh, respectively. Case 2B had the best results for this analysis

  15. Effects of ketone bodies in Alzheimer's disease in relation to neural hypometabolism, β-amyloid toxicity, and astrocyte function.

    PubMed

    Hertz, Leif; Chen, Ye; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2015-07-01

    Diet supplementation with ketone bodies (acetoacetate and β-hydroxybuturate) or medium-length fatty acids generating ketone bodies has consistently been found to cause modest improvement of mental function in Alzheimer's patients. It was suggested that the therapeutic effect might be more pronounced if treatment was begun at a pre-clinical stage of the disease instead of well after its manifestation. The pre-clinical stage is characterized by decade-long glucose hypometabolism in brain, but ketone body metabolism is intact even initially after disease manifestation. One reason for the impaired glucose metabolism may be early destruction of the noradrenergic brain stem nucleus, locus coeruleus, which stimulates glucose metabolism, at least in astrocytes. These glial cells are essential in Alzheimer pathogenesis. The β-amyloid peptide Aβ interferes with their cholinergic innervation, which impairs synaptic function because of diminished astrocytic glutamate release. Aβ also reduces glucose metabolism and causes hyperexcitability. Ketone bodies are similarly used against seizures, but the effectively used concentrations are so high that they must interfere with glucose metabolism and de novo synthesis of neurotransmitter glutamate, reducing neuronal glutamatergic signaling. The lower ketone body concentrations used in Alzheimer's disease may owe their effect to support of energy metabolism, but might also inhibit release of gliotransmitter glutamate. Alzheimer's disease is a panglial-neuronal disorder with long-standing brain hypometabolism, aberrations in both neuronal and astrocytic glucose metabolism, inflammation, hyperexcitability, and dementia. Relatively low doses of β-hydroxybutyrate can have an ameliorating effect on cognitive function. This could be because of metabolic supplementation or inhibition of Aβ-induced release of glutamate as gliotransmitter, which is likely to reduce hyperexcitability and inflammation. The therapeutic

  16. Studies on Crystalline Structure of Poly(aryl ether ketone ketone) Copolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honigfort, P. S.; Ho, R. M.; Cheng, S. Z. D.

    1998-03-01

    Recent studies on the Poly(aryl ether ketone ketone) [PEKK(T/I)] copolymer containing alternating terphthalic acid (T) and isopthalic acid (I) linked phenylene units have left unanswered polymorphic questions. To help answer these questions a PEKK(T/I) oligomer was prepared and its crystal structure was investigated and compared to results from the copolymer. Evidence was found for 3 different crystal forms. When the copolymer is crystallized near 300 C, only one orthorhombic unit cell (form I) forms, and these crystals are also evident in the oligomer. At crystallization temperatures below 210 C, another crystal unit cell (form II) occurs which can also be isolated in the oligomer. Also, evidence for a new form (form III), which coexists with both form I and II was identified in both the copolymer and the oligomer between 200 and 280 C. Evidence of a larger supercell symmetry consisting of 3 unit cells staggered in the a-axis dimension was seen in electron diffraction studies of form III. This research was supported by WSFDMR(96-17030).

  17. The partitioning of ketones between the gas and aqueous phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betterton, Eric A.

    Most ketones are not significantly hydrated; they therefore retain their chromophore and they could be photolytically degraded in solution yielding a variety of products including carboxylic acids, aldehydes and radicals. It is difficult to accurately model the partitioning of ketones between the gas phase and aqueous phase because of the lack suitable estimates of the Henry's Law constants; consequently the fate and environmental effects of ketones cannot be confidently predicted. Here we report the experimental determination of the Henry's Law constants of a series of ketones that has yielded a simple straight line equation to predict the Henry's Law constants of simple aliphatic ketones: log H ∗ =0.23Σσ ∗ + 1.51; where H ∗ is the effective Henry's Law constant (M atm -1, and Σσ ∗ is the Taft polar substituents constants. The results for 25°C are (M atm -1) CH 3COCH 3, 32; C 6H 5COCH 3, 110; CH 2ClCOCH 3, 59; CH 3COCOCH 3, 74; CF 3COCH 3, 138. Acetophenone appears to have an abnormally high H ∗. Most low molecular weight aliphatic ketones are predicted to characterized by H ∗⩾30 M atm -1 and therefore they are expected to be found in the aqueous phase at concentrations of ⩾5 - 0.5 μM (given a typical gas-phase concentration range of 1-10 ppbv). The expected rate of decomposition of ketones due to photolysis in hydrometers is briefly discussed.

  18. Cerebral metabolic adaptation and ketone metabolism after brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Prins, Mayumi L

    2010-01-01

    The developing central nervous system has the capacity to metabolize ketone bodies. It was once accepted that on weaning, the ‘post-weaned/adult’ brain was limited solely to glucose metabolism. However, increasing evidence from conditions of inadequate glucose availability or increased energy demands has shown that the adult brain is not static in its fuel options. The objective of this review is to summarize the body of literature specifically regarding cerebral ketone metabolism at different ages, under conditions of starvation and after various pathologic conditions. The evidence presented supports the following findings: (1) there is an inverse relationship between age and the brain’s capacity for ketone metabolism that continues well after weaning; (2) neuroprotective potentials of ketone administration have been shown for neurodegenerative conditions, epilepsy, hypoxia/ischemia, and traumatic brain injury; and (3) there is an age-related therapeutic potential for ketone as an alternative substrate. The concept of cerebral metabolic adaptation under various physiologic and pathologic conditions is not new, but it has taken the contribution of numerous studies over many years to break the previously accepted dogma of cerebral metabolism. Our emerging understanding of cerebral metabolism is far more complex than could have been imagined. It is clear that in addition to glucose, other substrates must be considered along with fuel interactions, metabolic challenges, and cerebral maturation. PMID:17684514

  19. METHYL KETONE METABOLISM IN HYDROCARBON-UTILIZING MYCOBACTERIA

    PubMed Central

    Lukins, H. B.; Foster, J. W.

    1963-01-01

    Lukins, H. B. (University of Texas, Austin) and J. W. Foster. Methyl ketone metabolism in hydrocarbon-utilizing mycobacteria. J. Bacteriol. 85: 1074–1087. 1963.—Species of Mycobacterium especially M. smegmatis 422, produced the homologous methyl ketones during the oxidation of propane, n-butane, n-pentane, or n-hexane. A carrier-trapping experiment demonstrated the formation of 2-undecanone, as well as 1,11-undecanedioic acid, during the oxidation of undecane-1-C14. Aliphatic alkane-utilizing mycobacteria were able to grow at the expense of several aliphatic methyl ketones as sole sources of carbon. Other ketones which did not support growth were oxidized by resting bacterial suspensions. M. smegmatis 422 cells grown on propane or acetone were simultaneously adapted to oxidize both substrates, as well as n-propanol. n-Propanol cells were unadapted to propane or acetone. Acetone produced from propane in a medium enriched in D2O contained a negligible quantity of D, presumably eliminating propylene as an intermediate in the oxidation. Cells grown at the expense of alkanes or methyl ketones in the presence of O218 had a higher content of O18 than did cells grown on terminally oxidized compounds, e.g., primary alcohols or fatty acids. An oxygenase reaction is postulated for the attack on methyl ketones. Acetol was isolated and characterized as an oxidation product of acetone by M. smegmatis 422. Acetol-grown cells had a higher O18 content than did n-propanol cells, and its utilization appears to involve at least one oxygenase reaction. Acetol produced from acetone in the presence of O218 was not enriched in the isotope, indicating the occurrence of exchange reactions or of oxygenation reactions at a later stage in the assimilation of acetone and acetol. PMID:14043998

  20. Development of biocatalysts for production of commodity chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Adsul, M G; Singhvi, M S; Gaikaiwari, S A; Gokhale, D V

    2011-03-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is recognized as potential sustainable source for production of power, biofuels and variety of commodity chemicals which would potentially add economic value to biomass. Recalcitrance nature of biomass is largely responsible for the high cost of its conversion. Therefore, it is necessary to introduce some cost effective pretreatment processes to make the biomass polysaccharides easily amenable to enzymatic attack to release mixed fermentable sugars. Advancement in systemic biology can provide new tools for the development of such biocatalysts for sustainable production of commodity chemicals from biomass. Integration of functional genomics and system biology approaches may generate efficient microbial systems with new metabolic routes for production of commodity chemicals. This paper provides an overview of the challenges that are faced by the processes converting lignocellulosic biomass to commodity chemicals. The critical factors involved in engineering new microbial biocatalysts are also discussed with more emphasis on commodity chemicals. PMID:21277771

  1. An (R)‐Imine Reductase Biocatalyst for the Asymmetric Reduction of Cyclic Imines

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Shahed; Leipold, Friedemann; Man, Henry; Wells, Elizabeth; France, Scott P.; Mulholland, Keith R.; Grogan, Gideon

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although the range of biocatalysts available for the synthesis of enantiomerically pure chiral amines continues to expand, few existing methods provide access to secondary amines. To address this shortcoming, we have over‐expressed the gene for an (R)‐imine reductase [(R)‐IRED] from Streptomyces sp. GF3587 in Escherichia coli to create a recombinant whole‐cell biocatalyst for the asymmetric reduction of prochiral imines. The (R)‐IRED was screened against a panel of cyclic imines and two iminium ions and was shown to possess high catalytic activity and enantioselectivity. Preparative‐scale synthesis of the alkaloid (R)‐coniine (90 % yield; 99 % ee) from the imine precursor was performed on a gram‐scale. A homology model of the enzyme active site, based on the structure of a closely related (R)‐IRED from Streptomyces kanamyceticus, was constructed and used to identify potential amino acids as targets for mutagenesis.

  2. Metagenomics-Guided Mining of Commercially Useful Biocatalysts from Marine Microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Uria, A R; Zilda, D S

    2016-01-01

    Marine microorganisms are a rich reservoir of highly diverse and unique biocatalysts that offer potential applications in food, pharmaceutical, fuel, and cosmetic industries. The fact that only less than 1% of microbes in any marine habitats can be cultured under standard laboratory conditions has hampered access to their extraordinary biocatalytic potential. Metagenomics has recently emerged as a powerful and well-established tool to investigate the vast majority of hidden uncultured microbial diversity for the discovery of novel industrially relevant enzymes from different types of environmental samples, such as seawater, marine sediment, and symbiotic microbial consortia. We discuss here in this review about approaches and methods in metagenomics that have been used and can potentially be used to mine commercially useful biocatalysts from uncultured marine microbes. PMID:27452163

  3. Process development and modeling of fluidized-bed reactor with coimmobilized biocatalyst for fuel ethanol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, May Yongmei

    This research focuses on two steps of commercial fuel ethanol production processes: the hydrolysis starch process and the fermentation process. The goal of this research is to evaluate the performance of co-immobilized biocatalysts in a fluidized bed reactor with emphasis on economic and engineering aspects and to develop a predictive mathematical model for this system. The productivity of an FBR is higher than productivity of a traditional batch reactor or CSTR. Fluidized beds offer great advantages over packed beds for immobilized cells when small particles are used or when the reactant feed contains suspended solids. Plugging problems, excessive pressure drops (and thus attrition), or crushing risks may be avoided. No mechanical stirring is required as mixing occurs due to the natural turbulence in the fluidized process. Both enzyme and microorganism are immobilized in one catalyst bead which is called co-immobilization. Inside this biocatalyst matrix, starch is hydrolyzed by the enzyme glucoamylase to form glucose and then converted to ethanol and carbon dioxide by microorganisms. Two biocatalysts were evaluated: (1) co-immobilized yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae and glucoamylase. (2) co-immobilized Zymomonas mobilis and glucoamylase. A co-immobilized biocatalyst accomplishes the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF process). When compared to a two-step process involving separate saccharification and fermentation stages, the SSF process has productivity values twice that given by the pre-saccharified process when the time required for pre-saccharification (15--25 h) was taken into account. The SSF process should also save capital cost. The information about productivity, fermentation yield, concentration profiles along the bed, ethanol inhibition, et al., was obtained from the experimental data. For the yeast system, experimental results showed that: no apparent decrease of productivity occurred after two and half months, the productivity

  4. Copper-binding peptides from human prion protein and newly designed peroxidative biocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Kagenishi, Tomoko; Yokawa, Ken; Kadono, Takashi; Uezu, Kazuya; Kawano, Tomonori

    2011-01-01

    A previous work suggested that peptides from the histidine-containing copper-binding motifs in human prion protein (PrP) function as peroxidase-like biocatalysts catalyzing the generation of superoxide anion radicals in the presence of neurotransmitters (aromatic monoamines) and phenolics such as tyrosine and tyrosyl residues on proteins. In this study, using various phenolic substrates, the phenol-dependent superoxide-generating activities of PrP-derived peptide sequences were compared. Among the peptides tested, the GGGTH pentapeptide was shown to be the most active catalyst for phenol-dependent reactions. Based on these results, we designed a series of oligoglycyl-histidines as novel peroxidative biocatalysts, and their catalytic performances including kinetics, heat tolerance, and freezing tolerance were analysed. PMID:21630593

  5. Catalytic Intramolecular Ketone Alkylation with Olefins by Dual Activation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hee Nam; Dong, Guangbin

    2015-12-01

    Two complementary methods for catalytic intramolecular ketone alkylation reactions with unactivated olefins, resulting in Conia-ene-type reactions, are reported. The transformations are enabled by dual activation of both the ketone and the olefin and are atom-economical as stoichiometric oxidants or reductants are not required. Assisted by Kool's aniline catalyst, the reaction conditions can be both pH- and redox-neutral. A broad range of functional groups are thus tolerated. Whereas the rhodium catalysts are effective for the formation of five-membered rings, a ruthenium-based system that affords the six-membered ring products was also developed. PMID:26486569

  6. Polyether ether ketone encased monolith frits made of polyether ether ketone tubing with a 0.25 mm opening resulting in an improved separation performance in liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Park, Sin Young; Cheong, Won Jo

    2016-05-01

    Tiny polyether ether ketone encased monolith frits have been prepared by modified catalytic sulfonation of the inner surface of polyether ether tubing (1.6 mm od, 0.25 mm id) followed by modified formation of organic monolith and cutting of the tubing into slices. The frit was placed below the central hole of the column outlet union and supported by a combination of a silica capillary (0.365 mm od, 0.05 mm id) and a polyether ether ketone sleeve (1.6 mm od, 0.38 mm id) tightened with a nut and a ferrule when the column was packed to prevent sinking of the frit element into the union hole (0.25 mm opening) otherwise. The column packed this way with the frits investigated in this study has shown better separation performance owing to the reduced frit volume in comparison to the column packed with a commercial stainless-steel screen frit. This study establishes the strategy of disposable microcolumns in which cheap disposable frits are used whenever the column is re-packed to yield columns of even better chromatographic performance than the columns with commercial frits. PMID:26910135

  7. Enzymes in Food Processing: A Condensed Overview on Strategies for Better Biocatalysts

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    Food and feed is possibly the area where processing anchored in biological agents has the deepest roots. Despite this, process improvement or design and implementation of novel approaches has been consistently performed, and more so in recent years, where significant advances in enzyme engineering and biocatalyst design have fastened the pace of such developments. This paper aims to provide an updated and succinct overview on the applications of enzymes in the food sector, and of progresses made, namely, within the scope of tapping for more efficient biocatalysts, through screening, structural modification, and immobilization of enzymes. Targeted improvements aim at enzymes with enhanced thermal and operational stability, improved specific activity, modification of pH-activity profiles, and increased product specificity, among others. This has been mostly achieved through protein engineering and enzyme immobilization, along with improvements in screening. The latter has been considerably improved due to the implementation of high-throughput techniques, and due to developments in protein expression and microbial cell culture. Expanding screening to relatively unexplored environments (marine, temperature extreme environments) has also contributed to the identification and development of more efficient biocatalysts. Technological aspects are considered, but economic aspects are also briefly addressed. PMID:21048872

  8. Integrated (Meta) Genomic and Synthetic Biology Approaches to Develop New Biocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Parages, María L; Gutiérrez-Barranquero, José A; Reen, F Jerry; Dobson, Alan D W; O'Gara, Fergal

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, the marine environment has been the subject of increasing attention from biotechnological and pharmaceutical industries as a valuable and promising source of novel bioactive compounds. Marine biodiscovery programmes have begun to reveal the extent of novel compounds encoded within the enormous bacterial richness and diversity of the marine ecosystem. A combination of unique physicochemical properties and spatial niche-specific substrates, in wide-ranging and extreme habitats, underscores the potential of the marine environment to deliver on functionally novel biocatalytic activities. With the growing need for green alternatives to industrial processes, and the unique transformations which nature is capable of performing, marine biocatalysts have the potential to markedly improve current industrial pipelines. Furthermore, biocatalysts are known to possess chiral selectivity and specificity, a key focus of pharmaceutical drug design. In this review, we discuss how the explosion in genomics based sequence analysis, allied with parallel developments in synthetic and molecular biology, have the potential to fast-track the discovery and subsequent improvement of a new generation of marine biocatalysts. PMID:27007381

  9. Integrated (Meta) Genomic and Synthetic Biology Approaches to Develop New Biocatalysts

    PubMed Central

    Parages, María L.; Gutiérrez-Barranquero, José A.; Reen, F. Jerry; Dobson, Alan D.W.; O’Gara, Fergal

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the marine environment has been the subject of increasing attention from biotechnological and pharmaceutical industries as a valuable and promising source of novel bioactive compounds. Marine biodiscovery programmes have begun to reveal the extent of novel compounds encoded within the enormous bacterial richness and diversity of the marine ecosystem. A combination of unique physicochemical properties and spatial niche-specific substrates, in wide-ranging and extreme habitats, underscores the potential of the marine environment to deliver on functionally novel biocatalytic activities. With the growing need for green alternatives to industrial processes, and the unique transformations which nature is capable of performing, marine biocatalysts have the potential to markedly improve current industrial pipelines. Furthermore, biocatalysts are known to possess chiral selectivity and specificity, a key focus of pharmaceutical drug design. In this review, we discuss how the explosion in genomics based sequence analysis, allied with parallel developments in synthetic and molecular biology, have the potential to fast-track the discovery and subsequent improvement of a new generation of marine biocatalysts. PMID:27007381

  10. Asymmetric reduction of ketones with recombinant E. coli whole cells in neat substrates.

    PubMed

    Jakoblinnert, Andre; Mladenov, Radoslav; Paul, Albert; Sibilla, Fabrizio; Schwaneberg, Ulrich; Ansorge-Schumacher, Marion B; de María, Pablo Domínguez

    2011-11-28

    The asymmetric reduction of ketones is performed by using lyophilized whole cells in neat substrates with defined water activity (a(w)). Ketones and alcohols prone to be unstable in aqueous media can now be converted via biocatalysis. PMID:22005469

  11. A combined bioinformatics and functional metagenomics approach to discovering lipolytic biocatalysts

    PubMed Central

    Masuch, Thorsten; Kusnezowa, Anna; Nilewski, Sebastian; Bautista, José T.; Kourist, Robert; Leichert, Lars I.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of protein sequence data published today is of metagenomic origin. However, our ability to assign functions to these sequences is often hampered by our general inability to cultivate the larger part of microbial species and the sheer amount of sequence data generated in these projects. Here we present a combination of bioinformatics, synthetic biology, and Escherichia coli genetics to discover biocatalysts in metagenomic datasets. We created a subset of the Global Ocean Sampling dataset, the largest metagenomic project published to date, by removing all proteins that matched Hidden Markov Models of known protein families from PFAM and TIGRFAM with high confidence (E-value > 10-5). This essentially left us with proteins with low or no homology to known protein families, still encompassing ~1.7 million different sequences. In this subset, we then identified protein families de novo with a Markov clustering algorithm. For each protein family, we defined a single representative based on its phylogenetic relationship to all other members in that family. This reduced the dataset to ~17,000 representatives of protein families with more than 10 members. Based on conserved regions typical for lipases and esterases, we selected a representative gene from a family of 27 members for synthesis. This protein, when expressed in E. coli, showed lipolytic activity toward para-nitrophenyl (pNP) esters. The Km-value of the enzyme was 66.68 μM for pNP-butyrate and 68.08 μM for pNP-palmitate with kcat/Km values at 3.4 × 106 and 6.6 × 105 M-1s-1, respectively. Hydrolysis of model substrates showed enantiopreference for the R-form. Reactions yielded 43 and 61% enantiomeric excess of products with ibuprofen methyl ester and 2-phenylpropanoic acid ethyl ester, respectively. The enzyme retains 50% of its maximum activity at temperatures as low as 10°C, its activity is enhanced in artificial seawater and buffers with higher salt concentrations with an optimum osmolarity of

  12. Utility of ketone measurement in the prevention, diagnosis and management of diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Misra, S; Oliver, N S

    2015-01-01

    Ketone measurement is advocated for the diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis and assessment of its severity. Assessing the evidence base for ketone measurement in clinical practice is challenging because multiple methods are available but there is a lack of consensus about which is preferable. Evaluating the utility of ketone measurement is additionally problematic because of variability in the biochemical definition of ketoacidosis internationally and in the proposed thresholds for ketone measures. This has led to conflicting guidance from expert bodies on how ketone measurement should be used in the management of ketoacidosis. The development of point-of-care devices that can reliably measure the capillary blood ketone β-hydroxybutyrate (BOHB) has widened the spectrum of applications of ketone measurement, but whether the evidence base supporting these applications is robust enough to warrant their incorporation into routine clinical practice remains unclear. The imprecision of capillary blood ketone measures at higher values, the lack of availability of routine laboratory-based assays for BOHB and the continued cost-effectiveness of urine ketone assessment prompt further discussion on the role of capillary blood ketone assessment in ketoacidosis. In the present article, we review the various existing methods of ketone measurement, the precision of capillary blood ketone as compared with other measures, its diagnostic accuracy in predicting ketoacidosis and other clinical applications including prevention, assessment of severity and resolution of ketoacidosis. PMID:25307274

  13. Crystal morphology and phase identifications in poly(aryl ether ketones)s and their copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, R.M.; Cheng, S.Z.D.; Hsiao, B.S.

    1995-12-01

    A series of poly(aryl ether ketone ketone)s prepared from diphenyl ether (DPE) and terephthalic acid M or isophthalic acid (T) have been investigated. PEKK(T) has been reported to exhibit two polymorphism (form I and form II) based on wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and electron diffraction (ED) experiments.

  14. 21 CFR 862.1435 - Ketones (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ketones (nonquantitative) test system. 862.1435 Section 862.1435 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  15. ANALYSIS OF ALDEHYDES AND KETONES IN THE GAS PHASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development and testing of a 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine-acetonitrile (DNPH-ACN) method for the analysis of aldehydes and ketones in ambient air are described. A discussion of interferences, preparation of calibration standards, analytical testing, fluorescence methods and car...

  16. Ketonization of Cuphea oil for the production of 2-undecanone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this work was to demonstrate the viability of the cross ketonization reaction with the triacylglycerol from Cuphea sp. and acetic acid in a fixed-bed plug-flow reactor. The seed oil from Cuphea sp. contains up to 71% decanoic acid and the reaction of this fatty acid residue with ac...

  17. Ketone body therapy: from the ketogenic diet to the oral administration of ketone ester

    PubMed Central

    Hashim, Sami A.; VanItallie, Theodore B.

    2014-01-01

    Ketone bodies (KBs), acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate (βHB), were considered harmful metabolic by-products when discovered in the mid-19th century in the urine of patients with diabetic ketoacidosis. It took physicians many years to realize that KBs are normal metabolites synthesized by the liver and exported into the systemic circulation to serve as an energy source for most extrahepatic tissues. Studies have shown that the brain (which normally uses glucose for energy) can readily utilize KBs as an alternative fuel. Even when there is diminished glucose utilization in cognition-critical brain areas, as may occur early in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), there is preliminary evidence that these same areas remain capable of metabolizing KBs. Because the ketogenic diet (KD) is difficult to prepare and follow, and effectiveness of KB treatment in certain patients may be enhanced by raising plasma KB levels to ≥2 mM, KB esters, such as 1,3-butanediol monoester of βHB and glyceryl-tris-3-hydroxybutyrate, have been devised. When administered orally in controlled dosages, these esters can produce plasma KB levels comparable to those achieved by the most rigorous KD, thus providing a safe, convenient, and versatile new approach to the study and potential treatment of a variety of diseases, including epilepsy, AD, and Parkinson’s disease. PMID:24598140

  18. Ketone body therapy: from the ketogenic diet to the oral administration of ketone ester.

    PubMed

    Hashim, Sami A; VanItallie, Theodore B

    2014-09-01

    Ketone bodies (KBs), acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate (βHB), were considered harmful metabolic by-products when discovered in the mid-19th century in the urine of patients with diabetic ketoacidosis. It took physicians many years to realize that KBs are normal metabolites synthesized by the liver and exported into the systemic circulation to serve as an energy source for most extrahepatic tissues. Studies have shown that the brain (which normally uses glucose for energy) can readily utilize KBs as an alternative fuel. Even when there is diminished glucose utilization in cognition-critical brain areas, as may occur early in Alzheimer's disease (AD), there is preliminary evidence that these same areas remain capable of metabolizing KBs. Because the ketogenic diet (KD) is difficult to prepare and follow, and effectiveness of KB treatment in certain patients may be enhanced by raising plasma KB levels to ≥2 mM, KB esters, such as 1,3-butanediol monoester of βHB and glyceryl-tris-3-hydroxybutyrate, have been devised. When administered orally in controlled dosages, these esters can produce plasma KB levels comparable to those achieved by the most rigorous KD, thus providing a safe, convenient, and versatile new approach to the study and potential treatment of a variety of diseases, including epilepsy, AD, and Parkinson's disease. PMID:24598140

  19. The Production of Biodiesel from Cottonseed Oil Using Rhizopus oryzae Whole Cell Biocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athalye, Sneha Kishor

    Biodiesel is an environmentally friendly alternative to fossil fuels which have become increasingly expensive in recent times. An alternate approach to alkaline biodiesel production is needed as catalyst miscibility with the glycerol by-product, generation of large amounts of waste water, and saponification of the feedstock are major disadvantages associated with the process. Lipases are water soluble enzymes which act as catalysts in many lipid based reactions. Reuse of lipases can significantly reduce cost of enzymatic biodiesel production; however retention of lipolytic activity still remains a challenge. Use of microbial cells immobilized on various surfaces like sponge, foam and plastics as biocatalysts instead of extracted enzyme could help overcome this problem. A novel, rigid biomass support with high surface area made from recyclable polyethylene (Bioblok(TM)) was used in this study. Several fungal and bacterial species have been reported to possess appreciable levels of lipase activity. The biomass production and immobilization as well as lipase activity of three different species; Candida rugosa (ATCC #38772), Aspergillus oryzae (ATCC #58299), and Rhizopus oryzae (ATTC #34612) were tested. C. rugosa did not attach well to the support particles while A.oryzae had lower biomass accumulation of 6.1 g (dry cell wt)/L compared to 11.8 g (dry cell wt)/L for R.oryzae. Hence Rhizopus oryzae, fungal specie with cell surface bound lipase was selected for the current study. The study investigated the influence of media composition and growth time of the R.oryzae whole cell biocatalysts, immobilized on the BSPs, for FAME production from cottonseed oil. R.oryzae BSPs grown in basal media supplemented with 1% (w/v) of glucose or oil or both for 48 h, 72 h or 90 h were used in a 36 h transesterification reaction with cottonseed oil and methanol. BSPs grown in both glucose and oil supplemented medium for 72 h had the highest conversion of 22.4% (wt/wt) and a biomass

  20. The Production of Biodiesel from Cottonseed Oil Using Rhizopus oryzae Whole Cell Biocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athalye, Sneha Kishor

    Biodiesel is an environmentally friendly alternative to fossil fuels which have become increasingly expensive in recent times. An alternate approach to alkaline biodiesel production is needed as catalyst miscibility with the glycerol by-product, generation of large amounts of waste water, and saponification of the feedstock are major disadvantages associated with the process. Lipases are water soluble enzymes which act as catalysts in many lipid based reactions. Reuse of lipases can significantly reduce cost of enzymatic biodiesel production; however retention of lipolytic activity still remains a challenge. Use of microbial cells immobilized on various surfaces like sponge, foam and plastics as biocatalysts instead of extracted enzyme could help overcome this problem. A novel, rigid biomass support with high surface area made from recyclable polyethylene (Bioblok(TM)) was used in this study. Several fungal and bacterial species have been reported to possess appreciable levels of lipase activity. The biomass production and immobilization as well as lipase activity of three different species; Candida rugosa (ATCC #38772), Aspergillus oryzae (ATCC #58299), and Rhizopus oryzae (ATTC #34612) were tested. C. rugosa did not attach well to the support particles while A.oryzae had lower biomass accumulation of 6.1 g (dry cell wt)/L compared to 11.8 g (dry cell wt)/L for R.oryzae. Hence Rhizopus oryzae, fungal specie with cell surface bound lipase was selected for the current study. The study investigated the influence of media composition and growth time of the R.oryzae whole cell biocatalysts, immobilized on the BSPs, for FAME production from cottonseed oil. R.oryzae BSPs grown in basal media supplemented with 1% (w/v) of glucose or oil or both for 48 h, 72 h or 90 h were used in a 36 h transesterification reaction with cottonseed oil and methanol. BSPs grown in both glucose and oil supplemented medium for 72 h had the highest conversion of 22.4% (wt/wt) and a biomass

  1. Highly efficient biodiesel production by a whole-cell biocatalyst employing a system with high lipase expression in Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Takaya, Tomohiro; Koda, Risa; Adachi, Daisuke; Nakashima, Kazunori; Wada, Junpei; Bogaki, Takayuki; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2011-05-01

    In the present study, a system with high lipase expression in Aspergillus oryzae was developed using an improved enolase promoter (P-enoA124) and the 5' untranslated region of a heat-shock protein (Hsp-UTR). P-enoA142 enhanced the transcriptional level of a heterologous lipase gene and Hsp-UTR improved its translational efficiency. Fusarium heterosporum lipase (FHL) was inserted into a pSENSU-FHL expression vector harboring P-enoA142 and Hsp-UTR and was transformed into an A. oryzae NS4 strain. Transformants possessing pSENSU-FHL in single (pSENSU-FHL#1) and double copies (pSENSU-FHL#2) were selected to evaluate the lipase activity of the whole-cell biocatalyst. The two strains, pSENSU-FHL#1 and #2, showed excellent lipase activity in hydrolysis compared with the strain transformed with conventional expression vector pNAN8142-FHL. Furthermore, by using pSENSU-FHL#2, methanolysis could proceed much more effectively without deactivation, which allowed a swift addition of methanol to the reaction mixture, thereby reducing reaction time. PMID:21380514

  2. Effects of lactone, ketone, and phenolic compounds on methane production and metabolic intermediates during anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Wikandari, Rachma; Sari, Noor Kartika; A'yun, Qurrotul; Millati, Ria; Cahyanto, Muhammad Nur; Niklasson, Claes; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2015-02-01

    Fruit waste is a potential feedstock for biogas production. However, the presence of fruit flavors that have antimicrobial activity is a challenge for biogas production. Lactones, ketones, and phenolic compounds are among the several groups of fruit flavors that are present in many fruits. This work aimed to investigate the effects of two lactones, i.e., γ-hexalactone and γ-decalactone; two ketones, i.e., furaneol and mesifurane; and two phenolic compounds, i.e., quercetin and epicatechin on anaerobic digestion with a focus on methane production, biogas composition, and metabolic intermediates. Anaerobic digestion was performed in a batch glass digester incubated at 55 °C for 30 days. The flavor compounds were added at concentrations of 0.05, 0.5, and 5 g/L. The results show that the addition of γ-decalactone, quercetin, and epicathechin in the range of 0.5-5 g/L reduced the methane production by 50 % (MIC50). Methane content was reduced by 90 % with the addition of 5 g/L of γ-decalactone, quercetin, and epicathechin. Accumulation of acetic acid, together with an increase in carbon dioxide production, was observed. On the contrary, γ-hexalactone, furaneol, and mesifurane increased the methane production by 83-132 % at a concentration of 5 g/L. PMID:25416476

  3. A biocatalyst for the removal of sulfite from alcoholic beverages.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sung-Chyr; Georgiou, George

    2005-01-01

    The presence of sulfites in alcoholic beverages, particularly in wines, can cause allergic responses with symptoms ranging from mild gastrointestinal problems to life threatening anaphylactic shock in a substantial portion of the population. We have developed a simple and inexpensive biocatalytic method that employs wheatgrass (Triticum aestivum) chloroplasts for the efficient oxidation of sulfites in wines to innocuous sulfates. A sufficiently high rate of sulfite oxidation was obtained in the presence of ethanol at concentrations commonly found in most wines. Crude chloroplast preparations at a concentration as low as 5 mg/mL were capable of reducing sulfite in commercial white wines from 150 ppm to under 7.5 ppm within 3 hours. A 93% removal of sulfite in commercial red wines was observed with 1 mg/mL chloroplasts within 45 min. Optimal sulfite removal efficiency was observed at pH 8.5 and was promoted by illumination, indicating the participation of light-induced photosynthetic electron transport processes in sulfite oxidation. Overall, this work indicates that biocatalytic oxidation using wheatgrass chloroplasts can be employed to remove sulfites from beverages prior to consumption. PMID:15540199

  4. Intracellular Metabolism of α,β-Unsaturated Carbonyl Compounds, Acrolein, Crotonaldehyde and Methyl Vinyl Ketone, Active Toxicants in Cigarette Smoke: Participation of Glutathione Conjugation Ability and Aldehyde-Ketone Sensitive Reductase Activity.

    PubMed

    Horiyama, Shizuyo; Hatai, Mayuko; Takahashi, Yuta; Date, Sachiko; Masujima, Tsutomu; Honda, Chie; Ichikawa, Atsushi; Yoshikawa, Noriko; Nakamura, Kazuki; Kunitomo, Masaru; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    The major toxicants in cigarette smoke, α,β-unsaturated aldehydes, such as acrolein (ACR) and crotonaldehyde (CA), and α,β-unsaturated ketone, methyl vinyl ketone (MVK), are known to form Michael-type adducts with glutathione (GSH) and consequently cause intracellular GSH depletion, which is involved in cigarette smoke-induced cytotoxicity. We have previously clarified that exposure to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) of a mouse melanoma cell culture medium causes rapid reduction of intracellular GSH levels, and that the GSH-MVK adduct can be detected by LC/MS analysis while the GSH-CA adduct is hardly detected. In the present study, to clarify why the GSH-CA adduct is difficult to detect in the cell medium, we conducted detailed investigation of the structures of the reaction products of ACR, CA, MVK and CSE in the GSH solution or the cell culture medium. The mass spectra indicated that in the presence of the cells, the GSH-CA and GSH-ACR adducts were almost not detected while their corresponding alcohols were detected. On the other hand, both the GSH-MVK adducts and their reduced products were detected. In the absence of the cells, the reaction of GSH with all α,β-unsaturated carbonyls produced only their corresponding adducts. These results show that the GSH adducts of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes, CA and ACR, are quickly reduced by certain intracellular carbonyl reductase(s) and excreted from the cells, unlike the GSH adduct of α,β-unsaturated ketone, MVK. Such a difference in reactivity to the carbonyl reductase might be related to differences in the cytotoxicity of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes and ketones. PMID:27250793

  5. Novel sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone ketone)s for direct methanol fuel cells usage: Synthesis, water uptake, methanol diffusion coefficient and proton conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gang; Fu, Tiezhu; Shao, Ke; Li, Xianfeng; Zhao, Chengji; Na, Hui; Zhang, Hong

    A novel series of sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone ketone)s (SPEEKKs) with different degrees of sulfonation (Ds) were synthesized from 1,3-bis(3-sodium sulfonate-4-fluorobenzoyl)benzene (1,3-SFBB-Na), 1,3-bis(4-fluorobenzoyl)benzene (1,3-FBB) and 3,3‧,5,5‧-tetramethyl-4,4‧-biphenol (TMBP) by aromatic nucleophilic polycondensation. The chemical structures of SPEEKKs were confirmed by FT-IR spectroscopy and the Ds values of the polymers were calculated by 1H NMR and titration methods, respectively. The thermal stabilities of the SPEEKKs in acid and sodium forms were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), which showed that SPEEKKs had excellent thermal properties at high temperatures. All the SPEEKK polymers were easily solution cast into tough membranes. Water uptakes, proton conductivities and methanol diffusion coefficients of the SPEEKK membranes were measured. Water uptake increased with Ds and temperature. Compared to Nafion, the SPEEKK-60, -70 and -80 membranes showed higher proton conductivities at 80 °C, while the other SPEEKK membranes showed relatively lower proton conductivities. This may be due to the different distribution of ion-conducting domains in membrane. However, these membranes showed lower methanol diffusions in the range of 8.32 × 10 -9 to 1.14 × 10 -7 cm 2 s -1 compared with that of Nafion (2 × 10 -6 cm 2 s -1) at the same temperature. The membranes also showed excellent mechanical properties (with a Young's modulus > 1 GPa and a tensile strength > 40 MPa). These results indicate that the SPEEKK membranes are promising materials for use in direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) applications.

  6. Optimization of culture conditions to produce high yields of active Acetobacter sp. CCTCC M209061 cells for anti-Prelog reduction of prochiral ketones

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Chiral alcohols are widely used in the synthesis of chiral pharmaceuticals, flavors and functional materials and appropriate whole-cell biocatalysts offer a highly enantioselective, minimally polluting route to these valuable compounds. The recently isolated strain Acetobacter sp. CCTCC M209061 showed exclusive anti-Prelog stereoselectivity for the reduction of prochiral ketones, but the low biomass has limited its commercialization and industrial applications. To tackle this problem, the effects of medium components and culture conditions on the strain's growth and reduction activity were explored. Results By using a one-at-a-time method and a central composite rotatable design (CCRD), the optimal medium and culture conditions were found to be as follows: glucose 8.26 g/L, fructose 2.50 g/L, soy peptone 83.92 g/L, MnSO4·H2O 0.088 g/L, pH 5.70, 30°C and 10% (v/v) inoculum. Under the above-mentioned conditions, the biomass after 30 h cultivation reached 1.10 ± 0.03 g/L, which was 9.5-fold higher than that obtained with basic medium. Also, the reduction activity towards 4'-chloroacetophenone was markedly enhanced to 39.49 ± 0.96 μmol/min/g from 29.34 ± 0.65 μmol/min/g, with the product e.e. being above 99%. Comparable improvements were also seen with the enantioselective bioreduction of 4-(trimethylsilyl)-3-butyn-2-one to the key pharmaceutical precursor (R) - 4-(trimethylsilyl)-3-butyn-2-ol. Conclusions The biomass and reduction activity of Acetobacter sp. CCTCC M209061 can be greatly enhanced through the optimization strategy. This facilitates use of the strain in the anti-Prelog stereoselective reduction of prochiral ketones to enantiopure chiral alcohols as building blocks for many industries. PMID:22099947

  7. Bacterial Anabaena variabilis phenylalanine ammonia lyase: a biocatalyst with broad substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Lovelock, Sarah L; Turner, Nicholas J

    2014-10-15

    Phenylalanine ammonia lyases (PALs) catalyse the regio- and stereoselective hydroamination of cinnamic acid analogues to yield optically enriched α-amino acids. Herein, we demonstrate that a bacterial PAL from Anabaena variabilis (AvPAL) displays significantly higher activity towards a series of non-natural substrates than previously described eukaryotic PALs. Biotransformations performed on a preparative scale led to the synthesis of the 2-chloro- and 4-trifluoromethyl-phenylalanine derivatives in excellent ee, highlighting the enormous potential of bacterial PALs as biocatalysts for the synthesis of high value, non-natural amino acids. PMID:25037641

  8. Biological lignocellulose solubilization: Comparative evaluation of biocatalysts and enhancement via cotreatment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Paye, Julie M. D.; Guseva, Anna; Hammer, Sarah K.; Gjersing, Erica; Davis, Mark F.; Davison, Brian H.; Olstad, Jessica; Donohoe, Bryon S.; Nguyen, Thanh Yen; Wyman, Charles E.; et al

    2016-01-12

    Feedstock recalcitrance is the most important barrier impeding cost-effective production of cellulosic biofuels. Pioneer commercial cellulosic ethanol facilities employ thermochemical pretreatment and addition of fungal cellulase, reflecting the main research emphasis in the field. However, it has been suggested that it may be possible to process cellulosic biomass without thermochemical pretreatment using thermophilic, cellulolytic bacteria. Thus, to further explore this idea, we examine the ability of various biocatalysts to solubilize autoclaved but otherwise unpretreated cellulosic biomass under controlled but not industrial conditions.

  9. Functionalization of poly(aryl ether ether ketone)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Fei; Roovers, J.

    1993-12-31

    Bromomethyl and dibromomethyl substituted poly(aryl ether ether ketone) have been prepared from methyl poly(aryl ether ether ketone) by bromination with bromine. These brominated polymers are intermediates that can be further functionalized by: hydrolysis, oxidation, substitution etc. A series of new functionalized PEEK polymers has been prepared. The functional group includes -CH{sub 2}OH, -CH{sub 2}OCH{sub 3}, -CHO, -COOH, -COOCH{sub 3}, -CH{sub 2}CN, -CH{sub 2}COOH, -CH{sub 2}OCOCH{sub 3}, -CH{sub 2}N{sup +}H(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 3}){sub 2}Br{sup {minus}}, -CH{sub 2}N(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 3}){sub 2}, -CH{sub 2}N{sup +}H(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 3}){sub 3}Br{sup {minus}}.

  10. A constitutive model of polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK).

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Ou, Hengan; Lu, Bin; Long, Hui

    2016-01-01

    A modified Johnson-Cook (JC) model was proposed to describe the flow behaviour of polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) with the consideration of coupled effects of strain, strain rate and temperature. As compared to traditional JC model, the modified one has better ability to predict the flow behaviour at elevated temperature conditions. In particular, the yield stress was found to be inversely proportional to temperature from the predictions of the proposed model. PMID:26409233

  11. Catalytic Leuckart-Wallach-type reductive amination of ketones.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Masato; Lee, Donghyun; Hayashi, Shinnosuke; Tanaka, Shinji; Yoshimura, Masahiro

    2002-11-29

    A CpRh(III) complex catalyzes reductive amination of ketones using HCOONH(4) at 50-70 degrees C to give the corresponding primary amines in high yields. The reaction is clean and operationally simple and proceeds at a lower temperature and with higher chemoselectivity than the original Leuckart-Wallach reaction. The new method has been applied to the synthesis of alpha-amino acids directly from alpha-keto acids. PMID:12444661

  12. Trifluoromethyl ketones as inhibitors of the processionary moth sex pheromone.

    PubMed

    Parrilla, A; Guerrero, A

    1994-02-01

    Aliphatic and aromatic trifluoromethyl ketones have been evaluated in the laboratory and in the field as inhibitors of the pheromone response of the processionary moth Thaumetopoea pityocampa males. Among them, two compounds, (Z)-1,1,1-trifluoro-15-octadecen-13-yn-2-one and (Z)-1,1,1-trifluoro-16-nonadecen-14-yn-2-one, are closely related analogs of the natural pheromone (Z)-13-hexadecen-11-ynyl acetate. In the laboratory experiments, carried out by pre-exposure of males to vapors of the chemicals, alpha-naphthyl trifluoromethyl ketone, beta-naphthyl trifluoromethyl ketone, 1,1,1-trifluorotetradecan-2-one and (Z)-16-nonadecen-14-yn-2-one displayed notable blockage of the pheromone detection on EAG. The activity of 1,1,1-trifluorotetradecan-2-one is postulated to be due to the inhibition of the pheromone-degrading esterase. In general, the compounds have shown low specificity for the substrate and exhibited only a modest or null EAG intrinsic activity. In the field, benzyl trifluoromethyl ketone, trifluoroacetophenone, (Z)-1,1,1-trifluoro-15-octadecen-13-yn-2-one, (Z)-1,1,1-trifluoro-16-nonadecen-14-yn-2-one and beta-naphthyl trifluoroacetate showed a remarkable disruptant effect when mixed with the pheromone in 1:0.1, 1:1 and 1:10 ratio. (Z)-16-Nonadecen-14-yn-2-one has been found to be a modest agonist of the natural pheromone, exhibiting an attractant activity threefold lower than the parent molecule. PMID:8055254

  13. Caloric restriction increases ketone bodies metabolism and preserves blood flow in aging brain

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ai-Ling; Zhang, Wei; Gao, Xiaoli; Watts, Lora

    2015-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to increase the life span and health span of a broad range of species. However, CR effects on in vivo brain functions are far from explored. In this study, we used multimetric neuroimaging methods to characterize the CR-induced changes of brain metabolic and vascular functions in aging rats. We found that old rats (24 months of age) with CR diet had reduced glucose uptake and lactate concentration, but increased ketone bodies level, compared with the age-matched and young (5 months of age) controls. The shifted metabolism was associated with preserved vascular function: old CR rats also had maintained cerebral blood flow relative to the age-matched controls. When investigating the metabolites in mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle, we found that citrate and α-ketoglutarate were preserved in the old CR rats. We suggest that CR is neuroprotective; ketone bodies, cerebral blood flow, and α-ketoglutarate may play important roles in preserving brain physiology in aging. PMID:25896951

  14. Reconstruction of frontal bone using specific implant polyether-ether-ketone.

    PubMed

    Camarini, Edevaldo Tadeu; Tomeh, Jorge Kaluf; Dias, Rafael Rodrigues; da Silva, Everton Jose

    2011-11-01

    Defects on the craniofacial complex may result in aesthetic defects, functional damage, and psychologic consequences. Previously, surgeons showed no interest in reconstructing the operated area, but in the treatment of the problem, leaving bone contour is a secondary issue. Nowadays, area reconstruction with post-reestablishment of contour and local shape has become one of the surgeon's priorities. The use of alloplastic implants with specific digital design has been stated to be an effective technique on the treatment of craniofacial defects, reducing the need for manipulation in the intraoperative period and decreasing surgery time. Polyether ether ketone (PEEK) is a potential candidate because it is a linear polyaromatic semicrystalline polymer that combines strength, stiffness, durability, and resistance. Polyether ether ketone biocompatibility has been supported in literature, and subsequent medical applications of the material have been observed. The aim of this study was to describe a case of frontal bone defect reconstruction in which the PEEK was used as polymer material in a specific implant for the Synthes (PEEK-PSI) patient. PMID:22075823

  15. Cyclohexyl Ketone Inhibitors of Pin1 Dock in a Trans-Diaxial Cyclohexane Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guoyan G.; Slebodnick, Carla; Etzkorn, Felicia A.

    2012-01-01

    Cyclohexyl ketone substrate analogue inhibitors (Ac–pSer-Ψ[C = OCH]-Pip–tryptamine) of Pin1, the cell cycle regulatory peptidyl-prolyl isomerase (PPIase), were designed and synthesized as potential electrophilic acceptors for the Pin1 active site Cys113 nucleophile to test a proposed nucleophilic addition-isomerization mechanism. Because they were weak inhibitors, models of all three stereoisomers were docked into the active site of Pin1. Each isomer consistently minimized to a trans-diaxial cyclohexane conformation. From this, we hypothesize that Pin1 stretches substrates into a trans-pyrrolidine conformation to lower the barrier to isomerization. Our reduced amide inhibitor of Pin1 adopted a similar trans-pyrrolidine conformation in the crystal structure. The molecular model of 1, which mimics the l-Ser-l-Pro stereochemistry, in the Pin1 active site showed a distance of 4.4 Å, and an angle of 31° between Cys113-S and the ketone carbon. The computational models suggest that the mechanism of Pin1 PPIase is not likely to proceed through nucleophilic addition. PMID:23028504

  16. Individual surface-engineered microorganisms as robust Pickering interfacial biocatalysts for resistance-minimized phase-transfer bioconversion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhaowei; Ji, Haiwei; Zhao, Chuanqi; Ju, Enguo; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2015-04-13

    A powerful strategy for long-term and diffusional-resistance-minimized whole-cell biocatalysis in biphasic systems is reported where individually encapsulated bacteria are employed as robust and recyclable Pickering interfacial biocatalysts. By individually immobilizing bacterial cells and optimizing the hydrophobic/hydrophilic balance of the encapsulating magnetic mineral shells, the encased bacteria became interfacially active and locate at the Pickering emulsion interfaces, leading to dramatically enhanced bioconversion performances by minimizing internal and external diffusional resistances. Moreover, in situ product separation and biocatalyst recovery was readily achieved using a remote magnetic field. Importantly, the mineral shell effectively protected the entire cell from long-term organic-solvent stress, as shown by the reusability of the biocatalysts for up to 30 cycles, while retaining high stereoselective catalytic activities, cell viabilities, and proliferative abilities. PMID:25706244

  17. Me2(CH2Cl)SiCN: Bifunctional Cyanating Reagent for the Synthesis of Tertiary Alcohols with a Chloromethyl Ketone Moiety via Ketone Cyanosilylation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xing-Ping; Zhou, Jian

    2016-07-20

    We report a novel bifunctional cyanating reagent, Me2(CH2Cl)SiCN, which paves the way to a one-pot sequential synthesis of tertiary alcohols featuring a chloromethyl ketone moiety via enantioselective ketone cyanosilylation. This method contributes to gram-scale enantioselective total synthesis of the aggregation pheromone of the Colorado potato beetle, (S)-CPB. PMID:27399262

  18. Enhancement of L-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase activity and circulating ketone body levels by pantethine. Relevance to dopaminergic injury

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The administration of the ketone bodies hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate is known to exert a protective effect against metabolic disorders associated with cerebral pathologies. This suggests that the enhancement of their endogenous production might be a rational therapeutic approach. Ketone bodies are generated by fatty acid beta-oxidation, a process involving a mitochondrial oxido-reductase superfamily, with fatty acid-CoA thioesters as substrates. In this report, emphasis is on the penultimate step of the process, i.e. L-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase activity. We determined changes in enzyme activity and in circulating ketone body levels in the MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease. Since the active moiety of CoA is pantetheine, mice were treated with pantethine, its naturally-occurring form. Pantethine has the advantage of being known as an anti-inflammatory and hypolipidemic agent with very few side effects. Results We found that dehydrogenase activity and circulating ketone body levels were drastically reduced by the neurotoxin MPTP, whereas treatment with pantethine overcame these adverse effects. Pantethine prevented dopaminergic neuron loss and motility disorders. In vivo and in vitro experiments showed that the protection was associated with enhancement of glutathione (GSH) production as well as restoration of respiratory chain complex I activity and mitochondrial ATP levels. Remarkably, pantethine treatment boosted the circulating ketone body levels in MPTP-intoxicated mice, but not in normal animals. Conclusions These finding demonstrate the feasibility of the enhancement of endogenous ketone body production and provide a promising therapeutic approach to Parkinson's disease as well as, conceivably, to other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:20416081

  19. Formulation and characterization of an immobilized laccase biocatalyst and its application to eliminate organic micropollutants in wastewater.

    PubMed

    Nair, Rakesh R; Demarche, Philippe; Agathos, Spiros N

    2013-09-25

    Over the past decades, water pollution by trace organic compounds (ng L(-1)) has become one of the key environmental issues for developed countries. To date there is no effective and sustainable remediation strategy available. Laccases from white rot fungi were found particularly attractive for the removal of some micropollutants such as the plasticizer bisphenol A (BPA), the anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac (DF) and the steroidal hormone 17-α-ethinylestradiol (EE2). Laccase immobilization is a prerequisite for their use in continuous water treatment processes. In this study, laccase from Coriolopsis gallica was immobilized on mesoporous silica spheres in a two-step adsorption-crosslinking process. The initial laccase activity, crosslinker (glutaraldehyde) concentration and extra protein (albumin) concentration were varied following a central composite experimental design and optimized with respect to the immobilization yield, activity and thermal stability of the biocatalysts. After a multi-objective optimization of the biocatalyst formulation, a maximum biocatalyst activity of 383 Ug(-1), determined with 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate) at pH 4.5, was obtained. Biocatalyst particles were physically characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area and Barrett-Joyner-Halenda pore size analyses revealing few modifications of the surface area and structure during/after the immobilization procedure. The biocatalyst showed a significantly higher thermostability than the free enzyme with a half-life of 31.5 hours and 3.9 hours compared to 6.1 hours and 0.6 hours at 55°C and 75°C respectively. The biocatalyst was able to eliminate in a continuously stirred membrane reactor more than 95% of BPA 10 μM and EE2 10 μM and 70% of DF 10 μM when treated individually and more than 90% when treated as a mixture in aqueous buffered solution (pH 5) for more than 60 reactor volumes. In real wastewater conditions (pH 7

  20. Are Lipases Still Important Biocatalysts? A Study of Scientific Publications and Patents for Technological Forecasting.

    PubMed

    Daiha, Karina de Godoy; Angeli, Renata; de Oliveira, Sabrina Dias; Almeida, Rodrigo Volcan

    2015-01-01

    The great potential of lipases is known since 1930 when the work of J. B. S. Haldane was published. After eighty-five years of studies and developments, are lipases still important biocatalysts? For answering this question the present work investigated the technological development of four important industrial sectors where lipases are applied: production of detergent formulations; organic synthesis, focusing on kinetic resolution, production of biodiesel, and production of food and feed products. The analysis was made based on research publications and patent applications, working as scientific and technological indicators, respectively. Their evolution, interaction, the major players of each sector and the main subject matters disclosed in patent documents were discussed. Applying the concept of technology life cycle, S-curves were built by plotting cumulative patent data over time to monitor the attractiveness of each technology for investment. The results lead to a conclusion that the use of lipases as biocatalysts is still a relevant topic for the industrial sector, but developments are still needed for lipase biocatalysis to reach its full potential, which are expected to be achieved within the third, and present, wave of biocatalysis. PMID:26111144

  1. Improvement of Biocatalysts for Industrial and Environmental Purposes by Saturation Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Valetti, Francesca; Gilardi, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory evolution techniques are becoming increasingly widespread among protein engineers for the development of novel and designed biocatalysts. The palette of different approaches ranges from complete randomized strategies to rational and structure-guided mutagenesis, with a wide variety of costs, impacts, drawbacks and relevance to biotechnology. A technique that convincingly compromises the extremes of fully randomized vs. rational mutagenesis, with a high benefit/cost ratio, is saturation mutagenesis. Here we will present and discuss this approach in its many facets, also tackling the issue of randomization, statistical evaluation of library completeness and throughput efficiency of screening methods. Successful recent applications covering different classes of enzymes will be presented referring to the literature and to research lines pursued in our group. The focus is put on saturation mutagenesis as a tool for designing novel biocatalysts specifically relevant to production of fine chemicals for improving bulk enzymes for industry and engineering technical enzymes involved in treatment of waste, detoxification and production of clean energy from renewable sources. PMID:24970191

  2. Are Lipases Still Important Biocatalysts? A Study of Scientific Publications and Patents for Technological Forecasting

    PubMed Central

    Daiha, Karina de Godoy; Angeli, Renata; de Oliveira, Sabrina Dias; Almeida, Rodrigo Volcan

    2015-01-01

    The great potential of lipases is known since 1930 when the work of J. B. S. Haldane was published. After eighty-five years of studies and developments, are lipases still important biocatalysts? For answering this question the present work investigated the technological development of four important industrial sectors where lipases are applied: production of detergent formulations; organic synthesis, focusing on kinetic resolution, production of biodiesel, and production of food and feed products. The analysis was made based on research publications and patent applications, working as scientific and technological indicators, respectively. Their evolution, interaction, the major players of each sector and the main subject matters disclosed in patent documents were discussed. Applying the concept of technology life cycle, S-curves were built by plotting cumulative patent data over time to monitor the attractiveness of each technology for investment. The results lead to a conclusion that the use of lipases as biocatalysts is still a relevant topic for the industrial sector, but developments are still needed for lipase biocatalysis to reach its full potential, which are expected to be achieved within the third, and present, wave of biocatalysis. PMID:26111144

  3. Regioselective synthesis of cytarabine monopropionate by using a fungal whole-cell biocatalyst in nonaqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mei-yan; Wu, Hui; Lu, Zhi-hong; Li, Xiao-feng; Lai, Fu-rao; Zhao, Guang-lei

    2014-08-01

    The utilization of a dehydrated fungal biocatalyst of Aspergillus oryzae cells was successfully performed to achieve efficient acylation modification of a polar nucleoside cytarabine (ara-C). Organic solvents showed evident influence on the reaction catalyzed by the A. oryzae whole-cells. Except for hexane-pyridine, the catalytic activity and regioselectivity of the whole-cells clearly increased with increasing the polarity of the hydrophobic organic solvents used. The effects of some crucial factors on the reaction were further examined. The best reaction medium, hydrophobic solvent concentration, vinyl propionate/ara-C ratio, reaction temperature and shaking speed were confirmed as isopropyl ether (IPE)-pyridine, 30% (v/v), 90, 30 °C and 140-180 rpm, respectively. The cell biocatalyst also showed good thermal stabilities in both IPE-pyridine and hexane-pyridine systems. In addition, the desired 3'-O-propional derivative of ara-C was synthesized with the yields of 88.3% and regioselectivity (>70%). The resulting biocatalytic system appears to be an effective alternative, and can thus be employed for application in highly regioselective modification of nucleoside analogues. PMID:24957351

  4. Biocatalyst Enhancement

    EPA Science Inventory

    The increasing availability of enzyme collections has assisted attempts by pharmaceutical producers to adopt green chemistry approaches to manufacturing. A joint effort between an enzyme producer and a pharmaceutical manufacturer has been enhanced over the past three years by ena...

  5. Aminosilica materials as adsorbents for the selective removal of aldehydes and ketones from simulated bio-oil.

    PubMed

    Drese, Jeffrey H; Talley, Anne D; Jones, Christopher W

    2011-03-21

    The fast pyrolysis of biomass is a potential route to the production of liquid biorenewable fuel sources. However, degradation of the bio-oil mixtures due to reaction of oxygenates, such as aldehydes and ketones, reduces the stability of the liquids and can impact long-term storage and shipping. Herein, solid aminosilica adsorbents are described for the selective adsorptive removal of reactive aldehyde and ketone species. Three aminosilica adsorbents are prepared through the reaction of amine-containing silanes with pore-expanded mesoporous silica. A fourth aminosilica adsorbent is prepared through the ring-opening polymerization of aziridine from pore-expanded mesoporous silica. Adsorption experiments with a representative mixture of bio-oil model compounds are presented using each adsorbent at room temperature and 45 °C. The adsorbent comprising only primary amines adsorbs the largest amount of aldehydes and ketones. The overall reactivity of this adsorbent increases with increasing temperature. Additional aldehyde screening experiments show that the reactivity of aldehydes with aminosilicas varies depending on their chemical functionality. Initial attempts to regenerate an aminosilica adsorbent by acid hydrolysis show that they can be at least partially regenerated for further use. PMID:21246749

  6. Advanced selective non-invasive ketone body detection sensors based on new ionophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyapalan, A.; Sarswat, P. K.; Zhu, Y.; Free, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    New molecules and methods were examined that can be used to detect trace level ketone bodies. Diseases such as type 1 diabetes, childhood hypo-glycaemia-growth hormone deficiency, toxic inhalation, and body metabolism changes are linked with ketone bodies concentration. Here we introduce, selective ketone body detection sensors based on small, environmentally friendly organic molecules with Lewis acid additives. Density functional theory (DFT) simulation of the sensor molecules (Bromo-acetonaphthone tungstate (BANT) and acetonaphthophenyl ether propiono hydroxyl tungstate (APPHT)), indicated a fully relaxed geometry without symmetry attributes and specific coordination which enhances ketone bodies sensitivity. A portable sensing unit was made in which detection media containing ketone bodies at low concentration and new molecules show color change in visible light as well as unique irradiance during UV illumination. RGB analysis, electrochemical tests, SEM characterization, FTIR, absorbance and emission spectroscopy were also performed in order to validate the ketone sensitivity of these new molecules.

  7. The ketone metabolite β-hydroxybutyrate blocks NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Youm, Yun-Hee; Nguyen, Kim Y; Grant, Ryan W; Goldberg, Emily L; Bodogai, Monica; Kim, Dongin; D'Agostino, Dominic; Planavsky, Noah; Lupfer, Christopher; Kanneganti, Thirumala D; Kang, Seokwon; Horvath, Tamas L; Fahmy, Tarek M; Crawford, Peter A; Biragyn, Arya; Alnemri, Emad; Dixit, Vishwa Deep

    2015-03-01

    The ketone bodies β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) and acetoacetate (AcAc) support mammalian survival during states of energy deficit by serving as alternative sources of ATP. BHB levels are elevated by starvation, caloric restriction, high-intensity exercise, or the low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet. Prolonged fasting reduces inflammation; however, the impact that ketones and other alternative metabolic fuels produced during energy deficits have on the innate immune response is unknown. We report that BHB, but neither AcAc nor the structurally related short-chain fatty acids butyrate and acetate, suppresses activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in response to urate crystals, ATP and lipotoxic fatty acids. BHB did not inhibit caspase-1 activation in response to pathogens that activate the NLR family, CARD domain containing 4 (NLRC4) or absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) inflammasome and did not affect non-canonical caspase-11, inflammasome activation. Mechanistically, BHB inhibits the NLRP3 inflammasome by preventing K(+) efflux and reducing ASC oligomerization and speck formation. The inhibitory effects of BHB on NLRP3 are not dependent on chirality or starvation-regulated mechanisms like AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), reactive oxygen species (ROS), autophagy or glycolytic inhibition. BHB blocks the NLRP3 inflammasome without undergoing oxidation in the TCA cycle, and independently of uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2), sirtuin-2 (SIRT2), the G protein-coupled receptor GPR109A or hydrocaboxylic acid receptor 2 (HCAR2). BHB reduces NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18 production in human monocytes. In vivo, BHB or a ketogenic diet attenuates caspase-1 activation and IL-1β secretion in mouse models of NLRP3-mediated diseases such as Muckle-Wells syndrome, familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome and urate crystal-induced peritonitis. Our findings suggest that the anti-inflammatory effects of caloric restriction or ketogenic diets may be linked to BHB

  8. Ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate blocks the NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated inflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    Youm, Yun-Hee; Nguyen, Kim Y.; Grant, Ryan W.; Goldberg, Emily L.; Bodogai, Monica; Kim, Dongin; D'Agostino, Dominic; Planavsky, Noah; Lupfer, Christopher; Kanneganti, Thirumala D.; Kang, Seokwon; Horvath, Tamas L.; Fahmy, Tarek M.; Crawford, Peter A.; Biragyn, Arya; Alnemri, Emad; Dixit, Vishwa Deep

    2015-01-01

    Ketone bodies , β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) and acetoacetate support mammalian survival during states of energy deficit by serving as alternative source of ATP1. BHB levels are elevated during starvation, high-intensity exercise or by the low carbohydrate ketogenic diet2. Prolonged caloric restriction or fasting reduces inflammation as immune system adapts to low glucose supply and energy metabolism switches towards mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, ketogenesis and ketolysis2-6. However, role of ketones bodies in regulation of innate immune response is unknown. We report that BHB, but neither acetoacetate nor structurally-related short chain fatty acids, butyrate and acetate, suppresses activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in response to several structurally unrelated NLRP3 activators, without impacting NLRC4, AIM2 or non-canonical caspase-11 inflammasome activation. Mechanistically, BHB inhibits NLRP3 inflammasome by preventing K+ efflux and reducing ASC oligomerization and speck formation. The inhibitory effects of BHB on NLRP3 were not dependent on chirality or classical starvation regulated mechanisms like AMPK, reactive oxygen species (ROS), autophagy or glycolytic inhibition. BHB blocked NLRP3 inflammasome without undergoing oxidation in TCA cycle, independently of uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2), Sirt2, receptor Gpr109a and inhibition of NLRP3 did not correlate with magnitude of histone acetylation in macrophages. BHB reduced the NLRP3 inflammasome mediated IL-1β and IL-18 production in human monocytes. In vivo, BHB attenuates caspase-1 activation and IL-1β secretion in mouse models of NLRP3-mediated diseases like Muckle-Wells Syndrome (MWS), Familial Cold Autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS) and urate crystal induce body cavity inflammation. Taken together, these findings suggest that the anti-inflammatory effects of caloric restriction or ketogenic diets may be mechanistically linked to BHB-mediated inhibition of the NLRP3 inflammasome, and point to the potential

  9. Rhodium-Catalyzed Ketone Methylation Using Methanol Under Mild Conditions: Formation of α-Branched Products**

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Louis K M; Poole, Darren L; Shen, Di; Healy, Mark P; Donohoe, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    The rhodium-catalyzed methylation of ketones has been accomplished using methanol as the methylating agent and the hydrogen-borrowing method. The sequence is notable for the relatively low temperatures that are required and for the ability of the reaction system to form α-branched products with ease. Doubly alkylated ketones can be prepared from methyl ketones and two different alcohols by using a sequential one-pot iridium- and rhodium-catalyzed process. PMID:24288297

  10. On the nature of the olefination reaction involving ditungsten hexaalkoxides and aldehydes or ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Chisholm, M.H.; Huffman, J.C.; Lucas, E.A.; Sousa, A.; Streib, W.E.

    1992-03-25

    Reductive coupling of aldehydes and ketones to olefins under the action of ditungsten hexaalkoxides was investigated. In these reactions, reductive cleavage of the aldehyde or ketone carbonyl is followed by formation of the olefinic C-C bond and breaking of the carbonyl C-O bond of the second aldehyde or ketone. Observations concerning the initial C-O bond cleavage and subsequent C-C bond formation are presented. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Investigation of attractive and repulsive interactions associated with ketones in supercritical CO2, based on Raman spectroscopy and theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajiya, Daisuke; Saitow, Ken-ichi

    2013-08-01

    Carbonyl compounds are solutes that are highly soluble in supercritical CO2 (scCO2). Their solubility governs the efficiency of chemical reactions, and is significantly increased by changing a chromophore. To effectively use scCO2 as solvent, it is crucial to understand the high solubility of carbonyl compounds, the solvation structure, and the solute-solvent intermolecular interactions. We report Raman spectroscopic data, for three prototypical ketones dissolved in scCO2, and four theoretical analyses. The vibrational Raman spectra of the C=O stretching modes of ketones (acetone, acetophenone, and benzophenone) were measured in scCO2 along the reduced temperature Tr = T/Tc = 1.02 isotherm as a function of the reduced density ρr = ρ/ρc in the range 0.05-1.5. The peak frequencies of the C=O stretching modes shifted toward lower energies as the fluid density increased. The density dependence was analyzed by using perturbed hard-sphere theory, and the shift was decomposed into attractive and repulsive energy components. The attractive energy between the ketones and CO2 was up to nine times higher than the repulsive energy, and its magnitude increased in the following order: acetone < acetophenone < benzophenone. The Mulliken charges of the three solutes and CO2 molecules obtained by using quantum chemistry calculations described the order of the magnitude of the attractive energy and optimized the relative configuration between each solute and CO2. According to theoretical calculations for the dispersion energy, the dipole-induced-dipole interaction energy, and the frequency shift due to their interactions, the experimentally determined attractive energy differences in the three solutes were attributed to the dispersion energies that depended on a chromophore attached to the carbonyl groups. It was found that the major intermolecular interaction with the attractive shift varied from dipole-induced dipole to dispersion depending on the chromophore in the ketones in

  12. Generating Phenotypic Diversity in a Fungal Biocatalyst to Investigate Alcohol Stress Tolerance Encountered during Microbial Cellulosic Biofuel Production

    PubMed Central

    Hennessy, Rosanna C.; Doohan, Fiona; Mullins, Ewen

    2013-01-01

    Consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) of lignocellulosic biomass offers an alternative route to renewable energy. The crop pathogen Fusarium oxysporum is a promising fungal biocatalyst because of its broad host range and innate ability to co-saccharify and ferment lignocellulose to bioethanol. A major challenge for cellulolytic CBP-enabling microbes is alcohol inhibition. This research tested the hypothesis that Agrobacterium tumefaciens - mediated transformation (ATMT) could be exploited as a tool to generate phenotypic diversity in F. oxysporum to investigate alcohol stress tolerance encountered during CBP. A random mutagenesis library of gene disruption transformants (n=1,563) was constructed and screened for alcohol tolerance in order to isolate alcohol sensitive or tolerant phenotypes. Following three rounds of screening, exposure of select transformants to 6% ethanol and 0.75% n-butanol resulted respectively in increased (≥11.74%) and decreased (≤43.01%) growth compared to the wild –type (WT). Principal component analysis (PCA) quantified the level of phenotypic diversity across the population of genetically transformed individuals and isolated candidate strains for analysis. Characterisation of one strain, Tr. 259, ascertained a reduced growth phenotype under alcohol stress relative to WT and indicated the disruption of a coding region homologous to a putative sugar transporter (FOXG_09625). Quantitative PCR (RT-PCR) showed FOXG_09625 was differentially expressed in Tr. 259 compared to WT during alcohol-induced stress (P<0.05). Phylogenetic analysis of putative sugar transporters suggests diverse functional roles in F. oxysporum and other filamentous fungi compared to yeast for which sugar transporters form part of a relatively conserved family. This study has confirmed the potential of ATMT coupled with a phenotypic screening program to select for genetic variation induced in response to alcohol stress. This research represents a first step in the

  13. [Pollution Characteristics of Aldehydes and Ketones Compounds in the Exhaust of Beijing Typical Restaurants].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jing-chen; Cui, Tong; He, Wan-qing; Nie, Lei; Wang, Jun-ling; Pan, Tao

    2015-08-01

    Aldehydes and ketones compounds, as one of the components in the exhaust of restaurants, are a class of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with strong chemical reactivity. However, there is no systematic study on aldehydes and ketones compounds in the exhaust of restaurants. To further clarify the food source emission levels of aldehydes and ketones compounds and controlling measures, to access city group catering VOCs emissions control decision-making basis, this study selected 8 Beijing restaurants with different types. The aldehydes and ketones compounds were sampled using DNPH-silica tube, and then ultra performance liquid chromatography was used for quantitative measurement. The aldehydes and ketones concentrations of reference volume condition from 8 restaurants in descending order were Roasted Duck restaurant, Chinese Style Barbecue, Home Dishes, Western Fast-food, School Canteen, Chinese Style Fast-food, Sichuan Cuisine, Huaiyang Cuisine. The results showed that the range of aldehydes and ketones compounds (C1-C9) concentrations of reference volume condition in the exhaust of restaurants was 115.47-1035.99 microg x m(-3). The composition of aldehydes and ketones compounds in the exhaust of sampled restaurants was obviously different. The percentages of C1-C3 were above 40% in the exhaust from Chinese style restaurants. Fast food might emit more C4-C9 aldehydes and ketones compounds. From the current situation of existing aldehydes and ketones compounds control, the removal efficiency of high voltage electrostatic purifiers widely used in Beijing is limited. PMID:26591999

  14. Plant lipases: biocatalyst aqueous environment in relation to optimal catalytic activity in lipase-catalyzed synthesis reactions.

    PubMed

    Caro, Yanis; Pina, Michel; Turon, Fabrice; Guilbert, Stephane; Mougeot, Estelle; Fetsch, David V; Attwool, Philip; Graille, Jean

    2002-03-20

    Adsorption and desorption isotherms of two commercial enzyme preparations of papain and bromelain were determined with a Dynamic Vapor System. The Guggenheim-Anderson-deBoer (GAB) modeling of the obtained sorption isotherms allowed the definition of different levels of hydration of those samples. Afterward, these enzyme preparations were used as biocatalysts in water and solvent-free esterification and alcoholysis reactions. The evolution of the obtained fatty acid ester level as a function of the initial hydration level of the biocatalyst, i.e., thermodynamic water activity (a(w)) and water content, was studied. The results show an important correlation between the initial hydration level of the biocatalyst and its catalytic activity during the lipase-catalyzed synthesis reactions. Thus, the Carica papaya lipase (crude papain preparation) catalytic activity is highly dependent on the biocatalyst hydration state. The optimized synthesis reaction yield is obtained when the a(w) value of the enzyme preparation is stabilized at 0.22, which corresponds to 2% water content. This optimal level of hydration occurs on the linear part of the biocatalyst's sorption isotherm, where the water molecules can form a mono- or multiple layer with the protein network. The synthesis reaction yield decreases when the a(w) of the preparation is higher than 0.22, because the excess water molecules modify the system equilibrium leading to the reverse and competitive reaction, i.e., hydrolysis. These results show also that an optimal storage condition for the highly hydrophilic crude papain preparation is a relative humidity strictly lower than 70% to avoid an irreversible structural transition leading to a useless biocatalyst. Concerning the bromelain preparation, no effect of the hydration level on the catalytic activity during esterification reactions was observed. This biocatalyst has too weak a catalytic activity which makes it difficult to observe any differences. Furthermore, the

  15. Selective Catalytic Hydrogenations of Nitriles, Ketones, and Aldehydes by Well-Defined Manganese Pincer Complexes.

    PubMed

    Elangovan, Saravanakumar; Topf, Christoph; Fischer, Steffen; Jiao, Haijun; Spannenberg, Anke; Baumann, Wolfgang; Ludwig, Ralf; Junge, Kathrin; Beller, Matthias

    2016-07-20

    Hydrogenations constitute fundamental processes in organic chemistry and allow for atom-efficient and clean functional group transformations. In fact, the selective reduction of nitriles, ketones, and aldehydes with molecular hydrogen permits access to a green synthesis of valuable amines and alcohols. Despite more than a century of developments in homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, efforts toward the creation of new useful and broadly applicable catalyst systems are ongoing. Recently, Earth-abundant metals have attracted significant interest in this area. In the present study, we describe for the first time specific molecular-defined manganese complexes that allow for the hydrogenation of various polar functional groups. Under optimal conditions, we achieve good functional group tolerance, and industrially important substrates, e.g., for the flavor and fragrance industry, are selectively reduced. PMID:27219853

  16. Beyond ketonization: selective conversion of carboxylic acids to olefins over balanced Lewis acid–base pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Baylon, Rebecca A. L.; Sun, Junming; Martin, Kevin J.; Venkitasubramanian, Padmesh; Wang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Dwindling petroleum reserves combined with increased energy demand and political factors encouraging an increase in energy independence have led to a large amount of research on sustainable alternatives. To this end, biomass conversion has been recognized as themost readily viable technology to produce biofuel concerning our reliance on liquid fuels for transportation and has the advantage of being easily integrated into our heavy use of combustion engines. The interest in biomass conversion has also resulted in reduced costs and a greater abundance of bio-oil, a mixture of hundreds of oxygenates including alcohols, aldehydes, carboxylic acids, and ketones. However, the presence of carboxylic acids in bio-oil derived from lignocellulose pyrolysis leads to low pH, instability, and corrosiveness. In addition, carboxylic acids (i.e. acetic acid) can also be produced via fermentation of sugars. This can be accomplished by a variety of homoacetogenic microorganisms that can produce acetic acid with 100% carbon yield.

  17. An Iron Catalyst for Ketone Hydrogenations Under Mild Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, R. Morris

    2007-10-01

    Casey and Guan reported a homogeneous catalyst for ketone hydrogenation that does not require a precious metal, but instead is based on iron. Excellent yields and chemoselectivity for hydrogenation are found under mild conditions (25 °C, 3 atm H2). An ionic hydrogenation mechanism allows the delivery of a proton from the OH and a hydride from the metal. RMB gratefully acknowledges funding from the Division of Chemical Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US Department of Energy, and from a grant from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  18. Asymmetric Propargylation of Ketones using Allenylboronates Catalyzed by Chiral Biphenols

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, David S.; Schaus, Scott E.

    2011-01-01

    Chiral biphenols catalyze the enantioselective asymmetric propargylation of ketones using allenylboronates. The reaction uses 10 mol % of 3,3′-Br2-BINOL as the catalyst and allenyldioxoborolane as the nucleophile, in the absence of solvent, and under microwave irradiation to afford the homopropargylic alcohol. The reaction products are obtained in good yields (60 – 98%) and high enantiomeric ratios (3:1 – 99:1). Diastereoselective propargylations using chiral racemic allenylboronates result in good diastereoselectivities (dr > 86:14) and enantioselectivities (er > 92:8) under the catalytic conditions. PMID:21732609

  19. Asymmetric propargylation of ketones using allenylboronates catalyzed by chiral biphenols.

    PubMed

    Barnett, David S; Schaus, Scott E

    2011-08-01

    Chiral biphenols catalyze the enantioselective asymmetric propargylation of ketones using allenylboronates. The reaction uses 10 mol % of 3,3'-Br(2)-BINOL as the catalyst and allenyldioxoborolane as the nucleophile, in the absence of solvent, and under microwave irradiation to afford the homopropargylic alcohol. The reaction products are obtained in good yields (60-98%) and high enantiomeric ratios (3:1-99:1). Diastereoselective propargylations using chiral racemic allenylboronates result in good diastereoselectivities (dr >86:14) and enantioselectivities (er >92:8) under the catalytic conditions. PMID:21732609

  20. Effects of trifluoromethyl ketones on the motility of Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Wolfart, Krisztina; Molnar, Annamaria; Kawase, Masami; Motohashi, Noboru; Molnar, Joseph

    2004-09-01

    In the present study, we showed the inhibition of motility by trifluoromethyl ketone (TF) derivatives (1-8) in Proteus vulgaris (P. vulgaris) cultures. Among them, 1-(2-benzoxazoyl)-3,3,3-trifluoro-2-propanone (1) showed a much stronger inhibitory effect on the motility of P. vulgaris than other TF compounds at 10% MIC. Our results suggest the possibility of an inhibitory action of TF compounds on the proton motive forces by affecting the action of biological motor and proton efflux in the membranes, resulting in a reduction of the ratio of running and the increased number of tumbling and non-motile cells. PMID:15340240

  1. Copper-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation of aryl and heteroaryl ketones.

    PubMed

    Krabbe, Scott W; Hatcher, Mark A; Bowman, Roy K; Mitchell, Mark B; McClure, Michael S; Johnson, Jeffrey S

    2013-09-01

    High throughput screening enabled the development of a Cu-based catalyst system for the asymmetric hydrogenation of prochiral aryl and heteroaryl ketones that operates at H2 pressures as low as 5 bar. A ligand combination of (R,S)-N-Me-3,5-xylyl-BoPhoz and tris(3,5-xylyl)phosphine provided benzylic alcohols in good yields and enantioselectivities. The electronic and steric characteristics of the ancillary triarylphosphine were important in determining both reactivity and selectivity. PMID:23980941

  2. The effect of ketone bodies on renal ammoniogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lemieux, Guy; Vinay, Patrick; Robitaille, Pierre; Plante, Gérard E.; Lussier, Yolande; Martin, Pierre

    1971-01-01

    Infusion of ketone bodies to ammonium chloride-loaded acidotic dogs was found to induce significant reduction in urinary excretion of ammonia. This effect could not be attributed to urinary pH variations. Total ammonia production by the left kidney was measured in 25 animals infused during 90 min with the sodium salt of D,L-β-hydroxybutyric acid adjusted to pH 6.0 or 4.2. Ketonemia averaged 4.5 mM/liter. In all experiments the ammonia content of both urine and renal venous blood fell markedly so that ammoniogenesis was depressed by 60% or more within 60 min after the onset of infusion. Administration of equimolar quantities of sodium acetoacetate adjusted to pH 6.0 resulted in a 50% decrease in renal ammonia production. Infusion of ketone bodies adjusted to pH 6.0 is usually accompanied by a small increase in extracellular bicarbonate (3.7 mM/liter). However infusion of D,L-sodium lactate or sodium bicarbonate in amounts sufficient to induce a similar rise in plasma bicarbonate resulted in only a slight decrement in ammonia production (15%). The continuous infusion of 5% mannitol alone during 90-150 min failed to influence renal ammoniogenesis. Infusion of pure sodium-free β-hydroxybutyric acid prepared by ion exchange (pH 2.2) resulted in a 50% decrease in renal ammoniogenesis in spite of the fact that both urinary pH and plasma bicarbonate fell significantly. During all experiments where ketones were infused, the renal extraction of glutamine became negligible as the renal glutamine arteriovenous difference was abolished. Renal hemodynamics did not vary significantly. Infusion of β-hydroxybutyrate into the left renal artery resulted in a rapid decrease in ammoniogenesis by the perfused kidney. The present study indicates that ketone bodies exert their inhibitory influence within the renal tubular cell. Since their effect is independent of urinary or systemic acid-base changes, it is suggested that they depress renal ammoniogenesis by preventing the

  3. Chemical Modification in the Design of Immobilized Enzyme Biocatalysts: Drawbacks and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Nazzoly; Dos Santos, Jose C S; Ortiz, Claudia; Torres, Rodrigo; Barbosa, Oveimar; Rodrigues, Rafael C; Berenguer-Murcia, Ángel; Fernandez-Lafuente, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    Chemical modification of enzymes and immobilization used to be considered as separate ways to improve enzyme properties. This review shows how the coupled use of both tools may greatly improve the final biocatalyst performance. Chemical modification of a previously immobilized enzyme is far simpler and easier to control than the modification of the free enzyme. Moreover, if protein modification is performed to improve its immobilization (enriching the enzyme in reactive groups), the final features of the immobilized enzyme may be greatly improved. Chemical modification may be directed to improve enzyme stability, but also to improve selectivity, specificity, activity, and even cell penetrability. Coupling of immobilization and chemical modification with site-directed mutagenesis is a powerful instrument to obtain fully controlled modification. Some new ideas such as photoreceptive enzyme modifiers that change their physical properties under UV exposition are discussed. PMID:27166751

  4. Label-Free Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering Approach for High-Throughput Screening of Biocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Westley, Chloe; Xu, Yun; Carnell, Andrew J; Turner, Nicholas J; Goodacre, Royston

    2016-06-01

    Biocatalyst discovery and directed evolution are central to many pharmaceutical research programs, yet the lack of robust high-throughput screening methods for large libraries of enzyme variants generated (typically 10(6)-10(8)) has hampered progress and slowed enzyme optimization. We have developed a label-free generally applicable approach based on Raman spectroscopy which results in significant reductions in acquisition times (>30-fold). Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is employed to monitor the enzyme-catalyzed conversion by xanthine oxidase of hypoxanthine to xanthine to uric acid. This approach measures the substrates and products directly and does not require chromogenic substrates or lengthy chromatography, was successfully benchmarked against HPLC, and shows high levels of accuracy and reproducibility. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this SERS approach has utility in monitoring enzyme inhibition illustrating additional medical significance to this high-throughput screening method. PMID:27132981

  5. Application of biocatalysts to Space Station ECLSS and PMMS water reclamation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolly, Clifford D.; Bagdigian, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    Immobilized enzyme reactors have been developed and tested for potential water reclamation applications in the Space Station Freedom Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) and Process Materials Management System (PMMS). The reactors convert low molecular weight organic contaminants found in ECLSS and PMMS wastewaters to compounds that are more efficiently removed by existing technologies. Demonstration of the technology was successfully achieved with two model reactors. A packed bed reactor containing immobilized urease was found to catalyze the complete decomposition of urea to by-products that were subsequently removed using conventional ion exchange results. A second reactor containing immobilized alcohol oxidase showed promising results relative to its ability to convert methanol and ethanol to the corresponding aldehydes for subsequent removal. Preliminary assessments of the application of biocatalysts to ECLSS and PMMS water reclamation sytems are presented.

  6. Biocatalyst activity in nonaqueous environments correlates with centisecond-range protein motions

    PubMed Central

    Eppler, Ross K.; Hudson, Elton P.; Chase, Shannon D.; Dordick, Jonathan S.; Reimer, Jeffrey A.; Clark, Douglas S.

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies exploring the relationship between enzymatic catalysis and protein dynamics in the aqueous phase have yielded evidence that dynamics and enzyme activity are strongly correlated. Given that protein dynamics are significantly attenuated in organic solvents and that proteins exhibit a wide range of motions depending on the specific solvent environment, the nonaqueous milieu provides a unique opportunity to examine the role of protein dynamics in enzyme activity. Variable-temperature kinetic measurements, X-band electron spin resonance spectroscopy, 1H NMR relaxation, and 19F NMR spectroscopy experiments were performed on subtilisin Carlsberg colyophilized with several inorganic salts and suspended in organic solvents. The results indicate that salt activation induces a greater degree of transition-state flexibility, reflected by a more positive ΔΔS†, for the more active biocatalyst preparations in organic solvents. In contrast, ΔΔH† was negligible regardless of salt type or salt content. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy and 1H NMR relaxation measurements, including spin-lattice relaxation, spin-lattice relaxation in the rotating frame, and longitudinal magnetization exchange, revealed that the enzyme's turnover number (kcat) was strongly correlated with protein motions in the centisecond time regime, weakly correlated with protein motions in the millisecond regime, and uncorrelated with protein motions on the piconanosecond timescale. In addition, 19F chemical shift measurements and hyperfine tensor measurements of biocatalyst formulations inhibited with 4-fluorobenzenesulfonyl fluoride and 4-ethoxyfluorophosphinyl-oxy-TEMPO, respectively, suggest that enzyme activation was only weakly affected by changes in active-site polarity. PMID:18840689

  7. Biocatalyst activity in nonaqueous environments correlates with centisecond-range protein motions.

    PubMed

    Eppler, Ross K; Hudson, Elton P; Chase, Shannon D; Dordick, Jonathan S; Reimer, Jeffrey A; Clark, Douglas S

    2008-10-14

    Recent studies exploring the relationship between enzymatic catalysis and protein dynamics in the aqueous phase have yielded evidence that dynamics and enzyme activity are strongly correlated. Given that protein dynamics are significantly attenuated in organic solvents and that proteins exhibit a wide range of motions depending on the specific solvent environment, the nonaqueous milieu provides a unique opportunity to examine the role of protein dynamics in enzyme activity. Variable-temperature kinetic measurements, X-band electron spin resonance spectroscopy, (1)H NMR relaxation, and (19)F NMR spectroscopy experiments were performed on subtilisin Carlsberg colyophilized with several inorganic salts and suspended in organic solvents. The results indicate that salt activation induces a greater degree of transition-state flexibility, reflected by a more positive DeltaDeltaS(dagger), for the more active biocatalyst preparations in organic solvents. In contrast, DeltaDeltaH(dagger) was negligible regardless of salt type or salt content. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy and (1)H NMR relaxation measurements, including spin-lattice relaxation, spin-lattice relaxation in the rotating frame, and longitudinal magnetization exchange, revealed that the enzyme's turnover number (k(cat)) was strongly correlated with protein motions in the centisecond time regime, weakly correlated with protein motions in the millisecond regime, and uncorrelated with protein motions on the piconanosecond timescale. In addition, (19)F chemical shift measurements and hyperfine tensor measurements of biocatalyst formulations inhibited with 4-fluorobenzenesulfonyl fluoride and 4-ethoxyfluorophosphinyl-oxy-TEMPO, respectively, suggest that enzyme activation was only weakly affected by changes in active-site polarity. PMID:18840689

  8. Olive Recombinant Hydroperoxide Lyase, an Efficient Biocatalyst for Synthesis of Green Leaf Volatiles.

    PubMed

    Jacopini, Sabrina; Mariani, Magali; de Caraffa, Virginie Brunini-Bronzini; Gambotti, Claude; Vincenti, Sophie; Desjobert, Jean-Marie; Muselli, Alain; Costa, Jean; Berti, Liliane; Maury, Jacques

    2016-06-01

    Volatile C6-aldehydes are the main contributors to the characteristic odor of plants known as "green note" and are widely used by the flavor industry. Biotechnological processes were developed to fulfill the high demand in C6-aldehydes in natural flavorants and odorants. Recombinant hydroperoxide lyases (HPLs) constitute an interesting alternative to overcome drawbacks arising from the use of HPL from plant extracts. Thus, olive recombinant 13-HPL was assayed as biocatalysts to produce C6-aldehydes. Firstly, a cDNA encoding for olive HPL of Leccino variety was isolated and cloned in pQE-30 expression vector. In order to improve the enzyme solubility, its chloroplast transit peptide was deleted. Both enzymes (HPL wild type and HPL deleted) were expressed into Escherichia coli strain M15, purified, characterized, and then used for bioconversion of 13-hydroperoxides of linoleic and linolenic acids. Aldehydes produced were extracted, then identified and quantified using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Recombinant HPL wild type (HPLwt) allowed producing 5.61 mM of hexanal and 4.39 mM of 3Z-hexenal, corresponding to high conversion yields of 93.5 and 73 %, respectively. Using HPL deleted (HPLdel) instead of HPLwt failed to obtain greater quantities of hexanal or 3Z-hexenal. No undesirable products were formed, and no isomerization of 3Z-hexenal in 2E-hexenal occurred. The olive recombinant HPLwt appears to be a promising efficient biocatalyst for the production of C6-aldehydes. PMID:26961190

  9. Human ketone body production and utilization studied using tracer techniques: Regulation by free fatty acids, insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, U.; Lustenberger, M.; Mueller-Brand, J.G.; Gerber, P.P.; Stauffacher, W.

    1989-05-01

    Ketone body concentrations fluctuate markedly during physiological and pathological conditions. Tracer techniques have been developed in recent years to study production, utilization, and the metabolic clearance rate of ketone bodies. This review describes data on the roles of insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones in the regulation of ketone body kinetics. The data indicate that insulin lowers ketone body concentrations by three independent mechanisms: first, it inhibits lipolysis, and thus lowers free fatty acid availability for ketogenesis; second, it restrains ketone body production within the liver; third, it enhances peripheral ketone body utilization. To assess these effects in humans in vivo, experimental models were developed to study insulin effects with controlled concentrations of free fatty acids, insulin, glucagon, and ketone bodies. Presently available data also support an important role of catecholamines in increasing ketone body concentrations. Evidence was presented that norepinephrine increases ketogenesis not only by stimulating lipolysis, and thus releasing free fatty acids, but also by increasing intrahepatic ketogenesis. Thyroid hormone availability was associated with lipolysis and ketogenesis. Ketone body concentrations after an overnight fast were only modestly elevated in hyperthyroidism resulting from increased peripheral ketone body clearance. There was a significant correlation between serum triiodothyronine levels and the ketone body metabolic clearance rate. Thus, ketone body homeostasis in human subjects resulted from the interaction of hormones such as insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones regulating lipolysis, intrahepatic ketogenesis, and peripheral ketone body utilization. 58 references.

  10. Synthesis, conformational parameters and packing considerations of methyl bispyridyl ketones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weck, Christian; Katzsch, Felix; Gruber, Tobias

    2015-10-01

    The crystal structures of two bispyridyl ketones featuring either two methyl residues or one methyl and one bromomethyl residue, respectively, are presented. In order to elucidate the influence of the substituents, a comprehensive comparison with the non-methylated mother compound has been performed. A special focus lies thereby on the relative position of the heteroatoms and their free electron pairs. The two methyl groups at the bispyridyl ketone result in two molecules in the asymmetric unit adopting rather different conformations. Due to the fast crystallization conditions and a melting point differing from the literature, a polymorph close to a local minimum in the energy hypersurface seems possible. After introducing a bromine atom to one of the two methyl groups, the molecular conformation is very similar to the unsubstituted molecule. The packing of both title compounds is dominated by weak contacts of the C-H⋯π and C-H⋯Y type (Y = O, N) and C-H⋯Br- and Br⋯π-contacts for the brominated molecule.

  11. Fenofibrate Induces Ketone Body Production in Melanoma and Glioblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Grabacka, Maja M.; Wilk, Anna; Antonczyk, Anna; Banks, Paula; Walczyk-Tytko, Emilia; Dean, Matthew; Pierzchalska, Malgorzata; Reiss, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Ketone bodies [beta-hydroxybutyrate (bHB) and acetoacetate] are mainly produced in the liver during prolonged fasting or starvation. bHB is a very efficient energy substrate for sustaining ATP production in peripheral tissues; importantly, its consumption is preferred over glucose. However, the majority of malignant cells, particularly cancer cells of neuroectodermal origin such as glioblastoma, are not able to use ketone bodies as a source of energy. Here, we report a novel observation that fenofibrate, a synthetic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARa) agonist, induces bHB production in melanoma and glioblastoma cells, as well as in neurospheres composed of non-transformed cells. Unexpectedly, this effect is not dependent on PPARa activity or its expression level. The fenofibrate-induced ketogenesis is accompanied by growth arrest and downregulation of transketolase, but the NADP/NADPH and GSH/GSSG ratios remain unaffected. Our results reveal a new, intriguing aspect of cancer cell biology and highlight the benefits of fenofibrate as a supplement to both canonical and dietary (ketogenic) therapeutic approaches against glioblastoma. PMID:26869992

  12. Enantioselective Reduction of Ketones and Imines Catalyzed by (CN-Box)Re(V)-Oxo Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Nolin, Kristine A.; Ahn, Richard W.; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Kennedy-Smith, Joshua J.

    2012-01-01

    The development and application of chiral, non-racemic Re(V)-oxo complexes to the enantioselective reduction of prochiral ketones is described. In addition to the enantioselective reduction of prochiral ketones, we report the application of these complexes to (1) a tandem Meyer-Schuster rearrangement/reduction to access enantioenriched allylic alcohols and (2) the enantioselective reduction of imines. PMID:20623567

  13. Raspberry Ketone Trifluoroacetate, a new attractant for the Queensland fruit fly (Bactrocera tryoni (Froggatt))

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Queensland fruit fly (Bactrocera tryoni, Q-fly) is a major agricultural pest in eastern Australia. The deployment of male lures comprises an important component of several control and detection strategies for this pest. A novel fluorinated analog of raspberry ketone, raspberry ketone trifluoroac...

  14. Further research on the biological activities and the safety of raspberry ketone are needed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Raspberry ketone supplements have grabbed consumer attention with the possibility they might help burn fat and aid weight loss. While raspberry ketone occurs naturally, and is found in raspberry fruit, most is synthetically produced for use in commercial products as flavorings, fragrances, or dietar...

  15. Visible-Light Induced Direct Synthesis of Polysubstituted Furans from Cyclopropyl Ketones.

    PubMed

    Feng, Liyan; Yan, Hang; Yang, Chao; Chen, Dafa; Xia, Wujiong

    2016-08-19

    In this article, a photoredox protocol for the synthesis of furans via oxidative coupling of olefin generated in situ from cyclopropyl ketones with ketonic oxygen atom is presented. Moreover, bromination of furans in the presence of overstoichiometric oxidant has been achieved with high regioselectivity. PMID:27167091

  16. 40 CFR 721.10413 - Fluorinated dialkyl ketone (generic) (P-10-135).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) (P-10-135). 721.10413 Section 721.10413 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10413 Fluorinated dialkyl ketone (generic) (P-10-135). (a) Chemical... as fluorinated dialkyl ketone (PMN P-10-135) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10417 - Biphenyl alkyl morpholino ketone (generic) (P-11-338).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (generic) (P-11-338). 721.10417 Section 721.10417 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10417 Biphenyl alkyl morpholino ketone (generic) (P-11-338). (a... generically as biphenyl alkyl morpholino ketone (PMN P-11-338) is subject to reporting under this section...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10413 - Fluorinated dialkyl ketone (generic) (P-10-135).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) (P-10-135). 721.10413 Section 721.10413 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10413 Fluorinated dialkyl ketone (generic) (P-10-135). (a) Chemical... as fluorinated dialkyl ketone (PMN P-10-135) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10413 - Fluorinated dialkyl ketone (generic) (P-10-135).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) (P-10-135). 721.10413 Section 721.10413 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10413 Fluorinated dialkyl ketone (generic) (P-10-135). (a) Chemical... as fluorinated dialkyl ketone (PMN P-10-135) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10417 - Biphenyl alkyl morpholino ketone (generic) (P-11-338).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (generic) (P-11-338). 721.10417 Section 721.10417 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10417 Biphenyl alkyl morpholino ketone (generic) (P-11-338). (a... generically as biphenyl alkyl morpholino ketone (PMN P-11-338) is subject to reporting under this section...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10417 - Biphenyl alkyl morpholino ketone (generic) (P-11-338).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (generic) (P-11-338). 721.10417 Section 721.10417 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10417 Biphenyl alkyl morpholino ketone (generic) (P-11-338). (a... generically as biphenyl alkyl morpholino ketone (PMN P-11-338) is subject to reporting under this section...

  2. Beyond ketonization: selective conversion of carboxylic acids to olefins over balanced Lewis acid-base pairs.

    PubMed

    Baylon, Rebecca A L; Sun, Junming; Martin, Kevin J; Venkitasubramanian, Padmesh; Wang, Yong

    2016-04-11

    We report the direct conversion of mixed carboxylic acids to C-C olefins with up to 60 mol% carbon yield through cascade (cross) ketonization, (cross) aldolization and self-deoxygenation reactions. Co-feeding hydrogen provides an additional ketone hydrogenation/dehydration pathway to a wider range of olefins. PMID:26898532

  3. Regulation of myocardial ketone body metabolism by the gut microbiota during nutrient deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Peter A.; Crowley, Jan R.; Sambandam, Nandakumar; Muegge, Brian D.; Costello, Elizabeth K.; Hamady, Micah; Knight, Rob; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2009-01-01

    Studies in mice indicate that the gut microbiota promotes energy harvest and storage from components of the diet when these components are plentiful. Here we examine how the microbiota shapes host metabolic and physiologic adaptations to periods of nutrient deprivation. Germ-free (GF) mice and mice who had received a gut microbiota transplant from conventionally raised donors were compared in the fed and fasted states by using functional genomic, biochemical, and physiologic assays. A 24-h fast produces a marked change in gut microbial ecology. Short-chain fatty acids generated from microbial fermentation of available glycans are maintained at higher levels compared with GF controls. During fasting, a microbiota-dependent, Pparα-regulated increase in hepatic ketogenesis occurs, and myocardial metabolism is directed to ketone body utilization. Analyses of heart rate, hydraulic work, and output, mitochondrial morphology, number, and respiration, plus ketone body, fatty acid, and glucose oxidation in isolated perfused working hearts from GF and colonized animals (combined with in vivo assessments of myocardial physiology) revealed that the fasted GF heart is able to sustain its performance by increasing glucose utilization, but heart weight, measured echocardiographically or as wet mass and normalized to tibial length or lean body weight, is significantly reduced in both fasted and fed mice. This myocardial-mass phenotype is completely reversed in GF mice by consumption of a ketogenic diet. Together, these results illustrate benefits provided by the gut microbiota during periods of nutrient deprivation, and emphasize the importance of further exploring the relationship between gut microbes and cardiovascular health. PMID:19549860

  4. Proton-exchange membrane materials based on blends of poly(ether ketone ketone) and poly(ether imide)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swier, S.; Gasa, J.; Shaw, M. T.; Weiss, R. A.

    2004-03-01

    The development of materials for proton-exchange membranes (PEM) involves finding a compromise between high proton conductivities and sufficient mechanical and chemical stability to withstand the conditions in the fuel cell. The currently used perfluorinated polymer electrolyte membranes tend to be expensive and have problems in case of extensive application. New polymer electrolytes based on hydrocarbon polymers are therefore the focus of a considerable research effort. Blends of sulfonated poly(ether ketone ketone) (SPEKK) and poly(ether imide) (PEI) were evaluated as PEMs. Sulfonation of PEKK was achieved by using a mixture of concentrated sulfuric acid and fuming sulfuric acid, and blend membranes were prepared by casting a solution of the two polymers in N-methyl-2- pyrrolidone. The hydration level of the membrane decreased with increasing PEI concentration, but a proton conductivity comparable to NafionTM was obtained for blends containing less than 20 wt% PEI. The fuel cell performance of the membranes was affected by the sulfonation level of the PEKK, the blend composition and the casting procedure employed. The state of water in the membrane was evaluated from the depression of the glass transition and from the melting endotherms associated with water. Proton conductivity depended strongly on the hydration number (water molecules per sulfonate group), which depended on the sulfonation level of the PEKK and the blend morphology. Sorption data from gravimetric techniques provided important transport information like the solubility and diffusivity of water and methanol.

  5. Interfacial interactions of poly(ether ketone ketone) polymer coatings onto oxide-free phosphate films on an aluminum surface

    SciTech Connect

    Asunskis, A. L.; Sherwood, P. M. A.

    2007-07-15

    This article continues a series of papers that shows how thin (10 nm or less) oxide-free phosphate films can be formed on a number of metals. The films formed have potential as corrosion resistant films. Previous papers have shown that it is possible to extend the range of the surface coatings that can be formed by placing a thin polymer layer over the phosphate layer. In this work it is shown how the water insoluble polymer poly(ether ketone ketone) (PEKK) can be placed over a thin oxide-free phosphate film on aluminum metal. The surface and the interfaces involved were studied by valence band and core level x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Difference spectra in the valence band region were used to show that there is a chemical interaction between the PEKK and phosphate thin films on the aluminum metal. Three different phosphate film compositions were studied using different phosphorous containing acids, H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, H{sub 3}PO{sub 3}, and H{sub 3}PO{sub 2}. This type of interaction illustrates the potential of phosphates to act as adhesion promoters. The valence band spectra are interpreted by calculations.

  6. Rules for biocatalyst and reaction engineering to implement effective, NAD(P)H-dependent, whole cell bioreductions.

    PubMed

    Kratzer, Regina; Woodley, John M; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2015-12-01

    Access to chiral alcohols of high optical purity is today frequently provided by the enzymatic reduction of precursor ketones. However, bioreductions are complicated by the need for reducing equivalents in the form of NAD(P)H. The high price and molecular weight of NAD(P)H necessitate in situ recycling of catalytic quantities, which is mostly accomplished by enzymatic oxidation of a cheap co-substrate. The coupled oxidoreduction can be either performed by free enzymes in solution or by whole cells. Reductase selection, the decision between cell-free and whole cell reduction system, coenzyme recycling mode and reaction conditions represent design options that strongly affect bioreduction efficiency. In this paper, each option was critically scrutinized and decision rules formulated based on well-described literature examples. The development chain was visualized as a decision-tree that can be used to identify the most promising route towards the production of a specific chiral alcohol. General methods, applications and bottlenecks in the set-up are presented and key experiments required to "test" for decision-making attributes are defined. The reduction of o-chloroacetophenone to (S)-1-(2-chlorophenyl)ethanol was used as one example to demonstrate all the development steps. Detailed analysis of reported large scale bioreductions identified product isolation as a major bottleneck in process design. PMID:26343336

  7. The rotational spectrum of Roesky’s ketone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blockhuys, Frank; Tersago, Karla; Shlykov, Sergey A.; Konrad, Alexander; Christen, Dines

    2010-08-01

    The experimental rotational spectrum of 5-oxo-1,3,2,4-dithiadiazole (Roesky's ketone) has been recorded and the experimental rotational constants have been determined. The latter have been used to evaluate the performance of a large number of quantum chemical methods combined with different basis sets, by comparing the calculated with the experimental values. The results of this comparison indicate that, in general, the wave-function-based methods perform better than those from Density Functional Theory. Four of the 42 investigated method/basis set combinations prove to be the most valuable, i.e., MP4(SDQ)/(aug-)cc-pVTZ, B3PW91/cc-pV(T+d)Z and MPW1PW91/aug-cc-pVTZ, as they produce rotational constants with a root-mean-square deviation from the experimental values of only about 5 MHz.

  8. Electron impact ionization of cycloalkanes, aldehydes, and ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Dhanoj; Antony, Bobby

    2014-08-07

    The theoretical calculations of electron impact total ionization cross section for cycloalkane, aldehyde, and ketone group molecules are undertaken from ionization threshold to 2 keV. The present calculations are based on the spherical complex optical potential formalism and complex scattering potential ionization contribution method. The results of most of the targets studied compare fairly well with the recent measurements, wherever available and the cross sections for many targets are predicted for the first time. The correlation between the peak of ionization cross sections with number of target electrons and target parameters is also reported. It was found that the cross sections at their maximum depend linearly with the number of target electrons and with other target parameters, confirming the consistency of the values reported here.

  9. Multilayer enzyme-coupled magnetic nanoparticles as efficient, reusable biocatalysts and biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Josep; Zhang, Yue; Taylor, Hannah; Cespedes, Oscar; Webb, Michael E.; Zhou, Dejian

    2011-09-01

    Herein we report the development of a highly active, magnetically retrievable and reusable biocatalyst using multilayer enzyme coupled-magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) prepared by layer-by-layer assembly using two well-studied enzymes, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and glucose oxidase (GOX), as a model enzyme system. We show that by combining the use of a biocompatible linker as well as biospecific immobilisation, the first layer enzyme in our HRP1-MNP system retains the native activity of the enzyme in solution, and the overall catalytic activity of the multilayer enzyme system, HRPx-MNP, increases linearly with the increasing number of enzyme layers. Furthermore, the HRPx-MNP system can be conveniently retrieved by using an external magnetic field and reused for 10 consecutive cycles without apparent reduction of catalytic activity. We also report the development of a novel coupled bienzyme, GOX/HRPx-MNP, system that can perform bi-enzymatic reactions to couple the colourless GOX-catalyzed reaction to the chromophoric HRP-catalyzed reaction via H2O2 production. This model bienzyme-MNP system can be used for simple, rapid colorimetric quantification of micromolar glucose.Herein we report the development of a highly active, magnetically retrievable and reusable biocatalyst using multilayer enzyme coupled-magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) prepared by layer-by-layer assembly using two well-studied enzymes, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and glucose oxidase (GOX), as a model enzyme system. We show that by combining the use of a biocompatible linker as well as biospecific immobilisation, the first layer enzyme in our HRP1-MNP system retains the native activity of the enzyme in solution, and the overall catalytic activity of the multilayer enzyme system, HRPx-MNP, increases linearly with the increasing number of enzyme layers. Furthermore, the HRPx-MNP system can be conveniently retrieved by using an external magnetic field and reused for 10 consecutive cycles without apparent

  10. A New Biocatalyst for Production of Optically Pure Aryl Epoxides by Styrene Monooxygenase from Pseudomonas fluorescens ST

    PubMed Central

    Di Gennaro, Patrizia; Colmegna, Andrea; Galli, Enrica; Sello, Guido; Pelizzoni, Francesca; Bestetti, Giuseppina

    1999-01-01

    We developed a biocatalyst by cloning the styrene monooxygenase genes (styA and styB) from Pseudomonas fluorescens ST responsible for the oxidation of styrene to its corresponding epoxide. Recombinant Escherichia coli was able to oxidize different aryl vinyl and aryl ethenyl compounds to their corresponding optically pure epoxides. The results of bioconversions indicate the broad substrate preference of styrene monooxygenase and its potential for the production of several fine chemicals. PMID:10347083