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Sample records for key metabolic enzyme

  1. [Aspartate aminotransferase--key enzyme in the human systemic metabolism].

    PubMed

    Otto-Ślusarczyk, Dagmara; Graboń, Wojciech; Mielczarek-Puta, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Aspartate aminotransferase is an organ-nonspecific enzyme located in many tissues of the human body where it catalyzes reversible reaction of transamination. There are two aspartate aminotransferase isoforms--cytoplasmic (AST1) and mitochondrial (AST2), that usually occur together and interact with each other metabolically. Both isoforms are homodimers containing highly conservative regions responsible for catalytic properties of enzyme. The common feature of all aspartate aminotransfeses is Lys - 259 residue covalent binding with prosthetic group - pyridoxal phosphate. The differences in the primary structure of AST isoforms determine their physico-chemical, kinetic and immunological properties. Because of the low concentration of L-aspartate (L-Asp) in the blood, AST is the only enzyme, which supply of this amino acid as a substrate for many metabolic processes, such as urea cycle or purine and pyrimidine nucleotides in the liver, synthesis of L-arginine in the kidney and purine nucleotide cycle in the brain and the skeletal muscle. AST is also involved in D-aspartate production that regulates the metabolic activity at the auto-, para- and endocrine level. Aspartate aminotransferase is a part of the malate-aspartate shuttle in the myocardium, is involved in gluconeogenesis in the liver and kidney, glyceroneogenesis in the adipose tissue, and synthesis of neurotransmitters and neuro-glial pathway in the brain. Recently, the significant role of AST in glutaminolysis - normal metabolic pathway in tumor cells, was demonstrated. The article is devoted the role of AST, known primarily as a diagnostic liver enzyme, in metabolism of various human tissues and organs. PMID:27117097

  2. Maltose Metabolism in the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Thermococcus litoralis: Purification and Characterization of Key Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Karina B.; Peist, Ralf; Kossmann, Marina; Boos, Winfried; Santos, Helena

    1999-01-01

    Maltose metabolism was investigated in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus litoralis. Maltose was degraded by the concerted action of 4-α-glucanotransferase and maltodextrin phosphorylase (MalP). The first enzyme produced glucose and a series of maltodextrins that could be acted upon by MalP when the chain length of glucose residues was equal or higher than four, to produce glucose-1-phosphate. Phosphoglucomutase activity was also detected in T. litoralis cell extracts. Glucose derived from the action of 4-α-glucanotransferase was subsequently metabolized via an Embden-Meyerhof pathway. The closely related organism Pyrococcus furiosus used a different metabolic strategy in which maltose was cleaved primarily by the action of an α-glucosidase, a p-nitrophenyl-α-d-glucopyranoside (PNPG)-hydrolyzing enzyme, producing glucose from maltose. A PNPG-hydrolyzing activity was also detected in T. litoralis, but maltose was not a substrate for this enzyme. The two key enzymes in the pathway for maltose catabolism in T. litoralis were purified to homogeneity and characterized; they were constitutively synthesized, although phosphorylase expression was twofold induced by maltodextrins or maltose. The gene encoding MalP was obtained by complementation in Escherichia coli and sequenced (calculated molecular mass, 96,622 Da). The enzyme purified from the organism had a specific activity for maltoheptaose, at the temperature for maximal activity (98°C), of 66 U/mg. A Km of 0.46 mM was determined with heptaose as the substrate at 60°C. The deduced amino acid sequence had a high degree of identity with that of the putative enzyme from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 (66%) and with sequences of the enzymes from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima (60%) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (31%) but not with that of the enzyme from E. coli (13%). The consensus binding site for pyridoxal 5′-phosphate is conserved in the T. litoralis

  3. Rhodanese functions as sulfur supplier for key enzymes in sulfur energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Aussignargues, Clément; Giuliani, Marie-Cécile; Infossi, Pascale; Lojou, Elisabeth; Guiral, Marianne; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie-Thérèse; Ilbert, Marianne

    2012-06-01

    How microorganisms obtain energy is a challenging topic, and there have been numerous studies on the mechanisms involved. Here, we focus on the energy substrate traffic in the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus. This bacterium can use insoluble sulfur as an energy substrate and has an intricate sulfur energy metabolism involving several sulfur-reducing and -oxidizing supercomplexes and enzymes. We demonstrate that the cytoplasmic rhodanese SbdP participates in this sulfur energy metabolism. Rhodaneses are a widespread family of proteins known to transfer sulfur atoms. We show that SbdP has also some unusual characteristics compared with other rhodaneses; it can load a long sulfur chain, and it can interact with more than one partner. Its partners (sulfur reductase and sulfur oxygenase reductase) are key enzymes of the sulfur energy metabolism of A. aeolicus and share the capacity to use long sulfur chains as substrate. We demonstrate a positive effect of SbdP, once loaded with sulfur chains, on sulfur reductase activity, most likely by optimizing substrate uptake. Taken together, these results lead us to propose a physiological role for SbdP as a carrier and sulfur chain donor to these key enzymes, therefore enabling channeling of sulfur substrate in the cell as well as greater efficiency of the sulfur energy metabolism of A. aeolicus. PMID:22496367

  4. Subcellular distribution of key enzymes of lipid metabolism during the euthermia-hibernation-arousal cycle

    PubMed Central

    Suozzi, Anna; Malatesta, Manuela; Zancanaro, Carlo

    2009-01-01

    Mammalian hibernation is a natural, fully reversible hypometabolic state characterized by a drastic reduction of body temperature and metabolic activity, which ensures survival to many species under adverse environmental conditions. During hibernation, many hibernators rely for energy supply almost exclusively on lipid reserves; the shift from carbohydrate to lipid metabolism implies profound rearrangement of the anabolic and catabolic pathways of energetic substrates. However, the structural counterpart of such adaptation is not known. In this study we investigated, by using immunoelectron microscopy, the fine intracellular distribution of two key enzymes involved in lipid metabolism, namely, the fatty acid synthase (FAS) and the long-chain fatty acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL), in hepatocytes of euthermic, hibernating and arousing hazel dormice. Our results show that the two enzymes are differentially distributed in cellular compartments (cytoplasm, mitochondria and cell nuclei) of hepatocytes during euthermia. Quantitative redistribution of both enzymes among cellular compartments takes place during hibernation and arousal, in accordance with the physiological changes. Interestingly, this redistribution follows different seasonal patterns in cytoplasm, mitochondria and nuclei. In conclusion, our data represent the first quantitative morphological evidence of lipid enzyme distribution in a true hibernator throughout the year cycle, thus providing a structural framework to biochemical changes associated with the hypometabolism of hibernation. PMID:19538638

  5. Lactate dehydrogenase is the key enzyme for pneumococcal pyruvate metabolism and pneumococcal survival in blood.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Paula; Al-Bayati, Firas A Y; Andrew, Peter W; Neves, Ana Rute; Yesilkaya, Hasan

    2014-12-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a fermentative microorganism and causes serious diseases in humans, including otitis media, bacteremia, meningitis, and pneumonia. However, the mechanisms enabling pneumococcal survival in the host and causing disease in different tissues are incompletely understood. The available evidence indicates a strong link between the central metabolism and pneumococcal virulence. To further our knowledge on pneumococcal virulence, we investigated the role of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), which converts pyruvate to lactate and is an essential enzyme for redox balance, in the pneumococcal central metabolism and virulence using an isogenic ldh mutant. Loss of LDH led to a dramatic reduction of the growth rate, pinpointing the key role of this enzyme in fermentative metabolism. The pattern of end products was altered, and lactate production was totally blocked. The fermentation profile was confirmed by in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of glucose metabolism in nongrowing cell suspensions of the ldh mutant. In this strain, a bottleneck in the fermentative steps is evident from the accumulation of pyruvate, revealing LDH as the most efficient enzyme in pyruvate conversion. An increase in ethanol production was also observed, indicating that in the absence of LDH the redox balance is maintained through alcohol dehydrogenase activity. We also found that the absence of LDH renders the pneumococci avirulent after intravenous infection and leads to a significant reduction in virulence in a model of pneumonia that develops after intranasal infection, likely due to a decrease in energy generation and virulence gene expression. PMID:25245810

  6. Lactate Dehydrogenase Is the Key Enzyme for Pneumococcal Pyruvate Metabolism and Pneumococcal Survival in Blood

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, Paula; Al-Bayati, Firas A. Y.; Andrew, Peter W.; Neves, Ana Rute

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a fermentative microorganism and causes serious diseases in humans, including otitis media, bacteremia, meningitis, and pneumonia. However, the mechanisms enabling pneumococcal survival in the host and causing disease in different tissues are incompletely understood. The available evidence indicates a strong link between the central metabolism and pneumococcal virulence. To further our knowledge on pneumococcal virulence, we investigated the role of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), which converts pyruvate to lactate and is an essential enzyme for redox balance, in the pneumococcal central metabolism and virulence using an isogenic ldh mutant. Loss of LDH led to a dramatic reduction of the growth rate, pinpointing the key role of this enzyme in fermentative metabolism. The pattern of end products was altered, and lactate production was totally blocked. The fermentation profile was confirmed by in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of glucose metabolism in nongrowing cell suspensions of the ldh mutant. In this strain, a bottleneck in the fermentative steps is evident from the accumulation of pyruvate, revealing LDH as the most efficient enzyme in pyruvate conversion. An increase in ethanol production was also observed, indicating that in the absence of LDH the redox balance is maintained through alcohol dehydrogenase activity. We also found that the absence of LDH renders the pneumococci avirulent after intravenous infection and leads to a significant reduction in virulence in a model of pneumonia that develops after intranasal infection, likely due to a decrease in energy generation and virulence gene expression. PMID:25245810

  7. Regulation of sucrose metabolism in higher plants: localization and regulation of activity of key enzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, H.; Huber, S. C.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Sucrose (Suc) plays a central role in plant growth and development. It is a major end product of photosynthesis and functions as a primary transport sugar and in some cases as a direct or indirect regulator of gene expression. Research during the last 2 decades has identified the pathways involved and which enzymes contribute to the control of flux. Availability of metabolites for Suc synthesis and 'demand' for products of sucrose degradation are important factors, but this review specifically focuses on the biosynthetic enzyme sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS), and the degradative enzymes, sucrose synthase (SuSy), and the invertases. Recent progress has included the cloning of genes encoding these enzymes and the elucidation of posttranslational regulatory mechanisms. Protein phosphorylation is emerging as an important mechanism controlling SPS activity in response to various environmental and endogenous signals. In terms of Suc degradation, invertase-catalyzed hydrolysis generally has been associated with cell expansion, whereas SuSy-catalyzed metabolism has been linked with biosynthetic processes (e.g., cell wall or storage products). Recent results indicate that SuSy may be localized in multiple cellular compartments: (1) as a soluble enzyme in the cytosol (as traditionally assumed); (2) associated with the plasma membrane; and (3) associated with the actin cytoskeleton. Phosphorylation of SuSy has been shown to occur and may be one of the factors controlling localization of the enzyme. The purpose of this review is to summarize some of the recent developments relating to regulation of activity and localization of key enzymes involved in sucrose metabolism in plants.

  8. Depletion of reduction potential and key energy generation metabolic enzymes underlies tellurite toxicity in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Anaganti, Narasimha; Basu, Bhakti; Gupta, Alka; Joseph, Daisy; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress resistant Deinococcus radiodurans surprisingly exhibited moderate sensitivity to tellurite induced oxidative stress (LD50 = 40 μM tellurite, 40 min exposure). The organism reduced 70% of 40 μM potassium tellurite within 5 h. Tellurite exposure significantly modulated cellular redox status. The level of ROS and protein carbonyl contents increased while the cellular reduction potential substantially decreased following tellurite exposure. Cellular thiols levels initially increased (within 30 min) of tellurite exposure but decreased at later time points. At proteome level, tellurite resistance proteins (TerB and TerD), tellurite reducing enzymes (pyruvate dehydrogense subunits E1 and E3), ROS detoxification enzymes (superoxide dismutase and thioredoxin reductase), and protein folding chaperones (DnaK, EF-Ts, and PPIase) displayed increased abundance in tellurite-stressed cells. However, remarkably decreased levels of key metabolic enzymes (aconitase, transketolase, 3-hydroxy acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, electron transfer flavoprotein alpha, and beta) involved in carbon and energy metabolism were observed upon tellurite stress. The results demonstrate that depletion of reduction potential in intensive tellurite reduction with impaired energy metabolism lead to tellurite toxicity in D. radiodurans. PMID:25331933

  9. A Key Role for Old Yellow Enzyme in the Metabolism of Drugs by Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Kubata, Bruno Kilunga; Kabututu, Zakayi; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Munday, Craig J.; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Ohkubo, Kei; Lazarus, Michael; Maruyama, Toshihiko; Martin, Samuel K.; Duszenko, Michael; Urade, Yoshihiro

    2002-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas' disease. So far, first choice anti-chagasic drugs in use have been shown to have undesirable side effects in addition to the emergence of parasite resistance and the lack of prospect for vaccine against T. cruzi infection. Thus, the isolation and characterization of molecules essential in parasite metabolism of the anti-chagasic drugs are fundamental for the development of new strategies for rational drug design and/or the improvement of the current chemotherapy. While searching for a prostaglandin (PG) F2α synthase homologue, we have identified a novel “old yellow enzyme” from T. cruzi (TcOYE), cloned its cDNA, and overexpressed the recombinant enzyme. Here, we show that TcOYE reduced 9,11-endoperoxide PGH2 to PGF2α as well as a variety of trypanocidal drugs. By electron spin resonance experiments, we found that TcOYE specifically catalyzed one-electron reduction of menadione and β-lapachone to semiquinone-free radicals with concomitant generation of superoxide radical anions, while catalyzing solely the two-electron reduction of nifurtimox and 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide drugs without free radical production. Interestingly, immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that anti-TcOYE polyclonal antibody abolished major reductase activities of the lysates toward these drugs, identifying TcOYE as a key drug-metabolizing enzyme by which quinone drugs have their mechanism of action. PMID:12417633

  10. Divergent regulation of the key enzymes of polyamine metabolism by chiral alpha-methylated polyamine analogues.

    PubMed

    Hyvönen, Mervi T; Howard, Michael T; Anderson, Christine B; Grigorenko, Nikolay; Khomutov, Alex R; Vepsäläinen, Jouko; Alhonen, Leena; Jänne, Juhani; Keinänen, Tuomo A

    2009-09-01

    The natural polyamines are ubiquitous multifunctional organic cations which play important roles in regulating cellular proliferation and survival. Here we present a novel approach to investigating polyamine functions by using optical isomers of MeSpd (alpha-methylspermidine) and Me2Spm (alpha,omega-bismethylspermine), metabolically stable functional mimetics of natural polyamines. We studied the ability of MeSpd and Me2Spm to alter the normal polyamine regulation pathways at the level of polyamine uptake and the major control mechanisms known to affect the key polyamine metabolic enzymes. These include: (i) ODC (ornithine decarboxylase), which catalyses the rate-limiting step of polyamine synthesis; (ii) ODC antizyme, an inhibitor of ODC and polyamine uptake; (iii) SSAT (spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase), the major polyamine catabolic enzyme; and (iv) AdoMetDC (S-adenosyl-L-methionine decarboxylase), which is required for the conversion of putrescine into spermidine, and spermidine into spermine. We show that the stereoisomers differ in their cellular uptake and ability to downregulate ODC and AdoMetDC, and to induce SSAT. These effects are mediated by the ability of the enantiomers to induce +1 ribosomal frameshifting on ODC antizyme mRNA, to suppress the translation of AdoMetDC uORF (upstream open reading frame) and to regulate the alternative splicing of SSAT pre-mRNA. The unique effects of chiral polyamine analogues on polyamine metabolism may offer novel possibilities for studying the physiological functions, control mechanisms, and targets of the natural polyamines, as well as advance therapeutic drug development in cancer and other human health-related issues. PMID:19522702

  11. Comparative Analysis on the Key Enzymes of the Glycerol Cycle Metabolic Pathway in Dunaliella salina under Osmotic Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Lu, Yan; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2012-01-01

    The glycerol metabolic pathway is a special cycle way; glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3pdh), glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatase (G3pp), dihydroxyacetone reductase (Dhar), and dihydroxyacetone kinase (Dhak) are the key enzymes around the pathway. Glycerol is an important osmolyte for Dunaliella salina to resist osmotic stress. In this study, comparative activities of the four enzymes in D. salina and their activity changes under various salt stresses were investigated, from which glycerol metabolic flow direction in the glycerol metabolic pathway was estimated. Results showed that the salinity changes had different effects on the enzymes activities. NaCl could stimulate the activities of all the four enzymes in various degrees when D. salina was grown under continuous salt stress. When treated by hyperosmotic or hypoosmotic shock, only the activity of G3pdh in D. salina was significantly stimulated. It was speculated that, under osmotic stresses, the emergency response of the cycle pathway in D. salina was driven by G3pdh via its response to the osmotic stress. Subsequently, with the changes of salinity, other three enzymes started to respond to osmotic stress. Dhar played a role of balancing the cycle metabolic pathway by its forward and backward reactions. Through synergy, the four enzymes worked together for the effective flow of the cycle metabolic pathways to maintain the glycerol requirements of cells in order to adapt to osmotic stress environments. PMID:22675484

  12. Immunohistochemical Localization of Key Arachidonic Acid Metabolism Enzymes during Fracture Healing in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hsuan-Ni; O’Connor, J. Patrick

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the localization of critical enzymes involved in arachidonic acid metabolism during the initial and regenerative phases of mouse femur fracture healing. Previous studies found that loss of cyclooxygenase-2 activity impairs fracture healing while loss of 5-lipoxygenase activity accelerates healing. These diametric results show that arachidonic acid metabolism has an essential function during fracture healing. To better understand the function of arachidonic acid metabolism during fracture healing, expression of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), cyclooxygenase -2 (COX-2), 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO), and leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H) was localized by immunohistochemistry in time-staged fracture callus specimens. All four enzymes were detected in leukocytes present in the bone marrow and attending inflammatory response that accompanied the fracture. In the tissues surrounding the fracture site, the proportion of leukocytes expressing COX-1, COX-2, or LTA4H decreased while those expressing 5-LO remained high at 4 and 7 days after fracture. This may indicate an inflammation resolution function for 5-LO during fracture healing. Only COX-1 was consistently detected in fracture callus osteoblasts during the later stages of healing (day 14 after fracture). In contrast, callus chondrocytes expressed all four enzymes, though 5-LO appeared to be preferentially expressed in newly differentiated chondrocytes. Most interestingly, osteoclasts consistently and strongly expressed COX-2. In addition to bone surfaces and the growth plate, COX-2 expressing osteoclasts were localized at the chondro-osseous junction of the fracture callus. These observations suggest that arachidonic acid mediated signaling from callus chondrocytes or from callus osteoclasts at the chondro-osseous junction regulate fracture healing. PMID:24516658

  13. Characterisation of genes encoding key enzymes involved in sugar metabolism of apple fruit in controlled atmosphere storage.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhu; Liu, Ruiling; Li, Boqiang; Tian, Shiping

    2013-12-15

    Sugars are essential contributors to fruit flavour. Controlled atmosphere (CA) storage has been proved to be beneficial for maintaining harvested fruit quality. To explore regulatory mechanism of sugar metabolism in fruit stored in CA condition, we cloned several genes, encoding key enzymes, involved in sugar metabolism in apple fruit, and analyzed sugar contents, along with gene expression and enzyme activities in fruits stored in air and CA. The results indicated that CA could maintain higher contents of sugars, including sucrose, fructose and glucose. Expression levels of key genes, such as sucrose synthase (SS), sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS), fructokinase (FK) and hexokinase (HK), were shown to be correlated with the corresponding enzyme activities. We found that activities of neutral invertase (NI), vacuolar invertase (VI), FK and HK were inhibited, but SPS activity was promoted in apple fruit stored in CA, suggesting that CA storage could enhance sucrose synthesis and delay hydrolysis of sucrose and hexose. These findings provided molecular evidence to explain why higher sugar levels in harvested fruit are maintained under CA storage. PMID:23993488

  14. Shared origins of a key enzyme during the evolution of C4 and CAM metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Christin, Pascal-Antoine; Arakaki, Monica; Osborne, Colin P.; Bräutigam, Andrea; Sage, Rowan F.; Hibberd, Julian M.; Kelly, Steven; Covshoff, Sarah; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Hancock, Lillian; Edwards, Erika J.

    2014-01-01

    CAM and C4 photosynthesis are two key plant adaptations that have evolved independently multiple times, and are especially prevalent in particular groups of plants, including the Caryophyllales. We investigate the origin of photosynthetic PEPC, a key enzyme of both the CAM and C4 pathways. We combine phylogenetic analyses of genes encoding PEPC with analyses of RNA sequence data of Portulaca, the only plants known to perform both CAM and C4 photosynthesis. Three distinct gene lineages encoding PEPC exist in eudicots (namely ppc-1E1, ppc-1E2 and ppc-2), one of which (ppc-1E1) was recurrently recruited for use in both CAM and C4 photosynthesis within the Caryophyllales. This gene is present in multiple copies in the cacti and relatives, including Portulaca. The PEPC involved in the CAM and C4 cycles of Portulaca are encoded by closely related yet distinct genes. The CAM-specific gene is similar to genes from related CAM taxa, suggesting that CAM has evolved before C4 in these species. The similar origin of PEPC and other genes involved in the CAM and C4 cycles highlights the shared early steps of evolutionary trajectories towards CAM and C4, which probably diverged irreversibly only during the optimization of CAM and C4 phenotypes. PMID:24638902

  15. Key Residues Controlling Phenacetin Metabolism By Human Cytochrome P450 2A Enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    DeVore, N.M.; Smith, B.D.; Urban, M.J.; Scott, E.E.

    2009-05-14

    Although the human lung cytochrome P450 2A13 (CYP2A13) and its liver counterpart cytochrome P450 2A6 (CYP2A6) are 94% identical in amino acid sequence, they metabolize a number of substrates with substantially different efficiencies. To determine differences in binding for a diverse set of cytochrome P450 2A ligands, we have measured the spectral binding affinities (K{sub D}) for nicotine, phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), coumarin, 2{prime}-methoxyacetophenone (MAP), and 8-methoxypsoralen. The differences in the K{sub D} values for CYP2A6 versus CYP2A13 ranged from 74-fold for 2{prime}-methoxyacetophenone to 1.1-fold for coumarin, with CYP2A13 demonstrating the higher affinity. To identify active site amino acids responsible for the differences in binding of MAP, PEITC, and coumarin, 10 CYP2A13 mutant proteins were generated in which individual amino acids from the CYP2A6 active site were substituted into CYP2A13 at the corresponding position. Titrations revealed that substitutions at positions 208, 300, and 301 individually had the largest effects on ligand binding. The collective relevance of these amino acids to differential ligand selectivity was verified by evaluating binding to CYP2A6 mutant enzymes that incorporate several of the CYP2A13 amino acids at these positions. Inclusion of four CYP2A13 amino acids resulted in a CYP2A6 mutant protein (I208S/I300F/G301A/S369G) with binding affinities for MAP and PEITC much more similar to those observed for CYP2A13 than to those for CYP2A6 without altering coumarin binding. The structure-based quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis using COMBINE successfully modeled the observed mutant-ligand trends and emphasized steric roles for active site residues including four substituted amino acids and an adjacent conserved Leu{sup 370}.

  16. An alternative, arginase-independent pathway for arginine metabolism in Kluyveromyces lactis involves guanidinobutyrase as a key enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Romagnoli, G; Verhoeven, M D; Mans, R; Fleury Rey, Y; Bel-Rhlid, R; van den Broek, M; Maleki Seifar, R; Ten Pierick, A; Thompson, M; Müller, V; Wahl, S A; Pronk, J T; Daran, J M

    2014-01-01

    Most available knowledge on fungal arginine metabolism is derived from studies on Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in which arginine catabolism is initiated by releasing urea via the arginase reaction. Orthologues of the S. cerevisiae genes encoding the first three enzymes in the arginase pathway were cloned from Kluyveromyces lactis and shown to functionally complement the corresponding deletion in S. cerevisiae. Surprisingly, deletion of the single K. lactis arginase gene KlCAR1 did not completely abolish growth on arginine as nitrogen source. Growth rate of the deletion mutant strongly increased during serial transfer in shake-flask cultures. A combination of RNAseq-based transcriptome analysis and 13C-15N-based flux analysis was used to elucidate the arginase-independent pathway. Isotopic 13C15N-enrichment in γ-aminobutyrate revealed succinate as the entry point in the TCA cycle of the alternative pathway. Transcript analysis combined with enzyme activity measurements indicated increased expression in the Klcar1Δ mutant of a guanidinobutyrase (EC.3.5.3.7), a key enzyme in a new pathway for arginine degradation. Expression of the K. lactis KLLA0F27995g (renamed KlGBU1) encoding guanidinobutyrase enabled S. cerevisiae to use guanidinobutyrate as sole nitrogen source and its deletion in K. lactis almost completely abolish growth on this nitrogen source. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that this enzyme activity is widespread in fungi. PMID:24912400

  17. Inhibitory Potential of Turbinaria ornata against Key Metabolic Enzymes Linked to Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Unnikrishnan, P. S.; Suthindhiran, K.; Jayasri, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    One of the therapeutic approaches in treating diabetes is to reduce postprandial hyperglycemia by inhibiting major carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes. In the present study, crude extracts of marine seaweed, Turbinaria ornata, were tested for their antidiabetic potential using enzyme inhibitory assays (α-amylase, α-glucosidase, and dipeptidyl peptidase-IV). Among the tested extracts, methanol and acetone extracts showed significant inhibitory effects on α-amylase (IC50 250.9 μg/mL), α-glucosidase (535.6 μg/mL), and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (55.2 μg/mL), respectively. Free radical scavenging activity of these extracts was analyzed using DPPH assay (65%). Extracts were tested for in vitro toxicity using DNA fragmentation assay, haemolytic assay, and MTT assay. None of the extracts showed toxicity in tested models. Furthermore, GC-MS analysis of lead extracts showed the presence of major compounds, hentriacontane, z, z-6, 28-heptatriactontadien-2-one, 8-heptadecene, and 1-heptacosanol. Our findings suggest that Turbinaria ornata can be used as a potential source for further in vivo studies in controlling hyperglycemia. PMID:25050371

  18. Russelioside B, a pregnane glycoside ameliorates hyperglycemia in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats by regulating key enzymes of glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Sattar, Essam; El-Maraghy, Shohda A; El-Dine, Riham Salah; Rizk, Sherine M

    2016-05-25

    An alternative strategy to treat diabetes mellitus is the use of various natural agents possessing hypoglycemic effect. Caralluma quadrangula has been used in Saudi traditional medicine in cases of thirst and hunger and for the treatment of diabetes. The present study was designed to evaluate the improving effect of russelioside B, a pregnane glycoside isolated from Caralluma quadrangula on glucose metabolism in the liver of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes mellitus was induced in rats by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg body weight). Experimental rats were administered russelioside B at a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight once a day for 30 days. The results showed that RB improved the fasting serum glucose level, glycated hemoglobin percent, serum insulin level and lipid profile. A significant improvement was observed upon the administration of russelioside B on the activities of the key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism (glucokinase, glucose-6-phosphatase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and glycogen phosphorylase) in the liver of diabetic rats. Further, russelioside B administration to diabetic rats reverted gene expression of glucokinase, glucose-6-phosphatase, glycogen synthase and glycogen synthase kinase-3β to near normal levels. In conclusion, russelioside B possess antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic effect in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. Hence, administration of russelioside B may represent a potentially useful strategy for the management of diabetes. PMID:27038876

  19. Immunogold Localization of Key Metabolic Enzymes in the Anammoxosome and on the Tubule-Like Structures of Kuenenia stuttgartiensis

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Naomi M.; Neumann, Sarah; Mesman, Rob J.; Ferousi, Christina; Keltjens, Jan T.; Jetten, Mike S. M.; van Niftrik, Laura

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria oxidize ammonium with nitrite as the terminal electron acceptor to form dinitrogen gas in the absence of oxygen. Anammox bacteria have a compartmentalized cell plan with a central membrane-bound “prokaryotic organelle” called the anammoxosome. The anammoxosome occupies most of the cell volume, has a curved membrane, and contains conspicuous tubule-like structures of unknown identity and function. It was suggested previously that the catalytic reactions of the anammox pathway occur in the anammoxosome, and that proton motive force was established across its membrane. Here, we used antibodies raised against five key enzymes of the anammox catabolism to determine their cellular location. The antibodies were raised against purified native hydroxylamine oxidoreductase-like protein kustc0458 with its redox partner kustc0457, hydrazine dehydrogenase (HDH; kustc0694), hydroxylamine oxidase (HOX; kustc1061), nitrite oxidoreductase (NXR; kustd1700/03/04), and hydrazine synthase (HZS; kuste2859-61) of the anammox bacterium Kuenenia stuttgartiensis. We determined that all five protein complexes were exclusively located inside the anammoxosome matrix. Four of the protein complexes did not appear to form higher-order protein organizations. However, the present data indicated for the first time that NXR is part of the tubule-like structures, which may stretch the whole length of the anammoxosome. These findings support the anammoxosome as the locus of catabolic reactions of the anammox pathway. IMPORTANCE Anammox bacteria are environmentally relevant microorganisms that contribute significantly to the release of fixed nitrogen in nature. Furthermore, the anammox process is applied for nitrogen removal from wastewater as an environment-friendly and cost-effective technology. These microorganisms feature a unique cellular organelle, the anammoxosome, which was proposed to contain the energy metabolism of the cell and

  20. Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Identified as a Key Enzyme in Erythrocytic Plasmodium falciparum Carbon Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Chokkathukalam, Achuthanunni; Watson, David G.; Breitling, Rainer; Coombs, Graham H.; Müller, Sylke

    2014-01-01

    Phospoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is absent from humans but encoded in the Plasmodium falciparum genome, suggesting that PEPC has a parasite-specific function. To investigate its importance in P. falciparum, we generated a pepc null mutant (D10Δpepc), which was only achievable when malate, a reduction product of oxaloacetate, was added to the growth medium. D10Δpepc had a severe growth defect in vitro, which was partially reversed by addition of malate or fumarate, suggesting that pepc may be essential in vivo. Targeted metabolomics using 13C-U-D-glucose and 13C-bicarbonate showed that the conversion of glycolytically-derived PEP into malate, fumarate, aspartate and citrate was abolished in D10Δpepc and that pentose phosphate pathway metabolites and glycerol 3-phosphate were present at increased levels. In contrast, metabolism of the carbon skeleton of 13C,15N-U-glutamine was similar in both parasite lines, although the flux was lower in D10Δpepc; it also confirmed the operation of a complete forward TCA cycle in the wild type parasite. Overall, these data confirm the CO2 fixing activity of PEPC and suggest that it provides metabolites essential for TCA cycle anaplerosis and the maintenance of cytosolic and mitochondrial redox balance. Moreover, these findings imply that PEPC may be an exploitable target for future drug discovery. PMID:24453970

  1. Comparative studies of vertebrate lipoprotein lipase: a key enzyme of very low density lipoprotein metabolism.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Roger S; Vandeberg, John L; Cox, Laura A

    2011-06-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LIPL or LPL; E.C.3.1.1.34) serves a dual function as a triglyceride lipase of circulating chylomicrons and very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDL) and facilitates receptor-mediated lipoprotein uptake into heart, muscle and adipose tissue. Comparative LPL amino acid sequences and protein structures and LPL gene locations were examined using data from several vertebrate genome projects. Mammalian LPL genes usually contained 9 coding exons on the positive strand. Vertebrate LPL sequences shared 58-99% identity as compared with 33-49% sequence identities with other vascular triglyceride lipases, hepatic lipase (HL) and endothelial lipase (EL). Two human LPL N-glycosylation sites were conserved among seven predicted sites for the vertebrate LPL sequences examined. Sequence alignments, key amino acid residues and conserved predicted secondary and tertiary structures were also studied. A CpG island was identified within the 5'-untranslated region of the human LPL gene which may contribute to the higher than average (×4.5 times) level of expression reported. Phylogenetic analyses examined the relationships and potential evolutionary origins of vertebrate lipase genes, LPL, LIPG (encoding EL) and LIPC (encoding HL) which suggested that these have been derived from gene duplication events of an ancestral neutral lipase gene, prior to the appearance of fish during vertebrate evolution. Comparative divergence rates for these vertebrate sequences indicated that LPL is evolving more slowly (2-3 times) than for LIPC and LIPG genes and proteins. PMID:21561822

  2. Metabolic enzyme expression highlights a key role for MTHFD2 and the mitochondrial folate pathway in cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Roland; Jain, Mohit; Madhusudhan, Nikhil; Sheppard, Nina Gustafsson; Strittmatter, Laura; Kampf, Caroline; Huang, Jenny; Asplund, Anna; Mootha, Vamsi K.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic remodeling is now widely regarded as a hallmark of cancer, but it is not clear whether individual metabolic strategies are frequently exploited by many tumours. Here we compare messenger RNA profiles of 1,454 metabolic enzymes across 1,981 tumours spanning 19 cancer types to identify enzymes that are consistently differentially expressed. Our meta-analysis recovers established targets of some of the most widely used chemotherapeutics, including dihydrofolate reductase, thymidylate synthase and ribonucleotide reductase, while also spotlighting new enzymes, such as the mitochondrial proline biosynthetic enzyme PYCR1. The highest scoring pathway is mitochondrial one-carbon metabolism and is centred on MTHFD2. MTHFD2 RNA and protein are markedly elevated in many cancers and correlated with poor survival in breast cancer. MTHFD2 is expressed in the developing embryo, but is absent in most healthy adult tissues, even those that are proliferating. Our study highlights the importance of mitochondrial compartmentalization of one-carbon metabolism in cancer and raises important therapeutic hypotheses.

  3. Metabolic enzyme expression highlights a key role for MTHFD2 and the mitochondrial folate pathway in cancer.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Roland; Jain, Mohit; Madhusudhan, Nikhil; Sheppard, Nina Gustafsson; Strittmatter, Laura; Kampf, Caroline; Huang, Jenny; Asplund, Anna; Mootha, Vamsi K

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic remodeling is now widely regarded as a hallmark of cancer, but it is not clear whether individual metabolic strategies are frequently exploited by many tumours. Here we compare messenger RNA profiles of 1,454 metabolic enzymes across 1,981 tumours spanning 19 cancer types to identify enzymes that are consistently differentially expressed. Our meta-analysis recovers established targets of some of the most widely used chemotherapeutics, including dihydrofolate reductase, thymidylate synthase and ribonucleotide reductase, while also spotlighting new enzymes, such as the mitochondrial proline biosynthetic enzyme PYCR1. The highest scoring pathway is mitochondrial one-carbon metabolism and is centred on MTHFD2. MTHFD2 RNA and protein are markedly elevated in many cancers and correlated with poor survival in breast cancer. MTHFD2 is expressed in the developing embryo, but is absent in most healthy adult tissues, even those that are proliferating. Our study highlights the importance of mitochondrial compartmentalization of one-carbon metabolism in cancer and raises important therapeutic hypotheses. PMID:24451681

  4. Metabolic enzyme expression highlights a key role for MTHFD2 and the mitochondrial folate pathway in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Roland; Jain, Mohit; Madhusudhan, Nikhil; Sheppard, Nina Gustafsson; Strittmatter, Laura; Kampf, Caroline; Huang, Jenny; Asplund, Anna; Mootha, Vamsi K

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic remodeling is now widely regarded as a hallmark of cancer, but it is not clear whether individual metabolic strategies are frequently exploited by many tumours. Here we compare messenger RNA profiles of 1,454 metabolic enzymes across 1,981 tumours spanning 19 cancer types to identify enzymes that are consistently differentially expressed. Our meta-analysis recovers established targets of some of the most widely used chemotherapeutics, including dihydrofolate reductase, thymidylate synthase and ribonucleotide reductase, while also spotlighting new enzymes, such as the mitochondrial proline biosynthetic enzyme PYCR1. The highest scoring pathway is mitochondrial one-carbon metabolism and is centred on MTHFD2. MTHFD2 RNA and protein are markedly elevated in many cancers and correlated with poor survival in breast cancer. MTHFD2 is expressed in the developing embryo, but is absent in most healthy adult tissues, even those that are proliferating. Our study highlights the importance of mitochondrial compartmentalization of one-carbon metabolism in cancer and raises important therapeutic hypotheses. PMID:24451681

  5. Mass Spectrometry-based Workflow for Accurate Quantification of Escherichia coli Enzymes: How Proteomics Can Play a Key Role in Metabolic Engineering*

    PubMed Central

    Trauchessec, Mathieu; Jaquinod, Michel; Bonvalot, Aline; Brun, Virginie; Bruley, Christophe; Ropers, Delphine; de Jong, Hidde; Garin, Jérôme; Bestel-Corre, Gwenaëlle; Ferro, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic engineering aims to design high performance microbial strains producing compounds of interest. This requires systems-level understanding; genome-scale models have therefore been developed to predict metabolic fluxes. However, multi-omics data including genomics, transcriptomics, fluxomics, and proteomics may be required to model the metabolism of potential cell factories. Recent technological advances to quantitative proteomics have made mass spectrometry-based quantitative assays an interesting alternative to more traditional immuno-affinity based approaches. This has improved specificity and multiplexing capabilities. In this study, we developed a quantification workflow to analyze enzymes involved in central metabolism in Escherichia coli (E. coli). This workflow combined full-length isotopically labeled standards with selected reaction monitoring analysis. First, full-length 15N labeled standards were produced and calibrated to ensure accurate measurements. Liquid chromatography conditions were then optimized for reproducibility and multiplexing capabilities over a single 30-min liquid chromatography-MS analysis. This workflow was used to accurately quantify 22 enzymes involved in E. coli central metabolism in a wild-type reference strain and two derived strains, optimized for higher NADPH production. In combination with measurements of metabolic fluxes, proteomics data can be used to assess different levels of regulation, in particular enzyme abundance and catalytic rate. This provides information that can be used to design specific strains used in biotechnology. In addition, accurate measurement of absolute enzyme concentrations is key to the development of predictive kinetic models in the context of metabolic engineering. PMID:24482123

  6. Antidiabetic efficacy of citronellol, a citrus monoterpene by ameliorating the hepatic key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Subramani; Muruganathan, Udaiyar

    2016-04-25

    Diabetes mellitus is a clinically complex disease characterized by chronic hyperglycemia with metabolic disturbances. During diabetes, endogenous hepatic glucose production is increased as a result of impaired activities of the key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the antidiabetic efficacy of citronellol, a citrus monoterpene in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes mellitus was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of STZ (40 mg/kg b.w). STZ induced diabetic rats received citronellol orally at the doses of 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg b.w for 30 days. In this study the levels of plasma glucose, insulin, hemoglobin (Hb), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C), glycogen, and the activities of carbohydrate metabolic enzymes, liver and kidney markers were evaluated. Oral administration of citronellol (50 mg/kg) for 30 days dose dependently improved the levels of insulin, Hb and hepatic glycogen with significant decrease in glucose and HbA1C levels. The altered activities of carbohydrate metabolic enzymes, hepatic and kidney markers were restored to near normal. Citronellol supplement was found to be effective in preserving the normal histological appearance of hepatic cells and insulin-positive β-cells in STZ-rats. Our results suggest that administration of citronellol attenuates the hyperglycemia in the STZ-induced diabetic rats by ameliorating the key carbohydrate metabolic enzymes and could be developed as a functional and nutraceutical ingredient in combating diabetes mellitus. PMID:26944432

  7. Differential 3-bromopyruvate inhibition of cytosolic and mitochondrial human serine hydroxymethyltransferase isoforms, key enzymes in cancer metabolic reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Paiardini, Alessandro; Tramonti, Angela; Schirch, Doug; Guiducci, Giulia; di Salvo, Martino Luigi; Fiascarelli, Alessio; Giorgi, Alessandra; Maras, Bruno; Cutruzzolà, Francesca; Contestabile, Roberto

    2016-11-01

    The cytosolic and mitochondrial isoforms of serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT1 and SHMT2, respectively) are well-recognized targets of cancer research, since their activity is critical for purine and pyrimidine biosynthesis and because of their prominent role in the metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells. Here we show that 3-bromopyruvate (3BP), a potent novel anti-tumour agent believed to function primarily by blocking energy metabolism, differentially inactivates human SHMT1 and SHMT2. SHMT1 is completely inhibited by 3BP, whereas SHMT2 retains a significant fraction of activity. Site directed mutagenesis experiments on SHMT1 demonstrate that selective inhibition relies on the presence of a cysteine residue at the active site of SHMT1 (Cys204) that is absent in SHMT2. Our results show that 3BP binds to SHMT1 active site, forming an enzyme-3BP complex, before reacting with Cys204. The physiological substrate l-serine is still able to bind at the active site of the inhibited enzyme, although catalysis does not occur. Modelling studies suggest that alkylation of Cys204 prevents a productive binding of l-serine, hampering interaction between substrate and Arg402. Conversely, the partial inactivation of SHMT2 takes place without the formation of a 3BP-enzyme complex. The introduction of a cysteine residue in the active site of SHMT2 by site directed mutagenesis (A206C mutation), at a location corresponding to that of Cys204 in SHMT1, yields an enzyme that forms a 3BP-enzyme complex and is completely inactivated. This work sets the basis for the development of selective SHMT1 inhibitors that target Cys204, starting from the structure and reactivity of 3BP. PMID:27530298

  8. Assessment of mercaptopurine (6MP) metabolites and 6MP metabolic key-enzymes in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wojtuszkiewicz, Anna; Barcelos, Ana; Dubbelman, Boas; De Abreu, Ronney; Brouwer, Connie; Bökkerink, Jos P; de Haas, Valerie; de Groot-Kruseman, Hester; Jansen, Gerrit; Kaspers, Gertjan L; Cloos, Jacqueline; Peters, G J

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is treated with combination chemotherapy including mercaptopurine (6MP) as an important component. Upon its uptake, 6MP undergoes a complex metabolism involving many enzymes and active products. The prognostic value of all the factors engaged in this pathway still remains unclear. This study attempted to determine which components of 6MP metabolism in leukemic blasts and red blood cells are important for 6MP's sensitivity and toxicity. In addition, changes in the enzymatic activities and metabolite levels during the treatment were analyzed. In a cohort (N=236) of pediatric ALL patients enrolled in the Dutch ALL-9 protocol, we studied the enzymes inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT), hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT), and purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) as well as thioguanine nucleotides (TGN) and methylthioinosine nucleotides (meTINs). Activities of selected enzymes and levels of 6MP derivatives were measured at various time points during the course of therapy. The data obtained and the toxicity related parameters available for these patients were correlated with each other. We found several interesting relations, including high concentrations of two active forms of 6MP--TGN and meTIN--showing a trend toward association with better in vitro antileukemic effect of 6MP. High concentrations of TGN and elevated activity of HGPRT were found to be significantly associated with grade III/IV leucopenia. However, a lot of data of enzymatic activities and metabolite concentrations as well as clinical toxicity were missing, thereby limiting the number of assessed relations. Therefore, although a complex study of 6MP metabolism in ALL patients is feasible, it warrants more robust and strict data collection in order to be able to draw more reliable conclusions. PMID:24940700

  9. Polyphenols rich fraction from Geoffroea decorticans fruits flour affects key enzymes involved in metabolic syndrome, oxidative stress and inflammatory process.

    PubMed

    Costamagna, M S; Zampini, I C; Alberto, M R; Cuello, S; Torres, S; Pérez, J; Quispe, C; Schmeda-Hirschmann, G; Isla, M I

    2016-01-01

    Geoffroea decorticans (chañar), is widely distributed throughout Northwestern Argentina. Its fruit is consumed as flour, arrope or hydroalcoholic beverage. The chañar fruits flour was obtained and 39 phenolic compounds were tentatively identified by HPLC-MS/MS(n). The compounds comprised caffeic acid glycosides, simple phenolics (protocatechuic acid and vanillic acid), a glycoside of vanillic acid, p-coumaric acid and its phenethyl ester as well as free and glycosylated flavonoids. The polyphenols enriched extract with and without gastroduodenal digestion inhibited enzymes associated with metabolic syndrome, including α-amylase, α-glucosidase, lipase and hydroxyl methyl glutaryl CoA reductase. The polyphenolic extract exhibited antioxidant activity by different mechanisms and inhibited the pro-inflammatory enzymes (ciclooxygenase, lipoxygenase and phospholipase A2). The polyphenolic extract did not showed mutagenic effect by Ames test against Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100 strains. These findings add evidence that chañar fruit flour may be considered a functional food with preventive properties against diseases associated with oxidative stress, inflammatory mediators and metabolic syndrome. PMID:26212988

  10. Characterization of a NADH-Dependent Glutamate Dehydrogenase Mutant of Arabidopsis Demonstrates the Key Role of this Enzyme in Root Carbon and Nitrogen Metabolism[W

    PubMed Central

    Fontaine, Jean-Xavier; Tercé-Laforgue, Thérèse; Armengaud, Patrick; Clément, Gilles; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Pelletier, Sandra; Catterou, Manuella; Azzopardi, Marianne; Gibon, Yves; Lea, Peter J.; Hirel, Bertrand; Dubois, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    The role of NADH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) was investigated by studying the physiological impact of a complete lack of enzyme activity in an Arabidopsis thaliana plant deficient in three genes encoding the enzyme. This study was conducted following the discovery that a third GDH gene is expressed in the mitochondria of the root companion cells, where all three active GDH enzyme proteins were shown to be present. A gdh1-2-3 triple mutant was constructed and exhibited major differences from the wild type in gene transcription and metabolite concentrations, and these differences appeared to originate in the roots. By placing the gdh triple mutant under continuous darkness for several days and comparing it to the wild type, the evidence strongly suggested that the main physiological function of NADH-GDH is to provide 2-oxoglutarate for the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The differences in key metabolites of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in the triple mutant versus the wild type indicated that, through metabolic processes operating mainly in roots, there was a strong impact on amino acid accumulation, in particular alanine, γ-aminobutyrate, and aspartate in both roots and leaves. These results are discussed in relation to the possible signaling and physiological functions of the enzyme at the interface of carbon and nitrogen metabolism. PMID:23054470

  11. Characterization of a NADH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase mutant of Arabidopsis demonstrates the key role of this enzyme in root carbon and nitrogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Jean-Xavier; Tercé-Laforgue, Thérèse; Armengaud, Patrick; Clément, Gilles; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Pelletier, Sandra; Catterou, Manuella; Azzopardi, Marianne; Gibon, Yves; Lea, Peter J; Hirel, Bertrand; Dubois, Frédéric

    2012-10-01

    The role of NADH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) was investigated by studying the physiological impact of a complete lack of enzyme activity in an Arabidopsis thaliana plant deficient in three genes encoding the enzyme. This study was conducted following the discovery that a third GDH gene is expressed in the mitochondria of the root companion cells, where all three active GDH enzyme proteins were shown to be present. A gdh1-2-3 triple mutant was constructed and exhibited major differences from the wild type in gene transcription and metabolite concentrations, and these differences appeared to originate in the roots. By placing the gdh triple mutant under continuous darkness for several days and comparing it to the wild type, the evidence strongly suggested that the main physiological function of NADH-GDH is to provide 2-oxoglutarate for the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The differences in key metabolites of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in the triple mutant versus the wild type indicated that, through metabolic processes operating mainly in roots, there was a strong impact on amino acid accumulation, in particular alanine, γ-aminobutyrate, and aspartate in both roots and leaves. These results are discussed in relation to the possible signaling and physiological functions of the enzyme at the interface of carbon and nitrogen metabolism. PMID:23054470

  12. In vitro inhibitory potential of Cynara scolymus, Silybum marianum, Taraxacum officinale, and Peumus boldus on key enzymes relevant to metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Villiger, Angela; Sala, Filippo; Suter, Andy; Butterweck, Veronika

    2015-01-15

    Boldocynara®, a proprietary dietary supplement product consisting of the plants Cynara scolymus, Silybum marianum, Taraxacum officinale, and Peumus boldus, used to promote functions of the liver and the gallbladder. It was the aim of the present study to look from a different perspective at the product by investigating the in vitro potential of Boldocynara® as a combination product and its individual extracts on key enzymes relevant to metabolic syndrome. Peumus boldus extract exhibited pronounced inhibitory activities on α-glucosidase (80% inhibition at 100 µg/ml, IC50: 17.56 µg/ml). Silybum marianum had moderate pancreatic lipase (PL) inhibitory activities (30% at 100 µg/ml) whereas Cynara scolymus showed moderate ACE inhibitory activity (31% at 100 µg/ml). The combination had moderate to weak effects on the tested enzymes. In conclusion, our results indicate some moderate potential of the dietary supplement Boldocynara® and its single ingredients for the prevention of metabolic disorders. PMID:25636882

  13. In Silico Modeling of Liver Metabolism in a Human Disease Reveals a Key Enzyme for Histidine and Histamine Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Pagliarini, Roberto; Castello, Raffaele; Napolitano, Francesco; Borzone, Roberta; Annunziata, Patrizia; Mandrile, Giorgia; De Marchi, Mario; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; di Bernardo, Diego

    2016-06-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type I (PH1) is an autosomal-recessive inborn error of liver metabolism caused by alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT) deficiency. In silico modeling of liver metabolism in PH1 recapitulated accumulation of known biomarkers as well as alteration of histidine and histamine levels, which we confirmed in vitro, in vivo, and in PH1 patients. AGT-deficient mice showed decreased vascular permeability, a readout of in vivo histamine activity. Histamine reduction is most likely caused by increased catabolism of the histamine precursor histidine, triggered by rerouting of alanine flux from AGT to the glutamic-pyruvate transaminase (GPT, also known as the alanine-transaminase ALT). Alanine administration reduces histamine levels in wild-type mice, while overexpression of GPT in PH1 mice increases plasma histidine, normalizes histamine levels, restores vascular permeability, and decreases urinary oxalate levels. Our work demonstrates that genome-scale metabolic models are clinically relevant and can link genotype to phenotype in metabolic disorders. PMID:27239044

  14. [Gene expression of the key enzymes controlling starch synthesis and metabolism in rice grain endosperm under effects of high temperature after anthesis].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Lian-Jin; Dong, Hu; Cai, Xiao-Bo; Feng, Yan-Ning; Ren, Ping; Cheng, Fang-Min

    2012-03-01

    Taking an early-season indica cultivar 'Jiazao 935' whose grain quality was sensitive to temperature as test material, and by using artificial climatic chamber and real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR (FQ-PCR), this paper studied the relative expression amount and its dynamic changes of ten isoform genes of the key enzymes controlling starch synthesis and metabolism in rice grain endosperm, including sbe1, sbe3, and sbe4 of starch branching enzyme (SBE), isal, isa2, isa3, and pul of starch debranching enzyme (DBE), and Wx, sss1, and sss2a of starch synthase (SS), at the mean daily temperature 22 and 32 degrees C after anthesis. There existed obvious differences in the expression patterns of these genes under the high temperature stress, and the expression patterns were isoform-dependent. The relative expression amount of sbe1 and sbe3 under high temperature decreased significantly, and both of the genes were the sensitive isoform genes of SBE to high temperature stress. Among the DBE genes, pul was the isoform gene with high expression level, being more sensitive to high temperature stress than isa1, isa2, and isa3. Among the SS genes, sss2a had a significantly lower relative expression amount than sss1 and Wx, but sss2a and sss1 were more sensitive to high temperature than Wx, suggesting that sss2a and sss1 could be the important genes that adjusted the starch structure in rice endosperm under high temperature stress, especially at the middle and late grain filling stages. PMID:22720620

  15. Vanadate treatment restores the expression of genes for key enzymes in the glucose and ketone bodies metabolism in the liver of diabetic rats.

    PubMed Central

    Valera, A; Rodriguez-Gil, J E; Bosch, F

    1993-01-01

    Oral administration of vanadate to diabetic streptozotocin-treated rats decreased the high blood glucose and D-3-hydroxybutyrate levels related to diabetes. The increase in the expression of the P-enolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene, the main regulatory enzyme of gluconeogenesis, was counteracted in the liver and the kidney after vanadate administration to diabetic rats. Vanadate also counteracted the induction in tyrosine aminotransferase gene expression due to diabetes and was able to increase the expression of the glucokinase gene to levels even higher than those found in healthy animals. Similarly, an induction in pyruvate kinase mRNA transcripts was observed in diabetic vanadate-treated rats. These effects were correlated with changes on glucokinase and pyruvate kinase activities. Vanadate treatment caused a decrease in the expression of the liver-specific glucose transporter, GLUT-2. Thus, vanadate was able to restore liver glucose utilization and block glucose production in diabetic rats. The increase in the expression of the mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase (HMGCoAS) gene, the key regulatory enzyme in the ketone bodies production pathway, observed in diabetic rats was also blocked by vanadate. Furthermore, a similar pattern in the expression of PEPCK, GLUT-2, HMGCoAS, and the transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha genes has been observed. All of these results suggest that the regulation of the expression of genes involved in the glucose and ketone bodies metabolism could be a key step in the normalization process induced by vanadate administration to diabetic rats. Images PMID:8100835

  16. Metabolic regulation via enzyme filamentation

    PubMed Central

    Aughey, Gabriel N.; Liu, Ji-Long

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Determining the mechanisms of enzymatic regulation is central to the study of cellular metabolism. Regulation of enzyme activity via polymerization-mediated strategies has been shown to be widespread, and plays a vital role in mediating cellular homeostasis. In this review, we begin with an overview of the filamentation of CTP synthase, which forms filamentous structures termed cytoophidia. We then highlight other important examples of the phenomenon. Moreover, we discuss recent data relating to the regulation of enzyme activity by compartmentalization into cytoophidia. Finally, we hypothesize potential roles for enzyme filament formation in the regulation of metabolism, development and disease. PMID:27098510

  17. Absence of effects of dietary wheat bran on the activities of some key enzymes of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in mouse liver and adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Stanley, J C; Lambadarios, J A; Newsholme, E A

    1986-03-01

    1. The effects of a 100 g/kg dietary substitution of wheat bran on the body-weight gain, food consumption and faecal dry weight of mice given a high-sucrose diet and on the activities of some key enzymes of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in liver and adipose tissue were studied. 2. Wheat bran had no effect on body-weight gain, food consumption or faecal dry weight. 3. Wheat bran had no effect on the activities of hepatic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.49), 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.44), malate dehydrogenase (oxaloacetate-decarboxylating) (NADP+) (EC 1.1.1.40), ATP-citrate (pro-3S)-lyase (EC 4.1.3.8), pyruvate kinase (EC 2.7.1.40) and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11). The activity of hepatic 6-phosphofructokinase (EC 2.7.1.11) increased but only when expressed on a body-weight basis. 4. Wheat bran had no effect on the activities of adipose tissue glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase (oxaloacetate-decarboxylating) (NADP+), ATP-citrate (pro-3S)-lyase, hexokinase (EC 2.7.1.1), 6-phosphofructokinase and pyruvate kinase. 5. These results suggest that unlike guar gum and bagasse, wheat bran does not change the flux through some pathways of lipogenesis in liver and adipose tissue when mice are given high-sucrose diets. PMID:2823866

  18. Effect of nitrogen and phosphorus deficiency on transcriptional regulation of genes encoding key enzymes of starch metabolism in duckweed (Landoltia punctata).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhao; Shi, Hui-juan; Wang, Mao-lin; Cui, Long; Zhao, Hai; Zhao, Yun

    2015-01-01

    The production of starch by plants influences their use as biofuels. Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) regulate starch gene expression during plant growth and development, yet the role of key enzymes such as ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (E.C. 2.7.7.27 AGPase) in starch metabolism during N- and P-deficiency remains unknown. We investigated the effect of N- and P-deficiency on the expression of large (LeAPL1, LeAPL2, and LeAPL3) and small (LeAPS) subunits of AGPase in duckweed (Landoltia punctata) and their correlation with starch content. We first isolated the full-length cDNA encoding LeAPL1 (GenBank Accession No. KJ603244) and LeAPS (GenBank Accession No. KJ603243); they contained open reading frames of 1554 bp (57.7-kDa polypeptide of 517 amino acids) and 1578 bp (57.0 kDa polypeptide of 525 amino acids), respectively. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that LeAPL1 and LeAPL3 were highly expressed during early stages of N-deficiency, while LeAPL2 was only expressed during late stage. However, in response to P-deficiency, LeAPL1 and LeAPL2 were upregulated during early stages and LeAPL3 was primarily expressed in the late stage. Interestingly, LeAPS was highly expressed following N-deficiency during both stages, but was only upregulated in the early stage after P-deficiency. The activities of AGPase and soluble starch synthesis enzyme (SSS EC 2.4.1.21) were positively correlated with changes in starch content. Furthermore, LeAPL3 and LeSSS (SSS gene) were positively correlated with changes in starch content during N-deficiency, while LeAPS and LeSSS were correlated with starch content in response to P-deficiency. These results elevate current knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying starch synthesis. PMID:25438139

  19. Long-term feeding a plant-based diet devoid of marine ingredients strongly affects certain key metabolic enzymes in the rainbow trout liver.

    PubMed

    Véron, Vincent; Panserat, Stéphane; Le Boucher, Richard; Labbé, Laurent; Quillet, Edwige; Dupont-Nivet, Mathilde; Médale, Françoise

    2016-04-01

    Incorporation of a plant blend in the diet can affect growth parameters and metabolism in carnivorous fish. We studied for the first time the long-term (1 year) metabolic response of rainbow trout fed from first feeding with a plant-based diet totally devoid of marine ingredients. Hepatic enzymes were analyzed at enzymatic and molecular levels, at 3, 8 and 24 h after the last meal to study both the short-term effects of the last meal and long-term effects of the diet. The results were compared with those of fish fed a control diet of fish meal and fish oil. Growth, feed intake, feed efficiency and protein retention were lower in the group fed the plant-based diet. Glucokinase and pyruvate kinase activity were lower in the livers of trout fed the plant-based diet which the proportion of starch was lower than in the control diet. Glutamate dehydrogenase was induced by the plant-based diet, suggesting an imbalance of amino acids and a possible link with the lower protein retention observed. Gene expression of delta 6 desaturase was higher in fish fed the plant-based diet, probably linked to a high dietary level of linolenic acid and the absence of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in vegetable oils. Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA synthase expression was also induced by plant-based diet because of the low rate of cholesterol in the diet. Changes in regulation mechanisms already identified through short-term nutritional experiments (<12 weeks) suggest that metabolic responses are implemented at short term and remain in the long term. PMID:26746847

  20. Effects of different dwarfing interstocks on key enzyme activities and the expression of genes related to malic acid metabolism in Red Fuji apples.

    PubMed

    Shi, J; Li, F F; Ma, H; Li, Z Y; Xu, J Z

    2015-01-01

    In this experiment, the test materials were 'Red Fuji' apple trees grafted onto three interstocks (No. 53, No. 111, and No. 236), which were chosen from SH40 seeding interstocks. The content of malic acid, the enzyme activities, and the expression of genes related to malic acid metabolism were determined during fruit development.The results showed that malic acid content in the ripe fruit on interstock No. 53 was higher than that in the interstock No. 111 fruit. The malate dehydrogenase (NAD-MDH) activity in apples on interstock No. 53 was highest on Day 30, Day 100, and Day 160 after bloom, and the malic enzyme (NADP-ME) activity in apples on interstock No. 111 was higher than in the interstock No. 53 fruit from Day 70 to Day 100 after bloom. The relative expression of NAD-MDH genes in interstock No. 53 fruit was higher than in No. 236 fruit on Day 100 after bloom, but the relative expression of NADP-ME in No. 236 interstock fruit was lower than in No. 53 fruit. The relative expression of NAD-MDH genes in No. 53 interstock fruit was highest on Day 160 after bloom. This might have been the main reason for the difference in the accumulation of malic acid in the ripe apples.There was a positive correlation between the relative expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and the malic acid content of the fruit, and the content of malic acid in the apples was affected by the PEPC activity during the early developmental stage. PMID:26782412

  1. Androgen-metabolizing enzymes: A structural perspective.

    PubMed

    Manenda, Mahder Seifu; Hamel, Charles Jérémie; Masselot-Joubert, Loreleï; Picard, Marie-Ève; Shi, Rong

    2016-07-01

    Androgen-metabolizing enzymes convert cholesterol, a relatively inert molecule, into some of the most potent chemical messengers in vertebrates. This conversion involves thermodynamically challenging reactions catalyzed by P450 enzymes and redox reactions catalyzed by Aldo-Keto Reductases (AKRs). This review covers the structures of these enzymes with a focus on active site interactions and proposed mechanisms. Due to their role in a number of diseases, particularly in cancer, androgen-metabolizing enzymes have been targets of drug design. Hence we will also highlight how existing knowledge of structure is being used to this end. PMID:26924584

  2. Contributions of Human Enzymes in Carcinogen Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Rendic, Slobodan; Guengerich, F. Peter

    2012-01-01

    Considerable support exists for roles of metabolism in modulating the carcinogenic properties of chemicals. In particular, many of these compounds are procarcinogens that require activation to electrophilic forms to exert genotoxic effects. We systematically analyzed the existing literature on metabolism of carcinogens by human enzymes, which has been developed largely in the past 25 years. The metabolism and especially bioactivation of carcinogens are dominated by cytochrome P450 enzymes (66% of bioactivations). Within this group, six P450s—1A1, 1A2, 1B1, 2A6, 2E1, and 3A4—accounted for 77% of the P450 activation reactions. The roles of these P450s can be compared with those estimated for drug metabolism and should be considered in issues involving enzyme induction, chemoprevention, molecular epidemiology, inter-individual variations, and risk assessment. PMID:22531028

  3. Filamentation of Metabolic Enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qing-Ji; Kassim, Hakimi; Huang, Yong; Li, Hui; Zhang, Jing; Li, Guang; Wang, Peng-Ye; Yan, Jun; Ye, Fangfu; Liu, Ji-Long

    2016-06-20

    Compartmentation via filamentation has recently emerged as a novel mechanism for metabolic regulation. In order to identify filament-forming metabolic enzymes systematically, we performed a genome-wide screening of all strains available from an open reading frame-GFP collection in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We discovered nine novel filament-forming proteins and also confirmed those identified previously. From the 4159 strains, we found 23 proteins, mostly metabolic enzymes, which are capable of forming filaments in vivo. In silico protein-protein interaction analysis suggests that these filament-forming proteins can be clustered into several groups, including translational initiation machinery and glucose and nitrogen metabolic pathways. Using glutamine-utilising enzymes as examples, we found that the culture conditions affect the occurrence and length of the metabolic filaments. Furthermore, we found that two CTP synthases (Ura7p and Ura8p) and two asparagine synthetases (Asn1p and Asn2p) form filaments both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Live imaging analyses suggest that metabolic filaments undergo sub-diffusion. Taken together, our genome-wide screening identifies additional filament-forming proteins in S. cerevisiae and suggests that filamentation of metabolic enzymes is more general than currently appreciated. PMID:27312010

  4. Nature's inordinate fondness for metabolic enzymes: why metabolic enzyme loci are so frequently targets of selection.

    PubMed

    Marden, James H

    2013-12-01

    Metabolic enzyme loci were some of the first genes accessible for molecular evolution and ecology research. New technologies now make the whole genome, transcriptome or proteome readily accessible, allowing unbiased scans for loci exhibiting significant differences in allele frequency or expression level and associated with phenotypes and/or responses to natural selection. With surprising frequency and in many cases in proportions greater than chance relative to other genes, glycolysis and TCA cycle enzyme loci appear among the genes with significant associations in these studies. Hence, there is an ongoing need to understand the basis for fitness effects of metabolic enzyme polymorphisms. Allele-specific effects on the binding affinity and catalytic rate of individual enzymes are well known, but often of uncertain significance because metabolic control theory and in vivo studies indicate that many individual metabolic enzymes do not affect pathway flux rate. I review research, so far little used in evolutionary biology, showing that metabolic enzyme substrates affect signalling pathways that regulate cell and organismal biology, and that these enzymes have moonlighting functions. To date there is little knowledge of how alleles in natural populations affect these phenotypes. I discuss an example in which alleles of a TCA enzyme locus associate with differences in a signalling pathway and development, organismal performance, and ecological dynamics. Ultimately, understanding how metabolic enzyme polymorphisms map to phenotypes and fitness remains a compelling and ongoing need for gaining robust knowledge of ecological and evolutionary processes. PMID:24106889

  5. Pollen wall development: the associated enzymes and metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Jiang, J; Zhang, Z; Cao, J

    2013-03-01

    Pollen grains are surrounded by a sculpted wall, which protects male gametophytes from various environmental stresses and microbial attacks, and also facilitates pollination. Pollen wall development requires lipid and polysaccharide metabolism, and some key genes and proteins that participate in these processes have recently been identified. Here, we summarise the genes and describe their functions during pollen wall development via several metabolic pathways. A working model involving substances and catalytic enzyme reactions that occur during pollen development is also presented. This model provides information on the complete process of pollen wall development with respect to metabolic pathways. PMID:23252839

  6. Enzymes of glucose metabolism in Frankia sp.

    PubMed

    Lopez, M F; Torrey, J G

    1985-04-01

    Enzymes of glucose metabolism were assayed in crude cell extracts of Frankia strains HFPArI3 and HFPCcI2 as well as in isolated vesicle clusters from Alnus rubra root nodules. Activities of the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway enzymes glucokinase, phosphofructokinase, and pyruvate kinase were found in Frankia strain HFPArI3 and glucokinase and pyruvate kinase were found in Frankia strain HFPCcI2 and in the vesicle clusters. An NADP+-linked glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and an NAD-linked 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase were found in all of the extracts, although the role of these enzymes is unclear. No NADP+-linked 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase was found. Both dehydrogenases were inhibited by adenosine 5-triphosphate, and the apparent Km's for glucose 6-phosphate and 6-phosphogluconate were 6.86 X 10(-4) and 7.0 X 10(-5) M, respectively. In addition to the enzymes mentioned above, an NADP+-linked malic enzyme was detected in the pure cultures but not in the vesicle clusters. In contrast, however, the vesicle clusters had activity of an NAD-linked malic enzyme. The possibility that this enzyme resulted from contamination from plant mitochondria trapped in the vesicle clusters could not be discounted. None of the extracts showed activities of the Entner-Doudoroff enzymes or the gluconate metabolism enzymes gluconate dehydrogenase or gluconokinase. Propionate- versus trehalose-grown cultures of strain HFPArI3 showed similar activities of most enzymes except malic enzyme, which was higher in the cultures grown on the organic acid. Nitrogen-fixing cultures of strain HFPArI3 showed higher specific activities of glucose 6-phosphate and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenases and phosphofructokinase than ammonia-grown cultures. PMID:3980434

  7. Isolation and structural characterization of 2R, 3R taxifolin 3-O-rhamnoside from ethyl acetate extract of Hydnocarpus alpina and its hypoglycemic effect by attenuating hepatic key enzymes of glucose metabolism in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Balamurugan, Rangachari; Vendan, Subramanian Ezhil; Aravinthan, Adithan; Kim, Jong-Hoon

    2015-04-01

    Hydnocarpus alpina Wt. (Flacourtiaceae) (H. alpina) is a large tree traditionally used to treat leprosy; it also posses antidiabetic property. The present study was undertaken to isolate, characterize and to evaluate the antidiabetic effect of 2R, 3R taxifolin 3-O-rhamnoside. (rhamnoside) and its impact on carbohydrate metabolic key enzymes in control and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes mellitus was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ) (40 mg/kg). Oral administration of rhamnoside for 21 days significantly reduced food intake, calorie intake, blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin levels, and improved plasma insulin levels. Administration of rhamnoside showed significant increase in the body weight, body composition (Lean body weight (LBW) and retro body fat), glycolytic hexokinase, glucose-6-phophate dehydrogenase and pyruvate kinase levels where as significant decrease was observed in the levels of glucose-6-phosphatase fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase in diabetic treated rats. Further, administration of rhamnoside significantly improved the glycogen content, glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase, suggesting the antihyperglycemic potential of rhamnoside in diabetic rats. The results obtained were compared with glibenclamide a standard hypoglycaemic drug. Immunohistopathological study of pancreas revealed increased number of β-cells and insulin granules in diabetes-induced rats after treatment with rhamnoside for 21 days. Furthermore, Co-administration of rhamnoside (50 mg/kg) with nifedipine (13.6 mg/kg), a Ca(2+)ion channel blocker, or nicorandil (6.8 mg/kg), an ATP-sensitive K(+) ion channel opener, reveals the insulin secretion property of rhamnoside via a K(+)-ATP channels dependent pathway in diabetic rats. In conclusion, rhamnoside normalized blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, key hepatic enzymes and glycogen content by increasing insulin secretion via K

  8. Expression of Enzymes that Metabolize Medications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, Virginia E.; Peters, C. P.

    2012-01-01

    Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. Clinically-used medication doses are given with normal liver function in mind. A drug overdose can result if the liver is damaged and removing pharmaceuticals from the circulation at a rate slower than normal. Alternatively, if liver function is elevated and removing drugs from the system more quickly than usual, it would be as if too little drug had been given for effective treatment. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism we want to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver.

  9. Metabolic profiling reveals key metabolic features of renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Catchpole, Gareth; Platzer, Alexander; Weikert, Cornelia; Kempkensteffen, Carsten; Johannsen, Manfred; Krause, Hans; Jung, Klaus; Miller, Kurt; Willmitzer, Lothar; Selbig, Joachim; Weikert, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Recent evidence suggests that metabolic changes play a pivotal role in the biology of cancer and in particular renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Here, a global metabolite profiling approach was applied to characterize the metabolite pool of RCC and normal renal tissue. Advanced decision tree models were applied to characterize the metabolic signature of RCC and to explore features of metastasized tumours. The findings were validated in a second independent dataset. Vitamin E derivates and metabolites of glucose, fatty acid, and inositol phosphate metabolism determined the metabolic profile of RCC. α-tocopherol, hippuric acid, myoinositol, fructose-1-phosphate and glucose-1-phosphate contributed most to the tumour/normal discrimination and all showed pronounced concentration changes in RCC. The identified metabolic profile was characterized by a low recognition error of only 5% for tumour versus normal samples. Data on metastasized tumours suggested a key role for metabolic pathways involving arachidonic acid, free fatty acids, proline, uracil and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. These results illustrate the potential of mass spectroscopy based metabolomics in conjunction with sophisticated data analysis methods to uncover the metabolic phenotype of cancer. Differentially regulated metabolites, such as vitamin E compounds, hippuric acid and myoinositol, provide leads for the characterization of novel pathways in RCC. PMID:19845817

  10. 21 CFR 862.3360 - Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3360 Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. (a) Identification. A drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system is a device intended for use in testing deoxyribonucleic acid...

  11. 21 CFR 862.3360 - Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3360 Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. (a) Identification. A drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system is a device intended for use in testing deoxyribonucleic acid...

  12. 21 CFR 862.3360 - Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3360 Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. (a) Identification. A drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system is a device intended for use in testing deoxyribonucleic acid...

  13. 21 CFR 862.3360 - Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3360 Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. (a) Identification. A drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system is a device intended for use in testing deoxyribonucleic acid...

  14. 21 CFR 862.3360 - Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3360 Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. (a) Identification. A drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system is a device intended for use in testing deoxyribonucleic acid...

  15. Metabolic Enzymes of Cocaine Metabolite Benzoylecgonine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiabin; Zheng, Xirong; Zhan, Max; Zhou, Ziyuan; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Zheng, Fang

    2016-08-19

    Cocaine is one of the most addictive drugs without a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved medication. Enzyme therapy using an efficient cocaine-metabolizing enzyme is recognized as the most promising approach to cocaine overdose treatment. The actual enzyme, known as RBP-8000, under current clinical development for cocaine overdose treatment is our previously designed T172R/G173Q mutant of bacterial cocaine esterase (CocE). The T172R/G173Q mutant is effective in hydrolyzing cocaine but inactive against benzoylecgonine (a major, biologically active metabolite of cocaine). Unlike cocaine itself, benzoylecgonine has an unusually stable zwitterion structure resistant to further hydrolysis in the body and environment. In fact, benzoylecgonine can last in the body for a very long time (a few days) and, thus, is responsible for the long-term toxicity of cocaine and a commonly used marker for drug addiction diagnosis in pre-employment drug tests. Because CocE and its mutants are all active against cocaine and inactive against benzoylecgonine, one might simply assume that other enzymes that are active against cocaine are also inactive against benzoylecgonine. Here, through combined computational modeling and experimental studies, we demonstrate for the first time that human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) is actually active against benzoylecgonine, and that a rationally designed BChE mutant can not only more efficiently accelerate cocaine hydrolysis but also significantly hydrolyze benzoylecgonine in vitro and in vivo. This sets the stage for advanced studies to design more efficient mutant enzymes valuable for the development of an ideal cocaine overdose enzyme therapy and for benzoylecgonine detoxification in the environment. PMID:27224254

  16. Truffles contain endocannabinoid metabolic enzymes and anandamide.

    PubMed

    Pacioni, Giovanni; Rapino, Cinzia; Zarivi, Osvaldo; Falconi, Anastasia; Leonardi, Marco; Battista, Natalia; Colafarina, Sabrina; Sergi, Manuel; Bonfigli, Antonella; Miranda, Michele; Barsacchi, Daniela; Maccarrone, Mauro

    2015-02-01

    Truffles are the fruiting body of fungi, members of the Ascomycota phylum endowed with major gastronomic and commercial value. The development and maturation of their reproductive structure are dependent on melanin synthesis. Since anandamide, a prominent member of the endocannabinoid system (ECS), is responsible for melanin synthesis in normal human epidermal melanocytes, we thought that ECS might be present also in truffles. Here, we show the expression, at the transcriptional and translational levels, of most ECS components in the black truffle Tuber melanosporum Vittad. at maturation stage VI. Indeed, by means of molecular biology and immunochemical techniques, we found that truffles contain the major metabolic enzymes of the ECS, while they do not express the most relevant endocannabinoid-binding receptors. In addition, we measured anandamide content in truffles, at different maturation stages (from III to VI), through liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis, whereas the other relevant endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol was below the detection limit. Overall, our unprecedented results suggest that anandamide and ECS metabolic enzymes have evolved earlier than endocannabinoid-binding receptors, and that anandamide might be an ancient attractant to truffle eaters, that are well-equipped with endocannabinoid-binding receptors. PMID:25433633

  17. Enzyme Recruitment and Its Role in Metabolic Expansion

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Although more than 109 years have passed since the existence of the last universal common ancestor, proteins have yet to reach the limits of divergence. As a result, metabolic complexity is ever expanding. Identifying and understanding the mechanisms that drive and limit the divergence of protein sequence space impact not only evolutionary biologists investigating molecular evolution but also synthetic biologists seeking to design useful catalysts and engineer novel metabolic pathways. Investigations over the past 50 years indicate that the recruitment of enzymes for new functions is a key event in the acquisition of new metabolic capacity. In this review, we outline the genetic mechanisms that enable recruitment and summarize the present state of knowledge regarding the functional characteristics of extant catalysts that facilitate recruitment. We also highlight recent examples of enzyme recruitment, both from the historical record provided by phylogenetics and from enzyme evolution experiments. We conclude with a look to the future, which promises fruitful consequences from the convergence of molecular evolutionary theory, laboratory-directed evolution, and synthetic biology. PMID:24483367

  18. Induction of drug metabolizing enzymes by sulfinpyrazone.

    PubMed

    Walter, E; Staiger, C; de Vries, J; Zimmermann, R; Weber, E

    1981-01-01

    A previous interaction study of sulfinpyrazone (Anturano) suggested that it induced microsomal drug metabolizing enzymes in the liver. To verify this finding the effect of sulfinpyrazone 800 mg per day for four weeks was investigated in ten healthy volunteers. Both the therapeutic actions of sulfinpyrazone, the uricosuric and the antiaggregating effects, were demonstrated (p less than 0.05). The influence on the microsomal drug metabolizing system in the liver was demonstrated by an increase in serum-gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase from 15.1 to 23.3 U/l (p greater than 0.05), a significant increase in the urinary excretion of d-glucaric acid (29.6 to 77.9 microMol/24 h, p less than 0.05) and an increase in antipyrine clearance from 50.3 ml/min to 83.9 ml/min (p less than 0.05). The possibility of enhancement of drug metabolism during treatment with sulfinpyrazone in combination with other drugs should be kept in mind. PMID:6113147

  19. Key enzymes of the retinoid (visual) cycle in vertebrate retina

    PubMed Central

    Kiser, Philip D.; Golczak, Marcin; Maeda, Akiko; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    A major goal in vision research over the past few decades has been to understand the molecular details of retinoid processing within the retinoid (visual) cycle. This includes the consequences of side reactions that result from delayed all-trans-retinal clearance and condensation with phospholipids that characterize a variety of serious retinal diseases. Knowledge of the basic retinoid biochemistry involved in these diseases is essential for development of effective therapeutics. Photoisomerization of the 11-cis-retinal chromophore of rhodopsin triggers a complex set of metabolic transformations collectively termed phototransduction that ultimately lead to light perception. Continuity of vision depends on continuous conversion of all-trans-retinal back to the 11-cis-retinal isomer. This process takes place in a series of reactions known as the retinoid cycle, which occur in photoreceptor and RPE cells. All-trans-retinal, the initial substrate of this cycle, is a chemically reactive aldehyde that can form toxic conjugates with proteins and lipids. Therefore, much experimental effort has been devoted to elucidate molecular mechanisms of the retinoid cycle and all-trans-retinal-mediated retinal degeneration, resulting in delineation of many key steps involved in regenerating 11-cis-retinal. Three particularly important reactions are catalyzed by enzymes broadly classified as acyltransferases, short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases and carotenoid/retinoid isomerases/oxygenases. PMID:21447403

  20. Mechanistic insights into the regulation of metabolic enzymes by acetylation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The activity of metabolic enzymes is controlled by three principle levels: the amount of enzyme, the catalytic activity, and the accessibility of substrates. Reversible lysine acetylation is emerging as a major regulatory mechanism in metabolism that is involved in all three levels of controlling metabolic enzymes and is altered frequently in human diseases. Acetylation rivals other common posttranslational modifications in cell regulation not only in the number of substrates it modifies, but also the variety of regulatory mechanisms it facilitates. PMID:22826120

  1. Metabolic Enzymes Moonlighting in the Nucleus: Metabolic Regulation of Gene Transcription.

    PubMed

    Boukouris, Aristeidis E; Zervopoulos, Sotirios D; Michelakis, Evangelos D

    2016-08-01

    During evolution, cells acquired the ability to sense and adapt to varying environmental conditions, particularly in terms of fuel supply. Adaptation to fuel availability is crucial for major cell decisions and requires metabolic alterations and differential gene expression that are often epigenetically driven. A new mechanistic link between metabolic flux and regulation of gene expression is through moonlighting of metabolic enzymes in the nucleus. This facilitates delivery of membrane-impermeable or unstable metabolites to the nucleus, including key substrates for epigenetic mechanisms such as acetyl-CoA which is used in histone acetylation. This metabolism-epigenetics axis facilitates adaptation to a changing environment in normal (e.g., development, stem cell differentiation) and disease states (e.g., cancer), providing a potential novel therapeutic target. PMID:27345518

  2. Expression of Enzymes that Metabolize Medications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, V. E.; Peters, C. P.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Increased exposure to radiation is one physiological stressor associated with spaceflight and it is feasible to conduct ground experiments using known radiation exposures. The health of the liver, especially the activity rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. While radiation is known to alter normal physiological function, how radiation affects liver metabolism of administered medications is unclear. Crew health could be affected if the actions of medications used in spaceflight deviated from expectations formed during terrestrial medication use. This study is an effort to identify liver metabolic enzymes whose expression is altered by spaceflight or by radiation exposures that mimic features of the spaceflight environment. METHODS: Using procedures approved by the Animal Care and Use Committee, mice were exposed to either 137Cs (controls, 50 mGy, 6Gy, or 50 mGy + 6Gy separated by 24 hours) or 13 days of spaceflight on STS 135. Animals were anesthetized and sacrificed at several time points (4 hours, 24 hours or 7 days) after their last radiation exposure, or within 6 hours of return to Earth for the STS 135 animals. Livers were removed immediately and flash-frozen in liquid nitrogen. Tissue was homogenized, RNA extracted, purified and quality-tested. Complementary DNA was prepared from high-quality RNA samples, and used in RT-qPCR experiments to determine relative expression of a wide variety of genes involved in general metabolism and drug metabolism. RESULTS: Results of the ground radiation exposure experiments indicated 65 genes of the 190 tested were significantly affected by at least one of the radiation doses. Many of the affected genes are involved in the metabolism of drugs with hydrophobic or steroid-like structures, maintenance of redox homeostasis and repair of DNA damage. Most affected genes returned to near control expression levels by 7 days post

  3. Chemical and functional characterization of seed, pulp and skin powder from chilto (Solanum betaceum), an Argentine native fruit. Phenolic fractions affect key enzymes involved in metabolic syndrome and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Orqueda, María Eugenia; Rivas, Marisa; Zampini, Iris Catiana; Alberto, María Rosa; Torres, Sebastian; Cuello, Soledad; Sayago, Jorge; Thomas-Valdes, Samanta; Jiménez-Aspee, Felipe; Schmeda-Hirschmann, Guillermo; Isla, María Inés

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the nutritional and functional components of powder obtained by lyophilization of whole fruits, seeds, pulp and skin from chilto (Solanum betaceum Cav) cultivated in the ecoregion of Yungas, Argentina. The powders have low carbohydrate and sodium content and are a source of vitamin C, carotenoid, phenolics, potassium and fiber. The HPLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis of the fractions enriched in phenolics allowed the identification of 12 caffeic acid derivatives and related phenolics, 10 rosmarinic acid derivatives and 7 flavonoids. The polyphenols enriched extracts before and after simulated gastroduodenal digestion inhibited enzymes associated with metabolic syndrome, including α-glucosidase, amylase and lipase and exhibited antioxidant activity by different mechanisms. None of the analyzed fruit powders showed acute toxicity or genotoxicity. The powders from the three parts of S. betaceum fruit may be a potential functional food and the polyphenol enriched extract of seed and skin may have nutraceutical properties. PMID:27596394

  4. Metabolic Enzymes of Helminth Parasites: Potential as Drug Targets.

    PubMed

    Timson, David J

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic pathways that extract energy from carbon compounds are essential for an organism's survival. Therefore, inhibition of enzymes in these pathways represents a potential therapeutic strategy to combat parasitic infections. However, the high degree of similarity between host and parasite enzymes makes this strategy potentially difficult. Nevertheless, several existing drugs to treat infections by parasitic helminths (worms) target metabolic enzymes. These include the trivalent antimonials that target phosphofructokinase and Clorsulon that targets phosphoglycerate mutase and phosphoglycerate kinase. Glycolytic enzymes from a variety of helminths have been characterised biochemically, and some inhibitors identified. To date none of these inhibitors have been developed into therapies. Many of these enzymes are externalised from the parasite and so are also of interest in the development of potential vaccines. Less work has been done on tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes and oxidative phosphorylation complexes. Again, while some inhibitors have been identified none have been developed into drug-like molecules. Barriers to the development of novel drugs targeting metabolic enzymes include the lack of experimentally determined structures of helminth enzymes, lack of direct proof that the enzymes are vital in the parasites and lack of cell culture systems for many helminth species. Nevertheless, the success of Clorsulon (which discriminates between highly similar host and parasite enzymes) should inspire us to consider making serious efforts to discover novel anthelminthics, which target metabolic enzymes. PMID:26983888

  5. Metabolic Enzymes Enjoying New Partnerships as RNA-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Castello, Alfredo; Hentze, Matthias W.; Preiss, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In the past century, few areas of biology advanced as much as our understanding of the pathways of intermediary metabolism. Initially considered unimportant in terms of gene regulation, crucial cellular fate changes, cell differentiation, or malignant transformation are now known to involve ‘metabolic remodeling’ with profound changes in the expression of many metabolic enzyme genes. This review focuses on the recent identification of RNA-binding activity of numerous metabolic enzymes. We discuss possible roles of this unexpected second activity in feedback gene regulation (‘moonlighting’) and/or in the control of enzymatic function. We also consider how metabolism-driven post-translational modifications could regulate enzyme–RNA interactions. Thus, RNA emerges as a new partner of metabolic enzymes with far-reaching possible consequences to be unraveled in the future. PMID:26520658

  6. Identification of the Key Enzyme of Roseoflavin Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Julia; Konjik, Valentino; Jankowitsch, Frank; Sandhoff, Roger; Mack, Matthias

    2016-05-10

    The bacteria Streptomyces davawensis and Streptomyces cinnabarinus produce roseoflavin, the only known natural riboflavin (vitamin B2 ) analogue with antibiotic activity. Roseoflavin can be considered a natural antimetabolite and has been postulated to be biosynthesized from riboflavin via the key intermediate 8-demethyl-8-aminoriboflavin (AF). The required site-specific substitution of one of the methyl groups on the dimethylbenzene ring of riboflavin by an amino group (to give AF) is challenging. The pathway from riboflavin to AF has remained elusive, and the corresponding enzyme/s was/were unknown. Herein, we show by systematic gene deletion, heterologous gene expression, and biochemical studies that the enzyme specified by the gene BN159_7989 from S. davawensis is able to carry out a whole set of chemical reactions starting from riboflavin-5'-phosphate to give the final product 8-demethyl-8-aminoriboflavin-5'-phosphate (AFP). PMID:27062037

  7. Enzyme clustering accelerates processing of intermediates through metabolic channeling.

    PubMed

    Castellana, Michele; Wilson, Maxwell Z; Xu, Yifan; Joshi, Preeti; Cristea, Ileana M; Rabinowitz, Joshua D; Gitai, Zemer; Wingreen, Ned S

    2014-10-01

    We present a quantitative model to demonstrate that coclustering multiple enzymes into compact agglomerates accelerates the processing of intermediates, yielding the same efficiency benefits as direct channeling, a well-known mechanism in which enzymes are funneled between enzyme active sites through a physical tunnel. The model predicts the separation and size of coclusters that maximize metabolic efficiency, and this prediction is in agreement with previously reported spacings between coclusters in mammalian cells. For direct validation, we study a metabolic branch point in Escherichia coli and experimentally confirm the model prediction that enzyme agglomerates can accelerate the processing of a shared intermediate by one branch, and thus regulate steady-state flux division. Our studies establish a quantitative framework to understand coclustering-mediated metabolic channeling and its application to both efficiency improvement and metabolic regulation. PMID:25262299

  8. Enzyme clustering accelerates processing of intermediates through metabolic channeling

    PubMed Central

    Castellana, Michele; Wilson, Maxwell Z.; Xu, Yifan; Joshi, Preeti; Cristea, Ileana M.; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Gitai, Zemer; Wingreen, Ned S.

    2015-01-01

    We present a quantitative model to demonstrate that coclustering multiple enzymes into compact agglomerates accelerates the processing of intermediates, yielding the same efficiency benefits as direct channeling, a well-known mechanism in which enzymes are funneled between enzyme active sites through a physical tunnel. The model predicts the separation and size of coclusters that maximize metabolic efficiency, and this prediction is in agreement with previously reported spacings between coclusters in mammalian cells. For direct validation, we study a metabolic branch point in Escherichia coli and experimentally confirm the model prediction that enzyme agglomerates can accelerate the processing of a shared intermediate by one branch, and thus regulate steady-state flux division. Our studies establish a quantitative framework to understand coclustering-mediated metabolic channeling and its application to both efficiency improvement and metabolic regulation. PMID:25262299

  9. Key applications of plant metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Lau, Warren; Fischbach, Michael A; Osbourn, Anne; Sattely, Elizabeth S

    2014-06-01

    Great strides have been made in plant metabolic engineering over the last two decades, with notable success stories including Golden rice. Here, we discuss the field's progress in addressing four long-standing challenges: creating plants that satisfy their own nitrogen requirement, so reducing or eliminating the need for nitrogen fertilizer; enhancing the nutrient content of crop plants; engineering biofuel feed stocks that harbor easy-to-access fermentable saccharides by incorporating self-destructing lignin; and increasing photosynthetic efficiency. We also look to the future at emerging areas of research in this field. PMID:24915445

  10. Key Applications of Plant Metabolic Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Warren; Fischbach, Michael A.; Osbourn, Anne; Sattely, Elizabeth S.

    2014-01-01

    Great strides have been made in plant metabolic engineering over the last two decades, with notable success stories including Golden rice. Here, we discuss the field's progress in addressing four long-standing challenges: creating plants that satisfy their own nitrogen requirement, so reducing or eliminating the need for nitrogen fertilizer; enhancing the nutrient content of crop plants; engineering biofuel feed stocks that harbor easy-to-access fermentable saccharides by incorporating self-destructing lignin; and increasing photosynthetic efficiency. We also look to the future at emerging areas of research in this field. PMID:24915445

  11. Sirtuin 1 Deacetylase: A Key Regulator of Hepatic Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kemper, Jongsook Kim; Choi, SungE; Kim, Dong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Summary Obesity is a serious medical problem worldwide and disruption of metabolic/energy homeostasis plays a pivotal role in this global epidemic. In obese people, fatty liver (steatosis) develops, which increases the risk for diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and even, liver cancer. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is a NAD+-dependent deacetylase that functions as a key metabolic/energy sensor and mediates homeostatic responses to nutrient availability. Accumulating evidence indicates that SIRT1 is a master regulator of the transcriptional networks that control hepatic lipid metabolism. During energy-deprived conditions, SIRT1 deacetylates and alters the expression and activities of key transcriptional regulators involved in hepatic lipogenesis, fatty acid β-oxidation, and cholesterol/bile acid metabolism. This review will discuss the latest advances in this field, focusing on beneficial roles of SIRT1 in hepatic lipid metabolism including its potential as a therapeutic target for treatment of steatosis and other obesity-related metabolic diseases. PMID:23374725

  12. Use of immobilized enzymes in drug metabolism studies.

    PubMed

    Dulik, D M; Fenselau, C

    1988-04-01

    The immobilization of drug-metabolizing enzymes onto polymeric supports offers several advantages over use of conventional microsomal or soluble enzyme preparations. These include increased storage stability, facilitated separation of products from the incubation mixture, the ability to recover and reuse the enzyme catalyst, and in many cases, stabilization of the tertiary structure of membrane-bound enzymes. Attachment of the protein to the solid support may be accomplished by adsorption, covalent bonding, or entrapment techniques. This methodology has been successfully utilized for studies with such enzymes as cytochrome P-450, UDP-glucuronyltransferases, glutathione S-transferases, S-methyltransferases, and N-acetyltransferases. Although often employed for the synthesis of xenobiotic metabolites, immobilized enzymes have been used for mechanistic and relative reactivity studies, limited kinetic studies, and extracorporeal detoxification. Co-immobilization of multiple drug-metabolizing enzyme systems has made possible the sequential formation of metabolites arising from oxidation followed by conjugation. Immobilized enzymes may also be used in the prediction of species-dependent metabolic pathways. The potential for large-scale synthesis of drug metabolites using this methodology has been explored. PMID:3127263

  13. Key enzymes catalyzing glycerol to 1,3-propanediol.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Wang, Shizhen; Wang, Yuanpeng; Fang, Baishan

    2016-01-01

    Biodiesel can replace petroleum diesel as it is produced from animal fats and vegetable oils, and it produces about 10 % (w/w) glycerol, which is a promising new industrial microbial carbon, as a major by-product. One of the most potential applications of glycerol is its biotransformation to high value chemicals such as 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PD), dihydroxyacetone (DHA), succinic acid, etc., through microbial fermentation. Glycerol dehydratase, 1,3-propanediol dehydrogenase (1,3-propanediol-oxydoreductase), and glycerol dehydrogenase, which were encoded, respectively, by dhaB, dhaT, and dhaD and with DHA kinase are encompassed by the dha regulon, are the three key enzymes in glycerol bioconversion into 1,3-PD and DHA, and these are discussed in this review article. The summary of the main research direction of these three key enzyme and methods of glycerol bioconversion into 1,3-PD and DHA indicates their potential application in future enzymatic research and industrial production, especially in biodiesel industry. PMID:26966462

  14. Nucleotide-metabolizing enzymes in Chlamydomonas flagella.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Flavin, M

    1976-01-10

    Nucleotides have at least two functions in eukaryotic cilia and flagella. ATP, originating in the cells, is utilized for motility by energy-transducing protein(s) called dynein, and the binding of guanine nucleotides to tubulin, and probably certain transformations of the bound nucleotides, are prerequisites for the assembly of microtubules. Besides dynein, which can be solubulized from Chlamydomonas flagella as a heterogeneous, Mg2+ or Ca2+-activated ATPase, we have purified and characterized five other flagellar enzymes involved in nucleotide transformations. A homogeneous, low molecular weight, Ca2+-specific adenosine triphosphatase was isolated, which was inhibited by Mg2+ and was not specific for ATP. This enzyme was not formed by treating purified dynein with proteases. It was absent from extracts of Tetrahymena cilia. Its function might be an auxiliary energy transducer, or in steering or tactic responses. Two species of adenylate kinase were isolated, one of which was much elevated in regenerating flagella; the latter was also present in cell bodies. A large part of flagellar nucleoside diphosphokinase activity could not be solubilized. Two soluble enzyme species were identified, one of which was also present in cell bodies. Since these enzymes are of interest because they might function in microtubule assembly, we studied the extent to which brain nucleoside diphosphokinase co-polymerizes with tubulin purified by repeated cycles of polymerization. Arginine kinase was not detected in Chlamydomonas flagellar extracts. PMID:397

  15. Relationship between Metabolic Fluxes and Sequence-Derived Properties of Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Kampenusa, Inara

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic fluxes are key parameters of metabolic pathways being closely related to the kinetic properties of enzymes, thereby could be dependent on. This study examines possible relationships between the metabolic fluxes and the physical-chemical/structural features of enzymes from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae glycolysis pathway. Metabolic fluxes were quantified by the COPASI tool using the kinetic models of Hynne and Teusink at varied concentrations of external glucose. The enzyme sequences were taken from the UniProtKB and the average amino acid (AA) properties were computed using the set of Georgiev's uncorrelated scales that satisfy the VARIMAX criterion and specific AA indices that show the highest correlations with those. Multiple linear regressions (88.41% metabolic fluxes and the selected sets of the average AA properties. The hydrophobicity, α-helicity, and net charge were pointed out as the most influential characteristics of the sequences. The results provide an evidence that metabolic fluxes of the yeast glycolysis pathway are closely related to certain physical-chemical properties of relevant enzymes and support the view on the interdependence of catalytic, binding, and structural AA residues to ensure the efficiency of biocatalysts and, hence, physiologically adequate metabolic processes.

  16. Interplay of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP) and Metabolizing Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ye; Bian, Yicong; Jiang, Yan; Qian, Sainan; Yu, Aiming; Zeng, Su

    2015-01-01

    The recent identification of the interplay between metabolizing enzymes and BCRP has drawn more and more attention from people. BCRP, a transporter belonging to ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family, has been hypothesized to play roles in many aspects including protecting the human body against therapeutics because it is expressed in the tissues that function as barriers in vivo. Efficient coupling of BCRP and metabolizing enzymes enables rapid elimination of foreign compounds from the body because BCRP could facilitate the excretion of metabolites catalyzed by phase I and II enzymes into bile, urine and feces. Without BCRP coupling, pass through the cell membrane may be difficult for them by passive diffusion because of the increment of the molecular weight and water solubility. Thus the metabolism-efflux alliance has extraordinary importance to drug metabolism, distribution, pharmacological effect, toxicity and elimination. In this manuscript, a brief discussion about the interplays of BCRP and metabolizing enzymes in liver, intestine, kidney, lung and other organs were presented and summarized. Many endogenous and exogenous compounds belong to different chemical groups, for instance, the dietary flavonoids and the steroidal hormones were involved. Clarifying the cooperation mechanisms of BCRP and enzymes could lead to a better prediction of drug clearance in vitro. PMID:26652256

  17. Characterizing Metabolic Inhibition Using Electrochemical Enzyme-DNA Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Dominic O.; Bajrami, Besnik; Jansson, Ingela; Schenkman, John B.; Rusling, James F.

    2009-01-01

    Studies of metabolic enzyme inhibition are necessary in drug development and toxicity investigations as potential tools to limit or prevent appearance of deleterious metabolites formed, for example by cytochrome (cyt) P450 enzymes. In this paper, we evaluate the use of enzyme/DNA toxicity biosensors as tools to investigate enzyme inhibition. We have examined DNA damage due to cyt P450cam metabolism of styrene using DNA/enzyme films on pyrolytic graphite (PG) electro*des monitored via Ru(bpy)32+–mediated DNA oxidation. Styrene metabolism initiated by hydrogen peroxide was evaluated with and without the inhibitors, imidazole, imidazole-4-acetic acid and sulconazole (in micromolar range) to monitor DNA damage inhibition. The initial rates of DNA damage decreased with increased inhibitor concentrations. Linear and nonlinear fits of Michaelis-Menten inhibition models were used to determine apparent inhibition constants (KI*) for the inhibitors. Elucidation of the best fitting inhibition model was achieved by comparing correlation coefficients and the sum of the square of the errors (SSE) from each inhibition model. Results confirmed the utility of the enzyme/DNA biosensor for metabolic inhibition studies. A simple competitive inhibition model best approximated the data for imidazole, imidazole-4-acetic acid and sulconazole with KI* of 268.2, 142.3 and 204.2 µM, respectively. PMID:19099359

  18. Characterizing metabolic inhibition using electrochemical enzyme/DNA biosensors.

    PubMed

    Hull, Dominic O; Bajrami, Besnik; Jansson, Ingela; Schenkman, John B; Rusling, James F

    2009-01-15

    Studies of metabolic enzyme inhibition are necessary in drug development and toxicity investigations as potential tools to limit or prevent appearance of deleterious metabolites formed, for example, by cytochrome (cyt) P450 enzymes. In this paper, we evaluate the use of enzyme/DNA toxicity biosensors as tools to investigate enzyme inhibition. We have examined DNA damage due to cyt P450cam metabolism of styrene using DNA/enzyme films on pyrolytic graphite (PG) electrodes monitored via Ru(bpy)(3)(2+)-mediated DNA oxidation. Styrene metabolism initiated by hydrogen peroxide was evaluated with and without the inhibitors, imidazole, imidazole-4-acetic acid, and sulconazole (in micromolar range) to monitor DNA damage inhibition. The initial rates of DNA damage decreased with increased inhibitor concentrations. Linear and nonlinear fits of Michaelis-Menten inhibition models were used to determine apparent inhibition constants (K(I)*) for the inhibitors. Elucidation of the best fitting inhibition model was achieved by comparing correlation coefficients and the sum of the square of the errors (SSE) from each inhibition model. Results confirmed the utility of the enzyme/DNA biosensor for metabolic inhibition studies. A simple competitive inhibition model best approximated the data for imidazole, imidazole-4-acetic acid and sulconazole with K(I)* of 268.2, 142.3, and 204.2 microM, respectively. PMID:19099359

  19. Lipid metabolizing enzyme activities modulated by phospholipid substrate lateral distribution.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Dino G; Reyes, Juan G; De la Fuente, Milton

    2011-09-01

    Biological membranes contain many domains enriched in phospholipid lipids and there is not yet clear explanation about how these domains can control the activity of phospholipid metabolizing enzymes. Here we used the surface dilution kinetic theory to derive general equations describing how complex substrate distributions affect the activity of enzymes following either the phospholipid binding kinetic model (which assumes that the enzyme molecules directly bind the phospholipid substrate molecules), or the surface-binding kinetic model (which assumes that the enzyme molecules bind to the membrane before binding the phospholipid substrate). Our results strongly suggest that, if the enzyme follows the phospholipid binding kinetic model, any substrate redistribution would increase the enzyme activity over than observed for a homogeneous distribution of substrate. Besides, enzymes following the surface-binding model would be independent of the substrate distribution. Given that the distribution of substrate in a population of micelles (each of them a lipid domain) should follow a Poisson law, we demonstrate that the general equations give an excellent fit to experimental data of lipases acting on micelles, providing reasonable values for kinetic parameters--without invoking special effects such as cooperative phenomena. Our theory will allow a better understanding of the cellular-metabolism control in membranes, as well as a more simple analysis of the mechanisms of membrane acting enzymes. PMID:21108012

  20. Enzyme Regulation& Catalysis in Carbon Fixation Metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Miziorko, Henry M

    2004-12-14

    The overall long term goal of this program is the elucidation of molecular events in carbon assimilation. It has become axiomatic that control of flux through metabolic pathways is effectively imposed at irreversible reactions situated early in those pathways. The current focal point of this project is phosphoribulokinase (PRK), which catalyzes formation of the carbon dioxide acceptor, ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate. This reaction represents an early irreversible step unique to Calvin's reductive pentose phosphate pathway. Predictably, the PRK reaction represents an important control point in carbon fixation, regulated by a light dependent thiol/disulfide exchange in eukaryotes and by allosteric effectors in prokaryotes. Characterization of naturally occurring mutants as well as gene knockout experiments substantiate the importance of PRK to in vivo control of carbon assimilation in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Thus, given the potential impact of enhancement or inhibition of PRK activity on energy (biomass/biofuel) production, elucidation of the molecular events that account for PRK activity is a significant scientific goal.

  1. Experiment K-7-21: Effect of Microgravity on 1: Metabolic Enzymes of Type 1 and Type 2 Muscle Fibers, and on 2: Metabolic Enzymes, Neurotransmitter Amino Acids, and Neurotransmitter Associated Enzymes in Selected Regions of the Central Nervous System. Part 2; The Distribution of Selected Enzymes and Amino Acids in the Hippocampal Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, O. H.; Krasnov, I.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E. I.; Nemeth, P. M.; McDougal, D. B., Jr.; Choksi, R.; Carter, J. G.; Chi, M. M. Y.; Manchester, J. K.; Pusateri, M. E.

    1994-01-01

    Six key metabolic enzymes plus glutaminase and glutamate decarboxylase, as well as glutamate, aspartate and GABA, were measured in 11 regions of the hippocampal formation of synchronous, flight and tail suspension rats. Major differences were observed in the normal distribution patterns of each enzyme and amino acid, but no substantive effects of either microgravity or tail suspension on these patterns were clearly demonstrated.

  2. How nutritional status signalling coordinates metabolism and lignocellulolytic enzyme secretion.

    PubMed

    Brown, Neil Andrew; Ries, Laure Nicolas Annick; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique

    2014-11-01

    The utilisation of lignocellulosic plant biomass as an abundant, renewable feedstock for green chemistries and biofuel production is inhibited by its recalcitrant nature. In the environment, lignocellulolytic fungi are naturally capable of breaking down plant biomass into utilisable saccharides. Nonetheless, within the industrial context, inefficiencies in the production of lignocellulolytic enzymes impede the implementation of green technologies. One of the primary causes of such inefficiencies is the tight transcriptional control of lignocellulolytic enzymes via carbon catabolite repression. Fungi coordinate metabolism, protein biosynthesis and secretion with cellular energetic status through the detection of intra- and extra-cellular nutritional signals. An enhanced understanding of the signals and signalling pathways involved in regulating the transcription, translation and secretion of lignocellulolytic enzymes is therefore of great biotechnological interest. This comparative review describes how nutrient sensing pathways regulate carbon catabolite repression, metabolism and the utilisation of alternative carbon sources in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and ascomycete fungi. PMID:25011009

  3. Engineering of Metabolic Pathways by Artificial Enzyme Channels

    PubMed Central

    Pröschel, Marlene; Detsch, Rainer; Boccaccini, Aldo R.; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Application of industrial enzymes for production of valuable chemical compounds has greatly benefited from recent developments in Systems and Synthetic Biology. Both, in vivo and in vitro systems have been established, allowing conversion of simple into complex compounds. Metabolic engineering in living cells needs to be balanced which is achieved by controlling gene expression levels, translation, scaffolding, compartmentation, and flux control. In vitro applications are often hampered by limited protein stability/half-life and insufficient rates of substrate conversion. To improve stability and catalytic activity, proteins are post-translationally modified and arranged in artificial metabolic channels. Within the review article, we will first discuss the supramolecular organization of enzymes in living systems and second summarize current and future approaches to design artificial metabolic channels by additive manufacturing for the efficient production of desired products. PMID:26557643

  4. Bifidobacterial Enzymes Involved in the Metabolism of Human Milk Oligosaccharides123

    PubMed Central

    Kitaoka, Motomitsu

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal colonization of bifidobacteria is important for the health of infants. Human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) have been identified as growth factors for bifidobacteria. Recently, a bifidobacterial enzymatic system to metabolize HMO was identified. 1,3-β-Galactosyl-N-acetylhexosamine phosphorylase (GLNBP, EC 2.4.1.211), which catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of galacto-N-biose (GNB) (Galβ1→3GalNAc)] and lacto-N-biose I (LNB) (Galβ1→3GlcNAc), is a key enzyme to explain the metabolism of HMO. Infant-type bifidobacteria possess the intracellular pathway to specifically metabolize GNB and LNB (GNB/LNB pathway). Bifidobacterium bifidum possesses extracellular enzymes to liberate LNB from HMO. However, Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis imports intact HMO to be hydrolyzed by intracellular enzymes. Bifidobacterial enzymes related to the metabolism of HMO are useful tools for preparing compounds related to HMO. For instance, LNB and GNB were produced from sucrose and GlcNAc/GalNAc in 1 pot using 4 bifidobacterial enzymes, including GLNBP. LNB is expected to be a selective bifidus factor for infant-type strains. PMID:22585921

  5. Dynamic Reorganization of Metabolic Enzymes into Intracellular Bodies

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Jeremy D.; Zhao, Alice; Ellington, Andrew D.; Marcotte, Edward M.

    2013-01-01

    Both focused and large-scale cell biological and biochemical studies have revealed that hundreds of metabolic enzymes across diverse organisms form large intracellular bodies. These proteinaceous bodies range in form from fibers and intracellular foci—such as those formed by enzymes of nitrogen and carbon utilization and of nucleotide biosynthesis—to high-density packings inside bacterial microcompartments and eukaryotic microbodies. Although many enzymes clearly form functional mega-assemblies, it is not yet clear for many recently discovered cases whether they represent functional entities, storage bodies, or aggregates. In this article, we survey intracellular protein bodies formed by metabolic enzymes, asking when and why such bodies form and what their formation implies for the functionality—and dysfunctionality—of the enzymes that comprise them. The panoply of intracellular protein bodies also raises interesting questions regarding their evolution and maintenance within cells. We speculate on models for how such structures form in the first place and why they may be inevitable. PMID:23057741

  6. Moonlighting transcriptional activation function of a fungal sulfur metabolism enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Levati, Elisabetta; Sartini, Sara; Bolchi, Angelo; Ottonello, Simone; Montanini, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Moonlighting proteins, including metabolic enzymes acting as transcription factors (TF), are present in a variety of organisms but have not been described in higher fungi so far. In a previous genome-wide analysis of the TF repertoire of the plant-symbiotic fungus Tuber melanosporum, we identified various enzymes, including the sulfur-assimilation enzyme phosphoadenosine-phosphosulfate reductase (PAPS-red), as potential transcriptional activators. A functional analysis performed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, now demonstrates that a specific variant of this enzyme, PAPS-red A, localizes to the nucleus and is capable of transcriptional activation. TF moonlighting, which is not present in the other enzyme variant (PAPS-red B) encoded by the T. melanosporum genome, relies on a transplantable C-terminal polypeptide containing an alternating hydrophobic/hydrophilic amino acid motif. A similar moonlighting activity was demonstrated for six additional proteins, suggesting that multitasking is a relatively frequent event. PAPS-red A is sulfur-state-responsive and highly expressed, especially in fruitbodies, and likely acts as a recruiter of transcription components involved in S-metabolism gene network activation. PAPS-red B, instead, is expressed at low levels and localizes to a highly methylated and silenced region of the genome, hinting at an evolutionary mechanism based on gene duplication, followed by epigenetic silencing of this non-moonlighting gene variant. PMID:27121330

  7. Moonlighting transcriptional activation function of a fungal sulfur metabolism enzyme.

    PubMed

    Levati, Elisabetta; Sartini, Sara; Bolchi, Angelo; Ottonello, Simone; Montanini, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Moonlighting proteins, including metabolic enzymes acting as transcription factors (TF), are present in a variety of organisms but have not been described in higher fungi so far. In a previous genome-wide analysis of the TF repertoire of the plant-symbiotic fungus Tuber melanosporum, we identified various enzymes, including the sulfur-assimilation enzyme phosphoadenosine-phosphosulfate reductase (PAPS-red), as potential transcriptional activators. A functional analysis performed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, now demonstrates that a specific variant of this enzyme, PAPS-red A, localizes to the nucleus and is capable of transcriptional activation. TF moonlighting, which is not present in the other enzyme variant (PAPS-red B) encoded by the T. melanosporum genome, relies on a transplantable C-terminal polypeptide containing an alternating hydrophobic/hydrophilic amino acid motif. A similar moonlighting activity was demonstrated for six additional proteins, suggesting that multitasking is a relatively frequent event. PAPS-red A is sulfur-state-responsive and highly expressed, especially in fruitbodies, and likely acts as a recruiter of transcription components involved in S-metabolism gene network activation. PAPS-red B, instead, is expressed at low levels and localizes to a highly methylated and silenced region of the genome, hinting at an evolutionary mechanism based on gene duplication, followed by epigenetic silencing of this non-moonlighting gene variant. PMID:27121330

  8. Sphingolipid metabolism enzymes as targets for anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Kok, J W; Sietsma, H

    2004-05-01

    Treatment with anti-cancer agents in most cases ultimately results in apoptotic cell death of the target tumor cells. Unfortunately, tumor cells can develop multidrug resistance, e.g., by a reduced propensity to engage in apoptosis by which they become insensitive to multiple chemotherapeutics. Ceramide. the central molecule in cellular sphingolipid metabolism, has been recognized as an important mediator of apoptosis. Moreover, an increased cellular capacity for ceramide glycosylation has been identified as a novel multidrug resistance mechanism. Indeed, virtually all multidrug resistant cell types exhibit a deviating sphingolipid composition, most typically an increased level of glucosylceramide. Thus, the enzyme glucosylceramide synthase, which converts ceramide into glucosylceramide, has emerged as a potential target to increase apoptosis and decrease drug resistance of tumor cells. In addition, several other steps in the pathways of sphingolipid metabolism arc altered in multidrug resistant cells, opening a perspective on additional sphingolipid metabolism enzymes as targets for anti-cancer therapy. In this article, we present an overview of the current understanding concerning drug resistance-related changes in sphingolipid metabolism and how interference with this metabolism can be exploited to over come multidrug resistance. PMID:15134220

  9. Radiation Exposure Alters Expression of Metabolic Enzyme Genes in Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, V. E.; Mangala, L. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2011-01-01

    Most administered pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. The health of the liver, especially the rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver, and clinically-used medication doses are given with normal liver function in mind. A drug overdose can result in the case of a liver that is damaged and removing pharmaceuticals from the circulation at a rate slower than normal. Alternatively, if liver function is elevated and removing drugs from the system more quickly than usual, it would be as if too little drug had been given for effective treatment. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism, we want to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver and exposure to cosmic radiation is one aspect of spaceflight that can be modeled in ground experiments. Additionally, it has been previous noted that pre-exposure to small radiation doses seems to confer protection against later and larger radiation doses. This protective power of pre-exposure has been called a priming effect or radioadaptation. This study is an effort to examine the drug metabolizing effects of radioadaptation mechanisms that may be triggered by early exposure to low radiation doses.

  10. Chemoprotective activity of boldine: modulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kubínová, R; Machala, M; Minksová, K; Neca, J; Suchý, V

    2001-03-01

    Possible chemoprotective effects of the naturally occurring alkaloid boldine, a major alkaloid of boldo (Peumus boldus Mol.) leaves and bark, including in vitro modulations of drug-metabolizing enzymes in mouse hepatoma Hepa-1 cell line and mouse hepatic microsomes, were investigated. Boldine manifested inhibition activity on hepatic microsomal CYP1A-dependent 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase and CYP3A-dependent testosterone 6 beta-hydroxylase activities and stimulated glutathione S-transferase activity in Hepa-1 cells. In addition to the known antioxidant activity, boldine could decrease the metabolic activation of other xenobiotics including chemical mutagens. PMID:11265593

  11. Unidirectional steady state rates of central metabolism enzymes measured simultaneously in a living plant tissue.

    PubMed

    Roscher, A; Emsley, L; Raymond, P; Roby, C

    1998-09-25

    The unidirectional steady state reaction rates of several enzymes and metabolic fluxes of distinct processes were measured simultaneously in hypoxic maize root tips using two-dimensional phosphorus NMR exchange spectroscopy. A single spectrum monitors ATP synthesis and hydrolysis as well as the activities of four enzymes involved in key pathways of central metabolism: UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, phosphoglucomutase, hexose-phosphate isomerase, and enolase. The corresponding unidirectional reaction rates and net metabolic fluxes were calculated from spectral intensities. This method provides a unique picture, at enzyme resolution, of how metabolism reacts in a concerted fashion to changes in external parameters such as temperature and oxygen concentration. By increasing hypoxia via an increase in temperature, we measured the expected increase in glycolysis through enolase activity while total ATP synthesis settled. At the same time, we observed a net flux through phosphoglucomutase and UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase toward carbohydrate synthesis. This result is discussed in relation to the current hypothesis on the turnover of cell walls and sucrose. This reaction also produces a net flux of pyrophosphate, which is needed by pyrophosphate:fructose-6-phosphate 1-phosphotransferase to work as a glycolytic enzyme. PMID:9737962

  12. Radiation Exposure Alters Expression of Metabolic Enzyme Genes In Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, Virginia E.; Mangala, L. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2010-01-01

    Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. The health of the liver, especially the rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism it is important to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver. Exposure to cosmic radiation is one aspect of spaceflight that can be modeled in ground experiments. This study is an effort to examine the effects of adaptive mechanisms that may be triggered by early exposure to low radiation doses. Using procedures approved by the JSC Animal Care & Use Committee, C57 male mice were exposed to Cs-137 in groups: controls, low dose (50 mGy), high dose (6Gy) and a fourth group that received both radiation doses separated by 24 hours. Animals were anesthetized and sacrificed 4 hours after their last radiation exposure. Livers were removed immediately and flash-frozen in liquid nitrogen. Tissue was homogenized, RNA extracted and purified (Absolutely RNA, Agilent). Quality of RNA samples was evaluated (Agilent Bioanalyzer 2100). Complementary DNA was prepared from high-quality RNA samples, and used to run RT-qPCR screening arrays for DNA Repair and Drug Metabolism (SuperArray, SABiosciences/Qiagen; BioRad Cfx96 qPCR System). Of 91 drug metabolism genes examined, expression of 7 was altered by at least one treatment condition. Genes that had elevated expression include those that metabolize promethazine and steroids (4-8-fold), many that reduce oxidation products, and one that reduces heavy metal exposure (greater than 200-fold). Of the 91 DNA repair and general metabolism genes examined, expression of 14 was altered by at least one treatment condition. These gene expression changes are likely homeostatic and could lead to development of new radioprotective countermeasures.

  13. Human Metabolic Enzymes Deficiency: A Genetic Mutation Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Swati; Singh, Ashok K; Keshari, Amit K; Maity, Siddhartha; Sarkar, Srimanta; Saha, Sudipta

    2016-01-01

    One of the extreme challenges in biology is to ameliorate the understanding of the mechanisms which emphasize metabolic enzyme deficiency (MED) and how these pretend to have influence on human health. However, it has been manifested that MED could be either inherited as inborn error of metabolism (IEM) or acquired, which carries a high risk of interrupted biochemical reactions. Enzyme deficiency results in accumulation of toxic compounds that may disrupt normal organ functions and cause failure in producing crucial biological compounds and other intermediates. The MED related disorders cover widespread clinical presentations and can involve almost any organ system. To sum up the causal factors of almost all the MED-associated disorders, we decided to embark on a less traveled but nonetheless relevant direction, by focusing our attention on associated gene family products, regulation of their expression, genetic mutation, and mutation types. In addition, the review also outlines the clinical presentations as well as diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:27051561

  14. Human Metabolic Enzymes Deficiency: A Genetic Mutation Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Swati; Singh, Ashok K.; Maity, Siddhartha; Sarkar, Srimanta

    2016-01-01

    One of the extreme challenges in biology is to ameliorate the understanding of the mechanisms which emphasize metabolic enzyme deficiency (MED) and how these pretend to have influence on human health. However, it has been manifested that MED could be either inherited as inborn error of metabolism (IEM) or acquired, which carries a high risk of interrupted biochemical reactions. Enzyme deficiency results in accumulation of toxic compounds that may disrupt normal organ functions and cause failure in producing crucial biological compounds and other intermediates. The MED related disorders cover widespread clinical presentations and can involve almost any organ system. To sum up the causal factors of almost all the MED-associated disorders, we decided to embark on a less traveled but nonetheless relevant direction, by focusing our attention on associated gene family products, regulation of their expression, genetic mutation, and mutation types. In addition, the review also outlines the clinical presentations as well as diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:27051561

  15. Role of Sphingolipids and Metabolizing Enzymes in Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Kitatani, Kazuyuki; Taniguchi, Makoto; Okazaki, Toshiro

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids such as ceramide, sphingosine-1-phosphate and sphingomyelin have been emerging as bioactive lipids since ceramide was reported to play a role in human leukemia HL-60 cell differentiation and death. Recently, it is well-known that ceramide acts as an inducer of cell death, that sphingomyelin works as a regulator for microdomain function of the cell membrane, and that sphingosine-1-phosphate plays a role in cell survival/proliferation. The lipids are metabolized by the specific enzymes, and each metabolite could be again returned to the original form by the reverse action of the different enzyme or after a long journey of many metabolizing/synthesizing pathways. In addition, the metabolites may serve as reciprocal bio-modulators like the rheostat between ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate. Therefore, the change of lipid amount in the cells, the subcellular localization and the downstream signal in a specific subcellular organelle should be clarified to understand the pathobiological significance of sphingolipids when extracellular stimulation induces a diverse of cell functions such as cell death, proliferation and migration. In this review, we focus on how sphingolipids and their metabolizing enzymes cooperatively exert their function in proliferation, migration, autophagy and death of hematopoetic cells, and discuss the way developing a novel therapeutic device through the regulation of sphingolipids for effectively inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing cell death in hematological malignancies such as leukemia, malignant lymphoma and multiple myeloma. PMID:25997737

  16. Role of Sphingolipids and Metabolizing Enzymes in Hematological Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Kitatani, Kazuyuki; Taniguchi, Makoto; Okazaki, Toshiro

    2015-06-01

    Sphingolipids such as ceramide, sphingosine-1-phosphate and sphingomyelin have been emerging as bioactive lipids since ceramide was reported to play a role in human leukemia HL-60 cell differentiation and death. Recently, it is well-known that ceramide acts as an inducer of cell death, that sphingomyelin works as a regulator for microdomain function of the cell membrane, and that sphingosine-1-phosphate plays a role in cell survival/proliferation. The lipids are metabolized by the specific enzymes, and each metabolite could be again returned to the original form by the reverse action of the different enzyme or after a long journey of many metabolizing/synthesizing pathways. In addition, the metabolites may serve as reciprocal bio-modulators like the rheostat between ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate. Therefore, the change of lipid amount in the cells, the subcellular localization and the downstream signal in a specific subcellular organelle should be clarified to understand the pathobiological significance of sphingolipids when extracellular stimulation induces a diverse of cell functions such as cell death, proliferation and migration. In this review, we focus on how sphingolipids and their metabolizing enzymes cooperatively exert their function in proliferation, migration, autophagy and death of hematopoetic cells, and discuss the way developing a novel therapeutic device through the regulation of sphingolipids for effectively inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing cell death in hematological malignancies such as leukemia, malignant lymphoma and multiple myeloma. PMID:25997737

  17. Xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in canine mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Kumaraguruparan, R; Subapriya, R; Balachandran, C; Manohar, B Murali; Thangadurai, A; Nagini, S

    2006-09-01

    Mammary tumours are the most common neoplasms in female dogs. The present study was designed to evaluate the relationship between different clinical stages with activities of phase I and phase II carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes in canine mammary tumours. The levels of cytochrome P450 and cytochrome b5 and the activities of glutathione S-transferase (GST), gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), DT-diaphorase (DTD) and NADPH diaphorase in tumour tissues of 25 bitches was estimated. Enhanced levels of cytochrome P450 and b5 and phase II enzyme activities were observed in tumour tissues compared to the corresponding uninvolved adjacent tissues. The magnitude of the changes in phase I and phase II enzyme status was, however, more pronounced in stages I and II compared to stages III and IV. The results suggest that the balance between phase I carcinogen activation and phase II detoxification systems may play an important role in canine mammary tumour development. PMID:16014333

  18. Carbon Metabolism Enzymes of Rhizobium tropici Cultures and Bacteroids.

    PubMed

    Romanov, V I; Hernández-Lucas, I; Martínez-Romero, E

    1994-07-01

    We determined the activities of selected enzymes involved in carbon metabolism in free-living cells of Rhizobium tropici CFN299 grown in minimal medium with different carbon sources and in bacteroids of the same strain. The set of enzymatic activities in sucrose-grown cells suggests that the pentose phosphate pathway, with the participation of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway, is probably the primary route for sugar catabolism. In glutamate- and malate-grown cells, high activities of the gluconeogenic enzymes (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, fructose-6-phosphate aldolase, and fructose bisphosphatase) were detected. In bacteroids, isolated in Percoll gradients, the levels of activity for many of the enzymes measured were similar to those of malate-grown cells, except that higher activities of glucokinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and NAD-dependent phosphogluconate dehydrogenase were detected. Phosphoglucomutase and UDP glucose pyrophosphorylase showed high and constant levels under all growth conditions and in bacteroids. PMID:16349319

  19. Regulation of gene expression by a metabolic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Hall, David A; Zhu, Heng; Zhu, Xiaowei; Royce, Thomas; Gerstein, Mark; Snyder, Michael

    2004-10-15

    Gene expression in eukaryotes is normally believed to be controlled by transcriptional regulators that activate genes encoding structural proteins and enzymes. To identify previously unrecognized DNA binding activities, a yeast proteome microarray was screened with DNA probes; Arg5,6, a well-characterized mitochondrial enzyme involved in arginine biosynthesis, was identified. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that Arg5,6 is associated with specific nuclear and mitochondrial loci in vivo, and Arg5,6 binds to specific fragments in vitro. Deletion of Arg5,6 causes altered transcript levels of both nuclear and mitochondrial target genes. These results indicate that metabolic enzymes can directly regulate eukaryotic gene expression. PMID:15486299

  20. Endoribonucleases--enzymes gaining spotlight in mRNA metabolism.

    PubMed

    Li, Wai Ming; Barnes, Tavish; Lee, Chow H

    2010-02-01

    The efficient turnover of messenger RNA represents an important mechanism that allows the cell to control gene expression. Until recently, the mechanism of mRNA decay was mainly attributed to exonucleases, comprising enzymes that degrade RNAs from the ends of the molecules. This article summarizes the endoribonucleases, comprising enzymes that cleave RNA molecules internally, which were identified in more recent years in eukaryotic mRNA metabolism. Endoribonucleases have received little attention in the past, based on the difficulty in their identification and a lack of understanding of their physiological significance. This review aims to compare the similarities and differences among this group of enzymes, as well as their known cellular functions. Despite the many differences in protein structure, and thus difficulties in identifying them based on amino acid sequence, most endoribonucleases possess essential cellular functions and have been shown to play an important role in mRNA turnover. PMID:19968858

  1. Elucidation of metabolic pathways from enzyme classification data.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Andrew G; Tipton, Keith F

    2014-01-01

    The IUBMB Enzyme List is widely used by other databases as a source for avoiding ambiguity in the recognition of enzymes as catalytic entities. However, it was not designed for metabolic pathway tracing, which has become increasingly important in systems biology. A Reactions Database has been created from the material in the Enzyme List to allow reactions to be searched by substrate/product, and pathways to be traced from any selected starting/seed substrate. An extensive synonym glossary allows searches by many of the alternative names, including accepted abbreviations, by which a chemical compound may be known. This database was necessary for the development of the application Reaction Explorer ( http://www.reaction-explorer.org ), which was written in Real Studio ( http://www.realsoftware.com/realstudio/ ) to search the Reactions Database and draw metabolic pathways from reactions selected by the user. Having input the name of the starting compound (the "seed"), the user is presented with a list of all reactions containing that compound and then selects the product of interest as the next point on the ensuing graph. The pathway diagram is then generated as the process iterates. A contextual menu is provided, which allows the user: (1) to remove a compound from the graph, along with all associated links; (2) to search the reactions database again for additional reactions involving the compound; (3) to search for the compound within the Enzyme List. PMID:24218216

  2. Modulatory Role of Shorea robusta Bark on Glucose-metabolizing Enzymes in Diethylnitrosamine Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kalaiselvan, A.; Anand, T.; Gokulakrishnan, K.; Kamaraj, M. C.; Velavan, S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The modulations of glucose-metabolizing enzyme activities play a vital rolein the depletion of energy metabolism and leads to inhibition of cancer growth. Objective: To find the effect of shorearobusta bark extract on glucose-metbolizing enzymes in diethylnitrosamine (DEN) induced hepatocellular carcinoma rats. Materials and Methods: Biochemical evaluation of glucose metabolizing enzyme were done in before and after shorearobusta bark extract (500mg/kg) treatment in DEN induced rats. Results: A significant increasein the activities of the key glycolytic enzymes viz., hexokinase and phosphoglucoisomerase, with a significant decrease in the gluconeogenic enzymes glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatasewere observed in HCC bearing rats, when compared with the control. Administration of shorearobusta extract caused a significant decrease in theactivities of glycolytic enzymes and an increase in the gluconeogenic enzymes activities to near normal values. Conclusion: The current findings suggest that the S. robusta extract has a definite modulating role on the key enzymes ofglucose-metabolism in HCC. The modulatory effect may be due to the phytoactive constituents present in the extract of S. robusta. SUMMARY Administration of shorea robusta bark extract caused a significant decrease in the activities of glycolytic enzymes and an increase in the gluconeogenic enzymes activities to near normal values. The S. robusta extract has modulatory activity on the carbohydrate metabolism in DEN-induced HCC bearing rats through a mechanism that which does not provoke any acute biochemical disturbances in the metabolic pathways of glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. The modulatory effect of S. robusta extract may be attributed to the presence of active compounds such as polyphenols and flavonoids. Abbreviations used: HCC: Hepatocellular Carcinoma, SRBE: Shorearobusta bark extract; HEX: Hexokinase; PGI: Phosphoglucoisomerase; DEN: Diethylnitrosamine. PMID

  3. Global probabilistic annotation of metabolic networks enables enzyme discovery

    PubMed Central

    Plata, Germán; Fuhrer, Tobias; Hsiao, Tzu-Lin; Sauer, Uwe; Vitkup, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Annotation of organism-specific metabolic networks is one of the main challenges of systems biology. Importantly, due to inherent uncertainty of computational annotations, predictions of biochemical function need to be treated probabilistically. We present a global probabilistic approach to annotate genome-scale metabolic networks that integrates sequence homology and context-based correlations under a single principled framework. The developed method for Global Biochemical reconstruction Using Sampling (GLOBUS) not only provides annotation probabilities for each functional assignment, but also suggests likely alternative functions. GLOBUS is based on statistical Gibbs sampling of probable metabolic annotations and is able to make accurate functional assignments even in cases of remote sequence identity to known enzymes. We apply GLOBUS to genomes of Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus, and validate the method predictions by experimentally demonstrating the 6-phosphogluconolactonase activity of ykgB and the role of the sps pathway for rhamnose biosynthesis in B. subtilis. PMID:22960854

  4. CYP450 Enzyme-Mediated Metabolism of TCAS and Its Inhibitory and Induced Effects on Metabolized Enzymes in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Guolin; Wang, Cheng; Zhou, Lili; Li, Lei; Chen, Huiming; Yu, Wenlian; Li, Haishan

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the enzymes catalyzing the phaseⅠmetabolism of thiacalixarene (TCAS) based on in vitro system including cDNA-expressed P450 enzymes, human liver microsomes plus inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies. In addition, the inhibitory potential of TCAS on major CYP450 drug metabolizing enzymes (CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2B6, CYP2D6 and CYP3A4) was assessed. The results showed that CYP1A2 and CYP2C9 mediated TCAS hydroxylation. IC50 values for TCAS in rat and human liver microsomes were greater than 50 µM, and it demonstrated a weak inhibition of rat and human CYP450 enzymes. Finally, sandwiched hepatocytes were used to evaluate the induction of CYP1A and CYP3A to define the function of TCAS in vivo. The results showed that incubation of TCAS at different concentrations for 72 h failed to induce CYP1A and CYP3A. However, incubation of the cells with 50 and 100 µM TCAS caused a profound decrease in the activities of CYP1A and CYP3A, which was probably due to cytotoxic effects, suggesting that exposure to TCAS might be a health concern. PMID:26404338

  5. Enhancing Biosynthesis of a Ginsenoside Precursor by Self-Assembly of Two Key Enzymes in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chengcheng; Gao, Xin; Liu, Xinbin; Wang, Yong; Yang, Shengli; Wang, Fengqing; Ren, Yuhong

    2016-05-01

    Ginsenosides from the edible and medicinal plant ginseng have demonstrated various pharmacological activities. However, producing ginsenoside efficiently remains a challenge. Engineering metabolic pathways through protein assembly in yeast is a promising way for ginsenoside production. In the biosynthetic pathway of ginsenosides, dammarenediol-II synthase and squalene epoxidase are two key enzymes that determine the production rate of the dammarane-type ginsenoside precursor dammarenediol-II. In this work, a strategy to enhance the biosynthesis of dammarenediol-II in Pichia pastoris was developed by the self-assembly of the two key enzymes via protein-protein interaction. After being modified by interacting proteins, the two enzymes were successfully co-localized, resulting in a 2.1-fold enhancement in dammarenediol-II yields. PMID:27074597

  6. Targeting drug-metabolizing enzymes for effective chemoprevention and chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Hollie I; Njar, Vincent C O; Yu, Zhen; Castro, David J; Gonzalez, Frank J; Williams, David E; Huang, Ying; Kong, Ah-Ng T; Doloff, Joshua C; Ma, Jie; Waxman, David J; Scott, Emily E

    2010-04-01

    The primary focus of chemoprevention research is the prevention of cancer using pharmacological, biological, and nutritional interventions. Chemotherapeutic approaches that have been used successfully for both the prevention and treatment of a number of human malignancies have arisen from the identification of specific agents and appropriate molecular targets. Although drug-metabolizing enzymes have historically been targeted in attempts to block the initial, genotoxic events associated with the carcinogenic process, emerging evidence supports the idea that manipulating drug-metabolizing enzymes may also be an effective strategy to be used for treating tumor progression, invasion, and, perhaps, metastasis. This report summarizes a symposium that presents some recent progress in this area. One area of emphasis is the development of a CYP17 inhibitor for treatment of prostate cancer that may also have androgen-independent anticancer activity at higher concentrations. A second focus is the use of a mouse model to investigate the effects of aryl hydrocarbon receptor and Cyp1b1 status and chemopreventative agents on transplacental cancer. A third area of focus is the phytochemical manipulation of not only cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes but also phase II inflammatory and antioxidant enzymes via the nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 pathway to block tumor progression. A final highlight is the use of prodrugs activated by P450 enzymes to halt tumor growth and considerations of dosing schedule and targeted delivery of the P450 transgene to tumor tissue. In addition to highlighting recent successes in these areas, limitations and areas that should be targeted for further investigation are discussed. PMID:20233842

  7. Targeting Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes for Effective Chemoprevention and Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Hollie I.; Njar, Vincent C. O.; Yu, Zhen; Castro, David J.; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Williams, David E.; Huang, Ying; Kong, Ah-Ng T.; Doloff, Joshua C.; Ma, Jie; Waxman, David J.

    2010-01-01

    The primary focus of chemoprevention research is the prevention of cancer using pharmacological, biological, and nutritional interventions. Chemotherapeutic approaches that have been used successfully for both the prevention and treatment of a number of human malignancies have arisen from the identification of specific agents and appropriate molecular targets. Although drug-metabolizing enzymes have historically been targeted in attempts to block the initial, genotoxic events associated with the carcinogenic process, emerging evidence supports the idea that manipulating drug-metabolizing enzymes may also be an effective strategy to be used for treating tumor progression, invasion, and, perhaps, metastasis. This report summarizes a symposium that presents some recent progress in this area. One area of emphasis is the development of a CYP17 inhibitor for treatment of prostate cancer that may also have androgen-independent anticancer activity at higher concentrations. A second focus is the use of a mouse model to investigate the effects of aryl hydrocarbon receptor and Cyp1b1 status and chemopreventative agents on transplacental cancer. A third area of focus is the phytochemical manipulation of not only cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes but also phase II inflammatory and antioxidant enzymes via the nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 pathway to block tumor progression. A final highlight is the use of prodrugs activated by P450 enzymes to halt tumor growth and considerations of dosing schedule and targeted delivery of the P450 transgene to tumor tissue. In addition to highlighting recent successes in these areas, limitations and areas that should be targeted for further investigation are discussed. PMID:20233842

  8. The metabolic pathway collection from EMP: the enzymes and metabolic pathways database.

    PubMed

    Selkov, E; Basmanova, S; Gaasterland, T; Goryanin, I; Gretchkin, Y; Maltsev, N; Nenashev, V; Overbeek, R; Panyushkina, E; Pronevitch, L; Selkov, E; Yunus, I

    1996-01-01

    The Enzymes and Metabolic Pathways database (EMP) is an encoding of the contents of over 10 000 original publications on the topics of enzymology and metabolism. This large body of information has been transformed into a queryable database. An extraction of over 1800 pictorial representations of metabolic pathways from this collection is freely available on the World Wide Web. We believe that this collection will play an important role in the interpretation of genetic sequence data, as well as offering a meaningful framework for the integration of many other forms of biological data. PMID:8594593

  9. Microsomal and lysosomal enzymes of triacylglycerol metabolism in rat placenta.

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, R A; Haynes, E B

    1984-01-01

    The placenta plays a major role in transporting lipid to the developing foetus. Since previous studies have suggested that placental lipid transport involves intermediate esterification steps, we investigated selected microsomal and lysosomal enzymes of triacylglycerol metabolism in rat placenta. Between gestational days 10 and 14, microsomal phosphatidic acid phosphatase specific activity was 6-fold greater than the activity in adult rat liver. Phosphatidic acid phosphatase activity decreased 50% on day 15. Studies employing several different phosphorylated substrates indicated a high degree of substrate specificity. Lysosomal triacylglycerol lipase and cholesterol esterase activities decreased about 50% between days 15 and 18, then rose late in gestation. No changes were observed in the specific activities of fatty acid: CoA ligase, glycerolphosphate acyltransferase, lysophosphatidate acyltransferase, diacylglycerol acyltransferase or diacylglycerol cholinephosphotransferase during the final 12 days of gestation. Kinetic observations (competitive inhibition by alternative substrates, pH-dependence and thermal inactivation) were consistent with the hypothesis that glycerol phosphate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate can be acylated by a single microsomal enzyme in placenta. Except for fatty acid: CoA ligase, the activities of microsomal and lysosomal enzymes of triacylglycerol metabolism were comparable with those in adult rat liver. These observations are consistent with physiological studies suggesting that triacylglycerol synthetic and degradative pathways are very active in rat placenta. PMID:6696738

  10. In vivo enzyme activity in inborn errors of metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, G.N.; Walter, J.H.; Leonard, J.V.; Halliday, D. )

    1990-08-01

    Low-dose continuous infusions of (2H5)phenylalanine, (1-13C)propionate, and (1-13C)leucine were used to quantitate phenylalanine hydroxylation in phenylketonuria (PKU, four subjects), propionate oxidation in methylmalonic acidaemia (MMA, four subjects), and propionic acidaemia (PA, four subjects) and leucine oxidation in maple syrup urine disease (MSUD, four subjects). In vivo enzyme activity in PKU, MMA, and PA subjects was similar to or in excess of that in adult controls (range of phenylalanine hydroxylation in PKU, 3.7 to 6.5 mumol/kg/h, control 3.2 to 7.9, n = 7; propionate oxidation in MMA, 15.2 to 64.8 mumol/kg/h, and in PA, 11.1 to 36.0, control 5.1 to 19.0, n = 5). By contrast, in vivo leucine oxidation was undetectable in three of the four MSUD subjects (less than 0.5 mumol/kg/h) and negligible in the remaining subject (2 mumol/kg/h, control 10.4 to 15.7, n = 6). These results suggest that significant substrate removal can be achieved in some inborn metabolic errors either through stimulation of residual enzyme activity in defective enzyme systems or by activation of alternate metabolic pathways. Both possibilities almost certainly depend on gross elevation of substrate concentrations. By contrast, only minimal in vivo oxidation of leucine appears possible in MSUD.

  11. Alteration of drug metabolizing enzymes in sulphite oxidase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tutuncu, Begum; Kuçukatay, Vural; Arslan, Sevki; Sahin, Barbaros; Semiz, Asli; Sen, Alaattin

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible effects of sulphite oxidase (SOX, E.C. 1.8.3.1) deficiency on xenobiotic metabolism. For this purpose, SOX deficiency was produced in rats by the administration of a low molybdenum diet with concurrent addition of 200 ppm tungsten to their drinking water. First, hepatic SOX activity in deficient groups was measured to confirm SOX deficiency. Then, aminopyrine N-demethylase, aniline 4-hydroxylase, aromatase, caffeine N-demethylase, cytochrome b5 reductase, erythromycin N-demethylase, ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase, glutathione S-transferase, N-nitrosodimethylamine N-demethylase and penthoxyresorufin O-deethylase activities were determined to follow changes in the activity of drug metabolizing enzymes in SOX-deficient rats. Our results clearly demonstrated that SOX deficiency significantly elevated A4H, caffeine N-demethylase, erythromycin N-demethylase and N-nitrosodimethylamine N-demethylase activities while decreasing ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase and aromatase activities. These alterations in drug metabolizing enzymes can contribute to the varying susceptibility and response of sulphite-sensitive individuals to different drugs and/or therapeutics used for treatments. PMID:22798713

  12. Lon protease: A key enzyme controlling mitochondrial bioenergetics in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Quirós, Pedro M; Bárcena, Clea; López-Otín, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    We have recently explored the in vivo functional and oncologic relevance of Lon protease (LONP1), an enzyme involved in mitochondrial quality control. We found that LONP1 is an essential protein for life and that it also performs a critical function in tumorigenesis by regulating the bioenergetics of cancer cells. PMID:27308364

  13. Gene expression analysis of membrane transporters and drug-metabolizing enzymes in the lung of healthy and COPD subjects

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Tove; Hegelund Myrbäck, Tove; Olsson, Marita; Seidegård, Janeric; Werkström, Viktoria; Zhou, Xiao-Hong; Grunewald, Johan; Gustavsson, Lena; Nord, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    This study describes for the first time the expression levels of genes encoding membrane transporters and drug-metabolizing enzymes in the lungs of ex-smoking patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Membrane transporters and drug-metabolizing enzymes are key determinants of drug uptake, metabolism, and elimination for systemically administered as well as inhaled drugs, with consequent influence on clinical efficacy and patient safety. In this study, while no difference in gene expression was found between healthy and COPD subjects, we identified a significant regional difference in mRNA expression of both membrane transporters and drug-metabolizing enzymes between central and peripheral tissue in both healthy and COPD subjects. The majority of the differentially expressed genes were higher expressed in the central airways such as the transporters SLC2A1 (GLUT1), SLC28A3 (CNT3), and SLC22A4 (OCTN1) and the drug-metabolizing enzymes GSTZ1, GSTO2, and CYP2F1. Together, this increased knowledge of local pharmacokinetics in diseased and normal lung may improve modeling of clinical outcomes of new chemical entities intended for inhalation therapy delivered to COPD patients. In addition, based on the similarities between COPD and healthy subjects regarding gene expression of membrane transporters and drug-metabolizing enzymes, our results suggest that clinical pharmacological studies in healthy volunteers could be a valid model of COPD patients regarding drug disposition of inhaled drugs in terms of drug metabolism and drug transporters. PMID:25505599

  14. Enzymes of yeast polyphosphate metabolism: structure, enzymology and biological roles.

    PubMed

    Gerasimaitė, Rūta; Mayer, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) is found in all living organisms. The known polyP functions in eukaryotes range from osmoregulation and virulence in parasitic protozoa to modulating blood coagulation, inflammation, bone mineralization and cellular signalling in mammals. However mechanisms of regulation and even the identity of involved proteins in many cases remain obscure. Most of the insights obtained so far stem from studies in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we provide a short overview of the properties and functions of known yeast polyP metabolism enzymes and discuss future directions for polyP research. PMID:26862210

  15. Carbohydrate-active enzymes exemplify entropic principles in metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kartal, Önder; Mahlow, Sebastian; Skupin, Alexander; Ebenhöh, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Glycans comprise ubiquitous and essential biopolymers, which usually occur as highly diverse mixtures. The myriad different structures are generated by a limited number of carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes), which are unusual in that they catalyze multiple reactions by being relatively unspecific with respect to substrate size. Existing experimental and theoretical descriptions of CAZyme-mediated reaction systems neither comprehensively explain observed action patterns nor suggest biological functions of polydisperse pools in metabolism. Here, we overcome these limitations with a novel theoretical description of this important class of biological systems in which the mixing entropy of polydisperse pools emerges as an important system variable. In vitro assays of three CAZymes essential for central carbon metabolism confirm the power of our approach to predict equilibrium distributions and non-equilibrium dynamics. A computational study of the turnover of the soluble heteroglycan pool exemplifies how entropy-driven reactions establish a metabolic buffer in vivo that attenuates fluctuations in carbohydrate availability. We argue that this interplay between energy- and entropy-driven processes represents an important regulatory design principle of metabolic systems. PMID:22027553

  16. The RNA world and the origin of metabolic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Ralser, Markus

    2014-01-01

    An RNA world has been placed centre stage for explaining the origin of life. Indeed, RNA is the most plausible molecule able to form both a (self)-replicator and to inherit information, necessities for initiating genetics. However, in parallel with self-replication, the proto-organism had to obtain the ability to catalyse supply of its chemical constituents, including the ribonucleotide metabolites required to replicate RNA. Although the possibility of an RNA-catalysed metabolic network has been considered, it is to be questioned whether RNA molecules, at least on their own, possess the required catalytic capacities. An alternative scenario for the origin of metabolism involves chemical reactions that are based on environmental catalysts. Recently, we described a non-enzymatic glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway-like reactions catalysed by metal ions [mainly Fe(II)] and phosphate, simple inorganic molecules abundantly found in Archaean sediments. While the RNA world can serve to explain the origin of genetics, the origin of the metabolic network might thus date back to constraints of environmental chemistry. Interestingly, considering a metal-catalysed origin of metabolism gives rise to an attractive hypothesis about how the first enzymes could have formed: simple RNA or (poly)peptide molecules could have bound the metal ions, and thus increased their solubility, concentration and accessibility. In a second step, this would have allowed substrate specificity to evolve. PMID:25109990

  17. Pharmacogenetics of drug-metabolizing enzymes in US Hispanics

    PubMed Central

    Duconge, Jorge; Cadilla, Carmen L.; Ruaño, Gualberto

    2015-01-01

    Although the Hispanic population is continuously growing in the United States, they are underrepresented in pharmacogenetic studies. This review addresses the need for compiling available pharmacogenetic data in US Hispanics, discussing the prevalence of clinically relevant polymorphisms in pharmacogenes encoding for drug-metabolizing enzymes. CYP3A5*3 (0.245–0.867) showed the largest frequency in a US Hispanic population. A higher prevalence of CYP2C9*3, CYP2C19*4, and UGT2B7 IVS1+985 A>Gwas observed in US Hispanic vs. non-Hispanic populations. We found interethnic and intraethnic variability in frequencies of genetic polymorphisms for metabolizing enzymes, which highlights the need to define the ancestries of participants in pharmacogenetic studies. New approaches should be integrated in experimental designs to gain knowledge about the clinical relevance of the unique combination of genetic variants occurring in this admixed population. Ethnic subgroups in the US Hispanic population may harbor variants that might be part of multiple causative loci or in linkage-disequilibrium with functional variants. Pharmacogenetic studies in Hispanics should not be limited to ascertain commonly studied polymorphisms that were originally identified in their parental populations. The success of the Personalized Medicine paradigm will depend on recognizing genetic diversity between and within US Hispanics and the uniqueness of their genetic backgrounds. PMID:25431893

  18. Interplay of metabolizing enzymes and transporter of xenobiotics.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hwee Ying; Ho, Qin Shi; Wong, Kim Ping

    2016-01-01

    1. Xenobiotics are metabolized and eliminated through the coordinated interplay of their metabolizing enzymes and transporters. However, these two activities in vitro are measured separately, with the addition of ATP as a pre-requisite. 2. We propose a human renal cell-line model which integrates the sulfate and glutathione conjugation of xenobiotics with the efflux of their respective conjugates. Sulfation and glutathionylation represent two major Phase II detoxification of xenobiotics in man. The reactions are catalyzed, respectively, by phenolsulfotransferase and glutathione-S-transferase followed by extrusion of their respective conjugates. 3. Using Ko-143, a specific inhibitor of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, we identified this transporter to be responsible for the efflux of p-cresol sulfate, harmol sulfate and the glutathione conjugate of 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene. 4. The conjugation-cum-efflux was inhibited by oligomycin and uncouplers, which highlights the role of cellular mitochondria in providing ATP for the biosynthesis of their conjugating agents, 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) and reduced glutathione as well as for the transport function of BCRP. 5. The human 786-O renal cell-line provides a "3-in-1" system linking ATP biosynthesis to metabolism of xenobiotics and their ultimate transport and elimination by BCRP; this integrated system was not apparent in other human cell-lines examined. PMID:26226519

  19. Highlighting the Need for Systems-Level Experimental Characterization of Plant Metabolic Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Engqvist, Martin K M

    2016-01-01

    The biology of living organisms is determined by the action and interaction of a large number of individual gene products, each with specific functions. Discovering and annotating the function of gene products is key to our understanding of these organisms. Controlled experiments and bioinformatic predictions both contribute to functional gene annotation. For most species it is difficult to gain an overview of what portion of gene annotations are based on experiments and what portion represent predictions. Here, I survey the current state of experimental knowledge of enzymes and metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana as well as eleven economically important crops and forestry trees - with a particular focus on reactions involving organic acids in central metabolism. I illustrate the limited availability of experimental data for functional annotation of enzymes in most of these species. Many enzymes involved in metabolism of citrate, malate, fumarate, lactate, and glycolate in crops and forestry trees have not been characterized. Furthermore, enzymes involved in key biosynthetic pathways which shape important traits in crops and forestry trees have not been characterized. I argue for the development of novel high-throughput platforms with which limited functional characterization of gene products can be performed quickly and relatively cheaply. I refer to this approach as systems-level experimental characterization. The data collected from such platforms would form a layer intermediate between bioinformatic gene function predictions and in-depth experimental studies of these functions. Such a data layer would greatly aid in the pursuit of understanding a multiplicity of biological processes in living organisms. PMID:27516767

  20. Highlighting the Need for Systems-Level Experimental Characterization of Plant Metabolic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Engqvist, Martin K. M.

    2016-01-01

    The biology of living organisms is determined by the action and interaction of a large number of individual gene products, each with specific functions. Discovering and annotating the function of gene products is key to our understanding of these organisms. Controlled experiments and bioinformatic predictions both contribute to functional gene annotation. For most species it is difficult to gain an overview of what portion of gene annotations are based on experiments and what portion represent predictions. Here, I survey the current state of experimental knowledge of enzymes and metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana as well as eleven economically important crops and forestry trees – with a particular focus on reactions involving organic acids in central metabolism. I illustrate the limited availability of experimental data for functional annotation of enzymes in most of these species. Many enzymes involved in metabolism of citrate, malate, fumarate, lactate, and glycolate in crops and forestry trees have not been characterized. Furthermore, enzymes involved in key biosynthetic pathways which shape important traits in crops and forestry trees have not been characterized. I argue for the development of novel high-throughput platforms with which limited functional characterization of gene products can be performed quickly and relatively cheaply. I refer to this approach as systems-level experimental characterization. The data collected from such platforms would form a layer intermediate between bioinformatic gene function predictions and in-depth experimental studies of these functions. Such a data layer would greatly aid in the pursuit of understanding a multiplicity of biological processes in living organisms. PMID:27516767

  1. Maternal smoking, xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme gene variants, and gastroschisis risk.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Mary M; Reefhuis, Jennita; Gallagher, Margaret L; Mulle, Jennifer G; Hoffmann, Thomas J; Koontz, Deborah A; Sturchio, Cynthia; Rasmussen, Sonja A; Witte, John S; Richter, Patricia; Honein, Margaret A

    2014-06-01

    Maternal smoking during pregnancy is one proposed risk factor for gastroschisis, but reported associations have been modest, suggesting that differences in genetic susceptibility might play a role. We included 108 non-Hispanic white and 62 Hispanic families who had infants with gastroschisis, and 1,147 non-Hispanic white and 337 Hispanic families who had liveborn infants with no major structural birth defects (controls) in these analyses. DNA was extracted from buccal cells collected from infants and mothers, and information on periconceptional smoking history was obtained from maternal interviews, as part of the National Birth Defects Prevention Study. We analyzed five polymorphisms in three genes that code for enzymes involved in metabolism of some cigarette smoke constituents (CYP1A1, CYP1A2, and NAT2). Logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) independently for maternal smoking and maternal and infant gene variants, and to assess joint associations of maternal smoking and maternal or infant gene variants with gastroschisis. In analyses adjusted for maternal age at delivery and stratified by maternal race-ethnicity, we identified three suggestive associations among 30 potential associations with sufficient numbers to calculate ORs: CYP1A1*2A for non-Hispanic white mothers who smoked periconceptionally (aOR = 0.38, 95% CI 0.15-0.98), and NAT2*6 for Hispanic non-smoking mothers (aOR = 2.17, 95% CI 1.12-4.19) and their infants (aOR = 2.11, 95% CI 1.00-4.48). This analysis does not support the occurrence of effect modification between periconceptional maternal smoking and most of the xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme gene variants assessed. PMID:24668907

  2. Cortisol-Metabolizing Enzymes in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Blumenfeld, Zeev; Kaidar, Gabi; Zuckerman-Levin, Nehama; Dumin, Elena; Knopf, Carlos; Hochberg, Ze’ev

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to assess the activity of cortisol-metabolizing enzymes in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), using a fully quantitative gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GCMS) method. DESIGN We investigated the glucocorticoid degradation pathways that include 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD) type 1, 5α-reductase (5α-R) and 5β-reductase (5β-R), 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and 20α- and 20β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (20α-HSD and 20β-HSD, respectively) in young nonobese women with PCOS, using a fully quantitative GCMS method. SETTING This study was conducted in a tertiary referral hospital in Israel. PATIENTS This study group consisted of 13 young women, aged 20.1 ± 2.8 years (mean ± SD), with the body mass index (BMI) of 22.6 ± 3.7 kg/m2, diagnosed with PCOS according to the Rotterdam criteria. The control group consisted of 14 healthy young women matched for weight, height, and BMI. INTERVENTIONS Urine samples were analyzed using GCMS. We measured urinary steroid metabolites that represent the products and substrates of the study enzymes and calculated the product/substrate ratios to represent enzyme activity. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES The calculation of enzymatic activity, based on glucocorticoid degradation metabolites, was done by GCMS in PCOS vs. controls. RESULTS All glucocorticoid degradation metabolites were higher in the PCOS group than in controls. Of the adrenal enzymes, the activities of 21-hydroxylase and 17α-hydroxylase were reduced, whereas the activity of 17,20-lyase was enhanced in PCOS. Of the degradation enzymes, the activity of 11β-HSD type 1 was reduced in women with PCOS only when calculated from cortoles and cortolones ratios. The activities of 5α-R/5β-R were increased only when calculating the 11-hydroxy metabolites of androgens. The activity of 20α-HSD was elevated in the patients with PCOS and its relation with the substrate levels was lost. CONCLUSIONS We confirm PCOS

  3. Fermentation, Respiration & Enzyme Specificity: A Simple Device & Key Experiments with Yeast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinking, Larry N.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Using graphs and diagrams, the authors describe a simple fermentation chamber and provide key experiments that can be used in the classroom to give students meaningful insight into metabolic processes. (ZWH)

  4. Carbohydrate Content and Enzyme Metabolism in Developing Canola Siliques.

    PubMed Central

    King, S. P.; Lunn, J. E.; Furbank, R. T.

    1997-01-01

    Little biochemical information is available on carbohydrate metabolism in developing canola (Brassica napus L.) silique (pod) wall and seed tissues. This research examines the carbohydrate contents and sucrose (Suc) metabolic enzyme activities in different aged silique wall and seed tissues during oil filling. The silique wall partitioned photosynthate into Suc over starch and predominantly accumulated hexose. The silique wall hexose content and soluble acid invertase activity rapidly fell as embryos progressed from the early- to late-cotyledon developmental stages. A similar trend was not evident for alkaline invertase, Suc synthase (SuSy), and Suc-phosphate synthase. Silique wall SuSy activities were much higher than source leaves at all times and may serve to supply the substrate for secondary cell wall thickening. In young seeds starch was the predominant accumulated carbohydrate over the sampled developmental range. Seed hexose levels dropped as embryos developed from the early- to midcotyledon stage. Hexose and starch were localized to the testa or liquid endosperm, whereas Suc was evenly distributed among seed components. With the switch to oil accumulation, seed SuSy activity increased by 3.6-fold and soluble acid invertase activity decreased by 76%. These data provide valuable baseline knowledge for the genetic manipulation of canola seed carbon partitioning. PMID:12223695

  5. Ammonium Metabolism Enzymes Aid Helicobacter pylori Acid Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Erica F.

    2014-01-01

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori possesses a highly active urease to support acid tolerance. Urea hydrolysis occurs inside the cytoplasm, resulting in the production of NH3 that is immediately protonated to form NH4+. This ammonium must be metabolized or effluxed because its presence within the cell is counterproductive to the goal of raising pH while maintaining a viable proton motive force (PMF). Two compatible hypotheses for mitigating intracellular ammonium toxicity include (i) the exit of protonated ammonium outward via the UreI permease, which was shown to facilitate diffusion of both urea and ammonium, and/or (ii) the assimilation of this ammonium, which is supported by evidence that H. pylori assimilates urea nitrogen into its amino acid pools. We investigated the second hypothesis by constructing strains with altered expression of the ammonium-assimilating enzymes glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and the ammonium-evolving periplasmic enzymes glutaminase (Ggt) and asparaginase (AsnB). H. pylori strains expressing elevated levels of either GS or GDH are more acid tolerant than the wild type, exhibit enhanced ammonium production, and are able to alkalize the medium faster than the wild type. Strains lacking the genes for either Ggt or AsnB are acid sensitive, have 8-fold-lower urea-dependent ammonium production, and are more acid sensitive than the parent. Additionally, we found that purified H. pylori GS produces glutamine in the presence of Mg2+ at a rate similar to that of unadenylated Escherichia coli GS. These data reveal that all four enzymes contribute to whole-cell acid resistance in H. pylori and are likely important for assimilation and/or efflux of urea-derived ammonium. PMID:24936052

  6. Applying theories of microbial metabolism for induction of targeted enzyme activity in a methanogenic microbial community at a metabolic steady state.

    PubMed

    Speda, Jutta; Johansson, Mikaela A; Jonsson, Bengt-Harald; Karlsson, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Novel enzymes that are stable in diverse conditions are intensively sought because they offer major potential advantages in industrial biotechnology, and microorganisms in extreme environments are key sources of such enzymes. However, most potentially valuable enzymes are currently inaccessible due to the pure culturing problem of microorganisms. Novel metagenomic and metaproteomic techniques that circumvent the need for pure cultures have theoretically provided possibilities to identify all genes and all proteins in microbial communities, but these techniques have not been widely used to directly identify specific enzymes because they generate vast amounts of extraneous data.In a first step towards developing a metaproteomic approach to pinpoint targeted extracellular hydrolytic enzymes of choice in microbial communities, we have generated and analyzed the necessary conditions for such an approach by the use of a methanogenic microbial community maintained on a chemically defined medium. The results show that a metabolic steady state of the microbial community could be reached, at which the expression of the targeted hydrolytic enzymes were suppressed, and that upon enzyme induction a distinct increase in the targeted enzyme expression was obtained. Furthermore, no cross talk in expression was detected between the two focal types of enzyme activities under their respective inductive conditions. Thus, the described approach should be useful to generate ideal samples, collected before and after selective induction, in controlled microbial communities to clearly discriminate between constituently expressed proteins and extracellular hydrolytic enzymes that are specifically induced, thereby reducing the analysis to only those proteins that are distinctively up-regulated. PMID:27115757

  7. Mercaptosuccinate Dioxygenase, a Cysteine Dioxygenase Homologue, from Variovorax paradoxus Strain B4 Is the Key Enzyme of Mercaptosuccinate Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Ulrike; Schürmann, Marc; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The versatile thiol mercaptosuccinate has a wide range of applications, e.g. in quantum dot research or in bioimaging. Its metabolism is investigated in Variovorax paradoxus strain B4, which can utilize this compound as the sole source of carbon and sulfur. Proteomic studies of strain B4 resulted in the identification of a putative mercaptosuccinate dioxygenase, a cysteine dioxygenase homologue, possibly representing the key enzyme in the degradation of mercaptosuccinate. Therefore, the putative mercaptosuccinate dioxygenase was heterologously expressed, purified, and characterized in this study. The results clearly demonstrated that the enzyme utilizes mercaptosuccinate with concomitant consumption of oxygen. Thus, the enzyme is designated as mercaptosuccinate dioxygenase. Succinate and sulfite were verified as the final reaction products. The enzyme showed an apparent Km of 0.4 mm, and a specific activity (Vmax) of 20.0 μmol min−1 mg−1 corresponding to a kcat of 7.7 s−1. Furthermore, the enzyme was highly specific for mercaptosuccinate, no activity was observed with cysteine, dithiothreitol, 2-mercaptoethanol, and 3-mercaptopropionate. These structurally related thiols did not have an inhibitory effect either. Fe(II) could clearly be identified as metal cofactor of the mercaptosuccinate dioxygenase with a content of 0.6 mol of Fe(II)/mol of enzyme. The recently proposed hypothesis for the degradation pathway of mercaptosuccinate based on proteome analyses could be strengthened in the present study. (i) Mercaptosuccinate is first converted to sulfinosuccinate by this mercaptosuccinate dioxygenase; (ii) sulfinosuccinate is spontaneously desulfinated to succinate and sulfite; and (iii) whereas succinate enters the central metabolism, sulfite is detoxified by the previously identified putative molybdopterin oxidoreductase. PMID:25228698

  8. Reprogramming metabolism by histone methyltransferase NSD2 drives endocrine resistance via coordinated activation of pentose phosphate pathway enzymes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junjian; Duan, Zhijian; Nugent, Zoann; Zou, June X; Borowsky, Alexander D; Zhang, Yanhong; Tepper, Clifford G; Li, Jian Jian; Fiehn, Oliver; Xu, Jianzhen; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Murphy, Leigh C; Chen, Hong-Wu

    2016-08-10

    Metabolic reprogramming such as the aerobic glycolysis or Warburg effect is well recognized as a common feature of tumorigenesis. However, molecular mechanisms underlying metabolic alterations for tumor therapeutic resistance are poorly understood. Through gene expression profiling analysis we found that histone H3K36 methyltransferase NSD2/MMSET/WHSC1 expression was highly elevated in tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cell lines and clinical tumors. IHC analysis indicated that NSD2 protein overexpression was associated with the disease recurrence and poor survival. Ectopic expression of NSD2 wild type, but not the methylase-defective mutant, drove endocrine resistance in multiple cell models and xenograft tumors. Mechanistically, NSD2 was recruited to and methylated H3K36me2 at the promoters of key glucose metabolic enzyme genes. Its overexpression coordinately up-regulated hexokinase 2 (HK2) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), two key enzymes of glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), as well as TP53-induced glycolysis regulatory phosphatase TIGAR. Consequently, NSD2-driven tamoxifen-resistant cells and tumors displayed heightened PPP activity, elevated NADPH production, and reduced ROS level, without significantly altered glycolysis. These results illustrate a coordinated, epigenetic activation of key glucose metabolic enzymes in therapeutic resistance and nominate methyltransferase NSD2 as a potential therapeutic target for endocrine resistant breast cancer. PMID:27164560

  9. Comprehensive Structural Characterization of the Bacterial Homospermidine Synthase–an Essential Enzyme of the Polyamine Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Krossa, Sebastian; Faust, Annette; Ober, Dietrich; Scheidig, Axel J.

    2016-01-01

    The highly conserved bacterial homospermidine synthase (HSS) is a key enzyme of the polyamine metabolism of many proteobacteria including pathogenic strains such as Legionella pneumophila and Pseudomonas aeruginosa; The unique usage of NAD(H) as a prosthetic group is a common feature of bacterial HSS, eukaryotic HSS and deoxyhypusine synthase (DHS). The structure of the bacterial enzyme does not possess a lysine residue in the active center and thus does not form an enzyme-substrate Schiff base intermediate as observed for the DHS. In contrast to the DHS the active site is not formed by the interface of two subunits but resides within one subunit of the bacterial HSS. Crystal structures of Blastochloris viridis HSS (BvHSS) reveal two distinct substrate binding sites, one of which is highly specific for putrescine. BvHSS features a side pocket in the direct vicinity of the active site formed by conserved amino acids and a potential substrate discrimination, guiding, and sensing mechanism. The proposed reaction steps for the catalysis of BvHSS emphasize cation-π interaction through a conserved Trp residue as a key stabilizer of high energetic transition states. PMID:26776105

  10. Effect of Chromium(VI) Toxicity on Enzymes of Nitrogen Metabolism in Clusterbean (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba L.)

    PubMed Central

    Sangwan, Punesh; Joshi, U. N.

    2014-01-01

    Heavy metals are the intrinsic component of the environment with both essential and nonessential types. Their excessive levels pose a threat to plant growth and yield. Also, some heavy metals are toxic to plants even at very low concentrations. The present investigation (a pot experiment) was conducted to determine the affects of varying chromium(VI) levels (0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 mg chromium(VI) kg−1 soil in the form of potassium dichromate) on the key enzymes of nitrogen metabolism in clusterbean. Chromium treatment adversely affect nitrogenase, nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, glutamine synthetase, and glutamate dehydrogenase in various plant organs at different growth stages as specific enzyme activity of these enzymes decreased with an increase in chromium(VI) levels from 0 to 2.0 mg chromium(VI) kg−1 soil and 4.0 mg chromium(VI) kg−1 soil was found to be lethal to clusterbean plants. In general, the enzyme activity increased with advancement of growth to reach maximum at flowering stage and thereafter decreased at grain filling stage. PMID:24744916

  11. Effect of biotin on transcription levels of key enzymes and glutamate efflux in glutamate fermentation by Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yan; Duan, Zuoying; Shi, Zhongping

    2014-02-01

    Biotin is an important factor affecting the performance of glutamate fermentation by biotin auxotrophic Corynebacterium glutamicum and glutamate is over-produced only when initial biotin content is controlled at suitable levels or initial biotin is excessive but with Tween 40 addition during fermentation. The transcription levels of key enzymes at pyruvate, isocitrate and α-ketoglutarate metabolic nodes, as well as transport protein (TP) of glutamate were investigated under the conditions of varied biotin contents and Tween 40 supplementation. When biotin was insufficient, the genes encoding key enzymes and TP were down-regulated in the early production phase, in particular, the transcription level of isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) which was only 2% of that of control. Although the cells' morphology transformation and TP level were not affected, low transcription level of ICDH led to lower final glutamate concentration (64 g/L). When biotin was excessive, the transcription levels of key enzymes were at comparable levels as those of control with ICDH as an exception, which was only 3-22% of control level throughout production phase. In this case, little intracellular glutamate accumulation (1.5 mg/g DCW) and impermeable membrane resulted in non glutamate secretion into broth, even though the quantity of TP was more than 10-folds of control level. Addition of Tween 40 when biotin was excessive stimulated the expression of all key enzymes and TP, intracellular glutamate content was much higher (10-12 mg/g DCW), and final glutamate concentration reached control level (75-80 g/L). Hence, the membrane alteration and TP were indispensable in glutamate secretion. Biotin and Tween 40 influenced the expression level of ICDH and glutamate efflux, thereby influencing glutamate production. PMID:23990041

  12. Breast cancer and steroid metabolizing enzymes: the role of progestogens.

    PubMed

    Pasqualini, Jorge R

    2009-12-01

    It is well documented that breast tissue, both normal and cancerous, contains all the enzymatic systems necessary for the bioformation and metabolic transformation of estrogens, androgens and progesterone. These include sulfatases, aromatase, hydroxysteroid-dehydrogenases, sulfotransferases, hydroxylases and glucuronidases. The control of these enzymes plays an important role in the development and pathogenesis of hormone-dependent breast cancer. As discussed in this review, various progestogens including dydrogesterone and its 20alpha-dihydro-derivative, medrogestone, promegestone, nomegestrol acetate and norelgestromin can reduce intratissular levels of estradiol in breast cancer by blocking sulfatase and 17beta-hydroxysteroid-dehydrogenase type 1 activities. A possible correlation has been postulated between breast cell proliferation and estrogen sulfotransferase activity. Progesterone is largely transformed in the breast; normal breast produces mainly 4-ene derivatives, whereas 5alpha-derivatives are most common in breast cancer tissue. It has been suggested that this specific conversion of progesterone may be involved in breast carcinogenesis. In conclusion, treatment with anti-aromatases combined with anti-sulfatase or 17beta-hydroxysteroid-dehydrogenase type 1 could provide new therapeutic possibilities in the treatment of patients with hormone-dependent breast cancer. PMID:19962254

  13. A QUANTITATIVE MODEL FOR XENOBIOTIC METABOLIZING ENZYME (XME) INDUCTION REGULATED BY THE PREGNANE X RECEPTOR (PXR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nuclear receptor, PXR, is an integral part of the regulation of hepatic metabolism. It has been shown to regulate specific CYPs (phase I drug-metabolizing enzymes) as well as certain phase II drug metabolism activities, including UDP-glucuronosyl transferase (UGT), sulfotran...

  14. A multiscale approach to modelling drug metabolism by membrane-bound cytochrome P450 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lonsdale, Richard; Rouse, Sarah L; Sansom, Mark S P; Mulholland, Adrian J

    2014-07-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes are found in all life forms. P450s play an important role in drug metabolism, and have potential uses as biocatalysts. Human P450s are membrane-bound proteins. However, the interactions between P450s and their membrane environment are not well-understood. To date, all P450 crystal structures have been obtained from engineered proteins, from which the transmembrane helix was absent. A significant number of computational studies have been performed on P450s, but the majority of these have been performed on the solubilised forms of P450s. Here we present a multiscale approach for modelling P450s, spanning from coarse-grained and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to reaction modelling using hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods. To our knowledge, this is the first application of such an integrated multiscale approach to modelling of a membrane-bound enzyme. We have applied this protocol to a key human P450 involved in drug metabolism: CYP3A4. A biologically realistic model of CYP3A4, complete with its transmembrane helix and a membrane, has been constructed and characterised. The dynamics of this complex have been studied, and the oxidation of the anticoagulant R-warfarin has been modelled in the active site. Calculations have also been performed on the soluble form of the enzyme in aqueous solution. Important differences are observed between the membrane and solution systems, most notably for the gating residues and channels that control access to the active site. The protocol that we describe here is applicable to other membrane-bound enzymes. PMID:25033460

  15. A Multiscale Approach to Modelling Drug Metabolism by Membrane-Bound Cytochrome P450 Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Sansom, Mark S. P.; Mulholland, Adrian J.

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes are found in all life forms. P450s play an important role in drug metabolism, and have potential uses as biocatalysts. Human P450s are membrane-bound proteins. However, the interactions between P450s and their membrane environment are not well-understood. To date, all P450 crystal structures have been obtained from engineered proteins, from which the transmembrane helix was absent. A significant number of computational studies have been performed on P450s, but the majority of these have been performed on the solubilised forms of P450s. Here we present a multiscale approach for modelling P450s, spanning from coarse-grained and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to reaction modelling using hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods. To our knowledge, this is the first application of such an integrated multiscale approach to modelling of a membrane-bound enzyme. We have applied this protocol to a key human P450 involved in drug metabolism: CYP3A4. A biologically realistic model of CYP3A4, complete with its transmembrane helix and a membrane, has been constructed and characterised. The dynamics of this complex have been studied, and the oxidation of the anticoagulant R-warfarin has been modelled in the active site. Calculations have also been performed on the soluble form of the enzyme in aqueous solution. Important differences are observed between the membrane and solution systems, most notably for the gating residues and channels that control access to the active site. The protocol that we describe here is applicable to other membrane-bound enzymes. PMID:25033460

  16. Peroxisome proliferators alter the expression of estrogen-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Corton, J C; Bocos, C; Moreno, E S; Merritt, A; Cattley, R C; Gustafsson, J A

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to some peroxisome proliferator chemicals (PPC) leads to toxic effects on sex organ function possibly by alterations of steroid hormone metabolism. A systematic search for genes whose mRNA levels are modulated by the PPC WY-14643 (WY) was carried out in rat liver, a site of steroid hormone metabolism. The sequence of one up-regulated cDNA (2480 bp) was predicted to encode a protein of 735 amino acids with 82% identity to the porcine 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type IV (HSD IV) originally isolated as a 17 beta-estradiol dehydrogenase. The rat HSD IV was localized to peroxisomes and was regulated by diverse PPC by two distinct mechanisms. Induction of HSD IV and acyl-CoA oxidase (ACO) proteins in rat liver at different treatment times and concentrations of gemfibrozil (GEM) and di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) were almost identical, suggesting that HSD IV mRNA induction involves the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, a regulator of ACO. In contrast, HSD IV protein levels were only weakly induced by WY, a strong inducer of ACO protein, even though the levels of both HSD IV and ACO mRNA were strongly stimulated by WY. Thus HSD IV protein levels were uniquely regulated pretranslationally by WY. In addition to HSD IV we also identified the male-specific alpha 2u-globulin as a PPC down-regulated gene. This prompted us to examine the expression of another male-specific gene, CYP2C11, that catalyzes the hydroxylations of estradiol at the 2 and 16 alpha positions. Cyp2C11 protein expression in rat liver was either decreased or completely abolished after a 3-week treatment by GEM or WY, respectively. Decreased expression of enzymes which inactivate estradiol including Cyp2C11, and the reported increased expression of aromatase may explain why male rats exposed to diverse PPC have higher serum estradiol levels. These higher estradiol levels in male rats have been thought to be mechanistically linked to Leydig cell hyperplasia and adenomas. Increased

  17. Establishing a herbicide-metabolizing enzyme library in Beckmannia syzigachne to identify genes associated with metabolic resistance.

    PubMed

    Pan, Lang; Gao, Haitao; Xia, Wenwen; Zhang, Teng; Dong, Liyao

    2016-04-01

    Non-target site resistance (NTSR) to herbicides is an increasing concern for weed control. Metabolic herbicide resistance is an important mechanism for NTSR. However, little is known about metabolic resistance at the genetic level. In this study, we have identified three fenoxaprop-P-ethyl-resistant American sloughgrass (Beckmannia syzigachne Steud.) populations, in which the molecular basis for NTSR remains unclear. To reveal the mechanisms of metabolic resistance, the genes likely to be involved in herbicide metabolism (e.g. for cytochrome P450s, esterases, hydrolases, oxidases, peroxidases, glutathione S-transferases, glycosyltransferases, and transporter proteins) were isolated using transcriptome sequencing, in combination with RT-PCR (reverse transcription-PCR) and RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends). Consequently, we established a herbicide-metabolizing enzyme library containing at least 332 genes, and each of these genes was cloned and the sequence and the expression level compared between the fenoxaprop-P-ethyl-resistant and susceptible populations. Fifteen metabolic enzyme genes were found to be possibly involved in fenoxaprop-P-ethyl resistance. In addition, we found five metabolizing enzyme genes that have a different gene sequence in plants of susceptible versus resistant B. syzigachne populations. These genes may be major candidates for herbicide metabolic resistance. This established metabolic enzyme library represents an important step forward towards a better understanding of herbicide metabolism and metabolic resistance in this and possibly other closely related weed species. This new information may help to understand weed metabolic resistance and to develop novel strategies of weed management. PMID:26739863

  18. Simultaneous prediction of enzyme orthologs from chemical transformation patterns for de novo metabolic pathway reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Tabei, Yasuo; Yamanishi, Yoshihiro; Kotera, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Metabolic pathways are an important class of molecular networks consisting of compounds, enzymes and their interactions. The understanding of global metabolic pathways is extremely important for various applications in ecology and pharmacology. However, large parts of metabolic pathways remain unknown, and most organism-specific pathways contain many missing enzymes. Results: In this study we propose a novel method to predict the enzyme orthologs that catalyze the putative reactions to facilitate the de novo reconstruction of metabolic pathways from metabolome-scale compound sets. The algorithm detects the chemical transformation patterns of substrate–product pairs using chemical graph alignments, and constructs a set of enzyme-specific classifiers to simultaneously predict all the enzyme orthologs that could catalyze the putative reactions of the substrate–product pairs in the joint learning framework. The originality of the method lies in its ability to make predictions for thousands of enzyme orthologs simultaneously, as well as its extraction of enzyme-specific chemical transformation patterns of substrate–product pairs. We demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed method by applying it to some ten thousands of metabolic compounds, and analyze the extracted chemical transformation patterns that provide insights into the characteristics and specificities of enzymes. The proposed method will open the door to both primary (central) and secondary metabolism in genomics research, increasing research productivity to tackle a wide variety of environmental and public health matters. Availability and Implementation: Contact: maskot@bio.titech.ac.jp PMID:27307627

  19. Drug Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Variation, Nicotine Metabolism, Prospective Abstinence, and Cigarette Consumption.

    PubMed

    Bergen, Andrew W; Michel, Martha; Nishita, Denise; Krasnow, Ruth; Javitz, Harold S; Conneely, Karen N; Lessov-Schlaggar, Christina N; Hops, Hyman; Zhu, Andy Z X; Baurley, James W; McClure, Jennifer B; Hall, Sharon M; Baker, Timothy B; Conti, David V; Benowitz, Neal L; Lerman, Caryn; Tyndale, Rachel F; Swan, Gary E

    2015-01-01

    The Nicotine Metabolite Ratio (NMR, ratio of trans-3'-hydroxycotinine and cotinine), has previously been associated with CYP2A6 activity, response to smoking cessation treatments, and cigarette consumption. We searched for drug metabolizing enzyme and transporter (DMET) gene variation associated with the NMR and prospective abstinence in 2,946 participants of laboratory studies of nicotine metabolism and of clinical trials of smoking cessation therapies. Stage I was a meta-analysis of the association of 507 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 173 DMET genes with the NMR in 449 participants of two laboratory studies. Nominally significant associations were identified in ten genes after adjustment for intragenic SNPs; CYP2A6 and two CYP2A6 SNPs attained experiment-wide significance adjusted for correlated SNPs (CYP2A6 PACT=4.1E-7, rs4803381 PACT=4.5E-5, rs1137115, PACT=1.2E-3). Stage II was mega-regression analyses of 10 DMET SNPs with pretreatment NMR and prospective abstinence in up to 2,497 participants from eight trials. rs4803381 and rs1137115 SNPs were associated with pretreatment NMR at genome-wide significance. In post-hoc analyses of CYP2A6 SNPs, we observed nominally significant association with: abstinence in one pharmacotherapy arm; cigarette consumption among all trial participants; and lung cancer in four case:control studies. CYP2A6 minor alleles were associated with reduced NMR, CPD, and lung cancer risk. We confirmed the major role that CYP2A6 plays in nicotine metabolism, and made novel findings with respect to genome-wide significance and associations with CPD, abstinence and lung cancer risk. Additional multivariate analyses with patient variables and genetic modeling will improve prediction of nicotine metabolism, disease risk and smoking cessation treatment prognosis. PMID:26132489

  20. Drug Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Variation, Nicotine Metabolism, Prospective Abstinence, and Cigarette Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Bergen, Andrew W.; Michel, Martha; Nishita, Denise; Krasnow, Ruth; Javitz, Harold S.; Conneely, Karen N.; Lessov-Schlaggar, Christina N.; Hops, Hyman; Zhu, Andy Z. X.; Baurley, James W.; McClure, Jennifer B.; Hall, Sharon M.; Baker, Timothy B.; Conti, David V.; Benowitz, Neal L.; Lerman, Caryn; Tyndale, Rachel F.; Swan, Gary E.

    2015-01-01

    The Nicotine Metabolite Ratio (NMR, ratio of trans-3’-hydroxycotinine and cotinine), has previously been associated with CYP2A6 activity, response to smoking cessation treatments, and cigarette consumption. We searched for drug metabolizing enzyme and transporter (DMET) gene variation associated with the NMR and prospective abstinence in 2,946 participants of laboratory studies of nicotine metabolism and of clinical trials of smoking cessation therapies. Stage I was a meta-analysis of the association of 507 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 173 DMET genes with the NMR in 449 participants of two laboratory studies. Nominally significant associations were identified in ten genes after adjustment for intragenic SNPs; CYP2A6 and two CYP2A6 SNPs attained experiment-wide significance adjusted for correlated SNPs (CYP2A6 PACT=4.1E-7, rs4803381 PACT=4.5E-5, rs1137115, PACT=1.2E-3). Stage II was mega-regression analyses of 10 DMET SNPs with pretreatment NMR and prospective abstinence in up to 2,497 participants from eight trials. rs4803381 and rs1137115 SNPs were associated with pretreatment NMR at genome-wide significance. In post-hoc analyses of CYP2A6 SNPs, we observed nominally significant association with: abstinence in one pharmacotherapy arm; cigarette consumption among all trial participants; and lung cancer in four case:control studies. CYP2A6 minor alleles were associated with reduced NMR, CPD, and lung cancer risk. We confirmed the major role that CYP2A6 plays in nicotine metabolism, and made novel findings with respect to genome-wide significance and associations with CPD, abstinence and lung cancer risk. Additional multivariate analyses with patient variables and genetic modeling will improve prediction of nicotine metabolism, disease risk and smoking cessation treatment prognosis. PMID:26132489

  1. Improving the Production of L-Phenylalanine by Identifying Key Enzymes Through Multi-Enzyme Reaction System in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dongqin; Liu, Yongfei; Xu, Yiran; Zheng, Ping; Li, Haixing; Zhang, Dawei; Sun, Jibin

    2016-01-01

    L-Phenylalanine (L-Phe) is an important amino acid used in both food and medicinal applications. We developed an in vitro system that allowed a direct, quantitative investigation of phenylalanine biosynthesis in E. coli. Here, the absolute concentrations of six enzymes (AroK, AroL, AroA, AroC, PheA and TyrB) involved in the shikimate (SHIK) pathway were determined by a quantitative proteomics approach and in vitro enzyme titration experiments. The reconstitution of an in vitro reaction system for these six enzymes was established and their effects on the phenylalanine production were tested. The results showed that the yield of phenylalanine increased 3.0 and 2.1 times when the concentrations of shikimate kinase (AroL) and 5-enolpyruvoyl shikimate 3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase (AroA) were increased 2.5 times. Consistent results were obtained from in vivo via the overexpression of AroA in a phenylalanine-producing strain, and the titer of phenylalanine reached 62.47 g/l after 48 h cultivation in a 5-liter jar fermentor. Our quantitative findings provide a practical method to detect the potential bottleneck in a specific metabolic pathway to determine which gene products should be targeted to improve the yield of the desired product. PMID:27558633

  2. Improving the Production of L-Phenylalanine by Identifying Key Enzymes Through Multi-Enzyme Reaction System in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dongqin; Liu, Yongfei; Xu, Yiran; Zheng, Ping; Li, Haixing; Zhang, Dawei; Sun, Jibin

    2016-01-01

    L-Phenylalanine (L-Phe) is an important amino acid used in both food and medicinal applications. We developed an in vitro system that allowed a direct, quantitative investigation of phenylalanine biosynthesis in E. coli. Here, the absolute concentrations of six enzymes (AroK, AroL, AroA, AroC, PheA and TyrB) involved in the shikimate (SHIK) pathway were determined by a quantitative proteomics approach and in vitro enzyme titration experiments. The reconstitution of an in vitro reaction system for these six enzymes was established and their effects on the phenylalanine production were tested. The results showed that the yield of phenylalanine increased 3.0 and 2.1 times when the concentrations of shikimate kinase (AroL) and 5-enolpyruvoyl shikimate 3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase (AroA) were increased 2.5 times. Consistent results were obtained from in vivo via the overexpression of AroA in a phenylalanine-producing strain, and the titer of phenylalanine reached 62.47 g/l after 48 h cultivation in a 5-liter jar fermentor. Our quantitative findings provide a practical method to detect the potential bottleneck in a specific metabolic pathway to determine which gene products should be targeted to improve the yield of the desired product. PMID:27558633

  3. Structure and Function of Human Xylulokinase, an Enzyme with Important Roles in Carbohydrate Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Bunker, Richard D.; Bulloch, Esther M. M.; Dickson, James M. J.; Loomes, Kerry M.; Baker, Edward N.

    2013-01-01

    d-Xylulokinase (XK; EC 2.7.1.17) catalyzes the ATP-dependent phosphorylation of d-xylulose (Xu) to produce xylulose 5-phosphate (Xu5P). In mammals, XK is the last enzyme in the glucuronate-xylulose pathway, active in the liver and kidneys, and is linked through its product Xu5P to the pentose-phosphate pathway. XK may play an important role in metabolic disease, given that Xu5P is a key regulator of glucose metabolism and lipogenesis. We have expressed the product of a putative human XK gene and identified it as the authentic human d-xylulokinase (hXK). NMR studies with a variety of sugars showed that hXK acts only on d-xylulose, and a coupled photometric assay established its key kinetic parameters as Km(Xu) = 24 ± 3 μm and kcat = 35 ± 5 s−1. Crystal structures were determined for hXK, on its own and in complexes with Xu, ADP, and a fluorinated inhibitor. These reveal that hXK has a two-domain fold characteristic of the sugar kinase/hsp70/actin superfamily, with glycerol kinase as its closest relative. Xu binds to domain-I and ADP to domain-II, but in this open form of hXK they are 10 Å apart, implying that a large scale conformational change is required for catalysis. Xu binds in its linear keto-form, sandwiched between a Trp side chain and polar side chains that provide exquisite hydrogen bonding recognition. The hXK structure provides a basis for the design of specific inhibitors with which to probe its roles in sugar metabolism and metabolic disease. PMID:23179721

  4. Application of a hierarchical enzyme classification method reveals the role of gut microbiome in human metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Enzymes are known as the molecular machines that drive the metabolism of an organism; hence identification of the full enzyme complement of an organism is essential to build the metabolic blueprint of that species as well as to understand the interplay of multiple species in an ecosystem. Experimental characterization of the enzymatic reactions of all enzymes in a genome is a tedious and expensive task. The problem is more pronounced in the metagenomic samples where even the species are not adequately cultured or characterized. Enzymes encoded by the gut microbiota play an essential role in the host metabolism; thus, warranting the need to accurately identify and annotate the full enzyme complements of species in the genomic and metagenomic projects. To fulfill this need, we develop and apply a method called ECemble, an ensemble approach to identify enzymes and enzyme classes and study the human gut metabolic pathways. Results ECemble method uses an ensemble of machine-learning methods to accurately model and predict enzymes from protein sequences and also identifies the enzyme classes and subclasses at the finest resolution. A tenfold cross-validation result shows accuracy between 97 and 99% at different levels in the hierarchy of enzyme classification, which is superior to comparable methods. We applied ECemble to predict the entire complements of enzymes from ten sequenced proteomes including the human proteome. We also applied this method to predict enzymes encoded by the human gut microbiome from gut metagenomic samples, and to study the role played by the microbe-derived enzymes in the human metabolism. After mapping the known and predicted enzymes to canonical human pathways, we identified 48 pathways that have at least one bacteria-encoded enzyme, which demonstrates the complementary role of gut microbiome in human gut metabolism. These pathways are primarily involved in metabolizing dietary nutrients such as carbohydrates, amino acids, lipids

  5. Metabolism of Monoterpenes: Acetylation of (-)-Menthol by a Soluble Enzyme Preparation from Peppermint (Mentha piperita) Leaves.

    PubMed

    Croteau, R; Hooper, C L

    1978-05-01

    The essential oil from mature leaves of flowering peppermint (Mentha piperita L.) contains up to 15% (-)-menthyl acetate, and leaf discs converted exogenous (-)-[G-(3)H]menthol into this ester in approximately 15% yield of the incorporated precursor. Leaf extracts catalyzed the acetyl coenzyme A-dependent acetylation of (-)-[G-(3)H]menthol and the product of this transacetylase reaction was identified by radiochromatographic techniques. Transacetylase activity was located mainly in the 100,000g supernatant fraction, and the preparation was partially purified by combination of Sephadex G-100 gel filtration and chromatography on O-diethylaminoethyl-cellulose. The transacetylase had a molecular weight of about 37,000 as judged by Sephadex G-150 gel filtration, and a pH optimum near 9. The apparent K(m) and velocity for (-)-menthol were 0.3 mm and 16 nmol/hr. mg of protein, respectively. The saturation curve for acetyl coenzyme A was sigmoidal, showing apparent saturation near 0.1 mm. Dithioerythritol was required for maximum activity and stability of the enzyme, and the enzyme was inhibited by thiol directed reagents such as p-hydroxymercuribenzoate. Diisopropylfluorophosphate also inhibited transacylation suggesting the involvement of a serine residue in catalysis. The transacylase was highly specific for acetyl coenzyme A; propionyl coenzyme A and butyryl coenzyme A were not nearly as efficient as acyl donors (11% and 2%, respectively). However, the enzyme was much less selective with regard to the alcohol substrate, suggesting that the nature of the acetate ester synthesized in mint is more dependent on the type of alcohol available than on the specificity of the transacetylase. This is the first report on an enzyme involved in monoterpenol acetylation in plants. A very similar enzyme, catalyzing this key reaction in the metabolism of menthol, was also isolated from the flowers of peppermint. PMID:16660375

  6. Primacy of cardiac chymase over angiotensin converting enzyme as an angiotensin-(1-12) metabolizing enzyme.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Sarfaraz; Varagic, Jasmina; VonCannon, Jessica L; Groban, Leanne; Collawn, James F; Dell'Italia, Louis J; Ferrario, Carlos M

    2016-09-16

    We showed previously that rat angiotensin-(1-12) [Ang-(1-12)] is metabolized by chymase and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) to generate Angiotensin II (Ang II). Here, we investigated the affinity of cardiac chymase and ACE enzymes for Ang-(1-12) and Angiotensin I (Ang I) substrates. Native plasma membranes (PMs) isolated from heart and lung tissues of adult spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were incubated with radiolabeled (125)I-Ang-(1-12) or (125)I-Ang I, in the absence or presence of a chymase or ACE inhibitor (chymostatin and lisinopril, respectively). Products were quantitated by HPLC connected to an in-line flow-through gamma detector. The rate of (125)I-Ang II formation from (125)I-Ang-(1-12) by chymase was significantly higher (heart: 7.0 ± 0.6 fmol/min/mg; lung: 33 ± 1.2 fmol/min/mg, P < 0.001) when compared to (125)I-Ang I substrate (heart: 0.8 ± 0.1 fmol/min/mg; lung: 2.1 ± 0.1 fmol/min/mg). Substrate affinity of (125)I-Ang-(1-12) for rat cardiac chymase was also confirmed using excess unlabeled Ang-(1-12) or Ang I (0-250 μM). The rate of (125)I-Ang II formation was significantly lower using unlabeled Ang-(1-12) compared to unlabeled Ang I substrate. Kinetic data showed that rat chymase has a lower Km (64 ± 6.3 μM vs 142 ± 17 μM), higher Vmax (13.2 ± 1.3 μM/min/mg vs 1.9 ± 0.2 μM/min/mg) and more than 15-fold higher catalytic efficiency (ratio of Vmax/Km) for Ang-(1-12) compared to Ang I substrate, respectively. We also investigated ACE mediated hydrolysis of (125)I-Ang-(1-12) and (125)I-Ang I in solubilized membrane fractions of the SHR heart and lung. Interestingly, no significant difference in (125)I-Ang II formation by ACE was detected using either substrate, (125)I-Ang-(1-12) or (125)I-Ang I, both in the heart (1.8 ± 0.2 fmol/min/mg and 1.8 ± 0.3 fmol/min/mg, respectively) and in the lungs (239 ± 25 fmol/min/mg and 248 ± 34 fmol/min/mg, respectively). Compared to chymase, ACE

  7. Regulation of Squalene Synthase, a Key Enzyme of Sterol Biosynthesis, in Tobacco1

    PubMed Central

    Devarenne, Timothy P.; Ghosh, Anirban; Chappell, Joe

    2002-01-01

    Squalene synthase (SS) represents a putative branch point in the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway capable of diverting carbon flow specifically to the biosynthesis of sterols and, hence, is considered a potential regulatory point for sterol metabolism. For example, when plant cells grown in suspension culture are challenged with fungal elicitors, suppression of sterol biosynthesis has been correlated with a reduction in SS enzyme activity. The current study sought to correlate changes in SS enzyme activity with changes in the level of the corresponding protein and mRNA. Using an SS-specific antibody, the initial suppression of SS enzyme activity in elicitor-challenged cells was not reflected by changes in the absolute level of the corresponding polypeptide, implicating a post-translational control mechanism for this enzyme activity. In comparison, the absolute level of the SS mRNA did decrease approximately 5-fold in the elicitor-treated cells, which is suggestive of decreased transcription of the SS gene. Study of SS in intact plants was also initiated by measuring the level of SS enzyme activity, the level of the corresponding protein, and the expression of SS gene promoter-reporter gene constructs in transgenic plants. SS enzyme activity, polypeptide level, and gene expression were all localized predominately to the shoot apical meristem, with much lower levels observed in leaves and roots. These later results suggest that sterol biosynthesis is localized to the apical meristems and that apical meristems may be a source of sterols for other plant tissues. PMID:12114564

  8. Metabolism of chamaechromone in vitro with human liver microsomes and recombinant human drug-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lou, Yan; Hu, Haihong; Qiu, Yunqing; Zheng, Jinqi; Wang, Linrun; Zhang, Xingguo; Zeng, Su

    2014-04-01

    Chamaechromone is a major component in the dried roots of Stellera chamaejasme with antihepatitis B virus and insecticidal activity. In this study, metabolic profiles of chamaechromone were investigated in human liver microsomes. One monohydroxide and two monoglucuronides of chamaechromone were identified. The enzyme kinetics for both hydroxylation and glucuronidation were fitted to the Michaelis-Menten equation. The hydroxylation of chamaechromone was inhibited by α-naphthoflavone, and predominantly catalyzed by recombinant human cytochrome P450 1A2, whereas the glucuronidation was inhibited by quercetin, 1-naphthol, and fluconazole, and mainly catalyzed by recombinant human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A3, 1A7, 1A9, and 2B7. PMID:24687737

  9. Acute Liver Injury Induces Nucleocytoplasmic Redistribution of Hepatic Methionine Metabolism Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Miguel; Garrido, Francisco; Pérez-Miguelsanz, Juliana; Pacheco, María; Partearroyo, Teresa; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The discovery of methionine metabolism enzymes in the cell nucleus, together with their association with key nuclear processes, suggested a putative relationship between alterations in their subcellular distribution and disease. Results: Using the rat model of d-galactosamine intoxication, severe changes in hepatic steady-state mRNA levels were found; the largest decreases corresponded to enzymes exhibiting the highest expression in normal tissue. Cytoplasmic protein levels, activities, and metabolite concentrations suffered more moderate changes following a similar trend. Interestingly, galactosamine treatment induced hepatic nuclear accumulation of methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT) α1 and S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase tetramers, their active assemblies. In fact, galactosamine-treated livers showed enhanced nuclear MAT activity. Acetaminophen (APAP) intoxication mimicked most galactosamine effects on hepatic MATα1, including accumulation of nuclear tetramers. H35 cells that overexpress tagged-MATα1 reproduced the subcellular distribution observed in liver, and the changes induced by galactosamine and APAP that were also observed upon glutathione depletion by buthionine sulfoximine. The H35 nuclear accumulation of tagged-MATα1 induced by these agents correlated with decreased glutathione reduced form/glutathione oxidized form ratios and was prevented by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and glutathione ethyl ester. However, the changes in epigenetic modifications associated with tagged-MATα1 nuclear accumulation were only prevented by NAC in galactosamine-treated cells. Innovation: Cytoplasmic and nuclear changes in proteins that regulate the methylation index follow opposite trends in acute liver injury, their nuclear accumulation showing potential as disease marker. Conclusion: Altogether these results demonstrate galactosamine- and APAP-induced nuclear accumulation of methionine metabolism enzymes as active oligomers and unveil the implication of

  10. Anandamide and decidual remodelling: COX-2 oxidative metabolism as a key regulator.

    PubMed

    Almada, M; Piscitelli, F; Fonseca, B M; Di Marzo, V; Correia-da-Silva, G; Teixeira, N

    2015-11-01

    Recently, endocannabinoids have emerged as signalling mediators in reproduction. It is widely accepted that anandamide (AEA) levels must be tightly regulated, and that a disturbance in AEA levels may impact decidual stability and regression. We have previously characterized the endocannabinoid machinery in rat decidual tissue and reported the pro-apoptotic action of AEA on rat decidual cells. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an inducible enzyme that plays a crucial role in early pregnancy, and is also a key modulator in the crosstalk between endocannabinoids and prostaglandins. On the other hand, AEA-oxidative metabolism by COX-2 is not merely a mean to inactivate its action, but it yields the formation of a new class of mediators, named prostaglandin-ethanolamides, or prostamides. In this study we found that AEA-induced apoptosis in decidual cells involves COX-2 metabolic pathway. AEA induced COX-2 expression through p38 MAPK, resulting in the formation of prostamide E2 (PME2). Our findings also suggest that AEA-induced effect is associated with NF-kB activation. Finally, we describe the involvement of PME2 in the induction of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in rat decidual cells. Altogether, our findings highlight the role of COX-2 as a gatekeeper in the uterine environment and clarify the impact of the deregulation of AEA levels on the decidual remodelling process. PMID:26335727

  11. Sensor potency of the moonlighting enzyme-decorated cytoskeleton: the cytoskeleton as a metabolic sensor

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is extensive evidence for the interaction of metabolic enzymes with the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. The significance of these interactions is far from clear. Presentation of the hypothesis In the cytoskeletal integrative sensor hypothesis presented here, the cytoskeleton senses and integrates the general metabolic activity of the cell. This activity depends on the binding to the cytoskeleton of enzymes and, depending on the nature of the enzyme, this binding may occur if the enzyme is either active or inactive but not both. This enzyme-binding is further proposed to stabilize microtubules and microfilaments and to alter rates of GTP and ATP hydrolysis and their levels. Testing the hypothesis Evidence consistent with the cytoskeletal integrative sensor hypothesis is presented in the case of glycolysis. Several testable predictions are made. There should be a relationship between post-translational modifications of tubulin and of actin and their interaction with metabolic enzymes. Different conditions of cytoskeletal dynamics and enzyme-cytoskeleton binding should reveal significant differences in local and perhaps global levels and ratios of ATP and GTP. The different functions of moonlighting enzymes should depend on cytoskeletal binding. Implications of the hypothesis The physical and chemical effects arising from metabolic sensing by the cytoskeleton would have major consequences on cell shape, dynamics and cell cycle progression. The hypothesis provides a framework that helps the significance of the enzyme-decorated cytoskeleton be determined. PMID:23398642

  12. Comparative genomic and phylogenetic investigation of the xenobiotic metabolizing arylamine N-acetyltransferase enzyme family

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) are xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes characterized in several bacteria and eukaryotic organisms. We report a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis employing an exhaustive dataset of NAT-homologous sequences recovered through inspection of 2445 genomes. We describe ...

  13. Multi-objective optimization of enzyme manipulations in metabolic networks considering resilience effects

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Improving the synthesis rate of desired metabolites in metabolic systems is one of the main tasks in metabolic engineering. In the last decade, metabolic engineering approaches based on the mathematical optimization have been used extensively for the analysis and manipulation of metabolic networks. Experimental evidence shows that mutants reflect resilience phenomena against gene alterations. Although researchers have published many studies on the design of metabolic systems based on kinetic models and optimization strategies, almost no studies discuss the multi-objective optimization problem for enzyme manipulations in metabolic networks considering resilience phenomenon. Results This study proposes a generalized fuzzy multi-objective optimization approach to formulate the enzyme intervention problem for metabolic networks considering resilience phenomena and cell viability. This approach is a general framework that can be applied to any metabolic networks to investigate the influence of resilience phenomena on gene intervention strategies and maximum target synthesis rates. This study evaluates the performance of the proposed approach by applying it to two metabolic systems: S. cerevisiae and E. coli. Results show that the maximum synthesis rates of target products by genetic interventions are always over-estimated in metabolic networks that do not consider the resilience effects. Conclusions Considering the resilience phenomena in metabolic networks can improve the predictions of gene intervention and maximum synthesis rates in metabolic engineering. The proposed generalized fuzzy multi-objective optimization approach has the potential to be a good and practical framework in the design of metabolic networks. PMID:21929795

  14. Xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme (XME) expression in aging humans.

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the presence of foreign compounds, metabolic homeostasis of the organism is maintained by the liver’s ability to detoxify and eliminate these xenobiotics. This is accomplished, in part, by the expression of XMEs, which metabolize xenobiotics and determine whether exposure will...

  15. Effects of boron deficiency on major metabolites, key enzymes and gas exchange in leaves and roots of Citrus sinensis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi-Bin; Yang, Lin-Tong; Li, Yan; Xu, Jing; Liao, Tian-Tai; Chen, Yan-Bin; Chen, Li-Song

    2014-06-01

    Boron (B) deficiency is a widespread problem in many crops, including Citrus. The effects of B-deficiency on gas exchange, carbohydrates, organic acids, amino acids, total soluble proteins and phenolics, and the activities of key enzymes involved in organic acid and amino acid metabolism in 'Xuegan' [Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck] leaves and roots were investigated. Boron-deficient leaves displayed excessive accumulation of nonstructural carbohydrates and much lower CO2 assimilation, demonstrating feedback inhibition of photosynthesis. Dark respiration, concentrations of most organic acids [i.e., malate, citrate, oxaloacetate (OAA), pyruvate and phosphoenolpyruvate] and activities of enzymes [i.e., phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), NAD-malate dehydrogenase, NAD-malic enzyme (NAD-ME), NADP-ME, pyruvate kinase (PK), phosphoenolpyruvate phosphatase (PEPP), citrate synthase (CS), aconitase (ACO), NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP-IDH) and hexokinase] involved in glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and the anapleurotic reaction were higher in B-deficient leaves than in controls. Also, total free amino acid (TFAA) concentration and related enzyme [i.e., NADH-dependent glutamate 2-oxoglutarate aminotransferase (NADH-GOGAT) and glutamate OAA transaminase (GOT)] activities were enhanced in B-deficient leaves. By contrast, respiration, concentrations of nonstructural carbohydrates and three organic acids (malate, citrate and pyruvate), and activities of most enzymes [i.e., PEPC, NADP-ME, PK, PEPP, CS, ACO, NAD-isocitrate dehydrogenase, NADP-IDH and hexokinase] involved in glycolysis, the TCA cycle and the anapleurotic reaction, as well as concentration of TFAA and activities of related enzymes (i.e., nitrate reductase, NADH-GOGAT, glutamate pyruvate transaminase and glutamine synthetase) were lower in B-deficient roots than in controls. Interestingly, leaf and root concentration of total phenolics increased, whereas that of total soluble protein decreased

  16. Key enzymes and proteins of crop insects as candidate for RNAi based gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Kola, Vijaya Sudhakara Rao; Renuka, P.; Madhav, Maganti Sheshu; Mangrauthia, Satendra K.

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a mechanism of homology dependent gene silencing present in plants and animals. It operates through 21–24 nucleotides small RNAs which are processed through a set of core enzymatic machinery that involves Dicer and Argonaute proteins. In recent past, the technology has been well appreciated toward the control of plant pathogens and insects through suppression of key genes/proteins of infecting organisms. The genes encoding key enzymes/proteins with the great potential for developing an effective insect control by RNAi approach are actylcholinesterase, cytochrome P450 enzymes, amino peptidase N, allatostatin, allatotropin, tryptophan oxygenase, arginine kinase, vacuolar ATPase, chitin synthase, glutathione-S-transferase, catalase, trehalose phosphate synthase, vitellogenin, hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, and hormone receptor genes. Through various studies, it is demonstrated that RNAi is a reliable molecular tool which offers great promises in meeting the challenges imposed by crop insects with careful selection of key enzymes/proteins. Utilization of RNAi tool to target some of these key proteins of crop insects through various approaches is described here. The major challenges of RNAi based insect control such as identifying potential targets, delivery methods of silencing trigger, off target effects, and complexity of insect biology are very well illustrated. Further, required efforts to address these challenges are also discussed. PMID:25954206

  17. Microbial responses to membrane cleaning using sodium hypochlorite in membrane bioreactors: Cell integrity, key enzymes and intracellular reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaomeng; Wang, Zhiwei; Wang, Xueye; Zheng, Xiang; Ma, Jinxing; Wu, Zhichao

    2016-01-01

    Sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) is a commonly used reagent for membrane cleaning in membrane bioreactors (MBRs), while it, being a kind of disinfectant (oxidant), may impair viability of microbes or even totally inactivate them upon its diffusion into mixed liquor during membrane cleaning. In this study, we systematically examine the effects of NaClO on microorganisms in terms of microbial cell integrity, metabolism behaviours (key enzymes), and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) under various NaClO concentrations. Different proportions of microbial cells in activated sludge were damaged within several minutes dependent on NaClO dosages (5-50 mg/g-SS), and correspondingly organic matters were released to bulk solution. Inhibition of key enzymes involved in organic matter biodegradation, nitrification and denitrification was observed in the presence of NaClO above 1 mg/g-SS, and thus organic matter and nitrogen removal efficiencies were decreased. It was also demonstrated that intracellular ROS production was increased with the NaClO dosage higher than 1 mg/g-SS, which likely induced further damage to microbial cells. PMID:26512807

  18. FADD is a key regulator of lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Hongqin; Wang, Xueshi; Zha, Daolong; Gan, Ziyi; Cai, Fangfang; Du, Pan; Yang, Yunwen; Yang, Bingya; Zhang, Xiangyu; Yao, Chun; Zhou, Yuqiang; Jiang, Chizhou; Guan, Shengwen; Zhang, Xuerui; Zhang, Jing; Jiang, Wenhui; Hu, Qingang; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2016-01-01

    FADD, a classical apoptotic signaling adaptor, was recently reported to have non-apoptotic functions. Here, we report the discovery that FADD regulates lipid metabolism. PPAR-α is a dietary lipid sensor, whose activation results in hypolipidemic effects. We show that FADD interacts with RIP140, which is a corepressor for PPAR-α, and FADD phosphorylation-mimic mutation (FADD-D) or FADD deficiency abolishes RIP140-mediated transcriptional repression, leading to the activation of PPAR-α. FADD-D-mutant mice exhibit significantly decreased adipose tissue mass and triglyceride accumulation. Also, they exhibit increased energy expenditure with enhanced fatty acid oxidation in adipocytes due to the activation of PPAR-α. Similar metabolic phenotypes, such as reduced fat formation, insulin resistance, and resistance to HFD-induced obesity, are shown in adipose-specific FADD knockout mice. Additionally, FADD-D mutation can reverse the severe genetic obesity phenotype of ob/ob mice, with elevated fatty acid oxidation and oxygen consumption in adipose tissue, improved insulin resistance, and decreased triglyceride storage. We conclude that FADD is a master regulator of glucose and fat metabolism with potential applications for treatment of insulin resistance and obesity. PMID:27357657

  19. Mammalian alpha beta hydrolase domain (ABHD) proteins: lipid metabolizing enzymes at the interface of cell signaling and energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. Mark

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of lipid metabolism underlies many chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Therefore, understanding enzymatic mechanisms controlling lipid synthesis and degradation is imperative for successful drug discovery for these human diseases. Genes encoding α/β hydrolase fold domain (ABHD) proteins are present in virtually all reported genomes, and conserved structural motifs shared by these proteins predict common roles in lipid synthesis and degradation. However, the physiological substrates and products for these lipid metabolizing enzymes and their broader role in metabolic pathways remain largely uncharacterized. Recently, mutations in several members of the ABHD protein family have been implicated in inherited inborn errors of lipid metabolism. Furthermore, studies in cell and animal models have revealed important roles for ABHD proteins in lipid metabolism, lipid signal transduction, and metabolic disease. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive summary surrounding the current state of knowledge regarding mammalian ABHD protein family members. In particular, we will discuss how ABHD proteins are ideally suited to act at the interface of lipid metabolism and signal transduction. Although, the current state of knowledge regarding mammalian ABHD proteins is still in its infancy, this review highlights the potential for the ABHD enzymes as being attractive targets for novel therapies targeting metabolic disease. PMID:23328280

  20. Axonal and dendritic localization of mRNAs for glycogen-metabolizing enzymes in cultured rodent neurons

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Localization of mRNAs encoding cytoskeletal or signaling proteins to neuronal processes is known to contribute to axon growth, synaptic differentiation and plasticity. In addition, a still increasing spectrum of mRNAs has been demonstrated to be localized under different conditions and developing stages thus reflecting a highly regulated mechanism and a role of mRNA localization in a broad range of cellular processes. Results Applying fluorescence in-situ-hybridization with specific riboprobes on cultured neurons and nervous tissue sections, we investigated whether the mRNAs for two metabolic enzymes, namely glycogen synthase (GS) and glycogen phosphorylase (GP), the key enzymes of glycogen metabolism, may also be targeted to neuronal processes. If it were so, this might contribute to clarify the so far enigmatic role of neuronal glycogen. We found that the mRNAs for both enzymes are localized to axonal and dendritic processes in cultured lumbar spinal motoneurons, but not in cultured trigeminal neurons. In cultured cortical neurons which do not store glycogen but nevertheless express glycogen synthase, the GS mRNA is also subject to axonal and dendritic localization. In spinal motoneurons and trigeminal neurons in situ, however, the mRNAs could only be demonstrated in the neuronal somata but not in the nerves. Conclusions We could demonstrate that the mRNAs for major enzymes of neural energy metabolism can be localized to neuronal processes. The heterogeneous pattern of mRNA localization in different culture types and developmental stages stresses that mRNA localization is a versatile mechanism for the fine-tuning of cellular events. Our findings suggest that mRNA localization for enzymes of glycogen metabolism could allow adaptation to spatial and temporal energy demands in neuronal events like growth, repair and synaptic transmission. PMID:24898526

  1. Enzymes Involved in Pyrophosphate and Calcium Metabolism as Targets for Anti-scuticociliate Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mallo, Natalia; Lamas, Jesús; DeFelipe, Ana-Paula; Sueiro, Rosa-Ana; Fontenla, Francisco; Leiro, José-Manuel

    2016-07-01

    Inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) is a key metabolite in cellular bioenergetics under chronic stress conditions in prokaryotes, protists and plants. Inorganic pyrophosphatases (PPases) are essential enzymes controlling the cellular concentration of PPi and mediating intracellular pH and Ca(2+) homeostasis. We report the effects of the antimalarial drugs chloroquine (CQ) and artemisinin (ART) on the in vitro growth of Philasterides dicentrarchi, a scuticociliate parasite of turbot; we also evaluated the action of these drugs on soluble (sPPases) and vacuolar H+-PPases (H+-PPases). CQ and ART inhibited the in vitro growth of ciliates with IC50 values of respectively 74 ± 9 μM and 80 ± 8 μM. CQ inhibits the H+ translocation (with an IC50 of 13.4 ± 0.2 μM), while ART increased translocation of H+ and acidification. However, both drugs caused a decrease in gene expression of H+-PPases. CQ significantly inhibited the enzymatic activity of sPPases, decreasing the consumption of intracellular PPi. ART inhibited intracellular accumulation of Ca(2+) induced by ATP, indicating an effect on the Ca(2+) -ATPase. The results suggest that CQ and ART deregulate enzymes associated with PPi and Ca(2+) metabolism, altering the intracellular pH homeostasis vital for parasite survival and providing a target for the development of new drugs against scuticociliatosis. PMID:26751587

  2. Experiment K-6-21. Effect of microgravity on 1) metabolic enzymes of type 1 and type 2 muscle fibers and on 2) metabolic enzymes, neutransmitter amino acids, and neurotransmitter associated enzymes in motor and somatosensory cerebral cortex. Part 1: Metabolic enzymes of individual muscle fibers; part 2: metabolic enzymes of hippocampus and spinal cord

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, O.; Mcdougal, D., Jr.; Nemeth, Patti M.; Maggie, M.-Y. Chi; Pusateri, M.; Carter, J.; Manchester, J.; Norris, Beverly; Krasnov, I.

    1990-01-01

    The individual fibers of any individual muscle vary greatly in enzyme composition, a fact which is obscured when enzyme levels of a whole muscle are measured. The purpose of this study was therefore to assess the changes due to weightless on the enzyme patterns composed by the individual fibers within the flight muscles. In spite of the limitation in numbers of muscles examined, it is apparent that: (1) that the size of individual fibers (i.e., their dry weight) was reduced about a third, (2) that this loss in dry mass was accompanied by changes in the eight enzymes studied, and (3) that these changes were different for the two muscles, and different for the two enzyme groups. In the soleus muscle the absolute amounts of the three enzymes of oxidative metabolism decreased about in proportion to the dry weight loss, so that their concentration in the atrophic fibers was almost unchanged. In contrast, there was little loss among the four enzymes of glycogenolysis - glycolysis so that their concentrations were substantially increased in the atrophic fibers. In the TA muscle, these seven enzymes were affected in just the opposite direction. There appeared to be no absolute loss among the oxidative enzymes, whereas the glycogenolytic enzymes were reduced by nearly half, so that the concentrations of the first metabolic group were increased within the atrophic fibers and the concentrations of the second group were only marginally decreased. The behavior of hexokinase was exceptional in that it did not decrease in absolute terms in either type of muscle and probably increased as much as 50 percent in soleus. Thus, their was a large increase in concentration of this enzyme in the atrophied fibers of both muscles. Another clear-cut finding was the large increase in the range of activities of the glycolytic enzymes among individual fibers of TA muscles. This was due to the emergence of TA fibers with activities for enzymes of this group extending down to levels as low as

  3. Metabolic engineering is key to a sustainable chemical industry.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Annabel C

    2011-08-01

    The depletion of fossil fuel stocks will prohibit their use as the main feedstock of future industrial processes. Biocatalysis is being increasingly used to reduce fossil fuel reliance and to improve the sustainability, efficiency and cost of chemical production. Even with their current small market share, biocatalyzed processes already generate approximately US$50 billion and it has been estimated that they could be used to produce up to 20% of fine chemicals by 2020. Until the advent of molecular biological technologies, the compounds that were readily accessible from renewable biomass were restricted to naturally-occurring metabolites. However, metabolic engineering has considerably broadened the range of compounds now accessible, providing access to compounds that cannot be otherwise reliably sourced, as well as replacing established chemical processes. This review presents the case for continued efforts to promote the adoption of biocatalyzed processes, highlighting successful examples of industrial chemical production from biomass and/or via biocatalyzed processes. A selection of emerging technologies that may further extend the potential and sustainability of biocatalysis are also presented. As the field matures, metabolic engineering will be increasingly crucial in maintaining our quality of life into a future where our current resources and feedstocks cannot be relied upon. PMID:21666928

  4. Optimal kinetic design of enzymes in a linear metabolic pathway.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, G

    1993-06-24

    The rate equations for a sequence of enzymic reactions conforming to Michaelis-Menten kinetics have been analyzed in order to establish what kinetic design optimizes the steady-state reaction flux for a given total concentration of enzymes and a given average magnitude of true and apparent first-order rate constants in the reaction system. Analytical solutions are presented which have been derived with the assumptions that the concentration of the first substrate in the pathway represents a fixed parameter and that no diffusional constraints come into operation. The solutions prescribe that reaction flux in the examined system becomes optimal when all of the enzymes are present at equal active-site concentrations. The optimal kinetic design of each enzyme reaction is characterized by forward (true or apparent) first-order rate constants of equal magnitude and reverse rate constants of equal magnitude. This means that the optimal kinetic design of the examined pathway is highly uniform, individual enzymes being likely to exhibit optimal V values differing by a factor less than 5 and optimal Km/[S] values falling within the range 0.3-2. PMID:8518291

  5. Computational Prediction of Metabolism: Sites, Products, SAR, P450 Enzyme Dynamics, and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Metabolism of xenobiotics remains a central challenge for the discovery and development of drugs, cosmetics, nutritional supplements, and agrochemicals. Metabolic transformations are frequently related to the incidence of toxic effects that may result from the emergence of reactive species, the systemic accumulation of metabolites, or by induction of metabolic pathways. Experimental investigation of the metabolism of small organic molecules is particularly resource demanding; hence, computational methods are of considerable interest to complement experimental approaches. This review provides a broad overview of structure- and ligand-based computational methods for the prediction of xenobiotic metabolism. Current computational approaches to address xenobiotic metabolism are discussed from three major perspectives: (i) prediction of sites of metabolism (SOMs), (ii) elucidation of potential metabolites and their chemical structures, and (iii) prediction of direct and indirect effects of xenobiotics on metabolizing enzymes, where the focus is on the cytochrome P450 (CYP) superfamily of enzymes, the cardinal xenobiotics metabolizing enzymes. For each of these domains, a variety of approaches and their applications are systematically reviewed, including expert systems, data mining approaches, quantitative structure–activity relationships (QSARs), and machine learning-based methods, pharmacophore-based algorithms, shape-focused techniques, molecular interaction fields (MIFs), reactivity-focused techniques, protein–ligand docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and combinations of methods. Predictive metabolism is a developing area, and there is still enormous potential for improvement. However, it is clear that the combination of rapidly increasing amounts of available ligand- and structure-related experimental data (in particular, quantitative data) with novel and diverse simulation and modeling approaches is accelerating the development of effective tools for

  6. Metaproteomic Analysis of a Chemosynthetic Hydrothermal Vent Community Reveals Insights into Key-Metabolic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steen, I.; Stokke, R.; Lanzen, A.; Pedersen, R.; Øvreås, L.; Urich, T.

    2010-12-01

    internal sulfur cycle within the community. The community contained expressed enzymes of a variety of carbon metabolism pathways. Key enzymes of the reverse TCA cycle for fixation of CO2 and the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway for oxidation of acetyl-CoA and / or the fixation of CO2 were found. Key enzymes of aerobic and anaerobic methane-oxidation pathways were identified as well, namely particulate methane monooxygenase and methyl-Coenzyme M reductase. Various house-keeping gene-products, like cold- and heat shock proteins as well as ribosomal proteins and ATP synthases were identified. This approach has a future potential of broadening our understanding of environmental complexity and regulation in response to geochemical constraints. [1] Dupierris, V., Masselon, C., Court, M., Kieffer-Jaquinod, S., and Bruley, C. (2009) A toolbox for validation of mass spectrometry peptides identification and generation of database: IRMa. Bioinformatics 25, 1980-1981.

  7. Polymorphisms of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes and susceptibility to cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Hirvonen, A

    1999-01-01

    The variation in individual responses to exogenous agents is exceptionally wide. It is because of this large diversity of responsiveness that risk factors to environmentally induced diseases have been difficult to pinpoint, particularly at low exposure levels. Opportunities now exist for studies of host factors in cancer or other diseases in which an environmental component can be presumed. Many of the studies have shown an elevated disease proneness for individuals carrying the potential at-risk alleles of metabolic genes, but a number of controversial results have also been reported. This article is an overview of the data published to date on metabolic genotypes related to individual susceptibility to cancer. PMID:10229705

  8. Water at Biological Phase Boundaries: Its Role in Interfacial Activation of Enzymes and Metabolic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Damodaran, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Many life-sustaining activities in living cells occur at the membrane-water interface. The pertinent questions that we need to ask are, what are the evolutionary reasons in biology for choosing the membrane-water interface as the site for performing and/or controlling crucial biological reactions, and what is the key physical principle that is very singular to the membrane-water interface that biology exploits for regulating metabolic processes in cells? In this chapter, a hypothesis is developed, which espouses that cells control activities of membrane-bound enzymes through manipulation of the thermodynamic activity of water in the lipid-water interfacial region. The hypothesis is based on the fact that the surface pressure of a lipid monolayer is a direct measure of the thermodynamic activity of water at the lipid-water interface. Accordingly, the surface pressure-dependent activation or inactivation of interfacial enzymes is directly related to changes in the thermodynamic activity of interfacial water. Extension of this argument suggests that cells may manipulate conformations (and activities) of membrane-bound enzymes by manipulating the (re)activity of interfacial water at various locations in the membrane by localized compression or expansion of the interface. In this respect, cells may use the membrane-bound hormone receptors, lipid phase transition, and local variations in membrane lipid composition as effectors of local compression and/or expansion of membrane, and thereby local water activity. Several experimental data in the literature will be reexamined in the light of this hypothesis. PMID:26438268

  9. Antidiabetic activity of Sedum dendroideum: metabolic enzymes as putative targets for the bioactive flavonoid kaempferitrin.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Daniel; Casanova, Livia Marques; Marcondes, Mariah Celestino; Espindola-Netto, Jair Machado; Paixão, Larissa Pereira; De Melo, Giany Oliveira; Zancan, Patricia; Sola-Penna, Mauro; Costa, Sônia Soares

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antidiabetic potential of a leaf extract and flavonoids from Sedum dendroideum (SD). Additionally, our goals were to establish a possible structure/activity relationship between these flavonoids and to assess the most active flavonoid on the glycolytic enzyme 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase (PFK). SD juice (LJ), a flavonoid-rich fraction (BF), and separately five flavonoids were evaluated intraperitoneally for their acute hypoglycemic activity in normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. First, the major flavonoids kaempferol 3,7-dirhamnoside or kaempferitrin (1), kaempferol 3-glucoside-7-rhamnoside (2), and kaempferol 3-neohesperidoside-7-rhamnoside (3) were tested. Then, the monoglycosides kaempferol 7-rhamnoside (5) and kaempferol 3-rhamnoside (6) were assayed to establish their structure/activity relationship. The effect of 1 on PFK was evaluated in skeletal muscle, liver, and adipose tissue from treated mice. LJ (400 mg/kg), BF (40 mg/kg), and flavonoid 1 (4 mg/kg) reduced glycemia in diabetic mice (120 min) by 52, 53, and 61%, respectively. Flavonoids 2, 3, 5, and 6 were inactive or showed little activity, suggesting that the two rhamnosyl moieties in kaempferitrin are important requirements. Kaempferitrin enhanced the PFK activity chiefly in hepatic tissue, suggesting that it is able to stimulate tissue glucose utilization. This result is confirmed testing kaempferitrin on C2C12 cell line, where it enhanced glucose consumption, lactate production, and the key regulatory glycolytic enzymes. The hypoglycemic activity of kaempferitrin depends on the presence of both rhamnosyl residues in the flavonoid structure when intraperitoneally administered. Our findings show for the first time that a flavonoid is capable of stimulating PFK in a model of diabetes and that kaempferitrin stimulates glucose-metabolizing enzymes. This study contributes to the knowledge of the mechanisms by which this flavonoid exerts its hypoglycemic

  10. Metabolism of red blood cells in chronic renal failure. I. Glycolytic enzyme levels.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Commes, J L; Tabernero, J M; Martin-Vasallo, P; De Castro, S; Battaner, E

    1979-01-01

    This paper starts a series on red blood cell (RBC) metabolism in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF). The glycolytic enzyme levels and in vitro half-lives of these patients' RBCs were determined. A number of enzymes (hexokinase, glucose-6-phosphate isomerase, fructose-6-phosphate kinase, aldolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase) showed higher activities than in normal control RBCs. Other enzyme activities were normal. These results were discussed and several possible mechanisms considered. We favour the point of view of a shortened life span of the RBCs in CRF, making the most unstable enzymes of the glycolytic sequence appear increase as compared with normal controls. PMID:226898

  11. Chromatographic assay to study the activity of multiple enzymes involved in the synthesis and metabolism of dopamine and serotonin.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Lindsay D; Baker, Hannah; Yeoman, Mark S; Patel, Bhavik Anil

    2012-03-21

    Serotonin and dopamine are crucial regulators of signalling in the peripheral and central nervous systems. We present an ex-vivo, isocratic chromatographic method that allows for the measurement of tyrosine, L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA), dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), tryptophan, 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), serotonin and 5-hydroxy-3-indoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in a model central nervous (CNS) system, to study the role of key enzymes involved in the synthesis and metabolism of serotonin and dopamine. By utilising a sample splitting technique, we could test a single CNS sample at multiple time points under various pharmacological treatments. In, addition, we were able to conduct this assay by utilising the endogenous biochemical components of the CNS to study the synthesis and metabolism of serotonin and dopamine, negating the requirement of additional enzyme activators or stabilisers in the biological matrix. Finally we utilised NSD-1015, an aromatic amino acid decarboxylase enzyme inhibitor used to study the synthesis of dopamine and serotonin to monitor alterations in levels of key neurochemicals. 3-hydroxybenzylhydrazine dihydrochloride (NSD-1015) was able to reduce levels of serotonin and dopamine, whilst elevating precursors L-DOPA and 5-HTP. PMID:22290325

  12. Key Roles of Glutamine Pathways in Reprogramming the Cancer Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Michalak, Krzysztof Piotr; Maćkowska-Kędziora, Agnieszka; Sobolewski, Bogusław; Woźniak, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine (GLN) is commonly known as an important metabolite used for the growth of cancer cells but the effects of its intake in cancer patients are still not clear. However, GLN is the main substrate for DNA and fatty acid synthesis. On the other hand, it reduces the oxidative stress by glutathione synthesis stimulation, stops the process of cancer cachexia, and nourishes the immunological system and the intestine epithelium, as well. The current paper deals with possible positive effects of GLN supplementation and conditions that should be fulfilled to obtain these effects. The analysis of GLN metabolism suggests that the separation of GLN and carbohydrates in the diet can minimize simultaneous supply of ATP (from glucose) and NADPH2 (from glutamine) to cancer cells. It should support to a larger extent the organism to fight against the cancer rather than the cancer cells. GLN cannot be considered the effective source of ATP for cancers with the impaired oxidative phosphorylation and pyruvate dehydrogenase inhibition. GLN intake restores decreased levels of glutathione in the case of chemotherapy and radiotherapy; thus, it facilitates regeneration processes of the intestine epithelium and immunological system. PMID:26583064

  13. Adrenomedullin 2.0: Adjusting Key Levers for Metabolic Stability.

    PubMed

    Schönauer, Ria; Els-Heindl, Sylvia; Fischer, Jan-Patrick; Köbberling, Johannes; Riedl, Bernd; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2016-06-23

    The 52 amino acid peptide hormone adrenomedullin (ADM) plays a major role in the development and regulation of the cardiovascular and lymphatic system and has therefore gained significant interest for clinical applications. Because adrenomedullin exhibits low metabolic stability, enhancement of the plasma half-life is essential for peptide-based drug design. Fluorescently labeled ADM analogues synthesized by Fmoc/t-Bu solid phase peptide synthesis were used to analyze their enzymatic degradation and specific fragmentation pattern in human blood plasma. The determination of important cleavage sites allowed the development of selectively modified peptides in a rational approach. By combination of palmitoylation, lactam-bridging, and Nα-methylation, ADM analogues protected from enzymatic cleavage in human blood were developed and revealed an explicitly elongated half-life of 5 days in comparison to the wild-type in vitro. This triple-modification did not alter the selectivity of the analogues at the AM1 receptor, highlighting their potential for therapeutic applications. PMID:27166982

  14. Key Roles of Glutamine Pathways in Reprogramming the Cancer Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Michalak, Krzysztof Piotr; Maćkowska-Kędziora, Agnieszka; Sobolewski, Bogusław; Woźniak, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine (GLN) is commonly known as an important metabolite used for the growth of cancer cells but the effects of its intake in cancer patients are still not clear. However, GLN is the main substrate for DNA and fatty acid synthesis. On the other hand, it reduces the oxidative stress by glutathione synthesis stimulation, stops the process of cancer cachexia, and nourishes the immunological system and the intestine epithelium, as well. The current paper deals with possible positive effects of GLN supplementation and conditions that should be fulfilled to obtain these effects. The analysis of GLN metabolism suggests that the separation of GLN and carbohydrates in the diet can minimize simultaneous supply of ATP (from glucose) and NADPH2 (from glutamine) to cancer cells. It should support to a larger extent the organism to fight against the cancer rather than the cancer cells. GLN cannot be considered the effective source of ATP for cancers with the impaired oxidative phosphorylation and pyruvate dehydrogenase inhibition. GLN intake restores decreased levels of glutathione in the case of chemotherapy and radiotherapy; thus, it facilitates regeneration processes of the intestine epithelium and immunological system. PMID:26583064

  15. Analysis of the key enzymes of butyric and acetic acid fermentation in biogas reactors

    PubMed Central

    Gabris, Christina; Bengelsdorf, Frank R; Dürre, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at the investigation of the mechanisms of acidogenesis, which is a key process during anaerobic digestion. To expose possible bottlenecks, specific activities of the key enzymes of acidification, such as acetate kinase (Ack, 0.23–0.99 U mg−1 protein), butyrate kinase (Buk, < 0.03 U mg−1 protein) and butyryl-CoA:acetate-CoA transferase (But, 3.24–7.64 U mg−1 protein), were determined in cell free extracts of biogas reactor content from three different biogas reactors. Furthermore, the detection of Ack was successful via Western blot analysis. Quantification of corresponding functional genes encoding Buk (buk) and But (but) was not feasible, although an amplification was possible. Thus, phylogenetic trees were constructed based on respective gene fragments. Four new clades of possible butyrate-producing bacteria were postulated, as well as bacteria of the genera Roseburia or Clostridium identified. The low Buk activity was in contrast to the high specific But activity in the analysed samples. Butyrate formation via Buk activity does barely occur in the investigated biogas reactor. Specific enzyme activities (Ack, Buk and But) in samples drawn from three different biogas reactors correlated with ammonia and ammonium concentrations (NH3 and NH4+-N), and a negative dependency can be postulated. Thus, high concentrations of NH3 and NH4+-N may lead to a bottleneck in acidogenesis due to decreased specific acidogenic enzyme activities. PMID:26086956

  16. Analysis of the key enzymes of butyric and acetic acid fermentation in biogas reactors.

    PubMed

    Gabris, Christina; Bengelsdorf, Frank R; Dürre, Peter

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed at the investigation of the mechanisms of acidogenesis, which is a key process during anaerobic digestion. To expose possible bottlenecks, specific activities of the key enzymes of acidification, such as acetate kinase (Ack, 0.23-0.99 U mg(-1) protein), butyrate kinase (Buk, < 0.03 U mg(-1) protein) and butyryl-CoA:acetate-CoA transferase (But, 3.24-7.64 U mg(-1) protein), were determined in cell free extracts of biogas reactor content from three different biogas reactors. Furthermore, the detection of Ack was successful via Western blot analysis. Quantification of corresponding functional genes encoding Buk (buk) and But (but) was not feasible, although an amplification was possible. Thus, phylogenetic trees were constructed based on respective gene fragments. Four new clades of possible butyrate-producing bacteria were postulated, as well as bacteria of the genera Roseburia or Clostridium identified. The low Buk activity was in contrast to the high specific But activity in the analysed samples. Butyrate formation via Buk activity does barely occur in the investigated biogas reactor. Specific enzyme activities (Ack, Buk and But) in samples drawn from three different biogas reactors correlated with ammonia and ammonium concentrations (NH₃ and NH₄(+)-N), and a negative dependency can be postulated. Thus, high concentrations of NH₃ and NH₄(+)-N may lead to a bottleneck in acidogenesis due to decreased specific acidogenic enzyme activities. PMID:26086956

  17. Pyruvate kinase and aspartate-glutamate carrier distributions reveal key metabolic links between neurons and glia in retina

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Ken J.; Du, Jianhai; Sloat, Stephanie R.; Contreras, Laura; Linton, Jonathan D.; Turner, Sally J.; Sadilek, Martin; Hurley, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Symbiotic relationships between neurons and glia must adapt to structures, functions, and metabolic roles of the tissues they are in. We show here that Müller glia in retinas have specific enzyme deficiencies that can enhance their ability to synthesize Gln. The metabolic cost of these deficiencies is that they impair the Müller cell’s ability to metabolize Glc. We show here that the cells can compensate for this deficiency by using metabolites produced by neurons. Müller glia are deficient for pyruvate kinase (PK) and for aspartate/glutamate carrier 1 (AGC1), a key component of the malate-aspartate shuttle. In contrast, photoreceptor neurons express AGC1 and the M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase, which is commonly associated with aerobic glycolysis in tumors, proliferating cells, and some other cell types. Our findings reveal a previously unidentified type of metabolic relationship between neurons and glia. Müller glia compensate for their unique metabolic adaptations by using lactate and aspartate from neurons as surrogates for their missing PK and AGC1. PMID:25313047

  18. Hydrogenosome Metabolism Is the Key Target for Antiparasitic Activity of Resveratrol against Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Mallo, Natalia; Lamas, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Metronidazole (MDZ) and related 5-nitroimidazoles are the recommended drugs for treatment of trichomoniasis, a sexually transmitted disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trichomonas vaginalis. However, novel treatment options are needed, as recent reports have claimed resistance to these drugs in T. vaginalis isolates. In this study, we analyzed for the first time the in vitro effects of the natural polyphenol resveratrol (RESV) on T. vaginalis. At concentrations of between 25 and 100 μM, RESV inhibited the in vitro growth of T. vaginalis trophozoites; doses of 25 μM exerted a cytostatic effect, and higher doses exerted a cytotoxic effect. At these concentrations, RESV caused inhibition of the specific activity of a 120-kDa [Fe]-hydrogenase (Tvhyd). RESV did not affect Tvhyd gene expression and upregulated pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase (a hydrogenosomal enzyme) gene expression only at a high dose (100 μM). At doses of 50 to 100 μM, RESV also caused overexpression of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), a protective protein found in the hydrogenosome of T. vaginalis. The results demonstrate the potential of RESV as an antiparasitic treatment for trichomoniasis and suggest that the mechanism of action involves induction of hydrogenosomal dysfunction. In view of the results, we propose hydrogenosomal metabolism as a key target in the design of novel antiparasitic drugs. PMID:23478970

  19. Novel TPP-riboswitch activators bypass metabolic enzyme dependency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Günter; Lünse, Christina; Suckling, Colin; Scott, Fraser

    2014-07-01

    Riboswitches are conserved regions within mRNA molecules that bind specific metabolites and regulate gene expression. TPP-riboswitches, which respond to thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP), are involved in the regulation of thiamine metabolism in numerous bacteria. As these regulatory RNAs are often modulating essential biosynthesis pathways they have become increasingly interesting as promising antibacterial targets. Here, we describe thiamine analogs containing a central 1,2,3-triazole group to induce repression of thiM-riboswitch dependent gene expression in different E. coli strains. Additionally, we show that compound activation is dependent on proteins involved in the metabolic pathways of thiamine uptake and synthesis. The most promising molecule, triazolethiamine (TT), shows concentration dependent reporter gene repression that is dependent on the presence of thiamine kinase ThiK, whereas the effect of pyrithiamine (PT), a known TPP-riboswitch modulator, is ThiK independent. We further show that this dependence can be bypassed by triazolethiamine-derivatives that bear phosphate-mimicking moieties. As triazolethiamine reveals superior activity compared to pyrithiamine, it represents a very promising starting point for developing novel antibacterial compounds that target TPP-riboswitches. Riboswitch-targeting compounds engage diverse endogenous mechanisms to attain in vivo activity. These findings are of importance for the understanding of compounds that require metabolic activation to achieve effective riboswitch modulation and they enable the design of novel compound generations that are independent of endogenous activation mechanisms.

  20. Drug Metabolizing Enzymes in Type II Diabetes and their Pharmacogenetics During Therapy of Anti-Diabetes Drugs.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Hsu, Minna J; Agoramoorthy, Govindasamy

    2015-01-01

    The type 2 diabetes or T2D mellitus has turn into an epidemic throughout the globe in recent years. Various forms of treatment modalities have been available for patients with T2D with some major classes of approved drugs that include Sulfonylureas, Meglitinides, Biguanides, Thiazolidinedione, Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, GLP-1 analogs, DPP-4 Inhibitors, and SGLT2 inhibitors. This review focuses on the drug metabolizing enzymes (DME), gene polymorphisms, and inter-individual variability in therapeutics including adverse reaction effects involving Phase-I DME and Phase-II in general. This review also covers some key anti-diabetic drugs with respect to their pharcogenomics. PMID:26652255

  1. Pharmacogenomics of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters: implications for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Bluth, Martin H

    2011-01-01

    The new era of personalized medicine, which integrates the uniqueness of an individual with respect to the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a drug, holds promise as a means to provide greater safety and efficacy in drug design and development. Personalized medicine is particularly important in oncology, whereby most clinically used anticancer drugs have a narrow therapeutic window and exhibit a large interindividual pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic variability. This variability can be explained, at least in part, by genetic variations in the genes encoding drug metabolizing enzymes, transporters, or drug targets. Understanding of how genetic variations influence drug disposition and action could help in tailoring cancer therapy based on individual’s genetic makeup. This review focuses on the pharmacogenomics of drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters, with a particular highlight of examples whereby genetic variations in the metabolizing enzymes and transporters influence the pharmacokinetics and/or response of chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:23226051

  2. Relevance of induction of human drug-metabolizing enzymes: pharmacological and toxicological implications

    PubMed Central

    PARK, B. K.; KITTERINGHAM, N. R.; PIRMOHAMED, M.; TUCKER, G. T.

    1996-01-01

    1Human drug-metabolizing systems can be induced, or activated, by a large number of exogenous agents including drugs, alcohol, components in the diet and cigarette smoke, as well as by endogenous factors. 2Such perturbation of enzyme activity undoubtedly contributes to both intra- and inter-individual variation both with respect to the rate and route of metabolism for a particular drug. Induction may, in theory, either attenuate the pharmacological response or exacerbate the toxicity of a particular drug, or both. 3The clinical impact of enzyme induction will depend upon the number of different enzyme isoforms affected and the magnitude of the inductive response within an individual, and also on the therapeutic indices of the affected substrates. 4The toxicological implications will be determined either by any change in the route of metabolism, or by a disturbance of the balance between activation and detoxication processes, which may be isozyme selective. PMID:8799511

  3. [Enzymes of the Xenobiotic Metabolism of Continuous Cell Lines in invitro Toxicity Testing

    PubMed

    Wiebel, Friedrich J.; Roscher, Eike

    1988-01-01

    Cells in continuous culture contain a large number of enzymes which are involved in the metabolism of potentially toxic chemicals. As a rule, the activities of these enzymes represent functions of low tussle specificity. In contrast, those functions which are specialized "differentiated" functions in vivo are no longer expressed in continuous cell lines. However, an increasing number of observations indicates that cell lines may also contain these functions. Cell lines which lack or possess specific xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes are already applicable for analyzing the complex mechanisms of activation and inactivation of chemicals. With a better understanding how differentiated cell functions are regulated, prospects are promising for establishing metabolically competent cell lines, which can also be used in the screening of toxic chemicals. PMID:11227057

  4. EnzDP: improved enzyme annotation for metabolic network reconstruction based on domain composition profiles.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nam-Ninh; Srihari, Sriganesh; Leong, Hon Wai; Chong, Ket-Fah

    2015-10-01

    Determining the entire complement of enzymes and their enzymatic functions is a fundamental step for reconstructing the metabolic network of cells. High quality enzyme annotation helps in enhancing metabolic networks reconstructed from the genome, especially by reducing gaps and increasing the enzyme coverage. Currently, structure-based and network-based approaches can only cover a limited number of enzyme families, and the accuracy of homology-based approaches can be further improved. Bottom-up homology-based approach improves the coverage by rebuilding Hidden Markov Model (HMM) profiles for all known enzymes. However, its clustering procedure relies firmly on BLAST similarity score, ignoring protein domains/patterns, and is sensitive to changes in cut-off thresholds. Here, we use functional domain architecture to score the association between domain families and enzyme families (Domain-Enzyme Association Scoring, DEAS). The DEAS score is used to calculate the similarity between proteins, which is then used in clustering procedure, instead of using sequence similarity score. We improve the enzyme annotation protocol using a stringent classification procedure, and by choosing optimal threshold settings and checking for active sites. Our analysis shows that our stringent protocol EnzDP can cover up to 90% of enzyme families available in Swiss-Prot. It achieves a high accuracy of 94.5% based on five-fold cross-validation. EnzDP outperforms existing methods across several testing scenarios. Thus, EnzDP serves as a reliable automated tool for enzyme annotation and metabolic network reconstruction. Available at: www.comp.nus.edu.sg/~nguyennn/EnzDP . PMID:26542446

  5. Identification of the human liver enzymes involved in the metabolism of the antimigraine agent almotriptan.

    PubMed

    Salva, Miquel; Jansat, Josep M; Martinez-Tobed, Antonio; Palacios, Jose M

    2003-04-01

    Almotriptan is a novel highly selective 5-hydroxytryptamine(1B/1D) agonist developed for the acute oral treatment of migraine. The in vitro metabolism of almotriptan has been investigated using human liver subcellular fractions and cDNA-expressed human enzymes, to study the metabolic pathways and identify the enzymes responsible for the formation of the major metabolites. Specific enzymes were identified by correlation analysis, chemical inhibition studies, and incubation with various cDNA expressed human enzymes. Human liver microsomes and S9 fraction metabolize almotriptan by 2-hydroxylation of the pyrrolidine group to form a carbinolamine metabolite intermediate, a reaction catalyzed by CYP3A4 and CYP2D6. This metabolite is further oxidized by aldehyde dehydrogenase to the open ring gamma-aminobutyric acid metabolite. Almotriptan is also metabolized at the dimethylaminoethyl group by N-demethylation, a reaction that is carried out by five different cytochrome P450s, flavin monooxygenase-3 mediated N-oxidation, and MAO-A catalyzed oxidative deamination to form the indole acetic acid and the indole ethyl alcohol derivatives of almotriptan. The use of human liver mitochondria confirmed the contribution of MAO-A to the metabolism of almotriptan. Both, the gamma-aminobutyric acid and the indole acetic acid metabolites have been found to be the major in vivo metabolites of almotriptan in humans. In addition, different clinical trials conducted to study the effects of CYP3A4, CYP2D6, and MAO-A on the pharmacokinetics of almotriptan confirmed the involvement of these enzymes in the metabolic clearance of this drug and that no dose changes are required in the presence of inhibitors of these enzymes. PMID:12642466

  6. Molecular changes in mitochondrial respiratory activity and metabolic enzyme activity in muscle of four pig breeds with distinct metabolic types.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuan; Trakooljul, Nares; Muráni, Eduard; Krischek, Carsten; Schellander, Karl; Wicke, Michael; Wimmers, Klaus; Ponsuksili, Siriluck

    2016-02-01

    Skeletal muscles are metabolically active and have market value in meat-producing farm animals. A better understanding of biological pathways affecting energy metabolism in skeletal muscle could advance the science of skeletal muscle. In this study, comparative pathway-focused gene expression profiling in conjunction with muscle fiber typing were analyzed in skeletal muscles from Duroc, Pietrain, and Duroc-Pietrain crossbred pigs. Each breed type displayed a distinct muscle fiber-type composition. Mitochondrial respiratory activity and glycolytic and oxidative enzyme activities were comparable among genotypes, except for significantly lower complex I activity in Pietrain pigs homozygous-positive for malignant hyperthermia syndrome. At the transcriptional level, lactate dehydrogenase B showed breed specificity, with significantly lower expression in Pietrain pigs homozygous-positive for malignant hyperthermia syndrome. A similar mRNA expression pattern was shown for several subunits of oxidative phosphorylation complexes, including complex I, complex II, complex IV, and ATP synthase. Significant correlations were observed between mRNA expression of genes in focused pathways and enzyme activities in a breed-dependent manner. Moreover, expression patterns of pathway-focused genes were well correlated with muscle fiber-type composition. These results stress the importance of regulation of transcriptional rate of genes related to oxidative and glycolytic pathways in the metabolic capacity of muscle fibers. Overall, the results further the breed-specific understanding of the molecular basis of metabolic enzyme activities, which directly impact meat quality. PMID:26759028

  7. Knowledge-based simulation of DNA metabolism: prediction of enzyme action.

    PubMed

    Brutlag, D L; Galper, A R; Millis, D H

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a knowledge-based simulation of DNA metabolism that accurately predicts the actions of enzymes on DNA under a large number of environmental conditions. Previous simulations of enzyme systems rely predominantly on mathematical models. We use a frame-based representation to model enzymes, substrates and conditions. Interactions between these objects are expressed using production rules and an underlying truth maintenance system. The system performs rapid inference and can explain its reasoning. A graphical interface provides access to all elements of the simulation, including object representations and explanation graphs. Predicting enzyme action is the first step in the development of a large knowledge base to envision the metabolic pathways of DNA replication and repair. PMID:2004281

  8. The Role of Xenobiotic-Metabolizing Enzymes in Anthelmintic Deactivation and Resistance in Helminths.

    PubMed

    Matoušková, Petra; Vokřál, Ivan; Lamka, Jiří; Skálová, Lenka

    2016-06-01

    Xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XMEs) modulate the biological activity and behavior of many drugs, including anthelmintics. The effects of anthelmintics can often be abolished by XMEs when the drugs are metabolized to an inefficient compound. XMEs therefore play a significant role in anthelmintic efficacy. Moreover, differences in XMEs between helminths are reflected by differences in anthelmintic metabolism between target species. Taking advantage of the newly sequenced genomes of many helminth species, progress in this field has been remarkable. The present review collects up to date information regarding the most important XMEs (phase I and phase II biotransformation enzymes; efflux transporters) in helminths. The participation of these XMEs in anthelmintic metabolism and their possible roles in drug resistance are evaluated. PMID:26968642

  9. Biotransformation of anthelmintics and the activity of drug-metabolizing enzymes in the tapeworm Moniezia expansa.

    PubMed

    Prchal, Lukáš; Bártíková, Hana; Bečanová, Aneta; Jirásko, Robert; Vokřál, Ivan; Stuchlíková, Lucie; Skálová, Lenka; Kubíček, Vladimír; Lamka, Jiří; Trejtnar, František; Szotáková, Barbora

    2015-04-01

    The sheep tapeworm Moniezia expansa is very common parasite, which affects ruminants such as sheep, goats as well as other species. The benzimidazole anthelmintics albendazole (ABZ), flubendazole (FLU) and mebendazole (MBZ) are often used to treat the infection. The drug-metabolizing enzymes of helminths may alter the potency of anthelmintic treatment. The aim of our study was to assess the activity of the main drug-metabolizing enzymes and evaluate the metabolism of selected anthelmintics (ABZ, MBZ and FLU) in M. expansa. Activities of biotransformation enzymes were determined in subcellular fractions. Metabolites of the anthelmintics were detected and identified using high performance liquid chromatography/ultra-violet/VIS/fluorescence or ultra-high performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Reduction of MBZ, FLU and oxidation of ABZ were proved as well as activities of various metabolizing enzymes. Despite the fact that the conjugation enzymes glutathione S-transferase, UDP-glucuronosyl transferase and UDP-glucosyl transferase were active in vitro, no conjugated metabolites of anthelmintics were identified either ex vivo or in vitro. The obtained results indicate that sheep tapeworm is able to deactivate the administered anthelmintics, and thus protects itself against their action. PMID:25373326

  10. FAst MEtabolizer (FAME): A rapid and accurate predictor of sites of metabolism in multiple species by endogenous enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kirchmair, Johannes; Williamson, Mark J; Afzal, Avid M; Tyzack, Jonathan D; Choy, Alison P K; Howlett, Andrew; Rydberg, Patrik; Glen, Robert C

    2013-11-25

    FAst MEtabolizer (FAME) is a fast and accurate predictor of sites of metabolism (SoMs). It is based on a collection of random forest models trained on diverse chemical data sets of more than 20 000 molecules annotated with their experimentally determined SoMs. Using a comprehensive set of available data, FAME aims to assess metabolic processes from a holistic point of view. It is not limited to a specific enzyme family or species. Besides a global model, dedicated models are available for human, rat, and dog metabolism; specific prediction of phase I and II metabolism is also supported. FAME is able to identify at least one known SoM among the top-1, top-2, and top-3 highest ranked atom positions in up to 71%, 81%, and 87% of all cases tested, respectively. These prediction rates are comparable to or better than SoM predictors focused on specific enzyme families (such as cytochrome P450s), despite the fact that FAME uses only seven chemical descriptors. FAME covers a very broad chemical space, which together with its inter- and extrapolation power makes it applicable to a wide range of chemicals. Predictions take less than 2.5 s per molecule in batch mode on an Ultrabook. Results are visualized using Jmol, with the most likely SoMs highlighted. PMID:24219364

  11. Increments and Duplication Events of Enzymes and Transcription Factors Influence Metabolic and Regulatory Diversity in Prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Núñez, Mario Alberto; Poot-Hernandez, Augusto Cesar; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Katya; Perez-Rueda, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the content of enzymes and DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) in 794 non-redundant prokaryotic genomes was evaluated. The identification of enzymes was based on annotations deposited in the KEGG database as well as in databases of functional domains (COG and PFAM) and structural domains (Superfamily). For identifications of the TFs, hidden Markov profiles were constructed based on well-known transcriptional regulatory families. From these analyses, we obtained diverse and interesting results, such as the negative rate of incremental changes in the number of detected enzymes with respect to the genome size. On the contrary, for TFs the rate incremented as the complexity of genome increased. This inverse related performance shapes the diversity of metabolic and regulatory networks and impacts the availability of enzymes and TFs. Furthermore, the intersection of the derivatives between enzymes and TFs was identified at 9,659 genes, after this point, the regulatory complexity grows faster than metabolic complexity. In addition, TFs have a low number of duplications, in contrast to the apparent high number of duplications associated with enzymes. Despite the greater number of duplicated enzymes versus TFs, the increment by which duplicates appear is higher in TFs. A lower proportion of enzymes among archaeal genomes (22%) than in the bacterial ones (27%) was also found. This low proportion might be compensated by the interconnection between the metabolic pathways in Archaea. A similar proportion was also found for the archaeal TFs, for which the formation of regulatory complexes has been proposed. Finally, an enrichment of multifunctional enzymes in Bacteria, as a mechanism of ecological adaptation, was detected. PMID:23922780

  12. Chalcone-based Selective Inhibitors of a C4 Plant Key Enzyme as Novel Potential Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, G. T. T.; Erlenkamp, G.; Jäck, O.; Küberl, A.; Bott, M.; Fiorani, F.; Gohlke, H.; Groth, G.

    2016-01-01

    Weeds are a challenge for global food production due to their rapidly evolving resistance against herbicides. We have identified chalcones as selective inhibitors of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), a key enzyme for carbon fixation and biomass increase in the C4 photosynthetic pathway of many of the world’s most damaging weeds. In contrast, many of the most important crop plants use C3 photosynthesis. Here, we show that 2′,3′,4′,3,4-Pentahydroxychalcone (IC50 = 600 nM) and 2′,3′,4′-Trihydroxychalcone (IC50 = 4.2 μM) are potent inhibitors of C4 PEPC but do not affect C3 PEPC at a same concentration range (selectivity factor: 15–45). Binding and modeling studies indicate that the active compounds bind at the same site as malate/aspartate, the natural feedback inhibitors of the C4 pathway. At the whole plant level, both substances showed pronounced growth-inhibitory effects on the C4 weed Amaranthus retroflexus, while there were no measurable effects on oilseed rape, a C3 plant. Growth of selected soil bacteria was not affected by these substances. Our chalcone compounds are the most potent and selective C4 PEPC inhibitors known to date. They offer a novel approach to combat C4 weeds based on a hitherto unexplored mode of allosteric inhibition of a C4 plant key enzyme. PMID:27263468

  13. Chalcone-based Selective Inhibitors of a C4 Plant Key Enzyme as Novel Potential Herbicides.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, G T T; Erlenkamp, G; Jäck, O; Küberl, A; Bott, M; Fiorani, F; Gohlke, H; Groth, G

    2016-01-01

    Weeds are a challenge for global food production due to their rapidly evolving resistance against herbicides. We have identified chalcones as selective inhibitors of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), a key enzyme for carbon fixation and biomass increase in the C4 photosynthetic pathway of many of the world's most damaging weeds. In contrast, many of the most important crop plants use C3 photosynthesis. Here, we show that 2',3',4',3,4-Pentahydroxychalcone (IC50 = 600 nM) and 2',3',4'-Trihydroxychalcone (IC50 = 4.2 μM) are potent inhibitors of C4 PEPC but do not affect C3 PEPC at a same concentration range (selectivity factor: 15-45). Binding and modeling studies indicate that the active compounds bind at the same site as malate/aspartate, the natural feedback inhibitors of the C4 pathway. At the whole plant level, both substances showed pronounced growth-inhibitory effects on the C4 weed Amaranthus retroflexus, while there were no measurable effects on oilseed rape, a C3 plant. Growth of selected soil bacteria was not affected by these substances. Our chalcone compounds are the most potent and selective C4 PEPC inhibitors known to date. They offer a novel approach to combat C4 weeds based on a hitherto unexplored mode of allosteric inhibition of a C4 plant key enzyme. PMID:27263468

  14. Chalcone-based Selective Inhibitors of a C4 Plant Key Enzyme as Novel Potential Herbicides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, G. T. T.; Erlenkamp, G.; Jäck, O.; Küberl, A.; Bott, M.; Fiorani, F.; Gohlke, H.; Groth, G.

    2016-06-01

    Weeds are a challenge for global food production due to their rapidly evolving resistance against herbicides. We have identified chalcones as selective inhibitors of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), a key enzyme for carbon fixation and biomass increase in the C4 photosynthetic pathway of many of the world’s most damaging weeds. In contrast, many of the most important crop plants use C3 photosynthesis. Here, we show that 2‧,3‧,4‧,3,4-Pentahydroxychalcone (IC50 = 600 nM) and 2‧,3‧,4‧-Trihydroxychalcone (IC50 = 4.2 μM) are potent inhibitors of C4 PEPC but do not affect C3 PEPC at a same concentration range (selectivity factor: 15–45). Binding and modeling studies indicate that the active compounds bind at the same site as malate/aspartate, the natural feedback inhibitors of the C4 pathway. At the whole plant level, both substances showed pronounced growth-inhibitory effects on the C4 weed Amaranthus retroflexus, while there were no measurable effects on oilseed rape, a C3 plant. Growth of selected soil bacteria was not affected by these substances. Our chalcone compounds are the most potent and selective C4 PEPC inhibitors known to date. They offer a novel approach to combat C4 weeds based on a hitherto unexplored mode of allosteric inhibition of a C4 plant key enzyme.

  15. Gene Expression of Glutamate Metabolizing Enzymes in the Hippocampal Formation in Human Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Tore; Lee, Tih-Shih W; Wang, Yue; Peréz, Edgar; Drummond, Jana; Lauritzen, Fredrik; Bergersen, Linda H; Woodruff, James H Meador; Spencer, Dennis D; de Lanerolle, Nihal C; McCullumsmith, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    Summary PURPOSE Increased interictal concentrations of extracellular hippocampal glutamate have been implicated in the pathophysiology of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) in humans. Recent studies suggest that perturbations of the glutamate metabolizing enzymes glutamine synthetase (GS) and phosphate activated glutaminase (PAG) may underlie the glutamate excess in TLE. However, the molecular mechanism of the enzyme perturbations remains unclear. A better understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of GS and PAG could facilitate the discovery of novel therapeutics for TLE. METHODS We used in situ hybridization on histological sections to assess the distribution and quantity of mRNA for GS and PAG in subfields of hippocampal formations from: (a) patients with TLE and concomitant hippocampal sclerosis, (b) patients with TLE and no hippocampal sclerosis, and (c) non-epilepsy autopsy subjects. KEY FINDINGS GS mRNA was increased by approximately 50% in the CA3 in TLE patients without hippocampal sclerosis vs. in TLE patients with sclerosis and in non-epilepsy subjects. PAG mRNA was increased by more than 100% in the subiculum in both TLE patient categories vs. in non-epilepsy subjects. PAG mRNA was also increased in the CA1, CA2, CA3 and dentate hilus in TLE without hippocampal sclerosis vs. in TLE with sclerosis. Finally, PAG mRNA was increased in the dentate gyrus in TLE with sclerosis vs. in non-epilepsy subjects, and also increased in the hilus in TLE without sclerosis vs. in TLE with sclerosis. SIGNIFICANCE These findings demonstrate complex changes in the expression of mRNAs for GS and PAG in the hippocampal formation in TLE, and raise the possibility that both transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms may underlie the regulation of GS and PAG proteins in the epileptic brain. PMID:23384343

  16. Reduction of nuclear encoded enzymes of mitochondrial energy metabolism in cells devoid of mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Edith E; Mayr, Johannes A; Zimmermann, Franz A; Feichtinger, René G; Stanger, Olaf; Sperl, Wolfgang; Kofler, Barbara

    2012-01-20

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndromes are generally associated with reduced activities of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) enzymes that contain subunits encoded by mtDNA. Conversely, entirely nuclear encoded mitochondrial enzymes in these syndromes, such as the tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme citrate synthase (CS) and OXPHOS complex II, usually exhibit normal or compensatory enhanced activities. Here we report that a human cell line devoid of mtDNA (HEK293 ρ(0) cells) has diminished activities of both complex II and CS. This finding indicates the existence of a feedback mechanism in ρ(0) cells that downregulates the expression of entirely nuclear encoded components of mitochondrial energy metabolism. PMID:22222373

  17. Metabolic Diseases Downregulate the Majority of Histone Modification Enzymes, Making a Few Upregulated Enzymes Novel Therapeutic Targets--"Sand Out and Gold Stays".

    PubMed

    Shao, Ying; Chernaya, Valeria; Johnson, Candice; Yang, William Y; Cueto, Ramon; Sha, Xiaojin; Zhang, Yi; Qin, Xuebin; Sun, Jianxin; Choi, Eric T; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-feng

    2016-02-01

    To determine whether the expression of histone modification enzymes is regulated in physiological and pathological conditions, we took an experimental database mining approach pioneered in our labs to determine a panoramic expression profile of 164 enzymes in 19 human and 17 murine tissues. We have made the following significant findings: (1) Histone enzymes are differentially expressed in cardiovascular, immune, and other tissues; (2) our new pyramid model showed that heart and T cells are among a few tissues in which histone acetylation/deacetylation, and histone methylation/demethylation are in the highest varieties; and (3) histone enzymes are more downregulated than upregulated in metabolic diseases and regulatory T cell (Treg) polarization/ differentiation, but not in tumors. These results have demonstrated a new working model of "Sand out and Gold stays," where more downregulation than upregulation of histone enzymes in metabolic diseases makes a few upregulated enzymes the potential novel therapeutic targets in metabolic diseases and Treg activity. PMID:26746407

  18. Controlled sumoylation of the mevalonate pathway enzyme HMGS-1 regulates metabolism during aging

    PubMed Central

    Sapir, Amir; Tsur, Assaf; Koorman, Thijs; Ching, Kaitlin; Mishra, Prashant; Bardenheier, Annabelle; Podolsky, Lisa; Bening-Abu-Shach, Ulrike; Boxem, Mike; Chou, Tsui-Fen; Broday, Limor; Sternberg, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    Many metabolic pathways are critically regulated during development and aging but little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying this regulation. One key metabolic cascade in eukaryotes is the mevalonate pathway. It catalyzes the synthesis of sterol and nonsterol isoprenoids, such as cholesterol and ubiquinone, as well as other metabolites. In humans, an age-dependent decrease in ubiquinone levels and changes in cholesterol homeostasis suggest that mevalonate pathway activity changes with age. However, our knowledge of the mechanistic basis of these changes remains rudimentary. We have identified a regulatory circuit controlling the sumoylation state of Caenorhabditis elegans HMG-CoA synthase (HMGS-1). This protein is the ortholog of human HMGCS1 enzyme, which mediates the first committed step of the mevalonate pathway. In vivo, HMGS-1 undergoes an age-dependent sumoylation that is balanced by the activity of ULP-4 small ubiquitin-like modifier protease. ULP-4 exhibits an age-regulated expression pattern and a dynamic cytoplasm-to-mitochondria translocation. Thus, spatiotemporal ULP-4 activity controls the HMGS-1 sumoylation state in a mechanism that orchestrates mevalonate pathway activity with the age of the organism. To expand the HMGS-1 regulatory network, we combined proteomic analyses with knockout studies and found that the HMGS-1 level is also governed by the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. We propose that these conserved molecular circuits have evolved to govern the level of mevalonate pathway flux during aging, a flux whose dysregulation is associated with numerous age-dependent cardiovascular and cancer pathologies. PMID:25187565

  19. Fumarase: a mitochondrial metabolic enzyme and a cytosolic/nuclear component of the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Yogev, Ohad; Yogev, Orli; Singer, Esti; Shaulian, Eitan; Goldberg, Michal; Fox, Thomas D; Pines, Ophry

    2010-03-01

    In eukaryotes, fumarase (FH in human) is a well-known tricarboxylic-acid-cycle enzyme in the mitochondrial matrix. However, conserved from yeast to humans is a cytosolic isoenzyme of fumarase whose function in this compartment remains obscure. A few years ago, FH was surprisingly shown to underlie a tumor susceptibility syndrome, Hereditary Leiomyomatosis and Renal Cell Cancer (HLRCC). A biallelic inactivation of FH has been detected in almost all HLRCC tumors, and therefore FH was suggested to function as a tumor suppressor. Recently it was suggested that FH inhibition leads to elevated intracellular fumarate, which in turn acts as a competitive inhibitor of HPH (HIF prolyl hydroxylase), thereby causing stabilization of HIF (Hypoxia-inducible factor) by preventing proteasomal degradation. The transcription factor HIF increases the expression of angiogenesis regulated genes, such as VEGF, which can lead to high microvessel density and tumorigenesis. Yet this mechanism does not fully explain the large cytosolic population of fumarase molecules. We constructed a yeast strain in which fumarase is localized exclusively to mitochondria. This led to the discovery that the yeast cytosolic fumarase plays a key role in the protection of cells from DNA damage, particularly from DNA double-strand breaks. We show that the cytosolic fumarase is a member of the DNA damage response that is recruited from the cytosol to the nucleus upon DNA damage induction. This function of fumarase depends on its enzymatic activity, and its absence in cells can be complemented by high concentrations of fumaric acid. Our findings suggest that fumarase and fumaric acid are critical elements of the DNA damage response, which underlies the tumor suppressor role of fumarase in human cells and which is most probably HIF independent. This study shows an exciting crosstalk between primary metabolism and the DNA damage response, thereby providing a scenario for metabolic control of tumor propagation

  20. Architectural Organization of the Metabolic Regulatory Enzyme Ghrelin O-Acyltransferase*

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Martin S.; Ruch, Travis R.; Hsiao, Po-Yuan; Hwang, Yousang; Zhang, Pingfeng; Dai, Lixin; Huang, Cheng Ran Lisa; Berndsen, Christopher E.; Kim, Min-Sik; Pandey, Akhilesh; Wolberger, Cynthia; Marmorstein, Ronen; Machamer, Carolyn; Boeke, Jef D.; Cole, Philip A.

    2013-01-01

    Ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) is a polytopic integral membrane protein required for activation of ghrelin, a secreted metabolism-regulating peptide hormone. Although GOAT is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity and diabetes and plays a key role in other physiologic processes, little is known about its structure or mechanism. GOAT is a member of the membrane-bound O-acyltransferase (MBOAT) family, a group of polytopic integral membrane proteins involved in lipid-biosynthetic and lipid-signaling reactions from prokaryotes to humans. Here we use phylogeny and a variety of bioinformatic tools to predict the topology of GOAT. Using selective permeabilization indirect immunofluorescence microscopy in combination with glycosylation shift immunoblotting, we demonstrate that GOAT contains 11 transmembrane helices and one reentrant loop. Development of the V5Glyc tag, a novel, small, and sensitive dual topology reporter, facilitated these experiments. The MBOAT family invariant residue His-338 is in the ER lumen, consistent with other family members, but conserved Asn-307 is cytosolic, making it unlikely that both are involved in catalysis. Photocross-linking of synthetic ghrelin analogs and inhibitors demonstrates binding to the C-terminal region of GOAT, consistent with a role of His-338 in the active site. This knowledge of GOAT architecture is important for a deeper understanding of the mechanism of GOAT and other MBOATs and could ultimately advance the discovery of selective inhibitors for these enzymes. PMID:24045953

  1. Nerve Agent Hydrolysis Activity Designed into a Human Drug Metabolism Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Hemmert, Andrew C.; Otto, Tamara C.; Chica, Roberto A.; Wierdl, Monika; Edwards, Jonathan S.; Lewis, Steven L.; Edwards, Carol C.; Tsurkan, Lyudmila; Cadieux, C. Linn; Kasten, Shane A.; Cashman, John R.; Mayo, Stephen L.; Potter, Philip M.; Cerasoli, Douglas M.; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2011-01-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) nerve agents are potent suicide inhibitors of the essential neurotransmitter-regulating enzyme acetylcholinesterase. Due to their acute toxicity, there is significant interest in developing effective countermeasures to OP poisoning. Here we impart nerve agent hydrolysis activity into the human drug metabolism enzyme carboxylesterase 1. Using crystal structures of the target enzyme in complex with nerve agent as a guide, a pair of histidine and glutamic acid residues were designed proximal to the enzyme's native catalytic triad. The resultant variant protein demonstrated significantly increased rates of reactivation following exposure to sarin, soman, and cyclosarin. Importantly, the addition of these residues did not alter the high affinity binding of nerve agents to this protein. Thus, using two amino acid substitutions, a novel enzyme was created that efficiently converted a group of hemisubstrates, compounds that can start but not complete a reaction cycle, into bona fide substrates. Such approaches may lead to novel countermeasures for nerve agent poisoning. PMID:21445272

  2. Nerve agent hydrolysis activity designed into a human drug metabolism enzyme.

    PubMed

    Hemmert, Andrew C; Otto, Tamara C; Chica, Roberto A; Wierdl, Monika; Edwards, Jonathan S; Lewis, Steven M; Lewis, Steven L; Edwards, Carol C; Tsurkan, Lyudmila; Cadieux, C Linn; Kasten, Shane A; Cashman, John R; Mayo, Stephen L; Potter, Philip M; Cerasoli, Douglas M; Redinbo, Matthew R

    2011-01-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) nerve agents are potent suicide inhibitors of the essential neurotransmitter-regulating enzyme acetylcholinesterase. Due to their acute toxicity, there is significant interest in developing effective countermeasures to OP poisoning. Here we impart nerve agent hydrolysis activity into the human drug metabolism enzyme carboxylesterase 1. Using crystal structures of the target enzyme in complex with nerve agent as a guide, a pair of histidine and glutamic acid residues were designed proximal to the enzyme's native catalytic triad. The resultant variant protein demonstrated significantly increased rates of reactivation following exposure to sarin, soman, and cyclosarin. Importantly, the addition of these residues did not alter the high affinity binding of nerve agents to this protein. Thus, using two amino acid substitutions, a novel enzyme was created that efficiently converted a group of hemisubstrates, compounds that can start but not complete a reaction cycle, into bona fide substrates. Such approaches may lead to novel countermeasures for nerve agent poisoning. PMID:21445272

  3. Phosphatidate Kinase, A Novel Enzyme in Phospholipid Metabolism (Characterization of the Enzyme from Suspension-Cultured Catharanthus roseus Cells).

    PubMed Central

    Wissing, J. B.; Kornak, B.; Funke, A.; Riedel, B.

    1994-01-01

    Phosphatidate kinase (adenosine 5[prime]-triphosphate:phosphatidic acid phosphotransferase), a novel enzyme of phospholipid metabolism, was detected recently in the plasma membranes of suspension-cultured Catharanthus roseus cells and purified (J.B. Wissing, H. Behrbohm [1993] Plant Physiol 102: 1243-1249). In the present work the properties of phosphatidate kinase are described. The enzyme showed a pH optimum of 6.1 and an isoelectric point of 4.8, and was rather stable in the presence of its substrates. Although the kinase accepted both ATP and GTP, with Km values of about 12 and 18 [mu]M, respectively, the only lipid substrate was phosphatidic acid; neither lysophosphatidic acid nor any other lipid tested was phosphorylated. With 32P- and 14C-labeled diacylglycerol pyrophosphate, the product of the enzyme, it was shown that the kinase catalyzes a reversible reaction. The activity of the extracted enzyme depended on the presence of surfactants such as Triton X-100 or [beta]-octylglucoside, whereas deoxycholate was strongly inhibitory. Kinetic analysis with Triton X-100/phosphatidate mixed micelles performed according to the "surface dilution" kinetic model showed saturation kinetics with respect to both bulk and surface concentration of phosphatidate. The interfacial Michaelis constant for phosphatidate was determined as 0.6 mol %. PMID:12232252

  4. [Effect of Low-Intensity 900 MHz Frequency Electromagnetic Radiation on Rat Brain Enzyme Activities Linked to Energy Metabolism].

    PubMed

    Petrosyan, M S; Nersesova, L S; Gazaryants, M G; Meliksetyan, G O; Malakyan, M G; Bajinyan, S A; Akopian, J I

    2015-01-01

    The research deals with the effect of low-intensity 900 MHz frequency electromagnetic radiation (EMR), power density 25 μW/cm2, on the following rat brain and blood serum enzyme activities: creatine kinase (CK), playing a central role in the process of storing and distributing the cell energy, as well as alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) that play a key role in providing the conjunction of carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. The comparative analysis of the changes in the enzyme activity studied at different times following the two-hour single, as well as fractional, radiation equivalent of the total time showed that the most radiosensitive enzyme is the brain creatine kinase, which may then be recommended as a marker of the radio frequency radiation impact. According to the analysis of the changing dynamics of the CK, ALT and AST activity level, with time these changes acquire the adaptive character and are directed to compensate the damaged cell energy metabolism. PMID:26964348

  5. Enzymes of glucose metabolism in carcinoma of the cervix and endometrium of the human uterus.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, M. J.; Goldberg, D. M.; Neal, F. E.; Millar, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    Twelve enzymes related to the direct oxidative and glycolytic pathways of glucose metabolism were assayed in 88 cancers of the cervix and 48 cancers of the endometrium of the human uterus, and the activities compared with those obtained from a group of control tissues. Significant increases for all but one of the enzymes studied (alpha-glycerolphosphate dehydrogenase) were found in cancer of the cervix, when compared with normal cervix epithelium. Hexokinase, phoshofructokinase, and aldolase appear to be rate-limiting in normal cervix epithelium; however, since the increase in activity of the first two in cancers was least of all the glycolytic enzymes, redundant enzyme synthesis probably occurs in the malignant cell for the enzymes catalysing reversible reactions. There was virtually no correlation between the activity of any enzyme measured in the cancer sample and histological assessments of the degree of malignancy of the tumour, or the clinical stage of the disease. All enzymes except pyruvate kinase had significantly higher activity in normal endometrium than in normal cervix epithelium, presumably reflecting the greater metabolic requirements of the former tissue. Only phosphoglucose isomerase and pyruvate kinase were significantly higher in endometrial cancer than in normal endometrium, and there were few significant differences between cancers of the cervix and of the endometrium, despite the marked differences in their tissues of origin. These results suggest the changes occur during malignant transformation to the activities of both regulatory enzymes and those catalysing reversible reactions, in a manner justifying the conclusion that the general metabolism of tumours is convergent. PMID:678439

  6. Comparative investigation of the xenobiotic metabolizing arylamine N-acetyltransferase enzyme family among fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) are xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes well-characterized in several bacteria and higher eukaryotes. The role of NATs in fungal biology has only recently been investigated. The NAT1 gene of Gibberella moniliformis was the first NAT cloned and characterized from fun...

  7. Phylogenetic and biological investigation of the xenobiotic metabolizing arylamine N-acetyltransferase enzyme family among fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) are xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes well-characterized in several bacteria and eukaryotic organisms. The role of NATs in fungal biology has only recently been investigated. The NAT1 (FDB2) gene of Fusarium verticillioides was the first NAT cloned and character...

  8. IDENTIFICATION OF CHANGES IN XENOBIOTIC METABOLISM ENZYME EXPRESSION DURING AGING USING COMPREHENSIVE TRANSCRIPT PROFILING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aging leads to changes in the expression of enzymes and transporters important in the metabolism and fate of xenobiotics in liver, kidney and intestine. Most notable are the changes in a number of CYP and xenobiotic transporter genes regulated by the nuclear receptors PXR, CAR an...

  9. Activities of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in rat placenta and liver in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fabian, Eric; Wang, Xinyi; Engel, Franziska; Li, Hequn; Landsiedel, Robert; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard

    2016-06-01

    In order to assess whether the placental metabolism of xenobiotic compounds should be taken into consideration for physiologically-based toxicokinetic (PBTK) modelling, the activities of seven phase I and phase II enzymes have been quantified in the 18-day placenta of untreated Wistar rats. To determine their relative contribution, these activities were compared to those of untreated adult male rat liver, using commonly accepted assays. The enzymes comprised cytochrome P450 (CYP), flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), esterase, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT), and glutathione S-transferase (GST). In contrast to liver, no activities were measurable for 7-ethylresorufin-O-dealkylase (CYP1A), 7-pentylresorufin-O-dealkylase (CYP2B), 7-benzylresorufin-O-dealkylase (CYP2B, 2C and 3 A), UGT1, UGT2 and GST in placenta, indicating that the placental activity of these enzymes was well below their hepatic activity. Low activities in placenta were determined for FMO (4%), and esterase (8%), whereas the activity of placental ADH and ALDH accounted for 35% and 40% of the hepatic activities, respectively. In support of the negligible placental CYP activity, testosterone and six model azole fungicides, which were readily metabolized by rat hepatic microsomes, failed to exhibit any metabolic turnover with rat placental microsomes. Hence, with the possible exception of ADH and ALDH, the activities of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in rat placenta are too low to warrant consideration in PBTK modelling. PMID:26944803

  10. Coordinated Changes in Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme Gene Expression in Aging Male Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to gain better insight on aging and susceptibility, we characterized the expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes (XMEs) from the livers of rats to evaluate the change in capacity to respond to xenobiotics across the adult lifespan. Gene expression profiles for XMEs...

  11. Hepatic Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme Gene Expression Through the Life Stages of the Mouse

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Differences in responses to environmental chemicals and drugs between life stages are likely due in part to differences in the expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and transporters (XMETs). No comprehensive analysis of the mRNA expression of XMETs has been ca...

  12. Characterisation of the cytochrome P450 enzymes involved in the in vitro metabolism of granisetron.

    PubMed Central

    Bloomer, J C; Baldwin, S J; Smith, G J; Ayrton, A D; Clarke, S E; Chenery, R J

    1994-01-01

    1. The metabolism of granisetron was investigated in human liver microsomes to identify the specific forms of cytochrome P450 responsible. 2. 7-hydroxy and 9'-desmethyl granisetron were identified as the major products of metabolism following incubation of granisetron with human liver microsomes. At low, clinically relevant, concentrations of granisetron the 7-hydroxy metabolite predominated. Rates of granisetron 7-hydroxylation varied over 100-fold in the human livers investigated. 3. Enzyme kinetics demonstrated the involvement of at least two enzymes contributing to the 7-hydroxylation of granisetron, one of which was a high affinity component with a Km of 4 microM. A single, low affinity, enzyme was responsible for the 9'-desmethylation of granisetron. 4. Granisetron caused no inhibition of any of the cytochrome P450 activities investigated (CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP2B6, CYP2C9/8, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2E1 and CYP3A), at concentrations up to 250 microM. 5. Studies using chemical inhibitors selective for individual P450 enzymes indicated the involvement of cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A), both pathways of granisetron metabolism being very sensitive to ketoconazole inhibition. Correlation data were consistent with the role of CYP3A3/4 in granisetron 9'-desmethylation but indicated that a different enzyme was involved in the 7-hydroxylation. PMID:7888294

  13. Regional variation in muscle metabolic enzymes in individual American shad (Alosa sapidissima)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leonard, J.B.K.

    1999-01-01

    Evaluation of the activity of metabolic enzymes is often used to asses metabolic capacity at the tissue level, but the amount of regional variability within a tissue in an individual fish of a given species is frequently unknown. The activities of four enzymes (citrate synthase (CS), phosphofructokinase, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and ??-hydroxyacyl coenzyme A dehydrogenase (HOAD) were assayed in red and white muscle at 10 sites along the body of adult American shad (Alosa sapidissima). Red and white muscle HOAD and white muscle CS and LDH varied significantly, generally increasing posteriorly. Maximal variation occurs in red muscle HOAD (~450%) and white muscle LDH (~60%) activity. Differences between the sexes also vary with sampling location. This study suggests that the variability in enzyme activity may be linked to functional differences in the muscle at different locations, and also provides guidelines for sample collection in this species.

  14. Sphingolipid metabolism and interorganellar transport: localization of sphingolipid enzymes and lipid transfer proteins.

    PubMed

    Yamaji, Toshiyuki; Hanada, Kentaro

    2015-02-01

    In recent decades, many sphingolipid enzymes, sphingolipid-metabolism regulators and sphingolipid transfer proteins have been isolated and characterized. This review will provide an overview of the intracellular localization and topology of sphingolipid enzymes in mammalian cells to highlight the locations where respective sphingolipid species are produced. Interestingly, three sphingolipids that reside or are synthesized in cytosolic leaflets of membranes (ceramide, glucosylceramide and ceramide-1-phosphate) all have cytosolic lipid transfer proteins (LTPs). These LTPs consist of ceramide transfer protein (CERT), four-phosphate adaptor protein 2 (FAPP2) and ceramide-1-phosphate transfer protein (CPTP), respectively. These LTPs execute functions that affect both the location and metabolism of the lipids they bind. Molecular details describing the mechanisms of regulation of LTPs continue to emerge and reveal a number of critical processes, including competing phosphorylation and dephosphorylation reactions and binding interactions with regulatory proteins and lipids that influence the transport, organelle distribution and metabolism of sphingolipids. PMID:25382749

  15. Dietary Isoflavones as Modulators of Drug Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters: Effect on Prescription Medicines.

    PubMed

    Taneja, Isha; Raju, Kanumuri Siva Rama; Wahajuddin, Muhammad

    2016-07-29

    Isoflavones are the most widely consumed phytoestrogens. Besides being a dietary constituent, their consumption has been increasing in the form of herbal supplements and as promising alternatives to hormonal replacement therapy, in conjunction with prescription medicines. Isoflavones are extensively metabolized by phase I and II enzymes and are substrates of drug transporters. At high concentrations isoflavones may interact with drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters and modulate their activity, thus, altering the absorption, metabolism, distribution, excretion and toxicity profile of the co-administered drugs. This review summarizes the up-to-date literature of isoflavone-drug interactions giving insight into the possible mechanisms of interactions, in vitro-in vivo correlation and their implications on clinical outcomes. PMID:26561312

  16. Recombinant arginine-degrading enzymes in metabolic anticancer therapy and bioanalytics.

    PubMed

    Stasyk, Oleh V; Boretsky, Yuriy R; Gonchar, Mykhailo V; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2015-03-01

    Tumor cells often exhibit specific metabolic defects due to the aberrations in oncogene-dependent regulatory and/or signaling pathways that distinguish them from normal cells. Among others, many malignant cells are deficient in biosynthesis of certain amino acids and concomitantly exhibit elevated sensitivity to deprivation of these amino acids. Although the underlying causes of such metabolic changes are still not fully understood, this feature of malignant cells is exploited in metabolic enzymotherapies based on single amino acid, e.g., arginine, deprivation. To achieve efficient arginine depletion in vivo, two recombinant enzymes, bacterial arginine deiminase and human arginase I have been evaluated and are undergoing further development. This review is aimed to summarize the current knowledge on the application of arginine-degrading enzymes as anticancer agents and as bioanalytical tools for arginine assays. The problems that have to be solved to optimize this therapy for clinical application are discussed. PMID:25231409

  17. Odorant Metabolism Catalyzed by Olfactory Mucosal Enzymes Influences Peripheral Olfactory Responses in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Thiebaud, Nicolas; Veloso Da Silva, Stéphanie; Jakob, Ingrid; Sicard, Gilles; Chevalier, Joëlle; Ménétrier, Franck; Berdeaux, Olivier; Artur, Yves; Heydel, Jean-Marie; Le Bon, Anne-Marie

    2013-01-01

    A large set of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XMEs), such as the cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYPs), esterases and transferases, are highly expressed in mammalian olfactory mucosa (OM). These enzymes are known to catalyze the biotransformation of exogenous compounds to facilitate elimination. However, the functions of these enzymes in the olfactory epithelium are not clearly understood. In addition to protecting against inhaled toxic compounds, these enzymes could also metabolize odorant molecules, and thus modify their stimulating properties or inactivate them. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro biotransformation of odorant molecules in the rat OM and assessed the impact of this metabolism on peripheral olfactory responses. Rat OM was found to efficiently metabolize quinoline, coumarin and isoamyl acetate. Quinoline and coumarin are metabolized by CYPs whereas isoamyl acetate is hydrolyzed by carboxylesterases. Electro-olfactogram (EOG) recordings revealed that the hydroxylated metabolites derived from these odorants elicited lower olfactory response amplitudes than the parent molecules. We also observed that glucurono-conjugated derivatives induced no olfactory signal. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the local application of a CYP inhibitor on rat olfactory epithelium increased EOG responses elicited by quinoline and coumarin. Similarly, the application of a carboxylesterase inhibitor increased the EOG response elicited by isoamyl acetate. This increase in EOG amplitude provoked by XME inhibitors is likely due to enhanced olfactory sensory neuron activation in response to odorant accumulation. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest that biotransformation of odorant molecules by enzymes localized to the olfactory mucosa may change the odorant’s stimulating properties and may facilitate the clearance of odorants to avoid receptor saturation. PMID:23555703

  18. Colon cancer chemopreventive efficacy of silibinin through perturbation of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in experimental rats.

    PubMed

    Sangeetha, Nagarajan; Viswanathan, Periyaswamy; Balasubramanian, Thangavel; Nalini, Namasivayam

    2012-01-15

    Our findings reported so far demonstrate that silibinin modulates gut microbial enzymes, colonic oxidative stress and Wnt/β-catenin signaling, to exert its antiproliferative effect against 1,2 di-methylhydrazine (DMH) induced colon carcinogenesis. Since xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes play a crucial role in carcinogen activation and metabolism, we aimed to explore the effect of silibinin on xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes during DMH induced colon carcinogenesis. Male albino rats were randomly divided into six groups. Group 1 served as control and group 2 rats received 50mg/kg body weight of silibinin p.o. every day. Groups 3-6 rats were given DMH at a dose of (20mg/kg body weight subcutaneously) once a week for 15 weeks to induce colonic tumors. In addition to DMH, group 4 (initiation), group 5 (post-initiation) and group 6 (entire period) rats received silibinin (50mg/kg body weight, p.o., everyday) at different time points during the experimental period of 32 weeks. Rats exposed to DMH alone showed increased activities of phase I enzymes (cytochrome b5, cytochrome b5 reductase, cytochromeP450, cytochromeP450 reductase, cytochromP4502E1) and decreased activities of phase II enzymes (Uridine diphospho glucuronyl transferase, Glutathione-S-transferase and DT-Diaphorase) in the liver and colonic mucosa as compared to control rats. Silibinin supplementation modulates the xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes favoring carcinogen detoxification. Evaluation of lipid peroxidation and antioxidants status showed that silibinin supplementation counteracts DMH induced hepatic and circulatory oxidative stress. Tumor burden in experimental animals was assessed both macroscopically and microscopically in the colon tissues. Our findings emphasize the potential chemopreventive action of silibinin against DMH induced colon carcinogenesis. PMID:22115893

  19. Homologues of xenobiotic metabolizing N-acetyltransferases in plant-associated fungi: Novel functions for an old enzyme family

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant-pathogenic fungi and their hosts engage in chemical warfare, attacking each other with toxic products of secondary metabolism and defending themselves via an arsenal of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes. One such enzyme is homologous to arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT) and has been identified...

  20. Identification and subcellular localization of starch-metabolizing enzymes in the green alga Dunaliella marina.

    PubMed

    Kombrink, E; Wöber, G

    1980-07-01

    Enzymes of starch synthesis and degradation were identified in crude extracts of the unicellular green alga Dunaliella marina (Volvocales). By polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and specific staining for enzyme activities, 4 multiple forms of starch synthase, 2 amylases, and at least 2 forms of α-glucan phosphorylase were visible. Using specific α-glucans incorporated into the gel before electrophoresis we have tentatively correlated α-amylase and β-amylase with both hydrolytic activities. The activities of α-glucan phosphorylase and amylase(s) were measured quantitatively in crude extracts, and the concomitant action of α-glucan phosphorylase and amylase(s) was found to account for the fastest rate of starch mobilization observed in vivo. Isolated chloroplasts retained both typical plastid marker enzymes and ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase, starch synthase, amylase(s), and α-glucan phosphorylase to a similar percentage. Gel electrophoretic analysis followed by staining for enzyme activity of a stromal fraction resulted in a pattern of multiple forms of starch-metabolizing enzymes analogous to that found in a crude extract. We interpret the combined data as indicating the exclusive location in vivo of starch-metabolizing enzymes in chloroplasts of D. marina. PMID:24306243

  1. Effects of grafting on key photosynthetic enzymes and gene expression in the citrus cultivar Huangguogan.

    PubMed

    Liao, L; Cao, S Y; Rong, Y; Wang, Z H

    2016-01-01

    Grafting influences scion photosynthetic capacity and fruit quality. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), which strongly affects photosynthetic rate, and Rubisco activase (RCA), which regulates Rubisco activity, are two key photosynthetic enzymes. However, little information is available regarding the effect of grafting on the concentration and expression of Rubisco and RCA in the citrus cultivar Huangguogan. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of grafting Huangguogan plants onto trifoliate orange, tangerine, and orange on: 1) the concentration of Rubisco and RCA; 2) the mRNA levels of rbcL, rbcS, and rca; and 3) fruit quality. Overall, the results showed that when Huangguogan plants budded on tangerine and orange, they had better fruit quality, while on trifoliate orange they had higher Rubisco concentration. Tangerine and orange are probably the most suitable rootstocks for Huangguogan plants given the environmental conditions of Sichuan Province, China. PMID:26985941

  2. Metabolic pathways of inhaled glucocorticoids by the CYP3A enzymes.

    PubMed

    Moore, Chad D; Roberts, Jessica K; Orton, Christopher R; Murai, Takahiro; Fidler, Trevor P; Reilly, Christopher A; Ward, Robert M; Yost, Garold S

    2013-02-01

    Asthma is one of the most prevalent diseases in the world, for which the mainstay treatment has been inhaled glucocorticoids (GCs). Despite the widespread use of these drugs, approximately 30% of asthma sufferers exhibit some degree of steroid insensitivity or are refractory to inhaled GCs. One hypothesis to explain this phenomenon is interpatient variability in the clearance of these compounds. The objective of this research is to determine how metabolism of GCs by the CYP3A family of enzymes could affect their effectiveness in asthmatic patients. In this work, the metabolism of four frequently prescribed inhaled GCs, triamcinolone acetonide, flunisolide, budesonide, and fluticasone propionate, by the CYP3A family of enzymes was studied to identify differences in their rates of clearance and to identify their metabolites. Both interenzyme and interdrug variability in rates of metabolism and metabolic fate were observed. CYP3A4 was the most efficient metabolic catalyst for all the compounds, and CYP3A7 had the slowest rates. CYP3A5, which is particularly relevant to GC metabolism in the lungs, was also shown to efficiently metabolize triamcinolone acetonide, budesonide, and fluticasone propionate. In contrast, flunisolide was only metabolized via CYP3A4, with no significant turnover by CYP3A5 or CYP3A7. Common metabolites included 6β-hydroxylation and Δ(6)-dehydrogenation for triamcinolone acetonide, budesonide, and flunisolide. The structure of Δ(6)-flunisolide was unambiguously established by NMR analysis. Metabolism also occurred on the D-ring substituents, including the 21-carboxy metabolites for triamcinolone acetonide and flunisolide. The novel metabolite 21-nortriamcinolone acetonide was also identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and NMR analysis. PMID:23143891

  3. Metabolic Pathways of Inhaled Glucocorticoids by the CYP3A Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Chad D.; Roberts, Jessica K.; Orton, Christopher R.; Murai, Takahiro; Fidler, Trevor P.; Reilly, Christopher A.; Ward, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most prevalent diseases in the world, for which the mainstay treatment has been inhaled glucocorticoids (GCs). Despite the widespread use of these drugs, approximately 30% of asthma sufferers exhibit some degree of steroid insensitivity or are refractory to inhaled GCs. One hypothesis to explain this phenomenon is interpatient variability in the clearance of these compounds. The objective of this research is to determine how metabolism of GCs by the CYP3A family of enzymes could affect their effectiveness in asthmatic patients. In this work, the metabolism of four frequently prescribed inhaled GCs, triamcinolone acetonide, flunisolide, budesonide, and fluticasone propionate, by the CYP3A family of enzymes was studied to identify differences in their rates of clearance and to identify their metabolites. Both interenzyme and interdrug variability in rates of metabolism and metabolic fate were observed. CYP3A4 was the most efficient metabolic catalyst for all the compounds, and CYP3A7 had the slowest rates. CYP3A5, which is particularly relevant to GC metabolism in the lungs, was also shown to efficiently metabolize triamcinolone acetonide, budesonide, and fluticasone propionate. In contrast, flunisolide was only metabolized via CYP3A4, with no significant turnover by CYP3A5 or CYP3A7. Common metabolites included 6β-hydroxylation and Δ6-dehydrogenation for triamcinolone acetonide, budesonide, and flunisolide. The structure of Δ6-flunisolide was unambiguously established by NMR analysis. Metabolism also occurred on the D-ring substituents, including the 21-carboxy metabolites for triamcinolone acetonide and flunisolide. The novel metabolite 21-nortriamcinolone acetonide was also identified by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry and NMR analysis. PMID:23143891

  4. Identification and Functional Analysis of Delta-9 Desaturase, a Key Enzyme in PUFA Synthesis, Isolated from the Oleaginous Diatom Fistulifera

    PubMed Central

    Muto, Masaki; Kubota, Chihiro; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Satoh, Akira; Matsumoto, Mitsufumi; Yoshino, Tomoko; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Oleaginous microalgae are one of the promising resource of nonedible biodiesel fuel (BDF) feed stock alternatives. Now a challenge task is the decrease of the long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) content affecting on the BDF oxidative stability by using gene manipulation techniques. However, only the limited knowledge has been available concerning the fatty acid and PUFA synthesis pathways in microalgae. Especially, the function of Δ9 desaturase, which is a key enzyme in PUFA synthesis pathway, has not been determined in diatom. In this study, 4 Δ9 desaturase genes (fD9desA, fD9desB, fD9desC and fD9desD) from the oleaginous diatom Fistulifera were newly isolated and functionally characterized. The putative Δ9 acyl-CoA desaturases in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) showed 3 histidine clusters that are well-conserved motifs in the typical Δ9 desaturase. Furthermore, the function of these Δ9 desaturases was confirmed in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ole1 gene deletion mutant (Δole1). All the putative Δ9 acyl-CoA desaturases showed Δ9 desaturation activity for C16∶0 fatty acids; fD9desA and fD9desB also showed desaturation activity for C18∶0 fatty acids. This study represents the first functional analysis of Δ9 desaturases from oleaginous microalgae and from diatoms as the first enzyme to introduce a double bond in saturated fatty acids during PUFA synthesis. The findings will provide beneficial insights into applying metabolic engineering processes to suppressing PUFA synthesis in this oleaginous microalgal strain. PMID:24039966

  5. Comparative metabolism as a key driver of wildlife species sensitivity to human and veterinary pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Thomas H; Madden, Judith C; Naidoo, Vinny; Walker, Colin H

    2014-11-19

    Human and veterinary drug development addresses absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination and toxicology (ADMET) of the Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API) in the target species. Metabolism is an important factor in controlling circulating plasma and target tissue API concentrations and in generating metabolites which are more easily eliminated in bile, faeces and urine. The essential purpose of xenobiotic metabolism is to convert lipid-soluble, non-polar and non-excretable chemicals into water soluble, polar molecules that are readily excreted. Xenobiotic metabolism is classified into Phase I enzymatic reactions (which add or expose reactive functional groups on xenobiotic molecules), Phase II reactions (resulting in xenobiotic conjugation with large water-soluble, polar molecules) and Phase III cellular efflux transport processes. The human-fish plasma model provides a useful approach to understanding the pharmacokinetics of APIs (e.g. diclofenac, ibuprofen and propranolol) in freshwater fish, where gill and liver metabolism of APIs have been shown to be of importance. By contrast, wildlife species with low metabolic competency may exhibit zero-order metabolic (pharmacokinetic) profiles and thus high API toxicity, as in the case of diclofenac and the dramatic decline of vulture populations across the Indian subcontinent. A similar threat looms for African Cape Griffon vultures exposed to ketoprofen and meloxicam, recent studies indicating toxicity relates to zero-order metabolism (suggesting P450 Phase I enzyme system or Phase II glucuronidation deficiencies). While all aspects of ADMET are important in toxicity evaluations, these observations demonstrate the importance of methods for predicting API comparative metabolism as a central part of environmental risk assessment. PMID:25405970

  6. Comparative metabolism as a key driver of wildlife species sensitivity to human and veterinary pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Thomas H.; Madden, Judith C.; Naidoo, Vinny; Walker, Colin H.

    2014-01-01

    Human and veterinary drug development addresses absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination and toxicology (ADMET) of the Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API) in the target species. Metabolism is an important factor in controlling circulating plasma and target tissue API concentrations and in generating metabolites which are more easily eliminated in bile, faeces and urine. The essential purpose of xenobiotic metabolism is to convert lipid-soluble, non-polar and non-excretable chemicals into water soluble, polar molecules that are readily excreted. Xenobiotic metabolism is classified into Phase I enzymatic reactions (which add or expose reactive functional groups on xenobiotic molecules), Phase II reactions (resulting in xenobiotic conjugation with large water-soluble, polar molecules) and Phase III cellular efflux transport processes. The human–fish plasma model provides a useful approach to understanding the pharmacokinetics of APIs (e.g. diclofenac, ibuprofen and propranolol) in freshwater fish, where gill and liver metabolism of APIs have been shown to be of importance. By contrast, wildlife species with low metabolic competency may exhibit zero-order metabolic (pharmacokinetic) profiles and thus high API toxicity, as in the case of diclofenac and the dramatic decline of vulture populations across the Indian subcontinent. A similar threat looms for African Cape Griffon vultures exposed to ketoprofen and meloxicam, recent studies indicating toxicity relates to zero-order metabolism (suggesting P450 Phase I enzyme system or Phase II glucuronidation deficiencies). While all aspects of ADMET are important in toxicity evaluations, these observations demonstrate the importance of methods for predicting API comparative metabolism as a central part of environmental risk assessment. PMID:25405970

  7. Characterization of Anammox Hydrazine Dehydrogenase, a Key N2-producing Enzyme in the Global Nitrogen Cycle.

    PubMed

    Maalcke, Wouter J; Reimann, Joachim; de Vries, Simon; Butt, Julea N; Dietl, Andreas; Kip, Nardy; Mersdorf, Ulrike; Barends, Thomas R M; Jetten, Mike S M; Keltjens, Jan T; Kartal, Boran

    2016-08-12

    Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria derive their energy for growth from the oxidation of ammonium with nitrite as the electron acceptor. N2, the end product of this metabolism, is produced from the oxidation of the intermediate, hydrazine (N2H4). Previously, we identified N2-producing hydrazine dehydrogenase (KsHDH) from the anammox organism Kuenenia stuttgartiensis as the gene product of kustc0694 and determined some of its catalytic properties. In the genome of K. stuttgartiensis, kustc0694 is one of 10 paralogs related to octaheme hydroxylamine (NH2OH) oxidoreductase (HAO). Here, we characterized KsHDH as a covalently cross-linked homotrimeric octaheme protein as found for HAO and HAO-related hydroxylamine-oxidizing enzyme kustc1061 from K. stuttgartiensis Interestingly, the HDH trimers formed octamers in solution, each octamer harboring an amazing 192 c-type heme moieties. Whereas HAO and kustc1061 are capable of hydrazine oxidation as well, KsHDH was highly specific for this activity. To understand this specificity, we performed detailed amino acid sequence analyses and investigated the catalytic and spectroscopic (electronic absorbance, EPR) properties of KsHDH in comparison with the well defined HAO and kustc1061. We conclude that HDH specificity is most likely derived from structural changes around the catalytic heme 4 (P460) and of the electron-wiring circuit comprising seven His/His-ligated c-type hemes in each subunit. These nuances make HDH a globally prominent N2-producing enzyme, next to nitrous oxide (N2O) reductase from denitrifying microorganisms. PMID:27317665

  8. Purification and characterization of aspartate N-acetyltransferase: A critical enzyme in brain metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qinzhe; Zhao, Mojun; Parungao, Gwenn G; Viola, Ronald E

    2016-03-01

    Canavan disease (CD) is a neurological disorder caused by an interruption in the metabolism of N-acetylaspartate (NAA). Numerous mutations have been found in the enzyme that hydrolyzes NAA, and the catalytic activity of aspartoacylase is significantly impaired in CD patients. Recent studies have also supported an important role in CD for the enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of NAA in the brain. However, previous attempts to study this enzyme had not succeeded in obtaining a soluble, stable and active form of this membrane-associated protein. We have now utilized fusion constructs with solubilizing protein partners to obtain an active and soluble form of aspartate N-acetyltransferase. Characterization of the properties of this enzyme has set the stage for the development of selective inhibitors that can lower the elevated levels of NAA that are observed in CD patients and potentially serve as a new treatment therapy. PMID:26550943

  9. Characterization of the first enzyme in 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Hausinger, R P; Fukumori, F

    1995-01-01

    This paper reviews the properties of the Alcaligenes eutrophus JMP134 tfdA gene product, the enzyme responsible for the first step in 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) biodegradation. The gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and several of its enzymatic properties were characterized. Although this enzyme catalyzes a hydroxylation reaction, it is not a monooxygenase. Rather, TfdA is an Fe(II) and alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase that metabolizes the latter cosubstrate to succinate and carbon dioxide. A variety of other phenoxyacetates and alpha-ketoacids can be used by the enzyme, but the greatest catalytic efficiencies were found using 2,4-D and alpha-ketoglutarate. The enzyme possesses multiple essential histidine residues, whereas catalytically essential cysteine and lysine groups do not appear to be present. PMID:8565907

  10. Mcy protein, a potential antidiabetic agent: evaluation of carbohydrate metabolic enzymes and antioxidant status.

    PubMed

    Marella, Saritha; Maddirela, Dilip Rajasekhar; Kumar, E G T V; Tilak, Thandaiah Krishna; Badri, Kameswara Rao; Chippada, Apparao

    2016-05-01

    The objective of the present study is to elucidate the long-term effects of anti-hyperglycemic active principle, Mcy protein (MCP), isolated from the fruits of Momordica cymbalaria on carbohydrate metabolism and oxidative stress in experimental diabetic rats. We used streptozotocin induced diabetic rats for the current studies. Our studies showed that MCP (2.5mg/kg.b.w) treatment significantly normalized the deranged activities of critical carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes, hexokinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-bis phosphatase. In addition MCP showed inhibitory activity on α-glucosidase and aldose reductase enzymes in in vitro assays. Further MCP treatment improved the antioxidant defensive mechanism by preventing deleterious oxidative products of cellular metabolism, which initiates the lipid peroxidation and by normalizing the antioxidant enzyme (catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase) activities. Additional structural studies using circular dichroism spectroscopy indicate that MCP contains majorly α-helix. Our findings suggest MCP regulates blood glucose and better manage diabetes mellitus associated complications by regulating carbohydrate metabolism and by protecting from the deleterious effects of oxidative stress. PMID:26826289

  11. The Effects of Pharmaceutical Excipients on Gastrointestinal Tract Metabolic Enzymes and Transporters-an Update.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenpeng; Li, Yanyan; Zou, Peng; Wu, Man; Zhang, Zhenqing; Zhang, Tao

    2016-07-01

    Accumulating evidence from the last decade has shown that many pharmaceutical excipients are not pharmacologically inert but instead have effects on metabolic enzymes and/or drug transporters. Hence, the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination (ADME) of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) may be altered due to the modulation of their metabolism and transport by excipients. The impact of excipients is a potential concern for Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS)-based biowaivers, particularly as the BCS-based biowaivers have been extended to class 3 drugs in certain dosage forms. The presence of different excipients or varying amounts of excipients between formulations may result in bio-inequivalence. The excipient impact may lead to significant variations in clinical outcomes as well. The aim of this paper is to review the recent findings of excipient effects on gastrointestinal (GI) absorption, focusing on their interactions with the metabolic enzymes and transporters in the GI tract. A wide range of commonly used excipients such as binders, diluents, fillers, solvents, and surfactants are discussed here. We summarized the reported effects of those excipients on GI tract phase I and phase II enzymes, uptake and efflux transporters, and relevant clinical significance. This information can enhance our understanding of excipient influence on drug absorption and is useful in designing pharmacokinetic studies and evaluating the resultant data. PMID:27184579

  12. Enzyme Regulation in Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Photosynthesis : Studies on Thioredoxin-Linked Enzymes of KalanchoE daigremontiana.

    PubMed

    Hutcheson, S W; Buchanan, B B

    1983-07-01

    Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase) and sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphatase (SBPase) were identified and purified from the Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plant, Kalanchoë daigremontiana. FBPase and SBPase showed respective molecular weights of 180,000 and 76,000, and exhibited immunological cross-reactivity with their counterparts from chloroplasts of C(3) (spinach) and C(4) (corn) plants. Based on Western blot analysis, FBPase was composed of four identical 45,000-dalton subunits and SBPase of two identical 38,000-dalton subunits. Immunological evidence, together with physical properties, indicated that both enzymes were of chloroplast origin.Kalanchoë FBPase and SBPase could be activated by thioredoxin f reduced chemically by dithiothreitol or photochemically by a reconstituted Kalanchoë ferredoxin/thioredoxin system. Both enzymes were activated synergistically by reduced thioredoxin f and thier respective substrates.Kalanchoë FBPase could be partially activated by Mg(2+) at concentrations greater than 10 millimolar; however, such activation was considerably less than that observed in the presence of reduced thioredoxin and Ca(2+), especially in the pH range between 7.8 and 8.3. In contrast to FBPase, Kalanchoë SBPase exhibited an absolute requirement for a dithiol such as reduced thioredoxin irrespective of Mg(2+) concentration. However, like FBPase, increased Mg(2+) concentrations enhanced the thioredoxin-linked activation of this enzyme.In conjunction with these studies, an NADP-linked malate dehydrogenase (NADP-MDH) was identified in cell-free preparations of Kalanchoë leaves which required reduced thioredoxin m for activity.These results indicate that Kalanchoë FBPase, SBPase, and NADP-MDH share physical and regulatory properties with their equivalents in C(3) and C(4) plants. In contrast to previous evidence, all three enzymes appear to have the capacity to be photoregulated in chloroplasts of CAM plants, thereby providing a means for the

  13. Increased oxygen radical-dependent inactivation of metabolic enzymes by liver microsomes after chronic ethanol consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Dicker, E.; Cederbaum, A.I. )

    1988-10-01

    Enzymatic and nonenzymatic mixed-function oxidase systems have been shown to generate an oxidant that catalyzes the inactivation of glutamine synthetase and other metabolic enzymes. Recent studies have shown that microsomes isolated from rats chronically fed ethanol generate reactive oxygen intermediates at elevated rates compared with controls. Microsomes from rats fed ethanol were found to be more effective than control microsomes in catalyzing the inactivation of enzymes added to the incubation system. The enzymes studied were alcohol dehydrogenase, lactic dehydrogenase, and pyruvate kinase. The inactivation process by both types of microsomal preparations was sensitive to catalase and glutathione plus glutathione peroxidase, but was not affected by superoxide dismutase or hydroxyl radical scavengers. Iron was required for the inactivation of added enzymes; microsomes from the rats fed ethanol remained more effective than control microsomes in catalyzing the inactivation of enzymes in the absence or presence of several ferric complexes. The inactivation of enzymes was enhanced by the addition of menadione or paraquat to the microsomes, and rates of inactivation were higher with the microsomes from the ethanol-fed rats. The enhanced generation of reactive oxygen intermediates and increased inactivation of enzymes by microsomes may contribute toward the hepatotoxic effects associated with ethanol consumption.

  14. Drug Metabolism Enzyme Expression and Activity in Primary Cultures of Human Proximal Tubular Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lash, Lawrence H.; Putt, David A.; Cai, Hongliang

    2008-01-01

    We previously catalogued expression and activity of organic anion and cation, amino acid, and peptide transporters in primary cultures of human proximal tubular (hPT) cells to establish them as a cellular model to study drug transport in the human kidney [Toxicology 228, 200–218 (2006)]. Here, we extend our analysis to drug metabolism enzymes. Expression of 11 cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes was determined with specific antibodies. CYP1B1, CYP3A4, and CYP4A11 were the only CYP enzymes readily detected in total cell extracts. These same CYP enzymes, as well as CYP3A5 and possibly CYP2D6, were detected in microsomes from confluent hPT cells, although expression levels varied among kidney samples. In agreement with Western blot data, only activity of CYP3A4/5 was detected among the enzyme activities measured. Expression of all three glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) known to be found in hPT cells, GSTA, GSTP, and GSTT, was readily detected. Variable expression of three sulfotransferases (SULTs), SULT1A3, SULT1E, and SULT2A1, and three UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), UGT1A1, UGT1A6, and UGT2B7, was also detected. When examined over the course of cell growth to confluence, expression of all enzymes was generally maintained at readily measurable levels, although they were often lower than in fresh tissue. These results indicate that primary cultures of hPT cells possess significant capacity to metabolize many classes of drugs, and can be used as an effective model to study drug metabolism. PMID:18055091

  15. Stereochemical course, isotope effects, and enzyme inhibitor studies of glaucine metabolism in fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, K.M.

    1986-01-01

    The microbial transformation of the aporphine alkaloid glaucine by the fungi Fusarium solani (ATCC 12823) and Aspergillus flavipes (ATCC 1030) proceeds with complete substrate stereoselectivity. The fungus F. solani metabolizes only S-(+)-glaucine (1) to dehydroglaucine (3), and A. flavipes metabolizes only R-(-)-glaucine (2) to dehydroglaucine. This facile microbiological reaction is useful in the destructive resolution of racemic mixtures of glaucine, and may provide a model for producing pure enantiomers (either R or S) of other aporphines from racemic mixtures. In order to extend the reaction to other aporphines and related alkaloids, the overall stereochemical course and enzyme(s) involved in the reaction, and the substrate requirements of the enzyme were investigated. The overall stereochemical course of the transformation was examined using C-7 methyl-blocked analogs of glaucine, cis- and trans-7-methylglaucine, as substrates for the fungi. Isolation and examination of residual substrates from semi-preparative scale incubations by MS, PMR, PMR with a chiral shift reagent, OR and ORD indicated that the transformation was enantioselective in the case of A. flavipes. However, only a 10% enrichment of 6aR,7R-cis-7-methylglaucine was observed in F. solani cultures. The oxidation of glaucine can be envisioned as proceeding through one of several mechanisms, each involving a different enzyme system. Deuterium isotope, induction and enzyme inhibitor experiments helped to distinguish between the three mechanisms.

  16. Identification of Multiple Phosphorylation Sites on Maize Endosperm Starch Branching Enzyme IIb, a Key Enzyme in Amylopectin Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Makhmoudova, Amina; Williams, Declan; Brewer, Dyanne; Massey, Sarah; Patterson, Jenelle; Silva, Anjali; Vassall, Kenrick A.; Liu, Fushan; Subedi, Sanjeena; Harauz, George; Siu, K. W. Michael; Tetlow, Ian J.; Emes, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Starch branching enzyme IIb (SBEIIb) plays a crucial role in amylopectin biosynthesis in maize endosperm by defining the structural and functional properties of storage starch and is regulated by protein phosphorylation. Native and recombinant maize SBEIIb were used as substrates for amyloplast protein kinases to identify phosphorylation sites on the protein. A multidisciplinary approach involving bioinformatics, site-directed mutagenesis, and mass spectrometry identified three phosphorylation sites at Ser residues: Ser649, Ser286, and Ser297. Two Ca2+-dependent protein kinase activities were partially purified from amyloplasts, termed K1, responsible for Ser649 and Ser286 phosphorylation, and K2, responsible for Ser649 and Ser297 phosphorylation. The Ser286 and Ser297 phosphorylation sites are conserved in all plant branching enzymes and are located at opposite openings of the 8-stranded parallel β-barrel of the active site, which is involved with substrate binding and catalysis. Molecular dynamics simulation analysis indicates that phospho-Ser297 forms a stable salt bridge with Arg665, part of a conserved Cys-containing domain in plant branching enzymes. Ser649 conservation appears confined to the enzyme in cereals and is not universal, and is presumably associated with functions specific to seed storage. The implications of SBEIIb phosphorylation are considered in terms of the role of the enzyme and the importance of starch biosynthesis for yield and biotechnological application. PMID:24550386

  17. Structural and Functional Insights into (S)-Ureidoglycolate Dehydrogenase, a Metabolic Branch Point Enzyme in Nitrogen Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myung-Il; Shin, Inchul; Cho, Suhee; Lee, Jeehyun; Rhee, Sangkee

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen metabolism is one of essential processes in living organisms. The catabolic pathways of nitrogenous compounds play a pivotal role in the storage and recovery of nitrogen. In Escherichia coli, two different, interconnecting metabolic routes drive nitrogen utilization through purine degradation metabolites. The enzyme (S)-ureidoglycolate dehydrogenase (AllD), which is a member of l-sulfolactate dehydrogenase-like family, converts (S)-ureidoglycolate, a key intermediate in the purine degradation pathway, to oxalurate in an NAD(P)-dependent manner. Therefore, AllD is a metabolic branch-point enzyme for nitrogen metabolism in E. coli. Here, we report crystal structures of AllD in its apo form, in a binary complex with NADH cofactor, and in a ternary complex with NADH and glyoxylate, a possible spontaneous degradation product of oxalurate. Structural analyses revealed that NADH in an extended conformation is bound to an NADH-binding fold with three distinct domains that differ from those of the canonical NADH-binding fold. We also characterized ligand-induced structural changes, as well as the binding mode of glyoxylate, in the active site near the NADH nicotinamide ring. Based on structural and kinetic analyses, we concluded that AllD selectively utilizes NAD+ as a cofactor, and further propose that His116 acts as a general catalytic base and that a hydride transfer is possible on the B-face of the nicotinamide ring of the cofactor. Other residues conserved in the active sites of this novel l-sulfolactate dehydrogenase-like family also play essential roles in catalysis. PMID:23284870

  18. Dydrogesterone metabolism in human liver by aldo-keto reductases and cytochrome P450 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Olbrich, Matthias; Weigl, Kevin; Kahler, Elke; Mihara, Katsuhiro

    2016-10-01

    1. The metabolism of dydrogesterone was investigated in human liver cytosol (HLC) and human liver microsomes (HLM). Enzymes involved in dydrogesterone metabolism were identified and their relative contributions were estimated. 2. Dydrogesterone clearance was clearly higher in HLC compared to HLM. The major active metabolite 20α-dihydrodydrogesterone (20α-DHD) was only produced in HLC. 3. The formation of 20α-DHD by cytosolic aldo-keto reductase 1C (AKR1C) was confirmed with isoenzyme-specific AKR inhibitors. 4. Using recombinantly expressed human cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoenzymes, dydrogesterone was shown to be metabolically transformed by CYP3A4 and CYP2C19. 5. A clear contribution of CYP3A4 to microsomal metabolism of dydrogesterone was demonstrated with HLM and isoenzyme-specific CYP inhibitors, and confirmed by a significant correlation between dydrogesterone clearance and CYP3A4 activity. 6. Contribution of CYP2C19 was shown to be clearly less than CYP3A4 and restricted to a small group of human individuals with very high CYP2C19 activity. Therefore, it is expected that CYP2C19 genetic variations will not affect dydrogesterone pharmacokinetics in man. 7. In conclusion, dydrogesterone metabolism in the liver is dominated primarily by cytosolic enzymes (particularly AKR1C) and secondarily by CYP3A4, with the former exclusively responsible for 20α-DHD formation. PMID:26796435

  19. Pivotal Enzyme in Glutamate Metabolism of Poly-γ-Glutamate-Producing Microbes

    PubMed Central

    Ashiuchi, Makoto; Yamamoto, Takashi; Kamei, Tohru

    2013-01-01

    The extremely halophilic archaeon Natrialba aegyptiaca secretes the L-homo type of poly-γ-glutamate (PGA) as an extremolyte. We examined the enzymes involved in glutamate metabolism and verified the presence of L-glutamate dehydrogenases, L-aspartate aminotransferase, and L-glutamate synthase. However, neither glutamate racemase nor D-amino acid aminotransferase activity was detected, suggesting the absence of sources of D-glutamate. In contrast, D-glutamate-rich PGA producers mostly possess such intracellular sources of D-glutamate. The results of our present study indicate that the D-glutamate-anabolic enzyme “glutamate racemase” is pivotal in the biosynthesis of PGA. PMID:25371338

  20. Xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in human skin and SkinEthic reconstructed human skin models.

    PubMed

    Eilstein, Joan; Léreaux, Guillaume; Arbey, Eric; Daronnat, Edwige; Wilkinson, Simon; Duché, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Skin metabolism is becoming a major consideration in the development of new cosmetic ingredients, skin being the first organ exposed to them. In order to replace limited samples of Excised human skin (EHS), in vitro engineered human skins have been developed. 3D models are daily used to develop and evaluate new cosmetic ingredients and have to be characterized and compared with EHS in terms of metabolic capabilities. This work presents the determination of apparent catalytic parameters (apparent Vmax, Km and the ratio Vmax/Km) in 3D models compared with EHS for cytochrome P450 dependent monooxygenase isoforms involved in drug metabolism, esterases, alcohol dehydrogenases, aldehyde dehydrogenases, peroxidases, glutathione S-transferases, N-acetyl transferases, uridinyl diphosphate glucuronyl transferases and sulfotransferases. Results show that all these enzymes involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics are expressed and functional in the EHS and 3D models. Also, the Vmax/Km ratios (estimating the intrinsic metabolic clearances) show that the metabolic abilities are the most often comparable between the skin models and EHS. These results indicate that the 3D models can substitute themselves for EHS to select cosmetic ingredients on the basis of their metabolism, efficacy or/and safety. PMID:25808006

  1. Parvoviruses Cause Nuclear Envelope Breakdown by Activating Key Enzymes of Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Porwal, Manvi; Cohen, Sarah; Snoussi, Kenza; Popa-Wagner, Ruth; Anderson, Fenja; Dugot-Senant, Nathalie; Wodrich, Harald; Dinsart, Christiane; Kleinschmidt, Jürgen A.; Panté, Nelly; Kann, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Disassembly of the nuclear lamina is essential in mitosis and apoptosis requiring multiple coordinated enzymatic activities in nucleus and cytoplasm. Activation and coordination of the different activities is poorly understood and moreover complicated as some factors translocate between cytoplasm and nucleus in preparatory phases. Here we used the ability of parvoviruses to induce nuclear membrane breakdown to understand the triggers of key mitotic enzymes. Nuclear envelope disintegration was shown upon infection, microinjection but also upon their application to permeabilized cells. The latter technique also showed that nuclear envelope disintegration was independent upon soluble cytoplasmic factors. Using time-lapse microscopy, we observed that nuclear disassembly exhibited mitosis-like kinetics and occurred suddenly, implying a catastrophic event irrespective of cell- or type of parvovirus used. Analyzing the order of the processes allowed us to propose a model starting with direct binding of parvoviruses to distinct proteins of the nuclear pore causing structural rearrangement of the parvoviruses. The resulting exposure of domains comprising amphipathic helices was required for nuclear envelope disintegration, which comprised disruption of inner and outer nuclear membrane as shown by electron microscopy. Consistent with Ca++ efflux from the lumen between inner and outer nuclear membrane we found that Ca++ was essential for nuclear disassembly by activating PKC. PKC activation then triggered activation of cdk-2, which became further activated by caspase-3. Collectively our study shows a unique interaction of a virus with the nuclear envelope, provides evidence that a nuclear pool of executing enzymes is sufficient for nuclear disassembly in quiescent cells, and demonstrates that nuclear disassembly can be uncoupled from initial phases of mitosis. PMID:24204256

  2. Application of the Key Events Dose-response Framework to Folate Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jing; Wang, Bing; Sahyoun, Nadine R

    2016-06-10

    Folate is a vitamin that plays a role as a cofactor and coenzyme in many essential reactions. These reactions are interrelated and any change in folate homeostasis could affect other reactions. With food fortified with folic acid, and use of multivitamin, unmetabolized folic acid (UMFA) has been detected in blood circulation, particularly among older adults. This has raised concern about the potential harmful effect of high folic acid intake and UMFA on health conditions such as cognitive dysfunction and cancer. To examine what is known about folate metabolism and the release of circulating UMFA, the Key Events Dose-Response Framework (KEDRF) was used to review each of the major key events, dose-response characteristics and homeostatic mechanisms of folate metabolism. The intestine, liver and kidneys each play essential roles in regulating body folate homeostasis. But the determining event in folate metabolism leading to the release of UMFA in circulation appears to be the saturation of dihydrofolate reductase in the liver. However, at each of the key events in folate metabolism, limited information is available on threshold, homeostatic regulation and intracellular effects of folic acid. More studies are needed to fill in the knowledge gaps for quantitatively characterizing the dose-effect relationship especially in light of the call for extending folate fortification to other foods. PMID:25674817

  3. The Genes and Enzymes of Phosphonate Metabolism by Bacteria, and Their Distribution in the Marine Environment

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal-Chiu, Juan F.; Quinn, John P.; McGrath, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Phosphonates are compounds that contain the chemically stable carbon–phosphorus (C–P) bond. They are widely distributed amongst more primitive life forms including many marine invertebrates and constitute a significant component of the dissolved organic phosphorus reservoir in the oceans. Virtually all biogenic C–P compounds are synthesized by a pathway in which the key step is the intramolecular rearrangement of phosphoenolpyruvate to phosphonopyruvate. However C–P bond cleavage by degradative microorganisms is catalyzed by a number of enzymes – C–P lyases, C–P hydrolases, and others of as-yet-uncharacterized mechanism. Expression of some of the pathways of phosphonate catabolism is controlled by ambient levels of inorganic P (Pi) but for others it is Pi-independent. In this report we review the enzymology of C–P bond metabolism in bacteria, and also present the results of an in silico investigation of the distribution of the genes that encode the pathways responsible, in both bacterial genomes and in marine metagenomic libraries, and their likely modes of regulation. Interrogation of currently available whole-genome bacterial sequences indicates that some 10% contain genes encoding putative pathways of phosphonate biosynthesis while ∼40% encode one or more pathways of phosphonate catabolism. Analysis of metagenomic data from the global ocean survey suggests that some 10 and 30%, respectively, of bacterial genomes across the sites sampled encode these pathways. Catabolic routes involving phosphonoacetate hydrolase, C–P lyase(s), and an uncharacterized 2-aminoethylphosphonate degradative sequence were predominant, and it is likely that both substrate-inducible and Pi-repressible mechanisms are involved in their regulation. The data we present indicate the likely importance of phosphonate-P in global biogeochemical P cycling, and by extension its role in marine productivity and in carbon and nitrogen dynamics in the oceans. PMID:22303297

  4. Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-Based In Vitro Metabolic Profiling Reveals Altered Enzyme Expressions in Eicosanoid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Su Hyeon; Kim, Eung Ju; Lee, Dong-Hyoung; Lee, Won-Yong; Chung, Bong Chul

    2016-01-01

    Background Eicosanoids are metabolites of arachidonic acid that are rapidly biosynthesized and degraded during inflammation, and their metabolic changes reveal altered enzyme expression following drug treatment. We developed an eicosanoid profiling method and evaluated their changes on drug treatment. Methods Simultaneous quantitative profiling of 32 eicosanoids in liver S9 fractions obtained from rabbits with carrageenan-induced inflammation was performed and validated by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry coupled to anion-exchange solid-phase purification. Results The limit of quantification for the devised method ranged from 0.5 to 20.0 ng/mg protein, and calibration linearity was achieved (R2>0.99). The precision (% CV) and accuracy (% bias) ranged from 4.7 to 10.3% and 88.4 to 110.9%, respectively, and overall recoveries ranged from 58.0 to 105.3%. Our method was then applied and showed that epitestosterone treatment reduced the levels of all eicosanoids that were generated by cyclooxygenases and lipoxygenases. Conclusions Quantitative eicosanoid profiling combined with in vitro metabolic assays may be useful for evaluating metabolic changes affected by drugs during eicosanoid metabolism. PMID:27139607

  5. Enzymes of sphingosine metabolism as potential pharmacological targets for therapeutic intervention in cancer.

    PubMed

    Cuvillier, Olivier; Levade, Thierry

    2003-05-01

    Whereas some sphingolipids such as sphingoid bases and ceramide can mediate and induce cell killing, other sphingolipids such as sphingosine 1-phosphate promote cell survival or proliferation. The tight equilibrium between the intracellular levels of each of these biomodulators is controlled by the various enzymes that either produce or degrade these lipid molecules. Herein, the effects of sphingoid bases and their derivatives on the regulation of (cancer) cell growth and death are reviewed. In addition, the consequences of pharmacological manipulation of the enzymes that govern sphingoid base metabolism on in vitro and in vivo tumor cell growth are presented. Further development of pharmacological tools aimed at interfering with the metabolism of sphingolipids is expected to provide new avenues in the treatment of cancers as well as other diseases. PMID:12676517

  6. Dual function of MIPS1 as a metabolic enzyme and transcriptional regulator.

    PubMed

    Latrasse, David; Jégu, Teddy; Meng, Pin-Hong; Mazubert, Christelle; Hudik, Elodie; Delarue, Marianne; Charon, Céline; Crespi, Martin; Hirt, Heribert; Raynaud, Cécile; Bergounioux, Catherine; Benhamed, Moussa

    2013-03-01

    Because regulation of its activity is instrumental either to support cell proliferation and growth or to promote cell death, the universal myo-inositol phosphate synthase (MIPS), responsible for myo-inositol biosynthesis, is a critical enzyme of primary metabolism. Surprisingly, we found this enzyme to be imported in the nucleus and to interact with the histone methyltransferases ATXR5 and ATXR6, raising the question of whether MIPS1 has a function in transcriptional regulation. Here, we demonstrate that MIPS1 binds directly to its promoter to stimulate its own expression by locally inhibiting the spreading of ATXR5/6-dependent heterochromatin marks coming from a transposable element. Furthermore, on activation of pathogen response, MIPS1 expression is reduced epigenetically, providing evidence for a complex regulatory mechanism acting at the transcriptional level. Thus, in plants, MIPS1 appears to have evolved as a protein that connects cellular metabolism, pathogen response and chromatin remodeling. PMID:23341037

  7. Enzyme

    MedlinePlus

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  8. Inhibitory action of Epilobium hirsutum extract and its constituent ellagic acid on drug-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Celik, Gurbet; Semiz, Aslı; Karakurt, Serdar; Gencler-Ozkan, Ayse Mine; Arslan, Sevki; Adali, Orhan; Sen, Alaattin

    2016-04-01

    Epilobium hirsutum (EH) is a medicinal plant for treating various diseases. Despite its wide usage, there is no available information about its potential influences on drug metabolism. The present study was undertaken to determine the in vivo effects of EH on hepatic CYP2B, CYP2C, CYP2D, and CYP3A enzymes that are primarily involved in drug metabolism. Male Wistar rats were injected intraperitoneally with EH water extract (EHWE) and ellagic acid (EA) at a daily dose of 37.5 and 20 mg/kg, respectively, for 9 days and hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes were assessed at activity, protein and mRNA levels. Erythromycin N-demethylase activity was inhibited by 53 and 21 % in EHWE- and EA-treated rats, respectively. Benzphetamine N-demethylase and 7-benzyloxyresorufin-O-debenzylase activities were decreased by 53 and 43 %, and 57 and 57 % in EHWE-and EA-treated rats, respectively. Moreover, protein levels of CYP2B1, CYP2C6, CYP2D2, and CYP3A1 also decreased by 55, 15, 33, and 82 % as a result of EHWE treatment of rats, respectively. Similarly, CYP2B1, CYP2C6, CYP2D2, and CYP3A1 protein levels decreased by 62, 63, 49, and 37 % with EA treatment, respectively. qRT-PCR analyses also showed that mRNA levels of these enzymes were significantly inhibited with bothEHWE and EA treatments. In conclusion, inhibition of drug clearances leading to drug toxicity because of the lowered activity and expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes might be observed in the people who used EH as complementary herbal remedy that might be contributed by its EA content. PMID:25425117

  9. Proteomic analysis for the impact of hypercholesterolemia on expressions of hepatic drug transporters and metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Pu, Qiang-Hong; Wu, Ming-Jun; Yu, Chao

    2016-10-01

    1. Our objective is to investigate the alterations of hepatic drug transporters and metabolizing enzymes in hypercholesterolemia. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed high-cholesterol chows for 8 weeks to induce hypercholesterolemia. Protein levels of hepatic drug transporters and metabolizing enzymes were analyzed by iTRAQ labeling coupled with LC TRIPLE-TOF. 2. Total 239 differentially expressed proteins were identified using proteomic analysis. Among those, protein levels of hepatic drug transporters (MRP2, ABCD3, OAT2, SLC25A12, SCL38A3, SLC2A2 and SLC25A5) and metabolizing enzymes (CYP2B3, CYP2C7, CYP2C11, CYP2C13, CYP4A2 and UGT2B) were markedly reduced, but the levels of CYP2C6 and CYP2E1 were increased in hypercholesterolemia group compared to control. Decreased expressions of drug transporters MRP2 and OAT2 were further confirmed by real time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) and western blot. 3. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed that these differentially expressed proteins were regulated by various signaling pathways including nuclear receptors and inflammatory cytokines. One of the nuclear receptor candidates, liver X receptor alpha (LXRα), was further validated by RT-qPCR and western blot. Additionally, LXRα agonist T0901317 rescued the reduced expressions of MRP2 and OAT2 in HepG2 cells in hypercholesterolemic serum treatment. 4. Our present results indicated that hypercholesterolemia affected the expressions of various drug transporters and metabolizing enzymes in liver via nuclear receptors pathway. Especially, decreased function of LXRα contributes to the reduced expressions of MRP2 and OAT2. PMID:26887802

  10. The effect of enzyme inhibition on the metabolism and activation of tacrine by human liver microsomes.

    PubMed Central

    Spaldin, V; Madden, S; Pool, W F; Woolf, T F; Park, B K

    1994-01-01

    1. Tacrine (1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-9-aminoacridine-hydrochloride: THA) underwent metabolism in vitro by a panel (n = 12) of human liver microsomes genotyped for CYP2D6, in the presence of NADPH, to both protein-reactive and stable metabolites. 2. There was considerable variation in the extent of THA metabolism amongst human livers. Protein-reactive metabolite formation showed a 10-fold variation (0.6 +/- 0.1%-5.2 +/- 0.8% of incubated radioactivity mg-1 protein) whilst stable metabolites showed a 3-fold variation (24.3 +/- 1.7%-78.6 +/- 2.6% of incubated radioactivity). 3. Using cytochrome P450 isoform specific inhibitors CYP1A2 was identified as the major enzyme involved in all routes of THA metabolism. 4. There was a high correlation between aromatic and alicyclic hydroxylation (r = 0.92, P < 0.0001) consistent with these biotransformations being catalysed by the same enzymes. 5. Enoxacin (ENOX), cimetidine (CIM) and chloroquine (CQ) inhibited THA metabolism by a preferential decrease in the bioactivation to protein-reactive, and hence potentially toxic, species. The inhibitory potency of ENOX and CIM was increased significantly upon pre-incubation with microsomes and NADPH. 6. Covalent binding correlated with 7-OH-THA formation before (r = 0.792, P < 0.0001) and after (r = 0.73, P < 0.0001) inhibition by CIM, consistent with a two-step mechanism in the formation of protein-reactive metabolite(s) via a 7-OH intermediate. 7. The use of enzyme inhibitors may provide a useful tool for examining the relationship between the metabolism and toxicity of THA in vivo. PMID:7946932