Science.gov

Sample records for keystone policy dialogue

  1. National policy dialogue on state and federal regulation of the electricity industry - staff report on a Keystone policy dialogue

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    For over two years, The Keystone Center facilitated a dialogue on State and Federal Regulation of the Electricity Industry. The intent of this report is to assist policy-makers faced with decisions about changes to traditional utility regulation and planning and provide an overview of a diverse group`s deliberations on regulatory jurisdictional conflicts. This report is not a consensus document, rather it is a staff written summary of two years of discussion on the issues. The participants in the Keystone Dialogue believed that all affected interests could benefit from, if nothing else, a summary of their discussions of state/federal issues. The electric utility industry is one of the last remaining, heavily regulated industries in the United States. Rate and corporate regulation is split between state and federal governments and there is distinct regulatory authority at each level. For example, retail rate regulation occurs at the state level, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission is responsible for wholesale rate regulation under the Federal Power Act, and the Securities and Exchange Commission oversees registered utility holding companies as defined under the Public Utility Holding Company Act of 1935. This jurisdictional split between state and federal regulation has evolved over many years through legislation and litigation on such matters. The creation of this allocation of regulatory responsibility was initiated in 1935 with the passage of the Public Utility Holding Company Act and the Federal Power Act when the economic and technological changes that are now occurring in the industry simply could not have been envisioned.

  2. Utility planning using least-cost principles and the role of externalities - staff report on a Keystone policy dialogue

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    For over two years, The Keystone Center facilitated a two-phase dialogue on Utility Planning Using Least-Cost Principles and, in the second phase, on the role of Externalities. The intent of this report is to assist policy-makers faced with decisions about changes to traditional utility regulation and planning. This report is not a consensus document, rather it is staff written summary of two years of discussion on the issues. As a concept, least-cost planning has been discussed since the 1970`s and many states have implemented such programs since the mid-1980`s. Yet, the actual goals and objectives of least-cost planning remain a source of controversy between affected interest groups. Some industry observers believe that least-cost planning can help reconcile the often conflicting demands between increased capacity requirements and concerns about the external costs of power production. In traditional utility regulation practices, capital investments are rewarded and revenue is a direct function of sales. However, a number state public utility commissions have altered their practices to allow for returns on investments in more efficient end-use equipment (also known as ratebasing conservation) and adjusting revenues to account for sales lost due to utility conservation programs. Other states are planning these types of changes. Still others are observing the impacts of the changes before they commit.

  3. Energy and Obesity--The 2008 Keystone Youth Policy Summits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NCSSSMST Journal, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Keystone Science School and Keystone Center for Science and Public Policy programs blend learning in the natural world with developing mediation and conflict resolution skills. Since 2004, these two divisions of The Keystone Center in Colorado have partnered with the National Consortium for Specialized Secondary Schools of Mathematics, Science and…

  4. Challenging Political Spectacle through Grassroots Policy Dialogues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winton, Sue; Evans, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Can simply talking about policy strengthen democracy? Drawing on data collected for case studies of one Canadian and two U.S. grassroots organizations, we demonstrate that taking part in policy dialogues hosted by grassroots organizations enables participants to gain greater clarity regarding policy issues, policy processes, and citizens'…

  5. Shaping the Education Policy Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Douglas E.; Crowson, Robert L.; Shipps, Dorothy

    2011-01-01

    One important hallmark of William Lowe Boyd's scholarship was his uncanny ability to identify and articulate changes in the key ideas that shape and reshape scholarly, professional, and public discussions of educational policy and politics. Whether one thinks about debates over centralization and decentralization of policy control, changes in…

  6. Democracy in Education through Community-Based Policy Dialogues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winton, Sue

    2010-01-01

    In 2008, People for Education, an Ontario-based parent-led organization, hosted eight policy dialogues with citizens about possibilities for the province's public schools. Policy dialogues are conversations about policy issues, ideas, processes, and outcomes where participants share their knowledge, perspectives, and experiences. In small groups…

  7. Dialogue: Manpower Policies for the 70's

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Generation, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Summarizes the results of a discussion among S. M. Miller, R. D. Corwin, Dennis A. Derryck, Marcia Freedman, Sar Levitan, Jerome Rosow, Robert Schrank, and Elwood Taub on manpower policies for the 1970's. (JM)

  8. Public Policy, Science, and Environmental Risk. Brookings Dialogues on Public Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panem, Sandra, Ed.

    This workshop explored the complex issues involved in scientific measurement of environmental risk. Specific purposes were to articulate policy issues that concern the use of scientific data in environmental risk assessment and to contribute to the dialogue from which better policy might emerge. Viewpoints of workshop participants from the…

  9. Celebrity Climate Contrarians: Understanding a keystone species in contemporary climate science-policy-public interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boykoff, M. T.

    2012-12-01

    Since the 1980s, a keystone species called 'climate contrarians' has emerged and thrived. Through resistance to dominant interpretations of scientific evidence, and often outlier views on optimal responses to climate threats, contrarians have raised many meta-level questions: for instance, questions involve to what extent have their varied interventions been effective in terms of sparking a new and wise Copernican revolution; or do their amplified voices instead service entrenched carbon-based industry interests while they blend debates over 'climate change' with other culture wars? While the value of their influence has generated numerous debates, there is no doubt that climate contrarians have had significant influence on climate science, policy and public communities in ways that are larger than would be expected from their relative abundance in society. As such, a number of these actors have achieved 'celebrity status' in science-policy circles, and, at times, larger public spaces. This presentation focuses on how - particularly through amplified mass media attention to their movements - various outlier interventions have demonstrated themselves to be (often deliberately) detrimental to efforts that seek to enlarge rather than constrict the spectrum of possibility for mobilizing appropriate responses to ongoing climate challenges. Also, this work analyses the growth pathways of these charismatic megafauna through interview data and participant observations completed by the author at the 2011 Heartland Institute's Sixth International Conference on Climate Change. This provides detail on how outlier perspectives characterized as climate contrarians do work in these spaces under the guise of public intellectualism to achieve intended goals and objectives. The research undertaken and related in the presentation here seeks to better understand motivations that prop up these contrarian stances, such as possible ideological or evidentiary disagreement to the orthodox

  10. Social movement heterogeneity in public policy framing: A multi-stakeholder analysis of the Keystone XL pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesley, David T. A.

    In 2011, stakeholders with differing objectives formed an alliance to oppose the Keystone XL heavy oil pipeline. The alliance, which came to be known as "Tar Sands Action," implemented various strategies, some of which were more successful than others. Tar Sands Action was a largely heterogeneous alliance that included indigenous tribes, environmentalists, ranchers, landowners, and trade unions, making it one of the more diverse social movement organizations in history. Each of these stakeholder categories had distinct demographic structures, representing an array of racial, ethnic, educational, occupational, and political backgrounds. Participants also had differing policy objectives that included combating climate change and protecting jobs, agricultural interests, water resources, wildlife, and human health. The current dissertation examines the Tar Sands Action movement to understand how heterogeneous social movement organizations mobilize supporters, maintain alliances, and create effective frames to achieve policy objectives. A multi-stakeholder analysis of the development, evolution and communication of frames concerning the Keystone XL controversy provides insight into the role of alliances, direct action, and the news media in challenging hegemonic frames. Previous research has ignored the potential value that SMO heterogeneity provides by treating social movements as culturally homogenous. However, diversity has been shown to affect performance in business organizations. The current study demonstrates that under some circumstances, diversity can also improve policy outcomes. Moreover, policy frames are shown to be more effective in sustaining news media and public interest through a process the author calls dynamic frame sequencing (DFS). DFS refers to a process implementing different stakeholder frames at strategically opportune moments. Finally, Tar Sands Action was one of the first SMOs to rely heavily on social media to build alliances, disseminate

  11. Speaking across Difference in Community Dialogues on Affirmative Action Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Kristen L.; Moses, Michele S.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the relevance of participants' social group differences with regard to the processes and outcomes of community dialogues on affirmative action. We found that participants' professional status was most salient to both the quantity of participants' contributions as well as their persuasiveness within the dialogues, with…

  12. US-Japan energy policy dialogue. [Final] report, June 1991--December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-16

    The Atlantic Council has cooperated in an ongoing dialogue on energy policy issues with key Japanese organizations for the past twelve years. These Japanese organizations are the Committee for Energy Policy Promotion (CEPP) and the Institute of Energy Economics (IEE). The members of CEPP are major energy supplier and user companies. The IEE conducts sophisticated research and prepares policy papers on a range of international and Japanese energy issues. This energy dialogue is the only long-term US-Japan dialogue which engages CEPP/IEE members. Over the past twelve years the US-Japan energy dialogue has met seventeen times, with alternating meetings held in Tokyo, Hawaii, and Washington, DC. While the dialogue is a private sector activity, US and Japanese government officials are kept informed on the program and are invited to participate in the meetings in Washington and Tokyo. Major benefits of this activity have included: Establishment of close working relationships among Japanese and US private sector energy institutions and experts; exchange of papers on energy issues among participants and on a selected basis to others in the private and governmental sectors; facilitation of separate US-Japanese work on policy issues - for example a joint US-Japan cooperative policy paper on global climate change published in 1991, some government representatives participated in a May 1991 meeting on this subject. Encouragement of Japanese participation in separate Atlantic Council programs on US energy policy imperatives (1990); technology cooperation with developing countries in the field of energy supply and use for sustainable development (1992); creation of a World Energy Efficiency Association (1993); and a US-Japan-Newly Independent States project on NIS energy policy (1992--1994).

  13. Education Community Dialogue towards Building a Policy Agenda for Adult Education: Reflections Drawn from Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirano, Tatiana Lotierzo; Giannecchini, Laura; Magalhaes, Giovanna Mode; Munhoz, Fabiola; Croso, Camilla

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we share the experience of the "Amplifying Voices" initiative. Held by the Latin American Campaign for the Right to Education (CLADE) within the scope of public policy advocacy, "Amplifying Voices" applies the principles of consultation and dialogue in youth and adult education communities, aiming at a stronger…

  14. Promoting Evidence to Policy Link on the Control of Infectious Diseases of Poverty in Nigeria: Outcome of A Multi-Stakeholders Policy Dialogue

    PubMed Central

    Uneke, Chigozie Jesse; Ebeh Ezeoha, Abel; Uro-Chukwu, Henry; Ezeonu, Chinonyelum Thecla; Ogbu, Ogbonnaya; Onwe, Friday; Edoga, Chima

    2015-01-01

    Background: In Nigeria, malaria, schistosomiasis and lymphatic filariasis are among infectious diseases of poverty (IDP) with severe health burden and require effective policy strategies for their control. In this study, we investigated the value of policy brief and policy dialogue as excellent policymaking mechanisms that enable policymakers to adapt effective evidence informed policy for IDP control. Methods: A policy brief was developed on the control of malaria, schistosomiasis and lymphatic filariasis and subjected to deliberations in a one-day multi-stakeholder policy dialogue held in Ebonyi State Nigeria. A modified cross sectional intervention study design was used in this investigation. Structured pre-tested questionnaires were used to evaluate the policy brief document and policy dialogue process at the end of the policy dialogue. Results: Forty-seven policymakers participated in the dialogue. An analysis of the response on the policy brief regarding context, different features of the problem; policy options and key implementation considerations indicated the mean ratings (MNRs) mostly ranged from 6.40-6.85 on 7 point scale. The over-all assessment of the policy brief had MNR at 6.54. The analysis of the response on the policy dialogue regarding the level of priority of policy issue, opportunity to discuss different features of the problem and options for addressing the problem, and the MNRs mostly ranged from 6.50-6.82. The overall assessment of the policy dialogue had MNR at 6.72. Conclusion: Policy dialogues can allow research evidence to be considered together with views, experiences and tacit knowledge of policymakers and can enhance evidence-to-policy link. PMID:26290826

  15. Community-based dialogue: engaging communities of color in the United states' genetics policy conversation.

    PubMed

    Bonham, Vence L; Citrin, Toby; Modell, Stephen M; Franklin, Tené Hamilton; Bleicher, Esther W B; Fleck, Leonard M

    2009-06-01

    Engaging communities of color in the genetics public policy conversation is important for the translation of genetics research into strategies aimed at improving the health of all. Implementing model public participation and consultation processes can be informed by the Communities of Color Genetics Policy Project, which engaged individuals from African American and Latino communities of diverse socioeconomic levels in the process of "rational democratic deliberation" on ethical and policy issues stretching from genome research to privacy and discrimination concerns to public education. The results of the study included the development of a participatory framework based on a combination of the theory of democratic deliberation and the community-based public health model which we describe as "community-based dialogue." PMID:19451407

  16. Literacy, Knowledge and Development: South-South Policy Dialogue on Quality Education for Adults and Young People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Madhu, Ed.; Castro Mussot, Luz-Maria, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This publication contains the results of the conference "South-South Policy Dialogue on Quality Education for Adults and Young People" that took place in Mexico City in 2005. Articles were written by participants who presented their national programmes from the governmental perspective, which were reflected in the literacy policies, but there were…

  17. US-Japan energy policy dialogue. [Contains a list of attendees, agenda, report summaries, and a financial report

    SciTech Connect

    Guertin, Donald L.; Davis, W. Kenneth; Ikuta, Toyoaki

    1993-03-16

    The Atlantic Council has cooperated in an ongoing dialogue on energy policy issues with key Japanese organizations for the past twelve years. These Japanese organizations are the Committee for Energy Policy Promotion (CEPP) and the Institute of Energy Economics (IEE). The members of CEPP are major energy supplier and user companies. The IEE conducts sophisticated research and prepares policy papers on a range of international and Japanese energy issues. This energy dialogue is the only long-term US-Japan dialogue which engages CEPP/IEE members. Over the past twelve years the US-Japan energy dialogue has met seventeen times, with alternating meetings held in Tokyo, Hawaii, and Washington, DC. While the dialogue is a private sector activity, US and Japanese government officials are kept informed on the program and are invited to participate in the meetings in Washington and Tokyo. Major benefits of this activity have included: Establishment of close working relationships among Japanese and US private sector energy institutions and experts; exchange of papers on energy issues among participants and on a selected basis to others in the private and governmental sectors; facilitation of separate US-Japanese work on policy issues - for example a joint US-Japan cooperative policy paper on global climate change published in 1991, some government representatives participated in a May 1991 meeting on this subject. Encouragement of Japanese participation in separate Atlantic Council programs on US energy policy imperatives (1990); technology cooperation with developing countries in the field of energy supply and use for sustainable development (1992); creation of a World Energy Efficiency Association (1993); and a US-Japan-Newly Independent States project on NIS energy policy (1992--1994).

  18. Keystone State of Confusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Reginald

    2009-01-01

    When high school seniors begin searching for the best school to fit their higher education goals, they may need a road map, tour guide and interpreter to help them sort through Pennsylvania's higher education universe. For sure there are seemingly endless choices--public, private, large, small, urban and rural. The Keystone State boasts nearly 200…

  19. The Keystone Pathogen Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Hajishengallis, George; Darveau, Richard P.; Curtis, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the importance of the human microbiome in host health and disease. However, for the most part the mechanisms by which the microbiome mediates disease, or protection from it, remain poorly understood. The “keystone pathogen” hypothesis holds that certain low-abundance microbial pathogens can orchestrate inflammatory disease by remodelling a normally benign microbiota into a dysbiotic one. In this Opinion, we critically assess the available literature in support of this hypothesis, which may provide a novel conceptual basis for the development of targeted diagnostic and treatment modalities for complex dysbiotic diseases. PMID:22941505

  20. Education as Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazepides, Tasos

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show that genuine dialogue is a refined human achievement and probably the most valid criterion on the basis of which we can evaluate educational or social policy and practice. The paper explores the prerequisites of dialogue in the language games, the common certainties, the rules of logic and the variety of common…

  1. Double keystone bird in a keystone species complex.

    PubMed Central

    Daily, G C; Ehrlich, P R; Haddad, N M

    1993-01-01

    Species in a Colorado subalpine ecosystem show subtle interdependences. Red-naped sapsuckers play two distinct keystone roles. They excavate nest cavities in fungus-infected aspens that are required as nest sites by two species of swallows, and they drill sap wells into willows that provide abundant nourishment for themselves, hummingbirds, orange-crowned warblers, chipmunks, and an array of other sap robbers. The swallows thus depend on, and the sap robbers benefit from, a keystone species complex comprised of sapsuckers, willows, aspens, and a heartwood fungus. Disappearance of any element of the complex could cause an unanticipated unraveling of the community. PMID:11607351

  2. Policies and Processes for Social Inclusion: Using EquiFrame and EquIPP for Policy Dialogue

    PubMed Central

    MacLachlan, Malcolm; Mannan, Hasheem; Huss, Tessy; Munthali, Alister; Amin, Mutamad

    2016-01-01

    The application of EquiFrame in the analysis of sexual and reproductive health policies by Ivanova et al to a new thematic area, their selection of only some of the Core Concepts of human rights in health service provision and the addition of new vulnerable groups relevant to the purpose of their analysis, are all very welcome developments. We also applaud their application of EquiFrame to policies in countries where it has not previously been used, along with their use of interviews with policy-makers to produce a deeper understanding of policy processes. We argue that clear justification for the inclusion of additional, or replacement of some exiting vulnerable groups within EquiFrame should be accompanied by clear definitions of such groups, along with the evidence-base that justifies their classification as a vulnerable or marginalised group. To illustrate the versatility of EquiFrame, we summarise a range of ways in which it has been used across a number of regions; including a brief Case Study of its use to develop the National Health Policy of Malawi. While EquiFrame focuses on policy content, we preview a new policy analysis tool – Equity and Inclusion in Policy Processes (EquIPP) – which assesses the extent of equity and inclusion in broader policy processes. Together, EquiFrame and EquIPP can be used to help governments and civil society ensure that policies are addressing the much stronger emphasis on social inclusion, now apparent in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). PMID:26927591

  3. Conservation of resources for sustainable ecosystems: a dialogue on connecting science, policy,and management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For over a century rangeland science has focused, with varying degrees of success, on issues of sustainable goods and services. Our goal in this paper is to analyze this research history for insights into how best to link science, policy, and management of natural resources. We describe three broad ...

  4. Human cloning laws, human dignity and the poverty of the policy making dialogue

    PubMed Central

    Caulfield, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    Background The regulation of human cloning continues to be a significant national and international policy issue. Despite years of intense academic and public debate, there is little clarity as to the philosophical foundations for many of the emerging policy choices. The notion of "human dignity" is commonly used to justify cloning laws. The basis for this justification is that reproductive human cloning necessarily infringes notions of human dignity. Discussion The author critiques one of the most commonly used ethical justifications for cloning laws – the idea that reproductive cloning necessarily infringes notions of human dignity. He points out that there is, in fact, little consensus on point and that the counter arguments are rarely reflected in formal policy. Rarely do domestic or international instruments provide an operational definition of human dignity and there is rarely an explanation of how, exactly, dignity is infringed in the context reproductive cloning. Summary It is the author's position that the lack of thoughtful analysis of the role of human dignity hurts the broader public debate about reproductive cloning, trivializes the value of human dignity as a normative principle and makes it nearly impossible to critique the actual justifications behind many of the proposed policies. PMID:12887735

  5. Conservation of Resources for Sustainable Ecosystems: A Dialogue on Connecting Science, Policy, and Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For over a century rangeland science has focused, with varying degrees of success, on issues of sustainable goods and services. Our goal in this paper is to analyze this research history for insights into how best to link science, policy, and management of natural resources. We describe three broa...

  6. The Importance of Negotiation for Policy Dialogue: Latin American Training Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaramillo, Maria Clara

    2004-01-01

    Over the past several decades, Latin American countries have supported processes of bringing public policy decisions on education closer to the people concerned. Participation at all levels of decision-making processes has generally been highly valued. Nonetheless, these decentralization efforts came about without governments taking the necessary…

  7. Sharpening the Dialogue: Engaging Policymakers in the Alignment of Appropriations, Tuition, and Financial Aid Policy. Exchanges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michelau, Demaree K.

    2006-01-01

    This issue of "Exchanges" highlights a number of issues in the challenge to align appropriations, tuition and financial aid (AFTA) policy. Two distinct trends in the nature of the American student population are identified: significant demographic shifts and the emerging necessity of serving adult learners. These shifts are prompting state…

  8. 1. Photocopied January 1973 from the Keystone Bridge Company Album, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopied January 1973 from the Keystone Bridge Company Album, 1874. THE KEYSTONE BRIDGE COMPANY: LUCY FURNACE. - Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Parkersburg Bridge, Ohio River, Parkersburg, Wood County, WV

  9. Scientific research, stakeholders, and policy: continuing dialogue during research on radionuclides on Amchitka Island, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Powers, Charles W; Kosson, David S; Halverson, John; Siekaniec, Gregory; Morkill, Anne; Patrick, Robert; Duffy, Lawrence K; Barnes, David

    2007-10-01

    changed the research thrust were (1) the inclusion of Aleut hunters and fishers on the biological expedition itself to ensure that subsistence foods and methods were represented, and (2) the addition of a fisheries biologist on a NOAA research trawler to allow sampling of commercial fishes. Although the original research design called for the collection of biota by Aleut subsistence fishermen, and by a commercial fishing boat, the research was modified with continued stakeholder input to actually include Aleuts and a fisheries biologist on the expeditions to ensure their representation. The inclusion of stakeholders during the development of protocols and the research itself improved the overall quality of the investigation, while making it more relevant to the interested and affected parties. Final responsibility for the design and execution of the research and radionuclide analysis rested with the researchers, but the process of stakeholder inclusion made the research more valuable as a source of credible information and for public policy decisions. PMID:17175094

  10. The Paradox of Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The Council of Europe's 2008 "White Paper on Intercultural Dialogue" signalled--with a measure of deep concern--the limits of multiculturalism and its attendant problems of identity politics, communal segregation, and the undermining of rights and freedoms in culturally closed communities. The White Paper proposed the replacement of the policy of…

  11. Keystone feasibility study. Final report. Vol. 4

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-12-01

    Volume four of the Keystone coal-to-methanol project includes the following: (1) project management; (2) economic and financial analyses; (3) market analysis; (4) process licensing and agreements; and (5) appendices. 24 figures, 27 tables.

  12. Beyond engagement in working with children in eight Nairobi slums to address safety, security, and housing: Digital tools for policy and community dialogue.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Claudia; Chege, Fatuma; Maina, Lucy; Rothman, Margot

    2016-01-01

    This article studies the ways in which researchers working in the area of health and social research and using participatory visual methods might extend the reach of participant-generated creations such as photos and drawings to engage community leaders and policy-makers. Framed as going 'beyond engagement', the article explores the idea of the production of researcher-led digital dialogue tools, focusing on one example, based on a series of visual arts-based workshops with children from eight slums in Nairobi addressing issues of safety, security, and well-being in relation to housing. The authors conclude that there is a need for researchers to embark upon the use of visual tools to expand the life and use of visual productions, and in particular to ensure meaningful participation of communities in social change. PMID:27132645

  13. Keystone Method: A Learning Paradigm in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siadat, M. Vali; Musial, Paul M.; Sagher, Yoram

    2008-01-01

    This study reports the effects of an integrated instructional program (the Keystone Method) on the students' performance in mathematics and reading, and tracks students' persistence and retention. The subject of the study was a large group of students in remedial mathematics classes at the college, willing to learn but lacking basic educational…

  14. Battle over proposed Keystone pipeline continues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-07-01

    Opposing sides in the battle over the proposed construction of the controversial Keystone XL pipeline continue to push their messages on the issue. The American Petroleum Institute (API) announced on 9 July that it has launched a new advertising campaign in support of the pipeline, which, if built, will ship oil from Canadian tar sands to refineries in the Gulf of Mexico.

  15. Pack rats (Neotoma spp.): Keystone ecological engineers?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential role of two species of pack rats (Neotoma albigula and Neotoma micropus) as keystone ecological engineers was examined by estimating the species diversity of invertebrates living in the nest middens, and nitrogen mineralization rates in soils associated with the middens. Although pack-...

  16. Dialogue and Its Conditions: The Construction of European Citizenship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgson, Naomi

    2011-01-01

    The Council of Europe's "White Paper on Intercultural Dialogue" provides an example of the way in which dialogue has become part of the current mode of governance in Europe. Throughout current policy, the terms "dialogue" and "voice" inform the introduction of practices and tools that constitute the citizen, or active learning citizen. Notions of…

  17. Interreligious Dialogue in Schools: Beyond Asymmetry and Categorisation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riitaoja, Anna-Leena; Dervin, Fred

    2014-01-01

    Interreligious dialogue is a central objective in European and UNESCO policy and research documents, in which educational institutions are seen as central places for dialogue. In this article, we discuss this type of dialogue under the conditions of asymmetry and categorisation in two Finnish schools. Finnish education has often been lauded for…

  18. The Keystone Center final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1998-01-22

    The Keystone Center began its work with the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) in May, 1996, when The Center agreed to design, organize, and facilitate stakeholder meetings at two DOE sites: Savannah River and Hanford. These meetings were held June 24--25, 1996 for the purpose of discussing the role of EMSP in constructing a site-specific basic research agenda that maps site cleanup needs to basic science areas. Summaries of the discussions from these meetings as well as lists of the stakeholders who were invited are included as Attachment 1. In August/September 1996, the Keystone Center was asked to convene two additional site meetings using funds that remained in their contract. These meetings were held in October 1996 at Oak Ridge and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Summaries from these meetings and participant lists are included as Attachment 2.

  19. Dialogue and Team Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Game, Ann; Metcalfe, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Although dialogue is a common word in educational theory, its full significance is diluted if it is seen as a matter of exchange or negotiation of prior intellectual positions. In fact, the "dia"- of dialogue indicates "through": dialogue moves through participants and they through it. Dialogue allows participants to have thoughts they could not…

  20. 23. NORTH KEYSTONE OF PORTE COCHERE INSCRIBED 'MDCCCLII.' (1852) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. NORTH KEYSTONE OF PORTE COCHERE INSCRIBED 'MDCCCLII.' (1852) - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  1. 25. EAST KEYSTONE OF PORTE COCHERE INSCRIBED 'G. CAMERON. BUILDER.' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. EAST KEYSTONE OF PORTE COCHERE INSCRIBED 'G. CAMERON. BUILDER.' - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  2. 24. WEST KEYSTONE OF PORTE COCHERE INSCRIBED 'J. RENWICK. JR. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. WEST KEYSTONE OF PORTE COCHERE INSCRIBED 'J. RENWICK. JR. ARCHITECT.' - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  3. 2007 Youth Policy Summit Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Ellen; Fussell, Annemarie; Templin, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    The NCSSSMST (National Consortium for Specialized Secondary Schools of Mathematics, Science and Technology) and Keystone Science School co-sponsored two Youth Policy Summits during the summer of 2007. Forty students represented 10 high schools from across the country at each Summit, meeting for a week in June and August at Keystone Science School…

  4. Old and New Policies in Dialogue: Greek-Cypriot Teachers' Interpretations of a Peace-Related Initiative through Existing Policy Discourses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charalambous, Panayiota; Charalambous, Constadina; Zembylas, Michalinos

    2014-01-01

    This paper looks at teachers' interpretations of a recent and controversial Greek-Cypriot policy initiative, which aimed to promote "peaceful coexistence" between the two rival communities in conflict-ridden Cyprus. Specifically, it focuses on the ways in which Greek-Cypriot teachers constructed the relation between the new policy…

  5. 75 FR 27551 - Keystone Energy Partners, LP; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Keystone Energy Partners, LP; Notice of Filing May 10, 2010. Take notice that on December 16, 2009, Keystone Energy Partners, LP submit for filing an Updated Market...

  6. Transnational corporations as 'keystone actors' in marine ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Österblom, Henrik; Jouffray, Jean-Baptiste; Folke, Carl; Crona, Beatrice; Troell, Max; Merrie, Andrew; Rockström, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Keystone species have a disproportionate influence on the structure and function of ecosystems. Here we analyze whether a keystone-like pattern can be observed in the relationship between transnational corporations and marine ecosystems globally. We show how thirteen corporations control 11-16% of the global marine catch (9-13 million tons) and 19-40% of the largest and most valuable stocks, including species that play important roles in their respective ecosystem. They dominate all segments of seafood production, operate through an extensive global network of subsidiaries and are profoundly involved in fisheries and aquaculture decision-making. Based on our findings, we define these companies as keystone actors of the Anthropocene. The phenomenon of keystone actors represents an increasingly important feature of the human-dominated world. Sustainable leadership by keystone actors could result in cascading effects throughout the entire seafood industry and enable a critical transition towards improved management of marine living resources and ecosystems. PMID:26017777

  7. Transnational Corporations as ‘Keystone Actors’ in Marine Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Österblom, Henrik; Jouffray, Jean-Baptiste; Folke, Carl; Crona, Beatrice; Troell, Max; Merrie, Andrew; Rockström, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Keystone species have a disproportionate influence on the structure and function of ecosystems. Here we analyze whether a keystone-like pattern can be observed in the relationship between transnational corporations and marine ecosystems globally. We show how thirteen corporations control 11-16% of the global marine catch (9-13 million tons) and 19-40% of the largest and most valuable stocks, including species that play important roles in their respective ecosystem. They dominate all segments of seafood production, operate through an extensive global network of subsidiaries and are profoundly involved in fisheries and aquaculture decision-making. Based on our findings, we define these companies as keystone actors of the Anthropocene. The phenomenon of keystone actors represents an increasingly important feature of the human-dominated world. Sustainable leadership by keystone actors could result in cascading effects throughout the entire seafood industry and enable a critical transition towards improved management of marine living resources and ecosystems. PMID:26017777

  8. Dialogue and Adult Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarule, Jill Mattuck

    1992-01-01

    Discussion of the role of language and dialogue in adult learning looks at dialogue as epistemology and at talk as learning. It is proposed that the challenge in teaching and retaining adult learners is to create dialogue-rich classrooms, including many external speech opportunities, small-group discussion, and group projects. (MSE)

  9. Creating Dialogue by Storytelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Passila, Anne; Oikarinen, Tuija; Kallio, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this paper is to develop practice and theory from Augusto Boal's dialogue technique (Image Theatre) for organisational use. The paper aims to examine how the members in an organisation create dialogue together by using a dramaturgical storytelling framework where the dialogue emerges from storytelling facilitated by…

  10. Probabilistic authenticated quantum dialogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Tzonelih; Luo, Yi-Ping

    2015-12-01

    This work proposes a probabilistic authenticated quantum dialogue (PAQD) based on Bell states with the following notable features. (1) In our proposed scheme, the dialogue is encoded in a probabilistic way, i.e., the same messages can be encoded into different quantum states, whereas in the state-of-the-art authenticated quantum dialogue (AQD), the dialogue is encoded in a deterministic way; (2) the pre-shared secret key between two communicants can be reused without any security loophole; (3) each dialogue in the proposed PAQD can be exchanged within only one-step quantum communication and one-step classical communication. However, in the state-of-the-art AQD protocols, both communicants have to run a QKD protocol for each dialogue and each dialogue requires multiple quantum as well as classical communicational steps; (4) nevertheless, the proposed scheme can resist the man-in-the-middle attack, the modification attack, and even other well-known attacks.

  11. 76 FR 28026 - TransCanada Keystone Pipeline, LP; Notice of Request for Waiver

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission TransCanada Keystone Pipeline, LP; Notice of Request for Waiver Take notice that on May 2, 2011, TransCanada Keystone Pipeline, LP (TransCanada Keystone) filed a request for... changes to its committed rates. TransCanada Keystone states that good cause exists to grant such a...

  12. 5. Detail, date stone in belt course above keystone, east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Detail, date stone in belt course above keystone, east portal of Tunnel 22, view to southeast, 380mm lens with electronic flash fill. - Southern Pacific Railroad Natron Cutoff, Tunnel 22, Milepost 581.85, Oakridge, Lane County, OR

  13. Detail view of keystone sculpted head in the arched passage ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of keystone sculpted head in the arched passage to the lobby vestibule - United States Department of Commerce, Bounded by Fourteenth, Fifteenth, and E streets and Constitution Avenue, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  14. 72. Detail of keystone emblem over the main entrance to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    72. Detail of keystone emblem over the main entrance to the Carpenter's Union Hall. The inscription translates 'Labor conquers all.' - Butte Historic District, Bounded by Copper, Arizona, Mercury & Continental Streets, Butte, Silver Bow County, MT

  15. Revisiting Dialogues and Monologues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kvernbekk, Tone

    2012-01-01

    In educational discourse dialogue tends to be viewed as being (morally) superior to monologue. When we look at them as basic forms of communication, we find that dialogue is a two-way, one-to-one form and monologue is a one-way, one-to-many form. In this paper I revisit the alleged (moral) superiority of dialogue. First, I problematize certain…

  16. The keystone flap: expanding the dermatologic surgeon's armamentarium.

    PubMed

    Hessam, Schapoor; Sand, Michael; Bechara, Falk G

    2015-01-01

    First described in 2003, the keystone flap has become an established plastic and reconstructive surgery technique for the closure of soft tissue defects following the excision of skin tumors. Complex reconstruction procedures may thus be avoided [3]. In dermatosurgery, however, the keystone flap remains largely unknown.Compared to subcutaneous pedicle flaps, the keystone flap technique warrants better vascular supply by additional-ly preserving musculocutaneous and fasciocutaneous perforator vessels [4]. Moreover, the flap is hyperemic compared to the surrounding skin [5]. Adequate perfusion and its specific design result in high safety of the flap. According to both published data and the authors’ experience, the keystone flap technique is associated with a low complication rate [1, 6].In summary, the keystone flap method yields good aesthetic and functional results by preserving shape and cont-our, avoiding differences in skin coloration and preserving sensitivity (Figure 1b). The flap is particularly well suited for deep defects with exposed bones or tendons, especially on the extremities or the trunk. Alternative closing options such as secondary intention healing, primary closure, or local flaps appear less adequate in these cases. In addition, skin grafting without long-term wound conditioning–for example negative pressure wound therapy–or expensive der-mal replacement products are not very promising. Thus, the keystone flap provides the dermatosurgeon with an effective alternative to reconstruction techniques. PMID:25640508

  17. Persuasion Dialogues in ELT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutherford, Ramsey; Winks, Martin

    1978-01-01

    Some features of "persuasion dialogue" are examined, and suggestions are offered for ways in which persuasion might be used as a topic in the language class to stimulate the use of realistic language through appropriate role playing. Three dialogues are presented that illustrate different kinds of persuasion. (SW)

  18. Models of Persuasion Dialogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakken, Henry

    This chapter1 reviews formal dialogue systems for persuasion. In persuasion dialogues two or more participants try to resolve a conflict of opinion, each trying to persuade the other participants to adopt their point of view. Dialogue systems for persuasion regulate how such dialogues can be conducted and what their outcome is. Good dialogue systems ensure that conflicts of view can be resolved in a fair and effective way [6]. The term ‘persuasion dialogue’ was coined by Walton [13] as part of his influential classification of dialogues into six types according to their goal. While persuasion aims to resolve a difference of opinion, negotiation tries to resolve a conflict of interest by reaching a deal, information seeking aims at transferring information, deliberationdeliberation wants to reach a decision on a course of action, inquiry is aimed at “growth of knowledge and agreement” and quarrel is the verbal substitute of a fight. This classification leaves room for shifts of dialogues of one type to another. In particular, other types of dialogues can shift to persuasion when a conflict of opinion arises. For example, in information-seeking a conflict of opinion could arise on the credibility of a source of information, in deliberation the participants may disagree about likely effects of plans or actions and in negotiation they may disagree about the reasons why a proposal is in one’s interest.

  19. Humanising Coursebook Dialogues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmis, Ivor

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I argue that the most important thing about coursebook dialogues is not whether they are "authentic" or "inauthentic" but whether they are "plausible" as human interaction and behaviour. Coursebook dialogues are often constructed as vehicles for various kinds of language work and even sometimes as…

  20. Keystone microbiome meeting 2012: a mountain top experience

    PubMed Central

    Kostic, Aleksandar D; Garrett, Wendy S

    2012-01-01

    The joint Keystone Symposia on ‘Innate Immunity and the Microbiome' took place in March 2012 in Keystone, Colorado. Gabriel Nunez (U. Michigan, USA) and Akiko Iwasaki (Yale U., USA) organized sessions focused on innate immune sensing of microbe and damage signals, whilst Andrew Gewirtz (Georgia State U., USA), Fergus Shanahan (National U. Ireland, Ireland) and Ruth Ley (Cornell U., USA) organized the microbiome-focused session. Joint and concurrent talks, and poster sessions between the groups, made for a sensational meeting with active exchange between participants. This meeting point is focused on the microbiome meeting talks and joint sessions.

  1. Keystone Herbivores and the Evolution of Plant Defenses.

    PubMed

    Poelman, Erik H; Kessler, André

    2016-06-01

    Plants need to defend themselves against a diverse and dynamic herbivore community. Such communities may be shaped by keystone herbivores that through their feeding alter the plant phenotype as well as the likelihood of attack by other herbivores. Here, we discuss such herbivores that have a large effect on the interaction network structure with associated fitness consequences for the plant, as dominant agents of selection on plant defense traits. Merging the keystone herbivore concept with plant fitness and trait selection frameworks will provide an approach to identify which herbivores drive selection in complex multispecies interactions in natural and agricultural systems. PMID:26832946

  2. The Keystone Approach: Integration of Methodology and Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siadat, M. Vali; Peterson, Euguenia; Oseledets, Cyrill; Wang, Ming-Jer; Zhang, Guo Quan

    2012-01-01

    This article is the result of a comprehensive research study investigating the impact of computer-learning technology as well as the impact of a synergistic teaching approach (Keystone Method) on developmental mathematics classes at the college level. The study focused on mathematics skills of elementary and intermediate algebra students and…

  3. Mistletoe as a keystone resource: an experimental test.

    PubMed

    Watson, David M; Herring, Matthew

    2012-09-22

    Various entities have been designated keystone resources, but few tests have been attempted and we are unaware of any experimental manipulations of purported keystone resources. Mistletoes (Loranthaceae) provide structural and nutritional resources within canopies, and their pervasive influence on diversity led to their designation as keystone resources. We quantified the effect of mistletoe on diversity with a woodland-scale experiment, comparing bird diversities before and after all mistletoe plants were removed from 17 treatment sites, with those of 11 control sites and 12 sites in which mistletoe was naturally absent. Three years after mistletoe removal, treatment woodlands lost, on average, 20.9 per cent of their total species richness, 26.5 per cent of woodland-dependent bird species and 34.8 per cent of their woodland-dependent residents, compared with moderate increases in control sites and no significant changes in mistletoe-free sites. Treatment sites lost greater proportions of birds recorded nesting in mistletoe, but changes in species recorded feeding on mistletoe did not differ from control sites. Having confirmed the status of mistletoe as a keystone resource, we suggest that nutrient enrichment via litter-fall is the main mechanism promoting species richness, driving small-scale heterogeneity in productivity and food availability for woodland animals. This explanation applies to other parasitic plants with high turnover of enriched leaves, and the community-scale influence of these plants is most apparent in low productivity systems. PMID:22787026

  4. 21. PHOTOGRAPH OF PAGE 986 IN Keystone Coal Buyers Catalog, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. PHOTOGRAPH OF PAGE 986 IN Keystone Coal Buyers Catalog, 1922, UPPER PHOTOGRAPH, VIEW SOUTH, COMMUNITY OF ETHEL; ETHEL COAL COMPANY MINE SUPPLY BUILDING IS LOCATED IN MID-GROUND LEFT OF CENTER PARTIALLY OBSCURED BY ROOF OF HOUSE IN FOREGROUND - Ethel Coal Company & Supply Building, Left fork of Dingess Run (Ethel Hollow), Ethel, Logan County, WV

  5. Behaviour - The keystone in optimizing free-ranging ungulate production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Free-ranging animal behaviour is a keystone to optimizing free-ranging domestic animal production. This chapter focuses on several aspects that emanate from foraging including defining terms, concepts and the complexity that underlie managing animals and landscapes. Behaviour is investigated in li...

  6. Mistletoe as a keystone resource: an experimental test

    PubMed Central

    Watson, David M.; Herring, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Various entities have been designated keystone resources, but few tests have been attempted and we are unaware of any experimental manipulations of purported keystone resources. Mistletoes (Loranthaceae) provide structural and nutritional resources within canopies, and their pervasive influence on diversity led to their designation as keystone resources. We quantified the effect of mistletoe on diversity with a woodland-scale experiment, comparing bird diversities before and after all mistletoe plants were removed from 17 treatment sites, with those of 11 control sites and 12 sites in which mistletoe was naturally absent. Three years after mistletoe removal, treatment woodlands lost, on average, 20.9 per cent of their total species richness, 26.5 per cent of woodland-dependent bird species and 34.8 per cent of their woodland-dependent residents, compared with moderate increases in control sites and no significant changes in mistletoe-free sites. Treatment sites lost greater proportions of birds recorded nesting in mistletoe, but changes in species recorded feeding on mistletoe did not differ from control sites. Having confirmed the status of mistletoe as a keystone resource, we suggest that nutrient enrichment via litter-fall is the main mechanism promoting species richness, driving small-scale heterogeneity in productivity and food availability for woodland animals. This explanation applies to other parasitic plants with high turnover of enriched leaves, and the community-scale influence of these plants is most apparent in low productivity systems. PMID:22787026

  7. Impact of the Keystone XL pipeline on global oil markets and greenhouse gas emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Peter; Lazarus, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Climate policy and analysis often focus on energy production and consumption, but seldom consider how energy transportation infrastructure shapes energy systems. US President Obama has recently brought these issues to the fore, stating that he would only approve the Keystone XL pipeline, connecting Canadian oil sands with US refineries and ports, if it `does not significantly exacerbate the problem of carbon pollution'. Here, we apply a simple model to understand the implications of the pipeline for greenhouse gas emissions as a function of any resulting increase in oil sands production. We find that for every barrel of increased production, global oil consumption would increase 0.6 barrels owing to the incremental decrease in global oil prices. As a result, and depending on the extent to which the pipeline leads to greater oil sands production, the net annual impact of Keystone XL could range from virtually none to 110 million tons CO2 equivalent annually. This spread is four times wider than found by the US State Department (1-27 million tons CO2e), who did not account for global oil market effects. The approach used here, common in lifecycle analysis, could also be applied to other pending fossil fuel extraction and supply infrastructure.

  8. Keystone Flap: Versatile Flap for Reconstruction of Limb Defects

    PubMed Central

    Janna, Rakesh K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is always a constant search for a new solution to tackle defects in the limbs. The technique has to be simple, easily reproducible and performed within a short duration. The answer is keystone island flap keystone flap is a simple, less time consuming, durable and easily reproducible option to reconstruct most of the limb defects. Aim: The aim of this article is to study the usefulness of keystone flap in reconstruction of various upper and lower limb defects. Materials and Methods: This retrospective review involves study of 20 patients undergoing keystone flap reconstruction for various defects from 2012 to 2014. Patient demographic data, medical histories, comorbidities, surgical indications, defect characteristics and locations, hospitalization, complications and follow-up were evaluated and are presented as uncontrolled case series. Results: Ages of the patients were ranging from 18 to 65 y with an average of 38.75y. Among the defects, 10 were following trauma (50%), 5 were due to tumour resection (25%), 3 followed debridement of abscess (15%) and another 2 defects were due to surgical wound dehiscence (10%). The largest defect covered by this flap in our study measured 45 x 18 cm and the smallest defect was 8 x4 cm. The average intra-operative time was 45.5 min (range 20-90 min). Fourteen flaps were done to cover lower limb defects (70%), 4 for upper limb defects and 2 were for defects in the axilla. Partial flap necrosis was observed in one case. The average duration of hospital stay of patients was 3.45 d. All patients were followed until they achieved stable, healed wound.The overall success rate was 95%. Conclusion: Keystone flap can be safely used to cover various limb defects with minimal pain, a sensate cover and excellent cosmetic outcome, minimizing the need for microsurgical techniques or prolonged operative time. PMID:25954659

  9. Empowering Dialogues in Humanistic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aloni, Nimrod

    2013-01-01

    In this article I propose a conception of empowering educational dialogue within the framework of humanistic education. It is based on the notions of Humanistic Education and Empowerment, and draws on a large and diverse repertoire of dialogues--from the classical Socratic, Confucian and Talmudic dialogues, to the modern ones associated with the…

  10. Learning to Internalize Action Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Teresa Ellen

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to explore how participants of a communications workshop, "Action Dialogue," perceived their ability to engage in dialogue was improved and enhanced. The study was based on the following assumptions: (1) dialogue skills can be learned and people are able to learn these skills; (2) context and emotion influence…

  11. Learning through Ethnographic Dialogues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landis, David; Kalieva, Rysaldy; Abitova, Sanim; Izmukhanbetova, Sophia; Musaeva, Zhanbota

    2006-01-01

    This article describes ways that conversations constituted ethnographic research for students and teachers in Kazakhstan. Through dialogues with local community members, students worked as researchers to develop knowledge about cultural patterns and social life. Ethnographic research and writing provided valuable language and research experiences…

  12. Russian Supplementary Dialogues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace Corps, Ashgabat (Turkmenistan).

    This manual is designed for the Russian language training of Peace Corps volunteers serving in Turkmenistan, and focuses on daily communication skills needed in that context. It consists of nine topical lessons, each containing several brief dialogues targeting specific language competencies, and exercises. Text is entirely in Russian, except for…

  13. Capabilities for Intercultural Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosbie, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    The capabilities approach offers a valuable analytical lens for exploring the challenge and complexity of intercultural dialogue in contemporary settings. The central tenets of the approach, developed by Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum, involve a set of humanistic goals including the recognition that development is a process whereby people's…

  14. Education as Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jourard, Sidney M.

    1978-01-01

    In this discussion, the author's last public presentation before his death in 1974, is a dedication to dialogue as the essence of education. In the midst of modern consciousness-altering technology, he valued authentic conservation more powerful than LSD, meditation, and all the rest. (Editor/RK)

  15. Relationships between Theorists/Researchers and Policy Makers/Practitioners: Rethinking the Two-Cultures Thesis and the Possibility of Dialogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginsburg, Mark B.; Gorostiaga, Jorge M.

    2001-01-01

    Examines the limited communication between educational theorists and researchers, on the one hand, and policy makers and practitioners, on the other. Discounts the "two cultures" thesis for explaining the communication gap, arguing that the groups are heterogeneous and overlap. Discusses six approaches to closing the communication gap, and…

  16. Questions of Value and Meaning in State Environmental Policy: A State-wide Conference for Dialogue at the Bicentennial. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Endowment for the Humanities, Gainesville.

    The relationship between the humanities and environmental policy questions is explored in this final conference report. Emphasis was on underlining the role of ethical questions and human aspirations, as well as empirical inquiry, in environmental quality decisions. The two-day program in Tallahassee, Florida, involved public officials, community…

  17. Modeling the consequences of the demise and potential recovery of a keystone-species: wild rabbits and avian scavengers in Mediterranean landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortés-Avizanda, Ainara; Colomer, Maria Àngels; Margalida, Antoni; Ceballos, Olga; Donázar, José Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Restoration of demised keystone-species populations is an overriding concern in conservation biology. However, since no population is independent of its environment, progress is needed in predicting the efficacy of restoration in unstable ecological contexts. Here, by means of Population Dynamics P-system Models (PDP), we studied long-term changes in the population size of Egyptian vultures (Neophron percnopterus) inhabiting a Natural Park, northern Spain, to changes in the numbers of wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), a keystone-species of Mediterranean ecosystems that have suffered >90% population decline after a hemorrhagic disease outbreak. Low availability of rabbit carcasses leads Egyptian vultures to extend their foraging activities to unprotected areas with higher non-natural mortality whereas growing numbers of griffon vultures (Gyps fulvus), a dominant competitor, progressively monopolize trophic resources resulting in a focal population decrease. Modeling shows that, even if keystone-species populations recover in core protected areas, the return to the original studied population size may be unfeasible, due to both the high non-natural mortality rates in humanized areas and long-term changes in the scavenger guild structure. Policy decisions aimed to restore keystone-species should rely on holistic approaches integrating the effects of spatial heterogeneity on both producer and consumer populations as well as within-guild processes.

  18. Modeling the consequences of the demise and potential recovery of a keystone-species: wild rabbits and avian scavengers in Mediterranean landscapes.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Avizanda, Ainara; Colomer, Maria Àngels; Margalida, Antoni; Ceballos, Olga; Donázar, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Restoration of demised keystone-species populations is an overriding concern in conservation biology. However, since no population is independent of its environment, progress is needed in predicting the efficacy of restoration in unstable ecological contexts. Here, by means of Population Dynamics P-system Models (PDP), we studied long-term changes in the population size of Egyptian vultures (Neophron percnopterus) inhabiting a Natural Park, northern Spain, to changes in the numbers of wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), a keystone-species of Mediterranean ecosystems that have suffered >90% population decline after a hemorrhagic disease outbreak. Low availability of rabbit carcasses leads Egyptian vultures to extend their foraging activities to unprotected areas with higher non-natural mortality whereas growing numbers of griffon vultures (Gyps fulvus), a dominant competitor, progressively monopolize trophic resources resulting in a focal population decrease. Modeling shows that, even if keystone-species populations recover in core protected areas, the return to the original studied population size may be unfeasible, due to both the high non-natural mortality rates in humanized areas and long-term changes in the scavenger guild structure. Policy decisions aimed to restore keystone-species should rely on holistic approaches integrating the effects of spatial heterogeneity on both producer and consumer populations as well as within-guild processes. PMID:26593338

  19. Modeling the consequences of the demise and potential recovery of a keystone-species: wild rabbits and avian scavengers in Mediterranean landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Avizanda, Ainara; Colomer, Maria Àngels; Margalida, Antoni; Ceballos, Olga; Donázar, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Restoration of demised keystone-species populations is an overriding concern in conservation biology. However, since no population is independent of its environment, progress is needed in predicting the efficacy of restoration in unstable ecological contexts. Here, by means of Population Dynamics P-system Models (PDP), we studied long-term changes in the population size of Egyptian vultures (Neophron percnopterus) inhabiting a Natural Park, northern Spain, to changes in the numbers of wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), a keystone-species of Mediterranean ecosystems that have suffered >90% population decline after a hemorrhagic disease outbreak. Low availability of rabbit carcasses leads Egyptian vultures to extend their foraging activities to unprotected areas with higher non-natural mortality whereas growing numbers of griffon vultures (Gyps fulvus), a dominant competitor, progressively monopolize trophic resources resulting in a focal population decrease. Modeling shows that, even if keystone-species populations recover in core protected areas, the return to the original studied population size may be unfeasible, due to both the high non-natural mortality rates in humanized areas and long-term changes in the scavenger guild structure. Policy decisions aimed to restore keystone-species should rely on holistic approaches integrating the effects of spatial heterogeneity on both producer and consumer populations as well as within-guild processes. PMID:26593338

  20. Research on Spoken Dialogue Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aist, Gregory; Hieronymus, James; Dowding, John; Hockey, Beth Ann; Rayner, Manny; Chatzichrisafis, Nikos; Farrell, Kim; Renders, Jean-Michel

    2010-01-01

    Research in the field of spoken dialogue systems has been performed with the goal of making such systems more robust and easier to use in demanding situations. The term "spoken dialogue systems" signifies unified software systems containing speech-recognition, speech-synthesis, dialogue management, and ancillary components that enable human users to communicate, using natural spoken language or nearly natural prescribed spoken language, with other software systems that provide information and/or services.

  1. 76 FR 60113 - Advisory Committee on the Secretary of State's Strategic Dialogue With Civil Society

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-28

    ... Committee on the Secretary of State's Strategic Dialogue With Civil Society ACTION: Notice of meeting... (FACA), the Advisory Committee on the Secretary of State's Strategic Dialogue with Civil Society will... formulation of U.S. policies, proposals, and strategies for engagement with, and protection of, civil...

  2. Silent images in dialogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, Isabel; Sandford-Richardson, Elizabeth; Richardson, Martin; Bernardo, Luis Miguel; Crespo, Helder

    2016-03-01

    In this series of digital art holograms and lenticulars, we used the HoloCam Portable Light System with the 35 mm cameras, Canon IS3 and the Canon 700D, to capture the image information, it was then edited on the computer using Motion 5 and Final Cut Pro X programs. We are presenting several actions in the digital holographic space. The figures are in dialogue within the holographic space and the viewer, in front of the holographic plate. In holography the time of the image is the time of the viewer present. And that particular feature is what distinguishes digital holography from other media.

  3. 77 FR 5614 - In the Matter of the Keystone XL Pipeline

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE In the Matter of the Keystone XL Pipeline This notice is to inform the public that the Department of State has denied the Application of TransCanada Keystone Pipeline, L.P. for a Presidential Permit Authorizing...

  4. The Achilles' heel hypothesis: misinformed keystone individuals impair collective learning and reduce group success.

    PubMed

    Pruitt, Jonathan N; Wright, Colin M; Keiser, Carl N; DeMarco, Alex E; Grobis, Matthew M; Pinter-Wollman, Noa

    2016-01-27

    Many animal societies rely on highly influential keystone individuals for proper functioning. When information quality is important for group success, such keystone individuals have the potential to diminish group performance if they possess inaccurate information. Here, we test whether information quality (accurate or inaccurate) influences collective outcomes when keystone individuals are the first to acquire it. We trained keystone or generic individuals to attack or avoid novel stimuli and implanted these trained individuals within groups of naive colony-mates. We subsequently tracked how quickly groups learned about their environment in situations that matched (accurate information) or mismatched (inaccurate information) the training of the trained individual. We found that colonies with just one accurately informed individual were quicker to learn to attack a novel prey stimulus than colonies with no informed individuals. However, this effect was no more pronounced when the informed individual was a keystone individual. In contrast, keystones with inaccurate information had larger effects than generic individuals with identical information: groups containing keystones with inaccurate information took longer to learn to attack/avoid prey/predator stimuli and gained less weight than groups harbouring generic individuals with identical information. Our results convey that misinformed keystone individuals can become points of vulnerability for their societies. PMID:26817771

  5. 78 FR 26358 - TransCanada Keystone Pipeline, LP; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission TransCanada Keystone Pipeline, LP; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order... and Procedure, 18 CFR 385.207(a)(2)(2012), TransCanada Keystone Pipeline, LP filed a petition...

  6. Policies and Processes for Social Inclusion: Using EquiFrame and EquIPP for Policy Dialogue Comment on "Are Sexual and Reproductive Health Policies Designed for All? Vulnerable Groups in Policy Documents of Four European Countries and Their Involvement in Policy Development".

    PubMed

    MacLachlan, Malcolm; Mannan, Hasheem; Huss, Tessy; Munthali, Alister; Amin, Mutamad

    2015-01-01

    The application of EquiFrame in the analysis of sexual and reproductive health policies by Ivanova et al to a new thematic area, their selection of only some of the Core Concepts of human rights in health service provision and the addition of new vulnerable groups relevant to the purpose of their analysis, are all very welcome developments. We also applaud their application of EquiFrame to policies in countries where it has not previously been used, along with their use of interviews with policy-makers to produce a deeper understanding of policy processes. We argue that clear justification for the inclusion of additional, or replacement of some exiting vulnerable groups within EquiFrame should be accompanied by clear definitions of such groups, along with the evidence-base that justifies their classification as a vulnerable or marginalised group. To illustrate the versatility of EquiFrame, we summarise a range of ways in which it has been used across a number of regions; including a brief Case Study of its use to develop the National Health Policy of Malawi. While EquiFrame focuses on policy content, we preview a new policy analysis tool - Equity and Inclusion in Policy Processes (EquIPP) - which assesses the extent of equity and inclusion in broader policy processes. Together, EquiFrame and EquIPP can be used to help governments and civil society ensure that policies are addressing the much stronger emphasis on social inclusion, now apparent in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). PMID:26927591

  7. John Dewey Lives: A Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayers, William C.; Schubert, William H.

    2012-01-01

    This dialogue is an edited version of a dialogue between William C. Ayers and William H. Schubert at the November 10-12, 2011, meeting of the Progressive Education Network hosted by the Francis W. Parker School in Chicago, Illinois. It was the opening keynote session on the evening of November 10. Ayers interviewed Schubert, who acted as John…

  8. Jim and Dave: A Dialogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doud, Robert E.

    This is a fictional dialogue intended to honor Jim Kingman and David Leary, both professors of history who retired after long careers at Pasadena City College in California (PCC). The dialogue hypothesizes the observations of both men as they look on the honorary gold plates of previous retirees that decorate the wall of a PCC public dining hall.…

  9. Imre Lakatos's Use of Dialogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greig, Judith Maxwell

    This paper uses a book, "Proofs and Refutations: The Logic of Mathematical Discovery," as an example of Lakatos's use of dialogue. The book was originally adapted from his dissertation and influenced by Polya and Popper. His discussion of the Euler conjecture is summarized. Three purposes for choosing the dialogue form for the book were that it…

  10. The Moon: Keystone to Understanding Planetary Geological Processes and History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-01-01

    Extensive and intensive exploration of the Earth's Moon by astronauts and an international array of automated spacecraft has provided an unequaled data set that has provided deep insight into geology, geochemistry, mineralogy, petrology, chronology, geophysics and internal structure. This level of insight is unequaled except for Earth. Analysis of these data sets over the last 35 years has proven fundamental to understanding planetary surface processes and evolution, and is essential to linking surface processes with internal and thermal evolution. Much of the understanding that we presently have of other terrestrial planets and outer planet satellites derives from the foundation of these data. On the basis of these data, the Moon is a laboratory for understanding of planetary processes and a keystone for providing evolutionary perspective. Important comparative planetology issues being addressed by lunar studies include impact cratering, magmatic activity and tectonism. Future planetary exploration plans should keep in mind the importance of further lunar exploration in continuing to build solid underpinnings in this keystone to planetary evolution. Examples of these insights and applications to other planets are cited.

  11. Mammal population regulation, keystone processes and ecosystem dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, A R E

    2003-01-01

    The theory of regulation in animal populations is fundamental to understanding the dynamics of populations, the causes of mortality and how natural selection shapes the life history of species. In mammals, the great range in body size allows us to see how allometric relationships affect the mode of regulation. Resource limitation is the fundamental cause of regulation. Top-down limitation through predators is determined by four factors: (i). body size; (ii). the diversity of predators and prey in the system; (iii). whether prey are resident or migratory; and (iv). the presence of alternative prey for predators. Body size in mammals has two important consequences. First, mammals, particularly large species, can act as keystones that determine the diversity of an ecosystem. I show how keystone processes can, in principle, be measured using the example of the wildebeest in the Serengeti ecosystem. Second, mammals act as ecological landscapers by altering vegetation succession. Mammals alter physical structure, ecological function and species diversity in most terrestrial biomes. In general, there is a close interaction between allometry, population regulation, life history and ecosystem dynamics. These relationships are relevant to applied aspects of conservation and pest management. PMID:14561329

  12. A hydrologic description of Keystone Lake near Tampa, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reichenbaugh, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    The terrain around Keystone Lake, a 388-acre lake in northwest Hillsborough County, Florida, near the Cosme well field, is dotted with sinks that promote leakage from the surficial aquifer to the underlying Floridan aquifer. The lake, an integral part of the Brooker Creek channel, receives overland runoff from cypress swamps, pastures, citrus groves, and lakefront residential areas. The lake, a composite of many coalescing sinkholes, is generally 14 to 16 ft deep and has been dredged in places to 23 ft deep. Since 1960, rainfall in the area shows a cumulative negative departure of 86 in. from the long-term average. The mean annual lake stage in 1973 was the lowest on record. Concurrently, municipal pumpage in the Cosme well field from the Floridan aquifer peaked in 1961 and again in 1973, and in 1972 the potentiometric surface was the lowest since 1960. Comparisons of the hydrographs of lake stage and the potentiometric surface in the Floridan aquifer with rainfall graphs shows that both correspond closely to seasonal rainfall, resulting in the trend of decreasing seasonal maximum levels in the lake and the aquifer. Keystone Lake water quality is adequate for recreation and propagation of wildlife. (Woodard-USGS)

  13. A Learning Alberta: Dialogue and Direction. The Forum Background

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Advanced Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Participants in "A Learning Alberta--Dialogue and Direction," the Minister's Forum on Advanced Learning are an important part of a process that has been underway across Alberta since January of 2005. Led by the Honourable Dave Hancock, Minister of Advanced Education, a new vision and policy framework is being developed to guide future directions…

  14. Conference in Dialogue: Presentation By National Education Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuentes, Roy O.

    Designed to construct a frame of reference and to encourage attitudes that facilitate productive dialogue during and after the conference, this address gives an overview of American mobility, re-examines the problem of managing the education of the migrant/mobile student, explains the structure of the National Policy Workshop on Education for…

  15. Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Judith L.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This theme issue is devoted to discussions of early childhood policy issues. "Creating a Shared Vision: How Policy Affects Early Childhood Care and Development" (Judith L. Evans) defines policy, discusses the motivation for changing or creating national policy and the process for changing such policies, and provides a sample design for an early…

  16. A Procedure for Analyzing Classroom Dialogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, John A.

    Classroom dialogue is an important influence on students' learning, making the structure and content of dialogue important research variables. An analysis of two sample classroom dialogues using the Thematic and Structural Analysis (TSA) Technique shows a positive correlation between the quality of dialogue structure and the level of student…

  17. Improving the Efficiency of Dialogue in Tutoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopp, Kristopher J.; Britt, M. Anne; Millis, Keith; Graesser, Arthur C.

    2012-01-01

    The current studies investigated the efficient use of dialogue in intelligent tutoring systems that use natural language interaction. Such dialogues can be relatively time-consuming. This work addresses the question of how much dialogue is needed to produce significant learning gains. In Experiment 1, a full dialogue condition and a read-only…

  18. Design of Man-Computer Dialogues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, James

    An attempt is made to provide a comprehensive guide to design of the dialogues between man and computer that take place at computer terminals. Particular topics include problems with conventional alphanumeric dialogues, dialogues with sound and graphics, pyschological characteristics of computer terminal users, problems of designing dialogues for…

  19. The Ins and Outs of Viral Infection: Keystone Meeting Review

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Sara W.; Kirkegaard, Karla; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Freed, Eric O.

    2014-01-01

    Newly observed mechanisms for viral entry, assembly, and exit are challenging our current understanding of the replication cycle of different viruses. To address and better understand these mechanisms, a Keystone Symposium was organized in the snowy mountains of Colorado (“The Ins and Outs of Viral Infection: Entry, Assembly, Exit, and Spread”; 30 March–4 April 2014, Beaver Run Resort, Breckenridge, Colorado, organized by Karla Kirkegaard, Mavis Agbandje-McKenna, and Eric O. Freed). The meeting served to bring together cell biologists, structural biologists, geneticists, and scientists expert in viral pathogenesis to discuss emerging mechanisms of viral ins and outs. The conference was organized around different phases of the viral replication cycle, including cell entry, viral assembly and post-assembly maturation, virus structure, cell exit, and virus spread. This review aims to highlight important topics and themes that emerged during the conference. PMID:25256395

  20. Immunomicrobial pathogenesis of periodontitis: keystones, pathobionts, and host response.

    PubMed

    Hajishengallis, George

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have uncovered novel mechanisms underlying the breakdown of periodontal host-microbe homeostasis, which can precipitate dysbiosis and periodontitis in susceptible hosts. Dysbiotic microbial communities of keystone pathogens and pathobionts are thought to exhibit synergistic virulence whereby not only can they endure the host response but can also thrive by exploiting tissue-destructive inflammation, which fuels a self-feeding cycle of escalating dysbiosis and inflammatory bone loss, potentially leading to tooth loss and systemic complications. Here, I discuss new paradigms in our understanding of periodontitis, which may shed light into other polymicrobial inflammatory disorders. In addition, I highlight gaps in knowledge required for an integrated picture of the interplay between microbes and innate and adaptive immune elements that initiate and propagate chronic periodontal inflammation. PMID:24269668

  1. Weighting and indirect effects identify keystone species in food webs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Zhang, Huayong; O'Gorman, Eoin J; Tian, Wang; Ma, Athen; Moore, John C; Borrett, Stuart R; Woodward, Guy

    2016-09-01

    Species extinctions are accelerating globally, yet the mechanisms that maintain local biodiversity remain poorly understood. The extinction of species that feed on or are fed on by many others (i.e. 'hubs') has traditionally been thought to cause the greatest threat of further biodiversity loss. Very little attention has been paid to the strength of those feeding links (i.e. link weight) and the prevalence of indirect interactions. Here, we used a dynamical model based on empirical energy budget data to assess changes in ecosystem stability after simulating the loss of species according to various extinction scenarios. Link weight and/or indirect effects had stronger effects on food-web stability than the simple removal of 'hubs', demonstrating that both quantitative fluxes and species dissipating their effects across many links should be of great concern in biodiversity conservation, and the potential for 'hubs' to act as keystone species may have been exaggerated to date. PMID:27346328

  2. Mass Digitization: Implications for Information Policy: Report from "Scholarship and Libraries in Transition: A Dialogue about the Impacts of Mass Digitization Projects" Symposium (Ann Arbor, Michigan, March 10-11, 2006)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US National Commission on Libraries and Information Science, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. National Commission on Libraries and Information Science (NCLIS) sponsored the symposium "Scholarship and Libraries in Transition: A Dialogue about the Impacts of Mass Digitization Projects" in March 2006 at the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor. The symposium was organized with a keynote and several other individual presentations, as well…

  3. Addressivity in cogenerative dialogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Pei-Ling

    2014-03-01

    Ashraf Shady's paper provides a first-hand reflection on how a foreign teacher used cogens as culturally adaptive pedagogy to address cultural misalignments with students. In this paper, Shady drew on several cogen sessions to showcase his journey of using different forms of cogens with his students. To improve the quality of cogens, one strategy he used was to adjust the number of participants in cogens. As a result, some cogens worked and others did not. During the course of reading his paper, I was impressed by his creative and flexible use of cogens and at the same time was intrigued by the question of why some cogens work and not others. In searching for an answer, I found that Mikhail Bakhtin's dialogism, especially the concept of addressivity, provides a comprehensive framework to address this question. In this commentary, I reanalyze the cogen episodes described in Shady's paper in the light of dialogism. My analysis suggests that addressivity plays an important role in mediating the success of cogens. Cogens with high addressivity function as internally persuasive discourse that allows diverse consciousnesses to coexist and so likely affords productive dialogues. The implications of addressivity in teaching and learning are further discussed.

  4. Aerogel Keystones: Extraction Of Complete Hypervelocity Impact Events From Aerogel Collectors

    SciTech Connect

    Westphal, A J; Snead, C; Butterworth, A; Graham, G A; Bradley, J; Bajt, S; Grant, P G; Bench, G; Brennan, S; Piannetta, P

    2003-11-07

    In January 2006, the Stardust mission will return the first samples from a solid solar-system body since Apollo, and the first samples of contemporary interstellar dust ever collected. Although sophisticated laboratory instruments exist for the analysis of Stardust samples, techniques for the recovery of particles and particle residues from aerogel collectors remain primitive. Here we describe our recent progress in developing techniques for extracting small volumes of aerogel, which we have called ''keystones,'' which completely contain particle impacts but minimize the damage to the surrounding aerogel collector. These keystones can be fixed to custom-designed micromachined silicon fixtures (so-called ''microforklifts''). In this configuration the samples are self-supporting, which can be advantageous in situations in which interference from a supporting substrate is undesirable. The keystones may also be extracted and placed onto a substrate without a fixture. We have also demonstrated the capability of homologously crushing these unmounted keystones for analysis techniques which demand flat samples.

  5. The Generation in Between: A Perspective from the Keystone IV Conference.

    PubMed

    Chen, Frederick M; Bliss, Erika; Dunn, Aaron; Edgoose, Jennifer; Elliott, Tricia C; Maxwell, Lisa C; Morris, Carl G; Phillips, Robert L

    2016-01-01

    Keystone IV affirmed the value of relationships in family medicine, but each generation of family physicians took away different impressions and lessons. "Generation III," between the Baby Boomers and Millennials, reported conflict between their professional ideal of family medicine and the realities of current practice. But the Keystone conference also helped them appreciate core values of family medicine, their shared experience, and new opportunities for leadership. PMID:27387165

  6. The ACA Medicaid Expansion Waiver in the Keystone State: Do the Medically Uninsured "Got a Friend in Pennsylvania"?

    PubMed

    Olson, Laura Katz

    2015-06-01

    Medicaid is fundamental to near universal health insurance coverage under the 2010 Affordable Care Act (ACA). Its goal of broadening the program to all households with income at or below 138 percent of the federal poverty level was thwarted in 2012 by a Supreme Court decision that allowed the states to choose whether or not they would join. This essay seeks to assess the status of Pennsylvania with regard to the Medicaid expansion controversy. It briefly describes the Keystone State's existing Medicaid program and the potential impact of the ACA on its growth. It then discusses Governor Tom Corbett's market-based alternative and what he achieved in his deliberations with the Obama administration. The article also discusses some of the financial considerations facing Pennsylvania policy makers in the expansion decision, the role of three of the more influential lobby groups, and the problematic situation of the medically uninsured population. PMID:25700373

  7. The dialogue goes on.

    PubMed

    Salas, R M

    1975-01-01

    A worldwide dialogue on population began in 1974, World Population Year, in Bucharest. Although there was a general awareness among the delegates at the World Population Conference that the population issue is beyond the ideological background, no consensus on the definition of the problem was reached. Some saw it as a currently unsustainable increase in the number of people dependent on available resources; some viewed it as a question of density; others believed it to be a "national pride" issue relating to insufficient hands available to develop national resources to their full potential; politicians spoke of the issue as a political matter; technicians saw it as a need for programs of action through which information and equipment for limiting fertility could be available to those who sought it; and the economic planners regarded the problem as a need for a balance between people and resources. It has become necessary to view the population issue as an integral and essential factor in development planning and programming. A 2-way line of communication between people and planners is crucial. This was the reason for the Fund's support of continuing programs of training and briefing communicators interested in effecting social change. The Year allowed several hundred editors, writers and broadcasters to commit themselves as individuals and professionals to the urgent population question. Several thousand members of nongovernmental and other institutions and private individuals were also given the opportunity to search for the ideas, techniques, values and priorities that will lead to solutions. The newsletter acts as a communication vehicle to sustain public commitment. It is also a measure of the responsiveness that UNFPA has adopted as one of its cardinal principles. PMID:12312922

  8. The legacy effects of keystone individuals on collective behaviour scale to how long they remain within a group.

    PubMed

    Pruitt, Jonathan N; Pinter-Wollman, Noa

    2015-09-01

    The collective behaviour of social groups is often strongly influenced by one or few individuals, termed here 'keystone individuals'. We examined whether the influence of keystone individuals on collective behaviour lingers after their departure and whether these lingering effects scale with their tenure in the group. In the social spider, Stegodyphus dumicola, colonies' boldest individuals wield a disproportionately large influence over colony behaviour. We experimentally manipulated keystones' tenure in laboratory-housed colonies and tracked their legacy effects on collective prey capture following their removal. We found that bolder keystones caused more aggressive collective foraging behaviour and catalysed greater inter-individual variation in boldness within their colonies. The longer keystones remained in a colony, the longer both of these effects lingered after their departure. Our data demonstrate that, long after their disappearance, keystones have large and lasting effects on social dynamics at both the individual and colony levels. PMID:26336171

  9. The legacy effects of keystone individuals on collective behaviour scale to how long they remain within a group

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Jonathan N.; Pinter-Wollman, Noa

    2015-01-01

    The collective behaviour of social groups is often strongly influenced by one or few individuals, termed here ‘keystone individuals’. We examined whether the influence of keystone individuals on collective behaviour lingers after their departure and whether these lingering effects scale with their tenure in the group. In the social spider, Stegodyphus dumicola, colonies' boldest individuals wield a disproportionately large influence over colony behaviour. We experimentally manipulated keystones' tenure in laboratory-housed colonies and tracked their legacy effects on collective prey capture following their removal. We found that bolder keystones caused more aggressive collective foraging behaviour and catalysed greater inter-individual variation in boldness within their colonies. The longer keystones remained in a colony, the longer both of these effects lingered after their departure. Our data demonstrate that, long after their disappearance, keystones have large and lasting effects on social dynamics at both the individual and colony levels. PMID:26336171

  10. People Are Primary: A Perspective from the Keystone IV Conference.

    PubMed

    Etz, Rebecca S

    2016-01-01

    As a person invested in personal doctoring, what promises are you willing to make about when and where you will "be there" for others? Attendees of the G. Gayle Stephens Keystone IV Conference answered that question on submitted index cards and through ongoing conference discussions. Those data were analyzed using grounded theory and combined to develop the following answer in aggregate: We will be held accountable to those who need us. We understand the need for expertise and compassion as we help others to navigate the intersection of science and humanism. We will serve as leaders in personal, public, and political conversations. We will mark a path for the profession ensuring alignment of personal practices with professional principles. We will not allow the needed conversations of processes, data points, and determinations of value to undermine our relationships with our patients. We will be there for you. Attentive and fully present. We will care for you when you have no need and you do not ask. We will center that care in your lived experience of health and illness, knowing you over time. We will be here for you now, over time and across distance, in ways that foster the feeling of wholeness and belonging. We will use the best knowledge, best tailored to meet our shared understanding of your goals and aspirations. PMID:27387163

  11. Historical Text Comprehension Reflective Tutorial Dialogue System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grigoriadou, Maria; Tsaganou, Grammatiki; Cavoura, Theodora

    2005-01-01

    The Reflective Tutorial Dialogue System (ReTuDiS) is a system for learner modelling historical text comprehension through reflective dialogue. The system infers learners' cognitive profiles and constructs their learner models. Based on the learner model the system plans the appropriate--personalized for learners--reflective tutorial dialogue in…

  12. The Play of Socratic Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Proponents of philosophy for children generally see themselves as heirs to the "Socratic" tradition. They often claim too that children's aptitude for play leads them naturally to play with abstract, philosophical ideas. However in Plato's dialogues we find in the mouth of "Socrates" many warnings against philosophising with the young. Those…

  13. Facilitating Dialogues about Racial Realities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quaye, Stephen John

    2014-01-01

    Background/Context: Facilitating dialogues about racial issues in higher education classroom settings continues to be a vexing problem facing postsecondary educators. In order for students to discuss race with their peers, they need skilled facilitators who are knowledgeable about racial issues and able to support students in these difficult…

  14. Virtual Worlds and Course Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tapsis, Nikolaos; Tsolakidis, Konstantinos; Vitsilaki, Chryssi

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the effects of the use of Second Life (SL) as a learning environment on a course's dialogue. An experimental design within groups was used with thirty-seven graduate students for three weeks. Half of them followed the course activities in the official Learning Management System (LMS) of the program, Blackboard Vista, and the…

  15. The Effect of Keystone Individuals on Collective Outcomes Can Be Mediated through Interactions or Behavioral Persistence.

    PubMed

    Pinter-Wollman, Noa; Keiser, Carl N; Wollman, Roy; Pruitt, Jonathan N

    2016-08-01

    Collective behavior emerges from interactions among group members who often vary in their behavior. The presence of just one or a few keystone individuals, such as leaders or tutors, may have a large effect on collective outcomes. These individuals can catalyze behavioral changes in other group members, thus altering group composition and collective behavior. The influence of keystone individuals on group function may lead to trade-offs between ecological situations, because the behavioral composition they facilitate may be suitable in one situation but not another. We use computer simulations to examine various mechanisms that allow keystone individuals to exert their influence on group members. We further discuss a trade-off between two potentially conflicting collective outcomes, cooperative prey attack and disease dynamics. Our simulations match empirical data from a social spider system and produce testable predictions for the causes and consequences of the influence of keystone individuals on group composition and collective outcomes. We find that a group's behavioral composition can be impacted by the keystone individual through changes to interaction patterns or behavioral persistence over time. Group behavioral composition and the mechanisms that drive the distribution of phenotypes influence collective outcomes and lead to trade-offs between disease dynamics and cooperative prey attack. PMID:27420788

  16. Racial dialogues: challenges faculty of color face in the classroom.

    PubMed

    Sue, Derald Wing; Rivera, David P; Watkins, Nicole L; Kim, Rachel H; Kim, Suah; Williams, Chantea D

    2011-07-01

    Research on the experiences of faculty of color in predominantly White institutions (PWIs) suggests that they often experience the campus climate as invalidating, alienating, and hostile. Few studies, however, have actually focused on the classroom experiences of faculty of color when difficult racial dialogues occur. Using Consensually Qualitative Research, eight faculty of color were interviewed about their experiences in the classroom when racially tinged topics arose. Three major findings emerged. First, difficult racial dialogues were frequently instigated by the presence of racial microaggressions delivered toward students of color or the professor. Dialogues on race were made more difficult when the classrooms were diverse, when heated emotions arose, when there was a strong fear of self-disclosure, and when racial perspectives differed. Second, all faculty experienced an internal struggle between balancing their own values and beliefs with an attempt to remain objective. This conflict was often described as exhausting and energy-depleting. Third, faculty of color described both successful and unsuccessful strategies in facilitating difficult dialogues on race that arose in the course of their teaching. These findings have major implications for how PWIs can develop new programs, policies, and practices that will aid and support colleagues of color. PMID:21787066

  17. Keystone characteristics that support cultural resilience in Karen refugee parents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Susan G.

    2015-08-01

    This participatory action research study used the conceptual framework of social-ecological resilience to explore how Karen (pronounced Ka·rén) refugee parents re-construct cultural resilience in resettlement. The funds of knowledge approach helped to define essential knowledge used by Karen parents within their own community. Framing this study around the concept of resilience situated it within an emancipatory paradigm: refugee parents were actors choosing their own cultural identity and making decisions about what cultural knowledge was important for the science education of their children. Sustainability science with its capacity to absorb indigenous knowledge as legitimate scientific knowledge offered a critical platform for reconciling Karen knowledge with scientific knowledge for science education. Photovoice, participant observation, and semi-structured interviews were used to create visual and written narrative portraits of Karen parents. Narrative analysis revealed that Karen parents had constructed a counter-narrative in Burma and Thailand that enabled them to resist assimilation into the dominant ethnic culture; by contrast, their narrative of life in resettlement in the U.S. focused on the potential for self-determination. Keystone characteristics that contributed to cultural resilience were identified to be the community garden and education as a gateway to a transformed future. Anchored in a cultural tradition of farming, these Karen parents gained perspective and comfort in continuity and the potential of self-determination rooted in the land. Therefore, a cross-cultural learning community for Karen elementary school students that incorporates the Karen language and Karen self-sustaining knowledge of horticulture would be an appropriate venue for building a climate of reciprocity for science learning.

  18. Invasive Asian Earthworms Negatively Impact Keystone Terrestrial Salamanders.

    PubMed

    Ziemba, Julie L; Hickerson, Cari-Ann M; Anthony, Carl D

    2016-01-01

    Asian pheretimoid earthworms (e.g. Amynthas and Metaphire spp.) are invading North American forests and consuming the vital detrital layer that forest floor biota [including the keystone species Plethodon cinereus (Eastern Red-backed Salamander)], rely on for protection, food, and habitat. Plethodon cinereus population declines have been associated with leaf litter loss following the invasion of several exotic earthworm species, but there have been few studies on the specific interactions between pheretimoid earthworms and P. cinereus. Since some species of large and active pheretimoids spatially overlap with salamanders beneath natural cover objects and in detritus, they may distinctively compound the negative consequences of earthworm-mediated resource degradation by physically disturbing important salamander activities (foraging, mating, and egg brooding). We predicted that earthworms would exclude salamanders from high quality microhabitat, reduce foraging efficiency, and negatively affect salamander fitness. In laboratory trials, salamanders used lower quality microhabitat and consumed fewer flies in the presence of earthworms. In a natural field experiment, conducted on salamander populations from "non-invaded" and "pheretimoid invaded" sites in Ohio, salamanders and earthworms shared cover objects ~60% less than expected. Earthworm abundance was negatively associated with juvenile and male salamander abundance, but had no relationship with female salamander abundance. There was no effect of pheretimoid invasion on salamander body condition. Juvenile and non-resident male salamanders do not hold stable territories centered beneath cover objects such as rocks or logs, which results in reduced access to prey, greater risk of desiccation, and dispersal pressure. Habitat degradation and physical exclusion of salamanders from cover objects may hinder juvenile and male salamander performance, ultimately reducing recruitment and salamander abundance following Asian

  19. Invasive Asian Earthworms Negatively Impact Keystone Terrestrial Salamanders

    PubMed Central

    Ziemba, Julie L.

    2016-01-01

    Asian pheretimoid earthworms (e.g. Amynthas and Metaphire spp.) are invading North American forests and consuming the vital detrital layer that forest floor biota [including the keystone species Plethodon cinereus (Eastern Red-backed Salamander)], rely on for protection, food, and habitat. Plethodon cinereus population declines have been associated with leaf litter loss following the invasion of several exotic earthworm species, but there have been few studies on the specific interactions between pheretimoid earthworms and P. cinereus. Since some species of large and active pheretimoids spatially overlap with salamanders beneath natural cover objects and in detritus, they may distinctively compound the negative consequences of earthworm-mediated resource degradation by physically disturbing important salamander activities (foraging, mating, and egg brooding). We predicted that earthworms would exclude salamanders from high quality microhabitat, reduce foraging efficiency, and negatively affect salamander fitness. In laboratory trials, salamanders used lower quality microhabitat and consumed fewer flies in the presence of earthworms. In a natural field experiment, conducted on salamander populations from “non-invaded” and “pheretimoid invaded” sites in Ohio, salamanders and earthworms shared cover objects ~60% less than expected. Earthworm abundance was negatively associated with juvenile and male salamander abundance, but had no relationship with female salamander abundance. There was no effect of pheretimoid invasion on salamander body condition. Juvenile and non-resident male salamanders do not hold stable territories centered beneath cover objects such as rocks or logs, which results in reduced access to prey, greater risk of desiccation, and dispersal pressure. Habitat degradation and physical exclusion of salamanders from cover objects may hinder juvenile and male salamander performance, ultimately reducing recruitment and salamander abundance

  20. Tropical forest fragmentation limits pollination of a keystone understory herb.

    PubMed

    Hadley, Adam S; Frey, Sarah J K; Robinson, W Douglas; Kress, W John; Betts, Matthew G

    2014-08-01

    Loss of native vegetation cover is thought to be a major driver of declines in pollination success worldwide. However, it is not well known whether reducing the fragmentation of remaining vegetation can ameliorate these negative effects. We tested the independent effects of composition vs. configuration on the reproductive success of a keystone tropical forest herb (Heliconia tortuosa). To do this we designed a large-scale mensurative experiment that independently varied connected forest-patch size (configuration) and surrounding amount of forest (composition). In each patch, we tested whether pollen tubes, fruit, and seed set were associated with these landscape variables. We also captured hummingbirds as an indication of pollinator availability in a subset of patches according to the same design. We found evidence for an effect of configuration on seed set of H. tortuosa, but not on other aspects of plant reproduction; proportion of seeds produced increased 40% across the gradient in patch size we observed (0.64 to > 1300 ha), independent of the amount of forest in the surrounding landscape at both local and landscape scales. We also found that the availability of pollinators was dependent upon forest configuration; hummingbird capture rates increased three and one-half times across the patch size gradient, independent of forest amount. Finally, pollinator availability was strongly positively correlated with seed set. We hypothesize that the effects of configuration on plant fitness that we observed are due to reduced pollen quality resulting from altered hummingbird availability and/or movement behavior. Our results suggest that prioritizing larger patches of tropical forest may be particularly important for conservation of this species. PMID:25230471

  1. Experimenting with distributed approaches – Case study: A ‘national-level’ distributed dialogue on bioenergy in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Entradas, Marta

    2014-01-01

    An emerging thread in the public participation debate is the need for innovative and more experimental forms of dialogue to address weaknesses of previous structured deliberative methods. This research note discusses an experiment with a distributed approach to dialogue, which used bioenergy as a case study. We discuss the potential of the model to attract a variety of publics and views and to inform policy. This is done with a view to refining future dialogues and increasing the involvement of scientists and other practitioners at the science-policy interface. PMID:25404169

  2. Experimenting with distributed approaches - Case study: A 'national-level' distributed dialogue on bioenergy in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Entradas, Marta

    2016-05-01

    An emerging thread in the public participation debate is the need for innovative and more experimental forms of dialogue to address weaknesses of previous structured deliberative methods. This research note discusses an experiment with a distributed approach to dialogue, which used bioenergy as a case study. We discuss the potential of the model to attract a variety of publics and views and to inform policy. This is done with a view to refining future dialogues and increasing the involvement of scientists and other practitioners at the science-policy interface. PMID:25404169

  3. 76 FR 8396 - Notice of Availability of Report Commissioned by Department of Energy Entitled “Keystone XL...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Notice of Availability of Report Commissioned by Department of Energy Entitled ``Keystone XL Assessment'' Regarding the Proposed TransCanada Keystone XL Project Notice is hereby given that the Department of State received on January 31, 2011, a...

  4. Figure analysis: An implementation dialogue.

    PubMed

    Wiles, Amy M

    2016-07-01

    Figure analysis is a novel active learning teaching technique that reinforces visual literacy. Small groups of students discuss diagrams in class in order to learn content. The instructor then gives a brief introduction and later summarizes the content of the figure. This teaching technique can be used in place of lecture as a mechanism to deliver information to students. Here, a "how to" guide is presented in the form of an in-class dialogue, displaying the difficulties in visual interpretation that some students may experience while figure analysis is being implemented in an upper-level, cell biology course. Additionally, the dialogue serves as a guide for instructors who may implement the active learning technique as they consider how to respond to students' concerns in class. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(4):345-348, 2016. PMID:26892173

  5. Positive Community Relations: The Keystone to the CEMP

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwell, W.T.; Tappen, J.; Karr, L.

    2006-07-01

    evolved into a program that currently includes 28 environmental and radiation monitoring stations located in communities around the NTS. Although the capabilities of the off-site monitoring program at NTS have and will continue to evolve, the fundamental keystone of the program continues to be positive community relations, expressed through operation of stations by local residents, dissemination of near-real time monitoring data through on-site displays and a CEMP web site, annual training of station operators, public outreach programs and, most importantly, the maintenance of personal relationships. (authors)

  6. The Moon: Keystone To Understanding Planetary Geological Processes and History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, J. W.

    Extensive and intensive exploration of the Earth's Moon by astronauts and an interna- tional array of automated spacecraft provides data on geology, geochemistry, miner- alogy, petrology, chronology, geophysics and internal structure unequaled except for Earth. This level of detail has proven fundamental to understanding planetary surface processes and evolution, and is essential to linking surface processes with internal and thermal evolution. On the basis of these data, the Moon is a laboratory for under- standing of planetary processes and a keystone for providing evolutionary perspective. Important comparative planetology issues being addressed by lunar studies include- Impact cratering: New information on the nature of the process, depth of excavation, role of oblique impact, nature of the modification stage, production of impact melt, ejecta emplacement dynamics, the role of volatile emplacement and fate, particularly at the poles, and the establishment of crater size-frequency distribution chronology. Magmatic activity: New insight into plutonism (intrusion) and volcanism (extrusion), and their role as major crustal building and resurfacing processes throughout history, as well as the distribution of mantle melting processes in space and time. The nature of magmatic activity during heavy bombardment (intrusion, extrusion, cryptomaria) and in later lunar history, in terms of the mare stratigraphic record, the distribution of basalt types, the distribution of melting in space and time, volume and flux informa- tion, and the full range of eruption styles and their petrogenetic significance. Tectonic activity: The Moon is the type location for tectonics on a one-plate planet which can be understood in the context of the complete lunar data set and extended to other planetary bodies. Issues include distinguishing magmatic and tectonic graben, estab- lishing the three-dimensional structure and chronology of wrinkle ridges and arches, determining the internal

  7. Pennsylvania Keystone STARS: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Pennsylvania's Keystone STARS prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4) Indicators for…

  8. Constraints and time lags for recovery of a keystone species (Dipodomys spectabilis) after landscape restoration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Habitat restoration is typically focused on reestablishing suitable conditions at a local scale, but landscape constraints may be important for keystone species with limited dispersal. We tested for time lags and examined the relative importance of local and landscape constraints on the response of ...

  9. Fostering Quality Online Dialogue: Does Labeling Help?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bures, Eva; Abrami, Philip; Schmid, Richard F.

    2010-01-01

    Despite its potential, online dialogue (online dialogue) can be superficial. Following Vygotskian (1978) and design experiment approaches (Brown, 1992), this study explores a labelling feature that allows students to tag parts of their messages. Data comes from 4 sessions of a graduate education course. Students engaged in 2-3 graded online…

  10. Using Dialogue Journals to Focus on Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linnell, Kimberly Miller

    2010-01-01

    Dialogue journals have been used in a wide range of educational settings for quite some time. These written conversations between teachers and students are especially well suited for the ESL classroom. This article describes how many of the conditions known to foster second language acquisition are inherent in the dialogue journal. Traditionally,…

  11. Metaphors of Literacy: Dialogues in Inclusive Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Causarano, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the importance of metaphors in education and in inclusive settings in particular. Metaphors are seen as the fabric of collaboration through dialogue across the curriculum. The article analyzes the dialogues among the Language Arts, Social Studies, and inclusion teacher in a large middle school in the Southwest of the United…

  12. Interfaith Dialogue at Peace Museums in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gachanga, Timothy; Mutisya, Munuve

    2015-01-01

    This paper makes a case for further studies on the contribution of peace museums to interfaith dialogue debate. Based on our experiences as museum curators, teachers and peace researchers and a review of published materials, we argue that there is a lacuna in the study on the contribution of peace museums to the interfaith dialogue debate. The…

  13. A System Theory Approach to Interfaith Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massoudi, Mehrdad

    2006-01-01

    Dialogue is an encounter between two or more human beings. We will consider how some scientists, philosophers and religious scholars have looked at dialogue and attempt to learn from each tradition while seeing this encounter under the umbrella of "Systems theory", related to thermodynamics and flavored with Buddhist philosophy. The process of…

  14. Some Features of Dialogue between Twins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savic, Svenka; Jocic, Mirjana

    1975-01-01

    Dialogues of sets of socially similar twins are studied. The opinion that twins have slower syntactic development than non-twins is seriously questioned. Dialogues with twins saying the same utterance together, correcting each other, quarreling, playing verbal games, etc. are analyzed in their deep structure. (SCC)

  15. Listening in on Monologues and Dialogues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tree, Jean E. Fox

    1999-01-01

    Compares the communicative effectiveness of spontaneous monologues and dialogues on nonparticipating addressees overhearing talk. Finds that overhearers were more accurate at following instructions in a referential communication task when listening in on dialogues than when listening in on monologues. Suggests greater number of discourse markers…

  16. What Makes Dialogues Easy to Understand?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branigan, Holly P.; Catchpole, Ciara M.; Pickering, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    Two experiments investigate the question of why dialogues tend to be easier for anyone to understand than monologues. One possibility is that overhearers of dialogue have access to the different perspectives provided by the interlocutors, whereas overhearers of monologue have access to the speaker's perspective alone (Fox Tree, 1999). Directors…

  17. Influence in science dialogue: Individual attitude changes as a result of dialogue between laypersons and scientists.

    PubMed

    Zorn, Theodore E; Roper, Juliet; Weaver, C Kay; Rigby, Colleen

    2012-10-01

    Dialogue as a science communication process has been idealized in both practitioner and scholarly literature. However, there is inconsistency in what is meant by dialogue, the forms it should take, and its purported consequences. Empirical research on the experienced benefits of dialogue is limited. The present study addresses this gap by examining attitudinal changes among laypeople and scientists in dialogue on the topic of human biotechnology (HBT). We found that, as a result of participation in dialogue, laypeople's attitudes toward scientists were more positive and scientists' and laypeople's attitudes toward HBT tended to converge. Additionally, laypeople reported increased communicative self-efficacy after the dialogue experience. However, effects in some cases differed by dialogue format. Implications for practice and research are discussed. PMID:23832562

  18. Three dialogues concerning robots in elder care.

    PubMed

    Metzler, Theodore A; Barnes, Susan J

    2014-01-01

    The three dialogues in this contribution concern 21st century application of life-like robots in the care of older adults. They depict conversations set in the near future, involving a philosopher (Dr Phonius) and a nurse (Dr Myloss) who manages care at a large facility for assisted living. In their first dialogue, the speakers discover that their quite different attitudes towards human-robot interaction parallel fundamental differences separating their respective concepts of consciousness. The second dialogue similarly uncovers deeply contrasting notions of personhood that appear to be associated with respective communities of nursing and robotics. The additional key awareness that arises in their final dialogue links applications of life-like robots in the care of older adults with potential transformations in our understandings of ourselves - indeed, in our understandings of the nature of our own humanity. This series of dialogues, therefore, appears to address a topic in nursing philosophy that merits our careful attention. PMID:24320977

  19. This New Field of Inclusive Education: Beginning a Dialogue on Conceptual Foundations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danforth, Scot; Naraian, Srikala

    2015-01-01

    Numerous scholars have suggested that the standard knowledge base of the field of special education is not a suitable intellectual foundation for the development of research, policy, and practice in the field of inclusive education. Still, we have yet to have a dialogue on what conceptual foundations may be most generative for the growth and…

  20. Difficult Dialogues, Rewarding Solutions: Strategies to Expand Postsecondary Opportunities While Controlling Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Immerwahr, John

    2009-01-01

    This report from Public Agenda is a summary of the process and outcomes of the "Difficult Dialogues" that took place in November 2008 at the 4th annual policy summit of the Midwestern Higher Education Compact (MHEC). Nearly 200 state legislators, institutional and system-level leaders and governing board members, faculty, executive branch…

  1. 76 FR 41246 - Pesticide Program Dialogue Committee, Pesticide Registration Improvement Act Process Improvement...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ...The Pesticide Program Dialogue Committee (PPDC) provides a forum for a diverse group of stake holders to provide advice to the pesticide program on various pesticide regulatory, policy, and program implementation issues. In meeting its Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) and Endangered Species Act (ESA) obligations, EPA continues to seek advice from the PPDC and its......

  2. Spatial variation in keystone effects: Small mammal diversity associated with black-tailed prairie dog colonies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cully, J.F.; Collinge, S.K.; Van Nimwegen, R. E.; Ray, C.; Johnson, W.C.; Thiagarajan, B.; Conlin, D.B.; Holmes, B.E.

    2010-01-01

    Species with extensive geographic ranges may interact with different species assemblages at distant locations, with the result that the nature of the interactions may vary spatially. Black-tailed prairie dogs Cynomys ludovicianus occur from Canada to Mexico in grasslands of the western Great Plains of North America. Black-tailed prairie dogs alter vegetation and dig extensive burrow systems that alter grassland habitats for plants and other animal species. These alterations of habitat justify the descriptor " ecological engineer," and the resulting changes in species composition have earned them status as a keystone species. We examined the impact of black-tailed prairie dogs on small mammal assemblages by trapping at on- and off-colony locations at eight study areas across the species' geographic range. We posed 2 nested hypotheses: 1) prairie dogs function as a keystone species for other rodent species; and 2) the keystone role varies spatially. Assuming that it does, we asked what are the sources of the variation? Black-tailed prairie dogs consistently functioned as a keystone species in that there were strong statistically significant differences in community composition on versus off prairie dog colonies across the species range in prairie grassland. Small mammal species composition varied along both latitudinal and longitudinal gradients, and species richness varied from 4 to 11. Assemblages closer together were more similar; such correlations approximately doubled when including only on- or off-colony grids. Black-tailed prairie dogs had a significant effect on associated rodent assemblages that varied regionally, dependent upon the composition of the local rodent species pool. Over the range of the black-tailed prairie dog, on-colony rodent richness and evenness were less variable, and species composition was more consistent than off-colony assemblages. ?? 2010 The Authors.

  3. Brokered dialogue: A new research method for controversial health and social issues

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Dialogue is a foundational feature of social life and an important way in which we come to understand one another. In situations of controversy dialogue is often absent because of a range of social barriers. We have developed a new film-based qualitative research method for studying controversial issues in healthcare and social policy. We call this method Brokered Dialogue. Theoretically informed by the traditions in narrative inquiry and visual anthropology, the method is premised on the idea that dialogue possesses features making it unique as a generator of new knowledge and opportunities for social intervention. Film is not only an extraordinarily rich data source, but an excellent medium for knowledge transfer and dissemination. Discussion The paper introduces the Brokered Dialogue method. We outline its critical steps, including the procedures for sampling, data collection and data analysis of both textual and visual data. Participants in a Brokered Dialogue engage in filmed interviews that capture their perspectives on a given topic; they then share their perspectives with, and pose questions of, one another through the medium of film. Using a participatory editing process, only footage that participants feel comfortable showing to others is incorporated. This technique offers participants a ‘safe’ space for respectful interaction. The editing process itself is analytic, and the final assembly of footage approximates a dialogue on the topic at hand. A link to a film produced from a project piloting the method is provided to demonstrate its real world application. Summary Brokered Dialogue is a method for promoting respectful interactions among those with seemingly divergent views on a controversial topic and for discovering critical points of divergence that may represent pathways for improvement. While the end product is a ‘film’, the goal is to have these films used as catalysts for ongoing respectful dialogue and problem

  4. Entropy growth in emotional online dialogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sienkiewicz, J.; Skowron, M.; Paltoglou, G.; Hołyst, Janusz A.

    2013-02-01

    We analyze emotionally annotated massive data from IRC (Internet Relay Chat) and model the dialogues between its participants by assuming that the driving force for the discussion is the entropy growth of emotional probability distribution.

  5. Keystone conference on environmental biotechnology. Summary -- Results of conference

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This symposium brought together a unique mix of scientists, engineers and policy makers to discuss the latest applications of biotechnology to in situ bioremediation and ex situ biodegradation of pollutants and industrial wastes. Several new topics were prominent in the discussions. Chief among these were issues related to environmentally acceptable endpoints, command and control versus incentive driven regulations, bioavailability of pollutants to microbial action, delivery of biodegrading organisms to pollutant plumes, value added production, and genetic probes for monitoring the status of soil consortia. These new issues gave a new perspective to the more traditional topics of the molecular genetics of microorganisms, marine bioremediation, bioprocessing of industrial and agricultural wastes, and engineered bioremediation systems which were featured.

  6. Ranking Multiple Dialogue States by Corpus Statistics to Improve Discourse Understanding in Spoken Dialogue Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashinaka, Ryuichiro; Nakano, Mikio

    This paper discusses the discourse understanding process in spoken dialogue systems. This process enables a system to understand user utterances from the context of a dialogue. Ambiguity in user utterances caused by multiple speech recognition hypotheses and parsing results sometimes makes it difficult for a system to decide on a single interpretation of a user intention. As a solution, the idea of retaining possible interpretations as multiple dialogue states and resolving the ambiguity using succeeding user utterances has been proposed. Although this approach has proven to improve discourse understanding accuracy, carefully created hand-crafted rules are necessary in order to accurately rank the dialogue states. This paper proposes automatically ranking multiple dialogue states using statistical information obtained from dialogue corpora. The experimental results in the train ticket reservation and weather information service domains show that the statistical information can significantly improve the ranking accuracy of dialogue states as well as the slot accuracy and the concept error rate of the top-ranked dialogue states.

  7. Lessons learnt from the Climate Dialogue initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crok, Marcel; Strengers, Bart; Vasileiadou, Eleftheria

    2015-04-01

    The weblog Climate Dialogue (climatedialogue.org) has been an experimental climate change communication project. It was the result of a motion in the Dutch parliament, which asked the Dutch government "to also involve climate sceptics in future studies on climate change". Climate Dialogue was set up by the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), the Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency (PBL), and Dutch science journalist Marcel Crok. It operated for slightly more than two years (From November 2012 till December 2014). Around 20 climate scientists from all over the world, many of them leading in their respective fields, participated in six dialogues. Climate Dialogue was a moderated blog on controversial climate science topics introducing a combination of several novel elements: a) bringing together scientists with widely separated viewpoints b) strict moderation of the discussion and c) compilation of executive and extended summaries of the discussions that were approved by the invited scientists. In our talk, we will discuss the operation and results of the Climate Dialogue project, focusing more explicitly on the lessons learnt with respect to online climate change communication addressing the question: "To what extent can online climate change communication bring together climate scientists with widely separated viewpoints, and what would be the advantage of such communication practice?" We identify how Climate Dialogue was received and perceived by the participating scientists, but also by different scientific and online communities. Finally, we present our ideas on how Climate Dialogue could evolve in a novel way of contributing to (climate) science and what steps would be necessary and/or beneficial for such a platform to survive and succeed.

  8. Reproductive health and health sector reform in developing countries: establishing a framework for dialogue.

    PubMed Central

    Lubben, Marianne; Mayhew, Susannah H.; Collins, Charles; Green, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    It is not clear how policy-making in the field of reproductive health relates to changes associated with programmes for the reform of the health sector in developing countries. There has been little communication between these two areas, yet policy on reproductive health has to be implemented in the context of structural change. This paper examines factors that limit dialogue between the two areas and proposes the following framework for encouraging it: the identification of policy groups and the development of bases for collaborative links between them; the introduction of a common understanding around relevant policy contexts; reaching agreement on compatible aims relating to reproductive health and health sector change; developing causal links between policy content in reproductive health and health sector change as a basis for evidence-based policy-making; and strengthening policy-making structures, systems, skills, and values. PMID:12219159

  9. A Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) Model for the Keystone Predator Pisaster ochraceus

    PubMed Central

    Monaco, Cristián J.; Wethey, David S.; Helmuth, Brian

    2014-01-01

    We present a Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) model for the quintessential keystone predator, the rocky-intertidal sea star Pisaster ochraceus. Based on first principles, DEB theory is used to illuminate underlying physiological processes (maintenance, growth, development, and reproduction), thus providing a framework to predict individual-level responses to environmental change. We parameterized the model for P. ochraceus using both data from the literature and experiments conducted specifically for the DEB framework. We devoted special attention to the model’s capacity to (1) describe growth trajectories at different life-stages, including pelagic larval and post-metamorphic phases, (2) simulate shrinkage when prey availability is insufficient to meet maintenance requirements, and (3) deal with the combined effects of changing body temperature and food supply. We further validated the model using an independent growth data set. Using standard statistics to compare model outputs with real data (e.g. Mean Absolute Percent Error, MAPE) we demonstrated that the model is capable of tracking P. ochraceus’ growth in length at different life-stages (larvae: MAPE = 12.27%; post-metamorphic, MAPE = 9.22%), as well as quantifying reproductive output index. However, the model’s skill dropped when trying to predict changes in body mass (MAPE = 24.59%), potentially because of the challenge of precisely anticipating spawning events. Interestingly, the model revealed that P. ochraceus reserves contribute little to total biomass, suggesting that animals draw energy from structure when food is limited. The latter appears to drive indeterminate growth dynamics in P. ochraceus. Individual-based mechanistic models, which can illuminate underlying physiological responses, offer a viable framework for forecasting population dynamics in the keystone predator Pisaster ochraceus. The DEB model herein represents a critical step in that direction, especially in a period of

  10. Ontogenetic functional diversity: size structure of a keystone predator drives functioning of a complex ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Volker H W; Rasmussen, Nick L

    2013-05-01

    A central challenge in community ecology is to understand the connection between biodiversity and the functioning of ecosystems. While traditional approaches have largely focused on species-level diversity, increasing evidence indicates that there exists substantial ecological diversity among individuals within species. By far, the largest source of this intraspecific diversity stems from variation among individuals in ontogenetic stage and size. Although such ontogenetic shifts are ubiquitous in natural communities, whether and how they scale up to influence the structure and functioning of complex ecosystems is largely unknown. Here we take an experimental approach to examine the consequences of ontogenetic niche shifts for the structure of communities and ecosystem processes. In particular we experimentally manipulated the stage structure in a keystone predator, larvae of the dragonfly Anax junius, in complex experimental pond communities to test whether changes in the population stage or size structure of a keystone species scale up to alter community structure and ecosystem processes, and how functional differences scale with relative differences in size among stages. We found that the functional role of A. junius was stage-specific. Altering what stages were present in a pond led to concurrent changes in community structure, primary producer biomass (periphyton and phytoplankton), and ultimately altered ecosystem processes (respiration and net primary productivity), indicating a strong, but stage-specific, trophic cascade. Interestingly, the stage-specific effects did not simply scale with size or biomass of the predator, but instead indicated clear ontogenetic niche shifts in ecological interactions. Thus, functional differences among stages within a keystone species scaled up to alter the functioning of entire ecosystems. Therefore, our results indicate that the classical approach of assuming an average functional role of a species can be misleading because

  11. Keystone predators (eastern newts, Notophthalmus viridescens) reduce the impacts of an aquatic invasive species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kimberly G.

    2006-01-01

    Predation, competition, and their interaction are known to be important factors that influence the structure of ecological communities. In particular, in those cases where a competitive hierarchy exists among prey species, the presence of certain keystone predators can result in enhanced diversity in the prey community. However, little is known regarding the influence of keystone predator presence on invaded prey communities. Given the widespread occurrence of invasive species and substantial concern regarding their ecological impacts, studies on this topic are needed. In this study I used naturalistic replications of an experimental tadpole assemblage to assess the influence of predatory eastern newts, Notophthalmus viridescens, on the outcome of interspecific competition among native and nonindigenous tadpoles. When newts were absent, the presence of the tadpoles of one invasive species, the Cuban treefrog, Osteopilus septentrionalis, resulted in decreased survival and growth rate of the dominant native species, Bufo terrestris, and dominance of the tadpole assemblage by O. septentrionalis. However, the presence of one adult newt generally reduced or eliminated the negative impacts of O. septentrionalis tadpoles, resulting in comparable survival and performance of native species in invaded and noninvaded treatments. Differential mortality among the tadpole species suggests that newts preyed selectively on O. septentrionalis tadpoles, supporting the hypothesis that newts acted as keystone predators in the invaded assemblage. The presence of nonindigenous larval cane toads, Bufo marinus, did not significantly affect native species, and this species was not negatively affected by the presence of newts. Collectively, these results suggest that eastern newts significantly modified the competitive hierarchy of the invaded tadpole assemblage and reduced the impacts of a competitively superior invasive species. If general, these results suggest that the presence of

  12. The Ecology of a Keystone Seed Disperser, the Ant Rhytidoponera violacea

    PubMed Central

    Lubertazzi, Dave; Aliberti Lubertazzi, Maria A.; McCoy, Neil; Gove, Aaron D.; Majer, Jonathan D.; Dunn, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    Rhytidoponera violacea (Forel) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) is a keystone seed disperser in Kwongan heathl and habitats of southwestern Australia. Like many myrmecochorous ants, little is known about the basic biology of this species. In this study various aspects of the biology of R. violacea were examined and the researchers evaluated how these characteristics may influence seed dispersal. R. violacea nesting habits (relatively shallow nests), foraging behavior (scramble competitor and lax food selection criteria), and other life history characteristics complement their role as a mutualist that interacts with the seeds of many plant species. PMID:21067420

  13. Quantum Secure Dialogue with Quantum Encryption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Tian-Yu

    2014-09-01

    How to solve the information leakage problem has become the research focus of quantum dialogue. In this paper, in order to overcome the information leakage problem in quantum dialogue, a novel approach for sharing the initial quantum state privately between communicators, i.e., quantum encryption sharing, is proposed by utilizing the idea of quantum encryption. The proposed protocol uses EPR pairs as the private quantum key to encrypt and decrypt the traveling photons, which can be repeatedly used after rotation. Due to quantum encryption sharing, the public announcement on the state of the initial quantum state is omitted, thus the information leakage problem is overcome. The information-theoretical efficiency of the proposed protocol is nearly 100%, much higher than previous information leakage resistant quantum dialogue protocols. Moreover, the proposed protocol only needs single-photon measurements and nearly uses single photons as quantum resource so that it is convenient to implement in practice.

  14. Race talk: the psychology of racial dialogues.

    PubMed

    Sue, Derald Wing

    2013-11-01

    Constructive dialogues on race have been proposed as a means to heal racial and ethnic divides, reduce prejudice and misinformation, increase racial literacy, and foster improved race relations. Studies on the psychology of racial dialogues indicate social and academic norms that dictate against race talk between White Americans and persons of color: (a) the politeness protocol, (b) the academic protocol, and (c) the color-blind protocol. These protocols discourage race talk and allow society to enter into a conspiracy of silence regarding the detrimental impact oppression plays on persons of color. Facilitating difficult dialogues on race requires educators to recognize what makes such discussions difficult. For people of color, engaging in race talk exposes them to microaggressions that invalidate and assail their racial/ethnic identities. For Whites, honest discussions are impeded by fears of appearing racist, of realizing their racism, of acknowledging White privilege, and of taking responsibility to combat racism. PMID:24320648

  15. Interfaith Dialogue as a Means for Transformational Conversations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krebs, Stephanie Russell

    2015-01-01

    This article reports findings, inspired by the researcher's personal, transformational experience, on students' responses to an interfaith dialogue at an Interfaith Youth Core Interfaith Leadership Institute. Results demonstrated that several factors characterize interfaith dialogue: the environment, individual relationships fostered through…

  16. Experimental infection of vertebrates of the Pocomoke Cypress Swamp, Maryland with Keystone and Jamestown Canyon viruses.

    PubMed

    Watts, D M; Tammariello, R F; Dalrymple, J M; Eldridge, B F; Russell, P K; Top, F H

    1979-03-01

    Experimental studies were conducted to assess the susceptibility of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), gray squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis), and cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) to Jamestown Canyon (JC) and/or Keystone (KEY) virus infection. Viremia occurred in 5 of 6 deer inoculated with JC virus; however, all deer developed KEY virus neutralizing antibody. Based on the observation that antibody elicited by primary infection of deer with either KEY or JC virus exhibited partial heterologous neutralization in vitro, cross-challenge experiments were performed in these animals. Keystone virus failed to infect deer 30 days post primary JC virus infection; however, deer became infected when challenged with KEY virus 80 days after the initial JC virus infection as indicated by a substantial increase in antibody titer. Similarly, JC virus failed to produce viremia in immune animals infected with KEY virus 80 days previously, although 2 of the 3 animals challenged had serological evidence of infection. Three field-collected cottontail rabbits with no evidence of KEY antibody were readily susceptible to KEY virus infection and developed viremias of 1-4 days' duration; rabbits with KEY virus antibody did not develop viremia upon KEY virus challenge. Eight antibody-negative field-collected gray squirrels became viremic following injection with KEY virus; however, a comparable group of squirrels did not become viremic when injected with JC virus. PMID:453437

  17. The Personal Doctoring Manifesto: A Perspective from the Keystone IV Conference.

    PubMed

    DeVoe, Jennifer E; Barnes, Kathleen; Morris, Carl; Campbell, Kendall; Morris-Singer, Andrew; Westfall, John M; Grumbach, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    The Keystone IV Conference was a touchstone moment for multigenerational conversations regarding our health care system and an opportunity to reconnect with the values of personal doctoring as a vocation. It inspired participants to renew commitments to relationships, healthy communities, and social change. Keystone IV was also a stark reminder of the need to rekindle family medicine's counterculture flame in today's tumultuous health care environment and reclaim the role of personal doctors in American society. Reimagining and reigniting the fire of personal relationship is today's counterculture movement for primary care. Personal doctors must heed the call for immediate action, which requires defining when relationships matter most in health care and understanding how to harness paradigm shifts in information technology, team-based care, and population health to strengthen, rather than undermine, personal doctoring. Simultaneously, we must also invent a new notion of personal doctoring that creates partnerships with patients and families to drive forward a social movement demanding health care focused on the whole person in the context of his or her community. Change will occur when patients insist on a personal doctoring approach as an essential priority for what they expect from the health care system-that anything less is unacceptable. PMID:27387168

  18. A View from Cheyenne Mountain: Generation III’s Perspective of Keystone III

    PubMed Central

    Bliss, Erika; Cadwallader, Kara; Steyer, Terrence E.; Clements, Deborah S.; DeVoe, Jennifer E.; Fink, Kenneth; Khubesrian, Marina; Lyons, Paul; Steiner, Elizabeth; Weismiller, David

    2014-01-01

    In October 2000 the family of family medicine convened the Keystone III conference at Cheyenne Mountain Resort. Keystone III participants included members of Generation I (entered practice before 1970), Generation II (entered 1970–1990), and Generation III (entered after 1990). They represented a wide range of family physicians, from medical students to founders of the discipline, and from small-town solo practice to academic medicine. During the conference, the three generations worked together and separately thinking about the past, present, and future of family medicine, our roles in it, and how the understanding of a family physician and our discipline had and would continue to evolve. After the conference, the 10 Generation III members wrote the article published here, reflecting on our experiences as new physicians and physicians in training, and the similarities and differences between our experiences and those of physicians in Generations I and II. Key similarities included commitment to whole-person care, to a wide scope of practice, to community health, and to ongoing engagement with our discipline. Key differences included our understanding of availability, the need for work-life balance, the role of technology in the physician-patient relationship, and the perceptions of the relationship between medicine and a range of outside forces such as insurance and government. This article, presented with only minor edits, thus reflects accurately our perceptions in late 2000. The accompanying editorial reflects our current perspective. PMID:24445106

  19. Do tabular corals constitute keystone structures for fishes on coral reefs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerry, J. T.; Bellwood, D. R.

    2015-03-01

    This study examined the changes in community composition of reef fishes by experimentally manipulating the availability of shelter provided by tabular structures on a mid-shelf reef on the Great Barrier Reef. At locations where access to tabular corals ( Acropora hyacinthus and Acropora cytherea) was excluded, a rapid and sustained reduction in the abundance of large reef fishes occurred. At locations where tabular structure was added, the abundance and diversity of large reef fishes increased and the abundance of small reef fishes tended to decrease, although over a longer time frame. Based on their response to changes in the availability of tabular structures, nine families of large reef fishes were separated into three categories; designated as obligate, facultative or non-structure users. This relationship may relate to the particular ecological demands of each family, including avoidance of predation and ultraviolet radiation, access to feeding areas and reef navigation. This study highlights the importance of tabular corals for large reef fishes in shallow reef environments and provides a possible mechanism for local changes in the abundance of reef fishes following loss of structural complexity on coral reefs. Keystone structures have a distinct structure and disproportionate effect on their ecosystem relative to their abundance, as such the result of this study suggests tabular corals may constitute keystone structures on shallow coral reefs.

  20. The role of a keystone fault in triggering the complex El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, John M.; Oskin, Michael E.; Teran, Orlando J.

    2016-04-01

    The 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake in Baja California, Mexico activated slip on multiple faults of diverse orientations, which is commonly the case for large earthquakes. The critical stress level for fault failure depends on fault orientation and is lowest for optimally oriented faults positioned approximately 30° to the greatest principal compressive stress. Yet, misoriented faults whose positioning is not conducive to rupture are also common. Here we use stress inversions of surface displacement and seismic data to show that the El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake initiated on a fault that, owing to its orientation, was among those that required the greatest stress for failure. Although other optimally oriented faults must have reached critical stress earlier in the interseismic period, Coulomb stress modelling shows that slip on these faults was initially muted because they were pinned, held in place by misoriented faults that helped regulate their slip. In this way, faults of diverse orientations could be maintained at critical stress without destabilizing the network. We propose that regional stress build-up continues until a misoriented keystone fault reaches its threshold and its failure then spreads spontaneously across the network in a large earthquake. Our keystone fault hypothesis explains seismogenic failure of severely misoriented faults such as the San Andreas fault and the entire class of low-angle normal faults.

  1. Effects of frugivore impoverishment and seed predators on the recruitment of a keystone palm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadini, Rodrigo F.; Fleury, Marina; Donatti, Camila I.; Galetti, Mauro

    2009-03-01

    Many plant species are threatened as a result of extinction of their large-bodied frugivores all over the world. Additionally, introduced herbivores and seed predators may cause severe pressure on early stages of plant recruitment. We studied the seed dispersal and seed predation of the keystone palm Euterpe edulis on a land-bridge island with a highly impoverished frugivore fauna and overabundant seed predators, and in a continuous Atlantic forest in Brazil. While the diversity of avian seed dispersers and predators was higher on the mainland, the abundance of seed dispersers was 4-fold higher on the island. Turdus flavipes was responsible for 72% and 96% of seeds removed in the island and mainland, respectively. However, the higher density of T. flaviceps on the island did not result in higher seed removal. In fact, seed removal rate was 1.7 times lower there than on the mainland, probably due to the aggressive behavior of the major seed disperser who defend palm fruits. Seed predation, on the other hand, was markedly higher on the island, where nearly 100% of seeds were preyed upon, but only 0.3% on the mainland. As a consequence of higher seed predation the population of E. edulis has few numbers of seedlings and saplings on the island. Therefore, management of the seed predator populations on the island is a key priority for recovering the natural population of this keystone palm and the frugivores that depend on its fruits.

  2. Reflective Scientific Sense-Making Dialogue in Two Languages: The Science in the Dialogue and the Dialogue in the Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ash, Doris

    2004-01-01

    In this paper I focus on the transition from everyday to scientific ways of reasoning, and on the intertwined roles of meaning-making dialogue and science content as they contribute to scientific literacy. I refer to views of science, and how scientific understanding is advanced dialogically, by Hurd (Science Education, 1998, 82, 402-416), Brown…

  3. Feedback Dialogues That Stimulate Students' Reflective Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van der Schaaf, Marieke; Baartman, Liesbeth; Prins, Frans; Oosterbaan, Anne; Schaap, Harmen

    2013-01-01

    How can feedback dialogues stimulate students' reflective thinking? This study aims to investigate: (1) the effects of feedback dialogues between teachers and students on students' perceptions of teacher feedback and (2) the relation between features of feedback dialogues and students' thinking activities as part of reflective…

  4. Dialogue-Based CALL: An Overview of Existing Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bibauw, Serge; François, Thomas; Desmet, Piet

    2015-01-01

    Dialogue-based Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL) covers applications and systems allowing a learner to practice the target language in a meaning-focused conversational activity with an automated agent. We first present a common definition for dialogue-based CALL, based on three features: dialogue as the activity unit, computer as the…

  5. When We Talk. A Guide to Interracial Intercultural Dialogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Carol

    This book is designed to help the person invited to, or expected to attend, a dialogue group on intercultural or interracial relations. It helps the participant be comfortable in such discussions and derive personal benefit from them. While "dialogue" simply means talking together, an organized dialogue session may actually be a class or a forum…

  6. Research Currents: Dialogue as the Heart of Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuy, Roger W.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the importance of dialogue in learning, notes that it is lacking in many educational situations, and recommends the use of written dialogue journals as a means of communication between teachers and individual students. Points out the advantages of dialogue journals for improving writing for different social purposes. (SKC)

  7. Studying and Facilitating Dialogue in Select Online Management Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivancevich, John M.; Gilbert, Jacqueline A.; Konopaske, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Dialogue is arguably one of the most significant elements of learning in higher education. The premise of this article is that online instructors can creatively facilitate dialogue for effectively teaching online management courses. This article presents a dialogue-focused framework for addressing significant behavioral, structural, and…

  8. 78 FR 43960 - Advisory Committee on the Secretary of State's Strategic Dialogue With Civil Society; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Advisory Committee on the Secretary of State's Strategic Dialogue With Civil Society; Notice of the Renewal of an Advisory Committee This is notice of the renewal of the Secretary's Foreign Affairs Policy Board. The...

  9. A Question of Autonomy: Bourdieu's Field Approach and Higher Education Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maton, Karl

    2005-01-01

    The concept of field forms the centre of Pierre Bourdieu's relational sociology and the notion of "autonomy" is its keystone. This article explores the usefulness of these underexamined concepts for studying policy in higher education. It begins by showing how Bourdieu's "field" approach enables higher education to be examined as a distinct and…

  10. Dialoguing with Dreams in Existential Art Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Bruce L.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a theoretical and methodological framework for interactive dialogue and analysis of dream images in existential art therapy. In this phenomenological-existential approach, the client and art therapist are regarded as equal partners with respect to sharing in the process of creation and discovery of meaning (Frankl, 1955,…

  11. Dialogue Needs a Point and Purpose.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Viviane M. J.

    1995-01-01

    Examines the writings of Burbules and Young, two major educational theorists committed to promoting and understanding the practice of dialogue in educational contexts, focusing on Jurgen Habermas's theory of communicative action. Their works have shown the necessity for researchers to move across disciplinary boundaries and developing theories of…

  12. Czech Basic Course: Air Force Dialogues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This is one of a series of supplementary materials used in the final phase of the "Czech Basic Course" developed and implemented at the Defense Language Institute. The purpose of this text is to acquaint students with specialized airport terminology pertaining to takeoff and landing precedures conducted in Czech. The dialogues, presented in…

  13. Dialogue or Exorcism? A Rejoinder to Schempp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siedentop, Daryl

    1987-01-01

    When comparing research strategies in physical education, it serves no purpose to characterize the quantitative approach as contrived, unnatural, rigid, ahistorical, and simplistic while describing the qualitative approach as natural, responsive, context-relevant, flexible, and complex. What is needed is dialogue regarding similarities and…

  14. History of Dialogue Journals and Dissertation Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staton, Jana; Peyton, Joy Kreeft

    The use of dialogue journals as a means of communication between students and teachers originated as a teacher-developed classroom practice rather than a research idea or theory-derived technique. It began in 1964 when a California teacher, Leslee Reed, became fascinated with the comments about learning that she solicited from her students, and…

  15. Adaptive Dialogue Systems for Assistive Living Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papangelis, Alexandros

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive Dialogue Systems (ADS) are intelligent systems, able to interact with users via multiple modalities, such as speech, gestures, facial expressions and others. Such systems are able to make conversation with their users, usually on a specific, narrow topic. Assistive Living Environments are environments where the users are by definition not…

  16. Unexpected Convergences: A Dialogue across Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrosio, John; Park, Gilbert C.

    2009-01-01

    Over the past two years, the authors have been meeting regularly to discuss issues and challenges related to multicultural education. The majority of their students are from small, rural, mostly White, working and middle class communities located within a 150 mile radius of the Midwestern campus where they teach. In this dialogue, the authors…

  17. First Footing Inter-Faith Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luby, Antony

    2014-01-01

    This article examines an action research project on inter-faith dialogue within the sensitive context of Catholic pupils being taught Catholic religious education in state-funded secondary schools. Twenty pupils in S3 and S4 (Year 10 and Year 11) participated in a series of three paired conversations that focused primarily on science and religion,…

  18. Peacebuilding Dialogue Pedagogies in Canadian Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickmore, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    Constructively critical and inclusive dialogue about conflictual issues is one necessary ingredient of both democratic citizenship and peacebuilding learning. However, in North American classrooms populated by heterogeneous and non-affluent students, pedagogies involving discussion of conflicts are rarely fully implemented, sustained, or inclusive…

  19. Using Interactive Whiteboards to Orchestrate Classroom Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer, Neil; Hennessy, Sara; Warwick, Paul

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on the use of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) as a tool for encouraging and supporting classroom dialogue. The authors' concern here is with the promotion of "dialogic" communication between teachers and students, which is now widely recognised as educationally valuable. In this study they investigated how teachers could use the…

  20. Engaging Men in Difficult Dialogues about Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loschiavo, Chris; Miller, David S.; Davies, Jon

    2007-01-01

    Male privilege is one aspect of social inequality that underlies much of the oppression and violence that occurs on college campuses. Mad Skills, a program addressing power and privilege with college men, is described along with general recommendations about how to engage men in difficult dialogues. The PIE Model is used to describe defensive…

  1. Online Learning Dialogues in Learning through Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosley, Sara; Young, David

    2006-01-01

    Purpose--The aim of this paper is to describe a study of online, asynchronous dialogues between tutors and nine work-based postgraduate learners on learning through work (LtW) programmes. Design/methodology/approach-- Adopting a constructivist perspective and using a qualitative approach, 670 messages were segmented into semantic units and…

  2. Dialogue of Cultures: The Israeli Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iram, Yaacov

    The future of the Israeli society, like the future of all democratic, multicultural societies, will be determined by the ability to maintain a meaningful dialogue among its diverse groups: Jews and Arabs, immigrants from diverse cultures and socio-economic strata. This paper presents and analyzes an educational program to promote understanding and…

  3. A Dialogue between an Educator and Psychologist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noam, Gil G.; Bernstein-Yamashiro, Beth

    2013-01-01

    This conclusion to the volume presents a dialogue from the perspective of educator and clinician. With examples from professional development and practice, the discussion revolves around teacher training and the role of the administrator in creating a bounded and safe environment in which teachers can develop healthy relationships. It discusses…

  4. Reclaiming Literacy Classrooms through Critical Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fecho, Bob; Coombs, Dawan; McAuley, Sean

    2012-01-01

    Authors Fecho, Coombs, and McAuley discuss the integral role of dialogue in literacy classrooms dominated by standardized testing, curriculum, and instruction. Their argument in support of the dialogical literacy classroom begins with a historical and theoretical justification for these principles, then transitions into a discussion of the…

  5. Reflection, dialogue, and the possibilities of space.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Arno K; Naidu, Thirusha

    2015-03-01

    To educate physicians who are capable of delivering ethical, socially responsible, patient-centered care, there have been calls for identifying curricular space for reflection on the human and societal dimensions of medicine. These appeals, however, beg the question: What does it mean to devote space in an otherwise busy curriculum for these types of reflection? This Perspective is an attempt to understand the nature of this educational space in terms of its purpose, uses, dynamics, and limitations, and the underlying components that allow reflection and transformation to occur. Reflections on psychosocial themes often take the form of dialogues, which differ from the discussions commonly encountered in clinical settings because they require the engagement of the participants' whole selves--life experiences, backgrounds, personal values, beliefs, and perspectives--in the exchanges. Dialogues allow for the inclusion of affective and experiential dimensions in addition to intellectual/cognitive domains in learning, and for an emphasis on discovering new perspectives, insights, and questions instead of limiting participants solely to an instrumental search for solutions. Although these reflections may vary greatly in their form and settings, the reflective space requires three qualities: safety and confidentiality, an intentional designation of a time apart from the distractions of daily life for reflection and dialogue, and an awareness of the transitional nature--the liminality--of a critically important period of professional identity development. In this open space of reflection and dialogue, one's identity as a humanistic physician takes form. PMID:25426737

  6. Supporting Critical Dialogue across Educational Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laman, Tasha Tropp; Jewett, Pamela; Jennings, Louise B.; Wilson, Jennifer L.; Souto-Manning, Mariana

    2012-01-01

    This article draws upon five different empirical studies to examine how critical dialogue can be fostered across educational settings and with diverse populations: middle-school students discussing immigration picture books, a teacher study group exploring texts on homelessness, a teacher education class studying critical literacy, working class…

  7. Professional Academic Development through Professional Journal Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruth, Damian; Naidoo, Kogi

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the cooperative analysis by a lecturer and an academic development practitioner of a reflective journal dialogue over the 12 weeks of teaching a postgraduate course. Through a retrospective analysis of the journal the present paper explores the following issues: the framing of an inquiry; the personal-professional nexus; and…

  8. Authenticated Quantum Dialogue Based on Bell States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ching-Ying; Yang, Chun-Wei; Hwang, Tzonelih

    2015-03-01

    This work proposes an authenticated quantum dialogue (AQD) based on Bell states, allowing two communicants to perform mutual authentication and secure bidirectional communications simultaneously via public classical channels. Compared with the other AQDs, the proposed protocol is free from information leakage and is secure under several well-known attacks.

  9. Video: A Stimulus for Dialogue Journal Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Valerie A.

    This paper describes one teacher's use of a videotaped mystery series to stimulate students' entries in dialogue journals. Students are shown an episode of the mystery in class and are then asked to write a personal response to it. The aim of the journals is to enhance student confidence and writing skills. Results of an analysis of the journal…

  10. Youth Leadership, Racism, and Intergroup Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulden, Walter T.

    2006-01-01

    The National Conference for Community and Justice--Greater Kansas City's Youth Leadership Institute (Anytown) for high school-aged youth--is designed to expose young people to multicultural issues and topics and facilitate purposeful intergroup dialogue on addressing systemic oppression and privilege. An evaluation was conducted over a three-year…

  11. A Posthumous Dialogue with John Nicolis: IERU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rössler, Otto E.

    2014-12-01

    The reader is taken into the heart of a fictitious dialogue between two friends who never talked long enough with each other during the lifetime of both. It is the fearlessness of the mind of John that prompted the hopefully not too erratic thoughts that are going to be offered. The central figure is Heraclitus, the Great.

  12. 75 FR 22890 - Notice of Extension of Public Comment Period for the Proposed Keystone XL Pipeline Project Draft...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ... Register on April 16, 2010 [75 FR 19969]. A second notice that listed the public comment meetings and... preferred method for commenting. By mail addressed to: Elizabeth Orlando, Keystone XL Project Manager, U.S... security screening. Fax to: (202) 647-1052, attention Elizabeth Orlando. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...

  13. Reversing Present Day Northern Plains Ecosystem Water Supply Stressors Resulting from the Near Extinction of Three Keystone Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, M. R.

    2006-05-01

    Near-extinction of three keystone species (the beaver, the bison, and the prairie dog) had a measurable negative influence on the local and regional climate, and water availability in the Northern Great Plains ecosystem compared to pre-contact conditions. Restoration of these three keystone species may have a significant positive influence by increasing the recharge rate to the aquifers and raising soil moisture due to the sharp hooves and wallows of the bison, prairie dog burrows, and beaver dams providing avenues of ingress. Predictions 1) The recharge of the aquifer will be greater where these three keystone species are present because of the prairie dog burrows, buffalo hooves and wallows, and beaver dams in comparison to the control area; 2) The entire ecosystem will be rejuvenated where the three species are permitted to return; 3) The microclimate changes caused by this reintroduction will stimulate an observable, measurable improvement in water supply when allowed to proceed to near pre-contact conditions. Next Steps 1) Inventory research area containing bison, prairie dog, and beaver versus control plot. (keystone species absent). 2) Measure the soil moisture, water table, water influx rates. 3) Monitor changes over time. 4) Later phase manipulation: Beaver re-introduction into severely damaged riparian area. 5) Link to Northern Plains NEON Initiative. Current Activity 1. Candidate study locations on Standing Rock reservation have been selected and evaluated for suitability, both as study site with beaver activity and a control site with beaver absent. 2. Research mentor identified and selected. Dr. Carol Johnston of South Dakota State University, Director of the Center for Biocomplexity Studies has graciously agreed to oversee my research project 3. Review of previous work is nearing completion. 4. Tribal Agency personnel currently involved with research related to the three keystone species have been interviewed and information obtained from them

  14. Large extinctions in an evolutionary model: The role of innovation and keystone species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Sanjay; Krishna, Sandeep

    2002-02-01

    The causes of major and rapid transitions observed in biological macroevolution as well as in the evolution of social systems are a subject of much debate. Here we identify the proximate causes of crashes and recoveries that arise dynamically in a model system in which populations of (molecular) species coevolve with their network of chemical interactions. Crashes are events that involve the rapid extinction of many species, and recoveries the assimilation of new ones. These are analyzed and classified in terms of the structural properties of the network. We find that in the absence of large external perturbation, "innovation" is a major cause of large extinctions and the prime cause of recoveries. Another major cause of crashes is the extinction of a "keystone species." Different classes of causes produce crashes of different characteristic sizes.

  15. Cognitive vulnerability to depression: A comparison of the weakest link, keystone and additive models

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, Laura C.; Ciesla, Jeffrey A.; Felton, Julia W.; Weitlauf, Amy S.; Anderson, Nicholas L.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple theories of cognitive vulnerability to depression have been proposed, each focusing on different aspects of negative cognition and utilising different measures of risk. Various methods of integrating such multiple indices of risk have been examined in the literature, and each demonstrates some promise. Yet little is known about the interrelations among these methods, or their incremental validity in predicting changes in depression. The present study compared three integrative models of cognitive vulnerability: the additive, weakest link, and keystone models. Support was found for each model as predictive of depression over time, but only the weakest link model demonstrated incremental utility in predicting changes in depression over the other models. We also explore the correlation between these models and each model’s unique contribution to predicting onset of depressive symptoms. PMID:21851251

  16. Large extinctions in an evolutionary model: The role of innovation and keystone species

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sanjay; Krishna, Sandeep

    2002-01-01

    The causes of major and rapid transitions observed in biological macroevolution as well as in the evolution of social systems are a subject of much debate. Here we identify the proximate causes of crashes and recoveries that arise dynamically in a model system in which populations of (molecular) species coevolve with their network of chemical interactions. Crashes are events that involve the rapid extinction of many species, and recoveries the assimilation of new ones. These are analyzed and classified in terms of the structural properties of the network. We find that in the absence of large external perturbation, “innovation” is a major cause of large extinctions and the prime cause of recoveries. Another major cause of crashes is the extinction of a “keystone species.” Different classes of causes produce crashes of different characteristic sizes. PMID:11842190

  17. Parasites that change predator or prey behaviour can have keystone effects on community composition

    PubMed Central

    Hatcher, Melanie J.; Dick, Jaimie T. A.; Dunn, Alison M.

    2014-01-01

    Parasites play pivotal roles in structuring communities, often via indirect interactions with non-host species. These effects can be density-mediated (through mortality) or trait-mediated (behavioural, physiological and developmental), and may be crucial to population interactions, including biological invasions. For instance, parasitism can alter intraguild predation (IGP) between native and invasive crustaceans, reversing invasion outcomes. Here, we use mathematical models to examine how parasite-induced trait changes influence the population dynamics of hosts that interact via IGP. We show that trait-mediated indirect interactions impart keystone effects, promoting or inhibiting host coexistence. Parasites can thus have strong ecological impacts, even if they have negligible virulence, underscoring the need to consider trait-mediated effects when predicting effects of parasites on community structure in general and biological invasions in particular. PMID:24429680

  18. Deposition, diagenesis, and porosity relationships in the Glorieta formation, Keystone (Holt) field, Winkler County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Haack, R.C.; Jacka, A.D.

    1984-04-01

    Production of hydrocarbons from the Chevron 7C H.E. Lovett well, Keystone (Holt) field, is from the upper part of the Glorieta formation (Leonardian). The field is located near the western margin of the Central Basin platform (Permian basin) on a present-day structural high. The 116-ft (35.4-m) core contains at least 7 cycles of deposition, which consist, upward from the base, of progradational subtidal, intertidal and supratidal deposits. Supratidal deposits predominantly consist of dolostones with fenestral cavities; sabkha deposits are not represented. Scattered nodules of nonevaporitic anhydrite have been emplaced within subtidally deposited carbonates after dolomitization. Intrabiopelgrapestone grainstones, oointrabiopelgrainstones, intrabiopelpackstones and wackestones, and intrapelpackstones and wackestones are the predominant lithofacies. Dolostone is the predominant lithology.

  19. A keystone mutualism underpins resilience of a coastal ecosystem to drought.

    PubMed

    Angelini, Christine; Griffin, John N; van de Koppel, Johan; Lamers, Leon P M; Smolders, Alfons J P; Derksen-Hooijberg, Marlous; van der Heide, Tjisse; Silliman, Brian R

    2016-01-01

    Droughts are increasing in severity and frequency, yet the mechanisms that strengthen ecosystem resilience to this stress remain poorly understood. Here, we test whether positive interactions in the form of a mutualism between mussels and dominant cordgrass in salt marshes enhance ecosystem resistance to and recovery from drought. Surveys spanning 250 km of southeastern US coastline reveal spatially dispersed mussel mounds increased cordgrass survival during severe drought by 5- to 25-times. Surveys and mussel addition experiments indicate this positive effect of mussels on cordgrass was due to mounds enhancing water storage and reducing soil salinity stress. Observations and models then demonstrate that surviving cordgrass patches associated with mussels function as nuclei for vegetative re-growth and, despite covering only 0.1-12% of die-offs, markedly shorten marsh recovery periods. These results indicate that mutualisms, in supporting stress-resistant patches, can play a disproportionately large, keystone role in enhancing ecosystem resilience to climatic extremes. PMID:27534803

  20. Redispersal of seeds by a keystone ant augments the spread of common wildflowers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canner, Judith E.; Dunn, Robert R.; Giladi, Itamar; Gross, Kevin

    2012-04-01

    Myrmecochory (dispersal of seeds by ants) is an evolutionarily and ecologically common mutualism. Most of the research on the costs and benefits of myrmecochory in North America assumes that ant-dispersed seeds are taken to, and left in, the ant nest. Here, we use a novel seed-tracking technique to quantify secondary dispersal of seeds from the nest into the surrounding leaf litter by the keystone seed-dispersing ant, Aphaenogaster rudis. We found that A. rudis redispersed >90% of the seeds it took into its nest an average distance of 51.5 cm. A mathematical model shows redispersal increases the rate of population spread of the myrmecochores Hexastylis arifolia and Asarum canadense by 22.5%, and increases the expected cumulative dispersal distance away from the parent plant by 24%. Our results suggest myrmecochory benefits plants in eastern North American forests by increasing the distance between the seed and parent plant and reducing competition among siblings.

  1. Frugivory in Canopy Plants in a Western Amazonian Forest: Dispersal Systems, Phylogenetic Ensembles and Keystone Plants.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Pablo R; Link, Andrés; González-Caro, Sebastian; Torres-Jiménez, María Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Frugivory is a widespread mutualistic interaction in which frugivores obtain nutritional resources while favoring plant recruitment through their seed dispersal services. Nonetheless, how these complex interactions are organized in diverse communities, such as tropical forests, is not fully understood. In this study we evaluated the existence of plant-frugivore sub-assemblages and their phylogenetic organization in an undisturbed western Amazonian forest in Colombia. We also explored for potential keystone plants, based on network analyses and an estimate of the amount of fruit going from plants to frugivores. We carried out diurnal observations on 73 canopy plant species during a period of two years. During focal tree sampling, we recorded frugivore identity, the duration of each individual visit, and feeding rates. We did not find support for the existence of sub assemblages, such as specialized vs. generalized dispersal systems. Visitation rates on the vast majority of canopy species were associated with the relative abundance of frugivores, in which ateline monkeys (i.e. Lagothrix and Ateles) played the most important roles. All fruiting plants were visited by a variety of frugivores and the phylogenetic assemblage was random in more than 67% of the cases. In cases of aggregation, the plant species were consumed by only primates or only birds, and filters were associated with fruit protection and likely chemical content. Plants suggested as keystone species based on the amount of pulp going from plants to frugivores differ from those suggested based on network approaches. Our results suggest that in tropical forests most tree-frugivore interactions are generalized, and abundance should be taken into account when assessing the most important plants for frugivores. PMID:26492037

  2. Frugivory in Canopy Plants in a Western Amazonian Forest: Dispersal Systems, Phylogenetic Ensembles and Keystone Plants

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Pablo R.; Link, Andrés; González-Caro, Sebastian; Torres-Jiménez, María Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Frugivory is a widespread mutualistic interaction in which frugivores obtain nutritional resources while favoring plant recruitment through their seed dispersal services. Nonetheless, how these complex interactions are organized in diverse communities, such as tropical forests, is not fully understood. In this study we evaluated the existence of plant-frugivore sub-assemblages and their phylogenetic organization in an undisturbed western Amazonian forest in Colombia. We also explored for potential keystone plants, based on network analyses and an estimate of the amount of fruit going from plants to frugivores. We carried out diurnal observations on 73 canopy plant species during a period of two years. During focal tree sampling, we recorded frugivore identity, the duration of each individual visit, and feeding rates. We did not find support for the existence of sub assemblages, such as specialized vs. generalized dispersal systems. Visitation rates on the vast majority of canopy species were associated with the relative abundance of frugivores, in which ateline monkeys (i.e. Lagothrix and Ateles) played the most important roles. All fruiting plants were visited by a variety of frugivores and the phylogenetic assemblage was random in more than 67% of the cases. In cases of aggregation, the plant species were consumed by only primates or only birds, and filters were associated with fruit protection and likely chemical content. Plants suggested as keystone species based on the amount of pulp going from plants to frugivores differ from those suggested based on network approaches. Our results suggest that in tropical forests most tree-frugivore interactions are generalized, and abundance should be taken into account when assessing the most important plants for frugivores. PMID:26492037

  3. Extensive Mine-Shrapnel and Gunshot Wound Closure Using Keystone Island Perforator Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Sliesarenko, Sergii V.; Sliesarenko, Kirill S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: During military operations, one aspect of a plastic surgeon’s work is to restore extensive and deep wound defects in a short period of time and provide a high degree of functional recovery to the damaged area. Because many injuries caused by military operations cannot be closed using a primary suture, the specialist has to select another surgical approach to close the wound defect. Surgeons must select methods that not only cover the extensive wound defect in 1 step but also allow skin coverage that is anatomically, functionally, and visually similar to the surrounding tissues to reduce the length of the hospital stay and ensure optimal functional recovery of the damaged organ. Methods: From 2014 to 2015, 25 patients underwent 36 reconstructions at our center after receiving mine-shrapnel and gunshot wounds. All reconstructions occurred during the acute period and used keystone island perforator flaps. The authors’ wound management technique was characterized by an aggressive surgical and antibiotic therapy protocol. Results: In all cases, after surgical debridement, the mine-shrapnel and gunshot wound defects were completely closed in 1 stage during the acute period. The working time in the operating room to perform the transposition of the flap ranged from 45 to 90 minutes, with an average of 68 minutes. All displaced flaps were similar in structure and color to the surrounding tissues and did not change the contours of the body. The adequate restoration of skin allowed patients to begin early recovery of functional activity. Conclusions: Local keystone island perforator flaps can be considered one of the primary methods of plastic closure of extensive defects caused by mine-shrapnel and gunshot wounds at different anatomical locations, providing that the tissue surrounding the defect is intact and usable as a donor resource. PMID:27579247

  4. Identifying keystone species in the human gut microbiome from metagenomic timeseries using sparse linear regression.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Charles K; Mehta, Pankaj

    2014-01-01

    Human associated microbial communities exert tremendous influence over human health and disease. With modern metagenomic sequencing methods it is now possible to follow the relative abundance of microbes in a community over time. These microbial communities exhibit rich ecological dynamics and an important goal of microbial ecology is to infer the ecological interactions between species directly from sequence data. Any algorithm for inferring ecological interactions must overcome three major obstacles: 1) a correlation between the abundances of two species does not imply that those species are interacting, 2) the sum constraint on the relative abundances obtained from metagenomic studies makes it difficult to infer the parameters in timeseries models, and 3) errors due to experimental uncertainty, or mis-assignment of sequencing reads into operational taxonomic units, bias inferences of species interactions due to a statistical problem called "errors-in-variables". Here we introduce an approach, Learning Interactions from MIcrobial Time Series (LIMITS), that overcomes these obstacles. LIMITS uses sparse linear regression with boostrap aggregation to infer a discrete-time Lotka-Volterra model for microbial dynamics. We tested LIMITS on synthetic data and showed that it could reliably infer the topology of the inter-species ecological interactions. We then used LIMITS to characterize the species interactions in the gut microbiomes of two individuals and found that the interaction networks varied significantly between individuals. Furthermore, we found that the interaction networks of the two individuals are dominated by distinct "keystone species", Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroided stercosis, that have a disproportionate influence on the structure of the gut microbiome even though they are only found in moderate abundance. Based on our results, we hypothesize that the abundances of certain keystone species may be responsible for individuality in the human gut

  5. Controlled quantum dialogue robust against conspiring users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Shih-Hung; Hwang, Tzonelih

    2016-07-01

    This paper explores a new security problem in controlled quantum dialogue (CQD) protocols, where the communicants may try to conspire to communicate without the controller's permission. According to our survey, all the previous CQD protocols suffer from this attack. In order to resolve this problem, we also present an improvement protocol. The security analyses show that the improved scheme is secure under this and other well-known attacks.

  6. Trade policy and health: from conflicting interests to policy coherence.

    PubMed

    Blouin, Chantal

    2007-03-01

    Policy incoherence at the interface between trade policy and health can take many forms, such as international trade commitments that strengthen protection of pharmaceutical patents, or promotion of health tourism that exacerbates the shortage of physicians in rural areas. Focusing on the national policy-making process, we make recommendations regarding five conditions that are necessary, but not sufficient, to ensure that international trade policies are coherent with national health objectives. These conditions are: space for dialogue and joint fact-finding; leadership by ministries of health; institutional mechanisms for coordination; meaningful engagement with stakeholders; and a strong evidence base. PMID:17486206

  7. Instruction dialogues: Teaching new skills to a robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crangle, Colleen; Suppes, P.

    1989-01-01

    Extended dialogues between a human user and a robot system are presented. The purpose of each dialogue is to teach the robot a new skill or to improve the performance of a skill it already has. The particular interest is in natural language dialogues but the illustrated techniques can be applied to any high level language. The primary purpose is to show how verbal instruction can be integrated with the robot's autonomous learning of a skill.

  8. Computing Systemic Risk Using Multiple Behavioral and Keystone Networks: The Emergence of a Crisis in Primate Societies and Banks*

    PubMed Central

    Fushing, Hsieh; Jordà, Òscar; Beisner, Brianne; McCowan, Brenda

    2015-01-01

    What do the behavior of monkeys in captivity and the financial system have in common? The nodes in such social systems relate to each other through multiple and keystone networks, not just one network. Each network in the system has its own topology, and the interactions among the system’s networks change over time. In such systems, the lead into a crisis appears to be characterized by a decoupling of the networks from the keystone network. This decoupling can also be seen in the crumbling of the keystone’s power structure toward a more horizontal hierarchy. This paper develops nonparametric methods for describing the joint model of the latent architecture of interconnected networks in order to describe this process of decoupling, and hence provide an early warning system of an impending crisis. PMID:26056422

  9. Errorless acquiescence training: a potential "keystone" approach to building peer interaction skills in children with severe problem behavior.

    PubMed

    Ducharme, Joseph M; Folino, Anthony; Derosie, Janine

    2008-01-01

    Errorless acquiescence training (EAT) was developed as a graduated, success-focused, and short-term intervention for building social skills. The approach focuses on building the skill of acquiescence (i.e., teaching children to be flexible with the needs and will of peers). The authors predict that acquiescence would serve as a keystone, that is, a skill that when trained produces widespread improvements in child behavior, including reductions in antisocial behavior. The authors provide EAT to eight children referred to a clinical classroom for severe antisocial behavior. Consistent with errorless paradigms, key intervention components present at the initiation of intervention are systematically faded at a slow enough rate to ensure continued prosocial interactions throughout and following treatment. Children demonstrate substantial increases in acquiescent responding and other prosocial behavior as well as covariant reductions in antisocial behaviors. Acquiescence is discussed in terms of its potential as a keystone for prosocial responding in children with antisocial behavior. PMID:18096971

  10. Reflective scientific sense-making dialogue in two languages: The science in the dialogue and the dialogue in the science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ash, Doris

    2004-11-01

    In this paper I focus on the transition from everyday to scientific ways of reasoning, and on the intertwined roles of meaning-making dialogue and science content as they contribute to scientific literacy. I refer to views of science, and how scientific understanding is advanced dialogically, by Hurd (Science Education, 1998, 82, 402-416), Brown (The Journal of Learning Sciences, 1992, 2(2), 141-178), Bruner (Acts of Meaning, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1990), Roth (In J. Brophy (Ed.), Social Constructivist Teaching: Affordances and Constraints (Advances in Research on Teaching Series, Vol. 9), New York: Elsevier/JAI, 2003), and Wells (Dialogic Inquiry: Towards a Sociocultural Practice and Theory of Education, New York: Cambridge University Press, 1999). I argue that family collaborative dialogues in nonschool settings can be the foundations for scientific ways of thinking. I focus on the particular reflective family dialogues at the Monterey Bay Aquarium, when family members remembered and synthesized essential biological themes, centering on adaptation, from one visit to the next, in both Spanish and English. My approach is informed by sociocultural theory, with emphasis on the negotiations of meaning in the zone of proximal development (Vygotsky, 1978), as learners engage in joint productive activity (Tharp & Gallimore, Rousing Minds to Life: Teaching, Learning and Schooling in Social Context, New York: Cambridge University Press, 1988). Over the past decades, researchers have discovered that observing social activity, conversation, and meaning-making in informal settings (Crowley & Callanan, 1997; Guberman, 2002; Rogoff, 2001; Vasquez, Pease-Alvarez, & Shannon, Pushing Boundaries: Language and Culture in a Mexicano Community, New York: Cambridge University Press, 1994) has much to teach us regarding learning in general. To date there has been little research with Spanish-speaking families in informal learning settings and virtually none that

  11. Policy Briefs on California Education Finance and Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Collaborative on District Reform, 2007

    2007-01-01

    In October 2007, EdSource hosted a policy convening in response to findings from the "Getting Down to Facts" research project. These four briefs were prepared by a working group of district Collaborative members to inform the dialogue of this "Getting from Facts to Policy" conference. They advocate for new state policy in the areas of (1)…

  12. Building dialogue on complex conservation issues in a conference setting.

    PubMed

    Rock, Jenny; Sparrow, Andrew; Wass, Rob; Moller, Henrik

    2014-10-01

    Dialogue about complex science and society issues is important for contemporary conservation agendas. Conferences provide an appropriate space for such dialogue, but despite its recognized worth, best practices for facilitating active dialogue are still being explored. Face-to-face (FTF) and computer-mediated communication (CMC) are two approaches to facilitating dialogue that have different strengths. We assessed the use of these approaches to create dialogue on cultural perspectives of conservation and biodiversity at a national ecology conference. In particular, we aimed to evaluate their potential to enhance dialogue through their integrated application. We used an interactive blog to generate CMC on participant-sourced issues and to prime subsequent discussion in an FTF conference workshop. The quantity and quality of both CMC and FTF discussion indicated that both approaches were effective in building dialogue. Prior to the conference the blog averaged 126 views per day, and 44 different authors contributed a total of 127 comments. Twenty-five participants subsequently participated in active FTF discussion during a 3-h workshop. Postconference surveys confirmed that CMC had developed participants' thinking and deepened FTF dialogue; 88% indicated specifically that CMC helped facilitate the FTF discussion. A further 83% of respondents concluded that preliminary blog discussion would be useful for facilitating dialogue at future conferences. PMID:24962421

  13. Racial microaggressions and difficult dialogues on race in the classroom.

    PubMed

    Sue, Derald Wing; Lin, Annie I; Torino, Gina C; Capodilupo, Christina M; Rivera, David P

    2009-04-01

    A qualitative study supports the observation that difficult dialogues on race and racism are often triggered by racial microaggressions that make their appearance in classroom encounters or educational activities and materials. Difficult dialogues are filled with strong powerful emotions that may prove problematic to both students and teachers. When poorly handled by teachers, difficult dialogues can assail the personal integrity of students of color while reinforcing biased worldviews of White students. The success or failure of facilitating difficult dialogues on race is intimately linked to the characteristics and actions of instructors and their ability to recognize racial microaggressions. Implications regarding specific education and training recommendations are presented. PMID:19364205

  14. The Strategic Dialogue on Tobacco Harm Reduction: a vision and blueprint for action in the US

    PubMed Central

    Zeller, Mitchell; Hatsukami, Dorothy

    2016-01-01

    The issues related to tobacco harm reduction continue to challenge the tobacco control research and policy communities. The potential for combusting tobacco products to reduce exposure and risk remains largely unknown, but this has not stopped manufacturers from offering such products making these claims. The role of oral tobacco products in a harm reduction regimen has also been a source of dialogue and debate. Within the last few years, major cigarette manufacturing companies have begun selling smokeless products for the first time, claiming to target current cigarette smokers. Other cigarette manufacturers are also offering smokeless products in markets around the world. The harm reduction debate has at times been divisive. There has been no unifying set of principles or goals articulated to guide tobacco control efforts. In particular, the research needs are extraordinarily high in order to drive evidence-based policy in this area and avoid the mistakes made with “light” cigarettes. This paper discusses recommendations from a strategic dialogue held with key, mostly US-based tobacco control researchers and policy makers to develop a strategic vision and blueprint for research, policy and communications to reduce the harm from tobacco for the US. Short-term and long-term objectives are described. PMID:19240228

  15. Euphausia mucronata: A keystone herbivore and prey of the Humboldt Current System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antezana, Tarsicio

    2010-04-01

    Euphausiids are important components of many ecosystems, especially in productive regions of temperate and high latitudes. The present paper makes the case that E. mucronata plays a keystone role in the food web of the Humboldt Current System (HCS) based on a synthesis of new and published data supporting its potential role as a primary grazer, as well as a principal prey for upper trophic level fish. E. mucronata is an endemic species, concentrated in the coastal upwelling belt of the HCS, with morpho-physiological adaptations to vertically migrate into the Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ). Within the 100-km coastal belt of the HCS it accounts for ca. 50% of the meso zooplankton wet weight in winter. In the mixed layer, it is a herbivore with high night ingestion rates (612.2 ng Chl eq ind -1 h -1 or 1013.9 μg C ind -1 d -1, in winter), and accounted for a 19.3% impact on primary production in winter, at an intermediate population abundance (3.8 ind m -3). At higher abundances (50 ind m -3) equivalent to swarms, impact on primary production could reach 254%. Additionally E. mucronata is a common prey of numerous upper trophic level predators. The diet of jack mackerel ( Trachurus murphyi) off central Chile (34-39°S) indicates a striking dependence on E. mucronata prey (average of 75% of stomach content in weight). The fishing season off central Chile extended from austral fall (March-April) and continued at least until the end of austral winter (September). The average daily ration of jack mackerel was 17.4 g, which is equivalent to 2.3% of fish body weight per day. The total E. mucronata consumed in 1991 by the landed population of fish (3.7 million tons yr -1) amounted to 23.2 million tons yr -1. The total estimated population of jack mackerel that year (17.6 million tons) would have consumed ca. 110.2 million tons of E. mucronata. Based on stomach contents, consumption of E. mucronata by other nektonic predators off Chile and off Peru is also outstanding. Four

  16. Dialogue Journal Bibliography: Published Works about Dialogue Journal Research and Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peyton, Joy Kreeft; Staton, Jana

    This annotated bibliography refers to extensive material available for teachers, researchers, and administrators desiring to know more about dialogue journal use and research with many different student populations, from elementary through adult education, regarding teaching English-as-a-Second-Language. It is divided into four sections. Section…

  17. Rimac: A Natural-Language Dialogue System that Engages Students in Deep Reasoning Dialogues about Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Sandra; Jordan, Pamela; Litman, Diane

    2011-01-01

    The natural-language tutorial dialogue system that the authors are developing will allow them to focus on the nature of interactivity during tutoring as a malleable factor. Specifically, it will serve as a research platform for studies that manipulate the frequency and types of verbal alignment processes that take place during tutoring, such as…

  18. Ruminococcus bromii is a keystone species for the degradation of resistant starch in the human colon

    PubMed Central

    Ze, Xiaolei; Duncan, Sylvia H; Louis, Petra; Flint, Harry J

    2012-01-01

    The release of energy from particulate substrates such as dietary fiber and resistant starch (RS) in the human colon may depend on the presence of specialist primary degraders (or ‘keystone species') within the microbial community. We have explored the roles of four dominant amylolytic bacteria found in the human colon in the degradation and utilization of resistant starches. Eubacterium rectale and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron showed limited ability to utilize RS2- and RS3-resistant starches by comparison with Bifidobacterium adolescentis and Ruminococcus bromii. In co-culture, however, R. bromii proved unique in stimulating RS2 and RS3 utilization by the other three bacterial species, even in a medium that does not permit growth of R. bromii itself. Having previously demonstrated low RS3 fermentation in vivo in two individuals with undetectable populations of R. bromii-related bacteria, we show here that supplementation of mixed fecal bacteria from one of these volunteers with R. bromii, but not with the other three species, greatly enhanced the extent of RS3 fermentation in vitro. This argues strongly that R. bromii has a pivotal role in fermentation of RS3 in the human large intestine, and that variation in the occurrence of this species and its close relatives may be a primary cause of variable energy recovery from this important component of the diet. This work also indicates that R. bromii possesses an exceptional ability to colonize and degrade starch particles when compared with previously studied amylolytic bacteria from the human colon. PMID:22343308

  19. The keystone species of Precambrian deep bedrock biosphere belong to Burkholderiales and Clostridiales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purkamo, L.; Bomberg, M.; Kietäväinen, R.; Salavirta, H.; Nyyssönen, M.; Nuppunen-Puputti, M.; Ahonen, L.; Kukkonen, I.; Itävaara, M.

    2015-11-01

    The bacterial and archaeal community composition and the possible carbon assimilation processes and energy sources of microbial communities in oligotrophic, deep, crystalline bedrock fractures is yet to be resolved. In this study, intrinsic microbial communities from six fracture zones from 180-2300 m depths in Outokumpu bedrock were characterized using high-throughput amplicon sequencing and metagenomic prediction. Comamonadaceae-, Anaerobrancaceae- and Pseudomonadaceae-related OTUs form the core community in deep crystalline bedrock fractures in Outokumpu. Archaeal communities were mainly composed of Methanobacteraceae-affiliating OTUs. The predicted bacterial metagenomes showed that pathways involved in fatty acid and amino sugar metabolism were common. In addition, relative abundance of genes coding the enzymes of autotrophic carbon fixation pathways in predicted metagenomes was low. This indicates that heterotrophic carbon assimilation is more important for microbial communities of the fracture zones. Network analysis based on co-occurrence of OTUs revealed the keystone genera of the microbial communities belonging to Burkholderiales and Clostridiales. Bacterial communities in fractures resemble those found from oligotrophic, hydrogen-enriched environments. Serpentinization reactions of ophiolitic rocks in Outokumpu assemblage may provide a source of energy and organic carbon compounds for the microbial communities in the fractures. Sulfate reducers and methanogens form a minority of the total microbial communities, but OTUs forming these minor groups are similar to those found from other deep Precambrian terrestrial bedrock environments.

  20. Predictions replaced by facts: a keystone species' behavioural responses to declining arctic sea-ice.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Charmain D; Lydersen, Christian; Ims, Rolf A; Kovacs, Kit M

    2015-11-01

    Since the first documentation of climate-warming induced declines in arctic sea-ice, predictions have been made regarding the expected negative consequences for endemic marine mammals. But, several decades later, little hard evidence exists regarding the responses of these animals to the ongoing environmental changes. Herein, we report the first empirical evidence of a dramatic shift in movement patterns and foraging behaviour of the arctic endemic ringed seal (Pusa hispida), before and after a major collapse in sea-ice in Svalbard, Norway. Among other changes to the ice-regime, this collapse shifted the summer position of the marginal ice zone from over the continental shelf, northward to the deep Arctic Ocean Basin. Following this change, which is thought to be a 'tipping point', subadult ringed seals swam greater distances, showed less area-restricted search behaviour, dived for longer periods, exhibited shorter surface intervals, rested less on sea-ice and did less diving directly beneath the ice during post-moulting foraging excursions. In combination, these behavioural changes suggest increased foraging effort and thus also likely increases in the energetic costs of finding food. Continued declines in sea-ice are likely to result in distributional changes, range reductions and population declines in this keystone arctic species. PMID:26582841

  1. An Application of Keystone Perforator Island Flap for Closure of Lumbosacral Myelomeningocele Defects.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye-Sung; Morrison, Edwin; Lo, Cheng; Leong, James

    2016-09-01

    Myelomeningocele, also known as spina bifida, is the commonest form of neural tube defect in which both meninges and spinal cord herniate through a large vertebral defect. It may be located at any spinal level; however; lumbosacral involvement is most common. After birth, the closure of spinal lesion is preferably undertaken in the first 48 hours to minimize the risk of injury and central nervous system infection. Relatively small skin defects overlying the dural repair may be directly closed. However, larger defects require reconstructive closure. Numerous methods of reconstruction have been described, such as split skin graft, local flaps or lumbosacral fasciocutaneous flaps, muscle flaps using latissimus dorsi, gluteal or paraspinous muscles, and perforator flaps namely superior gluteal artery perforators, and dorsal intercostal artery perforator flaps. At Monash Health, Victoria, we have used the keystone perforator island flaps to reconstruct lumbosacral myelomeningocele defects on 5 newborns between January 2008 and January 2014. This article evaluates the short-term and long-term outcomes of these patients who were followed up for 10 to 66 months. PMID:26418773

  2. Predator diversity stabilizes and strengthens trophic control of a keystone grazer.

    PubMed

    Griffin, John N; Silliman, Brian R

    2011-02-23

    Despite the global vulnerability of predators to extinction, and the critical functional role they play in many ecosystems, there have been few realistic tests of the consequences of predator species deletion (conversely, predator diversity) in natural ecosystems. We performed a four-month field experiment in a southeastern United States salt marsh to test the role of predatory crab diversity in regulating populations of a keystone grazer that can decimate marsh vegetation at high densities. Our results revealed that a combination of this system's two resident predator species, in comparison to individual species, both stabilize and strengthen predation rates on the potent grazer. Monthly monitoring of predation rates from intense, hot summer months into the cooler autumn indicate this diversity benefit arises from predators responding differentially to changing environmental conditions across seasons. This study provides some of the first experimental field support for the insurance hypothesis from marine ecosystems, suggests that predator temporal complementarity may be more common than currently perceived, and argues for conservation of predator diversity to ensure reliable and effective control of potentially habitat-destroying grazers. PMID:20739314

  3. Keystone effects of an alien top-predator stem extinctions of native mammals.

    PubMed

    Letnic, Mike; Koch, Freya; Gordon, Chris; Crowther, Mathew S; Dickman, Christopher R

    2009-09-22

    Alien predators can have catastrophic effects on ecosystems and are thought to be much more harmful to biodiversity than their native counterparts. However, trophic cascade theory and the mesopredator release hypothesis predict that the removal of top predators will result in the reorganization of trophic webs and loss of biodiversity. Using field data collected throughout arid Australia, we provide evidence that removal of an alien top-predator, the dingo, has cascading effects through lower trophic levels. Dingo removal was linked to increased activity of herbivores and an invasive mesopredator, the red fox (Vulpes vulpes), and to the loss of grass cover and native species of small mammals. Using species distribution data, we predict that reintroducing or maintaining dingo populations would produce a net benefit for the conservation of threatened native mammals across greater than 2.42 x 10(6) km(2) of Australia. Our study provides evidence that an alien top predator can assume a keystone role and be beneficial for biodiversity conservation, and also that mammalian carnivores more generally can generate strong trophic cascades in terrestrial ecosystems. PMID:19535372

  4. Deciphering microbial interactions and detecting keystone species with co-occurrence networks

    PubMed Central

    Berry, David; Widder, Stefanie

    2014-01-01

    Co-occurrence networks produced from microbial survey sequencing data are frequently used to identify interactions between community members. While this approach has potential to reveal ecological processes, it has been insufficiently validated due to the technical limitations inherent in studying complex microbial ecosystems. Here, we simulate multi-species microbial communities with known interaction patterns using generalized Lotka-Volterra dynamics. We then construct co-occurrence networks and evaluate how well networks reveal the underlying interactions and how experimental and ecological parameters can affect network inference and interpretation. We find that co-occurrence networks can recapitulate interaction networks under certain conditions, but that they lose interpretability when the effects of habitat filtering become significant. We demonstrate that networks suffer from local hot spots of spurious correlation in the neighborhood of hub species that engage in many interactions. We also identify topological features associated with keystone species in co-occurrence networks. This study provides a substantiated framework to guide environmental microbiologists in the construction and interpretation of co-occurrence networks from microbial survey datasets. PMID:24904535

  5. Keystone Symposium on Antibodies as Drugs: March 27-April 1, 2009, Whistler, BC CA.

    PubMed

    Wurch, Thierry; Larbouret, Christel; Robert, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    The symposium on Antibodies as Drugs, organized by Keystone Symposia and chaired by J. Marks, (University of California Los Angeles, USA), E.S. Ward (University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, USA) and L. Weiner (Georgetown University Medical Center, USA), was held in Whistler, British Columbia. This Canadian Rockies village, which will host the 2010 Olympic Games, served as an enchanting backdrop to the meeting. The more than 350 speakers and attendees included scientists from major pharmaceutical firms, e.g., Abbott, MedImmune/Astra Zeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Merck & Co., Pfizer, Sanofi-Aventis, Schering, GlaxoSmithKline, Eli Lilly, Hoffmann LaRoche, Novartis, Wyeth, and biotechnology companies, e.g., Ablynx, Medarex, Morphosys, GenMab, Amgen, Genentech, ImmunoGen, Agensys, Domantis, Biogen Idec, Centocor, LFB, Micromet, PDL Biopharma, Borean Pharma, Dyax Corp., Symphogen and Syntonix. Academic research groups at Imperial College London, University of Oxford, ETH Zürich, Scripps, Institute Cochin, Karolinska Institute, Utrecht University, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Baylor College, Paul Ehrlich Institute, University of California San Francisco, University of California San Diego, University of Nantes, University of Tours and Ludwig Institute were also represented, as were regulatory authorities, including the US Food and Drug Administration, National Institutes of Health and the Public Health Agency of Canada). The meeting was very interactive and included thoughtful exchanges during the different sessions and networking events. PMID:20068403

  6. A keystone predator controls bacterial diversity in the pitcher-plant (Sarracenia purpurea) microecosystem.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Celeste N; Day, Stephanie; Wolfe, Benjamin E; Ellison, Aaron M; Kolter, Roberto; Pringle, Anne

    2008-09-01

    The community of organisms inhabiting the water-filled leaves of the carnivorous pitcher-plant Sarracenia purpurea includes arthropods, protozoa and bacteria, and serves as a model system for studies of food web dynamics. Despite the wealth of data collected by ecologists and zoologists on this food web, very little is known about the bacterial assemblage in this microecosystem. We used terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis to quantify bacterial diversity within the pitchers as a function of pitcher size, pH of the pitcher fluid and the presence of the keystone predator in this food web, larvae of the pitcher-plant mosquito Wyeomyia smithii. Results were analysed at two spatial scales: within a single bog and across three isolated bogs. Pitchers were sterile before they opened and composition of the bacterial assemblage was more variable between different bogs than within bogs. Measures of bacterial richness and diversity were greater in the presence of W. smithii and increased with increasing pitcher size. Our results suggest that fundamental ecological concepts derived from macroscopic food webs can also be used to predict the bacterial assemblages in pitcher plants. PMID:18479443

  7. Drove roads: Keystone structures that promote ant diversity in Mediterranean forest landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azcárate, Francisco M.; Seoane, Javier; Castro, Sara; Peco, Begoña

    2013-05-01

    Drove roads are the traditional corridors used by pastoralists for seasonal movements of livestock (transhumance). They cover a considerable land area in Mediterranean countries and, although they are an obvious source of landscape diversity, their influence on the diversity and composition of animal assemblages has not been documented. Ant communities were studied on four active drove roads, two in forests (submediterranean and conifer) and two in open environments (croplands and rangelands). They were compared with the respective matrix communities and their contribution to local species richness was evaluated. The effects were heavily dependent on the open or closed nature of the matrix. In forest environments, drove roads increased ant species richness at the local scale, acting as clear keystone structures. Their species richness and functional diversity were highest on the fine scale, species composition was different, and a slight edge effect in the matrix was detected. In contrast, drove roads had little or even a negative effect in open environment locations. We conclude that drove roads have a high conservation value for ants in Mediterranean forest environments, in addition to their importance as reservoirs of plant biodiversity and generators of ecological goods and services.

  8. A keystone mutualism underpins resilience of a coastal ecosystem to drought

    PubMed Central

    Angelini, Christine; Griffin, John N.; van de Koppel, Johan; Lamers, Leon P. M.; Smolders, Alfons J. P.; Derksen-Hooijberg, Marlous; van der Heide, Tjisse; Silliman, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Droughts are increasing in severity and frequency, yet the mechanisms that strengthen ecosystem resilience to this stress remain poorly understood. Here, we test whether positive interactions in the form of a mutualism between mussels and dominant cordgrass in salt marshes enhance ecosystem resistance to and recovery from drought. Surveys spanning 250 km of southeastern US coastline reveal spatially dispersed mussel mounds increased cordgrass survival during severe drought by 5- to 25-times. Surveys and mussel addition experiments indicate this positive effect of mussels on cordgrass was due to mounds enhancing water storage and reducing soil salinity stress. Observations and models then demonstrate that surviving cordgrass patches associated with mussels function as nuclei for vegetative re-growth and, despite covering only 0.1–12% of die-offs, markedly shorten marsh recovery periods. These results indicate that mutualisms, in supporting stress-resistant patches, can play a disproportionately large, keystone role in enhancing ecosystem resilience to climatic extremes. PMID:27534803

  9. Deciphering microbial interactions and detecting keystone species with co-occurrence networks.

    PubMed

    Berry, David; Widder, Stefanie

    2014-01-01

    Co-occurrence networks produced from microbial survey sequencing data are frequently used to identify interactions between community members. While this approach has potential to reveal ecological processes, it has been insufficiently validated due to the technical limitations inherent in studying complex microbial ecosystems. Here, we simulate multi-species microbial communities with known interaction patterns using generalized Lotka-Volterra dynamics. We then construct co-occurrence networks and evaluate how well networks reveal the underlying interactions and how experimental and ecological parameters can affect network inference and interpretation. We find that co-occurrence networks can recapitulate interaction networks under certain conditions, but that they lose interpretability when the effects of habitat filtering become significant. We demonstrate that networks suffer from local hot spots of spurious correlation in the neighborhood of hub species that engage in many interactions. We also identify topological features associated with keystone species in co-occurrence networks. This study provides a substantiated framework to guide environmental microbiologists in the construction and interpretation of co-occurrence networks from microbial survey datasets. PMID:24904535

  10. Learning through Personal Connections: Cogenerative Dialogues in Synchronous Virtual Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bondi, Stephanie; Daher, Tareq; Holland, Amy; Smith, Adam R.; Dam, Stacy

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the role of cogenerative dialogues in a synchronous virtual classroom. Cogenerative dialogues are a way for students and instructors to reflect upon in-class events and work collaboratively during the course to optimize teaching and learning. In the present study, cogen has been found to be a tool for enhancing connections…

  11. The High Stakes of Artificial Dialogue in Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Douglas J.

    2009-01-01

    Talking about important events, experiences, and ideas is a crucial societal concern for many reasons. In the field of teacher education, dialogue may be even more difficult because it is sometimes seen as being both essential and troubling. Dialogue is complicated because some people are fearful of open inquiry; others are inclined to rant; and…

  12. Dialogue as a Means of Learning and Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskas, Richard S.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine how dialogue is involved in learning and teaching in the classroom. Dialogue is present in many forms as it is used in group interactions, used with technology and how pre-service teachers communicate with their school supervisors during their training. Research was conducted through Educational Resources…

  13. Using Intergroup Dialogue to Promote Social Justice and Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessel, Adrienne; Rogge, Mary E.; Garlington, Sarah B.

    2006-01-01

    Intergroup dialogue is a public process designed to involve individuals and groups in an exploration of societal issues such as politics, racism, religion, and culture that are often flashpoints for polarization and social conflict. This article examines intergroup dialogue as a bridging mechanism through which social workers in clinical, other…

  14. Bakhtin and Freire: Dialogue, Dialectic and Boundary Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Dialogue is a seminal concept within the work of the Brazilian adult education theorist, Paulo Freire, and the Russian literary critic and philosopher, Mikhail Bakhtin. While there are commonalities in their understanding of dialogue, they differ in their treatment of dialectic. This paper addresses commonalities and dissonances within a…

  15. Socratic Dialogue, the Humanities and the Art of the Question

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Sebastian

    2006-01-01

    Plato's depiction of Socrates' interrogations in his early dialogues provides an enduring example of the importance of asking questions as an educative method. This article considers the central educational elements of Socratic dialogue and the ways in which these were developed in the 20th century, particularly in "The Socratic Method" practised…

  16. "He Said What?!" Constructed Dialogue in Various Interface Modes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Lesa; Morris, Carla; Langdon, Clifton

    2012-01-01

    This study analyzes the manifestation of constructed dialogue in ASL narratives as dependent on the interface mode (i.e., face-to-face conversation, electronic conversation over videophone, and vlog monologues). Comparisons of eye gaze over three interface modes shows how aspects of constructed dialogue are altered to fit the communication mode.…

  17. A Response to Jane Sahi's "Dialogue as Education: Martin Buber"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baniwal, Vikas

    2014-01-01

    This article is inspired by Jane Sahi's commentary, "Dialogue as Education: Martin Buber," published under the feature "Classics with Commentary" in the Monsoon 2005 issue of "Contemporary Education Dialogue." I seek to further the discussion of the contributions of Martin Buber to the discourse of education through…

  18. Dialogue as Moral Paradigm: Paths toward Intercultural Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, J. Gregory

    2011-01-01

    The Council of Europe's 2008 "White Paper on Intercultural Dialogue: 'living together as equals in dignity'" points to the need for shared values upon which intercultural dialogue might rest. In order, however, to overcome the monologic separateness that threatens community, we must educate ourselves to recognize the dialogism of our humanity and…

  19. Dialogue on Modernity and Modern Education in Dispute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Michael; Peters, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    This is a dialogue or conversation between Michael Baker (MB) and Michael A. Peters (MP) on the concept of modernity and its significance for educational theory. The dialogue took place originally as a conversation about a symposium on modernity held at the American Educational Studies Association meeting 2010. It was later developed for…

  20. A Model for Negotiation in Teaching-Learning Dialogues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Describes a model for negotiation based on an analysis of teaching-learning dialogues. Topics discussed include the concept of negotiation in research; the relevance of dialogue analysis and modeling for artificial intelligence research; multidisciplinary perspectives; negotiation processes; communicative acts in negotiations; and theoretical…

  1. Socrates Lives: Dialogue as a Means of Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moberg, Eric M.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to argue for the ongoing use of dialogue as a modern pedagogical and andragogical method. The author reviewed 18 scholarly sources from three education databases in this literature review. The use of dialogue as mode of instruction dates from the Socratic Method of 399 B.C.E. to present uses. The literature reveals…

  2. Classroom Dialogue: A Systematic Review across Four Decades of Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Christine; Abedin, Manzoorul

    2013-01-01

    Recognizing that empirical research into classroom dialogue has been conducted for about 40?years, a review is reported of 225 studies published between 1972 and 2011. The studies were identified through systematic search of electronic databases and scrutiny of publication reference lists. They focus on classroom dialogue in primary and secondary…

  3. A Dialogue: Our Selves, Our Students, and Obama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Jennifer; Kelly, Kim

    2009-01-01

    The following essay is a dialogue between two high school English teachers at a small, progressive public school on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. Throughout their dialogue, Jen, whose voice appears in italics, and Kim, whose voice appears in plain text, discuss the factors that motivated their decisions to become teachers, tell of the distinct…

  4. Russian Basic Course: Dialogue Cartoon Guides, Lessons 1-83.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This booklet of cartoon guides contains 83 units of instructional materials prepared by the Defense Language Insitute for use in an intensive, conversational, Russian course. Included are cartoon guides to dialogues and dialogue recombinations which focus on social concerns and military matters. (RL)

  5. Facilitating Difficult Dialogues at the Intersections of Religious Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, Sherry K.

    2009-01-01

    A core definition of a "difficult dialogue" is a verbal or written exchange of ideas or opinions among citizens within a community that centers on an awakening of potentially conflicting views about beliefs and values. As informed by Fried's definition of religious privilege (2007), difficult dialogue at the intersections of religious privilege…

  6. A Dialogue on Liberal Learning in Professional Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of American Colleges, Washington, DC.

    The third in a series of reports on AAC-sponsored dialogues on liberal learning is presented. This dialogue, focusing on the role of liberal learning in professional education, was designed for both teachers and administrators representing a variety of colleges of business, engineering, fine arts, and the health sciences. In the first case study,…

  7. The National Dialogue on Standards-Based Education: Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lefkowits, Laura; Arens, Sheila A.

    2004-01-01

    In response to the need to ensure that standards fulfill their promise of supporting a system of education that leaves no child behind, McREL created a multimedia, multi-site, ongoing nationwide dialogue related to standards-based reform efforts. These dialogues provided participants with opportunities to share underlying assumptions, beliefs, and…

  8. 75 FR 82387 - Next Generation Risk Assessment Public Dialogue Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-30

    ... AGENCY Next Generation Risk Assessment Public Dialogue Conference AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... Generation of Risk Assessment'' (NexGen) program, EPA is announcing a 2-day public dialogue conference to... Information About the Conference The landscape of risk assessment is changing rapidly with new advances...

  9. Introductory CAI Dialogue in Differential Calculus for Freshman Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalman, C. S.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    A project on computer based dialogue for freshmen is described and evaluated. The dialogue utilizes a CAI language written in Fortran that allows a designer to easily write and edit questions at his own desk without the use of a terminal. (Author/DT)

  10. DISCUSS: Toward a Domain Independent Representation of Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Lee

    2012-01-01

    While many studies have demonstrated that conversational tutoring systems have a positive effect on learning, the amount of manual effort required to author, design, and tune dialogue behaviors remains a major barrier to widespread deployment and adoption of these systems. Such dialogue systems must not only understand student speech, but must…