Science.gov

Sample records for keystone policy dialogue

  1. National policy dialogue on state and federal regulation of the electricity industry - staff report on a Keystone policy dialogue

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    For over two years, The Keystone Center facilitated a dialogue on State and Federal Regulation of the Electricity Industry. The intent of this report is to assist policy-makers faced with decisions about changes to traditional utility regulation and planning and provide an overview of a diverse group`s deliberations on regulatory jurisdictional conflicts. This report is not a consensus document, rather it is a staff written summary of two years of discussion on the issues. The participants in the Keystone Dialogue believed that all affected interests could benefit from, if nothing else, a summary of their discussions of state/federal issues. The electric utility industry is one of the last remaining, heavily regulated industries in the United States. Rate and corporate regulation is split between state and federal governments and there is distinct regulatory authority at each level. For example, retail rate regulation occurs at the state level, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission is responsible for wholesale rate regulation under the Federal Power Act, and the Securities and Exchange Commission oversees registered utility holding companies as defined under the Public Utility Holding Company Act of 1935. This jurisdictional split between state and federal regulation has evolved over many years through legislation and litigation on such matters. The creation of this allocation of regulatory responsibility was initiated in 1935 with the passage of the Public Utility Holding Company Act and the Federal Power Act when the economic and technological changes that are now occurring in the industry simply could not have been envisioned.

  2. Utility planning using least-cost principles and the role of externalities - staff report on a Keystone policy dialogue

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    For over two years, The Keystone Center facilitated a two-phase dialogue on Utility Planning Using Least-Cost Principles and, in the second phase, on the role of Externalities. The intent of this report is to assist policy-makers faced with decisions about changes to traditional utility regulation and planning. This report is not a consensus document, rather it is staff written summary of two years of discussion on the issues. As a concept, least-cost planning has been discussed since the 1970`s and many states have implemented such programs since the mid-1980`s. Yet, the actual goals and objectives of least-cost planning remain a source of controversy between affected interest groups. Some industry observers believe that least-cost planning can help reconcile the often conflicting demands between increased capacity requirements and concerns about the external costs of power production. In traditional utility regulation practices, capital investments are rewarded and revenue is a direct function of sales. However, a number state public utility commissions have altered their practices to allow for returns on investments in more efficient end-use equipment (also known as ratebasing conservation) and adjusting revenues to account for sales lost due to utility conservation programs. Other states are planning these types of changes. Still others are observing the impacts of the changes before they commit.

  3. Energy and Obesity--The 2008 Keystone Youth Policy Summits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NCSSSMST Journal, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Keystone Science School and Keystone Center for Science and Public Policy programs blend learning in the natural world with developing mediation and conflict resolution skills. Since 2004, these two divisions of The Keystone Center in Colorado have partnered with the National Consortium for Specialized Secondary Schools of Mathematics, Science and…

  4. Challenging Political Spectacle through Grassroots Policy Dialogues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winton, Sue; Evans, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Can simply talking about policy strengthen democracy? Drawing on data collected for case studies of one Canadian and two U.S. grassroots organizations, we demonstrate that taking part in policy dialogues hosted by grassroots organizations enables participants to gain greater clarity regarding policy issues, policy processes, and citizens'…

  5. Shaping the Education Policy Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Douglas E.; Crowson, Robert L.; Shipps, Dorothy

    2011-01-01

    One important hallmark of William Lowe Boyd's scholarship was his uncanny ability to identify and articulate changes in the key ideas that shape and reshape scholarly, professional, and public discussions of educational policy and politics. Whether one thinks about debates over centralization and decentralization of policy control, changes in…

  6. Democracy in Education through Community-Based Policy Dialogues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winton, Sue

    2010-01-01

    In 2008, People for Education, an Ontario-based parent-led organization, hosted eight policy dialogues with citizens about possibilities for the province's public schools. Policy dialogues are conversations about policy issues, ideas, processes, and outcomes where participants share their knowledge, perspectives, and experiences. In small groups…

  7. Dialogue: Manpower Policies for the 70's

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Generation, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Summarizes the results of a discussion among S. M. Miller, R. D. Corwin, Dennis A. Derryck, Marcia Freedman, Sar Levitan, Jerome Rosow, Robert Schrank, and Elwood Taub on manpower policies for the 1970's. (JM)

  8. Public Policy, Science, and Environmental Risk. Brookings Dialogues on Public Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panem, Sandra, Ed.

    This workshop explored the complex issues involved in scientific measurement of environmental risk. Specific purposes were to articulate policy issues that concern the use of scientific data in environmental risk assessment and to contribute to the dialogue from which better policy might emerge. Viewpoints of workshop participants from the…

  9. Celebrity Climate Contrarians: Understanding a keystone species in contemporary climate science-policy-public interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boykoff, M. T.

    2012-12-01

    Since the 1980s, a keystone species called 'climate contrarians' has emerged and thrived. Through resistance to dominant interpretations of scientific evidence, and often outlier views on optimal responses to climate threats, contrarians have raised many meta-level questions: for instance, questions involve to what extent have their varied interventions been effective in terms of sparking a new and wise Copernican revolution; or do their amplified voices instead service entrenched carbon-based industry interests while they blend debates over 'climate change' with other culture wars? While the value of their influence has generated numerous debates, there is no doubt that climate contrarians have had significant influence on climate science, policy and public communities in ways that are larger than would be expected from their relative abundance in society. As such, a number of these actors have achieved 'celebrity status' in science-policy circles, and, at times, larger public spaces. This presentation focuses on how - particularly through amplified mass media attention to their movements - various outlier interventions have demonstrated themselves to be (often deliberately) detrimental to efforts that seek to enlarge rather than constrict the spectrum of possibility for mobilizing appropriate responses to ongoing climate challenges. Also, this work analyses the growth pathways of these charismatic megafauna through interview data and participant observations completed by the author at the 2011 Heartland Institute's Sixth International Conference on Climate Change. This provides detail on how outlier perspectives characterized as climate contrarians do work in these spaces under the guise of public intellectualism to achieve intended goals and objectives. The research undertaken and related in the presentation here seeks to better understand motivations that prop up these contrarian stances, such as possible ideological or evidentiary disagreement to the orthodox

  10. Social movement heterogeneity in public policy framing: A multi-stakeholder analysis of the Keystone XL pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesley, David T. A.

    In 2011, stakeholders with differing objectives formed an alliance to oppose the Keystone XL heavy oil pipeline. The alliance, which came to be known as "Tar Sands Action," implemented various strategies, some of which were more successful than others. Tar Sands Action was a largely heterogeneous alliance that included indigenous tribes, environmentalists, ranchers, landowners, and trade unions, making it one of the more diverse social movement organizations in history. Each of these stakeholder categories had distinct demographic structures, representing an array of racial, ethnic, educational, occupational, and political backgrounds. Participants also had differing policy objectives that included combating climate change and protecting jobs, agricultural interests, water resources, wildlife, and human health. The current dissertation examines the Tar Sands Action movement to understand how heterogeneous social movement organizations mobilize supporters, maintain alliances, and create effective frames to achieve policy objectives. A multi-stakeholder analysis of the development, evolution and communication of frames concerning the Keystone XL controversy provides insight into the role of alliances, direct action, and the news media in challenging hegemonic frames. Previous research has ignored the potential value that SMO heterogeneity provides by treating social movements as culturally homogenous. However, diversity has been shown to affect performance in business organizations. The current study demonstrates that under some circumstances, diversity can also improve policy outcomes. Moreover, policy frames are shown to be more effective in sustaining news media and public interest through a process the author calls dynamic frame sequencing (DFS). DFS refers to a process implementing different stakeholder frames at strategically opportune moments. Finally, Tar Sands Action was one of the first SMOs to rely heavily on social media to build alliances, disseminate

  11. Speaking across Difference in Community Dialogues on Affirmative Action Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Kristen L.; Moses, Michele S.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the relevance of participants' social group differences with regard to the processes and outcomes of community dialogues on affirmative action. We found that participants' professional status was most salient to both the quantity of participants' contributions as well as their persuasiveness within the dialogues, with…

  12. US-Japan energy policy dialogue. [Final] report, June 1991--December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-16

    The Atlantic Council has cooperated in an ongoing dialogue on energy policy issues with key Japanese organizations for the past twelve years. These Japanese organizations are the Committee for Energy Policy Promotion (CEPP) and the Institute of Energy Economics (IEE). The members of CEPP are major energy supplier and user companies. The IEE conducts sophisticated research and prepares policy papers on a range of international and Japanese energy issues. This energy dialogue is the only long-term US-Japan dialogue which engages CEPP/IEE members. Over the past twelve years the US-Japan energy dialogue has met seventeen times, with alternating meetings held in Tokyo, Hawaii, and Washington, DC. While the dialogue is a private sector activity, US and Japanese government officials are kept informed on the program and are invited to participate in the meetings in Washington and Tokyo. Major benefits of this activity have included: Establishment of close working relationships among Japanese and US private sector energy institutions and experts; exchange of papers on energy issues among participants and on a selected basis to others in the private and governmental sectors; facilitation of separate US-Japanese work on policy issues - for example a joint US-Japan cooperative policy paper on global climate change published in 1991, some government representatives participated in a May 1991 meeting on this subject. Encouragement of Japanese participation in separate Atlantic Council programs on US energy policy imperatives (1990); technology cooperation with developing countries in the field of energy supply and use for sustainable development (1992); creation of a World Energy Efficiency Association (1993); and a US-Japan-Newly Independent States project on NIS energy policy (1992--1994).

  13. Education Community Dialogue towards Building a Policy Agenda for Adult Education: Reflections Drawn from Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirano, Tatiana Lotierzo; Giannecchini, Laura; Magalhaes, Giovanna Mode; Munhoz, Fabiola; Croso, Camilla

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we share the experience of the "Amplifying Voices" initiative. Held by the Latin American Campaign for the Right to Education (CLADE) within the scope of public policy advocacy, "Amplifying Voices" applies the principles of consultation and dialogue in youth and adult education communities, aiming at a stronger…

  14. Promoting Evidence to Policy Link on the Control of Infectious Diseases of Poverty in Nigeria: Outcome of A Multi-Stakeholders Policy Dialogue

    PubMed Central

    Uneke, Chigozie Jesse; Ebeh Ezeoha, Abel; Uro-Chukwu, Henry; Ezeonu, Chinonyelum Thecla; Ogbu, Ogbonnaya; Onwe, Friday; Edoga, Chima

    2015-01-01

    Background: In Nigeria, malaria, schistosomiasis and lymphatic filariasis are among infectious diseases of poverty (IDP) with severe health burden and require effective policy strategies for their control. In this study, we investigated the value of policy brief and policy dialogue as excellent policymaking mechanisms that enable policymakers to adapt effective evidence informed policy for IDP control. Methods: A policy brief was developed on the control of malaria, schistosomiasis and lymphatic filariasis and subjected to deliberations in a one-day multi-stakeholder policy dialogue held in Ebonyi State Nigeria. A modified cross sectional intervention study design was used in this investigation. Structured pre-tested questionnaires were used to evaluate the policy brief document and policy dialogue process at the end of the policy dialogue. Results: Forty-seven policymakers participated in the dialogue. An analysis of the response on the policy brief regarding context, different features of the problem; policy options and key implementation considerations indicated the mean ratings (MNRs) mostly ranged from 6.40-6.85 on 7 point scale. The over-all assessment of the policy brief had MNR at 6.54. The analysis of the response on the policy dialogue regarding the level of priority of policy issue, opportunity to discuss different features of the problem and options for addressing the problem, and the MNRs mostly ranged from 6.50-6.82. The overall assessment of the policy dialogue had MNR at 6.72. Conclusion: Policy dialogues can allow research evidence to be considered together with views, experiences and tacit knowledge of policymakers and can enhance evidence-to-policy link. PMID:26290826

  15. Community-based dialogue: engaging communities of color in the United states' genetics policy conversation.

    PubMed

    Bonham, Vence L; Citrin, Toby; Modell, Stephen M; Franklin, Tené Hamilton; Bleicher, Esther W B; Fleck, Leonard M

    2009-06-01

    Engaging communities of color in the genetics public policy conversation is important for the translation of genetics research into strategies aimed at improving the health of all. Implementing model public participation and consultation processes can be informed by the Communities of Color Genetics Policy Project, which engaged individuals from African American and Latino communities of diverse socioeconomic levels in the process of "rational democratic deliberation" on ethical and policy issues stretching from genome research to privacy and discrimination concerns to public education. The results of the study included the development of a participatory framework based on a combination of the theory of democratic deliberation and the community-based public health model which we describe as "community-based dialogue." PMID:19451407

  16. Literacy, Knowledge and Development: South-South Policy Dialogue on Quality Education for Adults and Young People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Madhu, Ed.; Castro Mussot, Luz-Maria, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This publication contains the results of the conference "South-South Policy Dialogue on Quality Education for Adults and Young People" that took place in Mexico City in 2005. Articles were written by participants who presented their national programmes from the governmental perspective, which were reflected in the literacy policies, but there were…

  17. US-Japan energy policy dialogue. [Contains a list of attendees, agenda, report summaries, and a financial report

    SciTech Connect

    Guertin, Donald L.; Davis, W. Kenneth; Ikuta, Toyoaki

    1993-03-16

    The Atlantic Council has cooperated in an ongoing dialogue on energy policy issues with key Japanese organizations for the past twelve years. These Japanese organizations are the Committee for Energy Policy Promotion (CEPP) and the Institute of Energy Economics (IEE). The members of CEPP are major energy supplier and user companies. The IEE conducts sophisticated research and prepares policy papers on a range of international and Japanese energy issues. This energy dialogue is the only long-term US-Japan dialogue which engages CEPP/IEE members. Over the past twelve years the US-Japan energy dialogue has met seventeen times, with alternating meetings held in Tokyo, Hawaii, and Washington, DC. While the dialogue is a private sector activity, US and Japanese government officials are kept informed on the program and are invited to participate in the meetings in Washington and Tokyo. Major benefits of this activity have included: Establishment of close working relationships among Japanese and US private sector energy institutions and experts; exchange of papers on energy issues among participants and on a selected basis to others in the private and governmental sectors; facilitation of separate US-Japanese work on policy issues - for example a joint US-Japan cooperative policy paper on global climate change published in 1991, some government representatives participated in a May 1991 meeting on this subject. Encouragement of Japanese participation in separate Atlantic Council programs on US energy policy imperatives (1990); technology cooperation with developing countries in the field of energy supply and use for sustainable development (1992); creation of a World Energy Efficiency Association (1993); and a US-Japan-Newly Independent States project on NIS energy policy (1992--1994).

  18. Keystone State of Confusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Reginald

    2009-01-01

    When high school seniors begin searching for the best school to fit their higher education goals, they may need a road map, tour guide and interpreter to help them sort through Pennsylvania's higher education universe. For sure there are seemingly endless choices--public, private, large, small, urban and rural. The Keystone State boasts nearly 200…

  19. The Keystone Pathogen Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Hajishengallis, George; Darveau, Richard P.; Curtis, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the importance of the human microbiome in host health and disease. However, for the most part the mechanisms by which the microbiome mediates disease, or protection from it, remain poorly understood. The “keystone pathogen” hypothesis holds that certain low-abundance microbial pathogens can orchestrate inflammatory disease by remodelling a normally benign microbiota into a dysbiotic one. In this Opinion, we critically assess the available literature in support of this hypothesis, which may provide a novel conceptual basis for the development of targeted diagnostic and treatment modalities for complex dysbiotic diseases. PMID:22941505

  20. Education as Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazepides, Tasos

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show that genuine dialogue is a refined human achievement and probably the most valid criterion on the basis of which we can evaluate educational or social policy and practice. The paper explores the prerequisites of dialogue in the language games, the common certainties, the rules of logic and the variety of common…

  1. Double keystone bird in a keystone species complex.

    PubMed Central

    Daily, G C; Ehrlich, P R; Haddad, N M

    1993-01-01

    Species in a Colorado subalpine ecosystem show subtle interdependences. Red-naped sapsuckers play two distinct keystone roles. They excavate nest cavities in fungus-infected aspens that are required as nest sites by two species of swallows, and they drill sap wells into willows that provide abundant nourishment for themselves, hummingbirds, orange-crowned warblers, chipmunks, and an array of other sap robbers. The swallows thus depend on, and the sap robbers benefit from, a keystone species complex comprised of sapsuckers, willows, aspens, and a heartwood fungus. Disappearance of any element of the complex could cause an unanticipated unraveling of the community. PMID:11607351

  2. Policies and Processes for Social Inclusion: Using EquiFrame and EquIPP for Policy Dialogue

    PubMed Central

    MacLachlan, Malcolm; Mannan, Hasheem; Huss, Tessy; Munthali, Alister; Amin, Mutamad

    2016-01-01

    The application of EquiFrame in the analysis of sexual and reproductive health policies by Ivanova et al to a new thematic area, their selection of only some of the Core Concepts of human rights in health service provision and the addition of new vulnerable groups relevant to the purpose of their analysis, are all very welcome developments. We also applaud their application of EquiFrame to policies in countries where it has not previously been used, along with their use of interviews with policy-makers to produce a deeper understanding of policy processes. We argue that clear justification for the inclusion of additional, or replacement of some exiting vulnerable groups within EquiFrame should be accompanied by clear definitions of such groups, along with the evidence-base that justifies their classification as a vulnerable or marginalised group. To illustrate the versatility of EquiFrame, we summarise a range of ways in which it has been used across a number of regions; including a brief Case Study of its use to develop the National Health Policy of Malawi. While EquiFrame focuses on policy content, we preview a new policy analysis tool – Equity and Inclusion in Policy Processes (EquIPP) – which assesses the extent of equity and inclusion in broader policy processes. Together, EquiFrame and EquIPP can be used to help governments and civil society ensure that policies are addressing the much stronger emphasis on social inclusion, now apparent in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). PMID:26927591

  3. The Importance of Negotiation for Policy Dialogue: Latin American Training Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaramillo, Maria Clara

    2004-01-01

    Over the past several decades, Latin American countries have supported processes of bringing public policy decisions on education closer to the people concerned. Participation at all levels of decision-making processes has generally been highly valued. Nonetheless, these decentralization efforts came about without governments taking the necessary…

  4. Human cloning laws, human dignity and the poverty of the policy making dialogue

    PubMed Central

    Caulfield, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    Background The regulation of human cloning continues to be a significant national and international policy issue. Despite years of intense academic and public debate, there is little clarity as to the philosophical foundations for many of the emerging policy choices. The notion of "human dignity" is commonly used to justify cloning laws. The basis for this justification is that reproductive human cloning necessarily infringes notions of human dignity. Discussion The author critiques one of the most commonly used ethical justifications for cloning laws – the idea that reproductive cloning necessarily infringes notions of human dignity. He points out that there is, in fact, little consensus on point and that the counter arguments are rarely reflected in formal policy. Rarely do domestic or international instruments provide an operational definition of human dignity and there is rarely an explanation of how, exactly, dignity is infringed in the context reproductive cloning. Summary It is the author's position that the lack of thoughtful analysis of the role of human dignity hurts the broader public debate about reproductive cloning, trivializes the value of human dignity as a normative principle and makes it nearly impossible to critique the actual justifications behind many of the proposed policies. PMID:12887735

  5. Conservation of Resources for Sustainable Ecosystems: A Dialogue on Connecting Science, Policy, and Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For over a century rangeland science has focused, with varying degrees of success, on issues of sustainable goods and services. Our goal in this paper is to analyze this research history for insights into how best to link science, policy, and management of natural resources. We describe three broa...

  6. Sharpening the Dialogue: Engaging Policymakers in the Alignment of Appropriations, Tuition, and Financial Aid Policy. Exchanges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michelau, Demaree K.

    2006-01-01

    This issue of "Exchanges" highlights a number of issues in the challenge to align appropriations, tuition and financial aid (AFTA) policy. Two distinct trends in the nature of the American student population are identified: significant demographic shifts and the emerging necessity of serving adult learners. These shifts are prompting state…

  7. Conservation of resources for sustainable ecosystems: a dialogue on connecting science, policy,and management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For over a century rangeland science has focused, with varying degrees of success, on issues of sustainable goods and services. Our goal in this paper is to analyze this research history for insights into how best to link science, policy, and management of natural resources. We describe three broad ...

  8. 1. Photocopied January 1973 from the Keystone Bridge Company Album, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopied January 1973 from the Keystone Bridge Company Album, 1874. THE KEYSTONE BRIDGE COMPANY: LUCY FURNACE. - Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Parkersburg Bridge, Ohio River, Parkersburg, Wood County, WV

  9. Scientific research, stakeholders, and policy: continuing dialogue during research on radionuclides on Amchitka Island, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Powers, Charles W; Kosson, David S; Halverson, John; Siekaniec, Gregory; Morkill, Anne; Patrick, Robert; Duffy, Lawrence K; Barnes, David

    2007-10-01

    changed the research thrust were (1) the inclusion of Aleut hunters and fishers on the biological expedition itself to ensure that subsistence foods and methods were represented, and (2) the addition of a fisheries biologist on a NOAA research trawler to allow sampling of commercial fishes. Although the original research design called for the collection of biota by Aleut subsistence fishermen, and by a commercial fishing boat, the research was modified with continued stakeholder input to actually include Aleuts and a fisheries biologist on the expeditions to ensure their representation. The inclusion of stakeholders during the development of protocols and the research itself improved the overall quality of the investigation, while making it more relevant to the interested and affected parties. Final responsibility for the design and execution of the research and radionuclide analysis rested with the researchers, but the process of stakeholder inclusion made the research more valuable as a source of credible information and for public policy decisions. PMID:17175094

  10. The Paradox of Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The Council of Europe's 2008 "White Paper on Intercultural Dialogue" signalled--with a measure of deep concern--the limits of multiculturalism and its attendant problems of identity politics, communal segregation, and the undermining of rights and freedoms in culturally closed communities. The White Paper proposed the replacement of the policy of…

  11. Keystone feasibility study. Final report. Vol. 4

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-12-01

    Volume four of the Keystone coal-to-methanol project includes the following: (1) project management; (2) economic and financial analyses; (3) market analysis; (4) process licensing and agreements; and (5) appendices. 24 figures, 27 tables.

  12. Beyond engagement in working with children in eight Nairobi slums to address safety, security, and housing: Digital tools for policy and community dialogue.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Claudia; Chege, Fatuma; Maina, Lucy; Rothman, Margot

    2016-01-01

    This article studies the ways in which researchers working in the area of health and social research and using participatory visual methods might extend the reach of participant-generated creations such as photos and drawings to engage community leaders and policy-makers. Framed as going 'beyond engagement', the article explores the idea of the production of researcher-led digital dialogue tools, focusing on one example, based on a series of visual arts-based workshops with children from eight slums in Nairobi addressing issues of safety, security, and well-being in relation to housing. The authors conclude that there is a need for researchers to embark upon the use of visual tools to expand the life and use of visual productions, and in particular to ensure meaningful participation of communities in social change. PMID:27132645

  13. Keystone Method: A Learning Paradigm in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siadat, M. Vali; Musial, Paul M.; Sagher, Yoram

    2008-01-01

    This study reports the effects of an integrated instructional program (the Keystone Method) on the students' performance in mathematics and reading, and tracks students' persistence and retention. The subject of the study was a large group of students in remedial mathematics classes at the college, willing to learn but lacking basic educational…

  14. Battle over proposed Keystone pipeline continues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-07-01

    Opposing sides in the battle over the proposed construction of the controversial Keystone XL pipeline continue to push their messages on the issue. The American Petroleum Institute (API) announced on 9 July that it has launched a new advertising campaign in support of the pipeline, which, if built, will ship oil from Canadian tar sands to refineries in the Gulf of Mexico.

  15. Pack rats (Neotoma spp.): Keystone ecological engineers?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential role of two species of pack rats (Neotoma albigula and Neotoma micropus) as keystone ecological engineers was examined by estimating the species diversity of invertebrates living in the nest middens, and nitrogen mineralization rates in soils associated with the middens. Although pack-...

  16. Interreligious Dialogue in Schools: Beyond Asymmetry and Categorisation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riitaoja, Anna-Leena; Dervin, Fred

    2014-01-01

    Interreligious dialogue is a central objective in European and UNESCO policy and research documents, in which educational institutions are seen as central places for dialogue. In this article, we discuss this type of dialogue under the conditions of asymmetry and categorisation in two Finnish schools. Finnish education has often been lauded for…

  17. Dialogue and Its Conditions: The Construction of European Citizenship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgson, Naomi

    2011-01-01

    The Council of Europe's "White Paper on Intercultural Dialogue" provides an example of the way in which dialogue has become part of the current mode of governance in Europe. Throughout current policy, the terms "dialogue" and "voice" inform the introduction of practices and tools that constitute the citizen, or active learning citizen. Notions of…

  18. The Keystone Center final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1998-01-22

    The Keystone Center began its work with the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) in May, 1996, when The Center agreed to design, organize, and facilitate stakeholder meetings at two DOE sites: Savannah River and Hanford. These meetings were held June 24--25, 1996 for the purpose of discussing the role of EMSP in constructing a site-specific basic research agenda that maps site cleanup needs to basic science areas. Summaries of the discussions from these meetings as well as lists of the stakeholders who were invited are included as Attachment 1. In August/September 1996, the Keystone Center was asked to convene two additional site meetings using funds that remained in their contract. These meetings were held in October 1996 at Oak Ridge and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Summaries from these meetings and participant lists are included as Attachment 2.

  19. Dialogue and Team Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Game, Ann; Metcalfe, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Although dialogue is a common word in educational theory, its full significance is diluted if it is seen as a matter of exchange or negotiation of prior intellectual positions. In fact, the "dia"- of dialogue indicates "through": dialogue moves through participants and they through it. Dialogue allows participants to have thoughts they could not…

  20. 23. NORTH KEYSTONE OF PORTE COCHERE INSCRIBED 'MDCCCLII.' (1852) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. NORTH KEYSTONE OF PORTE COCHERE INSCRIBED 'MDCCCLII.' (1852) - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  1. 25. EAST KEYSTONE OF PORTE COCHERE INSCRIBED 'G. CAMERON. BUILDER.' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. EAST KEYSTONE OF PORTE COCHERE INSCRIBED 'G. CAMERON. BUILDER.' - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  2. 24. WEST KEYSTONE OF PORTE COCHERE INSCRIBED 'J. RENWICK. JR. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. WEST KEYSTONE OF PORTE COCHERE INSCRIBED 'J. RENWICK. JR. ARCHITECT.' - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  3. 2007 Youth Policy Summit Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Ellen; Fussell, Annemarie; Templin, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    The NCSSSMST (National Consortium for Specialized Secondary Schools of Mathematics, Science and Technology) and Keystone Science School co-sponsored two Youth Policy Summits during the summer of 2007. Forty students represented 10 high schools from across the country at each Summit, meeting for a week in June and August at Keystone Science School…

  4. Old and New Policies in Dialogue: Greek-Cypriot Teachers' Interpretations of a Peace-Related Initiative through Existing Policy Discourses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charalambous, Panayiota; Charalambous, Constadina; Zembylas, Michalinos

    2014-01-01

    This paper looks at teachers' interpretations of a recent and controversial Greek-Cypriot policy initiative, which aimed to promote "peaceful coexistence" between the two rival communities in conflict-ridden Cyprus. Specifically, it focuses on the ways in which Greek-Cypriot teachers constructed the relation between the new policy…

  5. 75 FR 27551 - Keystone Energy Partners, LP; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Keystone Energy Partners, LP; Notice of Filing May 10, 2010. Take notice that on December 16, 2009, Keystone Energy Partners, LP submit for filing an Updated Market...

  6. Transnational corporations as 'keystone actors' in marine ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Österblom, Henrik; Jouffray, Jean-Baptiste; Folke, Carl; Crona, Beatrice; Troell, Max; Merrie, Andrew; Rockström, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Keystone species have a disproportionate influence on the structure and function of ecosystems. Here we analyze whether a keystone-like pattern can be observed in the relationship between transnational corporations and marine ecosystems globally. We show how thirteen corporations control 11-16% of the global marine catch (9-13 million tons) and 19-40% of the largest and most valuable stocks, including species that play important roles in their respective ecosystem. They dominate all segments of seafood production, operate through an extensive global network of subsidiaries and are profoundly involved in fisheries and aquaculture decision-making. Based on our findings, we define these companies as keystone actors of the Anthropocene. The phenomenon of keystone actors represents an increasingly important feature of the human-dominated world. Sustainable leadership by keystone actors could result in cascading effects throughout the entire seafood industry and enable a critical transition towards improved management of marine living resources and ecosystems. PMID:26017777

  7. Transnational Corporations as ‘Keystone Actors’ in Marine Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Österblom, Henrik; Jouffray, Jean-Baptiste; Folke, Carl; Crona, Beatrice; Troell, Max; Merrie, Andrew; Rockström, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Keystone species have a disproportionate influence on the structure and function of ecosystems. Here we analyze whether a keystone-like pattern can be observed in the relationship between transnational corporations and marine ecosystems globally. We show how thirteen corporations control 11-16% of the global marine catch (9-13 million tons) and 19-40% of the largest and most valuable stocks, including species that play important roles in their respective ecosystem. They dominate all segments of seafood production, operate through an extensive global network of subsidiaries and are profoundly involved in fisheries and aquaculture decision-making. Based on our findings, we define these companies as keystone actors of the Anthropocene. The phenomenon of keystone actors represents an increasingly important feature of the human-dominated world. Sustainable leadership by keystone actors could result in cascading effects throughout the entire seafood industry and enable a critical transition towards improved management of marine living resources and ecosystems. PMID:26017777

  8. Dialogue and Adult Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarule, Jill Mattuck

    1992-01-01

    Discussion of the role of language and dialogue in adult learning looks at dialogue as epistemology and at talk as learning. It is proposed that the challenge in teaching and retaining adult learners is to create dialogue-rich classrooms, including many external speech opportunities, small-group discussion, and group projects. (MSE)

  9. Creating Dialogue by Storytelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Passila, Anne; Oikarinen, Tuija; Kallio, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this paper is to develop practice and theory from Augusto Boal's dialogue technique (Image Theatre) for organisational use. The paper aims to examine how the members in an organisation create dialogue together by using a dramaturgical storytelling framework where the dialogue emerges from storytelling facilitated by…

  10. Probabilistic authenticated quantum dialogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Tzonelih; Luo, Yi-Ping

    2015-12-01

    This work proposes a probabilistic authenticated quantum dialogue (PAQD) based on Bell states with the following notable features. (1) In our proposed scheme, the dialogue is encoded in a probabilistic way, i.e., the same messages can be encoded into different quantum states, whereas in the state-of-the-art authenticated quantum dialogue (AQD), the dialogue is encoded in a deterministic way; (2) the pre-shared secret key between two communicants can be reused without any security loophole; (3) each dialogue in the proposed PAQD can be exchanged within only one-step quantum communication and one-step classical communication. However, in the state-of-the-art AQD protocols, both communicants have to run a QKD protocol for each dialogue and each dialogue requires multiple quantum as well as classical communicational steps; (4) nevertheless, the proposed scheme can resist the man-in-the-middle attack, the modification attack, and even other well-known attacks.

  11. 76 FR 28026 - TransCanada Keystone Pipeline, LP; Notice of Request for Waiver

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission TransCanada Keystone Pipeline, LP; Notice of Request for Waiver Take notice that on May 2, 2011, TransCanada Keystone Pipeline, LP (TransCanada Keystone) filed a request for... changes to its committed rates. TransCanada Keystone states that good cause exists to grant such a...

  12. 5. Detail, date stone in belt course above keystone, east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Detail, date stone in belt course above keystone, east portal of Tunnel 22, view to southeast, 380mm lens with electronic flash fill. - Southern Pacific Railroad Natron Cutoff, Tunnel 22, Milepost 581.85, Oakridge, Lane County, OR

  13. Detail view of keystone sculpted head in the arched passage ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of keystone sculpted head in the arched passage to the lobby vestibule - United States Department of Commerce, Bounded by Fourteenth, Fifteenth, and E streets and Constitution Avenue, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  14. 72. Detail of keystone emblem over the main entrance to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    72. Detail of keystone emblem over the main entrance to the Carpenter's Union Hall. The inscription translates 'Labor conquers all.' - Butte Historic District, Bounded by Copper, Arizona, Mercury & Continental Streets, Butte, Silver Bow County, MT

  15. Revisiting Dialogues and Monologues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kvernbekk, Tone

    2012-01-01

    In educational discourse dialogue tends to be viewed as being (morally) superior to monologue. When we look at them as basic forms of communication, we find that dialogue is a two-way, one-to-one form and monologue is a one-way, one-to-many form. In this paper I revisit the alleged (moral) superiority of dialogue. First, I problematize certain…

  16. The keystone flap: expanding the dermatologic surgeon's armamentarium.

    PubMed

    Hessam, Schapoor; Sand, Michael; Bechara, Falk G

    2015-01-01

    First described in 2003, the keystone flap has become an established plastic and reconstructive surgery technique for the closure of soft tissue defects following the excision of skin tumors. Complex reconstruction procedures may thus be avoided [3]. In dermatosurgery, however, the keystone flap remains largely unknown.Compared to subcutaneous pedicle flaps, the keystone flap technique warrants better vascular supply by additional-ly preserving musculocutaneous and fasciocutaneous perforator vessels [4]. Moreover, the flap is hyperemic compared to the surrounding skin [5]. Adequate perfusion and its specific design result in high safety of the flap. According to both published data and the authors’ experience, the keystone flap technique is associated with a low complication rate [1, 6].In summary, the keystone flap method yields good aesthetic and functional results by preserving shape and cont-our, avoiding differences in skin coloration and preserving sensitivity (Figure 1b). The flap is particularly well suited for deep defects with exposed bones or tendons, especially on the extremities or the trunk. Alternative closing options such as secondary intention healing, primary closure, or local flaps appear less adequate in these cases. In addition, skin grafting without long-term wound conditioning–for example negative pressure wound therapy–or expensive der-mal replacement products are not very promising. Thus, the keystone flap provides the dermatosurgeon with an effective alternative to reconstruction techniques. PMID:25640508

  17. Persuasion Dialogues in ELT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutherford, Ramsey; Winks, Martin

    1978-01-01

    Some features of "persuasion dialogue" are examined, and suggestions are offered for ways in which persuasion might be used as a topic in the language class to stimulate the use of realistic language through appropriate role playing. Three dialogues are presented that illustrate different kinds of persuasion. (SW)

  18. Models of Persuasion Dialogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakken, Henry

    This chapter1 reviews formal dialogue systems for persuasion. In persuasion dialogues two or more participants try to resolve a conflict of opinion, each trying to persuade the other participants to adopt their point of view. Dialogue systems for persuasion regulate how such dialogues can be conducted and what their outcome is. Good dialogue systems ensure that conflicts of view can be resolved in a fair and effective way [6]. The term ‘persuasion dialogue’ was coined by Walton [13] as part of his influential classification of dialogues into six types according to their goal. While persuasion aims to resolve a difference of opinion, negotiation tries to resolve a conflict of interest by reaching a deal, information seeking aims at transferring information, deliberationdeliberation wants to reach a decision on a course of action, inquiry is aimed at “growth of knowledge and agreement” and quarrel is the verbal substitute of a fight. This classification leaves room for shifts of dialogues of one type to another. In particular, other types of dialogues can shift to persuasion when a conflict of opinion arises. For example, in information-seeking a conflict of opinion could arise on the credibility of a source of information, in deliberation the participants may disagree about likely effects of plans or actions and in negotiation they may disagree about the reasons why a proposal is in one’s interest.

  19. Humanising Coursebook Dialogues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmis, Ivor

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I argue that the most important thing about coursebook dialogues is not whether they are "authentic" or "inauthentic" but whether they are "plausible" as human interaction and behaviour. Coursebook dialogues are often constructed as vehicles for various kinds of language work and even sometimes as…

  20. Keystone microbiome meeting 2012: a mountain top experience

    PubMed Central

    Kostic, Aleksandar D; Garrett, Wendy S

    2012-01-01

    The joint Keystone Symposia on ‘Innate Immunity and the Microbiome' took place in March 2012 in Keystone, Colorado. Gabriel Nunez (U. Michigan, USA) and Akiko Iwasaki (Yale U., USA) organized sessions focused on innate immune sensing of microbe and damage signals, whilst Andrew Gewirtz (Georgia State U., USA), Fergus Shanahan (National U. Ireland, Ireland) and Ruth Ley (Cornell U., USA) organized the microbiome-focused session. Joint and concurrent talks, and poster sessions between the groups, made for a sensational meeting with active exchange between participants. This meeting point is focused on the microbiome meeting talks and joint sessions.

  1. Keystone Herbivores and the Evolution of Plant Defenses.

    PubMed

    Poelman, Erik H; Kessler, André

    2016-06-01

    Plants need to defend themselves against a diverse and dynamic herbivore community. Such communities may be shaped by keystone herbivores that through their feeding alter the plant phenotype as well as the likelihood of attack by other herbivores. Here, we discuss such herbivores that have a large effect on the interaction network structure with associated fitness consequences for the plant, as dominant agents of selection on plant defense traits. Merging the keystone herbivore concept with plant fitness and trait selection frameworks will provide an approach to identify which herbivores drive selection in complex multispecies interactions in natural and agricultural systems. PMID:26832946

  2. Mistletoe as a keystone resource: an experimental test.

    PubMed

    Watson, David M; Herring, Matthew

    2012-09-22

    Various entities have been designated keystone resources, but few tests have been attempted and we are unaware of any experimental manipulations of purported keystone resources. Mistletoes (Loranthaceae) provide structural and nutritional resources within canopies, and their pervasive influence on diversity led to their designation as keystone resources. We quantified the effect of mistletoe on diversity with a woodland-scale experiment, comparing bird diversities before and after all mistletoe plants were removed from 17 treatment sites, with those of 11 control sites and 12 sites in which mistletoe was naturally absent. Three years after mistletoe removal, treatment woodlands lost, on average, 20.9 per cent of their total species richness, 26.5 per cent of woodland-dependent bird species and 34.8 per cent of their woodland-dependent residents, compared with moderate increases in control sites and no significant changes in mistletoe-free sites. Treatment sites lost greater proportions of birds recorded nesting in mistletoe, but changes in species recorded feeding on mistletoe did not differ from control sites. Having confirmed the status of mistletoe as a keystone resource, we suggest that nutrient enrichment via litter-fall is the main mechanism promoting species richness, driving small-scale heterogeneity in productivity and food availability for woodland animals. This explanation applies to other parasitic plants with high turnover of enriched leaves, and the community-scale influence of these plants is most apparent in low productivity systems. PMID:22787026

  3. 21. PHOTOGRAPH OF PAGE 986 IN Keystone Coal Buyers Catalog, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. PHOTOGRAPH OF PAGE 986 IN Keystone Coal Buyers Catalog, 1922, UPPER PHOTOGRAPH, VIEW SOUTH, COMMUNITY OF ETHEL; ETHEL COAL COMPANY MINE SUPPLY BUILDING IS LOCATED IN MID-GROUND LEFT OF CENTER PARTIALLY OBSCURED BY ROOF OF HOUSE IN FOREGROUND - Ethel Coal Company & Supply Building, Left fork of Dingess Run (Ethel Hollow), Ethel, Logan County, WV

  4. Behaviour - The keystone in optimizing free-ranging ungulate production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Free-ranging animal behaviour is a keystone to optimizing free-ranging domestic animal production. This chapter focuses on several aspects that emanate from foraging including defining terms, concepts and the complexity that underlie managing animals and landscapes. Behaviour is investigated in li...

  5. Mistletoe as a keystone resource: an experimental test

    PubMed Central

    Watson, David M.; Herring, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Various entities have been designated keystone resources, but few tests have been attempted and we are unaware of any experimental manipulations of purported keystone resources. Mistletoes (Loranthaceae) provide structural and nutritional resources within canopies, and their pervasive influence on diversity led to their designation as keystone resources. We quantified the effect of mistletoe on diversity with a woodland-scale experiment, comparing bird diversities before and after all mistletoe plants were removed from 17 treatment sites, with those of 11 control sites and 12 sites in which mistletoe was naturally absent. Three years after mistletoe removal, treatment woodlands lost, on average, 20.9 per cent of their total species richness, 26.5 per cent of woodland-dependent bird species and 34.8 per cent of their woodland-dependent residents, compared with moderate increases in control sites and no significant changes in mistletoe-free sites. Treatment sites lost greater proportions of birds recorded nesting in mistletoe, but changes in species recorded feeding on mistletoe did not differ from control sites. Having confirmed the status of mistletoe as a keystone resource, we suggest that nutrient enrichment via litter-fall is the main mechanism promoting species richness, driving small-scale heterogeneity in productivity and food availability for woodland animals. This explanation applies to other parasitic plants with high turnover of enriched leaves, and the community-scale influence of these plants is most apparent in low productivity systems. PMID:22787026

  6. The Keystone Approach: Integration of Methodology and Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siadat, M. Vali; Peterson, Euguenia; Oseledets, Cyrill; Wang, Ming-Jer; Zhang, Guo Quan

    2012-01-01

    This article is the result of a comprehensive research study investigating the impact of computer-learning technology as well as the impact of a synergistic teaching approach (Keystone Method) on developmental mathematics classes at the college level. The study focused on mathematics skills of elementary and intermediate algebra students and…

  7. Impact of the Keystone XL pipeline on global oil markets and greenhouse gas emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Peter; Lazarus, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Climate policy and analysis often focus on energy production and consumption, but seldom consider how energy transportation infrastructure shapes energy systems. US President Obama has recently brought these issues to the fore, stating that he would only approve the Keystone XL pipeline, connecting Canadian oil sands with US refineries and ports, if it `does not significantly exacerbate the problem of carbon pollution'. Here, we apply a simple model to understand the implications of the pipeline for greenhouse gas emissions as a function of any resulting increase in oil sands production. We find that for every barrel of increased production, global oil consumption would increase 0.6 barrels owing to the incremental decrease in global oil prices. As a result, and depending on the extent to which the pipeline leads to greater oil sands production, the net annual impact of Keystone XL could range from virtually none to 110 million tons CO2 equivalent annually. This spread is four times wider than found by the US State Department (1-27 million tons CO2e), who did not account for global oil market effects. The approach used here, common in lifecycle analysis, could also be applied to other pending fossil fuel extraction and supply infrastructure.

  8. Keystone Flap: Versatile Flap for Reconstruction of Limb Defects

    PubMed Central

    Janna, Rakesh K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is always a constant search for a new solution to tackle defects in the limbs. The technique has to be simple, easily reproducible and performed within a short duration. The answer is keystone island flap keystone flap is a simple, less time consuming, durable and easily reproducible option to reconstruct most of the limb defects. Aim: The aim of this article is to study the usefulness of keystone flap in reconstruction of various upper and lower limb defects. Materials and Methods: This retrospective review involves study of 20 patients undergoing keystone flap reconstruction for various defects from 2012 to 2014. Patient demographic data, medical histories, comorbidities, surgical indications, defect characteristics and locations, hospitalization, complications and follow-up were evaluated and are presented as uncontrolled case series. Results: Ages of the patients were ranging from 18 to 65 y with an average of 38.75y. Among the defects, 10 were following trauma (50%), 5 were due to tumour resection (25%), 3 followed debridement of abscess (15%) and another 2 defects were due to surgical wound dehiscence (10%). The largest defect covered by this flap in our study measured 45 x 18 cm and the smallest defect was 8 x4 cm. The average intra-operative time was 45.5 min (range 20-90 min). Fourteen flaps were done to cover lower limb defects (70%), 4 for upper limb defects and 2 were for defects in the axilla. Partial flap necrosis was observed in one case. The average duration of hospital stay of patients was 3.45 d. All patients were followed until they achieved stable, healed wound.The overall success rate was 95%. Conclusion: Keystone flap can be safely used to cover various limb defects with minimal pain, a sensate cover and excellent cosmetic outcome, minimizing the need for microsurgical techniques or prolonged operative time. PMID:25954659

  9. Empowering Dialogues in Humanistic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aloni, Nimrod

    2013-01-01

    In this article I propose a conception of empowering educational dialogue within the framework of humanistic education. It is based on the notions of Humanistic Education and Empowerment, and draws on a large and diverse repertoire of dialogues--from the classical Socratic, Confucian and Talmudic dialogues, to the modern ones associated with the…

  10. Learning to Internalize Action Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Teresa Ellen

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to explore how participants of a communications workshop, "Action Dialogue," perceived their ability to engage in dialogue was improved and enhanced. The study was based on the following assumptions: (1) dialogue skills can be learned and people are able to learn these skills; (2) context and emotion influence…

  11. Relationships between Theorists/Researchers and Policy Makers/Practitioners: Rethinking the Two-Cultures Thesis and the Possibility of Dialogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginsburg, Mark B.; Gorostiaga, Jorge M.

    2001-01-01

    Examines the limited communication between educational theorists and researchers, on the one hand, and policy makers and practitioners, on the other. Discounts the "two cultures" thesis for explaining the communication gap, arguing that the groups are heterogeneous and overlap. Discusses six approaches to closing the communication gap, and…

  12. Questions of Value and Meaning in State Environmental Policy: A State-wide Conference for Dialogue at the Bicentennial. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Endowment for the Humanities, Gainesville.

    The relationship between the humanities and environmental policy questions is explored in this final conference report. Emphasis was on underlining the role of ethical questions and human aspirations, as well as empirical inquiry, in environmental quality decisions. The two-day program in Tallahassee, Florida, involved public officials, community…

  13. Russian Supplementary Dialogues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace Corps, Ashgabat (Turkmenistan).

    This manual is designed for the Russian language training of Peace Corps volunteers serving in Turkmenistan, and focuses on daily communication skills needed in that context. It consists of nine topical lessons, each containing several brief dialogues targeting specific language competencies, and exercises. Text is entirely in Russian, except for…

  14. Capabilities for Intercultural Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosbie, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    The capabilities approach offers a valuable analytical lens for exploring the challenge and complexity of intercultural dialogue in contemporary settings. The central tenets of the approach, developed by Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum, involve a set of humanistic goals including the recognition that development is a process whereby people's…

  15. Learning through Ethnographic Dialogues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landis, David; Kalieva, Rysaldy; Abitova, Sanim; Izmukhanbetova, Sophia; Musaeva, Zhanbota

    2006-01-01

    This article describes ways that conversations constituted ethnographic research for students and teachers in Kazakhstan. Through dialogues with local community members, students worked as researchers to develop knowledge about cultural patterns and social life. Ethnographic research and writing provided valuable language and research experiences…

  16. Education as Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jourard, Sidney M.

    1978-01-01

    In this discussion, the author's last public presentation before his death in 1974, is a dedication to dialogue as the essence of education. In the midst of modern consciousness-altering technology, he valued authentic conservation more powerful than LSD, meditation, and all the rest. (Editor/RK)

  17. Modeling the consequences of the demise and potential recovery of a keystone-species: wild rabbits and avian scavengers in Mediterranean landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Avizanda, Ainara; Colomer, Maria Àngels; Margalida, Antoni; Ceballos, Olga; Donázar, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Restoration of demised keystone-species populations is an overriding concern in conservation biology. However, since no population is independent of its environment, progress is needed in predicting the efficacy of restoration in unstable ecological contexts. Here, by means of Population Dynamics P-system Models (PDP), we studied long-term changes in the population size of Egyptian vultures (Neophron percnopterus) inhabiting a Natural Park, northern Spain, to changes in the numbers of wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), a keystone-species of Mediterranean ecosystems that have suffered >90% population decline after a hemorrhagic disease outbreak. Low availability of rabbit carcasses leads Egyptian vultures to extend their foraging activities to unprotected areas with higher non-natural mortality whereas growing numbers of griffon vultures (Gyps fulvus), a dominant competitor, progressively monopolize trophic resources resulting in a focal population decrease. Modeling shows that, even if keystone-species populations recover in core protected areas, the return to the original studied population size may be unfeasible, due to both the high non-natural mortality rates in humanized areas and long-term changes in the scavenger guild structure. Policy decisions aimed to restore keystone-species should rely on holistic approaches integrating the effects of spatial heterogeneity on both producer and consumer populations as well as within-guild processes. PMID:26593338

  18. Modeling the consequences of the demise and potential recovery of a keystone-species: wild rabbits and avian scavengers in Mediterranean landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortés-Avizanda, Ainara; Colomer, Maria Àngels; Margalida, Antoni; Ceballos, Olga; Donázar, José Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Restoration of demised keystone-species populations is an overriding concern in conservation biology. However, since no population is independent of its environment, progress is needed in predicting the efficacy of restoration in unstable ecological contexts. Here, by means of Population Dynamics P-system Models (PDP), we studied long-term changes in the population size of Egyptian vultures (Neophron percnopterus) inhabiting a Natural Park, northern Spain, to changes in the numbers of wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), a keystone-species of Mediterranean ecosystems that have suffered >90% population decline after a hemorrhagic disease outbreak. Low availability of rabbit carcasses leads Egyptian vultures to extend their foraging activities to unprotected areas with higher non-natural mortality whereas growing numbers of griffon vultures (Gyps fulvus), a dominant competitor, progressively monopolize trophic resources resulting in a focal population decrease. Modeling shows that, even if keystone-species populations recover in core protected areas, the return to the original studied population size may be unfeasible, due to both the high non-natural mortality rates in humanized areas and long-term changes in the scavenger guild structure. Policy decisions aimed to restore keystone-species should rely on holistic approaches integrating the effects of spatial heterogeneity on both producer and consumer populations as well as within-guild processes.

  19. Modeling the consequences of the demise and potential recovery of a keystone-species: wild rabbits and avian scavengers in Mediterranean landscapes.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Avizanda, Ainara; Colomer, Maria Àngels; Margalida, Antoni; Ceballos, Olga; Donázar, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Restoration of demised keystone-species populations is an overriding concern in conservation biology. However, since no population is independent of its environment, progress is needed in predicting the efficacy of restoration in unstable ecological contexts. Here, by means of Population Dynamics P-system Models (PDP), we studied long-term changes in the population size of Egyptian vultures (Neophron percnopterus) inhabiting a Natural Park, northern Spain, to changes in the numbers of wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), a keystone-species of Mediterranean ecosystems that have suffered >90% population decline after a hemorrhagic disease outbreak. Low availability of rabbit carcasses leads Egyptian vultures to extend their foraging activities to unprotected areas with higher non-natural mortality whereas growing numbers of griffon vultures (Gyps fulvus), a dominant competitor, progressively monopolize trophic resources resulting in a focal population decrease. Modeling shows that, even if keystone-species populations recover in core protected areas, the return to the original studied population size may be unfeasible, due to both the high non-natural mortality rates in humanized areas and long-term changes in the scavenger guild structure. Policy decisions aimed to restore keystone-species should rely on holistic approaches integrating the effects of spatial heterogeneity on both producer and consumer populations as well as within-guild processes. PMID:26593338

  20. Research on Spoken Dialogue Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aist, Gregory; Hieronymus, James; Dowding, John; Hockey, Beth Ann; Rayner, Manny; Chatzichrisafis, Nikos; Farrell, Kim; Renders, Jean-Michel

    2010-01-01

    Research in the field of spoken dialogue systems has been performed with the goal of making such systems more robust and easier to use in demanding situations. The term "spoken dialogue systems" signifies unified software systems containing speech-recognition, speech-synthesis, dialogue management, and ancillary components that enable human users to communicate, using natural spoken language or nearly natural prescribed spoken language, with other software systems that provide information and/or services.

  1. 76 FR 60113 - Advisory Committee on the Secretary of State's Strategic Dialogue With Civil Society

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-28

    ... Committee on the Secretary of State's Strategic Dialogue With Civil Society ACTION: Notice of meeting... (FACA), the Advisory Committee on the Secretary of State's Strategic Dialogue with Civil Society will... formulation of U.S. policies, proposals, and strategies for engagement with, and protection of, civil...

  2. Silent images in dialogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, Isabel; Sandford-Richardson, Elizabeth; Richardson, Martin; Bernardo, Luis Miguel; Crespo, Helder

    2016-03-01

    In this series of digital art holograms and lenticulars, we used the HoloCam Portable Light System with the 35 mm cameras, Canon IS3 and the Canon 700D, to capture the image information, it was then edited on the computer using Motion 5 and Final Cut Pro X programs. We are presenting several actions in the digital holographic space. The figures are in dialogue within the holographic space and the viewer, in front of the holographic plate. In holography the time of the image is the time of the viewer present. And that particular feature is what distinguishes digital holography from other media.

  3. 78 FR 26358 - TransCanada Keystone Pipeline, LP; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission TransCanada Keystone Pipeline, LP; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order... and Procedure, 18 CFR 385.207(a)(2)(2012), TransCanada Keystone Pipeline, LP filed a petition...

  4. 77 FR 5614 - In the Matter of the Keystone XL Pipeline

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE In the Matter of the Keystone XL Pipeline This notice is to inform the public that the Department of State has denied the Application of TransCanada Keystone Pipeline, L.P. for a Presidential Permit Authorizing...

  5. The Achilles' heel hypothesis: misinformed keystone individuals impair collective learning and reduce group success.

    PubMed

    Pruitt, Jonathan N; Wright, Colin M; Keiser, Carl N; DeMarco, Alex E; Grobis, Matthew M; Pinter-Wollman, Noa

    2016-01-27

    Many animal societies rely on highly influential keystone individuals for proper functioning. When information quality is important for group success, such keystone individuals have the potential to diminish group performance if they possess inaccurate information. Here, we test whether information quality (accurate or inaccurate) influences collective outcomes when keystone individuals are the first to acquire it. We trained keystone or generic individuals to attack or avoid novel stimuli and implanted these trained individuals within groups of naive colony-mates. We subsequently tracked how quickly groups learned about their environment in situations that matched (accurate information) or mismatched (inaccurate information) the training of the trained individual. We found that colonies with just one accurately informed individual were quicker to learn to attack a novel prey stimulus than colonies with no informed individuals. However, this effect was no more pronounced when the informed individual was a keystone individual. In contrast, keystones with inaccurate information had larger effects than generic individuals with identical information: groups containing keystones with inaccurate information took longer to learn to attack/avoid prey/predator stimuli and gained less weight than groups harbouring generic individuals with identical information. Our results convey that misinformed keystone individuals can become points of vulnerability for their societies. PMID:26817771

  6. Policies and Processes for Social Inclusion: Using EquiFrame and EquIPP for Policy Dialogue Comment on "Are Sexual and Reproductive Health Policies Designed for All? Vulnerable Groups in Policy Documents of Four European Countries and Their Involvement in Policy Development".

    PubMed

    MacLachlan, Malcolm; Mannan, Hasheem; Huss, Tessy; Munthali, Alister; Amin, Mutamad

    2015-01-01

    The application of EquiFrame in the analysis of sexual and reproductive health policies by Ivanova et al to a new thematic area, their selection of only some of the Core Concepts of human rights in health service provision and the addition of new vulnerable groups relevant to the purpose of their analysis, are all very welcome developments. We also applaud their application of EquiFrame to policies in countries where it has not previously been used, along with their use of interviews with policy-makers to produce a deeper understanding of policy processes. We argue that clear justification for the inclusion of additional, or replacement of some exiting vulnerable groups within EquiFrame should be accompanied by clear definitions of such groups, along with the evidence-base that justifies their classification as a vulnerable or marginalised group. To illustrate the versatility of EquiFrame, we summarise a range of ways in which it has been used across a number of regions; including a brief Case Study of its use to develop the National Health Policy of Malawi. While EquiFrame focuses on policy content, we preview a new policy analysis tool - Equity and Inclusion in Policy Processes (EquIPP) - which assesses the extent of equity and inclusion in broader policy processes. Together, EquiFrame and EquIPP can be used to help governments and civil society ensure that policies are addressing the much stronger emphasis on social inclusion, now apparent in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). PMID:26927591

  7. Jim and Dave: A Dialogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doud, Robert E.

    This is a fictional dialogue intended to honor Jim Kingman and David Leary, both professors of history who retired after long careers at Pasadena City College in California (PCC). The dialogue hypothesizes the observations of both men as they look on the honorary gold plates of previous retirees that decorate the wall of a PCC public dining hall.…

  8. John Dewey Lives: A Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayers, William C.; Schubert, William H.

    2012-01-01

    This dialogue is an edited version of a dialogue between William C. Ayers and William H. Schubert at the November 10-12, 2011, meeting of the Progressive Education Network hosted by the Francis W. Parker School in Chicago, Illinois. It was the opening keynote session on the evening of November 10. Ayers interviewed Schubert, who acted as John…

  9. Imre Lakatos's Use of Dialogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greig, Judith Maxwell

    This paper uses a book, "Proofs and Refutations: The Logic of Mathematical Discovery," as an example of Lakatos's use of dialogue. The book was originally adapted from his dissertation and influenced by Polya and Popper. His discussion of the Euler conjecture is summarized. Three purposes for choosing the dialogue form for the book were that it…

  10. The Moon: Keystone to Understanding Planetary Geological Processes and History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-01-01

    Extensive and intensive exploration of the Earth's Moon by astronauts and an international array of automated spacecraft has provided an unequaled data set that has provided deep insight into geology, geochemistry, mineralogy, petrology, chronology, geophysics and internal structure. This level of insight is unequaled except for Earth. Analysis of these data sets over the last 35 years has proven fundamental to understanding planetary surface processes and evolution, and is essential to linking surface processes with internal and thermal evolution. Much of the understanding that we presently have of other terrestrial planets and outer planet satellites derives from the foundation of these data. On the basis of these data, the Moon is a laboratory for understanding of planetary processes and a keystone for providing evolutionary perspective. Important comparative planetology issues being addressed by lunar studies include impact cratering, magmatic activity and tectonism. Future planetary exploration plans should keep in mind the importance of further lunar exploration in continuing to build solid underpinnings in this keystone to planetary evolution. Examples of these insights and applications to other planets are cited.

  11. Mammal population regulation, keystone processes and ecosystem dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, A R E

    2003-01-01

    The theory of regulation in animal populations is fundamental to understanding the dynamics of populations, the causes of mortality and how natural selection shapes the life history of species. In mammals, the great range in body size allows us to see how allometric relationships affect the mode of regulation. Resource limitation is the fundamental cause of regulation. Top-down limitation through predators is determined by four factors: (i). body size; (ii). the diversity of predators and prey in the system; (iii). whether prey are resident or migratory; and (iv). the presence of alternative prey for predators. Body size in mammals has two important consequences. First, mammals, particularly large species, can act as keystones that determine the diversity of an ecosystem. I show how keystone processes can, in principle, be measured using the example of the wildebeest in the Serengeti ecosystem. Second, mammals act as ecological landscapers by altering vegetation succession. Mammals alter physical structure, ecological function and species diversity in most terrestrial biomes. In general, there is a close interaction between allometry, population regulation, life history and ecosystem dynamics. These relationships are relevant to applied aspects of conservation and pest management. PMID:14561329

  12. A hydrologic description of Keystone Lake near Tampa, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reichenbaugh, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    The terrain around Keystone Lake, a 388-acre lake in northwest Hillsborough County, Florida, near the Cosme well field, is dotted with sinks that promote leakage from the surficial aquifer to the underlying Floridan aquifer. The lake, an integral part of the Brooker Creek channel, receives overland runoff from cypress swamps, pastures, citrus groves, and lakefront residential areas. The lake, a composite of many coalescing sinkholes, is generally 14 to 16 ft deep and has been dredged in places to 23 ft deep. Since 1960, rainfall in the area shows a cumulative negative departure of 86 in. from the long-term average. The mean annual lake stage in 1973 was the lowest on record. Concurrently, municipal pumpage in the Cosme well field from the Floridan aquifer peaked in 1961 and again in 1973, and in 1972 the potentiometric surface was the lowest since 1960. Comparisons of the hydrographs of lake stage and the potentiometric surface in the Floridan aquifer with rainfall graphs shows that both correspond closely to seasonal rainfall, resulting in the trend of decreasing seasonal maximum levels in the lake and the aquifer. Keystone Lake water quality is adequate for recreation and propagation of wildlife. (Woodard-USGS)

  13. Conference in Dialogue: Presentation By National Education Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuentes, Roy O.

    Designed to construct a frame of reference and to encourage attitudes that facilitate productive dialogue during and after the conference, this address gives an overview of American mobility, re-examines the problem of managing the education of the migrant/mobile student, explains the structure of the National Policy Workshop on Education for…

  14. A Learning Alberta: Dialogue and Direction. The Forum Background

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Advanced Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Participants in "A Learning Alberta--Dialogue and Direction," the Minister's Forum on Advanced Learning are an important part of a process that has been underway across Alberta since January of 2005. Led by the Honourable Dave Hancock, Minister of Advanced Education, a new vision and policy framework is being developed to guide future directions…

  15. Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Judith L.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This theme issue is devoted to discussions of early childhood policy issues. "Creating a Shared Vision: How Policy Affects Early Childhood Care and Development" (Judith L. Evans) defines policy, discusses the motivation for changing or creating national policy and the process for changing such policies, and provides a sample design for an early…

  16. Design of Man-Computer Dialogues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, James

    An attempt is made to provide a comprehensive guide to design of the dialogues between man and computer that take place at computer terminals. Particular topics include problems with conventional alphanumeric dialogues, dialogues with sound and graphics, pyschological characteristics of computer terminal users, problems of designing dialogues for…

  17. Improving the Efficiency of Dialogue in Tutoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopp, Kristopher J.; Britt, M. Anne; Millis, Keith; Graesser, Arthur C.

    2012-01-01

    The current studies investigated the efficient use of dialogue in intelligent tutoring systems that use natural language interaction. Such dialogues can be relatively time-consuming. This work addresses the question of how much dialogue is needed to produce significant learning gains. In Experiment 1, a full dialogue condition and a read-only…

  18. A Procedure for Analyzing Classroom Dialogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, John A.

    Classroom dialogue is an important influence on students' learning, making the structure and content of dialogue important research variables. An analysis of two sample classroom dialogues using the Thematic and Structural Analysis (TSA) Technique shows a positive correlation between the quality of dialogue structure and the level of student…

  19. Mass Digitization: Implications for Information Policy: Report from "Scholarship and Libraries in Transition: A Dialogue about the Impacts of Mass Digitization Projects" Symposium (Ann Arbor, Michigan, March 10-11, 2006)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US National Commission on Libraries and Information Science, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. National Commission on Libraries and Information Science (NCLIS) sponsored the symposium "Scholarship and Libraries in Transition: A Dialogue about the Impacts of Mass Digitization Projects" in March 2006 at the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor. The symposium was organized with a keynote and several other individual presentations, as well…

  20. The Ins and Outs of Viral Infection: Keystone Meeting Review

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Sara W.; Kirkegaard, Karla; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Freed, Eric O.

    2014-01-01

    Newly observed mechanisms for viral entry, assembly, and exit are challenging our current understanding of the replication cycle of different viruses. To address and better understand these mechanisms, a Keystone Symposium was organized in the snowy mountains of Colorado (“The Ins and Outs of Viral Infection: Entry, Assembly, Exit, and Spread”; 30 March–4 April 2014, Beaver Run Resort, Breckenridge, Colorado, organized by Karla Kirkegaard, Mavis Agbandje-McKenna, and Eric O. Freed). The meeting served to bring together cell biologists, structural biologists, geneticists, and scientists expert in viral pathogenesis to discuss emerging mechanisms of viral ins and outs. The conference was organized around different phases of the viral replication cycle, including cell entry, viral assembly and post-assembly maturation, virus structure, cell exit, and virus spread. This review aims to highlight important topics and themes that emerged during the conference. PMID:25256395

  1. Immunomicrobial pathogenesis of periodontitis: keystones, pathobionts, and host response.

    PubMed

    Hajishengallis, George

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have uncovered novel mechanisms underlying the breakdown of periodontal host-microbe homeostasis, which can precipitate dysbiosis and periodontitis in susceptible hosts. Dysbiotic microbial communities of keystone pathogens and pathobionts are thought to exhibit synergistic virulence whereby not only can they endure the host response but can also thrive by exploiting tissue-destructive inflammation, which fuels a self-feeding cycle of escalating dysbiosis and inflammatory bone loss, potentially leading to tooth loss and systemic complications. Here, I discuss new paradigms in our understanding of periodontitis, which may shed light into other polymicrobial inflammatory disorders. In addition, I highlight gaps in knowledge required for an integrated picture of the interplay between microbes and innate and adaptive immune elements that initiate and propagate chronic periodontal inflammation. PMID:24269668

  2. Weighting and indirect effects identify keystone species in food webs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Zhang, Huayong; O'Gorman, Eoin J; Tian, Wang; Ma, Athen; Moore, John C; Borrett, Stuart R; Woodward, Guy

    2016-09-01

    Species extinctions are accelerating globally, yet the mechanisms that maintain local biodiversity remain poorly understood. The extinction of species that feed on or are fed on by many others (i.e. 'hubs') has traditionally been thought to cause the greatest threat of further biodiversity loss. Very little attention has been paid to the strength of those feeding links (i.e. link weight) and the prevalence of indirect interactions. Here, we used a dynamical model based on empirical energy budget data to assess changes in ecosystem stability after simulating the loss of species according to various extinction scenarios. Link weight and/or indirect effects had stronger effects on food-web stability than the simple removal of 'hubs', demonstrating that both quantitative fluxes and species dissipating their effects across many links should be of great concern in biodiversity conservation, and the potential for 'hubs' to act as keystone species may have been exaggerated to date. PMID:27346328

  3. Addressivity in cogenerative dialogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Pei-Ling

    2014-03-01

    Ashraf Shady's paper provides a first-hand reflection on how a foreign teacher used cogens as culturally adaptive pedagogy to address cultural misalignments with students. In this paper, Shady drew on several cogen sessions to showcase his journey of using different forms of cogens with his students. To improve the quality of cogens, one strategy he used was to adjust the number of participants in cogens. As a result, some cogens worked and others did not. During the course of reading his paper, I was impressed by his creative and flexible use of cogens and at the same time was intrigued by the question of why some cogens work and not others. In searching for an answer, I found that Mikhail Bakhtin's dialogism, especially the concept of addressivity, provides a comprehensive framework to address this question. In this commentary, I reanalyze the cogen episodes described in Shady's paper in the light of dialogism. My analysis suggests that addressivity plays an important role in mediating the success of cogens. Cogens with high addressivity function as internally persuasive discourse that allows diverse consciousnesses to coexist and so likely affords productive dialogues. The implications of addressivity in teaching and learning are further discussed.

  4. Aerogel Keystones: Extraction Of Complete Hypervelocity Impact Events From Aerogel Collectors

    SciTech Connect

    Westphal, A J; Snead, C; Butterworth, A; Graham, G A; Bradley, J; Bajt, S; Grant, P G; Bench, G; Brennan, S; Piannetta, P

    2003-11-07

    In January 2006, the Stardust mission will return the first samples from a solid solar-system body since Apollo, and the first samples of contemporary interstellar dust ever collected. Although sophisticated laboratory instruments exist for the analysis of Stardust samples, techniques for the recovery of particles and particle residues from aerogel collectors remain primitive. Here we describe our recent progress in developing techniques for extracting small volumes of aerogel, which we have called ''keystones,'' which completely contain particle impacts but minimize the damage to the surrounding aerogel collector. These keystones can be fixed to custom-designed micromachined silicon fixtures (so-called ''microforklifts''). In this configuration the samples are self-supporting, which can be advantageous in situations in which interference from a supporting substrate is undesirable. The keystones may also be extracted and placed onto a substrate without a fixture. We have also demonstrated the capability of homologously crushing these unmounted keystones for analysis techniques which demand flat samples.

  5. The Generation in Between: A Perspective from the Keystone IV Conference.

    PubMed

    Chen, Frederick M; Bliss, Erika; Dunn, Aaron; Edgoose, Jennifer; Elliott, Tricia C; Maxwell, Lisa C; Morris, Carl G; Phillips, Robert L

    2016-01-01

    Keystone IV affirmed the value of relationships in family medicine, but each generation of family physicians took away different impressions and lessons. "Generation III," between the Baby Boomers and Millennials, reported conflict between their professional ideal of family medicine and the realities of current practice. But the Keystone conference also helped them appreciate core values of family medicine, their shared experience, and new opportunities for leadership. PMID:27387165

  6. The ACA Medicaid Expansion Waiver in the Keystone State: Do the Medically Uninsured "Got a Friend in Pennsylvania"?

    PubMed

    Olson, Laura Katz

    2015-06-01

    Medicaid is fundamental to near universal health insurance coverage under the 2010 Affordable Care Act (ACA). Its goal of broadening the program to all households with income at or below 138 percent of the federal poverty level was thwarted in 2012 by a Supreme Court decision that allowed the states to choose whether or not they would join. This essay seeks to assess the status of Pennsylvania with regard to the Medicaid expansion controversy. It briefly describes the Keystone State's existing Medicaid program and the potential impact of the ACA on its growth. It then discusses Governor Tom Corbett's market-based alternative and what he achieved in his deliberations with the Obama administration. The article also discusses some of the financial considerations facing Pennsylvania policy makers in the expansion decision, the role of three of the more influential lobby groups, and the problematic situation of the medically uninsured population. PMID:25700373

  7. The dialogue goes on.

    PubMed

    Salas, R M

    1975-01-01

    A worldwide dialogue on population began in 1974, World Population Year, in Bucharest. Although there was a general awareness among the delegates at the World Population Conference that the population issue is beyond the ideological background, no consensus on the definition of the problem was reached. Some saw it as a currently unsustainable increase in the number of people dependent on available resources; some viewed it as a question of density; others believed it to be a "national pride" issue relating to insufficient hands available to develop national resources to their full potential; politicians spoke of the issue as a political matter; technicians saw it as a need for programs of action through which information and equipment for limiting fertility could be available to those who sought it; and the economic planners regarded the problem as a need for a balance between people and resources. It has become necessary to view the population issue as an integral and essential factor in development planning and programming. A 2-way line of communication between people and planners is crucial. This was the reason for the Fund's support of continuing programs of training and briefing communicators interested in effecting social change. The Year allowed several hundred editors, writers and broadcasters to commit themselves as individuals and professionals to the urgent population question. Several thousand members of nongovernmental and other institutions and private individuals were also given the opportunity to search for the ideas, techniques, values and priorities that will lead to solutions. The newsletter acts as a communication vehicle to sustain public commitment. It is also a measure of the responsiveness that UNFPA has adopted as one of its cardinal principles. PMID:12312922

  8. The legacy effects of keystone individuals on collective behaviour scale to how long they remain within a group.

    PubMed

    Pruitt, Jonathan N; Pinter-Wollman, Noa

    2015-09-01

    The collective behaviour of social groups is often strongly influenced by one or few individuals, termed here 'keystone individuals'. We examined whether the influence of keystone individuals on collective behaviour lingers after their departure and whether these lingering effects scale with their tenure in the group. In the social spider, Stegodyphus dumicola, colonies' boldest individuals wield a disproportionately large influence over colony behaviour. We experimentally manipulated keystones' tenure in laboratory-housed colonies and tracked their legacy effects on collective prey capture following their removal. We found that bolder keystones caused more aggressive collective foraging behaviour and catalysed greater inter-individual variation in boldness within their colonies. The longer keystones remained in a colony, the longer both of these effects lingered after their departure. Our data demonstrate that, long after their disappearance, keystones have large and lasting effects on social dynamics at both the individual and colony levels. PMID:26336171

  9. The legacy effects of keystone individuals on collective behaviour scale to how long they remain within a group

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Jonathan N.; Pinter-Wollman, Noa

    2015-01-01

    The collective behaviour of social groups is often strongly influenced by one or few individuals, termed here ‘keystone individuals’. We examined whether the influence of keystone individuals on collective behaviour lingers after their departure and whether these lingering effects scale with their tenure in the group. In the social spider, Stegodyphus dumicola, colonies' boldest individuals wield a disproportionately large influence over colony behaviour. We experimentally manipulated keystones' tenure in laboratory-housed colonies and tracked their legacy effects on collective prey capture following their removal. We found that bolder keystones caused more aggressive collective foraging behaviour and catalysed greater inter-individual variation in boldness within their colonies. The longer keystones remained in a colony, the longer both of these effects lingered after their departure. Our data demonstrate that, long after their disappearance, keystones have large and lasting effects on social dynamics at both the individual and colony levels. PMID:26336171

  10. People Are Primary: A Perspective from the Keystone IV Conference.

    PubMed

    Etz, Rebecca S

    2016-01-01

    As a person invested in personal doctoring, what promises are you willing to make about when and where you will "be there" for others? Attendees of the G. Gayle Stephens Keystone IV Conference answered that question on submitted index cards and through ongoing conference discussions. Those data were analyzed using grounded theory and combined to develop the following answer in aggregate: We will be held accountable to those who need us. We understand the need for expertise and compassion as we help others to navigate the intersection of science and humanism. We will serve as leaders in personal, public, and political conversations. We will mark a path for the profession ensuring alignment of personal practices with professional principles. We will not allow the needed conversations of processes, data points, and determinations of value to undermine our relationships with our patients. We will be there for you. Attentive and fully present. We will care for you when you have no need and you do not ask. We will center that care in your lived experience of health and illness, knowing you over time. We will be here for you now, over time and across distance, in ways that foster the feeling of wholeness and belonging. We will use the best knowledge, best tailored to meet our shared understanding of your goals and aspirations. PMID:27387163

  11. Historical Text Comprehension Reflective Tutorial Dialogue System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grigoriadou, Maria; Tsaganou, Grammatiki; Cavoura, Theodora

    2005-01-01

    The Reflective Tutorial Dialogue System (ReTuDiS) is a system for learner modelling historical text comprehension through reflective dialogue. The system infers learners' cognitive profiles and constructs their learner models. Based on the learner model the system plans the appropriate--personalized for learners--reflective tutorial dialogue in…

  12. The Play of Socratic Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Proponents of philosophy for children generally see themselves as heirs to the "Socratic" tradition. They often claim too that children's aptitude for play leads them naturally to play with abstract, philosophical ideas. However in Plato's dialogues we find in the mouth of "Socrates" many warnings against philosophising with the young. Those…

  13. Facilitating Dialogues about Racial Realities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quaye, Stephen John

    2014-01-01

    Background/Context: Facilitating dialogues about racial issues in higher education classroom settings continues to be a vexing problem facing postsecondary educators. In order for students to discuss race with their peers, they need skilled facilitators who are knowledgeable about racial issues and able to support students in these difficult…

  14. Virtual Worlds and Course Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tapsis, Nikolaos; Tsolakidis, Konstantinos; Vitsilaki, Chryssi

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the effects of the use of Second Life (SL) as a learning environment on a course's dialogue. An experimental design within groups was used with thirty-seven graduate students for three weeks. Half of them followed the course activities in the official Learning Management System (LMS) of the program, Blackboard Vista, and the…

  15. The Effect of Keystone Individuals on Collective Outcomes Can Be Mediated through Interactions or Behavioral Persistence.

    PubMed

    Pinter-Wollman, Noa; Keiser, Carl N; Wollman, Roy; Pruitt, Jonathan N

    2016-08-01

    Collective behavior emerges from interactions among group members who often vary in their behavior. The presence of just one or a few keystone individuals, such as leaders or tutors, may have a large effect on collective outcomes. These individuals can catalyze behavioral changes in other group members, thus altering group composition and collective behavior. The influence of keystone individuals on group function may lead to trade-offs between ecological situations, because the behavioral composition they facilitate may be suitable in one situation but not another. We use computer simulations to examine various mechanisms that allow keystone individuals to exert their influence on group members. We further discuss a trade-off between two potentially conflicting collective outcomes, cooperative prey attack and disease dynamics. Our simulations match empirical data from a social spider system and produce testable predictions for the causes and consequences of the influence of keystone individuals on group composition and collective outcomes. We find that a group's behavioral composition can be impacted by the keystone individual through changes to interaction patterns or behavioral persistence over time. Group behavioral composition and the mechanisms that drive the distribution of phenotypes influence collective outcomes and lead to trade-offs between disease dynamics and cooperative prey attack. PMID:27420788

  16. Racial dialogues: challenges faculty of color face in the classroom.

    PubMed

    Sue, Derald Wing; Rivera, David P; Watkins, Nicole L; Kim, Rachel H; Kim, Suah; Williams, Chantea D

    2011-07-01

    Research on the experiences of faculty of color in predominantly White institutions (PWIs) suggests that they often experience the campus climate as invalidating, alienating, and hostile. Few studies, however, have actually focused on the classroom experiences of faculty of color when difficult racial dialogues occur. Using Consensually Qualitative Research, eight faculty of color were interviewed about their experiences in the classroom when racially tinged topics arose. Three major findings emerged. First, difficult racial dialogues were frequently instigated by the presence of racial microaggressions delivered toward students of color or the professor. Dialogues on race were made more difficult when the classrooms were diverse, when heated emotions arose, when there was a strong fear of self-disclosure, and when racial perspectives differed. Second, all faculty experienced an internal struggle between balancing their own values and beliefs with an attempt to remain objective. This conflict was often described as exhausting and energy-depleting. Third, faculty of color described both successful and unsuccessful strategies in facilitating difficult dialogues on race that arose in the course of their teaching. These findings have major implications for how PWIs can develop new programs, policies, and practices that will aid and support colleagues of color. PMID:21787066

  17. Invasive Asian Earthworms Negatively Impact Keystone Terrestrial Salamanders.

    PubMed

    Ziemba, Julie L; Hickerson, Cari-Ann M; Anthony, Carl D

    2016-01-01

    Asian pheretimoid earthworms (e.g. Amynthas and Metaphire spp.) are invading North American forests and consuming the vital detrital layer that forest floor biota [including the keystone species Plethodon cinereus (Eastern Red-backed Salamander)], rely on for protection, food, and habitat. Plethodon cinereus population declines have been associated with leaf litter loss following the invasion of several exotic earthworm species, but there have been few studies on the specific interactions between pheretimoid earthworms and P. cinereus. Since some species of large and active pheretimoids spatially overlap with salamanders beneath natural cover objects and in detritus, they may distinctively compound the negative consequences of earthworm-mediated resource degradation by physically disturbing important salamander activities (foraging, mating, and egg brooding). We predicted that earthworms would exclude salamanders from high quality microhabitat, reduce foraging efficiency, and negatively affect salamander fitness. In laboratory trials, salamanders used lower quality microhabitat and consumed fewer flies in the presence of earthworms. In a natural field experiment, conducted on salamander populations from "non-invaded" and "pheretimoid invaded" sites in Ohio, salamanders and earthworms shared cover objects ~60% less than expected. Earthworm abundance was negatively associated with juvenile and male salamander abundance, but had no relationship with female salamander abundance. There was no effect of pheretimoid invasion on salamander body condition. Juvenile and non-resident male salamanders do not hold stable territories centered beneath cover objects such as rocks or logs, which results in reduced access to prey, greater risk of desiccation, and dispersal pressure. Habitat degradation and physical exclusion of salamanders from cover objects may hinder juvenile and male salamander performance, ultimately reducing recruitment and salamander abundance following Asian

  18. Invasive Asian Earthworms Negatively Impact Keystone Terrestrial Salamanders

    PubMed Central

    Ziemba, Julie L.

    2016-01-01

    Asian pheretimoid earthworms (e.g. Amynthas and Metaphire spp.) are invading North American forests and consuming the vital detrital layer that forest floor biota [including the keystone species Plethodon cinereus (Eastern Red-backed Salamander)], rely on for protection, food, and habitat. Plethodon cinereus population declines have been associated with leaf litter loss following the invasion of several exotic earthworm species, but there have been few studies on the specific interactions between pheretimoid earthworms and P. cinereus. Since some species of large and active pheretimoids spatially overlap with salamanders beneath natural cover objects and in detritus, they may distinctively compound the negative consequences of earthworm-mediated resource degradation by physically disturbing important salamander activities (foraging, mating, and egg brooding). We predicted that earthworms would exclude salamanders from high quality microhabitat, reduce foraging efficiency, and negatively affect salamander fitness. In laboratory trials, salamanders used lower quality microhabitat and consumed fewer flies in the presence of earthworms. In a natural field experiment, conducted on salamander populations from “non-invaded” and “pheretimoid invaded” sites in Ohio, salamanders and earthworms shared cover objects ~60% less than expected. Earthworm abundance was negatively associated with juvenile and male salamander abundance, but had no relationship with female salamander abundance. There was no effect of pheretimoid invasion on salamander body condition. Juvenile and non-resident male salamanders do not hold stable territories centered beneath cover objects such as rocks or logs, which results in reduced access to prey, greater risk of desiccation, and dispersal pressure. Habitat degradation and physical exclusion of salamanders from cover objects may hinder juvenile and male salamander performance, ultimately reducing recruitment and salamander abundance

  19. Tropical forest fragmentation limits pollination of a keystone understory herb.

    PubMed

    Hadley, Adam S; Frey, Sarah J K; Robinson, W Douglas; Kress, W John; Betts, Matthew G

    2014-08-01

    Loss of native vegetation cover is thought to be a major driver of declines in pollination success worldwide. However, it is not well known whether reducing the fragmentation of remaining vegetation can ameliorate these negative effects. We tested the independent effects of composition vs. configuration on the reproductive success of a keystone tropical forest herb (Heliconia tortuosa). To do this we designed a large-scale mensurative experiment that independently varied connected forest-patch size (configuration) and surrounding amount of forest (composition). In each patch, we tested whether pollen tubes, fruit, and seed set were associated with these landscape variables. We also captured hummingbirds as an indication of pollinator availability in a subset of patches according to the same design. We found evidence for an effect of configuration on seed set of H. tortuosa, but not on other aspects of plant reproduction; proportion of seeds produced increased 40% across the gradient in patch size we observed (0.64 to > 1300 ha), independent of the amount of forest in the surrounding landscape at both local and landscape scales. We also found that the availability of pollinators was dependent upon forest configuration; hummingbird capture rates increased three and one-half times across the patch size gradient, independent of forest amount. Finally, pollinator availability was strongly positively correlated with seed set. We hypothesize that the effects of configuration on plant fitness that we observed are due to reduced pollen quality resulting from altered hummingbird availability and/or movement behavior. Our results suggest that prioritizing larger patches of tropical forest may be particularly important for conservation of this species. PMID:25230471

  20. Keystone characteristics that support cultural resilience in Karen refugee parents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Susan G.

    2015-08-01

    This participatory action research study used the conceptual framework of social-ecological resilience to explore how Karen (pronounced Ka·rén) refugee parents re-construct cultural resilience in resettlement. The funds of knowledge approach helped to define essential knowledge used by Karen parents within their own community. Framing this study around the concept of resilience situated it within an emancipatory paradigm: refugee parents were actors choosing their own cultural identity and making decisions about what cultural knowledge was important for the science education of their children. Sustainability science with its capacity to absorb indigenous knowledge as legitimate scientific knowledge offered a critical platform for reconciling Karen knowledge with scientific knowledge for science education. Photovoice, participant observation, and semi-structured interviews were used to create visual and written narrative portraits of Karen parents. Narrative analysis revealed that Karen parents had constructed a counter-narrative in Burma and Thailand that enabled them to resist assimilation into the dominant ethnic culture; by contrast, their narrative of life in resettlement in the U.S. focused on the potential for self-determination. Keystone characteristics that contributed to cultural resilience were identified to be the community garden and education as a gateway to a transformed future. Anchored in a cultural tradition of farming, these Karen parents gained perspective and comfort in continuity and the potential of self-determination rooted in the land. Therefore, a cross-cultural learning community for Karen elementary school students that incorporates the Karen language and Karen self-sustaining knowledge of horticulture would be an appropriate venue for building a climate of reciprocity for science learning.

  1. Experimenting with distributed approaches – Case study: A ‘national-level’ distributed dialogue on bioenergy in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Entradas, Marta

    2014-01-01

    An emerging thread in the public participation debate is the need for innovative and more experimental forms of dialogue to address weaknesses of previous structured deliberative methods. This research note discusses an experiment with a distributed approach to dialogue, which used bioenergy as a case study. We discuss the potential of the model to attract a variety of publics and views and to inform policy. This is done with a view to refining future dialogues and increasing the involvement of scientists and other practitioners at the science-policy interface. PMID:25404169

  2. Experimenting with distributed approaches - Case study: A 'national-level' distributed dialogue on bioenergy in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Entradas, Marta

    2016-05-01

    An emerging thread in the public participation debate is the need for innovative and more experimental forms of dialogue to address weaknesses of previous structured deliberative methods. This research note discusses an experiment with a distributed approach to dialogue, which used bioenergy as a case study. We discuss the potential of the model to attract a variety of publics and views and to inform policy. This is done with a view to refining future dialogues and increasing the involvement of scientists and other practitioners at the science-policy interface. PMID:25404169

  3. 76 FR 8396 - Notice of Availability of Report Commissioned by Department of Energy Entitled “Keystone XL...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Notice of Availability of Report Commissioned by Department of Energy Entitled ``Keystone XL Assessment'' Regarding the Proposed TransCanada Keystone XL Project Notice is hereby given that the Department of State received on January 31, 2011, a...

  4. Figure analysis: An implementation dialogue.

    PubMed

    Wiles, Amy M

    2016-07-01

    Figure analysis is a novel active learning teaching technique that reinforces visual literacy. Small groups of students discuss diagrams in class in order to learn content. The instructor then gives a brief introduction and later summarizes the content of the figure. This teaching technique can be used in place of lecture as a mechanism to deliver information to students. Here, a "how to" guide is presented in the form of an in-class dialogue, displaying the difficulties in visual interpretation that some students may experience while figure analysis is being implemented in an upper-level, cell biology course. Additionally, the dialogue serves as a guide for instructors who may implement the active learning technique as they consider how to respond to students' concerns in class. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(4):345-348, 2016. PMID:26892173

  5. The Moon: Keystone To Understanding Planetary Geological Processes and History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, J. W.

    Extensive and intensive exploration of the Earth's Moon by astronauts and an interna- tional array of automated spacecraft provides data on geology, geochemistry, miner- alogy, petrology, chronology, geophysics and internal structure unequaled except for Earth. This level of detail has proven fundamental to understanding planetary surface processes and evolution, and is essential to linking surface processes with internal and thermal evolution. On the basis of these data, the Moon is a laboratory for under- standing of planetary processes and a keystone for providing evolutionary perspective. Important comparative planetology issues being addressed by lunar studies include- Impact cratering: New information on the nature of the process, depth of excavation, role of oblique impact, nature of the modification stage, production of impact melt, ejecta emplacement dynamics, the role of volatile emplacement and fate, particularly at the poles, and the establishment of crater size-frequency distribution chronology. Magmatic activity: New insight into plutonism (intrusion) and volcanism (extrusion), and their role as major crustal building and resurfacing processes throughout history, as well as the distribution of mantle melting processes in space and time. The nature of magmatic activity during heavy bombardment (intrusion, extrusion, cryptomaria) and in later lunar history, in terms of the mare stratigraphic record, the distribution of basalt types, the distribution of melting in space and time, volume and flux informa- tion, and the full range of eruption styles and their petrogenetic significance. Tectonic activity: The Moon is the type location for tectonics on a one-plate planet which can be understood in the context of the complete lunar data set and extended to other planetary bodies. Issues include distinguishing magmatic and tectonic graben, estab- lishing the three-dimensional structure and chronology of wrinkle ridges and arches, determining the internal

  6. Positive Community Relations: The Keystone to the CEMP

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwell, W.T.; Tappen, J.; Karr, L.

    2006-07-01

    evolved into a program that currently includes 28 environmental and radiation monitoring stations located in communities around the NTS. Although the capabilities of the off-site monitoring program at NTS have and will continue to evolve, the fundamental keystone of the program continues to be positive community relations, expressed through operation of stations by local residents, dissemination of near-real time monitoring data through on-site displays and a CEMP web site, annual training of station operators, public outreach programs and, most importantly, the maintenance of personal relationships. (authors)

  7. Pennsylvania Keystone STARS: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Pennsylvania's Keystone STARS prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4) Indicators for…

  8. Constraints and time lags for recovery of a keystone species (Dipodomys spectabilis) after landscape restoration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Habitat restoration is typically focused on reestablishing suitable conditions at a local scale, but landscape constraints may be important for keystone species with limited dispersal. We tested for time lags and examined the relative importance of local and landscape constraints on the response of ...

  9. Metaphors of Literacy: Dialogues in Inclusive Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Causarano, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the importance of metaphors in education and in inclusive settings in particular. Metaphors are seen as the fabric of collaboration through dialogue across the curriculum. The article analyzes the dialogues among the Language Arts, Social Studies, and inclusion teacher in a large middle school in the Southwest of the United…

  10. Interfaith Dialogue at Peace Museums in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gachanga, Timothy; Mutisya, Munuve

    2015-01-01

    This paper makes a case for further studies on the contribution of peace museums to interfaith dialogue debate. Based on our experiences as museum curators, teachers and peace researchers and a review of published materials, we argue that there is a lacuna in the study on the contribution of peace museums to the interfaith dialogue debate. The…

  11. A System Theory Approach to Interfaith Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massoudi, Mehrdad

    2006-01-01

    Dialogue is an encounter between two or more human beings. We will consider how some scientists, philosophers and religious scholars have looked at dialogue and attempt to learn from each tradition while seeing this encounter under the umbrella of "Systems theory", related to thermodynamics and flavored with Buddhist philosophy. The process of…

  12. Some Features of Dialogue between Twins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savic, Svenka; Jocic, Mirjana

    1975-01-01

    Dialogues of sets of socially similar twins are studied. The opinion that twins have slower syntactic development than non-twins is seriously questioned. Dialogues with twins saying the same utterance together, correcting each other, quarreling, playing verbal games, etc. are analyzed in their deep structure. (SCC)

  13. Fostering Quality Online Dialogue: Does Labeling Help?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bures, Eva; Abrami, Philip; Schmid, Richard F.

    2010-01-01

    Despite its potential, online dialogue (online dialogue) can be superficial. Following Vygotskian (1978) and design experiment approaches (Brown, 1992), this study explores a labelling feature that allows students to tag parts of their messages. Data comes from 4 sessions of a graduate education course. Students engaged in 2-3 graded online…

  14. Using Dialogue Journals to Focus on Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linnell, Kimberly Miller

    2010-01-01

    Dialogue journals have been used in a wide range of educational settings for quite some time. These written conversations between teachers and students are especially well suited for the ESL classroom. This article describes how many of the conditions known to foster second language acquisition are inherent in the dialogue journal. Traditionally,…

  15. Listening in on Monologues and Dialogues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tree, Jean E. Fox

    1999-01-01

    Compares the communicative effectiveness of spontaneous monologues and dialogues on nonparticipating addressees overhearing talk. Finds that overhearers were more accurate at following instructions in a referential communication task when listening in on dialogues than when listening in on monologues. Suggests greater number of discourse markers…

  16. What Makes Dialogues Easy to Understand?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branigan, Holly P.; Catchpole, Ciara M.; Pickering, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    Two experiments investigate the question of why dialogues tend to be easier for anyone to understand than monologues. One possibility is that overhearers of dialogue have access to the different perspectives provided by the interlocutors, whereas overhearers of monologue have access to the speaker's perspective alone (Fox Tree, 1999). Directors…

  17. Influence in science dialogue: Individual attitude changes as a result of dialogue between laypersons and scientists.

    PubMed

    Zorn, Theodore E; Roper, Juliet; Weaver, C Kay; Rigby, Colleen

    2012-10-01

    Dialogue as a science communication process has been idealized in both practitioner and scholarly literature. However, there is inconsistency in what is meant by dialogue, the forms it should take, and its purported consequences. Empirical research on the experienced benefits of dialogue is limited. The present study addresses this gap by examining attitudinal changes among laypeople and scientists in dialogue on the topic of human biotechnology (HBT). We found that, as a result of participation in dialogue, laypeople's attitudes toward scientists were more positive and scientists' and laypeople's attitudes toward HBT tended to converge. Additionally, laypeople reported increased communicative self-efficacy after the dialogue experience. However, effects in some cases differed by dialogue format. Implications for practice and research are discussed. PMID:23832562

  18. Three dialogues concerning robots in elder care.

    PubMed

    Metzler, Theodore A; Barnes, Susan J

    2014-01-01

    The three dialogues in this contribution concern 21st century application of life-like robots in the care of older adults. They depict conversations set in the near future, involving a philosopher (Dr Phonius) and a nurse (Dr Myloss) who manages care at a large facility for assisted living. In their first dialogue, the speakers discover that their quite different attitudes towards human-robot interaction parallel fundamental differences separating their respective concepts of consciousness. The second dialogue similarly uncovers deeply contrasting notions of personhood that appear to be associated with respective communities of nursing and robotics. The additional key awareness that arises in their final dialogue links applications of life-like robots in the care of older adults with potential transformations in our understandings of ourselves - indeed, in our understandings of the nature of our own humanity. This series of dialogues, therefore, appears to address a topic in nursing philosophy that merits our careful attention. PMID:24320977

  19. This New Field of Inclusive Education: Beginning a Dialogue on Conceptual Foundations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danforth, Scot; Naraian, Srikala

    2015-01-01

    Numerous scholars have suggested that the standard knowledge base of the field of special education is not a suitable intellectual foundation for the development of research, policy, and practice in the field of inclusive education. Still, we have yet to have a dialogue on what conceptual foundations may be most generative for the growth and…

  20. Difficult Dialogues, Rewarding Solutions: Strategies to Expand Postsecondary Opportunities While Controlling Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Immerwahr, John

    2009-01-01

    This report from Public Agenda is a summary of the process and outcomes of the "Difficult Dialogues" that took place in November 2008 at the 4th annual policy summit of the Midwestern Higher Education Compact (MHEC). Nearly 200 state legislators, institutional and system-level leaders and governing board members, faculty, executive branch…

  1. 76 FR 41246 - Pesticide Program Dialogue Committee, Pesticide Registration Improvement Act Process Improvement...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ...The Pesticide Program Dialogue Committee (PPDC) provides a forum for a diverse group of stake holders to provide advice to the pesticide program on various pesticide regulatory, policy, and program implementation issues. In meeting its Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) and Endangered Species Act (ESA) obligations, EPA continues to seek advice from the PPDC and its......

  2. Spatial variation in keystone effects: Small mammal diversity associated with black-tailed prairie dog colonies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cully, J.F.; Collinge, S.K.; Van Nimwegen, R. E.; Ray, C.; Johnson, W.C.; Thiagarajan, B.; Conlin, D.B.; Holmes, B.E.

    2010-01-01

    Species with extensive geographic ranges may interact with different species assemblages at distant locations, with the result that the nature of the interactions may vary spatially. Black-tailed prairie dogs Cynomys ludovicianus occur from Canada to Mexico in grasslands of the western Great Plains of North America. Black-tailed prairie dogs alter vegetation and dig extensive burrow systems that alter grassland habitats for plants and other animal species. These alterations of habitat justify the descriptor " ecological engineer," and the resulting changes in species composition have earned them status as a keystone species. We examined the impact of black-tailed prairie dogs on small mammal assemblages by trapping at on- and off-colony locations at eight study areas across the species' geographic range. We posed 2 nested hypotheses: 1) prairie dogs function as a keystone species for other rodent species; and 2) the keystone role varies spatially. Assuming that it does, we asked what are the sources of the variation? Black-tailed prairie dogs consistently functioned as a keystone species in that there were strong statistically significant differences in community composition on versus off prairie dog colonies across the species range in prairie grassland. Small mammal species composition varied along both latitudinal and longitudinal gradients, and species richness varied from 4 to 11. Assemblages closer together were more similar; such correlations approximately doubled when including only on- or off-colony grids. Black-tailed prairie dogs had a significant effect on associated rodent assemblages that varied regionally, dependent upon the composition of the local rodent species pool. Over the range of the black-tailed prairie dog, on-colony rodent richness and evenness were less variable, and species composition was more consistent than off-colony assemblages. ?? 2010 The Authors.

  3. Brokered dialogue: A new research method for controversial health and social issues

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Dialogue is a foundational feature of social life and an important way in which we come to understand one another. In situations of controversy dialogue is often absent because of a range of social barriers. We have developed a new film-based qualitative research method for studying controversial issues in healthcare and social policy. We call this method Brokered Dialogue. Theoretically informed by the traditions in narrative inquiry and visual anthropology, the method is premised on the idea that dialogue possesses features making it unique as a generator of new knowledge and opportunities for social intervention. Film is not only an extraordinarily rich data source, but an excellent medium for knowledge transfer and dissemination. Discussion The paper introduces the Brokered Dialogue method. We outline its critical steps, including the procedures for sampling, data collection and data analysis of both textual and visual data. Participants in a Brokered Dialogue engage in filmed interviews that capture their perspectives on a given topic; they then share their perspectives with, and pose questions of, one another through the medium of film. Using a participatory editing process, only footage that participants feel comfortable showing to others is incorporated. This technique offers participants a ‘safe’ space for respectful interaction. The editing process itself is analytic, and the final assembly of footage approximates a dialogue on the topic at hand. A link to a film produced from a project piloting the method is provided to demonstrate its real world application. Summary Brokered Dialogue is a method for promoting respectful interactions among those with seemingly divergent views on a controversial topic and for discovering critical points of divergence that may represent pathways for improvement. While the end product is a ‘film’, the goal is to have these films used as catalysts for ongoing respectful dialogue and problem

  4. Entropy growth in emotional online dialogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sienkiewicz, J.; Skowron, M.; Paltoglou, G.; Hołyst, Janusz A.

    2013-02-01

    We analyze emotionally annotated massive data from IRC (Internet Relay Chat) and model the dialogues between its participants by assuming that the driving force for the discussion is the entropy growth of emotional probability distribution.

  5. Keystone conference on environmental biotechnology. Summary -- Results of conference

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This symposium brought together a unique mix of scientists, engineers and policy makers to discuss the latest applications of biotechnology to in situ bioremediation and ex situ biodegradation of pollutants and industrial wastes. Several new topics were prominent in the discussions. Chief among these were issues related to environmentally acceptable endpoints, command and control versus incentive driven regulations, bioavailability of pollutants to microbial action, delivery of biodegrading organisms to pollutant plumes, value added production, and genetic probes for monitoring the status of soil consortia. These new issues gave a new perspective to the more traditional topics of the molecular genetics of microorganisms, marine bioremediation, bioprocessing of industrial and agricultural wastes, and engineered bioremediation systems which were featured.

  6. Ranking Multiple Dialogue States by Corpus Statistics to Improve Discourse Understanding in Spoken Dialogue Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashinaka, Ryuichiro; Nakano, Mikio

    This paper discusses the discourse understanding process in spoken dialogue systems. This process enables a system to understand user utterances from the context of a dialogue. Ambiguity in user utterances caused by multiple speech recognition hypotheses and parsing results sometimes makes it difficult for a system to decide on a single interpretation of a user intention. As a solution, the idea of retaining possible interpretations as multiple dialogue states and resolving the ambiguity using succeeding user utterances has been proposed. Although this approach has proven to improve discourse understanding accuracy, carefully created hand-crafted rules are necessary in order to accurately rank the dialogue states. This paper proposes automatically ranking multiple dialogue states using statistical information obtained from dialogue corpora. The experimental results in the train ticket reservation and weather information service domains show that the statistical information can significantly improve the ranking accuracy of dialogue states as well as the slot accuracy and the concept error rate of the top-ranked dialogue states.

  7. Lessons learnt from the Climate Dialogue initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crok, Marcel; Strengers, Bart; Vasileiadou, Eleftheria

    2015-04-01

    The weblog Climate Dialogue (climatedialogue.org) has been an experimental climate change communication project. It was the result of a motion in the Dutch parliament, which asked the Dutch government "to also involve climate sceptics in future studies on climate change". Climate Dialogue was set up by the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), the Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency (PBL), and Dutch science journalist Marcel Crok. It operated for slightly more than two years (From November 2012 till December 2014). Around 20 climate scientists from all over the world, many of them leading in their respective fields, participated in six dialogues. Climate Dialogue was a moderated blog on controversial climate science topics introducing a combination of several novel elements: a) bringing together scientists with widely separated viewpoints b) strict moderation of the discussion and c) compilation of executive and extended summaries of the discussions that were approved by the invited scientists. In our talk, we will discuss the operation and results of the Climate Dialogue project, focusing more explicitly on the lessons learnt with respect to online climate change communication addressing the question: "To what extent can online climate change communication bring together climate scientists with widely separated viewpoints, and what would be the advantage of such communication practice?" We identify how Climate Dialogue was received and perceived by the participating scientists, but also by different scientific and online communities. Finally, we present our ideas on how Climate Dialogue could evolve in a novel way of contributing to (climate) science and what steps would be necessary and/or beneficial for such a platform to survive and succeed.

  8. Reproductive health and health sector reform in developing countries: establishing a framework for dialogue.

    PubMed Central

    Lubben, Marianne; Mayhew, Susannah H.; Collins, Charles; Green, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    It is not clear how policy-making in the field of reproductive health relates to changes associated with programmes for the reform of the health sector in developing countries. There has been little communication between these two areas, yet policy on reproductive health has to be implemented in the context of structural change. This paper examines factors that limit dialogue between the two areas and proposes the following framework for encouraging it: the identification of policy groups and the development of bases for collaborative links between them; the introduction of a common understanding around relevant policy contexts; reaching agreement on compatible aims relating to reproductive health and health sector change; developing causal links between policy content in reproductive health and health sector change as a basis for evidence-based policy-making; and strengthening policy-making structures, systems, skills, and values. PMID:12219159

  9. Ontogenetic functional diversity: size structure of a keystone predator drives functioning of a complex ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Volker H W; Rasmussen, Nick L

    2013-05-01

    A central challenge in community ecology is to understand the connection between biodiversity and the functioning of ecosystems. While traditional approaches have largely focused on species-level diversity, increasing evidence indicates that there exists substantial ecological diversity among individuals within species. By far, the largest source of this intraspecific diversity stems from variation among individuals in ontogenetic stage and size. Although such ontogenetic shifts are ubiquitous in natural communities, whether and how they scale up to influence the structure and functioning of complex ecosystems is largely unknown. Here we take an experimental approach to examine the consequences of ontogenetic niche shifts for the structure of communities and ecosystem processes. In particular we experimentally manipulated the stage structure in a keystone predator, larvae of the dragonfly Anax junius, in complex experimental pond communities to test whether changes in the population stage or size structure of a keystone species scale up to alter community structure and ecosystem processes, and how functional differences scale with relative differences in size among stages. We found that the functional role of A. junius was stage-specific. Altering what stages were present in a pond led to concurrent changes in community structure, primary producer biomass (periphyton and phytoplankton), and ultimately altered ecosystem processes (respiration and net primary productivity), indicating a strong, but stage-specific, trophic cascade. Interestingly, the stage-specific effects did not simply scale with size or biomass of the predator, but instead indicated clear ontogenetic niche shifts in ecological interactions. Thus, functional differences among stages within a keystone species scaled up to alter the functioning of entire ecosystems. Therefore, our results indicate that the classical approach of assuming an average functional role of a species can be misleading because

  10. A Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) Model for the Keystone Predator Pisaster ochraceus

    PubMed Central

    Monaco, Cristián J.; Wethey, David S.; Helmuth, Brian

    2014-01-01

    We present a Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) model for the quintessential keystone predator, the rocky-intertidal sea star Pisaster ochraceus. Based on first principles, DEB theory is used to illuminate underlying physiological processes (maintenance, growth, development, and reproduction), thus providing a framework to predict individual-level responses to environmental change. We parameterized the model for P. ochraceus using both data from the literature and experiments conducted specifically for the DEB framework. We devoted special attention to the model’s capacity to (1) describe growth trajectories at different life-stages, including pelagic larval and post-metamorphic phases, (2) simulate shrinkage when prey availability is insufficient to meet maintenance requirements, and (3) deal with the combined effects of changing body temperature and food supply. We further validated the model using an independent growth data set. Using standard statistics to compare model outputs with real data (e.g. Mean Absolute Percent Error, MAPE) we demonstrated that the model is capable of tracking P. ochraceus’ growth in length at different life-stages (larvae: MAPE = 12.27%; post-metamorphic, MAPE = 9.22%), as well as quantifying reproductive output index. However, the model’s skill dropped when trying to predict changes in body mass (MAPE = 24.59%), potentially because of the challenge of precisely anticipating spawning events. Interestingly, the model revealed that P. ochraceus reserves contribute little to total biomass, suggesting that animals draw energy from structure when food is limited. The latter appears to drive indeterminate growth dynamics in P. ochraceus. Individual-based mechanistic models, which can illuminate underlying physiological responses, offer a viable framework for forecasting population dynamics in the keystone predator Pisaster ochraceus. The DEB model herein represents a critical step in that direction, especially in a period of

  11. Keystone predators (eastern newts, Notophthalmus viridescens) reduce the impacts of an aquatic invasive species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kimberly G.

    2006-01-01

    Predation, competition, and their interaction are known to be important factors that influence the structure of ecological communities. In particular, in those cases where a competitive hierarchy exists among prey species, the presence of certain keystone predators can result in enhanced diversity in the prey community. However, little is known regarding the influence of keystone predator presence on invaded prey communities. Given the widespread occurrence of invasive species and substantial concern regarding their ecological impacts, studies on this topic are needed. In this study I used naturalistic replications of an experimental tadpole assemblage to assess the influence of predatory eastern newts, Notophthalmus viridescens, on the outcome of interspecific competition among native and nonindigenous tadpoles. When newts were absent, the presence of the tadpoles of one invasive species, the Cuban treefrog, Osteopilus septentrionalis, resulted in decreased survival and growth rate of the dominant native species, Bufo terrestris, and dominance of the tadpole assemblage by O. septentrionalis. However, the presence of one adult newt generally reduced or eliminated the negative impacts of O. septentrionalis tadpoles, resulting in comparable survival and performance of native species in invaded and noninvaded treatments. Differential mortality among the tadpole species suggests that newts preyed selectively on O. septentrionalis tadpoles, supporting the hypothesis that newts acted as keystone predators in the invaded assemblage. The presence of nonindigenous larval cane toads, Bufo marinus, did not significantly affect native species, and this species was not negatively affected by the presence of newts. Collectively, these results suggest that eastern newts significantly modified the competitive hierarchy of the invaded tadpole assemblage and reduced the impacts of a competitively superior invasive species. If general, these results suggest that the presence of

  12. The Ecology of a Keystone Seed Disperser, the Ant Rhytidoponera violacea

    PubMed Central

    Lubertazzi, Dave; Aliberti Lubertazzi, Maria A.; McCoy, Neil; Gove, Aaron D.; Majer, Jonathan D.; Dunn, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    Rhytidoponera violacea (Forel) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) is a keystone seed disperser in Kwongan heathl and habitats of southwestern Australia. Like many myrmecochorous ants, little is known about the basic biology of this species. In this study various aspects of the biology of R. violacea were examined and the researchers evaluated how these characteristics may influence seed dispersal. R. violacea nesting habits (relatively shallow nests), foraging behavior (scramble competitor and lax food selection criteria), and other life history characteristics complement their role as a mutualist that interacts with the seeds of many plant species. PMID:21067420

  13. Quantum Secure Dialogue with Quantum Encryption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Tian-Yu

    2014-09-01

    How to solve the information leakage problem has become the research focus of quantum dialogue. In this paper, in order to overcome the information leakage problem in quantum dialogue, a novel approach for sharing the initial quantum state privately between communicators, i.e., quantum encryption sharing, is proposed by utilizing the idea of quantum encryption. The proposed protocol uses EPR pairs as the private quantum key to encrypt and decrypt the traveling photons, which can be repeatedly used after rotation. Due to quantum encryption sharing, the public announcement on the state of the initial quantum state is omitted, thus the information leakage problem is overcome. The information-theoretical efficiency of the proposed protocol is nearly 100%, much higher than previous information leakage resistant quantum dialogue protocols. Moreover, the proposed protocol only needs single-photon measurements and nearly uses single photons as quantum resource so that it is convenient to implement in practice.

  14. Race talk: the psychology of racial dialogues.

    PubMed

    Sue, Derald Wing

    2013-11-01

    Constructive dialogues on race have been proposed as a means to heal racial and ethnic divides, reduce prejudice and misinformation, increase racial literacy, and foster improved race relations. Studies on the psychology of racial dialogues indicate social and academic norms that dictate against race talk between White Americans and persons of color: (a) the politeness protocol, (b) the academic protocol, and (c) the color-blind protocol. These protocols discourage race talk and allow society to enter into a conspiracy of silence regarding the detrimental impact oppression plays on persons of color. Facilitating difficult dialogues on race requires educators to recognize what makes such discussions difficult. For people of color, engaging in race talk exposes them to microaggressions that invalidate and assail their racial/ethnic identities. For Whites, honest discussions are impeded by fears of appearing racist, of realizing their racism, of acknowledging White privilege, and of taking responsibility to combat racism. PMID:24320648

  15. Interfaith Dialogue as a Means for Transformational Conversations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krebs, Stephanie Russell

    2015-01-01

    This article reports findings, inspired by the researcher's personal, transformational experience, on students' responses to an interfaith dialogue at an Interfaith Youth Core Interfaith Leadership Institute. Results demonstrated that several factors characterize interfaith dialogue: the environment, individual relationships fostered through…

  16. The Personal Doctoring Manifesto: A Perspective from the Keystone IV Conference.

    PubMed

    DeVoe, Jennifer E; Barnes, Kathleen; Morris, Carl; Campbell, Kendall; Morris-Singer, Andrew; Westfall, John M; Grumbach, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    The Keystone IV Conference was a touchstone moment for multigenerational conversations regarding our health care system and an opportunity to reconnect with the values of personal doctoring as a vocation. It inspired participants to renew commitments to relationships, healthy communities, and social change. Keystone IV was also a stark reminder of the need to rekindle family medicine's counterculture flame in today's tumultuous health care environment and reclaim the role of personal doctors in American society. Reimagining and reigniting the fire of personal relationship is today's counterculture movement for primary care. Personal doctors must heed the call for immediate action, which requires defining when relationships matter most in health care and understanding how to harness paradigm shifts in information technology, team-based care, and population health to strengthen, rather than undermine, personal doctoring. Simultaneously, we must also invent a new notion of personal doctoring that creates partnerships with patients and families to drive forward a social movement demanding health care focused on the whole person in the context of his or her community. Change will occur when patients insist on a personal doctoring approach as an essential priority for what they expect from the health care system-that anything less is unacceptable. PMID:27387168

  17. A View from Cheyenne Mountain: Generation III’s Perspective of Keystone III

    PubMed Central

    Bliss, Erika; Cadwallader, Kara; Steyer, Terrence E.; Clements, Deborah S.; DeVoe, Jennifer E.; Fink, Kenneth; Khubesrian, Marina; Lyons, Paul; Steiner, Elizabeth; Weismiller, David

    2014-01-01

    In October 2000 the family of family medicine convened the Keystone III conference at Cheyenne Mountain Resort. Keystone III participants included members of Generation I (entered practice before 1970), Generation II (entered 1970–1990), and Generation III (entered after 1990). They represented a wide range of family physicians, from medical students to founders of the discipline, and from small-town solo practice to academic medicine. During the conference, the three generations worked together and separately thinking about the past, present, and future of family medicine, our roles in it, and how the understanding of a family physician and our discipline had and would continue to evolve. After the conference, the 10 Generation III members wrote the article published here, reflecting on our experiences as new physicians and physicians in training, and the similarities and differences between our experiences and those of physicians in Generations I and II. Key similarities included commitment to whole-person care, to a wide scope of practice, to community health, and to ongoing engagement with our discipline. Key differences included our understanding of availability, the need for work-life balance, the role of technology in the physician-patient relationship, and the perceptions of the relationship between medicine and a range of outside forces such as insurance and government. This article, presented with only minor edits, thus reflects accurately our perceptions in late 2000. The accompanying editorial reflects our current perspective. PMID:24445106

  18. Experimental infection of vertebrates of the Pocomoke Cypress Swamp, Maryland with Keystone and Jamestown Canyon viruses.

    PubMed

    Watts, D M; Tammariello, R F; Dalrymple, J M; Eldridge, B F; Russell, P K; Top, F H

    1979-03-01

    Experimental studies were conducted to assess the susceptibility of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), gray squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis), and cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) to Jamestown Canyon (JC) and/or Keystone (KEY) virus infection. Viremia occurred in 5 of 6 deer inoculated with JC virus; however, all deer developed KEY virus neutralizing antibody. Based on the observation that antibody elicited by primary infection of deer with either KEY or JC virus exhibited partial heterologous neutralization in vitro, cross-challenge experiments were performed in these animals. Keystone virus failed to infect deer 30 days post primary JC virus infection; however, deer became infected when challenged with KEY virus 80 days after the initial JC virus infection as indicated by a substantial increase in antibody titer. Similarly, JC virus failed to produce viremia in immune animals infected with KEY virus 80 days previously, although 2 of the 3 animals challenged had serological evidence of infection. Three field-collected cottontail rabbits with no evidence of KEY antibody were readily susceptible to KEY virus infection and developed viremias of 1-4 days' duration; rabbits with KEY virus antibody did not develop viremia upon KEY virus challenge. Eight antibody-negative field-collected gray squirrels became viremic following injection with KEY virus; however, a comparable group of squirrels did not become viremic when injected with JC virus. PMID:453437

  19. Effects of frugivore impoverishment and seed predators on the recruitment of a keystone palm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadini, Rodrigo F.; Fleury, Marina; Donatti, Camila I.; Galetti, Mauro

    2009-03-01

    Many plant species are threatened as a result of extinction of their large-bodied frugivores all over the world. Additionally, introduced herbivores and seed predators may cause severe pressure on early stages of plant recruitment. We studied the seed dispersal and seed predation of the keystone palm Euterpe edulis on a land-bridge island with a highly impoverished frugivore fauna and overabundant seed predators, and in a continuous Atlantic forest in Brazil. While the diversity of avian seed dispersers and predators was higher on the mainland, the abundance of seed dispersers was 4-fold higher on the island. Turdus flavipes was responsible for 72% and 96% of seeds removed in the island and mainland, respectively. However, the higher density of T. flaviceps on the island did not result in higher seed removal. In fact, seed removal rate was 1.7 times lower there than on the mainland, probably due to the aggressive behavior of the major seed disperser who defend palm fruits. Seed predation, on the other hand, was markedly higher on the island, where nearly 100% of seeds were preyed upon, but only 0.3% on the mainland. As a consequence of higher seed predation the population of E. edulis has few numbers of seedlings and saplings on the island. Therefore, management of the seed predator populations on the island is a key priority for recovering the natural population of this keystone palm and the frugivores that depend on its fruits.

  20. The role of a keystone fault in triggering the complex El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, John M.; Oskin, Michael E.; Teran, Orlando J.

    2016-04-01

    The 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake in Baja California, Mexico activated slip on multiple faults of diverse orientations, which is commonly the case for large earthquakes. The critical stress level for fault failure depends on fault orientation and is lowest for optimally oriented faults positioned approximately 30° to the greatest principal compressive stress. Yet, misoriented faults whose positioning is not conducive to rupture are also common. Here we use stress inversions of surface displacement and seismic data to show that the El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake initiated on a fault that, owing to its orientation, was among those that required the greatest stress for failure. Although other optimally oriented faults must have reached critical stress earlier in the interseismic period, Coulomb stress modelling shows that slip on these faults was initially muted because they were pinned, held in place by misoriented faults that helped regulate their slip. In this way, faults of diverse orientations could be maintained at critical stress without destabilizing the network. We propose that regional stress build-up continues until a misoriented keystone fault reaches its threshold and its failure then spreads spontaneously across the network in a large earthquake. Our keystone fault hypothesis explains seismogenic failure of severely misoriented faults such as the San Andreas fault and the entire class of low-angle normal faults.

  1. Do tabular corals constitute keystone structures for fishes on coral reefs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerry, J. T.; Bellwood, D. R.

    2015-03-01

    This study examined the changes in community composition of reef fishes by experimentally manipulating the availability of shelter provided by tabular structures on a mid-shelf reef on the Great Barrier Reef. At locations where access to tabular corals ( Acropora hyacinthus and Acropora cytherea) was excluded, a rapid and sustained reduction in the abundance of large reef fishes occurred. At locations where tabular structure was added, the abundance and diversity of large reef fishes increased and the abundance of small reef fishes tended to decrease, although over a longer time frame. Based on their response to changes in the availability of tabular structures, nine families of large reef fishes were separated into three categories; designated as obligate, facultative or non-structure users. This relationship may relate to the particular ecological demands of each family, including avoidance of predation and ultraviolet radiation, access to feeding areas and reef navigation. This study highlights the importance of tabular corals for large reef fishes in shallow reef environments and provides a possible mechanism for local changes in the abundance of reef fishes following loss of structural complexity on coral reefs. Keystone structures have a distinct structure and disproportionate effect on their ecosystem relative to their abundance, as such the result of this study suggests tabular corals may constitute keystone structures on shallow coral reefs.

  2. Reflective Scientific Sense-Making Dialogue in Two Languages: The Science in the Dialogue and the Dialogue in the Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ash, Doris

    2004-01-01

    In this paper I focus on the transition from everyday to scientific ways of reasoning, and on the intertwined roles of meaning-making dialogue and science content as they contribute to scientific literacy. I refer to views of science, and how scientific understanding is advanced dialogically, by Hurd (Science Education, 1998, 82, 402-416), Brown…

  3. Research Currents: Dialogue as the Heart of Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuy, Roger W.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the importance of dialogue in learning, notes that it is lacking in many educational situations, and recommends the use of written dialogue journals as a means of communication between teachers and individual students. Points out the advantages of dialogue journals for improving writing for different social purposes. (SKC)

  4. Dialogue-Based CALL: An Overview of Existing Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bibauw, Serge; François, Thomas; Desmet, Piet

    2015-01-01

    Dialogue-based Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL) covers applications and systems allowing a learner to practice the target language in a meaning-focused conversational activity with an automated agent. We first present a common definition for dialogue-based CALL, based on three features: dialogue as the activity unit, computer as the…

  5. When We Talk. A Guide to Interracial Intercultural Dialogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Carol

    This book is designed to help the person invited to, or expected to attend, a dialogue group on intercultural or interracial relations. It helps the participant be comfortable in such discussions and derive personal benefit from them. While "dialogue" simply means talking together, an organized dialogue session may actually be a class or a forum…

  6. Studying and Facilitating Dialogue in Select Online Management Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivancevich, John M.; Gilbert, Jacqueline A.; Konopaske, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Dialogue is arguably one of the most significant elements of learning in higher education. The premise of this article is that online instructors can creatively facilitate dialogue for effectively teaching online management courses. This article presents a dialogue-focused framework for addressing significant behavioral, structural, and…

  7. Feedback Dialogues That Stimulate Students' Reflective Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van der Schaaf, Marieke; Baartman, Liesbeth; Prins, Frans; Oosterbaan, Anne; Schaap, Harmen

    2013-01-01

    How can feedback dialogues stimulate students' reflective thinking? This study aims to investigate: (1) the effects of feedback dialogues between teachers and students on students' perceptions of teacher feedback and (2) the relation between features of feedback dialogues and students' thinking activities as part of reflective…

  8. 78 FR 43960 - Advisory Committee on the Secretary of State's Strategic Dialogue With Civil Society; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Advisory Committee on the Secretary of State's Strategic Dialogue With Civil Society; Notice of the Renewal of an Advisory Committee This is notice of the renewal of the Secretary's Foreign Affairs Policy Board. The...

  9. A Question of Autonomy: Bourdieu's Field Approach and Higher Education Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maton, Karl

    2005-01-01

    The concept of field forms the centre of Pierre Bourdieu's relational sociology and the notion of "autonomy" is its keystone. This article explores the usefulness of these underexamined concepts for studying policy in higher education. It begins by showing how Bourdieu's "field" approach enables higher education to be examined as a distinct and…

  10. Using Interactive Whiteboards to Orchestrate Classroom Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer, Neil; Hennessy, Sara; Warwick, Paul

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on the use of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) as a tool for encouraging and supporting classroom dialogue. The authors' concern here is with the promotion of "dialogic" communication between teachers and students, which is now widely recognised as educationally valuable. In this study they investigated how teachers could use the…

  11. Engaging Men in Difficult Dialogues about Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loschiavo, Chris; Miller, David S.; Davies, Jon

    2007-01-01

    Male privilege is one aspect of social inequality that underlies much of the oppression and violence that occurs on college campuses. Mad Skills, a program addressing power and privilege with college men, is described along with general recommendations about how to engage men in difficult dialogues. The PIE Model is used to describe defensive…

  12. Online Learning Dialogues in Learning through Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosley, Sara; Young, David

    2006-01-01

    Purpose--The aim of this paper is to describe a study of online, asynchronous dialogues between tutors and nine work-based postgraduate learners on learning through work (LtW) programmes. Design/methodology/approach-- Adopting a constructivist perspective and using a qualitative approach, 670 messages were segmented into semantic units and…

  13. Dialogue of Cultures: The Israeli Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iram, Yaacov

    The future of the Israeli society, like the future of all democratic, multicultural societies, will be determined by the ability to maintain a meaningful dialogue among its diverse groups: Jews and Arabs, immigrants from diverse cultures and socio-economic strata. This paper presents and analyzes an educational program to promote understanding and…

  14. A Dialogue between an Educator and Psychologist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noam, Gil G.; Bernstein-Yamashiro, Beth

    2013-01-01

    This conclusion to the volume presents a dialogue from the perspective of educator and clinician. With examples from professional development and practice, the discussion revolves around teacher training and the role of the administrator in creating a bounded and safe environment in which teachers can develop healthy relationships. It discusses…

  15. Reclaiming Literacy Classrooms through Critical Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fecho, Bob; Coombs, Dawan; McAuley, Sean

    2012-01-01

    Authors Fecho, Coombs, and McAuley discuss the integral role of dialogue in literacy classrooms dominated by standardized testing, curriculum, and instruction. Their argument in support of the dialogical literacy classroom begins with a historical and theoretical justification for these principles, then transitions into a discussion of the…

  16. Czech Basic Course: Air Force Dialogues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This is one of a series of supplementary materials used in the final phase of the "Czech Basic Course" developed and implemented at the Defense Language Institute. The purpose of this text is to acquaint students with specialized airport terminology pertaining to takeoff and landing precedures conducted in Czech. The dialogues, presented in…

  17. Dialogue or Exorcism? A Rejoinder to Schempp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siedentop, Daryl

    1987-01-01

    When comparing research strategies in physical education, it serves no purpose to characterize the quantitative approach as contrived, unnatural, rigid, ahistorical, and simplistic while describing the qualitative approach as natural, responsive, context-relevant, flexible, and complex. What is needed is dialogue regarding similarities and…

  18. History of Dialogue Journals and Dissertation Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staton, Jana; Peyton, Joy Kreeft

    The use of dialogue journals as a means of communication between students and teachers originated as a teacher-developed classroom practice rather than a research idea or theory-derived technique. It began in 1964 when a California teacher, Leslee Reed, became fascinated with the comments about learning that she solicited from her students, and…

  19. Adaptive Dialogue Systems for Assistive Living Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papangelis, Alexandros

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive Dialogue Systems (ADS) are intelligent systems, able to interact with users via multiple modalities, such as speech, gestures, facial expressions and others. Such systems are able to make conversation with their users, usually on a specific, narrow topic. Assistive Living Environments are environments where the users are by definition not…

  20. Unexpected Convergences: A Dialogue across Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrosio, John; Park, Gilbert C.

    2009-01-01

    Over the past two years, the authors have been meeting regularly to discuss issues and challenges related to multicultural education. The majority of their students are from small, rural, mostly White, working and middle class communities located within a 150 mile radius of the Midwestern campus where they teach. In this dialogue, the authors…

  1. First Footing Inter-Faith Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luby, Antony

    2014-01-01

    This article examines an action research project on inter-faith dialogue within the sensitive context of Catholic pupils being taught Catholic religious education in state-funded secondary schools. Twenty pupils in S3 and S4 (Year 10 and Year 11) participated in a series of three paired conversations that focused primarily on science and religion,…

  2. Peacebuilding Dialogue Pedagogies in Canadian Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickmore, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    Constructively critical and inclusive dialogue about conflictual issues is one necessary ingredient of both democratic citizenship and peacebuilding learning. However, in North American classrooms populated by heterogeneous and non-affluent students, pedagogies involving discussion of conflicts are rarely fully implemented, sustained, or inclusive…

  3. Youth Leadership, Racism, and Intergroup Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulden, Walter T.

    2006-01-01

    The National Conference for Community and Justice--Greater Kansas City's Youth Leadership Institute (Anytown) for high school-aged youth--is designed to expose young people to multicultural issues and topics and facilitate purposeful intergroup dialogue on addressing systemic oppression and privilege. An evaluation was conducted over a three-year…

  4. Professional Academic Development through Professional Journal Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruth, Damian; Naidoo, Kogi

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the cooperative analysis by a lecturer and an academic development practitioner of a reflective journal dialogue over the 12 weeks of teaching a postgraduate course. Through a retrospective analysis of the journal the present paper explores the following issues: the framing of an inquiry; the personal-professional nexus; and…

  5. Authenticated Quantum Dialogue Based on Bell States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ching-Ying; Yang, Chun-Wei; Hwang, Tzonelih

    2015-03-01

    This work proposes an authenticated quantum dialogue (AQD) based on Bell states, allowing two communicants to perform mutual authentication and secure bidirectional communications simultaneously via public classical channels. Compared with the other AQDs, the proposed protocol is free from information leakage and is secure under several well-known attacks.

  6. A Posthumous Dialogue with John Nicolis: IERU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rössler, Otto E.

    2014-12-01

    The reader is taken into the heart of a fictitious dialogue between two friends who never talked long enough with each other during the lifetime of both. It is the fearlessness of the mind of John that prompted the hopefully not too erratic thoughts that are going to be offered. The central figure is Heraclitus, the Great.

  7. Reflection, dialogue, and the possibilities of space.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Arno K; Naidu, Thirusha

    2015-03-01

    To educate physicians who are capable of delivering ethical, socially responsible, patient-centered care, there have been calls for identifying curricular space for reflection on the human and societal dimensions of medicine. These appeals, however, beg the question: What does it mean to devote space in an otherwise busy curriculum for these types of reflection? This Perspective is an attempt to understand the nature of this educational space in terms of its purpose, uses, dynamics, and limitations, and the underlying components that allow reflection and transformation to occur. Reflections on psychosocial themes often take the form of dialogues, which differ from the discussions commonly encountered in clinical settings because they require the engagement of the participants' whole selves--life experiences, backgrounds, personal values, beliefs, and perspectives--in the exchanges. Dialogues allow for the inclusion of affective and experiential dimensions in addition to intellectual/cognitive domains in learning, and for an emphasis on discovering new perspectives, insights, and questions instead of limiting participants solely to an instrumental search for solutions. Although these reflections may vary greatly in their form and settings, the reflective space requires three qualities: safety and confidentiality, an intentional designation of a time apart from the distractions of daily life for reflection and dialogue, and an awareness of the transitional nature--the liminality--of a critically important period of professional identity development. In this open space of reflection and dialogue, one's identity as a humanistic physician takes form. PMID:25426737

  8. Dialoguing with Dreams in Existential Art Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Bruce L.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a theoretical and methodological framework for interactive dialogue and analysis of dream images in existential art therapy. In this phenomenological-existential approach, the client and art therapist are regarded as equal partners with respect to sharing in the process of creation and discovery of meaning (Frankl, 1955,…

  9. Dialogue Needs a Point and Purpose.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Viviane M. J.

    1995-01-01

    Examines the writings of Burbules and Young, two major educational theorists committed to promoting and understanding the practice of dialogue in educational contexts, focusing on Jurgen Habermas's theory of communicative action. Their works have shown the necessity for researchers to move across disciplinary boundaries and developing theories of…

  10. Video: A Stimulus for Dialogue Journal Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Valerie A.

    This paper describes one teacher's use of a videotaped mystery series to stimulate students' entries in dialogue journals. Students are shown an episode of the mystery in class and are then asked to write a personal response to it. The aim of the journals is to enhance student confidence and writing skills. Results of an analysis of the journal…

  11. Supporting Critical Dialogue across Educational Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laman, Tasha Tropp; Jewett, Pamela; Jennings, Louise B.; Wilson, Jennifer L.; Souto-Manning, Mariana

    2012-01-01

    This article draws upon five different empirical studies to examine how critical dialogue can be fostered across educational settings and with diverse populations: middle-school students discussing immigration picture books, a teacher study group exploring texts on homelessness, a teacher education class studying critical literacy, working class…

  12. 75 FR 22890 - Notice of Extension of Public Comment Period for the Proposed Keystone XL Pipeline Project Draft...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ... Register on April 16, 2010 [75 FR 19969]. A second notice that listed the public comment meetings and... preferred method for commenting. By mail addressed to: Elizabeth Orlando, Keystone XL Project Manager, U.S... security screening. Fax to: (202) 647-1052, attention Elizabeth Orlando. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...

  13. Reversing Present Day Northern Plains Ecosystem Water Supply Stressors Resulting from the Near Extinction of Three Keystone Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, M. R.

    2006-05-01

    Near-extinction of three keystone species (the beaver, the bison, and the prairie dog) had a measurable negative influence on the local and regional climate, and water availability in the Northern Great Plains ecosystem compared to pre-contact conditions. Restoration of these three keystone species may have a significant positive influence by increasing the recharge rate to the aquifers and raising soil moisture due to the sharp hooves and wallows of the bison, prairie dog burrows, and beaver dams providing avenues of ingress. Predictions 1) The recharge of the aquifer will be greater where these three keystone species are present because of the prairie dog burrows, buffalo hooves and wallows, and beaver dams in comparison to the control area; 2) The entire ecosystem will be rejuvenated where the three species are permitted to return; 3) The microclimate changes caused by this reintroduction will stimulate an observable, measurable improvement in water supply when allowed to proceed to near pre-contact conditions. Next Steps 1) Inventory research area containing bison, prairie dog, and beaver versus control plot. (keystone species absent). 2) Measure the soil moisture, water table, water influx rates. 3) Monitor changes over time. 4) Later phase manipulation: Beaver re-introduction into severely damaged riparian area. 5) Link to Northern Plains NEON Initiative. Current Activity 1. Candidate study locations on Standing Rock reservation have been selected and evaluated for suitability, both as study site with beaver activity and a control site with beaver absent. 2. Research mentor identified and selected. Dr. Carol Johnston of South Dakota State University, Director of the Center for Biocomplexity Studies has graciously agreed to oversee my research project 3. Review of previous work is nearing completion. 4. Tribal Agency personnel currently involved with research related to the three keystone species have been interviewed and information obtained from them

  14. Deposition, diagenesis, and porosity relationships in the Glorieta formation, Keystone (Holt) field, Winkler County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Haack, R.C.; Jacka, A.D.

    1984-04-01

    Production of hydrocarbons from the Chevron 7C H.E. Lovett well, Keystone (Holt) field, is from the upper part of the Glorieta formation (Leonardian). The field is located near the western margin of the Central Basin platform (Permian basin) on a present-day structural high. The 116-ft (35.4-m) core contains at least 7 cycles of deposition, which consist, upward from the base, of progradational subtidal, intertidal and supratidal deposits. Supratidal deposits predominantly consist of dolostones with fenestral cavities; sabkha deposits are not represented. Scattered nodules of nonevaporitic anhydrite have been emplaced within subtidally deposited carbonates after dolomitization. Intrabiopelgrapestone grainstones, oointrabiopelgrainstones, intrabiopelpackstones and wackestones, and intrapelpackstones and wackestones are the predominant lithofacies. Dolostone is the predominant lithology.

  15. Cognitive vulnerability to depression: A comparison of the weakest link, keystone and additive models

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, Laura C.; Ciesla, Jeffrey A.; Felton, Julia W.; Weitlauf, Amy S.; Anderson, Nicholas L.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple theories of cognitive vulnerability to depression have been proposed, each focusing on different aspects of negative cognition and utilising different measures of risk. Various methods of integrating such multiple indices of risk have been examined in the literature, and each demonstrates some promise. Yet little is known about the interrelations among these methods, or their incremental validity in predicting changes in depression. The present study compared three integrative models of cognitive vulnerability: the additive, weakest link, and keystone models. Support was found for each model as predictive of depression over time, but only the weakest link model demonstrated incremental utility in predicting changes in depression over the other models. We also explore the correlation between these models and each model’s unique contribution to predicting onset of depressive symptoms. PMID:21851251

  16. Large extinctions in an evolutionary model: The role of innovation and keystone species

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sanjay; Krishna, Sandeep

    2002-01-01

    The causes of major and rapid transitions observed in biological macroevolution as well as in the evolution of social systems are a subject of much debate. Here we identify the proximate causes of crashes and recoveries that arise dynamically in a model system in which populations of (molecular) species coevolve with their network of chemical interactions. Crashes are events that involve the rapid extinction of many species, and recoveries the assimilation of new ones. These are analyzed and classified in terms of the structural properties of the network. We find that in the absence of large external perturbation, “innovation” is a major cause of large extinctions and the prime cause of recoveries. Another major cause of crashes is the extinction of a “keystone species.” Different classes of causes produce crashes of different characteristic sizes. PMID:11842190

  17. Parasites that change predator or prey behaviour can have keystone effects on community composition

    PubMed Central

    Hatcher, Melanie J.; Dick, Jaimie T. A.; Dunn, Alison M.

    2014-01-01

    Parasites play pivotal roles in structuring communities, often via indirect interactions with non-host species. These effects can be density-mediated (through mortality) or trait-mediated (behavioural, physiological and developmental), and may be crucial to population interactions, including biological invasions. For instance, parasitism can alter intraguild predation (IGP) between native and invasive crustaceans, reversing invasion outcomes. Here, we use mathematical models to examine how parasite-induced trait changes influence the population dynamics of hosts that interact via IGP. We show that trait-mediated indirect interactions impart keystone effects, promoting or inhibiting host coexistence. Parasites can thus have strong ecological impacts, even if they have negligible virulence, underscoring the need to consider trait-mediated effects when predicting effects of parasites on community structure in general and biological invasions in particular. PMID:24429680

  18. Redispersal of seeds by a keystone ant augments the spread of common wildflowers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canner, Judith E.; Dunn, Robert R.; Giladi, Itamar; Gross, Kevin

    2012-04-01

    Myrmecochory (dispersal of seeds by ants) is an evolutionarily and ecologically common mutualism. Most of the research on the costs and benefits of myrmecochory in North America assumes that ant-dispersed seeds are taken to, and left in, the ant nest. Here, we use a novel seed-tracking technique to quantify secondary dispersal of seeds from the nest into the surrounding leaf litter by the keystone seed-dispersing ant, Aphaenogaster rudis. We found that A. rudis redispersed >90% of the seeds it took into its nest an average distance of 51.5 cm. A mathematical model shows redispersal increases the rate of population spread of the myrmecochores Hexastylis arifolia and Asarum canadense by 22.5%, and increases the expected cumulative dispersal distance away from the parent plant by 24%. Our results suggest myrmecochory benefits plants in eastern North American forests by increasing the distance between the seed and parent plant and reducing competition among siblings.

  19. A keystone mutualism underpins resilience of a coastal ecosystem to drought.

    PubMed

    Angelini, Christine; Griffin, John N; van de Koppel, Johan; Lamers, Leon P M; Smolders, Alfons J P; Derksen-Hooijberg, Marlous; van der Heide, Tjisse; Silliman, Brian R

    2016-01-01

    Droughts are increasing in severity and frequency, yet the mechanisms that strengthen ecosystem resilience to this stress remain poorly understood. Here, we test whether positive interactions in the form of a mutualism between mussels and dominant cordgrass in salt marshes enhance ecosystem resistance to and recovery from drought. Surveys spanning 250 km of southeastern US coastline reveal spatially dispersed mussel mounds increased cordgrass survival during severe drought by 5- to 25-times. Surveys and mussel addition experiments indicate this positive effect of mussels on cordgrass was due to mounds enhancing water storage and reducing soil salinity stress. Observations and models then demonstrate that surviving cordgrass patches associated with mussels function as nuclei for vegetative re-growth and, despite covering only 0.1-12% of die-offs, markedly shorten marsh recovery periods. These results indicate that mutualisms, in supporting stress-resistant patches, can play a disproportionately large, keystone role in enhancing ecosystem resilience to climatic extremes. PMID:27534803

  20. Large extinctions in an evolutionary model: The role of innovation and keystone species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Sanjay; Krishna, Sandeep

    2002-02-01

    The causes of major and rapid transitions observed in biological macroevolution as well as in the evolution of social systems are a subject of much debate. Here we identify the proximate causes of crashes and recoveries that arise dynamically in a model system in which populations of (molecular) species coevolve with their network of chemical interactions. Crashes are events that involve the rapid extinction of many species, and recoveries the assimilation of new ones. These are analyzed and classified in terms of the structural properties of the network. We find that in the absence of large external perturbation, "innovation" is a major cause of large extinctions and the prime cause of recoveries. Another major cause of crashes is the extinction of a "keystone species." Different classes of causes produce crashes of different characteristic sizes.

  1. Frugivory in Canopy Plants in a Western Amazonian Forest: Dispersal Systems, Phylogenetic Ensembles and Keystone Plants.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Pablo R; Link, Andrés; González-Caro, Sebastian; Torres-Jiménez, María Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Frugivory is a widespread mutualistic interaction in which frugivores obtain nutritional resources while favoring plant recruitment through their seed dispersal services. Nonetheless, how these complex interactions are organized in diverse communities, such as tropical forests, is not fully understood. In this study we evaluated the existence of plant-frugivore sub-assemblages and their phylogenetic organization in an undisturbed western Amazonian forest in Colombia. We also explored for potential keystone plants, based on network analyses and an estimate of the amount of fruit going from plants to frugivores. We carried out diurnal observations on 73 canopy plant species during a period of two years. During focal tree sampling, we recorded frugivore identity, the duration of each individual visit, and feeding rates. We did not find support for the existence of sub assemblages, such as specialized vs. generalized dispersal systems. Visitation rates on the vast majority of canopy species were associated with the relative abundance of frugivores, in which ateline monkeys (i.e. Lagothrix and Ateles) played the most important roles. All fruiting plants were visited by a variety of frugivores and the phylogenetic assemblage was random in more than 67% of the cases. In cases of aggregation, the plant species were consumed by only primates or only birds, and filters were associated with fruit protection and likely chemical content. Plants suggested as keystone species based on the amount of pulp going from plants to frugivores differ from those suggested based on network approaches. Our results suggest that in tropical forests most tree-frugivore interactions are generalized, and abundance should be taken into account when assessing the most important plants for frugivores. PMID:26492037

  2. Frugivory in Canopy Plants in a Western Amazonian Forest: Dispersal Systems, Phylogenetic Ensembles and Keystone Plants

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Pablo R.; Link, Andrés; González-Caro, Sebastian; Torres-Jiménez, María Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Frugivory is a widespread mutualistic interaction in which frugivores obtain nutritional resources while favoring plant recruitment through their seed dispersal services. Nonetheless, how these complex interactions are organized in diverse communities, such as tropical forests, is not fully understood. In this study we evaluated the existence of plant-frugivore sub-assemblages and their phylogenetic organization in an undisturbed western Amazonian forest in Colombia. We also explored for potential keystone plants, based on network analyses and an estimate of the amount of fruit going from plants to frugivores. We carried out diurnal observations on 73 canopy plant species during a period of two years. During focal tree sampling, we recorded frugivore identity, the duration of each individual visit, and feeding rates. We did not find support for the existence of sub assemblages, such as specialized vs. generalized dispersal systems. Visitation rates on the vast majority of canopy species were associated with the relative abundance of frugivores, in which ateline monkeys (i.e. Lagothrix and Ateles) played the most important roles. All fruiting plants were visited by a variety of frugivores and the phylogenetic assemblage was random in more than 67% of the cases. In cases of aggregation, the plant species were consumed by only primates or only birds, and filters were associated with fruit protection and likely chemical content. Plants suggested as keystone species based on the amount of pulp going from plants to frugivores differ from those suggested based on network approaches. Our results suggest that in tropical forests most tree-frugivore interactions are generalized, and abundance should be taken into account when assessing the most important plants for frugivores. PMID:26492037

  3. Identifying keystone species in the human gut microbiome from metagenomic timeseries using sparse linear regression.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Charles K; Mehta, Pankaj

    2014-01-01

    Human associated microbial communities exert tremendous influence over human health and disease. With modern metagenomic sequencing methods it is now possible to follow the relative abundance of microbes in a community over time. These microbial communities exhibit rich ecological dynamics and an important goal of microbial ecology is to infer the ecological interactions between species directly from sequence data. Any algorithm for inferring ecological interactions must overcome three major obstacles: 1) a correlation between the abundances of two species does not imply that those species are interacting, 2) the sum constraint on the relative abundances obtained from metagenomic studies makes it difficult to infer the parameters in timeseries models, and 3) errors due to experimental uncertainty, or mis-assignment of sequencing reads into operational taxonomic units, bias inferences of species interactions due to a statistical problem called "errors-in-variables". Here we introduce an approach, Learning Interactions from MIcrobial Time Series (LIMITS), that overcomes these obstacles. LIMITS uses sparse linear regression with boostrap aggregation to infer a discrete-time Lotka-Volterra model for microbial dynamics. We tested LIMITS on synthetic data and showed that it could reliably infer the topology of the inter-species ecological interactions. We then used LIMITS to characterize the species interactions in the gut microbiomes of two individuals and found that the interaction networks varied significantly between individuals. Furthermore, we found that the interaction networks of the two individuals are dominated by distinct "keystone species", Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroided stercosis, that have a disproportionate influence on the structure of the gut microbiome even though they are only found in moderate abundance. Based on our results, we hypothesize that the abundances of certain keystone species may be responsible for individuality in the human gut

  4. Extensive Mine-Shrapnel and Gunshot Wound Closure Using Keystone Island Perforator Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Sliesarenko, Sergii V.; Sliesarenko, Kirill S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: During military operations, one aspect of a plastic surgeon’s work is to restore extensive and deep wound defects in a short period of time and provide a high degree of functional recovery to the damaged area. Because many injuries caused by military operations cannot be closed using a primary suture, the specialist has to select another surgical approach to close the wound defect. Surgeons must select methods that not only cover the extensive wound defect in 1 step but also allow skin coverage that is anatomically, functionally, and visually similar to the surrounding tissues to reduce the length of the hospital stay and ensure optimal functional recovery of the damaged organ. Methods: From 2014 to 2015, 25 patients underwent 36 reconstructions at our center after receiving mine-shrapnel and gunshot wounds. All reconstructions occurred during the acute period and used keystone island perforator flaps. The authors’ wound management technique was characterized by an aggressive surgical and antibiotic therapy protocol. Results: In all cases, after surgical debridement, the mine-shrapnel and gunshot wound defects were completely closed in 1 stage during the acute period. The working time in the operating room to perform the transposition of the flap ranged from 45 to 90 minutes, with an average of 68 minutes. All displaced flaps were similar in structure and color to the surrounding tissues and did not change the contours of the body. The adequate restoration of skin allowed patients to begin early recovery of functional activity. Conclusions: Local keystone island perforator flaps can be considered one of the primary methods of plastic closure of extensive defects caused by mine-shrapnel and gunshot wounds at different anatomical locations, providing that the tissue surrounding the defect is intact and usable as a donor resource. PMID:27579247

  5. Controlled quantum dialogue robust against conspiring users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Shih-Hung; Hwang, Tzonelih

    2016-07-01

    This paper explores a new security problem in controlled quantum dialogue (CQD) protocols, where the communicants may try to conspire to communicate without the controller's permission. According to our survey, all the previous CQD protocols suffer from this attack. In order to resolve this problem, we also present an improvement protocol. The security analyses show that the improved scheme is secure under this and other well-known attacks.

  6. Trade policy and health: from conflicting interests to policy coherence.

    PubMed

    Blouin, Chantal

    2007-03-01

    Policy incoherence at the interface between trade policy and health can take many forms, such as international trade commitments that strengthen protection of pharmaceutical patents, or promotion of health tourism that exacerbates the shortage of physicians in rural areas. Focusing on the national policy-making process, we make recommendations regarding five conditions that are necessary, but not sufficient, to ensure that international trade policies are coherent with national health objectives. These conditions are: space for dialogue and joint fact-finding; leadership by ministries of health; institutional mechanisms for coordination; meaningful engagement with stakeholders; and a strong evidence base. PMID:17486206

  7. Instruction dialogues: Teaching new skills to a robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crangle, Colleen; Suppes, P.

    1989-01-01

    Extended dialogues between a human user and a robot system are presented. The purpose of each dialogue is to teach the robot a new skill or to improve the performance of a skill it already has. The particular interest is in natural language dialogues but the illustrated techniques can be applied to any high level language. The primary purpose is to show how verbal instruction can be integrated with the robot's autonomous learning of a skill.

  8. Reflective scientific sense-making dialogue in two languages: The science in the dialogue and the dialogue in the science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ash, Doris

    2004-11-01

    In this paper I focus on the transition from everyday to scientific ways of reasoning, and on the intertwined roles of meaning-making dialogue and science content as they contribute to scientific literacy. I refer to views of science, and how scientific understanding is advanced dialogically, by Hurd (Science Education, 1998, 82, 402-416), Brown (The Journal of Learning Sciences, 1992, 2(2), 141-178), Bruner (Acts of Meaning, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1990), Roth (In J. Brophy (Ed.), Social Constructivist Teaching: Affordances and Constraints (Advances in Research on Teaching Series, Vol. 9), New York: Elsevier/JAI, 2003), and Wells (Dialogic Inquiry: Towards a Sociocultural Practice and Theory of Education, New York: Cambridge University Press, 1999). I argue that family collaborative dialogues in nonschool settings can be the foundations for scientific ways of thinking. I focus on the particular reflective family dialogues at the Monterey Bay Aquarium, when family members remembered and synthesized essential biological themes, centering on adaptation, from one visit to the next, in both Spanish and English. My approach is informed by sociocultural theory, with emphasis on the negotiations of meaning in the zone of proximal development (Vygotsky, 1978), as learners engage in joint productive activity (Tharp & Gallimore, Rousing Minds to Life: Teaching, Learning and Schooling in Social Context, New York: Cambridge University Press, 1988). Over the past decades, researchers have discovered that observing social activity, conversation, and meaning-making in informal settings (Crowley & Callanan, 1997; Guberman, 2002; Rogoff, 2001; Vasquez, Pease-Alvarez, & Shannon, Pushing Boundaries: Language and Culture in a Mexicano Community, New York: Cambridge University Press, 1994) has much to teach us regarding learning in general. To date there has been little research with Spanish-speaking families in informal learning settings and virtually none that

  9. Policy Briefs on California Education Finance and Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Collaborative on District Reform, 2007

    2007-01-01

    In October 2007, EdSource hosted a policy convening in response to findings from the "Getting Down to Facts" research project. These four briefs were prepared by a working group of district Collaborative members to inform the dialogue of this "Getting from Facts to Policy" conference. They advocate for new state policy in the areas of (1)…

  10. Errorless acquiescence training: a potential "keystone" approach to building peer interaction skills in children with severe problem behavior.

    PubMed

    Ducharme, Joseph M; Folino, Anthony; Derosie, Janine

    2008-01-01

    Errorless acquiescence training (EAT) was developed as a graduated, success-focused, and short-term intervention for building social skills. The approach focuses on building the skill of acquiescence (i.e., teaching children to be flexible with the needs and will of peers). The authors predict that acquiescence would serve as a keystone, that is, a skill that when trained produces widespread improvements in child behavior, including reductions in antisocial behavior. The authors provide EAT to eight children referred to a clinical classroom for severe antisocial behavior. Consistent with errorless paradigms, key intervention components present at the initiation of intervention are systematically faded at a slow enough rate to ensure continued prosocial interactions throughout and following treatment. Children demonstrate substantial increases in acquiescent responding and other prosocial behavior as well as covariant reductions in antisocial behaviors. Acquiescence is discussed in terms of its potential as a keystone for prosocial responding in children with antisocial behavior. PMID:18096971

  11. Computing Systemic Risk Using Multiple Behavioral and Keystone Networks: The Emergence of a Crisis in Primate Societies and Banks*

    PubMed Central

    Fushing, Hsieh; Jordà, Òscar; Beisner, Brianne; McCowan, Brenda

    2015-01-01

    What do the behavior of monkeys in captivity and the financial system have in common? The nodes in such social systems relate to each other through multiple and keystone networks, not just one network. Each network in the system has its own topology, and the interactions among the system’s networks change over time. In such systems, the lead into a crisis appears to be characterized by a decoupling of the networks from the keystone network. This decoupling can also be seen in the crumbling of the keystone’s power structure toward a more horizontal hierarchy. This paper develops nonparametric methods for describing the joint model of the latent architecture of interconnected networks in order to describe this process of decoupling, and hence provide an early warning system of an impending crisis. PMID:26056422

  12. Building dialogue on complex conservation issues in a conference setting.

    PubMed

    Rock, Jenny; Sparrow, Andrew; Wass, Rob; Moller, Henrik

    2014-10-01

    Dialogue about complex science and society issues is important for contemporary conservation agendas. Conferences provide an appropriate space for such dialogue, but despite its recognized worth, best practices for facilitating active dialogue are still being explored. Face-to-face (FTF) and computer-mediated communication (CMC) are two approaches to facilitating dialogue that have different strengths. We assessed the use of these approaches to create dialogue on cultural perspectives of conservation and biodiversity at a national ecology conference. In particular, we aimed to evaluate their potential to enhance dialogue through their integrated application. We used an interactive blog to generate CMC on participant-sourced issues and to prime subsequent discussion in an FTF conference workshop. The quantity and quality of both CMC and FTF discussion indicated that both approaches were effective in building dialogue. Prior to the conference the blog averaged 126 views per day, and 44 different authors contributed a total of 127 comments. Twenty-five participants subsequently participated in active FTF discussion during a 3-h workshop. Postconference surveys confirmed that CMC had developed participants' thinking and deepened FTF dialogue; 88% indicated specifically that CMC helped facilitate the FTF discussion. A further 83% of respondents concluded that preliminary blog discussion would be useful for facilitating dialogue at future conferences. PMID:24962421

  13. Racial microaggressions and difficult dialogues on race in the classroom.

    PubMed

    Sue, Derald Wing; Lin, Annie I; Torino, Gina C; Capodilupo, Christina M; Rivera, David P

    2009-04-01

    A qualitative study supports the observation that difficult dialogues on race and racism are often triggered by racial microaggressions that make their appearance in classroom encounters or educational activities and materials. Difficult dialogues are filled with strong powerful emotions that may prove problematic to both students and teachers. When poorly handled by teachers, difficult dialogues can assail the personal integrity of students of color while reinforcing biased worldviews of White students. The success or failure of facilitating difficult dialogues on race is intimately linked to the characteristics and actions of instructors and their ability to recognize racial microaggressions. Implications regarding specific education and training recommendations are presented. PMID:19364205

  14. The Strategic Dialogue on Tobacco Harm Reduction: a vision and blueprint for action in the US

    PubMed Central

    Zeller, Mitchell; Hatsukami, Dorothy

    2016-01-01

    The issues related to tobacco harm reduction continue to challenge the tobacco control research and policy communities. The potential for combusting tobacco products to reduce exposure and risk remains largely unknown, but this has not stopped manufacturers from offering such products making these claims. The role of oral tobacco products in a harm reduction regimen has also been a source of dialogue and debate. Within the last few years, major cigarette manufacturing companies have begun selling smokeless products for the first time, claiming to target current cigarette smokers. Other cigarette manufacturers are also offering smokeless products in markets around the world. The harm reduction debate has at times been divisive. There has been no unifying set of principles or goals articulated to guide tobacco control efforts. In particular, the research needs are extraordinarily high in order to drive evidence-based policy in this area and avoid the mistakes made with “light” cigarettes. This paper discusses recommendations from a strategic dialogue held with key, mostly US-based tobacco control researchers and policy makers to develop a strategic vision and blueprint for research, policy and communications to reduce the harm from tobacco for the US. Short-term and long-term objectives are described. PMID:19240228

  15. Euphausia mucronata: A keystone herbivore and prey of the Humboldt Current System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antezana, Tarsicio

    2010-04-01

    Euphausiids are important components of many ecosystems, especially in productive regions of temperate and high latitudes. The present paper makes the case that E. mucronata plays a keystone role in the food web of the Humboldt Current System (HCS) based on a synthesis of new and published data supporting its potential role as a primary grazer, as well as a principal prey for upper trophic level fish. E. mucronata is an endemic species, concentrated in the coastal upwelling belt of the HCS, with morpho-physiological adaptations to vertically migrate into the Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ). Within the 100-km coastal belt of the HCS it accounts for ca. 50% of the meso zooplankton wet weight in winter. In the mixed layer, it is a herbivore with high night ingestion rates (612.2 ng Chl eq ind -1 h -1 or 1013.9 μg C ind -1 d -1, in winter), and accounted for a 19.3% impact on primary production in winter, at an intermediate population abundance (3.8 ind m -3). At higher abundances (50 ind m -3) equivalent to swarms, impact on primary production could reach 254%. Additionally E. mucronata is a common prey of numerous upper trophic level predators. The diet of jack mackerel ( Trachurus murphyi) off central Chile (34-39°S) indicates a striking dependence on E. mucronata prey (average of 75% of stomach content in weight). The fishing season off central Chile extended from austral fall (March-April) and continued at least until the end of austral winter (September). The average daily ration of jack mackerel was 17.4 g, which is equivalent to 2.3% of fish body weight per day. The total E. mucronata consumed in 1991 by the landed population of fish (3.7 million tons yr -1) amounted to 23.2 million tons yr -1. The total estimated population of jack mackerel that year (17.6 million tons) would have consumed ca. 110.2 million tons of E. mucronata. Based on stomach contents, consumption of E. mucronata by other nektonic predators off Chile and off Peru is also outstanding. Four

  16. Rimac: A Natural-Language Dialogue System that Engages Students in Deep Reasoning Dialogues about Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Sandra; Jordan, Pamela; Litman, Diane

    2011-01-01

    The natural-language tutorial dialogue system that the authors are developing will allow them to focus on the nature of interactivity during tutoring as a malleable factor. Specifically, it will serve as a research platform for studies that manipulate the frequency and types of verbal alignment processes that take place during tutoring, such as…

  17. Dialogue Journal Bibliography: Published Works about Dialogue Journal Research and Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peyton, Joy Kreeft; Staton, Jana

    This annotated bibliography refers to extensive material available for teachers, researchers, and administrators desiring to know more about dialogue journal use and research with many different student populations, from elementary through adult education, regarding teaching English-as-a-Second-Language. It is divided into four sections. Section…

  18. An Application of Keystone Perforator Island Flap for Closure of Lumbosacral Myelomeningocele Defects.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye-Sung; Morrison, Edwin; Lo, Cheng; Leong, James

    2016-09-01

    Myelomeningocele, also known as spina bifida, is the commonest form of neural tube defect in which both meninges and spinal cord herniate through a large vertebral defect. It may be located at any spinal level; however; lumbosacral involvement is most common. After birth, the closure of spinal lesion is preferably undertaken in the first 48 hours to minimize the risk of injury and central nervous system infection. Relatively small skin defects overlying the dural repair may be directly closed. However, larger defects require reconstructive closure. Numerous methods of reconstruction have been described, such as split skin graft, local flaps or lumbosacral fasciocutaneous flaps, muscle flaps using latissimus dorsi, gluteal or paraspinous muscles, and perforator flaps namely superior gluteal artery perforators, and dorsal intercostal artery perforator flaps. At Monash Health, Victoria, we have used the keystone perforator island flaps to reconstruct lumbosacral myelomeningocele defects on 5 newborns between January 2008 and January 2014. This article evaluates the short-term and long-term outcomes of these patients who were followed up for 10 to 66 months. PMID:26418773

  19. Predator diversity stabilizes and strengthens trophic control of a keystone grazer.

    PubMed

    Griffin, John N; Silliman, Brian R

    2011-02-23

    Despite the global vulnerability of predators to extinction, and the critical functional role they play in many ecosystems, there have been few realistic tests of the consequences of predator species deletion (conversely, predator diversity) in natural ecosystems. We performed a four-month field experiment in a southeastern United States salt marsh to test the role of predatory crab diversity in regulating populations of a keystone grazer that can decimate marsh vegetation at high densities. Our results revealed that a combination of this system's two resident predator species, in comparison to individual species, both stabilize and strengthen predation rates on the potent grazer. Monthly monitoring of predation rates from intense, hot summer months into the cooler autumn indicate this diversity benefit arises from predators responding differentially to changing environmental conditions across seasons. This study provides some of the first experimental field support for the insurance hypothesis from marine ecosystems, suggests that predator temporal complementarity may be more common than currently perceived, and argues for conservation of predator diversity to ensure reliable and effective control of potentially habitat-destroying grazers. PMID:20739314

  20. Keystone effects of an alien top-predator stem extinctions of native mammals.

    PubMed

    Letnic, Mike; Koch, Freya; Gordon, Chris; Crowther, Mathew S; Dickman, Christopher R

    2009-09-22

    Alien predators can have catastrophic effects on ecosystems and are thought to be much more harmful to biodiversity than their native counterparts. However, trophic cascade theory and the mesopredator release hypothesis predict that the removal of top predators will result in the reorganization of trophic webs and loss of biodiversity. Using field data collected throughout arid Australia, we provide evidence that removal of an alien top-predator, the dingo, has cascading effects through lower trophic levels. Dingo removal was linked to increased activity of herbivores and an invasive mesopredator, the red fox (Vulpes vulpes), and to the loss of grass cover and native species of small mammals. Using species distribution data, we predict that reintroducing or maintaining dingo populations would produce a net benefit for the conservation of threatened native mammals across greater than 2.42 x 10(6) km(2) of Australia. Our study provides evidence that an alien top predator can assume a keystone role and be beneficial for biodiversity conservation, and also that mammalian carnivores more generally can generate strong trophic cascades in terrestrial ecosystems. PMID:19535372

  1. Deciphering microbial interactions and detecting keystone species with co-occurrence networks

    PubMed Central

    Berry, David; Widder, Stefanie

    2014-01-01

    Co-occurrence networks produced from microbial survey sequencing data are frequently used to identify interactions between community members. While this approach has potential to reveal ecological processes, it has been insufficiently validated due to the technical limitations inherent in studying complex microbial ecosystems. Here, we simulate multi-species microbial communities with known interaction patterns using generalized Lotka-Volterra dynamics. We then construct co-occurrence networks and evaluate how well networks reveal the underlying interactions and how experimental and ecological parameters can affect network inference and interpretation. We find that co-occurrence networks can recapitulate interaction networks under certain conditions, but that they lose interpretability when the effects of habitat filtering become significant. We demonstrate that networks suffer from local hot spots of spurious correlation in the neighborhood of hub species that engage in many interactions. We also identify topological features associated with keystone species in co-occurrence networks. This study provides a substantiated framework to guide environmental microbiologists in the construction and interpretation of co-occurrence networks from microbial survey datasets. PMID:24904535

  2. Keystone Symposium on Antibodies as Drugs: March 27-April 1, 2009, Whistler, BC CA.

    PubMed

    Wurch, Thierry; Larbouret, Christel; Robert, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    The symposium on Antibodies as Drugs, organized by Keystone Symposia and chaired by J. Marks, (University of California Los Angeles, USA), E.S. Ward (University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, USA) and L. Weiner (Georgetown University Medical Center, USA), was held in Whistler, British Columbia. This Canadian Rockies village, which will host the 2010 Olympic Games, served as an enchanting backdrop to the meeting. The more than 350 speakers and attendees included scientists from major pharmaceutical firms, e.g., Abbott, MedImmune/Astra Zeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Merck & Co., Pfizer, Sanofi-Aventis, Schering, GlaxoSmithKline, Eli Lilly, Hoffmann LaRoche, Novartis, Wyeth, and biotechnology companies, e.g., Ablynx, Medarex, Morphosys, GenMab, Amgen, Genentech, ImmunoGen, Agensys, Domantis, Biogen Idec, Centocor, LFB, Micromet, PDL Biopharma, Borean Pharma, Dyax Corp., Symphogen and Syntonix. Academic research groups at Imperial College London, University of Oxford, ETH Zürich, Scripps, Institute Cochin, Karolinska Institute, Utrecht University, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Baylor College, Paul Ehrlich Institute, University of California San Francisco, University of California San Diego, University of Nantes, University of Tours and Ludwig Institute were also represented, as were regulatory authorities, including the US Food and Drug Administration, National Institutes of Health and the Public Health Agency of Canada). The meeting was very interactive and included thoughtful exchanges during the different sessions and networking events. PMID:20068403

  3. Ruminococcus bromii is a keystone species for the degradation of resistant starch in the human colon

    PubMed Central

    Ze, Xiaolei; Duncan, Sylvia H; Louis, Petra; Flint, Harry J

    2012-01-01

    The release of energy from particulate substrates such as dietary fiber and resistant starch (RS) in the human colon may depend on the presence of specialist primary degraders (or ‘keystone species') within the microbial community. We have explored the roles of four dominant amylolytic bacteria found in the human colon in the degradation and utilization of resistant starches. Eubacterium rectale and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron showed limited ability to utilize RS2- and RS3-resistant starches by comparison with Bifidobacterium adolescentis and Ruminococcus bromii. In co-culture, however, R. bromii proved unique in stimulating RS2 and RS3 utilization by the other three bacterial species, even in a medium that does not permit growth of R. bromii itself. Having previously demonstrated low RS3 fermentation in vivo in two individuals with undetectable populations of R. bromii-related bacteria, we show here that supplementation of mixed fecal bacteria from one of these volunteers with R. bromii, but not with the other three species, greatly enhanced the extent of RS3 fermentation in vitro. This argues strongly that R. bromii has a pivotal role in fermentation of RS3 in the human large intestine, and that variation in the occurrence of this species and its close relatives may be a primary cause of variable energy recovery from this important component of the diet. This work also indicates that R. bromii possesses an exceptional ability to colonize and degrade starch particles when compared with previously studied amylolytic bacteria from the human colon. PMID:22343308

  4. The keystone species of Precambrian deep bedrock biosphere belong to Burkholderiales and Clostridiales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purkamo, L.; Bomberg, M.; Kietäväinen, R.; Salavirta, H.; Nyyssönen, M.; Nuppunen-Puputti, M.; Ahonen, L.; Kukkonen, I.; Itävaara, M.

    2015-11-01

    The bacterial and archaeal community composition and the possible carbon assimilation processes and energy sources of microbial communities in oligotrophic, deep, crystalline bedrock fractures is yet to be resolved. In this study, intrinsic microbial communities from six fracture zones from 180-2300 m depths in Outokumpu bedrock were characterized using high-throughput amplicon sequencing and metagenomic prediction. Comamonadaceae-, Anaerobrancaceae- and Pseudomonadaceae-related OTUs form the core community in deep crystalline bedrock fractures in Outokumpu. Archaeal communities were mainly composed of Methanobacteraceae-affiliating OTUs. The predicted bacterial metagenomes showed that pathways involved in fatty acid and amino sugar metabolism were common. In addition, relative abundance of genes coding the enzymes of autotrophic carbon fixation pathways in predicted metagenomes was low. This indicates that heterotrophic carbon assimilation is more important for microbial communities of the fracture zones. Network analysis based on co-occurrence of OTUs revealed the keystone genera of the microbial communities belonging to Burkholderiales and Clostridiales. Bacterial communities in fractures resemble those found from oligotrophic, hydrogen-enriched environments. Serpentinization reactions of ophiolitic rocks in Outokumpu assemblage may provide a source of energy and organic carbon compounds for the microbial communities in the fractures. Sulfate reducers and methanogens form a minority of the total microbial communities, but OTUs forming these minor groups are similar to those found from other deep Precambrian terrestrial bedrock environments.

  5. Predictions replaced by facts: a keystone species' behavioural responses to declining arctic sea-ice.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Charmain D; Lydersen, Christian; Ims, Rolf A; Kovacs, Kit M

    2015-11-01

    Since the first documentation of climate-warming induced declines in arctic sea-ice, predictions have been made regarding the expected negative consequences for endemic marine mammals. But, several decades later, little hard evidence exists regarding the responses of these animals to the ongoing environmental changes. Herein, we report the first empirical evidence of a dramatic shift in movement patterns and foraging behaviour of the arctic endemic ringed seal (Pusa hispida), before and after a major collapse in sea-ice in Svalbard, Norway. Among other changes to the ice-regime, this collapse shifted the summer position of the marginal ice zone from over the continental shelf, northward to the deep Arctic Ocean Basin. Following this change, which is thought to be a 'tipping point', subadult ringed seals swam greater distances, showed less area-restricted search behaviour, dived for longer periods, exhibited shorter surface intervals, rested less on sea-ice and did less diving directly beneath the ice during post-moulting foraging excursions. In combination, these behavioural changes suggest increased foraging effort and thus also likely increases in the energetic costs of finding food. Continued declines in sea-ice are likely to result in distributional changes, range reductions and population declines in this keystone arctic species. PMID:26582841

  6. Deciphering microbial interactions and detecting keystone species with co-occurrence networks.

    PubMed

    Berry, David; Widder, Stefanie

    2014-01-01

    Co-occurrence networks produced from microbial survey sequencing data are frequently used to identify interactions between community members. While this approach has potential to reveal ecological processes, it has been insufficiently validated due to the technical limitations inherent in studying complex microbial ecosystems. Here, we simulate multi-species microbial communities with known interaction patterns using generalized Lotka-Volterra dynamics. We then construct co-occurrence networks and evaluate how well networks reveal the underlying interactions and how experimental and ecological parameters can affect network inference and interpretation. We find that co-occurrence networks can recapitulate interaction networks under certain conditions, but that they lose interpretability when the effects of habitat filtering become significant. We demonstrate that networks suffer from local hot spots of spurious correlation in the neighborhood of hub species that engage in many interactions. We also identify topological features associated with keystone species in co-occurrence networks. This study provides a substantiated framework to guide environmental microbiologists in the construction and interpretation of co-occurrence networks from microbial survey datasets. PMID:24904535

  7. A keystone mutualism underpins resilience of a coastal ecosystem to drought

    PubMed Central

    Angelini, Christine; Griffin, John N.; van de Koppel, Johan; Lamers, Leon P. M.; Smolders, Alfons J. P.; Derksen-Hooijberg, Marlous; van der Heide, Tjisse; Silliman, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Droughts are increasing in severity and frequency, yet the mechanisms that strengthen ecosystem resilience to this stress remain poorly understood. Here, we test whether positive interactions in the form of a mutualism between mussels and dominant cordgrass in salt marshes enhance ecosystem resistance to and recovery from drought. Surveys spanning 250 km of southeastern US coastline reveal spatially dispersed mussel mounds increased cordgrass survival during severe drought by 5- to 25-times. Surveys and mussel addition experiments indicate this positive effect of mussels on cordgrass was due to mounds enhancing water storage and reducing soil salinity stress. Observations and models then demonstrate that surviving cordgrass patches associated with mussels function as nuclei for vegetative re-growth and, despite covering only 0.1–12% of die-offs, markedly shorten marsh recovery periods. These results indicate that mutualisms, in supporting stress-resistant patches, can play a disproportionately large, keystone role in enhancing ecosystem resilience to climatic extremes. PMID:27534803

  8. A keystone predator controls bacterial diversity in the pitcher-plant (Sarracenia purpurea) microecosystem.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Celeste N; Day, Stephanie; Wolfe, Benjamin E; Ellison, Aaron M; Kolter, Roberto; Pringle, Anne

    2008-09-01

    The community of organisms inhabiting the water-filled leaves of the carnivorous pitcher-plant Sarracenia purpurea includes arthropods, protozoa and bacteria, and serves as a model system for studies of food web dynamics. Despite the wealth of data collected by ecologists and zoologists on this food web, very little is known about the bacterial assemblage in this microecosystem. We used terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis to quantify bacterial diversity within the pitchers as a function of pitcher size, pH of the pitcher fluid and the presence of the keystone predator in this food web, larvae of the pitcher-plant mosquito Wyeomyia smithii. Results were analysed at two spatial scales: within a single bog and across three isolated bogs. Pitchers were sterile before they opened and composition of the bacterial assemblage was more variable between different bogs than within bogs. Measures of bacterial richness and diversity were greater in the presence of W. smithii and increased with increasing pitcher size. Our results suggest that fundamental ecological concepts derived from macroscopic food webs can also be used to predict the bacterial assemblages in pitcher plants. PMID:18479443

  9. Drove roads: Keystone structures that promote ant diversity in Mediterranean forest landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azcárate, Francisco M.; Seoane, Javier; Castro, Sara; Peco, Begoña

    2013-05-01

    Drove roads are the traditional corridors used by pastoralists for seasonal movements of livestock (transhumance). They cover a considerable land area in Mediterranean countries and, although they are an obvious source of landscape diversity, their influence on the diversity and composition of animal assemblages has not been documented. Ant communities were studied on four active drove roads, two in forests (submediterranean and conifer) and two in open environments (croplands and rangelands). They were compared with the respective matrix communities and their contribution to local species richness was evaluated. The effects were heavily dependent on the open or closed nature of the matrix. In forest environments, drove roads increased ant species richness at the local scale, acting as clear keystone structures. Their species richness and functional diversity were highest on the fine scale, species composition was different, and a slight edge effect in the matrix was detected. In contrast, drove roads had little or even a negative effect in open environment locations. We conclude that drove roads have a high conservation value for ants in Mediterranean forest environments, in addition to their importance as reservoirs of plant biodiversity and generators of ecological goods and services.

  10. 75 FR 82387 - Next Generation Risk Assessment Public Dialogue Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-30

    ... AGENCY Next Generation Risk Assessment Public Dialogue Conference AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... Generation of Risk Assessment'' (NexGen) program, EPA is announcing a 2-day public dialogue conference to... Information About the Conference The landscape of risk assessment is changing rapidly with new advances...

  11. Introductory CAI Dialogue in Differential Calculus for Freshman Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalman, C. S.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    A project on computer based dialogue for freshmen is described and evaluated. The dialogue utilizes a CAI language written in Fortran that allows a designer to easily write and edit questions at his own desk without the use of a terminal. (Author/DT)

  12. DISCUSS: Toward a Domain Independent Representation of Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Lee

    2012-01-01

    While many studies have demonstrated that conversational tutoring systems have a positive effect on learning, the amount of manual effort required to author, design, and tune dialogue behaviors remains a major barrier to widespread deployment and adoption of these systems. Such dialogue systems must not only understand student speech, but must…

  13. "He Said What?!" Constructed Dialogue in Various Interface Modes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Lesa; Morris, Carla; Langdon, Clifton

    2012-01-01

    This study analyzes the manifestation of constructed dialogue in ASL narratives as dependent on the interface mode (i.e., face-to-face conversation, electronic conversation over videophone, and vlog monologues). Comparisons of eye gaze over three interface modes shows how aspects of constructed dialogue are altered to fit the communication mode.…

  14. A Response to Jane Sahi's "Dialogue as Education: Martin Buber"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baniwal, Vikas

    2014-01-01

    This article is inspired by Jane Sahi's commentary, "Dialogue as Education: Martin Buber," published under the feature "Classics with Commentary" in the Monsoon 2005 issue of "Contemporary Education Dialogue." I seek to further the discussion of the contributions of Martin Buber to the discourse of education through…

  15. Dialogue as Moral Paradigm: Paths toward Intercultural Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, J. Gregory

    2011-01-01

    The Council of Europe's 2008 "White Paper on Intercultural Dialogue: 'living together as equals in dignity'" points to the need for shared values upon which intercultural dialogue might rest. In order, however, to overcome the monologic separateness that threatens community, we must educate ourselves to recognize the dialogism of our humanity and…

  16. Dialogue on Modernity and Modern Education in Dispute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Michael; Peters, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    This is a dialogue or conversation between Michael Baker (MB) and Michael A. Peters (MP) on the concept of modernity and its significance for educational theory. The dialogue took place originally as a conversation about a symposium on modernity held at the American Educational Studies Association meeting 2010. It was later developed for…

  17. A Model for Negotiation in Teaching-Learning Dialogues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Describes a model for negotiation based on an analysis of teaching-learning dialogues. Topics discussed include the concept of negotiation in research; the relevance of dialogue analysis and modeling for artificial intelligence research; multidisciplinary perspectives; negotiation processes; communicative acts in negotiations; and theoretical…

  18. Socrates Lives: Dialogue as a Means of Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moberg, Eric M.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to argue for the ongoing use of dialogue as a modern pedagogical and andragogical method. The author reviewed 18 scholarly sources from three education databases in this literature review. The use of dialogue as mode of instruction dates from the Socratic Method of 399 B.C.E. to present uses. The literature reveals…

  19. Classroom Dialogue: A Systematic Review across Four Decades of Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Christine; Abedin, Manzoorul

    2013-01-01

    Recognizing that empirical research into classroom dialogue has been conducted for about 40?years, a review is reported of 225 studies published between 1972 and 2011. The studies were identified through systematic search of electronic databases and scrutiny of publication reference lists. They focus on classroom dialogue in primary and secondary…

  20. A Dialogue: Our Selves, Our Students, and Obama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Jennifer; Kelly, Kim

    2009-01-01

    The following essay is a dialogue between two high school English teachers at a small, progressive public school on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. Throughout their dialogue, Jen, whose voice appears in italics, and Kim, whose voice appears in plain text, discuss the factors that motivated their decisions to become teachers, tell of the distinct…

  1. Russian Basic Course: Dialogue Cartoon Guides, Lessons 1-83.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This booklet of cartoon guides contains 83 units of instructional materials prepared by the Defense Language Insitute for use in an intensive, conversational, Russian course. Included are cartoon guides to dialogues and dialogue recombinations which focus on social concerns and military matters. (RL)

  2. Facilitating Difficult Dialogues at the Intersections of Religious Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, Sherry K.

    2009-01-01

    A core definition of a "difficult dialogue" is a verbal or written exchange of ideas or opinions among citizens within a community that centers on an awakening of potentially conflicting views about beliefs and values. As informed by Fried's definition of religious privilege (2007), difficult dialogue at the intersections of religious privilege…

  3. A Dialogue on Liberal Learning in Professional Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of American Colleges, Washington, DC.

    The third in a series of reports on AAC-sponsored dialogues on liberal learning is presented. This dialogue, focusing on the role of liberal learning in professional education, was designed for both teachers and administrators representing a variety of colleges of business, engineering, fine arts, and the health sciences. In the first case study,…

  4. Facilitating Dialogue on Religion and Sexuality Using a Descriptive Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, Richard W.

    2009-01-01

    Dialogue on religion and sexuality is difficult because these topics consist of deeply seated concepts of self, as well as one's relationship to other selves in the world. This chapter offers practical steps for creating and navigating difficult dialogues with respect to sexuality and religion. It suggests that partnership with departments,…

  5. Exploring Creative Thinking in Graphically Mediated Synchronous Dialogues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wegerif, Rupert; McLaren, Bruce M.; Chamrada, Marian; Scheuer, Oliver; Mansour, Nasser; Miksatko, Jan; Williams, Mriga

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on an aspect of the EC funded Argunaut project which researched and developed awareness tools for moderators of online dialogues. In this study we report on an investigation into the nature of creative thinking in online dialogues and whether or not this creative thinking can be coded for and recognized automatically such that…

  6. Writing before Speaking: How the Dialogue Journal Stimulates Conversation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Michelle Marie

    The dialogue journal procedure, which involves written turn-taking between a teacher and a student, is examined in terms of how the journal process can prepare students for later oral communication. The use of the dialogue journal with four distinct student populations (hearing impaired or deaf, learning disabled, bilingual, and…

  7. The Socratic Dialogue in Asynchronous Online Discussions: Is Constructivism Redundant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingsley, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine Socratic dialogue in asynchronous online discussions in relation to constructivism. The links between theory and practice in teaching are to be discussed whilst tracing the origins of Socratic dialogue and recent trends and use of seminar in research based institutions. Design/methodology/approach: Many online…

  8. The Dialogue Journal: A Tool for Building Better Writers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denne-Bolton, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Using dialogue journals gives English language learners valuable writing practice. This article explores topics such as audience, fluency, teacher-student relationships, empowerment, and making the connection to academic writing. And the author gives practical advice on how teachers can institute dialogue journals in their classrooms and how best…

  9. An Investigation into Participation in Classroom Dialogue in Mainland China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Classroom dialogue is commonly used in teaching and learning, and viewed as in terms of helping students to think critically and understand knowledge better. Thus, educators and scholars call on active participation in classroom dialogue. However, students in mainland China are traditionally viewed as less talkative in class. In this study, I…

  10. Using Intergroup Dialogue to Promote Social Justice and Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessel, Adrienne; Rogge, Mary E.; Garlington, Sarah B.

    2006-01-01

    Intergroup dialogue is a public process designed to involve individuals and groups in an exploration of societal issues such as politics, racism, religion, and culture that are often flashpoints for polarization and social conflict. This article examines intergroup dialogue as a bridging mechanism through which social workers in clinical, other…

  11. Analyzing Empirical Notions of Suffering: Advancing Youth Dialogue and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baring, Rito V.

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the possibilities of advancing youth dialogue and education among the Filipino youth using empirical notions of students on suffering. Examining empirical data, this analysis exposes uncharted notions of suffering and shows relevant meanings that underscore the plausible trappings of youth dialogue and its benefits on…

  12. Practical Implementation of "Soka" Education: A Dialogue with Monte Joffee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joffee, Monte; Goulah, Jason; Gebert, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a dialogue with Monte Joffee. Joffee has been an active leader in the small school and charter school movements in New York City for over 20 years. He is a cofounder of The Renaissance Charter School in New York City and served as its founding principal (1993-2007). In this dialogue, Joffee articulates the ways in which…

  13. Bakhtin and Freire: Dialogue, Dialectic and Boundary Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Dialogue is a seminal concept within the work of the Brazilian adult education theorist, Paulo Freire, and the Russian literary critic and philosopher, Mikhail Bakhtin. While there are commonalities in their understanding of dialogue, they differ in their treatment of dialectic. This paper addresses commonalities and dissonances within a…

  14. Socratic Dialogue, the Humanities and the Art of the Question

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Sebastian

    2006-01-01

    Plato's depiction of Socrates' interrogations in his early dialogues provides an enduring example of the importance of asking questions as an educative method. This article considers the central educational elements of Socratic dialogue and the ways in which these were developed in the 20th century, particularly in "The Socratic Method" practised…

  15. Learning through Personal Connections: Cogenerative Dialogues in Synchronous Virtual Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bondi, Stephanie; Daher, Tareq; Holland, Amy; Smith, Adam R.; Dam, Stacy

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the role of cogenerative dialogues in a synchronous virtual classroom. Cogenerative dialogues are a way for students and instructors to reflect upon in-class events and work collaboratively during the course to optimize teaching and learning. In the present study, cogen has been found to be a tool for enhancing connections…

  16. The High Stakes of Artificial Dialogue in Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Douglas J.

    2009-01-01

    Talking about important events, experiences, and ideas is a crucial societal concern for many reasons. In the field of teacher education, dialogue may be even more difficult because it is sometimes seen as being both essential and troubling. Dialogue is complicated because some people are fearful of open inquiry; others are inclined to rant; and…

  17. Dialogue as a Means of Learning and Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskas, Richard S.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine how dialogue is involved in learning and teaching in the classroom. Dialogue is present in many forms as it is used in group interactions, used with technology and how pre-service teachers communicate with their school supervisors during their training. Research was conducted through Educational Resources…

  18. The National Dialogue on Standards-Based Education: Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lefkowits, Laura; Arens, Sheila A.

    2004-01-01

    In response to the need to ensure that standards fulfill their promise of supporting a system of education that leaves no child behind, McREL created a multimedia, multi-site, ongoing nationwide dialogue related to standards-based reform efforts. These dialogues provided participants with opportunities to share underlying assumptions, beliefs, and…

  19. Esperanza y Poder: Democratic Dialogue and Authentic Parent Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stratton, Susan

    2006-01-01

    This study explored ways to increase authentic participation of Mexican American parents in the education of their children. It focused on direct dialogue between Spanish-speaking parents and English-speaking school personnel and how dialogue facilitated group development. The design of the study included phenomenological inquiry and action…

  20. Intergroup Dialogue: Education for a Broad Conception of Civic Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurin, Patricia; Nagda, Biren A.; Sorensen, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    Intergroup dialogue provides what students need in order to relate and collaborate across differences, something they have to do in community projects that usually involve interactions across racial, social class, religious, and geographical divides. In this article, the authors demonstrate the efficacy of intergroup dialogue, drawing from a…

  1. Capturing Mentor Teachers' Reflective Moments during Mentoring Dialogues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crasborn, Frank; Hennissen, Paul; Brouwer, Niels; Korthagen, Fred; Bergen, Theo

    2010-01-01

    The main goal of the current study is to capture differential frequencies of mentor teachers' reflective moments, as indicators of different levels of consciousness in mentor teachers' use and acquisition of supervisory skills during mentoring dialogues. For each of the 30 participants, two mentoring dialogues were analyzed: one before and one…

  2. Fostering climate dialogue by introducing students to uncertainty in decision-making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addor, N.; Ewen, T.; Johnson, L.; Coltekin, A.; Derungs, C.; Muccione, V.

    2014-12-01

    Uncertainty is present in all fields of climate research, spanning from climate projections, to assessing regional impacts and vulnerabilities to adaptation policy and decision-making. The complex and interdisciplinary nature of climate information, however, makes the decision-making process challenging. This process is further hindered by a lack of institutionalized dialogue between climate researchers, decision-makers and user groups. Forums that facilitate such dialogue would allow these groups to actively engage with each other to improve decisions. In parallel, introducing students to these challenges is one way to foster such climate dialogue. We present the design and outcome of an innovative workshop-seminar series we convened at the University of Zurich to demonstrate the pedagogical importance of such forums. An initial two-day workshop brought together 50 participants, including bachelor, master and PhD students and academic staff, and nine speakers from academia, industry, government, and philanthropy. The main objectives were to provide participants with tools to communicate uncertainty in their current or future research projects, to foster exchange between practitioners, students and scientists from different backgrounds and finally to expose students to multidisciplinary collaborations and real-world problems involving decisions under uncertainty. An opinion survey conducted before and after the workshop enabled us to observe changes in participants' perspectives on what information and tools should be exchanged between researchers and decision-makers to better address uncertainty. Responses demonstrated a marked shift from a pre-workshop vertical conceptualization of researcher-user group interaction to a post-workshop horizontal mode: in the former, researchers were portrayed as bestowing data-based products to decision-makers, while in the latter, both sets of actors engaged in frequent communication, exchanging their needs and expertise. Drawing

  3. Learning through Civic Participation: Policy Actors' Perspectives on Curriculum Reform Involvement in Ontario

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Laura Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    When citizens participate in policy production, the advantages go beyond policy outcomes--though the presumption is that participation leads to better public policy. Robust democracy characterized by agonistic exchanges among policy actors ought to encourage learning, dialogue, empow­erment, equity, and a shared spirit of inquiry. This article…

  4. Teacher-Student Dialogue: Transforming Teacher Interpersonal Behaviour and Pedagogical Praxis through Co-Teaching and Co-Generative Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahmawati, Yuli; Koul, Rekha; Fisher, Darrell

    2015-01-01

    The paper reports a study of the effectiveness of co-teaching and co-generative dialogue in science learning and teaching in lower secondary science classes. The idea of co-teaching and co-generative dialogue--first proposed by two leading educationists, Roth and Tobin, in early 2000--made an international impact in educational research. In the…

  5. The Use of the Dialogue Concepts from the Arsenal of the Norwegian Dialogue Pedagogy in the Time of Postmodernism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gradovski, Mikhail

    2012-01-01

    Inspired by the views by the American educationalist Henry Giroux on the role teachers and educationalists should be playing in the time of postmodernism and by Abraham Maslow's concept of biological idiosyncrasy, the author discusses how the concepts of the dialogues created by the representatives of Norwegian Dialogue Pedagogy, Hans Skjervheim,…

  6. AdaRTE: adaptable dialogue architecture and runtime engine. A new architecture for health-care dialogue systems.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Barahona, L M; Giorgino, T

    2007-01-01

    Spoken dialogue systems have been increasingly employed to provide ubiquitous automated access via telephone to information and services for the non-Internet-connected public. In the health care context, dialogue systems have been successfully applied. Nevertheless, speech-based technology is not easy to implement because it requires a considerable development investment. The advent of VoiceXML for voice applications contributed to reduce the proliferation of incompatible dialogue interpreters, but introduced new complexity. As a response to these issues, we designed an architecture for dialogue representation and interpretation, AdaRTE, which allows developers to layout dialogue interactions through a high level formalism that offers both declarative and procedural features. AdaRTE aim is to provide a ground for deploying complex and adaptable dialogues whilst allows the experimentation and incremental adoption of innovative speech technologies. It provides the dynamic behavior of Augmented Transition Networks and enables the generation of different backends formats such as VoiceXML. It is especially targeted to the health care context, where a framework for easy dialogue deployment could reduce the barrier for a more widespread adoption of dialogue systems. PMID:17911878

  7. An International Dialogue on Community Colleges in a Changing World. [Symposium Report of] New Orleans Jam Session (New Orleans, Louisiana, January 8-9, 2002).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfeld, Stuart; Liston, Cynthia

    This document details a symposium that brought together U.S., Canadian, and European experts, college leaders, and policy makers for an "International Dialogue on Community Colleges in a Changing World." Discussion centered on the following four topics: (1) Community colleges are the largest source of postsecondary education for immigrants and…

  8. Estaurine Freshwater Entrainment By Oyster Reefs: Quantifying A Keystone Ecosystem Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, D. A.; Olabarrieta, M.; Frederick, P.; Valle-Levinson, A.; Seavey, J.

    2014-12-01

    Oyster reefs have been shown to provide myriad critical ecosystem services, however their role in directing flow and currents during non-storm conditions has been largely neglected. In many regions, oyster reefs form as linear structures perpendicular to the coast and across the path of streams and rivers, potentially entraining large volumes of freshwater flow and altering nearshore mixing. We hypothesize that these reefs have the potential to influence salinity over large areas, providing a "keystone" ecosystem service by supporting multiple estuarine functions. Here we present results from a field and modeling study to quantify the effects of reef extent and elevation on estuarine salinities under varying river discharge. We found salinity differences ranging from 2 to 16 g/kg between inshore and offshore sides of degraded oyster reefs in the Suwannee Sound (FL, USA), supporting the role of reefs as local-scale freshwater dams. Moreover, differences between inshore and offshore salinities were correlated with flow, with the most marked differences during periods of low flow. Hydrodynamic modeling using the 3-D Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) suggests that the currently degraded reef system entrained greater volumes of freshwater in the past, buffering the landward advance of high salinities, particularly during low flow events related to droughts. Using ROMS, we also modeled a variety of hypothetical oyster bar morphology scenarios (historical, current, and "restored") to understand how changes in reef structure (elevation, extent, and completeness) impact estuarine mixing and near-shore salinities. Taken together, these results serve to: 1) elucidate a poorly documented ecosystem service of oyster reefs; 2) provide an estimate of the magnitude and sptial extent of the freshwater entrainment effect; and 3) offer quantitative information to managers and restoration specialists interested in restoring oyster habitat.

  9. In situ transcriptomic analysis of the globally important keystone N2-fixing taxon Crocosphaera watsonii.

    PubMed

    Hewson, Ian; Poretsky, Rachel S; Beinart, Roxanne A; White, Angelicque E; Shi, Tuo; Bench, Shellie R; Moisander, Pia H; Paerl, Ryan W; Tripp, H James; Montoya, Joseph P; Moran, Mary Ann; Zehr, Jonathan P

    2009-05-01

    The diazotrophic cyanobacterium Crocosphaera watsonii supplies fixed nitrogen (N) to N-depleted surface waters of the tropical oceans, but the factors that determine its distribution and contribution to global N(2) fixation are not well constrained for natural populations. Despite the heterogeneity of the marine environment, the genome of C. watsonii is highly conserved in nucleotide sequence in contrast to sympatric planktonic cyanobacteria. We applied a whole assemblage shotgun transcript sequencing approach to samples collected from a bloom of C. watsonii observed in the South Pacific to understand the genomic mechanisms that may lead to high population densities. We obtained 999 C. watsonii transcript reads from two metatranscriptomes prepared from mixed assemblage RNA collected in the day and at night. The C. watsonii population had unexpectedly high transcription of hypothetical protein genes (31% of protein-encoding genes) and transposases (12%). Furthermore, genes were expressed that are necessary for living in the oligotrophic ocean, including the nitrogenase cluster and the iron-stress-induced protein A (isiA) that functions to protect photosystem I from high-light-induced damage. C. watsonii transcripts retrieved from metatranscriptomes at other locations in the southwest Pacific Ocean, station ALOHA and the equatorial Atlantic Ocean were similar in composition to those recovered in the enriched population. Quantitative PCR and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR were used to confirm the high expression of these genes within the bloom, but transcription patterns varied at shallower and deeper horizons. These data represent the first transcript study of a rare individual microorganism in situ and provide insight into the mechanisms of genome diversification and the ecophysiology of natural populations of keystone organisms that are important in global nitrogen cycling. PMID:19225552

  10. Keystone Project: coal-to-methanol feasibility study. Volume I. Project summary. [Cairnbrook, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-12-01

    The Keystone Project is proposed to be a facility that would eventually produce up to 67,000 barrels per day (bpd) of fuel-grade methanol from 2330 tons per day of bituminous coals. Initial production capacity of the plant, which could be on stream in early 1988, would be 13,300 barrels per day, could be expanded to the full 67,000 bpd capacity by the addition of unit additional process trains. This approach provides for a rapid and cost-effective implementation of the project with minimum risk. The Feasibility Study involved a comprehensive 18-month evaluation aimed at assessing the viability of the project from technical, economic, financial, marketing, environmental, health and safety, socioeconomics and business aspects. The work scope included seven tasks, which address important issues in the project: Preliminary Facility Design; Economic and Financial Analysis; Market Analysis; Siting Evaluation and Resource Assessment; Environmental, Health, Safety and Socioeconomic Assessments; Detailed Evaluation and Plan for Project Completion; and Program Management. The results provide a body of quantitative and qualitative information on which a decision can be made by interested investors whether to proceed with the project. The following work objectives were accomplished: a preliminary facility design and cost estimates based on a specific site were established; the size and nature of potential markets, probable product prices and key market regulatory issues were evaluated; the commercial feasibility of the project was determined based on economic and financial parameters, such as capitalization and debt structure, local and federal incentives and investor rate of return and cash flow; and environmental, health and safety, socioeconomics and related regulatory aspects of the project were evaluated. The results indicate that the project can be viable if given appropriate financial support from the US Synthetic Fuels Corporation.

  11. Interaction and Relationship Between Groundwater and Surface Water at Keystone Heritage Park EL Paso Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, B.

    2012-12-01

    Belinda Gonzalez1, Joshua Villalobos1, Marissa Cameron 2 1Department of Geological Sciences, El Paso Community College, El Paso, TX 79925, USA 2Department of Geological Sciences, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968, USA beli_72764@yahoo.com Historically the floodplain of the Rio Grande River was dotted with shifting wetlands and ponds.The increasing population throughout the United States and Mexico has made it necessary to put the Rio Grande floodplain under till for cultivation. Along with cultivation, the river was channelized and dammed to prevent flooding and to stabilize the Mexico/U.S. border.The loss of wetland ecosystems in the area changed migration patterns of water fowl and destroyed priceless aquatic habitats.The area of our study, Keystone Heritage Park, is the last remaining open wetlands in El Paso County. Before efforts of restoration to reestablish wetlands associated with the Rio Grande can begin, there must be an in-depth, and complete, understanding of the surface and subsurface hydrological system which created and sustains this last remaining wetland. Studies of the wetland's soil properties and their effect on groundwater flow have indicated regions on the periphery of the wetlands where soils are saturated with moisture.These subsurface regions of saturated soils are semi-linear in shape and lead toward the wetland indicating that they are possible loci for groundwater flow for the wetland.These subsurface soil layers are possibly composed of mountain front alluvium that is being feed with meteoric water entering faults that bound the nearby Franklin Mountains.The primary goals of this study are 1) initiate a systematic data acquisition from 9 piezometers and 2 water level loggers of temporal variations in the depth of the groundwater due to regional pumping or rain fall and 2) generate a depth and TDS (Total Dissolved Solids) profile of the wetland pond to locate regions where groundwater maybe entering the lake.

  12. Elevated water temperature and carbon dioxide concentration increase the growth of a keystone echinoderm

    PubMed Central

    Gooding, Rebecca A.; Harley, Christopher D. G.; Tang, Emily

    2009-01-01

    Anthropogenic climate change poses a serious threat to biodiversity. In marine environments, multiple climate variables, including temperature and CO2 concentration ([CO2]), are changing simultaneously. Although temperature has well-documented ecological effects, and many heavily calcified marine organisms experience reduced growth with increased [CO2], little is known about the combined effects of temperature and [CO2], particularly on species that are less dependent on calcified shells or skeletons. We manipulated water temperature and [CO2] to determine the effects on the sea star Pisaster ochraceus, a keystone predator. We found that sea star growth and feeding rates increased with water temperature from 5 °C to 21 °C. A doubling of current [CO2] also increased growth rates both with and without a concurrent temperature increase from 12 °C to 15 °C. Increased [CO2] also had a positive but nonsignificant effect on sea star feeding rates, suggesting [CO2] may be acting directly at the physiological level to increase growth rates. As in past studies of other marine invertebrates, increased [CO2] reduced the relative calcified mass in sea stars, although this effect was observed only at the lower experimental temperature. The positive relationship between growth and [CO2] found here contrasts with previous studies, most of which have shown negative effects of [CO2] on marine species, particularly those that are more heavily calcified than P. ochraceus. Our findings demonstrate that increased [CO2] will not have direct negative effects on all marine invertebrates, suggesting that predictions of biotic responses to climate change should consider how different types of organisms will respond to changing climatic variables. PMID:19470464

  13. Rapid genetic restoration of a keystone species exhibiting delayed demographic response.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, Bradley J; Schooley, Robert L; Bestelmeyer, Brandon T; McCarthy, Alison J; Sierzega, Kevin

    2015-12-01

    Genetic founder effects are often expected when animals colonize restored habitat in fragmented landscapes, but empirical data on genetic responses to restoration are limited. We examined the genetic response of banner-tailed kangaroo rats (Dipodomys spectabilis) to landscape-scale grassland restoration in the Chihuahuan Desert of New Mexico, USA. Dipodomys spectabilis is a grassland specialist and keystone species. At sites treated with herbicide to remove shrubs, colonization by D. spectabilis is slow and populations persist at low density for ≥10 years (≥6 generations). Persistence at low density and low gene flow may cause strong founder effects. We compared genetic structure of D. spectabilis populations between treated sites and remnant grasslands, and we examined how the genetic response to restoration depended on treatment age, area, and connectivity to source populations. Allelic richness and heterozygosity were similar between treated sites and remnant grasslands. Allelic richness at treated sites was greatest early in the restoration trajectory, and genetic divergence did not differ between recently colonized and established populations. These results indicated that founder effects during colonization of treated sites were weak or absent. Moreover, our results suggested founder effects were not mitigated by treatment area or connectivity. Dispersal is negatively density-dependent in D. spectabilis, and we hypothesize that high gene flow may occur early in the restoration trajectory when density is low. Our study shows genetic diversity can be recovered more rapidly than demographic components of populations after habitat restoration and that founder effects are not inevitable for animals colonizing restored habitat in fragmented landscapes. PMID:26577599

  14. The Role of Interpersonal Communication in Preventing Unsafe Abortion in Communities: The Dialogues for Life Project in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Bingham, Allison; Drake, Jennifer Kidwell; Goodyear, Lorelei; Gopinath, C. Y.; Kaufman, Anne; Bhattarai, Sanju

    2010-01-01

    Legal, procedural, and institutional restrictions on safe abortion services—such as laws forbidding the practice or policies preventing donors from supporting groups who provide legal services—remain a major access barrier for women worldwide. However, even when abortion services are legal, women face social and cultural barriers to accessing safe abortion services and preventing unwanted pregnancy. Interpersonal communication interventions play an important role in overcoming these obstacles, including as part of broad educational- and behavioral-change efforts. This article presents results from an interpersonal communication behavior change pilot intervention, Dialogues for Life, undertaken in Nepal from 2004 to 2006, after abortion was legalized in 2002. The project aimed to encourage and enable women to prevent unplanned pregnancies and unsafe abortions and was driven by dialogue groups and select community events. The authors’ results confirm that a dialogue-based interpersonal communication intervention can help change behavior and that this method is feasible in a low-resource, low-literacy setting. Dialogue groups play a key role in addressing sensitive and stigmatizing health issues such as unsafe abortion and in empowering women to negotiate for the social support they need when making decisions about their health. PMID:21128150

  15. A Switch in Keystone Seed-Dispersing Ant Genera between Two Elevations for a Myrmecochorous Plant, Acacia terminalis

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Fiona J.; Auld, Tony D.; Ramp, Daniel; Kingsford, Richard T.

    2016-01-01

    The dispersal capacity of plant species that rely on animals to disperse their seeds (biotic dispersal) can alter with changes to the populations of their keystone dispersal vectors. Knowledge on how biotic dispersal systems vary across landscapes allows better understanding of factors driving plant persistence. Myrmecochory, seed dispersal by ants, is a common method of biotic dispersal for many plant species throughout the world. We tested if the seed dispersal system of Acacia terminalis (Fabaceae), a known myrmecochore, differed between two elevations in the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area, in southeastern Australia. We compared ant assemblages, seed removal rates of ants and other vertebrates (bird and mammal) and the dominant seed-dispersing ant genera. At low elevations (c. 200 m a.s.l) seed removal was predominantly by ants, however, at high elevation sites (c. 700 m a.s.l) vertebrate seed dispersers or seed predators were present, removing over 60% of seeds from experimental depots when ants were excluded. We found a switch in the keystone seed-dispersing ant genera from Rhytidoponera at low elevations sites to Aphaenogaster at high elevation sites. This resulted in more seeds being removed faster at low elevation sites compared to high elevation sites, however long-term seed removal rates were equal between elevations. Differences in the keystone seed removalist, and the addition of an alternate dispersal vector or seed predator at high elevations, will result in different dispersal and establishment patterns for A. terminalis at different elevations. These differences in dispersal concur with other global studies that report myrmecochorous dispersal systems alter with elevation. PMID:27310262

  16. A Switch in Keystone Seed-Dispersing Ant Genera between Two Elevations for a Myrmecochorous Plant, Acacia terminalis.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Fiona J; Auld, Tony D; Ramp, Daniel; Kingsford, Richard T

    2016-01-01

    The dispersal capacity of plant species that rely on animals to disperse their seeds (biotic dispersal) can alter with changes to the populations of their keystone dispersal vectors. Knowledge on how biotic dispersal systems vary across landscapes allows better understanding of factors driving plant persistence. Myrmecochory, seed dispersal by ants, is a common method of biotic dispersal for many plant species throughout the world. We tested if the seed dispersal system of Acacia terminalis (Fabaceae), a known myrmecochore, differed between two elevations in the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area, in southeastern Australia. We compared ant assemblages, seed removal rates of ants and other vertebrates (bird and mammal) and the dominant seed-dispersing ant genera. At low elevations (c. 200 m a.s.l) seed removal was predominantly by ants, however, at high elevation sites (c. 700 m a.s.l) vertebrate seed dispersers or seed predators were present, removing over 60% of seeds from experimental depots when ants were excluded. We found a switch in the keystone seed-dispersing ant genera from Rhytidoponera at low elevations sites to Aphaenogaster at high elevation sites. This resulted in more seeds being removed faster at low elevation sites compared to high elevation sites, however long-term seed removal rates were equal between elevations. Differences in the keystone seed removalist, and the addition of an alternate dispersal vector or seed predator at high elevations, will result in different dispersal and establishment patterns for A. terminalis at different elevations. These differences in dispersal concur with other global studies that report myrmecochorous dispersal systems alter with elevation. PMID:27310262

  17. Assessing oral literacy demand in genetic counseling dialogue: preliminary test of a conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Roter, Debra L; Erby, Lori H; Larson, Susan; Ellington, Lee

    2007-10-01

    Health literacy deficits affect half the American patient population and are linked to poor health, ineffective disease management and high rates of hospitalization. Restricted literacy has also been linked with less satisfying medical visits and communication difficulties, particularly in terms of the interpersonal and informational aspects of care. Despite growing attention to these issues by researchers and policy makers, few studies have attempted to conceptualize and assess those aspects of dialogue that challenge persons with low literacy skills, i.e., the oral literacy demand within medical encounters. The current study uses videotapes and transcripts of 152 prenatal and cancer pretest genetic counseling sessions recorded with simulated clients to develop a conceptual framework to explore oral literacy demand and its consequences for medical interaction and related outcomes. Ninety-six prenatal and 81 cancer genetic counselors-broadly representative of the US National Society of Genetic Counselors-participated in the study. Key elements of the conceptual framework used to define oral literacy demand include: (1) use of unfamiliar technical terms; (2) general language complexity, reflected in the application of Microsoft Word grammar summary statistics to session transcripts; and, (3) structural characteristics of dialogue, including pacing, density, and interactivity. Genetic counselor outcomes include self-ratings of session satisfaction, informativeness, and development of rapport. The simulated clients rated their satisfaction with session communication, the counselor's effective use of nonverbal skills, and the counselor's affective demeanor during the session. Sessions with greater overall technical term use were longer and used more complex language reflected in readability indices and multi-syllabic vocabulary (measures averaging p<.05). Sessions with a high proportionate use of technical terms were characterized by shorter visits, high readability

  18. Shaping the Public Dialogue on Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitzer, W.; Anderson, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    In order to broaden the public dialogue about climate change, climate scientists need to leverage the potential of informal science education and recent advances in social and cognitive science. In the US, more than 1,500 informal science venues (science centers, museums, aquariums, zoos, nature centers, national parks, etc.) are visited annually by 61% of the population. Extensive research shows that these visitors are receptive to learning about climate change and trust these institutions as reliable sources. Given that we spend less than 5% of our lifetime in a classroom, and only a fraction of that is focused on science, informal science venues will continue to play a critical role in shaping public understanding of environmental issues in the years ahead. Public understanding of climate change continues to lag far behind the scientific consensus not merely because the public lacks information, but because there is in fact too much complex and contradictory information available. Fortunately, we can now (1) build on careful empirical cognitive and social science research to understand what people already value, believe, and understand; and then (2) design and test strategies for translating complex science so that people can examine evidence, make well-informed inferences, and embrace science-based solutions. The New England Aquarium is leading a national effort to enable informal science education institutions to effectively communicate the impacts of climate change and ocean acidification on marine ecosystems. This NSF-funded partnership, the National Network for Ocean and Climate Change Interpretation (NNOCCI), involves the Association of Zoos and Aquariums, FrameWorks Institute, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Monterey Bay Aquarium, and National Aquarium, with evaluation conducted by the New Knowledge Organization, Pennsylvania State University, and Ohio State University. We believe that skilled interpreters can serve as "communication strategists" by

  19. Communication in the Classroom: Student-Improvised Dialogues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farid, Anne

    1976-01-01

    This article provides a rationale for and gives a detailed description of the use of student-improvised dialogues in ESL classrooms. The focus is on techniques suitable to small classes of students with advanced English proficiency. (CHK)

  20. Science and religion in dialogue over the global commons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edenhofer, Ottmar; Flachsland, Christian; Knopf, Brigitte

    2015-10-01

    The Pope's encyclical makes unprecedented progress in developing scientific dialogue with religion by drawing on research, and encouraging further discussion about the ethical challenge of governing the global commons.

  1. Recreational trails as a source of negative impacts on the persistence of keystone species and facilitation.

    PubMed

    Ballantyne, Mark; Pickering, Catherine Marina

    2015-08-15

    Hiking trails, which are among the most common forms of infrastructure created for nature-based tourism, can alter key ecological processes. Trails can damage plants that facilitate the establishment and growth of other species leading to changes in community and functional composition. This can be a particular concern in harsh alpine ecosystems where plant communities are often dominated by one or two keystone species that provide shelter to a suite of beneficiary species. We analysed how a hiking trail affects interspecific facilitation by a dominant trampling-sensitive nurse shrub in the highest National Park in Australia. First we assessed the effects of the trail on the abundance, size and density of the nurse shrub at different distances from the trail. We then compared species richness and composition between areas in, and out, of the nurse shrub's canopy at different distances from the trail. To better understand why some species may benefit from facilitation and any effects of the trail on the quality of facilitation we compared functional composition between quadrats using community trait weighted means calculated by combining plant composition with species functional traits (canopy height, leaf area, % dry weight of leaves and specific leaf area). The abundance, size and density of nurse shrubs was lower on the trail edges than further away, particularly on the leeward edge, where there was more bare ground and less shrub cover. There were differences in species richness, cover, composition and functional composition in and outside the nurse shrub canopy. The shrubs appeared to facilitate species with more competitive, but less stress tolerant traits (e.g. taller plants with leaves that were larger, had high specific leaf area and low dry matter content). However, despite reductions in nurse shrubs near the trail, where they do exist, they appear to provide the same 'quality' of facilitation as nurse shrubs further away. However, longer-term effects may

  2. Reflections on the dialogue process, FRAME and the Three Rs.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jane A

    2009-12-01

    My contribution to FRAME's 40th Anniversary meeting started by looking back: offering some reflections on the benefits and difficulties of engaging in wide-ranging dialogue on laboratory animal issues, largely based on experience with two forums - both of which have involved FRAME. Drawing on this discussion, I then looked forward: arguing that such dialogue now has an especially important role to play in developing strategies to replace (and reduce or avoid) the use of animals in research. PMID:20105014

  3. Eavesdropping on the quantum dialogue protocol in lossy channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Heng; Zhang, Xiu-Lan; Lü, Hui

    2011-07-01

    We present an improved eavesdropping scheme on the quantum dialogue protocol in lossy channel, which is based on the strategies of Wójcik [Phys. Rev. Lett. 90 157901 (2003)] and ZML [Phys. Lett. A 333 46 (2004)] attack schemes. We show that our attack scheme doubles the domain of Eve's eavesdropping and Eve can gain more information of the communication with less risk of being detected. Finally, a possible improvement for the dialogue protocol security is proposed.

  4. Laurentia and Salvador-Congo: Keystone cratons in Late Proterozoic break-up of Rodinia and assembly of Gondwana supercontinents

    SciTech Connect

    Unrug, R. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    The break-up of Rodinia, the supercontinent assembled in the Middle Proterozoic chelogenic cycle (1.65--1.0 Ga), and the simultaneous assembly of the Gondwana Supercontinent were the major tectonic events of the Neoproterozoic. Laurentia occupied a central keystone position in the configuration of Rodinia. Its break-up resulted in rearrangement of Rodinia fragments: some were incorporated in the accreting Gondwana, while Laurentia, Baltica and Siberia drifted independently. Reconstructions of the position of Laurentia in the Rodinia Supercontinent are based on two criteria. The first is the continuity of Middle Proterozoic mobile belts suturing the older cratons and the match of piercing points of the mobile belts at the post- Middle Proterozoic margins of the older cratons. The second is the similarity of sedimentary sequences along Late Proterozoic passive margins formed during break-up of Rodinia. The first criterion allows for several interpretations. The second may be invalid, as conjugate margins developing over an oblique detachment will accumulate dissimilar sedimentary sequences. In reconstructions of the Gondwana Supercontinent the recently redefined Salvador-Congo craton occupied the central keystone position, between the East Gondwana continent and a number of smaller cratons of West Gondwana. It is entirely surrounded by collisional mobile belts, all containing important transcurrent shear zone systems. The margins of the Salvador-Congo craton were facing three major Late Proterozoic oceans.

  5. A Strategy of Dialogue for Communicating Hazard and Risk Information Between the Science and Emergency Management Sectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisner, R. K.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation will describe a collaborative dialogue process between earth scientists and emergency management officials that focused on translation of science into policy, building long term trust based relationships between sectors and unified presentation of hazards, risks and consequence management to public officials and the general public. The author will describe the structure and process of the California Earthquake Prediction Evaluation Council (CEPEC) in assessing the credibility of long and short term earthquake predictions, assessment of risk, and the formulation of public communication strategies and preparatory actions by government agencies. For nearly 4 decades, earth scientists, politically appointed state officials and emergency managers have engaged in ongoing discussions of the policy implications of research on potential seismic risk. Some discussions were scheduled and occurred over months, and others were ad hoc and occurred in the minutes between potential precursory incidents and possible large events. The effectiveness of this process was dependent on building respect for ones counterparts expertise, bias and responsibilities, clear communication of data, uncertainty and knowledge of the physical models assumed, history and probabilities; and the physical and political consequences of possible events; and the costs and economic and social disruption of alternative preparedness actions. But, the dialogue included political and social scientists, representatives of the print and broadcast media, political and management officials from federal, state and local governments. The presentation will provide an assessment of the effectiveness of the collaborative dialogue process and lessons on sustaining a long term partnership among the participating federal, state and local officials.

  6. Supporting chronic pain management across provincial and territorial health systems in Canada: Findings from two stakeholder dialogues

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Michael G; Lavis, John N; Ellen, Moriah E

    2015-01-01

    policy agendas. Dialogue participants emphasized the need to mobilize behind an effort to build a national network that would bring together existing organizations and committed individuals. CONCLUSIONS: Developing a national network and, thereafter, a national pain strategy are important initiatives that garnered broad-based support during the dialogues. Efforts toward achieving this goal have been made since convening the dialogues. PMID:26291124

  7. Kidney research national dialogue overview and commentary.

    PubMed

    Rys-Sikora, Krystyna E; Ketchum, Christian J; Star, Robert A

    2013-09-01

    The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) asked the scientific community to formulate and prioritize research objectives to improve understanding of kidney function and disease. The Kidney Research National Dialogue welcomed all interested parties to submit, discuss, and prioritize ideas via an interactive website. More than 1600 participants posted approximately 300 ideas and assigned them to 12 topic areas (AKI, CKD, diabetic nephropathy, National Kidney Disease Education Program/translation, ESRD/dialysis, GN/inflammation, hypertension, normal biology/development/physiology, polycystic kidney disease, training, transplantation, other). This commentary provides an overview of the NIDDK's first experience with web-based strategic planning and addresses the broader issues of open access and cloud-sourcing technologies to capture input from a large, heterogeneous group of contributors. Discussions and findings for each topic will be published as separate, forthcoming commentaries. A final commentary will present cross-cutting themes and concluding remarks. The hope is that this series of commentaries constitutes a cohesive, integrated vision of future research opportunities to be pursued by the kidney research community and supported by the NIDDK. PMID:23788616

  8. Dialogue as a tool for meaning making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruni, Angela Suzanne Dudley

    In order to empower citizens to analyze the effects, risk, and value of science, a knowledge of scientific concepts is necessary (Mejlgaard, 2009). The formal educational system plays a role in this endeavor (Gil-Perez & Vilches, 2005). One proposed constructivist practice is the use of social learning activities using verbalized, shared cognition among learners. In an effort to investigate the effects of verbally shared cognition, this project sought to determine if social learning opportunities affect the mastery of content in gateway biology courses and to identify the types of dialogue students engage in during cognitive collaboration. Fifty-seven students enrolled in a small southern community college were randomly assigned into treatment groups for each of nine units of instruction. The treatment variable was participation in verbalized social learning activities. Treatment differences based on a pretest/posttest design were analyzed using various statistical methods and recorded student discussions were analyzed for characteristics of talk based on a model developed by Mercer. Findings support the use of social learning activities as a way to improve content knowledge. Students in the treatment group had higher posttest and gain scores than those in the control group, with statistical significance reached in some cases. Types of talk were examined to support the constructivist method of learning. Findings support the use of non-confrontational talk as the vector of meaning making within the classroom.

  9. The nuclear weapons inheritance project: student-to-student dialogues and interactive peer education in disarmament activism.

    PubMed

    Buhmann, Caecilie Böck

    2007-01-01

    The Nuclear Weapons Inheritance Project is a student run and student initiated project founded in 2001 with the purpose of increasing awareness of health effects of nuclear policies and empowering university students to take action in a local and international context. The project uses dialogues to discuss nuclear disarmament with university students and a method of interactive peer education to train new trainers. The project has met more than 1500 students in nuclear weapon states in dialogue and trained about 400 students from all over the world. This article describes the methods and results of the project and discuss how the experience of the project can be used in other projects seeking to increase awareness of a topic and to initiate action on social injustice. PMID:17542184

  10. Ragnar Rommetveit's Approach to Everyday Spoken Dialogue from Within.

    PubMed

    Kowal, Sabine; O'Connell, Daniel C

    2016-04-01

    The following article presents basic concepts and methods of Ragnar Rommetveit's (born 1924) hermeneutic-dialogical approach to everyday spoken dialogue with a focus on both shared consciousness and linguistically mediated meaning. He developed this approach originally in his engagement of mainstream linguistic and psycholinguistic research of the 1960s and 1970s. He criticized this research tradition for its individualistic orientation and its adherence to experimental methodology which did not allow the engagement of interactively established meaning and understanding in everyday spoken dialogue. As a social psychologist influenced by phenomenological philosophy, Rommetveit opted for an alternative conceptualization of such dialogue as a contextualized, partially private world, temporarily co-established by interlocutors on the basis of shared consciousness. He argued that everyday spoken dialogue should be investigated from within, i.e., from the perspectives of the interlocutors and from a psychology of the second person. Hence, he developed his approach with an emphasis on intersubjectivity, perspectivity and perspectival relativity, meaning potential of utterances, and epistemic responsibility of interlocutors. In his methods, he limited himself for the most part to casuistic analyses, i.e., logical analyses of fictitious examples to argue for the plausibility of his approach. After many years of experimental research on language, he pursued his phenomenologically oriented research on dialogue in English-language publications from the late 1980s up to 2003. During that period, he engaged psycholinguistic research on spoken dialogue carried out by Anglo-American colleagues only occasionally. Although his work remained unfinished and open to development, it provides both a challenging alternative and supplement to current Anglo-American research on spoken dialogue and some overlap therewith. PMID:26597220

  11. Resampling in hyperspectral cameras as an alternative to correcting keystone in hardware, with focus on benefits for the optical design and data quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridman, Andrei; Høye, Gudrun; Løke, Trond

    2013-06-01

    Current high-resolution hyperspectral cameras attempt to correct misregistration errors in hardware. Usually, it is required that aberrations in the optical system must be controlled with precision 0.1 pixel or smaller. This severely limits other specifications of the hyperspectral camera, such as spatial resolution and light gathering capacity, and often requires very tight tolerances. If resampling is used to correct keystone in software instead of in hardware, then these stringent requirements could be lifted. Preliminary designs show that a resampling camera should be able to resolve at least 3000-5000 pixels, while at the same time collecting up to four times more light than the majority of current high spatial resolution cameras that correct keystone in hardware (HW corrected cameras). A Virtual Camera software, specifically developed for this purpose, was used to compare the performance of resampling cameras and HW corrected cameras. For the cameras where a large keystone is corrected by resampling, different resampling methods are investigated. Different criteria are suggested for quantifying performance, and the tested cameras are compared according to these criteria. The simulations showed that the performance of a resampling camera is comparable to that of a HW corrected camera with 0.1 pixel residual keystone, and that the use of a more advanced resampling method than the commonly used linear interpolation - such as for instance high-resolution cubic splines - is highly beneficial for the data quality of the resampled image. Our findings suggest that if high-resolution sensors are available, it would be better to use resampling instead of trying to correct keystone in hardware.

  12. Verbal redundancy aids memory for filmed entertainment dialogue.

    PubMed

    Hinkin, Michael P; Harris, Richard J; Miranda, Andrew T

    2014-01-01

    Three studies investigated the effects of presentation modality and redundancy of verbal content on recognition memory for entertainment film dialogue. U.S. participants watched two brief movie clips and afterward answered multiple-choice questions about information from the dialogue. Experiment 1 compared recognition memory for spoken dialogue in the native language (English) with subtitles in English, French, or no subtitles. Experiment 2 compared memory for material in English subtitles with spoken dialogue in English, French, or no sound. Experiment 3 examined three control conditions with no spoken or captioned material in the native language. All participants watched the same video clips and answered the same questions. Performance was consistently good whenever English dialogue appeared in either the subtitles or sound, and best of all when it appeared in both, supporting the facilitation of verbal redundancy. Performance was also better when English was only in the subtitles than when it was only spoken. Unexpectedly, sound or subtitles in an unfamiliar language (French) modestly improved performance, as long as there was also a familiar channel. Results extend multimedia research on verbal redundancy for expository material to verbal information in entertainment media. PMID:24684077

  13. Public Dialogue on Science in Sweden.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyring, Annagreta

    1988-01-01

    Explains how Sweden has proceeded to popularize science. Addresses topics dealing with policy, the energy debate, booklets with large circulation, computers and society, contacts between schools and research, building up small science centers, mass media, literary quality, children's responsibility, and some of the challenges. (RT)

  14. Modernising Education: International Dialogue and Cooperation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orekhova, Elena; Polunina, Liudmila

    2013-01-01

    The paper deals with the internationalization of higher education and its consequences both for education policy and educational practice in Russia. The internationalization is considered to be not only a political and social process but also a cultural phenomenon having a considerable impact on the modernization of education. Within this context…

  15. ESL Parents and Teachers: Towards Dialogue?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gou, Yan; Mohan, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Conflict and miscommunication between English as a Second Language (ESL) parents and teachers has had a major impact on educational policy, but few empirical studies examine it as discourse. This study examines communication between ESL parents and high school ESL teachers in a "Parents' Night" (PN) event organised to increase understanding of the…

  16. Health assessment for Keystone Hydraulics/J. W. Rex Company, Lansdale, Pennsylvania, Region 3. CERCLIS No. PAD980926976. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-04

    The Keystone Hydraulics/J. W. Rex Company Site has been listed on the National Priorities List. A metal heat-treating facility operated there from the 1940s until 1950. The Allied Paint Company then conducted operations until 1979. The site has been a construction equipment storage area since 1979. Identified contaminants of concern on-site include trichloroethylene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE), 1,1-dichloroethylene (1,1-DCE), cis-1,2-dichloroethylene (DCE), and vinyl chloride in well water. Identified soil contaminants include DCE, TCE, PCE, and vinyl chloride. Off-site contamination of groundwater by TCE and vinyl chloride has been found. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via groundwater and soil.

  17. Exploring SETAC's roles in the global dialogue on sustainability--an opening debate.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Ron; Kapustka, Larry; Stahl, Cynthia; Fava, Jim; Lavoie, Emma; Robertson, Cory; Sanderson, Hans; Scott, Heidi; Seager, Tom; Vigon, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    A combination platform-debate session was held at the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) North America annual meeting in Boston (November 2011). The session was organized by members of the Advisory Group on Sustainability, newly formed and approved as a global entity by the SETAC World Council just prior to the meeting. The platform portion of the session provided a historical backdrop for the debate that was designed to explore SETAC's role in the sustainability dialogue. The debate portion presented arguments for and against the proposition that "Science is the primary contribution of SETAC to the global dialogue on sustainability." Although the debate was not designed to achieve a definitive sustainability policy for SETAC, the audience clearly rejected the proposition, indicating a desire from the SETAC membership for an expanded role in global sustainability forums. This commentary details the key elements of the session, identifies the contribution the Advisory Group will have at the World Congress in Berlin (May 2012), and invites interested persons to become active in the Advisory Group. PMID:22553080

  18. 75 FR 26938 - Notice of Vacancies on the U.S. Section of the U.S.-Iraq Business Dialogue

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-13

    ... Dialogue or Dialogue) in July 2006. This notice announces ten open membership opportunities for... currently seeking candidates for ten membership positions on the U.S. Section of the Dialogue....

  19. Persuasive Dialogue Based on a Narrative Theory: An ECA Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavazza, Marc; Smith, Cameron; Charlton, Daniel; Crook, Nigel; Boye, Johan; Pulman, Stephen; Moilanen, Karo; Pizzi, David; de La Camara, Raul Santos; Turunen, Markku

    Embodied Conversational Agents (ECA) are poised to constitute a specific category within persuasive systems, in particular through their ability to support affective dialogue. One possible approach consists in using ECA as virtual coaches or personal assistants and to make persuasion part of a dialogue game implementing specific argumentation or negotiation features. In this paper, we explore an alternative framework, which emerges from the long-term development of ECA as "Companions" supporting free conversation with the user, rather than task-oriented dialogue. Our system aims at influencing user attitudes as part of free conversation, albeit on a limited set of topics. We describe the implementation of a Companion ECA to which the user reports on his working day, and which can assess the user's emotional attitude towards daily events in the office, trying to influence such attitude using affective strategies derived from a narrative model. This discussion is illustrated through examples from a first fully-implemented prototype.

  20. Predicting user mental states in spoken dialogue systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callejas, Zoraida; Griol, David; López-Cózar, Ramón

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we propose a method for predicting the user mental state for the development of more efficient and usable spoken dialogue systems. This prediction, carried out for each user turn in the dialogue, makes it possible to adapt the system dynamically to the user needs. The mental state is built on the basis of the emotional state of the user and their intention, and is recognized by means of a module conceived as an intermediate phase between natural language understanding and the dialogue management in the architecture of the systems. We have implemented the method in the UAH system, for which the evaluation results with both simulated and real users show that taking into account the user's mental state improves system performance as well as its perceived quality.

  1. Development of critically reflective dialogues in communities of health professionals.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Esther; Endedijk, Maaike; Jaarsma, Debbie; van Beukelen, Peter; Simons, Robert-Jan

    2013-10-01

    Critically reflective dialogues (CRD) are important for knowledge sharing and creating meaning in communities. CRD includes different aspects: being open about mistakes, critical opinion sharing, asking for and giving feedback, experimentation, challenging groupthink and research utilisation. In this article we explore whether CRD aspects change over time, through a study of two dialogues each from six different communities of veterinary health professionals. Change was studied from the perspective of observations, through analysing transcripts of dialogues, and from the perspective of community members' perceptions, through an evaluative discussion with members. The results showed that some communities became more open about mistakes, a finding that is related to an increase in trust. Other observed aspects of CRD seemed to be fairly stable over time. Community members perceived research utilisation and asking for and giving feedback to have been increased. From an analysis of perceptions of the community members it emerged that limited interaction could be associated with the epistemological conceptions of community members. PMID:22976456

  2. Collaborative dialogue: Exploring 4th graders' discussions of science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmondson, Elizabeth Wilkinson

    The impact of collaborative dialogue environment on student abilities to do and understanding of scientific inquiry and the nature of science was the focus of this research study. The dialogue was facilitated by the XReport, a worldwide web based ejournaling system. This study was one involving qualitative research viewed through a constructivist lens. The study design was a case study approach. The unit of analysis for the study was the classroom in which the collaborative dialogue via the XReport occurred. Three regional elementary classrooms participated in online dialogue about their electric circuits unit. Lesson entries and subsequent dialogue provided evidence that the students developed an understanding of scientific inquiry and the nature of science. Weekly classroom visits and teacher interviews supplied supporting evidence of student understanding. The data reveal that the students are able to create reasonable explanations and then to communicate their investigations and explanations to others (NSES Ability #4 and #5). The students made connections between their actions and those of scientists (NSES Understanding #5 and #6). However, the students did not connect their experiences with the theme scientific knowledge is empirical (NOS Empirical). The students did understand that science is a public endeavor (NOS Public-Criticism) and that the same evidence should yield similar conclusions (NOS Public-Same Conclusions). The students recognized that their partner's work was replicable and, when not, to question the inconsistencies. However, they were not able to connect their ability to the nature of science (NOS Replicable-Inconsistencies). Collaborative dialogue opens doors onto the world for elementary students. Not only does it allow students to talk about science with students at other schools, but also it offers them a more real model of science. This study informs the field as to fourth graders abilities to do and understanding of scientific inquiry

  3. Creating dialogue: a workshop on "Uncertainty in Decision Making in a Changing Climate"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewen, Tracy; Addor, Nans; Johnson, Leigh; Coltekin, Arzu; Derungs, Curdin; Muccione, Veruska

    2014-05-01

    Uncertainty is present in all fields of climate research, spanning from projections of future climate change, to assessing regional impacts and vulnerabilities, to adaptation policy and decision-making. In addition to uncertainties, managers and planners in many sectors are often confronted with large amounts of information from climate change research whose complex and interdisciplinary nature make it challenging to incorporate into the decision-making process. An overarching issue in tackling this problem is the lack of institutionalized dialogue between climate researchers, decision-makers and user groups. Forums that facilitate such dialogue would allow climate researchers to actively engage with end-users and researchers in different disciplines to better characterize uncertainties and ultimately understand which ones are critically considered and incorporated into decisions made. We propose that the introduction of students to these challenges at an early stage of their education and career is a first step towards improving future dialogue between climate researchers, decision-makers and user groups. To this end, we organized a workshop at the University of Zurich, Switzerland, entitled "Uncertainty in Decision Making in a Changing Climate". It brought together 50 participants, including Bachelor, Master and PhD students and academic staff, and nine selected speakers from academia, industry, government, and philanthropy. Speakers introduced participants to topics ranging from uncertainties in climate model scenarios to managing uncertainties in development and aid agencies. The workshop consisted of experts' presentations, a panel discussion and student group work on case studies. Pedagogical goals included i) providing participants with an overview of the current research on uncertainty and on how uncertainty is dealt with by decision-makers, ii) fostering exchange between practitioners, students, and scientists from different backgrounds, iii) exposing

  4. Daisaku Ikeda and Value-Creative Dialogue: A New Current in Interculturalism and Educational Philosophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goulah, Jason

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on Daisaku Ikeda's (1928- ) philosophy and practice of intercultural dialogue--what I call "value-creative dialogue"--as a new current in interculturalism and educational philosophy and theory. I use excerpts from Ikeda's writings to consider two aspects of his approach to dialogue. First, I locate his approach…

  5. An Exploration of Reflective Dialogue between Student Teachers in Music and Their Cooperating Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stegman, Sandra Frey

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the content of reflective dialogues between student teachers in music and their cooperating teachers, as well as to understand the effects of reflective dialogue on professional development. I was guided in this analysis of 49 transcriptions of interviews and reflective dialogues between student teachers…

  6. Creating Critical Conversations: Investigating the Utility of Socratic Dialogues in Elementary Social Studies Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Lisa Brown

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the utility of Socratic dialogues in the elementary social studies methods course. Findings include preservice teachers' behaviors during dialogues, perceived strengths and challenges of using Socratic dialogues in teacher education, and the impact on student learning. Challenges and apprehensions encountered by the teacher…

  7. Computer-Mediated Epistemic Dialogue: Explanation and Argumentation as Vehicles for Understanding Scientific Notions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Vries, Erica; Lund, Kristine; Baker, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Epistemic dialogues, involving explanation and argumentation, have been recognized as potential vehicles for conceptual understanding. Although the role of dialogue in learning has received much attention, the problem of creating situations in which students engage in epistemic dialogue has only begun to be addressed. This article highlights the…

  8. Continuous Vocational Training in Europe. Documentation on the Social Dialogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heidemann, Winfried, Ed.; And Others

    This document, which is intended primarily for European trade union experts who are responsible for further training and education (FTE) and negotiations in the field of further education and training, examines the social dialogue and collective agreements on further training and education at the European, national, and sectoral levels. Presented…

  9. Dialogues as Teaching Tools in the Biochemical Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts-Kirchhoff, Elizabeth S.; Caspers, Mary Lou

    2001-01-01

    Reports on the implementation of a group project whose goal was to write a dialogue that explores one area in which advances in biochemical research give rise to ethical and societal considerations. Reports that the project was regarded highly by students. (Author/MM)

  10. Drawings and Dialogue: Word Solving in Early Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Belinda S.

    2012-01-01

    Envisioning oneself as a competent reader is an important first step to reading well. This article describes an intervention that employs drawings coupled with teacher-student dialogue, which sets the stage for strategy learning as a key to word-solving. A process for the interventionist, Title I or any teacher working with students who find…

  11. Plato the Pederast: Rhetoric and Cultural Procreation in the Dialogues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ervin, Elizabeth

    1993-01-01

    Examines Plato's Dialogues by reading them through two cultural lenses: the role of eros in classical Greece and its analogous relationship to language and rhetoric; and the educational function of eros within the ancient institution of pederasty. Shows how the cultural values of ancient Greece manifested themselves in Plato's erotic educational…

  12. Incidental Vocabulary Acquisition from Oral and Written Dialogue Journals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Cheryl; Sagers, Sherri L.; LaPorte, Carrie

    1999-01-01

    Presents a hypothesis-generating study of advanced university English-as-a-Foreign-Language learners' incidental vocabulary acquisition from oral and written dialogue journals over a semester. Teacher and student entries were analyzed and transcribed using WordCruncher (1993). Analyses compare characteristics of the input to the learners in the…

  13. "OK This Is Hard": Doing Emotions in Social Justice Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuby, Candace R.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, I explore emotions in relation to social justice dialogue and share vignettes to illustrate how emotions are embodied, situated and fissured, drawing upon narrative, critical sociocultural and rhizomatic theories. Data comes from a practitioner inquiry while teaching 5- and 6-year-olds in a summer enrichment program in a…

  14. When Are Tutorial Dialogues More Effective than Reading?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Danielle E.; VanLehn, Kurt; Graesser, Arthur C.; Jackson, G. Tanner; Jordan, Pamela; Olney, Andrew; Rosa, Andrew Carolyn P.

    2007-01-01

    It is often assumed that engaging in a one-on-one dialogue with a tutor is more effective than listening to a lecture or reading a text. Although earlier experiments have not always supported this hypothesis, this may be due in part to allowing the tutors to cover different content than the noninteractive instruction. In 7 experiments, we tested…

  15. Nanotechnology and Public Interest Dialogue: Some International Observations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Diana M.; Hodge, Graeme A.

    2007-01-01

    This article examines nanotechnology within the context of the public interest. It notes that though nanotechnology research and development investment totalled US$9.6 billion in 2005, the public presently understands neither the implications nor how it might be best governed. The article maps a range of nanotechnology dialogue activities under…

  16. Memory for Dialogue: Recalling an Anchor through Talk and Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaver, Pam

    This paper reports on a project involving student recall of the dialogue in a movie and retention of the "anchor," which in this case refers to a videotape recording of "To Kill a Mockingbird." The project looked at how students retained knowledge over a few days and what kind of activities resulted from expertise with an anchor. The goal of…

  17. Dialogue, Language and Identity: Critical Issues for Networked Management Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferreday, Debra; Hodgson, Vivien; Jones, Chris

    2006-01-01

    This paper draws on the work of Mikhail Bakhtin and Norman Fairclough to show how dialogue is central to the construction of identity in networked management learning. The paper is based on a case study of a networked management learning course in higher education and attempts to illustrate how participants negotiate issues of difference,…

  18. The Use of Spontaneous Dialogues in the Business Language Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stock, Janet C.

    Dialogues, or role-playing, are useful in second language instruction because they increase student motivation to learn the language, enhance self-esteem by showing students they can express themselves in realistic communicative activities, and inhibit students less than non-simulated situations. In one teacher's approach, students have no…

  19. Developing Difficult Dialogues: An Evaluation of Classroom Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Placier, Peggy; Kroner, Crystal; Burgoyne, Suzanne; Worthington, Roger

    2012-01-01

    The University of Missouri (MU) participated in the Ford Foundation's Difficult Dialogues Initiative (DDI) supporting faculty development projects at over 40 institutions of higher education from 2006-2010. This paper reports findings from an evaluation conducted with instructors who not only engaged in faculty development workshops but also…

  20. Automatic Coding of Dialogue Acts in Collaboration Protocols

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erkens, Gijsbert; Janssen, Jeroen

    2008-01-01

    Although protocol analysis can be an important tool for researchers to investigate the process of collaboration and communication, the use of this method of analysis can be time consuming. Hence, an automatic coding procedure for coding dialogue acts was developed. This procedure helps to determine the communicative function of messages in online…

  1. Distributed Pedagogical Leadership and Generative Dialogue in Educational Nodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jappinen, Aini-Kristiina; Sarja, Anneli

    2012-01-01

    The article presents practices of distributed pedagogical leadership and generative dialogue as a tool with which management and personnel can better operate in the increasingly turbulent world of education. Distributed pedagogical leadership includes common characteristics of a professional learning community when the educational actors…

  2. An Important Part of Me: A Dialogue about Difference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lico, Sofia; Luttrell, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    This article is an experiment in writing about and across differences; it seeks to open up dialogue between adults and young people in childhood and youth studies research. The coauthors, Sofia and Wendy, met through Wendy's longitudinal research project, which explores the roles that gender, race, and immigrant status play in how young people…

  3. Exploring How Collaborative Dialogues Facilitate Synchronous Collaborative Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeh, Hui-Chin

    2014-01-01

    Collaborative writing (CW) research has gained prevalence in recent years. However, the ways in which students interact socially to produce written texts through synchronous collaborative writing (SCW) is rarely studied. This study aims to investigate the effects of SCW on students' writing products and how collaborative dialogues facilitate…

  4. Chinese-Mandarin: Basic Dialogues for Airport Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This booklet seeks to introduce basic dialogues for utilization at airport facilities. The English version of the phraseology is provided with the Chinese Mandarin text. The phraseology includes material on: (1) departure control, (2) high altitude penetration, (3) beacon identification, (4) arrival control, (5) circling approach, (6) final…

  5. Psychological Type and Asynchronous Written Dialogue in Adult Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Lin; Cranton, Patricia; Bridglall, Beatrice

    2005-01-01

    This study explores how adults learn from asynchronous written dialogue through the lens of psychological type preferences. We asked participants to discover their dominant and auxiliary psychological preferences using the Personal Empowerment through Type inventory. Participants then completed an open-ended survey in which they described their…

  6. Dialogue of New Directions: The Spiritual Heart in Adventure Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenders, Gordon; Henderson, Bob

    1991-01-01

    Field notes written by students and guides during an eight-day university credit course in canoeing and wilderness living are presented as a dialogue to illuminate the spiritual experience of self-realization and well-being that comes to many students during the trip. (SV)

  7. From Design for Dominance to Design for Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keitges, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    The increasing complexity of the network society is the result of a particular approach to design: that of mastery, control, ease of use and interconnectedness. The author analyzes this design approach for its negative and positive aspects, which he labels as "designing for dominance" and "designing for dialogue", respectively. Both of these…

  8. Dialogue medicine: a health-liberating attitude in general practice.

    PubMed

    Hellström, O

    1998-11-01

    Dialogue medicine is presented as the prime means of understanding patients' illnesses. It is a practical attitude especially aimed to assist or inspire patients to consider, see and manage their illness-demanding efforts to unwittingly suppress or disguise such self-reproaching thoughts as are worse to bear than the feeling of being afflicted with disease. Along with diagnosing patients' perceived bodily disorders, doctors can choose to see them as persons whose ailments stand for efforts to manage their existence as communicative human beings. The core of the paper is an encounter between the author and a female patient which illuminates the usefulness of genuine dialogue in medical practice. The paper illustrates how the dialogical attitude helps patients to see and manage their difficult life-situations and how the doctor can be inspired to change and develop and improve his/her skills as a dialogue partner. Doctors' dialogical attitude in the encounter encompasses for example openness, empathy, sensitivity, courage, attentiveness and responsiveness, accompanied by concern, trust, respect, affection, appreciation and hope. The philosophical and theoretical foundations of the concept of dialogue medicine are sketched out and some practically significant traits are described. PMID:9887854

  9. Towards Individualized Dialogue Support for Ill-Defined Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weerasinghe, Amali; Mitrovic, Antonija; Martin, Brent

    2009-01-01

    One of the critical factors contributing to the effectiveness of human tutoring is the conversational aspect of the instruction. Our goal is to develop a general model for supporting dialogues with menu-based input that could be used in both well- and ill-defined instructional tasks. We have previously studied how human tutors provide additional…

  10. Listening as Embracing the Other: Martin Buber's Philosophy of Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Mordechai

    2011-01-01

    In this essay, Mordechai Gordon interprets Martin Buber's ideas on dialogue, presence, and especially his notion of embracing in an attempt to shed some light on Buber's understanding of listening. Gordon argues that in order to understand Buber's conception of listening, one needs to examine this concept in the context of his philosophy of…

  11. Dialogue and Discourse in a Nigerian English Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akindele, Femi

    Although many studies have been undertaken by literary critics and stylisticians on African English literary texts generally and Nigerian English prose fiction specifically, there has been little or no analysis of dialogue and discourse in such texts. An examination of the phenomenon of speech as manifested in conversational pieces in Nigerian…

  12. Process Memos: Facilitating Dialogues about Writing between Students and Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrott, Heather Macpherson; Cherry, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    We have created a new teaching tool--process memos--to improve student writing. Process memos are guided reflections submitted with scaffolded assignments that facilitate a written dialogue between students and instructors about the process of writing. Within these memos, students critically assess available teaching tools, discuss their writing…

  13. The Role of Meaningful Dialogue in Early Childhood Education Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deakins, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Action research was used to study the effectiveness of Learning Organisation and Adaptive Enterprise theories for promoting organisation-wide learning and creating a more effective early childhood education organisation. This article describes the leadership steps taken to achieve shared vision via meaningful dialogue between board, management and…

  14. Queer Reparations: Dialogue and the Queer Past of Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    This article reflects on historical homophobia within educational practice and administration as an effort to consider how we might promote dialogue around the queer past of schooling. Along the way, it provides some discussion of the significance of archival knowledge in helping us to develop an understanding of the past while also providing…

  15. Mapping Place and Identity in Academic Development: A Humanistic Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Trevor; Dea, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a humanistic dialogue between the authors that focuses on mapping place and identity in academic development. The authors chose this format in order to capture some of the important work that conversation among intellectual peers can do--work that forms the basis of much learning at conferences and in the corridors and…

  16. Understanding Poverty through Race Dialogues in Teacher Preparation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Larry C.; Moss, Glenda; Zijdemans Boudreau, Anita S.

    2015-01-01

    This study used critical dialogue within a teacher preparation program to address the dilemma of preparing preservice teachers for educational arenas in which they will interface with students who are socially and economically disadvantaged. Using Critical Race Theory as a lens, the study addressed the following research questions: What were the…

  17. Creation of the "Sphere of the Between" in Educational Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lederman-Daniely, Dvora

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the current perception of dialogical teaching models as a notion that is concerned primarily with the cognitive layers of the dialogue, and focuses on the cognitive functions of learning, information processing, interpretation and decision-making. This perception, according to different researchers, ignores the relational…

  18. Tell Them I Sing: A Dialogue on Integrating Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Nan; Fisher, Douglas

    2000-01-01

    Provides a fictional dialogue between a music educator and classroom teacher on: (1) a misunderstanding of one another's motives; (2) their unique points of view; and (3) their ideas for collaboration on an integrated unit on westward expansion based on "Sarah, Plain and Tall" by Patricia MacLachlan. (CMK)

  19. A Dialogue and Social Software Perspective on Deep Learning Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravenscroft, Andrew; Boyle, Tom

    2010-01-01

    This article considers projects in Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) that have focussed on designing digital tools that stimulate and support dialogue rich learning. These have emphasised collaborative thinking and meaning making in a rich and varied range of educational contexts. Technically, they have exploited AI, CSCL and HCI techniques, and…

  20. Intangible Culture, Cooperation and Intercultural Dialogue among University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goncalves, Susana

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on intercultural competence and dialogue across cultural borders between university students from different Portuguese-speaking countries. Various principles and strategies for intercultural education are summarised, and the project "cultures@esec", based on such principles and strategies, is described. The project was focused…

  1. Dialogue-Based Call: A Case Study on Teaching Pronouns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vlugter, P.; Knott, A.; McDonald, J.; Hall, C.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a computer assisted language learning (CALL) system that uses human-machine dialogue as its medium of interaction. The system was developed to help students learn the basics of the Maori language and was designed to accompany the introductory course in Maori running at the University of Otago. The student engages in a task-based…

  2. Social Class Dialogues and the Fostering of Class Consciousness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madden, Meredith

    2015-01-01

    How do critical pedagogies promote undergraduate students' awareness of social class, social class identity, and social class inequalities in education? How do undergraduate students experience class consciousness-raising in the intergroup dialogue classroom? This qualitative study explores undergraduate students' class consciousness-raising in an…

  3. The Rise of Antiscience in Our National Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otto, Shawn Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    Considering the close link between family attitudes about science and student performance, it is especially troubling that it has become increasingly acceptable in public dialogue, particularly in the "professional/executive" class, to be antiscience. This change is noticeable by watching the changing public expressions of U.S. politicians, who…

  4. Keeping Public Officials Accountable through Dialogue: Resolving the Accountability Paradox.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Nancy C.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses Harmon's Accountability Paradox in relation to the accountability of public officials. Promotes the use of dialogue because its advantage outweighs its cost as a mechanism of accountability when officials confront problems that defy definition and solution and when traditional solution methods have failed. (Contains 54 references.) (JOW)

  5. Lived Experience of Interracial Dialogue on Race: Proclivity to Participate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willow, Rebecca A.

    2008-01-01

    The author conducted a qualitative inquiry of individuals' proclivity to participate in interracial dialogues. Lived experience of 20 participants in a race study circle yielded the overarching themes of education, self-reflection, advanced empathy, moral consciousness, universality, racial identity development, and social interest. Implications…

  6. Teacher Dialogue and Its Relationship to Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Heather Norton

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have been conducted to analyze the different methods and structures of teacher conversations. Researchers realize how complex the study of teacher dialogue may be and have concentrated their efforts to study discourse within the context of teaching teams. Some of the literature has focused on what topics and factors of dialogue…

  7. Professional Judgement in Ethical Decision-Making: Dialogue and Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehr, Ron; Sumarah, John

    2004-01-01

    This article examines the role of professional judgement in the ethical decision-making process. Drawing on the personalist philosophy of John MacMurray, and the CCA Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice, the authors propose that a social constructivist approach involving dialogue and relationship complement the current internal psychologically…

  8. Adding without Contradiction: The Challenge of Opening up Interracial Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cargile, Aaron Castelan

    2010-01-01

    This essay begins with the question, "What can educators do to minimize the risks inherent to interracial dialogue?" Though no such meaningful conversation ever will be without risk, this article offers two specific strategies that have helped foster open classroom climates: adding without contradiction and granting freedom for conclusions. Both…

  9. Self-Assessment and Dialogue as Tools for Appreciating Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neal, Gwenelle S.

    2012-01-01

    As social work educators continue to examine methods and techniques to provide meaningful knowledge about racism and discrimination, the role of self-assessment and dialogue should also be explored. This teaching note presents a tool for students and educators to use in considering literature discrimination and increasing awareness of…

  10. Storytelling as Dialogue: How Teachers Construct Professional Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savvidou, Christine

    2010-01-01

    This study shows how a group of English language lecturers use storytelling as a form of professional dialogue. The aim of the study is to highlight the dialogic role of storytelling in supporting the construction of lecturers' professional knowledge and not to identify lecturers' professional knowledge. In a professional development project, 12…

  11. Gender-Based Analysis On-Line Dialogue. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    An online dialogue on gender-based analysis (GBA) was held from February 15 to March 7, 2001. Invitations and a background paper titled "Why Gender-Based Analysis?" were sent to 350 women's organizations and individuals throughout Canada. Efforts were made to ensure that aboriginal and Metis women, visible minority women, and women with special…

  12. Radical versus Social Constructivism: Dilemma, Dialogue, and Defense

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belbase, Shashidhar

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to discuss epistemological and philosophical foundation of meaningful learning and teaching mathematics and science from the perspective of radical and social constructivism. I have reflected on my experiences of radical and social constructivism through dilemma, dialogue, and defense of my personal epistemology of learning. I went…

  13. Destructive Dialogue: Negative Self-Talk and Effective Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Richard L., II; Cotrell, Howard W.

    Destructive dialogue, originating from frustration and disappointment, is an intrapersonal process that always involves a person in a relationship to others and that can be defined as inner talk cast in a negative tone. It is so powerful, influential, and pervasive that it can affect all aspects of a person's life and become a self-fulfilling…

  14. Participatory and Dialogue Democracy in U.S. Mathematics Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukhopadhyay, Shiuli

    2009-01-01

    Teaching math to reflect values of democracy has to begin with some consideration of how democracy is conceptualized. A review of various theories of democracy conducted by Hagen (1992) provides everyone with a good starting point as it identifies three primary forms of democracy: competitive, participatory, and dialogue. In this essay, the author…

  15. This Passionate Study: A Dialogue with Florence Nightingale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maindonald, John; Richardson, Alice M.

    2004-01-01

    On her death in 1910, Florence Nightingale left a vast collection of reports, letters, notes and other written material. There are numerous publications that make use of this material, often highlighting Florence's attitude to a particular issue. In this paper we gather a set of quotations and construct a dialogue with Florence Nightingale on the…

  16. Dialogue procedures for the management of odour related community conflicts.

    PubMed

    Sucker, K

    2009-01-01

    In the German Guideline on Odour in Ambient Air (GOAA) statements about the degree of residential odour annoyance are based on the frequency of recognisable odours and hedonic tone. The use of olfactory standards to adequately estimate the annoyance impact is limited if, for example, worry about adverse health outcomes significantly influences the annoyance response of the population. This report introduces dialogue procedures as complementary measures to consider the complainants' subjective perceptions and worries adequately. At first, it is illustrated that odour exposure and number of odour complaints are not necessarily correlated. Then the "interest analysis" and the five steps of a dialogue procedure are presented. A dialogue procedure can be initiated in "quiet times" - where the focus is on trust building and on the development of adequate communication strategies to promote realistic risk reception - as well as in order to establish a successful conflict resolution process if the issue is complex and emotionally discussed. After that, two examples of handling odour complaints are shown. Finally, considerations applying dialogue procedures as a tool to advance odour annoyance mitigation are outlined. PMID:19273885

  17. The WCCES and Intercultural Dialogue: Historical Perspectives and Continuing Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The World Council of Comparative Education Societies (WCCES) has been strongly concerned with intercultural dialogue since the Council was created in 1970. Indeed advancement of education "for international understanding in the interests of peace, intercultural cooperation, mutual respect among peoples and observance of human rights" is one of the…

  18. The Silenced Dialogue and Pre-Service Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curry, Kristal

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author reflects on the 1988 article "The Silenced Dialogue," by Lisa Delpit, which described the lack of communication dividing Black and White educators when it comes to the issue of race, specifically due to the disparity between reliance on theory (White) and reliance on cultural understanding (Black). Nearly a…

  19. Turn Taking: A Dialogue on Past, Present, and Future Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooney, Margaret; Bittner, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Most of the games children play require learning and practicing the concept of give and take, or turn taking, a crucial element in play/life. This article shares a dialogue between Margaret (Peggy) Cooney, a professor in the Department of Elementary & Early Childhood Education in the College of Education at University of Wyoming, and Mark Bittner,…

  20. Developments in Religious Studies: Towards a Dialogue with Religious Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cush, Denise; Robinson, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    The early days of non-confessional, multi-faith religious education in Britain benefitted from close collaboration between academics in universities, teacher educators and teachers. This article attempts to initiate a revival of such a dialogue, by summarizing some developments in religious studies at university level and suggesting possible…

  1. Development of Critically Reflective Dialogues in Communities of Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Groot, Esther; Endedijk, Maaike; Jaarsma, Debbie; van Beukelen, Peter; Simons, Robert-Jan

    2013-01-01

    Critically reflective dialogues (CRD) are important for knowledge sharing and creating meaning in communities. CRD includes different aspects: being open about mistakes, critical opinion sharing, asking for and giving feedback, experimentation, challenging groupthink and research utilisation. In this article we explore whether CRD aspects change…

  2. The Dialogue of Disciplines: An Arts Approach to Shakespeare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bashian, Kathleen Ryniker

    1996-01-01

    Describes using a "dialogue of disciplines", a teaching method which traces a particular theme across artistic disciplines, to present Shakespeare's play "Romeo and Juliet" in a comprehensive way. Suggests that exposing students to paintings, films, stage performances, and operas creates a multidimensional experience and encourages exploration of…

  3. What Makes Scientific Dialogue Possible in the Classroom?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doig, Brian

    This paper focuses on the scientific dialogue of a small group following an experiment on motion under gravity. This research was designed to investigate ways in which practical activities can be used to foster links between upper elementary children's spontaneous concepts and Newtonian mechanics. Implicit in this is the notion that teaching…

  4. Interculturalism, Education and Dialogue. Global Studies in Education. Volume 13

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besley, Tina, Ed.; Peters, Michael A., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Intercultural dialogue is a concept and discourse that dates back to the 1980s. It is the major means for managing diversity and strengthening democracy within Europe and beyond. It has been adopted by the United Nations, UNESCO and the Council of Europe as the basis for interreligious and interfaith initiatives and has become increasingly…

  5. 76 FR 2109 - Next Generation Risk Assessment Public Dialogue Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Next Generation Risk Assessment Public Dialogue Conference Correction In notice document 2010-32977 appearing on page 82387 in the issue of Thursday, December 30, 2010, make the following...

  6. From Dialogue to Action: Consciousness-Raising with Academic Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seher, Christin L.; Iverson, Susan V.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the authors argue that facilitated dialogues with academic mothers can provide space for consciousness-raising, validation, co-mentoring, and taking action. Stemming from the authors' experiences of negotiating motherhood in the academy, and their facilitation of a book discussion about academic motherhood through a faculty…

  7. Claiming Our Own Space: Polyphony in Teacher-Student Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skidmore, David; Murakami, Kyoko

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we reappraise the model of Discourse Analysis developed by Sinclair and Coulthard (1975) to analyse classroom talk. We analyse an extract of teacher-student dialogue using this model, then re-analyse the same extract drawing on conventions and concepts developed within the framework of Conversation Analysis. We argue that this…

  8. The age of the Keystone thrust: laser-fusion 40Ar/39Ar dating of foreland basin deposits, southern Spring Mountains, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleck, R.J.; Carr, M.D.

    1990-01-01

    Nonmarine sedimentary and volcaniclastic foreland-basin deposits in the Spring Mountains are cut by the Contact and Keystone thrusts. These synorogenic deposits, informally designated the Lavinia Wash sequence by Carr (1980), previously were assigned a Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous(?) age. New 40Ar.39Ar laser-fusion and incremental-heating studies of a tuff bed in the Lavinia Wash sequence support a best estimate age of 99.0 ?? 0.4 Ma, indicating that the Lavinia Wash sequence is actually late Early Cretaceous in age and establishing a maximum age for final emplacement of the Contact and Keystone thrust plates consistent with the remainder of the Mesozoic foreland thrust belt. -from Authors

  9. Professional Dialogue, Reflective Practice and Teacher Research: Engaging Early Childhood Pre-Service Teachers in Collegial Dialogue about Curriculum Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simoncini, Kym M.; Lasen, Michelle; Rocco, Sharn

    2014-01-01

    While embedded in teacher professional standards and assumed aspects of teacher professionalism, willingness and ability to engage in professional dialogue about practice and curriculum initiatives are rarely examined or explicitly taught in teacher education programs. With this in mind, the authors designed an assessment task for pre-service…

  10. Moving the science data quality dialogue forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Erin; Meyer, Carol B.; Lenhardt, W. Christopher

    2012-05-01

    Federation of Earth Science Information Partners Summer 2011 Meeting; Santa Fe, New Mexico, 12-15 July 2011 Scientific data quality is important to scientists, archivists, decision makers, and the public. Uncertain quality costs valuable research dollars and has impacts beyond the initial science. The Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP) is a consortium of Earth science data and technology professionals spanning the government (NASA, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), National Science Foundation), academia, and private sectors (both commercial and nonprofit). The organization is dedicated to transforming research data and information into useful and usable data and information products for decision makers, policy makers, and the public.

  11. Geology and Fluorspar Deposits of the Levias-Keystone and Dike-Eaton Areas, Crittenden County, Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trace, Robert Denny

    1962-01-01

    The fault systems of the Levias-Keystone and Dike-Eaton areas, in the Kentucky-Illinois fiuorspar district, are a complex northeastward-trending sys- tem and a simple northwestward-trending system of steeply dipping normal faults, associated in part with a lamprophyre dike. Fluorspar mining started in the area about 1900 and, as of 1945, more than 200,000 tons of crude ore probably has been mined; most of the ore was from the Levias-Keystone area. A small quantity of zinc and lead ore also is present in the Dike-Eaton area. The deposits are localized along faults that displace fiat-lying or low-dipping limestones, sandstones, and shales of the Meramec and Chester series of Missis- sippian age. Movement along most of the faults was principally vertical, with displacement as much as 600 feet. Some horizontal movement occurred along at least one fault. Geologic mapping of the surface and data from underground workings have revealed 13 faults in an area of four-fifths of a square mile. Only a few of these faults are known to contain economically important deposits of fiuorspar. The most abundant vein minerals are calcite and fiuorite with subordinate quantities of sphalerite, galena, barite, and quartz. Some weathering products of sphalerite and galena are present also. The veins are dominantly calcite that contains fiuorite lenses but in places are mainly fiuorite having lesser quantities of calcite. Sphalerite- and galena-bearing deposits are present in the Dike-Eaton area. The ore bodies mainly are the result of fissure filling and replacement of calcite by fiuorite; in addition a small amount of limestone wallrock probably has been replaced. Residual concentrations of high-grade fluorspar in the overburden above faults have yielded some so-called gravel fiuorspar. The position of the veins within the faults may be related to one or more factors such as type of wallrock, change in dip of the fault, and amount of displacement.

  12. Identification of potential water-bearing zones by the use of borehole geophysics in the vicinity of Keystone Sanitation Superfund Site, Adams County, Pennsylvania and Carroll County, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conger, Randall W.

    1997-01-01

    Between April 23, 1996, and June 21, 1996, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency contracted Haliburton-NUS, Inc., to drill four clusters of three monitoring wells near the Keystone Sanitation Superfund Site. The purpose of the wells is to allow monitoring and sampling of shallow, intermediate, and deep waterbearing zones for the purpose of determining the horizontal and vertical distribution of any contaminated ground water migrating from the Keystone Site. Twelve monitoring wells, ranging in depth from 50 to 397.9 feet below land surface, were drilled in the vicinity of the Keystone Site. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted borehole-geophysical logging and determined, with geophysical logs and other available data, the ideal intervals to be screened in each well. Geophysical logs were run on four intermediate and four deep wells, and a caliper log only was run on shallow well CL-AD-173 (HN-1S). Interpretation of geophysical logs and existing data determined the placement of screens within each borehole.

  13. Resampling in hyperspectral cameras as an alternative to correcting keystone in hardware, with focus on benefits for optical design and data quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridman, Andrei; Høye, Gudrun; Løke, Trond

    2014-05-01

    Current high-resolution hyperspectral cameras attempt to correct misregistration errors in hardware. This severely limits other specifications of the hyperspectral camera, such as spatial resolution and light gathering capacity. If resampling is used to correct keystone in software instead of in hardware, then these stringent requirements could be lifted. Preliminary designs show that a resampling camera should be able to resolve at least 3000-5000 pixels, while at the same time collecting up to four times more light than the majority of current high spatial resolution cameras. A virtual camera software, specifically developed for this purpose, was used to compare the performance of resampling and hardware corrected cameras. Different criteria are suggested for quantifying the camera performance. The simulations showed that the performance of a resampling camera is comparable to that of a hardware corrected camera with 0.1 pixel residual keystone, and that the use of a more advanced resampling method than the commonly used linear interpolation, such as high-resolution cubic splines, is highly beneficial for the data quality of the resampled image. Our findings suggest that if high-resolution sensors are available, it would be better to use resampling instead of trying to correct keystone in hardware.

  14. 78 FR 77426 - Notice of Vacancies on the U.S. Section of the U.S.-Iraq Business Dialogue

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-23

    ... International Trade Administration Notice of Vacancies on the U.S. Section of the U.S.-Iraq Business Dialogue... Notice. SUMMARY: The U.S. Secretary of Commerce and the Iraq Minister of Trade in July 2006 established the U.S.-Iraq Business Dialogue (Business Dialogue or Dialogue) as a bilateral forum to...

  15. The Public Policy Pedagogy of Corporate and Alternative News Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Deirdre M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper argues for seeing in-depth news coverage of political, social, and economic issues as "public policy pedagogy." To develop my argument, I draw on Nancy Fraser's democratic theory, which attends to social differences and does not assume that unity is a starting point or an end goal of public dialogue. Alongside the formation of…

  16. South Dakota School of Mines, Keystone, South Dakota solar-energy-system performanceevaluation, June 1980-April 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Eck, T.F.

    1981-01-01

    The South Dakota School of Mines site is the Mount Rushmore National Memorial Visitor's Center in Keystone, South Dakota. The active solar energy system is a retrofit designed to supply 45% of the heating load and 53% of the observation room cooling load. The system is equipped with 2000 square feet of flat-plate collector panels double-glazed with a black chrome absorber surface; 3000 gallons of water in an insulated tank for sensible heat storage; a two-stage fuel oil furnace for auxiliary heating; and direct expansion electric air conditioning units for auxiliary cooling. The actual heating and cooling provided are 42% and 12% respectively. The solar fraction, solar savings ratio, conventional fueld savings, electrical energy expense, system performance factor, and solar system coefficient of performance are among the performance data listed. A control problem is reported that kept the collector pump running 24 hours a day for 18 days. Performance data are given for each subsystem as well as for the overall system. Typical system operation and the system operating sequence for a day are given. The system's use of solar energy and the percentage of losses are given. Also included are a system description, performance evaluation techniques and equations, long-term weather data, chemical analysis of the antifreeze solutions, sensor technology, and typical weather and performance data for a month. (LEW)

  17. Dancing with the Stars: How Choreographed Bacterial Interactions Dictate Nososymbiocity and Give Rise to Keystone Pathogens, Accessory Pathogens, and Pathobionts.

    PubMed

    Hajishengallis, George; Lamont, Richard J

    2016-06-01

    Many diseases that originate on mucosal membranes ensue from the action of polymicrobial communities of indigenous organisms working in concert to disrupt homeostatic mechanisms. Multilevel physical and chemical communication systems among constituent organisms underlie polymicrobial synergy and dictate the community's pathogenic potential or nososymbiocity, that is, disease arising from living together with a susceptible host. Functional specialization of community participants, often originating from metabolic codependence, has given rise to several newly appreciated designations within the commensal-to-pathogen spectrum. Accessory pathogens, while inherently commensal in a particular microenvironment, nonetheless enhance the colonization or metabolic activity of pathogens. Keystone pathogens (bacterial drivers or alpha-bugs) exert their influence at low abundance by modulating both the composition and levels of community participants and by manipulating host responses. Pathobionts (or bacterial passengers) exploit disrupted host homeostasis to flourish and promote inflammatory disease. In this review we discuss how commensal or pathogenic properties of organisms are not intrinsic features, and have to be considered within the context of both the microbial community in which they reside and the host immune status. PMID:26968354

  18. Microsatellite primers in Agave utahensis (Asparagaceae), a keystone species in the Mojave Desert and Colorado Plateau1

    PubMed Central

    Byers, Charlee; Maughan, Peter J.; Clouse, Jared; Stewart, J. Ryan

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Utah agave (Agave utahensis) and its putative subspecies, A. utahensis subsp. kaibabensis and A. utahensis subsp. utahensis, are keystone species of the Mojave Desert and Colorado Plateau in the southwestern United States. Here we developed microsatellite markers to study population structure and genetic diversity of the two subspecies of A. utahensis. • Methods and Results: We analyzed 22,386 454-pyrosequencing large contigs (>400 bp), derived from a genome reduction experiment consisting of A. utahensis accessions, for putative microsatellites. The use of unique multiplex barcodes for each of the Agave accessions allowed for the identification of putatively polymorphic microsatellites based solely on sequence alignment analysis. We report the characteristics of 11 polymorphic microsatellite loci based on a panel of 104 individuals from the two subspecies. The number of alleles per locus varied from three to eight, with an average of 5.5 alleles per locus. Observed and expected heterozygosity values ranged from 0.038 to 0.777 and 0.038 to 0.707, respectively. • Conclusions: The microsatellites identified here will be invaluable for future studies of population structure, polyploidy, and genetic diversity across the species. PMID:25225631

  19. Influence of the Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program in ICUs: Evidence From the Keystone ICU Project.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yea-Jen; Marsteller, Jill A

    2016-07-01

    Using data from the Keystone ICU project, this study examined whether the intensive care units (ICUs) that implemented the Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program (CUSP) would have greater improvement in safety climate, team progress barriers, and central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) than ICUs not implementing CUSP. The study population consisted of 103 ICUs; 60 ICUs (58%) used CUSP, with 6 of them later discontinuing CUSP, and 17 ICUs (16.5%) never used CUSP. The researchers could not determine CUSP use status for the remaining 26 ICUs because of missing data. The use of CUSP was associated with improved safety climate, job satisfaction, and working conditions after a 2-year period, as measured by the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire. Study results on barriers and CLABSIs are inconclusive. This study demonstrated that unit-based, formalized processes targeting cultural improvements in teamwork, communication, self-identification of hazards, and hazard mitigation can improve several aspects of patient safety climate in ICUs. PMID:25732375

  20. Paisang ( Quercus griffithii): A Keystone Tree Species in Sustainable Agroecosystem Management and Livelihoods in Arunachal Pradesh, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ranjay K.; Singh, Anshuman; Garnett, Stephen T.; Zander, Kerstin K.; Lobsang; Tsering, Darge

    2015-01-01

    In a study of the traditional livelihoods of 12 Monpa and Brokpa villages in Arunachal Pradesh, India using social-ecological and participatory rural appraisal techniques, we found that the forest tree species paisang ( Quercus griffithii, a species of oak) is vital to agroecosystem sustainability. Paisang trees are conserved both by individuals and through community governance, because their leaves play a crucial role in sustaining 11 traditional cropping systems of the Monpa peoples. An Indigenous institution, Chhopa, regulates access to paisang leaves, ensuring that the relationship between paisang and traditional field crop species within Monpa agroecosystems is sustainable. The Monpa farmers also exchange leaves and agricultural products for yak-based foods produced by the transhumant Brokpa, who are primarily yak herders. Yak herds also graze in paisang groves during winter. These practices have enabled the conservation of about 33 landraces, yak breeds, and a number of wild plants. Paisang thus emerged as a culturally important keystone species in the cultures and livelihoods of both Monpa and Brokpa. Ecological and conservation knowledge and ethics about paisang vary with gender, social systems, and altitudes. Labor shortages, however, have already caused some changes to the ways in which paisang leaves are used and yak grazing patterns are also changing in the face of changes in attitude among local landowners. Given new competing interests, incentives schemes are now needed to conserve the ecologically sustainable traditional livelihoods.

  1. Paisang (Quercus griffithii): a keystone tree species in sustainable agroecosystem management and livelihoods in Arunachal Pradesh, India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ranjay K; Singh, Anshuman; Garnett, Stephen T; Zander, Kerstin K; Lobsang; Tsering, Darge

    2015-01-01

    In a study of the traditional livelihoods of 12 Monpa and Brokpa villages in Arunachal Pradesh, India using social-ecological and participatory rural appraisal techniques, we found that the forest tree species paisang (Quercus griffithii, a species of oak) is vital to agroecosystem sustainability. Paisang trees are conserved both by individuals and through community governance, because their leaves play a crucial role in sustaining 11 traditional cropping systems of the Monpa peoples. An Indigenous institution, Chhopa, regulates access to paisang leaves, ensuring that the relationship between paisang and traditional field crop species within Monpa agroecosystems is sustainable. The Monpa farmers also exchange leaves and agricultural products for yak-based foods produced by the transhumant Brokpa, who are primarily yak herders. Yak herds also graze in paisang groves during winter. These practices have enabled the conservation of about 33 landraces, yak breeds, and a number of wild plants. Paisang thus emerged as a culturally important keystone species in the cultures and livelihoods of both Monpa and Brokpa. Ecological and conservation knowledge and ethics about paisang vary with gender, social systems, and altitudes. Labor shortages, however, have already caused some changes to the ways in which paisang leaves are used and yak grazing patterns are also changing in the face of changes in attitude among local landowners. Given new competing interests, incentives schemes are now needed to conserve the ecologically sustainable traditional livelihoods. PMID:25343981

  2. Alternatives to project-specific consent for access to personal information for health research: Insights from a public dialogue

    PubMed Central

    Willison, Donald J; Swinton, Marilyn; Schwartz, Lisa; Abelson, Julia; Charles, Cathy; Northrup, David; Cheng, Ji; Thabane, Lehana

    2008-01-01

    Background The role of consent for research use of health information is contentious. Most discussion has focused on when project-specific consent may be waived but, recently, a broader range of consent options has been entertained, including broad opt-in for multiple studies with restrictions and notification with opt-out. We sought to elicit public values in this matter and to work toward an agreement about a common approach to consent for use of personal information for health research through deliberative public dialogues. Methods We conducted seven day-long public dialogues, involving 98 participants across Canada. Immediately before and after each dialogue, participants completed a fixed-response questionnaire rating individuals' support for 3 approaches to consent in the abstract and their consent choices for 5 health research scenarios using personal information. They also rated how confident different safeguards made them feel that their information was being used responsibly. Results Broad opt-in consent for use of personal information garnered the greatest support in the abstract. When presented with specific research scenarios, no one approach to consent predominated. When profit was introduced into the scenarios, consent choices shifted toward greater control over use. Despite lively and constructive dialogues, and considerable shifting in opinion at the individual level, at the end of the day, there was no substantive aggregate movement in opinion. Personal controls were among the most commonly cited approaches to improving people's confidence in the responsible use of their information for research. Conclusion Because no one approach to consent satisfied even a simple majority of dialogue participants and the importance placed on personal controls, a mechanism should be developed for documenting consent choice for different types of research, including ways for individuals to check who has accessed their medical record for purposes other than

  3. 78 FR 41958 - Proposed Collection, Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-12

    ... the Secretary of Labor for implementing Section 24(a) of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of..., the National Academy of Sciences study, Counting Injuries and Illnesses in the Workplace, and another report, Keystone National Policy Dialogue on Work-Related Illness and Injury Recordkeeping,...

  4. Quantum Dialogue Based on Hypertanglement Against Collective Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui-jin; Li, Dong-fen; Zhang, Feng-li; Qin, Zhiguang; Baaguere, Edward; Zhan, Huayi

    2016-03-01

    The major problem faced by photons propagating through a physical channel is that of collective noise. This collective noise has the ability to reduce the number of quantum bits that are transmitted, thereby reduces the message fidelity. The traditional method of noise immunity is the use of entanglement purification, which consumes a lot of quantum resources in accomplishing the joint probability of noise immunity but does not guarantee accurate quantum dialog. In this paper, we investigate a new approach to quantum dialogue in which quantum information can be faithfully transmitted via a noisy channel. we constructs corresponding Decoherence Free Subspace(DFS), the quantum state after the change is in the maximally entangled state, so as to realize the fidelity of quantum dialogue model that can ensure the accuracy and noise resistance, and secret information exchange.

  5. Quantum Dialogue Based on Hypertanglement Against Collective Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui-jin; Li, Dong-fen; Zhang, Feng-li; Qin, Zhiguang; Baaguere, Edward; Zhan, Huayi

    2016-08-01

    The major problem faced by photons propagating through a physical channel is that of collective noise. This collective noise has the ability to reduce the number of quantum bits that are transmitted, thereby reduces the message fidelity. The traditional method of noise immunity is the use of entanglement purification, which consumes a lot of quantum resources in accomplishing the joint probability of noise immunity but does not guarantee accurate quantum dialog. In this paper, we investigate a new approach to quantum dialogue in which quantum information can be faithfully transmitted via a noisy channel. we constructs corresponding Decoherence Free Subspace(DFS), the quantum state after the change is in the maximally entangled state, so as to realize the fidelity of quantum dialogue model that can ensure the accuracy and noise resistance, and secret information exchange.

  6. "Sound Off": Regional Rural Youth Dialogue on Employment, Education and Communication. Rural Dialogue Summary Report (Vernon, British Columbia, Canada, January 14, 2006)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Rural Partnership, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This report is a summary of discussions that took place at the "Sound Off" Regional Rural Youth Dialogue on Employment, Education and Communication, held in Vernon, British Columbia, on January 14, 2006. This event was part of the Rural Dialogue, an ongoing, two-way discussion between the Government of Canada and Canadians from rural, remote and …

  7. Learning and Community Transition in the Lakes District Rural Dialogue. Rural Dialogue Summary Report (Burns Lake, British Columbia, Canada, March 29, 2006)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Rural Partnership, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This report is a summary of discussions that took place at the Learning and Community Transition, Lakes District Rural Dialogue, held in Burns Lake, British Columbia, on March 29, 2006. This dialogue emerged further to a meeting of northern federal representatives which was organized to better coordinate federal support for northern B.C.…

  8. Indian Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Policy Database (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Bushe, S.

    2013-09-01

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the Indian Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Policy Database (IREEED) developed in collaboration by the United States Department of Energy and India's Ministry of New and Renewable Energy. IREEED provides succinct summaries of India's central and state government policies and incentives related to renewable energy and energy efficiency. The online, public database was developed under the U.S.- India Energy Dialogue and the Clean Energy Solution Center.

  9. Creating a public space and dialogue on sexuality and rights: a case study from Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This article describes and analyses a research based engagement by a university school of public health in Bangladesh aimed at raising public debate on sexuality and rights and making issues such as discrimination more visible to policy makers and other key stakeholders in a challenging context. The impetus for this work came from participation in an international research programme with a particular interest in bridging international and local understandings of sexual and reproductive rights. The research team worked to create a platform to broaden discussions on sexuality and rights by building on a number of research activities on rural and urban men’s and women’s sexual health concerns, and on changing concepts of sexuality and understandings of sexual rights among specific population groups in Dhaka city, including sexual minorities. Linked to this on-going process of improving the evidence base, there has been a series of learning and capacity building activities over the last four years consisting of training workshops, meetings, conferences and dialogues. These brought together different configurations of stakeholders – members of sexual minorities, academics, service providers, advocacy organisations, media and policy makers. This process contributed to developing more effective advocacy strategies through challenging representations of sexuality and rights in the public domain. Gradually, these efforts brought visibility to hidden or stigmatised sexuality and rights issues through interim outcomes that have created important steps towards changing attitudes and policies. These included creating safe spaces for sexual minorities to meet and strategise, development of learning materials for university students and engagement with legal rights groups on sexual rights. Through this process, it was found to be possible to create a public space and dialogue on sexuality and rights in a conservative and challenging environment like Bangladesh by bringing

  10. Changes Resulting from Reflection Dialogues on Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Reiko; Fukada, Mika

    2014-01-01

    Background Reflection is defined here as a process by which, through self-conversation, one’s self and one’s behavior acquire meaning. However, people have limitations in terms of what they can express and be aware of during reflection. This finding points to the importance of facilitators. The purpose of this study was to determine what changes can be brought about through reflection dialogues on nursing practice. Methods The Participants were 9 nurses who worked at three institutions in City A, each with about 200 beds. Workplace topics were examined through self-reflections and reflection dialogues. The depth of reflection was assessed using the three levels of reflection described by Mezirow—{reflecting on the content}, {reflecting on the process} and {reflecting on the assumptions}. Results In reflecting on nursing practice, the participants were also divided into those who had already reached the highest level, {reflecting on assumptions}, via self-reflection, and those who remained at the level of {reflecting on processes}, despite the use of reflection dialogues. Conclusion The development of reflective thinking on nursing practice was connected not only to the participants’ desire to explore ways of accepting their individual experiences, but may also be connected to whether or not they are able to question themselves about their thoughts and preconceptions about nursing work. PMID:25067874

  11. Analyzing learning during Peer Instruction dialogues: A resource activation framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Anna K.; Galloway, Ross K.; Hardy, Judy; Sinclair, Christine M.

    2014-12-01

    Peer Instruction (PI) is an evidence based pedagogy commonly used in undergraduate physics instruction. When asked questions designed to test conceptual understanding, it has been observed that the proportion of students choosing the correct answer increases following peer discussion; however, relatively little is known about what takes place during these discussions or how they are beneficial to the processes of learning physics [M. C. James and S. Willoughby, Am. J. Phys. 79, 123 (2011)]. In this paper a framework for analyzing PI discussions developed through the lens of the "resources model" [D. Hammer, Am. J. Phys. 64, 1316 (1996); D. Hammer et al., Information Age Publishing (2005)] is proposed. A central hypothesis for this framework is that the dialogue with peers plays a crucial role in activating appropriate cognitive resources, enabling the students to see the problem differently, and therefore to answer the questions correctly. This framework is used to gain greater insights into the PI discussions of first year undergraduate physics students at the University of Edinburgh, UK, which were recorded using Livescribe Smartpens. Analysis of the dialogues revealed three different types of resource activation corresponding to increasing cognitive grain size. These were activation of knowledge elements, activation of linkages between knowledge elements, and activation of control structures (epistemic games and epistemological frames). Three case studies are examined to illustrate the role that peer dialogue plays in the activation of these cognitive resources in a PI session. The implications for pedagogical practice are discussed.

  12. Extending the Dialogue about Science and Humanities in Counseling: A Reply to Hansen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Clayton V.; Guterman, Jeffrey T.; Kopp, David M.

    2012-01-01

    This is a reply to Hansen's (2012b) rejoinder to the authors (Guterman, Martin, & Kopp, 2012), which is a response to Hansen's (2012a) keystone article about the relationship between humanities and science in counseling. In this reply, the authors provide remaining clarifications, points of disagreement, and suggestions for future directions in…

  13. Éducation, Dialogue Interculturel et Société de L'information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachariev, Zacharie

    2006-09-01

    EDUCATION, INTERCULTURAL DIALOGUE AND THE INFORMATION SOCIETY - The present study examines the contribution of education to developing the potentials of intercultural dialogue. The author reflects on educational means for distinguishing between, on one hand, universalization and, on the other, the elimination of particularity at a time of increasing cultural exchange. He presents some thoughts on the fundamentals of ethics for intercultural dialogue at school, examining difficulties in multicultural dialogue or its eventual risks. The study also addresses the conditions for producing and spreading educational messages, their quality, and the content necessary for reinforcing dialogue, as well as the interconnections between education and technology. Finally, the author identifies possible ways to avoid transforming dialogue into an ideological instrument or accepting an exclusive economic, financial or technical logic.

  14. Role of the fish astyanax aeneus (Characidae) as a keystone nutrient recycler in low-nutrient neotropical streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Small, G.E.; Pringle, C.M.; Pyron, M.; Duff, J.H.

    2011-01-01

    Nutrient recycling by animals is a potentially important biogeochemical process in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Stoichiometric traits of individual species may result in some taxa playing disproportionately important roles in the recycling of nutrients relative to their biomass, acting as keystone nutrient recyclers. We examined factors controlling the relative contribution of 12 Neotropical fish species to nutrient recycling in four streams spanning a range of phosphorus (P) levels. In high-P conditions (135 ??g/L soluble reactive phosphorus, SRP), most species fed on P-enriched diets and P excretion rates were high across species. In low-P conditions (3 ??g/L SRP), aquatic food resources were depleted in P, and species with higher body P content showed low rates of P recycling. However, fishes that were subsidized by terrestrial inputs were decoupled from aquatic P availability and therefore excreted P at disproportionately high rates. One of these species, Astyanax aeneus (Characidae), represented 12% of the total population and 18% of the total biomass of the fish assemblage in our focal low-P study stream but had P excretion rates >10-fold higher than other abundant fishes. As a result, we estimated that P excretion by A. aeneus accounted for 90% of the P recycled by this fish assemblage and also supplied ???90% of the stream P demand in this P-limited ecosystem. Nitrogen excretion rates showed little variation among species, and the contribution of a given species to ecosystem N recycling was largely dependent upon the total biomass of that species. Because of the high variability in P excretion rates among fish species, ecosystem-level P recycling could be particularly sensitive to changes in fish community structure in P-limited systems. ?? 2011 by the Ecological Society of America.

  15. Rapid response of a grassland ecosystem to an experimental manipulation of a keystone rodent and domestic livestock.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Ana D; Ponce, Eduardo; Lightfoot, David C; Fredrickson, Ed L; Brown, James H; Cruzado, Juan; Brantley, Sandra L; Sierra-Corona, Rodrigo; List, Rurik; Toledo, David; Ceballos, Gerardo

    2010-11-01

    Megaherbivores and small burrowing mammals commonly coexist and play important functional roles in grassland ecosystems worldwide. The interactive effects of these two functional groups of herbivores in shaping the structure and function of grassland ecosystems are poorly understood. In North America's central grasslands, domestic cattle (Bos taurus) have supplanted bison (Bison bison), and now coexist with prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.), a keystone burrowing rodent. Understanding the ecological relationships between cattle and prairie dogs and their independent and interactive effects is essential to understanding the ecology and important conservation issues affecting North American grassland ecosystems. To address these needs, we established a long-term manipulative experiment that separates the independent and interactive effects of prairie dogs and cattle using a 2 x 2 factorial design. Our study is located in the Janos-Casas Grandes region of northwestern Chihuahua, Mexico, which supports one of the largest remaining complexes of black-tailed prairie dogs (C. ludovicianus). Two years of posttreatment data show nearly twofold increases in prairie dog abundance on plots grazed by cattle compared to plots without cattle. This positive effect of cattle on prairie dogs resulted in synergistic impacts when they occurred together. Vegetation height was significantly lower on the plots where both species co-occurred compared to where either or both species was absent. The treatments also significantly affected abundance and composition of other grassland animal species, including grasshoppers and banner-tailed kangaroo rats (Dipodomys spectabilis). Our results demonstrate that two different functional groups of herbivorous mammals, burrowing mammals and domestic cattle, have distinctive and synergistic impacts in shaping the structure and function of grassland ecosystems. PMID:21141180

  16. A Keystone Ant Species Provides Robust Biological Control of the Coffee Berry Borer Under Varying Pest Densities.

    PubMed

    Morris, Jonathan R; Vandermeer, John; Perfecto, Ivette

    2015-01-01

    Species' functional traits are an important part of the ecological complexity that determines the provisioning of ecosystem services. In biological pest control, predator response to pest density variation is a dynamic trait that impacts the provision of this service in agroecosystems. When pest populations fluctuate, farmers relying on biocontrol services need to know how natural enemies respond to these changes. Here we test the effect of variation in coffee berry borer (CBB) density on the biocontrol efficiency of a keystone ant species (Azteca sericeasur) in a coffee agroecosystem. We performed exclosure experiments to measure the infestation rate of CBB released on coffee branches in the presence and absence of ants at four different CBB density levels. We measured infestation rate as the number of CBB bored into fruits after 24 hours, quantified biocontrol efficiency (BCE) as the proportion of infesting CBB removed by ants, and estimated functional response from ant attack rates, measured as the difference in CBB infestation between branches. Infestation rates of CBB on branches with ants were significantly lower (71%-82%) than on those without ants across all density levels. Additionally, biocontrol efficiency was generally high and did not significantly vary across pest density treatments. Furthermore, ant attack rates increased linearly with increasing CBB density, suggesting a Type I functional response. These results demonstrate that ants can provide robust biological control of CBB, despite variation in pest density, and that the response of predators to pest density variation is an important factor in the provision of biocontrol services. Considering how natural enemies respond to changes in pest densities will allow for more accurate biocontrol predictions and better-informed management of this ecosystem service in agroecosystems. PMID:26562676

  17. Ocean Warming Enhances Malformations, Premature Hatching, Metabolic Suppression and Oxidative Stress in the Early Life Stages of a Keystone Squid

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Rui; Pimentel, Marta S.; Boavida-Portugal, Joana; Teixeira, Tatiana; Trübenbach, Katja; Diniz, Mário

    2012-01-01

    Background The knowledge about the capacity of organisms’ early life stages to adapt to elevated temperatures is very limited but crucial to understand how marine biota will respond to global warming. Here we provide a comprehensive and integrated view of biological responses to future warming during the early ontogeny of a keystone invertebrate, the squid Loligo vulgaris. Methodology/Principal Findings Recently-spawned egg masses were collected and reared until hatching at present day and projected near future (+2°C) temperatures, to investigate the ability of early stages to undergo thermal acclimation, namely phenotypic altering of morphological, behavioural, biochemical and physiological features. Our findings showed that under the projected near-future warming, the abiotic conditions inside the eggs promoted metabolic suppression, which was followed by premature hatching. Concomitantly, the less developed newborns showed greater incidence of malformations. After hatching, the metabolic burst associated with the transition from an encapsulated embryo to a planktonic stage increased linearly with temperature. However, the greater exposure to environmental stress by the hatchlings seemed to be compensated by physiological mechanisms that reduce the negative effects on fitness. Heat shock proteins (HSP70/HSC70) and antioxidant enzymes activities constituted an integrated stress response to ocean warming in hatchlings (but not in embryos). Conclusions/Significance The stressful abiotic conditions inside eggs are expected to be aggravated under the projected near-future ocean warming, with deleterious effects on embryo survival and growth. Greater feeding challenges and the lower thermal tolerance limits of the hatchlings are strictly connected to high metabolic demands associated with the planktonic life strategy. Yet, we found some evidence that, in the future, the early stages might support higher energy demands by adjusting some cellular functional properties

  18. Transcriptome profiling of developmental and xenobiotic responses in a keystone soil animal, the oligochaete annelid Lumbricus rubellus

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Jennifer; Hedley, B Ann; Svendsen, Claus; Wren, Jodie; Jonker, Martijs J; Hankard, Peter K; Lister, Linsey J; Stürzenbaum, Stephen R; Morgan, A John; Spurgeon, David J; Blaxter, Mark L; Kille, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Background Natural contamination and anthropogenic pollution of soils are likely to be major determinants of functioning and survival of keystone invertebrate taxa. Soil animals will have both evolutionary adaptation and genetically programmed responses to these toxic chemicals, but mechanistic understanding of such is sparse. The clitellate annelid Lumbricus rubellus is a model organism for soil health testing, but genetic data have been lacking. Results We generated a 17,000 sequence expressed sequence tag dataset, defining ~8,100 different putative genes, and built an 8,000-element transcriptome microarray for L. rubellus. Strikingly, less than half the putative genes (43%) were assigned annotations from the gene ontology (GO) system; this reflects the phylogenetic uniqueness of earthworms compared to the well-annotated model animals. The microarray was used to identify adult- and juvenile-specific transcript profiles in untreated animals and to determine dose-response transcription profiles following exposure to three xenobiotics from different chemical classes: inorganic (the metal cadmium), organic (the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon fluoranthene), and agrochemical (the herbicide atrazine). Analysis of these profiles revealed compound-specific fingerprints which identify the molecular responses of this annelid to each contaminant. The data and analyses are available in an integrated database, LumbriBASE. Conclusion L. rubellus has a complex response to contaminant exposure, but this can be efficiently analysed using molecular methods, revealing unique response profiles for different classes of effector. These profiles may assist in the development of novel monitoring or bioremediation protocols, as well as in understanding the ecosystem effects of exposure. PMID:18522720

  19. A Keystone Ant Species Provides Robust Biological Control of the Coffee Berry Borer Under Varying Pest Densities

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Jonathan R.; Vandermeer, John; Perfecto, Ivette

    2015-01-01

    Species’ functional traits are an important part of the ecological complexity that determines the provisioning of ecosystem services. In biological pest control, predator response to pest density variation is a dynamic trait that impacts the provision of this service in agroecosystems. When pest populations fluctuate, farmers relying on biocontrol services need to know how natural enemies respond to these changes. Here we test the effect of variation in coffee berry borer (CBB) density on the biocontrol efficiency of a keystone ant species (Azteca sericeasur) in a coffee agroecosystem. We performed exclosure experiments to measure the infestation rate of CBB released on coffee branches in the presence and absence of ants at four different CBB density levels. We measured infestation rate as the number of CBB bored into fruits after 24 hours, quantified biocontrol efficiency (BCE) as the proportion of infesting CBB removed by ants, and estimated functional response from ant attack rates, measured as the difference in CBB infestation between branches. Infestation rates of CBB on branches with ants were significantly lower (71%-82%) than on those without ants across all density levels. Additionally, biocontrol efficiency was generally high and did not significantly vary across pest density treatments. Furthermore, ant attack rates increased linearly with increasing CBB density, suggesting a Type I functional response. These results demonstrate that ants can provide robust biological control of CBB, despite variation in pest density, and that the response of predators to pest density variation is an important factor in the provision of biocontrol services. Considering how natural enemies respond to changes in pest densities will allow for more accurate biocontrol predictions and better-informed management of this ecosystem service in agroecosystems. PMID:26562676

  20. Using an isolated population boom to explore barriers to recovery in the keystone Caribbean coral reef herbivore Diadema antillarum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodmer, Max D. V.; Rogers, Alex D.; Speight, Martin R.; Lubbock, Natalie; Exton, Dan A.

    2015-12-01

    Recovery of the keystone herbivore Diadema antillarum after the 1983-1984 mass mortality event poses one of the greatest challenges to Caribbean coral reef conservation, yet our understanding of the problem remains severely limited. Whilst some recovery has been observed, this has been restricted to the shallows (≤5 m). We report a newly discovered, isolated population recovery on Banco Capiro, Honduras, representing the largest recorded post-mortality densities beyond the shallowest environments (0.74-2.27 individuals m-2 at depths ≥10 m) alongside an unusually high mean percentage scleractinian coral cover of 49-62 %, likely no coincidence. On the nearby island of Utila, we report D. antillarum densities of 0.003-0.012 individuals m-2 and scleractinian coral cover of 12 % at depths ≥10 m, "typical" for a contemporary Caribbean coral reef. The three order of magnitude disparity in population density between sites separated by <60 km presents a unique opportunity to investigate barriers preventing their region-wide recovery by simultaneously addressing a range of previously proposed hypotheses. Despite concerns over the impacts of asynchronous spawning in low-density populations, we find that recruitment is occurring on Utila. This suggests that, whilst Allee effects are likely to be a contributing factor, the major barriers suppressing recovery are instead impacting juvenile survival into adulthood. Similarly, variations in heterospecific echinoids, interspecific competitors, and nutrient availability fail to account for population differences. Instead, we highlight a lack of structural complexity on contemporary Caribbean reefs as the most likely explanation for the limited recovery through a lack of provision of juvenile predation refugia, representing a further consequence of the recent ubiquitous phase shifts throughout the region. Using these findings, we propose future management strategies to stimulate recovery and, consequently, reef health

  1. Serologic evidence of Jamestown Canyon and Keystone virus infection in vertebrates of the DelMarVa Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Watts, D M; LeDuc, J W; Bailey, C L; Dalrymple, J M; Gargan, T P

    1982-11-01

    Serological data accumulated during the past decade indicated that a variety of feral and domestic animals of the Delaware-Maryland-Virginia (DelMarVa) Peninsula were infected with Jamestown Canyon (JC) and/or Keystone (KEY) viruses (Bunyaviridae, California serogroup). Neutralizing (N) antibody to JC virus was most prevalent in white-tailed deer, sika deer, cottontail rabbits and horses. KEY virus N antibody was detected most frequently in gray squirrels and domestic goats. N antibody indicative of past infection by one or both viruses also was found in raccoons, horses and humans. JC and/or KEY virus N antibodies were not demonstrable in sera of several other species of small mammals and reptiles. Investigations were extended to evaluate the role of domestic goats as an amplifying host of JC and KEY viruses and to assess their potential as sentinels of virus transmission. Goats maintained in the Pocomoke Cypress Swamp during the summer season of 1978, acquired N antibodies to JC and KEY viruses. Following experimental inoculation with either JC or KEY virus, all goats developed N antibody despite the absence of a demonstrable viremia in most animals. Goats proved to be effective as sentinels for monitoring the transmission of JC and KEY viruses; however, the exceptionally low titers or absence of viremia following inoculation with these viruses would seem to preclude a potential virus-amplifying role for this species. Although findings implicated primarily gray squirrels and white-tailed deer as possible amplifying hosts of KEY and JC virus, respectively, further investigations will be required to clarify their role, particularly since both viruses may be maintained entirely by transovarial transmission. PMID:7149110

  2. Climate Modeling in Support of Policy Decisionmaking in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasseur, G. P.

    2010-12-01

    As a reaction to the increasing demand for climate information for adaptation strategies, the Climate Service Center (CSC) has been founded in Germany. The main objective of CSC is bringing together climate change information, impact assessments and economic and policy strategies in one institution and thus facilitating communication between the disciplines and sectors. It became obvious, that bridging the gap between available climate change information and the requirements of the impact, vulnerability and adaptation communities is of utmost importance. Two different aspects have to be considered: the temporal and spatial refinement of biogeophysical quantities, usually done via dynamical or statistical downscaling of the coarse-scale climate information, and the incorporation of uncertainty measures into the decision making process for adaptation policies. For both aspects, communication is the key necessity. Organizing thematic workshops to assemble the disciplines is therefore one keystone of the CSC work. During the presentation, the CSC vision, strategy and methodologies will be explained.

  3. An abundant small sized fish as keystone species? The effect of Pomatoschistus microps on food webs and its trophic role in two intertidal benthic communities: A modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pockberger, Moritz; Kellnreitner, Florian; Ahnelt, Harald; Asmus, Ragnhild; Asmus, Harald

    2014-02-01

    Ecological network analysis (ENA) was used to study the effects of Pomatoschistus microps on energy transport through the food web, its impact on other compartments and its possible role as a keystone species in the trophic webs of an Arenicola tidal flat ecosystem and a sparse Zostera noltii bed ecosystem. Three ENA models were constructed: (a) model 1 contains data of the original food web from prior research in the investigated area by Baird et al. (2007), (b) an updated model 2 which included biomass and diet data of P. microps from recent sampling, and (c) model 3 simulating a food web without P. microps. A comparison of energy transport between the different models revealed that more energy is transported from lower trophic levels up the food chain, in the presence of P. microps (models 1 and 2) than in its absence (model 3). Calculations of the keystone index (KSi) revealed the high overall impact (measured as εi) of this fish species on food webs. In model 1, P. microps was assigned a low KSi in the Arenicola flat and in the sparse Z. noltii bed. Calculations in model 2 ranked P. microps first for keystoneness and εi in both communities, the Arenicola flat and the sparse Z. noltii bed. Taken together, our results give insight into the role of P. microps when considering a whole food web and reveal direct and indirect trophic interactions of this small-sized fish species. These results might illustrate the impact and importance of abundant, widespread species in food webs and facilitate further investigations.

  4. Auditory verbal hallucinations--breaking the silence of inner dialogue.

    PubMed

    Stanghellini, Giovanni; Cutting, John

    2003-01-01

    Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs) are usually defined as perceptions of speech that occur in the absence of any appropriate external stimulus. This definition, we argue, is false. We maintain that AVHs are disorders of self-consciousness that are best understood as the becoming conscious of inner dialogue. Normally, subconscious interior conversations are experienced as a sense of partnership between distinct parts: we feel these parts as distinct, but also integrated and collaborating with each other in decision-making and in self-representation. AVHs attest to a breakdown in this process of interior conversation: the feeling of unity in duality falls apart, and the dialectic partnership on which self-representation is grounded shatters into a mere dichotomy. There is a fracture in self-consciousness. If ipseity (i.e. the prereflective modality of self-awareness, the self-feeling of one's own self in which the one who feels and what is felt is but one thing) is lacking, the sense of unity weakens, and the sense of duality increases. This crisis of ipseity is accompanied by an increase of reflexivity (i.e. the process through which I take a part of myself as a focal object of awareness). Hyperreflexivity contributes to the objectification of the sense of duality and to the loss of the sense of 'myness' of inner speech. In schizophrenics, inner dialogue becomes anomalously manifest. Whereas in normal conditions, inner dialogue is the medium for self-representation, AVHs arise through its morbid objectification: inner speech comes to the foreground in the concrete fashion of alien 'voices'. PMID:12845282

  5. Tutorial dialogues and gist explanations of genetic breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Widmer, Colin L; Wolfe, Christopher R; Reyna, Valerie F; Cedillos-Whynott, Elizabeth M; Brust-Renck, Priscila G; Weil, Audrey M

    2015-09-01

    The intelligent tutoring system (ITS) BRCA Gist is a Web-based tutor developed using the Shareable Knowledge Objects (SKO) platform that uses latent semantic analysis to engage women in natural-language dialogues to teach about breast cancer risk. BRCA Gist appears to be the first ITS designed to assist patients' health decision making. Two studies provide fine-grained analyses of the verbal interactions between BRCA Gist and women responding to five questions pertaining to breast cancer and genetic risk. We examined how "gist explanations" generated by participants during natural-language dialogues related to outcomes. Using reliable rubrics, scripts of the participants' verbal interactions with BRCA Gist were rated for content and for the appropriateness of the tutor's responses. Human researchers' scores for the content covered by the participants were strongly correlated with the coverage scores generated by BRCA Gist, indicating that BRCA Gist accurately assesses the extent to which people respond appropriately. In Study 1, participants' performance during the dialogues was consistently associated with learning outcomes about breast cancer risk. Study 2 was a field study with a more diverse population. Participants with an undergraduate degree or less education who were randomly assigned to BRCA Gist scored higher on tests of knowledge than those assigned to the National Cancer Institute website or than a control group. We replicated findings that the more expected content that participants included in their gist explanations, the better they performed on outcome measures. As fuzzy-trace theory suggests, encouraging people to develop and elaborate upon gist explanations appears to improve learning, comprehension, and decision making. PMID:25921818

  6. A K-12 Federal Policy Framework for Competency Education: Building Capacity for Systems Change. CompetencyWorks Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthen, Maria; Pace, Lillian

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides federal policymakers and advocates with comprehensive, big-picture ideas for transforming federal policy to support the transition to competency-based learning. It is meant to start a dialogue on these issues, posing important questions to explore as policymakers contemplate a new vision for federal education policy through the…

  7. A dialogue in paradise: John Milton's visit with Galileo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Hugh

    2001-03-01

    According to his 1644 speech, ``Areopagitica,'' the English poet John Milton visited Galileo in his villa in Arcetri in 1638 while Galileo was under house arrest for offending the Church authorities. This article explores the influences Galileo may have had on Milton's writing as a result of the presumed meeting between the two, and discusses some similarities between Galileo's Starry Messenger (1610) and Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems (1632) and Milton's Paradise Lost (1667). Teachers and students of physics, astronomy, and li!!terature can benefit from studying connections such as these between science and the arts.

  8. A psychiatric dialogue on the mind-body problem.

    PubMed

    Kendler, K S

    2001-07-01

    Of all the human professions, psychiatry is most centrally concerned with the relationship of mind and brain. In many clinical interactions, psychiatrists need to consider both subjective mental experiences and objective aspects of brain function. This article attempts to summarize, in the form of a dialogue between a philosophically informed attending psychiatrist and three residents, the major philosophical positions on the mind-body problem. The positions reviewed include the following: substance dualism, property dualism, type identity, token identity, functionalism, eliminative materialism, and explanatory dualism. This essay seeks to provide a brief user-friendly introduction, from a psychiatric perspective, to current thinking about the mind-body problem. PMID:11431218

  9. Theophrastus' biological opuscula and the Hippocratic Corpus: a critical dialogue?

    PubMed

    Debru, Armelle

    2005-01-01

    Recent work on Theophrastus' biological opuscula opens new perspectives on the still obscure relations between this author and the Hippocratic writings. The three short treatises On Fatigue, On Sweat, On Dizziness, present unquestionable resemblances with many Hippocratic notions, but still more differences from them. This suggests a possible critical dialogue, using allusions to, and substitutions from, certain Hippocratic writings such as Regimen. Reading such writings in the light of the Theophrastean material reveals in them such important themes as differences and causes, which coincide with Theophrastus' own epistemological interests and which may have played some role in his research. PMID:17144080

  10. The Bolivar Channel Ecosystem of the Galapagos Marine Reserve: Energy flow structure and role of keystone groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Diego J.; Wolff, Matthias

    2011-08-01

    Oscillation. Most important keystone groups of large relative impact over other system compartments are sharks and marine mammals. In addition, the important role of macro-algae, sea stars and urchins, phytoplankton and barracudas should be emphasized for their great contribution to the trophic flows and biomass of the system.

  11. Keystone indices probabilistic species sensitivity distribution in the case of the derivation of water quality criteria for copper in Tai Lake.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jun; Zhao, Qianyuan; Wang, Peifang; Wang, Chao; Miao, Lingzhan; Feng, Chenglian

    2016-07-01

    An alternative method for species sensitivity distribution (SSD) that considers the interaction between species and the community importance is illustrated in this article. First, a food web based on the relationship between predator and prey was constructed, and the keystone indices of species were obtained based on the food web. Then, the probability density distribution of the sensitivity for each species was derived from all of the available endpoints of each species. Finally, the species sensitivity distribution for ecosystem was constructed by sampling a specific number of values from the probability density distribution of the sensitivity for each species. Data of copper toxicity to the aquatic organisms in Tai Lake were selected to derived site-specific water quality criteria (WQC). Ninety-seven endpoints of acute toxicity for 47 species and 188 endpoints of chronic toxicity for 29 species were included, and the acute and chronic WQC developed by keystone indices probabilistic species sensitivity distribution (K-PSSD) were 4.982 μg/L and 0.965 μg/L, respectively. Results showed that the aquatic organisms of Tai Lake might be underprotected. Compared with the SSD, the K-PSSD coped with the interactions between species, the community importance, and the intraspecies and interspecies variation more effectively and was better at depicting the tendency and information of raw data. The K-PSSD was especially applicable to site-specific WQC and provided an alternative or supplement to the SSD. PMID:26996916

  12. Fault tolerant channel-encrypting quantum dialogue against collective noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, TianYu

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, two fault tolerant channel-encrypting quantum dialogue (QD) protocols against collective noise are presented. One is against collective-dephasing noise, while the other is against collective-rotation noise. The decoherent-free states, each of which is composed of two physical qubits, act as traveling states combating collective noise. Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen pairs, which play the role of private quantum key, are securely shared between two participants over a collective-noise channel in advance. Through encryption and decryption with private quantum key, the initial state of each traveling two-photon logical qubit is privately shared between two participants. Due to quantum encryption sharing of the initial state of each traveling logical qubit, the issue of information leakage is overcome. The private quantum key can be repeatedly used after rotation as long as the rotation angle is properly chosen, making quantum resource economized. As a result, their information-theoretical efficiency is nearly up to 66.7%. The proposed QD protocols only need single-photon measurements rather than two-photon joint measurements for quantum measurements. Security analysis shows that an eavesdropper cannot obtain anything useful about secret messages during the dialogue process without being discovered. Furthermore, the proposed QD protocols can be implemented with current techniques in experiment.

  13. Open Dialogue Approach - about the phenomenon of Scandinavian Psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Kłapciński, Michał M; Rymaszewska, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    After twenty years of transformation of Finnish mental health care, in the late 80s and early 90s of the last century, incidence of schizophrenia in Western Lapland dropped from 35/100,000 to 7/100,000. This phenomenon is linked with Yrjo O. Alanen et al. who investigated schizophrenia treatment outcomes and psychosocial rehabilitation of people with schizophrenia. Investigators focused on an individually tailored psychotherapeutic recovery plan during patient's hospitalization, including care for patients' families. Within the "Finnish National Schizophrenia Project" the principles of the Need-Adapted Treatment were created and 50% of Finland's country gained access to mobile crisis intervention teams. Further studies were continued within "Acute PsychosisIntegrated Treatment Project" (1992-1993) which locally, in Western Lapland, proceeded into "Open Dialogue in Acute Psychosis Project" (ODAP) (1994-1997). In this approach, all important decisions regarding the patient, including hospitalization or pharmacotherapy, are discussed not only with the entire therapeutic team, but also with the patient and his family members. Two - and five-year follow-ups demonstrated high treatment efficacy as well as important cost reduction in mental health care spending. First two"Open Dialogue Method" training courses for representatives of the medical, psychological, nursing and social care have been completed in Poland in October 2014. Studies evaluating the therapeutic effectiveness of the described approach are being planned. PMID:26909395

  14. Fault-tolerant authenticated quantum dialogue using logical Bell states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Tian-Yu

    2015-09-01

    Two fault-tolerant authenticated quantum dialogue protocols are proposed in this paper by employing logical Bell states as the quantum resource, which combat the collective-dephasing noise and the collective-rotation noise, respectively. The two proposed protocols each can accomplish the mutual identity authentication and the dialogue between two participants simultaneously and securely over one kind of collective noise channels. In each of two proposed protocols, the information transmitted through the classical channel is assumed to be eavesdroppable and modifiable. The key for choosing the measurement bases of sample logical qubits is pre-shared privately between two participants. The Bell state measurements rather than the four-qubit joint measurements are adopted for decoding. The two participants share the initial states of message logical Bell states with resort to the direct transmission of auxiliary logical Bell states so that the information leakage problem is avoided. The impersonation attack, the man-in-the-middle attack, the modification attack and the Trojan horse attacks from Eve all are detectable.

  15. Quantum Dialogue with Authentication Based on Bell States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Dongsu; Ma, Wenping; Yin, Xunru; Li, Xiaoping

    2013-06-01

    We propose an authenticated quantum dialogue protocol, which is based on a shared private quantum entangled channel. In this protocol, the EPR pairs are randomly prepared in one of the four Bell states for communication. By performing four Pauli operations on the shared EPR pairs to encode their shared authentication key and secret message, two legitimate users can implement mutual identity authentication and quantum dialogue without the help from the third party authenticator. Furthermore, due to the EPR pairs which are used for secure communication are utilized to implement authentication and the whole authentication process is included in the direct secure communication process, it does not require additional particles to realize authentication in this protocol. The updated authentication key provides the counterparts with a new authentication key for the next authentication and direct communication. Compared with other secure communication with authentication protocols, this one is more secure and efficient owing to the combination of authentication and direct communication. Security analysis shows that it is secure against the eavesdropping attack, the impersonation attack and the man-in-the-middle (MITM) attack.

  16. Educating for a "Spirituality of Dialogue": Theological Foundations, Hermeneutical Invitations, and Pedagogical Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratliff, Therese L.

    2010-01-01

    To be truly effective, dialogue in communities of faith must be more than tactics or strategies for community management. Fostering a "spirituality of dialogue" is a unique contribution that Religious Education can offer faith communities, providing a concrete locus for the interplay and mutual enrichment of theological inquiry and Religious…

  17. Teaching and Leading through Dialogue: Pope Francis and Catholic Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The early pontificate of Francis has been marked by substantial changes in the style of papal governance and teaching. Francis's engagement in dialogue with members of the media corresponds to a willingness to foster meaningful dialogue among the bishops and to use teaching documents to raise questions rather than answer them. At the Extraordinary…

  18. Dialogue as an Organizational Learning Intervention: Taking a Closer Look at Psychological Barriers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurer, Martin

    2008-01-01

    This paper synthesizes conceptual and empirical literature on organizational learning interventions based on dialogue. First, I attempt to delineate the concept of dialogue and to explain its relevance to organizational learning. Examples and arguments in support of dialogic learning initiatives are presented. Organizational realities and…

  19. Learning from Our Differences: A Dialogue across Perspectives on Quality in Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Pamela A.; Phillips, D. C.; Erickson, Frederick D.; Floden, Robert E.; Lather, Patti A.; Schneider, Barbara L.

    2009-01-01

    The dialogue re-presented in this article is intended to foster mutual engagement--and opportunity for learning--across different perspectives on research within the education research community. Participants in the dialogue each addressed the following questions: (1) What are the touchstones by which you judge quality or rigor in education…

  20. Task of the Teaching Life: Self through Bakhtinian Dialogue and Ideological Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKnight, Douglas

    2004-01-01

    This article describes Mikhail Bakhtin's 20th century work on dialogue as it may serve one engaged in teaching as a vocation and existential pursuit rather than as a job or profession. Dialogue, as theorized by Bakhtin, within the pedagogical real, potentially becomes a mode of being through which the individual engages in the project of selfhood,…

  1. Fieldwork, Co-Teaching and Co-Generative Dialogue in Lower Secondary School Environmental Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahmawati, Yuli; Koul, Rekha

    2016-01-01

    This article reports one of the case studies in a 3-year longitudinal study in environmental science education. This case explores the process of teaching about ecosystems through co-teaching and co-generative dialogue in a Year-9 science classroom in Western Australia. Combining with co-teaching and co-generative dialogue aimed at transforming…

  2. Deer, Dissension, and Dialogue: A University-Community Collaboration in Public Deliberation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Wynne

    2009-01-01

    Michigan State University embarked upon an initiative to explore deliberative dialogue as a tool for addressing community-based contested issues in agriculture and natural resources. Our goal is to assess the extent to which deliberative dialogue can help "bridge the divides" among citizens and professionals and fulfill the land-grant mission. In…

  3. An Online Synchronous e-Dialogue Series on Nuclear Waste Management in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, Ann; Newman, Lenore

    2006-01-01

    Online dialogues can meaningfully engage a diverse audience and provide a method to both educate and interest the public in complex environmental and social issues. This article discusses a series of e-dialogues conducted for the Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Canada in which the public engaged in discussions concerning the risk and…

  4. 78 FR 4189 - Advisory Committee on the Secretary of State's Strategic Dialogue With Civil Society

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-18

    ... Committee on the Secretary of State's Strategic Dialogue With Civil Society ACTION: Notice of meeting... on the Secretary of State's Strategic Dialogue with Civil Society will convene in Washington, DC on... strategies for engagement with, and protection of, civil society worldwide. The objective of this meeting...

  5. 77 FR 25780 - Advisory Committee on the Secretary of State's Strategic Dialogue With Civil Society

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-01

    ... Committee on the Secretary of State's Strategic Dialogue With Civil Society ACTION: Notice of meeting... on the Secretary of State's Strategic Dialogue with Civil Society will convene in Washington, DC on... strategies for engagement with, and protection of, civil society worldwide. ] The objective of this...

  6. Meaningful Dialogue in Digitally Mediated Learning for In-Service Teacher Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramp, Andy

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers the role and development of meaningful dialogue in digitally mediated learning (DML) in UK higher education for teachers. It argues that more research is vital in the field of meaningful dialogue if we are to avoid the risk that pedagogic values in DML become increasingly driven by market forces toward "data vending"…

  7. Investigating the Relationship between Dialogue Structure and Tutoring Effectiveness: A Hidden Markov Modeling Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Kristy Elizabeth; Phillips, Robert; Ingram, Amy; Ha, Eun Young; Wallis, Michael; Vouk, Mladen; Lester, James

    2011-01-01

    Identifying effective tutorial dialogue strategies is a key issue for intelligent tutoring systems research. Human-human tutoring offers a valuable model for identifying effective tutorial strategies, but extracting them is a challenge because of the richness of human dialogue. This article addresses that challenge through a machine learning…

  8. What Would Freud Say to Voltaire? The Use of Dialogues in Survey Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Linda

    2008-01-01

    An assignment to write a dialogue differs little from that of writing a traditional essay. Writing a dialogue requires students to combine traditional academic requirements--such as information literacy, writing competency, and critical thinking--with a healthy dose of imagination, creativity, and individuality. In practice, assignments to write…

  9. Crossing the Divide within Continental Philosophy: Reconstruction, Deconstruction, Dialogue and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papastephanou, Marianna

    2012-01-01

    In this article I explore some points of convergence between Habermas and Derrida that revolve around the intersection of ethical and epistemological issues in dialogue. After some preliminary remarks on how dialogue and language are viewed by Habermas and Derrida as standpoints for departing from the philosophy of consciousness and from…

  10. The Intersection of Dialogue and Low Transactional Distance: Considerations for Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farquhar, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    The theory of transactional distance has been subjected to a variety of empirical tests and philosophical critiques. Throughout this process, the variable of dialogue has attracted much attention. Although dialogue has proven difficult to measure and define, it is widely regarded as an ideal outcome of the teacher-learner transaction. Considered…

  11. Innovation in Parent Education: Self-Reflection and Dialogue as Avenues of Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Lorraine Kvistberg; Thomas, Ruth G.

    A constructivist approach to parent education that enabled parents to be active participants in reflection and dialogue processes was tested in a study. Instruction was designed to stimulate and support self-reflection and dialogue processes enabling parents to be active participants in constructing new meanings to their child rearing practices.…

  12. Dialogue Journals: Interactive Writing To Develop Language and Literacy. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peyton, Joy Kreeft

    This digest focuses on the use of dialogue journals for developing the language and literacy skills of students of all ages learning English a Second Language. Dialogue journals are written conversations in which students and teachers communicate on a regular basis. Students write as much as they choose, and the teacher writes back, responding to…

  13. Dialogue Journal Writing with Limited-English-Proficient (LEP) Students. Q & A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peyton, Joy Kreeft

    A dialogue journal is a written conversation in which a student and teacher communicate regularly over a period of a semester or a school year. The student may write as much as he chooses on any topic, and the teacher responds, introduces new topics, offers observations, clarifies, and asks and answers questions. Teachers use dialogue journals to…

  14. Dialogue Journals: Interactive Writing To Develop Language and Literacy. Revised. ERIC Q&A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peyton, Joy Kreeft

    Many teachers of adult learners of English have found dialogue journals, interactive writing with a teacher or other individual, to be an important part of their classes. Dialogue journals not only open new channels of communication, but they also provide natural contexts for language and literacy development. When adult learners write with their…

  15. Why Can't We Talk About Race? Racial Legacies and Learning: An American Dialogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of American Colleges and Universities, Washington, DC.

    This brochure describes an initiative of the Association of American Colleges and Universities, Racial Legacies and Learning, designed to foster learning and dialogue about America's racial legacies and opportunities. The project began in early April 1998 with a national Campus Week of Dialogue, and was expected to culminate in campus-community…

  16. Reciprocal Dialogue between Educational Decision Makers and Students of Color: Opportunities and Obstacles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertrand, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This article explores the possibilities for reciprocal dialogue between educational decision makers and Students of Color. Such dialogue--defined as interactions in which participants build on each other's words--may provide the means to develop creative ways to address manifestations of systemic racism in education. The article uses…

  17. Researching Teachers' and Parents' Perceptions of Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tveit, Anne Dorthe

    2014-01-01

    While there has been a great deal of research done on parent involvement and the challenges of conducting effective dialogue in parent-teacher meetings, less attention has been paid to how teachers and parents themselves perceive dialogue. The purpose of the present article is to study whether deliberative principles are vital to teachers'…

  18. Student and Teacher Strategies for Communicating through Dialogue Journals in Hebrew: A Teacher Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwarzer, David

    2004-01-01

    Two major issues are addressed in this teacher research paper: A description of strategies used by students in their dialogue journal writing and a description of strategies used by the teacher?researcher in responses to students' dialogue journal entries. The major findings are that students used L1 as a resource in their L2 for the following…

  19. More than a Conversation: Using Cogenerative Dialogues in the Professional Development of High School Chemistry Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Sonya N.; Scantlebury, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on content-based and pedagogical instructors' use of cogenerative dialogues to improve instructional practice and to evaluate program effectiveness in a professional development program for high school chemistry teachers. We share our research findings from using cogenerative dialogues as an evaluative tool for general…

  20. Beyond Space and across Time: Non-Finalized Dialogue about Science and Religion Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Pei-Ling

    2010-01-01

    This commentary dialogues with three articles that analyze the same database about science and religion discourse produced 17 years ago. Dialogues in these three articles and this commentary across space and time allow us to develop new and different understandings of the same database and situation. As part of this commentary, I discuss topics…

  1. Composing Narratives and Opening Spaces--Exploring Intercultural and Gender Themes through Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witherell, Carol Smith

    2010-01-01

    The author has felt for many years that stories and dialogue are at the heart of good teaching and learning environments. In the classes that have shaped her learning and development the most, the teaching and learning roles were shared and interchangeable. These environments were rich with narrative, voice, dialogue, and spaces for all to speak…

  2. Faith Dialogue as a Pedagogy for a Post Secular Religious Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castelli, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Inter-faith or inter-religious dialogue takes place for a range of reasons and comes in many guises, from the reconciliatory encounter to ease rivalry, to an engagement with the other in an exploration of the meaning and purpose of the human condition. This article examines the process of dialogue in a religious education context and proposes a…

  3. Bakhtin's Theory of Dialogue: A Construct for Pedagogy, Methodology and Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamston, Julie

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the application of Bakhtin's (1981, 1986a,b) theorisation of language as dialogue to the study of young students' struggle with discourses of ethnicity within the context of a Studies of Asia curriculum project (Hamston 2003). Bakhtin's rich conceptualisation of the productive and ethical nature of dialogue has operated at…

  4. Staff and Student Experiences of Dialogue Days, a Student Engagement Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asghar, Mandy

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the findings from a descriptive phenomenological exploration of the lived experience of dialogue days, a student engagement activity, from the perspectives of staff and students. I suggest that dialogue days enhance the relational and emotional aspects of learning with the potential to impact on future student engagement and…

  5. A Primary-Grade Teacher's Guidance toward Small-Group Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, Ellen; Kyle, Diane W.; Moore, Gayle H.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe how one primary teacher of poor and working class rural students promoted small-group dialogue about books and literary concepts. Specifically, we focused on how she guided the students from the beginning of a lesson in ways that later led to dialogue during a videotaped four-day lesson sequence. We…

  6. Faculty Teaching Diversity through Difficult Dialogues: Stories of Challenges and Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gayles, Joy Gaston; Kelly, Bridget Turner; Grays, Shaefny; Zhang, Jing Jing; Porter, Kamaria P.

    2015-01-01

    Teaching diversity courses in graduate preparation programs is likely to trigger difficult dialogues that evoke a range of emotional responses. Difficult dialogues on diversity topics must be managed effectively in order to enhance multicultural competence. This interpretive study examined the experiences of faculty who teach diversity courses in…

  7. Analysis of Dialogue Journal Writing as a Communicative Event. Final Report. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staton, Jana; And Others

    This is the second of two related documents that make up the final report of a study that analyzed the text of 26 student-teacher dialogue journals from a sixth grade classroom. The report defines "dialogue journal writing" as interactive, functional writing that occurs between students and teacher on a daily basis about self-generated topics of…

  8. Racial Pedagogy of the Oppressed: Critical Interracial Dialogue for Teachers of Color

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohli, Rita

    2012-01-01

    Brazilian education activist Paulo Freire (1970) argues that to create social change, oppressed people must have critical consciousness about their conditions, and that this consciousness is developed through dialogue. He theorizes that dialogue allows for reflection and unity building, tools needed to transform society. When considering racial…

  9. Successful Track Record with Diverse Policies (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-05-01

    The Clean Energy Solutions Center helps governments, advisors, and analysts create policies and programs that advance the deployment of clean energy technologies. Through its no-cost offerings, the Solutions Center enables countries to learn from and share policy best practices, data, and analysis tools, creating an international dialogue on clean energy policies that raises global awareness of emerging policy issues and innovations. As part of these efforts, the Solutions Center provides an indispensable service by connecting those seeking policy information and advice with a policy expert who can help them achieve their goals. The Solutions Center's Ask an Expert service matches policymakers with one of the more than 30 global experts selected as authoritative leaders on specific clean energy policy topics.

  10. On the group-theoretic structure of a class of quantum dialogue protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Chitra; Kothari, Vivek; Banerjee, Anindita; Pathak, Anirban

    2013-02-01

    A sufficient condition for implementation of the quantum dialogue protocol is obtained and it is shown that the set of unitary operators used for the purpose must form a group under multiplication. A generalized protocol of quantum dialogue is obtained using the sufficient condition. Further, several examples of possible groups of unitary operators and quantum states that may be used for implementation of quantum dialogue are systematically generated. As examples, it is shown that GHZ state, GHZ-like state, W state, 4 and 5-qubit Cluster states, Ω state, Brown state, Q4 state and Q5 state can be used to implement quantum dialogue protocol. It is also shown that if a quantum system is found to be suitable for quantum dialogue then that can provide solution of the socialist millionaire problem too.

  11. Disability rights in dialogue with clinical genetics conference, May 31 to June 2, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The issue of prenatal diagnosis and selective abortion has been hotly debated in the medical, genetic counselling, feminist, parents, disability rights and bio-ethics literature, each of the various positions critiquing each other. People from the disability rights community in particular have began to articulate a critical view of the practice of widespread prenatal diagnosis with intent to abort because the pregnancy might result in a child with a disability. Unfortunately, people from the various disciplines and perspectives, such as bioethics, disability rights, feminism and so forth, by and large, have tended only to write for themselves and their colleagues. Few people have crossed disciplines to try to talk to people with other views. The rapid advances of genome research have continued to produce new prenatal tests, raising many complex ethical questions regarding the applications of prenatal testing. But the widely disparate positions of the various factions has made it difficult to move toward formulation of public policy change necessary to encompass these new genetic technologies. Genetic counselling is in the front lines of the controversial social and ethical issues arising from prenatal diagnosis, in its interface between medical science and the consumer of services. The primary intent of the conference was to invite and facilitate productive dialogue between individuals and groups of people who have traditionally not interacted as a result of their disparate views on these issues and to learn from this process, emphasizing the involvement of people with disabilities and people who work in clinical genetics.

  12. Demonstration of a Spoken Dialogue Interface for Planning Activities of a Semi-autonomous Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowding, John; Frank, Jeremy; Hockey, Beth Ann; Jonsson, Ari; Aist, Gregory

    2002-01-01

    Planning and scheduling in the face of uncertainty and change pushes the capabilities of both planning and dialogue technologies by requiring complex negotiation to arrive at a workable plan. Planning for use of semi-autonomous robots involves negotiation among multiple participants with competing scientific and engineering goals to co-construct a complex plan. In NASA applications this plan construction is done under severe time pressure so having a dialogue interface to the plan construction tools can aid rapid completion of the process. But, this will put significant demands on spoken dialogue technology, particularly in the areas of dialogue management and generation. The dialogue interface will need to be able to handle the complex dialogue strategies that occur in negotiation dialogues, including hypotheticals and revisions, and the generation component will require an ability to summarize complex plans. This demonstration will describe a work in progress towards building a spoken dialogue interface to the EUROPA planner for the purposes of planning and scheduling the activities of a semi-autonomous robot. A prototype interface has been built for planning the schedule of the Personal Satellite Assistant (PSA), a mobile robot designed for micro-gravity environments that is intended for use on the Space Shuttle and International Space Station. The spoken dialogue interface gives the user the capability to ask for a description of the plan, ask specific questions about the plan, and update or modify the plan. We anticipate that a spoken dialogue interface to the planner will provide a natural augmentation or alternative to the visualization interface, in situations in which the user needs very targeted information about the plan, in situations where natural language can express complex ideas more concisely than GUI actions, or in situations in which a graphical user interface is not appropriate.

  13. Effective dialogue: Enhanced public engagement as a legitimising tool for municipal waste management decision-making

    SciTech Connect

    Garnett, Kenisha; Cooper, Tim

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • A review of public engagement in waste management decision-making is undertaken. • Enhanced public engagement is explored as a means to legitimise waste decisions. • Analytical–deliberative processes are explored as a tool for effective dialogue. • Considerations for integrating public values with technical analysis are outlined. • Insights into the design of appropriate public engagement processes are provided. - Abstract: The complexity of municipal waste management decision-making has increased in recent years, accompanied by growing scrutiny from stakeholders, including local communities. This complexity reflects a socio-technical framing of the risks and social impacts associated with selecting technologies and sites for waste treatment and disposal facilities. Consequently there is growing pressure on local authorities for stakeholders (including communities) to be given an early opportunity to shape local waste policy in order to encourage swift planning, development and acceptance of the technologies needed to meet statutory targets to divert waste from landfill. This paper presents findings from a research project that explored the use of analytical–deliberative processes as a legitimising tool for waste management decision-making. Adopting a mixed methods approach, the study revealed that communicating the practical benefits of more inclusive forms of engagement is proving difficult even though planning and policy delays are hindering development and implementation of waste management infrastructure. Adopting analytical–deliberative processes at a more strategic level will require local authorities and practitioners to demonstrate how expert-citizen deliberations may foster progress in resolving controversial issues, through change in individuals, communities and institutions. The findings suggest that a significant shift in culture will be necessary for local authorities to realise the potential of more inclusive decision

  14. Policy Dialogue and Target Setting: Do Current Indicators of Education for All Signify Progress?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewin, Keith M.

    2011-01-01

    Governments and development agencies met at Jomtien in 1990 and Dakar in 2000 and committed themselves to achieve "Education for All" (EFA). Most aid to education is now the umbrella of EFA and its associated goals, targets and indicators. This paper selects some of the indicators used for EFA and analyses their strengths and weaknesses. Gross and…

  15. Tracking the Traces of Intercultural Dialogue in Internationalization Policies of Three EU Universities: Towards a Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodin, Jane; Lundgren, Ulla; Castro, Paloma

    2011-01-01

    The internationalization of higher education has been a major concern in the last decades for a variety of reasons. This concern has been addressed by policymakers in a number of ways, most commonly through increased international partnerships and recruitment of international students. Much of the underlying motivation for internationalization is…

  16. Molecular and chemical dialogues in bacteria-protozoa interactions

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chunxu; Mazzola, Mark; Cheng, Xu; Oetjen, Janina; Alexandrov, Theodore; Dorrestein, Pieter; Watrous, Jeramie; van der Voort, Menno; Raaijmakers, Jos M.

    2015-01-01

    Protozoan predation of bacteria can significantly affect soil microbial community composition and ecosystem functioning. Bacteria possess diverse defense strategies to resist or evade protozoan predation. For soil-dwelling Pseudomonas species, several secondary metabolites were proposed to provide protection against different protozoan genera. By combining whole-genome transcriptome analyses with (live) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS), we observed multiple changes in the molecular and chemical dialogues between Pseudomonas fluorescens and the protist Naegleria americana. Lipopeptide (LP) biosynthesis was induced in Pseudomonas upon protozoan grazing and LP accumulation transitioned from homogeneous distributions across bacterial colonies to site-specific accumulation at the bacteria-protist interface. Also putrescine biosynthesis was upregulated in P. fluorescens upon predation. We demonstrated that putrescine induces protozoan trophozoite encystment and adversely affects cyst viability. This multifaceted study provides new insights in common and strain-specific responses in bacteria-protozoa interactions, including responses that contribute to bacterial survival in highly competitive soil and rhizosphere environments. PMID:26246193

  17. Using electronic dialogue to augment traditional classroom instruction

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, H.A.

    1996-09-01

    This paper demonstrates how an electronic dialogue with a panel of human factors experts was used effectively as an augmentation to traditional classroom instruction. Nine students spent a one and one- half hour class session using a variety of commercial electronic mail software packages available on their own desk-tops (not in a university computer lab) to engage in discussion with remotely distributed instructors on topics generated by the students themselves. Ninety eight messages were exchanged, with about 60% having technical content. Interaction content and style were analyzed, and a survey was distributed to participants to evaluate the session. Process observations by this author augmented these data. Strengths and weaknesses of using technology not specifically designed for this function are discussed.

  18. Enhancing motor learning through dyad practice: contributions of observation and dialogue.

    PubMed

    Granados, Carolina; Wulf, Gabriele

    2007-06-01

    It has been shown that practice in dyads, as compared to individual practice, can enhance motor learning and increase the efficiency of practice (as two participants can be trained at the same time; Shea, Wulf, & Whitacre, 1999). The dyad practice protocol used by Shea et al. included both observation and dialogue between partners. Thus, it was not clear whether the learning benefits of dyad practice were due to observation, dialogue, or both. The present study examined the individual and interactive effects of observation and dialogue. The task used was speed cup stacking. Participants practiced under one of four conditions: observation/dialogue, observation/no dialogue, no observation/dialogue, and no observation/no dialogue. The two conditions that included observational practice were more effective (i.e., produced faster movement times) than the two conditions without it, both during practice and on a retention test performed under individual performance conditions. This suggests that the learning advantages of dyad practice are primarily due to the opportunity to observe another learner. PMID:17679493

  19. The policy and science of soil change - a Victorian perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Jane; Crawford, Michael C.

    2015-07-01

    Understanding and managing soil change is an important component of maintaining soil health and soil security which is important for the future of agricultural productivity in Victoria. Historically, soil policy in Victoria has been dealt with on the basis of a single issue. With the emergence of farming systems thinking, and the concept of soil health and soil security, a more holistic approach is now being taken. A seven-step policy framework has been developed that promotes dialogue between scientist and policy makers. The questions it asks (what is the problem and how can it be solved?) clarify the role of government investment, and developing partnerships between science and policy, enables early identification of potential policy problems and development of appropriate policy interventions to manage soil change and ultimately soil health, soil security and soil productivity.

  20. Postcolonial Teacher Education Reform in Namibia: Travelling of Policies and Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arreman, Inger Erixon; Erixon, Per-Olof; Rehn, Karl-Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Long before Namibia's independence in 1990, Sweden initiated a policy dialogue with Namibia's future political leadership. This article reviews the impact of an educational reform in Namibia in the early 1990s called the Integrated Teacher Training Programme (ITTP), which was an outcome of collaboration between the South West African People's…

  1. Children Left Behind: Series Summary and Recommendations. Education Policy Briefs. Volume 2, Number 4, Summer 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skiba, Russell; Rausch, M. Karega; Ritter, Shana

    2004-01-01

    This document summarizes the findings of a series of three briefing papers that were produced via the collaboration of the Center for Evaluation and Education Policy and the Indiana Youth Services Association in an effort to create a dialogue between the education and juvenile justice communities on effective methods of school discipline: (1)…

  2. Research, Policy, and Practice in Action: The Office of Community College Research and Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamani-Gallaher, Eboni M.; Bragg, Debra D.

    2015-01-01

    The Office for Community College Research and Leadership (OCCRL) founded in 1989 focuses on P-20 education and the role of community colleges in facilitating educational access and equity. This article highlights the work of OCCRL as a research center that bridges inquiry, policy, and practice in contributing to the national dialogue on relevant…

  3. Building Local Knowledge for Developing Health Policy through Key Informant Interviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, Lois Wright

    2002-01-01

    Key informant surveys of 138 leaders in 14 rural counties revealed the top 10 health goals across these counties. These goals are a starting point for public dialogues to develop a local health agenda. Key informant interviews can expand the knowledge base from which extension educators develop health education and policy programming. (SK)

  4. De-Politicizing Language: Obstacles to Political Theory's Engagement with Language Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ives, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This article argues that while there exists considerable overlap and potentially productive dialogue between political theory and language policy scholarship, any such effort will be hampered by the dominant approaches to political theory that assume individualistic and instrumentalist conceptions of language. Augmenting the language ideologies…

  5. Reframing Educational Policy: Democracy, Community, and the Individual. Advances in Contemporary Educational Thought, Volume 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahne, Joseph

    Rather than defining and debating particular goals, educational policymakers tend to focus on the technical issues surrounding educational practice. This book considers the social and ethical orientations that structure mainstream policy dialogues and the way in which adoption of some alternative social and ethical principles would change the form…

  6. Changing Labour Markets in Europe: The Role of Institutions and Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auer, Peter, Ed.

    This book contains five papers on the role of institutions in changing labor markets in Europe. "Introduction" (Peter Auer) explores the following topics: institutions and labor market forces; macroeconomic policy; redistribution of working times; equality of opportunity; and industrial relations and social dialogue. "Small-Economy Macroeconomics"…

  7. Efficient Three-Party Quantum Dialogue Protocol Based on the Continuous Variable GHZ States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhen-Bo; Gong, Li-Hua; Zhu, Qi-Biao; Cheng, Shan; Zhou, Nan-Run

    2016-07-01

    Based on the continuous variable GHZ entangled states, an efficient three-party quantum dialogue protocol is devised, where each legitimate communication party could simultaneously deduce the secret information of the other two parties with perfect efficiency. The security is guaranteed by the correlation of the continuous variable GHZ entangled states and the randomly selected decoy states. Furthermore, the three-party quantum dialogue protocol is directly generalized to an N-party quantum dialogue protocol by using the n-tuple continuous variable GHZ entangled states.

  8. Efficient Three-Party Quantum Dialogue Protocol Based on the Continuous Variable GHZ States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhen-Bo; Gong, Li-Hua; Zhu, Qi-Biao; Cheng, Shan; Zhou, Nan-Run

    2016-02-01

    Based on the continuous variable GHZ entangled states, an efficient three-party quantum dialogue protocol is devised, where each legitimate communication party could simultaneously deduce the secret information of the other two parties with perfect efficiency. The security is guaranteed by the correlation of the continuous variable GHZ entangled states and the randomly selected decoy states. Furthermore, the three-party quantum dialogue protocol is directly generalized to an N-party quantum dialogue protocol by using the n-tuple continuous variable GHZ entangled states.

  9. A psychology of religious plurality: from intra-religious dialogue to intra-psychic reality.

    PubMed

    Kramp, Joseph M

    2012-09-01

    Panikkar's (The intra-religious dialogue, 1978) classic, re-issued by Paulist Press in 1999, grapples with the theological challenges in the disciplines of comparative theology and the theology of religions through what he terms, "intra-religious dialogue." In this psychology of religious plurality, I use works from a variety of disciplines to highlight the achievements of Panikkar's intra-religious dialogue, as well as to critique his work in the hope of finding categories of understanding that can be profitably used to face the inter-personal crises of the contemporary world, namely religious terrorism. PMID:20607410

  10. Accelerating Momentum Toward Improved Health for Patients and Populations: Family Medicine as a Disruptive Innovation-A Perspective from the Keystone IV Conference.

    PubMed

    Stream, Glen; DeVoe, Jennifer E; Hughes, Lauren S; Phillips, Robert L

    2016-01-01

    This paper was prepared in follow up to the G. Gayle Stephens Keystone IV Conference by authors who attended the conference and are also members of the Family Medicine for America's Health board of directors (FMAHealth.org). It connects the aspirations of the current strategic and communications efforts of FMAHealth with the ideas developed at the conference. The FMAHealth project is sponsored by 8 national family medicine organizations and seeks to build on the work of the original Future of Family Medicine project. Among its objectives are a robust family physician workforce practicing in a continually improving medical home model, supported by a comprehensive payment model sufficient to sustain the medical home and enable the personal physician relationship with patients. PMID:27387167

  11. FTIR Analysis of Aerogel Keystones from the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector: Assessment of Terrestrial Organic Contamination and X-Ray Microprobe Beam Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, M. E.; Bechtel, H. A.; Allen, C.; Bajt, S.; Borg, J.; Brenker, F.; Bridges, J.; Brownlee, D. E.; Burchell, M.; Burghammer, M.; Butterworth, A. L.; Cloetens, P.; Davis, A. M.; Floss, C.; Flynn, G. J.; Frank, D.; Gainsforth, Z.; Grun, E.; Hech, P R.; Hillier, J. K.

    2011-01-01

    The Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector (SIDC) was intended to capture and return contemporary interstellar dust. The approx.0.1 sq m collector was composed of aerogel tiles (85% of the collecting area) and aluminum foils and was exposed to the interstellar dust stream for a total exposure factor of 20 sq m day. The Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE) is a consortium-based project to characterize the collection using nondestructive techniques. Sandford et al. recently assessed numerous potential sources of organic contaminants in the Stardust cometary collector. These contaminants could greatly complicate the analysis and interperetation of any organics associated with interstellar dust, particularly because signals from these particles are expected to be exceedingly small. Here, we present a summary of FTIR analyses of over 20 aerogel keystones, many of which contained candidates for interstellar dust.

  12. A pest is a pest is a pest? The dilemma of neotropical leaf-cutting ants: Keystone taxa of natural ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, Harold G.; Pagani, Maria Inez; da Silva, Osvaldo Aulino; Forti, Luis Carlos; da Silva, Virgilio Pereira; de Vasconcelos, Heraldo Luis

    1989-11-01

    Leaf-cutting ants of the genera Acromyrmex and Atta are considered the principal polyphagous pests of the Neotropics Although some members of these genera are of economic importance, have a broad geographic distribution, and are extremely good colonizers, others are endemic and closely interact with native ecosystems. Control is generally practiced against any colony, irrespective of its taxonomic status. Indiscriminate control coupled with habitat destruction threatens endemic species with extinction, and, through habitat simplification, favors other pest species. As nests of Atta are large, having several square meters of nest surface, the endemic taxa can be easily used as environmental indicators for natural ecosystems Likewise, the pest species can be used to detect environmental disturbance As these ants are keystone species and easily identified by nonspecialists, efforts should be made to integrate these into viable conservation programs

  13. The National Educational Technology Plan: Continuing the Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Raymond; Waks, Leonard

    2012-01-01

    The members of the working group on National Educational Technology Policy continue to base their formulations around entrenched conceptions of education, retaining the language of teachers, students, curriculum standards, specified objectives and the like. Several of those participating in the panel examining the policy report in an earlier issue…

  14. The essential dialogue: a Norwegian study of art communication in mental health care.

    PubMed

    Ingeberg, Mette Holme; Wikstrøm, Britt-Maj; Berg, Arild

    2012-08-01

    This study focuses on how semi-structured art dialogues can be used to communicate with older patients with impaired mental health. The study was conducted on a geropsychiatric ward at a university hospital in Norway. To communicate with the patients via works of art, health professionals used semi-structured art dialogues; data were collected by qualitative methods. The findings are based on verbatim quotations regarding the health professionals' experiences of their communication with the patients. Two main categories were identified: the physical domain and the caring domain. Dialogues about figurative as well as nonfigurative art forms were found to stimulate and evoke memories; for some patients, these dialogues were an essential step in creating well-being as well as more-being. PMID:22801819

  15. Clarendon's Dialogue Concerning Education: A Neglected Document in Seventeenth-Century Educational History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrest, A.

    1972-01-01

    Illuminating the social history of the time and presenting the thoughts of an eminent Royalist statesman, Clarendon's Dialogue ought to assume a significance at least equal to some of the better-known Puritan tracts. (Author)

  16. 76 FR 51375 - Dialogues in Diversifying Clinical Trials: Successful Strategies for Engaging Women and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Dialogues in Diversifying Clinical Trials: Successful Strategies for Engaging Women and Minorities in Clinical Trials AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... Diversifying Clinical Trials: Successful Strategies for Engaging Women and Minorities in Clinical Trials....

  17. Effects of problem structure and dialogue type on the performance of the man/machine interface

    SciTech Connect

    Palko, J.B.

    1986-01-01

    This research project is intended to provide guidance for software designers who must decide on a dialogue style for interactive problem solving support for new or infrequent users. In addition, it examines the relative performance of these dialogues in environments with a varying amount of problem structure. The three dialogue styles that are recommended by various writers in the field of information systems are: (1) menu driven, (2) question/response, and (3) form filling. It is concluded that if an interface is properly designed it probably does not matter which dialogue style is used in some problem settings. It is also clear that adding problem parameters reduces the ability of the problem solver to determine the best solution.

  18. Technology-Based Nursing Education: Overview and Call for Further Dialogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallow, Gail; Gilje, Fredricka

    1999-01-01

    Nurse educators need to analyze values, communication, and social processes when deciding to use technology in the curriculum. Reflection and dialogue are needed regarding the impact of technology-based nursing education. (SK)

  19. How do gut feelings feature in tutorial dialogues on diagnostic reasoning in GP traineeship?

    PubMed

    Stolper, C F; Van de Wiel, M W J; Hendriks, R H M; Van Royen, P; Van Bokhoven, M A; Van der Weijden, T; Dinant, G J

    2015-05-01

    Diagnostic reasoning is considered to be based on the interaction between analytical and non-analytical cognitive processes. Gut feelings, a specific form of non-analytical reasoning, play a substantial role in diagnostic reasoning by general practitioners (GPs) and may activate analytical reasoning. In GP traineeships in the Netherlands, trainees mostly see patients alone but regularly consult with their supervisors to discuss patients and problems, receive feedback, and improve their competencies. In the present study, we examined the discussions of supervisors and their trainees about diagnostic reasoning in these so-called tutorial dialogues and how gut feelings feature in these discussions. 17 tutorial dialogues focussing on diagnostic reasoning were video-recorded and transcribed and the protocols were analysed using a detailed bottom-up and iterative content analysis and coding procedure. The dialogues were segmented into quotes. Each quote received a content code and a participant code. The number of words per code was used as a unit of analysis to quantitatively compare the contributions to the dialogues made by supervisors and trainees, and the attention given to different topics. The dialogues were usually analytical reflections on a trainee's diagnostic reasoning. A hypothetico-deductive strategy was often used, by listing differential diagnoses and discussing what information guided the reasoning process and might confirm or exclude provisional hypotheses. Gut feelings were discussed in seven dialogues. They were used as a tool in diagnostic reasoning, inducing analytical reflection, sometimes on the entire diagnostic reasoning process. The emphasis in these tutorial dialogues was on analytical components of diagnostic reasoning. Discussing gut feelings in tutorial dialogues seems to be a good educational method to familiarize trainees with non-analytical reasoning. Supervisors need specialised knowledge about these aspects of diagnostic reasoning and

  20. Policy Problematization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, P. Taylor

    2014-01-01

    This article places Michel Foucault's concept of "problematization" in relation to educational policy research. My goal is to examine a key assumption of policy related to "solving problems" through such technologies. I discuss the potential problematization has to alter conceptions of policy research; and, through this…

  1. An intelligent multi-media human-computer dialogue system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, J. G.; Bettinger, K. E.; Byoun, J. S.; Dobes, Z.; Thielman, C. Y.

    1988-01-01

    Sophisticated computer systems are being developed to assist in the human decision-making process for very complex tasks performed under stressful conditions. The human-computer interface is a critical factor in these systems. The human-computer interface should be simple and natural to use, require a minimal learning period, assist the user in accomplishing his task(s) with a minimum of distraction, present output in a form that best conveys information to the user, and reduce cognitive load for the user. In pursuit of this ideal, the Intelligent Multi-Media Interfaces project is devoted to the development of interface technology that integrates speech, natural language text, graphics, and pointing gestures for human-computer dialogues. The objective of the project is to develop interface technology that uses the media/modalities intelligently in a flexible, context-sensitive, and highly integrated manner modelled after the manner in which humans converse in simultaneous coordinated multiple modalities. As part of the project, a knowledge-based interface system, called CUBRICON (CUBRC Intelligent CONversationalist) is being developed as a research prototype. The application domain being used to drive the research is that of military tactical air control.

  2. Theology and disaster studies: The need for dialogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chester, David K.

    2005-09-01

    In hazard analysis the conventional wisdom holds that disasters are features of either human vulnerability and/or de-moralised nature. The notion of the 'Act of God' has been almost completely replaced. Using examples of volcanic eruptions and Christian theology, it is argued that many actual and potential victims of hazards continue to explain losses in theistic terms; even in societies where individuals are aware of alternative scientific and social explanations. In Christianity attempts to reconcile God's love, justice and omnipotence on the one hand and human suffering on the other, is termed theodicy, and it is proposed that recent developments allow more fruitful dialogue to take place between hazard analysts and theologians than has been the case hitherto. During the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction (1990-2000) a consensus emerged that, if responses to disaster are to be successfully managed, then an awareness of local culture is vitally important. This consensus has continued, as research agendas are currently being formulated for the International Strategy for Disaster Reduction. In many disaster prone regions, religion is an essential element of culture and must be carefully considered in the planning process, and not simply dismissed as a symptom of ignorance, superstition and backwardness.

  3. Decision-making through dialogue: reconfiguring autonomy in genetic counseling.

    PubMed

    White, M T

    1998-01-01

    Nondirective genetic counseling developed as a means of promoting informed and independent decision-making. To the extent that it minimizes risks of coercion, this counseling approach effectively respects client autonomy. However, it also permits clients to make partially informed, poorly reasoned or ethically questionable choices, and denies counselors a means of demonstrating accountability for the use of their services. These practical and ethical tensions result from an excessive focus on noncoercion while neglecting the contribution of adequate information and deliberative competence to autonomous decision-making. A counseling approach that emphasizes the role of deliberation may more reliably produce thoroughly reasoned decisions. In such an approach, characterized by dialogue, counselors are responsible for ensuring that decisions are fully informed and carefully deliberated. Counseling remains nonprescriptive, but in the course of discussion counselors may introduce unsolicited information and/or challenge what they believe are questionable choices. By this means clients can be better assured that the decisions they make are fully considered, while counselors demonstrate a limited degree of professional accountability. PMID:9564083

  4. [Ethics, medical ethics, and occupational medicine: is their dialogue possible?].

    PubMed

    Buzzi, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    Today's medicine faces some critical moral challenges, yet the medical class suffers from an increasingly evident malaise: a growing dissatisfaction with an ethical demand often perceived as a cumbersome burden of rules and prohibitions, which risk to erode the fiduciary relations with patients. Such a negative appraisal is partly due to a narrow interpretation of the meaning of ethics, a misconception whose roots are in the positivistic stance that permeates our culture, and in its almost exclusively technological bent. This radical orientation of our culture shows itself in the vanishing of the idea of an intrinsic ethical dimension of medicine and consequent eclipse of traditional medical ethics, currently all but assimilated by bioethics. Maintaining a clear distinction between medical ethics and bioethics is a fundamental condition for guaranteeing an original ethical reflection in medicine, thereby fostering a constructive dialogue between philosophical and medical ethics. In this sense, occupational medicine holds a very propitious position, at the cross-roads to some of the most important dimensions in human life and society: health, work, environment. In a milieu which is too often inclined to efface the living human being and the deepest needs of humanity, the moral commitment of medical profession to the care of the integral reality of the embodied human person is one of the most important ethical challenges facing occupational medicine and a most valuable contribution to the current ethical debate. PMID:26822241

  5. Lifestyle Shapes the Dialogue between Environment, Microglia, and Adult Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Valero, Jorge; Paris, Iñaki; Sierra, Amanda

    2016-04-20

    Lifestyle modulates brain function. Diet, stress levels, and physical exercise among other factors influence the "brain cognitive reserve", that is, the capacity of the brain to maintain a normal function when confronting neurodegenerative diseases, injury, and/or aging. This cognitive reserve relays on several cellular and molecular elements that contribute to brain plasticity allowing adaptive responses to cognitive demands, and one of its key components is the hippocampal neurogenic reserve. Hippocampal neural stem cells give rise to new neurons that integrate into the local circuitry and contribute to hippocampal functions such as memory and learning. Importantly, adult hippocampal neurogenesis is well-known to be modulated by the demands of the environment and lifestyle factors. Diet, stress, and physical exercise directly act on neural stem cells and/or their progeny, but, in addition, they may also indirectly affect neurogenesis by acting on microglia. Microglia, the guardians of the brain, rapidly sense changes in the brain milieu, and it has been recently shown that their function is affected by lifestyle factors. However, few studies have analyzed the modulatory effect of microglia on adult neurogenesis in these conditions. Here, we review the current knowledge about the dialogue maintained between microglia and the hippocampal neurogenic cascade. Understanding how the communication between microglia and hippocampal neurogenesis is affected by lifestyle choices is crucial to maintain the brain cognitive reserve and prevent the maladaptive responses that emerge during disease or injury through adulthood and aging. PMID:26971802

  6. Nietzche's echo--a dialogue with Thomas Altizer.

    PubMed

    Moss, David M

    2010-03-01

    Prophets provoke psychological unrest, especially when exposing accepted beliefs as profound deceptions. The biblical prophets exemplify such confrontation as do certain atheists ardently opposed to the images of God created by those seers. The German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche dramatically illustrates this type of counterforce to the Judeo-Christian tradition. His prophet Zarathustra is intended to be a model for the modern mind, one free of superstitions inflicted by antiquated religious dogma. Nietzsche's credo "God is dead" served as a declaration for the nineteenth century. In the twentieth century, it became a theological diagnosis. As a "movement," or "tenor," the death of God or radical theology was spearheaded by Thomas Altizer, a well-published young professor center-staged during the turbulent 1960s. His work foreshadows a new strain of atheism currently represented by biologist Richard Dawkins (2006, The God delusion. New York: Houghton Mifflin), philosopher Daniel Dennett (2006, Breaking the spell. New York: Penquin), neuroscientist Sam Harris (2004, The end of faith. New York: W.W. Norton; 2008, Letter to a Christian nation. New York: Vintage), journalist Christopher Hitchens (2007, God is not great. New York: Twelve), and mathematician John Allen Paulos (Paulos 2008, Irreligion. New York: Hill & Wang). This twenty-first century crusade against belief in God is best understood as a psychodynamic ignited by Altizer's Christian atheism. The present dialogue reflects that dynamic while the prologue and epilogue reveal evidence of Providence amidst claims of God's demise in contemporary history. PMID:19399624

  7. The Kidney Research National Dialogue: Gearing Up to Move Forward

    PubMed Central

    Bonventre, Joseph V.; Boulware, L. Ebony; Dember, Laura M.; Freedman, Barry I.; Furth, Susan L.; Holzman, Lawrence B.; Ketchum, Christian J.; Little, Melissa H.; Mehrotra, Rajnish; Moe, Sharon M.; Sands, Jeff M.; Sedor, John R.; Somlo, Stefan; Star, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases–supported Kidney Research National Dialogue asked the scientific community to formulate and prioritize research objectives that would improve our understanding of kidney function and disease; >1600 participants from >30 countries posted >300 ideas and >500 comments covering all areas of kidney research. Smaller groups of investigators interrogated the postings and published a series of commentaries in CJASN. Additional review of the entire series identified six cross-cutting themes: (1) increase training and team science opportunities to maintain/expand the nephrology workforce, (2) develop novel technologies to assess kidney function, (3) promote human discovery research to better understand normal and diseased kidney function, (4) establish integrative models of kidney function to inform diagnostic and treatment strategies, (5) promote interventional studies that incorporate more responsive outcomes and improved trial designs, and (6) foster translation from clinical investigation to community implementation. Together, these cross-cutting themes provide a research plan to better understand normal kidney biology and improve the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of kidney disease, and as such, they will inform future research efforts supported by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases through workshops and initiatives. PMID:25225184

  8. Notes for a dialogue between psychoanalysis and neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Scalzone, Franco

    2005-10-01

    The author postulates that the dialogue between psychoanalysis and neuroscience is based on the assumption that both deal with virtual structures. They are two facets of the same noumenal reality, but with different phenomenal realities, and it is possible to use metapsychology as a lingua franca to develop communication between the two fields. In the second part of the paper, the author reflects on the results of recent neurophysiological research which seem to offer to psychoanalysis possibilities for finding an anatomical physiological correlate of some well-known psychic phenomena and mechanisms, such as imitation, introjection, identification, empathy, identity, mother child communication, learning, social communication and the analyst patient relationship. Particular neurons, called mirror neurons, have been located in the F5 area of baboons' brains. They are also present in man's brain within Broca's area. These neurons activate our motor system during both the performance of actions and the observation of actions performed by others giving rise to an automatic response, a sort of simulation or, rather, imitation, as the process is not intentional, but automatic and unaware, that is, unconscious. PMID:16174615

  9. Information leakage resistant quantum dialogue against collective noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, TianYu

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, two information leakage resistant quantum dialogue (QD) protocols over a collective-noise channel are proposed. Decoherence-free subspace (DFS) is used to erase the influence from two kinds of collective noise, i.e., collective-dephasing noise and collective-rotation noise, where each logical qubit is composed of two physical qubits and free from noise. In each of the two proposed protocols, the secret messages are encoded on the initial logical qubits via two composite unitary operations. Moreover, the single-photon measurements rather than the Bell-state measurements or the more complicated measurements are needed for decoding, making the two proposed protocols easier to implement. The initial state of each logical qubit is privately shared between the two authenticated users through the direct transmission of its auxiliary counterpart. Consequently, the information leakage problem is avoided in the two proposed protocols. Moreover, the detailed security analysis also shows that Eve's several famous active attacks can be effectively overcome, such as the Trojan horse attack, the intercept-resend attack, the measure-resend attack, the entangle-measure attack and the correlation-elicitation (CE) attack.

  10. The kidney research national dialogue: gearing up to move forward.

    PubMed

    Bonventre, Joseph V; Boulware, L Ebony; Dember, Laura M; Freedman, Barry I; Furth, Susan L; Holzman, Lawrence B; Ketchum, Christian J; Little, Melissa H; Mehrotra, Rajnish; Moe, Sharon M; Sands, Jeff M; Sedor, John R; Somlo, Stefan; Star, Robert A; Rys-Sikora, Krystyna E

    2014-10-01

    The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases-supported Kidney Research National Dialogue asked the scientific community to formulate and prioritize research objectives that would improve our understanding of kidney function and disease; >1600 participants from >30 countries posted >300 ideas and >500 comments covering all areas of kidney research. Smaller groups of investigators interrogated the postings and published a series of commentaries in CJASN. Additional review of the entire series identified six cross-cutting themes: (1) increase training and team science opportunities to maintain/expand the nephrology workforce, (2) develop novel technologies to assess kidney function, (3) promote human discovery research to better understand normal and diseased kidney function, (4) establish integrative models of kidney function to inform diagnostic and treatment strategies, (5) promote interventional studies that incorporate more responsive outcomes and improved trial designs, and (6) foster translation from clinical investigation to community implementation. Together, these cross-cutting themes provide a research plan to better understand normal kidney biology and improve the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of kidney disease, and as such, they will inform future research efforts supported by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases through workshops and initiatives. PMID:25225184

  11. Interpreting BOLD: towards a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Hall, Catherine N; Howarth, Clare; Kurth-Nelson, Zebulun; Mishra, Anusha

    2016-10-01

    Cognitive neuroscience depends on the use of blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to probe brain function. Although commonly used as a surrogate measure of neuronal activity, BOLD signals actually reflect changes in brain blood oxygenation. Understanding the mechanisms linking neuronal activity to vascular perfusion is, therefore, critical in interpreting BOLD. Advances in cellular neuroscience demonstrating differences in this neurovascular relationship in different brain regions, conditions or pathologies are often not accounted for when interpreting BOLD. Meanwhile, within cognitive neuroscience, the increasing use of high magnetic field strengths and the development of model-based tasks and analyses have broadened the capability of BOLD signals to inform us about the underlying neuronal activity, but these methods are less well understood by cellular neuroscientists. In 2016, a Royal Society Theo Murphy Meeting brought scientists from the two communities together to discuss these issues. Here, we consolidate the main conclusions arising from that meeting. We discuss areas of consensus about what BOLD fMRI can tell us about underlying neuronal activity, and how advanced modelling techniques have improved our ability to use and interpret BOLD. We also highlight areas of controversy in understanding BOLD and suggest research directions required to resolve these issues.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'. PMID:27574302

  12. Clarissa Spoken Dialogue System for Procedure Reading and Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hieronymus, James; Dowding, John

    2004-01-01

    Speech is the most natural modality for humans use to communicate with other people, agents and complex systems. A spoken dialogue system must be robust to noise and able to mimic human conversational behavior, like correcting misunderstandings, answering simple questions about the task and understanding most well formed inquiries or commands. The system aims to understand the meaning of the human utterance, and if it does not, then it discards the utterance as being meant for someone else. The first operational system is Clarissa, a conversational procedure reader and navigator, which will be used in a System Development Test Objective (SDTO) on the International Space Station (ISS) during Expedition 10. In the present environment one astronaut reads the procedure on a Manual Procedure Viewer (MPV) or paper, and has to stop to read or turn pages, shifting focus from the task. Clarissa is designed to read and navigate ISS procedures entirely with speech, while the astronaut has his eyes and hands engaged in performing the task. The system also provides an MPV like graphical interface so the procedure can be read visually. A demo of the system will be given.

  13. Accessibility of electronically mediated education: policy issues.

    PubMed

    Blair, Martin E; Goldmann, Hilary; Relton, Joy

    2004-01-01

    Electronic technology has transformed education systems over the past 30 years. Generally speaking, technology has been an incredible benefit for individuals with disabilities. However, the use of technology, particularly in education, has been sometimes discriminatory toward those who are unable to interact with it in the standard ways anticipated by its inventors. Disability policies have attempted to address issues of equality of opportunity for all citizens, but application of these policies to rapidly evolving technology has been difficult. In this article we provide a brief review of disability policy as it pertains to education. We also review several current policy initiatives related to higher education information technology--all of which pertain to public kindergarten through 12th-grade education. We raise questions that arise when careful thought is given to ways in which disability, education, and technology policies overlap. We anticipate that these next few pages will generate dialogue among researchers, policy makers, educators, technology engineers, and others interested in how electronically mediated education affects individuals with disabilities and how it can be used to ensure equal access to the educational benefits available in schools protected by U.S. civil rights legislation. PMID:15566041

  14. PREFACE: Padjadjaran Earth Dialogues: International Symposium on Geophysical Issues, PEDISGI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosandi, Y.; Urbassek, H. M.; Yamanaka, H.

    2016-01-01

    This issue of IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science contains selected papers presented at the Padjadjaran Earth Dialogues: International Symposium on Geophysical Issues, PEDISGI. The meeting was held from June 8 to 10, 2015, at the Bale-Sawala of Universitas Padjadjaran in Jatinangor, Indonesia. The PEDISGI is a symposium to accommodate communication between researchers, in particular geophysicists and related scientists, and to enable sharing of knowledge and research findings concerning local and global geophysical issues. The symposium was attended by 126 participants and 64 contributors from Indonesian universities and the neighbouring countries in four categories, viz. Theoretical and Computational Geophysics, Environmental Geophysics, Geophysical Explorations, and Geophysical Instrumentations and Methods. The symposium was accompanied by a dialog, discussing a chosen topic regarding environmental and geological problems of relevance for the Indonesian archipelago and the surrounding regions. For this first event the topic was ''The formation of Bandung-Basin between myths and facts: Exemplary cultural, geological and geophysical study on the evolution of the earth surface'', presented by invited speakers and local experts. This activity was aimed at extending our knowledge on this particular subject, which may have global impact. This topic was augmented by theoretical background lectures on the earth's surface formation, presented by the invited speakers of the symposium. The meeting would not have been successful without the assistance of the local organizing committee. We want to specially thank Irwan A. Dharmawan for managing the programme, Anggie Susilawati and Mia U. Hasanah for the conference administration, and Dini Fitriani for financial management. We also thank the National Geographic Indonesia for its support via the Business to Business Collaboration Program. The conference photograph can be viewed in the PDF.

  15. The cinema-cognition dialogue: a match made in brain.

    PubMed

    Dudai, Yadin

    2012-01-01

    That human evolution amalgamates biological and cultural change is taken as a given, and that the interaction of brain, body, and culture is more reciprocal then initially thought becomes apparent as the science of evolution evolves (Jablonka and Lamb, 2005). The contribution of science and technology to this evolutionary process is probably the first to come to mind. The biology of Homo sapiens permits and promotes the development of technologies and artefacts that enable us to sense and reach physical niches previously inaccessible. This extends our biological capabilities, but is also expected to create selective pressures on these capabilities. The jury is yet out on the pace at which critical biological changes take place in evolution. There is no question, however, that the kinetics of technological and cultural change is much faster, rendering the latter particularly important in the biography of the individual and the species alike. The capacity of art to enrich human capabilities is recurrently discussed by philosophers and critics (e.g., Arsitotle/Poetics, Richards, 1925; Smith and Parks, 1951; Gibbs, 1994). Yet less attention is commonly allotted to the role of the arts in the aforementioned ongoing evolutional tango. My position is that the art of cinema is particularly suited to explore the intriguing dialogue between art and the brain. Further, in the following set of brief notes, intended mainly to trigger further thinking on the subject, I posit that cinema provides an unparalleled and highly rewarding experimentation space for the mind of the individual consumer of that art. In parallel, it also provides a useful and promising device for investigating brain and cognition. PMID:22969715

  16. The cinema-cognition dialogue: a match made in brain

    PubMed Central

    Dudai, Yadin

    2012-01-01

    That human evolution amalgamates biological and cultural change is taken as a given, and that the interaction of brain, body, and culture is more reciprocal then initially thought becomes apparent as the science of evolution evolves (Jablonka and Lamb, 2005). The contribution of science and technology to this evolutionary process is probably the first to come to mind. The biology of Homo sapiens permits and promotes the development of technologies and artefacts that enable us to sense and reach physical niches previously inaccessible. This extends our biological capabilities, but is also expected to create selective pressures on these capabilities. The jury is yet out on the pace at which critical biological changes take place in evolution. There is no question, however, that the kinetics of technological and cultural change is much faster, rendering the latter particularly important in the biography of the individual and the species alike. The capacity of art to enrich human capabilities is recurrently discussed by philosophers and critics (e.g., Arsitotle/Poetics, Richards, 1925; Smith and Parks, 1951; Gibbs, 1994). Yet less attention is commonly allotted to the role of the arts in the aforementioned ongoing evolutional tango. My position is that the art of cinema is particularly suited to explore the intriguing dialogue between art and the brain. Further, in the following set of brief notes, intended mainly to trigger further thinking on the subject, I posit that cinema provides an unparalleled and highly rewarding experimentation space for the mind of the individual consumer of that art. In parallel, it also provides a useful and promising device for investigating brain and cognition. PMID:22969715

  17. The psychologist said quickly, "dialogue descriptions modulate reading speed!".

    PubMed

    Stites, Mallory C; Luke, Steven G; Christianson, Kiel

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated whether the semantic content of a dialogue description can affect reading times on an embedded quote, to determine whether the speed at which a character is described as saying a quote influences how quickly it is read. Yao and Scheepers (Cognition, 121:447-453, 2011) previously found that readers were faster to read direct quotes when the preceding context implied that the talker generally spoke quickly, an effect attributed to perceptual simulation of talker speed. For the present study, we manipulated the speed of a physical action performed by the speaker independently from character talking rate to determine whether these sources have separable effects on perceptual simulation of a direct quote. The results showed that readers spent less time reading direct quotes described as being said quickly, as compared to those described as being said slowly (e.g., John walked/bolted into the room and said energetically/nonchalantly, "I finally found my car keys."), an effect that was not present when a nearly identical phrase was presented as an indirect quote (e.g., John . . . said energetically that he finally found his car keys.). The speed of the character's movement did not affect direct-quote reading times. Furthermore, fast adverbs were themselves read significantly faster than slow adverbs, an effect that we attribute to implicit effects on the eye movement program stemming from automatically activated semantic features of the adverbs. Our findings add to the literature on perceptual simulation by showing that these effects can be instantiated with only a single adverb and are strong enough to override the effects of global sentence speed. PMID:22927027

  18. Another Link in the Chain: State Policies and Practices for Case Management and Environmental Investigation for Lead-Poisoned Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guthrie, Anne M.; McLaine, Pat

    Policy and practice for screening children for lead poisoning have dominated the dialogue about the health care system's role in lead poisoning prevention, with little attention directed to how the health care system responds to a lead-poisoned child once identified. This report details a study of the case management and environmental…

  19. Are Sexual and Reproductive Health Policies Designed for All? Vulnerable Groups in Policy Documents of Four European Countries and Their Involvement in Policy Development

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Olena; Dræbel, Tania; Tellier, Siri

    2015-01-01

    Background: Health policies are important instruments for improving population health. However, experience suggests that policies designed for the whole population do not always benefit the most vulnerable. Participation of vulnerable groups in the policy-making process provides an opportunity for them to influence decisions related to their health, and also to exercise their rights. This paper presents the findings from a study that explored how vulnerable groups and principles of human rights are incorporated into national sexual and reproductive health (SRH) policies of 4 selected countries (Spain, Scotland, Republic of Moldova, and Ukraine). It also aimed at discussing the involvement of vulnerable groups in SRH policy development from the perspective of policy-makers. Methods: Literature review, health policy analysis and 5 semi-structured interviews with policy-makers were carried out in this study. Content analysis of SRH policies was performed using the EquiFrame analytical framework. Results: The study revealed that vulnerable groups and core principles of human rights are differently addressed in SRH policies within 4 studied countries. The opinions of policy-makers on the importance of mentioning vulnerable groups in policy documents and the way they ought to be mentioned varied, but they agreed that a clear definition of vulnerability, practical examples, and evidences on health status of these groups have to be included. In addition, different approaches to vulnerable group’s involvement in policy development were identified during the interviews and the range of obstacles to this process was discussed by respondents. Conclusion: Incorporation of vulnerable groups in the SRH policies and their involvement in policy development were found to be important in addressing SRH of these groups and providing an opportunity for them to advocate for equal access to healthcare and exercise their rights. Future research on this topic should include

  20. Engaging civil society through deliberative dialogue to create the first Mental Health Strategy for Canada: Changing Directions, Changing Lives.

    PubMed

    Mulvale, Gillian; Chodos, Howard; Bartram, Mary; MacKinnon, Mary Pat; Abud, Manon

    2014-12-01

    Citizen engagement through deliberative dialogue is increasingly being used to address 'wicked problems' in policy-making, such as the development of national mental health policy. In 2012, the Mental Health Commission of Canada (MHCC), a national organization funded by and operating at arm's length from the federal government, released the first Mental Health Strategy for Canada: Changing Directions, Changing Lives (Mental Health Commission of Canada, 2012). Despite much-needed reform, Canada, unlike most other industrialized countries, had never previously developed a national Mental Health Strategy (the Strategy). This was due to a mix of policy factors, including a federalist system of government where primary responsibility for healthcare resides with provincial and territorial governments and a highly diverse set of stakeholder groups with diverging core ideas for mental health reform that were rooted in deeply held value differences. In this case study, we review the essential role that engagement of civil society played in the creation of the Strategy, beginning with the efforts to create a national body to shine the light on the need for mental health reform in Canada, followed by the development of a framework of specific goals based on core principles to guide the development of the Strategy, and ultimately, the creation of the Strategy itself. We discuss the various approaches to civil society engagement in each step of this process and focus in particular on how deliberative approaches helped build trust and common ground amongst stakeholders around complex, and often contentious, issues. The nature and outcomes of the deliberative processes including the key tensions between different stakeholder perspectives and values are described. We close by highlighting the lessons learned in a process that culminated with a Strategy that received strong endorsement from stakeholders across Canada. Mental Health Commission of Canada (2012). Changing Directions