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Sample records for kidney 2-vessel cord

  1. Down syndrome serum screening also identifies an increased risk for multicystic dysplastic kidney, 2-vessel cord, and hydrocele

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Jodi D.; Sullivan, Lisa M.; Mackinnon, Brenda L.; Collins, Jamie; Malone, Fergal D.; Porter, T. Flint; Nyberg, David A.; Comstock, Christine H.; Bukowski, Radek; Berkowitz, Richard L.; Gross, Susan J.; Dugoff, Lorraine; Craigo, Sabrina D.; Timor-Tritsch, Ilan E.; Carr, Stephen R.; Wolfe, Honor M.; D'Alton, Mary E.

    2008-01-01

    Objective The FASTER trial compared 1st and 2nd trimester screening methods for aneuploidy. We examined relationships between maternal serum markers and common congenital anomalies in the pediatric outcome data set of 36,837 subjects. Methods We used nested case control studies, with cases defined by the most common anomalies in our follow-up database, and up to four controls matched by enrollment site, maternal age and race, enrollment gestational age, and infant gender. Serum markers were dichotomized to ≥ 2 or < 0.5 multiples of the median (MoM). Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (C.I.) were estimated. Results Statistically significant (p < 0.05) associations were found between inhibin A ≥ 2 MoM and fetal multicystic dysplastic kidney (MCDK) (odds ratio (OR) =27.5, 95% C.I.: 2.8-267.7) and 2-vessel cord (OR=4.22, 95% CI:1.6-10.9), hCG of ≥ 2 MoM with MCDK (OR=19.56, 95% CI: 1.9-196.2) and hydrocele (OR=2.48, 95% CI: 1.3-4.6), and PAPPA ≥ 2.0 MoM with hydrocele (OR=1.88, 95% CI:1.1-3.3). Conclusion In this large prospective study, significant associations were found between several maternal serum markers and congenital anomalies. This suggests potential additional benefits to screening programs that are primarily designed to detect aneuploidy. PMID:19034930

  2. Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell transplantation ameliorates burn-induced acute kidney injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, Gang; Huang, Sha; Chen, Yongbin; Ma, Kui

    2013-09-01

    Excessive systemic inflammation following burns could lead to acute kidney injury (AKI). Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) suppress immune cell responses and have beneficial effects in various inflammatory-related immune disorders. However, autologous MSCs are not vital enough for the treatment because of the severely burned patients' deleterious condition. Umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) could be a suitable substitute cell candidate but no data are available on the therapeutic effectiveness of UC-MSCs transplantation for burn injury and its consequences. In this study, UC-MSCs or ulinastatin was administered intravenously in the rats with burn trauma, and the therapeutic effects of UC-MSCs on the survival of severe burn-induced AKI rats and functional protection of kidney were analyzed. Results showed that UC-MSCs promoted the survival and prevented commitment to apoptosis of resident kidney cells and reduced organ microscopic damage in kidneys after thermal trauma. Thus, our study demonstrates that intravenously delivered UC-MSCs protected the host from death caused by kidney injury subsequent to severe burn, identifying UC-MSCs transplantation may be an attractive candidate for cell-based treatments for burns and induced organ damage. PMID:24043673

  3. Improved Protective Effect of Umbilical Cord Stem Cell Transplantation on Cisplatin-Induced Kidney Injury in Mice Pretreated with Antithymocyte Globulin

    PubMed Central

    Večerić-Haler, Željka; Erman, Andreja; Cerar, Anton; Motaln, Helena; Kološa, Katja; Lah Turnšek, Tamara; Sodin Šemrl, Snežna; Lakota, Katja; Mrak-Poljšak, Katjuša; Škrajnar, Špela; Kranjc, Simona; Arnol, Miha; Perše, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are recognised as a promising tool to improve renal recovery in experimental models of cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury. However, these preclinical studies were performed on severely immunodeficient animals. Here, we investigated whether human umbilical cord derived MSC treatment could equally ameliorate acute kidney injury induced by cisplatin and prolong survival in mice with a normal immune system and those with a suppressed immune system by polyclonal antithymocyte globulin (ATG). We demonstrated that ATG pretreatment, when followed by MSC transplantation, significantly improved injured renal function parameters, as evidenced by decreased blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine concentration, as well as improved renal morphology. This tissue restoration was also supported by increased survival of mice. The beneficial effects of ATG were associated with reduced level of inflammatory protein serum amyloid A3 and induced antioxidative expression of superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD-1), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and hem oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Infused MSCs became localised predominantly in peritubular areas and acted to reduce renal cell death. In conclusion, these results show that ATG diminished in situ inflammation and oxidative stress associated with cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury, the effects that may provide more favourable microenvironment for MSC action, with consequential synergistic improvements in renal injury and animal survival as compared to MSC treatment alone. PMID:26880955

  4. Extracellular membrane vesicles from umbilical cord blood-derived MSC protect against ischemic acute kidney injury, a feature that is lost after inflammatory conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Kilpinen, Lotta; Impola, Ulla; Sankkila, Lotta; Ritamo, Ilja; Aatonen, Maria; Kilpinen, Sami; Tuimala, Jarno; Valmu, Leena; Levijoki, Jouko; Finckenberg, Piet; Siljander, Pia; Kankuri, Esko; Mervaala, Eero; Laitinen, Saara

    2013-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are shown to have a great therapeutic potential in many immunological disorders. Currently the therapeutic effect of MSCs is considered to be mediated via paracrine interactions with immune cells. Umbilical cord blood is an attractive but still less studied source of MSCs. We investigated the production of extracellular membrane vesicles (MVs) from human umbilical cord blood derived MSCs (hUCBMSC) in the presence (MVstim) or absence (MVctrl) of inflammatory stimulus. Methods hUCBMSCs were cultured in serum free media with or without IFN-γ and MVs were collected from conditioned media by ultracentrifugation. The protein content of MVs were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Hypoxia induced acute kidney injury rat model was used to analyze the in vivo therapeutic potential of MVs and T-cell proliferation and induction of regulatory T cells were analyzed by co-culture assays. Results Both MVstim and MVctrl showed similar T-cell modulation activity in vitro, but only MVctrls were able to protect rat kidneys from reperfusion injury in vivo. To clarify this difference in functionality we made a comparative mass spectrometric analysis of the MV protein contents. The IFN-γ stimulation induced dramatic changes in the protein content of the MVs. Complement factors (C3, C4A, C5) and lipid binding proteins (i.e apolipoproteins) were only found in the MVctrls, whereas the MVstim contained tetraspanins (CD9, CD63, CD81) and more complete proteasome complex accompanied with MHCI. We further discovered that differently produced MV pools contained specific Rab proteins suggesting that same cells, depending on external signals, produce vesicles originating from different intracellular locations. Conclusions We demonstrate by both in vitro and in vivo models accompanied with a detailed analysis of molecular characteristics that inflammatory conditioning of MSCs influence on the protein content and functional properties of MVs revealing the

  5. Spinal Cord Stimulation in the Treatment of Postherpetic Neuralgia in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: A Case Series and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Baek, In Yeob; Park, Ju Yeon; Kim, Hyae Jin; Yoon, Ji Uk; Byoen, Gyeong Jo

    2011-01-01

    Background Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) is usually managed pharmacologically. It is not uncommon for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) to suffer from PHN. It is difficult to prescribe a sufficient dose of anticonvulsants for intractable pain because of the decreased glomerular filtration rate. If the neural blockade and pulsed radiofrequency ablation provide only short-term amelioration of pain, spinal cord stimulation (SCS) with a low level of evidence may be used only as a last resort. This study was done to evaluate the efficacy of spinal cord stimulation in the treatment of PHN in patients with CKD. Methods PHN patients with CKD who needed hemo-dialysis who received insufficient relief of pain over a VAS of 8 regardless of the neuropathic medications were eligible for SCS trial. The follow-up period was at least 2 years after permanent implantation. Results Eleven patients received percutaneous SCS test trial from Jan 2003 to Dec 2007. Four patients had successfully received a permanent SCS implant with their pain being tolerable at a VAS score of less than 3 along with small doses of neuropathic medications. Conclusions SCS was helpful in managing tolerable pain levels in some PHN patients with CKD along with tolerable neuropathic medications for over 2 years. PMID:21935494

  6. TMI-2 Vessel Investigation Project integration report

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, J. R.; Rempe, J. L.; Stickler, L. A.; Korth, G. E.; Diercks, D. R.; Neimark, L. A.; Akers, D W; Schuetz, B. K.; Shearer, T L; Chavez, S. A.; Thinnes, G. L.; Witt, R. J.; Corradini, M L; Kos, J. A.

    1994-03-01

    The Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) Vessel Investigation Project (VIP) was an international effort that was sponsored by the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The primary objectives of the VIP were to extract and examine samples from the lower head and to evaluate the potential modes of failure and the margin of structural integrity that remained in the TMI-2 reactor vessel during the accident. This report presents a summary of the major findings and conclusions that were developed from research during the VIP. Results from the various elements of the project are integrated to form a cohesive understanding of the vessel`s condition after the accident.

  7. Enhanced renoprotective effect of IGF-1 modified human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells on gentamicin-induced acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pengfei; Feng, Yetong; Dong, Delu; Liu, Xiaobo; Chen, Yaoyu; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Yulai

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic action of umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) against acute kidney injury (AKI) has been demonstrated by several groups. However, how to further enhance the renoprotective effect of UC-MSCs and improve the therapy effect, are still unclear. In this study, we mainly investigated whether insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1)-modified UC-MSCs hold an enhanced protective effect on gentamicin-induced AKI in vivo. Our results indicated that the IGF-1 overexpression could enhance the therapeutic action of human UC-MSCs, and the AKI rats treated with IGF-1-overexpressed UC-MSCs (UC-MSCs-IGF-1) showed better recovery of biochemical variables in serum or urine associated with renal function, histological injury and renal apoptosis, compared with AKI rats treated with normal UC-MSCs. RNA microarray analysis indicated that some key genes in the signal pathways associated with anti-oxidation, anti-inflammatory, and cell migratory capacity were up-regulated in UC-MSCs-IGF-1, and the results were further confirmed with qPCR. Furthermore, a series of detection in vitro and in vivo indicated that the UC-MSCs-IGF-1 hold better anti-oxidation, anti-inflammatory, and cell migratory capacity for IGF-1 overexpression. Thus, our study indicated that enhancement of UC-MSCs bioactivities with IGF-1 overexpression could increase the UC-MSCs therapeutic potential and further developed a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of AKI. PMID:26830766

  8. Effect of kidney-reinforcing and marrow-beneficial Chinese medicine on bone metabolism-related factors following spinal cord injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, DA-AN; DENG, YUE NING; LIU, LEI; LI, JIAN JUN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of traditional Chinese kidney reinforcing and marrow-beneficial medicine (KRMB) on the prevention and treatment of abnormal bone metabolism and osteoporosis (OP) resulting from spinal cord injury (SCI). Rat models of OP following SCI were surgically established. The rats were randomly divided into five groups: Normal; sham operation + KRMB; normal + KRMB; SCI + KRMB; and SCI model group. Bone mineral density (BMD), and the expression of bone gamma-carboxyglutamic-acid containing protein (BGP), hepcidin mRNA and bone sialoprotein (BSP) were recorded at 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 weeks after the operation. BMD expression in the SCI model group was significantly lower compared with the normal, sham + KRMB and normal + KRMB groups at 4, 6, 8 and 10 weeks (P<0.01), and was significantly lower than that in the SCI + KRMB group at 6 (P<0.05), 8 and 10 weeks (P<0.01). The level of serum BGP in the SCI model group was significantly higher compared with the normal, sham + KRMB and normal + KRMB groups at each time point (P<0.01), and lower than the SCI + KRMB group (P<0.01). The SCI + KRMB group was significantly higher than the normal, sham operation + KRMB and normal + KRMB groups (P<0.01). Hepcidin mRNA expression in the rat livers in the normal, sham + KRMB and normal + KRMB group was significantly higher than that in the SCI + KRMB group and SCI model group at each time point (P<0.01). Hepcidin mRNA expression in the SCI + KRMB group was significantly higher than that in the SCI model group at 1 week (P<0.01), and significantly higher than the SCI model group at 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 weeks (P<0.01). BSP expression in the SCI model group was significantly higher than that in the normal, sham + KRMB and normal + KRMB groups at each time point (P<0.01). BSP expression in SCI model group was higher than that in the SCI + KRMB group at 1 (P<0.05), 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 weeks (P<0.01). In conclusion, KRMB traditional Chinese medicine may

  9. Cord Blood and Transplants

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  10. Kidney Failure

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    ... if You Have Kidney Disease Kidney Failure Expand Dialysis Kidney Transplant Preparing for Kidney Failure Treatment Choosing Not to Treat with Dialysis or Transplant Paying for Kidney Failure Treatment Contact ...

  11. Spinal cord trauma

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    Spinal cord injury; Compression of spinal cord; SCI; Cord compression ... them more likely to fall may also have spinal cord injury. ... vary depending on the location of the injury. Spinal cord injury causes weakness and loss of feeling at, and ...

  12. Kidney Facts

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    ... Home / Before The Transplant / Organ Facts / Kidney Organ Facts Heart Lung Heart/Lung Kidney Pancreas Kidney/Pancreas Liver ... Receiving "the call" About the Operation Heart Lung Heart/Lung Kidney Pancreas Kidney/Pancreas Liver Intestine Kidney Facts The kidneys are a pair of reddish-brown ...

  13. Kidney Transplant

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    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  14. Kidney Cysts

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    ... fluid-filled sac. There are two types of kidney cysts. Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) runs in families. In PKD, the ... place of the normal tissue. They enlarge the kidneys and make them work poorly, leading to kidney ...

  15. Your Kidneys

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    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Your Kidneys KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Kidneys Print A A ... and it will be lighter. What Else Do Kidneys Do? Kidneys are always busy. Besides filtering the ...

  16. Kidney Disease

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  17. Kidney Cysts

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    ... are two types of kidney cysts. Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) runs in families. In PKD, the cysts ... failure, dialysis or kidney transplants. Acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD) usually happens in people who are on ...

  18. Kidney Dysplasia

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  19. Kidney Disease

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    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Kidney Disease What is Kidney Disease? What the Kidneys Do Click for more information You have two ... damaged, wastes can build up in the body. Kidney Function and Aging Kidney function may be reduced ...

  20. Kidney Diseases

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    ... until you go to the bathroom. Most kidney diseases attack the nephrons. This damage may leave kidneys ... medicines. You have a higher risk of kidney disease if you have diabetes, high blood pressure, or ...

  1. Kidney Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... taking out waste products and making urine. Kidney tests check to see how well your kidneys are working. They include blood, urine, and imaging tests. Early kidney disease usually does not have signs ...

  2. Kidney Failure

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    ... enough red blood cells. This is called kidney failure. If your kidneys fail, you need treatment to ... providers, family, and friends, most people with kidney failure can lead full and active lives. NIH: National ...

  3. Kidney Problems

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    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Kidney Problems Basic Facts & Information The kidneys are two ... the production of red blood cells. What are Kidney Diseases? For about one-third of older people, ...

  4. Kidney stones

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... urine exits the kidney and enters the ureter. As urine can become very concentrated as it passes through the kidneys. When the urine ... chemicals dissolved in the urine can crystallize, forming a kidney stone (renal calculus). Usually the calculus is ...

  5. Kidney Diseases

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    ... until you go to the bathroom. Most kidney diseases attack the nephrons. This damage may leave kidneys ... medicines. You are at greater risk for kidney disease if you have diabetes, high blood pressure, or ...

  6. Kidney Biopsy

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    ... F For More Information National Kidney Foundation MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... Disease Organizations​​ . (PDF, 345 KB) Alternate Language URL Kidney Biopsy Page Content On this page: What is ...

  7. Solitary Kidney

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    ... Institute, Inc., Kidney School National Kidney Foundation MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... Organizations​​ . (PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Solitary Kidney Page Content On this page: What is a ...

  8. Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome

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    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome? Tethered spinal cord syndrome is a neurological ...

  9. Spinal Cord Infarction

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  10. Spinal Cord Diseases

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    Your spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of your back. It carries signals back ... of the spine, this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injuries

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    Your spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of your back. It carries signals back ... forth between your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually ...

  12. Kidney Biopsy

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  13. Kidney removal

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    ... the surgical cut is located. Recovery after a laparoscopic procedure is most often quicker, with less pain. Outlook (Prognosis) The outcome is most often good when a single kidney is removed. If both kidneys are removed, ...

  14. Kidney stones

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  15. Kidney Failure

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  16. Ectopic Kidney

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  17. Kidney transplant

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  18. Kidney Dysplasia

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  19. American Kidney Fund

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  20. HIV and Kidney Disease

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  1. Intramolecular group transfer is a characteristic of neurotoxic esterase and is independent of the tissue source of the enzyme. A comparison of the aging behaviour of di-isopropyl phosphorofluoridate-labelled proteins in brain, spinal cord, liver, kidney and spleen from hen and in human placenta.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, D G

    1983-01-01

    Neurotoxic esterase activity was measured in homogenates of human placenta and hen brain, spinal cord, liver, kidney and spleen. The activity in liver comprised less than 20% of the Paraoxon-resistant esterases, but in the other tissues neurotoxic esterase accounted for over 50%. The same tissues were labelled with [3H]di-isopropyl phosphorofluoridate, and any isopropyl group transferred on to protein during 'aging' of the labelled enzymes (alkali-volatilizable tritium) was measured. No Paraoxon-sensitive labelled sites were found to age in this way in any tissue. In brain, the Paraoxon-resistant alkali-volatilizable-tritium-labelled sites correlated with the number of neurotoxic esterase labelled sites, indicating that 'aging' and isopropyl group transfer were 100% efficient. The site receiving the transferred isopropyl group was characterized by analysing the distribution of radiolabelled proteins on gel-filtration chromatography in the presence of SDS. In particulate preparations from each tissue, the protein-bound alkali-volatilizable tritium (transferred isopropyl group) was attached to a polypeptide of Mr 178 000. This same polypeptide also bore the isopropyl-phosphoryl group of neurotoxic esterase, indicating that aging of neurotoxic esterase is an intramolecular group transfer. The apparent turnover number for the enzyme (average 1.6 X 10(5) min-1) was approximately the same in each hen tissue, confirming that closely similar enzymes were present in brain, spinal cord, liver and spleen. The apparent turnover for the human enzyme was 1.8-fold higher than that for the hen enzyme. The concentration of the neurotoxic esterase phosphorylated subunit in brain, spinal cord, spleen, placenta and liver was 14.6, 3.8, 7.4, 3.3 and 3.8 pmol/g of tissue. The evidence indicated that neurotoxic esterase is present in each tissue except kidney, and that isopropyl group transfer on 'aging' occurs on this enzyme only. This process is an intramolecular transfer of the group

  2. Kidney biopsy

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    ... Goodpasture syndrome IgA nephropathy Interstitial nephritis Lupus nephritis Medullary cystic kidney disease Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis Membranous nephropathy Minimal change disease Nephrotic ...

  3. Spinal cord stimulation

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    Spinal cord stimulation is a treatment for pain that uses a mild electric current to block nerve impulses ... stretched into the space on top of your spinal cord. These wires will be connected to a small ...

  4. Spinal Cord Diseases

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    ... this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such as meningitis and polio Inflammatory diseases Autoimmune diseases Degenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury Map

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    ... on the severity of the injury. Tap this spinal column to see how the level of injury affects loss of function and control. Learn more about spinal cord injuries. A spinal cord injury affects the ...

  6. Kidney Cancer

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    You have two kidneys. They are fist-sized organs on either side of your backbone above your waist. The tubes inside filter and ... blood, taking out waste products and making urine. Kidney cancer forms in the lining of tiny tubes ...

  7. Kidney Stones

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    ... be signs of kidney stones that need a doctor's help: Extreme pain in your back or side that will not go away Blood in your urine Fever and chills Vomiting Urine that smells bad or looks cloudy A burning feeling when you urinate Your doctor will diagnose a kidney stone with urine, blood, ...

  8. Ectopic Kidney

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    ... Human Development March of Dimes National Office MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... Organizations​​ . (PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Ectopic Kidney Page Content On this page: What is an ...

  9. Calculations to estimate the margin to failure in the TMI-2 vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Stickler, L.A.; Rempe, J.L.; Chavez, S.A.; Thinnes, G.L.; Snow, S.D.; Witt, R.J.; Corradini, M.L.; Kos, J.A.

    1994-03-01

    As part of the OECD-sponsored Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) Vessel Investigation Project (VIP), margin-to-failure calculations for mechanisms having the potential to threaten the integrity of the vessel were performed to improve understanding of events that occurred during the TMI-2 accident. Analyses considered four failure mechanisms: tube rupture, tube ejection, global vessel failure, and localized vessel failure. Calculational input was based on data from the TMI-2 VIP examinations of the vessel steel samples, the instrument tube nozzles, and samples of the hard layer of debris found on the TMI-2 vessel lower head. Sensitivity studies were performed to investigate the uncertainties in key parameters for these analyses.

  10. Spinal Cord Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... forth between your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually begin with a blow that fractures or ... down on the nerve parts that carry signals. Spinal cord injuries can be complete or incomplete. With a complete ...

  11. Kidney disease - resources

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    Resources - kidney disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on kidney disease: National Kidney Disease Education Program -- www.nkdep.nih.gov National Kidney Foundation -- www.kidney.org National ...

  12. Chronic Kidney Diseases

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    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Chronic Kidney Diseases KidsHealth > For Kids > Chronic Kidney Diseases Print ... re talking about your kidneys. What Are the Kidneys? Your kidneys are tucked under your lower ribs ...

  13. Kidney transplant

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    ... series References Barry JM, Conlin MJ. In: Renal transplantation. Wein AJ, ed. Campbell-Walsh Urology . 10th ed. ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Kidney Transplantation Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  14. Kidney stones

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    ... kidney or ureter. It uses sound or shock waves to break up stones. Then, the stone fragments ... the urine. It is also called extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy or ESWL. Procedures performed by passing a ...

  15. The mechanism of renin release from the ischaemic kidney

    PubMed Central

    Labal, S.E.; Pola, J.L.; Seeber, A. Martinez; Taquini, A.C.

    1974-01-01

    The re-establishment of blood flow to an ischaemic kidney produced an elevation of blood pressure in the rat. This response did not occur in animals with a pithed spinal cord or in rats with low blood pressure produced by haemorrhage. When the blood pressure was raised in rats with pithed spinal cords, by the intravenous infusion of noradrenaline, the response was restored. Occlusion of the subclavian arteries did not prevent the response. It is considered that the increase in blood pressure, produced by renin release, after re-establishment of the blood flow in an ischaemic kidney is a 'washout' phenomenon independent of the integrity of the nervous system. PMID:4447861

  16. Kidney Disease Basics

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    ... Links Take the first step Alternate Language URL Kidney Disease Basics Page Content Your kidneys filter extra water ... blood pressure are the most common causes of kidney disease. ​These conditions can slowly damage the kidneys over ...

  17. Diabetes and Kidney Disease

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    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  18. Pregnancy and Kidney Disease

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    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  19. About Chronic Kidney Disease

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    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  20. Kidney-Pancreas Transplant

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    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  1. Polycystic kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    Cysts - kidneys; Kidney - polycystic; Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease; ADPKD ... Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is passed down through families (inherited). The 2 inherited forms of PKD are autosomal dominant ...

  2. Kidney Stones (For Parents)

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    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Kidney Stones KidsHealth > For Parents > Kidney Stones Print A ... remove the stones from their urinary tracts. How Kidney Stones Form It's the kidneys' job to remove ...

  3. Kidney Stones in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nephrology American Kidney Fund National Kidney Foundation MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... Disease Organizations​​ . (PDF, 345 KB) Alternate Language URL Kidney Stones in Children Page Content On this page: ...

  4. Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders Go Back Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders Email Print + Share The kidneys filter the ... but some less serious ones occur more frequently. Kidney stones These are probably the most commonly encountered ...

  5. Chronic kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic kidney disease is the slow loss of kidney function over time. The main job of the kidneys is to ... Chronic kidney disease (CKD) slowly gets worse over months or years. You may not notice any symptoms for some time. ...

  6. Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD)

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    MENU Return to Web version Polycystic Kidney Disease Overview What is polycystic kidney disease? Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is an inherited disease that affects the kidneys. Sacs of fluid (called ...

  7. National Kidney Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  8. Polycystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... a kidney transplant or blood-filtering treatments called dialysis. The two main types of PKD are autosomal ... so people with kidney failure must receive either dialysis or a kidney transplant to replace kidney function. ...

  9. Kidney pain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A kidney stone is a solid piece of material that forms in a kidney. Kidney stones may be the size of sand or gravel, ... A kidney stone is a solid piece of material that forms in a kidney. Kidney stones may be the size ...

  10. Kidney pain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A kidney stone is a solid piece of material that forms in a kidney. Kidney stones may be the size of sand or ... A kidney stone is a solid piece of material that forms in a kidney. Kidney stones may be the ...

  11. Modeling spinal cord biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, Carlos; Shah, Sameer; Cohen, Avis; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-02-01

    Regeneration after spinal cord injury is a serious health issue and there is no treatment for ailing patients. To understand regeneration of the spinal cord we used a system where regeneration occurs naturally, such as the lamprey. In this work, we analyzed the stress response of the spinal cord to tensile loading and obtained the mechanical properties of the cord both in vitro and in vivo. Physiological measurements showed that the spinal cord is pre-stressed to a strain of 10%, and during sinusoidal swimming, there is a local strain of 5% concentrated evenly at the mid-body and caudal sections. We found that the mechanical properties are homogeneous along the body and independent of the meninges. The mechanical behavior of the spinal cord can be characterized by a non-linear viscoelastic model, described by a modulus of 20 KPa for strains up to 15% and a modulus of 0.5 MPa for strains above 15%, in agreement with experimental data. However, this model does not offer a full understanding of the behavior of the spinal cord fibers. Using polymer physics we developed a model that relates the stress response as a function of the number of fibers.

  12. Dysplastic kidneys.

    PubMed

    Winyard, Paul; Chitty, Lyn S

    2008-06-01

    Dysplastic kidneys are common malformations affecting up to 1 in 1000 of the general population. They are part of the spectrum of Congenital Abnormalities of the Kidney and Urinary Tract (CAKUT) and an increasing number of children are being diagnosed on antenatal ultrasound. In the past, these patients may not have been detected until adulthood following investigation for other illness, or even as incidental findings at post mortem, unless there was severe bilateral dysplasia leading to Potter's sequence or renal failure in childhood. Excluding syndromic cases with defects in other organ systems, features linked to worse prognosis at presentation are: (1) bilateral disease; (2) decreased functional renal mass (which encompasses not just small kidneys but also large ones where cysts replace normal architecture); (3) lower urinary tract obstruction; and (4) anhydramnios or severe oligohydramnios. Dysplasia and renal function are dynamic and can evolve during pregnancy, so repeated assessment is necessary when pathology is expected. Worsening dimensions or decreasing amniotic fluid levels imply poorer prognosis, but there are no proven therapies during pregnancy, though vesicoamniotic shunting may be indicated with obstruction. Postnatal investigations aim to define the anatomy, which helps to estimate risks of infection and kidney function. Management might then involve observation, prophylactic antibiotics, surgery and/or renal support. Risks of renal malignancy and hypertension are low during childhood, but longer-term follow-up is needed, particularly to determine blood pressure and renal function in adulthood and pregnancy. Around 10% of cases have a family history of significant renal/urinary tract malformation. Monogenic causes include mutations in individual genes, such as TCF2/hepatocyte nuclear factor 1ss (HNF1beta), PAX2 and uroplakins, but there are also recent reports of children with compound heterozygote mutations in several renal/urinary tract

  13. Kidney stones.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saeed R; Pearle, Margaret S; Robertson, William G; Gambaro, Giovanni; Canales, Benjamin K; Doizi, Steeve; Traxer, Olivier; Tiselius, Hans-Göran

    2016-01-01

    Kidney stones are mineral deposits in the renal calyces and pelvis that are found free or attached to the renal papillae. They contain crystalline and organic components and are formed when the urine becomes supersaturated with respect to a mineral. Calcium oxalate is the main constituent of most stones, many of which form on a foundation of calcium phosphate called Randall's plaques, which are present on the renal papillary surface. Stone formation is highly prevalent, with rates of up to 14.8% and increasing, and a recurrence rate of up to 50% within the first 5 years of the initial stone episode. Obesity, diabetes, hypertension and metabolic syndrome are considered risk factors for stone formation, which, in turn, can lead to hypertension, chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. Management of symptomatic kidney stones has evolved from open surgical lithotomy to minimally invasive endourological treatments leading to a reduction in patient morbidity, improved stone-free rates and better quality of life. Prevention of recurrence requires behavioural and nutritional interventions, as well as pharmacological treatments that are specific for the type of stone. There is a great need for recurrence prevention that requires a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in stone formation to facilitate the development of more-effective drugs. PMID:27188687

  14. Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dramatically Improves Function After Spinal Cord Injury in Rats May 2004 press release on an experimental treatment ... NINDS). Signaling Molecule Improves Nerve Cell Regeneration in Rats August 2002 news summary on a signaling molecule ...

  15. Spinal cord abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... abscess is caused by an infection inside the spine. An abscess of the spinal cord itself is ... by a staphylococcus infection that spreads through the spine. It may be caused by tuberculosis in some ...

  16. Cord-Blood Banking

    MedlinePlus

    ... cord blood mainly because of the promise that stem cell research holds for the future. Most of us would have little use for stem cells now, but research into using them to treat diseases is ongoing — ...

  17. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Braingate" research? What is the status of stem-cell research? How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? When can we ...

  18. Testing for Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education Program > Learn About Kidney Disease > What Causes Kidney Disease? > Testing for Kidney Disease | Share External Link Disclaimer What ... from our online catalog . Alternate Language URL Español Testing for Kidney Disease Page Content Early kidney disease usually does not ...

  19. Chronic kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic; Renal failure - chronic; Chronic renal insufficiency; Chronic kidney failure; Chronic renal failure ... Chronic kidney disease (CKD) slowly gets worse over months or years. You may not notice any symptoms for some ...

  20. Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    You have two kidneys, each about the size of your fist. Their main job is to filter wastes and excess water out of ... help control blood pressure, and make hormones. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) means that your kidneys are damaged ...

  1. Diabetic Kidney Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... too high. Over time, this can damage your kidneys. Your kidneys clean your blood. If they are damaged, waste ... in your blood instead of leaving your body. Kidney damage from diabetes is called diabetic nephropathy. It ...

  2. Kidney cell electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, P.

    1980-01-01

    The following aspects of kidney cell electrophoresis are discussed: (1) the development and testing of electrophoresis solutions; (2) optimization of freezing and thawing; (3) procedures for evaluation of separated kidney cells; and (4) electrophoretic mobility characterization of kidney cells.

  3. Kidney cell electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, P.

    1979-01-01

    A kidney cell electrophoresis technique is described in four parts: (1) the development and testing of electrophoresis solutions; (2) optimization of freezing and thawing; (3) procedures for evaluation of separated kidney cells; and (4) electrophoretic mobility characteristics of kidney cells.

  4. Acute kidney failure

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure; Renal failure; Renal failure - acute; ARF; Kidney injury - acute ... There are many possible causes of kidney damage. They include: ... cholesterol (cholesterol emboli) Decreased blood flow due to very ...

  5. Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... a kidney transplant or blood-filtering treatments called dialysis. The cysts are more likely to develop in people who are on kidney dialysis. The chance of developing acquired cystic kidney disease ...

  6. Kidney (Renal) Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... renal function using ureteral stenting, nephrostomy, surgery or dialysis. What is kidney (renal) failure? How is kidney ... as a urinary stent or kidney stone removal. Dialysis , including hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis: These procedures remove ...

  7. Kidney Disease (Nephropathy)

    MedlinePlus

    ... or to have the blood filtered by machine (dialysis). Who Gets Kidney Disease? Not everyone with diabetes ... health care team. Kidney Failure Once kidneys fail, dialysis is necessary. The person must choose whether to ...

  8. Diabetes and Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease, and Other Dental Problems Diabetic Eye Disease Diabetes and Kidney Disease What are my kidneys and ... urine until releasing it through urination. How can diabetes affect my kidneys? Too much glucose , also called ...

  9. Medullary Sponge Kidney

    MedlinePlus

    ... UTIs and kidney stones. [ Top ] Medications to Prevent Future Urinary Tract Infections and Kidney Stones Health care ... can recommend medications and dietary changes to prevent future UTIs and kidney stones. [ Top ] Clinical Trials The ...

  10. Umbilical cord avulsion in waterbirth.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Robyn

    2014-01-01

    Umbilical cord avulsion (or "cord snapping") is often cited as a risk associated with waterbirth. This article discusses a case study in which a cord avulsed during a waterbirth and uses it as a basis to explore the incidence, etiology, and associated risk factors of umbilical cord avulsion. The diagnosis, clinical presentation, and management of cord avulsion in waterbirth is presented along with a thorough review of the literature and relevant professional standards. This article offers recommendations for clinical practice to minimize the risk of a cord avulsion and highlights the need for additional research and provider education to ensure optimal care of women and newborns. PMID:24588881

  11. Ultrasound, color - normal umbilical cord (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a normal color Doppler ultrasound of the umbilical cord performed at 30 weeks gestation. The cord ... the cord, two arteries and one vein. The umbilical cord is connected to the placenta, located in ...

  12. Keep Your Kidneys Clear: Kicking Kidney Stones

    MedlinePlus

    ... PDF—450 kb) Hey, Parents: It’s a Noisy Planet Keep Your Kidneys Clear Keep Your Kidneys Clear ... Pike Bethesda, Maryland 20892 Department of Health and Human Services Office of Communications and Public Liaison

  13. Cadmium and the kidney.

    PubMed Central

    Friberg, L

    1984-01-01

    The paper is a review of certain aspects of importance of cadmium and the kidney regarding the assessment of risks and understanding of mechanisms of action. The review discusses the following topics: history and etiology of cadmium-induced kidney dysfunction and related disorders; cadmium metabolism, metallothionein and kidney dysfunction; cadmium in urine as indicator of body burden, exposure and kidney dysfunction; cadmium levels in kidney and liver as indicators of kidney dysfunction; characteristics of early kidney dysfunction; the critical concentration concept; critical concentrations of cadmium in kidney cortex; and prognosis. PMID:6734547

  14. KIDNEY XENOTRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Peter J.; Cooper, David K.C.; d’Apice, Anthony J.F.

    2013-01-01

    Xenotransplantation using pigs as donors offers the possibility of eliminating the chronic shortage of donor kidneys, but there are several obstacles to be overcome before this goal can be achieved. Preclinical studies have shown that while porcine renal xenografts are broadly compatible physiologically, they provoke a complex rejection process involving preformed and elicited antibodies, heightened innate immune cell reactivity, dysregulated coagulation, and a strong T cell-mediated adaptive response. Furthermore, the susceptibility of the xenograft to pro-inflammatory and pro-coagulant stimuli is probably increased by cross-species molecular defects in regulatory pathways. To balance these disadvantages, xenotransplantation has at its disposal a unique tool to address particular rejection mechanisms and incompatibilities: genetic modification of the donor. This review focuses on the pathophysiology of porcine renal xenograft rejection, and on the significant genetic, pharmacological and technical progress that has been made to prolong xenograft survival. PMID:24088952

  15. Umbilical cord care in newborns

    MedlinePlus

    ... the stump clean with gauze and water only. Sponge bathe the rest of your baby, as well. ... Neonatal care - umbilical cord Images Umbilical cord healing Sponge bath References Carlo WA, Ambalavanan N. The umbilicus. ...

  16. At Risk for Kidney Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... or organization Alternate Language URL At Risk for Kidney Disease? Page Content You are at risk for kidney ... failure by treating kidney disease early. Diabetes and Kidney Disease Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure. ...

  17. Spinal cord schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Adeel, Ahmed Awad

    2015-01-01

    Acute myelopathy is increasingly being recognized as a common neurological complication of schistosomiasis. Schistosome eggs reach the spinal cord either as egg emboli or as eggs produced by ectopic worms. This leads to inflammatory reaction and granuloma formation around the eggs. Patients with spinal schistosomiasis may not have clinical evidence of schistosomiasis. The typical clinical picture is that of lumbar pain preceded by other symptoms by hours or up to 3 weeks. Patients may present with paraparesis, urinary retention or paraplegia. Definitive diagnosis of spinal cord schistosomiasis is by detection of the eggs in a spinal cord biopsy or at autopsy. However, most cases are diagnosed based on a presumptive diagnosis that depends on a suggestive clinical picture, history or evidence of active schistosomiasis and exclusion of other conditions. Investigations include stools and urine examination for schistosome eggs, blood tests, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and examination of the cerebrospinal fluid. Treatment of cases is mainly by praziquantel, corticosteroids, surgical intervention and rehabilitation.

  18. Spinal cord injury pain.

    PubMed

    Beric, Aleksandar

    2003-01-01

    Awareness that SCI pain is common emerged during the past decade. However, there are a number of unresolved issues. There is a need for variety of experimental models to reflect diversity of SCI pains. Current classification is not as user-friendly as it should be. More attention should be given to a condition of the spinal cord below and above the SCI lesion. A consensus for what is an optimal SCI functional assessment for patients with sensory complaints and pain should be developed. Further extensive SCI pain research is needed prior to spinal cord regeneration trials in order to be able to cope with a potential for newly developed pains that may appear during incomplete spinal cord regenerative attempts. PMID:12821403

  19. Learning with the Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Richard

    2015-06-01

    To what extent does the spinal cord play a role in the learning of motor tasks? A new study that simultaneously images the brain and spinal cord shows that the spinal cord is actively and independently involved in the earliest stages of motor learning. PMID:26125625

  20. Medullary Sponge Kidney

    MedlinePlus

    ... Association of Kidney Patients National Kidney Foundation MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Medullary Sponge Kidney Page Content On this page: What is Medullary ...

  1. Kidney stones

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The age of peak incidence for stone disease is 20 to 40 years, although stones are seen in all age groups. There is a male to female ratio of 3:2. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of interventions for stone removal in people with asymptomatic kidney stones? What are the effects of interventions for the removal of symptomatic renal stones? What are the effects of interventions to remove symptomatic ureteric stones? What are the effects of interventions for the management of acute renal colic? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 21 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antispasmodic drugs, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, intravenous fluids, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), opioids, oral fluids, percutaneous nephrolithotomy, and ureteroscopy. PMID:22075544

  2. Kidney Stones

    PubMed Central

    Kleeman, Charles R.; Coburn, Jack W.; Brickman, Arnold S.; Lee, David B. N.; Narins, Robert G.; Ehrlich, Richard M.

    1980-01-01

    The prevalence of kidney stones has steadily risen during this century; passage of a calculus and a positive family history increase the probability of recurrence. Findings from recent studies on the cause of renal calculi have stressed crystallization and crystal aggregation of stone minerals from supersaturated urine, rather than excessive organic matrix. Absence of normal urine inhibitors of calcium salts is also stressed. Formation of calcium oxalate stones is the major problem. Therapy with decreased calcium and oxalate intake, thiazides, phosphate salts and allopurinol in various combinations has substantially decreased the prevalence of recurrent stones. The rationale for the use of allopurinol is that uric acid salts enhance the tendency for calcium oxalate to crystallize from supersaturated urine. The hypercalciuria seen in 30 percent to 40 percent of patients with oxalate stones is usually caused by intestinal hyperabsorption of calcium. Although patients with uric acid calculi constitute only a small fraction of those in whom stones form, they represent a group in whom good medical therapy, based on sound physiologic principles, has proved extremely successful. Renal tubular syndromes lead to nephrocalcinosis and lithiasis through hypercalciuria, alkaline urine and hypocitraturia, the latter an inhibitor of calcium salt precipitation. Recent advances in surgical techniques are discussed, including the rationale for removing staghorn calculi. The ileal ureter and coagulum pyelolithotomy deserve special emphasis. ImagesFigure 2.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 7. PMID:7385835

  3. Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... How much do you know about taking good care of yourself? Links to more information girlshealth glossary girlshealth.gov home http://www.girlshealth.gov/ Home Illness & disability Types of ... Spinal cord injury Read advice from Dr. Jeffrey Rabin , a pediatric rehabilitation specialist at the Children’s National Medical Center. ...

  4. Anterior spinal cord syndrome of unknown etiology

    PubMed Central

    Klakeel, Merrine; Thompson, Justin; McDonald, Frank

    2015-01-01

    A spinal cord injury encompasses a physical insult to the spinal cord. In the case of anterior spinal cord syndrome, the insult is a vascular lesion at the anterior spinal artery. We present the cases of two 13-year-old boys with anterior spinal cord syndrome, along with a review of the anatomy and vasculature of the spinal cord and an explanation of how a lesion in the cord corresponds to anterior spinal cord syndrome. PMID:25552812

  5. Neuroprotective efficacy of lifarizine (RS-87476) in a simplified rat survival model of 2 vessel occlusion.

    PubMed Central

    McBean, D. E.; Winters, V.; Wilson, A. D.; Oswald, C. B.; Alps, B. J.; Armstrong, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    kg-1 i.p.) at identical time points. 6. Histopathological damage was assessed, from cresyl violet and haematoxyline/eosin stained sections, using a scoring system of 0-6 (no damage-complete neuronal death). The dosing regimen of lifarizine gave reduced damage in the hippocampal CA1 sub-field (4.1 +/- 0.3 to 2.8 +/- 0.6) and striatum (1.7 +/- 0.3 to 1.2 +/- 0.3) and significant neuroprotection in the anterior cortex (2.0 +/- 0.2 to 1.2 +/- 0.2; p < 0.05), thalamus (1.5 +/- 0.2 to 0.8 +/- 0.2; p < 0.01), posterior cortex (1.5 +/- 0.2 to 1.0 +/- 0.2; p < 0.05) and cerebellar brain stem (0.9 +/- 0.2 to 0.4 +/- 0.1; p < 0.01). The overall mean brain score was significantly reduced (from 1.5 +/- 0.1 to 0.9 +/- 0.2). 7. These data show that the newly modified 2 vessel occlusion model produced a quantifiable level of ischaemic damage and that the novel agent lifarizine is neuroprotective in the model. Images Figure 2 PMID:8719782

  6. Kidney Disease Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Albumin Children and Kidney Disease Additional Kidney Information Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ... to share this content freely. March 1, 2012​ Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ...

  7. Testing for Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Albumin Children and Kidney Disease Additional Kidney Information Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ... to share this content freely. September 17, 2014​​ Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ...

  8. Polycystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... and requires immediate medical attention. [ Top ] How do health care providers diagnose autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease? Health ... when test results are available. [ Top ] How do health care providers treat autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease? Although ...

  9. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    Acute renal arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... kidneys need a good blood supply. The main artery to the kidney is called the renal artery. ...

  10. Kidney Stones in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... had a kidney stone. 2 2 Scales CD, Smith AC, Hanley JM, Saigal CS. Prevalence of kidney ... table or, less commonly, in a tub of water above the lithotripter. The lithotripter generates shock waves ...

  11. Keep Your Kidneys Healthy

    MedlinePlus

    ... our online catalog . Alternate Language URL Keep Your Kidneys Healthy Page Content The steps you take to ... and heart disease. Tips to help keep your kidneys healthy: Keep your blood pressure at the target ...

  12. Diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  13. MedlinePlus: Kidney Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Start Here Kidney Transplant (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research) Kidney Transplant (National Kidney Foundation) Treatment Methods for Kidney Failure: Transplantation (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and ...

  14. Sexuality and Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  15. Staying Fit with Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  16. Hydronephrosis of one kidney

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute hydronephrosis; Urinary obstruction; Unilateral hydronephrosis; Nephrolithiasis - hydronephrosis; Kidney stone - hydronephrosis; Renal calculi - hydronephrosis; Ureteral calculi - hydronephrosis; ...

  17. FAQs about Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Website Managing Bowel Function After Spinal Cord Injury Resilience, Depression and Bouncing Back after SCI Getting to ... a “complete” and “incomplete” spinal cord injury? What recovery is expected following spinal cord injury? Where is ...

  18. Simple Kidney Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Organizations​​ . (PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Simple Kidney Cysts Page Content On this page: What are simple ... Points to Remember Clinical Trials What are simple kidney cysts? Simple kidney cysts are abnormal, fluid-filled sacs ...

  19. Kidney Disease of Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Organizations​​ . (PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Español Kidney Disease of Diabetes Page Content On this page: The ... and Human Services, 2008. [ Top ] The Course of Kidney Disease Diabetic kidney disease takes many years to develop. ...

  20. Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Catherine Kelleher, M.D., University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver. About the Kidney Failure Series The NIDDK Kidney Failure Series includes booklets and fact sheets that can help you learn more about treatment methods for kidney failure, complications of dialysis, financial help ...

  1. Diabetes and kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... occurs over time in people with diabetes. This type of kidney disease is called diabetic nephropathy. Causes Each kidney is made of hundreds ... ACE inhibitors Diabetes - what to ask your doctor - type 2 Update Date ... Diabetic Kidney Problems Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A. ...

  2. Normal black kidney

    PubMed Central

    Yarmohamadi, Aliasghar; Rezayat, Ali Reza Akhavan; Memar, Bahram; Rahimi, Hamid Reza; Cand, PhD

    2014-01-01

    A black kidney has 3 major differential diagnoses: hemosiderosis, lipofuscin pigment and melanotic renal cell carcinoma. Excluding lipofuscin, the other 2 are accompanied by an abnormal renal function. We report on a 25-year-old man who intended to donate a kidney to his cousin. On the operating room table when we incised the left flank region and exposed the kidney, we found a firm and black kidney so the operation was cancelled due to potential vascular injuries. Days after the incomplete procedure, we reviewed the donor’s biochemistry and imaging to reassess his renal function, but the results showed quite normal renal function again. The result of Ham test was also negative. Two weeks later, we began the operation, removed the same left kidney and found that it was in the same conditions as it was before. We took the opportunity to send needle biopsies of the kidney for histopathologic analysis. The analysis showed a melanotic kidney without pathological changes in glomeruli and interstitium and vessels. A black kidney may result in hemosiderin, lipofuscin or melanin deposits in the kidney, which can confirm the diagnosis; however, special tests for underlying disease and renal function should be considered. Some causes of black kidney lead to abnormal function, but our patients’s kidney returned to normal. PMID:24839502

  3. Myofibroblasts in Fibrotic Kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Naoki; Duffield, Jeremy S

    2013-01-01

    Fibrosis of the kidney glomerulus and interstitium are characteristic features of almost all chronic kidney diseases. Fibrosis is tightly associated with destruction of capillaries, inflammation, and epithelial injury which progresses to loss of nephrons, and replacement of kidney parenchyma with scar tissue. Understanding the origins and nature of the cells known as myofibroblasts that make scar tissue is central to development of new therapeutics for kidney disease. Whereas many cell lineages in the body have become defined by well-established markers, myofibroblasts have been much harder to identify with certainty. Recent insights from genetic fate mapping and the use of dynamic reporting of cells that make fibrillar collagen in mice have identified with greater clarity the major population of myofibroblasts and their precursors in the kidney. This review will explore the nature of these cells in health and disease of the kidney to underst and their central role in the pathogenesis of kidney disease. PMID:24187654

  4. Adjustment to Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... of injury are alive and easily get educational information on the Internet. Web happy. sites such as the National Spinal Cord Injury Association (www.spinalcord.org) and SPINAL CORD Injury ♦ “Because of my injury, it is now impossible for me Information Network (www.spinalcord.uab.edu) have to ever ...

  5. Retraining the injured spinal cord

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgerton, V. R.; Leon, R. D.; Harkema, S. J.; Hodgson, J. A.; London, N.; Reinkensmeyer, D. J.; Roy, R. R.; Talmadge, R. J.; Tillakaratne, N. J.; Timoszyk, W.; Tobin, A.

    2001-01-01

    The present review presents a series of concepts that may be useful in developing rehabilitative strategies to enhance recovery of posture and locomotion following spinal cord injury. First, the loss of supraspinal input results in a marked change in the functional efficacy of the remaining synapses and neurons of intraspinal and peripheral afferent (dorsal root ganglion) origin. Second, following a complete transection the lumbrosacral spinal cord can recover greater levels of motor performance if it has been exposed to the afferent and intraspinal activation patterns that are associated with standing and stepping. Third, the spinal cord can more readily reacquire the ability to stand and step following spinal cord transection with repetitive exposure to standing and stepping. Fourth, robotic assistive devices can be used to guide the kinematics of the limbs and thus expose the spinal cord to the new normal activity patterns associated with a particular motor task following spinal cord injury. In addition, such robotic assistive devices can provide immediate quantification of the limb kinematics. Fifth, the behavioural and physiological effects of spinal cord transection are reflected in adaptations in most, if not all, neurotransmitter systems in the lumbosacral spinal cord. Evidence is presented that both the GABAergic and glycinergic inhibitory systems are up-regulated following complete spinal cord transection and that step training results in some aspects of these transmitter systems being down-regulated towards control levels. These concepts and observations demonstrate that (a) the spinal cord can interpret complex afferent information and generate the appropriate motor task; and (b) motor ability can be defined to a large degree by training.

  6. Choosing a Treatment for Kidney Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Kidney Failure www.kidney.org National Kidney Foundation's Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative Did you know that the National Kidney Foundation's Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (NKF- KDOQI)™ has ...

  7. Attitudes Towards Individuals with Spinal Cord Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Cassandra Sligh D.; Gooden, Randy; Nowell, Jennifer; Wilson, Navodda

    2010-01-01

    This paper will shed light on the lives of persons with spinal cord injuries by revealing the literature on spinal cord injuries that focuses on research that can shed light on attitudes towards persons with spinal cord injuries. The background literature related to incidences, the definition of spinal cord injury, and vocational opportunities are…

  8. Diabetes and kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetic nephropathy; Nephropathy - diabetic; Diabetic glomerulosclerosis; Kimmelstiel-Wilson disease ... Diabetic kidney disease is a major cause of sickness and death in people with diabetes. It can ...

  9. Spermatic Cord Leiomyosarcoma Rare Case.

    PubMed

    Frigerio, Pamela; Muruato-Araiza, Jesus Sebastian; Marcos-Morales, Selim; Cepeda-Nieto, Ana Cecilia; Berdeal-Fernandez, Eliseo; Zepeda-Contreras, Sebastián

    2016-05-01

    Case description of a male patient of 64 years who presents a left groin-scrotum painless tumor, growing, from several months of evolution. Physical examination demonstrated the existence of a mass effect of the left distal spermatic cord, and was later confirmed by ultrasound and CT. Laboratory parameters were normal. The performed surgery consisted in a radical orchiectomy with high ligation of the left cord. In conclusion, preoperative diagnosis of spermatic cord leiomyosarcoma is difficult we need the combination of present illness, physical examination, exams and the gold standard histopathological and immunohistochemical studies allowed a definitive diagnosis. PMID:27169019

  10. [Experimental vocal cord abduction impairment with an artificial vocal cord].

    PubMed

    Isozaki, Eiji; Tobisawa, Shinsuke; Nishizawa, Misato; Nakayama, Hideto; Fukui, Kotaro; Takanishi, Asuo

    2009-07-01

    Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) has recently been applied to the patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA) with various respiratory complications including vocal cord abduction impairment and respiratory disturbance by the central origin. Any consensus guidelines on setting up the inspiratory positive airway pressure (IPAP) and expiratory one (EPAP), however, have not been raised yet. To investigate this problem, we made the upper airway tract model with moderately and severely narrow glottis using a training/test lung and the artificial vocal cord which was developed for a humanoid talking robot in Waseda University. The artificial vocal cord was molded out of a high performance thermoplastic rubber in imitation of the human larynx. Previous studies using with a high-speed camera and a sound analyzer showed that the artificial vocal cord resembled human larynx closely both morphologically and functionally. The opening and closing movements of the artificial vocal cord were observed fiberscopically under various conditions of IPAP (4-20 cmH2O) and EPAP (4-10 cmH2O). The maximal glottic width during inspiration and expiration were measured by a pair of calipers on the video-monitored display. Both of the moderately and the severely narrow artificial vocal cords without non-paralytic factors showed typical paradoxical movement showing adduction in inspiration and abduction in expiration, which is characteristic to vocal cord abductor impairment seen in MSA. In the model with moderately severe narrow glottis, this paradoxical movement was released under any positive pressures of continuous (CPAP) and bilevel (Bilevel PAP) modes. In the model with severely narrow glottis, however, there existed a threshold in setting up the optimal EPAP to release the paradoxical movement. In conclusion, EPAP-leading procedure seems to be preferable to IPAP-leading procedure to dilate the narrow glottis as a pneumatic splint in the managements of the patients with

  11. Overview of Spinal Cord Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... temperature from the body to the spinal cord. Did You Know... Doctors can often tell where the ... on symptoms and results of a physical examination. Did You Know... Nerves from the lowest parts of ...

  12. What Is Spinal Cord Injury?

    MedlinePlus

    ... lowest point on the spinal cord below which sensory feeling and motor movement diminish or disappear. The ... injury is so severe that almost all feeling (sensory function) and all ability to control movement (motor ...

  13. National Kidney Disease Education Program

    MedlinePlus

    ... from our online catalog . Alternate Language URL National Kidney Disease Education Program (NKDEP) Page Content Improving the understanding, ... kidney disease. Minorities Are at Higher Risk for Kidney Disease. If you are African American, Hispanic, or American ...

  14. Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... our online catalog. Alternate Language URL Español Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines: What You Need to Know Page ... you need to know Because you have chronic kidney disease, you should take steps to protect your kidneys. ...

  15. National Kidney Disease Education Program

    MedlinePlus

    ... from our online catalog . Alternate Language URL National Kidney Disease Education Program (NKDEP) Page Content Improving the ... kidney disease. Minorities Are at Higher Risk for Kidney Disease. If you are African American, Hispanic, or ...

  16. Keep Your Kidneys Healthy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Albumin Children and Kidney Disease Additional Kidney Information Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ... to share this content freely. September 17, 2014​​​​ Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ...

  17. Acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Lang, Joanna; Zuber, Kim; Davis, Jane

    2016-04-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) complicates up to 20% of all hospital admissions. Responding to the increase in admissions, complications, mortality, morbidity, and cost of AKI, Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes convened an expert panel to study the issue, review the literature, and publish guidelines to evaluate and treat patients with AKI in the acute setting. This article reviews those guidelines. PMID:27023656

  18. Amyloidosis and Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Foundation Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Amyloidosis and Kidney Disease Page Content On this page: What is ...

  19. [Promoting Living Kidney Transplantation].

    PubMed

    Lin, Chiu-Chu

    2016-04-01

    Kidney transplantation is the best approach for treating patients with end stage renal disease, offering patients the best chance of returning to normal health. While the techniques used in kidney transplantation surgery are mature and highly successful, there is a severe shortage of donor organs. Statistics show a serious imbalance between organ donations and patients on the waiting list for organ transplantation. Moreover, evidence from empirical studies has shown a better transplantation outcome for patients who receive living donor transplantation than for those who receive organs from cadavers. Although using relatives as donors offers an effective way to reduce the problem of organ shortage, this strategy faces many challenges and many other factors affect the promotion of living donor transplantation. This article elaborates how cultural and psychological factors, kidney transplantation awareness, and ethics and laws impact upon living kidney donations and then proposes coping strategies for promoting living kidney transplantation. PMID:27026555

  20. Bioengineering Kidneys for Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Madariaga, Maria Lucia L.; Ott, Harald C.

    2014-01-01

    One in ten Americans suffer from chronic kidney disease, and close to 90,000 people die each year from causes related to kidney failure. Patients with end-stage renal disease are faced with two options: hemodialysis or transplantation. Unfortunately, the reach of transplantation is limited because of the shortage of donor organs and the need for immunosuppression. Bioengineered kidney grafts theoretically present a novel solution to both problems. Herein we discuss the history of bioengineering organs, the current status of bioengineered kidneys, considerations for the future of the field, and challenges to clinical translation. We hope that by integrating principles of tissue engineering, and stem cell and developmental biology, bioengineered kidney grafts will advance the field of regenerative medicine while meeting a critical clinical need. PMID:25217267

  1. Trb2, a mouse homolog of tribbles, is dispensable for kidney and mouse development

    SciTech Connect

    Takasato, Minoru; Kobayashi, Chiyoko; Okabayashi, Koji; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Oshima, Naoko; Asashima, Makoto; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi

    2008-09-05

    Glomeruli comprise an important filtering apparatus in the kidney and are derived from the metanephric mesenchyme. A nuclear protein, Sall1, is expressed in this mesenchyme, and we previously reported that Trb2, a mouse homolog of Drosophila tribbles, is expressed in the mesenchyme-derived tissues of the kidney by microarray analyses using Sall1-GFP knock-in mice. In the present report, we detected Trb2 expression in a variety of organs during gestation, including the kidneys, mesonephros, testes, heart, eyes, thymus, blood vessels, muscle, bones, tongue, spinal cord, and ganglions. In the developing kidney, Trb2 signals were detected in podocytes and the prospective mesangium of the glomeruli, as well as in ureteric bud tips. However, Trb2 mutant mice did not display any apparent phenotypes and no proteinuria was observed, indicating normal glomerular functions. These results suggest that Trb2 plays minimal roles during kidney and mouse development.

  2. What Is Kidney Cancer (Renal Cell Carcinoma)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the key statistics about kidney cancer? What is kidney cancer? Kidney cancer is a cancer that starts ... and spread, see What Is Cancer? About the kidneys To understand more about kidney cancer, it helps ...

  3. Analgesic Nephropathy (Painkillers and the Kidneys)

    MedlinePlus

    ... American Kidney Fund National Kidney Foundation, Inc. MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... Alternate Language URL Analgesic Nephropathy (Painkillers and the Kidneys) Page Content On this page: Acute Kidney Failure ...

  4. Diet - chronic kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this special diet to limit the buildup of waste products in the body. Limiting fluids between dialysis ... up when the kidneys no longer function well. Dangerous heart rhythms may result, which can lead to ...

  5. Kidney Stones in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... through the child’s body to break the kidney stone into smaller particles to pass more readily through the urinary tract. Children younger than age 12 may receive general anesthesia during the procedure. ...

  6. Kidney transplant - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Kidney Transplantation A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  7. Acute kidney failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... level. You may need dialysis. This is a treatment that does what healthy kidneys normally do -- rid the body of harmful wastes, extra salt, and water. Dialysis can save your life if your potassium ...

  8. Kidney Disease and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Kidney Disease & Diabetes Updated:Jan 26,2016 One of the more ... thereafter.) This content was last reviewed January 2016. Diabetes • Home • About Diabetes • Why Diabetes Matters Introduction Cardiovascular ...

  9. [Cystic kidney diseases].

    PubMed

    Zerres, K; Ortiz Brüchle, N

    2012-04-01

    Cystic kidney diseases are clinically and genetically heterogeneous. The most important entities are autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive polycystic kidney diseases. The proteins encoded by the involved genes are referred to as cystoproteins, which are located predominantly in the primary cilia. Primary cilia play an important role in cyst formation. Inherited polycystic kidney diseases belong to the increasing number of reported ciliopathies, including several syndromic entities. An exact diagnosis is the basis for medical care and genetic counselling; thus, the diagnostic algorithm should include clinical, ultrasonographic and morphological features of the underlying kidney disease, knowledge about further features and family history. Molecular genetic testing may contribute important information towards a definite diagnosis. PMID:22410941

  10. Sulfadiazine for kidney disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rucker, R.R.; Bernier, A.F.; Whipple, W.J.; Burrows, R.E.

    1951-01-01

    The blueback salmon fingerlings (Oncorhynchus nerka) at the U.S. Fish-Cultural Station at Winthrop, Washington, underwent an infection that was caused by a very short, Gram-positive, nonmotile, rod-shaped bacterium. A further description is impossible at this time, as the organism has not been grown satisfactorily for proper identification. The disease was characterized by white, raised areas of dead tissue mainly in the kidney: for this reason it is referred to as kidney disease. Belding and Merrill (1935) described a disease among the brook, brown, and rainbow trout at a State hatchery in Massachusetts which, from the description, might be the same as kidney disease. J.H. Wales of the California Division of Fish and Game described (unpublished manuscript, 1941) a disease in hatchery trout in California which seems to be identical to kidney disease.

  11. Organ Facts: Kidney / Pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... the kidneys is to remove waste from the body through the production of urine. They also help to regulate blood pressure, blood volume and the chemical (electrolyte) composition of the blood. The pancreas is a five ...

  12. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    ... arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... often result in permanent kidney failure. Acute arterial occlusion of the renal artery can occur after injury ...

  13. Diet and Kidney Stones

    MedlinePlus

    ... drink at least three quarts (12 cups) of water a day to help reduce the risk for stone formation. Making these healthy lifestyle changes can also help reduce ... NY Register Now 2016 Orangeburg Kidney Walk Thu, ...

  14. Amyloidosis and Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... body has fewer red blood cells than normal. Dialysis-related Amyloidosis People who suffer from kidney failure ... weight loss [ Top ] What are the symptoms of dialysis-related amyloidosis? The symptoms of dialysis-related amyloidosis ...

  15. Kidney Replacement Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... their function with either dialysis or a transplant. Dialysis Dialysis, the more common form of kidney-replacement ... the result of diabetes, not of hemodialysis. Peritoneal dialysis Another form of dialysis is called peritoneal dialysis. ...

  16. Disabled Vocal Cords: An Occupational Hazard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Norma B.

    1987-01-01

    A teacher points out the occupational hazard that can result from the misuse of the voice and ensuing vocal cord damage. Presents discussion of ways to avoid misusing the voice and prevent vocal cord damage. (MD)

  17. Percutaneous umbilical cord blood sampling - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... or blood disorder, your doctor may recommend percutaneous umbilical cord blood sampling (PUBS), which is performed at ... sample of the fetus' blood directly from the umbilical cord. The sample is then analyzed for genetic ...

  18. Transplant Outcomes (Bone Marrow and Cord Blood)

    MedlinePlus

    ... reports show patient survival and transplant data of bone marrow and umbilical cord blood transplants in the transplant ... Data by Center Report —View the number of bone marrow and cord blood transplants performed at a specific ...

  19. Spinal Cord Injury Model System Information Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... Go New to Website Managing Bowel Function After Spinal Cord Injury Resilience, Depression and Bouncing Back after SCI Getting ... the UAB-SCIMS Contact the UAB-SCIMS UAB Spinal Cord Injury Model System Newly Injured Health Daily Living Consumer ...

  20. Neonatal polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Verghese, Priya; Miyashita, Yosuke

    2014-09-01

    This article provides an up-to-date comprehensive review and summary on neonatal polycystic kidney disease (PKD) with emphasis on the differential diagnosis, clinical manifestations, diagnostic techniques, and potential therapeutic approaches for the major causes of neonatal PKD, namely hereditary disease, including autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant PKD and nonhereditary PKD, with particular emphasis on multicystic dysplastic kidney. A brief overview of obstructive cystic dysplasia and simple and complex cysts is also included. PMID:25155726

  1. Kidney cell electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Tasks were undertaken in support of two objectives. They are: (1) to carry out electrophoresis experiments on cells in microgravity; and (2) assess the feasibility of using purified kidney cells from embryonic kidney cultures as a source of important cell products. Investigations were carried out in the following areas: (1) ground based electrophoresis technology; (2) cell culture technology; (3) electrophoresis of cells; (4) urokinase assay research; (5) zero-g electrophoresis; and (6) flow cytometry.

  2. The medieval kidney.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Joseph

    2002-07-01

    This article surveys the various perceptions of the kidney and its pathologies by encyclopedists, preachers, natural philosophers, surgeons and academic physicians around 1300. It focuses on the medical works of Arnau de Vilanova (d. 1311) and shows the medical discourse about the kidney in all its complexity. It draws attention to the incorporation of the medical nephrological debate into the scholastic frame, and to the close links between nephrology and astrology as well as alchemy. PMID:12097733

  3. Learning from the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Loeb, Gerald E

    2001-01-01

    The graceful control of multiarticulated limbs equipped with slow, non-linear actuators (muscles) is a difficult problem for which robotic engineering affords no general solution. The vertebrate spinal cord provides an existence proof that such control is, indeed, possible. The biological solution is complex and incompletely known, despite a century of meticulous neurophysiological research, celebrated in part by this symposium. This is frustrating for those who would reanimate paralysed limbs either through promoting regeneration of the injured spinal cord or by functional electrical stimulation. The importance of and general role played by the spinal cord might be more easily recognized by analogy to marionette puppets, another system in which a brain (the puppeteer's) must cope with a large number of partially redundant actuators (strings) moving a mechanical linkage with complex intrinsic properties. PMID:11351019

  4. Isolated intramedullary spinal cord cysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Agale, Shubhangi V.; Bhavsar, Shweta; Choudhury, Barnik; Manohar, Vidhya

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of intradural, intramedullary, spinal cord neurocysticercosis at dorsal 10-11 (D10-11) level in a mentally retarded male. A 38-year-old, mentally retarded male presented with weakness and stiffness in both the lower limbs and waist since one year. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a D10-D11 intradural space occupying lesion with cord compression. Intraoperatively, the tumor was grayish white, soft, cystic, and intramedullary with a well-defined plane with surrounding cord tissue. Gross examination revealed a cystic lesion of 1.5×1×0.8 cm, with a whitish nodule of 0.3 cm in diameter. The cyst wall was thin, shiny, and translucent. Microscopic examination revealed cysticercous cyst. Spinal neurocysticercosis should be considered in differential diagnosis of spinal mass lesion in patients residing in endemic area such as India. PMID:22870160

  5. Signaling during Kidney Development

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Mirja; Rak-Raszewska, Aleksandra; Pietilä, Ilkka; Quaggin, Susan E.; Vainio, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    The kidney plays an essential role during excretion of metabolic waste products, maintenance of key homeostasis components such as ion concentrations and hormone levels. It influences the blood pressure, composition and volume. The kidney tubule system is composed of two distinct cell populations: the nephrons forming the filtering units and the collecting duct system derived from the ureteric bud. Nephrons are composed of glomeruli that filter the blood to the Bowman’s capsule and tubular structures that reabsorb and concentrate primary urine. The collecting duct is a Wolffian duct-derived epithelial tube that concentrates and collects urine and transfers it via the renal pelvis into the bladder. The mammalian kidney function depends on the coordinated development of specific cell types within a precise architectural framework. Due to the availability of modern analysis techniques, the kidney has become a model organ defining the paradigm to study organogenesis. As kidney diseases are a problem worldwide, the understanding of mammalian kidney cells is of crucial importance to develop diagnostic tools and novel therapies. This review focuses on how the pattern of renal development is generated, how the inductive signals are regulated and what are their effects on proliferation, differentiation and morphogenesis. PMID:25867084

  6. Signaling during Kidney Development.

    PubMed

    Krause, Mirja; Rak-Raszewska, Aleksandra; Pietilä, Ilkka; Quaggin, Susan E; Vainio, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    The kidney plays an essential role during excretion of metabolic waste products, maintenance of key homeostasis components such as ion concentrations and hormone levels. It influences the blood pressure, composition and volume. The kidney tubule system is composed of two distinct cell populations: the nephrons forming the filtering units and the collecting duct system derived from the ureteric bud. Nephrons are composed of glomeruli that filter the blood to the Bowman's capsule and tubular structures that reabsorb and concentrate primary urine. The collecting duct is a Wolffian duct-derived epithelial tube that concentrates and collects urine and transfers it via the renal pelvis into the bladder. The mammalian kidney function depends on the coordinated development of specific cell types within a precise architectural framework. Due to the availability of modern analysis techniques, the kidney has become a model organ defining the paradigm to study organogenesis. As kidney diseases are a problem worldwide, the understanding of mammalian kidney cells is of crucial importance to develop diagnostic tools and novel therapies. This review focuses on how the pattern of renal development is generated, how the inductive signals are regulated and what are their effects on proliferation, differentiation and morphogenesis. PMID:25867084

  7. 14 CFR 31.57 - Rip cords.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rip cords. 31.57 Section 31.57 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Design Construction § 31.57 Rip cords. (a) If a rip cord is used...

  8. Evaluation of spinal cord injury animal models

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Fang, Marong; Chen, Haohao; Gou, Fangming; Ding, Mingxing

    2014-01-01

    Because there is no curative treatment for spinal cord injury, establishing an ideal animal model is important to identify injury mechanisms and develop therapies for individuals suffering from spinal cord injuries. In this article, we systematically review and analyze various kinds of animal models of spinal cord injury and assess their advantages and disadvantages for further studies. PMID:25598784

  9. Psychological Aspects of Spinal Cord Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Daniel W.

    1976-01-01

    Reviewing literature on the psychological impact of spinal cord injury suggests: (a) depression may not be a precondition for injury adjustment; (b) many persons sustaining cord injury may have experienced psychological disruption prior to injury; and (c) indexes of rehabilitation success need to be developed for the spinal cord injured. (Author)

  10. An Ectopic Pelvic Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Bhoil, Rohit; Sood, Dinesh; Singh, Yash Paul; Nimkar, Kshama; Shukla, Anurag

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background If a kidney does not ascend as it should in normal fetal development, it remains in the pelvic area and is called a pelvic kidney. Often a person with a pelvic kidney will go through his/her whole life unaware of this condition, unless it is discovered during neonatal kidney ultrasound screening or if complications arise later in life due to this or a completely different reason and the condition is noted during investigations. Generally, this is not a harmful condition but it can lead to complications like in our case. With appropriate testing and treatment, if needed, an ectopic kidney should cause no serious long-term health complications and all that may be required for the patient is reassurance with advice to follow up at regular intervals. Case Report A 28-year-old male presented with recurrent pain in his lower left abdomen for one month and an episode of hematuria 3 days earlier accompanied by an attack of acute pain lasting for 3–4 hours. He gave a history of passing 2 small (about 5 mm each) calculi in his urine after the occurrence of hematuria, following which pain decreased in intensity. No history of fever was present. Conclusions Although a simple ectopic kidney seldom causes symptoms, the association of malrotation of the renal pelvis with calculus increases the risk of hematuria and/or hydronephrosis, presenting with colicky pain as in the present case. The clinician should be aware of these in such a case. If asymptomatic, no treatment is required. However, the patient should be advised to have follow-up ultrasounds at regular intervals to detect complications like calculus, hydronephrosis, etc. With appropriate testing and treatment, if required, an ectopic kidney should not cause serious long-term health complications. PMID:26413178

  11. Melatonin lowers edema after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng; Chen, Xiao; Qiao, Suchi; Liu, Xinwei; Liu, Chang; Zhu, Degang; Su, Jiacan; Wang, Zhiwei

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin has been shown to diminish edema in rats. Melatonin can be used to treat spinal cord injury. This study presumed that melatonin could relieve spinal cord edema and examined how it might act. Our experiments found that melatonin (100 mg/kg, i.p.) could reduce the water content of the spinal cord, and suppress the expression of aquaporin-4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein after spinal cord injury. This suggests that the mechanism by which melatonin alleviates the damage to the spinal cord by edema might be related to the expression of aquaporin-4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein. PMID:25657743

  12. SPINAL CORD INJURY (SCI) DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Spinal Cord Injury Database has been in existence since 1973 and captures data from SCI cases in the United States. Since its inception, 24 federally funded Model SCI Care Systems have contributed data to the National SCI Database. Statistics are derived from this da...

  13. Horseshoe kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kanyári, Zsolt; Zádori, Gergely; Zsom, Lajos; Berhés, Mariann; Hamar, Mátyás; Kóbor, Krisztina; Péter, Antal

    2015-01-01

    Horseshoe kidney is a fusion anomaly found in approximately one in 400–600 people. Due to vascular and ureteral variations, transplantation with a horseshoe kidney presents a technical challenge. In our case, the isthmus connected the upper poles and contained parenchyma. It consisted of three renal arteries, five veins collected to the inferior vena cava, and two ureters and pyelons. It was implanted en bloc to the left side retroperitoneally. During the early period, cellular and humoral rejection was confirmed and treated. For a urine leak, double J catheters were implanted into both ureters. Later, the first catheter was removed. Subsequently, urinary sepsis developed, necessitating graftectomy. The uncommon anatomy of ureters and antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) may both be factors for a ureter tip necrosis led to an infected urinoma. After other Hungarian authors, we also report a horseshoe kidney transplantation that was technically successful. However, after an adequately treated but severe acute humoral rejection, the patient developed sepsis, and the kidney had to be removed. We conclude that transplantation with horseshoe kidney is technically feasible but may increase the risk for urinary complications and resultant infections. Careful consideration of risk and benefit is advised when a transplant professional is faced with this option. PMID:26120481

  14. Diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Merlin C; Brownlee, Michael; Susztak, Katalin; Sharma, Kumar; Jandeleit-Dahm, Karin A M; Zoungas, Sophia; Rossing, Peter; Groop, Per-Henrik; Cooper, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    The kidney is arguably the most important target of microvascular damage in diabetes. A substantial proportion of individuals with diabetes will develop kidney disease owing to their disease and/or other co-morbidity, including hypertension and ageing-related nephron loss. The presence and severity of chronic kidney disease (CKD) identify individuals who are at increased risk of adverse health outcomes and premature mortality. Consequently, preventing and managing CKD in patients with diabetes is now a key aim of their overall management. Intensive management of patients with diabetes includes controlling blood glucose levels and blood pressure as well as blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system; these approaches will reduce the incidence of diabetic kidney disease and slow its progression. Indeed, the major decline in the incidence of diabetic kidney disease (DKD) over the past 30 years and improved patient prognosis are largely attributable to improved diabetes care. However, there remains an unmet need for innovative treatment strategies to prevent, arrest, treat and reverse DKD. In this Primer, we summarize what is now known about the molecular pathogenesis of CKD in patients with diabetes and the key pathways and targets implicated in its progression. In addition, we discuss the current evidence for the prevention and management of DKD as well as the many controversies. Finally, we explore the opportunities to develop new interventions through urgently needed investment in dedicated and focused research. For an illustrated summary of this Primer, visit: http://go.nature.com/NKHDzg. PMID:27188921

  15. Peroxisomes and Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Peroxisomes are organelles present in most eukaryotic cells. The organs with the highest density of peroxisomes are the liver and kidneys. Peroxisomes possess more than fifty enzymes and fulfill a multitude of biological tasks. They actively participate in apoptosis, innate immunity, and inflammation. In recent years, a considerable amount of evidence has been collected to support the involvement of peroxisomes in the pathogenesis of kidney injury. Recent Advances: The nature of the two most important peroxisomal tasks, beta-oxidation of fatty acids and hydrogen peroxide turnover, functionally relates peroxisomes to mitochondria. Further support for their communication and cooperation is furnished by the evidence that both organelles share the components of their division machinery. Until recently, the majority of studies on the molecular mechanisms of kidney injury focused primarily on mitochondria and neglected peroxisomes. Critical Issues: The aim of this concise review is to introduce the reader to the field of peroxisome biology and to provide an overview of the evidence about the contribution of peroxisomes to the development and progression of kidney injury. The topics of renal ischemia–reperfusion injury, endotoxin-induced kidney injury, diabetic nephropathy, and tubulointerstitial fibrosis, as well as the potential therapeutic implications of peroxisome activation, are addressed in this review. Future Directions: Despite recent progress, further studies are needed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms induced by dysfunctional peroxisomes and the role of the dysregulated mitochondria–peroxisome axis in the pathogenesis of renal injury. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 217–231. PMID:26972522

  16. Newborn cord care practices in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Susan; Norr, Kathleen; Sankar, Girija; Sipsma, Heather

    2015-10-01

    Newborn cord infections commonly lead to neonatal sepsis and death, particularly in low-resource countries where newborns may receive unhygienic cord care. Topical application of chlorhexidine to the newborn's cord has been shown to prevent infection. Such benefits may be particularly important in Haiti. We explored current cord care practices by conducting a qualitative study using five focus groups among key community stakeholders (mothers of newborns/children under age two years, pregnant women, traditional birth attendants, community health workers, traditional healers) in Petit-Goâve, Haiti. Data collection was guided by the Health Belief Model. Results suggest community stakeholders recognise that infants are susceptible to cord infection and that cord infection is a serious threat to newborns. Long-held traditional cord care practices are potential barriers to adopting a new cord care intervention. However, all groups acknowledged that traditional practices could be harmful to the newborn while expressing a willingness to adopt practices that would protect the newborn. Results demonstrate potential acceptability for altering traditional cord care practices among neonatal caretakers in Haiti. An informational campaign designed to educate local health workers and new mothers to eliminate unhygienic cord applications while promoting chlorhexidine application may be a strong approach for preventing neonatal cord infections. PMID:25727359

  17. Advances in umbilical cord blood transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ballen, Karen K

    2006-09-01

    The first successful cord blood transplant was reported in 1989. In the last sixteen years, there has been a substantial increase in the use of cord blood as an alternative stem cell source for patients without matched related or unrelated bone marrow donors. Approximately 5000 cord blood transplants have been performed worldwide. Recently, the results in adult cord blood transplantation appear promising. In this review, the preclinical background, cord blood banking, and ethical issues will be briefly addressed. Outcome data for both pediatric and adult transplantation will be reviewed, with an emphasis on new strategies for adult cord blood transplantation. New indications for cord blood use outside of hematology/oncology will also be explored. PMID:18220876

  18. Epidemiology of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kurtzke, J F

    1977-01-01

    Accidents are the cause of some 50 deaths per 100 000 population each year in the US; some 3% of these are from traumatic spinal cord injury alone. Traumatic spinal cord injury in socioeconomically advanced countries, has a probably annual incidence rate of 3 per 100 000 population. Males are affected five times as often as females, and in the US, Negroes have twice the rates of whites. Half the cases are due to motor vehicle accidents, 1/4 to falls, and 1/10 to sports injuries. Maximal ages at risk are 15 to 34; only for cord damage due to falls do this risk differ, and here elderly are the more prone. Associated injuries are common in traumatic cord injury, and head injury and pulmonary dysfunction are frequent causes of the acute deaths in traumatic SCI which is why complete quadriplegia has a high early case-fatality ratio. Late deaths in SCI are principally the direct or indirect result of the neurogenic bladder. With treatment in comprehensive spinal cord injury centers, more than 4 of 5 traumatic SCI patients will survive ten years with an average of almost 18 years. Median survival may be almost 14 years for complete quadriplegia, 17 for complete paraplegia, 19 for incomplete quadriplegia, 20 for incomplete paraplegia and 28 for cauda equina lesions. Prevalence is likely to be some 50 per 100 000 population with about 20 per 100 000 completely paralyzed (3 quadriplegic and 19 paraplegic). Some 4 out of 5 survivors of traumatic SCI should be able to live at home and perform gainful work after such treatment. PMID:616527

  19. Keep Your Kidneys Healthy: Catch Kidney Disease Early

    MedlinePlus

    ... point, you may need a kidney transplant or dialysis. It’s a good idea to talk with your ... healthy kidneys and finding a well-matched donor. Dialysis is a treatment that filters wastes and water ...

  20. Aging Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Musso, Carlos G; Giordani, María C; Imperiali, Nora

    2016-01-01

    There are several immunological and non-immunological factors related to renal graft deterioration, and histological lesions such as interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy overlap with those observed in aging kidneys. Consequently, it has been proposed that kidney transplant senescence could contribute to graft loss. The process of cell senescence displays characteristics such as an increased expression of specific aging suppressor genes, shortened telomeres, mitochondrial changes, increased expression of negative regulators of the cell cycle, and immunological senescence. Additionally, tubular frailty characterizes the aged kidney, making it more susceptible to ischemia, reperfusion, toxic injury, and consequently, to inflammation. Moreover, renal tissue injury predisposes the older graft not only to progressive deterioration due to glomerular hyperfiltration, but also triggers acute rejection due to increased immunogenicity. In conclusion, renal graft senescence is a complex process, and its better understanding will help the nephrologist in its management in order to achieve a longer graft survival. PMID:27103042

  1. Brain–kidney crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Encephalopathy and altered higher mental functions are common clinical complications of acute kidney injury. Although sepsis is a major triggering factor, acute kidney injury predisposes to confusion by causing generalised inflammation, leading to increased permeability of the blood–brain barrier, exacerbated by hyperosmolarity and metabolic acidosis due to the retention of products of nitrogen metabolism potentially resulting in increased brain water content. Downregulation of cell membrane transporters predisposes to alterations in neurotransmitter secretion and uptake, coupled with drug accumulation increasing the risk of encephalopathy. On the other hand, acute brain injury can induce a variety of changes in renal function ranging from altered function and electrolyte imbalances to inflammatory changes in brain death kidney donors. PMID:25043644

  2. Imaging of Spinal Cord Injury: Acute Cervical Spinal Cord Injury, Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy, and Cord Herniation.

    PubMed

    Talekar, Kiran; Poplawski, Michael; Hegde, Rahul; Cox, Mougnyan; Flanders, Adam

    2016-10-01

    We review the pathophysiology and imaging findings of acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), cervical spondylotic myelopathy, and briefly review the much less common cord herniation as a unique cause of myelopathy. Acute traumatic SCI is devastating to the patient and the costs to society are staggering. There are currently no "cures" for SCI and the only accepted pharmacologic treatment regimen for traumatic SCI is currently being questioned. Evaluation and prognostication of SCI is a demanding area with significant deficiencies, including lack of biomarkers. Accurate classification of SCI is heavily dependent on a good clinical examination, the results of which can vary substantially based upon the patient׳s condition or comorbidities and the skills of the examiner. Moreover, the full extent of a patients׳ neurologic injury may not become apparent for days after injury; by then, therapeutic response may be limited. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the best imaging modality for the evaluation of spinal cord parenchyma, conventional MR techniques do not appear to differentiate edema from axonal injury. Recently, it is proposed that in addition to characterizing the anatomic extent of injury, metrics derived from conventional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging, in conjunction with the neurological examination, can serve as a reliable objective biomarker for determination of the extent of neurologic injury and early identification of patients who would benefit from treatment. Cervical spondylosis is a common disorder affecting predominantly the elderly with a potential to narrow the spinal canal and thereby impinge or compress upon the neural elements leading to cervical spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy. It is the commonest nontraumatic cause of spinal cord disorder in adults. Imaging plays an important role in grading the severity of spondylosis and detecting cord abnormalities suggesting myelopathy. PMID:27616315

  3. At Risk for Kidney Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Albumin Children and Kidney Disease Additional Kidney Information Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ... to share this content freely. March 5, 2014​ Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ...

  4. Diet for Kidney Stone Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... may also help prevent kidney stones, such as citrus drinks. Recommendations based on the specific type of ... do to prevent kidney stones. Some studies suggest citrus drinks like lemonade and orange juice protect against ...

  5. Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alternate Language URL Español Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines: What You Need to Know Page Content What ... pharmacist and provider need to know about your medicine and supplement use Your kidneys do not filter ...

  6. Kidney Stone Treatment with Lithotripsy

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Kidney Stone Treatment with Lithotripsy Broward Health Medical Center Fort Lauderdale, FL November 11, 2011 I'm ... got at least three stones in his left kidney. He's been having pain and blood in his ...

  7. Kidney Disease: A Silent Problem

    MedlinePlus

    ... dialysis or a transplant might work for you. Medicare And Kidney Disease Medicare may help pay for some kidney disease education and treatment. Contact Medicare to learn more about what is covered. Look ...

  8. Kidney Failure and Vascular Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... toxic level, they can be removed artificially through dialysis, or a kidney transplant can be performed. A ... can be treated with an artificial kidney machine (dialysis) which removes toxins from the blood. Patients requiring ...

  9. Kidney stones - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    Renal calculi - self-care; Nephrolithiasis - self-care; Stones - kidney - self-care ... You visited your health care provider or the hospital because you have a kidney stone. You will need to take self-care steps. Which steps ...

  10. Prevent Diabetes Problems: Keep Your Kidneys Healthy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Language URL Español Prevent diabetes problems: Keep your kidneys healthy Page Content On this page: What are ... I keep my kidneys healthy? What are my kidneys and what do they do? Your kidneys are ...

  11. Lupus and Kidney Disease (Lupus Nephritis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  12. Working with Kidney Disease: Rehabilitation and Employment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  13. Vitamins and Minerals in Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  14. Travel Tips: A Guide for Kidney Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  15. Medicines and Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dialysis or Transplant Paying for Kidney Failure Treatment Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ... to share this content freely. ​​September 17, 2014 ​​ Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ...

  16. Monitoring Your Kidney Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dialysis or Transplant Paying for Kidney Failure Treatment Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ... to share this content freely. ​​September 17, 2014​​ ​​ Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ...

  17. Hypomagnesaemia in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Van Laecke, Steven; Van Biesen, Wim

    2015-07-01

    In the era of calcineurin inhibitors, hypomagnesaemia is a very common finding in kidney transplant recipients. Especially the first weeks after transplantation it is the rule rather than the exception. Hypomagnesaemia or low magnesium intake have been associated with a higher mortality or more cardiovascular events in the general population, but this association has never been explored in kidney transplant recipients, despite their increased cardiovascular risk. Kidney transplant recipients with pre- or post-transplant hypomagnesaemia seem to have an aberrant glucose metabolism and develop diabetes mellitus more frequently. Moreover, observations from alternate study populations, animal experiments or in vitro studies suggest a possible role of magnesium deficiency in graft dysfunction, bone metabolism and transplant immunology. Future observational and especially interventional studies should further define whether and to what extent we should make effort to correct this electrolyte disturbance in transplant recipients. Considering the mechanism of renal magnesium wasting, normalizing the serum magnesium concentration by oral supplementation alone might turn out to be cumbersome in kidney transplant recipients. PMID:26001746

  18. Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fax: 813–636–8122 Email: info@aakp.org Internet: www.aakp.org American Kidney Fund 6110 Executive ... Fax: 301–881–0898 Email: helpline@kidneyfund.org Internet: www.kidneyfund.org Life Options Rehabilitation Resource Center ...

  19. Hypoxia in Diabetic Kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Takiyama, Yumi; Haneda, Masakazu

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is now a leading cause of end-stage renal disease. In addition, DN accounts for the increased mortality in type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and then patients without DN achieve long-term survival compatible with general population. Hypoxia represents an early event in the development and progression of DN, and hypoxia-inducible factor- (HIF-) 1 mediates the metabolic responses to renal hypoxia. Diabetes induces the “fraternal twins” of hypoxia, that is, pseudohypoxia and hypoxia. The kidneys are susceptible to hyperoxia because they accept 20% of the cardiac output. Therefore, the kidneys have specific vasculature to avoid hyperoxia, that is, AV oxygen shunting. The NAD-dependent histone deacetylases (HDACs) sirtuins are seven mammalian proteins, SIRTs 1–7, which are known to modulate longevity and metabolism. Recent studies demonstrated that some isoforms of sirtuins inhibit the activation of HIF by deacetylation or noncatalyzing effects. The kidneys, which have a vascular system that protects them against hyperoxia, unfortunately experience extraordinary hypernutrition today. Then, an unexpected overload of glucose augments the oxygen consumption, which ironically results in hypoxia. This review highlights the primary role of HIF in diabetic kidneys for the metabolic adaptation to diabetes-induced hypoxia. PMID:25054148

  20. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease Page Content On this page: What is anemia? ... should. [ Top ] How is anemia related to chronic kidney disease? Anemia commonly occurs in people with chronic kidney ...

  1. Kidneys and How They Work

    MedlinePlus

    ... Options National Kidney Foundation The NephCure Foundation MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... PDF, 345 KB) Alternate Language URL Español The Kidneys and How They Work Page Content On this ...

  2. Is Progressive Chronic Kidney Disease a Slow Acute Kidney Injury?

    PubMed

    Cowgill, Larry D; Polzin, David J; Elliott, Jonathan; Nabity, Mary B; Segev, Gilad; Grauer, Gregory F; Brown, Scott; Langston, Cathy; van Dongen, Astrid M

    2016-11-01

    International Renal Interest Society chronic kidney disease Stage 1 and acute kidney injury Grade I categorizations of kidney disease are often confused or ignored because patients are nonazotemic and generally asymptomatic. Recent evidence suggests these seemingly disparate conditions may be mechanistically linked and interrelated. Active kidney injury biomarkers have the potential to establish a new understanding for traditional views of chronic kidney disease, including its early identification and possible mediators of its progression, which, if validated, would establish a new and sophisticated paradigm for the understanding and approach to the diagnostic evaluation, and treatment of urinary disease in dogs and cats. PMID:27593574

  3. An Intermediate Animal Model of Spinal Cord Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Guiho, Thomas; Coste, Christine Azevedo; Delleci, Claire; Chenu, Jean-Patrick; Vignes, Jean-Rodolphe; Bauchet, Luc; Guiraud, David

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injuries (SCI) result in the loss of movement and sensory feedback as well as organs dysfunctions. For example, nearly all SCI subjects loose their bladder control and are prone to kidney failure if they do not proceed to intermittent (self-) catheterization. Electrical stimulation of the sacral spinal roots with an implantable neuroprosthesis is a promising approach, with commercialized products, to restore continence and control micturition. However, many persons do not ask for this intervention since a surgical deafferentation is needed and the loss of sensory functions and reflexes become serious side effects of this procedure. Recent results renewed interest in spinal cord stimulation. Stimulation of existing pre-cabled neural networks involved in physiological processes regulation is suspected to enable synergic recruitment of spinal fibers. The development of direct spinal stimulation strategies aiming at bladder and bowel functions restoration would therefore appear as a credible alternative to existent solutions. However, a lack of suitable large animal model complicates these kinds of studies. In this article, we propose a new animal model of spinal stimulation -pig- and will briefly introduce results from one first acute experimental validation session. PMID:27478570

  4. Ganglioglioma of the Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheimer, Daniel C; Johnson, Mahlon D; Judkins, Alexander R

    2015-01-01

    Ganglioglioma is a rare tumor consisting of neoplastic glial and neuronal elements. It accounts for only 0.5% of all primary central nervous system (CNS) neoplasms. We report an unusual case of extensive intramedullary thoracic spinal cord ganglioglioma in a 14-month-old girl who underwent subtotal resection followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. The epidemiology, histopathologic features, imaging findings, treatment, and prognosis are subsequently reviewed. PMID:26605127

  5. Cervical cord injury after massage.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tzu-Han; Chiu, Jan-Wei; Chan, Rai-Chi

    2011-10-01

    We present the case of a 47-yr-old gentleman with cervical cord injury after he received massage in the neck area. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine showed a herniation of the nucleus pulposus and compressive myelopathy. The patient required surgical intervention and rehabilitation. Despite 6 mos of rehabilitation, residual hand dysfunction and minor ambulation problems persisted. Although massage has many benefits, this case reminds us that there is potential danger in performing neck massage. PMID:21862908

  6. Bending insensitive optical curl cord patch cords based on Holey-fibers for FTTH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Chang-Hyun; Ouh, Chi-Hwan; Ryu, Ki-Sun; Kang, Hee-Jeon; Lee, Sang-Bae; Han, Young-Geon

    2008-03-01

    We experimentally demonstrate real practical optical curl patch cords based on holey fibers with bending insensitivity. After making 6-hole holey fibers with the VAD method, the optical curl patch cord with the fabricated holey fiber is developed.

  7. Religious perspectives on umbilical cord blood banking.

    PubMed

    Jordens, Christopher F C; O'Connor, Michelle A C; Kerridge, Ian H; Stewart, Cameron; Cameron, Andrew; Keown, Damien; Lawrence, Rabbi Jeremy; McGarrity, Andrew; Sachedina, Abdulaziz; Tobin, Bernadette

    2012-03-01

    Umbilical cord blood is a valuable source of haematopoietic stem cells. There is little information about whether religious affiliations have any bearing on attitudes to and decisions about its collection, donation and storage. The authors provided information about umbilical cord blood banking to expert commentators from six major world religions (Catholicism, Anglicanism, Islam, Judaism, Hinduism and Buddhism) and asked them to address a specific set of questions in a commentary. The commentaries suggest there is considerable support for umbilical cord blood banking in these religions. Four commentaries provide moral grounds for favouring public donation over private storage. None attach any particular religious significance to the umbilical cord or to the blood within it, nor place restrictions on the ethnicity or religion of donors and recipients. Views on ownership of umbilical cord blood vary. The authors offer a series of general points for those who seek a better understanding of religious perspectives on umbilical cord blood banking. PMID:22558902

  8. Hypertension and a missing kidney

    PubMed Central

    Raina, Rupesh; Gulani, Vikas; Mehta, Lina; Jacobs, Gretta H.; Joyce, Kelly; Ponsky, Todd A.; Kenagy, David N.

    2012-01-01

    Standard initial assessment via ultrasound of a 4-year-old girl with hypertension revealed the absence of one kidney. Instead of cross-sectional imaging of the retroperitoneal space, a functional (nuclear) study was performed. This revealed a malformed kidney within the chest. Though systemic levels of renin and aldosterone were not elevated, removal of the malformed kidney normalized the blood pressure. The presence of prominent smooth muscle nodules surrounding the arteries was seen in the malformed kidney. Initial attempts to avert surgery by pharmacologically reducing blood flow to the malformed kidney were unsuccessful. The review of the literature offers little evidence to support such a strategy. PMID:25874090

  9. Management of acute spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wagner, F C

    1977-06-01

    Based on the experience with 58 patients with acute spinal cord injuries, a system for rapidly evaluating such patients has been developed. With the knowledge that has been acquired clinically and experimentally of spinal cord injury and with the information provided by laminography and by either air or Pantopaque myelography, a reasonably certain diagnosis of the type of spinal cord injury may be made. Treatment designed to restore neurological function may then be instituted promptly. PMID:882906

  10. Cord blood transplant: current and future issues.

    PubMed

    Inoue, S

    1998-01-01

    Cord blood as the source of hematopoietic stem cells has several advantages over bone marrow cells for transplant purpose. It is readily available, and causes no physical harm or inconveniences to the donor in the processing of harvesting cells. Waiting time between initiating the search and the time to transplant from an unrelated donor is much shorter with cord blood than with unrelated donor bone marrow. The incidence of graft-versus-host diseases is much less. Because of these advantages, cord blood has been increasingly used as the source of stem cells. As of this writing, more than 200 cord blood transplants have been done in patients with hematological malignancies, solid tumors, hematological diseases, immunodeficiency syndromes, and metabolic diseases. One of the limitations inherent in the cord blood is its limited number of hematopoietic stem cells. Thus it has been primarily used for pediatric patients, though more recently, adult patients also have been transplanted with cord blood as people have become more experienced in harvesting cord blood thus yielding a larger number of stem cells in a given specimen. Efforts have been made to amplify stem cells in vitro following harvesting cord blood stem cells, so that adult recipients also would routinely benefit from this resource. Cord blood lymphocytes are functionally "naive", do not generate vigorous mixed lymphocyte culture reactivities. The low incidence of graft-versus-host disease in the recipients of cord blood is due to this particular property. It is highly desirable that the world wide cord blood registry, similar to the international bone marrow registry would be instituted, but there are logistic, ethical and financial problems that need to be resolved. Cord blood is one of the best stem cell sources, and its application is quite wide. PMID:10771961

  11. Kidney diseases and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Moon, Kyung Hyun; Ko, In Kap; Yoo, James J; Atala, Anthony

    2016-04-15

    Kidney disease is a worldwide public health problem. Renal failure follows several disease stages including acute and chronic kidney symptoms. Acute kidney injury (AKI) may lead to chronic kidney disease (CKD), which can progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) with a mortality rate. Current treatment options are limited to dialysis and kidney transplantation; however, problems such as donor organ shortage, graft failure and numerous complications remain a concern. To address this issue, cell-based approaches using tissue engineering (TE) and regenerative medicine (RM) may provide attractive approaches to replace the damaged kidney cells with functional renal specific cells, leading to restoration of normal kidney functions. While development of renal tissue engineering is in a steady state due to the complex composition and highly regulated functionality of the kidney, cell therapy using stem cells and primary kidney cells has demonstrated promising therapeutic outcomes in terms of restoration of renal functions in AKI and CKD. In this review, basic components needed for successful renal kidney engineering are discussed, and recent TE and RM approaches to treatment of specific kidney diseases will be presented. PMID:26134528

  12. Anorexia nervosa and the kidney.

    PubMed

    Bouquegneau, Antoine; Dubois, Bernard E; Krzesinski, Jean-Marie; Delanaye, Pierre

    2012-08-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a common psychiatric disorder that disproportionately affects adolescents and young adults and is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Anorexia nervosa can affect the kidney in numerous ways, including increased rates of acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease, electrolyte abnormalities, and nephrolithiasis. Additionally, the diagnosis and treatment of anorexia nervosa-associated kidney diseases are challenging, reflecting complications such as refeeding syndrome, as well as the limitations of serum creatinine level in this population to estimate kidney function and the psychosocial challenges inherent with treating systemic manifestations of psychiatric conditions. In this review, we discuss kidney diseases and kidney-associated conditions that occur in individuals with anorexia nervosa, summarizing many of the challenges in treating patients with this disease. PMID:22609034

  13. Therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; de Barros Filho, Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa; Marcon, Raphael Martus; Letaif, Olavo Biraghi; da Rocha, Ivan Dias

    2012-01-01

    This study reviews the literature concerning possible therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury. Spinal cord injury is a disabling and irreversible condition that has high economic and social costs. There are both primary and secondary mechanisms of damage to the spinal cord. The primary lesion is the mechanical injury itself. The secondary lesion results from one or more biochemical and cellular processes that are triggered by the primary lesion. The frustration of health professionals in treating a severe spinal cord injury was described in 1700 BC in an Egyptian surgical papyrus that was translated by Edwin Smith; the papyrus reported spinal fractures as a “disease that should not be treated.” Over the last two decades, several studies have been performed to obtain more effective treatments for spinal cord injury. Most of these studies approach a patient with acute spinal cord injury in one of four manners: corrective surgery or a physical, biological or pharmacological treatment method. Science is unraveling the mechanisms of cell protection and neuroregeneration, but clinically, we only provide supportive care for patients with spinal cord injuries. By combining these treatments, researchers attempt to enhance the functional recovery of patients with spinal cord injuries. Advances in the last decade have allowed us to encourage the development of experimental studies in the field of spinal cord regeneration. The combination of several therapeutic strategies should, at minimum, allow for partial functional recoveries for these patients, which could improve their quality of life. PMID:23070351

  14. Neurologic foundations of spinal cord fusion (GEMINI).

    PubMed

    Canavero, Sergio; Ren, XiaoPing; Kim, C-Yoon; Rosati, Edoardo

    2016-07-01

    Cephalosomatic anastomosis has been carried out in both monkeys and mice with preservation of brain function. Nonetheless the spinal cord was not reconstructed, leaving the animals unable to move voluntarily. Here we review the details of the GEMINI spinal cord fusion protocol, which aims at restoring electrophysiologic conduction across an acutely transected spinal cord. The existence of the cortico-truncoreticulo-propriospinal pathway, a little-known anatomic entity, is described, and its importance concerning spinal cord fusion emphasized. The use of fusogens and electrical stimulation as adjuvants for nerve fusion is addressed. The possibility of achieving cephalosomatic anastomosis in humans has become reality in principle. PMID:27180142

  15. How Are Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Children Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... spinal cord tumors in children staged? How are brain and spinal cord tumors diagnosed in children? Brain ... resonance angiography (MRA) or computerized tomographic angiography (CTA). Brain or spinal cord tumor biopsy Imaging tests such ...

  16. General Information about Childhood Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cord Tumors Treatment Overview (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Childhood Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors Go ... types of brain and spinal cord tumors. The information from tests and procedures done to detect (find) ...

  17. Testosterone Plus Finasteride Treatment After Spinal Cord Injury

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-07

    Spinal Cord Injury; Spinal Cord Injuries; Trauma, Nervous System; Wounds and Injuries; Central Nervous System Diseases; Nervous System Diseases; Spinal Cord Diseases; Gonadal Disorders; Endocrine System Diseases; Hypogonadism; Genital Diseases, Male

  18. Kidney stone disease

    PubMed Central

    Coe, Fredric L.; Evan, Andrew; Worcester, Elaine

    2005-01-01

    About 5% of American women and 12% of men will develop a kidney stone at some time in their life, and prevalence has been rising in both sexes. Approximately 80% of stones are composed of calcium oxalate (CaOx) and calcium phosphate (CaP); 10% of struvite (magnesium ammonium phosphate produced during infection with bacteria that possess the enzyme urease), 9% of uric acid (UA); and the remaining 1% are composed of cystine or ammonium acid urate or are diagnosed as drug-related stones. Stones ultimately arise because of an unwanted phase change of these substances from liquid to solid state. Here we focus on the mechanisms of pathogenesis involved in CaOx, CaP, UA, and cystine stone formation, including recent developments in our understanding of related changes in human kidney tissue and of underlying genetic causes, in addition to current therapeutics. PMID:16200192

  19. Kidney Cell Electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, P.

    1985-01-01

    Materials and procedures for microgravity electrophoresis of living human embryonic kidney cells were evaluated, ground support in the form of analytical cell electrophoresis and flow cytometry was provided and cells returned from space flight were analyzed. Preflight culture media, electrophoresis buffer, fraction collection media, temperature profiles, and urokinase assay procedures were tested prior to flight. Electrophoretic mobility distributions of aliquots of the cell population to be fractionated in flight were obtained. The protocol established and utilized is given.

  20. Cholesteatoma in ectopic kidney

    PubMed Central

    Karabulut, Yasemin Yuyucu; Tek, Mesut; Eti, Neslihan; Akbay, Erdem

    2016-01-01

    Cholesteatoma in the urinary system is a rarely seen benign condition. Rosina firstly defined this condition in the year 1953. Histopathologically it is characterized with keratinization, and squamous metaplasia of urothelial epithelium associated with desquamation of keratinized layers. Flank pain is the most common symptom that is caused by elimination of keratinous material. In our case we will discuss cholesteatoma developed in an ectopic kidney which has not been described in the literature before.

  1. Acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Gerhard Anton

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Acute kidney injury is a frequent and serious complication in hospitalized patients. Mortality rates have not substantially been decreased during the last 20 years. In most patients AKI results from transient renal hypoperfusion or ischemia. The consequences include tubular cell dysfunction/damage, inflammation of the organ, and post-ischemic microvasculopathy. The two latter events perpetuate kidney damage in AKI. Clinical manifestations result from diminished excretion of water, electrolytes, and endogenous / exogenous waste products. Patients are endangered by cardiovascular complications such as hypertension, heart failure, and arrhythmia. In addition, the whole organism may be affected by systemic toxification (uremia). The diagnostic approach in AKI involves several steps with renal biopsy inevitable in some patients. The current therapy focuses on preventing further kidney damage and on treatment of complications. Different pharmacological strategies have failed to significantly improve prognosis in AKI. If dialysis treatment becomes mandatory, intermittent and continuous renal replacement therapies are equally effective. Thus, new therapies are urgently needed in order to reduce short- and long-term outcome in AKI. In this respect, stem cell-based regimens may offer promising perspectives. PMID:25618438

  2. Acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Patschan, Daniel; Müller, Gerhard Anton

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is a frequent and serious complication in hospitalized patients. Mortality rates have not substantially been decreased during the last 20 years. In most patients AKI results from transient renal hypoperfusion or ischemia. The consequences include tubular cell dysfunction/damage, inflammation of the organ, and post-ischemic microvasculopathy. The two latter events perpetuate kidney damage in AKI. Clinical manifestations result from diminished excretion of water, electrolytes, and endogenous / exogenous waste products. Patients are endangered by cardiovascular complications such as hypertension, heart failure, and arrhythmia. In addition, the whole organism may be affected by systemic toxification (uremia). The diagnostic approach in AKI involves several steps with renal biopsy inevitable in some patients. The current therapy focuses on preventing further kidney damage and on treatment of complications. Different pharmacological strategies have failed to significantly improve prognosis in AKI. If dialysis treatment becomes mandatory, intermittent and continuous renal replacement therapies are equally effective. Thus, new therapies are urgently needed in order to reduce short- and long-term outcome in AKI. In this respect, stem cell-based regimens may offer promising perspectives. PMID:25618438

  3. Segmentation of the human spinal cord.

    PubMed

    De Leener, Benjamin; Taso, Manuel; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Callot, Virginie

    2016-04-01

    Segmenting the spinal cord contour is a necessary step for quantifying spinal cord atrophy in various diseases. Delineating gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) is also useful for quantifying GM atrophy or for extracting multiparametric MRI metrics into specific WM tracts. Spinal cord segmentation in clinical research is not as developed as brain segmentation, however with the substantial improvement of MR sequences adapted to spinal cord MR investigations, the field of spinal cord MR segmentation has advanced greatly within the last decade. Segmentation techniques with variable accuracy and degree of complexity have been developed and reported in the literature. In this paper, we review some of the existing methods for cord and WM/GM segmentation, including intensity-based, surface-based, and image-based methods. We also provide recommendations for validating spinal cord segmentation techniques, as it is important to understand the intrinsic characteristics of the methods and to evaluate their performance and limitations. Lastly, we illustrate some applications in the healthy and pathological spinal cord. One conclusion of this review is that robust and automatic segmentation is clinically relevant, as it would allow for longitudinal and group studies free from user bias as well as reproducible multicentric studies in large populations, thereby helping to further our understanding of the spinal cord pathophysiology and to develop new criteria for early detection of subclinical evolution for prognosis prediction and for patient management. Another conclusion is that at the present time, no single method adequately segments the cord and its substructure in all the cases encountered (abnormal intensities, loss of contrast, deformation of the cord, etc.). A combination of different approaches is thus advised for future developments, along with the introduction of probabilistic shape models. Maturation of standardized frameworks, multiplatform availability, inclusion

  4. Comprehensive renal scintillation procedures in spinal cord injury: comparison with excretory urography

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, L.K.; Dubovsky, E.V.; Bueschen, A.J.; Witten, D.M.; Scott, J.W.; Kuhlemeier, K.; Stover, S.L.

    1981-07-01

    A /sup 131/iodine orthoiodohippurate comprehensive renal scintillation procedure was performed and compared to results of excretory urography in 200 spinal cord injury patients. No severe urographic abnormalities were undetected by the comprehensive renal scintillation procedure. Only 1.4 per cent of renal units had greater than minimal pyelocaliectasis or ureterectasis in the presence of a normal radionuclide examination. A relatively large number of abnormalities were detected on the renal scintillation procedure when the excretory urogram was normal. Serial followup will be required to determine the significance of these findings but present data suggest that a comprehensive renal scintillation procedure and a plain film of the kidneys, ureters and bladder may be used for screening upper urinary tract abnormalities in lieu of an excretory urogram. This is particularly advantageous for the spinal cord injury population, since there have been no toxic or allergic reactions reported, no bowel preparation or dehydration is required and there is relatively low radiation exposure.

  5. Sphingolipids in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Jones, Zachary B; Ren, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a debilitating condition that affects millions of individuals worldwide. Despite progress over the last few decades, the molecular mechanisms of secondary SCI that continue to occur days and weeks after the original trauma remain poorly understood. As a result, current therapies for SCI are only marginally effective. Sphingolipids, a diverse class of bioactive lipids, have been shown to regulate SCI repair and key secondary injury processes such as apoptosis, ischemia and inflammation. This review will discuss the numerous roles of sphingolipids and highlight the potential of sphingolipid-targeted therapies for SCI. PMID:27570580

  6. Sphingolipids in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Zachary B; Ren, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a debilitating condition that affects millions of individuals worldwide. Despite progress over the last few decades, the molecular mechanisms of secondary SCI that continue to occur days and weeks after the original trauma remain poorly understood. As a result, current therapies for SCI are only marginally effective. Sphingolipids, a diverse class of bioactive lipids, have been shown to regulate SCI repair and key secondary injury processes such as apoptosis, ischemia and inflammation. This review will discuss the numerous roles of sphingolipids and highlight the potential of sphingolipid-targeted therapies for SCI. PMID:27570580

  7. Recognising metastatic spinal cord compression.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Ben

    2015-04-01

    Metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) is a potentially life changing oncological emergency. Neurological function and quality of life can be preserved if patients receive an early diagnosis and rapid access to acute interventions to prevent or reduce nerve damage. Symptoms include developing spinal pain, numbness or weakness in arms or legs, or unexplained changes in bladder and bowel function. Community nurses are well placed to pick up on the 'red flag' symptoms of MSCC and ensure patients access prompt, timely investigations to minimise damage. PMID:25839873

  8. Family-directed umbilical cord blood banking.

    PubMed

    Gluckman, Eliane; Ruggeri, Annalisa; Rocha, Vanderson; Baudoux, Etienne; Boo, Michael; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Welte, Kathy; Navarrete, Cristina; van Walraven, Suzanna M

    2011-11-01

    Umbilical cord blood transplantation from HLA-identical siblings provides good results in children. These results support targeted efforts to bank family cord blood units that can be used for a sibling diagnosed with a disease which can be cured by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or for research that investigates the use of allogeneic or autologous cord blood cells. Over 500 patients transplanted with related cord blood units have been reported to the Eurocord registry with a 4-year overall survival of 91% for patients with non-malignant diseases and 56% for patients with malignant diseases. Main hematologic indications in children are leukemia, hemoglobinopathies or inherited hematologic, immunological or metabolic disorders. However, family-directed cord blood banking is not widely promoted; many cord blood units used in sibling transplantation have been obtained from private banks that do not meet the necessary criteria required to store these units. Marketing by private banks who predominantly store autologous cord blood units has created public confusion. There are very few current validated indications for autologous storage but some new indications might appear in the future. Little effort is devoted to provide unbiased information and to educate the public as to the distinction between the different types of banking, economic models and standards involved in such programs. In order to provide a better service for families in need, directed-family cord blood banking activities should be encouraged and closely monitored with common standards, and better information on current and future indications should be made available. PMID:21750089

  9. Family-directed umbilical cord blood banking

    PubMed Central

    Gluckman, Eliane; Ruggeri, Annalisa; Rocha, Vanderson; Baudoux, Etienne; Boo, Michael; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Welte, Kathy; Navarrete, Cristina; van Walraven, Suzanna M.

    2011-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood transplantation from HLA-identical siblings provides good results in children. These results support targeted efforts to bank family cord blood units that can be used for a sibling diagnosed with a disease which can be cured by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or for research that investigates the use of allogeneic or autologous cord blood cells. Over 500 patients transplanted with related cord blood units have been reported to the Eurocord registry with a 4-year overall survival of 91% for patients with non-malignant diseases and 56% for patients with malignant diseases. Main hematologic indications in children are leukemia, hemoglobinopathies or inherited hematologic, immunological or metabolic disorders. However, family-directed cord blood banking is not widely promoted; many cord blood units used in sibling transplantation have been obtained from private banks that do not meet the necessary criteria required to store these units. Marketing by private banks who predominantly store autologous cord blood units has created public confusion. There are very few current validated indications for autologous storage but some new indications might appear in the future. Little effort is devoted to provide unbiased information and to educate the public as to the distinction between the different types of banking, economic models and standards involved in such programs. In order to provide a better service for families in need, directed-family cord blood banking activities should be encouraged and closely monitored with common standards, and better information on current and future indications should be made available. PMID:21750089

  10. Neonatal umbilical cord myiasis in New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Puvabanditsin, S; Malik, I; Weidner, L M; Jadhav, S; Sanderman, J; Mehta, R

    2014-09-01

    Human myiasis is a rare condition. It is more common in tropical regions. Umbilical cord myiasis has not previously been reported from a temperate climate, for example, New Jersey. We report a 9-day-old infant with umbilical cord myiasis. The maggots were identified by the entomologist as the larvae of Sarcophagidae, more commonly known as flesh flies. PMID:25179383

  11. Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (CORD): Evaluation plan

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (CORD) project evaluation will determine the extent to which the CORD model of linking primary care (PC) interventions to public health (PH) interventions in multiple community sectors affects BMI and behavior in children (2 to 12 years). The evaluation c...

  12. Nutrition of People with Spinal Cord Injuries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This conference proceeding summarizes current knowledge about the nutritional status and needs of the spinal cord injured patient. Topics covered include the aspects of spinal cord injury that influence nutrient intakes and status, and the nutrients most likely to be problematic in this diverse gro...

  13. Spinal Cord Ring Enhancement in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Klawiter, Eric C; Benzinger, Tammie; Roy, Abhik; Naismith, Robert T; Parks, Becky J; Cross, Anne H

    2010-01-01

    Objective Describe the clinical and imaging characteristics of spinal cord ring enhancement in multiple sclerosis (MS). Design Clinical case series. Setting Academic referral center. Patients Twenty MS subjects with spinal cord ring enhancement were retrospectively identified from 322 cervical and thoracic spinal cord MRI studies over a 3 year period. Main Outcome Measures Demographics, disability, pattern of enhancement on spinal cord imaging, and concomitant brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were determined. Results Ring enhancement was seen in 20 subjects with spinal cord enhancement, most commonly in the cervical cord. Incomplete or ‘open’ ring enhancement was the dominant pattern in 19 of 20 (95%) subjects. Concurrent ring enhancing brain lesions were present in 40% of subjects. At the time of the MRI, the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) ranged from 1.0–7.0 (median 3.0). Conclusion Ring enhancement is not an uncommon pattern for MS spinal cord lesions, occurring with a prevalence of 6.2% (20/322). The most common pattern was incomplete ring enhancement in the cervical spinal cord. Recognition of this pattern may improve and expedite the diagnosis of MS and preclude need for invasive diagnostic interventions. PMID:21060017

  14. The rationale behind collecting umbilical cord blood

    PubMed Central

    Zech, Nicolas H.; Broer, Nikolas; Ribitsch, Iris; Zech, Mathias H.; Broer, Karl-heinz; Ertan, Kubilay; Preisegger, Karl-heinz

    2010-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is an increasingly important and rich source of stem cells. These cells can be used for the treatment of many diseases, including cancers and immune and genetic disorders. For patients for whom no suitable related donor is available, this source of hematopoietic stem cells offers substantial advantages, notably the relative ease of procurement, the absence of risk to the donor, the small likelihood of transmitting clinically important infections, the low risk of severe graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and the rapid availability of placental blood for transplantation centers. Even though almost 80 diseases are treatable with cord blood stem cells, 97 percent of cord blood is still disposed of after birth and lost for patients in need! To improve availability of stem cells to a broader community, efforts should be undertaken to collect cord blood and expectant parents should be properly informed of their options with regard to cord blood banking. PMID:24591908

  15. Ultrasound in Acute Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Nalesso, Federico; Petrucci, Ilaria; Samoni, Sara; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Kidneys' imaging provides useful information in acute kidney injury (AKI) diagnosis and management. Today, several imaging techniques give information on kidneys anatomy, urinary obstruction, differential diagnosis between AKI and chronic kidney disease (CKD), renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate. Ultrasound is a safe, non-invasive and repeatable imaging technique so it is widely used in the first level work-up of AKI. The utility of contrast-enhanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in AKI or in AKI during CKD is limited because of renal toxicity associated with contrast agents used. PMID:27169556

  16. CD74 in Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Valiño-Rivas, Lara; Baeza-Bermejillo, Ciro; Gonzalez-Lafuente, Laura; Sanz, Ana Belen; Ortiz, Alberto; Sanchez-Niño, Maria Dolores

    2015-01-01

    CD74 (invariant MHC class II) regulates protein trafficking and is a receptor for macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) and d-dopachrome tautomerase (d-DT/MIF-2). CD74 expression is increased in tubular cells and/or glomerular podocytes and parietal cells in human metabolic nephropathies, polycystic kidney disease, graft rejection and kidney cancer and in experimental diabetic nephropathy and glomerulonephritis. Stressors like abnormal metabolite (glucose, lyso-Gb3) levels and inflammatory cytokines increase kidney cell CD74. MIF activates CD74 to increase inflammatory cytokines in podocytes and tubular cells and proliferation in glomerular parietal epithelial cells and cyst cells. MIF overexpression promotes while MIF targeting protects from experimental glomerular injury and kidney cysts, and interference with MIF/CD74 signaling or CD74 deficiency protected from crescentic glomerulonephritis. However, CD74 may protect from interstitial kidney fibrosis. Furthermore, CD74 expression by stressed kidney cells raises questions about the kidney safety of cancer therapy strategies delivering lethal immunoconjugates to CD74-expressing cells. Thus, understanding CD74 biology in kidney cells is relevant for kidney therapeutics. PMID:26441987

  17. Pain following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Siddall, P J; Loeser, J D

    2001-02-01

    Chronic pain is an important problem following spinal cord injury (SCI) and is a major impediment to effective rehabilitation. The reported prevalence of chronic SCI pain is variable but averages 65% with around one third of these people rating their pain as severe. The mechanisms responsible for the presence of pain are poorly understood. However, evidence from clinical observations and the use of animal models of SCI pain suggests that a number of processes may be important. These include functional and structural plastic changes in the central nervous system following injury, with changes in receptor function and loss of normal inhibition resulting in an increased neuronal excitability. A number of specific types of SCI pain can be distinguished based on descriptors, location and response to treatment. Nociceptive pain can arise from musculoskeletal structures and viscera and neuropathic pain can arise from spinal cord and nerve damage. The role of psychological and environmental factors also needs to be considered. Accurate identification of these pain types will help in selecting appropriate treatment approaches. Current treatments employ a variety of pharmacological, surgical, physical and psychological approaches. However, evidence for many of the treatments in use is still limited. It is hoped that future research will identify effective treatment strategies that accurately target specific mechanisms. PMID:11402361

  18. Rehabilitation of spinal cord injuries

    PubMed Central

    Nas, Kemal; Yazmalar, Levent; Şah, Volkan; Aydın, Abdulkadir; Öneş, Kadriye

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is the injury of the spinal cord from the foramen magnum to the cauda equina which occurs as a result of compulsion, incision or contusion. The most common causes of SCI in the world are traffic accidents, gunshot injuries, knife injuries, falls and sports injuries. There is a strong relationship between functional status and whether the injury is complete or not complete, as well as the level of the injury. The results of SCI bring not only damage to independence and physical function, but also include many complications from the injury. Neurogenic bladder and bowel, urinary tract infections, pressure ulcers, orthostatic hypotension, fractures, deep vein thrombosis, spasticity, autonomic dysreflexia, pulmonary and cardiovascular problems, and depressive disorders are frequent complications after SCI. SCI leads to serious disability in the patient resulting in the loss of work, which brings psychosocial and economic problems. The treatment and rehabilitation period is long, expensive and exhausting in SCI. Whether complete or incomplete, SCI rehabilitation is a long process that requires patience and motivation of the patient and relatives. Early rehabilitation is important to prevent joint contractures and the loss of muscle strength, conservation of bone density, and to ensure normal functioning of the respiratory and digestive system. An interdisciplinary approach is essential in rehabilitation in SCI, as in the other types of rehabilitation. The team is led by a physiatrist and consists of the patients’ family, physiotherapist, occupational therapist, dietician, psychologist, speech therapist, social worker and other consultant specialists as necessary. PMID:25621206

  19. Ablation of kidney tumors.

    PubMed

    Karam, Jose A; Ahrar, Kamran; Matin, Surena F

    2011-04-01

    While surgical excision remains the gold standard for curative treatment of small renal cell carcinomas, ablative therapy has a place as a minimally invasive, kidney function-preserving therapy in carefully selected patients who are poor candidates for surgery. Although laparoscopic cryoablation and percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) are commonly performed, percutaneous cryoablation and laparoscopic RFA are reportedly being performed with increasing frequency. The renal function and complication profiles following ablative therapy are favorable, while oncologic outcomes lag behind those of surgery, thus reinforcing the need for careful patient selection. PMID:21377587

  20. The kidney and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Harris, J P; Chester, A C; Schreiner, G E

    1978-10-01

    Many clinical parameters and biochemical values normally change as a result of the profound effect of pregnancy on the kidney. These changes include hydronephrosis, decreased BUN and uric acid, proteinuria and glycosuria (70 percent one time), frequency, nocturia, edema (80 percent) and reductions in blood pressure. "Normal is abnormal." A BUN of 20 mg. percent is the equivalent of 40 mg. percent in a nonpregnant woman, and a blood pressure of 120/80 in the 24th week of preganancy may be hypertensive. PMID:707275

  1. [Infertility and kidney transplantation].

    PubMed

    Atallah, David; Salameh, Charbel; El Kassis, Nadine; Safi, Joelle; Lutfallah, Fouad; Bejjani, Lina; Ghaname, Wadih; Moukarzel, Maroun

    2015-01-01

    Renal failure impairs the endocrine system, especially in women, due to hyperprolactinemia, altering fertility, ovulatory cycles, libido and growth in adolescents. Renal transplantation is considered the best solution to the problems of renal failure and and of dialysis, as evidenced by comparing the rate of hyperprolactinemia (100% in chronic renal failure, 60% in patients on dialysis and 35% in post-transplantation). Kidney transplant is less efficient for restoring perfect function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis due in part to the immunosuppressant regimens prescribed. When these drugs are properly managed, transplantation will restore near normal sexual function. PMID:26591193

  2. Polycystic kidney disease: The cadence of kidney growth in ADPKD.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Arlene

    2009-06-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease is characterized by the development and expansion of cysts, which ultimately results in kidney failure. The rate of this expansion can now be quantified within a short period of time, which has implications for assessing the risk of renal failure in affected patients. PMID:19474826

  3. Obesity and kidney protection

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Aravind; Biersmith, Michael; Tolouian, Ramin

    2014-01-01

    Context: Obesity, both directly and indirectly, increases the risk for a variety of disease conditions including diabetes, hypertension, liver disease, and certain cancers, which in turn, decreases the overall lifespan in both men and women. Though the cardiovascular risks of obesity are widely acknowledged, less often identified is the relationship between obesity and renal function. Evidence Acquisitions: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, PubMed, EBSCO and Web of Science has been searched. Results: The concept of the “Metabolic Syndrome“ helps us to understand this close link between obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and renal dysfunction. An elevated body mass index has shown to be one of the major determinants of glomerular hyperfiltration that lead to the development of chronic kidney disease. Interestingly, weight loss can lead to attenuation of hyperfiltration in severely obese patients suggesting a possible therapeutic option to combat obesity-related hyperfiltration. Conclusions: Various treatment strategies had been suggested to decrease impact of obesity on kidneys. These are blood pressure controling, inhibition of the renin-angiotensinaldosterone axis, improving glycemic control, improving dyslipidemia, improving protein uriaand lifestyle modifications. Regardless of the numerous pharmacotherapies, the focus should be on the root cause: obesity. PMID:25093156

  4. Genetic kidney diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of the primary cause of a disease is essential for understanding its mechanisms and for adequate classification, prognosis, and treatment. Recently, the etiologies of many kidney diseases have been revealed as single-gene defects. This is exemplified by steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome, which is caused by podocin mutations in ~25% of childhood and ~15% of adult cases. Knowledge of a disease-causing mutation in a single-gene disorder represents one of the most robust diagnostic examples of “personalized medicine”, because the mutation conveys an almost 100% risk of developing the disease by a certain age. Whereas single-gene diseases are rare disorders, polygenic “risk alleles” are found in common adult-onset diseases. This review will discuss prominent renal single-gene kidney disorders and polygenic risk alleles of common disorders. We delineate how emerging techniques of total exome capture and large-scale sequencing will facilitate molecular genetic diagnosis, prognosis and specific therapy and lead to a better understanding of disease mechanisms, thus enabling development of new targeted drugs. PMID:20382325

  5. Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Zuk, Anna; Bonventre, Joseph V

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a global public health concern associated with high morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs. Other than dialysis, no therapeutic interventions reliably improve survival, limit injury, or speed recovery. Despite recognized shortcomings of in vivo animal models, the underlying pathophysiology of AKI and its consequence, chronic kidney disease (CKD), is rich with biological targets. We review recent findings relating to the renal vasculature and cellular stress responses, primarily the intersection of the unfolded protein response, mitochondrial dysfunction, autophagy, and the innate immune response. Maladaptive repair mechanisms that persist following the acute phase promote inflammation and fibrosis in the chronic phase. Here macrophages, growth-arrested tubular epithelial cells, the endothelium, and surrounding pericytes are key players in the progression to chronic disease. Better understanding of these complex interacting pathophysiological mechanisms, their relative importance in humans, and the utility of biomarkers will lead to therapeutic strategies to prevent and treat AKI or impede progression to CKD or end-stage renal disease (ESRD). PMID:26768243

  6. The kidney in space.

    PubMed

    Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Leivaditis, Konstantinos; Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Dombros, Nicholas

    2012-12-01

    Renal adaptation in space has been studied during various space missions since the early 70s. Technical and financial disadvantages of performing experiments under real microgravity conditions have warranted the conductance of relative studies under simulated weightlessness on earth. Arriving in microgravity leads to a redistribution of body fluids to the upper part of the body and an exaggerated extravasation very early in-flight. Plasma volume as well as skin evaporation and oral hydration are reduced, while total body water seems to remain stable. Urinary sodium is diminished and a substantial amount of sodium is retained outside the intravascular space. Glomerular filtration rate shows a transient mild increase. Urinary albumin excretion is reduced although initial studies had demonstrated the opposite. Examination of renal histopathology after exposure to simulated microgravity in rats revealed glomerular atrophy, interstitial edema, and degeneration of renal tubular cells. Acute urinary retention which has been reported during spaceflights can lead to certain medical complications that could compromise an entire mission. Kidney stone formation is another important potential hazard for any manned spaceflight. Increased kidney stone formation in space is attributed to several factors including reduced fluid intake, hypercalciuria, and the presence of nanobacteria. Nutritional and pharmacological interventions are currently recommended as preventive measures against renal stone formation in space travelers. PMID:23001611

  7. The Impact Of Sports Activities On Quality Of Life Of Persons With A Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Eminović, Fadilj; Dopsaj, Milivoj; Pavlović, Dragan; Arsić, Sladjana; Otašević, Jadranka

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives Studying the quality of life of people with a spinal cord injury is of great importance as it allows the monitoring of both functioning and adaptation to disability. The aim of this study was to determine the difference between persons with a spinal cord injury involved in sports activities and those not involved in sports activities in relation to their quality of life and the presence of secondary health conditions (pressure ulcers, urinary infections, muscle spasms, osteoporosis, pain, kidney problems-infections, calculosis and poor circulation). Methods The study included a total of 44 participants with spinal cord injury-paraplegia of both genders; 26 of them were athletes and 18 were not athletes. The athletes were training actively for the last two years, minimally 2-3 times per week. A specially designed questionnaire, medical documentation and the Spinal Cord Injury Quality of Life Questionnaire (SCI QL-23) were used for research purposes. Chi-square test was used to analyze the differences between the groups, while multiple analysis of variance (MANOVA) was used to determine the differences between the sets of variables. Results Among the participants, the athletes perceived higher quality of life than the non-athletes (male gender p<0.001 and female gender p<0.05). Regarding secondary health conditions, the athletes reported the presence of less pain (p=0.034) and a subjective feeling of better circulation (p=0.023). Conclusion The implementation of sports activities significantly improves quality of life in the population of people with spinal cord injury-paraplegia. However, sports activities only partially affect secondary health conditions. PMID:27284378

  8. CD11d integrin blockade reduces the systemic inflammatory response syndrome after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Feng; Brown, Arthur; Dekaban, Gregory A.; Omana, Vanessa; Weaver, Lynne C.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic injury to the spinal cord triggers a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), in which inflammatory cells from the circulation invade organs such as the liver, lung and kidney, leading to damage of these organs. Our previous study (Gris, et al, Exp. Neurol, 2008) demonstrated that spinal cord injury (SCI) activates circulating neutrophils that then invade the lung and kidney from 2 to 24 h after injury, increasing myeloperoxidase activity, cyclooxygenase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression and lipid peroxidation in these organs. The present study was designed to ascertain whether a treatment that limits the influx of leukocytes into the injured spinal cord would also be effective in reducing the SIRS after SCI. This treatment is intravenous delivery of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against the CD11d subunit of the CD11d/CD18 integrin expressed by neutrophils and monocytes. We delivered the anti-CD11d mAb at 2 h post moderate clip compression SCI at the 4th or 12th thoracic segments and assessed inflammation, oxidative activity and cellular damage within the lung, kidney and liver at 12 h post-injury. In some analyses we compared high and low thoracic injuries to evaluate the importance of injury level on the intensity of the SIRS. After T4 injury, treatment with the anti-integrin mAb reduced the presence of neutrophils and macrophages in the lung, with associated decreases in expression of NF-κB and oxidative enzymes and in the concentration of free radicals in this organ. The treatment also reduced lipid peroxidation, protein nitration and cell death in the lung. The anti-CD11d treatment also reduced the inflammatory cells within the kidney after T4 injury, as well as the free radical concentration and amount of lipid peroxidation. In the liver, the mAb treatment reduced the influx of neutrophils but most of the other measures examined were unaffected by SCI. The inflammatory responses within the lung and kidney were often greater after T4

  9. Kidney Disease Statistics for the United States

    MedlinePlus

    ... also order print versions from our online catalog. Kidney Disease Statistics for the United States Page Content On ... for Vascular Access Acknowledgments The Growing Burden of Kidney Disease Kidney disease statistics for the United States convey ...

  10. Kidney Disease: Early Detection and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Kidney Disease: Early Detection and Treatment Past Issues / Winter ... called a "urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio." Treating Kidney Disease Kidney disease is usually a progressive disease, ...