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Sample records for kidney 2-vessel cord

  1. Transplantation of differentiated umbilical cord mesenchymal cells under kidney capsule for control of type I diabetes in rat.

    PubMed

    Moshrefi, Mojgan; Yari, Nahid; Nabipour, Fatemeh; Bazrafshani, Mohammad Reza; Nematollahi-mahani, Seyed Noureddin

    2015-08-01

    Nowadays, stem cells have been introduced as an appropriate source of regenerative medicine for treatment of type I diabetes. Human umbilical cord matrix-derived mesenchymal cells (hUCMC) have successfully been differentiated into insulin producing cells. The isolated hUCM cells were characterized by the expression of stem cell surface markers and by differentiation into adipocytes and osteocytes. The hUCMCs were cultured with different concentrations of neural conditional medium (NCM) and were induced to differentiate into insulin producing cells (IPCs). As 60% NCM concentration resulted in higher nestin and PDX1 expression, the cells were first exposed to 60% NCM and were then induced for IPCs differentiation. PDX1 and insulin gene expression was evaluated in the treated cells. Also, the secretion capacity of the IPCs was assessed by glucose challenge test. IPCs were transferred under the rat kidney capsule. Blood glucose level, weight gain and immunohistochemistry assessments were done in the treated animals. hUCMC expressed mesenchymal cell surface markers and successfully differentiated into adipocytes and osteocytes. Higher NCM concentration resulted in higher PDX1 and nestin expression. The IPCs expressed insulin and PDX1. IPCs were detectable under the kidney capsule 2 months after injection. IPCs transplantation resulted in a sharp decline of blood sugar level and less weight loss. Differentiated hUCM cells could alleviate the insulin deprivation in the rat model of type I diabetes. In addition, higher NCM concentration leads to more differentiation into IPCs and more nestin and PDX1 expression. Kidney capsule can serve as a suitable nominee for IPCs transplantation. PMID:26025422

  2. Improved Protective Effect of Umbilical Cord Stem Cell Transplantation on Cisplatin-Induced Kidney Injury in Mice Pretreated with Antithymocyte Globulin

    PubMed Central

    Večerić-Haler, Željka; Erman, Andreja; Cerar, Anton; Motaln, Helena; Kološa, Katja; Lah Turnšek, Tamara; Sodin Šemrl, Snežna; Lakota, Katja; Mrak-Poljšak, Katjuša; Škrajnar, Špela; Kranjc, Simona; Arnol, Miha; Perše, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are recognised as a promising tool to improve renal recovery in experimental models of cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury. However, these preclinical studies were performed on severely immunodeficient animals. Here, we investigated whether human umbilical cord derived MSC treatment could equally ameliorate acute kidney injury induced by cisplatin and prolong survival in mice with a normal immune system and those with a suppressed immune system by polyclonal antithymocyte globulin (ATG). We demonstrated that ATG pretreatment, when followed by MSC transplantation, significantly improved injured renal function parameters, as evidenced by decreased blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine concentration, as well as improved renal morphology. This tissue restoration was also supported by increased survival of mice. The beneficial effects of ATG were associated with reduced level of inflammatory protein serum amyloid A3 and induced antioxidative expression of superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD-1), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and hem oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Infused MSCs became localised predominantly in peritubular areas and acted to reduce renal cell death. In conclusion, these results show that ATG diminished in situ inflammation and oxidative stress associated with cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury, the effects that may provide more favourable microenvironment for MSC action, with consequential synergistic improvements in renal injury and animal survival as compared to MSC treatment alone. PMID:26880955

  3. Extracellular membrane vesicles from umbilical cord blood-derived MSC protect against ischemic acute kidney injury, a feature that is lost after inflammatory conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Kilpinen, Lotta; Impola, Ulla; Sankkila, Lotta; Ritamo, Ilja; Aatonen, Maria; Kilpinen, Sami; Tuimala, Jarno; Valmu, Leena; Levijoki, Jouko; Finckenberg, Piet; Siljander, Pia; Kankuri, Esko; Mervaala, Eero; Laitinen, Saara

    2013-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are shown to have a great therapeutic potential in many immunological disorders. Currently the therapeutic effect of MSCs is considered to be mediated via paracrine interactions with immune cells. Umbilical cord blood is an attractive but still less studied source of MSCs. We investigated the production of extracellular membrane vesicles (MVs) from human umbilical cord blood derived MSCs (hUCBMSC) in the presence (MVstim) or absence (MVctrl) of inflammatory stimulus. Methods hUCBMSCs were cultured in serum free media with or without IFN-γ and MVs were collected from conditioned media by ultracentrifugation. The protein content of MVs were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Hypoxia induced acute kidney injury rat model was used to analyze the in vivo therapeutic potential of MVs and T-cell proliferation and induction of regulatory T cells were analyzed by co-culture assays. Results Both MVstim and MVctrl showed similar T-cell modulation activity in vitro, but only MVctrls were able to protect rat kidneys from reperfusion injury in vivo. To clarify this difference in functionality we made a comparative mass spectrometric analysis of the MV protein contents. The IFN-γ stimulation induced dramatic changes in the protein content of the MVs. Complement factors (C3, C4A, C5) and lipid binding proteins (i.e apolipoproteins) were only found in the MVctrls, whereas the MVstim contained tetraspanins (CD9, CD63, CD81) and more complete proteasome complex accompanied with MHCI. We further discovered that differently produced MV pools contained specific Rab proteins suggesting that same cells, depending on external signals, produce vesicles originating from different intracellular locations. Conclusions We demonstrate by both in vitro and in vivo models accompanied with a detailed analysis of molecular characteristics that inflammatory conditioning of MSCs influence on the protein content and functional properties of MVs revealing the complexity of the MSC paracrine regulation. PMID:24349659

  4. TMI-2 Vessel Investigation Project integration report

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, J. R.; Rempe, J. L.; Stickler, L. A.; Korth, G. E.; Diercks, D. R.; Neimark, L. A.; Akers, D W; Schuetz, B. K.; Shearer, T L; Chavez, S. A.; Thinnes, G. L.; Witt, R. J.; Corradini, M L; Kos, J. A.

    1994-03-01

    The Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) Vessel Investigation Project (VIP) was an international effort that was sponsored by the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The primary objectives of the VIP were to extract and examine samples from the lower head and to evaluate the potential modes of failure and the margin of structural integrity that remained in the TMI-2 reactor vessel during the accident. This report presents a summary of the major findings and conclusions that were developed from research during the VIP. Results from the various elements of the project are integrated to form a cohesive understanding of the vessel`s condition after the accident.

  5. Enhanced renoprotective effect of IGF-1 modified human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells on gentamicin-induced acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pengfei; Feng, Yetong; Dong, Delu; Liu, Xiaobo; Chen, Yaoyu; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Yulai

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic action of umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) against acute kidney injury (AKI) has been demonstrated by several groups. However, how to further enhance the renoprotective effect of UC-MSCs and improve the therapy effect, are still unclear. In this study, we mainly investigated whether insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1)-modified UC-MSCs hold an enhanced protective effect on gentamicin-induced AKI in vivo. Our results indicated that the IGF-1 overexpression could enhance the therapeutic action of human UC-MSCs, and the AKI rats treated with IGF-1-overexpressed UC-MSCs (UC-MSCs-IGF-1) showed better recovery of biochemical variables in serum or urine associated with renal function, histological injury and renal apoptosis, compared with AKI rats treated with normal UC-MSCs. RNA microarray analysis indicated that some key genes in the signal pathways associated with anti-oxidation, anti-inflammatory, and cell migratory capacity were up-regulated in UC-MSCs-IGF-1, and the results were further confirmed with qPCR. Furthermore, a series of detection in vitro and in vivo indicated that the UC-MSCs-IGF-1 hold better anti-oxidation, anti-inflammatory, and cell migratory capacity for IGF-1 overexpression. Thus, our study indicated that enhancement of UC-MSCs bioactivities with IGF-1 overexpression could increase the UC-MSCs therapeutic potential and further developed a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of AKI. PMID:26830766

  6. Kidney Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... fluid-filled sac. There are two types of kidney cysts. Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) runs in families. In PKD, the ... place of the normal tissue. They enlarge the kidneys and make them work poorly, leading to kidney ...

  7. Kidney Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  8. Kidney Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... More Information American Kidney Fund National Kidney Foundation Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... Disease Organizations​​ . (PDF, 345 KB) Alternate Language URL Kidney Biopsy Page Content On this page: What is ...

  9. Kidney Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... upcoming screening events. Kidney Action Day Kidney Action Day Learn about our signature outreach event. About AKF ... support of AKF. Kidney Action Day Kidney Action Day Learn about our signature outreach event. Free health ...

  10. Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Kidney Disease What is Kidney Disease? What the Kidneys Do Click for more information You have two ... damaged, wastes can build up in the body. Kidney Function and Aging Kidney function may be reduced ...

  11. Kidney School

    MedlinePlus

    ... copies? Read our licensing agreement Living Successfully with Kidney Disease People with kidney disease can live long ... Listen Printing multiple copies? Read our licensing agreement Kidneys: How They Work, How They Fail, What You ...

  12. Kidney Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Kidney Problems Basic Facts & Information The kidneys are two ... the production of red blood cells. What are Kidney Diseases? For about one-third of older people, ...

  13. Kidney biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... through the kidney Connective tissue diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus Other diseases that may be affecting the kidney, such as diabetes Kidney transplant rejection , if you had a transplant

  14. Spinal Cord Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Your spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of your back. It carries signals back ... of the spine, this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such ...

  15. Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... If surgery is not advisable, spinal cord nerve roots may be cut to relieve pain. In adults, surgery to free (detether) the spinal cord can reduce the size and further development of cysts in the cord and may restore ...

  16. Spinal cord contusion

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Gong; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yazhou; Zhao, Xianghui

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability with devastating neurological outcomes and limited therapeutic opportunities, even though there are thousands of publications on spinal cord injury annually. There are two major types of spinal cord injury, transaction of the spinal cord and spinal cord contusion. Both can theoretically be treated, but there is no well documented treatment in human being. As for spinal cord contusion, we have developed an operation with fabulous result. PMID:25206890

  17. Solitary Kidney

    MedlinePlus

    ... Institute, Inc., Kidney School National Kidney Foundation MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... Organizations​​ . (PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Solitary Kidney Page Content On this page: What is a ...

  18. Kidney Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Your kidneys are two bean-shaped organs, each about the size of your fists. They are located near the ... back, just below the rib cage. Inside each kidney about a million tiny structures called nephrons filter ...

  19. Kidney Failure

    MedlinePlus

    Healthy kidneys clean your blood by removing excess fluid, minerals, and wastes. They also make hormones that keep your ... strong and your blood healthy. But if the kidneys are damaged, they don't work properly. Harmful ...

  20. Kidney stones

    MedlinePlus

    ... dissolved in the urine can crystallize, forming a kidney stone (renal calculus). Usually the calculus is the size ... painful. Often, people may not know they have kidney stones until they feel the painful symptoms resulting from ...

  1. Kidney transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Side effects from medicines used to prevent transplant rejection Loss of transplanted kidney ... tries to destroy it. In order to avoid rejection, almost all kidney transplant recipients must take medicines ...

  2. Ectopic Kidney

    MedlinePlus

    ... kidneys filter about 3 ounces of blood, removing wastes and extra water. The wastes and extra water make up the 1 to ... until being released through urination. The kidneys remove wastes and extra water from the blood to form ...

  3. Kidney Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... right diagnosis. [ Top ] What should a person do days before a kidney biopsy? Days before the procedure, ... Top ] What can a person expect on the day of the kidney biopsy? A person should arrive ...

  4. Kidney Dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dimes National Kidney Foundation Urology Care Foundation MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... Disease Organizations​​ . (PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Kidney Dysplasia Page Content On this page: What is ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Fertility After Spinal Cord Injury Coping with a New Injury Coping with a New Injury Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair ... after an injury? What are the most promising new treatments for spinal cord injuries? What are the ...

  6. Spinal Cord Infarction

    MedlinePlus

    ... 800-225-0292 Fax: 973-912-9433 National Spinal Cord Injury Association 120-34 Queens Boulevard, #1320 Kew Gardens, ... 785-4452 Related NINDS Publications and Information NINDS Spinal Cord Injury Information Page Spinal cord injury information sheet compiled ...

  7. Spinal Cord Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually begin with a blow that fractures or ... bone disks that make up your spine. Most injuries don't cut through your spinal cord. Instead, ...

  8. Kidney Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    You have two kidneys. They are fist-sized organs on either side of your backbone above your waist. The tubes inside filter and ... blood, taking out waste products and making urine. Kidney cancer forms in the lining of tiny tubes ...

  9. Chronic Kidney Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skiing, Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Chronic Kidney Diseases KidsHealth > For Kids > Chronic Kidney Diseases Print ... re talking about your kidneys. What Are the Kidneys? Your kidneys are tucked under your lower ribs ...

  10. Kidney (Renal) Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Kidney Failure Kidney failure, also known as renal failure, ... evaluated? How is kidney failure treated? What is kidney (renal) failure? The kidneys are designed to maintain ...

  11. Kidney disease - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - kidney disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on kidney disease: National Kidney Disease Education Program -- www.nkdep.nih.gov National Kidney Foundation -- www.kidney.org National ...

  12. Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... kidneys Your kidneys are vital organs that remove waste and extra fluid from your blood. Chronic kidney ... kidneys Your kidneys are vital organs that remove waste and extra fluid from your blood. Tests for ...

  13. Tests for Kidney Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... kidneys Your kidneys are vital organs that remove waste and extra fluid from your blood. Chronic kidney ... kidneys Your kidneys are vital organs that remove waste and extra fluid from your blood. Tests for ...

  14. Calculations to estimate the margin to failure in the TMI-2 vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Stickler, L.A.; Rempe, J.L.; Chavez, S.A.; Thinnes, G.L.; Snow, S.D.; Witt, R.J.; Corradini, M.L.; Kos, J.A.

    1994-03-01

    As part of the OECD-sponsored Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) Vessel Investigation Project (VIP), margin-to-failure calculations for mechanisms having the potential to threaten the integrity of the vessel were performed to improve understanding of events that occurred during the TMI-2 accident. Analyses considered four failure mechanisms: tube rupture, tube ejection, global vessel failure, and localized vessel failure. Calculational input was based on data from the TMI-2 VIP examinations of the vessel steel samples, the instrument tube nozzles, and samples of the hard layer of debris found on the TMI-2 vessel lower head. Sensitivity studies were performed to investigate the uncertainties in key parameters for these analyses.

  15. Kidney Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dialysis or Transplant Paying for Kidney Failure Treatment Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ... to share this content freely. October 2, 2013 Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ...

  16. Keeping kidneys.

    PubMed

    2012-10-01

    Most countries struggle to meet the demand for transplant kidneys, but a few are reaping the benefits of systems dedicated to increasing the number of organ donations after death. Ben Jones and Mireia Bes report. PMID:23109738

  17. Kidney removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... removed (simple nephrectomy) Removal of one entire kidney, surrounding fat, and the adrenal gland (radical nephrectomy). In ... removed. Your surgeon will also take out the surrounding fat, and sometimes the adrenal gland and some ...

  18. Spinal Cord Injury Map

    MedlinePlus

    ... Short List Government Programs Family and Caregiver Support Financial Help Active Lifestyle Advocacy Employment and Education Adaptive Technology Recent Medical Research Good Things to Read Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Model System Rehab Hospitals Pediatric Spinal Cord Injury Sex and ...

  19. Keep Your Kidneys Clear: Kicking Kidney Stones

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your Kidneys Clear Keep Your Kidneys Clear Kicking Kidney Stones Some say that passing a kidney stone is like delivering a baby made of razor ... is that, although they can be excruciatingly painful, kidney stones rarely cause permanent damage, and you may be ...

  20. Modeling spinal cord biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, Carlos; Shah, Sameer; Cohen, Avis; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-02-01

    Regeneration after spinal cord injury is a serious health issue and there is no treatment for ailing patients. To understand regeneration of the spinal cord we used a system where regeneration occurs naturally, such as the lamprey. In this work, we analyzed the stress response of the spinal cord to tensile loading and obtained the mechanical properties of the cord both in vitro and in vivo. Physiological measurements showed that the spinal cord is pre-stressed to a strain of 10%, and during sinusoidal swimming, there is a local strain of 5% concentrated evenly at the mid-body and caudal sections. We found that the mechanical properties are homogeneous along the body and independent of the meninges. The mechanical behavior of the spinal cord can be characterized by a non-linear viscoelastic model, described by a modulus of 20 KPa for strains up to 15% and a modulus of 0.5 MPa for strains above 15%, in agreement with experimental data. However, this model does not offer a full understanding of the behavior of the spinal cord fibers. Using polymer physics we developed a model that relates the stress response as a function of the number of fibers.

  1. Transection of Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Shulman, Stanford T.; Madden, John D.; Esterly, John R.; Shanklin, Douglas R.

    1971-01-01

    A newborn infant, delivered following mid-forceps rotation, presented with apnoea, anaesthesia below the level of the mid-neck, and flaccid quadriplegia. At necropsy there was transection of the cord, and atlanto-occipital and atlantoaxial dislocations. Cord injury usually follows breech presentation, the lesion is in the lower cervical or upper thoracic segments, and results from excessive traction. By contrast, in the rare cases following cephalic delivery, the lesion is most often in the upper cervical cord and probably results from rotational forces. PMID:5104538

  2. Pregnancy and Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  3. Polycystic kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    Cysts - kidneys; Kidney - polycystic; Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease; ADPKD ... Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is passed down through families (inherited). The 2 inherited forms of PKD are autosomal dominant ...

  4. Kidney-Pancreas Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  5. About Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  6. Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... an AKF screening Kidney Action Day Kidney Action Day Learn about our signature outreach event. About AKF ... our Northeast Region. Kidney Action Day Kidney Action Day Our late spring event is an elegant fundraiser ...

  7. National Kidney Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  8. American Kidney Fund

    MedlinePlus

    ... upcoming screening events. Kidney Action Day Kidney Action Day Learn about our signature outreach event. About AKF ... support of AKF. Kidney Action Day Kidney Action Day Learn about our signature outreach event. Free health ...

  9. Kidney Stones

    MedlinePlus

    ... when you urinate Your doctor will diagnose a kidney stone with urine, blood, and imaging tests. If you have a stone that won't pass on its own, you may need treatment. It can be done with shock waves; with ...

  10. Your Kidneys

    MedlinePlus

    ... jobs of the kidneys is to filter the waste out of the blood . How does the waste get in your blood? Well, your blood delivers ... to break down the nutrients. Some of the waste is the result of these chemical reactions. Some ...

  11. Cord-Blood Banking

    MedlinePlus

    ... service to the cord-blood bank, and initial processing. Transplantation Cryogenic blood-forming stem cells can be ... doctor. © 1995- The Nemours Foundation. All rights reserved. Images provided by The Nemours Foundation, iStock, Getty Images, ...

  12. Spinal cord abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... irritation (inflammation) and the collection of infected material (pus) in or around the spinal cord. ... occurs as a complication of an epidural abscess . Pus forms as a collection of: Destroyed tissue cells ...

  13. Cord Blood and Transplants

    MedlinePlus

    ... two sources are bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cells. Every family who donates their baby’s umbilical cord ... transplant than after a transplant using peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC). If you are expecting a baby or ...

  14. Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dramatically Improves Function After Spinal Cord Injury in Rats May 2004 press release on an experimental treatment ... NINDS). Signaling Molecule Improves Nerve Cell Regeneration in Rats August 2002 news summary on a signaling molecule ...

  15. Central Cord Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... MRI) is used to indicate the degree of spinal cord compression and vertebral instability. Vertebral instability due to acute traumatic injury or cervical disc herniation is often treated by surgery to ...

  16. Kidney pain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A kidney stone is a solid piece of material that forms in a kidney. Kidney stones may be the size of sand or ... A kidney stone is a solid piece of material that forms in a kidney. Kidney stones may be the ...

  17. Dysplastic kidneys.

    PubMed

    Winyard, Paul; Chitty, Lyn S

    2008-06-01

    Dysplastic kidneys are common malformations affecting up to 1 in 1000 of the general population. They are part of the spectrum of Congenital Abnormalities of the Kidney and Urinary Tract (CAKUT) and an increasing number of children are being diagnosed on antenatal ultrasound. In the past, these patients may not have been detected until adulthood following investigation for other illness, or even as incidental findings at post mortem, unless there was severe bilateral dysplasia leading to Potter's sequence or renal failure in childhood. Excluding syndromic cases with defects in other organ systems, features linked to worse prognosis at presentation are: (1) bilateral disease; (2) decreased functional renal mass (which encompasses not just small kidneys but also large ones where cysts replace normal architecture); (3) lower urinary tract obstruction; and (4) anhydramnios or severe oligohydramnios. Dysplasia and renal function are dynamic and can evolve during pregnancy, so repeated assessment is necessary when pathology is expected. Worsening dimensions or decreasing amniotic fluid levels imply poorer prognosis, but there are no proven therapies during pregnancy, though vesicoamniotic shunting may be indicated with obstruction. Postnatal investigations aim to define the anatomy, which helps to estimate risks of infection and kidney function. Management might then involve observation, prophylactic antibiotics, surgery and/or renal support. Risks of renal malignancy and hypertension are low during childhood, but longer-term follow-up is needed, particularly to determine blood pressure and renal function in adulthood and pregnancy. Around 10% of cases have a family history of significant renal/urinary tract malformation. Monogenic causes include mutations in individual genes, such as TCF2/hepatocyte nuclear factor 1ss (HNF1beta), PAX2 and uroplakins, but there are also recent reports of children with compound heterozygote mutations in several renal/urinary tract developmental genes. Effective genetic screening in future may require gene chip or other techniques to assess multiple genes concurrently, but this should not replace a multidisciplinary approach to these often difficult cases. PMID:18065301

  18. Spinal cord injury pain.

    PubMed

    Saulino, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Chronic pain associated with traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) can be quite challenging to the physiatrist. This highly prevalent condition within the SCI population requires an appropriate evaluative approach including a thorough history, a targeted physical examination, and appropriate use of diagnostic testing. The International Spinal Cord Injury Pain Classification allows for a reasonable categorization of the various pain syndromes and may assist in selecting a reasoned treatment strategy. A multitude of management approaches exist including nonpharmacologic, pharmacologic, and interventional approaches. This article provides an overview of the epidemiology, classification, evaluation, and management of SCI-associated pain. PMID:24787340

  19. Spinal cord concussion.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, D; Del Bigio, M; Jell, R M

    1981-11-01

    A reliable experimental model using decerebrate frogs has been developed by which a measured cutaneous stimulus to the right forelimb produces a single electrical response from the left sciatic nerve. Using this model, the minimal concussing force necessary to abolish the propagation of the nerve impulse down the spinal cord was established by trial and error. The mean recovery time was 31.2 seconds, with a standard deviation of 1.32 seconds. Recovery of function of the spinal cord, as measured this method, was complete following single and multiple concussions. PMID:6977881

  20. Kidney cell electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, P.

    1979-01-01

    A kidney cell electrophoresis technique is described in four parts: (1) the development and testing of electrophoresis solutions; (2) optimization of freezing and thawing; (3) procedures for evaluation of separated kidney cells; and (4) electrophoretic mobility characteristics of kidney cells.

  1. Kidney cell electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, P.

    1980-01-01

    The following aspects of kidney cell electrophoresis are discussed: (1) the development and testing of electrophoresis solutions; (2) optimization of freezing and thawing; (3) procedures for evaluation of separated kidney cells; and (4) electrophoretic mobility characterization of kidney cells.

  2. Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    You have two kidneys, each about the size of your fist. Their main job is to filter wastes and excess water out of ... help control blood pressure, and make hormones. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) means that your kidneys are damaged ...

  3. Diabetic Kidney Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... too high. Over time, this can damage your kidneys. Your kidneys clean your blood. If they are damaged, waste ... in your blood instead of leaving your body. Kidney damage from diabetes is called diabetic nephropathy. It ...

  4. Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... but some less serious ones occur more frequently. Kidney stones These are probably the most commonly encountered kidney complications of IBD—particularly oxalate stones. Kidney stones are more common in Crohn's patients with disease ...

  5. Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... well as they should. Normal, healthy kidneys remove waste from the blood. The waste then leaves your body in your urine. The ... have chronic kidney disease, your kidneys cannot remove waste from the blood as well as they should. ...

  6. Injury - kidney and ureter

    MedlinePlus

    ... injury Removing the entire kidney ( nephrectomy ), draining the space around the kidney, or stopping the bleeding via ... BA. Acute kidney injury. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  7. Kidney Disease Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... statement, and the Director's Update newsletter Offices & Divisions Organizational structure ... kidney disease . When someone has a sudden change in kidney function—because of illness, or injury, ...

  8. Kidney Disease: A Silent Problem

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidney Disease: A Silent Problem Heath and Aging Kidney Disease: A Silent Problem Kidney Disease Who Is ... hormones that your body needs to stay healthy. Kidney Disease Kidney disease can sometimes develop very quickly, ...

  9. Primary Spinal Cord Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Soo; Yoon, Do Heum

    2010-01-01

    Primary central nervous system (CNS) melanoma is a rare condition that accounts for only 1% of all melanomas. A 34-year-old Korean female presented with a two-month history of progressive weakness in both legs. Spinal magnetic resonance image (MRI) revealed a spinal cord tumor at the level of T4, which was hyperintense on T1-weighted imaging and hypointense on T2-weighted imaging. The intradural and extramedullary tumor was completely resected and diagnosed as melanoma. There were no metastatic lesions. At three years after surgery, the patient is still alive, with no evidence of tumor recurrence. We present the details of this case along with a comprehensive review of spinal cord melanoma. PMID:20856666

  10. Simple Kidney Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information American Kidney Fund National Kidney Foundation MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... Organizations​​ . (PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Simple Kidney Cysts Page Content On this page: What are ...

  11. Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidney Patients Life Options National Kidney Foundation MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease Page Content On this page: What is ...

  12. Robotic assisted kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Pranjal; Pal, Bipinchandra; Modi, Jayesh; Kumar, Suresh; Sood, Akshay; Menon, Mani

    2014-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the standard of care for patients with end stage renal disease. While open surgery remains the gold standard, minimally invasive surgery has recently been introduced for the recipient undergoing kidney transplantation. We review the evolution of techniques of minimally invasive surgery for kidney transplantation with specific emphasis on technical aspects of robotic assisted kidney transplantation. PMID:25097315

  13. Kidney Stones

    PubMed Central

    Kleeman, Charles R.; Coburn, Jack W.; Brickman, Arnold S.; Lee, David B. N.; Narins, Robert G.; Ehrlich, Richard M.

    1980-01-01

    The prevalence of kidney stones has steadily risen during this century; passage of a calculus and a positive family history increase the probability of recurrence. Findings from recent studies on the cause of renal calculi have stressed crystallization and crystal aggregation of stone minerals from supersaturated urine, rather than excessive organic matrix. Absence of normal urine inhibitors of calcium salts is also stressed. Formation of calcium oxalate stones is the major problem. Therapy with decreased calcium and oxalate intake, thiazides, phosphate salts and allopurinol in various combinations has substantially decreased the prevalence of recurrent stones. The rationale for the use of allopurinol is that uric acid salts enhance the tendency for calcium oxalate to crystallize from supersaturated urine. The hypercalciuria seen in 30 percent to 40 percent of patients with oxalate stones is usually caused by intestinal hyperabsorption of calcium. Although patients with uric acid calculi constitute only a small fraction of those in whom stones form, they represent a group in whom good medical therapy, based on sound physiologic principles, has proved extremely successful. Renal tubular syndromes lead to nephrocalcinosis and lithiasis through hypercalciuria, alkaline urine and hypocitraturia, the latter an inhibitor of calcium salt precipitation. Recent advances in surgical techniques are discussed, including the rationale for removing staghorn calculi. The ileal ureter and coagulum pyelolithotomy deserve special emphasis. ImagesFigure 2.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 7. PMID:7385835

  14. Vocal Cord Nodules, Polyps, and Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... seen in three forms; nodules, polyps, and cysts. Vocal Cord Nodules (also called Singer's Nodes, Screamer's Nodes) Vocal ... disappear when overuse of the area is stopped. Vocal Cord Polyp A vocal cord polyp typically occurs only ...

  15. Cutting the Cord-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This animation shows the view from the rear hazard avoidance cameras on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit as the rover turns 45 degrees clockwise. This maneuver is the first step in a 3-point turn that will rotate the rover 115 degrees to face west. The rover must make this turn before rolling off the lander because airbags are blocking it from exiting from the front lander petal. Before this crucial turn took place, engineers instructed the rover to cut the final cord linking it to the lander. The turn took around 30 minutes to complete.

  16. Cutting the Cord

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This animation shows the view from the front hazard avoidance cameras on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit as the rover turns 45 degrees clockwise. This maneuver is the first step in a 3-point turn that will rotate the rover 115 degrees to face west. The rover must make this turn before rolling off the lander because airbags are blocking it from exiting off the front lander petal. Before this crucial turn could take place, engineers instructed the rover to cut the final cord linking it to the lander. The turn took around 30 minutes to complete.

  17. Retraining the injured spinal cord

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgerton, V. R.; Leon, R. D.; Harkema, S. J.; Hodgson, J. A.; London, N.; Reinkensmeyer, D. J.; Roy, R. R.; Talmadge, R. J.; Tillakaratne, N. J.; Timoszyk, W.; Tobin, A.

    2001-01-01

    The present review presents a series of concepts that may be useful in developing rehabilitative strategies to enhance recovery of posture and locomotion following spinal cord injury. First, the loss of supraspinal input results in a marked change in the functional efficacy of the remaining synapses and neurons of intraspinal and peripheral afferent (dorsal root ganglion) origin. Second, following a complete transection the lumbrosacral spinal cord can recover greater levels of motor performance if it has been exposed to the afferent and intraspinal activation patterns that are associated with standing and stepping. Third, the spinal cord can more readily reacquire the ability to stand and step following spinal cord transection with repetitive exposure to standing and stepping. Fourth, robotic assistive devices can be used to guide the kinematics of the limbs and thus expose the spinal cord to the new normal activity patterns associated with a particular motor task following spinal cord injury. In addition, such robotic assistive devices can provide immediate quantification of the limb kinematics. Fifth, the behavioural and physiological effects of spinal cord transection are reflected in adaptations in most, if not all, neurotransmitter systems in the lumbosacral spinal cord. Evidence is presented that both the GABAergic and glycinergic inhibitory systems are up-regulated following complete spinal cord transection and that step training results in some aspects of these transmitter systems being down-regulated towards control levels. These concepts and observations demonstrate that (a) the spinal cord can interpret complex afferent information and generate the appropriate motor task; and (b) motor ability can be defined to a large degree by training.

  18. Chronic kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15114537 . Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) Anemia Work Group. KDIGO Clinical Practice ... pdf/KDIGO-Anemia%20GL.pdf . Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) Blood Pressure Work Group. KDIGO Clinical ...

  19. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    ... quickly or it is affecting the only working kidney. Treatment to open the artery may include: Clot-dissolving medicines (thrombolytics) Medicines that prevent the blood from ... kidney failure. Medicines to lower cholesterol may be needed ...

  20. Kidney transplant - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... functions that both kidneys perform in healthy people. Kidney transplant recipients are required to take immunosuppressive medications for the rest of the lives, to prevent immune rejection of the transplanted organ.

  1. Medullary cystic kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood test Creatinine clearance - blood and urine Uric acid blood test Urine specific gravity (will be low) The following tests can help diagnose this condition: Abdominal CT scan Abdominal ultrasound Kidney biopsy Kidney ultrasound

  2. Acute kidney failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... days) loss of your kidneys' ability to remove waste and help balance fluids and electrolytes in your ... your kidneys work again and prevent fluid and waste from building up in your body while they ...

  3. Kidney Disease (Nephropathy)

    MedlinePlus

    ... act as filters. Their job is to remove waste products from the blood. Sometimes this filtering system ... Failing kidneys lose their ability to filter out waste products, resulting in kidney disease. How Does Diabetes ...

  4. Kidney Replacement Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... control. Hemodialysis In hemodialysis, an artificial kidney removes waste from the blood. A surgeon must first create ... time. Blood travels through the artificial kidney, where waste products are filtered out, and the clean blood ...

  5. Flu Season and Your Kidneys

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  6. Diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  7. Kidney Disease Risks among Hispanics

    MedlinePlus

    ... an AKF screening Kidney Action Day Kidney Action Day Learn about our signature outreach event. About AKF ... our Northeast Region. Kidney Action Day Kidney Action Day Our late spring event is an elegant fundraiser ...

  8. Spinal cord and bone metastasizing renal tumor of childhood.

    PubMed

    Arrotegui, J I; Barrios, C

    1995-01-01

    In recent reports on renal tumors of childhood with bone involvement neoplasms originally considered to be Wilms tumor have been assigned to new groups. After reviewing the literature, we knew that Wilms tumor rarely metastasizes in this way. Our case illustrates the unique biological feature of the rare, unfavorable histology Wilms tumor variant know as 'clear cell sarcoma of the kidney' (CCSK). Metastases to the spinal cord, as observed in our patient are distinctly unusual. To our knowledge, only two previous cases have been reported in the world literature. PMID:8556625

  9. Attitudes Towards Individuals with Spinal Cord Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Cassandra Sligh D.; Gooden, Randy; Nowell, Jennifer; Wilson, Navodda

    2010-01-01

    This paper will shed light on the lives of persons with spinal cord injuries by revealing the literature on spinal cord injuries that focuses on research that can shed light on attitudes towards persons with spinal cord injuries. The background literature related to incidences, the definition of spinal cord injury, and vocational opportunities are…

  10. Spermatic Cord Leiomyosarcoma Rare Case

    PubMed Central

    Frigerio, Pamela; Muruato-Araiza, Jesus Sebastian; Marcos-Morales, Selim; Cepeda-Nieto, Ana Cecilia; Berdeal-Fernandez, Eliseo; Zepeda-Contreras, Sebastián

    2016-01-01

    Case description of a male patient of 64 years who presents a left groin-scrotum painless tumor, growing, from several months of evolution. Physical examination demonstrated the existence of a mass effect of the left distal spermatic cord, and was later confirmed by ultrasound and CT. Laboratory parameters were normal. The performed surgery consisted in a radical orchiectomy with high ligation of the left cord. In conclusion, preoperative diagnosis of spermatic cord leiomyosarcoma is difficult we need the combination of present illness, physical examination, exams and the gold standard histopathological and immunohistochemical studies allowed a definitive diagnosis.

  11. Pathophysiology of spinal cord trauma.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D K; Hall, E D

    1993-06-01

    This article reviews the pathophysiology of spinal cord injury. The focus is on the role of post-traumatic membrane lipid changes, including lipid hydrolysis with enzymatic lipid peroxidation (ie, eicosanoid production) and nonenzymatic, free radical-induced lipid peroxidation in the secondary autodestruction of injured spinal cord tissue. A speculative etiopathogenesis of secondary injury is presented in an attempt to explain the importance and order of the pathophysiologic events that result in tissue death and the apparent effectiveness of diverse pharmacologic agents in the treatment of experimental spinal cord injury. PMID:8503537

  12. Normal black kidney

    PubMed Central

    Yarmohamadi, Aliasghar; Rezayat, Ali Reza Akhavan; Memar, Bahram; Rahimi, Hamid Reza; Cand, PhD

    2014-01-01

    A black kidney has 3 major differential diagnoses: hemosiderosis, lipofuscin pigment and melanotic renal cell carcinoma. Excluding lipofuscin, the other 2 are accompanied by an abnormal renal function. We report on a 25-year-old man who intended to donate a kidney to his cousin. On the operating room table when we incised the left flank region and exposed the kidney, we found a firm and black kidney so the operation was cancelled due to potential vascular injuries. Days after the incomplete procedure, we reviewed the donor’s biochemistry and imaging to reassess his renal function, but the results showed quite normal renal function again. The result of Ham test was also negative. Two weeks later, we began the operation, removed the same left kidney and found that it was in the same conditions as it was before. We took the opportunity to send needle biopsies of the kidney for histopathologic analysis. The analysis showed a melanotic kidney without pathological changes in glomeruli and interstitium and vessels. A black kidney may result in hemosiderin, lipofuscin or melanin deposits in the kidney, which can confirm the diagnosis; however, special tests for underlying disease and renal function should be considered. Some causes of black kidney lead to abnormal function, but our patients’s kidney returned to normal. PMID:24839502

  13. Depression and Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... colleagues, with an educational grant from Pfizer Inc. University of Washington-operated SCI Clinics: Harborview Medical Center ... Spinal Cord Injury Clinic nurses: 206-744-5862 University of Washington Medical Center Rehabilitation Medicine Clinic 1959 ...

  14. Overview of Spinal Cord Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... temperature from the body to the spinal cord. Did You Know... Doctors can often tell where the ... on symptoms and results of a physical examination. Did You Know... Nerves from the lowest parts of ...

  15. Pregnancy Complications: Umbilical Cord Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... oxygen to the baby and removes the baby's waste products. The umbilical cord begins to form at ... supply) to the baby. The two arteries transport waste from the baby to the placenta (where waste ...

  16. Spinal cord stimulation.

    PubMed

    Costantini, A

    2005-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a neuromodulation technique using electricity, proposed for the first time by Shealy in 1967, as an alternative to neuroablation. Technological improvements in the last 20 years (percutaneous electrodes, single and dual leads, octopolar electrodes, high energy internal pulse generators) have allowed to obtain good results with SCS in various clinical situations of chronic pain. The main clinical indications to SCS are: vascular pain--refractory angina and peripheral vascular diseases (PVD); rachidian pain--failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS), degenerative low back leg pain (LBLP), nerve root lesions, incomplete spine lesions, spinal stenosis; neuropathic pain; chronic regional pain syndrome (CRPS) type 1 and type 2; perineal pain and urological diseases (urge-incontinence, interstitial cystitis). There are important differences between Europe and USA in the SCS use in various indications, especially about PVD. Really, in Europe this technique has been widely used and, finally, there are prospective studies establishing the utility of SCS in: limb survival; pain control; regression to Fontaine stage II; improvement of free interval of claudication. All of this is going to change the attitude towards SCS in USA, where the amputation incidence for critical ischaemia is considerably higher than in Europe. An indication to SCS not very mentioned in literature and that seems to have good results is LBLP due to acquired or mixed (constitutional-acquired) spinal stenosis. In this situation SCS seems to improve notably pain control and quality of life index of patients. PMID:16012421

  17. Living Related Kidney Donors

    PubMed Central

    Lazarovits, Andrew I.

    1992-01-01

    A kidney transplant is the treatment of choice for suitable patients with end-stage renal disease. The living related kidney donor represents an important source of kidneys because graft survival is much better and there is a critical shortage of organ donors. This article reviews the risks to the donor and the means by which these individuals are assessed in order to minimize the risk. PMID:21221370

  18. HCV and the kidney.

    PubMed

    Corouge, Marion; Vallet-Pichard, Anaïs; Pol, Stanislas

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is significantly associated with a risk of renal deterioration over time. Renal impairment, especially stage 4-5 chronic kidney disease, increases the risk of: (i) the prevalence and incidence (in dialysis/transplantation) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection; (ii) liver deterioration during kidney transplantation and (iii) allograft failure and patient mortality. HCV-infected dialysis patients have a higher mortality than non-infected dialysis patients and than HCV-infected kidney recipients. The harmful impact of HCV emphasizes the need for oral antiviral therapies in patients with chronic kidney disease. Symptomatic cryoglobulinemic vasculitis and extensive liver fibrosis are already approved indications for early access to oral antiviral treatment. Patients with stage 4-5 chronic kidney disease should also be given priority: dialysis patients (whatever the stage of fibrosis and whether or not they are candidates for kidney transplantation) as well as all kidney recipients. The results of treatment of HCV with direct-acting antiviral (DAAs) drugs in patients with late chronic kidney disease are excellent, similar to those in the general population, although additional clinical trials are definitely needed, particularly to optimize adjustment of treatment to kidney function and determine the risk of drug-drug interactions. PMID:26725894

  19. The kidney allocation system.

    PubMed

    Friedewald, John J; Samana, Ciara J; Kasiske, Bertram L; Israni, Ajay K; Stewart, Darren; Cherikh, Wida; Formica, Richard N

    2013-12-01

    The current kidney allocation system for transplants is outdated and has not evolved to reflect the changing demographics of patients on the waiting list. This article proposes a new system for kidney allocation, which more appropriately incorporates the biology of highly sensitized patients into the waiting-time scoring algorithm. This system will significantly reduce mismatches between possible donor kidney longevity and life expectancy of recipients, and makes incremental advances toward more geographic sharing. The proposed system makes significant progress toward eliminating deficiencies in the current system, and has the potential to increase the supply of available kidneys. PMID:24206858

  20. Kidney tissue reconstruction by fetal kidney cell transplantation: effect of gestation stage of fetal kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Soo; Gwak, So-Jung; Han, Joungho; Park, Heung Jae; Park, Moon Hyang; Song, Kang Won; Cho, Seung Woo; Rhee, Yun Hee; Chung, Hyung Min; Kim, Byung-Soo

    2007-06-01

    Dialysis and kidney transplantation, current therapies for kidney failure, have limitations such as severe complications, donor shortage, and immune-related problems. The development of an alternative treatment for kidney failure is demanded. The present study shows that the transplantation of fetal kidney cells reconstitutes functional kidney tissue, and that the gestation stage of kidney cells influences the kidney reconstitution. Fetal kidney cells were isolated from metanephroi of rat fetuses at various gestation stages and transplanted into the omentum or kidney of immunodeficient mice. Immunophenotype analysis of fetal kidney cells showed apparent expression of stem cell markers. Three weeks after transplantation, histological analyses of retrieved grafts revealed the formation of kidney structures, including fluorescently labeled transplanted cells, suggesting the potential of fetal kidney cells to reconstitute kidney tissues. The grafts retrieved from omentum contained cystic fluids with concentrated solutes. However, transplanted early fetal kidney cells had also differentiated into nonrenal tissues such as bone and cartilage. In addition, transplantation of fetal kidney cells from a later gestation stage resulted in poor kidney structure formation. Kidney-specific genes were strongly expressed in the earlier cell transplants. The cells at an earlier gestation stage had higher colony forming ability than the cells at a later stage. This study demonstrates the reconstitution of kidney tissue by transplanting fetal kidney cells and the presence of an optimal time window in which fetal kidney cells regenerate kidney tissues. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article. PMID:17548530

  1. Spinal Cord Injury Model System Information Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact the UAB-SCIMS UAB Spinal Cord Injury Model System Newly Injured Health Daily Living Consumer Groups ... University of Alabama at Birmingham Spinal Cord Injury Model System (UAB-SCIMS) maintains this Information Network as ...

  2. Disabled Vocal Cords: An Occupational Hazard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Norma B.

    1987-01-01

    A teacher points out the occupational hazard that can result from the misuse of the voice and ensuing vocal cord damage. Presents discussion of ways to avoid misusing the voice and prevent vocal cord damage. (MD)

  3. FAQs about Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the UAB-SCIMS UAB Spinal Cord Injury Model System Newly Injured Health Daily Living Consumer Groups Professional Groups Research Información En Español Information for the Newly Injured FAQs about Spinal Cord ...

  4. 10 Symptoms of Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... the liver, can cause pain. Kidney infections and kidney stones can cause severe pain, often in spasms. Bladder infections can cause burning when you urinate. People who have medullary sponge kidney say it is painful. What patients said: "About ...

  5. Management of umbilical cord clamping.

    PubMed

    Webbon, Lucy

    2013-02-01

    The Royal College of Midwives (RCM) has updated its third stage of labour guidelines (RCM 2012) to be clearly supportive of a delay in umbilical cord clamping, although specific guidance on timing is yet to be announced. It is therefore imperative that both midwives and student midwives understand and are able to integrate delaying into their practice, as well as communicating to women the benefits; only in this way can we give women fully informed choices on this aspect of care. The main benefit of delayed cord clamping is the protection it can provide in reducing childhood anaemia, which is a major issue, especially in poorer countries. A review of the evidence found no risks linked to delayed clamping, and no evidence that it cannot be used in combination with the administration of uterotonic drugs. Delayed cord clamping can be especially beneficial for pre term and compromised babies. PMID:23461232

  6. Trb2, a mouse homolog of tribbles, is dispensable for kidney and mouse development

    SciTech Connect

    Takasato, Minoru; Kobayashi, Chiyoko; Okabayashi, Koji; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Oshima, Naoko; Asashima, Makoto; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi

    2008-09-05

    Glomeruli comprise an important filtering apparatus in the kidney and are derived from the metanephric mesenchyme. A nuclear protein, Sall1, is expressed in this mesenchyme, and we previously reported that Trb2, a mouse homolog of Drosophila tribbles, is expressed in the mesenchyme-derived tissues of the kidney by microarray analyses using Sall1-GFP knock-in mice. In the present report, we detected Trb2 expression in a variety of organs during gestation, including the kidneys, mesonephros, testes, heart, eyes, thymus, blood vessels, muscle, bones, tongue, spinal cord, and ganglions. In the developing kidney, Trb2 signals were detected in podocytes and the prospective mesangium of the glomeruli, as well as in ureteric bud tips. However, Trb2 mutant mice did not display any apparent phenotypes and no proteinuria was observed, indicating normal glomerular functions. These results suggest that Trb2 plays minimal roles during kidney and mouse development.

  7. Keep Your Kidneys Healthy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Albumin Children and Kidney Disease Additional Kidney Information Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ... to share this content freely. September 17, 2014​​​​ Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ...

  8. RBE for lung and cord

    SciTech Connect

    Hornsey, S.

    1982-12-01

    The sparing effect of fractionation of neutron dose is very small for late damage in tissues. This is seen in the almost flat isoeffect curve for damage to skin, CNS and to lung. This means that differences in the RBE curves for these tissues are determined by differences in the slopes of the photon isoeffect curves. The relevant slopes of the photon isoeffect curves giving the exponent of N in the Ellis formula are 0.24 for subcutaneous tissue, 0.27 for lung damage and 0.38-0.45 for damage to spinal cord, while the exponent for N for neutrons for these tissues is 0.04 for subcutaneous tissues and zero for lung and spinal cord. The slopes of the RBE curves for lung and cord or for skin and cord when RBE is plotted against dose/fraction of photons are significantly different, and the RBE at a ..gamma.. ray dose/fraction normally used in therapy of about 2 Gy, is significantly higher for spinal cord than for lung or skin. The sparing of damage by extending overall treatment time for both lung and CNS is small for X or ..gamma..-irradiation. For neutron irradiation the sparing is similar to that with photons for the CNS but is much less with neutrons than with photons for the lung. This is because different mechanisms are responsible for this type of sparing of damage in the two tissues. In lung, slow repair is involved while in the spinal cord, the sparing is related to the slow cell proliferation.

  9. RBE for lung and cord

    SciTech Connect

    Hornsey, S.

    1982-12-01

    The sparing effect of fractionation of neutron dose is very small for late damage in tissues. This is seen in the almost flat isoeffect curve for damage to skin, CNS and to lung. This means that differences in the RBE curves for these tissues are determined by differences in the slopes of the photon isoeffect curves. The relative slopes of the slopes of the photon isoeffect curves giving the exponent of N in the Ellis formula are 0.24 for subcutaneous tissue, 0.27 for lung damage and 0.38-0.45 for damage to spinal cord, while the exponent for N for neutrons for these tissues is 0.04 for subcutaneous tissues and zero for lung and spinal cord. The slopes of RBE curves for lung and cord or for skin and cord when RBE is plotted against dose/fraction of photons are significantly different, and the RBE at a ..gamma.. ray dose/fraction normally used in therapy of about 2 Gy, is significantly higher for spinal cord than for lung or skin. The sparing of damage by extending overall treatment time for both lung and CNS is small for X or ..gamma..-irradiation. For neutron irradiation the sparing is similar to that with photons for the CNS but is much less with neutrons than with photons for the lung. This is because different mechanisms are respnsible for this type of sparing of damage in the two tissues. In lung slow, repair is involved while in the spinal cord, the sparing is related to the slow cell proliferation.

  10. Bioengineering Kidneys for Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Madariaga, Maria Lucia L.; Ott, Harald C.

    2014-01-01

    One in ten Americans suffer from chronic kidney disease, and close to 90,000 people die each year from causes related to kidney failure. Patients with end-stage renal disease are faced with two options: hemodialysis or transplantation. Unfortunately, the reach of transplantation is limited because of the shortage of donor organs and the need for immunosuppression. Bioengineered kidney grafts theoretically present a novel solution to both problems. Herein we discuss the history of bioengineering organs, the current status of bioengineered kidneys, considerations for the future of the field, and challenges to clinical translation. We hope that by integrating principles of tissue engineering, and stem cell and developmental biology, bioengineered kidney grafts will advance the field of regenerative medicine while meeting a critical clinical need. PMID:25217267

  11. [Promoting Living Kidney Transplantation].

    PubMed

    Lin, Chiu-Chu

    2016-04-01

    Kidney transplantation is the best approach for treating patients with end stage renal disease, offering patients the best chance of returning to normal health. While the techniques used in kidney transplantation surgery are mature and highly successful, there is a severe shortage of donor organs. Statistics show a serious imbalance between organ donations and patients on the waiting list for organ transplantation. Moreover, evidence from empirical studies has shown a better transplantation outcome for patients who receive living donor transplantation than for those who receive organs from cadavers. Although using relatives as donors offers an effective way to reduce the problem of organ shortage, this strategy faces many challenges and many other factors affect the promotion of living donor transplantation. This article elaborates how cultural and psychological factors, kidney transplantation awareness, and ethics and laws impact upon living kidney donations and then proposes coping strategies for promoting living kidney transplantation. PMID:27026555

  12. Evaluation of spinal cord injury animal models

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Fang, Marong; Chen, Haohao; Gou, Fangming; Ding, Mingxing

    2014-01-01

    Because there is no curative treatment for spinal cord injury, establishing an ideal animal model is important to identify injury mechanisms and develop therapies for individuals suffering from spinal cord injuries. In this article, we systematically review and analyze various kinds of animal models of spinal cord injury and assess their advantages and disadvantages for further studies. PMID:25598784

  13. 14 CFR 31.57 - Rip cords.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rip cords. 31.57 Section 31.57 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Design Construction § 31.57 Rip cords. (a) If a rip cord is used...

  14. Psychological Aspects of Spinal Cord Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Daniel W.

    1976-01-01

    Reviewing literature on the psychological impact of spinal cord injury suggests: (a) depression may not be a precondition for injury adjustment; (b) many persons sustaining cord injury may have experienced psychological disruption prior to injury; and (c) indexes of rehabilitation success need to be developed for the spinal cord injured. (Author)

  15. 14 CFR 31.57 - Rip cords.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Rip cords. 31.57 Section 31.57 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Design Construction § 31.57 Rip cords. (a) If a rip cord is used...

  16. Spinal cord astrocytoma mimicking multifocal myelitis

    PubMed Central

    Neutel, Dulce; Teodoro, Tiago; Coelho, Miguel; Pimentel, José; Albuquerque, Luísa

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Differential diagnosis of acute/subacute intrinsic spinal cord lesions can be challenging. In addition, intramedullary neoplasms typically show gadolinium enhancement, mass effect, and cord expansion. Case report We report a patient with spinal cord and brain stem lesions resembling multifocal myelitis. Magnetic resonance imaging showed no spinal cord enlargement or gadolinium enhancing. Treatment of myelitis was undertaken without stopping the progression of the disease. Biopsy was made and led to a histological diagnosis of astrocytoma. Discussion Astrocytoma must remain as a possible diagnosis of spinal cord lesions, even without typical characteristics of neoplasms. Furthermore, biopsy should always be considered when diagnosis is uncertain. PMID:24621037

  17. Banking on cord blood stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Michael J

    2008-07-01

    Umbilical cord blood gifted to non-profit public cord blood banks is now routinely used as an alternative source of haematopoietic stem cells for allogeneic transplantation for children and adults with cancer, bone marrow failure syndromes, haemoglobinopathies and many genetic metabolic disorders. Because of the success and outcomes of public cord banking, many companies now provide private cord banking services. However, in the absence of any published transplant evidence to support autologous and non-directed family banking, commercial cord banks currently offer a superfluous service. PMID:18548085

  18. SPINAL CORD INJURY (SCI) DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Spinal Cord Injury Database has been in existence since 1973 and captures data from SCI cases in the United States. Since its inception, 24 federally funded Model SCI Care Systems have contributed data to the National SCI Database. Statistics are derived from this da...

  19. Umbilical cord care in newborns

    MedlinePlus

    ... only hanging on by a thread. Watch the umbilical cord stump for infection. This does not occur often. But ... not, call your baby's doctor. If your baby's stump has not fallen off ... may be a problem with the baby's anatomy or immune system.

  20. What Is Kidney Cancer (Renal Cell Carcinoma)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the key statistics about kidney cancer? What is kidney cancer? Kidney cancer is a cancer that starts ... and spread, see What Is Cancer? About the kidneys To understand more about kidney cancer, it helps ...

  1. Keep Your Kidneys Healthy: Catch Kidney Disease Early

    MedlinePlus

    ... please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Keep Your Kidneys Healthy Catch Kidney Disease Early Your kidneys aren’t very big—each is about the ... other substances inside your body. Unfortunately, if your kidneys start to malfunction, you might not realize it ...

  2. Cord blood transplant for acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Ballen, Karen K; Lazarus, Hillard

    2016-04-01

    Umbilical cord blood is a haematopoietic progenitor cell source for patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), other haematological malignancies and metabolic diseases who can be cured by allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation, but who do not have a human leucocyte antigen compatible related or unrelated donor. Although the first cord blood transplants were done in children, there are currently more cord blood transplants performed in adults. In this review, we explore the history of umbilical cord blood transplantation, paediatric and adult outcome results, and novel trends to improve engraftment and reduce infection. Umbilical cord blood transplantation cures approximately 30-40% of adults and 60-70% of children with AML. Controversial issues, including the use of double versus single cord blood units for transplantation, optimal cord blood unit selection, infection prophylaxis, conditioning regimens and graft versus host disease prophylaxis, will be reviewed. Finally, comparison to other graft sources, cost, access to care, and the ideal graft source are discussed. PMID:26766286

  3. Umbilical cord blood: information for childbirth educators.

    PubMed

    Waller-Wise, Renece

    2011-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood was once thought of as a waste product. Now, years after the first successful umbilical cord blood transplant, more families seek information about whether or not to save their newborn's cord blood. Childbirth educators may be one of the main sources that an expectant family depends on to gain more knowledge about cord blood banking in order to make an informed decision. Preserving umbilical cord blood in public banks is advisable for any family; however, it is recommended that expectant families only consider private cord blood banking when they have a relative with a known disorder that is treatable by stem cell transplants. The childbirth educator is encouraged to be well versed on the topic of cord blood banking, so that as questions from class participants arise, the topic can be explored and addressed appropriately. PMID:22211060

  4. Medicines and Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dialysis or Transplant Paying for Kidney Failure Treatment Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ... to share this content freely. ​​September 17, 2014 Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ...

  5. Sulfadiazine for kidney disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rucker, R.R.; Bernier, A.F.; Whipple, W.J.; Burrows, R.E.

    1951-01-01

    The blueback salmon fingerlings (Oncorhynchus nerka) at the U.S. Fish-Cultural Station at Winthrop, Washington, underwent an infection that was caused by a very short, Gram-positive, nonmotile, rod-shaped bacterium. A further description is impossible at this time, as the organism has not been grown satisfactorily for proper identification. The disease was characterized by white, raised areas of dead tissue mainly in the kidney: for this reason it is referred to as kidney disease. Belding and Merrill (1935) described a disease among the brook, brown, and rainbow trout at a State hatchery in Massachusetts which, from the description, might be the same as kidney disease. J.H. Wales of the California Division of Fish and Game described (unpublished manuscript, 1941) a disease in hatchery trout in California which seems to be identical to kidney disease.

  6. Testing for Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... statement, and the Director's Update newsletter Offices & Divisions Organizational structure and descriptions ... kidney disease usually does not have signs (a change in your body) or symptoms (a change in ...

  7. Kidney (Renal) Failure

    MedlinePlus

    Advertisement Resize Text: Toggle navigation Find a Urologist Submit About Us What We Do Foundation History Leadership ... a kidney stone or scar tissue Share Symptoms Advertisement Patient Education Materials We provide free patient education ...

  8. Diabetes and Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... NKF Newsroom Contact Us You are here Home » Diabetes - A Major Risk Factor for Kidney Disease Diabetes ... of your body. Are there different types of diabetes? The most common ones are Type 1 and ...

  9. Kidney Disease and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Kidney Disease & Diabetes Updated:Jan 26,2016 One of the more ... thereafter.) This content was last reviewed January 2016. Diabetes • Home • About Diabetes • Why Diabetes Matters Introduction Cardiovascular ...

  10. Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... below the rib cage. The kid neys filter wastes and extra fluid from the blood to produce ... filters out many, but not all, of the wastes that healthy kidneys remove. Researchers believe that an ...

  11. Kidney Stones in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... tract is the body’s drainage system for removing wastes and extra water. The urinary tract includes two ... kidneys filter about 3 ounces of blood, removing wastes and extra water. The wastes and extra water ...

  12. Kidney cell electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Tasks were undertaken in support of two objectives. They are: (1) to carry out electrophoresis experiments on cells in microgravity; and (2) assess the feasibility of using purified kidney cells from embryonic kidney cultures as a source of important cell products. Investigations were carried out in the following areas: (1) ground based electrophoresis technology; (2) cell culture technology; (3) electrophoresis of cells; (4) urokinase assay research; (5) zero-g electrophoresis; and (6) flow cytometry.

  13. The medieval kidney.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Joseph

    2002-07-01

    This article surveys the various perceptions of the kidney and its pathologies by encyclopedists, preachers, natural philosophers, surgeons and academic physicians around 1300. It focuses on the medical works of Arnau de Vilanova (d. 1311) and shows the medical discourse about the kidney in all its complexity. It draws attention to the incorporation of the medical nephrological debate into the scholastic frame, and to the close links between nephrology and astrology as well as alchemy. PMID:12097733

  14. Neonatal polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Verghese, Priya; Miyashita, Yosuke

    2014-09-01

    This article provides an up-to-date comprehensive review and summary on neonatal polycystic kidney disease (PKD) with emphasis on the differential diagnosis, clinical manifestations, diagnostic techniques, and potential therapeutic approaches for the major causes of neonatal PKD, namely hereditary disease, including autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant PKD and nonhereditary PKD, with particular emphasis on multicystic dysplastic kidney. A brief overview of obstructive cystic dysplasia and simple and complex cysts is also included. PMID:25155726

  15. Signaling during Kidney Development

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Mirja; Rak-Raszewska, Aleksandra; Pietilä, Ilkka; Quaggin, Susan E.; Vainio, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    The kidney plays an essential role during excretion of metabolic waste products, maintenance of key homeostasis components such as ion concentrations and hormone levels. It influences the blood pressure, composition and volume. The kidney tubule system is composed of two distinct cell populations: the nephrons forming the filtering units and the collecting duct system derived from the ureteric bud. Nephrons are composed of glomeruli that filter the blood to the Bowman’s capsule and tubular structures that reabsorb and concentrate primary urine. The collecting duct is a Wolffian duct-derived epithelial tube that concentrates and collects urine and transfers it via the renal pelvis into the bladder. The mammalian kidney function depends on the coordinated development of specific cell types within a precise architectural framework. Due to the availability of modern analysis techniques, the kidney has become a model organ defining the paradigm to study organogenesis. As kidney diseases are a problem worldwide, the understanding of mammalian kidney cells is of crucial importance to develop diagnostic tools and novel therapies. This review focuses on how the pattern of renal development is generated, how the inductive signals are regulated and what are their effects on proliferation, differentiation and morphogenesis. PMID:25867084

  16. Signaling during Kidney Development.

    PubMed

    Krause, Mirja; Rak-Raszewska, Aleksandra; Pietilä, Ilkka; Quaggin, Susan E; Vainio, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    The kidney plays an essential role during excretion of metabolic waste products, maintenance of key homeostasis components such as ion concentrations and hormone levels. It influences the blood pressure, composition and volume. The kidney tubule system is composed of two distinct cell populations: the nephrons forming the filtering units and the collecting duct system derived from the ureteric bud. Nephrons are composed of glomeruli that filter the blood to the Bowman's capsule and tubular structures that reabsorb and concentrate primary urine. The collecting duct is a Wolffian duct-derived epithelial tube that concentrates and collects urine and transfers it via the renal pelvis into the bladder. The mammalian kidney function depends on the coordinated development of specific cell types within a precise architectural framework. Due to the availability of modern analysis techniques, the kidney has become a model organ defining the paradigm to study organogenesis. As kidney diseases are a problem worldwide, the understanding of mammalian kidney cells is of crucial importance to develop diagnostic tools and novel therapies. This review focuses on how the pattern of renal development is generated, how the inductive signals are regulated and what are their effects on proliferation, differentiation and morphogenesis. PMID:25867084

  17. The shortened spinal cord in tetraodontiform fishes.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Masato; Hosaka, Yoshinao Z; Doi, Hiroyuki; Sakai, Harumi

    2015-03-01

    In teleosts, the spinal cord generally extends along the entire vertebral canal. The Tetraodontiformes, in which the spinal cord is greatly reduced in length with a distinct long filum terminale and cauda equina, have been regarded as an aberration. The aims of this study are: 1) to elucidate whether the spinal cord in all tetraodontiform fishes shorten with the filum terminale, and 2) to describe the gross anatomical and histological differences in the spinal cord among all families of the Tetraodontiformes. Representative species from all families of the Tetraodontiformes, and for comparison the carp as a common teleost, were investigated. In the Triacanthodidae, Triacanthidae, and Triodontidae, which are the more ancestral taxa of the Tetraodontiformes, the spinal cord extends through the entire vertebral canal. In the Triacanthidae and Triodontidae, the caudal half or more spinal segments of the spinal cord, however, lack gray matter and consist largely of nerve fibers. In the other tetraodontiform families, the spinal cord is shortened forming a filum terminale with the cauda equina, which is prolonged as far as the last vertebra. The shortened spinal cord is divided into three groups. In the Ostraciidae and Molidae, the spinal cord tapers abruptly at the cranium or first vertebra forming a cord-like filum terminale. In the Monacanthidae, Tetraodontidae, and Diodontidae, it abruptly flattens at the rostral vertebrae forming a flat filum terminale. The spinal cord is relatively longer in the Monacanthidae than that in the other two families. It is suggested by histological features of the flat filum terminale that shortening of the spinal cord in this group progresses in order of the Monacanthidae, Tetraodontidae, and Diodontidae. In the Balistidae and Aracanidae, the cord is relatively long and then gradually decreased in dorso-ventral thickness. PMID:25388857

  18. An Ectopic Pelvic Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Bhoil, Rohit; Sood, Dinesh; Singh, Yash Paul; Nimkar, Kshama; Shukla, Anurag

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background If a kidney does not ascend as it should in normal fetal development, it remains in the pelvic area and is called a pelvic kidney. Often a person with a pelvic kidney will go through his/her whole life unaware of this condition, unless it is discovered during neonatal kidney ultrasound screening or if complications arise later in life due to this or a completely different reason and the condition is noted during investigations. Generally, this is not a harmful condition but it can lead to complications like in our case. With appropriate testing and treatment, if needed, an ectopic kidney should cause no serious long-term health complications and all that may be required for the patient is reassurance with advice to follow up at regular intervals. Case Report A 28-year-old male presented with recurrent pain in his lower left abdomen for one month and an episode of hematuria 3 days earlier accompanied by an attack of acute pain lasting for 3–4 hours. He gave a history of passing 2 small (about 5 mm each) calculi in his urine after the occurrence of hematuria, following which pain decreased in intensity. No history of fever was present. Conclusions Although a simple ectopic kidney seldom causes symptoms, the association of malrotation of the renal pelvis with calculus increases the risk of hematuria and/or hydronephrosis, presenting with colicky pain as in the present case. The clinician should be aware of these in such a case. If asymptomatic, no treatment is required. However, the patient should be advised to have follow-up ultrasounds at regular intervals to detect complications like calculus, hydronephrosis, etc. With appropriate testing and treatment, if required, an ectopic kidney should not cause serious long-term health complications. PMID:26413178

  19. Ganglioglioma of the Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheimer, Daniel C; Johnson, Mahlon D; Judkins, Alexander R

    2015-01-01

    Ganglioglioma is a rare tumor consisting of neoplastic glial and neuronal elements. It accounts for only 0.5% of all primary central nervous system (CNS) neoplasms. We report an unusual case of extensive intramedullary thoracic spinal cord ganglioglioma in a 14-month-old girl who underwent subtotal resection followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. The epidemiology, histopathologic features, imaging findings, treatment, and prognosis are subsequently reviewed. PMID:26605127

  20. Religious perspectives on umbilical cord blood banking.

    PubMed

    Jordens, Christopher F C; O'Connor, Michelle A C; Kerridge, Ian H; Stewart, Cameron; Cameron, Andrew; Keown, Damien; Lawrence, Rabbi Jeremy; McGarrity, Andrew; Sachedina, Abdulaziz; Tobin, Bernadette

    2012-03-01

    Umbilical cord blood is a valuable source of haematopoietic stem cells. There is little information about whether religious affiliations have any bearing on attitudes to and decisions about its collection, donation and storage. The authors provided information about umbilical cord blood banking to expert commentators from six major world religions (Catholicism, Anglicanism, Islam, Judaism, Hinduism and Buddhism) and asked them to address a specific set of questions in a commentary. The commentaries suggest there is considerable support for umbilical cord blood banking in these religions. Four commentaries provide moral grounds for favouring public donation over private storage. None attach any particular religious significance to the umbilical cord or to the blood within it, nor place restrictions on the ethnicity or religion of donors and recipients. Views on ownership of umbilical cord blood vary. The authors offer a series of general points for those who seek a better understanding of religious perspectives on umbilical cord blood banking. PMID:22558902

  1. [An unusual cause of ureteral obstruction in kidney transplant].

    PubMed

    Vigo, Valentina; Rossi, Luigi; Lisi, Piero; Antonelli, Maurizio; Lomonte, Carlo; Basile, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Inguinal herniation of the ureter in a kidney transplantation is a rare cause of late distal ureteral obstruction. Herniation is usually secondary to the implant of a long redundant ureter and to its course on the spermatic cord. This clinical condition can worsen graft function in the presence of ipsilateral hydroureteronephrosis. In this review, we describe the case of an asymptomatic 51-year-old man with a history of right iliac renal allotransplantation 12 years before. Kidney ultrasound showed moderate hydroureteronephrosis and ureteral kneeling at the upper third of the inguinal canal. The patient presented a mild increase in serum creatinine; physical examination revealed an ipsilateral inguinal hernia. A CT scan of the abdomen with no contrast medium confirmed middle-distal ureteral kneeling engaging in the sac of the right inguinal hernia. The patient underwent surgical hernia repair with no complications and his renal function recovered completely. PMID:26913744

  2. Horseshoe kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kanyári, Zsolt; Zádori, Gergely; Zsom, Lajos; Berhés, Mariann; Hamar, Mátyás; Kóbor, Krisztina; Péter, Antal

    2015-01-01

    Horseshoe kidney is a fusion anomaly found in approximately one in 400–600 people. Due to vascular and ureteral variations, transplantation with a horseshoe kidney presents a technical challenge. In our case, the isthmus connected the upper poles and contained parenchyma. It consisted of three renal arteries, five veins collected to the inferior vena cava, and two ureters and pyelons. It was implanted en bloc to the left side retroperitoneally. During the early period, cellular and humoral rejection was confirmed and treated. For a urine leak, double J catheters were implanted into both ureters. Later, the first catheter was removed. Subsequently, urinary sepsis developed, necessitating graftectomy. The uncommon anatomy of ureters and antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) may both be factors for a ureter tip necrosis led to an infected urinoma. After other Hungarian authors, we also report a horseshoe kidney transplantation that was technically successful. However, after an adequately treated but severe acute humoral rejection, the patient developed sepsis, and the kidney had to be removed. We conclude that transplantation with horseshoe kidney is technically feasible but may increase the risk for urinary complications and resultant infections. Careful consideration of risk and benefit is advised when a transplant professional is faced with this option. PMID:26120481

  3. Horseshoe kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nemes, Balázs; Kanyári, Zsolt; Zádori, Gergely; Zsom, Lajos; Berhés, Mariann; Hamar, Mátyás; Kóbor, Krisztina; Péter, Antal

    2015-06-01

    Horseshoe kidney is a fusion anomaly found in approximately one in 400-600 people. Due to vascular and ureteral variations, transplantation with a horseshoe kidney presents a technical challenge. In our case, the isthmus connected the upper poles and contained parenchyma. It consisted of three renal arteries, five veins collected to the inferior vena cava, and two ureters and pyelons. It was implanted en bloc to the left side retroperitoneally. During the early period, cellular and humoral rejection was confirmed and treated. For a urine leak, double J catheters were implanted into both ureters. Later, the first catheter was removed. Subsequently, urinary sepsis developed, necessitating graftectomy. The uncommon anatomy of ureters and antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) may both be factors for a ureter tip necrosis led to an infected urinoma. After other Hungarian authors, we also report a horseshoe kidney transplantation that was technically successful. However, after an adequately treated but severe acute humoral rejection, the patient developed sepsis, and the kidney had to be removed. We conclude that transplantation with horseshoe kidney is technically feasible but may increase the risk for urinary complications and resultant infections. Careful consideration of risk and benefit is advised when a transplant professional is faced with this option. PMID:26120481

  4. Therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; de Barros Filho, Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa; Marcon, Raphael Martus; Letaif, Olavo Biraghi; da Rocha, Ivan Dias

    2012-01-01

    This study reviews the literature concerning possible therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury. Spinal cord injury is a disabling and irreversible condition that has high economic and social costs. There are both primary and secondary mechanisms of damage to the spinal cord. The primary lesion is the mechanical injury itself. The secondary lesion results from one or more biochemical and cellular processes that are triggered by the primary lesion. The frustration of health professionals in treating a severe spinal cord injury was described in 1700 BC in an Egyptian surgical papyrus that was translated by Edwin Smith; the papyrus reported spinal fractures as a “disease that should not be treated.” Over the last two decades, several studies have been performed to obtain more effective treatments for spinal cord injury. Most of these studies approach a patient with acute spinal cord injury in one of four manners: corrective surgery or a physical, biological or pharmacological treatment method. Science is unraveling the mechanisms of cell protection and neuroregeneration, but clinically, we only provide supportive care for patients with spinal cord injuries. By combining these treatments, researchers attempt to enhance the functional recovery of patients with spinal cord injuries. Advances in the last decade have allowed us to encourage the development of experimental studies in the field of spinal cord regeneration. The combination of several therapeutic strategies should, at minimum, allow for partial functional recoveries for these patients, which could improve their quality of life. PMID:23070351

  5. Testosterone Plus Finasteride Treatment After Spinal Cord Injury

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-29

    Spinal Cord Injury; Spinal Cord Injuries; Trauma, Nervous System; Wounds and Injuries; Central Nervous System Diseases; Nervous System Diseases; Spinal Cord Diseases; Gonadal Disorders; Endocrine System Diseases; Hypogonadism; Genital Diseases, Male

  6. Brain–kidney crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Encephalopathy and altered higher mental functions are common clinical complications of acute kidney injury. Although sepsis is a major triggering factor, acute kidney injury predisposes to confusion by causing generalised inflammation, leading to increased permeability of the blood–brain barrier, exacerbated by hyperosmolarity and metabolic acidosis due to the retention of products of nitrogen metabolism potentially resulting in increased brain water content. Downregulation of cell membrane transporters predisposes to alterations in neurotransmitter secretion and uptake, coupled with drug accumulation increasing the risk of encephalopathy. On the other hand, acute brain injury can induce a variety of changes in renal function ranging from altered function and electrolyte imbalances to inflammatory changes in brain death kidney donors. PMID:25043644

  7. Segmentation of the human spinal cord.

    PubMed

    De Leener, Benjamin; Taso, Manuel; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Callot, Virginie

    2016-04-01

    Segmenting the spinal cord contour is a necessary step for quantifying spinal cord atrophy in various diseases. Delineating gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) is also useful for quantifying GM atrophy or for extracting multiparametric MRI metrics into specific WM tracts. Spinal cord segmentation in clinical research is not as developed as brain segmentation, however with the substantial improvement of MR sequences adapted to spinal cord MR investigations, the field of spinal cord MR segmentation has advanced greatly within the last decade. Segmentation techniques with variable accuracy and degree of complexity have been developed and reported in the literature. In this paper, we review some of the existing methods for cord and WM/GM segmentation, including intensity-based, surface-based, and image-based methods. We also provide recommendations for validating spinal cord segmentation techniques, as it is important to understand the intrinsic characteristics of the methods and to evaluate their performance and limitations. Lastly, we illustrate some applications in the healthy and pathological spinal cord. One conclusion of this review is that robust and automatic segmentation is clinically relevant, as it would allow for longitudinal and group studies free from user bias as well as reproducible multicentric studies in large populations, thereby helping to further our understanding of the spinal cord pathophysiology and to develop new criteria for early detection of subclinical evolution for prognosis prediction and for patient management. Another conclusion is that at the present time, no single method adequately segments the cord and its substructure in all the cases encountered (abnormal intensities, loss of contrast, deformation of the cord, etc.). A combination of different approaches is thus advised for future developments, along with the introduction of probabilistic shape models. Maturation of standardized frameworks, multiplatform availability, inclusion in large suite and data sharing would also ultimately benefit to the community. PMID:26724926

  8. Kidney Failure and Vascular Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... with renal failure can be treated with an artificial kidney machine (dialysis) which removes toxins from the blood. Patients requiring ongoing dialysis use the artificial kidney machine up to three times a week ...

  9. At Risk for Kidney Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Albumin Children and Kidney Disease Additional Kidney Information Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ... to share this content freely. March 5, 2014​ Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ...

  10. Kidney Stone Treatment with Lithotripsy

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Kidney Stone Treatment with Lithotripsy Broward Health Medical Center Fort Lauderdale, FL November 11, 2011 I'm ... got at least three stones in his left kidney. He's been having pain and blood in his ...

  11. Kidney Failure: What to Expect

    MedlinePlus

    ... have leg cramps. These problems are caused by waste products that build up in the blood, a condition known as uremia. Healthy kidneys remove waste products from the blood. When the kidneys stop ...

  12. Lupus and Kidney Disease (Lupus Nephritis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  13. Treatment Methods for Kidney Failure: Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Life Options Rehabilitation Program National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Treatment Methods for Kidney Failure: Kidney Transplantation Page Content On this page: ...

  14. When Your Child Needs a Kidney Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Food Allergies When Your Child Needs a Kidney Transplant KidsHealth > For Parents > When Your Child Needs ... to monitor their new kidney function. About the Kidneys Kidneys are bean-shaped organs located near the ...

  15. Vitamins and Minerals in Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  16. Kidney Disease Risks among African-Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... an AKF screening Kidney Action Day Kidney Action Day Learn about our signature outreach event. About AKF ... our Northeast Region. Kidney Action Day Kidney Action Day Our late spring event is an elegant fundraiser ...

  17. You, Your Blood Pressure, and Your Kidneys

    MedlinePlus

    ... an AKF screening Kidney Action Day Kidney Action Day Learn about our signature outreach event. About AKF ... our Northeast Region. Kidney Action Day Kidney Action Day Our late spring event is an elegant fundraiser ...

  18. Monitoring Your Kidney Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dialysis or Transplant Paying for Kidney Failure Treatment Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ... to share this content freely. ​​September 17, 2014​​ Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ...

  19. HIV and Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... most important waste products are excess sodium and water. . Each kidney contains about a million filtering units called nephrons. They: eliminate wastes from the body, regulate the volume and pressure of blood, and control levels of electrolytes and blood acidity. HOW DO I ...

  20. Hypomagnesaemia in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Van Laecke, Steven; Van Biesen, Wim

    2015-07-01

    In the era of calcineurin inhibitors, hypomagnesaemia is a very common finding in kidney transplant recipients. Especially the first weeks after transplantation it is the rule rather than the exception. Hypomagnesaemia or low magnesium intake have been associated with a higher mortality or more cardiovascular events in the general population, but this association has never been explored in kidney transplant recipients, despite their increased cardiovascular risk. Kidney transplant recipients with pre- or post-transplant hypomagnesaemia seem to have an aberrant glucose metabolism and develop diabetes mellitus more frequently. Moreover, observations from alternate study populations, animal experiments or in vitro studies suggest a possible role of magnesium deficiency in graft dysfunction, bone metabolism and transplant immunology. Future observational and especially interventional studies should further define whether and to what extent we should make effort to correct this electrolyte disturbance in transplant recipients. Considering the mechanism of renal magnesium wasting, normalizing the serum magnesium concentration by oral supplementation alone might turn out to be cumbersome in kidney transplant recipients. PMID:26001746

  1. Kidney Stones in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... specific type of kidney stone include the following: Calcium Oxalate Stones reducing sodium reducing animal protein, such as ... fish getting enough calcium from food or taking calcium supplements with food avoiding foods high in oxalate, such as spinach, rhubarb, nuts, and wheat bran ...

  2. The molecular cloning of platelet-derived growth factor-C (PDGF-C) gene of Gekko japonicus and its expression change in the spinal cord after tail amputation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Fan, Zheng; Zhou, Youlang; Liu, Mei; Ding, Fei; Gu, Xiaosong

    2009-03-01

    The platelet-derived growth factor-C (PDGF-C) gene of Gekko japonicus was obtained from a brain and spinal cord cDNA library. The results of Northern blot showed that transcript of PDGF-C gene of gecko is 2.8 kb in length, and it was abundantly expressed in tissues of heart, lung, kidney, and ovary. In situ hybridization (ISH) revealed that positive hybridization signals were present in both gray matter and white matter of the spinal cord. The change of PDGF-C expression in the spinal cord after tail amputation was examined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot. The expression of PDGF-C in the spinal cord showed highest level at 1 day after tail amputation, and gradually decreased until 2 weeks, which indicated that the expression level of PDGF-C might be associated with the process of spinal cord injury and regeneration. PMID:18925432

  3. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidney Foundation U.S. Food and Drug Administration MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease Page Content On this page: What is ...

  4. Kidneys and How They Work

    MedlinePlus

    ... Options National Kidney Foundation The NephCure Foundation MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... PDF, 345 KB) Alternate Language URL Español The Kidneys and How They Work Page Content On this ...

  5. Transplant Outcomes (Bone Marrow and Cord Blood)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Data by Center Report —View the number of bone marrow and cord blood transplants performed at a specific transplant center. U.S. Transplant Data by Disease Report —View the number of bone marrow and cord blood transplants reported for a specific disease. You can also ...

  6. Nutrition of People with Spinal Cord Injuries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This conference proceeding summarizes current knowledge about the nutritional status and needs of the spinal cord injured patient. Topics covered include the aspects of spinal cord injury that influence nutrient intakes and status, and the nutrients most likely to be problematic in this diverse gro...

  7. Family-directed umbilical cord blood banking

    PubMed Central

    Gluckman, Eliane; Ruggeri, Annalisa; Rocha, Vanderson; Baudoux, Etienne; Boo, Michael; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Welte, Kathy; Navarrete, Cristina; van Walraven, Suzanna M.

    2011-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood transplantation from HLA-identical siblings provides good results in children. These results support targeted efforts to bank family cord blood units that can be used for a sibling diagnosed with a disease which can be cured by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or for research that investigates the use of allogeneic or autologous cord blood cells. Over 500 patients transplanted with related cord blood units have been reported to the Eurocord registry with a 4-year overall survival of 91% for patients with non-malignant diseases and 56% for patients with malignant diseases. Main hematologic indications in children are leukemia, hemoglobinopathies or inherited hematologic, immunological or metabolic disorders. However, family-directed cord blood banking is not widely promoted; many cord blood units used in sibling transplantation have been obtained from private banks that do not meet the necessary criteria required to store these units. Marketing by private banks who predominantly store autologous cord blood units has created public confusion. There are very few current validated indications for autologous storage but some new indications might appear in the future. Little effort is devoted to provide unbiased information and to educate the public as to the distinction between the different types of banking, economic models and standards involved in such programs. In order to provide a better service for families in need, directed-family cord blood banking activities should be encouraged and closely monitored with common standards, and better information on current and future indications should be made available. PMID:21750089

  8. Family-directed umbilical cord blood banking.

    PubMed

    Gluckman, Eliane; Ruggeri, Annalisa; Rocha, Vanderson; Baudoux, Etienne; Boo, Michael; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Welte, Kathy; Navarrete, Cristina; van Walraven, Suzanna M

    2011-11-01

    Umbilical cord blood transplantation from HLA-identical siblings provides good results in children. These results support targeted efforts to bank family cord blood units that can be used for a sibling diagnosed with a disease which can be cured by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or for research that investigates the use of allogeneic or autologous cord blood cells. Over 500 patients transplanted with related cord blood units have been reported to the Eurocord registry with a 4-year overall survival of 91% for patients with non-malignant diseases and 56% for patients with malignant diseases. Main hematologic indications in children are leukemia, hemoglobinopathies or inherited hematologic, immunological or metabolic disorders. However, family-directed cord blood banking is not widely promoted; many cord blood units used in sibling transplantation have been obtained from private banks that do not meet the necessary criteria required to store these units. Marketing by private banks who predominantly store autologous cord blood units has created public confusion. There are very few current validated indications for autologous storage but some new indications might appear in the future. Little effort is devoted to provide unbiased information and to educate the public as to the distinction between the different types of banking, economic models and standards involved in such programs. In order to provide a better service for families in need, directed-family cord blood banking activities should be encouraged and closely monitored with common standards, and better information on current and future indications should be made available. PMID:21750089

  9. Neonatal umbilical cord myiasis in New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Puvabanditsin, S; Malik, I; Weidner, L M; Jadhav, S; Sanderman, J; Mehta, R

    2014-09-01

    Human myiasis is a rare condition. It is more common in tropical regions. Umbilical cord myiasis has not previously been reported from a temperate climate, for example, New Jersey. We report a 9-day-old infant with umbilical cord myiasis. The maggots were identified by the entomologist as the larvae of Sarcophagidae, more commonly known as flesh flies. PMID:25179383

  10. CORD Conducts a Feasibility Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Best, Gilmary

    This document presents the results of a feasibility study conducted by the Consortium for Development of Research Potential in Education (CORD) to determine if the 5 institutions in the Detroit area that comprise CORD can pool their resources to provide a coordinated institute for re-educating the conventionally trained teachers in multicultural…

  11. Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (CORD): Evaluation plan

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (CORD) project evaluation will determine the extent to which the CORD model of linking primary care (PC) interventions to public health (PH) interventions in multiple community sectors affects BMI and behavior in children (2 to 12 years). The evaluation c...

  12. Comprehensive renal scintillation procedures in spinal cord injury: comparison with excretory urography

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, L.K.; Dubovsky, E.V.; Bueschen, A.J.; Witten, D.M.; Scott, J.W.; Kuhlemeier, K.; Stover, S.L.

    1981-07-01

    A /sup 131/iodine orthoiodohippurate comprehensive renal scintillation procedure was performed and compared to results of excretory urography in 200 spinal cord injury patients. No severe urographic abnormalities were undetected by the comprehensive renal scintillation procedure. Only 1.4 per cent of renal units had greater than minimal pyelocaliectasis or ureterectasis in the presence of a normal radionuclide examination. A relatively large number of abnormalities were detected on the renal scintillation procedure when the excretory urogram was normal. Serial followup will be required to determine the significance of these findings but present data suggest that a comprehensive renal scintillation procedure and a plain film of the kidneys, ureters and bladder may be used for screening upper urinary tract abnormalities in lieu of an excretory urogram. This is particularly advantageous for the spinal cord injury population, since there have been no toxic or allergic reactions reported, no bowel preparation or dehydration is required and there is relatively low radiation exposure.

  13. Kidney Size Comparison of BEN Victims

    Normal size kidney (left) and a Balkan endemic nephropathy (BEN) kidney (right). The BEN kidney is reduced by one third compared to a normal kidney. The collapse of the kidney structure in the BEN kidney causes the organ to cease to function, resulting in uremia (blood poisoning) and requiring dialy...

  14. Endovascular treatment of spinal cord arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Veznedaroglu, Erol; Nelson, Peter K; Jabbour, Pascal M; Rosenwasser, Robert H

    2006-11-01

    Spinal cord arteriovenous malformations are rare lesions that represent one-tenth of the brain arteriovenous malformations. Depending on their location and relationship to the dura, these lesions are divided into four categories. Their clinical manifestations may vary from mild symptoms to severe motor deficits. Spinal angiography remains the "gold standard" for diagnosing spinal cord vascular lesions. Although the type of shunting remains difficult to determine by the magnetic resonance imaging, it is well analyzed by spinal angiography. The cure of the shunting is not by itself a therapeutic goal, but the objective is the creation of a new hemodynamic equilibrium between the lesion and the spinal cord to decrease the risk of hemorrhage and prevent the progression of the spinal cord ischemia. The endovascular tools seem to be a reasonable therapeutic option for the treatment of the majority of the spinal cord arteriovenous malformations. PMID:17053604

  15. Recording of cord dorsum potentials in calves.

    PubMed

    Van Soens, I; De Vlamynck, C; Pille, F; Vlaminck, L; Duchateau, L; Van Ham, L

    2015-10-01

    Cord dorsum potentials are sensory evoked potentials being used to assess proximal sensory nerve, dorsal nerve root and spinal cord dorsal horn function. The purpose of the present study was to establish normal values for onset latency, peak latency and peak-to-peak amplitude of cord dorsum potentials after saphenous nerve stimulation in 15 healthy calves. Under general anesthesia, the saphenous nerve was stimulated in the periphery and cord dorsum potentials were recorded from the interarcuate space L3-L4, L4-L5, L5-L6 and L6-S1. Cord dorsum potentials were easily recorded at the different recording sites and consisted of a large negative peak followed by a long latency positive phase. The largest responses were recorded at the L5-L6 interarcuate space. Body temperature significantly influenced peak-to-peak amplitude. Onset latency prolonged with increasing limb length. PMID:26412527

  16. Spinal Cord Injury Reduces the Efficacy of Pseudorabies Virus Labeling of Sympathetic Preganglionic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Duale, Hanad; Hou, Shaoping; Derbenev, Andrei V.; Smith, Bret N.; Rabchevsky, Alexander G.

    2009-01-01

    The retrograde transynaptic tracer pseudorabies virus (PRV) is used as a marker for synaptic connectivity in the spinal cord. Using PRV we sought to document putative synaptic plasticity below a high thoracic (T) spinal cord transection. This lesion has been linked to the development of a number of debilitating conditions including autonomic dysreflexia. Two weeks after injury, complete T4-transected and/or T4-hemisected and sham rats were injected with PRV-expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) or monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP1) into the kidneys. We expected greater PRV labeling after injury due to plasticity of spinal circuitry but 96 hours post-PRV-EGFP inoculation, we found fewer EGFP+ cells in the thoracolumbar gray matter of T4-transected compared to sham rats (p < 0.01); Western blot analysis corroborated decreased EGFP protein levels (p < 0.01). Moreover, viral glycoproteins that are critical for cell adsorption and entry were also reduced in the thoracolumbar spinal cord of injured versus sham rats (p < 0.01). PRV labeling of sympathetic postganglionic neurons in the celiac ganglia innervating the kidneys was also significantly reduced in injured versus sham rats (p < 0.01). By contrast, the numbers and distribution of FluoroGold-labeled (intraperitoneal injection) sympathetic preganglionic neurons throughout the sampled regions appeared similar in injured and sham rats. These results question whether spinal cord injury exclusively retards PRV expression and/or transport or whether this injury broadly affects host cell-viral interactions. PMID:19151624

  17. Rehabilitation of spinal cord injuries

    PubMed Central

    Nas, Kemal; Yazmalar, Levent; Şah, Volkan; Aydın, Abdulkadir; Öneş, Kadriye

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is the injury of the spinal cord from the foramen magnum to the cauda equina which occurs as a result of compulsion, incision or contusion. The most common causes of SCI in the world are traffic accidents, gunshot injuries, knife injuries, falls and sports injuries. There is a strong relationship between functional status and whether the injury is complete or not complete, as well as the level of the injury. The results of SCI bring not only damage to independence and physical function, but also include many complications from the injury. Neurogenic bladder and bowel, urinary tract infections, pressure ulcers, orthostatic hypotension, fractures, deep vein thrombosis, spasticity, autonomic dysreflexia, pulmonary and cardiovascular problems, and depressive disorders are frequent complications after SCI. SCI leads to serious disability in the patient resulting in the loss of work, which brings psychosocial and economic problems. The treatment and rehabilitation period is long, expensive and exhausting in SCI. Whether complete or incomplete, SCI rehabilitation is a long process that requires patience and motivation of the patient and relatives. Early rehabilitation is important to prevent joint contractures and the loss of muscle strength, conservation of bone density, and to ensure normal functioning of the respiratory and digestive system. An interdisciplinary approach is essential in rehabilitation in SCI, as in the other types of rehabilitation. The team is led by a physiatrist and consists of the patients’ family, physiotherapist, occupational therapist, dietician, psychologist, speech therapist, social worker and other consultant specialists as necessary. PMID:25621206

  18. Rehabilitation of spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Nas, Kemal; Yazmalar, Levent; Şah, Volkan; Aydın, Abdulkadir; Öneş, Kadriye

    2015-01-18

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is the injury of the spinal cord from the foramen magnum to the cauda equina which occurs as a result of compulsion, incision or contusion. The most common causes of SCI in the world are traffic accidents, gunshot injuries, knife injuries, falls and sports injuries. There is a strong relationship between functional status and whether the injury is complete or not complete, as well as the level of the injury. The results of SCI bring not only damage to independence and physical function, but also include many complications from the injury. Neurogenic bladder and bowel, urinary tract infections, pressure ulcers, orthostatic hypotension, fractures, deep vein thrombosis, spasticity, autonomic dysreflexia, pulmonary and cardiovascular problems, and depressive disorders are frequent complications after SCI. SCI leads to serious disability in the patient resulting in the loss of work, which brings psychosocial and economic problems. The treatment and rehabilitation period is long, expensive and exhausting in SCI. Whether complete or incomplete, SCI rehabilitation is a long process that requires patience and motivation of the patient and relatives. Early rehabilitation is important to prevent joint contractures and the loss of muscle strength, conservation of bone density, and to ensure normal functioning of the respiratory and digestive system. An interdisciplinary approach is essential in rehabilitation in SCI, as in the other types of rehabilitation. The team is led by a physiatrist and consists of the patients' family, physiotherapist, occupational therapist, dietician, psychologist, speech therapist, social worker and other consultant specialists as necessary. PMID:25621206

  19. Hypertension and a missing kidney

    PubMed Central

    Raina, Rupesh; Gulani, Vikas; Mehta, Lina; Jacobs, Gretta H.; Joyce, Kelly; Ponsky, Todd A.; Kenagy, David N.

    2012-01-01

    Standard initial assessment via ultrasound of a 4-year-old girl with hypertension revealed the absence of one kidney. Instead of cross-sectional imaging of the retroperitoneal space, a functional (nuclear) study was performed. This revealed a malformed kidney within the chest. Though systemic levels of renin and aldosterone were not elevated, removal of the malformed kidney normalized the blood pressure. The presence of prominent smooth muscle nodules surrounding the arteries was seen in the malformed kidney. Initial attempts to avert surgery by pharmacologically reducing blood flow to the malformed kidney were unsuccessful. The review of the literature offers little evidence to support such a strategy. PMID:25874090

  20. Kidney diseases and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Moon, Kyung Hyun; Ko, In Kap; Yoo, James J; Atala, Anthony

    2016-04-15

    Kidney disease is a worldwide public health problem. Renal failure follows several disease stages including acute and chronic kidney symptoms. Acute kidney injury (AKI) may lead to chronic kidney disease (CKD), which can progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) with a mortality rate. Current treatment options are limited to dialysis and kidney transplantation; however, problems such as donor organ shortage, graft failure and numerous complications remain a concern. To address this issue, cell-based approaches using tissue engineering (TE) and regenerative medicine (RM) may provide attractive approaches to replace the damaged kidney cells with functional renal specific cells, leading to restoration of normal kidney functions. While development of renal tissue engineering is in a steady state due to the complex composition and highly regulated functionality of the kidney, cell therapy using stem cells and primary kidney cells has demonstrated promising therapeutic outcomes in terms of restoration of renal functions in AKI and CKD. In this review, basic components needed for successful renal kidney engineering are discussed, and recent TE and RM approaches to treatment of specific kidney diseases will be presented. PMID:26134528

  1. Anorexia nervosa and the kidney.

    PubMed

    Bouquegneau, Antoine; Dubois, Bernard E; Krzesinski, Jean-Marie; Delanaye, Pierre

    2012-08-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a common psychiatric disorder that disproportionately affects adolescents and young adults and is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Anorexia nervosa can affect the kidney in numerous ways, including increased rates of acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease, electrolyte abnormalities, and nephrolithiasis. Additionally, the diagnosis and treatment of anorexia nervosa-associated kidney diseases are challenging, reflecting complications such as refeeding syndrome, as well as the limitations of serum creatinine level in this population to estimate kidney function and the psychosocial challenges inherent with treating systemic manifestations of psychiatric conditions. In this review, we discuss kidney diseases and kidney-associated conditions that occur in individuals with anorexia nervosa, summarizing many of the challenges in treating patients with this disease. PMID:22609034

  2. Acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Connell, Alistair; Laing, Chris

    2015-12-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) - an abrupt deterioration in renal function - causes a rise in serum creatinine (SCr) or fall in urine output. It is common, occurring in up to 20% of hospital admissions. Importantly, even small rises in SCr are associated with increased risk of death and longer hospital stays. A 2009 National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death report found that a proportion of AKI in secondary care was avoidable. In addition, management of established AKI was 'good' less than half the time. In practice, AKI represents a heterogeneous group of conditions, encompassing impairments in both kidney structure and function. Delivering disease-specific treatment early in the course of AKI may improve outcomes. The provision of best-practice care for all will rely on a better understanding of risk, and frameworks of care that can be applied across a diverse patient group. PMID:26621953

  3. The kidney research predicament.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Lisa; Ibrahim, Tod; Zent, Roy; Fischer, Michael J

    2014-05-01

    Research funding from public and private sources has reached an all-time low. Economic conditions, sequestration, and a trend of low award success rates have created an imbalance between the supply of highly qualified research investigators and the availability of critically necessary research dollars. This grim environment continues to hinder the success of established investigators and deter potential investigators from joining the research workforce. Without action and support of innovative science, the future of the US health care system is in jeopardy, and its leadership role in medical research will decrease. This work discusses the effects of the decline in research funding, the plight of kidney research, and the impact of the American Society of Nephrology Grants Program on scientists. The ASN also calls on the entire nephrology community to rejuvenate the research environment, improve the lives of millions of people with kidney disease, and ultimately, find a cure. PMID:24652790

  4. The Kidney Research Predicament

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Lisa; Ibrahim, Tod; Fischer, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Research funding from public and private sources has reached an all-time low. Economic conditions, sequestration, and a trend of low award success rates have created an imbalance between the supply of highly qualified research investigators and the availability of critically necessary research dollars. This grim environment continues to hinder the success of established investigators and deter potential investigators from joining the research workforce. Without action and support of innovative science, the future of the US health care system is in jeopardy, and its leadership role in medical research will decrease. This work discusses the effects of the decline in research funding, the plight of kidney research, and the impact of the American Society of Nephrology Grants Program on scientists. The ASN also calls on the entire nephrology community to rejuvenate the research environment, improve the lives of millions of people with kidney disease, and ultimately, find a cure. PMID:24652790

  5. Kidney Cell Electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, P.

    1985-01-01

    Materials and procedures for microgravity electrophoresis of living human embryonic kidney cells were evaluated, ground support in the form of analytical cell electrophoresis and flow cytometry was provided and cells returned from space flight were analyzed. Preflight culture media, electrophoresis buffer, fraction collection media, temperature profiles, and urokinase assay procedures were tested prior to flight. Electrophoretic mobility distributions of aliquots of the cell population to be fractionated in flight were obtained. The protocol established and utilized is given.

  6. Therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; Barros Filho, Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa de; Marcon, Raphael Martus; Letaif, Olavo Biraghi; Rocha, Ivan Dias da

    2012-10-01

    This study reviews the literature concerning possible therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury. Spinal cord injury is a disabling and irreversible condition that has high economic and social costs. There are both primary and secondary mechanisms of damage to the spinal cord. The primary lesion is the mechanical injury itself. The secondary lesion results from one or more biochemical and cellular processes that are triggered by the primary lesion. The frustration of health professionals in treating a severe spinal cord injury was described in 1700 BC in an Egyptian surgical papyrus that was translated by Edwin Smith; the papyrus reported spinal fractures as a "disease that should not be treated." Over the last biological or pharmacological treatment method. Science is unraveling the mechanisms of cell protection and neuroregeneration, but clinically, we only provide supportive care for patients with spinal cord injuries. By combining these treatments, researchers attempt to enhance the functional recovery of patients with spinal cord injuries. Advances in the last decade have allowed us to encourage the development of experimental studies in the field of spinal cord regeneration. The combination of several therapeutic strategies should, at minimum, allow for partial functional recoveries for these patients, which could improve their quality of life. PMID:23070351

  7. Claudins and the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Claudins are tight-junction membrane proteins that function as both pores and barriers in the paracellular pathway in epithelial cells. In the kidney, claudins determine the permeability and selectivity of different nephron segments along the renal tubule. In the proximal tubule, claudins have a role in the bulk reabsorption of salt and water. In the thick ascending limb, claudins are important for the reabsorption of calcium and magnesium and are tightly regulated by the calcium-sensing receptor. In the distal nephron, claudins need to form cation barriers and chloride pores to facilitate electrogenic sodium reabsorption and potassium and acid secretion. Aldosterone and the with-no-lysine (WNK) proteins likely regulate claudins to fine-tune distal nephron salt transport. Genetic mutations in claudin-16 and -19 cause familial hypomagnesemic hypercalciuria with nephrocalcinosis, whereas polymorphisms in claudin-14 are associated with kidney stone risk. It is likely that additional roles for claudins in the pathogenesis of other types of kidney diseases have yet to be uncovered. PMID:24948743

  8. Acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Gerhard Anton

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Acute kidney injury is a frequent and serious complication in hospitalized patients. Mortality rates have not substantially been decreased during the last 20 years. In most patients AKI results from transient renal hypoperfusion or ischemia. The consequences include tubular cell dysfunction/damage, inflammation of the organ, and post-ischemic microvasculopathy. The two latter events perpetuate kidney damage in AKI. Clinical manifestations result from diminished excretion of water, electrolytes, and endogenous / exogenous waste products. Patients are endangered by cardiovascular complications such as hypertension, heart failure, and arrhythmia. In addition, the whole organism may be affected by systemic toxification (uremia). The diagnostic approach in AKI involves several steps with renal biopsy inevitable in some patients. The current therapy focuses on preventing further kidney damage and on treatment of complications. Different pharmacological strategies have failed to significantly improve prognosis in AKI. If dialysis treatment becomes mandatory, intermittent and continuous renal replacement therapies are equally effective. Thus, new therapies are urgently needed in order to reduce short- and long-term outcome in AKI. In this respect, stem cell-based regimens may offer promising perspectives. PMID:25618438

  9. Stem cell therapy for the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Injury and disease of the spinal cord are generally met with a poor prognosis. This poor prognosis is due not only to the characteristics of the diseases but also to our poor ability to deliver therapeutics to the spinal cord. The spinal cord is extremely sensitive to direct manipulation, and delivery of therapeutics has proven a challenge for both scientists and physicians. Recent advances in stem cell technologies have opened up a new avenue for the treatment of spinal cord disease and injury. Stem cells have proven beneficial in rodent models of spinal cord disease and injury. In these animal models, stem cells have been shown to produce their effect by the dual action of cell replacement and the trophic support of the factors secreted by these cells. In this review we look at the main clinical trials involving stem cell transplant into the spinal cord, focusing on motor neuron diseases and spinal cord injury. We will also discuss the major hurdles in optimizing stem cell delivery methods into the spinal cord. We shall examine current techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging guidance and cell labeling and will look at the current research striving to improve these techniques. With all caveats and future research taken into account, this is a very exciting time for stem cell transplant into the spinal cord. We are only beginning to realize the huge potential of stem cells in a central nervous system setting to provide cell replacement and trophic support. Many more trials will need to be undertaken before we can fully exploit the attributes of stem cells. PMID:22776143

  10. Nanomedicine for treating spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, Jacqueline Y.; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2013-09-01

    Spinal cord injury results in significant mortality and morbidity, lifestyle changes, and difficult rehabilitation. Treatment of spinal cord injury is challenging because the spinal cord is both complex to treat acutely and difficult to regenerate. Nanomaterials can be used to provide effective treatments; their unique properties can facilitate drug delivery to the injury site, enact as neuroprotective agents, or provide platforms to stimulate regrowth of damaged tissues. We review recent uses of nanomaterials including nanowires, micelles, nanoparticles, liposomes, and carbon-based nanomaterials for neuroprotection in the acute phase. We also review the design and neural regenerative application of electrospun scaffolds, conduits, and self-assembling peptide scaffolds.

  11. Sonographic Assessment of the Umbilical Cord

    PubMed Central

    Bosselmann, S.; Mielke, G.

    2015-01-01

    The umbilical cord (UC) is a vital connection between fetus and placenta. It constitutes a stable connection to the fetomaternal interface, while allowing the fetal mobility that is of great importance for fetal development in general and fetal neuromotor development in particular. This combination of mechanical stability and flexibility is due to the architecture of the UC. There is however a range of umbilical cord complications that may be life threatening to the fetus and these too can be explained to a large extent by the cordʼs structural characteristics. This review article discusses clinically relevant aspects of UC ultrasound. PMID:26366000

  12. Thiamine deficiency following umbilical cord blood transplant.

    PubMed

    Trueg, Anne; Borho, Teri; Srivastava, Shivani; Kiel, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    A case of Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) in the setting of umbilical cord blood transplant is reported. The patient, originally diagnosed with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia, proceeded to an umbilical cord blood transplant. He presented with altered mental status 149 days following transplant. Prompt magnetic resonance imaging, baseline thiamine level, and immediate intravenous replacement allowed for recovery of most symptoms. Accompanying this case is a review of the known cases of WE in hematopoietic cell transplants and their causative factors. This is the first known adult case of WE independent of parenteral nutrition use in the setting of umbilical cord transplant. PMID:23239794

  13. Vocal Cord Actinomycosis Mimicking a Laryngeal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Yoshihama, Keisuke; Kato, Yasumasa; Baba, Yuh

    2013-01-01

    Laryngeal carcinoma and laryngeal papilloma are the most commonly encountered tumorous lesions in the larynx. Herein, we report a case of the mass arising from the left vocal cord in a 49-year-old Japanese man. Endoscopic examination suggested that the mass is a tumor such as carcinoma and papilloma. Pathological examination showed that the specimen demonstrated actinomycosis in the left vocal cord. Although vocal cord actinomycosis is extremely rare, the otolaryngologist should recognize this condition during the inspection of the larynx. PMID:23573444

  14. Cord blood for brain injury.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jessica M; Kurtzberg, Joanne

    2015-06-01

    Recovery from neurological injuries is typically incomplete and often results in significant and permanent disabilities. Currently, most available therapies are limited to supportive or palliative measures, aimed at managing the symptoms of the condition. Because restorative therapies targeting the underlying cause of most neurological diseases do not exist, cell therapies targeting anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective and regenerative potential hold great promise. Cord blood (CB) cells can induce repair through mechanisms that involve trophic or cell-based paracrine effects or cellular integration and differentiation. Both may be operative in emerging CB therapies for neurologic conditions, and there are numerous potential applications of CB-based regenerative therapies in neurological diseases, including genetic diseases of childhood, ischemic events such as stroke and neurodegenerative diseases of adulthood. CB appears to hold promise as an effective therapy for patients with brain injuries. In this Review, we describe the state of science and clinical applications of CB therapy for brain injury. PMID:25800775

  15. Malignancies of the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Waters, J Dawn; Peran, Encarnacion Maria Navarro; Ciacci, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    The management of intramedullary spinal cord tumors (IMSCT) is primarily concerned with the preservation of existing neurologic function. To this end, clinical scientists are continually seeking tools and techniques to improve the safety and efficacy of tumor resection and control. Further advances in safety and efficacy can be proposed at each phase of management, from pre-operative screening to post-treatment monitoring. Innovations within the areas of molecular biology and genetics, intraoperative imaging and stereotactic radiosurgery offer exciting new options to explore in the management of IMSCT. This section will review the pathophysiology and epidemiology of IMSCT and the state-of-the-art management before delving into the promising new tools and techniques for each phase of management. PMID:23281516

  16. Fitness and Spinal Cord Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Mackie, J. William; McCormack, Rebecca; Campbell, Duncan

    1989-01-01

    Activity for many disabled persons often begins as therapy, but the additional rewards derived from exercise must be appreciated. Public attitudes toward disabled persons have changed during the last few decades, recently focusing on abilities rather than on disabilities. The family physician of patients with spinal cord injuries will assist in managing acute medical problems and the association with loss of some degree of physical capacity. Physicians also can guide these individuals to choose a life that remains active and interesting over a “house-bound,” but safe, existence. Sensitivity and timing play key roles in establishing exercise as an intergral part of a disabled individuals' altered lifestyle. The physician can advocate increased access to wheelchairs and other facilities that make life easier for disabled individuals. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:21248871

  17. Spinal cord injury in youth.

    PubMed

    Apple, D F; Anson, C A; Hunter, J D; Bell, R B

    1995-02-01

    To identify special characteristics of the pediatric spinal cord-injured (SCI) population, we analyzed a database of 1,770 traumatic SCI patients; 88 (5%) fell into the two pediatric subgroups: 0-12 years (n = 26) and 13-15 years (n = 62) at time of injury. Differences between age groups were identified with regard to demographics, neurologic characteristics, associated injuries and complications, and management. Mode level of bony injury was C2 in preteens, C4 in teens, and C4-C5 in adults. Scoliosis developed far more frequently in children, particularly preteens (23%), than in adults (5%). Violent etiologies, predominantly gunshots, accounted for a disproportionate share of injuries to preteens (19%) and African-Americans (28%), as compared with adults (12%) and Caucasians (7%). This last finding underscores the urgent need to mount a response to the nationwide proliferation of gunshot-related SCI in children and minorities. PMID:7729113

  18. CD11d integrin blockade reduces the systemic inflammatory response syndrome after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Feng; Brown, Arthur; Dekaban, Gregory A.; Omana, Vanessa; Weaver, Lynne C.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic injury to the spinal cord triggers a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), in which inflammatory cells from the circulation invade organs such as the liver, lung and kidney, leading to damage of these organs. Our previous study (Gris, et al, Exp. Neurol, 2008) demonstrated that spinal cord injury (SCI) activates circulating neutrophils that then invade the lung and kidney from 2 to 24 h after injury, increasing myeloperoxidase activity, cyclooxygenase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression and lipid peroxidation in these organs. The present study was designed to ascertain whether a treatment that limits the influx of leukocytes into the injured spinal cord would also be effective in reducing the SIRS after SCI. This treatment is intravenous delivery of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against the CD11d subunit of the CD11d/CD18 integrin expressed by neutrophils and monocytes. We delivered the anti-CD11d mAb at 2 h post moderate clip compression SCI at the 4th or 12th thoracic segments and assessed inflammation, oxidative activity and cellular damage within the lung, kidney and liver at 12 h post-injury. In some analyses we compared high and low thoracic injuries to evaluate the importance of injury level on the intensity of the SIRS. After T4 injury, treatment with the anti-integrin mAb reduced the presence of neutrophils and macrophages in the lung, with associated decreases in expression of NF-κB and oxidative enzymes and in the concentration of free radicals in this organ. The treatment also reduced lipid peroxidation, protein nitration and cell death in the lung. The anti-CD11d treatment also reduced the inflammatory cells within the kidney after T4 injury, as well as the free radical concentration and amount of lipid peroxidation. In the liver, the mAb treatment reduced the influx of neutrophils but most of the other measures examined were unaffected by SCI. The inflammatory responses within the lung and kidney were often greater after T4 than T12 injury. Clinical studies show that SIRS, with its associated organ failure, contributes significantly to the morbidity and mortality of SCI patients. This anti-integrin treatment may block the onset of SIRS after SCI. PMID:21784069

  19. Nuchal cord: a definition and a study associating placental location and nuchal cord incidence.

    PubMed

    Collins, J H; Geddes, D; Collins, C L; De Angelis, L

    1991-07-01

    The umbilical cord around the neck of the fetus at the time of birth has been referred to in the literature by many different terms, including the term nuchal cord. A standardized definition of nuchal cord is proposed in order to allow for more accurate study of this problem. A prospective study is undertaken applying this specific definition. The results suggest a statistically significant relationship between nuchal cord incidence and placental location. A relationship between fetal heart rate decelerations and placental location also surfaced. PMID:1919285

  20. What Is Vocal Cord Dysfunction (VCD)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... your vocal cords. The breathing test is called spirometry and must include a flow-volume loop. This ... be so hard. To learn more about the spirometry test, see the ATS Patient Information Series fact ...

  1. Tracheostomy in Spinal Cord Injured Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ganuza, Javier-Romero; Oliviero, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Patients with cervical spinal cord injury frequently need prolonged mechanical ventilation as a result of worsening pulmonary vital capacity due to paralysis of respiratory muscles, severe impairment of tracheobronchial secretions clearance and high incidence of respiratory complications like pneumonia or atelectasis. Patients with thoracic spinal cord injury may need mechanical ventilation due to associate injuries. For these reasons, tracheostomy is frequently performed in these patients, more frequently when the spinal cord injury is at cervical level. Percutaneous technique, performed in the ICU, should be considered the preferred procedure for performing elective tracheostomies in spinal cord injured patients. Tracheostomy should be implemented as soon as possible in SCI patients they require prolonged mechanical ventilation. Tracheostomy can be performed just after anterolateral cervical spine fixation surgery. Tracheostomy can be removed when no longer needed without major complications. PMID:23905031

  2. Spinal Cord Injury: Hope through Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... chronic pain in people with spinal cord injury. Robotic-assisted therapy Most recovery following SCI takes place ... the safety and efficacy of a type of robotic therapy device known as the AMES device. The ...

  3. Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Adults Download Printable ... the topics below to get started. What Is Brain/CNS Tumors In Adults? What are adult brain ...

  4. Umbilical cord blood banking in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, H C; Falkenburg, J H

    1998-07-01

    Cord blood banks are being developed in the United States and Europe. In The Netherlands, the EuroCord Nederland Foundation (ECN) has been established to coordinate the development of a national cord blood bank for unrelated transplants. The aim of ECN is to collect at least 5000 transplants for patients who lack an HLA-identical related or unrelated bone marrow donor. Four blood banks in Leiden, Groningen, Nijmegen and Amsterdam, Europdonor Foundation and the Department of Hematology of the Leiden University Medical Center participate in this organization. From March 1995 to November 1997, 720 units have been collected, processed, HLA typed, tested for transmissible diseases and cryopreserved in the Dutch cord blood bank. PMID:9715870

  5. The tethered spinal cord: an overview.

    PubMed

    Patterson, P

    1989-12-01

    The growing child with a tethered spinal cord experiences serious neurological deficits as a result of traction on the conus medullaris. Children with tethered cords most commonly present with pain in the lower back, with motor or sensory loss in the lower limbs, with bowel or bladder dysfunction, or with scoliosis. Often, the neurological basis of these symptoms is overlooked. Surgical release of tethering arrests neurological deterioration. Without surgical intervention symptoms will progressively worsen and may become irreversible. Preoperatively the nurse must prepare the child and his family for neurological investigations and for surgery. Postoperatively the nurse must be skilled in assessing spinal cord function, providing pain management, and assisting in ambulation. This presentation will review the pathophysiology of the tethered spinal cord, the preparation of the school-aged child for surgery, and the postoperative nursing care of the pediatric laminectomy patient. PMID:2688738

  6. Staging Childhood Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. These are ...

  7. Cord blood hyperlipoproteinemia and perinatal stress.

    PubMed

    Cress, H R; Shaher, R M; Laffin, R; Karpowicz, K

    1977-01-01

    In 275 neonates mean cord blood cholesterol level was 70 +/- 17 (SD) mg/dl, with a range from 30 to 153 mg/dl. Mean cord blood triglyceride level was 33 +/- 26 (SD) mg/dl, with a range of 5-192 mg/dl. In an attempt to correlate perinatal problems and hypercholesterolemia in neonates we compared 15 hypercholesterolemic neonates who had cord blood cholesterol levels above 95 mg/dl, range 100-153 mg/dl, and triglyceride levels less than 65 mg/dl, with 65 normal neonates whose cord blood cholesterol levels were less than 95 mg/dl and triglyceride values were less than 65 mg/dl. We also compared 19 hypertriglyceridemic neonates who had cord blood triglyceride levels greater than 65 mg/dl, range 66-192 mg/dl, and cholesterol levels less than 95 mg/dl with the 65 normal neonates. Elevated cord blood cholesterol values greater than 95 mg/dl or triglyceride values greater than 65 mg/dl were associated with maternal-fetal problems related to unfavorable intralterine environment, fetal distress, and fetal anoxia. There was a significant correlation between post-term delivery and hypercholesterolemic neonates, and low Apgar scores and maternal hypertension were more often associated with hypertriglyceridemic infants. There was no association between serum cholesterol or triglyceride levels and prolonged ruptured membranes, cesarean section, maternal diabetes, or maternal hypothyroidism. Consequently, we think that when neonates are identified who have elevated cholesterol or triglyceride levels, the possible influence of maternal-fetal perinatal complications should be considered. Speculation Infants with familial hypercholesterolemia may be identified by increases in cord blood cholesterol concentrations. Elevated cord blood cholesterol or triglyceride values of some neonates, however, may represent hyperlipoproteinemia related to neonatal stress associated with maternal-fetal perinatal problems. PMID:831215

  8. Tuberculosis of the Spermatic Cord: Case Report☆

    PubMed Central

    Benjelloun, Amine; Elktaibi, Abderrahim; Elharrech, Younes; Touiti, Driss; Ghoundale, Omar

    2014-01-01

    The spermatic cord tuberculoma is uncommon, especially in its lower portion. Most cases were described in Japanese literature. We report a case of tuberculosis of the spermatic cord in a sexually active young man, revealed by a scrotal mass mimicking a tumor of the testicle and discuss the suitable diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, with preservation of the testes and the other sexual organs. PMID:26958480

  9. Cell death in developing human spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Vilović, Katarina; Ilijić, Ema; Glamoclija, Violeta; Kolić, Kresimir; Bocina, Ivana; Sapunar, Damir; Saraga-Babić, Mirna

    2006-01-01

    Cell death in the developing human spinal cord was investigated in 5-12 week human conceptuses using immunohistochemical and TUNEL methods. Expression of pro-apoptotic (Fas-receptor, caspase-3) and anti-apoptotic (bcl-2) markers and marker for internucleosomal fragmentation (TUNEL) were analysed in the cranial and caudal parts of the human spinal cord. In early developmental stages (5-6 weeks) of the cranial spinal cord, bcl-2 positive cells were seen in the ventricular zone and in the roof plate, while in the caudal part they were seen surrounding the central lumen. Subsequently, bcl-2 expression appeared in the basal plates of the grey matter and in the spinal ganglia, and from the seventh week on they also appeared in the intermediate horn of the grey matter. In the fetal period, bcl-2 expression appeared in the dorsal horns of the grey matter (9 weeks) but ceased in the ventricular zone (12 weeks) . In the trunk region, TUNEL-positive cells were found in ventricular and mantle zones along the whole length of the spinal cord. Caspase-3 positive cells and Fas-receptor positive cells appeared only in the grey matter of the cranial segments (head and trunk) of the spinal cord, but they were missing in the caudal parts. Caspase-3 dependant pathway, probably activated by Fas-receptor, seems to operate only in the cranial part of the human spinal cord. In the caudal (sacrococcygeal and tail) parts, cells seem to die by caspase-3 independent pathway. The interplay of pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic factors may be associated with cranial spinal cord morphogenesis, adjustment of cells number and selective survival of neurons, while in the caudal regions these factors cause massive cell death associated with regression of the caudal spinal cord. PMID:16315061

  10. [Kidney transplantation in children].

    PubMed

    Coppo, R; Amore, A; Peruzzi, L; Conti, G; Roasio, L; Amoroso, A

    2005-01-01

    Indications, procedures, complications, pharmacokinetics and outcomes of renal transplantation are different in children and in adults. Subjects <18 yrs old, are often included in a unique list as in Italy, benefiting from donors <15 yrs old, and the waiting time is reduced to <12 months in 71% of cases. The risk of thrombosis limits the use of donors <2 yrs and trans-plantation in infants <1 yr. The age at kidney transplantation is <5 yrs in 20-30% of children. In Italy living-related trans-plantation (LRT) is performed in 7% of cases, while in the USA it is more common (57%) and is often pre-emptive before entering dialysis (24%). Current therapy tends to reduce steroid treatment doses and, optimizing induction therapy with IL-2R inhibitors, using tacrolimus or mycophenolate or sirolimus. Transplanted patient survival is better in children than in adults (94-98% at 5 yrs). Infections, cardiovascular diseases and neoplasia induce 34, 15 and 12% of deaths, respectively, at 10 yrs; morbidity for infections and lymphoproliferative disease is increasing. Acute rejections declined from 70% in 1987 to 31% in 2002 in cadaveric transplantation (CT) and renal survival at 3 yrs increased from 50% in 1985 to 82% for CT and up to 92% in LRT. In adolescents (11-17 yrs old) renal survival is lower than in infants and in adults <65 yrs old. Renal losses are due to chronic transplant nephropathy (32%), vascular thrombosis (13%) and the recurrence of the original nephropathy (focal glomerulosclerosis up to 50%, membrano-proliferative glomerulonephritis up to 30%, and primary hyperoxaluria up to 90% if combined kidney-liver transplantation is not performed). Growth improves after transplantation particularly in children <5 yrs, while it is not completely satisfactory in adolescents. Overall, results indicate that kidney transplantation in children has very much improved and will offer in the near future even more favorable outcomes. PMID:16267794

  11. CD74 in Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Valiño-Rivas, Lara; Baeza-Bermejillo, Ciro; Gonzalez-Lafuente, Laura; Sanz, Ana Belen; Ortiz, Alberto; Sanchez-Niño, Maria Dolores

    2015-01-01

    CD74 (invariant MHC class II) regulates protein trafficking and is a receptor for macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) and d-dopachrome tautomerase (d-DT/MIF-2). CD74 expression is increased in tubular cells and/or glomerular podocytes and parietal cells in human metabolic nephropathies, polycystic kidney disease, graft rejection and kidney cancer and in experimental diabetic nephropathy and glomerulonephritis. Stressors like abnormal metabolite (glucose, lyso-Gb3) levels and inflammatory cytokines increase kidney cell CD74. MIF activates CD74 to increase inflammatory cytokines in podocytes and tubular cells and proliferation in glomerular parietal epithelial cells and cyst cells. MIF overexpression promotes while MIF targeting protects from experimental glomerular injury and kidney cysts, and interference with MIF/CD74 signaling or CD74 deficiency protected from crescentic glomerulonephritis. However, CD74 may protect from interstitial kidney fibrosis. Furthermore, CD74 expression by stressed kidney cells raises questions about the kidney safety of cancer therapy strategies delivering lethal immunoconjugates to CD74-expressing cells. Thus, understanding CD74 biology in kidney cells is relevant for kidney therapeutics. PMID:26441987

  12. [Infertility and kidney transplantation].

    PubMed

    Atallah, David; Salameh, Charbel; El Kassis, Nadine; Safi, Joelle; Lutfallah, Fouad; Bejjani, Lina; Ghaname, Wadih; Moukarzel, Maroun

    2015-01-01

    Renal failure impairs the endocrine system, especially in women, due to hyperprolactinemia, altering fertility, ovulatory cycles, libido and growth in adolescents. Renal transplantation is considered the best solution to the problems of renal failure and and of dialysis, as evidenced by comparing the rate of hyperprolactinemia (100% in chronic renal failure, 60% in patients on dialysis and 35% in post-transplantation). Kidney transplant is less efficient for restoring perfect function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis due in part to the immunosuppressant regimens prescribed. When these drugs are properly managed, transplantation will restore near normal sexual function. PMID:26591193

  13. [Kidney toxicity's "HAART" therapy].

    PubMed

    Marino, Alfonsina; Ardu, Francesco; Dentone, Chiara; Secondo, Giovanni; Ferrea, G

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and antiretroviral therapy can damage the kidney. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) generally improves the renal function as it reduces the viral replication, although the renal function may be reduced by certain antiretroviral drugs. HAART causes acute tubular necrosis, acute interstitial nephritis, calculi, Fanconi Syndrome, crystal nephropathy, elevated lipid levels as well as calcium and phosphorus alteration. The physician must estimate renal function before and during antiretroviral therapy, especially when HIV-infected patients have some risk factors for renal damage such as high-blood pressure or hepatitis B or C infections. PMID:26480259

  14. The molecular characterization of the brain protein 44-like (Brp44l) gene of Gekko japonicus and its expression changes in spinal cord after tail amputation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Maorong; Gu, Xiaosong; Feng, Xiao; Fan, Zheng; Ding, Fei; Liu, Yan

    2009-02-01

    The cDNA encoding brain protein 44-like (Brp44l) was identified from the brain and spinal cord cDNA library of Gekko japonicus. It contains a 324 bp open reading frame corresponding to a deduced protein of 107 amino acids. The molecular weight of the BRP44L protein is 12.2664 kDa and its theoretical pI is 9.67. At amino acid level, the BRP44L from gecko shares 85-89% similarity with those from other species. Northern blotting showed that Brp44l was ubiquitously expressed in the major organs of Gekko japonicus including brain, spinal cord, heart, lung, liver, and kidney, suggesting a fundamental biological role of this gene. In situ hybridization (ISH) revealed that positive hybridization signals were present in gray matter of spinal cord. The change of Brp44l expression in spinal cord after tail amputation was examined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The expression level of this gene increased in the spinal cord after tail amputation, and reached the highest value at 1 week after tail amputation, which indicated that the expression level of Brp44l might be associated with the process of spinal cord injury and regeneration. PMID:18026869

  15. Inadvertent Transmission of Polycystic Kidney Disease in Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Langote, Amit; Mazarova, Andrea; Mahoney, John; Blew, Brian; Knoll, Greg A.

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 55 Final Diagnosis: Polycystic transformation of transplant kidney Symptoms: Hematuia Medication: Tacrolimus • Mycophenoalte Moefitil • Prednisone Clinical Procedure: Graft nephrectomy Specialty: Nephrology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Although organ donors are rigorously tested, occasionally an unidentified donor disease can be transmitted to the recipient. These conditions include malignancies, infections, and, rarely, congenital diseases. Case Report: We report a case of an inadvertent transmission of polycystic kidney disease from a 40-year-old trauma victim to both kidney recipients. There was no family history of renal disease in the donor. The renal allografts gradually increased in size with the development of cysts and functioned for 10 and 14 years. Conclusions: We report a case of inadvertent transmission of polycystic kidney disease from an unsuspecting deceased donor to both the recipients through renal allograft. Both the grafts lasted long enough to suggest that polycystic kidneys from deceased donors can be considered for transplantation. PMID:25716074

  16. Obesity and kidney protection

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Aravind; Biersmith, Michael; Tolouian, Ramin

    2014-01-01

    Context: Obesity, both directly and indirectly, increases the risk for a variety of disease conditions including diabetes, hypertension, liver disease, and certain cancers, which in turn, decreases the overall lifespan in both men and women. Though the cardiovascular risks of obesity are widely acknowledged, less often identified is the relationship between obesity and renal function. Evidence Acquisitions: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, PubMed, EBSCO and Web of Science has been searched. Results: The concept of the “Metabolic Syndrome“ helps us to understand this close link between obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and renal dysfunction. An elevated body mass index has shown to be one of the major determinants of glomerular hyperfiltration that lead to the development of chronic kidney disease. Interestingly, weight loss can lead to attenuation of hyperfiltration in severely obese patients suggesting a possible therapeutic option to combat obesity-related hyperfiltration. Conclusions: Various treatment strategies had been suggested to decrease impact of obesity on kidneys. These are blood pressure controling, inhibition of the renin-angiotensinaldosterone axis, improving glycemic control, improving dyslipidemia, improving protein uriaand lifestyle modifications. Regardless of the numerous pharmacotherapies, the focus should be on the root cause: obesity. PMID:25093156

  17. Pruritus in Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Combs, Sara A; Teixeira, J Pedro; Germain, Michael J

    2015-07-01

    Pruritus is a common and distressing symptom in patients with chronic kidney disease. The most recent epidemiologic data have suggested that approximately 40% of patients with end-stage renal disease experience moderate to severe pruritus and that uremic pruritus (UP) has a major clinical impact, being associated strongly with poor quality of life, impaired sleep, depression, and increased mortality. The pathogenesis of UP remains largely unclear, although several theories on etiologic or contributing factors have been proposed including increased systemic inflammation; abnormal serum parathyroid hormone, calcium, and phosphorus levels; an imbalance in opiate receptors; and a neuropathic process. UP can present somewhat variably, although it tends to affect large, discontinuous, but symmetric, areas of skin and to be most symptomatic at night. A variety of alternative systemic or dermatologic conditions should be considered, especially in patients with asymmetric pruritus or other atypical features. Treatment initially should focus on aggressive skin hydration, patient education on minimizing scratching, and optimization of the aspects of chronic kidney disease care that are most relevant to pruritus, including dialysis adequacy and serum parathyroid hormone, calcium, and phosphorus management. Data for therapy specifically for UP remain limited, although topical therapies, gabapentin, type B ultraviolet light phototherapy, acupuncture, and opioid-receptor modulators all may play a role. PMID:26355256

  18. Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Zuk, Anna; Bonventre, Joseph V

    2016-01-14

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a global public health concern associated with high morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs. Other than dialysis, no therapeutic interventions reliably improve survival, limit injury, or speed recovery. Despite recognized shortcomings of in vivo animal models, the underlying pathophysiology of AKI and its consequence, chronic kidney disease (CKD), is rich with biological targets. We review recent findings relating to the renal vasculature and cellular stress responses, primarily the intersection of the unfolded protein response, mitochondrial dysfunction, autophagy, and the innate immune response. Maladaptive repair mechanisms that persist following the acute phase promote inflammation and fibrosis in the chronic phase. Here macrophages, growth-arrested tubular epithelial cells, the endothelium, and surrounding pericytes are key players in the progression to chronic disease. Better understanding of these complex interacting pathophysiological mechanisms, their relative importance in humans, and the utility of biomarkers will lead to therapeutic strategies to prevent and treat AKI or impede progression to CKD or end-stage renal disease (ESRD). PMID:26768243

  19. Kidney Disease: Early Detection and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Kidney Disease: Early Detection and Treatment Past Issues / Winter ... called a "urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio." Treating Kidney Disease Kidney disease is usually a progressive disease, ...

  20. Risk Factors for Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Renal. Home » Kidney Info » 1 in 9 Adults Risk Factors for CKD x What are you doing to ... to prevent or delay kidney failure. Kidney Disease Risk Factors You Can Change Diabetes Type 2 diabetes is ...

  1. Kidney Disease Statistics for the United States

    MedlinePlus

    ... also order print versions from our online catalog. Kidney Disease Statistics for the United States Page Content ... for Vascular Access Acknowledgments The Growing Burden of Kidney Disease Kidney disease statistics for the United States ...

  2. Kidney Stones in Children and Teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Kidney Stones in Children and Teens Page Content Article Body ​ ... teen girls having the highest incidence. Types of Kidney Stones There are many different types of kidney stones ...

  3. Treatment Methods for Kidney Failure: Peritoneal Dialysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Life Options Rehabilitation Program National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Treatment Methods for Kidney Failure: Peritoneal Dialysis Page Content On this page: ...

  4. Adiposity and spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Gorgey, Ashraf S; Wells, Kathryn M; Austin, Timothy L

    2015-01-01

    The drastic changes in body composition following spinal cord injury (SCI) have been shown to play a significant role in cardiovascular and metabolic health. The pattern of storage and distribution of different types of adipose tissue may impact metabolic health variables similar to carbohydrate, lipid and bone metabolism. The use of magnetic resonance imaging provides insights on the interplay among different regional adipose tissue compartments and their role in developing chronic diseases. Regional adipose tissue can be either distributed centrally or peripherally into subcutaneous and ectopic sites. The primary ectopic adipose tissue sites are visceral, intramuscular and bone marrow. Dysfunction in the central nervous system following SCI impacts the pattern of distribution of adiposity especially between tetraplegia and paraplegia. The current editorial is focused primarily on introducing different types of adipose tissue and establishing scientific basis to develop appropriate dietary, rehabilitation or pharmaceutical interventions to manage the negative consequences of increasing adiposity after SCI. We have also summarized the clinical implications and future recommendations relevant to study adiposity after SCI. PMID:26396933

  5. Tubulocystic carcinoma of the kidney

    PubMed Central

    Adair, Carol F.; Zhang, Haiying

    2015-01-01

    Tubulocystic carcinoma (TCC) of the kidney is a unique, rare, and recently recognized neoplasm. Although originally considered a low-grade collecting duct carcinoma, TCC is now considered to be a distinct entity. TCC should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cystic renal neoplasms. We report a case of TCC arising in the left kidney. PMID:26130898

  6. Role of kidney biomarkers of chronic kidney disease: An update

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Zeba; Pandey, Manoj

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a progressive pathological condition marked by deteriorating renal function over time. Diagnostic of kidney disease depend on serum creatinine level and glomerular filtration rate which is detectable when kidney function become half. The detection of kidney damage in an early stage needs robust biomarkers. Biomarkers allow monitoring the disease progression at initial stages of disease. On the onset of impairment in cellular organization there is perturbation in signaling molecules which are either up-regulated or down-regulated and act as an indicator or biomarker of diseased stage. This review compiled the cell signaling of different kidney biomarkers associated with the onset of chronic kidney diseases. Delay in diagnosis of CKD will cause deterioration of nephron function which leads to End stage renal disease and at that point patients require dialysis or kidney transplant. Detailed information on the complex network in signaling pathway leading to a coordinated pattern of gene expression and regulation in CKD will undoubtedly provide important clues to develop novel prognostic and therapeutic strategies for CKD. PMID:25183938

  7. [Kidney and hemoglobinopathy].

    PubMed

    Rémy, Philippe; Audard, Vincent; Galactéros, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    Sickle-cell disease (SCD), one of the most common severe monogenic disorders into the world, is associated with an increased frequency of chronic kidney disease. SCD is caused by a point mutation in the gene encoding β globin gene which leads to the formation of hemoglobin S that polymerises after deoxygenation. HbS polymerisation is associated with erythrocyte rigidity and vaso-occlusive episodes that play a central role into SCD pathogenesis. The spectrum of renal diseases during SCD is broad and includes various renal manifestations which become more apparent with increasing age. Underlying pathophysiological processes involved in sickle cell nephropathy are multifactorial but endothelial dysfunction related to chronic hemolysis is a key factor contributing to renal involvement. Our review focuses on the pathogenesis and on the spectrum of renal manifestations occurring in SCD patients. PMID:26947986

  8. Wars, disasters and kidneys.

    PubMed

    Lameire, N

    2014-12-01

    This paper summarizes the impact that wars had on the history of nephrology, both worldwide and in the Ghent Medical Faculty notably on the definition, research and clinical aspects of acute kidney injury. The paper briefly describes the role of 'trench nephritis' as observed both during World War I and II, supporting the hypothesis that many of the clinical cases could have been due to Hantavirus nephropathy. The lessons learned from the experience with crush syndrome first observed in World War II and subsequently investigated over many decades form the basis for the creation of the Renal Disaster Relief Task Force of the International Society of Nephrology. Over the last 15 years, this Task Force has successfully intervened both in the prevention and management of crush syndrome in numerous disaster situations like major earthquakes. PMID:25409904

  9. Melioidosis and the kidney.

    PubMed

    Jabbar, Zulfikar; Currie, Bart J

    2013-03-01

    Melioidosis, caused by the saprophytic soil and freshwater Gram-negative aerobic bacillus Burkholderia pseudomallei, is classically characterized by pneumonia, sometimes with multiple organ abscesses, usually in patients with defined risk factors and with a mortality rate of up to 40%. It is a major cause of community-acquired sepsis in Southeast Asia and tropical northern Australia with an expanding global geographical distribution. It is increasingly recognized as an opportunistic infectious disease of importance to physicians, who may need to suspect it in at-risk patients that may come from or visit endemic areas, and could be fatal if treated late or inappropriately. Mortality could be prevented by early institution of specific antimicrobial therapy. Epidemiology, clinical features, overall management, and aspects of melioidosis particularly relevant to kidney disease and immunosuppression are discussed in this review. PMID:23279670

  10. Metals and kidney autoimmunity.

    PubMed Central

    Bigazzi, P E

    1999-01-01

    The causes of autoimmune responses leading to human kidney pathology remain unknown. However, environmental agents such as microorganisms and/or xenobiotics are good candidates for that role. Metals, either present in the environment or administered for therapeutic reasons, are prototypical xenobiotics that cause decreases or enhancements of immune responses. In particular, exposure to gold and mercury may result in autoimmune responses to various self-antigens as well as autoimmune disease of the kidney and other tissues. Gold compounds, currently used in the treatment of patients with progressive polyarticular rheumatoid arthritis, can cause a nephrotic syndrome. Similarly, an immune-mediated membranous nephropathy frequently occurred when drugs containing mercury were commonly used. Recent epidemiologic studies have shown that occupational exposure to mercury does not usually result in autoimmunity. However, mercury induces antinuclear antibodies, sclerodermalike disease, lichen planus, or membranous nephropathy in some individuals. Laboratory investigations have confirmed that the administration of gold or mercury to experimental animals leads to autoimmune disease quite similar to that observed in human subjects exposed to these metals. In addition, studies of inbred mice and rats have revealed that a few strains are susceptible to the autoimmune effects of gold and mercury, whereas the majority of inbred strains are resistant. These findings have emphasized the importance of genetic (immunogenetic and pharmacogenetic) factors in the induction of metal-associated autoimmunity. (italic)In vitro(/italic) and (italic)in vivo(/italic) research of autoimmune disease caused by mercury and gold has already yielded valuable information and answered a number of important questions. At the same time it has raised new issues about possible immunostimulatory or immunosuppressive mechanisms of xenobiotic activity. Thus it is evident that investigations of metal-induced renal autoimmunity have the potential to produce new knowledge with relevance to autoimmune disease caused by xenobiotics in general as well as to idiopathic autoimmunity. PMID:10502542

  11. Spinal cord ischemia after cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, H; Ujike, Y; Asai, Y; Kaneko, M; Chiba, S

    1994-01-01

    Subsequent to cardiac arrest, a 58-year-old man with intractable dysrhythmia and severe arteriosclerosis developed flaccid paraplegia, depressed deep tendon reflexes, and showed no pain or temperature sensation caudal to Th-7 in spite of completely intact proprioception and vibration sensation. An echocardiogram showed no clots or vegetation on the prosthetic valve and no thrombus in the left atrium or left ventricle. The patient's paraplegia was permanent, at least through a follow-up period of 2 years. These findings suggest that the etiology was spinal cord ischemia due to blood supply in the area of the anterior spinal artery (ASA); however, magnetic resonance T2-weighted imaging demonstrated signal abnormalities throughout the gray matter and in the adjacent center white matter. Somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEP) measure neural transmission in the afferent spinal cord pathway, which is located in the lateral and posterior columns of the white matter; these showed a delay in latency between Th-6 and Th-7. The spinal cord is as vulnerable to transient ischemia as the brain. Spinal cord ischemia after cardiac arrest results from principal damage in the anterior horn of the gray matter, the so-called ASA syndrome; however, the pathways of SEP and pathogenesis of the spinal cord ischemia need further investigation. PMID:7884198

  12. Radiation tolerance of the cervical spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    McCunniff, A.J.; Liang, M.J.

    1989-03-01

    The incidence of permanent injury to the spinal cord as a complication of radiation therapy generally correlates positively with total radiation dosage. However, several reports in the literature have indicated that fraction size is also an important factor in the development or nondevelopment of late injuries in normal tissue. To determine the effect of fraction size on the incidence of radiation-induced spinal cord injuries, we reviewed 144 cases of head and neck cancer treated at our institution between 1971 and 1980 with radiation greater than 5600 cGy to a portion of the cervical spinal cord. Most of these patients received greater than or equal to 6000 cGy, with fraction sizes ranging from 133 cGy to 200 cGy. Fifty-three of the 144 patients have been followed up for 2 years or more. Nearly half of these (26 patients) received greater than 6000 cGy with fraction sizes of 133 cGy to 180 cGy. Only 1 of the 53 (1.9%) has sustained permanent spinal cord injury; 20 months after completion of radiation treatments he developed Brown-Sequard syndrome. Our experience suggests that radiation injuries to the spinal cord correlate not only with total radiation dosage, but also with fraction size; low fraction sizes appear to decrease the incidence of such injuries.

  13. Umbilical cord blood lead levels in California.

    PubMed

    Satin, K P; Neutra, R R; Guirguis, G; Flessel, P

    1991-01-01

    During the fall of 1984, we conducted a survey of umbilical cord blood lead levels of 723 live births that occurred at 5 hospitals located in 5 cities in California. Historical ambient air lead levels were used as a qualitative surrogate of air and dust exposure. The area-specific cord blood means (all means approximately 5 micrograms/dl), medians, deciles, and distributions did not vary among locations. The California distributions included means that were lower than the 6.6 micrograms/dl reported in Needleman et al.'s Boston study in 1979. Indeed, the entire California distribution was shifted to the left of the Boston study distribution, even though 3% of the California cord lead levels exceeded 10 micrograms/dl--the level above which Needleman et al. have documented psychoneurological effects in children during the first few years of life. Fourteen percent of premature babies had cord blood lead levels above 10 micrograms/dl. The association between prematurity (i.e., less than 260 d gestation) and elevated (greater than 5 micrograms/dl) cord blood lead was observed in all hospitals and yielded a relative risk of 2.9 (95% CI: .9, 9.2) and a population attributable risk of 47%. Further research is needed to confirm this association and to explore the roles of endogenous and exogenous sources of lead exposure to the mothers who give birth to premature infants. PMID:2039272

  14. Rehabilitation and treatment of spinal cord tumors

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Vishwa S.; Lofton, LaTanya

    2013-01-01

    Context Due to advances in acute oncological treatment, patients with spinal cord tumors exhibit improved survival. However, these patients have not received the full benefits of rehabilitation services to address their neurological deficits and rehabilitation goals. Objective To evaluate the epidemiology and pathophysiology of spinal cord tumors, address methods of acute oncological management, review treatment for neurological sequelae, and understand the implications as they relate to rehabilitation. Methods An extensive literature review was performed regarding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, acute oncological management, neurological sequelae, and rehabilitation for patients with spinal cord tumors. Databases used included pubmed.gov and OVID, as well as individual journal and textbook articles. Results Access to treatment should be increased given improved survival and functional deficits for patients with spinal cord tumors. Individuals can benefit from inpatient rehabilitation programs, in spite of increased medical co-morbidity and neurological deficits. Specific areas of improvement include functionality, mood, quality of life, and survival. Adjustments to treatment plans must incorporate medical complications from cancer and its treatment, perceived quality of life, and prognosis. Conclusions Patients with spinal cord tumors who participate in rehabilitation programs show general improvement in function, mood, quality of life, and survival. Adaptations to care plans should be made to accommodate medical co-morbidities from cancer and its treatment, patient perceptions, and prognosis. PMID:23433329

  15. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell transplantation restores damaged ovaries

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shao-Fang; Hu, Hong-Bo; Xu, Hong-Yan; Fu, Xia-Fei; Peng, Dong-Xian; Su, Wei-Yan; He, Yuan-Li

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian injury because of chemotherapy can decrease the levels of sexual hormones and potentia generandi of patients, thereby greatly reducing quality of life. The goal of this study was to investigate which transplantation method for human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (HUMSCs) can recover ovarian function that has been damaged by chemotherapy. A rat model of ovarian injury was established using an intraperitoneal injection of cyclophosphamide. Membrane-labelled HUMSCs were subsequently injected directly into ovary tissue or tail vein. The distribution of fluorescently labelled HUMSCs, estrous cycle, sexual hormone levels, and potentia generandi of treated and control rats were then examined. HUMSCs injected into the ovary only distributed to the ovary and uterus, while HUMSCs injected via tail vein were detected in the ovary, uterus, kidney, liver and lung. The estrous cycle, levels of sex hormones and potentia generandi of the treated rats were also recovered to a certain degree. Moreover, in some transplanted rats, fertility was restored and their offspring developed normally. While ovary injection could recover ovarian function faster, both methods produced similar results in the later stages of observation. Therefore, our results suggest that transplantation of HUMSCs by tail vein injection represents a minimally invasive and effective treatment method for ovarian injury. PMID:25922900

  16. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell transplantation restores damaged ovaries.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shao-Fang; Hu, Hong-Bo; Xu, Hong-Yan; Fu, Xia-Fei; Peng, Dong-Xian; Su, Wei-Yan; He, Yuan-Li

    2015-09-01

    Ovarian injury because of chemotherapy can decrease the levels of sexual hormones and potentia generandi of patients, thereby greatly reducing quality of life. The goal of this study was to investigate which transplantation method for human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (HUMSCs) can recover ovarian function that has been damaged by chemotherapy. A rat model of ovarian injury was established using an intraperitoneal injection of cyclophosphamide. Membrane-labelled HUMSCs were subsequently injected directly into ovary tissue or tail vein. The distribution of fluorescently labelled HUMSCs, estrous cycle, sexual hormone levels, and potentia generandi of treated and control rats were then examined. HUMSCs injected into the ovary only distributed to the ovary and uterus, while HUMSCs injected via tail vein were detected in the ovary, uterus, kidney, liver and lung. The estrous cycle, levels of sex hormones and potentia generandi of the treated rats were also recovered to a certain degree. Moreover, in some transplanted rats, fertility was restored and their offspring developed normally. While ovary injection could recover ovarian function faster, both methods produced similar results in the later stages of observation. Therefore, our results suggest that transplantation of HUMSCs by tail vein injection represents a minimally invasive and effective treatment method for ovarian injury. PMID:25922900

  17. Causes of Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: Knowledge of the causes of spinal cord injury (SCI) and associated factors is critical in the development of successful prevention programs. Objective: This study analyzed data from the National SCI Database (NSCID) and National Shriners SCI Database (NSSCID) in the United States to examine specific etiologies of SCI by age, sex, race, ethnicity, day and month of injury, and neurologic outcomes. Methods: NSCID and NSSCID participants who had a traumatic SCI from 2005 to 2011 with known etiology were included in the analyses (N=7,834). Thirty-seven causes of injury documented in the databases were stratified by personal characteristics using descriptive analysis. Results: The most common causes of SCI were automobile crashes (31.5%) and falls (25.3%), followed by gunshot wounds (10.4%), motorcycle crashes (6.8%), diving incidents (4.7%), and medical/surgical complications (4.3%), which collectively accounted for 83.1% of total SCIs since 2005. Automobile crashes were the leading cause of SCI until age 45 years, whereas falls were the leading cause after age 45 years. Gunshot wounds, motorcycle crashes, and diving caused more SCIs in males than females. The major difference among race/ethnicity was in the proportion of gunshot wounds. More SCIs occurred during the weekends and warmer months, which seemed to parallel the increase of motorcycle- and diving-related SCIs. Level and completeness of injury are also associated with etiology of injury. Conclusions: The present findings suggest that prevention strategies should be tailored to the targeted population and major causes to have a meaningful impact on reducing the incidence of SCI. PMID:23678280

  18. Vocational Rehabilitation of Persons with Spinal Cord Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poor, Charles R.

    1975-01-01

    Reviews historical development of organized vocational rehabilitation programming for the spinal cord injured in the United States. Significant factors that affect vocational rehabilitation outcomes with spinal cord injured persons are listed and discussed. (Author)

  19. Angiomyxoma: a rare tumor of the umbilical cord

    PubMed Central

    Göksever, Hale; Celiloğlu, Murat; Küpelioğlu, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Tumors of the umbilical cord are rare anomalies and should be considered when using prenatal ultrasound for detection of cystic lesions. Differential diagnosis of umbilical cord tumors should comprise umbilical cord teratoma, hemangioma and angiomyxoma. It can also be an umbilical cord polyp, umbilical cord cyst, hernia into the cord and omphalocele, which are mostly isolated findings, except omphalocele. Angiomyxoma is a rare tumor of the umbilical cord and is associated with incresaed perinatal morbidity and mortality. We present a 22-year-old woman with a large umbilical cord tumor who underwent a caesarean section. As in our case, neither chromosomal aberrations nor elevated alphafetoprotein were found after amniocentesis or chordocentesis. Macroscopical and microscopical pathological examinations of the mass after delivery revealed an angiomyxoma with cystic degenerations in myxoid stroma. PMID:24591896

  20. Umbilical cord blood transplantation: the first 25 years and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Gluckman, Eliane; Broxmeyer, Hal E.

    2013-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood is an alternative hematopoietic stem cell source for patients with hematologic diseases who can be cured by allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Initially, umbilical cord blood transplantation was limited to children, given the low cell dose infused. Both related and unrelated cord blood transplants have been performed with high rates of success for a variety of hematologic disorders and metabolic storage diseases in the pediatric setting. The results for adult umbilical cord blood transplantation have improved, with greater emphasis on cord blood units of sufficient cell dose and human leukocyte antigen match and with the use of double umbilical cord blood units and improved supportive care techniques. Cord blood expansion trials have recently shown improvement in time to engraftment. Umbilical cord blood is being compared with other graft sources in both retrospective and prospective trials. The growth of the field over the last 25 years and the plans for future exploration are discussed. PMID:23673863

  1. ACOG Committee Opinion No. 648: Umbilical Cord Blood Banking.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    Once considered a waste product that was discarded with the placenta, umbilical cord blood is now known to contain potentially life-saving hematopoietic stem cells. When used in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, umbilical cord blood offers several distinct advantages over bone marrow or peripheral stem cells. However, umbilical cord blood collection is not part of routine obstetric care and is not medically indicated. Umbilical cord blood collection should not compromise obstetric or neonatal care or alter routine practice for the timing of umbilical cord clamping. If a patient requests information on umbilical cord blood banking, balanced and accurate information regarding the advantages and disadvantages of public and private umbilical cord blood banking should be provided. The routine storage of umbilical cord blood as "biologic insurance" against future disease is not recommended. PMID:26595583

  2. Committee Opinion No. 648 Summary: Umbilical Cord Blood Banking.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    Once considered a waste product that was discarded with the placenta, umbilical cord blood is now known to contain potentially life-saving hematopoietic stem cells. When used in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, umbilical cord blood offers several distinct advantages over bone marrow or peripheral stem cells. However, umbilical cord blood collection is not part of routine obstetric care and is not medically indicated. Umbilical cord blood collection should not compromise obstetric or neonatal care or alter routine practice for the timing of umbilical cord clamping. If a patient requests information on umbilical cord blood banking, balanced and accurate information regarding the advantages and disadvantages of public and private umbilical cord blood banking should be provided. The routine storage of umbilical cord blood as "biologic insurance" against future disease is not recommended. PMID:26595578

  3. What Are Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Children?

    MedlinePlus

    ... as depression A change in personality Weakness or paralysis in part of the body Changes in vision, ... bowel control. Spinal cord tumors can cause weakness, paralysis, or numbness. The spinal cord is a narrow ...

  4. Unusual cord transection in a patient with traumatic spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Baliyan, Vinit; Shylendran, Sudhin; Ajay, K. Yadav; Kumar, Atin; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Sinha, Sumit

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury is one of the most debilitating injuries in patients with spinal trauma. Cord injury may range from simple cord edema to frank transection. Cord transection is the most severe form of cord injury as it results in complete and irreversible loss of all neural functions. Generally, it is a result of unstable spinal fractures with associated spondylolisthesis or spondyloptosis. Generally, the level of cord transection corresponds to the level of spinal fracture/spondylolisthesis. However, here we are presenting a case having a traumatic spinal fracture with spondylolisthesis where the level of cord transection was much higher than the level of the spinal fracture. Due to the traumatic traction, the cord distal to transection is displaced inferior leaving behind a long segment of the empty thecal sac. PMID:26889291

  5. Kidney donation after cardiac death

    PubMed Central

    Akoh, Jacob A

    2012-01-01

    There is continuing disparity between demand for and supply of kidneys for transplantation. This review describes the current state of kidney donation after cardiac death (DCD) and provides recommendations for a way forward. The conversion rate for potential DCD donors varies from 40%-80%. Compared to controlled DCD, uncontrolled DCD is more labour intensive, has a lower conversion rate and a higher discard rate. The super-rapid laparotomy technique involving direct aortic cannulation is preferred over in situ perfusion in controlled DCD donation and is associated with lower kidney discard rates, shorter warm ischaemia times and higher graft survival rates. DCD kidneys showed a 5.73-fold increase in the incidence of delayed graft function (DGF) and a higher primary non function rate compared to donation after brain death kidneys, but the long term graft function is equivalent between the two. The cold ischaemia time is a controllable factor that significantly influences the outcome of allografts, for example, limiting it to < 12 h markedly reduces DGF. DCD kidneys from donors < 50 function like standard criteria kidneys and should be viewed as such. As the majority of DCD kidneys are from controlled donation, incorporation of uncontrolled donation will expand the donor pool. Efforts to maximise the supply of kidneys from DCD include: implementing organ recovery from emergency department setting; improving family consent rate; utilising technological developments to optimise organs either prior to recovery from donors or during storage; improving organ allocation to ensure best utility; and improving viability testing to reduce primary non function. PMID:24175245

  6. Metastatic Spermatic Cord Tumor From Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Ji Geon; Jeong, Hye Yun; Kim, Ki Soo; Lee, Jin Sook; Kim, Sang Su; Kim, Ho Young

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic tumors of the spermatic cord are extremely rare, and the prognosis for patients is typically poor. In the majority of cases, the primary tumor occurs in the gastrointestinal tract. We report a case of a 62-year-old man with a metastatic spermatic cord tumor. The patient complained of groin discomfort with a tender mass in the right inguinal area. An excisional biopsy was performed, and the pathologic finding was a metastatic mucinous adenocarcinoma. We performed a systemic evaluation including colonoscopy, abdominal computed tomography, and total-body positron emission tomography, and the primary tumor was confirmed to involve the total colon, including the cecum, sigmoid colon, and rectum. The pathologic finding for rectum revealed a mucinous adenocarcinoma compatible with a metastatic spermatic cord tumor. PMID:26576400

  7. Vocal cord paralysis caused by stingray.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh Jin; Park, Jung Je; Kim, Jin Pyeong; Woo, Seung Hoon

    2013-11-01

    Foreign bodies in the oral cavity and pharynx are commonly encountered in the emergency room and outpatient departments, and the most frequently observed of these foreign bodies are fish bones. Among the possible complications resulting from a pharyngeal foreign body, vocal cord fixation is extremely rare, with only three cases previously reported in the English literature. The mechanisms of vocal cord fixation can be classified into mechanical articular fixation, direct injury of the recurrent laryngeal nerve, or recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis secondary to inflammation. The case discussed here is different from previous cases. We report a rare case of vocal cord paralysis caused by the venom of a stingray tail in the hypopharynx. PMID:24077868

  8. Radiation-induced spinal cord hemorrhage (hematomyelia).

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Amit; Kanekar, Sangam; Thamburaj, Krishnamurthy; Vijay, Kanupriya

    2014-10-23

    Intraspinal hemorrhage is very rare and intramedullary hemorrhage, also called hematomyelia, is the rarest form of intraspinal hemorrhage, usually related to trauma. Spinal vascular malformations such intradural arteriovenous malformations are the most common cause of atraumatic hematomyelia. Other considerations include warfarin or heparin anticoagulation, bleeding disorders, spinal cord tumors. Radiation-induced hematomyelia of the cord is exceedingly rare with only one case in literature to date. We report the case of an 8 year old girl with Ewing's sarcoma of the thoracic vertebra, under radiation therapy, presenting with hematomyelia. We describe the clinical course, the findings on imaging studies and the available information in the literature. Recognition of the clinical pattern of spinal cord injury should lead clinicians to perform imaging studies to evaluate for compressive etiologies. PMID:25568739

  9. Intractable Pruritus After Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Deborah A; Jaffee, Kenneth M; Kundu, Anjana

    2009-01-01

    Background: This report describes a young woman with incomplete traumatic cervical spinal cord injury and intractable pruritus involving her dorsal forearm. Method: Case report. Findings: Anatomic distribution of the pruritus corresponded to the dermatomal distribution of her level of spinal cord injury and vertebral fusion. Symptoms were attributed to the spinal cord injury and possible cervical root injury. Pruritus was refractory to all treatments, including topical lidocaine, gabapentin, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, intravenous Bier block, stellate ganglion block, and acupuncture. Conclusions: Further understanding of neuropathic pruritus is needed. Diagnostic workup of intractable pruritus should include advanced imaging to detect ongoing nerve root compression. If diagnostic studies suggest radiculopathy, epidural steroid injection should be considered. Because the autonomic nervous system may be involved in complex chronic pain or pruritic syndromes, sympatholysis via such techniques as stellate ganglion block might be effective. PMID:19777867

  10. Vascular anatomy of the spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Thron, A.K.

    1988-01-01

    The book summarizes the anatomic guidelines of external blood supply to the spinal cord. The basic principles of arterial supply and venous drainage are illustrated by explicit schemes for quick orientation. In the first part of the book, systematic radiologic-anatomic investigations of the superficial and deep vessels of all segments of the spinal cord are introduced. The microvascular morphology is portrayed by numerous microradiographic sections in all three dimensions without overshadowing. The three-dimensional representation of the vascular architecture illustrates elementary outlines and details of arterial territories, anastomotic cross-linking as well as the capillary system, particularly the hitherto unknown structure of the medullary venous system with its functionally important anastomoses and varying regional structures. These often now radiologic-anatomic findings are discussed as to their functional and pathophysiologic impact and constitute the basic on which to improve one's understanding of vascular syndromes of the spinal cord.

  11. Cord blood clinical processing, cryopreservation, and storage.

    PubMed

    Elmoazzen, Heidi; Holovati, Jelena L

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic umbilical cord blood (UCB) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has become a crucial advancement in the treatment for a variety of diseases including hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic malignancies, BM failure syndromes, hemoglobinopathies, and metabolic and immunodeficiency disorders. It has been well documented that the success of UCB engraftment is tied to UCB banking processes, and now there are established guidelines for standardization of collection, banking, processing, and cryopreservation for unrelated UCB units with purpose of achieving consistent production of high quality placental and UCB units for administration. In 2011, Canada's Ministry of Health has announced Canada's first national, publicly funded umbilical cord blood bank, which aims to provide altruistic donations for unrelated allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant. In this chapter, we describe specific protocols for clinical processing, cryopreservation, and storage of UCB used by the Canadian Blood Services National Public Umbilical Cord Blood Bank. PMID:25428018

  12. Primary Multifocal Gliosarcoma of the Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ramesh M.; Finn, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Gliosarcoma (GS) is a rare and exceedingly malignant neoplasm of the central nervous system. It displays clinical features similar to glioblastoma, yet is histologically unique as it harbors both gliomatous and sarcomatous cellular components. Involvement of the neuro-axis is predominantly limited to the cerebral parenchyma and meninges. Primary GS of the spinal cord is rarely encountered. We report a case of a 54 year old male who presented with 2 months of progressive, bilateral lower extremity sensory deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging of the neuro-axis revealed multiple intradural lesions involving the cervical and thoracic spinal cord without evidence of intracranial involvement. Surgical resection of a dural based, extramedullary cervical lesion and two exophytic, intramedullary thoracic lesions revealed gliosarcoma, WHO grade IV. The patient died approximately 11 months after presentation. This report confirms that GS is not limited to supratentorial involvement and can primarily affect the spinal cord.

  13. Cannabinoids to treat spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Arevalo-Martin, Angel; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo; Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating condition for which there is no standard treatment beyond rehabilitation strategies. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge on the use of cannabinoids to treat this condition. The endocannabinoid system is expressed in the intact spinal cord, and it is dramatically upregulated after lesion. Endogenous activation of this system counteracts secondary damage following SCI, and treatments with endocannabinoids or synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists promote a better functional outcome in experimental models. The use of cannabinoids in SCI is a new research field and many questions remain open. Here, we discuss caveats and suggest some future directions that may help to understand the role of cannabinoids in SCI and how to take advantage of this system to regain functions after spinal cord damage. PMID:25805333

  14. Untethering an unusual cause of kidney injury in a teenager with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yen, Elizabeth; Miele, Niel F; Barone, Joseph G; Tyagi, Rachana; Weiss, Lynne S

    2014-11-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is characterized by the acute nature and the inability of kidneys to maintain fluid homeostasis as well as adequate electrolyte and acid-base balance, resulting in an accumulation of nitrogenous waste and elevation of serum blood urea nitrogen and creatinine values. Acute kidney injury may be a single isolated event, yet oftentimes, it results from an acute chronic kidney disease. It is critical to seek out the etiology of AKI and to promptly manage the underlying chronic kidney disease to prevent comorbidities and mortality that may ensue. We described a case of a 16-year-old adolescent girl with Down syndrome who presented with AKI and electrolyte aberrance.Abdominal and renal ultrasounds demonstrated a significantly dilated bladder as well as frank hydronephrosis and hydroureter bilaterally. Foley catheter was successful in relieving the obstruction and improving her renal function. However, a magnetic resonance imaging was pursued in light of her chronic constipation and back pain, and it revealed a structural defect (tethered cord) that underlies a chronic process that was highly likely contributory to her AKI. She was managed accordingly with a guarded result and required long-term and close monitoring. PMID:25373571

  15. The benefits of optimal cord clamping.

    PubMed

    Busellato, Lisa; Bayes, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Optimal cord clamping is known and now widely recognised as having positive consequences for the neonate in the short- and medium-term. This review of some of the key literature published over the last five years on the effects of both ECC and OCC provides an insight into the evidence on this topic. The aim of this article is to summarise the key papers on the topic of the effect of timing of cord clamping, including some of those included in the Cochrane Review as well as the majority that have been published since, to provide an up-to-date overview. PMID:26975125

  16. Vocal Cord Dysfunction: A Frequently Forgotten Entity

    PubMed Central

    Campainha, S.; Ribeiro, C.; Guimarães, M.; Lima, R.

    2012-01-01

    Vocal cord dysfunction (VCD) is a disorder characterized by unintentional paradoxical adduction of the vocal cords, resulting in episodic shortness of breath, wheezing and stridor. Due to its clinical presentation, this entity is frequently mistaken for asthma. The diagnosis of VCD is made by direct observation of the upper airway by rhinolaryngoscopy, but due to the variable nature of this disorder the diagnosis can sometimes be challenging. We report the case of a 41-year old female referred to our Allergology clinics with the diagnosis of asthma. Thorough investigation revealed VCD as the cause of symptoms. PMID:23024876

  17. Spinal cord monitoring in neuromuscular scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Tucker, S K; Noordeen, M H; Pitt, M C

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews the use of spinal cord monitoring in neuromuscular scoliosis, a condition having a higher incidence of true positive results than idiopathic scoliosis. While somatosensory cortical evoked potentials (SCEP) are unreliable, somatosensory spinal evoked potentials (SSEP) are possible to obtain in most cases and a method using an epidural electrode is described. The '50% rule' is satisfactory having good specificity and sensitivity with it rare for post-operative paralysis to have occurred undetected. The spinal cord in these cases appears to have increased susceptibility particularly during the passage of sublaminar wires with the incidence of complications reduced using modern instrumentation. PMID:11269804

  18. Turkish Adaptation of Spinal Cord Independence Measure--Version III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kesiktas, Nur; Paker, Nurdan; Bugdayci, Derya; Sencan, Sureyya; Karan, Ayse; Muslumanoglu, Lutfiye

    2012-01-01

    Various rating scales have been used to assess ability in individuals with spinal cord injury. There is no specific functional assessment scale for Turkish patients with spinal cord injury. The Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM) is a specific test, which has become popular in the last decade. A study was conducted to validate and evaluate the…

  19. Sexuality Counseling with Clients Who Have Spinal Cord Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrow, Jeff

    1990-01-01

    Examines effects of spinal cord injury on sexuality. Discusses areas of sexual concern. Provides suggestions for treating clients with spinal cord injuries experiencing sexual difficulties. Concludes that major goal in working with clients with spinal cord injuries who have sexual difficulties should be the facilitation of a creative and…

  20. 30 CFR 18.35 - Portable (trailing) cables and cords.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Portable (trailing) cables and cords. 18.35... and Design Requirements § 18.35 Portable (trailing) cables and cords. (a) Portable cables and cords... conductor of a current-carrying capacity consistent with the Insulated Power Cable Engineers...

  1. 30 CFR 18.35 - Portable (trailing) cables and cords.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Portable (trailing) cables and cords. 18.35... and Design Requirements § 18.35 Portable (trailing) cables and cords. (a) Portable cables and cords... conductor of a current-carrying capacity consistent with the Insulated Power Cable Engineers...

  2. Biomarkers in chronic kidney disease, from kidney function to kidney damage

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Giacoman, Salvador; Madero, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) typically evolves over many years, with a long latent period when the disease is clinically silent and therefore diagnosis, evaluation and treatment is based mainly on biomarkers that assess kidney function. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) remains the ideal marker of kidney function. Unfortunately measuring GFR is time consuming and therefore GFR is usually estimated from equations that take into account endogenous filtration markers like serum creatinine (SCr) and cystatin C (CysC). Other biomarkers such as albuminuria may precede kidney function decline and have demonstrated to have strong associations with disease progression and outcomes. New potential biomarkers have arisen with the promise of detecting kidney damage prior to the currently used markers. The aim of this review is to discuss the utility of the GFR estimating equations and biomarkers in CKD and the different clinical settings where these should be applied. The CKD-Epidemiology Collaboration equation performs better than the modification of diet in renal disease equation, especially at GFR above 60 mL/min per 1.73 m2. Equations combining CysC and SCr perform better than the equations using either CysC or SCr alone and are recommended in situations where CKD needs to be confirmed. Combining creatinine, CysC and urine albumin to creatinine ratio improves risk stratification for kidney disease progression and mortality. Kidney injury molecule and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin are considered reasonable biomarkers in urine and plasma to determine severity and prognosis of CKD. PMID:25664247

  3. Ultrasonography of the Kidney: A Pictorial Review

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann; Ewertsen, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonography of the kidneys is essential in the diagnosis and management of kidney-related diseases. The kidneys are easily examined, and most pathological changes in the kidneys are distinguishable with ultrasound. In this pictorial review, the most common findings in renal ultrasound are highlighted. PMID:26838799

  4. Electroporation of Embryonic Kidney Explants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, Nicholas; Houle, Daniel; Gupta, Indra R.

    Metanephric kidney development in the mouse begins at embryonic day (E) 10.5, when the ureteric bud (UB), an outgrowth of the epithelial nephric duct, invades the neighboring metanephric mesenchyme (MM). The ureteric bud then undergoes a series of branching events to form the collecting duct network of the adult kidney (Fig. 19.1). As each ureteric bud tip forms, the adjacent undifferentiated mesenchyme is induced to epithelialize and form a nephron, the functional unit of the adult kidney that filters waste. Rodent embryonic kidneys can be dissected and cultured as explants such that branching morphogenesis and nephrogenesis can be observed ex vivo (Rothenpieler and Dressler, 1993; Vega et al., 1996; Piscione et al., 1997; Gupta et al., 2003).

  5. Targeted Therapies for Kidney Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat advanced kidney cancer. These drugs block angiogenesis (growth of the new blood vessels that nourish ... questions. Sorafenib (Nexavar) Sorafenib acts by blocking both angiogenesis and growth-stimulating molecules in the cancer cell ...

  6. Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... statement, and the Director's Update newsletter Offices & Divisions Organizational structure and ... you should take steps to protect your kidneys. Make changes to what you eat, manage your blood pressure, ...

  7. The kidney tight junction (Review)

    PubMed Central

    HOU, JIANGHUI

    2014-01-01

    The tight junction is an important subcellular organelle which plays a vital role in epithelial barrier function. Claudin, as the integral membrane component of tight junctions, creates a paracellular transport pathway for various ions to be reabsorbed by the kidneys. This review summarizes advances in claudin structure, function and pathophysiology in kidney diseases. Different claudin species confer selective paracellular permeability to each of three major renal tubular segments: the proximal tubule, the thick ascending limb of Henle’s loop and the distal nephron. Defects in claudin function can cause a wide spectrum of kidney diseases, such as hypomagnesemia, hypercalciuria, kidney stones and hypertension. Studies using transgenic mouse models with claudin mutations have recapitulated several of these renal disease phenotypes and have elucidated the underlying biological mechanisms. Modern recording approaches based upon scanning ion conductance microscopy may resolve the biophysical nature of claudin transport function and provide novel insight into tight junction architecture. PMID:25319473

  8. Development of the Mammalian Kidney.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    The basic unit of kidney function is the nephron. In the mouse, around 14,000 nephrons form in a 10-day period extending into early neonatal life, while the human fetus forms the adult complement of nephrons in a 32-week period completed prior to birth. This review discusses our current understanding of mammalian nephrogenesis: the contributing cell types and the regulatory processes at play. A conceptual developmental framework has emerged for the mouse kidney. This framework is now guiding studies of human kidney development enabled in part by in vitro systems of pluripotent stem cell-seeded nephrogenesis. A near future goal will be to translate our developmental knowledge-base to the productive engineering of new kidney structures for regenerative medicine. PMID:26969971

  9. Diet for Kidney Stone Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... specific type of kidney stone include the following: Calcium Oxalate Stones reducing sodium reducing animal protein, such as ... with increased daily sodium consumption. People who form calcium oxalate or calcium phosphate stones should limit their intake ...

  10. Stress and the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Marino A.; Griffith, Derek M.; Thorpe, Roland J.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of CKD has increased considerably over the past 2 decades. The rising rates of CKD have been attributed to known comorbidities such as diabetes, hypertension, and obesity; however, recent research has begun to explore the degree to which social, economic, and psychological factors have implications for the prevalence and progression of CKD, especially among high-risk populations such as African Americans. It has been suggested that stress can have implications for CKD, but this area of research has been largely unexplored. One contributing factor associated with the paucity of research on CKD is that many of the social, psychological, and environmental stressors cannot be recreated or simulated in a laboratory setting. Social science has established that stress can have implications for health, and we believe that stress is an important determinant of the development and progression of CKD. We draw heavily from the social scientific and social epidemiologic literature to present an intersectional conceptual frame specifying how stress can have implications for kidney disease, its progression, and its complications through multiple stressors and pathways. PMID:25573512

  11. The Systemic Inflammatory Response after Spinal Cord Injury in the Rat Is Decreased by α4β1 Integrin Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Feng; Omana, Vanessa; Brown, Arthur; Weaver, Lynne C.

    2015-01-01

    The systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) follows spinal cord injury (SCI) and causes damage to the lungs, kidney, and liver due to an influx of inflammatory cells from the circulation. After SCI in rats, the SIRS develops within 12 h and is sustained for at least 3 days. We have previously shown that blockade of CD11d/ CD18 integrin reduces inflammation-driven secondary damage to the spinal cord. This treatment reduces the SIRS after SCI. In another study we found that blockade of α4β1 integrin limited secondary cord damage more effectively than blockade of CD11d/CD18. Therefore we considered it important to assess the effects of anti-α4β1 treatment on the SIRS in the lung, kidney, and liver after SCI. An anti-α4 antibody was given IV at 2 h after SCI at the fourth thoracic segment and the effects on the organs were evaluated at 24 h post-injury. The migration of neutrophils into the lungs and liver was markedly reduced and all three organs contained fewer macrophages. In the lungs and liver, the activation of the oxidative enzymes myeloperoxidase (MPO), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and gp91phox, the production of free radicals, lipid peroxidation, and cell death were substantially and similarly reduced. Treatment effects were less robust in the kidney. Overall, the efficacy of the anti-α4β1 treatment did not differ greatly from that of the anti-CD11d antibody, although details of the results differed. The SIRS after SCI impedes recovery, and attenuation of the SIRS with an anti-integrin treatment is an important, clinically-relevant finding. PMID:22150233

  12. The three-kidney rat

    SciTech Connect

    Provoost, A.P.; Van Aken, M.

    1984-01-01

    In contrast to the numerous research into the adaption of renal function when nephons are lost, much less attention has been paid to the effects of an extra kidney. Through the availability of inbred rat strains, techniques to transplant rat kidneys, and methods to measure total and individual kidney function repeatedly in the same animal, it became possible to study the renal function in rats with three kidneys. Adult male rats of a highly inbred Wistar strain were used. Nine recipients of a third kidney (3-K) were compared with 5 sham operated control (2-K) rats. The total GFR, as measured by the plasma clearance of Cr-5l EDTA, was taken 1,3,6,9, and 15 weeks after operation. The contribution of each kidney to the total renal function was determined by a Tc-99m DTPA scan performed at weeks 10 and 16. After transplantation the total GFR of 3-K rats was, in general, not different from the value before transplantation or from that of 2-K rats. The lack of increase of the GFR of 3-K rats was not the result of a non-functioning graft.

  13. Some traditional umbilical cord care practices in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Smith, Cheryl K

    2009-01-01

    Traditional umbilical cord care practices in developing countries are helpful in some cases and harmful in others. This paper discusses some of the current practices and why they are helpful or harmful. Babies born in developing countries around the world often do not have the benefit of sanitary methods for cutting the umbilical cord or keeping the cord clean. In addition, a variety of traditional practices have evolved in different countries, some of which are harmful and some that help to ensure that bacteria do not enter the cord stump. This article will discuss some of the traditional umbilical cord care practices in developing countries around the world. PMID:19824251

  14. Treatment of early stage vocal cord carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ayers, G.

    1989-03-01

    The cure rates for early stage vocal cord cancer are excellent with primary radiotherapy. Voice quality remains as good or becomes better than prior to treatment. For the local failures that do occur, surgical salvage will yield ultimate cure rates of about 95% for T1 and 90% for T2 tumors.

  15. Pediatric primary intramedullary spinal cord glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Lober, Robert; Sharma, Suash; Bell, Beverly; Free, Alan; Figueroa, Ramon; Sheils, Chris W; Lee, Mark; Cowell, John

    2010-01-01

    Spinal cord tumors in pediatric patients are rare, representing less than 1% of all central nervous system tumors. Two cases of pediatric primary intramedullary spinal cord glioblastoma at ages 14 and 8 years are reported. Both patients presented with rapid onset paraparesis and quadraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging in both showed heterogeneously enhancing solitary mass lesions localized to lower cervical and upper thoracic spinal cord parenchyma. Histopathologic diagnosis was glioblastoma. Case #1 had a small cell component (primitive neuroectodermal tumor-like areas), higher Ki67, and p53 labeling indices, and a relatively stable karyotype with only minimal single copy losses involving regions: Chr8;pter-30480019, Chr16;pter-29754532, Chr16;56160245–88668979, and Chr19;32848902-qter on retrospective comparative genomic hybridization using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples. Case #2 had relatively bland histomorphology and negligible p53 immunoreactivity. Both underwent multimodal therapy including gross total resection, postoperative radiation and chemotherapy. However, there was no significant improvement in neurological deficits, and overall survival in both cases was 14 months.This report highlights the broad histological spectrum and poor overall survival despite multi modality therapy. The finding of relatively unique genotypic abnormalities resembling pediatric embryonal tumors in one case may highlight the value of genome-wide profiling in development of effective therapy. The differences in management with intracranial and low-grade spinal cord gliomas and current management issues are discussed. PMID:21139963

  16. Accommodating Workers with Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowler, Denetta; Batiste, Linda; Whidden, Eddie

    1998-01-01

    Examination of over 1,000 calls to the Job Accommodation Network involving workers with spinal cord injury identified the nature of the industry, job, career progression, and accessibility solutions. The number of calls increased dramatically after passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act. (SK)

  17. Employment Outcomes Following Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, S.; Murphy, G. S.; Athanasou, J. A.; Hickey, L.

    1998-01-01

    A study of 83 Australian adults with spinal cord injuries found that at least 56% had worked at some time post-injury and those who were working when surveyed had done so for an average of close to 10 years. Clerical, office, and administrative occupations proved to be the most suitable. (Author/CR)

  18. Percutaneous umbilical cord blood sampling - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    If you are at risk for having a baby with a genetic defect or blood disorder, your doctor may recommend ... umbilical cord. The sample is then analyzed for genetic defects ... check if your baby has anemia. If your baby has severe anemia, ...

  19. Autoregulation of spinal cord blood flow: is the cord a microcosm of the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, R.; Albin, M.S.; Bunegin, L.; Gelineau, J.

    1986-11-01

    The autoregulatory capability of regional areas of the brain and spinal cord was demonstrated in 18 rats anesthetized with a continuous infusion of intravenous pentothal. Blood flow was measured by the injection of radioactive microspheres (Co57, Sn113, Ru103, Sc46). Blood flow measurements were made at varying levels of mean arterial pressure (MAP) which was altered by neosynephrine to raise MAP or trimethaphan to lower MAP. Autoregulation of the spinal cord mirrored that of the brain, with an autoregulatory range of 60 to 120 mm Hg for both tissues. Within this range, cerebral blood flow (CBF) was 59.2 +/- 3.2 ml/100 g/min (SEM) and spinal cord blood flow (SCBF) was 61.1 +/- 3.6. There was no significant difference in CBF and SCBF in the autoregulatory range. Autoregulation was also demonstrated regionally in the left cortex, right cortex, brainstem, thalamus, cerebellum, hippocampus and cervical, thoracic and lumbar cord. This data provides a coherent reference point in establishing autoregulatory curves under barbiturate anesthesia. Further investigation of the effects of other anesthetic agents on autoregulation of the spinal cord is needed. It is possible that intraspinal cord compliance, like intracranial compliance, might be adversely affected by the effects of anesthetics on autoregulation.

  20. Differentiation of idiopathic spinal cord herniation from CSF-isointense intraspinal extramedullary lesions displacing the cord.

    PubMed

    Haber, Marc D; Nguyen, Dustin D; Li, Shan

    2014-01-01

    Focal spinal cord displacement can be caused by idiopathic spinal cord herniation (ISCH), in which the cord protrudes through a dural defect into the epidural space, causing cord displacement and tethering. ISCH is uncommon and often is misdiagnosed initially, which results in delayed management. ISCH can be mimicked by space-occupying cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-isointense intraspinal extramedullary lesions, such as epidermoid cysts or teratomas, intradural arachnoid cysts, epidural hematomas or abscesses, cystic nerve sheath tumors, synovial or Tarlov cysts, meningoceles, and pseudomeningoceles. Initial computed tomography (CT) and unenhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging studies may depict focal cord displacement and a widened CSF space but often are not sufficient to identify the underlying cause. High-resolution thin-section MR imaging can delineate the exact location of the dural defect and the protrusion of the herniated cord through this defect into the epidural space. At imaging, unimpeded CSF pulsation artifacts seen within a widened CSF space exclude a space-occupying lesion. A filling defect seen at conventional or CT myelography can help confirm a CSF-isointense space-occupying lesion; intravenous contrast agent administration can help exclude a rim-enhancing cystic extramedullary lesion. The clinical presentation usually is nonspecific, but symptom acuity, fever, and trauma can guide the imaging evaluation and help narrow the differential diagnosis. A multimodality imaging approach is essential to differentiate ISCH from space-occupying CSF-isointense intraspinal extramedullary lesions. PMID:24617681

  1. Effect of gamma irradiation on the properties of tyre cords

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aytaç, Ayşe; Şen, Murat; Deniz, Veli; Güven, Olgun

    2007-12-01

    Gamma irradiation of high tenacity Nylon 6.6 (Ny 66) and polyester (PET) tyre cords was investigated. The untreated and treated tyre cords with different twist levels were irradiated at different dose rates in air. The effects of irradiation on both Ny 66 and PET cords were not found to be depending on the twist levels of the cords. The changes in the mechanical and thermal properties with absorbed dose at two different dose rates were measured. The mechanical properties were observed to deteriorate with increasing dose for Ny 66 cords, whereas remained almost unchanged for PET cords both in greige and dipped forms. Hot shrinkage value for the greige Ny 66 cords was found to be improved, i.e. decreased. This decrease was much lower for greige PET than Ny 66 cords. It is concluded that PET cord has higher radiation resistance than Ny 66 cord and the effects of high energy irradiation on tyre cords have to be taken into consideration during tyre design if pre-vulcanization with high energy radiation is to be applied.

  2. Advances in unrelated cord blood transplants in malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Gluckman, E

    2012-01-01

    Cord blood is an unlimited source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) for allogeneic HSC transplant. Since the first human cord blood transplant performed 20 years ago, cord blood banks have been established worldwide for collection and cryopreservation of cord blood for allogeneic HSC transplant. More than 500 000 cord blood units are now available for international exchange of cord blood units. A global network of cord blood banks and transplant centers has been established for a common inventory and study of clinical outcomes. Results of unrelated allogeneic cord blood transplants in malignant and nonmalignant diseases, in adults and children, show that, compared with HLA-matched unrelated bone marrow transplant, cord blood has several advantages including prompt availability of the transplant, decrease of graft versus host disease and better long-term immune recovery resulting in a similar long-term survival. Several studies have shown that the number of cells is the most important factor for engraftment while some degree of HLA mismatches is acceptable. Progresses in this field are expected to facilitate engraftment including ex vivo expansion of stem cells, intra-bone injection of cord blood cells and double cord blood transplants.

  3. In-vivo spinal cord deformation in flexion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Qing; Dougherty, Lawrence; Margulies, Susan S.

    1997-05-01

    Traumatic mechanical loading of the head-neck complex results cervical spinal cord injury when the distortion of the cord is sufficient to produce functional or structural failure of the cord's neural and/or vascular components. Characterizing cervical spinal cord deformation during physiological loading conditions is an important step to defining a comprehensive injury threshold associated with acute spinal cord injury. In this study, in vivo quasi- static deformation of the cervical spinal cord during flexion of the neck in human volunteers was measured using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of motion with spatial modulation of magnetization (SPAMM). A custom-designed device was built to guide the motion of the neck and enhance more reproducibility. the SPAMM pulse sequence labeled the tissue with a series of parallel tagging lines. A single- shot gradient-recalled-echo sequence was used to acquire the mid-sagittal image of the cervical spine. A comparison of the tagged line pattern in each MR reference and deformed image pair revealed the distortion of the spinal cord. The results showed the cervical spinal cord elongates during head flexion. The elongation experienced by the spinal cord varies linearly with head flexion, with the posterior surface of the cord stretching more than the anterior surface. The maximal elongation of the cord is about 12 percent of its original length.

  4. Umbilical cord cell banking-implications for the future

    SciTech Connect

    Gunning, Jennifer . E-mail: gunning@cf.ac.uk

    2005-09-01

    The first successful cord cell transplant to a sibling with Fanconi's anaemia took place 15 years ago. This proven utility of cord blood led to the establishment of cord blood banks both private and public and there are now nearly 100 cord blood banks worldwide. It is estimated that over 200,000 cord blood units (CBU) are held by the private sector and over 160,000 CBU are registered with the largest public cord blood registry. There is a tension between private cord blood banks, which store CBU for autologous or family use, and public banks, which store CBU for unrelated use and the ethics of private cord blood storage has been questioned. But more general ethical questions also arise regarding ownership, consent, confidentiality, costs and quality standards and patenting. In looking at these ethical issues one also needs to look at potential future use of cord blood stem cells. Up until now cord cells have principally been used in the treatment of paediatric blood and immune disorders. Improvements in cell expansion technology will make CBU more appropriate also for treating adults with such disorders. However, it has also been demonstrated that cord blood stem cells have the capacity to differentiate into other types of cells, neuronal, bone, epithelial and muscle which would have a future role to play in cell therapy and regenerative medicine.

  5. Umbilical cord cell banking--implications for the future.

    PubMed

    Gunning, Jennifer

    2005-09-01

    The first successful cord cell transplant to a sibling with Fanconi's anaemia took place 15 years ago. This proven utility of cord blood led to the establishment of cord blood banks both private and public and there are now nearly 100 cord blood banks worldwide. It is estimated that over 200,000 cord blood units (CBU) are held by the private sector and over 160,000 CBU are registered with the largest public cord blood registry. There is a tension between private cord blood banks, which store CBU for autologous or family use, and public banks, which store CBU for unrelated use and the ethics of private cord blood storage has been questioned. But more general ethical questions also arise regarding ownership, consent, confidentiality, costs and quality standards and patenting. In looking at these ethical issues one also needs to look at potential future use of cord blood stem cells. Up until now cord cells have principally been used in the treatment of paediatric blood and immune disorders. Improvements in cell expansion technology will make CBU more appropriate also for treating adults with such disorders. However, it has also been demonstrated that cord blood stem cells have the capacity to differentiate into other types of cells, neuronal, bone, epithelial and muscle which would have a future role to play in cell therapy and regenerative medicine. PMID:15982697

  6. Perioperative acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Goren, O; Matot, I

    2015-12-01

    Perioperative acute kidney injury (AKI) is not uncommon and is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Recently, several definition systems for AKI were proposed, incorporating both small changes of serum creatinine and urinary output reduction as diagnostic criteria. Novel biomarkers are under investigation as fast and accurate predictors of AKI. Several special considerations regarding the risk of AKI are of note in the surgical patient. Co-morbidities are important risk factors for AKI. The surgery in itself, especially emergency and major surgery in the critically ill, is associated with a high incidence of AKI. Certain types of surgeries, such as cardiac and transplantation surgeries, require special attention because they carry higher risk of AKI. Nephrotoxic drugs, contrast dye, and diuretics are commonly used in the perioperative period and are responsible for a significant amount of in-hospital AKI. Before surgery, the anaesthetist is required to identify patients at risk of AKI, optimize anaemia, and treat hypovolaemia. During surgery, normovolaemia is of utmost importance. Additionally, the surgical and anaesthesia team is advised to use measures to reduce blood loss and avoid unnecessary blood transfusion. Hypotension should be avoided because even short periods of mean arterial pressure <55-60 mm Hg carry a risk of postoperative AKI. Higher blood pressures are probably required for hypertensive patients. Urine output can be reduced significantly during surgery and is unrelated to perioperative renal function. Thus, fluids should not be given in excess for the sole purpose of avoiding or treating oliguria. Use of hydroxyethyl starch needs to be reconsidered. Recent evidence indicates a beneficial effect of administering low-chloride solutions. PMID:26658199

  7. Simplified spinal cord phantom for evaluation of SQUID magnetospinography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Y.; Oyama, D.; Somchai, N.; Kawabata, S.; Uehara, G.

    2014-05-01

    Spinal cord functional imaging by magnetospinography (MSG) is a noninvasive diagnostic method for spinal cord diseases. However, the accuracy and spatial resolution of lesion localization by MSG have barely been evaluated in detail so far. We developed a simplified spinal cord phantom for MSG evaluation. The spinal cord phantom is composed of a cylindrical vessel filled with saline water, which acts as a model of a neck. A set of modeled vertebrae is arranged in the cylindrical vessel, which has a neural current model made from catheter electrodes. The neural current model emulates the current distribution around the activated site along the axon of the spinal cord nerve. Our MSG system was used to observe the magnetic field from the phantom; a quadrupole-like pattern of the magnetic field distribution, which is a typical distribution pattern for spinal cord magnetic fields, was successfully reproduced by the phantom. Hence, the developed spinal cord phantom can be used to evaluate MSG source analysis methods.

  8. Do Kidney Stone Formers Have A Kidney Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Zisman, Anna L.; Evan, Andrew P.; Coe, Fredric L.; Worcester, Elaine M.

    2015-01-01

    Nephrolithiasis is a highly prevalent disorder affecting approximately one in eleven people and is associated with multiple complications including hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and chronic kidney disease. Significant epidemiologic associations with chronic kidney disease and ESRD have been noted and are reviewed herein, but debate persists in the literature as to whether kidney stone formation is a pathogenic process contributing to kidney disease. Corroborating evidence supporting the presence of kidney disease in stone formers includes the variability of renal function by stone type, the positive association of stone size with renal dysfunction, the presence of markers of renal injury in the urine of even asymptomatic stone formers, and direct evidence of renal tissue injury on histopathology. Proposed pathogenic mechanisms include recurrent obstruction and comorbid conditions such as recurrent urinary tract infections and structural abnormalities. Recent work evaluating the renal histopathology of different groups of stone formers adds further granularity, suggesting variability in mechanisms of renal injury by stone type and confirming the pathogenic effects of crystal formation. Genetic abnormalities leading to stone formation including cystinuria and primary hyperoxaluria, among others, contribute to the burden of disease in the stone-forming population. PMID:26376133

  9. [Kidney donors and kidney transplantation in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Giessing, M; Conrad, S; Schönberger, B; Huland, H; Budde, K; Neumayer, H-H; Loening, S A

    2004-08-01

    The likelihood of terminal renal insufficiency escalates with age, increasing the risk of dying as a patient requiring dialysis. In 1999, Eurotransplant initiated the Eurotransplant Senior Programm (ESP), in which the kidneys of old donors (>64 years) are allocated to recipients 64 years and older. Allocation does not take HLA-matching into account and is performed regionally only according to blood-group-compatibility to keep the storage time short. As a consequence of the short ischemic time, and thus reduced non-immunological damage to the anyways susceptible old kidney, graft-function and graft-survival in the ESP are very good. The results of the initial 5 years of this program show that it successfully utilizes more kidneys from old donors and that more old recipients are being transplanted, with a satisfactory graft-function. Increased donor- and/or recipient age require a thorough evaluation to exclude malignant and other diseases. Furthermore, short term controls on the waiting list and following kidney transplantation are prerequisites for successful transplantation in the aged recipient. If this is guaranteed, kidney transplantation in the old recipient-even with old donor organs-is a good alternative to the morbidity of a prolonged dialysis. Nevertheless, the role of HLA-matching should be reconsidered to reduce rejections. PMID:15249962

  10. Multiple sclerosis of the spinal cord: Magnetic resonance appearance

    SciTech Connect

    Thielen, K.R.; Miller, G.M.

    1996-05-01

    To determine the MR appearance of spinal cord multiple sclerosis (MS) plaques in patients presenting with myclopathy by using a high-field (1.5 T) imager. We studied 119 patients who underwent high-field (1.5 T) MR studies of the spinal cord for evaluation of myelopathy. All 119 patients were thought to have possible findings of spinal cord MS at the time of the MRI interpretation. Sixty-four plaques were studied in 47 patients with clinically definite MS and adequate quality MRI. Of these patients 68% had a single spinal cord plaque, 19% had two plaques, and 13% had three or more plaques. Sixty-two percent of the plaques occurred in the cervical spinal cord and most frequently involved the posterior (41%) and lateral (25%) aspects of the spinal cord. None of the 64 lesions involved the entire thickness of the spinal cord. The lesion length varied from 2 to 60 mm, with 84% of the lesions <15 mm in length. The spinal cord diameter was unchanged in 84% of plaques, enlarged at the level of the lesion in 14%, and atrophic in 2%. Just over half (55%) of the plaques enhanced with intravenously administered gadolinium. Of the patients who received synchronous head and spinal cord examinations on the same day, 24% had normal findings on the MR study of the head. Follow-up spinal cord studies were available in nine patients. New lesions developed in two patients, while previously described lesions resolved. In three patients only new lesions developed. In four patients no change occurred in the existing number of cord plaques. Spinal cord demyelinating plaques present as well-circumscribed foci of increased T2 signal that asymmetrically involve the spinal cord parenchyma. Knowledge of their usual appearance may prevent unnecessary biopsy. An MR examination of the head may confirm the imaging suggestion of spinal cord demyelinating disease, because up to 76% of patients have abnormal intracranial findings. 15 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Hereditary Causes of Kidney Stones and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Edvardsson, Vidar O.; Goldfarb, David S.; Lieske, John C.; Beara-Lasic, Lada; Anglani, Franca; Milliner, Dawn S.; Palsson, Runolfur

    2013-01-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency, cystinuria, Dent disease, familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC) and primary hyperoxaluria (PH) are rare but important causes of severe kidney stone disease and/or chronic kidney disease in children. Recurrent kidney stone disease and nephrocalcinosis, particularly in pre-pubertal children, should alert the physician to the possibility of an inborn error of metabolism as the underlying cause. Unfortunately, the lack of recognition and knowledge of the five disorders has frequently resulted in an unacceptable delay in diagnosis and treatment, sometimes with grave consequences. A high index of suspicion coupled with early diagnosis may reduce or even prevent the serious long-term complications of these diseases. In this paper, we review the epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and outcome of patients with APRT deficiency, cystinuria, Dent disease, FHHNC and PH with emphasis on childhood manifestations. PMID:23334384

  12. Current Bioengineering Methods for Whole Kidney Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Shuichiro; Yokoo, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Kidney regeneration is likely to provide an inexhaustible source of tissues and organs for immunosuppression-free transplantation. It is currently garnering considerable attention and might replace kidney dialysis as the ultimate therapeutic strategy for renal failure. However, anatomical complications make kidney regeneration difficult. Here, we review recent advances in the field of kidney regeneration, including (i) the directed differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells/embryonic stem cells into kidney cells; (ii) blastocyst decomplementation; (iii) use of a decellularized cadaveric scaffold; (iv) embryonic organ transplantation; and (v) use of a nephrogenic niche for growing xenoembryos for de novo kidney regeneration from stem cells. All these approaches represent potentially promising therapeutic strategies for the treatment of patients with chronic kidney disease. Although many obstacles to kidney regeneration remain, we hope that innovative strategies and reliable research will ultimately allow the restoration of renal function in patients with end-stage kidney disease. PMID:26089921

  13. Adult stem-like cells in kidney.

    PubMed

    Hishikawa, Keiichi; Takase, Osamu; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Tsujimura, Taro; Nangaku, Masaomi; Takato, Tsuyoshi

    2015-03-26

    Human pluripotent cells are promising for treatment for kidney diseases, but the protocols for derivation of kidney cell types are still controversial. Kidney tissue regeneration is well confirmed in several lower vertebrates such as fish, and the repair of nephrons after tubular damages is commonly observed after renal injury. Even in adult mammal kidney, renal progenitor cell or system is reportedly presents suggesting that adult stem-like cells in kidney can be practical clinical targets for kidney diseases. However, it is still unclear if kidney stem cells or stem-like cells exist or not. In general, stemness is defined by several factors such as self-renewal capacity, multi-lineage potency and characteristic gene expression profiles. The definite use of stemness may be obstacle to understand kidney regeneration, and here we describe the recent broad findings of kidney regeneration and the cells that contribute regeneration. PMID:25815133

  14. Quantitative autoradiography of angiotensin II receptors in brain and kidney: focus on cardiovascular implications

    SciTech Connect

    Gehlert, D.R.; Speth, R.C.; Wamsley, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    Quantitative techniques of receptor autoradiography have been applied to localize (/sup 125/I)-angiotensin II binding sites in brain and kidney. High densities of autoradiographic grains, indicating the presence of angiotensin II receptors, have been localized to several rat brain nuclei including the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, nucleus of the solitary tract, anterior pituitary, locus coeruleus and several hypothalamic nuclei. Cat thoracic spinal cord exhibited a high density of sites over the intermedio-lateral cell column. In sections of rat kidney, angiotensin II receptors were detected in the glomerulus, vasa recta and ureter. The cardiovascular implications of these results are apparent and relate angiotensin II to hypertensive mechanisms. Thus, angiotensin II represents an endocoid which is involved in control of blood pressure through its effects on peripheral organs as well as the central nervous system.

  15. Living kidney donors and ESRD.

    PubMed

    Ross, Lainie Friedman

    2015-07-01

    There are more than 325 living kidney donors who have developed end-stage renal disease and have been listed on the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN)/United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) deceased donor kidney wait list. The OPTN/UNOS database records where these kidney donors are listed and, if they donated after April 1994, where that donation occurred. These 2 locations are often not the same. In this commentary, I examine whether a national living donor registry should be created and whether transplantation centers should be notified when one of their living kidney donors develops end-stage renal disease. I consider and refute 5 potential objections to center notification. I explain that transplantation centers should look back at these cases and input data into a registry to attempt to identify patterns that could improve donor evaluation protocols. Creating a registry and mining the information it contains is, in my view, our moral and professional responsibility to future patients and the transplantation endeavor. As individuals and as a community, we need to acknowledge the many unknown risks of living kidney donation and take responsibility for identifying these risks. We then must share information about these risks, educate prospective donors about them, and attempt to minimize them. PMID:25936672

  16. Gene therapy approaches for spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, Corinne

    As the biomedical engineering field expands, combination technologies are demonstrating enormous potential for treating human disease. In particular, intersections between the rapidly developing fields of gene therapy and tissue engineering hold promise to achieve tissue regeneration. Nonviral gene therapy uses plasmid DNA to deliver therapeutic proteins in vivo for extended periods of time. Tissue engineering employs biomedical materials, such as polymers, to support the regrowth of injured tissue. In this thesis, a combination strategy to deliver genes and drugs in a polymeric scaffold was applied to a spinal cord injury model. In order to develop a platform technology to treat spinal cord injury, several nonviral gene delivery systems and polymeric scaffolds were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Nonviral vector trafficking was evaluated in primary neuronal culture to develop an understanding of the barriers to gene transfer in neurons and their supporting glia. Although the most efficient gene carrier in vitro differed from the optimal gene carrier in vivo, confocal and electron microscopy of these nonviral vectors provided insights into the interaction of these vectors with the nucleus. A novel pathway for delivering nanoparticles into the nuclei of neurons and Schwann cells via vesicle trafficking was observed in this study. Reporter gene expression levels were evaluated after direct and remote delivery to the spinal cord, and the optimal nonviral vector, dose, and delivery strategy were applied to deliver the gene encoding the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) to the spinal cord. An injectable and biocompatible gel, composed of the amphiphillic polymer poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(epsilon-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-PCL-PEG) was evaluated as a drug and gene delivery system in vitro, and combined with the optimized nonviral gene delivery system to treat spinal cord injury. Plasmid DNA encoding the bFGF gene and the therapeutic NEP1--40 peptide were incorporated in the PEG-PCL-PEG gel and injected into a lesion transecting the main dorsomedial and minor ventral medial corticospinal tract (CST). The degree of collateralization of the transected CST was quantified as an indicator of the regenerative potential of these treatments. At one month post-injury, we observed the robust rostral collateralization of the CST tract in response to the bFGF plasmid-loaded gel. In conclusion, we hope that this platform technology can be applied to the sustained local delivery of other proteins for the treatment of spinal cord injury.

  17. Supernumerary Kidney With a Horseshoe Component☆

    PubMed Central

    Fathollahi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of supernumerary kidney consisting of 4 renal moieties and including a horseshoe kidney. A 40-year-old woman presented complaining of intermittent vague abdominal pain and heaviness for a few years. Ultrasonography of the urinary tract revealed 2 kidneys on the left side and horseshoe kidneys located distal to them. The right horseshoe kidney was of small size. Further imaging revealed 4 renal moieties. Three moieties were on the left side and the other was attached to the most distal moiety on the left, forming a horseshoe kidney.

  18. Umbilical cord blood transplant for malignancies: a hope or hype.

    PubMed

    Bahl, Ankur; Bakhshi, Sameer

    2013-08-01

    Cord blood is a rich and unlimited source of hematopoietic stem cells for allogeneic stem cell transplant to treat a variety of oncologic, genetic, hematologic, and immunodeficiency disorders. Since the first successful cord blood transplant in 1988, a large number of cord blood banks have been established world over for collection and storage of cord blood for future use. Majority of such transplants are performed in children, however, the number in adults have been growing steadily in recent years. Results from various transplant registries reveals that a single cord blood provides enough stem cells to provide short and long term engraftment, and has low incidence and less severity of graft versus host disease. With a high booming birth rate and a large genetic diversity, India has potential to become the largest supplier of cord blood stem cells in world. To meet the future transplant need of the country sincere efforts from various institutes and government agencies are needed to increase the number of public cord blood banks in the country. In this article the author will focus on the issue of public and private cord blood banking; the role of physicians in educating and counseling families with regard to the utility of cord blood for donor itself as well as the future of umbilical cord blood transplant in India. PMID:23660949

  19. PAI-1 and kidney fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li-Jun; Fogo, Agnes B.

    2016-01-01

    Substantial evidence demonstrates a link of increased plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and glomerulosclerosis and kidney fibrosis, providing a novel therapeutic option for prevention and treatment of chronic kidney diseases. Several mechanisms contributing to increased PAI-1 will be addressed, including classic key profibrotic factors such as the renin-angiotensin-system (RAS) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), and novel molecules identified by proteomic analysis, such as thymosin- β4. The fibrotic sequelae caused by increased PAI-1 in kidney depend not only on its classic inhibition of tissue-type and urokinase-type plasminogen activators (tPA and uPA), but also its influence on cell migration. PMID:19273183

  20. Hypercoagulability in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Parajuli, Sandesh; Lockridge, Joseph B; Langewisch, Eric D; Norman, Douglas J; Kujovich, Jody L

    2016-04-01

    Thrombosis remains an important complication after kidney transplantation. Outcomes for graft and deep vein thrombosis are not favorable. The majority of early kidney transplant failure in adults is due to allograft thrombosis. Risk stratification, early diagnosis, and appropriate intervention are critical to the management of thrombotic complications of transplant. In patients with end-stage renal disease, the prevalence of acquired risk factors for thrombosis is significantly high. Because of hereditary and acquired risk factors, renal transplant recipients manifest features of a chronic prothrombotic state. Identification of hereditary thrombotic risk factors before transplantation may be a useful tool for selecting appropriate candidates for thrombosis prophylaxis immediately after transplantation. Short-term anticoagulation may be appropriate for all patients after kidney transplantation. PMID:26413991

  1. Computational analysis of kidney scintigrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrincianu, D.; Puscasu, E.; Creanga, D.; Stefanescu, C.

    2013-11-01

    The scintigraphic investigation of normal and pathological kidneys was carried out using specialized gamma-camera device from nuclear medicine hospital department. Technetium 90m isotope with gamma radiation emission, coupled with vector molecules for kidney tissues was introduced into the subject body, its dynamics being recorded as data source for kidney clearance capacity. Two representative data series were investigated, corresponding to healthy and pathological organs respectively. The semi-quantitative tests applied for the comparison of the two distinct medical situations were: the shape of probability distribution histogram, the power spectrum, the auto-correlation function and the Lyapunov exponent. While power spectrum led to similar results in both cases, significant differences were revealed by means of distribution probability, Lyapunov exponent and correlation time, recommending these numerical tests as possible complementary tools in clinical diagnosis.

  2. Growing kidney in the frog.

    PubMed

    Chan, Techuan; Asashima, Makoto

    2006-01-01

    An understanding of the regulation of kidney development has increased dramatically in the past decade. The pronephros, mesonephros, and metanephros represent three distinct renal organs that function, in succession, as the vertebrate excretory system during development of the kidney. These three organ systems are derived from the intermediate mesoderm and develop in a well-defined temporal and spatial sequence. The pronephros, which consists of a tubule, duct and glomus, is established first and is the simplest of the excretory organs in vertebrates. Xenopus pronephros serves as an ideal model for investigating organogenesis and development of renal function in vertebrates. In this article, we highlight the advantages of Xenopus for analyzing kidney organogenesis and the latest research in pronephros development. PMID:16554664

  3. Radiation-associated kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Laura A; Kavanagh, Brian D; Paulino, Arnold C; Das, Shiva K; Miften, Moyed; Li, X Allen; Pan, Charlie; Ten Haken, Randall K; Schultheiss, Timothy E

    2010-03-01

    The kidneys are the dose-limiting organs for radiotherapy to upper abdominal cancers and during total body irradiation. The incidence of radiotherapy-associated kidney injury is likely underreported owing to its long latency and because the toxicity is often attributed to more common causes of kidney injury. The pathophysiology of radiation injury is poorly understood. Its presentation can be acute and irreversible or subtle, with a gradual progressive dysfunction over years. A variety of dose and volume parameters have been associated with renal toxicity and are reviewed to provide treatment guidelines. The available predictive models are suboptimal and require validation. Mitigation of radiation nephropathy with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and other compounds has been shown in animal models and, more recently, in patients. PMID:20171504

  4. Computational analysis of kidney scintigrams

    SciTech Connect

    Vrincianu, D.; Puscasu, E.; Creanga, D.; Stefanescu, C.

    2013-11-13

    The scintigraphic investigation of normal and pathological kidneys was carried out using specialized gamma-camera device from nuclear medicine hospital department. Technetium 90m isotope with gamma radiation emission, coupled with vector molecules for kidney tissues was introduced into the subject body, its dynamics being recorded as data source for kidney clearance capacity. Two representative data series were investigated, corresponding to healthy and pathological organs respectively. The semi-quantitative tests applied for the comparison of the two distinct medical situations were: the shape of probability distribution histogram, the power spectrum, the auto-correlation function and the Lyapunov exponent. While power spectrum led to similar results in both cases, significant differences were revealed by means of distribution probability, Lyapunov exponent and correlation time, recommending these numerical tests as possible complementary tools in clinical diagnosis.

  5. The exposome for kidney stones.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, David S

    2016-02-01

    The exposome is the assembly and measure of all the exposures of an individual in a lifetime. An individual's exposures begin before birth and include insults from environmental and occupational sources. The associated field is called exposomics, which relies on the application of internal and external exposure assessment methods. Exposomics has not yet been thoroughly applied to the study of kidney stones although much is known about how diet and fluid intake affect nephrolithiasis. Some other novel exposures that may contribute to kidney stones are discussed including use of antibiotics, urbanization and migration to urban heat islands, and occupation. People whose school and jobs limit their access to fluids and adequate bathroom facilities may have higher prevalence of stones. Examples include athletes, teachers, heathcare workers, and cab drivers. Occupational kidney stones have received scant attention and may represent a neglected, and preventable, type of stone. An exposomic-oriented history would include a careful delineation of occupation and activities. PMID:26615595

  6. Radiation-Associated Kidney Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Laura A.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Paulino, Arnold C.; Das, Shiva K.; Miften, Moyed; Li, X. Allen; Pan, Charlie; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Schultheiss, Timothy E.

    2010-03-01

    The kidneys are the dose-limiting organs for radiotherapy to upper abdominal cancers and during total body irradiation. The incidence of radiotherapy-associated kidney injury is likely underreported owing to its long latency and because the toxicity is often attributed to more common causes of kidney injury. The pathophysiology of radiation injury is poorly understood. Its presentation can be acute and irreversible or subtle, with a gradual progressive dysfunction over years. A variety of dose and volume parameters have been associated with renal toxicity and are reviewed to provide treatment guidelines. The available predictive models are suboptimal and require validation. Mitigation of radiation nephropathy with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and other compounds has been shown in animal models and, more recently, in patients.

  7. Knowledge about umbilical cord blood banking among Greek citizens

    PubMed Central

    Karagiorgou, Louiza Z.; Pantazopoulou, Maria-Nikoletta P.; Mainas, Nikolaos C.; Beloukas, Apostolos I.; Kriebardis, Anastasios G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Umbilical cord blood supplies in Greece are not sufficient to meet the high transfusion needs. This study was designed to determine Greeks’ opinion about umbilical cord blood, identify the reasons for the lack of motivation to donate umbilical cord blood and allow experts to establish better recruitment campaigns to enrich the donor pool. Materials and methods The attitudes and knowledge about umbilical cord blood of randomly selected Greek citizens (n=1,019) were assessed by means of a standardised anonymous questionnaire. The results were analysed using the χ2test and Spearman’s correlation coefficient. Results Forty-eight percent of respondents knew about umbilical cord blood and had full knowledge about what storage/donation offers. Media (35%) and doctors (25%) were the main source of information. The information from the state was considered either inadequate or non-existent by 85% of the responders. Ninety-five percent of the people questioned would like further information regarding umbilical cord blood transplantation and umbilical cord blood storage/donation. Six percent of the respondents who had children and were in favour of umbilical cord blood transplantation, had stored/donated UCB. With regards to future decisions, 84% of the sample would store/donate umbilical cord blood, of whom 57% would keep the umbilical cord blood in a private bank. Discussion It was concluded that Greek citizens receive information about umbilical cord blood from both the state and advertising campaigns by the Ministry of Health and Social Solidarity. A kind of cooperation between all hospitals and public umbilical cord blood banks would be advisable in order to facilitate access to umbilical cord blood donations. PMID:24120604

  8. Relationship between Spinal Cord Volume and Spinal Cord Injury due to Spinal Shortening

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Feng; Yang, Jin-Cheng; Ma, Xiang-Yang; Xu, Jun-Jie; Yang, Qing-Lei; Zhou, Xin; Xiao, Yao-Sheng; Hu, Hai-Sheng; Xia, Li-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Vertebral column resection is associated with a risk of spinal cord injury. In the present study, using a goat model, we aimed to investigate the relationship between changes in spinal cord volume and spinal cord injury due to spinal shortening, and to quantify the spinal cord volume per 1-mm height in order to clarify a safe limit for shortening. Vertebral column resection was performed at T10 in 10 goats. The spinal cord was shortened until the somatosensory-evoked potential was decreased by 50% from the baseline amplitude or delayed by 10% relative to the baseline peak latency. A wake-up test was performed, and the goats were observed for two days postoperatively. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure the spinal cord volume, T10 height, disc height, osteotomy segment height, and spinal segment height pre- and postoperatively. Two of the 10 goats were excluded, and hence, only data from eight goats were analyzed. The somatosensory-evoked potential of these eight goats demonstrated meaningful changes. With regard to neurologic function, five and three goats were classified as Tarlov grades 5 and 4 at two days postoperatively. The mean shortening distance was 23.6 ± 1.51 mm, which correlated with the d-value (post-pre) of the spinal cord volume per 1-mm height of the osteotomy segment (r = 0.95, p < 0.001) and with the height of the T10 body (r = 0.79, p = 0.02). The mean d-value (post-pre) of the spinal cord volume per 1-mm height of the osteotomy segment was 142.87 ± 0.59 mm3 (range, 142.19–143.67 mm3). The limit for shortening was approximately 106% of the vertebral height. The mean volumes of the osteotomy and spinal segments did not significantly change after surgery (t = 0.310, p = 0.765 and t = 1.241, p = 0.255, respectively). Thus, our results indicate that the safe limit for shortening can be calculated using the change in spinal cord volume per 1-mm height. PMID:26001196

  9. Mathematical Modeling of Kidney Transport

    PubMed Central

    Layton, Anita T.

    2013-01-01

    In addition to metabolic waste and toxin excretion, the kidney also plays an indispensable role in regulating the balance of water, electrolytes, nitrogen, and acid-base. In this review, we describe representative mathematical models that have been developed to better understand kidney physiology and pathophysiology, including the regulation of glomerular filtration, the regulation of renal blood flow by means of the tubuloglomerular feedback mechanisms and of the myogenic mechanism, the urine concentrating mechanism, epithelial transport, and regulation of renal oxygen transport. We discuss the extent to which these modeling efforts have expanded our understanding of renal function in both health and disease. PMID:23852667

  10. [MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES ON KIDNEY STONES].

    PubMed

    Romanova, Yu M; Mulabaev, N S; Tolordava, E R; Seregin, A V; Seregin, I V; Alexeeva, N V; Stepanova, T V; Levina, G A; Barhatova, O I; Gamova, N A; Goncharova, S A; Didenko, L V; Rakovskaya, I V

    2015-01-01

    The clinical material obtained surgically in patients with kidney stone disease (KSD) was tested for content of the stone microflora using PCR and standard microbiological methods. It was demonstrated that about 50% of stones in patients with KSD were infected with various infection agents as observed using standard microbiological and molecular genetic methods. The percentage of detection of the Mycoplasma hominis using cultural method is lower than the percentage detected using PCR, which is due to difficult isolation and cultivation, as well as DNA fragments of mycoplasma observed after antibiotic therapy. Studies based on modern microscopy methods showed that microorganisms on the surface of the kidney stone formed multispecies biofilms. PMID:26182663

  11. [Mechanism of and Therapy for Kidney Fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Kuma, Akihiro; Tamura, Masahito; Otsuji, Yutaka

    2016-03-01

    Fibrosis occurs in systemic tissues other than the brain and finally induces dysfunction of the fibrotic organ. Kidney fibrosis is related to scarring after acute kidney injury and the progression of chronic kidney disease. Kidney function decreases with the progression of kidney fibrosis. As fibrotic tissue cannot return to its original status, advanced kidney fibrosis requires the administration of dialysis or kidney transplantation. Thus, elucidation the mechanism of kidney fibrosis is an important research theme. The proliferation and activation of (myo) fibroblasts and the excessive production of an extracellular matrix are common mechanisms in fibrosis in many organs, but it seems that kidney fibrosis has specific pathways. Tubular epithelial, mesangial cells, and erythropoietin producing cells, which exist only in the kidney, participate in forming kidney fibrosis. This review highlights an understanding of the cells and their underlying mechanisms, which are specific to kidney fibrosis process: transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), epithelial-mesenchymal transition, wingless/int-1 (WNT) signaling, renal anemia, and uremia. Finally, we describe potential therapies that focus on the mechanisms of kidney fibrosis: anti-TGF-β antibody and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). PMID:26972942

  12. FGF-2-Responsive and Spinal Cord-Resident Cells Improve Locomotor Function after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Masaki; Jikoh, Takahiro; Fukumitsu, Hidefumi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The adult central nervous system has only a limited capacity for axonal regeneration. In this study, fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) was injected once into the spinal cord tissue around the injury site immediately after complete spinal cord transection in rats. This treatment markedly improved the locomotor function of the animals. Histological analysis demonstrated that tissue composed of FGF-2-induced fibronectin-positive cells (FIFs) had infiltrated the injury site and filled large cystic cavities, into which numerous axons with growth-associated protein-43 immunoreactivity penetrated. The FIFs could also be cultured from the intact spinal cord tissue, demonstrating that they were resident in the non-injured spinal cord. They had a spindle-shaped morphology and enhanced expression of mRNAs of N-cadherin and neurotrophic factors, suggesting the beneficial properties of the FIFs for axonal regeneration. Thus, these results argue for the continual use of autologous transplantation as a novel and promising cell therapy for the treatment of spinal cord injury. PMID:20199141

  13. The crying sign: the winking umbilical cord.

    PubMed

    Smith, Aisling M; Healy, David B; Ryan, C Anthony; Dempsey, Eugene M

    2015-01-01

    A preterm baby girl, born at 34 weeks gestation, with features of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome was noted to have a relatively large umbilical stump. No fetal abnormalities had been detected on anatomy scan at 28 weeks and only mild polyhydramnios and macrosomia were noted on a 32-week ultrasound scan. Although there was no obvious omphalocoele, clinical assessment of the umbilical cord revealed an abdominal wall defect through which bowel would protrude into the umbilicus when the infant was crying. In keeping with an abdominal wall defect α-fetoprotein was found to be elevated. Surgical consultation advised conservative management. Subsequently, detachment of the umbilical cord occurred 1 week postdischarge and a large umbilical hernia persists. Genetic analysis confirmed a diagnosis of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. PMID:25820111

  14. Bowel Management in Spinal Cord Injury Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injuries are common in the United States, affecting approximately 12,000 people per year. Most of these patients lack normal bowel function. The pattern of dysfunction varies with the spinal level involved. Most patients use a bowel management program, and elements of successful programs are discussed. Surgical treatment, when indicated, could include sacral nerve stimulation, Malone antegrade continence enema, and colostomy. PMID:25320571

  15. Health Literacy of Living Kidney Donors and Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Dageforde, Leigh Anne; Petersen, Alec W.; Feurer, Irene D.; Cavanaugh, Kerri L.; Harms, Kelly A.; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M.; Moore, Derek E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Health literacy (HL) may be a mediator for known socioeconomic and racial disparities in living kidney donation. Methods We evaluated the associations of patient and demographic characteristics with HL in living kidney donors (LD), living donor kidney transplant recipients (LDR), and deceased donor recipients (DDR) in a single center retrospective review of patients undergoing kidney donation or transplantation from September 2010 to July 2012. HL and demographic data were collected. HL was assessed via the Short Literacy Survey (SLS) comprising three self-reported screening questions scored using the 5-point Likert scale [low (3-8), moderate (9-14), high (15)]. Chi-square and logistic regression were used to test factors associated with lower HL. Results The sample included 360 adults (105 LD, 103 LDR, 152 DDR; 46±14 years; 70% white; 56% male; 14±3 years of education). HL scores were skewed (49% high, 41% moderate, 10% low). The distribution of HL categories differed significantly among groups (p=0.019). After controlling for age, race, gender, education and a race-education interaction term, DDR were more likely to have moderate or low HL than LDR (OR 1.911; 95%CI 1.096, 3.332; p=0.022) Conclusions Overall, living donors had high HL. The distribution of low, moderate and high HL differed significantly between LD, DDR and LDR. DDR had a higher likelihood of having low HL than LDR. Screening kidney transplant candidates and donors for lower HL may identify barriers to living donation. Future interventions addressing HL may be important to increase living donation and reduce disparities. PMID:24573114

  16. Alternative donors: cord blood for adults.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Annalisa

    2016-04-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a curative treatment for patients with hematological diseases. The probability of finding a human leukocyte antigen (HLA)- identical donor among family members is around 25% and 30% that of having a full matched unrelated donor in the registry. Patients in need may also benefit of a HLA-mismatched HSCT either from an haploidentical donors or from umbilical cord blood (UCB). Much has been learned about UCB transplant (UCBT) since the first human UCBT was performed back in 1988. Cord blood banks have been established worldwide for the collection, cryopreservation, and distribution of UCB for HSCT. Today, a global network of cord blood banks and transplant centers has been established with a large common inventory of more than 650,000 UCB units available, allowing for more than 40,000 UCBT worldwide in children and adults with severe hematological diseases. Several studies have been published on UCBT, assessing risk factors such as cell dose and HLA mismatch. Outcomes of several retrospective comparative studies showed similar results using other stem cell sources both in pediatric and adult setting. New strategies are ongoing to facilitate engraftment and reduce transplant-related mortality. In this issue, we review the current results of UCBT in adults with hematological malignancies and the clinical studies comparing UCBT with other transplant strategies. We provide guidelines for donor algorithm selection in UCBT setting. PMID:27000728

  17. Recent therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Raspa, Andrea; Pugliese, Raffaele; Maleki, Mahboubeh; Gelain, Fabrizio

    2016-02-01

    A spinal cord injury (SCI) often causes permanent changes in strength and sensation functions below the site of the injury and affects thousands of people each year. Transplantation of stem cells is a promising approach in acute SCI as it may support spinal cord repair. However, in case of chronic SCI greater amounts of nervous tissue have to be regenerated, leaving scaffold transplantation the only feasible option for cellular engraftment and nervous bridging. The aim of regenerative medicine, specifically tissue engineering, is to create a microenvironment that mimics native extracellular matrix (ECM), capable of promoting specific cell-matrix interactions, coaxing cell behavior, and fostering host tissue regeneration. In this regard, nanostructured scaffolds are currently the most promising advanced substrates capable of supporting nervous fiber ingrowth and delivery of neurotrophic drugs. Among them, electrospinning technique and Self-Assembling Peptides (SAPs) have recently attracted lots of attention for their reproducible synthesis and high tailorability. This review highlights clinical trials and recent encouraging strategies for spinal cord repair comprising both cell therapy and nanomedicine. PMID:26134352

  18. Racial Disparity in Kidney Transplant Outcomes Narrows

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health News on: African American Health Health Disparities Kidney Transplantation Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics African American Health Health Disparities Kidney Transplantation About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Get ...

  19. Ultrasound: Renal (Kidneys, Ureters, Bladder) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... present since birth the presence of blockages or kidney stones complications of a urinary tract infection (UTI) cysts ... and Related Conditions Urinary Tract Infections Wilms Tumor Kidney Stones Vesicoureteral Reflux (VUR) Glomerulonephritis Ultrasound: Abdomen Ultrasound: Bladder ...

  20. Study Links Climate Change to Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158680.html Study Links Climate Change to Kidney Disease Rising temperatures, less rain seen ... 5, 2016 THURSDAY, May 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Climate change may boost rates of chronic kidney disease worldwide ...

  1. Prevent Diabetes Problems: Keep Your Kidneys Healthy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fund National Kidney Foundation American Diabetes Association JDRF Diabetes Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support to patients ... PDF, 293 KB). Alternate Language URL Español Prevent diabetes problems: Keep your kidneys healthy Page Content On ...

  2. Autophagy in Kidney Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhibo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Autophagy is emerging as an important pathway in many biological processes and diseases. This review summarizes the current progress on the role of autophagy in renal physiology and pathology. Recent Advances: Studies from renal cells in culture, human kidney tissues, and experimental animal models implicate that autophagy regulates many critical aspects of normal and disease conditions in the kidney, such as diabetic nephropathy and other glomerular diseases, tubular injuries, kidney development and aging, cancer, and genetic diseases associated with the kidney. Critical Issues: The importance of autophagy in the kidney has just started to be elucidated. How the process of autophagy is altered in the pathogenesis of kidney diseases and how this alteration is beneficial or detrimental to kidney functions still need to be fully understood. Future Directions: Investigations that uncover the precise mechanism and regulation of autophagy in various kidney diseases may lead to new strategies for therapeutic modulation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 519537. PMID:23642034

  3. Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Afinitor (Everolimus) Aldesleukin Avastin (Bevacizumab) Axitinib Bevacizumab Cabometyx ( ...

  4. Allergen specific responses in cord and adult blood are differentially modulated in the presence of endotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Eiwegger, T; Mayer, E; Brix, S; Schabussova, I; Dehlink, E; Bohle, B; Barkholt, V; Szépfalusi, Z

    2008-01-01

    Background Endotoxins are common contaminants in allergen preparations and affect antigen-specific cellular responses. Distinct effects of endotoxin on cells in human umbilical cord and adult blood are poorly defined. Objectives To examine the effect of endotoxins in allergen preparations on cellular responses in human cord and peripheral blood (PB). Methods The endotoxin content in β lactoglobulin (BLG), the peanut allergen Ara h 1 and the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 was assessed. Proliferation and cytokine response of mononuclear cells towards contaminated and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-free allergens were evaluated at different time-points. Fractions of contaminated BLG were generated and assayed on their immuno-stimulatory capacity. The involvement of toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and 4 was investigated by blocking antibodies and TLR-transfected human embryonic kidney cells. Results The proliferative response of cord blood (CB)-derived mononuclear cells towards allergen-preparations at day 3 was related to the level of LPS contamination. At day 7, proliferation was also detected in the absence of endotoxin. Cytokine production in CB was strongly affected by the content of endotoxin, TLR-4 dependent and not related to the allergen content. Allergen- and endotoxin-induced proliferative responses were generally significantly higher in CB than in adult blood. Conclusion Endotoxins in allergen preparations confound allergen-specific cellular responses. The impact of these contaminations varies with the blood source (CB vs. PB), the type of allergen and is time- and dose-dependent. Cite this as: T. Eiwegger, E. Mayer, S. Brix, I. Schabussova, E. Dehlink, B. Bohle, V. Barkholt and Z. Szépfalusi, Clinical and Experimental Allergy, 2008 (38) 1627–1634. PMID:18771487

  5. Private cord blood banking: current use and clinical future.

    PubMed

    Hollands, Peter; McCauley, Catherina

    2009-09-01

    International private umbilical cord blood banking has expanded rapidly in recent years since the first cord blood transplant which was 20 years ago. Private companies offer parents the opportunity to store umbilical cord blood for the possible future use by their child or other family members. The private cord blood industry has been criticised by a number of professional bodies including the EU Ethics Committee, the Royal College of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, the Royal College of Midwives and the US College of Paediatrics. This review presents the arguments from the opponents of private cord blood banking, and then makes the case for private cord banking based on the latest scientific and clinical evidence. PMID:19603288

  6. Multimodal Approach to the Management of Metastatic Epidural Spinal Cord Compression (MESCC) Due to Solid Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Tancioni, Flavio; Navarria, Pierina; Lorenzetti, Martin A.; Pedrazzoli, Paolo; Masci, Giovanna; Mancosu, Pietro; Alloisio, Marco; Morenghi, Emanuela; Santoro, Armando; Rodriguez y Baena, Riccardo; Scorsetti, Marta

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of a multidisciplinary approach for treatment of patients with metastatic epidural spinal cord compression in terms of feasibility, local control, and survival. Methods and Materials: Eighty-nine consecutive patients treated between January 2004 and December 2007 were included. The most common primary cancers were lung, breast, and kidney cancers. Ninety-eight surgical procedures were performed. Radiotherapy was performed within the first month postoperatively. Clinical outcome was evaluated by modified visual analog scale for pain, Frankel scale for neurologic deficit, and magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography scan. Nearly all patients (93%) had back pain before treatment, whereas major or minor preoperative neurologic deficit was present in 62 cases (63%). Results: Clinical remission of pain was obtained in the vast majority of patients (91%). Improvement of neurologic deficit was observed in 45 cases (72.5%). Local relapse occurred in 10%. Median survival was 11 months (range, 0-46 months). Overall survival at 1 year was 43.6%. Type of primary tumor significantly affected survival. Conclusions: In patients with metastatic epidural spinal cord compression, the combination of surgery plus radiotherapy is feasible and provides clinical benefit in most patients. The discussion of each single case within a multidisciplinary team has been of pivotal importance in implementing the most appropriate therapeutic approach.

  7. Detecting Kidney and Urinary Tract Abnormalities Before Birth

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  8. Do You Have Symptoms of a Kidney Stone?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  9. Children with Chronic Kidney Disease: Tips for Parents

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  10. Hernia of Umbilical Cord: Report of Three Unusual Cases

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Bilal; Mirza, Afzal; Hashim, Imran; Saleem, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Congenital hernia of umbilical cord is a less frequent entity in newborns and occasionally associated with other maladies. Herein, we report three unusual cases of hernia of umbilical cord. First case was associated with in-utero evisceration of entire small bowel through the presumably ruptured hernia of umbilical cord and other two cases had associated patent vitellointestinal duct (PVID). All of the cases were managed successfully. PMID:26034710

  11. Vocal Cord Paralysis and its Etiologies: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Seyed Toutounchi, Seyed Javad; Eydi, Mahmood; Golzari, Samad EJ; Ghaffari, Mohammad Reza; Parvizian, Nashmil

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Vocal cord paralysis is a common symptom of numerous diseases and it may be due to neurogenic or mechanical fixation of the cords. Paralysis of the vocal cords is just a symptom of underlying disease in some cases; so, clinical diagnosis of the underlying cause leading to paralysis of the vocal cords is important. This study evaluates the causes of vocal cord paralysis. Methods: In a prospective study, 45 patients with paralyzed vocal cord diagnosis were examined by tests such as examination of the pharynx, larynx, esophagus, thyroid, cervical, lung, and mediastinum, brain and heart by diagnostic imaging to investigate the cause vocal cord paralysis. The study was ended by diagnosing the reason of vocal cord paralysis at each stage of the examination and the clinical studies. Results: The mean duration of symptoms was 18.95±6.50 months. The reason for referral was phonation changes (97.8%) and aspiration (37.8%) in the subjects. There was bilateral paralysis in 6.82%, left paralysis in 56.82% and right in 63.36% of subjects. The type of vocal cord placement was midline in 52.8%, paramedian in 44.4% and lateral in 2.8% of the subjects. The causes of vocal cords paralysis were idiopathic paralysis (31.11%), tumors (31.11%), surgery (28.89%), trauma, brain problems, systemic disease and other causes (2.2%). Conclusion: An integrated diagnostic and treatment program is necessary for patients with vocal cord paralysis. Possibility of malignancy should be excluded before marking idiopathic reason to vocal cord paralysis. PMID:24753832

  12. Extensive Spinal Cord Injury following Staphylococcus aureus Septicemia and Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    De Schryver, Nicolas; Cosnard, Guy; van Pesch, Vincent; Godfraind, Catherine; Hantson, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is rarely complicated by spinal cord involvement in adults. We report a case of Staphylococcus aureus septicemia complicated by meningitis and extensive spinal cord injury, leading to ascending brain stem necrosis and death. This complication was investigated by magnetic resonance imaging which demonstrated intramedullary hyperintensity on T2-weighted images and by multimodality evoked potentials. Postmortem microscopic examination confirmed that the extensive spinal cord injury was of ischemic origin, caused by diffuse leptomeningitis and endarteritis. PMID:21738506

  13. [Intradural spinal cord lipoma. Apropos of 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Medjek, L; Adjmi, M; Hammoum, S

    1992-12-01

    The authors report two cases of intradural spinal cord. The first is located in the thoracic segment, the second has a cervico-thoracic seat. In the two cases these spinal cords lipoma are responsible for a progressive medullary compression. In this article the authors make a succinct review of the literature. They underline also the fundamental part of the MRI for the diagnosis and the injured balance sheet of the intradural spinal cord lipoma. PMID:1301435

  14. Cellular therapies for treating pain associated with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Spinal cord injury leads to immense disability and loss of quality of life in human with no satisfactory clinical cure. Cell-based or cell-related therapies have emerged as promising therapeutic potentials both in regeneration of spinal cord and mitigation of neuropathic pain due to spinal cord injury. This article reviews the various options and their latest developments with an update on their therapeutic potentials and clinical trialing. PMID:22394650

  15. Bacterial kidney disease (Renibacterium salmoninarum)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD), caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum, is a prevalent disease of salmonid fish that impacts sustainable production for consumption and species conservation efforts. The disease is chronic in nature and mortality most often occurs in juvenile salmonids and prespawning a...

  16. Cyclooxygenase-2 and kidney failure.

    PubMed

    Rios, Amelia; Vargas-Robles, Hilda; Gámez-Méndez, Ana Maria; Escalante, Bruno

    2012-08-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX)-dependent prostaglandins are necessary for normal kidney function. These prostaglandins are associated with inflammation, maintenance of sodium and water homeostasis, control of renin release, renal vasodilation, vasoconstriction attenuation, and prenatal renal development. COX-2 expression is regulated by the renin-angiotensin system, glucocorticoids or mineralcorticoids, and aldosterone, supporting a role for COX-2 in kidney function. Indeed, COX-2 mRNA and protein levels as well as enzyme activity are increased, along with PGE2, during kidney failure. In addition, changes in COX-2 expression are associated with increased blood pressure, urinary volume, sodium and protein and decreased urinary osmolarity. Intrarenal mechanisms such as angiotensin II (Ang II) production, increased sodium delivery, glomerular hypertension, and renal tubular inflammation have been suggested to be responsible for the increase in COX-2 expression. Although, specific COX-2 pharmacological inhibition has been related to the prevention of kidney damage, clinical studies have reported that COX-2 inhibition may cause side effects such as edema or a modest elevation in blood pressure and could possibly interfere with antihypertensive drugs and increase the risk of cardiovascular complications. Thus, administration of COX-2 inhibitors requires caution, especially in the presence of underlying cardiovascular disease. PMID:22119250

  17. Kidney Tumors | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Pediatric kidney tumors fall into four primary categories: Wilms tumors (~85% of all cases), clear cell sarcomas of the kidney (~5%), congenital mesoblastic nephromas (~4%), and rhabdoid tumors of the kidney (~3%). The TARGET initiative is investigating three of these tumor types.

  18. Overview of Kidney Diseases in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidney Foundation United Network for Organ Sharing MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Overview of Kidney Disease in Children Page Content On this page: ...

  19. What Happens After Treatment for Kidney Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Kidney Cancer (Adult) - Renal Cell Carcinoma + - Text Size Download Printable Version [PDF] » After Treatment TOPICS Document Topics GO » SEE A LIST » What happens after treatment for kidney cancer? Can I get another cancer after having kidney ...

  20. Conkiss: Conformal Kidneys Sparing 3D Noncoplanar Radiotherapy Treatment for Pancreatic Cancer As an Alternative to IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Sebestyen, Zsolt; Kovacs, Peter; Gulyban, Akos; Farkas, Robert; Bellyei, Szabolcs; Liposits, Gabor; Szigeti, Andras; Esik, Olga; Derczy, Katalin; Mangel, Laszlo

    2011-04-01

    When treating pancreatic cancer using standard (ST) 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) beam arrangements, the kidneys often receive a higher dose than their probable tolerance limit. Our aim was to elaborate a new planning method that-similarly to IMRT-effectively spares the kidneys without compromising the target coverage. Conformal kidneys sparing (CONKISS) 5-field, noncoplanar plans were compared with ST plans for 23 consecutive patients retrospectively. Optimal beam arrangements were used consisting of a left- and right-wedged beam-pair and an anteroposterior beam inclined in the caudal direction. The wedge direction determination (WEDDE) algorithm was developed to adjust the adequate direction of wedges. The aimed organs at risk (OARs) mean dose limits were: kidney <12 Gy, liver <25 Gy, small bowels <30 Gy, and spinal cord maximum <45 Gy. Conformity and homogeneity indexes with z-test were used to evaluate and compare the different planning approaches. The mean dose to the kidneys decreased significantly (p < 0.05): left kidney 7.7 vs. 10.7 Gy, right kidney 9.1 vs. 11.7 Gy. Meanwhile the mean dose to the liver increased significantly (18.1 vs. 15.0 Gy). The changes in the conformity, homogeneity, and in the doses to other OARs were not significant. The CONKISS method balances the load among the OARs and significantly reduces the dose to the kidneys, without any significant change in the conformity and homogeneity. Using 3D-CRT the CONKISS method can be a smart alternative to IMRT to enhance the possibility of dose escalation.

  1. Umbilical cord blood: a guide for primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Martin, Paul L; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Hesse, Brett

    2011-09-15

    Umbilical cord blood stem cell transplants are used to treat a variety of oncologic, genetic, hematologic, and immunodeficiency disorders. Physicians have an important role in educating, counseling, and offering umbilical cord blood donation and storage options to patients. Parents may donate their infant's cord blood to a public bank, pay to store it in a private bank, or have it discarded. The federal government and many state governments have passed laws and issued regulations regarding umbilical cord blood, and some states require physicians to discuss cord blood options with pregnant women. Five prominent medical organizations have published recommendations about cord blood donation and storage. Current guidelines recommend donation of umbilical cord blood to public banks when possible, or storage through the Related Donor Cord Blood Program when a sibling has a disease that may require a stem cell transplant. Experts do not currently recommend private banking for unidentified possible future use. Step-by-step guidance and electronic resources are available to physicians whose patients are considering saving or donating their infant's umbilical cord blood. PMID:21916391

  2. Cord Blood Transplantation: Can We Make it Better?

    PubMed Central

    Metheny, Leland; Caimi, Paolo; de Lima, Marcos

    2013-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood is an established source of hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation. It enjoys several advantages over bone marrow or peripheral blood, including increased tolerance for Human Leukocyte Antigen mismatches, decreased incidence of graft-versus-host disease, and easy availability. Unrelated cord blood does have limitations, however, especially in the treatment of adults. In the 24 years since the first umbilical cord blood transplant was performed, significant progress has been made, but delayed hematopoietic engraftment and increased treatment-related mortality remain obstacles to widespread use. Here we summarize the latest results of unrelated cord blood transplants, and review strategies under investigation to improve clinical outcomes. PMID:24062989

  3. Spinal cord herniation with characteristic bone change: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Tasuku; Nakane, Yukimi; Tachibana, Eiji; Ogura, Koichiro

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Spinal cord herniation (SCH) is a rare disease characterized by herniation of the thoracic spinal cord through an anterior dural defect, presenting with progressive myelopathy. A case of a 69-year-old woman who presented with Brown-Sequard syndrome and a bone defect, in which an osteophyte created a hemisphere-like cavity with spinal cord herniation, is presented. The strangled spinal cord was released, and the defect was closed microsurgically using an artificial dural patch to prevent re-herniation. Postoperatively, the patient experienced gradual improvement in neurologic function. The SCH mechanism and surgical strategy are discussed. PMID:26412899

  4. Optical Monitoring and Detection of Spinal Cord Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita, Rickson C.; D’Souza, Angela; Bilfinger, Thomas V.; Galler, Robert M.; Emanuel, Asher; Schenkel, Steven S.; Yodh, Arjun G.; Floyd, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    Spinal cord ischemia can lead to paralysis or paraparesis, but if detected early it may be amenable to treatment. Current methods use evoked potentials for detection of spinal cord ischemia, a decades old technology whose warning signs are indirect and significantly delayed from the onset of ischemia. Here we introduce and demonstrate a prototype fiber optic device that directly measures spinal cord blood flow and oxygenation. This technical advance in neurological monitoring promises a new standard of care for detection of spinal cord ischemia and the opportunity for early intervention. We demonstrate the probe in an adult Dorset sheep model. Both open and percutaneous approaches were evaluated during pharmacologic, physiological, and mechanical interventions designed to induce variations in spinal cord blood flow and oxygenation. The induced variations were rapidly and reproducibly detected, demonstrating direct measurement of spinal cord ischemia in real-time. In the future, this form of hemodynamic spinal cord diagnosis could significantly improve monitoring and management in a broad range of patients, including those undergoing thoracic and abdominal aortic revascularization, spine stabilization procedures for scoliosis and trauma, spinal cord tumor resection, and those requiring management of spinal cord injury in intensive care settings. PMID:24358279

  5. Cord blood banking: what nurses and healthcare providers should know.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Yasmin

    2011-01-01

    Although the use of embryonic stem cells to treat disease has caused much controversy, one type of stem cell treatment has slowly and steadily shown promise but has not engendered negative ethical media attention: the use of umbilical stem cells. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) contains stem cells that have already successfully treated a variety of diseases, including leukemias, lymphomas, hemoglobinopathies, immunodeficiencies, and disorders of metabolism; ongoing research continues to explore additional diseases for potential treatment. Cord blood can be stored in private banks or public banks. Private cord blood banks save cord blood for use by the family only, at a cost. Public cord blood banks accept donations and the cord blood is then used for the general public and/or research. A review of the literature finds that public banking is the preferred recommendation over private unless there is a known family member with a disease that can currently be treated with cord blood. This article discusses cord blood banking options as well as the ethical issues and barriers facing both healthcare providers and patients when dealing with cord blood banking. PMID:21918487

  6. Osmotic parameters of red blood cells from umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Zhurova, Mariia; McGann, Locksley E; Acker, Jason P

    2014-06-01

    The transfusion of red blood cells from umbilical cord blood (cord RBCs) is gathering significant interest for the treatment of fetal and neonatal anemia, due to its high content of fetal hemoglobin as well as numerous other potential benefits to fetuses and neonates. However, in order to establish a stable supply of cord RBCs for clinical use, a cryopreservation method must be developed. This, in turn, requires knowledge of the osmotic parameters of cord RBCs. Thus, the objective of this study was to characterize the osmotic parameters of cord RBCs: osmotically inactive fraction (b), hydraulic conductivity (Lp), permeability to cryoprotectant glycerol (Pglycerol), and corresponding Arrhenius activation energies (Ea). For Lp and Pglycerol determination, RBCs were analyzed using a stopped-flow system to monitor osmotically-induced RBC volume changes via intrinsic RBC hemoglobin fluorescence. Lp and Pglycerol were characterized at 4°C, 20°C, and 35°C using Jacobs and Stewart equations with the Ea calculated from the Arrhenius plot. Results indicate that cord RBCs have a larger osmotically inactive fraction compared to adult RBCs. Hydraulic conductivity and osmotic permeability to glycerol of cord RBCs differed compared to those of adult RBCs with the differences dependent on experimental conditions, such as temperature and osmolality. Compared to adult RBCs, cord RBCs had a higher Ea for Lp and a lower Ea for Pglycerol. This information regarding osmotic parameters will be used in future work to develop a protocol for cryopreserving cord RBCs. PMID:24727610

  7. What Are the Key Statistics about Brain and Spinal Cord Cancers?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and spinal cord tumors? What are the key statistics about brain and spinal cord tumors? The American ... cord tumors .” Visit the American Cancer Society’s Cancer Statistics Center for more key statistics. Last Medical Review: ...

  8. The effects of high- and low-risk environments on cognitive function in rats following 2-vessel occlusion of the carotid arteries: a behavioral study.

    PubMed

    Winocur, Gordon; Thompson, Charlie; Hakim, Antoine; Greenwood, Carol

    2013-09-01

    In a prospective study of environmental factors affecting cognitive recovery from stroke, adult male rats were reared for 3 months in a high-risk (relatively isolated, low activity, high-fat diet, high-stress) or low-risk (social, healthy diet, low-stress, physically active) environment. They then received cognitive testing to assess various aspects of learning and memory before undergoing 2-vessel occlusion (2VO) of the carotid arteries, or sham surgery. Rats were returned to their respective environments post-operatively. Relative to pre-operative levels, 2VO rats exhibited significant cognitive losses that were consistently greater in the high-risk group than its low-risk counterpart. As well, the high-risk 2VO group was impaired, relative to the low-risk 2VO group on tests of new learning introduced post-operatively. At 3-month follow-up testing, rats that had undergone 2VO surgery exhibited further decline on some tests but recovery on others, with recovery generally slower in the high-risk 2VO group. The high-risk environment also affected rats' pre-operative cognitive performance and, to a lesser extent, their performance following sham surgery. Overall, the study shows that rats experiencing cerebral ischemia are more likely to experience severe cognitive deficits if exposed to a high-risk environment and recover more slowly than ischemic rats in a more favorable environment. The results underscore the importance of lifestyle factors with respect to the impact of stroke on cognition and in assessing prospects for recovery of function. PMID:23742800

  9. Expression of neurotrophic factors in injured spinal cord after transplantation of human-umbilical cord blood stem cells in rats

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hyo-jin; Chung, Wook-hun; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Chung, Dai-Jung; Yang, Wo-Jong; Lee, A-Jin; Choi, Chi-Bong; Chang, Hwa-Seok; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Suh, Hyun Jung; Lee, Dong-Hun; Hwang, Soo-Han; Do, Sun Hee

    2016-01-01

    We induced percutaneous spinal cord injuries (SCI) using a balloon catheter in 45 rats and transplanted human umbilical cord blood derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) at the injury site. Locomotor function was significantly improved in hUCB-MSCs transplanted groups. Quantitative ELISA of extract from entire injured spinal cord showed increased expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3). Our results show that treatment of SCI with hUCB-MSCs can improve locomotor functions, and suggest that increased levels of BDNF, NGF and NT-3 in the injured spinal cord were the main therapeutic effect. PMID:27051345

  10. Simultaneous Brain–Cervical Cord fMRI Reveals Intrinsic Spinal Cord Plasticity during Motor Sequence Learning

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Adad, Julien; Marchand-Pauvert, Veronique; Benali, Habib; Doyon, Julien

    2015-01-01

    The spinal cord participates in the execution of skilled movements by translating high-level cerebral motor representations into musculotopic commands. Yet, the extent to which motor skill acquisition relies on intrinsic spinal cord processes remains unknown. To date, attempts to address this question were limited by difficulties in separating spinal local effects from supraspinal influences through traditional electrophysiological and neuroimaging methods. Here, for the first time, we provide evidence for local learning-induced plasticity in intact human spinal cord through simultaneous functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and spinal cord during motor sequence learning. Specifically, we show learning-related modulation of activity in the C6–C8 spinal region, which is independent from that of related supraspinal sensorimotor structures. Moreover, a brain–spinal cord functional connectivity analysis demonstrates that the initial linear relationship between the spinal cord and sensorimotor cortex gradually fades away over the course of motor sequence learning, while the connectivity between spinal activity and cerebellum gains strength. These data suggest that the spinal cord not only constitutes an active functional component of the human motor learning network but also contributes distinctively from the brain to the learning process. The present findings open new avenues for rehabilitation of patients with spinal cord injuries, as they demonstrate that this part of the central nervous system is much more plastic than assumed before. Yet, the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying this intrinsic functional plasticity in the spinal cord warrant further investigations. PMID:26125597

  11. The Bergamo Kidney Transplant Program.

    PubMed

    Perico, Norberto; Cravedi, Paolo; Ruggenenti, Piero; Gotti, Eliana; Rota, Giovanni; Locatelli, Giuseppe; Gambara, Vincenzo; Perna, Annalisa; Rota, Stefano; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2005-01-01

    Since the beginning of transplant activities in 1989, the Kidney Transplant Center at the Ospedali Riuniti Bergamo has based its clinical program on the most recent achievements of transplant medicine, in order to optimize the outcome of kidney grafts and improve the quality of life of kidney transplant recipients. Although the transplantation community attempts to keep up with increasing demand for transplantable organs, the supply continues to fall far short of the need. This observation prompted us to focus on the expansion of the available pool of deceased donor organs. In 1997, we established a dual kidney transplant program for donors older than 60 years based on a pretransplant histology protocol with a scoring system ranging from low-dose RATG and delayed CsA administration has been successfully adopted in this population of kidney transplant recipients in our routine clinic practice. In kidney transplantation, chronic deterioration of renal function and death with a functioning graft, mainly due to side effects of the medications, represents a major limitation for long-term success of many transplant programs. We recently documented that per-protocol biopsy more than one year after kidney transplantation is a safe procedure to guide change of conventional immunosuppressive regimens and to lower the risk of major drug-related side effects. In particular, substantial reduction of the CsA dose, leading to extremely low CsA trough level, has no major detrimental effect on renal function and histology during 3 years follow-up, while patients remain free of rejection episodes with concomitant steroid and azathioprine therapy. Novel induction therapies with Campath-1H or Simulect and low-RATG have also helped to minimize maintenance immunosuppression in most patients largely avoiding the use of corticosteroids, Monitoring a patient's exposure to immunosuppressive agents is a critical issue in a minimum of 0 (no renal lesions) to a maximum of 12 (marked changes in renal parenchyma). The assumptions of the proposed algorithm to guide acceptance of single suboptimal or dual marginal kidneys for transplantation were validated in a prospective pilot study involving centers in Europe and North America. Whether the encouraging short-term data translate into improved graft survival is currently a matter of investigation in a prospective, multicenter, matched-cohort trial. As kidneys from marginal donors have an increased risk of delayed graft function, we also studied strategies to manage and prevent this complication. A dual immunosuppressive regimen of basiliximab and transplantation. By pharmacokinetics studies, we documented that a fixed dose regimen of MMF--adopted in the majority of transplant units worldwide--might no longer be the best approach for the management of transplant patients, and MPA pharmacokinetic monitoring is advised. Similarly, we reported pharmacokinetic interaction of concomitant immunosuppression on blood levels of the new immunosuppressant sirolimus. We have a special multiorgan transplant program at our center for patients affected by rare diseases, such as the recurrent hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Based on genotyping for complement factor H-1, membrane co-factor protein or factor I gene mutations, we are exploring the possibility of combining liver and renal transplant or performing renal transplant alone in patients with recurrent HUS who have end-stage renal disease. The achievements of our clinical center are the result of the continuous support by an intense clinical and basic research program. This has allowed us to create a unique model to address the major challenges of transplant medicine. PMID:17424727

  12. Expansion Duroplasty Improves Intraspinal Pressure, Spinal Cord Perfusion Pressure, and Vascular Pressure Reactivity Index in Patients with Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: Injured Spinal Cord Pressure Evaluation Study

    PubMed Central

    Phang, Isaac; Werndle, Melissa C.; Saadoun, Samira; Varsos, Georgios; Czosnyka, Marek; Zoumprouli, Argyro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We recently showed that, after traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI), laminectomy does not improve intraspinal pressure (ISP), spinal cord perfusion pressure (SCPP), or the vascular pressure reactivity index (sPRx) at the injury site sufficiently because of dural compression. This is an open label, prospective trial comparing combined bony and dural decompression versus laminectomy. Twenty-one patients with acute severe TSCI had re-alignment of the fracture and surgical fixation; 11 had laminectomy alone (laminectomy group) and 10 had laminectomy and duroplasty (laminectomy+duroplasty group). Primary outcomes were magnetic resonance imaging evidence of spinal cord decompression (increase in intradural space, cerebrospinal fluid around the injured cord) and spinal cord physiology (ISP, SCPP, sPRx). The laminectomy and laminectomy+duroplasty groups were well matched. Compared with the laminectomy group, the laminectomy+duroplasty group had greater increase in intradural space at the injury site and more effective decompression of the injured cord. In the laminectomy+duroplasty group, ISP was lower, SCPP higher, and sPRx lower, (i.e., improved vascular pressure reactivity), compared with the laminectomy group. Laminectomy+duroplasty caused cerebrospinal fluid leak that settled with lumbar drain in one patient and pseudomeningocele that resolved completely in five patients. We conclude that, after TSCI, laminectomy+duroplasty improves spinal cord radiological and physiological parameters more effectively than laminectomy alone. PMID:25705999

  13. Neurocontrol of Movement in Humans With Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Dimitrijevic, Milan R; Danner, Simon M; Mayr, Winfried

    2015-10-01

    In this review of neurocontrol of movement after spinal cord injury, we discuss neurophysiological evidences of conducting and processing mechanisms of the spinal cord. We illustrate that external afferent inputs to the spinal cord below the level of the lesion can modify, initiate, and maintain execution of movement in absence or partial presence of brain motor control after chronic spinal cord injury. We review significant differences between spinal reflex activity elicited by single and repetitive stimulation. The spinal cord can respond with sensitization, habituation, and dis-habituation to regular repetitive stimulation. Therefore, repetitive spinal cord reflex activity can contribute to the functional configuration of the spinal network. Moreover, testing spinal reflex activity in individuals with motor complete spinal cord injury provided evidences for subclinical residual brain influence, suggesting the existence of axons traversing the injury site and influencing the activities below the level of lesion. Thus, there are two motor control models of chronic spinal cord injury in humans: "discomplete" and "reduced and altered volitional motor control." We outline accomplishments in modification and initiation of altered neurocontrol in chronic spinal cord injury people with epidural and functional electrical stimulation. By nonpatterned electrical stimulation of lumbar posterior roots, it is possible to evoke bilateral extension as well as rhythmic motor outputs. Epidural stimulation during treadmill stepping shows increased and/or modified motor activity. Finally, volitional efforts can alter epidurally induced rhythmic activities in incomplete spinal cord injury. Overall, we highlight that upper motor neuron paralysis does not entail complete absence of connectivity between cortex, brain stem, and spinal motor cells, but there can be altered anatomy and corresponding neurophysiological characteristics. With specific input to the spinal cord below the level of the lesion, the clinical status of upper motor neuron paralysis without structural modification can be modified, and movements can be initiated. Thus, external afferent input can partially replace brain control. PMID:26471132

  14. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in disadvantaged populations.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Garcia, Guillermo; Jha, Vivekanand; Tao Li, Philip Kam; Garcia-Garcia, Guillermo; Couser, William G; Erk, Timur; Zakharova, Elena; Segantini, Luca; Shay, Paul; Riella, Miguel C; Osafo, Charlotte; Dupuis, Sophie; Kernahan, Charles

    2015-02-01

    Twelve March 2015 will mark the 10th anniversary of World Kidney Day (WKD), an initiative of the International Society of Nephrology and the International Federation of Kidney Foundations. Since its inception in 2006, WKD has become the most successful effort ever mounted to raise awareness among decision-makers and the general public about the importance of kidney disease. Each year WKD reminds us that kidney disease is common, harmful and treatable. The focus of WKD 2015 is on chronic kidney disease (CKD) in disadvantaged populations. This article reviews the key links between poverty and CKD and the consequent implications for the prevention of kidney disease and the care of kidney patients in these populations. PMID:25713703

  15. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in disadvantaged populations

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Garcia, Guillermo; Jha, Vivekanand

    2015-01-01

    Twelve March 2015 will mark the 10th anniversary of World Kidney Day (WKD), an initiative of the International Society of Nephrology and the International Federation of Kidney Foundations. Since its inception in 2006, WKD has become the most successful effort ever mounted to raise awareness among decision-makers and the general public about the importance of kidney disease. Each year WKD reminds us that kidney disease is common, harmful and treatable. The focus of WKD 2015 is on chronic kidney disease (CKD) in disadvantaged populations. This article reviews the key links between poverty and CKD and the consequent implications for the prevention of kidney disease and the care of kidney patients in these populations. PMID:25713703

  16. Cord blood banking activity in Iran National Cord Blood Bank: a two years experience.

    PubMed

    Jamali, Mostafa; Atarodi, Kamran; Nakhlestani, Mozhdeh; Abolghasemi, Hasan; Sadegh, Hosein; Faranoosh, Mohammad; Golzade, Khadije; Fadai, Razieh; Niknam, Fereshte; Zarif, Mahin Nikougoftar

    2014-02-01

    Today umbilical cord blood (UCB) has known as a commonly used source of hematopoietic stem cells for allogeneic transplantation and many cord blood banks have been established around the world for collection and cryopreservation of cord blood units. Herein, we describe our experience at Iran National Cord Blood Bank (INCBB) during 2 years of activity. From November 2010 to 2012, UCBs were collected from 5 hospitals in Tehran. All the collection, processing, testing, cryopreservation and storage procedures were done according to standard operation procedures. Total nucleated cells (TNC) count, viability test, CD34+ cell count, colony forming unit (CFU) assay, screening tests and HLA typing were done on all banked units. Within 3770 collected units, only 32.9% fulfilled banking criteria. The mean volume of units was 105.2 ml and after volume reduction the mean of TNC, viability, CD34+ cells and CFUs was 10.76×10(8), 95.2%, 2.99×10(6) and 7.1×10(5), respectively. One unit was transplanted at Dec 2012 to a 5-year old patient with five of six HLA compatibilities. In our country banking of UCB is new and high rate of hematopoietic stem cell transplants needs expanding CB banks capacity to find more matching units, optimization of methods and sharing experiences to improve biological characterization of units. PMID:24262492

  17. Volume effects in Rhesus monkey spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Schultheiss, T.E. ); Stephens, L.C.; Price, R.E.; Ang, K.K.; Peters, L.J. )

    1994-04-30

    An experiment was conducted to test for the existence of a volume effect in radiation myelopathy using Rhesus monkeys treated with clinically relevant field sizes and fractionation schedules. Five groups of Rhesus monkeys were irradiated using 2.2 Gy per fraction to their spinal cords. Three groups were irradiated with 8 cm fields to total doses of 70.4, 77, and 83.6 Gy. Two additional groups were irradiated to 70.4 Gy using 4 and 16 cm fields. The incidence of paresis expressed within 2 years following the completion of treatment was determined for each group. Maximum likelihood estimation was used to determine parameters of a logistic dose response function. The volume effect was modeled using the probability model in which the probability of producing a lesion in an irradiated volume is governed by the probability of the occurrence of independent events. This is a two parameter model requiring only the estimates of the parameters of the dose-response function for the reference volume, but not needing any additional parameters for describing the volume effect. The probability model using a logistic dose-response function fits the data well with the D[sub 50] = 75.8 Gy for the 8-cm field. No evidence was seen for a difference in sensitivities for different anatomical levels of the spinal cord. Most lesions were type 3, combined white matter parenchymal and vascular lesions. Latent periods did not differ significantly from those of type 3 lesions in humans. The spinal cord exhibits a volume effect that is well described by the probability model. Because the dose response function for radiation myelopathy is steep, the volume effect is modest. The Rhesus monkey remains the animal model most similar to humans in dose response, histopathology, and latency for radiation myelopathy. 22 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Prognosis and Treatment of Spinal Cord Astrocytoma

    SciTech Connect

    Minehan, Kiernan J. Brown, Paul D.; Scheithauer, Bernd W.; Krauss, William E.; Wright, Michael P.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To identify the prognostic factors for spinal cord astrocytoma and determine the effects of surgery and radiotherapy on outcome. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study reviewed the cases of consecutive patients with spinal cord astrocytoma treated at Mayo Clinic Rochester between 1962 and 2005. Results: A total of 136 consecutive patients were identified. Of these 136 patients, 69 had pilocytic and 67 had infiltrative astrocytoma. The median follow-up for living patients was 8.2 years (range, 0.08-37.6), and the median survival for deceased patients was 1.15 years (range, 0.01-39.9). The extent of surgery included incisional biopsy only (59%), subtotal resection (25%), and gross total resection (16%). Patients with pilocytic tumors survived significantly longer than those with infiltrative astrocytomas (median overall survival, 39.9 vs. 1.85 years; p < 0.001). Patients who underwent resection had a worse, although nonsignificant, median survival than those who underwent biopsy only (pilocytic, 18.1 vs. 39.9 years, p = 0.07; infiltrative, 19 vs. 30 months, p = 0.14). Postoperative radiotherapy, delivered in 75% of cases, gave no significant survival benefit for those with pilocytic tumors (39.9 vs. 18.1 years, p = 0.33) but did for those with infiltrative astrocytomas (24 vs. 3 months; Wilcoxon p = 0.006). On multivariate analysis, pilocytic histologic type, diagnosis after 1984, longer symptom duration, younger age, minimal surgical extent, and postoperative radiotherapy predicted better outcome. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that histologic type is the most important prognostic variable affecting the outcome of spinal cord astrocytomas. Surgical resection was associated with shorter survival and thus remains an unproven treatment. Postoperative radiotherapy significantly improved survival for patients with infiltrative astrocytomas but not for those with pilocytic tumors.

  19. Percutaneous Ablation in the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Bradford J.; Gervais, Debra A.

    2011-01-01

    Percutaneous ablation in the kidney is now performed as a standard therapeutic nephron-sparing option in patients who are poor candidates for resection. Its increasing use has been largely prompted by the rising incidental detection of renal cell carcinomas with cross-sectional imaging and the need to preserve renal function in patients with comorbid conditions, multiple renal cell carcinomas, and/or heritable renal cancer syndromes. Clinical studies to date indicate that radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation are effective therapies with acceptable short- to intermediate-term outcomes and with a low risk in the appropriate setting, with attention to pre-, peri-, and postprocedural detail. The results following percutaneous radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma are reviewed in this article, including those of several larger scale studies of ablation of T1a tumors. Clinical and technical considerations unique to ablation in the kidney are presented, and potential complications are discussed. © RSNA, 2011 PMID:22012904

  20. Biomarkers of Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Vishal S.; Ferguson, Michael A.; Bonventre, Joseph V.

    2009-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common condition with a high risk of death. The standard metrics used to define and monitor the progression of AKI, such as serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen levels, are insensitive, nonspecific, and change significantly only after significant kidney injury and then with a substantial time delay. This delay in diagnosis not only prevents timely patient management decisions, including administration of putative therapeutic agents, but also significantly affects the preclinical evaluation of toxicity thereby allowing potentially nephrotoxic drug candidates to pass the preclinical safety criteria only to be found to be clinically nephrotoxic with great human costs. Studies to establish effective therapies for AKI will be greatly facilitated by two factors: (a) development of sensitive, specific, and reliable biomarkers for early diagnosis/prognosis of AKI in preclinical and clinical studies, and (b) development and validation of high-throughput innovative technologies that allow rapid multiplexed detection of multiple markers at the bedside. PMID:17937594

  1. Aging Biology in the Kidney.

    PubMed

    Bitzer, Markus; Wiggins, Jocelyn

    2016-01-01

    The notion that kidney function declines with age in the general population is well known in the Nephrology community and the average loss of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) about 1ml per year in most longitudinal studies. There is much debate within the community about whether this represents "normal aging" or whether this constitutes a form of renal disease. However this debate turns out, the real question is whether this decline is preventable - can it be modified or slowed? Efforts to find drivers of this decline are still in the very earliest stages, but have shown some promise at elucidating some of the pathologies involved. This article will address both the wider issue of the biology of aging as well as the specific pathologies of the aging kidney. PMID:26709058

  2. Kidney Regeneration: Lessons from Development

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, Takuto; Hukriede, Neil; de Caestecker, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    A number of genes involved in kidney development are reactivated in the adult after acute kidney injury (AKI). This has led to the belief that tissue repair mechanisms recapitulate pathways involved in embryonic development after AKI. We will discuss evidence to support this hypothesis by comparing the mechanisms of development with common pathways known to regulate post-AKI repair, or that we identified as cell-specific candidates based on public datasets from recent AKI translational profiling studies. We will argue that while many of these developmental pathways are reactivated after AKI, this is not associated with general cellular reprogramming to an embryonic state. We will show that reactivation of these developmental genes is often associated with expression in cells that are not normally involved in mediating parallel responses in the embryo, and that depending on the cellular context, these responses can have beneficial or detrimental effects on injury and repair after AKI. PMID:26120499

  3. Homocysteine in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Ostrakhovitch, Elena A; Tabibzadeh, Siamak

    2015-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia occurs in chronic- and end-stage kidney disease at the time when dialysis or transplant becomes indispensable for survival. Excessive accumulation of homocysteine (Hcy) aggravates conditions associated with imbalanced homeostasis and cellular redox thereby resulting in severe oxidative stress leading to oxidation of reduced free and protein-bound thiols. Thiol modifications such as N-homocysteinylation, sulfination, cysteinylation, glutathionylation, and sulfhydration control cellular responses that direct complex metabolic pathways. Although cysteinyl modifications are kept low, under Hcy-induced stress, thiol modifications persist thus surpassing cellular proteostasis. Here, we review mechanisms of redox regulation and show how cysteinyl modifications triggered by excess Hcy contribute development and progression of chronic kidney disease. We discuss different signaling events resulting from aberrant cysteinyl modification with a focus on transsulfuration. PMID:26471081

  4. The immunobiology of cord blood transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Despite significant recent advances in the applicability and outcome following unrelated cord blood transplantation (UCBT), infections remain a major cause of mortality associated with poor immune recovery in the first 6 months after UCBT. Enhanced immune reconstitution not only could improve survival by reduced transplant related mortality, but may also favorably impact on relapse incidence by improved graft-versus-leukemia effects. This review will summarize our current understanding of the biology of immune recovery post-UCBT with an emphasis on adaptive T cell dependent immunity. New efforts to boost immunity will be also highlighted including our own laboratory, where ex vivo T cell expansion is pursued towards adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:21253423

  5. Functional electrical stimulation and spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chester H; Triolo, Ronald J; Elias, Anastasia L; Kilgore, Kevin L; DiMarco, Anthony F; Bogie, Kath; Vette, Albert H; Audu, Musa L; Kobetic, Rudi; Chang, Sarah R; Chan, K Ming; Dukelow, Sean; Bourbeau, Dennis J; Brose, Steven W; Gustafson, Kenneth J; Kiss, Zelma H T; Mushahwar, Vivian K

    2014-08-01

    Spinal cord injuries (SCI) can disrupt communications between the brain and the body, resulting in loss of control over otherwise intact neuromuscular systems. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) of the central and peripheral nervous system can use these intact neuromuscular systems to provide therapeutic exercise options to allow functional restoration and to manage medical complications following SCI. The use of FES for the restoration of muscular and organ functions may significantly decrease the morbidity and mortality following SCI. Many FES devices are commercially available and should be considered as part of the lifelong rehabilitation care plan for all eligible persons with SCI. PMID:25064792

  6. [Bilateral vocal cord paresis after total thyroidectomy].

    PubMed

    Dralle, H; Neu, J; Musholt, T J; Nies, C

    2016-01-01

    A 66-year-old female patient complained of hoarseness and dyspnea under exertion following total thyroidectomy. Due to a faulty operating technique both nerves to the vocal cords were damaged. From the operation report it emerged that the dissection was carried out by protecting the border lamellae but the recurrent laryngeal nerve could not be found on both sides. This article presents the external expert opinion, the decision of the arbitration board and the assessment of the case by two specialist physicians. PMID:26683653

  7. Immunotherapy strategies for spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Tang; Lu, Xiu-Min; Chen, Kai-Ting; Shu, Ya-Hai; Qiu, Chun-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) of adult mammalian after traumatic injury is limited, which often causes permanent functional motor and sensory loss. After spinal cord injury (SCI), the lack of regeneration is mainly attributed to the presence of a hostile microenvironment, glial scarring, and cavitation. Besides, inflammation has also been proved to play a crucial role in secondary degeneration following SCI. The more prominent treatment strategies in experimental models focus mainly on drugs and cell therapies, however, only a few strategies applied in clinical studies and therapies still have only limited effects on the repair of SCI. Recently, the interests in immunotherapy strategies for CNS are increasing in number and breadth. Immunotherapy strategies have made good progresses in treating many CNS degenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), stroke, and multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the strategies begin to be considered to the treatment of SCI and other neurological disorders in recent years. Besides anti-inflamatory therapy, immunization with protein vaccines and DNA vaccines has emerged as a novel therapy strategy because of the simplicity of preparation and application. An inflammatory response followed by spinal cord injury, and is controled by specific signaling molecules, such as some cytokines playing a crucial role. As a result, appropriate immunoregulation, the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and anti-inflammatory cytokines may be an effective therapy strategy for earlier injury of spinal cord. In addition, myelinassociated inhibitors (MAIs) in the injured spinal cord, such as Nogo, myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) and oligodendrocyte- myelin glycoprotein (OMgp) are known to prevent axonal regeneration through their co-receptors, and to trigger demyelinating autoimmunity through T cell-mediated harmful autoimmune response. The antagonism of the MAIs through vaccinating with protein or DNA vaccines targeting Nogo, MAG, OMgp, and their co-receptors, may be an effective strategy for the treatment of SCI. However, immunotherapy such as anti-inflammtory therapy or vaccine targeting MAIs or their receptors, accompanied with the potential in risking autoimmune diseases. As a result, in order to optimize the anti-inflammtory therapy and design of protein or DNA vaccines for their use in the future clinical application, we need to further understand the possible mechanisms of neuroprotective immunity. This review presents recent advances in the development of immunotherapy strategies for the treatment of axonal degeneration and demyelination, and improvement of motor function after SCI. PMID:25860061

  8. Natural polyphenols and spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Khalatbary, Ali Reza

    2014-07-01

    Polyphenols have been shown to have some of the neuroprotective effects against neurodegenerative diseases. These effects are attributed to a variety of biological activities, including free radical scavenging/antioxidant and anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic activities. In this regard, many efforts have been made to study the effects of various well-known dietary polyphenols on spinal cord injury (SCI) and to explore the mechanisms behind the neuroprotective effects. The aim of this paper is to present the mechanisms of neuroprotection of natural polyphenols used in animal models of SCI. PMID:24842137

  9. Natural Polyphenols and Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Khalatbary, Ali Reza

    2014-01-01

    Polyphenols have been shown to have some of the neuroprotective effects against neurodegenerative diseases. These effects are attributed to a variety of biological activities, including free radical scavenging/antioxidant and anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic activities. In this regard, many efforts have been made to study the effects of various well-known dietary polyphenols on spinal cord injury (SCI) and to explore the mechanisms behind the neuroprotective effects. The aim of this paper is to present the mechanisms of neuroprotection of natural polyphenols used in animal models of SCI. PMID:24842137

  10. OPTIMAL TIMING FOR CLAMPING THE UMBILICAL CORD AFTER BIRTH

    PubMed Central

    Raju, Tonse N. K.; Singal, Nalini

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis This paper provides a brief overview of pros and cons of clamping the cord too early (within seconds) after birth. It also highlights evolving data that suggests that delaying cord clamping for 30–60 seconds after birth is beneficial to the baby and the mother, with no measurable negative effects. PMID:23164185

  11. Intraspinal microstimulation generates functional movements after spinal-cord injury.

    PubMed

    Saigal, Rajiv; Renzi, Costantino; Mushahwar, Vivian K

    2004-12-01

    Restoring locomotion after spinal-cord injury has been a difficult problem to solve with traditional functional electrical stimulation (FES) systems. Intraspinal microstimulation (ISMS) is a novel approach to FES that takes advantage of spinal-cord locomotor circuits by stimulating in the spinal cord directly. Previous studies in spinal-cord intact cats showed near normal recruitment order, reduced fatigue, and functional, synergistic movements induced by stimulation through a few microwires implanted over a 3-cm region in the lumbosacral cord. The present study sought to test the feasibility of ISMS for restoring locomotion after complete spinal-cord transection. In four adult male cats, the spinal cord was severed at T10, T11, or T12. Two to four weeks later, 30 wires (30 microm, stainless steel) were implanted, under anesthesia, in both sides of the lumbosacral cord. The cats were then decerebrated. Stimulus pulses (40-50 Hz, 200 micros, biphasic) with amplitudes ranging from 1-4x threshold (threshold = 32 +/- 19 microA) were delivered through each unipolar electrode. Kinetics, kinematics, and electromyographic (EMG) measurements were obtained with the cats suspended over a stationary treadmill with embedded force platforms for the hindlimbs. Phasic, interleaved stimulation through electrodes generating flexor or extensor movements produced bilateral weight-bearing stepping of the hindlimbs with ample foot clearance during swing. Minimal changes in kinematics and little fatigue were seen during episodes of 40 consecutive steps. The results indicate that ISMS is a promising technique for restoring locomotion after injury. PMID:15614999

  12. Personal Adjustment Training for the Spinal Cord Injured

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roessler, Richard; And Others

    1976-01-01

    This article describes experiences with Personal Achievement Skills (PAS), a group counseling process in a spinal cord injury project, emphasizing training in communication and goal setting in the context of group process. Issues in conducting such training and providing comprehensive service to the spinal cord injured are discussed in detail.…

  13. Chemo-port insertion: A cause of vocal cord palsy.

    PubMed

    Alazzawi, Sarmad; Hindi, Khalid; Malik, Ausama; Wee, Chong Aun; Prepageran, Narayanan

    2015-11-01

    We describe extremely rare cases of vocal cord palsy following surgical insertion of a chemo port. Our cohort consisted of patients with cancer who developed hoarseness immediately after central venous line placement for the administration of chemotherapy, with vocal cord palsy confirmed with flexible laryngoscopy. Given the timing, central venous line placement appears to be the most likely cause. PMID:26108861

  14. Shriners Hospital Spinal Cord Injury Self Care Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Carol

    This manual is intended for young people with spinal cord injuries who are receiving rehabilitation services within the Spinal Cord Injury Unit at Shriners Hospital (San Francisco, California). An introduction describes the rehabilitation program, which includes family conferences, an individualized program, an independent living program,…

  15. Complete recovery of spinal cord compression following parathyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Alka; Kurian, Susy; John, Lily

    1981-01-01

    A case is reported of spinal cord compression at T2 level caused by a brown tumour of primary hyperparathyroidism involving the posterior arch of the vertebra. The spontaneous regression of cord compression following parathyroidectomy is documented clinically and radiologically. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:7335567

  16. The Hanging Cord with a Real Tip Mass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deschaine, J. S.; Suits, B. H.

    2008-01-01

    Normal mode solutions for the perfectly flexible hanging cord problem have been known for over 200 years. More recently, theoretical results for a hanging cord with a point mass attached were presented. Here the theoretical results are tested experimentally using high-precision techniques which are accessible for use in an introductory laboratory.…

  17. [Marrow donor registration and cord blood banking: current issues].

    PubMed

    Takanashi, Minoko

    2016-03-01

    Marrow donor registration and cord blood banking are essential components of the infrastructure required for unrelated haemopoietic stem cell transplantations. We now have a new law to support and regulate the Marrow Donor Coordination Agency, Cord Blood Banks and the Haematopoietic Stem Cell Provision Support Organization. We also need to have a specific goal for bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cell donor registration, a minimum cord blood bank size, and the demographic data to back the medical needs for unrelated haemopoietic stem cell transplantations. To improve bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cell transplantations, we need to recruit younger adults for marrow registration and make greater efforts to shorten the coordinating period. For cord blood transplantations, uniting and empowering the cord blood collection sites is needed, to encourage and motivate obstetricians and other staff, as the quality of cord blood units is primarily determined during collection. Also, the cord blood banks must work cooperatively to provide cord blood internationally, which includes coordinating with international agencies and their regulations. PMID:27076238

  18. 2. GENERAL VIEW: MAIN DRIVEWAY: CORD CABIN IS TO THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. GENERAL VIEW: MAIN DRIVEWAY: CORD CABIN IS TO THE RIGHT OF KIOSK THE FAGEOL CABIN IS IN THE BACKGROUND. - Camp Richardson Resort, Cord Cabin, U.S. Highway 89, 3 miles west of State Highway 50 & 89, South Lake Tahoe, El Dorado County, CA

  19. "Ex Corde Ecclesiae" and Catholic Higher Education in America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caridi, James A.

    2011-01-01

    This research assessed "Ex Corde Ecclesiae" within American Catholic higher education from the perspective of presidents and academicians who oversee or teach within theology or religious studies. Pope John Paul II's "Ex Corde Ecclesiae" outlines the theological essence of the Catholic University and details its specific responsibilities toward…

  20. Research using autologous cord blood - time for a policy change.

    PubMed

    Han, Michael X; Craig, Maria E

    2013-08-19

    • Type 1 diabetes results from the loss of normal immunological self-tolerance, which may be attributable to the failure of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). Umbilical cord blood is rich in Tregs and therefore has the potential to prevent or delay the onset of type 1 diabetes. A pilot trial is currently underway in Australia to examine whether infusion of autologous cord blood can prevent type 1 diabetes in high-risk children with serum antibodies to multiple β-cell antigens. • A number of other potential therapeutic indications for autologous cord blood have been proposed, including cerebral palsy and hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. • Recruitment to clinical trials using cord blood is influenced by divergent public and private cord blood banking policy in Australia. The burgeoning consumer demand for storage of cord blood highlights the need for regulatory bodies to develop and adapt policies to facilitate research that may extend the use of cord blood beyond currently recognised indications. • Consumers, researchers and policymakers must also recognise specific ethical issues associated with collection and storage of cord blood, including storage in public and private banks, informed consent, ownership, access and the principle of beneficence. PMID:23984789

  1. Autophagy in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Kaushal, Gur P; Shah, Sudhir V

    2016-04-01

    Autophagy is a conserved multistep pathway that degrades and recycles damaged organelles and macromolecules to maintain intracellular homeostasis. The autophagy pathway is upregulated under stress conditions including cell starvation, hypoxia, nutrient and growth-factor deprivation, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and oxidant injury, most of which are involved in the pathogenesis of acute kidney injury (AKI). Recent studies demonstrate that basal autophagy in the kidney is vital for the normal homeostasis of the proximal tubules. Deletion of key autophagy proteins impaired renal function and increased p62 levels and oxidative stress. In models of AKI, autophagy deletion in proximal tubules worsened tubular injury and renal function, highlighting that autophagy is renoprotective in models of AKI. In addition to nonselective sequestration of autophagic cargo, autophagy can facilitate selective degradation of damaged organelles, particularly mitochondrial degradation through the process of mitophagy. Damaged mitochondria accumulate in autophagy-deficient kidneys of mice subjected to ischemia-reperfusion injury, but the precise mechanisms of regulation of mitophagy in AKI are not yet elucidated. Recent progress in identifying the interplay of autophagy, apoptosis, and regulated necrosis has revived interest in examining shared pathways/molecules in this crosstalk during the pathogenesis of AKI. Autophagy and its associated pathways pose potentially unique targets for therapeutic interventions in AKI. PMID:26924060

  2. Aging in the Canine Kidney.

    PubMed

    Cianciolo, R E; Benali, S L; Aresu, L

    2016-03-01

    Given the irreversible nature of nephron loss, aging of the kidney is of special interest to diagnostic and toxicologic pathologists. There are many similarities among histologic lesions in aged human and canine kidneys, including increased frequency of glomerulosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis, and tubular atrophy. Unfortunately, there are few studies in which renal tissue from aged healthy dogs was adequately examined with advanced diagnostics-namely, transmission electron microscopy and immunofluorescence-so age-associated changes in canine podocytes and glomerular basement membranes are poorly characterized. An age-associated decrease in the glomerular filtration rate in humans and dogs (specifically small breed dogs) has been documented. Although lesions in aged rats and mice differ somewhat from those of aged dogs and humans, the knowledge gained from rodent models is still vital to elucidating the pathogenesis of age-associated renal disease. Many novel molecules implicated in renal aging have been identified through genetically modified rodent models and transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of human kidneys. These molecules represent intriguing therapeutic targets and diagnostic biomarkers. Likewise, influencing critical pathways of cellular aging, such as telomere shortening, cellular senescence, and autophagy, could improve renal function in the elderly. PMID:26508694

  3. Nephrology Update: Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sharmeela; Rahman, Mahboob

    2016-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects more than 1 in 10 individuals in the United States. The care of these patients must be managed by family physicians and nephrology subspecialists. The kidneys often are affected by systemic processes such as diabetes and hypertension, and optimal management of these conditions is critical to slow decline in renal function in CKD patients. These patients are at high risk of cardiovascular disease, and statin therapy is recommended for adults with CKD who are at least age 50 years and not receiving dialysis. Patients with CKD and anemia can be treated with iron therapy and often with an erythropoietin-stimulating agent. Electrolyte abnormalities are managed with dietary changes and drugs. Sodium restriction and modification of dietary protein intake also may be needed. Consultation with a renal dietitian may be helpful. Because many drugs are metabolized by the kidneys, physicians should ensure that drug dosages are appropriate for the level of renal function. Early consultation with or referral to a nephrology subspecialist for patients with reduced renal function, resistant hypertension or electrolyte levels, and other conditions have been associated with improved outcomes in CKD patients. PMID:27163761

  4. Kidney transplantation in obese patients.

    PubMed

    Tran, Minh-Ha; Foster, Clarence E; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Ichii, Hirohito

    2016-03-24

    The World Health Organization estimated that in 2014, over 600 million people met criteria for obesity. In 2011, over 30% of individuals undergoing kidney transplant had a body mass index (BMI) 35 kg/m(2) or greater. A number of recent studies have confirmed the relationship between overweight/obesity and important comorbidities in kidney transplant patients. As with non-transplant surgeries, the rate of wound and soft tissue complications are increased following transplant as is the incidence of delayed graft function. These two issues appear to contribute to longer length of stay compared to normal BMI. New onset diabetes after transplant and cardiac outcomes also appear to be increased in the obese population. The impact of obesity on patient survival after kidney transplantation remains controversial, but appears to mirror the impact of extremes of BMI in non-transplant populations. Early experience with (open and laparoscopic) Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy support excellent weight loss (in the range of 50%-60% excess weight lost at 1 year), but experts have recommended the need for further studies. Long term nutrient deficiencies remain a concern but in general, these procedures do not appear to adversely impact absorption of immunosuppressive medications. In this study, we review the literature to arrive at a better understanding of the risks related to renal transplantation among individuals with obesity. PMID:27011911

  5. Blood disorders after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Reindl-Schwaighofer, Roman; Oberbauer, Rainer

    2014-04-01

    Post transplant anemia (PTA) is a common issue in kidney transplant recipients. Most importantly it is associated with an impaired allograft function. Other important factors associated with PTA are immunosuppressive drugs (MPA, AZA and SRL), iron deficiency, infections (Parvo B19), older donor age, rejection episodes, an increased inflammatory state, and erythropoietin hyporesponsiveness. As there are no adequately powered RCTs in the kidney transplant population on anemia treatment with ESA, we have to rely on what we know from the large RCTs in the CKD population. The recently published KDIGO guidelines do not recommend treatment with ESA if Hb is >10 g/dl. Repletion of iron stores is emphasized. Post transplant leukopenia (PTL) and thrombocytopenia (PTT) are frequent complications especially in the first six months after kidney transplantation. Myelosuppression caused by immunosuppressive agents (MPA, AZA, SRL, rATG), antimicrobial drugs (VGCV), and CMV infection is the predominant cause. There are no widely accepted guidelines on treatment strategies, but most often dose reduction or discontinuation of causative medication is done. Most clinicians tend to decrease MPA dose, but this is eventually associated with an increase in acute rejection episodes. VGCV dose reduction (preemptive treatment instead of CMV prophylaxis) may be a successful strategy. In severe cases G-CSF treatment is an important management option and seems to be safe. PMID:24211181

  6. NAFLD and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Marcuccilli, Morgan; Chonchol, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in developed countries and it is now considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Evidence linking NAFLD to the development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is emerging as a popular area of scientific interest. The rise in simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation as well as the significant cost associated with the presence of chronic kidney disease in the NAFLD population make this entity a worthwhile target for screening and therapeutic intervention. While several cross-sectional and case control studies have been published to substantiate these theories, very little data exists on the underlying cause of NAFLD and CKD. In this review, we will discuss the most recent publications on the diagnosis of NAFLD as well new evidence regarding the pathophysiology of NAFLD and CKD as an inflammatory disorder. These mechanisms include the role of obesity, the renin-angiotensin system, and dysregulation of fructose metabolism and lipogenesis in the development of both disorders. Further investigation of these pathways may lead to novel therapies that aim to target the NAFLD and CKD. However, more prospective studies that include information on both renal and liver histology will be necessary in order to understand the relationship between these diseases. PMID:27089331

  7. Kidney transplantation in obese patients

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Minh-Ha; Foster, Clarence E; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Ichii, Hirohito

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization estimated that in 2014, over 600 million people met criteria for obesity. In 2011, over 30% of individuals undergoing kidney transplant had a body mass index (BMI) 35 kg/m2 or greater. A number of recent studies have confirmed the relationship between overweight/obesity and important comorbidities in kidney transplant patients. As with non-transplant surgeries, the rate of wound and soft tissue complications are increased following transplant as is the incidence of delayed graft function. These two issues appear to contribute to longer length of stay compared to normal BMI. New onset diabetes after transplant and cardiac outcomes also appear to be increased in the obese population. The impact of obesity on patient survival after kidney transplantation remains controversial, but appears to mirror the impact of extremes of BMI in non-transplant populations. Early experience with (open and laparoscopic) Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy support excellent weight loss (in the range of 50%-60% excess weight lost at 1 year), but experts have recommended the need for further studies. Long term nutrient deficiencies remain a concern but in general, these procedures do not appear to adversely impact absorption of immunosuppressive medications. In this study, we review the literature to arrive at a better understanding of the risks related to renal transplantation among individuals with obesity. PMID:27011911

  8. Variable-Tension-Cord Suspension/Vibration-Isolation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villemarette, Mark L.; Boston, Joshua; RInks, Judith; Felice, Pat; Stein, Tim; Payne, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    A system for mechanical suspension and vibration isolation of a machine or instrument is based on the use of Kevlar (or equivalent aromatic polyamide) cord held in variable tension between the machine or instrument and a surrounding frame. The basic concept of such a tensioned-cord suspension system (including one in which the cords are made of aromatic polyamide fibers) is not new by itself; what is new here is the additional provision for adjusting the tension during operation to optimize vibration- isolation properties. In the original application for which this system was conceived, the objective is to suspend a reciprocating cryocooler aboard a space shuttle and to prevent both (1) transmission of launch vibrations to the cryocooler and (2) transmission of vibrations from the cryocooler to samples in a chamber cooled by the cryocooler. The basic mechanical principle of this system can also be expected to be applicable to a variety of other systems in which there are requirements for cord suspension and vibration isolation. The reciprocating cryocooler of the original application is a generally axisymmetric object, and the surrounding frame is a generally axisymmetric object with windows (see figure). Two cords are threaded into a spoke-like pattern between attachment rings on the cryocooler, holes in the cage, and cord-tension- adjusting assemblies. Initially, the cord tensions are adjusted to at least the level necessary to suspend the cryocooler against gravitation. Accelerometers for measuring vibrations are mounted (1) on the cold tip of the cryocooler and (2) adjacent to the cage, on a structure that supports the cage. During operation, a technician observes the accelerometer outputs on an oscilloscope while manually adjusting the cord tensions in an effort to minimize the amount of vibration transmitted to and/or from the cryocooler. A contemplated future version of the system would include a microprocessor-based control subsystem that would include cord-tension actuators. This control subsystem would continually adjust the cord tension in response to accelerometer feedback to optimize vibration-isolation properties as required for various operating conditions. The control system could also adjust cord tensions (including setting the two cords to different tensions) to suppress resonances. Other future enhancements could include optimizing the cord material, thickness, and braid; optimizing the spoke patterns; and adding longitudinal cords for applications in which longitudinal stiffness and vibration suppression are required.

  9. Cord Wood Testing in a Non-Catalytic Wood Stove

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, T.; Trojanowski, R.; Wei, G.

    2014-06-30

    EPA Method 28 and the current wood stove regulations have been in-place since 1988. Recently, EPA proposed an update to the existing NSPS for wood stove regulations which includes a plan to transition from the current crib wood fuel to cord wood fuel for certification testing. Cord wood is seen as generally more representative of field conditions while the crib wood is seen as more repeatable. In any change of certification test fuel, there are questions about the impact on measured results and the correlation between tests with the two different fuels. The purpose of the work reported here is to provide data on the performance of a noncatalytic stove with cord wood. The stove selected has previously been certified with crib wood which provides a basis for comparison with cord wood. Overall, particulate emissions were found to be considerably higher with cord wood.

  10. RhoA/Rho kinase in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiangbing; Xu, Xiao-ming

    2016-01-01

    A spinal cord injury refers to an injury to the spinal cord that is caused by a trauma instead of diseases. Spinal cord injury includes a primary mechanical injury and a much more complex secondary injury process involving inflammation, oxidation, excitotoxicity, and cell death. During the secondary injury, many signal pathways are activated and play important roles in mediating the pathogenesis of spinal cord injury. Among them, the RhoA/Rho kinase pathway plays a particular role in mediating spinal degeneration and regeneration. In this review, we will discuss the role and mechanism of RhoA/Rho kinase-mediated spinal cord pathogenesis, as well as the potential of targeting RhoA/Rho kinase as a strategy for promoting both neuroprotection and axonal regeneration. PMID:26981071

  11. Spinal cord ischemia is multifactorial: what is the best protocol?

    PubMed

    Melissano, Germano; Bertoglio, Luca; Mascia, Daniele; Rinaldi, Enrico; Del Carro, Ubaldo; Nardelli, Pasquale; Chiesa, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    Despite the improved understanding of spinal cord anatomy and spinal cord ischemia pathophysiology, the rate of debilitating postoperative paraparesis or paraplegia is still not negligible after procedures for thoracic or thoracoabdominal aortic disease. Single studies have demonstrated the role of different treatment modalities to prevent or treat spinal cord ischemia. A multimodal approach, however, is advocated by most authors. Even after the employment of endovascular techniques become routine, the rate of spinal cord ischemia after treatment of thoracoabdominal aortic pathology remained unchanged over time. Spinal cord ischemia is often treatable by different means that concur to improve indirect spinal perfusion through collateral circulation; it should, therefore, be managed promptly and aggressively due to its potential reversibility. Ongoing technical improvements of non-invasive diagnostic tools may allow a better preoperative assessment of the spinal vascular network and a better planning of both open and endovascular thoracic or thoracoabdominal repair. PMID:26731537

  12. Umbilical cord blood banking: beyond the public-private divide.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Michelle A C; Samuel, Gabrielle; Jordens, Christopher F C; Kerridge, Ian H

    2012-03-01

    Umbilical cord blood is a source of haematopoietic progenitor cells, which are used to treat a range of malignant, genetic, metabolic and immune disorders. Until recently, cord blood was either collected through donations to publicly funded cord blood banks for use in allogeneic transplantation, or stored in commercial cord blood banks for use in autologous transplantation. The line between public and private cord blood banking is being blurred by the emergence of "hybrid" models that combine aspects of both the public and private systems. The authors describe these hybrid models and argue that their emergence is explained by both market forces and public sector policy They propose that the future of the sector will depend heavily on several key developments that will differentially affect public, private and hybrid banking models. PMID:22558903

  13. Kidney Function and Plasma Copeptin Levels in Healthy Kidney Donors and Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zittema, Debbie; van den Berg, Else; Meijer, Esther; Boertien, Wendy E.; Muller Kobold, Anneke C.; Franssen, Casper F.M.; de Jong, Paul E.; Bakker, Stephan J.L.; Navis, Gerjan

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Plasma copeptin, a marker of arginine vasopressin, is elevated in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and predicts disease progression. It is unknown whether elevated copeptin levels result from decreased kidney clearance or as compensation for impaired concentrating capacity. Data from patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and healthy kidney donors before and after donation were used, because after donation, overall GFR decreases with a functionally normal kidney. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Data were obtained between October of 2008 and January of 2012 from healthy kidney donors who visited the institution for routine measurements predonation and postdonation and patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease who visited the institution for kidney function measurement. Plasma copeptin levels were measured using a sandwich immunoassay, GFR was measured as 125I-iothalamate clearance, and urine concentrating capacity was measured as urine-to-plasma ratio of urea. In patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, total kidney volume was measured with magnetic resonance imaging. Results Patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (n=122, age=40 years, men=56%) had significantly higher copeptin levels (median=6.8 pmol/L; interquartile range=3.4–15.7 pmol/L) compared with donors (n=134, age=52 years, men=49%) both predonation and postdonation (median=3.8 pmol/L; interquartile range=2.8–6.3 pmol/L; P<0.001; median=4.4 pmol/L; interquartile range=3.6–6.1 pmol/L; P<0.001). In donors, copeptin levels did not change after donation, despite a significant fall in GFR (from 105±17 to 66±10; P<0.001). Copeptin and GFR were significantly associated in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (β=−0.45, P<0.001) but not in donors. In patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, GFR and total kidney volume were both associated significantly with urine-to-plasma ratio of urea (β=0.84, P<0.001; β=−0.51, P<0.001, respectively). Conclusions On the basis of the finding in donors that kidney clearance is not a main determinant of plasma copeptin levels, it was hypothesized that, in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, kidney damage and associated impaired urine concentration capacity determine copeptin levels. PMID:24993447

  14. Ipsilateral kidney sparing in treatment of pancreatic malignancies using volumetric-modulated arc therapy avoidance sectors

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Raymond W. Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    2015-10-01

    Recent research has shown treating pancreatic cancer with volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to be superior to either intensity-modulated radiation therapy or 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), with respect to reducing normal tissue toxicity, monitor units, and treatment time. Furthermore, using avoidance sectors with RapidArc planning can further reduce normal tissue dose while maintaining target conformity. This study looks at the methods in reducing dose to the ipsilateral kidney, in pancreatic head cases, while observing dose received by other critical organs using avoidance sectors. Overall, 10 patients were retrospectively analyzed. Each patient had preoperative/unresectable pancreatic tumor and were selected based on the location of the right kidney being situated within the traditional 3D-CRT treatment field. The target planning target volume (286.97 ± 85.17 cm{sup 3}) was prescribed to 50.4 Gy using avoidance sectors of 30°, 40°, and 50° and then compared with VMAT as well as 3D-CRT. Analysis of the data shows that the mean dose to the right kidney was reduced by 11.6%, 15.5%, and 21.9% for avoidance angles of 30°, 40°, and 50°, respectively, over VMAT. The mean dose to the total kidney also decreased by 6.5%, 8.5%, and 11.0% for the same increasing angles. Spinal cord maximum dose, however, increased as a function of angle by 3.7%, 4.8%, and 6.1% compared with VMAT. Employing avoidance sector angles as a complement to VMAT planning can significantly reduce high dose to the ipsilateral kidney while not greatly overdosing other critical organs.

  15. [Renal failure and cystic kidney diseases].

    PubMed

    Correas, J-M; Joly, D; Chauveau, D; Richard, S; Hélénon, O

    2011-04-01

    Cystic kidney diseases often are discovered at the time of initial work-up of renal failure through ultrasound or family history, or incidentally at the time of an imaging test. Hereditary diseases include autosomal dominant or recessive polycystic kidney disease (PKD), tuberous sclerosis (TS) and medullary cystic kidney disease (MCKD). Autosomal dominant PKD is characterized by large renal cysts developing in young adults. Renal failure is progressive and becomes severe around 50-60 years of age. Atypical cysts (hemorrhagic or hyperdense) are frequent on CT and MRI examinations. Imaging plays a valuable role in the management of acute complications such as cyst hemorrhage or infection. Autosomal recessive PKD is often detected in neonates, infants or young adults. It is characterized by renal enlargement due to the presence of small cysts and liver disease (fibrosis and biliary ductal dilatation). Late manifestation or slow progression of autosomal recessive PKD may be more difficult to distinguish from autosomal dominant PKD. These cystic kidney diseases should not be confused with non-hereditary incidental multiple renal cysts. In tuberous sclerosis, renal cysts are associated with angiomyolipomas and sometimes pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis. Renal failure is inconstant. Other hereditary cystic kidney diseases, including MCKD and nephronophtisis, are usually associated with renal failure. Non-hereditary cystic kidney diseases include multicystic renal dysplasia (due to complete pelvi-ureteric atresia or hydronephrosis), acquired multicystic kidney disease (chronic renal failure, chronic hemodialysis) and varied cystic kidney diseases (multicystic renal disease, glomerulocystic kidney disease, microcystic kidney disease). PMID:21549887

  16. Neurogenic potential of spinal cord organotypic culture.

    PubMed

    Glazova, Margarita V; Pak, Elena S; Murashov, Alexander K

    2015-05-01

    There are several neurogenic niches in the adult mammalian central nervous system. In the central nervous system, neural stem cells (NSC) localize not only to the periventricular area, but are also diffusely distributed in the parenchyma. Here, we assessed neurogenic potential of organotypic cultures prepared from adult mouse spinal cord. Slices were placed on Millipore inserts for organotypic culture and incubated in neurobasal media supplemented with B27 and N2 for up to 9 weeks. After 3-4 weeks, the cell's aggregates formed in the slices. The aggregate's cells were BrdU-uptake, nestin and alkaline phosphatase positive. At the later stage of incubation, we observed Oct3/4 in the inner mass of the neurospheres as well as expression of Dppa1, which is an Oct-4 downstream target gene and a marker for pluripotency. To check differentiation, the formed neurospheres were isolated and cultured for several days in differentiation media. The obtained data demonstrated the cells from isolated neurospheres differentiate into astrocytes and MAP2-positive neurons. Immunostaining for HB9 and Lim2 revealed subsequent differentiation of MAP2-positive cells into motor neurons and interneurons, respectively. We hypothesized neuronal loss and/or long-term culturing of spinal cord slices may trigger a reset of the internal cell program and promote proliferation and further differentiation of NSC. PMID:25805458

  17. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients

    PubMed Central

    Taweel, Waleed Al; Seyam, Raouf

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete emptying, and dryness. Management typically begins with anticholinergic medications and clean intermittent catheterization. Patients who fail this treatment because of inefficacy or intolerability are candidates for a spectrum of more invasive procedures. Endoscopic managements to relieve the bladder outlet resistance include sphincterotomy, botulinum toxin injection, and stent insertion. In contrast, patients with incompetent sphincters are candidates for transobturator tape insertion, sling surgery, or artificial sphincter implantation. Coordinated bladder emptying is possible with neuromodulation in selected patients. Bladder augmentation, usually with an intestinal segment, and urinary diversion are the last resort. Tissue engineering is promising in experimental settings; however, its role in clinical bladder management is still evolving. In this review, we summarize the current literature pertaining to the pathology and management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury. PMID:26090342

  18. Subdural hematoma following spinal cord stimulator implant.

    PubMed

    Chiravuri, Srinivas; Wasserman, Ronald; Chawla, Amit; Haider, Naeem

    2008-01-01

    Headache following interventional procedures is a diagnostic challenge due to the multitude of possible etiologies involved. Presentation can be simple (PDPH alone) or complex (exacerbation of pre-existing chronic headache along with PDPH) or headache associated with a new onset intracranial process. Subdural hematoma is a rare complication of cranio-spinal trauma. Cranial subdural hematoma may present in an acute, sub-acute, or chronic fashion. Diagnosis of a subdural hematoma in the wake of a PDPH is difficult, requiring a high level of suspicion. Delayed diagnosis of subdural hematoma is usually related to failure to consider it in the differential diagnosis. Thorough history, assessment of the evolution of symptoms, and imaging studies may identify the possible cause and help direct treatment. Change in the character of initial presenting symptoms may be a sign of resolution of the headache or the onset of a secondary process. We report a case of acute intracranial subdural hematoma secondary to unintentional dural puncture during placement of a permanent spinal cord stimulator lead for refractory angina. There is need for careful follow-up of patients with a known post-dural tear. Failure to identify uncommon adverse events in patients with complicated spinal cord stimulator implantation may lead to permanent injury. PMID:18196176

  19. Lizard tail spinal cord: a new experimental model of spinal cord injury without limb paralysis.

    PubMed

    Szarek, Dariusz; Marycz, Krzysztof; Lis, Anna; Zawada, Zbigniew; Tabakow, Paweł; Laska, Jadwiga; Jarmundowicz, Włodzimierz

    2016-04-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a well-known devastating lesion that sadly is very resistant to all treatment attempts. This fact has stimulated the exploration of multiple regenerative strategies that are examined at both the basic and clinical level. For laboratory research, differentin vivomodels are used, but each has many important limitations. The main limitation of these models is the high level of animal suffering related to the inflicted neurologic injury. It has caused a growing tendency to limit the injury, but this, in turn, produces incomplete SCI models and uncertainties in the neuroregeneration interpretation. To overcome such limitations, a new experimental SCI model is proposed. Geckos have been extensively examined as a potential animal model of SCI. Their spinal cord extends into the tail and can be transected without causing the typical neurologic consequences observed in rat models. In this study, we compared the gecko tail SCI model with the rat model of thoracic SCI. Anatomic and histologic analyses showed comparability between the gecko and rat in diameter of spinal canal and spinal cord, as well as applicability of multiple staining techniques (hematoxylin and eosin, immunostaining, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy). We tested the suitability ofin vivostudy with 3 prototype implants for the reconstruction of SCI: a multichannel sponge, a multilaminar tube, and a gel cylinder. These were compared with a spinal cord excision (control). A 20-wk observation revealed no adverse effects of SCI on the animals' well-being. The animals were easily housed and observed. Histologic analysis showed growth of nervous tissue elements on implant surface and implant cellular colonization. The study showed that the gecko SCI model can be used as a primary model for the assessment of SCI treatment methods. It provides a platform for testing multiple solutions with limited animal suffering before performing tests on mammals. Detailed results of the experimental conditions and testing techniques are provided.-Szarek, D., Marycz, K., Lis, A., Zawada, Z., Tabakow, P., Laska, J., Jarmundowicz, W. Lizard tail spinal cord: a new experimental model of spinal cord injury without limb paralysis. PMID:26667043

  20. Acute kidney injury: an increasing global concern.

    PubMed

    Lameire, Norbert H; Bagga, Arvind; Cruz, Dinna; De Maeseneer, Jan; Endre, Zoltan; Kellum, John A; Liu, Kathleen D; Mehta, Ravindra L; Pannu, Neesh; Van Biesen, Wim; Vanholder, Raymond

    2013-07-13

    Despite an increasing incidence of acute kidney injury in both high-income and low-income countries and growing insight into the causes and mechanisms of disease, few preventive and therapeutic options exist. Even small acute changes in kidney function can result in short-term and long-term complications, including chronic kidney disease, end-stage renal disease, and death. Presence of more than one comorbidity results in high severity of illness scores in all medical settings. Development or progression of chronic kidney disease after one or more episode of acute kidney injury could have striking socioeconomic and public health outcomes for all countries. Concerted international action encompassing many medical disciplines is needed to aid early recognition and management of acute kidney injury. PMID:23727171

  1. CT of trauma to the abnormal kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Rhyner, P.; Federle, M.P.; Jeffrey, R.B.

    1984-04-01

    Traumatic injuries to already abnormal kidneys are difficult to assess by excretory urography and clinical evaluation. Bleeding and urinary extravasation may accompany minor trauma; conversely, underlying tumors, perirenal hemorrhage, and extravasation may be missed on urography. Computed tomography (CT) was performed in eight cases including three neoplasms, one adult polycystic disease, one simple renal cyst, two hydronephrotic kidneys, and one horseshoe kidney. CT provided specific and clinically useful information in each case that was not apparent on excretory urography.

  2. Focused ultrasound surgery on the kidney

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlosser, Jacques; Feuillu, Benoit; Lacoste, Francois; Andre-Bougaran, Joelle; Vallancien, Guy

    1998-04-01

    Introduction: High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) is a minimally invasive therapy which can produce tissues necrosis in depth by a local thermal effect. Objectives: Evaluate the effect of extracorporeal HIFU with electronic scanning in the treatment of pig kidney. Conclusion: Extracorporeal HIFU with electronic scanning can produce tissue necrosis into pig's kidneys. This treatment could be used in human as a non invasive therapy of small kidney's tumors less than 30 cm3 of volume.

  3. Bilateral multicystic kidneys--an unusual case.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Lila; Millard, Marie-Louise; Fairhurst, Joanna; Gilbert, Rodney D

    2002-11-01

    Multicystic dysplasia of the kidneys is a condition whose prognosis is good as it usually presents unilaterally. Bilateral cases are usually fatal in utero. We report a case of bilateral multicystic dysplasia of the kidneys where the lower moiety of the right kidney was spared cystic change. The patient had normal renal function and, following conservative management, remains alive and well 6 months later. PMID:12432443

  4. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling determines kidney size

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian-Kang; Nagai, Kojiro; Chen, Jianchun; Plieth, David; Hino, Masayo; Xu, Jinxian; Sha, Feng; Ikizler, T. Alp; Quarles, C. Chad; Threadgill, David W.; Neilson, Eric G.; Harris, Raymond C.

    2015-01-01

    Kidney size adaptively increases as mammals grow and in response to the loss of 1 kidney. It is not clear how kidneys size themselves or if the processes that adapt kidney mass to lean body mass also mediate renal hypertrophy following unilateral nephrectomy (UNX). Here, we demonstrated that mice harboring a proximal tubule–specific deletion of Pten (PtenptKO) have greatly enlarged kidneys as the result of persistent activation of the class I PI3K/mTORC2/AKT pathway and an increase of the antiproliferative signals p21Cip1/WAF and p27Kip1. Administration of rapamycin to PtenptKO mice diminished hypertrophy. Proximal tubule–specific deletion of Egfr in PtenptKO mice also attenuated class I PI3K/mTORC2/AKT signaling and reduced the size of enlarged kidneys. In PtenptKO mice, UNX further increased mTORC1 activation and hypertrophy in the remaining kidney; however, mTORC2-dependent AKT phosphorylation did not increase further in the remaining kidney of PtenptKO mice, nor was it induced in the remaining kidney of WT mice. After UNX, renal blood flow and amino acid delivery to the remaining kidney rose abruptly, followed by increased amino acid content and activation of a class III PI3K/mTORC1/S6K1 pathway. Thus, our findings demonstrate context-dependent roles for EGFR-modulated class I PI3K/mTORC2/AKT signaling in the normal adaptation of kidney size and PTEN-independent, nutrient-dependent class III PI3K/mTORC1/S6K1 signaling in the compensatory enlargement of the remaining kidney following UNX. PMID:25985273

  5. Wait too long to talk about kidney disease and you could be waiting for a kidney.

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Public Service Announcement Kidney Disease Past Issues / Summer 2006 Table of Contents ... Javascript on. Wait too long to talk about kidney disease and you could be waiting for a ...

  6. Subclinical Celiac Disease and Crystal-Induced Kidney Disease Following Kidney Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Capolongo, Giovanna; Abul-Ezz, Sameh; Moe, Orson W.; Sakhaee, Khashayar

    2015-01-01

    Decreased kidney function from kidney deposition of calcium oxalate has been previously described in inflammatory bowel disease as well as following jejuno-ileal and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgeries. Although celiac disease is the most prevalent bowel abnormality associated with intestinal malabsorption, its relationship to high kidney oxalate burden and decreased kidney function has not been established. We report a case of subclinical celiac disease and hyperoxaluria that presented with loss of kidney function as a result of high oxalate load in the absence of overt diarrhea, documented intestinal fat malabsorption, and nephrolithiasis. Subclinical celiac disease is commonly overlooked and hyperoxaluria is not usually investigated in kidney patients. We propose that this entity should be suspected in patients with chronic kidney disease in which the etiology of kidney damage has not been clearly established. PMID:22739230

  7. Kidney biomimicry--a rediscovered scientific field that could provide hope to patients with kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Stenvinkel, Peter; Johnson, Richard J

    2013-11-01

    Most studies on kidney disease have relied on classic experimental studies in mice and rats or clinical studies in humans. From such studies much understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of kidney disease has been obtained. However, breakthroughs in the prevention and treatment of kidney diseases have been relatively few, and new approaches to fight kidney disease are needed. Here we discuss kidney biomimicry as a new approach to understand kidney disease. Examples are given of how various animals have developed ways to prevent or respond to kidney failure, how to protect themselves from hypoxia or oxidative stress and from the scourge of hyperglycemia. We suggest that investigation of evolutionary biology and comparative physiology might provide new insights for the prevention and treatment of kidney disease. PMID:24220764

  8. 21 CFR 882.5880 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief... Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to stimulate electrically a patient's spinal cord to...

  9. 21 CFR 882.5880 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief... Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to stimulate electrically a patient's spinal cord to...

  10. 21 CFR 882.5880 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief... Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to stimulate electrically a patient's spinal cord to...

  11. 21 CFR 882.5880 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief... Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to stimulate electrically a patient's spinal cord to...

  12. 21 CFR 882.5880 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief... Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to stimulate electrically a patient's spinal cord to...

  13. Estimate of motor conduction in human spinal cord: slowed conduction in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Chang, C W; Lien, I N

    1991-10-01

    By using motor evoked potential (MEP) created by transcranial electric stimulation over the motor cortex and F-wave measurement from the peripheral nerve stimulation, it is possible to estimate the spinal cord motor conduction velocity (SCMCV) in the diseased state. Twenty-four patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) between T1 and T11 neurological levels participated in this study. MEP in leg muscle was absent in all neurologically complete paraplegics. In 16 patients with neurologically incomplete SCI, MEP was obtained in 13 patients. The SCMCV estimated from C7 to T12 spinal levels was 32.1 (SD = 9.4) m/s. This was significantly slower than 63.3 (SD = 8.6) m/s in 40 normal controls. This noninvasive, indirect method is measurable, and can provide valuable electrophysiological data in the assessment of motor function in patients with SCI. PMID:1944412

  14. [Acute kidney injury in children].

    PubMed

    Amira-Peco-Antić; Paripović, Dusan

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a clinical condition considered to be the consequence of a sudden decrease (> 25%) or discontinuation of renal function. The term AKI is used instead of the previous term acute renal failure, because it has been demonstrated that even minor renal lesions may cause far-reaching consequences on human health. Contemporary classifications of AKI (RIFLE and AKIN) are based on the change of serum creatinine and urinary output. In the developed countries, AKI is most often caused by renal ischemia, nephrotoxins and sepsis, rather than a (primary) diffuse renal disease, such as glomerulonephritis, interstitial nephritis, renovascular disorder and thrombotic microangiopathy. The main risk factors for hospital AKI are mechanical ventilation, use of vasoactive drugs, stem cell transplantation and diuretic-resistant hypervolemia. Prerenal and parenchymal AKI (previously known as acute tubular necrosis) jointly account for 2/3 of all AKI causes. Diuresis and serum creatinine concentration are not early diagnostic markers of AKI. Potential early biomarkers of AKI are neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), cystatin C, kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), interleukins 6, 8 and 18, and liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP). Early detection of kidney impairment, before the increase of serum creatinine, is important for timely initiated therapy and recovery. The goal of AKI treatment is to normalize the fluid and electrolyte status, as well as the correction of acidosis and blood pressure. Since a severe fluid overload resistant to diuretics and inotropic agents is associated with a poor outcome, the initiation of dialysis should not be delayed. The mortality rate of AKI is highest in critically ill children with multiple organ failure and hemodynamically unstable patients. PMID:25033598

  15. Glutamate receptors in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Dryer, Stuart E

    2015-10-01

    l-Glutamate (l-Glu) plays an essential role in the central nervous system (CNS) as an excitatory neurotransmitter, and exerts its effects by acting on a large number of ionotropic and metabotropic receptors. These receptors are also expressed in several peripheral tissues, including the kidney. This review summarizes the general properties of ionotropic and metabotropic l-Glu receptors, focusing on N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and Group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). NMDA receptors are expressed in the renal cortex and medulla, and appear to play a role in the regulation of renal blood flow, glomerular filtration, proximal tubule reabsorption and urine concentration within medullary collecting ducts. Sustained activation of NMDA receptors induces Ca(2+) influx and oxidative stress, which can lead to glomerulosclerosis, for example in hyperhomocysteinemia. Group 1 mGluRs are expressed in podocytes and probably in other cell types. Mice in which these receptors are knocked out gradually develop albuminuria and glomerulosclerosis. Several endogenous agonists of l-Glu receptors, which include sulfur-containing amino acids derived from l-homocysteine, and quinolinic acid (QA), as well as the co-agonists glycine and d-serine, are present in the circulation at concentrations capable of robustly activating ionotropic and metabotropic l-Glu receptors. These endogenous agonists may also be secreted from renal parenchymal cells, or from cells that have migrated into the kidney, by exocytosis or by transporters such as system x(-)(c), or by transporters involved in ammonia secretion. l-Glu receptors may be useful targets for drug therapy, and many selective orally-active compounds exist for investigation of these receptors as potential drug targets for various kidney diseases. PMID:25829324

  16. The cell cycle and acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Price, Peter M.; Safirstein, Robert L.; Megyesi, Judit

    2009-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) activates pathways of cell death and cell proliferation. Although seemingly discrete and unrelated mechanisms, these pathways can now be shown to be connected and even to be controlled by similar pathways. The dependence of the severity of renal-cell injury on cell cycle pathways can be used to control and perhaps to prevent acute kidney injury. This review is written to address the correlation between cellular life and death in kidney tubules, especially in acute kidney injury. PMID:19536080

  17. Basics of kidney biopsy: A nephrologist's perspective

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, S. K.; Sethi, S.; Dinda, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of the kidney biopsy is one of the major events in the history of nephrology. Primary indications of kidney biopsy are glomerular hematuria/proteinuria with or without renal dysfunction and unexplained renal failure. Kidney biopsy is usually performed in prone position but in certain situations, supine and lateral positions may be required. Biopsy needles have changed with times from Vim–Silverman needle to Tru-cut needle to spring-loaded automatic gun. The procedure has also changed from blind bedside kidney biopsy to ultrasound marking to real-time ultrasound guidance to rarely computerized tomography guidance and laparoscopic and open biopsy. In very specific situations, transjugular kidney biopsy may be required. Most of the centers do kidney biopsy on short 1-day admission, whereas some take it as an outdoor procedure. For critical interpretation of kidney biopsy, adequate sample and clinical information are mandatory. Tissue needs to be stained with multiple stains for delineation of various components of kidney tissue. Many consider that electron microscopy (EM) is a must for all kidney biopsies, but facilities for EM are limited even in big centers. Sophisticated tests such as immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridization are useful adjuncts for definitive diagnosis in certain situations. PMID:23960337

  18. Nutritional Management of Kidney Stones (Nephrolithiasis)

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Adam M.; Seifter, Julian L.; Dwyer, Johanna T.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of kidney stones is common in the United States and treatments for them are very costly. This review article provides information about epidemiology, mechanism, diagnosis, and pathophysiology of kidney stone formation, and methods for the evaluation of stone risks for new and follow-up patients. Adequate evaluation and management can prevent recurrence of stones. Kidney stone prevention should be individualized in both its medical and dietary management, keeping in mind the specific risks involved for each type of stones. Recognition of these risk factors and development of long-term management strategies for dealing with them are the most effective ways to prevent recurrence of kidney stones. PMID:26251832

  19. Phenotype Standardization for Drug Induced Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Ravindra L; Awdishu, Linda; Davenport, Andrew; Murray, Patrick; Macedo, Etienne; Cerda, Jorge; Chakaravarthi, Raj; Holden, Arthur; Goldstein, Stuart L.

    2015-01-01

    Drug induced kidney disease is a frequent cause of renal dysfunction; however, there are no standards to identify and characterize the spectrum of these disorders. We convened a panel of international, adult and pediatric, nephrologists and pharmacists to develop standardized phenotypes for drug induced kidney disease as part of the phenotype standardization project initiated by the International Serious Adverse Events Consortium. We propose four phenotypes of drug induced kidney disease based on clinical presentation: acute kidney injury, glomerular, tubular and nephrolithiasis, along with primary and secondary clinical criteria to support the phenotype definition, and a time course based on the KDIGO/AKIN definitions of acute kidney injury, acute kidney disease and chronic kidney disease. Establishing causality in drug induced kidney disease is challenging and requires knowledge of the biological plausibility for the specific drug, mechanism of injury, time course and assessment of competing risk factors. These phenotypes provide a consistent framework for clinicians, investigators, industry and regulatory agencies to evaluate drug nephrotoxicity across various settings. We believe that this is first step to recognizing drug induced kidney disease and developing strategies to prevent and manage this condition. PMID:25853333

  20. Optical Coherence Tomography in Kidney Transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Peter M.; Wierwille, Jeremiah; Chen, Yu

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is associated with both high mortality rates and an enormous economic burden [1]. The preferred treatment option for ESRD that can extend patients' lives and improve their quality of life is kidney transplantation. However, organ shortages continue to pose a major problem in kidney transplantation. Most kidneys for transplantation come from heart-beating cadavers. Although non-heart-beating cadavers represent a potentially large pool of donor kidneys, these kidneys are not often used due to the unknown extent of damage to the renal tubules (i.e., acute tubular necrosis or "ATN") induced by ischemia (i.e., lack of blood flow). Also, ischemic insult suffered by kidneys awaiting transplantation frequently causes ATN that leads to varying degrees of delayed graft function (DGF) after transplantation. Finally, ATN represents a significant risk for eventual graft and patient survival [2, 3] and can be difficult to discern from rejection. In present clinical practice, there is no reliable real-time test to determine the viability of donor kidneys and whether or not donor kidneys might exhibit ATN. Therefore, there is a critical need for an objective and reliable real-time test to predict ATN to use these organs safely and utilize the donor pool optimally. In this review, we provided preliminary data indicating that OCT can be used to predict the post-transplant function of kidneys used in transplantation.

  1. Kidney transplantation among identical twins: therapeutic dilemmas

    PubMed Central

    Dziewanowski, Krzysztof; Drozd, Radoslaw; Chojnowska, Anna; Dziewanowska-Rogalska, Małgorzata; Parczewski, Milosz

    2011-01-01

    A case of the successful kidney transplantation among two homozygous twins is presented here. Prior to the familial kidney transplantation from the identical twins, the patient underwent peritoneal and haemodialyses as well as cadaveric kidney transplant from an unrelated donor. In this patient, vascular accessibility was poor and the second familial transplantation was performed urgently. Transplanted kidney function proved excellent; however, the issues of the best immunosuppressant to be selected are under consideration. Decision on the use or withdrawal of immunosuppressant drugs requires careful review of the disease status, concomitant disease and other factors influencing the final outcome. PMID:22689721

  2. Curcumin protects against ischemic spinal cord injury: The pathway effect

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinhua; Wei, Hao; Lin, Meimei; Chen, Chunmei; Wang, Chunhua; Liu, Maobai

    2013-01-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors have been shown to participate in nerve cell injury during spinal cord ischemia. This study observed a protective effect of curcumin on ischemic spinal cord injury. Models of spinal cord ischemia were established by ligating the lumbar artery from the left renal artery to the bifurcation of the abdominal aorta. At 24 hours after model establishment, the rats were intraperitoneally injected with curcumin. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical results demonstrated that after spinal cord ischemia, inducible nitric oxide synthase and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor mRNA and protein expression significantly increased. However, curcumin significantly decreased inducible nitric oxide synthase and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor mRNA and protein expression in the ischemic spinal cord. Tarlov scale results showed that curcumin significantly improved motor function of the rat hind limb after spinal cord ischemia. The results demonstrate that curcumin exerts a neuroprotective fect against ischemic spinal cord injury by decreasing inducible nitric oxide synthase and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor expression. PMID:25206661

  3. Vocal cord palsy: An uncommon presenting feature of myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Prahlad K.; Batra, Anuradha; Sethi, Nitin K.; Torgovnick, Josh; Arsura, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Vocal cord palsy can have myriad causes. Unilateral vocal cord palsy is common and frequently asymptomatic. Trauma, head, neck and mediastinal tumors as well as cerebrovascular accidents have been implicated in causing unilateral vocal cord palsy. Viral neuronitis accounts for most idiopathic cases. Bilateral vocal cord palsy, on the other hand, is much less common and is a potentially life-threatening condition. Myasthenia gravis, an autoimmune disorder caused by antibodies targeting the post-synaptic acetylcholine receptor, has been infrequently implicated in its causation. We report here a case of bilateral vocal cord palsy developing in a 68-year-old man with no prior history of myasthenia gravis 2 months after he was operated on for diverticulitis of the large intestine. Delay in considering the diagnosis led to endotracheal intubation and prolonged mechanical ventilation with attendant complications. Our case adds to the existing literature implicating myasthenia gravis as an infrequent cause of bilateral vocal cord palsy. Our case is unusual as, in our patient, acute-onset respiratory distress and stridor due to bilateral vocal cord palsy was the first manifestation of a myasthenic syndrome. PMID:21655204

  4. Concise Review: Umbilical Cord Blood Transplantation: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, Javier; Rezvani, Katayoun; Hosing, Chitra; Bollard, Catherine M.; Oran, Betul; Olson, Amanda; Popat, Uday; Molldrem, Jeffrey; McNiece, Ian K.; Shpall, Elizabeth J.

    2014-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is an important treatment option for fit patients with poor-risk hematological malignancies; nevertheless, the lack of available fully matched donors limits the extent of its use. Umbilical cord blood has emerged as an effective alternate source of hematopoietic stem cell support. Transplantation with cord blood allows for faster availability of frozen sample and avoids invasive procedures for donors. In addition, this procedure has demonstrated reduced relapse rates and similar overall survival when compared with unrelated allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The limited dose of CD34-positive stem cells available with single-unit cord transplantation has been addressed by the development of double-unit cord transplantation. In combination with improved conditioning regimens, double-unit cord transplantation has allowed for the treatment of larger children, as well as adult patients with hematological malignancies. Current excitement in the field revolves around the development of safer techniques to improve homing, engraftment, and immune reconstitution after cord blood transplantation. Here the authors review the past, present, and future of cord transplantation. PMID:25378655

  5. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy improves local microenvironment after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Shuquan; Luo, Min; Li, Yajun

    2014-01-01

    Clinical studies have shown that hyperbaric oxygen therapy improves motor function in patients with spinal cord injury. In the present study, we explored the mechanisms associated with the recovery of neurological function after hyperbaric oxygen therapy in a rat model of spinal cord injury. We established an acute spinal cord injury model using a modification of the free-falling object method, and treated the animals with oxygen at 0.2 MPa for 45 minutes, 4 hours after injury. The treatment was administered four times per day, for 3 days. Compared with model rats that did not receive the treatment, rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen had fewer apoptotic cells in spinal cord tissue, lower expression levels of aquaporin 4/9 mRNA and protein, and more NF-200 positive nerve fibers. Furthermore, they had smaller spinal cord cavities, rapid recovery of somatosensory and motor evoked potentials, and notably better recovery of hindlimb motor function than model rats. Our findings indicate that hyperbaric oxygen therapy reduces apoptosis, downregulates aquaporin 4/9 mRNA and protein expression in injured spinal cord tissue, improves the local microenvironment for nerve regeneration, and protects and repairs the spinal cord after injury. PMID:25657740

  6. Cooling athletes with a spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Griggs, Katy E; Price, Michael J; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L

    2015-01-01

    Cooling strategies that help prevent a reduction in exercise capacity whilst exercising in the heat have received considerable research interest over the past 3 decades, especially in the lead up to a relatively hot Olympic and Paralympic Games. Progressing into the next Olympic/Paralympic cycle, the host, Rio de Janeiro, could again present an environmental challenge for competing athletes. Despite the interest and vast array of research into cooling strategies for the able-bodied athlete, less is known regarding the application of these cooling strategies in the thermoregulatory impaired spinal cord injured (SCI) athletic population. Individuals with a spinal cord injury (SCI) have a reduced afferent input to the thermoregulatory centre and a loss of both sweating capacity and vasomotor control below the level of the spinal cord lesion. The magnitude of this thermoregulatory impairment is proportional to the level of the lesion. For instance, individuals with high-level lesions (tetraplegia) are at a greater risk of heat illness than individuals with lower-level lesions (paraplegia) at a given exercise intensity. Therefore, cooling strategies may be highly beneficial in this population group, even in moderate ambient conditions (~21 °C). This review was undertaken to examine the scientific literature that addresses the application of cooling strategies in individuals with an SCI. Each method is discussed in regards to the practical issues associated with the method and the potential underlying mechanism. For instance, site-specific cooling would be more suitable for an athlete with an SCI than whole body water immersion, due to the practical difficulties of administering this method in this population group. From the studies reviewed, wearing an ice vest during intermittent sprint exercise has been shown to decrease thermal strain and improve performance. These garments have also been shown to be effective during exercise in the able-bodied. Drawing on additional findings from the able-bodied literature, the combination of methods used prior to and during exercise and/or during rest periods/half-time may increase the effectiveness of a strategy. However, due to the paucity of research involving athletes with an SCI, it is difficult to establish an optimal cooling strategy. Future studies are needed to ensure that research outcomes can be translated into meaningful performance enhancements by investigating cooling strategies under the constraints of actual competition. Cooling strategies that meet the demands of intermittent wheelchair sports need to be identified, with particular attention to the logistics of the sport. PMID:25119157

  7. Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines: What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines What You Need to Know Because you have chronic kidney disease, you should take steps to protect your kidneys. ... n n n Notes: For more information National Kidney Disease Education Program 1-866-4 KIDNEY (1-866- ...

  8. Restructuring the National Kidney Foundation.

    PubMed

    Brand, J L

    2000-04-01

    The National Kidney Foundation reorganized its governance structure for the first time in its 50-year history. Following a 2-year review, which involved all constituents of the Foundation and took advantage of the advice of professional consultants, the NKF delegated governance responsibilities to the Board of Directors and created a General Assembly of affiliate leaders and professional staff. NKF national and affiliate leaders agreed on this course of action so that power would be more appropriately shared between the national organization and the affiliates and the overall organization would be better positioned to succeed in the NKF's first national fund raising campaign. PMID:10766005

  9. [Diabetic kidney disease - Update 2016].

    PubMed

    Sourij, Harald; Edlinger, Roland; Prischl, Friedrich; Auinger, Martin; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Säemann, Marcus D; Prager, Rudolf; Clodi, Martin; Schernthaner, Guntram; Mayer, Gert; Oberbauer, Rainer; Rosenkranz, Alexander R

    2016-04-01

    Recent epidemiological evaluations have shown that approximately 5 % of all Austrians suffer from diabetes including renal involvement, i. e. 400.000 people in Austria are affected. The risk of start and progression of this disease can be ameliorated by lifestyle interventions as well as optimization of blood pressure and glucose levels. The present article represents the joint recommendations of the Austrian Diabetes Association and the Austrian Society for Nephrology for the prevention and treatment of diabetic kidney disease. PMID:27052231

  10. Effect of Cord Blood Processing on Transplant Outcomes after Single Myeloablative Umbilical Cord Blood Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ballen, Karen K.; Logan, Brent R.; Laughlin, Mary J.; He, Wensheng; Ambruso, Daniel R.; Armitage, Susan E.; Beddard, Rachel L.; Bhatla, Deepika; Hwang, William Y.K.; Kiss, Joseph E.; Koegler, Gesine; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Nagler, Arnon; Oh, David; Petz, Lawrence D.; Price, Thomas H.; Quinones, Ralph R.; Ratanatharathorn, Voravit; Rizzo, J. Douglas; Sazama, Kathleen; Scaradavou, Andromachi; Schuster, Michael W.; Sender, Leonard S.; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Spellman, Stephen R.; Sutton, Millicent; Weitekamp, Lee Ann; Wingard, John R.; Eapen, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Variations in cord blood manufacturing and administration are common, and the optimal practice, not known. We compared processing and banking practices at 16 public cord blood banks (CBB) in the United States, and assessed transplant outcomes on 530 single umbilical cord blood (UCB) myeloablative transplantations for hematologic malignancies, facilitated by these banks. UCB banking practices were separated into three mutually exclusive groups based on whether processing was automated or manual; units were plasma and red blood cell reduced or buffy coat production method or plasma reduced. Compared to the automated processing system for units, the day-28 neutrophil recovery was significantly lower after transplantation of units that were manually processed and plasma reduced (red cell replete) (odds ratio [OR] 0.19 p=0.001) or plasma and red cell reduced (OR 0.54, p=0.05). Day-100 survival did not differ by CBB. However, day-100 survival was better with units that were thawed with the dextran-albumin wash method compared to the “no wash” or “dilution only” techniques (OR 1.82, p=0.04). In conclusion, CBB processing has no significant effect on early (day 100) survival despite differences in kinetics of neutrophil recovery. PMID:25543094

  11. Effect of cord blood processing on transplantation outcomes after single myeloablative umbilical cord blood transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ballen, Karen K; Logan, Brent R; Laughlin, Mary J; He, Wensheng; Ambruso, Daniel R; Armitage, Susan E; Beddard, Rachel L; Bhatla, Deepika; Hwang, William Y K; Kiss, Joseph E; Koegler, Gesine; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Nagler, Arnon; Oh, David; Petz, Lawrence D; Price, Thomas H; Quinones, Ralph R; Ratanatharathorn, Voravit; Rizzo, J Douglas; Sazama, Kathleen; Scaradavou, Andromachi; Schuster, Michael W; Sender, Leonard S; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Spellman, Stephen R; Sutton, Millicent; Weitekamp, Lee Ann; Wingard, John R; Eapen, Mary

    2015-04-01

    Variations in cord blood manufacturing and administration are common, and the optimal practice is not known. We compared processing and banking practices at 16 public cord blood banks (CBB) in the United States and assessed transplantation outcomes on 530 single umbilical cord blood (UCB) myeloablative transplantations for hematologic malignancies facilitated by these banks. UCB banking practices were separated into 3 mutually exclusive groups based on whether processing was automated or manual, units were plasma and red blood cell reduced, or buffy coat production method or plasma reduced. Compared with the automated processing system for units, the day 28 neutrophil recovery was significantly lower after transplantation of units that were manually processed and plasma reduced (red cell replete) (odds ratio, .19; P = .001) or plasma and red cell reduced (odds ratio, .54; P = .05). Day 100 survival did not differ by CBB. However, day 100 survival was better with units that were thawed with the dextran-albumin wash method compared with the "no wash" or "dilution only" techniques (odds ratio, 1.82; P = .04). In conclusion, CBB processing has no significant effect on early (day 100) survival despite differences in kinetics of neutrophil recovery. PMID:25543094

  12. Renal cell carcinoma in a natural remaining kidney after two kidney transplantations. Case report.

    PubMed

    Jekunen, A; Maiche, A; Rissanen, P; Virkkunen, P

    1994-06-01

    A 57-year-old woman with nephropathy following a streptococcal infection had received a kidney transplant in 1980 and 1986 and immunosuppressive treatment since 1980. Renal cell carcinoma was found in the right native kidney in 1991, with skeletal metastases. Nephrectomy was performed and radiotherapy given. Removal of non-functioning kidneys would prevent development of such cancer. PMID:7939471

  13. Aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen in cord blood and amniotic fluid of high-risk pregnancies: a biochemical approach to the dynamic assessment of deviant fetal growth.

    PubMed

    Vanhaesebrouck, P; Kint, J; Van Kets, H; Govaert, P; Smets, K; Defoort, P; Leroy, J

    1994-07-01

    N-terminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP) concentration was measured in cord serum, amniotic fluid, and maternal serum from high-risk pregnancies. The fetal PIIINP variability was shown to be independent of the maternal serum PIIINP values. Although a highly significant negative correlation was found between the fetal propeptide level and gestational age in both appropriate-for-gestational-age neonates (n = 504) and small-for-gestational-age infants (n = 98), the PIIINP concentration in cord serum or amniotic fluid of small-for-gestational-age infants was significantly lower compared with that of appropriate-for-gestational-age infants matched for postconceptional age. PIIINP assay may thus serve as a dynamic biochemical indicator of deviant fetal growth. The PIIINP results were also related to the severity or duration of intrauterine growth retardation, as indicated by significantly lower propeptide cord serum values in nonmalformed small-for-gestational-age infants with small head circumference, known as an index for the chronicity of fetal nutritional deprivation. Preeclampsia, maternal diabetes or smoking, and congenital anomalies appeared not to be associated with any alteration of fetal propeptide concentration, provided they did not cause fetal growth deceleration. The finding of extremely high cord serum PIIINP values in six newborn infants with the Potter malformation sequence led to the speculation that large amounts of propeptides or their fragments usually are excreted by the fetal kidneys into the amniotic fluid. We suggest that determination of the PIIINP level in amniotic fluid or cord serum, obtained by amniocentesis and percutaneous umbilical sampling, may be a helpful adjunctive biochemical parameter in future research protocols assessing fetuses at risk for intrauterine growth retardation. PMID:7936841

  14. Internet-based atlas of the primate spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Tokuno, Hironobu; Tanaka, Ikuko; Senoo, Aya; Umitsu, Yoshitomo; Akazawa, Toshikazu; Nakamura, Yasuhisa; Watson, Charles

    2011-05-01

    In 2009, we reported an online brain atlas of the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) at http://marmoset-brain.org:2008. Here we report new digital images of the primate spinal cord sections added to the website. We prepared histological sections of every segment of the spinal cord of the common marmoset, rhesus monkey and Japanese monkey with various staining techniques. The sections were scanned with Carl Zeiss MIRAX SCAN at light microscopic resolution. Obtained digital data were processed and converted into multi-resolutionary images with Adobe Photoshop and Zoomify Design. These images of the primate spinal cords are now available on the web via the Internet. PMID:21291922

  15. [Therapy progress of spinal cord compression by metastatic spinal tumor].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yao-sheng; He, Qi-zhen; Liu, Shu-bin; Jiang, Wei-gang; Lei, Ming-xing

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic epidural compression of the spinal cord is a significant source of morbidity in patients with systemic cancer. With improvment of oncotheray, survival period in the patients is improving and metastatic cord compression is en- countered increasingly often. Surgical management performed for early circumferential decompression for the spinal cord com- pression with spine instability, and spine reconstruction performed. Patients with radiosensitive tumours without spine instabili- ty, radiotherapy is an effective therapy. Spinal stereotactic radiosurgery and minimally invasive techniques, such as vertebro- plasty and kyphoplasty, percutaneous pedicle screw fixation, radiofrequency ablation are promising options for treatment of cer- tain selected patients with spinal metastases. PMID:27019908

  16. [Pre-hospital care management of acute spinal cord injury].

    PubMed

    Hess, Thorsten; Hirschfeld, Sven; Thietje, Roland; Lönnecker, Stefan; Kerner, Thoralf; Stuhr, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Acute injury to the spine and spinal cord can occur both in isolation as also in the context of multiple injuries. Whereas a few decades ago, the cause of paraplegia was almost exclusively traumatic, the ratio of traumatic to non-traumatic causes in Germany is currently almost equivalent. In acute treatment of spinal cord injury, restoration and maintenance of vital functions, selective control of circulation parameters, and avoidance of positioning or transport-related additional damage are in the foreground. This article provides information on the guideline for emergency treatment of patients with acute injury of the spine and spinal cord in the preclinical phase. PMID:27070515

  17. Will safety release cords on children's cameras prevent strangulation?

    PubMed

    Ridenour, Marcella V

    2003-12-01

    This study investigated the automatic safety release mechanisms on neck cords for children's cameras. The purpose of the safety release mechanism is to reduce accidental strangulation associated with children's toys that have neck cords. The horizontal pull forces that activate the automatic safety release mechanism were measured for two different styles of release mechanisms for neck cords. When these forces were compared to forces associated with child strangulation, the automatic safety mechanisms released at higher forces than the forces associated with accidental strangulation or death, which is contrary to what was intended and creates a false sense of security for parents who select a toy camera with such a device. PMID:14738371

  18. Automatic photolaryngoscope for vibration analysis of vocal cords

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igielski, J.; Kujawinska, Malgorzata; Pawlowski, Z.

    1995-05-01

    The vibration analysis of vocal cords gives information about the functioning of speech organs as well as about some illness within human organism. The analysis is usually performed by electroglottography or stroboscopic methods. The authors present the new opto-mechanical and electronic system of photolaryngoscope. The instrument uses laser diode light for illumination of vocal cords. The light reflected from the vibrating cord surface is detected electronically and analyzed. The further mathematical analysis of glottograms by autoregression method with covariance or by periodogram method is performed in order to define new criteria for medical interpretation of results.

  19. 18F-FDG Hypermetabolism in Spinal Cord Schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Altinyay, Mustafa Erkan; Alharthi, Ashraf; Alassiri, Ali H; Syed, Ghulam Mustafa Shah

    2016-03-01

    A 24-year-old Saudi man presented with progressive lower-back pain for 3 months followed by lower-limb weakness, numbness, and urinary retention. Cerebrospinal fluid examination revealed high-protein, elevated white blood cell count with lymphocyte predominance. MRI scan of the spine demonstrated heterogeneously enhancing longitudinal spinal cord lesion from T6 through T9. FDG-PET/CT demonstrated prominently hypermetabolic lesion in the spinal cord. He had laminectomy and spinal cord (intramedullary) biopsy. Pathology revealed Schistosoma mansoni ova. PMID:26447373

  20. Early elective colostomy following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Michelle

    Elective colostomy is an accepted method of bowel management for patients who have had a spinal cord injury (SCI). Approximately 2.4% of patients with SCI have a colostomy, and traditionally it is performed as a last resort several years after injury, and only if bowel complications persist when all other methods have failed. This is despite evidence that patients find a colostomy easier to manage and frequently report wishing it had been performed earlier. It was noticed in the author's spinal unit that increasing numbers of patients were requesting colostomy formation during inpatient rehabilitation following SCI. No supporting literature was found for this; it appears to be an emerging and untested practice. This article explores colostomy formation as a method of bowel management in patients with SCI, considers the optimal time for colostomy formation after injury and examines issues for health professionals. PMID:26973012

  1. Functional Electrical Stimulation and Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chester H.; Triolo, Ronald J.; Elias, Anastasia L.; Kilgore, Kevin L.; DiMarco, Anthony F.; Bogie, Kath; Vette, Albert H.; Audu, Musa; Kobetic, Rudi; Chang, Sarah R.; Chan, K. Ming; Dukelow, Sean; Bourbeau, Dennis J.; Brose, Steven W.; Gustafson, Kenneth J.; Kiss, Zelma; Mushahwar, Vivian K.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Spinal cord injuries (SCI) can disrupt communications between the brain and the body, leading to a loss of control over otherwise intact neuromuscular systems. The use of electrical stimulation (ES) of the central and peripheral nervous system can take advantage of these intact neuromuscular systems to provide therapeutic exercise options, to allow functional restoration, and even to manage or prevent many medical complications following SCI. The use of ES for the restoration of upper extremity, lower extremity and truncal functions can make many activities of daily living a potential reality for individuals with SCI. Restoring bladder and respiratory functions and preventing pressure ulcers may significantly decrease the morbidity and mortality following SCI. Many of the ES devices are already commercially available and should be considered by all SCI clinicians routinely as part of the lifelong rehabilitation care plan for all eligible individuals with SCI. PMID:25064792

  2. How to Improve Cord Blood Engraftment?

    PubMed

    Beksac, Meral; Yurdakul, Pinar

    2016-01-01

    Various factors make cord blood (CB) a significant source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), including ease of procurement and lack of donor attrition, with the ability to process and store the donor cells long term. Importantly, high proliferative potential of the immature HSCs allows one log less use of cells compared to bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cells. As total nucleated cell (TNC) and CD34(+) cell content of CB grafts are correlated to engraftment rate and speed, strategies to expand HSC and homing have been developed. This chapter will focus only on modalities such as intrabone administration, fucosylation, CD26 inhibition, prostaglandin E2 derivative or complement 3 exposure, and SDF-1/CXCR4/CXCL-12 pathway interventions that have been experimented successfully. Furthermore, increasing evidence in line with better recognition of CB progenitors that are involved in engraftment and homing will also be addressed. PMID:26925402

  3. [Spinal cord stimulation - evidence and personal experience].

    PubMed

    Klein-Weigel, P

    2010-08-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been successfully used to treat chronic pain syndromes for decades. For this purpose, an electrode is implanted into the epidural space under local anaesthesia and connected to a neurostimulator which applies a weak direct current to the dorsal roots of the spinal column. Besides pain control, SCS increases the blood supply in the stimulated area. This effect is mediated by a sympathicolytic effect and the liberation of vasodilatators within the stimulated skin area. A Cochrane meta-analysis has revealed a significantly increased limb salvage rate in patients with non-reconstructable critical limb ischaemia (CLI) treated with SCS. The effect of SCS in CLI might be predicted by the measurement of forefoot transcutaneous pO (2) in supine and dependent positions, which renders trial stimulation unnecessary in many cases. PMID:20806142

  4. Genetic control of Drosophila nerve cord development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skeath, James B.; Thor, Stefan

    2003-01-01

    The Drosophila ventral nerve cord has been a central model system for studying the molecular genetic mechanisms that control CNS development. Studies show that the generation of neural diversity is a multistep process initiated by the patterning and segmentation of the neuroectoderm. These events act together with the process of lateral inhibition to generate precursor cells (neuroblasts) with specific identities, distinguished by the expression of unique combinations of regulatory genes. The expression of these genes in a given neuroblast restricts the fate of its progeny, by activating specific combinations of downstream genes. These genes in turn specify the identity of any given postmitotic cell, which is evident by its cellular morphology and choice of neurotransmitter.

  5. Optogenetics Applications for Treating Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Sadia; Komai, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    Cases of spinal cord injury (SCI) are increasing all over the world; and in USA alone, there are 273,000 patients, which not only leads to morbidity and mortality but also results in a great economic burden. Many approaches are being used at the pre-clinical and clinical level to treat SCI including therapeutic agents, surgical decompression, stem cell therapy etc. Recently, a new approach called optogenetics has emerged in which light sensitive proteins are used to switch neurons on and off, and this approach has great potential to be used as therapy due to its specificity and rapid response in milliseconds. Few animal studies have been performed so far in which the respiratory and bladder function of rats was restored through the use of optogenetics. On the basis of promising results obtained, in the future, this approach can prove to be a valuable tool to treat patients with SCI. PMID:25901246

  6. Cardiovascular disease and spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Noonan, Vanessa K.; Krassioukov, Andrei; Borisoff, Jaimie

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the association between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and spinal cord injury (SCI) in a large representative sample. Methods: Data were compiled from more than 60,000 individuals from the 2010 cycle of the cross-sectional Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS). Multivariable logistic regression analysis was conducted to examine this relationship, adjusting for confounders and using probability weighting to account for the CCHS sampling method. Results: After adjusting for age and sex, SCI was associated with a significant increased odds of heart disease (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 2.72, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.94–3.82) and stroke (adjusted OR = 3.72, 95% CI 2.22–6.23). Conclusions: These remarkably heightened odds highlight the exigent need for targeted interventions and prevention strategies addressing modifiable risk factors for CVD in individuals with SCI. PMID:23884034

  7. How to Improve Cord Blood Engraftment?

    PubMed Central

    Beksac, Meral; Yurdakul, Pinar

    2016-01-01

    Various factors make cord blood (CB) a significant source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), including ease of procurement and lack of donor attrition, with the ability to process and store the donor cells long term. Importantly, high proliferative potential of the immature HSCs allows one log less use of cells compared to bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cells. As total nucleated cell (TNC) and CD34+ cell content of CB grafts are correlated to engraftment rate and speed, strategies to expand HSC and homing have been developed. This chapter will focus only on modalities such as intrabone administration, fucosylation, CD26 inhibition, prostaglandin E2 derivative or complement 3 exposure, and SDF-1/CXCR4/CXCL-12 pathway interventions that have been experimented successfully. Furthermore, increasing evidence in line with better recognition of CB progenitors that are involved in engraftment and homing will also be addressed. PMID:26925402

  8. Medical treatment of acute spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Ceylan, S; Kalelioğlu, M; Aktürk, G; Aktürk, F; Ceylan, S

    1990-01-01

    The injury was performed with 600 g-cm/weight on the spinal cord of 40 cats with T8-9 laminectomy in this study. Ten cats were given 10 mg/kg naloxone i.v. 1 h after injury. Ten cats were given 2 mg/kg thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) i.v. 1 h after injury followed by 1 mg/kg per hour for 4 h. Intravenous lidocaine was begun 30 min after injury in ten cats, administered as 1.5 mg/kg over the initial 5 min, 3 mg/kg over the next 30 min and 1 mg/kg every 30 min for 4 h. The remaining ten cats were given only saline (control group). TRH-treated cats showed significantly better histopathological scores than either naloxone- or lidocaine-treated animals (KW:13.65, P less than 0.50). PMID:2112263

  9. [Spinal cord toxoplasmosis in HIV infection].

    PubMed

    Pittner, Y; Dufour, J-F; David, G; Boibieux, A; Peyramond, D

    2009-06-01

    We report the case of an atypical localization of a spinal cord "toxoplasmic abscess". The 46-year-old patient, HIV-1 positive, was admitted for acute urine retention and gait disorders. MRI revealed a T12-L1 medullary lesion suggesting a tumoral, inflammatory and infectious pathology. The radiological aspect and immunosuppression lead to the initiation of a treatment against Toxoplasma gondii, following the same treatment principles as for cerebral toxoplasmosis. The diagnosis can only be proved by data from autopsy or surgical biopsy, but toxoplasmosis PCR on CSF seems to be an interesting alternative to confirm the diagnosis. According to the literature, PCR is not sensitive enough as a diagnostic tool. Improvement after treatment supported the diagnosis confirmed by PCR. PMID:19304424

  10. Umbilical cord blood donation: public or private?

    PubMed

    Ballen, K K; Verter, F; Kurtzberg, J

    2015-10-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is a graft source for patients with malignant or genetic diseases who can be cured by allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), but who do not have an appropriately HLA-matched family or volunteer unrelated adult donor. Starting in the 1990s, unrelated UCB banks were established, accepting donations from term deliveries and storing UCB units for public use. An estimated 730 000 UCB units have been donated and stored to date and ~35 000 UCB transplants have been performed worldwide. Over the past 20 years, private and family banks have grown rapidly, storing ~4 million UCB units for a particular patient or family, usually charging an up-front and yearly storage fee; therefore, these banks are able to be financially sustainable without releasing UCB units. Private banks are not obligated to fulfill the same regulatory requirements of the public banks. The public banks have released ~30 times more UCB units for therapy. Some countries have transitioned to an integrated banking model, a hybrid of public and family banking. Today, pregnant women, their families, obstetrical providers and pediatricians are faced with multiple choices about the disposition of their newborn's cord blood. In this commentary, we review the progress of UCB banking technology; we also analyze the current data on pediatric and adult unrelated UCB, including the recent expansion of interest in transplantation for hemoglobinopathies, and discuss emerging studies on the use of autologous UCB for neurologic diseases and regenerative medicine. We will review worldwide approaches to UCB banking, ethical considerations, criteria for public and family banking, integrated banking ideas and future strategies for UCB banking. PMID:26030051

  11. Clinical Significance of Pregnancies Complicated by Velamentous Umbilical Cord Insertion Associated With Other Umbilical Cord/Placental Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Shunji; Kato, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Background We examined the clinical significance of pregnancies complicated by velamentous cord insertion (VCI) associated with other umbilical cord/placental abnormalities. Methods Data were collected from 168 deliveries complicated by VCI and from 16,797 unaffected controls. All placentae were screened identically by trained staff. In this study, we examined the presence of excessively long umbilical cord (longer than 70 cm), vasa previa, single umbilical artery, circumvallate placenta, succenturiate placenta, lobed placenta, placenta previa, low lying placenta and placenta accrete as the other umbilical cord/placental abnormalities. Results Using a multivariate analysis, the pregnancies complicated by VCI were independently associated with in vitro fertilization use (P < 0.01), maternal smoking (P = 0.03), preterm delivery (P = 0.03), fetal asphyxia (P = 0.01) and small-for-gestational-age infants (P = 0.02). It was also independently associated with vasa previa (P < 0.01), single umbilical artery (P = 0.04), lobed placenta (P = 0.01) and placenta previa (P = 0.03). However, these umbilical cord/placental abnormalities were not associated with the further adverse outcomes of the pregnancies complicated by VCI. Conclusion VCI is associated with an increased risk of adverse perinatal outcomes irrespective of the presence of other umbilical cord/placental abnormalities. Routine identification of the placental cord insertion site should be considered. PMID:26491497

  12. Management of severe spinal cord injury following hyperbaric exposure.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Bruce; Laden, Gerard

    2015-09-01

    There is an increasing body of evidence that drainage of lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) improves functional neurological outcome after reperfusion injury to the spinal cord that occasionally follows aortic reconstructive surgery. This beneficial effect is considered owing to lowering of the CSF pressure thereby normalising spinal cord blood flow and reducing the 'secondary' cord injury caused by vascular congestion and cord swelling in the relatively confined spinal canal. Whilst lacking definitive proof, there are convincing randomised controlled trials (RCTs), cohort data and systematic reviews supporting this intervention. The therapeutic window for lumbar CSF drainage requires further elucidation; however, it appears to be days rather than hours post insult. We contend that the same benefit is likely to be achieved following other primary spinal cord injuries that cause cord swelling and elicit the 'secondary' injury. Traditionally the concept of CSF drainage has been considered more applicable to the brain as contained in a 'closed box' by lowering intracranial pressure (ICP) to improve cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP). The control of CPP is intended to limit 'secondary' brain injury and is a key concept of brain injury management. Using microdialysis in the spinal cords of trauma patients, it has been shown that intraspinal pressure (ISP) needs to be kept below 20 mmHg and spinal cord perfusion pressure (SCPP) above 70 mmHg to avoid biochemical evidence of secondary cord damage. Vasopressor have also been used in spinal cord injury to improve perfusion, however complications are common, typically cardiac in nature, and require very careful monitoring; the evidence supporting this approach is notably less convincing. Decompression illness (DCI) of the spinal cord is treated with recompression, hyperbaric oxygen, various medications designed to reduce the inflammatory response and fluid administration to normalise blood pressure and haematocrit. These management protocols are based largely on anecdote and transferred evidence from conventional cord trauma, as the low numbers and sporadic nature of DCI in divers makes RCTs nigh on impossible. Unfortunately even with best management, some patients are left with significant neurological deficit. The 'iceberg phenomenon', occurs when patients with DCI of the cord make a good neurological recovery but actually have profound cord damage as revealed in one case some four years later at post mortem and another example in a diver who developed late functional deterioration due to loss of neuronal reserve. This clinical evidence, together with animal study data, support the notion that even a modest preservation of spinal cord axons is associated with significant improvement in neurological outcome. In the light of the positive level two evidence in the vascular literature that CSF drainage limits 'secondary' injury thereby improving neurological outcome, we propose that centres with appropriate clinical experience consider using lumbar CSF drainage to normalise SCPP, as an adjunct to the conventional treatment of severe spinal cord DCI. Divers with severe spinal cord DCI are generally in the most productive years of their lives and, given the potentially devastating impact of this condition, should be given the benefit of any possible adjuvant treatment that may serve to improve long-term outcome. PMID:26415075

  13. Ultrasonic Destruction of Kidney Stones

    PubMed Central

    Brannen, George E.; Bush, William H.

    1984-01-01

    Kidney stones may be removed without using a surgical incision by a combination of techniques and skills recently developed in the fields of urology and radiology. Percutaneous access to the kidney is established under fluoroscopic control. A guide wire placed into the renal pelvis allows a nephroscope to be inserted and the collecting system visualized. A long hollow metal probe is advanced through the nephroscope and placed in contact with the stone. This probe conducts the ultrasonic energy. The stone absorbs the energy and breaks into fine granules, which are evacuated by suction. Twenty-three consecutively seen patients presenting with 27 upper urinary tract calculi for which removal was indicated underwent successful percutaneous ultrasonic lithotripsy. Fifteen stones were located in the renal pelvis, eight in a calix, three at the ureteropelvic junction and one in the upper ureter. One infected staghorn calculus was removed. Two complications resulted in extended hospital stays, but in no patients were surgical incisions required. Of the 23 patients, 9 had previously had a surgical lithotomy. The authors believe that most renal and upper ureteral calculi for which removal is indicated may be extracted percutaneously with the aid of the ultrasonic lithotriptor. The patients may expect a rapid convalescence with diminished pain. Images PMID:6730470

  14. Chromium-induced kidney disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wedeen, R.P. ); Qian, Lifen )

    1991-05-01

    Kidney disease is often cited as one of the adverse effects of chromium, yet chronic renal disease due to occupational or environmental exposure to chromium has not been reported. Occasional cases of acute tubular necrosis (ATN) following massive absorption of chromate have been described. Chromate-induced ATN has been extensively studied in experimental animals following parenteral administration of large doses of potassium chromate (hexavalent). The chromate is selectively accumulated in the convoluted proximal tubule where necrosis occurs. An adverse long-term effect of low-dose chromium exposure on the kidneys is suggested by reports of low molecular weight (LMW) proteinuria in chromium workers. Excessive urinary excretion of {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin, a specific proximal tubule brush border protein, and retinol-binding protein has been reported among chrome palters and welders. However, LMW proteinuria occurs after a variety of physiologic stresses, is usually reversible, and cannot by itself be considered evidence of chromic renal disease. Chromate-induced ATN and LMW proteinuria in chromium workers, nevertheless, raise the possibility that low-level, long-term exposure may produce persistent renal injury. The absence of evidence of chromate-induced chromic renal disease cannot be interpreted as evidence of the absence of such injury.

  15. Pathophysiology of Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Basile, David P.; Anderson, Melissa D.; Sutton, Timothy A.

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is the leading cause of nephrology consultation and is associated with high mortality rates. The primary causes of AKI include ischemia, hypoxia or nephrotoxicity. An underlying feature is a rapid decline in GFR usually associated with decreases in renal blood flow. Inflammation represents an important additional component of AKI leading to the extension phase of injury, which may be associated with insensitivity to vasodilator therapy. It is suggested that targeting the extension phase represents an area potential of treatment with the greatest possible impact. The underlying basis of renal injury appears to be impaired energetics of the highly metabolically active nephron segments (i.e., proximal tubules and thick ascending limb) in the renal outer medulla, which can trigger conversion from transient hypoxia to intrinsic renal failure. Injury to kidney cells can be lethal or sublethal. Sublethal injury represents an important component in AKI, as it may profoundly influence GFR and renal blood flow. The nature of the recovery response is mediated by the degree to which sublethal cells can restore normal function and promote regeneration. The successful recovery from AKI depends on the degree to which these repair processes ensue and these may be compromised in elderly or CKD patients. Recent data suggest that AKI represents a potential link to CKD in surviving patients. Finally, earlier diagnosis of AKI represents an important area in treating patients with AKI that has spawned increased awareness of the potential that biomarkers of AKI may play in the future. PMID:23798302

  16. Nephrology Update: Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Sarabu, Nagaraju; Rahman, Mahboob

    2016-05-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) refers to any acute decrease in glomerular filtration rate, regardless of etiology. Staging of AKI has been recommended to stratify AKI patients according to severity of the condition, based on serum creatinine level and urine output. Classification of AKI into prerenal, intrinsic renal, and postrenal etiologies is helpful in differential diagnosis and management. AKI in hospitalized patients typically occurs due to decreased renal perfusion. Drug-induced, contrast-associated, postoperative, and sepsis-associated AKI also can occur. Clinical assessment of a patient with AKI involves a medical record review, thorough history and physical examination, urinary and blood tests, renal imaging, and, in some instances, renal biopsy. Contrast-induced nephropathy is a common iatrogenic etiology of AKI associated with administration of intravenous iodinated contrast media. Measures to prevent AKI should be taken before administration of intravenous iodinated contrast. AKI can result in many short- and long-term complications, including chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. Appropriate treatment of AKI patients involves management of the underlying etiology, when possible, and use of nondialytic and dialytic therapies. PMID:27163760

  17. Sleep disorders in kidney disease.

    PubMed

    De Santo, R M; Perna, A; Di Iorio, B R; Cirillo, M

    2010-03-01

    Sleep disorders are common in patients with end stage renal disease receiving hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. However also a well functioning renal graft does not cure the poor sleep pattern which now emerges as a problem even in early chronic kidney disease (CKD). When patients are made aware for the first time of a disease such as CKD, which may brink to dialysis or at the best to a renal transplant patients begin to experience a disordered sleep. Sleeping disorders include insomnia (I), sleep apnoea (SAS), restless legs syndrome (RLS), periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD), excessive daily sleeping (EDS), sleepwalking, nightmares, and narcolepsy. Disordered sleep did not meet the clinical and scientific interest it deserves, in addition and we do not have a well defined solution for sleeping complaints. However, awareness that a poor sleep is associated with poor quality of life and carries an increase in mortality risk has recently stimulated interest in the field. There are many putative causes for a disordered sleep in chronic kidney disease and in end-stage renal disease. For a unifying hypothesis demographic factors, lifestyles, disease related factors, psychological factors, treatment related factors, and social factor must be taken into consideration. PMID:20424573

  18. Ultrasonic propulsion of kidney stones

    PubMed Central

    May, Philip C.; Bailey, Michael R.; Harper, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Ultrasonic propulsion is a novel technique that uses short bursts of focused ultrasonic pulses to reposition stones transcutaneously within the renal collecting system and ureter. The purpose of this review is to discuss the initial testing of effectiveness and safety, directions for refinement of technique and technology, and opinions on clinical application. Recent findings Preclinical studies with a range of probes, interfaces, and outputs have demonstrated feasibility and consistent safety of ultrasonic propulsion with room for increased outputs and refinement toward specific applications. Ultrasonic propulsion was used painlessly and without adverse events to reposition stones in 14 of 15 human study participants without restrictions on patient size, stone size, or stone location. The initial feasibility study showed applicability in a range of clinically relevant situations, including facilitating passage of residual fragments following ureteroscopy or shock wave lithotripsy, moving a large stone at the UPJ with relief of pain, and differentiating large stones from a collection of small fragments. Summary Ultrasonic propulsion shows promise as an office-based system for transcutaneously repositioning kidney stones. Potential applications include facilitating expulsion of residual fragments following ureteroscopy or shock wave lithotripsy, repositioning stones prior to treatment, and repositioning obstructing UPJ stones into the kidney to alleviate acute renal colic. PMID:26845428

  19. Transplantation of canine umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells in experimentally induced spinal cord injured dogs.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ji Hey; Byeon, Ye Eun; Ryu, Hak Hyun; Jeong, Yun Hyeok; Lee, Young Won; Kim, Wan Hee; Kang, Kyung Sun; Kweon, Oh Kyeong

    2007-09-01

    This study was to determine the effects of allogenic umbilical cord blood (UCB)-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and recombinant methionyl human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rmhGCSF) on a canine spinal cord injury model after balloon compression at the first lumbar vertebra. Twenty-five adult mongrel dogs were assigned to five groups according to treatment after a spinal cord injury: no treatment (CN); saline treatment (CP); rmhGCSF treatment (G); UCB-MSCs treatment (UCB-MSC); co-treatment (UCBG). The UCBMSCs isolated from cord blood of canine fetuses were prepared as 10(6) cells/150 microl saline. The UCB-MSCs were directly injected into the injured site of the spinal cord and rmhGCSF was administered subcutaneously 1 week after the induction of spinal cord injury. The Olby score, magnetic resonance imaging, somatosensory evoked potentials and histopathological examinations were used to evaluate the functional recovery after transplantation. The Olby scores of all groups were zero at the 0-week evaluation. At 2 week after the transplantation, the Olby scores in the groups with the UCB-MSC and UCBG were significantly higher than in the CN and CP groups. However, there were no significant differences between the UCB-MSC and UCBG groups, and between the CN and CP groups. These comparisons remained stable at 4 and 8 week after transplantation. There was significant improvement in the nerve conduction velocity based on the somatosensory evoked potentials. In addition, a distinct structural consistency of the nerve cell bodies was noted in the lesion of the spinal cord of the UCB-MSC and UCBG groups. These results suggest that transplantation of the UCB-MSCs resulted in recovery of nerve function in dogs with a spinal cord injury and may be considered as a therapeutic modality for spinal cord injury. PMID:17679775

  20. Studying the Genetic Basis of Kidney Cancer - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Marston Linehan, NCI's Chief of Urologic Surgery, has spent the last several decades studying kidney cancer genes and treating kidney cancer patients. Learn more about his experience as a kidney cancer physician scientist and TCGA contributor in this

  1. What Are the Risk Factors for Kidney Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... know what causes kidney cancer? What are the risk factors for kidney cancer? A risk factor is anything ... develop kidney cancer. Lifestyle-related and job-related risk factors Smoking Smoking increases the risk of developing renal ...

  2. What I Need to Know about Kidney Stones

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alternate Language URL Español What I need to know about Kidney Stones Page Content On this page: ... stones? To prevent kidney stones, you need to know what caused your kidney stone. Your doctor may ...

  3. What You Need to Know about Kidney Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Publications Reports What You Need To Know About™ Kidney Cancer This booklet is about cancer that starts in ... choices about your care. This booklet covers: How kidney cancer is diagnosed Common symptoms for kidney cancer Treatments ...

  4. Nutrition for Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... as meat and dairy products break down into waste products that healthy kidneys remove from the blood. ... What do the kidneys do? The kidneys remove wastes and extra water from the blood and make ...

  5. [Causes of removal of kidney allotransplants].

    PubMed

    Rozental', R L; Il'inskiĭ, I M; Tikhomirova, T E; Bitsans, Ia B; Luse, L Ia

    1983-07-01

    The most frequent causes of cessation of the functioning of 60 kidney transplants was an acute rejection reaction and thrombosis of main vessels of the transplanted kidney. The authors believe the attraction of the cytological analysis of the urine, instrumental and roentgen-radiological examinations as well as biochemical data to improve the diagnosis of pathological changes in the transplant. PMID:6353738

  6. The Experience of Living Kidney Donors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Judith Belle; Karley, Mary Lou; Boudville, Neil; Bullas, Ruth; Garg, Amit X.; Muirhead, Norman

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the experiences, feelings, and ideas of living kidney donors. Using a phenomenological, qualitative research approach, the authors interviewed 12 purposefully selected living kidney donors (eight men and four women), who were between four and 29 years since donation. Interviews were audiotaped, and transcribed verbatim, and…

  7. MicroRNAs in Diabetic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rong; Chung, Arthur C. K.; Yu, Xueqing; Lan, Hui Y.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid growth of diabetes and diabetic kidney disease exerts a great burden on society. Owing to the lack of effective treatments for diabetic kidney disease, treatment relies on drugs that either reduces its progression or involve renal replacement therapies, such as dialysis and kidney transplantation. It is urgent to search for biomarkers for early diagnosis and effective therapy. The discovery of microRNAs had lead to a new era of post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Studies from cells, experimental animal models and patients under diabetic conditions demonstrate that expression patterns of microRNAs are altered during the progression of diabetic kidney disease. Functional studies indicate that the ability of microRNAs to bind 3′ untranslated region of messenger RNA not only shows their capability to regulate expression of target genes, but also their therapeutic potential to diabetic kidney disease. The presence of microRNAs in plasma, serum, and urine has been shown to be possible biomarkers in diabetic kidney disease. Therefore, identification of the pathogenic role of microRNAs possesses an important clinical impact in terms of prevention and treatment of progression in diabetic kidney disease because it allows us to design novel and specific therapies and diagnostic tools for diabetic kidney disease. PMID:24550986

  8. Diabetes Mellitus in the Transplanted Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Peev, Vasil; Reiser, Jochen; Alachkar, Nada

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is the most common cause of chronic kidney disease and end stage renal disease. New onset diabetes mellitus after transplant (NODAT) has been described in approximately 30% of non-diabetic kidney-transplant recipients many years post transplantation. DM in patients with kidney transplantation constitutes a major comorbidity, and has significant impact on the patients and allografts’ outcome. In addition to the major comorbidity and mortality that result from cardiovascular and other DM complications, long standing DM after kidney-transplant has significant pathological injury to the allograft, which results in lowering the allografts and the patients’ survivals. In spite of the cumulative body of data on diabetic nephropathy (DN) in the native kidney, there has been very limited data on the DN in the transplanted kidney. In this review, we will shed the light on the risk factors that lead to the development of NODAT. We will also describe the impact of DM on the transplanted kidney, and the outcome of kidney-transplant recipients with NODAT. Additionally, we will present the most acceptable data on management of NODAT. PMID:25221544

  9. Kidney Failure - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arabic) الفشل الكلوي - العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Bosnian (Bosanski) Kidney Failure Otkazivanje rada bubrega - Bosanski (Bosnian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Kidney Failure 肾衰 - 简体中文 (Chinese - ...

  10. Allopurinol and kidney function: An update.

    PubMed

    Stamp, Lisa K; Chapman, Peter T; Palmer, Suetonia C

    2016-01-01

    Allopurinol is the most commonly used urate lowering therapy in the management of gout. Despite the fact that it has been available for over 40 years there is ongoing debate about optimal allopurinol dosing in gout patients with chronic kidney disease. Given that gout is common in patients with renal impairment, clinicians need to be aware of the relationships between serum urate and kidney function as well as the effects of allopurinol on kidney function and vice versa. The use of allopurinol in patients on dialysis is an understudied area. Dialysis reduces plasma oxypurinol concentrations, therefore the dose and time of administration in relationship to dialysis need to be carefully considered. Recently, it has been suggested that there may be a role for allopurinol in patients with chronic kidney disease without gout. Observational studies have reported an association between serum urate and chronic kidney disease and end stage renal failure. The effect of urate lowering therapy with allopurinol on progression of kidney disease has been examined in small studies with varying results. Larger clinical trials are currently underway. This review will examine the relationships between allopurinol and kidney function in adults with and without renal disease and address allopurinol dosing in gout patients with impaired kidney function. PMID:26453097

  11. Study of Kidney Tumors in Younger Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-17

    Clear Cell Sarcoma of the Kidney; Congenital Mesoblastic Nephroma; Diffuse Hyperplastic Perilobar Nephroblastomatosis; Rhabdoid Tumor of the Kidney; Stage I Renal Cell Cancer; Stage I Wilms Tumor; Stage II Renal Cell Cancer; Stage II Wilms Tumor; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Wilms Tumor; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Wilms Tumor; Stage V Wilms Tumor

  12. The Experience of Living Kidney Donors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Judith Belle; Karley, Mary Lou; Boudville, Neil; Bullas, Ruth; Garg, Amit X.; Muirhead, Norman

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the experiences, feelings, and ideas of living kidney donors. Using a phenomenological, qualitative research approach, the authors interviewed 12 purposefully selected living kidney donors (eight men and four women), who were between four and 29 years since donation. Interviews were audiotaped, and transcribed verbatim, and

  13. Bone marrow and umbilical cord blood human mesenchymal stem cells: state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Malgieri, Arianna; Kantzari, Eugenia; Patrizi, Maria Patrizia; Gambardella, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent adult stem cells present in all tissues, as part of the perivascular population. As multipotent cells, MSCs can differentiate into different tissues originating from mesoderm ranging from bone and cartilage, to cardiac muscle. MSCs are an excellent candidate for cell therapy because they are easily accessible, their isolation is straightforward, they can be bio-preserved with minimal loss of potency, and they have shown no adverse reactions to allogeneic versus autologous MSCs transplants. Therefore, MSCs are being explored to regenerate damaged tissue and treat inflammation, resulting from cardiovascular disease and myo-cardial infarction (MI), brain and spinal cord injury, stroke, diabetes, cartilage and bone injury, Crohn's disease and graft versus host disease (GvHD). Most of the application and clinical trials involve MSCs from bone marrow (BMMSCs). Transplantation of MSCs from bone marrow is considered safe and has been widely tested in clinical trials of cardiovascular, neurological, and immunological disease with encouraging results. There are examples of MSCs utilization in the repair of kidney, muscle and lung. The cells were also found to promote angiogenesis, and were used in chronic skin wound treatment. Recent studies involve also mesenchymal stem cell transplant from umbilical cord (UCMSCt). One of these demonstrate that UCMSCt may improve symptoms and biochemical values in patients with severe refractory systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and therefore this source of MSCs need deeper studies and require more attention. However, also if there are 79 registered clinical trial sites for evaluating MSC therapy throughout the world, it is still a long way to go before using these cells as a routinely applied therapy in clinics. PMID:21072260

  14. Dynamic loading characteristics of an intradural spinal cord stimulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliynyk, M. S.; Gillies, G. T.; Oya, H.; Wilson, S.; Reddy, C. G.; Howard, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    We have measured the forces that act on the electrode-bearing surface of an intradural neuromodulator designed to be in direct contact with the pial surface of the spinal cord, as part of our effort to develop a new method for treating intractable pain. The goal was to investigate the pressures produced by this device on the spinal cord and compare them with normal intrathecal pressure. For this purpose, we employed a dual-sensor arrangement that allowed us to measure the response of a custom-designed silicone spinal cord surrogate to the forces applied by the device. We found that the device had a mean compliance of ≈63 μN μm-1, and that over a 3 mm range of compression, the mid-span pressure it exerted on the spinal cord was ≈1.88 × 103 Pa = 14.1 mm Hg, which lies within the range of normal intrathecal pressure in humans.

  15. Clinical and Experimental Advances in Regeneration of Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Jung Keun; Kim, Hae-Won

    2010-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is one of the major disabilities dealt with in clinical rehabilitation settings and is multifactorial in that the patients suffer from motor and sensory impairments as well as many other complications throughout their lifetimes. Many clinical trials have been documented during the last two decades to restore damaged spinal cords. However, only a few pharmacological therapies used in clinical settings which still have only limited effects on the regeneration, recovery speed, or retraining of the spinal cord. In this paper, we will introduce recent clinical trials, which performed pharmacological treatments and cell transplantations for patients with SCI, and evaluate recent in vivo studies for the regeneration of injured spinal cord, including stem-cell transplantation, application of neurotrophic factors and suppressor of inhibiting factors, development of biomaterial scaffolds and delivery systems, rehabilitation, and the combinations of these therapies to evaluate what can be appropriately applied in the future to the patients with SCI. PMID:21350645

  16. Congenital hernia of cord: an often misdiagnosed entity.

    PubMed

    Raju, Rubin; Satti, Mohamed; Lee, Quoc; Vettraino, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    Congenital hernia of the cord, also known as umbilical cord hernia, is an often misdiagnosed and under-reported entity, easily confused with a small omphalocele. It is different from postnatally diagnosed umbilical hernias and is believed to arise from persistent physiological mid-gut herniation. Its incidence is estimated to be 1 in 5000. Unlike an omphalocele, it is considered benign and is not linked with chromosomal anomalies. It has been loosely associated with intestinal anomalies, suggesting the need for a complete fetal anatomical ultrasound evaluation. We present a case of a fetal umbilical cord hernia diagnosed in a 28-year-old woman at 21 weeks gestation. The antenatal and intrapartum courses were uncomplicated. It was misdiagnosed postnatally as a small omphalocele, causing unwarranted anxiety in the parents. Increased awareness and knowledge of such an entity among health professionals is important to prevent unwarranted anxiety from misdiagnosis, and inadvertent bowel injury during cord clamping at delivery. PMID:25899514

  17. Sex Cord-Gonadal Stromal Tumor of the Rete Testis

    PubMed Central

    Sajadi, Kamran P.; Dalton, Rory R.; Brown, James A.

    2009-01-01

    A 34-year-old tetraplegic patient with suppurative epididymitis was found on follow-up examination and ultrasonography to have a testicular mass. The radical orchiectomy specimen contained an undifferentiated spindled sex cord-stromal tumor arising in the rete testis. Testicular sex cord-stromal tumors are far less common than germ cell neoplasms and are usually benign. The close relationship between sex cords and ductules of the rete testis during development provides the opportunity for these uncommon tumors to arise anatomically within the rete tesis. This undifferentiated sex cord-stromal tumor, occurring in a previously unreported location, is an example of an unusual lesion mimicking an intratesticular malignant neoplasm. PMID:19125206

  18. What Are the Treatments for Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for SCI? " People with SCI may benefit from rehabilitation, including 3 , 4 : Physical therapy geared toward muscle ... management of spinal cord injury: From impact to Rehabilitation , 2nd ed. Rolling Meadows, IL: American Association of ...

  19. Storage of cord blood attracts private-sector interest

    PubMed Central

    Hass, J

    1999-01-01

    Storage of cord blood from their babies can cost parents several hundred dollars, and some private companies are already offering the service. Janis Hass reports that some Canadian specialists question the value of the banks. PMID:10081471

  20. Avoiding neonatal death: an intervention study of umbilical cord care.

    PubMed

    Garner, P; Lai, D; Baea, M; Edwards, K; Heywood, P

    1994-02-01

    During a study of pregnancy in a poor rural tropical area, a high prevalence of neonatal fever and umbilical cord infection was detected. Interim analysis showed that this was associated with subsequent development of neonatal sepsis. Therefore an intervention was introduced in two stages. In the first stage, acriflavine spirit and new razor blades were supplied to mothers, along with instructions for use, through antenatal clinics. In the second stage, when excessive cord bleeding was reported, umbilical cord clamps were added to the pack. The packs were associated with reduction of serious morbidity in the neonatal period. The study demonstrates the importance of umbilical cord care in the aetiology of life threatening neonatal morbidity in village births in a developing country and the effect of a simple intervention in reducing morbid episodes in the neonate. PMID:8182776

  1. 29. INTERIOR, ATTIC, DETAIL OF TOP CORD CONNECTION ON ROOF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. INTERIOR, ATTIC, DETAIL OF TOP CORD CONNECTION ON ROOF TRUSS SHOWING SCREW CONNECTION - U.S. Soldiers Home, Scott Building, Rock Creek Church Road & Upshur Street Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  2. Biomaterial Design Strategies for the Treatment of Spinal Cord Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Straley, Karin S.; Po Foo, Cheryl Wong

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The highly debilitating nature of spinal cord injuries has provided much inspiration for the design of novel biomaterials that can stimulate cellular regeneration and functional recovery. Many experts agree that the greatest hope for treatment of spinal cord injuries will involve a combinatorial approach that integrates biomaterial scaffolds, cell transplantation, and molecule delivery. This manuscript presents a comprehensive review of biomaterial-scaffold design strategies currently being applied to the development of nerve guidance channels and hydrogels that more effectively stimulate spinal cord tissue regeneration. To enhance the regenerative capacity of these two scaffold types, researchers are focusing on optimizing the mechanical properties, cell-adhesivity, biodegradability, electrical activity, and topography of synthetic and natural materials, and are developing mechanisms to use these scaffolds to deliver cells and biomolecules. Developing scaffolds that address several of these key design parameters will lead to more successful therapies for the regeneration of spinal cord tissue. PMID:19698073

  3. The placental blood program of the Barcelona Cord Blood Bank.

    PubMed

    Querol, S; Gabarró, M; Amat, L; Gonzalez, S; Gomez, M D; de la Calle, O; Madoz, P; Badell, I; Garcia, J

    1998-07-01

    Cord blood has recently become an alternative to bone marrow transplantation, generating the need for cord blood banks where large numbers of frozen cord blood units can be stored. The Barcelona Cord Blood Bank (bcB) was created in October 1995. Initially, several methods for volume reduction were tested, including Ficoll, Percoll, Gelatin and HES sedimentation. Of these, HES sedimentation (88% +/- 11 CD34+ cells recovery) was the one chosen for routine banking. Up to November 1997, the bank has processed 754 units with a median of 1.05 x 10(9) nucleated cells and 2.5 x 10(6) CD34+ cells stored per unit. Nine of these units have been shipped for transplantation. PMID:9715868

  4. Sex cord-gonadal stromal tumor of the rete testis.

    PubMed

    Sajadi, Kamran P; Dalton, Rory R; Brown, James A

    2009-01-01

    A 34-year-old tetraplegic patient with suppurative epididymitis was found on follow-up examination and ultrasonography to have a testicular mass. The radical orchiectomy specimen contained an undifferentiated spindled sex cord-stromal tumor arising in the rete testis. Testicular sex cord-stromal tumors are far less common than germ cell neoplasms and are usually benign. The close relationship between sex cords and ductules of the rete testis during development provides the opportunity for these uncommon tumors to arise anatomically within the rete tesis. This undifferentiated sex cord-stromal tumor, occurring in a previously unreported location, is an example of an unusual lesion mimicking an intratesticular malignant neoplasm. PMID:19125206

  5. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. These are ...

  6. General Information about Childhood Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. These are ...

  7. Senegenin inhibits neuronal apoptosis after spinal cord contusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shu-quan; Wu, Min-fei; Gu, Rui; Liu, Jia-bei; Li, Ye; Zhu, Qing-san; Jiang, Jin-lan

    2016-01-01

    Senegenin has been shown to inhibit neuronal apoptosis, thereby exerting a neuroprotective effect. In the present study, we established a rat model of spinal cord contusion injury using the modified Allen's method. Three hours after injury, senegenin (30 mg/g) was injected into the tail vein for 3 consecutive days. Senegenin reduced the size of syringomyelic cavities, and it substantially reduced the number of apoptotic cells in the spinal cord. At the site of injury, Bax and Caspase-3 mRNA and protein levels were decreased by senegenin, while Bcl-2 mRNA and protein levels were increased. Nerve fiber density was increased in the spinal cord proximal to the brain, and hindlimb motor function and electrophysiological properties of rat hindlimb were improved. Taken together, our results suggest that senegenin exerts a neuroprotective effect by suppressing neuronal apoptosis at the site of spinal cord injury. PMID:27212931

  8. World Kidney Day 2016: Averting the legacy of kidney disease-focus on childhood.

    PubMed

    Ingelfinger, Julie R; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Schaefer, Franz

    2016-03-01

    World Kidney Day 2016 focuses on kidney disease in childhood and the antecedents of adult kidney disease that can begin in earliest childhood. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in childhood differs from that in adults, as the largest diagnostic group among children includes congenital anomalies and inherited disorders, with glomerulopathies and kidney disease in the setting of diabetes being relatively uncommon. In addition, many children with acute kidney injury will ultimately develop sequelae that may lead to hypertension and CKD in later childhood or in adult life. Children born early, or who are small-for-date newborns, have a relatively increased risk for the development of CKD later in life. Persons with a high-risk birth and early childhood history should be watched closely in order to help detect early signs of kidney disease in time to provide effective prevention or treatment. Successful therapy is feasible for advanced CKD in childhood; there is evidence that children fare better than adults if they receive kidney replacement therapy including dialysis and transplantation, while only a minority of children may require this ultimate intervention. Because there are disparities in access to care, effort is needed so that those children with kidney disease, wherever they live, may be treated effectively, irrespective of their geographic or economic circumstances. Our hope is that World Kidney Day will inform the general public, policy-makers, and caregivers about the needs and possibilities surrounding kidney disease in childhood. PMID:26884120

  9. Using Xenopus to study genetic kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Lienkamp, Soeren S

    2016-03-01

    Modern sequencing technology is revolutionizing our knowledge of inherited kidney disease. However, the molecular role of genes affected by the rapidly rising number of identified mutations is lagging behind. Xenopus is a highly useful, but underutilized model organism with unique properties excellently suited to decipher the molecular mechanisms of kidney development and disease. The embryonic kidney (pronephros) can be manipulated on only one side of the animal and its formation observed directly through the translucent skin. The moderate evolutionary distance between Xenopus and humans is a huge advantage for studying basic principles of kidney development, but still allows us to analyze the function of disease related genes. Optogenetic manipulations and genome editing by CRISPR/Cas are exciting additions to the toolbox for disease modelling and will facilitate the use of Xenopus in translational research. Therefore, the future of Xenopus in kidney research is bright. PMID:26851624

  10. Acute Kidney Injury Associated with Linagliptin.

    PubMed

    Nandikanti, Deepak K; Gosmanova, Elvira O; Gosmanov, Aidar R

    2016-01-01

    Linagliptin is a dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) inhibitor that is approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. About 5% of linagliptin is eliminated by the kidneys and no dose adjustment is recommended in kidney impairment. We report a first case of linagliptin-associated acute kidney injury (AKI) in a patient with preexisting chronic kidney disease (CKD). We hypothesize that AKI was due to renal hypoperfusion from linagliptin-induced natriuresis and intravascular volume contraction in the setting of concomitant lisinopril use, which is known to impair autoregulation and potentiate hypotension-induced AKI. It may be prudent to exert caution and closely monitor kidney function when initiating linagliptin in combination with ACE-inhibitors in CKD patients. PMID:26981294

  11. Misinterpretation of radioisotope imaging in pelvic kidneys.

    PubMed

    Allen, D; Bultitude, M F; Nunan, T; Glass, J M

    2005-04-01

    We report the case of a gentleman referred with apparent worsening function in a hydronephrotic left-sided pelvic kidney. Imaging with Tc-99m-Mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG 3) in 1999, showed that the left kidney contributed 46% of renal function with no evidence of obstruction. Three years later, repeat scanning showed ectopic kidney function had decreased to 20% and with worsening pain, nephrectomy had been suggested. Review of the second MAG 3 scan revealed that only posterior images had been obtained. With pelvic kidneys, the pelvis forms a barrier between the radioactively labelled tracer and the gamma camera, thus, reducing the amount of radiation detected and underestimating function. A subsequent Dimercaptosuccinic acid scan (DMSA) was carried out with posterior and anterior images, the latter showing split renal function was identical to that seen on the initial scan. In patients with pelvic kidneys, anterior views must be obtained during radionuclide scanning if unnecessary nephrectomy is to be avoided. PMID:15875644

  12. Cyclic nucleotide signalling in kidney fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Schinner, Elisabeth; Wetzl, Veronika; Schlossmann, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Kidney fibrosis is an important factor for the progression of kidney diseases, e.g., diabetes mellitus induced kidney failure, glomerulosclerosis and nephritis resulting in chronic kidney disease or end-stage renal disease. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) were implicated to suppress several of the above mentioned renal diseases. In this review article, identified effects and mechanisms of cGMP and cAMP regarding renal fibrosis are summarized. These mechanisms include several signalling pathways of nitric oxide/ANP/guanylyl cyclases/cGMP-dependent protein kinase and cAMP/Epac/adenylyl cyclases/cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Furthermore, diverse possible drugs activating these pathways are discussed. From these diverse mechanisms it is expected that new pharmacological treatments will evolve for the therapy or even prevention of kidney failure. PMID:25622251

  13. De Novo Kidney Regeneration with Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yokote, Shinya; Yamanaka, Shuichiro; Yokoo, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have reported on techniques to mobilize and activate endogenous stem-cells in injured kidneys or to introduce exogenous stem cells for tissue repair. Despite many recent advantages in renal regenerative therapy, chronic kidney disease (CKD) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality and the number of CKD patients has been increasing. When the sophisticated structure of the kidneys is totally disrupted by end stage renal disease (ESRD), traditional stem cell-based therapy is unable to completely regenerate the damaged tissue. This suggests that whole organ regeneration may be a promising therapeutic approach to alleviate patients with uncured CKD. We summarize here the potential of stem-cell-based therapy for injured tissue repair and de novo whole kidney regeneration. In addition, we describe the hurdles that must be overcome and possible applications of this approach in kidney regeneration. PMID:23251079

  14. [Asymptomatic kidney stones: active surveillance vs. treatment].

    PubMed

    Neisius, A; Thomas, C; Roos, F C; Hampel, C; Fritsche, H-M; Bach, T; Thüroff, J W; Knoll, T

    2015-09-01

    The prevalence of kidney stones is increasing worldwide. Asymptomatic non-obstructing kidney stones are increasingly detected as an incidental finding on radiologic imaging, which has been performed more frequently over the last decades. Beside the current interventional treatment modalities such as extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL), ureterorenoscopy (URS) and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL), active surveillance of asymptomatic kidney stones has been a focus of discussion lately, not only for attending physicians, but even more so for patients. The current German and European guidelines recommend active surveillance for patients with asymptomatic kidney stones if no interventional therapy is mandatory because of pain or medical factors. Herein we review the current literature on risks and benefits of active surveillance of asymptomatic non-obstructing kidney stones. PMID:26378390

  15. The multicystic dysplastic kidney in children.

    PubMed

    Chang, W T; Chen, H C; Peng, H C

    1993-05-01

    Multicystic dysplastic kidney (MCDK) is the most common renal cystic disease in infancy and the second most common neonatal abdominal mass. It represents an extreme form of renal dysplasia. The key features in MCDK include variability in size, loss of kidney shape, absence of function and obstruction of ureter. Current management is still controversial. The prognosis is largely depended upon the problems of associated anomalies and the condition of the contralateral kidney. From September '82 to September '91, twelve patients with multicystic kidney have been treated at Taichung Veterans General Hospital. Ten of them received elective nephrectomy. The postoperative condition was uneventful. However, there was a high frequency of associated anomalies (41.6%) and pathologic contralateral kidney (50%). Two patients who refused operation were put on close observation and follow-up with ultrasound. During the surgical patients' follow-up period, one suffered from repeated urinary tract infection and the other died of multiple congenital anomalies. PMID:8334562

  16. Cyclooxygenase (COX) Inhibitors and the Newborn Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Francine G.; Wade, Andrew W.; Lewis, Megan L.; Qi, Wei

    2012-01-01

    This review summarizes our current understanding of the role of cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors (COXI) in influencing the structural development as well as the function of the developing kidney. COXI administered either during pregnancy or after birth can influence kidney development including nephronogenesis, and can decrease renal perfusion and ultrafiltration potentially leading to acute kidney injury in the newborn period. To date, which COX isoform (COX-1 or COX-2) plays a more important role in during fetal development and influences kidney function early in life is not known, though evidence points to a predominant role for COX-2. Clinical implications of the use of COXI in pregnancy and in the newborn infant are also evaluated herein, with specific reference to the potential effects of COXI on nephronogenesis as well as newborn kidney function. PMID:24281306

  17. Acute Kidney Injury Associated with Linagliptin

    PubMed Central

    Nandikanti, Deepak K.; Gosmanova, Elvira O.; Gosmanov, Aidar R.

    2016-01-01

    Linagliptin is a dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) inhibitor that is approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. About 5% of linagliptin is eliminated by the kidneys and no dose adjustment is recommended in kidney impairment. We report a first case of linagliptin-associated acute kidney injury (AKI) in a patient with preexisting chronic kidney disease (CKD). We hypothesize that AKI was due to renal hypoperfusion from linagliptin-induced natriuresis and intravascular volume contraction in the setting of concomitant lisinopril use, which is known to impair autoregulation and potentiate hypotension-induced AKI. It may be prudent to exert caution and closely monitor kidney function when initiating linagliptin in combination with ACE-inhibitors in CKD patients. PMID:26981294

  18. Comparison of Upright Gait with Supine Bungee-Cord Gait

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boda, Wanda L.; Hargens, Alan R.; Campbell, J. A.; Yang, C.; Holton, Emily M. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Running on a treadmill with bungee-cord resistance is currently used on the Russian space station MIR as a countermeasure for the loss of bone and muscular strength which occurs during spaceflight. However, it is unknown whether ground reaction force (GRF) at the feet using bungee-cord resistance is similar to that which occurs during upright walking and running on Earth. We hypothesized-that the DRAMs generated during upright walking and running are greater than the DRAMs generated during supine bungee-cord gait. Eleven healthy subjects walked (4.8 +/- 0.13 km/h, mean +/- SE) and ran (9.1 +/- 0.51 km/h) during upright and supine bungee-cord exercise on an active treadmill. Subjects exercised for 3 min in each condition using a resistance of 1 body weight calibrated during an initial, stationary standing position. Data were sampled at a frequency of 500Hz and the mean of 3 trials was analyzed for each condition. A repeated measures analysis of variance tested significance between the conditions. Peak DRAMs during upright walking were significantly greater (1084.9 +/- 111.4 N) than during supine bungee-cord walking (770.3 +/- 59.8 N; p less than 0.05). Peak GRFs were also significantly greater for upright running (1548.3 +/- 135.4 N) than for supine bungee-cord running (1099.5 +/- 158.46 N). Analysis of GRF curves indicated that forces decreased throughout the stance phase for bungee-cord gait but not during upright gait. These results indicate that bungee-cord exercise may not create sufficient loads at the feet to counteract the loss of bone and muscular strength that occurs during long-duration exposure to microgravity.

  19. Surgical Outcomes of High-Grade Spinal Cord Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Hida, Kazutoshi; Yano, Syunsuke; Aoyama, Takeshi; Koyanagi, Izumi; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2015-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective study. Purpose The purpose of this study was to obtain useful information for establishing the guidelines for treating high-grade spinal cord gliomas. Overview of Literature The optimal management of high-grade spinal cord gliomas remains controversial. We report the outcomes of the surgical management of 14 high-grade spinal glioma. Methods We analyzed the outcomes of 14 patients with high-grade spinal cord gliomas who were surgically treated between 1989 and 2012. Survival was charted with the Kaplan-Meier plots and comparisons were made with the log-rank test. Results None of the patients with high-grade spinal cord gliomas underwent total resection. Subtotal resection was performed in two patients, partial resection was performed in nine patients, and open biopsy was performed in three patients. All patients underwent postoperative radiotherapy and six patients further underwent radiation cordotomy. The median survival time for patients with high-grade spinal cord gliomas was 15 months, with a 5-year survival rate of 22.2%. The median survival time for patients with World Health Organization grade III tumors was 25.5 months, whereas the median survival time for patients with glioblastoma multiforme was 12.5 months. Both univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models demonstrated a significant effect only in the group that did not include cervical cord lesion as a factor associated with survival (p=0.04 and 0.03). Conclusions The surgical outcome of patients diagnosed with high-grade spinal cord gliomas remains poor. Notably, only the model which excluded cervical cord lesions as a factor significantly predicted survival. PMID:26713128

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord lesions in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Honig, L S; Sheremata, W A

    1989-01-01

    The clinical and pathological manifestations of multiple sclerosis are due to areas of demyelination which occur throughout the white matter of the central nervous system. MRI of the brain frequently shows abnormalities in the hemispheric subcortical white matter; these are demonstrable in the majority of patients and support the clinical diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. Our studies have shown that while MRI identifies such cerebral lesions in nearly all clinically definite multiple sclerosis patients with illness of duration greater than 10 years, these areas of abnormal T2 signal are present less often in the brains of patients studied within 3 years of disease onset. However, symptoms referable to the long tracts of the spinal cord are prominent in many of these patients. Imaging of the spinal cord has presented technical problems because of the small size of the cord, patient body, heart and respiratory movements, and limitations of surface coil technology. The spinal cord of 77 patients with multiple sclerosis have been imaged, revealing three types of abnormalities: (1) approximately half the cords show regions of abnormal T2 weighted signal; (2) during acute exacerbation, spinal cord enlargement (swelling) may be observed; (3) spinal cord atrophy (narrowing) is found particularly in patients with disease of longer duration and greater disability. Unlike the presence of brain lesions, the existence of spinal cord lesions of high T2 signal is not associated with increasing duration of disease but is correlated with disability status. Of patients with such lesions about one fifth did not exhibit brain lesions discernible by MRI. Images PMID:2738588