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Sample records for kidney disease rat

  1. Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Kidney Disease KidsHealth > For Teens > Kidney Disease Print A ... Syndrome Coping With Kidney Conditions What Do the Kidneys Do? You might never think much about some ...

  2. Kidney Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... until you go to the bathroom. Most kidney diseases attack the nephrons. This damage may leave kidneys ... medicines. You have a higher risk of kidney disease if you have diabetes, high blood pressure, or ...

  3. Kidney Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... until you go to the bathroom. Most kidney diseases attack the nephrons. This damage may leave kidneys ... medicines. You are at greater risk for kidney disease if you have diabetes, high blood pressure, or ...

  4. Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Kidney Disease What is Kidney Disease? What the Kidneys Do Click for more information You have two ... damaged, wastes can build up in the body. Kidney Function and Aging Kidney function may be reduced ...

  5. Chronic Kidney Disease Impairs Bone Defect Healing in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weiqing; Kang, Ning; Seriwatanachai, Dutmanee; Dong, Yuliang; Zhou, Liyan; Lin, Yunfeng; Ye, Ling; Liang, Xing; Yuan, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been regarded as a risk for bone health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of CKD on bone defect repair in rats. Uremia was induced by subtotal renal ablation, and serum levels of BUN and PTH were significantly elevated four weeks after the second renal surgery. Calvarial defects of 5-mm diameter were created and implanted with or without deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM). Micro-CT and histological analyses consistently revealed a decreased newly regenerated bone volume for CKD rats after 4 and 8 weeks. In addition, 1.4-mm-diameter cortical bone defects were established in the distal end of femora and filled with gelatin sponge. CKD rats exhibited significantly lower values of regenerated bone and bone mineral density (BMD) within the cortical gap after 2 and 4 weeks. Moreover, histomorphometric analysis showed an increase in both osteoblast number (N.Ob/B.Pm) and osteoclast number (N.Oc/B.Pm) in CKD groups due to hyperparathyroidism. Notably, collagen maturation was delayed in CKD rats as verified by Masson’s Trichrome staining. These data indicate that declined renal function negatively affects bone regeneration in both calvarial and femoral defects. PMID:26955758

  6. Salivary Alterations in Rats with Experimental Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Ana Carolina; Bergamaschi, Cassia Toledo; de Souza, Douglas Nesadal; Nogueira, Fernando Neves

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to analyze changes in saliva composition and salivary secretion process of rats with chronic kidney disease induced by 5/6 nephrectomy to set the foundation for salivary studies related to CKD. Methods CKD was induced in Wistar rats via 5/6 nephrectomy. Blood and saliva samples were collected from Control, Sham and CKD groups at 8 and 12 weeks after the surgery. Salivation was stimulated via intraperitoneal injections of pilocarpine (1.0 mg/Kg body weight) or isoproterenol (5.0 mg/Kg body weight). Saliva was collected and immediately stored at -80°C until analysis. The salivary flow rate, total protein, amylase and peroxidase activities, and urea concentrations were measured. The blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine concentrations were also evaluated. Results Increases in BUN and serum creatinine concentrations were observed in the CKD groups. Amylase activity was significantly reduced in response to both stimuli in the CKD groups at 8 weeks and increased in the CKD groups at 12 weeks in response to isoproterenol stimulus. The peroxidase activities of the CKD groups were significantly reduced in response to isoproterenol stimulation and were increased at 12 weeks in response to pilocarpine stimulation. Salivary urea was significantly increased in the CKD groups at 8 weeks in response to the isoproterenol stimuli and at 12 weeks in response to both salivary agonists. Conclusions The pattern of alterations observed in this experimental model is similar to those observed in patients and clearly demonstrates the viability of 5/6 nephrectomy as an experimental model in future studies to understand the alterations in salivary compositions and in salivary glands that are elicited by CKD. PMID:26859883

  7. Determinants of renal tissue hypoxia in a rat model of polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Ow, Connie P C; Abdelkader, Amany; Hilliard, Lucinda M; Phillips, Jacqueline K; Evans, Roger G

    2014-11-15

    Renal tissue oxygen tension (PO2) and its determinants have not been quantified in polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Therefore, we measured kidney tissue PO2 in the Lewis rat model of PKD (LPK) and in Lewis control rats. We also determined the relative contributions of altered renal oxygen delivery and consumption to renal tissue hypoxia in LPK rats. PO2 of the superficial cortex of 11- to 13-wk-old LPK rats, measured by Clark electrode with the rat under anesthesia, was higher within the cysts (32.8 ± 4.0 mmHg) than the superficial cortical parenchyma (18.3 ± 3.5 mmHg). PO2 in the superficial cortical parenchyma of Lewis rats was 2.5-fold greater (46.0 ± 3.1 mmHg) than in LPK rats. At each depth below the cortical surface, tissue PO2 in LPK rats was approximately half that in Lewis rats. Renal blood flow was 60% less in LPK than in Lewis rats, and arterial hemoglobin concentration was 57% less, so renal oxygen delivery was 78% less. Renal venous PO2 was 38% less in LPK than Lewis rats. Sodium reabsorption was 98% less in LPK than Lewis rats, but renal oxygen consumption did not significantly differ between the two groups. Thus, in this model of PKD, kidney tissue is severely hypoxic, at least partly because of deficient renal oxygen delivery. Nevertheless, the observation of similar renal oxygen consumption, despite markedly less sodium reabsorption, in the kidneys of LPK compared with Lewis rats, indicates the presence of inappropriately high oxygen consumption in the polycystic kidney. PMID:25209412

  8. HIV and Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... FOR KIDNEY DISEASE? HIV MEDICATIONS AND THE KIDNEYS DIALYSIS AND KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION THE BOTTOM LINE WHY SHOULD ... disease (ESRD) or kidney failure. This can require dialysis or a kidney transplant. The rate of kidney ...

  9. Aβ damages learning and memory in Alzheimer's disease rats with kidney-yang deficiency.

    PubMed

    Qi, Dongmei; Qiao, Yongfa; Zhang, Xin; Yu, Huijuan; Cheng, Bin; Qiao, Haifa

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that Alzheimer's disease was considered as the consequence produced by deficiency of Kidney essence. However, the mechanism underlying the symptoms also remains elusive. Here we report that spatial learning and memory, escape, and swimming capacities were damaged significantly in Kidney-yang deficiency rats. Indeed, both hippocampal Aβ(40) and 42 increases in Kidney-yang deficiency contribute to the learning and memory impairments. Specifically, damage of synaptic plasticity is involved in the learning and memory impairment of Kidney-yang deficiency rats. We determined that the learning and memory damage in Kidney-yang deficiency due to synaptic plasticity impairment and increases of Aβ(40) and 42 was not caused via NMDA receptor internalization induced by Aβ increase. β-Adrenergic receptor agonist can rescue the impaired long-term potential (LTP) in Kidney-yang rats. Taken together, our results suggest that spatial learning and memory inhibited in Kidney-yang deficiency might be induced by Aβ increase and the decrease of β(2) receptor function in glia. PMID:22645624

  10. Kidney disease - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - kidney disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on kidney disease: National Kidney Disease Education Program -- www.nkdep.nih.gov National Kidney Foundation -- www.kidney.org National ...

  11. Chronic Kidney Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Chronic Kidney Diseases KidsHealth > For Kids > Chronic Kidney Diseases Print ... re talking about your kidneys. What Are the Kidneys? Your kidneys are tucked under your lower ribs ...

  12. Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD)

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Polycystic Kidney Disease Overview What is polycystic kidney disease? Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is an inherited disease that affects the kidneys. Sacs of fluid (called ...

  13. Telmisartan ameliorates fibrocystic liver disease in an orthologous rat model of human autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Daisuke; Kugita, Masanori; Sasaki, Mai; Horie, Shigeo; Nakanishi, Koichi; Abe, Takaaki; Aukema, Harold M; Yamaguchi, Tamio; Nagao, Shizuko

    2013-01-01

    Human autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) produces kidneys which are massively enlarged due to multiple cysts, hypertension, and congenital hepatic fibrosis characterized by dilated bile ducts and portal hypertension. The PCK rat is an orthologous model of human ARPKD with numerous fluid-filled cysts caused by stimulated cellular proliferation in the renal tubules and hepatic bile duct epithelia, with interstitial fibrosis developed in the liver. We previously reported that a peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-γ full agonist ameliorated kidney and liver disease in PCK rats. Telmisartan is an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) used widely as an antihypertensive drug and shows partial PPAR-γ agonist activity. It also has nephroprotective activity in diabetes and renal injury and prevents the effects of drug-induced hepatotoxicity and hepatic fibrosis. In the present study, we determined whether telmisartan ameliorates progression of polycystic kidney and fibrocystic liver disease in PCK rats. Five male and 5 female PCK and normal control (+/+) rats were orally administered 3 mg/kg telmisartan or vehicle every day from 4 to 20 weeks of age. Treatment with telmisartan decreased blood pressure in both PCK and +/+ rats. Blood levels of aspartate amino transferase, alanine amino transferase and urea nitrogen were unaffected by telmisartan treatment. There was no effect on kidney disease progression, but liver weight relative to body weight, liver cystic area, hepatic fibrosis index, expression levels of Ki67 and TGF-β, and the number of Ki67- and TGF-β-positive interstitial cells in the liver were significantly decreased in telmisartan-treated PCK rats. Therefore, telmisartan ameliorates congenital hepatic fibrosis in ARPKD, possibly through the inhibition of signaling cascades responsible for cellular proliferation and interstitial fibrosis in PCK rats. The present results support the potential therapeutic use of ARBs for the

  14. Telmisartan Ameliorates Fibrocystic Liver Disease in an Orthologous Rat Model of Human Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yoshihara, Daisuke; Kugita, Masanori; Sasaki, Mai; Horie, Shigeo; Nakanishi, Koichi; Abe, Takaaki; Aukema, Harold M.; Yamaguchi, Tamio; Nagao, Shizuko

    2013-01-01

    Human autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) produces kidneys which are massively enlarged due to multiple cysts, hypertension, and congenital hepatic fibrosis characterized by dilated bile ducts and portal hypertension. The PCK rat is an orthologous model of human ARPKD with numerous fluid-filled cysts caused by stimulated cellular proliferation in the renal tubules and hepatic bile duct epithelia, with interstitial fibrosis developed in the liver. We previously reported that a peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-γ full agonist ameliorated kidney and liver disease in PCK rats. Telmisartan is an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) used widely as an antihypertensive drug and shows partial PPAR-γ agonist activity. It also has nephroprotective activity in diabetes and renal injury and prevents the effects of drug-induced hepatotoxicity and hepatic fibrosis. In the present study, we determined whether telmisartan ameliorates progression of polycystic kidney and fibrocystic liver disease in PCK rats. Five male and 5 female PCK and normal control (+/+) rats were orally administered 3 mg/kg telmisartan or vehicle every day from 4 to 20 weeks of age. Treatment with telmisartan decreased blood pressure in both PCK and +/+ rats. Blood levels of aspartate amino transferase, alanine amino transferase and urea nitrogen were unaffected by telmisartan treatment. There was no effect on kidney disease progression, but liver weight relative to body weight, liver cystic area, hepatic fibrosis index, expression levels of Ki67 and TGF-β, and the number of Ki67- and TGF-β-positive interstitial cells in the liver were significantly decreased in telmisartan-treated PCK rats. Therefore, telmisartan ameliorates congenital hepatic fibrosis in ARPKD, possibly through the inhibition of signaling cascades responsible for cellular proliferation and interstitial fibrosis in PCK rats. The present results support the potential therapeutic use of ARBs for the

  15. Constitutive renal Rel/nuclear factor-κB expression in Lewis polycystic kidney disease rats

    PubMed Central

    Ta, Michelle H T; Schwensen, Kristina G; Liuwantara, David; Huso, David L; Watnick, Terry; Rangan, Gopala K

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the temporal expression and pattern of Rel/nuclear factor (NF)-κB proteins in renal tissue in polycystic kidney disease (PKD). METHODS: The renal expression of Rel/NF-κB proteins was determined by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and immunoblot analysis in Lewis polycystic kidney rats (LPK, a genetic ortholog of human nephronopthsis-9) from postnatal weeks 3 to 20. At each timepoint, renal disease progression and the mRNA expression of NF-κB-dependent genes (TNFα and CCL2) were determined. NF-κB was also histologically assessed in human PKD tissue. RESULTS: Progressive kidney enlargement in LPK rats was accompanied by increased renal cell proliferation and interstitial monocyte accumulation (peaking at weeks 3 and 10 respectively), and progressive interstitial fibrosis (with α smooth muscle actin and Sirius Red deposition significantly increased compared to Lewis kidneys from weeks 3 to 6 onwards). Rel/NF-κB proteins (phosphorylated-p105, p65, p50, c-Rel and RelB) were expressed in cystic epithelial cells (CECs) of LPK kidneys as early as postnatal week 3 and sustained until late-stage disease at week 20. From weeks 10 to 20, nuclear p65, p50, RelB and cytoplasmic IκBα protein levels, and TNFα and CCL2 expression, were upregulated in LPK compared to Lewis kidneys. NF-κB proteins were consistently expressed in CECs of human PKD. The DNA damage marker γ-H2AX was also identified in the CECs of LPK and human polycystic kidneys. CONCLUSION: Several NF-κB proteins are consistently expressed in CECs in human and experimental PKD. These data suggest that the upregulation of both the canonical and non-canonical pathways of NF-κB signaling may be a constitutive and early pathological feature of cystic renal diseases. PMID:27458563

  16. [Metabolic therapy of nephrolithiasis in two different rat models of kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Trashkov, A P; Vasiliev, A G; Kovalenko, A L; Tagirov, N S

    2015-01-01

    108 albino male rats were used in two experimental rat models reproducing urolithiasis for the assessment of metabolic drug medicine Remaxol nephroprotective effect upon the development of this disease. "Ethyleneglycol" model consisted of adding 1% ethylene glycol solution in drinking water for 37 days and "fructose-induced" one--of adding 10% fructose solution in drinking water for the same period. Therapy included a 10-day course of daily i.v. injections of Remaxol (14 ml/kg). Both experimental models were successful in producing urolithiasis with considerable disturbances in the structure and functioning of kidneys up to revealing microconcrement formation. The "ethyleneglycol" model proved to cause maximum changes while the "Fructose-induced" model--only moderate ones. Metabolic correction of these changes was successful in nephroprotection effectively normalizing kidney functions and the total protein concentration, eliminating hyperglycemia and reducing creatinine and urea blood plasma concentration in both rat experimental models. PMID:26036006

  17. Effects of hydration in rats and mice with polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Hopp, Katharina; Wang, Xiaofang; Ye, Hong; Irazabal, María V; Harris, Peter C; Torres, Vicente E

    2015-02-01

    Vasopressin and V2 receptor signaling promote polycystic kidney disease (PKD) progression, raising the question whether suppression of vasopressin release through enhanced hydration can delay disease advancement. Enhanced hydration by adding 5% glucose to the drinking water has proven protective in a rat model orthologous to autosomal recessive PKD. We wanted to exclude a glucose effect and explore the influence of enhanced hydration in a mouse model orthologous to autosomal dominant PKD. PCK rats were assigned to normal water intake (NWI) or high water intake (HWI) groups achieved by feeding a hydrated agar diet (HWI-agar) or by adding 5% glucose to the drinking water (HWI-glucose), with the latter group used to recapitulate previously published results. Homozygous Pkd1 R3277C (Pkd1(RC/RC)) mice were assigned to NWI and HWI-agar groups. To evaluate the effectiveness of HWI, kidney weight and histomorphometry were assessed, and urine vasopressin, renal cAMP levels, and phosphodiesterase activities were measured. HWI-agar, like HWI-glucose, reduced urine vasopressin, renal cAMP levels, and PKD severity in PCK rats but not in Pkd1(RC/RC) mice. Compared with rat kidneys, mouse kidneys had higher phosphodiesterase activity and lower cAMP levels and were less sensitive to the cystogenic effect of 1-deamino-8-d-arginine vasopressin, as previously shown for Pkd1(RC/RC) mice and confirmed here in Pkd2(WS25/-) mice. We conclude that the effect of enhanced hydration in rat and mouse models of PKD differs. More powerful suppression of V2 receptor-mediated signaling than achievable by enhanced hydration alone may be necessary to affect the development of PKD in mouse models. PMID:25503729

  18. Renal Primordia Activate Kidney Regenerative Events in a Rat Model of Progressive Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Imberti, Barbara; Corna, Daniela; Rizzo, Paola; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Abbate, Mauro; Longaretti, Lorena; Cassis, Paola; Benedetti, Valentina; Benigni, Ariela; Zoja, Carlamaria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Morigi, Marina

    2015-01-01

    New intervention tools for severely damaged kidneys are in great demand to provide patients with a valid alternative to whole organ replacement. For repairing or replacing injured tissues, emerging approaches focus on using stem and progenitor cells. Embryonic kidneys represent an interesting option because, when transplanted to sites such as the renal capsule of healthy animals, they originate new renal structures. Here, we studied whether metanephroi possess developmental capacity when transplanted under the kidney capsule of MWF male rats, a model of spontaneous nephropathy. We found that six weeks post-transplantation, renal primordia developed glomeruli and tubuli able to filter blood and to produce urine in cyst-like structures. Newly developed metanephroi were able to initiate a regenerative-like process in host renal tissues adjacent to the graft in MWF male rats as indicated by an increase in cell proliferation and vascular density, accompanied by mRNA and protein upregulation of VEGF, FGF2, HGF, IGF-1 and Pax-2. The expression of SMP30 and NCAM was induced in tubular cells. Oxidative stress and apoptosis markedly decreased. Our study shows that embryonic kidneys generate functional nephrons when transplanted into animals with severe renal disease and at the same time activate events at least partly mimicking those observed in kidney tissues during renal regeneration. PMID:25811887

  19. Renal primordia activate kidney regenerative events in a rat model of progressive renal disease.

    PubMed

    Imberti, Barbara; Corna, Daniela; Rizzo, Paola; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Abbate, Mauro; Longaretti, Lorena; Cassis, Paola; Benedetti, Valentina; Benigni, Ariela; Zoja, Carlamaria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Morigi, Marina

    2015-01-01

    New intervention tools for severely damaged kidneys are in great demand to provide patients with a valid alternative to whole organ replacement. For repairing or replacing injured tissues, emerging approaches focus on using stem and progenitor cells. Embryonic kidneys represent an interesting option because, when transplanted to sites such as the renal capsule of healthy animals, they originate new renal structures. Here, we studied whether metanephroi possess developmental capacity when transplanted under the kidney capsule of MWF male rats, a model of spontaneous nephropathy. We found that six weeks post-transplantation, renal primordia developed glomeruli and tubuli able to filter blood and to produce urine in cyst-like structures. Newly developed metanephroi were able to initiate a regenerative-like process in host renal tissues adjacent to the graft in MWF male rats as indicated by an increase in cell proliferation and vascular density, accompanied by mRNA and protein upregulation of VEGF, FGF2, HGF, IGF-1 and Pax-2. The expression of SMP30 and NCAM was induced in tubular cells. Oxidative stress and apoptosis markedly decreased. Our study shows that embryonic kidneys generate functional nephrons when transplanted into animals with severe renal disease and at the same time activate events at least partly mimicking those observed in kidney tissues during renal regeneration. PMID:25811887

  20. Polycystic kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    Cysts - kidneys; Kidney - polycystic; Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease; ADPKD ... Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is passed down through families (inherited). The 2 inherited forms of PKD are autosomal dominant ...

  1. Chronic kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic kidney disease is the slow loss of kidney function over time. The main job of the kidneys is to ... Chronic kidney disease (CKD) slowly gets worse over months or years. You may not notice any symptoms for some time. ...

  2. Kidney Disease Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Links Take the first step Alternate Language URL Kidney Disease Basics Page Content Your kidneys filter extra water ... blood pressure are the most common causes of kidney disease. ​These conditions can slowly damage the kidneys over ...

  3. Testing for Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education Program > Learn About Kidney Disease > What Causes Kidney Disease? > Testing for Kidney Disease | Share External Link Disclaimer What ... from our online catalog . Alternate Language URL Español Testing for Kidney Disease Page Content Early kidney disease usually does not ...

  4. Resistance to Recombinant Human Erythropoietin Therapy in a Rat Model of Chronic Kidney Disease Associated Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Patrícia; Ribeiro, Sandra; Fernandes, João; Vala, Helena; Rocha-Pereira, Petronila; Bronze-da-Rocha, Elsa; Belo, Luís; Costa, Elísio; Santos-Silva, Alice; Reis, Flávio

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the mechanisms explaining the persistence of anemia and resistance to recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) therapy in a rat model of chronic kidney disease (CKD)-associated anemia with formation of anti-rHuEPO antibodies. The remnant kidney rat model of CKD induced by 5/6 nephrectomy was used to test a long-term (nine weeks) high dose of rHuEPO (200 UI/kg bw/week) treatment. Hematological and biochemical parameters were evaluated as well as serum and tissue (kidney, liver and/or duodenum) protein and/or gene expression of mediators of erythropoiesis, iron metabolism and tissue hypoxia, inflammation, and fibrosis. Long-term treatment with a high rHuEPO dose is associated with development of resistance to therapy as a result of antibodies formation. In this condition, serum EPO levels are not deficient and iron availability is recovered by increased duodenal absorption. However, erythropoiesis is not stimulated, and the resistance to endogenous EPO effect and to rHuEPO therapy results from the development of a hypoxic, inflammatory and fibrotic milieu in the kidney tissue. This study provides new insights that could be important to ameliorate the current therapeutic strategies used to treat patients with CKD-associated anemia, in particular those that become resistant to rHuEPO therapy. PMID:26712750

  5. Resistance to Recombinant Human Erythropoietin Therapy in a Rat Model of Chronic Kidney Disease Associated Anemia.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Patrícia; Ribeiro, Sandra; Fernandes, João; Vala, Helena; Rocha-Pereira, Petronila; Bronze-da-Rocha, Elsa; Belo, Luís; Costa, Elísio; Santos-Silva, Alice; Reis, Flávio

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the mechanisms explaining the persistence of anemia and resistance to recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) therapy in a rat model of chronic kidney disease (CKD)-associated anemia with formation of anti-rHuEPO antibodies. The remnant kidney rat model of CKD induced by 5/6 nephrectomy was used to test a long-term (nine weeks) high dose of rHuEPO (200 UI/kg bw/week) treatment. Hematological and biochemical parameters were evaluated as well as serum and tissue (kidney, liver and/or duodenum) protein and/or gene expression of mediators of erythropoiesis, iron metabolism and tissue hypoxia, inflammation, and fibrosis. Long-term treatment with a high rHuEPO dose is associated with development of resistance to therapy as a result of antibodies formation. In this condition, serum EPO levels are not deficient and iron availability is recovered by increased duodenal absorption. However, erythropoiesis is not stimulated, and the resistance to endogenous EPO effect and to rHuEPO therapy results from the development of a hypoxic, inflammatory and fibrotic milieu in the kidney tissue. This study provides new insights that could be important to ameliorate the current therapeutic strategies used to treat patients with CKD-associated anemia, in particular those that become resistant to rHuEPO therapy. PMID:26712750

  6. Diabetes and Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease, and Other Dental Problems Diabetic Eye Disease Diabetes and Kidney Disease What are my kidneys and ... urine until releasing it through urination. How can diabetes affect my kidneys? Too much glucose , also called ...

  7. Untargeted plasma and tissue metabolomics in rats with chronic kidney disease given AST-120.

    PubMed

    Velenosi, Thomas J; Hennop, Anzel; Feere, David A; Tieu, Alvin; Kucey, Andrew S; Kyriacou, Polydoros; McCuaig, Laura E; Nevison, Stephanie E; Kerr, Michael A; Urquhart, Bradley L

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) results in the accumulation of metabolic waste products that are normally cleared by the kidney, known as uremia. Many of these waste products are from bacteria metabolites in the gut. Accumulation of uremic toxins in plasma and tissue, as well as the gut-plasma-tissue metabolic axis are important for understanding pathophysiological mechanisms of comorbidities in CKD. In this study, an untargeted metabolomics approach was used to determine uremic toxin accumulation in plasma, liver, heart and kidney tissue in rats with adenine-induced CKD. Rats with CKD were also given AST-120, a spherical carbon adsorbent, to assess metabolic changes in plasma and tissues with the removal of gut-derived uremic toxins. AST-120 decreased >55% of metabolites that were increased in plasma, liver and heart tissue of rats with CKD. CKD was primarily defined by 8 gut-derived uremic toxins, which were significantly increased in plasma and all tissues. These metabolites were derived from aromatic amino acids and soy protein including: indoxyl sulfate, p-cresyl sulfate, hippuric acid, phenyl sulfate, pyrocatechol sulfate, 4-ethylphenyl sulfate, p-cresol glucuronide and equol 7-glucuronide. Our results highlight the importance of diet and gut-derived metabolites in the accumulation of uremic toxins and define the gut-plasma-tissue metabolic axis in CKD. PMID:26932318

  8. Untargeted plasma and tissue metabolomics in rats with chronic kidney disease given AST-120

    PubMed Central

    Velenosi, Thomas J.; Hennop, Anzel; Feere, David A.; Tieu, Alvin; Kucey, Andrew S.; Kyriacou, Polydoros; McCuaig, Laura E.; Nevison, Stephanie E.; Kerr, Michael A.; Urquhart, Bradley L.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) results in the accumulation of metabolic waste products that are normally cleared by the kidney, known as uremia. Many of these waste products are from bacteria metabolites in the gut. Accumulation of uremic toxins in plasma and tissue, as well as the gut-plasma-tissue metabolic axis are important for understanding pathophysiological mechanisms of comorbidities in CKD. In this study, an untargeted metabolomics approach was used to determine uremic toxin accumulation in plasma, liver, heart and kidney tissue in rats with adenine-induced CKD. Rats with CKD were also given AST-120, a spherical carbon adsorbent, to assess metabolic changes in plasma and tissues with the removal of gut-derived uremic toxins. AST-120 decreased >55% of metabolites that were increased in plasma, liver and heart tissue of rats with CKD. CKD was primarily defined by 8 gut-derived uremic toxins, which were significantly increased in plasma and all tissues. These metabolites were derived from aromatic amino acids and soy protein including: indoxyl sulfate, p-cresyl sulfate, hippuric acid, phenyl sulfate, pyrocatechol sulfate, 4-ethylphenyl sulfate, p-cresol glucuronide and equol 7-glucuronide. Our results highlight the importance of diet and gut-derived metabolites in the accumulation of uremic toxins and define the gut-plasma-tissue metabolic axis in CKD. PMID:26932318

  9. Diabetes and Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  10. Pregnancy and Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  11. About Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  12. Effect of Sodium-Glucose Cotransport Inhibition on Polycystic Kidney Disease Progression in PCK Rats.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Sarika; Rodriguez, Daniel; Riwanto, Meliana; Edenhofer, Ilka; Segerer, Stephan; Mitchell, Katharyn; Wüthrich, Rudolf P

    2015-01-01

    The sodium-glucose-cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitor dapagliflozin (DAPA) induces glucosuria and osmotic diuresis via inhibition of renal glucose reabsorption. Since increased diuresis retards the progression of polycystic kidney disease (PKD), we investigated the effect of DAPA in the PCK rat model of PKD. DAPA (10 mg/kg/d) or vehicle was administered by gavage to 6 week old male PCK rats (n=9 per group). Renal function, albuminuria, kidney weight and cyst volume were assessed after 6 weeks of treatment. Treatment with DAPA markedly increased glucose excretion (23.6 ± 4.3 vs 0.3 ± 0.1 mmol/d) and urine output (57.3 ± 6.8 vs 19.3 ± 0.8 ml/d). DAPA-treated PCK rats had higher clearances for creatinine (3.1 ± 0.1 vs 2.6 ± 0.2 ml/min) and BUN (1.7 ± 0.1 vs 1.2 ± 0.1 ml/min) after 3 weeks, and developed a 4-fold increase in albuminuria. Ultrasound imaging and histological analysis revealed a higher cyst volume and a 23% higher total kidney weight after 6 weeks of DAPA treatment. At week 6 the renal cAMP content was similar between DAPA and vehicle, and staining for Ki67 did not reveal an increase in cell proliferation. In conclusion, the inhibition of glucose reabsorption with the SGLT2-specific inhibitor DAPA caused osmotic diuresis, hyperfiltration, albuminuria and an increase in cyst volume in PCK rats. The mechanisms which link glucosuria to hyperfiltration, albuminuria and enhanced cyst volume in PCK rats remain to be elucidated. PMID:25927597

  13. Effect of Sodium-Glucose Cotransport Inhibition on Polycystic Kidney Disease Progression in PCK Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Sarika; Rodriguez, Daniel; Riwanto, Meliana; Edenhofer, Ilka; Segerer, Stephan; Mitchell, Katharyn; Wüthrich, Rudolf P.

    2015-01-01

    The sodium-glucose-cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitor dapagliflozin (DAPA) induces glucosuria and osmotic diuresis via inhibition of renal glucose reabsorption. Since increased diuresis retards the progression of polycystic kidney disease (PKD), we investigated the effect of DAPA in the PCK rat model of PKD. DAPA (10 mg/kg/d) or vehicle was administered by gavage to 6 week old male PCK rats (n=9 per group). Renal function, albuminuria, kidney weight and cyst volume were assessed after 6 weeks of treatment. Treatment with DAPA markedly increased glucose excretion (23.6 ± 4.3 vs 0.3 ± 0.1 mmol/d) and urine output (57.3 ± 6.8 vs 19.3 ± 0.8 ml/d). DAPA-treated PCK rats had higher clearances for creatinine (3.1 ± 0.1 vs 2.6 ± 0.2 ml/min) and BUN (1.7 ± 0.1 vs 1.2 ± 0.1 ml/min) after 3 weeks, and developed a 4-fold increase in albuminuria. Ultrasound imaging and histological analysis revealed a higher cyst volume and a 23% higher total kidney weight after 6 weeks of DAPA treatment. At week 6 the renal cAMP content was similar between DAPA and vehicle, and staining for Ki67 did not reveal an increase in cell proliferation. In conclusion, the inhibition of glucose reabsorption with the SGLT2-specific inhibitor DAPA caused osmotic diuresis, hyperfiltration, albuminuria and an increase in cyst volume in PCK rats. The mechanisms which link glucosuria to hyperfiltration, albuminuria and enhanced cyst volume in PCK rats remain to be elucidated. PMID:25927597

  14. l-Carnitine improves cognitive and renal functions in a rat model of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Abu Ahmad, Nur; Armaly, Zaher; Berman, Sylvia; Jabour, Adel; Aga-Mizrachi, Shlomit; Mosenego-Ornan, Efrat; Avital, Avi

    2016-10-01

    Over the past decade, the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) has reached epidemic proportions. The search for novel pharmacological treatment for CKD has become an area of intensive clinical research. l-Carnitine, considered as the "gatekeeper" responsible for admitting long chain fatty acids into cell mitochondria. l-Carnitine synthesis and turnover are regulated mainly by the kidney and its levels inversely correlate with serum creatinine of normal subjects and CKD patients. Previous studies showed that l-carnitine administration to elderly people is improving and preserving cognitive function. As yet, there are no clinical intervention studies that investigated the effect of l-carnitine administration on cognitive impairment evidenced in CKD patients. Thus, we aimed to investigate the effects of l-carnitine treatment on renal function and on the cognitive performance in a rat model of progressive CKD. To assess the role of l-carnitine on CKD condition, we estimated the renal function and cognitive abilities in a CKD rat model. We found that all CKD animals exhibited renal function deterioration, as indicated by elevated serum creatinine, BUN, and ample histopathological abnormalities. l-Carnitine treatment of CKD rats significantly reduced serum creatinine and BUN, attenuated renal hypertrophy and decreased renal tissue damage. In addition, in the two way shuttle avoidance learning, CKD animals showed cognitive impairment which recovered by the administration of l-carnitine. We conclude that in a rat model of CKD, l-carnitine administration significantly improved cognitive and renal functions. PMID:27241631

  15. Sodium-Glucose Linked Cotransporter-2 Inhibition Does Not Attenuate Disease Progression in the Rat Remnant Kidney Model of Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanling; Thai, Kerri; Kepecs, David M.; Gilbert, Richard E.

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological inhibition of the proximal tubular sodium-glucose linked cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) leads to glycosuria in both diabetic and non-diabetic settings. As a consequence of their ability to modulate tubuloglomerular feedback, SGLT2 inhibitors, like agents that block the renin-angiotensin system, reduce intraglomerular pressure and single nephron GFR, potentially affording renoprotection. To examine this further we administered the SGLT2 inhibitor, dapagliflozin, to 5/6 (subtotally) nephrectomised rats, a model of progressive chronic kidney disease (CKD) that like CKD in humans is characterised by single nephron hyperfiltration and intraglomerular hypertension and where angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers are demonstrably beneficial. When compared with untreated rats, both sham surgery and 5/6 nephrectomised rats that had received dapagliflozin experienced substantial glycosuria. Nephrectomised rats developed hypertension, heavy proteinuria and declining GFR that was unaffected by the administration of dapagliflozin. Similarly, SGLT2 inhibition did not attenuate the extent of glomerulosclerosis, tubulointerstitial fibrosis or overexpression of the profibrotic cytokine, transforming growth factor-ß1 mRNA in the kidneys of 5/6 nephrectomised rats. While not precluding beneficial effects in the diabetic setting, these findings indicate that SGLT2 inhibition does not have renoprotective effects in this classical model of progressive non-diabetic CKD. PMID:26741142

  16. Chronic kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic; Renal failure - chronic; Chronic renal insufficiency; Chronic kidney failure; Chronic renal failure ... Chronic kidney disease (CKD) slowly gets worse over months or years. You may not notice any symptoms for some ...

  17. Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    You have two kidneys, each about the size of your fist. Their main job is to filter wastes and excess water out of ... help control blood pressure, and make hormones. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) means that your kidneys are damaged ...

  18. Kidney Disease (Nephropathy)

    MedlinePlus

    ... or to have the blood filtered by machine (dialysis). Who Gets Kidney Disease? Not everyone with diabetes ... health care team. Kidney Failure Once kidneys fail, dialysis is necessary. The person must choose whether to ...

  19. Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... a kidney transplant or blood-filtering treatments called dialysis. The cysts are more likely to develop in people who are on kidney dialysis. The chance of developing acquired cystic kidney disease ...

  20. Kidney Injury Molecule-1 Is Specifically Expressed in Cystically-Transformed Proximal Tubules of the PKD/Mhm (cy/+) Rat Model of Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gauer, Stefan; Urbschat, Anja; Gretz, Norbert; Hoffmann, Sigrid C.; Kränzlin, Bettina; Geiger, Helmut; Obermüller, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Expression of kidney injury molecule-1 (Kim-1) is rapidly upregulated following tubular injury, constituting a biomarker for acute kidney damage. We examined the renal localization of Kim-1 expression in PKD/Mhm (polycystic kidney disease, Mannheim) (cy/+) rats (cy: mutated allel, +: wild type allel), an established model for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, with chronic, mainly proximal tubulointerstitial alterations. For immunohistochemistry or Western blot analysis, kidneys of male adult heterozygously-affected (cy/+) and unaffected (+/+) littermates were perfusion-fixed or directly removed. Kim-1 expression was determined using peroxidase- or fluorescence-linked immunohistochemistry (alone or in combination with markers for tubule segments or differentiation). Compared to (+/+), only in (cy/+) kidneys, a chronic expression of Kim-1 could be detected by Western blot analysis, which was histologically confined to an apical cellular localization in areas of cystically-transformed proximal tubules with varying size and morphology, but not in distal tubular segments. Kim-1 was expressed by cystic epithelia exhibiting varying extents of dedifferentiation, as shown by double labeling with aquaporin-1, vimentin or osteopontin, yielding partial cellular coexpression. In this model, in contrast to other known molecules indicating renal injury and/or repair mechanisms, the chronic renal expression of Kim-1 is strictly confined to proximal cysts. Its exact role in interfering with tubulo-interstitial alterations in polycystic kidney disease warrants future investigations. PMID:27231899

  1. Kidney Injury Molecule-1 Is Specifically Expressed in Cystically-Transformed Proximal Tubules of the PKD/Mhm (cy/+) Rat Model of Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Gauer, Stefan; Urbschat, Anja; Gretz, Norbert; Hoffmann, Sigrid C; Kränzlin, Bettina; Geiger, Helmut; Obermüller, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Expression of kidney injury molecule-1 (Kim-1) is rapidly upregulated following tubular injury, constituting a biomarker for acute kidney damage. We examined the renal localization of Kim-1 expression in PKD/Mhm (polycystic kidney disease, Mannheim) (cy/+) rats (cy: mutated allel, +: wild type allel), an established model for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, with chronic, mainly proximal tubulointerstitial alterations. For immunohistochemistry or Western blot analysis, kidneys of male adult heterozygously-affected (cy/+) and unaffected (+/+) littermates were perfusion-fixed or directly removed. Kim-1 expression was determined using peroxidase- or fluorescence-linked immunohistochemistry (alone or in combination with markers for tubule segments or differentiation). Compared to (+/+), only in (cy/+) kidneys, a chronic expression of Kim-1 could be detected by Western blot analysis, which was histologically confined to an apical cellular localization in areas of cystically-transformed proximal tubules with varying size and morphology, but not in distal tubular segments. Kim-1 was expressed by cystic epithelia exhibiting varying extents of dedifferentiation, as shown by double labeling with aquaporin-1, vimentin or osteopontin, yielding partial cellular coexpression. In this model, in contrast to other known molecules indicating renal injury and/or repair mechanisms, the chronic renal expression of Kim-1 is strictly confined to proximal cysts. Its exact role in interfering with tubulo-interstitial alterations in polycystic kidney disease warrants future investigations. PMID:27231899

  2. At Risk for Kidney Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... or organization Alternate Language URL At Risk for Kidney Disease? Page Content You are at risk for kidney ... failure by treating kidney disease early. Diabetes and Kidney Disease Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure. ...

  3. Direct conscious telemetry recordings demonstrate increased renal sympathetic nerve activity in rats with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Ibrahim M.; Sarma Kandukuri, Divya; Harrison, Joanne L.; Hildreth, Cara M.; Phillips, Jacqueline K.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with sympathetic hyperactivity and impaired blood pressure control reflex responses, yet direct evidence demonstrating these features of autonomic dysfunction in conscious animals is still lacking. Here we measured renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) using telemetry-based recordings in a rat model of CKD, the Lewis Polycystic Kidney (LPK) rat, and assessed responses to chemoreflex activation and acute stress. Male LPK and Lewis control animals (total n = 16) were instrumented for telemetric recording of RSNA and MAP. At 12–13 weeks-of-age, resting RSNA and MAP, sympathetic and haemodynamic responses to both peripheral (hypoxia: 10% O2) and central chemoreflex (hypercapnia: 7% CO2) activation and acute stress (open-field exposure), were measured. As indicators of renal function, urinary protein (UPro) and creatinine (UCr) levels were assessed. LPK rats had higher resting RSNA (1.2 ± 0.1 vs. 0.6 ± 0.1 μV, p < 0.05) and MAP (151 ± 8 vs. 97 ± 2 mmHg, p < 0.05) compared to Lewis. MAP was negatively correlated with UCr (r = −0.80, p = 0.002) and positively correlated with RSNA (r = 0.66, p = 0.014), with multiple linear regression modeling indicating the strongest correlation was with Ucr. RSNA and MAP responses to activation of the central chemoreflex and open-field stress were reduced in the LPK relative to the Lewis (all p < 0.05). This is the first description of dual conscious telemetry recording of RSNA and MAP in a genetic rodent model of CKD. Elevated RSNA is likely a key contributor to the marked hypertension in this model, while attenuated RSNA and MAP responses to central chemoreflex activation and acute stress in the LPK indicate possible deficits in the neural processing of autonomic outflows evoked by these sympathoexcitatory pathways. PMID:26300784

  4. Polycystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... and requires immediate medical attention. [ Top ] How do health care providers diagnose autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease? Health ... when test results are available. [ Top ] How do health care providers treat autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease? Although ...

  5. Impact of Iodinated Contrast on Renal Function and Hemodynamics in Rats with Chronic Hyperglycemia and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Sheila Marques; Martins, Daniel Malisani; da Fonseca, Cassiane Dezoti; Watanabe, Mirian; Vattimo, Maria de Fátima Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Iodinated contrast (IC) is clinically used in diagnostic and interventional procedures, but its use can result in contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and chronic hyperglycemia (CH) are important predisposing factors to CI-AKI. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of iodinated contrast on the renal function and hemodynamics in rats with chronic hyperglycemia and chronic kidney disease. A total of 30 rats were divided into six groups; Sham: control of chronic renal disease; Citrate: control of chronic hyperglycemia (CH); Nx5/6: rats with 5/6 nephrectomy; Chronic Hyperglycemia: rats receiving Streptozotocin 65 mg/kg; Nx5/6 + IC: rats Nx5/6 received 6 mL/kg of IC; CH + IC: Chronic hyperglycemia rats receiving 6 mL/kg of IC. Renal function (inulin clearance; urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, NGAL) and hemodynamics (arterial blood pressure; renal blood flow; renal vascular resistance) were evaluated. Iodinated contrast significantly increased urinary NGAL and reduced inulin clearance, while the hemodynamics parameters showed changes in arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, and renal vascular resistance in both CKD and CH groups. The results suggest that the iodinated contrast in risk factors models has important impact on renal function and hemodynamics. NGAL was confirmed to play a role of highlight in diagnosis of CI-AKI. PMID:27034930

  6. Impact of Iodinated Contrast on Renal Function and Hemodynamics in Rats with Chronic Hyperglycemia and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Sheila Marques; Martins, Daniel Malisani; da Fonseca, Cassiane Dezoti; Watanabe, Mirian; Vattimo, Maria de Fátima Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Iodinated contrast (IC) is clinically used in diagnostic and interventional procedures, but its use can result in contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and chronic hyperglycemia (CH) are important predisposing factors to CI-AKI. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of iodinated contrast on the renal function and hemodynamics in rats with chronic hyperglycemia and chronic kidney disease. A total of 30 rats were divided into six groups; Sham: control of chronic renal disease; Citrate: control of chronic hyperglycemia (CH); Nx5/6: rats with 5/6 nephrectomy; Chronic Hyperglycemia: rats receiving Streptozotocin 65 mg/kg; Nx5/6 + IC: rats Nx5/6 received 6 mL/kg of IC; CH + IC: Chronic hyperglycemia rats receiving 6 mL/kg of IC. Renal function (inulin clearance; urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, NGAL) and hemodynamics (arterial blood pressure; renal blood flow; renal vascular resistance) were evaluated. Iodinated contrast significantly increased urinary NGAL and reduced inulin clearance, while the hemodynamics parameters showed changes in arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, and renal vascular resistance in both CKD and CH groups. The results suggest that the iodinated contrast in risk factors models has important impact on renal function and hemodynamics. NGAL was confirmed to play a role of highlight in diagnosis of CI-AKI. PMID:27034930

  7. Kidney Disease of Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Organizations​​ . (PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Español Kidney Disease of Diabetes Page Content On this page: The ... and Human Services, 2008. [ Top ] The Course of Kidney Disease Diabetic kidney disease takes many years to develop. ...

  8. Arginine and Asymmetric Dimethylarginine in Puromycin Aminonucleoside-Induced Chronic Kidney Disease in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gin-Fu; Moningka, Natasha C.; Sasser, Jennifer M.; Zharikov, Sergey; Cunningham, Mark; Tain, You-Lin; Schwartz, Idit F.; Baylis, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims Reduced renal L-arginine (L-Arg) synthesis/transport, induction of arginases and increased endogenous NOS inhibitor, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) will inhibit NO production. This study investigated pathways of L-Arg synthesis/uptake/utilization, ADMA degradation and oxidant/antioxidants in puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN) chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods Rats were given low- (LD) or high-dose (HD) PAN and followed for 11 weeks for proteinuria. BP was measured and blood and tissues were harvested and analyzed for abundance of argininosuccinate synthase (ASS) and lyase (ASL), arginase, cationic amino acid transporter (CAT1) and dimethylargininedimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) in kidney, cortex, aorta and liver. Arginase and DDAH activity, plasma L-Arg and ADMA, renal pathology and creatinine clearances were also measured. Results PAN caused dose-dependent kidney damage and hypertension and creatinine clearance fell in HD-PAN. Renal ASS fell in HD-PAN, renal cortex and aortic ASL and membrane CAT1 fell in both PAN groups. There was no activation of renal arginase, but aortic arginase increased in LD-PAN. Renal DDAH activity fell moderately in LD-PAN and markedly in HD-PAN where hepatic DDAH activity also fell. Plasma L-Arg was unchanged while ADMA rose moderately and dose-dependently with PAN. There were several indices of oxidative stress which was most prominent in HD-PAN. Conclusion Reduction in renal ASS/ASL and loss of renal cortex CAT1 compromises renal L-Arg synthesis and release. Loss of aortic CAT1 impairs L-Arg uptake. Increased plasma ADMA was associated with progressive loss of renal DDAH activity. However, loss of renal clearance and falls in hepatic DDAH activity in HD-PAN did not have additive effects on plasma ADMA. PMID:22179117

  9. Diabetes and kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetic nephropathy; Nephropathy - diabetic; Diabetic glomerulosclerosis; Kimmelstiel-Wilson disease ... Diabetic kidney disease is a major cause of sickness and death in people with diabetes. It can ...

  10. Does swimming exercise affect experimental chronic kidney disease in rats treated with gum acacia?

    PubMed

    Ali, Badreldin H; Al-Salam, Suhail; Al Za'abi, Mohammed; Al Balushi, Khalid A; Ramkumar, Aishwarya; Waly, Mostafa I; Yasin, Javid; Adham, Sirin A; Nemmar, Abderrahim

    2014-01-01

    Different modes of exercise are reported to be beneficial in subjects with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Similar benefits have also been ascribed to the dietary supplement gum acacia (GA). Using several physiological, biochemical, immunological, and histopathological measurements, we assessed the effect of swimming exercise (SE) on adenine-induced CKD, and tested whether SE would influence the salutary action of GA in rats with CKD. Eight groups of rats were used, the first four of which were fed normal chow for 5 weeks, feed mixed with adenine (0.25% w/w) to induce CKD, GA in the drinking water (15% w/v), or were given adenine plus GA, as above. Another four groups were similarly treated, but were subjected to SE during the experimental period, while the first four groups remained sedentary. The pre-SE program lasted for four days (before the start of the experimental treatments), during which the rats were made to swim for 5 to 10 min, and then gradually extended to 20 min per day. Thereafter, the rats in the 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th groups started to receive their respective treatments, and were subjected to SE three days a week for 45 min each. Adenine induced the typical signs of CKD as confirmed by histopathology, and the other measurements, and GA significantly ameliorated all these signs. SE did not affect the salutary action of GA on renal histology, but it partially improved some of the above biochemical and physiological analytes, suggesting that addition of this mode of exercise to GA supplementation may improve further the benefits of GA supplementation. PMID:25048380

  11. Does Swimming Exercise Affect Experimental Chronic Kidney Disease in Rats Treated with Gum Acacia?

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Badreldin H.; Al-Salam, Suhail; Al Za'abi, Mohammed; Al Balushi, Khalid A.; Ramkumar, Aishwarya; Waly, Mostafa I.; Yasin, Javid; Adham, Sirin A.; Nemmar, Abderrahim

    2014-01-01

    Different modes of exercise are reported to be beneficial in subjects with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Similar benefits have also been ascribed to the dietary supplement gum acacia (GA). Using several physiological, biochemical, immunological, and histopathological measurements, we assessed the effect of swimming exercise (SE) on adenine –induced CKD, and tested whether SE would influence the salutary action of GA in rats with CKD. Eight groups of rats were used, the first four of which were fed normal chow for 5 weeks, feed mixed with adenine (0.25% w/w) to induce CKD, GA in the drinking water (15% w/v), or were given adenine plus GA, as above. Another four groups were similarly treated, but were subjected to SE during the experimental period, while the first four groups remained sedentary. The pre-SE program lasted for four days (before the start of the experimental treatments), during which the rats were made to swim for 5 to 10 min, and then gradually extended to 20 min per day. Thereafter, the rats in the 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th groups started to receive their respective treatments, and were subjected to SE three days a week for 45 min each. Adenine induced the typical signs of CKD as confirmed by histopathology, and the other measurements, and GA significantly ameliorated all these signs. SE did not affect the salutary action of GA on renal histology, but it partially improved some of the above biochemical and physiological analytes, suggesting that addition of this mode of exercise to GA supplementation may improve further the benefits of GA supplementation. PMID:25048380

  12. Resistant starch alters gut microbiome and metabolomic profiles concurrent with amelioration of chronic kidney disease in rats.

    PubMed

    Kieffer, Dorothy A; Piccolo, Brian D; Vaziri, Nosratola D; Liu, Shuman; Lau, Wei L; Khazaeli, Mahyar; Nazertehrani, Sohrab; Moore, Mary E; Marco, Maria L; Martin, Roy J; Adams, Sean H

    2016-05-01

    Patients and animals with chronic kidney disease (CKD) exhibit profound alterations in the gut environment including shifts in microbial composition, increased fecal pH, and increased blood levels of gut microbe-derived metabolites (xenometabolites). The fermentable dietary fiber high amylose maize-resistant starch type 2 (HAMRS2) has been shown to alter the gut milieu and in CKD rat models leads to markedly improved kidney function. The aim of the present study was to identify specific cecal bacteria and cecal, blood, and urinary metabolites that associate with changes in kidney function to identify potential mechanisms involved with CKD amelioration in response to dietary resistant starch. Male Sprague-Dawley rats with adenine-induced CKD were fed a semipurified low-fiber diet or a high-fiber diet [59% (wt/wt) HAMRS2] for 3 wk (n = 9 rats/group). The cecal microbiome was characterized, and cecal contents, serum, and urine metabolites were analyzed. HAMRS2-fed rats displayed decreased cecal pH, decreased microbial diversity, and an increased Bacteroidetes-to-Firmicutes ratio. Several uremic retention solutes were altered in the cecal contents, serum, and urine, many of which had strong correlations with specific gut bacteria abundances, i.e., serum and urine indoxyl sulfate were reduced by 36% and 66%, respectively, in HAMRS2-fed rats and urine p-cresol was reduced by 47% in HAMRS2-fed rats. Outcomes from this study were coincident with improvements in kidney function indexes and amelioration of CKD outcomes previously reported for these rats, suggesting an important role for microbial-derived factors and gut microbe metabolism in regulating host kidney function. PMID:26841824

  13. Effects of dietary phosphate on adynamic bone disease in rats with chronic kidney disease--role of sclerostin?

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Juliana C; Ferrari, Guaraciaba O; Neves, Katia R; Cavallari, Raquel T; Dominguez, Wagner V; Dos Reis, Luciene M; Graciolli, Fabiana G; Oliveira, Elizabeth C; Liu, Shiguang; Sabbagh, Yves; Jorgetti, Vanda; Schiavi, Susan; Moysés, Rosa M A

    2013-01-01

    High phosphate intake is known to aggravate renal osteodystrophy along various pathogenetic pathways. Recent studies have raised the possibility that dysregulation of the osteocyte Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is also involved in chronic kidney disease (CKD)-related bone disease. We investigated the role of dietary phosphate and its possible interaction with this pathway in an experimental model of adynamic bone disease (ABD) in association with CKD and hypoparathyroidism. Partial nephrectomy (Nx) and total parathyroidectomy (PTx) were performed in male Wistar rats. Control rats with normal kidney and parathyroid function underwent sham operations. Rats were divided into three groups and underwent pair-feeding for 8 weeks with diets containing either 0.6% or 1.2% phosphate: sham 0.6%, Nx+PTx 0.6%, and Nx+PTx 1.2%. In the two Nx+PTx groups, serum creatinine increased and blood ionized calcium decreased compared with sham control group. They also presented hyperphosphatemia and reduced serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) levels. Fractional urinary excretion of phosphate increased in Nx+PTx 1.2% rats despite lower PTH and FGF23 levels than in sham group. These biochemical changes were accompanied by a decrease in bone formation rates. The Nx+PTx 1.2% group had lower bone volume (BV/TV), higher osteoblast and osteocyte apoptosis, and higher SOST and Dickkopf-1 gene expression than the Nx+PTx 0.6% group. Nx+PTx 0.6% rat had very low serum sclerostin levels, and Nx+PTx 1.2% had intermediate sclerostin levels compared with sham group. Finally, there was a negative correlation between BV/TV and serum sclerostin. These results suggest that high dietary phosphate intake decreases bone volume in an experimental model of CKD-ABD, possibly via changes in SOST expression through a PTH-independent mechanism. These findings could have relevance for the clinical setting of CKD-ABD in patients who low turnover bone disease might be attenuated

  14. Kidney Disease Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Albumin Children and Kidney Disease Additional Kidney Information Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ... to share this content freely. March 1, 2012​ Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ...

  15. Testing for Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Albumin Children and Kidney Disease Additional Kidney Information Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ... to share this content freely. September 17, 2014​​ Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ...

  16. Mesenchymal stem cells from rats with chronic kidney disease exhibit premature senescence and loss of regenerative potential.

    PubMed

    Klinkhammer, Barbara Mara; Kramann, Rafael; Mallau, Monika; Makowska, Anna; van Roeyen, Claudia Renate; Rong, Song; Buecher, Eva Bettina; Boor, Peter; Kovacova, Katarina; Zok, Stephanie; Denecke, Bernd; Stuettgen, Esther; Otten, Simon; Floege, Juergen; Kunter, Uta

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation has the potential for organ repair. Nevertheless, some factors might lessen the regenerative potential of MSCs, e.g. donor age or systemic disease. It is thus important to carefully assess the patient's suitability for autologous MSC transplantation. Here we investigated the effects of chronic kidney disease (CKD) on MSC function. We isolated bone marrow MSCs from remnant kidney rats (RK) with CKD (CKD-RK-MSC) and found signs of premature senescence: spontaneous adipogenesis, reduced proliferation capacity, active senescence-associated-β-galactosidase, accumulation of actin and a modulated secretion profile. The functionality of CKD-RK-MSCs in vivo was tested in rats with acute anti-Thy1.1-nephritis, where healthy MSCs have been shown to be beneficial. Rats received healthy MSCs, CKD-RK-MSC or medium by injection into the left renal artery. Kidneys receiving healthy MSCs exhibited accelerated healing of glomerular lesions, whereas CKD-RK-MSC or medium exerted no benefit. The negative influence of advanced CKD/uremia on MSCs was confirmed in a second model of CKD, adenine nephropathy (AD). MSCs from rats with adenine nephropathy (CKD-AD-MSC) also exhibited cellular modifications and functional deficits in vivo. We conclude that CKD leads to a sustained loss of in vitro and in vivo functionality in MSCs, possibly due to premature cellular senescence. Considering autologous MSC therapy in human renal disease, studies identifying uremia-associated mechanisms that account for altered MSC function are urgently needed. PMID:24667162

  17. Diabetes and kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... occurs over time in people with diabetes. This type of kidney disease is called diabetic nephropathy. Causes Each kidney is made of hundreds ... ACE inhibitors Diabetes - what to ask your doctor - type 2 Update Date ... Diabetic Kidney Problems Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A. ...

  18. Amyloidosis and Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Foundation Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Amyloidosis and Kidney Disease Page Content On this page: What is ...

  19. Hereditary error in epidermal growth factor prohormone metabolism in a rat model of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, J; Eysselein, V

    1993-12-30

    Normal Sprague Dawley (SPRD) rats of both sexes secrete an 165 kDa EGF prohormone in urine. Sexually mature Hannover-Sprague Dawley rats (Han:SPRD) heterozygous males and females with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) secrete a prohormone of similar molecular mass in urine. The male, but not the female, also secretes two variant prohormone isoforms with molecular masses close to 200 kDa. Both the 165 and 200 kDa EGF prohormone isoforms are totally absent, in urine, at 11 months of age in male but not in female heterozygous Han:SPRD rats. At this age, the male kidneys exhibit numerous cysts filled with colorless fluids and these fluids contain abundant quantities of a 66 kDa EGF prohormone metabolite. Homozygous Han:SPRD rats which are born with cystic disease secrete only trace amounts of 165 kDa EGF prohormone in their urine while their normal looking littermates secrete the 165 kDa EGF prohormone in abundant quantities. The cyst fluids of homozygous rats contain trace amounts of 165 and 154 kDa EGF prohormone isoforms while the 66 kDa EGF prohormone metabolites present in abundant quantities. The massive amounts of 66 kDa EGF prohormone metabolite in cyst fluids of PKD rats suggests that EGF prohormone and its isoforms undergo aberrant proteolysis in association with cyst pathogenesis both in heterozygous and homozygous kidneys. The specific retention of the 66 kDa EGF prohormone metabolite within the cyst suggests that this molecule may function as a cystogen. PMID:8280123

  20. National Kidney Disease Education Program

    MedlinePlus

    ... from our online catalog . Alternate Language URL National Kidney Disease Education Program (NKDEP) Page Content Improving the ... kidney disease. Minorities Are at Higher Risk for Kidney Disease. If you are African American, Hispanic, or ...

  1. National Kidney Disease Education Program

    MedlinePlus

    ... from our online catalog . Alternate Language URL National Kidney Disease Education Program (NKDEP) Page Content Improving the understanding, ... kidney disease. Minorities Are at Higher Risk for Kidney Disease. If you are African American, Hispanic, or American ...

  2. Diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  3. Sexuality and Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  4. Staying Fit with Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  5. Nitric Oxide Resistance Reduces Arteriovenous Fistula Maturation in Chronic Kidney Disease in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Molin, Daniel G.; Wagenaar, Allard; Compeer, Mathijs G.; Tordoir, Jan H.; Schurink, Geert W.; De Mey, Jo G.; Post, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Autologous arteriovenous (AV) fistulas are the first choice for vascular access but have a high risk of non-maturation due to insufficient vessel adaptation, a process dependent on nitric oxide (NO)-signaling. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with oxidative stress that can disturb NO-signaling. Here, we evaluated the influence of CKD on AV fistula maturation and NO-signaling. Methods CKD was established in rats by a 5/6th nephrectomy and after 6 weeks, an AV fistula was created between the carotid artery and jugular vein, which was followed up at 3 weeks with ultrasound and flow assessments. Vessel wall histology was assessed afterwards and vasoreactivity of carotid arteries was studied in a wire myograph. The soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) activator BAY 60–2770 was administered daily to CKD animals for 3 weeks to enhance fistula maturation. Results CKD animals showed lower flow rates, smaller fistula diameters and increased oxidative stress levels in the vessel wall. Endothelium-dependent relaxation was comparable but vasorelaxation after sodium nitroprusside was diminished in CKD vessels, indicating NO resistance of the NO-receptor sGC. This was confirmed by stimulation with BAY 60–2770 resulting in increased vasorelaxation in CKD vessels. Oral administration of BAY 60–2770 to CKD animals induced larger fistula diameters, however; flow was not significantly different from vehicle-treated CKD animals. Conclusions CKD induces oxidative stress resulting in NO resistance that can hamper AV fistula maturation. sGC activators like BAY 60–2770 could offer therapeutic potential to increase AV fistula maturation. PMID:26727368

  6. RIPK3-Mediated Necroptosis and Apoptosis Contributes to Renal Tubular Cell Progressive Loss and Chronic Kidney Disease Progression in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yongjun; Cui, Hongwang; Xia, Yunfeng; Gan, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Tubulointerstitial fibrosis (TIF) is caused by the progressive loss of renal tubular cells and the consequent replacement of the extracellular matrix. The progressive depletion of renal tubular cells results from apoptosis and necroptosis; however, the relative significance of each of these cell death mechanisms at different stages during the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) remains unclear. We sought to explore the mechanisms of renal tubular cell death during the early and intermediate stages of chronic renal damage of subtotal nephrectomied (SNx) rats. The results of tissue histological assays indicated that the numbers of necrotic dying cells and apoptotic cells were significantly higher in kidney tissues derived from a rat model of CKD. In addition, there was a significant increase in necroptosis observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and an increase in the proportion of TUNEL-positive cells in kidney tissues from SNx rats compared with control rats, and necrostatin-1 (Nec-1) could inhibit necroptosis and reduce the proportion of TUNEL-positive cells. More importantly, we observed a significant increase in the incidence of necroptosis compared with apoptosis by TEM in vivo and in vitro and a significant increase in the proportion of TUNEL-positive tubular epithelial cells that did not express caspase-3 compared with those expressing cleaved caspase-3 in vitro. Furthermore, treatment with Nec-1 and zVAD strongly reduced necroptosis- and apoptosis-mediated renal tubular cell death and decreased the levels of blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine and tubular damage scores of SNx rats. These results suggest that necroptotic cell death plays a more significant role than apoptosis in mediating the loss of renal tubular cells in SNx rats and that effectively blocking both necroptosis and apoptosis improves renal function and tubular damage at early and intermediate stages of CKD. PMID:27281190

  7. Sulfadiazine for kidney disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rucker, R.R.; Bernier, A.F.; Whipple, W.J.; Burrows, R.E.

    1951-01-01

    The blueback salmon fingerlings (Oncorhynchus nerka) at the U.S. Fish-Cultural Station at Winthrop, Washington, underwent an infection that was caused by a very short, Gram-positive, nonmotile, rod-shaped bacterium. A further description is impossible at this time, as the organism has not been grown satisfactorily for proper identification. The disease was characterized by white, raised areas of dead tissue mainly in the kidney: for this reason it is referred to as kidney disease. Belding and Merrill (1935) described a disease among the brook, brown, and rainbow trout at a State hatchery in Massachusetts which, from the description, might be the same as kidney disease. J.H. Wales of the California Division of Fish and Game described (unpublished manuscript, 1941) a disease in hatchery trout in California which seems to be identical to kidney disease.

  8. Soy Protein Alleviates Hypertension and Fish Oil Improves Diastolic Heart Function in the Han:SPRD-Cy Rat Model of Cystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Naser H M; Thandapilly, Sijo J; Jia, Yong; Netticadan, Thomas; Aukema, Harold

    2016-05-01

    Abnormalities in cardiac structure and function are very common among people with chronic kidney disease, in whom cardiovascular disease is the major cause of death. Dietary soy protein and fish oil reduce kidney disease progression in the Han:SPRD-Cy model of cystic renal disease. However, the effects of these dietary interventions in preventing alterations in cardiac structure and function due to kidney disease (reno-cardiac syndrome) in a cystic kidney disease model are not known. Therefore, weanling Han:SPRD-Cy diseased (Cy/+) and normal (+/+) rats were given diets containing either casein or soy protein, and either soy or fish oil in a three-way design for 8 weeks. Diseased rats had larger hearts, augmented left ventricular mass, and higher systolic and mean arterial blood pressure compared to the normal rats. Assessment of cardiac function using two-dimensional guided M-mode and pulse-wave Doppler echocardiography revealed that isovolumic relaxation time was prolonged in the diseased compared to normal rats, reflecting a diastolic heart dysfunction, and fish oil prevented this elevation. Soy protein resulted in a small improvement in systolic and mean arterial pressure but did not improve diastolic heart function, while fish oil prevented diastolic heart dysfunction in this model of cystic kidney disease. PMID:26626478

  9. Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... our online catalog. Alternate Language URL Español Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines: What You Need to Know Page ... you need to know Because you have chronic kidney disease, you should take steps to protect your kidneys. ...

  10. Kidney Disease and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Kidney Disease & Diabetes Updated:Jan 26,2016 One of the more ... thereafter.) This content was last reviewed January 2016. Diabetes • Home • About Diabetes • Why Diabetes Matters Introduction Cardiovascular ...

  11. [Cystic kidney diseases].

    PubMed

    Zerres, K; Ortiz Brüchle, N

    2012-04-01

    Cystic kidney diseases are clinically and genetically heterogeneous. The most important entities are autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive polycystic kidney diseases. The proteins encoded by the involved genes are referred to as cystoproteins, which are located predominantly in the primary cilia. Primary cilia play an important role in cyst formation. Inherited polycystic kidney diseases belong to the increasing number of reported ciliopathies, including several syndromic entities. An exact diagnosis is the basis for medical care and genetic counselling; thus, the diagnostic algorithm should include clinical, ultrasonographic and morphological features of the underlying kidney disease, knowledge about further features and family history. Molecular genetic testing may contribute important information towards a definite diagnosis. PMID:22410941

  12. 1H NMR-Based Metabolite Profiling of Plasma in a Rat Model of Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ju-Ae; Choi, Hyo-Jung; Kwon, Yong-Kook; Ryu, Do Hyun; Kwon, Tae-Hwan; Hwang, Geum-Sook

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by the gradual loss of the kidney function to excrete wastes and fluids from the blood. 1H NMR-based metabolomics was exploited to investigate the altered metabolic pattern in rats with CKD induced by surgical reduction of the renal mass (i.e., 5/6 nephrectomy (5/6 Nx)), particularly for identifying specific metabolic biomarkers associated with early of CKD. Plasma metabolite profiling was performed in CKD rats (at 4- or 8-weeks after 5/6 Nx) compared to sham-operated rats. Principle components analysis (PCA), partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and orthogonal partial least squares-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) score plots showed a significant separation between the groups. The resulting metabolic profiles demonstrated significantly increased plasma levels of organic anions, including citrate, β-hydroxybutyrate, lactate, acetate, acetoacetate, and formate in CKD. Moreover, levels of alanine, glutamine, and glutamate were significantly higher. These changes were likely to be associated with complicated metabolic acidosis in CKD for counteracting systemic metabolic acidosis or increased protein catabolism from muscle. In contrast, levels of VLDL/LDL (CH2)n and N-acetylglycoproteins were decreased. Taken together, the observed changes of plasma metabolite profiles in CKD rats provide insights into the disturbed metabolism in early phase of CKD, in particular for the altered metabolism of acid-base and/or amino acids. PMID:24465563

  13. Neonatal polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Verghese, Priya; Miyashita, Yosuke

    2014-09-01

    This article provides an up-to-date comprehensive review and summary on neonatal polycystic kidney disease (PKD) with emphasis on the differential diagnosis, clinical manifestations, diagnostic techniques, and potential therapeutic approaches for the major causes of neonatal PKD, namely hereditary disease, including autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant PKD and nonhereditary PKD, with particular emphasis on multicystic dysplastic kidney. A brief overview of obstructive cystic dysplasia and simple and complex cysts is also included. PMID:25155726

  14. Comparative pharmacokinetics of catalpol and acteoside in normal and chronic kidney disease rats after oral administration of Rehmannia glutinosa extract.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Min; Qian, Dawei; Liu, Pei; Shang, Er-xin; Jiang, Shu; Guo, Jianming; Su, Shu-lan; Duan, Jin-ao; Du, Leyue; Tao, Jinhua

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a sensitive and robust ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method with multiple-reaction monitoring mode was developed, validated, and applied to determine pharmacokinetics of catalpol and acteoside in normal and doxorubicin-induced chronic kidney disease rats after oral administration of Rehmannia glutinosa extract. The lower limits of quantification for catalpol and acteoside in rat plasma were 2.62 and 0.61 ng/mL, with a signal-to-noise ratio of ≥10. Precision and accuracy studies showed that catalpol and acteoside plasma concentrations were within the 10% range in all studies. The extraction recoveries of catalpol and acteoside were both >68.24% and the matrix effects ranged from 96.59 to 101.62%. The method was successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic study of catalpol and acteoside after oral administration of RG extract to normal and model rats, respectively. This study might further support the traditional use of RG to treat kidney diseases clinically. PMID:26031219

  15. Diminazene Aceturate Improves Cardiac Fibrosis and Diastolic Dysfunction in Rats with Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Velkoska, Elena; Patel, Sheila K.; Griggs, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) 2 is a negative regulator of the renin angiotensin system (RAS) through its role to degrade angiotensin II. In rats with subtotal nephrectomy (STNx), adverse cardiac remodelling occurs despite elevated cardiac ACE2 activity. We hypothesised that diminazene aceturate (DIZE), which has been described as having an off-target effect to activate ACE2, would have beneficial cardiac effects in STNx rats. STNx led to hypertension, diastolic dysfunction, left ventricular hypertrophy, cardiac fibrosis, and increased cardiac ACE, ACE2, Ang II and Ang 1–7 levels. Cardiac gene expression of ADAM17 was also increased. In STNx, two-weeks of subcutaneous DIZE (15mg/kg/d) had no effect on blood pressure but improved diastolic dysfunction and cardiac fibrosis, reduced ADAM17 mRNA and shifted the cardiac RAS balance to a cardioprotective profile with reduced ACE and Ang II. There was no change in cardiac ACE2 activity or in cardiac Ang 1–7 levels with DIZE. In conclusion, our results suggest that DIZE exerts a protective effect on the heart under the pathological condition of kidney injury. This effect was not due to improved kidney function, a fall in blood pressure or a reduction in LVH but was associated with a reduction in cardiac ACE and cardiac Ang II levels. As in vitro studies showed no direct effect of DIZE on ACE2 or ACE activity, the precise mechanism of action of DIZE remains to be determined. PMID:27571511

  16. Diminazene Aceturate Improves Cardiac Fibrosis and Diastolic Dysfunction in Rats with Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Velkoska, Elena; Patel, Sheila K; Griggs, Karen; Burrell, Louise M

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) 2 is a negative regulator of the renin angiotensin system (RAS) through its role to degrade angiotensin II. In rats with subtotal nephrectomy (STNx), adverse cardiac remodelling occurs despite elevated cardiac ACE2 activity. We hypothesised that diminazene aceturate (DIZE), which has been described as having an off-target effect to activate ACE2, would have beneficial cardiac effects in STNx rats. STNx led to hypertension, diastolic dysfunction, left ventricular hypertrophy, cardiac fibrosis, and increased cardiac ACE, ACE2, Ang II and Ang 1-7 levels. Cardiac gene expression of ADAM17 was also increased. In STNx, two-weeks of subcutaneous DIZE (15mg/kg/d) had no effect on blood pressure but improved diastolic dysfunction and cardiac fibrosis, reduced ADAM17 mRNA and shifted the cardiac RAS balance to a cardioprotective profile with reduced ACE and Ang II. There was no change in cardiac ACE2 activity or in cardiac Ang 1-7 levels with DIZE. In conclusion, our results suggest that DIZE exerts a protective effect on the heart under the pathological condition of kidney injury. This effect was not due to improved kidney function, a fall in blood pressure or a reduction in LVH but was associated with a reduction in cardiac ACE and cardiac Ang II levels. As in vitro studies showed no direct effect of DIZE on ACE2 or ACE activity, the precise mechanism of action of DIZE remains to be determined. PMID:27571511

  17. Cordyceps sinensis protects against liver and heart injuries in a rat model of chronic kidney disease: a metabolomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xia; Zhong, Fang; Tang, Xu-long; Lian, Fu-lin; Zhou, Qiao; Guo, Shan-mai; Liu, Jia-fu; Sun, Peng; Hao, Xu; Lu, Ying; Wang, Wei-ming; Chen, Nan; Zhang, Nai-xia

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To test the hypothesis that the traditional Chinese medicine Cordyceps sinensis could improve the metabolic function of extrarenal organs to achieve its anti-chronic kidney disease (CKD) effects. Methods: Male SD rats were divided into CKD rats (with 5/6-nephrectomy), CKD rats treated with Cordyceps sinensis (4 mg•kg-1•d-1, po), and sham-operated rats. After an 8-week treatment, metabolites were extracted from the hearts and livers of the rats, and then subjected to 1H-NMR-based metabolomic analysis. Results: Oxidative stress, energy metabolism, amino acid and protein metabolism and choline metabolism were considered as links between CKD and extrarenal organ dysfunction. Within the experimental period of 8 weeks, the metabolic disorders in the liver were more pronounced than in the heart, suggesting that CKD-related extrarenal organ dysfunctions occurred sequentially rather than simultaneously. Oral administration of Cordyceps sinensis exerted statistically significant rescue effects on the liver and heart by reversely regulating levels of those metabolites that are typically perturbed in CKD. Conclusion: Oral administration of Cordyceps sinensis significantly attenuates the liver and heart injuries in CKD rats. The 1H NMR-based metabolomic approach has provided a systematic view for understanding of CKD and the drug treatment, which can also be used to elucidate the mechanisms of action of other traditional Chinese medicines. PMID:24632844

  18. Dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids or soy protein isolate did not attenuate disease progression in a female rat model of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Maditz, Kaitlin H; Oldaker, Chris; Nanda, Nainika; Benedito, Vagner; Livengood, Ryan; Tou, Janet C

    2014-06-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is an incurable genetic disorder that is characterized by multiple benign cysts. As PKD advances, cyst growth increases kidney volume, decreases renal function, and may lead to end-stage renal disease; however, in a PKD rat model, feeding soy protein isolate (SPI) reduced cyst proliferation and growth. The n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are noted for their anti-inflammatory actions. Therefore, diet therapy could offer a potentially efficacious, safe, and cost-effective strategy for treating PKD. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of soy protein and/or n-3 PUFAs on PKD progression and severity in the rat model of autosomal recessive PKD. We hypothesized that the antiproliferative and anti-inflammatory actions associated with soy protein and n-3 PUFA supplementation will attenuate PKD progression in female PCK rats. For 12 weeks, young (age, 28 days) female PCK rats were randomly assigned (n=12/group) to 4 different diets: casein±corn oil, casein±soybean oil, SPI±soybean oil, or SPI±1:1 soybean/salmon oil (SPI±SB). The feeding of the different protein and lipid sources had no significant effect on relative kidney weight. Histologic evaluation showed no significant differences in cortical or medullary cyst size, interstitial inflammation, and fibrosis among diet groups. However, rats fed SPI±SB diet had cortical cyst obstruction and the highest (P<.01) serum blood urea nitrogen concentration. Rats fed SPI±SB diet had the highest (P<.001) renal docosahexaeonic acid, but there were no significant differences in renal tissue inflammation and proliferation gene expression among the diet groups. Based on these results, dietary soy protein and/or n-3 PUFAs did not attenuate disease progression or severity in the female PCK rat model of autosomal recessive PKD. PMID:25026920

  19. Biochemical validation of a rat model for polycystic kidney disease: comparison of guanidino compound profile with the human condition.

    PubMed

    Torremans, A; Marescau, B; Kränzlin, B; Gretz, N; Billiouw, J-M; Vanholder, R; De Smet, R; Bouwman, K; Brouns, R; De Deyn, P P

    2006-06-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) accounts for 7-10% of all dialyzed renal insufficient patients. Accumulation of specific guanidino compounds (GCs) has been related to neurological, cardiovascular, hematological, and immunological complications of renal failure. In this study, we investigate whether the PKD/Mhm rat model can be used as a biochemical model for human PKD. For the validation of the rat model, we performed the first detailed evaluation of the concentrations of GCs in serum and urine of patients with PKD in addition to the GC patterns in the plasma, urine, and tissues of the PKD/Mhm rat model. The GCs were determined after separation on a cation exchange resin and fluorescence detection. The GC levels and changes observed in blood and urine of patients with PKD are comparable with those found in patients with renal insufficiency due to different etiologies. The PKD/Mhm rat model can be used as a biochemical model for human PKD as the obvious increases of urea, guanidinosuccinic acid, creatinine, guanidine, methylguanidine, and N(G)N(G)-dimethylarginine (symmetrical dimethylarginine) seen in blood of oldest heterozygous and younger homozygous PKD rats were largely within the same range as those found in the studied human PKD population, especially in patients with a glomerular filtration rate below 60 ml/min/1.73 m(2). The decreased levels of plasma guanidinoacetic acid seen at end-stage renal disease in homozygous and oldest heterozygous rats were also observed in serum of patients with a glomerular filtration rate below 20 ml/min/1.73 m(2). The PKD/Mhm rat model has, besides similar disease characteristics with human PKD, comparable GC alterations. PMID:16641922

  20. Global Gene Expression Profiling in PPAR-γ Agonist-Treated Kidneys in an Orthologous Rat Model of Human Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yoshihara, Daisuke; Kugita, Masanori; Yamaguchi, Tamio; Aukema, Harold M.; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Morita, Miwa; Hiki, Yoshiyuki; Calvet, James P.; Wallace, Darren P.; Toyohara, Takafumi; Abe, Takaaki; Nagao, Shizuko

    2012-01-01

    Kidneys are enlarged by aberrant proliferation of tubule epithelial cells leading to the formation of numerous cysts, nephron loss, and interstitial fibrosis in polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Pioglitazone (PIO), a PPAR-γ agonist, decreased cell proliferation, interstitial fibrosis, and inflammation, and ameliorated PKD progression in PCK rats (Am. J. Physiol.-Renal, 2011). To explore genetic mechanisms involved, changes in global gene expression were analyzed. By Gene Set Enrichment Analysis of 30655 genes, 13 of the top 20 downregulated gene ontology biological process gene sets and six of the top 20 curated gene set canonical pathways identified to be downregulated by PIOtreatment were related to cell cycle and proliferation, including EGF, PDGF and JNK pathways. Their relevant pathways were identified using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Gene and Genomes database. Stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase 1 is a key enzyme in fatty acid metabolism found in the top 5 genes downregulated by PIO treatment. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the gene product of this enzyme was highly expressed in PCK kidneys and decreased by PIO. These data show that PIO alters the expression of genes involved in cell cycle progression, cell proliferation, and fatty acid metabolism. PMID:22666229

  1. Pathological and molecular mechanisms underlying resistance to recombinant human erythropoietin therapy in the remnant kidney rat model of chronic kidney disease associated anemia.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Sandra; Garrido, Patrícia; Fernandes, João; Vala, Helena; Rocha-Pereira, Petronila; Costa, Elísio; Belo, Luís; Reis, Flávio; Santos-Silva, Alice

    2016-06-01

    Anemia of chronic kidney disease (CKD) can be corrected by treatment with recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO); however, some patients become hyporesponsive. The molecular mechanisms underlying this resistance remain to be elucidated. Our aim was to study hyporesponsiveness to rHuEPO therapy using the remnant kidney rat model of anemia associated with CKD induced by 5/6 nephrectomy. At starting, male Wistar rats were divided in 3 groups, for a 3-week protocol: Sham, CRF (vehicle) and two rHuEPO (200 k/kg body weight [BW]/week) treated groups; at the end of protocol, the rHuEPO treated rats were subdivided in responders (CRF200) and non-responders (CRF200NR), according to their hematologic response; blood, cellular and tissue studies were performed. The CRF200 group achieved correction of anemia, while the CRF200NR group developed anemia, after an initial response (1st week) to rHuEPO therapy. CRF and CRF200NR groups presented a trend to higher serum CRP levels; CRF200NR showed also high levels of renal inflammatory markers, such as interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, nuclear factor kappa B, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1); no changes were found in iron metabolism. Our data suggest that the development of anemia/rHuEPO hyporesponsiveness is associated with a higher systemic and renal inflammatory condition, favoring hypoxia and triggering an increase in renal expression of HIF-1α, TGF-β1 and CTGF that will further aggravate renal fibrosis, which will enhance the inflammatory response, creating a cycle that promotes disease progression. New therapeutic strategies to reduce inflammation in CKD patients could improve the response to rHuEPO therapy and reduce hyporesponsiveness. PMID:27039028

  2. Epoetin beta pegol prevents endothelial dysfunction as evaluated by flow-mediated dilation in chronic kidney disease rats.

    PubMed

    Serizawa, Kenichi; Yogo, Kenji; Tashiro, Yoshihito; Aizawa, Ken; Kawasaki, Ryohei; Hirata, Michinori; Endo, Koichi

    2015-11-15

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients have a poor prognosis due to cardiovascular disease. Anemia and endothelial dysfunction are important risk factors for cardiovascular events in CKD patients, and treatment with erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) has been reported to improve the quality of life in CKD patients. In this study, we evaluated the effect of anemia correcting dose of epoetin beta pegol (continuous erythropoietin receptor activator; C.E.R.A.) on endothelial function in 5/6 nephrectomized rats (Nx rats). C.E.R.A. was subcutaneously administered once a fortnight, 5 times in total, from 1 week after nephrectomy. Twenty-four hours after last administration, endothelial function was evaluated by measuring flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in the femoral arteries of anesthetized Nx rats by ultrasound system. Femoral arteries were harvested for western blot analysis. C.E.R.A. significantly increased FMD of Nx rats. Endothelium-independent vasodilation induced by nitroglycerin injection was not influenced by C.E.R.A treatment. Nox4 expression and nitrotyrosine accumulation were significantly decreased, and phosphorylation of eNOS was significantly enhanced in the femoral arteries of C.E.R.A.-treated rats. C.E.R.A. normalized hemoglobin levels but did not affect body weight, systolic blood pressure, heart rate, urinary protein excretion and plasma creatinine. These results indicate that C.E.R.A. prevented endothelial dysfunction in Nx rats, possibly through reduction of local oxidative stress and enhancement of eNOS phosphorylation in the arteries. This study provides the first evidence that C.E.R.A. prevented endothelial dysfunction in CKD model rats under conditions of amelioration of anemia. PMID:26432688

  3. Diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Merlin C; Brownlee, Michael; Susztak, Katalin; Sharma, Kumar; Jandeleit-Dahm, Karin A M; Zoungas, Sophia; Rossing, Peter; Groop, Per-Henrik; Cooper, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    The kidney is arguably the most important target of microvascular damage in diabetes. A substantial proportion of individuals with diabetes will develop kidney disease owing to their disease and/or other co-morbidity, including hypertension and ageing-related nephron loss. The presence and severity of chronic kidney disease (CKD) identify individuals who are at increased risk of adverse health outcomes and premature mortality. Consequently, preventing and managing CKD in patients with diabetes is now a key aim of their overall management. Intensive management of patients with diabetes includes controlling blood glucose levels and blood pressure as well as blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system; these approaches will reduce the incidence of diabetic kidney disease and slow its progression. Indeed, the major decline in the incidence of diabetic kidney disease (DKD) over the past 30 years and improved patient prognosis are largely attributable to improved diabetes care. However, there remains an unmet need for innovative treatment strategies to prevent, arrest, treat and reverse DKD. In this Primer, we summarize what is now known about the molecular pathogenesis of CKD in patients with diabetes and the key pathways and targets implicated in its progression. In addition, we discuss the current evidence for the prevention and management of DKD as well as the many controversies. Finally, we explore the opportunities to develop new interventions through urgently needed investment in dedicated and focused research. For an illustrated summary of this Primer, visit: http://go.nature.com/NKHDzg. PMID:27188921

  4. Kidney Disease: A Silent Problem

    MedlinePlus

    ... dialysis or a transplant might work for you. Medicare And Kidney Disease Medicare may help pay for some kidney disease education and treatment. Contact Medicare to learn more about what is covered. Look ...

  5. Polycystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... a kidney transplant or blood-filtering treatments called dialysis. The two main types of PKD are autosomal ... so people with kidney failure must receive either dialysis or a kidney transplant to replace kidney function. ...

  6. Genetic kidney diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of the primary cause of a disease is essential for understanding its mechanisms and for adequate classification, prognosis, and treatment. Recently, the etiologies of many kidney diseases have been revealed as single-gene defects. This is exemplified by steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome, which is caused by podocin mutations in ~25% of childhood and ~15% of adult cases. Knowledge of a disease-causing mutation in a single-gene disorder represents one of the most robust diagnostic examples of “personalized medicine”, because the mutation conveys an almost 100% risk of developing the disease by a certain age. Whereas single-gene diseases are rare disorders, polygenic “risk alleles” are found in common adult-onset diseases. This review will discuss prominent renal single-gene kidney disorders and polygenic risk alleles of common disorders. We delineate how emerging techniques of total exome capture and large-scale sequencing will facilitate molecular genetic diagnosis, prognosis and specific therapy and lead to a better understanding of disease mechanisms, thus enabling development of new targeted drugs. PMID:20382325

  7. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease Page Content On this page: What is anemia? ... should. [ Top ] How is anemia related to chronic kidney disease? Anemia commonly occurs in people with chronic kidney ...

  8. Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alternate Language URL Español Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines: What You Need to Know Page Content What ... pharmacist and provider need to know about your medicine and supplement use Your kidneys do not filter ...

  9. At Risk for Kidney Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Albumin Children and Kidney Disease Additional Kidney Information Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ... to share this content freely. March 5, 2014​ Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ...

  10. A New Apparatus for Standardized Rat Kidney Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Schirutschke, Holger; Gladrow, Lars; Norkus, Christian; Parmentier, Simon Paul; Hohenstein, Bernd; Hugo, Christian P. M.

    2014-01-01

    Survival biopsies are frequently applied in rat kidney disease models, but several drawbacks such as surgical kidney trauma, bleeding risk and variable loss of kidney tissue are still unsolved. Therefore, we developed an easy-to-use core biopsy instrument and evaluated whether two consecutive kidney biopsies within the same kidney can be carried out in a standardized manner. On day 0, 18 Lewis rats underwent a right nephrectomy and 9 of these rats a subsequent first biopsy of the left kidney (Bx group). 9 control rats had a sham biopsy of the left kidney (Ctrl group). On day 7, a second kidney biopsy/sham biopsy was performed. On day 42, all animals were sacrificed and their kidneys were removed for histology. Biopsy cylinders contained 57±28 glomeruli per transversal section, representing an adequate sample size. PAS staining showed that the biopsy depth was limited to the renal cortex whereas surgical tissue damage was limited to the area immediately adjacent to the taken biopsy cylinder. On day 42, the reduction of functional renal mass after two biopsies was only 5.2% and no differences of body weight, blood pressure, proteinuria, serum creatinine, glomerulosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis or number of ED-1 positive macrophages were found between both groups. In summary, our apparatus offers a safe method to perform repetitive kidney biopsies with minimal trauma and sufficient sample size and quality even in experimental disease models restricted to one single kidney. PMID:25506931

  11. Kidney biomimicry--a rediscovered scientific field that could provide hope to patients with kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Stenvinkel, Peter; Johnson, Richard J

    2013-11-01

    Most studies on kidney disease have relied on classic experimental studies in mice and rats or clinical studies in humans. From such studies much understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of kidney disease has been obtained. However, breakthroughs in the prevention and treatment of kidney diseases have been relatively few, and new approaches to fight kidney disease are needed. Here we discuss kidney biomimicry as a new approach to understand kidney disease. Examples are given of how various animals have developed ways to prevent or respond to kidney failure, how to protect themselves from hypoxia or oxidative stress and from the scourge of hyperglycemia. We suggest that investigation of evolutionary biology and comparative physiology might provide new insights for the prevention and treatment of kidney disease. PMID:24220764

  12. Kidney diseases and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Moon, Kyung Hyun; Ko, In Kap; Yoo, James J; Atala, Anthony

    2016-04-15

    Kidney disease is a worldwide public health problem. Renal failure follows several disease stages including acute and chronic kidney symptoms. Acute kidney injury (AKI) may lead to chronic kidney disease (CKD), which can progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) with a mortality rate. Current treatment options are limited to dialysis and kidney transplantation; however, problems such as donor organ shortage, graft failure and numerous complications remain a concern. To address this issue, cell-based approaches using tissue engineering (TE) and regenerative medicine (RM) may provide attractive approaches to replace the damaged kidney cells with functional renal specific cells, leading to restoration of normal kidney functions. While development of renal tissue engineering is in a steady state due to the complex composition and highly regulated functionality of the kidney, cell therapy using stem cells and primary kidney cells has demonstrated promising therapeutic outcomes in terms of restoration of renal functions in AKI and CKD. In this review, basic components needed for successful renal kidney engineering are discussed, and recent TE and RM approaches to treatment of specific kidney diseases will be presented. PMID:26134528

  13. Sympathetic overactivity prevails over the vascular amplifier phenomena in a chronic kidney disease rat model of hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ameer, Omar Z.; Hildreth, Cara M.; Phillips, Jacqueline K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We examined whether increased sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) accounts for enhanced depressor responses to ganglionic blockade in the Lewis polycystic kidney (LPK) model of chronic kidney disease (CKD) or whether it reflects increased vascular responses to vasodilation (vascular amplifier). Under urethane anesthesia, depressor responses to ganglionic blockade (hexamethonium, 0.5–40 mg/kg i.v.), and direct vasodilation (sodium nitroprusside [SNP], 2.5–40 μg/kg i.v. and adenosine, 3–300 μg/kg i.v.) were compared in the LPK with normotensive Lewis and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) (total n = 37). Hexamethonium (8 mg/kg) produced a greater depressor response in the LPK (−51 ± 3 mmHg) compared with Lewis (−31 ± 3 mmHg, P <0.05) but not SHR (−46 ± 3 mmHg). In LPK, the ratio of the hexamethonium/vasodilator MAP responses was greater when compared with Lewis (hexamethonium/SNP 1.34 ± 0.1 vs. 0.9 ± 0.09 and hexamethonium/adenosine: 2.28 ± 0.3 vs. 1.16 ± 0.1, both P <0.05) but not SHR. Results for systolic blood pressure (SBP) were comparable. The slope of the relationship between the fall in SBP induced by hexamethonium and normalized low frequency (LFnu) power was also greater in the LPK (17.93 ± 3.26 mmHg/LFnu) compared with Lewis (2.78 ± 0.59 mmHg/LFnu, P =0.001) and SHR (3.36 ±0.72 mmHg/LFnu, P =0.003). These results indicate that in the LPK, sympathetic activity predominates over any vascular amplifier effect, supporting increased sympathetic vasomotor tone as a major contributor to hypertension in this model of CKD. PMID:25413325

  14. Kidney Disease: Early Detection and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Kidney Disease: Early Detection and Treatment Past Issues / Winter ... called a "urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio." Treating Kidney Disease Kidney disease is usually a progressive disease, ...

  15. Kidney Disease: Early Detection and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Kidney Disease: Early Detection and Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2008 ... called a "urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio." Treating Kidney Disease Kidney disease is usually a progressive disease, which ...

  16. Emodin via colonic irrigation modulates gut microbiota and reduces uremic toxins in rats with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yu-Qun; Dai, Zhenhua; Lu, Fuhua; Lu, Zhaoyu; Liu, Xusheng; Chen, Cha; Qu, Pinghua; Li, Dingcheng; Hua, Zhengshuang; Qu, Yanni; Zou, Chuan

    2016-04-01

    Gut microbiota plays a dual role in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is closely linked to production of uremic toxins. Strategies of reducing uremic toxins by targeting gut microbiota are emerging. It is known that Chinese medicine rhubarb enema can reduce uremic toxins and improve renal function. However, it remains unknown which ingredient or mechanism mediates its effect. Here we utilized a rat CKD model of 5/6 nephrectomy to evaluate the effect of emodin, a main ingredient of rhubarb, on gut microbiota and uremic toxins in CKD. Emodin was administered via colonic irrigation at 5ml (1mg/day) for four weeks. We found that emodin via colonic irrigation (ECI) altered levels of two important uremic toxins, urea and indoxyl sulfate (IS), and changed gut microbiota in rats with CKD. ECI remarkably reduced urea and IS and improved renal function. Pyrosequencing and Real-Time qPCR analyses revealed that ECI resumed the microbial balance from an abnormal status in CKD. We also demonstrated that ten genera were positively correlated with Urea while four genera exhibited the negative correlation. Moreover, three genera were positively correlated with IS. Therefore, emodin altered the gut microbiota structure. It reduced the number of harmful bacteria, such as Clostridium spp. that is positively correlated with both urea and IS, but augmented the number of beneficial bacteria, including Lactobacillus spp. that is negatively correlated with urea. Thus, changes in gut microbiota induced by emodin via colonic irrigation are closely associated with reduction in uremic toxins and mitigation of renal injury. PMID:27003359

  17. Emodin via colonic irrigation modulates gut microbiota and reduces uremic toxins in rats with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Fuhua; Lu, Zhaoyu; Liu, Xusheng; Chen, Cha; Qu, Pinghua; Li, Dingcheng; Hua, Zhengshuang; Qu, Yanni; Zou, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Gut microbiota plays a dual role in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is closely linked to production of uremic toxins. Strategies of reducing uremic toxins by targeting gut microbiota are emerging. It is known that Chinese medicine rhubarb enema can reduce uremic toxins and improve renal function. However, it remains unknown which ingredient or mechanism mediates its effect. Here we utilized a rat CKD model of 5/6 nephrectomy to evaluate the effect of emodin, a main ingredient of rhubarb, on gut microbiota and uremic toxins in CKD. Emodin was administered via colonic irrigation at 5ml (1mg/day) for four weeks. We found that emodin via colonic irrigation (ECI) altered levels of two important uremic toxins, urea and indoxyl sulfate (IS), and changed gut microbiota in rats with CKD. ECI remarkably reduced urea and IS and improved renal function. Pyrosequencing and Real-Time qPCR analyses revealed that ECI resumed the microbial balance from an abnormal status in CKD. We also demonstrated that ten genera were positively correlated with Urea while four genera exhibited the negative correlation. Moreover, three genera were positively correlated with IS. Therefore, emodin altered the gut microbiota structure. It reduced the number of harmful bacteria, such as Clostridium spp. that is positively correlated with both urea and IS, but augmented the number of beneficial bacteria, including Lactobacillus spp. that is negatively correlated with urea. Thus, changes in gut microbiota induced by emodin via colonic irrigation are closely associated with reduction in uremic toxins and mitigation of renal injury. PMID:27003359

  18. Chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Drawz, Paul; Rahman, Mahboob

    2015-06-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of chronic kidney disease, focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and patient information. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic from these primary sources in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of science writers and physician writers. Editorial consultants from ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP provide expert review of the content. Readers who are interested in these primary resources for more detail can consult http://smartmedicine.acponline.org, http://mksap.acponline.org, and other resources referenced in each issue of In the Clinic. PMID:26030647

  19. Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Catherine Kelleher, M.D., University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver. About the Kidney Failure Series The NIDDK Kidney Failure Series includes booklets and fact sheets that can help you learn more about treatment methods for kidney failure, complications of dialysis, financial help ...

  20. Myeloperoxidase in kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Malle, Ernst; Buch, Thomas; Grone, Hermann-Josef

    2003-12-01

    In glomerular and tubulointerstitial disease, polymorphonuclear- and monocyte-derived reactive oxygen species may contribute to oxidative modification of proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. In part, the processes instigated by reactive oxygen species parallel events that lead to the development of atherosclerosis. Myeloperoxidase (MPO), a heme protein and catalyst for (lipo)protein oxidation is present in these mononuclear cells. The ability of MPO to generate hypochlorous acid/hypochlorite (HOCl/OCl-) from hydrogen peroxide in the presence of chloride ions is a unique and defining activity for this enzyme. The MPO-hydrogen peroxide-chloride system leads to a variety of chlorinated protein and lipid adducts that in turn may cause dysfunction of cells in different compartments of the kidney. The aim of this article is to cover and interpret some experimental and clinical aspects in glomerular and tubulointerstitial diseases in which the MPO-hydrogen peroxide-chloride system has been considered an important pathophysiologic factor in the progression but also the attenuation of experimental renal disease. The colocalization of MPO and HOCl-modified proteins in glomerular peripheral basement membranes and podocytes in human membranous glomerulonephritis, the presence of HOCl-modified proteins in mononuclear cells of the interstitium and in damaged human tubular epithelia, the inflammation induced and exacerbated by MPO antibody complexes in necrotizing glomerulonephritis, and the presence of HOCl-modified epitopes in urine following hyperlipidemia-induced renal damage in rodents suggest that MPO is an important pathogenic factor in glomerular and tubulointerstitial diseases. Specifically, the interaction of MPO with nitric oxide metabolism adds to the complexity of actions of oxidants and may help to explain bimodal partly detrimental partly beneficial effects of the MPO-hydrogen peroxide-chloride system in redox-modulated renal diseases. PMID:14633118

  1. Kidney Disease Statistics for the United States

    MedlinePlus

    ... also order print versions from our online catalog. Kidney Disease Statistics for the United States Page Content On ... for Vascular Access Acknowledgments The Growing Burden of Kidney Disease Kidney disease statistics for the United States convey ...

  2. Lupus and Kidney Disease (Lupus Nephritis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  3. Working with Kidney Disease: Rehabilitation and Employment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  4. Vitamins and Minerals in Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  5. Age-Related Alterations in Blood Biochemical Characterization of Hepatorenal Function in the PCK Rat: A Model of Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Yuichi; Brock, William J; Ito, Yuko; Morishita, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    PCK rats develop age-related polycystic kidney disease (PKD) and liver disease and have been used to investigate pharmacotherapies to ameliorate hepatorenal lesions for patients with PKD. The PCK rat may be useful to understand the possible susceptibility to hepatotoxicity observed in the patient with PKD having hepatic polycystic lesions. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the background blood biochemical changes that reflect the hepatorenal function of PCK rats as well as the terminal histopathology in order to determine whether this model would be suitable for extrapolating the susceptibility of hepatotoxicity in patients. The blood biochemical parameters of hepatorenal function and histopathology were investigated in PCK rats at ages 5 to 19 weeks and compared to those outcomes in the Sprague Dawley (SD) rat. There were notable blood biochemical changes possibly due to biliary dysgenesis in the PCK rat as early as 5 weeks of age. High levels of γ-glutamyl transpeptidase, alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase, and total bile acids persisted throughout the study compared to the SD rat. Increased aspartate aminotransferase, total bilirubin, and hyperlipidemia and a decrease in albumin were also evident at 10 to 19 weeks of age possibly due to progression of cholestatic liver dysfunction secondary to age-related liver cystic progression. Increased liver weights generally correlated with the severity of biliary and hepatic histopathological changes. In male PCK rats, age-related increases in blood urea nitrogen and creatinine at 10 to 19 weeks of age were observed, and the cystic progression was more severe than that in females. These data indicate that the PCK rat showed notable blood biochemical changes reflecting alteration of the liver function compared to the SD rat. Also, there was a large individual variation in these parameters possibly due to variable progression rate of biliary dysgenesis and subsequent liver damages in PCK

  6. [Chronic Kidney Disease and Bone].

    PubMed

    James, Junichiro

    2016-08-01

    Both bone and kidney are members of the physiological network sharing a purpose of systemic mineral metabolism. In patients with chronic kidney disease whose kidney function is lost, the organ functions of other mineral metabolism network member including bone fail into uncontrollable due to dysregulated feedback system. This is the concept of Chronic Kidney Disease(related)- Mineral and Bone Disorder(CKD-MBD). However, the bone metabolic abnormalities in patients with chronic kidney disease cannot be explained merely by the framework of this mineral metabolism network. Although dialysis patients show several times higher hip fracture risk than general population, the main pathogenesis seems not to be their disordered mineral metabolism. We need to consider "uremic osteoporosis" characterized by deteriorated bone material properties due to uremic condition. PMID:27461505

  7. Resistant starch alters gut microbiome and metabolomics profiles concurrent with amelioration of chronic kidney disease in rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Patients and animals with chronic kidney disease (CKD) exhibit profound alterations in the gut environment including shifts in microbial composition, increased fecal pH, and increased blood levels of gut microbe-derived metabolites (xeno-metabolites). The fermentable dietary fiber—high amylose maize...

  8. Resistant starch alters gut microbiota and reduces uremic retention solutes in rats with adenine-induced chronic kidney disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by the reduced ability to void urine, leading to accumulation of waste products in the body. Recently, it has been observed that patients with CKD have an altered gut microbiome. This may in part be due to reduced fiber intake. Patients with CKD are ofte...

  9. Ultrasound in Acute Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Nalesso, Federico; Petrucci, Ilaria; Samoni, Sara; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Kidneys' imaging provides useful information in acute kidney injury (AKI) diagnosis and management. Today, several imaging techniques give information on kidneys anatomy, urinary obstruction, differential diagnosis between AKI and chronic kidney disease (CKD), renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate. Ultrasound is a safe, non-invasive and repeatable imaging technique so it is widely used in the first level work-up of AKI. The utility of contrast-enhanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in AKI or in AKI during CKD is limited because of renal toxicity associated with contrast agents used. PMID:27169556

  10. High Blood Pressure and Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Center National Kidney Foundation Smokefree.gov MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... Alternate Language URL Español High Blood Pressure and Kidney Disease Page Content On this page: What is ...

  11. End-stage kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Transplantation: Principles and Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 3. Inker LA, Astor BC, ... Primer on Kidney Diseases . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 53. Taal M. Risk factors ...

  12. Diet - chronic kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this special diet to limit the buildup of waste products in the body. Limiting fluids between dialysis ... up when the kidneys no longer function well. Dangerous heart rhythms may result, which can lead to ...

  13. Amyloidosis and Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... body has fewer red blood cells than normal. Dialysis-related Amyloidosis People who suffer from kidney failure ... weight loss [ Top ] What are the symptoms of dialysis-related amyloidosis? The symptoms of dialysis-related amyloidosis ...

  14. Kidney Injury in Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Regner, Kevin R; Singbartl, Kai

    2016-07-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs frequently in patients with liver disease and increases morbidity and mortality. Hepatorenal syndrome is a common cause of AKI in patients with decompensated cirrhosis and is due to alterations in systemic and renal hemodynamics. Serum creatinine-based estimation of kidney function is a key component of the Model for End-stage Liver Disease score in liver transplant candidates. Continuous renal replacement therapy is used in critically ill patients with liver failure and AKI. Simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation (SLK) may be required in patients with liver failure and prolonged AKI. Identification of appropriate candidates for SLK remains controversial. PMID:27339675

  15. CD74 in Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Valiño-Rivas, Lara; Baeza-Bermejillo, Ciro; Gonzalez-Lafuente, Laura; Sanz, Ana Belen; Ortiz, Alberto; Sanchez-Niño, Maria Dolores

    2015-01-01

    CD74 (invariant MHC class II) regulates protein trafficking and is a receptor for macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) and d-dopachrome tautomerase (d-DT/MIF-2). CD74 expression is increased in tubular cells and/or glomerular podocytes and parietal cells in human metabolic nephropathies, polycystic kidney disease, graft rejection and kidney cancer and in experimental diabetic nephropathy and glomerulonephritis. Stressors like abnormal metabolite (glucose, lyso-Gb3) levels and inflammatory cytokines increase kidney cell CD74. MIF activates CD74 to increase inflammatory cytokines in podocytes and tubular cells and proliferation in glomerular parietal epithelial cells and cyst cells. MIF overexpression promotes while MIF targeting protects from experimental glomerular injury and kidney cysts, and interference with MIF/CD74 signaling or CD74 deficiency protected from crescentic glomerulonephritis. However, CD74 may protect from interstitial kidney fibrosis. Furthermore, CD74 expression by stressed kidney cells raises questions about the kidney safety of cancer therapy strategies delivering lethal immunoconjugates to CD74-expressing cells. Thus, understanding CD74 biology in kidney cells is relevant for kidney therapeutics. PMID:26441987

  16. Relationship between Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 and Biochemical and Bone Histomorphometric Alterations in a Chronic Kidney Disease Rat Model Undergoing Parathyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Hung-Wei; Hung, Peir-Haur; Hsiao, Chih-Yen; Liou, Hung-Hsiang; Lin, Hsin-Shih; Huang, Tsang-Hai; Jou, I-Ming; Tsai, Kuen-Jer

    2015-01-01

    Background Phosphate burden in chronic kidney disease (CKD) leads to elevated serum fibroblast factor-23 (FGF-23) levels, secondary hyperparathyroidism and chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD). However dissociated hyperphosphatemia and low serum FGF-23 concentrations have been observed in experimentally parathyoridectomized rats. The relationships between serum mineral, hormone, and bone metabolism may be altered in the presence of CKD. The aim of our study was to investigate whether a consistent relationship existed between serum FGF-23 levels, specific serum biochemical markers, and histomorphometric parameters of bone metabolism in a parathyroidectomized CKD animal model. Results Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups: parathyroidectomy (PTX) and CKD (PTX+CKD, 9 rats), CKD without PTX (CKD, 9 rats), and neither PTX nor CKD (sham-operated control, 8 rats); CKD was induced by partial nephrectomy. At 8 weeks after partial nephrectomy, serum biomarkers were measured. Bone histomorphometries of the distal femoral metaphyseal bone were analyzed. The mean serum FGF-23 levels and mean bone formation rate were the highest in the CKD group and the lowest in the PTX+CKD group. Bone volume parameters increased significantly in the PTX+CKD group. Pearson’s correlation revealed that serum FGF-23 levels associated with those of intact parathyroid hormone, phosphate, collagen type I C-telopeptide, and calcium. Univariate linear regression showed that serum FGF-23 values correlated with bone formation rate, bone volume, and osteoid parameters. Stepwise multivariate regression analysis revealed that circulating FGF-23 values were independently associated with bone volume and thickness (β = -0.737; p < 0.001 and β = -0.526; p = 0.006, respectively). Serum parathyroid hormone levels independently correlated with bone formation rate (β = 0.714; p < 0.001) while collagen type I C-telopeptide levels correlated with osteoid parameter. Conclusion Serum FGF

  17. Bacterial kidney disease (Renibacterium salmoninarum)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD), caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum, is a prevalent disease of salmonid fish that impacts sustainable production for consumption and species conservation efforts. The disease is chronic in nature and mortality most often occurs in juvenile salmonids and prespawning a...

  18. Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fax: 813–636–8122 Email: info@aakp.org Internet: www.aakp.org American Kidney Fund 6110 Executive ... Fax: 301–881–0898 Email: helpline@kidneyfund.org Internet: www.kidneyfund.org Life Options Rehabilitation Resource Center ...

  19. Medicines and Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dialysis or Transplant Paying for Kidney Failure Treatment Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ... to share this content freely. ​​September 17, 2014 ​​ Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ...

  20. Kidney Disease and Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Rennke, Helmut G.; Laubach, Jacob P.; Richardson, Paul G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Kidney injury is a common complication of multiple myeloma and other plasma cell dyscrasias, and it is associated with increased mortality. Multiple pathogenic mechanisms can contribute to kidney injury in the patient with myeloma, some of which are the result of nephrotoxic monoclonal Ig and some of which are independent of paraprotein deposition. The pathogenic mechanisms that underlie paraprotein-related kidney disease are increasingly well understood. A novel assay allowing the quantification of free light chains in the serum has aided the diagnosis of new onset disease and allowed for the earlier detection of relapse. Novel myeloma agents have shown considerable promise in reversing renal failure in some patients and improving outcomes. Stem cell transplantation remains a mainstay of management for younger patients with myeloma who are suitable candidates for intensive therapy, whereas the role of new drugs, plasma exchange, and kidney transplantation continues to evolve. PMID:23868898

  1. Glycine metabolism in rat kidney cortex slices.

    PubMed

    Rowsell, E V; Al-Naama, M M; Rowsell, K V

    1982-04-15

    When rat kidney cortex slices were incubated with glycine or [1-14C]glycine, after correcting for metabolite changes with control slices, product formation and glycine utilization fitted the requirements of the equation: 2 Glycine leads to ammonia + CO2 + serine. Evidence is presented that degradation via glyoxylate, by oxidation or transamination, is unlikely to have any significant role in kidney glycine catabolism. It is concluded that glycine metabolism in rat kidney is largely via glycine cleavage closely coupled with serine formation. 1-C decarboxylation and urea formation with glycine in rat hepatocyte suspensions were somewhat greater than decarboxylation or ammonia formation in kidney slices, showing that in the rat, potentially, the liver is quantitatively the more important organ in glycine catabolism. There was no evidence of ammonia formation from glycine with rat brain cortex, heart, spleen or diaphragm and 1-C decarboxylation was very weak. PMID:6810880

  2. Glomerulocystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Siroky, Brian J.; Yin, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Glomerulocystic disease is a rare renal cystic disease with a long descriptive history. Findings from recent studies have significantly advanced the pathophysiological understanding of the disease processes leading to this peculiar phenotype. Many genetic syndromes associated with glomerulocystic disease have had their respective proteins localized to primary cilia or centrosomes. Transcriptional control of renal developmental pathways is dysregulated in obstructive diseases that also lead to glomerulocystic disease, emphasizing the importance of transcriptional choreography between renal development and renal cystic disease. PMID:20091054

  3. Is Progressive Chronic Kidney Disease a Slow Acute Kidney Injury?

    PubMed

    Cowgill, Larry D; Polzin, David J; Elliott, Jonathan; Nabity, Mary B; Segev, Gilad; Grauer, Gregory F; Brown, Scott; Langston, Cathy; van Dongen, Astrid M

    2016-11-01

    International Renal Interest Society chronic kidney disease Stage 1 and acute kidney injury Grade I categorizations of kidney disease are often confused or ignored because patients are nonazotemic and generally asymptomatic. Recent evidence suggests these seemingly disparate conditions may be mechanistically linked and interrelated. Active kidney injury biomarkers have the potential to establish a new understanding for traditional views of chronic kidney disease, including its early identification and possible mediators of its progression, which, if validated, would establish a new and sophisticated paradigm for the understanding and approach to the diagnostic evaluation, and treatment of urinary disease in dogs and cats. PMID:27593574

  4. Kidney stone disease

    PubMed Central

    Coe, Fredric L.; Evan, Andrew; Worcester, Elaine

    2005-01-01

    About 5% of American women and 12% of men will develop a kidney stone at some time in their life, and prevalence has been rising in both sexes. Approximately 80% of stones are composed of calcium oxalate (CaOx) and calcium phosphate (CaP); 10% of struvite (magnesium ammonium phosphate produced during infection with bacteria that possess the enzyme urease), 9% of uric acid (UA); and the remaining 1% are composed of cystine or ammonium acid urate or are diagnosed as drug-related stones. Stones ultimately arise because of an unwanted phase change of these substances from liquid to solid state. Here we focus on the mechanisms of pathogenesis involved in CaOx, CaP, UA, and cystine stone formation, including recent developments in our understanding of related changes in human kidney tissue and of underlying genetic causes, in addition to current therapeutics. PMID:16200192

  5. Regenerative medicine in kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Little, Melissa H; Kairath, Pamela

    2016-08-01

    The treatment of renal failure has changed little in decades. Organ transplantation and dialysis continue to represent the only therapeutic options available. However, decades of fundamental research into the response of the kidney to acute injury and the processes driving progression to chronic kidney disease are beginning to open doors to new options. Similarly, continued investigations into the cellular and molecular basis of normal kidney development, together with major advances in stem cell biology, are now delivering options in regenerative medicine not possible as recently as a decade ago. In this review, we will discuss advances in regenerative medicine as it may be applied to the kidney. This will cover cellular therapies focused on ameliorating injury and improving repair as well as advancements in the generation of new renal tissue from stem/progenitor cells. PMID:27234568

  6. [Diabetic kidney disease - Update 2016].

    PubMed

    Sourij, Harald; Edlinger, Roland; Prischl, Friedrich; Auinger, Martin; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Säemann, Marcus D; Prager, Rudolf; Clodi, Martin; Schernthaner, Guntram; Mayer, Gert; Oberbauer, Rainer; Rosenkranz, Alexander R

    2016-04-01

    Recent epidemiological evaluations have shown that approximately 5% of all Austrians suffer from diabetes including renal involvement, i. e. 400.000 people in Austria are affected. The risk of start and progression of this disease can be ameliorated by lifestyle interventions as well as optimization of blood pressure and glucose levels. The present article represents the joint recommendations of the Austrian Diabetes Association and the Austrian Society for Nephrology for the prevention and treatment of diabetic kidney disease. PMID:27052231

  7. Study Links Climate Change to Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158680.html Study Links Climate Change to Kidney Disease Rising temperatures, less rain seen ... 5, 2016 THURSDAY, May 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Climate change may boost rates of chronic kidney disease worldwide ...

  8. Growth Failure in Children with Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Language URL Growth Failure in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease Page Content On this page: What is growth ... What is growth failure in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD)? Growth failure is a complication of CKD ...

  9. Study Links Climate Change to Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158680.html Study Links Climate Change to Kidney Disease Rising temperatures, less rain ... 5, 2016 THURSDAY, May 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Climate change may boost rates of chronic kidney disease ...

  10. NAFLD and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Marcuccilli, Morgan; Chonchol, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in developed countries and it is now considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Evidence linking NAFLD to the development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is emerging as a popular area of scientific interest. The rise in simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation as well as the significant cost associated with the presence of chronic kidney disease in the NAFLD population make this entity a worthwhile target for screening and therapeutic intervention. While several cross-sectional and case control studies have been published to substantiate these theories, very little data exists on the underlying cause of NAFLD and CKD. In this review, we will discuss the most recent publications on the diagnosis of NAFLD as well new evidence regarding the pathophysiology of NAFLD and CKD as an inflammatory disorder. These mechanisms include the role of obesity, the renin-angiotensin system, and dysregulation of fructose metabolism and lipogenesis in the development of both disorders. Further investigation of these pathways may lead to novel therapies that aim to target the NAFLD and CKD. However, more prospective studies that include information on both renal and liver histology will be necessary in order to understand the relationship between these diseases. PMID:27089331

  11. Parallel Analysis of mRNA and microRNA Microarray Profiles to Explore Functional Regulatory Patterns in Polycystic Kidney Disease: Using PKD/Mhm Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Dweep, Harsh; Sticht, Carsten; Kharkar, Asawari; Pandey, Priyanka; Gretz, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a frequent monogenic renal disease, characterised by fluid-filled cysts that are thought to result from multiple deregulated pathways such as cell proliferation and apoptosis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate the expression of many genes associated with such biological processes and human pathologies. To explore the possible regulatory role of miRNAs in PKD, the PKD/Mhm (cy/+) rat, served as a model to study human ADPKD. A parallel microarray-based approach was conducted to profile the expression changes of mRNAs and miRNAs in PKD/Mhm rats. 1,573 up- and 1,760 down-regulated genes were differentially expressed in PKD/Mhm. These genes are associated with 17 pathways (such as focal adhesion, cell cycle, ECM-receptor interaction, DNA replication and metabolic pathways) and 47 (e.g., cell proliferation, Wnt and Tgfβ signaling) Gene Ontologies. Furthermore, we found the similar expression patterns of deregulated genes between PKD/Mhm (cy/+) rat and human ADPKD, PKD1L3/L3, PKD1−/−, Hnf1α-deficient, and Glis2lacZ/lacZ models. Additionally, several differentially regulated genes were noted to be target hubs for miRNAs. We also obtained 8 significantly up-regulated miRNAs (rno-miR-199a-5p, −214, −146b, −21, −34a, −132, −31 and −503) in diseased kidneys of PKD/Mhm rats. Additionally, the binding site overrepresentation and pathway enrichment analyses were accomplished on the putative targets of these 8 miRNAs. 7 out of these 8 miRNAs and their possible interactions have not been previously described in ADPKD. We have shown a strong overlap of functional patterns (pathways) between deregulated miRNAs and mRNAs in the PKD/Mhm (cy/+) rat model. Our findings suggest that several miRNAs may be associated in regulating pathways in ADPKD. We further describe novel miRNAs and their possible targets in ADPKD, which will open new avenues to understand the pathogenesis of human ADPKD

  12. Inhibition of Comt with tolcapone slows progression of polycystic kidney disease in the more severely affected PKD/Mhm (cy/+) substrain of the Hannover Sprague-Dawley rat

    PubMed Central

    Boehn, Susanne N.E.; Spahn, Sonja; Neudecker, Sabine; Keppler, Andrea; Bihoreau, Marie-Thérèse; Kränzlin, Bettina; Pandey, Priyanka; Hoffmann, Sigrid C.; Li, Li; Torres, Vicente E.; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Gretz, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Background Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is one of the most common human inherited diseases. Modifier genes seem to modulate the disease progression and might therefore be promising drug targets. Although a number of modifier loci have been already identified, no modifier gene has been proven to be a real modifier yet. Methods Gene expression profiling of two substrains of the Han:SPRD rat, namely PKD/Mhm and PKD/US, both harboring the same mutation, was conducted in 36-day-old animals. Catechol-O-methyltransferase (Comt) was identified as a potential modifier gene. A 3-month treatment with tolcapone, a selective inhibitor of Comt, was carried out in PKD/Mhm and PKD/US (cy/+) animals. Results Comt is localized within a known modifier locus of PKD (MOP2). The enzyme encoding gene was found upregulated in the more severely affected PKD/Mhm substrain and was hence presumed to be a putative modifier gene of PKD. The treatment with tolcapone markedly attenuated the loss of renal function, inhibited renal enlargement, shifted the size distribution of renal cysts and retarded cell proliferation, apoptosis, inflammation and fibrosis development in affected (cy/+) male and female PKD/Mhm and PKD/US rats. Conclusions Comt has been confirmed to be the first reported modifier gene for PKD and tolcapone offers a promising drug for treating PKD. PMID:23543593

  13. Angiogenesis and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The number of patients requiring renal replacement therapy due to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is increasing worldwide. The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD), and the importance of CKD as a risk factor in development of ESRD and in complicating cardiovascular disease (CVD) have been confirmed. In recent years, the involvement of angiogenesis-related factors in the progression of CKD has been studied, and the potential therapeutic effects on CKD of modulating these factors have been identified. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, a potent pro-angiogenic factor, is involved in the development of the kidney, in maintenance of the glomerular capillary structure and filtration barrier, and in the renal repair process after injury. VEGF-A is also involved in the development of early diabetic nephropathy, demonstrated by the therapeutic effects of anti-VEGF-A antibody. Angiopoietin (Ang)-1 induces the maturation of newly formed blood vessels, and the therapeutic effects of Ang-1 in diabetic nephropathy have been described. In experimental models of diabetic nephropathy, the therapeutic effects of angiogenesis inhibitors, including angiostatin, endostatin and tumstatin peptides, the isocoumarin NM-3, and vasohibin-1, have been reported. Further analysis of the involvement of angiogenesis-related factors in the development of CKD is required. Determining the disease stage at which therapy is most effective and developing an effective drug delivery system targeting the kidney will be essential for pro-or anti-angiogenic strategies for patients with CKD. PMID:20687922

  14. Kidney disease in Paraguay.

    PubMed

    Santa Cruz, Francisco; Cabrera, Walter; Barreto, Susana; Mayor, María Magdalena; Báez, Diana

    2005-08-01

    Paraguay is a landlocked country located in South America with a total population of 5,884,491. Most of the population (95%) is mestizo, a mixture of Spanish and American/Indian races. The total number of indigenous people in the country has increased from 38,703 in 1981 to 85,674 in 2002. The gross domestic product per capita was US $932.00 annually per person in the year 2002. Between 1992 and 1997, there were 380 patients on chronic dialysis in Paraguay and 75 patients received renal transplants, mostly living-related. The prevalence of renal replacement therapy was 87 patients per million, and the incidence of renal disease continues to rise. Seventy percent of cases of ESRD are of unknown etiology and 15% have diabetes-related renal disease. Only citizens covered by the employee's national health insurance have complete coverage for dialysis and transplantation. The remainder of the population has to apply to public hospitals when the need for hemodialysis arises. At such hospitals, they can receive hemodialysis coverage from the National Institute of Nephrology or from other medical foundations to obtain entrance to these programs. They must otherwise use their own resources to pay for treatment. Seventy percent of patients on chronic dialysis turn to public hospitals for treatment. Hospital hemodialysis is the method most widely used. Home dialysis is rarely performed and there are very few programs for ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. Thus, a large number of patients are not able to enter chronic dialysis programs. In a recent survey of 4655 ill children registered, the distribution of main renal disease was acute glomerulonephritis in 42 cases (9 per 1000), nephrotic syndrome in 40 cases (8.5 per 1000), systemic lupus erythematosis in 28 cases (6 per 1000), and hematuria alone in 11 cases (2.3 per 1000). In ambulatory pediatric practice, urinary tract infection is the leading reason for seeking medical advice. Two thirds of such cases are associated with

  15. Semiautomated quantitative image analysis of glomerular immunohistochemistry markers desmin, vimentin, podocin, synaptopodin and WT-1 in acute and chronic rat kidney disease models.

    PubMed

    Funk, J; Ott, V; Herrmann, A; Rapp, W; Raab, S; Riboulet, W; Vandjour, A; Hainaut, E; Benardeau, A; Singer, T; Jacobsen, B

    2016-03-01

    Five different glomerular immunohistochemistry markers were evaluated and compared in four different acute and chronic rat kidney disease models. Progression of glomerular or podocyte damage was shown in the puromycin aminonucleoside nephrosis (PAN) and Zucker fatty/spontaneously hypertensive heart failure F1 hybrid (ZSF1) rat model. Progression and prevention of glomerular damage was demonstrated in the Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) and Dahl salt-sensitive (Dahl SS) rat. Immunohistochemistry was performed for desmin, vimentin, podocin, synaptopodin and Wilms tumor protein-1 (WT-1), and evaluation of glomerular immunohistochemistry markers was done by semiautomated quantitative image analysis. We found desmin and WT-1 as the most sensitive markers for podocyte damage in both acute and chronic glomerular damage followed by vimentin, podocin and synaptopodin. We were able to demonstrate that early podocyte damage as shown by increased desmin and vimentin staining together with either a phenotypic podocyte change or podocyte loss (reduced numbers of WT-1-stained podocytes) drives the progression of glomerular damage. This is followed by a reduction in podocyte-specific proteins such as podocin and synaptopodin. Our report describes the different sensitivity of glomerular or podocyte markers and gives future guidance for the selection of the most sensitive markers for efficacy testing of new drugs as well as for the selection of tissue-based toxicity markers for glomerular or podocyte injury. In addition to functional clinical chemistry markers, desmin and WT-1 immunohistochemistry offers reliable and valuable data on the morphologic state of podocytes. PMID:26671788

  16. [Chronic kidney disease and nutrition].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takuya; Kumagai, Hiromichi

    2016-03-01

    Abnormalities of mineral metabolism develop with decline of renal function in chronic kidney disease (CKD), and it is called as a CKD-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD). The standard approach for management of CKD-MBD is to keep serum phosphorus, calcium, and parathyroid hormone in the reference range by dietary intervention and medications. It has been recently pointed out that starting the treatment from early CKD is important for suppressing CKD-MBD. PMID:26923973

  17. Arterial disease in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Moody, William E; Edwards, Nicola C; Chue, Colin D; Ferro, Charles J; Townend, Jonathan N

    2013-03-01

    End stage renal disease is associated with a very high risk of premature cardiovascular death and morbidity. Early stage chronic kidney disease (CKD) is also associated with an increased frequency of cardiovascular events and is a common but poorly recognised and undertreated risk factor. Cardiovascular disease in CKD can be attributed to two distinct but overlapping pathological processes, namely atherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis. While the risk of athero-thrombotic events such as myocardial infarction is elevated, arteriosclerosis is the predominant pathophysiological process involving fibrosis and thickening of the medial arterial layer. This results in increased arterial stiffness causing left ventricular hypertrophy and fibrosis and the exposure of vulnerable vascular beds such as the brain and kidney to high pressure fluctuations causing small vessel disease. These pathophysiological features are manifest by a high risk of lethal arrhythmia, congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction and stroke. Recent work has highlighted the importance of aldosterone and disordered bone mineral metabolism. PMID:23118349

  18. Sleep disorders in kidney disease.

    PubMed

    De Santo, R M; Perna, A; Di Iorio, B R; Cirillo, M

    2010-03-01

    Sleep disorders are common in patients with end stage renal disease receiving hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. However also a well functioning renal graft does not cure the poor sleep pattern which now emerges as a problem even in early chronic kidney disease (CKD). When patients are made aware for the first time of a disease such as CKD, which may brink to dialysis or at the best to a renal transplant patients begin to experience a disordered sleep. Sleeping disorders include insomnia (I), sleep apnoea (SAS), restless legs syndrome (RLS), periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD), excessive daily sleeping (EDS), sleepwalking, nightmares, and narcolepsy. Disordered sleep did not meet the clinical and scientific interest it deserves, in addition and we do not have a well defined solution for sleeping complaints. However, awareness that a poor sleep is associated with poor quality of life and carries an increase in mortality risk has recently stimulated interest in the field. There are many putative causes for a disordered sleep in chronic kidney disease and in end-stage renal disease. For a unifying hypothesis demographic factors, lifestyles, disease related factors, psychological factors, treatment related factors, and social factor must be taken into consideration. PMID:20424573

  19. [Renal failure and cystic kidney diseases].

    PubMed

    Correas, J-M; Joly, D; Chauveau, D; Richard, S; Hélénon, O

    2011-04-01

    Cystic kidney diseases often are discovered at the time of initial work-up of renal failure through ultrasound or family history, or incidentally at the time of an imaging test. Hereditary diseases include autosomal dominant or recessive polycystic kidney disease (PKD), tuberous sclerosis (TS) and medullary cystic kidney disease (MCKD). Autosomal dominant PKD is characterized by large renal cysts developing in young adults. Renal failure is progressive and becomes severe around 50-60 years of age. Atypical cysts (hemorrhagic or hyperdense) are frequent on CT and MRI examinations. Imaging plays a valuable role in the management of acute complications such as cyst hemorrhage or infection. Autosomal recessive PKD is often detected in neonates, infants or young adults. It is characterized by renal enlargement due to the presence of small cysts and liver disease (fibrosis and biliary ductal dilatation). Late manifestation or slow progression of autosomal recessive PKD may be more difficult to distinguish from autosomal dominant PKD. These cystic kidney diseases should not be confused with non-hereditary incidental multiple renal cysts. In tuberous sclerosis, renal cysts are associated with angiomyolipomas and sometimes pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis. Renal failure is inconstant. Other hereditary cystic kidney diseases, including MCKD and nephronophtisis, are usually associated with renal failure. Non-hereditary cystic kidney diseases include multicystic renal dysplasia (due to complete pelvi-ureteric atresia or hydronephrosis), acquired multicystic kidney disease (chronic renal failure, chronic hemodialysis) and varied cystic kidney diseases (multicystic renal disease, glomerulocystic kidney disease, microcystic kidney disease). PMID:21549887

  20. Urea synthesis in rats fed diet containing kidney beans.

    PubMed

    Scislowski, P W; Grant, G; Harris, I; Pickard, K; Pusztai, A

    1992-10-01

    When rats were fed a diet containing kidney bean (Phaesolus vulgaris) urea excretion was increased 3-5 fold. Isolated liver mitochondria from rats fed the kidney bean diet produced 40% more citrulline in the presence of arginine than mitochondria isolated from control rats. Mitochondrial activities of urea cycle enzymes and N-acetylglutamate synthetase were similar in animals fed diets containing kidney bean or lactalbumin. The possible mechanisms causing acute urea production in rats fed with kidney bean are discussed. PMID:1445392

  1. Nephrology Update: Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sharmeela; Rahman, Mahboob

    2016-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects more than 1 in 10 individuals in the United States. The care of these patients must be managed by family physicians and nephrology subspecialists. The kidneys often are affected by systemic processes such as diabetes and hypertension, and optimal management of these conditions is critical to slow decline in renal function in CKD patients. These patients are at high risk of cardiovascular disease, and statin therapy is recommended for adults with CKD who are at least age 50 years and not receiving dialysis. Patients with CKD and anemia can be treated with iron therapy and often with an erythropoietin-stimulating agent. Electrolyte abnormalities are managed with dietary changes and drugs. Sodium restriction and modification of dietary protein intake also may be needed. Consultation with a renal dietitian may be helpful. Because many drugs are metabolized by the kidneys, physicians should ensure that drug dosages are appropriate for the level of renal function. Early consultation with or referral to a nephrology subspecialist for patients with reduced renal function, resistant hypertension or electrolyte levels, and other conditions have been associated with improved outcomes in CKD patients. PMID:27163761

  2. Pregnancy in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Vellanki, Kavitha

    2013-05-01

    Despite vast improvements in fetal outcomes, pregnancy in women with CKD is fraught with hazards; worsening of renal function and complications like preeclampsia and premature delivery are common. To date, there is no accurate formula to calculate glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Also, whether the current CKD classification is better than the older classification at predicting outcomes in pregnant women with CKD is unknown. Women with an estimated GFR ≥1.4 mg/dL are at increased risk of progressive worsening of renal function regardless of the cause of the underlying kidney disease. Preeclampsia is difficult to diagnose in pregnant women with underlying CKD, and serum markers such as soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt1) and placental growth factor (PIGF) may lead the way for definitive diagnosis. New-onset lupus or lupus flare is an indication for kidney biopsy during pregnancy; cyclosporine is safe and is the most effective agent that can be used during pregnancy. Women with adult polycystic kidney disease are at increased risk of hypertension and preeclampsia during pregnancy, as well as hepatic cysts later in life, the latter occurring with multiple pregnancies. Strict blood pressure control is important in pregnant women with diabetic nephropathy. A multidisciplinary team that includes nephrologists and obstetricians who deal with high-risk pregnancies should be involved in the care of pregnant women with CKD for successful pregnancy outcomes. PMID:23928386

  3. Polycystic kidney disease: The cadence of kidney growth in ADPKD.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Arlene

    2009-06-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease is characterized by the development and expansion of cysts, which ultimately results in kidney failure. The rate of this expansion can now be quantified within a short period of time, which has implications for assessing the risk of renal failure in affected patients. PMID:19474826

  4. Chromium-induced kidney disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wedeen, R.P. ); Qian, Lifen )

    1991-05-01

    Kidney disease is often cited as one of the adverse effects of chromium, yet chronic renal disease due to occupational or environmental exposure to chromium has not been reported. Occasional cases of acute tubular necrosis (ATN) following massive absorption of chromate have been described. Chromate-induced ATN has been extensively studied in experimental animals following parenteral administration of large doses of potassium chromate (hexavalent). The chromate is selectively accumulated in the convoluted proximal tubule where necrosis occurs. An adverse long-term effect of low-dose chromium exposure on the kidneys is suggested by reports of low molecular weight (LMW) proteinuria in chromium workers. Excessive urinary excretion of {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin, a specific proximal tubule brush border protein, and retinol-binding protein has been reported among chrome palters and welders. However, LMW proteinuria occurs after a variety of physiologic stresses, is usually reversible, and cannot by itself be considered evidence of chromic renal disease. Chromate-induced ATN and LMW proteinuria in chromium workers, nevertheless, raise the possibility that low-level, long-term exposure may produce persistent renal injury. The absence of evidence of chromate-induced chromic renal disease cannot be interpreted as evidence of the absence of such injury.

  5. Effect of erythropoietin on hepatic cytochrome P450 expression and function in an adenine-fed rat model of chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Feere, D A; Velenosi, T J; Urquhart, B L

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Erythropoietin (EPO) is used to treat anaemia associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Hypoxia is associated with anaemia and is known to cause a decrease in cytochrome P450 (P450) expression. As EPO production is regulated by hypoxia, we investigated the role of EPO on P450 expression and function. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Male Wistar rats were subjected to a 0.7% adenine diet for 4 weeks to induce CKD. The diet continued for an additional 2 weeks while rats received EPO by i.p. injection every other day. Following euthanasia, hepatic P450 mRNA and protein expression were determined. Hepatic enzyme activity of selected P450s was determined and chromatin immunoprecipitation was used to characterize binding of nuclear receptors involved in the transcriptional regulation of CYP2C and CYP3A. KEY RESULTS EPO administration decreased hepatic mRNA and protein expression of CYP3A2 (P < 0.05), but not CYP2C11. Similarly, EPO administration decreased CYP3A2 protein expression by 81% (P < 0.001). A 32% decrease (P < 0.05) in hepatic CYP3A enzymatic activity (Vmax) was observed for the formation of 6βOH-testosterone in the EPO-treated group. Decreases in RNA pol II recruitment (P < 0.01), hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α binding (P < 0.05) and pregnane X receptor binding (P < 0.01) to the promoter region of CYP3A were also observed in EPO-treated rats. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our data show that EPO decreases the expression and function of CYP3A, but not CYP2C in rat liver. PMID:25219905

  6. Multiple Myeloma and Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Noiri, Eisei

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) has a high incidence rate in the elderly. Responsiveness to treatments differs considerably among patients because of high heterogeneity of MM. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a common clinical feature in MM patients, and treatment-related mortality and morbidity are higher in MM patients with CKD than in patients with normal renal function. Recent advances in diagnostic tests, chemotherapy agents, and dialysis techniques are providing clinicians with novel approaches for the management of MM patients with CKD. Once reversible factors, such as hypercalcemia, have been corrected, the most common cause of severe acute kidney injury (AKI) in MM patients is tubulointerstitial nephropathy, which results from very high circulating concentrations of monoclonal immunoglobulin free light chains (FLC). In the setting of AKI, an early reduction of serum FLC concentration is related to kidney function recovery. The combination of extended high cutoff hemodialysis and chemotherapy results in sustained reductions in serum FLC concentration in the majority of patients and a high rate of independence from dialysis. PMID:24288486

  7. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in disadvantaged populations

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Garcia, Guillermo; Jha, Vivekanand

    2015-01-01

    Twelve March 2015 will mark the 10th anniversary of World Kidney Day (WKD), an initiative of the International Society of Nephrology and the International Federation of Kidney Foundations. Since its inception in 2006, WKD has become the most successful effort ever mounted to raise awareness among decision-makers and the general public about the importance of kidney disease. Each year WKD reminds us that kidney disease is common, harmful and treatable. The focus of WKD 2015 is on chronic kidney disease (CKD) in disadvantaged populations. This article reviews the key links between poverty and CKD and the consequent implications for the prevention of kidney disease and the care of kidney patients in these populations. PMID:25713703

  8. Genetic loci influencing kidney function and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Chambers, John C; Zhang, Weihua; Lord, Graham M; van der Harst, Pim; Lawlor, Debbie A; Sehmi, Joban S; Gale, Daniel P; Wass, Mark N; Ahmadi, Kourosh R; Bakker, Stephan J L; Beckmann, Jacqui; Bilo, Henk J G; Bochud, Murielle; Brown, Morris J; Caulfield, Mark J; Connell, John M C; Cook, H Terence; Cotlarciuc, Ioana; Davey Smith, George; de Silva, Ranil; Deng, Guohong; Devuyst, Olivier; Dikkeschei, Lambert D; Dimkovic, Nada; Dockrell, Mark; Dominiczak, Anna; Ebrahim, Shah; Eggermann, Thomas; Farrall, Martin; Ferrucci, Luigi; Floege, Jurgen; Forouhi, Nita G; Gansevoort, Ron T; Han, Xijin; Hedblad, Bo; Homan van der Heide, Jaap J; Hepkema, Bouke G; Hernandez-Fuentes, Maria; Hypponen, Elina; Johnson, Toby; de Jong, Paul E; Kleefstra, Nanne; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lapsley, Marta; Li, Yun; Loos, Ruth J F; Luan, Jian'an; Luttropp, Karin; Maréchal, Céline; Melander, Olle; Munroe, Patricia B; Nordfors, Louise; Parsa, Afshin; Peltonen, Leena; Penninx, Brenda W; Perucha, Esperanza; Pouta, Anneli; Prokopenko, Inga; Roderick, Paul J; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh J; Sanna, Serena; Schalling, Martin; Schlessinger, David; Schlieper, Georg; Seelen, Marc A J; Shuldiner, Alan R; Sjögren, Marketa; Smit, Johannes H; Snieder, Harold; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Timothy D; Stenvinkel, Peter; Sternberg, Michael J E; Swaminathan, Ramasamyiyer; Tanaka, Toshiko; Ubink-Veltmaat, Lielith J; Uda, Manuela; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallace, Chris; Waterworth, Dawn; Zerres, Klaus; Waeber, Gerard; Wareham, Nicholas J; Maxwell, Patrick H; McCarthy, Mark I; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Mooser, Vincent; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Lightstone, Liz; Scott, James; Navis, Gerjan; Elliott, Paul; Kooner, Jaspal S

    2010-05-01

    Using genome-wide association, we identify common variants at 2p12-p13, 6q26, 17q23 and 19q13 associated with serum creatinine, a marker of kidney function (P = 10(-10) to 10(-15)). Of these, rs10206899 (near NAT8, 2p12-p13) and rs4805834 (near SLC7A9, 19q13) were also associated with chronic kidney disease (P = 5.0 x 10(-5) and P = 3.6 x 10(-4), respectively). Our findings provide insight into metabolic, solute and drug-transport pathways underlying susceptibility to chronic kidney disease. PMID:20383145

  9. Bone Disease after Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bouquegneau, Antoine; Salam, Syrazah; Delanaye, Pierre; Eastell, Richard; Khwaja, Arif

    2016-07-01

    Bone and mineral disorders occur frequently in kidney transplant recipients and are associated with a high risk of fracture, morbidity, and mortality. There is a broad spectrum of often overlapping bone diseases seen after transplantation, including osteoporosis as well as persisting high- or low-turnover bone disease. The pathophysiology underlying bone disorders after transplantation results from a complex interplay of factors, including preexisting renal osteodystrophy and bone loss related to a variety of causes, such as immunosuppression and alterations in the parathyroid hormone-vitamin D-fibroblast growth factor 23 axis as well as changes in mineral metabolism. Management is complex, because noninvasive tools, such as imaging and bone biomarkers, do not have sufficient sensitivity and specificity to detect these abnormalities in bone structure and function, whereas bone biopsy is not a widely available diagnostic tool. In this review, we focus on recent data that highlight improvements in our understanding of the prevalence, pathophysiology, and diagnostic and therapeutic strategies of mineral and bone disorders in kidney transplant recipients. PMID:26912549

  10. Hereditary Causes of Kidney Stones and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Edvardsson, Vidar O.; Goldfarb, David S.; Lieske, John C.; Beara-Lasic, Lada; Anglani, Franca; Milliner, Dawn S.; Palsson, Runolfur

    2013-01-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency, cystinuria, Dent disease, familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC) and primary hyperoxaluria (PH) are rare but important causes of severe kidney stone disease and/or chronic kidney disease in children. Recurrent kidney stone disease and nephrocalcinosis, particularly in pre-pubertal children, should alert the physician to the possibility of an inborn error of metabolism as the underlying cause. Unfortunately, the lack of recognition and knowledge of the five disorders has frequently resulted in an unacceptable delay in diagnosis and treatment, sometimes with grave consequences. A high index of suspicion coupled with early diagnosis may reduce or even prevent the serious long-term complications of these diseases. In this paper, we review the epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and outcome of patients with APRT deficiency, cystinuria, Dent disease, FHHNC and PH with emphasis on childhood manifestations. PMID:23334384

  11. [Skin and chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Raffaella; Mancini, Elena; Santoro, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Kidneys and skin are seldom considered associated, but their relationship is more closer than generally believed. In some immunological diseases (SLE...) and genetic syndromes (tuberous sclerosis, Fabrys disease...) the cutaneous manifestations are integral parts of the clinical picture. In advanced uremia, besides the well-known itching skin lesions, calciphylaxis may appear, a typical example of cutaneous involvement secondary to the metabolic complications (calcium-phosphate imbalance) of the renal disease. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis appears only in patients with renal failure and it has a very severe prognosis due to the systemic organ involvement. Moreover, there is a heterogeneous group of metabolic diseases, with renal involvement, that may be accompanied by skin lesions, either related to the disease itself or to its complications (diabetes mellitus, porphyrias). In systemic amyloidosis, fibrils may deposit even in dermis leading to different skin lesions. In some heroin abusers, in the presence of suppurative lesions in the sites of needle insertion, renal amyloidosis should be suspected, secondary to the chronic inflammation. Atheroembolic disease is nowadays frequently observed, as a consequence of the increasing number of invasive intravascular manoeuvres. Skin manifestations like livedo reticularis or the blue toe syndrome are the most typical signs, but often renal dysfunction is also present. In all these conditions, the skin lesion may be a first sign, a warning, that should arouse the suspicion of a more complex pathology, even with renal involvement. Being aware of this relationship is fundamental to accelerate the diagnostic process. PMID:25315722

  12. A Review of Pediatric Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Kaspar, C D W; Bholah, R; Bunchman, T E

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is complex in both adults and children, but the disease is far from the same between these populations. Here we review the marked differences in etiology, comorbidities, impact of disease on growth and quality of life, issues unique to adolescents and transitions to adult care, and special considerations of congenital kidney and urinary tract anomalies for transplantation. PMID:26766175

  13. Kidney disease associated with plasma cell dyscrasias

    PubMed Central

    Goes, Nelson B.; Spitzer, Thomas R.; Raje, Noopur S.; Humphreys, Benjamin D.; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Richardson, Paul G.

    2010-01-01

    Plasma cell dyscrasias are frequently encountered malignancies often associated with kidney disease through the production of monoclonal immunoglobulin (Ig). Paraproteins can cause a remarkably diverse set of pathologic patterns in the kidney and recent progress has been made in explaining the molecular mechanisms of paraprotein-mediated kidney injury. Other recent advances in the field include the introduction of an assay for free light chains and the use of novel antiplasma cell agents that can reverse renal failure in some cases. The role of stem cell transplantation, plasma exchange, and kidney transplantation in the management of patients with paraprotein-related kidney disease continues to evolve. PMID:20462963

  14. Chronic kidney disease in children

    PubMed Central

    Becherucci, Francesca; Roperto, Rosa Maria; Materassi, Marco; Romagnani, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major health problem worldwide. Although relatively uncommon in children, it can be a devastating illness with many long-term consequences. CKD presents unique features in childhood and may be considered, at least in part, as a stand-alone nosologic entity. Moreover, some typical features of paediatric CKD, such as the disease aetiology or cardiovascular complications, will not only influence the child's health, but also have long-term impact on the life of the adult that they will become. In this review we will focus on the unique issues of paediatric CKD, in terms of aetiology, clinical features and treatment. In addition, we will discuss factors related to CKD that start during childhood and require appropriate treatments in order to optimize health outcomes and transition to nephrologist management in adult life. PMID:27478602

  15. [Recent developments in genetic kidney diseases].

    PubMed

    Liebau, M C; Benzing, T

    2011-05-01

    The improved understanding of genetic kidney diseases has given rise to a more detailed understanding of kidney function within the last decade. Insights into the pathophysiological principles of frequent kidney diseases - partly inherited, partly acquired - have been obtained by the investigation of rare genetic disorders and can now serve as a starting point for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. In this way various clinical multicenter trials, which are based on the observations made in basic science have been established for the very common autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Furthermore, the influence of genetic aspects on frequent kidney diseases, e. g. diabetic nephropathy, is becoming more obvious. This article aims to give an overview over essential recent development in the field of genetic kidney diseases. PMID:21544793

  16. Risk of stroke in kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, Toshiharu

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors - hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidemia - are related to the incidence of stroke. Chronic kidney disease has also been recognized to be a major public health problem as a cardiovascular risk factor. Growing evidence has suggested that chronic kidney disease is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease including stroke in general populations. Those with chronic kidney disease have a greater prevalence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Several meta-analyses assessing the association between chronic kidney disease and stroke have found that the magnitude of the risk estimates adjusted for known traditional cardiovascular risk factors were reduced as compared with the age-adjusted risk estimates. While these findings on the surface seem to downplay the effect of chronic kidney disease on stroke, they may actually suggest that an accumulation of traditional cardiovascular risk factors in those with chronic kidney disease increases the risk of stroke, and that applying appropriate treatments to those with chronic kidney disease is important for reducing the risk of stroke. Additionally, other large-scale meta-analyses demonstrated that chronic kidney disease was a significant risk factor for stroke independent of known cardiovascular risk factors. Chronic kidney disease may also be associated with an increase in nontraditional risk factors such as hyperhomocysteinemia, inflammation, asymmetric dimethylarginine, oxidative stress, and anemia, and thrombogenic factors such as left ventricular hypertrophy, endothelial dysfunction, and arterial stiffness. Herein, we review the results of meta-analyses of published cohort studies for a better understanding of the precise nature of the relationship between chronic kidney disease and stroke, important to both the clinical and public health fields. Further studies are warranted to determine whether

  17. Phenotype Standardization for Drug Induced Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Ravindra L; Awdishu, Linda; Davenport, Andrew; Murray, Patrick; Macedo, Etienne; Cerda, Jorge; Chakaravarthi, Raj; Holden, Arthur; Goldstein, Stuart L.

    2015-01-01

    Drug induced kidney disease is a frequent cause of renal dysfunction; however, there are no standards to identify and characterize the spectrum of these disorders. We convened a panel of international, adult and pediatric, nephrologists and pharmacists to develop standardized phenotypes for drug induced kidney disease as part of the phenotype standardization project initiated by the International Serious Adverse Events Consortium. We propose four phenotypes of drug induced kidney disease based on clinical presentation: acute kidney injury, glomerular, tubular and nephrolithiasis, along with primary and secondary clinical criteria to support the phenotype definition, and a time course based on the KDIGO/AKIN definitions of acute kidney injury, acute kidney disease and chronic kidney disease. Establishing causality in drug induced kidney disease is challenging and requires knowledge of the biological plausibility for the specific drug, mechanism of injury, time course and assessment of competing risk factors. These phenotypes provide a consistent framework for clinicians, investigators, industry and regulatory agencies to evaluate drug nephrotoxicity across various settings. We believe that this is first step to recognizing drug induced kidney disease and developing strategies to prevent and manage this condition. PMID:25853333

  18. Do Kidney Stone Formers Have A Kidney Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Zisman, Anna L.; Evan, Andrew P.; Coe, Fredric L.; Worcester, Elaine M.

    2015-01-01

    Nephrolithiasis is a highly prevalent disorder affecting approximately one in eleven people and is associated with multiple complications including hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and chronic kidney disease. Significant epidemiologic associations with chronic kidney disease and ESRD have been noted and are reviewed herein, but debate persists in the literature as to whether kidney stone formation is a pathogenic process contributing to kidney disease. Corroborating evidence supporting the presence of kidney disease in stone formers includes the variability of renal function by stone type, the positive association of stone size with renal dysfunction, the presence of markers of renal injury in the urine of even asymptomatic stone formers, and direct evidence of renal tissue injury on histopathology. Proposed pathogenic mechanisms include recurrent obstruction and comorbid conditions such as recurrent urinary tract infections and structural abnormalities. Recent work evaluating the renal histopathology of different groups of stone formers adds further granularity, suggesting variability in mechanisms of renal injury by stone type and confirming the pathogenic effects of crystal formation. Genetic abnormalities leading to stone formation including cystinuria and primary hyperoxaluria, among others, contribute to the burden of disease in the stone-forming population. PMID:26376133

  19. Hypertension in Cardiovascular and Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Botdorf, Joshua; Chaudhary, Kunal; Whaley-Connell, Adam

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between hypertension and chronic kidney disease (CKD) is bidirectional in nature and, generally, management strategies for cardiovascular risk reduction also attenuate progression of CKD. Prevalent hypertension increases with diminishing kidney function, and the management strategy changes with level of kidney function. In this review, we will examine the evidence for management of hypertension, as a modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease in CKD, and the impact of this management on progression of CKD. PMID:22096454

  20. Kidney Failure and Vascular Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... toxic level, they can be removed artificially through dialysis, or a kidney transplant can be performed. A ... can be treated with an artificial kidney machine (dialysis) which removes toxins from the blood. Patients requiring ...

  1. Anti-VEGF antibody treatment accelerates polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Raina, Shagun; Honer, Michael; Krämer, Stefanie D; Liu, Yang; Wang, Xueqi; Segerer, Stephan; Wüthrich, Rudolf P; Serra, Andreas L

    2011-10-01

    Polycystic kidney growth implies expansion of the vasculature, suggesting that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-dependent processes play a critical role and that VEGF is a putative therapeutic target. Whether an anti-VEGF antibody improves renal cystic disease has not been determined. We administrated 5 mg/kg B20.4.1, an anti-VEGF-A antibody, or vehicle intraperitoneally twice weekly to 4-wk-old male normal (+/+) and cystic (Cy/+) Han:SPRD rats for 6 wk. Renal function, urinary protein excretion, organ/body weight ratios, cyst volume, tubular epithelial cell (TEC) proliferation, renal VEGF, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and -2α expression, renal histology, and kidney hypoxia visualized by [(18)F]fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography were assessed. The treated compared with untreated +/+ rats had lower TEC proliferation rates, whereas Cy/+ rats receiving B20.4.1 displayed an increased proximal TEC proliferation rate, causing enhanced cyst and kidney growth. The +/+ and Cy/+ rats receiving B20.4.1 had severe renal failure and extensive glomerular damage. Proteinuria, which was highest in anti-VEGF-treated Cy/+ and lowest in untreated normal littermates, was positively correlated with renal HIF-1α and negatively correlated with VEGF expression. The untreated Cy/+ vs. +/+ rats had higher overall [(18)F]fluoromisonidazole uptake. The +/+ rats receiving B20.4.1 vs. untreated had increased [(18)F]fluoromisonidazole uptake, whereas the uptake was unchanged among treated vs. untreated Cy/+ animals. In conclusion, B20.4.1 caused an exaggerated cystic response of the proximal tubules in cystic rats and severe kidney injury that was associated with low renal VEGF and high HIF-1α levels. Anti-VEGF drug therapy may therefore not be a treatment option for polycystic kidney disease. PMID:21677148

  2. Imaging in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) diagnosis and staging are based on estimated or calculated glomerular filtration rate (GFR), urinalysis and kidney structure at renal imaging techniques. Ultrasound (US) has a key role in evaluating both morphological changes (by means of B-Mode) and patterns of vascularization (by means of color-Doppler and contrast-enhanced US), thus contributing to CKD diagnosis and to the follow-up of its progression. In CKD, conventional US allows measuring longitudinal diameter and cortical thickness and evaluating renal echogenicity and urinary tract status. Maximum renal length is usually considered a morphological marker of CKD, as it decreases contemporarily to GFR, and should be systematically recorded in US reports. More recently, it has been found to be a significant correlation of both renal longitudinal diameter and cortical thickness with renal function. Conventional US should be integrated by color Doppler, which shows parenchymal perfusion and patency of veins and arteries, and by spectral Doppler, which is crucial for the diagnosis of renal artery stenosis and provides important information about intrarenal microcirculation. Different values of renal resistive indexes (RIs) have been associated with different primary diseases, as they reflect vascular compliance. Since RIs significantly correlate with renal function, they have been proposed to be independent risk factors for CKD progression, besides proteinuria, low GFR and arterial hypertension. Despite several new applications, US and color Doppler contribute to a definite diagnosis in <50% of cases of CKD, because of the lack of specific US patterns, especially in cases of advanced CKD. However, US is useful to evaluate CKD progression and to screen patients at risk for CKD. The indications and the recommended frequency of color Doppler US could differ in each case and the follow-up should be tailored. PMID:27170301

  3. Proline transport in rat kidney mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Atlante, A; Passarella, S; Pierro, P; Quagliariello, E

    1994-02-15

    Proline transport in rat kidney mitochondria was investigated both by using isotopic techniques and by spectroscopic measurements, in which proline metabolism was essentially allowed to occur. Widely used criteria for demonstrating the occurrence of carrier-mediated transport were successfully applied in both cases. Differences found in the Km and Vmax values, in pH and temperature dependence of proline transport, and in the inhibitor sensitivity demonstrate the existence of two separate translocators for proline in rat kidney mitochondria, i.e., the proline uniporter and the proline/glutamate antiporter. Efflux of glutamate via glutamate/OH- translocator following proline uptake by mitochondria was experimentally ruled out. Discussion is also made of the possible role of such translocators in proline metabolism and in the putative proline/glutamate shuttle. PMID:7906935

  4. Subclinical Celiac Disease and Crystal-Induced Kidney Disease Following Kidney Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Capolongo, Giovanna; Abul-Ezz, Sameh; Moe, Orson W.; Sakhaee, Khashayar

    2015-01-01

    Decreased kidney function from kidney deposition of calcium oxalate has been previously described in inflammatory bowel disease as well as following jejuno-ileal and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgeries. Although celiac disease is the most prevalent bowel abnormality associated with intestinal malabsorption, its relationship to high kidney oxalate burden and decreased kidney function has not been established. We report a case of subclinical celiac disease and hyperoxaluria that presented with loss of kidney function as a result of high oxalate load in the absence of overt diarrhea, documented intestinal fat malabsorption, and nephrolithiasis. Subclinical celiac disease is commonly overlooked and hyperoxaluria is not usually investigated in kidney patients. We propose that this entity should be suspected in patients with chronic kidney disease in which the etiology of kidney damage has not been clearly established. PMID:22739230

  5. Is My Child at Risk for Kidney Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... URL Español Is My Child at Risk for Kidney Disease? Page Content Some diseases and conditions put children ... blood and keep the bones strong. What is kidney disease? Infections or other health problems can cause kidney ...

  6. [Troponins and chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Di Lullo, Luca; Barbera, Vincenzo; Santoboni, Alberto; Bellasi, Antonio; Cozzolino, Mario; De Pascalis, Antonio; Rivera, Rodolfo; Balducci, Alessandro; Russo, Domenico; Ronco, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Coronary thrombosis was recognized since 19th century as clinical entity with bad outcomes; only in 1912 it was reported that acute myocardial infarction had to been distinguished from angina pectoris. First diagnostic test was electrocardiogram, while white blood cells count and erythrocytes sedimentation rate were the only available laboratory tests. Late in the 60s and 70s glutammic oxaloacetic and glutamic pyravate transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase were added to biomarkers pool to provide a diagnosis of myocardial infarction related to myocardial cells injury. Only in 1987 assays for cardiac troponin were developed to assess structural damage of myocardial cells and in 2010 high sensibility troponins first dosage kits became available. It is well known that the population with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is at greater risk for cardiovascular disease and death than the general population. The use and interpretation of high sensitivity cardiac troponin (hs-cTn) assays have been particularly challenging in these patients with the majority having elevated levels at baseline. Aim of this review is to evaluate hs-cTn in patients with CKD for the diagnosis of AMI and for the prognostic significance of elevated levels in CKD patients without AMI. PMID:26252257

  7. Characterization of muscarinic receptors in rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Blankesteijn, W M; Siero, H L; Rodrigues de Miranda, J F; van Megen, Y J; Russel, F G

    1993-01-01

    Muscarinic receptors in mammalian kidney seem to be involved in diuresis. In this study we give a detailed characterization of receptors in rat kidney. Specific binding of [3H](-)-quinuclidinylbenzilate ([3H]QNB) to membranes of rat kidney cortex was saturable and of high affinity. A dissociation constant of 0.063 +/- 0.003 nM and a receptor density of 1.46 +/- 0.07 pmol/g wet weight were obtained. The dissociation kinetics could be best described by assuming a mono-exponential function (k-1 = (0.52 +/- 0.1) x 10(-4) s-1). The binding of [3H]QNB reached a maximum in 60 min at 0.6 nM at 37 degrees C. Competition experiments with the enantiomers of benzetimide confirmed the muscarinic nature of the [3H]QNB binding sites. The inhibition constants of pirenzepine (0.23 +/- 0.02 microM), (+-)-hexahydrosiladifenidol (0.040 +/- 0.002 microM), AF-DX 116 (1.45 +/- 0.07 microM), methoctramine (1.67 +/- 0.02 microM) and gallamine (78 +/- 3 microM) classified this receptor as an M3 receptor. Inhibition of [3H]QNB binding by the agonists methylfurtrethonium, arecoline, isoarecoline methiodide, arecaidine propargyl ester and McN-A-343 displayed monophasic inhibition curves. With (+/-)-cis-2-methyl-4-dimethylaminomethyl-1,3- dioxolane methiodide in two out of four experiments a small (11%) population of high affinity agonist sites could be detected. The potassium sparing diuretic amiloride inhibited [3H]QNB binding (36 +/- 3 microM). Although in a way related to the amiloride binding site, the muscarinic receptors in rat kidney are unlikely to be the primary target of diuretic action of this drug. PMID:8420789

  8. Wait too long to talk about kidney disease and you could be waiting for a kidney.

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Public Service Announcement Kidney Disease Past Issues / Summer 2006 Table of Contents For ... Javascript on. Wait too long to talk about kidney disease and you could be waiting for a kidney. ...

  9. Niacin and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Taketani, Yutaka; Masuda, Masashi; Yamanaka-Okumura, Hisami; Tatsumi, Sawako; Segawa, Hiroko; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi; Takeda, Eiji; Yamamoto, Hironori

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an increasing problem worldwide. The number of end-stage renal disease patients requiring treatment by dialysis is estimated to be increasing by 10,000 patients per year in Japan. Furthermore, an estimated 13 million people are living with CKD in Japan. Various complications are associated with CKD, including cardiovascular disease (CVD). More than one-third of CKD patients die from CVD. Thus, prevention of CVD is a primary concern for the treatment of CKD patients. CKD-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is a serious complication that typically leads to CVD. Hyperphosphatemia is thought to be a central-risk factor for CKD-MBD. Therefore, managing hyperphosphatemia is crucial to prevent CKD-MBD and CVD. It is difficult to achieve the target serum phosphate level through dietary modifications alone in patients with hyperphosphatemia, because most foods contain phosphate. Thus, phosphate binders such as calcium carbonate are commonly prescribed to CKD patients with hyperphosphatemia, but these have undesirable side effects. Inhibition of intestinal phosphate transport activity has also been investigated as an alternative approach for controlling serum phosphate levels in CKD patients. Nicotinamide, which is the amide of niacin, can inhibit intestinal phosphate transport. Niacin and related compounds have also been developed as drugs for hyperlipidemia conditions, especially hypertriglyceridemia with low high-density lipoprotein. This type of dyslipidemia is frequently observed in CKD patients and is a modifiable risk factor for CVD. Thus, niacin and related compounds may have utility for the treatment of both hyperphosphatemia and dyslipidemia in CKD patients to prevent CVD. PMID:26598845

  10. Intestinal Microbiota-Kidney Cross Talk in Acute Kidney Injury and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Sanjeev; Martina-Lingua, Maria N.; Bandapalle, Samatha; Pluznick, Jennifer; Hamad, Abdel Rahim A.; Peterson, Daniel A.; Rabb, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    The pathophysiology of acute kidney injury (AKI) involves multiple and overlapping immunological, biochemical, and hemodynamic mechanisms that modulate the effects of both the initial insult and the subsequent repair. Limited but recent experimental data have revealed that the intestinal microbiota significantly affects outcomes in AKI. Additional evidence shows significant changes in the intestinal microbiota in chronic kidney disease patients and in experimental AKI. In this minireview, we discuss the current status of the effect of intestinal microbiota on kidney diseases, the immunomodulatory effects of intestinal microbiota, and the potential mechanisms by which microbiota can modify kidney diseases and vice versa. We also propose future studies to clarify the role of intestinal microbiota in kidney diseases and to explore how the modification of gut microbiota may be a potential therapeutic tool. PMID:25343838

  11. Sirtuin and metabolic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Wakino, Shu; Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuin is a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide–dependent deacetylase. One of its isoforms, Sirt1, is a key molecule in glucose, lipid, and energy metabolism. The renal protective effects of Sirt1 are found in various models of renal disorders with metabolic impairment, such as diabetic nephropathy. Protective effects include the maintenance of glomerular barrier function, anti–fibrosis effects, anti–oxidative stress effects, and regulation of mitochondria function and energy metabolism. Various target molecules subject to direct deacetylation or epigenetic gene regulation have been identified as effectors of the renal protective function of sirtuin. Recently, it was demonstrated that Sirt1 expression decreases in proximal tubules before albuminuria in a mouse model of diabetic nephropathy, and that albuminuria is suppressed in proximal tubule–specific mice overexpressing Sirt1. These findings suggest that decreased Sirt1 expression in proximal tubular cells causes abnormal nicotine metabolism and reduces the supply of nicotinamide mononucleotide from renal tubules to glomeruli. This further decreases expression of Sirt1 in glomerular podocytes and increases expression of a tight junction protein, claudin-1, which results in albuminuria. Activators of the sirtuin family of proteins, including resveratrol, may be important in the development of new therapeutic strategies for treating metabolic kidney diseases, including diabetic nephropathy. PMID:26083654

  12. Chronic kidney disease - pediatric risk factors.

    PubMed

    Tasic, Velibor; Janchevska, Aleksandra; Emini, Nora; Sahpazova, Emilija; Gucev, Zoran; Polenakovic, Momir

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge about the progression of chronic kidney disease is an important issue for every pediatric nephrologist and pediatrician in order to implement appropriate measures to prevent wasting of renal function and the final consequence - end stage renal disease with the need for the dialysis and transplantation. Therefore it is important to know, treat or ameliorate the standard risk factors such as hypertension, proteinuria, anemia, hyperparathyroidism etc. In this review devoted to the World Kidney Day 2016 we will pay attention to the low birth parameters, obesity, hyperuricemia and smoking which emerged as particularly important risk factors for children and adolescent with chronic kidney disease. PMID:27442412

  13. Why kidneys fail in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Grantham, Jared J; Mulamalla, Sumanth; Swenson-Fields, Katherine I

    2011-10-01

    The weight of evidence gathered from studies in humans with hereditary polycystic kidney disease (PKD)1 and PKD2 disorders, as well as from experimental animal models, indicates that cysts are primarily responsible for the decline in glomerular filtration rate that occurs fairly late in the course of the disease. The processes underlying this decline include anatomic disruption of glomerular filtration and urinary concentration mechanisms on a massive scale, coupled with compression and obstruction by cysts of adjacent nephrons in the cortex, medulla and papilla. Cysts prevent the drainage of urine from upstream tributaries, which leads to tubule atrophy and loss of functioning kidney parenchyma by mechanisms similar to those found in ureteral obstruction. Cyst-derived chemokines, cytokines and growth factors result in a progression to fibrosis that is comparable with the development of other progressive end-stage renal diseases. Treatment of renal cystic disorders early enough to prevent or reduce cyst formation or slow cyst growth, before the secondary changes become widespread, is a reasonable strategy to prolong the useful function of kidneys in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. PMID:21862990

  14. Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines: What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines What You Need to Know Because you have chronic kidney disease, you should take steps to protect your kidneys. ... n n n Notes: For more information National Kidney Disease Education Program 1-866-4 KIDNEY (1-866- ...

  15. [Polycystic kidney disease: from genetics to dialysis].

    PubMed

    Ortiz Arduan, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common genetic cause of end stage renal disease. In addition, end-stage renal disease is complicated by acquired polycystic kidney disease. Recent advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of ADPKD have identified the primary cilium as key to cystogenesis, and have defined the molecular, cellular and tissue pathogenesis of the disease, leading to the design of clinical trials that may ultimately lead to effective therapy of the disease. In 2012 a key trial has shown that blockade of vasopressin receptors with tolvaptan slows the rate of cyst growth and may slow the loss of renal function. PMID:24298871

  16. Chronic Disease and Childhood Development: Kidney Disease and Transplantation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Susan D.; Simmons, Roberta G.

    As part of a larger study of transplantation and chronic disease and the family, 124 children (10-18 years old) who were chronically ill with kidney disease (n=72) or were a year or more post-transplant (n=52) were included in a study focusing on the effects of chronic kidney disease and transplantation on children's psychosocial development. Ss…

  17. JAK INHIBITION AND PROGRESSIVE KIDNEY DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Brosius, Frank C.; He, John Cijiang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To review the role of JAK-STAT signaling in the progression of chronic kidney diseases. Recent findings The JAK-STAT pathway transmits signals from extracellular ligands, including many cytokines and chemokines. While these responses are best characterized in lymphoid cells, they also occur in kidney cells such as podocytes, mesangial cells, and tubular cells. JAK-STAT expression and signaling abnormalities occur in humans and animal models of different chronic kidney diseases. Enhanced expression and augmented activity of JAK1, JAK2 and STAT3 promote diabetic nephropathy and their inhibition appears to reduce disease. Activation of JAK-STAT signaling in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease may play an important role in cyst growth. Activation of JAK-STAT signaling promotes HIV-associated nephropathy and may also participate in the tubular responses to chronic obstructive uropathy. Based on data from experimental models, inhibition of JAK-STAT signaling, via increased expression of the suppressors of cytokine signaling proteins or pharmacologic inhibition of JAK and STAT proteins, could play a therapeutic role in multiple chronic kidney diseases. Summary Activation of the JAK-STAT pathway appears to play a role in the progression of some chronic kidney diseases. More work is needed to determine the specific role the pathway plays in individual diseases. PMID:25415616

  18. Vaccination against salmonid bacterial kidney disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD) of salmonid fishes, caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum, has presented challenges for development of effective vaccines, despite several decades of research. The only vaccine against BKD that is commercially licensed is an injectable preparation containing live cells ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: polycystic kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... aneurysm ) in a large blood vessel called the aorta or in blood vessels at the base of ... Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Educational Resources (8 ...

  20. Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... the U.S. The high cardiovascular death rate in dialysis patients with ADPKD remains a problem. Kidney transplantation ... who develop ESRD receive a transplant before beginning dialysis therapy. Limited organ availability has resulted in longer ...

  1. End-stage kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... changes the results of many tests. People receiving dialysis will need these and other tests done often: ... ESRD may need to be treated with dialysis or kidney transplant . ... or take medicines to help your body work well. DIALYSIS Dialysis ...

  2. Glomerulocystic kidney disease in a kitten.

    PubMed

    Harkin, Kenneth R; Biller, David S; Balentine, Heather L

    2003-12-15

    A 4-month-old 1-kg female Siamese-Manx cross kitten was evaluated because of renomegaly and renal failure. Ultrasonography and cytologic examination of a renal aspirate failed to provide an antemortem diagnosis. Histologic lesions included diffuse cystic dilatation of all tubules and Bowman's spaces in the renal cortex and occasional small glomerular tufts; the lesions were similar to those of glomerulocystic kidney disease of humans. Glomerulocystic kidney disease is a rare cause of early-onset renal failure, but should be considered when renomegaly is detected, cysts are not detected in the kidney by ultrasonography, and cytologic examination of a renal aspirate is nondiagnostic. PMID:14690206

  3. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Cystic Renal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Cysts are frequently found in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and they have a different prognostic significance depending on the clinical context. Simple solitary parenchymal cysts and peripelvic cysts are very common and they have no clinical significance. At US, simple cyst appears as a round anechoic pouch with regular and thin profiles. On the other hand, hereditary polycystic disease is a frequent cause of CKD in children and adults. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) are the best known cystic hereditary diseases. ADPKD and ARPKD show a diffused cystic degeneration with cysts of different diameters derived from tubular epithelium. Medullary cystic disease may be associated with tubular defects, acidosis and lithiasis and can lead to CKD. Acquired cystic kidney disease, finally, is secondary to progressive structural end-stage kidney remodelling and may be associated with renal cell carcinoma. PMID:27169740

  4. Chronic kidney disease alters intestinal microbial flora.

    PubMed

    Vaziri, Nosratola D; Wong, Jakk; Pahl, Madeleine; Piceno, Yvette M; Yuan, Jun; DeSantis, Todd Z; Ni, Zhenmin; Nguyen, Tien-Hung; Andersen, Gary L

    2013-02-01

    The population of microbes (microbiome) in the intestine is a symbiotic ecosystem conferring trophic and protective functions. Since the biochemical environment shapes the structure and function of the microbiome, we tested whether uremia and/or dietary and pharmacologic interventions in chronic kidney disease alters the microbiome. To identify different microbial populations, microbial DNA was isolated from the stools of 24 patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and 12 healthy persons, and analyzed by phylogenetic microarray. There were marked differences in the abundance of 190 bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) between the ESRD and control groups. OTUs from Brachybacterium, Catenibacterium, Enterobacteriaceae, Halomonadaceae, Moraxellaceae, Nesterenkonia, Polyangiaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, and Thiothrix families were markedly increased in patients with ESRD. To isolate the effect of uremia from inter-individual variations, comorbid conditions, and dietary and medicinal interventions, rats were studied 8 weeks post 5/6 nephrectomy or sham operation. This showed a significant difference in the abundance of 175 bacterial OTUs between the uremic and control animals, most notably as decreases in the Lactobacillaceae and Prevotellaceae families. Thus, uremia profoundly alters the composition of the gut microbiome. The biological impact of this phenomenon is unknown and awaits further investigation. PMID:22992469

  5. Biomarkers in chronic kidney disease, from kidney function to kidney damage

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Giacoman, Salvador; Madero, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) typically evolves over many years, with a long latent period when the disease is clinically silent and therefore diagnosis, evaluation and treatment is based mainly on biomarkers that assess kidney function. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) remains the ideal marker of kidney function. Unfortunately measuring GFR is time consuming and therefore GFR is usually estimated from equations that take into account endogenous filtration markers like serum creatinine (SCr) and cystatin C (CysC). Other biomarkers such as albuminuria may precede kidney function decline and have demonstrated to have strong associations with disease progression and outcomes. New potential biomarkers have arisen with the promise of detecting kidney damage prior to the currently used markers. The aim of this review is to discuss the utility of the GFR estimating equations and biomarkers in CKD and the different clinical settings where these should be applied. The CKD-Epidemiology Collaboration equation performs better than the modification of diet in renal disease equation, especially at GFR above 60 mL/min per 1.73 m2. Equations combining CysC and SCr perform better than the equations using either CysC or SCr alone and are recommended in situations where CKD needs to be confirmed. Combining creatinine, CysC and urine albumin to creatinine ratio improves risk stratification for kidney disease progression and mortality. Kidney injury molecule and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin are considered reasonable biomarkers in urine and plasma to determine severity and prognosis of CKD. PMID:25664247

  6. Diagnosis and treatment of diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Gosmanov, Aidar R; Wall, Barry M; Gosmanova, Elvira O

    2014-05-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is the most common cause of chronic kidney disease in the United States. In the last several years, there have been several new developments in the field of the DKD. In 2007, the National Kidney Foundation and Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative released clinical practice guidelines that included new definitions and summarized diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for DKD. The results of several recent randomized controlled trials provided novel insights regarding effects of glycemic and lipid control on vascular and renal outcomes in patients with diabetes. Additionally, the findings of the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes-Blood Pressure trial played a critical role in the revision of blood pressure target guidelines in patients with diabetes. The goal of this review article is to summarize recent updates and recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of DKD. PMID:24553399

  7. Applications of Metabolomics for Kidney Disease Research

    PubMed Central

    Wettersten, Hiromi I.; Weiss, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    Metabolomics is one of the relative newcomers of the omics techniques and is likely the one most closely related to actual real-time disease pathophysiology. Hence, it has the power to yield not only specific biomarkers but also insight into the pathophysiology of disease. Despite this power, metabolomics as applied to kidney disease is still in its early adolescence and has not yet reached the mature stage of clinical application, i.e., specific biomarker and therapeutic target discovery. On the other hand, the insight gained from hints into what makes these diseases tick, as is evident from the metabolomics pathways which have been found to be altered in kidney cancer, are now beginning to bear fruit in leading to potential therapeutic targets. It is quite likely that, with greater numbers of clinical materials and with more investigators jumping into the field, metabolomics may well change the course of kidney disease research. PMID:23538740

  8. Epidemiologic insights into pediatric kidney stone disease.

    PubMed

    Matlaga, Brian R; Schaeffer, Anthony J; Novak, Thomas E; Trock, Bruce J

    2010-12-01

    The epidemiology of pediatric kidney stone has not yet been as rigorously defined as that of adult kidney stone disease. Herein, we review our recent epidemiologic works characterizing pediatric stone disease using the Kids' Inpatient Database (KID). Specifically we investigated the age and gender distribution of pediatric kidney stone disease, changes in disease prevalence over time, and medical comorbidities associated with this disorder. We identified patients by International Classification of Disease 9th Edition (ICD-9) codes for renal and ureteral calculi as the primary diagnosis. Medical comorbidities were identified using specific comorbidity software. Statistical comparisons between children with and without stone disease were performed. In the first decade of life, stone disease was more prevalent among males than females; however, in the second decade of life females were more commonly affected. Of note, there was a significant increase in treated stone disease across both genders between 1997 and 2003. We also found that the risk of kidney stone diagnosis in children younger than 6 years of age was significantly associated with hypertension and diabetes mellitus. The gender distribution among pediatric stone formers varies significantly by age, although overall females have a greater prevalence than males. There is also a strong association of stone disease and both diabetes and hypertension, although this was only observed in children less than 6 years of age. Taken all together, these findings suggest that urolithiasis in the young child is a complex systemic disease process. PMID:20967433

  9. Glomerulonephritis-induced changes in kidney gene expression in rats

    PubMed Central

    Pavkovic, Mira; Riefke, Björn; Frisk, Anna-Lena; Gröticke, Ina; Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, Heidrun

    2015-01-01

    We investigated a glomerulonephritis (GN) model in rats induced by nephrotoxic serum (NTS) which contains antibodies against the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). The anti-GBM GN model in rats is widely used since its biochemical and histopathological characteristics are similar to crescentic nephritis and Goodpasture's disease in humans (Pusey, 2003[2]). Male Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats were dosed once with 1, 2.5 and 5 ml/kg nephrotoxic serum (NTS) or 1.5 and 5 ml/kg NTS, respectively. GN and tubular damage were observed histopathologically in all treated rats after 14 days. To obtain insight into molecular processes during GN pathogenesis, mRNA expression was investigated in WKY and SD kidneys using Affymetrix's GeneChip Rat genome 230_2.0 arrays (GSE64265). The immunopathological processes during GN are still not fully understood and likely involve both innate and adaptive immunity. In the present study, several hundred mRNAs were found deregulated, which functionally were mostly associated with inflammation and regeneration. The β-chain of the major histocompatibility complex class II RT1.B (Rt1-Bb) and complement component 6 (C6) were identified as two mRNAs differentially expressed between WKY and SD rat strains which could be related to known different susceptibilities to NTS of different rat strains; both were increased in WKY and decreased in SD rats (Pavkovic et al., 2015 [1]). Increased Rt1-Bb expression in WKY rats could indicate a stronger and more persistent cellular reaction of the adaptive immune system in this strain, in line with findings indicating adaptive immune reactions during GN. The complement cascade is also known to be essential for GN development, especially terminal cascade products like C6. PMID:26697341

  10. Cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease. A clinical update from Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO).

    PubMed

    Herzog, Charles A; Asinger, Richard W; Berger, Alan K; Charytan, David M; Díez, Javier; Hart, Robert G; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Kasiske, Bertram L; McCullough, Peter A; Passman, Rod S; DeLoach, Stephanie S; Pun, Patrick H; Ritz, Eberhard

    2011-09-01

    Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is high, and the presence of CKD worsens outcomes of cardiovascular disease (CVD). CKD is associated with specific risk factors. Emerging evidence indicates that the pathology and manifestation of CVD differ in the presence of CKD. During a clinical update conference convened by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO), an international group of experts defined the current state of knowledge and the implications for patient care in important topic areas, including coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, cerebrovascular disease, atrial fibrillation, peripheral arterial disease, and sudden cardiac death. Although optimal strategies for prevention, diagnosis, and management of these complications likely should be modified in the presence of CKD, the evidence base for decision making is limited. Trials targeting CVD in patients with CKD have a large potential to improve outcomes. PMID:21750584

  11. Microcirculation in Acute and Chronic Kidney Diseases.

    PubMed

    Zafrani, Lara; Ince, Can

    2015-12-01

    The renal microvasculature is emerging as a key player in acute and chronic kidney diseases. Renal microvascular disease involves alterations in endothelial barrier permeability, exaggerated inflammation, impairment of endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation involving the nitric oxide system, increased oxidative stress, and loss of angiogenic factors. Moreover, evidence suggests that there is a microvascular component to the pathogenesis of renal scarring. New technology is being developed to explore renal microcirculation in vivo in experimental models and humans. This technology will provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of kidney diseases and will help guide specific therapeutic strategies aimed at restoring the renal microcirculation. This article reviews the cellular and molecular mechanisms of renal microvascular dysfunction in acute and chronic kidney diseases and the potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications of these findings. Recent developments in the monitoring of renal microcirculation are described with respect to their advantages and limitations, and future directions are outlined. PMID:26231789

  12. Castleman's disease of the kidney: Sonographic findings.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Chin Chin; Cheah, Foong Koon; Wong, Siew Kune

    2015-09-01

    We report a case of rare Castleman's disease of the kidney that mimicked a renal neoplasm with emphasis on the imaging and histologic findings. A 47-year-old man presented with dyspeptic symptoms. Ultrasound revealed a vascular, heterogeneous mass in the left kidney. Multiphasic CT scan confirmed an enhancing lesion with enlarged left para-aortic lymph nodes suspicious for nodal metastases. The provisional diagnosis was renal cell carcinoma. Percutaneous biopsy yielded a diagnosis of Castleman's disease of the hyaline-vascular type. Despite advancement in imaging modalities, differentiation of hyaline-vascular variant of Castleman's disease from hypervascular renal neoplasm remains difficult and the final diagnosis requires histopathological confirmation. PMID:24947075

  13. The Western Diet and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, Divya; Vellanki, Kavitha; Kramer, Holly

    2015-03-01

    Characteristics of the Western diet that fueled the obesity epidemic may also impact kidney disease incidence and progression. Enlarging portion sizes over the past half century has been accompanied by increased intake of protein, sodium, and processed foods while consumption of fruits and vegetables has declined. Overall dietary patterns play a strong role for chronic disease risk including chronic kidney disease. While dietary patterns high in fresh fruits and vegetables and low in red meats, such as the Mediterranean diet, decrease the risk of chronic diseases, the Western diet, characterized by high intake of red meat, animal fat, sweets, and desserts and low intake of fresh fruits and vegetables and low-fat dairy products, increases risk of chronic diseases. In this article, we review the potential mechanisms whereby several key characteristics of the typical Western diet may impact kidney disease incidence and progression. We also discuss a public health policy initiative to improve dietary choices. Reducing protein intake to the recommended daily allowance of 0.8 g/kg/day and increasing intake of fruit and vegetables and fiber may mitigate kidney disease progression and reduce risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. PMID:25754321

  14. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate reduces the progression of total kidney volume and cyst enlargement in experimental polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Ta, Michelle H. T.; Rao, Padmashree; Korgaonkar, Mayuresh; Foster, Sheryl F.; Peduto, Anthony; Harris, David C. H.; Rangan, Gopala K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Heterocyclic dithiocarbamates have anti‐inflammatory and anti‐proliferative effects in rodent models of chronic kidney disease. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) reduces the progression of polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Male Lewis polycystic kidney (LPK) rats (an ortholog of Nek8/NPHP9) received intraperitoneal injections of either saline vehicle or PDTC (40 mg/kg once or twice daily) from postnatal weeks 4 until 11. By serial magnetic resonance imaging at weeks 5 and 10, the relative within‐rat increase in total kidney volume and cyst volume were 1.3‐fold (P =0.01) and 1.4‐fold (P < 0.01) greater, respectively, in LPK + Vehicle compared to the LPK + PDTC(40 mg/kg twice daily) group. At week 11 in LPK rats, PDTC attenuated the increase in kidney weight to body weight ratio by 25% (P < 0.01) and proteinuria by 66% (P < 0.05 vs. LPK + Vehicle) but did not improve renal dysfunction. By quantitative whole‐slide image analysis, PDTC did not alter interstitial CD68+ cell accumulation, interstitial fibrosis, or renal cell proliferation in LPK rats at week 11. The phosphorylated form of the nuclear factor (NF)‐κB subunit, p105, was increased in cystic epithelial cells of LPK rats, but was not altered by PDTC. Moreover, PDTC did not significantly alter nuclear expression of the p50 subunit or NF‐κB (p65)‐DNA binding. Kidney enlargement in LPK rats was resistant to chronic treatment with a proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib. In conclusion, PDTC reduced renal cystic enlargement and proteinuria but lacked anti‐inflammatory effects in LPK rats. PMID:25501440

  15. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate reduces the progression of total kidney volume and cyst enlargement in experimental polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Ta, Michelle H T; Rao, Padmashree; Korgaonkar, Mayuresh; Foster, Sheryl F; Peduto, Anthony; Harris, David C H; Rangan, Gopala K

    2014-12-01

    Heterocyclic dithiocarbamates have anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative effects in rodent models of chronic kidney disease. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) reduces the progression of polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Male Lewis polycystic kidney (LPK) rats (an ortholog of Nek8/NPHP9) received intraperitoneal injections of either saline vehicle or PDTC (40 mg/kg once or twice daily) from postnatal weeks 4 until 11. By serial magnetic resonance imaging at weeks 5 and 10, the relative within-rat increase in total kidney volume and cyst volume were 1.3-fold (P = 0.01) and 1.4-fold (P < 0.01) greater, respectively, in LPK + Vehicle compared to the LPK + PDTC(40 mg/kg twice daily) group. At week 11 in LPK rats, PDTC attenuated the increase in kidney weight to body weight ratio by 25% (P < 0.01) and proteinuria by 66% (P < 0.05 vs. LPK + Vehicle) but did not improve renal dysfunction. By quantitative whole-slide image analysis, PDTC did not alter interstitial CD68+ cell accumulation, interstitial fibrosis, or renal cell proliferation in LPK rats at week 11. The phosphorylated form of the nuclear factor (NF)-κB subunit, p105, was increased in cystic epithelial cells of LPK rats, but was not altered by PDTC. Moreover, PDTC did not significantly alter nuclear expression of the p50 subunit or NF-κB (p65)-DNA binding. Kidney enlargement in LPK rats was resistant to chronic treatment with a proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib. In conclusion, PDTC reduced renal cystic enlargement and proteinuria but lacked anti-inflammatory effects in LPK rats. PMID:25501440

  16. Molecular pathways of chronic kidney disease progression.

    PubMed

    Bienaimé, Frank; Canaud, Guillaume; El Karoui, Khalil; Gallazzini, Morgan; Terzi, Fabiola

    2016-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease is characterized by the progressive loss of functional nephrons. This loss means that the remaining nephrons are put under stress and are forced to adapt in order to maintain kidney function. Over the time, the strains imposed by these adaptations result in a vicious circle in which the loss of damaged nephrons results in the damage of the so far healthy nephrons. Hence, the rate of chronic kidney disease progression depends on the ability of the remaining nephrons to cope with stress. This article reviews the molecular pathways involved in the compensation and deterioration process after nephron reduction. In particular, we examine the role of mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC)/serine-threonine protein kinase AKT, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and unfolded protein response pathways, as well as the pleiotropic function of Lipocalin 2. We also discuss the dual role played by some of these pathways in acute and chronic kidney disease. Finally, the relevance of these experimental finding to human chronic kidney disease is discussed. PMID:26972095

  17. Chronic kidney disease in disadvantaged populations

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Garcia, G.; Jha, V.

    2015-01-01

    The increased burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in disadvantaged populations is due to both global factors and population-specific issues. Low socioeconomic status and poor access to care contribute to health care disparities and exacerbate the negative effects of genetic or biological predisposition. Provision of appropriate renal care to these populations requires a two-pronged approach: expanding the reach of dialysis through development of low-cost alternatives that can be practiced in remote locations, and implementation and evaluation of cost-effective prevention strategies. Kidney transplantation should be promoted by expansion of deceased donor transplant programs and use of inexpensive, generic immunosuppressive drugs. The message of World Kidney Day 2015 is that a concerted attack against the diseases that lead to end-stage renal disease, by increasing community outreach, better education, improved economic opportunity, and access to preventive medicine for those at highest risk, could end the unacceptable relationship between CKD and disadvantage in these communities. PMID:25760025

  18. HIV-associated immune complex kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Nobakht, Ehsan; Cohen, Scott D; Rosenberg, Avi Z; Kimmel, Paul L

    2016-05-01

    The introduction in the late 20(th) century of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) to treat patients infected with HIV has changed the natural history of the disease from an acute illness that rapidly culminates in death, to a chronic condition that can be managed with medications. Over the past decade the epidemiology of kidney disease in US patients infected with HIV has changed, perhaps because of the increased availability and use of cART. Patients with HIV infection exhibit unique immunologic characteristics, including immunodeficiency and dysregulation of immunoglobulin synthetic responses and T-cell function, which can result in glomerular immune complex deposition and subsequent kidney injury. This Review examines the differential diagnoses of HIV-associated immune complex kidney diseases (HIVICD), and discusses the clinical manifestations and mechanisms underlying their development. We address the issues associated with treatment, clinical outcomes, and research needs to enhance our ability to diagnose and optimally treat patients with HIVICD. PMID:26782145

  19. Chronic kidney disease in disadvantaged populations.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Garcia, G; Jha, V

    2015-05-01

    The increased burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in disadvantaged populations is due to both global factors and population-specific issues. Low socioeconomic status and poor access to care contribute to health care disparities and exacerbate the negative effects of genetic or biological predisposition. Provision of appropriate renal care to these populations requires a two-pronged approach: expanding the reach of dialysis through development of low-cost alternatives that can be practiced in remote locations, and implementation and evaluation of cost-effective prevention strategies. Kidney transplantation should be promoted by expansion of deceased donor transplant programs and use of inexpensive, generic immunosuppressive drugs. The message of World Kidney Day 2015 is that a concerted attack against the diseases that lead to end-stage renal disease, by increasing community outreach, better education, improved economic opportunity, and access to preventive medicine for those at highest risk, could end the unacceptable relationship between CKD and disadvantage in these communities. PMID:25760025

  20. "Exercise as medicine" in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, T J; Shur, N F; Smith, A C

    2016-08-01

    Exercise and physical activity are increasingly becoming key tools in the treatment and prevention of several medical conditions including arthritis and diabetes; this notion has been termed "exercise as medicine". Exercise has favorable effects on reducing cardiovascular risk, inflammation, cachexia, and hypertension, in addition to increasing physical functioning, strength, and cardio-respiratory capacity. Chronic kidney disease, a condition that affects around 10% of the population, is often overlooked as a target for exercise-based therapy. Despite the vast range of severity in kidney disease (e.g., pre-dialysis, dialysis, transplant), exercise has a potential role in all patients suffering from the condition. In this review, we summarise the important role exercise may have in the clinical management of kidney disease and how this form of 'medicine' should be best administered and 'prescribed'. PMID:27334146

  1. Genetics Home Reference: medullary cystic kidney disease type 1

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease type 1 medullary cystic kidney disease type 1 Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Close All Description Medullary cystic kidney disease type 1 (MCKD1) is an inherited condition that affects the ...

  2. Chronic kidney disease and venous thromboembolism: epidemiology and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Wattanakit, Keattiyoat; Cushman, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review An estimated 13% of Americans have kidney disease. We sought to describe the association of kidney disease with risk of venous thromboembolism and discuss possible mechanisms explaining this association. Recent findings All severities of kidney disease appear to increase the risk of venous thromboembolism. In the general population the risk associated with mild to moderate kidney disease is 1.3–2-fold increased, and present even for microalbuminuria, although stage 1 chronic kidney disease itself has not been studied. End-stage renal disease is also associated with a 2.3-fold increased risk, compared to the general population. Although data are limited, risk increases after kidney transplant and with nephrotic syndrome as well. Summary Rates of kidney disease are increasing rapidly in the population and kidney disease is a risk factor for venous thromboembolism. An improved understanding of mechanisms linking kidney disease with venous thromboembolism will allow further study of best prevention efforts. PMID:19561505

  3. Obesity and kidney disease: Beyond the hyperfiltration.

    PubMed

    Mascali, A; Franzese, O; Nisticò, S; Campia, U; Lauro, D; Cardillo, C; Di Daniele, N; Tesauro, M

    2016-09-01

    In industrialized countries, overweight and obesity account for approximately 13.8% and 24.9% of the kidney disease observed in men and women, respectively. Moreover, obesity-associated glomerulopathy is now considered as "an emerging epidemic." Kidney function can be negatively impacted by obesity through several mechanisms, either direct or indirect. While it is well established that obesity represents the leading risk factor for type 2 diabetes and hypertension, awareness that obesity is associated with direct kidney damage independently of hypertension and diabetes is still not widespread. In this paper we will discuss the emerging role of adipose tissue, particularly in the visceral depot, in obesity-induced chronic kidney damage. PMID:27044633

  4. Nephrectomy in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: A Patient with Exceptionally Large, Still Functioning Kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Spithoven, Edwin M.; Casteleijn, Niek F.; Berger, Paul; Goldschmeding, Roel

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary kidney disease. It is characterized by progressive cyst formation in both kidneys, often leading to end-stage kidney disease. Indications for surgical removal of an ADPKD kidney include intractable pain, hematuria, infection, or exceptional enlargement and small abdominal cavity hampering implantation of a donor kidney. We report the case of an extraordinarily large ADPKD kidney weighing 8.7 kg (19.3 lb) with a maximal length of 48 cm (19 inch), and with cysts filled with both clear and bloody fluid. PMID:25028584

  5. Dermatoglyphics in kidney diseases: a review.

    PubMed

    Wijerathne, Buddhika T B; Meier, Robert J; Salgado, Sujatha S; Agampodi, Suneth B

    2016-01-01

    Kidney diseases are becoming a major cause of global burden with high mortality and morbidity. The origins of most kidney diseases are known, but for some the exact aetiology is not yet understood. Dermatoglyphics is the scientific study of epidermal ridge patterns and it has been used as a non-invasive diagnostic tool to detect or predict different medical conditions that have foetal origin. However, there have been a limited number of studies that have evaluated a dermatoglyphic relationship in different kidney diseases. The aim of this review was to systematically identify, review and appraise available literature that evaluated an association of different dermatoglyphic variables with kidney diseases. This review is reported according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses checklist. The PubMed(®) (Medline), POPLINE, Cochrane Library and Trip Database and grey literature sources such as OpenGrey, Google Scholar, and Google were searched to earliest date to 17 April 2014. Of the 36 relevant publications, 15 were included in the review. Of these studies, there are five case reports, seven case series and three comparative studies. Possible association of dermatoglyphics with Wilms tumor (WT) had been evaluated in two comparative studies and one case series that found fewer whorls and a lower mean total ridge count (TRC). Another study evaluated adult polycystic kidney disease (APCD) type III that revealed lower TRC means in all cases. All other case series and case reports describe dermatoglyphics in various kidney disease such as acro-renal-ocular syndrome, potter syndrome, kabuki makeup syndrome, neurofaciodigitorenal syndrome, syndactyly type V, ring chromosome 13 syndrome, trisomy 13 syndrome and sirenomelia. It is evident that whorl pattern frequency and TRC have been used widely to investigate the uncertainty related to the origin of several kidney diseases such as WT and APCD type III. However, small sample sizes

  6. Wait too long to talk about kidney disease and you could be waiting for a kidney.

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Public Service Announcement Kidney Disease Past Issues / Summer 2006 Table of Contents ... Javascript on. Wait too long to talk about kidney disease and you could be waiting for a ...

  7. Hypoxia and Dysregulated Angiogenesis in Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Shinji; Tanaka, Tetsuhiro; Nangaku, Masaomi

    2015-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that renal hypoxia has a crucial role in the pathogenesis of acute kidney injury (AKI), chronic kidney disease (CKD), and AKI-to-CKD transition, ultimately culminating in end-stage kidney disease. Renal hypoxia in progressive CKD is intricately linked to persisting capillary loss, which is mainly due to dysregulated angiogenesis. Summary In CKD, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) accumulates in the ischemic tubulointerstitium but fails to sufficiently stimulate angiogenic responses, partly because of blunted activation of HIF, which is best exemplified in diabetic kidney disease. In addition, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression is downregulated, possibly because injured tubules are not able to express sufficient VEGF and inflammatory circumstances inhibit VEGF expression. The upregulation of antiangiogenic factors and the incompetence of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) may also play some roles in the inadequacy of capillary restoration. Administration of VEGF or angiopoietin-1 maintains peritubular capillaries in several kidney diseases; however, administration of a single angiogenic factor may lead to the formation of abnormal vessels and induce inflammation, resulting in worsening of hypoxia and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. HIF stabilization, which aims to achieve the formation of mature and stable vessels by inducing coordinated angiogenesis, is a promising strategy. Given that the effect of systemic HIF activation is highly context-dependent, further studies are needed to elucidate the precise roles of HIF in various kidney diseases. The adoptive transfer of EPCs or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is a fascinating alternative strategy to restore the peritubular capillaries. Key Message Suppressed HIF activation and VEGF expression may be responsible for the dysregulated angiogenesis in progressive CKD. Administration of a single angiogenic factor can cause abnormal vessel formation and

  8. Therapeutic targets for treating fibrotic kidney diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, So-Young; Kim, Sung Il; Choi, Mary E.

    2014-01-01

    Renal fibrosis is the hallmark of virtually all progressive kidney diseases and strongly correlates with the deterioration of kidney function. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade is central to the current treatment of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) for the renoprotective effects aimed to prevent or slow progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). However, the incidence of CKD is still increasing, and there is a critical need for new therapeutics. Here, we review novel strategies targeting various components implicated in the fibrogenic pathway to inhibit or retard the loss of kidney function. We focus, in particular, on anti-fibrotic approaches that target transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, a key mediator of kidney fibrosis, and exciting new data on the role of autophagy. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-7 and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) are highlighted as modulators of pro-fibrotic TGF-β activity. BMP-7 has a protective role against TGF-β1 in kidney fibrosis, whereas CTGF enhances TGF-β-mediated fibrosis. We also discuss recent advances in the development of additional strategies for anti-fibrotic therapy. These include strategies targeting chemokine pathways via CC chemokine receptor 1 and 2 to modulate the inflammatory response, inhibition of phosphodiesterase to restore nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic 3′,5′ guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) function, inhibition of NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1) and 4 (Nox4) to suppress reactive oxygen species production, as well as inhibition of endothelin-1 or tumor necrosis factor-α to ameliorate progressive renal fibrosis. Furthermore, a brief overview of some of the biomarkers of kidney fibrosis currently being explored that may improve the ability to monitor anti-fibrotic therapies. It is hoped that evidence based on the preclinical and clinical data discussed in this review leads to novel anti-fibrotic therapies effective in patients with CKD to prevent or delay progression to ESRD. PMID

  9. [Chronic kidney disease, an often underestimated complication of diabetes].

    PubMed

    Sauvanet, Jean-Pierre

    2015-03-01

    Diabetic kidney chronic kidney disease, an often underestimated complication of diabetes. Diabetic kidney disease is a serious complication which can evolve into severe chronic kidney disease (CKD), or even end-stage renal disease (ESRD). It impacts on the patient's quality of life and that of their family and significantly increases the cost of care. The development and progression of chronic kidney disease is prevented by strictly controlling blood sugar levels and cardiovascular risk factors as well as monitoring the markers of kidney disease. In the case of CKD, treatment may need to be adapted. PMID:26036123

  10. Tissue-Engineered Kidney Disease Models

    PubMed Central

    DesRochers, Teresa M.; Palma, Erica; Kaplan, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Renal disease represents a major health problem that often results in end-stage renal failure necessitating dialysis and eventually transplantation. Historically these diseases have been studied with patient observation and screening, animal models, and two-dimensional cell culture. In this review, we focus on recent advances in tissue engineered kidney disease models that have the capacity to compensate for the limitations of traditional modalities. The cells and materials utilized to develop these models are discussed and tissue engineered models of polycystic kidney disease, drug-induced nephrotoxicity, and the glomerulus are examined in detail. The application of these models has the potential to direct future disease treatments and preclinical drug development. PMID:24361391

  11. STAT3 Signaling in Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weimbs, Thomas; Talbot, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the gene coding for the integral membrane protein polycystin-1 (PC1) are the cause of most cases of autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), a very common disease that leads to kidney failure and currently lacks approved treatment. Recent work has revealed that PC1 can regulate the transcription factor STAT3, and that STAT3 is aberrantly activated in the kidneys of ADPKD patients and PKD mouse models. Recent approaches to directly inhibit STAT3 in PKD mouse models have been promising. Numerous signaling pathways are known to activate STAT3 and many have long been implicated in the pathogenesis of PKD - such as EGF/EGFR, HGF/c-Met, Src. However, a role of STAT3 in the pathogenesis of PKD had never been considered until now. Here, we review the current findings that suggest that STAT3 is a promising target for the treatment of PKD. PMID:26523147

  12. Obesity in kidney disease: A heavyweight opponent

    PubMed Central

    Felizardo, Raphael Jose Ferreira; da Silva, Marina Burgos; Aguiar, Cristhiane Favero; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is an important worldwide challenge that must be faced in most developed and developing countries because of unhealthy nutritional habits. The consequences of obesity and being overweight are observed in different organs, but the kidney is one of the most affected. Excess adipose tissue causes hemodynamic alterations in the kidney that can result in renal disease. However, obesity is also commonly associated with other comorbidities such as chronic inflammation, hypertension and diabetes. This association of several aggravating factors is still a matter of concern in clinical and basic research because the pathophysiologic mechanisms surrounding chronic kidney disease development in obese patients remain unclear. This review will discuss the consequences of obesity in the context of renal injury. PMID:25332896

  13. Tuberculosis-associated chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Jobson Lopes; da Silva Junior, Geraldo Bezerra; Daher, Elizabeth De Francesco

    2011-06-01

    Extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB) account for approximately 15-20% of TB cases in immunocompetent patients. The genitourinary system is the third most commonly affected site. We report the case of a 20-year-old man admitted with fever, chills, dry cough, right flank pain, and oliguria who developed renal function loss. The pyelogram evidenced silence of the right kidney, and the abdominal and pelvic magnetic resonance showed significant dilation of the right pyelocaliceal system and proximal ureter. Biopsies of renal cortex and retroperitoneal lymph nodes showed caseous granuloma consistent with TB. Treatment was started with rifampicin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol, and the patient presented a favorable outcome but with non-dialytic chronic kidney disease. This case illustrates a case of chronic kidney disease secondary to TB in a young, otherwise healthy man. PMID:21633015

  14. Genetics Home Reference: uromodulin-associated kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... and How They Work Educational Resources (4 links) Disease InfoSearch: Medullary cystic kidney disease 2 Merck Manual Home Edition: ... Registry (3 links) Familial juvenile gout Glomerulocystic kidney disease with hyperuricemia and ... cystic kidney disease 2 Scientific articles on PubMed ( ...

  15. RAGE and glyoxalase in kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Inagi, Reiko

    2016-08-01

    Glycation is an important reaction in the regulation of physiological state. When poorly controlled, however, glycation can also result in the accumulation of glycated proteins (advanced glycation endproducts; AGEs) in the body. This AGE accumulation is termed glycative stress, and is an established pathological factor: to date, glycative stress has been closely associated with not only kidney diseases, but also kidney aging. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that the progression of renal tubular damage and tubular aging are often correlated with activation of the receptor for the AGE (RAGE)-AGE pathway or decreased activity of glyoxalase 1, which is an anti-glycation enzyme to lower glycative stress. Further, glycative stress exacerbates the derangement of protein homeostasis: the posttranslationally modified proteins by glycation often lose or gain their functions. Such deranged protein homeostasis leads to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, a state of ER dysfunction in which the quality control of proteins is defective, as well as to induction of its stress signal, the unfolded protein response (UPR), in the kidney. The lowering of glycative stress via modulation of RAGE-AGE axis or glyoxalase 1 activity is beneficial for tubular homeostasis and the subsequent prevention and treatment of kidney disease, suggesting the possibility of novel therapeutic approaches which target glycative stress. In this review, we focused on the impact of glycative stress in the kidney, especially the role of RAGE and glyoxalase 1. Further we also discuss the crosstalk between glycative stress and ER stress in their effect on protein homeostasis. PMID:27270765

  16. Bilirubin UDP-glucuronyltransferase activity of wistar rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Foliot, A; Christoforov, B; Petite, J P; Etienne, J P; Housset, E; Dubois, M

    1975-08-01

    Wistar rat kidneys have been shown to possess a bilirubin glucuronyltransferase (BGT) activity capable of conjugating about 3/5 of the total pool of unconjugated bilirubin within 48 h of being grafted to Gunn rat hosts. Bilirubin conjugated by the kidney is taken up by the liver and excreted in the bile. Except when the bile duct is ligated, no conjugated bilirubin appears in the plasma or urine. Renal BGT activity is about 1/20th of the hepatic activity on a weight basis in Wistar rats. The Gunn rat's hyperbilirubinemia probably causes an induction of the renal enzyme since its activity doubles in 48 h. PMID:808968

  17. High Blood Pressure and Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the urine. A urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio above 30 mg/g may be a sign of kidney disease. Blood Test A blood test involves having blood drawn at a health care provider’s office or a commercial facility and sending the sample to a lab for analysis. A health care provider may order a blood ...

  18. Averting the legacy of kidney disease-focus on childhood.

    PubMed

    Ingelfinger, Julie R; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Schaefer, Franz

    2016-03-01

    World Kidney Day 2016 focuses on kidney disease in childhood and the antecedents of adult kidney disease that can begin in earliest childhood. Chronic kidney disease in childhood differs from that in adults, as the largest diagnostic group among children includes congenital anomalies and inherited disorders, with glomerulopathies and kidney disease in the setting of diabetes being relatively uncommon. In addition, many children with acute kidney injury will ultimately develop sequelae that may lead to hypertension and chronic kidney disease in later childhood or in adult life. Children born early or who are small-for-date newborns have a relatively increased risk for the development of chronic kidney disease later in life. Persons with a high-risk birth and early childhood history should be watched closely in order to help detect early signs of kidney disease in time to provide effective prevention or treatment. Successful therapy is feasible for advanced chronic kidney disease in childhood; there is evidence that children fare better than adults if they receive kidney replacement therapy including dialysis and transplant, whereas only a minority of children may require this ultimate intervention. Because there are disparities in access to care, effort is needed so that those children with kidney disease, wherever they live, may be treated effectively, irrespective of their geographic or economic circumstances. Our hope is that World Kidney Day will inform the general public, policy makers, and caregivers about the needs and possibilities surrounding kidney disease in childhood. PMID:26880442

  19. Screening for cardiovascular disease before kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Palepu, Sneha; Prasad, G V Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Pre-kidney transplant cardiac screening has garnered particular attention from guideline committees as an approach to improving post-transplant success. Screening serves two major purposes: To more accurately inform transplant candidates of their risk for a cardiac event before and after the transplant, thereby informing decisions about proceeding with transplantation, and to guide pre-transplant management so that post-transplant success can be maximized. Transplant candidates on dialysis are more likely to be screened for coronary artery disease than those not being considered for transplantation. Thorough history and physical examination taking, resting electrocardiography and echocardiography, exercise stress testing, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, dobutamine stress echocardiography, cardiac computed tomography, cardiac biomarker measurement, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging all play contributory roles towards screening for cardiovascular disease before kidney transplantation. In this review, the importance of each of these screening procedures for both coronary artery disease and other forms of cardiac disease are discussed. PMID:26722655

  20. Screening for cardiovascular disease before kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Palepu, Sneha; Prasad, G V Ramesh

    2015-12-24

    Pre-kidney transplant cardiac screening has garnered particular attention from guideline committees as an approach to improving post-transplant success. Screening serves two major purposes: To more accurately inform transplant candidates of their risk for a cardiac event before and after the transplant, thereby informing decisions about proceeding with transplantation, and to guide pre-transplant management so that post-transplant success can be maximized. Transplant candidates on dialysis are more likely to be screened for coronary artery disease than those not being considered for transplantation. Thorough history and physical examination taking, resting electrocardiography and echocardiography, exercise stress testing, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, dobutamine stress echocardiography, cardiac computed tomography, cardiac biomarker measurement, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging all play contributory roles towards screening for cardiovascular disease before kidney transplantation. In this review, the importance of each of these screening procedures for both coronary artery disease and other forms of cardiac disease are discussed. PMID:26722655

  1. Characterization of homocysteine metabolism in the rat kidney.

    PubMed Central

    House, J D; Brosnan, M E; Brosnan, J T

    1997-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have provided strong evidence that an elevated plasma homocysteine concentration is an important independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We have shown, in the rat, that the kidney is a major site for the removal and subsequent metabolism of plasma homocysteine [Bostom, Brosnan, Hall, Nadeau and Selhub (1995) Atherosclerosis 116, 59-62]. To characterize the role of the kidney in homocysteine metabolism further, we measured the disappearance of homocysteine in isolated renal cortical tubules of the rat. Renal tubules metabolized homocysteine primarily through the transulphuration pathway, producing cystathionine and cysteine (78% of homocysteine disappearance). Methionine production accounted for less than 2% of the disappearance of homocysteine. Cystathionine, and subsequently cysteine, production rates, as well as the rate of disappearance of homocysteine, were sensitive to the level of serine in the incubation medium, as increased serine concentrations permitted higher rates of cystathionine and cysteine production. On the basis of enrichment profiles of cystathionine beta-synthase and cystathionine gamma-lyase, in comparison with marker enzymes of known location, we concluded that cystathionine beta-synthase was enriched in the outer cortex, specifically in cells of the proximal convoluted tubule. Cystathionine gamma-lyase exhibited higher enrichment patterns in the inner cortex and outer medulla, with strong evidence of an enrichment in cells of the proximal straight tubule. These studies indicate that factors that influence the transulphuration of homocysteine may influence the renal clearance of this amino acid. PMID:9359866

  2. [Cardiovascular risk in polycystic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, Adelaide; Stallone, Giovanni; Infante, Barbara; Grandaliano, Giuseppe; Schena, Francesco Paolo

    2015-09-01

    Hypertension is common and occurs in the majority of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) patients prior to loss of kidney function. Hypertension relates to progressive kidney enlargement, and is a significant independent risk factor for progression to end-stage renal disease. The pathogenesis of hypertension in ADPKD is complex and depends on many factors that influence each other. High expression of PKD1 and PKD2 genes is present in the cilia of tubular epithelial cells, in endothelial cells and in vascular smooth muscle cells. Decreased or absent polycystin-1 or -2 expression is associated with abnormal vascular structure and function. PKD1/PKD2 deficiency results in reduced nitric oxide levels, altered endothelial response to shear stress with attenuation in vascular relaxation. Activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system occurs in ADPKD due to decreased nitric oxide production as well as bilateral cyst expansion and intra-renal ischemia. With increasing cyst size, further activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system occurs, blood pressure increases and a vicious cycle ensues with enhanced cyst growth and hypertension ultimately leading to end-stage renal disease. Inhibition of the angiotensin-aldosterone system is possible with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and seems to be the first-line treatment for hypertension in these subjects. As suggested by the HALT-PKD study, an aggressive blood pressure control is safe and recommended and is associated with preservation of kidney function and a reduction in total kidney volume over time. A collaborative multidisciplinary approach between nephrologists and cardiologists is necessary for the monitoring of kidney and heart complications. PMID:26418387

  3. Improved Structure and Function in Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Rat Kidneys with Renal Tubular Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kelly, K J; Zhang, Jizhong; Han, Ling; Kamocka, Malgorzata; Miller, Caroline; Gattone, Vincent H; Dominguez, Jesus H

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease is a truly catastrophic monogenetic disease, causing death and end stage renal disease in neonates and children. Using PCK female rats, an orthologous model of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease harboring mutant Pkhd1, we tested the hypothesis that intravenous renal cell transplantation with normal Sprague Dawley male kidney cells would improve the polycystic kidney disease phenotype. Cytotherapy with renal cells expressing wild type Pkhd1 and tubulogenic serum amyloid A1 had powerful and sustained beneficial effects on renal function and structure in the polycystic kidney disease model. Donor cell engraftment and both mutant and wild type Pkhd1 were found in treated but not control PCK kidneys 15 weeks after the final cell infusion. To examine the mechanisms of global protection with a small number of transplanted cells, we tested the hypothesis that exosomes derived from normal Sprague Dawley cells can limit the cystic phenotype of PCK recipient cells. We found that renal exosomes originating from normal Sprague Dawley cells carried and transferred wild type Pkhd1 mRNA to PCK cells in vivo and in vitro and restricted cyst formation by cultured PCK cells. The results indicate that transplantation with renal cells containing wild type Pkhd1 improves renal structure and function in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease and may provide an intra-renal supply of normal Pkhd1 mRNA. PMID:26136112

  4. Improved Structure and Function in Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Rat Kidneys with Renal Tubular Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, K. J.; Zhang, Jizhong; Han, Ling; Kamocka, Malgorzata; Miller, Caroline; Dominguez, Jesus H.

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease is a truly catastrophic monogenetic disease, causing death and end stage renal disease in neonates and children. Using PCK female rats, an orthologous model of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease harboring mutant Pkhd1, we tested the hypothesis that intravenous renal cell transplantation with normal Sprague Dawley male kidney cells would improve the polycystic kidney disease phenotype. Cytotherapy with renal cells expressing wild type Pkhd1 and tubulogenic serum amyloid A1 had powerful and sustained beneficial effects on renal function and structure in the polycystic kidney disease model. Donor cell engraftment and both mutant and wild type Pkhd1 were found in treated but not control PCK kidneys 15 weeks after the final cell infusion. To examine the mechanisms of global protection with a small number of transplanted cells, we tested the hypothesis that exosomes derived from normal Sprague Dawley cells can limit the cystic phenotype of PCK recipient cells. We found that renal exosomes originating from normal Sprague Dawley cells carried and transferred wild type Pkhd1 mRNA to PCK cells in vivo and in vitro and restricted cyst formation by cultured PCK cells. The results indicate that transplantation with renal cells containing wild type Pkhd1 improves renal structure and function in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease and may provide an intra-renal supply of normal Pkhd1 mRNA. PMID:26136112

  5. Common Heartburn Drugs Linked to Kidney Disease in Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_158313.html Common Heartburn Drugs Linked to Kidney Disease in Study But finding can't show whether ... heartburn may be at increased risk of developing kidney disease, a new study suggests. The research is the ...

  6. Kidney Disease and Diabetes - What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issue Past Issues Special Section Kidney Disease and Diabetes: What You Need to Know Past Issues / Winter ... family are at risk for kidney disease or diabetes—conditions that affect millions of Americans. Photo courtesy ...

  7. Phosphorus: Tips for People with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

    MedlinePlus

    Phosphorus Tips for People with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) National Kidney Disease Education Program What Is Phosphorus? Phosphorus is a mineral that helps keep your bones healthy. It also helps ...

  8. Chronic Kidney Disease: What Does It Mean for Me?

    MedlinePlus

    ... online catalog. Alternate Language URL Españ​ol Chronic Kidney Disease: What Does it Mean for Me? Page Content ... My Lifestyle CKD: Tracking My Test Results Chronic Kidney Disease: The Basics You've been told that you ...

  9. Slowing progression of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Drawz, Paul E; Rosenberg, Mark E

    2013-12-01

    Early identification of chronic kidney disease (CKD) provides an opportunity to implement therapies to improve kidney function and slow progression. The goal of this article is to review established and developing clinical therapies directed at slowing progression. The importance of controlling blood pressure will be discussed along with the target blood pressure that should be achieved in CKD patients. Therapy directed at inhibiting the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system remains the mainstay of treatment with single-agent inhibition of this system being as good as dual blockade with fewer adverse effects. Other therapies that may be used include correction of metabolic acidosis, dietary protein restriction, and new models for delivering care to patients with CKD. Emerging therapies targeting endothelin, uric acid, kidney fibrosis, and oxidant stress hold promise for the future. PMID:25019022

  10. Technology innovation for patients with kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mitsides, Nicos; Keane, David F; Lindley, Elizabeth; Mitra, Sandip

    2014-01-01

    The loss of kidney function is a life-changing event leading to life-long dependence on healthcare. Around 5000 people are diagnosed with kidney failure every year. Historically, technology in renal medicine has been employed for replacement therapies. Recently, a lot of emphasis has been placed on technologies that aid early identification and prevent progression of kidney disease, while at the same time empowering affected individuals to gain control over their chronic illness. There is a shift in diversity of technology development, driven by collaborative innovation initiatives such the National Institute's for Health Research Healthcare Technology Co-operative for Devices for Dignity. This has seen the emergence of the patient as a key figure in designing technologies that are fit for purpose, while business involvement has ensured uptake and sustainability of these developments. An embodiment of this approach is the first successful Small Business Research Initiative in the field of renal medicine in the UK. PMID:26453039

  11. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Organizations​​ . (PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Anemia in CKD Page Content On this page: What ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in which the body ...

  12. Role of autophagy in chronic kidney diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Song; Zhang, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney diseases (CKD), a common pathway of various glomerular diseases, which carries great morbidity and mortality to people. CKD is characterized by progressive kidney fibrosis and remodeling. CKD is also associated with the depletion of glomerular and tubular cells. Autophagy is a highly conserved process that degrades cellular long-lived proteins and organelles. It plays an important role in both normal and disease states, including immunity, inflammation, and adaptation to stress. Evidence has indicated that impaired autophagic activity is involved in the development of CKD. Here, we review the progress in our understanding of the role of autophagy in the development and progression of CKD. Targeting the autophagic signaling pathways may be a therapeutic strategy for CKD. PMID:26885176

  13. 42 CFR 410.48 - Kidney disease education services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Kidney disease education services. 410.48 Section... Kidney disease education services. (a) Definitions. As used in this section: Kidney disease patient education services means face-to-face educational services provided to patients with Stage IV chronic...

  14. 42 CFR 410.48 - Kidney disease education services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Kidney disease education services. 410.48 Section... Kidney disease education services. (a) Definitions. As used in this section: Kidney disease patient education services means face-to-face educational services provided to patients with Stage IV chronic...

  15. 42 CFR 410.48 - Kidney disease education services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Kidney disease education services. 410.48 Section... Kidney disease education services. (a) Definitions. As used in this section: Kidney disease patient education services means face-to-face educational services provided to patients with Stage IV chronic...

  16. 42 CFR 410.48 - Kidney disease education services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Kidney disease education services. 410.48 Section... Kidney disease education services. (a) Definitions. As used in this section: Kidney disease patient education services means face-to-face educational services provided to patients with Stage IV chronic...

  17. 42 CFR 410.48 - Kidney disease education services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Kidney disease education services. 410.48 Section... Kidney disease education services. (a) Definitions. As used in this section: Kidney disease patient education services means face-to-face educational services provided to patients with Stage IV chronic...

  18. Keep Your Kidneys Healthy: Catch Kidney Disease Early

    MedlinePlus

    ... point, you may need a kidney transplant or dialysis. It’s a good idea to talk with your ... healthy kidneys and finding a well-matched donor. Dialysis is a treatment that filters wastes and water ...

  19. Inhibition of Aerobic Glycolysis Attenuates Disease Progression in Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Riwanto, Meliana; Kapoor, Sarika; Rodriguez, Daniel; Edenhofer, Ilka; Segerer, Stephan; Wüthrich, Rudolf P.

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulated signaling cascades alter energy metabolism and promote cell proliferation and cyst expansion in polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Here we tested whether metabolic reprogramming towards aerobic glycolysis (“Warburg effect”) plays a pathogenic role in male heterozygous Han:SPRD rats (Cy/+), a chronic progressive model of PKD. Using microarray analysis and qPCR, we found an upregulation of genes involved in glycolysis (Hk1, Hk2, Ldha) and a downregulation of genes involved in gluconeogenesis (G6pc, Lbp1) in cystic kidneys of Cy/+ rats compared with wild-type (+/+) rats. We then tested the effect of inhibiting glycolysis with 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) on renal functional loss and cyst progression in 5-week-old male Cy/+ rats. Treatment with 2DG (500 mg/kg/day) for 5 weeks resulted in significantly lower kidney weights (-27%) and 2-kidney/total-body-weight ratios (-20%) and decreased renal cyst index (-48%) compared with vehicle treatment. Cy/+ rats treated with 2DG also showed higher clearances of creatinine (1.98±0.67 vs 1.41±0.37 ml/min), BUN (0.69±0.26 vs 0.40±0.10 ml/min) and uric acid (0.38±0.20 vs 0.21±0.10 ml/min), and reduced albuminuria. Immunoblotting analysis of kidney tissues harvested from 2DG-treated Cy/+ rats showed increased phosphorylation of AMPK-α, a negative regulator of mTOR, and restoration of ERK signaling. Assessment of Ki-67 staining indicated that 2DG limits cyst progression through inhibition of epithelial cell proliferation. Taken together, our results show that targeting the glycolytic pathway may represent a promising therapeutic strategy to control cyst growth in PKD. PMID:26752072

  20. Inhibition of Aerobic Glycolysis Attenuates Disease Progression in Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Riwanto, Meliana; Kapoor, Sarika; Rodriguez, Daniel; Edenhofer, Ilka; Segerer, Stephan; Wüthrich, Rudolf P

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulated signaling cascades alter energy metabolism and promote cell proliferation and cyst expansion in polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Here we tested whether metabolic reprogramming towards aerobic glycolysis ("Warburg effect") plays a pathogenic role in male heterozygous Han:SPRD rats (Cy/+), a chronic progressive model of PKD. Using microarray analysis and qPCR, we found an upregulation of genes involved in glycolysis (Hk1, Hk2, Ldha) and a downregulation of genes involved in gluconeogenesis (G6pc, Lbp1) in cystic kidneys of Cy/+ rats compared with wild-type (+/+) rats. We then tested the effect of inhibiting glycolysis with 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) on renal functional loss and cyst progression in 5-week-old male Cy/+ rats. Treatment with 2DG (500 mg/kg/day) for 5 weeks resulted in significantly lower kidney weights (-27%) and 2-kidney/total-body-weight ratios (-20%) and decreased renal cyst index (-48%) compared with vehicle treatment. Cy/+ rats treated with 2DG also showed higher clearances of creatinine (1.98±0.67 vs 1.41±0.37 ml/min), BUN (0.69±0.26 vs 0.40±0.10 ml/min) and uric acid (0.38±0.20 vs 0.21±0.10 ml/min), and reduced albuminuria. Immunoblotting analysis of kidney tissues harvested from 2DG-treated Cy/+ rats showed increased phosphorylation of AMPK-α, a negative regulator of mTOR, and restoration of ERK signaling. Assessment of Ki-67 staining indicated that 2DG limits cyst progression through inhibition of epithelial cell proliferation. Taken together, our results show that targeting the glycolytic pathway may represent a promising therapeutic strategy to control cyst growth in PKD. PMID:26752072

  1. A Prediction Model for Chronic Kidney Disease Includes Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Monica A.; Taylor, George W.

    2009-01-01

    Background An estimated 75% of the seven million Americans with moderate-to-severe chronic kidney disease are undiagnosed. Improved prediction models to identify high-risk subgroups for chronic kidney disease enhance the ability of health care providers to prevent or delay serious sequelae, including kidney failure, cardiovascular disease, and premature death. Methods We identified 11,955 adults ≥18 years of age in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Chronic kidney disease was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 15 to 59 ml/minute/1.73 m2. High-risk subgroups for chronic kidney disease were identified by estimating the individual probability using β coefficients from the model of traditional and non-traditional risk factors. To evaluate this model, we performed standard diagnostic analyses of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value using 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20% probability cutoff points. Results The estimated probability of chronic kidney disease ranged from virtually no probability (0%) for an individual with none of the 12 risk factors to very high probability (98%) for an older, non-Hispanic white edentulous former smoker, with diabetes ≥10 years, hypertension, macroalbuminuria, high cholesterol, low high-density lipoprotein, high C-reactive protein, lower income, and who was hospitalized in the past year. Evaluation of this model using an estimated 5% probability cutoff point resulted in 86% sensitivity, 85% specificity, 18% positive predictive value, and 99% negative predictive value. Conclusion This United States population–based study suggested the importance of considering multiple risk factors, including periodontal status, because this improves the identification of individuals at high risk for chronic kidney disease and may ultimately reduce its burden. PMID:19228085

  2. Arterial Stiffness and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Garnier, Anne-Sophie; Briet, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major public health concern due to the high prevalence of associated cardiovascular (CV) disease. CV mortality is 10-30 times higher in end-stage renal disease patients than in the age-adjusted general population. The last 20 years have been marked by a huge effort in the characterization of the vascular remodeling process associated with CKD and its consequences on the renal, CV and general prognosis. By comparison with patients with normal renal function, with or without hypertension, an increase in large artery stiffness has been described in end-stage renal disease as well as in CKD stages 2-5. Most clinical studies are consistent with the observation that damage to large arteries may contribute to the high incidence of CV disease. By contrast, the impact of large artery stiffening and remodeling on CKD progression is still a matter of debate. Concomitant exposure to other CV risk factors, including diabetes, seems to play a major role in the association between aortic stiffness and estimated GFR. The conflicting results obtained from longitudinal studies designed to evaluate the impact of baseline aortic stiffness on GFR progression are detailed in the present review. Only pulse pressure, central and peripheral, is almost constantly associated with incident CKD and GFR decline. Kidney transplantation improves patients’ CV prognosis, but its impact on arterial stiffness is still controversial. Donor age, living kidney donation and mean blood pressure appear to be the main determinants of improvement in aortic stiffness after kidney transplantation. PMID:27195244

  3. L-FABP: A novel biomarker of kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yao; Xie, Yuanyuan; Shao, Xinghua; Ni, Zhaohui; Mou, Shan

    2015-05-20

    Human liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (hL-FABP), which is found in both the normal and the diseased human kidney, has been observed to bind free fatty acids. Recently, the predictive and prognostic value of L-FABP in kidney diseases has attracted considerable attention. Numerous studies have demonstrated that L-FABP is a promising biomarker of several kidney diseases, and it has also been shown to attenuate renal injury. We performed a literature review regarding the ability of L-FABP to identify patients at risk of developing kidney diseases, including acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) and to protect the kidneys in the course of kidney disease. PMID:25797895

  4. Vitamin D in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chau, Yahn-Yir

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is widespread in both the pediatric and adult chronic kidney disease (CKD) population. CKD is characterized by dysregulation of vitamin D and mineral metabolism. Secondary hyperparathyroidism and its management puts patients with CKD at increased cardiovascular risk. Emergence of experimental and some clinical data suggesting beneficial effects of vitamin D on proteinuria, blood pressure, inflammation and cardiovascular outcomes has pushed it to the center stage of CKD research. Pediatric data on vitamin D dysregulation and its consequences are still in its infancy. Ongoing prospective studies such as Chronic Kidney disease in Children (CKiD) and the Cardiovascular Comorbidity in Children with CKD (4 C) should help to delineate the evolution of disturbances in mineral metabolism and its adverse effects on growth, CKD progression and cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:22544696

  5. Diabetic Kidney Disease: A Syndrome Rather Than a Single Disease.

    PubMed

    Piccoli, Giorgina B; Grassi, Giorgio; Cabiddu, Gianfranca; Nazha, Marta; Roggero, Simona; Capizzi, Irene; De Pascale, Agostino; Priola, Adriano M; Di Vico, Cristina; Maxia, Stefania; Loi, Valentina; Asunis, Anna M; Pani, Antonello; Veltri, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The term "diabetic kidney" has recently been proposed to encompass the various lesions, involving all kidney structures that characterize protean kidney damage in patients with diabetes. While glomerular diseases may follow the stepwise progression that was described several decades ago, the tenet that proteinuria identifies diabetic nephropathy is disputed today and should be limited to glomerular lesions. Improvements in glycemic control may have contributed to a decrease in the prevalence of glomerular lesions, initially described as hallmarks of diabetic nephropathy, and revealed other types of renal damage, mainly related to vasculature and interstitium, and these types usually present with little or no proteinuria. Whilst glomerular damage is the hallmark of microvascular lesions, ischemic nephropathies, renal infarction, and cholesterol emboli syndrome are the result of macrovascular involvement, and the presence of underlying renal damage sets the stage for acute infections and drug-induced kidney injuries. Impairment of the phagocytic response can cause severe and unusual forms of acute and chronic pyelonephritis. It is thus concluded that screening for albuminuria, which is useful for detecting "glomerular diabetic nephropathy", does not identify all potential nephropathies in diabetes patients. As diabetes is a risk factor for all forms of kidney disease, diagnosis in diabetic patients should include the same combination of biochemical, clinical, and imaging tests as employed in non-diabetic subjects, but with the specific consideration that chronic kidney disease (CKD) may develop more rapidly and severely in diabetic patients. PMID:26676663

  6. Haemostasis in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Jens; Menke, Julia; Sollinger, Daniel; Schinzel, Helmut; Thürmel, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    The coagulation system has gained much interest again as new anticoagulatory substances have been introduced into clinical practice. Especially patients with renal failure are likely candidates for such a therapy as they often experience significant comorbidity including cardiovascular diseases that require anticoagulation. Patients with renal failure on new anticoagulants have experienced excessive bleeding which can be related to a changed pharmacokinetic profile of the compounds. However, the coagulation system itself, even without any interference with coagulation modifying drugs, is already profoundly changed during renal failure. Coagulation disorders with either episodes of severe bleeding or thrombosis represent an important cause for the morbidity and mortality of such patients. The underlying reasons for these coagulation disorders involve the changed interaction of different components of the coagulation system such as the coagulation cascade, the platelets and the vessel wall in the metabolic conditions of renal failure. Recent work provides evidence that new factors such as microparticles (MPs) can influence the coagulation system in patients with renal insufficiency through their potent procoagulatory effects. Interestingly, MPs may also contain microRNAs thus inhibiting the function of platelets, resulting in bleeding episodes. This review comprises the findings on the complex pathophysiology of coagulation disorders including new factors such as MPs and microRNAs in patients with renal insufficiency. PMID:24132242

  7. Endothelin Blockade in Diabetic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Anguiano, Lidia; Riera, Marta; Pascual, Julio; Soler, María José

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) remains the most common cause of chronic kidney disease and multiple therapeutic agents, primarily targeted at the renin-angiotensin system, have been assessed. Their only partial effectiveness in slowing down progression to end-stage renal disease, points out an evident need for additional effective therapies. In the context of diabetes, endothelin-1 (ET-1) has been implicated in vasoconstriction, renal injury, mesangial proliferation, glomerulosclerosis, fibrosis and inflammation, largely through activation of its endothelin A (ETA) receptor. Therefore, endothelin receptor antagonists have been proposed as potential drug targets. In experimental models of DKD, endothelin receptor antagonists have been described to improve renal injury and fibrosis, whereas clinical trials in DKD patients have shown an antiproteinuric effect. Currently, its renoprotective effect in a long-time clinical trial is being tested. This review focuses on the localization of endothelin receptors (ETA and ETB) within the kidney, as well as the ET-1 functions through them. In addition, we summarize the therapeutic benefit of endothelin receptor antagonists in experimental and human studies and the adverse effects that have been described. PMID:26239552

  8. Interdisciplinary care clinics in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Johns, Tanya S; Yee, Jerry; Smith-Jules, Terrian; Campbell, Ruth C; Bauer, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    The burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is substantial, and is associated with high hospitalization rates, premature deaths, and considerable health care costs. These factors provide strong rationale for quality improvement initiatives in CKD care. The interdisciplinary care clinic (IDC) has emerged as one solution to improving CKD care. The IDC team may include other physicians, advanced practice providers, nurses, dietitians, pharmacists, and social workers--all working together to provide effective care to patients with chronic kidney disease. Studies suggest that IDCs may improve patient education and preparedness prior to kidney failure, both of which have been associated with improved health outcomes. Interdisciplinary care may also delay the progression to end-stage renal disease and reduce mortality. While most studies suggest that IDC services are likely cost-effective, financing IDCs is challenging and many insurance providers do not pay for all of the services. There are also no robust long-term studies demonstrating the cost-effectiveness of IDCs. This review discusses IDC models and its potential impact on CKD care as well as some of the challenges that may be associated with implementing these clinics. PMID:26458811

  9. Obesity, hypertension, and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Michael E; do Carmo, Jussara M; da Silva, Alexandre A; Juncos, Luis A; Wang, Zhen; Hall, John E

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for essential hypertension, diabetes, and other comorbid conditions that contribute to development of chronic kidney disease. Obesity raises blood pressure by increasing renal tubular sodium reabsorption, impairing pressure natriuresis, and causing volume expansion via activation of the sympathetic nervous system and renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system and by physical compression of the kidneys, especially when there is increased visceral adiposity. Other factors such as inflammation, oxidative stress, and lipotoxicity may also contribute to obesity-mediated hypertension and renal dysfunction. Initially, obesity causes renal vasodilation and glomerular hyperfiltration, which act as compensatory mechanisms to maintain sodium balance despite increased tubular reabsorption. However, these compensations, along with increased arterial pressure and metabolic abnormalities, may ultimately lead to glomerular injury and initiate a slowly developing vicious cycle that exacerbates hypertension and worsens renal injury. Body weight reduction, via caloric restriction and increased physical activity, is an important first step for management of obesity, hypertension, and chronic kidney disease. However, this strategy may not be effective in producing long-term weight loss or in preventing cardiorenal and metabolic consequences in many obese patients. The majority of obese patients require medical therapy for obesity-associated hypertension, metabolic disorders, and renal disease, and morbidly obese patients may require surgical interventions to produce sustained weight loss. PMID:24600241

  10. Genetic Considerations in Pediatric Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Harshman, Lyndsay A; Zepeda-Orozco, Diana

    2016-03-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in children is an irreversible process that, in some cases, may lead to end-stage renal disease. The majority of children with CKD have a congenital disorder of the kidney or urological tract arising from birth. There is strong evidence for both a genetic and epigenetic component to progression of CKD. Utilization of gene-mapping strategies, ranging from genome-wide association studies to single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis, serves to identify potential genetic variants that may lend to disease variation. Genome-wide association studies evaluating population-based data have identified different loci associated with CKD progression. Analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms on an individual level suggests that secondary systemic sequelae of CKD are closely related to dysfunction of the cardiovascular-inflammatory axis and may lead to advanced cardiovascular disease through abnormal vascular calcification and activation of the renin-angiotensin system. Similarly, genetic variants affecting cytokine control, fibrosis, and parenchymal development may modulate CKD through development and acceleration of renal interstitial fibrosis. Epigenetic studies evaluate modification of the genome through DNA methylation, histone modification, or RNA interference, which may be directly influenced by external or environmental factors directing genomic expression. Lastly, improved understanding of the genetic and epigenetic contribution to CKD progression may allow providers to identify a population at accelerated risk for disease progression and apply novel therapies targeted at the genetic mechanism of disease. PMID:27617141

  11. Chronic kidney disease: Statins in chronic kidney disease: time to move on?

    PubMed

    Haynes, Richard; Wanner, Christoph

    2015-05-01

    Statins reduce the risk of atherosclerotic vascular disease in healthy individuals and those with chronic kidney disease (CKD); however, clinical trials have suggested a minimal effect of statins on CKD progression. The PLANET trials compared the renal effects of rosuvastatin and atorvastatin, but the findings leave many questions unanswered. PMID:25802077

  12. World Kidney Day 2016: Averting the legacy of kidney disease-focus on childhood.

    PubMed

    Ingelfinger, Julie R; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Schaefer, Franz

    2016-03-01

    World Kidney Day 2016 focuses on kidney disease in childhood and the antecedents of adult kidney disease that can begin in earliest childhood. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in childhood differs from that in adults, as the largest diagnostic group among children includes congenital anomalies and inherited disorders, with glomerulopathies and kidney disease in the setting of diabetes being relatively uncommon. In addition, many children with acute kidney injury will ultimately develop sequelae that may lead to hypertension and CKD in later childhood or in adult life. Children born early, or who are small-for-date newborns, have a relatively increased risk for the development of CKD later in life. Persons with a high-risk birth and early childhood history should be watched closely in order to help detect early signs of kidney disease in time to provide effective prevention or treatment. Successful therapy is feasible for advanced CKD in childhood; there is evidence that children fare better than adults if they receive kidney replacement therapy including dialysis and transplantation, while only a minority of children may require this ultimate intervention. Because there are disparities in access to care, effort is needed so that those children with kidney disease, wherever they live, may be treated effectively, irrespective of their geographic or economic circumstances. Our hope is that World Kidney Day will inform the general public, policy-makers, and caregivers about the needs and possibilities surrounding kidney disease in childhood. PMID:26884120

  13. Editorial: World Kidney Day 2016: Averting the Legacy of Kidney Disease--Focus on Childhood.

    PubMed

    Ingelfinger, Julie R; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Schaefer, Franz

    2016-01-01

    World Kidney Day 2016 focuses on kidney disease in childhood and the antecedents of adult kidney disease that can begin in earliest childhood. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in childhood differs from that in adults, as the largest diagnostic group among children includes congenital anomalies and inherited disorders, with glomerulopathies and kidney disease in the setting of diabetes being relatively uncommon. In addition, many children with acute kidney injury will ultimately develop sequelae that may lead to hypertension and CKD in later childhood or in adult life. Children born early or who are small-for-date newborns have a relatively increased risk for the development of CKD later in life. Persons with a high-risk birth and early childhood history should be watched closely to help detect early signs of kidney disease in time to provide effective prevention or treatment. Successful therapy is feasible for advanced CKD in childhood; there is evidence that children fare better than adults if they receive kidney replacement therapy including dialysis and transplantation, although only a minority of children may require this ultimate intervention. Because there are disparities in access to care, effort is needed so that those children with kidney disease, wherever they live, may be treated effectively, irrespective of their geographic or economic circumstances. Our hope is that World Kidney Day will inform the general public, policy makers, and caregivers about the needs and possibilities surrounding kidney disease in childhood. PMID:27085729

  14. Skin manifestations of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Robles-Mendez, J C; Vazquez-Martinez, O; Ocampo-Candiani, J

    2015-10-01

    Skin manifestations associated with chronic kidney disease are very common. Most of these conditions present in the end stages and may affect the patient's quality of life. Knowledge of these entities can contribute to establishing an accurate diagnosis and prognosis. Severe renal pruritus is associated with increased mortality and a poor prognosis. Nail exploration can provide clues about albumin and urea levels. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a preventable disease associated with gadolinium contrast. Comorbidities, such as diabetes mellitus and secondary hyperparathyroidism, can lead to acquired perforating dermatosis and calciphylaxis, respectively. Effective and innovative treatments are available for all of these conditions. PMID:26093993

  15. The role of urinary peptidomics in kidney disease research.

    PubMed

    Klein, Julie; Bascands, Jean-Loup; Mischak, Harald; Schanstra, Joost P

    2016-03-01

    Urinary peptidomics focuses on endogenous urinary peptide content. Many studies now show the usefulness of this approach for the discovery and validation of biomarkers in kidney diseases that are as varied as chronic kidney disease, acute kidney injury, congenital anomalies of the kidney and the urinary tract, and polycystic kidney disease. Most studies focus on chronic kidney disease and demonstrate that urinary peptidome analysis can substantially contribute to early detection and stratification of patients with chronic kidney disease. A number of multicenter studies are ongoing that aim further validation in a clinical setting and broaden the applicability of urinary peptides. The association of urinary peptides with kidney disease also starts to deliver information on the pathophysiology of kidney disease with emphasis on extracellular matrix remodeling. Bioinformatic peptide centric tools have been developed that allow to model the changes in protease activity involved in kidney disease, based on the urinary peptidome content. A novel application of urinary peptidome analysis is the back-translation of results obtained in humans to animals for animal model validation and improvement of readout in these preclinical models. In conclusion, urinary peptidomics not only contribute to detection and stratification of kidney disease in the clinic, but might also create a new impulse in drug discovery through better insight in the pathophysiology of disease and optimized translatability of animal models. PMID:26880450

  16. Endogenously elevated bilirubin modulates kidney function and protects from circulating oxidative stress in a rat model of adenine-induced kidney failure

    PubMed Central

    Boon, Ai-Ching; Lam, Alfred K.; Gopalan, Vinod; Benzie, Iris F.; Briskey, David; Coombes, Jeff S.; Fassett, Robert G.; Bulmer, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    Mildly elevated bilirubin is associated with a reduction in the presence and progression of chronic kidney disease and related mortality, which may be attributed to bilirubin’s antioxidant properties. This study investigated whether endogenously elevated bilirubin would protect against adenine-induced kidney damage in male hyperbilirubinaemic Gunn rats and littermate controls. Animals were orally administered adenine or methylcellulose solvent (vehicle) daily for 10 days and were then monitored for 28 days. Serum and urine were assessed throughout the protocol for parameters of kidney function and antioxidant/oxidative stress status and kidneys were harvested for histological examination upon completion of the study. Adenine-treated animals experienced weight-loss, polyuria and polydipsia; however, these effects were significantly attenuated in adenine-treated Gunn rats. No difference in the presence of dihydroadenine crystals, lymphocytic infiltration and fibrosis were noted in Gunn rat kidneys versus controls. However, plasma protein carbonyl and F2-isoprostane concentrations were significantly decreased in Gunn rats versus controls, with no change in urinary 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine or kidney tissue F2-isoprostane concentrations. These data indicated that endogenously elevated bilirubin specifically protects from systemic oxidative stress in the vascular compartment. These data may help to clarify the protective relationship between bilirubin, kidney function and cardiovascular mortality in clinical investigations. PMID:26498893

  17. Kidney Disease and Diabetes - What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Kidney Disease and Diabetes: What You Need to Know ... page please turn Javascript on. March is National Kidney Month , a good time to check if you ...

  18. When Your Child Has a Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... two treatment options are available — dialysis and transplant. Dialysis Nearly all kids with end-stage kidney disease ... a living related donor can't be found, dialysis may be required until a donor kidney becomes ...

  19. Assessment of cognitive dysfunction in kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Nasser, Mohamed El Tayeb; Shawki, Sahar; El Shahawy, Yasser; Sany, Dawlat

    2012-11-01

    Cognitive dysfunction includes reduced mental alertness, intellectual impairment, decreased attention and concentration, memory deficits and diminished perceptual-motor coordination. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients may suffer from cognitive impairment, which may decrease an individual's quality of life, increase resource utilization and result in suboptimal medical care. This study was carried out on 120 patients with different stages of CKD from our nephrology outpatient clinic divided into three groups: Group I: 50 CKD patients, stage 3 and stage 4; Group II: 50 end-stage renal disease patients on regular hemodialysis with K t/v >1.1; and Group III: 20 acute kidney injury patients, followed-up till their renal functions stabilized besides Group IV: 20 healthy subjects served as controls. All patients underwent laboratory investigations and psychometric tests, which include trial making test part B, digit span test, digit symbol test and mini-mental state examination. There was a significant difference of mean values of cognitive function tests in Groups I, II and III on comparing them with Group IV. Stage 3 CKD scored better than stage 4 CKD, which was worse than hemodialysis patients, and lastly acute kidney injury patients had mild cognitive impairment, which was restored after recovery. We found an association between hemoglobin and cognitive function tests score in the studied groups. The degree of cognitive impairment was associated with the severity of CKD, and dialysis improved cognitive performance. PMID:23168850

  20. Interactions between thyroid disorders and kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Gopal; Mohapatra, Anjali

    2012-01-01

    There are several interactions between thyroid and kidney functions in each other organ's disease states. Thyroid hormones affect renal development and physiology. Thyroid hormones have pre-renal and intrinsic renal effects by which they increase the renal blood flow and the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Hypothyroidism is associated with reduced GFR and hyperthyroidism results in increased GFR as well as increased renin – angiotensin – aldosterone activation. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by a low T3 syndrome which is now considered a part of an atypical nonthyroidal illness. CKD patients also have increased incidence of primary hypothyroidism and subclinical hypothyroidism. The physiological benefits of a hypothyroid state in CKD, and the risk of CKD progression with hyperthyroidism emphasize on a conservative approach in the treatment of thyroid hormone abnormalities in CKD. Thyroid dysfunction is also associated with glomerulonephritis often by a common autoimmune etiology. Several drugs could affect both thyroid and kidney functions. There are few described interactions between thyroid and renal malignancies. A detailed knowledge of all these interactions is important for both the nephrologists and endocrinologists for optimal management of the patient. PMID:22470856

  1. Hypertension and chronic kidney disease in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sengul, Sule; Erdem, Yunus; Batuman, Vecihi; Erturk, Sehsuvar

    2013-12-01

    Worldwide, both hypertension and chronic kidney disease are major public health problems, due to their epidemic proportions and their association with high cardiovascular mortality. In 2003, the first Prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension in Turkey (the PatenT) study was conducted in a nationally representative population (n=4910) by the Turkish Society of Hypertension and Renal Diseases, and showed that overall age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of hypertension in Turkey was 31.8%. The PatenT study also reported that overall awareness (40.7%), treatment (31.1%), and control rates (8.1%) of hypertension were strikingly low. Only 20.7% of the patients who were aware of their hypertension and receiving treatment had their blood pressure controlled to <140/90 mm Hg. In the Chronic Renal Disease in Turkey (CREDIT) study (n=10,748), the overall prevalence of chronic kidney (including all stages) disease was 15.7% and increased with advancing age. In the same population, the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, obesity, and metabolic syndrome were reported as 32.7%, 12.7%, 76.3%, 20.1%, and 31.3%, respectively. The prevalence and awareness of hypertension in CREDIT population was 32.7% and 48.6%, respectively. According to the data obtained from national surveys, the prevalence of hypertension and chronic kidney disease in Turkey is alarmingly high. To improve prevention, early diagnosis, and treatment of these major public health problems, appropriate health strategies should be implemented by the government, together with medical societies, non-governmental organizations, industry, health-care providers, and academia. PMID:25019009

  2. Soluble Urokinase Receptor and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hayek, Salim S.; Sever, Sanja; Ko, Yi-An; Trachtman, Howard; Awad, Mosaab; Wadhwani, Shikha; Altintas, Mehmet M.; Wei, Changli; Hotton, Anna L.; French, Audrey L.; Sperling, Laurence S.; Lerakis, Stamatios; Quyyumi, Arshed A.; Reiser, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Relatively high plasma levels of soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) have been associated with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and poor clinical outcomes in patients with various conditions. It is unknown whether elevated suPAR levels in patients with normal kidney function are associated with future decline in the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and with incident chronic kidney disease. METHODS We measured plasma suPAR levels in 3683 persons enrolled in the Emory Cardiovascular Biobank (mean age, 63 years; 65% men; median suPAR level, 3040 pg per milliliter) and determined renal function at enrollment and at subsequent visits in 2292 persons. The relationship between suPAR levels and the eGFR at baseline, the change in the eGFR over time, and the development of chronic kidney disease (eGFR <60 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 of body-surface area) were analyzed with the use of linear mixed models and Cox regression after adjustment for demographic and clinical variables. RESULTS A higher suPAR level at baseline was associated with a greater decline in the eGFR during follow-up; the annual change in the eGFR was −0.9 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 among participants in the lowest quartile of suPAR levels as compared with −4.2 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 among participants in the highest quartile (P<0.001). The 921 participants with a normal eGFR (≥90 ml per minute per 1.73 m2) at baseline had the largest suPAR-related decline in the eGFR. In 1335 participants with a baseline eGFR of at least 60 ml per minute per 1.73 m2, the risk of progression to chronic kidney disease in the highest quartile of suPAR levels was 3.13 times as high (95% confidence interval, 2.11 to 4.65) as that in the lowest quartile. CONCLUSIONS An elevated level of suPAR was independently associated with incident chronic kidney disease and an accelerated decline in the eGFR in the groups studied. (Funded by the Abraham J. and Phyllis Katz Foundation

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and pathophysiology of the rat kidney in streptozotocin-induced diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Lohr, J.; Mazurchuk, R.J.; Acara, M.A.; Nickerson, P.A.; Fiel, R.J. )

    1991-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance imaging was performed on rats before induction of diabetes with streptozotocin (STZ) and at 2 and 12 days postinduction. Images revealed an increase in maximal longitudinal and axial dimensions of the kidneys at 2 days and a further increase at 12 days. Similarly, an increase in the size of the remaining kidney was seen in a rat which underwent uninephrectomy as a positive control. Two major differences were observed between the kidney undergoing compensatory hypertrophy and those developing diabetic nephropathy: (i) Expansion of the renal vasculature was seen only in images of the diabetic rat; (ii) A loss in conspicuity of the normal corticomedullary junction was seen in the T2-weighted images of the diabetic rat but not in the uninephrectomized rat. Histologic examination revealed that the medulla increased to a size greater than the cortex during diabetic nephropathy whereas the medullary volume was less than that of the cortex during compensatory hypertrophy. In vitro T1 relaxation times in cortex, outer medulla and inner medulla of kidneys from control rats were measured and compared with the same respective regions in diabetic rats. When these values were correlated with tissue water content, a linear increase in relaxation rate versus percent water content from cortex to inner medulla was found in the control kidneys, but this correlation was absent in diabetic nephropathy. These studies demonstrate that MRI is an effective noninvasive tool for studying the course of renal hypertrophy and hydration changes in the development of renal disease in STZ-induced diabetes in the rat.

  4. Mechanisms of progression of chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) occurs in all age groups, including children. Regardless of the underlying cause, CKD is characterized by progressive scarring that ultimately affects all structures of the kidney. The relentless progression of CKD is postulated to result from a self-perpetuating vicious cycle of fibrosis activated after initial injury. We will review possible mechanisms of progressive renal damage, including systemic and glomerular hypertension, various cytokines and growth factors, with special emphasis on the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS), podocyte loss, dyslipidemia and proteinuria. We will also discuss possible specific mechanisms of tubulointerstitial fibrosis that are not dependent on glomerulosclerosis, and possible underlying predispositions for CKD, such as genetic factors and low nephron number. PMID:17647026

  5. Crohnic Kidney Disease: Recurrent Acute Kidney Failure in a Patient With Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Mehmet Emin; Ercan, Zafer; Karakas, Emel Yigit; Ulas, Turgay; Buyukhatipoglu, Hakan

    2014-01-01

    Context: Short bowel syndrome is a rare and devastating complication in chronic inflammatory bowel disease following functional or anatomic loss of extensive segments of the intestine. Case Report: A 60-year-old male patient with Crohn's disease had undergone multiple resections of the intestine and developed short bowel syndrome. Despite up to 4-5 liters of orally fluid, sufficient calcium and magnesium intake, he suffered from recurrent acute kidney injury due to profound volume depletion and those electrolyte deficiencies. Administration of intravenous fluid and electrolyte repleacement treatment at regular intervals prevented further kidney injuries. Conclusion: We present a case of recurrent acute kidney failure in a patient with Crohn's disease, and aimed to remark importance of receiving sufficient parenteral fluid and electrolyte support in those with short bowel syndrome. PMID:25599054

  6. 77 FR 28890 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Notice of Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Initial Review Group; Kidney, Urologic and Hematologic Diseases D Subcommittee. Date... . Name of Committee: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Initial...

  7. 78 FR 9063 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Initial Review Group; Kidney, Urologic and Hematologic Diseases D Subcommittee. Date... . Name of Committee: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Initial...

  8. 75 FR 3741 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Initial Review Group; Kidney, Urologic and Hematologic Diseases D Subcommittee. Date... . Name of Committee: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Initial...

  9. Lipid peroxidation and antioxidant status in kidney and liver of rats treated with sulfasalazine.

    PubMed

    Linares, Victoria; Alonso, Virginia; Albina, Maria L; Bellés, Montserrat; Sirvent, Juan J; Domingo, José L; Sánchez, Domènec J

    2009-02-27

    Sulfasalazine (SASP) is a drug commonly used in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). In this study, the changes in endogenous antioxidant capacity and oxidative damage in liver and kidney of SASP-treated rats were investigated. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were orally given 0, 300, or 600 mg SASP/kg body weight for 14 days. One half of the animals in each group remained 14 additional days without SASP treatment. At the end of the experimental period, rats were euthanized and liver and kidney were removed. In both organs, the following stress markers were determined: reduced glutathione (GSH), oxidized glutathione (GSSG), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS). Moreover, histological examination of kidneys showed phagolysosomes after 14 days of SASP withdrawal. A dropsical degeneration was also observed in renal tissue. Oral SASP administration induced a significant increase in TBARS levels in both liver and kidney. After 2 weeks without SASP administration, a recovery of these levels was noted. SOD activity was significantly reduced, while CAT activity significantly increased at 600 mg SASP/(kg day). In kidney, GPx activity significantly increased, while GST activity and GSH levels were significantly reduced at 600 mg SASP/(kg day). These results suggest that in male rats, oxidative damage can be a mechanism for nephro- and hepatotoxicity related with SASP treatment. PMID:19071188

  10. Experimental glomerulonephritis in the isolated perfused rat kidney.

    PubMed Central

    Couser, W G; Steinmuller, D R; Stilmant, M M; Salant, D J; Lowenstein, L M

    1978-01-01

    The development of immune deposits on the subepithelial surface of the glomerular capillary wall was studied in isolated rat kidneys perfused at controlled perfusion pressure, pH, temperature, and flow rates with recirculating oxygenated perfusate containing bovine serum albumin (BSA) in buffer and sheep antibody to rat proximal tubular epithelial cell brush border antigen (Fx1A). Control kidney were perfused with equal concentrations of non-antibody immunoglobulin (Ig)G. Renal function was monitored by measuring inulin clearance, sodium reabsorption, and urine flow as well as BSA excretion and fractional clearance. Perfused kidneys were studied by light, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy. All kidneys perfused with anti-Fx1A developed diffuse, finely granular deposits of IgG along the glomerular capillary wall by immunofluorescence. Electron microscopy revealed these deposits to be localized exclusively in the subepithelial space and slit pores. Similar deposits were produced in a nonrecirculating perfusion system, thereby excluding the formation of immune complexes in the perfusate caused by renal release of tubular antigen. Control kidneys perfused with nonantibody IgG did not develop glomerular immune deposits. Renal function and BSA excretion were the same in experimental and control kidneys. Glomerular deposits in antibody perfused kidneys were indistinguishable from deposits in rats injected with anti-Fx1A or immunized with Fx1A to produce autologous immune complex nephropathy. These studies demonstrate that subepithelial immune deposits can be produced in the isolated rat kidney by perfusion with specific antibody to Fx1A in the absence of circulating immune complexes. In this model deposits result from in situ complex formation rather than circulating immune complex deposition. Images PMID:372233

  11. Methods in renal research: kidney transplantation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Tillou, Xavier; Howden, Brian O; Kanellis, John; Nikolic-Paterson, David J; Ma, Frank Y

    2016-06-01

    Kidney transplantation in small animals has been crucial in the development of anti-rejection therapies. While there is no substitute for a skilled microsurgeon, there are many aspects of the transplant procedure that can be modified to optimize the reproducibility and utility of the technique. This article provides a detailed description, including video recording, of orthotopic kidney transplantation in the rat. The key variables in the technique are also discussed. PMID:26648592

  12. Transcriptome Analysis of Human Diabetic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Woroniecka, Karolina I.; Park, Ae Seo Deok; Mohtat, Davoud; Thomas, David B.; Pullman, James M.; Susztak, Katalin

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is the single leading cause of kidney failure in the U.S., for which a cure has not yet been found. The aim of our study was to provide an unbiased catalog of gene-expression changes in human diabetic kidney biopsy samples. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Affymetrix expression arrays were used to identify differentially regulated transcripts in 44 microdissected human kidney samples. DKD samples were significant for their racial diversity and decreased glomerular filtration rate (~25–35 mL/min). Stringent statistical analysis, using the Benjamini-Hochberg corrected two-tailed t test, was used to identify differentially expressed transcripts in control and diseased glomeruli and tubuli. Two different web-based algorithms were used to define differentially regulated pathways. RESULTS We identified 1,700 differentially expressed probesets in DKD glomeruli and 1,831 in diabetic tubuli, and 330 probesets were commonly differentially expressed in both compartments. Pathway analysis highlighted the regulation of Ras homolog gene family member A, Cdc42, integrin, integrin-linked kinase, and vascular endothelial growth factor signaling in DKD glomeruli. The tubulointerstitial compartment showed strong enrichment for inflammation-related pathways. The canonical complement signaling pathway was determined to be statistically differentially regulated in both DKD glomeruli and tubuli and was associated with increased glomerulosclerosis even in a different set of DKD samples. CONCLUSIONS Our studies have cataloged gene-expression regulation and identified multiple novel genes and pathways that may play a role in the pathogenesis of DKD or could serve as biomarkers. PMID:21752957

  13. Midkine in nephrogenesis, hypertension and kidney diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Waichi; Sato, Yuka

    2014-01-01

    Midkine (MK; K; gene abbreviation, Mdk: mus musculus, MDK: homo sapiens) is a multifunctional heparin-binding growth factor that regulates cell growth, survival and migration as well as anti-apoptotic activity in nephrogenesis and development. Proximal tubular epithelial cells are the main sites of MK expression in the kidneys. The pathophysiological roles of MK are diverse, ranging from the development of acute kidney injury (AKI) to the progression of chronic kidney disease, often accompanied by hypertension, renal ischaemia and diabetic nephropathy. The obvious hypertension that develops in Mdk+/+ mouse models of renal ablation compared with Mdk−/− mice eventually leads to progressive renal failure, such as glomerular sclerosis and tubulointerstitial damage associated with elevated plasma angiotensin (Ang) II levels. MK is also induced in the lung endothelium by oxidative stress and subsequently up-regulated by ACE, which hydrolyzes Ang II to induce further oxidative stress, thus accelerating MK generation; this leads to a vicious cycle of positive feedback in the MK-Ang II pathway. Kidney–lung interactions involving positive feedback between the renin-angiotensin system and MK might partly account for the pathogenesis of hypertension and kidney damage. MK is also involved in the pathogenesis of AKI and diabetic nephropathy through the recruitment of inflammatory cells. In contrast, MK plays a protective role against crescentic glomerulonephritis, by down-regulating plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. These diverse actions of MK might open up new avenues for targeted approaches to treating hypertension and various renal diseases. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Midkine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-4 PMID:24106831

  14. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Chronic Tubulointerstitial Diseases.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Chronic tubulointerstitial diseases are a common final pathway toward chronic renal failure regardless the primary damage (glomerular, vascular or directly the tubulointerstitium). Chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis (CTN) is characterized by interstitial scarring, fibrosis and tubule atrophy, resulting in progressive chronic kidney disease. Most frequent causes of CTN are drugs, heavy metals, obstructive uropathy, nephrolithiasis, reflux disease, immunologic diseases, neoplasia, ischemia, metabolic diseases, genetics and miscellaneous. At ultrasound (US), kidneys' morphological aspect is similar in all forms of chronic interstitial nephropathy and only chronic pyelonephritis with or without reflux shows distinguishing characteristics. In interstitial nephropathy, kidneys' profiles are finely irregular and corticomedullary differentiation is altered because of a diffused hyperechogenicity. The only indirect sign of chronic interstitial damage can be derived from the value of intrarenal resistive indexes that hardly overcome 0.75. US is mandatory in clinical chronic pyelonephritis work-up because it provides information on kidney's diameter and on growth nomogram in children. Renal profiles can be more or less altered depending on the number of cortical scars and the presence of pseudonodular areas of segmental compensatory hypertrophy. In the early stages, US diagnosis of renal tuberculosis is difficult because parenchymal lesions are non-specific. US sensitivity in the diagnosis of hydronephrosis is very high, close to 100% and, finally, US is the first choice imaging technique in the diagnosis of urinary lithiasis. PMID:27169608

  15. Developmental Programming of Hypertension and Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Euming; Yosypiv, Ihor V.

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of evidence supports the concept that changes in the intrauterine milieu during “sensitive” periods of embryonic development or in infant diet after birth affect the developing individual, resulting in general health alterations later in life. This phenomenon is referred to as “developmental programming” or “developmental origins of health and disease.” The risk of developing late-onset diseases such as hypertension, chronic kidney disease (CKD), obesity or type 2 diabetes is increased in infants born prematurely at <37 weeks of gestation or in low birth weight (LBW) infants weighing <2,500 g at birth. Both genetic and environmental events contribute to the programming of subsequent risks of CKD and hypertension in premature or LBW individuals. A number of observations suggest that susceptibility to subsequent CKD and hypertension in premature or LBW infants is mediated, at least in part, by reduced nephron endowment. The major factors influencing in utero environment that are associated with a low final nephron number include uteroplacental insufficiency, maternal low-protein diet, hyperglycemia, vitamin A deficiency, exposure to or interruption of endogenous glucocorticoids, and ethanol exposure. This paper discusses the effect of premature birth, LBW, intrauterine milieu, and infant feeding on the development of hypertension and renal disease in later life as well as examines the role of the kidney in developmental programming of hypertension and CKD. PMID:23251800

  16. Tracking kidney volume in mice with polycystic kidney disease by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Wallace, D P; Hou, Y-P; Huang, Z L; Nivens, E; Savinkova, L; Yamaguchi, T; Bilgen, M

    2008-03-01

    Polycystic kidney disease is characterized by the progressive enlargement of kidneys due to expanding fluid-filled cysts with the rate of renal volume increase held to be a marker of disease progression. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used to monitor changes in renal volume in patients with polycystic kidney disease; however, it has not been effectively used in mice to monitor changes in kidney volume during drug treatment studies. We used a powerful 9.4-T horizontal bore magnetic resonance scanner to track changes in kidney volume in pcy/pcy mice, an ortholog of nephronophthisis type 3. Mice were sequentially scanned from 4 to 30 weeks of age and kidney volumes determined from high-resolution images. Kidney volume and maximal cross-sectional surface area correlated positively with kidney weight and the histologic determination of surface area. The increase in kidney volume was exponential up to 20 weeks of age, after which there was a plateau consistent with the replacement of normal parenchyma by fibrotic tissue. Our study demonstrates that MRI accurately determines the rate of kidney volume increase in mice with polycystic kidney disease and hence may be useful in assessing the effectiveness of therapeutic agents to slow disease progression. PMID:18185504

  17. MALDI imaging MS reveals candidate lipid markers of polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Ruh, Hermelindis; Salonikios, Theresia; Fuchser, Jens; Schwartz, Matthias; Sticht, Carsten; Hochheim, Christina; Wirnitzer, Bernhard; Gretz, Norbert; Hopf, Carsten

    2013-10-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) is a severe, monogenetically inherited kidney and liver disease. PCK rats carrying the orthologous mutant gene serve as a model of human disease, and alterations in lipid profiles in PCK rats suggest that defined subsets of lipids may be useful as molecular disease markers. Whereas MALDI protein imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) has become a promising tool for disease classification, widely applicable workflows that link MALDI lipid imaging and identification as well as structural characterization of candidate disease-classifying marker lipids are lacking. Here, we combine selective MALDI imaging of sulfated kidney lipids and Fisher discriminant analysis (FDA) of imaging data sets for identification of candidate markers of progressive disease in PCK rats. Our study highlights strong increases in lower mass lipids as main classifiers of cystic disease. Structure determination by high-resolution mass spectrometry identifies these altered lipids as taurine-conjugated bile acids. These sulfated lipids are selectively elevated in the PCK rat model but not in models of related hepatorenal fibrocystic diseases, suggesting that they be molecular markers of the disease and that a combination of MALDI imaging with high-resolution MS methods and Fisher discriminant data analysis may be applicable for lipid marker discovery. PMID:23852700

  18. Rare inherited kidney diseases: challenges, opportunities, and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Devuyst, Olivier; Knoers, Nine V A M; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Schaefer, Franz

    2014-01-01

    At least 10% of adults and nearly all children who receive renal-replacement therapy have an inherited kidney disease. These patients rarely die when their disease progresses and can remain alive for many years because of advances in organ-replacement therapy. However, these disorders substantially decrease their quality of life and have a large effect on health-care systems. Since the kidneys regulate essential homoeostatic processes, inherited kidney disorders have multisystem complications, which add to the usual challenges for rare disorders. In this review, we discuss the nature of rare inherited kidney diseases, the challenges they pose, and opportunities from technological advances, which are well suited to target the kidney. Mechanistic insights from rare disorders are relevant for common disorders such as hypertension, kidney stones, cardiovascular disease, and progression of chronic kidney disease. PMID:24856029

  19. Talking with Your Health Care Professionals about Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Information about diabetes, digestive and liver diseases, kidney diseases, weight control and nutrition, urologic diseases, endocrine and ... metabólicas, y enfermedades hematológicas Health Statistics Diabetes, digestive, kidney diseases, obesity, weight and more Healthy Moments Radio Broadcast ...

  20. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Information about diabetes, digestive and liver diseases, kidney diseases, weight control and nutrition, urologic diseases, endocrine and ... metabólicas, y enfermedades hematológicas Health Statistics Diabetes, digestive, kidney diseases, obesity, weight and more Healthy Moments Radio Broadcast ...

  1. Overview of Kidney Diseases in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... a kidney transplant or blood-filtering treatments called dialysis. Children with CKD or kidney failure face many ... kidneys do. The two types of treatment are dialysis and transplantation. More information is provided in the ...

  2. Averting the legacy of kidney disease - Focus on childhood.

    PubMed

    Ingelfinger, Julie R; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Schaefer, Franz

    2016-03-01

    World Kidney Day 2016 focuses on kidney disease in childhood and the antecedents of adult kidney disease that can begin in earliest childhood. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in childhood differs from that in adults, as the largest diagnostic group among children includes congenital anomalies and inherited disorders, with glomerulopathies and kidney disease in the setting of diabetes being relatively uncommon. In addition, many children with acute kidney injury will ultimately develop sequelae that may lead to hypertension and CKD in later childhood or in adult life. Children born early or who are small-for date newborns have relatively increased risk for the development of CKD later in life. Persons with a high-risk birth and early childhood history should be watched closely in order to help detect early signs of kidney disease in time to provide effective prevention or treatment. Successful therapy is feasible for advanced CKD in childhood; there is evidence that children fare better than adults, if they receive kidney replacement therapy including dialysis and transplantation, while only a minority of children may require this ultimate intervention Because there are disparities in access to care, effort is needed so that those children with kidney disease, wherever they live, may be treated effectively, irrespective of their geographic or economic circumstances. Our hope is that World Kidney Day will inform the general public, policy makers and caregivers about the needs and possibilities surrounding kidney disease in childhood. PMID:26997373

  3. Averting the legacy of kidney disease – focus on childhood

    PubMed Central

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Schaefer, Franz

    2016-01-01

    World Kidney Day 2016 focuses on kidney disease in childhood and the antecedents of adult kidney disease that can begin in earliest childhood. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in childhood differs from that in adults, as the largest diagnostic group amongst children includes congenital anomalies and inherited disorders, with glomerulopathies and kidney disease in the setting of diabetes being relatively uncommon. In addition, many children with acute kidney injury will ultimately develop sequelae that may lead to hypertension and CKD in later childhood or in adult life. Children born early or who are small-for-date newborns have relatively increased risk for the development of CKD later in life. Persons with a high-risk birth and early childhood history should be watched closely to help to detect early signs of kidney disease in time to provide effective prevention or treatment. Successful therapy is feasible for advanced CKD in childhood; there is evidence that children fare better than adults, if they receive kidney replacement therapy including dialysis and transplantation, whilst only a minority of children may require this ultimate intervention. Because there are disparities in access to care, effort is needed so that children with kidney disease, wherever they live, may be treated effectively, irrespective of their geographic or economic circumstances. Our hope is that World Kidney Day will inform the general public, policymakers and caregivers about the needs and possibilities surrounding kidney disease in childhood. PMID:27247150

  4. Averting the legacy of kidney disease - focus on childhood

    PubMed Central

    Ingelfinger, J.R.; Kalantar-Zadeh, K.; Schaefer, F.

    2016-01-01

    World Kidney Day 2016 focuses on kidney disease in childhood and the antecedents of adult kidney disease that can begin in earliest childhood. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in childhood differs from that in adults, in that the largest diagnostic group among children includes congenital anomalies and inherited disorders, with glomerulopathies and kidney disease as a consequence of diabetes being relatively uncommon. In addition, many children with acute kidney injury will ultimately develop sequelae that may lead to hypertension and CKD in later childhood or in adult life. Children born early or who are small-for-date newborns have relatively increased risk for the development of CKD later in life. Persons with a high-risk birth and early childhood history should be watched closely in order to help detect early signs of kidney disease in time to provide effective prevention or treatment. Successful therapy is feasible for advanced CKD in childhood; there is evidence that children fare better than adults, if they receive kidney replacement therapy including dialysis and transplantation, although only a minority of children may require this ultimate intervention. Because there are disparities in access to care, effort is needed so that children with kidney disease, wherever they live, may be treated effectively, irrespective of their geographic or economic circumstances. Our hope is that the World Kidney Day will inform the general public, policy makers and caregivers about the needs and possibilities surrounding kidney disease in childhood. PMID:27096201

  5. Averting the Legacy of Kidney Disease - Focus on Childhood.

    PubMed

    Ingelfinger, Julie R; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Schaefer, Franz

    2016-04-01

    World Kidney Day 2016 focuses on kidney disease in childhood and the antecedents of adult kidney disease that can begin in earliest childhood. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in childhood differs from that in adults, as the largest diagnostic group among children includes congenital anomalies and inherited disorders, with glomerulopathies and kidney disease in the setting of diabetes being relatively uncommon. In addition, many children with acute kidney injury will ultimately develop sequelae that may lead to hypertension and CKD in later childhood or in adult life. Children born early or who are small-for date newborns have relatively increased risk for the development of CKD later in life. Persons with a high-risk birth and early childhood history should be watched closely in order to help detect early signs of kidney disease in time to provide effective prevention or treatment. Successful therapy is feasible for advanced CKD in childhood; there is evidence that children fare better than adults, if they receive kidney replacement therapy including dialysis and transplantation, while only a minority of children may require this ultimate intervention. Because there are disparities in access to care, effort is needed so that those children with kidney disease, wherever they live, may be treated effectively, irrespective of their geographic or economic circumstances. Our hope is that World Kidney Day will inform the general public, policy makers and caregivers about the needs and possibilities surrounding kidney disease in childhood. PMID:27536691

  6. Polycystic kidney disease: an unrecognized emerging infectious disease?

    PubMed Central

    Miller-Hjelle, M. A.; Hjelle, J. T.; Jones, M.; Mayberry, W. R.; Dombrink-Kurtzman, M. A.; Peterson, S. W.; Nowak, D. M.; Darras, F. S.

    1997-01-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is one of the most common genetic diseases in humans. We contend that it may be an emerging infectious disease and/or microbial toxicosis in a vulnerable human subpopulation. Use of a differential activation protocol for the Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) assay showed bacterial endotoxin and fungal (1-->3)-beta-D-glucans in cyst fluids from human kidneys with PKD. Fatty acid analysis of cyst fluid confirmed the presence of 3-hydroxy fatty acids characteristic of endotoxin. Tissue and cyst fluid from three PKD patients were examined for fungal components. Serologic tests showed Fusarium, Aspergillus, and Candida antigens. IgE, but not IgG, reactive with Fusarium and Candida were also detected in cyst fluid. Fungal DNA was detected in kidney tissue and cyst fluid from these three PKD patients, but not in healthy human kidney tissue. We examine the intertwined nature of the actions of endotoxin and fungal components, sphingolipid biology in PKD, the structure of PKD gene products, infections, and integrity of gut function to establish a mechanistic hypothesis for microbial provocation of human cystic disease. Proof of this hypothesis will require identification of the microbes and microbial components involved and multifaceted studies of PKD cell biology. PMID:9204292

  7. Diabetic Kidney Disease: Pathophysiology and Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Toth-Manikowski, Stephanie; Atta, Mohamed G.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a worldwide epidemic that has led to a rise in diabetic kidney disease (DKD). Over the past two decades, there has been significant clarification of the various pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of DKD. Nonetheless, very little has changed in the way clinicians manage patients with this disorder. Indeed, treatment is primarily centered on controlling hyperglycemia and hypertension and inhibiting the renin-angiotensin system. The purpose of this review is to describe the current understanding of how the hemodynamic, metabolic, inflammatory, and alternative pathways are all entangled in pathogenesis of DKD and detail the various therapeutic targets that may one day play a role in quelling this epidemic. PMID:26064987

  8. Baroreflex dysfunction in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Manpreet; Chandran, Dinu S; Jaryal, Ashok Kumar; Bhowmik, Dipankar; Agarwal, Sanjay Kumar; Deepak, Kishore Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients have high cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. The presence of traditional and CKD related risk factors results in exaggerated vascular calcification in these patients. Vascular calcification is associated with reduced large arterial compliance and thus impaired baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) resulting in augmented blood pressure (BP) variability and hampered BP regulation. Baroreflex plays a vital role in short term regulation of BP. This review discusses the normal baroreflex physiology, methods to assess baroreflex function, its determinants along with the prognostic significance of assessing BRS in CKD patients, available literature on BRS in CKD patients and the probable patho-physiology of baroreflex dysfunction in CKD. PMID:26788464

  9. New Insights Into Molecular Mechanisms of Diabetic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Badal, Shawn S.; Danesh, Farhad R.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic kidney disease remains a major microvascular complication of diabetes and the most common cause of chronic kidney failure requiring dialysis in the United States. Medical advances over the past century have substantially improved the management of diabetes mellitus and thereby have increased patient survival. However, current standards of care reduce but do not eliminate the risk of diabetic kidney disease, and further studies are warranted to define new strategies for reducing the risk of diabetic kidney disease. In this review, we highlight some of the novel and established molecular mechanisms that contribute to the development of the disease and its outcomes. In particular, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of diabetic kidney disease, with special emphasis on the mitochondrial oxidative stress and microRNA targets. Additionally, candidate genes associated with susceptibility to diabetic kidney disease and alterations in various cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors are addressed briefly. PMID:24461730

  10. Life Cycle Analysis of Kidney Gene Expression in Male F344 Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kwekel, Joshua C.; Desai, Varsha G.; Moland, Carrie L.; Vijay, Vikrant; Fuscoe, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Age is a predisposing condition for susceptibility to chronic kidney disease and progression as well as acute kidney injury that may arise due to the adverse effects of some drugs. Age-related differences in kidney biology, therefore, are a key concern in understanding drug safety and disease progression. We hypothesize that the underlying suite of genes expressed in the kidney at various life cycle stages will impact susceptibility to adverse drug reactions. Therefore, establishing changes in baseline expression data between these life stages is the first and necessary step in evaluating this hypothesis. Untreated male F344 rats were sacrificed at 2, 5, 6, 8, 15, 21, 78, and 104 weeks of age. Kidneys were collected for histology and gene expression analysis. Agilent whole-genome rat microarrays were used to query global expression profiles. An ANOVA (p<0.01) coupled with a fold-change>1.5 in relative mRNA expression, was used to identify 3,724 unique differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Principal component analyses of these DEGs revealed three major divisions in life-cycle renal gene expression. K-means cluster analysis identified several groups of genes that shared age-specific patterns of expression. Pathway analysis of these gene groups revealed age-specific gene networks and functions related to renal function and aging, including extracellular matrix turnover, immune cell response, and renal tubular injury. Large age-related changes in expression were also demonstrated for the genes that code for qualified renal injury biomarkers KIM-1, Clu, and Tff3. These results suggest specific groups of genes that may underlie age-specific susceptibilities to adverse drug reactions and disease. This analysis of the basal gene expression patterns of renal genes throughout the life cycle of the rat will improve the use of current and future renal biomarkers and inform our assessments of kidney injury and disease. PMID:24116033

  11. Structural Equation Modeling Highlights the Potential of Kim-1 as a Biomarker for Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, Lesley; Akintola, Adebayo; Chen, Gang; Catania, Jeffrey M.; Vaidya, Vishal; Burghardt, Robert C.; Bonventre, Joseph V.; Trzeciakowski, Jerome; Parrish, Alan R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major public health problem, and despite continued research in the field, there is still a need to identify both biomarkers of risk and progression, as well as potential therapeutic targets. Structural equation modeling (SEM) is a family of statistical techniques that has been utilized in the fields of sociology and psychology for many years; however, its utilization in the biological sciences is relatively novel. SEM's ability to investigate complex relationships in an efficient, single model could be utilized to understand the progression of CKD, as well as to develop a predictive model to assess kidney status in the patient. Methods Fischer 344 rats were fed either an ad libitum diet or a calorically restricted diet, and a time-course study of kidney structure and function was performed. EQS, a SEM software package, was utilized to generate five CKD models of the Fisher 344 rat and identify relationships between measured variables and estimates of kidney damage and kidney function. Results All models identified strong relationships between a biomarker for CKD, kidney injury molecule-1 (Kim-1) and kidney damage, in the Fischer 344 rat CKD model. Models also indicate a strong relationship between age and renal damage and dysfunction. Conclusion SEM can be used to model CKD and could be useful to examine biomarkers in CKD patients. PMID:22269876

  12. Tissue culture correlational study of genetic cholangiopathy of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Nakanuma, Yasuni; Sato, Yasunori; Harada, Kenichi

    2013-01-01

    Cholangiocytes are epithelial cells that line the biliary tract and are also known as biliary epithelial cells (BECs). In vitro culture studies of BECs in correlation with tissue section examination may give us a comprehensive analysis of biliary tract diseases. Herein, we discuss genetic cholangiopathy of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD), mainly using a polycystic kidney (PCK) rat, an animal model of ARPKD. The hepatobiliary lesions in ARPKD patients (Caroli's disease and congenital hepatic fibrosis) and in PCK rats are speculated to be related to mutations to polycystic kidney and hepatic disease 1 (PKHD1) which have been recently demonstrated, though the exact causal relation between these mutations and hepatobiliary pathology remain to be clarified. Recently we clarified that BECs of PCK rat showed increased cell proliferation followed by irregular dilatation of intrahepatic bile ducts. We also identified the essential involvement of the MEK5-ERK5 pathway in the abnormal proliferation of BECs in the PCK rat. The degradation of laminin and type IV collagen (basal membrane components of bile ducts) was closely related to the biliary dysgenesis and cystogenesis in the PCK rats. BECs also showed mesenchymal phenotype followed by progressive portal tract fibrosis, indicating TGF-β1 may be involved in this acquisition of mesenchymal phenotype. Detailed tissue culture correlation studies of ARPKD and PCK rats are mandatory to evaluate the pathogenesis of this genetic cholangiopathy. PMID:23097114

  13. Simultaneous determination of loganin, morroniside, catalpol and acteoside in normal and chronic kidney disease rat plasma by UPLC-MS for investigating the pharmacokinetics of Rehmannia glutinosa and Cornus officinalis Sieb drug pair extract.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Min; Tao, Jinhua; Qian, Dawei; Liu, Pei; Shang, Er-xin; Jiang, Shu; Guo, Jianming; Su, Shu-lan; Duan, Jin-ao; Du, Leyue

    2016-01-15

    A sensitive and rapid method for determination of loganin, morroniside, catalpol and acteoside in rat plasma after oral administration of Rehmannia glutinosa Libosch and Cornus officinalis Sieb drug pair based on ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS). Chromatographic separation was achieved using an Acquity UPLC BEH C18 column (100mm×2.1mm, 1.7μm) at a flow rate of 0.4mL/min, using gradient mode containing 0.1% formic acid in water and acetonitrile were used as the mobile phase A and B. Loganin, morroniside, catalpol, acteoside and the internal standard (chloramphenicol) were detected by selected reaction monitoring in the negative ion mode with the mass transition of m/z 451.0→179.0 (morroniside), m/z 435.0→227.0 (loganin), m/z 407.1→199.1 (catalpol), m/z 623.2→161.0 (acteoside) and m/z 320.8→151.9 (chloramphenicol), respectively. All calibration curves showed good linearity (r>0.991). The precision was evaluated by intra-day and inter-day assays and the RSD% were all within 9.58%. The recovery ranged from 67.62 to 80.14%. The method was successfully applied to pharmacokinetic study of the analytes in normal and doxorubicin-induced chronic kidney disease rat plasma. PMID:26720701

  14. Pirfenidone Is Renoprotective in Diabetic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yanqing; Ravasi, Timothy; McGowan, Tracy A.; Toh, Irene; Dunn, Stephen R.; Okada, Shinichi; Shaw, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Although several interventions slow the progression of diabetic nephropathy, current therapies do not halt progression completely. Recent preclinical studies suggested that pirfenidone (PFD) prevents fibrosis in various diseases, but the mechanisms underlying its antifibrotic action are incompletely understood. Here, we evaluated the role of PFD in regulation of the extracellular matrix. In mouse mesangial cells, PFD decreased TGF-β promoter activity, reduced TGF-β protein secretion, and inhibited TGF-β–induced Smad2-phosphorylation, 3TP-lux promoter activity, and generation of reactive oxygen species. To explore the therapeutic potential of PFD, we administered PFD to 17-wk-old db/db mice for 4 wk. PFD treatment significantly reduced mesangial matrix expansion and expression of renal matrix genes but did not affect albuminuria. Using liquid chromatography with subsequent electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry, we identified 21 proteins unique to PFD-treated diabetic kidneys. Analysis of gene ontology and protein–protein interactions of these proteins suggested that PFD may regulate RNA processing. Immunoblotting demonstrated that PFD promotes dosage-dependent dephosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor, potentially inhibiting translation of mRNA. In conclusion, PFD is renoprotective in diabetic kidney disease and may exert its antifibrotic effects, in part, via inhibiting RNA processing. PMID:19578007

  15. Central blood pressure and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Yoichi; Kanno, Yoshihiko; Takenaka, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we focused on the relationship between central blood pressure and chronic kidney diseases (CKD). Wave reflection is a major mechanism that determines central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Recent medical technology advances have enabled non-invasive central blood pressure measurements. Clinical trials have demonstrated that compared with brachial blood pressure, central blood pressure is a stronger risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) and renal diseases. CKD is characterized by a diminished renal autoregulatory ability, an augmented direct transmission of systemic blood pressure to glomeruli, and an increase in proteinuria. Any elevation in central blood pressure accelerates CKD progression. In the kidney, interstitial inflammation induces oxidative stress to handle proteinuria. Oxidative stress facilitates atherogenesis, increases arterial stiffness and central blood pressure, and worsens the CV prognosis in patients with CKD. A vicious cycle exists between CKD and central blood pressure. To stop this cycle, vasodilator antihypertensive drugs and statins can reduce central blood pressure and oxidative stress. Even in early-stage CKD, mineral and bone disorders (MBD) may develop. MBD promotes oxidative stress, arteriosclerosis, and elevated central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Early intervention or prevention seems necessary to maintain vascular health in patients with CKD. PMID:26788468

  16. Schistosomiasis-associated kidney disease: A review

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Geraldo Bezerra; Duarte, Daniella Bezerra; Barros, Elvino José Guardão; Daher, Elizabeth De Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease caused by organisms from the genus Schistosoma. The disease is endemic in tropical areas, where there are currently millions of people living in areas with transmission risk. Schistosomiasis-associated kidney disease is not frequently described in literature. The disease has a chronic evolution, with variable severity. Glomerulonephritis is described in 10-12% in autopsy studies. Proteinuria is reported in 20% of patients with S. mansoni infection. Schistosomal glomerulopathy generally occur in young patients, male, with hepato-splenomegaly. The glomerular lesion in schistosomiasis has an immunological nature. Antigens from the parasite seem to be related to glomerulopathy and have been found in the sera of humans and animals infected by the S. mansoni. Vesical involvement is common in the infection by S. haematobium, a parasitic disease prevalent in African countries. In the S. haematobium infection, hematuria and dysuria can be observed due to inflammation and ulceration in the bladder mucosa, generaly occuring 3 to 4 months after primary infection. Specific antiparasitic treatment is indicated to all patients infected by Schistosoma. There are 2 drugs available for treatment, praziquantel and oxamniquine. We revise the general aspects of the disease and describe the features of renal involvement in schistosomiasis.

  17. Vaccination against bacterial kidney disease: Chapter 22

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, Diane G.; Wiens, Gregory D.; Hammell, K. Larry; Rhodes, Linda D.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD) of salmonid fishes, caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum, has been recognized as a serious disease in salmonid fishes since the 1930s. This chapter discusses the occurrence and significance, etiology, and pathogenesis of BKD. It then describes the different vaccination procedures and the effects and side-effects of vaccination. Despite years of research, however, only a single vaccine has been licensed for prevention of BKD, and has demonstrated variable efficacy. Therefore, in addition to a presentation of the current status of BKD vaccination, a discussion of potential future directions for BKD vaccine development is included in the chapter. This discussion is focused on the unique characteristics of R. salmoninarum and its biology, as well as aspects of the salmonid immune system that might be explored specifically to develop more effective vaccines for BKD prevention.

  18. Sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Maung, Stephanie C; El Sara, Ammar; Chapman, Cherylle; Cohen, Danielle; Cukor, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Sleep disorders have a profound and well-documented impact on overall health and quality of life in the general population. In patients with chronic disease, sleep disorders are more prevalent, with an additional morbidity and mortality burden. The complex and dynamic relationship between sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease (CKD) remain relatively little investigated. This article presents an overview of sleep disorders in patients with CKD, with emphasis on relevant pathophysiologic underpinnings and clinical presentations. Evidence-based interventions will be discussed, in the context of individual sleep disorders, namely sleep apnea, insomnia, restless leg syndrome and excessive daytime sleepiness. Limitations of the current knowledge as well as future research directions will be highlighted, with a final discussion of different conceptual frameworks of the relationship between sleep disorders and CKD. PMID:27152260

  19. Mass spectrometry in Chronic Kidney Disease research

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Proteomics has evolved into an invaluable tool for biomedical research and for research on renal diseases. A central player in the proteomic revolution is the mass spectrometer and its application to analyze biological samples. Our need to understand both the identity of proteins and their abundance has led to improvements in mass spectrometers and their ability to analyze complex tryptic peptide mixtures with high sensitivity and high mass accuracy in a high throughput fashion (such as the LTQ-Orbitrap). It should not be surprising that this occurred coincident with dramatic improvements in our understanding chronic kidney disease (CKD), the mechanisms through which CKD progresses and the development of candidate CKD biomarkers. This review attempts to present a basic framework for the operational components of mass spectrometers, basic insight into how they are used in renal research and a discussion of CKD research that was driven by mass spectrometry. PMID:21044768

  20. Sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Maung, Stephanie C; El Sara, Ammar; Chapman, Cherylle; Cohen, Danielle; Cukor, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disorders have a profound and well-documented impact on overall health and quality of life in the general population. In patients with chronic disease, sleep disorders are more prevalent, with an additional morbidity and mortality burden. The complex and dynamic relationship between sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease (CKD) remain relatively little investigated. This article presents an overview of sleep disorders in patients with CKD, with emphasis on relevant pathophysiologic underpinnings and clinical presentations. Evidence-based interventions will be discussed, in the context of individual sleep disorders, namely sleep apnea, insomnia, restless leg syndrome and excessive daytime sleepiness. Limitations of the current knowledge as well as future research directions will be highlighted, with a final discussion of different conceptual frameworks of the relationship between sleep disorders and CKD. PMID:27152260

  1. Report of six kidney disease-associated Castleman's disease cases.

    PubMed

    Sui, Yanxia; Zhao, Dongli

    2015-12-01

    Castleman's disease (CD) is an uncommon, benign, non-neoplastic, lymphoproliferative disease of uncertain etiology. Here, we report 6 cases of kidney disease-associated CD in China. All patients exhibited multicentric CD (MCD) with involvement of the mediastinum, neck, bilateral axillary, and bilateral inguinal regions. Clinical manifestations included fever, fatigue, edema, and swollen lymph nodes. Laboratory examinations of all 6 patients found proteinuria or renal insufficiency. Two of the patients were diagnosed with hyaline vascular type MCD, and 4 patients were diagnosed with plasma cell type CD. The case 1 and case 4 patients had mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis, case 3 had type I membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, case 2 and case 5 had interstitial nephritis, and case 6 had AA type amyloidosis nephropathy. Three patients were treated with prednisone plus cyclophosphamide, 1 patient received COP therapy (cyclophosphamide, vincristine and prednisone), and 2 patients received COP therapy supplemented by small doses of radiation therapy delivered to local lymph nodes. In all cases, the clinical manifestations of MCD, including fever, fatigue, edema, swollen lymph nodes, and proteinuria, were alleviated or abolished by treatment. One patient responded to treatment with complete MCD remission, and another 4 patients survived. However, 1 patient died due to renal failure. In conclusion, common diagnosis and treatment techniques are suitable for kidney disease-associated CD. However, treatment efficacy might be difficult to predict, and some cases may have poor prognosis with this treatment strategy. Therefore, additional studies investigating kidney disease-associated CD and treatment outcomes in larger patient populations are needed. PMID:26445003

  2. Chronic kidney disease in pregnancy: Maternal and fetal outcomes and progression of kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Wolski, Penny; Callaway, Leonie K; Barrett, Helen L; Fagermo, Narelle; Lust, Karin; Shakhovskoy, Rebekah E

    2015-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of Australian data regarding renal disease in pregnancy. We undertook a retrospective cohort study at a tertiary institution to examine the impact of renal disease on pregnancy outcomes and the effect of pregnancy on disease progression. Methods A total of 55 pregnancies of patients with renal disease admitted from 2003 to 2010 to the Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital were analysed. Pre-conception variables, fetal/delivery and maternal outcomes were analysed in this group and in a control group of women with normal kidney function pre-pregnancy. Results Of the 55 pregnancies, 71% experienced pre-term delivery, 38% had intra-uterine growth restriction and 62% required caesarean section. Of all, 60% of neonates required neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission and six perinatal deaths occurred. Of all, 67% of women suffered preeclampsia, 47% anaemia and 3 patients required dialysis in pregnancy. Postpartum deterioration of renal function occurred in patients with pre-conception chronic kidney disease stage 3–5. Conclusions Chronic kidney disease of all stages is a risk factor for adverse pregnancy outcomes. In a tertiary institution however, there is a high rate of successful pregnancy (84%).

  3. Relationship between ultrasonographically determined kidney volume and progression of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Vegar Zubović, Sandra; Kristić, Spomenka; Sefić Pašić, Irmina

    2016-08-01

    Aim To investigate a correlation between calculated creatinine clearance as a measure of kidney's functional abilities and ultrasonographically determined kidney volume, which represents actual size of the kidney, in fact residual renal mass in chronic kidney disease, in order to determine possibilities of ultrasound as a diagnostic method in diagnosing and follow up of chronic renal disease. Methods Prospective study included 150 patients with registered demographic and anthropometric data, and also with relevant laboratory tests of renal function. Longitudinal diameter, thickness and width of the kidney and renal volume calculated according to the Dinkel's formula were measured by ultrasound. A correlation between the measured volume of the kidneys and calculated creatinine clearance was done by the Spearman method, with statistical significance of p<0.05. Results Statistically significant correlation between the estimated creatinine clearance values and the average of the calculated values of kidney volume was found (p<0.01). Average value of the kidneys' volume showed a linear decrease with the progression of chronic kidney disease: the kidney volume in the control healthy group was 171.7 ± 32.6 mL (95.22- 229.59 mL), and in the subjects classified in stage IV it was 74.7 ± 24.6 mL (43.22-165.65 mL). Conclusion Calculated volume of kidney well correlated with creatinine clearance as a measure of functional ability of the kidneys and with the stage of chronic renal disease. It can be used in clinical practice for monitoring of chronic kidney disease in conjunction with other clinical and laboratory parameters. PMID:27452323

  4. Systemic and renal lipids in kidney disease development and progression.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Patricia; Ducasa, Gloria Michelle; Fornoni, Alessia

    2016-03-15

    Altered lipid metabolism characterizes proteinuria and chronic kidney diseases. While it is thought that dyslipidemia is a consequence of kidney disease, a large body of clinical and experimental studies support that altered lipid metabolism may contribute to the pathogenesis and progression of kidney disease. In fact, accumulation of renal lipids has been observed in several conditions of genetic and nongenetic origins, linking local fat to the pathogenesis of kidney disease. Statins, which target cholesterol synthesis, have not been proven beneficial to slow the progression of chronic kidney disease. Therefore, other therapeutic strategies to reduce cholesterol accumulation in peripheral organs, such as the kidney, warrant further investigation. Recent advances in the understanding of the biology of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) have revealed that functional HDL, rather than total HDL per se, may protect from both cardiovascular and kidney diseases, strongly supporting a role for altered cholesterol efflux in the pathogenesis of kidney disease. Although the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for lipid-induced renal damage have yet to be uncovered, several studies suggest novel mechanisms by which cholesterol, free fatty acids, and sphingolipids may affect glomerular and tubular cell function. This review will focus on the clinical and experimental evidence supporting a causative role of lipids in the pathogenesis of proteinuria and kidney disease, with a primary focus on podocytes. PMID:26697982

  5. Homoarginine and Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease: Results from the Mild to Moderate Kidney Disease Study

    PubMed Central

    Drechsler, Christiane; Kollerits, Barbara; Meinitzer, Andreas; März, Winfried; Ritz, Eberhard; König, Paul; Neyer, Ulrich; Pilz, Stefan; Wanner, Christoph; Kronenberg, Florian

    2013-01-01

    Background Homoarginine is an amino acid derivative mainly synthesized in the kidney. It is suggested to increase nitric oxide availability, enhance endothelial function and to protect against cardiovascular diseases. We aimed to investigate the relation between homoarginine, kidney function and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods We measured plasma homoarginine concentrations in baseline samples of the Mild to Moderate Kidney Disease (MMKD) Study, a prospective cohort study of 227 patients with CKD in Europe. Homoarginine concentrations were available in 182 of the baseline samples and in 139 of the prospectively-followed patients. We correlated homoarginine concentrations to parameters of kidney function. The association between homoarginine and progression of CKD was assessed during a follow-up of up to seven years (median 4.45 years, interquartile range 2.54–5.19) using Cox regression analysis. Progression of CKD was defined as doubling of baseline serum creatinine and/or end-stage renal disease. Results Study participants were at baseline on average 47±13 years old and 65% were male. Mean±standard deviation of homoarginine concentrations were 2.5±1.1 µmol/L and concentrations were incrementally lower at lower levels of GFR with mean concentrations of 2.90±1.02 µmol/L (GFR>90 ml/min), 2.64±1.06 µmol/L (GFR 60–90 ml/min), 2.52±1.24 µmol/L (GFR 30–60 ml/min) and 2.05±0.78 µmol/L (GFR<30 ml/min), respectively (p = 0.002). The age- and sex-adjusted risk to reach the renal endpoint was significantly higher by 62% with each decrease by one standard deviation (1.1 µmol/L) of homoarginine (HR 1.62, 95% CI 1.16–2.27, p = 0.005). This association was independent of proteinuria (HR 1.56, 95% CI 1.11–2.20, p = 0.01), and was slightly attenuated when adjusting for GFR (HR 1.40 (95% CI 0.98–1.98, p = 0.06). Conclusions Homoarginine concentrations are directly correlated with kidney function and are significantly

  6. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Kidneys' Structural Changes in End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) are the most important manifestations of end-stage kidneys' structural changes. ACKD is caused by kidney damage or scarring and it is characterized by the presence of small, multiple cortical and medullary cysts filled with a fluid similar to preurine. ACKD prevalence varies according to predialysis and dialysis age and its pathogenesis is unknown, although it is stated that progressive destruction of renal tissue induces hypertrophy/compensatory hyperplasia of residual nephrons and may trigger the degenerative process. ACKD is almost asymptomatic, but it can lead to several complications (bleeding, rupture, infections, RCC). Ultrasound (US) is the first level imaging technique in ACKD, because of its sensitivity and reliability. The most serious complication of ACKD is RCC, which is stimulated by the same growth factors and proto-oncogenes that lead to the genesis of cysts. Two different histological types of RCC have been identified: (1) RCC associated with ACKD and (2) papillary renal clear cell carcinoma. Tumors in end-stage kidneys are mainly small, multifocal and bilateral, with a papillary structure and a low degree of malignancy. At US, RCC appears as a small inhomogeneous nodule (<3 cm), clearly outlined from the renal profile and hypoechoic if compared with sclerotic parenchyma. In some cases, tumor appears as a homogeneous and hyperechoic multifocal mass. The most specific US sign of a small tumor in end-stage kidney is the important arterial vascularization, in contrast with renal parenchymal vascular sclerosis. PMID:27169876

  7. 5/6th Nephrectomy in Combination with High Salt Diet and Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition to Induce Chronic Kidney Disease in the Lewis Rat

    PubMed Central

    van Koppen, Arianne; Verhaar, Marianne C.; Bongartz, Lennart G.; Joles, Jaap A.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a global problem. Slowing CKD progression is a major health priority. Since CKD is characterized by complex derangements of homeostasis, integrative animal models are necessary to study development and progression of CKD. To study development of CKD and novel therapeutic interventions in CKD, we use the 5/6th nephrectomy ablation model, a well known experimental model of progressive renal disease, resembling several aspects of human CKD. The gross reduction in renal mass causes progressive glomerular and tubulo-interstitial injury, loss of remnant nephrons and development of systemic and glomerular hypertension. It is also associated with progressive intrarenal capillary loss, inflammation and glomerulosclerosis. Risk factors for CKD invariably impact on endothelial function. To mimic this, we combine removal of 5/6th of renal mass with nitric oxide (NO) depletion and a high salt diet. After arrival and acclimatization, animals receive a NO synthase inhibitor (NG-nitro-L-Arginine) (L-NNA) supplemented to drinking water (20 mg/L) for a period of 4 weeks, followed by right sided uninephrectomy. One week later, a subtotal nephrectomy (SNX) is performed on the left side. After SNX, animals are allowed to recover for two days followed by LNNA in drinking water (20 mg/L) for a further period of 4 weeks. A high salt diet (6%), supplemented in ground chow (see time line Figure 1), is continued throughout the experiment. Progression of renal failure is followed over time by measuring plasma urea, systolic blood pressure and proteinuria. By six weeks after SNX, renal failure has developed. Renal function is measured using 'gold standard' inulin and para-amino hippuric acid (PAH) clearance technology. This model of CKD is characterized by a reduction in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and effective renal plasma flow (ERPF), hypertension (systolic blood pressure>150 mmHg), proteinuria (> 50 mg/24 hr) and mild uremia (>10 mM). Histological

  8. 5/6th nephrectomy in combination with high salt diet and nitric oxide synthase inhibition to induce chronic kidney disease in the Lewis rat.

    PubMed

    van Koppen, Arianne; Verhaar, Marianne C; Bongartz, Lennart G; Joles, Jaap A

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a global problem. Slowing CKD progression is a major health priority. Since CKD is characterized by complex derangements of homeostasis, integrative animal models are necessary to study development and progression of CKD. To study development of CKD and novel therapeutic interventions in CKD, we use the 5/6th nephrectomy ablation model, a well known experimental model of progressive renal disease, resembling several aspects of human CKD. The gross reduction in renal mass causes progressive glomerular and tubulo-interstitial injury, loss of remnant nephrons and development of systemic and glomerular hypertension. It is also associated with progressive intrarenal capillary loss, inflammation and glomerulosclerosis. Risk factors for CKD invariably impact on endothelial function. To mimic this, we combine removal of 5/6th of renal mass with nitric oxide (NO) depletion and a high salt diet. After arrival and acclimatization, animals receive a NO synthase inhibitor (NG-nitro-L-Arginine) (L-NNA) supplemented to drinking water (20 mg/L) for a period of 4 weeks, followed by right sided uninephrectomy. One week later, a subtotal nephrectomy (SNX) is performed on the left side. After SNX, animals are allowed to recover for two days followed by LNNA in drinking water (20 mg/L) for a further period of 4 weeks. A high salt diet (6%), supplemented in ground chow (see time line Figure 1), is continued throughout the experiment. Progression of renal failure is followed over time by measuring plasma urea, systolic blood pressure and proteinuria. By six weeks after SNX, renal failure has developed. Renal function is measured using 'gold standard' inulin and para-amino hippuric acid (PAH) clearance technology. This model of CKD is characterized by a reduction in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and effective renal plasma flow (ERPF), hypertension (systolic blood pressure>150 mmHg), proteinuria (> 50 mg/24 hr) and mild uremia (>10 mM). Histological

  9. Kidney diseases in children - early diagnosis and prevention.

    PubMed

    Polenakovic, Momir; Gucev, Zoran; Tasic, Velibor

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric kidney diseases were in the focus of the World Kidney Day 2016. Macedonian pediatric nephrologists gave their contribution with public appearance in kindergartens, primary and secondary schools, with interactive lectures and discussion with the youngest about the kidney function, healthy life style and simple measures to prevent kidney and urinary tract diseases. Besides promotive appearance in the media, series of lectures were presented in front of the health professionals. The aim was to attract the attention of the professionals for early diagnosis and prevention of kidney disease. The action starts in utero, followed by early postnatal imaging and assessment, conservative treatment and in selected cases surgical treatment. The emphasis is on the multidisciplinary and comprehensive approach to children and adolescents with kidney diseases. PMID:27442411

  10. Rationale for early treatment of polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Grantham, Jared J

    2015-07-01

    In hereditary cystic disorders, renal injury begins with the formation of the first cyst. Renal injury may manifest as large kidneys, abdominal pain, hypertension and hematuria in children and young adults with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). In autosomal recessive PKD (ARPKD) and ADPKD, cysts form primarily in collecting ducts and expand progressively. Collecting duct cysts that block urine flow have the potential to block urine formation in large numbers of upstream nephrons. In an ARPKD rat congenitally lacking vasopressin, only a few cysts developed until exogenous arginine vasopressin (AVP) was administered. AVP elevates cyclic AMP in vulnerable tubule cells to stimulate mitogenesis and fluid secretion, thereby causing cysts to form and enlarge indefinitely. The administration of an AVP-V2 receptor inhibitor or the consumption of sufficient water to persistently lower plasma AVP levels will ameliorate disease progression. Renal volume measurements provide the most reliable way to forecast long-term outcome in individual children and adult patients with ADPKD. Many drugs that have demonstrated efficacy in small clinical trials, preclinical trials and cell-based studies are in the treatment pipeline. Counseling, regular exercise, limitation of dietary calories, salt, protein and fat, increased fluid intake throughout the day and treatment of hypertension are components of a rational treatment program that can be offered at an early age to those with, or at risk for developing PKD. PMID:25022529

  11. Phenotype standardization for drug-induced kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Ravindra L; Awdishu, Linda; Davenport, Andrew; Murray, Patrick T; Macedo, Etienne; Cerda, Jorge; Chakaravarthi, Raj; Holden, Arthur L; Goldstein, Stuart L

    2015-08-01

    Drug-induced kidney disease is a frequent cause of renal dysfunction; however, there are no standards to identify and characterize the spectrum of these disorders. We convened a panel of international, adult and pediatric, nephrologists and pharmacists to develop standardized phenotypes for drug-induced kidney disease as part of the phenotype standardization project initiated by the International Serious Adverse Events Consortium. We propose four phenotypes of drug-induced kidney disease based on clinical presentation: acute kidney injury, glomerular, tubular, and nephrolithiasis, along with the primary and secondary clinical criteria to support the phenotype definition, and a time course based on the KDIGO/AKIN definitions of acute kidney injury, acute kidney disease, and chronic kidney disease. Establishing causality in drug-induced kidney disease is challenging and requires knowledge of the biological plausibility for the specific drug, mechanism of injury, time course, and assessment of competing risk factors. These phenotypes provide a consistent framework for clinicians, investigators, industry, and regulatory agencies to evaluate drug nephrotoxicity across various settings. We believe that this is the first step to recognizing drug-induced kidney disease and developing strategies to prevent and manage this condition. PMID:25853333

  12. A high affinity kidney targeting by chitobionic acid-conjugated polysorbitol gene transporter alleviates unilateral ureteral obstruction in rats.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Kim, Sanghwa; Firdous, Jannatul; Lee, Ah-Young; Hong, Seong-Ho; Seo, Min Kyeong; Park, Tae-Eun; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Chae, Chanhee; Cho, Chong-Su; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2016-09-01

    Aside from kidney transplantation - a procedure which is exceedingly dependent on donor-match and availability leading to excessive costs - there are currently no permanent treatments available which reverse kidney injury and failure. However, kidney-specific targeted gene therapy has outstanding potential to treat kidney-related dysfunction. Herein we report a novel kidney-specific targeted gene delivery system developed through the conjugation of chitobionic acid (CBA) to a polysorbitol gene transporter (PSGT) synthesized from sorbitol diacrylate and low molecular weight polyethylenimine (PEI) carrying hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) gene to alleviate unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) in rats. CBA-PSGT performed exceptionally well for targeted delivery of HGF to kidney tissues compared to its non-targeted counterparts (P < 0.001) after systemic tail-vein injection and significantly reduced the UUO symptoms, returning the UUO rats to a normal health status. The kidney-targeted CBA-PSGT-delivered HGF also strikingly reduced various pathologic and molecular markers in vivo such as the level of collagens (type I and II), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, and the expressions of ICAM-1, TIMP-1 and α-SMA which play a critical role in obstructive kidney functions. Therefore, CBA-PSGT should be further investigated because of its potential to alleviate UUO and kidney-related diseases using high affinity kidney targeting. PMID:27318934

  13. [Treatment of hypertension in chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Palomo-Piñón, Silvia; Rosas-Peralta, Martín; Paniagua-Sierra, José Ramón

    2016-01-01

    Systemic arterial hypertension (SAH) is a progressive cardiovascular syndrome caused by complex and interrelated causes. The early markers of this syndrome are often present even before the blood pressure (BP) elevation; therefore, SAH cannot only be classified by the BP elevation threshold, which sometimes is discreet. Its progression is strongly associated with structural and functional cardiovascular abnormalities, which lead to end-organ damage (heart, kidney, brain, blood vessels and other organs), and cause premature morbidity and death. In this sense, the BP is only a biomarker of this cardiovascular syndrome, which is why it is more useful to consider individual BP patterns of the ill patient rather than a single BP threshold. The study and treatment of hypertension in chronic kidney disease (CKD) has made some progresses, especially in patients requiring dialysis. The use of non-invasive technology to register the BP has reconfigured health care of patients in regards to the diagnosis, circadian pattern, clinical surveillance, pharmacological prescription, prognosis, and risk of cardiovascular events (as well as mortality). The opportunity in the diagnosis and treatment means a delay in the onset of complications and, also, of dialysis. The blockade of the renin-aldotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), a regular monitoring of the dry weight of the population in dialysis, and non-pharmacological interventions to modify lifestyle are the maneuvers with greater impact on the morbidity and mortality of patients. PMID:27284847

  14. APOL1 Kidney Risk Alleles: Population Genetics and Disease Associations

    PubMed Central

    Limou, Sophie; Nelson, George W.; Kopp, Jeffrey B.; Winkler, Cheryl A.

    2014-01-01

    APOL1 kidney disease is a unique case in the field of the genetics of common disease: 2 variants (termed G1 and G2) with high population frequency have been repeatedly associated with nondiabetic CKDs, with very strong effect size (odds ratios 3–29) in populations of sub-Saharan African descent. This review provides an update on the spectrum of APOL1 kidney disease and on the worldwide distribution of these kidney risk variants. We also summarize the proper way to run a recessive analysis on joint and independent effects of APOL1 G1 and G2 kidney risk variants. PMID:25168832

  15. Neprilysin inhibition in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Judge, Parminder; Haynes, Richard; Landray, Martin J.; Baigent, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Despite current practice, patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at increased risk of progression to end-stage renal disease and cardiovascular events. Neprilysin inhibition (NEPi) is a new therapeutic strategy with potential to improve outcomes for patients with CKD. NEPi enhances the activity of natriuretic peptide systems leading to natriuresis, diuresis and inhibition of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS), which could act as a potentially beneficial counter-regulatory system in states of RAS activation such as chronic heart failure (HF) and CKD. Early NEPi drugs were combined with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors but were associated with unacceptable rates of angioedema and, therefore, withdrawn. However, one such agent (omapatrilat) showed promise of NEP/RAS inhibition in treating CKD in animal models, producing greater reductions in proteinuria, glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis compared with isolated RAS inhibition. A new class of drug called angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor (ARNi) has been developed. One such drug, LCZ696, has shown substantial benefits in trials in hypertension and HF. In CKD, HF is common due to a range of mechanisms including hypertension and structural heart disease (including left ventricular hypertrophy), suggesting that ARNi could benefit patients with CKD by both retarding the progression of CKD (hence delaying the need for renal replacement therapy) and reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease. LCZ696 is now being studied in a CKD population. PMID:25140014

  16. Neprilysin inhibition in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Judge, Parminder; Haynes, Richard; Landray, Martin J; Baigent, Colin

    2015-05-01

    Despite current practice, patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at increased risk of progression to end-stage renal disease and cardiovascular events. Neprilysin inhibition (NEPi) is a new therapeutic strategy with potential to improve outcomes for patients with CKD. NEPi enhances the activity of natriuretic peptide systems leading to natriuresis, diuresis and inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), which could act as a potentially beneficial counter-regulatory system in states of RAS activation such as chronic heart failure (HF) and CKD. Early NEPi drugs were combined with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors but were associated with unacceptable rates of angioedema and, therefore, withdrawn. However, one such agent (omapatrilat) showed promise of NEP/RAS inhibition in treating CKD in animal models, producing greater reductions in proteinuria, glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis compared with isolated RAS inhibition. A new class of drug called angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor (ARNi) has been developed. One such drug, LCZ696, has shown substantial benefits in trials in hypertension and HF. In CKD, HF is common due to a range of mechanisms including hypertension and structural heart disease (including left ventricular hypertrophy), suggesting that ARNi could benefit patients with CKD by both retarding the progression of CKD (hence delaying the need for renal replacement therapy) and reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease. LCZ696 is now being studied in a CKD population. PMID:25140014

  17. Risk Factors for Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... for answers to your questions about kidney function, dialysis, keeping a job, Medicare, exercise, and more. With ... touch of the sugar". About 44% of new dialysis patients have diabetes. What you can do: Kidney ...

  18. Neural regulation of the kidney function in rats with cisplatin induced renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Goulding, Niamh E.; Johns, Edward J.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is often associated with a disturbed cardiovascular homeostasis. This investigation explored the role of the renal innervation in mediating deranged baroreflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and renal excretory function in cisplatin-induced renal failure. Methods: Rats were either intact or bilaterally renally denervated 4 days prior to receiving cisplatin (5 mg/kg i.p.) and entered a chronic metabolic study for 8 days. At day 8, other groups of rats were prepared for acute measurement of RSNA or renal function with either intact or denervated kidneys. Results: Following the cisplatin challenge, creatinine clearance was 50% lower while fractional sodium excretion and renal cortical and medullary TGF-β1 concentrations were 3–4 fold higher in both intact and renally denervated rats compared to control rats. In cisplatin-treated rats, the maximal gain of the high-pressure baroreflex curve was only 20% that of control rats, but following renal denervation not different from that of renally denervated control rats. Volume expansion reduced RSNA by 50% in control and in cisplatin-treated rats but only following bilateral renal denervation. The volume expansion mediated natriuresis/diuresis was absent in the cisplatin-treated rats but was normalized following renal denervation. Conclusions: Cisplatin-induced renal injury impaired renal function and caused a sympatho-excitation with blunting of high and low pressure baroreflex regulation of RSNA, which was dependent on the renal innervation. It is suggested that in man with CKD there is a dysregulation of the neural control of the kidney mediated by its sensory innervation. PMID:26175693

  19. Hyperuricemia-induced inflammasome and kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Isaka, Yoshitaka; Takabatake, Yoshitsugu; Takahashi, Atsushi; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Yoshimori, Tamotsu

    2016-06-01

    Classically, urate nephropathy has been postulated to cause kidney disease by depositing intraluminal crystal in the collecting duct. Recently, molecular mechanisms of inflammasome have been investigated. Urate-induced inflammasome pathway is comprised of urate crystal uptake into intracellular lysosomes and subsequent lysosomal rupture with mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, which activates the NLRP3 inflammasome. Against the lysosomal rupture and mitochondrial ROS production, autophagy acts to protect proximal tubular cells by isolating them from expanding the inflammation. In addition, increased cellular urate, directly or indirectly via xanthine oxidase-induced oxidative stress, may be associated with inflammasome. In addition to the traditional therapy against hyperuricemia, management of urate-induced inflammasome or augmentation of autophagy may offer the new effective therapies. PMID:25829326

  20. Insomnia in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Anett V; Novak, Marta; Bohra, Miqdad; Mucsi, Istvan

    2015-07-01

    Insomnia and poor self-perceived sleep are very common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Poor sleep is associated with fatigue, sleepiness, impaired daytime functioning, impaired health-related quality of life, and increased morbidity and mortality. Many illness- and treatment-related factors (metabolic changes, inflammation, altered sleep regulatory mechanisms, symptoms and complications of CKD, comorbid conditions, medications, and renal replacement therapies) may disturb sleep and contribute to the high prevalence of insomnia in this patient population. Accordingly, the approach to both diagnosing and treating this condition is quite complex. Although sleep-related problems are very important for patients with CKD, they largely are under-recognized and undertreated. Very few intervention trials provide an evidence base to support treatment decisions in this particular patient population. With this review we hope to increase awareness of insomnia among professionals involved in the management of patients with CKD and to provide guidance in recognizing and treating this important condition. PMID:26355254

  1. MicroRNAs and Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Noureddine, Lama; Hajarnis, Sachin; Patel, Vishal

    2013-01-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD), the most common genetic cause of chronic renal failure, is characterized by the presence of numerous fluid-filled cysts in renal parenchyma. Despite recent progress, no FDA-approved therapy is available to retard cyst growth. Here, we review current evidence implicating two groups of miRNAs – the miR-17~92 cluster and miR-200s - in the pathogenesis of PKD. We present a new hypothesis for cyst growth involving miRNAs and regulation of PKD gene dosage. We propose that manipulating miRNA function in an attempt to normalize PKD gene dosage represents a novel therapeutic strategy in PKD. PMID:25221607

  2. Nutrition for Early Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Center Medical Education Institute, Inc. (MEI) MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Nutrition for Early Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults Page Content On this page: ...

  3. Autoradiographic quantification of adrenergic receptors in rat kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Calianos, T. II; Muntz, K.H. )

    1990-07-01

    The adrenergic nervous system is active in kidney function, and the kidney has large numbers of adrenergic receptor subtypes. Because of the cellular complexity of the kidney, it is difficult to obtain direct assessments of adrenergic receptor binding characteristics over specific tissue compartments. Qualitative autoradiography allows the localization of adrenergic receptors over tissue types in the kidney, but quantitative autoradiography allows direct comparison of adrenergic receptor number over different cellular compartments. The purpose of this study was to obtain direct assessments of alpha 1, alpha 2, and beta adrenergic receptor numbers over different tissue compartments of the kidney using quantitative autoradiography. Sections of Sprague-Dawley rat kidney were incubated in several concentrations of 3H-dihydroalprenolol to label beta receptors, 3H-prazosin to label alpha 1 receptors and 3H-rauwolscine to label the alpha 2 receptors. Sections of rat heart incubated in 3H-dihydroalprenolol were included as standards. The sections were then prepared for receptor autoradiography. After processing, the grains were then quantified on an image analysis system, and binding curves constructed from the specific binding. In some animals, the proximal tubules were stained to localize the proximal convoluted tubules. Significant Scatchard analyses were obtained in the glomeruli with dihydroalprenolol (5.18 X 10(9) receptors/mm3) and with rauwolscine (2.48 X 10(9) receptors/mm3). Significant Scatchard analyses were obtained in the cortex with rauwolscine (9.47 X 10(9) receptors/mm3) and with prazosin (3.9 X 10(9)). In addition, specific binding was seen with rauwolscine and prazosin to the kidney arterioles.

  4. High Intensity Interval Training Favourably Affects Angiotensinogen mRNA Expression and Markers of Cardiorenal Health in a Rat Model of Early-Stage Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Patrick S.; Scanlan, Aaron T.; Dalbo, Vincent J.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of CKD-related complications stem from cardiovascular pathologies such as hypertension. To help reduce cardiovascular complications, aerobic exercise is often prescribed. Emerging evidence suggests high intensity interval training (HIIT) may be more beneficial than traditional aerobic exercise. However, appraisals of varying forms of aerobic exercise, along with descriptions of mechanisms responsible for health-related improvements, are lacking. This study examined the effects of 8 weeks of HIIT (85% VO2max), versus low intensity aerobic exercise (LIT; 45–50% VO2max) and sedentary behaviour (SED), in an animal model of early-stage CKD. Tissue-specific mRNA expression of RAAS-related genes and CKD-related clinical markers were examined. Compared to SED, HIIT resulted in increased plasma albumin (p = 0.001), reduced remnant kidney weight (p = 0.028), and reduced kidney weight-body weight ratios (p = 0.045). Compared to LIT, HIIT resulted in reduced Agt mRNA expression (p = 0.035), reduced plasma LDL (p = 0.001), triglycerides (p = 0.029), and total cholesterol (p = 0.002), increased plasma albumin (p = 0.047), reduced remnant kidney weight (p = 0.005), and reduced kidney weight-body weight ratios (p = 0.048). These results suggest HIIT is a more potent regulator of several markers that describe and influence health in CKD. PMID:26090382

  5. High Intensity Interval Training Favourably Affects Angiotensinogen mRNA Expression and Markers of Cardiorenal Health in a Rat Model of Early-Stage Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Patrick S; Scanlan, Aaron T; Dalbo, Vincent J

    2015-01-01

    The majority of CKD-related complications stem from cardiovascular pathologies such as hypertension. To help reduce cardiovascular complications, aerobic exercise is often prescribed. Emerging evidence suggests high intensity interval training (HIIT) may be more beneficial than traditional aerobic exercise. However, appraisals of varying forms of aerobic exercise, along with descriptions of mechanisms responsible for health-related improvements, are lacking. This study examined the effects of 8 weeks of HIIT (85% VO2max), versus low intensity aerobic exercise (LIT; 45-50% VO2max) and sedentary behaviour (SED), in an animal model of early-stage CKD. Tissue-specific mRNA expression of RAAS-related genes and CKD-related clinical markers were examined. Compared to SED, HIIT resulted in increased plasma albumin (p = 0.001), reduced remnant kidney weight (p = 0.028), and reduced kidney weight-body weight ratios (p = 0.045). Compared to LIT, HIIT resulted in reduced Agt mRNA expression (p = 0.035), reduced plasma LDL (p = 0.001), triglycerides (p = 0.029), and total cholesterol (p = 0.002), increased plasma albumin (p = 0.047), reduced remnant kidney weight (p = 0.005), and reduced kidney weight-body weight ratios (p = 0.048). These results suggest HIIT is a more potent regulator of several markers that describe and influence health in CKD. PMID:26090382

  6. Skin problems in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kuypers, Dirk R J

    2009-03-01

    Skin disorders associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) can markedly affect a patient's quality of life and can negatively impact their mental and physical health. Uremic pruritus, which is frequently encountered in patients with CKD, is considered to be an inflammatory systemic disease rather than a local skin disorder. Biomarkers of inflammation are increased in patients with uremic pruritus and an imbalance of the endogenous opioidergic system might be involved in the complex pathogenesis of the disease. Treatment options for uremic pruritus include emollients, topical capsaicin cream, ultraviolet B phototherapy, gabapentin, oral activated charcoal and nalfurafine, a kappa-opioid-receptor agonist. Calcific uremic arteriolopathy is triggered by an imbalance of promoters and inhibitors of vascular calcification, caused by the inflammatory changes that occur in uremia. Promising therapeutic strategies for calcific uremic arteriolopathy include bisphosphonates and intravenous sodium thiosulfate. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a devastating condition associated with the use of gadolinium-based contrast agents in patients with CKD. At present, no therapies are available for this complication. Preventive measures include use of iodine-based contrast agents, particularly in patients with CKD stage 4 and 5. If gadolinium contrast is necessary, administration of low volumes of the more stable macrocyclic ionic types of gadolinium-based contrast agent is advocated. Hemodialysis following gadolinium exposure might offer benefits but evidence is lacking. PMID:19190625

  7. Addressing Health Disparities in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ta-Chien; Fan, I.-Chun; Liu, Michael Shi-Yung; Su, Ming-Daw; Chiang, Po-Huang

    2014-01-01

    According to the official health statistics, Taiwan has the highest prevalence of end stage renal disease (ESRD) in the world. Each year, around 60,000 ESRD patients in Taiwan consume 6% of the national insurance budget for dialysis treatment. The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been climbing during 2008–2012. However, the spatial disparities and clustering of CKD at the public health level have rarely been discussed. The aims of this study are to explore the possible population level risk factors and identify any clusters of CKD, using the national health insurance database. The results show that the ESRD prevalence in females is higher than that in males. ESRD medical expenditure constitutes 87% of total CKD medical expenditure. Pre-CKD and pre-ESRD disease management might slow the progression from CKD to ESRD. After applying ordinary least-squares regression, the percentages of high education status and the elderly in the townships are positively correlated with CKD prevalence. Geographically weighted regression and Local Moran’s I are used for identifying the clusters in southern Taiwan. The findings can be important evidence for earlier and targeted community interventions and reducing the health disparities of CKD. PMID:25514144

  8. Kidney Disease and the Nexus of Chronic Kidney Disease and Acute Kidney Injury: The Role of Novel Biomarkers as Early and Accurate Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Yerramilli, Murthy; Farace, Giosi; Quinn, John; Yerramilli, Maha

    2016-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and acute kidney injury (AKI) are interconnected and the presence of one is a risk for the other. CKD is an important predictor of AKI after exposure to nephrotoxic drugs or major surgery, whereas persistent or repetitive injury could result in the progression of CKD. This brings new perspectives to the diagnosis and monitoring of kidney diseases highlighting the need for a panel of kidney-specific biomarkers that reflect functional as well as structural damage and recovery, predict potential risk and provide prognosis. This article discusses the kidney-specific biomarkers, symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA), clusterin, cystatin B, and inosine. PMID:27485279

  9. Recurrence of diabetic kidney disease in a type 1 diabetic patient after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nyumura, Izumi; Honda, Kazuho; Babazono, Tetsuya; Horita, Shigeru; Murakami, Toru; Fuchinoue, Shohei; Uchigata, Yasuko

    2015-07-01

    Post-transplant hyperglycaemia of diabetic patients may cause recurrent diabetic kidney disease (DKD) in kidney allografts. We report a patient with slowly progressive DKD with calcineurin inhibitor toxicity (CNI) toxicity after the kidney transplantation. A 28-year-old female with type 1 diabetes mellitus underwent successful kidney transplantation from her mother in April 2003, and the kidney graft survived for more than 10 years. She was treated with combined immunosuppressive therapy consisting of cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil. After transplantation, she continued to take insulin injection four times per day, but her glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) was above 10%. Protocol allograft kidney biopsies performed 5 and 10 years after transplantation revealed the recurrence of slowly progressive diabetic kidney disease. In addition, arteriolar hyalinosis partly associated with calcineurin inhibitor toxicity (CNI) was detected with progression. Post-transplant hyperglycaemia causes recurrent diabetic kidney disease (DKD) in kidney allografts, but its progression is usually slow. For long-term management, it is important to prevent the progression of the calcineurin inhibitor arteriolopathy, as well as maintain favourable glycaemic control. PMID:26031596

  10. Increases in kidney volume in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease can be detected within 6 months.

    PubMed

    Kistler, Andreas D; Poster, Diane; Krauer, Fabienne; Weishaupt, Dominik; Raina, Shagun; Senn, Oliver; Binet, Isabelle; Spanaus, Katharina; Wüthrich, Rudolf P; Serra, Andreas L

    2009-01-01

    Kidney volume growth is considered the best surrogate marker predicting the decline of renal function in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. To assess the therapeutic benefit of new drugs more rapidly, changes in kidney volume need to be determined over a short time interval. Here we measured renal volume changes by manual segmentation volumetry applied to magnetic resonance imaging scans obtained with an optimized T1-weighted acquisition protocol without gadolinium-based contrast agents. One hundred young patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and preserved renal function had a significant increase in total kidney volume by 2.71+/-4.82% in 6 months. Volume measurements were highly reproducible and accurate, as indicated by correlation coefficients of 1.000 for intra-observer and 0.996 for inter-observer agreement, with acceptable within-subject standard deviations. The change in renal volume correlated with baseline total kidney volume in all age subgroups. Total kidney volume positively correlated with male gender, hypertension, albuminuria and a history of macrohematuria but negatively with creatinine clearance. Albuminuria was associated with accelerated volume progression. Our study shows that increases in kidney volume can be reliably measured over a 6 month period in early autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease using unenhanced magnetic resonance imaging sequences. PMID:18971924

  11. Nitric Oxide Modulates Vascular Disease in the Remnant Kidney Model

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Duk-Hee; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Feng, Lili; Johnson, Richard J.

    2002-01-01

    A loss of the microvascular endothelium occurs in the remnant kidney model of renal disease and may play an important role in progression (Kang et al, J Am Soc Nephrol, 12:1434, 2001). Given that nitric oxide (NO) is a potent endothelial cell survival factor, we hypothesized that stimulating (with l-arginine) or blocking (with nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, (l-NAME)) NO synthesis could modulate the integrity of the microvasculature and hence affect progression of renal disease. Rats underwent 5/6 nephrectomy (RK) and then were randomized at 4 weeks to receive vehicle, l-NAME, or l-arginine for 4 weeks. Systolic blood pressure and renal function was measured, and tissues were collected at 8 weeks for histological and molecular analyses. The effect of modulation of NO on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) and mouse medullary thick ascending limb tubular epithelial cells (mTAL) was also studied. Inhibition of NO with l-NAME was associated with more rapid progression compared to RK alone, with worse blood pressure, proteinuria, renal function, glomerulosclerosis, and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. The injury was also associated with more glomerular and peritubular capillary endothelial cell loss in association with an impaired endothelial proliferative response. Interestingly, the preglomerular endothelium remained intact or was occasionally hyperplastic, and this was associated with a pronounced proliferation of the vascular SMCs with de novo expression of VEGF. Cell culture studies confirmed a divergent effect of NO inhibition on VEGF expression, with inhibition of VEGF synthesis in mTAL cells and stimulation of VEGF in vascular SMC. In contrast to the effects of NO inhibition, stimulation of NO with l-arginine had minimal effects in this rat model of progressive renal disease. These studies confirm that blockade of NO synthesis accelerates progression of renal disease in the remnant kidney model, and

  12. Definition and classification of chronic kidney disease: a position statement from Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO).

    PubMed

    Levey, Andrew S; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Tsukamoto, Yusuke; Levin, Adeera; Coresh, Josef; Rossert, Jerome; De Zeeuw, Dick; Hostetter, Thomas H; Lameire, Norbert; Eknoyan, Garabed

    2005-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem, with adverse outcomes of kidney failure, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and premature death. A simple definition and classification of kidney disease is necessary for international development and implementation of clinical practice guidelines. Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) conducted a survey and sponsored a controversies conference to (1) provide a clear understanding to both the nephrology and nonnephrology communities of the evidence base for the definition and classification recommended by Kidney Disease Quality Outcome Initiative (K/DOQI), (2) develop global consensus for the adoption of a simple definition and classification system, and (3) identify a collaborative research agenda and plan that would improve the evidence base and facilitate implementation of the definition and classification of CKD. The K/DOQI definition and classification were accepted, with clarifications. CKD is defined as kidney damage or glomerular filtration rate (GFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) for 3 months or more, irrespective of cause. Kidney damage in many kidney diseases can be ascertained by the presence of albuminuria, defined as albumin-to-creatinine ratio >30 mg/g in two of three spot urine specimens. GFR can be estimated from calibrated serum creatinine and estimating equations, such as the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) Study equation or the Cockcroft-Gault formula. Kidney disease severity is classified into five stages according to the level of GFR. Kidney disease treatment by dialysis and transplantation should be noted. Simple, uniform classifications of CKD by cause and by risks for kidney disease progression and CVD should be developed. PMID:15882252

  13. Heritability of Measures of Kidney Disease Among Zuni Indians: The Zuni Kidney Project

    PubMed Central

    MacCluer, Jean W.; Scavini, Marina; Shah, Vallabh O.; Cole, Shelley A.; Laston, Sandra L.; Voruganti, V. Saroja; Paine, Susan S.; Eaton, Alfred J.; Comuzzie, Anthony G.; Tentori, Francesca; Pathak, Dorothy R.; Bobelu, Arlene; Bobelu, Jeanette; Ghahate, Donica; Waikaniwa, Mildred; Zager, Philip G.

    2010-01-01

    Background The long-term goal of the GKDZI (Genetics of Kidney Disease in Zuni Indians) Study is to identify genes, environmental factors, and genetic-environmental interactions that modulate susceptibility to renal disease and intermediate phenotypes. Study Design A community-based participatory research approach was used to recruit family members of individuals with kidney disease. Setting & Participants The study was conducted in the Zuni Indians, a small endogamous tribe located in rural New Mexico. We recruited members of extended families, ascertained through a proband with kidney disease and at least 1 sibling with kidney disease. 821 participants were recruited, comprising 7,702 relative pairs. Predictor Outcomes & Measurements Urine albumin-creatinine ratio (UACR) and hematuria were determined in 3 urine samples and expressed as a true ratio. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was estimated using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) Study equation modified for American Indians. Probands were considered to have kidney disease if UACR was ≥0.2 in 2 or more of 3 spot urine samples or estimated GFR was decreased according to the CRIC (Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort) Study criteria. Results Kidney disease was identified in 192 participants (23.4%). There were significant heritabilities for estimated GFR, UACR, serum creatinine, serum urea nitrogen, and uric acid and a variety of phenotypes related to obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. There were significant genetic correlations of some kidney-related phenotypes with these other phenotypes. Limitations Limitations include absence of renal biopsy, possible misclassification bias, lack of direct GFR measurements, and failure to include all possible environmental interactions. Conclusions Many phenotypes related to kidney disease showed significant heritabilities in Zuni Indians, and there were significant genetic correlations with phenotypes related to obesity, diabetes, and

  14. Inhalation of mercury vapor can cause the toxic effects on rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Akgül, Nilgün; Altunkaynak, Berrin Zuhal; Altunkaynak, Muhammed Eyüp; Deniz, Ömür Gülsüm; Ünal, Deniz; Akgül, Hayati Murat

    2016-01-01

    Dental amalgam has been used in dentistry as a filling material. The filler comprises mercury (Hg). It is considered one of the most important and widespread environmental pollutants, which poses a serious potential threat for the humans and animals. However, mercury deposition affects the nervous, cardiovascular, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, and especially renal systems. In most animals' species and humans, the kidney is one of the main sites of deposition of mercury and target organ for its toxicity. In this study, the effects of mercury intake on kidney in rats were searched. For the this purpose; we used 24 adult female Wistar albino rats (200 g in weight) obtained from Experimental Research and Application Center of Atatürk University with ethical approval. Besides, they were placed into a specially designed glass cage. Along this experiment for 45 days, subjects were exposed to (1 mg/m(3)/day) mercury vapor. However, no application was used for the control subjects. At the end of the experiment, kidney samples were obtained from all subjects and processed for routine light microscopic level and stereological aspect were assessed. Finally, according to our results, mercury affects the histological features of the kidney. That means, the severe effects of mercury has been shown using stereological approach, which is one of the ideal quantitative methods in the current literature. In this study, it was detected that chronic exposure to mercury vapor may lead to renal damage and diseases in an experimental rat model. PMID:26888214

  15. Averting the Legacy of Kidney Disease-Focus on Childhood.

    PubMed

    Ingelfinger, Julie R; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Schaefer, Franz; On Behalf Of The World Kidney Day Steering Committee

    2016-01-01

    World Kidney Day 2016 focuses on kidney disease in childhood and the antecedents of adult kidney disease that can begin in earliest childhood. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in childhood differs from that in adults, as the largest diagnostic group among children includes congenital anomalies and inherited disorders, with glomerulopathies and kidney disease in the setting of diabetes being relatively uncommon. In addition, many children with acute kidney injury will ultimately develop sequelae that may lead to hypertension and CKD in later childhood or in adult life. Children born early or who are small-for date newborns have relatively increased risk for the development of CKD later in life. Persons with a high-risk birth and early childhood history should be watched closely in order to help detect early signs of kidney disease in time to provide effective prevention or treatment. Successful therapy is feasible for advanced CKD in childhood; there is evidence that children fare better than adults if they receive kidney replacement therapy, including dialysis and transplantation, while only a minority of children may require this ultimate intervention.  Since there are disparities in access to care, effort is needed so that those children with kidney disease, wherever they live, may be treated effectively, irrespective of their geographic or economic circumstances. Our hope is that World Kidney Day will inform the general public, policy makers and caregivers about the needs and possibilities surrounding kidney disease in childhood. "For in every adult there dwells the child that was, and in every child there lies the adult that will be."-John Connolly, The Book of Lost Things. PMID:27417242

  16. 76 FR 3147 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Fellowships in Digestive Diseases and Nutrition. Date: February... Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Lactation and...

  17. 78 FR 28859 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Notice of Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... and Kidney Diseases Initial Review Group; Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases B... Committee: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Initial Review Group;...

  18. 78 FR 9401 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-08

    ... Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; R24 Collaborative Interdisciplinary Team Science-3... Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; R24 Collaborative Interdisciplinary Team Science-8... Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; R24 Collaborative Interdisciplinary Team...

  19. Determination of boron distribution in rat's brain, kidney and liver.

    PubMed

    Pazirandeh, Ali; Jameie, Behnam; Zargar, Maysam

    2009-07-01

    To determine relative boron distribution in rat's brain, liver and kidney, a mixture of boric acid and borax, was used. After transcardial injection of the solution, the animals were sacrificed and the brain, kidney and liver were removed. The coronal sections of certain areas of the brain were prepared by freezing microtome. The slices were sandwiched within two pieces of CR-39. The samples were bombarded in a thermal neutron field of the TRR pneumatic facility. The alpha tracks are registered on CR-39 after being etched in NaOH. The boron distribution was determined by counting these alpha tracks CR-39 plastics. The distribution showed non-uniformity in brain, liver and kidney. PMID:19375929

  20. Bone Marrow and Kidney Transplant for Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease and Blood Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-28

    Chronic Kidney Disease; Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL); Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML); Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL); Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL); Hodgkin Disease; Multiple Myeloma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS); Aplastic Anemia; AL Amyloidosis; Diamond Blackfan Anemia; Myelofibrosis; Myeloproliferative Disease; Sickle Cell Anemia; Autoimmune Diseases; Thalassemia

  1. Chronic kidney disease and erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Etsu; Nishimatsu, Hiroaki; Oba, Shigeyoshi; Takahashi, Masao; Homma, Yukio

    2014-11-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common condition among male chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Its prevalence is estimated to be approximately 80% among these patients. It has been well established that the production of nitric oxide from the cavernous nerve and vascular endothelium and the subsequent production of cyclic GMP are critically important in initiating and maintaining erection. Factors affecting these pathways can induce ED. The etiology of ED in CKD patients is multifactorial. Factors including abnormalities in gonadal-pituitary system, disturbance in autonomic nervous system, endothelial dysfunction, anemia (and erythropoietin deficiency), secondary hyperparathyroidism, drugs, zinc deficiency, and psychological problems are implicated in the occurrence of ED. An improvement of general conditions is the first step of treatment. Sufficient dialysis and adequate nutritional intake are necessary. In addition, control of anemia and secondary hyperparathyroidism is required. Changes of drugs that potentially affect erectile function may be necessary. Further, zinc supplementation may be necessary when zinc deficiency is suspected. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5Is) are commonly used for treating ED in CKD patients, and their efficacy was confirmed by many studies. Testosterone replacement therapy in addition to PDE5Is may be useful, particularly for CKD patients with hypogonadism. Renal transplantation may restore erectile function. ED is an early marker of cardiovascular disease (CVD), which it frequently precedes; therefore, it is crucial to examine the presence of ED in CKD patients not only for the improvement of the quality of life but also for the prevention of CVD attack. PMID:25374815

  2. Limited health literacy in advanced kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Dominic M; Bradley, John A; Bradley, Clare; Draper, Heather; Johnson, Rachel; Metcalfe, Wendy; Oniscu, Gabriel; Robb, Matthew; Tomson, Charles; Watson, Chris; Ravanan, Rommel; Roderick, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Limited health literacy may reduce the ability of patients with advanced kidney disease to understand their disease and treatment and take part in shared decision making. In dialysis and transplant patients, limited health literacy has been associated with low socioeconomic status, comorbidity, and mortality. Here, we investigated the prevalence and associations of limited health literacy using data from the United Kingdom-wide Access to Transplantation and Transplant Outcome Measures (ATTOM) program. Incident dialysis, incident transplant, and transplant wait-listed patients ages 18 to 75 were recruited from 2011 to 2013 and data were collected from patient questionnaires and case notes. A score >2 in the Single-Item Literacy Screener was used to define limited health literacy. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify patient factors associated with limited health literacy. We studied 6842 patients, 2621 were incident dialysis, 1959 were wait-listed, and 2262 were incident transplant. Limited health literacy prevalence was 20%, 15%, and 12% in each group, respectively. Limited health literacy was independently associated with low socioeconomic status, poor English fluency, and comorbidity. However, transplant wait-listing, preemptive transplantation, and live-donor transplantation were associated with increasing health literacy. PMID:27521115

  3. The Chronic Kidney Disease - Colonic Axis.

    PubMed

    Pahl, Madeleine V; Vaziri, Nosratola D

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has long been known to cause significant gastrointestinal and colonic pathology. Recent advances in understanding of the role of colonic bacterial microbiome and its function and composition in health and disease have revealed previously unappreciated effects of CKD-associated colonic pathology on the development of uremic complications. CKD can result in profound changes in the microbiome composition and biosynthetic pattern, and the structure and function of the colon. Increases in bacteria that produce urease, uricase, p-cresol- and indole-forming enzymes and the depletion of bacteria that possess short chain fatty acid forming enzymes have been described in human and animal models. Disruption of the colonic epithelial tight junction in different animal models of CKD has been reported and is largely due to the conversion of luminal urea to ammonia by urease possessing bacteria. Together, these changes contribute to the pathogenesis of systemic inflammation and uremic toxicity by allowing the translocation of endotoxin and microbial fragments into the circulation. Additionally, colonic bacteria are the main source of several well-known pro-inflammatory uremic toxins such as indoxyl sulfate, P-cresol sulfate. This review is intended to provide an overview of the effects of CKD on the colonic microbiome and the intestinal epithelial barrier structure and function and their role in the pathogenesis the systemic inflammation and uremic toxicity. PMID:25855516

  4. Chronic kidney disease and erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Etsu; Nishimatsu, Hiroaki; Oba, Shigeyoshi; Takahashi, Masao; Homma, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common condition among male chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Its prevalence is estimated to be approximately 80% among these patients. It has been well established that the production of nitric oxide from the cavernous nerve and vascular endothelium and the subsequent production of cyclic GMP are critically important in initiating and maintaining erection. Factors affecting these pathways can induce ED. The etiology of ED in CKD patients is multifactorial. Factors including abnormalities in gonadal-pituitary system, disturbance in autonomic nervous system, endothelial dysfunction, anemia (and erythropoietin deficiency), secondary hyperparathyroidism, drugs, zinc deficiency, and psychological problems are implicated in the occurrence of ED. An improvement of general conditions is the first step of treatment. Sufficient dialysis and adequate nutritional intake are necessary. In addition, control of anemia and secondary hyperparathyroidism is required. Changes of drugs that potentially affect erectile function may be necessary. Further, zinc supplementation may be necessary when zinc deficiency is suspected. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5Is) are commonly used for treating ED in CKD patients, and their efficacy was confirmed by many studies. Testosterone replacement therapy in addition to PDE5Is may be useful, particularly for CKD patients with hypogonadism. Renal transplantation may restore erectile function. ED is an early marker of cardiovascular disease (CVD), which it frequently precedes; therefore, it is crucial to examine the presence of ED in CKD patients not only for the improvement of the quality of life but also for the prevention of CVD attack. PMID:25374815

  5. Pediatric kidney disease: tracking onset and improving clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bates, Carlton M; Charlton, Jennifer R; Ferris, Maria E; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Hoshizaki, Deborah K; Warady, Bradley A; Moxey-Mims, Marva M

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies confirm that much of adult kidney disease may have its origins in childhood, often as a result of abnormal or suboptimal fetal kidney development. Understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of CKD in children is rapidly evolving because of robust longitudinal clinical data, identification of monogenic mutations related to common causes of CKD, and improved knowledge of factors that influence the onset and progression of CKD. The Kidney Research National Dialogue, supported by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, asked the research and clinical communities to formulate and prioritize research objectives that would improve understanding of kidney function and diseases. This commentary outlines high-priority research objectives to assess factors associated with the predisposition to develop renal disease in children, and address the unique challenges in treating this population. PMID:24651076

  6. Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease: Antenatal Diagnosis and Histopathological Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Rajanna, Dayananda Kumar; Reddy, Anjani; Srinivas, Naren Satya; Aneja, Ankur

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) is one of the most common inheritable disease manifesting in infancy and childhood with a frequency of 1:6,000 to 1:55,000 births. The patient in her second trimester presented with a history of amenorrhea. Ultrasound examination revealed bilateral, enlarged, hyperechogenic kidneys, placentomegaly, and severe oligohydramnios. The pregnancy was terminated. An autopsy was performed on the fetus. Both the kidneys were found to be enlarged and the cut surface showed numerous cysts. The liver sections showed changes due to fibrosis. The final diagnosis of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease was made based on these findings. In this article, we correlate the ante-natal ultrasound and histopathological findings in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease. PMID:23814685

  7. Chronic kidney disease in an adult with propionic acidemia.

    PubMed

    Vernon, H J; Bagnasco, S; Hamosh, A; Sperati, C J

    2014-01-01

    We report an adult male with classic propionic acidemia (PA) who developed chronic kidney disease in the third decade of his life. This diagnosis was recognized by an increasing serum creatinine and confirmed by reduced glomerular filtration on a (99m)Tc-diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (DTPA) scan. Histopathology of the kidney showed moderate glomerulo- and tubulointerstitial fibrosis with very segmental mesangial IgA deposits. This is the second reported case of kidney disease in an individual with propionic acidemia possibly indicating that chronic kidney disease may be a late-stage complication of propionic acidemia. Additionally, this is the first description of the histopathology of kidney disease in an individual with propionic acidemia. As more cases emerge, the clinical course and spectrum of renal pathology in this disorder will be better defined. PMID:23756992

  8. Pentoxifylline in ischemia-induced acute kidney injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Alice S; Rodrigues, Luiz Erlon; Martinelli, Reinaldo

    2009-01-01

    Ischemia is an important cause of acute kidney injury (AKI). Pentoxifylline has been shown to improve tissue oxygenation and endothelial function and inhibit proinflammatory cytokine production. The aim of this study was to evaluate a possible renal protective effect of pentoxifylline against ischemia by measuring mitochondrial respiratory metabolism as an index of cell damage. Rats were submitted to right nephrectomy. The left kidney was submitted to ischemia by clamping the renal artery for 45 minutes. Immediately after release of the clamp, 1 mL of a solution containing 20 mg of pentoxifylline/mL was injected intravenously, while a control group received 1 mL of normal saline intravenously. Five minutes after the injection, the left kidney was removed, homogenized, and subjected to refrigerated differential centrifugation. Mitochondrial respiratory metabolism was measured polarographically. The mitochondria isolated from the kidneys of saline-treated rats had an endogenous respiration of 9.20 +/- 1.0 etamol O(2)/mg protein/min compared to 8.9 +/- 1.4 etamol O(2)/mg protein/min in the pentoxifylline-treated rats (p > 0.05). When stimulated by sodium succinate, the respiratory metabolism increased in a similar fashion in both groups of animals: 17.9 +/- 2.3 and 18.1 +/- 2.1 etamol O(2)/mg protein/min in the untreated and pentoxifylline-treated groups, respectively (p > 0.05). In the present study, pentoxifylline was not found to exert any protective effect on the kidney. It is possible that at the time of pentoxifylline administration, the mitochondria had already been damaged by the process of ischemia, and its effect may have been insufficient to reverse cell damage. PMID:19925292

  9. Impact of Lifestyle Modification on Diabetic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Onyenwenyi, Chijoke; Ricardo, Ana C

    2015-09-01

    Kidney disease is common in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus and is associated with adverse health outcomes, including progression to end-stage renal disease. In the general population, adherence to a healthy lifestyle is known to reduce the risk of cardiovascular events and death. Among individuals with diabetic kidney disease, modifications in lifestyle factors, including diet, physical activity, smoking habits, and body mass index, represent a promising cost-effective therapeutic adjunct to pharmacologic treatment of kidney disease incidence and progression. PMID:26194155

  10. Dietary fatty acids and kidney transplantation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kort, W J; de Keijzer, M H; Hekking-Weijma, I; Vermeij, M

    1991-01-01

    In five groups of 15 rats allogeneic kidney transplantations were performed. Four groups received pre- and postoperatively a semisynthetic diet, isocalorically but differing in quantity and quality of fatty acids: group I received a diet high in saturated fat; group II, a diet high in linoleic acid; group III, a diet containing fish oil; group IV, a diet high in monoenoic acid. Finally, the fifth group of rats was fed a standard commercial chow and served as a control for the procedure of technique and immunological regimen. All groups received the same immunosuppressive regimen of immunological enhancement induced by pretreatment with complete donor blood. Survival and several parameters of graft function were studied. The results showed that the technical mortality, i.e. animals dying in the first week after transplantation, was substantially higher in rats on the semisynthetic diets in comparison with the group of rats on the commercial diet. A statistically significant better graft function could be observed in the group of rats on the diet high in linoleic acid in the first period after kidney transplantation, compared to the other groups on semisynthetic diets. This difference disappeared in the course of the study when a number of animals was lost due to graft rejection. Furthermore, in the same diet group mortality due to rejection was significantly decreased as well. PMID:1952815

  11. Hepatitis C virus-related kidney disease: an overview.

    PubMed

    Kamar, N; Izopet, J; Alric, L; Guilbeaud-Frugier, C; Rostaing, L

    2008-03-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infection leads to chronic liver disease, but also to extra-hepatic manifestations, including kidney disease. We provide an overview of HCV-related kidney diseases in non-transplanted and in kidney transplant patients, and their therapies. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, associated with Type 2 cryoglobulinemia, is the predominant Type of HCV-related glomerulonephritis. Membranous glomerulonephritis and focal segmental glomerular sclerosis are less commonly described. HCV infection seems to be linked to Type 2 diabetes mellitus, and might alter the progression of diabetic-related nephropathy. Patients infected by HCV should be annually screened for markers of kidney disease and, similarly, patients with membranoproliferative or membranous glomerulonephritis should be screened for HCV infection. After transplantation, cryoglobulinemia is frequent and is associated with HCV markers. HCV-related kidney disease requires specific treatment. In non-kidney-transplant patients, treatment relies on either only anti-HCV therapy in cases of moderate renal disease, or combined anti-viral and immunosuppressive therapies in cases of severe renal disease, i.e., nephrotic syndrome and/or progressive renal failure, and in diseases that are refractory to anti-HCV therapy. In kidney transplant patients, ribavirin monotherapy could be used cautiously, whereas rituximab might be a treatment of choice in the presence of cryoglobulinemia. In liver-transplant patients, in addition to anti-HCV therapy, rituximab might be also used. PMID:18397713

  12. Total Kidney Volume in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: A Biomarker of Disease Progression and Therapeutic Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Alam, Ahsan; Dahl, Neera K; Lipschutz, Joshua H; Rossetti, Sandro; Smith, Patricia; Sapir, Daniel; Weinstein, Jordan; McFarlane, Philip; Bichet, Daniel G

    2015-10-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common potentially life-threatening monogenic disorder in humans, characterized by progressive development and expansion of fluid-filled cysts in the kidneys and other organs. Ongoing cyst growth leads to progressive kidney enlargement, whereas kidney function remains stable for decades as a result of hyperfiltration and compensation by unaffected nephrons. Kidney function irreversibly declines only in the late stages of the disease, when most of the parenchyma is lost to cystic and fibrotic tissue and the remaining compensatory capacity is overwhelmed. Hence, conventional kidney function measures, such as glomerular filtration rate, do not adequately assess disease progression in ADPKD, especially in its early stages. Given the recent development of potential targeted therapies in ADPKD, it has become critically important to identify relevant biomarkers that can be used to determine the degree of disease progression and evaluate the effects of therapeutic interventions on the course of the disease. We review the current evidence to provide an informed perspective on whether total kidney volume (TKV) is a suitable biomarker for disease progression and whether TKV can be used as an efficacy end point in clinical trials. We conclude that because cystogenesis is the central factor leading to kidney enlargement, TKV appears to be an appropriate biomarker and is gaining wider acceptance. Several studies have identified TKV as a relevant imaging biomarker for monitoring and predicting disease progression and support its use as a prognostic end point in clinical trials. PMID:25960302

  13. High Blood Pressure and Chronic Kidney Disease in Children: A Guide for Parents

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  14. New Study Shows 59 Percent of Americans Will Develop Kidney Disease in Their Lifetime

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  15. [Uncaria tomentosa and acute ischemic kidney injury in rats].

    PubMed

    de Fátima Fernandes Vattimo, Maria; da Silva, Natalia Oliveira

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the renoprotective effects of Uncaria Tomentosa (cat's claw) on ischemic acute kidney injury induced by renal clamping in rats. The hypoxia and hypoperfusion increase the production of reactive species already present in the inflammatory process. Results showed that the renal function evaluated by creatinine clearance, the urinary excretion of peroxides and malondealdehyde indexes demonstrated that UT induced renoprotection, probably related to its antioxidant activities. PMID:21445508

  16. Uranium dynamics and developmental sensitivity in rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Homma-Takeda, Shino; Kokubo, Toshiaki; Terada, Yasuko; Suzuki, Kyoko; Ueno, Shunji; Hayao, Tatsuo; Inoue, Tatsuya; Kitahara, Keisuke; Blyth, Benjamin J; Nishimura, Mayumi; Shimada, Yoshiya

    2013-07-01

    Renal toxicity is the principal health concern after uranium exposure. Children are particularly vulnerable to uranium exposure; with contact with depleted uranium in war zones or groundwater contamination the most likely exposure scenarios. To investigate renal sensitivity to uranium exposure during development, we examined uranium distribution and uranium-induced apoptosis in the kidneys of neonate (7-day-old), prepubertal (25-day-old) and adult (70-day-old) male Wistar rats. Mean renal uranium concentrations increased with both age-at-exposure and exposure level after subcutaneous administration of uranium acetate (UA) (0.1-2 mg kg(-1) body weight). Although less of the injected uranium was deposited in the kidneys of the two younger rat groups, the proportion of the peak uranium content remaining in the kidneys after 2 weeks declined with age-at-exposure, suggesting reduced clearance in younger animals. In situ high-energy synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence analysis revealed site-specific accumulation of uranium in the S3 segment of the proximal tubules, distributed in the inner cortex and outer stripe of the outer medulla. Apoptosis and cell loss in the proximal tubules increased with age-at-exposure to 0.5 mg kg(-1) UA. Surprisingly, prepubertal rats were uniquely sensitive to uranium-induced lethality from the higher exposure levels. Observations of increased apoptosis in generating/re-generating tubules particularly in prepubertal rats could help to explain their high mortality rate. Together, our findings suggest that age-at-exposure and exposure level are important parameters for uranium toxicity; uranium tends to persist in developing kidneys after low-level exposures, although renal toxicity is more pronounced in adults. PMID:23619997

  17. Acute renal failure potentiates methylmalonate-induced oxidative stress in brain and kidney of rats.

    PubMed

    Schuck, P F; Alves, L; Pettenuzzo, L F; Felisberto, F; Rodrigues, L B; Freitas, B W; Petronilho, F; Dal-Pizzol, F; Streck, E L; Ferreira, G C

    2013-03-01

    Tissue methylmalonic acid (MMA) accumulation is the biochemical hallmark of methylmalonic acidemia. The disease is clinically characterized by progressive neurological deterioration and kidney failure, whose pathophysiology is still unclear. In the present work we investigated the effects of acute MMA administration on various parameters of oxidative stress in cerebral cortex and kidney of young rats, as well as the influence of acute renal failure on MMA-elicited effects on these parameters. Acute renal failure was induced by gentamicin, an aminoglycoside antibiotic whose utilization over prolonged periods causes nephrotoxicity. The administration of gentamicin alone increased carbonyl content and inhibited superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in cerebral cortex, as well as increased thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBA-RS) and sulfhydryl levels and diminished glutathione peroxidase activity in kidney. On the other hand, MMA administration increased TBA-RS levels in cerebral cortex and decreased SOD activity in kidney. Furthermore, the simultaneous administration of MMA and gentamicin to the rats provoked an augment in TBA-RS levels and superoxide generation in cerebral cortex and in TBA-RS, carbonyl and sulfhydryl levels in kidney, while diminished SOD activity in both studied tissues. Finally, nitrate/nitrite content, reduced glutathione levels, 2',7'-dihydrodichlorofluorescein oxidation and catalase activity were not affected by this animal treatment in either tissue. In conclusion, our present data are in line with the hypothesis that MMA acts as a toxin in brain and kidney of rats and suggest that renal injury potentiates the toxicity of MMA on oxidative stress parameters in brain and peripheral tissues. PMID:23297832

  18. Vitamin D deficiency aggravates ischemic acute kidney injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    de Bragança, Ana Carolina; Volpini, Rildo A; Canale, Daniele; Gonçalves, Janaína G; Shimizu, Maria Heloisa M; Sanches, Talita R; Seguro, Antonio C; Andrade, Lúcia

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency (VDD) increases the risk of death in hospitalized patients. Renal ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) induces acute kidney injury (AKI), which activates cell cycle inhibitors, including p21, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor and genomic target of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, which is in turn a potent immunomodulator with antiproliferative effects. In this study, we assess the impact of VDD in renal IRI. Wistar rats were divided into groups, each evaluated for 30 days: control (receiving a standard diet); VDD (receiving a vitamin D-free diet); IRI (receiving a standard diet and subjected to 45-min bilateral renal ischemia on day 28); and VDD + IRI (receiving a vitamin D-free diet and subjected to 45-min bilateral renal ischemia on day 28). At 48 h after IRI, animals were euthanized; blood, urine, and kidney tissue samples were collected. Compared with IRI rats, VDD + IRI rats showed a more severe decrease in glomerular filtration rate, greater urinary protein excretion, a higher kidney/body weight ratio and lower renal aquaporin 2 expression, as well as greater morphological damage, characterized by increased interstitial area and tubular necrosis. Our results suggest that the severity of tubular damage in IRI may be associated with downregulation of vitamin D receptors and p21. VDD increases renal inflammation, cell proliferation and cell injury in ischemic AKI. PMID:25780095

  19. CA V is present in rat kidney mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Dodgson, S.J.; Contino, L.C.

    1987-05-01

    Guinea pig liver mitochondria contain the unique carbonic anhydrase isozyme, CA V. Prior to sacrifice, 15 rats and 15 guinea pigs were either fed normal lab chow (group 1), starved 48 hours (group 2) or fed normal lab chow and given to drink only water with added HCl, pH 2.5 (group 3). Mitochondria were prepared from excised livers and kidneys. CA V activity of disrupted mitochondria was measured by /sup 18/O-mass spectrometric technique at pH 7.4, 37/sup 0/C, 25 mM NaHCO/sub 3/. Mass spectrometric CA assays with intact kidney mitochondria localize CA V activity to the matrix, as was found for liver mitochondria. It has been shown in hepatocytes prepared from starved guinea pigs and rats that inhibition of CA V results in decreased rate of gluconeogenesis from pyruvate. These present results are in line with the published observation that rat kidneys are much more gluconeogenic than guinea pig, and that this is increased by starvation and acidosis.

  20. Chronic kidney disease and the skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Paul D

    2014-01-01

    Fractures across the stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) could be due to osteoporosis, some form of renal osteodystrophy defined by specific quantitative histomorphometry or chronic kidney disease–mineral and bone disorder (CKD–MBD). CKD–MBD is a systemic disease that links disorders of mineral and bone metabolism due to CKD to either one or all of the following: abnormalities of calcium, phosphorus, parathyroid hormone or vitamin D metabolism; abnormalities in bone turnover, mineralization, volume, linear growth or strength; or vascular or other soft-tissue calcification. Osteoporosis, as defined by the National Institutes of Health, may coexist with renal osteodystrophy or CKD–MBD. Differentiation among these disorders is required to manage correctly the correct disorder to reduce the risk of fractures. While the World Health Organization (WHO) bone mineral density (BMD) criteria for osteoporosis can be used in patients with stages 1–3 CKD, the disorders of bone turnover become so aberrant by stages 4 and 5 CKD that neither the WHO criteria nor the occurrence of a fragility fracture can be used for the diagnosis of osteoporosis. The diagnosis of osteoporosis in stages 4 and 5 CKD is one of the exclusion—excluding either renal osteodystrophy or CKD–MBD as the cause of low BMD or fragility fractures. Differentiations among the disorders of renal osteodystrophy, CKD–MBD or osteoporosis are dependent on the measurement of specific biochemical markers, including serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and/or quantitative bone histomorphometry. Management of fractures in stages 1–3 CKD does not differ in persons with or without CKD with osteoporosis assuming that there is no evidence for CKD–MBD, clinically suspected by elevated PTH, hyperphosphatemia or fibroblast growth factor 23 due to CKD. Treatment of fractures in persons with osteoporosis and stages 4 and 5 CKD is not evidence-based, with the exception of post-hoc analysis suggesting efficacy and

  1. Stroke and Chronic Kidney Disease: Epidemiology, Pathogenesis, and Management Across Kidney Disease Stages

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Daniel E.; Dad, Taimur

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cerebrovascular disease and stroke are very common at all stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD), likely representing both shared risk factors as well as synergy among risk factors. More subtle ischemic brain lesions may be particularly common in the CKD population, with subtle manifestations including cognitive impairment. For individuals with nondialysis CKD, the prevention, approach to, diagnosis, and management of stroke is similar to the general, non-CKD population. For individuals with end-stage renal disease, far less is known regarding the prevention of stroke. Stroke prophylaxis using warfarin in dialysis patients with atrial fibrillation in particular remains of uncertain benefit. End-stage renal disease patients can be managed aggressively in the setting of acute stroke. Outcomes after stroke at all stages of CKD are poor, and improving these outcomes should be the subject of future clinical trials. PMID:26355250

  2. 2-Hydroxyestradiol slows progression of experimental polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Oyama, Terry T.; Lindsley, Jessie N.; Schutzer, William E.; Beard, Douglas R.; Gattone, Vincent H.; Komers, Radko

    2012-01-01

    Male gender is a risk factor for progression of polycystic kidney disease (PKD). 17β-Estradiol (E2) protects experimentally, but clinical use is limited by adverse effects. Novel E2 metabolites provide many benefits of E2 without stimulating the estrogen receptor, and thus may be safer. We hypothesized that E2 metabolites are protective in a model of PKD. Studies were performed in male control Han:SPRD rats, and in cystic males treated with orchiectomy, 2-methoxyestradiol, 2-hydroxyestradiol (2-OHE), or vehicle, from age 3 to 12 wk. Cystic rats exhibited renal functional impairment (∼50% decrease in glomerular filtration and renal plasma flow rates, P < 0.05) and substantial cyst development (20.5 ± 2.0% of cortex area). 2-OHE was the most effective in limiting cysts (6.0 ± 0.7% of cortex area, P < 0.05 vs. vehicle-treated cystic rats) and preserving function, in association with suppression of proliferation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis markers. Downregulation of p21 expression and increased expression of Akt, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and some of its downstream effectors were significantly reversed by 2-OHE. Thus, 2-OHE limits disease progression in a cystic rodent model. Mechanisms include reduced renal cell proliferation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. These effects may be mediated, at least in part, by preservation of p21 and suppression of Akt and mTOR. Estradiol metabolites may represent a novel, safe intervention to slow progression of PKD. PMID:22160773

  3. The Expression Changes of Inflammasomes in the Aging Rat Kidneys.

    PubMed

    Song, Fei; Ma, Yuxiang; Bai, Xue-Yuan; Chen, Xiangmei

    2016-06-01

    The mechanisms of kidney aging are not yet clear. Studies have shown that immunological inflammation is related to kidney aging. Inflammasomes are important components of innate immune system in the body. However, the function of inflammasomes and their underlying mechanisms in renal aging remain unclear. In this study, for the first time, we systematically investigated the role of the inflammasomes and the inflammatory responses activated by inflammasomes during kidney aging. We found that during kidney aging, the expression levels of the molecules associated with the activation of inflammasomes, including toll-like receptor-4 and interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R), were significantly increased; their downstream signaling pathway molecule interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-4 (IRAK4) was markedly activated (Phospho-IRAK4 was obviously increased); the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway was activated (the activated NF-κB pathway molecules Phospho-IKKβ, Phospho-IκBα, and Phospho-NF-κBp65 were significantly elevated); the levels of the inflammasome components NOD-like receptor P3 (NLRP3), NLRC4, and pro-caspase-1 were prominently upregulated; and the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 were notably increased in the kidneys of 24-month-old (elderly group) rats. These results showed that inflammasomes are markedly activated during the renal aging process and might induce inflamm-aging by promoting the maturation and secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18. PMID:26219846

  4. 78 FR 52937 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ... and Nutrition Research; 93.849, Kidney Diseases, Urology and Hematology Research, National Institutes... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Time-Sensitive Obesity Research. Date: September 16, 2013....

  5. Nutrition in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... or 212–889–2210 Fax: 212–689–9261 Internet: www.kidney.org A Healthy Food Guide for ... Riverside Plaza, Suite 2000 Chicago, IL 60606–6995 Internet: www.eatright.org Your Kidney Test Results Solving ...

  6. Contextual Poverty, Nutrition and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Orlando M.

    2014-01-01

    Nutrition plays an important role in chronic kidney disease (CKD) outcomes. One of the strongest factors that impacts nutrition is socioeconomic status as evidenced by the large body of epidemiologic data showing that income and education are directly associated with diet quality. Apart from individual-level markers of socioeconomic status such as income and education, contextual factors such as availability of and transportation to food outlets that provide healthy food options and the density of fast food restaurants within particular regions markedly impact the ability of individuals to comply with nutrition recommendations. This is particularly true for nutrition guidelines most specific to individuals with CKD such as the consumption of protein, saturated fat, sodium and phosphorus, all of which have been shown to impact CKD health and are influenced by the availability of healthy food options within individual neighborhood food environments. Because of the strong association of contextual poverty with the diet quality, any serious attempt to improve the diet of CKD patients must include a discussion of the environmental barriers that each individual faces in trying to access healthy foods and health care providers should take account of these barriers when tailoring specific recommendations. PMID:25573510

  7. [Chronic kidney disease: therapy and care].

    PubMed

    Noel, Natacha; Gaha, Khaled; Rieu, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major public health problem. It is therefore important to slow its progression and to treat its complications. Regardless of the causal nephropathy, arterial hypertension and proteinuria are the major progression factors of CKD. Thus, optimal control of blood pressure, reduction of proteinuria by using rennin angiotension system inhibitors can slow the progression of CKD. This effect can be enhanced by reducing sodium intake. The recent recommendations suggest that blood pressure should not be higher than 130/80 mmHg and proteinuria should not exceed 0,5 g/day. The consequences of advanced stages of the CKD have to be diagnosed and treated early: anemia, abnormal bone metabolism, hyperkalemia, fluid overload, metabolic acidosis... A particular emphasis has to be given to cardiovascular complications and risk factors. Monitoring data are well defined by the actual recommandations. Nephrologist can provide a set of recommended intervention to the primary care physician. The most accepted criterion of initiation of dialysis, in absence of clinic uremic manifestation is a glomerular filtration rate lower than 7 ml/min/1,73m2. Psychological and medical preparation of the patient to dialysis is essential. The possibility of renal transplantation should be evaluated during the following of patient with CKD PMID:22335066

  8. Resistant Hypertension in Nondialysis Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stanzione, Giovanna; Conte, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Resistant hypertension (RH) is defined as blood pressure (BP) that remains above the target of less than 140/90 mmHg in the general population and 130/80 mmHg in people with diabetes mellitus or chronic kidney disease (CKD) in spite of the use of at least three full-dose antihypertensive drugs including a diuretic or as BP that reaches the target by means of four or more drugs. In CKD, RH is a common condition due to a combination of factors including sodium retention, increased activity of the renin-angiotensin system, and enhanced activity of the sympathetic nervous system. Before defining the hypertensive patient as resistant it is mandatory to exclude the so-called “pseudoresistance.” This condition, which refers to the apparent failure to reach BP target in spite of an appropriate antihypertensive treatment, is mainly caused by white coat hypertension that is prevalent (30%) in CKD patients. Recently we have demonstrated that “true” RH represents an independent risk factor for renal and cardiovascular outcomes in CKD patients. PMID:23710342

  9. MicroRNAs and in kidney function and disease

    PubMed Central

    Akkina, Sanjeev; Becker, Bryan N.

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) are short non-coding RNA sequences that regulate gene expression by blocking protein translation or inducing mRNA degradation. miRNA is found in various tissues with variable expression and changes in expression are related to various disease processes. Evidence suggests that changes in miRNA expression are critical for the normal development of kidney tissue. Alternatively, in diseases such as diabetic nephropathy, polycystic kidney disease, and lupus nephritis, specific miRNAs may enhance disease manifestations in a myriad of ways, ranging from activation of fibrotic pathways to anatomical changes that abet proteinuria. The variable expression of miRNA in kidney tissue, whether in the context of normal development or disease processes, makes miRNAs a valuable new tool for understanding, diagnosing, and discovering therapeutic options for pathological processes that affect the kidney. PMID:21420034

  10. Sexual dysfunction in men and women with chronic kidney disease and end-stage kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Biff F

    2003-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common finding in both men and women with chronic kidney failure. Common disturbances include erectile dysfunction in men, menstrual abnormalities in women, and decreased libido and fertility in both sexes. These abnormalities are primarily organic in nature and are related to uremia as well as the other comorbid conditions that frequently occur in the chronic kidney failure patient. Fatigue and psychosocial factors related to the presence of a chronic disease are also contributory factors. Disturbances in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis can be detected before the need for dialysis but continue to worsen once dialytic therapy is initiated. Impaired gonadal function is prominent in uremic men, whereas the disturbances in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis are more subtle. By contrast, central disturbances are more prominent in uremic women. Therapy is initially directed toward optimizing the delivery of dialysis, correcting anemia with recombinant erythropoietin, and controlling the degree of secondary hyperparathyroidism with vitamin D. For many practicing nephrologists, sildenafil has become the first line therapy in the treatment of impotence. In the hypogonadal man whose only complaint is decreased libido, testosterone may be of benefit. Regular gynecologic follow-up is required in uremic women to guard against potential complications of unopposed estrogen effect. Uremic women should be advised against pregnancy while on dialysis. Successful transplantation is the most effective means of restoring normal sexual function in both men and women with chronic kidney failure. PMID:12616463

  11. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Improve Renovascular Function in Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Federico; Peterson, Karen M; Xu, Rende; Miller, Brent; Psaltis, Peter J; Harris, Peter C; Lerman, Lilach O; Rodriguez-Porcel, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is a common cause of end-stage renal failure, for which there is no accepted treatment. Progenitor and stem cells have been shown to restore renal function in a model of renovascular disease, a disease that shares many features with PKD. The objective of this study was to examine the potential of adult stem cells to restore renal structure and function in PKD. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, 2.5 × 10(5)) were intrarenally infused in 6-week-old PCK rats. At 10 weeks of age, PCK rats had an increase in systolic blood pressure (SBP) versus controls (126.22 ± 2.74 vs. 116.45 ± 3.53 mmHg, p < 0.05) and decreased creatinine clearance (3.76 ± 0.31 vs. 6.10 ± 0.48 µl/min/g, p < 0.01), which were improved in PKD animals that received MSCs (SBP: 114.67 ± 1.34 mmHg, and creatinine clearance: 4.82 ± 0.24 µl/min/g, p = 0.001 and p = 0.003 vs. PKD, respectively). MSCs preserved vascular density and glomeruli diameter, measured using microcomputed tomography. PCK animals had increased urine osmolality (843.9 ± 54.95 vs. 605.6 ± 45.34 mOsm, p < 0.01 vs. control), which was improved after MSC infusion and not different from control (723.75 ± 56.6 mOsm, p = 0.13 vs. control). Furthermore, MSCs reduced fibrosis and preserved the expression of proangiogenic molecules, while cyst size and number were unaltered by MSCs. Delivery of exogenous MSCs improved vascular density and renal function in PCK animals, and the benefit was observed up to 4 weeks after a single infusion. Cell-based therapy constitutes a novel approach in PKD. PMID:25290249

  12. Rufus of Ephesus and his "Diseases of the Kidneys".

    PubMed

    Eknoyan, Garabed

    2002-07-01

    The first book on diseases of the kidneys, titled "Diseases of the Kidneys and Bladder", was written by Ruphus of Ephesus at the close of the 1st century AD. Little is known of Rufus, who seems to have attained fame and was considered an equal of Hippocrates and Galen. He was highly respected and extensively quoted by authors of Byzantine, Arabic and Middle Ages medicine. In his description of diseases of the kidneys he makes a concerted effort to correlate structure and function, and to provide a rational explanation of the altered function of the kidneys in disease. The section of his monograph "On Hardening of the Kidneys" is brief, but constitutes the first description of morbid and clinical features of the end-stage kidneys. Like many of his contemporaries, Rufus wrote several monographs on selected topics and organs. That he chose diseases of the kidneys as the subject of one of his monographs makes him especially pertinent to the history of nephrology. PMID:12119467

  13. Therapeutic role of sirolimus in non-transplant kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Rangan, Gopala K; Nguyen, Tina; Mainra, Rahul; Succar, Lena; Schwensen, Kristina G; Burgess, Jane S; Ho, Kok On

    2009-08-01

    Sirolimus is a member of a novel class of immunosuppressant drug that potently suppresses T cell proliferation and expansion by inhibition of the Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (TORC1) protein kinase. Sirolimus also has anti-proliferative effects on intrinsic cells of the kidney, and increasing evidence suggests that it may have a therapeutic role in non-transplant renal diseases. In the normal kidney, sirolimus is considered to be non-nephrotoxic. In the diseased kidney, sirolimus may be beneficial or detrimental, depending on the type of renal injury. In polycystic kidney disease, TORC1 activation mediates renal tubular epithelial cell (TEC) proliferation and cyst growth in animals, and Phase III clinical trials are underway to determine the effect of sirolimus in attenuating disease progression in humans. In contrast, in acute kidney injury, sirolimus transiently impairs proximal TEC regeneration and delays renal recovery. In animal models of lupus nephritis and diabetic kidney disease, sirolimus prevents disease progression. However, the efficacy of sirolimus in human glomerulonephritis as well as in diabetic chronic kidney disease remains unclear, as it paradoxically exacerbates renal dysfunction when the baseline glomerular filtration rate is low (< 40 ml/min/1.73 m(2)) and there is heavy proteinuria (> 300 mg/day). This may, in part, be due to inhibition of compensatory glomerular capillary repair through the suppression of endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenic growth factor production by podocytes. Therefore, at present, polycystic kidney disease is the most promising therapeutic application for sirolimus in non-transplant renal diseases, and further studies are needed to clarify its role in other situations. PMID:19374918

  14. [Ultrasound and color Doppler applications in chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) encompasses all clinical features and complications during the progression of various kidney conditions towards end-stage renal disease. These conditions include immune and inflammatory diseases such as primary and HCV-related glomerulonephritis; infectious diseases such as pyelonephritis with or without reflux and tuberculosis; vascular diseases such as chronic ischemic nephropathy; hereditary and congenital diseases such as polycystic disease and congenital cystic dysplasia; metabolic diseases including diabetes and hyperuricemia; and systemic diseases (collagen disease, vasculitis, myeloma). During the progression of CKD, ultrasound imaging can differentiate the nature of the renal damage in only 50-70% of cases. Infact, the end-stage kidney appears shrunken, reduced in volume (Ø <9 cm), unstructured, amorphous, with acquired cystic degeneration (small and multiple cysts involving the cortex and medulla) or nephrocalcinosis, but there are rare exceptions, such as polycystic kidney disease, diabetic nephropathy, and secondary inflammatory nephropathies. The main difficulties in the differential diagnosis are encountered in multifactorial CKD, which is commonly presented to the nephrologist at stage 4-5, when the kidney is shrunken, unstructured and amorphous. As in acute renal injury and despite the lack of sensitivity, ultrasonography is essential for assessing the progression of the renal damage and related complications, and for evaluating all conditions that increase the risk of CKD, such as lithiasis, recurrent urinary tract infections, vesicoureteral reflux, polycystic kidney disease and obstructive nephropathy. The timing and frequency of ultrasound scans in CKD patients should be evaluated case by case. In this review we will consider the morphofunctional features of the kidney in all nephropathies that may lead to progressive CKD. PMID:23229668

  15. 77 FR 53208 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases, including consideration of personnel qualifications and performance, and the competence..., National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institute of Health, Building...

  16. 78 FR 58325 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Bariatric Surgery-- Related Ancillary Studies (R01s). Date... Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Regulatory Mechanisms in Intestinal Motility...

  17. 75 FR 9231 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Metabolic Dysfunction Collaborative Interdisciplinary Science... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; CAMUS Trial. Date: April 2, 2010....

  18. 75 FR 9911 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Seeding Team Science in Diabetes Endocrinology and Metabolic... of Committee: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis...

  19. 75 FR 65365 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Genetics of Nephropathy Ancillary Studies. Date: November 15... Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Consortium for Radiologic Imaging Studies...

  20. 77 FR 47082 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Clinical Trial Cooperative Agreement Grant Review Meeting. ] Date... and Nutrition Research; 93.849, Kidney Diseases, Urology and Hematology Research, National...

  1. 76 FR 38193 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Endogenous Insulin Secretion Preservation. Date: July 27, 2011... and Nutrition Research; 93.849, Kidney Diseases, Urology and Hematology Research, National...

  2. 77 FR 10540 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel: Genetic and Lifestyle Factors and Risk of Gastrointestinal... and Nutrition Research; 93.849, Kidney Diseases, Urology and Hematology Research, National...

  3. 77 FR 62520 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Ancillary Studies to Major Ongoing Clinical Research Studies..., Kidney Diseases, Urology and Hematology Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: October...

  4. 78 FR 19275 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases, including consideration of personnel qualifications and performance, and the competence..., National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive, and Kidney Diseases, National Institute of Health, Building...

  5. ASK1: a new therapeutic target for kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Tesch, Greg H; Ma, Frank Y; Nikolic-Paterson, David J

    2016-08-01

    Stress-induced activation of p38 MAPK and JNK signaling is a feature of both acute and chronic kidney disease and is associated with disease progression. Inhibitors of p38 MAPK or JNK activation provide protection against inflammation and fibrosis in animal models of kidney disease; however, clinical trials of p38 MAPK and JNK inhibitors in other diseases (rheumatoid arthritis and pulmonary fibrosis) have been disappointing. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) acts as an upstream regulator for the activation of p38 MAPK and JNK in kidney disease. Mice lacking the Ask1 gene are healthy with normal homeostatic functions and are protected from acute kidney injury induced by ischemia-reperfusion and from renal interstitial fibrosis induced by ureteric obstruction. Recent studies have shown that a selective ASK1 inhibitor substantially reduced renal p38 MAPK activation and halted the progression of nephropathy in diabetic mice, and this has led to a current clinical trial of an ASK1 inhibitor in patients with stage 3 or 4 diabetic kidney disease. This review explores the rationale for targeting ASK1 in kidney disease and the therapeutic potential of ASK1 inhibitors based on current experimental evidence. PMID:27226108

  6. Kidney disease postorbital lesions in spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hendricks, Jerry D.; Leek, Steve L.

    1975-01-01

    Gross exophthalmos in one or both eyes of yearling spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) was caused by postorbital, granulomatous inflammatory tissue that developed in response to invasion of the site by Corynebacterium sp., the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease.

  7. Medicare Spends Billions on Chronic Kidney Disease, Study Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158020.html Medicare Spends Billions on Chronic Kidney Disease, Study Finds ... affects nearly 14 percent of Americans and costs Medicare billions of dollars a year, a new study ...

  8. Overview of Kidney Diseases in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... an intravenous (IV) tube. Some children may need dialysis for a short time to take over the work the kidneys usually do. Most children recover completely with no long-term consequences. More information is provided in the NIDDK ...

  9. A Soft Computing Approach to Kidney Diseases Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Neves, José; Martins, M Rosário; Vilhena, João; Neves, João; Gomes, Sabino; Abelha, António; Machado, José; Vicente, Henrique

    2015-10-01

    Kidney renal failure means that one's kidney have unexpectedly stopped functioning, i.e., once chronic disease is exposed, the presence or degree of kidney dysfunction and its progression must be assessed, and the underlying syndrome has to be diagnosed. Although the patient's history and physical examination may denote good practice, some key information has to be obtained from valuation of the glomerular filtration rate, and the analysis of serum biomarkers. Indeed, chronic kidney sickness depicts anomalous kidney function and/or its makeup, i.e., there is evidence that treatment may avoid or delay its progression, either by reducing and prevent the development of some associated complications, namely hypertension, obesity, diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular complications. Acute kidney injury appears abruptly, with a rapid deterioration of the renal function, but is often reversible if it is recognized early and treated promptly. In both situations, i.e., acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease, an early intervention can significantly improve the prognosis. The assessment of these pathologies is therefore mandatory, although it is hard to do it with traditional methodologies and existing tools for problem solving. Hence, in this work, we will focus on the development of a hybrid decision support system, in terms of its knowledge representation and reasoning procedures based on Logic Programming, that will allow one to consider incomplete, unknown, and even contradictory information, complemented with an approach to computing centered on Artificial Neural Networks, in order to weigh the Degree-of-Confidence that one has on such a happening. The present study involved 558 patients with an age average of 51.7 years and the chronic kidney disease was observed in 175 cases. The dataset comprise twenty four variables, grouped into five main categories. The proposed model showed a good performance in the diagnosis of chronic kidney disease, since the

  10. Application of regenerative medicine for kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Yokoo, Takashi; Fukui, Akira; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2007-01-01

    Following recent advancements of stem cell research, the potential for organ regeneration using somatic stem cells as an ultimate therapy for organ failure has increased. However, anatomically complicated organs such as the kidney and liver have proven more refractory to stem cell-based regenerative techniques. At present, kidney regeneration is considered to require one of two approaches depending on the type of renal failure, namely acute renal failure (ARF) and chronic renal failure (CRF).The kidney has the potential to regenerate itself provided that the damage is not too severe and the kidney's structure remains intact. Regenerative medicine for ARF should therefore aim to activate or support this potent. In cases of the irreversible damage to the kidney, which is most likely in patients with CRF undergoing long-term dialysis, self-renewal is totally lost. Thus, regenerative medicine for CRF will likely involve the establishment of a functional whole kidney de novo. This article reviews the challenges and recent advances in both approaches and discusses the potential approach of these novel strategies for clinical application. PMID:19279698

  11. Application of Regenerative Medicine for Kidney Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Akira; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2007-01-01

    Following recent advancements of stem cell research, the potential for organ regeneration using somatic stem cells as an ultimate therapy for organ failure has increased. However, anatomically complicated organs such as the kidney and liver have proven more refractory to stem cell-based regenerative techniques. At present, kidney regeneration is considered to require one of two approaches depending on the type of renal failure, namely acute renal failure (ARF) and chronic renal failure (CRF). The kidney has the potential to regenerate itself provided that the damage is not too severe and the kidney's structure remains intact. Regenerative medicine for ARF should therefore aim to activate or support this potent. In cases of the irreversible damage to the kidney, which is most likely in patients with CRF undergoing long-term dialysis, self-renewal is totally lost. Thus, regenerative medicine for CRF will likely involve the establishment of a functional whole kidney de novo. This article reviews the challenges and recent advances in both approaches and discusses the potential approach of these novel strategies for clinical application. PMID:19279698

  12. Modelling kidney disease with CRISPR-mutant kidney organoids derived from human pluripotent epiblast spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Benjamin S.; Brooks, Craig R.; Lam, Albert Q.; Fu, Hongxia; Morizane, Ryuji; Agrawal, Vishesh; Saad, Abdelaziz F.; Li, Michelle K.; Hughes, Michael R.; Werff, Ryan Vander; Peters, Derek T.; Lu, Junjie; Baccei, Anna; Siedlecki, Andrew M.; Valerius, M. Todd; Musunuru, Kiran; McNagny, Kelly M.; Steinman, Theodore I.; Zhou, Jing; Lerou, Paul H.; Bonventre, Joseph V.

    2015-01-01

    Human-pluripotent-stem-cell-derived kidney cells (hPSC-KCs) have important potential for disease modelling and regeneration. Whether the hPSC-KCs can reconstitute tissue-specific phenotypes is currently unknown. Here we show that hPSC-KCs self-organize into kidney organoids that functionally recapitulate tissue-specific epithelial physiology, including disease phenotypes after genome editing. In three-dimensional cultures, epiblast-stage hPSCs form spheroids surrounding hollow, amniotic-like cavities. GSK3β inhibition differentiates spheroids into segmented, nephron-like kidney organoids containing cell populations with characteristics of proximal tubules, podocytes and endothelium. Tubules accumulate dextran and methotrexate transport cargoes, and express kidney injury molecule-1 after nephrotoxic chemical injury. CRISPR/Cas9 knockout of podocalyxin causes junctional organization defects in podocyte-like cells. Knockout of the polycystic kidney disease genes PKD1 or PKD2 induces cyst formation from kidney tubules. All of these functional phenotypes are distinct from effects in epiblast spheroids, indicating that they are tissue specific. Our findings establish a reproducible, versatile three-dimensional framework for human epithelial disease modelling and regenerative medicine applications. PMID:26493500

  13. Early protective effect of mitofusion 2 overexpression in STZ-induced diabetic rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wan Xin; Wu, Wei Hua; Zeng, Xiao Xi; Bo, Hong; Huang, Song Min

    2012-04-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a serious complication of diabetes with a poorly defined etiology and limited treatment options. Early intervention is key to preventing the progression of DN. Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2) regulates mitochondrial morphology and signaling, and is involved in the pathogenesis of numerous diseases. Furthermore, Mfn2 is also closely associated with the development of diabetes, but its functional roles in the diabetic kidney remain unknown. This study investigated the effect of Mfn2 at an early stage of DN. Mfn2 was overexpressed by adenovirus-mediated gene transfer in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Clinical parameters (proteinuria, albumin/creatinine ratio), pathological changes, ultra-microstructural changes in nephrons, expression of collagen IV and phosph-p38, ROS production, mitochondrial function, and apoptosis were evaluated and compared with diabetic rats expressing control levels of Mfn2. Endogenous Mfn2 expression decreased with time in DN. Compared to the blank transfection control group, overexpression of Mfn2 decreased kidney weight relative to body weight, reduced proteinuria and ACR, and improved pathological changes typical of the diabetic kidney, like enlargement of glomeruli, accumulation of ECM, and thickening of the basement membrane. In addition, Mfn2 overexpression inhibited activation of p38, and the accumulation of ROS; prevented mitochondrial dysfunction; and reduced the synthesis of collagen IV, but did not affect apoptosis of kidney cells. This study demonstrates that Mfn2 overexpression can attenuate pathological changes in the kidneys of diabetic rats. Further studies are needed to clarify the underlying mechanism of this protective function. Mfn2 might be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of early stage DN. PMID:22095488

  14. OCCUPATIONAL SILICA EXPOSURE AND CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Vupputuri, Suma; Parks, Christine G.; Nylander-French, Leena A.; Owen-Smith, Ashli; Hogan, Susan L.; Sandler, Dale P.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Occupational exposure to silica may be associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Most studies have been conducted in occupational cohorts with high levels of exposure but small numbers of cases. We analyzed data from a population-based case-control study of occupational silica exposure and CKD. Methods Cases were hospital patients with newly diagnosed CKD and community controls were selected using random digit dialing and frequency matched by age, gender, race and proximity to the hospital. Silica exposure estimates were assigned by industrial hygiene review of lifetime job history data and weighted for certainty and intensity. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) for CKD conditioned on demographic, lifestyle and clinical variables. Results The mean age of participants was 62 years (range, 30-83 years), 56% were male and 54% were white. Any silica exposure (compared to none) was associated with a 40% increased risk of CKD (OR=1.40, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.04, 1.89) in a multivariable adjusted model. The mean cumulative duration of silica exposure was significantly higher in exposed cases than in exposed controls (33.4 vs. 24.8 years, respectively). Overall, compared to non-exposed participants, the ORs (95% CI) for those below and above the median duration of silica exposure were 1.20 (95% CI: 0.77, 1.86) and 1.76 (95% CI: 1.14, 2.71), respectively. Conclusions We found a positive relationship between occupational silica exposure and CKD. A dose-response trend of increasing CKD risk with increasing duration of silica exposure was observed and was particularly strong among non-whites. PMID:22032652

  15. [Horseshoe kidney, stone disease and prostate cancer: a case presentation].

    PubMed

    Hermida Pérez, J A; Bermejo Hernández, A; Hernández Guerra, J S; Sobenes Gutierrez, R J

    2013-01-01

    The horseshoe kidney is the most common congenital renal fusion anomalies. It occurs in 0.25% of the population, or 1 in every 400 people. It is more frequent in males (ratio 2:1). The most observed complication of horseshoe kidney is stone disease, although there may be others such as, abdominal pain, urinary infections, haematuria, hydronephrosis, trauma and tumours (most commonly associated with hypernephroma and Wilms tumour). We describe a case of a male patient with horseshoe kidney, stone disease and adenocarcinoma of the prostate. One carrier of this condition who suffered a transitional cell carcinoma of the prostate was found in a review of the literature. PMID:24315083

  16. Oxidative stress and alteration of biochemical markers in liver and kidney by malathion in rat pups.

    PubMed

    Selmi, Slimen; El-Fazaa, Saloua; Gharbi, Najoua

    2015-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the effects of malathion exposure through maternal milk on oxidative stress, functional an metabolic parameters in kidney and liver of rat pups. We found that lactational exposure to malation (200 mg/kg, body weight (bw)) induced an oxidative stress status assessed by an increase in malondialdhyde (MDA) content, reflecting lipoperoxidation, a decrease in thiol groups' content as well as depletion of enzyme activities as a superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) on postnatal days (Pnds) 21 and 51. Moreover, the current study showed that malathion induced liver and kidney dysfunctions demonstrated by considerable increase in phosphatase alkaline (PAL), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities as well as total and direct bilirubin, creatinine urea and acid uric contents. We also observed an increase in triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and a decrease in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) in the plasma of treated rat pups. These findings evidenced that malathion exposure during lactation through maternal milk of rats pups induced kidney and liver oxidative stress as well as functional and metabolic disorders that play a role in the development of others pathologies as cardiovascular diseases and cancers. PMID:23344821

  17. The epidermal growth factor receptor pathway in chronic kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Harskamp, Laura R; Gansevoort, Ron T; van Goor, Harry; Meijer, Esther

    2016-08-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway has a critical role in renal development, tissue repair and electrolyte handling. Numerous studies have reported an association between dysregulation of this pathway and the initiation and progression of various chronic kidney diseases such as diabetic nephropathy, chronic allograft nephropathy and polycystic kidney disease through the promotion of renal cell proliferation, fibrosis and inflammation. In the oncological setting, compounds that target the EGFR pathway are already in clinical use or have been evaluated in clinical trials; in the renal setting, therapeutic interventions targeting this pathway by decreasing ligand availability with disintegrin and metalloproteinase inhibitors or with ligand-neutralizing antibodies, or by inhibiting receptor activation with tyrosine kinase inhibitors or monoclonal antibodies are only just starting to be explored in animal models of chronic kidney disease and in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. In this Review we focus on the role of the EGFR signalling pathway in the kidney under physiological conditions and during the pathophysiology of chronic kidney diseases and explore the clinical potential of interventions in this pathway to treat chronic renal diseases. PMID:27374915

  18. Dyslipidemia, kidney disease, and cardiovascular disease in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Szu-chi; Tseng, Chin-Hsiao

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the relationship between dyslipidemia, chronic kidney disease, and cardiovascular diseases in patients with diabetes. Diabetes mellitus is associated with complications in the cardiovascular and renal system, and is increasing in prevalence worldwide. Modification of the multifactorial risk factors, in particular dyslipidemia, has been suggested to reduce the rates of diabetes-related complications. Dyslipidemia in diabetes is a condition that includes hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoprotein levels, and increased small and dense low-density lipoprotein particles. This condition is associated with higher cardiovascular risk and mortality in diabetic patients. Current treatment guidelines focus on lowering the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level; multiple trials have confirmed the cardiovascular benefits of treatment with statins. Chronic kidney disease also contributes to dyslipidemia, and dyslipidemia in turn is related to the occurrence and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Different patterns of dyslipidemia are associated with different stages of diabetic nephropathy. Some trials have shown that treatment with statins not only decreased the risk of cardiovascular events, but also delayed the progression of diabetic nephropathy. However, studies using statins as the sole treatment of hyperlipidemia in patients on dialysis have not shown benefits with respect to cardiovascular risk. Diabetic patients with nephropathy have a higher risk of cardiovascular events than those without nephropathy. The degree of albuminuria and the reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate are also correlated with the risk of cardiovascular events. Treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers to reduce albuminuria in diabetic patients has been shown to decrease the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:24380085

  19. Neuronal activation in the central nervous system of rats in the initial stage of chronic kidney disease-modulatory effects of losartan and moxonidine.

    PubMed

    Palkovits, Miklós; Šebeková, Katarína; Klenovics, Kristina Simon; Kebis, Anton; Fazeli, Gholamreza; Bahner, Udo; Heidland, August

    2013-01-01

    The effect of mild chronic renal failure (CRF) induced by 4/6-nephrectomy (4/6NX) on central neuronal activations was investigated by c-Fos immunohistochemistry staining and compared to sham-operated rats. In the 4/6 NX rats also the effect of the angiotensin receptor blocker, losartan, and the central sympatholyticum moxonidine was studied for two months. In serial brain sections Fos-immunoreactive neurons were localized and classified semiquantitatively. In 37 brain areas/nuclei several neurons with different functional properties were strongly affected in 4/6NX. It elicited a moderate to high Fos-activity in areas responsible for the monoaminergic innervation of the cerebral cortex, the limbic system, the thalamus and hypothalamus (e.g. noradrenergic neurons of the locus coeruleus, serotonergic neurons in dorsal raphe, histaminergic neurons in the tuberomamillary nucleus). Other monoaminergic cell groups (A5 noradrenaline, C1 adrenaline, medullary raphe serotonin neurons) and neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (innervating the sympathetic preganglionic neurons and affecting the peripheral sympathetic outflow) did not show Fos-activity. Stress- and pain-sensitive cortical/subcortical areas, neurons in the limbic system, the hypothalamus and the circumventricular organs were also affected by 4/6NX. Administration of losartan and more strongly moxonidine modulated most effects and particularly inhibited Fos-activity in locus coeruleus neurons. In conclusion, 4/6NX elicits high activity in central sympathetic, stress- and pain-related brain areas as well as in the limbic system, which can be ameliorated by losartan and particularly by moxonidine. These changes indicate a high sensitivity of CNS in initial stages of CKD which could be causative in clinical disturbances. PMID:23818940

  20. Stop chronic kidney disease progression: Time is approaching.

    PubMed

    Sharaf El Din, Usama Abdel Azim; Salem, Mona Mansour; Abdulazim, Dina Ossama

    2016-05-01

    Progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is inevitable. However, the last decade has witnessed tremendous achievements in this field. Today we are optimistic; the dream of withholding this progression is about to be realistic. The recent discoveries in the field of CKD management involved most of the individual diseases leading the patients to end-stage renal disease. Most of these advances involved patients suffering diabetic kidney disease, chronic glomerulonephritis, polycystic kidney disease, renal amyloidosis and chronic tubulointerstitial disease. The chronic systemic inflammatory status and increased oxidative stress were also investigated. This inflammatory status influences the anti-senescence Klotho gene expression. The role of Klotho in CKD progression together with its therapeutic value are explored. The role of gut as a major source of inflammation, the pathogenesis of intestinal mucosal barrier damage, the role of intestinal alkaline phosphatase and the dietary and therapeutic implications add a novel therapeutic tool to delay CKD progression. PMID:27152262

  1. Stop chronic kidney disease progression: Time is approaching

    PubMed Central

    Sharaf El Din, Usama Abdel Azim; Salem, Mona Mansour; Abdulazim, Dina Ossama

    2016-01-01

    Progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is inevitable. However, the last decade has witnessed tremendous achievements in this field. Today we are optimistic; the dream of withholding this progression is about to be realistic. The recent discoveries in the field of CKD management involved most of the individual diseases leading the patients to end-stage renal disease. Most of these advances involved patients suffering diabetic kidney disease, chronic glomerulonephritis, polycystic kidney disease, renal amyloidosis and chronic tubulointerstitial disease. The chronic systemic inflammatory status and increased oxidative stress were also investigated. This inflammatory status influences the anti-senescence Klotho gene expression. The role of Klotho in CKD progression together with its therapeutic value are explored. The role of gut as a major source of inflammation, the pathogenesis of intestinal mucosal barrier damage, the role of intestinal alkaline phosphatase and the dietary and therapeutic implications add a novel therapeutic tool to delay CKD progression. PMID:27152262

  2. Comprehensive Care for People With Diabetic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Koyal

    2015-01-01

    IN BRIEF Diabetic kidney disease carries a heavy burden, both economically and in terms of quality of life, largely because of its very high risk for vascular disease. Coordinated, multidisciplinary care with attention to appropriate, timely screening and preventive management is crucial to reducing the morbidity and mortality of this devastating disease. PMID:26300612

  3. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor in Clinical Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bruchfeld, Annette; Wendt, Mårten; Miller, Edmund J.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a proinflammatory cytokine implicated in acute and chronic inflammatory conditions, including sepsis, autoimmune disease, atherogenesis, plaque instability, and pulmonary arterial hypertension. MIF in plasma and urine is significantly elevated in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) and elevated MIF in serum is associated with markers of oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffness, and markers of myocardial damage in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Furthermore, MIF seems to be involved in vascular processes and cardiovascular disease associated with CKD, glomerulonephritis, autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, and possibly also in progression to renal failure. Moreover, in active anti-neutrophil cytoplasmatic antibody-associated vasculitis, plasma MIF levels have been shown to be significantly elevated as compared with samples from patients in remission. A significant difference in the genotype frequency of high production MIF -173 G/C genotype has been found in end-stage renal disease, compared to controls. Inhibition of MIF in a diabetic nephropathy model ameliorated blood glucose and albuminuria and in a model of adult polycystic kidney disease cyst growth was delayed. Preclinical studies support a potential therapeutic role for MIF in AKI and in a number of CKDs, whereas these data in human disease are still observational. Future interventional studies are needed to delineate the role of MIF as a treatment target in clinical kidney disease. PMID:26858715

  4. 75 FR 56119 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Fellowships in Digestive Diseases and Nutrition. Date: October 18... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel. Kidney Disease Ancillary Studies....

  5. Prevention of apoptosis averts glomerular tubular disconnection and podocyte loss in proteinuric kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Burlaka, Ievgeniia; Nilsson, Linnéa M; Scott, Lena; Holtbäck, Ulla; Eklöf, Ann-Christine; Fogo, Agnes B; Brismar, Hjalmar; Aperia, Anita

    2016-07-01

    There is a great need for treatment that arrests progression of chronic kidney disease. Increased albumin in urine leads to apoptosis and fibrosis of podocytes and tubular cells and is a major cause of functional deterioration. There have been many attempts to target fibrosis, but because of the lack of appropriate agents, few have targeted apoptosis. Our group has described an ouabain-activated Na,K-ATPase/IP3R signalosome, which protects from apoptosis. Here we show that albumin uptake in primary rat renal epithelial cells is accompanied by a time- and dose-dependent mitochondrial accumulation of the apoptotic factor Bax, down-regulation of the antiapoptotic factor Bcl-xL and mitochondrial membrane depolarization. Ouabain opposes these effects and protects from apoptosis in albumin-exposed proximal tubule cells and podocytes. The efficacy of ouabain as an antiapoptotic and kidney-protective therapeutic tool was then tested in rats with passive Heymann nephritis, a model of proteinuric chronic kidney disease. Chronic ouabain treatment preserved renal function, protected from renal cortical apoptosis, up-regulated Bax, down-regulated Bcl-xL, and rescued from glomerular tubular disconnection and podocyte loss. Thus we have identified a novel clinically feasible therapeutic tool, which has the potential to protect from apoptosis and rescue from loss of functional tissue in chronic proteinuric kidney disease. PMID:27217195

  6. Insights into kidney diseases from genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Wuttke, Matthias; Köttgen, Anna

    2016-09-01

    Over the past decade, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have considerably improved our understanding of the genetic basis of kidney function and disease. Population-based studies, used to investigate traits that define chronic kidney disease (CKD), have identified >50 genomic regions in which common genetic variants associate with estimated glomerular filtration rate or urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Case-control studies, used to study specific CKD aetiologies, have yielded risk loci for specific kidney diseases such as IgA nephropathy and membranous nephropathy. In this Review, we summarize important findings from GWAS and clinical and experimental follow-up studies. We also compare risk allele frequency, effect sizes, and specificity in GWAS of CKD-defining traits and GWAS of specific CKD aetiologies and the implications for study design. Genomic regions identified in GWAS of CKD-defining traits can contain causal genes for monogenic kidney diseases. Population-based research on kidney function traits can therefore generate insights into more severe forms of kidney diseases. Experimental follow-up studies have begun to identify causal genes and variants, which are potential therapeutic targets, and suggest mechanisms underlying the high allele frequency of causal variants. GWAS are thus a useful approach to advance knowledge in nephrology. PMID:27477491

  7. Targeting Cell Death Pathways for Therapeutic Intervention in Kidney Diseases.

    PubMed

    Garg, Jay P; Vucic, Domagoj

    2016-05-01

    Precise regulation of cell death and survival is essential for proper maintenance of organismal homeostasis, development, and the immune system. Deregulated cell death can lead to developmental defects, neuropathies, infections, and cancer. Kidney diseases, especially acute pathologies linked to ischemia-reperfusion injury, are among illnesses that profoundly are affected by improper regulation or execution of cell death pathways. Attempts to develop medicines for kidney diseases have been impacted by the complexity of these pathologies given the heterogeneous patient population and diverse etiologies. By analyzing cell death pathways activated in kidney diseases, we attempt to differentiate their importance for these pathologies with a goal of identifying those that have more profound impact and the best therapeutic potential. Although classic apoptosis still might be important, regulated necrosis pathways including necroptosis, ferroptosis, parthanatos, and mitochondrial permeability transition-associated cell death play a significantly role in kidney diseases, especially in acute kidney pathologies. Although targeting receptor-interacting protein 1 kinase appears to be the best therapeutic strategy, combination with inhibitors of other cell death pathways is likely to bring superior benefit and possible cure to patients suffering from kidney diseases. PMID:27339381

  8. MicroRNAs in the pathogenesis of cystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Phua, Yu Leng; Ho, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Cystic kidney diseases are common renal disorders characterized by the formation of fluid-filled epithelial cysts in the kidneys. The progressive growth and expansion of the renal cyst replaces existing renal tissue within the renal parenchyma, leading to reduced renal function. While several genes have been identified in association with inherited causes of cystic kidney disease, the molecular mechanisms that regulate these genes in the context of post-transcriptional regulation are still poorly understood. There is Increasing evidence that miRNA dysregulation is associated with the pathogenesis of cystic kidney disease. Recent findings In this review, recent studies that implicate dysregulation of miRNA expression in cystogenesis will be discussed. The relationship of specific specific miRNAs, such as the miR-17~92 cluster and cystic kidney disease, miR-92a and von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) syndrome, and alterations in LIN28-LET7 expression in Wilms tumor will be explored. Summary At present, there are no specific treatments available for patients with cystic kidney disease. Understanding and identifying specific miRNAs involved in the pathogenesis of these disorders may have the potential to lead to the development of novel therapies and biomarkers. PMID:25490692

  9. Mistletoe alkali inhibits peroxidation in rat liver and kidney

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zheng-Ming; Feng, Ping; Jiang, Dong-Qiao; Wang, Xue-Jiang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To explore the antioxidant and free radical scavenger properties of mistletoe alkali (MA). METHODS: The antioxidant effect of mistletoe alkali on the oxidative stress induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) in rats was investigated. The rats were divided into four groups (n = 8): CCl4-treated group (1 mL/kg body weight), MA -treated group (90 mg/kg), CCl4+MA-treated group and normal control group. After 4 wk of treatment, the level of malondialdehyde (MDA), a lipid peroxidation product (LPO) was measured in serum and homogenates of liver and kidney. Also, the level of glutathione (GSH), and activities of glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GSPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) in liver and kidney were determined. Scavenging effects on hydroxyl free radicals produced in vitro by Fenton reaction were studied by ESR methods using 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) as a spin trap reagent and H2O2/UV as the OH· source. Urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) was determined by competitive ELISA. RESULTS: In CCl4-treated group, the level of LPO in serum of liver and kidney was significantly increased compared to controls. The levels of GSH and enzyme activities of SOD, GSPx and GR in liver and kidney were significantly decreased in comparison with controls. In CCl4+MA-treated group, the changes in the levels of LPO in serum of liver and kidney were not statistically significant compared to controls. The levels of SOD, GSPx and GR in liver and kidney were significantly increased in comparison with controls. There was a significant difference in urinary excretion of 8-OHdG between the CCl4-treated and MA-treated groups. CONCLUSION: Oxidative stress may be a major mechanism for the toxicity of CCl4. MA has a protective effect against CCl4 toxicity by inhibiting the oxidative damage and stimulating GST activities. Thus, clinical application of MA should be considered in cases with carbon tetrachloride-induced injury

  10. Modulatory effect of Mangifera indica against carbon tetrachloride induced kidney damage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Adeneye, Adejuwon Adewale; Aiyeola, Sheriff Aboyade; Benebo, Adokiye Senibo

    2015-01-01

    There is little scientific evidence on the local use of Mangifera indica in kidney diseases. This study investigated the reno-modulatory roles of the aqueous stem bark extract of Mangifera indica (MIASE) against CCl4-induced renal damage. Rats were treated intragastrically with 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg/day MIASE for 7 days before and after the administration of CCl4 (3 ml/kg of 30% CCl4, i.p.). Serum levels of electrolytes (Na+, K+, Cl−, HCO3−), urea and creatinine were determined. Renal tissue reduced glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), catalase (CAT), superoxide (SOD) activities were also assessed. The histopathological changes in kidneys were determined using standard methods. In CCl4 treated rats the results showed significant (p<0.05) increases in serum Na+, K+, Cl−, urea and creatinine. CCl4 also caused significant (p<0.05) decreases in renal tissue SOD, CAT and GSH and significant (p<0.05) increases in MDA. The oral MIASE treatment (125-500 mg/kg) was found to significantly (p<0.05) attenuate the increase in serum electrolytes, urea and creatinine. Similarly, MIASE significantly (p<0.05) attenuated the decrease in SOD, CAT and GSH levels and correspondingly attenuated increases in MDA. Mangifera indica may present a great prospect for drug development in the management of kidney disease with lipid peroxidation as its etiology. PMID:27486379

  11. Modulatory effect of Mangifera indica against carbon tetrachloride induced kidney damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Awodele, Olufunsho; Adeneye, Adejuwon Adewale; Aiyeola, Sheriff Aboyade; Benebo, Adokiye Senibo

    2015-12-01

    There is little scientific evidence on the local use of Mangifera indica in kidney diseases. This study investigated the reno-modulatory roles of the aqueous stem bark extract of Mangifera indica (MIASE) against CCl4-induced renal damage. Rats were treated intragastrically with 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg/day MIASE for 7 days before and after the administration of CCl4 (3 ml/kg of 30% CCl4, i.p.). Serum levels of electrolytes (Na+, K+, Cl(-), HCO3(-)), urea and creatinine were determined. Renal tissue reduced glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), catalase (CAT), superoxide (SOD) activities were also assessed. The histopathological changes in kidneys were determined using standard methods. In CCl4 treated rats the results showed significant (p<0.05) increases in serum Na+, K+, Cl(-), urea and creatinine. CCl4 also caused significant (p<0.05) decreases in renal tissue SOD, CAT and GSH and significant (p<0.05) increases in MDA. The oral MIASE treatment (125-500 mg/kg) was found to significantly (p<0.05) attenuate the increase in serum electrolytes, urea and creatinine. Similarly, MIASE significantly (p<0.05) attenuated the decrease in SOD, CAT and GSH levels and correspondingly attenuated increases in MDA. Mangifera indica may present a great prospect for drug development in the management of kidney disease with lipid peroxidation as its etiology. PMID:27486379

  12. Clinical management of the uraemic syndrome in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Vanholder, Raymond; Fouque, Denis; Glorieux, Griet; Heine, Gunnar H; Kanbay, Mehmet; Mallamaci, Francesca; Massy, Ziad A; Ortiz, Alberto; Rossignol, Patrick; Wiecek, Andrzej; Zoccali, Carmine; London, Gérard Michel

    2016-04-01

    The clinical picture of the uraemic syndrome is a complex amalgam of accelerated ageing and organ dysfunction, which progress in parallel to chronic kidney disease. The uraemic syndrome is associated with cardiovascular disease, metabolic bone disease, inflammation, protein energy wasting, intestinal dysbiosis, anaemia, and neurological and endocrine dysfunction. In this Review, we summarise specific, modern management options for the uraemic syndrome in chronic kidney disease. Although large randomised controlled trials are scarce, based on data from randomised controlled trials and observational studies, as well as pathophysiological reasoning, a therapeutic algorithm can be developed for this complex and multifactorial condition, with interventions targeting several modifiable factors simultaneously. PMID:26948372

  13. Beta-2 Microglobulin Kidney Disease Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... accumulate in joint spaces ( synovitis ) in long-term dialysis patients; this is called dialysis-related amyloidosis (DRA). A B2M test may be ... early kidney dysfunction. People who have been on dialysis for five years or more may develop dialysis- ...

  14. Maternal micronutrient deficiency leads to alteration in the kidney proteome in rat pups.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shadab; Basak, Trayambak; Anand Kumar, K; Bhardwaj, Gourav; Lalitha, A; Yadav, Dilip K; Chandak, Giriraj Ratan; Raghunath, Manchala; Sengupta, Shantanu

    2015-09-01

    Maternal nutritional deficiency significantly perturbs the offspring's physiology predisposing them to metabolic diseases during adulthood. Vitamin B12 and folate are two such micronutrients, whose deficiency leads to elevated homocysteine levels. We earlier generated B12 and/or folate deficient rat models and using high-throughput proteomic approach, showed that maternal vitamin B12 deficiency modulates carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in the liver of pups through regulation of PPAR signaling pathway. In this study, using similar approach, we identified 26 differentially expressed proteins in the kidney of pups born to mothers fed with vitamin B12 deficient diet while only four proteins were identified in the folate deficient group. Importantly, proteins like calreticulin, cofilin 1 and nucleoside diphosphate kinase B that are involved in the functioning of the kidney were upregulated in B12 deficient group. Our results hint towards a larger effect of vitamin B12 deficiency compared to that of folate presumably due to greater elevation of homocysteine in vitamin B12 deficient group. In view of widespread vitamin B12 and folate deficiency and its association with several diseases like anemia, cardiovascular and renal diseases, our results may have large implications for kidney diseases in populations deficient in vitamin B12 especially in vegetarians and the elderly people.This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics in India. PMID:25982389

  15. Kidney bioengineering in regenerative medicine: An emerging therapy for kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Qian; Wang, Li-Ren; Pan, Liang-Liang; Wang, Hui; Zhu, Gui-Qi; Liu, Wen-Yue; Wang, Jiang-Tao; Braddock, Martin; Zheng, Ming-Hua

    2016-02-01

    The prevalence of end-stage renal disease is emerging as a serious worldwide public health problem because of the shortage of donor organs and the need to take lifelong immunosuppressive medication in patients who receive a transplanted kidney. Recently, tissue bioengineering of decellularization and recellularization scaffolds has emerged as a novel strategy for organ regeneration, and we review the critical technologies supporting these methods. We present a summary of factors associated with experimental protocols that may shed light on the future development of kidney bioengineering and we discuss the cell sources and bioreactor techniques applied to the recellularization process. Finally, we review some artificial renal engineering technologies and their future prospects, such as kidney on a chip and the application of three-dimensional and four-dimensional printing in kidney tissue engineering. PMID:26596504

  16. Feline glomeruli: morphologic comparisons in normal, autolytic, and diseased kidneys.

    PubMed

    Crowell, W A; Leininger, J R

    1976-09-01

    Twelve cats were used to study autolytic changes in glomerular morphology and compare these with lesions of naturally occurring feline renal disease. The 12 cats had normal clinical, urinary, and blood features. One kidney (0-hour control) was excised immediately after a given cat was euthanatized, and portions of it were prepared for light and electron microscopy. The opposite kidney (autolytic) remained in situ for selected postmortem intervals, up to 24 hours, at which time it was similarly processed. Renal tissues from 4 additional cats (3 with proteinuria and 1 with diabetes mellitus) were processed and examined for comparison. Zero-hour control kidneys had the following mean quantitations: renal weight was 9.9 g; glomerular diameter, 83 mum; number of cells per glomerulus in 1-mum section was 63; and diameter of cell nuclei was 6.3 mum for mesangial, 6.7 mum for visceral epithelial, and 6.4 mum for endothelial. In comparison with 0-hour control kidneys, autolytic kidneys had increased weight and glomerular diameter, but the diameter of cell nuclei decreased. Basement membrane thickness and glomerular cell numbers did not differ between 0-hour control and autolytic kidneys. Kidneys from 4 diseased cats had increased glomerular diameter and glomerular basement membrane changes characterized by hyalin thickening and dense deposits. These changes are compatible with a lesion diagnosis of membranous glomerulonephritis. PMID:962208

  17. Race and kidney disease: role of social and environmental factors.

    PubMed Central

    Nzerue, Chike M.; Demissochew, Haliu; Tucker, J. Kevin

    2002-01-01

    Numerous studies have documented the presence of racial disparities among Americans in health outcomes with respect to cardiovascular disease, infant mortality, cancer, and kidney disease. With regard to kidney diseases, these disparities are more dramatic. African, Hispanic, and Native Americans have the highest risks of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The incidence of ESRD is four times higher in African Americans than in whites. Diseases causing chronic kidney failure, such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, systemic lupus erythematosus, and human immunodeficiency virus-associated nephropathy, are particularly prevalent among African-American patients. In addition to the higher prevalence, the morbidity associated with kidney complications of these diseases appears worse in African-American patients. African Americans also have worse outcomes and a relatively reduced access to kidney transplantation--the best therapy for ESRD. It is highly likely that social and environmental factors play a very significant role in the persistence of these disparities. A detailed understanding of these socioeconomic and environmental factors will be critical in formulating rational public health strategies to redress these disparities. This paper reviews the social, economic and environmental factors that impact on the incidence of ESRD in minority groups. PMID:12152910

  18. Gut microbiota and inflammation in chronic kidney disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Mafra, Denise; Fouque, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a multifactorial phenotype that in chronic kidney disease is associated with adverse patient outcomes. Recently, alterations in gut microbiota composition and intestinal barrier have been associated with inflammation and oxidative stress in CKD patients. Vanholder and Glorieux recently critically reviewed [Clin Kidney J (2015) 8 (2): 168-179] the current understanding of the role of gut microbiota in the production of uraemic toxins and the therapeutic implications. Where do we stand now? The basic mechanisms of the gut-kidney crosstalk must still be clarified. In addition, the efficacy and safety of therapeutic strategies to modulate the gut microbiota in order to decrease uraemic toxin production and inflammation in chronic kidney disease should be evaluated. Finally, an impact of such strategies on hard outcomes should be demonstrated before incorporation into routine clinical practice. PMID:26034597

  19. Sonar and its Use in Kidney Disease in Children

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, E. A.; Murphy, A. V.; Arneil, G. C.

    1972-01-01

    The basic principles of diagnostic ultrasound or sonar are given, together with the special technique required for scanning newborn infants and small children for kidney abnormalities. Illustrative examples of the potential of this procedure, both in diagnosis and in monitoring changes include a normal neonatal and preadolescent kidney, unilateral renal agenesis, duplex kidney, renal cyst, polycystic disease, nephroblastoma, and examples of mild and severe hydronephrosis. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6FIG. 7FIG. 8FIG. 9FIG. 10FIG. 11FIG. 12 PMID:4343783

  20. MicroRNAs as potential therapeutic targets in kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Ivan G; Grafals, Monica; Portilla, Didier; Duffield, Jeremy S

    2014-01-01

    One cornerstone of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is fibrosis, as kidneys are susceptible due to their high vascularity and predisposition to ischemia. Presently, only therapies targeting the angiotensin receptor are used in clinical practice to retard the progression of CKD. Thus, there is a pressing need for new therapies designed to treat the damaged kidney. Several independent laboratories have identified a number of microRNAs that are dysregulated in human and animal models of CKD. We will explore the evidence suggesting that by blocking the activity of such dysregulated microRNAs, new therapeutics could be developed to treat the progression of CKD. PMID:23660218

  1. Diabetic kidney disease in Australia: current burden and future projections.

    PubMed

    White, Sarah; Chadban, Steve

    2014-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus is now the most common cause of new cases of end-stage kidney disease treated with kidney replacement therapy in Australia. In addition to the approximately 5000 Australians receiving maintenance dialysis or living with a kidney transplant as a consequence of diabetes, many die from untreated end-stage kidney disease due to diabetes (DM-ESKD) each year. For every Australian receiving renal replacement therapy due to diabetes, at least 50 others have earlier stages of diabetic kidney disease (DKD). Based on projected increases in type 2 diabetes prevalence, the size of this underlying population with DKD will potentially exceed half a million by 2025. In addition to the risk of developing DM-ESKD, this population is at increased risk of premature cardiovascular morbidity and all-cause mortality. Higher rates of hospitalization, use of specialist services and prescription drugs mean that those with DKD also incur significantly greater health care costs compared with those with diabetes or chronic kidney disease alone. However, in contrast to the increasing prevalence of diabetes and early stages of DKD, recent trends in the incidence of DM-ESKD suggest that better management in the earlier stages of DKD has been successful in slowing rates of disease progression. Simultaneous improvements in use of renin-angiotensin inhibitors and improved glycaemic and blood pressure control are likely to be largely responsible for this trend. Primary prevention, maximizing early detection of DKD and optimal management of diabetes and kidney disease hold great potential to attenuate the future health burden attributable to DKD in Australia. PMID:24888506

  2. Present and Future in the Treatment of Diabetic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Arriba, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic kidney disease is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease. Albuminuria is recognized as the most important prognostic factor for chronic kidney disease progression. For this reason, blockade of renin-angiotensin system remains the main recommended strategy, with either angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers. However, other antiproteinuric treatments have begun to be studied, such as direct renin inhibitors or aldosterone blockers. Beyond antiproteinuric treatments, other drugs such as pentoxifylline or bardoxolone have yielded conflicting results. Finally, alternative pathogenic pathways are being explored, and emerging therapies including antifibrotic agents, endothelin receptor antagonists, or transcription factors show promising results. The aim of this review is to explain the advances in newer agents to treat diabetic kidney disease, along with the background of the renin-angiotensin system blockade. PMID:25945357

  3. 78 FR 14312 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; George M. O'Brien Kidney Research Core Centers (P30). Date: April... Diseases and Nutrition Research; 93.849, Kidney Diseases, Urology and Hematology Research,...

  4. 78 FR 22273 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Acute Kidney Injury. Date: June 6, 2013. Time: 2:00 p.m. to 5:00... Metabolic Research; 93.848, Digestive Diseases and Nutrition Research; 93.849, Kidney Diseases, Urology...

  5. 76 FR 24897 - National Institute of Diabetes And Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes And Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Initial Review Group, Kidney, Urologic and Hematologic Diseases D Subcommittee. Date..., Endocrinology and Metabolic Research; 93.848, Digestive Diseases and Nutrition Research; 93.849, Kidney...

  6. 77 FR 6130 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Cellular Biology of Kidney Function and Disease. Date: March 15... and Metabolic Research; 93.848, Digestive Diseases and Nutrition Research; 93.849, Kidney...

  7. 78 FR 72683 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, PAR13-228: Biomarkers for Diabetes, Digestive, Kidney and..., Digestive Diseases and Nutrition Research; 93.849, Kidney Diseases, Urology and Hematology...

  8. How to Read a Food Label: Tips for People with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Read a Tips for People with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) National Kidney Disease Education Program If you have CKD, you may ... 4 KIDNEY (1-866-454-3639). The National Kidney Disease Education Program (NKDEP) encourages people to get tested ...

  9. Lamotrigine kidney distribution in male rats following a single intraperitoneal dose.

    PubMed

    Castel-Branco, M M; Falcão, A C; Figueiredo, I V; Macedo, T R A; Caramona, M M

    2004-02-01

    As it has been previously shown that lamotrigine (LTG) accumulates in the kidney of male rats, the purpose of the present investigation was to characterize the kidney profiles of LTG and its kidney distribution pattern in male rats, in order to confirm if a preferential distribution exists and to analyse if it does or does not affect the LTG systemic pharmacokinetics. Adult male Wistar rats were intraperitoneally injected with 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg of LTG. The concentration-time profiles of LTG in plasma and whole kidney were determined over 120 h postdose. The distribution of LTG in the rat kidney was investigated in another group of rats by measuring LTG levels in the renal cortex and medulla. The LTG plasma concentration-time profiles revealed a linear relationship with dose. However, a slight increase in the LTG elimination half-life with dose was observed. In contrast, a nonlinear relationship was established between LTG kidney levels and the dose administered. Consequently, nonparallel patterns were observed between LTG plasma and kidney profiles. The LTG kidney distribution pattern revealed an accumulation of LTG in the renal cortex. The present study demonstrated that LTG distributes preferentially to the kidneys of the male rat in a dose-dependent manner and suggests that such distribution may slightly affect the systemic kinetics of the drug. PMID:14748754

  10. New approaches to the autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease patient with dual kidney-liver complications.

    PubMed

    Telega, Grzegorz; Cronin, David; Avner, Ellis D

    2013-06-01

    Improved neonatal medical care and renal replacement technology have improved the long-term survival of patients with ARPKD. Ten-yr survival of those surviving the first year of life is reported to be 82% and is continuing to improve further. However, despite increases in overall survival and improved treatment of systemic hypertension and other complications of their renal disease, nearly 50% of survivors will develop ESRD within the first decade of life. In addition to renal pathology, patients with ARPKD develop ductal plate malformations with cystic dilation of intra- and extrahepatic bile ducts resulting in CHF and Caroli syndrome. Many patients with CHF will develop portal hypertension with resulting esophageal varices, splenomegaly, hypersplenism, protein losing enteropathy, and gastrointestinal bleeding. Management of portal hypertension may require EBL of esophageal varices or porto-systemic shunting. Complications of hepatic involvement can include ascending cholangitis, cholestasis with malabsorption of fat-soluble vitamins, and rarely benign or malignant liver tumors. Patients with ARPKD who eventually reach ESRD, and ultimately require kidney transplantation, present a unique set of complications related to their underlying hepato-biliary disease. In this review, we focus on new approaches to these challenging patients, including the indications for liver transplantation in ARPKD patients with severe chronic kidney disease awaiting kidney transplant. While survival in patients with ARPKD and isolated kidney transplant is comparable to that of age-matched pediatric patients who have received kidney transplants due to other primary renal diseases, 64-80% of the mortality occurring in ARPKD kidney transplant patients is attributed to cholangitis/sepsis, which is related to their hepato-biliary disease. Recent data demonstrate that surgical mortality among pediatric liver transplant recipients is decreased to <10% at one yr. The immunosuppressive regimen

  11. Soluble Fn14 Is Detected and Elevated in Mouse and Human Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Campanholle, Gabriela; Nagiec, Eva E.; Wang, Ju; Syed, Jameel; O’Neil, Shawn P.; Zhan, Yutian; Brenneman, Karrie; Homer, Bruce; Neubert, Hendrik; Karim, Riyez; Pullen, Nick; Evans, Steven M.; Fleming, Margaret; Chockalingam, Priya; Lin, Lih-Ling

    2016-01-01

    The cytokine TWEAK and its cognate receptor Fn14 are members of the TNF/TNFR superfamily and are upregulated in tissue injury to mediate local tissue responses including inflammation and tissue remodeling. We found that in various models of kidney disease, Fn14 expression (mRNA and protein) is upregulated in the kidney. These models include: lupus nephritis mouse models (Nephrotoxic serum Transfer Nephritis and MRL.Faslpr/lpr), acute kidney injury models (Ischemia reperfusion injury and Folic acid injury), and a ZSF-1 diabetic nephropathy rat model. Fn14 expression levels correlate with disease severity as measured by disease histology. We have also shown for the first time the detection of soluble Fn14 (sFn14) in the urine and serum of mice. Importantly, we found the sFn14 levels are markedly increased in the diseased mice and are correlated with disease biomarkers including proteinuria and MCP-1. We have also detected sFn14 in human plasma and urine. Moreover, sFn14 levels, in urine are significantly increased in DN patients and correlated with proteinuria and MCP-1 levels. Thus our data not only confirm the up-regulation of Fn14/TWEAK pathway in kidney diseases, but also suggest a novel mechanism for its regulation by the generation of sFn14. The correlation of sFn14 levels and disease severity suggest that sFn14 may serve as a potential biomarker for both acute and chronic kidney diseases. PMID:27171494

  12. The case for disease management in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Randolph A; Scott, Susan; Mattern, William D; Mohini, Ravinder; Nissenson, Allen R

    2006-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a growing epidemic in the United States and worldwide, with nearly two thirds of CKD patients also having diabetes, hypertension, or both. Morbidity and mortality among patients with CKD are high, as are the costs associated with care, which is highly fragmented. Disease management (DM) programs are designed to coordinate the delivery of care to patients, improve clinical outcomes, and reduce costs along the continuum of care. The goals of DM programs in CKD patients are to fill the gaps in current care by focusing on four key areas: (1) slowing the progression of CKD, (2) identifying and managing the complications of CKD, (3) identifying and managing associated comorbid conditions, and (4) smoothing the transition to renal replacement therapy (RRT). To be successful, this approach requires multidisciplinary collaboration among physicians (eg, primary care physicians, endocrinologists, cardiologists, nephrologists, surgeons) and participating caregivers including nurses, dieticians, social workers, and pharmacists. Patient identification, limited reimbursement, late patient referral, and lack of primary care physician and nephrologist knowledge about the importance and details of CKD management are all barriers that must be overcome for such programs to be successfully implemented. Considering the magnitude of the opportunity, DM applied to CKD is a promising approach to the care of this vulnerable population. PMID:16620194

  13. Survey Shows Blacks Not Concerned Enough about Kidney Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black Issues in Higher Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Health officials may have an uphill battle in educating Blacks about a disease that's being called a "silent killer," a recent survey shows. Kidney disease is an illness that's become more prevalent, especially in the nation's Black population, but a survey conducted in Jackson, Atlanta, Baltimore and Cleveland shows only 15 percent of those…

  14. Grape Powder Improves Age-Related Decline in Mitochondrial and Kidney Functions in Fischer 344 Rats.

    PubMed

    Pokkunuri, Indira; Ali, Quaisar; Asghar, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effects and mechanism of grape powder- (GP-) mediated improvement, if any, on aging kidney function. Adult (3-month) and aged (21-month) Fischer 344 rats were treated without (controls) and with GP (1.5% in drinking water) and kidney parameters were measured. Control aged rats showed higher levels of proteinuria and urinary kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), which decreased with GP treatment in these rats. Renal protein carbonyls (protein oxidation) and gp (91phox) -NADPH oxidase levels were high in control aged rats, suggesting oxidative stress burden in these rats. GP treatment in aged rats restored these parameters to the levels of adult rats. Moreover, glomerular filtration rate and sodium excretion were low in control aged rats suggesting compromised kidney function, which improved with GP treatment in aged rats. Interestingly, low renal mitochondrial respiration and ATP levels in control aged rats were associated with reduced levels of mitochondrial biogenesis marker MtTFA. Also, Nrf2 proteins levels were reduced in control aged rats. GP treatment increased levels of MtTFA and Nrf2 in aged rats. These results suggest that GP by potentially regulating Nrf2 improves aging mitochondrial and kidney functions. PMID:27528887

  15. Grape Powder Improves Age-Related Decline in Mitochondrial and Kidney Functions in Fischer 344 Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Quaisar

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effects and mechanism of grape powder- (GP-) mediated improvement, if any, on aging kidney function. Adult (3-month) and aged (21-month) Fischer 344 rats were treated without (controls) and with GP (1.5% in drinking water) and kidney parameters were measured. Control aged rats showed higher levels of proteinuria and urinary kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), which decreased with GP treatment in these rats. Renal protein carbonyls (protein oxidation) and gp91phox-NADPH oxidase levels were high in control aged rats, suggesting oxidative stress burden in these rats. GP treatment in aged rats restored these parameters to the levels of adult rats. Moreover, glomerular filtration rate and sodium excretion were low in control aged rats suggesting compromised kidney function, which improved with GP treatment in aged rats. Interestingly, low renal mitochondrial respiration and ATP levels in control aged rats were associated with reduced levels of mitochondrial biogenesis marker MtTFA. Also, Nrf2 proteins levels were reduced in control aged rats. GP treatment increased levels of MtTFA and Nrf2 in aged rats. These results suggest that GP by potentially regulating Nrf2 improves aging mitochondrial and kidney functions. PMID:27528887

  16. Chronic Kidney Disease Induced Intestinal Mucosal Barrier Damage Associated with Intestinal Oxidative Stress Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chao; Wang, Qiang; Zhou, Chunyu; Kang, Xin; Zhao, Shuang; Liu, Shuai; Fu, Huijun; Yu, Zhen; Peng, Ai

    2016-01-01

    Background. To investigate whether intestinal mucosal barrier was damaged or not in chronic kidney disease progression and the status of oxidative stress. Methods. Rats were randomized into two groups: a control group and a uremia group. The uremia rat model was induced by 5/6 kidney resection. In postoperative weeks (POW) 4, 6, 8, and 10, eight rats were randomly selected from each group to prepare samples for assessing systemic inflammation, intestinal mucosal barrier changes, and the status of intestinal oxidative stress. Results. The uremia group presented an increase trend over time in the serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-10, serum D-lactate and diamine oxidase, and intestinal permeability, and these biomarkers were significantly higher than those in control group in POW 8 and/or 10. Chiu's scores in uremia group were also increased over time, especially in POW 8 and 10. Furthermore, the intestinal malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase levels were significantly higher in uremia group when compared with those in control group in POW 8 and/or 10. Conclusions. The advanced chronic kidney disease could induce intestinal mucosal barrier damage and further lead to systemic inflammation. The underlying mechanism may be associated with the intestinal oxidative stress injury. PMID:27493661

  17. 75 FR 14605 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases, including consideration of personnel qualifications and performance, and the competence..., Director, Division of Intramural Research, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney...

  18. Long-term risk of chronic kidney disease in unilateral multicystic dysplastic kidney.

    PubMed

    Mansoor, Omer; Chandar, Jayanthi; Rodriguez, Maria M; Abitbol, Carolyn L; Seeherunvong, Wacharee; Freundlich, Michael; Zilleruelo, Gaston

    2011-04-01

    The clinical spectrum of renal dysplasia includes the non-functioning multicystic dysplastic kidney (MCDK). We report our experience of the outcome of unilateral MCDK and its contralateral kidney in 101 children with the diagnosis of MCDK from 1985 to 2009. Data collected included urine protein/creatinine ratio, estimated GFR (eGFR), blood pressure, surgical intervention, renal length and abnormalities of the contralateral kidney, and the involution rate. There was a predominance of left-sided MCDK. Diagnosis was made prenatally in 86.7%. Contralateral abnormalities included vesicoureteral reflux (16.8%), UPJ obstruction (4.1%), and megaureter (2.4%). Complete involution of MCDK occurred within 5 years in 60%. Compensatory hypertrophy of the contralateral kidney to >97% occurred in 74.1%. Nephrectomy was performed in 19.8%. There was an increased risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage ≥ 2, and hypertension in those with contralateral abnormalities (p<0.0001; p<0.001 respectively). In those without contralateral abnormalities, hyperfiltration with mean eGFR of 149 ± 13 ml/min/1.73 m(2) was seen in 32% and proteinuria in 9.8%. There was a significantly inverse relationship between proteinuria and eGFR (p<0.0001). In conclusion, children with contralateral abnormalities are at risk for developing decreased kidney function, whereas a substantial number of patients with no obvious contralateral abnormalities have markers of renal injury. Therefore, systematic follow-up of all patients is recommended. PMID:21240528

  19. Recent developments in epigenetics of acute and chronic kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Marpadga A; Natarajan, Rama

    2015-08-01

    The growing epidemic of obesity and diabetes, the aging population as well as prevalence of drug abuse has led to significant increases in the rates of the closely associated acute and chronic kidney diseases, including diabetic nephropathy. Furthermore, evidence shows that parental behavior and diet can affect the phenotype of subsequent generations via epigenetic transmission mechanisms. These data suggest a strong influence of the environment on disease susceptibility and that, apart from genetic susceptibility, epigenetic mechanisms need to be evaluated to gain critical new information about kidney diseases. Epigenetics is the study of processes that control gene expression and phenotype without alterations in the underlying DNA sequence. Epigenetic modifications, including cytosine DNA methylation and covalent post-translational modifications of histones in chromatin, are part of the epigenome, the interface between the stable genome and the variable environment. This dynamic epigenetic layer responds to external environmental cues to influence the expression of genes associated with disease states. The field of epigenetics has seen remarkable growth in the past few years with significant advances in basic biology, contributions to human disease, as well as epigenomics technologies. Further understanding of how the renal cell epigenome is altered by metabolic and other stimuli can yield novel new insights into the pathogenesis of kidney diseases. In this review, we have discussed the current knowledge on the role of epigenetic mechanisms (primarily DNAme and histone modifications) in acute and chronic kidney diseases, and their translational potential to identify much needed new therapies. PMID:25993323

  20. Recent Developments in Epigenetics of Acute and Chronic Kidney Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Marpadga A.; Natarajan, Rama

    2015-01-01

    The growing epidemic of obesity and diabetes, the aging population as well as prevalence of drug abuse has led to significant increases in the rates of the closely associated acute and chronic kidney diseases, including diabetic nephropathy. Furthermore, evidence shows that parental behavior and diet can affect the phenotype of subsequent generations via epigenetic transmission mechanisms. These data suggest a strong influence of the environment on disease susceptibility and that, apart from genetic susceptibility, epigenetic mechanisms need to be evaluated to gain critical new information about kidney diseases. Epigenetics is the study of processes that control gene expression and phenotype without alterations in the underlying DNA sequence. Epigenetic modifications, including cytosine DNA methylation and covalent post translational modifications of histones in chromatin are part of the epigenome, the interface between the stable genome and the variable environment. This dynamic epigenetic layer responds to external environmental cues to influence the expression of genes associated with disease states. The field of epigenetics has seen remarkable growth in the past few years with significant advances in basic biology, contributions to human disease, as well as epigenomics technologies. Further understanding of how the renal cell epigenome is altered by metabolic and other stimuli can yield novel new insights into the pathogenesis of kidney diseases. In this review, we have discussed the current knowledge on the role of epigenetic mechanisms (primarily DNA me and histone modifications) in acute and chronic kidney diseases, and their translational potential to identify much needed new therapies. PMID:25993323

  1. High Water Intake and Progression of Chronic Kidney Diseases.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hoon Young; Park, Hyeong Cheon; Ha, Sung Kyu

    2015-12-01

    Impact of water intake on the courses of chronic kidney and urinary tract diseases, such as urolithiasis, urinary tract infections, chronic kidney diseases (CKD), autosomal dominant polycystic kidney diseases and bladder cancer, has recently been studied. It still remains controversial whether increased water intake slows the progression of CKD or not. However, high water intake suppresses plasma levels of arginine vasopressin (AVP), which is expected to be beneficial for the preservation of the kidney function. Previous studies suggest that water intake suppresses plasma levels of AVP, and high levels of AVP have been suggested to play deleterious roles in animal models of kidney disease. Moreover, recent epidemic of CKD of unknown origin, which was supposed to be related to the insufficient water intake and chronic volume depletion, has been reported in Central America, further suggesting that the suppression of AVP by sustained water intake might be beneficial in this CKD population. Indeed, the data from recent studies were consistent with the view that high water intake is associated with slower progression of CKD. However, contradictory findings also exist. The intriguing effects of increased urine volume in preserving the glomerular filtration rate in human patients with CKD require more large and well-designed randomized prospective clinical trials. PMID:26848303

  2. The NLRP3 inflammasome in kidney disease and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Hutton, Holly L; Ooi, Joshua D; Holdsworth, Stephen R; Kitching, A Richard

    2016-09-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome is an intracellular platform that converts the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18 to their active forms in response to 'danger' signals, which can be either host or pathogen derived, and mediates a form of inflammatory cell death called pyroptosis. This component of the innate immune system was initially discovered because of its role in rare autoinflammatory syndromes called cryopyrinopathies, but it has since been shown to mediate injurious inflammation in a broad range of diseases. Inflammasome activation occurs in both immune cells, primarily macrophages and dendritic cells, and in some intrinsic kidney cells such as the renal tubular epithelium. The NLRP3 inflammasome has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of renal conditions, including acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, diabetic nephropathy and crystal-related nephropathy. The inflammasome also plays a role in autoimmune kidney disease, as IL-1β and IL-18 influence adaptive immunity through modulation of T helper cell subsets, skewing development in favour of Th17 and Th1 cells that are important in the development of autoimmunity. Both IL-1 blockade and two recently identified specific NLRP3 inflammasome blockers, MCC950 and β-hydroxybutyrate, have shown promise in the treatment of inflammasome-mediated conditions. These targeted therapies have the potential to be of benefit in the growing number of kidney diseases in which the NLRP3 inflammasome has been implicated. PMID:27011059

  3. [Clinical diagnosis of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease].

    PubMed

    Magistroni, Riccardo; Izzi, Claudia; Scolari, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common genetic disorder related to kidney. ADPKD is usually easy to diagnose in people who have a family history of ADPKDs developing typical symptoms, including flank, abdominal pain or macroscopic hematuria. In this setting, diagnosis in adults at risk for ADPKD is commonly performed by ultrasonography, which reveals two enlarged kidneys with multiple bilateral cysts. ADPKD may be more difficult to diagnose in the absence of family history or in subjects with atypical presentation, including asymmetric or focal renal imaging findings, discordant disease within family, early onset of ADPKD and development of ESRD before 30 yr of age. The presence of a total of three or more renal cysts for at-risk subjects aged 15-39 years and two cysts or more in each kidney for at-risk subjects aged 40-59 years are sufficient for the diagnosis of ADPKD. The absence of any renal cyst is sufficient for disease exclusion only for at-risk subjects aged 40 years or older. If the family history is negative, the diagnosis of ADPKD can be made in a patient with enlarged kidneys, numerous cysts, presence of liver cysts and absence of findings suggesting a different cystic disease. If the imaging diagnosis is not clear or showing atypical manifestations in subjects, molecular genetic testing should be performed. PMID:27067212

  4. Acute kidney injury in critically ill patients with lung disease: kidney-lung crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    de Abreu, Krasnalhia Lívia Soares; da Silva Junior, Geraldo Bezerra; Muniz, Thalita Diógenes; Barreto, Adller Gonçalves Costa; Lima, Rafael Siqueira Athayde; Holanda, Marcelo Alcântara; Pereira, Eanes Delgado Barros; Libório, Alexandre Braga; Daher, Elizabeth de Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the factors associated with acute kidney injury and outcome in patients with lung disease. Methods A prospective study was conducted with 100 consecutive patients admitted to a respiratory intensive care unit in Fortaleza (CE), Brazil. The risk factors for acute kidney injury and mortality were investigated in a group of patients with lung diseases. Results The mean age of the study population was 57 years, and 50% were male. The incidence of acute kidney injury was higher in patients with PaO2/FiO2<200 mmHg (54% versus 23.7%; p=0.02). Death was observed in 40 cases and the rate of mortality of the acute kidney injury group was higher (62.8% versus 27.6%; p=0.01). The independent factor that was found to be associated with acute kidney injury was PaO2/FiO2<200 mmHg (p=0.01), and the independent risk factors for death were PEEP at admission (OR: 3.6; 95%CI: 1.3-9.6; p=0.009) and need for hemodialysis (OR: 7.9; 95%CI: 2.2-28.3; p=0.001). Conclusion There was a higher mortality rate in the acute kidney injury group. Increased mortality was associated with mechanical ventilation, high PEEP, urea and need for dialysis. Further studies must be performed to better establish the relationship between kidney and lung injury and its impact on patient outcome. PMID:23917978

  5. Endocrine Abnormalities in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Kuczera, Piotr; Adamczak, Marcin; Wiecek, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    In patients with chronic kidney disease the alterations of the endocrine system may arise from several causes. The kidney is the site of degradation as well as synthesis of many different hormones. Moreover, a number of concomitant pathological conditions such as inflammation, metabolic acidosis and malnutrition may participate in the pathogenesis of endocrine abnormalities in this group of patients. The most pronounced endocrine abnormalities in patients with chronic kidney disease are the deficiencies of: calcitriol, testosterone, insulin-like growth factor and, erythropoietin (EPO). Additionally accumulation of several hormones, such as: prolactin, growth hormone and insulin frequently also occur. The clinical consequences of the abovementioned endocrine abnormalities are among others: anemia, infertility and bone diseases. PMID:27442377

  6. Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and chronic kidney disease in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Kiffel, Jeremy; Rahimzada, Yael; Trachtman, Howard

    2011-09-01

    Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is one of the most common forms of acquired glomerular disease leading to end-stage kidney disease. Its incidence is rising around the world. There is no proven therapy for those patients who do not respond to corticosteroids and it can recur in 20% to 25% of patients who receive a kidney transplant. The disease can be primary, or it can be secondary to various conditions including vesicoureteral reflux, obesity, medications, and infections. Recent advances have demonstrated the important role of genetic mutations in podocyte proteins as a cause of FSGS. There is an urgent need for randomized clinical trials to develop safe and effective therapy for FSGS that occurs in the native or transplanted kidney. PMID:21896374

  7. 78 FR 9931 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ..., Endocrinology and Metabolic Research; 93.848, Digestive Diseases and Nutrition Research; 93.849, Kidney Diseases... Kidney Diseases Special; Emphasis Panel; Time-Sensitive Obesity Applications Date: March 14, 2013....

  8. 75 FR 4094 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-26

    ... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Hematology Program Projects. Date: March 9, 2010. Time: 1 p.m. to... Diseases and Nutrition Research; 93.849, Kidney Diseases, Urology and Hematology Research,...

  9. 76 FR 60057 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-28

    ... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Cognitive Function in Chronic Disease Ancillary Studies. Date..., Kidney Diseases, Urology and Hematology Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: September 21... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and...

  10. Aortic PWV in Chronic Kidney Disease: A CRIC Ancillary Study

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Raymond R.; Wimmer, Neil J.; Chirinos, Julio A.; Parsa, Afshin; Weir, Matthew; Perumal, Kalyani; Lash, James P.; Chen, Jing; Steigerwalt, Susan P.; Flack, John; Go, Alan S.; Rafey, Mohammed; Rahman, Mahboob; Sheridan, Angela; Gadegbeku, Crystal A.; Robinson, Nancy A.; Joffe, Marshall

    2009-01-01

    Background Aortic PWV is a measure of arterial stiffness and has proved useful in predicting cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in several populations of patients, including the healthy elderly, hypertensives and those with end stage renal disease receiving hemodialysis. Little data exist characterizing aortic stiffness in patients with chronic kidney disease who are not receiving dialysis, and in particular the effect of reduced kidney function on aortic PWV. Methods We performed measurements of aortic PWV in a cross-sectional cohort of participants enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study to determine factors which predict increased aortic PWV in chronic kidney disease. Results PWV measurements were obtained in 2564 participants. The tertiles of aortic PWV (adjusted for waist circumference) were < 7.7 m/sec, 7.7–10.2 m/sec and > 10.2 m/sec with an overall mean (± S.D.) value of 9.48 ± 3.03 m/sec [95% CI = 9.35–9.61 m/sec]. Multivariable regression identified significant independent positive associations of age, blood glucose concentrations, race, waist circumference, mean arterial blood pressure, gender, and presence of diabetes with aortic PWV and a significant negative association with the level of kidney function. Conclusions The large size of this unique cohort, and the targeted enrollment of chronic kidney disease participants provides an ideal situation to study the role of reduced kidney function as a determinant of arterial stiffness. Arterial stiffness may be a significant component of the enhanced cardiovascular risk associated with kidney failure. PMID:20019670

  11. Identification and isolation of kidney-derived stem cells from transgenic rats with diphtheria toxin-induced kidney damage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing-Zhen; Chen, Xu-Dong; Liu, Gang; Guan, Guang-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Adult stem cells have been well characterized in numerous organs, with the exception of the kidneys. Therefore, the present study aimed to identify and isolate kidney-derived stem cells. A total of 12 Fischer 344 transgenic rats expressing the human diphtheria toxin receptor in podocyte cells of the kidney, were used in the present study. The rats were administered 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) in order to detect cellular proliferation. After 60 days, the rats were treated with the diphtheria toxin (DT), in order to induce kidney injury. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated that the number of BrdU-positive cells were increased following DT treatment. In addition, the expression of octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (Oct-4), a stem cell marker, was detected and suggested that kidney-specific stem cells were present in the DT-treated tissue samples. Furthermore, tissue samples exhibited repair of the DT-induced injury. Further cellular culturing was conducted in order to isolate the kidney-specific stem cells. After 5 weeks of culture, the majority of the cells were non-viable, with the exception of certain specialized, unique cell types, which were monomorphic and spindle-shaped in appearance. The unique cells were isolated and subjected to immunostaining and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses in order to reconfirm the expression of Oct-4 and to detect the expression of Paired box 2 (Pax-2), which is necessary for the formation of kidney structures. The unique cells were positive for Oct-4 and Pax-2; thus suggesting that the identified cells were kidney-derived stem cells. The results of the present study suggested that the unique cell type identified in the kidneys of the DT-treated rats were kidney-specific stem cells that may have been involved in the repair of DT-induced tissue injury. In addition, these cells may provide a useful cell line for studying the fundamental characteristics of kidney stem cells, as well as identifying

  12. Recent advances in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Rangan, G K; Tchan, M C; Tong, A; Wong, A T Y; Nankivell, B J

    2016-08-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common genetic renal disease in adults, affecting one in every 1000 Australians. It is caused by loss-of-function heterozygous mutations in either PKD1 or PKD2 , which encode the proteins, polycystin-1 and polycystin-2 respectively. The disease hallmark is the development of hundreds of microscopic fluid-filled cysts in the kidney during early childhood, which grow exponentially and continuously through life at varying rates (between 2% and 10% per year), causing loss of normal renal tissue and up to a 50% lifetime risk of dialysis-dependent kidney failure. Other systemic complications include hypertensive cardiac disease, hepatic cysts, intracranial aneurysms, diverticular disease and hernias. Over the last two decades, advances in the genetics and pathogenesis of this disease have led to novel treatments that reduce the rate of renal cyst growth and may potentially delay the onset of kidney failure. New evidence indicates that conventional therapies (such as angiotensin inhibitors and statins) have mild attenuating effects on renal cyst growth and that systemic levels of vasopressin are critical for promoting renal cyst growth in the postnatal period. Identifying and integrating patient-centred perspectives in clinical trials is also being advocated. This review will provide an update on recent advances in the clinical management of ADPKD. PMID:27553994

  13. Use of sevelamer in chronic kidney disease: beyond phosphorus control.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Osorio, Laura; Zambrano, Diana Pazmiño; Gracia-Iguacel, Carolina; Rojas-Rivera, Jorge; Ortiz, Alberto; Egido, Jesus; González Parra, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Sevelamer is a non-calcium phosphate binder used in advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) and in dialysis for hyperphosphataemia control. Several experimental, observational studies and clinical trials have shown that sevelamer has pleiotropic effects, beyond hyperphosphataemia control, including actions on inflammation, oxidative stress, lipid profile and atherogenesis, vascular calcification, endothelial dysfunction and the reduction of several uremic toxins. This is the biological basis for its global effect on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease. This review focuses on these pleiotropic actions of sevelamer and their impact on cardiovascular health, with the experience published after more than ten years of clinical expertise. PMID:26300515

  14. Imaging Approaches to Patients with Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Arlene B.; Wei, Wenjing

    2011-01-01

    Imaging is an important approach to diagnosis, monitoring and predicting outcomes for patients with Autosomal Dominant polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD). This paper reviews three common clinical imaging techniques, ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and their role in management of ADPKD. Ultrasonographic criteria for diagnosis in children and adults are reviewed. Total kidney volume (TKV), as measured by MRI, is suggested as important potential marker to determine disease progression and overall prognosis. Renal blood flow (RBF) and a novel approach to interpreting non-cystic renal parenchymal by CT images are other innovative imaging approaches described. PMID:21784272

  15. Effects of Brown Seaweed (Sargassum polycystum) Extracts on Kidney, Liver, and Pancreas of Type 2 Diabetic Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Motshakeri, Mahsa; Ebrahimi, Mahdi; Goh, Yong Meng; Othman, Hemn Hassan; Hair-Bejo, Mohd; Mohamed, Suhaila

    2014-01-01

    The edible seaweed Sargassum polycystum (SP) is traditionally used against several human diseases. This investigation evaluated the effects of two dietary doses of SP ethanolic and aqueous extracts on the pancreatic, hepatic, and renal morphology of type 2 diabetic rats (T2DM). T2DM was induced by feeding rats on high calorie diet followed by a low dose streptozotocin. Changes in the diabetic rat organs in SP treated groups with different doses of extracts were compared with normal rats, diabetic control rats, and metformin treated rats. After 22 days of treatment, the pathological lesions of the livers and kidneys in the diabetic rats were quantitatively and qualitatively alleviated (P < 0.05) by both the SP extracts at 150 mg/kg body weight and by metformin. All the treated diabetic groups revealed marked improvement in the histopathology of the pancreas compared with the control diabetic group. Oral administration of 300 mg/kg body weight of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of SP and metformin revealed pancreas protective or restorative effects. The seaweed extracts at 150 mg/kg body weight reduced the liver and kidney damages in the diabetic rats and may exert tissue repair or restoration of the pancreatic islets in experimentally induced diabetes to produce the beneficial homeostatic effects. PMID:24516503

  16. Effects of Brown Seaweed (Sargassum polycystum) Extracts on Kidney, Liver, and Pancreas of Type 2 Diabetic Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Motshakeri, Mahsa; Goh, Yong Meng; Othman, Hemn Hassan; Hair-Bejo, Mohd; Mohamed, Suhaila

    2014-01-01

    The edible seaweed Sargassum polycystum (SP) is traditionally used against several human diseases. This investigation evaluated the effects of two dietary doses of SP ethanolic and aqueous extracts on the pancreatic, hepatic, and renal morphology of type 2 diabetic rats (T2DM). T2DM was induced by feeding rats on high calorie diet followed by a low dose streptozotocin. Changes in the diabetic rat organs in SP treated groups with different doses of extracts were compared with normal rats, diabetic control rats, and metformin treated rats. After 22 days of treatment, the pathological lesions of the livers and kidneys in the diabetic rats were quantitatively and qualitatively alleviated (P < 0.05) by both the SP extracts at 150 mg/kg body weight and by metformin. All the treated diabetic groups revealed marked improvement in the histopathology of the pancreas compared with the control diabetic group. Oral administration of 300 mg/kg body weight of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of SP and metformin revealed pancreas protective or restorative effects. The seaweed extracts at 150 mg/kg body weight reduced the liver and kidney damages in the diabetic rats and may exert tissue repair or restoration of the pancreatic islets in experimentally induced diabetes to produce the beneficial homeostatic effects. PMID:24516503

  17. Dietary Sodium in Chronic Kidney Disease: A Comprehensive Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Julie A.; Cavanaugh, Kerri L.

    2010-01-01

    Despite existing guidelines, dietary sodium intake among people worldwide often exceeds recommended limits. Research evidence is growing in both animal and human studies showing indirect and direct adverse consequences of high dietary sodium on the kidney. In patients with kidney disease, dietary sodium may have important effects on proteinuria, efficacy of antiproteinuric pharmacologic therapy, hypertension control, maintaining an optimal volume status, and immunosuppressant therapy. Dietary sodium intake is an important consideration in patients with all stages of chronic kidney disease, including those receiving dialysis therapy or those who have received a kidney transplant. We review in detail the dietary sodium recommendations suggested by various organizations for patients with kidney disease. Potential barriers to successfully translating current sodium intake guidelines into practice include poor knowledge about the sodium content of food among both patients and providers, complex labeling information, patient preferences related to taste, and limited support for modifications in public policy. Finally, we offer existing and potential solutions that may assist providers in educating and empowering patients to effectively manage their dietary sodium intake. PMID:20557489

  18. Embryonic Stem Cells-loaded Gelatin Microcryogels Slow Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Xiao-Dong; Zheng, Wei; Wu, Cong-Mei; Wang, Shu-Qiang; Hong, Quan; Cai, Guang-Yan; Chen, Xiang-Mei; Wu, Di

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a public health problem. New interventions to slow or prevent disease progression are urgently needed. In this setting, cell therapies associated with regenerative effects are attracting increasing interest. We evaluated the effect of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) on the progression of CKD. Methods: Adult male Sprague–Dawley rats were subjected to 5/6 nephrectomy. We used pedicled greater omentum flaps packing ESC-loaded gelatin microcryogels (GMs) on the 5/6 nephrectomized kidney. The viability of ESCs within the GMs was detected using in vitro two-photon fluorescence confocal imaging. Rats were sacrificed after 12 weeks. Renal injury was evaluated using serum creatinine, urea nitrogen, 24 h protein, renal pathology, and tubular injury score results. Structural damage was evaluated by periodic acid-Schiff and Masson trichrome staining. Results: In vitro, ESCs could be automatically loaded into the GMs. Uniform cell distribution, good cell attachment, and viability were achieved from day 1 to 7 in vitro. After 12 weeks, in the pedicled greater omentum flaps packing ESC-loaded GMs on 5/6 nephrectomized rats group, the plasma urea nitrogen levels were 26% lower than in the right nephrectomy group, glomerulosclerosis index was 62% lower and tubular injury index was 40% lower than in the 5/6 nephrectomized rats group without GMs. Conclusions: In a rat model of established CKD, we demonstrated that the pedicled greater omentum flaps packing ESC-loaded GMs on the 5/6 nephrectomized kidney have a long-lasting therapeutic rescue function, as shown by the decreased progression of CKD and reduced glomerular injury. PMID:26879011

  19. Differential expression and regulation of Klotho by paricalcitol in the kidney, parathyroid and aorta of uremic rats

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, Cynthia S.; Zhang, Sarah; Delmez, James; Finch, Jane L; Slatopolsky, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Klotho plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Klotho is highly expressed in the kidney and parathyroid glands, but its presence in the vasculature is debated. Renal Klotho is decreased in CKD, but the effect of uremia on Klotho in other tissues is not defined. The effect of vitamin D receptor activator therapy in CKD on expression of Klotho in various tissues is also in debate. In uremic rats (surgical 5/6th nephrectomy model), we compared 3-months of treatment with and without paricalcitol on Klotho immunostaining in the kidney, parathyroid glands and aorta. With uremia, Klotho was unchanged in the parathyroid, significantly decreased in the kidney (66%) and the intimal-medial area of the aorta (69%), and significantly increased in the adventitial area of the aorta (67%) compared with controls. Paricalcitol prevented the decrease in Klotho in the kidney, increased expression in the parathyroid (31%), had no effect in the aortic media, but blunted the increase of Klotho in aortic adventitia. We propose that fibroblasts are responsible for expression of Klotho in the adventitia. In hyperplastic human parathyroid tissue from uremic patients, Klotho was higher in oxyphil compared with chief cells. Thus, under our conditions of moderate CKD and mild-to-moderate hyperphosphatemia in rats, the differential expression of Klotho and its regulation by paricalcitol in uremia is tissue-dependent. PMID:25692955

  20. Neurocognitive Outcomes in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease: Current Findings and Contemporary Endeavors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerson, Arlene C.; Butler, Robert; Moxey-Mims, Marva; Wentz, Alicia; Shinnar, Shlomo; Lande, Marc B.; Mendley, Susan R.; Warady, Bradley A.; Furth, Susan L.; Hooper, Stephen R.

    2006-01-01

    Given the rise in chronic kidney disease (CKD) in both children and adults, CKD has recently been targeted as a public health priority. Childhood onset kidney disease is generally a noncurable and progressive condition that leads to kidney failure by early adulthood. Fortunately, improved identification of kidney problems allows for early…

  1. 75 FR 34147 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Biomarkers in Acute Kidney Injury Ancillary Studies. Date: July... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Research; 93.849, Kidney Diseases, Urology and Hematology Research, National Institutes of Health,...

  2. Relationship between chronic kidney disease and metabolic syndrome: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Nashar, Khaled; Egan, Brent M

    2014-01-01

    Both metabolic syndrome (MetS) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are increasing in incidence and lead to significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The relationship between these two entities is complex. Individual components of the MetS are known risk factors for incident kidney disease, but it is not clear how the clustering of these components is linked to the development and progression of kidney disease. Cross-sectional studies show an association of the MetS and prevalent CKD; however, one cannot draw conclusions as to which came first – the MetS or the kidney disease. Observational studies suggest a relationship between MetS and incident CKD, but they also demonstrate the development of MetS in patients with established CKD. These observations suggest a bidirectional relationship. A better understanding of the relationship between components of the MetS and whether and how these components contribute to progression of CKD and incident cardiovascular disease could inform more effective prevention strategies. PMID:25258547

  3. Spectroscopic study of hydroxyproline transport in rat kidney mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Atlante, A; Passarella, S; Quagliariello, E

    1994-07-15

    Hydroxyproline uptake by rat kidney mitochondria is here first shown by monitoring the reduction of the intramitochondrial pyridine nucleotides which occurs as a result of metabolism of imported hydroxyproline via hydroxyproline oxidase and 3-hydroxy-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase. Widely used criteria for demonstrating the occurrence of carrier-mediated transport were applied to this process. Hydroxyproline uptake shows saturation features (Km and Vmax values, measured at 20 degrees C and at pH 7.20, were found to be about 1.4 mM and 5 nmoles/min x mg mitochondrial protein, respectively) and proves to be inhibited by the impermeable compound phenylsuccinate, but insensitive to externally added methylglutamate. Difference found in the Km and Vmax values, a different inhibitor sensitivity and the failure of hydroxyproline to cause efflux of glutamate from the mitochondria show that hydroxyproline enters mitochondria by means of a translocator different from those which transport proline. PMID:8037764

  4. [Activity of hydrogen sulfide production enzymes in kidneys of rats].

    PubMed

    Mel'nyk, A V; Pentiuk, O O

    2009-01-01

    An experimental research of activity and kinetic descriptions of enzymes participating in formation of hydrogen sulfide in the kidney of rats has been carried out. It was established that cystein, homocystein and thiosulphate are the basic substrates for hydrogen sulfide synthesis. The higest activity for hydrogen sulfide production belongs to thiosulfate-dithiolsulfurtransferase and cysteine aminotransferase, less activity is characteristic of cystathionine beta-synthase and cystathio-nine gamma-lyase. The highest affinity to substrate is registered for thiosulfate-dithiolsulfurtransferase and cystathionine gamma-lyase. It is discovered that the substrate inhibition is typical of all hydrogen sulfide formation enzymes, although this characteristic is the most expressed thiosulfat-dithiolsulfurtransferase. PMID:20387629

  5. Altered magnesium transport in slices of kidney cortex from chemically-induced diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskins, B.

    1981-10-01

    The uptake of magnesium-28 was measured in slices of kidney cortex from rats with alloxan-diabetes and from rats with streptozotocin-diabetes of increasing durations. In both forms of chemically-induced diabetes, magnesium-28 uptake by kidney cortex slices was significantly increased over uptake measured in kidney cortex slices from control rats. Immediate institution of daily insulin therapy to the diabetic rats prevented the diabetes-induced elevated uptake of magnesium without controlling blood glucose levels. Late institution of daily insulin therapy was ineffective in restoring the magnesium uptake to control values. These alterations in magnesium uptake occurred prior to any evidence of nephropathy (via the classic indices of proteinuria and increased BUN levels). The implications of these findings, together with our earlier demonstrations of altered calcium transport by kidney cortex slices from chemically-induced diabetic rats, are discussed in terms of disordered divalent cation transport being at least part of the basic pathogenesis underlying diabetic nephropathy.

  6. Light chain crystalline kidney disease: diagnostic urine microscopy as the "liquid kidney biopsy".

    PubMed

    Luciano, Randy L; Castano, Ekaterina; Fogazzi, Giovanni B; Perazella, Mark A

    2014-12-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell disorder, which often causes parenchymal kidney disease. Light chain (LC) cast nephropathy represents the most common renal lesion. In some instances, LC crystals precipitate within renal tubular lumens and deposit within proximal tubular cell cytoplasms. Importantly, urine microscopy in such patients can provide insight into the underlying LC-related lesion. Here we present two patients with MM complicated by acute kidney injury (AKI) where LC crystalline casts were observed on urinary sediment analysis. Kidney biopsy revealed acute tubular injury with LC crystal casts within both tubular lumens and renal tubular epithelial cell cytoplasms. These findings suggest that the urinary sediment may be a non-invasive way to diagnose LC crystalline-induced AKI in patients with MM. PMID:25295579

  7. Molecular diagnosis of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Torra Balcells, R; Ars Criach, E

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common inherited renal disorder. Its estimated prevalence is 1 per 800 individuals. ADPKD patients constitute 8% of the population on dialysis or kidney transplantation. The disease can be diagnosed using radiological or genetic procedures. Direct genetic diagnosis of the disease can now be performed in Spain; however, it is not an easy or cheap test. This is why every case should be considered individually to determine whether genetic testing is appropriate, and to determine which genetic test is most adequate. Genetic testing in ADPKD is of special interest for living donors and neonatal and sporadic cases. Genetic testing offers the chance of performing prenatal or pre-implantation testing of embryos in families with severe cases of the disease. Also, this will enable the disease to be treated, when specific treatment becomes available, in cases that would not be candidates for treatment without genetic confirmation. PMID:21270911

  8. Kidney and eye diseases: common risk factors, etiological mechanisms, and pathways.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chee Wai; Wong, Tien Yin; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Sabanayagam, Charumathi

    2014-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease is an emerging health problem worldwide. The eye shares striking structural, developmental, and genetic pathways with the kidney, suggesting that kidney disease and ocular disease may be closely linked. A growing number of studies have found associations of chronic kidney disease with age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and cataract. In addition, retinal microvascular parameters have been shown to be predictive of chronic kidney disease. Chronic kidney disease shares common vascular risk factors including diabetes, hypertension, smoking, and obesity, and pathogenetic mechanisms including inflammation, oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, and microvascular dysfunction, with ocular diseases supporting the 'Common Soil Hypothesis.' In this review, we present major epidemiological evidence for these associations and explore underlying pathogenic mechanisms and common risk factors for kidney and ocular disease. Understanding the link between kidney and ocular disease can lead to the development of new treatment and screening strategies for both diseases. PMID:24336029

  9. Thermal oscillations in rat kidneys: an infrared imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Gorbach, Alexander M.; Wang, Hengliang; Elster, Eric

    2008-01-01

    A high-resolution infrared (IR) camera was used to assess rhythmicity in localized renal blood flow, including the extent of regions containing nephrons with spontaneous oscillations in their individual blood flow. The IR imaging was able to follow changes in rat renal perfusion during baseline conditions, during occlusion of the main renal artery and during the administration of either saline or papaverine. Concurrent recordings were made of tubular pressure in superficial nephrons. Spontaneous vascular oscillations centred around 0.02–0.05 Hz and approximately 0.01 Hz could be detected reproducibly by IR imaging. Their spectral characteristics and their response to papaverine were in line with tubular pressure measurements. The intensity of and synchrony between thermal signals from different local areas of the kidney may allow, after surgical exposure, non-invasive imaging of functional clusters involved in renal cortical blood flow. Through visualization of the spatial extent of thermal oscillations, IR imaging holds promise in assessing kidney autoregulatory mechanisms. PMID:18650199

  10. Treatment of chronic kidney diseases with histone deacetylase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Na; Zhuang, Shougang

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) induce deacetylation of both histone and non-histone proteins and play a critical role in the modulation of physiological and pathological gene expression. Pharmacological inhibition of HDAC has been reported to attenuate progression of renal fibrogenesis in obstructed kidney and reduce cyst formation in polycystic kidney disease. HDAC inhibitors (HDACis) are also able to ameliorate renal lesions in diabetes nephropathy, lupus nephritis, aristolochic acid nephropathy, and transplant nephropathy. The beneficial effects of HDACis are associated with their anti-fibrosis, anti-inflammation, and immunosuppressant effects. In this review, we summarize recent advances on the treatment of various chronic kidney diseases with HDACis in pre-clinical models. PMID:25972812

  11. Indoxyl sulphate and kidney disease: Causes, consequences and interventions.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Robert J; Small, David M; Vesey, David A; Johnson, David W; Francis, Ross; Vitetta, Luis; Gobe, Glenda C; Morais, Christudas

    2016-03-01

    In the last decade, chronic kidney disease (CKD), defined as reduced renal function (glomerular filtration rate (GFR) < 60 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) ) and/or evidence of kidney damage (typically manifested as albuminuria) for at least 3 months, has become one of the fastest-growing public health concerns worldwide. CKD is characterized by reduced clearance and increased serum accumulation of metabolic waste products (uremic retention solutes). At least 152 uremic retention solutes have been reported. This review focuses on indoxyl sulphate (IS), a protein-bound, tryptophan-derived metabolite that is generated by intestinal micro-organisms (microbiota). Animal studies have demonstrated an association between IS accumulation and increased fibrosis, and oxidative stress. This has been mirrored by in vitro studies, many of which report cytotoxic effects in kidney proximal tubular cells following IS exposure. Clinical studies have associated IS accumulation with deleterious effects, such as kidney functional decline and adverse cardiovascular events, although causality has not been conclusively established. The aims of this review are to: (i) establish factors associated with increased serum accumulation of IS; (ii) report effects of IS accumulation in clinical studies; (iii) critique the reported effects of IS in the kidney, when administered both in vivo and in vitro; and (iv) summarize both established and hypothetical therapeutic options for reducing serum IS or antagonizing its reported downstream effects in the kidney. PMID:26239363

  12. Integrative microRNA-gene expression network analysis in genetic hypercalciuric stone-forming rat kidney

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuchao; Qin, Baolong; Hu, Henglong; Zhang, Jiaqiao; Wang, Yufeng; Wang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Background. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) influence a variety of biological functions by regulating gene expression post-transcriptionally. Aberrant miRNA expression has been associated with many human diseases. Urolithiasis is a common disease, and idiopathic hypercalciuria (IH) is an important risk factor for calcium urolithiasis. However, miRNA expression patterns and their biological functions in urolithiasis remain unknown. Methods and Results. A multi-step approach combining microarray miRNA and mRNA expression profile and bioinformatics analysis was adopted to analyze dysregulated miRNAs and genes in genetic hypercalciuric stone-forming (GHS) rat kidneys, using normal Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats as controls. We identified 2418 mRNAs and 19 miRNAs as significantly differentially expressed, over 700 gene ontology (GO) terms and 83 KEGG pathways that were significantly enriched in GHS rats. In addition, we constructed an miRNA-gene network that suggested that rno-miR-674-5p, rno-miR-672-5p, rno-miR-138-5p and rno-miR-21-3p may play important roles in the regulatory network. Furthermore, signal-net analysis suggested that NF-kappa B likely plays a crucial role in hypercalciuria urolithiasis. Conclusions. This study presents a global view of mRNA and miRNA expression in GHS rat kidneys, and suggests that miRNAs may be important in the regulation of hypercalciuria. The data provide valuable insights for future research, which should aim at validating the role of the genes featured here in the pathophysiology of hypercalciuria. PMID:27069814

  13. Kidney Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... if You Have Kidney Disease Kidney Failure Expand Dialysis Kidney Transplant Preparing for Kidney Failure Treatment Choosing Not to Treat with Dialysis or Transplant Paying for Kidney Failure Treatment Contact ...

  14. 78 FR 58322 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Initial Review Group, Digestive Diseases and Nutrition C Subcommittee. Date: October 23... Diseases and Nutrition Research; 93.849, Kidney Diseases, Urology and Hematology Research,...

  15. 76 FR 20692 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Initial Review Group; Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases B Subcommittee. Date...; 93.848, Digestive Diseases and Nutrition Research; 93.849, Kidney Diseases, Urology and...

  16. 76 FR 31618 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Polycystic Kidney Disease. Date: June 23, 2011. Time: 1:30 p.m... Metabolic Research; 93.848, Digestive Diseases and Nutrition Research; 93.849, Kidney Diseases, Urology and... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and...

  17. 78 FR 41941 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-12

    ... Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; PAR12-265 Ancillary Studies in Kidney Disease and Complications... Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special, Emphasis Panel; CRIC Ancillary...

  18. 78 FR 13360 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Chronic Kidney Disease in Children. Date: April 4, 2013. Time: 11... and Metabolic Research; 93.848, Digestive Diseases and Nutrition Research; 93.849, Kidney Diseases... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and...

  19. Review of tolvaptan for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Baur, Brian P; Meaney, Calvin J

    2014-06-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is characterized by bilateral renal cysts, kidney pain, hypertension, and progressive loss of renal function. It is a leading cause of end-stage renal disease and the most common inherited kidney disease in the United States. Despite its prevalence, disease-modifying treatment options do not currently exist. Tolvaptan is an orally active, selective arginine vasopressin V2 receptor antagonist already in use for hyponatremia. Tolvaptan exhibits dose-proportional pharmacokinetics with a half-life of ~12 hours. Metabolism occurs through the cytochrome P450 3A4 isoenzyme, and tolvaptan is a substrate for P-glycoprotein, resulting in numerous drug interactions. Recent research has highlighted the beneficial effect of tolvaptan on delaying the progression of ADPKD, which is the focus of this review. Pharmacologic, preclinical, and phase II and III clinical trial studies have demonstrated that tolvaptan is an effective treatment option that targets underlying pathogenic mechanisms of ADPKD. Tolvaptan delays the increase in total kidney volume (surrogate marker for disease progression), slows the decline in renal function, and reduces kidney pain. However, tolvaptan has significant adverse effects including aquaretic effects (polyuria, nocturia, polydipsia) and elevation of aminotransferase enzyme concentrations with the potential for acute liver failure. Appropriate patient selection is critical to optimize long-term benefits while minimizing adverse effects and hepatotoxic risk factors. Overall, tolvaptan is the first pharmacotherapeutic intervention to demonstrate significant benefit in the treatment of ADPKD, but practitioners and regulatory agencies must carefully weigh the risks versus benefits. Additional research should focus on incidence and risk factors of liver injury, cost-effectiveness, clinical management of drug-drug interactions, and long-term disease outcomes. PMID:24706579

  20. Knowledge, attitudes and beliefs of first-degree relatives of patients with chronic kidney disease toward kidney donation in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Bello, Babawale T; Raji, Yemi R

    2016-01-01

    In most parts of Sub-Saharan Africa, kidney transplant programs are dependent on the willingness of relatives of patients with kidney failure to donate kidneys. This study assessed the attitudes of relatives of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) toward kidney donation. This was a cross-sectional survey of relatives of patients with CKD attending the nephrology service of our hospital. The respondents' socio-demographic characteristics and knowledge and beliefs about kidney transplantation, as well as their willingness to donate a kidney, were assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. There were 161 respondents who returned completed questionnaires; the mean age of the respondents was 34.8±12.6 years and 52.2% of them were female. About 85.1% of the respondents were aware that kidney transplantation was a treatment option for end-stage renal failure, while 70% of them believed that kidney transplantation resulted in an improvement in the quality of life of these patients. However, 25.5% of the respondents believed that kidney donors were at risk of developing kidney failure in the future. Overall, 77.6% of the respondents were willing to donate a kidney, especially if the affected individual was their offspring. The majority of the respondents were willing to donate a kidney to a relative with CKD. PMID:26787577

  1. Ubiquitin, Proteasomes and Proteolytic Mechanisms Activated by Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Vik; Mitch, William E.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) includes 3 enzymes that conjugate ubiquitin to intracellular proteins that are then recognized and degraded in the proteasome. The process participates in the regulation of cell metabolism. In the kidney, the UPS regulates the turnover of transporters and signaling proteins and its activity is down regulated in acidosis-induced proximal tubular cell hypertrophy. In chronic kidney disease (CKD), muscle wasting occurs because complications of CKD including acidosis, insulin resistance, inflammation, and increased angiotensin II levels stimulate the UPS to degrade muscle proteins. This response also includes caspase-3 and calpains which act to cleave muscle proteins to provide substrates for the UPS. For example, caspase-3 degrades actomyosin, leaving a 14kD fragment of actin in muscle. The 14 kD actin fragment is increased in muscle of patient with kidney disease, burn injury and surgery. In addition, acidosis, insulin resistance, inflammation and angiotensin II stimulate glucocorticoid production. Glucocorticoids are also required for the muscle wasting that occurs in CKD. Thus, the UPS is involved in regulating kidney function and participates in highly organized responses that degrade muscle protein in response to loss of kidney function. PMID:18723090

  2. Kidney and Urinary Tract Involvement in Kawasaki Disease

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Toru

    2013-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a systemic vasculitis and can develop multiple organ injuries including kidney and urinary tract involvement. These disorders include pyuria, prerenal acute kidney injury (AKI), renal AKI caused by tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN), hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), and immune-complex mediated nephropathy, renal AKI associated with either Kawasaki disease shock syndrome or unknown causes, acute nephritic syndrome (ANS), nephrotic syndrome (NS), renal tubular abnormalities, renal abnormalities in imaging studies, and renal artery lesions (aneurysms and stenosis). Pyuria is common in KD and originates from the urethra and/or the kidney. TIN with AKI and renal tubular abnormalities probably result from renal parenchymal inflammation caused by T-cell activation. HUS and renal artery lesions are caused by vascular endothelial injuries resulting from vasculitis. Some patients with ANS have immunological abnormalities associated with immune-complex formation. Nephromegaly and renal parenchymal inflammatory foci are detected frequently in patients with KD by renal ultrasonography and renal scintigraphy, respectively. Although the precise pathogenesis of KD is not completely understood, renal vasculitis, immune-complex mediated kidney injuries, or T-cell immune-regulatory abnormalities have been proposed as possible mechanisms for the development of kidney and urinary tract injuries. PMID:24288547

  3. Anionic charge concentration of rat kidney glomeruli and glomerular basement membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Comper, W D; Lee, A S; Tay, M; Adal, Y

    1993-01-01

    Estimates of levels of glomerular and glomerular-basement-membrane anion charge should serve as useful quantitative markers for the integrity of the tissues in health and disease. We have developed a simple, rapid, technique to measure this charge through the use of ion exchange with radioisotopes 22Na+ and 36Cl- at low ionic strengths in phosphate buffer. When this technique is used, normal glomeruli isolated from rat have a measured net anion charge concentration of 17.4 +/- 3.7 p-equiv. per glomerulus (n = 20). Perfused rat kidneys that lose approximately half of their glomerular heparan [35S]sulphate content (owing to oxygen-radical damage) exhibited a lower anion charge, of 7.5 +/- 1.6 p-equiv. per glomerulus (n = 5). Glomerular basement membranes prepared from rat glomeruli by a sonication-centrifugation procedure in the presence of enzyme inhibitors had a charge concentration of 6.3 +/- 0.7 mu-equiv./g wet wt. of tissue (n = 4), whereas membranes prepared by sonication, centrifugation, DNAse and detergent treatment had a charge concentration of 7.1 +/- 1.6 mu-equiv./g wet wt. (n = 4). Isotope-dilution experiments with 3H2O on these detergent-prepared glomerular basement membranes demonstrated that they had a water content of approx. 93%, which would then give a net anion charge concentration of 7.6 +/- 1.7 m-equiv./l (n = 4). These values are in good agreement with those obtained by others using titration techniques [Bray and Robinson (1984) Kidney Int. 25, 527-533]. The relatively low magnitude of glomerular anion charge in normal kidneys is consistent with other recent findings that glomerular anion charge is too low to affect the glomerular transport of charged molecules in a direct, passive, biophysical manner through electrostatic interactions. PMID:8435064

  4. Using Digital Media to Promote Kidney Disease Education

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Karen; Briggs, Michael; Oleynik, Veronica; Cullen, Mac; Jones, Jewel; Newman, Eileen

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare providers and patients increasingly turn to the Internet—websites as well as social media platforms—for health-related information and support. Informed by research on audience behaviors and preferences related to digital health information, the National Kidney Disease Education Program (NKDEP) developed a comprehensive and user-friendly digital ecosystem featuring content and platforms relevant for each audience. NKDEP's analysis of website metrics and social media conversation mapping related to chronic kidney disease revealed gaps and opportunities, informing the development of a digital strategy to position NKDEP as a trustworthy digital source for evidence-based kidney disease information. NKDEP launched a redesigned website (www.nkdep.nih.gov) with enhanced content for multiple audiences as well as a complementary social media presence on Twitter and Facebook, serving to drive traffic to the website as well as actively engage target audiences in conversations about kidney disease. The results included improved website metrics and increasing social media engagement among consumers and healthcare providers. NKDEP will continue to monitor trends, explore new directions, and work to improve communication across digital platforms. PMID:23809289

  5. Sarcopenia and Physical Inactivity in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Keiji; Ookawara, Susumu; Morishita, Yoshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    Sarcopenia and physical inactivity synergistically progress in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and are strong predictors of mortality in this population. Exercise training and essential amino acids and vitamin D supplements may contribute to improving sarcopenia and physical inactivity in CKD patients. PMID:27570755

  6. Diabetes mellitus and kidney disease in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Pedro; Heras, Manuel; Díez, Juan J

    2014-05-21

    Management of diabetic elderly patients with chronic kidney disease involves specific characteristics that affect both metabolic control and therapeutic measures. Blood glucose control targets should be individualised based on life expectancy, renal function, hypoglycaemia risk and comorbidity. Metformin may be used alone or in combination with other oral anti-diabetic drugs but must be discontinued when the glomerular filtration rate is less than 30 mL/min. Gliclazide and glipizide are sulfonylureas that do not require dose adjustment in chronic kidney disease but they should be avoided in cases of advanced kidney disease because of the risk of hypoglycaemia. Repaglinide is the only meglitinide recommended in these patients. Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors must be avoided in patients with a glomerular filtration rate of less than 25 mL/min or those undergoing dialysis. Pioglitazone does not require dose adjustment but it has potentially adverse effects in this population. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors are effective and well tolerated. Of the latter, linagliptin does not require dose adjustment. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors are not recommended in elderly patients with advanced kidney disease. Lastly, insulin therapy, particularly using the new insulin analogues, allows adequate management of hyperglycaemia in these patients, with different therapeutic regimens that must be individualised in order to avoid hypoglycaemia. PMID:24798557

  7. Modeling Kidney Disease with iPS Cells

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Benjamin S.

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are somatic cells that have been transcriptionally reprogrammed to an embryonic stem cell (ESC)-like state. iPSCs are a renewable source of diverse somatic cell types and tissues matching the original patient, including nephron-like kidney organoids. iPSCs have been derived representing several kidney disorders, such as ADPKD, ARPKD, Alport syndrome, and lupus nephritis, with the goals of generating replacement tissue and ‘disease in a dish’ laboratory models. Cellular defects in iPSCs and derived kidney organoids provide functional, personalized biomarkers, which can be correlated with genetic and clinical information. In proof of principle, disease-specific phenotypes have been described in iPSCs and ESCs with mutations linked to polycystic kidney disease or focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. In addition, these cells can be used to model nephrotoxic chemical injury. Recent advances in directed differentiation and CRISPR genome editing enable more specific iPSC models and present new possibilities for diagnostics, disease modeling, therapeutic screens, and tissue regeneration using human cells. This review outlines growth opportunities and design strategies for this rapidly expanding and evolving field. PMID:26740740

  8. Managing diabetes in hospitalized patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Shridhar N; Tanenberg, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Because few randomized trials have been done, little is known about appropriate glycemic control in hospitalized patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetes mellitus. These patients are at high risk of hypoglycemia. It is prudent to monitor glucose closely, set less-stringent blood sugar goals, avoid oral antidiabetic agents, and possibly reduce insulin dosage. PMID:27055204

  9. MicroRNAs and Their Applications in Kidney Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Badal, Shawn S.; Danesh, Farhad R.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short, non-coding RNAs that employ classic Watson-Crick base-pairing to identify their target genes, ultimately resulting in destabilizing their target mRNAs and/or inhibiting their translation. The role of miRNAs in a wide-range of human diseases, including those afflicting the kidney, has been intensely investigated. However there is still a vast dearth of knowledge regarding their specific mode of action and therapeutic effects in various kidney diseases. This review discusses the latest efforts to further our understanding of the basic biology of miRNAs, their impact on various kidney diseases and their potential as novel biomarkers and therapeutic agents. We initially provide an overview of miRNA biology and the canonical pathway implicated in their biogenesis. We will then discuss commonly employed experimental strategies for miRNA research and highlight some of the newly described state-of-the-art technologies to identify miRNAs and their target genes. Finally, we will carefully examine the emerging role of miRNAs in the pathogenesis of various kidney diseases. PMID:24928414

  10. Utility of quantitative ultrasound for tracking the progression of polycystic kidney disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Timothy J.; Khant, Htet A.; Insana, Michael F.; Wood, John G.; Zhu, Yanning; Preston, David; Cowley, Benjamin D.

    2000-04-01

    We are combining techniques of quantitative ultrasonic imaging to study polycystic kidney disease (PKD) as the disease progresses to renal failure. Our goal is to use ultrasound noninvasively to detect morphological changes early in the disease process when interventions are most likely to be successful and prior to a significant loss in renal function. We are examining the kidneys of normal rats and those with PKD at various ages with several techniques to obtain comprehensive knowledge of the disease progression. The Han:SPRD rat inherits PKD as an autosomal dominant trait (ADPKD) that closely mimics ADPKD in humans. Changes in renal function are assessed using tracer kinetics (DTPA) and IOH clearance). Ultrasonic techniques, based on measurements of acoustic backscatter coefficients and parameters derived from these measurements, are sensitive to microscopic changes in the tissue morphology. Elasticity imaging is used to study the changes in the tissue macrostructure. All acoustic measurements are made using a state-of-the-art clinical imaging system (Siemens Elegra). Our results show that ultrasonic techniques are very sensitive to early changes in renal microstructure and macrostructure. Ultrasound can be used to detect changes in the renal cortex long before there is a measurable loss of renal function. These techniques are also useful for monitoring the progression of the disease. Most importantly, these techniques are noninvasive and directly applicable to humans.

  11. Novel therapeutic approaches to autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    LaRiviere, Wells B; Irazabal, Maria V; Torres, Vicente E

    2015-04-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is an inherited disorder characterized by the progressive growth of renal cysts that, over time, destroy the architecture of the renal parenchyma and typically lead to kidney failure by the sixth decade of life. ADPKD is common and represents a leading cause of renal failure worldwide. Currently, there are no Food and Drug Administration-approved treatments for the disease, and the existing standard of care is primarily supportive in nature. However, significant advances in the understanding of the molecular biology of the disease have inspired investigation into potential new therapies. Several drugs designed to slow or arrest the progression of ADPKD have shown promise in preclinical models and clinical trials, including vasopressin receptor antagonists and somatostatin analogs. This article examines the literature underlying the rationale for molecular therapies for ADPKD and reviews the existing clinical evidence for their indication for human patients with the disease. PMID:25438190

  12. Role of Myeloperoxidase in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kisic, Bojana; Miric, Dijana; Dragojevic, Ilija; Rasic, Julijana; Popovic, Ljiljana

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem. Patients with CKD have a number of disorders in the organism, and the presence of oxidative stress and systemic inflammation in these patients is the subject of numerous studies. Chronic inflammation joined with oxidative stress contributes to the development of numerous complications: accelerated atherosclerosis process and cardiovascular disease, emergence of Type 2 diabetes mellitus, development of malnutrition, anaemia, hyperparathyroidism, and so forth, affecting the prognosis and quality of life of patients with CKD. In this review we presented the potential role of the myeloperoxidase enzyme in the production of reactive/chlorinating intermediates and their role in oxidative damage to biomolecules in the body of patients with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. In addition, we discussed the role of modified lipoprotein particles under the influence of prooxidant MPO intermediates in the development of endothelial changes and cardiovascular complications in renal failure. PMID:27127544

  13. Cadmium, diabetes and chronic kidney disease

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Joshua R. Prozialeck, Walter C.

    2009-08-01

    Recent epidemiological studies suggest a positive association between exposure to the environmental pollutant cadmium (Cd) and the incidence and severity of diabetes. In this review, we examine the literature suggesting a relationship between Cd exposure, elevated blood glucose levels, and the development of diabetes. In addition we review human and animal studies indicating that Cd potentiates or exacerbates diabetic nephropathy. We also review the various possible cellular mechanisms by which Cd may alter blood glucose levels. In addition, we present some novel findings from our own laboratories showing that Cd elevates fasting blood glucose levels in an animal model of subchronic Cd exposure before overt signs of renal dysfunction are evident. These studies also show that Cd reduces insulin levels and has direct cytotoxic effects on the pancreas. Together, these findings indicate that Cd may be a factor in the development of some types of diabetes and they raise the possibility that Cd and diabetes-related hyperglycemia may act synergistically to damage the kidney.

  14. Albumin contributes to kidney disease progression in Alport syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jarad, George; Knutsen, Russell H; Mecham, Robert P; Miner, Jeffrey H

    2016-07-01

    Alport syndrome is a familial kidney disease caused by defects in the collagen type IV network of the glomerular basement membrane. Lack of collagen-α3α4α5(IV) changes the glomerular basement membrane morphologically and functionally, rendering it leaky to albumin and other plasma proteins. Filtered albumin has been suggested to be a cause of the glomerular and tubular injuries observed at advanced stages of Alport syndrome. To directly investigate the role that albumin plays in the progression of disease in Alport syndrome, we generated albumin knockout (Alb(-/-)) mice to use as a tool for removing albuminuria as a component of kidney disease. Mice lacking albumin were healthy and indistinguishable from control littermates, although they developed hypertriglyceridemia. Dyslipidemia was observed in Alb(+/-) mice, which displayed half the normal plasma albumin concentration. Alb mutant mice were bred to collagen-α3(IV) knockout (Col4a3(-/-)) mice, which are a model for human Alport syndrome. Lack of circulating and filtered albumin in Col4a3(-/-);Alb(-/-) mice resulted in dramatically improved kidney disease outcomes, as these mice lived 64% longer than did Col4a3(-/-);Alb(+/+) and Col4a3(-/-);Alb(+/-) mice, despite similar blood pressures and serum triglyceride levels. Further investigations showed that the absence of albumin correlated with reduced transforming growth factor-β1 signaling as well as reduced tubulointerstitial, glomerular, and podocyte pathology. We conclude that filtered albumin is injurious to kidney cells in Alport syndrome and perhaps in other proteinuric kidney diseases, including diabetic nephropathy. PMID:27147675

  15. [Chronic kidney diseases do not always pass unnoticed].

    PubMed

    Alves, Cyrielle; Pruijma, Menno; Rotman, Samuel; Bonny, Olivier

    2016-02-24

    Kidney diseases are frequent, but most of the time, they develop unnoticed. This paucity of symptoms may lead to delayed diagnosis with important consequences on their outcome. Nevertheless, specific systemic signs such as skin lesions, joint pain or electrolytes disturbances may sometimes alert the clinician and direct the diagnosis to an underlying nephropathy. A high awareness of clinicians is warranted to recognize these red flags and diagnose these diseases early, as illustrated by two clinical cases discussed in this article. PMID:27039602

  16. A new Internet resource for chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Ormandy, P; Vlaminck, H; Harrington, M; Forest, M; Visser, R

    2006-01-01

    This paper focuses on the development of a portal in the World Wide Web (WWW), which captures and locates quality information for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). It examines the problems patients face when accessing and understanding information gleaned from Web sites and describes an idea from a Research Board Member to facilitate patient access to quality information. The idea germinated into the development of a patient specific Web site, providing one stop access and links to appropriate CKD information, assessed by patients and health professionals. Collaboration between the EDTNA/ERCA Research Board and CEAPIR the European Federation of Kidney Patients has enhanced the project. PMID:16700172

  17. 77 FR 28396 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-14

    ... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Training in Behavioral Research in Type 1 Diabetes. Date: June 11... Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Improving Adherence in Type 1 Diabetes. Date: June...

  18. Impaired renal corin expression contributes to sodium retention in proteinuric kidney diseases

    PubMed Central

    Polzin, Danny; Kaminski, Henriette J.; Kastner, Christian; Wang, Wei; Krämer, Stephanie; Gambaryan, Stepan; Russwurm, Michael; Peters, Harm; Wu, Qingyu; Vandewalle, Alain; Bachmann, Sebastian; Theilig, Franziska

    2015-01-01

    Patients with proteinuric kidney diseases often experience symptoms of salt and water retention. It has been hypothesized that the dysregulated Na+ absorption is due to increased proteolytic cleavage of epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and increased Na,K-ATPase expression. Microarray analysis identified a reduced corin mRNA expression in kidneys from rat models of puromycin aminonucleoside-induced nephrotic syndrome (PAN) and acute anti-Thy1 glomerulonephritis (GN). Corin has been shown to convert pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) to ANP. Because ANP resistance has been assumed to be a mechanism accounting for volume retention, experiments were undertaken to analyze the renal expression and function of corin. Immunohistochemistry revealed that corin co-localized with ANP. In PAN and GN, kidneys exhibited concomitant increased pro-ANP and decreased ANP protein expression levels consistent with low corin levels. Importantly, kidneys from corin −/− mice showed increased levels of renal β-ENaC, phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) and protein kinase G II (PKGII) when compared to wild-type mice. Similar expression profile was observed in cell culture experiments suggesting that the increase in PDE5 and PKGII could account for the increase in β-ENaC as observed in PAN and GN. To conclude, our data provide novel insights into the mechanisms of volume retention in renal disease with corin as an important new mediator that acts through PKGII induction and ENaC activation. PMID:20613715

  19. Long noncoding RNAs in kidney and cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Lorenzen, Johan M; Thum, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Transcription of a large part of the human genome results in RNA transcripts that have limited or no protein-coding potential. These include long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), which are defined as being ≥200 nucleotides long. Unlike microRNAs, which have been extensively studied, little is known about the functional role of lncRNAs. However, studies over the past 5 years have shown that lncRNAs interfere with tissue homeostasis and have a role in pathological processes, including in the kidney and heart. The developmental expression of the microRNA sponge H19, for example, is altered in the kidneys of embryos carried by hyperglycaemic mothers, and the lncRNA Malat1 regulates hyperglycaemia-induced inflammation in endothelial cells. Putative roles for other lncRNAs have been identified in conditions such as heart failure, cardiac autophagy, hypertension, acute kidney injury, glomerular diseases, acute allograft rejection and renal cell carcinoma. This Review outlines our current understanding of the role and function of lncRNAs in kidney and cardiovascular disease as novel important regulators and potential therapeutic entry points of disease progression. PMID:27140855

  20. [Diabetic renal disease: the World Kidney Day in Chile].

    PubMed

    Ardiles, Leopoldo; Mezzano, Sergio

    2010-04-01

    The third version of the World Kidney Day will be held on May 13, 2010 in Chile and will be focused in diabetic renal damage, the main cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Currently, we are living a pandemic of CKD, a progressive and irreversible condition with high social and economic impact. In Chile, we have 857 patients per million inhabitants in hemodialysis and 35% are secondary to diabetes. Our general prevalence of diabetes is 4.2%, rising to 15% in people aged more than 64 years. With a 34% prevalence of hypertension, an aging population, high prevalence of obesity, and a sedentary lifestyle, there is an estimation of a rise in 85% of the prevalence of diabetes in South-America, for the next decades. The steps to be taken are clear: campaigns should be aimed at (1) prevention of type 2 diabetes; (2) screening for early diabetic kidney disease; (3) increasing patient awareness of kidney disease; (4) using medications of proven strategy and finally (5) research on new therapies. These concepts must be included in community and professional education to reduce the effects of this pandemic. PMID:20668785