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Sample records for killer cell infusion

  1. Autologous Stem Cell Transplant Recipients Tolerate Haploidentical Related-Donor Natural Killer Cell Enriched Infusions

    PubMed Central

    Klingemann, Hans; Grodman, Carrie; Cutler, Elliott; Duque, Marvin; Kadidlo, Diane; Klein, Andreas K.; Sprague, Kellie A.; Miller, Kenneth B.; Comenzo, Raymond L.; Kewalramani, Tarun; Yu, Neng; Van Etten, Richard A.; McKenna, David H.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND In the setting of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT), infusing natural killer (NK) cells from a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) mismatched donor can mediate an anti-leukemic effect. Graft versus tumor (GvT) effect following autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) may result in less disease relapse. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS We performed a phase I clinical trial to assess the safety and feasibility of infusing distantly processed donor NK enriched mononuclear cell (NK-MC) infusions from a MHC haplotype mismatched (haploidentical) donor to patients who recently underwent ASCT for a hematologic malignancy. On day 1, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MC) were obtained by steady-state leukapheresis and sent from Boston to the Production Assistance for Cellular Therapies (PACT) facility at the University of Minnesota, where immunomagnetic depletion of CD3 cells was performed on day 2. NK-MC product were then returned to Boston on day 2 for infusion on day 3. Toxicity, cellular product characteristics and logistic events were monitored. RESULTS At a median of 90 days (range, 49–191) following ASCT, thirteen patients were treated with escalating doses of NK-MC per kg from 105 to 2 ×107. Adverse effects included grade 2 rigors and muscle aches, but no grade 3 or 4 events, and no GvHD or marrow suppression. One air courier delay occurred. NK-MC products were viable with cytotoxic activity after transport. CONCLUSION CD3-depleted, MHC mismatched allogeneic NK-MC infusions can be safely and feasibly administered to patients after ASCT following distant processing and transport, justifying further development of this approach. PMID:22738379

  2. Haploidentical Natural Killer Cells Infused before Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Myeloid Malignancies: A Phase I Trial.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dean A; Denman, Cecele J; Rondon, Gabriela; Woodworth, Glenda; Chen, Julianne; Fisher, Tobi; Kaur, Indreshpal; Fernandez-Vina, Marcelo; Cao, Kai; Ciurea, Stefan; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Champlin, Richard E

    2016-07-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is an effective treatment for high-risk myeloid malignancies, but relapse remains the major post-transplantation cause of treatment failure. Alloreactive natural killer (NK) cells mediate a potent antileukemic effect and may also enhance engraftment and reduce graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Haploidentical transplantations provide a setting in which NK cell alloreactivity can be manipulated, but they are associated with high rates of GVHD. We performed a phase I study infusing escalating doses of NK cells from an HLA haploidentical-related donor-selected for alloreactivity when possible-as a component of the preparative regimen for allotransplantation from a separate HLA-identical donor. The goal of infusing third-party alloreactive NK cells was to augment the antileukemic effect of the transplantation without worsening GVHD and, thus, improve the overall outcome of hematopoietic transplantation. Twenty-one patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), or chronic myelogenous leukemia refractory or beyond first remission received a preparative regimen with busulfan and fludarabine followed by infusion of apheresis-derived, antibody-selected, and IL-2-activated NK cells. Doses were initially based on total nucleated cell (TNC) content and later based on CD56(+) cells to reduce variability. CD56(+) content ranged from .02 to 8.32 × 10(6)/kg. IL-2, .5 × 10(6) units/m(2) subcutaneously was administered daily for 5 days in the final cohort (n = 10). CD3(+) cells in the NK cell product were required to be < 10(5)/kg. Median relapse-free, overall, and GVHD-free/relapse-free survival for all patients enrolled was 102, 233, and 89 days, respectively. Five patients are alive, 5 patients died of transplantation-related causes, and 11 patients died of relapse. Despite the small sample size, survival was highly associated with CD56(+) cells delivered (P = .022) and development of

  3. Selective modulation of human natural killer cells in vivo after prolonged infusion of low dose recombinant interleukin 2.

    PubMed Central

    Caligiuri, M A; Murray, C; Robertson, M J; Wang, E; Cochran, K; Cameron, C; Schow, P; Ross, M E; Klumpp, T R; Soiffer, R J

    1993-01-01

    The immunologic consequences of prolonged infusions of rIL-2 in doses that produce physiologic serum concentrations of this cytokine were investigated. rIL-2 in doses of 0.5-6.0 x 10(6) U/m2 per d (3.3-40 micrograms/m2 per d) was administered by continuous intravenous infusion for 90 consecutive days to patients with advanced cancer. IL-2 concentrations (25 +/- 25 and 77 +/- 64 pM, respectively) that selectively saturate high-affinity IL-2 receptors (IL-2R) were achieved in the serum of patients receiving rIL-2 infusions of 10 micrograms/m2 per d and 30 micrograms/m2 per d. A gradual, progressive expansion of natural killer (NK) cells was seen in the peripheral blood of these patients with no evidence of a plateau effect during the 3 mo of therapy. A preferential expansion of CD56bright NK cells was consistently evident. NK cytotoxicity against tumor targets was only slightly enhanced at these dose levels. However, brief incubation of these expanded NK cells with IL-2 in vitro induced potent lysis of NK-sensitive, NK-resistant, and antibody-coated targets. Infusions of rIL-2 at 40 micrograms/m2 per d produced serum IL-2 levels (345 +/- 381 pM) sufficient to engage intermediate affinity IL-2R p75, which is constitutively expressed by human NK cells. This did not result in greater NK cell expansion compared to the lower dose levels, but did produce in vivo activation of NK cytotoxicity, as evidenced by lysis of NK-resistant targets. There was no consistent change in the numbers of CD56- CD3+ T cells, CD56+ CD3+ MHC-unrestricted T cells, or B cells during infusions of rIL-2 at any of the dosages used. This study demonstrates that prolonged infusions of rIL-2 in doses that saturate only high affinity IL-2R can selectively expand human NK cells for an extended period of time with only minimal toxicity. Further activation of NK cytolytic activity can also be achieved in vivo, but it requires concentrations of IL-2 that bind intermediate affinity IL-2R p75. Clinical

  4. Phase II Study of Haploidentical Natural Killer Cell Infusion for Treatment of Relapsed or Persistent Myeloid Malignancies Following Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Brian C; Le Luduec, Jean-Benoit; Forlenza, Christopher; Jakubowski, Ann A; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Young, James W; Hsu, Katharine C

    2016-04-01

    We conducted a phase 2 study to determine the efficacy of HLA-haploidentical related donor natural killer (NK) cells after cyclophosphamide-based lymphodepletion in patients with relapsed or progressive acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Eight patients (2 with MDS and 6 with AML) were treated with cyclophosphamide 50 mg/kg on day -3 and day -2 before infusion of NK cells isolated from a haploidentical related donor. One patient also received fludarabine 25 mg/m(2)/day for 4 days. Six doses of 1 million units of interleukin-2 (IL-2) were administered on alternating days beginning on day -1. The median number of NK cells infused was 10.6 × 10(6)/kg (range, 4.3 to 22.4 × 10(6)/kg), and the median number of CD3 cells infused was 2.1 × 10(3)/kg (range, 1.9 to 40 × 10(3)/kg). NK infusions were well tolerated, with a median time to neutrophil recovery of 19 days (range, 7 days to not achieved) and no incidence of graft-versus-host disease after NK infusion. One patient with AML and 1 patient with MDS achieved a complete response, but relapsed at 1.7 and 1.8 months, respectively. One patient with MDS experienced resolution of dysplastic features but persistence of clonal karyotype abnormalities; this patient was stable at 65 months after NK cell therapy. The median duration of survival was 12.9 months (range, 0.8 to 65.3 months). Chimerism analysis of CD3(-)/CD56(+) peripheral blood cells did not detect any circulating haploidentical NK cells after infusion. NK phenotyping was performed in 7 patients during and after IL-2 infusion. We found a slight trend toward greater expression of KIR2DL2/2DL3/2DS2 (5% versus 28%; P = .03) at 14 days in patients who survived longer than 6 months from NK cell infusion (n = 4) compared with those who died within 6 months of NK cell therapy (n = 3). In summary, our data support the safety of haploidentical NK cell

  5. Natural killer cell deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Orange, Jordan S.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are part of the innate immune defense against infection and cancer, and are especially useful in combating certain viral pathogens. The utility of NK cells in human health has been underscored by a growing number of individuals who are deficient in NK cells and/or their functions. This can be in the context of a broader genetically-defined congenital immunodeficiency of which there are over forty presently known to impair NK cells. The abnormality of NK cells, however, in certain cases represents the majority immunological defect. In aggregate, these conditions are termed NK cell deficiency. Recent advances have added clarity to this diagnosis and identified defects in three different genes that can cause NK cell deficiency as well as some of the underlying biology. Appropriate consideration of these diagnoses and patients raises the potential for rational therapeutic options and further innovation. PMID:23993353

  6. Immunobiology of natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lotzova, E.; Herberman, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    This book combines research from many disciplines into a review of natural killer (NK) cell-mediated immunity in humans and experimental animal system. Topics for the volumes include: Volume I: Assays for NK Cell Cytotoxicity; Their Values and Pitfalls. Separation and Characterization of Phenotypically Distinct Subsets of NK Cells. Ultrastructure and Cytochemistry of the Human Large Granular Lymphocytes. Phylogeny and Ontogeny of NK Cells. Tissue and Organ distribution of NK Cells. Genetic Control of NK Cell Activity in Rodents. Phenotype, Functional Heterogeneity, and Lineage of Natural Killer Cells. Target Cell Structures, Recognition Sites, and the Mechanism of NK Cytotoxicity. Natural Killer Cytotoxic Factors (NKCF) Role in Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity. Characteristics of Cultured NK Cells. Lectin-Dependent Killer Cells. MLC-Induced Cytotoxicity as a Model for the Development and Regulation of NK Cytotoxicity. LGL Lymphoproliferative Diseases in Man and Experimental Animals: The Characteristics of These Cells and Their Potential Experimental Uses. Index.

  7. Natural killer cells: remembrances of things past.

    PubMed

    Raulet, David H

    2009-04-14

    Recent work has revealed that natural killer cells exhibit a form of memory, previously considered an exclusive property of adaptive immunity. While protective, natural killer cell memory is probably hazier and more fleeting than T cell memory. PMID:19368874

  8. Revving up Natural Killer Cells and Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells Against Hematological Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Pittari, Gianfranco; Filippini, Perla; Gentilcore, Giusy; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Rutella, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells belong to innate immunity and exhibit cytolytic activity against infectious pathogens and tumor cells. NK-cell function is finely tuned by receptors that transduce inhibitory or activating signals, such as killer immunoglobulin-like receptors, NK Group 2 member D (NKG2D), NKG2A/CD94, NKp46, and others, and recognize both foreign and self-antigens expressed by NK-susceptible targets. Recent insights into NK-cell developmental intermediates have translated into a more accurate definition of culture conditions for the in vitro generation and propagation of human NK cells. In this respect, interleukin (IL)-15 and IL-21 are instrumental in driving NK-cell differentiation and maturation, and hold great promise for the design of optimal NK-cell culture protocols. Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells possess phenotypic and functional hallmarks of both T cells and NK cells. Similar to T cells, they express CD3 and are expandable in culture, while not requiring functional priming for in vivo activity, like NK cells. CIK cells may offer some advantages over other cell therapy products, including ease of in vitro propagation and no need for exogenous administration of IL-2 for in vivo priming. NK cells and CIK cells can be expanded using a variety of clinical-grade approaches, before their infusion into patients with cancer. Herein, we discuss GMP-compliant strategies to isolate and expand human NK and CIK cells for immunotherapy purposes, focusing on clinical trials of adoptive transfer to patients with hematological malignancies. PMID:26029215

  9. Revving up Natural Killer Cells and Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells Against Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Pittari, Gianfranco; Filippini, Perla; Gentilcore, Giusy; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Rutella, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells belong to innate immunity and exhibit cytolytic activity against infectious pathogens and tumor cells. NK-cell function is finely tuned by receptors that transduce inhibitory or activating signals, such as killer immunoglobulin-like receptors, NK Group 2 member D (NKG2D), NKG2A/CD94, NKp46, and others, and recognize both foreign and self-antigens expressed by NK-susceptible targets. Recent insights into NK-cell developmental intermediates have translated into a more accurate definition of culture conditions for the in vitro generation and propagation of human NK cells. In this respect, interleukin (IL)-15 and IL-21 are instrumental in driving NK-cell differentiation and maturation, and hold great promise for the design of optimal NK-cell culture protocols. Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells possess phenotypic and functional hallmarks of both T cells and NK cells. Similar to T cells, they express CD3 and are expandable in culture, while not requiring functional priming for in vivo activity, like NK cells. CIK cells may offer some advantages over other cell therapy products, including ease of in vitro propagation and no need for exogenous administration of IL-2 for in vivo priming. NK cells and CIK cells can be expanded using a variety of clinical-grade approaches, before their infusion into patients with cancer. Herein, we discuss GMP-compliant strategies to isolate and expand human NK and CIK cells for immunotherapy purposes, focusing on clinical trials of adoptive transfer to patients with hematological malignancies. PMID:26029215

  10. Turning Cancer Cells into Cancer Killers.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have changed leukemia cells into natural killer cells by adding a specific antibody to bone marrow cells from patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia. The induced natural killer cells killed leukemia cells in culture. The antibody does not trigger the same conversion in bone marrow from healthy patients. PMID:26621762

  11. Natural Killer Cells for Therapy of Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Suck, Garnet; Linn, Yeh Ching; Tonn, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Summary Clinical application of natural killer (NK) cells against leukemia is an area of intense investigation. In human leukocyte antigen-mismatched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCT), alloreactive NK cells exert powerful anti-leukemic activity in preventing relapse in the absence of graft-versus-host disease, particularly in acute myeloid leukemia patients. Adoptive transfer of donor NK cells post-HSCT or in non-transplant scenarios may be superior to the currently widely used unmanipulated donor lymphocyte infusion. This concept could be further improved through transfusion of activated NK cells. Significant progress has been made in good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compliant large-scale production of stimulated effectors. However, inherent limitations remain. These include differing yields and compositions of the end-product due to donor variability and inefficient means for cryopreservation. Moreover, the impact of the various novel activation strategies on NK cell biology and in vivo behavior are barely understood. In contrast, reproduction of the third-party NK-92 drug from a cryostored GMP-compliant master cell bank is straightforward and efficient. Safety for the application of this highly cytotoxic cell line was demonstrated in first clinical trials. This novel ‘off-the-shelf’ product could become a treatment option for a broad patient population. For specific tumor targeting chimeric-antigen-receptor-engineered NK-92 cells have been designed. PMID:27226791

  12. Natural Killer Cells for Therapy of Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Suck, Garnet; Linn, Yeh Ching; Tonn, Torsten

    2016-03-01

    Clinical application of natural killer (NK) cells against leukemia is an area of intense investigation. In human leukocyte antigen-mismatched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCT), alloreactive NK cells exert powerful anti-leukemic activity in preventing relapse in the absence of graft-versus-host disease, particularly in acute myeloid leukemia patients. Adoptive transfer of donor NK cells post-HSCT or in non-transplant scenarios may be superior to the currently widely used unmanipulated donor lymphocyte infusion. This concept could be further improved through transfusion of activated NK cells. Significant progress has been made in good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compliant large-scale production of stimulated effectors. However, inherent limitations remain. These include differing yields and compositions of the end-product due to donor variability and inefficient means for cryopreservation. Moreover, the impact of the various novel activation strategies on NK cell biology and in vivo behavior are barely understood. In contrast, reproduction of the third-party NK-92 drug from a cryostored GMP-compliant master cell bank is straightforward and efficient. Safety for the application of this highly cytotoxic cell line was demonstrated in first clinical trials. This novel 'off-the-shelf' product could become a treatment option for a broad patient population. For specific tumor targeting chimeric-antigen-receptor-engineered NK-92 cells have been designed. PMID:27226791

  13. Deficient natural killer cell function in preeclampsia

    SciTech Connect

    Alanen, A.; Lassila, O.

    1982-11-01

    Natural killer cell activity of peripheral blood lymphocytes was measured against K-562 target cells with a 4-hour /sup 51/Cr release assay in 15 primigravid women with preeclamptic symptoms. Nineteen primigravid women with an uncomplicated pregnancy and 18 nonpregnant women served as controls. The natural killer cell activity of preeclamptic women was observed to be significantly lower than that of both control groups. Natural killer cells in preeclamptic women responded normally to augmentation caused by interferon. These findings give further evidence for the participation of the maternal immune system in this pregnancy disorder.

  14. Natural killer cell activity during measles.

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, D E; Ward, B J; Jauregui, E; Johnson, R T; Vaisberg, A

    1990-01-01

    Natural killer cells are postulated to play an important role in host anti-viral defences. We measured natural killer cell activity in 30 individuals with acute measles (73 +/- 21 lytic units (LU)/10(7) cells) and 16 individuals with other infectious diseases (149 +/- 95 LU) and found it reduced compared with values for adults (375 +/- 70 LU; P less than 0.001) or children (300 +/- 73 LU, P less than 0.01) without infection. Reduced natural killer cell activity was found in measles patients with (84 +/- 30 LU) and without (55 +/- 18 LU) complications and was present for at least 3 weeks after the onset of the rash. Activity was increased by in vitro exposure of cells to interleukin-2. Depressed natural killer cell activity parallels in time the suppression of other parameters of cell-mediated immunity that occurs during measles. PMID:1696863

  15. Are natural killer cells superior CAR drivers?

    PubMed Central

    Klingemann, Hans

    2014-01-01

    T lymphocytes engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) are being celebrated as a major breakthrough of anticancer immunotherapy. Natural killer cells have not received similar attention as CAR effectors, although the use of these relatively short-lived cytotoxic cells is associated with several advantages. PMID:25340009

  16. The Human Natural Killer Cell Immune Synapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Daniel M.; Chiu, Isaac; Fassett, Marlys; Cohen, George B.; Mandelboim, Ofer; Strominger, Jack L.

    1999-12-01

    Inhibitory killer Ig-like receptors (KIR) at the surface of natural killer (NK) cells induced clustering of HLA-C at the contacting surface of target cells. In this manner, inhibitory immune synapses were formed as human NK cells surveyed target cells. At target/NK cell synapses, HLA-C/KIR distributed into rings around central patches of intercellular adhesion molecule-1/lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1, the opposite orientation to mature murine T cell-activating synapses. This organization of protein was stable for at least 20 min. Cells could support multiple synapses simultaneously, and clusters of HLA-C moved as NK cells crawled over target cells. Clustering required a divalent metal cation, explaining how metal chelators inhibit KIR function. Surprisingly, however, formation of inhibitory synapses was unaffected by ATP depletion and the cytoskeletal inhibitors, colchicine and cytochalsins B and D. Clearly, supramolecular organization within plasma membranes is critical for NK cell immunosurveillance.

  17. Natural killer cell regulation - beyond the receptors

    PubMed Central

    Urlaub, Doris; Fasbender, Frank; Claus, Maren

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes that are important for early and effective immune responses against infections and cancer. In the last 40 years, many receptors, their corresponding ligands and signaling pathways that regulate NK cell functions have been identified. However, we now know that additional processes, such as NK cell education, differentiation and also the formation of NK cell memory, have a great impact on the reactivity of these cells. Here, we summarize the current knowledge about these modulatory processes. PMID:25374665

  18. Viral Evasion of Natural Killer Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi; Li, Xiaojuan; Kuang, Ersheng

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a key role in antiviral innate defenses because of their abilities to kill infected cells and secrete regulatory cytokines. Additionally, NK cells exhibit adaptive memory-like antigen-specific responses, which represent a novel antiviral NK cell defense mechanism. Viruses have evolved various strategies to evade the recognition and destruction by NK cells through the downregulation of the NK cell activating receptors. Here, we review the recent findings on viral evasion of NK cells via the impairment of NK cell-activating receptors and ligands, which provide new insights on the relationship between NK cells and viral actions during persistent viral infections. PMID:27077876

  19. Immunobiology of natural killer cells. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Lotzova, E.; Herberman, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides a review of natural killer (NK) cell-mediated immunity in humans and experimental animal system. Topics for the volume include: In vivo activities of NK cells against primary and metastatic tumors in experimental animals; involvement of NK cells in human malignant disease; impaired NK cell profile in leukemia patients; in vivo modulation of NK activity in cancer patients; implications of aberrant NK cell activity in nonmalignant, chronic diseases; NK cell role in regulation of the growth and functions of hemopoietic and lymphoid cells; NK cells active against viral, bacterial, protozoan, and fungal infections; cytokine secretion and noncytotoxic functions of human large granular lymphocytes; augmentation of NK activity; regulation of NK cell activity by suppressor cells; NK cell cloning technology and characteristics of NK cell clones; comparison of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and NK activity, and index.

  20. Targeting natural killer cells in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Guillerey, Camille; Huntington, Nicholas D; Smyth, Mark J

    2016-08-19

    Alteration in the expression of cell-surface proteins is a common consequence of malignant transformation. Natural killer (NK) cells use an array of germline-encoded activating and inhibitory receptors that scan for altered protein-expression patterns, but tumor evasion of detection by the immune system is now recognized as one of the hallmarks of cancer. NK cells display rapid and potent immunity to metastasis or hematological cancers, and major efforts are now being undertaken to fully exploit NK cell anti-tumor properties in the clinic. Diverse approaches encompass the development of large-scale NK cell-expansion protocols for adoptive transfer, the establishment of a microenvironment favorable to NK cell activity, the redirection of NK cell activity against tumor cells and the release of inhibitory signals that limit NK cell function. In this Review we detail recent advances in NK cell-based immunotherapies and discuss the advantages and limitations of these strategies. PMID:27540992

  1. Development and maturation of natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Theresa L; Sun, Joseph C

    2016-04-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphocytes that are critical for host protection against pathogens and cancer due to their ability to rapidly release inflammatory cytokines and kill infected or transformed cells. In the 40 years since their initial discovery, much has been learned about how this important cellular lineage develops and functions. We now know that NK cells are the founding members of an expanded family of lymphocyte known as innate lymphoid cells (ILC). Furthermore, we have recently discovered that NK cells can possess features of adaptive immunity such as antigen specificity and long-lived memory responses. Here we will review our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms driving development of NK cells from the common lymphoid progenitor (CLP) to mature NK cells, and from activated effectors to long-lived memory NK cells. PMID:26845614

  2. Natural Killer Cell Reduction and Uteroplacental Vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Golic, Michaela; Haase, Nadine; Herse, Florian; Wehner, Anika; Vercruysse, Lisbeth; Pijnenborg, Robert; Balogh, Andras; Saether, Per Christian; Dissen, Erik; Luft, Friedrich C; Przybyl, Lukasz; Park, Joon-Keun; Alnaes-Katjavivi, Patji; Staff, Anne Cathrine; Verlohren, Stefan; Henrich, Wolfgang; Muller, Dominik N; Dechend, Ralf

    2016-10-01

    Uterine natural killer cells are important for uteroplacental development and pregnancy maintenance. Their role in pregnancy disorders, such as preeclampsia, is unknown. We reduced the number of natural killer cells by administering rabbit anti-asialo GM1 antiserum in an established rat preeclamptic model (female human angiotensinogen×male human renin) and evaluated the effects at the end of pregnancy (day 21), compared with preeclamptic control rats receiving normal rabbit serum. In 100% of the antiserum-treated, preeclamptic rats (7/7), we observed highly degenerated vessel cross sections in the mesometrial triangle at the end of pregnancy. This maternal uterine vasculopathy was characterized by a total absence of nucleated/living cells in the vessel wall and perivascularly and prominent presence of fibrosis. Furthermore, there were no endovascular trophoblast cells within the vessel lumen. In the control, normal rabbit serum-treated, preeclamptic rats, only 20% (1/5) of the animals displayed such vasculopathy. We confirmed the results in healthy pregnant wild-type rats: after anti-asialo GM1 treatment, 67% of maternal rats displayed vasculopathy at the end of pregnancy compared with 0% in rabbit serum-treated control rats. This vasculopathy was associated with a significantly lower fetal weight in wild-type rats and deterioration of fetal brain/liver weight ratio in preeclamptic rats. Anti-asialo GM1 application had no influence on maternal hypertension and albuminuria during pregnancy. Our results show a new role of natural killer cells during hypertensive pregnancy in maintaining vascular integrity. In normotensive pregnancy, this integrity seems important for fetal growth. PMID:27550919

  3. Natural Killer Cells and Antifungal Host Response

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Stanislaw; Zimmermann, Stefanie-Yvonne; Tramsen, Lars; Koehl, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    As a result of improved experimental methodologies and a better understanding of the immune system, there is increasing insight into the antifungal activity of natural killer (NK) cells. Murine and human NK cells are able to damage fungi of different genera and species in vitro, and they exert both direct and indirect antifungal activity through cytotoxic molecules such as perforin and through cytokines and interferons, respectively. On the other hand, recent data suggest that fungi exhibit immunosuppressive effects on NK cells. Whereas clear in vivo data are lacking in humans, the importance of NK cells in the host response against fungi has been demonstrated in animal models. Further knowledge of the interaction of NK cells with fungi might help to better understand the pathogenesis of invasive fungal infections and to improve treatment strategies. PMID:23365210

  4. Natural Killer Cells and Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Fasbender, Frank; Widera, Agata; Hengstler, Jan G.; Watzl, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    In the 40 years since the discovery of natural killer (NK) cells, it has been well established that these innate lymphocytes are important for early and effective immune responses against transformed cells and infections with different pathogens. In addition to these classical functions of NK cells, we now know that they are part of a larger family of innate lymphoid cells and that they can even mediate memory-like responses. Additionally, tissue-resident NK cells with distinct phenotypical and functional characteristics have been identified. Here, we focus on the phenotype of different NK cell subpopulations that can be found in the liver and summarize the current knowledge about the functional role of these cells with a special emphasis on liver fibrosis. NK cell cytotoxicity can contribute to liver damage in different forms of liver disease. However, NK cells can limit liver fibrosis by killing hepatic stellate cell-derived myofibroblasts, which play a key role in this pathogenic process. Therefore, liver NK cells need to be tightly regulated in order to balance these beneficial and pathological effects. PMID:26858722

  5. The evolution of natural killer cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Bustamante, Paola; Keşmir, Can; de Boer, Rob J

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are immune cells that play a crucial role against viral infections and tumors. To be tolerant against healthy tissue and simultaneously attack infected cells, the activity of NK cells is tightly regulated by a sophisticated array of germline-encoded activating and inhibiting receptors. The best characterized mechanism of NK cell activation is "missing self" detection, i.e., the recognition of virally infected or transformed cells that reduce their MHC expression to evade cytotoxic T cells. To monitor the expression of MHC-I on target cells, NK cells have monomorphic inhibitory receptors which interact with conserved MHC molecules. However, there are other NK cell receptors (NKRs) encoded by gene families showing a remarkable genetic diversity. Thus, NKR haplotypes contain several genes encoding for receptors with activating and inhibiting signaling, and that vary in gene content and allelic polymorphism. But if missing-self detection can be achieved by a monomorphic NKR system why have these polygenic and polymorphic receptors evolved? Here, we review the expansion of NKR receptor families in different mammal species, and we discuss several hypotheses that possibly underlie the diversification of the NK cell receptor complex, including the evolution of viral decoys, peptide sensitivity, and selective MHC-downregulation. PMID:26392015

  6. REPLICATIVE POTENTIAL OF HUMAN NATURAL KILLER CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Fujisaki, Hiroyuki; Kakuda, Harumi; Imai, Chihaya; Mullighan, Charles G.; Campana, Dario

    2009-01-01

    The replicative potential of human CD56+ CD3− natural killer (NK) cells is unknown. We found that by exposing NK cells to the leukemic cell line K562 genetically modified to express 4-1BB ligand and interleukin 15 (K562-mb15-41BBL), they expanded for up to 30 population doublings, achieving numbers that ranged from 1.6 × 105 to 1.2 × 1011 percent (median, 5.9 × 106 percent; n = 7) of those originally seeded. However, NK cells eventually became unresponsive to stimulation and died. Their demise could be suppressed by enforcing the expression of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene. TERT-overexpressing NK cells continued to proliferate in response to K562-mb15-41BBL stimulation for more than 1 year of culture, while maintaining a normal karyotype and genotype. Long-lived NK cells had high cytotoxicity against myeloid and T-lineage leukemic cells. They remained susceptible to genetic manipulation, becoming highly cytotoxic to B-lineage leukemic cells after expression of anti-CD19 signaling receptors. Thus, human NK cells have a replicative potential similar to that of T lymphocytes and their lifespan can be significantly prolonged by an increase in TERT activity. We suggest that the methods described here should have many applications in studies of NK cell biology and NK cell-based therapies. PMID:19344420

  7. Human natural killer cells: origin, receptors, function, and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Moretta, Lorenzo; Montaldo, Elisa; Vacca, Paola; Del Zotto, Genny; Moretta, Francesca; Merli, Pietro; Locatelli, Franco; Mingari, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are important effectors playing a relevant role in innate immunity, primarily in tumor surveillance and in defenses against viruses. Human NK cells recognize HLA class I molecules through surface receptors (KIR and NKG2A) that inhibit NK cell function and kill target cells that have lost (or underexpress) HLA class I molecules as it occurs in tumors or virus-infected cells. NK cell activation is mediated by an array of activating receptors and co-receptors that recognize ligands expressed primarily on tumors or virus-infected cells. In vivo anti-tumor NK cell activity may be suppressed by tumor or tumor-associated cells. Alloreactive NK cells (i.e. those that are not inhibited by the HLA class I alleles of the patient) derived from HSC of haploidentical donors play a major role in the cure of high-risk leukemia, by killing leukemia blasts and patient's DC, thus preventing tumor relapses and graft-versus-host disease. The expression of the HLA-C2-specific activating KIR2DS1 may also contribute to NK alloreactivity in patients expressing C2 alleles. A clear correlation has been proven between the size of the alloreactive NK cell population and the clinical outcome. Recently, haplo-HSCT has been further improved with the direct infusion, together with HSC, of donor-derived, mature alloreactive NK cells and TCRγδ(+) T cells - both contributing to a prompt anti-leukemia effect together with an efficient defense against pathogens during the 6- to 8-week interval required for the generation of alloreactive NK cells from HSC. PMID:25323661

  8. Natural Killer Cells: Key Players in Endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Thiruchelvam, Uma; Wingfield, Mary; O'Farrelly, Cliona

    2015-10-01

    Endometriosis affects more than 10% of women, causing significant pain and morbidity. It is also a significant cause of infertility. The aetiology of the disease remains an enigma, and the mechanisms responsible for the associated infertility are unclear. A role for immune cells in endometriosis has been postulated, with attention directed towards natural killer (NK) cells and macrophages. NK cells kill tumours and infected cells but also have roles in tissue remodelling in several organs including the uterus and are key to successful pregnancy. Here, we explore evidence (from peer-reviewed published articles) of phenotypic and functional abnormalities in NK cell subpopulations of women with endometriosis. It is clear that peripheral blood NK cells and peritoneal NK cells have reduced cytotoxic function in women with endometriosis. Uterine NK cells have a vital role in infertility, but very little research has been carried out in this area. We propose that abnormal u NK cell activity may contribute to the pathogenesis of endometriosis and its associated infertility and that future research should focus on this complex area. PMID:26104509

  9. Natural Killer Cells Modulation in Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Baier, Céline; Fino, Aurore; Sanchez, Carole; Farnault, Laure; Rihet, Pascal; Kahn-Perlès, Brigitte; Costello, Régis T.

    2013-01-01

    Hematological malignancies (HM) treatment improved over the last years resulting in increased achievement of complete or partial remission, but unfortunately high relapse rates are still observed, due to remaining minimal residual disease. Therefore, sustainment of long-term remission is crucial, using either drug maintenance treatment or by boosting or prolonging an immune response. Immune system has a key role in tumor surveillance. Nonetheless, tumor-cells evade the specific T-lymphocyte mediated immune surveillance using many mechanisms but especially by the down-regulation of the expression of HLA class I antigens. In theory, these tumor-cells lacking normal expression of HLA class I molecules should be destroyed by natural killer (NK) cells, according to the missing-self hypothesis. NK cells, at the frontier of innate and adaptive immune system, have a central role in tumor-cells surveillance as demonstrated in the setting of allogenic stem cell transplantation. Nevertheless, tumors develop various mechanisms to escape from NK innate immune pressure. Abnormal NK cytolytic functions have been described in many HM. We present here various mechanisms involved in the escape of HM from NK-cell surveillance, i.e., NK-cells quantitative and qualitative abnormalities. PMID:24391641

  10. Natural Killer Cells in Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Rehermann, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are traditionally regarded as first-line effectors of the innate immune response, but they also have a distinct role in chronic infection. Here, we review the role of NK cells against hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV), two agents that cause acute and chronic hepatitis in humans. Interest in NK cells was initially sparked by genetic studies that demonstrated an association between NK cell–related genes and the outcome of HCV infection. Viral hepatitis also provides a model to study the NK cell response to both endogenous and exogenous type I interferon (IFN). Levels of IFN-stimulated genes increase in both acute and chronic HCV infection and pegylated IFNα has been the mainstay of HCV and HBV treatment for decades. In chronic viral hepatitis, NK cells display decreased production of antiviral cytokines. This phenotype is found in both HCV and HBV infection but is induced by different mechanisms. Potent antivirals now provide the opportunity to study the reversibility of the suppressed cytokine production of NK cells in comparison with the antigen-induced defect in IFNγ and tumor necrosis factor-α production of virus-specific T cells. This has implications for immune reconstitution in other conditions of chronic inflammation and immune exhaustion, such as human immunodeficiency virus infection and cancer. PMID:26682281

  11. ALLOGENEIC NATURAL KILLER CELLS FOR REFRACTORY LYMPHOMA

    PubMed Central

    Bachanova, Veronika; Burns, Linda J.; McKenna, David H.; Curtsinger, Julie; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Lindgren, Bruce R.; Cooley, Sarah; Weisdorf, Daniel; Miller, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    We reported that IL-2 activated autologous NK cells can induce, but not maintain durable remissions in lymphoma patients. We hypothesized that allogeneic NK cells may overcome class I MHC-mediated inhibition of NK cell killing. In a pilot study we evaluated infusion of haploidentical donor NK cells for anti-tumor efficacy. Six patients with advanced B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) received rituximab, cyclophosphamide, and fludarabine as immunosupression to permit homeostatic NK cell expansion, followed by CD3-depleted NK cell enriched cell products followed by subcutaneous IL-2 administration (10×106 units every other day × 6 doses). At 2 months, four patients showed an objective clinical response. We observed early donor cell persistence in 2 patients (blood and in tumor-bearing node), but this was not detectable beyond 7 days. All patients demonstrated substantial increases in host regulatory T cells (Treg) after NK cell and IL-2 therapy (180±80 cells/μl vs baseline: 58±24 cells/μl, p=0.04) which may have limited donor cell expansion in vivo. These findings suggest safety and feasibility of allogeneic NK cell therapy in patients with lymphoma; however host Treg and inadequate immunodepletion may contribute to a hostile milieu for NK cell survival and expansion. Cell therapy trials should incorporate novel strategies to limit Treg expansion. PMID:20680271

  12. Biological Character of RetroNectin Activated Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) using autologous cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells is a promising treatment for metastatic carcinomas. In this study, we investigated the impact of RetroNectin on the proliferation, phenotype alternation, cytokine secretion, and cytotoxic activity of CIK cells from pancreatic cancer patients. Furthermore, we treated 13 patients with metastatic or locally advanced pancreatic cancer using autologous RetroNectin-activated CIK cells (R-CIK cells) alone or in combination with chemotherapy. Compared with only CD3 activated CIK cells (OKT-CIK cells), R-CIK cells showed stronger and faster proliferative ability, with a lower ratio of spontaneous apoptosis. Moreover, this ability continued after IL-2 was withdrawn from the culture system. R-CIK cells could also secrete higher levels of IL-2 and lower levels of IL-4 and IL-5 versus OKT-CIK cells. There was no difference between OKT-CIK and R-CIK cells in cytotoxic ability against lymphoma cell line K562. In patients who received auto-R-CIK cell infusion therapy, the overall objective response rate was 23.1%. Median survival time (mOS) after first R-CIK cell infusion was 10.57 months; the 1-year survival rate was 38.5%. No serious toxicity was associated with R-CIK cell infusion. In conclusion, RetroNectin may enhance antitumor activity of CIK cells: it is safe for use in treating pancreatic cancer. PMID:27433478

  13. Radiosensitivity of human natural killer cells: Binding and cytotoxic activities of natural killer cell subsets

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, R.; Vitale, M.; Mazzotti, G.; Manzoli, L.; Papa, S. )

    1990-10-01

    The sensitivity of human natural killer (NK) cell activities (both binding and killing) after exposure of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to different doses of gamma radiation was studied. A panel of monoclonal antibodies was used to identify the NK and T-lymphocyte subsets and to evaluate their radiosensitivity. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were irradiated with low (2-6 Gy) and high (10-30 Gy) doses and NK cell binding and cytotoxic activity against K562 target cells were studied after 3 h and 48 h in culture. The primary damage to NK cell activity was identified at the postbinding level and affected mainly the lytic machinery. After 48 h culture postirradiation, an overall depression of cytotoxic activity was observed, but ionizing radiation produced either a selection of the more cytotoxic NK cell subsets, which therefore might be considered more resistant to radiation damage than the less cytotoxic NK cells, or a long-term stimulation of cytotoxic activity in surviving cells.

  14. Alloreactive Natural Killer Cells for the Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia: From Stem Cell Transplantation to Adoptive Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Loredana; Parisi, Sarah; Urbani, Elena; Curti, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells express activating and inhibitory receptors, which recognize MHC class-I alleles, termed “Killer cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors” (KIRs). Preclinical and clinical data from haploidentical T-cell-depleted stem cell transplantation have demonstrated that alloreactive KIR-L mismatched NK cells play a major role as effectors against acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Outside the transplantation setting, several reports have proven the safety and feasibility of NK cell infusion in AML patients and, in some cases, provided evidence that transferred NK cells are functionally alloreactive and may have a role in disease control. The aim of the present work is to briefly summarize the most recent advances in the field by moving from the first preclinical and clinical demonstration of donor NK alloreactivity in the transplantation setting to the most recent attempts at exploiting the use of alloreactive NK cell infusion as a means of adoptive immunotherapy against AML. Altogether, these data highlight the pivotal role of NK cells for the development of novel immunological approaches in the clinical management of AML. PMID:26528283

  15. AUGMENTATION OF MURINE NATURAL KILLER CELL ACTIVITY BY MANGANESE CHLORIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural Killer (NK) cell activity of spleen cells from male CBA/J mice was augmented by a single parenteral injection of MnCl2 administered 1 day prior to testing by in vitro and in vivo isotope release assays. Increased cytotoxic activity was observed in vitro against both NK-se...

  16. Suppression of newborn natural killer cell activity by prostaglandin E2

    SciTech Connect

    Milch, P.O.; Salvatore, W.; Luft, B.; Baker, D.A.

    1988-10-01

    The effect of prostaglandin E2 on natural killer cell activity of cord blood was examined. Natural killer cell activity, determined by chromium 51 release, was significantly reduced after prostaglandin E2 (1 microgram/ml) treatment. Prostaglandin E2 has been found to enhance the cellular spread of herpesvirus. Thus prostaglandins may enhance viral infections indirectly by suppressing natural killer cell activity.

  17. Invariant natural killer T cells in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: killer choice for natural suppression.

    PubMed

    Guan, P; Bassiri, H; Patel, N P; Nichols, K E; Das, R

    2016-05-01

    Invariant natural killer T cells (iNKTs) are innate-like lipid-reactive T lymphocytes that express an invariant T-cell receptor (TCR). Following engagement of the iTCR, iNKTs rapidly secrete copious amounts of Th1 and Th2 cytokines and promote the functions of several immune cells including NK, T, B and dendritic cells. Accordingly, iNKTs bridge the innate and adaptive immune responses and modulate susceptibility to autoimmunity, infection, allergy and cancer. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is one of the most effective treatments for patients with hematologic malignancies. However, the beneficial graft versus leukemia (GvL) effect mediated by the conventional T cells contained within the allograft is often hampered by the concurrent occurrence of graft versus host disease (GvHD). Thus, developing strategies that can dissociate GvHD from GvL remain clinically challenging. Several preclinical and clinical studies demonstrate that iNKTs significantly attenuate GvHD without abrogating the GvL effect. Besides preserving the GvL activity of the donor graft, iNKTs themselves exert antitumor immune responses via direct and indirect mechanisms. Herein, we review the various mechanisms by which iNKTs provide antitumor immunity and discuss their roles in GvHD suppression. We also highlight the opportunities and obstacles in manipulating iNKTs for use in the cellular therapy of hematologic malignancies. PMID:26878658

  18. Interferon induces natural killer cell blastogenesis in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biron, C. A.; Sonnenfeld, G.; Welsh, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    Interferon (IFN), types beta and gamma, and IFN inducers polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, all stimulated the generation of blast-natural killer (NK) cells in mouse spleens, Blast-NK cells were characterized on the basis of size, 3H-thymidine uptake, and NK cell markers These data indicate that in addition to augmenting NK cell-mediated lysis, IFN may regulate NK cell proliferation in vivo.

  19. Effect of spaceflight on natural killer cell activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rykova, Marina P.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Lesniak, A. T.; Taylor, Gerald R.; Meshkov, Dimitrii O.; Mandel, Adrian D.; Medvedev, Andrei E.; Berry, Wallace D.; Fuchs, Boris B.; Konstantinova, Irina V.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of spaceflight on immune cell function were determined in rats flown on Cosmos 2044. Control groups included vivarium, synchronous, and antiorthostatically suspended rats. The ability of natural killer cells to lyse two different target cell lines was determined. Spleen and bone marrow cells obtained from flight rats showed significantly inhibited cytotoxicity for YAC-1 target cells compared with cells from synchronous control rats. This could have been due to exposure of the rats to microgravity. Antiorthostatic suspension did not affect the level of cytotoxicity from spleen cells of suspended rats for YAC-1 cells. On the other hand, cells from rats flown in space showed no significant differences from vivarium and synchronous control rats in cytotoxicity for K-562 target cells. Binding of natural killer cells to K-562 target cells was unaffected by spaceflight. Antiorthostatic suspension resulted in higher levels of cytotoxicity from spleen cells for Cr-51-labeled K-562 cells. The results indicate differential effects of spaceflight on function of natural killer cells. This shows that spaceflight has selective effects on the immune response.

  20. Present and Future of Allogeneic Natural Killer Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Okjae; Jung, Mi Young; Hwang, Yu Kyeong; Shin, Eui-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphocytes that are capable of eliminating tumor cells and are therefore used for cancer therapy. Although many early investigators used autologous NK cells, including lymphokine-activated killer cells, the clinical efficacies were not satisfactory. Meanwhile, human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation revealed the antitumor effect of allogeneic NK cells, and HLA-haploidentical, killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor ligand-mismatched allogeneic NK cells are currently used for many protocols requiring NK cells. Moreover, allogeneic NK cells from non-HLA-related healthy donors have been recently used in cancer therapy. The use of allogeneic NK cells from non-HLA-related healthy donors allows the selection of donor NK cells with higher flexibility and to prepare expanded, cryopreserved NK cells for instant administration without delay for ex vivo expansion. In cancer therapy with allogeneic NK cells, optimal matching of donors and recipients is important to maximize the efficacy of the therapy. In this review, we summarize the present state of allogeneic NK cell therapy and its future directions. PMID:26089823

  1. Impaired cytotoxicity associated with defective natural killer cell differentiation in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Hejazi, Maryam; Manser, Angela R.; Fröbel, Julia; Kündgen, Andrea; Zhao, Xiaoyi; Schönberg, Kathrin; Germing, Ulrich; Haas, Rainer; Gattermann, Norbert; Uhrberg, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer cells are well known to mediate anti-leukemic responses in myeloid leukemia but their role in myelodysplastic syndromes is not well understood. Here, in a cohort of newly diagnosed patients (n=75), widespread structural and functional natural killer cell defects were identified. One subgroup of patients (13%) had a selective deficiency of peripheral natural killer cells (count <10/mm3 blood) with normal frequencies of T and natural killer-like T cells. Natural killer cell-deficient patients were predominantly found in high-risk subgroups and deficiency of these cells was significantly associated with poor prognosis. In the second subgroup, comprising the majority of patients (76%), natural killer cells were present but exhibited poor cytotoxicity. The defect was strongly associated with reduced levels of perforin and granzyme B. Notably, natural killer cell function and arming of cytotoxic granules could be fully reconstituted by in vitro stimulation. Further phenotypic analysis of these patients revealed an immature natural killer cell compartment that was biased towards CD56bright cells. The residual CD56dim cells exhibited a significant increase of the unlicensed NKG2A−KIR− subset and a striking reduction in complexity of the repertoire of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors. Taken together, these results suggest that the widespread defects in natural killer cell function occurring in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes are mostly due to either unsuccessful or inefficient generation of mature, functionally competent natural killer cells, which might contribute to disease progression through impaired immune surveillance. PMID:25682594

  2. Impaired cytotoxicity associated with defective natural killer cell differentiation in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Hejazi, Maryam; Manser, Angela R; Fröbel, Julia; Kündgen, Andrea; Zhao, Xiaoyi; Schönberg, Kathrin; Germing, Ulrich; Haas, Rainer; Gattermann, Norbert; Uhrberg, Markus

    2015-05-01

    Natural killer cells are well known to mediate anti-leukemic responses in myeloid leukemia but their role in myelodysplastic syndromes is not well understood. Here, in a cohort of newly diagnosed patients (n=75), widespread structural and functional natural killer cell defects were identified. One subgroup of patients (13%) had a selective deficiency of peripheral natural killer cells (count <10/mm(3) blood) with normal frequencies of T and natural killer-like T cells. Natural killer cell-deficient patients were predominantly found in high-risk subgroups and deficiency of these cells was significantly associated with poor prognosis. In the second subgroup, comprising the majority of patients (76%), natural killer cells were present but exhibited poor cytotoxicity. The defect was strongly associated with reduced levels of perforin and granzyme B. Notably, natural killer cell function and arming of cytotoxic granules could be fully reconstituted by in vitro stimulation. Further phenotypic analysis of these patients revealed an immature natural killer cell compartment that was biased towards CD56(bright) cells. The residual CD56(dim) cells exhibited a significant increase of the unlicensed NKG2A(-)KIR(-) subset and a striking reduction in complexity of the repertoire of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors. Taken together, these results suggest that the widespread defects in natural killer cell function occurring in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes are mostly due to either unsuccessful or inefficient generation of mature, functionally competent natural killer cells, which might contribute to disease progression through impaired immune surveillance. PMID:25682594

  3. EFFECT OF NICKEL AND MANGANESE ON NATURAL KILLER CELL ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A single intramuscular injection of NiCl2 causes a suppression of natural killer (NK) cell activity, while a single injection of MnCl2 enhances NK activity. When injected together Mn preempts the suppressive effect of Ni on NK activity.

  4. Effect of different levels of alcohol consumption on natural killer and lymphokine activated killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Klassen, L.W.; DeVasure, J.M.; Lemley-Gillespie, S.D.; Thiele, G.M. Omaha VA Hospital, NE )

    1991-03-11

    The effect of alcohol consumption on natural killer (NK) cell activity is controversial as both increased and decreased levels have been reported. It was the purpose of this study to determine the effects of feeding BDF1 mice different levels of alcohol on NK and lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cell activity. After four-six weeks of chronic alcohol feeding, mice were sacrificed, spleen cells obtained and assayed for NK and IL-2 boosted NK activity against YAC-1 cells in a traditional {sup 51}chromium release assay. Cells were also cultured in the presence of IL-2 for five days and tested for cytolytic activity using P815 cells as targets. Cells from each group were passed over a nylon wool column and the adherent (AD) and nonadherent (NAD) populations collected and tested as above. Increased NK, 24 hour IL-2 boosted NK and 5 day LAK activity were observed only in the spleen cells obtained from mice on 20% alcohol. Also, NAD populations had a 2-4 fold higher lytic unit values (LU{sub 20}) at all levels of alcohol consumption and in all assays, as compared with the unseparated spleen cells. Analysis of cell surface markers on these three populations of cells show that there were differences in MAC-2, Asialo GM-1, Thy 1.2, B220 and NK 1.1 that may correlate with the differences observed in the cytolytic assays. These data suggest that different levels of alcohol affect the cytolytic activity of NK and LAK cells and may result from alterations in the cell subset populations.

  5. Influence of Vancomycin Infusion Methods on Endothelial Cell Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Drouet, Maryline; Chai, Feng; Barthélémy, Christine; Lebuffe, Gilles; Debaene, Bertrand; Odou, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral intravenous therapy is frequently used in routine hospital practice and, due to various factors, its most common side effect is phlebitis. The infusion of vancomycin is particularly associated with phlebitis despite its widespread use. French guidelines recommend central intravenous infusion for high concentrations of vancomycin, but peripheral intravenous therapy is often preferred in intensive care units. Methods of vancomycin infusion are either intermittent infusion or continuous infusion. A comparison of these methods under in vitro conditions simulating clinical use could result in better infusion efficacy. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were therefore challenged with clinical doses of vancomycin over a 24- to 72-h period using these infusion methods. Cell death was measured with the alamarBlue test. Concentration-dependent and time-dependent vancomycin toxicity on HUVECs was noted with a 50% lethal dose at 5 mg/ml after 24 h, reaching 2.5 mg/ml after 72 h of infusion, simulating long-term infusion. This toxicity does not seem to be induced by acidic pH. In comparing infusion methods, we observed that continuous infusion induced greater cell toxicity than intermittent infusion at doses higher than 1 g/day. The increasing use of vancomycin means that new guidelines are required to avoid phlebitis. If peripheral intravenous therapy is used to reduce infusion time, along with intermittent infusion, vein irritation and localized phlebitis may be reduced. Further studies have to be carried out to explore the causes of vancomycin endothelial toxicity. PMID:25421476

  6. Infused polymers for cell sheet release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juthani, Nidhi; Howell, Caitlin; Ledoux, Haylea; Sotiri, Irini; Kelso, Susan; Kovalenko, Yevgen; Tajik, Amanda; Vu, Thy L.; Lin, Jennifer J.; Sutton, Amy; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-05-01

    Tissue engineering using whole, intact cell sheets has shown promise in many cell-based therapies. However, current systems for the growth and release of these sheets can be expensive to purchase or difficult to fabricate, hindering their widespread use. Here, we describe a new approach to cell sheet release surfaces based on silicone oil-infused polydimethylsiloxane. By coating the surfaces with a layer of fibronectin (FN), we were able to grow mesenchymal stem cells to densities comparable to those of tissue culture polystyrene controls (TCPS). Simple introduction of oil underneath an edge of the sheet caused it to separate from the substrate. Characterization of sheets post-transfer showed that they retain their FN layer and morphology, remain highly viable, and are able to grow and proliferate normally after transfer. We expect that this method of cell sheet growth and detachment may be useful for low-cost, flexible, and customizable production of cellular layers for tissue engineering.

  7. Infused polymers for cell sheet release.

    PubMed

    Juthani, Nidhi; Howell, Caitlin; Ledoux, Haylea; Sotiri, Irini; Kelso, Susan; Kovalenko, Yevgen; Tajik, Amanda; Vu, Thy L; Lin, Jennifer J; Sutton, Amy; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering using whole, intact cell sheets has shown promise in many cell-based therapies. However, current systems for the growth and release of these sheets can be expensive to purchase or difficult to fabricate, hindering their widespread use. Here, we describe a new approach to cell sheet release surfaces based on silicone oil-infused polydimethylsiloxane. By coating the surfaces with a layer of fibronectin (FN), we were able to grow mesenchymal stem cells to densities comparable to those of tissue culture polystyrene controls (TCPS). Simple introduction of oil underneath an edge of the sheet caused it to separate from the substrate. Characterization of sheets post-transfer showed that they retain their FN layer and morphology, remain highly viable, and are able to grow and proliferate normally after transfer. We expect that this method of cell sheet growth and detachment may be useful for low-cost, flexible, and customizable production of cellular layers for tissue engineering. PMID:27189419

  8. Infused polymers for cell sheet release

    PubMed Central

    Juthani, Nidhi; Howell, Caitlin; Ledoux, Haylea; Sotiri, Irini; Kelso, Susan; Kovalenko, Yevgen; Tajik, Amanda; Vu, Thy L.; Lin, Jennifer J.; Sutton, Amy; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering using whole, intact cell sheets has shown promise in many cell-based therapies. However, current systems for the growth and release of these sheets can be expensive to purchase or difficult to fabricate, hindering their widespread use. Here, we describe a new approach to cell sheet release surfaces based on silicone oil-infused polydimethylsiloxane. By coating the surfaces with a layer of fibronectin (FN), we were able to grow mesenchymal stem cells to densities comparable to those of tissue culture polystyrene controls (TCPS). Simple introduction of oil underneath an edge of the sheet caused it to separate from the substrate. Characterization of sheets post-transfer showed that they retain their FN layer and morphology, remain highly viable, and are able to grow and proliferate normally after transfer. We expect that this method of cell sheet growth and detachment may be useful for low-cost, flexible, and customizable production of cellular layers for tissue engineering. PMID:27189419

  9. Isolation and identification of normal killer cells from Syrian hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Matveeva, V.A.; Klyuchareva, T.E.

    1986-09-01

    This paper gives data on isolation of normal killer cells from the blood and various tissues of Syrian hamsters in a Percoll density gradient and their identification on the basis of morphologic criteria and cytotoxic activity (CTA). CTA of the isolated cells was studied in the cytotoxic test with target cells of a human MOLT-4 thymoma cell labeled with /sup 51/Cr. Isolation of large granular lymphocytes from blood, spleen, and bone marrow of Syrian hamsters in Percoll density gradient is shown in the results of five experiments used for cells of each type.

  10. Posttransplant adoptive immunotherapy with activated natural killer cells in patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    deMagalhaes-Silverman, M; Donnenberg, A; Lembersky, B; Elder, E; Lister, J; Rybka, W; Whiteside, T; Ball, E

    2000-01-01

    Relapse after high-dose chemotherapy is the main cause of therapeutic failure in patients with metastatic breast cancer. Adoptive immunotherapy with interleukin-2 (IL-2) plus activated natural killer cells may eliminate residual disease without excessive toxicity. The authors sought to determine if immunotherapy immediately after transplantation would affect engraftment and the toxicity associated with transplantation. Fifteen consecutive patients with metastatic breast cancer were allocated to three cohorts. Cohort 1 (five patients) received high-dose cyclophosphamide, thiotepa, and carboplatin (CTCb) followed by peripheral blood stem cell infusion and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor at 10 micrograms/kg. Cohort 2 (five patients) received in addition rhIL-2 (2 x 10(6) IU/m2/day) for 4 days intravenously via continuous infusion after peripheral blood stem cell infusion. In cohort 3 (five patients), peripheral blood stem cell transplant was followed by infusion of autologous activated NK cells and rhIL-2 (2 x 10(6) IU/m2/day) for 4 days (via continuous intravenous infusion). Generation of activated NK cells was possible in all patients in cohort 3. All patients has successful engraftment. Median time to absolute neutrophil count more than 0.5 x 10(9)/L was 8 days (range, 8 to 11 days) in cohort 1, 9 days (range, 7 to 11 days) in cohort 2, and 9 days (range, 8 to 9 days) in cohort 3. Median time until the platelet count was more than 20 x 10(9)/L was 14 days (range, 9 to 22 days) in cohort 1, 11 days (range, 6 to 14 days) in cohort 2, and 12 days (range, 11 to 21 days) in cohort 3. All patients developed neutropenic fevers, but the overall toxicity associated with the infusion of IL-2 (cohort 2) or IL-2 plus activated NK cells (cohort 3) did not differ from that observed in cohort 1. Complete responses were achieved in one patient in cohort 1, in two patients in cohort 2, and in one patient in cohort 3. In conclusion, post-transplant adoptive immunotherapy with

  11. Expanded and Activated Natural Killer Cells for Immunotherapy of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Takahiro; Chang, Yu-Hsiang; Campana, Dario

    2016-07-01

    Viral infection of the liver is a major risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Natural killer (NK) cells recognize virally infected and oncogenically transformed cells, suggesting a therapeutic role for NK-cell infusions in HCC. Using the K562-mb15-41BBL cell line as a stimulus, we obtained large numbers of activated NK cells from the peripheral blood of healthy donors. Expanded NK cells exerted remarkably high cytotoxicity against HCC cell lines, which was generally much higher than that of unstimulated or IL2-activated NK cells. In immunodeficient NOD/scid IL2RGnull mice engrafted with Hep3B, treatment with expanded NK cells markedly reduced tumor growth and improved overall survival. HCC cells exposed for 48 hours to 5 μmol/L of sorafenib, a kinase inhibitor currently used for HCC treatment, remained highly sensitive to expanded NK cells. HCC cell reductions of 39.2% to 53.8% caused by sorafenib in three cell lines further increased to 80.5% to 87.6% after 4 hours of culture with NK cells at a 1:1 effector-to-target ratio. NK-cell cytotoxicity persisted even in the presence of sorafenib. We found that NKG2D, an NK-cell-activating receptor, was an important mediator of anti-HCC activity. We therefore enhanced its signaling capacity with a chimeric NKG2D-CD3ζ-DAP10 receptor. This considerably increased the anti-HCC cytotoxicity of expanded NK cells in vitro and in immunodeficient mice. The NK expansion and activation method applied in this study has been adapted to clinical-grade conditions. Hence, these results warrant clinical testing of expanded NK-cell infusions in patients with HCC, possibly after genetic modification with NKG2D-CD3ζ-DAP10. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(7); 574-81. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197065

  12. Organ-specific features of natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Fu-Dong; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; La Cava, Antonio; Van Kaer, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells can be swiftly mobilized by danger signals and are among the earliest arrivals at target organs of disease. However, the role of NK cells in mounting inflammatory responses is often complex and sometimes paradoxical. Here, we examine the divergent phenotypic and functional features of NK cells, as deduced largely from experimental mouse models of pathophysiological responses in the liver, mucosal tissues, uterus, pancreas, joints and brain. Moreover, we discuss how organ-specific factors, the local microenvironment and unique cellular interactions may influence the organ-specific properties of NK cells. PMID:21941294

  13. Natural killer T cells in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lan; Van Kaer, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a subset of T lymphocytes that share surface markers and functional characteristics with both conventional T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. Most NKT cells express a semiinvariant T cell receptor that reacts with glycolipid antigens presented by the major histocompatibility complex class I-related protein CD1d on the surface of antigen-presenting cells. NKT cells become activated during a variety of infections and inflammatory conditions, rapidly producing large amounts of immunomodulatory cytokines. NKT cells can influence the activation state and functional properties of multiple other cell types in the immune system and, thus, modulate immune responses against infectious agents, autoantigens, tumors, tissue grafts and allergens. One attractive aspect of NKT cells is that their immunomodulatory activities can be readily harnessed with cognate glycolipid antigens, such as the marine sponge-derived glycosphingolipid alpha-galactosylceramide. These properties of NKT cells are being exploited for therapeutic intervention to prevent or treat cancer, infections, and autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. PMID:21196373

  14. Use of natural killer cells as immunotherapy for leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Grzywacz, Bartosz; Miller, Jeffrey S.; Verneris, Michael R.

    2008-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells potentially play a significant role in eradicating residual disease following allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation, and have been explored as tools for adoptive immunotherapy for chemotherapy-refractory patients. NK cell cytotoxicity is modulated by multiple activating and inhibitory receptors that maintain a balance between self-tolerance and providing surveillance against pathogens and malignant transformation. The functional characteristics of NK cells are dictated by the strength of inhibitory receptor signalling. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-specific inhibitory receptor acquisition occurs sequentially during NK cell development, and is determined by the nature of immunological reconstitution after allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation. Polymorphisms of inhibitory receptors [killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs)] and their ligands (MHC) contribute to interindividual variability. As a result, the functional NK cell repertoire of individual donors has variable potential for graft-vs-leukaemia reactions. Models predicting NK cell alloreactivity, including KIR ligand mismatch and missing KIR ligand strategies, are discussed as algorithms for optimal NK cell donor selection. Future modifications to improve NK cell adoptive immunotherapy by means of increasing target recognition and reducing inhibitory signalling are being explored. PMID:18790450

  15. Clinically applicable magnetic-labeling of natural killer cells for MRI of transcatheter delivery to liver tumors: preclinical validation for clinical translation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kangan; Gordon, Andrew C; Zheng, Linfeng; Li, Weiguo; Guo, Yang; Sun, Jing; Zhang, Guixiang; Han, Guohong; Larson, Andrew C; Zhang, Zhuoli

    2015-01-01

    Aim To test the hypothesis that MRI can monitor intraportal vein (IPV) transcatheter delivery of clinically applicable heparin-protamine-ferumoxytol (HPF) nanocomplex-labeled natural killer (NK) cells to liver tumor. Materials & methods Liver tumor rat models underwent catheterization for IPV infusion of HPF-labeled NK cells (NK-92MI cell line). MRI measurements within tumor and adjacent liver tissues were compared pre- and post-NK cell infusion. Histology studies were used to identify NK cells in the target tumors. Results For first time, we demonstrated that MRI tracks HPF-labeled NK cells migration within liver following IPV delivery. Conclusion IPV transcatheter infusion permitted selective delivery of NK cells to liver tissues and MRI allowed tracking NK cell biodistributions within the tumors. PMID:26080698

  16. Circulating natural killer cells in retired asbestos cement workers.

    PubMed

    Froom, P; Lahat, N; Kristal-Boneh, E; Cohen, C; Lerman, Y; Ribak, J

    2000-01-01

    The effect of past exposure to asbestos on natural killer (NK) cell number and activity is uncertain. We measured NK cell number and activity in 1052 retired asbestos workers without symptomatic lung disease, lung cancer, or mesothelioma and with a long latency period from exposure; results were compared with those for 100 healthy age-matched controls. The exposed workers showed a decreased NK cell activity and increased NK cell number, yielding a 10.8 higher odds ratio for low NK activity per cell compared with controls (95% confidence interval 6.4 to 18.4), which was due to both a decrease in NK cell activity and an increase in NK cell number. Asbestos exposure of 10 years or more increased the risk of low NK activity per cell. We conclude that exposure to asbestos is associated with diminished effectiveness of NK cells and a concomitant increase in the number of NK circulating cells. PMID:10652684

  17. Antigen-Addicted T Cell Reserves Trickle Charge the Frontline Killers.

    PubMed

    Kalia, Vandana; Sarkar, Surojit

    2016-07-19

    Highly active killercells mediate a stable standoff during controlled persistent infections. In this issue of Immunity, Robey and colleagues describe a unique antigen-addicted T cell population bearing characteristics of both effector and memory CD8(+) T cells that provides a continuous supply of potent killercells to curb Toxoplasma gondii growth during latency. PMID:27438762

  18. Natural Killer Cells for Immunotherapy – Advantages of the NK-92 Cell Line over Blood NK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Klingemann, Hans; Boissel, Laurent; Toneguzzo, Frances

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are potent cytotoxic effector cells for cancer therapy and potentially for severe viral infections. However, there are technical challenges to obtain sufficient numbers of functionally active NK cells from a patient’s blood since they represent only 10% of the lymphocytes and are often dysfunctional. The alternative is to obtain cells from a healthy donor, which requires depletion of the allogeneic T cells to prevent graft-versus-host reactions. Cytotoxic cell lines have been established from patients with clonal NK-cell lymphoma. Those cells can be expanded in culture in the presence of IL-2. Except for the NK-92 cell line, though, none of the other six known NK cell lines has consistently and reproducibly shown high antitumor cytotoxicity. Only NK-92 cells can easily be genetically manipulated to recognize specific tumor antigens or to augment monoclonal antibody activity through antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. NK-92 is also the only cell line product that has been infused into patients with advanced cancer with clinical benefit and minimal side effects. PMID:27014270

  19. Involvement of cell wall beta-glucan in the action of HM-1 killer toxin.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, S; Ben Inoue, S; Mio, T; Yamada, T; Nakajima, T; Ichishima, E; Furuichi, Y; Yamada, H

    1994-07-01

    HM-1 killer toxin secreted from Hansenula mrakii inhibits the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells by interfering with beta-1,3-glucan synthesis. We found that HM-1 killer toxin killed intact cells but not protoplasts. In addition, cells lacking the functional KRE6 allele (kre6 delta) became resistant to higher concentration of HM-1 killer toxin. As reported by Roemer and Bussey [(1991) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 88 11295-11299], cells lacking functional KRE6 had a reduced level of the cell wall beta-1,6-glucan compared to that in cells harboring the normal KRE6. These results suggest that the cell wall beta-glucan is involved in the action of HM-1 killer toxin. Addition of HM-1 killer toxin with several kinds of oligosaccharides revealed that either beta-1,3- or beta-1,6-glucan blocked the cytocidal action of HM-1 killer toxin whereas alpha-1,4-glucan and chitin did not. Mannan also interfered with HM-1 killer toxin action, but this inhibitory effect was much weaker than that observed with beta-1,3- or beta-1,6-glucans. Thus, it appears that the cell wall beta-glucan interacts with HM-1 killer toxin, and that this toxin-beta-glucan commitment is required for the action of HM-1 killer toxin. PMID:8026578

  20. CAR-T cells are serial killers

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Alexander J; Jenkins, Misty R; Ritchie, David S; Prince, H Miles; Trapani, Joseph A; Kershaw, Michael H; Darcy, Phillip K; Neeson, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells have enjoyed unprecedented clinical success against haematological malignancies in recent years. However, several aspects of CAR T cell biology remain unknown. We recently compared CAR and T cell receptor (TCR)-based killing in the same effector cell and showed that CAR T cells can not only efficiently kill single tumor targets, they can also kill multiple tumor targets in a sequential manner. Single and serial killing events were not sustained long term due to CAR down-regulation after 20 hours. PMID:26587330

  1. Cord Blood as a Source of Natural Killer Cells.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Rohtesh S; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2015-01-01

    Cord blood (CB) offers several unique advantages as a graft source for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The risk of relapse and graft vs. host disease after cord blood transplantation (CBT) is lower than what is typically observed after other graft sources with a similar degree of human leukocyte antigen mismatch. Natural killer (NK) cells have a well-defined role in both innate and adaptive immunity and as the first lymphocytes to reconstitute after HSCT and CBT, and they play a significant role in protection against early relapse. In this article, we highlight the uses of CB NK cells in transplantation and adoptive immunotherapy. First, we will describe differences in the phenotype and functional characteristics of NK cells in CB as compared with peripheral blood. Then, we will review some of the obstacles we face in using resting CB NK cells for adoptive immunotherapy, and discuss methods to overcome them. We will review the current literature on killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors ligand mismatch and outcomes after CBT. Finally, we will touch on current strategies for the use of CB NK cells in cellular immunotherapy. PMID:26779484

  2. Cord Blood as a Source of Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Rohtesh S.; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2016-01-01

    Cord blood (CB) offers several unique advantages as a graft source for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The risk of relapse and graft vs. host disease after cord blood transplantation (CBT) is lower than what is typically observed after other graft sources with a similar degree of human leukocyte antigen mismatch. Natural killer (NK) cells have a well-defined role in both innate and adaptive immunity and as the first lymphocytes to reconstitute after HSCT and CBT, and they play a significant role in protection against early relapse. In this article, we highlight the uses of CB NK cells in transplantation and adoptive immunotherapy. First, we will describe differences in the phenotype and functional characteristics of NK cells in CB as compared with peripheral blood. Then, we will review some of the obstacles we face in using resting CB NK cells for adoptive immunotherapy, and discuss methods to overcome them. We will review the current literature on killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors ligand mismatch and outcomes after CBT. Finally, we will touch on current strategies for the use of CB NK cells in cellular immunotherapy. PMID:26779484

  3. Opioid peptides mediate the suppressive effect of stress on natural killer cell cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Shavit, Y; Lewis, J W; Terman, G W; Gale, R P; Liebeskind, J C

    1984-01-13

    The cytotoxic activity of natural killer cells was investigated in rats subjected to one of two inescapable footshock stress paradigms, both of which induce analgesia, but only one via activation of opioid mechanisms. Splenic natural killer cell activity was suppressed by the opioid, but not the nonopioid, form of stress. This suppression was blocked by the opioid antagonist naltrexone. Similar suppression of natural killer activity was induced by high doses of morphine. These results suggest that endogenous opioid peptides mediate the suppressive effect of certain forms of stress on natural killer cell cytotoxicity. PMID:6691146

  4. Apoptin: specific killer of tumor cells?

    PubMed

    Tavassoli, M; Guelen, L; Luxon, B A; Gäken, J

    2005-08-01

    In the early 1990s it was discovered that the VP3/Apoptin protein encoded by the Chicken Anemia virus (CAV) possesses an inherent ability to specifically kill cancer cells. Apoptin was found to be located in the cytoplasm of normal cells while in tumor cells it was localized mainly in the nucleus.(1) These differences in the localization pattern were suggested to be the main mechanism by which normal cells show resistance to Apoptin-mediated cell killing. Although the mechanism of action of Apoptin is presently unknown, it seems to function by the induction of programmed cell death (PCD) after translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and arresting the cell cycle at G2/M, possibly by interfering with the cyclosome.(2) In addition, cancer specific phosphorylation of Threonine residue 108 has been suggested to be important for Apoptin's function to kill tumor cells.(3) In contrast to the large number of publications reporting that nuclear localization, induction of PCD and phosphorylation of Apoptin is restricted to cancer cells, several recent studies have shown that Apoptin has the ability to migrate to the nucleus and induce PCD in some of the normal cell lines tested. There is evidence that high protein expression levels as well as the cellular growth rate may influence Apoptin's ability to specifically kill tumor cells. Thus far both in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that Apoptin is a powerful apoptosis inducing protein with a promising prospective utility in cancer therapy. However, here we show that several recent findings contradict some of the earlier results on the tumor specificity of Apoptin, thus creating some controversy in the field. The aim of this article is to review the available data, some published and some unpublished, which either agree or contradict the reported "black and white" tumor cell specificity of Apoptin. Understanding what factors appear to influence its function should help to develop Apoptin into a potent anti

  5. Apoptin: Specific killer of tumor cells?

    PubMed Central

    Tavassoli, M.; Guelen, L.; Luxon, B. A.; Gäken, J.

    2010-01-01

    In the early 1990s it was discovered that the VP3/Apoptin protein encoded by the Chicken Anemia virus (CAV) possesses an inherent ability to specifically kill cancer cells. Apoptin was found to be located in the cytoplasm of normal cells while in tumor cells it was localized mainly in the nucleus.1 These differences in the localization pattern were suggested to be the main mechanism by which normal cells show resistance to Apoptin-mediated cell killing. Although the mechanism of action of Apoptin is presently unknown, it seems to function by the induction of programmed cell death (PCD) after translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and arresting the cell cycle at g2/M, possibly by interfering with the cyclosome.2 In addition, cancer specific phosphorylation of Threonine residue 108 has been suggested to be important for Apoptin’s function to kill tumor cells.3 In contrast to the large number of publications reporting that nuclear localization, induction of PCD and phosphorylation of Apoptin is restricted to cancer cells, several recent studies have shown that Apoptin has the ability to migrate to the nucleus and induce PCD in some of the normal cell lines tested. There is evidence that high protein expression levels as well as the cellular growth rate may influence Apoptin’s ability to specifically kill tumor cells. Thus far both in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that Apoptin is a powerful apoptosis inducing protein with a promising prospective utility in cancer therapy. However, here we show that several recent findings contradict some of the earlier results on the tumor specificity of Apoptin, thus creating some controversy in the field. The aim of this article is to review the available data, some published and some unpublished, which either agree or contradict the reported “black and white” tumor cell specificity of Apoptin. Understanding what factors appear to influence its function should help to develop Apoptin into a potent anti

  6. Endothelial Cell Toxicity of Vancomycin Infusion Combined with Other Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Drouet, Maryline; Chai, Feng; Barthélémy, Christine; Lebuffe, Gilles; Debaene, Bertrand; Odou, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    French guidelines recommend central intravenous (i.v.) infusion for high concentrations of vancomycin, but peripheral intravenous (p.i.v.) infusion is often preferred in intensive care units. Vancomycin infusion has been implicated in cases of phlebitis, with endothelial toxicity depending on the drug concentration and the duration of the infusion. Vancomycin is frequently infused in combination with other i.v. antibiotics through the same administrative Y site, but the local toxicity of such combinations has been poorly evaluated. Such an assessment could improve vancomycin infusion procedures in hospitals. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were challenged with clinical doses of vancomycin over 24 h with or without other i.v. antibiotics. Cell death was measured with the alamarBlue test. We observed an excess cellular death rate without any synergistic effect but dependent on the numbers of combined infusions when vancomycin and erythromycin or gentamicin were infused through the same Y site. Incompatibility between vancomycin and piperacillin-tazobactam was not observed in our study, and rinsing the cells between the two antibiotic infusions did not reduce endothelial toxicity. No endothelial toxicity of imipenem-cilastatin was observed when combined with vancomycin. p.i.v. vancomycin infusion in combination with other medications requires new recommendations to prevent phlebitis, including limiting coinfusion on the same line, reducing the infusion rate, and choosing an intermittent infusion method. Further studies need to be carried out to explore other drug combinations in long-term vancomycin p.i.v. therapy so as to gain insight into the mechanisms of drug incompatibility under multidrug infusion conditions. PMID:26055373

  7. Endocytosis and Intracellular Trafficking of Human Natural Killer Cell Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Masilamani, Madhan; Peruzzi, Giovanna; Borrego, Francisco; Coligan, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a vital role in the defense against viral infections and tumor development. NK cell function is primarily regulated by the sum of signals from a broad array of activation and inhibitory receptors. Key to generating the input level of either activating or inhibitory signals is the maintenance of receptor expression levels on the cell surface. Although the mechanisms of endocytosis and trafficking for some cell surface receptors, such as transferrin receptor, and certain immune receptors, are very well known, that is not the situation for receptors expressed by NK cells. Recent studies have uncovered that endocytosis and trafficking routes characteristic for specific activation and inhibitory receptors can regulate the functional responses of NK cells. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of receptor endocytosis and trafficking, and integrate this with our current understanding of NK cell receptor trafficking. PMID:19719476

  8. The role of natural killer cells in viral infections.

    PubMed

    See, D M; Khemka, P; Sahl, L; Bui, T; Tilles, J G

    1997-09-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are important effectors for the lysis of both neoplastic and virus-infected cells. Lectin-like receptors on human NK cells, such as NKR-PIA and CD94, bind to target cell carbohydrate ligands and initiate the lytic process. In addition, P58 and P70 bind to major histocompatibility class I antigens on targets and mediate negative signals. Models using NK cell-deficient mice have proven useful in elaborating the role of NK cells in the immune defence against multiple viral agents. In addition, studies in humans have suggested a vital role of NK cells in the host defence against human immunodeficiency virus, herpesviruses, hepatitis B and C and other viruses. Several genetic disorders, chronic illnesses and infections have been associated with decreased NK function. PMID:9315107

  9. Understanding of molecular mechanisms in natural killer cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Suk Ran; Kim, Tae-Don; Choi, Inpyo

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells and the immune system are closely related and thus influence each other. Although immune cells can suppress cancer cell growth, cancer cells can evade immune cell attack via immune escape mechanisms. Natural killer (NK) cells kill cancer cells by secreting perforins and granzymes. Upon contact with cancer cells, NK cells form immune synapses to deliver the lethal hit. Mature NK cells are differentiated from hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow. They move to lymph nodes, where they are activated through interactions with dendritic cells. Interleukin-15 (IL-15) is a key molecule that activates mature NK cells. The adoptive transfer of NK cells to treat incurable cancer is an attractive approach. A certain number of activated NK cells are required for adoptive NK cell therapy. To prepare these NK cells, mature NK cells can be amplified to obtain sufficient numbers of NK cells. Alternatively, NK cells can be differentiated and amplified from hematopoietic stem cells. In addition, the selection of donors is important to achieve maximal efficacy. In this review, we discuss the overall procedures and strategies of NK cell therapy against cancer. PMID:25676064

  10. Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor gene association with cryptorchidism.

    PubMed

    Niepiekło-Miniewska, Wanda; Kuśnierczyk, Piotr; Havrylyuk, Anna; Kamieniczna, Marzena; Nakonechnyy, Andrij; Chopyak, Valentyna; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2015-12-01

    Cryptorchidism is a condition where a testis persists in the abdominal cavity. Thus, due to elevated temperature we may expect induction of aberrant immune reactions depending on genetic constitution of individual. This may be reflected by development of anti-sperm antibodies (ASA) in cryptorchid males. Also, natural killer (NK) cells which belong to innate immunity may control adaptive immunity. Therefore, the gene system encoding polymorphic NK cell immunoglobulin receptors (KIRs) has been studied. 109 prepubertal boys with cryptorchidism and 136 ethnically matched young male donors were selected to study NK cell KIRs. DNA was isolated using automatic Maxwell(®) system from the peripheral venous blood drawn onto anticoagulant. Olerup SSP KIR Genotyping kit including Taq polymerase was used for detection of KIR genes. Human leukocyte antigen-C (HLA-C) groups, C1 and C2 were established using a Olerup SSP KIR HLA Ligand kit. KIR2DL2 (killer immunoglobulin-like receptor two-domain long 2) and KIR2DS2 (killer immunoglobulin-like receptor two-domain short 2) genes were less frequent in patients than in control individuals (corrected p values: 0.0110 and 0.0383, respectively). However, no significant differences were observed between ASA-positive and ASA-negative patients, or between bilateral or unilateral cryptorchidism. No association between KIR ligands C1 and C2, alone or together with KIR2DL2, was found. However, the results suggest that KIR2DL2+/KIR2DS2+ genotype may be, to some extent, protective against cryptorchidism. PMID:26679162

  11. Quantitation of natural killer cell precursors in man.

    PubMed

    Gharehbaghian, Ahmad; Haque, K M Gausul; Truman, Carol; Newman, John; Bradley, Benjamin A

    2002-02-01

    A technique was developed to measure the frequency of natural killer cell precursors (NKpf) in human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples. Functional maturity of NK cells was reflected in their ability to lyse target cells from the K562 cell line. During the development of the technique, venous blood was taken from one healthy adult and assayed at different times to avoid individual variation. The technique was based on the principle of limiting dilution analysis. The NKpf assay was set up with a range of cell dilutions from 40,000 to 625 per 100 microl/well in 96-well culture plates. At the end of the culture period, the K562 cell line labelled with europium (Eu-K562) was added and the Eu-release was measured in culture supernatants using time-resolved fluorometry. The NKpf value differed between individuals and was influenced by the length of time in culture, being maximal at day 5. Maturation of NKp required the continuous presence of recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL-2), or rIL-15, both being equally effective. In the absence of cytokines, the functional NK cells declined rapidly beyond 24 h in culture. Irradiated allogeneic cells appeared to substitute in part for cytokines, but the numbers of allo-activated NKpf were lower than those observed when allo-activated NKpf were cultured with rIL-2. This suggested selective activation by the allogeneic stimulus of subsets of NKp or rIL-2-rescue of NKp subsets destined for apoptotic cell death. Alternatively, the increased frequency could have been attributable to activation of precursors of natural killer-T cells (NK-Tp). This assay is suitable for estimating the total number of precursors of functional NK cells in the blood of patients. PMID:11792377

  12. HPV vaccine stimulates cytotoxic activity of killer dendritic cells and natural killer cells against HPV-positive tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Van den Bergh, Johan M J; Guerti, Khadija; Willemen, Yannick; Lion, Eva; Cools, Nathalie; Goossens, Herman; Vorsters, Alex; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F I; Anguille, Sébastien; Van Damme, Pierre; Smits, Evelien L J M

    2014-01-01

    Cervarix™ is approved as a preventive vaccine against infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV) strains 16 and 18, which are causally related to the development of cervical cancer. We are the first to investigate in vitro the effects of this HPV vaccine on interleukin (IL)-15 dendritic cells (DC) as proxy of a naturally occurring subset of blood DC, and natural killer (NK) cells, two innate immune cell types that play an important role in antitumour immunity. Our results show that exposure of IL-15 DC to the HPV vaccine results in increased expression of phenotypic maturation markers, pro-inflammatory cytokine production and cytotoxic activity against HPV-positive tumour cells. These effects are mediated by the vaccine adjuvant, partly through Toll-like receptor 4 activation. Next, we demonstrate that vaccine-exposed IL-15 DC in turn induce phenotypic activation of NK cells, resulting in a synergistic cytotoxic action against HPV-infected tumour cells. Our study thus identifies a novel mode of action of the HPV vaccine in boosting innate immunity, including killing of HPV-infected cells by DC and NK cells. PMID:24979331

  13. Natural killer cells: walking three paths down memory lane.

    PubMed

    Min-Oo, Gundula; Kamimura, Yosuke; Hendricks, Deborah W; Nabekura, Tsukasa; Lanier, Lewis L

    2013-06-01

    Immunological memory has traditionally been regarded as a unique feature of the adaptive immune response, mediated in an antigen-specific manner by T and B lymphocytes. All other hematopoietic cells, including natural killer (NK) cells, are classified as innate immune cells, which have been considered short-lived but can respond rapidly against pathogens in a manner not thought to be driven by antigen. Interestingly, NK cells have recently been shown to survive long term after antigen exposure and subsequently mediate antigen-specific recall responses. In this review, we address the similarities between, and the controversies surrounding, three major viewpoints of NK memory that have arisen from these recent studies: (i) mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV)-induced memory; (ii) cytokine-induced memory; and (iii) liver-restricted memory cells. PMID:23499559

  14. Ex vivo generated natural killer cells acquire typical natural killer receptors and display a cytotoxic gene expression profile similar to peripheral blood natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Dorit; Spanholtz, Jan; Osl, Markus; Tordoir, Marleen; Lipnik, Karoline; Bilban, Martin; Schlechta, Bernhard; Dolstra, Harry; Hofer, Erhard

    2012-11-01

    Ex vivo differentiation systems of natural killer (NK) cells from CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells are of potential importance for adjuvant immunotherapy of cancer. Here, we analyzed ex vivo differentiation of NK cells from cord blood-derived CD34+ stem cells by gene expression profiling, real-time RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and functional analysis. Additionally, we compared the identified characteristics to peripheral blood (PB) CD56(bright) and CD56(dim) NK cells. The data show sequential expression of CD56 and the CD94 and NKG2 receptor chains during ex vivo NK cell development, resulting finally in the expression of a range of genes with partial characteristics of CD56(bright) and CD56(dim) NK cells from PB. Expression of characteristic NK cell receptors and cytotoxic genes was mainly found within the predominant ex vivo generated population of NKG2A+ NK cells, indicating the importance of NKG2A expression during NK cell differentiation and maturation. Furthermore, despite distinct phenotypic characteristics, the detailed analysis of cytolytic genes expressed within the ex vivo differentiated NK cells revealed a pattern close to CD56(dim) NK cells. In line with this finding, ex vivo generated NK cells displayed potent cytotoxicity. This supports that the ex vivo differentiation system faithfully reproduces major steps of the differentiation of NK cells from their progenitors, constitutes an excellent model to study NK cell differentiation, and is valuable to generate large-scale NK cells appropriate for immunotherapy. PMID:22571679

  15. Regulation of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by natural killer (NK) cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, B; Yamamura, T; Kondo, T; Fujiwara, M; Tabira, T

    1997-11-17

    In this report, we establish a regulatory role of natural killer (NK) cells in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a prototype T helper cell type 1 (Th1)-mediated disease. Active sensitization of C57BL/6 (B6) mice with the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)35-55 peptide induces a mild form of monophasic EAE. When mice were deprived of NK cells by antibody treatment before immunization, they developed a more serious form of EAE associated with relapse. Aggravation of EAE by NK cell deletion was also seen in beta 2-microglobulin-/- (beta 2m-/-) mice, indicating that NK cells can play a regulatory role in a manner independent of CD8+ T cells or NK1.1+ T cells (NK-T cells). The disease enhancement was associated with augmentation of T cell proliferation and production of Th1 cytokines in response to MOG35-55. EAE passively induced by the MOG35-55-specific T cell line was also enhanced by NK cell deletion in B6, beta 2m-/-, and recombination activation gene 2 (RAG-2)-/- mice, indicating that the regulation by NK cells can be independent of T, B, or NK-T cells. We further showed that NK cells inhibit T cell proliferation triggered by antigen or cytokine stimulation. Taken together, we conclude that NK cells are an important regulator for EAE in both induction and effector phases. PMID:9362528

  16. Clinical production and therapeutic applications of alloreactive natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    McKenna, David H; Kadidlo, Diane M; Cooley, Sarah; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances have improved our understanding of natural killer (NK) cell-mediated alloreactivity after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) or with adoptive transfer. NK cells contribute to a graft-versus-leukemia effect and may play a role in preventing graft-versus-host disease or controlling infectious diseases after allogeneic HCT. New discoveries in NK cell biology, including characterization of NK cell receptors and their interactions with self-HLA molecules and a better understanding of the mechanism of NK cell education have led to the development of novel strategies to exploit NK cell alloreactivity against tumors. While early studies using autologous NK cells lacked efficacy, the use of adoptively transferred NK cells to treat hematopoietic malignancies has been expanding. The production of allogeneic donor NK cells requires efficient removal of T- and B cells from clinical-scale leukapheresis collections. The goal of this chapter is to review NK cell biology, NK cell receptors, the use of NK cells as therapy and then to discuss the clinical decisions resulting in our current good manufacturing practices processing and activation of human NK cells for therapeutic use. PMID:22665252

  17. Natural killer cell mediated cytotoxic responses in the Tasmanian devil.

    PubMed

    Brown, Gabriella K; Kreiss, Alexandre; Lyons, A Bruce; Woods, Gregory M

    2011-01-01

    The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii), the world's largest marsupial carnivore, is under threat of extinction following the emergence of an infectious cancer. Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) is spread between Tasmanian devils during biting. The disease is consistently fatal and devils succumb without developing a protective immune response. The aim of this study was to determine if Tasmanian devils were capable of forming cytotoxic antitumour responses and develop antibodies against DFTD cells and foreign tumour cells. The two Tasmanian devils immunised with irradiated DFTD cells did not form cytotoxic or humoral responses against DFTD cells, even after multiple immunisations. However, following immunisation with xenogenic K562 cells, devils did produce cytotoxic responses and antibodies against this foreign tumour cell line. The cytotoxicity appeared to occur through the activity of natural killer (NK) cells in an antibody dependent manner. Classical NK cell responses, such as innate killing of DFTD and foreign cancer cells, were not observed. Cells with an NK-like phenotype comprised approximately 4 percent of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The results of this study suggest that Tasmanian devils have NK cells with functional cytotoxic pathways. Although devil NK cells do not directly recognise DFTD cancer cells, the development of antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity presents a potential pathway to induce cytotoxic responses against the disease. These findings have positive implications for future DFTD vaccine research. PMID:21957452

  18. Natural killer cells in hepatitis C: Current progress

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Joo Chun; Yang, Chang Mo; Song, Youkyong; Lee, Jae Myun

    2016-01-01

    Patients infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) are characterized by a high incidence of chronic infection, which results in chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The functional impairment of HCV-specific T cells is associated with the evolution of an acute infection to chronic hepatitis. While T cells are the important effector cells in adaptive immunity, natural killer (NK) cells are the critical effector cells in innate immunity to virus infections. The findings of recent studies on NK cells in hepatitis C suggest that NK cell responses are indeed important in each phase of HCV infection. In the early phase, NK cells are involved in protective immunity to HCV. The immune evasion strategies used by HCV may target NK cells and might contribute to the progression to chronic hepatitis C. NK cells may control HCV replication and modulate hepatic fibrosis in the chronic phase. Further investigations are, however, needed, because a considerable number of studies observed functional impairment of NK cells in chronic HCV infection. Interestingly, the enhanced NK cell responses during interferon-α-based therapy of chronic hepatitis C indicate successful treatment. In spite of the advances in research on NK cells in hepatitis C, establishment of more physiological HCV infection model systems is needed to settle unsolved controversies over the role and functional status of NK cells in HCV infection. PMID:26819513

  19. Advantages and applications of CAR-expressing natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Glienke, Wolfgang; Esser, Ruth; Priesner, Christoph; Suerth, Julia D.; Schambach, Axel; Wels, Winfried S.; Grez, Manuel; Kloess, Stephan; Arseniev, Lubomir; Koehl, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to donor T cells, natural killer (NK) cells are known to mediate anti-cancer effects without the risk of inducing graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). In order to improve cytotoxicity against resistant cancer cells, auspicious efforts have been made with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) expressing T- and NK cells. These CAR-modified cells express antigen receptors against tumor-associated surface antigens, thus redirecting the effector cells and enhancing tumor-specific immunosurveillance. However, many cancer antigens are also expressed on healthy tissues, potentially leading to off tumor/on target toxicity by CAR-engineered cells. In order to control such potentially severe side effects, the insertion of suicide genes into CAR-modified effectors can provide a means for efficient depletion of these cells. While CAR-expressing T cells have entered successfully clinical trials, experience with CAR-engineered NK cells is mainly restricted to pre-clinical investigations and predominantly to NK cell lines. In this review we summarize the data on CAR expressing NK cells focusing on the possible advantage using these short-lived effector cells and discuss the necessity of suicide switches. Furthermore, we address the compliance of such modified NK cells with regulatory requirements as a new field in cellular immunotherapy. PMID:25729364

  20. Invariant natural killer T cells: bridging innate and adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, Vrajesh V.; Wu, Lan

    2013-01-01

    Cells of the innate immune system interact with pathogens via conserved pattern-recognition receptors, whereas cells of the adaptive immune system recognize pathogens through diverse, antigen-specific receptors that are generated by somatic DNA rearrangement. Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are a subset of lymphocytes that bridge the innate and adaptive immune systems. Although iNKT cells express T cell receptors that are generated by somatic DNA rearrangement, these receptors are semi-invariant and interact with a limited set of lipid and glycolipid antigens, thus resembling the pattern-recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Functionally, iNKT cells most closely resemble cells of the innate immune system, as they rapidly elicit their effector functions following activation, and fail to develop immunological memory. iNKT cells can become activated in response to a variety of stimuli and participate in the regulation of various immune responses. Activated iNKT cells produce several cytokines with the capacity to jump-start and modulate an adaptive immune response. A variety of glycolipid antigens that can differentially elicit distinct effector functions in iNKT cells have been identified. These reagents have been employed to test the hypothesis that iNKT cells can be harnessed for therapeutic purposes in human diseases. Here, we review the innate-like properties and functions of iNKT cells and discuss their interactions with other cell types of the immune system. PMID:20734065

  1. Human Immunodeficiency Syndromes Affecting Human Natural Killer Cell Cytolytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Hyoungjun; Billadeau, Daniel D.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system that secrete cytokines upon activation and mediate the killing of tumor cells and virus-infected cells, especially those that escape the adaptive T cell response caused by the down regulation of MHC-I. The induction of cytotoxicity requires that NK cells contact target cells through adhesion receptors, and initiate activation signaling leading to increased adhesion and accumulation of F-actin at the NK cell cytotoxic synapse. Concurrently, lytic granules undergo minus-end directed movement and accumulate at the microtubule-organizing center through the interaction with microtubule motor proteins, followed by polarization of the lethal cargo toward the target cell. Ultimately, myosin-dependent movement of the lytic granules toward the NK cell plasma membrane through F-actin channels, along with soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor-dependent fusion, promotes the release of the lytic granule contents into the cleft between the NK cell and target cell resulting in target cell killing. Herein, we will discuss several disease-causing mutations in primary immunodeficiency syndromes and how they impact NK cell-mediated killing by disrupting distinct steps of this tightly regulated process. PMID:24478771

  2. Cytotoxic and natural killer cell stimulatory constituents of Phyllanthus songboiensis

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yulin; Yuan, Chunhua; Deng, Youcai; Kanagasabai, Ragu; Ninh, Tran Ngoc; Tu, Vuong Tan; Chai, Hee-Byung; Soejarto, Djaja D.; Fuchs, James R.; Yalowich, Jack C.; Yu, Jianhua; Kinghorn, A. Douglas

    2014-01-01

    A dichapetalin-type triterpenoid and a dibenzylbutyrolactone-type lignan, together with five known lignans, a known aromatic diterpenoid, and a known acylated phytosterol, were isolated from the aerial parts of Phyllanthus songboiensis, collected in Vietnam. Their structures were determined by interpretation of the spectroscopic data, and the inhibitory activity toward the HT-29 human colon cancer cells of all isolates was evaluated by a cytotoxicity assay. The known arylnaphthalene lignan, (+)-acutissimalignan A, was highly cytotoxic toward HT-29 cells, with an IC50 value of 19 nM, but this compound was inactive as a DNA topoisomerase IIα (topo IIα) poison. The known phytosterol, (−)-β-sitosterol-3-O-β-D-(6-O-palmitoyl)glucopyranoside, was found to stimulate natural killer (NK) cells at a concentration of 10 μM in the presence of interleukin 12 (IL-12). PMID:25596805

  3. The Application of Natural Killer Cell Immunotherapy for the Treatment of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rezvani, Katayoun; Rouce, Rayne H.

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are essential components of the innate immune system and play a critical role in host immunity against cancer. Recent progress in our understanding of NK cell immunobiology has paved the way for novel NK cell-based therapeutic strategies for the treatment of cancer. In this review, we will focus on recent advances in the field of NK cell immunotherapy, including augmentation of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, manipulation of receptor-mediated activation, and adoptive immunotherapy with ex vivo-expanded, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered, or engager-modified NK cells. In contrast to T lymphocytes, donor NK cells do not attack non-hematopoietic tissues, suggesting that an NK-mediated antitumor effect can be achieved in the absence of graft-vs.-host disease. Despite reports of clinical efficacy, a number of factors limit the application of NK cell immunotherapy for the treatment of cancer, such as the failure of infused NK cells to expand and persist in vivo. Therefore, efforts to enhance the therapeutic benefit of NK cell-based immunotherapy by developing strategies to manipulate the NK cell product, host factors, and tumor targets are the subject of intense research. In the preclinical setting, genetic engineering of NK cells to express CARs to redirect their antitumor specificity has shown significant promise. Given the short lifespan and potent cytolytic function of mature NK cells, they are attractive candidate effector cells to express CARs for adoptive immunotherapies. Another innovative approach to redirect NK cytotoxicity towards tumor cells is to create either bispecific or trispecific antibodies, thus augmenting cytotoxicity against tumor-associated antigens. These are exciting times for the study of NK cells; with recent advances in the field of NK cell biology and translational research, it is likely that NK cell immunotherapy will move to the forefront of cancer immunotherapy over the next few years. PMID

  4. Multiplicity and plasticity of natural killer cell signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chiesa, Sabrina; Mingueneau, Michael; Fuseri, Nicolas; Malissen, Bernard; Raulet, David H.; Malissen, Marie; Vivier, Eric; Tomasello, Elena

    2006-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells express an array of activating receptors that associate with DAP12 (KARAP), CD3ζ, and/or FcRγ ITAM (immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif)–bearing signaling subunits. In T and mast cells, ITAM-dependent signals are integrated by critical scaffolding elements such as LAT (linker for activation of T cells) and NTAL (non–T-cell activation linker). Using mice that are deficient for ITAM-bearing molecules, LAT or NTAL, we show that NK cell cytotoxicity and interferon-γ secretion are initiated by ITAM-dependent and -independent as well as LAT/NTAL-dependent and -independent pathways. The role of these various signaling circuits depends on the target cell as well as on the activation status of the NK cell. The multiplicity and the plasticity of the pathways that initiate NK cell effector functions contrast with the situation in T cells and B cells and provide an explanation for the resiliency of NK cell effector functions to various pharmacologic inhibitors and genetic mutations in signaling molecules. PMID:16291591

  5. Regulation of Natural Killer Cell Function by STAT3.

    PubMed

    Cacalano, Nicholas A

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, key members of a distinct hematopoietic lineage, innate lymphoid cells, are not only critical effectors that mediate cytotoxicity toward tumor and virally infected cells but also regulate inflammation, antigen presentation, and the adaptive immune response. It has been shown that NK cells can regulate the development and activation of many other components of the immune response, such as dendritic cells, which in turn, modulate the function of NK cells in multiple synergistic feed back loops driven by cell-cell contact, and the secretion of cytokines and chemokines that control effector function and migration of cells to sites of immune activation. The signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 is involved in driving almost all of the pathways that control NK cytolytic activity as well as the reciprocal regulatory interactions between NK cells and other components of the immune system. In the context of tumor immunology, NK cells are a first line of defense that eliminates pre-cancerous and transformed cells early in the process of carcinogenesis, through a mechanism of "immune surveillance." Even after tumors become established, NK cells are critical components of anticancer immunity: dysfunctional NK cells are often found in the peripheral blood of cancer patients, and the lack of NK cells in the tumor microenvironment often correlates to poor prognosis. The pathways and soluble factors activated in tumor-associated NK cells, cancer cells, and regulatory myeloid cells, which determine the outcome of cancer immunity, are all critically regulated by STAT3. Using the tumor microenvironment as a paradigm, we present here an overview of the research that has revealed fundamental mechanisms through which STAT3 regulates all aspects of NK cell biology, including NK development, activation, target cell killing, and fine tuning of the innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:27148255

  6. Antitumor Responses of Invariant Natural Killer T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Jennie B.; Benavides, Adriana D.; Das, Rupali; Bassiri, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are innate-like lymphocytes that were first described in the late 1980s. Since their initial description, numerous studies have collectively shed light on their development and effector function. These studies have highlighted the unique requirements for the activation of these lymphocytes and the functional responses that distinguish these cells from other effector lymphocyte populations such as conventional T cells and NK cells. This body of literature suggests that NKT cells play diverse nonredundant roles in a number of disease processes, including the initiation and propagation of airway hyperreactivity, protection against a variety of pathogens, development of autoimmunity, and mediation of allograft responses. In this review, however, we focus on the role of a specific lineage of NKT cells in antitumor immunity. Specifically, we describe the development of invariant NKT (iNKT) cells and the factors that are critical for their acquisition of effector function. Next, we delineate the mechanisms by which iNKT cells influence and modulate the activity of other immune cells to directly or indirectly affect tumor growth. Finally, we review the successes and failures of clinical trials employing iNKT cell-based immunotherapies and explore the future prospects for the use of such strategies. PMID:26543874

  7. Antigen specificity of invariant natural killer T-cells.

    PubMed

    Birkholz, Alysia M; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2015-12-01

    Natural killer T-cells, with an invariant T-cell antigen receptor α-chain (iNKT cells), are unique and conserved subset of lymphocytes capable of altering the immune system through their rapid and potent cytokine responses. They are reactive to lipid antigens presented by the CD1d molecule, an antigen-presenting molecule that is not highly polymorphic. iNKT cell responses frequently involve mixtures of cytokines that work against each other, and therefore attempts are underway to develop synthetic antigens that elicit only strong interferon-gamma (IFNγ) or only strong interleukin-4 responses but not both. Strong IFNγ responses may correlate with tighter binding to CD1d and prolonged stimulation of iNKT cells, and this may be useful for vaccine adjuvants and for stimulating anti-tumor responses. iNKT cells are self-reactive although the structure of the endogenous antigen is controversial. By contrast, bacterial and fungal lipids that engage the T-cell receptor and activate IFNγ from iNKT cells have been identified from both pathogenic and commensal organisms and the responses are in some cases highly protective from pathogens in mice. It is possible that the expanding knowledge of iNKT cell antigens and iNKT cell activation will provide the basis for therapies for patients suffering from infectious and immune diseases and cancer. PMID:27013447

  8. Natural killer cells in non-hematopoietic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Desbois, Mélanie; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Locher, Clara; Zitvogel, Laurence; Chaput, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells belong to the innate immune system and were initially described functionallywise by their spontaneous cytotoxic potential against transformed or virus-infected cells. A delicate balance between activating and inhibiting receptors regulates NK cell tolerance. A better understanding of tissue resident NK cells, of NK cell maturation stages and migration patterns has evolved allowing a thoughtful evaluation of their modus operandi. While evidence has been brought up for their relevance as gate keepers in some hematopoietic malignancies, the role of NK cells against progression and dissemination of solid tumors remains questionable. Hence, many studies pointed out the functional defects of the rare NK cell infiltrates found in tumor beds and the lack of efficacy of adoptively transferred NK cells in patients. However, several preclinical evidences suggest their anti-metastatic role in a variety of mouse tumor models. In the present review, we discuss NK cell functions according to their maturation stage and environmental milieu, the receptor/ligand interactions dictating tumor cell recognition and recapitulate translational studies aimed at deciphering their prognostic or predictive role against human solid malignancies. PMID:23269924

  9. Natural killer cells in non-hematopoietic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Desbois, Mélanie; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Locher, Clara; Zitvogel, Laurence; Chaput, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells belong to the innate immune system and were initially described functionallywise by their spontaneous cytotoxic potential against transformed or virus-infected cells. A delicate balance between activating and inhibiting receptors regulates NK cell tolerance. A better understanding of tissue resident NK cells, of NK cell maturation stages and migration patterns has evolved allowing a thoughtful evaluation of their modus operandi. While evidence has been brought up for their relevance as gate keepers in some hematopoietic malignancies, the role of NK cells against progression and dissemination of solid tumors remains questionable. Hence, many studies pointed out the functional defects of the rare NK cell infiltrates found in tumor beds and the lack of efficacy of adoptively transferred NK cells in patients. However, several preclinical evidences suggest their anti-metastatic role in a variety of mouse tumor models. In the present review, we discuss NK cell functions according to their maturation stage and environmental milieu, the receptor/ligand interactions dictating tumor cell recognition and recapitulate translational studies aimed at deciphering their prognostic or predictive role against human solid malignancies. PMID:23269924

  10. Involvement of LSECtin in the hepatic natural killer cell response.

    PubMed

    Yang, Juntao; Wang, He; Wang, Min; Liu, Biao; Xu, Hui; Xu, Feng; Zhao, Dianyuan; Hu, Bin; Zhao, Na; Wang, Junyi; Liu, Di; Tang, Li; He, Fuchu

    2016-07-15

    Accumulating evidence has indicated that natural killer cells (NK cells) play an important role in immune responses generated in the liver. However, the underlying molecular basis for local immune regulation is poorly understood. Mice were intraperitoneally injected with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (PolyI:C) at a dose of 20 mg/kg body wt. The percentage and absolute number of NK cells in the liver were analysed with flow cytometry. LSECtin knockout mice and LSECtin cDNA plasmids were used for analyze the role of LSECtin in hepatic NK cell regulation in vivo. Here, we show that the C-type lectin LSECtin, a member of the DC-SIGN family, is a novel liver regulator for NK cells. LSECtin could bind to NK cells in a carbohydrate-dependent manner and could regulate the number of hepatic NK cells. In the NK cell-mediated acute liver injury model induced with PolyI:C, the exogenous expression of LSECtin accelerated NK cell-induced liver injury, whereas the absence of LSECtin ameliorated this condition. Our results reveal that LSECtin is a novel, liver-specific NK cell regulator that may be a target for the treatment of inflammatory diseases in the liver. PMID:27184407

  11. Prolonged treatment response in aggressive natural killer cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Osuji, N; Matutes, E; Morilla, A; Del Giudice, I; Wotherspoon, A; Catovsky, D

    2005-05-01

    We describe a case of natural killer (NK) cell leukemia with acute presentation, systemic symptoms and hepatosplenomegaly. The uniform and aberrant phenotype of NK cells with infiltration of bone marrow and spleen was in keeping with a malignant diagnosis. Aggressive presentation was demonstrated by marked constitutional symptoms and significant tumor burden (liver, spleen, blood, bone marrow). The subsequent clinical course has been indolent, but this may have been influenced by treatment. Treatment consisted sequentially of splenectomy, intravenous pentostatin and the combination of cyclosporine A and recombinant human erythropoietin and has resulted in survival of over 48 months. We discuss the difficulties in the diagnosis of this condition, explore possible causes of cytopenia(s), and highlight the role of immunosuppression in controlling disease manifestations in large granular lymphocyte proliferative disorders. PMID:16019515

  12. Regulation of Natural Killer Cell Function by STAT3

    PubMed Central

    Cacalano, Nicholas A.

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, key members of a distinct hematopoietic lineage, innate lymphoid cells, are not only critical effectors that mediate cytotoxicity toward tumor and virally infected cells but also regulate inflammation, antigen presentation, and the adaptive immune response. It has been shown that NK cells can regulate the development and activation of many other components of the immune response, such as dendritic cells, which in turn, modulate the function of NK cells in multiple synergistic feed back loops driven by cell–cell contact, and the secretion of cytokines and chemokines that control effector function and migration of cells to sites of immune activation. The signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 is involved in driving almost all of the pathways that control NK cytolytic activity as well as the reciprocal regulatory interactions between NK cells and other components of the immune system. In the context of tumor immunology, NK cells are a first line of defense that eliminates pre-cancerous and transformed cells early in the process of carcinogenesis, through a mechanism of “immune surveillance.” Even after tumors become established, NK cells are critical components of anticancer immunity: dysfunctional NK cells are often found in the peripheral blood of cancer patients, and the lack of NK cells in the tumor microenvironment often correlates to poor prognosis. The pathways and soluble factors activated in tumor-associated NK cells, cancer cells, and regulatory myeloid cells, which determine the outcome of cancer immunity, are all critically regulated by STAT3. Using the tumor microenvironment as a paradigm, we present here an overview of the research that has revealed fundamental mechanisms through which STAT3 regulates all aspects of NK cell biology, including NK development, activation, target cell killing, and fine tuning of the innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:27148255

  13. Emerging role of Natural killer cells in oncolytic virotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Rauf; Rommelaere, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells constitute a subtype of lymphocytes that initiate innate immune responses against tumors and virus-infected cells. The ability of NK cells to kill target cells or to produce cytokines depends on the balance between signals from activating and inhibitory cell-surface receptors. Therapies with NK cells involve activation of endogenous NK cells and/or exogenous transfer by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation/adoptive cell therapy. To exploit the diverse functional abilities of NK cells for cancer immunotherapy, it is important to understand NK cell biology and the underlying regulatory mechanisms. The state of immune suppression prevalent in malignancies creates the need for innovative therapies. Oncolytic viruses are novel anticancer agents showing selective tropism for tumor cells and lacking pathogenicity in humans, but the use of oncolytic virotherapy (OVT) presents multiple challenges. An increasing body of evidence suggests that the host immune response may critically influence the outcome of OVT. Classically, the immune system is thought to limit the efficacy of therapy through virus clearance mediated by innate immune effectors or through adaptive antiviral immune responses eliminating infected cells. Effective strategies do need to be designed in OVT to circumvent the early antiviral activity of NK cells and to augment late NK-cell-mediated antitumor responses. The intrinsic immunostimulating capacity of oncolytic viruses and the possibility of engineering them to express heterologous immunostimulatory molecules (eg, cytokines) support the use of these agents to enhance antitumor immune responses besides inducing direct oncolytic effects. OVT has indeed shown promising therapeutic outcomes in various clinical trials. Here, we review the biology of NK cells, strategies involving NK cells for achieving cancer therapy, and, more particularly, the emerging role of NK cells in OVT.

  14. Aggressive mature natural killer cell neoplasms: from epidemiology to diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mature natural killer (NK) cell neoplasms are classified by the World Health Organization into NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type (NKTCL), aggressive NK-cell leukemia (ANKCL) and chronic lymphoproliferative disorders of NK-cells, the latter being considered provisionally. NKTCL and ANKCL are rare diseases, with higher prevalence in Asia, Central and South America. Most NKTCL present extranodal, as a destructive tumor affecting the nose and upper aerodigestive tract (nasal NKTCL) or any organ or tissue (extranasal NKTCL) whereas ANKCL manifests as a systemic disease with multiorgan involvement and naturally evolutes to death in a few weeks. The histopathological hallmark of these aggressive NK-cell tumors is a polymorphic neoplastic infiltrate with angiocentricity, angiodestruction and tissue necrosis. The tumor cells have cytoplasmatic azurophilic granules and usually show a CD45+bright, CD2+, sCD3-, cytCD3epsilon+, CD56+bright, CD16−/+, cytotoxic granules molecules+ phenotype. T-cell receptor genes are in germ-line configuration. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) -encoded membrane proteins and early region EBV RNA are usually detected on lymphoma cells, with a pattern suggestive of a latent viral infection type II. Complex chromosomal abnormalities are frequent and loss of chromosomes 6q, 11q, 13q, and 17p are recurrent aberrations. The rarity of the NK-cell tumors limits our ability to standardize the procedures for the diagnosis and clinical management and efforts should be made to encourage multi-institutional registries. PMID:23816348

  15. Stimulation of Natural Killer T Cells by Glycolipids

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Brian L.; Teyton, Luc; Bendelac, Albert; Savage, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a subset of T cells that recognize glycolipid antigens presented by the CD1d protein. The initial discovery of immunostimulatory glycolipids from a marine sponge and the T cells that respond to the compounds has led to extensive research by chemists and immunologists to understand how glycolipids are recognized, possible responses by NKT cells, and the structural features of glycolipids necessary for stimulatory activity. The presence of this cell type in humans and most mammals suggests that it plays critical roles in antigen recognition and the interface between innate and adaptive immunity. Both endogenous and exogenous natural antigens for NKT cells have been identified, and it is likely that glycolipid antigens remain to be discovered. Multiple series of structurally varied glycolipids have been synthesized and tested for stimulatory activity. The structural features of glycolipids necessary for NKT cell stimulation are moderately well understood, and designed compounds have proven to be much more potent antigens than their natural counterparts. Nevertheless, control over NKT cell responses by designed glycolipids has not been optimized, and further research will be required to fully reveal the therapeutic potential of this cell type. PMID:24352021

  16. Insights into the paracrine effects of uterine natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    GONG, XIN; LIU, YANXIA; CHEN, ZHENZHEN; XU, CAI; LU, QIUDAN; JIN, ZHE

    2014-01-01

    Uterine natural killer (uNK) cells are recruited into the uterus during establishment of the implantation and placentation of the embryo, and are hypothesized to regulate uterine spiral artery remodeling and angiogenesis during the initial stages of pregnancy. Failures in uNK cell activation are linked to diseases associated with pregnancy. However, the manner in which these cells interact with the endometrium remain unknown. Therefore, this study investigated the paracrine effects of uNK cells on the gene expression profile of an endometrial epithelial and stromal cell co-culture system in vitro, using a microarray analysis. Results from reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay experiments showed that soluble factors from uNK cells significantly alter endometrial gene expression. In conclusion, this study suggests that paracrine effects of uNK cells guide uNK cell proliferation, trophoblast migration, endometrial decidualization and angiogenesis, and maintain non-cytotoxicity of uNK cells. PMID:25310696

  17. Molecular Programming of Immunological Memory in Natural Killer Cells.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Aimee M; Madera, Sharline; Sun, Joseph C

    2015-01-01

    Immunological memory is a hallmark of the adaptive immune system. Although natural killer (NK) cells have traditionally been classified as a component of the innate immune system, they have recently been shown in mice and humans to exhibit certain features of immunological memory, including an ability to undergo a clonal-like expansion during virus infection, generate long-lived progeny (i.e. memory cells), and mediate recall responses against previously encountered pathogens--all characteristics previously ascribed only to adaptive immune responses by B and T cells in mammals. To date, the molecular events that govern the generation of NK cell memory are not completely understood. Using a mouse model of cytomegalovirus infection, we demonstrate that individual pro-inflammatory IL-12, IL-18, and type I-IFN signaling pathways are indispensible and play non-redundant roles in the generation of virus-specific NK cell memory. Furthermore, we discovered that antigen-specific proliferation and protection by NK cells is mediated by the transcription factor Zbtb32, which is induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines and promotes a cell cycle program in activated NK cells. A greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling NK cell responses will provide novel strategies for tailoring vaccines to target infectious disease. PMID:26324348

  18. Utilizing Chimeric Antigen Receptors to Direct Natural Killer Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hermanson, David L.; Kaufman, Dan S.

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells represent an attractive lymphocyte population for cancer immunotherapy due to their ability to lyse tumor targets without prior sensitization and without need for human leukocyte antigens-matching. Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are able to enhance lymphocyte targeting and activation toward diverse malignancies. CARs consist of an external recognition domain (typically a small chain variable fragment) directed at a specific tumor antigen that is linked with one or more intracellular signaling domains that mediate lymphocyte activation. Most CAR studies have focused on their expression in T cells. However, use of CARs in NK cells is starting to gain traction because they provide a method to redirect these cells more specifically to target refractory cancers. CAR-mediated anti-tumor activity has been demonstrated using NK cell lines, as well as NK cells isolated from peripheral blood, and NK cells produced from human pluripotent stem cells. This review will outline the CAR constructs that have been reported in NK cells with a focus on comparing the use of different signaling domains in combination with other co-activating domains. PMID:25972867

  19. Analyzing Antigen Recognition by Natural Killer T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeissig, Sebastian; Olszak, Torsten; Melum, Espen; Blumberg, Richard S.

    2013-01-01

    Natural Killer T (NKT) cells are a subset of T lymphocytes that recognize a wide variety of lipid antigens presented by CD1 molecules. NKT cells exhibit rapid activation after recognition of cognate antigens, secrete abundant amounts of T helper (Th) 1, Th2, and Th17 cytokines within hours of activation and shape the immune response through subsequent activation of dendritic, NK, T and B cells. NKT cells therefore play central roles in antimicrobial and anticancer immunity and in modulation of various autoimmune disorders. Consequently, recent research has focused on the discovery of microbial and self-antigens involved in NKT cell activation. In this chapter, we discuss different strategies for studying antigen recognition by NKT cells including CD1d tetramer-based approaches and in vitro assays characterizing NKT cell activation in response to lipid antigen presentation. While toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists and cytokines such as IL-12 are critical for NKT cell activation in vivo, particularly in the context of microbial infection, methods for detection of TLR- and cytokine-dependent NKT cell activation will not be discussed in this section. PMID:23329514

  20. The DNA methylation profile of activated human natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Wiencke, John K; Butler, Rondi; Hsuang, George; Eliot, Melissa; Kim, Stephanie; Sepulveda, Manuel A; Siegel, Derick; Houseman, E Andres; Kelsey, Karl T

    2016-05-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are now recognized to exhibit characteristics akin to cells of the adaptive immune system. The generation of adaptive memory is linked to epigenetic reprogramming including alterations in DNA methylation. The study herein found reproducible genome wide DNA methylation changes associated with human NK cell activation. Activation led predominately to CpG hypomethylation (81% of significant loci). Bioinformatics analysis confirmed that non-coding and gene-associated differentially methylated sites (DMS) are enriched for immune related functions (i.e., immune cell activation). Known DNA methylation-regulated immune loci were also identified in activated NK cells (e.g., TNFA, LTA, IL13, CSF2). Twenty-one loci were designated high priority and further investigated as potential markers of NK activation. BHLHE40 was identified as a viable candidate for which a droplet digital PCR assay for demethylation was developed. The assay revealed high demethylation in activated NK cells and low demethylation in naïve NK, T- and B-cells. We conclude the NK cell methylome is plastic with potential for remodeling. The differentially methylated region signature of activated NKs revealed similarities with T cell activation, but also provided unique biomarker candidates of NK activation, which could be useful in epigenome-wide association studies to interrogate the role of NK subtypes in global methylation changes associated with exposures and/or disease states. PMID:26967308

  1. High log-scale expansion of functional human natural killer cells from umbilical cord blood CD34-positive cells for adoptive cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Spanholtz, Jan; Tordoir, Marleen; Eissens, Diana; Preijers, Frank; van der Meer, Arnold; Joosten, Irma; Schaap, Nicolaas; de Witte, Theo M; Dolstra, Harry

    2010-01-01

    Immunotherapy based on natural killer (NK) cell infusions is a potential adjuvant treatment for many cancers. Such therapeutic application in humans requires large numbers of functional NK cells that have been selected and expanded using clinical grade protocols. We established an extremely efficient cytokine-based culture system for ex vivo expansion of NK cells from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from umbilical cord blood (UCB). Systematic refinement of this two-step system using a novel clinical grade medium resulted in a therapeutically applicable cell culture protocol. CD56(+)CD3(-) NK cell products could be routinely generated from freshly selected CD34(+) UCB cells with a mean expansion of >15,000 fold and a nearly 100% purity. Moreover, our protocol has the capacity to produce more than 3-log NK cell expansion from frozen CD34(+) UCB cells. These ex vivo-generated cell products contain NK cell subsets differentially expressing NKG2A and killer immunoglobulin-like receptors. Furthermore, UCB-derived CD56(+) NK cells generated by our protocol uniformly express high levels of activating NKG2D and natural cytotoxicity receptors. Functional analysis showed that these ex vivo-generated NK cells efficiently target myeloid leukemia and melanoma tumor cell lines, and mediate cytolysis of primary leukemia cells at low NK-target ratios. Our culture system exemplifies a major breakthrough in producing pure NK cell products from limited numbers of CD34(+) cells for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:20169160

  2. Natural Killer Cell Immunotherapy: From Bench to Bedside.

    PubMed

    Domogala, Anna; Madrigal, J Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2015-01-01

    The potential of natural killer (NK) cells to target numerous malignancies in vitro has been well documented; however, only limited success has been seen in the clinic. Although NK cells prove non-toxic and safe regardless of the cell numbers injected, there is often little persistence and expansion observed in a patient, which is vital for mounting an effective cellular response. NK cells can be isolated directly from peripheral blood, umbilical cord blood, or bone marrow, expanded in vitro using cytokines or differentiated in vitro from hematopoietic stem cells. Drugs that support NK cell function such as lenalidomide and bortezomib have also been studied in the clinic, however, the optimum combination, which can vary among different malignancies, is yet to be identified. NK cell proliferation, persistence, and function can further be improved by various activation techniques such as priming and cytokine addition though whether stimulation pre- or post-injection is more favorable is another obstacle to be tackled. Here, we review the various methods of obtaining and activating NK cells for use in the clinic while considering the ideal product and drug complement for the most successful cellular therapy. PMID:26089820

  3. Natural Killer Cell Immunotherapy: From Bench to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Domogala, Anna; Madrigal, J. Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2015-01-01

    The potential of natural killer (NK) cells to target numerous malignancies in vitro has been well documented; however, only limited success has been seen in the clinic. Although NK cells prove non-toxic and safe regardless of the cell numbers injected, there is often little persistence and expansion observed in a patient, which is vital for mounting an effective cellular response. NK cells can be isolated directly from peripheral blood, umbilical cord blood, or bone marrow, expanded in vitro using cytokines or differentiated in vitro from hematopoietic stem cells. Drugs that support NK cell function such as lenalidomide and bortezomib have also been studied in the clinic, however, the optimum combination, which can vary among different malignancies, is yet to be identified. NK cell proliferation, persistence, and function can further be improved by various activation techniques such as priming and cytokine addition though whether stimulation pre- or post-injection is more favorable is another obstacle to be tackled. Here, we review the various methods of obtaining and activating NK cells for use in the clinic while considering the ideal product and drug complement for the most successful cellular therapy. PMID:26089820

  4. Id2 regulates hyporesponsive invariant natural killer T cells.

    PubMed

    Stradner, Martin H; Cheung, Kitty P; Lasorella, Anna; Goldrath, Ananda W; D'Cruz, Louise M

    2016-08-01

    While the invariant natural killer T (iNKT)-cell response to primary stimulation with the glycolipid, α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer), is robust, the secondary response to this stimulus is muted resulting in a hyporesponsive state characterized by anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 (IL-10) production and high expression of programmed cell death 1 (PD1) and neuropilin 1 (NRP1). The E protein transcription factors and their negative regulators, the Id proteins, have previously been shown to regulate iNKT cell thymic development, subset differentiation and peripheral survival. Here, we provide evidence that the expression of the transcriptional regulator Id2 is downregulated upon stimulation of iNKT cells with their cognate antigen. Moreover, loss of Id2 expression by iNKT cells resulted in a hyporesponsive state, with splenic Id2-deficient iNKT cells expressing low levels of TBET, high levels of PD1 and NRP1 and production of IL-10 upon stimulation. We propose that downregulation of Id2 expression is an essential component of induction of the anti-inflammatory, hyporesponsive state in iNKT cells. PMID:26880074

  5. Natural killer cells regulate eosinophilic inflammation in chronic rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Heui; Choi, Go Eun; Lee, Bong-Jae; Kwon, Seog Woon; Lee, Seung-Hyo; Kim, Hun Sik; Jang, Yong Ju

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophils play a major pathologic role in the pathogenesis of diverse inflammatory diseases including chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Dysregulated production of prostaglandin (PG), particularly PGD2, is considered to be an important contributing factor to eosinophilic inflammation in CRS primarily through proinflammatory and chemotactic effects on eosinophils. Here, we provide evidence that PGD2 can promote eosinophilic inflammation through a suppression of Natural killer (NK) cell effector function and NK cell-mediated eosinophil regulation. Eosinophil apoptosis mediated by NK cells was significantly decreased in CRS patients compared with healthy controls. This decrease was associated with NK cell dysfunction and eosinophilic inflammation. Tissue eosinophils were positively correlated with blood eosinophils in CRS patients. In a murine model of CRS, NK cell depletion caused an exacerbation of blood eosinophilia and eosinophilic inflammation in the sinonasal tissue. PGD2 and its metabolite, but not PGE2 and a panel of cytokines including TGF-β, were increased in CRS patients compared with controls. Effector functions of NK cells were potently suppressed by PGD2-dependent, rather than PGE2-dependent, pathway in controls and CRS patients. Thus, our results suggest decreased NK cell-mediated eosinophil regulation, possibly through an increased level of PGD2, as a previously unrecognized link between PG dysregulation and eosinophilic inflammation in CRS. PMID:27271931

  6. Determination of natural killer cell function by flow cytometry.

    PubMed Central

    Kane, K L; Ashton, F A; Schmitz, J L; Folds, J D

    1996-01-01

    Natural killer cells (NK cells) are a subset of peripheral blood lymphocytes that mediate non-major histocompatibility complex-restricted cytotoxicity of foreign target cells. The "gold standard" assay for NK cell activity has been the chromium release assay. This method is not easily performed in the clinical laboratory because of difficulties with disposal of radioactive and hazardous materials, short reagent half-lives, expense, and difficulties with assay standardization. We describe a flow cytometric assay for the clinical measurement of NK cell activity. This study compared the chromium release assay and the flow cytometric assay by using clinically relevant specimens. There were no significant differences between the two assays in the measurement of lytic activity for 17 peripheral blood specimens or in reproducibility in repeated samplings of healthy individuals. We also established a normal range of values for NK activity in healthy adults and identified a small cluster of individuals who have exceptionally high or low levels of NK activity. The flow cytometric assay was validated by testing specimens from subjects expected to have abnormally low levels of NK activity (pregnant women) and specimens from healthy individuals in whom the activity of NK cells was enhanced by exposure to interleukin-2 or alpha interferon. Treatment with these agents was associated with a significant increase in NK activity. These results confirm and extend those of others, showing that the flow cytometric assay is a viable alternative to the chromium release assay for measuring NK cell activity. PMID:8705672

  7. Id2 regulates hyporesponsive invariant natural killer T cells

    PubMed Central

    Stradner, Martin H; Cheung, Kitty P; Lasorella, Anna; Goldrath, Ananda W; D’Cruz, Louise M

    2016-01-01

    While the invariant natural killer T (iNKT)-cell response to primary stimulation with the glycolipid, α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer), is robust, the secondary response to this stimulus is muted resulting in a hyporesponsive state characterized by anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 (IL-10) production and high expression of programmed cell death 1 (PD1) and neuropilin 1 (NRP1). The E protein transcription factors and their negative regulators, the Id proteins, have previously been shown to regulate iNKT cell thymic development, subset differentiation and peripheral survival. Here, we provide evidence that the expression of the transcriptional regulator Id2 is downregulated upon stimulation of iNKT cells with their cognate antigen. Moreover, loss of Id2 expression by iNKT cells resulted in a hyporesponsive state, with splenic Id2-deficient iNKT cells expressing low levels of TBET, high levels of PD1 and NRP1 and production of IL-10 upon stimulation. We propose that downregulation of Id2 expression is an essential component of induction of the anti-inflammatory, hyporesponsive state in iNKT cells. PMID:26880074

  8. Type I natural killer T cells: naturally born for fighting

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jin-quan; Xiao, Wei; Wang, Lan; He, Yu-ling

    2010-01-01

    Type І natural killer T cells (NKT cells), a subset of CD1d-restricted T cells with invariant Vαβ TCR, are characterized by prompt production of large amounts of Th1 and/or Th2 cytokines upon primary stimulation through the TCR complex. The rapid release of cytokines implies that type І NKT cells may play a critical role in modulating the upcoming immune responses, such as anti-tumor response, protection against infection, and autoimmunity. As a bridge between innate and adaptive immunity, type І NKT cells differentiate and mature upon stimulations to achieve and maintain a homeostasis. Orchestrating with other arms of adaptive immunity, type І NKT cells show strong cytotoxic effects in response to various tumors in a direct and/or indirect manner(s). This review will focus primarily on type І NKT cell development, homeostasis, and effector functions, especially in anti-tumor immunity, and followed by their potential applications in treatment of cancers. PMID:20694020

  9. Natural killer cells regulate eosinophilic inflammation in chronic rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Heui; Choi, Go Eun; Lee, Bong-Jae; Kwon, Seog Woon; Lee, Seung-Hyo; Kim, Hun Sik; Jang, Yong Ju

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophils play a major pathologic role in the pathogenesis of diverse inflammatory diseases including chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Dysregulated production of prostaglandin (PG), particularly PGD2, is considered to be an important contributing factor to eosinophilic inflammation in CRS primarily through proinflammatory and chemotactic effects on eosinophils. Here, we provide evidence that PGD2 can promote eosinophilic inflammation through a suppression of Natural killer (NK) cell effector function and NK cell-mediated eosinophil regulation. Eosinophil apoptosis mediated by NK cells was significantly decreased in CRS patients compared with healthy controls. This decrease was associated with NK cell dysfunction and eosinophilic inflammation. Tissue eosinophils were positively correlated with blood eosinophils in CRS patients. In a murine model of CRS, NK cell depletion caused an exacerbation of blood eosinophilia and eosinophilic inflammation in the sinonasal tissue. PGD2 and its metabolite, but not PGE2 and a panel of cytokines including TGF-β, were increased in CRS patients compared with controls. Effector functions of NK cells were potently suppressed by PGD2-dependent, rather than PGE2-dependent, pathway in controls and CRS patients. Thus, our results suggest decreased NK cell-mediated eosinophil regulation, possibly through an increased level of PGD2, as a previously unrecognized link between PG dysregulation and eosinophilic inflammation in CRS. PMID:27271931

  10. Novel targets for natural killer/T-cell lymphoma immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kumai, Takumi; Kobayashi, Hiroya; Harabuchi, Yasuaki

    2016-01-01

    Extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type (NKTL) is a rare but highly aggressive Epstein-Barr virus-related malignancy, which mainly occurs in nasopharyngeal and nasal/paranasal areas. In addition to its high prevalence in Asian, Central American and South American populations, its incidence rate has been gradually increasing in Western countries. The current mainstay of treatment is a combination of multiple chemotherapies and irradiation. Although chemoradiotherapy can cure NKTL, it often causes severe and fatal adverse events. Because a growing body of evidence suggests that immunotherapy is effective against hematological malignancies, this treatment could provide an alternative to chemoradiotherapy for treatment of NKTL. In this review, we focus on how recent findings could be used to develop efficient immunotherapies against NKTL. PMID:26642249

  11. [Nasal type natural killer/T cell lymphoma: case series and literature review].

    PubMed

    Düzlü, Mehmet; Ant, Ayça; Tutar, Hakan; Karamert, Recep; Şahin, Melih; Sayar, Erolcan; Cesur, Nesibe

    2016-01-01

    Nasal type natural killer/T-cell lymphoma is a rare type of extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphoma which originates from nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Exact diagnosis of nasal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, which is a rapidly progressive clinical condition, may be established by immunohistochemical analysis on biopsy material after clinical suspicion. In this article, we report four cases of nasal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma who were followed-up in our clinic and discuss the diagnosis and treatment of the disease in light of the literature data. PMID:27405082

  12. Extranodal Natural-Killer/T-Cell Lymphoma, Nasal Type

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Harinder; Liang, Raymond H. S.; Tse, Eric

    2010-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) classification recognizes 2 main categories of natural killer (NK) cell-derived neoplasms, namely, extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, and aggressive NK-cell leukaemia. Extranodal nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma is more frequent in the Far East and Latin America. Histopathological and immunophenotypical hallmarks include angiocentricity, angiodestruction, expression of cytoplasmic CD3 epsilon (ε), CD56, and cytotoxic molecules and evidence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. Early stage disease, in particular for localized lesion in the nasal region, is treated with chemotherapy and involved-field radiotherapy. On the other hand, multiagent chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment for advanced or disseminated disease. L-asparaginase-containing regimens have shown promise in treating this condition. The role of autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is yet to be clearly defined. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, with the putative graft-versus-lymphoma effect, offers a potentially curative option in patients with advanced disease. PMID:21234094

  13. Decidual Cell Regulation of Natural Killer Cell–Recruiting Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Lockwood, Charles J.; Huang, S. Joseph; Chen, Chie-Pein; Huang, Yingqun; Xu, Jie; Faramarzi, Saeed; Kayisli, Ozlem; Kayisli, Umit; Koopman, Louise; Smedts, Dineke; Buchwalder, Lynn F.; Schatz, Frederick

    2014-01-01

    First trimester human decidua is composed of decidual cells, CD56brightCD16− decidual natural killer (dNK) cells, and macrophages. Decidual cells incubated with NK cell–derived IFN-γ and either macrophage-derived TNF-α or IL-1β synergistically enhanced mRNA and protein expression of IP-10 and I-TAC. Both chemokines recruit CXCR3-expressing NK cells. This synergy required IFN-γ receptor 1 and 2 mediation via JAK/STAT and NFκB signaling pathways. However, synergy was not observed on neutrophil, monocyte, and NK cell–recruiting chemokines. Immunostaining of first trimester decidua localized IP-10, I-TAC, IFN-γR1, and -R2 to vimentin-positive decidual cells versus cytokeratin-positive interstitial trophoblasts. Flow cytometry identified high CXCR3 levels on dNK cells and minority peripheral CD56brightCD16− pNK cells and intermediate CXCR3 levels on the majority of CD56dimCD16+ pNK cells. Incubation of pNK cells with either IP-10 or I-TAC elicited concentration-dependent enhanced CXCR3 levels and migration of both pNK cell subsets that peaked at 10 ng/mL, whereas each chemokine at a concentration of 50 ng/mL inhibited CXCR3 expression and pNK cell migration. Deciduae from women with preeclampsia, a leading cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality, displayed significantly lower dNK cell numbers and higher IP-10 and I-TAC levels versus gestational age–matched controls. Significantly elevated IP-10 levels in first trimester sera from women eventually developing preeclampsia compared with controls, identifying IP-10 as a novel, robust early predictor of preeclampsia. PMID:23973270

  14. Neoadjuvant immunotherapy enhances radiosensitivity through natural killer cell activation.

    PubMed

    Chi, Chau-Hwa; Wang, Yu-Shan; Yang, Chieh-Han; Chi, Kwan-Hwa

    2010-02-01

    We investigated whether natural killer (NK) cells in the tumor microenvironment have a radiosensitization effect. The radiosensitization effect of combined CpG and Herceptin((R)) (Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco, CA) (CpG/Herceptin), given before or after radiation, was evaluated by using a murine colon cancer cell line overexpressing human HER2/neu, CT26HER2/neu. In vitro radiosensitization effects were investigated by coculture of CT26HER2/neu with splenocytes, CpG, and Herceptin before applying radiation. Tumor cells, cocultured with CpG-pretreated splenocytes and Herceptin, were more vulnerable to radiation damage. In BALB/c mice injected with CT26HER2/neu, CpG/Herceptin administered before radiotherapy was associated with a better retardation of tumor growth than when administered after radiotherapy. The radiosensitization effect was significantly abrogated by NK-cell depletion, indicating that NK cells play an essential role in it. Further, surviving mice treated with CpG or CpG/Herceptin and reverse transcriptase were resistant to renewed tumor challenge, suggesting the presence of an induced immune response to the tumor. Neoadjuvant immunotherapy with CpG/Herceptin may improve response to radiotherapy of HER2/neu-expressing tumors. PMID:20187795

  15. Clearance of acute myeloid leukemia by haploidentical natural killer cells is improved using IL-2 diphtheria toxin fusion protein

    PubMed Central

    Bachanova, Veronika; Cooley, Sarah; Defor, Todd E.; Verneris, Michael R.; Zhang, Bin; McKenna, David H.; Curtsinger, Julie; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Lewis, Dixie; Hippen, Keli; McGlave, Philip; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Blazar, Bruce R.

    2014-01-01

    Haploidentical natural killer (NK) cell infusions can induce remissions in some patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) but regulatory T-cell (Treg) suppression may reduce efficacy. We treated 57 refractory AML patients with lymphodepleting cyclophosphamide and fludarabine followed by NK cell infusion and interleukin (IL)-2 administration. In 42 patients, donor NK cell expansion was detected in 10%, whereas in 15 patients receiving host Treg depletion with the IL-2-diphtheria fusion protein (IL2DT), the rate was 27%, with a median absolute count of 1000 NK cells/μL blood. IL2DT was associated with improved complete remission rates at day 28 (53% vs 21%; P = .02) and disease-free survival at 6 months (33% vs 5%; P < .01). In the IL2DT cohort, NK cell expansion correlated with higher postchemotherapy serum IL-15 levels (P = .002), effective peripheral blood Treg depletion (<5%) at day 7 (P < .01), and decreased IL-35 levels at day 14 (P = .02). In vitro assays demonstrated that Tregs cocultured with NK cells inhibit their proliferation by competition for IL-2 but not for IL-15. Together with our clinical observations, this supports the need to optimize the in vivo cytokine milieu where adoptively transferred NK cells compete with other lymphocytes to improve clinical efficacy in patients with refractory AML. This study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov, identifiers: NCT00274846 and NCT01106950. PMID:24719405

  16. Chimeric antigen receptor-engineered cytokine-induced killer cells overcome treatment resistance of pre-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and enhance survival.

    PubMed

    Oelsner, Sarah; Wagner, Juliane; Friede, Miriam E; Pfirrmann, Verena; Genßler, Sabrina; Rettinger, Eva; Buchholz, Christian J; Pfeifer, Heike; Schubert, Ralf; Ottmann, Oliver G; Ullrich, Evelyn; Bader, Peter; Wels, Winfried S

    2016-10-15

    Pre-emptive cancer immunotherapy by donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) using cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells may be beneficial to prevent relapse with a reduced risk of causing graft-versus-host-disease. CIK cells are a heterogeneous effector cell population including T cells (CD3(+) CD56(-) ), natural killer (NK) cells (CD3(-) CD56(+) ) and natural killer T (T-NK) cells (CD3(+) CD56(+) ) that exhibit non-major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted cytotoxicity and are generated by ex vivo expansion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the presence of interferon (IFN)-γ, anti-CD3 antibody, interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interleukin-15 (IL-15). To facilitate selective target-cell recognition and enhance specific cytotoxicity against B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), we transduced CIK cells with a lentiviral vector encoding a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) that carries a composite CD28-CD3ζ domain for signaling and a CD19-specific scFv antibody fragment for cell binding (CAR 63.28.z). In vitro analysis revealed high and specific cell killing activity of CD19-targeted CIK/63.28.z cells against otherwise CIK-resistant cancer cell lines and primary B-ALL blasts, which was dependent on CD19 expression and CAR signaling. In a xenograft model in immunodeficient mice, treatment with CIK/63.28.z cells in contrast to therapy with unmodified CIK cells resulted in complete and durable molecular remissions of established primary pre-B-ALL. Our results demonstrate potent antileukemic activity of CAR-engineered CIK cells in vitro and in vivo, and suggest this strategy as a promising approach for adoptive immunotherapy of refractory pre-B-ALL. PMID:27253354

  17. Relationship between uterine natural killer cells and unexplained repeated miscarriage

    PubMed Central

    Farghali, Mohamed M.; El-kholy, Abdel-Latif G.; Swidan, Khaled H.; Abdelazim, Ibrahim A.; Rashed, Ahmed R.; El-Sobky, Ezzat; Goma, Mostafa F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the relation between uterine killer (uK) cells and unexplained repeated miscarriage (RM). Material and Methods Eighty women with unexplained repeated miscarriage and missed miscarriage of current pregnancy were studied. Fetal viability and gestational age of the current pregnancy were confirmed by ultrasound, followed by suction evacuation to collect abortion specimens and uterine wall curettage to collect decidua specimens. Abortion specimens were collected for long-term monolayer cell culture and subsequent chromosome analysis using conventional G-banding. Decidua specimens were subjected to immunohistochemical staining using monoclonal antibodies specific to CD56+ and CD16+ expressed by uK cells. Results CD56+ CD16+ uK cells were found in 85% [68/80] of the studied decidua specimens of women with unexplained repeated miscarriage; 88.5% [54/61] had normal abortion karyotyping and 73.7% [14/19] had abnormal abortion karyotyping. Moreover, 73.75% [59/80] of the studied women with a past history of early miscarriage had CD56+ CD16+ uK cells in their decidua specimens, and 66.25% [53/80] of studied women with a past history of late miscarriage had CD56+ CD16+ uK cells in their decidua specimens; the association between early and late miscarriage and CD56+ CD16+ uK cells in decidua specimens was significant. Conclusion CD56+CD16+ uK cells were predominant in the decidua specimens of the studied women with repeated miscarriage. A significant association was found between the presence of CD56+ CD16+ uK cells in the studied decidua specimens and unexplained repeated miscarriage. PMID:26692771

  18. Psychosocial resources, aging, and natural killer cell terminal maturity.

    PubMed

    Segerstrom, Suzanne C; Al-Attar, Ahmad; Lutz, Charles T

    2012-12-01

    Psychosocial factors may influence aspects of immunological aging. The present study tested the hypothesis that psychosocial resources correlate with the expression of the cell surface maker CD57 on natural killer (NK) immune cells. CD57 is a marker of terminal maturation and senescence in this cell subset. The study further tested the relative contribution of specific resources in the social, psychological, financial, and status-skill domains, given the potential differential value of different resources for younger and older adults, and the contribution of relative versus absolute resources. Younger (n = 38) and older (n = 34) women completed measures of relative and absolute resources and had blood drawn. Examined both between groups and within the older women, older age and fewer total relative resources were associated with more CD57 expression on NK cells. One SD in resources was the equivalent of 5 years of aging among the older women. Among the specific resource types, a preponderance of financial resources, both relative and absolute, was associated with less CD57 expression on NK cells, and these relationships did not significantly vary between younger and older women. There was no evidence that depressive symptoms mediated the effects of resources on CD57 expression on NK cells. These findings provide support for the hypothesis that the sense that one has substantial resources, particularly with regard to finances and possessions, may retard age-associated aspects of the microenvironment in which NK cells develop and mature, independent of effects on distress, and this process may begin in younger adulthood. PMID:22708535

  19. MANGANESE CHLORIDE ENHANCES MURINE CELL-MEDIATED CYTOTOXICITY: EFFECTS ON NATURAL KILLER CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural killer (NK) cell activity of mice given a single injection of manganese chloride (MnCl2) was significantly enhanced as measured in a 4-hr in vitro 51Cr release assay. Enhanced activity persisted for several days after injection. This cytotoxic activity was associated with...

  20. Hypothalamic modulation of splenic natural killer cell activity in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Katafuchi, T; Ichijo, T; Take, S; Hori, T

    1993-01-01

    1. The cytotoxic activity of splenic natural killer cells measured by a standard chromium release assay in urethane and alpha-chloralose-anaesthetized rats was significantly suppressed 20 min after bilateral ablation of the medial part of the preoptic hypothalamus (MPO). The suppression was completely blocked by prior splenic denervation. The splenic natural killer cell activity of MPO sham-lesioned rats or thalamus-lesioned rats, both having an intact splenic innervation, were not different from that of a non-treated control group. 2. Electrical stimulation of the bilateral MPO (0.1 ms, 0.1-0.3 mA, 5-100 Hz) suppressed the efferent activity of the splenic nerve in all six rats examined. The reduction of the nerve activity was accompanied by a transient fall in blood pressure. An I.V. injection of phenylephrine (3 micrograms/0.3 ml) also evoked a suppression of the nerve activity, which was accompanied by transient hypertension, suggesting that the suppressive effect of the MPO stimulation was independent of changes in blood pressure. On the other hand, a bilateral lesion of the MPO resulted in a sustained increase in the electrical activity of the splenic sympathetic nerve filaments which lasted for more than 2 h. 3. Microinjection of monosodium-L-glutamate (0.1 and 0.01 M in 0.1 microliters saline) unilaterally into the MPO evoked a transient suppression of the efferent discharge rate of the splenic nerve activity within 1 min, which was also accompanied by a decrease in blood pressure. The injection of saline (0.1 microliter) into the MPO had no effect. The microinjection of recombinant human interferon-alpha (200 and 2000 U in 0.1 microliter saline) into the MPO dose dependently increased the splenic nerve activity without any change in blood pressure. 4. In contrast, microinjection of interferon-alpha into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) had no effect on splenic nerve activity, although an injection of glutamate increased the nerve

  1. Recognition of Microbial Glycolipids by Natural Killer T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zajonc, Dirk M.; Girardi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    T cells can recognize microbial antigens when presented by dedicated antigen-presenting molecules. While peptides are presented by classical members of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) family (MHC I and II), lipids, glycolipids, and lipopeptides can be presented by the non-classical MHC member, CD1. The best studied subset of lipid-reactive T cells are type I natural killer T (iNKT) cells that recognize a variety of different antigens when presented by the non-classical MHCI homolog CD1d. iNKT cells have been shown to be important for the protection against various microbial pathogens, including B. burgdorferi, the causative agents of Lyme disease, and S. pneumoniae, which causes pneumococcal meningitis and community-acquired pneumonia. Both pathogens carry microbial glycolipids that can trigger the T cell antigen receptor (TCR), leading to iNKT cell activation. iNKT cells have an evolutionary conserved TCR alpha chain, yet retain the ability to recognize structurally diverse glycolipids. They do so using a conserved recognition mode, in which the TCR enforces a conserved binding orientation on CD1d. TCR binding is accompanied by structural changes within the TCR binding site of CD1d, as well as the glycolipid antigen itself. In addition to direct recognition of microbial antigens, iNKT cells can also be activated by a combination of cytokines (IL-12/IL-18) and TCR stimulation. Many microbes carry TLR antigens, and microbial infections can lead to TLR activation. The subsequent cytokine response in turn lower the threshold of TCR-mediated iNKT cell activation, especially when weak microbial or even self-antigens are presented during the cause of the infection. In summary, iNKT cells can be directly activated through TCR triggering of strong antigens, while cytokines produced by the innate immune response may be necessary for TCR triggering and iNKT cell activation in the presence of weak antigens. Here, we will review the molecular basis of iNKT cell

  2. Positioning Effects of KillerRed inside of Cells correlate with DNA Strand Breaks after Activation with Visible Light

    PubMed Central

    Waldeck, Waldemar; Mueller, Gabriele; Wiessler, Manfred; Tóth, Katalin; Braun, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are established tools for new applications, not-restricted to the cell biological research. They could also be ideal in surgery enhancing the precision to differentiate between the target tissue and the surrounding healthy tissue. FPs like the KillerRed (KRED), used here, can be activated by excitation with visible day-light for emitting active electrons which produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) resulting in photokilling processes. It is a given that the extent of the KRED's cell toxicity depends on its subcellular localization. Evidences are documented that the nuclear lamina as well as especially the chromatin are critical targets for KRED-mediated ROS-based DNA damaging. Here we investigated the damaging effects of the KRED protein fused to the nuclear lamina and to the histone H2A DNA-binding protein. We detected a frequency of DNA strand breaks, dependent first on the illumination time, and second on the spatial distance between the localization at the chromatin and the site of ROS production. As a consequence we could identify defined DNA bands with 200, 400 and (600) bps as most prominent degradation products, presumably representing an internucleosomal DNA cleavage induced by KRED. These findings are not restricted to the detection of programmed cell death processes in the therapeutic field like PDT, but they can also contribute to a better understanding of the structure-function relations in the epigenomic world. PMID:21278894

  3. Pulmonary Extranodal Natural Killer/T-Cell Lymphoma (Nasal Type)

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Wang; Xiaohong, Wang; Hong, Zhu; Bei, He

    2015-01-01

    Abstract An 83-year-old woman presented with intermittent fever for 2 weeks. Chest radiography and computed tomography images showed multiple nodules and masses scattered in both lung fields. Tissue samples obtained by computed tomography-guided needle biopsy revealed extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (ENKL). The lung is the major site of involvement and the skin may be the primary site. The radiological imaging of this case is different from the cases reported before. Besides, we reviewed the medical records of our hospital and searched the Pubmed database and found 12 cases altogether (include the case presented), which were diagnosed with pulmonary ENKL, and the features of chest images were studied. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the chest imaging features of pulmonary ENKL were reviewed. We conclude that if the radiographic manifestations are multiple patchy consolidations or multiple nodules and masses in both lungs with or without bilateral pleural effusions, the diagnostic considerations should include ENKL. PMID:26402808

  4. Natural Killer Cell-Based Therapies Targeting Cancer: Possible Strategies to Gain and Sustain Anti-Tumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dahlberg, Carin I. M.; Sarhan, Dhifaf; Chrobok, Michael; Duru, Adil D.; Alici, Evren

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells were discovered 40 years ago, by their ability to recognize and kill tumor cells without the requirement of prior antigen exposure. Since then, NK cells have been seen as promising agents for cell-based cancer therapies. However, NK cells represent only a minor fraction of the human lymphocyte population. Their skewed phenotype and impaired functionality during cancer progression necessitates the development of clinical protocols to activate and expand to high numbers ex vivo to be able to infuse sufficient numbers of functional NK cells to the cancer patients. Initial NK cell-based clinical trials suggested that NK cell-infusion is safe and feasible with almost no NK cell-related toxicity, including graft-versus-host disease. Complete remission and increased disease-free survival is shown in a small number of patients with hematological malignances. Furthermore, successful adoptive NK cell-based therapies from haploidentical donors have been demonstrated. Disappointingly, only limited anti-tumor effects have been demonstrated following NK cell infusion in patients with solid tumors. While NK cells have great potential in targeting tumor cells, the efficiency of NK cell functions in the tumor microenvironment is yet unclear. The failure of immune surveillance may in part be due to sustained immunological pressure on tumor cells resulting in the development of tumor escape variants that are invisible to the immune system. Alternatively, this could be due to the complex network of immune-suppressive compartments in the tumor microenvironment, including myeloid-derived suppressor cells, tumor-associated macrophages, and regulatory T cells. Although the negative effect of the tumor microenvironment on NK cells can be transiently reverted by ex vivo expansion and long-term activation, the aforementioned NK cell/tumor microenvironment interactions upon reinfusion are not fully elucidated. Within this context, genetic modification of NK cells

  5. Natural Killer Cell-Based Therapies Targeting Cancer: Possible Strategies to Gain and Sustain Anti-Tumor Activity.

    PubMed

    Dahlberg, Carin I M; Sarhan, Dhifaf; Chrobok, Michael; Duru, Adil D; Alici, Evren

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells were discovered 40 years ago, by their ability to recognize and kill tumor cells without the requirement of prior antigen exposure. Since then, NK cells have been seen as promising agents for cell-based cancer therapies. However, NK cells represent only a minor fraction of the human lymphocyte population. Their skewed phenotype and impaired functionality during cancer progression necessitates the development of clinical protocols to activate and expand to high numbers ex vivo to be able to infuse sufficient numbers of functional NK cells to the cancer patients. Initial NK cell-based clinical trials suggested that NK cell-infusion is safe and feasible with almost no NK cell-related toxicity, including graft-versus-host disease. Complete remission and increased disease-free survival is shown in a small number of patients with hematological malignances. Furthermore, successful adoptive NK cell-based therapies from haploidentical donors have been demonstrated. Disappointingly, only limited anti-tumor effects have been demonstrated following NK cell infusion in patients with solid tumors. While NK cells have great potential in targeting tumor cells, the efficiency of NK cell functions in the tumor microenvironment is yet unclear. The failure of immune surveillance may in part be due to sustained immunological pressure on tumor cells resulting in the development of tumor escape variants that are invisible to the immune system. Alternatively, this could be due to the complex network of immune-suppressive compartments in the tumor microenvironment, including myeloid-derived suppressor cells, tumor-associated macrophages, and regulatory T cells. Although the negative effect of the tumor microenvironment on NK cells can be transiently reverted by ex vivo expansion and long-term activation, the aforementioned NK cell/tumor microenvironment interactions upon reinfusion are not fully elucidated. Within this context, genetic modification of NK cells

  6. Potential role of natural killer cells in controlling tumorigenesis by human T-cell leukemia viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Feuer, G; Stewart, S A; Baird, S M; Lee, F; Feuer, R; Chen, I S

    1995-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV) is the etiologic agent of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), a malignancy of T lymphocytes that is characterized by a long latency period after virus exposure. Intraperitoneal inoculation of severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice with HTLV-transformed cell lines and ATL tumor cells was employed to investigate the tumorigenic potential of HTLV type I (HTLV-I)-infected cells. In contrast to inoculation of ATL (RV-ATL) cells into SCID mice, which resulted in the formation of lymphomas, inoculation of HTLV-I- and HTLV-II-transformed cell lines (SLB-I and JLB-II cells, respectively) did not result in tumor formation. Immunosuppression of SCID mice, either by whole-body irradiation or by treatment with an antiserum, anti-asialo GM1 (alpha-AGM1), which transiently abrogates natural killer cell activity in vivo, was necessary to establish the growth of tumors derived from HTLV-transformed cell lines. PCR and flow cytometric studies reveal that HTLV-I-transformed cells are eliminated from the peritoneal cavities of inoculated mice by 3 days postinoculation; in contrast, RV-ATL cells persist and are detected until the mice succumb to lymphoma development. The differing behaviors of HTLV-infected cell lines and ATL tumor cells in SCID mice suggest that ATL cells have a higher tumorigenic potential in vivo than do HTLV-infected cell lines because of their ability to evade natural killer cell-mediated cytolysis. PMID:7815516

  7. Decreased non-MHC-restricted (CD56+) killer cell cytotoxicity after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, S. K.; Kaur, I.; Grimm, E. A.; Smid, C.; Feeback, D. L.; Pierson, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    Cytotoxic activity of non-major histocompatibility complex-restricted (CD56+) (NMHC) killer cells and cell surface marker expression of peripheral blood mononuclear cells were determined before and after spaceflight. Ten astronauts (9 men, 1 woman) from two space shuttle missions (9- and 10-day duration) participated in the study. Blood samples were collected 10 days before launch, within 3 h after landing, and 3 days after landing. All peripheral blood mononuclear cell preparations were cryopreserved and analyzed simultaneously in a 4-h cytotoxicity (51)Cr release assay using K562 target cells. NMHC killer cell lytic activity was normalized per 1,000 CD56+ cells. When all 10 subjects were considered as one study group, NMHC killer cell numbers did not change significantly during the three sampling periods, but at landing lytic activity had decreased by approximately 40% (P < 0.05) from preflight values. Nine of ten astronauts had decreased lytic activity immediately after flight. NMHC killer cell cytotoxicity of only three astronauts returned toward preflight values by 3 days after landing. Consistent with decreased NMHC killer cell cytotoxicity, urinary cortisol significantly increased after landing compared with preflight levels. Plasma cortisol and ACTH levels at landing were not significantly different from preflight values. No correlation of changes in NMHC killer cell function or hormone levels with factors such as age, gender, mission, or spaceflight experience was found. After landing, expression of the major lymphocyte surface markers (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD14, CD16, CD56), as determined by flow cytometric analysis, did not show any consistent changes from measurements made before flight.

  8. Combined IL-15 and IL-12 drives the generation of CD34+-derived natural killer cells with superior maturation and alloreactivity potential following adoptive transfer

    PubMed Central

    Cany, Jeannette; van der Waart, Anniek B; Spanholtz, Jan; Tordoir, Marleen; Jansen, Joop H; van der Voort, Robbert; Schaap, Nicolaas M; Dolstra, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of allogeneic natural killer (NK) cells represents a promising treatment approach against cancer, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Previously, we reported a cytokine-based culture method for the generation of NK cell products with high cell number and purity. In this system, CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) were expanded and differentiated into NK cells under stroma-free conditions in the presence of IL-15 and IL-2. We show that combining IL-15 with IL-12 drives the generation of more mature and highly functional NK cells. In particular, replacement of IL-2 by IL-12 enhanced the cytolytic activity and IFNγ production of HPC-NK cells toward cultured and primary AML cells in vitro, and improved antileukemic responses in NOD/SCID-IL2Rγnull (NSG) mice bearing human AML cells. Phenotypically, IL-12 increased the frequency of HPC-NK cells expressing NKG2A and killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR), which were more responsive to target cell stimulation. In addition, NK15/12 cell products demonstrated superior maturation potential, resulting in >70% positivity for CD16 and/or KIR within 2 weeks after infusion into NSG mice. We predict that higher functionality and faster in vivo maturation will favor HPC-NK cell alloreactivity toward malignant cells in patients, making this cytokine combination an attractive strategy to generate clinical HPC-NK cell products for cancer adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:26140247

  9. Invariant Natural Killer T cells in children with Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Jyonouchi, Soma; Smith, Cara Lea; Saretta, Francesca; Abraham, Valsamma; Ruymann, Kathryn R; Modayur-Chandramouleeswaran, Prasanna; Wang, Mei-Lun; Spergel, Jonathan M.; Cianferoni, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    Background Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an atopic disease characterized by eosinophilic inflammation in which dietary antigens (in particular, milk) play a major role. EoE is most likely a mixed IgE and non-IgE food-mediated reaction in which over-expression of Th2 cytokines, particularly IL-13, play a major role; however, the cells responsible for IL-13 over-expression remain elusive. Th2-cytokines are secreted following the ligation of invariant natural killer T cell receptors to sphingolipids (SL). Sphingolipids (SL) are presented via the CD1d molecule on the INKT cell surface. Cow’s milk-derived SL has been shown to activate iNKTs from children with IgE-mediated food allergies to milk (FA-MA) to produce Th2 cytokines. The role of iNKTs and milk-SL in EoE pathogenesis is currently unknown. Objective To investigate the role of iNKTs and milk-SL in EoE. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 10 children with active EoE (EoE-A), 10 children with controlled EoE (EoE-C), and 16 healthy controls (Non-EoE) were measured ex-vivo and then incubated with α-galactosylceramide (αGal) and milk-SL. INKTs from peripheral blood (PB) and esophageal biopsies were studied. Results EoE-A-children had significantly fewer peripheral blood iNKTs with a greater Th2-response to αGal and milk-SM compared to iNKTs of EoE-C and Non-EoE children. Additionally, EoE-A children had increased iNKT levels in esophageal biopsies compared to EoE-C children. Conclusion Milk-SLs are able to activate peripheral blood iNKTs in EoE-A children to produce Th2 cytokines. Additionally, iNKT levels are higher at the site of active esophageal eosinophilic inflammation. Clinical Relevance This study suggests that sphingolipids (SL) contained in milk may drive the development of EoE by promoting an iNKT cell-mediated Th2-type cytokine response that facilitates eosinophil-mediated allergic inflammation. PMID:24118614

  10. Rapid reuptake of granzyme B leads to emperitosis: an apoptotic cell-in-cell death of immune killer cells inside tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, S; He, M-f; Chen, Y-h; Wang, M-y; Yu, X-M; Bai, J; Zhu, H-y; Wang, Y-y; Zhao, H; Mei, Q; Nie, J; Ma, J; Wang, J-f; Wen, Q; Ma, L; Wang, Y; Wang, X-n

    2013-01-01

    A cell-in-cell process refers to the invasion of one living cell into another homotypic or heterotypic cell. Different from non-apoptotic death processes of internalized cells termed entosis or cannibalism, we previously reported an apoptotic cell-in-cell death occurring during heterotypic cell-in-cell formation. In this study, we further demonstrated that the apoptotic cell-in-cell death occurred only in internalized immune killer cells expressing granzyme B (GzmB). Vacuole wrapping around the internalized cells inside the target cells was the common hallmark during the early stage of all cell-in-cell processes, which resulted in the accumulation of reactive oxygen species and subsequent mitochondrial injury of encapsulated killer or non-cytotoxic immune cells. However, internalized killer cells mediated rapid bubbling of the vacuoles with the subsequent degranulation of GzmB inside the vacuole of the target cells and underwent the reuptake of GzmB by killer cells themselves. The confinement of GzmB inside the vacuole surpassed the lysosome-mediated cell death occurring in heterotypic or homotypic entosis processes, resulting in a GzmB-triggered caspase-dependent apoptotic cell-in-cell death of internalized killer cells. On the contrary, internalized killer cells from GzmB-deficient mice underwent a typical non-apoptotic entotic cell-in-cell death similar to that of non-cytotoxic immune cells or tumor cells. Our results thus demonstrated the critical involvement of immune cells with cytotoxic property in apoptotic cell-in-cell death, which we termed as emperitosis taken from emperipolesis and apoptosis. Whereas entosis or cannibalism may serve as a feed-on mechanism to exacerbate and nourish tumor cells, emperitosis of immune killer cells inside tumor cells may serve as an in-cell danger sensation model to prevent the killing of target cells from inside, implying a unique mechanism for tumor cells to escape from immune surveillance. PMID:24113190

  11. Natural killer T cells: innate lymphocytes positioned as a bridge between acute and chronic inflammation?

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Lisa; Hegde, Subramanya

    2010-01-01

    Natural killer T cells are an innate population of T lymphocytes that recognize antigens derived from host lipids and glycolipids. In this review, we focus on how these unique T cells are positioned to influence both acute and chronic inflammatory processes through their early recruitment to sites of inflammation, interactions with myeloid antigen presenting cells, and recognition of lipids associated with inflammation. PMID:20850561

  12. Natural killer cell dysfunction during acute infection with foot-and-mouth diseaase virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural killer cells (NK) provide one of the initial barriers of cellular host defense against pathogens, in particular intracellular pathogens. The role of these cells in foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection is unknown. Previously, we characterized the phenotype and function of NK cells fr...

  13. Promoting natural killer cell functions by recombinant immunoligands mimicking an induced self phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kellner, Christian; Gramatzki, Martin; Peipp, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Immunoligands for stimulatory natural killer (NK)-cell receptors can be targeted to the surface of malignant cells by fusing them to antibody fragments. Mimicking an “induced-self” phenotype, such recombinant immunoligands signal danger, trigger NK-cell cytotoxicity and synergistically enhance antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. These findings may be translated into novel immunotherapeutic approaches against cancer. PMID:23894708

  14. A stay of execution: type I interferons pardon T cells from death by natural killers.

    PubMed

    Kahan, Shannon M; Zajac, Allan J

    2014-06-19

    In this issue of Immunity, Crouse et al., (2014) and Xu et al., (2014), show that by modulating the expression of natural killer (NK) cell receptor ligands, type I interferons protect responding T cells against culling by NK cells. PMID:24950208

  15. Disruption of Iron Regulation after Radiation and Donor Cell Infusion.

    PubMed

    Karoopongse, Ekapun; Marcondes, A Mario; Yeung, Cecilia; Holman, Zaneta; Kowdley, Kris V; Campbell, Jean S; Deeg, H Joachim

    2016-07-01

    Iron overload is common in patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Peritransplant events, such as total body irradiation (TBI), and the effects of donor cell infusion may contribute to iron overload, in addition to disease-associated anemia and RBC transfusions. Using murine models we show complex time- and dose-dependent interactions of TBI and transplanted donor cells with expression patterns of iron regulatory genes in the liver. Infusion of allogeneic or syngeneic donor T lymphocytes increased serum iron, transiently up-regulated interleukin-6 (IL-6) and hepcidin (Hamp), and down-regulated ferroportin1 (Fpn1). After 7 to 14 days, however, changes were significant only with allogeneic cells. TBI (200 to 400 Gy) also induced IL-6 and Hamp expression but had little effect on Fpn1. TBI combined with allogeneic donor cell infusion resulted in modest early up-regulation of IL-6, followed by a decline in IL-6 levels and Hamp as well as Fpn1, and was accompanied by increased liver iron content. Injection of Fas ligand-deficient T lymphocytes from gld mice resulted in substantially lower alterations of gene expression than infusion of wild-type T cells. The agonistic anti-Fas antibody, JO2, triggered early up-regulation of Stat3 and IL-6, followed by an increase in Hamp and decreased expression of Fpn1 by 7 to 14 days, implicating Fas as a key modulator of gene expression in HCT. Minimal histologic changes were observed in mouse liver and duodenum. These data show profound and interacting effects of TBI and cell transplantation on the expression of iron regulatory genes in murine recipients. Alterations are largely related to induction of cytokines and Fas-dependent signals. PMID:27060441

  16. Cytotoxic activity of allogeneic natural killer cells on U251 glioma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Guo, Meng; Wu, Tingting; Wan, Lixin

    2016-07-01

    The present study aimed to observe the cytotoxic activity of allogeneic natural killer (NK) cells on U251 glioma cells and to investigate their mechanism of action to establish an effective treatment strategy for neuroglioma. Cell survival curves, colony formation assays and karyotype analysis were performed to investigate the characteristics of U251 glioma cells. The present study demonstrated that natural killer group 2, member D (NKG2D)‑major histocompatibility complex class I‑related chain A/B (MICA/B) interactions contributed to the cytotoxic effect of NK cells on K562 and U251 cells. In antibody‑blocking assays to inhibit NKG2D ligands, the cytotoxic activity was not completely attenuated, which suggested that other signaling pathways contribute to the cytotoxic activity of NK cells on tumor cells in addition to the NKG2D‑mediated activity. The present study identified that the expression levels of NKG2D ligands on the surface of target cells influenced the strength of the NK cell immune response. Furthermore, allogeneic NK cells were observed to kill glioma cells in vitro, and this anticancer activity is associated with the rate of NKG2D expression on the surface of glioma cells. PMID:27175912

  17. Effect of chaetocin on renal cell carcinoma cells and cytokine-induced killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Rombo, Roman; Weiher, Hans; Schmidt-Wolf, Ingo G.H.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the cytotoxic effects of chaetocin on clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) cells and the possibility to combine the effects of chaetocin with the effects of cytokine-induced killer cells (CIK) assayed by MTT assay and FACS analysis. Chaetocin is a thiodioxopiperazine produced by fungi belonging to the chaetomiaceae family. In 2007, it was first reported that chaetocin shows potent and selective ex vivo anti-cancer activity by inducing reactive oxygen species. CIK cells are generated from CD3+/CD56- T lymphocytes with double negative CD4-/CD8- phenotype that are isolated from human blood. The addition of distinct interleukins and antibodies results in the generation of CIK cells that are able to specifically target and destroy renal carcinoma cells. The results of this research state that the anti-ccRCC activity of chaetocin is weak and does not show a high grade of selectivity on clear cell renal cell carcinoma cells. Although the CIK cells show a high grade of selective anti-ccRCC activity, this effect could not be improved by the addition of chaetocin. So chaetocin seems to be no suitable agent for specific targeting ccRCC cells or for the combination therapy with CIK cells in renal cancer. PMID:27141211

  18. Natural killer cell killing of acute myelogenous leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia blasts by killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor-negative natural killer cells after NKG2A and LIR-1 blockade.

    PubMed

    Godal, Robert; Bachanova, Veronika; Gleason, Michelle; McCullar, Valarie; Yun, Gong H; Cooley, Sarah; Verneris, Michael R; McGlave, Philip B; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2010-05-01

    Although the study of natural killer (NK) cell alloreactivity has been dominated by studies of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs), we hypothesized that NKG2A and LIR-1, present on 53% +/- 13% and 36% +/- 18% of normal NK cells, respectively, play roles in the NK cell killing of primary leukemia targets. KIR(-) cells, which compose nearly half of the circulating NK cell population, exhibit tolerance to primary leukemia targets, suggesting signaling through other inhibitory receptors. Both acute myelogenous leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia targets were rendered susceptible to lysis by fresh resting KIR(-) NK cells when inhibitory receptor-major histocompatibility class I interactions were blocked by pan-HLA antibodies, demonstrating that these cells are functionally competent. Blockade of a single inhibitory receptor resulted in slightly increased killing, whereas combined LIR-1 and NKG2A blockade consistently resulted in increased NK cell cytotoxicity. Dual blockade of NKG2A and LIR-1 led to significant killing of targets by resting KIR(-) NK cells, demonstrating that this population is not hyporesponsive. Together these results suggest that alloreactivity of a significant fraction of KIR(-) NK cells is mediated by NKG2A and LIR-1. Thus strategies to interrupt NKG2A and LIR-1 in combination with anti-KIR blockade hold promise for exploiting NK cell therapy in acute leukemias. PMID:20139023

  19. Killing defect of natural killer cells with the absence of natural killer cytotoxic factors in a child with Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Komiyama, A.; Kawai, H.; Yamada, S.; Kato, M.; Yanagisawa, M.; Miyagawa, Y.; Akabane, T.

    1987-06-01

    A killing defect of natural killer (NK) cells in the absence of NK cytotoxic factors (NKCF) was first demonstrated in a child with Hodgkin's disease. The patient lacked detectable NK cell activity in every phase of the disease as measured by a four-hour /sup 51/Cr-release assay using K562 cells as a target. The percent lysis at a 40:1 effector:target ratio by the patient's lymphocytes was persistently below 0.3% as compared with the normal lymphocyte value of 46.2% +/- 5.8% (mean +/- SD). NK cell activity was not detectable at effector:target ratios of 10:1 to 80:1 and by prolongation of the incubation time, and the NK cell defect was not restored or improved by lymphocyte stimulation with polyinosinic-polycytidilic acid, interferon (IFN)-alpha, or interleukin 2 (IL 2). The numbers of Leu-7+ cells and Leu-11+ cells were normal as counted by flow cytometry. A single cell-in-agarose assay demonstrated normal numbers of target binding cells (TBCs), and they showed the morphology of large granular lymphocytes. However, there were no TBCs with dead targets. These results indicated that the patient's lymphocytes contained normal numbers of NK cells that were capable of recognizing and binding to a target but were incapable of killing the bound target cell. The patient's lymphocytes were then studied for their release of NKCF upon interaction with K562 cells. The patient's cells did not release NKCF, and the NK cell defect was not restored or improved by stimulation of the cells with IFN or IL 2. It is suggested that the deficient release of NKCF may have been related to the killing defect of the NK cells in this patient.

  20. Functional impairment of natural killer cells in active ulcerative colitis: reversion of the defective natural killer activity by interleukin 2.

    PubMed Central

    Manzano, L; Alvarez-Mon, M; Abreu, L; Antonio Vargas, J; de la Morena, E; Corugedo, F; Duràntez, A

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the functional characteristics and clinical importance of the natural killer (NK) cytotoxicity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) from patients with ulcerative colitis. Normal NK activity was observed in PBMNC from patients with inactive disease, but a pronounced decrease was found in those with active disease. Clinical change from active to inactive disease was associated with enhancement of the depressed NK activity. The impairment of NK cytotoxicity found in patients with active disese could not be ascribed to a deficient number of NK cells as the amounts of HNK-1+, CD16+ (Leu 11), and CD11b (OKM1) cells in PBMNC were within normal ranges. This defective cytotoxic PBMNC activity was normalised by short term (18 hour) incubation with recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL-2). Moreover, long term (5 day) incubation of these effector cells with rIL-2 induced strong cytotoxic activity against NK resistant and NK sensitive target cells in patients with active and inactive disease. We also found that both precursors and effectors of cytotoxic activity promoted by short term and long term incubation with rIL-2 of PBMNC from the patients showed the phenotype of NK cells (CD16+, CD3-). Taken together, these results show that active ulcerative colitis is associated with a defective function of NK cells that is found to be normal in the inactive stage of the disease. The possible pathogenic and therapeutic implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:1541421

  1. Simultaneous measurement of natural killer cell cytotoxicity against each of three different target cell lines.

    PubMed

    Blomberg, K

    1994-02-10

    A time-resolved fluorometric assay for the simultaneous measurement of natural killer cell activity against three different lanthanide diethylenetriaminopentaacetate (LaDTPA) labelled target cell lines is described. The target cell line K-562 was labelled with SmDTPA, the cell line Molt with TbDTPA and the cell line Raji with EuDTPA. After co-incubation of the three target cell lines with effector cells the fluorescence of the lanthanides released from the lysed target cells was measured in an enhancer solution in which they formed highly fluorescent complexes. It was possible to differentiate the specific release from the three target cell lines because the emission lines of the europium, samarium and terbium complexes formed in the enhancer solution are well separated from each other. The autofluorescence from culture media supplemented with serum was avoided by the use of time-resolved fluorometry. The results show that applying fluorometry based on the combination of spectral and temporal resolution to natural killer cell assays, makes possible the simultaneous determination of lysis in up to three target cell lines in complex culture medium. PMID:8308301

  2. IN VITRO AUGMENTATION OF NATURAL KILLER CELL ACTIVITY BY MANGANESE CHLORIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The in vitro cultivation of murine spleen cells with MnCl2 resulted in the enhancement of natural killer (NK) cell activity as measured in a 4-h (51)Cr-release assay. Optimal enhancement of NK activity was observed at concentrations of 10-20 micrograms MnCl2 culture (72-144 micro...

  3. INHIBITION OF HUMAN NATURAL KILLER CELL ACTIVITY FOLLOWING IN VITRO EXPOSURE TO OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study we have examined the effect of in vitro ozone exposure on human peripheral blood natural killer (NK) cell activity measured against K562 tumor cells. he data showed that NK activity was nhibited in a time dependent manner with marked suppression observed after 6 hou...

  4. Genes encoding putative natural killer cell C-type lectin receptors in teleostean fishes

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Akie; Mayer, Werner E.; Overath, Peter; Klein, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Mammalian natural killer (NK) cells are cytotoxic lymphocytes that express receptors specific for MHC class I molecules. The NK cell receptors belong to two structurally unrelated families, the killer cell Ig-like receptors and the killer cell C-type lectin receptors. We describe a cDNA clone derived from the bony (cichlid) fish Paralabidochromis chilotes and show that it encodes a protein related to the CD94/NK cell group 2 (NKG2) subfamily of the killer cell C-type lectin receptors. The gene encoding this receptor in a related species, Oreochromis niloticus, has a similar structure to the human CD94/NKG2 genes and is a member of a multigene cluster that resembles the mammalian NK cell gene complex. Thus, the CD94/NKG2 subfamily of NK cell receptors must have arisen before the divergence of fish and tetrapods and may have retained its function (possibly monitoring the expression of MHC class I molecules) for >400 million years. PMID:12802013

  5. Natural Killer Cells as Helper Cells in Dendritic Cell Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Pampena, María Betina; Levy, Estrella Mariel

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine-based cancer immunotherapy has generated highly variable clinical results due to differing methods of vaccine preparation and variation in patient populations among other lesser factors. Moreover, these clinical responses do not necessarily correspond with the induction of tumor-specific cytotoxic lymphocytes. Here, we review the participation of natural killer (NK) cells as alternative immune components that could cooperate in successful vaccination treatment. NK cells have been described as helper cells in dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines, but the role in other kinds of vaccination strategies (whole cells, peptide, or DNA-based vaccines) is poorly understood. In this article, we address the following issues regarding the role of NK cells in cancer vaccines: NK cell anti-tumor action sites, and the loci of NK cell interaction with other immune cells; descriptions of new data on the memory characteristics of NK cells described in infectious diseases; and finally phenotypical and functional changes after vaccination measured by immunomonitoring in preclinical and clinical settings. PMID:25674087

  6. Generation of natural killer cells from hematopoietic stem cells in vitro for immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Luevano, Martha; Madrigal, Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are part of the innate immune system and are an alluring option for immunotherapy due to their ability to kill infected cells or cancer cells without prior sensitization. Throughout the past 20 years, different groups have been able to reproduce NK cell development in vitro, and NK cell ontogeny studies have provided the basis for the establishment of protocols to produce NK cells in vitro for immunotherapy. Here, we briefly discuss NK cell development and NK cell immunotherapy approaches. We review the factors needed for NK cell differentiation in vitro, which stem cell sources have been used, published protocols, challenges and future directions for Good Manufacturing Practice protocols. PMID:22705914

  7. Fractionated stem cell infusions for patients with plasma cell myeloma undergoing autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Landau, Heather; Wood, Kevin; Chung, David J; Koehne, Guenther; Lendvai, Nikoletta; Hassoun, Hani; Lesokhin, Alexander; Hoover, Elizabeth; Zheng, Junting; Devlin, Sean M; Giralt, Sergio

    2016-08-01

    We conducted a phase II trial investigating the impact of fractionated hematopoietic cell infusions on engraftment kinetics and symptom burden in patients with plasma cell myeloma (PCM) undergoing autologous hematopoietic cell transplant (AHCT). We hypothesized that multiple hematopoietic cell infusions would reduce duration of neutropenia and enhance immune recovery resulting in a better tolerated procedure. Twenty-six patients received high-dose melphalan followed by multiple cell infusions (Days 0, +2, +4, +6) and were compared to PCM patients (N = 77) who received high-dose melphalan and a single infusion (Day 0) (concurrent control group). The primary endpoint was number of days with ANC <500K/mcL. Symptom burden was assessed using the MSK-modified MD Anderson Symptom Inventory. Median duration of neutropenia was similar in study (4 days, range 3-5) and control patients (4 days, range 3-9) (p = 0.654). There was no significant difference in the number of red cell or platelet transfusions, days of fever, diarrhea, antibiotics, number of documented infections, or length of admission. Symptom burden surveys showed that AHCT was well-tolerated in both study and control patients. We conclude that fractionated stem cell infusions following high-dose melphalan do not enhance engraftment kinetics or significantly alter patients' clinical course following AHCT in PCM. PMID:26758672

  8. Assessment of human natural killer and lymphokine-activated killer cell cytotoxicity against Toxoplasma gondii trophozoites and brain cysts

    SciTech Connect

    Dannemann, B.R.; Morris, V.A.; Araujo, F.G.; Remington, J.S. )

    1989-10-15

    Because previous work has suggested that NK cells may be important in host resistance against the intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii we examined whether human NK cells and lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells have activity against trophozoites and cysts of this organism in vitro. A method to radiolabel Toxoplasma trophozoites with 51Cr was developed and direct cytotoxic activity was determined by using modifications of the standard 51Cr release assay. Viability of 51Cr-labeled trophozoites assessed by both methylene blue staining and trypan blue exclusion was greater than 90%. Significantly more 51Cr was released by anti-Toxoplasma antibody and C than by antibody in the absence of C. Incubation of trophozoites with freshly isolated human NK cells or NK cells activated with either rIL-2 or rIFN-alpha did not result in significant release of 51Cr (specific lysis was 0 to 2.3%). In contrast, the average specific lysis of radiolabeled trophozoites by LAK cells was significant. In a series of separate experiments, preincubation of radiolabeled trophozoites with heat-inactivated normal or Toxoplasma antibody-positive human serum increased the cytotoxicity of LAK cells from a mean specific lysis of 15% +/- 4.5 to 39% +/- 8.5, respectively, as assessed by 51Cr release. Because previous work has shown that radioisotope release from parasites may be nonspecific, separate experiments were performed to determine the cytotoxicity of LAK cells against antibody-coated trophozoites by using ethidium bromide-acridine orange staining to assess effector cell damage. LAK cells had a mean specific lysis of 51% against antibody-coated trophozoites by ethidium bromide-acridine orange staining. Preincubation with heat-inactivated Toxoplasma-antibody positive human serum did not increase activity of rIL-2-activated NK cells against 51CR-labeled trophozoites.

  9. Human NK cells maintain licensing status and are subject to killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) and KIR-ligand inhibition following ex vivo expansion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Erbe, Amy K; Alderson, Kory A; Phillips, Emily; Gallenberger, Mikayla; Gan, Jacek; Campana, Dario; Hank, Jacquelyn A; Sondel, Paul M

    2016-09-01

    Infusion of allogeneic NK cells is a potential immunotherapy for both hematopoietic malignancies and solid tumors. Interactions between killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) on human NK cells and KIR-ligands on tumor cells influence the magnitude of NK function. To obtain sufficient numbers of activated NK cells for infusion, one potent method uses cells from the K562 human erythroleukemia line that have been transfected to express activating 41BB ligand (41BBL) and membrane-bound interleukin 15 (mbIL15). The functional importance of KIRs on ex vivo expanded NK cells has not been studied in detail. We found that after a 12-day co-culture with K562-mbIL15-41BBL cells, expanded NK cells maintained inhibition specificity and prior in vivo licensing status determined by KIR/KIR-ligand interactions. Addition of an anti-CD20 antibody (rituximab) induced NK-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and augmented killing of CD20+ target cells. However, partial inhibition induced by KIR/KIR-ligand interactions persisted. Finally, we found that extended co-cultures of NK cells with stimulatory cells transduced to express various KIR-ligands modified both the inhibitory and activating KIR repertoires of the expanded NK cell product. These studies demonstrate that the licensing interactions known to occur during NK ontogeny also influence NK cell function following NK expansion ex vivo with HLA-null stimulatory cells. PMID:27392940

  10. Natural Killer Cells Improve Hematopoietic Stem Cell Engraftment by Increasing Stem Cell Clonogenicity In Vitro and in a Humanized Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Escobedo-Cousin, Michelle; Jackson, Nicola; Laza-Briviesca, Raquel; Ariza-McNaughton, Linda; Luevano, Martha; Derniame, Sophie; Querol, Sergio; Blundell, Michael; Thrasher, Adrian; Soria, Bernat; Cooper, Nichola; Bonnet, Dominique; Madrigal, Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2015-01-01

    Cord blood (CB) is increasingly used as a source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) for transplantation. Low incidence and severity of graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) and a robust graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect are observed following CB transplantation (CBT). However, its main disadvantages are a limited number of HSC per unit, delayed immune reconstitution and a higher incidence of infection. Unmanipulated grafts contain accessory cells that may facilitate HSC engraftment. Therefore, the effects of accessory cells, particularly natural killer (NK) cells, on human CB HSC (CBSC) functions were assessed in vitro and in vivo. CBSC cultured with autologous CB NK cells showed higher levels of CXCR4 expression, a higher migration index and a higher number of colony forming units (CFU) after short-term and long-term cultures. We found that CBSC secreted CXCL9 following interaction with CB NK cells. In addition, recombinant CXCL9 increased CBSC clonogenicity, recapitulating the effect observed of CB NK cells on CBSC. Moreover, the co-infusion of CBSC with CB NK cells led to a higher level of CBSC engraftment in NSG mouse model. The results presented in this work offer the basis for an alternative approach to enhance HSC engraftment that could improve the outcome of CBT. PMID:26465138

  11. Natural Killer Cells Improve Hematopoietic Stem Cell Engraftment by Increasing Stem Cell Clonogenicity In Vitro and in a Humanized Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Laza-Briviesca, Raquel; Ariza-McNaughton, Linda; Luevano, Martha; Derniame, Sophie; Querol, Sergio; Blundell, Michael; Thrasher, Adrian; Soria, Bernat; Cooper, Nichola; Bonnet, Dominique; Madrigal, Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2015-01-01

    Cord blood (CB) is increasingly used as a source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) for transplantation. Low incidence and severity of graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) and a robust graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect are observed following CB transplantation (CBT). However, its main disadvantages are a limited number of HSC per unit, delayed immune reconstitution and a higher incidence of infection. Unmanipulated grafts contain accessory cells that may facilitate HSC engraftment. Therefore, the effects of accessory cells, particularly natural killer (NK) cells, on human CB HSC (CBSC) functions were assessed in vitro and in vivo. CBSC cultured with autologous CB NK cells showed higher levels of CXCR4 expression, a higher migration index and a higher number of colony forming units (CFU) after short-term and long-term cultures. We found that CBSC secreted CXCL9 following interaction with CB NK cells. In addition, recombinant CXCL9 increased CBSC clonogenicity, recapitulating the effect observed of CB NK cells on CBSC. Moreover, the co-infusion of CBSC with CB NK cells led to a higher level of CBSC engraftment in NSG mouse model. The results presented in this work offer the basis for an alternative approach to enhance HSC engraftment that could improve the outcome of CBT. PMID:26465138

  12. Skin TLR7 triggering promotes accumulation of respiratory dendritic cells and natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Hackstein, Holger; Hagel, Nicole; Knoche, Angela; Kranz, Sabine; Lohmeyer, Jürgen; von Wulffen, Werner; Kershaw, Olivia; Gruber, Achim D; Bein, Gregor; Baal, Nelli

    2012-01-01

    The TLR7 agonist imiquimod has been used successfully as adjuvant for skin treatment of virus-associated warts and basal cell carcinoma. The effects of skin TLR7 triggering on respiratory leukocyte populations are unknown. In a placebo-controlled experimental animal study we have used multicolour flow cytometry to systematically analyze the modulation of respiratory leukocyte subsets after skin administration of imiquimod. Compared to placebo, skin administration of imiquimod significantly increased respiratory dendritic cells (DC) and natural killer cells, whereas total respiratory leukocyte, alveolar macrophages, classical CD4+ T helper and CD8+ T killer cell numbers were not or only moderately affected. DC subpopulation analyses revealed that elevation of respiratory DC was caused by an increase of respiratory monocytic DC and CD11b(hi) DC subsets. Lymphocyte subpopulation analyses indicated a marked elevation of respiratory natural killer cells and a significant reduction of B lymphocytes. Analysis of cytokine responses of respiratory leukocytes after stimulation with Klebsiella pneumonia indicated reduced IFN-γ and TNF-α expression and increased IL-10 and IL-12p70 production after 7 day low dose skin TLR7 triggering. Additionally, respiratory NK cytotoxic activity was increased after 7d skin TLR7 triggering. In contrast, lung histology and bronchoalveolar cell counts were not affected suggesting that skin TLR7 stimulation modulated respiratory leukocyte composition without inducing overt pulmonary inflammation. These data suggest the possibility to modulate respiratory leukocyte composition and respiratory cytokine responses against pathogens like Klebsiella pneumonia through skin administration of a clinically approved TLR7 ligand. Skin administration of synthetic TLR7 ligands may represent a novel, noninvasive means to modulate respiratory immunity. PMID:22927956

  13. Skin TLR7 Triggering Promotes Accumulation of Respiratory Dendritic Cells and Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hackstein, Holger; Hagel, Nicole; Knoche, Angela; Kranz, Sabine; Lohmeyer, Jürgen; von Wulffen, Werner; Kershaw, Olivia; Gruber, Achim D.; Bein, Gregor; Baal, Nelli

    2012-01-01

    The TLR7 agonist imiquimod has been used successfully as adjuvant for skin treatment of virus-associated warts and basal cell carcinoma. The effects of skin TLR7 triggering on respiratory leukocyte populations are unknown. In a placebo-controlled experimental animal study we have used multicolour flow cytometry to systematically analyze the modulation of respiratory leukocyte subsets after skin administration of imiquimod. Compared to placebo, skin administration of imiquimod significantly increased respiratory dendritic cells (DC) and natural killer cells, whereas total respiratory leukocyte, alveolar macrophages, classical CD4+ T helper and CD8+ T killer cell numbers were not or only moderately affected. DC subpopulation analyses revealed that elevation of respiratory DC was caused by an increase of respiratory monocytic DC and CD11bhi DC subsets. Lymphocyte subpopulation analyses indicated a marked elevation of respiratory natural killer cells and a significant reduction of B lymphocytes. Analysis of cytokine responses of respiratory leukocytes after stimulation with Klebsiella pneumonia indicated reduced IFN-γ and TNF-α expression and increased IL-10 and IL-12p70 production after 7 day low dose skin TLR7 triggering. Additionally, respiratory NK cytotoxic activity was increased after 7d skin TLR7 triggering. In contrast, lung histology and bronchoalveolar cell counts were not affected suggesting that skin TLR7 stimulation modulated respiratory leukocyte composition without inducing overt pulmonary inflammation. These data suggest the possibility to modulate respiratory leukocyte composition and respiratory cytokine responses against pathogens like Klebsiella pneumonia through skin administration of a clinically approved TLR7 ligand. Skin administration of synthetic TLR7 ligands may represent a novel, noninvasive means to modulate respiratory immunity. PMID:22927956

  14. Using miniature osmotic infusion pumps to maintain tritiated thymidine exposure to cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Neely, J.E.; Hake, D.A.

    1982-06-01

    To provide a constant level of tracer doses of tritiated thymidine to cultured cells during continuous infusion, miniature osmotic infusion pumps were used to provide replacement thymidine. By determining the loss of isotope from the media during nonreplacement, the rate of constant infusion replacement to maintain thymidine levels was calculated. The replacement rates were similar for the three cell lines examined and allowed a standard osmotic pump infusion.

  15. Human Decidual Natural Killer Cells Are a Unique NK Cell Subset with Immunomodulatory Potential

    PubMed Central

    Koopman, Louise A.; Kopcow, Hernan D.; Rybalov, Basya; Boyson, Jonathan E.; Orange, Jordan S.; Schatz, Frederick; Masch, Rachel; Lockwood, Charles J.; Schachter, Asher D.; Park, Peter J.; Strominger, Jack L.

    2003-01-01

    Natural killer cells constitute 50–90% of lymphocytes in human uterine decidua in early pregnancy. Here, CD56bright uterine decidual NK (dNK) cells were compared with the CD56bright and CD56dim peripheral NK cell subsets by microarray analysis, with verification of results by flow cytometry and RT-PCR. Among the ∼10,000 genes studied, 278 genes showed at least a threefold change with P ≤ 0.001 when comparing the dNK and peripheral NK cell subsets, most displaying increased expression in dNK cells. The largest number of these encoded surface proteins, including the unusual lectinlike receptors NKG2E and Ly-49L, several killer cell Ig-like receptors, the integrin subunits αD, αX, β1, and β5, and multiple tetraspanins (CD9, CD151, CD53, CD63, and TSPAN-5). Additionally, two secreted proteins, galectin-1 and progestagen-associated protein 14, known to have immunomodulatory functions, were selectively expressed in dNK cells. PMID:14568979

  16. MULT1E/mIL-12: a novel bifunctional protein for natural killer cell activation.

    PubMed

    Tietje, A; Li, J; Yu, X; Wei, Y

    2014-05-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have the potential to be effective killers of tumor cells. They are governed by inhibitory and activating receptors like NKG2D, whose ligands are normally upregulated in cells that are stressed, like cancer cells. Advanced cancer cells, however, have ways to reduce these ligands' expression, leaving them less detectable by NK cells. Along with these receptors, NK cells also require activating cytokines, like interleukin 12 (IL-12). The goal of this study is to develop a novel bi-functional fusion protein for enhanced NK cell activation. The proposed protein combines the extracellular domain of the NKG2D ligand Mouse UL-16-binding protein-like transcript 1 (MULT1E) and mouse IL-12 (mIL-12). It is hypothesized that when expressed by tumor cells, the protein will activate NK and other killer cells using the NKG2D receptor, and deliver mIL-12 to the NK cells where it can interact with the IL-12R and enhance cytotoxicity. The fusion protein, when expressed by engineered tumor cells, indeed activated NK cells in vitro as assayed by increased production of interferon-γ and cytotoxicity and significantly reduced tumor growth in vivo. Although the study is preliminary, the data suggest that the MULT1E/mIL-12 bi-functional fusion protein is an effective activator of NK cells for cancer treatment. PMID:24572784

  17. Interleukin-2 enhances the natural killer cell response to Herceptin-coated Her2/neu-positive breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Carson, W E; Parihar, R; Lindemann, M J; Personeni, N; Dierksheide, J; Meropol, N J; Baselga, J; Caligiuri, M A

    2001-10-01

    The Her2/neu (c-erbB-2) oncogene encodes a 185-kDa protein tyrosine kinase which is overexpressed in 20% of breast adenocarcinomas and is recognized by a humanized anti-Her2/neu monoclonal antibody (mAb) (rhu4D5 or Herceptin). Natural killer (NK) cells are capable of mediating antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC) against antibody-coated targets via their expression of a low-affinity receptor for IgG (FcgammaRIII or CD16). NK cells can be expanded in cancer patients via the administration of low-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2) and become potent cytotoxic effectors following exposure to high doses of IL-2. We tested IL-2-activated NK cells against Her2/neu+ (MCF-7Her2/neu) and Her2/neu- (MDA-468) breast cancer cell lines in a 4-h 51Cr-release cytotoxicity assay in the presence or absence of rhu4D5 mAb (effector : target ratio = 10 : 1). Specific lysis of rhu4D5-coated MCF-7Her2/neu and MDA-468 target cells by IL-2-activated NK cells was 35% and 3%, respectively (p < 0.05). Lysis was less than 5% when targets were treated with either the non-humanized mu4D5 mAb or control huIgG. Lysis of rhu4D5-coated MCF-7Her2/neu cells was inhibited by 80 % when NK cells were pre-treated with an anti-Fc receptor antibody prior to use in the cytotoxicity assay. Enhanced ADCC of MCF-7Her2/neu target cells was seen when the effector cells consisted of mononuclear cells obtained from a patient demonstrating significant expansion of NK cells secondary to therapy with low-dose IL-2. Serum from patients receiving infusions of rhu4D5 mAb could substitute for exogenous antibody in the ADCC assay. NK cells activated by rhu4D5-coated tumor cells in the presence of IL-2 also produced large amounts of IFN-gamma with concomitant up-regulation of cell-surface activation markers CD25 and CD69. These results lend support to the concurrent use of rhu4D5 mAb and IL-2 therapy in patients with cancers that express the Her2/neu oncogene. PMID:11592078

  18. ENHANCEMENT OF NATURAL KILLER CELL ACTIVITY AND INTERFERON PRODUCTION BY MANGANESE IN YOUNG MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect that MnCl2 has on murine splenic natural killer (NK) cell activity was investigated in infant (10 days old), pre-weanling (18 days old) and weanling (24 days old) C57BL/6J mice. Both MnCl2 and Poly I:C caused elevations in serum interferon levels. Time-course studies r...

  19. IMMUNOLOGIC EFFECTS OF NICKEL: 2. SUPPRESSION OF NATURAL KILLER CELL ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A single intramuscular injection of nickel chloride (18.3 mg/kg) caused a significant reduction in murine splenic natural killer (NK) cell activity. This reduction in NK activity was not associated with a significant reduction in spleen cellularity nor in the production of suppre...

  20. Identification of Anti-tumor Cells Carrying Natural Killer (NK) Cell Antigens in Patients With Hematological Cancers.

    PubMed

    Krzywinska, Ewelina; Allende-Vega, Nerea; Cornillon, Amelie; Vo, Dang-Nghiem; Cayrefourcq, Laure; Panabieres, Catherine; Vilches, Carlos; Déchanet-Merville, Julie; Hicheri, Yosr; Rossi, Jean-François; Cartron, Guillaume; Villalba, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, a cytotoxic lymphocyte lineage, are able to kill tumor cells in vitro and in mouse models. However, whether these cells display an anti-tumor activity in cancer patients has not been demonstrated. Here we have addressed this issue in patients with several hematological cancers. We found a population of highly activated CD56(dim)CD16(+) NK cells that have recently degranulated, evidence of killing activity, and it is absent in healthy donors. A high percentage of these cells expressed natural killer cell p46-related protein (NKp46), natural-killer group 2, member D (NKG2D) and killer inhibitory receptors (KIRs) and a low percentage expressed NKG2A and CD94. They are also characterized by a high metabolic activity and active proliferation. Notably, we found that activated NK cells from hematological cancer patients have non-NK tumor cell antigens on their surface, evidence of trogocytosis during tumor cell killing. Finally, we found that these activated NK cells are distinguished by their CD45RA(+)RO(+) phenotype, as opposed to non-activated cells in patients or in healthy donors displaying a CD45RA(+)RO(-) phenotype similar to naïve T cells. In summary, we show that CD45RA(+)RO(+) cells, which resemble a unique NK population, have recognized tumor cells and degranulate in patients with hematological neoplasias. PMID:26629531

  1. Natural killer cell stimulatory factor (NKSF) augments natural killer cell and antibody-dependent tumoricidal response against colon carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, M D; Sigal, R K; Williams, N N; Daly, J M

    1991-04-01

    The therapy of colorectal cancer may be improved by biologic response modifiers that enhance natural killer (NK) cell and antibody-dependent tumoricidal mechanisms. This study examined the effect of a recently discovered cytokine purified from the supernatant of an Ebstein-Barr virus-transformed B-lymphoblastoid cell line (RPMI-8866), natural killer cell stimulatory factor (NKSF), on NK and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) of human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines. Human peripheral blood lymphocytes were cultured for 24 hr in the presence or absence of NKSF (3.6 pM) or interleukin-2 (1 nM). The cultured lymphocytes were analyzed for lytic potential toward chromium-51-labeled colon carcinoma targets SW 1116, 498 LI, and WC 1. ADCC was measured by incubating chromium-51-labeled SW 1116 or WC 1 targets with the monoclonal antibody CO17-1A, an IgG2a antibody reactive with gastrointestinal cancer-associated cell antigen, or control mouse IgG prior to testing NKSF-treated or control PBL effectors in a 6-hr cytotoxicity assay. NKSF significantly enhanced NK cytolysis of colon carcinoma and NK-resistant lymphoma cell lines, and on a molar basis was approximately 300 times more potent than interleukin-2 in generating NK cytotoxicity. Furthermore, NKSF significantly augmented lymphocyte-mediated ADCC against colon carcinoma targets, and the combination of NKSF with the antibody CO17-1A had an additive effect on lymphocyte tumoricidial capacity. Thus, NKSF may have a potential role in the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:1673486

  2. Recognition of adult and pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia blasts by natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Torelli, Giovanni F.; Peragine, Nadia; Raponi, Sara; Pagliara, Daria; De Propris, Maria S.; Vitale, Antonella; Bertaina, Alice; Barberi, Walter; Moretta, Lorenzo; Basso, Giuseppe; Santoni, Angela; Guarini, Anna; Locatelli, Franco; Foà, Robin

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the pathways of recognition of acute lymphoblastic leukemia blasts by natural killer cells and to verify whether differences in natural killer cell activating receptor ligand expression among groups defined by age of patients, or presence of cytogenetic/molecular aberrations correlate with the susceptibility to recognition and killing. We analyzed 103 newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients: 46 adults and 57 children. Pediatric blasts showed a significantly higher expression of Nec-2 (P=0.03), ULBP-1 (P=0.01) and ULBP-3 (P=0.04) compared to adult cells. The differential expression of these ligands between adults and children was confined to B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia with no known molecular alterations. Within molecularly defined subgroups of patients, a high surface expression of NKG2D and DNAM1 ligands was found on BCR-ABL+ blasts, regardless of patient age. Accordingly, BCR-ABL+ blasts proved to be significantly more susceptible to natural killer-dependent lysis than B-lineage blasts without molecular aberrations (P=0.03). Cytotoxic tests performed in the presence of neutralizing antibodies indicated a pathway of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell recognition in the setting of the Nec-2/DNAM-1 interaction. These data provide a biological explanation of the different roles played by alloreactive natural killer cells in pediatric versus adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia and suggest that new natural killer-based strategies targeting specific subgroups of patients, particularly those BCR-ABL+, are worth pursuing further. PMID:24658822

  3. Optimal selection of natural killer cells to kill myeloma: the role of HLA-E and NKG2A.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Subhashis; van Gelder, Michel; Noort, Willy; Xu, Yunping; Rouschop, Kasper M A; Groen, Richard; Schouten, Harry C; Tilanus, Marcel G J; Germeraad, Wilfred T V; Martens, Anton C M; Bos, Gerard M J; Wieten, Lotte

    2015-08-01

    Immunotherapy with allogeneic natural killer (NK) cells offers therapeutic perspectives for multiple myeloma patients. Here, we aimed to refine NK cell therapy by evaluation of the relevance of HLA-class I and HLA-E for NK anti-myeloma reactivity. We show that HLA-class I was strongly expressed on the surface of patient-derived myeloma cells and on myeloma cell lines. HLA-E was highly expressed by primary myeloma cells but only marginally by cell lines. HLA-E(low) expression on U266 cells observed in vitro was strongly upregulated after in vivo (bone marrow) growth in RAG-2(-/-) γc(-/-) mice, suggesting that in vitro HLA-E levels poorly predict the in vivo situation. Concurrent analysis of inhibitory receptors (KIR2DL1, KIR2DL2/3, KIR3DL1 and NKG2A) and NK cell degranulation upon co-culture with myeloma cells revealed that KIR-ligand-mismatched NK cells degranulate more than matched subsets and that HLA-E abrogates degranulation of NKG2A+ subsets. Inhibition by HLA-class I and HLA-E was also observed with IL-2-activated NK cells and at low oxygen levels (0.6 %) mimicking hypoxic bone marrow niches where myeloma cells preferentially reside. Our study demonstrates that NKG2A-negative, KIR-ligand-mismatched NK cells are the most potent subset for clinical application. We envision that infusion of high numbers of this subclass will enhance clinical efficacy. PMID:25920521

  4. Natural killer cells and regulatory T cells in early pregnancy loss

    PubMed Central

    SHARMA, SURENDRA

    2015-01-01

    Survival of the allogeneic embryo in the uterus depends on the maintenance of immune tolerance at the maternal-fetal interface. The pregnant uterus is replete with activated maternal immune cells. How this immune tolerance is acquired and maintained has been a topic of intense investigation. The key immune cells that predominantly populate the pregnant uterus are natural killer (NK) cells. In normal pregnancy, these cells are not killers, but rather provide a microenvironment that is pregnancy compatible and supports healthy placentation. In placental mammals, an array of highly orchestrated immune elements to support successful pregnancy outcome has been incorporated. This includes active cooperation between maternal immune cells, particularly NK cells, and trophoblast cells. This intricate process is required for placentation, immune regulation and to remodel the blood supply to the fetus. During the past decade, various types of maternal immune cells have been thought to be involved in cross-talk with trophoblasts and in programming immune tolerance. RegulatoryT cells (Tregs) have attracted a great deal of attention in promoting implantation and immune tolerance beyond implantation. However, what has not been fully addressed is how this immune-trophoblast axis breaks down during adverse pregnancy outcomes, particularly early pregnancy loss, and in response to unscheduled inflammation. Intense research efforts have begun to shed light on the roles of NK cells and Tregs in early pregnancy loss, although much remains to be unraveled in order to fully characterize the mechanisms underlying their detrimental activity. An increased understanding of host-environment interactions that lead to the cytotoxic phenotype of these otherwise pregnancy compatible maternal immune cells is important for prediction, prevention and treatment of pregnancy maladies, particularly recurrent pregnancy loss. In this review, we discuss relevant information from experimental and human

  5. Natural killer cells and regulatory T cells in early pregnancy loss.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Surendra

    2014-01-01

    Survival of the allogeneic embryo in the uterus depends on the maintenance of immune tolerance at the maternal-fetal interface. The pregnant uterus is replete with activated maternal immune cells. How this immune tolerance is acquired and maintained has been a topic of intense investigation. The key immune cells that predominantly populate the pregnant uterus are natural killer (NK) cells. In normal pregnancy, these cells are not killers, but rather provide a microenvironment that is pregnancy compatible and supports healthy placentation. In placental mammals, an array of highly orchestrated immune elements to support successful pregnancy outcome has been incorporated. This includes active cooperation between maternal immune cells, particularly NK cells, and trophoblast cells. This intricate process is required for placentation, immune regulation and to remodel the blood supply to the fetus. During the past decade, various types of maternal immune cells have been thought to be involved in cross-talk with trophoblasts and in programming immune tolerance. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have attracted a great deal of attention in promoting implantation and immune tolerance beyond implantation. However, what has not been fully addressed is how this immune-trophoblast axis breaks down during adverse pregnancy outcomes, particularly early pregnancy loss, and in response to unscheduled inflammation. Intense research efforts have begun to shed light on the roles of NK cells and Tregs in early pregnancy loss, although much remains to be unraveled in order to fully characterize the mechanisms underlying their detrimental activity. An increased understanding of host-environment interactions that lead to the cytotoxic phenotype of these otherwise pregnancy compatible maternal immune cells is important for prediction, prevention and treatment of pregnancy maladies, particularly recurrent pregnancy loss. In this review, we discuss relevant information from experimental and human

  6. Application of Mass Cytometry (CyTOF) for Functional and Phenotypic Analysis of Natural Killer Cells.

    PubMed

    Kay, Alexander W; Strauss-Albee, Dara M; Blish, Catherine A

    2016-01-01

    Mass cytometry is a novel platform for high-dimensional phenotypic and functional analysis of single cells. This system uses elemental metal isotopes conjugated to monoclonal antibodies to evaluate up to 42 parameters simultaneously on individual cells with minimal overlap between channels. The platform can be customized for analysis of both phenotypic and functional markers. Here, we will describe methods to stain, collect, and analyze intracellular functional markers and surface phenotypic markers on natural killer cells. PMID:27177653

  7. STAT5 Loss Awakens the Dark Force in Natural Killer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jing; Cerwenka, Adelheid

    2016-04-01

    Natural killer cells (NK) are commonly considered to be potent antitumor effector cells. The study by Gotthardt and colleagues challenges this concept and reveals that STAT5-deficient/inhibited NK cells induce angiogenesis and promote tumor progression. These unexpected findings shed new light on potential adverse effects of JAK-STAT inhibitors in the clinics.Cancer Discov; 6(4); 347-9. ©2016 AACRSee related article by Gotthardt et al., p. 414. PMID:27045017

  8. Selection and expansion of natural killer cells for NK cell-based immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Becker, Petra S A; Suck, Garnet; Nowakowska, Paulina; Ullrich, Evelyn; Seifried, Erhard; Bader, Peter; Tonn, Torsten; Seidl, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have been used in several clinical trials as adaptive immunotherapy. The low numbers of these cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) have resulted in various approaches to preferentially expand primary NK cells from PBMC. While some clinical trials have used the addition of interleukin 2 (IL-2) to co-stimulate the expansion of purified NK cells from allogeneic donors, recent studies have shown promising results in achieving in vitro expansion of NK cells to large numbers for adoptive immunotherapy. NK cell expansion requires multiple cell signals for survival, proliferation and activation. Thus, expansion strategies have been focused either to substitute these factors using autologous feeder cells or to use genetically modified allogeneic feeder cells. Recent developments in the clinical use of genetically modified NK cell lines with chimeric antigen receptors, the development of expansion protocols for the clinical use of NK cell from human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells are challenging improvements for NK cell-based immunotherapy. Transfer of several of these protocols to clinical-grade production of NK cells necessitates adaptation of good manufacturing practice conditions, and the development of freezing conditions to establish NK cell stocks will require some effort and, however, should enhance the therapeutic options of NK cells in clinical medicine. PMID:26810567

  9. NK-92: an 'off-the-shelf therapeutic' for adoptive natural killer cell-based cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Suck, Garnet; Odendahl, Marcus; Nowakowska, Paulina; Seidl, Christian; Wels, Winfried S; Klingemann, Hans G; Tonn, Torsten

    2016-04-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are increasingly considered as immunotherapeutic agents in particular in the fight against cancers. NK cell therapies are potentially broadly applicable and, different from their T cell counterparts, do not cause graft-versus-host disease. Efficacy and clinical in vitro or in vivo expansion of primary NK cells will however always remain variable due to individual differences of donors or patients. Long-term storage of clinical NK cell lots to allow repeated clinical applications remains an additional challenge. In contrast, the established and well-characterized cell line NK-92 can be easily and reproducibly expanded from a good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compliant cryopreserved master cell bank. Moreover, no cost-intensive cell purification methods are required. To date, NK-92 has been intensively studied. The cells displayed superior cytotoxicity against a number of tumor types tested, which was confirmed in preclinical mouse studies. Subsequent clinical testing demonstrated safety of NK-92 infusions even at high doses. Despite the phase I nature of the trials conducted so far, some efficacy was noted, particularly against lung tumors. Furthermore, to overcome tumor resistance and for specific targeting, NK-92 has been engineered to express a number of different chimeric antigen receptors (CARs), including targeting, for example, CD19 or CD20 (anti-B cell malignancies), CD38 (anti-myeloma) or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2; ErbB2; anti-epithelial cancers). The concept of an NK cell line as an allogeneic cell therapeutic produced 'off-the-shelf' on demand holds great promise for the development of effective treatments. PMID:26559813

  10. In vivo kinetics of human natural killer cells: the effects of ageing and acute and chronic viral infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Wallace, Diana L; de Lara, Catherine M; Ghattas, Hala; Asquith, Becca; Worth, Andrew; Griffin, George E; Taylor, Graham P; Tough, David F; Beverley, Peter C L; Macallan, Derek C

    2007-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK) cells form a circulating population in a state of dynamic homeostasis. We investigated NK cell homeostasis by labelling dividing cells in vivo using deuterium-enriched glucose in young and elderly healthy subjects and patients with viral infection. Following a 24-hr intravenous infusion of 6,6-D2-glucose, CD3– CD16+ NK cells sorted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) were analysed for DNA deuterium content by gas chromatography mass spectrometry to yield minimum estimates for proliferation rate (p). In healthy young adults (n = 5), deuterium enrichment was maximal ∼10 days after labelling, consistent with postmitotic maturation preceding circulation. The mean (± standard deviation) proliferation rate was 4·3 ± 2·4%/day (equivalent to a doubling time of 16 days) and the total production rate was 15 ± 7·6 × 106 cells/l/day. Labelled cells disappeared from the circulation at a similar rate [6·9 ± 4·0%/day; half-life (T½) <10 days]. Healthy elderly subjects (n = 8) had lower proliferation and production rates (P = 2·5 ± 1·0%/day and 7·3 ± 3·7 × 106 cells/l/day, respectively; P = 0·04). Similar rates were seen in patients chronically infected with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) (P = 3·2 ± 1·9%/day). In acute infectious mononucleosis (n = 5), NK cell numbers were increased but kinetics were unaffected (P = 2·8 ± 1·0%/day) a mean of 12 days after symptom onset. Human NK cells have a turnover time in blood of about 2 weeks. Proliferation rates appear to fall with ageing, remain unperturbed by chronic HTLV-I infection and normalize rapidly following acute Epstein–Barr virus infection. PMID:17346281

  11. Distribution of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor genes in Poles.

    PubMed

    Majorczyk, E; Łuszczek, W; Nowak, I; Pawlik, A; Wiśniewski, A; Jasek, M; Kuśnierczyk, P

    2008-08-01

    Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) present on natural killer cells and minor subpopulations of T cells recognize class I human leucocyte antigen (HLA) molecules on the surface of target cells. Humans differ by the presence or absence of some KIR genes on their chromosomes. As KIRs are important for the outcome of tissue transplantation (particularly for haematopoietic stem cell transplantation) and possibly for pregnancy and autoimmune diseases, knowledge of the KIR gene distribution in a given human population is of practical value. Therefore, we tested 363 healthy individuals from Western Poland for the presence or absence of KIR genes. Results are compared with those published for other human populations. KIR gene frequencies in Poles are close to these in other Caucasoids but different from those in Asian and African populations, and particularly distant from those in Australian Aborigines. PMID:18976447

  12. Effects of OK-432 on murine bone marrow and the production of natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, S.B.; Rosse, C.

    1985-01-01

    The streptococcal preparation, OK-432, which augments anti-tumor responses in humans and mice, has been shown to be a potent immunomodulator. Among its effects is a pronounced augmentation of natural killer (NK) activity. The hypothesis that OK-432 alters the rates of production and maturation of NK cells in the bone marrow was tested. Studies to determine the kinetic parameters of NK cell production in normal C57BL/6J mice using tritiated thymidine, /sup 3/H-TdR, as a DNA marker are described. We are now extending those studies to determine the effect of OK-432 on the bone marrow and on the production of NK cells in the marrow. Initial observations are reported which indicate that OK-432 has profound effects on the cellularity and mitotic activity of the bone marrow, and in particular, on cells with the characteristics of natural killer cells within the marrow. 17 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Elevated levels of invariant natural killer T-cell and natural killer cell activation correlate with disease progression in HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections

    PubMed Central

    Bächle, Susanna M.; Malone, David F.G.; Buggert, Marcus; Karlsson, Annika C.; Isberg, Per-Erik; Biague, Antonio J.; Norrgren, Hans; Medstrand, Patrik; Moll, Markus; Sandberg, Johan K.; Jansson, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In this study, we aimed to investigate the frequency and activation of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells and natural killer (NK) cells among HIV-1, HIV-2, or dually HIV-1/HIV-2 (HIV-D)-infected individuals, in relation to markers of disease progression. Design: Whole blood samples were collected from treatment-naive HIV-1 (n = 23), HIV-2 (n = 34), and HIV-D (n = 11) infected individuals, as well as HIV-seronegative controls (n = 25), belonging to an occupational cohort in Guinea-Bissau. Methods: Frequencies and activation levels of iNKT and NK cell subsets were analysed using multicolour flow cytometry, and results were related to HIV-status, CD4+ T-cell levels, viral load, and T-cell activation. Results: HIV-1, HIV-D, and viremic HIV-2 individuals had lower numbers of CD4+ iNKT cells in circulation compared with seronegative controls. Numbers of CD56bright NK cells were also reduced in HIV-infected individuals as compared with control study participants. Notably, iNKT cell and NK cell activation levels, assessed by CD38 expression, were increased in HIV-1 and HIV-2 single, as well as dual, infections. HIV-2 viremia was associated with elevated activation levels in CD4+ iNKT cells, CD56bright, and CD56dim NK cells, as compared with aviremic HIV-2 infection. Additionally, disease markers such as CD4+ T-cell percentages, viral load, and CD4+ T-cell activation were associated with CD38 expression levels of both iNKT and NK cells, which activation levels also correlated with each other. Conclusion: Our data indicate that elevated levels of iNKT-cell and NK-cell activation are associated with viremia and disease progression markers in both HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections. PMID:27163705

  14. Distinct Cytokine Profiles of Neonatal Natural Killer T Cells after Expansion with Subsets of Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kadowaki, Norimitsu; Antonenko, Svetlana; Ho, Stephen; Rissoan, Marie-Clotilde; Soumelis, Vassili; Porcelli, Steven A.; Lanier, Lewis L.; Liu, Yong-Jun

    2001-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a highly conserved subset of T cells that have been shown to play a critical role in suppressing T helper cell type 1–mediated autoimmune diseases and graft versus host disease in an interleukin (IL)-4–dependent manner. Thus, it is important to understand how the development of IL-4– versus interferon (IFN)-γ–producing NKT cells is regulated. Here, we show that NKT cells from adult blood and those from cord blood undergo massive expansion in cell numbers (500–70,000-fold) during a 4-wk culture with IL-2, IL-7, phytohemagglutinin, anti-CD3, and anti-CD28 mAbs. Unlike adult NKT cells that preferentially produce both IL-4 and IFN-γ, neonatal NKT cells preferentially produce IL-4 after polyclonal activation. Addition of type 2 dendritic cells (DC2) enhances the development of neonatal NKT cells into IL-4+IFN-γ− NKT2 cells, whereas addition of type 1 dendritic cells (DC1) induces polarization towards IL-4−IFN-γ+ NKT1 cells. Adult NKT cells display limited plasticity for polarization induced by DC1 or DC2. Thus, newly generated NKT cells may possess the potent ability to develop into IL-4+IFN-γ− NKT2 cells in response to appropriate stimuli and may thereafter acquire the tendency to produce both IL-4 and IFN-γ. PMID:11369793

  15. Unnatural killer cells to prevent bloodborne metastasis: inspiration from biology and engineering.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Michael J; King, Michael R

    2014-06-01

    Metastasis contributes to over 90% of cancer-related deaths. Many types of cancer metastasize via the bloodstream, where circulating tumor cells (CTCs) originating from the primary tumor can undergo selectin-mediated adhesion with the blood vessel wall and subsequently transmigrate to anatomically distant organs. In an effort to neutralize CTCs with the potential to form metastases, a new therapeutic approach has been developed in which circulating leukocytes are functionalized to target and kill cancer cells in the bloodstream. This approach mimics the cytotoxic activity of natural killer cells and the chemical engineering concept of a fluidized bed reactor, which increases the surface area for surface-catalyzed reactions. The resulting 'unnatural killer cells', proven effective in vitro with human blood and also in the living mouse, holds promise in neutralizing CTCs to interrupt the metastasis process. PMID:24791860

  16. Natural Killer Cell Diversity in Viral Infection: Why and How Much?

    PubMed Central

    Blish, Catherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer cells are a diverse group of innate lymphocytes that are specialized to rapidly respond to cancerous or virus-infected cells. NK cell function is controlled by the integration of signals from activating and inhibitory receptors expressed at the cell surface. Variegated expression patterns of these activating and inhibitory receptors at the single cell level leads to a highly diverse NK cell repertoire. Here I review the factors that influence NK cell repertoire diversity and its functional consequences for our ability to fight viruses.

  17. [CELLS FORM AND THEIR SENSITIVITY TO LYTIC ACTIVITY OF NATURAL KILLER CELLS UNDER THE ANTIOXIDANT ACTION].

    PubMed

    Kirpichnikova, K M; Petrov, Yu P; Filatova, N A; Gamaley, I A

    2015-01-01

    The present paper is an attempt to estimate the influence of cell surface morphology changes to functional activity under the effect of antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), and alpha-lipoic asid (ALA). Two experimental parameters were used to characterize transformed fibroblasts 3T3-SV40 status. The functional one was the cell sensitivity to lysis by natural killer (NK) mouse splenocytes, and morphology index (cell form index) was a cell area. We showed that addition of NAC or ALA to the cell medium caused fast decrease of cell area and changes of cell form. On the other hand, their sensitivity to lysis NK cells gradually and significantly decreased. Then we compared NAC or ALA effect with the effects of other substances, which were non-antioxidants but caused cell responses which concurred with of antioxidants, at least partly. They were: latrunculin B, desorganizing actin filaments (as both antioxidants), OTZ reducing ROS level in the cell (as NAC), BSO (inhibitor of glutathione synthesis), increasing ROS level in the cell (as ALA), antibodies to gelatinases, MMP-2 and MMP-9 inactivating their activities (as both antioxidants). The results obtained showed a correlation between changes of morphology index and functional activity, sensitivity to lysis by NK cells. We suppose that geometry of cell surface might be a functional indicator of cell reaction to the antioxidant. PMID:26591569

  18. Serial Killing of Tumor Cells by Human Natural Killer Cells – Enhancement by Therapeutic Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Rauf; Watzl, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    Background Natural killer cells are an important component of the innate immune system. Anti-cancer therapies utilizing monoclonal antibodies also rely on the cytotoxicity of NK cells for their effectiveness. Here, we study the dynamics of NK cell cytotoxicity. Methodology/Principal Findings We observe that IL-2 activated human NK cells can serially hit multiple targets. Using functional assays, we demonstrate that on an average, a single IL-2 activated NK cell can kill four target cells. Data using live video microscopy suggest that an individual NK cell can make serial contacts with multiple targets and majority of contacts lead to lysis of target cells. Serial killing is associated with a loss of Perforin and Granzyme B content. A large majority of NK cells survive serial killing, and IL-2 can replenish their granular stock and restore the diminished cytotoxicity of ‘exhausted’ NK cells. IL-2 and IL-15 are equally effective in enhancing the killing frequency of resting NK cells. Significantly, Rituximab, a therapeutic monoclonal antibody increases the killing frequency of both resting and IL-2 activated NK cells. Conclusion/Significance Our data suggest that NK cell-based therapies for overcoming tumors rely on their serial killing ability. Therefore, strategies augmenting the killing ability of NK cells can boost the immune system and enhance the effectiveness of monoclonal antibody-based therapies. PMID:17389917

  19. Natural killer cell dysfunction in hepatocellular carcinoma and NK cell-based immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Cheng; Sun, Hao-yu; Xiao, Wei-hua; Zhang, Cai; Tian, Zhi-gang

    2015-10-01

    The mechanisms linking hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remain largely unknown. Natural killer (NK) cells account for 25%-50% of the total number of liver lymphocytes, suggesting that NK cells play an important role in liver immunity. The number of NK cells in the blood and tumor tissues of HCC patients is positively correlated with their survival and prognosis. Furthermore, a group of NK cell-associated genes in HCC tissues is positively associated with the prolonged survival. These facts suggest that NK cells and HCC progression are strongly associated. In this review, we describe the abnormal NK cells and their functional impairment in patients with chronic HBV and HCV infection, which contribute to the progression of HCC. Then, we summarize the association of NK cells with HCC based on the abnormalities in the numbers and phenotypes of blood and liver NK cells in HCC patients. In particular, the exhaustion of NK cells that represents lower cytotoxicity and impaired cytokine production may serve as a predictor for the occurrence of HCC. Finally, we present the current achievements in NK cell immunotherapy conducted in mouse models of liver cancer and in clinical trials, highlighting how chemoimmunotherapy, NK cell transfer, gene therapy, cytokine therapy and mAb therapy improve NK cell function in HCC treatment. It is conceivable that NK cell-based anti-HCC therapeutic strategies alone or in combination with other therapies will be great promise for HCC treatment. PMID:26073325

  20. Glucocorticoid cell reception in mice of different strains with natural killer cell activity depressed during immobilization stress

    SciTech Connect

    Lyashko, V.N.; Sukhikh, G.T.

    1987-08-01

    The authors study differences in stress-induced depression of natural killer cell activity in mice of different inbred lines, depending on parameters of glucocorticoid binding with glucorticoid receptors of spleen cells and on the hormonal status of the animals. In determining the parameters of glucocorticoid binding on intact splenocytes, aliquots of a suspension of washed splenocytes were incubated with tritium-labeled dexamethasone.

  1. Regulation of natural killer activity of lymphocytes from normal subjects and patients with chronic lymphatic leukemia by interaction between T and non-T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Khonina, N.A.; Shubinskii, G.Z.; Lozovoi, V.P.

    1987-08-01

    The authors study the effect of culture of human cells on functional activity of natural killer cells and investigate the possible mechanisms of regulation of natural killer activity by acting on cytodifferentiation of lymphocytes in normal subjects and in patients with the B-cell variant of chromic lymphatic leukemia. To estimate natural killer cell function, a membranotoxic test was carried out, using cells of the transplantable line K-562, labeled with /sup 3/H-uridine as the targets.

  2. Functional Reconstitution of Natural Killer Cells in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Md Ashik; Hill, Geoffrey R.; Tey, Siok-Keen

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are the first lymphocyte population to reconstitute following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and are important in mediating immunity against both leukemia and pathogens. Although NK cell numbers generally reconstitute within a month, the acquisition of mature NK cell phenotype and full functional competency can take 6 months or more, and is influenced by graft composition, concurrent pharmacologic immunosuppression, graft-versus-host disease, and other clinical factors. In addition, cytomegalovirus infection and reactivation have a dominant effect on NK cell memory imprinting following allogeneic HSCT just as it does in healthy individuals. Our understanding of NK cell education and licensing has evolved in the years since the “missing self” hypothesis for NK-mediated graft-versus-leukemia effect was first put forward. For example, we now know that NK cell “re-education” can occur, and that unlicensed NK cells can be more protective than licensed NK cells in certain settings, thus raising new questions about how best to harness graft-versus-leukemia effect. Here, we review current understanding of the functional reconstitution of NK cells and NK cell education following allogeneic HSCT, highlighting a conceptual framework for future research. PMID:27148263

  3. Mechanistic analysis of the antitumor efficacy of human natural killer cells against breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kajitani, Keiko; Tanaka, Yuka; Arihiro, Koji; Kataoka, Tsuyoshi; Ohdan, Hideki

    2012-07-01

    We investigated the role of human natural killer (NK) cells in the peripheral blood (PB) and liver in controlling breast cancer. The proportion of NK cells among liver mononuclear cells was significantly higher than among PB mononuclear cells. Liver NK cells inductively expressed higher levels of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) than PB NK cells in response to interleukin-2 (IL-2). Liver NK cells displayed higher cytotoxicity against various breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB231, MDA-MB453, MDA-MB468, and MCF-7) after IL-2 stimulation than did PB NK cells. Anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody (mAb) promoted the cytotoxicity of both the types of NK cells toward HER2-expressing cell lines. All breast cancer cell lines highly expressed death-inducing TRAIL receptors, death receptor 4, but did not express death-inhibitory receptors (DcR1 and DcR2). Both PB and liver NK cell-induced cytotoxicity was inhibited partially by anti-TRAIL mAb and more profoundly by the combination of anti-TRAIL mAb and concanamycin A, indicating that TRAIL and perforin are involved. IL-2-stimulated liver and PB NK cells exhibited upregulated expression of CXCR3, which bind to the chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11 secreted by breast cancer cells. We also found that IFN-γ promoted the production of CXCL10 from breast cancer cells. The results of this study show that IFN-γ secreted from NK cells likely promotes the production of CXCL10 from breast cancer cells, which in turn accelerates the migration of CXCR3-expressing NK cells into the tumor site. These findings suggest the possibility of a therapeutic approach by either activation of endogenous PB and liver NK cells or adoptive transfer of in vitro-activated autologous NK cells. PMID:22261932

  4. Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptor Genotype and Haplotype Investigation of Natural Killer Cells from an Australian Population of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Huth, T. K.; Brenu, E. W.; Staines, D. R.; Marshall-Gradisnik, S. M.

    2016-01-01

    Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genes encode for activating and inhibitory surface receptors, which are correlated with the regulation of Natural Killer (NK) cell cytotoxic activity. Reduced NK cell cytotoxic activity has been consistently reported in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) patients, and KIR haplotypes and allelic polymorphism remain to be investigated. The aim of this article was to conduct a pilot study to examine KIR genotypes, haplotypes, and allelic polymorphism in CFS/ME patients and nonfatigued controls (NFCs). Comparison of KIR and allelic polymorphism frequencies revealed no significant differences between 20 CFS/ME patients and 20 NFCs. A lower frequency of the telomeric A/B motif (P < 0.05) was observed in CFS/ME patients compared with NFCs. This pilot study is the first to report the differences in the frequency of KIR on the telomeric A/B motif in CFS/ME patients. Further studies with a larger CFS/ME cohort are required to validate these results. PMID:27346947

  5. Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptor Genotype and Haplotype Investigation of Natural Killer Cells from an Australian Population of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis Patients.

    PubMed

    Huth, T K; Brenu, E W; Staines, D R; Marshall-Gradisnik, S M

    2016-01-01

    Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genes encode for activating and inhibitory surface receptors, which are correlated with the regulation of Natural Killer (NK) cell cytotoxic activity. Reduced NK cell cytotoxic activity has been consistently reported in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) patients, and KIR haplotypes and allelic polymorphism remain to be investigated. The aim of this article was to conduct a pilot study to examine KIR genotypes, haplotypes, and allelic polymorphism in CFS/ME patients and nonfatigued controls (NFCs). Comparison of KIR and allelic polymorphism frequencies revealed no significant differences between 20 CFS/ME patients and 20 NFCs. A lower frequency of the telomeric A/B motif (P < 0.05) was observed in CFS/ME patients compared with NFCs. This pilot study is the first to report the differences in the frequency of KIR on the telomeric A/B motif in CFS/ME patients. Further studies with a larger CFS/ME cohort are required to validate these results. PMID:27346947

  6. The phenotypic and functional characteristics of umbilical cord blood and peripheral blood natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Verneris, Michael R; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2009-10-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation can be curative for patients with high-risk acute leukaemia. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is an increasingly used source of allogeneic stem cells for patients who are in need of a transplant, but do not have a sibling donor. This review highlights the similarities and differences between the natural killer (NK) cells obtained from adult peripheral blood (PB) and UCB. These two cell sources show similar percentages of NK cells, including the major CD56(dim) and CD56(bright) subpopulations. UCB also contains an additional CD56-CD16+ subset, not typically found in PB. In addition, there are a number of progenitor cell populations in UCB that can give rise to NK cells. Some studies showed that UCB NK cells express a relatively higher percentage of inhibitory receptors (CD94/NKG2A and killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors) and less adhesion molecules. Resting UCB NK cells also show significantly less cytotoxicity compared to PB NK cells. However, following cytokine stimulation, the cytotoxicity of UCB NK cells can be rapidly increased to levels that are comparable to PB NK cells. Activation and expansion protocols for UCB NK cells are briefly reviewed. Lastly, we outline the early use of UCB NK cells in clinical trials. PMID:19796267

  7. Effect of tunicamycin on sialomucin and natural killer susceptibility of rat mammary tumor ascites cells.

    PubMed

    Bharathan, S; Moriarty, J; Moody, C E; Sherblom, A P

    1990-09-01

    The MAT-B1 and MAT-C1 ascites sublines of the 13762 rat mammary adenocarcinoma contain a dominant cell surface "complex" consisting of two glycoproteins: ascites sialoglycoprotein (ASGP)-1, a Mr 600,000-700,000 peanut agglutinin-binding sialomucin, and ASGP-2, a Mr 120,000 concancavalin A-binding glycoprotein (Sherblom et al., J. Biol. Chem., 255: 783-790, 1980; Sherblom and Carraway, J. Biol. Chem., 255: 12051-12059, 1980). Although both cell lines are resistant to lysis by natural killer cells, treatments which result in loss of cell surface ASGP-1 render the cells susceptible to natural killer cell lysis (Sherblom and Moody, Cancer Res., 46:4543-4546, 1986). Treatment of the ascites cells with 5 micrograms/ml tunicamycin for 24 h effectively inhibits glycosylation of ASGP-2 without affecting cell viability or total protein synthesis. Under these conditions, expression of ASGP-1 is depressed by at least 50% in both cell lines, as monitored by [3H]glucosamine incorporation and by binding of peanut agglutinin to intact cells. The size distribution of O-linked oligosaccharides in ASGP-1 from tunicamycin-treated versus control MAT-B1 cells is indistinguishable, as determined by Bio-Gel P-4 chromatography following alkaline-borohydride treatment. Complex isolated from either treated or control cells bands at the same density in a CsCl gradient containing Triton X-100 and contains a diffuse band corresponding to ASGP-2 by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Tunicamycin-treated cells, consistent with the reduced expression of ASGP-1, are significantly more susceptible to natural killer cell-mediated lysis, when compared to untreated controls. The results suggest that N-linked glycosylation is a prerequisite for sialomucin synthesis and/or complex formation. PMID:2386935

  8. Unusual selection on the KIR3DL1/S1 natural killer cell receptor in Africans.

    PubMed

    Norman, Paul J; Abi-Rached, Laurent; Gendzekhadze, Ketevan; Korbel, Daniel; Gleimer, Michael; Rowley, Don; Bruno, Dan; Carrington, Christine V F; Chandanayingyong, Dasdayanee; Chang, Yih-Hsin; Crespí, Catalina; Saruhan-Direskeneli, Güher; Fraser, Patricia A; Hameed, Kamran; Kamkamidze, Giorgi; Koram, Kwadwo A; Layrisse, Zulay; Matamoros, Nuria; Milà, Joan; Park, Myoung Hee; Pitchappan, Ramasamy M; Ramdath, D Dan; Shiau, Ming-Yuh; Stephens, Henry A F; Struik, Siske; Verity, David H; Vaughan, Robert W; Tyan, Dolly; Davis, Ronald W; Riley, Eleanor M; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Parham, Peter

    2007-09-01

    Interactions of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I ligands diversify natural killer cell responses to infection. By analyzing sequence variation in diverse human populations, we show that the KIR3DL1/S1 locus encodes two lineages of polymorphic inhibitory KIR3DL1 allotypes that recognize Bw4 epitopes of protein">HLA-A and HLA-B and one lineage of conserved activating KIR3DS1 allotypes, also implicated in Bw4 recognition. Balancing selection has maintained these three lineages for over 3 million years. Variation was selected at D1 and D2 domain residues that contact HLA class I and at two sites on D0, the domain that enhances the binding of KIR3D to HLA class I. HLA-B variants that gained Bw4 through interallelic microconversion are also products of selection. A worldwide comparison uncovers unusual KIR3DL1/S1 evolution in modern sub-Saharan Africans. Balancing selection is weak and confined to D0, KIR3DS1 is rare and KIR3DL1 allotypes with similar binding sites predominate. Natural killer cells express the dominant KIR3DL1 at a high frequency and with high surface density, providing strong responses to cells perturbed in Bw4 expression. PMID:17694054

  9. Interactive effects of Na and K in killing by natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schlichter, L.C.; MacCoubrey, I.C. )

    1989-09-01

    Contact-mediated lysis by human natural killer cells is inhibited by a number of drugs that block the predominant K channel. In this study the authors have further examined the role of the K channel and the interactions between passive K and Na transport in killing. Low external Na-inhibited killing and inhibition were not due to reduced inward current through the Na channels in the target cell. A role for the Na/H antiport is suggested since amiloride inhibited killing in a dose-dependent manner that was competitive with external Na. Depolarizing the killer cell with elevated external K did not inhibit killing. On the contrary, high K{sub 0} reduced the inhibition caused by low Na{sub 0} and by the K-channel blockers quinidine, verapamil, and retinoic acid. Hyperpolarizing the killer cell with low K{sub 0} or valinomycin inhibited killing. Hence, the primary role of the K channels during killing is not to maintain the negative membrane potential. On the contrary, depolarization may promote killing under conditions where killing is submaximal.

  10. Pluripotent stem cell-derived natural killer cells for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Knorr, David A.; Kaufman, Dan S.

    2010-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provide an accessible, genetically tractable and homogenous starting cell populations to efficiently study human blood cell development. These cell populations provide platforms to develop new cell-based therapies to treat both malignant and non-malignant hematological diseases. Our group has previously demonstrated the ability of hESC-derived hematopoietic precursors to produce functional natural killer (NK) cells as well as an explanation of the underlying mechanism responsible for inefficient development of T and B cells from hESCs. hESCs and iPSCs, which can be reliably engineered in vitro, provide an important new model system to study human lymphocyte development and produce enhanced cell-based therapies with potential to serve as a “universal” source of anti-tumor lymphocytes for novel clinical therapies. This review will focus on the application of hESC-derived NK cells with currently used and novel therapeutics for clinical trials, current barriers to translation, and future applications through genetic engineering approaches. PMID:20801411

  11. Natural killer cells facilitate PRAME-specific T-cell reactivity against neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Spel, Lotte; Boelens, Jaap-Jan; van der Steen, Dirk M.; Blokland, Nina J.G.; van Noesel, Max M.; Molenaar, Jan J.; Heemskerk, Mirjam H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common solid tumor in children with an estimated 5-year progression free survival of 20–40% in stage 4 disease. Neuroblastoma actively avoids recognition by natural killer (NK) cells and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Although immunotherapy has gained traction for neuroblastoma treatment, these immune escape mechanisms restrain clinical results. Therefore, we aimed to improve neuroblastoma immunogenicity to further the development of antigen-specific immunotherapy against neuroblastoma. We found that neuroblastoma cells significantly increase surface expression of MHC I upon exposure to active NK cells which thereby readily sensitize neuroblastoma cells for recognition by CTLs. We show that oncoprotein PRAME serves as an immunodominant antigen for neuroblastoma as NK-modulated neuroblastoma cells are recognized by PRAMESLLQHLIGL/A2-specific CTL clones. Furthermore, NK cells induce MHC I upregulation in neuroblastoma through contact-dependent secretion of IFNγ. Our results demonstrate remarkable plasticity in the peptide/MHC I surface expression of neuroblastoma cells, which is reversed when neuroblastoma cells experience innate immune attack by sensitized NK cells. These findings support the exploration of NK cells as adjuvant therapy to enforce neuroblastoma-specific CTL responses. PMID:26452036

  12. Indomethacin augments lymphokine-activated killer cell generation by patients with malignant mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, L.S.; Bowman, R.V.; Davis, M.R.; Musk, A.W.; Robinson, B.W. )

    1989-10-01

    Human malignant mesothelioma (MM) cells are resistant to natural killer (NK) cell lysis but susceptible to lysis by lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells from control individuals. The present study was performed to determine the capacity of patients with MM (n = 22) and individuals occupationally exposed to asbestos (the major population at risk of developing this disease, n = 52) to generate LAK cells capable of effectively lysing human mesothelioma cells. Compared to controls (n = 20), both patient groups demonstrated significantly depressed LAK cell activity against mesothelioma tumor cell targets (55 +/- 3% lysis by controls vs 34 +/- 3% lysis by patients with MM, P less than 0.005; and 45 +/- 3% lysis by asbestos-exposed individuals, P less than 0.025). Addition of 10 micrograms/ml indomethacin during LAK cell generation restored normal LAK cell activity for patients with MM (52 +/- 6% lysis of cultured human MM cells, P = NS compared to controls), suggesting that the defective cytolytic cell function observed in some patients with MM is a result of prostaglandin-induced immunosuppression. The ability of indomethacin to restore suppressed LAK cell activity in patients with MM suggests that the concomitant use of this agent in ex vivo LAK cell generation and in patients undergoing interleukin/LAK cell therapy may be beneficial.

  13. Mechanisms of Innate Lymphoid Cell and Natural Killer T Cell Activation during Mucosal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Altmayer, Nora

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal surfaces in the airways and the gastrointestinal tract are critical for the interactions of the host with its environment. Due to their abundance at mucosal tissue sites and their powerful immunomodulatory capacities, the role of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) and natural killer T (NKT) cells in the maintenance of mucosal tolerance has recently moved into the focus of attention. While NKT cells as well as ILCs utilize distinct transcription factors for their development and lineage diversification, both cell populations can be further divided into three polarized subpopulations reflecting the distinction into Th1, Th2, and Th17 cells in the adaptive immune system. While bystander activation through cytokines mediates the induction of ILC and NKT cell responses, NKT cells become activated also through the engagement of their canonical T cell receptors (TCRs) by (glyco)lipid antigens (cognate recognition) presented by the atypical MHC I like molecule CD1d on antigen presenting cells (APCs). As both innate lymphocyte populations influence inflammatory responses due to the explosive release of copious amounts of different cytokines, they might represent interesting targets for clinical intervention. Thus, we will provide an outlook on pathways that might be interesting to evaluate in this context. PMID:24987710

  14. Modified procedure for labelling target cells in a europium release assay of natural killer cell activity.

    PubMed

    Pacifici, R; Di Carlo, S; Bacosi, A; Altieri, I; Pichini, S; Zuccaro, P

    1993-05-01

    Lanthanide europium chelated to diethylenetriaminopentaacetate (EuDTPA) can be used to label target cells such as tumor cells and lymphocytes (Blomberg et al., 1986a,b; Granberg et al., 1988). This procedure has permitted the development of new non-radioactive methods for the detection of target cell cytolysis by natural killer (NK) cells (Blomberg et al., 1986a,b), cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) (Granberg et al., 1988) or complement-mediated cytolysis (Cui et al., 1992). However, we had no success with this method because of a lack of comparability between human NK cell activity simultaneously measured by a classical 51Cr release assay (Seaman et al., 1981) and EuDTPA release assay (Blomberg et al., 1986a). Furthermore, cell division and cell viability were significantly impaired by the suggested concentrations of EuCl3. In this paper, we present a modified non-cytotoxic method for target cell labelling with EuDTPA while cells are growing in culture medium. PMID:8486925

  15. Glycolipid presentation to natural killer T cells differs in an organ-dependent fashion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieg, John; Yang, Guangli; Franck, Richard W.; van Rooijen, Nico; Tsuji, Moriya

    2005-01-01

    It has been shown that dendritic cells (DCs) are able to present glycolipids to natural killer (NK) T cells in vivo. However, the essential role of DCs, as well as the role of other cells in glycolipid presentation, is unknown. Here, we show that DCs are the crucial antigen-presenting cells (APCs) for splenic NK T cells, whereas Kupffer cells are the key APCs for hepatic NK T cells. Both cell types stimulate cytokine production by NK T cells within 2 h of glycolipid administration, but only DCs are involved in the systemic, downstream responses to glycolipid administration. More specifically, CD8+ DCs produce IL-12 in response to glycolipid presentation, which stimulates secondary IFN- production by NK cells in different organs. Different APCs participate in glycolipid presentation to NK T cells in vivo but differ in their involvement in the overall glycolipid response. dendritic cell | Kupffer cell

  16. A biodegradable killer microparticle to selectively deplete antigen-specific T cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Fang, Kun; Li, Miao-Chen; Chang, Di; Shahzad, Khawar Ali; Xu, Tao; Zhang, Lei; Gu, Ning; Shen, Chuan-Lai

    2016-01-01

    The specific eradication of pathogenic T cells for the treatment of allograft rejections and autoimmune disorders without impairment of overall immune function is a fundamental goal. Here, cell-sized poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) microparticles (PLGA MPs) were prepared as a scaffold to co-display the peptide/major histocompatibility complex (pMHC, target antigen) and anti-Fas monoclonal antibody (apoptosis-inducing molecule) for the generation of biodegradable killer MPs. Ovalbumin (OVA) antigen-targeted killer MPs significantly depleted OVA-specific CD8+ T cells in an antigen-specific manner, both in vitro and in OT-1 mice. After intravenous administration, the killer MPs predominantly accumulated in the liver, lungs, and gut of OT-1 mice with a retention time of up to 48 hours. The killing effects exerted by killer MPs persisted for 4 days after two injections. Moreover, the H-2Kb alloantigen-targeted killer MPs were able to eliminate low-frequency alloreactive T cells and prolong alloskin graft survival for 41.5 days in bm1 mice. Our data indicate that PLGA-based killer MPs are capable of specifically depleting pathogenic T cells, which highlights their therapeutic potential for treating allograft rejection and autoimmune disorders. PMID:26910923

  17. Lymphokine-activated killer cell phenomenon. Lysis of natural killer-resistant fresh solid tumor cells by interleukin 2-activated autologous human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, E.A.; Mazumder, A.; Zhang, H.Z.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1982-06-01

    Activation in lectin-free interleukin 2 (IL-2) containing supernatants of peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (PBL) from cancer patients or normal individuals resulted in expression of cytotoxicity toward 20 of 21 natural killer (NK)-resistant fresh solid tumor cells tested. Fresh solid tumor cells were resistant to NK-mediated lysis in 10 autologous patients' PBL-tumor interactions, and from 17 normal individuals tested against 13 allogeneic fresh tumors. Culture of PBL in IL-2 for 2-3 d was required for the lymphokine activated killers (LAK) to be expressed, and lytic activity toward a variety of NK-resistant fresh and cultured tumor targets developed in parallel. Autologous IL-2 was functional in LAK activation, as well as interferon-depleted IL-2 preparations. Irradiation of responder PBL before culture in IL-2 prevented LAK development. Precursors of LAK were present in PBL depleted of adherent cells and in NK-void thoracic duct lymphocytes, suggesting that the precursor is neither a monocyte nor an NK cell. LAK effectors expressed the serologically defined T cell markers of OKT.3, Leu-1, and 4F2, but did not express the monocyte/NK marker OKM-1. Lysis of autologous fresh solid tumors by LAK from cancer patients' PBL was demonstrated in 85% of the patient-fresh tumor combinations. Our data present evidence that the LAK system is a phenomenon distinct from either NK or CTL systems that probably accounts for a large number of reported nonclassical cytotoxicities. The biological role of LAK cells is not yet known, although it is suggested that these cells may be functional in immune surveillance against human solid tumors.

  18. Orchestration of Invariant Natural Killer T cell development by E and Id proteins

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sumedha; Zhuang, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Natural Killer T (NKT) cells are αβ T cells that express a semi-invariant T cell receptor (TCR) along with Natural Killer (NK) cell markers, and have an innate cell-like ability to produce a myriad of cytokines very quickly upon antigen exposure and subsequent activation. These cells are diverted from conventional single positive (SP) T cell fate at the double positive (DP) stage where TCR-mediated recognition of a lipid antigen presented on a CD1d molecule promotes their selection into the NKT lineage. Although many key regulatory molecules have been shown to play important roles in the development of NKT cells, the mechanism of lineage specification and acquisition of effector functions in these cells still remain to be fully addressed. In this review we specifically discuss the role of a family of class I Helix Loop Helix proteins known as E proteins, and of their antagonists Id proteins in NKT cell development. Recent works have shown that these proteins play key roles in iNKT development, from the invariant TCR rearrangement to terminal differentiation and maturation. Elucidating these roles provides an opportunity to uncover the transcriptional network that separates NKT cells from the concurrently developed conventional αβ T cells. PMID:25746046

  19. Clinical-Scale Derivation of Natural Killer Cells From Human Pluripotent Stem Cells for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Knorr, David A.; Ni, Zhenya; Hermanson, David; Hexum, Melinda K.; Bendzick, Laura; Cooper, Laurence J.N.; Lee, Dean A.

    2013-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of antitumor lymphocytes has gained intense interest in the field of cancer therapeutics over the past two decades. Human natural killer (NK) cells are a promising source of lymphocytes for anticancer immunotherapy. NK cells are part of the innate immune system and exhibit potent antitumor activity without need for human leukocyte antigen matching and without prior antigen exposure. Moreover, the derivation of NK cells from pluripotent stem cells could provide an unlimited source of lymphocytes for off-the-shelf therapy. To date, most studies on hematopoietic cell development from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have used incompletely defined conditions and been on a limited scale. Here, we have used a two-stage culture system to efficiently produce NK cells from hESCs and iPSCs in the absence of cell sorting and without need for xenogeneic stromal cells. This novel combination of embryoid body formation using defined conditions and membrane-bound interleukin 21-expressing artificial antigen-presenting cells allows production of mature and functional NK cells from several different hESC and iPSC lines. Although different hESC and iPSC lines had varying efficiencies in hematopoietic development, all cell lines tested could produce functional NK cells. These methods can be used to generate enough cytotoxic NK cells to treat a single patient from fewer than 250,000 input hESCs/iPSCs. Additionally, this strategy provides a genetically amenable platform to study normal NK cell development and education in vitro. PMID:23515118

  20. Clinical-scale derivation of natural killer cells from human pluripotent stem cells for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Knorr, David A; Ni, Zhenya; Hermanson, David; Hexum, Melinda K; Bendzick, Laura; Cooper, Laurence J N; Lee, Dean A; Kaufman, Dan S

    2013-04-01

    Adoptive transfer of antitumor lymphocytes has gained intense interest in the field of cancer therapeutics over the past two decades. Human natural killer (NK) cells are a promising source of lymphocytes for anticancer immunotherapy. NK cells are part of the innate immune system and exhibit potent antitumor activity without need for human leukocyte antigen matching and without prior antigen exposure. Moreover, the derivation of NK cells from pluripotent stem cells could provide an unlimited source of lymphocytes for off-the-shelf therapy. To date, most studies on hematopoietic cell development from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have used incompletely defined conditions and been on a limited scale. Here, we have used a two-stage culture system to efficiently produce NK cells from hESCs and iPSCs in the absence of cell sorting and without need for xenogeneic stromal cells. This novel combination of embryoid body formation using defined conditions and membrane-bound interleukin 21-expressing artificial antigen-presenting cells allows production of mature and functional NK cells from several different hESC and iPSC lines. Although different hESC and iPSC lines had varying efficiencies in hematopoietic development, all cell lines tested could produce functional NK cells. These methods can be used to generate enough cytotoxic NK cells to treat a single patient from fewer than 250,000 input hESCs/iPSCs. Additionally, this strategy provides a genetically amenable platform to study normal NK cell development and education in vitro. PMID:23515118

  1. Two-Stage Priming of Allogeneic Natural Killer Cells for the Treatment of Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Phase I Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kottaridis, Panagiotis D.; North, Janet; Tsirogianni, Maria; Marden, Chloe; Samuel, Edward R.; Jide-Banwo, Sam; Grace, Sarah; Lowdell, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    Human Natural Killer (NK) cells require at least two signals to trigger tumor cell lysis. Absence of ligands providing either signal 1 or 2 provides NK resistance. We manufactured a lysate of a tumour cell line which provides signal 1 to resting NK cells without signal 2. The tumor-primed NK cells (TpNK) lyse NK resistant Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) blasts expressing signal 2 ligands. We conducted a clinical trial to determine the toxicity of TpNK cell infusions from haploidentical donors. 15 patients with high risk AML were screened, 13 enrolled and 7 patients treated. The remaining 6 either failed to respond to re-induction chemotherapy or the donor refused to undergo peripheral blood apheresis. The conditioning consisted of fludarabine and total body irradiation. This was the first UK trial of a cell therapy regulated as a medicine. The complexity of Good Clinical Practice compliance was underestimated and led to failures requiring retrospective independent data review. The lessons learned are an important aspect of this report. There was no evidence of infusional toxicity. Profound myelosuppression was seen in the majority (median neutrophil recovery day 55). At six months follow-up, three patients treated in Complete Remission (CR) remained in remission, one patient infused in Partial Remission had achieved CR1, two had relapsed and one had died. One year post-treatment one patient remained in CR. Four patients remained in CR after treatment for longer than their most recent previous CR. During the 2 year follow-up six of seven patients died; median overall survival was 400 days post infusion (range 141–910). This is the first clinical trial of an NK therapy in the absence of IL-2 or other cytokine support. The HLA-mismatched NK cells survived and expanded in vivo without on-going host immunosuppression and appeared to exert an anti-leukemia effect in 4/7 patients treated. Trial Registration ISRCTN trial registry ISRCTN11950134 PMID:26062124

  2. Ocular anatomy, ganglion cell distribution and retinal resolution of a killer whale (Orcinus orca).

    PubMed

    Mass, Alla M; Supin, Alexander Y; Abramov, Andrey V; Mukhametov, Lev M; Rozanova, Elena I

    2013-01-01

    Retinal topography, cell density and sizes of ganglion cells in the killer whale (Orcinus orca) were analyzed in retinal whole mounts stained with cresyl violet. A distinctive feature of the killer whale's retina is the large size of ganglion cells and low cell density compared to terrestrial mammals. The ganglion cell diameter ranged from 8 to 100 µm, with the majority of cells within a range of 20-40 µm. The topographic distribution of ganglion cells displayed two spots of high cell density located in the temporal and nasal quadrants, 20 mm from the optic disk. The high-density areas were connected by a horizontal belt-like area passing below the optic disk of the retina. Peak cell densities in these areas were evaluated. Mean peak cell densities were 334 and 288 cells/mm(2) in the temporal and nasal high-density areas, respectively. With a posterior nodal distance of 19.5 mm, these high-density data predict a retinal resolution of 9.6' (3.1 cycles/deg.) and 12.6' (2.4 cycles/deg.) in the temporal and nasal areas, respectively, in water. PMID:23018493

  3. Licensed human natural killer cells aid dendritic cell maturation via TNFSF14/LIGHT

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Tim D.; Wilson, Erica B.; Black, Emma V. I.; Benest, Andrew V.; Vaz, Candida; Tan, Betty; Tanavde, Vivek M.; Cook, Graham P.

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between natural killer (NK) cells and dendritic cells (DCs) aid DC maturation and promote T-cell responses. Here, we have analyzed the response of human NK cells to tumor cells, and we identify a pathway by which NK–DC interactions occur. Gene expression profiling of tumor-responsive NK cells identified the very rapid induction of TNF superfamily member 14 [TNFSF14; also known as homologous to lymphotoxins, exhibits inducible expression, and competes with HSV glycoprotein D for HVEM, a receptor expressed by T lymphocytes (LIGHT)], a cytokine implicated in the enhancement of antitumor responses. TNFSF14 protein expression was induced by three primary mechanisms of NK cell activation, namely, via the engagement of CD16, by the synergistic activity of multiple target cell-sensing NK-cell activation receptors, and by the cytokines IL-2 and IL-15. For antitumor responses, TNFSF14 was preferentially produced by the licensed NK-cell population, defined by the expression of inhibitory receptors specific for self-MHC class I molecules. In contrast, IL-2 and IL-15 treatment induced TNFSF14 production by both licensed and unlicensed NK cells, reflecting the ability of proinflammatory conditions to override the licensing mechanism. Importantly, both tumor- and cytokine-activated NK cells induced DC maturation in a TNFSF14-dependent manner. The coupling of TNFSF14 production to tumor-sensing NK-cell activation receptors links the tumor immune surveillance function of NK cells to DC maturation and adaptive immunity. Furthermore, regulation by NK cell licensing helps to safeguard against TNFSF14 production in response to healthy tissues. PMID:25512551

  4. Modulation of suppression of mitogen-induced T cell-dependent B cell responses by natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Katz, P; Whalen, G; Mitchell, S R; Cupps, T R; Evans, M

    1990-04-01

    We examined the ability of human natural killer (NK) cells to modualte pokeweed mitogen (PWM)-induced polyclonal antibody production. Highly purified NK cells inhibited plaque-forming cell (PFC) responses and this suppression could be substantially increased by preincubation of NK cells with the known enhancers of NK cell lytic activity, interferon (IFN)-alpha, IFN-gamma, and interleukin-2. Additionally, costimulation of NK cells with two anti-CD2 antibodies (9-1 and 9.6), which recognize different epitopes on the CD2 molecule, also augmented the inhibitory effect. When subpopulations of NK cells were assayed for suppressor cell activity, this activity was primarily mediated by NK cells bearing Leu-7 but not Leu-2 (CD8) antigens. Thus, alteration of NK cell lytic activity may have significant effects on the immunoregulatory functions of these cells, which may have important implications for the in vivo manipulation of cytotoxic responses. PMID:2137740

  5. Linking CD11b+ Dendritic Cells and Natural Killer T Cells to Plaque Inflammation in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rombouts, Miche; Ammi, Rachid; Van Brussel, Ilse; Roth, Lynn; De Winter, Benedicte Y.; Vercauteren, Sven R.; Hendriks, Jeroen M. H.; Lauwers, Patrick; Van Schil, Paul E.; De Meyer, Guido R. Y.; Fransen, Erik; Cools, Nathalie; Schrijvers, Dorien M.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis remains the leading cause of death and disability in our Western society. To investigate whether the dynamics of leukocyte (sub)populations could be predictive for plaque inflammation during atherosclerosis, we analyzed innate and adaptive immune cell distributions in blood, plaques, and lymphoid tissue reservoirs in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE−/−) mice and in blood and plaques from patients undergoing endarterectomy. Firstly, there was predominance of the CD11b+ conventional dendritic cell (cDC) subset in the plaque. Secondly, a strong inverse correlation was observed between CD11b+ cDC or natural killer T (NKT) cells in blood and markers of inflammation in the plaque (including CD3, T-bet, CCR5, and CCR7). This indicates that circulating CD11b+ cDC and NKT cells show great potential to reflect the inflammatory status in the atherosclerotic plaque. Our results suggest that distinct changes in inflammatory cell dynamics may carry biomarker potential reflecting atherosclerotic lesion progression. This not only is crucial for a better understanding of the immunopathogenesis but also bares therapeutic potential, since immune cell-based therapies are emerging as a promising novel strategy in the battle against atherosclerosis and its associated comorbidities. The cDC-NKT cell interaction in atherosclerosis serves as a good candidate for future investigations. PMID:27051078

  6. Psychoneuroimmunology and natural killer cells: the chromium release whole blood assay.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Mary Ann; Barnes, Zachary; Broderick, Gordon; Klimas, Nancy G

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are an essential component of innate immunity. These lymphocytes are also sensitive barometers of the effects of endogenous and exogenous stressors on the immune system. This chapter will describe a chromium ((51)Cr) release bioassay designed to measure the target cell killing capacity of NK cells (NKCC). Key features of the cytotoxicity assay are that it is done with whole blood and that numbers of effector cells are determined for each sample by flow cytometry and lymphocyte count. Effector cells are defined as CD3-CD56+ lymphocytes. Target cells are the K562 eyrthroleukemia cell line. Killing capacity is defined as number of target cells killed per effector cell, at an effector cell/target cell ratio of 1:1 during a 4 h in vitro assay. PMID:22933153

  7. A shed NKG2D ligand that promotes natural killer cell activation and tumor rejection

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Weiwen; Gowen, Benjamin G.; Zhang, Li; Wang, Lin; Lau, Stephanie; Iannello, Alexandre; Xu, Jianfeng; Rovis, Tihana L.; Xiong, Na; Raulet, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Immune cells, including natural killer (NK) cells, recognize transformed cells and eliminate them in a process termed immunosurveillance. It is thought that tumor cells evade immunosurveillance by shedding membrane ligands that bind to the NKG2D activating receptor on NK cells and/or T cells, and desensitize these cells. In contrast, we show that in mice, shedding of MULT1, a high affinity NKG2D ligand, causes NK cell activation and tumor rejection. Recombinant soluble MULT1 stimulated tumor rejection in mice. Soluble MULT1 functions, at least in part, by competitively reversing a global desensitization of NK cells imposed by engagement of membrane NKG2D ligands on tumor-associated cells, such as myeloid cells. The results overturn conventional wisdom that soluble ligands are inhibitory, and suggest a new approach for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25745066

  8. Innate lymphoid cells and natural killer T cells in the gastrointestinal tract immune system.

    PubMed

    Montalvillo, Enrique; Garrote, José Antonio; Bernardo, David; Arranz, Eduardo

    2014-05-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is equipped with a highly specialized intrinsic immune system. However, the intestine is exposed to a high antigenic burden that requires a fast, nonspecific response -so-called innate immunity- to maintain homeostasis and protect the body from incoming pathogens. In the last decade multiple studies helped to unravel the particular developmental requirements and specific functions of the cells that play a role in innate immunity. In this review we shall focus on innate lymphoid cells, a newly discovered, heterogeneous set of cells that derive from an Id2-dependent lymphoid progenitor cell population. These cells have been categorized on the basis of the pattern of cytokines that they secrete, and the transcription factors that regulate their development and functions. Innate lymphoid cells play a role in the early response to pathogens, the anatomical contention of the commensal flora, and the maintenance of epithelial integrity.Amongst the various innate lymphoid cells we shall lay emphasis on a subpopulation with several peculiarities, namely that of natural killer T cells, a subset of T lymphocytes that express both T-cell and NK-cell receptors. The most numerous fraction of the NKT population are the so-called invariant NKT or iNKT cells. These iNKT cells have an invariant TCR and recognize the glycolipidic structures presented by the CD1d molecule, a homolog of class-I MHC molecules. Following activation they rapidly acquire cytotoxic activity and secrete both Th1 and Th2 cytokines, including IL-17. While their specific role is not yet established, iNKT cells take part in a great variety of intestinal immune responses ranging from oral tolerance to involvement in a number of gastrointestinal conditions. PMID:25287236

  9. Membrane-Bound TRAIL Supplements Natural Killer Cell Cytotoxicity Against Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sheard, Michael A.; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Liu, Yin; Lin, Tsen-Yin; Wu, Hong-Wei; Ji, Lingyun; Groshen, Susan; Lee, Dean A.; Seeger, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Neuroblastoma cells have been reported to be resistant to death induced by soluble, recombinant forms of TRAIL (CD253/TNFSF10) due to low or absent expression of caspase-8 and/or TRAIL-receptor 2 (TRAIL-R2/DR5/CD262/TNFRSF10b). However, their sensitivity to membrane-bound TRAIL on natural killer (NK) cells is not known. Comparing microarray gene expression and response to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity, we observed a correlation between TRAIL-R2 expression and the sensitivity of fourteen neuroblastoma cell lines to the cytotoxicity of NK cells activated with IL-2 plus IL-15. Even though most NK cytotoxicity was dependent upon perforin, the cytotoxicity was supplemented by TRAIL in fourteen of seventeen (82%) neuroblastoma cell lines as demonstrated using an anti-TRAIL neutralizing antibody. Similarly, a recently developed NK cell expansion system employing IL-2 plus lethally irradiated K562 feeder cells constitutively expressing membrane-bound IL-21 (K562 clone 9.mbIL21) resulted in activated NK cells derived from normal healthy donors and neuroblastoma patients that also utilized TRAIL to supplement cytotoxicity. Exogenous IFNγ up-regulated expression of caspase-8 in three of four neuroblastoma cell lines and increased the contribution of TRAIL to NK cytotoxicity against two of the three lines; however, relatively little inhibition of cytotoxicity was observed when activated NK cells were treated with an anti-IFNγ neutralizing antibody. Constraining the binding of anti-TRAIL neutralizing antibody to membrane-bound TRAIL but not soluble TRAIL indicated that membrane-bound TRAIL alone was responsible for essentially all of the supplemental cytotoxicity. Together, these findings support a role for membrane-bound TRAIL in the cytotoxicity of NK cells against neuroblastoma cells. PMID:23719242

  10. Identification of a novel gene expressed in activated natural killer cells and T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, C.A.; Schall, R.P.; He, H.; Cairns, J.S. )

    1992-01-15

    The authors have isolated a cDNA clone from a human activated NK cell-derived cDNA library that identifies a transcript [NK4] that is selectively expressed in lymphocytes. The expression of this transcript is increased after activation of T cells by mitogens or activation of NK cells by IL-2 (lymphokine-activated killer cells). The transcript levels demonstrated by Northern blot analysis increase by 12 h after activation, remain high for at least 48 h, and require protein synthesis for expression. Southern blot analysis of B lymphoblastoid lines derived from 18 unrelated individuals reveal variable banding patterns suggestive of polymorphism within the NK4 gene. No homology was found between the sequence of the coding region of this transcript and any sequences in the GenBank data base. Sequence homology to the U1 small nuclear RNA was found within the 3[prime] untranslated region immediately upstream of the site of polyadenylation, suggesting a possible role for U1 in the polyadenylation process. Sequence analysis indicates the transcript would encode a protein having a mass of 27 kDa. The presence of a signal sequence and lack of a transmembrane region suggests that the protein is secreted. In addition, the protein contains an RGD sequence that may be involved in cellular adhesion. This transcript appears to encode a novel product common to the activation pathways of both NK cells and T cells. 50 refs., 8 figs.

  11. Cell-based Immunotherapy for Colorectal Cancer with Cytokine-induced Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Sung; Kim, Yong Guk; Park, Eun Jae; Kim, Boyeong; Lee, Hong Kyung; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Youngsoo

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third leading cancer worldwide. Although incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer are gradually decreasing in the US, patients with metastatic colorectal cancer have poor prognosis with an estimated 5-year survival rate of less than 10%. Over the past decade, advances in combination chemotherapy regimens for colorectal cancer have led to significant improvement in progression-free and overall survival. However, patients with metastatic disease gain little clinical benefit from conventional therapy, which is associated with grade 3~4 toxicity with negative effects on quality of life. In previous clinical studies, cell-based immunotherapy using dendritic cell vaccines and sentinel lymph node T cell therapy showed promising therapeutic results for metastatic colorectal cancer. In our preclinical and previous clinical studies, cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells treatment for colorectal cancer showed favorable responses without toxicities. Here, we review current treatment options for colorectal cancer and summarize available clinical studies utilizing cell-based immunotherapy. Based on these studies, we recommend the use CIK cell therapy as a promising therapeutic strategy for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:27162526

  12. Current perspectives on natural killer cell education and tolerance: emerging roles for inhibitory receptors

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, L Michael

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are regulated through the coordinated functions of activating and inhibitory receptors. These receptors can act during the initial engagement of an NK cell with a target cell, or in subsequent NK cell engagements to maintain tolerance. Notably, each individual possesses a sizable minority-population of NK cells that are devoid of inhibitory receptors that recognize the surrounding MHC class I (ie, self-MHC). Since these NK cells cannot perform conventional inhibition, they are rendered less responsive through the process of NK cell education (also known as licensing) in order to reduce the likelihood of auto-reactivity. This review will delineate current views on NK cell education, clarify various misconceptions about NK cell education, and, lastly, discuss the relevance of NK cell education in anti-cancer therapies.

  13. KLRG+ invariant natural killer T cells are long-lived effectors.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kanako; Sato, Yusuke; Shinga, Jun; Watanabe, Takashi; Endo, Takaho; Asakura, Miki; Yamasaki, Satoru; Kawahara, Kazuyoshi; Kinjo, Yuki; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Watarai, Hiroshi; Ishii, Yasuyuki; Tsuji, Moriya; Taniguchi, Masaru; Ohara, Osamu; Fujii, Shin-ichiro

    2014-08-26

    Immunological memory has been regarded as a unique feature of the adaptive immune response mediated in an antigen-specific manner by T and B lymphocytes. However, natural killer (NK) cells and γδT cells, which traditionally are classified as innate immune cells, have been shown in recent studies to have hallmark features of memory cells. Invariant NKT cell (iNKT cell)-mediated antitumor effects indicate that iNKT cells are activated in vivo by vaccination with iNKT cell ligand-loaded CD1d(+) cells, but not by vaccination with unbound NKT cell ligand. In such models, it previously was thought that the numbers of IFN-γ-producing cells in the spleen returned to the basal level around 1 wk after the vaccination. In the current study, we demonstrate the surprising presence of effector memory-like iNKT cells in the lung. We found long-term antitumor activity in the lungs of mice was enhanced after vaccination with iNKT cell ligand-loaded dendritic cells. Further analyses showed that the KLRG1(+) (Killer cell lectin-like receptor subfamily G, member 1-positive) iNKT cells coexpressing CD49d and granzyme A persisted for several months and displayed a potent secondary response to cognate antigen. Finally, analyses of CDR3β by RNA deep sequencing demonstrated that some particular KLRG1(+) iNKT-cell clones accumulated, suggesting the selection of certain T-cell receptor repertoires by an antigen. The current findings identifying effector memory-like KLRG1(+) iNKT cells in the lung could result in a paradigm shift regarding the basis of newly developed extrathymic iNKT cells and could contribute to the future development of antitumor immunotherapy by uniquely energizing iNKT cells. PMID:25118276

  14. ACCUMULATION OF DIBUTYLTIN IN HUMAN NATURAL KILLER CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    NK cells are a subset of lymphocytes capable of killing tumor cells, virally infected cells and antibody coated cells. Dibutyltin dichloride (DBT) is a butyltin that has been used as a stabilizer in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastics and also as a deworming product in poultry. DBT...

  15. Effect of cytokine-induced killer cells on immune function in patients with lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    PAN, YANYAN; WU, YUANYUAN; JI, JUN; CAI, HONGJIAO; WANG, HESHUANG; JIANG, YIFAN; SANG, LIMIN; YANG, JIN; GAO, YANYAN; LIU, YING; YIN, LIANGWEI; ZHANG, LI

    2016-01-01

    Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells have been used as adoptive immunotherapy in cancer. The present study evaluated the effect of CIK cells on immune function in patients with lung cancer. Patients were divided into three groups, according to the treatment received prior to CIK cell treatment: CIK group (no prior treatment), Che-Sur group (prior chemotherapy and surgery) and Che-Rad group (prior chemotherapy and radiotherapy). Following treatment, the average percentage of cluster of differentiation (CD)3+CD4+, CD3+, natural killer (NK) and NKT cells in peripheral blood was significantly higher than that prior to CIK treatment in the Che-Sur and CIK groups, and the levels of interferon-γ in serum were significantly higher than those prior to CIK treatment in the Che-Sur and CIK groups. On the contrary, the levels of interleukin-10 had decreased in these groups following CIK treatment. Subsequently, patients were divided into three groups according to the percentage of CD3+CD56+ CIK cells that were administered to the patients. The number of NK and NKT cells increased with increasing number of CD3+CD56+ cells. The patients in the CIK and Che-Sur groups were the most benefited ones following CIK treatment, contrarily to those in the Che-Rad group, since the increase in the number of CD3+CD56+ CIK cells in the aforementioned patients enhanced the number of NK cells, which exhibit antitumor activity. PMID:27073559

  16. Immune activation by combination human lymphokine-activated killer and dendritic cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    West, E J; Scott, K J; Jennings, V A; Melcher, A A

    2011-01-01

    Background: Optimal cellular immunotherapy for cancer should ideally harness both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune response. Lymphokine-activated killer cells (LAKs) can trigger early innate killing of tumour targets, whereas long-term adaptive-specific tumour control requires priming of CD8+ cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTLs) following acquisition of tumour-associated antigens (TAAs) by antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells (DCs). As DCs stimulate both innate and adaptive effectors, combination cell therapy using LAKs and DCs has the potential to maximise anti-tumour immune priming. Methods: Reciprocal activation between human clinical grade LAKs and DCs on co-culture, and its immune consequences, was monitored by cell phenotype, cytokine release and priming of both innate and adaptive cytotoxicity against melanoma targets. Results: Co-culture of DCs and LAKs led to phenotypic activation of natural killer (NK) cells within the LAK population, which was associated with increased production of inflammatory cytokines and enhanced innate cytotoxicity against tumour cell targets. The LAKs reciprocally matured DCs, and the combination of LAKs and DCs, on addition of melanoma cells, supported priming of specific anti-tumour CTLs better than DCs alone. Conclusion: Clinical-grade LAKs/DCs represents a practical, effective combination cell immunotherapy for stimulation of both innate and adaptive anti-tumour immunity in cancer patients. PMID:21847125

  17. The proangiogenic phenotype of natural killer cells in patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Antonino; Focaccetti, Chiara; Pagani, Arianna; Imperatori, Andrea S; Spagnoletti, Marco; Rotolo, Nicola; Cantelmo, Anna Rita; Franzi, Francesca; Capella, Carlo; Ferlazzo, Guido; Mortara, Lorenzo; Albini, Adriana; Noonan, Douglas M

    2013-02-01

    The tumor microenvironment can polarize innate immune cells to a proangiogenic phenotype. Decidual natural killer (dNK) cells show an angiogenic phenotype, yet the role for NK innate lymphoid cells in tumor angiogenesis remains to be defined. We investigated NK cells from patients with surgically resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and controls using flow cytometric and functional analyses. The CD56(+)CD16(-) NK subset in NSCLC patients, which represents the predominant NK subset in tumors and a minor subset in adjacent lung and peripheral blood, was associated with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), placental growth factor (PIGF), and interleukin-8 (IL-8)/CXCL8 production. Peripheral blood CD56(+)CD16(-) NK cells from patients with the squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) subtype showed higher VEGF and PlGF production compared to those from patients with adenocarcinoma (AdC) and controls. Higher IL-8 production was found for both SCC and AdC compared to controls. Supernatants derived from NSCLC CD56(+)CD16(-) NK cells induced endothelial cell chemotaxis and formation of capillary-like structures in vitro, particularly evident in SCC patients and absent from controls. Finally, exposure to transforming growth factor-β(1) (TGFβ(1)), a cytokine associated with dNK polarization, upregulated VEGF and PlGF in peripheral blood CD56(+)CD16(-) NK cells from healthy subjects. Our data suggest that NK cells in NSCLC act as proangiogenic cells, particularly evident for SCC and in part mediated by TGFβ(1). PMID:23441128

  18. Rapid Response of Advanced Squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer with Thrombocytopenia after First-Line Treatment with Pembrolizumab Plus Autologous Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Xinwei; Ren, Baozhu; Li, Runmei; Ren, Xiubao

    2015-01-01

    We present the first clinical evidence of advanced squamous non-small cell lung cancer with severe thrombocytopenia showing dramatic improvement after first-line treatment with pembrolizumab plus autologous cytokine-induced killer cells. PMID:26734004

  19. Isolation and characterization of canine natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Michael, Helen T; Ito, Daisuke; McCullar, Valarie; Zhang, Bin; Miller, Jeffrey S; Modiano, Jaime F

    2013-09-15

    NK cells are non-T, non-B lymphocytes that kill target cells without previous activation. The immunophenotype and function of these cells in humans and mice are well defined, but canine NK cells remain incompletely characterized. Our objectives were to isolate and culture canine peripheral blood NK cells, and to define their immunophenotype and killing capability. PBMC were obtained from healthy dogs and T cells were depleted by immunomagnetic separation. The residual cells were cultured in media supplemented with IL-2, IL-15 or both, or with mouse embryonic liver (EL) feeder cells. Non-T, non-B lymphocytes survived and expanded in these cultures. IL-2 was necessary and sufficient for survival; the addition of IL-15 was necessary for expansion, but IL-15 alone did not support survival. Culture with EL cells and IL-2 also fostered survival and expansion. The non-T, non-B lymphocytes uniformly expressed CD45, MHC I, and showed significant cytotoxic activity against CTAC targets. Expression of MHC II, CD11/18 was restricted to subsets of these cells. The data show that cells meeting the criteria for NK cells in other species, i.e., non-T, non-B lymphocytes with cytotoxic activity, can be expanded from canine PBMC by T-cell depletion and culture with cytokines or feeder cells. PMID:23876304

  20. Intracoronary infusion of a combination of bone marrow-derived stem cells in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Minguell, José J; Florenzano, Fernando M; Ramírez, Manuel R; Martínez, Ramón F; Lasala, Gabriel P

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infusion of diverse types of bone marrow cells, as a source of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), into the ischemic myocardium is emerging as a promising therapy for coronary ischemia, probably mediated by the formation of new blood vessels. Studies have shown that while the procedure is safe and feasible, efficacy results are contentious. The investigators in the present preclinical translation study hypothesized that the infusion of a combination cell product consisting of EPCs and other cell types, such as mesenchymal stem cells, promotes the formation of more stable and mature blood vessels resulting in improved clinical outcomes. The safety and feasibility of the intracoronary infusion of such a cell combination was assessed in a canine model. METHODS: A mixture of canine autologous mononuclear cells (as the source of EPCs) and ex vivo-expanded bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells or a placebo solution were intracoronarily infused into healthy dogs. Follow-up after cell/placebo infusion included an electrocardiogram, serum cardiac enzyme testing, a transthoracic echocardiography and a histopathological heart examination. RESULTS: On follow-up at all time points after infusion, no significant changes or abnormalities in vital signs, electrocardiogram, transthoracic echocardiography and heart histology were detected. CONCLUSIONS: From a clinical perspective, the safety and feasibility of the protocol used in the present animal study demonstrated clinical relevance and provided direct evidence supporting the intracoronary infusion of combination stem/progenitor cell products. PMID:20631864

  1. Essential functions for ID proteins at multiple checkpoints in natural killer T cell development

    PubMed Central

    Verykokakis, Mihalis; Krishnamoorthy, Veena; Iavarone, Antonio; Lasorella, Anna; Sigvardsson, Mikael; Kee, Barbara L.

    2013-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells display characteristics of both adaptive and innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). Like other ILCs, iNKT cells constitutively express ID proteins, which antagonize the E protein transcription factors that are essential for adaptive lymphocyte development. However, unlike ILCs, ID2 is not essential for thymic iNKT cell development. Here we demonstrated that ID2 and ID3 redundantly promoted iNKT cell lineage specification involving the induction of the signature transcription factor PLZF and that ID3 was critical for development of TBET-dependent NKT1 cells. In contrast, both ID2 and ID3 limited iNKT cell numbers by enforcing the post-selection checkpoint in conventional thymocytes. Therefore, iNKT cells show both adaptive and innate-like requirements for ID proteins at distinct checkpoints during iNKT cell development. PMID:24244015

  2. Inhibition of hematopoietic recovery from radiation-induced myelosuppression by natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pantel, K.; Boertman, J.; Nakeff, A. )

    1990-05-01

    We have examined the role of natural killer (NK) cells in situ in the recovery of marrow hematopoiesis in B6D2F1 mice receiving various doses of total-body irradiation (TBI) as a well-characterized model for treatment-induced myelosuppression. Applying an in situ cytotoxic approach for ablating NK 1.1 cells, we have demonstrated that NK 1.1 cells differentially inhibit the recovery of hematopoietic stem cells (CFU-S) and their progenitor cells committed to granulocyte-macrophage differentiation from a sublethal dose of TBI (9 Gy) while not affecting the recovery of progenitor cells committed to either erythroid or megakaryocyte differentiation from TBI. However, recoveries of CFU-S and progenitor cells were unaffected by the ablation of NK cells prior to a moderate dose of TBI (2 Gy). These findings provide in situ evidence that NK cells are potential inhibitors of hematopoietic recovery from treatment-induced myelosuppression.

  3. NKG2A Complexed with CD94 Defines a Novel Inhibitory Natural Killer Cell Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Andrew G.; Posch, Phillip E.; Scorzelli, Christopher J.; Borrego, Francisco; Coligan, John E.

    1997-01-01

    CD94 is a C-type lectin expressed by natural killer (NK) cells and a subset of T cells. Blocking studies using anti-CD94 mAbs have suggested that it is a receptor for human leukocyte antigen class I molecules. CD94 has recently been shown to be a 26-kD protein covalently associated with an unidentified 43-kD protein(s). This report shows that NKG2A, a 43-kD protein, is covalently associated with CD94 on the surface of NK cells. Cell surface expression of NKG2A is dependent on the association with CD94 as glycosylation patterns characteristic of mature proteins are found only in NKG2A that is associated with CD94. Analysis of NK cell clones showed that NKG2A was expressed in all NK cell clones whose CD16-dependent killing was inhibited by cross-linking CD94. The induction of an inhibitory signal is consistent with the presence of two immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (V/LXYXXL) on the cytoplasmic domain of NKG2A. Similar motifs are found on Ly49 and killer cell inhibitory receptors, which also transmit negative signals to NK cells. PMID:9034158

  4. Targeting breast cancer stem cells with HER2-specific antibodies and natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Diessner, Joachim; Bruttel, Valentin; Becker, Kathrin; Pawlik, Miriam; Stein, Roland; Häusler, Sebastian; Dietl, Johannes; Wischhusen, Jörg; Hönig, Arnd

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide. Every year, nearly 1.4 million new cases of breast cancer are diagnosed, and about 450.000 women die of the disease. Approximately 15-25% of breast cancer cases exhibit increased quantities of the trans-membrane receptor tyrosine kinase human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) on the tumor cell surface. Previous studies showed that blockade of this HER2 proto-oncogene with the antibody trastuzumab substantially improved the overall survival of patients with this aggressive type of breast cancer. Recruitment of natural killer (NK) cells and subsequent induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) contributed to this beneficial effect. We hypothesized that antibody binding to HER2-positive breast cancer cells and thus ADCC might be further improved by synergistically applying two different HER2-specific antibodies, trastuzumab and pertuzumab. We found that tumor cell killing via ADCC was increased when the combination of trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and NK cells was applied to HER2-positive breast cancer cells, as compared to the extent of ADCC induced by a single antibody. Furthermore, a subset of CD44(high)CD24(low)HER2(low) cells, which possessed characteristics of cancer stem cells, could be targeted more efficiently by the combination of two HER2-specific antibodies compared to the efficiency of one antibody. These in vitro results demonstrated the immunotherapeutic benefit achieved by the combined application of trastuzumab and pertuzumab. These findings are consistent with the positive results of the clinical studies, CLEOPATRA and NEOSPHERE, conducted with patients that had HER2-positive breast cancer. Compared to a single antibody treatment, the combined application of trastuzumab and pertuzumab showed a stronger ADCC effect and improved the targeting of breast cancer stem cells. PMID:23593542

  5. Targeting breast cancer stem cells with HER2-specific antibodies and natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Diessner, Joachim; Bruttel, Valentin; Becker, Kathrin; Pawlik, Miriam; Stein, Roland; Häusler, Sebastian; Dietl, Johannes; Wischhusen, Jörg; Hönig, Arnd

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide. Every year, nearly 1.4 million new cases of breast cancer are diagnosed, and about 450.000 women die of the disease. Approximately 15-25% of breast cancer cases exhibit increased quantities of the trans-membrane receptor tyrosine kinase human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) on the tumor cell surface. Previous studies showed that blockade of this HER2 proto-oncogene with the antibody trastuzumab substantially improved the overall survival of patients with this aggressive type of breast cancer. Recruitment of natural killer (NK) cells and subsequent induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) contributed to this beneficial effect. We hypothesized that antibody binding to HER2-positive breast cancer cells and thus ADCC might be further improved by synergistically applying two different HER2-specific antibodies, trastuzumab and pertuzumab. We found that tumor cell killing via ADCC was increased when the combination of trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and NK cells was applied to HER2-positive breast cancer cells, as compared to the extent of ADCC induced by a single antibody. Furthermore, a subset of CD44highCD24lowHER2low cells, which possessed characteristics of cancer stem cells, could be targeted more efficiently by the combination of two HER2-specific antibodies compared to the efficiency of one antibody. These in vitro results demonstrated the immunotherapeutic benefit achieved by the combined application of trastuzumab and pertuzumab. These findings are consistent with the positive results of the clinical studies, CLEOPATRA and NEOSPHERE, conducted with patients that had HER2-positive breast cancer. Compared to a single antibody treatment, the combined application of trastuzumab and pertuzumab showed a stronger ADCC effect and improved the targeting of breast cancer stem cells. PMID:23593542

  6. ERAP1 regulates natural killer cell function by controlling the engagement of inhibitory receptors.

    PubMed

    Cifaldi, Loredana; Romania, Paolo; Falco, Michela; Lorenzi, Silvia; Meazza, Raffaella; Petrini, Stefania; Andreani, Marco; Pende, Daniela; Locatelli, Franco; Fruci, Doriana

    2015-03-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase ERAP1 regulates innate and adaptive immune responses by trimming peptides for presentation by MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules. Herein, we demonstrate that genetic or pharmacological inhibition of ERAP1 on human tumor cell lines perturbs their ability to engage several classes of inhibitory receptors by their specific ligands, including killer cell Ig-like receptors (KIR) by classical MHC-I-peptide (pMHC-I) complexes and the lectin-like receptor CD94-NKG2A by nonclassical pMHC-I complexes, in each case leading to natural killer (NK) cell killing. The protective effect of pMHC-I complexes could be restored in ERAP1-deficient settings by the addition of known high-affinity peptides, suggesting that ERAP1 was needed to positively modify the affinity of natural ligands. Notably, ERAP1 inhibition enhanced the ability of NK cells to kill freshly established human lymphoblastoid cell lines from autologous or allogeneic sources, thereby promoting NK cytotoxic activity against target cells that would not be expected because of KIR-KIR ligand matching. Overall, our results identify ERAP1 as a modifier to leverage immune functions that may improve the efficacy of NK cell-based approaches for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25592150

  7. First do no harm: uterine natural killer (NK) cells in assisted reproduction.

    PubMed

    Moffett, Ashley; Shreeve, Norman

    2015-07-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are a type of lymphocyte circulating in peripheral blood named because of their effector functions in killing target cells. Immune cells that share similar phenotypic characteristics but are poor killers populate the uterine lining at implantation and during early pregnancy when the placenta is established. The functions of these uterine NK (uNK) cells are essentially unknown but available data point to a role in regulating placentation in concert with other elements of the decidua and invading trophoblast cells. Despite the lack of scientific rationale and advice from clinical governing bodies, such as the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority, an increasing range of tests and therapies are still offered to women undergoing IVF or attending recurrent miscarriage clinics based on the myth that uterine NK cells need suppressing to prevent damage to the embryo. New treatments can be introduced at whim with subsequent demands for expensive trials to prove/disprove their efficacy. The evidence that targeting uNK or peripheral blood NK cells assists women with recurrent pregnancy failure is lacking. Healthcare professionals and patients should very carefully evaluate the practice of immunomodulation to enhance pregnancy outcome. A discussion on how to move towards stricter regulation of immunotherapy in non-hospital settings is now needed because it is clear that the potential risks and costs of these therapies outweigh any benefits. PMID:25954039

  8. Therapeutic manipulation of natural killer (NK) T cells in autoimmunity: are we close to reality?

    PubMed Central

    Simoni, Y; Diana, J; Ghazarian, L; Beaudoin, L; Lehuen, A

    2013-01-01

    T cells reactive to lipids and restricted by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-like molecules represent more than 15% of all lymphocytes in human blood. This heterogeneous population of innate cells includes the invariant natural killer T cells (iNK T), type II NK T cells, CD1a,b,c-restricted T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells. These populations are implicated in cancer, infection and autoimmunity. In this review, we focus on the role of these cells in autoimmunity. We summarize data obtained in humans and preclinical models of autoimmune diseases such as primary biliary cirrhosis, type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis and atherosclerosis. We also discuss the promise of NK T cell manipulations: restoration of function, specific activation, depletion and the relevance of these treatments to human autoimmune diseases. PMID:23199318

  9. Innate-like functions of natural killer T cell subsets result from highly divergent gene programs.

    PubMed

    Engel, Isaac; Seumois, Grégory; Chavez, Lukas; Samaniego-Castruita, Daniela; White, Brandie; Chawla, Ashu; Mock, Dennis; Vijayanand, Pandurangan; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2016-06-01

    Natural killer T cells (NKT cells) have stimulatory or inhibitory effects on the immune response that can be attributed in part to the existence of functional subsets of NKT cells. These subsets have been characterized only on the basis of the differential expression of a few transcription factors and cell-surface molecules. Here we have analyzed purified populations of thymic NKT cell subsets at both the transcriptomic level and epigenomic level and by single-cell RNA sequencing. Our data indicated that despite their similar antigen specificity, the functional NKT cell subsets were highly divergent populations with many gene-expression and epigenetic differences. Therefore, the thymus 'imprints' distinct gene programs on subsets of innate-like NKT cells that probably impart differences in proliferative capacity, homing, and effector functions. PMID:27089380

  10. Natural Killer Cell Recognition of Melanoma: New Clues for a More Effective Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Tarazona, Raquel; Duran, Esther; Solana, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells participate in the early immune response against melanoma and also contribute to the development of an adequate adaptive immune response by their crosstalk with dendritic cells and cytokine secretion. Melanoma resistance to conventional therapies together with its high immunogenicity justifies the development of novel therapies aimed to stimulate effective immune responses against melanoma. However, melanoma cells frequently escape to CD8 T cell recognition by the down-regulation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. In this scenario, NK cells emerge as potential candidates for melanoma immunotherapy due to their capacity to recognize and destroy melanoma cells expressing low levels of MHC class I molecules. In addition, the possibility to combine immune checkpoint blockade with other NK cell potentiating strategies (e.g., cytokine induction of activating receptors) has opened new perspectives in the potential use of adoptive NK cell-based immunotherapy in melanoma. PMID:26779186

  11. Development and function of CD94-deficient natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Orr, Mark T; Wu, Jun; Fang, Min; Sigal, Luis J; Spee, Pieter; Egebjerg, Thomas; Dissen, Erik; Fossum, Sigbjørn; Phillips, Joseph H; Lanier, Lewis L

    2010-01-01

    The CD94 transmembrane-anchored glycoprotein forms disulfide-bonded heterodimers with the NKG2A subunit to form an inhibitory receptor or with the NKG2C or NKG2E subunits to assemble a receptor complex with activating DAP12 signaling proteins. CD94 receptors expressed on human and mouse NK cells and T cells have been proposed to be important in NK cell tolerance to self, play an important role in NK cell development, and contribute to NK cell-mediated immunity to certain infections including human cytomegalovirus. We generated a gene-targeted CD94-deficient mouse to understand the role of CD94 receptors in NK cell biology. CD94-deficient NK cells develop normally and efficiently kill NK cell-susceptible targets. Lack of these CD94 receptors does not alter control of mouse cytomegalovirus, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, vaccinia virus, or Listeria monocytogenes. Thus, the expression of CD94 and its associated NKG2A, NKG2C, and NKG2E subunits is dispensable for NK cell development, education, and many NK cell functions. PMID:21151939

  12. Exploitation of natural killer cells for the treatment of acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Handgretinger, Rupert; Lang, Peter; André, Maya C

    2016-06-30

    Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in surveillance and elimination of malignant cells. Their spontaneous cytotoxicity was first demonstrated in vitro against leukemia cell lines, and NK cells might play a crucial role in the therapy of leukemia. NK cell activity is controlled by an array of germ line-encoded activating and inhibitory receptors, as well as modulating coreceptors. This biologic feature can be exploited in allogeneic cell therapy, and the recognition of "missing-self" on target cells is crucial for promoting NK cell-mediated graft-versus-leukemia effects. In this regard, NK cells that express an inhibitory killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (iKIR) for which the respective major histocompatibility complex class I ligand is absent on leukemic target cells can exert alloreactivity in vitro and in vivo. Several models regarding potential donor-patient constellations have been described that have demonstrated the clinical benefit of such alloreactivity of the donor-derived NK cell system in patients with adult acute myeloid leukemia and pediatric B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Moreover, adoptive transfer of mature allogeneic NK cells in the nontransplant or transplant setting has been shown to be safe and feasible, whereas its effectivity needs further evaluation. NK cell therapy can be further improved by optimal donor selection based on phenotypic and genotypic properties, by adoptive transfer of NK cells with ex vivo or in vivo cytokine stimulation, by the use of antibodies to induce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity or to block iKIRs, or by transduction of chimeric antigen receptors. PMID:27207791

  13. Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cell therapy for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma: efficacy and safety

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy of cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cell therapy in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. Materials and methods Randomized phase II and III trials on CIK cell-based therapy were identified by electronic searches using a combination of "hepatocellular carcinoma" and "cytokine-induced killer cells". Results The analysis showed significant survival benefit (one-year survival, p < 0.001; two-year survival, p < 0.001; median overall survival, p < 0.001) in favor of CIK-based therapy. Comparison of CIK group versus non-CIK group resulted in a significantly prolonged progression-free survival (PFS) (p < 0.01). A favored disease control rate (DCR) and overall response rate (ORR) were also observed in patients receiving CIK cell therapy (p < 0.01). Meanwhile, patients in the CIK group showed better quality of life (QoL), diminished HBV-DNA content and AFP level (p < 0.01). Comparing T-lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood, the analysis showed the ratio of CD3+, CD4+, CD4+CD8+ and CD3+CD4+ T cells significantly increased in the CIK group, compared with the non-CIK group (p < 0.01). Conclusions CIK cell therapy demonstrated a significant superiority in prolonging the median overall survival, PFS, DCR, ORR and QoL of HCC patients. These results support further larger scale randomized controlled trials for HCC patients with or without the combination of other therapeutic methods. PMID:23210562

  14. Natural killer cells after altaïr mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinova, I. V.; Rykova, M.; Meshkov, D.; Peres, C.; Husson, D.; Schmitt, D. A.

    Reduced in vitro NK cytotoxic activity have routinely been observed after both prolonged and short-term space flights. This study investigated the effects of space flight on NK cell functions, NK cell counts and the production of IL-2 and TNF by lymphocytes of French-Russian crew members. In the French cosmonaut, after 21 days space flight, the cytotoxic activity of NK cells, the capacity the NK cells to bind and lyse the individual target cells and the percentage of NK cells were decreased. In this cosmonaut a twofold reduction TNF production in cultures of lymphocytes stimulated with PMA and with the mixture of PHA and PMA was observed on the first day after landing. However, the activity of the production of TNF in 48-hour PHA-cultures of lymphocytes was unchanged and the biological activity of IL-2 was not reduced. The immunological examination did not detecte any substantial deviations from the norm in both russian cosmonauts after 197 days space flight. Various explanations for decreased cytotoxicity in cosmonauts after space flight can be proposed, and these include the defective function of NK cells and reduced numbers of circulating effector cells.

  15. Mobilization of natural killer cells inhibits development of collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Leavenworth, Jianmei W; Wang, Xiaoyang; Wenander, Carola Schellack; Spee, Pieter; Cantor, Harvey

    2011-08-30

    Although natural killer (NK) cells have been implicated in regulating immune responses, their ability to modulate disease development in autoimmune arthritis has not been analyzed. Here we investigate the contribution of NK cells to regulating collagen-induced arthritis, a well-characterized preclinical model of human rheumatoid arthritis. We find that the disease is induced by the combined action of two CD4(+) T helper (T(H)) subsets: follicular T(H) cells and T(H)17 cells. Both CD4(+) T(H) subsets are highly susceptible to lysis by NK cells after activation. Administration of antibody that activates NK cells through blockade of its inhibitory CD94/NKG2A receptor allows enhanced elimination of pathogenic follicular T(H) and T(H)17 cells and arrest of disease progression. These results suggest that antibody-dependent enhancement of NK activity may yield effective, previously undescribed therapeutic approaches to this autoimmune disorder. PMID:21873193

  16. Role of interleukin in human natural killer cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    London, L.; Perussia, B.; Trinchieri, G.

    1986-03-01

    Human NK cells, defined by the antibody B73.1, can be induced to proliferate in vitro in the presence of an IL-2 containing conditioned medium (CM) and an irradiated lymphoblastoid line, Daudi. Proliferating NK cells maintain phenotypic and functional characteristics of resting NK cells while newly expressing surface activation antigens (HLA-DR, transferrin receptor, and IL-2 receptor recognized by anti-TAC antibody). A goat anti-IL-2 antiserum and the anti-TAC monoclonal antibody completely block /sup 3/H-TdR incorporation in NK cells stimulated with CM alone or with irradiated Daudi cells. Inhibition is also observed when the antibodies are added up to day 4 of culture, indicating that IL-2 is required for both initiation and maintenance of proliferation. Human recombinant IL-2, either alone or with irradiated lymphoblastoid cells, replaces the CM in initiating /sup 3/H-TdR incorporation. In limiting dilution analysis the frequency of B73.1 (+) cells responding to rIL-2 is approximately 1/2000 and it is increased ten to thirty fold with the addition of irradiated Daudi cells to the cultures. Cultures stimulated with rIL-2 in the presence of colchicine, show a significant proportion of B73.1 + cells entering cycle each day during the first 3 days. These data show that a significant proportion of resting NK cells are capable of responding to IL-2 and that this response can occur over a period of several days after initiation of cultures.

  17. Cytokine-induced killer cells efficiently kill stem-like cancer cells of nasopharyngeal carcinoma via the NKG2D-ligands recognition.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fang; Rong, Xiao-Xiang; Xie, Rao-Ying; Jia, Li-Ting; Wang, Hui-Yan; Qin, Yu-Juan; Chen, Lin; Shen, Hong-Fen; Lin, Xiao-Lin; Yang, Jie; Yang, Sheng; Hao, Wei-Chao; Chen, Yan; Xiao, Sheng-Jun; Zhou, Hui-Rong; Lin, Tao-Yan; Chen, Yu-Shuang; Sun, Yan; Yao, Kai-Tai; Xiao, Dong

    2015-10-27

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are considered to be the root cause for cancer treatment failure. Thus, there remains an urgent need for more potent and safer therapies against CSCs for curing cancer. In this study, the antitumor activity of cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells against putative CSCs of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) was fully evaluated in vitro and in vivo. To visualize putative CSCs in vitro by fluorescence imaging, and image and quantify putative CSCs in tumor xenograft-bearing mice by in vivo bioluminescence imaging, NPC cells were engineered with CSC detector vector encoding GFP and luciferase (Luc) under control of Nanog promoter. Our study reported in vitro intense tumor-killing activity of CIK cells against putative CSCs of NPC, as revealed by percentage analysis of side population cells, tumorsphere formation assay and Nanog-promoter-GFP-Luc reporter gene strategy plus time-lapse recording. Additionally, time-lapse imaging firstly illustrated that GFP-labeled or PKH26-labeled putative CSCs or tumorspheres were usually attacked simultaneously by many CIK cells and finally killed by CIK cells, suggesting the necessity of achieving sufficient effector-to-target ratios. We firstly confirmed that NKG2D blockade by anti-NKG2D antibody significantly but partially abrogated CIK cell-mediated cytolysis against putative CSCs. More importantly, intravenous infusion of CIK cells significantly delayed tumor growth in NOD/SCID mice, accompanied by a remarkable reduction in putative CSC number monitored by whole-body bioluminescence imaging. Taken together, our findings suggest that CIK cells demonstrate the intense tumor-killing activity against putative CSCs of NPC, at least in part, by NKG2D-ligands recognition. These results indicate that CIK cell-based therapeutic strategy against CSCs presents a promising and safe approach for cancer treatment. PMID:26418951

  18. The multiple faces of the decidual natural killer cell.

    PubMed

    Winger, Edward E; Reed, Jane L

    2013-07-01

    The decidual NK (dNK) cell is called on to support placental growth by providing an array of growth factors that directly transform the spiral artery and direct trophoblast invasion. Successful transformation is dependent upon adequate stimulation paradoxically stimulating the cell for placental support rather than cytotoxicity. With the identification of its supportive role, the presence of an intact cytotoxic mechanism has been confusing. Investigators have found that the cell remains fully capable of cytotoxic responses particularly in response to pathogen-specific signals. We postulate a dual threshold model where moderate stimulation results in release of stimulatory factors supporting placentation while intense stimulation, particularly triggered through pathogen-specific receptors, restores the cell to its protective, cytotoxic, role. Individual dNK cells mature attaining the capacity to respond to the delivery of cognate signals. The process, known as 'licensing' tunes responsiveness to the degree to which stochastically selected inhibitory receptors block cytotoxic response to self. A changing licensing milieu within the decidua may result in altered and unsuitable receptor expression. We postulate that a heterogeneous population of dNK cells where cells inappropriately licensed for the milieu contributes to pathology. PMID:23448380

  19. Effects of opioid therapy on human natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Tabellini, Giovanna; Borsani, Elisa; Benassi, Marzia; Patrizi, Ornella; Ricotta, Doris; Caimi, Luigi; Lanzi, Roberto; Micheli, Fabrizio; Iorno, Vittorio; Bettaglio, Raffaella; Rezzani, Rita; Rodella, Luigi F; Parolini, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Opioid compounds, such as morphine, induce powerful analgesic effects and are extensively used clinically to treat a wide variety of pain. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of opioid therapy on phenotype and function peripheral blood NK cells. The patients were referred to three Italian pain therapy centers (Milan, Pavia, Piacenza) for chronic pain in neuropathic or mixed somatic components. The patients were between 18 and 75 years old and were of Caucasian ethnicity. We studied the expression of activating and inhibitory NK receptors to discriminate NK subsets with different CD56 surface expression intensities (CD56(bright) and CD56(dull) NK cells). The flow cytometry analysis of the NK cells was at normal levels in peripheral blood lymphocytes with fewer CD56(bright) compared to the CD56(dull) NK cell subset when compared to blood from drug free donors. Furthermore, the cytolytic activity of in vitro patient NK cells analyzed was not lower, as would be expected from the regular expression of activating NK receptors for both subsets. Taken together, these data indicate that NK cells from opioid treated patients do not show any signs of NK cell immune-suppression. PMID:24287448

  20. Natural killer cell receptor genes in the family Equidae: not only Ly49.

    PubMed

    Futas, Jan; Horin, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have important functions in immunity. NK recognition in mammals can be mediated through killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) and/or killer cell lectin-like Ly49 receptors. Genes encoding highly variable NK cell receptors (NKR) represent rapidly evolving genomic regions. No single conservative model of NKR genes was observed in mammals. Single-copy low polymorphic NKR genes present in one mammalian species may expand into highly polymorphic multigene families in other species. In contrast to other non-rodent mammals, multiple Ly49-like genes appear to exist in the horse, while no functional KIR genes were observed in this species. In this study, Ly49 and KIR were sought and their evolution was characterized in the entire family Equidae. Genomic sequences retrieved showed the presence of at least five highly conserved polymorphic Ly49 genes in horses, asses and zebras. These findings confirmed that the expansion of Ly49 occurred in the entire family. Several KIR-like sequences were also identified in the genome of Equids. Besides a previously identified non-functional KIR-Immunoglobulin-like transcript fusion gene (KIR-ILTA) and two putative pseudogenes, a KIR3DL-like sequence was analyzed. In contrast to previous observations made in the horse, the KIR3DL sequence, genomic organization and mRNA expression suggest that all Equids might produce a functional KIR receptor protein molecule with a single non-mutated immune tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM) domain. No evidence for positive selection in the KIR3DL gene was found. Phylogenetic analysis including rhinoceros and tapir genomic DNA and deduced amino acid KIR-related sequences showed differences between families and even between species within the order Perissodactyla. The results suggest that the order Perissodactyla and its family Equidae with expanded Ly49 genes and with a potentially functional KIR gene may represent an interesting model for evolutionary biology of

  1. Innate immune natural killer cells and their role in HIV and SIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Bostik, Pavel; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Mayne, Ann E; Ansari, Aftab A

    2010-01-01

    The findings that early events during HIV-1 and SIV infection of Asian rhesus macaques dictate the levels of viremia and rate of disease progression prior to the establishment of mature and effective adaptive immune responses strongly suggest an important role for innate immune mechanisms. In addition, the fact that the major target of HIV and SIV during this period of acute infection is the gastrointestinal tissue suggests that whatever role the innate immune system plays must either directly and/or indirectly focus on the GI tract. The object of this article is to provide a general overview of the innate immune system with a focus on natural killer (NK) cells and their role in the pathogenesis of lentivirus infection. The studies summarized include our current understanding of the phenotypic heterogeneity, the putative functions ascribed to the subsets, the maturation/differentiation of NK cells, the mechanisms by which their function is mediated and regulated, the studies of these NK-cell subsets, with a focus on killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) in nonhuman primates and humans, and finally, how HIV and SIV infection affects these NK cells in vivo. Clearly much has yet to be learnt on how the innate immune system influences the interaction between lentiviruses and the host within the GI tract, knowledge of which is reasoned to be critical for the formulation of effective vaccines against HIV-1. PMID:20730028

  2. Natural Killer-Like T-Cell Lymphoma Localized to the Terminal Ileum: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Bayol, Ümit; Cumurcu, Süheyla; Karaman, Kerem; Tuğmen, Cem; Akdeniz, Çağlar; Akman, Özlem; Ünlüoğlu, Saime

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes are non-organized lymphoid populations that are composed of heterogeneous subsets with diverse ontogeny and phenotypes, and the differential diagnosis is crucial. A 43-year-old male patient underwent an emergency laparotomy due to a perforated mass of the terminal ileum. A right hemicolectomy plus small bowel resection was performed. Histopathological examination showed medium to large cells with vesicular nuclei, including marked nucleoli with large, colorless cytoplasm. No signs of celiac disease were found in the adjacent mucosa. The tumor cells were immunohistochemically CD45+, CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD56+, Pan-Cytokeratin-, CD20-, CD79a-, CD5- and CD30-. Endomysial antibody and antigliadin antibody, IgM and IgG tests; and anti-Ebstein Barr virus latent membrane protein all proved negative. Finally, the histopathological diagnosis of tumor mass was natural killer-like T-cell lymphoma. Primary intestinal cytotoxic natural killer-like T-cell lymphoma is a rare entity, which is difficult to distinguish from other T-cell lymphomas. In addition to microscopic evaluation, immunohistochemical analysis and serological tests are essential to reach a definitive diagnosis. PMID:26832181

  3. Natural Killer-like B Cells Prime Innate Lymphocytes against Microbial Infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Xia, Pengyan; Chen, Yi; Huang, Guanling; Xiong, Zhen; Liu, Jing; Li, Chong; Ye, Buqing; Du, Ying; Fan, Zusen

    2016-07-19

    Natural killer (NK) cells and non-cytotoxic interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-producing group I innate lymphoid cells (ILC1s) produce large amounts of IFN-γ and cause activation of innate and adaptive immunity. However, how NKs and ILC1s are primed during infection remains elusive. Here we have shown that a lymphocyte subpopulation natural killer-like B (NKB) cells existed in spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs). NKBs had unique features that differed from T and B cells, and produced interleukin-18 (IL-18) and IL-12 at an early phase of infection. NKB cells played a critical role in eradication of microbial infection via secretion of IL-18 and IL-12. Moreover, IL-18 deficiency abrogated the antibacterial effect of NKBs. Upon bacterial challenge, NKB precursors (NKBPs) rapidly differentiated to NKBs that activated NKs and ILC1s against microbial infection. Our findings suggest that NKBs might be exploited to develop effective therapies for treatment of infectious diseases. PMID:27421702

  4. Killer cell immunoglobulin like receptor gene association with tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pydi, Satya Sudheer; Sunder, Sharada Ramaseri; Venkatasubramanian, Sambasivan; Kovvali, Srinivas; Jonnalagada, Subbanna; Valluri, Vijaya Lakshmi

    2013-01-01

    NK cells are vital components of innate immune system and are the first cells which come into picture mediating resistance against intracellular pathogens. NK cell cytotoxicity is modulated by a wide variety of cell surface receptors that recognize and respond towards infected cells. Activation of NK cells are controlled by both inhibitory and activating receptors, encoded by KIR genes and bind to HLA ligands. Not much is known about KIR genes and their influence on the pathogenesis with M. tuberculosis infection. Our study aimed at detecting the presence of 14 KIR genes, their distribution and their association with tuberculosis. Total 77 different genotype combinations were observed which belonged to B-haplotype. Fifteen genotypes were similar to those reported in other world populations while remaining 62 were unique to this study group. Inhibitory genes KIR3DL1, KIR2DL3 and activating genes KIR2DS1, KIR2DS5 conferred susceptibility towards TB either individually or in haplotype combinations. The complimentary MHC ligands need to be tested for the functional relevance of the associated genes. PMID:23073291

  5. Enhanced natural killer-cell and T-cell responses to influenza A virus during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Alexander W.; Fukuyama, Julia; Aziz, Natali; Dekker, Cornelia L.; Mackey, Sally; Swan, Gary E.; Davis, Mark M.; Holmes, Susan; Blish, Catherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Pregnant women experience increased morbidity and mortality after influenza infection, for reasons that are not understood. Although some data suggest that natural killer (NK)- and T-cell responses are suppressed during pregnancy, influenza-specific responses have not been previously evaluated. Thus, we analyzed the responses of women that were pregnant (n = 21) versus those that were not (n = 29) immediately before inactivated influenza vaccination (IIV), 7 d after vaccination, and 6 wk postpartum. Expression of CD107a (a marker of cytolysis) and production of IFN-γ and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP) 1β were assessed by flow cytometry. Pregnant women had a significantly increased percentage of NK cells producing a MIP-1β response to pH1N1 virus compared with nonpregnant women pre-IIV [median, 6.66 vs. 0.90% (P = 0.0149)] and 7 d post-IIV [median, 11.23 vs. 2.81% (P = 0.004)], indicating a heightened chemokine response in pregnant women that was further enhanced by the vaccination. Pregnant women also exhibited significantly increased T-cell production of MIP-1β and polyfunctionality in NK and T cells to pH1N1 virus pre- and post-IIV. NK- and T-cell polyfunctionality was also enhanced in pregnant women in response to the H3N2 viral strain. In contrast, pregnant women had significantly reduced NK- and T-cell responses to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and ionomycin. This type of stimulation led to the conclusion that NK- and T-cell responses during pregnancy are suppressed, but clearly this conclusion is not correct relative to the more biologically relevant assays described here. Robust cellular immune responses to influenza during pregnancy could drive pulmonary inflammation, explaining increased morbidity and mortality. PMID:25246558

  6. Natural Killer Cells for Cancer Immunotherapy: Pluripotent Stem Cells-Derived NK Cells as an Immunotherapeutic Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Eguizabal, Cristina; Zenarruzabeitia, Olatz; Monge, Jorge; Santos, Silvia; Vesga, Miguel Angel; Maruri, Natalia; Arrieta, Arantza; Riñón, Marta; Tamayo-Orbegozo, Estibaliz; Amo, Laura; Larrucea, Susana; Borrego, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play an essential role in the fight against tumor development. Over the last years, the progress made in the NK-cell biology field and in deciphering how NK-cell function is regulated, is driving efforts to utilize NK-cell-based immunotherapy as a promising approach for the treatment of malignant diseases. Therapies involving NK cells may be accomplished by activating and expanding endogenous NK cells by means of cytokine treatment or by transferring exogenous cells by adoptive cell therapy and/or by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. NK cells that are suitable for adoptive cell therapy can be derived from different sources, including ex vivo expansion of autologous NK cells, unstimulated or expanded allogeneic NK cells from peripheral blood, derived from CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors from peripheral blood and umbilical cord blood, and NK-cell lines. Besides, genetically modified NK cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors or cytokines genes may also have a relevant future as therapeutic tools. Recently, it has been described the derivation of large numbers of functional and mature NK cells from pluripotent stem cells, both embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, which adds another tool to the expanding NK-cell-based cancer immunotherapy arsenal. PMID:25309538

  7. Mouse Adenovirus Type 1 Infection of Natural Killer Cell-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Welton, Amanda R.; Gralinski, Lisa E.; Spindler, Katherine R.

    2008-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells contribute to the initial nonspecific response to viral infection, and viruses exhibit a range of sensitivities to NK cells in vivo. We investigated the role of NK cells in infection of mice by mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1) using antibody-mediated depletion and knockout mice. MAV-1 causes encephalomyelitis and replicates to highest levels in brains. NK cell-depleted mice infected with MAV-1 showed brain viral loads 8-20 days p.i. that were similar to wild-type control non-depleted mice. Mice genetically deficient for NK cells behaved similarly to wild-type control mice with respect to brain viral loads and survival. We conclude that NK cells are not required to control virus replication in the brains of MAV-1-infected mice. PMID:18155121

  8. In vivo proof of concept of adoptive immunotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma using allogeneic suicide gene-modified killer cells.

    PubMed

    Leboeuf, Céline; Mailly, Laurent; Wu, Tao; Bour, Gaetan; Durand, Sarah; Brignon, Nicolas; Ferrand, Christophe; Borg, Christophe; Tiberghien, Pierre; Thimme, Robert; Pessaux, Patrick; Marescaux, Jacques; Baumert, Thomas F; Robinet, Eric

    2014-03-01

    Cell therapy based on alloreactivity has completed clinical proof of concept against hematological malignancies. However, the efficacy of alloreactivity as a therapeutic approach to treat solid tumors is unknown. Using cell culture and animal models, we aimed to investigate the efficacy and safety of allogeneic suicide gene-modified killer cells as a cell-based therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), for which treatment options are limited. Allogeneic killer cells from healthy donors were isolated, expanded, and phenotypically characterized. Antitumor cytotoxic activity and safety were studied using a panel of human or murine HCC cell lines engrafted in immunodeficient or immunocompetent mouse models. Human allogeneic suicide gene-modified killer cells (aSGMKCs) exhibit a high, rapid, interleukin-2-dependent, and non-major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted in vitro cytotoxicity toward human hepatoma cells, mainly mediated by natural killer (NK) and NK-like T cells. In vivo evaluation of this cell therapy product demonstrates a marked, rapid, and sustained regression of HCC. Preferential liver homing of effector cells contributed to its marked efficacy. Calcineurin inhibitors allowed preventing rejection of allogeneic lymphocytes by the host immune system without impairing their antitumor activity. Our results demonstrate proof of concept for aSGMKCs as immunotherapy for HCC and open perspectives for the clinical development of this approach. PMID:24445938

  9. Implication of combined PD-L1/PD-1 blockade with cytokine-induced killer cells as a synergistic immunotherapy for gastrointestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Ruixuan; Ge, Xiaoxiao; Tang, Wenbo; Chang, Jinjia; Wu, Zheng; Liu, Xinyang; Lin, Ying; Zhang, Zhe; Li, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells represent a realistic approach in cancer immunotherapy with confirmed survival benefits in the context of metastatic solid tumors. However, therapeutic effects are limited to a fraction of patients. In this study, immune-resistance elements and ideal combination therapies were explored. Initially, phenotypic analysis was performed to document CD3, CD56, NKG2D, DNAM-1, PD-L1, PD-1, CTLA-4, TIM-3, 2B4, and LAG-3 on CIK cells. Upon engagement of CIK cells with the tumor cells, expression of PD-1 on CIK cells and PD-L1 on both cells were up-regulated. Over-expression of PD-L1 levels on tumor cells via lentiviral transduction inhibited tumoricidal activity of CIK cells, and neutralizing of PD-L1/PD-1 signaling axis could enhance their tumor-killing effect. Conversely, blockade of NKG2D, a major activating receptor of CIK cells, largely caused dysfunction of CIK cells. Functional study showed an increase of NKG2D levels along with PD-L1/PD-1 blockade in the presence of other immune effector molecule secretion. Additionally, combined therapy of CIK infusion and PD-L1/PD-1 blockade caused a delay of in vivo tumor growth and exhibited a survival advantage over untreated mice. These results provide a preclinical proof-of-concept for simultaneous PD-L1/PD-1 pathways blockade along with CIK infusion as a novel immunotherapy for unresectable cancers. PMID:26871284

  10. Aerosol Delivery of Interleukin-2 in Combination with Adoptive Transfer of Natural Killer Cells for the Treatment of Lung Metastasis: Methodology and Effect.

    PubMed

    Kiany, Simin; Gordon, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are a subtype of lymphocytes with a major role as a host defense mechanism against tumor cells. Allogeneic NK cell therapy is being used as an alternative promising therapy for many different cancers. Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a critical cytokine for NK cell proliferation, survival, and effector functions. Cytokine support is essential to activate, expand, and increase the life span of NK cells. Aerosol delivery of IL-2 in combination with adoptive transfer of NK cells offers a reasonable approach for the treatment of lung metastases as it avoids the deleterious side effects of systemic IL-2. Using a human OS mouse model, we demonstrated the efficacy of this approach. Combination therapy of aerosol IL-2 with NK cells resulted in a better therapeutic effect against OS lung metastases as compared with each therapy alone. Aerosol IL-2 selectively increased infiltration, retention, and proliferation of infused NK cells in the lung, and there was no local inflammation or toxicity in the lungs or any other organ. Our results demonstrate that delivery of IL-2 via the aerosol route offers a feasible and innovative approach to enhance the immunotherapeutic effect of NK cells against pulmonary metastases. In the following chapter, we describe the methodology and effect of this innovative therapeutic approach. PMID:27177675