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  1. Acadesine Kills Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) Cells through PKC-Dependent Induction of Autophagic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Guillaume; Ben Sahra, Issam; Puissant, Alexandre; Colosetti, Pascal; Belhacene, Nathalie; Gounon, Pierre; Hofman, Paul; Bost, Fréderic; Cassuto, Jill-Patrice; Auberger, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    CML is an hematopoietic stem cell disease characterized by the t(9;22) (q34;q11) translocation encoding the oncoprotein p210BCR-ABL. The effect of acadesine (AICAR, 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-D-ribofuranoside) a compound with known antileukemic effect on B cell chronic lymphoblastic leukemia (B-CLL) was investigated in different CML cell lines. Acadesine triggered loss of cell metabolism in K562, LAMA-84 and JURL-MK1 and was also effective in killing imatinib-resistant K562 cells and Ba/F3 cells carrying the T315I-BCR-ABL mutation. The anti-leukemic effect of acadesine did not involve apoptosis but required rather induction of autophagic cell death. AMPK knock-down by Sh-RNA failed to prevent the effect of acadesine, indicating an AMPK-independent mechanism. The effect of acadesine was abrogated by GF109203X and Ro-32-0432, both inhibitor of classical and new PKCs and accordingly, acadesine triggered relocation and activation of several PKC isoforms in K562 cells. In addition, this compound exhibited a potent anti-leukemic effect in clonogenic assays of CML cells in methyl cellulose and in a xenograft model of K562 cells in nude mice. In conclusion, our work identifies an original and unexpected mechanism by which acadesine triggers autophagic cell death through PKC activation. Therefore, in addition to its promising effects in B-CLL, acadesine might also be beneficial for Imatinib-resistant CML patients. PMID:19924252

  2. Temsirolimus and Imatinib Mesylate in Treating Patients With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-11

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  3. General Information about Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Go to Health Professional ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  4. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)

    MedlinePlus

    CML; Chronic myeloid leukemia; Chronic granulocytic leukemia; Leukemia - chronic granulocytic ... nuclear disaster. It takes many years to develop leukemia from radiation exposure. Most people treated for cancer ...

  5. ENHANCED AND SELECTIVE KILLING OF CHRONIC MYELOGENOUS LEUKEMIA CELLS WITH AN ENGINEERED BCR-ABL BINDING PROTEIN AND IMATINIB

    PubMed Central

    Constance, Jonathan E.; Woessner, David W.; Matissek, Karina J.; Mossalam, Mohanad; Lim, Carol S.

    2012-01-01

    The oncoprotein Bcr-Abl stimulates pro-survival pathways and suppresses apoptosis from its exclusively cytoplasmic locale, but when targeted to the mitochondrial compartment of leukemia cells, Bcr-Abl was potently cytotoxic. Therefore, we designed a protein construct to act as a mitochondrial chaperone to move Bcr-Abl to the mitochondria. The chaperone (i.e., the 43.6 kDa intracellular cryptic escort (iCE)) contains an EGFP tag and two previously characterized motifs: 1) An optimized Bcr-Abl binding motif that interacts with the coiled-coil domain of Bcr (ccmut3; 72 residues), and 2) A cryptic mitochondrial targeting signal (cMTS; 51 residues) that selectively targets the mitochondria in oxidatively stressed cells (i.e., Bcr-Abl positive leukemic cells) via phosphorylation at a key residue (T193) by protein kinase C. While the iCE colocalized with Bcr-Abl it did not re-localize to the mitochondria. However, the iCE was selectively toxic to Bcr-Abl positive K562 cells as compared to Bcr-Abl negative Cos-7 fibroblasts and 1471.1 murine breast cancer cells. The toxicity of the iCE to leukemic cells was equivalent to 10μM imatinib at 48 hours and the iCE combined with imatinib potentiated cell death beyond imatinib or the iCE alone. Substitution of either the ccmut3 or the cMTS with another Bcr-Abl binding domain (derived from Ras/Rab interaction protein 1 (RIN1; 295 residues)) or MTS (i.e., the canonical IMS derived from Smac/Diablo; 49 residues) did not match the cytotoxicity of the iCE. Additionally, a phosphorylation null mutant of the iCE also abolished the killing effect. The mitochondrial toxicity of Bcr-Abl and the iCE in Bcr-Abl positive K562 leukemia cells was confirmed by flow cytometric analysis of 7-AAD, TUNEL, and annexin-V staining. DNA segmentation and cell viability were assessed by microscopy. Subcellular localization of constructs was determined using confocal microscopy (including statistical colocalization analysis). Overall, the iCE was highly

  6. [Chronic myelogenous leukemia: diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Demeter, Judit; Poros, Anna; Bödör, Csaba; Horváth, Laura; Masszi, Tamás

    2016-09-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia is a clonal myeloproliferative neoplasm caused by reciprocal translocation involving chromosomes 9 and 22 resulting in the expression of a constitutively activated BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase that leads to the malignant transformation of the hematopoietic stem cells. The condition was previously known as a relentlessly progressive disease, but the treatment was revolutionalized by the efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Therapeutic success is thus currently determined by the depth of molecular response achieved on therapy. Multiple tyrosine kinase agents are available even for the first line treatment. This guideline summarizes current focal points of the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia specific to Hungary and provides definitions for optimal molecular responses in this condition. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(37), 1459-1468. PMID:27615196

  7. Management of chronic myelogenous leukemia in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Amit; Rolen, Katrina; Shah, Binay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Discovery of tyrosine kinase inhibitors has led to improvement in survival of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients. Many young CML patients encounter pregnancy during their lifetime. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors inhibit several proteins that are known to have important functions in gonadal development, implantation and fetal development, thus increasing the risk of embryo toxicities. Studies have shown imatinib to be embryotoxic in animals with varying effects in fertility. Since pregnancy is rare in CML, there are no randomized controlled trials to address the optimal management of this condition. However, there are several case reports and case series on CML in pregnancy. At the present time, there is no consensus on how to manage different pregnancy situations in CML. In this article, we review current literature on CML in pregnancy, discuss the effects of several tyrosine kinase inhibitors on fertility and pregnancy and suggest an evidence-based treatment of CML in pregnancy. PMID:25550528

  8. Nilotinib and Imatinib Mesylate After Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-09

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  9. 3-AP and Fludarabine in Treating Patients With Myeloproliferative Disorders, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Accelerated Phase or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-16

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Polycythemia Vera; Primary Myelofibrosis; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  10. Dasatinib in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia That Did Not Respond to Imatinib Mesylate

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-04

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Meningeal Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  11. Bosutinib in the management of chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Amsberg, Gunhild Keller-von; Schafhausen, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Bosutinib (SKI-606) is an orally available, once-daily dual Src and Abl kinase inhibitor, approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of adults with chronic, accelerated, or blast-phase Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia who are intolerant of or resistant to first- or second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Bosutinib effectively overcomes the majority of imatinib-resistance-conferring BCR-ABL mutations except V299L and T315I. In the Bosutinib Efficacy and Safety in chronic myeloid LeukemiA (BELA) trial, bosutinib attained a faster and deeper molecular response than imatinib in newly diagnosed chronic-phase chronic myelogenous leukemia patients. Treatment-emergent adverse events are usually very manageable. Low grade, mostly self-limiting diarrhea represents the most frequently observed toxicity of bosutinib. Anti-diarrheal drugs, antiemetic agents, and/or fluid replacement should be used to treat these patients. The improved hematological toxicity of bosutinib compared with other tyrosine kinase inhibitors has been ascribed to its minimal activity against platelet-derived growth factor receptor and KIT. In this review, we give an overview on the profile of bosutinib, the clinical potential and treatment-emergent adverse events. PMID:23674887

  12. Flavopiridol and Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia or Refractory Anemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-04-01

    Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Allogeneic Transplantation for Patients With Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-14

    Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute; Leukemia; Leukemia Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL); Leukemia Acute Lymphoid Leukemia (ALL); Leukemia Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML); Leukemia Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Leukemia Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

  14. Management of Advanced-Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Radich, Jerald P

    2016-05-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia represents the poster child of successful precision medicine in cancer, with amazing survival results achieved with targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in many patients with chronic-phase disease. Unfortunately, however, this good news has not extended to patients in blast crisis, for whom survival has not clearly been improved with TKIs. During his presentation at the NCCN 21st Annual Conference, Jerald P. Radich, MD, briefly explored the biology behind advanced-stage disease and several of the molecular findings in disease progression. He also reviewed some of the therapeutic options in advanced disease, emphasizing that transplantation, although fraught with some difficulties, offers the best long-term prognosis for patients in blast crisis. PMID:27226510

  15. On the global dynamics of a chronic myelogenous leukemia model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishchenko, Alexander P.; Starkov, Konstantin E.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we analyze some features of global dynamics of a three-dimensional chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) model with the help of the stability analysis and the localization method of compact invariant sets. The behavior of CML model is defined by concentrations of three cellpopulations circulating in the blood: naive T cells, effector T cells specific to CML and CML cancer cells. We prove that the dynamics of the CML system around the tumor-free equilibrium point is unstable. Further, we compute ultimate upper bounds for all three cell populations and provide the existence conditions of the positively invariant polytope. One ultimate lower bound is obtained as well. Moreover, we describe the iterative localization procedure for refining localization bounds; this procedure is based on cyclic using of localizing functions. Applying this procedure we obtain conditions under which the internal tumor equilibrium point is globally asymptotically stable. Our theoretical analyses are supplied by results of the numerical simulation.

  16. Granulocytic sarcoma with compressive myelopathy: a rare presentation of chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ganapule, Abhijeet P; Viswabandya, Auro; Jasper, Anita; Patel, Palak; Kokil, Gautami

    2014-07-01

    Granulocytic sarcoma occurs most commonly in acute myelogenous leukemia. The appearance of granulocytic sarcoma in chronic myelogenous leukemia signals accelerated phase/ blast transformation. This is a rare case of undiagnosed chronic myelogenous leukemia with granulocytic sarcoma causing cord compression, which went into tumour lysis syndrome requiring dialysis after starting of steroids and radiotherapy. A 43-year-old male presented in emergency department with acute onset of flaccid paralysis. On clinical examination, there was hepatosplenomegaly and lower motor neuron paralysis in the lower limbs. The peripheral smear was consistent with chronic myelogenous leukemia in chronic phase. The MRI spine revealed para-spinal and epidural masses causing cord compression and the biopsy from the paraspinal mass was consistent with granulocytic sarcoma. PMID:25177619

  17. Chronic myelogenous leukemia in a great horned owl (Bubo virginianus).

    PubMed

    Wiley, Jennifer L; Whittington, Julia K; Wilmes, Christine M; Messick, Joanne B

    2009-03-01

    A free-ranging adult female great horned owl (Bubo virginianus) was presented to the Wildlife Medical Clinic at the University of Illinois after being observed with anorexia and decreased activity. A severe leukocytosis (212 400 cells/microl), primarily comprised of mature heterophils, was found at presentation. Results of various diagnostic tests including radiographs, Chlamydophila serologic testing, measurement of Aspergillus antibody and antigen titers, plasma protein electrophoresis, fecal culture and acid-fast staining, coelioscopy, endoscopy, tracheoscopy, exploratory coelomotomy, nuclear scintigraphy, tissue cultures, bone marrow biopsy, and histopathology revealed no underlying cause for the persistent leukocytosis. No response to treatment with antibiotics or antifungal agents was observed, although a transient, significant decrease in the leukocyte count (6200 cells/microl) was observed after treatment with fenbendazole. A presumptive diagnosis of chronic myelogenous leukemia was made based on 3 factors: disease duration of greater than 3 months, a lack of identifiable foci of inflammation, and a lack of response to conventional therapy. The diagnosis was confirmed based on postmortem examination and testing 177 days after initial presentation. PMID:19530405

  18. Rho-signaling pathways in chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kuzelová, Katerina; Hrkal, Zbynēk

    2008-12-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a hematological malignancy that is characteristic by as expansion of myeloid cells and their premature release into the circulation. The molecular cause of CML is the fusion oncoprotein Bcr-Abl whose constitutive tyrosine-kinase (TK) activity maintains enhanced signaling through multiple signal transduction pathways and confers proliferative and survival advantage to CML cells. These effects can be largely suppressed by TK inhibitor Imatinib mesylate, currently the leading drug in CML treatment. However, Bcr-Abl contains also additional functional domains, in particular a DBL homology (DH) domain with guanine-exchange function (GEF) which can activate small GTPases of Rho family and a Src-homology3 (SH3) domain which recruits other proteins with GEF activity. Bcr-Abl affects among others the RhoA/ROCK/LIM/cofilin pathway that regulates the actin cytoskeleton assembly and thereby the cellular adhesion and migration. This review deals in detail with the known points of interference between Bcr-Abl and Rho kinase pathways and with the effects of Imatinib mesylate on Rho signaling and cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) components. The potential protein targets related to Bcr-Abl non-kinase activity are discussed. PMID:19075636

  19. Nilotinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-29

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  20. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia That Has Responded to Treatment With Imatinib Mesylate, Dasatinib, or Nilotinib

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-18

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  1. Transient monosomy 7 in a chronic myelogenous leukemia patient during nilotinib therapy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jawad, Majd D; Go, Ronald S; Ketterling, Rhett P; Begna, Kebede H; Reichard, Kaaren K; Shi, Min

    2016-03-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitor treated chronic myelogenous leukemia patients with monosomy 7 arising in Philadelphia chromosome negative (Ph-) cells tend to evolve into MDS/AML. However, monosomy 7 in Ph- cells can be a transient finding, and it is not an absolute indication of the emergence of a new myeloid malignancy. PMID:27014453

  2. Cytogenetic conversion following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for advanced chronic myelogenous leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    McGlave, P.B.; Miller, W.J.; Hurd, D.D.; Arthur, D.C.; Kim, T.

    1981-11-01

    We performed a pilot study to test the effectiveness of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia. Five patients in the advanced stages of chronic myelogenous leukemia (four in blast crisis, one in accelerated phase) with abnormal chromosomes underwent matched-sibling allogeneic bone marrow transplantation after preparation with busulfan, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, and fractionated total body irradiation. Engraftment and conversion to normal chromosome patterns after transplantation occurred in all five patients. None of the patients reverted to an abnormal chromosome pattern or demonstrated clinical or hematologic evidence of recurrent disease during the course of this study; however, longest survival from transplant was 248 days. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation can eradicate the abnormal clone even in far advanced chronic myelogenous leukemia and can provide normal hematopoiesis. We suggest that clinical complications of chemotherapeutic toxicity and infection were responsible for the short survival in this group of patients, and that these complications could be decreased by performing transplantation in the chronic phase or early accelerated phase of the disease.

  3. Chronic myelogenous leukaemia with persistent neutrophilia, eosinophilia and basophilia in a cat.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Hiroyuki; Seki, Takahiro; Nakahara, Yoshitaka; Tomita, Akitada; Takahashi, Masashi; Fujino, Yasuhito; Ohno, Koichi; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2014-06-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukaemia was diagnosed in a 7-year-old male neutered domestic shorthair cat. Leukocytosis (74,900/µl)--mature neutrophilia, eosinophilia and basophilia--was observed. Bone marrow aspiration revealed hypercellularity with proliferation of cells of myeloid lineage. An underlying condition leading to leukocytosis was not identified. The severe leukocytosis did not respond to antibiotic therapy. Based on these findings, chronic myelogenous leukaemia was diagnosed. Because of the absence of clinical signs, the cat was monitored without treatment until 7 months after diagnosis, when it developed pruritic skin lesions. Pruritus was controlled with oral prednisolone. Forty-two months after diagnosis, the cat developed nasal lymphoma, which was treated with radiation therapy, resulting in complete remission. The cat was still in good physical condition 63 months after diagnosis, despite the persistence of marked neutrophilia, eosinophilia and basophilia. PMID:24108200

  4. [Therapy-related chronic myelogenous leukemia following RFM therapy in a patient with follicular lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Shibazaki, Mio; Sumi, Masahiko; Takeda, Wataru; Kirihara, Takehiko; Kurihara, Taro; Sato, Keijiro; Ueki, Toshimitsu; Hiroshima, Yuki; Ueno, Mayumi; Ichikawa, Naoaki; Mori, Yuichi; Kobayashi, Hikaru

    2014-08-01

    Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myelogenous leukemia are increasingly being recognized as treatment complications in patients receiving chemotherapy or radiotherapy for previous neoplasms. However, therapy-related chronic myelogenous leukemia is relatively rare. A 61-year-old woman with a history of radiation therapy for breast cancer had previously, in 2007, received 4 courses of chemotherapy (RFM: rituximab, fludarabine, and mitoxantrone) for follicular lymphoma. In 2010, she was diagnosed with chronic-phase chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) with Philadelphia chromosome but no other cytogenetic anomalies. Although a complete cytogenetic response (CCyR) was achieved with imatinib therapy, she developed leukocytosis with lymphoblasts and lymphoid crisis was diagnosed in January 2013. G-banded karyotyping showed 45, XX, -7, t, (9;22)(q33;q11.2). Unrelated bone marrow stem cell transplantation was performed after she had achieved a CCyR with dasatinib therapy. Polymerase chain reaction detected no major bcr/abl transcript in her bone marrow 42 days after transplantation. The majority of secondary leukemias resulting from the use of cytotoxic drugs can be divided into two well-defined groups depending on whether the patient has received alkylating agents or topoisomerase II inhibitors. However, concerns regarding the leukemogenic potential of fludarabine-based chemotherapy are growing. The potential risk of therapy-related leukemias including CML needs to be considered following fludarabine-based chemotherapy. PMID:25186488

  5. Molecular relapse in chronic myelogenous leukemia patients after bone marrow transplantation detected by polymerase chain reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyers, C.L.; Timson, L.; Clark, S.S.; Witte, O.N.; Champlin, R. ); Kawasaki, E.S. )

    1990-01-01

    Relapse of chronic myelogenous leukemia after bone marrow transplantation can be detected by using clinical, cytogenetic, or molecular tools. A modification of the polymerase chain reaction can be used in patients to detect low levels of the BCR-ABL-encoded mRNA transcript, a specific marker for chronic myelogenous leukemia. Early detection of relapse after bone marrow transplantation could potentially alter treatment decisions. The authors prospectively evaluated 19 patients for evidence of molecular relapse, cytogenetic relapse, and clinical relapse after bone marrow transplantation. They used the polymerase chain reaction to detect residual BCR-ABL mRNA in patients followed up to 45 months after treatment and found 4 patients with BCR-ABL mRNA expression following bone marrow transplantation. Fifteen patients did not express detectable BCR-ABL mRNA. All 19 patients remain in clinical remission. In this prospective study of chronic myelogenous leukemia patients treated with bone marrow transplantation, molecular relapse preceded cytogenetic relapse in those patients who persistently express BCR-ABL mRNA. They recommend using standard clinical and cytogenetic testing to make patient care decisions until further follow-up determines the clinical outcome of those patients with residual BCR-ABL mRNA transcripts detected by polymerase chain reaction.

  6. Myeloid sarcoma presenting as a colon polyp and harbinger of chronic myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Robert; Ettel, Mark; Cho, Margaret; Chan, Alexander; Wu, Xiao-Jun; Neto, Antonio G

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma, also known as granulocytic sarcoma or chloroma is an unusual accumulation of malignant myeloid precursor cells in an extramedullary site, which disrupts the normal architecture of the involved tissue. It is known to occur more commonly in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia and less commonly in those with myelodysplastic syndrome and myeloproliferative neoplasm, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia. The most common sites of involvement include bone, skin and lymph nodes. However, rare cases have been reported in the gastrointestinal tract, genitourinary tract, or breast. Most commonly, a neoplastic extramedullary proliferation of myeloid precursors in a patient would have systemic involvement of a myeloid neoplasm, including in the bone marrow and peripheral blood. Infrequently, extramedullary disease may be the only site of involvement. It may also occur as a localized antecedent to more generalized disease or as a site of recurrence. Herein, we present the first case in the English literature of a patient presenting with an isolated site of myeloid sarcoma arising in the form of a colonic polyp which, after subsequent bone marrow biopsy, was found to be a harbinger of chronic myelogenous leukemia. PMID:26989468

  7. The role of stem cell transplantation for chronic myelogenous leukemia in the 21st century

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Sawa

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), a treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), has largely replaced curative strategies based on allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Nevertheless, SCT still remains an option for accelerated/blastic-phase and selected chronic-phase CML. Transplant outcomes can be optimized by peritransplant TKIs, conditioning regimen, BCR-ABL monitoring, and relapse management. Controversies exist in transplant timing, pediatric CML, alternative donors, and economics. SCT continues to serve as a platform of “operational cure” for CML with TKIs and immunotherapies. PMID:25852053

  8. Blastoid mantle cell lymphoma occurring in a patient in complete remission of chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Garzia, M; Sora, F; Teofili, L; Di Mario, A; Voso, M T; Rumi, C; La Rocca, L M; Sica, S; Zini, G

    2007-01-01

    The development of a de novo lymphoma in patients affected by chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a rare event. The introduction of new molecular cytogenetic techniques, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), allows a correct differential diagnosis between lymphoid blastic crisis and a blastoid variant of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), which shows an aggressive behavior and some molecular characteristics detectable by cytogenetics and immunohistochemistry. We report a case of a blastoid variant of MCL that developed in a patient with CML who achieved complete cytogenetic and molecular response to imatinib mesylate treatment. PMID:17353181

  9. Recognizing Endocrinopathies Associated With Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Therapy in Children With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Samis, Jill; Lee, Paul; Zimmerman, Donald; Arceci, Robert J; Suttorp, Meinolf; Hijiya, Nobuko

    2016-08-01

    Side effects of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment vary in children and adults with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). As children have a much longer life expectancy than adults, TKI therapy may continue for decades and with long-term consequences that differ from adults. Children may develop endocrinopathies related to "off-target" effects of TKIs, such as delayed growth, changes in bone metabolism, thyroid abnormalities, and effects on puberty and fertility. These endocrinopathies present additional challenges for pediatric patients with CML. This review critically evaluates the literature on long-term endocrine side effects of TKIs in the pediatric CML population and provides suggested recommendations. PMID:27100618

  10. Renal Bleeding Due to Extramedullary Hematopoiesis in a Patient With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia*

    PubMed Central

    Zettner, Stephanie; Mistry, Sandeep G.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder that normally presents in middle-aged adults. Renal infiltration and extramedullary hematopoiesis in renal tissue has been rarely reported. This case report presents a patient with CML and renal insufficiency who developed gross hematuria. Efforts at controlling the hematuria led to a cascade of events propelled by the underlying disorder that ultimately led to a radical nephrectomy, multiorgan failure, and prolonged hospitalization. We suggest that management of gross hematuria in clinically stable patients with CML, suspected of having extramedullary hematopoiesis, should prioritize treatment of the myeloproliferative disorder over efforts to control bleeding. PMID:26958483

  11. Structural biology contributions to the discovery of drugs to treat chronic myelogenous leukaemia

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan-Jacob, Sandra W. Fendrich, Gabriele; Floersheimer, Andreas; Furet, Pascal; Liebetanz, Janis; Rummel, Gabriele; Rheinberger, Paul; Centeleghe, Mario; Fabbro, Doriano; Manley, Paul W.

    2007-01-01

    A case study showing how the determination of multiple cocrystal structures of the protein tyrosine kinase c-Abl was used to support drug discovery, resulting in a compound effective in the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukaemia. Chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) results from the Bcr-Abl oncoprotein, which has a constitutively activated Abl tyrosine kinase domain. Although most chronic phase CML patients treated with imatinib as first-line therapy maintain excellent durable responses, patients who have progressed to advanced-stage CML frequently fail to respond or lose their response to therapy owing to the emergence of drug-resistant mutants of the protein. More than 40 such point mutations have been observed in imatinib-resistant patients. The crystal structures of wild-type and mutant Abl kinase in complex with imatinib and other small-molecule Abl inhibitors were determined, with the aim of understanding the molecular basis of resistance and to aid in the design and optimization of inhibitors active against the resistance mutants. These results are presented in a way which illustrates the approaches used to generate multiple structures, the type of information that can be gained and the way that this information is used to support drug discovery.

  12. Structural Biology Contributions to the Discovery of Drugs to Treat Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan-Jacob, Sandra W.; Fendrich, Gabriele; Floersheimer, Andreas; Furet, Pascal; Liebetanz, Janis; Rummel, Gabriele; Rheinberger, Paul; Centeleghe, Mario; Fabbro, Doriano; Manley, Paul W.

    This case study illustrates how the determination of multiple co-crystal structures of the protein tyrosine kinase c-Abl was used to support drug discovery efforts leading to the design of nilotinib, a newly approved therapy for imatinib-intolerant and - resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) results from the BCR-Abl onco-protein, which possesses a constitutively activated Abl tyrosine kinase domain. Although many chronic-phase CML patients treated with imatinib as first-line therapy maintain excellent, durable responses, patients who have progressed to advanced-stage CML frequently fail, or lose their response to therapy, often due to the emergence of drug-resistant mutants of the protein. More than 60 such point mutations have been detected in imatinib-resistant patients. We determined the crystal structures of wild-type and mutant Abl kinase in complex with imatinib and other small molecule Abl inhibitors, with the aim of understanding the molecular basis for resistance and to aid in the design and optimization of inhibitors active against the resistance mutants. These results are presented in a way which illustrates the approaches used to generate multiple structures, the type of information that can be gained and the way this information is used to support drug discovery.

  13. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-10

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Altered microenvironmental regulation of leukemic and normal stem cells in chronic myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bin; Ho, Yin Wei; Huang, Qin; Maeda, Takahiro; Lin, Allen; Lee, Sung-uk; Hair, Alan; Holyoake, Tessa L.; Huettner, Claudia; Bhatia, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Summary We characterized leukemia stem cells (LSC) in chronic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) using a transgenic mouse model. LSC were restricted to cells with long-term hematopoietic stem cell (LTHSC) phenotype. CML LTHSC demonstrated reduced homing and retention in the bone marrow (BM), related to decreased CXCL12 expression in CML BM, resulting from increased G-CSF production by leukemia cells. Altered cytokine expression in CML BM was associated with selective impairment of normal LTHSC growth and a growth advantage to CML LTHSC. Imatinib (IM) treatment partially corrected abnormalities in cytokine levels and LTHSC growth. These results were validated using human CML samples and provide improved understanding of microenvironmental regulation of normal and leukemic LTHSC and their response to IM in CML. PMID:22516264

  15. Update on the management of Philadelphia chromosome positive chronic myelogenous leukemia: role of nilotinib

    PubMed Central

    Emole, Josephine; Talabi, Taiwo; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a pluripotent stem cell disease characterized by the presence of the Philadelphia chromosome and the bcr-abl gene. The discovery of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) revolutionized therapy for CML, such that durable response, increased overall survival, and increased progression-free survival of patients in chronic phase CML is now possible. Due to resistance and intolerance to imatinib, there was need for development of second- and third-generation TKIs for the treatment of CML. This review examines the role of nilotinib, an oral second-generation TKI, in the treatment of Philadelphia positive CML. The pharmacology, efficacy, and safety of nilotinib are critically evaluated. Patient-related issues, including tolerance, drug interactions, and quality of life issues are also examined. PMID:27013862

  16. Regulation of c-Myc ubiquitination controls chronic myelogenous leukemia initiation and progression

    PubMed Central

    Reavie, Linsey; Buckley, Shannon M.; Loizou, Evangelia; Takeishi, Shoichiro; Aranda-Orgilles, Beatriz; Ndiaye-Lobry, Delphine; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Ibrahim, Sherif; Nakayama, Keiichi I.; Aifantis, Iannis

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms regulating leukemia-initiating cell (LIC) function are of important clinical significance. We use chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), as a model of LIC-dependent malignancy and identify the interaction between the ubiquitin ligase Fbw7 and its substrate c-Myc as a regulator of LIC homeostasis. Deletion of Fbw7 leads to c-Myc overexpression, p53-dependent LIC-specific apoptosis and the eventual inhibition of tumor progression. Decrease of either c-Myc protein levels or attenuation of the p53 response rescues LIC activity and disease progression. Further experiments showed that Fbw7 expression is required for survival and maintenance of human CML LIC. These studies identify a ubiquitin ligase:substrate pair regulating LIC activity, suggesting that targeting of the Fbw7:c-Myc axis is an attractive therapy target in refractory CML. PMID:23518350

  17. Gastric Antral Vascular Ectasia during the Treatment of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia with Imatinib Mesylate.

    PubMed

    Narukawa, Kensuke; Kakihana, Kazuhiko; Fujiwara, Takashi; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Doki, Noriko; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Ohashi, Kazuteru

    2016-01-01

    This report describes three patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia who developed gastric antral vascular ectasia (GAVE) during treatment with imatinib mesylate (IM). Cessation and/or switching from IM to nilotinib resulted in the alleviation of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and ectatic lesions. Furthermore, GI bleeding recurred after the re-administration of IM in one patient. Thus, we consider that the occurrence of GAVE in our patients was induced by IM. Although the precise mechanism of IM-GAVE is not understood, all patients took at least 400 mg/day of IM at the onset of GAVE. Thus, higher doses of IM (≥400 mg/day) may be a risk factor for IM-GAVE. PMID:26726089

  18. Kaposi's sarcoma following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    de Medeiros, B C; Rezuke, W N; Ricci, A; Tsongalis, G; Shen, P U; Bona, R D; Feingold, J M; Edwards, R L; Tutschka, P J; Bilgrami, S

    2000-01-01

    Unlike solid organ transplantation, Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) occurs rarely following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). In fact, only 5 cases of KS have been reported after allogeneic or autologous HSCT. The usual treatment combines a substantial decrease in, or elimination of, immunosuppressive therapy along with local measures such as surgical excision, cryotherapy or radiation therapy. A 46-year-old woman with chronic myelogenous leukemia who had received an allogeneic HSCT previously from an HLA-identical sibling, presented on day +814 with human herpes virus-8-associated KS involving her left lower extremity. She had been on continuous immunosuppressive therapy since her transplant because of chronic graft-versus-host disease. The intensity of immunosuppressive therapy was decreased once a diagnosis of KS had been established. However, the nodular lesions continued to progress in size and number. Therefore, a course of irradiation was administered to sites of bulk disease on her legs. Furthermore, thalidomide was initiated along with a topical retinoid, alitretinoin 0.1% gel applied twice daily to the nonirradiated lesions. This approach yielded a partial response in both irradiated and nonirradiated lesions over the course of the following 7 months. Both thalidomide and alitretinoin 0.1% gel appear to be beneficial in HSCT-associated KS and exhibit tolerable side effects. PMID:11154986

  19. Coexpression Pattern Analysis of NPM1-Associated Genes in Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wong, S. C. Cesar; Siu, Parco M.; Yung, Benjamin Y. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1) plays an important role in ribosomal synthesis and malignancies, but NPM1 mutations occur rarely in the blast-crisis and chronic-phase chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients. The NPM1-associated gene set (GCM_NPM1), in total 116 genes including NPM1, was chosen as the candidate gene set for the coexpression analysis. We wonder if NPM1-associated genes can affect the ribosomal synthesis and translation process in CML. Results. We presented a distribution-based approach for gene pair classification by identifying a disease-specific cutoff point that classified the coexpressed gene pairs into strong and weak coexpression structures. The differences in the coexpression patterns between the normal and the CML groups were reflected from the overall structure by performing two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Our developed method effectively identified the coexpression pattern differences from the overall structure: P  value = 1.71 × 10−22 < 0.05 for the maximum deviation D = 0.109. Moreover, we found that genes involved in the ribosomal synthesis and translation process tended to be coexpressed in the CML group. Conclusion. Our developed method can identify the coexpression difference between two different groups. Dysregulation of ribosomal synthesis and translation process may be related to the CML disease. Our significant findings may provide useful information for the novel CML mechanism exploration and cancer treatment. PMID:25961029

  20. Structural biology contributions to the discovery of drugs to treat chronic myelogenous leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Cowan-Jacob, Sandra W.; Fendrich, Gabriele; Floersheimer, Andreas; Furet, Pascal; Liebetanz, Janis; Rummel, Gabriele; Rheinberger, Paul; Centeleghe, Mario; Fabbro, Doriano; Manley, Paul W.

    2007-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) results from the Bcr-Abl oncoprotein, which has a constitutively activated Abl tyrosine kinase domain. Although most chronic phase CML patients treated with imatinib as first-line therapy maintain excellent durable responses, patients who have progressed to advanced-stage CML frequently fail to respond or lose their response to therapy owing to the emergence of drug-resistant mutants of the protein. More than 40 such point mutations have been observed in imatinib-resistant patients. The crystal structures of wild-type and mutant Abl kinase in complex with imatinib and other small-molecule Abl inhibitors were determined, with the aim of understanding the molecular basis of resistance and to aid in the design and optimization of inhibitors active against the resistance mutants. These results are presented in a way which illustrates the approaches used to generate multiple structures, the type of information that can be gained and the way that this information is used to support drug discovery. PMID:17164530

  1. Efficacy of levocarnitine for tyrosine kinase inhibitor-induced painful muscle cramps in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Michiko; Kuroda, Hiroyuki; Shimoyama, Saori; Ito, Ryo; Sugama, Yusuke; Sato, Ken; Yamauchi, Natsumi; Horiguchi, Hiroto; Nakamura, Hajime; Hamaguchi, Kota; Abe, Tomoyuki; Fujii, Shigeyuki; Maeda, Masahiro; Kato, Junji

    2016-04-01

    Muscle cramps are side effects commonly associated with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment. Patients suffering from muscle cramps are treated with various medications such as calcium, magnesium and vitamin supplements, but these therapies are often ineffective. We report two patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia who developed muscle cramps caused by TKI. These patients were treated successfully with levocarnitine. Both of our cases revealed the beneficial effects of levocarnitine treatment on TKI-induced muscle cramps. PMID:27169456

  2. BCR-ABL transcript variations in chronic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia patients on imatinib first-line: Possible role of the autologous immune system.

    PubMed

    Clapp, Geoffrey D; Lepoutre, Thomas; Nicolini, Franck E; Levy, Doron

    2016-05-01

    Many chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients in chronic phase who respond well to imatinib therapy show fluctuations in their leukemic loads in the long-term. We developed a mathematical model of CML that incorporates the intervention of an autologous immune response. Our results suggest that the patient's immune system plays a crucial role in imatinib therapy in maintaining disease control over time. The observed BCR-ABL/ABL oscillations in such patients provide a signature of the autologous immune response. PMID:27467931

  3. New hope for chronic myelogenous leukemia patients: dasatinib offers better efficacy with shorter treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ichinohe, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Although the discovery of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has dramatically improved the prognoses of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients, a cure has remained elusive. Unanswered questions include how long must a patient continue on TKI therapy, and how does a patient know when he/she can safely stop or finish this therapy? Imagawa et al. have carefully addressed these questions of safety and efficacy using a stop study of the second-generation TKI dasatinib. The results of a multicenter phase II trial termed the “dasatinib discontinuation” (DADI) trial indicated that 48% (30/63) of CML patients who had maintained a deep molecular response (DMR) to second-line or subsequent dasatinib therapy for at least for 1 year did not show any signs of disease relapse. Thus, even after it is stopped, dasatinib treatment may decrease the chance of disease relapse and provide a curative benefit to CML patients. This work by Imagawa et al. strongly supports the clinical utility of the second-generation TKI dasatinib for CML treatment. PMID:27488943

  4. The STAT5 inhibitor pimozide decreases survival of chronic myelogenous leukemia cells resistant to kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Erik A.; Walker, Sarah R.; Weisberg, Ellen; Bar-Natan, Michal; Barrett, Rosemary; Gashin, Laurie B.; Terrell, Shariya; Klitgaard, Josephine L.; Santo, Loredana; Addorio, Martha R.; Ebert, Benjamin L.; Griffin, James D.

    2011-01-01

    The transcription factor STAT5 is an essential mediator of the pathogenesis of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). In CML, the BCR/ABL fusion kinase causes the constitutive activation of STAT5, thereby driving the expression of genes promoting survival. BCR/ABL kinase inhibitors have become the mainstay of therapy for CML, although CML cells can develop resistance through mutations in BCR/ABL. To overcome this problem, we used a cell-based screen to identify drugs that inhibit STAT-dependent gene expression. Using this approach, we identified the psychotropic drug pimozide as a STAT5 inhibitor. Pimozide decreases STAT5 tyrosine phosphorylation, although it does not inhibit BCR/ABL or other tyrosine kinases. Furthermore, pimozide decreases the expression of STAT5 target genes and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in CML cell lines. Pimozide also selectively inhibits colony formation of CD34+ bone marrow cells from CML patients. Importantly, pimozide induces similar effects in the presence of the T315I BCR/ABL mutation that renders the kinase resistant to presently available inhibitors. Simultaneously inhibiting STAT5 with pimozide and the kinase inhibitors imatinib or nilotinib shows enhanced effects in inhibiting STAT5 phosphorylation and in inducing apoptosis. Thus, targeting STAT5 may be an effective strategy for the treatment of CML and other myeloproliferative diseases. PMID:21233313

  5. Heterogeneity of leukemia-initiating capacity of chronic myelogenous leukemia stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bin; Li, Ling; Ho, Yinwei; Li, Min; Marcucci, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) results from transformation of a long-term hematopoietic stem cell (LTHSC) by expression of the BCR-ABL fusion gene. However, BCR-ABL–expressing LTHSCs are heterogeneous in their capacity as leukemic stem cells (LSCs). Although discrepancies in proliferative, self-renewal, and differentiation properties of normal LTHSCs are being increasingly recognized, the mechanisms underlying heterogeneity of leukemic LTHSCs are poorly understood. Using a CML mouse model, we identified gene expression differences between leukemic and nonleukemic LTHSCs. Expression of the thrombopoietin (THPO) receptor MPL was elevated in leukemic LTHSC populations. Compared with LTHSCs with low MPL expression, LTHSCs with high MPL expression showed enhanced JAK/STAT signaling and proliferation in response to THPO in vitro and increased leukemogenic capacity in vivo. Although both G0 and S phase subpopulations were increased in LTHSCs with high MPL expression, LSC capacity was restricted to quiescent cells. Inhibition of MPL expression in CML LTHSCs reduced THPO-induced JAK/STAT signaling and leukemogenic potential. These same phenotypes were also present in LTHSCs from patients with CML, and patient LTHSCs with high MPL expression had reduced sensitivity to BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment but increased sensitivity to JAK inhibitors. Together, our studies identify MPL expression levels as a key determinant of heterogeneous leukemia-initiating capacity and drug sensitivity of CML LTHSCs and suggest that high MPL–expressing CML stem cells are potential targets for therapy. PMID:26878174

  6. Polyamine analog TBP inhibits proliferation of human K562 chronic myelogenous leukemia cells by induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    WANG, QING; WANG, YAN-LIN; WANG, KAI; YANG, JIAN-LIN; CAO, CHUN-YU

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of the novel polyamine analog tetrabutyl propanediamine (TBP) on the growth of K562 chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells and the underlying mechanism of these effects. MTT was used for the analysis of cell proliferation and flow cytometry was performed to analyze cell cycle distribution. DNA fragmentation analysis and Annexin V/propidium iodide double staining were used to identify apoptotic cells. The activity of the key enzymes in polyamine catabolism was detected using chemiluminescence. TBP can induce apoptosis and significantly inhibit K562 cell proliferation in a time- and dose-dependent manner. TBP treatment significantly induced the enzyme activity of spermine oxidase and acetylpolyamine oxidase in K562 cells, and also enhanced the inhibitory effect of the antitumor drug doxorubicin on K562 cell proliferation. As a novel polyamine analog, TBP significantly inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in K562 cells by upregulating the activity of the key enzymes in the polyamine catabolic pathways. TBP also increased the sensitivity of the K562 cells to the antitumor drug doxorubicin. These data indicate an important potential value of TBP for clinical therapy of human CML. PMID:25435975

  7. Heterogeneity of leukemia-initiating capacity of chronic myelogenous leukemia stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Li, Ling; Ho, Yinwei; Li, Min; Marcucci, Guido; Tong, Wei; Bhatia, Ravi

    2016-03-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) results from transformation of a long-term hematopoietic stem cell (LTHSC) by expression of the BCR-ABL fusion gene. However, BCR-ABL-expressing LTHSCs are heterogeneous in their capacity as leukemic stem cells (LSCs). Although discrepancies in proliferative, self-renewal, and differentiation properties of normal LTHSCs are being increasingly recognized, the mechanisms underlying heterogeneity of leukemic LTHSCs are poorly understood. Using a CML mouse model, we identified gene expression differences between leukemic and nonleukemic LTHSCs. Expression of the thrombopoietin (THPO) receptor MPL was elevated in leukemic LTHSC populations. Compared with LTHSCs with low MPL expression, LTHSCs with high MPL expression showed enhanced JAK/STAT signaling and proliferation in response to THPO in vitro and increased leukemogenic capacity in vivo. Although both G0 and S phase subpopulations were increased in LTHSCs with high MPL expression, LSC capacity was restricted to quiescent cells. Inhibition of MPL expression in CML LTHSCs reduced THPO-induced JAK/STAT signaling and leukemogenic potential. These same phenotypes were also present in LTHSCs from patients with CML, and patient LTHSCs with high MPL expression had reduced sensitivity to BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment but increased sensitivity to JAK inhibitors. Together, our studies identify MPL expression levels as a key determinant of heterogeneous leukemia-initiating capacity and drug sensitivity of CML LTHSCs and suggest that high MPL-expressing CML stem cells are potential targets for therapy. PMID:26878174

  8. A mathematical model for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and T cell interaction.

    PubMed

    Moore, Helen; Li, Natasha K

    2004-04-21

    In this paper, we propose and analyse a mathematical model for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), a cancer of the blood. We model the interaction between naive T cells, effector T cells, and CML cancer cells in the body, using a system of ordinary differential equations which gives rates of change of the three cell populations. One of the difficulties in modeling CML is the scarcity of experimental data which can be used to estimate parameters values. To compensate for the resulting uncertainties, we use Latin hypercube sampling (LHS) on large ranges of possible parameter values in our analysis. A major goal of this work is the determination of parameters which play a critical role in remission or clearance of the cancer in the model. Our analysis examines 12 parameters, and identifies two of these, the growth and death rates of CML, as critical to the outcome of the system. Our results indicate that the most promising research avenues for treatments of CML should be those that affect these two significant parameters (CML growth and death rates), while altering the other parameters should have little effect on the outcome. PMID:15038986

  9. Re-evaluating the role of BCR/ABL in chronic myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Theodora S; Mgbemena, Victoria E

    2014-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) requires the BCR/ABL tyrosine kinase for disease onset and maintenance. As a result, CML can be successfully treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as imatinib. Most patients are maintained in a disease-suppressed state on daily TKI therapy for several years and in many cases this treatment prevents progression to the blast phase. If the TKI is discontinued, CML redevelops in 95% of patients as a result of persisting leukemia initiating cells (LICs). There are several hypotheses that describe the potential mechanism(s) responsible for LIC persistence in CML, but supporting evidence is limited. Furthermore, of the few patients who discontinue TKI therapy and are “cured” (i.e., in treatment-free remission), most have residual BCR/ABL-expressing cells in their hematopoietic tissues. There are also healthy individuals without a CML diagnosis who express the BCR/ABL mutation in a fraction of their hematopoietic cells. Finally, mice that express BCR/ABL from the Bcr locus as a knockin mutation do not develop CML. These mice have lower BCR/ABL levels than retroviral or transgenic models of BCR/ABL that do develop CML. Understanding why mice with BCR/ABL expressed from the Bcr locus and some people that express BCR/ABL are not afflicted with CML will provide insights into therapies to prevent or cure this disease. PMID:27308345

  10. Development of pulmonary arterial hypertension during oral dasatinib therapy for chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Morishita, Sakura; Hagihara, Maki; Itabashi, Megumi; Ishii, Yoshimi; Yamamoto, Wataru; Numata, Ayumi; Motohashi, Kenji; Matsumoto, Kenji; Fujisawa, Shin; Nakajima, Hideaki

    2016-08-01

    We present a 36-year-old woman who had been taking oral dasatinib for 3 years for the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). Although adverse events such as thrombocytopenia and pleural effusion developed, she showed a major molecular response (MMR) 22 months after the initiation of oral dasatinib administration, and the therapy was thus continued. Approximately 34 months after oral dasatinib initiation, she developed severe exertional dyspnea and had to be urgently hospitalized. There was no apparent pleural effusion increase, and neither imaging nor blood test results suggested pneumonia or other infections. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) was suspected on the basis of transthoracic echocardiography. PAH was then confirmed by right heart catheterization. Though dasatinib was discontinued on the day of hospitalization, pulmonary hypertension and heart failure progressed, and she did not respond to catecholamines or PDE5 (phosphodiesterase type 5) inhibitors. On the 4(th) hospital day, she experienced cardiopulmonary arrest and died 1 week later. Cases with PAH due to oral administration of dasatinib have been reported previously. However, cases showing the rapid progression documented in our patient are rare and we advocate that PAH be considered a potential adverse event associated with dasatinib therapy. PMID:27599415

  11. Chronic myelogenous leukemia in chronic phase transforming into acute leukemia under treatment with dasatinib 4 months after diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yukitsugu; Tokita, Katsuya; Nagasawa, Fusako; Takahashi, Wataru; Nakamura, Yuko; Sasaki, Ko; Ichikawa, Motoshi; Mitani, Kinuko

    2016-03-01

    We report a 64-year-old woman morphologically diagnosed with chronic myelogenous leukemia in the chronic phase. Despite having achieved a complete hematological response following treatment with dasatinib, she developed lymphoblastic crisis 4 months later. Blastic cells were in a CD45-negative and SSC-low fraction, and positive for CD10, CD19, CD34, and HLA-DR expression and rearrangement in the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene. Chemotherapy using the HyperCVAD/MA regimen led to a complete cytogenetic response, and after cord blood transplantation, she obtained a complete molecular remission. However, the crisis recurred 6 months later. Another salvage therapy using L-AdVP regimen followed by nilotinib led to a complete molecular remission. Retrospective analyses using flow cytometry and polymerase chain reaction revealed a minimal blastic crisis clone present in the initial marrow in chronic phase. This case is informative as it suggests that sudden blastic crisis may occur from an undetectable blastic clone present at initial diagnosis and that leukemic stem cells may survive cytotoxic chemotherapy that eliminates most of the blastic cells. PMID:26662559

  12. Rebeccamycin Analog in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  13. CCI-779 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blastic Phase

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  14. Tanespimycin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  15. Physiological measurements corroborate symptomatic improvement after therapeutic leukapheresis in a pregnant woman with chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Galera, Pallavi; Haynes, Stefanie; Sulmasy, Paula; Bailey, Jeffrey A; Greene, Mindy; Vauthrin, Michelle; Brettler, Doreen; Liebmann, James; Mark Madison, J; Weinstein, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Therapeutic leukapheresis can control the white blood cell count (WBC) of pregnant women with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) who have hyperleukocytosis without leukostasis. The medical justification for this treatment has not been objectively documented. We report a 27-year-old woman, diagnosed with CML at 10-week gestation, who developed severe dyspnea on exertion. A workup that included chest CT and echocardiography with a bubble study detected no cardiopulmonary pathology to explain her symptoms, and thus she was referred for leukapheresis. Prior to her first leukapheresis, which lowered her WBC from 154 × 10(3) /μL to 133 × 10(3) /μL, her oxygen saturation (SpO2 ) on room air decreased from 98 to 93% during 100 feet of slow ambulation and she was dyspneic. Just after the leukapheresis, her dyspnea on exertion was much improved and her SpO2 remained at 98% with repeat ambulation. Spirometry and lung volume studies obtained before and after her first leukapheresis demonstrated 32 and 31% improvements in forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 s respectively, a 25% increase in functional residual capacity, and a 142% improvement in expiratory reserve volume. Residual volume decreased by almost 20%. Three times in a week, leukapheresis was continued until her WBC was controlled with interferon α-2b approximately 4 weeks later. Her dyspnea had completely resolved. She gave birth by elective caesarean section to a healthy boy at 32 weeks. Corroboration of symptom relief by leukapheresis with physiological data may justify such treatment in pregnant patients with CML. J. Clin. Apheresis 31:393-397, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26053950

  16. Clonal evolution in Ph{prime}-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia in blast crisis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, J.H.; Gebre, W.; Kalavar, M. |

    1994-09-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) usually transforms into accelerated and/or blastic phases (ABP) in 2 to 6 years, and patients with CML often succumb to the disease with cytogenetic evolvement. This 43-year-old man was know for his CML for the last 6 years. He experienced clinical deterioration with massive splenomegaly and granulocytic sarcoma in the enlarged axillary lymph nodes. The white blood cell count was 132.2 x 10{sup 9}/L with 14% basophils and less than 5% myeloblasts in the blood and the marrow. The peripheral blood disclosed 46,XY,t(9;22)(q34;q11)[9]/48,XY,+8,t(9;22)(q34;q11),+22q{sup -}[11]. He was treated accordingly and succumbed to the disease 6 months later. In CML, the Ph{prime}-positive finding is present in about 95% of the patients. The remaining Ph{prime}-negative ones are either bcr-positive or bcr-negative. This group may comprise heterogenous myeloid disorders and shows more often RAS gene mutations than {open_quotes}classic{close_quotes} CML. The common chromosomal abnormalities seen in ABP are an additional Ph{prime} chromosome, trisomy 8, isochrosome 17 and trisomy 19. Some 15-35% of patients in ABP show only Ph{prime} without additional mutation. Although overall survival is grim, patients with CML in ABP with additional chromosomal changes, regardless of the blastic natures, fare worse than those without. The presence of clonal evolution at the onset of ABP denotes clinical and hematologic deterioration and adversely effects patient`s survival.

  17. Revealing stiffening and brittling of chronic myelogenous leukemia hematopoietic primary cells through their temporal response to shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laperrousaz, B.; Berguiga, L.; Nicolini, F. E.; Martinez-Torres, C.; Arneodo, A.; Maguer Satta, V.; Argoul, F.

    2016-06-01

    Cancer cell transformation is often accompanied by a modification of their viscoelastic properties. When capturing the stress-to-strain response of primary chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells, from two data sets of CD34+ hematopoietic cells isolated from healthy and leukemic bone marrows, we show that the mean shear relaxation modulus increases upon cancer transformation. This stiffening of the cells comes along with local rupture events, detected as reinforced sharp local maxima of this modulus, suggesting that these cancer cells respond to a local mechanical stress by a cascade of local brittle failure events.

  18. Histological and In Vivo Microscopic Analysis of the Bone Marrow Microenvironment in a Murine Model of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Weissenberger, Eva S; Krause, Daniela S

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of the leukemic bone marrow microenvironment, also called the leukemic bone marrow niche, is an essential method to determine and to evaluate the progression of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and other leukemias in murine models. In this chapter we introduce the murine model of CML primarily used in our laboratory by describing blood and bone marrow analysis as well as the method of histological sectioning and immunohistochemistry in combination with various stainings that can help to understand the complex interaction between leukemic cells, their normal hematopoietic counterparts, and the bone marrow microenvironment. We conclude with describing how to image the bone marrow niche using in vivo microscopy. PMID:27581139

  19. The effects of 13-cis retinoic acid and interferon-alpha in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells in vivo in patients.

    PubMed

    Handa, H; Hegde, U P; Kotelnikov, V M; Mundle, S D; Dong, L M; Burke, P; Rose, S; Hsu, W T; Gaskin, F; Raza, A; Preisler, H D

    1997-01-01

    The effects of the administration of a 3-day course of 13-cis retinoic acid in combination with interferon a [RA/IFN] on the leukemia cells was measured in vivo in 43 patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia. The administration of RA/IFN was associated with a significant fall in the white blood cell count of patients with chronic-phase disease and with a fall in the percentage S-phase cells in CML patients regardless of the stage of their leukemia. In two thirds of the patients studied the administration of RA/IFN was also associated with an increase in marrow apoptosis. The cytokine combination also suppressed bcl-2 and myc expression in a minority of patients and such expression appears to be associated with response to a treatment regimen which includes RA/IFN. These studies are the first to directly assess the effects of the combination of RA/IFN on chronic myelogenous leukemia cells in vivo in patients. These effects, if seen in other malignant diseases, could account for the therapeutic benefit which has been associated with the administration of this combination of biological agents to patients with malignant disease. PMID:9444943

  20. GTI-2040 in Treating Patients With Relapsed, Refractory, or High-Risk Acute Leukemia, High-Grade Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Refractory or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Inhibition of crosstalk between Bcr-Abl and PKC signaling by PEITC, augments imatinib sensitivity in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Roy, Madhumita; Sarkar, Ruma; Mukherjee, Apurba; Mukherjee, Sutapa

    2015-12-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), a clonal hyperproliferation of immature blood cells accounts for 20% of adult leukemia cases. Reciprocal translocation of chromosomes 9 and 22, results into Bcr-Abl fusion and is responsible for expression of a tyrosine kinase protein p210(bcr/abl), which mediates several survival pathways and confer therapeutic resistance. Protein kinase C (PKC), a family of serine threonine kinases play an important role in the process of leukemogenesis. A crosstalk between Bcr-Abl and PKC signaling has been documented. Therefore, targeting p210(bcr/abl) and its associated signaling proteins using non-toxic natural means will be an effective strategy for antileukemic therapy. Aim of the present study is to investigate whether PEITC, a natural isothiocyanate in combination with imatinib mesylate (IM), a tyrosine kinase inhibitor could increase the therapeutic efficacy of IM by modulating the expression of p210(bcr/abl). Enhanced cytotoxic efficacy of IM by PEITC was further validated using another myelogenous leukemia cell line, KU812. It was observed that PEITC in combination with IM efficiently downregulated the expression of p210(bcr/abl) in chronic myelogenous leukemia cell lines (K-562). PEITC inhibited the expressions of PKCα, PKCβII and PKCζ (both phosphorylated and total form). Expression of Raf1 and ERK1/2, two important target proteins in PKC signaling cascade was diminished. The result indicated that PEITC ultimately reduced expression of Raf1 and ERK1/2 through Bcr-Abl and PKC inhibition. This result was further confirmed by UCN-01, a selective PKC inhibitor and IM; indicating an association between p210(bcr/abl) and PKC with Raf1 and ERK1/2. PEITC thus may have enormous potential in synergistic therapy of leukemia by enhancing drug efficacy. PMID:26456889

  2. Philadelphia chromosome-negative acute myeloid leukemia with 11q23/MLL translocation in a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Jaitly, Vanya; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Although defined by the presence of t(9;22), chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) can have other concurrent additional cytogenetic changes, especially during disease progression. Additional chromosomal changes (ACAs) in CML often occur in Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-positive cells and are associated with disease acceleration and treatment resistance. Occasionally chromosomal changes occur in Ph-negative cells and this phenomenon is often transient and does not correlate with disease progression. Very rarely myelodysplastic syndrome or acute leukemia can develop in Ph-negative cells. In this study, we report an unusual case of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with 11q23/MLL translocation emerging from Ph-negative cells in a patient with CML. PMID:27358881

  3. Dipeptide species regulate p38MAPK–Smad3 signalling to maintain chronic myelogenous leukaemia stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Naka, Kazuhito; Jomen, Yoshie; Ishihara, Kaori; Kim, Junil; Ishimoto, Takahiro; Bae, Eun-Jin; Mohney, Robert P.; Stirdivant, Steven M.; Oshima, Hiroko; Oshima, Masanobu; Kim, Dong-Wook; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Takihara, Yoshihiro; Kato, Yukio; Ooshima, Akira; Kim, Seong-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the specific survival of the rare chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) stem cell population could provide a target for therapeutics aimed at eradicating these cells. However, little is known about how survival signalling is regulated in CML stem cells. In this study, we survey global metabolic differences between murine normal haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and CML stem cells using metabolomics techniques. Strikingly, we show that CML stem cells accumulate significantly higher levels of certain dipeptide species than normal HSCs. Once internalized, these dipeptide species activate amino-acid signalling via a pathway involving p38MAPK and the stemness transcription factor Smad3, which promotes CML stem cell maintenance. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of dipeptide uptake inhibits CML stem cell activity in vivo. Our results demonstrate that dipeptide species support CML stem cell maintenance by activating p38MAPK–Smad3 signalling in vivo, and thus point towards a potential therapeutic target for CML treatment. PMID:26289811

  4. A comprehensive review of occupational and general population cancer risk: 1,3-Butadiene exposure-response modeling for all leukemia, acute myelogenous leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, myeloid neoplasm and lymphoid neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Sielken, Robert L; Valdez-Flores, Ciriaco

    2015-11-01

    Excess cancer risks associated with 1,3-butadiene (BD) inhalation exposures are calculated using an extensive data set developed by the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) from an epidemiology study of North American workers in the styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) industry. While the UAB study followed SBR workers, risk calculations can be adapted to estimate both occupational and general population risks. The data from the UAB SBR study offer an opportunity to quantitatively evaluate the association between cumulative exposure to BD and different types of cancer, accounting for the number of tasks involving high-intensity exposures to BD as well as confounding associated with the exposures to the multiple other chemicals in the SBR industry. Quantitative associations of BD exposure and cancer, specifically leukemia, can be further characterized by leukemia type, including potential associations with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), and the groups of lymphoid and myeloid neoplasms. Collectively, these multiple evaluations lead to a comprehensive analysis that makes use of all of the available information and is consistent with the risk assessment goals of the USEPA and other regulatory agencies, and in line with the recommendations of the USEPA Science Advisory Board. While a range of cancer risk values can result from these multiple factors, a preferred case for occupational and general population risk is highlighted. Cox proportional hazards models are used to fit exposure-response models to the most recent UAB data. The slope of the model with cumulative BD ppm-years as the predictor variable is not statistically significantly greater than zero for CML, AML, or, when any one of eight exposure covariates is added to the model, for all leukemias combined. The slope for CLL is statistically significantly different from zero. The slope for myeloid neoplasms is not statistically

  5. Risk stratification of chromosomal abnormalities in chronic myelogenous leukemia in the era of tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Cortes, Jorge E; Tang, Guilin; Khoury, Joseph D; Wang, Sa; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E; DiGiuseppe, Joseph A; Chen, Zi; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Hu, Shimin

    2016-06-01

    Clonal cytogenetic evolution with additional chromosomal abnormalities (ACAs) in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is generally associated with decreased response to tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy and adverse survival. Although ACAs are considered as a sign of disease progression and have been used as one of the criteria for accelerated phase, the differential prognostic impact of individual ACAs in CML is unknown, and a classification system to reflect such prognostic impact is lacking. In this study, we aimed to address these questions using a large cohort of CML patients treated in the era of TKIs. We focused on cases with single chromosomal changes at the time of ACA emergence and stratified the 6 most common ACAs into 2 groups: group 1 with a relatively good prognosis including trisomy 8, -Y, and an extra copy of Philadelphia chromosome; and group 2 with a relatively poor prognosis including i(17)(q10), -7/del7q, and 3q26.2 rearrangements. Patients in group 1 showed much better treatment response and survival than patients in group 2. When compared with cases with no ACAs, ACAs in group 2 conferred a worse survival irrelevant to the emergence phase and time. In contrast, ACAs in group 1 had no adverse impact on survival when they emerged from chronic phase or at the time of CML diagnosis. The concurrent presence of 2 or more ACAs conferred an inferior survival and can be categorized into the poor prognostic group. PMID:27006386

  6. 7-Hydroxystaurosporine and Perifosine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia or High Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Isorhamnetin 3-O-robinobioside from Nitraria retusa leaves enhance antioxidant and antigenotoxic activity in human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line K562

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In this report, the isorhamnetin 3-o-robinobioside and its original extract, the ethyl acetate extract, from Nitraria retusa leaves, were evaluated for their ability to induce antioxidant and antigenotoxic effects in human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line. Methods Nitraria retusa products properties were carried out by firstly evaluating their effects against lipid peroxidation induced by H2O2, using the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances species (TBARS) assay, and proceeding to the assay of cellular antioxidant activity, then doing the comet assay. Results The isorhamnetin 3-o-robinobioside showed a protective effect against lipid peroxidation induced by H2O2. The same natural compound and ethyl acetate extract inhibited oxidation induced by 2,2′-azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride in human chronic myelogenous leukemia cells with respectively 50% inhibitory concentration values of 0.225 mg/ml and 0.31 mg/ml, reflecting a significant antioxidant potential. The same two products inhibited the genotoxicity induced by hydroxyl radicals in the same human cell line (by 77.77% at a concentration of 800 μg/ml and by 80.55% at a concentration of 1000 μg/ml respectively). Conclusions The isorhamnetin 3- o-robinobioside and its original extract, the ethyl acetate extract, from Nitraria retusa leaves, have a great antioxidant and antigenotoxic potential on human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line K562. PMID:22913434

  8. Activation of a novel Bcr/Abl destruction pathway by WP1130 induces apoptosis of chronic myelogenous leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Bartholomeusz, Geoffrey A.; Talpaz, Moshe; Kapuria, Vaibhav; Kong, Ling Yuan; Wang, Shimei; Estrov, Zeev; Priebe, Waldemar; Wu, Ji

    2007-01-01

    Imatinib mesylate (Gleevec) is effective therapy against Philadelphia chromosome–positive leukemia, but resistance develops in all phases of the disease. Bcr/Abl point mutations and other alterations reduce the kinase inhibitory activity of imatinib mesylate; thus, agents that target Bcr/Abl through unique mechanisms may be needed. Here we describe the activity of WP1130, a small molecule that specifically and rapidly down-regulates both wild-type and mutant Bcr/Abl protein without affecting bcr/abl gene expression in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells. Loss of Bcr/Abl protein correlated with the onset of apoptosis and reduced phosphorylation of Bcr/Abl substrates. WP1130 did not affect Hsp90/Hsp70 ratios within the cells and did not require the participation of the proteasomal pathway for loss of Bcr/Abl protein. WP1130 was more effective in reducing leukemic versus normal hematopoietic colony formation and strongly inhibited colony formation of cells derived from patients with T315I mutant Bcr/Abl–expressing CML in blast crisis. WP1130 suppressed the growth of K562 heterotransplanted tumors as well as both wild-type Bcr/Abl and T315I mutant Bcr/Abl–expressing BaF/3 cells transplanted into nude mice. Collectively, our results demonstrate that WP1130 reduces wild-type and T315I mutant Bcr/Abl protein levels in CML cells through a unique mechanism and may be useful in treating CML. PMID:17202319

  9. Novel structural co-expression analysis linking the NPM1-associated ribosomal biogenesis network to chronic myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Lawrence WC; Lin, Xihong; Yung, Godwin; Lui, Thomas; Chiu, Ya Ming; Wang, Fengfeng; Tsui, Nancy BY; Cho, William CS; Yip, SP; Siu, Parco M.; Wong, SC Cesar; Yung, Benjamin YM

    2015-01-01

    Co-expression analysis reveals useful dysregulation patterns of gene cooperativeness for understanding cancer biology and identifying new targets for treatment. We developed a structural strategy to identify co-expressed gene networks that are important for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). This strategy compared the distributions of expressional correlations between CML and normal states, and it identified a data-driven threshold to classify strongly co-expressed networks that had the best coherence with CML. Using this strategy, we found a transcriptome-wide reduction of co-expression connectivity in CML, reflecting potentially loosened molecular regulation. Conversely, when we focused on nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1) associated networks, NPM1 established more co-expression linkages with BCR-ABL pathways and ribosomal protein networks in CML than normal. This finding implicates a new role of NPM1 in conveying tumorigenic signals from the BCR-ABL oncoprotein to ribosome biogenesis, affecting cellular growth. Transcription factors may be regulators of the differential co-expression patterns between CML and normal. PMID:26205693

  10. Initial diagnosis of chronic myelogenous leukemia based on quantification of M-BCR status using droplet digital PCR.

    PubMed

    Lund, Helen Louise; Hughesman, Curtis B; McNeil, Kelly; Clemens, Shahira; Hocken, Kimberly; Pettersson, Ryan; Karsan, Aly; Foster, Leonard J; Haynes, Charles

    2016-02-01

    Formed from a reciprocal translocation t(9:22)(q34;q11) of genetic material between the long arms of human chromosomes 9 and 22, the constitutively active breakpoint cluster region (BCR) Abelson 1 (ABL) tyrosine kinase BCR-ABL is known to be causative of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). In 98% of CML patients harboring the t(9:22)(q34;q11) translocation, known as the Philadelphia chromosome, the chimeric BCR-ABL oncogene is created through cleavage of the BCR gene within its major breakpoint region (M-BCR) and breakage of the ABL gene within a 100-kbp region downstream of exon 2a. Clinical detection of the fused BCR-ABL oncogene currently relies on direct visualization by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), a relatively tedious assay that typically offers a detection limit of ca. 2%. Here, we describe a novel assay that uses droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) technology to reliably measure M-BCR status and the presence of BCR-ABL. When applied to cell-line models of CML, the assay accurately quantifies BCR-ABL frequency to a detection limit of 0.25%. It therefore offers improved specificity relative to FISH, and may allow identification of variant translocation patterns, including derivative chromosome 9 deletions. PMID:26631023

  11. Combination of JAK2 and HSP90 inhibitors: an effective therapeutic option in drug-resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Perazzona, Bastianella; Sun, Xiaoping; Lin, Yu-Hsi; Arlinghaus, Ralph B.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that JAK2 serves as a novel therapeutic target in Bcr-Abl+ chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). We have reported the existence of an HSP90- associated high molecular weight network complex (HMWNC) that is composed of HSP90 client proteins BCR-ABL, JAK2, and STAT3 in wild type Bcr-Abl+ leukemic cells. Here we showed that the HSP90-HMWNC is present in leukemia cells from CML patients in blast stage, and in Imatinib (IM)-resistant 32Dp210 (T315I) leukemia cells. We found that the HSP90-HMWNC could be disassembled by depleting JAK2 with either Jak2-specific shRNA or treatment with JAK2 inhibitors (TG101209 or Ruxolitinib) and HSP90 inhibitor (AUY922). Combinational treatment with JAK2 and HSP90 inhibitors diminished the activation of BCR-ABL, JAK2 and its downstream targets. As a result, the IM-resistant 32Dp210 T315I cells underwent apoptosis. When administered in mice bearing 32Dp210 T315I leukemia, combinational therapy using Ruxolitinib and AUY922 prolonged the survival significantly. Thus, a combination of JAK2 and HSP90 inhibitors could be a powerful strategy for the treatment of CML, especially in IM-resistant patients. PMID:27551334

  12. Lineage-specific function of Engrailed-2 in the progression of chronic myelogenous leukemia to T-cell blast crisis

    PubMed Central

    Abollo-Jiménez, Fernando; Campos-Sánchez, Elena; Toboso-Navasa, Amparo; Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; González-Herrero, Inés; Alonso-Escudero, Esther; González, Marcos; Segura, Víctor; Blanco, Óscar; Martínez-Climent, José Ángel; Sánchez-García, Isidro; Cobaleda, César

    2014-01-01

    In hematopoietic malignancies, oncogenic alterations interfere with cellular differentiation and lead to tumoral development. Identification of the proteins regulating differentiation is essential to understand how they are altered in malignancies. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a biphasic disease initiated by an alteration taking place in hematopoietic stem cells. CML progresses to a blast crisis (BC) due to a secondary differentiation block in any of the hematopoietic lineages. However, the molecular mechanisms of CML evolution to T-cell BC remain unclear. Here, we have profiled the changes in DNA methylation patterns in human samples from BC-CML, in order to identify genes whose expression is epigenetically silenced during progression to T-cell lineage-specific BC. We have found that the CpG-island of the ENGRAILED-2 (EN2) gene becomes methylated in this progression. Afterwards, we demonstrate that En2 is expressed during T-cell development in mice and humans. Finally, we further show that genetic deletion of En2 in a CML transgenic mouse model induces a T-cell lineage BC that recapitulates human disease. These results identify En2 as a new regulator of T-cell differentiation whose disruption induces a malignant T-cell fate in CML progression, and validate the strategy used to identify new developmental regulators of hematopoiesis. PMID:24675889

  13. Effect of CD38 on the multidrug resistance of human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells to doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    YALÇINTEPE, LEMAN; HALIS, EMRE; ULKU, SIBEL

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance is a serious challenge in cancer chemotherapy. Alterations in the intracellular concentration and homeostasis of calcium (Ca2+) may contribute to the development of drug resistance. To investigate the mechanism of drug resistance in leukemia, the present study rendered human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells resistant to the cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin by progressively adapting the sensitive parental K562 cells to doxorubicin. The resulting cells were termed K562/DOX. Subsequently, the expression of two multidrug resistance proteins, P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1), was analyzed in K562/DOX cells. In addition to P-gp and MRP1, these cells also expressed cluster of differentiation (CD)38 and its active enzyme adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribosyl cyclase. The present study also demonstrated that K562/DOX cells responded to cyclic ADP-ribose-mediated increases in intracellular Ca2+. These data indicate that CD38 may participate in the development of drug resistance to doxorubicin in K562 cells. PMID:26998164

  14. Causes of resistance and treatment choices of second- and third-line treatment in chronic myelogenous leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Hochhaus, Andreas; Ernst, Thomas; Eigendorff, Ekkehard; La Rosée, Paul

    2015-04-01

    For patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia who fail first-line therapy, several factors should be considered for the decision of the next treatment option. Second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) dasatinib, nilotinib, and bosutinib offer improved potency and a high likelihood of success for these patients. Overall, efficacy data are comparable for these agents, and so physicians should consider the BCR-ABL1 mutation profile and the patient's history to make a decision on the best choice. Only a few BCR-ABL1 mutations seem to be less responsive to any of the three drugs, and it is recommended to choose the second-line TKI that has shown clinical activity against the specific mutation in these cases. For patients with all other mutations and for patients with no mutations, it is recommended to choose the second-generation TKI based on the patient's disease history. The third-generation TKI ponatinib is available after dasatinib or nilotinib failure or for patients with T315I mutations. However, optimal dose of ponatinib is still under investigation. Overall, it is recommended to select a drug that minimizes the likelihood of worsening the patient's past side effects or comorbid conditions. In any case, chance and risk of allogeneic stem cell transplantation should be compared with the long-term outcome of TKI therapy in patients eligible for this procedure. PMID:25814079

  15. Combination of JAK2 and HSP90 inhibitors: an effective therapeutic option in drug-resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sandip N; Leng, Xiaohong; Perazzona, Bastianella; Sun, Xiaoping; Lin, Yu-Hsi; Arlinghaus, Ralph B

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that JAK2 serves as a novel therapeutic target in Bcr-Abl+ chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). We have reported the existence of an HSP90- associated high molecular weight network complex (HMWNC) that is composed of HSP90 client proteins BCR-ABL, JAK2, and STAT3 in wild type Bcr-Abl+ leukemic cells. Here we showed that the HSP90-HMWNC is present in leukemia cells from CML patients in blast stage, and in Imatinib (IM)-resistant 32Dp210 (T315I) leukemia cells. We found that the HSP90-HMWNC could be disassembled by depleting JAK2 with either Jak2-specific shRNA or treatment with JAK2 inhibitors (TG101209 or Ruxolitinib) and HSP90 inhibitor (AUY922). Combinational treatment with JAK2 and HSP90 inhibitors diminished the activation of BCR-ABL, JAK2 and its downstream targets. As a result, the IM-resistant 32Dp210 T315I cells underwent apoptosis. When administered in mice bearing 32Dp210 T315I leukemia, combinational therapy using Ruxolitinib and AUY922 prolonged the survival significantly. Thus, a combination of JAK2 and HSP90 inhibitors could be a powerful strategy for the treatment of CML, especially in IM-resistant patients. PMID:27551334

  16. Generation of chronic myelogenous leukemia-specific T cells in cytokine-modified autologous mixed lymphocyte/tumor cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Müller, L; Provenzani, C; Pawelec, G

    2001-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) may be amenable to cell-based adoptive immunotherapy, as suggested by the graft-versus-leukemia effect of bone marrow transplantation and the therapeutic benefit of donor leukocyte infusions. Specific adoptive immunotherapy without bone marrow transplantation might be more effective and less cost-intensive. Professional antigen-presenting cells, the dendritic cells, from patients with CML are derived from the malignant clone and may stimulate antileukemia T-cell responses. Autologous T cells may also be able to recognize tumor antigens on CML cells directly. Here, the authors show that CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses to autologous CML cells can be generated in vitro rapidly and effectively by performing modified autologous mixed lymphocyte/tumor cell cultures (MLTC) in serum-free medium in the presence of cytokines known to support dendritic cell differentiation. MLTC-sensitized T cells secreted large amounts of the type 1 cytokine interferon-gamma, as well as interleukin (IL)-2. However, they also secreted a variety of other cytokines, including the type 2-subtype cytokine IL-13 but not the classic type 2 cytokines IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10. Monoclonal populations of CML-specific CD4 cells could be derived from these lines in limited numbers but showed markedly enhanced reactivity. This suggests that CML-specific T cells are relatively rare in these autologous MTLC-derived sensitized populations, but that their isolation and propagation would yield much more potent antitumor effector cells for use in adoptive immunotherapy without the need for bone marrow transplantation. PMID:11759071

  17. Real-time analysis of imatinib- and dasatinib-induced effects on chronic myelogenous leukemia cell interaction with fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Obr, Adam; Röselová, Pavla; Grebeňová, Dana; Kuželová, Kateřina

    2014-01-01

    Attachment of stem leukemic cells to the bone marrow extracellular matrix increases their resistance to chemotherapy and contributes to the disease persistence. In chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), the activity of the fusion BCR-ABL kinase affects adhesion signaling. Using real-time monitoring of microimpedance, we studied in detail the kinetics of interaction of human CML cells (JURL-MK1, MOLM-7) and of control BCR-ABL-negative leukemia cells (HEL, JURKAT) with fibronectin-coated surface. The effect of two clinically used kinase inhibitors, imatinib (a relatively specific c-ABL inhibitor) and dasatinib (dual ABL/SRC family kinase inhibitor), on cell binding to fibronectin is described. Both imatinib and low-dose (several nM) dasatinib reinforced CML cell interaction with fibronectin while no significant change was induced in BCR-ABL-negative cells. On the other hand, clinically relevant doses of dasatinib (100 nM) had almost no effect in CML cells. The efficiency of the inhibitors in blocking the activity of BCR-ABL and SRC-family kinases was assessed from the extent of phosphorylation at autophosphorylation sites. In both CML cell lines, SRC kinases were found to be transactivated by BCR-ABL. In the intracellular context, EC50 for BCR-ABL inhibition was in subnanomolar range for dasatinib and in submicromolar one for imatinib. EC50 for direct inhibition of LYN kinase was found to be about 20 nM for dasatinib and more than 10 µM for imatinib. Cells pretreated with 100 nM dasatinib were still able to bind to fibronectin and SRC kinases are thus not necessary for the formation of cell-matrix contacts. However, a minimal activity of SRC kinases might be required to mediate the increase in cell adhesivity induced by BCR-ABL inhibition. Indeed, active (autophosphorylated) LYN was found to localize in cell adhesive structures which were visualized using interference reflection microscopy. PMID:25198091

  18. Why do chronic myelogenous leukemia stem cells survive allogeneic stem cell transplantation or imatinib: does it really matter?

    PubMed

    Goldman, John; Gordon, Myrtle

    2006-01-01

    It is generally accepted that allogeneic stem cell transplantation can 'cure' chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), although occasional patients relapse more than 10 years after the transplant procedure. Such cures presumably result from the combined effects of leukemia stem cells (LSCs) of the conditioning regimen and the graft-vs.-leukemia (GvL) effect mediated by donor-derived T lymphocytes. The advent of imatinib has revolutionized the management of patients with CML, but much evidence suggests that it does not eradicate all LSCs, which theoretically remain a potential source of relapse to chronic phase or advanced phase disease. Moreover, sub-clones of Philadelphia-positive cells bearing mutations that code for amino-acid substitutions in the Bcr-Abl kinase domain can be identified in patients receiving treatment with imatinib and are associated with varying degrees of resistance to this agent. In the present review, we postulate that LSCs, similar to their normal counterparts, may alternate between cycling and quiescent modes. In the cycling mode, they may express Bcr-Abl protein and be susceptible to the acquisition of additional mutations, whereas, in the quiescent mode, they may express little or no Bcr-Abl oncoprotein, cannot acquire additional mutations and are unaffected by imatinib. Thus, a patient who starts treatment early in the natural history of CML, and who responds to imatinib clinically, may not have had the opportunity to acquire additional mutations in LSCs. In this case, the persistence long-term of quiescent 'non-mutated' LSCs despite imatinib treatment might be consistent with freedom from relapse to chronic or advanced phase disease, provided that they remain vulnerable to imatinib when they are recruited into cycle. Conversely, when imatinib resistant Philadelphia-positive sub-clones predominate, this is likely to be due to the recruitment to hematopoiesis of quiescent stem cells that had been in cycle before administration of imatinib and

  19. Clinical advances in the management of chronic myelogenous leukemia: focus on bosutinib and patient considerations

    PubMed Central

    Sweet, Kendra; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; Zhang, Ling

    2014-01-01

    The treatment for chronic myeloid leukemia has changed significantly over the past 15 years, and as of now, there are five BCR-ABL1 (breakpoint cluster region-Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog 1) tyrosine kinase inhibitors that have gained approval for treatment of this disease. All five are very effective drugs, and the decision surrounding which to use in specific patients is based on numerous factors. Bosutinib is one of the newer tyrosine kinase inhibitors to gain approval, and has been studied in the first-line setting as well as after failure of other tyrosine kinase inhibitors. It is an SRC-ABL1 (steroid receptor co-activator-ABL1) inhibitor that works in the presence of most kinase domain mutations. The primary side effects of bosutinib are gastrointestinal upsets. In the appropriate clinical setting, bosutinib can be considered a valuable addition to the armamentarium of treatments available for chronic myeloid leukemia. PMID:25045255

  20. Natural killer cell killing of acute myelogenous leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia blasts by killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor-negative natural killer cells after NKG2A and LIR-1 blockade.

    PubMed

    Godal, Robert; Bachanova, Veronika; Gleason, Michelle; McCullar, Valarie; Yun, Gong H; Cooley, Sarah; Verneris, Michael R; McGlave, Philip B; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2010-05-01

    Although the study of natural killer (NK) cell alloreactivity has been dominated by studies of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs), we hypothesized that NKG2A and LIR-1, present on 53% +/- 13% and 36% +/- 18% of normal NK cells, respectively, play roles in the NK cell killing of primary leukemia targets. KIR(-) cells, which compose nearly half of the circulating NK cell population, exhibit tolerance to primary leukemia targets, suggesting signaling through other inhibitory receptors. Both acute myelogenous leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia targets were rendered susceptible to lysis by fresh resting KIR(-) NK cells when inhibitory receptor-major histocompatibility class I interactions were blocked by pan-HLA antibodies, demonstrating that these cells are functionally competent. Blockade of a single inhibitory receptor resulted in slightly increased killing, whereas combined LIR-1 and NKG2A blockade consistently resulted in increased NK cell cytotoxicity. Dual blockade of NKG2A and LIR-1 led to significant killing of targets by resting KIR(-) NK cells, demonstrating that this population is not hyporesponsive. Together these results suggest that alloreactivity of a significant fraction of KIR(-) NK cells is mediated by NKG2A and LIR-1. Thus strategies to interrupt NKG2A and LIR-1 in combination with anti-KIR blockade hold promise for exploiting NK cell therapy in acute leukemias. PMID:20139023

  1. The -137G/C Polymorphism in Interleukin-18 Gene Promoter Contributes to Chronic Lymphocytic and Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Risk in Turkish Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yalçın, Serap; Mutlu, Pelin; Çetin, Türker; Sarper, Meral; Özgür, Gökhan; Avcu, Ferit

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is a cytokine that belongs to the IL-1 superfamily and is secreted by various immune and nonimmune cells. Evidence has shown that IL-18 has both anticancer and procancer effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between IL-18 gene polymorphisms and susceptibility to chronic lymphocytic leukemias (CLL) and chronic myelogenous leukemias (CML) in Turkish patients. Materials and Methods: The frequencies of polymorphisms (rs61667799(G/T), rs5744227(C/G), rs5744228(A/G), and rs187238(G/C)) were studied in 20 CLL patients, 30 CML patients, and 30 healthy individuals. The genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing analysis. Results: Significant associations were detected between the IL-18 rs187238(G/C) polymorphism and chronic leukemia. A higher prevalence of the C allele was found in CML cases with respect to controls. The GC heterozygous and CC homozygous genotypes were associated with risk of CML when compared with controls. However, prevalence of the C allele was not significantly high in CLL cases with respect to controls. There was only a significant difference between the homozygous CC genotype of CLL patients and the control group; thus, it can be concluded that the CC genotype may be associated with the risk of CLL. Based on our data, there were no significant associations between the IL-18 rs61667799(G/T), rs5744227(C/G), or rs5744228(A/G) polymorphisms and CLL or CML. Conclusions: IL-18 gene promoter rs187238(G/C) polymorphism is associated with chronic leukemia in the Turkish population. However, due to the limited number of studied patients, these are preliminary results that show the association between -137G/C polymorphism and patients (CLL and CML). Further large-scale studies combined with haplotype and expression analysis are required to validate the current findings. PMID:26376814

  2. Chronic myelogenous leukemia-like hematological malignancy with t(8;22) in a 26-year-old pregnant woman: A case report

    PubMed Central

    QIN, YOU-WEN; YANG, YI-NING; BAI, PING; WANG, CHUN

    2016-01-01

    t(8;22)(p11;q11) is a rare but recurrent genetic alteration in various hematological disorders. Patients with t(8;22)(p11;q11) may be misdiagnosed with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), due to the similar clinical features. Thus, the current study presents a patient with t(8;22)(p11;q11) who was previously misdiagnosed with CML in the chronic phase. The current patient was a 26-year-old woman who was 4-weeks pregnant and in whom an increased white blood cell count (4.0×1010/l) was found upon physical examination. The patient had no history of hematological disease. Although cytogenetics showed a normal karyotype and no breakpoint cluster region/Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog 1 (BCR/ABL) fusion gene was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, a diagnosis of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) was initially made according to the clinical and morphological features. Another 6 weeks later, t(8;22)(p11;q11) rearrangement was present in 9 out of 10 analyzed metaphases. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction indicated a negative result for the BCR/ABL fusion, but gave a positive result for the BCR-fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 fusion. A hematological diagnosis of atypical CML was again formed. PMID:27313753

  3. [Chronic myelogenous leukemia initially presenting with multiple subcutaneous tumors due to extramedullary hematopoiesis].

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Shuhei; Doki, Noriko; Kaito, Satoshi; Sakaguchi, Masahiro; Harada, Kaito; Hino, Yutaro; Yamamoto, Keita; Ikegawa, Shuntaro; Yosioka, Kosuke; Watanabe, Daisuke; Senoo, Yasushi; Watakabe, Kyoko; Hagino, Takeshi; Igarashi, Aiko; Najima, Yuho; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Kakihana, Kazuhiko; Miyawaki, Shuichi; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Ohashi, Kazuteru

    2016-04-01

    A 53-year-old woman was admitted with right upper-extremity pain and multiple subcutaneous masses. Bone marrow aspirate showed hypercellular marrow with increased myeloid components at all stages of maturation. Cytogenetic analysis of the bone marrow revealed 100% Philadelphia chromosome positivity along with BCR/ABL gene rearrangement, as demonstrated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A diagnosis of chronic phase of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) was therefore made. Biopsy of one of the subcutaneous masses showed proliferation of granulocytes in various stages of differentiation. There were also erythroid cells and megakaryocytes, without p53 and CD34-positive blasts. These results suggested that the subcutaneous masses had developed from extramedullary hematopoiesis, not blastomas. The patient was administered dasatinib (DA) 140 mg, combined with radiation therapy for pain and peripheral neuropathy from the right axial extramedullary tumor. The patient showed complete hematological remission and the subcutaneous masses had disappeared 1 month after starting administration of DA. Because the patient did not achieve a cytogenetic response, the tyrosine kinase inhibitor nilotinib was administered. She will undergo allogeneic stem cell transplantation in the near future. Extramedullary hematopoiesis in the early stages of CML is uncommon. Our case emphasizes the need to elucidate the pathogenesis of extramedullary hematopoiesis in the early stages of CML. PMID:27169451

  4. Gene Network Exploration of Crosstalk between Apoptosis and Autophagy in Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Cho, William C. S.; Chan, Lawrence W. C.; Wong, S. C. Cesar; Tsui, Nancy B. Y.; Siu, Parco M.; Yip, S. P.; Yung, Benjamin Y. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Gene expression levels change to adapt the stress, such as starvation, toxin, and radiation. The changes are signals transmitted through molecular interactions, eventually leading to two cellular fates, apoptosis and autophagy. Due to genetic variations, the signals may not be effectively transmitted to modulate apoptotic and autophagic responses. Such aberrant modulation may lead to carcinogenesis and drug resistance. The balance between apoptosis and autophagy becomes very crucial in coping with the stress. Though there have been evidences illustrating the apoptosis-autophagy interplay, the underlying mechanism and the participation of the regulators including transcription factors (TFs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) remain unclear. Results. Gene network is a graphical illustration for exploring the functional linkages and the potential coordinate regulations of genes. Microarray dataset for the study of chronic myeloid leukemia was obtained from Gene Expression Omnibus. The expression profiles of those genes related to apoptosis and autophagy, including MCL1, BCL2, ATG, beclin-1, BAX, BAK, E2F, cMYC, PI3K, AKT, BAD, and LC3, were extracted from the dataset to construct the gene networks. Conclusion. The network analysis of these genes explored the underlying mechanisms and the roles of TFs and miRNAs for the crosstalk between apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:25821802

  5. Chromosome arm-specific long telomeres: a new clonal event in primary chronic myelogenous leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Samassekou, Oumar; Li, Huiyu; Hébert, Josée; Ntwari, Aimé; Wang, Haixia; Cliché, Catherine Grenier; Bouchard, Eric; Huang, Shiang; Yan, Ju

    2011-06-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that critically shortened telomere lengths correlate with the chromosome instability in carcinogenesis. However, little has been noticed regarding the correlation of long telomeres at specific chromosomes with malignant disorders. We studied relative telomere lengths (RTLs) for individual chromosomes using the quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization technique in a cohort of 32 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and 32 normal samples. We found that telomeres at some specific chromosome arms remain well maintained or even lengthened in a high frequency (27/32) of leukemia cases. In particular, 10 chromosome arms, 4q, 5p, 7q, 11p, 13p, 13q, 14p, 15p, 18p, and Xp, with long telomeres were consistently identified in different samples, and six of them (4q, 5p, 13p, 13q, 14p, and Xp) with relatively long telomeres were also observed in normal samples, but they appeared in lower occurrence rate and shorter RTL than in CML samples. Our results strongly indicate the presence of a special leukemia cell population, or a clone, originated from a common progenitor that is characterized with chromosome arm-specific long telomeres. We suggest that relatively long telomeres located at key chromosomes could be preferentially maintained or further elongated during the early stage of malignant transformation. PMID:21677878

  6. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors Early in the Disease Course: Lessons From Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Musa; Jabbour, Elias

    2015-12-01

    The landscape of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) management has changed with the advent of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) targeting the BCR-ABL1 oncoprotein. Imatinib mesylate, followed by nilotinib and dasatinib, has been approved for newly diagnosed patients. Since none of these TKIs show survival superiority, the drug choice is a challenge. Even so, the rate of deeper and earlier responses is higher with second-generation TKIs than it is with imatinib, and, in general, better response is associated with a survival advantage, regardless of TKI type being used. Patients should be monitored carefully for response, and treatment failure should prompt a timely switch to another TKI. Side effect profile and drug cost are other important considerations in therapy choice. In several clinical studies, achieving undetectable and durable disease status allowed some patients to discontinue the TKI and enjoy long-term treatment-free remission. Cure for CML may be possible with TKIs alone or TKIs in combination with other investigational therapies. However, due to lack of long-term outcome data and absence of consensus for the definition of optimal response and time to stop TKIs, discontinuation is discouraged outside of a clinical trial. PMID:26615132

  7. An Adult Male Presenting with Concurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma Involving a CCND1-IGH Translocation and Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia with a Variant (9;22) Translocation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Peter M; Siangchin, Ken; Song, Sophie; Shabsovich, David; Naeini, Yalda; Tirado, Carlos A

    2016-01-01

    The t(11;14)(q13;q32) involving IGH and CCND1 a nd t(9;22) (q34;q11.2) involving BCR and ABL1 are common abnormalities in plasma cell myeloma (PCM) and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), respectively. However, the concurrence of the two malignancies is extremely rare. Herein, we present a case of an 87-year-old male who presented with anemia and monocytosis. FISH studies on a bone marrow sample enriched for plasma cells detected a t(11;14) positive for IGH and CCND1 fusion in 92% of nuclei. However, cytogenetic analysis of the bone marrow revealed a t(9;22)(q34;q11.2) in 40% of the metaphases. Interphase and metaphase FISH studies on the sample confirmed the presence of the BCR-ABL1 fusion in 88% of nuclei but did not show any signals corresponding to the derivative 9, suggesting a variant t(9;22) with a deletion or additional material of unknown origin at the 9q34 band of the derivative 9 and a derivative 22 bearing the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene. The concurrence of plasma cell myeloma and chronic myelogenous leukemia is extremely rare with less than 20 cases reported. The molecular pathway in which the multiple malignancies arise is still poorly understood, and this case provides insight into the concurrence of PCM and CML. PMID:27584682

  8. Cessation of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in patients with chronic-phase chronic myelogenous leukemia following durable complete molecular response: a single center facing the dilemma.

    PubMed

    Iliakis, Theodoros; Papadopoulou, Vasiliki; Diamantopoulos, Panagiotis T; Panayiotidis, Panayiotis; Zervakis, Konstantinos; Giannakopoulou, Nefeli; Tilimidos, Gerassimos; Angelopoulou, Maria; Siakantaris, Marina P; Pangalis, Gerassimos; Mantzourani, Marina; Variami, Eleni; Viniou, Nora Athina

    2013-08-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), namely imatinib mesylate (IM) and recently approved second-generation TKIs dasatinib and nilotinib, are currently considered the treatment of choice for newly-diagnosed chronic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia (CP-CML). Although treatment with TKIs has not yet been proven curative, it certainly accomplishes a sustained control of the disease in the vast majority of patients. More than a decade after the successful launching of IM in first-line treatment of CP-CML and the subsequent introduction of second-generation TKIs in this setting, the question of the possibility of TKI cessation in a specific subset of patients has emerged. Side-effects of TKIs, along with some patients' wish to abandon the drugs and the rising financial burden upon healthcare systems, have led to the dilemma whether IM can be safely withdrawn after achieving deep molecular remissions and which patients are suitable for this discontinuation. We examined the data of our patients with CML in search of potential canditates for cessation of TKI therapy and identified their characteristics. We also performed a thorough review of the relevant literature. Eight out of fifty patients were discriminated on grounds of sustained complete molecular response (CMR) exceeding 12 months, most of them with a low or intermediate Sokal score at diagnosis. The median interval from IM initiation to CMR was almost 2 years and the median duration of detected CMR reached 6.5 years. Based on the promising results of prospective clinical trials reporting successful cessation of treatment with TKIs on selected subgroups of patients, we decided to proceed to interruption of therapy in the specific subset of our patients and closely monitor their response. PMID:23898127

  9. Laboratory-Treated T Cells in Treating Patients With High-Risk Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Previously Treated With Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-08

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant With or Without Ex-vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-10

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Pancytopenia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ways to give How your gift saves lives Donate cord blood Cord blood is changing lives Federal cord blood ... Cord blood options Sibling directed donation How to donate cord blood Participating hospitals Cord blood FAQs Learn if you ...

  12. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)

    MedlinePlus

    ... The only known cure for CML is a bone marrow transplant , or stem cell transplant. Most patients, though, do ... years while on this medicine. Stem cell or bone marrow transplant is usually considered in persons whose disease comes ...

  13. Atypical Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  14. Bcl-2 and c-myc expression, cell cycle kinetics and apoptosis during the progression of chronic myelogenous leukemia from diagnosis to blastic phase.

    PubMed

    Handa, H; Hegde, U P; Kotelnikov, V M; Mundle, S D; Dong, L M; Burke, P; Rose, S; Gaskin, F; Raza, A; Preisler, H D

    1997-06-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) has a progressive course but little is known about the biologic characteristics of disease progression. This study was designed to assess the changes in cell proliferative characteristics, apoptosis, the expression of the bcl-2 and c-myc genes between the time of initial diagnosis and entrance into the blastic phase of the disease. We observed that the rate of cell proliferation decreased and the cell death rate did not significantly change as the disease accelerated. The level of bcl-2 expression was significantly higher in accelerated/blastic phase cells than in the chronic phase cells in the population as a whole, however, the bcl-2 expression level did not change in blast cell subpopulation. c-myc Expression was significantly higher in the blast cell subpopulation of accelerated/blastic phase than in that of earlier phases of the disease. In conclusion, the characteristics of CML cells, namely proliferation rate, c-myc and bcl-2 change during the course of the disease. It is possible that the change in c-myc expression plays a causative role in evolution of the blastic phase from the chronic phase. PMID:9279359

  15. Reduced intensity conditioning is superior to nonmyeloablative conditioning for older chronic myelogenous leukemia patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplant during the tyrosine kinase inhibitor era.

    PubMed

    Warlick, Erica; Ahn, Kwang Woo; Pedersen, Tanya L; Artz, Andrew; de Lima, Marcos; Pulsipher, Michael; Akpek, Gorgun; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Cairo, Mitchell; Chen, Yi-Bin; Cooper, Brenda; Deol, Abhinav; Giralt, Sergio; Gupta, Vikas; Khoury, H Jean; Kohrt, Holbrook; Lazarus, Hillard M; Lewis, Ian; Olsson, Richard; Pidala, Joseph; Savani, Bipin N; Seftel, Matthew; Socié, Gerard; Tallman, Martin; Ustun, Celaettin; Vij, Ravi; Vindeløv, Lars; Weisdorf, Daniel

    2012-04-26

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and reduced intensity conditioning (RIC)/nonmyeloablative (NMA) conditioning hematopoietic cell transplants (HCTs) have changed the therapeutic strategy for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients. We analyzed post-HCT outcomes of 306 CML patients reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research aged 40 years and older undergoing RIC/NMA HCT from 2001 to 2007: 117 (38%) aged 40 to 49 years, 119 (39%) 50 to 59 years, and 70 (23%) 60 years or older. The majority (74%) had treatment with imatinib before HCT. At HCT, most patients aged 40 to 49 years were in chronic phase (CP) 1 (74%), compared with 31% aged 60 years or older. Siblings were donors for 56% aged 40 to 49 years; older cohorts had more unrelated donors. The majority received peripheral blood grafts and RIC across all age groups. 3 year overall survival (54%, 52%, and 41%), day + 100 grade II-IV acute GVHD (26%, 32%, and 32%), chronic GVHD (58%, 51%, and 43%), and 1-year treatment-related mortality (18%, 20%, and 13%) were similar across ages. The 3-year relapse incidence (36%, 43%, and 66%) and disease-free survival (35%, 32%, and 16%) were inferior in the oldest cohort. Importantly, for CP1 patients, relapse and disease-free survival were similar across age cohorts. Allogeneic RIC HCT for older patients with CML can control relapse with acceptable toxicity and survival in TKI-exposed CML, especially if still in CP1. PMID:22408257

  16. Activated ClpP kills persisters and eradicates a chronic biofilm infection.

    PubMed

    Conlon, B P; Nakayasu, E S; Fleck, L E; LaFleur, M D; Isabella, V M; Coleman, K; Leonard, S N; Smith, R D; Adkins, J N; Lewis, K

    2013-11-21

    Chronic infections are difficult to treat with antibiotics but are caused primarily by drug-sensitive pathogens. Dormant persister cells that are tolerant to killing by antibiotics are responsible for this apparent paradox. Persisters are phenotypic variants of normal cells and pathways leading to dormancy are redundant, making it challenging to develop anti-persister compounds. Biofilms shield persisters from the immune system, suggesting that an antibiotic for treating a chronic infection should be able to eradicate the infection on its own. We reasoned that a compound capable of corrupting a target in dormant cells will kill persisters. The acyldepsipeptide antibiotic (ADEP4) has been shown to activate the ClpP protease, resulting in death of growing cells. Here we show that ADEP4-activated ClpP becomes a fairly nonspecific protease and kills persisters by degrading over 400 proteins, forcing cells to self-digest. Null mutants of clpP arise with high probability, but combining ADEP4 with rifampicin produced complete eradication of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms in vitro and in a mouse model of a chronic infection. Our findings indicate a general principle for killing dormant cells-activation and corruption of a target, rather than conventional inhibition. Eradication of a biofilm in an animal model by activating a protease suggests a realistic path towards developing therapies to treat chronic infections. PMID:24226776

  17. Vaccine Therapy Plus Immune Adjuvant in Treating Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-04

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  18. Extramedullary Involvement by Chronic Myelogeneous Leukemia in Five Patients With Unusual Clinicopathologic Features: A Review of the Effectiveness of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Soni, Abha; Paluri, Ravikumar; Deal, Taylor; Peker, Deniz

    2016-06-01

    Chronic myelogeneous leukemia (CML) is associated with BCR-ABL1 fusion gene leading to an abnormal tyrosine kinase molecule. The accepted first-line treatment is imatinib mesylate (IM). CML uncommonly occurs in the extramedullary sites at initial presentation or relapse. Here we report five adult patients with CML who developed myeloid sarcoma (MS) while on treatment with IM. A retrospective medical chart analysis was performed to identify CML patients with MS who were diagnosed and treated at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. The age ranged between 21 and 36 years (median: 28.5) with a male to female ratio of 4:1. All of the patients were diagnosed with CML in chronic phase with initial treatment including IM. The median interval period between the initial diagnosis of CML and MS was 27 months (range 7 - 60 months). The sites of extramedullary involvement included lymph nodes (n = 2), central nervous system (n = 2) and hepatobiliary organs (n = 1). All patients were treated with either induction therapy or stem cell transplant (SCT) following the diagnosis of MS. The median survival was 16 months (range 1 - 72 months). The longest survival was observed in a patient who successfully received SCT therapy. IM is frequently used as the first therapeutic choice in new diagnosed CML; however, its penetration and effectiveness in extramedullary tissue is still unclear. The current report also supports the literature with less favorable prognosis of CML in younger individuals. PMID:27222678

  19. Extramedullary Involvement by Chronic Myelogeneous Leukemia in Five Patients With Unusual Clinicopathologic Features: A Review of the Effectiveness of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Abha; Paluri, Ravikumar; Deal, Taylor; Peker, Deniz

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myelogeneous leukemia (CML) is associated with BCR-ABL1 fusion gene leading to an abnormal tyrosine kinase molecule. The accepted first-line treatment is imatinib mesylate (IM). CML uncommonly occurs in the extramedullary sites at initial presentation or relapse. Here we report five adult patients with CML who developed myeloid sarcoma (MS) while on treatment with IM. A retrospective medical chart analysis was performed to identify CML patients with MS who were diagnosed and treated at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. The age ranged between 21 and 36 years (median: 28.5) with a male to female ratio of 4:1. All of the patients were diagnosed with CML in chronic phase with initial treatment including IM. The median interval period between the initial diagnosis of CML and MS was 27 months (range 7 - 60 months). The sites of extramedullary involvement included lymph nodes (n = 2), central nervous system (n = 2) and hepatobiliary organs (n = 1). All patients were treated with either induction therapy or stem cell transplant (SCT) following the diagnosis of MS. The median survival was 16 months (range 1 - 72 months). The longest survival was observed in a patient who successfully received SCT therapy. IM is frequently used as the first therapeutic choice in new diagnosed CML; however, its penetration and effectiveness in extramedullary tissue is still unclear. The current report also supports the literature with less favorable prognosis of CML in younger individuals. PMID:27222678

  20. Nilotinib rapidly reverses breakpoint cluster region-Abelson oncogene fusion gene and M244V mutations in a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia: A case report

    PubMed Central

    SHEN, XULIANG; ZHANG, MEIXIANG; SHEN, YIFAN; SHI, WENZHI; LIU, WEI; WEI, WU

    2015-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a condition characterized by a balanced genetic translocation, t (9;22) (q34;q11.2), which leads to a fusion of the Abelson oncogene (ABL) from chromosome 9q34 with the breakpoint cluster region (BCR) gene on chromosome 22q11.2. This rearrangement is referred to as the Philadelphia chromosome. At a molecular level, this translocation results in the formation of the BCR-ABL fusion oncogene, which translates into a BCR-ABL oncoprotein. Imatinib, nilotinib and dasatinib are three tyrosine kinase inhibitors that have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of patients diagnosed with CML in the chronic phase (CML-CP). The present study describes the case of a patient with imatinib-resistant CML who, following two months of treatment with nilotinib, no longer exhibited detectable BCR-ABL fusion genes or M244V mutations. This suggests that nilotinib may be effective for treating CML cases in which the BCR-ABL fusion protein has an M244V mutation. PMID:26622510

  1. A phase 2 study of MK-0457 in patients with BCR-ABL T315I mutant chronic myelogenous leukemia and philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Seymour, J F; Kim, D W; Rubin, E; Haregewoin, A; Clark, J; Watson, P; Hughes, T; Dufva, I; Jimenez, J L; Mahon, F-X; Rousselot, P; Cortes, J; Martinelli, G; Papayannidis, C; Nagler, A; Giles, F J

    2014-01-01

    Aurora kinase overexpression has been observed in patients with hematologic malignancies. MK-0457, a pan-aurora kinase inhibitor that also inhibits the ABL T315I mutant, was evaluated to treat patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) or Philadelphia chromosome (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with the T315I mutation. Adults with Ph+ chronic phase (CP)-, accelerated phase (AP)- or blast phase (BP)-CML, or ALL and documented BCR-ABL T315I mutation were treated with a 5-day continuous infusion of MK-0457 administered every 14 days at 40 mg/m(2)/h, 32 mg/m(2)/h or 24 mg/m(2)/h. Fifty-two patients (CP, n=15; AP, n=14; BP, n=11; Ph+ ALL, n=12) were treated. Overall, 8% of patients achieved major cytogenetic response; 6% achieved unconfirmed complete or partial response; 39% had no response. Two patients (CP CML) achieved complete hematologic response. No patients with advanced CML or Ph+ ALL achieved major hematologic response. The most common adverse event (AE) was neutropenia (50%). The most common grade 3/4 AEs were neutropenia (46%) and febrile neutropenia (35%). MK-0457 demonstrated minimal efficacy and only at higher, intolerable doses; lower doses were tolerated and no unexpected toxicities were observed. These data will assist in the development of future aurora kinase inhibitors and in the selection of appropriate target patient populations. PMID:25127392

  2. Optimization of radotinib doses for the treatment of Asian patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia based on dose-response relationship analyses.

    PubMed

    Noh, Hayeon; Park, Min Soo; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Oh, Suk Joong; Zang, Dae Young; Park, Hye Lin; Cho, Dae Jin; Kim, Dong-Wook; Lee, Jangik I

    2016-08-01

    A fixed dose regimen for tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) is postulated to be responsible for variable safety outcomes in the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). The objective of this study was to explore an optimal dosing regimen for a TKI, radotinib, to improve its safety profile. Clinical data were obtained from a Phase 2 study of fixed-dose radotinib in 77 Asian patients with CML. The magnitude of radotinib dose adjusted for patient's body weight (Dose/BW) and the probability of dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) demonstrated a positive association (Logit[P] = 0.86*[Dose/BW]-4.45, p = 0.001). There was a significant difference in the Kaplan-Meier curves for time to first DLT between the patient subgroups of Dose/BW <6 and ≥6 mg/kg (259 versus 83 days). Consequently, a two-tier weight-based dosing regimen may improve the safety of radotinib: 300 mg or 400 mg twice daily for patients weighing ≤65 or >65 kg, respectively. PMID:26666371

  3. Integrative genomic analysis in K562 chronic myelogenous leukemia cells reveals that proximal NCOR1 binding positively regulates genes that govern erythroid differentiation and Imatinib sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Long, Mark D.; van den Berg, Patrick R.; Russell, James L.; Singh, Prashant K.; Battaglia, Sebastiano; Campbell, Moray J.

    2015-01-01

    To define the functions of NCOR1 we developed an integrative analysis that combined ENCODE and NCI-60 data, followed by in vitro validation. NCOR1 and H3K9me3 ChIP-Seq, FAIRE-seq and DNA CpG methylation interactions were related to gene expression using bootstrapping approaches. Most NCOR1 combinations (24/44) were associated with significantly elevated level expression of protein coding genes and only very few combinations related to gene repression. DAVID's biological process annotation revealed that elevated gene expression was uniquely associated with acetylation and ETS binding. A matrix of gene and drug interactions built on NCI-60 data identified that Imatinib significantly targeted the NCOR1 governed transcriptome. Stable knockdown of NCOR1 in K562 cells slowed growth and significantly repressed genes associated with NCOR1 cistrome, again, with the GO terms acetylation and ETS binding, and significantly dampened sensitivity to Imatinib-induced erythroid differentiation. Mining public microarray data revealed that NCOR1-targeted genes were significantly enriched in Imatinib response gene signatures in cell lines and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients. These approaches integrated cistrome, transcriptome and drug sensitivity relationships to reveal that NCOR1 function is surprisingly most associated with elevated gene expression, and that these targets, both in CML cell lines and patients, associate with sensitivity to Imatinib. PMID:26117541

  4. RalA, a GTPase targeted by miR-181a, promotes transformation and progression by activating the Ras-related signaling pathway in chronic myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiaochuang; Yang, Juhua; Li, Yumin; Li, Tianfu; Wang, Ruirui; Fei, Jia

    2016-01-01

    BCR/ABL is a well-known activator of multiple signaling pathways. RalA, a Ras downstream signaling molecule and a small GTPase, plays an important role in Bcr-Abl-induced leukemogenesis but the exact mechanism remains elusive. Here, we show that RalA GTPase activity is commonly high in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cell lines and patient samples. Overexpression of RalA results in malignant transformation and progression, and induces resistance to imatinib (IM) in BaF3 and K562 cell lines. RalA reduced survival and led to IM resistance in a xenografted mouse model. Ablation of RalA by either siRNA or miR-181a, a RalA targeting microRNA, attenuated the malignant phenotypes in K562 cells. RBC8, a selective Ral inhibitor, enhanced the inhibitory effects of IM in K562, KCL22 and BaF3-P210 cells. Interestingly, the phospho-specific protein microarray assay revealed that multiple phosphorylation signal proteins were decreased by RalA inhibition, including SAPK, JNK, SRC, VEGFR2, P38 MAPK, c-Kit, JunB, and Keratin18. Among them, P38 MAPK and SAPK/JNK are Ras downstream signaling kinases. Taken together, RalA GTPase might be an important oncogene activating the Ras-related signaling pathway in CML. PMID:26967392

  5. Interferon-alpha suppresses proliferation of chronic myelogenous leukemia cells K562 by extending cell cycle S-phase without inducing apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Grebenová, Dana; Kuzelová, Katerina; Fuchs, Ota; Halada, Petr; Havlícek, Vladimír; Marinov, Iuri; Hrkal, Zbynĕk

    2004-01-01

    We examined the effects of interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) treatment on the growth, cell cycle, proliferation, and apoptotic parameters as well as adhesive properties and proteome of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)-derived K562 cells. IFN-alpha treatment (200 to 600 U/ml, 24 to 72 h) suppressed growth and caused accumulation of K562 cells in the S-phase of cell cycle (increase in S-phase cells by up to 52% in comparison with the untreated controls) at the expenses of cells in G1-phase. No transition of cells to G0-phase occurred as followed from Ki-67 protein determination. Although the level of chimeric gene product, BCR-ABL mRNA coding for BCR-ABL protein with anti-apoptotic properties, decreased by 30%, apoptosis was not triggered as judged from Annexin-V, APO2.7, and TUNEL assays. Adhesion of K562 cells to fibronectin-coated surfaces increased by up to 52% as determined by calcein assay. The proteomic analysis (2-D electrophoresis in combination with mass spectrometry, MALDI-MS) revealed a single protein, ubiquitine cross-reactive protein (UBCR), whose level markedly increased due to IFN-alpha treatment. The ubiquitination-like directed degradation processes may thus play a role in the mechanism of IFN-alpha antiproliferative effects. PMID:14757443

  6. Bosutinib in the treatment of patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) chronic myelogenous leukemia: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ann Q.; Wilson, Nicole M.; Gleason, Shannon L.

    2014-01-01

    Bosutinib is an orally bioavailable SRC/ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor with activity against all phases of resistant chronic myeloid leukemia that do not express the T315I or V299L ABL kinase domain mutations. Bosutinib has a unique toxicity profile that is manageable. This paper provides an overview of bosutinib, covering pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetic properties, results of treatment in newly diagnosed and previously treated chronic myeloid leukemia patients, as well as common side effects. PMID:24490020

  7. Resveratrol induces apoptosis of human chronic myelogenous leukemia cells in vitro through p38 and JNK-regulated H2AX phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xin-pin; Xiong, Min; Xu, Cheng-shan; Duan, Lian-ning; Dong, Ya-qiong; Luo, Yuan; Niu, Tian-hui; Lu, Cheng-rong

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The phosphorylation of histone H2AX, a novel tumor suppressor protein, is involved in regulation of cancer cell apoptosis. The aim of this study was to examine whether H2AX phosphorylation was required for resveratrol-induced apoptosis of human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells in vitro. Methods: K562 cells were tested. Cell apoptosis was analyzed using flow cytometry, and the phosphorylation of H2AX and other signaling proteins was examined with Western blotting. To analyze the signaling pathways, the cells were transfected with lentiviral vectors encoding H2AX-wt or specific siRNAs. Results: Treatment of K562 cells with resveratrol (20–100 μmol/L) induced apoptosis and phosphorylation of H2AX at Ser139 in time- and dose-dependent manners, but reduced phosphorylation of histone H3 at Ser10. Resveratrol treatment activated two MAPK family members p38 and JNK, and blocked the activation of another MAPK family member ERK. Pretreatment with the p38 inhibitor SB202190 or the JNK inhibitor SP600125 dose-dependently reduced resveratrol-induced phosphorylation of H2AX, which were also observed when the cells were transfected with p38- or JNK-specific siRNAs. Overexpression of H2AX in K562 cells markedly increased resveratrol-induced apoptosis, whereas overexpression of H2AX-139m (Ser139 was mutated to block phosphorylation) inhibited resveratrol-induced apoptosis. K562 cells transfected with H2AX-specific siRNAs were resistant to resveratrol-induced apoptosis. Conclusion: H2AX phosphorylation at Ser139 in human CML cells, which is regulated by p38 and JNK, is essential for resveratrol-induced apoptosis. PMID:25619392

  8. Vorinostat and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  9. Regulation of human RNase-L by the miR-29 family reveals a novel oncogenic role in chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Teresa Y; Ezelle, Heather J; Venkataraman, Thiagarajan; Lapidus, Rena G; Scheibner, Kara A; Hassel, Bret A

    2013-01-01

    The endoribonuclease RNase-L is the terminal component of an interferon-regulated RNA decay pathway known as the 2'-5'-oligoadenylate (2-5A) system, whose established functions include antimicrobial and tumor suppressive activities. RNase-L activity requires binding of the small molecule 2-5A, leading to RNase-L dimerization and cleavage of single-stranded RNA. RNase-L expression is controlled post-transcriptionally by its 3'-untranslated region (3' UTR), which exerts a strong negative effect on RNase-L levels. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small noncoding RNAs that repress expression of target genes by binding to regions of complementarity often in the 3' UTR. The miR-29 family acts as a tumor suppressor in several cancers, including acute and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), and has many oncogenic targets. We report that the miR-29 family represses RNase-L protein expression across several cell types. Using a luciferase reporter, we showed that miR-29 acts via 4 target sites within the RNASEL 3' UTR. Mutation of all sites is required for abrogation of miR-29 repression. In light of the reported tumor suppressive role of miR-29 in K562 CML cells and miR-29 repression of RNase-L in these cells, we generated K562 cells with stable RNase-L knockdown and demonstrated that loss of RNase-L inhibits proliferation in vitro as well as tumor growth in a xenograft model. Our findings identify a previously unknown miRNA regulator of RNase-L expression and support a novel oncogenic role for RNase-L in CML and potentially other hematopoietic malignancies. PMID:23113544

  10. Activated ClpP kills persisters and eradicates a chronic biofilm infection.

    SciTech Connect

    Conlon, Brian P.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Fleck, Laura E.; LaFleur, Michael D.; Isabella, Vincent M.; Coleman, K.; Leonard, Steve N.; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Lewis, Kim

    2013-11-21

    The current antibiotic crisis stems from two distinct phenomena-drug resistance, and drug tolerance. Resistance mechanisms such as drug efflux or modification prevent antibiotics from binding to their targets 1, allowing pathogens to grow. Antibiotic tolerance is the property of persister cells, phenotypic variants of regular bacteria 2. Antibiotics kill by corrupting targets, but these are inactive in dormant persisters, leading to tolerance. Persisters were first identified by Joseph Bigger in 1944, when he discovered a surviving sub-population of Staphylococcus following treatment with penicillin3. Persisters are largely responsible for recalcitrance of chronic diseases such as tuberculosis, and various infections associated with biofilms - endocarditis, osteomyelitis, infections of catheters and indwelling devices, and deep-seated infections of soft tissues 4. There are a number of redundant pathways involved in persister formation5,6 precluding development of drugs inhibiting their formation. The acyldepsipeptide antibiotic (ADEP 4) has been shown to activate the ClpP protease resulting in death of growing cells 7. Here we show that ADEP4 activated ClpP becomes a fairly non-specific protease and kills persister cells by degradation of over 400 intracellular targets. clpP mutants are resistant to ADEP4 7, but we find that they display increased susceptibility to killing by a range of conventional antibiotics. Combining ADEP4 with rifampicin leads to eradication of persisters, stationary and biofilm populations of Staphylococcus aureus in vitro and in a deep-seated murine infection. Target corruption/activation provides an approach to killing persisters and eradicating chronic infections.

  11. Pyrrolo[1,2-b][1,2,5]benzothiadiazepines (PBTDs): A new class of agents with high apoptotic activity in chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells and in cells from patients at onset and who were imatinib-resistant.

    PubMed

    Silvestri, Romano; Marfè, Gabriella; Artico, Marino; La Regina, Giuseppe; Lavecchia, Antonio; Novellino, Ettore; Morgante, Emanuela; Morgante, Manuela; Di Stefano, Carla; Catalano, Gianfranco; Filomeni, Giuseppe; Abruzzese, Elisabetta; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa; Russo, Matteo Antonio; Amadori, Sergio; Cirilli, Roberto; La Torre, Francesco; Sinibaldi Salimei, Paola

    2006-09-21

    Pyrrolo[1,2-b][1,2,5]benzothiadiazepine 5,5-dioxides (PBTDs) induced apoptosis in human BCR-ABL-expressing leukemia cells. The apoptotic activity was also observed in primary leukemic blasts, obtained from chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients at onset or from patients in blast crisis and who were imatinib-resistant. Compounds 5 and 14 induced apoptosis before BCR-ABL protein expression and tyrosin phosphorylation were affected and activated different caspases in the apoptotic pathway. PBTDs are a new class of valid candidates for the treatment of CML. PMID:16970408

  12. Clinical efficacy of second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor and 5-azacytidine combination in chronic myelogenous leukaemia in myeloid blast crisis.

    PubMed

    Ghez, David; Micol, Jean-Baptiste; Pasquier, Florence; Auger, Nathalie; Saada, Véronique; Spentchian, Marc; Ianotto, Jean-Christophe; Bourhis, Jean-Henri; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Anelyse; Terré, Christine; Castaigne, Sylvie; Rigaudeau, Sophie; Rousselot, Philippe; de Botton, Stéphane

    2013-11-01

    Even in the tyrosine kinase inhibitors era, the prognosis of patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia in myeloid blast crisis remains dismal with few patients surviving longer than 6 months. Here we report the cases of 5 patients treated with the combination of 5-azacytidine and tyrosine kinase inhibitors for myeloid blast crisis CML. All patients achieved a complete haematological response including two with a complete cytogenetic and major molecular response. Two patients underwent an allogeneic stem cell transplantation. One died from relapse 34 months from diagnosis. The second is alive and free from disease at 11 months from diagnosis. The other 3 patients are still in complete haematological response after 15, 24 and 33 months of follow-up. These results suggest that the combination has a significant activity in myeloid blast crisis and may increase survival. PMID:23968731

  13. Chromosome Arm-Specific Long Telomeres: A New Clonal Event in Primary Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Cells12

    PubMed Central

    Samassekou, Oumar; Li, Huiyu; Hébert, Josée; Ntwari, Aimé; Wang, Haixia; Cliché, Catherine Grenier; Bouchard, Eric; Huang, Shiang; Yan, Ju

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that critically shortened telomere lengths correlate with the chromosome instability in carcinogenesis. However, little has been noticed regarding the correlation of long telomeres at specific chromosomes with malignant disorders. We studied relative telomere lengths (RTLs) for individual chromosomes using the quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization technique in a cohort of 32 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and 32 normal samples. We found that telomeres at some specific chromosome arms remain well maintained or even lengthened in a high frequency (27/32) of leukemia cases. In particular, 10 chromosome arms, 4q, 5p, 7q, 11p, 13p, 13q, 14p, 15p, 18p, and Xp, with long telomeres were consistently identified in different samples, and six of them (4q, 5p, 13p, 13q, 14p, and Xp) with relatively long telomeres were also observed in normal samples, but they appeared in lower occurrence rate and shorter RTL than in CML samples. Our results strongly indicate the presence of a special leukemia cell population, or a clone, originated from a common progenitor that is characterized with chromosome arm-specific long telomeres. We suggest that relatively long telomeres located at key chromosomes could be preferentially maintained or further elongated during the early stage of malignant transformation. PMID:21677878

  14. Stages of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... a piece of chromosome 22 break off and trade places. The bcr-abl gene is formed on ... Publications Site Map Digital Standards for NCI Websites POLICIES Accessibility Comment Policy Disclaimer FOIA Privacy & Security Reuse & ...

  15. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) - children

    MedlinePlus

    Acute myelogenous leukemia - children; AML; Acute myeloid leukemia - children; Acute granulocytic leukemia - children; Acute myeloblastic leukemia - children; Acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) - children

  16. Report of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia, from hematology clinic, Ahmedabad, Gujarat 2000-2010 at 1st myelostone meeting: Indian evidence of chronic myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Deotare, Uday R.; Chudgar, Urmish; Bhagat, Eva

    2013-01-01

    The data of 156 patients was presented from Hematology clinic, Ahmedabad. This hematology clinic caters large number of the population from Gujarat as well as from neighboring states such as Rajasthan and Madhya Pradesh. Out of 156 patients, 146 (94%) patients were in chronic phase. Complete hematological response was seen in 90% of patients and overall survival was 82% at 5 years. PMID:24516308

  17. Possible correlation of b3-a2-type bcr-abl messenger RNA defined by semiquantitative RT-PCR to platelet and megakaryocyte counts in Philadelphia-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Inokuchi, K; Futaki, M; Dan, K; Nomura, T

    1994-04-01

    Thirty-five patients with Philadelphia chromosome (Ph1)-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) were classified on the basis of the fusion pattern of bcr-abl mRNA determined by the reverse-transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method. Semiquantitative assay of the bcr exon 2/abl exon 2 fused mRNA (b2-a2) and bcr exon 3/abl exon 2 fused mRNA (b3-a2) resulted in 21 patients showing b3-a2 type mRNA, seven showing b2-a2 type and seven showing coexpression. Quantification of the autoradiographic signals of amplified products was estimated using an MCID image analysis system. The relative intensity was defined as the ratio of bcr-abl signal to that of beta-actin. The relationship between the semiquantified bcr-abl mRNA and the platelet/megakaryocyte counts was analyzed. A possible correlation was found between the semiquantified b3-a2 type mRNA and the platelet (p < .05, N = 28) and megakaryocyte (p < .05, N = 13) counts of these patients. This finding suggests the possibility that b3-a2 mRNA may affect the thrombopoietic activity in Ph1-positive CML in a dose-response manner. PMID:7520786

  18. From the field: Efficacy of detecting Chronic Wasting Disease via sampling hunter-killed white-tailed deer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diefenbach, D.R.; Rosenberry, C.S.; Boyd, Robert C.

    2004-01-01

    Surveillance programs for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in free-ranging cervids often use a standard of being able to detect 1% prevalence when determining minimum sample sizes. However, 1% prevalence may represent >10,000 infected animals in a population of 1 million, and most wildlife managers would prefer to detect the presence of CWD when far fewer infected animals exist. We wanted to detect the presence of CWD in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in Pennsylvania when the disease was present in only 1 of 21 wildlife management units (WMUs) statewide. We used computer simulation to estimate the probability of detecting CWD based on a sampling design to detect the presence of CWD at 0.1% and 1.0% prevalence (23-76 and 225-762 infected deer, respectively) using tissue samples collected from hunter-killed deer. The probability of detection at 0.1% prevalence was <30% with sample sizes of ???6,000 deer, and the probability of detection at 1.0% prevalence was 46-72% with statewide sample sizes of 2,000-6,000 deer. We believe that testing of hunter-killed deer is an essential part of any surveillance program for CWD, but our results demonstrated the importance of a multifaceted surveillance approach for CWD detection rather than sole reliance on testing hunter-killed deer.

  19. Mutation status and clinical outcome of 89 imatinib mesylate-resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia patients: a retrospective analysis from the French intergroup of CML (Fi(phi)-LMC GROUP).

    PubMed

    Nicolini, F E; Corm, S; Lê, Q-H; Sorel, N; Hayette, S; Bories, D; Leguay, T; Roy, L; Giraudier, S; Tulliez, M; Facon, T; Mahon, F-X; Cayuela, J-M; Rousselot, P; Michallet, M; Preudhomme, C; Guilhot, F; Roche-Lestienne, C

    2006-06-01

    The emergence of ABL point mutations is the most frequent cause for imatinib resistance in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients and can occur during any phase of the disease; however, their clinical impact remains controversial. In this study, we retrospectively analyzed the predictive impact of 94 BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations (18 T315I, 26 P-loop, 50 in other sites) found in 89 imatinib-resistant CML patients. At imatinib onset, 64% of patients (57/89) were in chronic phase (CP), 24% (21/89) in accelerated phase (AP) and 12% (11/89) in blastic phase (BP). T315I and P-loop mutations were preferentially discovered in accelerated phase of BP CML, and other types of mutations in CP (P=0.003). With a median follow-up of 39.2 months (6.3-67.2), since imatinib initiation, overall survival (OS) was significantly worse for P-loop (28.3 months) and for T315I (12.6 months), and not reached for other mutations (P=0.0004). For CP only, multivariate analysis demonstrated a worse OS for P-loop mutations (P=0.014), and a worse progression-free survival (PFS) for T315I mutations (P=0.014). Therefore, P-loop and T315I mutations selectively impair the outcome of imatinib-resistant CML patients, in contrast to other mutations, which may benefit from dose escalation of imatinib, able to improve or stabilize disease response. PMID:16642048

  20. Expression of Interferon Consensus Sequence Binding Protein (ICSBP) Is Downregulated in Bcr-Abl-Induced Murine Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia-Like Disease, and Forced Coexpression of ICSBP Inhibits Bcr-Abl-Induced Myeloproliferative Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Sheryl X.; Ren, Ruibao

    2000-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a clonal myeloproliferative disorder resulting from the neoplastic transformation of a hematopoietic stem cell. The majority of cases of CML are associated with the (9;22) chromosome translocation that generates the bcr-abl chimeric gene. Alpha interferon (IFN-α) treatment induces hematological remission and prolongs life in 75% of CML patients in the chronic phase. It has been shown that mice deficient in interferon consensus sequence binding protein (ICSBP), a member of the interferon regulatory factor family, manifest a CML-like syndrome. We have shown that expression of Bcr-Abl in bone marrow (BM) cells from 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-treated mice by retroviral transduction efficiently induces a myeloproliferative disease in mice resembling human CML. To directly test whether icsbp can function as a tumor suppressor gene, we examined the effect of ICSBP on Bcr-Abl-induced CML-like disease using this murine model for CML. We found that expression of the ICSBP protein was significantly decreased in Bcr-Abl-induced CML-like disease. Forced coexpression of ICSBP inhibited the Bcr-Abl-induced colony formation of BM cells from 5-FU-treated mice in vitro and Bcr-Abl-induced CML-like disease in vivo. Interestingly, coexpression of ICSBP and Bcr-Abl induced a transient B-lymphoproliferative disorder in the murine model of Bcr-Abl-induced CML-like disease. Overexpression of ICSBP consistently promotes rather than inhibits Bcr-Abl-induced B lymphoproliferation in a murine model where BM cells from non-5-FU-treated donors were used, indicating that ICSBP has a specific antitumor activity toward myeloid neoplasms. We also found that overexpression of ICSBP negatively regulated normal hematopoiesis. These data provide direct evidence that ICSBP can act as a tumor suppressor that regulates normal and neoplastic proliferation of hematopoietic cells. PMID:10648600

  1. Open Label, Phase II Study to Evaluate Efficacy and Safety of Oral Nilotinib in Philadelphia Positive (Ph+) Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) Pediatric Patients.

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-05

    Leukemia; Leukemia,Pediatric; Leukemia, Myleiod; Leukemia, Mylegenous, Chronic; Leukemia, Mylegenous, Accelerated; BCR-ABL Positive; Myeloproliferative Disorder; Bone Marrow Disease; Hematologic Diseases; Neoplastic Processes; Imatinib; Dasatinib; Enzyme Inhibitor; Protein Kinase Inhibitor

  2. Characterizing of Four Common BCR-ABL Kinase Domain Mutations (T315I, Y253H, M351T and E255K) in Iranian Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Patients With Imatinib Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Rejali, Leili; Poopak, Behzad; Hasanzad, Mandana; Sheikhsofla, Fatemeh; Varnoosfaderani, Ameneh Saadat; Safari, Nazila; Rabieipoor, Saghar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a kind of hematopoietic stem-cell cancer. A significant number of CML patients who do not achieve an acceptable response to therapy, show acquired resistance against Imatinib. One of the most considerable causes of resistance against Imatinib as the first line of therapy, are BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations. Objectives: One of the most considerable causes of resistance against Imatinib as the first line of therapy, are BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations. Patients and Methods: The study was performed on 39 CML patients with Imatinib resistance. Basic hematologic parameters in blood samples were checked to identify hematologic response. To identify molecular response, BCR-ABL/ABL ratio was assessed by Real-time PCR. The ABL kinase domain amplification was performed by PCR. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was performed to detect four common mutations (T315I, Y253H, E255K and M351T). Finally the results were approved by direct sequencing. Results: In this study, the Y253H mutation, detected by RFLP method and confirmed by direct sequencing, was the prevalent ABL kinase domain mutation in these 39 CML patients. The G250E, V379I and L384M mutations were found in three different cases with failure molecular response. CML patients with these four ABL kinase domain mutations cannot achieve major molecular response (MMR). In addition, complete hematologic response (CHR) was observed only in the V379I mutated case and not in other mutated patients. Conclusions: Identification of ABL kinase domain mutations may be used as a proper and useful method for improving therapeutic strategies, avoiding delay in treatment and excessive expenditure in CML patients with Imatinib resistance. PMID:26413254

  3. Molecular cytogenetic analyses of HIG, a novel human cell line carrying t(1;3)(p36.3;q25.3) established from a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia in blastic crisis.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Noriko; Ogawa, Seishi; Motokura, Tohru; Hangaishi, Akira; Wang, Lili; Qiao, Ying; Nannya, Yasuhito; Kogi, Mieko; Hirai, Hisamaru

    2003-12-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities involving 1p36, 3q21, and/or 3q26 have been reported in a subset of myeloid neoplasms having characteristic dysmegakaryopoiesis, and the overexpression of EVI1 on 3q26 or of MEL1 on 1p36 has been implicated in their pathogenesis. We describe molecular cytogenetic analyses of a novel human cell line, HIG, established from a unique case in which a novel translocation t(1;3)(p36;q26) appeared as the sole additional chromosomal abnormality at the time of blastic transformation of chronic myelogenous leukemia. The patient displayed clinical features resembling those of the 3q21q26 syndrome. The HIG cell line retained der(1)t(1;3)(p36;q26) but lost t(9;22)(q34;q11). To identify the relevant gene that would be deregulated by this translocation, we molecularly cloned the translocation's breakpoints. They were distant from the breakpoint cluster regions of the 3q21q26 syndrome or t(1;3)(p36;q21), and neither the EVI1 nor the MEL1 transcript was detected in the HIG cell line. None of the genes located within 150 kilobase pairs of the breakpoints were aberrantly expressed, suggesting that in this case other gene(s) more distant from the breakpoints are deregulated by possible remote effects. Further analyses of the deregulated genes in the HIG cell line should provide important insight into the mechanisms involved in these types of leukemias. PMID:14704036

  4. Clinical outcome of 27 imatinib mesylate-resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia patients harboring a T315I BCR-ABL mutation.

    PubMed

    Nicolini, Franck E; Hayette, Sandrine; Corm, Selim; Bachy, Emmanuel; Bories, Dominique; Tulliez, Michel; Guilhot, François; Legros, Laurence; Maloisel, Frédéric; Kiladjian, Jean-Jacques; Mahon, François-Xavier; Lê, Quoc-Hung; Michallet, Mauricette; Roche-Lestienne, Catherine; Preudhomme, Claude

    2007-09-01

    We analyzed 27 CML patients treated with imatinib (IM) who developed a BCR-ABLT315I mutation. These patients had poor prognostic features: High or intermediate Sokal index (82%), and lack of CCyR under IM (59%). At T315I discovery, patients were in advanced phase (59%), with clonal evolution (84%). Median time since diagnosis was 39 months, and progression occurred 13 months after IM initiation, regardless of disease phase. Overall survival since IM initiation was 42.5 months for chronic, and 17.5 months for advanced phases, and all patients progressed. This mutation seems related to or (partially?) responsible for progression and poor survival. PMID:17768119

  5. Cell killing, radiosensitization and cell cycle redistribution induced by chronic hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Spiro, I.J.; Rice, G.C.; Durand, R.E.; Stickler, R.; Ling, C.C.

    1984-08-01

    Some of the biological changes associated with extreme hypoxia at 37/sup 0/C (less than 10 ppM pO/sub 2/) were examined in Chinese hamster V79 cells. Specifically, extreme hypoxia caused an initial decrease in plating efficiency to 55% in 4 hr after the onset of hypoxia. Beyond this time, the decline in plating efficiency was more gradual reaching 35% of control at 20 hr. Flow microfluorimetry (FMF) studies, in which cells are sorted on the basis of DNA content and then assayed for viability, demonstrated that mid S phase cells were most sensitive to chronic hypoxia. Hypoxia also caused alterations in the cell cycle distribution of initially asynchronous cells, as determined by dual parameter FMF measurements of both cellular DNA content and incorporated BudR. Lastly, cells stored in chronic hypoxia displayed an enhanced radiosensitivity when compared to acutely hypoxic cells.

  6. Toward an HIV Cure Based on Targeted Killing of Infected Cells: Different Approaches Against Acute Versus Chronic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Barna; Berger, Edward A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Current regimens of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) offer effective control of HIV infection, with maintenance of immune health and near-normal life expectancy. What will it take to progress beyond the status quo, whereby infectious virus can be eradicated (a “sterilizing cure”) or fully controlled without the need for ongoing cART (a “functional cure”)? Recent findings Based on therapeutic advances in the cancer field, we propose that targeted cytotoxic therapy to kill HIV-infected cells represents a logical complement to cART for achieving an HIV cure. This concept is based on the fact that cART effectively blocks replication of the virus, but does not eliminate cells that are already infected; targeted cytotoxic therapy would contribute precisely this missing component. We suggest that different modalities are suited for curing primary acute versus established chronic infection. For acute infection, relatively short-acting potent agents such as recombinant immunotoxins might prove sufficient for HIV eradication whereas for chronic infection, a long-lasting (lifelong?) modality is required to maintain full virus control, as might be achieved with genetically modified autologous T cells. Summary We present perspectives for complementing cART with targeted cytotoxic therapy whereby HIV infection is either eradicated or fully controlled, thereby eliminating the need for lifelong antiretroviral therapy. PMID:25710815

  7. Superiority of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation to nilotinib and dasatinib for adult patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia in the accelerated phase.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lanping; Zhu, Huanling; Hu, Jianda; Wu, Depei; Jiang, Hao; Jiang, Qian; Huang, Xiaojun

    2015-09-01

    In the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) era, imatinib is the first-line therapy for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in chronic or accelerated phase. Although second-generation TKIs (TKI2), including dasatinib and nilotinib, are appropriate treatment regimens for patients with disease that progressed to accelerated phase following imatinib therapy, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is the only curative therapy. This study retrospectively analyzed the efficacy of TKI2 and HSCT for treatment of CML in accelerated phase. Ninety-three patients with CML registered in the Chinese CML alliance database from February 2001 to February 2014 were enrolled and divided into the TKI2 (n = 33) and allo-HSCT (n = 60) groups. In the TKI2 group, 26 and 7 patients received nilotinib and dasatinib, respectively, as initial TKI2 and 11 patients transferred to the alternative TKI2 after failure to one TKI2. In the allo-HSCT group, 22 (36.7%), 35 (58.3%), and 3 (10%) patients underwent allo-HSCT from an HLA-matched sibling donor, HLA mismatched/haploidentical donor, and unrelated donor, respectively. All patients in the HSCT group were engrafted. Overall, 69.7%, 48.5%, and 45.5% of patients presented hematological, cytogenetic, and major molecular responses, respectively, to at least one of TKI2. All 60 patients (100%) achieved CHR and cytogenetic response in the HSCT group. Patients in the TKI2 group exhibited lower 5-year overall survival rate (42.9% vs. 86.4%, P = 0.002), 5-year event-free survival rate (14.3% vs. 76.1%, P < 0.001), and 5-year progression-free survival (28.6% vs. 78.1%, P < 0.001) than those in the allo-HSCT group. Multivariate analysis showed that male sex and TKI2 therapy were predictors of poor overall survival, whereas hemoglobin < 100 g/L and TKI2 therapy were predictors of poor event-free survival and progression-free survival. These results indicated that allo-HSCT may be superior to nilotinib and dasatinib for adult

  8. Chronic Iron Overload Results in Impaired Bacterial Killing of THP-1 Derived Macrophage through the Inhibition of Lysosomal Acidification

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Jun-Kai; Wang, Shih-Chung; Ho, Li-Wei; Huang, Shi-Wei; Chang, Shu-Hao; Yang, Rei-Cheng; Ke, Yu-Yuan; Wu, Chun-Ying; Wang, Jiu-Yao; Shieh, Jeng-Jer

    2016-01-01

    Iron is essential for living organisms and the disturbance of iron homeostasis is associated with altered immune function. Additionally, bacterial infections can cause major complications in instances of chronic iron overload, such as patients with transfusion-dependent thalassemia. Monocytes and macrophages play important roles in maintaining systemic iron homoeostasis and in defense against invading pathogens. However, the effect of iron overload on the function of monocytes and macrophages is unclear. We elucidated the effects of chronic iron overload on human monocytic cell line (THP-1) and THP-1 derived macrophages (TDM) by continuously exposing them to high levels of iron (100 μM) to create I-THP-1 and I-TDM, respectively. Our results show that iron overload did not affect morphology or granularity of I-THP-1, but increased the granularity of I-TDM. Bactericidal assays for non-pathogenic E. coli DH5α, JM109 and pathogenic P. aeruginosa all revealed decreased efficiency with increasing iron concentration in I-TDM. The impaired P. aeruginosa killing ability of human primary monocyte derived macrophages (hMDM) was also found when cells are cultured in iron contained medium. Further studies on the bactericidal activity of I-TDM revealed lysosomal dysfunction associated with the inhibition of lysosomal acidification resulting in increasing lysosomal pH, the impairment of post-translational processing of cathepsins (especially cathepsin D), and decreased autophagic flux. These findings may explain the impaired innate immunity of thalassemic patients with chronic iron overload, suggesting the manipulation of lysosomal function as a novel therapeutic approach. PMID:27244448

  9. Wogonoside induces growth inhibition and cell cycle arrest via promoting the expression and binding activity of GATA-1 in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Hui, Hui; Xu, Jingyan; Yang, Hao; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Liu, Xiao; Zhou, Yuxin; Li, Zhiyu; Guo, Qinglong; Lu, Na

    2016-06-01

    GATA-1, a zinc finger transcription factor, has been demonstrated to play a key role in the progression of leukemia. In this study, we investigate the effects of wogonoside, a naturally bioactive flavonoid derived from Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, on cell growth and cell cycle in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells, and uncover its underlying mechanisms. The experimental design comprised CML cell lines K562, imatinib-resistant K562 (K562r) cells, and primary CML cells, treated in vitro or in vivo, respectively, with wogonoside; growth and cell cycle were then evaluated. We found that wogonoside could induce growth inhibition and G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in both normal and K562r cells. Wogonoside promotes the expression of GATA-1 and facilitates the binding to methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) and p21 promoter, thus inhibiting MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling and cell cycle checkpoint proteins, including CDK2, CDK4, cyclin A, and cyclin D1, and increasing p21 expression. Furthermore, in vivo studies showed that administration of wogonoside decreased CML cells and prolonged survival in NOD/SCID mice with CML cell xenografts. In conclusion, these results clearly revealed the inhibitory effect of wogonoside on the growth in CML cells and suggested that wogonoside may act as a promising drug for the treatment of imatinib-resistant CML. PMID:26104856

  10. Fangchinoline induces G0/G1 arrest by modulating the expression of CDKN1A and CCND2 in K562 human chronic myelogenous leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YUPING; CHEN, JIE; WANG, LIN; HUANG, YUJI; LENG, YE; WANG, GUIYING

    2013-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a hematopoietic stem cell disease caused by the oncoprotein BCR-ABL, which exhibits a constitutive tyrosine kinase activity. Imatinib mesylate (IM), an inhibitor of the tyrosine kinase activity of BCR-ABL, has been used as a first-line therapy for CML. However, IM is less effective in the accelerated phase and blastic phases of CML and certain patients develop IM resistance due to the mutation and amplification of the BCR-ABL gene. Fangchinoline, an important chemical constituent from the dried roots of Stephaniae tetrandrae S. Moore, exhibits significant antitumor activity in various types of cancers, including breast, prostate and hepatocellular carcinoma. However, the effects and the underlying mechanisms of fangchinoline in CML remain unclear. In the present study, we identified that fangchinoline inhibits cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner in K562 cells derived from the blast crisis of CML. Additional experiments revealed that fangchinoline induces cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase and has no effect on apoptosis, which is mediated through the upregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)-N1A and MCL-1 mRNA levels, as well as the downregulation of cyclin D2 (CCND2) mRNA levels. These findings suggest the potential of fangchinoline as an effective antitumor agent in CML. PMID:23596478

  11. Fangchinoline induces G0/G1 arrest by modulating the expression of CDKN1A and CCND2 in K562 human chronic myelogenous leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuping; Chen, Jie; Wang, Lin; Huang, Yuji; Leng, Ye; Wang, Guiying

    2013-04-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a hematopoietic stem cell disease caused by the oncoprotein BCR-ABL, which exhibits a constitutive tyrosine kinase activity. Imatinib mesylate (IM), an inhibitor of the tyrosine kinase activity of BCR-ABL, has been used as a first-line therapy for CML. However, IM is less effective in the accelerated phase and blastic phases of CML and certain patients develop IM resistance due to the mutation and amplification of the BCR-ABL gene. Fangchinoline, an important chemical constituent from the dried roots of Stephaniae tetrandrae S. Moore, exhibits significant antitumor activity in various types of cancers, including breast, prostate and hepatocellular carcinoma. However, the effects and the underlying mechanisms of fangchinoline in CML remain unclear. In the present study, we identified that fangchinoline inhibits cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner in K562 cells derived from the blast crisis of CML. Additional experiments revealed that fangchinoline induces cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase and has no effect on apoptosis, which is mediated through the upregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)-N1A and MCL-1 mRNA levels, as well as the downregulation of cyclin D2 (CCND2) mRNA levels. These findings suggest the potential of fangchinoline as an effective antitumor agent in CML. PMID:23596478

  12. Imatinib has the potential to exert its antileukemia effects by down-regulating hERG1 K+ channels in chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fang; Li, Huiyu; Liang, Kaiwei; Du, Yimei; Guo, Dongmei; Huang, Shiang

    2012-09-01

    Imatinib is a powerful protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitor that specifically targets BCR-ABL, KIT, and PDGFR kinases, has become the current first-line therapy for all newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Beside PTKs, PTK inhibitors alter the activity of a large number of voltage-dependent ion channels. hERG1 K(+) channels are highly expressed in leukemia cells and appear of exceptional importance in favoring leukemogenesis. The present study explored a possible regulatory effect of imatinib upon hERG1 K(+) channels as a means to uncover new molecular events involved in the antileukemic activity of this PTK inhibitor in CML. The results demonstrated that hERG1 was highly detected in K562 cells and primary CML cells, and down-regulated by imatinib at mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, imatinib markedly reduced hERG currents in HEK293T-hERG cells, this effect was accompanied by inhibition of CML cell proliferation and apoptosis, as well as suppression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion. Moreover, these antileukemia effects of imatinib were potentiated by E-4031, a specific hERG1 inhibitor. Together, these results provide evidence of a novel potential molecular mechanism of antileukemic activities by imatinib which, independent of targeting tyrosine kinase, highlight hERG1 K(+) channels as a therapeutic target for CML treatment. PMID:22161019

  13. A derivative of epigallocatechin-3-gallate induces apoptosis via SHP-1-mediated suppression of BCR-ABL and STAT3 signalling in chronic myelogenous leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ji Hoon; Yun, Miyong; Choo, Eun-Jeong; Kim, Sun-Hee; Jeong, Myoung-Seok; Jung, Deok-Beom; Lee, Hyemin; Kim, Eun-Ok; Kato, Nobuo; Kim, Bonglee; Srivastava, Sanjay K; Kaihatsu, Kunihiro; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is a component of green tea known to have chemo-preventative effects on several cancers. However, EGCG has limited clinical application, which necessitates the development of a more effective EGCG prodrug as an anticancer agent. Experimental Approach Derivatives of EGCG were evaluated for their stability and anti-tumour activity in human chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) K562 and KBM5 cells. Key Results EGCG-mono-palmitate (EGCG-MP) showed most prolonged stability compared with other EGCG derivatives. EGCG-MP exerted greater cytotoxicity and apoptosis in K562 and KBM5 cells than the other EGCG derivatives. EGCG-MP induced Src-homology 2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase 1 (SHP-1) leading decreased oncogenic protein BCR-ABL and STAT3 phosphorylation in CML cells, compared with treatment with EGCG. Furthermore, EGCG-MP reduced phosphorylation of STAT3 and survival genes in K562 cells, compared with EGCG. Conversely, depletion of SHP-1 or application of the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor pervanadate blocked the ability of EGCG-MP to suppress phosphorylation of BCR-ABL and STAT3, and the expression of survival genes downstream of STAT3. In addition, EGCG-MP treatment more effectively suppressed tumour growth in BALB/c athymic nude mice compared with untreated controls or EGCG treatment. Immunohistochemistry revealed increased caspase 3 and SHP-1 activity and decreased phosphorylation of BCR-ABL in the EGCG-MP-treated group relative to that in the EGCG-treated group. Conclusions and Implications EGCG-MP induced SHP-1-mediated inhibition of BCR-ABL and STAT3 signalling in vitro and in vivo more effectively than EGCG. This derivative may be a potent chemotherapeutic agent for CML treatment. PMID:25825203

  14. Timosaponin A-III reverses multi-drug resistance in human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562/ADM cells via downregulation of MDR1 and MRP1 expression by inhibiting PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie-Ru; Jia, Xiu-Hong; Wang, Hong; Yi, Ying-Jie; Wang, Jian-Yong; Li, You-Jie

    2016-05-01

    One of the major causes of failure in chemotherapy for patients with human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is the acquisition of multidrug resistance (MDR). MDR is often associated with the overexpression of drug efflux transporters of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein family. Timosaponin A-III (TAIII), a saponin isolated from the rhizome of Anemarrhena asphodeloides, has previously demonstrated the ability to suppress certain human tumor processes and the potential to be developed as an anticancer agent. Nevertheless, the ability of TAIII to reverse MDR has not yet been explored. In this study, the adriamycin (ADM) resistance reversal effect of TAIII in human CML K562/ADM cells and the underlying mechanism was investigated. The Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay showed that TAIII had a reversal effect on the drug resistance of K562/ADM cells. Flow cytometry assay showed increased intracellular accumulation of ADM after cells were pretreated with TAIII, and the changes in the accumulation of rhodamine-123 (Rho-123) and 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate (CFDA) dye in K562/ADM cells were determined to be similar to the changes of intracellular accumulation of ADM. After pretreatment of cells with TAIII, the decreasing expression of P-gp and MRP1 mRNA was examined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Western blotting showed TAIII inhibiting P-gp and MRP1 expression depended on the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway by decreasing the activity of p-Akt. Moreover, wortmannin an inhibitor of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway has a strong inhibitory effect on the expression of p-Akt, P-gp and MRP1. Besides, the combined treatment with TAIII did not have an affect on wortmannin downregulation of p-Akt, P-gp and MRP1. Taken together, our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that TAIII induced MDR reversal through inhibition of P-gp and MRP1 expression and function with regained adriamycin sensitivity which might mainly correlate to the regulation of PI3K

  15. Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Undifferentiated Myeloproliferative Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Accelerated Phase of Disease; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase of Disease; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Recurrent Disease

  16. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

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  17. Treatment Option Overview (Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a piece of chromosome 22 break off and trade places. The bcr-abl gene is formed on ... Publications Site Map Digital Standards for NCI Websites POLICIES Accessibility Comment Policy Disclaimer FOIA Privacy & Security Reuse & ...

  18. Treatment Options for Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... a piece of chromosome 22 break off and trade places. The bcr-abl gene is formed on ... Publications Site Map Digital Standards for NCI Websites POLICIES Accessibility Comment Policy Disclaimer FOIA Privacy & Security Reuse & ...

  19. Acute myelogenous leukaemia in Hurler's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, K T; McKenna, R W; Desnick, R J

    1978-06-01

    The occurrence of the Hurler syndrome and acute myelogenous leukaemia in a 2 1/2-year-old girl is described. This represents the first published report of the concurrence of these two diseases. PMID:97385

  20. Killing and conformal Killing tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heil, Konstantin; Moroianu, Andrei; Semmelmann, Uwe

    2016-08-01

    We introduce an appropriate formalism in order to study conformal Killing (symmetric) tensors on Riemannian manifolds. We reprove in a simple way some known results in the field and obtain several new results, like the classification of conformal Killing 2-tensors on Riemannian products of compact manifolds, Weitzenböck formulas leading to non-existence results, and construct various examples of manifolds with conformal Killing tensors.

  1. Killing Coyotes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beasley, Conger, Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Presents different viewpoints concerning the federal government's Animal Damage Control (ADC) Program cited as responsible for killing millions of predators. Critics provide evidence of outdated and inhumane methods exemplified in the coyote killings. The ADC emphasizes new, nonlethal methods of controlling animals cited as "noxious." (MCO)

  2. The increased killing of biofilms in vitro by combining topical silver dressings with topical negative pressure in chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Valente, Pedro Miguel Ds; Deva, Anand; Ngo, Quan; Vickery, Karen

    2016-02-01

    Chronic wounds remain a significant medical and financial burden in hospitals of today. A major factor in the transition from an acute to a chronic wound is its bacterial bioburden. Developments in molecular techniques have shown that chronic wounds remain colonised by many species of bacteria and that the bacteria within these chronic wounds exist in two forms. Treatments of chronic wounds have maintained a challenging field and significant ongoing research is being conducted. With the development of an in vitro wound model, we applied topical negative pressure (TNP) dressings to a spectrum of common bacterial biofilms found in chronic wounds and studied the synergistic efficacy between the application of TNP and silver-impregnated foam against these biofilms. This synergistic response was seen within the laboratory strains of staphylococcal biofilms over a 3-day treatment period but lost following the 5 days of treatment. However, combining topical pressure dressings and silver foam lead to a synergistic inactivation in Pseudomonas species over both 3-day and 5-day treatments. PMID:24712658

  3. Studies on the surface antigenicity and susceptibility to antibody-dependent killing of developing schistosomula using sera from chronically infected mice and mice vaccinated with irradiated cercariae

    SciTech Connect

    Bickle, Q.D.; Ford, M.J.

    1982-05-01

    Changes in the surface antigenicity and susceptibility to in vitro killing during development of schistosomula of Schistosoma mansoni were studied using serum from chronically infected mice (CIS) and from mice vaccinated with highly irradiated (20 krad) cercariae (VS). Binding of these sera was quantitated by counting the number of P388D/sub 1/ cells (a transformed, macrophage-like cell of mouse origin, bearing Fc receptors for IgG) binding to the parasite surface. Compared with schistosomula derived in vitro by mechanical transformation (MS), schistosomula recovered 3 hr after skin penetration in vitro (SS) showed a significant loss in surface binding of CIS. Schistosomula recovered 3 hr after skin penetration in vivo (SRS) showed even less binding, and this trend continued such that parasites recovered from the lungs 5 days after infection (LS) showed only minimal binding, and 10-day-old worms from the portal system showed no significant binding. In contrast, VS, which bound significantly less well to MS than CIS, showed enhanced binding to SS, and in the face of their declining antigenicity with respect to CIS, 3- to 24-hr SRS maintained this raised level of antigenicity. Although there appeared to be a decline in binding of VS thereafter, LS remained antigenic, still binding as many cells as MS did despite the fact that they also expressed host antigens detected usng antisera raised against mouse RBC. In spite of this persistence of VS binding up to the lung stage, resistance to eosinophil-mediated killing in vitro had developed by 48 hr post-infection, and LS were totally resistant to both eosinophil- and C-mediated killing.

  4. Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes Derived from Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection Kill Bystander Cells via Fas-FasL Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Gremion, Christel; Grabscheid, Benno; Wölk, Benno; Moradpour, Darius; Reichen, Jürg; Pichler, Werner; Cerny, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    The role of Fas-mediated lysis of hepatocytes in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-induced injury is frequently discussed. We therefore analyzed the effect of the number of HCV antigen-expressing cells, the mode of antigen presentation, and the number of cytotoxic T lymphocytes in a coculture system mimicking cellular components of the liver. Here, we show that endogenously processed HCV proteins are capable of inducing bystander killing. We further demonstrate that 0.8 to 1.5% of cells presenting HCV antigens suffice to induce lysis of 10 to 29% of bystander cells, suggesting that the mechanism may be operative at low fractions of infected versus uninfected hepatocytes in vivo. Our data underscore the role of the Fas pathway in HCV-related liver injury and support the exploration of Fas-based treatment strategies for patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection. PMID:14747581

  5. Killing Range

    PubMed Central

    Asal, Victor; Rethemeyer, R. Karl; Horgan, John

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the Provisional Irish Republican Army's (PIRA) brigade level behavior during the Northern Ireland Conflict (1970-1998) and identifies the organizational factors that impact a brigade's lethality as measured via terrorist attacks. Key independent variables include levels of technical expertise, cadre age, counter-terrorism policies experienced, brigade size, and IED components and delivery methods. We find that technical expertise within a brigade allows for careful IED usage, which significantly minimizes civilian casualties (a specific strategic goal of PIRA) while increasing the ability to kill more high value targets with IEDs. Lethal counter-terrorism events also significantly affect a brigade's likelihood of killing both civilians and high-value targets but in different ways. Killing PIRA members significantly decreases IED fatalities but also significantly decreases the possibility of zero civilian IED-related deaths in a given year. Killing innocent Catholics in a Brigade's county significantly increases total and civilian IED fatalities. Together the results suggest the necessity to analyze dynamic situational variables that impact terrorist group behavior at the sub-unit level. PMID:25838603

  6. 2-Phenylacetylenesulfonamide (PAS) induces p53-independent apoptotic killing of B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells.

    PubMed

    Steele, Andrew J; Prentice, Archibald G; Hoffbrand, A Victor; Yogashangary, Birunthini C; Hart, Stephen M; Lowdell, Mark W; Samuel, Edward R; North, Janet M; Nacheva, Elisabeth P; Chanalaris, Anastasios; Kottaridis, Panagiotis; Cwynarski, Kate; Wickremasinghe, R Gitendra

    2009-08-01

    We studied the actions of 2-phenylacetylenesulfonamide (PAS) on B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells. PAS (5-20 microM) initiated apoptosis within 24 hours, with maximal death at 48 hours asassessed by morphology, cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), caspase 3 activation, and annexin V staining. PAS treatment induced Bax proapoptotic conformational change, Bax movement from the cytosol to the mitochondria, and cytochrome c release, indicating that PAS induced apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway. PAS induced approximately 3-fold up-regulation of proapoptotic Noxa protein and mRNA levels. In addition, Noxa was found unexpectedly to be bound to Bcl-2 in PAS-treated cells. PAS treatment of CLL cells failed to up-regulate p53, suggesting that PAS induced apoptosis independently of p53. Furthermore, PAS induced apoptosis in CLL isolates with p53 gene deletion in more than 97% of cells. Normal B lymphocytes were as sensitive to PAS-induced Noxa up-regulation and apoptosis as were CLL cells. However, both T lymphocytes and bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor cells were relatively resistant to PAS. Our data suggest that PAS may represent a novel class of drug that induces apoptosis in CLL cells independently of p53 status by a mechanism involving Noxa up-regulation. PMID:19515722

  7. Effective killing of Gleevec-resistant CML cells with T315I mutation by a natural compound PEITC through redox-mediated mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, H; Trachootham, D; Lu, W; Carew, J; Giles, FJ; Keating, MJ; Arlinghaus, RB; Huang, P

    2008-01-01

    Mutation of Bcr-Abl is an important mechanism by which chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells become resistant to Gleevec. The T315I mutation is clinically significant since CML cells harboring this mutation are insensitive to Gleevec and other Bcr-Abl-targeted drugs. Identification of new agents capable of effectively killing CML cells with T315I mutation would have important therapeutic implications in Gleevec-resistant CML. Here, we showed that β-phenylethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), a natural compound found in vegetables, is effective in killing CML cells expressing T315I BCR-ABL. Treatment of leukemia cell lines harboring wild-type or mutant Bcr-Abl with 10 μm PEITC resulted in an elevated ROS stress and a redox-mediated degradation of the BCR-ABL protein, leading to massive death of the leukemia cells. Antioxidant NAC attenuated the PEITC-induced oxidative stress in CML cells and prevented the degradation of BCR-ABL, caspase-3 activation and cell death. We further showed that the ROS-induced degradation of BCR-ABL was mediated partially by caspase-3 and the proteasome pathway. The ability of PEITC to effectively kill T315I-positive CML cells was further confirmed using primary leukemia cells isolated from CML patients. Our results suggest that PEITC is a promising compound capable of killing Gleevec-resistant CML cells through a ROS-mediated mechanism and warrants further investigations. PMID:18385754

  8. Isolation and killing of candidate chronic myeloid leukemia stem cells by antibody targeting of IL-1 receptor accessory protein.

    PubMed

    Järås, Marcus; Johnels, Petra; Hansen, Nils; Agerstam, Helena; Tsapogas, Panagiotis; Rissler, Marianne; Lassen, Carin; Olofsson, Tor; Bjerrum, Ole Weis; Richter, Johan; Fioretos, Thoas

    2010-09-14

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is genetically characterized by the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome, formed through a reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22 and giving rise to the constitutively active tyrosine kinase P210 BCR/ABL1. Therapeutic strategies aiming for a cure of CML will require full eradication of Ph chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) CML stem cells. Here we used gene-expression profiling to identify IL-1 receptor accessory protein (IL1RAP) as up-regulated in CML CD34(+) cells and also in cord blood CD34(+) cells as a consequence of retroviral BCR/ABL1 expression. To test whether IL1RAP expression distinguishes normal (Ph(-)) and leukemic (Ph(+)) cells within the CML CD34(+)CD38(-) cell compartment, we established a unique protocol for conducting FISH on small numbers of sorted cells. By using this method, we sorted cells directly into drops on slides to investigate their Ph-chromosome status. Interestingly, we found that the CML CD34(+)CD38(-)IL1RAP(+) cells were Ph(+), whereas CML CD34(+)CD38(-)IL1RAP(-) cells were almost exclusively Ph(-). By performing long-term culture-initiating cell assays on the two cell populations, we found that Ph(+) and Ph(-) candidate CML stem cells could be prospectively separated. In addition, by generating an anti-IL1RAP antibody, we provide proof of concept that IL1RAP can be used as a target on CML CD34(+)CD38(-) cells to induce antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. This study thus identifies IL1RAP as a unique cell surface biomarker distinguishing Ph(+) from Ph(-) candidate CML stem cells and opens up a previously unexplored avenue for therapy of CML. PMID:20805474

  9. BMS-214662 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  10. Effective Concentration of a Multikinase Inhibitor within Bone Marrow Correlates with In Vitro Cell Killing in Therapy-Resistant Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mu, Chaofeng; Wu, Xiaoyan; Ma, Helen; Tao, Wenjing; Zhang, Guodong; Xia, Xiaojun; Shen, Jianliang; Mai, Junhua; Sun, Tong; Sun, Xiaoping; Arlinghaus, Ralph B; Shen, Haifa

    2016-05-01

    Leukemia cells escape BCR-ABL-targeted therapy by developing mutations, such as T315I, in the p210(BCR-ABL) fusion protein in Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Although most effort has been focused on development of new tyrosine kinase inhibitors, enrichment of these small-molecule inhibitors in the tumor tissue can also have a profound impact on treatment outcomes. Here, we report that a 2-hour exposure of the T315I-mutant CML cells to 10 μmol/L of the multikinase inhibitor TG101209 suppressed BCR-ABL-independent signaling and caused cell-cycle arrest at G2-M. Further increase in drug concentration to 17.5 μmol/L blocked phosphorylation of the mutant BCR-ABL kinase and its downstream JAK2 and STAT5. The effective dosage to overcome therapy resistance identified in an in vitro setting serves as a guidance to develop the proper drug formulation for in vivo efficacy. A targeted formulation was developed to achieve sustained bone marrow TG101209 concentration at or above 17.5 μmol/L for effective killing of CML cells in vivo Potent inhibition of leukemia cell growth and extended survival were observed in two murine models of CML treated with 40 mg/kg intravenously administered targeted TG101209, but not with the untargeted drug at the same dosage. Our finding provides a unique approach to develop treatments for therapy-resistant CML. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(5); 899-910. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26846820

  11. Beyond killing

    PubMed Central

    Vale, Pedro F.; McNally, Luke; Doeschl-Wilson, Andrea; King, Kayla C.; Popat, Roman; Domingo-Sananes, Maria R.; Allen, Judith E.; Soares, Miguel P.; Kümmerli, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    The antibiotic pipeline is running dry and infectious disease remains a major threat to public health. An efficient strategy to stay ahead of rapidly adapting pathogens should include approaches that replace, complement or enhance the effect of both current and novel antimicrobial compounds. In recent years, a number of innovative approaches to manage disease without the aid of traditional antibiotics and without eliminating the pathogens directly have emerged. These include disabling pathogen virulence-factors, increasing host tissue damage control or altering the microbiota to provide colonization resistance, immune resistance or disease tolerance against pathogens. We discuss the therapeutic potential of these approaches and examine their possible consequences for pathogen evolution. To guarantee a longer half-life of these alternatives to directly killing pathogens, and to gain a full understanding of their population-level consequences, we encourage future work to incorporate evolutionary perspectives into the development of these treatments. PMID:27016341

  12. Neural cell adhesion molecule (CD56)-positive acute myelogenous leukemia and myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative syndromes.

    PubMed

    Mann, K P; DeCastro, C M; Liu, J; Moore, J O; Bigner, S H; Traweek, S T

    1997-06-01

    The CD56 antigen is normally expressed on natural-killer cells but has additionally been shown to be present on a variety of hematologic malignancies, including a subset of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). There is disagreement, however, about its prognostic significance and its association with specific cytogenetic abnormalities. All clinical samples from June 1994, through September 1995, with increased myeloblasts were analyzed by multiparameter flow cytometry for anomalous expression of CD56. Patients with CD56+ blast cells were selected, and morphologic review was performed. Clinical information was obtained, and cytogenetic data were reviewed. Southern blot analysis to detect rearrangement of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene was performed when possible. The samples from 23 of 114 patients studied demonstrated anomalous expression of CD56 on myeloblasts, including patients with AML, myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), and chronic myelogenous leukemia in blast crisis. The samples from 10 of 15 patients with CD56+ AML demonstrated at least partial monocytic differentiation. Dysplastic features were displayed in the samples of 12 patients. Correlation with specific cytogenetic abnormalities was not found. The MLL gene was rearranged in five of 18 patients. Seventeen patients have died, with a median survival of 4.6 months for patients with AML. Three have sustained a complete remission. One has findings of high-grade myelodysplastic syndrome. Two were unavailable for follow-up. Expression of CD56 was found in 20% of patients with increased myeloblasts, including patients with high-grade MDS, chronic myelogenous leukemia in blast crisis, and AML. This phenotype was associated with dysplasia, monocytic differentiation, and rearrangement of the MLL gene. PMID:9169661

  13. Dasatinib combined with interferon-alfa induces a complete cytogenetic response and major molecular response in a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia harboring the T315I BCR-ABL1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Cornelison, A Megan; Welch, Mary-Alma; Koller, Charles; Jabbour, Elias

    2011-06-01

    Mutations of BCR-ABL1 are observed in 50% of patients with imatinib-resistant chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The T315I mutation is resistant to imatinib and second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). We report the case of a 57-year-old man diagnosed with CML in 2003 in whom imatinib therapy failed after which he acquired the T315I mutation. He was treated sequentially with an anti-T315I-specific agent, KW-2449, that led to eradication of the mutation without any further improvement. Subsequent introduction of combination therapy that included dasatinib and pegylated interferon led to the achievement of a sustained complete cytogenetic and major molecular response (MMR). This case illustrates the benefit of combination therapy that includes a TKI and a second agent with a different mechanism of action, either sequentially (TKI followed by KW-2449) or concomitantly (TKI + interferon), in eradicating resistant disease with the T315I clone. PMID:22035739

  14. Epidemiology of childhood acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, S; Neglia, J P

    1995-05-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is the second most common leukemia in children, with approximately 400 new cases occurring annually in the United States. Worldwide, the highest rates of childhood AML occur in Asia and the lowest rates are reported from India and South America. Numerous genetic risk factors for childhood AML have been defined, including Down syndrome, neurofibromatosis, and Fanconi anemia. Research into environmental risk factors has been limited by the rarity of this disease; however, studies of AML in adults have implicated ionizing radiation, solvents, and petroleum products as potential etiologic agents. The largest analytic study of childhood AML found that occupational exposures of either parent to pesticides, paternal exposure to petroleum products, and postnatal exposures to pesticides are increased in children with AML. In addition, maternal use of marijuana during pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of AML, especially the monocytic subtypes. Further study of childhood AML, including occurrence of the disease as a second malignancy, is needed in order to confirm these findings and to increase our understanding of this leukemia. PMID:7749772

  15. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) with variant Philadelphia chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Lorch, C.A.; Burkart, P.T.; Estman, A.

    1994-09-01

    Approximately 95% of patients with CML have the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph). Less than 10% of these have variant translocations. A 39-year-old male was diagnosed with CML after bone marrow examination. Cytogenetic studies showed a variant Ph chromosome, 46,X,t(16;22)(p13,q11), with chromosome 9 appearing cytogenetically normal. Southern blot analysis of peripheral blood showed BCR rearrangement within the 5.8 kb major breakpoint region. Reverse transriptase PCR (RT-PCR) studies confirmed the involvement of the C-ABL gene from chromosome 9. One year later, prior to matched unrelated transplant, a repeat marrow showed t(3;21) in addition to the variant Ph chromosome. Five months post-transplant, bone marrow showed only normal 46,XX donor cells and BCR rearrangement was not detectable by secondary RT-PCR. Two months later, a nodule, which proved to be a chloroma, was removed from the skin. Molecular studies of nodular DNA showed BCR rearrangement and cytogenetic studies showed karyotypic progression: 45,XY,t(3;21),t(4;8),t(16;22),-7. The patient`s marrow continued to show normal 46,XX donor chromosomes, but secondary RT-PCR studies showed marrow involvement. The disease progressed and the patient died. This case is remarkable for the rare variant Ph translocation, the extramedullary and skin disease progression, and the monitoring with secondary RT-PCR studies, along with cytogenetic analysis. These techniques, combined, lead to a more accurate assessment and follow-up of the disease progression.

  16. Planning a dynamic kill

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, L.W.

    1996-05-01

    This article discusses the methodology, design philosophy, and guidelines for planning a dynamic-kill operation for a wild well. The topics covered are two methods of computer analysis for designing dynamic-kill requirements, the design process, determining the pumping spread, and the pitfalls that a designer faces in planning a dynamic kill.

  17. A Ferritin Mutant of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Is Highly Susceptible to Killing by Antibiotics and Is Unable To Establish a Chronic Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Ruchi

    2012-01-01

    Iron is an essential, elusive, and potentially toxic nutrient for most pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Due to the poor solubility of ferric iron under aerobic conditions, free iron is not found in the host. M. tuberculosis requires specialized iron acquisition systems to replicate and cause disease. It also depends on a strict control of iron metabolism and intracellular iron levels to prevent iron-mediated toxicity. Under conditions of iron sufficiency, M. tuberculosis represses iron acquisition and induces iron storage, suggesting an important role for iron storage proteins in iron homeostasis. M. tuberculosis synthesizes two iron storage proteins, a ferritin (BfrB) and a bacterioferritin (BfrA). The individual contributions of these proteins to the adaptive response of M. tuberculosis to changes in iron availability are not clear. By generating individual knockout strains of bfrA and bfrB, the contribution of each one of these proteins to the maintenance of iron homeostasis was determined. The effect of altered iron homeostasis, resulting from impaired iron storage, on the resistance of M. tuberculosis to in vitro and in vivo stresses was examined. The results show that ferritin is required to maintain iron homeostasis, whereas bacterioferritin seems to be dispensable for this function. M. tuberculosis lacking ferritin suffers from iron-mediated toxicity, is unable to persist in mice, and, most importantly, is highly susceptible to killing by antibiotics, showing that endogenous oxidative stress can enhance the antibiotic killing of this important pathogen. These results are relevant for the design of new therapeutic strategies against M. tuberculosis. PMID:22802345

  18. Current status of immunomodulatory therapy in chronic hepatitis B, fifty years after discovery of the virus: Search for the "magic bullet" to kill cccDNA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ejuan; Kosinska, Anna; Lu, Mengji; Yan, Huimin; Roggendorf, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) is currently treated with IFN-α and nucleos(t)ide analogues, which have many clinical benefits, but there is no ultimate cure. The major problem consists in the persistence of cccDNA in infected hepatocytes. Because no antiviral drug has been evaluated which significantly reduces copies of cccDNA, cytolytic and noncytolytic approaches are needed. Effective virus-specific T- and B-cell responses remain crucial in eliminating cccDNA-carrying hepatocytes and for the long-term control of HBV infection. Reduction of viremia by antiviral drugs provides a window for reconstitution of an HBV-specific immune response. Preclinical studies in mice and woodchucks have shown that immunostimulatory strategies, such as prime-boost vaccination and PD-1 blockade, can boost a weak virus-specific T cell response and lead to effective control of HBV infection. Based on data obtained in our preclinical studies, the combination of antiviral drugs and immunomodulators may control HBV viremia during a patient's drug-off period. In this article, we review current immune-modulatory approaches for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B and the elimination of cccDNA in preclinical models. This article forms part of a symposium in Antiviral Research on "An unfinished story: from the discovery of the Australia antigen to the development of new curative therapies for hepatitis". PMID:26476376

  19. Ion-kill dosimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Fromm, M.; Chambaudet, A.

    2001-01-01

    Unanticipated late effects in neutron and heavy ion therapy, not attributable to overdose, imply a qualitative difference between low and high LET therapy. We identify that difference as 'ion kill', associated with the spectrum of z/beta in the radiation field, whose measurement we label 'ion-kill dosimetry'.

  20. Cloning, killing, and identity.

    PubMed Central

    McMahan, J

    1999-01-01

    One potentially valuable use of cloning is to provide a source of tissues or organs for transplantation. The most important objection to this use of cloning is that a human clone would be the sort of entity that it would be seriously wrong to kill. I argue that entities of the sort that you and I essentially are do not begin to exist until around the seventh month of fetal gestation. Therefore to kill a clone prior to that would not be to kill someone like you or me but would be only to prevent one of us from existing. And even after one of us begins to exist, the objections to killing it remain comparatively weak until its psychological capacities reach a certain level of maturation. These claims support the permissibility of killing a clone during the early stages of its development in order to use its organs for transplantation. PMID:10226909

  1. "It didn't kill me. It just made me stronger and wiser": Silver Linings for Children and Adolescents of Parents with Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Umberger, Wendy A; Risko, Judy

    2016-04-01

    Chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP) is a disease that affects adults in their child-rearing years and is often incurable and of indefinite duration. Children and adolescents who live with parental CNCP can endure multiple adversities and experience subsequent emotional and somatic difficulties. Resilience is the ability to overcome adversity and even experience growth. This study is a secondary analysis of qualitative data, which sought to gain a deeper understanding of the ways in which children and adolescents rebound and grow from experiences living with parents who suffer with CNCP. Young adult children (N=30) of parents with CNCP were interviewed. Content analysis yielded five ways in which their experiences led to areas of positive growth: (a) expanded ways of understanding; (b) cultivated a strong character; (c) aided in the development of important skills; (d) instilled a commitment to live well, and; (e) nurtured spirituality. Clinicians who work with children and adolescents whose parents are disabled with CNCP can create environments that foster resilience and serve as a guide by helping these youth recognize potentials that have not yet been actualized and promoting positive change and growth over time. PMID:26992861

  2. Evolution of coalitionary killing.

    PubMed

    Wrangham, R W

    1999-01-01

    Warfare has traditionally been considered unique to humans. It has, therefore, often been explained as deriving from features that are unique to humans, such as the possession of weapons or the adoption of a patriarchal ideology. Mounting evidence suggests, however, that coalitional killing of adults in neighboring groups also occurs regularly in other species, including wolves and chimpanzees. This implies that selection can favor components of intergroup aggression important to human warfare, including lethal raiding. Here I present the principal adaptive hypothesis for explaining the species distribution of intergroup coalitional killing. This is the "imbalance-of-power hypothesis," which suggests that coalitional killing is the expression of a drive for dominance over neighbors. Two conditions are proposed to be both necessary and sufficient to account for coalitional killing of neighbors: (1) a state of intergroup hostility; (2) sufficient imbalances of power between parties that one party can attack the other with impunity. Under these conditions, it is suggested, selection favors the tendency to hunt and kill rivals when the costs are sufficiently low. The imbalance-of-power hypothesis has been criticized on a variety of empirical and theoretical grounds which are discussed. To be further tested, studies of the proximate determinants of aggression are needed. However, current evidence supports the hypothesis that selection has favored a hunt-and-kill propensity in chimpanzees and humans, and that coalitional killing has a long history in the evolution of both species. PMID:10601982

  3. How neutrophils kill fungi.

    PubMed

    Gazendam, Roel P; van de Geer, Annemarie; Roos, Dirk; van den Berg, Timo K; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophils play a critical role in the prevention of invasive fungal infections. Whereas mouse studies have demonstrated the role of various neutrophil pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs), signal transduction pathways, and cytotoxicity in the murine antifungal immune response, much less is known about the killing of fungi by human neutrophils. Recently, novel primary immunodeficiencies have been identified in patients with a susceptibility to fungal infections. These human 'knock-out' neutrophils expand our knowledge to understand the role of PRRs and signaling in human fungal killing. From the studies with these patients it is becoming clear that neutrophils employ fundamentally distinct mechanisms to kill Candida albicans or Aspergillus fumigatus. PMID:27558342

  4. FISH KILLS, NORTH CAROLINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data related to fish kills in North Carolina are collected and stored in tables on the Web at the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources. http://www.esb.enr.state.nc.us/Fishkill/fishkill00.htm

  5. Bone Marrow and Kidney Transplant for Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease and Blood Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-28

    Chronic Kidney Disease; Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL); Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML); Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL); Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL); Hodgkin Disease; Multiple Myeloma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS); Aplastic Anemia; AL Amyloidosis; Diamond Blackfan Anemia; Myelofibrosis; Myeloproliferative Disease; Sickle Cell Anemia; Autoimmune Diseases; Thalassemia

  6. Functional characterization of the ectopically expressed olfactory receptor 2AT4 in human myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Manteniotis, S; Wojcik, S; Brauhoff, P; Möllmann, M; Petersen, L; Göthert, J R; Schmiegel, W; Dührsen, U; Gisselmann, G; Hatt, H

    2016-01-01

    The olfactory receptor (OR) family was found to be expressed mainly in the nasal epithelium. In the last two decades members of the OR family were detected to be functional expressed in different parts of the human body such as in liver, prostate or intestine cancer cells. Here, we detected the expression of several ORs in the human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cell line K562 and in white blood cells of clinically diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients by RT-PCR and next-generation sequencing. With calcium-imaging, we characterized in greater detail the cell biological role of one OR (OR2AT4) in leukemia. In both cell systems, the OR2AT4 agonist Sandalore-evoked strong Ca(2+) influx via the adenylate cyclase-cAMP-mediated pathway. The OR2AT4 antagonist Phenirat prevented the Sandalore-induced intracellular Ca(2+) increase. Western blot and flow cytometric experiments revealed that stimulation of OR2AT4 reduced the proliferation by decreasing p38-MAPK phosphorylation and induced apoptosis via phosphorylation of p44/42-MAPK. Furthermore, Sandalore increased the number of hemoglobin-containing cells in culture. We described for the first time an OR-mediated pathway in CML and AML that can regulate proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation after activation. This mechanism offers novel therapeutic options for the treatment of AML. PMID:27551494

  7. Functional characterization of the ectopically expressed olfactory receptor 2AT4 in human myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Manteniotis, S; Wojcik, S; Brauhoff, P; Möllmann, M; Petersen, L; Göthert, JR; Schmiegel, W; Dührsen, U; Gisselmann, G; Hatt, H

    2016-01-01

    The olfactory receptor (OR) family was found to be expressed mainly in the nasal epithelium. In the last two decades members of the OR family were detected to be functional expressed in different parts of the human body such as in liver, prostate or intestine cancer cells. Here, we detected the expression of several ORs in the human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cell line K562 and in white blood cells of clinically diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients by RT-PCR and next-generation sequencing. With calcium-imaging, we characterized in greater detail the cell biological role of one OR (OR2AT4) in leukemia. In both cell systems, the OR2AT4 agonist Sandalore-evoked strong Ca2+ influx via the adenylate cyclase-cAMP-mediated pathway. The OR2AT4 antagonist Phenirat prevented the Sandalore-induced intracellular Ca2+ increase. Western blot and flow cytometric experiments revealed that stimulation of OR2AT4 reduced the proliferation by decreasing p38-MAPK phosphorylation and induced apoptosis via phosphorylation of p44/42-MAPK. Furthermore, Sandalore increased the number of hemoglobin-containing cells in culture. We described for the first time an OR-mediated pathway in CML and AML that can regulate proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation after activation. This mechanism offers novel therapeutic options for the treatment of AML. PMID:27551494

  8. New Strategies in Acute Myelogenous Leukemia: Leukemogenesis and Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Gojo, Ivana; Karp, Judith E.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular technology have unraveled the complexity of leukemogenesis and provided the opportunity to design more personalized and pathophysiology-targeted therapeutic strategies. Despite the use of intensive chemotherapy, relapse remains the most common cause for therapeutic failure in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). The interactions between leukemia stem cells (LSC) and marrow microenvironment appear to be critical in promoting therapeutic resistance through progressive acquisition of genetic and epigenetic changes within leukemia cells and immune evasion, resulting in leukemia cell survival. With advances in genomic sequencing efforts, epigenetic and phenotypic characterization, personalized therapeutic strategies aimed at critical leukemia survival mechanisms may be feasible in the near future. Here, we review select novel approaches to therapy of AML such as targeting LSC, altering leukemia/marrow microenvironment interactions, inhibiting DNA repair or cell cycle checkpoints, and augmenting immune-based anti-leukemia activity. PMID:25324141

  9. Children Who Kill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natale, Jo Anna

    1999-01-01

    Two recent books, "When Good Kids Kill," by Michael D. Kelleher, and "Lost Boys," by James Garbarino, explore how children become killers and suggest ways to reduce our high-pressure society's epidemic levels of youth violence. Physically or psychologically distant parents and unaffirmative media messages are negative influences. (MLH)

  10. Killing vectors and anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Krisch, J. P.; Glass, E. N.

    2009-08-15

    We consider an action that can generate fluids with three unequal stresses for metrics with a spacelike Killing vector. The parameters in the action are directly related to the stress anisotropies. The field equations following from the action are applied to an anisotropic cosmological expansion and an extension of the Gott-Hiscock cosmic string.

  11. How microglia kill neurons.

    PubMed

    Brown, Guy C; Vilalta, Anna

    2015-12-01

    Microglia are resident brain macrophages that become inflammatory activated in most brain pathologies. Microglia normally protect neurons, but may accidentally kill neurons when attempting to limit infections or damage, and this may be more common with degenerative disease as there was no significant selection pressure on the aged brain in the past. A number of mechanisms by which activated microglia kill neurons have been identified, including: (i) stimulation of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase (PHOX) to produce superoxide and derivative oxidants, (ii) expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) producing NO and derivative oxidants, (iii) release of glutamate and glutaminase, (iv) release of TNFα, (v) release of cathepsin B, (vi) phagocytosis of stressed neurons, and (vii) decreased release of nutritive BDNF and IGF-1. PHOX stimulation contributes to microglial activation, but is not directly neurotoxic unless NO is present. NO is normally neuroprotective, but can react with superoxide to produce neurotoxic peroxynitrite, or in the presence of hypoxia inhibit mitochondrial respiration. Glutamate can be released by glia or neurons, but is neurotoxic only if the neurons are depolarised, for example as a result of mitochondrial inhibition. TNFα is normally neuroprotective, but can become toxic if caspase-8 or NF-κB activation are inhibited. If the above mechanisms do not kill neurons, they may still stress the neurons sufficiently to make them susceptible to phagocytosis by activated microglia. We review here whether microglial killing of neurons is an artefact, makes evolutionary sense or contributes in common neuropathologies and by what mechanisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Neuroprotection. PMID:26341532

  12. Deorphanization and characterization of the ectopically expressed olfactory receptor OR51B5 in myelogenous leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Manteniotis, S; Wojcik, S; Göthert, J R; Dürig, J; Dührsen, U; Gisselmann, G; Hatt, H

    2016-01-01

    The ectopic expression of olfactory receptors (ORs) in the human body has been of major interest in the past decade. Several studies have reported the expression of ORs not only in healthy tissues such as heart, sperm or skin cells, but also in cancerous tissues of the liver, prostate or intestine. In the present study, we detected the expression of OR51B5 in the chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cell line K562 and in white blood cell samples of clinically diagnosed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patients by reverse transcription-PCR and immunocytochemical staining. The known OR51B5 ligand isononyl alcohol increased the levels of intracellular Ca2+ in both AML patient blood cells and K562 cells. With calcium imaging experiments, we characterized in greater detail the OR51B5-mediated signaling pathway. Here, we observed an involvement of adenylate cyclase and the downstream L-type and T-type calcium channels. In addition, the activation of OR51B5 leads to an inhibition of cell proliferation in K562 cells. In western blot experiments, we found that incubation with isononyl alcohol led to a reduction in p38-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) phosphorylation that might be responsible for the decreased cell proliferation. In the present study, we characterized the OR51B5-mediated signaling pathway downstream of the activation with isononyl alcohol, which leads to reduced proliferation and therefore provide a novel pharmacological target for CML and AML, the latter of which remains difficult to treat. PMID:27551504

  13. Inhibition of pentose phosphate pathway suppresses acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Xu, Qian; Ji, Dexiang; Wei, Yanlin; Chen, Huamei; Li, Tingting; Wan, Bolin; Yuan, Liya; Huang, Ruibin; Chen, Guoan

    2016-05-01

    Pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is a metabolic pathway that generates NADPH and pentose. PPP genes have been reported to be primarily or secondarily upregulated in many cancers. We aimed to study the general alteration of PPP in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). We performed data mining and analysis of the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) AML dataset for genetic alteration of the PPP gene set. In vitro studies including proliferation, migration, and invasion assays, together with metabolite consumption and oxidation assays, were performed. PPP genes were upregulated in 61 % of patients with AML. The majority of altered cases were expression changes measured by RNA sequencing. Expressions of critical PPP genes such as G6PD, PFKL, PFKP, and PGLS were consistently upregulated in all altered cases. Altered PPP is not associated with survival or disease relapse. PPP inhibition using 6-aminonicotinamide (6AN) increases glucose oxidative metabolism in AML. 6AN decreased the glucose oxidation and increased fatty acid oxidation. Here, we showed that PPP inhibition increased glucose oxidative metabolism in AML. PPP inhibition suppressed growth, migration, and invasion of AML, but not colony formation. PPP plays an important role in AML. Our results could contribute to the development of novel targeted treatment. PMID:26596840

  14. Granulocytic Sarcoma in MLL-Positive Infant Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyoung Un; Lee, Dong Soon; Lee, Hye Seung; Kim, Chong Jai; Cho, Han Ik

    2001-01-01

    Granulocytic sarcoma is considered to be rare and its frequent occurrence is associated with specific genetic changes such as t(8;21). To investigate an association between MLL (mixed lineage leukemia or myeloid-lymphoid leukemia) rearrangement and granulocytic sarcoma, we applied fluorescence in situ hybridization for detection of the 11q23/MLL rearrangements on the bone marrow cells of 40 patients with childhood acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Nine (22.5%) of 40 patients exhibited MLL rearrangements. Three (33.3%) of these nine patients had granulocytic sarcoma and were younger than 12 months of age. Of these three patients one presented as granulocytic sarcoma of both testes with cerebrospinal fluid involvement, the second case presented in the form of an abdominal mass, and the third as a periorbital granulocytic sarcoma. On the other hand, no granulocytic sarcomas were found among MLL-negative patients. It is likely that MLL-positive infant AML may predispose granulocytic sarcoma. Regarding the findings of our study and those of other reports, we would guess that the incidence of granulocytic sarcoma in pediatric MLL-positive AML may be equal to or greater than the 18 to 24% described in AML with t(8;21). Further investigations designed to identify 11q23/MLL abnormalities of leukemic cells or extramedullary tumor may be helpful for the precise diagnosis of granulocytic sarcoma. PMID:11733351

  15. Charged conformal Killing spinors

    SciTech Connect

    Lischewski, Andree

    2015-01-15

    We study the twistor equation on pseudo-Riemannian Spin{sup c}-manifolds whose solutions we call charged conformal Killing spinors (CCKSs). We derive several integrability conditions for the existence of CCKS and study their relations to spinor bilinears. A construction principle for Lorentzian manifolds admitting CCKS with nontrivial charge starting from CR-geometry is presented. We obtain a partial classification result in the Lorentzian case under the additional assumption that the associated Dirac current is normal conformal and complete the classification of manifolds admitting CCKS in all dimensions and signatures ≤5 which has recently been initiated in the study of supersymmetric field theories on curved space.

  16. Preferential eradication of acute myelogenous leukemia stem cells by fenretinide

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Mi, Jian-Qing; Fang, Hai; Wang, Zhao; Wang, Chun; Wu, Lin; Zhang, Bin; Minden, Mark; Yang, Wen-Tao; Wang, Huan-Wei; Li, Jun-Min; Xi, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Sai-Juan; Zhang, Ji; Chen, Zhu; Wang, Kan-Kan

    2013-01-01

    Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) play important roles in leukemia initiation, progression, and relapse, and thus represent a critical target for therapeutic intervention. However, relatively few agents have been shown to target LSCs, slowing progress in the treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Based on in vitro and in vivo evidence, we report here that fenretinide, a well-tolerated vitamin A derivative, is capable of eradicating LSCs but not normal hematopoietic progenitor/stem cells at physiologically achievable concentrations. Fenretinide exerted a selective cytotoxic effect on primary AML CD34+ cells, especially the LSC-enriched CD34+CD38− subpopulation, whereas no significant effect was observed on normal counterparts. Methylcellulose colony formation assays further showed that fenretinide significantly suppressed the formation of colonies derived from AML CD34+ cells but not those from normal CD34+ cells. Moreover, fenretinide significantly reduced the in vivo engraftment of AML stem cells but not normal hematopoietic stem cells in a nonobese diabetic/SCID mouse xenotransplantation model. Mechanistic studies revealed that fenretinide-induced cell death was linked to a series of characteristic events, including the rapid generation of reactive oxygen species, induction of genes associated with stress responses and apoptosis, and repression of genes involved in NF-κB and Wnt signaling. Further bioinformatic analysis revealed that the fenretinide–down-regulated genes were significantly correlated with the existing poor-prognosis signatures in AML patients. Based on these findings, we propose that fenretinide is a potent agent that selectively targets LSCs, and may be of value in the treatment of AML. PMID:23513221

  17. Kill operation requires thorough analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, L.W.

    1995-05-15

    Full control of a blowout well requires a properly designed post-capping kill operation because failures in regaining well control usually occur during the kill operation, not during capping. Capping (the installation of pressure control or diverter equipment on the wellhead) is generally very reliable in gaining control of a blowout well. The following techniques are some of the viable means of killing blowout wells once the capping assemblies are in place: direct shut in of the flow; bullheading; momentum kill; volumetric control for migration of fluids or lubrication after migration ceases; and dynamic kills (friction-based dynamic kills or mass flow rate kills) The objective of most post-capping operations is to stop the flow and put the well under hydrostatic control. The means of killing a blowout once capping assemblies are in place should be chosen with care to avoid problems such as cratering, equipment failure, and underground blowouts. The particular circumstances and well integrity will dictate which kill method will be the most viable. Each of these five methods are explained.

  18. How electroshock weapons kill!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Marjorie

    2010-03-01

    Growing numbers of law enforcement officers now carry an electroshock weapon (ESW). Over 500 U.S. deaths have followed ESW use in the past 26 years; over 450 of these deaths followed use of an electromuscular disruptor in the past 9 years. Most training courses teach that ESWs are safe; that they can kill only by the direct effect of electric current on the heart; and that a death following use of an ESW always has some other cause. All these teachings are false! The last was disproved by Lundquist.^1 Williams^2 ruled out direct electrical effects as a cause of almost all the 213 deaths he studied, leaving disruption of normal physiological processes as the only alternative explanation. Careful study of all such deaths identifies 4 different ways that death has or could have been brought about by the ESW: kidney failure following rhabdomyolysis [rare]; cardiac arrest from hyperkalemia following rhabdomyolysis [undocumented]; lactic acid-induced ventricular fibrillation [conclusive proof impossible]; and [most common] anoxia from so much lactic acid in the circulating blood that it acts as an oxygen scavenger, continuously depleting the blood of oxygen until most of the lactate has been metabolized. ^1M. Lundquist, BAPS 54(1) K1.270(2009). ^2Howard E. Williams, Taser Electronic Control Devices and Sudden In-Custody Death, 2008.

  19. Resveratrol triggers apoptosis through regulating ceramide metabolizing genes in human K562 chronic myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Kartal, Melis; Saydam, Guray; Sahin, Fahri; Baran, Yusuf

    2011-01-01

    Resveratrol, an important phytoalexin in many plants, has been reported to have cytotoxic effects on various types of cancer. Ceramide is a bioactive sphingolipid that regulates many signaling pathways, including cell growth and proliferation, senescence and quiescence, apoptosis, and cell cycle. Ceramides are generated by longevity assurance genes (LASS). Glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) and sphingosine kinase-1 (SK-1) enzymes can convert ceramides to antiapoptotic molecules, glucosylceramide, and sphingosine-1-phosphate, respectively. C8:ceramide, an important cell-permeable analogue of natural ceramides, increases intracellular ceramide levels significantly, while 1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (PDMP) and SK-1 inhibitor increase accumulation of ceramides by inhibiting GCS and SK-1, respectively. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a hematological disorder resulting from generation of BCR/ABL oncogene. In this study, we examined the roles of ceramide metabolizing genes in resveratrol-induced apoptosis in K562 CML cells. There were synergistic cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of resveratrol with coadministration of C8:ceramide, PDMP, and SK-1 inhibitor. Interestingly, there were also significant increases in expression levels of LASS genes and decreases in expression levels of GCS and SK-1 in K562 cells in response to resveratrol. Our data, in total, showed for the first time that resveratrol might kill CML cells through increasing intracellular generation and accumulation of apoptotic ceramides. PMID:21500096

  20. Notes on super Killing tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, P. S.; Lindström, U.

    2016-03-01

    The notion of a Killing tensor is generalised to a superspace setting. Conserved quantities associated with these are defined for superparticles and Poisson brackets are used to define a supersymmetric version of the even Schouten-Nijenhuis bracket. Superconformal Killing tensors in flat superspaces are studied for spacetime dimensions 3,4,5,6 and 10. These tensors are also presented in analytic superspaces and super-twistor spaces for 3,4 and 6 dimensions. Algebraic structures associated with superconformal Killing tensors are also briefly discussed.

  1. Formation fracturing kills Indonesian blowout

    SciTech Connect

    Wizyodiazjo, S.; Salech, M.; Sumanta, K.

    1982-11-15

    Dynamic killing methods without fracturing could not be applied in killing PT-29 blowout, due to the reservoir rock properties (shaley sand formation). A special fracturing and acidizing technique was required in order to allow the calculated kill rate of 40 bbl/ min. A low injection rate of 0.5 bbl/min with high injection pressure of 1,250 psi occurred due to a degree of formation damage and the mud cake covering the sand face. The calculated formation fracture pressure of 1,393 psi was a reliable value compared to actual fracture pressure of 1,400 psi. The designed killing rate of 40 bbl/ min could not reach the blowout well due to some leak-off of the injected fluid in unexpected directions of the induced fractures. Clearing PT-29 of all debris was very important for immediate well capping. The capping operation was done after the fire was extinguished; although the well was still flowing gas and water, no hazard of explosion was detected. The exact subsurface position of the blowout well of PT-29 was uncertain due to the lack of directional survey data. This problem reduced the effectiveness of the killing operation. A reliable water supply is important to the success of the killing job. Once the fracture had been induced, kill fluid had to be pumped continuously; any interruption might cause the fracture to heal. Deviation and directional survey data on every vertical or directional well are absolutely important for accurate relief well drilling purposes in case it is required.

  2. [Drug treatment of acute myelogenous leukaemia. Current options and future perspectives].

    PubMed

    Telek, Béla; Rejtő, László; Batár, Péter; Miltényi, Zsófia; Reményi, Gyula; Simon, Zsófia; Ujj, Zsófia; Mezei, Gabriella; Szász, Róbert; Kiss, Attila; Udvardy, Miklós; Illés, Árpád

    2016-05-29

    Acute myelogenous leukemia is a heterogeneous disease. Recent molecular mutational analysis techniques have shed more light on different, genetically well characterised types of the disease. Treatment approach is uniform except for acute promyelocytic leukemia. Application of the "3 + 7" induction treatment has been the gold standard in the past 40 years. While the dose of cytarabine has not been changed, escalating daunorubicine dose in younger (<60 years) patients with good performance status to 90 mg/m(2) had a positive impact on overall survival. High dose chemotherapy is tolerated poorly in patients older than 60 years of age and, as treatment is not curative in the elderly, improvement of overall survival and quality of life remains the main goal of management in these patients. Low intensity treatment is beneficial and can provide additional advantage over supportive care. Innovative and targeted therapy approaches might give promise to better management of patients with acute myelogenous leukemia. PMID:27211353

  3. Liver infection caused by Coniothyrium fuckelii in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Kiehn, T E; Polsky, B; Punithalingam, E; Edwards, F F; Brown, A E; Armstrong, D

    1987-01-01

    A case of liver infection caused by Coniothyrium fuckelii is described in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia. This fungus is found in the soil and can be a pathogen of plants. Coniothyrium spp. are members of the order Sphaeropsidales, an order composed of fungi whose conidiomata are usually pycnidia with the conidiogenous hymenium lining the walls of the locule. Coniothyrium spp. must be differentiated from Phoma spp. and Hendersonula spp., the two most commonly isolated members of the Sphaeropsidales. Images PMID:3480895

  4. Killing, letting die and euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Husak, D N

    1979-12-01

    Medical ethicists debate whether or not the moral assessment of cases of euthanasia should depend on whether the patient is 'killed' or 'allowed to die'. The usual presupposition is that a clear distinction between killing and letting die can be drawn so that this substantive question is not begged. I contend that the categorisation of cases of instances of killing rather than as instances of letting die depends in part on a prior moral assessment of the case. Hence is it trivially rather than substantively true that the distinction has moral significance. But even if a morally neutral (ie non-question begging) distinction could be drawn, its application to the euthanasia controversy is problematic. I illustrate the difficulties of employing this distinction to reach moral conclusions by critically discussing Philippa Foot's recent treatment of euthanasia. I conclude that even if an act of euthanasia is an instance of killing, and there exists a prima facie moral duty not to kill, and no more stringent duty overrides this duty, one still cannot determine such an act to be morally impermissible. PMID:541821

  5. Heat production due to intracellular killing activity.

    PubMed

    Hayatsu, H; Masuda, S; Miyamae, T; Yamamura, M

    1990-09-01

    Using Saccharomyces ceravisiae, Candida albicans and Stapylococcus aureus, heat production during phagocytosis was measured in U937 cells which are capable of differentiating to monocytic phagocytes. No increase in heat production of non-differentiated U937 was observed since they were not phagocytic cells. However after differentiation to monocytic phagocytes by lymphokine, U937 cells produced a remarkable amount of heat during phagocytosis. Although Ehrlich ascites tumor cells sensitized with antibody were capable of engulfing S. aureus, no increase in heat nor in superoxide anion production during phagocytosis was detected. It was also found that no heat increase occurred in neutrophils from a patient with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). It can thus be concluded that the heat production during phagocytosis is due to the intercellular killing process of phagocytic cells. PMID:2131646

  6. Tipifarnib and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blast Phase

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Human AQP5 Plays a Role in the Progression of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML)

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Young Kwang; Kang, Sung Koo; Kim, Myoung Sook; Woo, Janghee; Lee, Juna; Chang, Steven; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kim, Myungshin; Park, Seonyang; Kim, Inho; Keam, Bhumsuk; Rhee, Jiyoung; Koo, Nam Hee; Park, Gyeongsin; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Jang, Se-Eun; Kweon, Il-Young; Sidransky, David; Moon, Chulso

    2008-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) have previously been associated with increased expression in solid tumors. However, its expression in hematologic malignancies including CML has not been described yet. Here, we report the expression of AQP5 in CML cells by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. While normal bone marrow biopsy samples (n = 5) showed no expression of AQP5, 32% of CML patient samples (n = 41) demonstrated AQP5 expression. In addition, AQP5 expression level increased with the emergence of imatinib mesylate resistance in paired samples (p = 0.047). We have found that the overexpression of AQP5 in K562 cells resulted in increased cell proliferation. In addition, small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting AQP5 reduced the cell proliferation rate in both K562 and LAMA84 CML cells. Moreover, by immunoblotting and flow cytometry, we show that phosphorylation of BCR-ABL1 is increased in AQP5-overexpressing CML cells and decreased in AQP5 siRNA-treated CML cells. Interestingly, caspase9 activity increased in AQP5 siRNA-treated cells. Finally, FISH showed no evidence of AQP5 gene amplification in CML from bone marrow. In summary, we report for the first time that AQP5 is overexpressed in CML cells and plays a role in promoting cell proliferation and inhibiting apoptosis. Furthermore, our findings may provide the basis for a novel CML therapy targeting AQP5. PMID:18612408

  8. Treatment Options for Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Juvenile Myelomonocytic ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... and given back to the patient through an infusion . These reinfused stem cells grow into (and restore) ... them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies are given by infusion. They may be used alone or to carry ...

  9. Selective Killing of Nonreplicating Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bryk, Ruslana; Gold, Benjamin; Venugopal, Aditya; Singh, Jasbir; Samy, Raghu; Pupek, Krzysztof; Cao, Hua; Popescu, Carmen; Gurney, Mark; Hotha, Srinivas; Cherian, Joseph; Rhee, Kyu; Ly, Lan; Converse, Paul J.; Ehrt, Sabine; Vandal, Omar; Jiang, Xiuju; Schneider, Jean; Lin, Gang; Nathan, Carl

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Antibiotics are typically more effective against replicating rather than nonreplicating bacteria. However, a major need in global health is to eradicate persistent or nonreplicating subpopulations of bacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Hence, identifying chemical inhibitors that selectively kill bacteria that are not replicating is of practical importance. To address this, we screened for inhibitors of dihydrolipoamide acyltransferase (DlaT), an enzyme required by Mtb to cause tuberculosis in guinea pigs and used by the bacterium to resist nitric oxide-derived reactive nitrogen intermediates, a stress encountered in the host. Chemical screening for inhibitors of Mtb DlaT identified select rhodanines as compounds that almost exclusively kill nonreplicating mycobacteria in synergy with products of host immunity, such as nitric oxide and hypoxia, and are effective on bacteria within macrophages, a cellular reservoir for latent Mtb. Compounds that kill nonreplicating pathogens in cooperation with host immunity could complement the conventional chemotherapy of infectious disease. PMID:18329613

  10. Killing symmetries as Hamiltonian constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusanna, Luca

    2016-02-01

    The existence of a Killing symmetry in a gauge theory is equivalent to the addition of extra Hamiltonian constraints in its phase space formulation, which imply restrictions both on the Dirac observables (the gauge invariant physical degrees of freedom) and on the gauge freedom. When there is a time-like Killing vector field only pure gauge electromagnetic fields survive in Maxwell theory in Minkowski space-time, while in ADM canonical gravity in asymptotically Minkowskian space-times only inertial effects without gravitational waves survive.

  11. Autoimmune-Like Hepatitis: A "Hepatitic" Manifestation of Chronic Graft Versus Host Disease in Post-Stem Cell Transplant.

    PubMed

    Baniak, Nick M; Kanthan, Rani

    2016-04-01

    A 59-year-old female received a matched related donor stem cell transplant for chronic myelogenous leukemia. After being successfully treated with prednisone for chronic graft versus host disease that initially started 50 days posttransplant, she developed hepatic dysfunction during the steroid taper on day 531, as evidenced by jaundice, elevated liver enzymes, and increased bilirubin. Liver biopsy showed histology suggestive of autoimmune-like hepatitis, which is a rare manifestation of chronic "hepatitic" graft versus host disease. PMID:26464160

  12. 33 CFR 117.801 - Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., English Kills and their tributaries. 117.801 Section 117.801 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....801 Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. (a) The following requirements apply to all bridges across Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills, and their tributaries: (1)...

  13. 33 CFR 117.801 - Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., English Kills and their tributaries. 117.801 Section 117.801 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....801 Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. (a) The following requirements apply to all bridges across Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills, and their tributaries: (1)...

  14. 33 CFR 117.801 - Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., English Kills and their tributaries. 117.801 Section 117.801 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....801 Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. (a) The following requirements apply to all bridges across Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills, and their tributaries: (1)...

  15. 33 CFR 117.801 - Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., English Kills and their tributaries. 117.801 Section 117.801 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....801 Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. (a) The following requirements apply to all bridges across Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills, and their tributaries: (1)...

  16. 33 CFR 117.801 - Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., English Kills and their tributaries. 117.801 Section 117.801 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....801 Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. (a) The following requirements apply to all bridges across Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills, and their tributaries: (1)...

  17. Why myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) may kill you: disorders in the inflammatory and oxidative and nitrosative stress (IO&NS) pathways may explain cardiovascular disorders in ME/CFS.

    PubMed

    Maes, Michael; Twisk, Frank Nm

    2009-01-01

    There is evidence that disorders in inflammatory and oxidative and nitrosative (IO&NS) pathways and a lowered antioxidant status are important pathophysiological mechanisms underpinning myalgic encephalomyelitis / chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). Important precipitating and perpetuating factors for ME/CFS are (amongst others) bacterial and viral infections; bacterial translocation due to an increased gut permeability; and psychological stress. Recently, Jason et al (2006) reported that the mean age of patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome dying from heart failure, i.e. 58.7 years, is significantly lower than the age of those dying from heart failure in the general US population, i.e. 83.1 years. These findings implicate that ME/CFS is a risk factor to cardio-vascular disorder. This review demonstrates that disorders in various IO&NS pathways provide explanations for the earlier mortality due to cardiovascular disorders in ME/CFS. These pathways are: a) chronic low grade inflammation with extended production of nuclear factor kappa B and COX-2 and increased levels of tumour necrosis factor alpha; b) increased O&NS with increased peroxide levels, and phospholipid oxidation including oxidative damage to phosphatidylinositol; c) decreased levels of specific antioxidants, i.e. coenzyme Q10, zinc and dehydroepiandrosterone-sulphate; d) bacterial translocation as a result of leaky gut; e) decreased omega-3 polyunsatutared fatty acids (PUFAs), and increased omega-6 PUFA and saturated fatty acid levels; and f) the presence of viral and bacterial infections and psychological stressors. The mechanisms whereby each of these factors may contribute towards cardio-vascular disorder in ME/CFS are discussed. ME/CFS is a multisystemic metabolic-inflammatory disorder. The aberrations in IO&NS pathways may increase the risk for cardiovascular disorders. PMID:20038921

  18. Recommendations of the Canadian Consensus Group on the Management of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Laneuville, P.; Barnett, M.J.; Bélanger, R.; Couban, S.; Forrest, D.L.; Roy, D.C.; Lipton, J.H.

    2006-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (cml) is a disease characterized by the expression of Bcr/Abl, an oncogenic protein tyrosine kinase, and by evolution over time from a relatively benign chronic phase to a rapidly fatal cml blast crisis. Until recently, the standard of care included potentially curative therapy with allogeneic stem cell transplantation, available only to a minority (about 10%) of patients, or medical therapy with interferon-α with or without cytarabine, which helped to prolong the chronic phase of the disease in a minority of patients. The availability of imatinib mesylate, a selective inhibitor of Bcr/Abl approved by Health Canada in 2001, has profoundly altered the clinical and laboratory management of cml. This change in practice has been reviewed by the Canadian Consensus Group on the Management of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia and has resulted in a new set of recommendations for the optimal care of cml patients. PMID:22792021

  19. Farm Education at Stony Kill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parisio, Richard

    1986-01-01

    Describes typical winter farm lessons for students visiting Stony Kill Farm Environmental Education Center located 70 miles north of New York City: butter and corncake making, soil erosion experiments, dissecting and growing seeds. Emphasizes major theme of conservation of farmland from destructive farming practices and careless development. (NEC)

  20. Does Assessment Kill Student Creativity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beghetto, Ronald A.

    2005-01-01

    Does assessment kill creativity? In this article, creativity is defined and discussed and an overview of creativity and motivational research is provided to describe how assessment practices can influence students' creativity. Recommendations for protecting creativity when assessing students also are provided.

  1. Comparative Analysis of Busulfan and Cyclophosphamide versus Cyclophosphamide and Total Body Irradiation in Full Intensity Unrelated Marrow Donor Transplantation for Acute Myelogenous Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia and Myelodysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Uberti, Joseph P.; Agovi, Manza-A.; Tarima, Sergey; Haagenson, Michael; Gandham, Sharavi; Anasetti, Claudio; Baker, K. Scott; Bolwell, Brian J.; Bornhauser, Martin; Chan, Ka Wah; Copelan, Edward; Davies, Stella M.; Finke, Juergen; Hale, Gregory A.; Kollman, Craig; McCarthy, Philip L.; Ratanatharathorn, Voravit; Ringdén, Olle; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Rizzo, J. Douglas

    2011-01-01

    We retrospectively compared clinical outcomes in 1593 T-repleted URD marrow transplant recipients with AML, MDS and CML who received myeloablative conditioning regimens of either busulfan and cyclophosphamide (BuCy), standard-dose Cy/TBI (1,000-1,260 cGy) or high-dose Cy/TBI (1,320-1,500 cGy). Subjects were drawn from patients transplanted between 1991 and 1999 facilitated by the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP). Patients who received high-dose Cy/TBI regimens were slightly younger, more likely to receive a mismatched transplant and to have intermediate or advanced disease compared to patients in the BuCy or standard-dose TBI group. Neutrophil recovery was significantly higher in the standard dose CY/TBI group compared to the high-dose Cy/TBI or BuCy group. Patients who received the high-dose Cy/TBI regimen had an increased risk of developing grade III-IV aGVHD when compared to the control group who received BuCy (p=0.011). Overall survival (OS), disease free survival (DFS), transplant-related mortality (TRM) and relapse were not significantly different between any of the regimens. We conclude that BuCy, standard-dose and high dose Cy/TBI regimens have equivalent efficacy profiles for OS, DFS, TRM and relapse risk in patients undergoing T-replete URD marrow transplantation for AML, CML and MDS. PMID:20400989

  2. Regulation of apoptosis by cyclic nucleotides in human erythroleukemia (HEL) cells and human myelogenous leukemia (K-562) cells.

    PubMed

    Dittmar, Fanni; Wolter, Sabine; Seifert, Roland

    2016-07-15

    The cyclic pyrimidine nucleotides cCMP and cUMP have been recently identified in numerous mammalian cell lines, in primary cells and in intact organs, but very little is still known about their biological function. A recent study of our group revealed that the membrane-permeable cCMP analog cCMP-acetoxymethylester (cCMP-AM) induces apoptosis in mouse lymphoma cells independent of protein kinase A via an intrinsic and mitochondria-dependent pathway. In our present study, we examined the effects of various cNMP-AMs in human tumor cell lines. In HEL cells, a human erythroleukemia cell line, cCMP-AM effectively reduced the number of viable cells, effectively induced apoptosis by altering the mitochondrial membrane potential and thereby caused changes in the cell cycle. cCMP itself was biologically inactive, indicating that membrane penetration is required to trigger intracellular effects. cCMP-AM did not induce apoptosis in K-562 cells, a human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line, due to rapid export via multidrug resistance-associated proteins. The biological effects of cCMP-AM differed from those of other cNMP-AMs. In conclusion, cCMP effectively induces apoptosis in HEL cells, cCMP export prevents apoptosis of K-562 cells and cNMPs differentially regulate various aspects of apoptosis, cell growth and mitochondrial function. In a broader perspective, our data support the concept of distinct second messenger roles of cAMP, cGMP, cCMP and cUMP. PMID:27157412

  3. Umbilical Cord Blood Transplantation Outcomes in Acute Myelogenous Leukemia/Myelodysplastic Syndromes Patients ≥70 Years Old

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Karamjeet S; Brunstein, Claudio; DeFor, Todd; Bejanyan, Nelli; Arora, Mukta; Warlick, Erica; Weisdorf, Daniel; Ustun, Celalettin

    2016-01-01

    The maximum age of patients receiving allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHCT) has been moving up over time. However, the availability of a suitable HLA-matched sibling donor may limit access of this patient population to alloHCT. We retrospectively investigated the outcomes of umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT) after reduced-intensity conditioning regimens in patients aged ≥70 years with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) between 2010 and 2014. During this period 70 patients with AML/MDS were referred to our center for alloHCT consideration. Twenty-two patients (33%) received alloHCT: 10 UCBT, 9 HLA full-matched sibling donor transplantation, 2 haploidentical alloHCT, and 1 unrelated donor alloHCT. In UCBT, cumulative incidences of nonrelapse mortality and relapse were 20% and 30% at 2 years, respectively. The cumulative incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) at day +100 and chronic GVHD at 2 years was 10%. Seven patients had viral reactivation/infections. Rates of overall survival and disease-free survival were 60% and 50% at 2 years, respectively. Moreover, these outcomes seemed to be similar to that of patients aged 60 to 69 years receiving UCBT (n = 60) and patients aged ≥70 years receiving HLA full-matched sibling donor transplantation (n = 9). These results suggest that UCBT is feasible in selected AML/MDS patients aged ≥70 years. In fact, UCBT shortens the required time for an unrelated donor search and thus increases the chance of proceeding with alloHCT, which might contribute to higher rates of alloHCT in the referral group. Outcomes of UCBT are promising; however, larger studies with a longer follow-up are needed. PMID:26415559

  4. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children and young adults with secondary myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myelogenous leukemia after aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Yoshimi, Ayami; Strahm, Brigitte; Baumann, Irith; Furlan, Ingrid; Schwarz, Stephan; Teigler-Schlegel, Andrea; Walther, Joachim-Ulrich; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Göhring, Gudrun; Nöllke, Peter; Führer, Monika; Niemeyer, Charlotte M

    2014-03-01

    Secondary myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myelogenous leukemia (sMDS/sAML) are the most serious secondary events occurring after immunosuppressive therapy in patients with aplastic anemia. Here we evaluate the outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in 17 children and young adults with sMDS/sAML after childhood aplastic anemia. The median interval between the diagnosis of aplastic anemia and the development of sMDS/sAML was 2.9 years (range, 1.2 to 13.0 years). At a median age of 13.1 years (range, 4.4 to 26.7 years), patients underwent HSCT with bone marrow (n = 6) or peripheral blood stem cell (n = 11) grafts from HLA-matched sibling donors (n = 2), mismatched family donors (n = 2), or unrelated donors (n = 13). Monosomy 7 was detected in 13 patients. The preparative regimen consisted of busulfan, cyclophosphamide, and melphalan in 11 patients and other agents in 6 patients. All patients achieved neutrophil engraftment. The cumulative incidence of grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was 47%, and that of chronic GVHD was 70%. Relapse occurred in 1 patient. The major cause of death was transplant-related complication (n = 9). Overall survival and event-free survival at 5 years after HSCT were both 41%. In summary, this study indicates that HSCT is a curative therapy for some patients with sMDS/sAML after aplastic anemia. Future efforts should focus on reducing transplantation-related mortality. PMID:24316460

  5. Beetle Kill Wall at NREL

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-05-29

    When it comes to designing an interior decorative feature for one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world, very few would consider bringing in a beetle to do the job. But thats what happened at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Research Support Facility (RSF) located on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) campus.In June, the RSF will become home to more than 800 workers from DOE and NREL and building visitors will be greeted with a soaring, two-story high wall entirely covered with wood harvested from the bark beetle infestation that has killed millions of pine trees in the Western U.S. But, the use of beetle kill wood is just one example of the resources being leveraged to make the RSF a model for sustainability and one more step toward NRELs goal to be a net zero energy campus.

  6. Beetle Kill Wall at NREL

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    When it comes to designing an interior decorative feature for one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world, very few would consider bringing in a beetle to do the job. But thats what happened at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Research Support Facility (RSF) located on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) campus.In June, the RSF will become home to more than 800 workers from DOE and NREL and building visitors will be greeted with a soaring, two-story high wall entirely covered with wood harvested from the bark beetle infestation that has killed millions of pine trees in the Western U.S. But, the use of beetle kill wood is just one example of the resources being leveraged to make the RSF a model for sustainability and one more step toward NRELs goal to be a net zero energy campus.

  7. Blood Clots That Kill: Preventing DVT

    MedlinePlus

    ... on. Feature: Deep Vein Thrombosis Blood Clots That Kill: Preventing DVT Past Issues / Spring 2011 Table of ... More "Deep Vein Thrombosis" Articles Blood Clots That Kill: Preventing DVT / Skater Tara Lipinski Speaks Out About ...

  8. Esophageal aspergillosis in cytologic brushings: report of two cases associated with acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Simon; Geisinger, Kim R

    2004-05-01

    Aspergillus, which commonly involves the sinonasal region and upper respiratory tract, is reported for the first time in esophageal brushings in two immunocompromised patients with a history of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Aspergillus species was identified in both cases in smears as scattered three-dimensional groups of fungi with 45 degrees angle branching. One case had a local esophageal noninvasive form, while the other, in addition to the esophagus, had disseminated to the spleen. Although Aspergillus is an uncommon cause of esophagitis in immunocompromised patients, its presence may be associated with an extremely poor prognosis as both expired shortly after detecting this fungus on esophageal brushings. PMID:15108234

  9. 33 CFR 117.702 - Arthur Kill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Arthur Kill. 117.702 Section 117.702 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.702 Arthur Kill. (a) The draw of the Arthur Kill (AK) Railroad Bridge shall be...

  10. The Effect of Bacteriophage Preparations on Intracellular Killing of Bacteria by Phagocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jończyk-Matysiak, Ewa; Łusiak-Szelachowska, Marzanna; Kłak, Marlena; Bubak, Barbara; Międzybrodzki, Ryszard; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Żaczek, Maciej; Fortuna, Wojciech; Rogóż, Paweł; Letkiewicz, Sławomir; Szufnarowski, Krzysztof; Górski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular killing of bacteria is one of the fundamental mechanisms against invading pathogens. Impaired intracellular killing of bacteria by phagocytes may be the reason of chronic infections and may be caused by antibiotics or substances that can be produced by some bacteria. Therefore, it was of great practical importance to examine whether phage preparations may influence the process of phagocyte intracellular killing of bacteria. It may be important especially in the case of patients qualified for experimental phage therapy (approximately half of the patients with chronic bacterial infections have their immunity impaired). Our analysis included 51 patients with chronic Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial infections treated with phage preparations at the Phage Therapy Unit in Wroclaw. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of experimental phage therapy on intracellular killing of bacteria by patients' peripheral blood monocytes and polymorphonuclear neutrophils. We observed that phage therapy does not reduce patients' phagocytes' ability to kill bacteria, and it does not affect the activity of phagocytes in patients with initially reduced ability to kill bacteria intracellularly. Our results suggest that experimental phage therapy has no significant adverse effects on the bactericidal properties of phagocytes, which confirms the safety of the therapy. PMID:26783541

  11. Fish kill from underwater explosions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuart, David J.

    1962-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has used 23 different shotpoints during two seasons of field work in our seismic study of crustal structure in western United States. Without exception, it has been found that under-water shotpoints result in a more efficient conversion of explosive energy into seismic energy than do drilled-hole shotpoints. This experience, together with elimination of drilling costs, has led to the use of underwater shotpoints wherever possible. Three of the 23 shotpoints were in the Pacific Ocean, and for these we have no detailed information on the fish kill. Another six shotpoints were located in inland bodies of water. These are: * Soda Lake near Fallon, Nevada * Mono Lake near Lee Vining, California * Lake Mead near Boulder City, Nevada * Shasta Lake near Redding, California * C.J. Strike Reservoir near Bruneau, Idaho * Lucky Peak Reservoir near Boise, Idaho The 22 high-explosive charges, weighing a total of 95,100 pounds, that were fired in lakes containing fish life resulted in the known death of 2,413 game fish with a total weight of 759 pounds. The average mortality was 110 game fish or 34.5 pounds of game fish killed per average shot of 4,325 pounds of high-explosives.

  12. Chronic gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Sipponen, Pentti; Maaroos, Heidi-Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Prevalence of chronic gastritis has markedly declined in developed populations during the past decades. However, chronic gastritis is still one of the most common serious pandemic infections with such severe killing sequelae as peptic ulcer or gastric cancer. Globally, on average, even more than half of people may have a chronic gastritis at present. Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood is the main cause of chronic gastritis, which microbial origin is the key for the understanding of the bizarre epidemiology and course of the disease. A life-long and aggressive inflammation in gastritis results in destruction (atrophic gastritis) of stomach mucosa with time (years and decades). The progressive worsening of atrophic gastritis results subsequently in dysfunctions of stomach mucosa. Atrophic gastritis will finally end up in a permanently acid-free stomach in the most extreme cases. Severe atrophic gastritis and acid-free stomach are the highest independent risk conditions for gastric cancer known so far. In addition to the risks of malignancy and peptic ulcer, acid-free stomach and severe forms of atrophic gastritis may associate with failures in absorption of essential vitamins, like vitamin B12, micronutrients (like iron, calcium, magnesium and zinc), diet and medicines. PMID:25901896

  13. A kill curve for Phanerozoic marine species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raup, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    A kill curve for Phanerozoic species is developed from an analysis of the stratigraphic ranges of 17,621 genera, as compiled by Sepkoski. The kill curve shows that a typical species' risk of extinction varies greatly, with most time intervals being characterized by very low risk. The mean extinction rate of 0.25/m.y. is thus a mixture of long periods of negligible extinction and occasional pulses of much higher rate. Because the kill curve is merely a description of the fossil record, it does not speak directly to the causes of extinction. The kill curve may be useful, however, to li inverted question markmit choices of extinction mechanisms.

  14. Timelike Killing spinors in seven dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Cariglia, Marco; Conamhna, Oisin A.P. Mac

    2004-12-15

    We employ the G-structure formalism to study supersymmetric solutions of minimal and SU(2) gauged supergravities in seven dimensions admitting Killing spinors with an associated timelike Killing vector. The most general such Killing spinor defines a SU(3) structure. We deduce necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of a timelike Killing spinor on the bosonic fields of the theories, and find that such configurations generically preserve one out of 16 supersymmetries. Using our general supersymmetric ansatz we obtain numerous new solutions, including squashed or deformed anti-de Sitter solutions of the gauged theory, and a large class of Goedel-like solutions with closed timelike curves.

  15. Bone marrow transplantation for acute myelogenous leukemia: factors associated with early mortality

    SciTech Connect

    Bortin, M.M.; Gale, R.P.; Kay, H.E.; Rimm, A.A.

    1983-03-04

    Comprehensive data were reported to the International Bone Marrow Transplant Registry, Milwaukee, regarding 156 patients with acute myelogenous leukemia who were treated with allogeneic bone marrow transplantation between 1978 and 1980. The minimum observation period was 15 months after transplant and most deaths occurred within the first six months. Prognostic factors were evaluated for associations with early mortality or life-threatening complications. Most early deaths were due to infections, interstitial pneumonitis, and graft-v-host disease (GVHD). Multivariate analyses disclosed five factors with significant associations with early death or a major cause of early death: (1) disease status; (2) dose-rate of irradiation; (3) drug used to prevent GVHD; (4) severity of GVHD; and (5) dose of marrow cells.It is emphasized that several of the important prognostic factors are within the control of the referring physician or the transplant team.

  16. Impact of genetic targets on cancer therapy in acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mithun Vinod; Barochia, Amit; Loughran, Thomas P

    2013-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is characterized by uncontrolled proliferation of the cells of myeloid origin. It can present at all ages, but is more common in adults. It is one of the most common leukemias in adults and continues to pose significant challenge in diagnosis and long-term management.AML is a disease at the forefront of genetic and genomic approaches to medicine. It is a disease that has witnessed rapid advances in terms of diagnosis, classification, prognosis and ultimately individualized therapy. Newly diagnosed AML patients are now routinely stratified according to cytogenetics and molecular markers which guides long-term prognosis and treatment. On the other hand, with few exceptions, the initial treatment (also known as induction treatment) of AML has been 'one-size-fits-all'. It remains a great challenge for patients and physicians to consolidate and translate these advances into eventual success in clinic [1, 2]. PMID:23288651

  17. Cutaneous infection caused by Cylindrocarpon lichenicola in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Iwen, P C; Tarantolo, S R; Sutton, D A; Rinaldi, M G; Hinrichs, S H

    2000-09-01

    Cylindrocarpon lichenicola is a saprophytic soil fungus which has rarely been associated with human disease. We report the first case of localized invasive cutaneous infection caused by this fungus in a 53-year-old male from the rural midwestern United States with relapsed acute myelogenous leukemia. On admission for induction chemotherapy, the patient was noted to have an abrasive laceration between the fourth and fifth metacarpophalangeal joints and on the dorsum of the right hand, which progressed to frank ulceration following chemotherapy. A biopsy provided an initial diagnosis of an invasive fungal infection consistent with aspergillosis based on the histopathological appearance of the mold in tissue. Multiple positive fungal cultures which were obtained from the biopsied tissue were subsequently identified by microscopic and macroscopic characteristics to be C. lichenicola. The infection resolved following marrow regeneration, aggressive debridement of the affected tissue, and treatment with amphotericin B. This case extends the conditions associated with invasive disease caused by C. lichenicola. PMID:10970386

  18. The Effects of Hemodynamic Shear Stress on Stemness of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raddatz, Andrew; Triantafillu, Ursula; Kim, Yonghyun (John)

    2015-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have recently been identified as the root cause of tumors generated from cancer cell populations. This is because these CSCs are drug-resistant and have the ability to self-renew and differentiate. Current methods of culturing CSCs require much time and money, so cancer cell culture protocols, which maximize yield of CSCs are needed. It was hypothesized that the quantity of Acute myelogenous leukemia stem cells (LSCs) would increase after applying shear stress to the leukemia cells based on previous studies with breast cancer in bioreactors. The shear stress was applied by pumping the cells through narrow tubing to mimic the in vivo bloodstream environment. In support of the hypothesis, shear stress was found to increase the amount of LSCs in a given leukemia population. This work was supported by NSF REU Site Award 1358991.

  19. Using Functional Signatures to Identify Repositioned Drugs for Breast, Myelogenous Leukemia and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shigemizu, Daichi; Hu, Zhenjun; Hung, Jui-Hung; Huang, Chia-Ling; Wang, Yajie; DeLisi, Charles

    2012-01-01

    The cost and time to develop a drug continues to be a major barrier to widespread distribution of medication. Although the genomic revolution appears to have had little impact on this problem, and might even have exacerbated it because of the flood of additional and usually ineffective leads, the emergence of high throughput resources promises the possibility of rapid, reliable and systematic identification of approved drugs for originally unintended uses. In this paper we develop and apply a method for identifying such repositioned drug candidates against breast cancer, myelogenous leukemia and prostate cancer by looking for inverse correlations between the most perturbed gene expression levels in human cancer tissue and the most perturbed expression levels induced by bioactive compounds. The method uses variable gene signatures to identify bioactive compounds that modulate a given disease. This is in contrast to previous methods that use small and fixed signatures. This strategy is based on the observation that diseases stem from failed/modified cellular functions, irrespective of the particular genes that contribute to the function, i.e., this strategy targets the functional signatures for a given cancer. This function-based strategy broadens the search space for the effective drugs with an impressive hit rate. Among the 79, 94 and 88 candidate drugs for breast cancer, myelogenous leukemia and prostate cancer, 32%, 13% and 17% respectively are either FDA-approved/in-clinical-trial drugs, or drugs with suggestive literature evidences, with an FDR of 0.01. These findings indicate that the method presented here could lead to a substantial increase in efficiency in drug discovery and development, and has potential application for the personalized medicine. PMID:22346740

  20. Defects in the oxidative killing of microorganisms by phagocytic leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Roos, D; Weening, R S

    One of the most important mechanisms of phagocytic killing of ingested microorganisms by leukocytes is the generation of toxic oxygen products. During phagocytosis, neutrophils, as well as monocytes and macrophages, display a strongly increased cell respiration. Quantitatively the most important product of this reaction is hydrogen peroxide. Superoxide is also generated in large amounts, probably as an intermediate in the formation of hydrogen peroxide. Indications exist that singlet oxygen and hydroxyl radicals are also formed in this process. Some of these oxygen products have microbicidal properties by themselves. The effect of hydrogen peroxide is greatly enhanced by the enzyme myeloperoxidase. Several dysfunctions of this sytem are known. In chronic granulomatous disease the enzyme system that produces superoxide is not operative. Thus, no superoxide or hydrogen peroxide is generated, leading to a severely decreased bacterial killing capacity. The exact molecular defects in the X-linked and the autosomal form are as yet undefined. Two variants are also known: lipochrome histiocytosis, with different clinical and histological manifestations, and a 'triggering defect' where only strongly opsonized particles trigger the respiratory burst. Myeloperoxidase deficiency leads to slightly decreased killing capacity, especially for yeasts. In glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency no oxygen radicals or hydrogen peroxide are produced because no equivalents for oxygen reduction can be generated in the hexose-monophosphate shunt. Deficiencies in the glutathione redox system also result in impaired phagocyte function, probably because the cells have to be protected against their own toxic oxygen products. PMID:225141

  1. Bull heading to kill live gas wells

    SciTech Connect

    Oudeman, P.; Avest, D. ter; Grodal, E.O.; Asheim, H.A.; Meissner, R.J.H.

    1994-12-31

    To kill a live closed-in gas well by bull heading down the tubing, the selected pump rate should be high enough to ensure efficient displacement of the gas into the formation (i.e., to avoid the kill fluid bypassing the gas). On the other hand, the pressures that develop during bull heading at high rate must not exceed wellhead pressure rating, tubing or casing burst pressures or the formation breakdown gradient, since this will lead, at best, to a very inefficient kill job. Given these constraints, the optimum kill rate, requited hydraulic horsepower, density and type of kill fluids have to be selected. For this purpose a numerical simulator has been developed, which predicts the sequence of events during bull heading. Pressures and flow rates in the well during the kill job are calculated, taking to account slip between the gas and kill fluid, hydrostatic and friction pressure drop, wellbore gas compression and leak-off to the formation. Comparison with the results of a dedicated field test demonstrates that these parameters can be estimated accurately. Example calculations will be presented to show how the simulator can be used to identify an optimum kill scenario.

  2. Efficacy of an Fc-modified anti-CD123 antibody (CSL362) combined with chemotherapy in xenograft models of acute myelogenous leukemia in immunodeficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Erwin M.; Yee, Dean; Busfield, Samantha J.; McManus, Julie F.; Cummings, Nik; Vairo, Gino; Wei, Andrew; Ramshaw, Hayley S.; Powell, Jason A.; Lopez, Angel F.; Lewis, Ian D.; McCall, Martin N.; Lock, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis of older patients with acute myelogenous leukemia is generally poor. The interleukin-3 receptor α-chain (CD123) is highly expressed on the surface of acute leukemia cells compared with normal hematopoietic stem cells. CSL362 is a fully humanized, CD123-neutralizing monoclonal antibody containing a modified Fc structure, which enhances human natural killer cell antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Six continuous acute myelogenous leukemia xenografts established from patient explants and characterized by cell and molecular criteria, produced progressively lethal disease 42-202 days after transplantation. CSL362 alone reduced engraftment of one of four and three of four acute myelogenous leukemia xenografts in the bone marrow and peripheral organs, respectively. A cytarabine and daunorubicin regimen was optimized using this model to identify potentially synergistic interactions with CSL362. Cytarabine/daunorubicin improved the survival of mice engrafted with four of four acute myelogenous leukemia xenografts by 31–41 days. Moreover, CSL362 extended the survival of cytarabine/daunorubicin-treated mice for two of two acute myelogenous leukemia xenografts, while augmentation of natural killer cell-deficient NSG mice with adoptively transferred human natural killer cells improved survival against a single xenograft. Interestingly, this enhanced CSL362 efficacy was lost in the absence of chemotherapy. This study shows that acute myelogenous leukemia xenografts provide a platform for the evaluation of new therapeutics, simulating complex in vivo interactions, and that the in vivo efficacy of CSL362 supports continued clinical development of this drug. PMID:26130514

  3. Momentum kill procedure can quickly control blowouts

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, W.D. ); Moore, P. )

    1993-08-30

    The momentum kill method can help in quickly regaining control of a blowing well, providing the blowing well rate and fluid properties can be estimated reasonably. The momentum of the kill fluid counteracts and overcomes the flowing momentum of formation fluids. In other words, sufficient mud density pumped at a sufficient rate is directed into the flow stream to force the escaping fluid column back into the well bore. Sufficient kill fluid hydrostatic pressure must be stacked'' in the hole so that the well remains dead after the operation. The momentum kill is not a panacea for all blowouts. An assessment must be made of the potential problems unique to this method, and certain requirements must be met if the technique is to be successful. The paper discusses some of the considerations for evaluating the use of the momentum kill method.

  4. Mount Unzen kills three volcanologists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVito, M. Catherine

    Three AGU members were among 37 people killed June 3 when Mount Unzen, a volcano in Nagasaki prefecture, Japan, erupted. Unzen last erupted in 1792. The first signs of renewed activity appeared in mid-1990, with increases in seismicity and the first volcanic tremor since observations began in 1966. The three volcanologists, Harry Glicken and Maurice and Katia Krafft, had traveled to Mount Unzen to monitor the increased seismic activity. Glicken, 33, was a visiting scientist at Tokyo Metropolitan University and an assistant researcher in geological sciences at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He worked for the U.S. Geological Survey until 1989, and narrowly escaped death in the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens in Washington.Glicken had been an AGU member since 1980 and was known for his work in debris avalanches. Maurice, 45, and Katia Krafft, 44, of Cernay, France, were professional volcanologists known for their extensive work in publishing books and films on volcanology for the general public. Both Kraffts joined AGU in 1975.

  5. Spacetime encodings. III. Second order Killing tensors

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, Jeandrew

    2010-01-15

    This paper explores the Petrov type D, stationary axisymmetric vacuum (SAV) spacetimes that were found by Carter to have separable Hamilton-Jacobi equations, and thus admit a second-order Killing tensor. The derivation of the spacetimes presented in this paper borrows from ideas about dynamical systems, and illustrates concepts that can be generalized to higher-order Killing tensors. The relationship between the components of the Killing equations and metric functions are given explicitly. The origin of the four separable coordinate systems found by Carter is explained and classified in terms of the analytic structure associated with the Killing equations. A geometric picture of what the orbital invariants may represent is built. Requiring that a SAV spacetime admits a second-order Killing tensor is very restrictive, selecting very few candidates from the group of all possible SAV spacetimes. This restriction arises due to the fact that the consistency conditions associated with the Killing equations require that the field variables obey a second-order differential equation, as opposed to a fourth-order differential equation that imposes the weaker condition that the spacetime be SAV. This paper introduces ideas that could lead to the explicit computation of more general orbital invariants in the form of higher-order Killing tensors.

  6. [Killing of cattle via electrical stunning].

    PubMed

    Maurer, B; Forster, S

    2007-04-01

    For disease control in the case of epidemics killing of cattle via electrical stunning is a method of choice. The official veterinarian is responsible for monitoring the adhesion to animal welfare principles during electrical stunning and killing. This requires specialised knowledge and experience as the symptoms of effective stunning are quite variable in cattle. Signs of effective and ineffective stunning are described below. In addition to suitable technical equipment, restraint of the animals and correct use of the equipment, neurophysiological processes have to be considered. Calm handling of the animals avoiding stress is a prerequisite for ensuring animal welfare and minimising pain especially when killing cattle using electrical methods. PMID:17484500

  7. Human Neutrophils Use Different Mechanisms To Kill Aspergillus fumigatus Conidia and Hyphae: Evidence from Phagocyte Defects.

    PubMed

    Gazendam, Roel P; van Hamme, John L; Tool, Anton T J; Hoogenboezem, Mark; van den Berg, J Merlijn; Prins, Jan M; Vitkov, Ljubomir; van de Veerdonk, Frank L; van den Berg, Timo K; Roos, Dirk; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2016-02-01

    Neutrophils are known to play a pivotal role in the host defense against Aspergillus infections. This is illustrated by the prevalence of Aspergillus infections in patients with neutropenia or phagocyte functional defects, such as chronic granulomatous disease. However, the mechanisms by which human neutrophils recognize and kill Aspergillus are poorly understood. In this work, we have studied in detail which neutrophil functions, including neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation, are involved in the killing of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia and hyphae, using neutrophils from patients with well-defined genetic immunodeficiencies. Recognition of conidia involves integrin CD11b/CD18 (and not dectin-1), which triggers a PI3K-dependent nonoxidative intracellular mechanism of killing. When the conidia escape from early killing and germinate, the extracellular destruction of the Aspergillus hyphae needs opsonization by Abs and involves predominantly recognition via Fcγ receptors, signaling via Syk, PI3K, and protein kinase C to trigger the production of toxic reactive oxygen metabolites by the NADPH oxidase and myeloperoxidase. A. fumigatus induces NET formation; however, NETs did not contribute to A. fumigatus killing. Thus, our findings reveal distinct killing mechanisms of Aspergillus conidia and hyphae by human neutrophils, leading to a comprehensive insight in the innate antifungal response. PMID:26718340

  8. Killing Initial Data on spacelike conformal boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paetz, Tim-Torben

    2016-08-01

    We analyze Killing Initial Data on Cauchy surfaces in conformally rescaled vacuum space-times satisfying Friedrich's conformal field equations. As an application, we derive the KID equations on a spacelike ℐ-.

  9. Quantum integrability of quadratic Killing tensors

    SciTech Connect

    Duval, C.; Valent, G.

    2005-05-01

    Quantum integrability of classical integrable systems given by quadratic Killing tensors on curved configuration spaces is investigated. It is proven that, using a 'minimal' quantization scheme, quantum integrability is ensured for a large class of classic examples.

  10. Killing vector fields and harmonic superfield theories

    SciTech Connect

    Groeger, Josua

    2014-09-15

    The harmonic action functional allows a natural generalisation to semi-Riemannian supergeometry, also referred to as harmonic, which resembles the supersymmetric sigma models studied in high energy physics. We show that Killing vector fields are infinitesimal supersymmetries of this harmonic action and prove three different Noether theorems in this context. En passant, we provide a homogeneous treatment of five characterisations of Killing vector fields on semi-Riemannian supermanifolds, thus filling a gap in the literature.

  11. Conserved quantities from piecewise Killing vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dray, Tevian; Padmanabhan, T.

    1989-07-01

    In the presence of symmetries, conserved quantities can be obtained by contracting the stress-energy tensor with a Killing vector. We generalize this result to piecewise Killing vectors by giving sufficient conditions for the construction of an associated conserved quantity. A typical example, namely, two stationary space-times joined together in such a way that the resulting space-time is not stationary, is treated in detail.

  12. Killing vector fields and harmonic superfield theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groeger, Josua

    2014-09-01

    The harmonic action functional allows a natural generalisation to semi-Riemannian supergeometry, also referred to as harmonic, which resembles the supersymmetric sigma models studied in high energy physics. We show that Killing vector fields are infinitesimal supersymmetries of this harmonic action and prove three different Noether theorems in this context. En passant, we provide a homogeneous treatment of five characterisations of Killing vector fields on semi-Riemannian supermanifolds, thus filling a gap in the literature.

  13. Killing-Yano tensors, rank-2 Killing tensors, and conserved quantities in higher dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krtous, Pavel; Kubiznák, David; Page, Don N.; Frolov, Valeri P.

    2007-02-01

    From the metric and one Killing-Yano tensor of rank D-2 in any D-dimensional spacetime with such a principal Killing-Yano tensor, we show how to generate k = [(D+1)/2] Killing-Yano tensors, of rank D-2j for all 0 <= j <= k-1, and k rank-2 Killing tensors, giving k constants of geodesic motion that are in involution. For the example of the Kerr-NUT-AdS spacetime (hep-th/0604125) with its principal Killing-Yano tensor (gr-qc/0610144), these constants and the constants from the k Killing vectors give D independent constants in involution, making the geodesic motion completely integrable (hep-th/0611083). The constants of motion are also related to the constants recently obtained in the separation of the Hamilton-Jacobi and Klein-Gordon equations (hep-th/0611245).

  14. Hazardous materials in Fresh Kills landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschhorn, J.S.

    1997-12-31

    No environmental monitoring and corrective action programs can pinpoint multiple locations of hazardous materials the total amount of them in a large landfill. Yet the consequences of hazardous materials in MSW landfills are considerable, in terms of public health concerns, environmental damage, and cleanup costs. In this paper a rough estimation is made of how much hazardous material may have been disposed in Fresh Kills landfill in Staten Island, New York. The logic and methods could be used for other MSW landfills. Fresh Kills has frequently been described as the world`s largest MSW landfill. While records of hazardous waste disposal at Fresh Kills over nearly 50 years of operation certainly do not exist, no reasonable person would argue with the conclusion that large quantities of hazardous waste surely have been disposed at Fresh Kills, both legally and illegally. This study found that at least 2 million tons of hazardous wastes and substances have been disposed at Fresh Kills since 1948. Major sources are: household hazardous waste, commercial RCRA hazardous waste, incinerator ash, and commercial non-RCRA hazardous waste, governmental RCRA hazardous waste. Illegal disposal of hazardous waste surely has contributed even more. This is a sufficient amount to cause serious environmental contamination and releases, especially from such a landfill without an engineered liner system, for example. This figure is roughly 1% of the total amount of waste disposed in Fresh Kills since 1948, probably at least 200 million tons.

  15. Killing of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by human lactoferrin.

    PubMed Central

    Kalmar, J R; Arnold, R R

    1988-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is a fastidious, facultative gram-negative rod associated with endocarditis, certain forms of periodontal disease, and other focal infections. Human neutrophils have demonstrated bactericidal activity against A. actinomycetemcomitans, and much of the oxygen-dependent killing has been attributed to the myeloperoxidase-H2O2-halide system. However, the contribution of other neutrophil components to killing activity is obscure. Lactoferrin, an iron-binding glycoprotein, is a major constituent of neutrophil-specific granules and is also found in mucosal secretions. In this report, we show that human lactoferrin is bactericidal for A. actinomycetemcomitans. Killing activity required an unsaturated (iron- and anion-free) molecule that produced a 2-log decrease in viability within 120 min at 37 degrees C at a concentration of 1.9 microM. Besides exhibiting concentration dependence, killing kinetics were affected by minor variations in temperature and pH. Magnesium, a divalent cation thought to stabilize lipopolysaccharide interactions on the surface of gram-negative organisms, enhanced lactoferrin killing of A. actinomycetemcomitans, while other cations, such as potassium and calcium, had no effect. Our data suggest that lactoferrin contributes to killing of A. actinomycetemcomitans by human neutrophils and that it may also play a significant role in innate secretory defense against this potential periodontopathogen. PMID:3417349

  16. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  17. Chronic pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  18. Microenvironmental remodeling as a parameter and prognostic factor of heterogeneous leukemogenesis in acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-A; Shim, Jae-Seung; Lee, Ga-Young; Yim, Hyeon Woo; Kim, Tae-Min; Kim, Myungshin; Leem, Sun-Hee; Lee, Jong-Wook; Min, Chang-Ki; Oh, Il-Hoan

    2015-06-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by clonal proliferation of stem cell-like blasts in bone marrow (BM); however, their unique cellular interaction within the BM microenvironment and its functional significance remain unclear. Here, we assessed the BM microenvironment of AML patients and demonstrate that the leukemia stem cells induce a change in the transcriptional programming of the normal mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC). The modified leukemic niche alters the expressions of cross-talk molecules (i.e., CXCL12 and JAG1) in MSCs to provide a distinct cross-talk between normal and leukemia cells, selectively suppressing normal primitive hematopoietic cells while supporting leukemogenesis and chemoresistance. Of note, AML patients exhibited distinct heterogeneity in the alteration of mesenchymal stroma in BM. The distinct pattern of stromal changes in leukemic BM at initial diagnosis was associated with a heterogeneous posttreatment clinical course with respect to the maintenance of complete remission for 5 to 8 years and early or late relapse. Thus, remodeling of mesenchymal niche by leukemia cells is an intrinsic self-reinforcing process of leukemogenesis that can be a parameter for the heterogeneity in the clinical course of leukemia and hence serve as a potential prognostic factor. PMID:25791383

  19. Phosphatidylserine index as a marker of the procoagulant phenotype of acute myelogenous leukemia cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tormoen, Garth W.; Recht, Olivia; Gruber, András; Levine, Ross L.; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2013-10-01

    Patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) are at risk for thrombotic complications. Risk to develop thrombosis is closely tied to leukemia subtype, and studies have shown an association between leukocytosis and thrombosis in AML M3. We evaluated the relative roles of cell count and the surface expression of tissue factor (TF) and phosphatidylserine (PS) in the procoagulant phenotype of AML cell lines. The TF-positive AML M3 cell lines, NB4 and HL60, and AML M2 cell line, AML14, exhibited both extrinsic tenase and prothrombinase activity in a purified system and promoted experimental thrombus formation. In contrast, the TF-negative AML cell line, HEL, exhibited only prothrombinase activity and did not affect the rate of occlusive thrombus formation. In plasma, NB4, HL60 and AML14 shortened clotting times in a cell-count, PS- and TF-dependent manner. Exposure of cultured NB4, HL60, and AML14 cells to the chemotherapeutic agent daunorubicin increased their extrinsic tenase activity and PS expression. Clot initiation time inversely correlated with logarithm of PS index, defined as the product of multiplying leukocyte count with cell surface PS exposure. We propose that leukemia cell PS index may serve as a biomarker for procoagulant activity.

  20. Tetraspanin 3 is Required for the Development and Propagation of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Takahiro; Blevins, Allen; Konuma, Takaaki; Weeks, Joi; Lytle, Nikki K.; Koechlein, Claire S.; Rizzieri, David; Chuah, Charles; Oehler, Vivian G.; Sasik, Roman; Hardiman, Gary; Reya, Tannishtha

    2015-01-01

    Summary Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML) is an aggressive cancer that strikes both adults and children, and is frequently resistant to therapy. Thus, identifying signals needed for AML propagation is a critical step toward developing new approaches for treating this disease. Here we show that Tetraspanin3 is a target of the RNA binding protein Musashi2, which plays a key role in AML. We generated Tspan3 knockout mice which were born without overt defects. However, Tspan3 deletion impaired leukemia stem cell self-renewal and disease propagation, and markedly improved survival in mouse models of AML. Additionally, Tspan3 inhibition blocked growth of AML patient samples suggesting that Tspan3 is also important in human disease. As part of the mechanism, we show that Tspan3-deficiency disabled responses to CXCL12/SDF-1, and led to defects in AML localization within the niche. These identify Tspan3 as an important regulator of aggressive leukemias and highlight a role for Tspan3 in oncogenesis. PMID:26212080

  1. Targeting aberrant glutathione metabolism to eradicate human acute myelogenous leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Pei, Shanshan; Minhajuddin, Mohammad; Callahan, Kevin P; Balys, Marlene; Ashton, John M; Neering, Sarah J; Lagadinou, Eleni D; Corbett, Cheryl; Ye, Haobin; Liesveld, Jane L; O'Dwyer, Kristen M; Li, Zheng; Shi, Lei; Greninger, Patricia; Settleman, Jeffrey; Benes, Cyril; Hagen, Fred K; Munger, Joshua; Crooks, Peter A; Becker, Michael W; Jordan, Craig T

    2013-11-22

    The development of strategies to eradicate primary human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells is a major challenge to the leukemia research field. In particular, primitive leukemia cells, often termed leukemia stem cells, are typically refractory to many forms of therapy. To investigate improved strategies for targeting of human AML cells we compared the molecular mechanisms regulating oxidative state in primitive (CD34(+)) leukemic versus normal specimens. Our data indicate that CD34(+) AML cells have elevated expression of multiple glutathione pathway regulatory proteins, presumably as a mechanism to compensate for increased oxidative stress in leukemic cells. Consistent with this observation, CD34(+) AML cells have lower levels of reduced glutathione and increased levels of oxidized glutathione compared with normal CD34(+) cells. These findings led us to hypothesize that AML cells will be hypersensitive to inhibition of glutathione metabolism. To test this premise, we identified compounds such as parthenolide (PTL) or piperlongumine that induce almost complete glutathione depletion and severe cell death in CD34(+) AML cells. Importantly, these compounds only induce limited and transient glutathione depletion as well as significantly less toxicity in normal CD34(+) cells. We further determined that PTL perturbs glutathione homeostasis by a multifactorial mechanism, which includes inhibiting key glutathione metabolic enzymes (GCLC and GPX1), as well as direct depletion of glutathione. These findings demonstrate that primitive leukemia cells are uniquely sensitive to agents that target aberrant glutathione metabolism, an intrinsic property of primary human AML cells. PMID:24089526

  2. Targeting Aberrant Glutathione Metabolism to Eradicate Human Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Shanshan; Minhajuddin, Mohammad; Callahan, Kevin P.; Balys, Marlene; Ashton, John M.; Neering, Sarah J.; Lagadinou, Eleni D.; Corbett, Cheryl; Ye, Haobin; Liesveld, Jane L.; O'Dwyer, Kristen M.; Li, Zheng; Shi, Lei; Greninger, Patricia; Settleman, Jeffrey; Benes, Cyril; Hagen, Fred K.; Munger, Joshua; Crooks, Peter A.; Becker, Michael W.; Jordan, Craig T.

    2013-01-01

    The development of strategies to eradicate primary human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells is a major challenge to the leukemia research field. In particular, primitive leukemia cells, often termed leukemia stem cells, are typically refractory to many forms of therapy. To investigate improved strategies for targeting of human AML cells we compared the molecular mechanisms regulating oxidative state in primitive (CD34+) leukemic versus normal specimens. Our data indicate that CD34+ AML cells have elevated expression of multiple glutathione pathway regulatory proteins, presumably as a mechanism to compensate for increased oxidative stress in leukemic cells. Consistent with this observation, CD34+ AML cells have lower levels of reduced glutathione and increased levels of oxidized glutathione compared with normal CD34+ cells. These findings led us to hypothesize that AML cells will be hypersensitive to inhibition of glutathione metabolism. To test this premise, we identified compounds such as parthenolide (PTL) or piperlongumine that induce almost complete glutathione depletion and severe cell death in CD34+ AML cells. Importantly, these compounds only induce limited and transient glutathione depletion as well as significantly less toxicity in normal CD34+ cells. We further determined that PTL perturbs glutathione homeostasis by a multifactorial mechanism, which includes inhibiting key glutathione metabolic enzymes (GCLC and GPX1), as well as direct depletion of glutathione. These findings demonstrate that primitive leukemia cells are uniquely sensitive to agents that target aberrant glutathione metabolism, an intrinsic property of primary human AML cells. PMID:24089526

  3. Ceramide-tamoxifen regimen targets bioenergetic elements in acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Morad, Samy A F; Ryan, Terence E; Neufer, P Darrell; Zeczycki, Tonya N; Davis, Traci S; MacDougall, Matthew R; Fox, Todd E; Tan, Su-Fern; Feith, David J; Loughran, Thomas P; Kester, Mark; Claxton, David F; Barth, Brian M; Deering, Tye G; Cabot, Myles C

    2016-07-01

    The objective of our study was to determine the mechanism of action of the short-chain ceramide analog, C6-ceramide, and the breast cancer drug, tamoxifen, which we show coactively depress viability and induce apoptosis in human acute myelogenous leukemia cells. Exposure to the C6-ceramide-tamoxifen combination elicited decreases in mitochondrial membrane potential and complex I respiration, increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS), and release of mitochondrial proapoptotic proteins. Decreases in ATP levels, reduced glycolytic capacity, and reduced expression of inhibitors of apoptosis proteins also resulted. Cytotoxicity of the drug combination was mitigated by exposure to antioxidant. Cells metabolized C6-ceramide by glycosylation and hydrolysis, the latter leading to increases in long-chain ceramides. Tamoxifen potently blocked glycosylation of C6-ceramide and long-chain ceramides. N-desmethyltamoxifen, a poor antiestrogen and the major tamoxifen metabolite in humans, was also effective with C6-ceramide, indicating that traditional antiestrogen pathways are not involved in cellular responses. We conclude that cell death is driven by mitochondrial targeting and ROS generation and that tamoxifen enhances the ceramide effect by blocking its metabolism. As depletion of ATP and targeting the "Warburg effect" represent dynamic metabolic insult, this ceramide-containing combination may be of utility in the treatment of leukemia and other cancers. PMID:27140664

  4. [Bacillus cereus sepsis and subarachnoid hemorrhage following consolidation chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia].

    PubMed

    Kawatani, Eri; Kishikawa, Yuki; Sankoda, Chikahiro; Kuwahara, Nobuo; Mori, Daisuke; Osoegawa, Kouichi; Matsuishi, Eijo; Gondo, Hisashi

    2009-04-01

    A 64-year-old man with acute myelogenous leukemia (FAB classification, M7) in remission received consolidation chemotherapy with mitoxantrone/cytosine arabinoside. WBC counts decreased to 0/microl on day 14, and fever (39.3 degrees C) and epigastralgia developed on day 15. Cefozopran was instituted for febrile neutropenia; however, on day 16, he was found to be in cardiac arrest. CT scan on day 16 revealed subarachnoid hemorrhage. Gram-positive rods were isolated from blood cultures on day 15, and were later identified as B.cereus. He recovered transiently, but eventually died on day 19. Postmortem examination demonstrated many colonies of B. cereus in the cerebrum, cerebellum, lung, and liver. Hepatocyte necrosis was also observed in the liver. Bacterial aneurysms or septic emboli were not identified in the arachnoid vessels, but necrosis of cerebral vessels was prominent, which was considered to be the cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage has been reported to be associated with B. cereus sepsis, which developed at nadir following chemotherapy for leukemia patients. Because of the aggressive clinical course of B. cereus sepsis, including the risk for subarachnoid hemorrhage, early treatment with effective antibiotics for B. cereus sepsis would be important in the management of leukemia patients after chemotherapy. PMID:19404024

  5. Summary of the published Indian data on chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Manish K; Sengar, Manju; Nair, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (LML) was recognized as a distinct entity in the mid-1800s. Since Nowell and Hunagerford initiated their research on CML in1960 our understanding in CML has been increasing. Imatinib became the preferred treatment from 2000 onwards as a result of its unprecedented success. The lack of structured Indian data on CML led to the formation of a CML data cansortuim which invited CML data albiet retro spartive form around the country including major cancer service providers both government and private. We provide a summary of published Indian data on CML here. PMID:27606306

  6. Management of imatinib-resistant patients with chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bhamidipati, Pavan Kumar; Kantarjian, Hagop; Cortes, Jorge; Cornelison, A. Megan

    2013-01-01

    Since its approval in 2001 for frontline management of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), imatinib has proven to be very effective in achieving high remission rates and improving prognosis. However, up to 33% of patients will not achieve optimal response. This has led researchers to develop new second- and third-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors. In this article, we review the mechanisms of resistance, recommendations for monitoring, assessment of milestones, and management options for patients with CML who are resistant to imatinib therapy. We further explain the potential pitfalls that can lead to unnecessary discontinuation, the prognosis of patients whose condition fails to respond to treatment, and the upcoming therapies. PMID:23610618

  7. Management of imatinib-resistant patients with chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bhamidipati, Pavan Kumar; Kantarjian, Hagop; Cortes, Jorge; Cornelison, A Megan; Jabbour, Elias

    2013-04-01

    Since its approval in 2001 for frontline management of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), imatinib has proven to be very effective in achieving high remission rates and improving prognosis. However, up to 33% of patients will not achieve optimal response. This has led researchers to develop new second- and third-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors. In this article, we review the mechanisms of resistance, recommendations for monitoring, assessment of milestones, and management options for patients with CML who are resistant to imatinib therapy. We further explain the potential pitfalls that can lead to unnecessary discontinuation, the prognosis of patients whose condition fails to respond to treatment, and the upcoming therapies. PMID:23610618

  8. Summary of the published Indian data on chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Manish K.; Sengar, Manju; Nair, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (LML) was recognized as a distinct entity in the mid-1800s. Since Nowell and Hunagerford initiated their research on CML in1960 our understanding in CML has been increasing. Imatinib became the preferred treatment from 2000 onwards as a result of its unprecedented success. The lack of structured Indian data on CML led to the formation of a CML data cansortuim which invited CML data albiet retro spartive form around the country including major cancer service providers both government and private. We provide a summary of published Indian data on CML here. PMID:27606306

  9. Comparison of allogeneic stem cell transplantation from familial-mismatched/haploidentical donors and from unrelated donors in adults with high-risk acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Cho, Byung-Sik; Yoon, Jae-Ho; Shin, Seung-Hwan; Yahng, Seung-Ah; Lee, Sung-Eun; Eom, Ki-Seong; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Lee, Seok; Min, Chang-Ki; Cho, Seok-Goo; Kim, Dong-Wook; Lee, Jong-Wook; Min, Woo-Sung; Park, Chong-Won; Kim, Hee-Je

    2012-10-01

    To weigh the pros and cons of familial-mismatched/haploidentical transplantation (FMT) in patients with high-risk acute myelogenous leukemia, we assessed outcomes of 23 patients who underwent FMT, using reduced-intensity conditioning with total body irradiation 800 cGy/busulfan/fludarabine/antithymocyte globulin without ex vivo T cell depletion, compared to 33 patients who underwent well-matched unrelated donor transplantation (WM-UDT) and 13 who underwent partially matched unrelated donor transplantation (PM-UDT) during the same period. The FMT patients had not only a similar pattern of engraftment and immune reconstitution as the WM-UDT and PM-UDT patients but also comparable incidences and severity of acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease. The FMT patients did not experience any form of engraftment failure. However, the cumulative incidence of cytomegalovirus DNAemia was significantly higher in the FMT group compared with the other groups (P = .036). After a median follow-up of 28 months, overall survival, disease-free survival, relapse, and nonrelapse mortality were 83%, 74%, 20%, and 7%, respectively, for WM-UDT; 51%, 51%, 31%, and 18% for PM-UDT; and 66%, 64%, 26%, and 10% for FMT. This demonstrates a trend for favorable survival outcomes of WM-UDT over FMT and of FMT over PM-UDT. However, we found no significant statistical differences in survival according to donor type. These data need to be interpreted cautiously because of limited power calculations due to the small number of each donor group. This pilot study suggests the feasibility of FMT using our novel regimen with careful evaluation of CMV DNAemia compared with WM-UDT and PM-UDT. Further trials with larger numbers of patients, comparing FMT directly with transplantation with other donor types, are needed. PMID:22516055

  10. Killing of Brucella abortus by bovine serum.

    PubMed Central

    Corbeil, L B; Blau, K; Inzana, T J; Nielsen, K H; Jacobson, R H; Corbeil, R R; Winter, A J

    1988-01-01

    Studies of the serum bactericidal system in bovine brucellosis were undertaken to investigate the role of the humoral immune response in protection of cattle against the facultative intracellular parasite Brucella abortus. Fresh sera from normal control cattle, infected cattle, and cattle immunized with B. abortus cell envelopes were collected before treatment and during the course of immunization or infection. Normal fresh bovine serum or fresh agammaglobulinemic serum from colostrum-deprived calves was effective in killing smooth virulent B. abortus 2308, but rough strains RB51 (a rough mutant of strain 2308) and 45/20 were much more sensitive to serum. The difference in susceptibility to serum was shown to be correlated with differences in lipopolysaccharide chemotype, with the more resistant strain 2308 having O polysaccharide and the more susceptible strains 45/20 and RB51 lacking O side chains. By treatment of fresh serum with MgCl2 and EGTA [ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid] killing was shown to occur via the classical pathway of complement activation. When antibody to B. abortus was present, killing of strain RB51 increased but killing of smooth strain 2308 decreased. The earliest antibody response in serum from infected animals did not interfere with killing. When affinity-purified bovine immunoglobulins specific for B. abortus smooth lipopolysaccharide were added to fresh normal bovine serum, immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) and IgG2 isotypes blocked killing but IgM and IgA isotypes did not. Thus, it appears that serum from previously unexposed animals or animals early during infection can kill smooth B. abortus, an appropriate defense mechanism before the organism becomes intracellular. At later stages of infection, blocking antibodies predominate. Images PMID:3141287