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Sample records for kinase cgamma leads

  1. Activation of mutant protein kinase C{gamma} leads to aberrant sequestration and impairment of its cellular function

    SciTech Connect

    Doran, Graeme; Davies, Kay E.; Talbot, Kevin

    2008-08-01

    Mutations in protein kinase C{gamma} (PKC{gamma}) cause the neurodegenerative disease spinocerebellar ataxia type 14 (SCA14). In this study, expression of an extensive panel of known SCA14-associated PKC{gamma} mutations as fusion proteins in cell culture led to the consistent formation of cytoplasmic aggregates in response to purinoceptor stimulation. Aggregates co-stained with antibodies to phosphorylated PKC{gamma} and the early endosome marker EEA1 but failed to redistribute to the cell membrane under conditions of oxidative stress. These studies suggest that Purkinje cell damage in SCA14 may result from a reduction of PKC{gamma} activity due its aberrant sequestration in the early endosome compartment.

  2. Platelet-derived growth factor stimulates protein kinase D through the activation of phospholipase Cgamma and protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Van Lint, J; Ni, Y; Valius, M; Merlevede, W; Vandenheede, J R

    1998-03-20

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) stimulates protein kinase D (PKD) in a time- and dose-dependent manner. We have used a series of PDGF receptor mutants that display a selective impairment of the binding of SH2-containing proteins (GTPase-activating protein, SHP-2, phospholipase Cgamma (PLCgamma), or phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI3K)) to show that Tyr-1021, the PLCgamma-binding site, is essential for PKD stimulation by PDGF in A431 cells. We next investigated whether any one of these four binding sites could mediate PKD activation in the absence of the other three sites. F5, a receptor mutant that lacks all four binding sites for GTPase-activating protein, PLCgamma, PI3K, and SHP-2, fails to activate PKD. A panel of single add-back mutants was used to investigate if any one of these four sites could restore signaling to PKD. Of the four sites, only the PLCgamma+ single add-back receptor restored PDGF-mediated activation of PKD, and only this add-back receptor produced diacylglycerol (DAG) in a PDGF-dependent manner. 1,2-Dioctanoyl-sn-glycerol, a membrane-permeant DAG analog, was found to be sufficient for activation of PKD. Taken together, these data indicate that PLCgamma activation is not only necessary, but also sufficient to mediate PDGF-induced PKD activation. Although the presence of a pleckstrin homology domain makes PKD a potential PI3K target, PKD was not stimulated by selective PI3K activation, and wortmannin, an inhibitor of PI3K, did not inhibit PDGF signaling to PKD. The activation of PKD by DAG or by the wild-type and PLCgamma+ add-back PDGF receptors was inhibited by GF109203X, suggesting a role for protein kinase C in the stimulation of PKD by PDGF. PDGF induced a time-dependent phosphorylation of PKD that closely correlated with activation. The PDGF-induced activation and phosphorylation of PKD were reversed by in vitro incubation of PKD with protein phosphatase 1 or 2A, indicating that PDGF signaling to PKD involves the Ser

  3. Protein kinase C-gamma is present in adriamycin resistant HL-60 leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Aquino, A; Warren, B S; Omichinski, J; Hartman, K D; Glazer, R I

    1990-01-30

    The isoform pattern of protein kinase C (PKC) was examined in wild-type and Adriamycin-resistant (HL-60/AR) HL-60 leukemia cells. Analyses were carried out by immunoblotting with mouse monoclonal antibodies against PKC-alpha and PKC-beta and a rabbit polyclonal antibody against the variable (V3) region of PKC-gamma. HL-60/AR cells contained an equivalent level of PKC-alpha and a lower amount of PKC-beta than HL-60 cells. In contrast, only HL-60/AR cells contained PKC-gamma. These results indicate that the regulation of this family of isoenzymes is altered in drug-resistant cells. PMID:2302237

  4. Mapping of sites on the Src family protein tyrosine kinases p55blk, p59fyn, and p56lyn which interact with the effector molecules phospholipase C-gamma 2, microtubule-associated protein kinase, GTPase-activating protein, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Pleiman, C M; Clark, M R; Gauen, L K; Winitz, S; Coggeshall, K M; Johnson, G L; Shaw, A S; Cambier, J C

    1993-01-01

    Engagement of the B-cell antigen receptor complex induces immediate activation of receptor-associated Src family tyrosine kinases including p55blk, p59fyn, p53/56lyn, and perhaps p56lck, and this response is accompanied by tyrosine phosphorylation of distinct cellular substrates. These kinases act directly or indirectly to phosphorylate and/or activate effector proteins including p42 (microtubule-associated protein kinase) (MAPK), phospholipases C-gamma 1 (PLC gamma 1) and C-gamma 2 (PLC gamma 2), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-K), and p21ras-GTPase-activating protein (GAP). Although coimmunoprecipitation results indicate that the Src family protein tyrosine kinases interact physically with some of these effector molecules, the molecular basis of this interaction has not been established. Here, we show that three distinct sites mediate the interaction of these kinases with effectors. The amino-terminal 27 residues of the unique domain of p56lyn mediate association with PLC gamma 2, MAPK, and GAP. Binding to PI 3-K is mediated through the Src homology 3 (SH3) domains of the Src family kinases. Relatively small proportions of cellular PI 3-K, PLC gamma 2, MAPK, and GAP, presumably those which are tyrosine phosphorylated, bind to the SH2 domains of these kinases. Comparative analysis of binding activities of Blk, Lyn, and Fyn shows that these kinases differ in their abilities to associate with MAPK and PI 3-K, suggesting that they may preferentially bind and subsequently phosphorylate distinct sets of downstream effector molecules in vivo. Fast protein liquid chromatography Mono Q column-fractionated MAPK maintains the ability to bind bacterially expressed Lyn, suggesting that the two kinases may interact directly. Images PMID:8395016

  5. Phospholipase C{gamma}1 stimulates transcriptional activation of the matrix metalloproteinase-3 gene via the protein kinase C/Raf/ERK cascade

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Soon Young; Choi, Ha Young; Ahn, Bong-Hyun; Son, Sang Wook; Lee, Young Han . E-mail: younghan@hanyang.ac.kr

    2007-02-16

    The phospholipid hydrolase phospholipase C{gamma}1 (PLC{gamma}1) plays a major role in regulation of cell proliferation, development, and cell motility. Overexpression of PLC{gamma}1 is associated with tumor development, and it is overexpressed in some tumors. Matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) is a protein involved in tumor invasion and metastasis. Here, we demonstrate that overexpression of PLC{gamma}1 stimulates MMP-3 expression at the transcriptional level via the PKC-mediated Raf/MEK1/ERK signaling cascade. We propose that modulation of PLC{gamma}1 activity might be of value in controlling the activity of MMPs, which are important regulators of invasion and metastasis in malignant tumors.

  6. Ethanol reduces GABAA alpha1 subunit receptor surface expression by a protein kinase Cgamma-dependent mechanism in cultured cerebral cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Suryanarayanan, Asha; Boyd, Kevin N; Comerford, Chris E; Lai, Marvin A; Ren, Qinglu; Morrow, A Leslie

    2010-05-01

    Prolonged ethanol exposure causes central nervous system hyperexcitability that involves a loss of GABAergic inhibition. We previously demonstrated that long-term ethanol exposure enhances the internalization of synaptic GABA(A) receptors composed of alpha1beta2/3gamma2 subunits. However, the mechanisms of ethanol-mediated internalization are unknown. This study explored the effect of ethanol on surface expression of GABA(A) alpha1 subunit-containing receptors in cultured cerebral cortical neurons and the role of protein kinase C (PKC) beta, gamma, and epsilon isoforms in their trafficking. Cultured neurons were prepared from rat pups on postnatal day 1 and maintained for 18 days. Cells were exposed to ethanol, and surface receptors were isolated by biotinylation and P2 fractionation, whereas functional analysis was conducted by whole-cell patch-clamp recording of GABA- and zolpidem-evoked responses. Ethanol exposure for 4 h decreased biotinylated surface expression of GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunits and reduced zolpidem (100 nM) enhancement of GABA-evoked currents. The PKC activator phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate mimicked the effect of ethanol, and the selective PKC inhibitor calphostin C prevented ethanol-induced internalization of these receptors. Ethanol exposure for 4 h also increased the colocalization and coimmunoprecipitation of PKCgamma with alpha1 subunits, whereas PKCbeta/alpha1 association and PKCepsilon/alpha1 colocalization were not altered by ethanol exposure. Selective PKCgamma inhibition by transfection of selective PKCgamma small interfering RNAs blocked ethanol-induced internalization of GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunits, whereas PKCbeta inhibition using pseudo-PKCbeta had no effect. These findings suggest that ethanol exposure selectively alters PKCgamma translocation to GABA(A) receptors and PKCgamma regulates GABA(A) alpha1 receptor trafficking after ethanol exposure. PMID:20159950

  7. Plasmodium falciparum Choline Kinase Inhibition Leads to a Major Decrease in Phosphatidylethanolamine Causing Parasite Death.

    PubMed

    Serrán-Aguilera, Lucía; Denton, Helen; Rubio-Ruiz, Belén; López-Gutiérrez, Borja; Entrena, Antonio; Izquierdo, Luis; Smith, Terry K; Conejo-García, Ana; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a life-threatening disease caused by different species of the protozoan parasite Plasmodium, with P. falciparum being the deadliest. Increasing parasitic resistance to existing antimalarials makes the necessity of novel avenues to treat this disease an urgent priority. The enzymes responsible for the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine are attractive drug targets to treat malaria as their selective inhibition leads to an arrest of the parasite's growth and cures malaria in a mouse model. We present here a detailed study that reveals a mode of action for two P. falciparum choline kinase inhibitors both in vitro and in vivo. The compounds present distinct binding modes to the choline/ethanolamine-binding site of P. falciparum choline kinase, reflecting different types of inhibition. Strikingly, these compounds primarily inhibit the ethanolamine kinase activity of the P. falciparum choline kinase, leading to a severe decrease in the phosphatidylethanolamine levels within P. falciparum, which explains the resulting growth phenotype and the parasites death. These studies provide an understanding of the mode of action, and act as a springboard for continued antimalarial development efforts selectively targeting P. falciparum choline kinase. PMID:27616047

  8. Genetic depletion of Polo-like kinase 1 leads to embryonic lethality due to mitotic aberrancies.

    PubMed

    Wachowicz, Paulina; Fernández-Miranda, Gonzalo; Marugán, Carlos; Escobar, Beatriz; de Cárcer, Guillermo

    2016-07-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is a serine/threonine kinase that plays multiple and essential roles during the cell division cycle. Its inhibition in cultured cells leads to severe mitotic aberrancies and cell death. Whereas previous reports suggested that Plk1 depletion in mice leads to a non-mitotic arrest in early embryos, we show here that the bi-allelic Plk1 depletion in mice certainly results in embryonic lethality due to extensive mitotic aberrations at the morula stage, including multi- and mono-polar spindles, impaired chromosome segregation and cytokinesis failure. In addition, the conditional depletion of Plk1 during mid-gestation leads also to severe mitotic aberrancies. Our data also confirms that Plk1 is completely dispensable for mitotic entry in vivo. On the other hand, Plk1 haploinsufficient mice are viable, and Plk1-heterozygous fibroblasts do not harbor any cell cycle alterations. Plk1 is overexpressed in many human tumors, suggesting a therapeutic benefit of inhibiting Plk1, and specific small-molecule inhibitors for this kinase are now being evaluated in clinical trials. Therefore, the different Plk1 mouse models here presented are a valuable tool to reexamine the relevance of the mitotic kinase Plk1 during mammalian development and animal physiology. PMID:27417127

  9. Leptin signalling and leptin-mediated activation of human platelets: importance of JAK2 and the phospholipases Cgamma2 and A2.

    PubMed

    Dellas, Claudia; Schäfer, Katrin; Rohm, Ilonka K; Lankeit, Mareike; Leifheit, Maren; Loskutoff, David J; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Konstantinides, Stavros V

    2007-11-01

    Leptin enhances agonist-induced platelet aggregation, and human platelets have been reported to express the leptin receptor. However, the pathways and mediators lying downstream of leptin binding to platelets remain, with few exceptions, unknown. In the present study, we sought to gain further insight into the possible role of leptin as a platelet agonist. Stimulation of platelets with leptin promoted thromboxane generation and activation of alpha(IIb)beta(3), as demonstrated by PAC-1 binding. Furthermore, it increased the adhesion to immobilised fibrinogen (p<0.001) and induced cytoskeletal rearrangement of both platelets and Meg01 cells. Leptin time- and dose-dependently phosphorylated the intracellular signalling molecules JAK2 and STAT3, although the importance of STAT3 for leptin-induced platelet activation remains to be determined. Important intracellular mediators and pathways activated by leptin downstream of JAK2 were found to include phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase, phospholipase Cgamma2 and protein kinase C, as well as the p38 MAP kinase-phospholipase A(2) axis. Accordingly, incubation with the specific inhibitors AG490, Ly294002, U73122, and SB203580 prevented leptin-mediated platelet activation. These results help delineate biologically relevant leptin signalling pathways in platelets and may improve our understanding of the mechanisms linking hyperleptinaemia to the increased thrombosis risk in human obesity. PMID:18000612

  10. Identification of “Preferred” Human Kinase Inhibitors for Sleeping Sickness Lead Discovery. Are Some Kinases Better than Others for Inhibitor Repurposing?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A kinase-targeting cell-based high-throughput screen (HTS) against Trypanosoma brucei was recently reported, and this screening set included the Published Kinase Inhibitor Set (PKIS). From the PKIS was identified 53 compounds with pEC50 ≥ 6. Utilizing the published data available for the PKIS, a statistical analysis of these active antiparasitic compounds was performed, allowing identification of a set of human kinases having inhibitors that show a high likelihood for blocking T. brucei cellular proliferation in vitro. This observation was confirmed by testing other established inhibitors of these human kinases and by mining past screening campaigns at GlaxoSmithKline. Overall, although the parasite targets of action are not known, inhibitors of this set of human kinases displayed an enhanced hit rate relative to a random kinase-targeting HTS campaign, suggesting that repurposing efforts should focus primarily on inhibitors of these specific human kinases. We therefore term this statistical analysis-driven approach “preferred lead repurposing”. PMID:26998514

  11. Stimulation of neuropeptide Y gene expression by brain-derived neurotrophic factor requires both the phospholipase Cgamma and Shc binding sites on its receptor, TrkB.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, A G; Hargreaves, A C; Gunn-Moore, F J; Tavaré, J M

    1998-01-01

    In PC12 cells, it has been previously reported that nerve growth factor stimulates neuropeptide Y (NPY) gene expression. In the current study we examined the signalling pathways involved in this effect by transiently expressing in PC12 cells the receptor (TrkB) for the related neurotrophin, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). BDNF caused a 3-fold induction of luciferase expression from a transiently co-transfected plasmid possessing the firefly luciferase gene under the control of the NPY promoter. This effect of BDNF was completely blocked by either a Y484F mutation in TrkB (which blocks high-affinity Shc binding to TrkB) or by a Y785F substitution [which blocks the binding, phosphorylation and activation of phospholipase Cgamma (PLCgamma)]. Activation of the NPY promoter by neurotrophin-3 in PC12 cells overexpressing TrkC was also completely blocked by a naturally occurring kinase insert which prevents the high-affinity binding of Shc and PLCgamma. NPY promoter activation by BDNF was blocked by PD98059, suggesting a role for mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase). Stimulation of NPY gene expression by PMA, but not by BDNF, was blocked by Ro-31-8220, a protein kinase C inhibitor, excluding a role for this serine/threonine protein kinase in the effect of BDNF. In addition, BDNF did not cause an elevation in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration. Taken together, our results suggest that stimulation of the NPY promoter by BDNF requires the simultaneous activation of two distinct pathways; one involves Shc and MAP kinase, and the other appears to be PLCgamma-independent but requires an intact tyrosine-785 on TrkB and so may involve an effector of TrkB signalling that remains to be identified. PMID:9677306

  12. Inhibition of Eimeria tenella CDK-related Kinase 2: From Target Identification to Lead Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Engels, Kristin; Beyer, Carsten; Fernández, Maria L. Suárez; Bender, Frank; Gaßel, Michael; Unden, Gottfried; Marhöfer, Richard J.; Mottram, Jeremy C.; Selzer, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites encompass several human-pathogenic as well as animal-pathogenic protozoans like Plasmodium falciparum, Toxoplasma gondii, and Eimeria tenella. E. tenella is the causative agent of coccidiosis a disease of chickens, which causes tremendous economic losses to the world poultry industry. Considerable increase of drug resistance makes it necessary to develop and pursue new therapeutic strategies. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are key molecules in the regulation of the cell cycle and are therefore prominent target proteins in parasitic diseases. Bioinformatic analysis revealed four potential CDK-like proteins of which one – E. tenella CDK-related kinase 2 (EtCRK2) – is already cloned, expressed and characterized.[1] Using the CDK specific inhibitor Flavopiridol in EtCRK2 enzyme assays and schizont maturation assays we could chemically validate CDK-like proteins as potential drug targets. An X-ray crystal structure of human CDK2 (HsCDK2) served as template to built protein models of EtCRK2 by comparative homology modeling. Structural differences in the ATP-binding site between EtCRK2 and HsCDK2 as well as chicken CDK3 have been addressed for the optimization of selective ATP-competitive inhibitors. Virtual screening and “wet-bench” high throughput screening campaigns on large compound libraries resulted in an initial set of hit compounds. These compounds were further analyzed and characterized leading to a set of four promising lead compounds inhibiting EtCRK2. PMID:20575139

  13. Convergent mutations and kinase fusions lead to oncogenic STAT3 activation in anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Crescenzo, Ramona; Abate, Francesco; Lasorsa, Elena; Tabbo', Fabrizio; Gaudiano, Marcello; Chiesa, Nicoletta; Di Giacomo, Filomena; Spaccarotella, Elisa; Barbarossa, Luigi; Ercole, Elisabetta; Todaro, Maria; Boi, Michela; Acquaviva, Andrea; Ficarra, Elisa; Novero, Domenico; Rinaldi, Andrea; Tousseyn, Thomas; Rosenwald, Andreas; Kenner, Lukas; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Tzankov, Alexander; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Paulli, Marco; Weisenburger, Dennis; Chan, Wing C; Iqbal, Javeed; Piris, Miguel A; Zamo', Alberto; Ciardullo, Carmela; Rossi, Davide; Gaidano, Gianluca; Pileri, Stefano; Tiacci, Enrico; Falini, Brunangelo; Shultz, Leonard D; Mevellec, Laurence; Vialard, Jorge E; Piva, Roberto; Bertoni, Francesco; Rabadan, Raul; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2015-04-13

    A systematic characterization of the genetic alterations driving ALCLs has not been performed. By integrating massive sequencing strategies, we provide a comprehensive characterization of driver genetic alterations (somatic point mutations, copy number alterations, and gene fusions) in ALK(-) ALCLs. We identified activating mutations of JAK1 and/or STAT3 genes in ∼20% of 88 [corrected] ALK(-) ALCLs and demonstrated that 38% of systemic ALK(-) ALCLs displayed double lesions. Recurrent chimeras combining a transcription factor (NFkB2 or NCOR2) with a tyrosine kinase (ROS1 or TYK2) were also discovered in WT JAK1/STAT3 ALK(-) ALCL. All these aberrations lead to the constitutive activation of the JAK/STAT3 pathway, which was proved oncogenic. Consistently, JAK/STAT3 pathway inhibition impaired cell growth in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25873174

  14. Novel ribofuranosylnucleoside lead compounds for potent and selective inhibitors of mitochondrial thymidine kinase-2.

    PubMed Central

    Balzarini, J; Zhu, C; De Clercq , E; Pérez-Pérez, M J; Chamorro, C; Camarasa, M J; Karlsson, A

    2000-01-01

    The ribonucleoside analogues (E)-5-(2-bromovinyl)uridine (5-BV-Urd) and 3'-spiro-(4'-amino-1',2'-oxathiole-2',2'-dioxide)-5-methyluridine (3'-AOD-5-MeUrd) emerged as potent and selective competitive inhibitors of mitochondrial thymidine kinase (TK)-2 with respect to thymidine (K(i)/K(m) values of 9.0 and 1.2 respectively). Cytosolic TK-1 did not show measurable affinity for these compounds. [(32)P]Phosphate transfer studies from [gamma-(32)P]ATP to 5-BV-Urd and 3'-AOD-5-MeUrd revealed extremely poor substrate activity but potent inhibitory potential of the compounds. It was concluded that the ribonucleosides 5-BV-Urd and 3'-AOD-5-MeUrd represent two new lead compounds for potent and selective inhibitors of mitochondrial TK-2. PMID:10998359

  15. Inactivation of MARK4, an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-related kinase, leads to insulin hypersensitivity and resistance to diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chao; Tian, Liang; Nie, Jia; Zhang, Hai; Han, Xiao; Shi, Yuguang

    2012-11-01

    MARK4, also known as Par-1d/MarkL1, is a member of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-related family of kinases, which are implicated in the regulation of dynamic biological functions, including glucose and energy homeostasis. However, the physiological function of MARK4 in mammals remains elusive. Here, we investigated a role for MARK4 in regulating energy homeostasis by generating mice with targeted inactivation of the mark4 gene. We show that MARK4 deficiency in mice caused hyperphagia, hyperactivity, and hypermetabolism, leading to protection from diet-induced obesity and its related metabolic complications through up-regulation of brown fat activity. Consequently, MARK4 deficiency mitigated insulin resistance associated with diet-induced obesity by dramatically enhancing insulin-stimulated AKT phosphorylation in major metabolic tissues. Ablation of MARK4 also significantly improved glucose homeostasis by up-regulating the activity and expression of AMPK kinase in key metabolic tissues. Taken together, these data identify a key role of MARK4 in energy metabolism, implicating the kinase as a novel drug target for the treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:22992738

  16. Identification of two C-terminal autophosphorylation sites in the PDGF beta-receptor: involvement in the interaction with phospholipase C-gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Rönnstrand, L; Mori, S; Arridsson, A K; Eriksson, A; Wernstedt, C; Hellman, U; Claesson-Welsh, L; Heldin, C H

    1992-01-01

    Two novel sites of autophosphorylation were localized to the C-terminal tail of the PDGF beta-receptor. To evaluate the importance of these phosphorylation sites, receptor mutants in which Tyr1009, Tyr1021 or both were replaced with phenylalanine residues, were expressed in porcine aortic endothelial (PAE) cells. These mutants were similar to the wild type receptor with regard to protein tyrosine kinase activity and ability to induce mitogenicity in response to PDGF-BB. However, both the Y1009F and Y1021F mutants showed a decreased ability to mediate association with and the tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase C-gamma (PLC-gamma) compared to the wild type PDGF beta-receptor; in the case of the Y1009F/Y1021F double mutant, no association or phosphorylation of PLC-gamma could be detected. These data show that tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-gamma is dependent on autophosphorylation of the PDGF beta-receptor at Tyr1009 and Tyr1021. Images PMID:1396585

  17. Phospholipase Cgamma1 inhibitory principles from the sarcotestas of Ginkgo biloba.

    PubMed

    Lee, J S; Cho, Y S; Park, E J; Kim, J; Oh, W K; Lee, H S; Ahn, J S

    1998-07-01

    Ten phenolic compounds were isolated from the CHCl3 extract of Ginkgo biloba sarcotestas (Ginkgoaceae) as a new class of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase Cgamma1 (PI-PLCgamma1) inhibitors. The substances without the long chain were ineffective. On the other hand, the activities of these compounds were dramatically decreased by acetylation of aromatic hydroxyl groups of cardanol, phenolic acid, and bilobol and by methylation of the aromatic carboxyl group of phenolic acid. The unsaturated long chain as well as the aromatic hydroxyl and carboxyl groups might play a key role for the PI-PLCgamma1 inhibitory activity. These compounds also inhibited the growth of a number of human cancer cell lines, but were less cytotoxic against a human normal colon cell line. PMID:9677265

  18. Loss of ATM kinase activity leads to embryonic lethality in mice.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Jeremy A; Pellegrini, Manuela; Lee, Baeck-Seung; Guo, Zhi; Filsuf, Darius; Belkina, Natalya V; You, Zhongsheng; Paull, Tanya T; Sleckman, Barry P; Feigenbaum, Lionel; Nussenzweig, André

    2012-08-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) mutated (ATM) is a key deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage signaling kinase that regulates DNA repair, cell cycle checkpoints, and apoptosis. The majority of patients with A-T, a cancer-prone neurodegenerative disease, present with null mutations in Atm. To determine whether the functions of ATM are mediated solely by its kinase activity, we generated two mouse models containing single, catalytically inactivating point mutations in Atm. In this paper, we show that, in contrast to Atm-null mice, both D2899A and Q2740P mutations cause early embryonic lethality in mice, without displaying dominant-negative interfering activity. Using conditional deletion, we find that the D2899A mutation in adult mice behaves largely similar to Atm-null cells but shows greater deficiency in homologous recombination (HR) as measured by hypersensitivity to poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase inhibition and increased genomic instability. These results may explain why missense mutations with no detectable kinase activity are rarely found in patients with classical A-T. We propose that ATM kinase-inactive missense mutations, unless otherwise compensated for, interfere with HR during embryogenesis. PMID:22869595

  19. Decay strength distributions in {sup 12}C({sup 12}C,{gamma}) radiative capture

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, D. G.; Fulton, B. R.; Marley, P.; Fox, S. P.; Glover, R.; Wadsworth, R.; Watson, D. L.; Courtin, S.; Haas, F.; Lebhertz, D.; Beck, C.; Papka, P.; Rousseau, M.; Sanchez i Zafra, A.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Davis, C.; Ottewell, D.; Pavan, M. M.; Pearson, J.; Ruiz, C.

    2007-10-15

    The heavy-ion radiative capture reaction, {sup 12}C({sup 12}C,{gamma}), has been investigated at energies both on- and off-resonance, with a particular focus on known resonances at E{sub c.m.}=6.0, 6.8, 7.5, and 8.0 MeV. Gamma rays detected in a BGO scintillator array were recorded in coincidence with {sup 24}Mg residues at the focal plane of the DRAGON recoil separator at TRIUMF. In this manner, the relative strength of all decay pathways through excited states up to the particle threshold could be examined for the first time. Isovector M1 transitions are found to be a important component of the radiative capture from the E{sub c.m.}=6.0 and 6.8 MeV resonances. Comparison with Monte Carlo simulations suggests that these resonances may have either J=0 or 2, with a preference for J=2. The higher energy resonances at E{sub c.m.}=7.5 and 8.0 MeV have a rather different decay pattern. The former is a clear candidate for a J=4 resonance, whereas the latter has a dominant J=4 character superposed on a J=2 resonant component underneath. The relationship between these resonances and the well-known quasimolecular resonances as well as resonances in breakup and electrofission of {sup 24}Mg into two {sup 12}C nuclei are discussed.

  20. Contrasting role of phospholipase C-{gamma}1 in the expression of immediate early genes induced by epidermal or platelet-derived growth factors

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Hongjun; Santos, Josue de los; Carpenter, Graham . E-mail: graham.carpenter@vanderbilt.edu

    2006-04-01

    While significant progress has been achieved in identifying the signal transduction elements that operate downstream of activated receptor tyrosine kinases, it remains unclear how different receptors utilize these signaling elements to achieve a common response. This study compares the capacity of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) to elicit the induction of immediate early gene (IEG) mRNAs in the presence or absence of phospholipase C-{gamma}1 (PLC-{gamma}1). The results show that while PDGF induction of nearly all IEG mRNAs is abrogated in plcg1 null cells, EGF induction of the same genes is variable in the null cells and exhibits three distinct responses. Five IEG mRNAs (Nup475, Cyr61, TF, Gly, TS7) are completely inducible by EGF in the presence or absence of PLC-{gamma}1, while three others (JE, KC, FIC) exhibit a stringent requirement for the presence of PLC-{gamma}1. The third type of response is exhibited by c-fos and COX-2. While these mRNAs are completely induced by EGF in the absence of PLC-{gamma}1, the time course of their accumulation is significantly delayed. No IEG was identified as completely inducible by EGF and PDGF in the absence of PLC-{gamma}1. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) demonstrate that PLC-{gamma}1 is necessary for nuclear extracts from PDGF-treated cells, but not EGF-treated cells, to interact with probes for AP-1 or NF-{kappa}B.

  1. The GTPase-activating protein of Ras suppresses platelet-derived growth factor beta receptor signaling by silencing phospholipase C-gamma 1.

    PubMed Central

    Valius, M; Secrist, J P; Kazlauskas, A

    1995-01-01

    The beta receptor for platelet-derived growth factor (beta PDGFR) is activated by binding of PDGF and undergoes phosphorylation at multiple tyrosine residues. The tyrosine-phosphorylated receptor associates with numerous SH2-domain-containing proteins which include phospholipase C-gamma 1 (PLC gamma), the GTPase-activating protein of Ras (GAP), the p85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K), the phosphotyrosine phosphatase Syp, and several other proteins. Our previous studies indicated that PI3K and PLC gamma were required for relay of the mitogenic signal of beta PDGFR, whereas GAP and Syp did not appear to be required for this response. In this study, we further investigated the role of GAP and Syp in mitogenic signaling by beta PDGFR. Focusing on the PLC gamma-dependent branch of beta PDGFR signaling, we constructed a series of mutant beta PDGFRs that contained the binding sites for pairs of the receptor-associated proteins: PLC gamma and PI3K, PLC gamma and GAP, or PLC gamma and Syp. Characterization of these mutants showed that while all receptors were catalytically active and bound similar amounts of PLC gamma, they differed dramatically in their ability to initiate DNA synthesis. This signaling deficiency related to an inability to efficiently tyrosine phosphorylate and activate PLC gamma. Surprisingly, the crippled receptor was the one that recruited PLC gamma and GAP. Thus, GAP functions to suppress signal relay by the beta PDGFR, and it does so by silencing PLC gamma. These findings demonstrate that the biological response to PDGF depends not only on the ability of the beta PDGFR to recruit signal relay enzymes but also on the blend of these receptor-associated proteins. PMID:7760802

  2. Plesiomonas shigelloides Septic Shock Leading to Death of Postsplenectomy Patient with Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency and Hemochromatosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Although Plesiomonas shigelloides, a water-borne bacterium of the Enterobacteriaceae family, usually causes self-limiting gastroenteritis with diarrhea, several cases of sepsis have been reported. We report the case of a 43-year-old male patient with hemochromatosis, pyruvate kinase deficiency, and asplenia via splenectomy who developed septic shock caused by P. shigelloides complicated by respiratory failure, renal failure, liver failure, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Early aggressive antimicrobial therapy and resuscitation measures were unsuccessful and the patient passed away. We kindly suggest clinicians to implement early diagnosis of septic shock, empirical coverage with antibiotics, and prompt volume resuscitation based on the high mortality rate of P. shigelloides bacteremia. PMID:27610253

  3. Plesiomonas shigelloides Septic Shock Leading to Death of Postsplenectomy Patient with Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency and Hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Samannodi, Mohammed; Zhao, Andrew; Nemshah, Yaser; Shiley, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Although Plesiomonas shigelloides, a water-borne bacterium of the Enterobacteriaceae family, usually causes self-limiting gastroenteritis with diarrhea, several cases of sepsis have been reported. We report the case of a 43-year-old male patient with hemochromatosis, pyruvate kinase deficiency, and asplenia via splenectomy who developed septic shock caused by P. shigelloides complicated by respiratory failure, renal failure, liver failure, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Early aggressive antimicrobial therapy and resuscitation measures were unsuccessful and the patient passed away. We kindly suggest clinicians to implement early diagnosis of septic shock, empirical coverage with antibiotics, and prompt volume resuscitation based on the high mortality rate of P. shigelloides bacteremia. PMID:27610253

  4. Deficiency of pantothenate kinase 2 (Pank2) in mice leads to retinal degeneration and azoospermia

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Yien-Ming; Duncan, Jacque L.; Westaway, Shawn K.; Yang, Haidong; Nune, George; Xu, Eugene Yujun; Hayflick, Susan J.; Gitschier, Jane

    2007-01-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN, formerly known as Hallervorden–Spatz syndrome) is a rare but devastating neurodegenerative disorder, resulting from an inherited defect in coenzyme A biosynthesis. As pathology in the human condition is limited to the central nervous system, specifically the retina and globus pallidus, we have generated a mouse knock-out of the orthologous murine gene (Pank2) to enhance our understanding of the mechanisms of disease and to serve as a testing ground for therapies. Over time, the homozygous null mice manifest retinal degeneration, as evidenced by electroretinography, light microscopy and pupillometry response. Specifically, Pank2 mice show progressive photoreceptor decline, with significantly lower scotopic a- and b-wave amplitudes, decreased cell number and disruption of the outer segment and reduced pupillary constriction response when compared with those of wild-type littermates. Additionally, the homozygous male mutants are infertile due to azoospermia, a condition that was not appreciated in the human. Arrest occurs in spermiogenesis, with complete absence of elongated and mature spermatids. In contrast to the human, however, no changes were observed in the basal ganglia by MRI or by histological exam, nor were there signs of dystonia, even after following the mice for one year. Pank2 mice are 20% decreased in weight when compared with their wild-type littermates; however, dysphagia was not apparent. Immunohistochemistry shows staining consistent with localization of Pank2 to the mitochondria in both the retina and the spermatozoa. PMID:15525657

  5. 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3 stimulates phospholipase C-gamma in rat colonocytes: role of c-Src in PLC-gamma activation.

    PubMed Central

    Khare, S; Bolt, M J; Wali, R K; Skarosi, S F; Roy, H K; Niedziela, S; Scaglione-Sewell, B; Aquino, B; Abraham, C; Sitrin, M D; Brasitus, T A; Bissonnette, M

    1997-01-01

    Our laboratory has previously demonstrated that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25[OH]2D3) rapidly stimulated polyphosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis, raised intracellular Ca2+, and activated two Ca2+-dependent protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms, PKC-alpha and -betaII in the rat large intestine. We also showed that the direct addition of 1,25(OH)2D3 to isolated colonic membranes failed to stimulate PI hydrolysis, but required secosteroid treatment of intact colonocytes, suggesting the involvement of a soluble factor. Furthermore, this PI hydrolysis was restricted to the basal lateral plasma membrane of these cells. In the present studies, therefore, we examined whether polyphosphoinositide-phospholipase C-gamma (PI-PLC-gamma), a predominantly cytosolic isoform of PI-PLC, was involved in the hydrolysis of colonic membrane PI by 1,25(OH)2D3. This isoform has been shown to be activated and membrane-associated by tyrosine phosphorylation. We found that 1,25(OH)2D3 caused a significant increase in the biochemical activity, particulate association, and the tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-gamma, specifically in the basal lateral membranes. This secosteroid also induced a twofold increase in the activity of Src, a proximate activator of PLC-gamma in other cells, with peaks at 1 and 9 min in association with Src tyrosine dephosphorylation. 1,25(OH)2D3 also increased the physical association of activated c-Src with PLC-gamma. In addition, Src isolated from colonocytes treated with 1,25(OH)2D3, demonstrated an increased ability to phosphorylate exogenous PLC-gamma in vitro. Inhibition of 1,25(OH)2D3-induced Src activation by PP1, a specific Src family protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor, blocked the ability of this secosteroid to stimulate the translocation and tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-gamma in the basolateral membrane (BLM). Src activation was lost in D deficiency, and was reversibly restored with the in vivo repletion of 1,25(OH)2D3. These studies demonstrate for the first time

  6. Translocation of mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein to plasma membrane leads to necrotic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Li, Wenjuan; Ren, Junming; Huang, Deli; He, Wan-ting; Song, Yunlong; Yang, Chao; Li, Wanyun; Zheng, Xinru; Chen, Pengda; Han, Jiahuai

    2014-01-01

    Mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) was identified to function downstream of receptor interacting protein 3 (RIP3) in tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF)-induced necrosis (also called necroptosis). However, how MLKL functions to mediate necroptosis is unknown. By reconstitution of MLKL function in MLKL-knockout cells, we showed that the N-terminus of MLKL is required for its function in necroptosis. The oligomerization of MLKL in TNF-treated cells is essential for necroptosis, as artificially forcing MLKL together by using the hormone-binding domain (HBD*) triggers necroptosis. Notably, forcing together the N-terminal domain (ND) but not the C-terminal kinase domain of MLKL causes necroptosis. Further deletion analysis showed that the four-α-helix bundle of MLKL (1-130 amino acids) is sufficient to trigger necroptosis. Both the HBD*-mediated and TNF-induced complexes of MLKL(ND) or MLKL are tetramers, and translocation of these complexes to lipid rafts of the plasma membrane precedes cell death. The homo-oligomerization is required for MLKL translocation and the signal sequence for plasma membrane location is located in the junction of the first and second α-helices of MLKL. The plasma membrane translocation of MLKL or MLKL(ND) leads to sodium influx, and depletion of sodium from the cell culture medium inhibits necroptosis. All of the above phenomena were not seen in apoptosis. Thus, the MLKL oligomerization leads to translocation of MLKL to lipid rafts of plasma membrane, and the plasma membrane MLKL complex acts either by itself or via other proteins to increase the sodium influx, which increases osmotic pressure, eventually leading to membrane rupture. PMID:24366341

  7. Phosphorylation of TRPV1 by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 promotes TRPV1 surface localization, leading to inflammatory thermal hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiao; Du, Junxie; Yang, Yanrui; Wang, Yun

    2015-11-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is an important serine/threonine kinase that plays critical roles in many physiological processes. Recently, Cdk5 has been reported to phosphorylate TRPV1 at threonine 407 (Thr-407) in humans (Thr-406 in rats), which enhances the function of TRPV1 channel and promotes thermal hyperalgesia in the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain rats. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unknown. Here, we demonstrate that Cdk5 phosphorylates TRPV1 at Threonine 406 and promotes the surface localization of TRPV1, leading to inflammatory thermal hyperalgesia. The mutation of Thr-406 of TRPV1 to alanine reduced the interaction of TRPV1 with the cytoskeletal elements and decreased the binding of TRPV1 with the motor protein KIF13B, which led to reduced surface distribution of TRPV1. Disrupting the phosphorylation of TRPV1 at Thr-406 dramatically reduced the surface level of TRPV1 in HEK 293 cells after transient expression and the channel function in cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Notably, intrathecal administration of the interfering peptide against the phosphorylation of Thr-406 alleviated heat hyperalgesia and reduced the surface level of TRPV1 in inflammatory pain rats. Together, these results demonstrate that Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation of TRPV1 at Thr-406 increases the surface level and the function of TRPV1, while the TAT-T406 peptide can effectively attenuate thermal hyperalgesia. Our studies provide a potential therapy for inflammatory pain. PMID:26376215

  8. Inhibition of Rho Kinase (ROCK) Leads to Increased Cerebral Blood Flow and Stroke Protection

    PubMed Central

    Rikitake, Yoshiyuki; Kim, Hyung-Hwan; Huang, Zhihong; Seto, Minoru; Yano, Kazuo; Asano, Toshio; Moskowitz, Michael A.; Liao, James K.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose Endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) plays a pivotal role in vascular protection. The Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, hydroxyfasudil, prevents the downregulation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) under hypoxic conditions. However, it is unknown whether inhibition of ROCK can attenuate ischemia-induced endothelial dysfunction and tissue damage in vivo. Methods Human vascular endothelial cells were treated with increasing concentrations of hydroxyfasudil (0.1 to 100 μmol/L) and eNOS expression and activity were measured. To determine the physiological relevance of eNOS regulation by ROCK, we administered fasudil, which is metabolized to hydroxyfasudil in vivo, to mice for 2 days before subjecting them to middle cerebral artery occlusion. Cerebral blood flow, cerebral infarct size, and neurologic deficit were measured. Results In a concentration-dependent manner, hydroxyfasudil increased eNOS mRNA and protein expression, resulting in a 1.9- and 1.6-fold increase, respectively, at 10 μmol/L (P<0.05 for both). This correlated with a 1.5- and 2.3-fold increase in eNOS activity and NO production, respectively (P<0.05 for both). Fasudil increased cerebral blood flow to both ischemic and nonischemic brain areas, reduced cerebral infarct size by 33%, and improved neurologic deficit score by 37% (P<0.05). This correlated with inhibition of brain and vascular ROCK activity and increased eNOS expression and activity. Another ROCK inhibitor, Y-27632, also showed similar effects. The neuroprotective effects of fasudil were absent in eNOS-deficient mice. Conclusions These findings indicate that the neuroprotective effect of ROCK inhibition is mediated by endothelium-derived NO and suggest that ROCK may be an important therapeutic target for ischemic stroke. PMID:16141422

  9. Allyl alcohol activation of protein kinase C delta leads to cytotoxicity of rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Maddox, Jane F; Roth, Robert A; Ganey, Patricia E

    2003-05-01

    Hepatotoxicity of allyl alcohol involves its bioactivation to acrolein and subsequent protein sulfhydryl loss and lipid peroxidation. However, the links between these events and hepatocellular death are not known. The purpose of these studies was to examine whether specific signal transduction pathways are associated with allyl alcohol toxicity in hepatocytes. Inhibition or augmentation of cyclic AMP and/or protein kinase A (PKA) by Rp-Ado-3N,5N-cyclic monophosphorothioate triethylamine salt or 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine had no effect on allyl alcohol-induced cell death. H-7, an inhibitor of PKA, PKC, and PKG, partially inhibited cell killing by allyl alcohol, whereas chelerythrine chloride, a nonselective PKC inhibitor, almost completely abolished allyl alcohol cytotoxicity. Neither 2,2N,3,3N,4,4N-hexahydroxy-1,1N,-biphenyl-6,6N-dimethanol-dimethyl ether, a selective PKC alpha and beta inhibitor, nor bisindolylmaleimide I, an inhibitor of PKC alpha, beta, and epsilon, had any effect on allyl alcohol cytotoxicity. In contrast, rottlerin, a selective PKCdelta inhibitor, blocked hepatocellular killing by allyl alcohol. Cytoprotection by chelerythrine chloride and rottlerin was not the result of inhibition of bioactivation of allyl alcohol because each inhibitor also prevented cell death from acrolein. Western blotting and immunohistochemical techniques revealed that allyl alcohol stimulated phosphorylation and translocation of PKCdelta to hepatocyte membranes (i.e., activation), and this activity was inhibited by rottlerin. Cell death appeared to occur via oncotic necrosis rather than apoptosis based on single-stranded DNA ELISA and propidium iodide staining. Together, these results indicate that activation of PKCdelta is a critical, early event in initiating hepatocyte injury and death from allyl alcohol. PMID:12755590

  10. Structure Guided Development of Novel Thymidine Mimetics targeting Pseudomonas aeruginosa Thymidylate Kinase: from Hit to Lead Generation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jun Yong; Plummer, Mark S.; Starr, Jeremy; Desbonnet, Charlene R.; Soutter, Holly; Chang, Jeanne; Miller, J. Richard; Dillman, Keith; Miller, Alita A.; Roush, William R.

    2012-01-01

    Thymidylate kinase (TMK) is a potential chemotherapeutic target because it is directly involved in the synthesis of an essential component, thymidine triphosphate, in DNA replication. All reported TMK inhibitors are thymidine analogs, which might retard their development as potent therapeutics due to cell permeability and off-target activity against human TMK. A small molecule hit (1, IC50 = 58 μM), which has reasonable inhibition potency against Pseudomonas aeruginosa TMK (PaTMK), was identified by the analysis of the binding mode of thymidine or TP5A in a PaTMK homology model. This hit (1) was co-crystallized with PaTMK, and several potent PaTMK inhibitors (leads, 46, 47, 48, and 56, IC50 = 100–200 nM) were synthesized using computer aided design approaches including virtual synthesis/screening, which was used to guide the design of inhibitors. The binding mode of the optimized leads in PaTMK overlaps with that of other bacterial TMKs, but not with human TMK which shares few common features with the bacterial enzymes. Therefore, the optimized TMK inhibitors described here should be useful for the development of antibacterial agents targeting TMK without undesired off-target effects. In addition, an inhibition mechanism associated with the LID loop, which mimics the process of phosphate transfer from ATP to dTMP, was proposed based on X-ray co-crystal structures, homology models, and SAR results. PMID:22243413

  11. Lead

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lead Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Lead Poisoning is Preventable If your home was built before ... of the RRP rule. Read more . Learn about Lead Poisoning Prevention Week . Report Uncertified Contractors and Environmental Violations ...

  12. How does cAMP/protein kinase A signaling lead to tumors in the adrenal cortex and other tissues?

    PubMed

    Almeida, Madson Q; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2011-04-10

    The overwhelming majority of benign lesions of the adrenal cortex leading to Cushing syndrome are linked to one or another abnormality of the cAMP signaling pathway. A small number of both massive macronodular adrenocortical disease and cortisol-producing adenomas harbor somatic GNAS mutations. Micronodular adrenocortical hyperplasias are either pigmented (the classic form being that of primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease) or non-pigmented; micronodular adrenocortical hyperplasias can be seen in the context of other conditions or isolated; for example, primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease usually occurs in the context of Carney complex, but isolated primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease has also been described. Both Carney complex and isolated primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease are caused by germline PRKAR1A mutations; somatic mutations of this gene that regulates cAMP-dependent protein kinase are also found in cortisol-producing adenomas, and abnormalities of PKA are present in most cases of massive macronodular adrenocortical disease. Micronodular adrenocortical hyperplasias and some cortisol-producing adenomas are associated with phosphodiesterase 11A and 8B defects, coded, respectively, by the PDE11A and PDE8B genes. Mouse models of Prkar1a deficiency also show that increased cAMP signaling leads to tumors in adrenal cortex and other tissues. In this review, we summarize all recent data from ours and other laboratories, supporting the view that Wnt-signaling acts as an important mediator of tumorigenicity induced by abnormal PRKAR1A function and aberrant cAMP signaling. PMID:21111774

  13. Overexpression of Protein Kinase C-ε in the Mouse Epidermis Leads to a Spontaneous Myeloproliferative-Like Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Deric L.; Reddig, Peter J.; Ness, Kristin J.; Leith, Catherine P.; Oberley, Terry D.; Verma, Ajit K.

    2005-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC)-ε, a Ca2+-independent, phospholipid-dependent serine/threonine kinase, is among the PKC isoforms expressed in mouse epidermis. We reported that FVB/N transgenic mouse lines that overexpress (8- or 18-fold) PKC-ε protein in basal epidermal cells and cells of the hair follicle develop papilloma-independent squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) elicited by 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene initiation and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-promotion or by repeated ultraviolet radiation exposures. The susceptibility to the development of SCC was proportional to the level of expression of the PKC-ε transgene. We now report that PKC-ε FVB/N transgenic mice (line 215) that overexpress in epidermis ∼18-fold PKC-ε protein more than their wild-type littermates spontaneously develop a myeloproliferative-like disease (MPD) in 100% of PKC-ε transgenic mice. The MPD was characterized by an excess of neutrophils and eosinophils, resulting in invasion of almost all vital organs of the mouse by 6 months of age. On gross examination these mice present with splenomegaly, hepatomegaly, and severe lymphadenopathy. Examination of the bone marrow revealed almost complete effacement by neutrophils, eosinophils, and their precursors. Furthermore, the spleen and lymph nodes were enlarged and exhibited marked extramedullary hematopoiesis. Complete pathological analysis of the second PKC-ε transgenic mouse (line 224) that expresses approximately eightfold PKC-ε protein more than their wild-type littermates revealed no remarkable findings in any of the affected organs as seen in line 215. However, peripheral blood analyses of PKC-ε transgenic mice indicated significant increases of neutrophils in the circulating blood in both PKC-ε transgenic lines. To determine whether there was an imbalance of cytokines in PKC-ε transgenic mice (line 215), resulting in aberrant myelopoiesis, we analyzed 17 cytokines in the peripheral blood. This analysis indicated that interleukin-5

  14. Lead

    MedlinePlus

    ... obvious symptoms, it frequently goes unrecognized. CDC’s Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program is committed to the Healthy People ... Lead Levels Information for Parents Tips for preventing lead poisoning About Us Overview of CDC’s Childhood Lead Poisoning ...

  15. Regulation of the phospholipase C-gamma2 pathway in B cells.

    PubMed

    Kurosaki, T; Maeda, A; Ishiai, M; Hashimoto, A; Inabe, K; Takata, M

    2000-08-01

    In B lymphocytes, a signaling complex that contributes to cell fate decisions is the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR), with different extents of receptor engagement leading to such outcomes as cell death, survival, or proliferation. Here, based upon the available genetic and biochemical data of the BCR signal components, we discuss several mechanisms by which BCR signals are propagated and modified, with specific emphasis on the phospholipase C (PLC)-gamma2-calcium pathway Gene-targeting experiments in DT40 chicken B cells highlighted the importance of the intracellular protein tyrosine kinases Syk and Btk in PLC-gamma2 activation. Until recently, the molecular mechanism underlying the double requirement for Syk and Btk in PLC-gamma2 activation remained unclear, but new data suggest that an adapter molecule, B-cell linker protein (alternatively named SLP-65 or BASH), phosphorylated by Syk, provides docking sites for Btk SH2 domain as well as PLC-gamma2 SH2 domains, thus bringing Btk into close proximity with PLC-gamma2. The activated Btk then phosphorylates PLC-gamma2, leading to its activation. The activated PLC-gamma2 converts phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate into the second messenger inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3), which in turn binds to IP3 receptors located on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Binding of IP3 to the IP3 receptors is essential for triggering a calcium release from the ER and subsequent entry of extracellular calcium. Balancing these activation signals in the PLC-gamma2-calcium pathway are the inhibitory receptors expressed on B cells, FcyRII and paired immunoglobin-like receptor (PIR)-B. Although both FcyRII and PIR-B inhibits the BCR-mediated [Ca2+]i increase, the inhibitory mechanisms of these receptors are distinct. The FcyRII-mediated inhibitory signal is dependent on lipid phosphatase SHIP, whereas the PIR-B requires redundant functions of protein phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2. Thus, PIR-B and FcgammaRII inhibit calcium signals by

  16. A tyrosine-phosphorylated carboxy-terminal peptide of the fibroblast growth factor receptor (Flg) is a binding site for the SH2 domain of phospholipase C-gamma 1.

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, M; Honegger, A M; Rotin, D; Fischer, R; Bellot, F; Li, W; Dionne, C A; Jaye, M; Rubinstein, M; Schlessinger, J

    1991-01-01

    Phospholipase C-gamma (PLC-gamma) is a substrate of the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR; encoded by the flg gene) and other receptors with tyrosine kinase activity. It has been demonstrated that the src homology region 2 (SH2 domain) of PLC-gamma and of other signalling molecules such as GTPase-activating protein and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-associated p85 direct their binding toward tyrosine-autophosphorylated regions of the epidermal growth factor or platelet-derived growth factor receptor. In this report, we describe the identification of Tyr-766 as an autophosphorylation site of flg-encoded FGFR by direct sequencing of a tyrosine-phosphorylated tryptic peptide isolated from the cytoplasmic domain of FGFR expressed in Escherichia coli. The same phosphopeptide was found in wild-type FGFR phosphorylated either in vitro or in living cells. Like other growth factor receptors, tyrosine-phosphorylated wild-type FGFR or its cytoplasmic domain becomes associated with intact PLC-gamma or with a fusion protein containing the SH2 domain of PLC-gamma. To delineate the site of association, we have examined the capacity of a 28-amino-acid tryptic peptide containing phosphorylated Tyr-766 to bind to various constructs containing SH2 and other domains of PLC-gamma. It is demonstrated that the tyrosine-phosphorylated peptide binds specifically to the SH2 domain but not to the SH3 domain or other regions of PLC-gamma. Hence, Tyr-766 and its flanking sequences represent a major binding site in FGFR for PLC-gamma. Alignment of the amino acid sequences surrounding Tyr-766 with corresponding regions of other FGFRs revealed conserved tyrosine residues in all known members of the FGFR family. We propose that homologous tyrosine-phosphorylated regions in other FGFRs also function as binding sites for PLC-gamma and therefore are involved in coupling to phosphatidylinositol breakdown. Images PMID:1656221

  17. A natural kinase-deficient variant of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Wang, L Y; Edenson, S P; Yu, Y L; Senderowicz, L; Turck, C W

    1996-08-01

    A fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 variant missing 37 amino acids from the carboxy-terminal tyrosine kinase catalytic domain was discovered in human lung fibroblasts and several other human cell lines. The receptor variant binds specifically to acidic fibroblast growth factor but has no tyrosine kinase activity. It was found that cellular transfectants expressing the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 variant are mitogenically inactive and ligand binding to the receptor causes neither receptor autophosphorylation nor phospholipase C-gamma transphosphorylation. The fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 variant therefore represents an inactive receptor for acidic fibroblast growth factor. Since both kinase and kinase-deficient receptor forms are expressed in cells, it is conceivable that the kinase-deficient receptor plays an important role in regulating cellular responses elicited by acidic fibroblast growth factor stimulation. PMID:8756477

  18. Fructose surges damage hepatic adenosyl-monophosphate-dependent kinase and lead to increased lipogenesis and hepatic insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Gugliucci, Alejandro

    2016-08-01

    Fructose may be a key contributor to the biochemical alterations which promote the metabolic syndrome (MetS), non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM): (a) its consumption in all forms but especially in liquid form has much increased alongside with incidence of MetS conditions; (b) it is metabolized almost exclusively in the liver, where it stimulates de novo lipogenesis to drive hepatic triglyceride (TG) synthesis which (c) contributes to hepatic insulin resistance and NAFLD (Lustig et al., 2015; Weiss et al., 2013; Lim et al., 2010; Schwarzet al., 2015; Stanhope et al., 2009, 2013) [1-6]. The specifics of fructose metabolism and its main location in the liver serve to explain many of the possible mechanisms involved. It also opens questions, as the consequences of large increases in fructose flux to the liver may wreak havoc with the regulation of metabolism and would produce two opposite effects (inhibition and activation of AMP dependent kinase-AMPK) that would tend to cancel each other. We posit that (1) surges of fructose in the portal vein lead to increased unregulated flux to trioses accompanied by unavoidable methylglyoxal (MG) production, (2) the new, sudden flux exerts carbonyl stress on the three arginines on the γ subunits AMP binding site of AMPK, irreversible blocking some of the enzyme molecules to allosteric modulation, (3) this explains why, even when fructose quick phosphorylation increases AMP and should therefore activate AMPK, the effects of fructose are compatible with inactivation of AMPK, which then solves the apparent metabolic paradox. We put forward the hypothesis that fructose loads, via the increase in MG flux worsens the fructose-driven metabolic disturbances that lead to unrestricted de novo lipogenesis, fatty liver and hepatic insulin resistance. It does so via the silencing of AMPK. Our hypothesis is testable and if proven correct will shed some further light on fructose metabolism in the liver. It will

  19. Targeting Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase-Activated Protein Kinase 2 (MAPKAPK2, MK2): Medicinal Chemistry Efforts To Lead Small Molecule Inhibitors to Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Mario; Forli, Stefano; Manetti, Fabrizio

    2016-04-28

    The p38/MAPK-activated kinase 2 (MK2) pathway is involved in a series of pathological conditions (inflammation diseases and metastasis) and in the resistance mechanism to antitumor agents. None of the p38 inhibitors entered advanced clinical trials because of their unwanted systemic side effects. For this reason, MK2 was identified as an alternative target to block the pathway but avoiding the side effects of p38 inhibition. However, ATP-competitive MK2 inhibitors suffered from low solubility, poor cell permeability, and scarce kinase selectivity. Fortunately, non-ATP-competitive inhibitors of MK2 have been already discovered that allowed circumventing the selectivity issue. These compounds showed the additional advantage to be effective at lower concentrations in comparison to the ATP-competitive inhibitors. Therefore, although the significant difficulties encountered during the development of these inhibitors, MK2 is still considered as an attractive target to treat inflammation and related diseases to prevent tumor metastasis and to increase tumor sensitivity to chemotherapeutics. PMID:26502061

  20. Phospholipase Cgamma2 dosage is critical for B cell development in the absence of adaptor protein BLNK.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shengli; Huo, Jianxin; Chew, Weng-Keong; Hikida, Masaki; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Lam, Kong-Peng

    2006-04-15

    B cell linker (BLNK) protein and phospholipase Cgamma2 (PLCgamma2) are components of the BCR signalosome that activate calcium signaling in B cells. Mice lacking either molecule have a severe but incomplete block in B lymphopoiesis. In this study, we generated BLNK-/- PLCgamma2-/- mice to examine the effect of simultaneous disruption of both molecules on B cell development. We showed that BLNK-/- PLCgamma2-/- mice had compounded defects in B cell maturation compared with either single mutant, suggesting that these two molecules cooperatively or synergistically signaled B lymphopoiesis. However, Ig H chain allelic exclusion was maintained in single and double mutants, indicating that signals propagated by BLNK and PLCgamma2 were not involved in this process. Interestingly, in the absence of BLNK, B cell development was dependent on plcgamma2 gene dosage. This was evidenced by the proportionate decrease in splenic B cell population and increase in bone marrow surface pre-BCR+ cells in PLCgamma2-diploid, -haploid, and -null animals. Intracellular calcium signaling and ERK activation in response to BCR engagement were also proportionately decreased and delayed, respectively, with stepwise reduction of plcgamma2 dosage in a BLNK(null) background. Thus, these data indicate the importance of BLNK not only as a conduit to specifically channel BCR-signaling pathways and as a scaffold for the assembling of macromolecular complex, but also as an efficient aggregator or concentrator of PLCgamma2 molecules to effect optimal signaling for B cell generation and activation. PMID:16585562

  1. Activation of the lutropin/choriogonadotropin receptor (LHR) in MA-10 cells leads to the tyrosine phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) by a pathway that involves Src family kinases*

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Tetsuya; Shiraishi, Koji; Welsh, Toni; Ascoli, Mario

    2006-01-01

    We show that activation of the endogenous or recombinant LHR in mouse Leydig tumor cells (MA-10 cells) leads to the tyrosine phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and one of its substrates (paxillin). Using specific antibodies to the five tyrosine residues of FAK that become phosphorylated we show that activation of the LHR increases the phosphorylation of Tyr576 and Tyr577 but it does not affect the phosphorylation of Tyr397, Tyr861 or Tyr925. Because FAK is a prominent substrate for the Src family of tyrosine kinases (SFKs) we tested for their involvement in the LHR-mediated phosphorylation of FAK-Tyr576. Src is not detectable in MA-10 cells, but two other prominent members of this family (Fyn and Yes) are present. The LHR-mediated phosphorylation of FAK-Tyr576 is readily inhibited by PP2 (a pharmacological inhibitor of SFKs) and by dominant-negative mutants of SKFs. Moreover, activation of the LHR in MA-10 cells results in the stimulation of the activity of Fyn and Yes and overexpression of either of these two tyrosine kinases enhances the LHR-mediate phosphorylation of FAK-Tyr576. Studies involving activation of other G protein-coupled receptors, overexpression of the different Gα subunits, and the use of second messenger analogs suggest that the LHR-induced phosphorylation of FAK-Tyr576 in MA-10 cells is mediated by SFKs, and that this family of kinases is, in turn, independently or cooperatively activated by the LHR-induced stimulation of Gs and Gq/11-mediated pathways. PMID:16293639

  2. In silico-screening approaches for lead generation: identification of novel allosteric modulators of human-erythrocyte pyruvate kinase.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Ashutosh; Safo, Martin K

    2012-01-01

    Identification of allosteric binding site modulators have gained increased attention lately for their potential to be developed as selective agents with a novel chemotype and targeting perhaps a new and unique binding site with probable fewer side effects. Erythrocyte pyruvate kinase (R-PK) is an important glycolytic enzyme that can be pharmacologically modulated through its allosteric effectors for the treatment of hemolytic anemia, sickle-cell anemia, hypoxia-related diseases, and other disorders arising from erythrocyte PK malfunction. An in-silico screening approach was applied to identify novel allosteric modulators of pyruvate kinase. A small-molecules database of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), was virtually screened based on structure/ligand-based pharmacophore. The virtual screening campaign led to the identification of several compounds with similar pharmacophoric features as fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), the natural allosteric activator of the kinase. The compounds were subsequently docked into the FBP-binding site using the programs FlexX and GOLD, and their interactions with the protein were analyzed with the energy-scoring function of HINT. Seven promising candidates were obtained from the NCI and subjected to kinetics analysis, which revealed both activators and inhibitors of the R-isozyme of PK (R-PK). PMID:22052500

  3. Identification, characterization and initial hit-to-lead optimization of a series of 4-arylamino-3-pyridinecarbonitrile as protein kinase C theta (PKCtheta) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cole, Derek C; Asselin, Magda; Brennan, Agnes; Czerwinski, Robert; Ellingboe, John W; Fitz, Lori; Greco, Rita; Huang, Xinyi; Joseph-McCarthy, Diane; Kelly, Michael F; Kirisits, Matthew; Lee, Julie; Li, Yuanhong; Morgan, Paul; Stock, Joseph R; Tsao, Désirée H H; Wissner, Allan; Yang, Xiaoke; Chaudhary, Divya

    2008-10-01

    The protein kinase C (PKC) family of serine/threonine kinases is implicated in a wide variety of cellular processes. The PKC theta (PKCtheta) isoform is involved in TCR signal transduction and T cell activation and regulates T cell mediated diseases, including lung inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness. Thus inhibition of PKCtheta enzyme activity by a small molecule represents an attractive strategy for the treatment of asthma. A PKCtheta high-throughput screening (HTS) campaign led to the identification of 4-(3-bromophenylamino)-5-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-3-pyridinecarbonitrile 4a, a low microM ATP competitive PKCtheta inhibitor. Structure based hit-to-lead optimization led to the identification of 5-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-4-(1H-indol-5-ylamino)-3-pyridinecarbonitrile 4p, a 70 nM PKCtheta inhibitor. Compound 4p was selective for inhibition of novel PKC isoforms over a panel of 21 serine/threonine, tyrosine, and phosphoinositol kinases, in addition to the conventional and atypical PKCs, PKCbeta, and PKCzeta, respectively. Compound 4p also inhibited IL-2 production in antiCD3/anti-CD28 activated T cells enriched from splenocytes. PMID:18783200

  4. Chronic Lead Exposure and Mixed Factors of Gender×Age×Brain Regions Interactions on Dendrite Growth, Spine Maturity and NDR Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Weizhen; Yang, Qian-Qian; Wang, Shuang; Xu, Yi; Wang, Hui-Li

    2015-01-01

    NDR1/2 kinase is essential in dendrite morphology and spine formation, which is regulated by cellular Ca2+. Lead (Pb) is a potent blocker of L-type calcium channel and our recent work showed Pb exposure impairs dendritic spine outgrowth in hippocampal neurons in rats. But the sensitivity of Pb-induced spine maturity with mixed factors (gender×age×brain regions) remains unknown. This study aimed to systematically investigate the effect of Pb exposure on spine maturity in rat brain with three factors (gender×age×brain regions), as well as the NDR1/2 kinase expression. Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to Pb from parturition to postnatal day 30, 60, 90, respectively. Golgi-Cox staining was used to examine spine maturity. Western blot assay was applied to measure protein expression and real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR assay was used to examine mRNA levels. The results showed chronic Pb exposure significantly decreased dendritic length and impaired spine maturity in both rat hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex. The impairment of dendritic length induced by Pb exposure tended to adolescence > adulthood, hippocampus > medial prefrontal cortex and female > male. Pb exposure induced significant damage in spine maturity during adolescence and early adult while little damage during adult in male rat brain and female medial prefrontal cortex. Besides, there was sustained impairment from adolescence to adulthood in female hippocampus. Interestingly, impairment of spine maturity followed by Pb exposure was correlated with NDR1/2 kinase. The reduction of NDR1/2 kinase protein expression after Pb exposure was similar to the result of spine maturity. In addition, NDR2 and their substrate Rabin3 mRNA levels were significantly decreased by Pb exposure in developmental rat brain. Taken together, Pb exposure impaired dendrite growth and maturity which was subject to gender×age×brain regions effects and related to NDR1/2 signal expression. PMID:26368815

  5. Fragment Molecular Orbital Method Applied to Lead Optimization of Novel Interleukin-2 Inducible T-Cell Kinase (ITK) Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Heifetz, Alexander; Trani, Giancarlo; Aldeghi, Matteo; MacKinnon, Colin H; McEwan, Paul A; Brookfield, Frederick A; Chudyk, Ewa I; Bodkin, Mike; Pei, Zhonghua; Burch, Jason D; Ortwine, Daniel F

    2016-05-12

    Inhibition of inducible T-cell kinase (ITK), a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase, may represent a novel treatment for allergic asthma. In our previous reports, we described the discovery of sulfonylpyridine (SAP), benzothiazole (BZT), indazole (IND), and tetrahydroindazole (THI) series as novel ITK inhibitors and how computational tools such as dihedral scans and docking were used to support this process. X-ray crystallography and modeling were applied to provide essential insight into ITK-ligand interactions. However, "visual inspection" traditionally used for the rationalization of protein-ligand affinity cannot always explain the full complexity of the molecular interactions. The fragment molecular orbital (FMO) quantum-mechanical (QM) method provides a complete list of the interactions formed between the ligand and protein that are often omitted from traditional structure-based descriptions. FMO methodology was successfully used as part of a rational structure-based drug design effort to improve the ITK potency of high-throughput screening hits, ultimately delivering ligands with potency in the subnanomolar range. PMID:26950250

  6. Dasatinib induces DNA damage and activates DNA repair pathways leading to senescence in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines with kinase-inactivating BRAF mutations

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Shaohua; Sen, Banibrata; Mazumdar, Tuhina; Byers, Lauren A.; Diao, Lixia; Wang, Jing; Tong, Pan; Giri, Uma; Heymach, John V.; Kadara, Humam N.; Johnson, Faye M.

    2016-01-01

    Improved therapies are greatly needed for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that does not harbor targetable kinase mutations or translocations. We previously demonstrated that NSCLC cells that harbor kinase-inactivating BRAF mutations (KIBRAF) undergo senescence when treated with the multitargeted kinase inhibitor dasatinib. Similarly, treatment with dasatinib resulted in a profound and durable response in a patient with KIBRAF NSCLC. However, no canonical pathways explain dasatinib-induced senescence in KIBRAF NSCLC. To investigate the underlying mechanism, we used 2 approaches: gene expression and reverse phase protein arrays. Both approaches showed that DNA repair pathways were differentially modulated between KIBRAF NSCLC cells and those with wild-type (WT) BRAF. Consistent with these findings, dasatinib induced DNA damage and activated DNA repair pathways leading to senescence only in the KIBRAF cells. Moreover, dasatinib-induced senescence was dependent on Chk1 and p21, proteins known to mediate DNA damage-induced senescence. Dasatinib also led to a marked decrease in TAZ but not YAP protein levels. Overexpression of TAZ inhibited dasatinib-induced senescence. To investigate other vulnerabilities in KIBRAF NSCLC cells, we compared the sensitivity of these cells with that of WTBRAF NSCLC cells to 79 drugs and identified a pattern of sensitivity to EGFR and MEK inhibitors in the KIBRAF cells. Clinically approved EGFR and MEK inhibitors, which are better tolerated than dasatinib, could be used to treat KIBRAF NSCLC. Our novel finding that dasatinib induced DNA damage and subsequently activated DNA repair pathways leading to senescence in KIBRAF NSCLC cells represents a unique vulnerability with potential clinical applications. PMID:26623721

  7. Reduced SMAD7 leads to overactivation of TGF-beta signaling in MDS that can be reversed by a specific inhibitor of TGF-beta receptor I kinase.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; McMahon, Christine; Bhagat, Tushar; Alencar, Cristina; Yu, Yiting; Fazzari, Melissa; Sohal, Davendra; Heuck, Christoph; Gundabolu, Krishna; Ng, Chun; Mo, Yongkai; Shen, Wa; Wickrema, Amittha; Kong, Guanghui; Friedman, Ellen; Sokol, Lubomir; Mantzaris, Ioannis; Mantzaris, Giannis; Pellagatti, Andrea; Boultwood, Jacqueline; Platanias, Leonidas C; Steidl, Ulrich; Yan, Lei; Yingling, Jonathan M; Lahn, Michael M; List, Alan; Bitzer, Markus; Verma, Amit

    2011-02-01

    Even though myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, the molecular alterations that lead to marrow failure have not been well elucidated. We have previously shown that the myelosuppressive TGF-β pathway is constitutively activated in MDS progenitors. Because there is conflicting data about upregulation of extracellular TGF-β levels in MDS, we wanted to determine the molecular basis of TGF-β pathway overactivation and consequent hematopoietic suppression in this disease. We observed that SMAD7, a negative regulator of TGF-β receptor I (TBRI) kinase, is markedly decreased in a large meta-analysis of gene expression studies from MDS marrow-derived CD34(+) cells. SMAD7 protein was also found to be significantly decreased in MDS marrow progenitors when examined immunohistochemically in a bone marrow tissue microarray. Reduced expression of SMAD7 in hematopoietic cells led to increased TGF-β-mediated gene transcription and enhanced sensitivity to TGF-β-mediated suppressive effects. The increased TGF-β signaling due to SMAD7 reduction could be effectively inhibited by a novel clinically relevant TBRI (ALK5 kinase) inhibitor, LY-2157299. LY-2157299 could inhibit TGF-β-mediated SMAD2 activation and hematopoietic suppression in primary hematopoietic stem cells. Furthermore, in vivo administration of LY-2157299 ameliorated anemia in a TGF-β overexpressing transgenic mouse model of bone marrow failure. Most importantly, treatment with LY-2157199 stimulated hematopoiesis from primary MDS bone marrow specimens. These studies demonstrate that reduction in SMAD7 is a novel molecular alteration in MDS that leads to ineffective hematopoiesis by activating of TGF-β signaling in hematopoietic cells. These studies also illustrate the therapeutic potential of TBRI inhibitors in MDS. PMID:21189329

  8. Reduced SMAD7 leads to overactivation of TGF-beta signaling in MDS that can be reversed by a specific inhibitor of TGF-beta receptor I kinase

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, L; McMahon, C; Bhagat, T; Alencar, C; Yu, Y; Fazzari, M; Sohal, D; Heuck, C; Gundabolu, K; Ng, C; Mo, Y; Shen, W; Wickrema, A; Kong, G; Friedman, E; Sokol, L; Mantzaris, G; Pellagatti, A; Boultwood, J; Platanias, LC.; Steidl, U; Yan, L; Yingling, JM; Lahn, MM; List, A; Bitzer, M; Verma, A

    2011-01-01

    Even though myelodysplastic syndromes are characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, the molecular alterations that lead to marrow failure have not been well elucidated. We have previously shown that the myelosuppressive TGF-β pathway is constitutively activated in MDS progenitors. Since there is conflicting data about upregulation of extracellular TGF-b levels in MDS, we wanted to determine the molecular basis of TGF-β pathway overactivation and consequent hematopoietic suppression in this disease. We observed that SMAD7, a negative regulator of TGF-β receptor I (TBRI) kinase is markedly decreased in a large meta-analysis of gene expression studies from MDS marrow derived CD34+ cells. SMAD7 protein was also found to be significantly decreased in MDS marrow progenitors when examined immunohistochemically in a bone marrow tissue microarray. Reduced expression of SMAD7 in hematopoietic cells led to increased TGF-β mediated gene transcription and enhanced sensitivity to TGF-β mediated suppressive effects. The increased TGF-β signaling due to SMAD7 reduction could be effectively inhibited by a novel clinically relevant TBRI (ALK5 kinase) inhibitor, LY-2157299. LY-2157299 could inhibit TGF-β mediated SMAD2 activation and hematopoietic suppression in primary hematopoietic stem cells. Furthermore, in vivo administration of LY-2157299 ameliorated anemia in a TGF-β overexpressing transgenic mouse model of bone marrow failure. Most importantly, treatment with LY-2157199 stimulated hematopoiesis from primary MDS bone marrow specimens. These studies demonstrate that reduction in SMAD7 is a novel molecular alteration in MDS that leads to ineffective hematopoiesis by activating of TGF-β signaling in hematopoietic cells. These studies also illustrate the therapeutic potential of TBRI inhibitors in MDS. PMID:21189329

  9. Overexpression of human ABCB1 in cancer cells leads to reduced activity of GSK461364, a specific inhibitor of polo-like kinase 1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chung-Pu; Hsiao, Sung-Han; Luo, Shi-Yu; Tuo, Wei-Cherng; Su, Ching-Ya; Li, Yan-Qing; Huang, Yang-Hui; Hsieh, Chia-Hung

    2014-10-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) is a serine/threonine kinase involved in the regulation of mitosis and is overexpressed in many tumor types. Inhibition of Plk1 leads to cell cycle arrest, onset of apoptosis, and cell death, thus Plk1 has emerged as an important target for cancer treatment. GSK461364 is a potent inhibitor of Plk1 that inhibits the proliferation of multiple human cancer cell lines by promoting G2/M cell cycle arrest at low concentrations. However, as is the case for many therapeutic drugs, the risk of developing drug resistance to GSK461364 can present a therapeutic challenge to clinicians. Since the overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transporter ABCB1 is one of the most common mechanisms of drug resistance, we aimed to investigate the effect of ABCB1 on the cellular efficacy of GSK461364. In this study, we observed a significantly reduced activity of GSK461364 in cells overexpressing human ABCB1. We showed that GSK461364 stimulates the ABCB1 ATPase activity and competitively inhibits ABCB1-mediated efflux of calcein-AM in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, as a way to assess the impact of ABCB1 on the efficacy of GSK461364, we evaluated the G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induced by GSK461364. We discovered that, by inhibiting the function of ABCB1, the reduced G2/M cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and sensitivity to GSK461364 treatment in ABCB1-overexpressing cells can be significantly restored. In conclusion, in order to achieve a better therapeutic outcome, combination therapy of GSK461364 with a modulator of ABCB1 should be further investigated as a potential treatment approach. PMID:25192198

  10. Lead Exposure Promotes Translocation of Protein Kinase C Activities in Rat Choroid Plexus in Vitro, but Not in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qiuqu; Slavkovich, Vesna; Zheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Lead (Pb) exposure reportedly modulates PKC activity in brain endothelial preparations, which may underlie Pb-induced damage at the blood–brain barrier. Our previous work indicates that Pb accumulates in the choroid plexus and causes dysfunction of this blood–cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier. The present studies were undertaken to test the hypothesis that Pb in the choroid plexus may alter PKC activity and thus affect the functions of the blood–CSF barrier. When choroidal epithelial cells in a primary culture were exposed to Pb (10 μM in culture medium), the membrane-bound PKC activity increased by 5.2-fold, while the cytosolic PKC activities decreased, an indication of the induction of PKC translocation by Pb. The effect of Pb on cellular PKC was concentration dependent in the range of 0.1–10 μM. We further evaluated PKC activity of the choroid plexus in rats chronically exposed to Pb in the drinking water (control, 50 or 250 μg Pb/ml) for 30, 60, or 90 days. Two-way analysis of variance revealed a significant age-related decline of PKC activities in both cytosol and membrane of the choroid plexus. However, Pb treatment did not alter plexus PKC activities. In addition, we found that short-term, acute Pb exposure in rats did not significantly change PKC activities nor did it affect the expression of PKC isoenzymes in the choroid plexus. Our results suggest that Pb exposure may promote the translocation of PKC from cytosol to membrane in rat blood–CSF barrier in vitro, but not in vivo. PMID:9512732

  11. HSP90 inhibition leads to degradation of the TYK2 kinase and apoptotic cell death in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Akahane, Koshi; Sanda, Takaomi; Mansour, Marc R.; Radimerski, Thomas; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Weinstock, David M.; Look, A. Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We previously found that TYK2 tyrosine kinase signaling through its downstream effector phospho-STAT1 (p-STAT1) acts to upregulate BCL2, which in turn mediates aberrant survival of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells. Here we show that pharmacologic inhibition of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) with a small-molecule inhibitor, NVP-AUY922 (AUY922), leads to rapid degradation of TYK2 and apoptosis in T-ALL cells. STAT1 protein levels were not affected by AUY922 treatment, but p-STAT1 (Tyr 701) levels rapidly became undetectable, consistent with a block in signaling downstream of TYK2. BCL2 expression was downregulated after AUY922 treatment, and although this effect was necessary for AUY922-induced apoptosis, it was not sufficient because many T-ALL cell lines were resistant to ABT-199, a specific inhibitor of BCL2. Unlike ABT-199, AUY922 also upregulated the proapoptotic proteins BIM and BAD, whose increased expression was required for AUY922-induced apoptosis. Thus, the potent cytotoxicity of AUY922 involves the synergistic combination of BCL2 downregulation coupled with upregulation of the proapoptotic proteins BIM and BAD. This two-pronged assault on the mitochondrial apoptotic machinery identifies HSP90 inhibitors as promising drugs for targeting the TYK2-mediated prosurvival signaling axis in T-ALL cells. PMID:26265185

  12. HSP90 inhibition leads to degradation of the TYK2 kinase and apoptotic cell death in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Akahane, K; Sanda, T; Mansour, M R; Radimerski, T; DeAngelo, D J; Weinstock, D M; Look, A T

    2016-01-01

    We previously found that tyrosine kinase 2 (TYK2) signaling through its downstream effector phospho-STAT1 acts to upregulate BCL2, which in turn mediates aberrant survival of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells. Here we show that pharmacologic inhibition of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) with a small-molecule inhibitor, NVP-AUY922 (AUY922), leads to rapid degradation of TYK2 and apoptosis in T-ALL cells. STAT1 protein levels were not affected by AUY922 treatment, but phospho-STAT1 (Tyr-701) levels rapidly became undetectable, consistent with a block in signaling downstream of TYK2. BCL2 expression was downregulated after AUY922 treatment, and although this effect was necessary for AUY922-induced apoptosis, it was not sufficient because many T-ALL cell lines were resistant to ABT-199, a specific inhibitor of BCL2. Unlike ABT-199, AUY922 also upregulated the proapoptotic proteins BIM and BAD, whose increased expression was required for AUY922-induced apoptosis. Thus, the potent cytotoxicity of AUY922 involves the synergistic combination of BCL2 downregulation coupled with upregulation of the proapoptotic proteins BIM and BAD. This two-pronged assault on the mitochondrial apoptotic machinery identifies HSP90 inhibitors as promising drugs for targeting the TYK2-mediated prosurvival signaling axis in T-ALL cells. PMID:26265185

  13. Reduction of brain barrier tight junctional proteins by lead exposure: role of activation of nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Src via chaperon GRP78.

    PubMed

    Song, Han; Zheng, Gang; Shen, Xue-Feng; Liu, Xin-Qin; Luo, Wen-Jing; Chen, Jing-Yuan

    2014-04-01

    Lead (Pb) has long been recognized as a neurodevelopmental toxin. Developing blood-brain barrier (BBB) is known to be a target of Pb neurotoxicity; however, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Recent evidence suggests that intracellular nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinase Src regulates tight junctional proteins (TJPs). This study was designed to investigate whether Pb acted on the Src-mediated cascade event leading to an altered TJP expression at BBB. Rats aged 20-22 days were exposed to Pb in drinking water (0, 100, 200, and 300 ppm Pb) for eight weeks. Electron microscopic and Western blot analyses revealed a severe leakage of BBB and significantly decreased expressions of TJP occludin and ZO-1. When cultured brain endothelial RBE4 cells were exposed to 10μM Pb for 24 h, expressions of phosphor-Src and an upstream regulator GRP78 were significantly increased by 6.42-fold and 8.29-fold (p < 0.01), respectively. Inactivation of Src pathway by a Src-specific inhibitor reversed Pb-induced downregulation of occludin, but not ZO-1; small interfering RNA knockdown of GRP78 attenuated Pb-induced Src phosphorylation and occludin reduction. Furthermore, Pb exposure caused redistribution of GRP78 from endoplasmic reticulum to cytosol and toward cell member. However, the data from immunoneutralization studies did not show the involvement of cell-surface GRP78 in regulating Src phosphorylation upon Pb exposure, suggesting that the cytosolic GRP78, rather than cell-surface GRP78, was responsible to Pb-induced Src activation and ensuing occludin reduction. Taken together, this study provides the evidence of a novel linkage of GRP78, Src activation to downregulation of occludin, and BBB disruption during Pb exposure. PMID:24431214

  14. Establishment of a Structure–Activity Relationship of 1H-Imidazo[4,5-c]quinoline-Based Kinase Inhibitor NVP-BEZ235 as a Lead for African Sleeping Sickness

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Compound NVP-BEZ235 (1) is a potent inhibitor of human phospoinositide-3-kinases and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) that also showed high inhibitory potency against Trypanosoma brucei cultures. With an eye toward using 1 as a starting point for anti-trypanosomal drug discovery, we report efforts to reduce host cell toxicity, to improve the physicochemical properties, and to improve the selectivity profile over human kinases. In this work, we have developed structure–activity relationships for analogues of 1 and have prepared analogues of 1 with improved solubility properties and good predicted central nervous system exposure. In this way, we have identified 4e, 9, 16e, and 16g as the most promising leads to date. We also report cell phenotype and phospholipidomic studies that suggest that these compounds exert their anti-trypanosomal effects, at least in part, by inhibition of lipid kinases. PMID:24805946

  15. Nodularin induces tumor necrosis factor-alpha and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and leads to induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Meili, Nicole; Christen, Verena; Fent, Karl

    2016-06-01

    Nodularin is produced by the cyanobacterium Nodularia spumigena. It is of concern due to hepatotoxicity in humans and animals. Here we investigated unexplored molecular mechanisms by transcription analysis in human liver cells, focusing on induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines, the tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and components of the activator protein-1 complex in human hepatoma cells (Huh7) exposed to non-cytotoxic (0.1 and 1μM) and toxic concentrations (5μM) for 24, 48, and 72h. Transcripts of TNF-α and ER stress marker genes were strongly induced at 1 and 5μM at all time-points. TNF-α led to induction of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), as demonstrated by induction of CJUN and CFOS, which form the AP-1 complex. Human primary liver cells reacted more sensitive than Huh7 cells. They showed higher cytotoxicity and induction of TNF-α and ER stress at 2.5nM, while HepG2 cells were insensitive up to 10μM due to low expression of organic anion transporting polypeptides. Furthermore, nodularin led to induction of TNF-α protein, and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-homologous (CHOP) protein. Our data indicate that nodularin induces inflammation and ER stress and leads to activation of MAPK in liver cells. All of these activated pathways, which were analysed here for the first time in detail, may contribute to the hepatotoxic, and tumorigenic action of nodularin. PMID:27061667

  16. Patient autoantibodies deplete postsynaptic muscle-specific kinase leading to disassembly of the ACh receptor scaffold and myasthenia gravis in mice.

    PubMed

    Cole, R N; Ghazanfari, N; Ngo, S T; Gervásio, O L; Reddel, S W; Phillips, W D

    2010-09-01

    The postsynaptic muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) coordinates formation of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) during embryonic development. Here we have studied the effects of MuSK autoantibodies upon the NMJ in adult mice. Daily injections of IgG from four MuSK autoantibody-positive myasthenia gravis patients (MuSK IgG; 45 mg day(1)i.p. for 14 days) caused reductions in postsynaptic ACh receptor (AChR) packing as assessed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). IgG from the patients with the highest titres of MuSK autoantibodies caused large (51-73%) reductions in postsynaptic MuSK staining (cf. control mice; P < 0.01) and muscle weakness. Among mice injected for 14 days with control and MuSK patient IgGs, the residual level of MuSK correlated with the degree of impairment of postsynaptic AChR packing. However, the loss of postsynaptic MuSK preceded this impairment of postsynaptic AChR. When added to cultured C2 muscle cells the MuSK autoantibodies caused tyrosine phosphorylation of MuSK and the AChR beta-subunit, and internalization of MuSK from the plasma membrane. The results suggest a pathogenic mechanism in which MuSK autoantibodies rapidly deplete MuSK from the postsynaptic membrane leading to progressive dispersal of postsynaptic AChRs. Moreover, maintenance of postsynaptic AChR packing at the adult NMJ would appear to depend upon physical engagement of MuSK with the AChR scaffold, notwithstanding activation of the MuSK-rapsyn system of AChR clustering. PMID:20603331

  17. Inhibition of the focal adhesion kinase and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 interaction leads to decreased survival in human neuroblastoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Beierle, Elizabeth A; Ma, Xiaojie; Stewart, Jerry E; Megison, Michael; Cance, William G; Kurenova, Elena V

    2014-03-01

    Neuroblastoma continues to be a devastating childhood solid tumor and is responsible for over 15% of all childhood cancer-related deaths. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 (VEGFR-3) are protein tyrosine kinases that are overexpressed in a number of human cancers, including neuroblastoma. These two kinases can directly interact and provide survival signals to cancer cells. In this study, we utilized siRNA to VEGFR-3 to demonstrate the biologic importance of this kinase in neuroblastoma cell survival. We also used confocal microscopy and immunoprecipitation to show that FAK and VEGFR-3 bind in neuroblastoma. Finally, employing a 12-amino-acid peptide (AV3) specific to VEGFR-3, we showed that the colocalization between FAK and VEGFR-3 could be disrupted, and that disruption resulted in decreased neuroblastoma cell survival. These studies provide insight to the FAK-VEGFR-3 interaction in neuroblastoma and demonstrate its importance in this tumor type. Focusing upon the FAK-VEGFR-3 interaction may provide a novel therapeutic target for the development of new strategies for treatment of neuroblastoma. PMID:23065847

  18. Tyrosine kinase gene rearrangements in epithelial malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Alice T.; Hsu, Peggy P.; Awad, Mark M.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements that lead to oncogenic kinase activation are observed in many epithelial cancers. These cancers express activated fusion kinases that drive the initiation and progression of malignancy, and often have a considerable response to small-molecule kinase inhibitors, which validates these fusion kinases as ‘druggable’ targets. In this Review, we examine the aetiologic, pathogenic and clinical features that are associated with cancers harbouring oncogenic fusion kinases, including anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), ROS1 and RET. We discuss the clinical outcomes with targeted therapies and explore strategies to discover additional kinases that are activated by chromosomal rearrangements in solid tumours. PMID:24132104

  19. Defective Hyphal Induction of a Candida albicans Phosphatidylinositol 3-Phosphate 5-Kinase Null Mutant on Solid Media Does Not Lead to Decreased Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Augsten, Martin; Hübner, Claudia; Nguyen, Monika; Künkel, Waldemar; Härtl, Albert; Eck, Raimund

    2002-01-01

    A phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate [PI(3)P] 5-kinase gene (CaFAB1) of the most important human pathogenic yeast, Candida albicans, was cloned and sequenced. An open reading frame was detected which encodes a 2,369-amino-acid protein with a calculated molecular mass of 268 kDa and a relative isoelectric point of 6.76. This protein exhibits 38% overall amino acid sequence identity with Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fab1p. We localized the CaFAB1 gene on chromosome R. To determine the influence of the PI(3)P 5-kinase CaFab1p on processes involved in C. albicans morphogenesis and pathogenicity, we sequentially disrupted both copies of the gene. Homozygous deletion of C. albicans CaFAB1 resulted in a mutant strain which exhibited defects in morphogenesis. A Cafab1 null mutant had enlarged vacuoles, an acidification defect, and increased generation times and was unable to form hyphae on different solid media. The sensitivities to hyperosmotic and high-temperature stresses, adherence, and virulence compared to those of wild-type strain SC5314 were not affected. PMID:12117957

  20. Affibody-mediated retention of the epidermal growth factor receptor in the secretory compartments leads to inhibition of phosphorylation in the kinase domain.

    PubMed

    Vernet, Erik; Lundberg, Emma; Friedman, Mikaela; Rigamonti, Nicolò; Klausing, Sandra; Nygren, Per-Ake; Gräslund, Torbjörn

    2009-09-01

    Abnormal activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is associated with various cancer-related processes and motivates the search for strategies that can selectively block EGFR signalling. In this study, functional knockdown of EGFR was achieved through expression of an affibody construct, (ZEGFR:1907)(2-)KDEL, with high affinity for EGFR and extended with the amino acids KDEL to make it resident in the secretory compartments. Expression of (ZEGFR:1907)(2-)KDEL resulted in 80% reduction ofthe cell surface level of EGFR, and fluorescent staining for EGFR and the (ZEGFR:1907)(2-)KDEL construct showed overlapping intracellular localisation. Immunocapture of EGFR from cell lysates showed that an intracellular complex between EGFR and the affibody construct had been formed, further indicating aspecific interaction between the affibody construct and EGFR. Surface depletion of EGFR led to a dramatic decrease in the amount of kinase domain phosphorylated EGFR, coincident with a significant decrease in the proliferation rate. PMID:19552886

  1. Ultra-deep sequencing leads to earlier and more sensitive detection of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance mutation T315I in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Baer, Constance; Kern, Wolfgang; Koch, Sarah; Nadarajah, Niroshan; Schindela, Sonja; Meggendorfer, Manja; Haferlach, Claudia; Haferlach, Torsten

    2016-07-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia cells acquire resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors through mutations in the ABL1 kinase domain. The T315I mutation mediates resistance to imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib and bosutinib, whereas sensitivity to ponatinib remains. Mutation detection by conventional Sanger sequencing requires 10%-20% expansion of the mutated subclone. We studied the T315I mutation development by ultra-deep sequencing on the 454 XL+ platform (Roche) in comparison to Sanger sequencing. By ultra-deep sequencing, mutations were detected at loads of 1%-2%. We selected 40 patients who had failed first-line to third-line treatment (imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib) and had high loads of the T315I mutation detected by Sanger sequencing. We confirmed T315I mutations by ultra-deep sequencing and investigated the mutation dynamics by backtracking earlier samples. In 20 of 40 patients, we identified the T315I three months (median) before Sanger sequencing detection limits were reached. To exclude sporadic low percentage mutation development without subsequent mutation outgrowth, we selected 42 patients without resistance mutations detected by Sanger sequencing but loss of major molecular response. Here, no mutation was detected by ultradeep sequencing. Additional non-T315I resistance mutations were found in 20 of 40 patients. Only 15% had two mutations per cell; the other cases showed multiple independently mutated clones and the T315I clone demonstrated a rapid outgrowth. In conclusion, T315I mutations could be detected earlier by ultra-deep sequencing compared to Sanger sequencing in a selected group of cases. Earlier mutation detection by ultra-deep sequencing might allow treatment to be changed before clonal increase of cells with the T315I mutation. PMID:27102501

  2. Lack of IL-1 Receptor-Associated Kinase-4 Leads to Defective Th1 Cell Responses and Renders Mice Susceptible to Mycobacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    Marinho, Fábio V; Fahel, Júlia S; Scanga, Charles A; Gomes, Marco Tulio R; Guimarães, Gabriela; Carvalho, Gabrielle R M; Morales, Stefanny V; Báfica, André; Oliveira, Sergio Costa

    2016-09-01

    The Toll-like and IL-1 family receptors play critical roles in innate and adaptive immunity against intracellular pathogens. Although previous data demonstrated the importance of TLRs and IL-1R signaling events for the establishment of an effective immune response to mycobacteria, the possible function of the adaptor molecule IL-1R-associated kinase (IRAK)-4 against this pathogen has not been addressed. In this study, we determined the role of IRAK-4 in signaling pathways responsible for controlling mycobacterial infections. This kinase is important for the production of IL-12 and TNF-α by macrophages and dendritic cells exposed to mycobacteria. Moreover, Mycobacterium bovis-infected IRAK-4-knockout macrophages displayed impaired MAPK and NF-κB activation. IL-1β secretion and caspase-1 activation were also dependent on IRAK-4 signaling. Mice lacking IRAK-4 showed increased M. bovis burden in spleen, liver, and lungs and smaller liver granulomas during 60 d of infection compared with wild-type mice. Furthermore, 80% of IRAK-4(-/-) mice succumbed to virulent M. tuberculosis within 100 d following low-dose infection. This increased susceptibility to mycobacteria correlated with reduced IFN-γ/TNF-α recall responses by splenocytes, as well as fewer IL-12p70-producing APCs. Additionally, we observed that IRAK-4 is also important for the production of IFN-γ by CD4(+) T cells from infected mice. Finally, THP-1 cells treated with an IRAK-4 inhibitor and exposed to M. bovis showed reduced TNF-α and IL-12, suggesting that the results found in mice can be extended to humans. In summary, these data demonstrate that IRAK-4 is essential for innate and adaptive immunity and necessary for efficient control of mycobacterial infections. PMID:27439514

  3. Ultra-deep sequencing leads to earlier and more sensitive detection of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance mutation T315I in chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Baer, Constance; Kern, Wolfgang; Koch, Sarah; Nadarajah, Niroshan; Schindela, Sonja; Meggendorfer, Manja; Haferlach, Claudia; Haferlach, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia cells acquire resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors through mutations in the ABL1 kinase domain. The T315I mutation mediates resistance to imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib and bosutinib, whereas sensitivity to ponatinib remains. Mutation detection by conventional Sanger sequencing requires 10%–20% expansion of the mutated subclone. We studied the T315I mutation development by ultra-deep sequencing on the 454 XL+ platform (Roche) in comparison to Sanger sequencing. By ultra-deep sequencing, mutations were detected at loads of 1%–2%. We selected 40 patients who had failed first-line to third-line treatment (imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib) and had high loads of the T315I mutation detected by Sanger sequencing. We confirmed T315I mutations by ultra-deep sequencing and investigated the mutation dynamics by backtracking earlier samples. In 20 of 40 patients, we identified the T315I three months (median) before Sanger sequencing detection limits were reached. To exclude sporadic low percentage mutation development without subsequent mutation outgrowth, we selected 42 patients without resistance mutations detected by Sanger sequencing but loss of major molecular response. Here, no mutation was detected by ultradeep sequencing. Additional non-T315I resistance mutations were found in 20 of 40 patients. Only 15% had two mutations per cell; the other cases showed multiple independently mutated clones and the T315I clone demonstrated a rapid outgrowth. In conclusion, T315I mutations could be detected earlier by ultra-deep sequencing compared to Sanger sequencing in a selected group of cases. Earlier mutation detection by ultra-deep sequencing might allow treatment to be changed before clonal increase of cells with the T315I mutation. PMID:27102501

  4. [Kinase inhibitors and their resistance].

    PubMed

    Togashi, Yosuke; Nishio, Kazuto

    2015-08-01

    Kinase cascades are involved in all stages of tumorigenesis through modulation of transformation and differentiation, cell-cycle progression, and motility. Advances in molecular targeted drug development allow the design and synthesis of inhibitors targeting cancer-associated signal transduction pathways. Potent selective inhibitors with low toxicity can benefit patients especially with several malignancies harboring an oncogenic driver addictive signal. This article evaluates information on solid tumor-related kinase signals and inhibitors, including receptor tyrosine kinase or serine/threonine kinase signals that lead to successful application in clinical settings. In addition, the resistant mechanisms to the inhibitors is summarized. PMID:26281685

  5. Piperlongumine chemosensitizes tumor cells through interaction with cysteine 179 of IκBα kinase, leading to suppression of NF-κB-regulated gene products.

    PubMed

    Han, Jia Gang; Gupta, Subash C; Prasad, Sahdeo; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2014-10-01

    Recently, two different reports appeared in prominent journals suggesting a mechanism by which piperlongumine, a pyridine alkaloid, mediates anticancer effects. In the current report, we describe another novel mechanism by which this alkaloid mediates its anticancer effects. We found that piperlongumine blocked NF-κB activated by TNFα and various other cancer promoters. This downregulation was accompanied by inhibition of phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα. Further investigation revealed that this pyridine alkaloid directly interacts with IκBα kinase (IKK) and inhibits its activity. Inhibition of IKK occurred through interaction with its cysteine 179 as the mutation of this residue to alanine abolished the activity of piperlongumine. Inhibition in NF-κB activity downregulated the expression of proteins involved in cell survival (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, c-IAP-1, c-IAP-2, survivin), proliferation (c-Myc, cyclin D1), inflammation (COX-2, IL6), and invasion (ICAM-1, -9, CXCR-4, VEGF). Overall, our results reveal a novel mechanism by which piperlongumine can exhibit antitumor activity through downmodulation of proinflammatory pathway. PMID:25082961

  6. Redox Regulation of Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Thu H.; Carroll, Kate S.

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases represent one of the largest families of genes found in eukaryotes. Kinases mediate distinct cellular processes ranging from proliferation, differentiation, survival, and apoptosis. Ligand-mediated activation of receptor kinases can lead to the production of endogenous H2O2 by membrane-bound NADPH oxidases. In turn, H2O2 can be utilized as a secondary messenger in signal transduction pathways. This review presents an overview of the molecular mechanisms involved in redox regulation of protein kinases and its effects on signaling cascades. In the first half, we will focus primarily on receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), whereas the latter will concentrate on downstream non-receptor kinases involved in relaying stimulant response. Select examples from the literature are used to highlight the functional role of H2O2 regarding kinase activity, as well as the components involved in H2O2 production and regulation during cellular signaling. In addition, studies demonstrating direct modulation of protein kinases by H2O2 through cysteine oxidation will be emphasized. Identification of these redox-sensitive residues may help uncover signaling mechanisms conserved within kinase subfamilies. In some cases, these residues can even be exploited as targets for the development of new therapeutics. Continued efforts in this field will further basic understanding of kinase redox regulation, and delineate the mechanisms involved in physiologic and pathological H2O2 responses. PMID:23639002

  7. From a natural product lead to the identification of potent and selective benzofuran-3-yl-(indol-3-yl)maleimides as glycogen synthase kinase 3beta inhibitors that suppress proliferation and survival of pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gaisina, Irina N; Gallier, Franck; Ougolkov, Andrei V; Kim, Ki H; Kurome, Toru; Guo, Songpo; Holzle, Denise; Luchini, Doris N; Blond, Sylvie Y; Billadeau, Daniel D; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2009-04-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK-3beta) is overexpressed in human colon and pancreatic carcinomas, contributing to cancer cell proliferation and survival. Here, we report the design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of benzofuran-3-yl-(indol-3-yl)maleimides, potent GSK-3beta inhibitors. Some of these compounds show picomolar inhibitory activity toward GSK-3beta and an enhanced selectivity against cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK-2). Selected GSK-3beta inhibitors were tested in the pancreatic cancer cell lines MiaPaCa-2, BXPC-3, and HupT3. We determined that some of these compounds, namely compounds 5, 6, 11, 20, and 26, demonstrate antiproliferative activity against some or all of the pancreatic cancer cells at low micromolar to nanomolar concentrations. We found that the treatment of pancreatic cancer cells with GSK-3beta inhibitors 5 and 26 resulted in suppression of GSK-3beta activity and a distinct decrease of the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) expression, leading to significant apoptosis. The present data suggest a possible role for GSK-3beta inhibitors in cancer therapy, in addition to their more prominent applications in CNS disorders. PMID:19338355

  8. Fisetin inhibits the activities of cyclin-dependent kinases leading to cell cycle arrest in HT-29 human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xianghua; Jung, Jae in; Cho, Han Jin; Lim, Do Young; Lee, Hyun Sook; Chun, Hyang Sook; Kwon, Dae Young; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2005-12-01

    Fisetin, a natural flavonol present in edible vegetables, fruits, and wine, was reported to exert anticarcinogenic effects. The objective of the current study was to examine the effect of fisetin on the cell cycle progression of the human colon cancer cell line HT-29. HT-29 cells were cultured in serum-free medium with 0, 20, 40, or 60 micromol/L fisetin. Fisetin dose dependently inhibited both cell growth and DNA synthesis (P < 0.05), with a 79 +/- 1% decrease in cell number observed 72 h after the addition of 60 micromol/L fisetin. Perturbed cell cycle progression from the G(1) to S phase was observed at 8 h with 60 micromol/L fisetin treatment, whereas a G(2)/M phase arrest was observed after 24 h (P < 0.05). The phosphorylation state of the retinoblastoma proteins shifted from hyperphosphorylated to hypophosphorylated in cells treated with 40 micromol/L fisetin. (P < 0.05). Fisetin decreased the activities of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK)2 and CDK4; these effects were likely attributable to decreases in the levels of cyclin E and D1 and an increase in p21(CIP1/WAF1) levels (P < 0.05). However, fisetin also inhibited CDk4 activity in a cell-free system (P < 0.05), indicating that it may directly inhibit CDk4 activity. The protein levels of cell division cycles (CDC)2 and CDC25C and the activity of CDC2 were also decreased in fisetin-treated cells (P < 0.05). These results indicate that inhibition of cell cycle progression in HT-29 cells after treatment with fisetin can be explained, at least in part, by modification of CDK activities. PMID:16317137

  9. Dectin-1-mediated Signaling Leads to Characteristic Gene Expressions and Cytokine Secretion via Spleen Tyrosine Kinase (Syk) in Rat Mast Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yukihiro; Chihara, Kazuyasu; Honjoh, Chisato; Takeuchi, Kenji; Yamauchi, Shota; Yoshiki, Hatsumi; Fujieda, Shigeharu; Sada, Kiyonao

    2014-01-01

    Dectin-1 recognizes β-glucan and plays important roles for the antifungal immunity through the activation of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) in dendritic cells or macrophages. Recently, expression of Dectin-1 was also identified in human and mouse mast cells, although its physiological roles were largely unknown. In this report, rat mast cell line RBL-2H3 was analyzed to investigate the molecular mechanism of Dectin-1-mediated activation and responses of mast cells. Treatment of cells with Dectin-1-specific agonist curdlan induced tyrosine phosphorylation of cellular proteins and the interaction of Dectin-1 with the Src homology 2 domain of Syk. These responses depended on tyrosine phosphorylation of the hemi-immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif in the cytoplasmic tail of Dectin-1, whereas they were independent of the γ-subunit of high-affinity IgE receptor. DNA microarray and real-time PCR analyses showed that Dectin-1-mediated signaling stimulated gene expression of transcription factor Nfkbiz and inflammatory cytokines, such as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, IL-3, IL-4, IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. The response was abrogated by pretreatment with Syk inhibitor R406. These results suggest that Syk is critical for Dectin-1-mediated activation of mast cells, although the signaling differs from that triggered by FcϵRI activation. In addition, these gene expressions induced by curdlan stimulation were specifically observed in mast cells, suggesting that Dectin-1-mediated signaling of mast cells offers new insight into the antifungal immunity. PMID:25246527

  10. A Mathematical Exploration of MAP Kinase Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Rhys; Balazsi, Gabor

    2008-03-01

    Mitogen-Activated Protein (MAP) kinase pathways are highly conserved from yeast to humans and are implicated in cell survival and cell death. Signaling through these pathways starts with the phosphorylation of the most upstream component (MAP kinase kinase kinase, MAPKKK), continues with phosphorylation of a MAP kinase kinase (MAPKK), and ends with phosphorylation of the target MAP kinase (MAPK). Theoretical studies over the past few decades have generated important insights into the dynamical behavior and signal processing capability of these pathways, including bistability, oscillations, signal amplification, etc. Prompted by the possibility of complex behavior in simpler signaling units than a full MAP kinase pathway, we investigate the possibility of In-Band Detection (IBD) within a single step of the cascade. We show that a basal rate of target phosphorylation can lead to IBD in a simpler system than the one described before, and define a precise relationship between the various reaction rates that is necessary to obtain IBD.

  11. High-Throughput Kinase Profiling: A More Efficient Approach towards the Discovery of New Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Miduturu, Chandrasekhar V.; Deng, Xianming; Kwiatkowski, Nicholas; Yang, Wannian; Brault, Laurent; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Chung, Eunah; Yang, Qingkai; Schwaller, Juerg; Knapp, Stefan; King, Randall W.; Lee, Jiing-Dwan; Herrgard, Sanna; Zarrinkar, Patrick; Gray, Nathanael S.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Selective protein kinase inhibitors have only been developed against a small number of kinase targets. Here we demonstrate that “high-throughput kinase profiling” is an efficient method for the discovery of lead compounds for established as well as unexplored kinase targets. We screened a library of 118 compounds constituting two distinct scaffolds (furan-thiazolidinediones and pyrimido-diazepines) against a panel of 353 kinases. A distinct kinase selectivity profile was observed for each scaffold. Selective inhibitors were identified with submicromolar cellular activity against PIM1, ERK5, ACK1, MPS1/PLK1–3 and Aurora A,B kinases. In addition, we identified potent inhibitors for so far unexplored kinases such as DRAK1, HIPK2 and DCAMKL1 that await further evaluation. This inhibitor-centric approach permits comprehensive assessment of a scaffold of interest and represents an efficient and general strategy for identifying new selective kinase inhibitors. PMID:21802008

  12. Oncoprotein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2001-02-27

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD or 55 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and theonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  13. Bile acid reflux contributes to development of esophageal adenocarcinoma via activation of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase Cgamma2 and NADPH oxidase NOX5-S.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jie; Behar, Jose; Wands, Jack; Resnick, Murray; Wang, Li Juan; Delellis, Ronald A; Lambeth, David; Cao, Weibiao

    2010-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease complicated by Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a major risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA). However, the mechanisms of the progression from BE to EA are not fully understood. Besides acid reflux, bile acid reflux may also play an important role in the progression from BE to EA. In this study, we examined the role of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) and a novel NADPH oxidase NOX5-S in bile acid-induced increase in cell proliferation. We found that taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA) significantly increased NOX5-S expression, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) production, and cell proliferation in EA cells. The TDCA-induced increase in cell proliferation was significantly reduced by U73122, an inhibitor of PI-PLC. PI-PLCbeta1, PI-PLCbeta3, PI-PLCbeta4, PI-PLCgamma1, and PI-PLCgamma2, but not PI-PLCbeta2 and PI-PLCdelta1, were detectable in FLO cells by Western blot analysis. Knockdown of PI-PLCgamma2 or extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 2 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase with small interfering RNAs (siRNA) significantly decreased TDCA-induced NOX5-S expression, H(2)O(2) production, and cell proliferation. In contrast, knockdown of PI-PLCbeta1, PI-PLCbeta3, PI-PLCbeta4, PI-PLCgamma1, or ERK1 MAP kinase had no significant effect. TDCA significantly increased ERK2 phosphorylation, an increase that was reduced by U73122 or PI-PLCgamma2 siRNA. We conclude that TDCA-induced increase in NOX5-S expression and cell proliferation may depend on sequential activation of PI-PLCgamma2 and ERK2 MAP kinase in EA cells. It is possible that bile acid reflux present in patients with BE may increase reactive oxygen species production and cell proliferation via activation of PI-PLCgamma2, ERK2 MAP kinase, and NADPH oxidase NOX5-S, thereby contributing to the development of EA. PMID:20086178

  14. Regulation and function of yeast PAS kinase

    PubMed Central

    Grose, Julianne H.; Sundwall, Eleanor; Rutter, Jared

    2016-01-01

    The inability to coordinate cellular metabolic processes with the cellular and organismal nutrient environment leads to a variety of disorders, including diabetes and obesity. Nutrient-sensing protein kinases, such as AMPK and mTOR, play a pivotal role in metabolic regulation and are promising therapeutic targets for the treatment of disease. In this Extra View, we describe another member of the nutrient-sensing protein kinase group, PAS kinase, which plays a role in the regulation of glucose utilization in both mammals and yeast. PAS kinase deficient mice are resistant to high fat diet-induced weight gain, insulin resistance and hepatic triglyceride hyperaccumulation, suggesting a role for PAS kinase in the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism in mammals. Likewise, PAS kinase deficient yeast display altered glucose partitioning, favoring glycogen biosynthesis at the expense of cell wall biosynthesis. As a result, PAS kinase deficient yeast are sensitive to cell wall perturbing agents. This partitioning of glucose in response to PAS kinase activation is due to phosphorylation of Ugp1, the enzyme primarily responsible for UDP-glucose production. The two yeast PAS kinase homologs, Psk1 and Psk2, are activated by two stimuli, cell integrity stress and nonfermentative carbon sources. We review what is known about yeast PAS kinase and describe a genetic screen that may help elucidate pathways involved in PAS kinase activation and function. PMID:19440050

  15. Poxviral Protein A52 Stimulates p38 Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Activation by Causing Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-associated Factor 6 (TRAF6) Self-association Leading to Transforming Growth Factor β-activated Kinase 1 (TAK1) Recruitment*

    PubMed Central

    Stack, Julianne; Hurst, Tara P.; Flannery, Sinead M.; Brennan, Kiva; Rupp, Sebastian; Oda, Shun-ichiro; Khan, Amir R.; Bowie, Andrew G.

    2013-01-01

    Vaccinia virus encodes a number of proteins that inhibit and manipulate innate immune signaling pathways that also have a role in virulence. These include A52, a protein shown to inhibit IL-1- and Toll-like receptor-stimulated NFκB activation, via interaction with interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 2 (IRAK2). Interestingly, A52 was also found to activate p38 MAPK and thus enhance Toll-like receptor-dependent IL-10 induction, which was TRAF6-dependent, but the manner in which A52 manipulates TRAF6 to stimulate p38 activation was unclear. Here, we show that A52 has a non-canonical TRAF6-binding motif that is essential for TRAF6 binding and p38 activation but dispensable for NFκB inhibition and IRAK2 interaction. Wild-type A52, but not a mutant defective in p38 activation and TRAF6 binding (F154A), caused TRAF6 oligomerization and subsequent TRAF6-TAK1 association. The crystal structure of A52 shows that it adopts a Bcl2-like fold and exists as a dimer in solution. Residue Met-65 was identified as being located in the A52 dimer interface, and consistent with that, A52-M65E was impaired in its ability to dimerize. A52-M65E although capable of interacting with TRAF6, was unable to cause either TRAF6 self-association, induce the TRAF6-TAK1 association, or activate p38 MAPK. The results suggest that an A52 dimer causes TRAF6 self-association, leading to TAK1 recruitment and p38 activation. This reveals a molecular mechanism whereby poxviruses manipulate TRAF6 to activate MAPKs (which can be proviral) without stimulating antiviral NFκB activation. PMID:24114841

  16. Protein Tyrosine Kinase Fyn Regulates TLR4-Elicited Responses on Mast Cells Controlling the Function of a PP2A-PKCα/β Signaling Node Leading to TNF Secretion.

    PubMed

    Martín-Ávila, Alejandro; Medina-Tamayo, Jaciel; Ibarra-Sánchez, Alfredo; Vázquez-Victorio, Genaro; Castillo-Arellano, Jorge Iván; Hernández-Mondragón, Alma Cristal; Rivera, Juan; Madera-Salcedo, Iris K; Blank, Ulrich; Macías-Silva, Marina; González-Espinosa, Claudia

    2016-06-15

    Mast cells produce proinflammatory cytokines in response to TLR4 ligands, but the signaling pathways involved are not fully described. In this study, the participation of the Src family kinase Fyn in the production of TNF after stimulation with LPS was evaluated using bone marrow-derived mast cells from wild-type and Fyn-deficient mice. Fyn(-/-) cells showed higher LPS-induced secretion of preformed and de novo-synthesized TNF. In both cell types, TNF colocalized with vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)3-positive compartments. Addition of LPS provoked coalescence of VAMP3 and its interaction with synaptosomal-associated protein 23; those events were increased in the absence of Fyn. Higher TNF mRNA levels were also observed in Fyn-deficient cells as a result of increased transcription and greater mRNA stability after LPS treatment. Fyn(-/-) cells also showed higher LPS-induced activation of TAK-1 and ERK1/2, whereas IκB kinase and IκB were phosphorylated, even in basal conditions. Increased responsiveness in Fyn(-/-) cells was associated with a lower activity of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and augmented activity of protein kinase C (PKC)α/β, which was dissociated from PP2A and increased its association with the adapter protein neuroblast differentiation-associated protein (AHNAK, desmoyokin). LPS-induced PKCα/β activity was associated with VAMP3 coalescence in WT and Fyn-deficient cells. Reconstitution of MC-deficient Wsh mice with Fyn(-/-) MCs produced greater LPS-dependent production of TNF in the peritoneal cavity. Our data show that Fyn kinase is activated after TLR4 triggering and exerts an important negative control on LPS-dependent TNF production in MCs controlling the inactivation of PP2Ac and activation of PKCα/β necessary for the secretion of TNF by VAMP3(+) carriers. PMID:27183589

  17. Kinase inhibitor profiling reveals unexpected opportunities to inhibit disease-associated mutant kinases

    PubMed Central

    Duong-Ly, Krisna C.; Devarajan, Karthik; Liang, Shuguang; Horiuchi, Kurumi Y.; Wang, Yuren; Ma, Haiching; Peterson, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Small-molecule kinase inhibitors have typically been designed to inhibit wild-type kinases rather than the mutant forms that frequently arise in diseases such as cancer. Mutations can have serious clinical implications by increasing kinase catalytic activity or conferring therapeutic resistance. To identify opportunities to repurpose inhibitors against disease-associated mutant kinases, we conducted a large-scale functional screen of 183 known kinase inhibitors against 76 recombinant, mutant kinases. The results revealed lead compounds with activity against clinically important mutant kinases including ALK, LRRK2, RET, and EGFR as well as unexpected opportunities for repurposing FDA-approved kinase inhibitors as leads for additional indications. Furthermore, using T674I PDGFRα as an example, we show how single-dose screening data can provide predictive structure-activity data to guide subsequent inhibitor optimization. This study provides a resource for the development of inhibitors against numerous disease-associated mutant kinases and illustrates the potential of unbiased profiling as an approach to compound-centric inhibitor development. PMID:26776524

  18. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase-gamma induces Xenopus oocyte maturation via lipid kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Hehl, S; Stoyanov, B; Oehrl, W; Schönherr, R; Wetzker, R; Heinemann, S H

    2001-01-01

    Type-I phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) were characterized as a group of intracellular signalling proteins expressing both protein and lipid kinase activities. Recent studies implicate PI3Ks as mediators of oocyte maturation, but the molecular mechanisms are poorly defined. Here we used the Xenopus oocyte expression system as a model to investigate a possible contribution of the gamma-isoform of PI3K (PI3Kgamma) in the different pathways leading to cell-cycle progression by monitoring the time course of germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD). Expression of a constitutive active PI3Kgamma (PI3Kgamma-CAAX) induced GVBD and increased the levels of phosphorylated Akt/protein kinase B and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Furthermore, PI3Kgamma-CAAX accelerated progesterone-induced GVBD, but had no effect on GVBD induced by insulin. The effects of PI3Kgamma-CAAX could be suppressed by pre-incubation of the oocytes with LY294002, PD98059 or roscovitine, inhibitors of PI3K, MEK (MAPK/extracellular-signal-regulated protein kinase kinase) and cdc2/cyclin B kinase, respectively. Mutants of PI3Kgamma-CAAX, in which either lipid kinase or both lipid and protein kinase activities were altered or eliminated, did not induce significant GVBD. Our data demonstrate that expression of PI3Kgamma in Xenopus oocytes accelerates their progesterone-induced maturation and that lipid kinase activity is required to induce this effect. PMID:11736661

  19. Where Will LEAD Lead?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildman, Louis

    After setting forth eight assumptions concerning the education of educational administrators, findings about the Leadership in Educational Administration Development (LEAD) program are discussed. The analysis is based on the first-year applications, telephone conversations with staff at a majority of the project sites, and additional material…

  20. Carnosol, a dietary diterpene, displays growth inhibitory effects in human prostate cancer PC3 cells leading to G2-phase cell cycle arrest and targets the 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jeremy J.; Syed, Deeba N.; Heren, Chenelle R.; Suh, Yewseok; Adhami, Vaqar M.; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The anti-cancer effect of carnosol was investigated in human prostate cancer PC3 cells. Methods Biochemical analysis and protein array data of carnosol treated PC3 cells were analyzed. Results We evaluated carnosol for its potential anti-cancer properties in the PC3 cells. Using an MTT assay we found that carnosol (10 – 70 µM) decreases cell viability in a time and dose dependent manner. Next, we evaluated the effect of carnosol (20–60 uM) effect using flow cytometry as well as biochemical analysis and found induction of G2-phase cell cycle arrest. To establish a more precise mechanism, we performed a protein array that evaluated 638 proteins involved in cell signaling pathways. The protein array identified 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a serine/threonine protein kinase involved in the regulation of cellular energy balance as a potential target. Further downstream effects consistent with cancer inhibition included the modulation of the mTOR/HSP70S6k/4E-BP1 pathway. Additionally, we found that carnosol targeted the PI3K/Akt pathway in a dose dependent manner. Conclusions These results suggest that carnosol targets multiple signaling pathways that include the AMPK pathway. The ability of carnosol to inhibit prostate cancer in vitro suggests carnosol may be a novel agent for the management of PCa. PMID:18286356

  1. LEADING WITH LEADING INDICATORS

    SciTech Connect

    PREVETTE, S.S.

    2005-01-27

    This paper documents Fluor Hanford's use of Leading Indicators, management leadership, and statistical methodology in order to improve safe performance of work. By applying these methods, Fluor Hanford achieved a significant reduction in injury rates in 2003 and 2004, and the improvement continues today. The integration of data, leadership, and teamwork pays off with improved safety performance and credibility with the customer. The use of Statistical Process Control, Pareto Charts, and Systems Thinking and their effect on management decisions and employee involvement are discussed. Included are practical examples of choosing leading indicators. A statistically based color coded dashboard presentation system methodology is provided. These tools, management theories and methods, coupled with involved leadership and employee efforts, directly led to significant improvements in worker safety and health, and environmental protection and restoration at one of the nation's largest nuclear cleanup sites.

  2. Mnk kinase pathway: Cellular functions and biological outcomes.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Sonali; Platanias, Leonidas C

    2014-08-26

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) interacting protein kinases 1 and 2 (Mnk1 and Mnk2) play important roles in controlling signals involved in mRNA translation. In addition to the MAPKs (p38 or Erk), multiple studies suggest that the Mnk kinases can be regulated by other known kinases such as Pak2 and/or other unidentified kinases by phosphorylation of residues distinct from the sites phosphorylated by the MAPKs. Several studies have established multiple Mnk protein targets, including PSF, heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1, Sprouty 2 and have lead to the identification of distinct biological functions and substrate specificity for the Mnk kinases. In this review we discuss the pathways regulating the Mnk kinases, their known substrates as well as the functional consequences of engagement of pathways controlled by Mnk kinases. These kinases play an important role in mRNA translation via their regulation of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) and their functions have important implications in tumor biology as well as the regulation of drug resistance to anti-oncogenic therapies. Other studies have identified a role for the Mnk kinases in cap-independent mRNA translation, suggesting that the Mnk kinases can exert important functional effects independently of the phosphorylation of eIF4E. The role of Mnk kinases in inflammation and inflammation-induced malignancies is also discussed. PMID:25225600

  3. Prokaryotic Diacylglycerol Kinase and Undecaprenol Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Van Horn, Wade D.; Sanders, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Prokaryotic diacylglycerol kinase (DAGK) and undecaprenol kinase (UDPK) are the lone members of a family of multispan membrane enzymes that are very small, lack relationships to any other family of proteins—including water soluble kinases, and that exhibit an unusual structure and active site architecture. Escherichia coli DAGK plays an important role in recycling diacylglycerol produced as a byproduct of biosynthesis of molecules located in the periplasmic space. UDPK seems to play an analogous role in Gram-positive bacteria, where its importance is evident by the fact that UDPK is essential for biofilm formation by the oral pathogen Streptococcus mutans. DAGK has also long served as a model system for studies of membrane protein biocatalysis, folding, stability, and structure. This review explores our current understanding of the microbial physiology, enzymology, structural biology, and folding of the prokaryotic diacylglycerol kinase family, which is based on over 40 years of studies. PMID:22224599

  4. Study of solar features causing GMSs with 250c'gamma' 'smaller than' H 'smaller than' 400'gamma' during the period 1999-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajiv

    2016-07-01

    The effect of solar features on geospheric conditions leading to geomagnetic storms (GMSs) with planetary index,A P ≥ 20 and the range of horizontal component of the Earth's magnetic field H such that 250γ

  5. Protein Kinases and Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anna M.; Messing, Robert O.

    2011-01-01

    Although drugs of abuse have different chemical structures and interact with different protein targets, all appear to usurp common neuronal systems that regulate reward and motivation. Addiction is a complex disease that is thought to involve drug-induced changes in synaptic plasticity due to alterations in cell signaling, gene transcription, and protein synthesis. Recent evidence suggests that drugs of abuse interact with and change a common network of signaling pathways that include a subset of specific protein kinases. The best studied of these kinases are reviewed here and include extracellular signal-regulated kinase, cAMP-dependent protein kinase, cyclin-dependent protein kinase 5, protein kinase C, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and Fyn tyrosine kinase. These kinases have been implicated in various aspects of drug addiction including acute drug effects, drug self-administration, withdrawal, reinforcement, sensitization, and tolerance. Identifying protein kinase substrates and signaling pathways that contribute to the addicted state may provide novel approaches for new pharma-cotherapies to treat drug addiction. PMID:18991950

  6. Varicella-Zoster Virus Open Reading Frame 66 Protein Kinase and Its Relationship to Alphaherpesvirus US3 Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Erazo, Angela

    2014-01-01

    The varicella-zoster virus (VZV) open reading frame (ORF) 66 encodes a basophilic kinase orthologous to the US3 protein kinases found in all alphaherpesviruses. This review summarizes current information on the ORF66 kinase, and outlines apparent differences from other US3 kinases, as well as some of the conserved functions. One critical difference is the VZV ORF66 kinase targeting of the major regulatory VZV IE62 protein to control its nuclear import and assembly into the VZV virion, which is so far unprecedented in the alphaherpesviruses. However, ORF66 targets some cellular targets which are also targeted by US3 kinases of other herpesviruses, including the histone deacetylase-1 and 2 proteins, pathways that lead to changes in actin dynamics, and the targeting of substrates of protein kinase A, including the nuclear matrix protein matrin 3. PMID:20186610

  7. Modeled microgravity-induced protein kinase C isoform expression in human lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, A.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.

    2004-01-01

    In long-term space travel, the crew is exposed to microgravity and radiation that invoke potential hazards to the immune system. T cell activation is a critical step in the immune response. Receptor-mediated signaling is inhibited in both microgravity and modeled microgravity (MMG) as reflected by diminished DNA synthesis in peripheral blood lymphocytes and their locomotion through gelled type I collagen. Direct activation of protein kinase C (PKC) bypassing cell surface events using the phorbol ester PMA rescues MMG-inhibited lymphocyte activation and locomotion, whereas the calcium ionophore ionomycin had no rescue effect. Thus calcium-independent PKC isoforms may be affected in MMG-induced locomotion inhibition and rescue. Both calcium-dependent isoforms and calcium-independent PKC isoforms were investigated to assess their expression in lymphocytes in 1 g and MMG culture. Human lymphocytes were cultured and harvested at 24, 48, 72, and 96 h, and serial samples were assessed for locomotion by using type I collagen and expression of PKC isoforms. Expression of PKC-alpha, -delta, and -epsilon was assessed by RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and immunoblotting. Results indicated that PKC isoforms delta and epsilon were downregulated by >50% at the transcriptional and translational levels in MMG-cultured lymphocytes compared with 1-g controls. Events upstream of PKC, such as phosphorylation of phospholipase Cgamma in MMG, revealed accumulation of inactive enzyme. Depressed calcium-independent PKC isoforms may be a consequence of an upstream lesion in the signal transduction pathway. The differential response among calcium-dependent and calcium-independent isoforms may actually result from MMG intrusion events earlier than PKC, but after ligand-receptor interaction.

  8. Modeled Microgravity-Induced Protein Kinase C Isoform Expression in Human Lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, A.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.

    2003-01-01

    In long-term space travel, the crew is exposed to microgravity and radiation that invoke potential hazards to the immune system. T cell activation is a critical step in the immune response. Receptor-mediated signaling is inhibited both in microgravity and modeled microgravity (MMG) as reflected in diminished DNA synthess in peripheral blood lymphocytes and their locomotion through gelled type 1 collagen. Direct activation of Protein Kinase C (PKC) bypassing cell surface events using the phorbol ester PMA rescues MMG-inhibited lymphocyte activation and locomotion, whereas calcium ionophore ionomycin had no rescue effect. Thus calcium-independent PKC isoforms may be affected in MMG-induced locomotion inhibition and rescue. Both calcium-dependent isoforms and calcium-independent PKC isoforms were investigated to assess their expression in lymphocytes in 19 and MMG-culture. Human lymphocytes were cultured and harvested at 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours and serial samples assessed for locomotion using type I collagen and expression of PKC isoforms. Expression of PKC-alpha, -delta and -epsilon was assessed by RT-PCR, flow cytometry and immunoblotting. Results indicated that PKC isoforms delta and epsilon were down-regulated by more than 50% at the transcriptional and translational levels in MMG-cultured lymphocytes compared with 19 controls. Events upstream of PKC such as phosphorylation of Phospholipase C(gamma) (PLC-gamma) in MMG, revealed accumulation of inactive enzyme. Depressed Ca++ -independent PKC isoforms may be a consequence of an upstream lesion in the signal transduction pathway. The differential response among calcium-dependent and calcium-independent isoforms may actually result from MMG intrusion events earlier than, but after ligand-receptor interaction. Keywords: Signal transduction, locomotion, immunity

  9. KEA: kinase enrichment analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lachmann, Alexander; Ma'ayan, Avi

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: Multivariate experiments applied to mammalian cells often produce lists of proteins/genes altered under treatment versus control conditions. Such lists can be projected onto prior knowledge of kinase–substrate interactions to infer the list of kinases associated with a specific protein list. By computing how the proportion of kinases, associated with a specific list of proteins/genes, deviates from an expected distribution, we can rank kinases and kinase families based on the likelihood that these kinases are functionally associated with regulating the cell under specific experimental conditions. Such analysis can assist in producing hypotheses that can explain how the kinome is involved in the maintenance of different cellular states and can be manipulated to modulate cells towards a desired phenotype. Summary: Kinase enrichment analysis (KEA) is a web-based tool with an underlying database providing users with the ability to link lists of mammalian proteins/genes with the kinases that phosphorylate them. The system draws from several available kinase–substrate databases to compute kinase enrichment probability based on the distribution of kinase–substrate proportions in the background kinase–substrate database compared with kinases found to be associated with an input list of genes/proteins. Availability: The KEA system is freely available at http://amp.pharm.mssm.edu/lib/kea.jsp Contact: avi.maayan@mssm.edu PMID:19176546

  10. Lead Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Experiments Stories Lessons Topics Games Activities Lessons MENU Lead Poisoning Kids Homepage Topics Pollution Lead Poisoning What is ... you can avoid contact with it! Sources of Lead Poisoning HOUSE PAINTS: Before1950, lead-based paint was used ...

  11. Lead Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... to determine lead sources, educating family members about lead poisoning , and instituting follow-up testing to monitor the ... high levels of lead, see the article on Lead Poisoning . The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has ...

  12. Lead Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Lead Poisoning What is it and who is affected? Lead is a highly toxic substance, exposure to which ... and children can suffer from the effects of lead poisoning, but childhood lead poisoning is much more frequent. ...

  13. Cyclin-dependent kinase 7 controls mRNA synthesis by affecting stability of preinitiation complexes, leading to altered gene expression, cell cycle progression, and survival of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Kelso, Timothy W R; Baumgart, Karen; Eickhoff, Jan; Albert, Thomas; Antrecht, Claudia; Lemcke, Sarah; Klebl, Bert; Meisterernst, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 7 (CDK7) activates cell cycle CDKs and is a member of the general transcription factor TFIIH. Although there is substantial evidence for an active role of CDK7 in mRNA synthesis and associated processes, the degree of its influence on global and gene-specific transcription in mammalian species is unclear. In the current study, we utilize two novel inhibitors with high specificity for CDK7 to demonstrate a restricted but robust impact of CDK7 on gene transcription in vivo and in in vitro-reconstituted reactions. We distinguish between relative low- and high-dose responses and relate them to distinct molecular mechanisms and altered physiological responses. Low inhibitor doses cause rapid clearance of paused RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) molecules and sufficed to cause genome-wide alterations in gene expression, delays in cell cycle progression at both the G1/S and G2/M checkpoints, and diminished survival of human tumor cells. Higher doses and prolonged inhibition led to strong reductions in RNAPII carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) phosphorylation, eventual activation of the p53 program, and increased cell death. Together, our data reason for a quantitative contribution of CDK7 to mRNA synthesis, which is critical for cellular homeostasis. PMID:25047832

  14. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 7 Controls mRNA Synthesis by Affecting Stability of Preinitiation Complexes, Leading to Altered Gene Expression, Cell Cycle Progression, and Survival of Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kelso, Timothy W. R.; Baumgart, Karen; Eickhoff, Jan; Albert, Thomas; Antrecht, Claudia; Lemcke, Sarah; Klebl, Bert

    2014-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 7 (CDK7) activates cell cycle CDKs and is a member of the general transcription factor TFIIH. Although there is substantial evidence for an active role of CDK7 in mRNA synthesis and associated processes, the degree of its influence on global and gene-specific transcription in mammalian species is unclear. In the current study, we utilize two novel inhibitors with high specificity for CDK7 to demonstrate a restricted but robust impact of CDK7 on gene transcription in vivo and in in vitro-reconstituted reactions. We distinguish between relative low- and high-dose responses and relate them to distinct molecular mechanisms and altered physiological responses. Low inhibitor doses cause rapid clearance of paused RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) molecules and sufficed to cause genome-wide alterations in gene expression, delays in cell cycle progression at both the G1/S and G2/M checkpoints, and diminished survival of human tumor cells. Higher doses and prolonged inhibition led to strong reductions in RNAPII carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) phosphorylation, eventual activation of the p53 program, and increased cell death. Together, our data reason for a quantitative contribution of CDK7 to mRNA synthesis, which is critical for cellular homeostasis. PMID:25047832

  15. Multiparameter Lead Optimization to Give an Oral Checkpoint Kinase 1 (CHK1) Inhibitor Clinical Candidate: (R)-5-((4-((Morpholin-2-ylmethyl)amino)-5-(trifluoromethyl)pyridin-2-yl)amino)pyrazine-2-carbonitrile (CCT245737).

    PubMed

    Osborne, James D; Matthews, Thomas P; McHardy, Tatiana; Proisy, Nicolas; Cheung, Kwai-Ming J; Lainchbury, Michael; Brown, Nathan; Walton, Michael I; Eve, Paul D; Boxall, Katherine J; Hayes, Angela; Henley, Alan T; Valenti, Melanie R; De Haven Brandon, Alexis K; Box, Gary; Jamin, Yann; Robinson, Simon P; Westwood, Isaac M; van Montfort, Rob L M; Leonard, Philip M; Lamers, Marieke B A C; Reader, John C; Aherne, G Wynne; Raynaud, Florence I; Eccles, Suzanne A; Garrett, Michelle D; Collins, Ian

    2016-06-01

    Multiparameter optimization of a series of 5-((4-aminopyridin-2-yl)amino)pyrazine-2-carbonitriles resulted in the identification of a potent and selective oral CHK1 preclinical development candidate with in vivo efficacy as a potentiator of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damaging chemotherapy and as a single agent. Cellular mechanism of action assays were used to give an integrated assessment of compound selectivity during optimization resulting in a highly CHK1 selective adenosine triphosphate (ATP) competitive inhibitor. A single substituent vector directed away from the CHK1 kinase active site was unexpectedly found to drive the selective cellular efficacy of the compounds. Both CHK1 potency and off-target human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) ion channel inhibition were dependent on lipophilicity and basicity in this series. Optimization of CHK1 cellular potency and in vivo pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) properties gave a compound with low predicted doses and exposures in humans which mitigated the residual weak in vitro hERG inhibition. PMID:27167172

  16. From Phosphosites to Kinases.

    PubMed

    Munk, Stephanie; Refsgaard, Jan C; Olsen, Jesper V; Jensen, Lars J

    2016-01-01

    Kinases play a pivotal role in propagating the phosphorylation-mediated signaling networks in living cells. With the overwhelming quantities of phosphoproteomics data being generated, the number of identified phosphorylation sites (phosphosites) is ever increasing. Often, proteomics investigations aim to understand the global signaling modulation that takes place in different biological conditions investigated. For phosphoproteomics data, identifying the kinases central to mediating this response is key. This has prompted several efforts to catalogue the immense amounts of phosphorylation data and known or predicted kinases responsible for the modifications. However, barely 20 % of the known phosphosites are assigned to a kinase, initiating various bioinformatics efforts that attempt to predict the responsible kinases. These algorithms employ different approaches to predict kinase consensus sequence motifs, mostly based on large scale in vivo and in vitro experiments. The context of the kinase and the phosphorylated proteins in a biological system is equally important for predicting association between the enzymes and substrates, an aspect that is also being tackled with available bioinformatics tools. This chapter summarizes the use of the larger phosphorylation databases, and approaches that can be applied to predict kinases that phosphorylate individual sites or that are globally modulated in phosphoproteomics datasets. PMID:26584935

  17. Asymmetric Tyrosine Kinase Arrangements in Activation or Autophosphorylation of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases

    SciTech Connect

    J Bae; J Schlessinger

    2011-12-31

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) play important roles in the control of many cellular processes including cell proliferation, cell adhesion, angiogenesis, and apoptosis. Ligand-induced dimerization of RTKs leads to autophosphorylation and activation of RTKs. Structural studies have shown that while isolated ectodomains of several RTKs form symmetric dimers the isolated cytoplasmic kinase domains of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) form asymmetric dimers during their activation. Binding of one kinase molecule of EGFR to a second kinase molecule asymmetrically leads to stimulation of kinase activity and enhanced autophosphorylation. Furthermore, the structures of the kinase domain of FGFR1 and FGFR2 reveal the formation of asymmetric interfaces in the processes of autophosphorylation at their specific phosphotyrosine (pY) sites. Disruption of asymmetric dimer interface of EGFR leads to reduction in enzymatic activity and drastic reduction of autophosphorylation of FGFRs in ligandstimulated live cells. These studies demonstrate that asymmetric dimer formation is as a common phenomenon critical for activation and autophosphorylation of RTKs.

  18. LKB1, the multitasking tumour suppressor kinase

    PubMed Central

    Marignani, P A

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the lkb1 gene are found in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS), with loss of heterozygosity or somatic mutations at the lkb1 locus, suggesting the gene product, the serine/threonine kinase LKB1, may function as a tumour suppressor. Patients with PJS are at a greater risk of developing cancers of epithelial tissue origin. It is widely accepted that the presence of hamartomatous polyps in PJS does not in itself lead to the development of malignancy. The signalling mechanisms that lead to these PJS related malignancies are not well understood. However, it is evident from the recent literature that LKB1 is a multitasking kinase, with unlimited potential in orchestrating cell activity. Thus far, LKB1 has been found to play a role in chromatin remodelling, cell cycle arrest, Wnt signalling, cell polarity, and energy metabolism, all of which may require the tumour suppressor function of this kinase and/or its catalytic activity. PMID:15623475

  19. let-7 Overexpression Leads to an Increased Fraction of Cells in G2/M, Direct Down-regulation of Cdc34, and Stabilization of Wee1 Kinase in Primary Fibroblasts*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Legesse-Miller, Aster; Elemento, Olivier; Pfau, Sarah J.; Forman, Joshua J.; Tavazoie, Saeed; Coller, Hilary A.

    2009-01-01

    microRNAs play a critically important role in a wide array of biological processes including those implicated in cancer, neuro-degenerative and metabolic disorders, and viral infection. Although we have begun to understand microRNA biogenesis and function, experimental demonstration of their functional effects and the molecular mechanisms by which they function remains a challenge. Members of the let-7/miR-98 family play a critical role in cell cycle control with respect to differentiation and tumorigenesis. In this study, we show that exogenous addition of pre-let-7 in primary human fibroblasts results in a decrease in cell number and an increased fraction of cells in the G2/M cell cycle phase. Combining microarray techniques with DNA sequence analysis to identify potential let-7 targets, we discovered 838 genes with a let-7 binding site in their 3′-untranslated region that were down-regulated upon overexpression of let-7b. Among these genes is cdc34, the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme of the Skp1/cullin/F-box (SCF) complex. Cdc34 protein levels are strongly down-regulated by let-7 overexpression. Reporter assays demonstrated direct regulation of the cdc34 3′-untranslated region by let-7. We hypothesized that low Cdc34 levels would result in decreased SCF activity, stabilization of the SCF target Wee1, and G2/M accumulation. Consistent with this hypothesis, small interfering RNA-mediated down-regulation of Wee1 reversed the G2/M phenotype induced by let-7 overexpression. We conclude that Cdc34 is a functional target of let-7 and that let-7 induces down-regulation of Cdc34, stabilization of the Wee1 kinase, and an increased fraction of cells in G2/M in primary fibroblasts. PMID:19126550

  20. Mevalonate kinase deficiency: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Favier, Leslie A; Schulert, Grant S

    2016-01-01

    Mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD) is a recessively inherited autoinflammatory disorder with a spectrum of manifestations, including the well-defined clinical phenotypes of hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome and mevalonic aciduria. Patients with MKD have recurrent attacks of hyperinflammation associated with fever, abdominal pain, arthralgias, and mucocutaneous lesions, and more severely affected patients also have dysmorphisms and central nervous system anomalies. MKD is caused by mutations in the gene encoding mevalonate kinase, with the degree of residual enzyme activity largely determining disease severity. Mevalonate kinase is essential for the biosynthesis of nonsterol isoprenoids, which mediate protein prenylation. Although the precise pathogenesis of MKD remains unclear, increasing evidence suggests that deficiency in protein prenylation leads to innate immune activation and systemic hyperinflammation. Given the emerging understanding of MKD as an autoinflammatory disorder, recent treatment approaches have largely focused on cytokine-directed biologic therapy. Herein, we review the current genetic and pathologic understanding of MKD, its various clinical phenotypes, and the evolving treatment approach for this multifaceted disorder. PMID:27499643

  1. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibition: An Approach to Drug Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitzki, Alexander; Gazit, Aviv

    1995-03-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) regulate cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and signaling processes in the cells of the immune system. Uncontrolled signaling from receptor tyrosine kinases and intracellular tyrosine kinases can lead to inflammatory responses and to diseases such as cancer, atherosclerosis, and psoriasis. Thus, inhibitors that block the activity of tyrosine kinases and the signaling pathways they activate may provide a useful basis for drug development. This article summarizes recent progress in the development of PTK inhibitors and demonstrates their potential use in the treatment of disease.

  2. Receptor Tyrosine Kinase and Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mirshafiey, Abbas; Ghalamfarsa, Ghasem; Asghari, Babak

    2014-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are essential components of signal transduction pathways that mediate cell-to-cell communication and their function as relay points for signaling pathways. They have a key role in numerous processes that control cellular proliferation and differentiation, regulate cell growth and cellular metabolism, and promote cell survival and apoptosis. Recently, the role of RTKs including TCR, FLT-3, c-Kit, c-Fms, PDGFR, ephrin, neurotrophin receptor, and TAM receptor in autoimmune disorder, especially rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis has been suggested. In multiple sclerosis pathogenesis, RTKs and their tyrosine kinase enzymes are selective important targets for tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) agents. TKIs, compete with the ATP binding site of the catalytic domain of several tyrosine kinases, and act as small molecules that have a favorable safety profile in disease treatment. Up to now, the efficacy of TKIs in numerous animal models of MS has been demonstrated, but application of these drugs in human diseases should be tested in future clinical trials. PMID:25337443

  3. Kinase active Misshapen regulates Notch signaling in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Abhinava K; Sachan, Nalani; Mutsuddi, Mousumi; Mukherjee, Ashim

    2015-11-15

    Notch signaling pathway represents a principal cellular communication system that plays a pivotal role during development of metazoans. Drosophila misshapen (msn) encodes a protein kinase, which is related to the budding yeast Ste20p (sterile 20 protein) kinase. In a genetic screen, using candidate gene approach to identify novel kinases involved in Notch signaling, we identified msn as a novel regulator of Notch signaling. Data presented here suggest that overexpression of kinase active form of Msn exhibits phenotypes similar to Notch loss-of-function condition and msn genetically interacts with components of Notch signaling pathway. Kinase active form of Msn associates with Notch receptor and regulate its signaling activity. We further show that kinase active Misshapen leads to accumulation of membrane-tethered form of Notch. Moreover, activated Msn also depletes Armadillo and DE-Cadherin from adherens junctions. Thus, this study provides a yet unknown mode of regulation of Notch signaling by Misshapen. PMID:26431585

  4. Lead Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Lead is a metal that occurs naturally in the earth's crust. Lead can be found in all parts of our ... from human activities such as mining and manufacturing. Lead used to be in paint; older houses may ...

  5. Lead poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... swallows a lead object or breathes in lead dust, some of the poison can stay in the ... a health problem. Lead is everywhere, including dirt, dust, new toys, and old house paint. Unfortunately, you ...

  6. Lead Toxicity

    MedlinePlus

    ... homes. • Most people, especially children, who suffer from lead poisoning are exposed through lead-contaminated household dust or ... and six if they are at risk of lead poisoning (see: ). Who can I call to get more ...

  7. RAF protein-serine/threonine kinases: Structure and regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Roskoski, Robert

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} The formation of unique side-to-side RAF dimers is required for full kinase activity. {yields} RAF kinase inhibitors block MEK activation in cells containing oncogenic B-RAF. {yields} RAF kinase inhibitors can lead to the paradoxical increase in RAF kinase activity. -- Abstract: A-RAF, B-RAF, and C-RAF are a family of three protein-serine/threonine kinases that participate in the RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK signal transduction cascade. This cascade participates in the regulation of a large variety of processes including apoptosis, cell cycle progression, differentiation, proliferation, and transformation to the cancerous state. RAS mutations occur in 15-30% of all human cancers, and B-RAF mutations occur in 30-60% of melanomas, 30-50% of thyroid cancers, and 5-20% of colorectal cancers. Activation of the RAF kinases requires their interaction with RAS-GTP along with dephosphorylation and also phosphorylation by SRC family protein-tyrosine kinases and other protein-serine/threonine kinases. The formation of unique side-to-side RAF dimers is required for full kinase activity. RAF kinase inhibitors are effective in blocking MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 activation in cells containing the oncogenic B-RAF Val600Glu activating mutation. RAF kinase inhibitors lead to the paradoxical increase in RAF kinase activity in cells containing wild-type B-RAF and wild-type or activated mutant RAS. C-RAF plays a key role in this paradoxical increase in downstream MEK-ERK activation.

  8. Lead Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... our environment. Much of it comes from human activities such as mining and manufacturing. Lead used to be in paint; older houses may still have lead paint. You could be exposed to lead by Eating food or drinking water that contains lead. Water pipes in older homes ...

  9. Lead poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Rekus, J.F.

    1992-08-01

    Construction workers who weld, cut or blast structural steel coated with lead-based paint are at significant risk of lead poisoning. Although technology to control these exposures may not have existed when the lead standard was promulgated, it is available today. Employers who do not take steps to protect their employees from lead exposure may be cited and fined severely for their failure.

  10. Pyruvate kinase blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... break down faster than normal, a condition called hemolytic anemia . This test helps diagnose pyruvate kinase deficiency (PKD) . ... Pa: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 32. Gallagher PG. Hemolytic anemias: red cell membrane and metabolic defects In: Goldman ...

  11. Design, synthesis and structure-activity relationships of novel biarylamine-based Met kinase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, David K; Chen, Xiao-Tao; Tarby, Christine; Kaltenbach, Robert; Cai, Zhen-Wei; Tokarski, John S; An, Yongmi; Sack, John S; Wautlet, Barri; Gullo-Brown, Johnni; Henley, Benjamin J; Jeyaseelan, Robert; Kellar, Kristen; Manne, Veeraswamy; Trainor, George L; Lombardo, Louis J; Fargnoli, Joseph; Borzilleri, Robert M

    2010-09-03

    Biarylamine-based inhibitors of Met kinase have been identified. Lead compounds demonstrate nanomolar potency in Met kinase biochemical assays and significant activity in the Met-driven GTL-16 human gastric carcinoma cell line. X-ray crystallography revealed that these compounds adopt a bioactive conformation, in the kinase domain, consistent with that previously seen with 2-pyridone-based Met kinase inhibitors. Compound 9b demonstrated potent in vivo antitumor activity in the GTL-16 human tumor xenograft model.

  12. Lead poisoning and brain cell function

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, G.W. Kennedy Institute, Baltimore, MD )

    1990-11-01

    Exposure to excessive amounts of inorganic lead during the toddler years may produce lasting adverse effects upon brain function. Maximal ingestion of lead occurs at an age when major changes are occurring in the density of brain synaptic connections. The developmental reorganization of synapses is, in part, mediated by protein kinases, and these enzymes are particularly sensitive to stimulation by lead. By inappropriately activating specific protein kinases, lead poisoning may disrupt the development of neural networks without producing overt pathological alterations. The blood-brain barrier is another potential vulnerable site for the neurotoxic action of lead. protein kinases appear to regulate the development of brain capillaries and the expression of the blood-brain barrier properties. Stimulation of protein kinase by lead may disrupt barrier development and alter the precise regulation of the neuronal environment that is required for normal brain function. Together, these findings suggest that the sensitivity of protein kinases to lead may in part underlie the brain dysfunction observed in children poisoned by this toxicant.

  13. Non-degradative Ubiquitination of Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Ball, K. Aurelia; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Lewinski, Mary K.; Guatelli, John; Verschueren, Erik; Krogan, Nevan J.; Jacobson, Matthew P.

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence supports other regulatory roles for protein ubiquitination in addition to serving as a tag for proteasomal degradation. In contrast to other common post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation, little is known about how non-degradative ubiquitination modulates protein structure, dynamics, and function. Due to the wealth of knowledge concerning protein kinase structure and regulation, we examined kinase ubiquitination using ubiquitin remnant immunoaffinity enrichment and quantitative mass spectrometry to identify ubiquitinated kinases and the sites of ubiquitination in Jurkat and HEK293 cells. We find that, unlike phosphorylation, ubiquitination most commonly occurs in structured domains, and on the kinase domain, ubiquitination is concentrated in regions known to be important for regulating activity. We hypothesized that ubiquitination, like other post-translational modifications, may alter the conformational equilibrium of the modified protein. We chose one human kinase, ZAP-70, to simulate using molecular dynamics with and without a monoubiquitin modification. In Jurkat cells, ZAP-70 is ubiquitinated at several sites that are not sensitive to proteasome inhibition and thus may have other regulatory roles. Our simulations show that ubiquitination influences the conformational ensemble of ZAP-70 in a site-dependent manner. When monoubiquitinated at K377, near the C-helix, the active conformation of the ZAP-70 C-helix is disrupted. In contrast, when monoubiquitinated at K476, near the kinase hinge region, an active-like ZAP-70 C-helix conformation is stabilized. These results lead to testable hypotheses that ubiquitination directly modulates kinase activity, and that ubiquitination is likely to alter structure, dynamics, and function in other protein classes as well. PMID:27253329

  14. Activity-based kinase profiling of approved tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Daisuke; Yokota, Koichi; Gouda, Masaki; Narumi, Yugo; Ohmoto, Hiroshi; Nishiwaki, Eiji; Akita, Kensaku; Kirii, Yasuyuki

    2013-02-01

    The specificities of nine approved tyrosine kinase inhibitors (imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib, gefitinib, erlotinib, lapatinib, sorafenib, sunitinib, and pazopanib) were determined by activity-based kinase profiling using a large panel of human recombinant active kinases. This panel consisted of 79 tyrosine kinases, 199 serine/threonine kinases, three lipid kinases, and 29 disease-relevant mutant kinases. Many potential targets of each inhibitor were identified by kinase profiling at the K(m) for ATP. In addition, profiling at a physiological ATP concentration (1 mm) was carried out, and the IC(50) values of the inhibitors against each kinase were compared with the estimated plasma-free concentration (calculated from published pharmacokinetic parameters of plasma C(trough) and C(max) values). This analysis revealed that the approved kinase inhibitors were well optimized for their target kinases. This profiling also implicates activity at particular off-target kinases in drug side effects. Thus, large-scale kinase profiling at both K(m) and physiological ATP concentrations could be useful in characterizing the targets and off-targets of kinase inhibitors. PMID:23279183

  15. Lead poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... lead is still found in some modern faucets. Soil contaminated by decades of car exhaust or years ... house paint scrapings. Lead is more common in soil near highways and houses. Hobbies involving soldering, stained ...

  16. Salicylic acid activates a 48-kD MAP kinase in tobacco.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, S; Klessig, D F

    1997-01-01

    The involvement of phosphorylation/dephosphorylation in the salicylic acid (SA) signal transduction pathway leading to pathogenesis-related gene induction has previously been demonstrated using kinase and phosphatase inhibitors. Here, we show that in tobacco suspension cells, SA induced a rapid and transient activation of a 48-kD kinase that uses myelin basic protein as a substrate. This kinase is called the p48 SIP kinase (for SA-Induced Protein kinase). Biologically active analogs of SA, which induce pathogenesis-related genes and enhanced resistance, also activated this kinase, whereas inactive analogs did not. Phosphorylation of a tyrosine residue(s) in the SIP kinase was associated with its activation. The SIP kinase was purified to homogeneity from SA-treated tobacco suspension culture cells. The purified SIP kinase is strongly phosphorylated on a tyrosine residue(s), and treatment with either protein tyrosine or serine/threonine phosphatases abolished its activity. Using primers corresponding to the sequences of internal tryptic peptides, we cloned the SIP kinase gene. Analysis of the SIP kinase sequence indicates that it belongs to the MAP kinase family and that it is distinct from the other plant MAP kinases previously implicated in stress responses, suggesting that different members of the MAP kinase family are activated by different stresses. PMID:9165755

  17. Ahnak protein activates protein kinase C (PKC) through dissociation of the PKC-protein phosphatase 2A complex.

    PubMed

    Lee, In Hye; Lim, Hee Jung; Yoon, Suhyeon; Seong, Je Kyung; Bae, Duk Soo; Rhee, Sue Goo; Bae, Yun Soo

    2008-03-01

    We have previously reported that central repeated units (CRUs) of Ahnak act as a scaffolding protein networking phospholipase Cgamma and protein kinase C (PKC). Here, we demonstrate that an Ahnak derivative consisting of four central repeated units binds and activates PKC-alpha in a phosphatidylserine/1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycerol-independent manner. Moreover, NIH3T3 cells expressing the 4 CRUs of Ahnak showed enhanced c-Raf, MEK, and Erk phosphorylation in response to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) compared with parental cells. To evaluate the effect of loss-of-function of Ahnak in cell signaling, we investigated PKC activation and Raf phosphorylation in embryonic fibroblast cells (MEFs) of the Ahnak knock-out (Ahnak(-/-)) mouse. Membrane translocation of PKC-alpha and phosphorylation of Raf in response to PMA or platelet-derived growth factor were decreased in Ahnak null MEF cells compared with wild type MEFs. Several lines of evidence suggest that PKC-alpha activity is regulated through association with protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). A co-immunoprecipitation assay indicated that the association of PKC-alpha with PP2A was disrupted in NIH3T3 cells expressing 4 CRUs of Ahnak in response to PMA. Consistently, Ahnak null MEF cells stimulated by PMA showed enhanced PKC-PP2A complex formation, and add-back expression of Ahnak into Ahnak null MEF cells abolished the PKC-PP2A complex formation in response to PMA. These data indicate that Ahnak potentiates PKC activation through inhibiting the interaction of PKC with PP2A. PMID:18174170

  18. Validation of in vivo pharmacodynamic activity of a novel PDGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor using immunohistochemistry and quantitative image analysis.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Michael R; Mei, Jay M; Tuman, Robert W; Galemmo, Robert A; Johnson, Dana L

    2005-08-01

    With the advent of agents directed against specific molecular targets in drug discovery, it has become imperative to show a compound's cellular impact on the intended biomolecule in vivo. The objective of the present study was to determine if we could develop an assay to validate the in vivo effects of a compound. Hence, we investigated the in vivo pharmacodynamic activity of JNJ-10198409, a relatively selective inhibitor of platelet-derived growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (PDGF-RTK), in tumor tissues after administering the compound orally in a nude mouse xenograft model of human LoVo colon cancer. We developed a novel assay to quantify the in vivo anti-PDGF-RTK activity of the inhibitor in tumor tissue by determining the phosphorylation status of phospholipase Cgamma1 (PLCgamma1), a key downstream cellular molecule in the PDGF-RTK signaling cascade. We used two antibodies, one specific for the total (phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms) PLCgamma1 (pan-PLCgamma1) and the other, specific for phosphorylated form of PLCgamma1 (ph-PLCgamma1) to immunohistochemically detect their expression in tumor tissues. Computer-assisted image analysis was then used to directly compare the ratio of ph-PLCgamma1 to pan-PLCgamma1 immunolabeling intensities in serial sections (5 mum) of tumors obtained from vehicle- and JNJ-10198409-treated tumor-bearing mice. Our data showed statistically significant, dose-dependent differences in the ph-PLC/pan-PLC ratio among the four treatment groups (vehicle, 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg b.i.d.). These results confirmed this compound's ability to suppress PDGF-RTK downstream signaling in tumor tissues in vivo. In addition to this specific application of this in vivo validation approach to those targets that use PLCgamma as a downstream signaling partner, these methods may also benefit other drug discovery targets. PMID:16093435

  19. Rho Kinases and Cardiac Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Toru; Liao, James K

    2016-06-24

    Hypertensive cardiac remodeling is characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy and interstitial fibrosis, which can lead to heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. The Rho-associated coiled-coil containing kinases (ROCKs) are members of the serine/threonine protein kinase family, which mediates the downstream effects of the small GTP-binding protein RhoA. There are 2 isoforms: ROCK1 and ROCK2. They have different functions in different types of cells and tissues. There is growing evidence that ROCKs contribute to the development of cardiovascular diseases, including cardiac fibrosis, hypertrophy, and subsequent heart failure. Recent experimental studies using ROCK inhibitors, such as fasudil, have shown the benefits of ROCK inhibition in cardiac remodeling. Mice lacking each ROCK isoform also exhibit reduced myocardial fibrosis in a variety of pathological models of cardiac remodeling. Indeed, clinical studies with fasudil have suggested that ROCKs could be potential novel therapeutic targets for cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the roles of ROCKs in the development of cardiac fibrosis and hypertrophy and discuss their therapeutic potential for deleterious cardiac remodeling. (Circ J 2016; 80: 1491-1498). PMID:27251065

  20. Feedback Regulation of Kinase Signaling Pathways by AREs and GREs

    PubMed Central

    Vlasova-St. Louis, Irina; Bohjanen, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    In response to environmental signals, kinases phosphorylate numerous proteins, including RNA-binding proteins such as the AU-rich element (ARE) binding proteins, and the GU-rich element (GRE) binding proteins. Posttranslational modifications of these proteins lead to a significant changes in the abundance of target mRNAs, and affect gene expression during cellular activation, proliferation, and stress responses. In this review, we summarize the effect of phosphorylation on the function of ARE-binding proteins ZFP36 and ELAVL1 and the GRE-binding protein CELF1. The networks of target mRNAs that these proteins bind and regulate include transcripts encoding kinases and kinase signaling pathways (KSP) components. Thus, kinase signaling pathways are involved in feedback regulation, whereby kinases regulate RNA-binding proteins that subsequently regulate mRNA stability of ARE- or GRE-containing transcripts that encode components of KSP. PMID:26821046

  1. Feedback Regulation of Kinase Signaling Pathways by AREs and GREs.

    PubMed

    Vlasova-St Louis, Irina; Bohjanen, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    In response to environmental signals, kinases phosphorylate numerous proteins, including RNA-binding proteins such as the AU-rich element (ARE) binding proteins, and the GU-rich element (GRE) binding proteins. Posttranslational modifications of these proteins lead to a significant changes in the abundance of target mRNAs, and affect gene expression during cellular activation, proliferation, and stress responses. In this review, we summarize the effect of phosphorylation on the function of ARE-binding proteins ZFP36 and ELAVL1 and the GRE-binding protein CELF1. The networks of target mRNAs that these proteins bind and regulate include transcripts encoding kinases and kinase signaling pathways (KSP) components. Thus, kinase signaling pathways are involved in feedback regulation, whereby kinases regulate RNA-binding proteins that subsequently regulate mRNA stability of ARE- or GRE-containing transcripts that encode components of KSP. PMID:26821046

  2. Lead Pencils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, L. B.

    1971-01-01

    A study, undertaken to determine the lead content of paint on various pencils in the Goddard supply system, is reported. The survey found that lead content varied from .04 mg per pencil for carmine colored pencils to approximately 43 mg per pencil for yellow colored pencils. Results also show that yellow pencils had higher lead content than other colors analyzed. More detailed results are given in tabular form.

  3. Phosphatidylinositol kinase from rabbit reticulocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Tuazon, P.T.; Heng, A.B.W.; Traugh, J.A.

    1986-05-01

    Phosphatidylinositol (PI) kinase was isolated from the postribosomal supernatant of rabbit reticulocytes. This activity was identified by the formation of a product that comigrated with phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PIP) when purified PI was phosphorylated in the presence of (/sup 32/P)ATP and Mg/sup 2 +/. Three major peaks of PI kinase activity were resolved by chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. The first peak eluted at 50-100 mM NaCl together with several serine protein kinases, casein kinase (CK) I and protease activated kinase (PAK) I and II. The PI kinase was subsequently separated from the protein kinases by chromatography on phosphocellulose. The second peak eluted at 125-160 mM NaCl and contained another lipid kinase activity that produced a product which comigrated with phosphatidic acid on thin layer chromatography. The third peak, which eluted at 165-200 mM NaCl, partly comigrated with casein kinase (CK) II and an active protein kinase(s) which phosphorylated mixed histone and histone I. CK II and the histone kinase activities were also separated by chromatography on phosphocelluslose. The different forms of PI kinase were characterized and compared with respect to substrate and salt requirements.

  4. Leading Democratically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookfield, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Democracy is the most venerated of American ideas, the one for which wars are fought and people die. So most people would probably agree that leaders should be able to lead well in a democratic society. Yet, genuinely democratic leadership is a relative rarity. Leading democratically means viewing leadership as a function or process, rather than…

  5. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Linn, Anning

    1996-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK.

  6. Lack of stereospecificity of suid pseudorabies virus thymidine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Maga, G; Verri, A; Bonizzi, L; Ponti, W; Poli, G; Garbesi, A; Niccolai, D; Spadari, S; Focher, F

    1993-01-01

    We have partially purified suid pseudorabies virus (PRV) thymidine kinase from infected thymidine kinase- mouse cells, and cytosolic swine thymidine kinase from lymphatic glands, and we have found that PRV thymidine kinase, unlike the host enzyme, shows no stereospecificity for D- and L-beta-nucleosides. In vitro, unnatural L-enantiomers, except L-deoxycytidine, function as specific inhibitors for the viral enzyme in the order: L-thymidine >> L-deoxyguanosine > L-deoxyuridine > L-deoxyadenosine. Contrary to human and swine thymidine kinases and like herpes simplex virus-1 and -2 thymidine kinases, PRV thymidine kinase phosphorylates both the natural (D-) and the unnatural (L-) thymidine enantiomers to their corresponding monophosphates with comparable efficiency. The kinetic parameters Vmax/Km for D- and L-thymidine are 3.7 and 2.3 respectively. Our results demonstrate that the lack of stereospecificity might be a common feature of the thymidine kinases that are encoded by human and animal herpes viruses. These observations could lead to the development of a novel class of antiviral drugs. PMID:8396911

  7. Lack of stereospecificity of suid pseudorabies virus thymidine kinase.

    PubMed

    Maga, G; Verri, A; Bonizzi, L; Ponti, W; Poli, G; Garbesi, A; Niccolai, D; Spadari, S; Focher, F

    1993-09-01

    We have partially purified suid pseudorabies virus (PRV) thymidine kinase from infected thymidine kinase- mouse cells, and cytosolic swine thymidine kinase from lymphatic glands, and we have found that PRV thymidine kinase, unlike the host enzyme, shows no stereospecificity for D- and L-beta-nucleosides. In vitro, unnatural L-enantiomers, except L-deoxycytidine, function as specific inhibitors for the viral enzyme in the order: L-thymidine > L-deoxyguanosine > L-deoxyuridine > L-deoxyadenosine. Contrary to human and swine thymidine kinases and like herpes simplex virus-1 and -2 thymidine kinases, PRV thymidine kinase phosphorylates both the natural (D-) and the unnatural (L-) thymidine enantiomers to their corresponding monophosphates with comparable efficiency. The kinetic parameters Vmax/Km for D- and L-thymidine are 3.7 and 2.3 respectively. Our results demonstrate that the lack of stereospecificity might be a common feature of the thymidine kinases that are encoded by human and animal herpes viruses. These observations could lead to the development of a novel class of antiviral drugs. PMID:8396911

  8. Rho kinase as a target for cerebral vascular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Lisa M; Sellers, James R; McKerracher, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    The development of novel pharmaceutical treatments for disorders of the cerebral vasculature is a serious unmet medical need. These vascular disorders are typified by a disruption in the delicate Rho signaling equilibrium within the blood vessel wall. In particular, Rho kinase overactivation in the smooth muscle and endothelial layers of the vessel wall results in cytoskeletal modifications that lead to reduced vascular integrity and abnormal vascular growth. Rho kinase is thus a promising target for the treatment of cerebral vascular disorders. Indeed, preclinical studies indicate that Rho kinase inhibition may reduce the formation/growth/rupture of both intracranial aneurysms and cerebral cavernous malformations. PMID:26062400

  9. Novel cinnoline-based inhibitors of LRRK2 kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, Albert W; Adler, Marc; Aubele, Danielle L; Bowers, Simeon; Franzini, Maurizio; Goldbach, Erich; Lorentzen, Colin; Neitz, R Jeffrey; Probst, Gary D; Quinn, Kevin P; Santiago, Pam; Sham, Hing L; Tam, Danny; Truong, Anh P; Ye, Xiaocong M; Ren, Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Inhibition of LRRK2 kinase activity is a therapeutic approach that may lead to new treatments for PD. Herein we report the discovery of a series of cinnoline-3-carboxamides that are potent against both wild-type and mutant LRRK2 kinase activity in biochemical assays. These compounds are also shown to be potent inhibitors in a cellular assay and to have good to excellent CNS penetration. PMID:23219325

  10. Designing novel kinases using evolutionary sequence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mody, Areez; Weiner, Joan; Iyer, Lakshman; Ramanathan, Sharad

    2006-03-01

    Cellular pathways with new functions are thought to arise from the duplication and divergence of proteins in existing pathways. The MAP kinase pathways in eukaryotes provide one example of this. These pathways consist of the MAP kinase proteins which are responsible for evoking the correct response to external stimuli. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae these pathways detect pheromones, osmolar stresses and nutrient levels, leading the cell into dramatic changes of morphology. Despite being homologous to each other, the MAP kinase proteins show specificity of function. We investigate the nature of the amino acid sequences conferring this specificity. To this end, we i) search the sequences of similar proteins in other Eukaryote species, ii) make a study of simple theoretical models exploring the constraints felt by these protein segments and iii) experimentally construct, a large suite of hybrid proteins made of segments taken from the homologous proteins. These are then expressed in Yeast cells to see what function they are able to perform. Particularly we also ask whether it is possible to design a new kinase protein possessing new function and specificity.

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Serine/Threonine Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    PRISIC, SLADJANA; HUSSON, ROBERT N.

    2014-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome encodes 11 serine/threonine protein kinases (STPKs). A similar number of two-component systems are also present, indicating that these two signal transduction mechanisms are both important in the adaptation of this bacterial pathogen to its environment. The M. tuberculosis phosphoproteome includes hundreds of Ser- and Thr-phosphorylated proteins that participate in all aspects of M. tuberculosis biology, supporting a critical role for the STPKs in regulating M. tuberculosis physiology. Nine of the STPKs are receptor type kinases, with an extracytoplasmic sensor domain and an intracellular kinase domain, indicating that these kinases transduce external signals. Two other STPKs are cytoplasmic and have regulatory domains that sense changes within the cell. Structural analysis of some of the STPKs has led to advances in our understanding of the mechanisms by which these STPKs are activated and regulated. Functional analysis has provided insights into the effects of phosphorylation on the activity of several proteins, but for most phosphoproteins the role of phosphorylation in regulating function is unknown. Major future challenges include characterizing the functional effects of phosphorylation for this large number of phosphoproteins, identifying the cognate STPKs for these phosphoproteins, and determining the signals that the STPKs sense. Ultimately, combining these STPK-regulated processes into larger, integrated regulatory networks will provide deeper insight into M. tuberculosis adaptive mechanisms that contribute to tuberculosis pathogenesis. Finally, the STPKs offer attractive targets for inhibitor development that may lead to new therapies for drug-susceptible and drug-resistant tuberculosis. PMID:25429354

  12. Targeting cancer with kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Stefan; Rahal, Rami; Stransky, Nicolas; Lengauer, Christoph; Hoeflich, Klaus P.

    2015-01-01

    Kinase inhibitors have played an increasingly prominent role in the treatment of cancer and other diseases. Currently, more than 25 oncology drugs that target kinases have been approved, and numerous additional therapeutics are in various stages of clinical evaluation. In this Review, we provide an in-depth analysis of activation mechanisms for kinases in cancer, highlight recent successes in drug discovery, and demonstrate the clinical impact of selective kinase inhibitors. We also describe the substantial progress that has been made in designing next-generation inhibitors to circumvent on-target resistance mechanisms, as well as ongoing strategies for combining kinase inhibitors in the clinic. Last, there are numerous prospects for the discovery of novel kinase targets, and we explore cancer immunotherapy as a new and promising research area for studying kinase biology. PMID:25932675

  13. The molecular basis of targeting protein kinases in cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-Jung; Nussinov, Ruth

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we provide an overview of targeted anticancer therapies with small molecule kinase inhibitors. First, we discuss why a single constitutively active kinase emanating from a variety of aberrant genetic alterations is capable of transforming a normal cell, leading it to acquire the hallmarks of a cancer cell. To draw attention to the fact that kinase inhibition in targeted cancer therapeutics differs from conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy, we exploit a conceptual framework explaining why suppressed kinase activity will selectively kill only the so-called oncogene 'addicted' cancer cell, while sparing the healthy cell. Second, we introduce the protein kinase superfamily in light of its common active conformation with precisely positioned structural elements, and the diversified auto-inhibitory conformations among the kinase families. Understanding the detailed activation mechanism of individual kinases is essential to relate the observed oncogenic alterations to the elevated constitutively active state, to identify the mechanism of consequent drug resistance, and to guide the development of the next-generation inhibitors. To clarify the vital importance of structural guidelines in studies of oncogenesis, we explain how somatic mutations in EGFR result in kinase constitutive activation. Third, in addition to the common theme of secondary (acquired) mutations that prevent drug binding from blocking a signaling pathway which is hijacked by the aberrant activated kinase, we discuss scenarios of drug resistance and relapse by compensating lesions that bypass the inactivated pathway in a vertical or horizontal fashion. Collectively, these suggest that the future challenge of cancer therapy with small molecule kinase inhibitors will rely on the discovery of distinct combinations of optimized drugs to target individual subtypes of different cancers. PMID:23651790

  14. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning; Davis, Roger; Derijard, Benoit

    2005-03-08

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  15. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Roger; Derijard, Benoit; Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2005-01-25

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  16. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1999-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD or 55 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and theonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  17. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1997-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  18. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1998-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  19. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning; Davis, Roger; Derijard, Benoit

    2003-02-04

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  20. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, M.; Hibi, M.; Lin, A.

    1997-02-25

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE is disclosed. The polypeptide has serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences. The method of detection of JNK is also provided. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites. 44 figs.

  1. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1997-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  2. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Lin, Anning

    1999-11-30

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD or 55 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and theonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  3. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2004-03-16

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  4. Mechanism of activation and functional role of protein kinase Ceta in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Bynagari, Yamini S; Nagy, Bela; Tuluc, Florin; Bhavaraju, Kamala; Kim, Soochong; Vijayan, K Vinod; Kunapuli, Satya P

    2009-05-15

    The novel class of protein kinase C (nPKC) isoform eta is expressed in platelets, but not much is known about its activation and function. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of activation and functional implications of nPKCeta using pharmacological and gene knock-out approaches. nPKCeta was phosphorylated (at Thr-512) in a time- and concentration-dependent manner by 2MeSADP. Pretreatment of platelets with MRS-2179, a P2Y1 receptor antagonist, or YM-254890, a G(q) blocker, abolished 2MeSADP-induced phosphorylation of nPKCeta. Similarly, ADP failed to activate nPKCeta in platelets isolated from P2Y1 and G(q) knock-out mice. However, pretreatment of platelets with P2Y12 receptor antagonist, AR-C69331MX did not interfere with ADP-induced nPKCeta phosphorylation. In addition, when platelets were activated with 2MeSADP under stirring conditions, although nPKCeta was phosphorylated within 30 s by ADP receptors, it was also dephosphorylated by activated integrin alpha(IIb)beta3 mediated outside-in signaling. Moreover, in the presence of SC-57101, a alpha(IIb)beta3 receptor antagonist, nPKCeta dephosphorylation was inhibited. Furthermore, in murine platelets lacking PP1cgamma, a catalytic subunit of serine/threonine phosphatase, alpha(IIb)beta3 failed to dephosphorylate nPKCeta. Thus, we conclude that ADP activates nPKCeta via P2Y1 receptor and is subsequently dephosphorylated by PP1gamma phosphatase activated by alpha(IIb)beta3 integrin. In addition, pretreatment of platelets with eta-RACK antagonistic peptides, a specific inhibitor of nPKCeta, inhibited ADP-induced thromboxane generation. However, these peptides had no affect on ADP-induced aggregation when thromboxane generation was blocked. In summary, nPKCeta positively regulates agonist-induced thromboxane generation with no effects on platelet aggregation. PMID:19286657

  5. Cyclin-dependent kinases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are protein kinases characterized by needing a separate subunit - a cyclin - that provides domains essential for enzymatic activity. CDKs play important roles in the control of cell division and modulate transcription in response to several extra- and intracellular cues. The evolutionary expansion of the CDK family in mammals led to the division of CDKs into three cell-cycle-related subfamilies (Cdk1, Cdk4 and Cdk5) and five transcriptional subfamilies (Cdk7, Cdk8, Cdk9, Cdk11 and Cdk20). Unlike the prototypical Cdc28 kinase of budding yeast, most of these CDKs bind one or a few cyclins, consistent with functional specialization during evolution. This review summarizes how, although CDKs are traditionally separated into cell-cycle or transcriptional CDKs, these activities are frequently combined in many family members. Not surprisingly, deregulation of this family of proteins is a hallmark of several diseases, including cancer, and drug-targeted inhibition of specific members has generated very encouraging results in clinical trials. PMID:25180339

  6. Ecotoxicology: Lead

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scheuhammer, A.M.; Beyer, W.N.; Schmitt, C.J.

    2008-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is a naturally occurring metallic element; trace concentrations are found in all environmental media and in all living things. However, certain human activities, especially base metal mining and smelting; combustion of leaded gasoline; the use of Pb in hunting, target shooting, and recreational angling; the use of Pb-based paints; and the uncontrolled disposal of Pb-containing products such as old vehicle batteries and electronic devices have resulted in increased environmental levels of Pb, and have created risks for Pb exposure and toxicity in invertebrates, fish, and wildlife in some ecosystems.

  7. Protein Kinase Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase Kinase 4 (MAP4K4) Promotes Obesity-induced Hyperinsulinemia.

    PubMed

    Roth Flach, Rachel J; Danai, Laura V; DiStefano, Marina T; Kelly, Mark; Menendez, Lorena Garcia; Jurczyk, Agata; Sharma, Rohit B; Jung, Dae Young; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Jason K; Bortell, Rita; Alonso, Laura C; Czech, Michael P

    2016-07-29

    Previous studies revealed a paradox whereby mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 4 (Map4k4) acted as a negative regulator of insulin sensitivity in chronically obese mice, yet systemic deletion of Map4k4 did not improve glucose tolerance. Here, we report markedly reduced glucose-responsive plasma insulin and C-peptide levels in whole body Map4k4-depleted mice (M4K4 iKO) as well as an impaired first phase of insulin secretion from islets derived from M4K4 iKO mice ex vivo After long-term high fat diet (HFD), M4K4 iKO mice pancreata also displayed reduced β cell mass, fewer proliferating β cells and reduced islet-specific gene mRNA expression compared with controls, although insulin content was normal. Interestingly, the reduced plasma insulin in M4K4 iKO mice exposed to chronic (16 weeks) HFD was not observed in response to acute HFD challenge or short term treatment with the insulin receptor antagonist S961. Furthermore, the improved insulin sensitivity in obese M4K4 iKO mice was abrogated by high exogenous insulin over the course of a euglycemic clamp study, indicating that hypoinsulinemia promotes insulin sensitivity in chronically obese M4K4 iKO mice. These results demonstrate that protein kinase Map4k4 drives obesity-induced hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in part by promoting insulin secretion from β cells in mice. PMID:27226575

  8. Tetraethyl lead

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Tetraethyl lead ; CASRN 78 - 00 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  9. A High-Throughput Radiometric Kinase Assay.

    PubMed

    Duong-Ly, Krisna C; Peterson, Jeffrey R

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant kinase signaling has been implicated in a number of diseases. While kinases have become attractive drug targets, only a small fraction of human protein kinases have validated inhibitors. Screening of libraries of compounds against a kinase or kinases of interest is routinely performed during kinase inhibitor development to identify promising scaffolds for a particular target and to identify kinase targets for compounds of interest. Screening of more focused compound libraries may also be conducted in the later stages of inhibitor development to improve potency and optimize selectivity. The dot blot kinase assay is a robust, high-throughput kinase assay that can be used to screen a number of small-molecule compounds against one kinase of interest or several kinases. Here, a protocol for a dot blot kinase assay used for measuring insulin receptor kinase activity is presented. This protocol can be readily adapted for use with other protein kinases. PMID:26501904

  10. MAP kinase dynamics in yeast.

    PubMed

    van Drogen, F; Peter, M

    2001-09-01

    MAP kinase pathways play key roles in cellular responses towards extracellular signals. In several cases, the three core kinases interact with a scaffold molecule, but the function of these scaffolds is poorly understood. They have been proposed to contribute to signal specificity, signal amplification, or subcellular localization of MAP kinases. Several MAP kinases translocate to the nucleus in response to their activation, suggesting that nuclear transport may provide a regulatory mechanism. Here we describe new applications for Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) and Fluorescence Loss In Photobleaching (FLIP), to study dynamic translocations of MAPKs between different subcellular compartments. We have used these methods to measure the nuclear/cytoplasmic dynamics of several yeast MAP kinases, and in particular to address the role of scaffold proteins for MAP-kinase signaling. PMID:11730324

  11. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase in myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kaliman, P; Zorzano, A

    1997-08-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) has been cloned and characterized in a wide range of organisms. PI 3-kinases are activated by a diversity of extracellular stimuli and are involved in multiple cell processes such as cell proliferation, protein trafficking, cell motility, differentiation, regulation of cytoskeletal structure, and apoptosis. It has recently been shown that PI 3-kinase is a crucial second messenger in the signaling of myogenesis. Two structurally unrelated highly specific inhibitors of PI 3-kinase-wortmannin and LY294002-block the morphological and biochemical differentiation program of different skeletal-muscle cell models. Moreover, L6E9 myoblasts overexpressing a dominant-negative mutant of PI 3-kinase p85 regulatory subunit (Δp85) are unable to differentiate. Furthermore, PI 3-kinase is specifically involved in the insulinlike growth factor (IGF)-dependent myogenic pathway. Indeed, the ability of IGF-I, des-1,3-IGF-I, and IGF-II to promote cell fusion and muscle-specific protein expression is impaired after treatment with PI 3-kinase inhibitors or in cells overexpressing Δp85. The identification of additional key downstream elements of the IGF/PI 3-kinase myogenic cascade is crucial to a detailed understanding of the process of muscle differentiation and may generate new tools for skeletal and cardiac muscle regeneration therapies. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997;7:198-202). © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc. PMID:21235885

  12. An X-ray structural study of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase: A eukaryotic serine kinase with a prokaryotic histidine-kinase fold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steussy, Calvin Nicklaus, Jr.

    2001-07-01

    Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase is an enzyme that controls the flow of glucose through the eukaryotic cell and contributes to the pathology of diabetes mellitus. Early work on this kinase demonstrated that it has an amino acid sequence much like bacterial histidine kinases, but an activity similar to that of modern serine/threonine kinases. This project utilized the techniques of X-ray crystallography to determine molecular structure of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, isozyme 2. The structure was phased using selenium substituted for sulfur in methionine residues, and data at multiple wavelengths was collected at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratories. PDK 2 was found to fold into a two-domain monomer that forms a dimer through two beta sheets in the C-terminal domain. The N-terminal domain is an alpha-helical bundle while the C-terminal domain is an alpha/beta sandwich. The fold of the C-terminal domain is very similar to that of the prokaryotic histidine kinases, indicating that they share a common ancestor. The catalytic mechanism, however, has evolved to use general base catalysis to activate the serine substrate, rather than the direct nucleophilic attack by the imidazole sidechain used in the prokaryotic kinases. Thus, the structure of the protein echoes its prokaryotic ancestor, while the chemical mechanism has adapted to a serine substrate. The electrostatic surface of PDK2 leads to the suggestion that the lipoyl domain of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, an important associated structure, may bind in the cleft formed between the N- and C-terminal domains. In addition, a network of hydrogen bonds directly connects the nucleotide binding pocket to the dimer interface, suggesting that there may be some interaction between dimer formation and ATP binding or ADP release.

  13. A conserved isoleucine maintains the inactive state of Bruton’s tyrosine kinase

    PubMed Central

    Boyken, Scott E.; Chopra, Nikita; Xie, Qian; Joseph, Raji E.; Wales, Thomas E.; Fulton, D. Bruce; Engen, John R.; Jernigan, Robert L.; Andreotti, Amy H.

    2014-01-01

    Despite high homology among non-receptor tyrosine kinases, different kinase families employ a diverse array of regulatory mechanisms. For example, the catalytic kinase domains of the Tec family kinases are inactive without assembly of the adjacent regulatory domains, whereas the Src kinase domains are autoinhibited by the assembly of similar adjacent regulatory domains. Using molecular dynamic simulations, biochemical assays, and biophysical approaches, we have uncovered an isoleucine residue in the kinase domain of the Tec family member Btk that, when mutated to the closely related leucine, leads to a shift in the conformational equilibrium of the kinase domain toward the active state. The single amino acid mutation results in measureable catalytic activity for the Btk kinase domain in the absence of the regulatory domains. We suggest this isoleucine side chain in the Tec family kinases acts as a ‘wedge’ that restricts the conformational space available to key regions in the kinase domain, preventing activation until the kinase domain associates with its regulatory subunits and overcomes the energetic barrier to activation imposed by the isoleucine side chain. PMID:25193673

  14. Adenylate kinase complements nucleoside diphosphate kinase deficiency in nucleotide metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Q; Inouye, M

    1996-01-01

    Nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase is a ubiquitous nonspecific enzyme that evidently is designed to catalyze in vivo ATP-dependent synthesis of ribo- and deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates from the corresponding diphosphates. Because Escherichia coli contains only one copy of ndk, the structural gene for this enzyme, we were surprised to find that ndk disruption yields bacteria that are still viable. These mutant cells contain a protein with a small amount NDP kinase activity. The protein responsible for this activity was purified and identified as adenylate kinase. This enzyme, also called myokinase, catalyzes the reversible ATP-dependent synthesis of ADP from AMP. We found that this enzyme from E. coli as well as from higher eukaryotes has a broad substrate specificity displaying dual enzymatic functions. Among the nucleoside monophosphate kinases tested, only adenylate kinase was found to have NDP kinase activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report of NDP kinase activity associated with adenylate kinase. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:8650159

  15. Protein kinases as drug targets in cancer.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Mehmet Alper; Kutuk, Ozgur; Basaga, Huveyda

    2006-11-01

    Identification of the key roles of protein kinases in signaling pathways leading to development of cancer has caused pharmacological interest to concentrate extensively on targeted therapies as a more specific and effective way for blockade of cancer progression. This review will mainly focus on inhibitors targeting these key components of cellular signaling by employing a technology-based point of view with respect to ATP- and non-ATP-competitive small molecule inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies of selected protein kinases, particularly, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), BCR-ABL, MEK, p38 MAPK, EGFR PDGFR, VEGFR, HER2 and Raf. Inhibitors of the heat shock protein Hsp90 are also included in a separate section, as this protein plays an essential role for the maturation/proper activation of cancer-related protein kinases. In the following review, the molecular details of the mode of action of these inhibitors as well as the emergence of drug resistance encountered in several cases are discussed in light of the structural, molecular and clinical studies conducted so far. PMID:17100568

  16. Biochemical and Structural Insights into Doublecortin-like Kinase Domain 1.

    PubMed

    Patel, Onisha; Dai, Weiwen; Mentzel, Mareike; Griffin, Michael D W; Serindoux, Juliette; Gay, Yoann; Fischer, Stefanie; Sterle, Shoukat; Kropp, Ashleigh; Burns, Christopher J; Ernst, Matthias; Buchert, Michael; Lucet, Isabelle S

    2016-09-01

    Doublecortin-like kinase 1 (DCLK1) is a serine/threonine kinase that belongs to the family of microtubule-associated proteins. Originally identified for its role in neurogenesis, DCLK1 has recently been shown to regulate biological processes outside of the CNS. DCLK1 is among the 15 most common putative driver genes for gastric cancers and is highly mutated across various other human cancers. However, our present understanding of how DCLK1 dysfunction leads to tumorigenesis is limited. Here, we provide evidence that DCLK1 kinase activity negatively regulates microtubule polymerization. We present the crystal structure of the DCLK1 kinase domain at 1.7 Å resolution, providing detailed insight into the ATP-binding site that will serve as a framework for future drug design. This structure also allowed for the mapping of cancer-causing mutations within the kinase domain, suggesting that a loss of kinase function may contribute to tumorigenesis. PMID:27545623

  17. Phosphorylation and activation of calcineurin by glycogen synthase (casein) kinase-1 and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, T.J.; Wang, J.H.

    1986-05-01

    Calcineurin is a phosphoprotein phosphatase that is activated by divalent cations and further stimulated by calmodulin. In this study calcineurin is shown to be a substrate for both glycogen synthase (casein) kinase-1 (CK-1) and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (A-kinase). Either kinase can catalyze the incorporation of 1.0-1.4 mol /sup 32/P/mol calcineurin. Analysis by SDS-PAGE revealed that only the ..cap alpha.. subunit is phosphorylated. Phosphorylation of calcineurin by either kinase leads to its activation. Using p-nitrophenyl phosphate as a substrate the authors observed a 2-3 fold activation of calcineurin by either Mn/sup 2 +/ or Ni/sup 2 +/ (in the presence or absence of calmodulin) after phosphorylation of calcineurin by either CK-1 or A-kinase. In the absence of Mn/sup 2 +/ or Ni/sup 2 +/ phosphorylated calcineurin, like the nonphosphorylated enzyme, showed very little activity. Ni/sup 2 +/ was a more potent activator of phosphorylated calcineurin compared to Mn/sup 2 +/. Higher levels of activation (5-8 fold) of calcineurin by calmodulin was observed when phosphorylated calcineurin was pretreated with Ni/sup 2 +/ before measurement of phosphatase activity. These results indicate that phosphorylation may be an important mechanism by which calcineurin activity is regulated by Ca/sup 2 +/.

  18. The early evolution of the phosphagen kinases--insights from choanoflagellate and poriferan arginine kinases.

    PubMed

    Conejo, Maria; Bertin, Matt; Pomponi, Shirley A; Ellington, W Ross

    2008-01-01

    Arginine kinase (AK) is a member of a large family of phosphoryl transfer enzymes called phosphagen (guanidino) kinases. AKs are present in certain protozoans, sponges, cnidarians, and both lophotrochozoan and ecdysozoan protostomes. Another phosphagen kinase, creatine kinase (CK), is found in sponges, cnidarians, and both deuterostome and protostome groups but does not appear to be present in protozoans. To probe the early evolution of phosphagen kinases, we have amplified the cDNAs for AKs from three choanoflagellates and from the hexactinellid sponge Aphrocallistes beatrix and the demosponges Suberites fuscus and Microciona prolifera. Phylogenetic analysis using maximum likelihood of these choanoflagellate and sponge AKs with other AK sequences revealed that the AK from the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis clusters with the AK from the glass sponge Aphrocallistes and is part of a larger cluster containing AKs from the demosponges Suberites and Microciona as well as basal and protostome invertebrates. In contrast, AKs from Codonosiga gracilis and Monosiga ovata form a distinct cluster apart from all other AK sequences. tBLASTn searches of the recently released M. brevicollis genome database showed that this species has three unique AK genes-one virtually identical to the M. brevicollis cDNA and the other two showing great similarity to C. gracilis and M. ovata AKs. Three distinct AK genes are likely present in choanoflagellates. Two of these AKs display extensive similarity to both CKs and an AK from sponges. Previous work has shown CK evolved from an AK-like ancestor prior to the divergence of sponges. The present results provide evidence suggesting that the initial gene duplication event(s) leading to the CK lineage may have occurred before the divergence of the choanoflagellate and animal lineages. PMID:18064398

  19. MAP kinase-interacting kinases--emerging targets against cancer.

    PubMed

    Diab, Sarah; Kumarasiri, Malika; Yu, Mingfeng; Teo, Theodosia; Proud, Christopher; Milne, Robert; Wang, Shudong

    2014-04-24

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-interacting kinases (Mnks) regulate the initiation of translation through phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E). Mnk-mediated eIF4E activation promotes cancer development and progression. While the phosphorylation of eIF4E is necessary for oncogenic transformation, the kinase activity of Mnks seems dispensable for normal development. For this reason, pharmacological inhibition of Mnks could represent an ideal mechanism-based and nontoxic therapeutic strategy for cancer treatment. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of Mnk biological roles, structures, and functions, as well as clinical implications. Importantly, we propose different strategies for identification of highly selective small molecule inhibitors of Mnks, including exploring a structural feature of their kinase domain, DFD motif, which is unique within the human kinome. We also argue that a combined targeting of Mnks and other pathways should be considered given the complexity of cancer. PMID:24613018

  20. A kinome wide screen identifies novel kinases involved in regulation of monoamine transporter function.

    PubMed

    Vuorenpää, Anne; Ammendrup-Johnsen, Ina; Jørgensen, Trine N; Gether, Ulrik

    2016-09-01

    The high affinity transporters for the monoamine neurotransmitters, dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin, play a key role in controlling monoaminergic neurotransmission. It is believed that the transporters (DAT, NET and SERT, respectively) are subject to tight regulation by the cellular signaling machinery to maintain monoaminergic homeostasis. Kinases constitute a pivotal role in cellular signaling, however, the regulation of monoamine transporters by the entire ensemble of kinases is unknown. Here, we perform a whole human kinome RNA interference screen to identify novel kinases involved in regulation of monoamine transporter function and surface expression. A primary screen in HEK 293 cells stably expressing DAT or SERT with siRNAs against 573 human kinases revealed 93 kinases putatively regulating transporter function. All 93 hits, which also included kinases previously implicated in monoamine transporter regulation, such as Protein kinase B (Akt) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), were validated with a new set of siRNAs in a secondary screen. In this screen we assessed both changes in uptake and surface expression leading to selection of 11 kinases for further evaluation in HEK 293 cells transiently expressing DAT, SERT or NET. Subsequently, three kinases; salt inducible kinase 3 (SIK3), cAMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit alpha (PKA C-α) and protein kinase X-linked (PrKX); were selected for additional exploration in catecholaminergic CATH.a differentiated cells (CAD) and rat chromocytoma (PC12) cells. Whereas SIK3 likely transcriptionally regulated expression of the three transfected transporters, depletion of PKA C-α was shown to decrease SERT function. Depletion of PrKX caused decreased surface expression and function of DAT without changing protein levels, suggesting that PrKX stabilizes the transporter at the cell surface. Summarized, our data provide novel insight into kinome regulation of the monoamine transporters and

  1. Neuronal migration and protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Ohshima, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    The formation of the six-layered structure of the mammalian cortex via the inside-out pattern of neuronal migration is fundamental to neocortical functions. Extracellular cues such as Reelin induce intracellular signaling cascades through the protein phosphorylation. Migrating neurons also have intrinsic machineries to regulate cytoskeletal proteins and adhesion properties. Protein phosphorylation regulates these processes. Moreover, the balance between phosphorylation and dephosphorylation is modified by extracellular cues. Multipolar-bipolar transition, radial glia-guided locomotion and terminal translocation are critical steps of radial migration of cortical pyramidal neurons. Protein kinases such as Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) involve these steps. In this review, I shall give an overview the roles of protein kinases in neuronal migration. PMID:25628530

  2. Protein Crystals of Raf Kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This image shows crystals of the protein raf kinase grown on Earth (photo a) and on USML-2 (photo b). The space-grown crystals are an order of magnitude larger. Principal Investigator: Dan Carter of New Century Pharmaceuticals

  3. Isolation of chloroplastic phosphoglycerate kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Macioszek, J.; Anderson, L.E. ); Anderson, J.B. )

    1990-09-01

    We report here a method for the isolation of high specific activity phosphoglycerate kinase (EC 2.7.2.3) from chloroplasts. The enzyme has been purified over 200-fold from pea (Pisum sativum L.) stromal extracts to apparent homogeneity with 23% recovery. Negative cooperativity is observed with the two enzyme phosphoglycerate kinase/glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.13) couple restored from the purified enzymes when NADPH is the reducing pyridine nucleotide, consistent with earlier results obtained with crude chloroplastic extracts. Michaelis Menten kinetics are observed when 3-phosphoglycerate is held constant and phosphoglycerate kinase is varied, which suggests that phosphoglycerate kinase-bound 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate may be the preferred substrate for glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase in the chloroplast.

  4. The azaindole framework in the design of kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mérour, Jean-Yves; Buron, Frédéric; Plé, Karen; Bonnet, Pascal; Routier, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    This review article illustrates the growing use of azaindole derivatives as kinase inhibitors and their contribution to drug discovery and innovation. The different protein kinases which have served as targets and the known molecules which have emerged from medicinal chemistry and Fragment-Based Drug Discovery (FBDD) programs are presented. The various synthetic routes used to access these compounds and the chemical pathways leading to their synthesis are also discussed. An analysis of their mode of binding based on X-ray crystallography data gives structural insights for the design of more potent and selective inhibitors. PMID:25460315

  5. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors and Diabetes: A Novel Treatment Paradigm?

    PubMed

    Fountas, Athanasios; Diamantopoulos, Leonidas-Nikolaos; Tsatsoulis, Agathocles

    2015-11-01

    Deregulation of protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity is implicated in various proliferative conditions. Multi-target tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are increasingly used for the treatment of different malignancies. Recently, several clinical cases of the reversal of both type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus (T1DM, T2DM) during TKI administration have been reported. Experimental in vivo and in vitro studies have elucidated some of the mechanisms behind this effect. For example, inhibition of Abelson tyrosine kinase (c-Abl) results in β cell survival and enhanced insulin secretion, while platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibition leads to improvement in insulin sensitivity. In addition, inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) reduces the degree of islet cell inflammation (insulitis). Therefore, targeting several PTKs may provide a novel approach for correcting the pathophysiologic disturbances of diabetes. PMID:26492832

  6. Structural Basis for Autoinhibition of c-Abl Tyrosine Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Nagar, Bhushan; Hantschel, Oliver; Young, Matthew A.; Scheffzek,Klaus; Veach, Darren; Bornmann, William; Clarkson, Bayard; Superti-Furga,Giulio; Kuriyan, John

    2003-03-21

    c-Abl is normally regulated by an autoinhibitory mechanism, the disruption of which leads to chronic myelogenous leukemia. The details of this mechanism have been elusive because c-Abl lacks aphosphotyrosine residue that triggers the assembly of the autoinhibited form of the closely related Src kinases by internally engaging the SH2 domain. Crystal structures of c-Abl show that the N-terminal myristoyl modification of c-Abl 1b binds to the kinase domain and induces conformational changes that allow the SH2 and SH3 domains to dock onto it. Autoinhibited c-Abl forms an assembly that is strikingly similar to that of inactive Src kinases but with specific differences that explain the differential ability of the drug STI-571/Gleevec/imatinib (STI-571)to inhibit the catalytic activity of Abl, but not that of c-Src.

  7. Multi-kinase inhibitors, AURKs and cancer.

    PubMed

    Cicenas, Jonas; Cicenas, Erikas

    2016-05-01

    Inhibitors that impact function of kinases are valuable both for the biological research as well as therapy of kinase-associated diseases, such as different cancers. There are quite a number of inhibitors, which are quite specific for certain kinases and several of them are either already approved for the cancer therapy or are in clinical studies of various phases. However, that does not mean that each single kinase inhibitor is suitable for targeted therapy. Some of them are not effective others might be toxic or fail some other criteria for the use in vivo. On the other hand, even in case of successful therapy, many responders eventually develop resistance to the inhibitors. The limitations of various single kinase inhibitors can be fought using compounds which target multiple kinases. This tactics can increase effectiveness of the inhibitors by the synergistic effect or help to diminish the likelihood of drug resistance. To date, several families of kinases are quite popular targets of the inhibition in cancers, such as tyrosine kinases, cycle-dependent kinases, mitogen-activated protein kinases, phosphoinositide 3-kinases as well as their pathway "players" and aurora kinases. Aurora kinases play an important role in the control of the mitosis and are often altered in diverse human cancers. Here, we will describe the most interesting multi-kinase inhibitors which inhibit aurora kinases among other targets and their use in preclinical and clinical cancer studies. PMID:27038473

  8. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1 (MAP3K1) integrates developmental signals for eyelid closure

    PubMed Central

    Geh, Esmond; Meng, Qinghang; Mongan, Maureen; Wang, Jingcai; Takatori, Atsushi; Zheng, Yi; Puga, Alvaro; Lang, Richard A.; Xia, Ying

    2011-01-01

    Developmental eyelid closure is an evolutionarily conserved morphogenetic event requiring proliferation, differentiation, cytoskeleton reorganization, and migration of epithelial cells at the tip of the developing eyelid. Many signaling events take place during eyelid closure, but how the signals converge to regulate the morphogenetic process remains an open and intriguing question. Here we show that mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1 (MAP3K1) highly expressed in the developing eyelid epithelium, forms with c-Jun, a regulatory axis that orchestrates morphogenesis by integrating two different networks of eyelid closure signals. A TGF-α/EGFR-RhoA module initiates one of these networks by inducing c-Jun expression which, in a phosphorylation-independent manner, binds to the Map3k1 promoter and causes an increase in MAP3K1 expression. RhoA knockout in the ocular surface epithelium disturbs this network by decreasing MAP3K1 expression, and causes delayed eyelid closure in Map3k1 hemizygotes. The second network is initiated by the enzymatic activity of MAP3K1, which phosphorylates and activates a JNK-c-Jun module, leading to AP-1 transactivation and induction of its downstream genes, such as Pai-1. MAP3K1 inactivation reduces AP-1 activity and PAI-1 expression both in cells and developing eyelids. MAP3K1 is therefore the nexus of an intracrine regulatory loop connecting the TGF-α/EGFR/RhoA-c-Jun and JNK-c-Jun-AP-1 pathways in developmental eyelid closure. PMID:21969564

  9. The discovery of novel vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases inhibitors: pharmacophore modeling, virtual screening and docking studies.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Wang, Zhanli; Zhang, Liangren; Zhang, Jufeng; Huang, Qian

    2007-03-01

    We have applied pharmacophore generation, database searching and docking methodologies to discover new structures for the design of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors, the tyrosine kinase insert domain-containing receptor kinase inhibitors. The chemical function based pharmacophore models were built for kinase insert domain-containing receptor kinase inhibitors from a set of 10 known inhibitors using the algorithm HipHop, which is implemented in the CATALYST software. The highest scoring HipHop model consists of four features: one hydrophobic, one hydrogen bond acceptor, one hydrogen bond donor and one ring aromatic function. Using the algorithm CatShape within CATALYST, the bound conformation of 4-amino-furo [2, 3-d] pyrimidine binding to kinase insert domain-containing receptor kinase was used to generate a shape query. A merged shape and hypothesis query that is in an appropriate alignment was then built. The combined shape and hypothesis model was used as a query to search Maybridge database for other potential lead compounds. A total of 39 compounds were retrieved as hits. The hits obtained were docked into kinase insert domain-containing receptor kinase active site. One novel potential lead was proposed based on CATALYST fit value, LigandFit docking scores, and examination of how the hit retain key interactions known to be required for kinase binding. This compound inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor stimulated kinase insert domain-containing receptor phosphorylation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. PMID:17441906

  10. Discovering the first tyrosine kinase

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Tony

    2015-01-01

    In the middle of the 20th century, animal tumor viruses were heralded as possible models for understanding human cancer. By the mid-1970s, the molecular basis by which tumor viruses transform cells into a malignant state was beginning to emerge as the first viral genomic sequences were reported and the proteins encoded by their transforming genes were identified and characterized. This was a time of great excitement and rapid progress. In 1978, prompted by the discovery from Ray Erikson’s group that the Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) v-Src–transforming protein had an associated protein kinase activity specific for threonine, my group at the Salk Institute set out to determine whether the polyomavirus middle T-transforming protein had a similar kinase activity. Here, I describe the experiments that led to the identification of a kinase activity associated with middle T antigen and our serendipitous discovery that this activity was specific for tyrosine in vitro, and how this in turn led to the fortuitous observation that the v-Src–associated kinase activity was also specific for tyrosine. Our finding that v-Src increased the level of phosphotyrosine in cellular proteins in RSV-transformed cells confirmed that v-Src is a tyrosine kinase and transforms cells by phosphorylating proteins on tyrosine. My colleague Bart Sefton and I reported these findings in the March issue of PNAS in 1980. Remarkably, all of the experiments in this paper were accomplished in less than one month. PMID:26130799

  11. Modelling the 2-kinase domain of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase on adenylate kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, L; Vertommen, D; Depiereux, E; Hue, L; Rider, M H; Feytmans, E

    1997-01-01

    Simultaneous multiple alignment of available sequences of the bifunctional enzyme 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase revealed several segments of conserved residues in the 2-kinase domain. The sequence of the kinase domain was also compared with proteins of known three-dimensional structure. No similarity was found between the kinase domain of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase and 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase. This questions the modelling of the 2-kinase domain on bacterial 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase that has previously been proposed [Bazan, Fletterick and Pilkis (1989) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 86, 9642-9646]. However, sequence similarities were found between the 2-kinase domain and several nucleotide-binding proteins, the most similar being adenylate kinase. A structural model of the 2-kinase domain based on adenylate kinase is proposed. It accommodates all the results of site-directed mutagenesis studies carried out to date on residues in the 2-kinase domain. It also allows residues potentially involved in catalysis and/or substrate binding to be predicted. PMID:9032445

  12. Rho-kinase mediated cytoskeletal stiffness in skinned smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Bo; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Jenny; Pascoe, Chris D.; Norris, Brandon A.; Liu, Jeffrey C.-Y.; Solomon, Dennis; Paré, Peter D.; Deng, Linhong

    2013-01-01

    The structurally dynamic cytoskeleton is important in many cell functions. Large gaps still exist in our knowledge regarding what regulates cytoskeletal dynamics and what underlies the structural plasticity. Because Rho-kinase is an upstream regulator of signaling events leading to phosphorylation of many cytoskeletal proteins in many cell types, we have chosen this kinase as the focus of the present study. In detergent skinned tracheal smooth muscle preparations, we quantified the proteins eluted from the muscle cells over time and monitored the muscle's ability to respond to acetylcholine (ACh) stimulation to produce force and stiffness. In a partially skinned preparation not able to generate active force but could still stiffen upon ACh stimulation, we found that the ACh-induced stiffness was independent of calcium and myosin light chain phosphorylation. This indicates that the myosin light chain-dependent actively cycling crossbridges are not likely the source of the stiffness. The results also indicate that Rho-kinase is central to the ACh-induced stiffness, because inhibition of the kinase by H1152 (1 μM) abolished the stiffening. Furthermore, the rate of relaxation of calcium-induced stiffness in the skinned preparation was faster than that of ACh-induced stiffness, with or without calcium, suggesting that different signaling pathways lead to different means of maintenance of stiffness in the skinned preparation. PMID:24072407

  13. Targeting the Pim kinases in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Keane, N A; Reidy, M; Natoni, A; Raab, M S; O'Dwyer, M

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell malignancy that remains incurable. Novel treatment strategies to improve survival are urgently required. The Pims are a small family of serine/threonine kinases with increased expression across the hematological malignancies. Pim-2 shows highest expression in MM and constitutes a promising therapeutic target. It is upregulated by the bone marrow microenvironment to mediate proliferation and promote MM survival. Pim-2 also has a key role in the bone destruction typically seen in MM. Additional putative roles of the Pim kinases in MM include trafficking of malignant cells, promoting oncogenic signaling in the hypoxic bone marrow microenvironment and mediating resistance to therapy. A number of Pim inhibitors are now under development with lead compounds entering the clinic. The ATP-competitive Pim inhibitor LGH447 has recently been reported to have single agent activity in MM. It is anticipated that Pim inhibition will be of clinical benefit in combination with standard treatments and/or with novel drugs targeting other survival pathways in MM. PMID:26186558

  14. Structures of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases reveal mechanism of activation by calcium

    SciTech Connect

    Wernimont, Amy K; Artz, Jennifer D.; Jr, Patrick Finerty; Lin, Yu-Hui; Amani, Mehrnaz; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Senisterra, Guillermo; Vedadi, Masoud; Tempel, Wolfram; Mackenzie, Farrell; Chau, Irene; Lourido, Sebastian; Sibley, L. David; Hui, Raymond

    2010-09-21

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) have pivotal roles in the calcium-signaling pathway in plants, ciliates and apicomplexan parasites and comprise a calmodulin-dependent kinase (CaMK)-like kinase domain regulated by a calcium-binding domain in the C terminus. To understand this intramolecular mechanism of activation, we solved the structures of the autoinhibited (apo) and activated (calcium-bound) conformations of CDPKs from the apicomplexan parasites Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum. In the apo form, the C-terminal CDPK activation domain (CAD) resembles a calmodulin protein with an unexpected long helix in the N terminus that inhibits the kinase domain in the same manner as CaMKII. Calcium binding triggers the reorganization of the CAD into a highly intricate fold, leading to its relocation around the base of the kinase domain to a site remote from the substrate binding site. This large conformational change constitutes a distinct mechanism in calcium signal-transduction pathways.

  15. A chemoproteomic method for identifying cellular targets of covalent kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying-Chu; Zhang, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinases are attractive drug targets for numerous human diseases including cancers, diabetes and neurodegeneration. A number of kinase inhibitors that covalently target a cysteine residue in their target kinases have recently entered use in the cancer clinic. Despite the advantages of covalent kinases inhibitors, their inherent reactivity can lead to non-specific binding to other cellular proteins and cause off- target effects in cells. It is thus essential to determine the identity of these off targets in order to fully account for the phenotype and to improve the selectivity and efficacy of covalent inhibitors. Herein we present a detailed protocol for a chemoproteomic method to enrich and identify cellular targets of covalent kinase inhibitors. PMID:27551330

  16. The FRK1 mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) from Solanum chacoense is involved in embryo sac and pollen development

    PubMed Central

    Lafleur, Edith; Kapfer, Christelle; Joly, Valentin; Liu, Yang; Tebbji, Faiza; Daigle, Caroline; Gray-Mitsumune, Madoka; Cappadocia, Mario; Nantel, André; Matton, Daniel P.

    2015-01-01

    The fertilization-related kinase 1 (ScFRK1), a nuclear-localized mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) from the wild potato species Solanum chacoense, belongs to a small group of pMEKKs that do not possess an extended N- or C-terminal regulatory domain. Initially selected based on its highly specific expression profile following fertilization, in situ expression analyses revealed that the ScFRK1 gene is also expressed early on during female gametophyte development in the integument and megaspore mother cell and, later, in the synergid and egg cells of the embryo sac. ScFRK1 mRNAs are also detected in pollen mother cells. Transgenic plants with lower or barely detectable levels of ScFRK1 mRNAs lead to the production of small fruits with severely reduced seed set, resulting from a concomitant decline in the number of normal embryo sacs produced. Megagametogenesis and microgametogenesis were affected, as megaspores did not progress beyond the functional megaspore (FG1) stage and the microspore collapsed around the first pollen mitosis. As for other mutants that affect embryo sac development, pollen tube guidance was severely affected in the ScFRK1 transgenic lines. Gametophyte to sporophyte communication was also affected, as observed from a marked change in the transcriptomic profiles of the sporophytic tissues of the ovule. The ScFRK1 MAPKKK is thus involved in a signalling cascade that regulates both male and female gamete development. PMID:25576576

  17. The FRK1 mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) from Solanum chacoense is involved in embryo sac and pollen development.

    PubMed

    Lafleur, Edith; Kapfer, Christelle; Joly, Valentin; Liu, Yang; Tebbji, Faiza; Daigle, Caroline; Gray-Mitsumune, Madoka; Cappadocia, Mario; Nantel, André; Matton, Daniel P

    2015-04-01

    The fertilization-related kinase 1 (ScFRK1), a nuclear-localized mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) from the wild potato species Solanum chacoense, belongs to a small group of pMEKKs that do not possess an extended N- or C-terminal regulatory domain. Initially selected based on its highly specific expression profile following fertilization, in situ expression analyses revealed that the ScFRK1 gene is also expressed early on during female gametophyte development in the integument and megaspore mother cell and, later, in the synergid and egg cells of the embryo sac. ScFRK1 mRNAs are also detected in pollen mother cells. Transgenic plants with lower or barely detectable levels of ScFRK1 mRNAs lead to the production of small fruits with severely reduced seed set, resulting from a concomitant decline in the number of normal embryo sacs produced. Megagametogenesis and microgametogenesis were affected, as megaspores did not progress beyond the functional megaspore (FG1) stage and the microspore collapsed around the first pollen mitosis. As for other mutants that affect embryo sac development, pollen tube guidance was severely affected in the ScFRK1 transgenic lines. Gametophyte to sporophyte communication was also affected, as observed from a marked change in the transcriptomic profiles of the sporophytic tissues of the ovule. The ScFRK1 MAPKKK is thus involved in a signalling cascade that regulates both male and female gamete development. PMID:25576576

  18. MAP kinase cascades: scaffolding signal specificity.

    PubMed

    van Drogen, Frank; Peter, Matthias

    2002-01-22

    Scaffold proteins organize many MAP kinase pathways by interacting with several components of these cascades. Recent studies suggest that scaffold proteins provide local activation platforms that contribute to signal specificity by insulating different MAP kinase pathways. PMID:11818078

  19. Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase regulates mast cell ion channel activity.

    PubMed

    Lam, Rebecca S; Shumilina, Ekaterina; Matzner, Nicole; Zemtsova, Irina M; Sobiesiak, Malgorzata; Lang, Camelia; Felder, Edward; Dietl, Paul; Huber, Stephan M; Lang, Florian

    2008-01-01

    Stimulation of the mast cell IgE-receptor (FcepsilonRI) by antigen leads to stimulation of Ca(2+) entry with subsequent mast cell degranulation and release of inflammatory mediators. Ca(2+) further activates Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels, which in turn provide the electrical driving force for Ca(2+) entry. Since phosphatidylinositol (PI)-3-kinase has previously been shown to be required for mast cell activation and degranulation, we explored, whether mast cell Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels may be sensitive to PI3-kinase activity. Whole-cell patch clamp experiments and Fura-2 fluorescence measurements for determination of cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration were performed in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells either treated or untreated with the PI3-kinase inhibitors LY-294002 (10 muM) and wortmannin (100 nM). Antigen-stimulated Ca(2+) entry but not Ca(2+) release from the intracellular stores was dramatically reduced upon PI3-kinase inhibition. Ca(2+) entry was further inhibited by TRPV blocker ruthenium red (10 muM). Ca(2+) entry following readdition after Ca(+)-store depletion with thapsigargin was again decreased by LY-294002, pointing to inhibition of store-operated channels (SOCs). Moreover, inhibition of PI3-kinase abrogated IgE-stimulated, but not ionomycin-induced stimulation of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels. These observations disclose PI3-kinase-dependent regulation of Ca(2+) entry and Ca(2+)-activated K(+)-channels, which in turn participate in triggering mast cell degranulation. PMID:18769043

  20. Kinase Impaired BRAF Mutations Confer Lung Cancer Sensitivity to Dasatinib

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Banibrata; Peng, Shaohua; Tang, Ximing; Erickson, Heidi S.; Galindo, Hector; Mazumdar, Tuhina; Stewart, David J.; Wistuba, Ignacio; Johnson, Faye M.

    2013-01-01

    During a clinical trial of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor dasatinib for advanced non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) one patient responded dramatically and remains cancer-free 4 years later. A comprehensive analysis of his tumor revealed a previously undescribed, kinase inactivating BRAF mutation (Y472CBRAF); no inactivating BRAF mutations were found in the non-responding tumors taken from other patients. Cells transfected with Y472CBRAF exhibited CRAF, MEK, and ERK activation – characteristics identical to signaling changes that occur with previously known kinase inactivating BRAF mutants. Dasatinib selectively induced senescence in NSCLC cells with inactivating BRAF mutations. Transfection of other NSCLC cells with these BRAF mutations also increased these cells’ dasatinib sensitivity, whereas transfection with an activating BRAF mutation led to their increased dasatinib resistance. The sensitivity induced by Y472CBRAF was reversed by the introduction of a BRAF mutation that impairs RAF dimerization. Dasatinib inhibited CRAF modestly, but concurrently induced RAF dimerization resulting in ERK activation in NSCLC cells with kinase inactivating BRAF mutations. The sensitivity of NSCLC with kinase impaired BRAF to dasatinib suggested synthetic lethality of BRAF and a dasatinib target. Inhibiting BRAF in NSCLC cells expressing wild-type BRAF likewise enhanced these cells’ dasatinib sensitivity. Thus, the patient’s BRAF mutation was likely responsible for his tumor’s marked response to dasatinib, suggesting that tumors bearing kinase impaired BRAF mutations may be exquisitely sensitive to dasatinib. Moreover, the potential synthetic lethality of combination therapy including dasatinib and BRAF inhibitors may lead to additional therapeutic options against cancers with wild-type BRAF. PMID:22649091

  1. AXL kinase as a novel target for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang Youl; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Halmos, Balazs

    2014-01-01

    The AXL receptor tyrosine kinase and its major ligand, GAS6 have been demonstrated to be overexpressed and activated in many human cancers (such as lung, breast, and pancreatic cancer) and have been correlated with poor prognosis, promotion of increased invasiveness/metastasis, the EMT phenotype and drug resistance. Targeting AXL in different model systems with specific small molecule kinase inhibitors or antibodies alone or in combination with other drugs can lead to inactivation of AXL-mediated signaling pathways and can lead to regained drug sensitivity and improved therapeutic efficacy, defining AXL as a promising novel target for cancer therapeutics. This review highlights the data supporting AXL as a novel treatment candidate in a variety of cancers as well as the current status of drug development targeting the AXL/GAS6 axis and future perspectives in this emerging field. PMID:25337673

  2. Lead-acid cell

    SciTech Connect

    Hradcovsky, R.J.; Kozak, O.R.

    1980-12-09

    A lead-acid storage battery is described that has a lead negative electrode, a lead dioxide positive electrode and a sulfuric acid electrolyte having an organic catalyst dissolved therein which prevents dissolution of the electrodes into lead sulfate whereby in the course of discharge, the lead dioxide is reduced to lead oxide and the lead is oxidized.

  3. Small molecule kinase inhibitor LRRK2-IN-1 demonstrates potent activity against colorectal and pancreatic cancer through inhibition of doublecortin-like kinase 1

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Doublecortin-like kinase 1 (DCLK1) is emerging as a tumor specific stem cell marker in colorectal and pancreatic cancer. Previous in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated the therapeutic effects of inhibiting DCLK1 with small interfering RNA (siRNA) as well as genetically targeting the DCLK1+ cell for deletion. However, the effects of inhibiting DCLK1 kinase activity have not been studied directly. Therefore, we assessed the effects of inhibiting DCLK1 kinase activity using the novel small molecule kinase inhibitor, LRRK2-IN-1, which demonstrates significant affinity for DCLK1. Results Here we report that LRRK2-IN-1 demonstrates potent anti-cancer activity including inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion as well as induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Additionally we found that it regulates stemness, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and oncogenic targets on the molecular level. Moreover, we show that LRRK2-IN-1 suppresses DCLK1 kinase activity and downstream DCLK1 effector c-MYC, and demonstrate that DCLK1 kinase activity is a significant factor in resistance to LRRK2-IN-1. Conclusions Given DCLK1’s tumor stem cell marker status, a strong understanding of its biological role and interactions in gastrointestinal tumors may lead to discoveries that improve patient outcomes. The results of this study suggest that small molecule inhibitors of DCLK1 kinase should be further investigated as they may hold promise as anti-tumor stem cell drugs. PMID:24885928

  4. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, protein kinase B and ribosomal S6 kinases in the stimulation of thyroid epithelial cell proliferation by cAMP and growth factors in the presence of insulin.

    PubMed

    Coulonval, K; Vandeput, F; Stein, R C; Kozma, S C; Lamy, F; Dumont, J E

    2000-06-01

    The proliferation of most normal cells depends on the co-operation of several growth factors and hormones, each with a specific role, but the key events involved in the action of each necessary stimulant remain largely uncharacterized. In the present study, the pathways involved in the mechanism(s) of co-operation have been investigated in primary cultures of dog thyroid epithelial cells. In this physiologically relevant system, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) acting through cAMP, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and phorbol esters (such as PMA) induce DNA synthesis. Their effect requires stimulation of the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) receptor by either IGF-1 or insulin, which are not themselves mitogenic agents. In contrast, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is itself fully mitogenic. The results of the study demonstrate that cAMP, EGF, HGF and PMA stimulate p70 ribosomal S6 kinase (p70 S6 kinase). However, insulin/IGF-1 also stimulate p70 S6 kinase. Thus stimulation of p70 S6 kinase might be necessary, but is certainly not sufficient, for the induction of DNA synthesis and is not specific for any stimulated pathway. In contrast, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) and protein kinase B (PKB) activation by insulin and HGF is strong and sustained, whereas it is weak and transient with EGF and absent in the presence of TSH or PMA. These findings suggest that: (i) stimulation of PI 3-kinases and/or PKB is not involved in the cAMP-dependent pathways leading to thyrocyte proliferation, or in the action of PMA, (ii) the stimulation of the PI 3-kinase/PKB pathway may account for the permissive action of insulin/IGF-1 in the proliferation of these cells, and (iii) the stimulation of this pathway by HGF may explain why this agent does not require insulin or IGF-1 for its mitogenic action. PMID:10816429

  5. Lead Poisoning Prevention Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC.gov . Lead Home Calendar of Events National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week Archived Materials CDC's Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program Advisory Committee (ACCLPP) Current Activities Blood ...

  6. (Na+ + K+)-ATPase Is a Target for Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase/Protein Kinase B and Protein Kinase C Pathways Triggered by Albumin*

    PubMed Central

    Peruchetti, Diogo B.; Pinheiro, Ana Acacia S.; Landgraf, Sharon S.; Wengert, Mira; Takiya, Christina M.; Guggino, William B.; Caruso-Neves, Celso

    2011-01-01

    In recent decades, evidence has confirmed the crucial role of albumin in the progression of renal disease. However, the possible role of signaling pathways triggered by physiologic concentrations of albumin in the modulation of proximal tubule (PT) sodium reabsorption has not been considered. In the present work, we have shown that a physiologic concentration of albumin increases the expression of the α1 subunit of (Na+ + K+)-ATPase in LLC-PK1 cells leading to an increase in enzyme activity. This process involves the sequential activation of PI3K/protein kinase B and protein kinase C pathways promoting inhibition of protein kinase A. This integrative network is inhibited when albumin concentration is increased, similar to renal disease, leading to a decrease in the α1 subunit of (Na+ + K+)-ATPase expression. Together, the results indicate that variation in albumin concentration in PT cells has an important effect on PT sodium reabsorption and, consequently, on renal sodium excretion. PMID:22057272

  7. An isoform-selective, small-molecule inhibitor targets the autoregulatory mechanism of p21-activated kinase

    PubMed Central

    Deacon, Sean W.; Beeser, Alexander; Fukui, Jami A.; Rennefahrt, Ulrike E. E.; Myers, Cynthia; Chernoff, Jonathan; Peterson, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Autoregulatory domains found within kinases may provide more unique targets for chemical inhibitors than the conserved ATP-binding pocket targeted by most inhibitors. The kinase Pak1 contains an autoinhibitory domain that suppresses the catalytic activity of its kinase domain. Pak1 activators relieve this autoinhibition and initiate conformational rearrangements and autophosphorylation events leading to kinase activation. We developed a screen for allosteric inhibitors targeting Pak1 activation and identified the inhibitor IPA-3. Remarkably, pre-activated Pak1 is resistant to IPA-3. IPA-3 also inhibits activation of related Pak isoforms regulated by autoinhibition, but not more distantly related Paks, nor >200 other kinases tested. Pak1 inhibition by IPA-3 in live cells supports a critical role for Pak in PDGF-stimulated Erk activation. These studies illustrate a novel strategy for kinase inhibition and introduce a highly selective, cell-permeable chemical inhibitor of Pak. PMID:18420139

  8. Attenuation of pattern recognition receptor signaling is mediated by a MAP kinase kinase kinase.

    PubMed

    Mithoe, Sharon C; Ludwig, Christina; Pel, Michiel J C; Cucinotta, Mara; Casartelli, Alberto; Mbengue, Malick; Sklenar, Jan; Derbyshire, Paul; Robatzek, Silke; Pieterse, Corné M J; Aebersold, Ruedi; Menke, Frank L H

    2016-03-01

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) play a key role in plant and animal innate immunity. PRR binding of their cognate ligand triggers a signaling network and activates an immune response. Activation of PRR signaling must be controlled prior to ligand binding to prevent spurious signaling and immune activation. Flagellin perception in Arabidopsis through FLAGELLIN-SENSITIVE 2 (FLS2) induces the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and immunity. However, the precise molecular mechanism that connects activated FLS2 to downstream MAPK cascades remains unknown. Here, we report the identification of a differentially phosphorylated MAP kinase kinase kinase that also interacts with FLS2. Using targeted proteomics and functional analysis, we show that MKKK7 negatively regulates flagellin-triggered signaling and basal immunity and this requires phosphorylation of MKKK7 on specific serine residues. MKKK7 attenuates MPK6 activity and defense gene expression. Moreover, MKKK7 suppresses the reactive oxygen species burst downstream of FLS2, suggesting that MKKK7-mediated attenuation of FLS2 signaling occurs through direct modulation of the FLS2 complex. PMID:26769563

  9. Src kinase regulation by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Roskoski, Robert . E-mail: biocrr@lsuhsc.edu

    2005-05-27

    Src and Src-family protein-tyrosine kinases are regulatory proteins that play key roles in cell differentiation, motility, proliferation, and survival. The initially described phosphorylation sites of Src include an activating phosphotyrosine 416 that results from autophosphorylation, and an inhibiting phosphotyrosine 527 that results from phosphorylation by C-terminal Src kinase (Csk) and Csk homologous kinase. Dephosphorylation of phosphotyrosine 527 increases Src kinase activity. Candidate phosphotyrosine 527 phosphatases include cytoplasmic PTP1B, Shp1 and Shp2, and transmembrane enzymes include CD45, PTP{alpha}, PTP{epsilon}, and PTP{lambda}. Dephosphorylation of phosphotyrosine 416 decreases Src kinase activity. Thus far PTP-BL, the mouse homologue of human PTP-BAS, has been shown to dephosphorylate phosphotyrosine 416 in a regulatory fashion. The platelet-derived growth factor receptor protein-tyrosine kinase mediates the phosphorylation of Src Tyr138; this phosphorylation has no direct effect on Src kinase activity. The platelet-derived growth factor receptor and the ErbB2/HER2 growth factor receptor protein-tyrosine kinases mediate the phosphorylation of Src Tyr213 and activation of Src kinase activity. Src kinase is also a substrate for protein-serine/threonine kinases including protein kinase C (Ser12), protein kinase A (Ser17), and CDK1/cdc2 (Thr34, Thr46, and Ser72). Of the three protein-serine/threonine kinases, only phosphorylation by CDK1/cdc2 has been demonstrated to increase Src kinase activity. Although considerable information on the phosphoprotein phosphatases that catalyze the hydrolysis of Src phosphotyrosine 527 is at hand, the nature of the phosphatases that mediate the hydrolysis of phosphotyrosine 138 and 213, and phosphoserine and phosphothreonine residues has not been determined.

  10. The JAK kinases: not just another kinase drug discovery target.

    PubMed

    Wilks, Andrew F

    2008-08-01

    There are four members of the JAK family of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) in the human genome. Since their discovery in 1989, great strides have been made in the understanding of their role in normal intracellular signalling. Importantly, their roles in pathologies ranging from cancer to immune deficiencies have placed them front and centre as potential drug targets. The recent discovery of the role of activating mutations in the kinase-like domain (KLD) of JAK2 in the development of polycythemia rubra vera, and the elaboration of KLD mutation as a broader mechanism by which cells might become hyperproliferative has sparked enormous interest in the development of JAK selective drug candidates. I review herein the progress that has been made in the discovery of JAK-targeted inhibitors, and discuss the challenges that face the development of these drugs for use in the clinic. PMID:18721891

  11. Protein Kinase A: A Master Kinase of Granulosa Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Pawan; Little-Ihrig, Lynda; Chandran, Uma; Law, Nathan C.; Hunzicker-Dunn, Mary; Zeleznik, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    Activation of protein kinase A (PKA) by follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) transduces the signal that drives differentiation of ovarian granulosa cells (GCs). An unresolved question is whether PKA is sufficient to initiate the complex program of GC responses to FSH. We compared signaling pathways and gene expression profiles of GCs stimulated with FSH or expressing PKA-CQR, a constitutively active mutant of PKA. Both FSH and PKA-CQR stimulated the phosphorylation of proteins known to be involved in GC differentiation including CREB, ß-catenin, AKT, p42/44 MAPK, GAB2, GSK-3ß, FOXO1, and YAP. In contrast, FSH stimulated the phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase but PKA-CQR did not. Microarray analysis revealed that 85% of transcripts that were up-regulated by FSH were increased to a comparable extent by PKA-CQR and of the transcripts that were down-regulated by FSH, 76% were also down-regulated by PKA-CQR. Transcripts regulated similarly by FSH and PKA-CQR are involved in steroidogenesis and differentiation, while transcripts more robustly up-regulated by PKA-CQR are involved in ovulation. Thus, PKA, under the conditions of our experimental approach appears to function as a master upstream kinase that is sufficient to initiate the complex pattern of intracellular signaling pathway and gene expression profiles that accompany GC differentiation. PMID:27324437

  12. Src-family tyrosine kinases in activation of ERK-1 and p85/p110-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase by G/CCKB receptors.

    PubMed

    Daulhac, L; Kowalski-Chauvel, A; Pradayrol, L; Vaysse, N; Seva, C

    1999-07-16

    We have analyzed in Chinese hamster ovary cells the upstream mediators by which the G protein-coupled receptor, gastrin/CCKB, activates the extracellular-regulated kinases (ERKs) and p85/p110-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) pathways. Overexpression of an inhibitory mutant of Shc completely blocked gastrin-stimulated Shc.Grb2 complex formation but partially inhibited ERK-1 activation by this peptide. Expression of Csk, which inactivates Src-family kinases, totally inhibited gastrin-induced Src-like activity detected in anti-Src and anti-Shc precipitates but diminished by 50% Shc phosphorylation and ERK-1 activation. We observed a rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) and an increase in Src-like kinase activity in anti-IRS-1 immunoprecipitates from gastrin-stimulated cells, suggesting that IRS-1 may be a direct substrate of Src. This hypothesis was supported by the inhibition of gastrin-induced Src. IRS-1 complex formation and IRS-1 phosphorylation in Csk-transfected cells. In addition, the increase in PI 3-kinase activity measured in anti-p85 or anti-IRS-1 precipitates following gastrin stimulation was abolished by Csk. Our results demonstrate the existence of two mechanisms in gastrin-mediated ERKs activation. One requires Shc phosphorylation by Src-family kinases, and the other one is independent of these two proteins. They also indicate that tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1 by Src-family kinases could lead to the recruitment and the activation of the p85/p110-PI 3-kinase in response to gastrin. PMID:10400698

  13. Protein kinases in vascular smooth muscle tone--role in the pulmonary vasculature and hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Ward, Jeremy P T; Knock, Greg A; Snetkov, Vladimir A; Aaronson, Philip I

    2004-12-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) is an adaptive mechanism that in the normal animal diverts blood away from poorly ventilated areas of the lung, thereby maintaining optimal ventilation-perfusion matching. In global hypoxia however, such as in respiratory disease or at altitude, it causes detrimental increases in pulmonary vascular resistance and pulmonary artery (PA) pressure. The precise intracellular pathways and mechanisms underlying HPV remain unclear, although it is now recognised that both an elevation in smooth muscle intracellular [Ca2+] and a concomitant increase in Ca2+ sensitivity are involved. Several key intracellular protein kinases have been proposed as components of the signal transduction pathways leading to development of HPV, specifically Rho kinase, non-receptor tyrosine kinases (NRTK), p38 mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase, and protein kinase C (PKC). All of these have been implicated to a greater or lesser extent in pathways leading to Ca2+ sensitisation, and in some cases regulation of intracellular [Ca2+] as well. In this article, we review the role of these key protein kinases in the regulation of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) constriction, applying what is known in the systemic circulation to the pulmonary circulation and HPV. We conclude that the strongest evidence for direct involvement of protein kinases in the mechanisms of HPV concerns a central role for Rho kinase in Ca2+ sensitisation, and a potential role for Src-family kinases in both modulation of Ca2+ entry via capacitative Ca2+ entry (CCE) and activation of Rho kinase, though others are likely to have indirect or modulatory influences. In addition, we speculate that Src family kinases may provide a central interface between the proposed hypoxia-induced generation of reactive oxygen species by mitochondria and both the elevation in intracellular [Ca2+] and Rho kinase mediated Ca2+ sensitisation. PMID:15556675

  14. Rho kinase as a therapeutic target in cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Surma, Michelle; Wei, Lei; Shi, Jianjian

    2011-01-01

    Rho kinase (ROCK) belongs to the AGC (PKA/PKG/PKC) family of serine/threonine kinases and is a major downstream effector of the small GTPase RhoA. ROCK plays central roles in the organization of the actin cytoskeleton and is involved in a wide range of fundamental cellular functions such as contraction, adhesion, migration, proliferation and gene expression. Two ROCK isoforms, ROCK1 a n d ROCK2, are assumed to be functionally redundant, based largely on the major common activators, the high degree of homology within the kinase domain and studies from overexpression with kinase constructs a n d chemical inhibitors (e.g., Y27632 a n d fasudil), which inhibit both ROCK1 and ROCK2. Extensive experimental a n d clinical studies support a critical role for the RhoA/ROCK pathway in the vascular bed in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases, in which increased ROCK activity mediates vascular smooth muscle cell hypercontraction, endothelial dysfunction, inflammatory cell recruitment and vascular remodeling. Recent experimental studies, using ROCK inhibitors or genetic mouse models, indicate that the RhoA/ROCK pathway in myocardium contributes to cardiac remodeling induced by ischemic injury or persistent hypertrophic stress, thereby leading to cardiac decompensation and heart failure. This article, based on recent molecular, cellular and animal studies, focuses on the current understanding of ROCK signaling in cardiovascular diseases and in the pathogenesis of heart failure. PMID:21929346

  15. Dynamic Clustering of the Bacterial Sensory Kinase BaeS.

    PubMed

    Koler, Moriah; Frank, Vered; Amartely, Hadar; Friedler, Assaf; Vaknin, Ady

    2016-01-01

    Several bacterial sensory-kinase receptors form clusters on the cell membrane. However, the dynamics of sensory-kinase clustering are largely unclear. Using measurements of fluorescence anisotropy and time-lapse imaging of Escherichia coli cells, we demonstrate that copper ions trigger self-association of BaeS receptors and lead to rapid formation of clusters, which can be reversibly dispersed by a metal chelator. Copper ions did not trigger self-association of other fluorescently tagged sensory kinases, and other divalent metal ions could not elicit self-association of BaeS. The histidine residues in the BaeS periplasmic domain are essential for copper binding in vitro and are important for the copper-induced BaeS responses in vivo. BaeS clustering was triggered also under conditions that directly triggered BaeS-dependent transcriptional responses. Thus, clustering of sensory kinase receptors can be dynamic and context dependent and can be triggered by specific environmental cues. PMID:26950881

  16. Dynamic Clustering of the Bacterial Sensory Kinase BaeS

    PubMed Central

    Koler, Moriah; Frank, Vered; Amartely, Hadar; Friedler, Assaf; Vaknin, Ady

    2016-01-01

    Several bacterial sensory-kinase receptors form clusters on the cell membrane. However, the dynamics of sensory-kinase clustering are largely unclear. Using measurements of fluorescence anisotropy and time-lapse imaging of Escherichia coli cells, we demonstrate that copper ions trigger self-association of BaeS receptors and lead to rapid formation of clusters, which can be reversibly dispersed by a metal chelator. Copper ions did not trigger self-association of other fluorescently tagged sensory kinases, and other divalent metal ions could not elicit self-association of BaeS. The histidine residues in the BaeS periplasmic domain are essential for copper binding in vitro and are important for the copper-induced BaeS responses in vivo. BaeS clustering was triggered also under conditions that directly triggered BaeS-dependent transcriptional responses. Thus, clustering of sensory kinase receptors can be dynamic and context dependent and can be triggered by specific environmental cues. PMID:26950881

  17. Targeting protein kinases to reverse multidrug resistance in sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua; Shen, Jacson; Choy, Edwin; Hornicek, Francis J; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2016-02-01

    Sarcomas are a group of cancers that arise from transformed cells of mesenchymal origin. They can be classified into over 50 subtypes, accounting for approximately 1% of adult and 15% of pediatric cancers. Wide surgical resection, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy are the most common treatments for the majority of sarcomas. Among these therapies, chemotherapy can palliate symptoms and prolong life for some sarcoma patients. However, sarcoma cells can have intrinsic or acquired resistance after treatment with chemotherapeutics drugs, leading to the development of multidrug resistance (MDR). MDR attenuates the efficacy of anticancer drugs and results in treatment failure for sarcomas. Therefore, overcoming MDR is an unmet need for sarcoma therapy. Certain protein kinases demonstrate aberrant expression and/or activity in sarcoma cells, which have been found to be involved in the regulation of sarcoma cell progression, such as cell cycle, apoptosis, and survival. Inhibiting these protein kinases may not only decrease the proliferation and growth of sarcoma cells, but also reverse their resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs to subsequently reduce the doses of anticancer drugs and decrease drug side-effects. The discovery of novel strategies targeting protein kinases opens a door to a new area of sarcoma research and provides insight into the mechanisms of MDR in chemotherapy. This review will focus on the recent studies in targeting protein kinase to reverse chemotherapeutic drug resistance in sarcoma. PMID:26827688

  18. Kinase-dependent Regulation of Monoamine Neurotransmitter Transporters.

    PubMed

    Bermingham, Daniel P; Blakely, Randy D

    2016-10-01

    Modulation of neurotransmission by the monoamines dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE), and serotonin (5-HT) is critical for normal nervous system function. Precise temporal and spatial control of this signaling in mediated in large part by the actions of monoamine transporters (DAT, NET, and SERT, respectively). These transporters act to recapture their respective neurotransmitters after release, and disruption of clearance and reuptake has significant effects on physiology and behavior and has been linked to a number of neuropsychiatric disorders. To ensure adequate and dynamic control of these transporters, multiple modes of control have evolved to regulate their activity and trafficking. Central to many of these modes of control are the actions of protein kinases, whose actions can be direct or indirectly mediated by kinase-modulated protein interactions. Here, we summarize the current state of our understanding of how protein kinases regulate monoamine transporters through changes in activity, trafficking, phosphorylation state, and interacting partners. We highlight genetic, biochemical, and pharmacological evidence for kinase-linked control of DAT, NET, and SERT and, where applicable, provide evidence for endogenous activators of these pathways. We hope our discussion can lead to a more nuanced and integrated understanding of how neurotransmitter transporters are controlled and may contribute to disorders that feature perturbed monoamine signaling, with an ultimate goal of developing better therapeutic strategies. PMID:27591044

  19. Activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase by insulin.

    PubMed Central

    Ruderman, N B; Kapeller, R; White, M F; Cantley, L C

    1990-01-01

    Insulin action appears to require the protein-tyrosine kinase domain of the beta subunit of the insulin receptor. Despite this, the identities and biochemical functions of the cellular targets of this tyrosine kinase are unknown. A phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) that phosphorylates the D-3 position of the inositol ring associates with several protein-tyrosine kinases. Here we report that PI 3-kinase activity is immunoprecipitated from insulin-stimulated CHO cells by antiphosphotyrosine and anti-insulin receptor antibodies. Insulin as low as 0.3 nM increased immunoprecipitable PI 3-kinase activity within 1 min. Increases in activity were much greater in CHO cells expressing the human insulin receptor (100,000 receptors per cell) than in control CHO cells (2000 receptors per cell). During insulin stimulation, various lipid products of the PI 3-kinase either appeared or increased in quantity in intact cells, suggesting that the appearance of immunoprecipitable PI 3-kinase reflects an increase in its activity in vivo. These results indicate that insulin at physiological concentrations regulates the PI 3-kinase and suggest that this regulation involves a physical association between the insulin receptor and the PI 3-kinase and tyrosyl phosphorylation. Images PMID:2154747

  20. Where Will LEAD Lead? An Update on My LEAD Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildman, Louis

    Issues in the future of a federal collaborative program, Leadership in Educational Administration Development (LEAD), are discussed in this paper. Problems attributed to LEAD are its antagonistic posture to educational administration programs in higher education and political conflicts of interest. Methodology involved analysis of successful LEAD…

  1. Lead in petrol. The isotopic lead experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Facchetti, S. )

    1989-10-01

    Many studies were dedicated to the evaluation of the impact of automotive lead on the environment and to the assessment of its absorption in the human population. They can be subdivided into two groups, those based on changes of air and blood lead concentrations and those based on changes of air and blood lead isotopic compositions. According to various authors, 50-66% of the lead added to petrol is mobilized in the atmosphere, while most of the remainder adheres to the walls of the exhaust system from which it is expelled by mechanical and thermal shocks in the forms of easily sedimented particles. The fraction directly emitted by engine exhaust fumes is found in the form of fine particles, which can be transferred a long way from the emitting sources. However important the contribution of petrol lead to the total airborne lead may be, our knowledge does not permit a straightforward calculation of the percentage of petrol lead in total blood lead, which of course can also originate from other sources (e.g., industrial, natural). To evaluate this percentage in 1973, the idea of the Isotopic Lead Experiment (ILE project) was conceived to label, on a regional scale, petrol with a nonradioactive lead of an isotopic composition sufficiently different from that of background lead and sufficiently stable in time. This Account summarizes the main results obtained by the ILE project.

  2. FMLP activates Ras and Raf in human neutrophils. Potential role in activation of MAP kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Worthen, G S; Avdi, N; Buhl, A M; Suzuki, N; Johnson, G L

    1994-01-01

    Chemoattractants bind to seven transmembrane-spanning, G-protein-linked receptors on polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) and induce a variety of functional responses, including activation of microtubule-associated protein (MAP) kinase. Although the pathways by which MAP kinases are activated in neutrophils are unknown, we hypothesized that activation of the Ras/Raf pathway leading to activation of MAP/ERK kinase (MEK) would be induced by the chemoattractant f-met-leu-phe. Human neutrophils exposed to 10 nM FMLP for 30 s exhibited an MAP kinase kinase activity coeluting with MEK-1. Immunoprecipitation of Raf-1 kinase after stimulation with FMLP revealed an activity that phosphorylated MEK, was detectable at 30 s, and peaked at 2-3 min. Immunoprecipitation of Ras from both intact neutrophils labeled with [32P]orthophosphate and electropermeabilized neutrophils incubated with [32P]GTP was used to determine that FMLP treatment was associated with activation of Ras. Activation of both Ras and Raf was inhibited by treatment of neutrophils with pertussis toxin, indicating predominant linkage to the Gi2 protein. Although phorbol esters activated Raf, activation induced by FMLP appeared independent of protein kinase C, further suggesting that Gi2 was linked to Ras and Raf independent of phospholipase C and protein kinase C. Dibutyryl cAMP, which inhibits many neutrophil functional responses, blocked the activation of Raf by FMLP, suggesting that interruption of the Raf/MAP kinase pathway influences neutrophil responses to chemoattractants. These data suggest that Gi2-mediated receptor regulation of the Ras/Raf/MAP kinase pathway is a primary response to chemoattractants. Images PMID:8040337

  3. Myogenic signaling of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase requires the serine-threonine kinase Akt/protein kinase B

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bing-Hua; Aoki, Masahiro; Zheng, Jenny Z.; Li, Jian; Vogt, Peter K.

    1999-01-01

    The oncogene p3k, coding for a constitutively active form of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase), strongly activates myogenic differentiation. Inhibition of endogenous PI 3-kinase activity with the specific inhibitor LY294002, or with dominant-negative mutants of PI 3-kinase, interferes with myotube formation and with the expression of muscle-specific proteins. Here we demonstrate that a downstream target of PI 3-kinase, serine-threonine kinase Akt, plays an important role in myogenic differentiation. Expression of constitutively active forms of Akt dramatically enhances myotube formation and expression of the muscle-specific proteins MyoD, creatine kinase, myosin heavy chain, and desmin. Transdominant negative forms of Akt inhibit myotube formation and the expression of muscle-specific proteins. The inhibition of myotube formation and the reduced expression of muscle-specific proteins caused by the PI 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 are completely reversed by constitutively active forms of Akt. Wild-type cellular Akt effects a partial reversal of LY294002-induced inhibition of myogenic differentiation. This result suggests that Akt can substitute for PI 3-kinase in the stimulation of myogenesis; Akt may be an essential downstream component of PI 3-kinase-induced muscle differentiation. PMID:10051597

  4. Oncoprotein protein kinase antibody kit

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2008-12-23

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  5. Phosphoinositide 3-kinases-a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Toker, Alex

    2012-01-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-K) signal relay pathway represents arguably one of the most intensely studied mechanisms by which extracellular signals elicit cellular responses through the generation of second messengers that are associated with cell growth and transformation. This chapter reviews the many landmark discoveries in the PI 3-K signaling pathway in biology and disease, from the identification of a novel phosphoinositide kinase activity associated with transforming oncogenes in the 1980s, to the identification of oncogenic mutations in the catalytic subunit of PI 3-K in the mid 2000s. Two and a half decades of intense research have provided clear evidence that the PI 3-K pathway controls virtually all aspects of normal cellular physiology, and that deregulation of one or more proteins that regulate or transduce the PI 3-K signal ultimately leads to human pathology. The most recent efforts have focused on the development of specific PI 3-K inhibitors that are currently being evaluated in clinical trials for a range of disease states.This chapter is devoted to a historical review of the landmark findings in the PI 3-K from its relatively humble beginnings in the early to mid 1980s up until the present day. When considering the key findings in the history of PI 3-K, it is essential to recognize the landmark studies by Lowell and Mabel Hokin in the 1950s who were the first to describe that extracellular agonists such as acetylcholine could stimulate the incorporation of radiolabeled phosphate into phospholipids (Hokin and Hokin 1953). Their work initiated an entirely new field of lipid signaling, and subsequent studies in the 1970s by Michell and Lapetina who linked phosphoinositide turnover to membrane-associated receptors that initiate intracellular calcium mobilization (Lapetina and Michell 1973). Later studies revealed that the phospholipase-mediated breakdown of the same minor membrane phospholipids such as PtdIns-4,5-P(2) (phosphatidylinositol-4

  6. The Role of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase-Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKAPKs) in Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Moens, Ugo; Kostenko, Sergiy; Sveinbjørnsson, Baldur

    2013-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways are implicated in several cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, cell survival, cell motility, metabolism, stress response and inflammation. MAPK pathways transmit and convert a plethora of extracellular signals by three consecutive phosphorylation events involving a MAPK kinase kinase, a MAPK kinase, and a MAPK. In turn MAPKs phosphorylate substrates, including other protein kinases referred to as MAPK-activated protein kinases (MAPKAPKs). Eleven mammalian MAPKAPKs have been identified: ribosomal-S6-kinases (RSK1-4), mitogen- and stress-activated kinases (MSK1-2), MAPK-interacting kinases (MNK1-2), MAPKAPK-2 (MK2), MAPKAPK-3 (MK3), and MAPKAPK-5 (MK5). The role of these MAPKAPKs in inflammation will be reviewed. PMID:24705157

  7. Lead and the Romans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddy, Aravind; Braun, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    Lead poisoning has been a problem since early history and continues into modern times. An appealing characteristic of lead is that many lead salts are sweet. In the absence of cane and beet sugars, early Romans used "sugar of lead" (lead acetate) to sweeten desserts, fruits, and sour wine. People most at risk would have been those who consumed the…

  8. Anacardic acid (6-nonadecyl salicylic acid), an inhibitor of histone acetyltransferase, suppresses expression of nuclear factor-κB–regulated gene products involved in cell survival, proliferation, invasion, and inflammation through inhibition of the inhibitory subunit of nuclear factor-κBα kinase, leading to potentiation of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Bokyung; Pandey, Manoj K.; Ahn, Kwang Seok; Yi, Tingfang; Chaturvedi, Madan M.; Liu, Mingyao

    2008-01-01

    Anacardic acid (6-pentadecylsalicylic acid) is derived from traditional medicinal plants, such as cashew nuts, and has been linked to anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and radiosensitization activities through a mechanism that is not yet fully understood. Because of the role of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation in these cellular responses, we postulated that anacardic acid might interfere with this pathway. We found that this salicylic acid potentiated the apoptosis induced by cytokine and chemotherapeutic agents, which correlated with the down-regulation of various gene products that mediate proliferation (cyclin D1 and cyclooxygenase-2), survival (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, cFLIP, cIAP-1, and survivin), invasion (matrix metalloproteinase-9 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1), and angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor), all known to be regulated by the NF-κB. We found that anacardic acid inhibited both inducible and constitutive NF-κB activation; suppressed the activation of IκBα kinase that led to abrogation of phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα; inhibited acetylation and nuclear translocation of p65; and suppressed NF-κB–dependent reporter gene expression. Down-regulation of the p300 histone acetyltransferase gene by RNA interference abrogated the effect of anacardic acid on NF-κB suppression, suggesting the critical role of this enzyme. Overall, our results demonstrate a novel role for anacardic acid in potentially preventing or treating cancer through modulation of NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:18349320

  9. Selective inhibition of the kinase DYRK1A by targeting its folding process.

    PubMed

    Kii, Isao; Sumida, Yuto; Goto, Toshiyasu; Sonamoto, Rie; Okuno, Yukiko; Yoshida, Suguru; Kato-Sumida, Tomoe; Koike, Yuka; Abe, Minako; Nonaka, Yosuke; Ikura, Teikichi; Ito, Nobutoshi; Shibuya, Hiroshi; Hosoya, Takamitsu; Hagiwara, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Autophosphorylation of amino-acid residues is part of the folding process of various protein kinases. Conventional chemical screening of mature kinases has missed inhibitors that selectively interfere with the folding process. Here we report a cell-based assay that evaluates inhibition of a kinase at a transitional state during the folding process and identify a folding intermediate-selective inhibitor of dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A), which we refer to as FINDY. FINDY suppresses intramolecular autophosphorylation of Ser97 in DYRK1A in cultured cells, leading to its degradation, but does not inhibit substrate phosphorylation catalysed by the mature kinase. FINDY also suppresses Ser97 autophosphorylation of recombinant DYRK1A, suggesting direct inhibition, and shows high selectivity for DYRK1A over other DYRK family members. In addition, FINDY rescues DYRK1A-induced developmental malformations in Xenopus laevis embryos. Our study demonstrates that transitional folding intermediates of protein kinases can be targeted by small molecules, and paves the way for developing novel types of kinase inhibitors. PMID:27102360

  10. Aurora Kinase Inhibition Overcomes Cetuximab Resistance in Squamous Cell Cancer of the Head and Neck

    PubMed Central

    Hoellein, Alexander; Pickhard, Anja; von Keitz, Fabienne; Schoeffmann, Stephanie; Piontek, Guido; Rudelius, Martina; Baumgart, Anja; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Peschel, Christian; Dechow, Tobias; Bier, Henning; Keller, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Squamous cell cancer of the head and neck (SCCHN) is the sixth leading cause for cancer deaths worldwide. Despite extense knowledge of risk factors and pathogenesis about 50 percent of all patients and essentially every patient with metastatic SCCHN eventually die from this disease. We analyzed the clinical data and performed immunohistochemistry for Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Aurora kinase A (Aurora-A) expression in 180 SCCHN patients. Patients characterized by elevated EGFR and elevated Aurora-A protein expression in tumor tissue represent a risk group with poor disease-free and overall survival (EGFRlow Aurora-Alow versus EGFRhigh Aurora-Ahigh, p = 0.024). Treating SCCHN cell lines with a pan-Aurora kinase inhibitor resulted in defective cytokinesis, polyploidy and apoptosis, which was effective irrespective of the EGFR status. Combined Aurora kinase and EGFR targeting using a monoclonal anti-EGFR antibody was more effective compared to single EGFR and Aurora kinase inhibition. Comparing pan-Aurora kinase and Aurora-A targeting hints towards a strong and clinically relevant biological effect mediated via Aurora kinase B. Taken together, our findings characterize a new poor risk group in SCCHN patients defined by elevated EGFR and Aurora-A protein expression. Our results demonstrate that combined targeting of EGFR and Aurora kinases represents a therapeutic means to activate cell cycle checkpoints and apoptosis in SCCHN. PMID:21865609

  11. Investigation of potential glycogen synthase kinase 3 inhibitors using pharmacophore mapping and virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Dessalew, Nigus; Bharatam, Prasad V

    2006-09-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 is a serine/threonine kinase that has attracted significant drug discovery attention in recent years. To investigate the identification of new potential glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors, a pharmacophore mapping study was carried out using a set of 21 structurally diverse glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors. A hypothesis containing four features: two hydrophobic, one hydrogen bond donor and another hydrogen bond acceptor was found to be the best from the 10 common feature hypotheses produced by HipHop module of Catalyst. The best hypothesis has a high cost of 156.592 and higher best fit values were obtained for the 21 inhibitors using this best hypothesis than the other HipHop hypotheses. The best hypothesis was then used to screen electronically the NCI2000 database. The hits obtained were docked into glycogen synthase kinase-3beta active site. A total of five novel potential leads were proposed after: (i) visual examination of how well they dock into the glycogen synthase kinase-3beta-binding site, (ii) comparative analysis of their FlexX, G-Score, PMF-Score, ChemScore and D-Scores values, (iii) comparison of their best fit value with the known inhibitors and (iv) examination of the how the hits retain interactions with the important amino acid residues of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta-binding site. PMID:17062013

  12. Design of substrate-based BCR-ABL kinase inhibitors using the cyclotide scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yen-Hua; Henriques, Sónia T.; Wang, Conan K.; Thorstholm, Louise; Daly, Norelle L.; Kaas, Quentin; Craik, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The constitutively active tyrosine kinase BCR-ABL is the underlying cause of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Current CML treatments rely on the long-term use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), which target the ATP binding site of BCR-ABL. Over the course of treatment, 20–30% of CML patients develop TKI resistance, which is commonly attributed to point mutations in the drug-binding region. We design a new class of peptide inhibitors that target the substrate-binding site of BCR-ABL by grafting sequences derived from abltide, the optimal substrate of Abl kinase, onto a cell-penetrating cyclotide MCoTI-II. Three grafted cyclotides show significant Abl kinase inhibition in vitro in the low micromolar range using a novel kinase inhibition assay. Our work also demonstrates that a reengineered MCoTI-II with abltide sequences grafted in both loop 1 and 6 inhibits the activity of [T315I]Abl in vitro, a mutant Abl kinase harboring the “gatekeeper” mutation which is notorious for being multidrug resistant. Results from serum stability and cell internalization studies confirm that the MCoTI-II scaffold provides enzymatic stability and cell-penetrating properties to the lead molecules. Taken together, our study highlights that reengineered cyclotides incorporating abltide-derived sequences are promising substrate-competitive inhibitors for Abl kinase and the T315I mutant. PMID:26264857

  13. Selective inhibition of the kinase DYRK1A by targeting its folding process

    PubMed Central

    Kii, Isao; Sumida, Yuto; Goto, Toshiyasu; Sonamoto, Rie; Okuno, Yukiko; Yoshida, Suguru; Kato-Sumida, Tomoe; Koike, Yuka; Abe, Minako; Nonaka, Yosuke; Ikura, Teikichi; Ito, Nobutoshi; Shibuya, Hiroshi; Hosoya, Takamitsu; Hagiwara, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Autophosphorylation of amino-acid residues is part of the folding process of various protein kinases. Conventional chemical screening of mature kinases has missed inhibitors that selectively interfere with the folding process. Here we report a cell-based assay that evaluates inhibition of a kinase at a transitional state during the folding process and identify a folding intermediate-selective inhibitor of dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A), which we refer to as FINDY. FINDY suppresses intramolecular autophosphorylation of Ser97 in DYRK1A in cultured cells, leading to its degradation, but does not inhibit substrate phosphorylation catalysed by the mature kinase. FINDY also suppresses Ser97 autophosphorylation of recombinant DYRK1A, suggesting direct inhibition, and shows high selectivity for DYRK1A over other DYRK family members. In addition, FINDY rescues DYRK1A-induced developmental malformations in Xenopus laevis embryos. Our study demonstrates that transitional folding intermediates of protein kinases can be targeted by small molecules, and paves the way for developing novel types of kinase inhibitors. PMID:27102360

  14. Lead levels - blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to screen people at risk for lead poisoning. This may include industrial workers and children who ... also used to measure how well treatment for lead poisoning is working. Lead is common in the environment, ...

  15. Protein Kinase C Enzymes in the Hematopoietic and Immune Systems.

    PubMed

    Altman, Amnon; Kong, Kok-Fai

    2016-05-20

    The protein kinase C (PKC) family, discovered in the late 1970s, is composed of at least 10 serine/threonine kinases, divided into three groups based on their molecular architecture and cofactor requirements. PKC enzymes have been conserved throughout evolution and are expressed in virtually all cell types; they represent critical signal transducers regulating cell activation, differentiation, proliferation, death, and effector functions. PKC family members play important roles in a diverse array of hematopoietic and immune responses. This review covers the discovery and history of this enzyme family, discusses the roles of PKC enzymes in the development and effector functions of major hematopoietic and immune cell types, and points out gaps in our knowledge, which should ignite interest and further exploration, ultimately leading to better understanding of this enzyme family and, above all, its role in the many facets of the immune system. PMID:27168244

  16. Involvement of Src kinases and PLCγ2 in clot retraction

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki-Inoue, Katsue; Hughes, Craig E.; Inoue, Osamu; Kaneko, Makoto; Cuyun-Lira, Olga; Takafuta, Toshiro; Watson, Steve P.; Ozaki, Yukio

    2007-01-01

    The integrin αIIbβ3 plays a critical role in mediating clot retraction by platelets which is important in vivo in consolidating thrombus formation. Actin–myosin interaction is essential for clot retraction. In the present study, we demonstrate that the structurally distinct Src kinase inhibitors, PP2 and PD173952, significantly reduced the rate of clot retraction, but did not prevent it reaching completion. This effect was accompanied by abolition of αIIbβ3-dependent protein tyrosine phosphorylation, including PLCγ2. A role for PLCγ2 in mediating clot retraction was demonstrated using PLCγ2-deficient murine platelets. Furthermore, platelet adhesion to fibrinogen leads to MLC phosphorylation through a pathway that is inhibited by PP2 and by the PLC inhibitor, U73122. These results demonstrate a partial role for Src kinase-dependent activation of PLCγ2 and MLC phosphorylation in mediating clot retraction downstream of integrin αIIbβ3. PMID:17055557

  17. In-situ coupling between kinase activities and protein dynamics within single focal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yiqian; Zhang, Kaiwen; Seong, Jihye; Fan, Jason; Chien, Shu; Wang, Yingxiao; Lu, Shaoying

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic activation of oncogenic kinases and regulation of focal adhesions (FAs) are crucial molecular events modulating cell adhesion in cancer metastasis. However, it remains unclear how these events are temporally coordinated at single FA sites. Therefore, we targeted fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensors toward subcellular FAs to report local molecular events during cancer cell adhesion. Employing single FA tracking and cross-correlation analysis, we quantified the dynamic coupling characteristics between biochemical kinase activities and structural FA within single FAs. We show that kinase activations and FA assembly are strongly and sequentially correlated, with the concurrent FA assembly and Src activation leading focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activation by 42.6 ± 12.6 sec. Strikingly, the temporal coupling between kinase activation and individual FA assembly reflects the fate of FAs at later stages. The FAs with a tight coupling tend to grow and mature, while the less coupled FAs likely disassemble. During FA disassembly, however, kinase activations lead the disassembly, with FAK being activated earlier than Src. Therefore, by integrating subcellularly targeted FRET biosensors and computational analysis, our study reveals intricate interplays between Src and FAK in regulating the dynamic life of single FAs in cancer cells. PMID:27383747

  18. In-situ coupling between kinase activities and protein dynamics within single focal adhesions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yiqian; Zhang, Kaiwen; Seong, Jihye; Fan, Jason; Chien, Shu; Wang, Yingxiao; Lu, Shaoying

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic activation of oncogenic kinases and regulation of focal adhesions (FAs) are crucial molecular events modulating cell adhesion in cancer metastasis. However, it remains unclear how these events are temporally coordinated at single FA sites. Therefore, we targeted fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensors toward subcellular FAs to report local molecular events during cancer cell adhesion. Employing single FA tracking and cross-correlation analysis, we quantified the dynamic coupling characteristics between biochemical kinase activities and structural FA within single FAs. We show that kinase activations and FA assembly are strongly and sequentially correlated, with the concurrent FA assembly and Src activation leading focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activation by 42.6 ± 12.6 sec. Strikingly, the temporal coupling between kinase activation and individual FA assembly reflects the fate of FAs at later stages. The FAs with a tight coupling tend to grow and mature, while the less coupled FAs likely disassemble. During FA disassembly, however, kinase activations lead the disassembly, with FAK being activated earlier than Src. Therefore, by integrating subcellularly targeted FRET biosensors and computational analysis, our study reveals intricate interplays between Src and FAK in regulating the dynamic life of single FAs in cancer cells. PMID:27383747

  19. Hypothermia-induced hyperphosphorylation: a new model to study tau kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Bretteville, Alexis; Marcouiller, François; Julien, Carl; El Khoury, Noura B.; Petry, Franck R.; Poitras, Isabelle; Mouginot, Didier; Lévesque, Georges; Hébert, Sébastien S.; Planel, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    Tau hyperphosphorylation is one hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. Pharmaceutical companies have thus developed kinase inhibitors aiming to reduce tau hyperphosphorylation. One obstacle in screening for tau kinase inhibitors is the low phosphorylation levels of AD-related phospho-epitopes in normal adult mice and cultured cells. We have shown that hypothermia induces tau hyperphosphorylation in vitro and in vivo. Here, we hypothesized that hypothermia could be used to assess tau kinase inhibitors efficacy. Hypothermia applied to models of biological gradual complexity such as neuronal-like cells, ex vivo brain slices and adult non-transgenic mice leads to tau hyperphosphorylation at multiple AD-related phospho-epitopes. We show that Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 inhibitors LiCl and AR-A014418, as well as roscovitine, a cyclin-dependent kinase 5 inhibitor, decrease hypothermia-induced tau hyperphosphorylation, leading to different tau phosphorylation profiles. Therefore, we propose hypothermia-induced hyperphosphorylation as a reliable, fast, convenient and inexpensive tool to screen for tau kinase inhibitors. PMID:22761989

  20. Role(s) of IL-2 inducible T cell kinase and Bruton's tyrosine kinase in mast cell response to lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weishan; August, Avery

    2016-06-01

    Mast cells play critical roles during immune responses to the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) that can lead to fatal septic hypothermia [1], [2], [3]. IL-2 inducible T cell kinase (ITK) and Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) are non-receptor tyrosine kinases that act downstream of numerous receptors, and have been shown to modulate mast cell responses downstream of FcεRIα [4], however, their roles in regulating mast cell responses to endotoxic stimuli were unclear. We found that the absence of ITK and BTK alters the mast cell response to LPS, and leads to enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine production by mast cells and more severe LPS-induced hypothermia in mice [5]. Here, we detail our investigation using microarray analysis to study the transcriptomic profiles of mast cell responses to LPS, and the roles of ITK and/or BTK expression in this process. Mouse whole genome array data of WT, Itk (-/-) , Btk (-/-) , and Itk (-/-)  Btk (-/-) bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) stimulated by PBS (control) or LPS for 1 h were used in our latest research article [5] and is available in the Gene Expression Omnibus under accession number GSE64287. PMID:27081634

  1. Labeling and Identification of Direct Kinase Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Scott M.; White, Forest M.

    2013-01-01

    Identifying kinase substrates is an important step in mapping signal transduction pathways, but remains a difficult and time-consuming process. Analog-sensitive kinases (AS-kinases) have been used to selectively tag and identify direct kinase substrates in lysates from whole cells. In this approach a gamma-thiol ATP-analog and AS-kinase are used to selectively thiophosphorylate target proteins. Thiophosphate is used as a chemical handle to purify peptides from a tryptic digest, and target proteins are identified by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Here, we describe an updated strategy for labeling AS-kinase substrates, solid-phase capture of thiophosphorylated peptides, incorporation of stable-isotopic labeling in cell culture (SILAC) for filtering nonspecific background peptides, enrichment of phosphorylated target peptides to identify low-abundance targets, and analysis by LC-MS/MS. PMID:22669844

  2. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases in Drosophila Development

    PubMed Central

    Sopko, Richelle; Perrimon, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation plays a significant role in a wide range of cellular processes. The Drosophila genome encodes more than 20 receptor tyrosine kinases and extensive studies in the past 20 years have illustrated their diverse roles and complex signaling mechanisms. Although some receptor tyrosine kinases have highly specific functions, others strikingly are used in rather ubiquitous manners. Receptor tyrosine kinases regulate a broad expanse of processes, ranging from cell survival and proliferation to differentiation and patterning. Remarkably, different receptor tyrosine kinases share many of the same effectors and their hierarchical organization is retained in disparate biological contexts. In this comprehensive review, we summarize what is known regarding each receptor tyrosine kinase during Drosophila development. Astonishingly, very little is known for approximately half of all Drosophila receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:23732470

  3. Regulation of Sphingolipid Biosynthesis by the Morphogenesis Checkpoint Kinase Swe1*

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Neha; Han, Gongshe; Somashekarappa, Niranjanakumari; Gable, Kenneth; Dunn, Teresa; Kohlwein, Sepp D.

    2016-01-01

    Sphingolipid (SL) biosynthesis is negatively regulated by the highly conserved endoplasmic reticulum-localized Orm family proteins. Defective SL synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae leads to increased phosphorylation and inhibition of Orm proteins by the kinase Ypk1. Here we present evidence that the yeast morphogenesis checkpoint kinase, Swe1, regulates SL biosynthesis independent of the Ypk1 pathway. Deletion of the Swe1 kinase renders mutant cells sensitive to serine palmitoyltransferase inhibition due to impaired sphingoid long-chain base synthesis. Based on these data and previous results, we suggest that Swe1 kinase perceives alterations in SL homeostasis, activates SL synthesis, and may thus represent the missing regulatory link that controls the SL rheostat during the cell cycle. PMID:26634277

  4. Structures of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases reveal mechanism of activation by calcium

    PubMed Central

    Wernimont, Amy K.; Artz, Jennifer D.; Finerty, Patrick; Lin, Y.; Amani, Mehrnaz; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Senisterra, Guillermo; Vedadi, Masoud; Tempel, Wolfram; Mackenzie, Farrell; Chau, Irene; Lourido, Sebastian; Sibley, L. David; Hui, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) play pivotal roles in the calcium-signaling pathway in plants, ciliates and apicomplexan parasites, and comprise a CaMK-like kinase domain regulated by a calcium-binding domain in the C-terminus. To understand this intramolecular mechanism of activation, we solved the structures of the autoinhibited (apo) and activated (calcium-bound) conformations of CDPKs from the apicomplexan parasites Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum. In the apo form, the C-terminal CDPK activation domain (CAD) resembles a calmodulin protein with an unexpected long helix in the N-terminus that inhibits the kinase domain in the same manner as CaMKII. Calcium binding triggers the reorganization of the CAD into a highly intricate fold, leading to its relocation around the base of the kinase domain to a site remote from the substrate-binding site. This large conformational change constitutes a distinct mechanism in calcium signal transduction pathways. PMID:20436473

  5. Regulation of Sphingolipid Biosynthesis by the Morphogenesis Checkpoint Kinase Swe1.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Neha; Han, Gongshe; Somashekarappa, Niranjanakumari; Gable, Kenneth; Dunn, Teresa; Kohlwein, Sepp D

    2016-01-29

    Sphingolipid (SL) biosynthesis is negatively regulated by the highly conserved endoplasmic reticulum-localized Orm family proteins. Defective SL synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae leads to increased phosphorylation and inhibition of Orm proteins by the kinase Ypk1. Here we present evidence that the yeast morphogenesis checkpoint kinase, Swe1, regulates SL biosynthesis independent of the Ypk1 pathway. Deletion of the Swe1 kinase renders mutant cells sensitive to serine palmitoyltransferase inhibition due to impaired sphingoid long-chain base synthesis. Based on these data and previous results, we suggest that Swe1 kinase perceives alterations in SL homeostasis, activates SL synthesis, and may thus represent the missing regulatory link that controls the SL rheostat during the cell cycle. PMID:26634277

  6. The role and targeting of Aurora kinases in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mehra, Ranee; Serebriiskii, Ilya G.; Burtness, Barbara; Astsaturov, Igor; Golemis, Erica A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Controlled activation of the Aurora kinases regulates mitotic progression in normal cells. Overexpression and hyperactivation of the Aurora-A and -B kinases play a leading role in tumorigenesis, inducing aneuploidy and genomic instability. In squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHN), overexpression of Aurora-A is associated with decreased survival, and reduction of Aurora-A and -B expression inhibits SCCHN cell growth and increases apoptosis. In this article, we provide a basic overview of the biological functions of Aurora kinases in normal cells and in cancer, and review both small studies and high throughput datasets that implicate Aurora-A, particularly, in the pathogenesis of SCCHN. Early phase clinical trials are beginning to evaluate the activity of small molecule inhibitors of the Aurora kinases. We summarize the state of current trials evaluating Aurora inhibitors in SCCHN, and discuss rational directions for future drug combination trials and biomarkers for use with Aurora-inhibiting agents. PMID:23993387

  7. KinMutBase, a database of human disease-causing protein kinase mutations.

    PubMed

    Stenberg, K A; Riikonen, P T; Vihinen, M

    1999-01-01

    KinMutBase (http://www.uta.fi/laitokset/imt/KinMut Base.html) is a registry of mutations in human protein kinases related to disorders. Kinases are essential cellular signalling molecules, in which mutations can lead into diseases including, e.g., immunodeficiencies, cancers and endocrine disorders. The first release of KinMutBase contains information for nine protein tyrosine kinases. There are altogether 170 entries representing 273 families and 403 patients. Mutations appear both in conserved hallmark residues of the kinases as well as in non-homologous sites. The KinMutBase WWW pages provide plenty of information, namely mutation statistics and display, clickable sequences with mutations, restriction enzyme patterns and online submission. PMID:9847229

  8. Discovery of Bivalent Kinase Inhibitors via Enzyme-Templated Fragment Elaboration

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We have employed novel fragment-based screening methodology to discover bivalent kinase inhibitors with improved selectivity. Starting from a low molecular weight promiscuous kinase inhibitor, we appended a thiol for subsequent reaction with a library of acrylamide electrophiles. Enzyme-templated screening was performed to identify acrylamides that assemble into bivalent inhibitors of c-Src kinase. Upon identification of acrylamide fragments that improve the binding affinity of our lead thiol, we characterized the resulting bivalent inhibitors and identified a series of kinase inhibitors with improved potency and selectivity compared to the thiol-containing precursor. Provided that protein can be prepared free of endogenous reactive cysteines, our methodology is general and could be applied to nearly any enzyme of interest. PMID:26286460

  9. Long Wavelength Monitoring of Protein Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Oien, Nathan P.; Nguyen, Luong T.; Jernigan, Finith E.; Priestman, Melanie A.

    2014-01-01

    A family of long wavelength protein kinase fluorescent reporters is described in which the probing wavelength is pre-programmed using readily available fluorophores. These agents can assess protein kinase activity within the optical window of tissue, as exemplified by monitoring endogenous cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity (1) in erythrocyte lysates and (2) in intact erythrocytes using a light-activatable reporter. PMID:24604833

  10. Protein synthesis inhibitors reveal differential regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase and stress-activated protein kinase pathways that converge on Elk-1.

    PubMed Central

    Zinck, R; Cahill, M A; Kracht, M; Sachsenmaier, C; Hipskind, R A; Nordheim, A

    1995-01-01

    Inhibitors of protein synthesis, such as anisomycin and cycloheximide, lead to superinduction of immediate-early genes. We demonstrate that these two drugs activate intracellular signaling pathways involving both the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) cascades. The activation of either pathway correlates with phosphorylation of the c-fos regulatory transcription factor Elk-1. In HeLa cells, anisomycin stabilizes c-fos mRNA when protein synthesis is inhibited to only 50%. Under these conditions, anisomycin, in contrast to cycloheximide, rapidly induces kinase activation and efficient Elk-1 phosphorylation. However, full inhibition of translation by either drug leads to prolonged activation of SAPK activity, while MAPK induction is transient. This correlates with prolonged Elk-1 phosphorylation and c-fos transcription. Elk-1 induction and c-fos activation are also observed in KB cells, in which anisomycin strongly induces SAPKs but not MAPKs. Purified p54 SAPK alpha efficiently phosphorylates the Elk-1 C-terminal domain in vitro and comigrates with anisomycin-activated kinases in in-gel kinase assays. Thus, Elk-1 provides a potential convergence point for the MAPK and SAPK signaling pathways. The activation of signal cascades and control of transcription factor function therefore represent prominent processes in immediate-early gene superinduction. PMID:7651411

  11. Pivotal Role of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase-Activated Protein Kinase 2 in Inflammatory Pulmonary Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Feng; Deng, Jing; Wang, Gang; Ye, Richard D.; Christman, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-activated protein kinase (MK2) is exclusively regulated by p38 MAPK in vivo. Upon activation of p38 MAPK, MK2 binds with p38 MAPK, leading to phosphorylation of TTP, Hsp27, Akt and Cdc25 that are involved in regulation of various essential cellular functions. In this review, we discuss current knowledge about molecular mechanisms of MK2 in regulation of TNF-α production, NADPH oxidase activation, neutrophil migration, and DNA-damage-induced cell cycle arrest which are involved in the molecular pathogenesis of acute lung injury, pulmonary fibrosis, and non-small-cell lung cancer. Collectively current and emerging new information indicate that developing MK2 inhibitors and blocking MK2-mediated signal pathways is a potential therapeutic strategy for treatment of inflammatory and fibrotic lung diseases and lung cancer. PMID:26119506

  12. Tec family kinases in inflammation and disease.

    PubMed

    Horwood, Nicole J; Urbaniak, Ania M; Danks, Lynett

    2012-04-01

    Over the last decade, the Tec family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (Btk, Tec, Bmx, Itk, and Rlk) have been shown to play a key role in inflammation and bone destruction. Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) has been the most widely studied due to the critical role of this kinase in B-cell development and recent evidence showing that blocking Btk signaling is effective in ameliorating lymphoma progression and experimental arthritis. This review will examine the role of TFK in myeloid cell function and the potential of targeting these kinases as a therapeutic intervention in autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:22449071

  13. MST kinases in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian MST kinase family, which is related to the Hippo kinase in Drosophila melanogaster, includes five related proteins: MST1 (also called STK4), MST2 (also called STK3), MST3 (also called STK24), MST4, and YSK1 (also called STK25 or SOK1). MST kinases are emerging as key signaling molecules that influence cell proliferation, organ size, cell migration, and cell polarity. Here we review the regulation and function of these kinases in normal physiology and pathologies, including cancer, endothelial malformations, and autoimmune disease. PMID:26370497

  14. A new “angle” on kinase inhibitor design: Prioritizing amphosteric activity above kinase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Meyerowitz, Justin G; Weiss, William A; Gustafson, W Clay

    2015-01-01

    The MYCN oncoprotein has remained an elusive target for decades. We recently reported a new class of kinase inhibitors designed to disrupt the conformation of Aurora kinase A enough to block its kinase-independent interaction with MYCN, resulting in potent degradation of MYCN. These studies provide proof-of-principle for a new method of targeting enzyme activity-independent functions of kinases and other enzymes. PMID:27308435

  15. Dynamic Allostery Mediated by a Conserved Tryptophan in the Tec Family Kinases.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Nikita; Wales, Thomas E; Joseph, Raji E; Boyken, Scott E; Engen, John R; Jernigan, Robert L; Andreotti, Amy H

    2016-03-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a Tec family non-receptor tyrosine kinase that plays a critical role in immune signaling and is associated with the immunological disorder X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA). Our previous findings showed that the Tec kinases are allosterically activated by the adjacent N-terminal linker. A single tryptophan residue in the N-terminal 17-residue linker mediates allosteric activation, and its mutation to alanine leads to the complete loss of activity. Guided by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry results, we have employed Molecular Dynamics simulations, Principal Component Analysis, Community Analysis and measures of node centrality to understand the details of how a single tryptophan mediates allostery in Btk. A specific tryptophan side chain rotamer promotes the functional dynamic allostery by inducing coordinated motions that spread across the kinase domain. Either a shift in the rotamer population, or a loss of the tryptophan side chain by mutation, drastically changes the coordinated motions and dynamically isolates catalytically important regions of the kinase domain. This work also identifies a new set of residues in the Btk kinase domain with high node centrality values indicating their importance in transmission of dynamics essential for kinase activation. Structurally, these node residues appear in both lobes of the kinase domain. In the N-lobe, high centrality residues wrap around the ATP binding pocket connecting previously described Catalytic-spine residues. In the C-lobe, two high centrality node residues connect the base of the R- and C-spines on the αF-helix. We suggest that the bridging residues that connect the catalytic and regulatory architecture within the kinase domain may be a crucial element in transmitting information about regulatory spine assembly to the catalytic machinery of the catalytic spine and active site. PMID:27010561

  16. Dynamic Allostery Mediated by a Conserved Tryptophan in the Tec Family Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Nikita; Wales, Thomas E.; Joseph, Raji E.; Boyken, Scott E.; Engen, John R.; Jernigan, Robert L.; Andreotti, Amy H.

    2016-01-01

    Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a Tec family non-receptor tyrosine kinase that plays a critical role in immune signaling and is associated with the immunological disorder X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA). Our previous findings showed that the Tec kinases are allosterically activated by the adjacent N-terminal linker. A single tryptophan residue in the N-terminal 17-residue linker mediates allosteric activation, and its mutation to alanine leads to the complete loss of activity. Guided by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry results, we have employed Molecular Dynamics simulations, Principal Component Analysis, Community Analysis and measures of node centrality to understand the details of how a single tryptophan mediates allostery in Btk. A specific tryptophan side chain rotamer promotes the functional dynamic allostery by inducing coordinated motions that spread across the kinase domain. Either a shift in the rotamer population, or a loss of the tryptophan side chain by mutation, drastically changes the coordinated motions and dynamically isolates catalytically important regions of the kinase domain. This work also identifies a new set of residues in the Btk kinase domain with high node centrality values indicating their importance in transmission of dynamics essential for kinase activation. Structurally, these node residues appear in both lobes of the kinase domain. In the N-lobe, high centrality residues wrap around the ATP binding pocket connecting previously described Catalytic-spine residues. In the C-lobe, two high centrality node residues connect the base of the R- and C-spines on the αF-helix. We suggest that the bridging residues that connect the catalytic and regulatory architecture within the kinase domain may be a crucial element in transmitting information about regulatory spine assembly to the catalytic machinery of the catalytic spine and active site. PMID:27010561

  17. Inhibition of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway triggers B16 melanoma cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Englaro, W; Bertolotto, C; Buscà, R; Brunet, A; Pagès, G; Ortonne, J P; Ballotti, R

    1998-04-17

    In B16 melanoma cells, mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases are activated during cAMP-induced melanogenesis (Englaro, W., Rezzonico, R., Durand-Clément, M., Lallemand, D., Ortonne, J. P., and Ballotti, R. (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 24315-24320). To establish the role of the MAP kinases in melanogenesis, we studied the effects of a specific MAP kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor PD 98059 on different melanogenic parameters. We showed that PD 98059 inhibits the activation of MAP kinase extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 by cAMP, but does not impair the effects of cAMP either on the morphological differentiation, characterized by an increase in dendrite outgrowth, or on the up-regulation of tyrosinase that is the key enzyme in melanogenesis. On the contrary, PD 98059 promotes by itself cell dendricity and increases the tyrosinase amount and activity. Moreover, down-regulation of the MAP kinase pathway by PD 98059, or with dominant negative mutants of p21(ras) and MEK, triggers a stimulation of the tyrosinase promoter activity and enhances the effect of cAMP on this parameter. Conversely, activation of the MAP kinase pathway, using constitutive active mutants of p21(ras) and MEK, leads to an inhibition of basal and cAMP-induced tyrosinase gene transcription. These results demonstrate that the MAP kinase pathway activation is not required for cAMP-induced melanogenesis. Furthermore, the inhibition of this pathway induces B16 melanoma cell differentiation, while a sustained activation impairs the melanogenic effect of cAMP-elevating agents. PMID:9545341

  18. Lead Surveillance Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Background on lead exposure is presented including forms of lead, sources, hematologic effects, neurologic effects, endocrine effects, renal effects, and reproductive and developmental effects. The purpose of the Lead Surveillance Program at LeRC is outlined, and the specifics of the Medical Surveillance Program for Lead Exposure at LeRC are discussed.

  19. Sensitive kinase assay linked with phosphoproteomics for identifying direct kinase substrates.

    PubMed

    Xue, Liang; Wang, Wen-Horng; Iliuk, Anton; Hu, Lianghai; Galan, Jacob A; Yu, Shuai; Hans, Michael; Geahlen, Robert L; Tao, W Andy

    2012-04-10

    Our understanding of the molecular control of many disease pathologies requires the identification of direct substrates targeted by specific protein kinases. Here we describe an integrated proteomic strategy, termed kinase assay linked with phosphoproteomics, which combines a sensitive kinase reaction with endogenous kinase-dependent phosphoproteomics to identify direct substrates of protein kinases. The unique in vitro kinase reaction is carried out in a highly efficient manner using a pool of peptides derived directly from cellular kinase substrates and then dephosphorylated as substrate candidates. The resulting newly phosphorylated peptides are then isolated and identified by mass spectrometry. A further comparison of these in vitro phosphorylated peptides with phosphopeptides derived from endogenous proteins isolated from cells in which the kinase is either active or inhibited reveals new candidate protein substrates. The kinase assay linked with phosphoproteomics strategy was applied to identify unique substrates of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), a protein-tyrosine kinase with duel properties of an oncogene and a tumor suppressor in distinctive cell types. We identified 64 and 23 direct substrates of Syk specific to B cells and breast cancer cells, respectively. Both known and unique substrates, including multiple centrosomal substrates for Syk, were identified, supporting a unique mechanism that Syk negatively affects cell division through its centrosomal kinase activity. PMID:22451900

  20. Diacylglycerol kinases in membrane trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Shuwei; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) belong to a family of cytosolic kinases that regulate the phosphorylation of diacylglycerol (DAG), converting it into phosphatidic acid (PA). There are 10 known mammalian DGK isoforms, each with a different tissue distribution and substrate specificity. These differences allow regulation of cellular responses by fine-tuning the delicate balance of cellular DAG and PA. DGK isoforms are best characterized as mediators of signal transduction and immune function. However, since recent studies reveal that DAG and PA are also involved in the regulation of endocytic trafficking, it is therefore anticipated that DGKs also plays an important role in membrane trafficking. In this review, we summarize the literature discussing the role of DGK isoforms at different stages of endocytic trafficking, including endocytosis, exocytosis, endocytic recycling, and transport from/to the Golgi apparatus. Overall, these studies contribute to our understanding of the involvement of PA and DAG in endocytic trafficking, an area of research that is drawing increasing attention in recent years. PMID:27057419

  1. Interleukin-20 Promotes Migration of Bladder Cancer Cells through Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase (ERK)-mediated MMP-9 Protein Expression Leading to Nuclear Factor (NF-κB) Activation by Inducing the Up-regulation of p21WAF1 Protein Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Se-Jung; Cho, Seok-Cheol; Lee, Eo-Jin; Kim, Sangtae; Lee, Soo-Bok; Lim, Jung-Hyurk; Choi, Yung Hyun; Kim, Wun-Jae; Moon, Sung-Kwon

    2013-01-01

    The role of inflammatory cytokine interleukin-20 (IL-20) has not yet been studied in cancer biology. Here, we demonstrated up-regulation of both IL-20 and IL-20R1 in muscle-invasive bladder cancer patients. The expressions of IL-20 and IL-20R1 were observed in bladder cancer 5637 and T-24 cells. We found that IL-20 significantly increased the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 via binding activity of NF-κB and AP-1 in bladder cancer cells and stimulated the activation of ERK1/2, JNK, p38 MAPK, and JAK-STAT signaling. Among the pathways examined, only ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 significantly inhibited IL-20-induced migration and invasion. Moreover, siRNA knockdown of IL-20R1 suppressed migration, invasion, ERK1/2 activation, and NF-κB-mediated MMP-9 expression induced by IL-20. Unexpectedly, the cell cycle inhibitor p21WAF1 was induced by IL-20 treatment without altering cell cycle progression. Blockade of p21WAF1 function by siRNA reversed migration, invasion, activation of ERK signaling, MMP-9 expression, and activation of NF-κB in IL-20-treated cells. In addition, IL-20 induced the activation of IκB kinase, the degradation and phosphorylation of IκBα, and NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation, which was regulated by ERK1/2. IL-20 stimulated the recruitment of p65 to the MMP-9 promoter region. Finally, the IL-20-induced migration and invasion of cells was confirmed by IL-20 gene transfection and by addition of anti-IL-20 antibody. This is the first report that p21WAF1 is involved in ERK1/2-mediated MMP-9 expression via increased binding activity of NF-κB, which resulted in the induction of migration in IL-20/IL-20R1 dyad-induced bladder cancer cells. These unexpected results might provide a critical new target for the treatment of bladder cancer. PMID:23271730

  2. Toxicokinetics of bone lead.

    PubMed Central

    Rabinowitz, M B

    1991-01-01

    This article discusses bone as a source of lead to the rest of the body and as a record of past lead exposure. Bone lead levels generally increase with age at rates dependent on the skeletal site and lead exposure. After occupational exposure, the slow decline in blood lead, a 5- to 19-year half-life, reflects the long skeletal half-life. Repeated measurements of bone lead demonstrate the slow elimination of lead from bone. Stable isotope ratios have revealed many details of skeletal uptake and subsequent release. The bulk turnover rates for compact bone are about 2% per year and 8% for spine. Turnover activity varies with age and health. Even though lead approximates calcium, radium, strontium, barium, fluorine, and other bone seekers, the rates for each are different. A simple, two-pool (bone and blood) kinetic model is presented with proposed numerical values for the changes in blood lead levels that occur with changes in turnover rates. Two approaches are offered to further quantify lead turnover. One involves a study of subjects with known past exposure. Changes in the ratio of blood lead to bone lead with time would reflect the course of bone lead availability. Also, stable isotopes and subjects who move from one geographical area to another offer opportunities. Sequential isotope measurements would indicate how much of the lead in blood is from current exposure or bone stores, distinct from changes in absorption or excretion. PMID:2040248

  3. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases with Intracellular Pseudokinase Domains

    PubMed Central

    Mendrola, Jeannine M.; Shi, Fumin; Park, Jin H.; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    As with other groups of protein kinases, approximately 10% of the receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) in the human proteome contain intracellular pseudokinases that lack one or more conserved catalytically important residues. These include ErbB3, a member of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family, and a series of unconventional Wnt receptors. We recently showed that, despite its reputation as a pseudokinase, the ErbB3 tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) does retain significant – albeit weak – kinase activity. This led us to suggest that a subgroup of RTKs may be able to signal even with very inefficient kinases. Recent work suggests that this is not the case, however. Other pseudokinase RTKs have not revealed significant kinase activity, and mutations that impair ErbB3’s weak kinase activity have not so far been found to exhibit signaling defects. These findings therefore point to models in which the TKDs of pseudokinase RTKs participate in receptor signaling by allosterically regulating associated kinases (such as ErbB3 regulation of ErbB2) and/or function as regulated ‘scaffolds’ for other intermolecular interactions central to signal propagation. Further structural and functional studies – particularly of the pseudokinase RTKs involved in Wnt signaling – are required to shed new light on these intriguing signaling mechanisms. PMID:23863174

  4. Genetics Home Reference: pyruvate kinase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... National (UK) Information Centre for Metabolic Diseases National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD): Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency Genetic Testing Registry (1 link) Pyruvate kinase deficiency of red cells Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (1 link) ...

  5. Sequential Transphosphorylation of the BRI1/BAK1 Receptor Kinase Pair Regulates Early Events of the Brassinosteriod Signaling Pathway Promoting Plant Growth and Development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development through a signal transduction pathway that is initiated by BR binding to the transmembrane receptor kinase BRI1. Activated BRI1 heterodimerizes with a second receptor kinase, BAK1, leading to enhanced signaling output. ...

  6. Coronary Sinus Lead Extraction.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Edmond M; Wilkoff, Bruce L

    2015-12-01

    Expanded indications for cardiac resynchronization therapy and the increasing incidence of cardiac implantable electronic device infection have led to an increased need for coronary sinus (CS) lead extraction. The CS presents unique anatomical obstacles to successful lead extraction. Training and facility requirements for CS lead extraction should mirror those for other leads. Here we review the indications, technique, and results of CS lead extraction. Published success rates and complications are similar to those reported for other leads, although multiple techniques may be required. Re-implantation options may be limited, which should be incorporated into pre-procedural decision making. PMID:26596810

  7. MAP4K Family Kinases in Immunity and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Huai-Chia; Wang, Xiaohong; Tan, Tse-Hua

    2016-01-01

    MAP kinase kinase kinase kinases (MAP4Ks) belong to the mammalian Ste20-like family of serine/threonine kinases. MAP4Ks including MAP4K1/HPK1, MAP4K2/GCK, MAP4K3/GLK, MAP4K4/HGK, MAP4K5/KHS, and MAP4K6/MINK have been reported to induce JNK activation through activating the MAP3K-MAP2K cascade. The physiological roles of MAP4Ks in immunity and inflammation are largely unknown until recent studies using biochemical approaches and knockout mice. Surprisingly, JNK is not the major target of MAP4Ks in immune cells; MAP4Ks regulate immune responses through novel targets. HPK1 inhibits T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling and B-cell receptor signaling via inducing phosphorylation/ubiquitination of SLP-76 and BLNK, respectively. GLK activates TCR signaling through phosphorylating/activating PKCθ. T-cell-mediated immune responses and Th17-mediated experimental autoimmune diseases are enhanced in HPK1 knockout mice but ameliorated in GLK knockout mice. Consistently, HPK1 levels are decreased in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and T cells from patients with psoriatic arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), respectively. Moreover, GLK levels are increased in T cells from patients with SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, or adult-onset Still's disease; the percentages of GLK-overexpression T cells are correlated with the disease activity. In addition, HGK phosphorylates and induces TRAF2 protein degradation, leading to negative regulation of IL-6 production in resting T cells. Loss of HGK in T cells results in spontaneous systemic inflammation and type 2 diabetes in mice. HGK is also involved in cancer cell migration. To date, the phenotypes of knockout mice for GCK, KHS, and MINK have not been reported; the roles of these three MAP4Ks in immune cell signaling are discussed in this review. Taken together, MAP4K family kinases play diverse roles in immune cell signaling, immune responses, and inflammation. PMID:26791862

  8. Protein kinase C mechanisms that contribute to cardiac remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Alexandra C.; Antal, Corina E.; Steinberg, Susan F.

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a highly-regulated and reversible process that is precisely controlled by the actions of protein kinases and protein phosphatases. Factors that tip the balance of protein phosphorylation lead to changes in a wide range of cellular responses, including cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. The protein kinase C (PKC) family of serine/threonine kinases sits at nodal points in many signal transduction pathways; PKC enzymes have been the focus of considerable attention since they contribute to both normal physiological responses as well as maladaptive pathological responses that drive a wide range of clinical disorders. This review provides a background on the mechanisms that regulate individual PKC isoenzymes followed by a discussion of recent insights into their role in the pathogenesis of diseases such as cancer. We then provide an overview on the role of individual PKC isoenzymes in the regulation of cardiac contractility and pathophysiological growth responses, with a focus on the PKC-dependent mechanisms that regulate pump function and/or contribute to the pathogenesis of heart failure. PMID:27433023

  9. Protein kinase C mechanisms that contribute to cardiac remodelling.

    PubMed

    Newton, Alexandra C; Antal, Corina E; Steinberg, Susan F

    2016-09-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a highly-regulated and reversible process that is precisely controlled by the actions of protein kinases and protein phosphatases. Factors that tip the balance of protein phosphorylation lead to changes in a wide range of cellular responses, including cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. The protein kinase C (PKC) family of serine/threonine kinases sits at nodal points in many signal transduction pathways; PKC enzymes have been the focus of considerable attention since they contribute to both normal physiological responses as well as maladaptive pathological responses that drive a wide range of clinical disorders. This review provides a background on the mechanisms that regulate individual PKC isoenzymes followed by a discussion of recent insights into their role in the pathogenesis of diseases such as cancer. We then provide an overview on the role of individual PKC isoenzymes in the regulation of cardiac contractility and pathophysiological growth responses, with a focus on the PKC-dependent mechanisms that regulate pump function and/or contribute to the pathogenesis of heart failure. PMID:27433023

  10. Synthetic sulfoglycolipids targeting the serine-threonine protein kinase Akt.

    PubMed

    Costa, Barbara; Dangate, Milind; Vetro, Maria; Donvito, Giulia; Gabrielli, Luca; Amigoni, Loredana; Cassinelli, Giuliana; Lanzi, Cinzia; Ceriani, Michela; De Gioia, Luca; Filippi, Giulia; Cipolla, Laura; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Perego, Paola; Colombo, Diego

    2016-08-15

    The serine-threonine protein kinase Akt, also known as protein kinase B, is a key component of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt-mTOR axis. Deregulated activation of this pathway is frequent in human tumors and Akt-dependent signaling appears to be critical in cell survival. PI3K activation generates 3-phosphorylated phosphatidylinositols that bind Akt pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. The blockage of Akt PH domain/phosphoinositides interaction represents a promising approach to interfere with the oncogenic potential of over-activated Akt. In the present study, phosphatidyl inositol mimics based on a β-glucoside scaffold have been synthesized as Akt inhibitors. The compounds possessed one or two lipophilic moieties of different length at the anomeric position of glucose, and an acidic or basic group at C-6. Docking studies, ELISA Akt inhibition assays, and cellular assays on different cell models highlighted 1-O-octadecanoyl-2-O-β-d-sulfoquinovopyranosyl-sn-glycerol as the best Akt inhibitor among the synthesized compounds, which could be considered as a lead for further optimization in the design of Akt inhibitors. PMID:27316541

  11. The lipid kinase PI4KIIIβ preserves lysosomal identity

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar, Sunandini; Patel, Bindi; Aphkhazava, David; Macian, Fernando; Santambrogio, Laura; Shields, Dennis; Cuervo, Ana Maria

    2013-01-01

    Lipid modifications are essential in cellular sorting and trafficking inside cells. The role of phosphoinositides in trafficking between Golgi and endocytic/lysosomal compartments has been extensively explored and the kinases responsible for these lipid changes have been identified. In contrast, the mechanisms that mediate exit and recycling from lysosomes (Lys), considered for a long time as terminal compartments, are less understood. In this work, we identify a dynamic association of the lipid kinase PI4KIIIβ with Lys and unveil its regulatory function in lysosomal export and retrieval. We have found that absence of PI4KIIIβ leads to abnormal formation of tubular structures from the lysosomal surface and loss of lysosomal constituents through these tubules. We demonstrate that the kinase activity of PI4KIIIβ is necessary to prevent this unwanted lysosomal efflux under normal conditions, and to facilitate proper sorting when recycling of lysosomal material is needed, such as in the physiological context of lysosomal reformation after prolonged starvation. PMID:23258225

  12. Targeting lung cancer through inhibition of checkpoint kinases

    PubMed Central

    Syljuåsen, Randi G.; Hasvold, Grete; Hauge, Sissel; Helland, Åslaug

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitors of checkpoint kinases ATR, Chk1, and Wee1 are currently being tested in preclinical and clinical trials. Here, we review the basic principles behind the use of such inhibitors as anticancer agents, and particularly discuss their potential for treatment of lung cancer. As lung cancer is one of the most deadly cancers, new treatment strategies are highly needed. We discuss how checkpoint kinase inhibition in principle can lead to selective killing of lung cancer cells while sparing the surrounding normal tissues. Several features of lung cancer may potentially be exploited for targeting through inhibition of checkpoint kinases, including mutated p53, low ERCC1 levels, amplified Myc, tumor hypoxia and presence of lung cancer stem cells. Synergistic effects have also been reported between inhibitors of ATR/Chk1/Wee1 and conventional lung cancer treatments, such as gemcitabine, cisplatin, or radiation. Altogether, inhibitors of ATR, Chk1, and Wee1 are emerging as new cancer treatment agents, likely to be useful in lung cancer treatment. However, as lung tumors are very diverse, the inhibitors are unlikely to be effective in all patients, and more work is needed to determine how such inhibitors can be utilized in the most optimal ways. PMID:25774168

  13. Sphingosine kinases and their metabolites modulate endolysosomal trafficking in photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Yonamine, Ikuko; Bamba, Takeshi; Nirala, Niraj K.; Jesmin, Nahid; Kosakowska-Cholody, Teresa; Nagashima, Kunio; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2011-01-01

    Internalized membrane proteins are either transported to late endosomes and lysosomes for degradation or recycled to the plasma membrane. Although proteins involved in trafficking and sorting have been well studied, far less is known about the lipid molecules that regulate the intracellular trafficking of membrane proteins. We studied the function of sphingosine kinases and their metabolites in endosomal trafficking using Drosophila melanogaster photoreceptors as a model system. Gain- and loss-of-function analyses show that sphingosine kinases affect trafficking of the G protein–coupled receptor Rhodopsin and the light-sensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) channel by modulating the levels of dihydrosphingosine 1 phosphate (DHS1P) and sphingosine 1 phosphate (S1P). An increase in DHS1P levels relative to S1P leads to the enhanced lysosomal degradation of Rhodopsin and TRP and retinal degeneration in wild-type photoreceptors. Our results suggest that sphingosine kinases and their metabolites modulate photoreceptor homeostasis by influencing endolysosomal trafficking of Rhodopsin and TRP. PMID:21321100

  14. Eph-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of citron kinase controls abscission.

    PubMed

    Jungas, Thomas; Perchey, Renaud T; Fawal, Mohamad; Callot, Caroline; Froment, Carine; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Besson, Arnaud; Davy, Alice

    2016-08-29

    Cytokinesis is the last step of cell division, culminating in the physical separation of daughter cells at the end of mitosis. Cytokinesis is a tightly regulated process that until recently was mostly viewed as a cell-autonomous event. Here, we investigated the role of Ephrin/Eph signaling, a well-known local cell-to-cell communication pathway, in cell division. We show that activation of Eph signaling in vitro leads to multinucleation and polyploidy, and we demonstrate that this is caused by alteration of the ultimate step of cytokinesis, abscission. Control of abscission requires Eph kinase activity, and Src and citron kinase (CitK) are downstream effectors in the Eph-induced signal transduction cascade. CitK is phosphorylated on tyrosines in neural progenitors in vivo, and Src kinase directly phosphorylates CitK. We have identified the specific tyrosine residues of CitK that are phosphorylated and show that tyrosine phosphorylation of CitK impairs cytokinesis. Finally, we show that, similar to CitK, Ephrin/Eph signaling controls neuronal ploidy in the developing neocortex. Our study indicates that CitK integrates intracellular and extracellular signals provided by the local environment to coordinate completion of cytokinesis. PMID:27551053

  15. Aurora Kinase Inhibitors: Current Status and Outlook

    PubMed Central

    Bavetsias, Vassilios; Linardopoulos, Spiros

    2015-01-01

    The Aurora kinase family comprises of cell cycle-regulated serine/threonine kinases important for mitosis. Their activity and protein expression are cell cycle regulated, peaking during mitosis to orchestrate important mitotic processes including centrosome maturation, chromosome alignment, chromosome segregation, and cytokinesis. In humans, the Aurora kinase family consists of three members; Aurora-A, Aurora-B, and Aurora-C, which each share a conserved C-terminal catalytic domain but differ in their sub-cellular localization, substrate specificity, and function during mitosis. In addition, Aurora-A and Aurora-B have been found to be overexpressed in a wide variety of human tumors. These observations led to a number of programs among academic and pharmaceutical organizations to discovering small molecule Aurora kinase inhibitors as anti-cancer drugs. This review will summarize the known Aurora kinase inhibitors currently in the clinic, and discuss the current and future directions. PMID:26734566

  16. Lead and tap water

    MedlinePlus

    Water contaminated with lead ... The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) monitors drinking water in the United States. It requires water suppliers to produce annual water quality reports. These reports include information about lead amounts, and they ...

  17. VOLUMETRIC LEAD ASSAY

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.; S.K. Dua; David Roelant; Sachin Kumar

    2001-01-01

    This report describes a system for handling and radioassay of lead, consisting of a robot, a conveyor, and a gamma spectrometer. The report also presents a cost-benefit analysis of options: radioassay and recycling lead vs. disposal as waste.

  18. Lead - nutritional considerations

    MedlinePlus

    ... lead soldered cans goes into effect. If imported wine containers have a lead foil wrapper, wipe the ... a towel moistened with lemon juice, vinegar, or wine before using. DO NOT store wine, spirits, or ...

  19. Lead - nutritional considerations

    MedlinePlus

    ... found in some containers and cooking utensils . Old paint poses the greatest danger for lead poisoning , especially ... leach out into the liquid. Other important recommendations: Paint over old leaded paint if it is in ...

  20. Lead and tap water

    MedlinePlus

    Water contaminated with lead ... The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) monitors drinking water and requires water suppliers to produce annual water quality reports. These reports, which include information about lead amounts, are available to consumers. For ...

  1. Sphingosine kinase regulation and cardioprotection

    PubMed Central

    Karliner, Joel S.

    2009-01-01

    Activation of sphingosine kinase/sphingosine-1-phosphate (SK/S1P)-mediated signalling has been recognized as critical for cardioprotection in response to acute ischaemia/reperfusion injury. Incubation of S1P with cultured cardiac myocytes subjected to hypoxia or treatment of isolated hearts either before ischaemia or at the onset of reperfusion (pharmacologic pre- or postconditioning) results in reduced myocyte injury. Synthetic agonists active at S1P receptors mimic these responses. Gene-targeted mice null for the SK1 isoform whose hearts are subjected to ischaemia/reperfusion injury exhibit increased infarct size and respond poorly either to ischaemic pre- or postconditioning. Measurements of cardiac SK activity and S1P parallel these observations. Ischaemic postconditioning combined with sphingosine and S1P rescues the heart from prolonged ischaemia. These observations may have considerable relevance for future therapeutic approaches to acute and chronic myocardial injury. PMID:19017750

  2. Calcium-Oxidant Signaling Network Regulates AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Activation upon Matrix Deprivation*

    PubMed Central

    Sundararaman, Ananthalakshmy; Amirtham, Usha; Rangarajan, Annapoorni

    2016-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has recently been implicated in anoikis resistance. However, the molecular mechanisms that activate AMPK upon matrix detachment remain unexplored. In this study, we show that AMPK activation is a rapid and sustained phenomenon upon matrix deprivation, whereas re-attachment to the matrix leads to its dephosphorylation and inactivation. Because matrix detachment leads to loss of integrin signaling, we investigated whether integrin signaling negatively regulates AMPK activation. However, modulation of focal adhesion kinase or Src, the major downstream components of integrin signaling, failed to cause a corresponding change in AMPK signaling. Further investigations revealed that the upstream AMPK kinases liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) contribute to AMPK activation upon detachment. In LKB1-deficient cells, we found AMPK activation to be predominantly dependent on CaMKKβ. We observed no change in ATP levels under detached conditions at early time points suggesting that rapid AMPK activation upon detachment was not triggered by energy stress. We demonstrate that matrix deprivation leads to a spike in intracellular calcium as well as oxidant signaling, and both these intracellular messengers contribute to rapid AMPK activation upon detachment. We further show that endoplasmic reticulum calcium release-induced store-operated calcium entry contributes to intracellular calcium increase, leading to reactive oxygen species production, and AMPK activation. We additionally show that the LKB1/CaMKK-AMPK axis and intracellular calcium levels play a critical role in anchorage-independent cancer sphere formation. Thus, the Ca2+/reactive oxygen species-triggered LKB1/CaMKK-AMPK signaling cascade may provide a quick, adaptable switch to promote survival of metastasizing cancer cells. PMID:27226623

  3. Transplacental transport of lead

    SciTech Connect

    Goyer, R.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Neurotoxicity is the major health effect from exposure to lead for infants and young children, and there is current concern regarding possible toxic effects of lead on the child while in utero. there is no placental-fetal barrier to lead transport. Maternal and fetal blood lead levels are nearly identical, so lead passes through the placenta unencumbered. Lead has been measured in the fetal brain as early as the end of the first trimester (13 weeks). There is a similar rate of increase in brain size and lead content throughout pregnancy in the fetus of mothers in the general population, so concentration of lead probably does not differ greatly during gestation unless exposure of the mother changes. Cell-specific sensitivity to the toxic effects of lead, however, may be greater the younger the fetus. Lead toxicity to the nervous system is characterized by edema or swelling of the brain due to altered permeability of capillary endothelial cells. Experimental studies suggest that immature endothelial cells forming the capillaries of the developing brain are less resistant to the effects of lead, permitting fluid and cations including lead to reach newly formed components of the brain, particularly astrocytes and neurons. Also, the ability of astrocytes and neurons to sequester lead in the form of lead protein complexes occurs only in the later stages of fetal development, permitting lead in maturing brain cells to interact with vital subcellular organelles, particularly mitochondria, which are the major cellular energy source. Intracellular lead also affects binding sites for calcium which, in turn, may affect numerous cell functions including neurotransmitter release.

  4. Solving the lead dilemma

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, S. )

    1989-10-01

    This paper discusses the widespread problem of lead poisoning among children. The perils of deleading are addressed and several methods of deleading currently in use are detailed and analyzed. These include the traditional method of burning or sanding off leaded paint, the Baltimore Model involving extensive refabrication of infected dwellings, and encapsulation by which leaded surfaces in the home are covered to prevent the escape of lead dust.

  5. PHOTOEMISSION PROPERTIES OF LEAD.

    SciTech Connect

    SMEDLEY,J.; RAO,T.; WARREN,J.; SEKUTOWICZ,J.; LEFFERTS,R.; LIPSKI,A.

    2004-07-05

    In this paper we present a study of the photoemission properties of lead at several UV wavelengths, including a study of the damage threshold of electroplated lead under laser cleaning. A quantum efficiency in excess of 0.1% has been achieved for a laser cleaned, electroplated lead sample with a laser wavelength of 193 nm. Niobium cathodes have been measured for comparison, and lead is found to be a superior photoemitter for all measured wavelengths.

  6. The tyrosine kinase FER is responsible for the capacitation-associated increase in tyrosine phosphorylation in murine sperm.

    PubMed

    Alvau, Antonio; Battistone, Maria Agustina; Gervasi, Maria Gracia; Navarrete, Felipe A; Xu, Xinran; Sánchez-Cárdenas, Claudia; De la Vega-Beltran, Jose Luis; Da Ros, Vanina G; Greer, Peter A; Darszon, Alberto; Krapf, Diego; Salicioni, Ana Maria; Cuasnicu, Patricia S; Visconti, Pablo E

    2016-07-01

    Sperm capacitation is required for fertilization. At the molecular level, this process is associated with fast activation of protein kinase A. Downstream of this event, capacitating conditions lead to an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation. The identity of the tyrosine kinase(s) mediating this process has not been conclusively demonstrated. Recent experiments using stallion and human sperm have suggested a role for PYK2 based on the use of small molecule inhibitors directed against this kinase. However, crucially, loss-of-function experiments have not been reported. Here, we used both pharmacological inhibitors and genetically modified mice models to investigate the identity of the tyrosine kinase(s) mediating the increase in tyrosine phosphorylation in mouse sperm. Similar to stallion and human, PF431396 blocks the capacitation-associated increase in tyrosine phosphorylation. Yet, sperm from Pyk2(-/-) mice displayed a normal increase in tyrosine phosphorylation, implying that PYK2 is not responsible for this phosphorylation process. Here, we show that PF431396 can also inhibit FER, a tyrosine kinase known to be present in sperm. Sperm from mice targeted with a kinase-inactivating mutation in Fer failed to undergo capacitation-associated increases in tyrosine phosphorylation. Although these mice are fertile, their sperm displayed a reduced ability to fertilize metaphase II-arrested eggs in vitro. PMID:27226326

  7. Pyp1 and Pyp2 PTPases dephosphorylate an osmosensing MAP kinase controlling cell size at division in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Millar, J B; Buck, V; Wilkinson, M G

    1995-09-01

    Simultaneous inactivation of pyp1 and pyp2 PTPases in fission yeast leads to aberrant cell morphology and growth arrest. Spontaneous recessive mutations that bypass the requirement for pyp1 and pyp2 and reside in two complementation groups were isolated, sty1 and sty2. sty1- and sty2- mutant cells are substantially delayed in the timing of mitotic initiation. We have isolated the sty1 gene, which encodes a MAP kinase that is closely related to a subfamily of MAP kinases regulated by osmotic stress including Saccharomyces cervisiae HOG1 and human CSBP1. We find that sty2 is allelic to the wis1 MAP kinase kinase and that delta sty1 and delta wis1 cells are unable to grow in high osmolarity medium. Osmotic stress induces both tyrosine phosphorylation of Sty1 and a reduction in cell size at division. Pyp2 associates with and tyrosine dephosphorylates Sty1 in vitro. We find that wis1-dependent induction of pyp2 mRNA is responsible for tyrosine dephosphorylation of Sty1 in vivo on prolonged exposure to osmotic stress. We conclude that Pyp1 and Pyp2 are tyrosine-specific MAP kinase phosphatases that inactivate an osmoregulated MAP kinase, Sty1, which acts downstream of the Wis1 MAP kinase kinase to control cell size at division in fission yeast. PMID:7657164

  8. Different Protein Kinase C Isoforms Determine Growth Factor Specificity in Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Corbit, Kevin C.; Soh, Jae-Won; Yoshida, Keiko; Eves, Eva M.; Weinstein, I. Bernard; Rosner, Marsha Rich

    2000-01-01

    Although mitogenic and differentiating factors often activate a number of common signaling pathways, the mechanisms leading to their distinct cellular outcomes have not been elucidated. In a previous report, we demonstrated that mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase (ERK) activation by the neurogenic agents fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and nerve growth factor is dependent on protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ), whereas MAP kinase activation in response to the mitogen epidermal growth factor (EGF) is independent of PKCδ in rat hippocampal (H19-7) and pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. We now show that EGF activates MAP kinase through a PKCζ-dependent pathway involving phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and PDK1 in H19-7 cells. PKCζ, like PKCδ, acts upstream of MEK, and PKCζ can potentiate Raf-1 activation by EGF. Inhibition of PKCζ also blocks EGF-induced DNA synthesis as monitored by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation in H19-7 cells. Finally, in embryonic rat brain hippocampal cell cultures, inhibitors of PKCζ or PKCδ suppress MAP kinase activation by EGF or FGF, respectively, indicating that these factors activate distinct signaling pathways in primary as well as immortalized neural cells. Taken together, these results implicate different PKC isoforms as determinants of growth factor signaling specificity within the same cell. Furthermore, these data provide a mechanism whereby different growth factors can differentially activate a common signaling intermediate and thereby generate biological diversity. PMID:10891480

  9. Targeting protein kinases in the malaria parasite: update of an antimalarial drug target.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Veronica M; Chavchich, Marina; Waters, Norman C

    2012-01-01

    Millions of deaths each year are attributed to malaria worldwide. Transmitted through the bite of an Anopheles mosquito, infection and subsequent death from the Plasmodium species, most notably P. falciparum, can readily spread through a susceptible population. A malaria vaccine does not exist and resistance to virtually every antimalarial drug predicts that mortality and morbidity associated with this disease will increase. With only a few antimalarial drugs currently in the pipeline, new therapeutic options and novel chemotypes are desperately needed. Hit-to-Lead diversity may successfully provide novel inhibitory scaffolds when essential enzymes are targeted, for example, the plasmodial protein kinases. Throughout the entire life cycle of the malaria parasite, protein kinases are essential for growth and development. Ongoing efforts continue to characterize these kinases, while simultaneously pursuing them as antimalarial drug targets. A collection of structural data, inhibitory profiles and target validation has set the foundation and support for targeting the malarial kinome. Pursuing protein kinases as cancer drug targets has generated a wealth of information on the inhibitory strategies that can be useful for antimalarial drug discovery. In this review, progress on selected protein kinases is described. As the search for novel antimalarials continues, an understanding of the phosphor-regulatory pathways will not only validate protein kinase targets, but also will identify novel chemotypes to thwart malaria drug resistance. PMID:22242850

  10. Lead Poisoning in Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pueschel, Siegfried M., Ed.; Linakis, James G., Ed.; Anderson, Angela C., Ed.

    The magnitude of childhood lead poisoning has been inexplicably neglected by modern medicine and by legislators. However, since the 1970s, increased attention has been focused on lead poisoning, and advances have been made in several areas, including understanding of the neurodevelopmental and behavioral ramifications of lead poisoning, and…

  11. Lead Poisoning (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Lead Poisoning KidsHealth > For Parents > Lead Poisoning Print A A ... Family en español La intoxicación por plomo About Lead Poisoning If you have young kids, it's important to ...

  12. Lead Poisoning in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boeckx, Roger L.

    1986-01-01

    Urban children are exposed to lead through the air they breathe, the water they drink, and the food and nonfood substances they ingest. The history, diagnosis, and treatment of lead poisoning in these children are discussed. Includes information on the toxicology of lead and the various risk classes. (JN)

  13. Lead Poisoning in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drummond, A. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Early symptoms of lead poisoning in children are often overlooked. Lead poisoning has its greatest effects on the brain and nervous system. The obvious long-term solution to the lead poisoning problem is removal of harmful forms of the metal from the environment. (JN)

  14. Learn about Lead

    MedlinePlus

    ... Determine if your family is at risk for lead poisoning with the Lead Poisoning Home Checklist (PDF) . Top of page What do I do if I think my child or I have been exposed to lead? Talk to your pediatrician, general physician, or local ...

  15. Lead and children

    PubMed Central

    Abelsohn, Alan R.; Sanborn, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To provide family physicians with a practical, evidence-based approach to screening for and preventing children’s exposure to lead. SOURCES OF INFORMATION MEDLINE was searched using terms relevant to lead exposure and poisoning. We reviewed English-language articles published in 2003 to 2008. Most cited studies provide level 2 or 3 evidence. MAIN MESSAGE Lead is a developmental neurotoxin. Children are most commonly exposed and they are most vulnerable. Lead exposure has been associated with many cognitive and motor deficits, as well as distractibility and other characteristics of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Although children’s blood lead levels have declined considerably over the past 3 decades with removal of lead from gasoline and paint, children can still be exposed to lead from lead paint in older homes, toys, and other sources. Because post-exposure treatment cannot reverse the cognitive effects of lead exposure, preventing lead exposure is essential. CONCLUSION Family physicians have an important role in screening for children at high risk of lead exposure, and in educating families to prevent the exposure of children to lead. PMID:20547517

  16. Lead poisoning: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendel, Neil

    1993-01-01

    A problem that should be of great concern to all of us is the lead poisoning of children. First, I would like to present a short overview concerning the reasons everyone should care about lead poisoning, then discuss the history of lead poisoning, what is happening today across the country, and the future.

  17. Lead Poisoning in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guyaux, Susan

    1990-01-01

    Overexposure to lead can permanently impair a child's mental and physical development. This article discusses sources of lead paint, survey and testing methods, management and abatement plans, drinking water contamination, and associated federal standards. Although lead is present in soil and in art, theater, and vocational programs, no federal…

  18. Apoptosis and melanogenesis in human melanoma cells induced by anthrax lethal factor inactivation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Han-Mo; Vanbrocklin, Matt; McWilliams, Mary Jane; Leppla, Stephan H.; Duesbery, Nicholas S.; Vande Woude, George F.

    2002-03-01

    Lethal factor, the principal virulence factor of Bacillus anthracis, inhibits mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling by proteolytically cleaving MAPK kinases. Edema factor, another component of anthrax toxin, is an adenylate cyclase, which increases intracellular cAMP. Inhibition of MAPK signaling with either anthrax lethal toxin (LeTx) or small molecule MAPK kinase inhibitors triggers apoptosis in human melanoma cells. Normal melanocytes do not undergo apoptosis in response to MAPK inhibition but arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Importantly, in vivo treatment of human melanoma xenograft tumors in athymic nude mice with LeTx results in significant or complete tumor regression without apparent side effects, suggesting that inhibiting the MAPK signaling pathway may be a useful strategy for treating melanoma. Additionally, interrupting MAPK signaling with LeTx and elevating cAMP with anthrax edema toxin in both melanoma cells and melanocytes lead to dramatic melanin production, perhaps explaining the formation of blackened eschars in cutaneous anthrax.

  19. Analysis of lead toxicity in human cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Lead is a metal with many recognized adverse health side effects, and yet the molecular processes underlying lead toxicity are still poorly understood. Quantifying the injurious effects of lead is also difficult because of the diagnostic limitations that exist when analyzing human blood and urine specimens for lead toxicity. Results We analyzed the deleterious impact of lead on human cells by measuring its effects on cytokine production and gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Lead activates the secretion of the chemokine IL-8 and impacts mitogen-dependent activation by increasing the secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α and of the chemokines IL-8 and MIP1-α in the presence of phytohemagglutinin. The recorded changes in gene expression affected major cellular functions, including metallothionein expression, and the expression of cellular metabolic enzymes and protein kinase activity. The expression of 31 genes remained elevated after the removal of lead from the testing medium thereby allowing for the measurement of adverse health effects of lead poisoning. These included thirteen metallothionein transcripts, three endothelial receptor B transcripts and a number of transcripts which encode cellular metabolic enzymes. Cellular responses to lead correlated with blood lead levels and were significantly altered in individuals with higher lead content resultantly affecting the nervous system, the negative regulation of transcription and the induction of apoptosis. In addition, we identified changes in gene expression in individuals with elevated zinc protoporphyrin blood levels and found that genes regulating the transmission of nerve impulses were affected in these individuals. The affected pathways were G-protein mediated signaling, gap junction signaling, synaptic long-term potentiation, neuropathic pain signaling as well as CREB signaling in neurons. Cellular responses to lead were altered in subjects with high

  20. Insulin-induced Drosophila S6 kinase activation requires phosphoinositide 3-kinase and protein kinase B.

    PubMed Central

    Lizcano, Jose M; Alrubaie, Saif; Kieloch, Agnieszka; Deak, Maria; Leevers, Sally J; Alessi, Dario R

    2003-01-01

    An important mechanism by which insulin regulates cell growth and protein synthesis is through activation of the p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase (S6K). In mammalian cells, insulin-induced PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) activation, generates the lipid second messenger PtdIns(3,4,5) P (3), which is thought to play a key role in triggering the activation of S6K. Although the major components of the insulin-signalling pathway are conserved in Drosophila, recent studies suggested that S6K activation does not require PI3K in this system. To investigate further the role of dPI3K (Drosophila PI3K) in dS6K (Drosophila S6K) activation, we examined the effect of two structurally distinct PI3K inhibitors on insulin-induced dS6K activation in Kc167 and S2 Drosophila cell lines. We found that both inhibitors prevented insulin-stimulated phosphorylation and activation of dS6K. To investigate further the role of the dPI3K pathway in regulating dS6K activation, we also used dsRNAi (double-stranded RNA-mediated interference) to decrease expression of dPI3K and the PtdIns(3,4,5) P (3) phosphatase dPTEN ( Drosophila phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10) in Kc167 and S2 cells. Knock-down of dPI3K prevented dS6K activation, whereas knock-down of dPTEN, which would be expected to increase PtdIns(3,4,5) P (3) levels, stimulated dS6K activity. Moreover, when the expression of the dPI3K target, dPKB (Drosophila protein kinase B), was decreased to undetectable levels, we found that insulin could no longer trigger dS6K activation. This observation provides the first direct demonstration that dPKB is required for insulin-stimulated dS6K activation. We also present evidence that the amino-acid-induced activation of dS6K in the absence of insulin, thought to be mediated by dTOR (Drosophila target of rapamycin), which is unaffected by the inhibition of dPI3K by wortmannin. The results of the present study support the view that, in Drosophila cells, dPI3K and dPKB, as well d

  1. AMP-activated protein kinase kinase: detection with recombinant AMPK alpha1 subunit.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Stephen R; O'Donnell, John B; Hammet, Andrew; Stapleton, David; Habinowski, Susan A; Means, Anthony R; Kemp, Bruce E; Witters, Lee A

    2002-05-10

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a heterotrimeric serine/threonine protein kinase important for the responses to metabolic stress. It consists of a catalytic alpha subunit and two non-catalytic subunits, beta and gamma, and is regulated both by the allosteric action of AMP and by phosphorylation of the alpha and beta subunits catalyzed by AMPKK(s) and autophosphorylation. The Thr172 site on the alpha subunit has been previously characterized as an activating phosphorylation site. Using bacterially expressed AMPK alpha1 subunit proteins, we have explored the role of Thr172-directed AMPKKs in alpha subunit regulation. Recombinant alpha1 subunit proteins, representing the N-terminus, have been expressed as maltose binding protein (MBP) 6x His fusion proteins and purified to homogeneity by Ni(2+) chromatography. Both wild-type alpha1(1-312) and alpha1(1-312)T172D are inactive when expressed in bacteria, but the former can be fully phosphorylated (1 mol/mol) on Thr172 and activated by a surrogate AMPKK, CaMKKbeta. The corresponding AMPKalpha1(1-392), an alpha construct containing its autoinhibitory sequence, can be similarly phosphorylated, but it remains inactive. In an insulinoma cell line, either low glucose or 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside (AICAR) treatment leads to activation and T172 phosphorylation of endogenous AMPK. Under the same conditions of cell incubation, we have identified an AMPKK activity that both phosphorylates and activates the recombinant alpha1(1-312), but this Thr172-directed AMPKK activity is unaltered by low glucose or AICAR, indicating that it is constitutively active. PMID:12051742

  2. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase association with the osteoclast cytoskeleton, and its involvement in osteoclast attachment and spreading.

    PubMed

    Lakkakorpi, P T; Wesolowski, G; Zimolo, Z; Rodan, G A; Rodan, S B

    1997-12-15

    Osteoclast activation involves attachment to the mineralized bone matrix and reorganization of the cytoskeleton, leading to polarization of the cell. Signaling molecules, PI3-kinase, rho A, and pp60c-src, were shown to be essential for osteoclastic bone resorption. In this study we have focused on the involvement of these signaling molecules in the early event of osteoclast activation: attachment, spreading, and organization of the cytoskeleton. Highly purified osteoclasts were fractionated into Triton X-100-soluble or cytosolic and Triton X-100-insoluble or cytoskeletal fractions, and the distribution of above-mentioned signaling molecules between the two fractions was examined. PI3-kinase, rho A, and pp60c-src all showed translocation to the cytoskeletal fraction upon osteoclast attachment to plastic. However, PI3-kinase and rho A, but not pp60c-src, showed further translocation of 2.4- and 3.2-fold, respectively, upon attachment of osteoclasts to bone. PI3-kinase translocation to the cytoskeleton was inhibited by either cytochalasin B or colchicine. Furthermore, treatment of osteoclasts with the PI3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin decreased its translocation, suggesting that PI3-kinase activity was needed for its translocation. Moreover, wortmannin inhibited osteoclast attachment to both bone and plastic and caused drastic changes in osteoclast morphology resulting in rounding of the cells, disappearance of F-actin structures or podosomes, and appearance of punctate or vesicular structures inside the cells. Osteoblastic MB1.8 cells and IC-21 macrophages did not show additional translocation of PI3-kinase or rho A upon attachment to bone or changes in attachment or morphology in response to wortmannin. Finally, PI3-kinase coimmunoprecipitated with alpha v beta 3 integrin from osteoclasts. PMID:9434625

  3. Substrate-Specific Reorganization of the Conformational Ensemble of CSK Implicates Novel Modes of Kinase Function

    PubMed Central

    Jamros, Michael A.; Oliveira, Leandro C.; Whitford, Paul C.; Onuchic, José N.; Adams, Joseph A.; Jennings, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    Protein kinases use ATP as a phosphoryl donor for the posttranslational modification of signaling targets. It is generally thought that the binding of this nucleotide induces conformational changes leading to closed, more compact forms of the kinase domain that ideally orient active-site residues for efficient catalysis. The kinase domain is oftentimes flanked by additional ligand binding domains that up- or down-regulate catalytic function. C-terminal Src kinase (Csk) is a multidomain tyrosine kinase that is up-regulated by N-terminal SH2 and SH3 domains. Although the X-ray structure of Csk suggests the enzyme is compact, X-ray scattering studies indicate that the enzyme possesses both compact and open conformational forms in solution. Here, we investigated whether interactions with the ATP analog AMP-PNP and ADP can shift the conformational ensemble of Csk in solution using a combination of small angle x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. We find that binding of AMP-PNP shifts the ensemble towards more extended rather than more compact conformations. Binding of ADP further shifts the ensemble towards extended conformations, including highly extended conformations not adopted by the apo protein, nor by the AMP-PNP bound protein. These ensembles indicate that any compaction of the kinase domain induced by nucleotide binding does not extend to the overall multi-domain architecture. Instead, assembly of an ATP-bound kinase domain generates further extended forms of Csk that may have relevance for kinase scaffolding and Src regulation in the cell. PMID:23028292

  4. Targeting Abl Kinases to Regulate Vascular Leak During Sepsis and ARDS

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Alicia N.; Aman, Jurjan; van Nieuw Amerongen, Geerten P.; Dudek, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    The vascular endothelium separates circulating fluid and inflammatory cells from the surrounding tissues. Vascular leak occurs in response to wide-spread inflammatory processes, such as sepsis and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS), due to the formation of gaps between endothelial cells (EC). Although these disorders are leading causes of mortality in the ICU, no medical therapies exist to restore EC barrier function. Recent evidence highlights a key role for the Abl family of non-receptor tyrosine kinases in regulating vascular barrier integrity. These kinases have well-described roles in cancer progression and neuronal morphogenesis, but their functions in the vasculature have remained enigmatic until recently. The Abl family kinases, c-Abl (Abl1) and Abl related gene (Arg, Abl2), phosphorylate several cytoskeletal effectors that mediate vascular permeability, including myosin light chain kinase, cortactin, vinculin, and β-catenin. They also regulate cell-cell and cell-matrix junction dynamics, and the formation of actin-based cellular protrusions in multiple cell types. Additionally, both c-Abl and Arg are activated by hyperoxia and contribute to oxidant-induced EC injury. These numerous roles of Abl kinases in EC and the current clinical usage of imatinib and other Abl kinase inhibitors have spurred recent interest in repurposing these drugs for the treatment of vascular barrier dysfunction. This review will describe the structure and function of Abl kinases with an emphasis on their roles in mediating vascular barrier integrity. We will also provide a critical evaluation of the potential for exploiting Abl kinase inhibition as a novel therapy for inflammatory vascular leak syndromes. PMID:25814671

  5. Rapid evolution of 6-phenylpurine inhibitors of protein kinase B through structure-based design.

    PubMed

    Donald, Alastair; McHardy, Tatiana; Rowlands, Martin G; Hunter, Lisa-Jane K; Davies, Thomas G; Berdini, Valerio; Boyle, Robert G; Aherne, G Wynne; Garrett, Michelle D; Collins, Ian

    2007-05-17

    6-phenylpurines were identified as novel, ATP-competitive inhibitors of protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) from a fragment-based screen and were rapidly progressed to potent compounds using iterative protein-ligand crystallography with a PKA-PKB chimeric protein. An elaborated lead compound showed cell growth inhibition and effects on cellular signaling pathways characteristic of PKB inhibition. PMID:17451235

  6. Novel insights into the mechanisms of mitotic spindle assembly by NEK kinases.

    PubMed

    Prosser, Suzanna L; O'Regan, Laura; Fry, Andrew M

    2016-05-01

    The mitotic spindle is the apparatus upon which chromosomes are segregated during cell division. We have discovered new roles for two members of the NIMA-related kinase (NEK) family in different molecular processes of spindle assembly. Moreover, loss of these proteins leads to segregation errors that drive cancer progression. PMID:27314078

  7. Novel insights into the mechanisms of mitotic spindle assembly by NEK kinases

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, Suzanna L.; O'Regan, Laura; Fry, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mitotic spindle is the apparatus upon which chromosomes are segregated during cell division. We have discovered new roles for two members of the NIMA-related kinase (NEK) family in different molecular processes of spindle assembly. Moreover, loss of these proteins leads to segregation errors that drive cancer progression. PMID:27314078

  8. Structure-Based Design of an Organoruthenium Phosphatidyl-inositol-3-Kinase Inhibitor Reveals a Switch Governing Lipid Kinase Potency and Selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Xie,P.; Williams, D.; Atilla-Gokcumen, G.; Milk, L.; Xiao, M.; Smalley, K.; Herlyn, M.; Meggers, E.; Marmorstein, R.

    2008-01-01

    Mutations that constitutively activate the phosphatidyl-inositol-3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway, including alterations in PI3K, PTEN, and AKT, are found in a variety of human cancers, implicating the PI3K lipid kinase as an attractive target for the development of therapeutic agents to treat cancer and other related diseases. In this study, we report on the combination of a novel organometallic kinase inhibitor scaffold with structure-based design to develop a PI3K inhibitor, called E5E2, with an IC50 potency in the mid-low-nanomolar range and selectivity against a panel of protein kinases. We also show that E5E2 inhibits phospho-AKT in human melanoma cells and leads to growth inhibition. Consistent with a role for the PI3K pathway in tumor cell invasion, E5E2 treatment also inhibits the migration of melanoma cells in a 3D spheroid assay. The structure of the PI3K?/E5E2 complex reveals the molecular features that give rise to this potency and selectivity toward lipid kinases with implications for the design of a subsequent generation of PI3K-isoform-specific organometallic inhibitors.

  9. Regulation of Protein Phosphatase 1I by Cdc25C-associated Kinase 1 (C-TAK1) and PFTAIRE Protein Kinase*

    PubMed Central

    Platholi, Jimcy; Federman, Anna; Detert, Julia A.; Heerdt, Paul; Hemmings, Hugh C.

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 1I (PP-1I) is a major endogenous form of protein phosphatase 1 (PP-1) that consists of the core catalytic subunit PP-1c and the regulatory subunit inhibitor 2 (I-2). Phosphorylation of the Thr-72 residue of I-2 is required for activation of PP-1I. We studied the effects of two protein kinases identified previously in purified brain PP-1I by mass spectrometry, Cdc25C-associated kinase 1 (C-TAK1) and PFTAIRE (PFTK1) kinase, for their ability to regulate PP-1I. Purified C-TAK1 phosphorylated I-2 in reconstituted PP-1I (PP-1c·I-2) on Ser-71, which resulted in partial inhibition of its ATP-dependent phosphatase activity and inhibited subsequent phosphorylation of Thr-72 by the exogenous activating kinase GSK-3. In contrast, purified PFTK1 phosphorylated I-2 at Ser-86, a site known to potentiate Thr-72 phosphorylation and activation of PP-1I phosphatase activity by GSK-3. These findings indicate that brain PP-1I associates with and is regulated by the associated protein kinases C-TAK1 and PFTK1. Multisite phosphorylation of the I-2 regulatory subunit of PP-1I leads to activation or inactivation of PP-1I through bidirectional modulation of Thr-72 phosphorylation, the critical activating residue of I-2. PMID:25028520

  10. Purification of MPF from starfish: identification as the H1 histone kinase p34cdc2 and a possible mechanism for its periodic activation.

    PubMed

    Labbe, J C; Picard, A; Peaucellier, G; Cavadore, J C; Nurse, P; Doree, M

    1989-04-21

    MPF extracted from starfish oocytes copurifies with an M phase-specific H1 histone kinase encoded by a homolog of the fission yeast cell cycle control gene cdc2+. The most purified preparations contain p34cdc2 as the only major protein. Activation of the p34cdc2 kinase is correlated with appearance of the MPF activity both in vivo and in vitro. The increase in protein kinase activity is associated with p34cdc2 dephosphorylation and the decrease in protein kinase activity on leaving M phase with rephosphorylation. Microinjection of a peptide perfectly conserved in p34cdc2 from yeast to humans induces meiotic maturation, suggesting that an inhibitory component in G2 arrested oocytes interacts with this region of the p34cdc2 kinase. We propose that initiation of M phase is brought about by the dephosphorylation of p34cdc2, leading to increase in its protein kinase activity. PMID:2649251

  11. Lead in the environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pattee, O.H.; Pain, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    Anthropogenic uses of lead have probably altered its availability and environmental distribution more than any other toxic element. Consequently, lead concentrations in many living organisms may be approaching thresholds of toxicity for the adverse effects of lead. Such thresholds are difficult to define, as they vary with the chemical and physical form of lead, exposure regime, other elements present and also vary both within and between species. The technological capability to accurately quantify low lead concentrations has increased over the last decade, and physiological and behavioral effects have been measured in wildlife with tissue lead concentrations below those previously considered safe for humans.s.236 Consequently. lead criteria for the protection of wildlife and human health are frequently under review, and 'thresholds' of lead toxicity are being reconsidered. Proposed lead criteria for the protection of natural resources have been reviewed by Eisler. Uptake of lead by plants is limited by its generally low availability in soils and sediments, and toxicity may be limited by storage mechanisms and its apparently limited translocation within most plants. Lead does not generally accumulate within the foliar parts of plants, which limits its transfer to higher trophic levels. Although lead may concentrate in plant and animal tissues, no evidence of biomagnification exists. Acid deposition onto surface waters and soils with low buffering capacity may influence the availability of lead for uptake by plants and animals, and this may merit investigation at susceptible sites. The biological significance of chronic low-level lead exposure to wildlife is sometimes difficult to quantify. Animals living in urban environments or near point sources of lead emission are inevitably subject to greater exposure to lead and enhanced risk of lead poisoning. Increasingly strict controls on lead emissions in many countries have reduced exposure to lead from some sources

  12. Identical M sub r 70,000 S6 kinase is activated biphasically by epidermal growth factor: A phosphopeptide that characterizes the late phase

    SciTech Connect

    Susa, M.; Thomas, G. )

    1990-09-01

    Mitogenic stimulation of quiescent mouse 3T3 cells with epidermal growth factor leads to biphasic S6 kinase activation. The kinases present in both phases of the response have been purified from {sup 32}P-labeled cells and shown to contain a phosphoprotein of equivalent M{sub r} 70,000. Chromatographic analysis of the purified S6 kinases on a Mono Q column reveals that (1) all {sup 32}P-labeled protein coelutes with S6 kinase activity, (2) only those fractions containing S6 kinase autophosphorylate, (3) autophosphorylation is restricted to a single M{sub r} 70,000 protein, and (4) the extent of autophosphorylation directly parallels the degree of S6 kinase activation. Analysis of the two autophosphorylated S6 kinases by two-dimensional tryptic phosphopeptide mapping indicates that they are the same protein. Both in vivo {sup 32}P-labeled S6 kinase contain phosphoserine and phosphothreonine but no detectable phosphotyrosine. Two-dimensional tryptic peptide maps of the in vivo {sup 32}P-labeled S6 kinases are essentially identical, except for a single qualitative change in the late-phase S6 kinase.

  13. Angiotensin II-triggered kinase signaling cascade in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Bali, Anjana; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies have projected the renin-angiotensin system as a central component of the physiological and pathological processes of assorted neurological disorders. Its primary effector hormone, angiotensin II (Ang II), not only mediates the physiological effects of vasoconstriction and blood pressure regulation in cardiovascular disease but is also implicated in a much wider range of neuronal activities and diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, neuronal injury, and cognitive disorders. Ang II produces different actions by acting on its two subtypes of receptors (AT1 and AT2); however, the well-known physiological actions of Ang II are mainly mediated through AT1 receptors. Moreover, recent studies also suggest the important functional role of AT2 receptor in the brain. Ang II acts on AT1 receptors and conducts its functions via MAP kinases (ERK1/2, JNK, and p38MAPK), glycogen synthase kinase, Rho/ROCK kinase, receptor tyrosine kinases (PDGF and EGFR), and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (Src, Pyk2, and JAK/STAT). AT1R-mediated NADPH oxidase activation also leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species, widely implicated in neuroinflammation. These signaling cascades lead to glutamate excitotoxicity, apoptosis, cerebral infarction, astrocyte proliferation, nociception, neuroinflammation, and progression of other neurological disorders. The present review focuses on the Ang II-triggered signal transduction pathways in central nervous system. PMID:26574890

  14. Protein kinase CK2 triggers cytosolic zinc signaling pathways by phosphorylation of zinc channel ZIP7

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Kathryn M.; Hiscox, Stephen; Nicholson, Robert I.; Hogstrand, Christer; Kille, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The transition element zinc, which has recently been identified as an intracellular second messenger, has been implicated in various signaling pathways, including those leading to cell proliferation. Zinc channels of the ZIP protein family (Solute Carrier Family 39A, SLC39A) transiently increase the cytosolic free zinc (Zn2+) concentration in response to extracellular signals. Here, we show that phosphorylation of evolutionarily conserved residues in zinc transporter ZIP7 is associated with the gated release of Zn2+ from intracellular stores, leading to activation of tyrosine kinases and the phosphorylation of AKT and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2). Through pharmacological manipulation, proximity assay, and mutagenesis, we identified CK2 as the kinase responsible for ZIP7 activation. Together, the present results show that eukaryotic transition element channels can be activated post-translationally by phosphorylation eliciting a cell signaling cascade. Our study links the regulated release of zinc from intracellular stores to phosphorylation of kinases involved in proliferative responses and cell migration, suggesting a functional role for ZIP7 and zinc signals for these events which are characteristic of cancerous cells. Furthermore, the interaction of ZIP7 with CK2, a kinase that is antiapoptotoc and promotes cell division, highlights the potential for ZIP7 as a target for anti-cancer drug development. PMID:22317921

  15. Mitotic regulation by NIMA-related kinases

    PubMed Central

    O'Regan, Laura; Blot, Joelle; Fry, Andrew M

    2007-01-01

    The NIMA-related kinases represent a family of serine/threonine kinases implicated in cell cycle control. The founding member of this family, the NIMA kinase of Aspergillus nidulans, as well as the fission yeast homologue Fin1, contribute to multiple aspects of mitotic progression including the timing of mitotic entry, chromatin condensation, spindle organization and cytokinesis. Mammals contain a large family of eleven NIMA-related kinases, named Nek1 to Nek11. Of these, there is now substantial evidence that Nek2, Nek6, Nek7 and Nek9 also regulate mitotic events. At least three of these kinases, as well as NIMA and Fin1, have been localized to the microtubule organizing centre of their respective species, namely the centrosome or spindle pole body. Here, they have important functions in microtubule organization and mitotic spindle assembly. Other Nek kinases have been proposed to play microtubule-dependent roles in non-dividing cells, most notably in regulating the axonemal microtubules of cilia and flagella. In this review, we discuss the evidence that NIMA-related kinases make a significant contribution to the orchestration of mitotic progression and thereby protect cells from chromosome instability. Furthermore, we highlight their potential as novel chemotherapeutic targets. PMID:17727698

  16. Dynamic architecture of a protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    McClendon, Christopher L.; Kornev, Alexandr P.; Gilson, Michael K.; Taylor, Susan S.

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinases are dynamically regulated signaling proteins that act as switches in the cell by phosphorylating target proteins. To establish a framework for analyzing linkages between structure, function, dynamics, and allostery in protein kinases, we carried out multiple microsecond-scale molecular-dynamics simulations of protein kinase A (PKA), an exemplar active kinase. We identified residue–residue correlated motions based on the concept of mutual information and used the Girvan–Newman method to partition PKA into structurally contiguous “communities.” Most of these communities included 40–60 residues and were associated with a particular protein kinase function or a regulatory mechanism, and well-known motifs based on sequence and secondary structure were often split into different communities. The observed community maps were sensitive to the presence of different ligands and provide a new framework for interpreting long-distance allosteric coupling. Communication between different communities was also in agreement with the previously defined architecture of the protein kinase core based on the “hydrophobic spine” network. This finding gives us confidence in suggesting that community analyses can be used for other protein kinases and will provide an efficient tool for structural biologists. The communities also allow us to think about allosteric consequences of mutations that are linked to disease. PMID:25319261

  17. [Mitogen-activated protein kinases in atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Bryk, Dorota; Olejarz, Wioletta; Zapolska-Downar, Danuta

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular signalling cascades, in which MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinases) intermediate, are responsible for a biological response of a cell to an external stimulus. MAP kinases, which include ERK1/2 (extracellular signalling-regulated kinase), JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase) and p 38 MAPK, regulate the activity of many proteins, enzymes and transcription factors and thus have a wide spectrum of biological effects. Many basic scientific studies have defined numerous details of their pathway organization and activation. There are also more and more studies suggesting that individual MAP kinases probably play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. They may mediate inflammatory processes, endothelial cell activation, monocyte/macrophage recruitment and activation, smooth muscle cell proliferation and T-lymphocyte differentiation, all of which represent crucial mechanisms involved in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The specific inhibition of an activity of the respective MAP kinases may prove a new therapeutic approach to attenuate atherosclerotic plaque formation in the future. In this paper, we review the current state of knowledge concerning MAP kinase-dependent cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying atherosclerosis. PMID:24491891

  18. Functional analysis of anomeric sugar kinases.

    PubMed

    Conway, Louis P; Voglmeir, Josef

    2016-09-01

    Anomeric sugar kinases perform fundamental roles in the metabolism of carbohydrates. Under- or overexpression of these enzymes, or mutations causing functional impairments can give rise to diseases such as galactosaemia and so the study of this class of kinase is of critical importance. In addition, anomeric sugar kinases which are naturally promiscuous, or have been artificially made so, may find application in the synthesis of libraries of drug candidates (for example, antibiotics), and natural or unnatural oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates. In this review, we provide an overview of the biological functions of these enzymes, the tools which have been developed to investigate them, and the current frontiers in their study. PMID:27351442

  19. Differential AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Recognition Mechanism of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase Kinase Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yuya; Kawaguchi, Yoshinori; Fujimoto, Tomohito; Kanayama, Naoki; Magari, Masaki; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi

    2016-06-24

    Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) is a known activating kinase for AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In vitro, CaMKKβ phosphorylates Thr(172) in the AMPKα subunit more efficiently than CaMKKα, with a lower Km (∼2 μm) for AMPK, whereas the CaMKIα phosphorylation efficiencies by both CaMKKs are indistinguishable. Here we found that subdomain VIII of CaMKK is involved in the discrimination of AMPK as a native substrate by measuring the activities of various CaMKKα/CaMKKβ chimera mutants. Site-directed mutagenesis analysis revealed that Leu(358) in CaMKKβ/Ile(322) in CaMKKα confer, at least in part, a distinct recognition of AMPK but not of CaMKIα. PMID:27151216

  20. Ground-based experiments complement microgravity flight opportunities in the investigation of the effects of space flight on the immune response: is protein kinase C gravity sensitive?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, S. K.; Woods, K. M.; Armstrong, J. W.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    This manuscript briefly reviews ground-based and flight experiments, discusses how those experiments complement each other, and details how those experiments lead us to speculate about the gravity-sensitive nature of protein kinase C.

  1. Rac-1 and Raf-1 kinases, components of distinct signaling pathways, activate myotonic dystrophy protein kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimizu, M.; Wang, W.; Walch, E. T.; Dunne, P. W.; Epstein, H. F.

    2000-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) is a serine-threonine protein kinase encoded by the myotonic dystrophy (DM) locus on human chromosome 19q13.3. It is a close relative of other kinases that interact with members of the Rho family of small GTPases. We show here that the actin cytoskeleton-linked GTPase Rac-1 binds to DMPK, and coexpression of Rac-1 and DMPK activates its transphosphorylation activity in a GTP-sensitive manner. DMPK can also bind Raf-1 kinase, the Ras-activated molecule of the MAP kinase pathway. Purified Raf-1 kinase phosphorylates and activates DMPK. The interaction of DMPK with these distinct signals suggests that it may play a role as a nexus for cross-talk between their respective pathways and may partially explain the remarkable pleiotropy of DM.

  2. Lead Poison Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    With NASA contracts, Whittaker Corporations Space Science division has developed an electro-optical instrument to mass screen for lead poisoning. Device is portable and detects protoporphyrin in whole blood. Free corpuscular porphyrins occur as an early effect of lead ingestion. Also detects lead in urine used to confirm blood tests. Test is inexpensive and can be applied by relatively unskilled personnel. Similar Whittaker fluorometry device called "drug screen" can measure morphine and quinine in urine much faster and cheaper than other methods.

  3. Lead poisoning: case studies.

    PubMed

    Gordon, J N; Taylor, A; Bennett, P N

    2002-05-01

    Early clinical features of lead toxicity are non-specific and an occupational history is particularly valuable. Lead in the body comprises 2% in the blood (t1/2 35 days) and 95% in bone and dentine (t1/2 20-30 years). Blood lead may remain elevated for years after cessation from long exposure, due to redistribution from bone. Blood lead concentration is the most widely used marker for inorganic lead exposure. Zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) concentration in blood usefully reflects lead exposure over the prior 3 months. Symptomatic patients with blood lead concentration >2.4 micromol l-1 (50 microg dl-1) or in any event >3.8 micromol l-1 (80 microg dl-1) should receive sodium calciumedetate i.v., followed by succimer by mouth for 19 days. Asymptomatic patients with blood lead concentration >2.4 micromol l-1 (50 microg dl-1) may be treated with succimer alone. Sodium calciumedetate should be given with dimercaprol to treat lead encephalopathy. PMID:11994050

  4. Contribution of PIP-5 kinase I{alpha} to raft-based Fc{gamma}RIIA signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Szymanska, Ewelina; Korzeniowski, Marek; Raynal, Patrick; Sobota, Andrzej; Kwiatkowska, Katarzyna

    2009-04-01

    Receptor Fc{gamma}IIA (Fc{gamma}RIIA) associates with plasma membrane rafts upon activation to trigger signaling cascades leading to actin polymerization. We examined whether compartmentalization of PI(4,5)P{sub 2} and PI(4,5)P{sub 2}-synthesizing PIP5-kinase I{alpha} to rafts contributes to Fc{gamma}RIIA signaling. A fraction of PIP5-kinase I{alpha} was detected in raft-originating detergent-resistant membranes (DRM) isolated from U937 monocytes and other cells. The DRM of U937 monocytes contained also a major fraction of PI(4,5)P{sub 2}. PIP5-kinase I{alpha} bound PI(4,5)P{sub 2}, and depletion of the lipid displaced PIP5-kinase I{alpha} from the DRM. Activation of Fc{gamma}RIIA in BHK transfectants led to recruitment of the kinase to the plasma membrane and enrichment of DRM in PI(4,5)P{sub 2}. Immunofluorescence studies revealed that in resting cells the kinase was associated with the plasma membrane, cytoplasmic vesicles and the nucleus. After Fc{gamma}RIIA activation, PIP5-kinase I{alpha} and PI(4,5)P{sub 2} co-localized transiently with the activated receptor at distinct cellular locations. Immunoelectron microscopy studies revealed that PIP5-kinase I{alpha} and PI(4,5)P{sub 2} were present at the edges of electron-dense assemblies containing activated Fc{gamma}RIIA in their core. The data suggest that activation of Fc{gamma}RIIA leads to membrane rafts coalescing into signaling platforms containing PIP5-kinase I{alpha} and PI(4,5)P{sub 2}.

  5. Effect of Narrow Spectrum Versus Selective Kinase Inhibitors on the Intestinal Proinflammatory Immune Response in Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Biancheri, Paolo; Foster, Martyn R.; Fyfe, Matthew C. T.; MacDonald, Thomas T.; Sirohi, Sameer; Solanke, Yemisi; Wood, Eleanor; Rowley, Adele; Webber, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Background: Kinases are key mediators of inflammation, highlighting the potential of kinase inhibitors as treatments for inflammatory disorders. Selective kinase inhibitors, however, have proved disappointing, particularly in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. Consequently, to improve efficacy, attention has turned to multikinase inhibition. Methods: The activity of a narrow spectrum kinase inhibitor, TOP1210, has been compared with selective kinase inhibitors (BIRB-796, dasatinib and BAY-61-3606) in a range of kinase assays, inflammatory cell assays, and in inflamed biopsies from patients with ulcerative colitis (UC). Effects on recombinant P38α, Src, and Syk kinase activities were assessed using Z-lyte assays (Invitrogen, Paisley, United Kingdom). Anti-inflammatory effects were assessed by measurement of proinflammatory cytokine release from peripheral blood mononuclear cells, primary macrophages, HT29 cells, inflamed colonic UC biopsies, and myofibroblasts isolated from inflamed colonic UC mucosa. Results: TOP1210 potently inhibits P38α, Src, and Syk kinase activities. Similarly, TOP1210 demonstrates potent inhibitory activity against proinflammatory cytokine release in each of the cellular assays and the inflamed colonic UC biopsies and myofibroblasts isolated from inflamed colonic UC mucosa. Generally, the selective kinase inhibitors showed limited and weaker activity in the cellular assays compared with the broad inhibitory profile of TOP1210. However, combination of the selective inhibitors led to improved efficacy and potency in both cellular and UC biopsy assays. Conclusions: Targeted, multikinase inhibition with TOP1210 leads to a broad efficacy profile in both the innate and adaptive immune responses, with significant advantages over existing selective kinase approaches, and potentially offers a much improved therapeutic benefit in inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:27104822

  6. Cellular response to low dose radiation: Role of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase like kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Balajee, A.S.; Meador, J.A.; Su, Y.

    2011-03-24

    It is increasingly realized that human exposure either to an acute low dose or multiple chronic low doses of low LET radiation has the potential to cause different types of cancer. Therefore, the central theme of research for DOE and NASA is focused on understanding the molecular mechanisms and pathways responsible for the cellular response to low dose radiation which would not only improve the accuracy of estimating health risks but also help in the development of predictive assays for low dose radiation risks associated with tissue degeneration and cancer. The working hypothesis for this proposal is that the cellular mechanisms in terms of DNA damage signaling, repair and cell cycle checkpoint regulation are different for low and high doses of low LET radiation and that the mode of action of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase like kinases (PIKK: ATM, ATR and DNA-PK) determines the dose dependent cellular responses. The hypothesis will be tested at two levels: (I) Evaluation of the role of ATM, ATR and DNA-PK in cellular response to low and high doses of low LET radiation in simple in vitro human cell systems and (II) Determination of radiation responses in complex cell microenvironments such as human EpiDerm tissue constructs. Cellular responses to low and high doses of low LET radiation will be assessed from the view points of DNA damage signaling, DNA double strand break repair and cell cycle checkpoint regulation by analyzing the activities (i.e. post-translational modifications and kinetics of protein-protein interactions) of the key target proteins for PI-3 kinase like kinases both at the intra-cellular and molecular levels. The proteins chosen for this proposal are placed under three categories: (I) sensors/initiators include ATM ser1981, ATR, 53BP1, gamma-H2AX, MDC1, MRE11, Rad50 and Nbs1; (II) signal transducers include Chk1, Chk2, FANCD2 and SMC1; and (III) effectors include p53, CDC25A and CDC25C. The primary goal of this proposal is to elucidate the

  7. Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Hartig, Monika B; Prokisch, Holger; Meitinger, Thomas; Klopstock, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) is a hereditary progressive disorder and the most frequent form of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA). PKAN patients present with a progressive movement disorder, dysarthria, cognitive impairment and retinitis pigmentosa. In magnetic resonance imaging, PKAN patients exhibit the pathognonomic "eye of the tiger" sign in the globus pallidus which corresponds to iron accumulation and gliosis as shown in neuropathological examinations. The discovery of the disease causing mutations in PANK2 has linked the disorder to coenzyme A (CoA) metabolism. PANK2 is the only one out of four PANK genes encoding an isoform which localizes to mitochondria. At least two other NBIA genes (PLA2G6, C19orf12) encode proteins that share with PANK2 a mitochondrial localization and all are suggested to play a role in lipid homeostasis. With no causal therapy available for PKAN until now, only symptomatic treatment is possible. A multi-centre retrospective study with bilateral pallidal deep brain stimulation in patients with NBIA revealed a significant improvement of dystonia. Recently, studies in the PANK Drosophila model "fumble" revealed improvement by the compound pantethine which is hypothesized to feed an alternate CoA biosynthesis pathway. In addition, pilot studies with the iron chelator deferiprone that crosses the blood brain barrier showed a good safety profile and some indication of efficacy. An adequately powered randomized clinical trial will start in 2012. This review summarizes clinical presentation, neuropathology and pathogenesis of PKAN. PMID:22515741

  8. Genetics Home Reference: mevalonate kinase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... cytoskeleton), gene activity (expression), and protein production and modification. Most MVK gene mutations that cause mevalonate kinase ... What are the different ways in which a genetic condition can be inherited? More about Inheriting Genetic ...

  9. How versatile are inositol phosphate kinases?

    PubMed Central

    Shears, Stephen B

    2004-01-01

    This review assesses the extent and the significance of catalytic versatility shown by several inositol phosphate kinases: the inositol phosphate multikinase, the reversible Ins(1,3,4) P (3)/Ins(3,4,5,6) P (4) kinase, and the kinases that synthesize diphosphoinositol polyphosphates. Particular emphasis is placed upon data that are relevant to the situation in vivo. It will be shown that catalytic promiscuity towards different inositol phosphates is not typically an evolutionary compromise, but instead is sometimes exploited to facilitate tight regulation of physiological processes. This multifunctionality can add to the complexity with which inositol signalling pathways interact. This review also assesses some proposed additional functions for the catalytic domains, including transcriptional regulation, protein kinase activity and control by molecular 'switching', all in the context of growing interest in 'moonlighting' (gene-sharing) proteins. PMID:14567754

  10. Pyruvate kinase and the "high ATP syndrome".

    PubMed Central

    Staal, G E; Jansen, G; Roos, D

    1984-01-01

    The erythrocytes of a patient with the so-called "high ATP syndrome" were characterized by a high ATP content and low 2,3-diphosphoglycerate level. The pyruvate kinase activity was specifically increased (about twice the normal level). After separation of the erythrocytes according to age by discontinuous Percoll density centrifugation, the pyruvate kinase activity was found to be increased in all Percoll fractions. Pyruvate kinase of the patient's cells was characterized by a decreased K0.5 for the substrate phosphoenolpyruvate and no inhibition by ATP. The Michaelis constant (Km) value for ADP, the nucleotide specificity, the thermostability, pH optimum, and immunological specific activity were normal. It is concluded that the high pyruvate kinase activity is due to a shift in the R(elaxed) in equilibrium T(ight) equilibrium to the R(elaxed) form. PMID:6736249

  11. Ocular Toxicity of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Mary Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To review common tyrosine kinase inhibitors, as well as their ocular side effects and management. Data Sources A comprehensive literature search was conducted using cINahl®, Pubmed, and cochrane databases for articles published since 2004 with the following search terms: ocular toxicities, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, ophthalmology, adverse events, eye, and vision. Data Synthesis Tyrosine kinase inhibitors can cause significant eye toxicity. Conclusions Given the prevalence of new tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapies and the complexity of possible pathogenesis of ocular pathology, oncology nurses can appreciate the occurrence of ocular toxicities and the role of nursing in the management of these problems. Implications for Nursing Knowledge of the risk factors and etiology of ocular toxicity of targeted cancer therapies can guide nursing assessment, enhance patient education, and improve care management. Including a review of eye symptoms and vision issues in nursing assessment can enhance early detection and treatment of ocular toxicity. PMID:26906134

  12. ALBUMIN CAUSES INCREASED MYOSIN LIGHT CHAIN KINASE EXPRESSION IN ASTROCYTES VIA P38 MITOGEN ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Janet L.; Ralay Ranaivo, Hantamala; Patel, Fatima; Chrzaszcz, MaryAnn; Venkatesan, Charu; Wainwright, Mark S.

    2011-01-01

    Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) plays an important role in the reorganization of the cytoskeleton leading to disruption of vascular barrier integrity in multiple organs including the blood brain barrier (BBB) after traumatic brain injury (TBI). MLCK has been linked to transforming growth factor (TGF) and rho kinase signaling pathways, but the mechanisms regulating MLCK expression following TBI are not well understood. Albumin leaks into the brain parenchyma following TBI, activates glia and has been linked to TGF-β receptor signaling. We investigated the role of albumin in the increase in MLCK in astrocytes and the signaling pathways involved in this increase. Following midline closed-skull TBI in mice, there was a significant increase in MLCK-immunoreactive (IR) cells and albumin extravasation, which was prevented by treatment with the MLCK inhibitor ML-7. Using immunohistochemical methods, we identified the MCLK-IR cells as astrocytes. In primary astrocytes, exposure to albumin increased both isoforms of MLCK, 130 and 210. Inhibition of the TGF-β receptor partially prevented the albumin-induced increase in both isoforms, which was not prevented by inhibition of smad3. Inhibition of p38 MAPK, but not ERK, JNK or rho kinase also prevented this increase. These results are further evidence of a role of MCLK in the mechanisms of BBB compromise following TBI, and identify astrocytes as a cell type, in addition to endothelium in the BBB which express MLCK. These findings implicate albumin, acting through p38 MAPK, in a novel mechanism by which activation of MLCK following TBI may lead to compromise of the BBB. PMID:21360574

  13. Kinase-interacting substrate screening is a novel method to identify kinase substrates

    PubMed Central

    Amano, Mutsuki; Hamaguchi, Tomonari; Shohag, Md. Hasanuzzaman; Kozawa, Kei; Kato, Katsuhiro; Zhang, Xinjian; Yura, Yoshimitsu; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Kataoka, Chikako; Nishioka, Tomoki

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases play pivotal roles in numerous cellular functions; however, the specific substrates of each protein kinase have not been fully elucidated. We have developed a novel method called kinase-interacting substrate screening (KISS). Using this method, 356 phosphorylation sites of 140 proteins were identified as candidate substrates for Rho-associated kinase (Rho-kinase/ROCK2), including known substrates. The KISS method was also applied to additional kinases, including PKA, MAPK1, CDK5, CaMK1, PAK7, PKN, LYN, and FYN, and a lot of candidate substrates and their phosphorylation sites were determined, most of which have not been reported previously. Among the candidate substrates for Rho-kinase, several functional clusters were identified, including the polarity-associated proteins, such as Scrib. We found that Scrib plays a crucial role in the regulation of subcellular contractility by assembling into a ternary complex with Rho-kinase and Shroom2 in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. We propose that the KISS method is a comprehensive and useful substrate screen for various kinases. PMID:26101221

  14. Identifying Kinase Substrates via a Heavy ATP Kinase Assay and Quantitative Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Müller, André C; Giambruno, Roberto; Weißer, Juliane; Májek, Peter; Hofer, Alexandre; Bigenzahn, Johannes W; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Jessen, Henning J; Bennett, Keiryn L

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based in vitro kinase screens play an essential role in the discovery of kinase substrates, however, many suffer from biological and technical noise or necessitate genetically-altered enzyme-cofactor systems. We describe a method that combines stable γ-[(18)O2]-ATP with classical in vitro kinase assays within a contemporary quantitative proteomic workflow. Our approach improved detection of known substrates of the non-receptor tyrosine kinase ABL1; and identified potential, new in vitro substrates. PMID:27346722

  15. Identifying Kinase Substrates via a Heavy ATP Kinase Assay and Quantitative Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Müller, André C.; Giambruno, Roberto; Weißer, Juliane; Májek, Peter; Hofer, Alexandre; Bigenzahn, Johannes W.; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Jessen, Henning J.; Bennett, Keiryn L.

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based in vitro kinase screens play an essential role in the discovery of kinase substrates, however, many suffer from biological and technical noise or necessitate genetically-altered enzyme-cofactor systems. We describe a method that combines stable γ-[18O2]-ATP with classical in vitro kinase assays within a contemporary quantitative proteomic workflow. Our approach improved detection of known substrates of the non-receptor tyrosine kinase ABL1; and identified potential, new in vitro substrates. PMID:27346722

  16. Seeding collaborations to advance kinase science with the GSK Published Kinase Inhibitor Set (PKIS).

    PubMed

    Drewry, David H; Willson, Timothy M; Zuercher, William J

    2014-01-01

    To catalyze research on historically untargeted protein kinases, we created the PKIS, an annotated set of 367 small molecule kinase inhibitors. The set has been widely distributed to academic collaborators as an open access tool. It has been used to identify chemical starting points for development of chemical probes for orphan kinases and to investigate kinase signaling in high content phenotypic assays. Access to the set comes with few restrictions other than the requirement that assay results be released into the public domain for the benefit of the entire research community. Examples from the efforts of several collaborators are summarized. PMID:24283969

  17. Protein kinase domain of twitchin has protein kinase activity and an autoinhibitory region.

    PubMed

    Lei, J; Tang, X; Chambers, T C; Pohl, J; Benian, G M

    1994-08-19

    Twitchin is a 753-kDa polypeptide located in the muscle A-bands of the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. It consists of multiple copies of both fibronectin III and immunoglobulin C2 domains and, near the C terminus, a protein kinase domain with greatest homology to the catalytic domains of myosin light chain kinases. We have expressed and purified from Escherichia coli twitchin's protein kinase catalytic core and flanking sequences that do not include fibronectin III and immunoglobulin C2 domains. The protein was shown to phosphorylate a model substrate and to undergo autophosphorylation. The autophosphorylation occurs at a slow rate, attaining a maximum at 3 h with a stoichiometry of about 1.0 mol of phosphate/mol of protein, probably through an intramolecular mechanism. Sequence analysis of proteolytically derived phosphopeptides revealed that autophosphorylation occurred N-terminal to the catalytic core, predominantly at Thr-5910, with possible minor sites at Ser5912 and/or Ser-5913. This portion of twitchin (residues 5890-6268) was also phosphorylated in vitro by protein kinase C in the absence of calcium and phosphotidylserine, but not by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. By comparing the activities of three twitchin segments, the enzyme appears to be inhibited by the 60-amino acid residues lying just C-terminal to the kinase catalytic core. Thus, like a number of other protein kinases including myosin light chain kinases, the twitchin kinase appears to be autoregulated. PMID:8063727

  18. A Molecular Brake in the Kinase Hinge Region Regulates the Activity of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Chen,H.; Ma, J.; Li, W.; Eliseenkova, A.; Xu, C.; Neubert, T.; Miller, W.; Mohammadi, M.

    2007-01-01

    Activating mutations in the tyrosine kinase domain of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) cause cancer and skeletal disorders. Comparison of the crystal structures of unphosphorylated and phosphorylated wild-type FGFR2 kinase domains with those of seven unphosphorylated pathogenic mutants reveals an autoinhibitory 'molecular brake' mediated by a triad of residues in the kinase hinge region of all FGFRs. Structural analysis shows that many other RTKs, including PDGFRs, VEGFRs, KIT, CSF1R, FLT3, TEK, and TIE, are also subject to regulation by this brake. Pathogenic mutations activate FGFRs and other RTKs by disengaging the brake either directly or indirectly.

  19. Redundant kinase activation and resistance of EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Min; Fu, Li-Wu

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have shown dramatic effects against that tumors harboring EGFR activating mutations in the EGFR intracytoplasmic tyrosine kinase domain and resulted in cell apoptosis. Unfortunately, a number of patients ultimately developed resistance by multiple mechanisms. Thus, elucidation of the mechanism of resistance to EGFR-TKIs can provide strategies for blocking or reversing the situation. Recent studies suggested that redundant kinase activation plays pivotal roles in escaping from the effects of EGFR-TKIs. Herein, we aimed to characterize several molecular events involved in the resistance to EGFR-TKIs mediated by redundant kinase activation. PMID:25520855

  20. Myosin, Transgelin, and Myosin Light Chain Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Léguillette, Renaud; Laviolette, Michel; Bergeron, Celine; Zitouni, Nedjma; Kogut, Paul; Solway, Julian; Kachmar, Linda; Hamid, Qutayba; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Airway smooth muscle (SM) of patients with asthma exhibits a greater velocity of shortening (Vmax) than that of normal subjects, and this is thought to contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness. A greater Vmax can result from increased myosin activation. This has been reported in sensitized human airway SM and in models of asthma. A faster Vmax can also result from the expression of specific contractile proteins that promote faster cross-bridge cycling. This possibility has never been addressed in asthma. Objectives: We tested the hypothesis that the expression of genes coding for SM contractile proteins is altered in asthmatic airways and contributes to their increased Vmax. Methods: We quantified the expression of several genes that code for SM contractile proteins in mild allergic asthmatic and control human airway endobronchial biopsies. The function of these contractile proteins was tested using the in vitro motility assay. Measurements and Main Results: We observed an increased expression of the fast myosin heavy chain isoform, transgelin, and myosin light chain kinase in patients with asthma. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated the expression of these genes at the protein level. To address the functional significance of this overexpression, we purified tracheal myosin from the hyperresponsive Fisher rats, which also overexpress the fast myosin heavy chain isoform as compared with the normoresponsive Lewis rats, and found a faster rate of actin filament propulsion. Conversely, transgelin did not alter the rate of actin filament propulsion. Conclusions: Selective overexpression of airway smooth muscle genes in asthmatic airways leads to increased Vmax, thus contributing to the airway hyperresponsiveness observed in asthma. PMID:19011151

  1. Plant cytosolic pyruvate kinase: a kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Podestá, F E; Plaxton, W C

    1992-11-20

    The kinetic properties of cytosolic pyruvate kinase (PKc) from germinating castor oil seeds (COS) have been investigated. From experiments in which the free Mg2+ concentration was varied at constant levels of either the complexed or free forms of the substrates it was determined that the true substrates are the free forms of both phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and ADP. This conclusion is corroborated by the quenching of intrinsic PKC tryptophan fluorescence by free PEP and ADP. Mg2+ is bound as the free bivalent cation but is likely released as MgATP. The fluorescence data, substrate interaction kinetics, and pattern of inhibition by products and substrate analogues (adenosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) for ADP and phenyl phosphate for PEP) are compatible with a sequential, compulsory-ordered, Tri-Bi type kinetic reaction mechanism. PEP is the leading substrate, and pyruvate the last product to abandon the enzyme. The dissociation constant and limiting Km for free PEP (8.2 to 22 and 38 microM, respectively) and the limiting Km for free ADP (2.9 microM) are considerably lower than those reported for the non-plant enzyme. The results indicate that COS PKc exists naturally in an activated state, similar to the fructose 1,6-bisphosphate-activated yeast enzyme. This deduction is consistent with a previous study (F.E. Podestá and W.C. Plaxton (1991) Biochem. J. 279, 495-501) that failed to identify any allosteric activators for the COS PKc, but which proposed a regulatory mechanism based upon ATP levels and pH-dependent alterations in the enzyme's response to various metabolite inhibitors. As plant phosphofructokinases display potent inhibition by PEP, the overall rate of glycolytic flux from hexose 6-phosphate to pyruvate in the plant cytosol will ultimately depend upon variations in PEP levels brought about by the regulation of PKc. PMID:1445948

  2. Protein kinase A alterations in endocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Yu, B; Ragazzon, B; Rizk-Rabin, M; Bertherat, J

    2012-09-01

    Various molecular and cellular alterations of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) pathway have been observed in endocrine tumors. Since protein kinase A (PKA) is a central key component of the cAMP pathway, studies of the alterations of PKA subunits in endocrine tumors reveal new aspects of the mechanisms of cAMP pathway alterations in human diseases. So far, most alterations have been observed for the regulatory subunits, mainly PRKAR1A and to a lower extent, PRKAR2B. One of the best examples of such alteration today is the multiple neoplasia syndrome Carney complex (CNC). The most common endocrine gland manifestations of CNC are pituitary GH-secreting adenomas, thyroid tumors, testicular tumors, and ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome due to primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD). Heterozygous germline inactivating mutations of the PKA regulatory subunit RIα gene (PRKAR1A) are observed in about two-third of CNC patients, and also in patients with isolated PPNAD. PRKAR1A is considered as a tumor suppressor gene. Interestingly, these mutations can also be observed as somatic alterations in sporadic endocrine tumors. More than 120 different PRKAR1A mutations have been found today. Most of them lead to an unstable mutant mRNA, which will be degraded by nonsense mediated mRNA decay. In vitro and in vivo functional studies are in progress to understand the mechanisms of endocrine tumor development due to PKA regulatory subunits inactivation. PRKAR1A mutations stimulate in most models PKA activity, mimicking in some way cAMP pathway constitutive activation. Cross-talks with other signaling pathways summarized in this review have been described and might participate in endocrine tumorigenesis. PMID:22752956

  3. LEAD IN CANDLE EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The candle-using public should be made aware that the core of candle wicks may contain lead. Used as a stiffening agent to keep the wick out of the molten wax, lead can be emitted as particulate to the air and then deposited on indoor surfaces. To define the problem, 100 sets of ...

  4. Lead Poisoning in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin-Fu, Jane S.

    This publication is a guide to help social and health workers plan a preventive campaign against lead poisoning, a cause of mental retardation other neurological handicaps, and death among children. The main victims are 1- to 6-year-olds living in areas where deteriorating housing prevails. Among the causes of lead poisoning are: ingestion of…

  5. Rapid Lead Screening Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... and treated earlier before the damaging effects of lead poisoning occur. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services ... exceed 10μg/dL, the threshold used to indicate lead poisoning. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) estimates one ...

  6. Leading Educational Change Wisely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrester, Gillian

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author reviews Christopher Branson's book entitled "Leading Educational Change Wisely". The book provides an alternative and engaging perspective on leading educational change. Branson utilises "wisdom" as its central conceptual device to present a thought-provoking and philosophical account on how leaders are able to build a…

  7. Supersonic Leading Edge Receptivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maslov, Anatoly A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes experimental studies of leading edge boundary layer receptivity for imposed stream disturbances. Studies were conducted in the supersonic T-325 facility at ITAM and include data for both sharp and blunt leading edges. The data are in agreement with existing theory and should provide guidance for the development of more complete theories and numerical computations of this phenomena.

  8. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Moses, William W.

    1991-01-01

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses.

  9. Lead toxicity: a review

    PubMed Central

    Ara, Anjum; Usmani, Jawed Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Lead toxicity is an important environmental disease and its effects on the human body are devastating. There is almost no function in the human body which is not affected by lead toxicity. Though in countries like US and Canada the use of lead has been controlled up to a certain extent, it is still used vehemently in the developing countries. This is primarily because lead bears unique physical and chemical properties that make it suitable for a large number of applications for which humans have exploited its benefits from historical times and thus it has become a common environmental pollutant. Lead is highly persistent in the environment and because of its continuous use its levels rise in almost every country, posing serious threats. This article reviews the works listed in the literature with recent updates regarding the toxicity of lead. Focus is also on toxic effects of lead on the renal, reproductive and nervous system. Finally the techniques available for treating lead toxicity are presented with some recent updates. PMID:27486361

  10. Leading Education Reference Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Michael D.

    This annotated bibliography focuses on, but is not limited to, reference sources on education found in the library at St. Bonaventure University, New York. The ERIC database leads the list of leading education reference sources. Also mentioned are the "Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors" and the Academic Index (InfoTrak) computer system. Other…

  11. Recovering lead from batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David Prengaman, R.

    1995-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, a significant number of processes have been developed to recover lead from scrap batteries. These processes recover lead via hydrometallurgical processing of the paste component of the battery followed by electrowinning. A number of pilot plant operations have been conducted, but thus far none of the processes have become operational.

  12. Integration of Apoptosis Signal-Regulating Kinase 1-Mediated Stress Signaling with the Akt/Protein Kinase B-IκB Kinase Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Puckett, Mary C.; Goldman, Erinn H.; Cockrell, Lisa M.; Huang, Bei; Kasinski, Andrea L.; Du, Yuhong; Wang, Cun-Yu; Lin, Anning; Ichijo, Hidenori; Khuri, Fadlo

    2013-01-01

    Cellular processes are tightly controlled through well-coordinated signaling networks that respond to conflicting cues, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS), endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress signals, and survival factors to ensure proper cell function. We report here a direct interaction between inhibitor of κB kinase (IKK) and apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1), unveiling a critical node at the junction of survival, inflammation, and stress signaling networks. IKK can be activated by growth factor stimulation or tumor necrosis factor alpha engagement. IKK forms a complex with and phosphorylates ASK1 at a sensor site, Ser967, leading to the recruitment of 14-3-3, counteracts stress signal-triggered ASK1 activation, and suppresses ASK1-mediated functions. An inhibitory role of IKK in JNK signaling has been previously reported to depend on NF-κB-mediated gene expression. Our data suggest that IKK has a dual role: a transcription-dependent and a transcription-independent action in controlling the ASK1-JNK axis, coupling IKK to ROS and ER stress response. Direct phosphorylation of ASK1 by IKK also defines a novel IKK phosphorylation motif. Because of the intimate involvement of ASK1 in diverse diseases, the IKK/ASK1 interface offers a promising target for therapeutic development. PMID:23530055

  13. Fibronectin phosphorylation by ecto-protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Imada, Sumi; Sugiyama, Yayoi; Imada, Masaru )

    1988-12-01

    The presence of membrane-associated, extracellular protein kinase (ecto-protein kinase) and its substrate proteins was examined with serum-free cultures of Swiss 3T3 fibroblast. When cells were incubated with ({gamma}-{sup 32})ATP for 10 min at 37{degree}C, four proteins with apparent molecular weights between 150 and 220 kDa were prominently phosphorylated. These proteins were also radiolabeled by lactoperoxidase catalyzed iodination and were sensitive to mild tryptic digestion, suggesting that they localized on the cell surface or in the extracellular matrix. Phosphorylation of extracellular proteins with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP in intact cell culture is consistent with the existence of ecto-protein kinase. Anti-fibronectin antibody immunoprecipitated one of the phosphoproteins which comigrated with a monomer and a dimer form of fibronectin under reducing and nonreducing conditions of electrophoresis, respectively. The protein had affinity for gelatin as demonstrated by retention with gelatin-conjugated agarose. This protein substrate of ecto-protein kinase was thus concluded to be fibronectin. The sites of phosphorylation by ecto-protein kinase were compared with those of intracellularly phosphorylated fibronectin by the analysis of radiolabeled amino acids and peptides. Ecto-protein kinase phosphorylated fibronectin at serine and threonine residues which were distinct from the sites of intracellular fibronectin phosphorylation.

  14. Lead polluters get punished

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-09

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Justice last week cracked down on 36 US companies for polluting the environment with lead. EPA slapped fines totaling more than $10 million on 12 of the offending companies, and Justice filed 24 civil complaints. Hank Habicht, deputy administrator of the EPA, said that his agency's initiative comes after 8 months of intense - and presumably successful - efforts at locating and documenting lead pollution in the soil, air, and water supply. Most feared has been lead's ability to damage the intellectual development of children. This caused the agency, Habicht said, to look beyond the usual suspect - lead in the water supply - to lead-laced dirt in residential areas. Meanwhile, the Department of Justice is using the EPA contamination data as well. Twenty US attorneys have been assigned to pore over the federal environmental statutes, including the Clean Water Act and the Superfund Law, in order to file civil complaints.

  15. Lead toxicity: Current concerns

    SciTech Connect

    Goyer, R.A. )

    1993-04-01

    Over the 20-year period since the first issue of Environmental Health Perspectives was published, there has been considerable progress in the understanding of the potential toxicity of exposure to lead. Many of these advances have been reviewed in published symposia, conferences, and review papers in EHP. This brief review identifies major advances as well as a number of current concerns that present opportunities for prevention and intervention strategies. The major scientific advance has been the demonstration that blood lead (PbB) levels of 10-15 micrograms/dL in newborn and very young infants result in cognitive and behavioral deficits. Further support for this observation is being obtained by prospective or longitudinal studies presently in progress. The mechanism(s) for the central nervous system effects of lead is unclear but involve lead interactions within calcium-mediated intracellular messenger systems and neurotransmission. Effects of low-level lead exposure on blood pressure, particularly in adult men, may be related to the effect of lead on calcium-mediated control of vascular smooth muscle contraction and on the renin-angiotensin system. Reproductive effects of lead have long been suspected, but low-level effects have not been well studied. Whether lead is a carcinogen or its association with renal adenocarcinoma is a consequence of cystic nephropathy is uncertain. Major risk factors for lead toxicity in children in the United States include nutrition, particularly deficiencies of essential metals, calcium, iron, and zinc, and housing and socioeconomic status. A goal for the year 2000 is to reduce prevalence of blood lead levels exceeding 15 micrograms/dL. 97 refs.

  16. Lead-free piezoceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yasuyoshi; Takao, Hisaaki; Tani, Toshihiko; Nonoyama, Tatsuhiko; Takatori, Kazumasa; Homma, Takahiko; Nagaya, Toshiatsu; Nakamura, Masaya

    2004-11-01

    Lead has recently been expelled from many commercial applications and materials (for example, from solder, glass and pottery glaze) owing to concerns regarding its toxicity. Lead zirconium titanate (PZT) ceramics are high-performance piezoelectric materials, which are widely used in sensors, actuators and other electronic devices; they contain more than 60 weight per cent lead. Although there has been a concerted effort to develop lead-free piezoelectric ceramics, no effective alternative to PZT has yet been found. Here we report a lead-free piezoelectric ceramic with an electric-field-induced strain comparable to typical actuator-grade PZT. We achieved this through the combination of the discovery of a morphotropic phase boundary in an alkaline niobate-based perovskite solid solution, and the development of a processing route leading to highly <001> textured polycrystals. The ceramic exhibits a piezoelectric constant d33 (the induced charge per unit force applied in the same direction) of above 300picocoulombs per newton (pCN-1), and texturing the material leads to a peak d33 of 416pCN-1. The textured material also exhibits temperature-independent field-induced strain characteristics.

  17. Lead in calcium supplements.

    PubMed

    Scelfo, G M; Flegal, A R

    2000-04-01

    Intercalibrated measurements of lead in calcium supplements indicate the importance of rigorous analytical techniques to accurately quantify contaminant exposures in complex matrices. Without such techniques, measurements of lead concentrations in calcium supplements may be either erroneously low, by as much as 50%, or below the detection limit needed for new public health criteria. In this study, we determined the lead content of 136 brands of supplements that were purchased in 1996. The calcium in the products was derived from natural sources (bonemeal, dolomite, or oyster shell) or was synthesized and/or refined (chelated and nonchelated calcium). The dried products were acid digested and analyzed for lead by high resolution-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The method's limit of quantitation averaged 0.06 microg/g, with a coefficient of variation of 1.7% and a 90-100% lead recovery of a bonemeal standard reference material. Two-thirds of those calcium supplements failed to meet the 1999 California criteria for acceptable lead levels (1.5 microg/daily dose of calcium) in consumer products. The nonchelated synthesized and/or refined calcium products, specifically antacids and infant formulas, had the lowest lead concentrations, ranging from nondetectable to 2.9 microg Pb/g calcium, and had the largest proportion of brands meeting the new criteria (85% of the antacids and 100% of the infant formulas). PMID:10753088

  18. Lead in calcium supplements.

    PubMed Central

    Scelfo, G M; Flegal, A R

    2000-01-01

    Intercalibrated measurements of lead in calcium supplements indicate the importance of rigorous analytical techniques to accurately quantify contaminant exposures in complex matrices. Without such techniques, measurements of lead concentrations in calcium supplements may be either erroneously low, by as much as 50%, or below the detection limit needed for new public health criteria. In this study, we determined the lead content of 136 brands of supplements that were purchased in 1996. The calcium in the products was derived from natural sources (bonemeal, dolomite, or oyster shell) or was synthesized and/or refined (chelated and nonchelated calcium). The dried products were acid digested and analyzed for lead by high resolution-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The method's limit of quantitation averaged 0.06 microg/g, with a coefficient of variation of 1.7% and a 90-100% lead recovery of a bonemeal standard reference material. Two-thirds of those calcium supplements failed to meet the 1999 California criteria for acceptable lead levels (1.5 microg/daily dose of calcium) in consumer products. The nonchelated synthesized and/or refined calcium products, specifically antacids and infant formulas, had the lowest lead concentrations, ranging from nondetectable to 2.9 microg Pb/g calcium, and had the largest proportion of brands meeting the new criteria (85% of the antacids and 100% of the infant formulas). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10753088

  19. Virtual screening of selective multitarget kinase inhibitors by combinatorial support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Ma, X H; Wang, R; Tan, C Y; Jiang, Y Y; Lu, T; Rao, H B; Li, X Y; Go, M L; Low, B C; Chen, Y Z

    2010-10-01

    Multitarget agents have been increasingly explored for enhancing efficacy and reducing countertarget activities and toxicities. Efficient virtual screening (VS) tools for searching selective multitarget agents are desired. Combinatorial support vector machines (C-SVM) were tested as VS tools for searching dual-inhibitors of 11 combinations of 9 anticancer kinase targets (EGFR, VEGFR, PDGFR, Src, FGFR, Lck, CDK1, CDK2, GSK3). C-SVM trained on 233-1,316 non-dual-inhibitors correctly identified 26.8%-57.3% (majority >36%) of the 56-230 intra-kinase-group dual-inhibitors (equivalent to the 50-70% yields of two independent individual target VS tools), and 12.2% of the 41 inter-kinase-group dual-inhibitors. C-SVM were fairly selective in misidentifying as dual-inhibitors 3.7%-48.1% (majority <20%) of the 233-1,316 non-dual-inhibitors of the same kinase pairs and 0.98%-4.77% of the 3,971-5,180 inhibitors of other kinases. C-SVM produced low false-hit rates in misidentifying as dual-inhibitors 1,746-4,817 (0.013%-0.036%) of the 13.56 M PubChem compounds, 12-175 (0.007%-0.104%) of the 168 K MDDR compounds, and 0-84 (0.0%-2.9%) of the 19,495-38,483 MDDR compounds similar to the known dual-inhibitors. C-SVM was compared to other VS methods Surflex-Dock, DOCK Blaster, kNN and PNN against the same sets of kinase inhibitors and the full set or subset of the 1.02 M Zinc clean-leads data set. C-SVM produced comparable dual-inhibitor yields, slightly better false-hit rates for kinase inhibitors, and significantly lower false-hit rates for the Zinc clean-leads data set. Combinatorial SVM showed promising potential for searching selective multitarget agents against intra-kinase-group kinases without explicit knowledge of multitarget agents. PMID:20712327

  20. Ubiquitin-Mediated Degradation of Aurora Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Lindon, Catherine; Grant, Rhys; Min, Mingwei

    2016-01-01

    The Aurora kinases are essential regulators of mitosis in eukaryotes. In somatic cell divisions of higher eukaryotes, the paralogs Aurora kinase A (AurA) and Aurora kinase B (AurB) play non-overlapping roles that depend on their distinct spatiotemporal activities. These mitotic roles of Aurora kinases depend on their interactions with different partners that direct them to different mitotic destinations and different substrates: AurB is a component of the chromosome passenger complex that orchestrates the tasks of chromosome segregation and cytokinesis, while AurA has many known binding partners and mitotic roles, including a well-characterized interaction with TPX2 that mediates its role in mitotic spindle assembly. Beyond the spatial control conferred by different binding partners, Aurora kinases are subject to temporal control of their activation and inactivation. Ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis is a critical route to irreversible inactivation of these kinases, which must occur for ordered transition from mitosis back to interphase. Both AurA and AurB undergo targeted proteolysis after anaphase onset as substrates of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) ubiquitin ligase, even while they continue to regulate steps during mitotic exit. Temporal control of Aurora kinase destruction ensures that AurB remains active at the midbody during cytokinesis long after AurA activity has been largely eliminated from the cell. Differential destruction of Aurora kinases is achieved despite the fact that they are targeted at the same time and by the same ubiquitin ligase, making these substrates an interesting case study for investigating molecular determinants of ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis in higher eukaryotes. The prevalence of Aurora overexpression in cancers and their potential as therapeutic targets add importance to the task of understanding the molecular determinants of Aurora kinase stability. Here, we review what is known about ubiquitin-mediated targeting

  1. Structural basis for UCN-01 (7-hydroxystaurosporine) specificity and PDK1 (3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1) inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Komander, David; Kular, Gursant S; Bain, Jennifer; Elliott, Matthew; Alessi, Dario R; Van Aalten, Daan M F

    2003-01-01

    PDK1 (3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1) is a member of the AGC (cAMP-dependent, cGMP-dependent, protein kinase C) family of protein kinases, and has a key role in insulin and growth-factor signalling through phosphorylation and subsequent activation of a number of other AGC kinase family members, such as protein kinase B. The staurosporine derivative UCN-01 (7-hydroxystaurosporine) has been reported to be a potent inhibitor for PDK1, and is currently undergoing clinical trials for the treatment of cancer. Here, we report the crystal structures of staurosporine and UCN-01 in complex with the kinase domain of PDK1. We show that, although staurosporine and UCN-01 interact with the PDK1 active site in an overall similar manner, the UCN-01 7-hydroxy group, which is not present in staurosporine, generates direct and water-mediated hydrogen bonds with active-site residues. Inhibition data from UCN-01 tested against a panel of 29 different kinases show a different pattern of inhibition compared with staurosporine. We discuss how these differences in inhibition could be attributed to specific interactions with the additional 7-hydroxy group, as well as the size of the 7-hydroxy-group-binding pocket. This information could lead to opportunities for structure-based optimization of PDK1 inhibitors. PMID:12892559

  2. CaMKII and at least two unidentified kinases phosphorylate regulatory light chain in non-contracting cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Eikemo, Hilde; Moltzau, Lise Román; Nguyen, Cam H T; Levy, Finn Olav; Skomedal, Tor; Osnes, Jan-Bjørn

    2016-08-12

    In cardiac tissue, regulatory light chain (RLC, myosin light chain 2) phosphorylation (Ser(15)) leads to modulation of muscle contraction through Ca(2+)-sensitization. To elucidate which kinases that are involved in the basal (diastolic phase) RLC phosphorylation, we studied non-contracting adult rat cardiomyocytes. RLC kinase activities in situ were unmasked by maximally inhibiting myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) by calyculin A in the absence and presence of various protein kinase inhibitors. Surprisingly MLCK did not contribute to the phosphorylation of RLC in the non-contracting cardiomyocytes. Two kinase activity groups were revealed by different sensitivities to staurosporine. The fraction with the highest sensitivity to staurosporine was inhibited by KN-93, a selective CaMKII inhibitor, producing a 23% ± 7% reduction in RLC phosphorylation. Calmodulin antagonism (W7) and reduction in Ca(2+) (EGTA) combined with low concentration of staurosporine caused a larger decrease in RLC phosphorylation than staurosporine alone. These data strongly suggest that in addition to CaMKII, there is another Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase and a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-independent kinase phosphorylating RLC. Thus the RLC phosphorylation seems to be ensured by redundant kinase activities. PMID:27237977

  3. Reconstitution of LHC phosphorylation by a protein kinase isolated from spinach thylakoids

    SciTech Connect

    Hind, G.; Coughlan, S.

    1986-01-01

    Protein kinase activity is responsible for phosphorylating the (LHC) light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b protein complex of photosystem II, leading to its migration in the thylakoid membrane, the fractional redistribution of excitation energy between photosystems II and I, and the phenomenon of state transition. Previous work from this laboratory described the purification to homogeneity of a thylakoid protein kinase which catalyzes the phosphorylation of isolated LHC at 1-10% of a rate estimated for this enzyme and substrate when resident together in the thylakoid membrane. In this communication, we report rates of LHC phosphorylation that are close to physiological, in a system comprised of isolated purified protein kinase (LHCK) and native LHC. 9 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  4. Zn(II)-Coordinated Quantum Dot-FRET Nanosensors for the Detection of Protein Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Butaek; Park, Ji-In; Lee, Kyung Jin; Lee, Jin-Won; Kim, Tae-Wuk; Kim, Young-Pil

    2015-01-01

    We report a simple detection of protein kinase activity using Zn(II)-mediated fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) between quantum dots (QDs) and dye-tethered peptides. With neither complex chemical ligands nor surface modification of QDs, Zn(II) was the only metal ion that enabled the phosphorylated peptides to be strongly attached on the carboxyl groups of the QD surface via metal coordination, thus leading to a significant FRET efficiency. As a result, protein kinase activity in intermixed solution was efficiently detected by QD-FRET via Zn(II) coordination, especially when the peptide substrate was combined with affinity-based purification. We also found that mono- and di-phosphorylation in the peptide substrate could be discriminated by the Zn(II)-mediated QD-FRET. Our approach is expected to find applications for studying physiological function and signal transduction with respect to protein kinase activity. PMID:26213934

  5. Tyrosine phosphorylation of mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 is important for cancer metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Hitosugi, Taro; Fan, Jun; Chung, Tae-Wook; Lythgoe, Katherine; Wang, Xu; Xie, Jianxin; Ge, Qingyuan; Gu, Ting-Lei; Polakiewicz, Roberto D.; Roesel, Johannes L.; Chen, Zhuo (Georgia); Boggon, Titus J.; Lonial, Sagar; Fu, Haian; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Kang, Sumin; Chen, Jing

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Many tumor cells rely on aerobic glycolysis instead of oxidative phosphorylation for their continued proliferation and survival. Myc and HIF-1 are believed to promote such a metabolic switch by, in part, upregulating gene expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) kinase 1 (PDHK1), which phosphorylates and inactivates mitochondrial PDH and consequently pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC). Here we report that tyrosine phosphorylation enhances PDHK1 kinase activity by promoting ATP and PDC binding. Functional PDC can form in mitochondria outside of matrix in some cancer cells and PDHK1 is commonly tyrosine phosphorylated in human cancers by diverse oncogenic tyrosine kinases localized to different mitochondrial compartments. Expression of phosphorylation-deficient, catalytic hypomorph PDHK1 mutants in cancer cells leads to decreased cell proliferation under hypoxia and increased oxidative phosphorylation with enhanced mitochondrial utilization of pyruvate, and reduced tumor growth in xenograft nude mice. Together, tyrosine phosphorylation activates PDHK1 to promote the Warburg effect and tumor growth. PMID:22195962

  6. Cucurbitacins: potential candidates targeting mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway for treatment of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mahmoud S; Halaweish, Fathi T

    2014-04-01

    Cucurbitacins (Cucs) have been classified as signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 inhibitors. Kinase inhibition has been a validated drug target in multiple types of malignancies. B-RAF mutations are highly expressed in the melanoma. Our hypothesis is the Cucs can be a potential candidate to inhibit the signaling kinase pathway. The research presented is the evaluation of Cucs, as B-RAF and MEK1 kinase inhibitors. Virtual screening methods were employed to identify lead compounds. The hypothesis was tested on mutant B-RAF cell lines, A-375 and Sk-Mel-28 cell lines to determine the activity toward melanoma. A series of natural Cucs show an improved activity toward Sk-Mel-28 and A-375 cell lines. Cucs show potential inhibition for the total and phosphorylated ERK using ELISA kits. Cucs could be potential candidate for inhibiting cell growth. PMID:23368732

  7. Checkpoint kinase inhibitors: SAR and radioprotective properties of a series of 2-arylbenzimidazoles.

    PubMed

    Arienti, Kristen L; Brunmark, Anders; Axe, Frank U; McClure, Kelly; Lee, Alice; Blevitt, Jon; Neff, Danielle K; Huang, Liming; Crawford, Shelby; Pandit, Chennagiri R; Karlsson, Lars; Breitenbucher, J Guy

    2005-03-24

    The discovery of a series of novel, potent, and highly selective inhibitors of the DNA damage control kinase chk2 is disclosed. Here we report the first SAR study around inhibitors of this kinase. High-throughput screening of purified human chk2 led to the identification of a novel series of 2-arylbenzimidazole inhibitors of the kinase. Optimization was facilitated using homology models of chk2 and docking of inhibitors, leading to the highly potent 2-arylbenzimidazole 2h (IC(50) 15 nM). Compound 2h is an ATP-competitive inhibitor of chk2 that dose dependently protects human CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells from apoptosis due to ionizing radiation. This work suggests that a selective small molecule inhibitor of chk2 could be a useful adjuvant to radiotherapy, increasing the therapeutic window of such treatment. PMID:15771432

  8. Cyclin-dependent kinases inhibitors as potential anticancer, antineurodegenerative, antiviral and antiparasitic agents.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Laurent

    2000-04-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) play a key role in the cell division cycle, in neuronal functions, in transcription and in apoptosis. Intensive screening with these kinases as targets has lead to the identification of highly selective and potent small - molecule inhibitors. Co-crystallization with CDK2 shows that these flat heterocyclic hydrophobic compounds bind through two or three hydrogen bonds with the side chains of two amino acids located in the ATP-binding pocket of the kinase. These inhibitors are anti-proliferative; they arrest cells in G1 and in G2/M phase. Furthermore they facilitate or even trigger apoptosis in proliferating cells while they protect neuronal cells and thymocytes from apoptosis. The potential use of these inhibitors is being extensively evaluated for cancer chemotherapy and also in other therapeutic areas: neurology (Alzheimer's disease), cardiovascular (restenosis, angiogenesis), nephrology (glomerulonephritis), parasitology (Plasmodium, Trypanosoma, Toxoplasma, etc.) and virology (cytomegalovirus, HIV, herpes virus). Copyright 2000 Harcourt Publishers Ltd. PMID:11498372

  9. A woman with recurrent "infections" since birth--a new mevalonate kinase mutation.

    PubMed

    Farber, C M; Wanders, J A W; Goffard, J C; Parma, J

    2011-01-01

    A tired 32-year-old woman complaining of tiredness was referred for work-up of a possible immune deficiency. She had a history of recurrent infections since birth, which usually responded to antibiotics within a few days. Her mother, a nurse, had reported that early charts had disappeared. Munchausen's by proxy was suspected for years. Careful anamnesis indicated possible recurrent fever. Serum IgD levels were high, which led us to suspect Hyper IgD Syndrome. Sequencing of the mevalonate kinase gene revealed 2 mutations, leading to amino acid substitutions: one already described (V3771) and R40W: never reported before. Mevalonate kinase activity was very low in the patient's peripheral blood cells. We used the "Poly Phen" prediction program successfully. Our experiments confirmed the diagnosis of mevalonate kinase deficiency. We used steroids to abort recurrent crises. PMID:21630610

  10. A Covalent Cysteine-Targeting Kinase Inhibitor of Ire1 Permits Allosteric Control of Endoribonuclease Activity.

    PubMed

    Waller, Daniel D; Jansen, Gregor; Golizeh, Makan; Martel-Lorion, Chloe; Dejgaard, Kurt; Shiao, Tze Chieh; Mancuso, John; Tsantrizos, Youla S; Roy, René; Sebag, Michael; Sleno, Lekha; Thomas, David Y

    2016-05-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) initiated by the transmembrane kinase/ribonuclease Ire1 has been implicated in a variety of diseases. Ire1, with its unique position in the UPR, is an ideal target for the development of therapies; however, the identification of specific kinase inhibitors is challenging. Recently, the development of covalent inhibitors has gained great momentum because of the irreversible deactivation of the target. We identified and determined the mechanism of action of the Ire1-inhibitory compound UPRM8. MS analysis revealed that UPRM8 inhibition occurs by covalent adduct formation at a conserved cysteine at the regulatory DFG+2 position in the Ire1 kinase activation loop. Mutational analysis of the target cysteine residue identified both UPRM8-resistant and catalytically inactive Ire1 mutants. We describe a novel covalent inhibition mechanism of UPRM8, which can serve as a lead for the rational design and optimization of inhibitors of human Ire1. PMID:26792008

  11. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Transactivation Is Required for Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Activation by Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors in HaCaT Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ockenga, Wymke; Kühne, Sina; Bocksberger, Simone; Banning, Antje; Tikkanen, Ritva

    2014-01-01

    Non-neuronal acetylcholine plays a substantial role in the human skin by influencing adhesion, migration, proliferation and differentiation of keratinocytes. These processes are regulated by the Mitogen-Activated Protein (MAP) kinase cascade. Here we show that in HaCaT keratinocytes all five muscarinic receptor subtypes are expressed, but M1 and M3 are the subtypes involved in mitogenic signaling. Stimulation with the cholinergic agonist carbachol leads to activation of the MAP kinase extracellular signal regulated kinase, together with the protein kinase Akt. The activation is fully dependent on the transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which even appears to be the sole pathway for the muscarinic receptors to facilitate MAP kinase activation in HaCaT cells. The transactivation pathway involves a triple-membrane-passing process, based on activation of matrix metalloproteases, and extracellular ligand release; whereas phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, Src family kinases or protein kinase C do not appear to be involved in MAP kinase activation. Furthermore, phosphorylation, ubiquitination and endocytosis of the EGF receptor after cholinergic transactivation are different from that induced by a direct stimulation with EGF, suggesting that ligands other than EGF itself mediate the cholinergic transactivation. PMID:25421240

  12. Leading Causes of Blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Vision Leading Causes of Blindness Past Issues / Winter 2012 ... of the lenses in your eyes. They affect vision and are very common in older people. More ...

  13. Lead levels - blood

    MedlinePlus

    Blood lead levels ... A blood sample is needed. Most of the time blood is drawn from a vein located on the inside ... may be used to puncture the skin. The blood collects in a small glass tube called a ...

  14. Leading Causes of Blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature: Vision Leading Causes of Blindness Past Issues / Summer 2008 ... of the lenses in your eyes. They affect vision and are very common in older people. More ...

  15. Chemical Proteomics Reveals Ferrochelatase as a Common Off-target of Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Klaeger, Susan; Gohlke, Bjoern; Perrin, Jessica; Gupta, Vipul; Heinzlmeir, Stephanie; Helm, Dominic; Qiao, Huichao; Bergamini, Giovanna; Handa, Hiroshi; Savitski, Mikhail M; Bantscheff, Marcus; Médard, Guillaume; Preissner, Robert; Kuster, Bernhard

    2016-05-20

    Many protein kinases are valid drug targets in oncology because they are key components of signal transduction pathways. The number of clinical kinase inhibitors is on the rise, but these molecules often exhibit polypharmacology, potentially eliciting desired and toxic effects. Therefore, a comprehensive assessment of a compound's target space is desirable for a better understanding of its biological effects. The enzyme ferrochelatase (FECH) catalyzes the conversion of protoporphyrin IX into heme and was recently found to be an off-target of the BRAF inhibitor Vemurafenib, likely explaining the phototoxicity associated with this drug in melanoma patients. This raises the question of whether FECH binding is a more general feature of kinase inhibitors. To address this, we applied a chemical proteomics approach using kinobeads to evaluate 226 clinical kinase inhibitors for their ability to bind FECH. Surprisingly, low or submicromolar FECH binding was detected for 29 of all compounds tested and isothermal dose response measurements confirmed target engagement in cells. We also show that Vemurafenib, Linsitinib, Neratinib, and MK-2461 reduce heme levels in K562 cells, verifying that drug binding leads to a loss of FECH activity. Further biochemical and docking experiments identified the protoporphyrin pocket in FECH as one major drug binding site. Since the genetic loss of FECH activity leads to photosensitivity in humans, our data strongly suggest that FECH inhibition by kinase inhibitors is the molecular mechanism triggering photosensitivity in patients. We therefore suggest that a FECH assay should generally be part of the preclinical molecular toxicology package for the development of kinase inhibitors. PMID:26863403

  16. Mediator kinase module and human tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Alison D.; Oldenbroek, Marieke; Boyer, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    Mediator is a conserved multi-subunit signal processor through which regulatory informatiosn conveyed by gene-specific transcription factors is transduced to RNA Polymerase II (Pol II). In humans, MED13, MED12, CDK8 and Cyclin C (CycC) comprise a four-subunit “kinase” module that exists in variable association with a 26-subunit Mediator core. Genetic and biochemical studies have established the Mediator kinase module as a major ingress of developmental and oncogenic signaling through Mediator, and much of its function in signal-dependent gene regulation derives from its resident CDK8 kinase activity. For example, CDK8-targeted substrate phosphorylation impacts transcription factor half-life, Pol II activity and chromatin chemistry and functional status. Recent structural and biochemical studies have revealed a precise network of physical and functional subunit interactions required for proper kinase module activity. Accordingly, pathologic change in this activity through altered expression or mutation of constituent kinase module subunits can have profound consequences for altered signaling and tumor formation. Herein, we review the structural organization, biological function and oncogenic potential of the Mediator kinase module. We focus principally on tumor-associated alterations in kinase module subunits for which mechanistic relationships as opposed to strictly correlative associations are established. These considerations point to an emerging picture of the Mediator kinase module as an oncogenic unit, one in which pathogenic activation/deactivation through component change drives tumor formation through perturbation of signal-dependent gene regulation. It follows that therapeutic strategies to combat CDK8-driven tumors will involve targeted modulation of CDK8 activity or pharmacologic manipulation of dysregulated CDK8-dependent signaling pathways. PMID:26182352

  17. Phospho-kinase profile of colorectal tumors guides in the selection of multi-kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Montero, Juan Carlos; Corrales-Sanchez, Verónica; Morales, Jorge Carlos; Núñez, Luz-Elena; Morís, Francisco; Pandiella, Atanasio; Ocaña, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases play a central role in the oncogenesis of colorectal tumors and are attractive druggable targets. Detection of activated kinases within a tumor could open avenues for drug selection and optimization of new kinase inhibitors. By using a phosphokinase arrays with human colorectal tumors we identified activated kinases, including the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR), components of the PI3K/mTOR pathway (AKT and S6), and STAT, among others. A pharmacological screening with kinase inhibitors against these proteins helped us to identify a new kinase inhibitor, termed EC-70124 that showed the highest anti-proliferative activity in cell lines. EC-70124 also inhibited cell migration and biochemical experiments demonstrated its effect targeting the PI3K/mTOR pathway. This drug also arrested cells at G2/M and induced apoptosis. Experiments in combination with standard chemotherapy used in the clinical setting indicated a synergistic effect. EC-70124 also reduced tumor growth in vivo and inhibited pS6 in the implanted tumors. In conclusion, by studying the kinase profile of colorectal tumors, we identified relevant activated pathways, and a new multi-kinase compound with significant antitumor properties. PMID:26418718

  18. Phospho-kinase profile of colorectal tumors guides in the selection of multi-kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Heras, Gemma; Cuenca-López, María Dolores; Montero, Juan Carlos; Corrales-Sanchez, Verónica; Morales, Jorge Carlos; Núñez, Luz-Elena; Morís, Francisco; Pandiella, Atanasio; Ocaña, Alberto

    2015-10-13

    Protein kinases play a central role in the oncogenesis of colorectal tumors and are attractive druggable targets. Detection of activated kinases within a tumor could open avenues for drug selection and optimization of new kinase inhibitors. By using a phosphokinase arrays with human colorectal tumors we identified activated kinases, including the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR), components of the PI3K/mTOR pathway (AKT and S6), and STAT, among others. A pharmacological screening with kinase inhibitors against these proteins helped us to identify a new kinase inhibitor, termed EC-70124 that showed the highest anti-proliferative activity in cell lines. EC-70124 also inhibited cell migration and biochemical experiments demonstrated its effect targeting the PI3K/mTOR pathway. This drug also arrested cells at G2/M and induced apoptosis. Experiments in combination with standard chemotherapy used in the clinical setting indicated a synergistic effect. EC-70124 also reduced tumor growth in vivo and inhibited pS6 in the implanted tumors. In conclusion, by studying the kinase profile of colorectal tumors, we identified relevant activated pathways, and a new multi-kinase compound with significant antitumor properties. PMID:26418718

  19. CDPKs are dual-specificity protein kinases and tyrosine autophosphorylation attenuates kinase activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs or CPKs) are classified as serine/threonine protein kinases but we made the surprising observation that soybean CDPK' and several Arabidopsis isoforms (AtCPK4 and AtCPK34) could also autophosphorylate on tyrosine residues. In studies with His6-GmCDPK', we ide...

  20. Co-inhibition of polo-like kinase 1 and Aurora kinases promotes mitotic catastrophe.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingjing; Hong, Myung Jin; Chow, Jeremy P H; Man, Wing Yu; Mak, Joyce P Y; Ma, Hoi Tang; Poon, Randy Y C

    2015-04-20

    Mitosis is choreographed by a number of protein kinases including polo-like kinases and Aurora kinases. As these kinases are frequently dysregulated in cancers, small-molecule inhibitors have been developed for targeted anticancer therapies. Given that PLK1 and Aurora kinases possess both unique functions as well as co-regulate multiple mitotic events, whether pharmacological inhibition of these kinases together can enhance mitotic catastrophe remains an outstanding issue to be determined. Using concentrations of inhibitors that did not induce severe mitotic defects on their own, we found that both the metaphase arrest and mitotic slippage induced by inhibitors targeting Aurora A and Aurora B (MK-5108 and Barasertib respectively) were enhanced by a PLK1 inhibitor (BI 2536). We found that PLK1 is overexpressed in cells from nasopharyngeal carcinoma, a highly invasive cancer with poor prognosis, in comparison to normal nasopharyngeal epithelial cells. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells were more sensitive to BI 2536 as a single agent and co-inhibition with Aurora kinases than normal cells. These observations underscore the mechanism and potential benefits of targeting PLK1 and Aurora kinases to induce mitotic catastrophe in cancer cells. PMID:25871386

  1. KinasePA: Phosphoproteomics data annotation using hypothesis driven kinase perturbation analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pengyi; Patrick, Ellis; Humphrey, Sean J; Ghazanfar, Shila; James, David E; Jothi, Raja; Yang, Jean Yee Hwa

    2016-07-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based quantitative phosphoproteomics has become a key approach for proteome-wide profiling of phosphorylation in tissues and cells. Traditional experimental design often compares a single treatment with a control, whereas increasingly more experiments are designed to compare multiple treatments with respect to a control. To this end, the development of bioinformatic tools that can integrate multiple treatments and visualise kinases and substrates under combinatorial perturbations is vital for dissecting concordant and/or independent effects of each treatment. Here, we propose a hypothesis driven kinase perturbation analysis (KinasePA) to annotate and visualise kinases and their substrates that are perturbed by various combinatorial effects of treatments in phosphoproteomics experiments. We demonstrate the utility of KinasePA through its application to two large-scale phosphoproteomics datasets and show its effectiveness in dissecting kinases and substrates within signalling pathways driven by unique combinations of cellular stimuli and inhibitors. We implemented and incorporated KinasePA as part of the "directPA" R package available from the comprehensive R archive network (CRAN). Furthermore, KinasePA also has an interactive web interface that can be readily applied to annotate user provided phosphoproteomics data (http://kinasepa.pengyiyang.org). PMID:27145998

  2. The SH2 domain of Abl kinases regulates kinase autophosphorylation by controlling activation loop accessibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamontanara, Allan Joaquim; Georgeon, Sandrine; Tria, Giancarlo; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Hantschel, Oliver

    2014-11-01

    The activity of protein kinases is regulated by multiple molecular mechanisms, and their disruption is a common driver of oncogenesis. A central and almost universal control element of protein kinase activity is the activation loop that utilizes both conformation and phosphorylation status to determine substrate access. In this study, we use recombinant Abl tyrosine kinases and conformation-specific kinase inhibitors to quantitatively analyse structural changes that occur after Abl activation. Allosteric SH2-kinase domain interactions were previously shown to be essential for the leukemogenesis caused by the Bcr-Abl oncoprotein. We find that these allosteric interactions switch the Abl activation loop from a closed to a fully open conformation. This enables the trans-autophosphorylation of the activation loop and requires prior phosphorylation of the SH2-kinase linker. Disruption of the SH2-kinase interaction abolishes activation loop phosphorylation. Our analysis provides a molecular mechanism for the SH2 domain-dependent activation of Abl that may also regulate other tyrosine kinases.

  3. Co-inhibition of polo-like kinase 1 and Aurora kinases promotes mitotic catastrophe

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingjing; Hong, Myung Jin; Chow, Jeremy P.H.; Man, Wing Yu; Mak, Joyce P.Y.; Ma, Hoi Tang; Poon, Randy Y.C.

    2015-01-01

    Mitosis is choreographed by a number of protein kinases including polo-like kinases and Aurora kinases. As these kinases are frequently dysregulated in cancers, small-molecule inhibitors have been developed for targeted anticancer therapies. Given that PLK1 and Aurora kinases possess both unique functions as well as co-regulate multiple mitotic events, whether pharmacological inhibition of these kinases together can enhance mitotic catastrophe remains an outstanding issue to be determined. Using concentrations of inhibitors that did not induce severe mitotic defects on their own, we found that both the metaphase arrest and mitotic slippage induced by inhibitors targeting Aurora A and Aurora B (MK-5108 and Barasertib respectively) were enhanced by a PLK1 inhibitor (BI 2536). We found that PLK1 is overexpressed in cells from nasopharyngeal carcinoma, a highly invasive cancer with poor prognosis, in comparison to normal nasopharyngeal epithelial cells. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells were more sensitive to BI 2536 as a single agent and co-inhibition with Aurora kinases than normal cells. These observations underscore the mechanism and potential benefits of targeting PLK1 and Aurora kinases to induce mitotic catastrophe in cancer cells. PMID:25871386

  4. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, S.E.; Moses, W.W.

    1991-05-14

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses. 3 figures.

  5. PAK4 promotes kinase-independent stabilization of RhoU to modulate cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Dart, Anna E.; Box, Gary M.; Court, William; Gale, Madeline E.; Brown, John P.; Pinder, Sarah E.; Eccles, Suzanne A.

    2015-01-01

    P21-activated kinase 4 (PAK4) is a Cdc42 effector protein thought to regulate cell adhesion disassembly in a kinase-dependent manner. We found that PAK4 expression is significantly higher in high-grade human breast cancer patient samples, whereas depletion of PAK4 modifies cell adhesion dynamics of breast cancer cells. Surprisingly, systematic analysis of PAK4 functionality revealed that PAK4-driven adhesion turnover is neither dependent on Cdc42 binding nor kinase activity. Rather, reduced expression of PAK4 leads to a concomitant loss of RhoU expression. We report that RhoU is targeted for ubiquitination by the Rab40A–Cullin 5 complex and demonstrate that PAK4 protects RhoU from ubiquitination in a kinase-independent manner. Overexpression of RhoU rescues the PAK4 depletion phenotype, whereas loss of RhoU expression reduces cell adhesion turnover and migration. These data support a new kinase-independent mechanism for PAK4 function, where an important role of PAK4 in cellular adhesions is to stabilize RhoU protein levels. Thus, PAK4 and RhoU cooperate to drive adhesion turnover and promote cell migration. PMID:26598620

  6. PRKX, a Novel cAMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Member, Plays an Important Role in Development.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sizhou; Li, Qian; Alberts, Ian; Li, Xiaohong

    2016-03-01

    The human protein kinase X gene (PRKX) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) are both c-AMP-dependent serine/threonine protein kinases within the protein kinase AGC subgroup. Of all the protein kinases in this group, PRKX is the least studied. PRKX has been isolated from patients with chondrodysplasia punctate and is involved in numerous processes, including sexual differentiation and fertilization, normal kidney development and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), blood maturation, neural development, and angiogenesis in vitro. Although the role of PRKX in development and disease has been reported recently, the underlying mechanism of PRKX activity is largely unknown. In addition, based on the expression pattern of PRKX and the extensive role of PKA in disease and development, PRKX might have additional crucial functions that have not been addressed in the literature. In this review, we summarize the characteristics and developmental functions of PRKX that have been reported by recent studies. In particular, we elucidate the structural and functional differences between PRKX and PKA, as well as the possible roles of PRKX in development and related diseases. Finally, we propose future studies that could lead to important discoveries of more PRKX functions and the underlying mechanisms involved. PMID:26252946

  7. Molecular Mechanism of Selectivity among G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Thal, David M.; Yeow, Raymond Y.; Schoenau, Christian; Huber, Jochen; Tesmer, John J.G.

    2012-07-11

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are key regulators of cell physiology and control processes ranging from glucose homeostasis to contractility of the heart. A major mechanism for the desensitization of activated GPCRs is their phosphorylation by GPCR kinases (GRKs). Overexpression of GRK2 is strongly linked to heart failure, and GRK2 has long been considered a pharmaceutical target for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Several lead compounds developed by Takeda Pharmaceuticals show high selectivity for GRK2 and therapeutic potential for the treatment of heart failure. To understand how these drugs achieve their selectivity, we determined crystal structures of the bovine GRK2-G{beta}{gamma} complex in the presence of two of these inhibitors. Comparison with the apoGRK2-G{beta}{gamma} structure demonstrates that the compounds bind in the kinase active site in a manner similar to that of the AGC kinase inhibitor balanol. Both balanol and the Takeda compounds induce a slight closure of the kinase domain, the degree of which correlates with the potencies of the inhibitors. Based on our crystal structures and homology modeling, we identified five amino acids surrounding the inhibitor binding site that we hypothesized could contribute to inhibitor selectivity. However, our results indicate that these residues are not major determinants of selectivity among GRK subfamilies. Rather, selectivity is achieved by the stabilization of a unique inactive conformation of the GRK2 kinase domain.

  8. Molecular basis of the essential s phase function of the rad53 checkpoint kinase.

    PubMed

    Hoch, Nicolas C; Chen, Eric S-W; Buckland, Robert; Wang, Shun-Chung; Fazio, Alessandro; Hammet, Andrew; Pellicioli, Achille; Chabes, Andrei; Tsai, Ming-Daw; Heierhorst, Jörg

    2013-08-01

    The essential yeast kinases Mec1 and Rad53, or human ATR and Chk1, are crucial for checkpoint responses to exogenous genotoxic agents, but why they are also required for DNA replication in unperturbed cells remains poorly understood. Here we report that even in the absence of DNA-damaging agents, the rad53-4AQ mutant, lacking the N-terminal Mec1 phosphorylation site cluster, is synthetic lethal with a deletion of the RAD9 DNA damage checkpoint adaptor. This phenotype is caused by an inability of rad53-4AQ to activate the downstream kinase Dun1, which then leads to reduced basal deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) levels, spontaneous replication fork stalling, and constitutive activation of and dependence on S phase DNA damage checkpoints. Surprisingly, the kinase-deficient rad53-K227A mutant does not share these phenotypes but is rendered inviable by additional phosphosite mutations that prevent its binding to Dun1. The results demonstrate that ultralow Rad53 catalytic activity is sufficient for normal replication of undamaged chromosomes as long as it is targeted toward activation of the effector kinase Dun1. Our findings indicate that the essential S phase function of Rad53 is comprised by the combination of its role in regulating basal dNTP levels and its compensatory kinase function if dNTP levels are perturbed. PMID:23754745

  9. Molecular Basis of the Essential S Phase Function of the Rad53 Checkpoint Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Hoch, Nicolas C.; Chen, Eric S.-W.; Buckland, Robert; Wang, Shun-Chung; Fazio, Alessandro; Hammet, Andrew; Pellicioli, Achille; Chabes, Andrei; Tsai, Ming-Daw

    2013-01-01

    The essential yeast kinases Mec1 and Rad53, or human ATR and Chk1, are crucial for checkpoint responses to exogenous genotoxic agents, but why they are also required for DNA replication in unperturbed cells remains poorly understood. Here we report that even in the absence of DNA-damaging agents, the rad53-4AQ mutant, lacking the N-terminal Mec1 phosphorylation site cluster, is synthetic lethal with a deletion of the RAD9 DNA damage checkpoint adaptor. This phenotype is caused by an inability of rad53-4AQ to activate the downstream kinase Dun1, which then leads to reduced basal deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) levels, spontaneous replication fork stalling, and constitutive activation of and dependence on S phase DNA damage checkpoints. Surprisingly, the kinase-deficient rad53-K227A mutant does not share these phenotypes but is rendered inviable by additional phosphosite mutations that prevent its binding to Dun1. The results demonstrate that ultralow Rad53 catalytic activity is sufficient for normal replication of undamaged chromosomes as long as it is targeted toward activation of the effector kinase Dun1. Our findings indicate that the essential S phase function of Rad53 is comprised by the combination of its role in regulating basal dNTP levels and its compensatory kinase function if dNTP levels are perturbed. PMID:23754745

  10. Quantitative Assessment of Local Collagen Matrix Remodeling in 3-D Culture: The Role of Rho Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Areum; Lakshman, Neema; Petroll, W.Matthew

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively assess the role of Rho kinase in modulating the pattern and amount of local cell-induced collagen matrix remodeling. Human corneal fibroblasts were plated inside 100 μm thick fibrillar collagen matrices and cultured for 24 hours in media with or without the Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632. Cells were then fixed and stained with phalloidin. Fluorescent (for f-actin) and reflected light (for collagen fibrils) 3-D optical section images were acquired using laser confocal microscopy. Fourier transform analysis was used to assess collagen fibril alignment, and 3-D cell morphology and local collagen density were measured using MetaMorph. Culture in serum-containing media induced significant global matrix contraction, which was inhibited by blocking Rho kinase (p < 0.001). Fibroblasts generally had a bipolar morphology and intracellular stress fibers. Collagen fibrils were compacted and aligned parallel to stress fibers and pseudopodia. When Rho kinase was inhibited, cells had a more cortical f-actin distribution and dendritic morphology. Both local collagen fibril density and alignment were significantly reduced (p<0.01). Overall, the data suggests that Rho kinase dependent contractile force generation leads to co-alignment of cells and collagen fibrils along the plane of greatest resistance, and that this process contributes to global matrix contraction. PMID:16978606

  11. Changes of epidermal cell morphology and keratin expression induced by inhibitors of protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Hegemann, L; Wevers, A; Bonnekoh, B; Mahrle, G

    1992-03-01

    Several lines of evidence show protein kinase C as being involved in various regulatory processes in keratinocyte biology, e.g. proliferation and differentiation. In the present study, we investigated the effects of three different inhibitors of protein kinase C, staurosporine, CP 46'665-1, and tiflucarbine, on cell morphology and keratin expression in a non-tumorigenic human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT cells). Staurosporine, being the most potent inhibitor of protein kinase C activity in vitro, and CP 46'665-1 induced morphological transformation to a fibroblast-like cell shape. In contrast, no changes in cell morphology were observed after exposure to tiflucarbine. The investigation of keratin expression in HaCaT cells grown in the presence of the different compounds revealed the following changes: After 72 h of cultivation, keratins 8 and 18 were still expressed in treated cells, whereas expression of keratin 13 was decreased as compared to control cells. Immunoblotting to detect vimentin demonstrated its absence in treated and control cells. Since tiflucarbine is known as a dual protein kinase C/calmodulin inhibitor whereas staurosporine and CP 46'665-1 do not antagonize calmodulin function, it might be possible that not only protein kinase C but also calmodulin is involved in the process leading to the morphological changes. PMID:1376142

  12. A lipid-regulated docking site on vinculin for protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Wolfgang H; Tigges, Ulrich; Zieseniss, Anke; Jockusch, Brigitte M

    2002-03-01

    During cell spreading, binding of actin-organizing proteins to acidic phospholipids and phosphorylation are important for localization and activity of these proteins at nascent cell-matrix adhesion sites. Here, we report on a transient interaction between the lipid-dependent protein kinase Calpha and vinculin, an early component of these sites, during spreading of HeLa cells on collagen. In vitro binding of protein kinase Calpha to vinculin tail was found dependent on free calcium and acidic phospholipids but independent of a functional kinase domain. The interaction was enhanced by conditions that favor the oligomerization of vinculin. Phosphorylation by protein kinase Calpha reached 1.5 mol of phosphate/mol of vinculin tail and required the C-terminal hydrophobic hairpin, a putative phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate-binding site. Mass spectroscopy of peptides derived from in vitro phosphorylated vinculin tail identified phosphorylation of serines 1033 and 1045. Inhibition of C-terminal phospholipid binding at the vinculin tail by mutagenesis or deletion reduced the rate of phosphorylation to < or =50%. We suggest a possible mechanism whereby phospholipid-regulated conformational changes in vinculin may lead to exposure of a docking site for protein kinase Calpha and subsequent phosphorylation of vinculin and/or vinculin interaction partners, thereby affecting the formation of cell adhesion complexes. PMID:11741957

  13. Central Role of Pyruvate Kinase in Carbon Co-catabolism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Noy, Tahel; Vergnolle, Olivia; Hartman, Travis E; Rhee, Kyu Y; Jacobs, William R; Berney, Michael; Blanchard, John S

    2016-03-25

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) displays a high degree of metabolic plasticity to adapt to challenging host environments. Genetic evidence suggests thatMtbrelies mainly on fatty acid catabolism in the host. However,Mtbalso maintains a functional glycolytic pathway and its role in the cellular metabolism ofMtbhas yet to be understood. Pyruvate kinase catalyzes the last and rate-limiting step in glycolysis and theMtbgenome harbors one putative pyruvate kinase (pykA, Rv1617). Here we show thatpykAencodes an active pyruvate kinase that is allosterically activated by glucose 6-phosphate (Glc-6-P) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP). Deletion ofpykApreventsMtbgrowth in the presence of fermentable carbon sources and has a cidal effect in the presence of glucose that correlates with elevated levels of the toxic catabolite methylglyoxal. Growth attenuation was also observed in media containing a combination of short chain fatty acids and glucose and surprisingly, in media containing odd and even chain fatty acids alone. Untargeted high sensitivity metabolomics revealed that inactivation of pyruvate kinase leads to accumulation of phosphoenolpyruvate (P-enolpyruvate), citrate, and aconitate, which was consistent with allosteric inhibition of isocitrate dehydrogenase by P-enolpyruvate. This metabolic block could be relieved by addition of the α-ketoglutarate precursor glutamate. Taken together, our study identifies an essential role of pyruvate kinase in preventing metabolic block during carbon co-catabolism inMtb. PMID:26858255

  14. KIDFamMap: a database of kinase-inhibitor-disease family maps for kinase inhibitor selectivity and binding mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yi-Yuan; Lin, Chih-Ta; Huang, Jhang-Wei; Hsu, Kai-Cheng; Tseng, Jen-Hu; You, Syuan-Ren; Yang, Jinn-Moon

    2013-01-01

    Kinases play central roles in signaling pathways and are promising therapeutic targets for many diseases. Designing selective kinase inhibitors is an emergent and challenging task, because kinases share an evolutionary conserved ATP-binding site. KIDFamMap (http://gemdock.life.nctu.edu.tw/KIDFamMap/) is the first database to explore kinase-inhibitor families (KIFs) and kinase-inhibitor-disease (KID) relationships for kinase inhibitor selectivity and mechanisms. This database includes 1208 KIFs, 962 KIDs, 55 603 kinase-inhibitor interactions (KIIs), 35 788 kinase inhibitors, 399 human protein kinases, 339 diseases and 638 disease allelic variants. Here, a KIF can be defined as follows: (i) the kinases in the KIF with significant sequence similarity, (ii) the inhibitors in the KIF with significant topology similarity and (iii) the KIIs in the KIF with significant interaction similarity. The KIIs within a KIF are often conserved on some consensus KIDFamMap anchors, which represent conserved interactions between the kinase subsites and consensus moieties of their inhibitors. Our experimental results reveal that the members of a KIF often possess similar inhibition profiles. The KIDFamMap anchors can reflect kinase conformations types, kinase functions and kinase inhibitor selectivity. We believe that KIDFamMap provides biological insights into kinase inhibitor selectivity and binding mechanisms. PMID:23193279

  15. KIDFamMap: a database of kinase-inhibitor-disease family maps for kinase inhibitor selectivity and binding mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Yi-Yuan; Lin, Chih-Ta; Huang, Jhang-Wei; Hsu, Kai-Cheng; Tseng, Jen-Hu; You, Syuan-Ren; Yang, Jinn-Moon

    2013-01-01

    Kinases play central roles in signaling pathways and are promising therapeutic targets for many diseases. Designing selective kinase inhibitors is an emergent and challenging task, because kinases share an evolutionary conserved ATP-binding site. KIDFamMap (http://gemdock.life.nctu.edu.tw/KIDFamMap/) is the first database to explore kinase-inhibitor families (KIFs) and kinase-inhibitor-disease (KID) relationships for kinase inhibitor selectivity and mechanisms. This database includes 1208 KIFs, 962 KIDs, 55 603 kinase-inhibitor interactions (KIIs), 35 788 kinase inhibitors, 399 human protein kinases, 339 diseases and 638 disease allelic variants. Here, a KIF can be defined as follows: (i) the kinases in the KIF with significant sequence similarity, (ii) the inhibitors in the KIF with significant topology similarity and (iii) the KIIs in the KIF with significant interaction similarity. The KIIs within a KIF are often conserved on some consensus KIDFamMap anchors, which represent conserved interactions between the kinase subsites and consensus moieties of their inhibitors. Our experimental results reveal that the members of a KIF often possess similar inhibition profiles. The KIDFamMap anchors can reflect kinase conformations types, kinase functions and kinase inhibitor selectivity. We believe that KIDFamMap provides biological insights into kinase inhibitor selectivity and binding mechanisms. PMID:23193279

  16. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in human and pet tumours with special reference to breast cancer: a comparative review.

    PubMed

    Ranieri, Girolamo; Pantaleo, Marianna; Piccinno, Mariagrazia; Roncetti, Maria; Mutinati, Maddalena; Marech, Ilaria; Patruno, Rosa; Rizzo, Annalisa; Sciorsci, Raffaele Luigi

    2013-11-01

    Tyrosine kinase receptors (TKRs) play a key role in tumour cell proliferation and survival since they are involved in endothelial cell activation leading to tumour neoangiogenesis. In particular, vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFRs), platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), stem cell factor receptor (c-KitR), and colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) are overexpressed or constitutively activated in human and pet malignancies. A variety of small molecule inhibitors targeting specific tyrosine kinases (known as tyrosine kinase inhibitors or TKIs) have recently been approved, or are under investigation, for the treatment of human cancer. TKI application in animal cancer is however relatively recent. This review aims to illustrate the major aspects of tyrosine kinase dysfunctions, with special regard to human and animal cancer of the mammary gland, providing an update on the background of the anti-angiogenic and anti-neoplastic properties of TKIs in human and veterinary cancer. PMID:23768779

  17. Magnesium Diboride Current Leads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, John

    2010-01-01

    A recently discovered superconductor, magnesium diboride (MgB2), can be used to fabricate conducting leads used in cryogenic applications. Dis covered to be superconducting in 2001, MgB2 has the advantage of remaining superconducting at higher temperatures than the previously used material, NbTi. The purpose of these leads is to provide 2 A of electricity to motors located in a 1.3 K environment. The providing environment is a relatively warm 17 K. Requirements for these leads are to survive temperature fluctuations in the 5 K and 11 K heat sinks, and not conduct excessive heat into the 1.3 K environment. Test data showed that each lead in the assembly could conduct 5 A at 4 K, which, when scaled to 17 K, still provided more than the required 2 A. The lead assembly consists of 12 steelclad MgB2 wires, a tensioned Kevlar support, a thermal heat sink interface at 4 K, and base plates. The wires are soldered to heavy copper leads at the 17 K end, and to thin copper-clad NbTi leads at the 1.3 K end. The leads were designed, fabricated, and tested at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe - Institut foer Technische Physik before inclusion in Goddard's XRS (X-Ray Spectrometer) instrument onboard the Astro-E2 spacecraft. A key factor is that MgB2 remains superconducting up to 30 K, which means that it does not introduce joule heating as a resistive wire would. Because the required temperature ranges are 1.3-17 K, this provides a large margin of safety. Previous designs lost superconductivity at around 8 K. The disadvantage to MgB2 is that it is a brittle ceramic, and making thin wires from it is challenging. The solution was to encase the leads in thin steel tubes for strength. Previous designs were so brittle as to risk instrument survival. MgB2 leads can be used in any cryogenic application where small currents need to be conducted at below 30 K. Because previous designs would superconduct only at up to 8 K, this new design would be ideal for the 8-30 K range.

  18. Identification of Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of Oncogenic RET Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Moccia, Marialuisa; Liu, Qingsong; Guida, Teresa; Federico, Giorgia; Brescia, Annalisa; Zhao, Zheng; Choi, Hwan Geun; Deng, Xianming; Tan, Li; Wang, Jinhua; Billaud, Marc; Gray, Nathanael S.

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic mutation of the RET receptor tyrosine kinase is observed in several human malignancies. Here, we describe three novel type II RET tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that inhibit the cellular activity of oncogenic RET mutants at two digit nanomolar concentration. These three compounds shared a 3-trifluoromethyl-4-methylpiperazinephenyl pharmacophore that stabilizes the ‘DFG-out’ inactive conformation of RET activation loop. They blocked RET-mediated signaling and proliferation with an IC50 in the nM range in fibroblasts transformed by the RET/C634R and RET/M918T oncogenes. They also inhibited autophosphorylation of several additional oncogenic RET-derived point mutants and chimeric oncogenes. At a concentration of 10 nM, ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01 inhibited RET kinase and signaling in human thyroid cancer cell lines carrying oncogenic RET alleles; they also inhibited proliferation of cancer, but not non-tumoral Nthy-ori-3-1, thyroid cells, with an IC50 in the nM range. The three compounds were capable of inhibiting the ‘gatekeeper’ V804M mutant which confers substantial resistance to established RET inhibitors. In conclusion, we have identified a type II TKI scaffold, shared by ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that may be used as novel lead for the development of novel agents for the treatment of cancers harboring oncogenic activation of RET. PMID:26046350

  19. Cardiac Progenitor Cell Cycling Stimulated by Pim-1 Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Cottage, Christopher T.; Bailey, Brandi; Fischer, Kimberlee M.; Avitable, Daniele; Collins, Brett; Tuck, Savilla; Quijada, Pearl; Gude, Natalie; Alvarez, Roberto; Muraski, John; Sussman, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Cardioprotective effects of Pim-1 kinase have been previously reported but the underlying mechanistic basis may involve a combination of cellular and molecular mechanisms that remain unresolved. The elucidation of the mechanistic basis for Pim-1 mediated cardioprotection provides important insights for designing therapeutic interventional strategies to treat heart disease. Objective Effects of cardiac-specific Pim-1 kinase expression on the cardiac progenitor cell (CPC) population were examined to determine whether Pim-1 mediates beneficial effects through augmenting CPC activity. Methods and Results Transgenic mice created with cardiac-specific Pim-1 overexpression (Pim-wt) exhibit enhanced Pim-1 expression in both cardiomyocytes and CPCs, both of which show increased proliferative activity assessed using 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), Ki-67, and c-Myc relative to nontransgenic controls. However, the total number of CPCs was not increased in the Pim-wt hearts during normal postnatal growth or after infarction challenge. These results suggest that Pim-1 overexpression leads to asymmetric division resulting in maintenance of the CPC population. Localization and quantitation of cell fate determinants Numb and α-adaptin by confocal microscopy were used to assess frequency of asymmetric division in the CPC population. Polarization of Numb in mitotic phospho-histone positive cells demonstrates asymmetric division in 65% of the CPC population in hearts of Pim-wt mice versus 26% in nontransgenic hearts after infarction challenge. Similarly, Pim-wt hearts had fewer cells with uniform α-adaptin staining indicative of symmetrically dividing CPCs, with 36% of the CPCs versus 73% in nontransgenic sections. Conclusions These findings define a mechanistic basis for enhanced myocardial regeneration in transgenic mice overexpressing Pim-1 kinase. PMID:20075333

  20. Tyrosine kinase BMX phosphorylates phosphotyrosine-primed motif mediating the activation of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sen; Jiang, Xinnong; Gewinner, Christina A; Asara, John M; Simon, Nicholas I; Cai, Changmeng; Cantley, Lewis C; Balk, Steven P

    2013-05-28

    The nonreceptor tyrosine kinase BMX (bone marrow tyrosine kinase gene on chromosome X) is abundant in various cell types and activated downstream of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) and the kinase Src, but its substrates are unknown. Positional scanning peptide library screening revealed a marked preference for a priming phosphorylated tyrosine (pY) in the -1 position, indicating that BMX substrates may include multiple tyrosine kinases that are fully activated by pYpY sites in the kinase domain. BMX phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) at Tyr⁵⁷⁷ subsequent to its Src-mediated phosphorylation at Tyr⁵⁷⁶. Loss of BMX by RNA interference or by genetic deletion in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) markedly impaired FAK activity. Phosphorylation of the insulin receptor in the kinase domain at Tyr¹¹⁸⁹ and Tyr¹¹⁹⁰, as well as Tyr¹¹⁸⁵, and downstream phosphorylation of the kinase AKT at Thr³⁰⁸ were similarly impaired by BMX deficiency. However, insulin-induced phosphorylation of AKT at Ser⁴⁷³ was not impaired in Bmx knockout MEFs or liver tissue from Bmx knockout mice, which also showed increased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, possibly because of decreased abundance of the phosphatase PHLPP (PH domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase). Thus, by identifying the pYpY motif as a substrate for BMX, our findings suggest that BMX functions as a central regulator among multiple signaling pathways mediated by tyrosine kinases. PMID:23716717

  1. The protein interaction landscape of the human CMGC kinase group.

    PubMed

    Varjosalo, Markku; Keskitalo, Salla; Van Drogen, Audrey; Nurkkala, Helka; Vichalkovski, Anton; Aebersold, Ruedi; Gstaiger, Matthias

    2013-04-25

    Cellular information processing via reversible protein phosphorylation requires tight control of the localization, activity, and substrate specificity of protein kinases, which to a large extent is accomplished by complex formation with other proteins. Despite their critical role in cellular regulation and pathogenesis, protein interaction information is available for only a subset of the 518 human protein kinases. Here we present a global proteomic analysis of complexes of the human CMGC kinase group. In addition to subgroup-specific functional enrichment and modularity, the identified 652 high-confidence kinase-protein interactions provide a specific biochemical context for many poorly studied CMGC kinases. Furthermore, the analysis revealed a kinase-kinase subnetwork and candidate substrates for CMGC kinases. Finally, the presented interaction proteome uncovered a large set of interactions with proteins genetically linked to a range of human diseases, including cancer, suggesting additional routes for analyzing the role of CMGC kinases in controlling human disease pathways. PMID:23602568

  2. Protein kinase activators alter glial cholesterol esterification

    SciTech Connect

    Jeng, I.; Dills, C.; Klemm, N.; Wu, C.

    1986-05-01

    Similar to nonneural tissues, the activity of glial acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase is controlled by a phosphorylation and dephosphorylation mechanism. Manipulation of cyclic AMP content did not alter the cellular cholesterol esterification, suggesting that cyclic AMP is not a bioregulator in this case. Therefore, the authors tested the effect of phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) on cellular cholesterol esterification to determine the involvement of protein kinase C. PMA has a potent effect on cellular cholesterol esterification. PMA depresses cholesterol esterification initially, but cells recover from inhibition and the result was higher cholesterol esterification, suggesting dual effects of protein kinase C. Studies of other phorbol analogues and other protein kinase C activators such as merezein indicate the involvement of protein kinase C. Oleoyl-acetyl glycerol duplicates the effect of PMA. This observation is consistent with a diacyl-glycerol-protein kinase-dependent reaction. Calcium ionophore A23187 was ineffective in promoting the effect of PMA. They concluded that a calcium-independent and protein C-dependent pathway regulated glial cholesterol esterification.

  3. Src Kinase Regulation in Progressively Invasive Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weichen; Allbritton, Nancy; Lawrence, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Metastatic progression is a multistep process that involves tumor growth and survival, motility and invasion, and subsequent proliferation in an inappropriate environment. The Src protein tyrosine kinase has been implicated in many of the biochemical pathways that drive these behaviors. Although Src itself is only rarely mutated in human tumors, its aberrant activity has been noted in various cancers and suggested to serve as a barometer of metastatic potential. With these features in mind, we examined Src kinase regulation at the structural, enzymatic, and expression levels as a function of progressively invasive prostate cancer cell lines. Surprisingly, both total Src content and kinase activity decrease with increasing cell line aggressiveness, an observation that appears to be inconsistent with the well-documented role of Src in the signaling pathways that drive growth and invasion. However, we do observe a direct correlation between Src kinase specific activity (total Src kinase activity/total Src content) and metastatic aggressiveness, possibly suggesting that in highly aggressive cell lines, key signaling enzymes are globally recruited to drive the cancerous phenotype. In addition, although the expected enhanced phosphorylation of Src at Tyr-416 (activation site) is present in the most aggressive prostate cancer cell lines, unexpectedly high phosphorylation levels at the Tyr-527 inhibitory site are observed as well. The latter, rather than representative of inhibited enzyme, is more indicative of primed Src responsive to local phosphorylated binding partners. PMID:23145001

  4. Kinase-Dependent and -Independent Roles of EphA2 in the Regulation of Prostate Cancer Invasion and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Taddei, Maria Letizia; Parri, Matteo; Angelucci, Adriano; Onnis, Barbara; Bianchini, Francesca; Giannoni, Elisa; Raugei, Giovanni; Calorini, Lido; Rucci, Nadia; Teti, Anna; Bologna, Mauro; Chiarugi, Paola

    2009-01-01

    Ligand-activated Eph tyrosine kinases regulate cellular repulsion, morphology, adhesion, and motility. EphA2 kinase is frequently up-regulated in several different types of cancers, including prostate, breast, colon, and lung carcinomas, as well as in melanoma. The existing data do not clarify whether EphA2 receptor phosphorylation or its simple overexpression, which likely leads to Eph kinase-independent responses, plays a role in the progression of malignant prostate cancer. In this study, we address the role of EphA2 tyrosine phosphorylation in prostate carcinoma cell adhesion, motility, invasion, and formation of metastases. Tumor cells expressing kinase-deficient EphA2 mutants, as well as an EphA2 variant lacking the cytoplasmic domain, are defective in ephrinA1-mediated cell rounding, retraction fiber formation, de-adhesion from the extracellular matrix, RhoA and Rac1 GTPase regulation, three-dimensional matrix invasion, and in vivo metastasis, suggesting a key role for EphA2 kinase activity. Nevertheless, EphA2 regulation of cell motility and invasion, as well as the formation of bone and visceral tumor colonies, reveals a component of both EphA2 kinase-dependent and -independent features. These results uncover a differential requirement for EphA2 kinase activity in the regulation of prostate carcinoma metastasis outcome, suggesting that although the kinase activity of EphA2 is required for the regulation of cell adhesion and cytoskeletal rearrangement, some distinct kinase-dependent and -independent pathways likely cooperate to drive cancer cell migration, invasion, and metastasis outcome. PMID:19264906

  5. Cell division cycle 6, a mitotic substrate of polo-like kinase 1, regulates chromosomal segregation mediated by cyclin-dependent kinase 1 and separase

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Hyungshin; Erikson, Raymond L.

    2010-01-01

    Defining the links between cell division and DNA replication is essential for understanding normal cell cycle progression and tumorigenesis. In this report we explore the effect of phosphorylation of cell division cycle 6 (Cdc6), a DNA replication initiation factor, by polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) on the regulation of chromosomal segregation. In mitosis, the phosphorylation of Cdc6 was highly increased, in correlation with the level of Plk1, and conversely, Cdc6 is hypophosphorylated in Plk1-depleted cells, although cyclin A- and cyclin B1-dependent kinases are active. Binding between Cdc6 and Plk1 occurs through the polo-box domain of Plk1, and Cdc6 is phosphorylated by Plk1 on T37. Immunohistochemistry studies reveal that Cdc6 and Plk1 colocalize to the central spindle in anaphase. Expression of T37V mutant of Cdc6 (Cdc6-TV) induces binucleated cells and incompletely separated nuclei. Wild-type Cdc6 but not Cdc6-TV binds cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1). Expression of wild-type Plk1 but not kinase-defective mutant promotes the binding of Cdc6 to Cdk1. Cells expressing wild-type Cdc6 display lower Cdk1 activity and higher separase activity than cells expressing Cdc6-TV. These results suggest that Plk1-mediated phosphorylation of Cdc6 promotes the interaction of Cdc6 and Cdk1, leading to the attenuation of Cdk1 activity, release of separase, and subsequent anaphase progression. PMID:21041660

  6. Rapid Discovery and Structure-Activity Relationships of Pyrazolopyrimidines That Potently Suppress Breast Cancer Cell Growth via SRC Kinase Inhibition with Exceptional Selectivity over ABL Kinase.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Craig; Dawson, John C; Dowling, Reece; Houston, Douglas R; Weiss, Jason T; Munro, Alison F; Muir, Morwenna; Harrington, Lea; Webster, Scott P; Frame, Margaret C; Brunton, Valerie G; Patton, E Elizabeth; Carragher, Neil O; Unciti-Broceta, Asier

    2016-05-26

    Novel pyrazolopyrimidines displaying high potency and selectivity toward SRC family kinases have been developed by combining ligand-based design and phenotypic screening in an iterative manner. Compounds were derived from the promiscuous kinase inhibitor PP1 to search for analogs that could potentially target a broad spectrum of kinases involved in cancer. Phenotypic screening against MCF7 mammary adenocarcinoma cells generated target-agnostic structure-activity relationships that biased subsequent designs toward breast cancer treatment rather than to a particular target. This strategy led to the discovery of two potent antiproliferative leads with phenotypically distinct anticancer mode of actions. Kinase profiling and further optimization resulted in eCF506, the first small molecule with subnanomolar IC50 for SRC that requires 3 orders of magnitude greater concentration to inhibit ABL. eCF506 exhibits excellent water solubility, an optimal DMPK profile and oral bioavailability, halts SRC-associated neuromast migration in zebrafish embryos without inducing life-threatening heart defects, and inhibits SRC phosphorylation in tumor xenografts in mice. PMID:27115835

  7. Rapid Discovery and Structure–Activity Relationships of Pyrazolopyrimidines That Potently Suppress Breast Cancer Cell Growth via SRC Kinase Inhibition with Exceptional Selectivity over ABL Kinase

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Novel pyrazolopyrimidines displaying high potency and selectivity toward SRC family kinases have been developed by combining ligand-based design and phenotypic screening in an iterative manner. Compounds were derived from the promiscuous kinase inhibitor PP1 to search for analogs that could potentially target a broad spectrum of kinases involved in cancer. Phenotypic screening against MCF7 mammary adenocarcinoma cells generated target-agnostic structure–activity relationships that biased subsequent designs toward breast cancer treatment rather than to a particular target. This strategy led to the discovery of two potent antiproliferative leads with phenotypically distinct anticancer mode of actions. Kinase profiling and further optimization resulted in eCF506, the first small molecule with subnanomolar IC50 for SRC that requires 3 orders of magnitude greater concentration to inhibit ABL. eCF506 exhibits excellent water solubility, an optimal DMPK profile and oral bioavailability, halts SRC-associated neuromast migration in zebrafish embryos without inducing life-threatening heart defects, and inhibits SRC phosphorylation in tumor xenografts in mice. PMID:27115835

  8. Interaction between protein kinase C and protein kinase A can modulate transmitter release at the rat neuromuscular synapse.

    PubMed

    Santafé, M M; Garcia, N; Lanuza, M A; Tomàs, M; Tomàs, J

    2009-02-15

    We used intracellular recording to investigate the functional interaction between protein kinase C (PKC) and protein kinase A (PKA) signal transduction cascades in the control of transmitter release in the neuromuscular synapses from adult rats. Our results indicate that: 1) PKA and PKC are independently involved in asynchronous release. 2) Evoked acetylcholine (ACh) release is enhanced with the PKA agonist Sp-8-BrcAMP and the PKC agonist phorbol ester (PMA). 3) PKA has a constitutive role in promoting a component of normal evoked transmitter release because, when the kinase is inhibited with H-89, the release diminishes. However, the PKC inhibitor calphostin C (CaC) does not affect ACh release. 4) PKA regulates neurotransmission without PKC involvement because, after PMA or CaC modulation of the PKC activity, coupling to the ACh release of PKA can normally be stimulated with Sp-8-BrcAMP or inhibited with H-89. 5) After PKA inhibition with H-89, PKC stimulation with PMA (or inhibition with CaC) does not lead to any change in evoked ACh release. However, in PKA-stimulated preparations with Sp-8-BrcAMP, PKC becomes tonically active, thus potentiating a component of release that can now be blocked with CaC. In normal conditions, therefore, PKA was able to modulate ACh release independently of PKC activity, whereas PKA stimulation caused the PKC coupling to evoked release. In contrast, PKA inhibition prevent PKC stimulation (with the phorbol ester) and coupling to ACh output. There was therefore some dependence of PKC on PKA activity in the fine control of the neuromuscular synaptic functionalism and ACh release. PMID:18816790

  9. Research Resource: Roles for Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Kinase 2 (CaMKK2) in Systems Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Marcelo, Kathrina L; Ribar, Thomas; Means, Christopher R; Tsimelzon, Anna; Stevens, Robert D; Ilkayeva, Olga; Bain, James R; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Newgard, Christopher B; Means, Anthony R; York, Brian

    2016-05-01

    A number of epidemiological studies have implicated calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling as a major factor in obesity that contributes to aberrant systems metabolism. Somewhat paradoxically, obesity correlates with decreased circulating Ca(2+) levels, leading to increased release of intracellular Ca(2+) stores from the endoplasmic reticulum. These findings suggest that insulin resistance associated with the obese state is linked to activation of canonical Ca(2+) signaling pathways. Mechanistically, increased intracellular Ca(2+) binds calmodulin (CaM) to activate a set of Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent protein kinases. In this research resource, we explore the metabolic functions and implications of Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent protein kinase kinase 2 (CaMKK2) as a metabolic effector of Ca(2+)/CaM action. We reveal the importance of CaMKK2 for gating insulin release from pancreatic β-cells while concomitantly influencing the sensitivity of insulin-responsive tissues. To provide a better understanding of the metabolic impact of CaMKK2 loss, we performed targeted metabolomic analyses of key metabolic byproducts of glucose, fatty acid, and amino acid metabolism in mice null for CaMKK2. We quantified amino acids and acyl carnitines in 3 insulin-sensitive tissues (liver, skeletal muscle, plasma) isolated from CaMKK2(-/-) mice and their wild-type littermates under conditions of dietary stress (low-fat diet, normal chow, high-fat diet, and fasting), thereby unveiling unique metabolic functions of CaMKK2. Our findings highlight CaMKK2 as a molecular rheostat for insulin action and emphasize the importance of Ca(2+)/CaM/CaMKK2 in regulation of whole-body metabolism. These findings reveal that CaMKK2 may be an attractive therapeutic target for combatting comorbidities associated with perturbed insulin signaling. PMID:27003444

  10. Leading healthcare in complexity.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Jeffrey

    2014-12-01

    Healthcare institutions and providers are in complexity. Networks of interconnections from relationships and technology create conditions in which interdependencies and non-linear dynamics lead to surprising, unpredictable outcomes. Previous effective approaches to leadership, focusing on top-down bureaucratic methods, are no longer effective. Leading in complexity requires leaders to accept the complexity, create an adaptive space in which innovation and creativity can flourish and then integrate the successful practices that emerge into the formal organizational structure. Several methods for doing adaptive space work will be discussed. Readers will be able to contrast traditional leadership approaches with leading in complexity. They will learn new behaviours that are required of complexity leaders, along with challenges they will face, often from other leaders within the organization. PMID:25815410

  11. Lead zirconate titanate ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, B.E. Jr.

    1986-12-02

    This patent describes a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) piezoelectric ceramic composition which, based on total composition weight, consists essentially of a solid solution of lead zirconate and lead titanate in a PbZrO/sub 3/:PbTiO/sub 3/ ratio from about 0.505:0.495 to about 0.54:0.46; a halide salt selected from the group consisting of fluorides and chlorides of alkali metal and alkaline earth elements and mixtures thereof except for francium and radium in an amount from about 0.5 to 2 weight percent; and an oxide selected from the group consisting of magnesium, barium, scandium, aluminum, lanthanum, praesodynium, neodymium, samarium, and mixtures thereof in an amount from about 0.5 to about 6 weight percent, the relative amount of oxide being from about 1 to about 4 times that of the halide.

  12. Regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase by protein kinase C and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 in vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Trappanese, Danielle M; Sivilich, Sarah; Ets, Hillevi K; Kako, Farah; Autieri, Michael V; Moreland, Robert S

    2016-06-01

    Vascular smooth muscle contraction is primarily regulated by phosphorylation of myosin light chain. There are also modulatory pathways that control the final level of force development. We tested the hypothesis that protein kinase C (PKC) and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase modulate vascular smooth muscle activity via effects on MAP kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1). Swine carotid arteries were mounted for isometric force recording and subjected to histamine stimulation in the presence and absence of inhibitors of PKC [bisindolylmaleimide-1 (Bis)], MAP kinase kinase (MEK) (U0126), and MKP-1 (sanguinarine) and flash frozen for measurement of MAP kinase, PKC-potentiated myosin phosphatase inhibitor 17 (CPI-17), and caldesmon phosphorylation levels. CPI-17 was phosphorylated in response to histamine and was inhibited in the presence of Bis. Caldesmon phosphorylation levels increased in response to histamine stimulation and were decreased in response to MEK inhibition but were not affected by the addition of Bis. Inhibition of PKC significantly increased p42 MAP kinase, but not p44 MAP kinase. Inhibition of MEK with U0126 inhibited both p42 and p44 MAP kinase activity. Inhibition of MKP-1 with sanguinarine blocked the Bis-dependent increase of MAP kinase activity. Sanguinarine alone increased MAP kinase activity due to its effects on MKP-1. Sanguinarine increased MKP-1 phosphorylation, which was inhibited by inhibition of MAP kinase. This suggests that MAP kinase has a negative feedback role in inhibiting MKP-1 activity. Therefore, PKC catalyzes MKP-1 phosphorylation, which is reversed by MAP kinase. Thus the fine tuning of vascular contraction is due to the concerted effort of PKC, MAP kinase, and MKP-1. PMID:27053523

  13. Structure and Dynamic Regulation of Abl Kinases*

    PubMed Central

    Panjarian, Shoghag; Iacob, Roxana E.; Chen, Shugui; Engen, John R.; Smithgall, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    The c-abl proto-oncogene encodes a unique protein-tyrosine kinase (Abl) distinct from c-Src, c-Fes, and other cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases. In normal cells, Abl plays prominent roles in cellular responses to genotoxic stress as well as in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. Abl is also well known in the context of Bcr-Abl, the oncogenic fusion protein characteristic of chronic myelogenous leukemia. Selective inhibitors of Bcr-Abl, of which imatinib is the prototype, have had a tremendous impact on clinical outcomes in chronic myelogenous leukemia and revolutionized the field of targeted cancer therapy. In this minireview, we focus on the structural organization and dynamics of Abl kinases and how these features influence inhibitor sensitivity. PMID:23316053

  14. Structure of the human dimeric ATM kinase.

    PubMed

    Lau, Wilson C Y; Li, Yinyin; Liu, Zhe; Gao, Yuanzhu; Zhang, Qinfen; Huen, Michael S Y

    2016-01-01

    DNA-double strand breaks activate the serine/threonine protein kinase ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) to initiate DNA damage signal transduction. This activation process involves autophosphorylation and dissociation of inert ATM dimers into monomers that are catalytically active. Using single-particle electron microscopy (EM), we determined the structure of dimeric ATM in its resting state. The EM map could accommodate the crystal structure of the N-terminal truncated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a closely related enzyme of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related protein kinase (PIKK) family, allowing for the localization of the N- and the C-terminal regions of ATM. In the dimeric structure, the actives sites are buried, restricting the access of the substrates to these sites. The unanticipated domain organization of ATM provides a basis for understanding its mechanism of inhibition. PMID:27097373

  15. The Role of Mirk Kinase in Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Eileen

    2011-01-01

    Targeting the tyrosine kinase KIT in gastrointestinal stromal tumors has led to improved treatment. Other kinases might serve as therapeutic targets in the more common forms of sarcoma. The kinase Mirk/dyrk1B is highly expressed in the vast majority of osteosarcomas and rhabdomyosarcomas and mediates their growth, as depletion of Mirk led to tumor cell apoptosis. Mirk is known to increase the expression of a series of antioxidant genes, which scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) within various tumor cells, mediating their survival. As a result, depleting Mirk led to increased levels of damaging ROS. Tumor cells depleted of Mirk were also sensitized to low levels of chemotherapeutic drugs that increase ROS levels. In contrast, Mirk expression is quite low in most normal cells, and Mirk depletion or embryonic knockout of Mirk did not detectably affect cell survival. Thus targeting Mirk for intervention in sarcomas might spare most normal tissues. PMID:21559261

  16. Structure of the human dimeric ATM kinase

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Wilson C. Y.; Li, Yinyin; Liu, Zhe; Gao, Yuanzhu; Zhang, Qinfen; Huen, Michael S. Y.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT DNA-double strand breaks activate the serine/threonine protein kinase ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) to initiate DNA damage signal transduction. This activation process involves autophosphorylation and dissociation of inert ATM dimers into monomers that are catalytically active. Using single-particle electron microscopy (EM), we determined the structure of dimeric ATM in its resting state. The EM map could accommodate the crystal structure of the N-terminal truncated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a closely related enzyme of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related protein kinase (PIKK) family, allowing for the localization of the N- and the C-terminal regions of ATM. In the dimeric structure, the actives sites are buried, restricting the access of the substrates to these sites. The unanticipated domain organization of ATM provides a basis for understanding its mechanism of inhibition. PMID:27097373

  17. Crystal structure of human nicotinamide riboside kinase.

    PubMed

    Khan, Javed A; Xiang, Song; Tong, Liang

    2007-08-01

    Nicotinamide riboside kinase (NRK) has an important role in the biosynthesis of NAD(+) as well as the activation of tiazofurin and other NR analogs for anticancer therapy. NRK belongs to the deoxynucleoside kinase and nucleoside monophosphate (NMP) kinase superfamily, although the degree of sequence conservation is very low. We report here the crystal structures of human NRK1 in a binary complex with the reaction product nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) at 1.5 A resolution and in a ternary complex with ADP and tiazofurin at 2.7 A resolution. The active site is located in a groove between the central parallel beta sheet core and the LID and NMP-binding domains. The hydroxyl groups on the ribose of NR are recognized by Asp56 and Arg129, and Asp36 is the general base of the enzyme. Mutation of residues in the active site can abolish the catalytic activity of the enzyme, confirming the structural observations. PMID:17698003

  18. Crystal Structure of Human Nicotinamide Riboside Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Khan,J.; Xiang, S.; Tong, L.

    2007-01-01

    Nicotinamide riboside kinase (NRK) has an important role in the biosynthesis of NAD{sup +} as well as the activation of tiazofurin and other NR analogs for anticancer therapy. NRK belongs to the deoxynucleoside kinase and nucleoside monophosphate (NMP) kinase superfamily, although the degree of sequence conservation is very low. We report here the crystal structures of human NRK1 in a binary complex with the reaction product nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution and in a ternary complex with ADP and tiazofurin at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution. The active site is located in a groove between the central parallel {beta} sheet core and the LID and NMP-binding domains. The hydroxyl groups on the ribose of NR are recognized by Asp56 and Arg129, and Asp36 is the general base of the enzyme. Mutation of residues in the active site can abolish the catalytic activity of the enzyme, confirming the structural observations.

  19. Regulation of Axonal Transport by Protein Kinases.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Katherine L; Greensmith, Linda; Schiavo, Giampietro

    2015-10-01

    The intracellular transport of organelles, proteins, lipids, and RNA along the axon is essential for neuronal function and survival. This process, called axonal transport, is mediated by two classes of ATP-dependent motors, kinesins, and cytoplasmic dynein, which carry their cargoes along microtubule tracks. Protein kinases regulate axonal transport through direct phosphorylation of motors, adapter proteins, and cargoes, and indirectly through modification of the microtubule network. The misregulation of axonal transport by protein kinases has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several nervous system disorders. Here, we review the role of protein kinases acting directly on axonal transport and discuss how their deregulation affects neuronal function, paving the way for the exploitation of these enzymes as novel drug targets. PMID:26410600

  20. Pharmacological inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases.

    PubMed

    Knockaert, Marie; Greengard, Paul; Meijer, Laurent

    2002-09-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) regulate the cell division cycle, apoptosis, transcription and differentiation in addition to functions in the nervous system. Deregulation of CDKs in various diseases has stimulated an intensive search for selective pharmacological inhibitors of these kinases. More than 50 inhibitors have been identified, among which >20 have been co-crystallized with CDK2. These inhibitors all target the ATP-binding pocket of the catalytic site of the kinase. The actual selectivity of most known CDK inhibitors, and thus the underlying mechanism of their cellular effects, is poorly known. Pharmacological inhibitors of CDKs are currently being evaluated for therapeutic use against cancer, alopecia, neurodegenerative disorders (e.g. Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and stroke), cardiovascular disorders (e.g. atherosclerosis and restenosis), glomerulonephritis, viral infections (e.g. HCMV, HIV and HSV) and parasitic protozoa (Plasmodium sp. and Leishmania sp.). PMID:12237154

  1. Kinase signaling in the spindle checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jungseog; Yu, Hongtao

    2009-06-01

    The spindle checkpoint is a cell cycle surveillance system that ensures the fidelity of chromosome segregation. In mitosis, it elicits the "wait anaphase" signal to inhibit the anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome until all chromosomes achieve bipolar microtubule attachment and align at the metaphase plate. Because a single kinetochore unattached to microtubules activates the checkpoint, the wait anaphase signal is thought to be generated by this kinetochore and is then amplified and distributed throughout the cell to inhibit the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome. Several spindle checkpoint kinases participate in the generation and amplification of this signal. Recent studies have begun to reveal the activation mechanisms of these checkpoint kinases. Increasing evidence also indicates that the checkpoint kinases not only help to generate the wait anaphase signal but also actively correct kinetochore-microtubule attachment defects. PMID:19228686

  2. X-Ray Crystal Structure of Bone Marrow Kinase in the X Chromosome: A Tec Family Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Muckelbauer, Jodi; Sack, John S.; Ahmed, Nazia; Burke, James; Chang, ChiehYing Y.; Gao, Mian; Tino, Joseph; Xie, Dianlin; Tebben, Andrew J.

    2012-06-27

    Bone marrow kinase in the X chromosome, a member of the Tec family of tyrosine kinases, plays a role in both monocyte/macrophage trafficking as well as cytokine secretion. Although the structures of Tec family kinases Bruton's tyrosine kinase and IL-2-inducible T-cell kinase are known, the crystal structures of other Tec family kinases have remained elusive. We report the X-ray crystal structures of bone marrow kinase in the X chromosome in complex with dasatinib at 2.4 {angstrom} resolution and PP2 at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. The bone marrow kinase in the X chromosome structures reveal a typical kinase protein fold; with well-ordered protein conformation that includes an open/extended activation loop and a stabilized DFG-motif rendering the kinase in an inactive conformation. Dasatinib and PP2 bind to bone marrow kinase in the X chromosome in the ATP binding pocket and display similar binding modes to that observed in other Tec and Src protein kinases. The bone marrow kinase in the X chromosome structures identify conformational elements of the DFG-motif that could potentially be utilized to design potent and/or selective bone marrow kinase in the X chromosome inhibitors.

  3. Phosphorylation of varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein gpI by mammalian casein kinase II and casein kinase I

    SciTech Connect

    Grose, C.; Jackson, W. ); Traugh, J.A. )

    1989-09-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) glycoprotein gpI is the predominant viral glycoprotein within the plasma membranes of infected cells. This viral glycoprotein is phosphorylated on its polypeptide backbone during biosynthesis. In this report, the authors investigated the protein kinases which participate in the phosphorylation events. Under in vivo conditions, VZV gpI was phosphorylated on its serine and threonine residues by protein kinases present within lysates of either VZV-infected or uninfected cells. Because this activity was diminished by heparin, a known inhibitor of casein kinase II, isolated gpI was incubated with purified casein kinase II and shown to be phosphorylated in an in vitro assay containing ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP. The same glycoprotein was phosphorylated when ({sup 32}P)GTP was substituted for ({sup 32}P)ATP in the protein kinase assay. They also tested whether VZV gpI was phosphorylated by two other ubiquitous mammalian protein kinases--casein kinase I and cyclic AMP-dependent kinase--and found that only casein kinase I modified gpI. When the predicted 623-amino-acid sequence of gpI was examined, two phosphorylation sites known to be optimal for casein kinase II were observed. In summary, this study showed that VZV gpI was phosphorylated by each of two mammalian protein kinases (casein kinase I and casein kinase II) and that potential serine-threonine phosphorylation sites for each of these two kinases were present in the viral glycoprotein.

  4. Identification of Ski as a target for Aurora A kinase

    PubMed Central

    Mosquera, Jocelyn; Armisen, Ricardo; Zhao, Hong Ling; Rojas, Diego A.; Maldonado, Edio; Tapia, Julio C; Colombo, Alicia; Hayman, Michael J; Marcelain, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    Ski is a negative regulator of the transforming growth factor-β and other signalling pathways. The absence of SKI in mouse fibroblasts leads to chromosome segregation defects and genomic instability, suggesting a role for Ski during mitosis. At this stage, Ski is phosphorylated but to date little is known about the kinases involved in this process. Here, we show that Aurora A kinase is able to phosphorylate Ski in vitro. In vivo, Aurora A and Ski co-localized at the centrosomes and co-immunoprecipitated. Conversely, a C-terminal truncation mutant of Ski (SkiΔ491–728) lacking a coiled-coil domain, displayed decreased centrosomal localization. This mutant no longer co-immunoprecipitated with Aurora-A in vivo, but was still phosphorylated in vitro, indicating that the Ski-Aurora A interaction takes place at the centrosomes. These data identify Ski as a novel target of Aurora A and contribute to an understanding of the role of these proteins in the mitotic process. PMID:21600873

  5. LAMMER kinase contributes to genome stability in Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    de Sena-Tomás, Carmen; Sutherland, Jeanette H; Milisavljevic, Mira; Nikolic, Dragana B; Pérez-Martín, José; Kojic, Milorad; Holloman, William K

    2015-09-01

    Here we report identification of the lkh1 gene encoding a LAMMER kinase homolog (Lkh1) from a screen for DNA repair-deficient mutants in Ustilago maydis. The mutant allele isolated results from a mutation at glutamine codon 488 to a stop codon that would be predicted to lead to truncation of the carboxy-terminal kinase domain of the protein. This mutant (lkh1(Q488*)) is highly sensitive to ultraviolet light, methyl methanesulfonate, and hydroxyurea. In contrast, a null mutant (lkh1Δ) deleted of the entire lkh1 gene has a less severe phenotype. No epistasis was observed when an lkh1(Q488*)rad51Δ double mutant was tested for genotoxin sensitivity. However, overexpressing the gene for Rad51, its regulator Brh2, or the Brh2 regulator Dss1 partially restored genotoxin resistance of the lkh1Δ and lkh1(Q488*) mutants. Deletion of lkh1 in a chk1Δ mutant enabled these double mutant cells to continue to cycle when challenged with hydroxyurea. lkh1Δ and lkh1(Q488*) mutants were able to complete the meiotic process but exhibited reduced heteroallelic recombination and aberrant chromosome segregation. The observations suggest that Lkh1 serves in some aspect of cell cycle regulation after DNA damage or replication stress and that it also contributes to proper chromosome segregation in meiosis. PMID:26176563

  6. Pyruvate kinase M2 is a phosphotyrosine-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Christofk, H.R.; Vander Heiden, M.G.; Wu, N.; Asara, J.M.; Cantley, L.C.

    2008-06-03

    Growth factors stimulate cells to take up excess nutrients and to use them for anabolic processes. The biochemical mechanism by which this is accomplished is not fully understood but it is initiated by phosphorylation of signalling proteins on tyrosine residues. Using a novel proteomic screen for phosphotyrosine-binding proteins, we have made the observation that an enzyme involved in glycolysis, the human M2 (fetal) isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2), binds directly and selectively to tyrosine-phosphorylated peptides. We show that binding of phosphotyrosine peptides to PKM2 results in release of the allosteric activator fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, leading to inhibition of PKM2 enzymatic activity. We also provide evidence that this regulation of PKM2 by phosphotyrosine signalling diverts glucose metabolites from energy production to anabolic processes when cells are stimulated by certain growth factors. Collectively, our results indicate that expression of this phosphotyrosine-binding form of pyruvate kinase is critical for rapid growth in cancer cells.

  7. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase p85beta regulates invadopodium formation

    PubMed Central

    Cariaga-Martínez, Ariel E.; Cortés, Isabel; García, Esther; Pérez-García, Vicente; Pajares, María J.; Idoate, Miguel A.; Redondo-Muñóz, Javier; Antón, Inés M.; Carrera, Ana C.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The acquisition of invasiveness is characteristic of tumor progression. Numerous genetic changes are associated with metastasis, but the mechanism by which a cell becomes invasive remains unclear. Expression of p85β, a regulatory subunit of phosphoinositide-3-kinase, markedly increases in advanced carcinoma, but its mode of action is unknown. We postulated that p85β might facilitate cell invasion. We show that p85β localized at cell adhesions in complex with focal adhesion kinase and enhanced stability and maturation of cell adhesions. In addition, p85β induced development at cell adhesions of an F-actin core that extended several microns into the cell z-axis resembling the skeleton of invadopodia. p85β lead to F-actin polymerization at cell adhesions by recruiting active Cdc42/Rac at these structures. In accordance with p85β function in invadopodium-like formation, p85β levels increased in metastatic melanoma and p85β depletion reduced invadopodium formation and invasion. These results show that p85β enhances invasion by inducing cell adhesion development into invadopodia-like structures explaining the metastatic potential of tumors with increased p85β levels. PMID:25217619

  8. Muscle specific kinase: organiser of synaptic membrane domains.

    PubMed

    Ghazanfari, Nazanin; Fernandez, Kristine J; Murata, Yui; Morsch, Marco; Ngo, Shyuan T; Reddel, Stephen W; Noakes, Peter G; Phillips, William D

    2011-03-01

    Muscle Specific Kinase (MuSK) is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase vital for forming and maintaining the mammalian neuromuscular junction (NMJ: the synapse between motor nerve and skeletal muscle). MuSK expression switches on during skeletal muscle differentiation. MuSK then becomes restricted to the postsynaptic membrane of the NMJ, where it functions to cluster acetylcholine receptors (AChRs). The expression, activation and turnover of MuSK are each regulated by signals from the motor nerve terminal. MuSK forms the core of an emerging signalling complex that can be acutely activated by neural agrin (N-agrin), a heparin sulfate proteoglycan secreted from the nerve terminal. MuSK activation initiates complex intracellular signalling events that coordinate the local synthesis and assembly of synaptic proteins. The importance of MuSK as a synapse organiser is highlighted by cases of autoimmune myasthenia gravis in which MuSK autoantibodies can deplete MuSK from the postsynaptic membrane, leading to complete disassembly of the adult NMJ. PMID:20974278

  9. Crystal structure of inhibitor of ;#954;B kinase [beta

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Guozhou; Lo, Yu-Chih; Li, Qiubai; Napolitano, Gennaro; Wu, Xuefeng; Jiang, Xuliang; Dreano, Michel; Karin, Michael; Wu, Hao

    2011-07-26

    Inhibitor of {kappa}B (I{kappa}B) kinase (IKK) phosphorylates I{kappa}B proteins, leading to their degradation and the liberation of nuclear factor {kappa}B for gene transcription. Here we report the crystal structure of IKK{beta} in complex with an inhibitor, at a resolution of 3.6 {angstrom}. The structure reveals a trimodular architecture comprising the kinase domain, a ubiquitin-like domain (ULD) and an elongated, {alpha}-helical scaffold/dimerization domain (SDD). Unexpectedly, the predicted leucine zipper and helix-loop-helix motifs do not form these structures but are part of the SDD. The ULD and SDD mediate a critical interaction with I{kappa}B{alpha} that restricts substrate specificity, and the ULD is also required for catalytic activity. The SDD mediates IKK{beta} dimerization, but dimerization per se is not important for maintaining IKK{beta} activity and instead is required for IKK{beta} activation. Other IKK family members, IKK{alpha}, TBK1 and IKK-i, may have a similar trimodular architecture and function.

  10. Protein Kinase C and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mondrinos, Mark J.; Kennedy, Paul A.; Lyons, Melanie; Deutschman, Clifford S.; Kilpatrick, Laurie E.

    2013-01-01

    The Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a major public health problem and a leading source of morbidity in Intensive Care Units (ICUs). Lung tissue in patients with ARDS is characterized by inflammation, with exuberant neutrophil infiltration, activation and degranulation that is thought to initiate tissue injury through the release of proteases and oxygen radicals. Treatment of ARDS is supportive primarily because the underlying pathophysiology is poorly understood. This gap in knowledge must be addressed in order to identify urgently needed therapies. Recent research efforts in anti-inflammatory drug development have focused on identifying common control points in multiple signaling pathways. The protein kinase C (PKC) serine-threonine kinases are master regulators of proinflammatory signaling hubs, making them attractive therapeutic targets. Pharmacological inhibition of broad spectrum PKC activity and, more importantly, of specific PKC isoforms (as well as deletion of PKCs in mice) exerts protective effects in various experimental models of lung injury. Furthermore, PKC isoforms have been implicated in inflammatory processes that may be involved in the pathophysiologic changes that result in ARDS, including activation of innate immune and endothelial cells, neutrophil trafficking to the lung, regulation of alveolar epithelial barrier functions and control of neutrophil pro-inflammatory and pro-survival signaling. This review focuses on the mechanistic involvement of PKC isoforms in the pathogenesis of ARDS and highlights the potential of developing new therapeutic paradigms based on the selective inhibition (or activation) of specific PKC isoforms. PMID:23572089

  11. Phosphorylation of the Kinase Interaction Motif in Mitogen-activated Protein (MAP) Kinase Phosphatase-4 Mediates Cross-talk between Protein Kinase A and MAP Kinase Signaling Pathways*

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Robin J.; Delavaine, Laurent; Cejudo-Marín, Rocío; Stewart, Graeme; Staples, Christopher J.; Didmon, Mark P.; Trinidad, Antonio Garcia; Alonso, Andrés; Pulido, Rafael; Keyse, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    MAP kinase phosphatase 4 (DUSP9/MKP-4) plays an essential role during placental development and is one of a subfamily of three closely related cytoplasmic dual-specificity MAPK phosphatases, which includes the ERK-specific enzymes DUSP6/MKP-3 and DUSP7/MKP-X. However, unlike DUSP6/MKP-3, DUSP9/MKP-4 also inactivates the p38α MAP kinase both in vitro and in vivo. Here we demonstrate that inactivation of both ERK1/2 and p38α by DUSP9/MKP-4 is mediated by a conserved arginine-rich kinase interaction motif located within the amino-terminal non-catalytic domain of the protein. Furthermore, DUSP9/MKP-4 is unique among these cytoplasmic MKPs in containing a conserved PKA consensus phosphorylation site 55RRXSer-58 immediately adjacent to the kinase interaction motif. DUSP9/MKP-4 is phosphorylated on Ser-58 by PKA in vitro, and phosphorylation abrogates the binding of DUSP9/MKP-4 to both ERK2 and p38α MAP kinases. In addition, although mutation of Ser-58 to either alanine or glutamic acid does not affect the intrinsic catalytic activity of DUSP9/MKP-4, phospho-mimetic (Ser-58 to Glu) substitution inhibits both the interaction of DUSP9/MKP-4 with ERK2 and p38α in vivo and its ability to dephosphorylate and inactivate these MAP kinases. Finally, the use of a phospho-specific antibody demonstrates that endogenous DUSP9/MKP-4 is phosphorylated on Ser-58 in response to the PKA agonist forskolin and is also modified in placental tissue. We conclude that DUSP9/MKP-4 is a bona fide target of PKA signaling and that attenuation of DUSP9/MKP-4 function can mediate cross-talk between the PKA pathway and MAPK signaling through both ERK1/2 and p38α in vivo. PMID:21908610

  12. Selectivity of docking sites in MAPK kinases.

    PubMed

    Bardwell, A Jane; Frankson, Erlynn; Bardwell, Lee

    2009-05-01

    Protein kinases often recognize their substrates and regulators through docking interactions that occur outside of the active site; these interactions can help us to understand kinase networks, and to target kinases with drugs. During mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, the ability of MAPK kinases (MKKs, or MEKs) to recognize their cognate MAPKs is facilitated by a short docking motif (the D-site) in the MKK N terminus, which binds to a complementary region on the MAPK. MAPKs then recognize many of their targets using the same strategy, because many MAPK substrates also contain D-sites. The extent to which docking contributes to the specificity of MAPK transactions is incompletely understood. Here we characterize the selectivity of the interaction between MKK-derived D-sites and MAPKs by measuring the ability of D-site peptides to inhibit MAPK-mediated phosphorylation of D-site-containing substrates. We find that all MKK D-sites bind better to their cognate MAPKs than they do to non-cognate MAPKs. For instance, the MKK3 D-site peptide, which is a remarkably potent inhibitor of p38alpha (IC(50) < 10 nm), does not inhibit JNK1 or JNK2. Likewise, MAPKs generally bind as well or better to cognate D-sites than to non-cognate D-sites. For instance, JNK1 and JNK2 do not appreciably bind to any D-sites other than their cognate D-sites from MKK4 and MKK7. In general, cognate, within-pathway interactions are preferred about an order of magnitude over non-cognate interactions. However, the selectivity of MAPKs and their cognate MKK-derived D-sites for each other is limited in some cases; in particular, ERK2 is not very selective. We conclude that MAPK-docking sites in MAPK kinases bind selectively to their cognate MAPKs. PMID:19196711

  13. Muscarine enhances soluble amyloid precursor protein secretion in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y by a pathway dependent on protein kinase C(alpha), src-tyrosine kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase but not phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Canet-Aviles, Rosa-Maria; Anderton, Mark; Hooper, Nigel M; Turner, Anthony J; Vaughan, Peter F T

    2002-06-15

    The signalling pathways by which muscarine and epidermal growth factor (EGF) regulate the secretion of the alpha-secretase cleavage product (sAPPalpha) of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) were examined in the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y. Using specific inhibitors it was found that over 80% of sAPPalpha secretion, enhanced by muscarine, occurred via the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family and was dependent on protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha) and a member of the Src family of non-receptor tyrosine kinases (Src-TK). In contrast the stimulation of sAPPalpha secretion by EGF was not affected by inhibitors of PKC nor Src-TK but was dependent on ERK1/2. In addition muscarine-enhanced sAPPalpha secretion and ERK1/2 activation were inhibited 60 and 80%, respectively, by micromolar concentrations of the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI-3K) inhibitor wortmannin. In comparison wortmannin decreased EGF stimulation of sAPPalpha secretion and ERK 1/2 activation by approximately 40%. Unexpectedly, U73122, an inhibitor of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C, did not inhibit muscarine enhancement of sAPPalpha secretion. These data are discussed in relation to a pathway for the enhancement of sAPPalpha secretion by muscarine which involves the activation of a Src-TK by G-protein beta/gamma-subunits leading to activation of PKCalpha, and ERK1/2 by a mechanism not involving phospholipase C. PMID:12191495

  14. Total contribution of airborne lead to blood lead.

    PubMed Central

    Manton, W I

    1985-01-01

    A nine year study of blood lead concentrations and isotope ratios carried out on a married couple shows that pulmonary deposition cannot account for all the airborne lead in blood; that lead from bone may comprise 70% of blood lead; and that during pregnancy blood lead may double due to mobilisation of lead from bone. PMID:3970881

  15. Tyrosine phosphorylation is a mandatory proximal step in radiation-induced activation of the protein kinase C signaling pathway in human B-lymphocyte precursors.

    PubMed Central

    Uckun, F M; Schieven, G L; Tuel-Ahlgren, L M; Dibirdik, I; Myers, D E; Ledbetter, J A; Song, C W

    1993-01-01

    Ionizing radiation triggers a signal in human B-lymphocyte precursors that is intimately linked to an active protein-tyrosine kinase regulatory pathway. We show that in B-lymphocyte precursors, irradiation with gamma-rays leads to (i) stimulation of phosphatidylinositol turnover; (ii) downstream activation by covalent modification of multiple serine-specific protein kinases, including protein kinase C; and (iii) activation of nuclear factor kappa B. All of the radiation-induced signals were effectively prevented by the protein-tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and herbimycin A. Thus, tyrosine phosphorylation is an important and perhaps mandatory proximal step in the activation of the protein kinase C signaling cascade in human B-lymphocyte precursors. Our report expands current knowledge of the radiation-induced signaling cascade by clarifying the chronological sequence of biochemical events that follow irradiation. Images PMID:8419931

  16. Cell signaling by receptor-tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Lemmon, Mark A.; Schlessinger, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Recent structural studies of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) have revealed unexpected diversity in the mechanisms of their activation by growth factor ligands. Strategies for inducing dimerization by ligand binding are surprisingly diverse, as are mechanisms that couple this event to activation of the intracellular tyrosine kinase domains. As our understanding of these details becomes increasingly sophisticated, it provides an important context for therapeutically countering the effects of pathogenic RTK mutations in cancer and other diseases. Much remains to be learned, however, about the complex signaling networks downstream from RTKs and how alterations in these networks are translated into cellular responses. PMID:20602996

  17. Teachers Take the Lead

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corder, Gregory W.; Marshall, Ian; Lineweaver, Lori; McIntyre, Peggy

    2008-01-01

    Classroom teachers can serve as instructional leaders to plan, execute, and assess staff development. Such responsibility can lead to successful outcomes, as evidenced by one school's teacher-led technology training. This article illustrates how sharing instructional leadership responsibilities helps develop collegiality among faculty members.

  18. Leading for Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yazzie-Mintz, Ethan

    2010-01-01

    As the dropout problem has grown--and as increasing numbers of students have started to see dropping out as a viable option for expressing their disaffection with school--practitioners, policymakers, and researchers have looked more closely at the factors that lead students to disengage from school and have attempted to find ways to create…

  19. Lead Poisoning in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin-Fu, Jane S.

    Designed as a public information pamphlet, the text discusses the problem of lead poisoning in children. The preventable nature of the problem is stressed as well as needed action on the part of the public, physicians and other health workers, and the legislators. The pamphlet emphasizes that each of these areas is essential in preventing death or…

  20. Leading by Interviewing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorenson, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    While the interview remains the most relevant process by which information about an applicant can be obtained, the effective school administrator must recognize that the interview process is much more than exploring an applicant's qualifications, skills, and experiences. The interview must also be utilized as a means of leading. In other words,…

  1. Change, Lead, Succeed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munger, Linda; von Frank, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    Redefine leadership in your school, and create capacity through school leadership teams that successfully coordinate professional learning. "Change, Lead, Succeed" shows school leaders and teachers in leadership roles what they need to know to effectively create a culture for change. Find out what distinguishes a school leadership team from other…

  2. Lead Thickness Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

    1998-02-16

    The preshower lead thickness applied to the outside of D-Zero's superconducting solenoid vacuum shell was measured at the time of application. This engineering documents those thickness measurements. The lead was ordered in sheets 0.09375-inch and 0.0625-inch thick. The tolerance on thickness was specified to be +/- 0.003-inch. The sheets all were within that thickness tolerance. The nomenclature for each sheet was designated 1T, 1B, 2T, 2B where the numeral designates it's location in the wrap and 'T' or 'B' is short for 'top' or 'bottom' half of the solenoid. Micrometer measurements were taken at six locations around the perimeter of each sheet. The width,length, and weight of each piece was then measured. Using an assumed pure lead density of 0.40974 lb/in{sup 3}, an average sheet thickness was calculated and compared to the perimeter thickness measurements. In every case, the calculated average thickness was a few mils thinner than the perimeter measurements. The ratio was constant, 0.98. This discrepancy is likely due to the assumed pure lead density. It is not felt that the perimeter is thicker than the center regions. The data suggests that the physical thickness of the sheets is uniform to +/- 0.0015-inch.

  3. Leading through Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerzon, Mark

    2006-01-01

    This article talks about leading significant learning opportunities through conflict of ideas in a school system. Catalyzing school change can turn emotional differences of opinion into learning opportunities. Leaders who want to deal effectively with these challenging, often tense situations need to be more than good managers. They need to be…

  4. ALL AGES LEAD MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetic (IEUBK) Model for Lead in Children (version 0.99d) was released in March 1994, and has been widely accepted in the risk assessment community as a tool for implementing the site specific risk assessment process when the issue is childhood...

  5. Leading the Way.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slevin, James F.

    1994-01-01

    Claims that the field of rhetoric and composition is leading the way in the increase in attention to the preparation of graduate students as future teachers. Explains how composition programs encourage the development of teacherly attributes. Suggests priorities for further thought and research. (HB)

  6. Lead and compounds (inorganic)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Lead and compounds ( inorganic ) ; CASRN 7439 - 92 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for

  7. Girls Leading Outward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamed, Heather; Reyes, Jazmin; Moceri, Dominic C.; Morana, Laura; Elias, Maurice J.

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe a program implemented in Red Bank Middle School in New Jersey to help at-risk, minority middle school girls realize their leadership potential. The GLO (Girls Leading Outward) program was developed by the Developing Safe and Civil Schools Project at Rutgers University and is facilitated by university students. Selected middle…

  8. Machining lead wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Schamaun, R.T.

    1987-09-01

    Recently, MEC-6 machined some 4-inch-diameter lead wafers to precision tolerances. The tolerance on the wafer thickness was +-0.000080 inch. A diamond tool was used to machine the wafers on a Moore No. 3 lathe. This report discusses the methods used to machine the wafers, the fixtures used to hold the wafers, and the inspection methods and results.

  9. Identification and characterization of plant Haspin kinase as a histone H3 threonine kinase

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Haspin kinases are mitotic kinases that are well-conserved from yeast to human. Human Haspin is a histone H3 Thr3 kinase that has important roles in chromosome cohesion during mitosis. Moreover, phosphorylation of histone H3 at Thr3 by Haspin in fission yeast, Xenopus, and human is required for accumulation of Aurora B on the centromere, and the subsequent activation of Aurora B kinase activity for accurate chromosome alignment and segregation. Although extensive analyses of Haspin have been carried out in yeast and animals, the function of Haspin in organogenesis remains unclear. Results Here, we identified a Haspin kinase, designated AtHaspin, in Arabidopsis thaliana. The purified AtHaspin phosphorylated histone H3 at both Thr3 and Thr11 in vitro. Live imaging of AtHaspin-tdTomato and GFP-α-tubulin in BY-2 cells showed that AtHaspin-tdTomato localized on chromosomes during prometaphase and metaphase, and around the cell plate during cytokinesis. This localization of AtHaspin overlapped with that of phosphorylated Thr3 and Thr11 of histone H3 in BY-2 cells. AtHaspin-GFP driven by the native promoter was expressed in root meristems, shoot meristems, floral meristems, and throughout the whole embryo at stages of high cell division. Overexpression of a kinase domain mutant of AtHaspin decreased the size of the root meristem, which delayed root growth. Conclusions Our results indicated that the Haspin kinase is a histone H3 threonine kinase in A. thaliana. AtHaspin phosphorylated histone H3 at both Thr3 and Thr11 in vitro. The expression and dominant-negative analysis showed that AtHaspin may have a role in mitotic cell division during plant growth. Further analysis of coordinated mechanisms involving Haspin and Aurora kinases will shed new light on the regulation of chromosome segregation in cell division during plant growth and development. PMID:21527018

  10. Purification and characterization of a casein kinase 2-type protein kinase from pea nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, H.; Roux, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    Almost all the polyamine-stimulated protein kinase activity associated with the chromatin fraction of nuclei purified from etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L.) plumules is present in a single enzyme that can be extracted from chromatin by 0.35 molar NaCl. This protein kinase can be further purified over 2000-fold by salt fractionation and anion-exchange and casein-agarose column chromatography, after which it is more than 90% pure. The purified kinase has a specific activity of about 650 nanomoles per minute per milligram protein in the absence of polyamines, with either ATP or GTP as phosphoryl donor. Spermidine can stimulate its activity fourfold, with half-maximal activation at about 2 millimolar. Spermine and putrescine also stimulate activity, although somewhat less effectively. This kinase has a tetrameric alpha 2 beta 2 structure with a native molecular weight of 130,000, and subunit molecular weights of 36,000 for the catalytic subunit (alpha) and 29,000 for the regulatory subunit (beta). In western blot analyses, only the alpha subunit reacts strongly with polyclonal antibodies to a Drosophila casein kinase II. The pea kinase can use casein and phosvitin as artificial substrates, phosphorylating both the serine and threonine residues of casein. It has a pH optimum near 8.0, a Vmax of 1.5 micromoles per minute per milligram protein, and a Km for ATP of approximately 75 micromolar. Its activity can be almost completely inhibited by heparin at 5 micrograms per milliliter, but is relatively insensitive to concentrations of staurosporine, K252a, and chlorpromazine that strongly antagonize Ca(2+) -regulated protein kinases. These results are discussed in relation to recent findings that casein kinase 2-type kinases may phosphorylate trans-acting factors that bind to light-regulated promoters in plants.

  11. Blood lead--tooth lead relationship among Boston children

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinowitz, M.B.; Leviton, A.; Bellinger, D.C. )

    1989-10-01

    The amount of lead in deciduous teeth has been used extensively as a marker for infant lead exposure and body burden. Elevated tooth lead levels have been seen in children who had lead poisoning. Also, on a population wide basis tooth lead levels appear to vary according to housing status and presumably lead exposure. This exposure index has been applied using varying techniques in Denmark, and the United Kingdom. Because of the neurotoxicity of lead, the tooth lead levels of retarded and normal children have been compared. Most recently, in research of lead and child development, tooth lead levels have been used as markers of past lead exposure. Despite the widespread use of tooth lead values, very little is known about the exact time course of lead deposition in tooth from blood. This report compares blood lead levels at different ages to tooth lead levels in a group of Boston children.

  12. Role of Protein Kinase C, PI3-kinase and Tyrosine Kinase in Activation of MAP Kinase by Glucose and Agonists of G-protein Coupled Receptors in INS-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Böcker, Dietmar

    2001-01-01

    MAP (mitogen-activated protein) kinase (also called Erk 1/2) plays a crucial role in cell proliferation and differentiation. Its impact on secretory events is less well established. The interplay of protein kinase C (PKC), PI3-kinase nd cellular tyrosine kinase with MAP kinase activity using inhibitors and compounds such as glucose, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and agonists of G-protein coupled receptors like gastrin releasing peptide (GRP), oxytocin (OT) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) was investigated in INS-1 cells, an insulin secreting cell line. MAP kinase activity was determined by using a peptide derived from the EGF receptor as a MAP kinase substrate and [ P 32 ]ATP. Glucose as well as GRP, OT and GIP exhibited a time-dependent increase in MAP kinase activity with a maximum at time point 2.5 min. All further experiments were performed using 2.5 min incubations. The flavone PD 098059 is known to bind to the inactive forms of MEK1 (MAPK/ERK-Kinase) thus preventing activation by upstream activators. 20 μM PD 098059 ( IC 50 =51 μM) inhibited MAP kinase stimulated by either glucose, GRP, OT, GIP or PMA. Inhibiton (“downregulation”) of PKC by a long term (22h) pretreatment with 1 μM PMA did not influence MAP kinase activity when augmented by either of the above mentioned compound. To investigate whether PI3-kinase and cellular tyrosine kinase are involved in G-protein mediated effects on MAP kinase, inhibitors were used: 100 nM wortmannin (PI3-kinase inhibitor) reduced the effects of GRP, OT and GIP but not that of PMA; 100 μM genistein (tyrosine kinase inhibitor) inhibited the stimulatory effect of either above mentioned compound on MAP kinase activation. Inhibition of MAP kinase by 20 μM PD 098059 did not influence insulin secretion modulated by either compound (glucose, GRP, OT or GIP). [ H 3 ]Thymidine incorporation, however, was severely inhibited by PD 098059. Thus MAP kinase is important for INS-1 cell proliferation but

  13. Fluid-flow-induced mesenchymal stem cell migration: role of focal adhesion kinase and RhoA kinase sensors.

    PubMed

    Riehl, Brandon D; Lee, Jeong Soon; Ha, Ligyeom; Lim, Jung Yul

    2015-03-01

    The study of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) migration under flow conditions with investigation of the underlying molecular mechanism could lead to a better understanding and outcome in stem-cell-based cell therapy and regenerative medicine. We used peer-reviewed open source software to develop methods for efficiently and accurately tracking, measuring and processing cell migration as well as morphology. Using these tools, we investigated MSC migration under flow-induced shear and tested the molecular mechanism with stable knockdown of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and RhoA kinase (ROCK). Under steady flow, MSCs migrated following the flow direction in a shear stress magnitude-dependent manner, as assessed by root mean square displacement and mean square displacement, motility coefficient and confinement ratio. Silencing FAK in MSCs suppressed morphology adaptation capability and reduced cellular motility for both static and flow conditions. Interestingly, ROCK silencing significantly increased migration tendency especially under flow. Blocking ROCK, which is known to reduce cytoskeletal tension, may lower the resistance to skeletal remodelling during the flow-induced migration. Our data thus propose a potentially differential role of focal adhesion and cytoskeletal tension signalling elements in MSC migration under flow shear. PMID:25589570

  14. G Protein-coupled Receptor Kinase 5 Phosphorylates Nucleophosmin and Regulates Cell Sensitivity to Polo-like Kinase 1 Inhibition*

    PubMed Central

    So, Christopher H.; Michal, Allison M.; Mashayekhi, Rouzbeh; Benovic, Jeffrey L.

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) phosphorylate activated G protein-coupled receptors, leading to their desensitization and endocytosis. GRKs have also been implicated in phosphorylating other classes of proteins and can localize in a variety of cellular compartments, including the nucleus. Here, we attempted to identify potential nuclear substrates for GRK5. Our studies reveal that GRK5 is able to interact with and phosphorylate nucleophosmin (NPM1) both in vitro and in intact cells. NPM1 is a nuclear protein that regulates a variety of cell functions including centrosomal duplication, cell cycle control, and apoptosis. GRK5 interaction with NPM1 is mediated by the N-terminal domain of each protein, and GRK5 primarily phosphorylates NPM1 at Ser-4, a site shared with polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1). NPM1 phosphorylation by GRK5 and PLK1 correlates with the sensitivity of cells to undergo apoptosis with cells having higher GRK5 levels being less sensitive and cells with lower GRK5 being more sensitive to PLK1 inhibitor-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our results demonstrate that GRK5 phosphorylates Ser-4 in nucleophosmin and regulates the sensitivity of cells to PLK1 inhibition. PMID:22467873

  15. Fluid-flow-induced mesenchymal stem cell migration: role of focal adhesion kinase and RhoA kinase sensors

    PubMed Central

    Riehl, Brandon D.; Lee, Jeong Soon; Ha, Ligyeom; Lim, Jung Yul

    2015-01-01

    The study of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) migration under flow conditions with investigation of the underlying molecular mechanism could lead to a better understanding and outcome in stem-cell-based cell therapy and regenerative medicine. We used peer-reviewed open source software to develop methods for efficiently and accurately tracking, measuring and processing cell migration as well as morphology. Using these tools, we investigated MSC migration under flow-induced shear and tested the molecular mechanism with stable knockdown of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and RhoA kinase (ROCK). Under steady flow, MSCs migrated following the flow direction in a shear stress magnitude-dependent manner, as assessed by root mean square displacement and mean square displacement, motility coefficient and confinement ratio. Silencing FAK in MSCs suppressed morphology adaptation capability and reduced cellular motility for both static and flow conditions. Interestingly, ROCK silencing significantly increased migration tendency especially under flow. Blocking ROCK, which is known to reduce cytoskeletal tension, may lower the resistance to skeletal remodelling during the flow-induced migration. Our data thus propose a potentially differential role of focal adhesion and cytoskeletal tension signalling elements in MSC migration under flow shear. PMID:25589570

  16. Detecting disulfide-bound complexes and the oxidative regulation of cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases by H2O2.

    PubMed

    Burgoyne, Joseph R; Eaton, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide regulates intracellular signaling by oxidatively converting susceptible cysteine thiols to a modified state, which includes the formation of intermolecular disulfides. This type of oxidative modification can occur within the cAMP- and cGMP-dependent protein kinases often referred to as PKA and PKG, which have important roles in regulating cardiac contractility and systemic blood pressure. Both kinases are stimulated through conical pathways that elevate their respective cyclic nucleotides leading to direct kinase stimulation. However, PKA and PKG can also be functionally modulated independently of cyclic nucleotide stimulation through direct cysteine thiol oxidation leading to intermolecular disulfide formation. In the case of PKG, the formation of an intermolecular disulfide between two parallel dimeric subunits leads to enhanced kinase affinity for substrate. For PKA, the formation of two intermolecular disulfides between antiparallel dimeric regulatory RI subunits increases the affinity of this kinase for its binding partners, the A-kinase anchoring proteins, leading to increased PKA localization to its substrates. In this chapter, we describe the methods for detecting intermolecular disulfide-bound proteins and monitoring PKA and PKG oxidation within biological samples. PMID:23849862

  17. Discovery and Optimization of Macrocyclic Quinoxaline-pyrrolo-dihydropiperidinones as Potent Pim-1/2 Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cee, Victor J; Chavez, Frank; Herberich, Bradley; Lanman, Brian A; Pettus, Liping H; Reed, Anthony B; Wu, Bin; Wurz, Ryan P; Andrews, Kristin L; Chen, Jie; Hickman, Dean; Laszlo, Jimmy; Lee, Matthew R; Guerrero, Nadia; Mattson, Bethany K; Nguyen, Yen; Mohr, Christopher; Rex, Karen; Sastri, Christine E; Wang, Paul; Wu, Qiong; Wu, Tian; Xu, Yang; Zhou, Yihong; Winston, Jeffrey T; Lipford, J Russell; Tasker, Andrew S; Wang, Hui-Ling

    2016-04-14

    The identification of Pim-1/2 kinase overexpression in B-cell malignancies suggests that Pim kinase inhibitors will have utility in the treatment of lymphoma, leukemia, and multiple myeloma. Starting from a moderately potent quinoxaline-dihydropyrrolopiperidinone lead, we recognized the potential for macrocyclization and developed a series of 13-membered macrocycles. The structure-activity relationships of the macrocyclic linker were systematically explored, leading to the identification of 9c as a potent, subnanomolar inhibitor of Pim-1 and -2. This molecule also potently inhibited Pim kinase activity in KMS-12-BM, a multiple myeloma cell line with relatively high endogenous levels of Pim-1/2, both in vitro (pBAD IC50 = 25 nM) and in vivo (pBAD EC50 = 30 nM, unbound), and a 100 mg/kg daily dose was found to completely arrest the growth of KMS-12-BM xenografts in mice. PMID:27096050

  18. Recent developments in receptor tyrosine kinases targeted anticancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Raval, Samir H.; Singh, Ratn D.; Joshi, Dilip V.; Patel, Hitesh B.; Mody, Shailesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Novel concepts and understanding of receptors lead to discoveries and optimization of many small molecules and antibodies as anti-cancerous drugs. Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are such a promising class of receptors under the investigation in past three decades. RTKs are one of the essential mediators of cell signaling mechanism for various cellular processes. Transformations such as overexpression, dysregulation, or mutations of RTKs may result into malignancy, and thus are an important target for anticancer therapy. Numerous subfamilies of RTKs, such as epidermal growth factor receptor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, fibroblast growth factor receptors, insulin-like growth factor receptor, and hepatocyte growth factor receptor, have been being investigated in recent years as target for anticancer therapy. The present review focuses several small molecules drugs as well as monoclonal antibodies targeting aforesaid subfamilies either approved or under investigation to treat the various cancers. PMID:27051190

  19. The unique protein kinase Cη: implications for breast cancer (review).

    PubMed

    Pal, Deepanwita; Basu, Alakananda

    2014-08-01

    Deregulation of key signal transduction pathways that govern important cellular processes leads to cancer. The development of effective therapeutics for cancer warrants a comprehensive understanding of the signaling pathways that are deregulated in cancer. The protein kinase C (PKC) family has served as an attractive target for cancer therapy for decades owing to its crucial roles in several cellular processes. PKCη is a novel member of the PKC family that plays critical roles in various cellular processes such as growth, proliferation, differentiation and cell death. The regulation of PKCη appears to be unique compared to other PKC isozymes, and there are conflicting reports regarding its role in cancer. This review focuses on the unique aspects of PKCη in terms of its structure, regulation and subcellular distribution and speculates on how these features could account for its distinct functions. We have also discussed the functional implications of PKCη in cancer with particular emphasis on breast cancer. PMID:24841225

  20. Phosphoinositide kinase signaling controls ER-PM cross-talk

    PubMed Central

    Omnus, Deike J.; Manford, Andrew G.; Bader, Jakob M.; Emr, Scott D.; Stefan, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane lipid dynamics must be precisely regulated for normal cellular function, and disruptions in lipid homeostasis are linked to the progression of several diseases. However, little is known about the sensory mechanisms for detecting membrane composition and how lipid metabolism is regulated in response to membrane stress. We find that phosphoinositide (PI) kinase signaling controls a conserved PDK-TORC2-Akt signaling cascade as part of a homeostasis network that allows the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to modulate essential responses, including Ca2+-regulated lipid biogenesis, upon plasma membrane (PM) stress. Furthermore, loss of ER-PM junctions impairs this protective response, leading to PM integrity defects upon heat stress. Thus PI kinase–mediated ER-PM cross-talk comprises a regulatory system that ensures cellular integrity under membrane stress conditions. PMID:26864629

  1. Lead/acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, Kathryn R.

    Lead/acid batteries are produced in sizes from less than 1 to 3000 Ah for a wide variety of portable, industrial and automotive applications. Designs include Planté, Fauré or pasted, and tubular electrodes. In addition to the traditional designs which are flooded with sulfuric acid, newer 'valve-regulated" designs have the acid immolibized in a silica gel or absorbed in a porous glass separator. Development is ongoing worldwide to increase the specific power, energy and deep discharge cycle life of this commercially successful system to meet the needs of new applications such as electric vehicles, load leveling, and solar energy storage. The operating principles, current status, technical challenges and commercial impact of the lead/acid battery are reviewed.

  2. LEAD SEVERING CONTRIVANCE

    DOEpatents

    Widmaier, W.

    1958-04-01

    A means for breaking an electrical circuit within an electronic tube during the process of manufacture is described. Frequently such circuits must be employed for gettering or vapor coating purposes, however, since an external pair of corector pins having no use after manufacture, is undesirable, this invention permits the use of existing leads to form a temporary circuit during manufacture, and severing it thereafter. One portion of the temporary circuit, made from a springy material such as tungsten, is spot welded to a fusable member. To cut the circuit an external radiant heat source melts the fusable member, allowing the tensed tungsten spring to contract and break the circuit. This inexpensive arrangement is particularly useful when the tube has a great many external leads crowded into the tube base.

  3. Quercetin inhibits a large panel of kinases implicated in cancer cell biology.

    PubMed

    Boly, Rainatou; Gras, Thierry; Lamkami, Touria; Guissou, Pierre; Serteyn, Didier; Kiss, Robert; Dubois, Jacques

    2011-03-01

    Flavonoids are polyphenolic secondary metabolites from plants that possess a common phenylbenzopyrone structure (C6-C3-C6). Depending upon variations in their heterocyclic C-ring, flavonoids are categorised into one of the following groups: flavones, flavonols, flavanones, flavanols, anthocyanidins, isoflavones or chalcones. Flavonols include, among others, the molecules quercetin, myricetin and kaempferol. The anticancer activity of flavonols was first attributed to their electron-donating ability, which comes from the presence of phenolic hydroxyl groups. However, an emerging view is that flavonoids, including quercetin, may also exert modulatory actions in cells by acting through the protein kinase and lipid kinase signalling pathways. Data from the current study showed that 2 μM quercetin, a low concentration that represents less than 10% of its IC50 growth-inhibitory concentration as calculated from the average of eight distinct cancer cell lines, decreased the activity of 16 kinases by more than 80%, including ABL1, Aurora-A, -B, -C, CLK1, FLT3, JAK3, MET, NEK4, NEK9, PAK3, PIM1, RET, FGF-R2, PDGF-Rα and -Rß. Many of these kinases are involved in the control of mitotic processes. Quantitative video microscopy analyses revealed that quercetin displayed strong anti-mitotic activity, leading to cell death. In conclusion, quercetin partly exerts its anticancer activity through the inhibition of the activity of a large set of kinases. Quercetin could be an interesting chemical scaffold from which to generate novel derivatives possessing various types of anti-kinase activities. PMID:21206969

  4. How do kinases contribute to tonicity-dependent regulation of the transcription factor NFAT5?

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    NFAT5 plays a critical role in maintaining the renal functions. Its dis-regulation in the kidney leads to or is associated with certain renal diseases or disorders, most notably the urinary concentration defect. Hypertonicity, which the kidney medulla is normally exposed to, activates NFAT5 through phosphorylation of a signaling molecule or NFAT5 itself. Hypotonicity inhibits NFAT5 through a similar mechanism. More than a dozen of protein and lipid kinases have been identified to contribute to tonicity-dependent regulation of NFAT5. Hypertonicity activates NFAT5 by increasing its nuclear localization and transactivating activity in the early phase and protein abundance in the late phase. The known mechanism for inhibition of NFAT5 by hypotonicity is a decrease of nuclear NFAT5. The present article reviews the effect of each kinase on NFAT5 nuclear localization, transactivation and protein abundance, and the relationship among these kinases, if known. Cyclosporine A and tacrolimus suppress immune reactions by inhibiting the phosphatase calcineurin-dependent activation of NFAT1. It is hoped that this review would stimulate the interest to seek explanations from the NFAT5 regulatory pathways for certain clinical presentations and to explore novel therapeutic approaches based on the pathways. On the basic science front, this review raises two interesting questions. The first one is how these kinases can specifically signal to NFAT5 in the context of hypertonicity or hypotonicity, because they also regulate other cellular activities and even opposite activities in some cases. The second one is why these many kinases, some of which might have redundant functions, are needed to regulate NFAT5 activity. This review reiterates the concept of signaling through cooperation. Cells need these kinases working in a coordinated way to provide the signaling specificity that is lacking in the individual one. Redundancy in regulation of NFAT5 is a critical strategy for cells to

  5. Luteolin Suppresses Cancer Cell Proliferation by Targeting Vaccinia-Related Kinase 1

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Joon; Harikishore, Amaravadhi; Lim, Jong-Kwan; Jung, Youngseob; Lyu, Ha-Na; Baek, Nam-In; Choi, Kwan Yong; Yoon, Ho Sup; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2014-01-01

    Uncontrolled proliferation, a major feature of cancer cells, is often triggered by the malfunction of cell cycle regulators such as protein kinases. Recently, cell cycle-related protein kinases have become attractive targets for anti-cancer therapy, because they play fundamental roles in cellular proliferation. However, the protein kinase-targeted drugs that have been developed so far do not show impressive clinical results and also display severe side effects; therefore, there is undoubtedly a need to investigate new drugs targeting other protein kinases that are critical in cell cycle progression. Vaccinia-related kinase 1 (VRK1) is a mitotic kinase that functions in cell cycle regulation by phosphorylating cell cycle-related substrates such as barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF), histone H3, and the cAMP response element (CRE)-binding protein (CREB). In our study, we identified luteolin as the inhibitor of VRK1 by screening a small-molecule natural compound library. Here, we evaluated the efficacy of luteolin as a VRK1-targeted inhibitor for developing an effective anti-cancer strategy. We confirmed that luteolin significantly reduces VRK1-mediated phosphorylation of the cell cycle-related substrates BAF and histone H3, and directly interacts with the catalytic domain of VRK1. In addition, luteolin regulates cell cycle progression by modulating VRK1 activity, leading to the suppression of cancer cell proliferation and the induction of apoptosis. Therefore, our study suggests that luteolin-induced VRK1 inhibition may contribute to establish a novel cell cycle-targeted strategy for anti-cancer therapy. PMID:25310002

  6. Cellular impedance assays for predictive preclinical drug screening of kinase inhibitor cardiovascular toxicity.

    PubMed

    Lamore, Sarah D; Kamendi, Harriet W; Scott, Clay W; Dragan, Yvonne P; Peters, Matthew F

    2013-10-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) toxicity is a leading contributor to drug attrition. Implementing earlier testing has successfully reduced human Ether-à-go-go-Related Gene-related arrhythmias. How- ever, analogous assays targeting functional CV effects remain elusive. Demand to address this gap is particularly acute for kinase inhibitors (KIs) that suffer frequent CV toxicity. The drug class also presents some particularly challenging requirements for assessing functional CV toxicity. Specifically, an assay must sense a downstream response that integrates diverse kinase signaling pathways. In addition, sufficient throughput is essential for handling inherent KI nonselectivity. A new opportunity has emerged with cellular impedance technology, which detects spontaneous beating cardiomyocytes. Impedance assays sense morphology changes downstream of cardiomyocyte contraction. To evaluate cardiomyocyte impedance assays for KI screening, we investigated two distinct KI classes where CV toxicity was discovered late and target risks remain unresolved. Microtubule-associated protein/microtubule affinity regulating kinase (MARK) inhibitors decrease blood pressure in dogs, whereas checkpoint kinase (Chk) inhibitors (AZD7762, SCH900776) exhibit dose-limiting CV toxicities in clinical trials. These in vivo effects manifested in vitro as cardiomyocyte beat cessation. MARK effects were deemed mechanism associated because beat inhibition potencies correlated with kinase inhibition, and gene knockdown and microtubule-targeting agents suppressed beating. MARK inhibitor impedance and kinase potencies aligned with rat blood pressure effects. Chk inhibitor effects were judged off-target because Chk and beat inhibition potencies did not correlate and knockdowns did not alter beating. Taken together, the data demonstrate that cardiomyocyte impedance assays can address three unmet needs-detecting KI functional cardiotoxicity in vitro, determining mechanism of action, and supporting safety structure

  7. Structural Basis for Selective Small Molecule Kinase Inhibition of Activated c-Met

    SciTech Connect

    Rickert, Keith W.; Patel, Sangita B.; Allison, Timothy J.; Byrne, Noel J.; Darke, Paul L.; Ford, Rachael E.; Guerin, David J.; Hall, Dawn L.; Kornienko, Maria; Lu, Jun; Munshi, Sanjeev K.; Reid, John C.; Shipman, Jennifer M.; Stanton, Elizabeth F.; Wilson, Kevin J.; Young, Jonathon R.; Soisson, Stephen M.; Lumb, Kevin J.

    2012-03-15

    The receptor tyrosine kinase c-Met is implicated in oncogenesis and is the target for several small molecule and biologic agents in clinical trials for the treatment of cancer. Binding of the hepatocyte growth factor to the cell surface receptor of c-Met induces activation via autophosphorylation of the kinase domain. Here we describe the structural basis of c-Met activation upon autophosphorylation and the selective small molecule inhibiton of autophosphorylated c-Met. MK-2461 is a potent c-Met inhibitor that is selective for the phosphorylated state of the enzyme. Compound 1 is an MK-2461 analog with a 20-fold enthalpy-driven preference for the autophosphorylated over unphosphorylated c-Met kinase domain. The crystal structure of the unbound kinase domain phosphorylated at Tyr-1234 and Tyr-1235 shows that activation loop phosphorylation leads to the ejection and disorder of the activation loop and rearrangement of helix {alpha}C and the G loop to generate a viable active site. Helix {alpha}C adopts a orientation different from that seen in activation loop mutants. The crystal structure of the complex formed by the autophosphorylated c-Met kinase domain and compound 1 reveals a significant induced fit conformational change of the G loop and ordering of the activation loop, explaining the selectivity of compound 1 for the autophosphorylated state. The results highlight the role of structural plasticity within the kinase domain in imparting the specificity of ligand binding and provide the framework for structure-guided design of activated c-Met inhibitors.

  8. Adhesion-related kinase induction of migration requires phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and ras stimulation of rac activity in immortalized gonadotropin-releasing hormone neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Nielsen-Preiss, Sheila M; Allen, Melissa P; Xu, Mei; Linseman, Daniel A; Pawlowski, John E; Bouchard, R J; Varnum, Brian C; Heidenreich, Kim A; Wierman, Margaret E

    2007-06-01

    GnRH neurons migrate into the hypothalamus during development. Although migratory defects may result in disordered activation of the reproductive axis and lead to delayed or absent sexual maturation, specific factors regulating GnRH neuronal migration remain largely unknown. The receptor tyrosine kinase, adhesion-related kinase (Ark) (also known as Axl, UFO, and Tyro7), has been implicated in the migration of GnRH neuronal cells. Binding of its ligand, growth arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6), promotes cytoskeletal remodeling and migration of NLT GnRH neuronal cells via Rac and p38 MAPK. Here, we examined the Axl effectors proximal to Rac in the signaling pathway. Gas6/Axl-induced lamellipodia formation and migration were blocked after phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) inhibition in GnRH neuronal cells. The p85 subunit of PI3K coimmunoprecipitated with Axl and was phosphorylated in a Gas6-sensitive manner. In addition, PI3K inhibition in GnRH neuronal cells diminished Gas6-induced Rac activation. Exogenous expression of a dominant-negative form of Ras also decreased GnRH neuronal lamellipodia formation, migration, and Rac activation. PI3K inhibition blocked Ras in addition to Rac activation and migration. In contrast, pharmacological blockade of the phospholipase C gamma effectors, protein kinase C or calcium/calmodulin protein kinase II, had no effect on Gas6/Axl signaling to promote Rac activation or stimulate cytoskeletal reorganization and migration. Together, these data show that the PI3K-Ras pathway is a major mediator of Axl actions upstream of Rac to induce GnRH neuronal cell migration. PMID:17332061

  9. Bruton tyrosine kinase (Btk) suppresses osteoblastic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kaneshiro, Shoichi; Ebina, Kosuke; Shi, Kenrin; Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Otsuki, Dai; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Higuchi, Chikahisa

    2015-09-01

    The Tec family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases has been shown to play a key role in inflammation and bone destruction. Bruton tyrosine kinase (Btk) has been the most widely studied because of its critical role in B cells. Furthermore, recent evidence has demonstrated that blocking Btk signaling is effective in ameliorating lymphoma progression and experimental arthritis. The role of Btk in osteoblastic differentiation has not been well elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated the role of Btk in osteoblastic differentiation and investigated the effects of a Btk inhibitor on osteoblastic differentiation in mouse preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells, primary calvarial osteoblasts, and bone marrow stromal ST2 cells. Btk expression was detected in all three cell lines. Btk inhibition stimulated mRNA expression of osteoblastic markers (alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and osterix) and promoted mineralization of the extracellular matrix. In addition, Btk knockdown caused increased mRNA expression of osteoblastic markers. Furthermore, Btk inhibition suppressed the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB), and protein kinase Cα (PKCα). Our results indicate that Btk may regulate osteoblastic differentiation through the MAPK, NFκB, and PKCα signaling pathways. PMID:25230818

  10. Pink1, the first ubiquitin kinase

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xinde; Hunter, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Pink1 and Parkin, identified through studies of hereditary early onset Parkinson's disease, are involved in mitochondria quality control. Parkin E3 ubiquitin ligase activity is activated by Pink1 kinase activity, although the mechanism is still elusive. Three recent reports uncover a surprising mechanism in which Pink1 directly phosphorylates ubiquitin to boost Parkin activity. PMID:24942162

  11. Genetics Home Reference: phosphoglycerate kinase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Phosphoglycerate kinase deficiency is a genetic disorder that affects the body's ability to break down the simple sugar glucose, which is the primary energy source for most cells. Researchers have described two major ...

  12. Phosphotyrosine enrichment identifies focal adhesion kinase and other tyrosine kinases for targeting in canine hemangiosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Marley, K; Maier, C S; Helfand, S C

    2012-09-01

    Canine hemangiosarcoma (HSA) is an endothelial cell malignancy driven, in part, by activating mutations in receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinases. Proteomics, Western blots and a tyrosine kinase inhibitor were used to elucidate activating mechanisms in HSA cell lines. Phosphotyrosine peptides from focal adhesion kinase (FAK) STAT3, Lyn, Fyn and other signal transduction kinases were identified by mass spectrometry. FAK was constitutively activated at tyrosine 397, the autophosphorylation site, and this was reversible with high concentrations of a FAK inhibitor. FAK inhibitor-14 suppressed migration and phosphorylation of FAK tyrosine 397 and tyrosines 576/577 and was cytotoxic to HSA cells suggesting FAK signalling may be an important contributor to canine HSA survival. PMID:22487216

  13. The crystal structure of choline kinase reveals a eukaryotic protein kinase fold

    SciTech Connect

    Peisach, D.; Gee, P.; Kent, K.; Xu, Z.

    2010-03-08

    Choline kinase catalyzes the ATP-dependent phosphorylation of choline, the first committed step in the CDP-choline pathway for the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine. The 2.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of a choline kinase from C. elegans (CKA-2) reveals that the enzyme is a homodimeric protein with each monomer organized into a two-domain fold. The structure is remarkably similar to those of protein kinases and aminoglycoside phosphotransferases, despite no significant similarity in amino acid sequence. Comparisons to the structures of other kinases suggest that ATP binds to CKA-2 in a pocket formed by highly conserved and catalytically important residues. In addition, a choline binding site is proposed to be near the ATP binding pocket and formed by several structurally flexible loops.

  14. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase 3 Is Required for Regulation during Dark-Light Transition.

    PubMed

    Lee, Horim

    2015-07-01

    Plant growth and development are coordinately orchestrated by environmental cues and phytohormones. Light acts as a key environmental factor for fundamental plant growth and physiology through photosensory phytochromes and underlying molecular mechanisms. Although phytochromes are known to possess serine/threonine protein kinase activities, whether they trigger a signal transduction pathway via an intracellular protein kinase network remains unknown. In analyses of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MAPKK, also called MKK) mutants, the mkk3 mutant has shown both a hypersensitive response in plant hormone gibberellin (GA) and a less sensitive response in red light signaling. Surprisingly, light-induced MAPK activation in wild-type (WT) seedlings and constitutive MAPK phosphorylation in dark-grown mkk3 mutant seedlings have also been found, respectively. Therefore, this study suggests that MKK3 acts in negative regulation in darkness and in light-induced MAPK activation during dark-light transition. PMID:26082029

  15. A new autoinhibited kinase conformation reveals a salt-bridge switch in kinase activation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Qiang; Yang, Shaoyuan; Li, Dan; Zhang, Xiaoying; Zheng, Jimin; Jia, Zongchao

    2016-01-01

    In the structure of autoinhibited EphA2 tyrosine kinase reported herein, we have captured the entire activation segment, revealing a previously unknown role of the conserved Arg762 in kinase autoinhibition by interacting with the essential Mg2+-chelating Asp757. While it is well known that this Arg residue is involved in an electrostatic interaction with the phospho-residue of the activation loop to stabilize the active conformation, our structure determination revealed a new role for the Arg, acting as a switch between the autoinhibited and activated conformations. Mutation of Arg762 to Ala in EphA2 sensitized Mg2+ response, resulting in enhanced kinase catalytic activity and Mg2+ cooperativity. Furthermore, mutation of the corresponding Arg/Lys to Ala in PKA and p38MAPK also exhibited similar behavior. This new salt bridge-mediated switch may thus be an important mechanism of activation on a broader scope for kinases which utilize autophosphorylation. PMID:27324091

  16. Crystal Structure of the Protein Kinase Domain of Yeast AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Snf1

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph,M.; Amodeo, G.; Bai, Y.; Tong, L.

    2005-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master metabolic regulator, and is an important target for drug development against diabetes, obesity, and other diseases. AMPK is a hetero-trimeric enzyme, with a catalytic ({alpha}) subunit, and two regulatory ({beta} and {gamma}) subunits. Here we report the crystal structure at 2.2 Angstrom resolution of the protein kinase domain (KD) of the catalytic subunit of yeast AMPK (commonly known as SNF1). The Snf1-KD structure shares strong similarity to other protein kinases, with a small N-terminal lobe and a large C-terminal lobe. Two negative surface patches in the structure may be important for the recognition of the substrates of this kinase.

  17. Activation of stress-activated MAP protein kinases up-regulates expression of transgenes driven by the cytomegalovirus immediate/early promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Bruening, W; Giasson, B; Mushynski, W; Durham, H D

    1998-01-01

    The immediate/early promoter/enhancer of cytomegalovirus (CMV promoter) is one of the most commonly used promoters for expression of transgenes in eukaryotic cells. In practice, the CMV promoter is often thought of as a constitutively active unregulated promoter. However, we have observed that transcription from the CMV promoter can be up-regulated by a variety of environmental stresses. Many forms of cellular stress stimulate MAP kinase signalling pathways, resulting in activation of stress-activated protein kinases [SAPKs, also called Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs)] and p38 kinases. We have found that the same conditions that lead to activation of SAPK/JNKs and p38 kinases can also dramatically increase expression from the CMV promoter. Inhibitors of p38 kinases abolished basal transcription from the CMV promoter and completely blocked stress-induced up-regulation of the CMV promoter. Overexpression of a dominant negative JNK kinase had no effect on basal transcription, but significantly reduced up-regulation caused by stress. These results have grave implications for use of the CMV promoter. If the CMV promoter can be up-regulated by cellular stresses, inadvertent activation of the stress kinase pathways may complicate, if not invalidate, the interpretation of a wide range of experiments. PMID:9421504

  18. Protein Kinase B (PknB) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Is Essential for Growth of the Pathogen in Vitro as well as for Survival within the Host*

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Yogesh; Upadhyay, Sandeep; Khan, Shazia; Nagarajan, Sathya Narayanan; Forti, Francesca; Nandicoori, Vinay Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis protein kinase B (PknB) comprises an intracellular kinase domain, connected through a transmembrane domain to an extracellular region that contains four PASTA domains. The present study describes the comprehensive analysis of different domains of PknB in the context of viability in avirulent and virulent mycobacteria. We find stringent regulation of PknB expression necessary for cell survival, with depletion or overexpression of PknB leading to cell death. Although PknB-mediated kinase activity is essential for cell survival, active kinase lacking the transmembrane or extracellular domain fails to complement conditional mutants not expressing PknB. By creating chimeric kinases, we find that the intracellular kinase domain has unique functions in the virulent strain, which cannot be substituted by other kinases. Interestingly, we find that although the presence of the C-terminal PASTA domain is dispensable in the avirulent M. smegmatis, all four PASTA domains are essential in M. tuberculosis. The differential behavior of PknB vis-à-vis the number of essential PASTA domains and the specificity of kinase domain functions suggest that PknB-mediated growth and signaling events differ in virulent compared with avirulent mycobacteria. Mouse infection studies performed to determine the role of PknB in mediating pathogen survival in the host demonstrate that PknB is not only critical for growth of the pathogen in vitro but is also essential for the survival of the pathogen in the host. PMID:24706757

  19. Endothelial NOS-dependent activation of c-Jun NH(2)- terminal kinase by oxidized low-density lipoprotein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Go, Y. M.; Levonen, A. L.; Moellering, D.; Ramachandran, A.; Patel, R. P.; Jo, H.; Darley-Usmar, V. M.

    2001-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is known to activate a number of signal transduction pathways in endothelial cells. Among these are the c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK), also known as stress-activated protein kinase, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). These mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAP kinase) determine cell survival in response to environmental stress. Interestingly, JNK signaling involves redox-sensitive mechanisms and is activated by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species derived from both NADPH oxidases, nitric oxide synthases (NOS), peroxides, and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL). The role of endothelial NOS (eNOS) in the activation of JNK in response to oxLDL has not been examined. Herein, we show that on exposure of endothelial cells to oxLDL, both ERK and JNK are activated through independent signal transduction pathways. A key role of eNOS activation through a phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-dependent mechanism leading to phosphorylation of eNOS is demonstrated for oxLDL-dependent activation of JNK. Moreover, we show that activation of ERK by oxLDL is critical in protection against the cytotoxicity of oxLDL.

  20. Drosophila Wee1 kinase rescues fission yeast from mitotic catastrophe and phosphorylates Drosophila Cdc2 in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, S D; Sprenger, F; Edgar, B A; O'Farrell, P H

    1995-01-01

    Cdc2 kinase activity is required for triggering entry into mitosis in all known eukaryotes. Elaborate mechanisms have evolved for regulating Cdc2 activity so that mitosis occurs in a timely manner, when preparations for its execution are complete. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Wee1 and a related Mik1 kinase are Cdc2-inhibitory kinases that are required for preventing premature activation of the mitotic program. To identify Cdc2-inhibitory kinases in Drosophila, we screened for cDNA clones that rescue S. pombe wee1- mik1- mutants from lethal mitotic catastrophe. One of the genes identified in this screen, Drosophila wee1 (Dwee1), encodes a new Wee1 homologue. Dwee1 kinase is closely related to human and Xenopus Wee1 homologues, and can inhibit Cdc2 activity by phosphorylating a critical tyrosine residue. Dwee1 mRNA is maternally provided to embryos, and is zygotically expressed during the postblastoderm divisions of embryogenesis. Expression remains high in the proliferating cells of the central nervous system well after cells in the rest of the embryo have ceased dividing. The loss of zygotically expressed Dwee1 does not lead to mitotic catastrophe during postblastoderm cycles 14 to 16. This result may indicate that maternally provided Dwee1 is sufficient for regulating Cdc2 during embryogenesis, or it may reflect the presence of a redundant Cdc2 inhibitory kinase, as in fission yeast. Images PMID:8573790

  1. Unraveling Kinase Activation Dynamics Using Kinase-Substrate Relationships from Temporal Large-Scale Phosphoproteomics Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Rima; Yang, Pengyi; Vafaee, Fatemeh; Fazakerley, Daniel; Humphrey, Sean; James, David; Kuncic, Zdenka

    2016-01-01

    In response to stimuli, biological processes are tightly controlled by dynamic cellular signaling mechanisms. Reversible protein phosphorylation occurs on rapid time-scales (milliseconds to seconds), making it an ideal carrier of these signals. Advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomics have led to the identification of many tens of thousands of phosphorylation sites, yet for the majority of these the kinase is unknown and the underlying network topology of signaling networks therefore remains obscured. Identifying kinase substrate relationships (KSRs) is therefore an important goal in cell signaling research. Existing consensus sequence motif based prediction algorithms do not consider the biological context of KSRs, and are therefore insensitive to many other mechanisms guiding kinase-substrate recognition in cellular contexts. Here, we use temporal information to identify biologically relevant KSRs from Large-scale In Vivo Experiments (KSR-LIVE) in a data-dependent and automated fashion. First, we used available phosphorylation databases to construct a repository of existing experimentally-predicted KSRs. For each kinase in this database, we used time-resolved phosphoproteomics data to examine how its substrates changed in phosphorylation over time. Although substrates for a particular kinase clustered together, they often exhibited a different temporal pattern to the phosphorylation of the kinase. Therefore, although phosphorylation regulates kinase activity, our findings imply that substrate phosphorylation likely serve as a better proxy for kinase activity than kinase phosphorylation. KSR-LIVE can thereby infer which kinases are regulated within a biological context. Moreover, KSR-LIVE can also be used to automatically generate positive training sets for the subsequent prediction of novel KSRs using machine learning approaches. We demonstrate that this approach can distinguish between Akt and Rps6kb1, two kinases that share the same linear consensus motif

  2. Unraveling Kinase Activation Dynamics Using Kinase-Substrate Relationships from Temporal Large-Scale Phosphoproteomics Studies.

    PubMed

    Domanova, Westa; Krycer, James; Chaudhuri, Rima; Yang, Pengyi; Vafaee, Fatemeh; Fazakerley, Daniel; Humphrey, Sean; James, David; Kuncic, Zdenka

    2016-01-01

    In response to stimuli, biological processes are tightly controlled by dynamic cellular signaling mechanisms. Reversible protein phosphorylation occurs on rapid time-scales (milliseconds to seconds), making it an ideal carrier of these signals. Advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomics have led to the identification of many tens of thousands of phosphorylation sites, yet for the majority of these the kinase is unknown and the underlying network topology of signaling networks therefore remains obscured. Identifying kinase substrate relationships (KSRs) is therefore an important goal in cell signaling research. Existing consensus sequence motif based prediction algorithms do not consider the biological context of KSRs, and are therefore insensitive to many other mechanisms guiding kinase-substrate recognition in cellular contexts. Here, we use temporal information to identify biologically relevant KSRs from Large-scale In Vivo Experiments (KSR-LIVE) in a data-dependent and automated fashion. First, we used available phosphorylation databases to construct a repository of existing experimentally-predicted KSRs. For each kinase in this database, we used time-resolved phosphoproteomics data to examine how its substrates changed in phosphorylation over time. Although substrates for a particular kinase clustered together, they often exhibited a different temporal pattern to the phosphorylation of the kinase. Therefore, although phosphorylation regulates kinase activity, our findings imply that substrate phosphorylation likely serve as a better proxy for kinase activity than kinase phosphorylation. KSR-LIVE can thereby infer which kinases are regulated within a biological context. Moreover, KSR-LIVE can also be used to automatically generate positive training sets for the subsequent prediction of novel KSRs using machine learning approaches. We demonstrate that this approach can distinguish between Akt and Rps6kb1, two kinases that share the same linear consensus motif

  3. The Roles of Protein Kinases in Learning and Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giese, Karl Peter; Mizuno, Keiko

    2013-01-01

    In the adult mammalian brain, more than 250 protein kinases are expressed, but only a few of these kinases are currently known to enable learning and memory. Based on this information it appears that learning and memory-related kinases either impact on synaptic transmission by altering ion channel properties or ion channel density, or regulate…

  4. Problem-Solving Test: "In Vitro" Protein Kinase A Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2009-01-01

    Phosphorylation of proteins by protein kinases is an important mechanism in the regulation of protein activity. Among hundreds of protein kinases present in human cells, PKA, the first kinase discovered, belongs to the most important and best characterized group of these enzymes. The author presents an experiment that analyzes the "in vitro"…

  5. Mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades in Vitis vinifera

    PubMed Central

    Çakır, Birsen; Kılıçkaya, Ozan

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most important mechanisms to control cellular functions in response to external and endogenous signals. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) are universal signaling molecules in eukaryotes that mediate the intracellular transmission of extracellular signals resulting in the induction of appropriate cellular responses. MAPK cascades are composed of four protein kinase modules: MAPKKK kinases (MAPKKKKs), MAPKK kinases (MAPKKKs), MAPK kinases (MAPKKs), and MAPKs. In plants, MAPKs are activated in response to abiotic stresses, wounding, and hormones, and during plant pathogen interactions and cell division. In this report, we performed a complete inventory of MAPK cascades genes in Vitis vinifera, the whole genome of which has been sequenced. By comparison with MAPK, MAPK kinases, MAPK kinase kinases and MAPK kinase kinase kinase kinase members of Arabidopsis thaliana, we revealed the existence of 14 MAPKs, 5 MAPKKs, 62 MAPKKKs, and 7 MAPKKKKs in Vitis vinifera. We identified orthologs of V. vinifera putative MAPKs in different species, and ESTs corresponding to members of MAPK cascades in various tissues. This work represents the first complete inventory of MAPK cascades in V. vinifera and could help elucidate the biological and physiological functions of these proteins in V. vinifera. PMID:26257761

  6. Identification of Protein Kinase Substrates by the Kinase-Interacting Substrate Screening (KISS) Approach.

    PubMed

    Amano, Mutsuki; Nishioka, Tomoki; Yura, Yoshimitsu; Kaibuchi, Kozo

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the substrates of protein kinases to understand their modes of action has been undertaken by various approaches and remains an ongoing challenge. Phosphoproteomic technologies have accelerated the accumulation of data concerning protein phosphorylation and have uncovered vast numbers of phosphorylation sites in vivo. In this unit, a novel in vitro screening approach for protein kinase substrates is presented, based on protein-protein interaction and mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomic technology. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27580705

  7. Trophoblast Cell Fusion and Differentiation Are Mediated by Both the Protein Kinase C and A Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Omata, Waka; Ackerman, William E.; Vandre, Dale D.; Robinson, John M.

    2013-01-01

    The syncytiotrophoblast of the human placenta is an epithelial barrier that interacts with maternal blood and is a key for the transfer of nutrients and other solutes to the developing fetus. The syncytiotrophoblast is a true syncytium and fusion of progenitor cytotrophoblasts is the cardinal event leading to the formation of this layer. BeWo cells are often used as a surrogate for cytotrophoblasts, since they can be induced to fuse, and then express certain differentiation markers associated with trophoblast syncytialization. Dysferlin, a syncytiotrophoblast membrane repair protein, is up-regulated in BeWo cells induced to fuse by treatment with forskolin; this fusion is thought to occur through cAMP/protein kinase A-dependent mechanisms. We hypothesized that dysferlin may also be up-regulated in response to fusion through other pathways. Here, we show that BeWo cells can also be induced to fuse by treatment with an activator of protein kinase C, and that this fusion is accompanied by increased expression of dysferlin. Moreover, a dramatic synergistic increase in dysferlin expression is observed when both the protein kinase A and protein kinase C pathways are activated in BeWo cells. This synergy in fusion is also accompanied by dramatic increases in mRNA for the placental fusion proteins syncytin 1, syncytin 2, as well as dysferlin. Dysferlin, however, was shown to be dispensable for stimulus-induced BeWo cell syncytialization, since dysferlin knockdown lines fused to the same extent as control cells. The classical trophoblast differentiation marker human chorionic gonadotropin was also monitored and changes in the expression closely parallel that of dysferlin in all of the experimental conditions employed. Thus different biochemical markers of trophoblast fusion behave in concert supporting the hypothesis that activation of both protein kinase C and A pathways lead to trophoblastic differentiation. PMID:24236208

  8. Protein kinase CK2 and protein kinase D are associated with the COP9 signalosome

    PubMed Central

    Uhle, Stefan; Medalia, Ohad; Waldron, Richard; Dumdey, Renate; Henklein, Peter; Bech-Otschir, Dawadschargal; Huang, Xiaohua; Berse, Matthias; Sperling, Joseph; Schade, Rüdiger; Dubiel, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    The COP9 signalosome (CSN) purified from human erythrocytes possesses kinase activity that phosphoryl ates proteins such as c-Jun and p53 with consequence for their ubiquitin (Ub)-dependent degradation. Here we show that protein kinase CK2 (CK2) and protein kinase D (PKD) co-purify with CSN. Immunoprecipi tation and far-western blots reveal that CK2 and PKD are in fact associated with CSN. As indicated by electron microscopy with gold-labeled ATP, at least 10% of CSN particles are associated with kinases. Kinase activity, most likely due to CK2 and PKD, co-immuno precipitates with CSN from HeLa cells. CK2 binds to ΔCSN3(111–403) and CSN7, whereas PKD interacts with full-length CSN3. CK2 phosphorylates CSN2 and CSN7, and PKD modifies CSN7. Both CK2 and PKD phosphorylate c-Jun as well as p53. CK2 phosphoryl ates Thr155, which targets p53 to degradation by the Ub system. Curcumin, emodin, DRB and resveratrol block CSN-associated kinases and induce degradation of c-Jun in HeLa cells. Curcumin treatment results in elevated amounts of c-Jun–Ub conjugates. We conclude that CK2 and PKD are recruited by CSN in order to regulate Ub conjugate formation. PMID:12628923

  9. Kinases and kinase signaling pathways: potential therapeutic targets in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Pan, Jing; Chen, Sheng-Di

    2012-08-01

    Complex molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) are gradually being elucidated. Accumulating genetic evidence implicates dysfunction of kinase activities and phosphorylation pathways in the pathogenesis of PD. Causative and risk gene products associated with PD include protein kinases (such as PINK1, LRRK2 and GAK) and proteins related phosphorylation signaling pathways (such as SNCA, DJ-1). PINK1, LRRK2 and several PD gene products have been associated with mitogen-activated protein (MAP) and protein kinase B (AKT) kinase signaling pathways. C-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) and p38, signaling pathways downstream of MAP, are particularly important in PD. JNK and p38 play an integral role in neuronal death. Targeting JNK or p38 signaling may offer an effective therapy for PD. Inhibitors of the ERK signaling pathway, which plays an important role in the development of l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID), have been shown to attenuate this condition in animal models. In this review, we summarize experimental evidence gathered over the last decade on the role of PINK1, LRRK2 and GAK and their related phosphorylation signaling pathways (JNK, ERK, p38 and PI3K/AKT) in PD. It is speculated that improvement or modulation of these signaling pathways will reveal potential therapeutic targets for attenuation of the cardinal symptoms and motor complications in patients with PD in the future. PMID:22709943

  10. Comprehensive kinase profile of pacritinib, a nonmyelosuppressive Janus kinase 2 inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Jack W; Al-Fayoumi, Suliman; Ma, Haiching; Komrokji, Rami S; Mesa, Ruben; Verstovsek, Srdan

    2016-01-01

    Pacritinib, potent inhibitor of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), JAK2V617F, and fms-like receptor tyrosine kinase 3, is in Phase III development in myelofibrosis. Among type 1 inhibitors, pacritinib shows a lack of myelosuppression at doses that both inhibit JAK2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway and demonstrate clinical efficacy. To elucidate these mechanisms and identify other disease targets, a kinome analysis screened 439 recombinant kinases at 100 nM pacritinib concentration. For kinases with >50% inhibition, pacritinib was titrated from 1 to 100 nM. JAK2, JAK2V617F, FLT3, colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor, and interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 achieved half-maximal inhibitory concentrations <50 nM. Pacritinib did not inhibit JAK1 (82% control at 100 nM). Lack of myelosuppression may stem from inhibiting JAK2 without affecting JAK1 and reducing hematopoietic inhibitory cytokines by suppressing interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 or colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor. The pacritinib kinome suggests therapeutic utility in acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, solid tumors, and inflammatory conditions. PMID:27574472

  11. Comprehensive kinase profile of pacritinib, a nonmyelosuppressive Janus kinase 2 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Singer, Jack W; Al-Fayoumi, Suliman; Ma, Haiching; Komrokji, Rami S; Mesa, Ruben; Verstovsek, Srdan

    2016-01-01

    Pacritinib, potent inhibitor of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), JAK2V617F, and fms-like receptor tyrosine kinase 3, is in Phase III development in myelofibrosis. Among type 1 inhibitors, pacritinib shows a lack of myelosuppression at doses that both inhibit JAK2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway and demonstrate clinical efficacy. To elucidate these mechanisms and identify other disease targets, a kinome analysis screened 439 recombinant kinases at 100 nM pacritinib concentration. For kinases with >50% inhibition, pacritinib was titrated from 1 to 100 nM. JAK2, JAK2V617F, FLT3, colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor, and interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 achieved half-maximal inhibitory concentrations <50 nM. Pacritinib did not inhibit JAK1 (82% control at 100 nM). Lack of myelosuppression may stem from inhibiting JAK2 without affecting JAK1 and reducing hematopoietic inhibitory cytokines by suppressing interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 or colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor. The pacritinib kinome suggests therapeutic utility in acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, solid tumors, and inflammatory conditions. PMID:27574472

  12. A Novel Mode of Protein Kinase Inhibition Exploiting Hydrophobic Motifs of Autoinhibited Kinases

    SciTech Connect

    S Eathiraj; R Palma; M Hirschi; E Volckova; E Nakuci; J Castro; C Chen; T Chan; D France; M Ashwell

    2011-12-31

    Protein kinase inhibitors with enhanced selectivity can be designed by optimizing binding interactions with less conserved inactive conformations because such inhibitors will be less likely to compete with ATP for binding and therefore may be less impacted by high intracellular concentrations of ATP. Analysis of the ATP-binding cleft in a number of inactive protein kinases, particularly in the autoinhibited conformation, led to the identification of a previously undisclosed non-polar region in this cleft. This ATP-incompatible hydrophobic region is distinct from the previously characterized hydrophobic allosteric back pocket, as well as the main pocket. Generalized hypothetical models of inactive kinases were constructed and, for the work described here, we selected the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) tyrosine kinase family as a case study. Initial optimization of a FGFR2 inhibitor identified from a library of commercial compounds was guided using structural information from the model. We describe the inhibitory characteristics of this compound in biophysical, biochemical, and cell-based assays, and have characterized the binding mode using x-ray crystallographic studies. The results demonstrate, as expected, that these inhibitors prevent activation of the autoinhibited conformation, retain full inhibitory potency in the presence of physiological concentrations of ATP, and have favorable inhibitory activity in cancer cells. Given the widespread regulation of kinases by autoinhibitory mechanisms, the approach described herein provides a new paradigm for the discovery of inhibitors by targeting inactive conformations of protein kinases.

  13. Decreased creatine kinase is linked to diastolic dysfunction in rats with right heart failure induced by pulmonary artery hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Ewan D.; Benoist, David; Drinkhill, Mark J.; Stones, Rachel; Helmes, Michiel; Wüst, Rob C.I.; Stienen, Ger J.M.; Steele, Derek S.; White, Ed

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to investigate the role of creatine kinase in the contractile dysfunction of right ventricular failure caused by pulmonary artery hypertension. Pulmonary artery hypertension and right ventricular failure were induced in rats by monocrotaline and compared to saline-injected control animals. In vivo right ventricular diastolic pressure–volume relationships were measured in anesthetized animals; diastolic force–length relationships in single enzymatically dissociated myocytes and myocardial creatine kinase levels by Western blot. We observed diastolic dysfunction in right ventricular failure indicated by significantly steeper diastolic pressure–volume relationships in vivo and diastolic force–length relationships in single myocytes. There was a significant reduction in creatine kinase protein expression in failing right ventricle. Dysfunction also manifested as a shorter diastolic sarcomere length in failing myocytes. This was associated with a Ca2 +-independent mechanism that was sensitive to cross-bridge cycling inhibition. In saponin-skinned failing myocytes, addition of exogenous creatine kinase significantly lengthened sarcomeres, while in intact healthy myocytes, inhibition of creatine kinase significantly shortened sarcomeres. Creatine kinase inhibition also changed the relatively flat contraction amplitude–stimulation frequency relationship of healthy myocytes into a steeply negative, failing phenotype. Decreased creatine kinase expression leads to diastolic dysfunction. We propose that this is via local reduction in ATP:ADP ratio and thus to Ca2 +-independent force production and diastolic sarcomere shortening. Creatine kinase inhibition also mimics a definitive characteristic of heart failure, the inability to respond to increased demand. Novel therapies for pulmonary artery hypertension are needed. Our data suggest that cardiac energetics would be a potential ventricular therapeutic target. PMID:26116865

  14. Leading change: 2--planning.

    PubMed

    Kerridge, Joanna

    National initiatives have outlined the importance of involving frontline staff in service improvement, and the ability to influence and manage change has been identified as an essential skill for delivering new models of care. Nurses often have to take the lead in managing change in clinical practice. The second in a three-part series is designed to help nurses at all levels develop the knowledge and skills to function as change agents within their organisations. This article focuses on planning the change and dealing with resistance. PMID:22439509

  15. Leading Change, Adding Value.

    PubMed

    Evans, Nick

    2016-09-12

    Essential facts Leading Change, Adding Value is NHS England's new nursing and midwifery framework. It is designed to build on Compassion in Practice (CiP), which was published 3 years ago and set out the 6Cs: compassion, care, commitment, courage, competence and communication. CiP established the values at the heart of nursing and midwifery, while the new framework sets out how staff can help transform the health and care sectors to meet the aims of the NHS England's Five Year Forward View. PMID:27615573

  16. Kinase-dead ATM protein is highly oncogenic and can be preferentially targeted by Topo-isomerase I inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kenta; Wang, Jiguang; Sprinzen, Lisa; Xu, Jun; Haddock, Christopher J; Li, Chen; Lee, Brian J; Loredan, Denis G; Jiang, Wenxia; Vindigni, Alessandro; Wang, Dong; Rabadan, Raul; Zha, Shan

    2016-01-01

    Missense mutations in ATM kinase, a master regulator of DNA damage responses, are found in many cancers, but their impact on ATM function and implications for cancer therapy are largely unknown. Here we report that 72% of cancer-associated ATM mutations are missense mutations that are enriched around the kinase domain. Expression of kinase-dead ATM (AtmKD/-) is more oncogenic than loss of ATM (Atm-/-) in mouse models, leading to earlier and more frequent lymphomas with Pten deletions. Kinase-dead ATM protein (Atm-KD), but not loss of ATM (Atm-null), prevents replication-dependent removal of Topo-isomerase I-DNA adducts at the step of strand cleavage, leading to severe genomic instability and hypersensitivity to Topo-isomerase I inhibitors. Correspondingly, Topo-isomerase I inhibitors effectively and preferentially eliminate AtmKD/-, but not Atm-proficientor Atm-/- leukemia in animal models. These findings identify ATM kinase-domain missense mutations as a potent oncogenic event and a biomarker for Topo-isomerase I inhibitor based therapy. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14709.001 PMID:27304073

  17. Tissue lead concentrations in Japanese quail ingesting lead Pellets or shot with lead pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Kendall, R.J.; Scanlon, P.F.

    1981-05-01

    Data obtained from birds shot by hunters warrant the consideration that shooting with lead pellets may contrbute to the quantity of lead detected in tissues. Information on the effects of shooting avian species with lead shot on tissue concentrations of lead is, therefore, of considerable importance in assessing the value of birds shot by hunters as a source of samples for studying lead contamination. Kendall found that liver and bone lead concentrations of mourning doves were substantially increased after ingestion of a lead shot. Waterfowl shot by hunters and with direct evidence of ingested lead shot had significantly higher liver lead concentrations than did waterfowl without ingested lead shot. As little information on the effects of shooting with lead projectiles on tissue lead concentrations exists, the present study was designed to measure the effects of shooting Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) with lead pellets on lead concentrations in livers and in bones).

  18. Induction of Central Host Signaling Kinases during Pneumococcal Infection of Human THP-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, Thomas P.; Scholz, Annemarie; Kiachludis, Delia; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a widespread colonizer of the mucosal epithelia of the upper respiratory tract of human. However, pneumococci are also responsible for numerous local as well as severe systemic infections, especially in children under the age of five and the elderly. Under certain conditions, pneumococci are able to conquer the epithelial barrier, which can lead to a dissemination of the bacteria into underlying tissues and the bloodstream. Here, specialized macrophages represent an essential part of the innate immune system against bacterial intruders. Recognition of the bacteria through different receptors on the surface of macrophages leads thereby to an uptake and elimination of bacteria. Accompanied cytokine release triggers the migration of leukocytes from peripheral blood to the site of infection, where monocytes differentiate into mature macrophages. The rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton during phagocytosis, resulting in the engulfment of bacteria, is thereby tightly regulated by receptor-mediated phosphorylation cascades of different protein kinases. The molecular cellular processes including the modulation of central protein kinases are only partially solved. In this study, the human monocytic THP-1 cell line was used as a model system to examine the activation of Fcγ and complement receptor-independent signal cascades during infection with S. pneumoniae. Pneumococci cultured either in chemically defined or complex medium showed no significant differences in pneumococcal phagocytosis by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) differentiated THP-1 cells. Double immuno-fluorescence microscopy and antibiotic protection assays demonstrated a time-dependent uptake and killing of S. pneumoniae 35A inside of macrophages. Infections of THP-1 cells in the presence of specific pharmacological inhibitors revealed a crucial role of actin polymerization and importance of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and Protein kinase B (Akt) as well during

  19. Induction of Central Host Signaling Kinases during Pneumococcal Infection of Human THP-1 Cells.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Thomas P; Scholz, Annemarie; Kiachludis, Delia; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a widespread colonizer of the mucosal epithelia of the upper respiratory tract of human. However, pneumococci are also responsible for numerous local as well as severe systemic infections, especially in children under the age of five and the elderly. Under certain conditions, pneumococci are able to conquer the epithelial barrier, which can lead to a dissemination of the bacteria into underlying tissues and the bloodstream. Here, specialized macrophages represent an essential part of the innate immune system against bacterial intruders. Recognition of the bacteria through different receptors on the surface of macrophages leads thereby to an uptake and elimination of bacteria. Accompanied cytokine release triggers the migration of leukocytes from peripheral blood to the site of infection, where monocytes differentiate into mature macrophages. The rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton during phagocytosis, resulting in the engulfment of bacteria, is thereby tightly regulated by receptor-mediated phosphorylation cascades of different protein kinases. The molecular cellular processes including the modulation of central protein kinases are only partially solved. In this study, the human monocytic THP-1 cell line was used as a model system to examine the activation of Fcγ and complement receptor-independent signal cascades during infection with S. pneumoniae. Pneumococci cultured either in chemically defined or complex medium showed no significant differences in pneumococcal phagocytosis by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) differentiated THP-1 cells. Double immuno-fluorescence microscopy and antibiotic protection assays demonstrated a time-dependent uptake and killing of S. pneumoniae 35A inside of macrophages. Infections of THP-1 cells in the presence of specific pharmacological inhibitors revealed a crucial role of actin polymerization and importance of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and Protein kinase B (Akt) as well during

  20. Structural Basis for a Reciprocating Mechanism of Negative Cooperativity in Dimeric Phosphagen Kinase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, X.; Ye, S; Guo, S; Yan, W; Bartlam, M; Rao, Z

    2010-01-01

    Phosphagen kinase (PK) family members catalyze the reversible phosphoryl transfer between phosphagen and ADP to reserve or release energy in cell energy metabolism. The structures of classic quaternary complexes of dimeric creatine kinase (CK) revealed asymmetric ligand binding states of two protomers, but the significance and mechanism remain unclear. To understand this negative cooperativity further, we determined the first structure of dimeric arginine kinase (dAK), another PK family member, at 1.75 {angstrom}, as well as the structure of its ternary complex with AMPPNP and arginine. Further structural analysis shows that the ligand-free protomer in a ligand-bound dimer opens more widely than the protomers in a ligand-free dimer, which leads to three different states of a dAK protomer. The unexpected allostery of the ligand-free protomer in a ligand-bound dimer should be relayed from the ligand-binding-induced allostery of its adjacent protomer. Mutations that weaken the interprotomer connections dramatically reduced the catalytic activities of dAK, indicating the importance of the allosteric propagation mediated by the homodimer interface. These results suggest a reciprocating mechanism of dimeric PK, which is shared by other ATP related oligomeric enzymes, e.g., ATP synthase. - Wu, X., Ye, S., Guo, S., Yan, W., Bartlam, M., Rao, Z. Structural basis for a reciprocating mechanism of negative cooperativity in dimeric phosphagen kinase activity.

  1. Pathophysiological significance and therapeutic targeting of germinal center kinase in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Julie Marie; Bhatt, Shruti; Patricelli, Matthew P; Nomanbhoy, Tyzoon K; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Natkunam, Yasodha; Gentles, Andrew J; Martinez, Ezequiel; Zhu, Daxing; Chapman, Jennifer Rose; Cortizas, Elena; Shyam, Ragini; Chinichian, Shideh; Advani, Ranjana; Tan, Li; Zhang, Jianming; Choi, Hwan Geun; Tibshirani, Robert; Buhrlage, Sara J; Gratzinger, Dita; Verdun, Ramiro; Gray, Nathanael S; Lossos, Izidore S

    2016-07-14

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, yet 40% to 50% of patients will eventually succumb to their disease, demonstrating a pressing need for novel therapeutic options. Gene expression profiling has identified messenger RNAs that lead to transformation, but critical events transforming cells are normally executed by kinases. Therefore, we hypothesized that previously unrecognized kinases may contribute to DLBCL pathogenesis. We performed the first comprehensive analysis of global kinase activity in DLBCL, to identify novel therapeutic targets, and discovered that germinal center kinase (GCK) was extensively activated. GCK RNA interference and small molecule inhibition induced cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in DLBCL cell lines and primary tumors in vitro and decreased the tumor growth rate in vivo, resulting in a significantly extended lifespan of mice bearing DLBCL xenografts. GCK expression was also linked to adverse clinical outcome in a cohort of 151 primary DLBCL patients. These studies demonstrate, for the first time, that GCK is a molecular therapeutic target in DLBCL tumors and that inhibiting GCK may significantly extend DLBCL patient survival. Because the majority of DLBCL tumors (∼80%) exhibit activation of GCK, this therapy may be applicable to most patients. PMID:27151888

  2. Identification of novel inhibitors of BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase via virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hui; Huang, Niu; Qi, Jing; Xie, Ping; Xu, Chen; Wang, Jianxiang; Yang, Chunzheng

    2003-11-01

    Inhibition of BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase activity has shown to be essential for the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). However, drug resistance has quickly arisen in recent clinical trials for STI571 (Gleevec), which is the first approved drug of CML by inhibiting ABL tyrosine kinase. It is desirable to develop new types of ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors that may overcome this drug resistance problem. Here we present the discovery of novel inhibitors targeted at the catalytic domain of ABL tyrosine kinase by using three-dimensional database searching techniques. From a database containing 200,000 commercially available compounds, the top 1000 compounds with the best DOCK energy score were selected and subjected to structural diversity and drug likeness analysis, 15 compounds were submitted for biological assay. Eight out of the 15 showed inhibitory activity against K562 cells with IC(50) value ranging from 10 to 200 microM. Two promising compounds showed inhibition in further ABL tyrosine phosphorylation assay. It is anticipated that those two compounds can serve as lead compounds for further drug design and optimization. PMID:14552760

  3. Optimization of a Novel Series of Ataxia-Telangiectasia Mutated Kinase Inhibitors as Potential Radiosensitizing Agents.

    PubMed

    Min, Jaeki; Guo, Kexiao; Suryadevara, Praveen K; Zhu, Fangyi; Holbrook, Gloria; Chen, Yizhe; Feau, Clementine; Young, Brandon M; Lemoff, Andrew; Connelly, Michele C; Kastan, Michael B; Guy, R Kiplin

    2016-01-28

    We previously reported a novel inhibitor of the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase, which is a target for novel radiosensitizing drugs. While our initial lead, compound 4, was relatively potent and nontoxic, it exhibited poor stability to oxidative metabolism and relatively poor selectivity against other kinases. The current study focused on balancing potency and selectivity with metabolic stability through structural modification to the metabolized site on the quinazoline core. We performed extensive structure-activity and structure-property relationship studies on this quinazoline ATM kinase inhibitor in order to identify structural variants with enhanced selectivity and metabolic stability. We show that, while the C-7-methoxy group is essential for potency, replacing the C-6-methoxy group considerably improves metabolic stability without affecting potency. Promising analogues 20, 27g, and 27n were selected based on in vitro pharmacology and evaluated in murine pharmacokinetic and tolerability studies. Compound 27g possessed significantly improve pharmacokinetics relative to that of 4. Compound 27g was also significantly more selective against other kinases than 4. Therefore, 27g is a good candidate for further development as a potential radiosensitizer. PMID:26632965

  4. HIPK family kinases bind and regulate the function of the CCR4-NOT complex.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Gil, Alfonso; Ritter, Olesja; Hornung, Juliane; Stekman, Hilda; Krüger, Marcus; Braun, Thomas; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Kracht, Michael; Schmitz, M Lienhard

    2016-06-15

    The serine/threonine kinase HIPK2 functions as a regulator of developmental processes and as a signal integrator of a wide variety of stress signals, such as DNA damage, hypoxia, and reactive oxygen intermediates. Because the kinase is generated in a constitutively active form, its expression levels are restricted by a variety of different mechanisms. Here we identify the CCR4-NOT complex as a new regulator of HIPK2 abundance. Down-regulation or knockout of the CCR4-NOT complex member CNOT2 leads to reduced HIPK2 protein levels without affecting the expression level of HIPK1 or HIPK3. A fraction of all HIPK family members associates with the CCR4-NOT components CNOT2 and CNOT3. HIPKs also phosphorylate the CCR4-NOT complex, a feature that is shared with their yeast progenitor kinase, YAK1. Functional assays reveal that HIPK2 and HIPK1 restrict CNOT2-dependent mRNA decay. HIPKs are well known regulators of transcription, but the mutual regulation between CCR4-NOT and HIPKs extends the regulatory potential of these kinases by enabling posttranscriptional gene regulation. PMID:27122605

  5. Beyond trastuzumab: small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors in HER-2-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Roy, Vivek; Perez, Edith A

    2009-11-01

    HER-2 is a transmembrane, tyrosine kinase (TK) receptor whose overexpression is associated with adverse prognosis in breast cancer. The biological effects of HER-2 are mediated by kinase activity causing phosphorylation of tyrosine residues in the cytoplasmic domain of the receptor molecule, leading to activation of downstream growth-promoting pathways. Antibody-mediated inhibition by trastuzumab as well as TK inhibition are clinically effective anti-HER-2 strategies. Kinase inhibitors offer some potential therapeutic advantages over antibody-based therapies. Being small molecules, TK inhibitors (TKIs) have oral bioavailability and ability to cross the blood-brain barrier. Because of their different mode of action, TKIs may be able to overcome some of the mechanisms of trastuzumab resistance. Preclinical, and limited clinical data also suggest that TKIs and trastuzumab have synergistic activity. Lapatinib is the only TKI available for clinical use at present, but several molecules with anti-HER-2 activity have been identified and are undergoing evaluation. These differ in the spectrum of kinases that they inhibit, potency of HER-2 inhibition, pharmacokinetic properties, and toxicity profiles, and are at various stages of clinical development. In this article we summarize selected HER-2 TKIs approved for clinical use or in development for which clinical data are available. PMID:19887469

  6. Ribosomal protein mutations induce autophagy through S6 kinase inhibition of the insulin pathway.

    PubMed

    Heijnen, Harry F; van Wijk, Richard; Pereboom, Tamara C; Goos, Yvonne J; Seinen, Cor W; van Oirschot, Brigitte A; van Dooren, Rowie; Gastou, Marc; Giles, Rachel H; van Solinge, Wouter; Kuijpers, Taco W; Gazda, Hanna T; Bierings, Marc B; Da Costa, Lydie; MacInnes, Alyson W

    2014-01-01

    Mutations affecting the ribosome lead to several diseases known as ribosomopathies, with phenotypes that include growth defects, cytopenia, and bone marrow failure. Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), for example, is a pure red cell aplasia linked to the mutation of ribosomal protein (RP) genes. Here we show the knock-down of the DBA-linked RPS19 gene induces the cellular self-digestion process of autophagy, a pathway critical for proper hematopoiesis. We also observe an increase of autophagy in cells derived from DBA patients, in CD34+ erythrocyte progenitor cells with RPS19 knock down, in the red blood cells of zebrafish embryos with RP-deficiency, and in cells from patients with Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS). The loss of RPs in all these models results in a marked increase in S6 kinase phosphorylation that we find is triggered by an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). We show that this increase in S6 kinase phosphorylation inhibits the insulin pathway and AKT phosphorylation activity through a mechanism reminiscent of insulin resistance. While stimulating RP-deficient cells with insulin reduces autophagy, antioxidant treatment reduces S6 kinase phosphorylation, autophagy, and stabilization of the p53 tumor suppressor. Our data suggest that RP loss promotes the aberrant activation of both S6 kinase and p53 by increasing intracellular ROS levels. The deregulation of these signaling pathways is likely playing a major role in the pathophysiology of ribosomopathies. PMID:24875531

  7. Exact solutions to a spatially extended model of kinase-receptor interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szopa, Piotr; Lipniacki, Tomasz; Kazmierczak, Bogdan

    2011-10-01

    B and Mast cells are activated by the aggregation of the immune receptors. Motivated by this phenomena we consider a simple spatially extended model of mutual interaction of kinases and membrane receptors. It is assumed that kinase activates membrane receptors and in turn the kinase molecules bound to the active receptors are activated by transphosphorylation. Such a type of interaction implies positive feedback and may lead to bistability. In this study we apply the Steklov eigenproblem theory to analyze the linearized model and find exact solutions in the case of non-uniformly distributed membrane receptors. This approach allows us to determine the critical value of receptor dephosphorylation rate at which cell activation (by arbitrary small perturbation of the inactive state) is possible. We found that cell sensitivity grows with decreasing kinase diffusion and increasing anisotropy of the receptor distribution. Moreover, these two effects are cooperating. We showed that the cell activity can be abruptly triggered by the formation of the receptor aggregate. Since the considered activation mechanism is not based on receptor crosslinking by polyvalent antigens, the proposed model can also explain B cell activation due to receptor aggregation following binding of monovalent antigens presented on the antigen presenting cell.

  8. Atomic structure of the KEOPS complex: an ancient protein kinase-containing molecular machine

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, D.Y.; Neculai, D.; Downey, M.; Orlicky, S.; Haffani, Y.Z.; Ceccarelli, D.F.; Ho, J.S.; Szilard, R.K.; Zhang, W.; Ho, C.S.; Wan, L.; Fares, C.; Rumpel, S.; Kurinov, I.; Arrowsmith, C.H.; Durocher, D.; Sicheri, F.

    2009-03-27

    Kae1 is a universally conserved ATPase and part of the essential gene set in bacteria. In archaea and eukaryotes, Kae1 is embedded within the protein kinase-containing KEOPS complex. Mutation of KEOPS subunits in yeast leads to striking telomere and transcription defects, but the exact biochemical function of KEOPS is not known. As a first step to elucidating its function, we solved the atomic structure of archaea-derived KEOPS complexes involving Kae1, Bud32, Pcc1, and Cgi121 subunits. Our studies suggest that Kae1 is regulated at two levels by the primordial protein kinase Bud32, which is itself regulated by Cgi121. Moreover, Pcc1 appears to function as a dimerization module, perhaps suggesting that KEOPS may be a processive molecular machine. Lastly, as Bud32 lacks the conventional substrate-recognition infrastructure of eukaryotic protein kinases including an activation segment, Bud32 may provide a glimpse of the evolutionary history of the protein kinase family.

  9. Kinase Inhibitors that Increase the Sensitivity of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus to β-Lactam Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Vornhagen, Jay; Burnside, Kellie; Whidbey, Christopher; Berry, Jessica; Qin, Xuan; Rajagopal, Lakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus are Gram-positive bacteria that are the leading cause of recurrent infections in humans that include pneumonia, bacteremia, osteomyelitis, arthritis, endocarditis, and toxic shock syndrome. The emergence of methicillin resistant S. aureus strains (MRSA) has imposed a significant concern in sustained measures of treatment against these infections. Recently, MRSA strains deficient in expression of a serine/threonine kinase (Stk1 or PknB) were described to exhibit increased sensitivity to β-lactam antibiotics. In this study, we screened a library consisting of 280 drug-like, low-molecular-weight compounds with the ability to inhibit protein kinases for those that increased the sensitivity of wild-type MRSA to β-lactams and then evaluated their toxicity in mice. We report the identification of four kinase inhibitors, the sulfonamides ST085384, ST085404, ST085405, and ST085399 that increased sensitivity of WT MRSA to sub-lethal concentrations of β-lactams. Furthermore, these inhibitors lacked alerting structures commonly associated with toxic effects, and toxicity was not observed with ST085384 or ST085405 in vivo in a murine model. These results suggest that kinase inhibitors may be useful in therapeutic strategies against MRSA infections. PMID:26506394

  10. Role of non-receptor protein kinases in spermatid transport during spermatogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Wan, H. T.; Mruk, Dolores D.; Tang, Elizabeth I.; Xiao, Xiang; Cheng, Yan-ho; Wong, Elissa W.P.; Wong, Chris K. C.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2014-01-01

    Non-receptor protein tyrosine kinases are cytoplasmic kinases that activate proteins by phosphorylating target protein tyrosine residues, in turn affecting multiple functions in eukaryotic cells. Herein, we focus on the role of non-receptor protein tyrosine kinases, most notably, FAK, c-Yes and c-Src, in the transport of spermatids across the seminiferous epithelium during spermatogenesis. Since spermatids, which are formed from spermatocytes via meiosis, are immotile haploid cells, they must be transported by Sertoli cells across the seminiferous epithelium during the epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis. Without the timely transport of spermatids across the epithelium, the release of sperms at spermiation fails to occur, leading to infertility. Thus, the molecular event pertinent to spermatid transport is crucial to spermatogenesis. Herein, we provide a critical discussion based on recent findings in the field. We also provide a hypothetical model on spermatid transport, and the role of non-receptor protein tyrosine kinases in this event. We also highlight areas of research that deserve attention by investigators in the field. PMID:24727349

  11. Regulation of mixed-lineage kinase activation in JNK-dependent morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Garlena, Rebecca A.; Gonda, Rebecca L.; Green, Alyssa B.; Pileggi, Rachel M.; Stronach, Beth

    2010-01-01

    Normal cells respond appropriately to various signals, while sustaining proper developmental programs and tissue homeostasis. Inappropriate signal reception, response or attenuation, can upset the normal balance of signaling within cells, leading to dysfunction or tissue malformation. To understand the molecular mechanisms that regulate protein-kinase-based signaling in the context of tissue morphogenesis, we analyzed the domain requirements of Drosophila Slpr, a mixed-lineage kinase (MLK), for Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling. The N-terminal half of Slpr is involved in regulated signaling whereas the C-terminal half promotes cortical protein localization. The SH3 domain negatively regulates Slpr activity consistent with autoinhibition via a conserved proline motif. Also, like many kinases, conserved residues in the activation segment of the catalytic domain regulate Slpr. Threonine 295, in particular, is essential for function. Slpr activation requires dual input from the MAP4K Misshapen (Msn), through its C-terminal regulatory domain, and the GTPase Rac, which both bind to the LZ–CRIB region of Slpr in vitro. Although Rac is sufficient to activate JNK signaling, our results indicate that there are Slpr-independent functions for Rac in dorsal closure. Finally, expression of various Slpr constructs alone or with upstream activators reveals a wide-ranging response at the cell and tissue level. PMID:20736302

  12. Role of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Indolent and Other Mature B-Cell Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Kutsch, Nadine; Marks, Reinhard; Ratei, Richard; Held, Thomas K; Schmidt-Hieber, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Targeting tyrosine kinases represents a highly specific treatment approach for different malignancies. This also includes non-Hodgkin lymphoma since it is well known that these enzymes are frequently involved in the lymphomagenesis. Hereby, tyrosine kinases might either be dysregulated intrinsically or be activated within signal transduction pathways leading to tumor survival and growth. Among others, Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) is of particular interest as a potential therapeutic target. Btk is stimulated by B-cell receptor signaling and activates different transcription factors such as nuclear factor κB. The Btk inhibitor ibrutinib has been approved for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and mantle-cell lymphoma recently. Numerous clinical trials evaluating this agent in different combinations (eg, with rituximab or classical chemotherapeutic agents) as a treatment option for aggressive and indolent lymphoma are under way. Here, we summarize the role of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the treatment of indolent and other non-Hodgkin lymphomas (eg, mantle-cell lymphoma). PMID:26327780

  13. Computer-aided identification of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors using ginsenosides from Panax ginseng.

    PubMed

    Sathishkumar, Natarajan; Karpagam, Veerappan; Sathiyamoorthy, Subramaniyam; Woo, Min Jin; Kim, Yeon-Ju; Yang, Deok-Chun

    2013-07-01

    Natural products have served as structural resources in the history of drug discovery for cancer therapy. Among these natural products, Korean Panax ginseng serves as a potential anti-cancer medicinal plant. To determine the anti-cancer activities of Korean P. ginseng active compounds, we performed pharmacophore-based virtual screening and molecular docking studies on EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) tyrosine kinase domain. The EGFR family tyrosine kinase receptor is a cell surface receptor that regulates diverse biological processes including cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, and apoptosis. Over expression of EGFR tyrosine kinase domain associated with the development and progression of numerous human cancers. In our study, we developed the best pharmacophore model (Hypo1) using a diverse training set and validated by Fischer's randomization, a test set, and a decoy set. The best validated model was employed in the virtual screening of P. ginseng compound database. Further, chosen molecules were evaluated by applying ADMET screening and molecular docking studies. Finally, 14 compounds were obtained based on binding affinity scores and interactions with protein active site residues. These final lead compounds from P. ginseng can be used in the designing of new EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:23668355

  14. Kinase Inhibitors that Increase the Sensitivity of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus to β-Lactam Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Vornhagen, Jay; Burnside, Kellie; Whidbey, Christopher; Berry, Jessica; Qin, Xuan; Rajagopal, Lakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus are Gram-positive bacteria that are the leading cause of recurrent infections in humans that include pneumonia, bacteremia, osteomyelitis, arthritis, endocarditis, and toxic shock syndrome. The emergence of methicillin resistant S. aureus strains (MRSA) has imposed a significant concern in sustained measures of treatment against these infections. Recently, MRSA strains deficient in expression of a serine/threonine kinase (Stk1 or PknB) were described to exhibit increased sensitivity to β-lactam antibiotics. In this study, we screened a library consisting of 280 drug-like, low-molecular-weight compounds with the ability to inhibit protein kinases for those that increased the sensitivity of wild-type MRSA to β-lactams and then evaluated their toxicity in mice. We report the identification of four kinase inhibitors, the sulfonamides ST085384, ST085404, ST085405, and ST085399 that increased sensitivity of WT MRSA to sub-lethal concentrations of β-lactams. Furthermore, these inhibitors lacked alerting structures commonly associated with toxic effects, and toxicity was not observed with ST085384 or ST085405 in vivo in a murine model. These results suggest that kinase inhibitors may be useful in therapeutic strategies against MRSA infections. PMID:26506394

  15. Sphingosine kinase A is a pleiotropic and essential enzyme forLeishmania survival and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ou; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Xu, Wei; Pawlowic, Mattie; Zhang, Kai

    2013-01-01

    Summary Sphingosine kinase is a key enzyme in sphingolipid metabolism, catalysing the conversion of sphingosine or dihydrosphingosine into sphingosine-1-phosphate or dihydrosphingosine-1-phosphate respectively. In mammals, sphingosine-1-phosphate is a powerful signalling molecule regulating cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis and immunity. Functions of sphingosine kinase or sphingosine-1-phosphate in pathogenic protozoans are virtually unknown. While most organisms possess two closely related sphingosine kinases, only one sphingosine kinase homologue (SKa) can be identified in Leishmania, which are vector-borne protozoan parasites responsible for leishmaniasis. Leishmania SKa is a large, cytoplasmic enzyme capable of phosphorylating both sphingosine and dihydrosphingosine. Remarkably, deletion of SKa leads to catastrophic defects in both the insect stage and mammalian stage of Leishmania parasites. Genetic and biochemical analyses demonstrate that proper expression of SKa is essential for Leishmania parasites to remove toxic metabolites, to survive stressful conditions, and to cause disease in mice. Therefore, SKa is a pleiotropic enzyme with vital roles throughout the life cycle of Leishmania. The essentiality of SKa and its apparent divergence from mammalian counterparts suggests that this enzyme can be selectively targeted to reduce Leishmania infection. PMID:23980754

  16. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5, a node protein in diminished tauopathy: a systems biology approach

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Alvarez, John F.; Uribe-Arias, S. Alejandro; Mejía-Raigosa, Daniel; Cardona-Gómez, Gloria P.

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia worldwide. One of the main pathological changes that occurs in AD is the intracellular accumulation of hyperphosphorylated Tau protein in neurons. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) is one of the major kinases involved in Tau phosphorylation, directly phosphorylating various residues and simultaneously regulating various substrates such as kinases and phosphatases that influence Tau phosphorylation in a synergistic and antagonistic way. It remains unknown how the interaction between CDK5 and its substrates promotes Tau phosphorylation, and systemic approaches are needed that allow an analysis of all the proteins involved. In this review, the role of the CDK5 signaling pathway in Tau hyperphosphorylation is described, an in silico model of the CDK5 signaling pathway is presented. The relationship among these theoretical and computational models shows that the regulation of Tau phosphorylation by PP2A and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) is essential under basal conditions and also describes the leading role of CDK5 under excitotoxic conditions, where silencing of CDK5 can generate changes in these enzymes to reverse a pathological condition that simulates AD. PMID:25225483

  17. Atomic structure of the KEOPS complex: an ancient protein kinase-containing molecular machine

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Daniel Y.L.; Neculai, Dante; Downey, Michael; Orlicky, Stephen; Haffani, Yosr Z.; Ceccarelli, Derek F.; Ho, Jenny S.L.; Szilard, Rachel K.; Zhang, Wei; Ho, Cynthia S.; Wan, Leo; Fares, Christophe; Rumpel, Sigrun; Kurinov, Igor; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Durocher, Daniel; Sicheri, Frank

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Kae1 is a universally conserved ATPase and part of the essential gene set in bacteria. In archaea and eukaryotes, Kae1 is embedded within the protein kinase-containing KEOPS complex. Mutation of KEOPS subunits in yeast leads to striking telomere and transcription defects but the exact biochemical function of KEOPS is not known. As a first step to elucidating its function, we solved the atomic structure of archaea-derived KEOPS complexes involving Kae1, Bud32, Pcc1 and Cgi121 subunits. Our studies suggest that Kae1 is regulated at two levels by the primordial protein kinase Bud32, which is itself regulated by Cgi121. Moreover, Pcc1 appears to function as a dimerization module, perhaps suggesting that KEOPS may be a processive molecular machine. Lastly, as Bud32 lacks the conventional substrate-recognition infrastructure of eukaryotic protein kinases including an activation segment, Bud32 may provide a glimpse of the evolutionary history of the protein kinase family. PMID:18951093

  18. HIPK family kinases bind and regulate the function of the CCR4-NOT complex

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Gil, Alfonso; Ritter, Olesja; Hornung, Juliane; Stekman, Hilda; Krüger, Marcus; Braun, Thomas; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Kracht, Michael; Schmitz, M. Lienhard

    2016-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase HIPK2 functions as a regulator of developmental processes and as a signal integrator of a wide variety of stress signals, such as DNA damage, hypoxia, and reactive oxygen intermediates. Because the kinase is generated in a constitutively active form, its expression levels are restricted by a variety of different mechanisms. Here we identify the CCR4-NOT complex as a new regulator of HIPK2 abundance. Down-regulation or knockout of the CCR4-NOT complex member CNOT2 leads to reduced HIPK2 protein levels without affecting the expression level of HIPK1 or HIPK3. A fraction of all HIPK family members associates with the CCR4-NOT components CNOT2 and CNOT3. HIPKs also phosphorylate the CCR4-NOT complex, a feature that is shared with their yeast progenitor kinase, YAK1. Functional assays reveal that HIPK2 and HIPK1 restrict CNOT2-dependent mRNA decay. HIPKs are well known regulators of transcription, but the mutual regulation between CCR4-NOT and HIPKs extends the regulatory potential of these kinases by enabling posttranscriptional gene regulation. PMID:27122605

  19. Activation of S6 kinase in human neutrophils by calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals: protein kinase C-dependent and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-independent pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Tudan, C; Jackson, J K; Charlton, L; Pelech, S L; Sahl, B; Burt, H M

    1998-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) has been shown previously to be a central enzyme in crystal-induced neutrophil activation. Since activation of the 70 kDa S6 kinase (p70S6K) has been shown to be dependent on PI 3-kinase activation in mammalian cells, and since the former is a key enzyme in the transmission of signals to the cell nucleus, activation of p70(S6K) was investigated in crystal-stimulated neutrophils. Cytosolic fractions from calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD)-crystal-activated neutrophils were separated by Mono Q chromatography and analysed for phosphotransferase activity using a range of substrates and probed by Western analysis using antibodies to p70(S6K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase). CPPD crystals induced a robust, transient activation (peak activity at 2 min) of p70(S6K) that was fully inhibited by pretreatment with rapamycin. This is the first report of the activation of p70(S6K) in neutrophil signal transduction pathways induced by an agonist. This crystal-induced activation of p70(S6K) could also be inhibited by a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor (Compound 3), but not by the PI 3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin. CPPD crystals also activated the ERK1 and ERK2 forms of MAP kinase (wortmannin insensitive), PKC (Compound 3 sensitive) and protein kinase B (wortmannin sensitive) in neutrophils. These data suggest that activation of p70(S6K) may proceed through a PI 3-kinase- and protein kinase B-independent but PKC-dependent pathway in crystal-activated neutrophils. PMID:9531494

  20. Evaluation of Kinase Activity Profiling Using Chemical Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Ruprecht, Benjamin; Zecha, Jana; Heinzlmeir, Stephanie; Médard, Guillaume; Lemeer, Simone; Kuster, Bernhard

    2015-12-18

    Protein kinases are important mediators of intracellular signaling and are reversibly activated by phosphorylation. Immobilized kinase inhibitors can be used to enrich these often low-abundance proteins, to identify targets of kinase inhibitors, or to probe their selectivity. It has been suggested that the binding of kinases to affinity beads reflects a kinase's activation status, a concept that is under considerable debate. To assess the merits of the idea, we performed a series of experiments including quantitative phosphoproteomics and purification of kinases by single or mixed affinity matrices from signaling activated or resting cancer cells. The data show that mixed affinity beads largely bind kinases independent of their activation status, and experiments using individual immobilized kinase inhibitors show mixed results in terms of preference for binding the active or inactive conformation. Taken together, activity- or conformation-dependent binding to such affinity resins depends (i) on the kinase, (ii) on the affinity probe, and (iii) on the activation status of the lysate or cell. As a result, great caution should be exercised when inferring kinase activity from such binding data. The results also suggest that assaying kinase activity using binding data is restricted to a limited number of well-chosen cases. PMID:26378887