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Sample records for kinase network inhibition

  1. Inhibition of protein kinase G activity protects neonatal mouse respiratory network from hyperthermic and hypoxic stress.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Gary A B; López-Guerrero, Juan J; Dawson-Scully, Ken; Peña, Fernando; Robertson, R Meldrum

    2010-01-22

    In spite of considerable research attention focused on clarifying the mechanisms by which the mammalian respiratory rhythm is generated, little attention has been given to examining how this neuronal circuit can be protected from heat stress. Hyperthermia has a profound effect on neuronal circuits including the circuit that generates breathing in mammals. As temperature of the brainstem increases, respiratory frequency concomitantly rises. If temperature continues to increase respiratory arrest (apnea) and death can occur. Previous research has implicated protein kinase G (PKG) activity in regulating neuronal thermosensitivity of neuronal circuits in invertebrates. Here we examine if pharmacological manipulation of PKG activity in a brainstem slice preparation could alter the thermosensitivity of the fictive neonatal mouse respiratory rhythm. We report a striking effect following alteration of PKG activity in the brainstem such that slices treated with the PKG inhibitor KT5823 recovered fictive respiratory rhythm generation significantly faster than control slices and slices treated with a PKG activator (8-Br-cGMP). Furthermore, slices treated with 8-Br-cGMP arrested fictive respiration at a significantly lower temperature than all other treatment groups. In a separate set of experiments we examined if altered PKG activity could regulate the response of slices to hypoxia by altering the protective switch to fictive gasping. Slices treated with 8-Br-cGMP did not switch to the fictive gasp-like pattern following exposure to hypoxia whereas slices treated with KT5823 did display fictive gasping. We propose that PKG activity inversely regulates the amount of stress the neonatal mammalian respiratory rhythm can endure. PMID:19945442

  2. Addressing the Glycine-Rich Loop of Protein Kinases by a Multi-Facetted Interaction Network: Inhibition of PKA and a PKB Mimic.

    PubMed

    Lauber, Birgit S; Hardegger, Leo A; Asraful, Alam K; Lund, Bjarte A; Dumele, Oliver; Harder, Michael; Kuhn, Bernd; Engh, Richard A; Diederich, François

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinases continue to be hot targets in drug discovery research, as they are involved in many essential cellular processes and their deregulation can lead to a variety of diseases. A series of 32 enantiomerically pure inhibitors was synthesized and tested towards protein kinase A (PKA) and protein kinase B mimic PKAB3 (PKA triple mutant). The ligands bind to the hinge region, ribose pocket, and glycine-rich loop at the ATP site. Biological assays showed high potency against PKA, with Ki values in the low nanomolar range. The investigation demonstrates the significance of targeting the often neglected glycine-rich loop for gaining high binding potency. X-ray co-crystal structures revealed a multi-facetted network of ligand-loop interactions for the tightest binders, involving orthogonal dipolar contacts, sulfur and other dispersive contacts, amide-π stacking, and H-bonding to organofluorine, besides efficient water replacement. The network was analyzed in a computational approach. PMID:26578105

  3. Diacylglycerol Kinase Inhibition and Vascular Function.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyehun; Allahdadi, Kyan J; Tostes, Rita C A; Webb, R Clinton

    2009-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs), a family of lipid kinases, convert diacylglycerol (DG) to phosphatidic acid (PA). Acting as a second messenger, DG activates protein kinase C (PKC). PA, a signaling lipid, regulates diverse functions involved in physiological responses. Since DGK modulates two lipid second messengers, DG and PA, regulation of DGK could induce related cellular responses. Currently, there are 10 mammalian isoforms of DGK that are categorized into five groups based on their structural features. These diverse isoforms of DGK are considered to activate distinct cellular functions according to extracellular stimuli. Each DGK isoform is thought to play various roles inside the cell, depending on its subcellular localization (nuclear, ER, Golgi complex or cytoplasm). In vascular smooth muscle, vasoconstrictors such as angiotensin II, endothelin-1 and norepinephrine stimulate contraction by increasing inositol trisphosphate (IP(3)), calcium, DG and PKC activity. Inhibition of DGK could increase DG availability and decrease PA levels, as well as alter intracellular responses, including calcium-mediated and PKC-mediated vascular contraction. The purpose of this review is to demonstrate a role of DGK in vascular function. Selective inhibition of DGK isoforms may represent a novel therapeutic approach in vascular dysfunction. PMID:21547002

  4. Phosphatidylinositol 4-kinases: Function, structure, and inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Boura, Evzen Nencka, Radim

    2015-10-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 4-kinases (PI4Ks) synthesize phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P), a key member of the phosphoinositide family. PI4P defines the membranes of Golgi and trans-Golgi network (TGN) and regulates trafficking to and from the Golgi. Humans have two type II PI4Ks (α and β) and two type III enzymes (α and β). Recently, the crystal structures were solved for both type II and type III kinase revealing atomic details of their function. Importantly, the type III PI4Ks are hijacked by +RNA viruses to create so-called membranous web, an extensively phosphorylated and modified membrane system dedicated to their replication. Therefore, selective and potent inhibitors of PI4Ks have been developed as potential antiviral agents. Here we focus on the structure and function of PI4Ks and their potential in human medicine.

  5. The phosphoinositide 3′-kinase delta inhibitor, CAL-101, inhibits B-cell receptor signaling and chemokine networks in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hoellenriegel, Julia; Meadows, Sarah A.; Sivina, Mariela; Wierda, William G.; Kantarjian, Hagop; Keating, Michael J.; Giese, Neill; O'Brien, Susan; Yu, Albert; Miller, Langdon L.; Lannutti, Brian J.

    2011-01-01

    In lymphocytes, the phosphoinositide 3′-kinase (PI3K) isoform p110δ (PI3Kδ) transmits signals from surface receptors, including the B-cell receptor (BCR). CAL-101, a selective inhibitor of PI3Kδ, displays clinical activity in CLL, causing rapid lymph node shrinkage and a transient lymphocytosis. Inhibition of pro-survival pathways, the presumed mechanism of CAL-101, does not explain this characteristic pattern of activity. Therefore, we tested CAL-101 in assays that model CLL-microenvironment interactions in vitro. We found that CAL-101 inhibits CLL cell chemotaxis toward CXCL12 and CXCL13 and migration beneath stromal cells (pseudoemperipolesis). CAL-101 also down-regulates secretion of chemokines in stromal cocultures and after BCR triggering. CAL-101 reduces survival signals derived from the BCR or from nurse-like cells, and inhibits BCR- and chemokine-receptor–induced AKT and MAP kinase (ERK) activation. In stromal cocultures, CAL-101 sensitizes CLL cells toward bendamustine, fludarabine, and dexamethasone. These results are corroborated by clinical data showing marked reductions in circulating CCL3, CCL4, and CXCL13 levels, and a surge in lymphocytosis during CAL-101 treatment. Thus, CAL-101 displays a dual mechanism of action, directly decreasing cell survival while reducing interactions that retain CLL cells in protective tissue microenvironments. These data provide an explanation for the clinical activity of CAL-101, and a roadmap for future therapeutic development. PMID:21803855

  6. Mechanism of inhibition of Raf-1 by protein kinase A.

    PubMed Central

    Häfner, S; Adler, H S; Mischak, H; Janosch, P; Heidecker, G; Wolfman, A; Pippig, S; Lohse, M; Ueffing, M; Kolch, W

    1994-01-01

    The cytoplasmic Raf-1 kinase is essential for mitogenic signalling by growth factors, which couple to tyrosine kinases, and by tumor-promoting phorbol esters such as 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, which activate protein kinase C (PKC). Signalling by the Raf-1 kinase can be blocked by activation of the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA). The molecular mechanism of this inhibition is not precisely known but has been suggested to involve attenuation of Raf-1 binding to Ras. Using purified proteins, we show that in addition to weakening the interaction of Raf-1 with Ras, PKA can inhibit Raf-1 function directly via phosphorylation of the Raf-1 kinase domain. Phosphorylation by PKA interferes with the activation of Raf-1 by either PKC alpha or the tyrosine kinase Lck and even can downregulate the kinase activity of Raf-1 previously activated by PKC alpha or amino-terminal truncation. This type of inhibition can be dissociated from the ability of Raf-1 to associate with Ras, since (i) the isolated Raf-1 kinase domain, which lacks the Ras binding domain, is still susceptible to inhibition by PKA, (ii) phosphorylation of Raf-1 by PKC alpha alleviates the PKA-induced reduction of Ras binding but does not prevent the downregulation of Raf-1 kinase activity by PKA and (iii) cAMP agonists antagonize transformation by v-Raf, which is Ras independent. Images PMID:7935389

  7. OTSSP167 Abrogates Mitotic Checkpoint through Inhibiting Multiple Mitotic Kinases.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wenbin; Arnst, Christopher; Tipton, Aaron R; Bekier, Michael E; Taylor, William R; Yen, Tim J; Liu, Song-Tao

    2016-01-01

    OTSSP167 was recently characterized as a potent inhibitor for maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) and is currently tested in Phase I clinical trials for solid tumors that have not responded to other treatment. Here we report that OTSSP167 abrogates the mitotic checkpoint at concentrations used to inhibit MELK. The abrogation is not recapitulated by RNAi mediated silencing of MELK in cells. Although OTSSP167 indeed inhibits MELK, it exhibits off-target activity against Aurora B kinase in vitro and in cells. Furthermore, OTSSP167 inhibits BUB1 and Haspin kinases, reducing phosphorylation at histones H2AT120 and H3T3 and causing mislocalization of Aurora B and associated chromosomal passenger complex from the centromere/kinetochore. The results suggest that OTSSP167 may have additional mechanisms of action for cancer cell killing and caution the use of OTSSP167 as a MELK specific kinase inhibitor in biochemical and cellular assays. PMID:27082996

  8. OTSSP167 Abrogates Mitotic Checkpoint through Inhibiting Multiple Mitotic Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Tipton, Aaron R.; Bekier, Michael E.; Taylor, William R.; Yen, Tim J.; Liu, Song-Tao

    2016-01-01

    OTSSP167 was recently characterized as a potent inhibitor for maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) and is currently tested in Phase I clinical trials for solid tumors that have not responded to other treatment. Here we report that OTSSP167 abrogates the mitotic checkpoint at concentrations used to inhibit MELK. The abrogation is not recapitulated by RNAi mediated silencing of MELK in cells. Although OTSSP167 indeed inhibits MELK, it exhibits off-target activity against Aurora B kinase in vitro and in cells. Furthermore, OTSSP167 inhibits BUB1 and Haspin kinases, reducing phosphorylation at histones H2AT120 and H3T3 and causing mislocalization of Aurora B and associated chromosomal passenger complex from the centromere/kinetochore. The results suggest that OTSSP167 may have additional mechanisms of action for cancer cell killing and caution the use of OTSSP167 as a MELK specific kinase inhibitor in biochemical and cellular assays. PMID:27082996

  9. Co-inhibition of polo-like kinase 1 and Aurora kinases promotes mitotic catastrophe.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingjing; Hong, Myung Jin; Chow, Jeremy P H; Man, Wing Yu; Mak, Joyce P Y; Ma, Hoi Tang; Poon, Randy Y C

    2015-04-20

    Mitosis is choreographed by a number of protein kinases including polo-like kinases and Aurora kinases. As these kinases are frequently dysregulated in cancers, small-molecule inhibitors have been developed for targeted anticancer therapies. Given that PLK1 and Aurora kinases possess both unique functions as well as co-regulate multiple mitotic events, whether pharmacological inhibition of these kinases together can enhance mitotic catastrophe remains an outstanding issue to be determined. Using concentrations of inhibitors that did not induce severe mitotic defects on their own, we found that both the metaphase arrest and mitotic slippage induced by inhibitors targeting Aurora A and Aurora B (MK-5108 and Barasertib respectively) were enhanced by a PLK1 inhibitor (BI 2536). We found that PLK1 is overexpressed in cells from nasopharyngeal carcinoma, a highly invasive cancer with poor prognosis, in comparison to normal nasopharyngeal epithelial cells. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells were more sensitive to BI 2536 as a single agent and co-inhibition with Aurora kinases than normal cells. These observations underscore the mechanism and potential benefits of targeting PLK1 and Aurora kinases to induce mitotic catastrophe in cancer cells. PMID:25871386

  10. Co-inhibition of polo-like kinase 1 and Aurora kinases promotes mitotic catastrophe

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingjing; Hong, Myung Jin; Chow, Jeremy P.H.; Man, Wing Yu; Mak, Joyce P.Y.; Ma, Hoi Tang; Poon, Randy Y.C.

    2015-01-01

    Mitosis is choreographed by a number of protein kinases including polo-like kinases and Aurora kinases. As these kinases are frequently dysregulated in cancers, small-molecule inhibitors have been developed for targeted anticancer therapies. Given that PLK1 and Aurora kinases possess both unique functions as well as co-regulate multiple mitotic events, whether pharmacological inhibition of these kinases together can enhance mitotic catastrophe remains an outstanding issue to be determined. Using concentrations of inhibitors that did not induce severe mitotic defects on their own, we found that both the metaphase arrest and mitotic slippage induced by inhibitors targeting Aurora A and Aurora B (MK-5108 and Barasertib respectively) were enhanced by a PLK1 inhibitor (BI 2536). We found that PLK1 is overexpressed in cells from nasopharyngeal carcinoma, a highly invasive cancer with poor prognosis, in comparison to normal nasopharyngeal epithelial cells. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells were more sensitive to BI 2536 as a single agent and co-inhibition with Aurora kinases than normal cells. These observations underscore the mechanism and potential benefits of targeting PLK1 and Aurora kinases to induce mitotic catastrophe in cancer cells. PMID:25871386

  11. Complete inhibition of creatine kinase in isolated perfused rat hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Fossel, E.T.; Hoefeler, H.

    1987-01-01

    Transient exposure of an isolated isovolumic perfused rat heart to low concentrations (0.5 mM) of perfusate-born iodoacetamide resulted in complete inhibition of creatine kinase and partial inhibition of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in the heart. At low levels of developed pressure, hearts maintained mechanical function, ATP, and creatine phosphate levels at control values. However, iodoacetamide-inhibited hearts were unable to maintain control values of end diastolic pressure or peak systolic pressure as work load increased. Global ischemia resulted in loss of all ATP without loss of creatine phosphate, indicating lack of active creatine kinase. These results indicate that isovolumic perfused rat hearts are able to maintain normal function and normal levels of high-energy phosphates without active creatine kinase at low levels of developed pressure. /sup 31/P-NMR of the heart was carried out.

  12. Kinase inhibitor profiling reveals unexpected opportunities to inhibit disease-associated mutant kinases

    PubMed Central

    Duong-Ly, Krisna C.; Devarajan, Karthik; Liang, Shuguang; Horiuchi, Kurumi Y.; Wang, Yuren; Ma, Haiching; Peterson, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Small-molecule kinase inhibitors have typically been designed to inhibit wild-type kinases rather than the mutant forms that frequently arise in diseases such as cancer. Mutations can have serious clinical implications by increasing kinase catalytic activity or conferring therapeutic resistance. To identify opportunities to repurpose inhibitors against disease-associated mutant kinases, we conducted a large-scale functional screen of 183 known kinase inhibitors against 76 recombinant, mutant kinases. The results revealed lead compounds with activity against clinically important mutant kinases including ALK, LRRK2, RET, and EGFR as well as unexpected opportunities for repurposing FDA-approved kinase inhibitors as leads for additional indications. Furthermore, using T674I PDGFRα as an example, we show how single-dose screening data can provide predictive structure-activity data to guide subsequent inhibitor optimization. This study provides a resource for the development of inhibitors against numerous disease-associated mutant kinases and illustrates the potential of unbiased profiling as an approach to compound-centric inhibitor development. PMID:26776524

  13. Tetraploidization increases sensitivity to Aurora B kinase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Marxer, Miriam; Foucar, Charles E; Man, Wing Yu; Chen, Yu; Ma, Hoi Tang; Poon, Randy Y C

    2012-07-01

    Aurora kinases are overexpressed in many cancers and are targets for anticancer drugs. The yeast homolog of Aurora B kinase, IPL1, was found to be a ploidy-specific lethality gene. Given that polyploidization is a common feature of many cancers, we hypothesized polyploidization also sensitizes mammalian cells to inhibition of Aurora kinases. Using two models of apparent diploid vs. tetraploid cell lines (one based on the hepatocellular carcinoma cell line Hep3B and another on untransformed mouse fibroblasts), we found that tetraploid cells were more sensitive to Aurora B inhibition than their diploid counterparts. Apoptosis could be induced in tetraploid cells by two different Aurora B inhibitors. Furthermore, tetraploid cells were sensitive to Aurora B inhibition but were not affected by Aurora A inhibition. Interestingly, the underlying mechanism was due to mitotic slippage and the subsequent excessive genome reduplication. In support of this, abolition of cytokinesis with dihydrocytochalasin B resulted in similar effects on tetraploid cells as Aurora B inhibition. These results indicate that inhibition of Aurora B or cytokinesis can promote apoptosis effectively in polyploid cancer cells. PMID:22722494

  14. In Vivo Inhibition of RIPK2 Kinase Alleviates Inflammatory Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Tigno-Aranjuez, Justine T.; Benderitter, Pascal; Rombouts, Frederik; Deroose, Frederik; Bai, XiaoDong; Mattioli, Benedetta; Cominelli, Fabio; Pizarro, Theresa T.; Hoflack, Jan; Abbott, Derek W.

    2014-01-01

    The RIPK2 kinase transduces signaling downstream of the intracellular peptidoglycan sensors NOD1 and NOD2 to promote a productive inflammatory response. However, excessive NOD2 signaling has been associated with numerous diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), sarcoidosis and inflammatory arthritis, making pharmacologic inhibition of RIPK2 an appealing strategy. In this work, we report the generation, identification, and evaluation of novel RIPK2 specific inhibitors. These compounds potently inhibit the RIPK2 tyrosine kinase activity in in vitro biochemical assays and cellular assays, as well as effectively reduce RIPK2-mediated effects in an in vivo peritonitis model. In conjunction with the development of these inhibitors, we have also defined a panel of genes whose expression is regulated by RIPK2 kinase activity. Such RIPK2 activation markers may serve as a useful tool for predicting settings likely to benefit from RIPK2 inhibition. Using these markers and the FDA-approved RIPK2 inhibitor Gefitinib, we show that pharmacologic RIPK2 inhibition drastically improves disease in a spontaneous model of Crohn Disease-like ileitis. Furthermore, using novel RIPK2-specific inhibitors, we show that cellular recruitment is inhibited in an in vivo peritonitis model. Altogether, the data presented in this work provides a strong rationale for further development and optimization of RIPK2-targeted pharmaceuticals and diagnostics. PMID:25213858

  15. HER kinase axis receptor dimer partner switching occurs in response to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibition despite failure to block cellular proliferation.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anjali; Penuel, Elicia; Mink, Sheldon; Schmidt, Joanna; Hodge, Amanda; Favero, Kristin; Tindell, Charles; Agus, David B

    2010-03-01

    The human epidermal receptor (HER) axis consists of a dynamic, interconnected family of receptors that make critical contributions to a number of malignancies. Therapeutics targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are unable to effectively inhibit tumor growth in a majority of cases. These tumors are assumed to possess primary resistance to anti-EGFR therapies, but the consequence of inhibiting EGFR in these tumors is unclear. We established isogenic cell lines by prolonged gefitinib treatment at concentrations that are in excess of that which is required for complete EGFR kinase inhibition but only minimally affected growth. Subsequently, we monitored the ligand-dependent HER profiles based on receptor expression, phosphorylation, and dimerization in conjunction with measurements of cellular susceptibility to gefitinib. Chronic EGFR kinase inhibition rapidly switched the HER network from dependence on EGFR to HER2. However, both receptors activated the critical signaling proteins AKT and mitogen-activated protein kinase, and in both cases, HER3 was the common association partner. Remarkably, the switch in receptor dimers caused diminished susceptibility to EGFR-targeted inhibitors gefitinib and cetuximab but acquired susceptibility to the HER2-targeted inhibitor pertuzumab. Overall, our study indicates that the EGFR pathway is responsive to EGFR inhibiting therapies that are not dependent on EGFR for their growth and survival, thus challenging the current definition of primary therapeutic resistance. Furthermore, EGFR kinase inhibition induces HER kinase receptors to engage in alternative dimerization that can ultimately influence therapeutic selection and responsiveness. PMID:20160029

  16. Inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases by p21.

    PubMed Central

    Harper, J W; Elledge, S J; Keyomarsi, K; Dynlacht, B; Tsai, L H; Zhang, P; Dobrowolski, S; Bai, C; Connell-Crowley, L; Swindell, E

    1995-01-01

    p21Cip1 is a cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor that is transcriptionally activated by p53 in response to DNA damage. We have explored the interaction of p21 with the currently known Cdks. p21 effectively inhibits Cdk2, Cdk3, Cdk4, and Cdk6 kinases (Ki 0.5-15 nM) but is much less effective toward Cdc2/cyclin B (Ki approximately 400 nM) and Cdk5/p35 (Ki > 2 microM), and does not associate with Cdk7/cyclin H. Overexpression of P21 arrests cells in G1. Thus, p21 is not a universal inhibitor of Cdks but displays selectivity for G1/S Cdk/cyclin complexes. Association of p21 with Cdks is greatly enhanced by cyclin binding. This property is shared by the structurally related inhibitor p27, suggesting a common biochemical mechanism for inhibition. With respect to Cdk2 and Cdk4 complexes, p27 shares the inhibitory potency of p21 but has slightly different kinase specificities. In normal diploid fibroblasts, the vast majority of active Cdk2 is associated with p21, but this active kinase can be fully inhibited by addition of exogenous p21. Reconstruction experiments using purified components indicate that multiple molecules of p21 can associate with Cdk/cyclin complexes and inactive complexes contain more than one molecule of p21. Together, these data suggest a model whereby p21 functions as an inhibitory buffer whose levels determine the threshold kinase activity required for cell cycle progression. Images PMID:7626805

  17. Scutellarein Reduces Inflammatory Responses by Inhibiting Src Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Nak Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Flavonoids are plant pigments that have been demonstrated to exert various pharmacological effects including anti-cancer, anti-diabetic, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-bacterial, and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the molecular mechanisms in terms of exact target proteins of flavonoids are not fully elucidated yet. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory mechanism of scutellarein (SCT), a flavonoid isolated from Erigeron breviscapus, Clerodendrum phlomidis and Oroxylum indicum Vent that have been traditionally used to treat various inflammatory diseases in China and Brazil. For this purpose, a nitric oxide (NO) assay, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), nuclear fractionation, immunoblot analysis, a kinase assay, and an overexpression strategy were employed. Scutellarein significantly inhibited NO production in a dose-dependent manner and reduced the mRNA expression levels of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW264.7 cells. In addition, SCT also dampened nuclear factor (NF)-κB-driven expression of a luciferase reporter gene upon transfection of a TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF) construct into Human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK 293) cells; similarly, NF-κ B nuclear translocation was inhibited by SCT. Moreover, the phosphorylation levels of various upstream signaling enzymes involved in NF-κB activation were decreased by SCT treatment in LPS-treated RAW264.7 cells. Finally, SCT strongly inhibited Src kinase activity and also inhibited the autophosphorylation of overexpressed Src. Therefore, our data suggest that SCT can block the inflammatory response by directly inhibiting Src kinase activity linked to NF-κB activation. PMID:26330757

  18. Nuclear localization of Lyn tyrosine kinase mediated by inhibition of its kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Kikuko; Nakayama, Yuji; Togashi, Yuuki; Obata, Yuuki; Kuga, Takahisa; Kasahara, Kousuke; Fukumoto, Yasunori; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2008-11-01

    Src-family kinases, cytoplasmic enzymes that participate in various signaling events, are found at not only the plasma membrane but also subcellular compartments, such as the nucleus, the Golgi apparatus and late endosomes/lysosomes. Lyn, a member of the Src-family kinases, is known to play a role in DNA damage response and cell cycle control in the nucleus. However, it is still unclear how the localization of Lyn to the nucleus is regulated. Here, we investigated the mechanism of the distribution of Lyn between the cytoplasm and the nucleus in epitheloid HeLa cells and hematopoietic THP-1 cells. Lyn was definitely detected in purified nuclei by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting analyses. Nuclear accumulation of Lyn was enhanced upon treatment of cells with leptomycin B (LMB), an inhibitor of Crm1-mediated nuclear export. Moreover, Lyn mutants lacking the sites for lipid modification were highly accumulated in the nucleus upon LMB treatment. Intriguingly, inhibition of the kinase activity of Lyn by SU6656, Csk overexpression, or point mutation in the ATP-binding site induced an increase in nuclear Lyn levels. These results suggest that Lyn being imported into and rapidly exported from the nucleus preferentially accumulates in the nucleus by inhibition of the kinase activity and lipid modification.

  19. IκB Kinase ε Is an NFATc1 Kinase that Inhibits T Cell Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junjie; Feng, Hao; Zhao, Jun; Feldman, Emily R; Chen, Si-Yi; Yuan, Weiming; Huang, Canhua; Akbari, Omid; Tibbetts, Scott A; Feng, Pinghui

    2016-07-12

    Activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) is crucial for immune responses. IKKε is an IκB kinase (IKK)-related kinase, and the function of IKKε remains obscure in T cells, despite its abundant expression. We report that IKKε inhibits NFAT activation and T cell responses by promoting NFATc1 phosphorylation. During T cell activation, IKKε was transiently activated to phosphorylate NFATc1. Loss of IKKε elevated T cell antitumor and antiviral immunity and, therefore, reduced tumor development and persistent viral infection. IKKε was activated in CD8(+) T cells of mice bearing melanoma or persistently infected with a model herpesvirus. These results collectively show that IKKε promotes NFATc1 phosphorylation and inhibits T cell responses, identifying IKKε as a crucial negative regulator of T cell activation and a potential target for immunotherapy. PMID:27346349

  20. HER-kinase Axis Receptor Dimer Partner Switching Occurs in Response to EGFR Tyrosine Kinase Inhibition Despite Failure to Block Cellular Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anjali; Penuel, Elicia; Mink, Sheldon; Schmidt, Joanna; Hodge, Amanda; Favero, Kristin; Tindell, Charles; Agus, David B.

    2010-01-01

    The HER-axis consists of a dynamic, interconnected family of receptors that make critical contributions to a number of malignancies. Therapeutics targeting EGFR, are unable to effectively inhibit tumor growth in a majority of cases. These tumors are assumed to possess primary resistance to anti-EGFR therapies but the consequence of inhibiting EGFR in these tumors is unclear. We established isogenic cell lines by prolonged gefitinib treatment at concentrations that are in excess of that which is required for complete EGFR kinase inhibition but only minimally effected growth. Subsequently, we monitored the ligand-dependent HER profiles based on receptor expression, phosphorylation and dimerization in conjunction with measurements of cellular susceptibility to gefitinib. Chronic EGFR kinase inhibition rapidly switched the HER network from dependence on EGFR to HER2. However, both receptors activated the critical signaling proteins, AKT and MAPK and in both cases HER3 was the common association partner. Remarkably, the switch in receptor dimers caused diminished susceptibility to EGFR-targeted inhibitors, gefitinib and cetuximab, but acquired susceptibility to the HER2-targeted inhibitor, pertuzumab. Overall, our study indicates that the EGFR pathway is responsive to EGFR inhibiting therapies that are not dependent on EGFR for their growth and survival thus challenging the current definition of primary therapeutic resistance. Further, EGFR kinase inhibition induces HER-kinase receptors to engage in alternative dimerization that can ultimately influence therapeutic selection and responsiveness. PMID:20160029

  1. Inhibition of Bcr serine kinase by tyrosine phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, J; Wu, Y; Ma, G Z; Lu, D; Haataja, L; Heisterkamp, N; Groffen, J; Arlinghaus, R B

    1996-01-01

    The first exon of the BCR gene encodes a new serine/threonine protein kinase. Abnormal fusion of the BCR and ABL genes, resulting from the formation of the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph), is the hallmark of Ph-positive leukemia. We have previously demonstrated that the Bcr protein is tyrosine phosphorylated within first-exon sequences by the Bcr-Abl oncoprotein. Here we report that in addition to tyrose 177 (Y-177), Y-360 and Y283 are phosphorylated in Bcr-Abl proteins in vitro. Moreover, Bcr tyrosine 360 is phosphorylated in vivo within both Bcr-Abl and Bcr. Bcr mutant Y177F had a greatly reduced ability to transphosphorylate casein and histone H1, whereas Bcr mutants Y177F and Y283F had wild-type activities. In contrast, the Y360F mutation had little effect on Bcr's autophosphorylation activity. Tyrosine-phosphorylated Bcr, phosphorylated in vitro by Bcr-Abl, was greatly inhibited in its serine/threonine kinase activity, impairing both auto- and transkinase activities of Bcr. Similarly, the isolation of Bcr from cells expressing Bcr-Abl under conditions that preserve phosphotyrosine residues also reduced Bcr's kinase activity. These results indicate that tyrosine 360 of Bcr is critical for the transphosphorylation activity of Bcr and that in Ph-positive leukemia, Bcr serine/threonine kinase activity is seriously impaired. PMID:8622703

  2. Targeting lung cancer through inhibition of checkpoint kinases

    PubMed Central

    Syljuåsen, Randi G.; Hasvold, Grete; Hauge, Sissel; Helland, Åslaug

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitors of checkpoint kinases ATR, Chk1, and Wee1 are currently being tested in preclinical and clinical trials. Here, we review the basic principles behind the use of such inhibitors as anticancer agents, and particularly discuss their potential for treatment of lung cancer. As lung cancer is one of the most deadly cancers, new treatment strategies are highly needed. We discuss how checkpoint kinase inhibition in principle can lead to selective killing of lung cancer cells while sparing the surrounding normal tissues. Several features of lung cancer may potentially be exploited for targeting through inhibition of checkpoint kinases, including mutated p53, low ERCC1 levels, amplified Myc, tumor hypoxia and presence of lung cancer stem cells. Synergistic effects have also been reported between inhibitors of ATR/Chk1/Wee1 and conventional lung cancer treatments, such as gemcitabine, cisplatin, or radiation. Altogether, inhibitors of ATR, Chk1, and Wee1 are emerging as new cancer treatment agents, likely to be useful in lung cancer treatment. However, as lung tumors are very diverse, the inhibitors are unlikely to be effective in all patients, and more work is needed to determine how such inhibitors can be utilized in the most optimal ways. PMID:25774168

  3. Growth inhibition by tyrosine kinase inhibitors in mesothelioma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Nutt, Joyce E; O'Toole, Kieran; Gonzalez, David; Lunec, John

    2009-06-01

    Clinical outcome following chemotherapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma is poor and improvements are needed. This preclinical study investigates the effect of five tyrosine kinase inhibitors (PTK787, ZD6474, ZD1839, SU6668 and SU11248) on the growth of three mesothelioma cell lines (NCI H226, NCI H28 and MSTO 211H), the presence of growth factor receptors and inhibition of their downstream signalling pathways. GI50 values were determined: ZD6474 and SU11248, mainly VEGFR2 inhibitors, gave the lowest GI50 across all cell lines (3.5-6.9 microM) whereas ZD1839 gave a GI50 in this range only in H28 cells. All cell lines were positive for EGFR, but only H226 cells were positive for VEGFR2 by Western blotting. ZD6474 and ZD1839 inhibited EGF-induced phosphorylation of EGFR, AKT and ERK, whereas VEGF-induced phosphorylation of VEGFR2 was completely inhibited with 0.1 microM SU11248. VEGFR2 was detected in tumour samples by immunohistochemistry. VEGFR2 tyrosine kinase inhibitors warrant further investigation in mesothelioma. PMID:19318229

  4. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β suppresses polyglutamine aggregation by inhibiting Vaccinia-related kinase 2 activity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunju; Ryu, Hye Guk; Kim, Sangjune; Lee, Dohyun; Jeong, Young-Hun; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2016-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by an abnormal expansion of polyglutamine repeats in the N-terminal of huntingtin. The amount of aggregate-prone protein is controlled by various mechanisms, including molecular chaperones. Vaccinia-related kinase 2 (VRK2) is known to negatively regulate chaperonin TRiC, and VRK2-facilitated degradation of TRiC increases polyQ protein aggregation, which is involved in HD. We found that VRK2 activity was negatively controlled by glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β). GSK3β directly bound to VRK2 and inhibited the catalytic activity of VRK2 in a kinase activity-independent manner. Furthermore, GSK3β increased the stability of TRiC and decreased the formation of HttQ103-GFP aggregates by inhibiting VRK2. These results indicate that GSK3β signaling may be a regulatory mechanism of HD progression and suggest targets for further therapeutic trials for HD. PMID:27377031

  5. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β suppresses polyglutamine aggregation by inhibiting Vaccinia-related kinase 2 activity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunju; Ryu, Hye Guk; Kim, Sangjune; Lee, Dohyun; Jeong, Young-Hun; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by an abnormal expansion of polyglutamine repeats in the N-terminal of huntingtin. The amount of aggregate-prone protein is controlled by various mechanisms, including molecular chaperones. Vaccinia-related kinase 2 (VRK2) is known to negatively regulate chaperonin TRiC, and VRK2-facilitated degradation of TRiC increases polyQ protein aggregation, which is involved in HD. We found that VRK2 activity was negatively controlled by glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β). GSK3β directly bound to VRK2 and inhibited the catalytic activity of VRK2 in a kinase activity-independent manner. Furthermore, GSK3β increased the stability of TRiC and decreased the formation of HttQ103-GFP aggregates by inhibiting VRK2. These results indicate that GSK3β signaling may be a regulatory mechanism of HD progression and suggest targets for further therapeutic trials for HD. PMID:27377031

  6. Phosphorylation of Human Choline Kinase Beta by Protein Kinase A: Its Impact on Activity and Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching Ching; Few, Ling Ling; Konrad, Manfred; See Too, Wei Cun

    2016-01-01

    Choline kinase beta (CKβ) is one of the CK isozymes involved in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine. CKβ is important for normal mitochondrial function and muscle development as the lack of the ckβ gene in human and mice results in the development of muscular dystrophy. In contrast, CKα is implicated in tumorigenesis and has been extensively studied as an anticancer target. Phosphorylation of human CKα was found to regulate the enzyme’s activity and its subcellular location. This study provides evidence for CKβ phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA). In vitro phosphorylation of CKβ by PKA was first detected by phosphoprotein staining, as well as by in-gel kinase assays. The phosphorylating kinase was identified as PKA by Western blotting. CKβ phosphorylation by MCF-7 cell lysate was inhibited by a PKA-specific inhibitor peptide, and the intracellular phosphorylation of CKβ was shown to be regulated by the level of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), a PKA activator. Phosphorylation sites were located on CKβ residues serine-39 and serine-40 as determined by mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis. Phosphorylation increased the catalytic efficiencies for the substrates choline and ATP about 2-fold, without affecting ethanolamine phosphorylation, and the S39D/S40D CKβ phosphorylation mimic behaved kinetically very similar. Remarkably, phosphorylation drastically increased the sensitivity of CKβ to hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) inhibition by about 30-fold. These findings suggest that CKβ, in concert with CKα, and depending on its phosphorylation status, might play a critical role as a druggable target in carcinogenesis. PMID:27149373

  7. The dynamical mechanism of auto-inhibition of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Peng, Cheng; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2011-07-01

    We use a novel normal mode analysis of an elastic network model drawn from configurations generated during microsecond all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to analyze the mechanism of auto-inhibition of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). A recent X-ray and mutagenesis experiment (Chen, et al Nature 2009, 459, 1146) of the AMPK homolog S. Pombe sucrose non-fermenting 1 (SNF1) has proposed a new conformational switch model involving the movement of the kinase domain (KD) between an inactive unphosphorylated open state and an active or semi-active phosphorylated closed state, mediated by the autoinhibitory domain (AID), and a similar mutagenesis study showed that rat AMPK has the same auto-inhibition mechanism. However, there is no direct dynamical evidence to support this model and it is not clear whether other functionally important local structural components are equally inhibited. By using the same SNF1 KD-AID fragment as that used in experiment, we show that AID inhibits the catalytic function by restraining the KD into an unproductive open conformation, thereby limiting local structural rearrangements, while mutations that disrupt the interactions between the KD and AID allow for both the local structural rearrangement and global interlobe conformational transition. Our calculations further show that the AID also greatly impacts the structuring and mobility of the activation loop. PMID:21814500

  8. The role of inhibition in epileptic networks.

    PubMed

    Trevelyan, Andrew J; Muldoon, Sarah F; Merricks, Edward M; Racca, Claudia; Staley, Kevin J

    2015-06-01

    Inhibition plays many roles in cortical circuits, including coordination of network activity in different brain rhythms and neuronal clusters, gating of activity, gain control, and dictating the manner in which activity flows through the network. This latter is particularly relevant to epileptic states, when extreme hypersynchronous discharges can spread across cortical territories. We review these different physiological and pathological roles and discuss how inhibition can be compromised and why this predisposes the network to seizures. PMID:26035675

  9. Inhibition of adenosine kinase by phosphonate and bisphosphonate derivatives.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae; Singh, Bhag; Gupta, Radhey S

    2006-02-01

    The enzyme adenosine kinase (AK) plays a central role in regulating the intracellular and interstitial concentration of the purine nucleoside adenosine (Ado). In view of the beneficial effects of Ado in protecting tissues from ischemia and other stresses, there is much interest in developing AK inhibitors, which can regulate Ado concentration in a site- and event-specific manner. The catalytic activity of AK from different sources is dependent upon the presence of activators such as phosphate (Pi). In this work we describe several new phosphorylated compounds which either activate or inhibit AK. The compounds acetyl phosphate, carbamoyl phosphate, dihydroxyacetone phosphate and imidodiphosphate were found to stimulate AK activity in a dose-dependent manner comparable to that seen with Pi. In contrast, a number of phosphonate and bisphosphonate derivatives, which included clodronate and etidronate, were found to inhibit the activity of purified AK in the presence of Pi. These AK inhibitors (viz. clodronate, etidronate, phosphonoacetic acid, 2-carboxyethylphosphonic acid, N-(phosphonomethyl)-glycine and N-(phosphonomethyl)iminodiacetic acid), at concentrations at which they inhibited AK, were also shown to inhibit the uptake of (3)H-adenosine and its incorporation into macromolecules in cultured mammalian cells, indicating that they were also inhibiting AK in intact cells. The drug concentrations at which these effects were observed showed limited toxicity to the cultured cells, indicating that these effects are not caused by cellular toxicity. These results indicate that the enzyme AK provides an additional cellular target for the clinically widely used bisphosphonates and related compounds, which could possibly be exploited for a new therapeutic application. Our structure-activity studies on different AK activators and inhibitors also indicate that all of the AK activating compounds have a higher partial positive charge (delta(+)) on the central phosphorous atom in

  10. Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibition in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Maddocks, Kami; Jones, Jeffrey A

    2016-04-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common adult leukemia and remains incurable outside of the setting of allogeneic stem cell transplant. While the standard therapy for both initial and relapsed CLL has traditionally included monoclonal antibody therapy in combination with chemotherapy, there are patients with high-risk disease features including unmutated IgVH, del(11q22) and del(17p13) that are associated with poor overall responses to these therapies with short time to relapse and shortened overall survival. Additionally, many of these therapies have a high rate of infectious toxicity in a population already at increased risk. Targeting the B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling pathway has emerged as a promising therapeutic advance in a variety of B-cell malignancies, including CLL. Bruton agammaglobulinemia tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a tyrosine kinase in the BCR pathway critical to the survival of both normal and malignant B cells and inhibition of this kinase has shown to block the progression of CLL. Ibrutinib, a first in class oral inhibitor of Btk, has shown promise as a very effective agent in the treatment of CLL-in both relapsed and upfront therapy, alone and in combination with other therapies, and in patients of all-risk disease-which has led to its approval in relapsed CLL and as frontline therapy in patients with the high-risk del(17p13) disease. Several studies are ongoing to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ibrutinib in combination with chemotherapy as frontline treatment for CLL and investigation into newer-generation Btk inhibitors is also underway. PMID:27040703

  11. Selective pharmacologic inhibition of a PASTA kinase increases Listeria monocytogenes susceptibility to β-lactam antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Pensinger, Daniel A; Aliota, Matthew T; Schaenzer, Adam J; Boldon, Kyle M; Ansari, Israr-ul H; Vincent, William J B; Knight, Benjamin; Reniere, Michelle L; Striker, Rob; Sauer, John-Demian

    2014-08-01

    While β-lactam antibiotics are a critical part of the antimicrobial arsenal, they are frequently compromised by various resistance mechanisms, including changes in penicillin binding proteins of the bacterial cell wall. Genetic deletion of the penicillin binding protein and serine/threonine kinase-associated protein (PASTA) kinase in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been shown to restore β-lactam susceptibility. However, the mechanism remains unclear, and whether pharmacologic inhibition would have the same effect is unknown. In this study, we found that deletion or pharmacologic inhibition of the PASTA kinase in Listeria monocytogenes by the nonselective kinase inhibitor staurosporine results in enhanced susceptibility to both aminopenicillin and cephalosporin antibiotics. Resistance to vancomycin, another class of cell wall synthesis inhibitors, or antibiotics that inhibit protein synthesis was unaffected by staurosporine treatment. Phosphorylation assays with purified kinases revealed that staurosporine selectively inhibited the PASTA kinase of L. monocytogenes (PrkA). Importantly, staurosporine did not inhibit a L. monocytogenes kinase without a PASTA domain (Lmo0618) or the PASTA kinase from MRSA (Stk1). Finally, inhibition of PrkA with a more selective kinase inhibitor, AZD5438, similarly led to sensitization of L. monocytogenes to β-lactam antibiotics. Overall, these results suggest that pharmacologic targeting of PASTA kinases can increase the efficacy of β-lactam antibiotics. PMID:24867981

  12. Selective Pharmacologic Inhibition of a PASTA Kinase Increases Listeria monocytogenes Susceptibility to β-Lactam Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Pensinger, Daniel A.; Aliota, Matthew T.; Schaenzer, Adam J.; Boldon, Kyle M.; Ansari, Israr-ul H.; Vincent, William J. B.; Knight, Benjamin; Reniere, Michelle L.; Striker, Rob

    2014-01-01

    While β-lactam antibiotics are a critical part of the antimicrobial arsenal, they are frequently compromised by various resistance mechanisms, including changes in penicillin binding proteins of the bacterial cell wall. Genetic deletion of the penicillin binding protein and serine/threonine kinase-associated protein (PASTA) kinase in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been shown to restore β-lactam susceptibility. However, the mechanism remains unclear, and whether pharmacologic inhibition would have the same effect is unknown. In this study, we found that deletion or pharmacologic inhibition of the PASTA kinase in Listeria monocytogenes by the nonselective kinase inhibitor staurosporine results in enhanced susceptibility to both aminopenicillin and cephalosporin antibiotics. Resistance to vancomycin, another class of cell wall synthesis inhibitors, or antibiotics that inhibit protein synthesis was unaffected by staurosporine treatment. Phosphorylation assays with purified kinases revealed that staurosporine selectively inhibited the PASTA kinase of L. monocytogenes (PrkA). Importantly, staurosporine did not inhibit a L. monocytogenes kinase without a PASTA domain (Lmo0618) or the PASTA kinase from MRSA (Stk1). Finally, inhibition of PrkA with a more selective kinase inhibitor, AZD5438, similarly led to sensitization of L. monocytogenes to β-lactam antibiotics. Overall, these results suggest that pharmacologic targeting of PASTA kinases can increase the efficacy of β-lactam antibiotics. PMID:24867981

  13. Calmodulin binds to and inhibits the activity of phosphoglycerate kinase.

    PubMed

    Myre, Michael A; O'Day, Danton H

    2004-09-17

    Phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) functions as a cytoplasmic ATP-generating glycolytic enzyme, a nuclear mediator in DNA replication and repair, a stimulator of Sendai virus transcription and an extracellular disulfide reductase in angiogenesis. Probing of a developmental expression library from Dictyostelium discoideum with radiolabelled calmodulin led to the isolation of a cDNA encoding a putative calmodulin-binding protein (DdPGK) with 68% sequence similarity to human PGK. Dictyostelium, rabbit and yeast PGKs bound to calmodulin-agarose in a calcium-dependent manner while DdPGK constructs lacking the calmodulin-binding domain (209KPFLAILGGAKVSDKIKLIE228) failed to bind. The calmodulin-binding domain shows 80% identity between diverse organisms and is situated beside the hinge and within the ATP binding domain adjacent to nine mutations associated with PGK deficiency. Calmodulin addition inhibits yeast PGK activity in vitro while the calmodulin antagonist W-7 abrogates this inhibition. Together, these data suggest that PGK activity may be negatively regulated by calcium and calmodulin signalling in eukaryotic cells. PMID:15363631

  14. Regulation of ERK Kinase by MEK1 Kinase Inhibition in the Brain*

    PubMed Central

    Tassin, Tara C.; Benavides, David R.; Plattner, Florian; Nishi, Akinori; Bibb, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Metabotropic (slow) and ionotropic (fast) neurotransmission are integrated by intracellular signal transduction mechanisms involving protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation to achieve experience-dependent alterations in brain circuitry. ERK is an important effector of both slow and fast forms of neurotransmission and has been implicated in normal brain function and CNS diseases. Here we characterize phosphorylation of the ERK-activating protein kinase MEK1 by Cdk5, ERK, and Cdk1 in vitro in intact mouse brain tissue and in the context of an animal behavioral paradigm of stress. Cdk5 only phosphorylates Thr-292, whereas ERK and Cdk1 phosphorylate both Thr-292 and Thr-286 MEK1. These sites interact in a kinase-specific manner and inhibit the ability of MEK1 to activate ERK. Thr-292 and Thr-286 MEK1 are phosphorylated in most mouse brain regions to stoichiometries of ∼5% or less. Phosphorylation of Thr-292 MEK1 is regulated by cAMP-dependent signaling in mouse striatum in a manner consistent with negative feedback inhibition in response to ERK activation. Protein phosphatase 1 and 2A contribute to the maintenance of the basal phosphorylation state of both Thr-292 and Thr-286 MEK1 and that of ERK. Activation of the NMDA class of ionotropic glutamate receptors reduces inhibitory MEK1 phosphorylation, whereas forced swim, a paradigm of acute stress, attenuates Thr-292 MEK1 phosphorylation. Together, the data indicate that these inhibitory MEK1 sites phosphorylated by Cdk5 and ERK1 serve as mechanistic points of convergence for the regulation of ERK signaling by both slow and fast neurotransmission. PMID:25971971

  15. A new “angle” on kinase inhibitor design: Prioritizing amphosteric activity above kinase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Meyerowitz, Justin G; Weiss, William A; Gustafson, W Clay

    2015-01-01

    The MYCN oncoprotein has remained an elusive target for decades. We recently reported a new class of kinase inhibitors designed to disrupt the conformation of Aurora kinase A enough to block its kinase-independent interaction with MYCN, resulting in potent degradation of MYCN. These studies provide proof-of-principle for a new method of targeting enzyme activity-independent functions of kinases and other enzymes. PMID:27308435

  16. Allosteric inhibition of SHP2 phosphatase inhibits cancers driven by receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Nan P; LaMarche, Matthew J; Chan, Ho Man; Fekkes, Peter; Garcia-Fortanet, Jorge; Acker, Michael G; Antonakos, Brandon; Chen, Christine Hiu-Tung; Chen, Zhouliang; Cooke, Vesselina G; Dobson, Jason R; Deng, Zhan; Fei, Feng; Firestone, Brant; Fodor, Michelle; Fridrich, Cary; Gao, Hui; Grunenfelder, Denise; Hao, Huai-Xiang; Jacob, Jaison; Ho, Samuel; Hsiao, Kathy; Kang, Zhao B; Karki, Rajesh; Kato, Mitsunori; Larrow, Jay; La Bonte, Laura R; Lenoir, Francois; Liu, Gang; Liu, Shumei; Majumdar, Dyuti; Meyer, Matthew J; Palermo, Mark; Perez, Lawrence; Pu, Minying; Price, Edmund; Quinn, Christopher; Shakya, Subarna; Shultz, Michael D; Slisz, Joanna; Venkatesan, Kavitha; Wang, Ping; Warmuth, Markus; Williams, Sarah; Yang, Guizhi; Yuan, Jing; Zhang, Ji-Hu; Zhu, Ping; Ramsey, Timothy; Keen, Nicholas J; Sellers, William R; Stams, Travis; Fortin, Pascal D

    2016-07-01

    The non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2, encoded by PTPN11, has an important role in signal transduction downstream of growth factor receptor signalling and was the first reported oncogenic tyrosine phosphatase. Activating mutations of SHP2 have been associated with developmental pathologies such as Noonan syndrome and are found in multiple cancer types, including leukaemia, lung and breast cancer and neuroblastoma. SHP2 is ubiquitously expressed and regulates cell survival and proliferation primarily through activation of the RAS–ERK signalling pathway. It is also a key mediator of the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) immune checkpoint pathways. Reduction of SHP2 activity suppresses tumour cell growth and is a potential target of cancer therapy. Here we report the discovery of a highly potent (IC50 = 0.071 μM), selective and orally bioavailable small-molecule SHP2 inhibitor, SHP099, that stabilizes SHP2 in an auto-inhibited conformation. SHP099 concurrently binds to the interface of the N-terminal SH2, C-terminal SH2, and protein tyrosine phosphatase domains, thus inhibiting SHP2 activity through an allosteric mechanism. SHP099 suppresses RAS–ERK signalling to inhibit the proliferation of receptor-tyrosine-kinase-driven human cancer cells in vitro and is efficacious in mouse tumour xenograft models. Together, these data demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of SHP2 is a valid therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancers. PMID:27362227

  17. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibition: An Approach to Drug Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitzki, Alexander; Gazit, Aviv

    1995-03-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) regulate cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and signaling processes in the cells of the immune system. Uncontrolled signaling from receptor tyrosine kinases and intracellular tyrosine kinases can lead to inflammatory responses and to diseases such as cancer, atherosclerosis, and psoriasis. Thus, inhibitors that block the activity of tyrosine kinases and the signaling pathways they activate may provide a useful basis for drug development. This article summarizes recent progress in the development of PTK inhibitors and demonstrates their potential use in the treatment of disease.

  18. Viral Evolved Inhibition Mechanism of the RNA Dependent Protein Kinase PKR's Kinase Domain, a Structural Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, K. Hari; Vadlamudi, Yallamandayya; Kumar, Muthuvel Suresh

    2016-01-01

    The protein kinase PKR activated by viral dsRNA, phosphorylates the eIF2α, which inhibit the mechanism of translation initiation. Viral evolved proteins mimicking the eIF2α block its phosphorylation and help in the viral replication. To decipher the molecular basis for the PKR’s substrate and inhibitor interaction mechanisms, we carried the molecular dynamics studies on the catalytic domain of PKR in complex with substrate eIF2α, and inhibitors TAT and K3L. The studies conducted show the altered domain movements of N lobe, which confers open and close state to the substrate-binding cavity. In addition, PKR exhibits variations in the secondary structural transition of the activation loop residues, and inter molecular contacts with the substrate and the inhibitors. Phosphorylation of the P+1 loop at the Thr-451 increases the affinity of the binding proteins exhibiting its role in the phosphorylation events. The implications of structural mechanisms uncovered will help to understand the basis of the evolution of the host-viral and the viral replication mechanisms. PMID:27088597

  19. Inhibition of isoprenylcysteine carboxylmethyltransferase augments BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibition-induced apoptosis in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wen Tian; Xiang, Wei; Ng, Bee Ling; Asari, Kartini; Bunte, Ralph M; Casey, Patrick J; Wang, Mei; Chuah, Charles

    2016-03-01

    Despite the success of BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors remains a therapeutic challenge. One strategy used to overcome resistance is combination of existing BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors with agents that target alternative pathways. We report that inhibition of isoprenylcysteine carboxylmethyltransferase (Icmt), a key enzyme in the protein prenylation pathway, with the selective inhibitor cysmethynil enhances the effect of BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors in killing CML cells. Cysmethynil augments tyrosine kinase inhibitor-induced apoptosis in both BCR-ABL1 wild type and BCR-ABL1 kinase domain mutant-expressing cell lines. Importantly, the enhanced apoptosis observed with the combination of cysmethynil and imatinib is significant only in primary CML CD34+ progenitor cells, not normal cord blood progenitor cells. The combination was also selective in inhibiting colony formation in CML CD34+ cells. The enhanced apoptosis appears to be due to combination of immediate and persistent inhibition of MAPK signaling. Consistent with in vitro studies, cysmethynil and imatinib, in combination, enhance the in vivo effects of either drug used alone. We found that simultaneous inhibition of BCR-ABL1 and Icmt may represent a potential therapeutic strategy for CML. PMID:26706195

  20. Inhibition Controls Asynchronous States of Neuronal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Treviño, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Computations in cortical circuits require action potentials from excitatory and inhibitory neurons. In this mini-review, I first provide a quick overview of findings that indicate that GABAergic neurons play a fundamental role in coordinating spikes and generating synchronized network activity. Next, I argue that these observations helped popularize the notion that network oscillations require a high degree of spike correlations among interneurons which, in turn, produce synchronous inhibition of the local microcircuit. The aim of this text is to discuss some recent experimental and computational findings that support a complementary view: one in which interneurons participate actively in producing asynchronous states in cortical networks. This requires a proper mixture of shared excitation and inhibition leading to asynchronous activity between neighboring cells. Such contribution from interneurons would be extremely important because it would tend to reduce the spike correlation between neighboring pyramidal cells, a drop in redundancy that could enhance the information-processing capacity of neural networks. PMID:27274721

  1. Novel links in the plant TOR kinase signaling network.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yan; Sheen, Jen

    2015-12-01

    Nutrient and energy sensing and signaling mechanisms constitute the most ancient and fundamental regulatory networks to control growth and development in all life forms. The target of rapamycin (TOR) protein kinase is modulated by diverse nutrient, energy, hormone and stress inputs and plays a central role in regulating cell proliferation, growth, metabolism and stress responses from yeasts to plants and animals. Recent chemical, genetic, genomic and metabolomic analyses have enabled significant progress toward molecular understanding of the TOR signaling network in multicellular plants. This review discusses the applications of new chemical tools to probe plant TOR functions and highlights recent findings and predictions on TOR-mediate biological processes. Special focus is placed on novel and evolutionarily conserved TOR kinase effectors as positive and negative signaling regulators that control transcription, translation and metabolism to support cell proliferation, growth and maintenance from embryogenesis to senescence in the plant system. PMID:26476687

  2. Ras-dependent and -independent pathways target the mitogen-activated protein kinase network in macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Büscher, D; Hipskind, R A; Krautwald, S; Reimann, T; Baccarini, M

    1995-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are activated upon a variety of extracellular stimuli in different cells. In macrophages, colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) stimulates proliferation, while bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inhibits cell growth and causes differentiation and activation. Both CSF-1 and LPS rapidly activate the MAPK network and induce the phosphorylation of two distinct ternary complex factors (TCFs), TCF/Elk and TCF/SAP. CSF-1, but not LPS, stimulated the formation of p21ras. GTP complexes. Expression of a dominant negative ras mutant reduced, but did not abolish, CSF-1-mediated stimulation of MEK and MAPK. In contrast, activation of the MEK kinase Raf-1 was Ras independent. Treatment with the phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C inhibitor D609 suppressed LPS-mediated, but not CSF-1-mediated, activation of Raf-1, MEK, and MAPK. Similarly, down-regulation or inhibition of protein kinase C blocked MEK and MAPK induction by LPS but not that by CSF-1. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate pretreatment led to the sustained activation of the Raf-1 kinase but not that of MEK and MAPK. Thus, activated Raf-1 alone does not support MEK/MAPK activation in macrophages. Phosphorylation of TCF/Elk but not that of TCF/SAP was blocked by all treatments that interfered with MAPK activation, implying that TCF/SAP was targeted by a MAPK-independent pathway. Therefore, CSF-1 and LPS target the MAPK network by two alternative pathways, both of which induce Raf-1 activation. The mitogenic pathway depends on Ras activity, while the differentiation signal relies on protein kinase C and phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C activation. PMID:7799956

  3. Protein-tyrosine phosphorylation interaction network in Bacillus subtilis reveals new substrates, kinase activators and kinase cross-talk

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lei; Pigeonneau, Nathalie; Ventroux, Magali; Derouiche, Abderahmane; Bidnenko, Vladimir; Mijakovic, Ivan; Noirot-Gros, Marie-Françoise

    2014-01-01

    Signal transduction in eukaryotes is generally transmitted through phosphorylation cascades that involve a complex interplay of transmembrane receptors, protein kinases, phosphatases and their targets. Our previous work indicated that bacterial protein-tyrosine kinases and phosphatases may exhibit similar properties, since they act on many different substrates. To capture the complexity of this phosphorylation-based network, we performed a comprehensive interactome study focused on the protein-tyrosine kinases and phosphatases in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. The resulting network identified many potential new substrates of kinases and phosphatases, some of which were experimentally validated. Our study highlighted the role of tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases and phosphatases in DNA metabolism, transcriptional control and cell division. This interaction network reveals significant crosstalk among different classes of kinases. We found that tyrosine kinases can bind to several modulators, transmembrane or cytosolic, consistent with a branching of signaling pathways. Most particularly, we found that the division site regulator MinD can form a complex with the tyrosine kinase PtkA and modulate its activity in vitro. In vivo, it acts as a scaffold protein which anchors the kinase at the cell pole. This network highlighted a role of tyrosine phosphorylation in the spatial regulation of the Z-ring during cytokinesis. PMID:25374563

  4. Inhibition of nucleoside diphosphate kinase in rat liver mitochondria by added 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine.

    PubMed

    Valenti, D; Barile, M; Quagliariello, E; Passarella, S

    1999-02-12

    The effect of 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine on nucleoside diphosphate kinase of isolated rat liver mitochondria has been studied. This is done by monitoring the increase in the rate of oxygen uptake by nucleoside diphosphate (TDP, UDP, CDP or GDP) addition to mitochondria in state 4. It is shown that 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine inhibits the mitochondrial nucleoside diphosphate kinase in a competitive manner, with a Ki value of about 10 microM as measured for each tested nucleoside diphosphate. It is also shown that high concentrations of GDP prevent 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine inhibition of the nucleoside diphosphate kinase. PMID:10050777

  5. Network-level effects of kinase inhibitors modulate TNF-α-induced apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Ken S.; Lin, Yi-Jang; Genetti, Casie; Samatar, Ahmed A.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Haigis, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Individual signaling pathways are not isolated, but rather operate in the context of the broader signaling network. Thus, the response of a cell to perturbation of a given pathway depends on the state of the network, which depends upon contextual inputs from the microenvironment. The cytokine tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) promotes opposing cellular behaviors under different conditions, which is influenced by perturbation of the network. For example, inhibition of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase MEK alters the kinetics of TNF-α-induced apoptosis in the mouse intestinal epithelium. We investigated whether MAPK signaling directly influences TNF-α-induced apoptosis, or whether network-level effects secondary to inhibition of the MAPK pathway alter the kinetics of cell death. We found that inhibitors of the MAPK kinase kinase Raf, MEK, and extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) exerted distinct effects on the timing and magnitude of TNF-α-induced apoptosis in the mouse intestine. Furthermore, even different MEK inhibitors exerted distinct effects; one of them, CH5126766, potentiated TNF-α-induced apoptosis. Computational modeling analysis and experimental perturbation identified the kinase Akt as the primary signaling node that promoted apoptosis in the context of TNF-α signaling in the presence of CH5126766. Our work emphasizes the importance of integrated network signaling in specifying cellular behavior in response to external perturbation. More broadly, this study highlights the importance of considering the network-level effects of pathway inhibitors and demonstrates the distinct effects of inhibitors that share the same target. PMID:26671150

  6. Sorafenib induces apoptosis in HL60 cells by inhibiting Src kinase-mediated STAT3 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Tao; Qu, Bingqian; Wu, Xingxin; Zhu, Xu; Meng, Fanyu; Gu, Yanhong; Shu, Yongqian; Shen, Yan; Sun, Yang; Xu, Qiang

    2011-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is constitutively active in approximately 50% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases and mediates multiple cellular processes including cell resistance to apoptosis. Inhibition of constitutively active STAT3 has been shown to induce AML cell apoptosis. Our aim was to ascertain if sorafenib, a multikinase inhibitor, may also inhibit STAT3 signaling and, therefore, be efficacious for AML. We found that sorafenib inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in human AML cell line (HL60) cells. In addition, sorafenib exposure reduced constitutive STAT3 phosphorylation in HL60 cells and repressed STAT3 DNA-binding activity and Mcl-1 and Bcl-2 expression. Similar results were obtained with the Src kinase inhibitor I, suggesting that sorafenib suppresses STAT3 phosphorylation by inhibiting Src-kinase activity. Furthermore, significant inhibition of Src kinase activity by sorafenib was observed in the kinase assay. In addition, Src could be co-immunoprecipitated with STAT3, and the phosphorylation of STAT3 was significantly inhibited by sorafenib only in cell lines in which phosphorylated Src is highly expressed. Taken together, our study indicates that sorafenib blocks Src kinase-mediated STAT3 phosphorylation and decreases the expression of apoptosis regulatory proteins Mcl-1 and Bcl-2, which are associated with increased apoptosis in HL60 cells. These findings provide a rationale for the treatment of human AML. PMID:20881478

  7. Selective inhibition of the kinase DYRK1A by targeting its folding process.

    PubMed

    Kii, Isao; Sumida, Yuto; Goto, Toshiyasu; Sonamoto, Rie; Okuno, Yukiko; Yoshida, Suguru; Kato-Sumida, Tomoe; Koike, Yuka; Abe, Minako; Nonaka, Yosuke; Ikura, Teikichi; Ito, Nobutoshi; Shibuya, Hiroshi; Hosoya, Takamitsu; Hagiwara, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Autophosphorylation of amino-acid residues is part of the folding process of various protein kinases. Conventional chemical screening of mature kinases has missed inhibitors that selectively interfere with the folding process. Here we report a cell-based assay that evaluates inhibition of a kinase at a transitional state during the folding process and identify a folding intermediate-selective inhibitor of dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A), which we refer to as FINDY. FINDY suppresses intramolecular autophosphorylation of Ser97 in DYRK1A in cultured cells, leading to its degradation, but does not inhibit substrate phosphorylation catalysed by the mature kinase. FINDY also suppresses Ser97 autophosphorylation of recombinant DYRK1A, suggesting direct inhibition, and shows high selectivity for DYRK1A over other DYRK family members. In addition, FINDY rescues DYRK1A-induced developmental malformations in Xenopus laevis embryos. Our study demonstrates that transitional folding intermediates of protein kinases can be targeted by small molecules, and paves the way for developing novel types of kinase inhibitors. PMID:27102360

  8. Targeting the SH2-Kinase Interface in Bcr-Abl Inhibits Leukemogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Grebien, Florian; Hantschel, Oliver; Wojcik, John; Kaupe, Ines; Kovacic, Boris; Wyrzucki, Arkadiusz M.; Gish, Gerald D.; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Koide, Akiko; Beug, Hartmut; Pawson, Tony; Valent, Peter; Koide, Shohei; Superti-Furga, Giulio

    2012-10-25

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is caused by the constitutively active tyrosine kinase Bcr-Abl and treated with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) imatinib. However, emerging TKI resistance prevents complete cure. Therefore, alternative strategies targeting regulatory modules of Bcr-Abl in addition to the kinase active site are strongly desirable. Here, we show that an intramolecular interaction between the SH2 and kinase domains in Bcr-Abl is both necessary and sufficient for high catalytic activity of the enzyme. Disruption of this interface led to inhibition of downstream events critical for CML signaling and, importantly, completely abolished leukemia formation in mice. Furthermore, disruption of the SH2-kinase interface increased sensitivity of imatinib-resistant Bcr-Abl mutants to TKI inhibition. An engineered Abl SH2-binding fibronectin type III monobody inhibited Bcr-Abl kinase activity both in vitro and in primary CML cells, where it induced apoptosis. This work validates the SH2-kinase interface as an allosteric target for therapeutic intervention.

  9. Selective inhibition of the kinase DYRK1A by targeting its folding process

    PubMed Central

    Kii, Isao; Sumida, Yuto; Goto, Toshiyasu; Sonamoto, Rie; Okuno, Yukiko; Yoshida, Suguru; Kato-Sumida, Tomoe; Koike, Yuka; Abe, Minako; Nonaka, Yosuke; Ikura, Teikichi; Ito, Nobutoshi; Shibuya, Hiroshi; Hosoya, Takamitsu; Hagiwara, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Autophosphorylation of amino-acid residues is part of the folding process of various protein kinases. Conventional chemical screening of mature kinases has missed inhibitors that selectively interfere with the folding process. Here we report a cell-based assay that evaluates inhibition of a kinase at a transitional state during the folding process and identify a folding intermediate-selective inhibitor of dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A), which we refer to as FINDY. FINDY suppresses intramolecular autophosphorylation of Ser97 in DYRK1A in cultured cells, leading to its degradation, but does not inhibit substrate phosphorylation catalysed by the mature kinase. FINDY also suppresses Ser97 autophosphorylation of recombinant DYRK1A, suggesting direct inhibition, and shows high selectivity for DYRK1A over other DYRK family members. In addition, FINDY rescues DYRK1A-induced developmental malformations in Xenopus laevis embryos. Our study demonstrates that transitional folding intermediates of protein kinases can be targeted by small molecules, and paves the way for developing novel types of kinase inhibitors. PMID:27102360

  10. 2-Methoxystypandrone inhibits signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and nuclear factor-κB signaling by inhibiting Janus kinase 2 and IκB kinase.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Shan; Qi, Chunting; Liu, Jiawei; Sun, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Qing; Sima, Zhenhua; Liu, Jingli; Li, Wuguo; Yu, Qiang

    2014-04-01

    Constitutive activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) or the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway occurs frequently in cancer cells and contributes to oncogenesis. The activation of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and IκB kinase (IKK) are key events in STAT3 and NF-κB signaling, respectively. We have identified 2-methoxystypandrone (2-MS) from a traditional Chinese medicinal herb Polygonum cuspidatum as a novel dual inhibitor of JAK2 and IKK. 2-MS inhibits both interleukin-6-induced and constitutively-activated STAT3, as well as tumor necrosis factor-α-induced NF-κB activation. 2-MS specifically inhibits JAK and IKKβ kinase activities but has little effect on activities of other kinases tested. The inhibitory effects of 2-MS on STAT3 and NF-κB signaling can be eliminated by DTT or glutathione and can last for 4 h after a pulse treatment. Furthermore, 2-MS inhibits growth and induces death of tumor cells, particularly those with constitutively-activated STAT3 or NF-κB signaling. We propose that the natural compound 2-MS, as a potent dual inhibitor of STAT3 and NF-κB pathways, is a promising anticancer drug candidate. PMID:24450414

  11. A Novel Mode of Protein Kinase Inhibition Exploiting Hydrophobic Motifs of Autoinhibited Kinases

    SciTech Connect

    S Eathiraj; R Palma; M Hirschi; E Volckova; E Nakuci; J Castro; C Chen; T Chan; D France; M Ashwell

    2011-12-31

    Protein kinase inhibitors with enhanced selectivity can be designed by optimizing binding interactions with less conserved inactive conformations because such inhibitors will be less likely to compete with ATP for binding and therefore may be less impacted by high intracellular concentrations of ATP. Analysis of the ATP-binding cleft in a number of inactive protein kinases, particularly in the autoinhibited conformation, led to the identification of a previously undisclosed non-polar region in this cleft. This ATP-incompatible hydrophobic region is distinct from the previously characterized hydrophobic allosteric back pocket, as well as the main pocket. Generalized hypothetical models of inactive kinases were constructed and, for the work described here, we selected the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) tyrosine kinase family as a case study. Initial optimization of a FGFR2 inhibitor identified from a library of commercial compounds was guided using structural information from the model. We describe the inhibitory characteristics of this compound in biophysical, biochemical, and cell-based assays, and have characterized the binding mode using x-ray crystallographic studies. The results demonstrate, as expected, that these inhibitors prevent activation of the autoinhibited conformation, retain full inhibitory potency in the presence of physiological concentrations of ATP, and have favorable inhibitory activity in cancer cells. Given the widespread regulation of kinases by autoinhibitory mechanisms, the approach described herein provides a new paradigm for the discovery of inhibitors by targeting inactive conformations of protein kinases.

  12. A dynamically coupled allosteric network underlies binding cooperativity in Src kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foda, Zachariah H.; Shan, Yibing; Kim, Eric T.; Shaw, David E.; Seeliger, Markus A.

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases are attractive drug targets because many human diseases are associated with the deregulation of kinase activity. However, how the catalytic kinase domain integrates different signals and switches from an active to an inactive conformation remains incompletely understood. Here we identify an allosteric network of dynamically coupled amino acids in Src kinase that connects regulatory sites to the ATP- and substrate-binding sites. Surprisingly, reactants (ATP and peptide substrates) bind with negative cooperativity to Src kinase while products (ADP and phosphopeptide) bind with positive cooperativity. We confirm the molecular details of the signal relay through the allosteric network by biochemical studies. Experiments on two additional protein tyrosine kinases indicate that the allosteric network may be largely conserved among these enzymes. Our work provides new insights into the regulation of protein tyrosine kinases and establishes a potential conduit by which resistance mutations to ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors can affect their activity.

  13. A dynamically coupled allosteric network underlies binding cooperativity in Src kinase

    PubMed Central

    Foda, Zachariah H.; Shan, Yibing; Kim, Eric T.; Shaw, David E.; Seeliger, Markus A.

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases are attractive drug targets because many human diseases are associated with the deregulation of kinase activity. However, how the catalytic kinase domain integrates different signals and switches from an active to an inactive conformation remains incompletely understood. Here we identify an allosteric network of dynamically coupled amino acids in Src kinase that connects regulatory sites to the ATP- and substrate-binding sites. Surprisingly, reactants (ATP and peptide substrates) bind with negative cooperativity to Src kinase while products (ADP and phosphopeptide) bind with positive cooperativity. We confirm the molecular details of the signal relay through the allosteric network by biochemical studies. Experiments on two additional protein tyrosine kinases indicate that the allosteric network may be largely conserved among these enzymes. Our work provides new insights into the regulation of protein tyrosine kinases and establishes a potential conduit by which resistance mutations to ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors can affect their activity. PMID:25600932

  14. A dynamically coupled allosteric network underlies binding cooperativity in Src kinase.

    PubMed

    Foda, Zachariah H; Shan, Yibing; Kim, Eric T; Shaw, David E; Seeliger, Markus A

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases are attractive drug targets because many human diseases are associated with the deregulation of kinase activity. However, how the catalytic kinase domain integrates different signals and switches from an active to an inactive conformation remains incompletely understood. Here we identify an allosteric network of dynamically coupled amino acids in Src kinase that connects regulatory sites to the ATP- and substrate-binding sites. Surprisingly, reactants (ATP and peptide substrates) bind with negative cooperativity to Src kinase while products (ADP and phosphopeptide) bind with positive cooperativity. We confirm the molecular details of the signal relay through the allosteric network by biochemical studies. Experiments on two additional protein tyrosine kinases indicate that the allosteric network may be largely conserved among these enzymes. Our work provides new insights into the regulation of protein tyrosine kinases and establishes a potential conduit by which resistance mutations to ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors can affect their activity. PMID:25600932

  15. Damnacanthal inhibits the NF-κB/RIP-2/caspase-1 signal pathway by inhibiting p56lck tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Ho; Jeong, Hyun-Ja

    2014-10-01

    Damnacanthal is a major constituent of Morinda citrifolia L. (noni) and exhibits anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the effects of damnacanthal on allergic diseases have not been determined. In this study, we investigated the effect of damnacanthal on mast cell-mediated allergic inflammatory responses. Damnacanthal significantly and dose-dependently inhibited compound 48/80-induced systemic anaphylactic shock, histamine release and intracellular calcium levels. In particular, IgE-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis was significantly inhibited by the oral administration of damnacanthal. In addition, we report for the first time that p56lck tyrosine kinase was expressed in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and calcium ionophore A23187 (PMACI)-stimulated mast cells. Furthermore, damnacanthal inhibited the up-regulation of p56lck tyrosine kinase activity by PMACI and repressed PMACI-induced histidine decarboxylase expression and activity. Damnacanthal also inhibited PMACI-induced interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α expressions by suppressing nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation and suppressed the activation of caspase-1 and the expression of receptor interacting protein-2. This study shows damnacanthal inhibits the NF-κB/receptor-interacting protein-2/caspase-1 signal pathway by inhibiting p56lck tyrosine kinase and suggests that damnacanthal has potential for the treatment of mast cell-mediated allergic disorders. PMID:25139491

  16. Inhibition of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway triggers B16 melanoma cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Englaro, W; Bertolotto, C; Buscà, R; Brunet, A; Pagès, G; Ortonne, J P; Ballotti, R

    1998-04-17

    In B16 melanoma cells, mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases are activated during cAMP-induced melanogenesis (Englaro, W., Rezzonico, R., Durand-Clément, M., Lallemand, D., Ortonne, J. P., and Ballotti, R. (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 24315-24320). To establish the role of the MAP kinases in melanogenesis, we studied the effects of a specific MAP kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor PD 98059 on different melanogenic parameters. We showed that PD 98059 inhibits the activation of MAP kinase extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 by cAMP, but does not impair the effects of cAMP either on the morphological differentiation, characterized by an increase in dendrite outgrowth, or on the up-regulation of tyrosinase that is the key enzyme in melanogenesis. On the contrary, PD 98059 promotes by itself cell dendricity and increases the tyrosinase amount and activity. Moreover, down-regulation of the MAP kinase pathway by PD 98059, or with dominant negative mutants of p21(ras) and MEK, triggers a stimulation of the tyrosinase promoter activity and enhances the effect of cAMP on this parameter. Conversely, activation of the MAP kinase pathway, using constitutive active mutants of p21(ras) and MEK, leads to an inhibition of basal and cAMP-induced tyrosinase gene transcription. These results demonstrate that the MAP kinase pathway activation is not required for cAMP-induced melanogenesis. Furthermore, the inhibition of this pathway induces B16 melanoma cell differentiation, while a sustained activation impairs the melanogenic effect of cAMP-elevating agents. PMID:9545341

  17. Inhibition of the kinase WNK1/HSN2 ameliorates neuropathic pain by restoring GABA inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kahle, Kristopher T; Schmouth, Jean-François; Lavastre, Valérie; Latremoliere, Alban; Zhang, Jinwei; Andrews, Nick; Omura, Takao; Laganière, Janet; Rochefort, Daniel; Hince, Pascale; Castonguay, Geneviève; Gaudet, Rébecca; Mapplebeck, Josiane C S; Sotocinal, Susana G; Duan, JingJing; Ward, Catherine; Khanna, Arjun R; Mogil, Jeffrey S; Dion, Patrick A; Woolf, Clifford J; Inquimbert, Perrine; Rouleau, Guy A

    2016-03-29

    HSN2is a nervous system predominant exon of the gene encoding the kinase WNK1 and is mutated in an autosomal recessive, inherited form of congenital pain insensitivity. The HSN2-containing splice variant is referred to as WNK1/HSN2. We created a knockout mouse specifically lacking theHsn2exon ofWnk1 Although these mice had normal spinal neuron and peripheral sensory neuron morphology and distribution, the mice were less susceptible to hypersensitivity to cold and mechanical stimuli after peripheral nerve injury. In contrast, thermal and mechanical nociceptive responses were similar to control mice in an inflammation-induced pain model. In the nerve injury model of neuropathic pain, WNK1/HSN2 contributed to a maladaptive decrease in the activity of the K(+)-Cl(-)cotransporter KCC2 by increasing its inhibitory phosphorylation at Thr(906)and Thr(1007), resulting in an associated loss of GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid)-mediated inhibition of spinal pain-transmitting nerves. Electrophysiological analysis showed that WNK1/HSN2 shifted the concentration of Cl(-)such that GABA signaling resulted in a less hyperpolarized state (increased neuronal activity) rather than a more hyperpolarized state (decreased neuronal activity) in mouse spinal nerves. Pharmacologically antagonizing WNK activity reduced cold allodynia and mechanical hyperalgesia, decreased KCC2 Thr(906)and Thr(1007)phosphorylation, and restored GABA-mediated inhibition (hyperpolarization) of injured spinal cord lamina II neurons. These data provide mechanistic insight into, and a compelling therapeutic target for treating, neuropathic pain after nerve injury. PMID:27025876

  18. Kinase-SUMO networks in diabetes-mediated cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Chang, Eugene; Abe, Jun-Ichi

    2016-05-01

    Type II diabetes mellitus (DM) is a common comorbidity in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Epidemiological studies including the Framingham, UKPDS, and MRFIT studies have shown diabetes to be an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease associated with increased incidence of morbidity and mortality. However, major randomized controlled clinical trials including ADVANCE, VAD, and ACCORD have failed to demonstrate a significant reduction in CVD complications from longstanding DM with strict glycemic control. This suggests that despite the strong clinical correlation between DM and CVD, the precise mechanisms of DM-mediated CVD pathogenesis remain unclear. Signal transduction investigations have shed some light on this question with numerous studies demonstrating the role of kinase pathways in facilitating DM and CVD pathology. Abnormalities in endothelial, vascular smooth muscle, and myocardial function from the pathological insults of hyperglycemia and oxidative stress in diabetes are thought to accelerate the development of cardiovascular disease. Extensive interplay between kinase pathways that regulate the complex pathology of DM-mediated CVD is heavily regulated by a number of post-translational modifications (PTMs). In this review, we focus on the role of a dynamic PTM known as SUMOylation and its role in regulating these kinase networks to provide a mechanistic link between DM and CVD. PMID:27085771

  19. Protein kinase C inhibition by sphingoid long-chain bases: effects on secretion in human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, E.; Arnold, R.R.; Merrill, A.H.; Lambeth, J.D.

    1987-05-01

    Sphingoid long-chain bases (sphinganine and sphingosine(So)) have recently been shown to inhibit protein kinase C (PK-C) in vitro and to block activation of the oxidative burst in intact neutrophils (PMN) by inhibiting this enzyme. In the present study, the authors have used So to investigate the role of protein kinase C in stimulus-induced secretion of PMN granule contents. Secretion of the specific granule component lactoferrin (Lf) is completely inhibited by pretreatment with So when either PMA or fLMP is used as the secretogogue. Secretion of lysozyme, a component of both the azurophilic and specific granules, is completely inhibited by So when PMA is used, but only 40% inhibited with fMLP. The secretion of the azurophilic granule markers US -glucuronidase and myeloperoxidase was not affected by So regardless of the agonist used. Data indicate that both PK-C-dependent and -independent pathways participate in the neutrophil secretory response.

  20. Paraptosis: mediation by MAP kinases and inhibition by AIP-1/Alix.

    PubMed

    Sperandio, S; Poksay, K; de Belle, I; Lafuente, M J; Liu, B; Nasir, J; Bredesen, D E

    2004-10-01

    Programmed cell death (pcd) may take the form of apoptotic or nonapoptotic pcd. Whereas cysteine aspartyl-specific proteases (caspases) mediate apoptosis, the mediators of nonapoptotic cell death programs are much less well characterized. Here, we report that paraptosis, an alternative, nonapoptotic cell death program that may be induced by the insulin-like growth factor I receptor (among other inducers), is mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and inhibited by AIP-1/Alix. The inhibition by AIP-1/Alix is specific for paraptosis since apoptosis was not inhibited. Caspases were not activated in this paradigm, nor were caspase inhibitors effective in blocking cell death. However, insulin-like growth factor I receptor (IGFIR)-induced paraptosis was inhibited by MEK-2-specific inhibitors and by antisense oligonucleotides directed against c-jun N-terminal kinase-1 (JNK-1). These results suggest that IGFIR-induced paraptosis is mediated by MAPKs, and inhibited by AIP-1/Alix. PMID:15195070

  1. Insulin Action is Blocked by a Monoclonal Antibody That Inhibits the Insulin Receptor Kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, David O.; Ho, Lisa; Korn, Laurence J.; Roth, Richard A.

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-six monoclonal antibodies to the human insulin receptor were produced. Thirty-four bound the intracellular domain of the receptor β subunit, the domain containing the tyrosine-specific kinase activity. Of these 34 antibodies, 33 recognized the rat receptor and 1 was shown to precipitate the receptors from mice, chickens, and frogs with high affinity. Another of the antibodies inhibited the kinase activities of the human and frog receptors with equal potencies. This antibody inhibited the kinase activities of these receptors by more than 90%, whereas others had no effect on either kinase activity. Microinjection of the inhibiting antibody into Xenopus oocytes blocked the ability of insulin to stimulate oocyte maturation. In contrast, this inhibiting antibody did not block the ability of progesterone to stimulate the same response. Furthermore, control immunoglobulin and a noninhibiting antibody to the receptor β subunit did not block this response to insulin. These results strongly support a role for the tyrosine-specific kinase activity of the insulin receptor in mediating this biological effect of insulin.

  2. ATR inhibition rewires cellular signaling networks induced by replication stress.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Sebastian A; Oehler, Hannah; Voigt, Andrea; Dalic, Denis; Freiwald, Anja; Serve, Hubert; Beli, Petra

    2016-02-01

    The slowing down or stalling of replication forks is commonly known as replication stress and arises from multiple causes such as DNA lesions, nucleotide depletion, RNA-DNA hybrids, and oncogene activation. The ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related kinase (ATR) plays an essential role in the cellular response to replication stress and inhibition of ATR has emerged as therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancers that exhibit high levels of replication stress. However, the cellular signaling induced by replication stress and the substrate spectrum of ATR has not been systematically investigated. In this study, we employed quantitative MS-based proteomics to define the cellular signaling after nucleotide depletion-induced replication stress and replication fork collapse following ATR inhibition. We demonstrate that replication stress results in increased phosphorylation of a subset of proteins, many of which are involved in RNA splicing and transcription and have previously not been associated with the cellular replication stress response. Furthermore, our data reveal the ATR-dependent phosphorylation following replication stress and discover novel putative ATR target sites on MCM6, TOPBP1, RAD51AP1, and PSMD4. We establish that ATR inhibition rewires cellular signaling networks induced by replication stress and leads to the activation of the ATM-driven double-strand break repair signaling. PMID:26572502

  3. Mechanism of action and therapeutic efficacy of Aurora kinase B inhibition in MYC overexpressing medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Claudia; Picard, Daniel; Shih, David; Raynaud, Denis; Leadly, Michael; MacKenzie, Danielle; Bryant, Melissa; Bebenek, Matthew; Smith, Christian A.; Taylor, Michael D.; Huang, Annie; Rutka, James T.

    2015-01-01

    Medulloblastoma comprises four molecular subgroups of which Group 3 medulloblastoma is characterized by MYC amplification and MYC overexpression. Lymphoma cells expressing high levels of MYC are susceptible to apoptosis following treatment with inhibitors of mitosis. One of the key regulatory kinases involved in multiple stages of mitosis is Aurora kinase B. We hypothesized that medulloblastoma cells that overexpress MYC would be uniquely sensitized to the apoptotic effects of Aurora B inhibition. The specific inhibition of Aurora kinase B was achieved in MYC-overexpressing medulloblastoma cells with AZD1152-HQPA. MYC overexpression sensitized medulloblastoma cells to cell death upon Aurora B inhibition. This process was found to be independent of endoreplication. Using both flank and intracranial cerebellar xenografts we demonstrate that tumors formed from MYC-overexpressing medulloblastoma cells show a response to Aurora B inhibition including growth impairment and apoptosis induction. Lastly, we show the distribution of AZD1152-HQPA within the mouse brain and the ability to inhibit intracranial tumor growth and prolong survival in mice bearing tumors formed from MYC-overexpressing medulloblastoma cells. Our results suggest the potential for therapeutic application of Aurora kinase B inhibitors in the treatment of Group 3 medulloblastoma. PMID:25739120

  4. Linking phenotype to kinase: identification of a novel benzoxaborole hinge-binding motif for kinase inhibition and development of high-potency rho kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Akama, Tsutomu; Dong, Chen; Virtucio, Charlotte; Sullivan, David; Zhou, Yasheen; Zhang, Yong-Kang; Rock, Fernando; Freund, Yvonne; Liu, Liang; Bu, Wei; Wu, Anne; Fan, Xiao-Qing; Jarnagin, Kurt

    2013-12-01

    Benzoxaboroles are a novel class of drug-like compounds that have been rich sources of novel inhibitors for various enzymes and of new drugs. While examining benzoxaborole activity in phenotypic screens, our attention was attracted by the (aminomethylphenoxy)benzoxaborole family, which potently inhibited Toll-like receptor-stimulated cytokine secretion from leukocytes. After considering their structure-activity relationships and the central role of kinases in leukocyte biology, we performed a kinome-wide screen to investigate the members of the (aminomethylphenoxy)benzoxaborole family. This technique identified Rho-activated kinase (ROCK) as a target. We showed competitive behavior, with respect to ATP, and then determined the ROCK2-drug cocrystal structure. The drug occupies the ATP site in which the oxaborole moiety provides hydrogen bond donors and acceptors to the hinge, and the aminomethyl group interacts with the magnesium/ATP-interacting aspartic acid common to protein kinases. The series exhibits excellent selectivity against most of the kinome, with greater than 15-fold selectivity against the next best member of the AGC protein kinase subfamily. Medicinal chemistry efforts with structure-based design resulted in a compound with a Ki of 170 nM. Cellular studies revealed strong enzyme inhibition rank correlation with suppression of intracellular phosphorylation of a ROCK substrate. The biochemical potencies of these compounds also translated to functional activity, causing smooth muscle relaxation in rat aorta and guinea pig trachea. The series exhibited oral availability and one member reduced rat blood pressure, consistent with ROCK's role in smooth muscle contraction. Thus, the benzoxaborole moiety represents a novel hinge-binding kinase scaffold that may have potential for therapeutic use. PMID:24049062

  5. Mechanism of Activation and Inhibition of the HER4/ErbB4 Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu,C.; Tarrant, M.; Choi, S.; Sathyamurthy, A.; Bose, R.; Banjade, S.; Pal, A.; Bornmann, W.; Lemmon, M.; et al

    2008-01-01

    HER4/ErbB4 is a ubiquitously expressed member of the EGF/ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases that is essential for normal development of the heart, nervous system, and mammary gland. We report here crystal structures of the ErbB4 kinase domain in active and lapatinib-inhibited forms. Active ErbB4 kinase adopts an asymmetric dimer conformation essentially identical to that observed to be important for activation of the EGF receptor/ErbB1 kinase. Mutagenesis studies of intact ErbB4 in Ba/F3 cells confirm the importance of this asymmetric dimer for activation of intact ErbB4. Lapatinib binds to an inactive form of the ErbB4 kinase in a mode equivalent to its interaction with the EGF receptor. All ErbB4 residues contacted by lapatinib are conserved in the EGF receptor and HER2/ErbB2, which lapatinib also targets. These results demonstrate that key elements of kinase activation and inhibition are conserved among ErbB family members.

  6. Selective inhibition of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide kinases by dinucleoside disulfide mimics of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide analogues.

    PubMed

    Petrelli, Riccardo; Sham, Yuk Yin; Chen, Liqiang; Felczak, Krzysztof; Bennett, Eric; Wilson, Daniel; Aldrich, Courtney; Yu, Jose S; Cappellacci, Loredana; Franchetti, Palmarisa; Grifantini, Mario; Mazzola, Francesca; Di Stefano, Michele; Magni, Giulio; Pankiewicz, Krzysztof W

    2009-08-01

    Diadenosine disulfide (5) was reported to inhibit NAD kinase from Listeria monocytogenes and the crystal structure of the enzyme-inhibitor complex has been solved. We have synthesized tiazofurin adenosine disulfide (4) and the disulfide 5, and found that these compounds were moderate inhibitors of human NAD kinase (IC(50)=110 microM and IC(50)=87 microM, respectively) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis NAD kinase (IC(50)=80 microM and IC(50)=45 microM, respectively). We also found that NAD mimics with a short disulfide (-S-S-) moiety were able to bind in the folded (compact) conformation but not in the common extended conformation, which requires the presence of a longer pyrophosphate (-O-P-O-P-O-) linkage. Since majority of NAD-dependent enzymes bind NAD in the extended conformation, selective inhibition of NAD kinases by disulfide analogues has been observed. Introduction of bromine at the C8 of the adenine ring restricted the adenosine moiety of diadenosine disulfides to the syn conformation making it even more compact. The 8-bromoadenosine adenosine disulfide (14) and its di(8-bromoadenosine) analogue (15) were found to be the most potent inhibitors of human (IC(50)=6 microM) and mycobacterium NAD kinase (IC(50)=14-19 microM reported so far. None of the disulfide analogues showed inhibition of lactate-, and inosine monophosphate-dehydrogenase (IMPDH), enzymes that bind NAD in the extended conformation. PMID:19596199

  7. Plasmodium falciparum Choline Kinase Inhibition Leads to a Major Decrease in Phosphatidylethanolamine Causing Parasite Death.

    PubMed

    Serrán-Aguilera, Lucía; Denton, Helen; Rubio-Ruiz, Belén; López-Gutiérrez, Borja; Entrena, Antonio; Izquierdo, Luis; Smith, Terry K; Conejo-García, Ana; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a life-threatening disease caused by different species of the protozoan parasite Plasmodium, with P. falciparum being the deadliest. Increasing parasitic resistance to existing antimalarials makes the necessity of novel avenues to treat this disease an urgent priority. The enzymes responsible for the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine are attractive drug targets to treat malaria as their selective inhibition leads to an arrest of the parasite's growth and cures malaria in a mouse model. We present here a detailed study that reveals a mode of action for two P. falciparum choline kinase inhibitors both in vitro and in vivo. The compounds present distinct binding modes to the choline/ethanolamine-binding site of P. falciparum choline kinase, reflecting different types of inhibition. Strikingly, these compounds primarily inhibit the ethanolamine kinase activity of the P. falciparum choline kinase, leading to a severe decrease in the phosphatidylethanolamine levels within P. falciparum, which explains the resulting growth phenotype and the parasites death. These studies provide an understanding of the mode of action, and act as a springboard for continued antimalarial development efforts selectively targeting P. falciparum choline kinase. PMID:27616047

  8. Upstream mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway inhibition: MEK inhibitor followed by a BRAF inhibitor in advanced melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Goldinger, Simone M; Zimmer, Lisa; Schulz, Carsten; Ugurel, Selma; Hoeller, Christoph; Kaehler, Katharina C; Schadendorf, Dirk; Hassel, Jessica C; Becker, Juergen; Hauschild, Axel; Dummer, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    BRAF-mutant melanoma can be successfully treated by BRAF kinase inhibitors (BRAFi) and MEK kinase inhibitors (MEKi). However, the administration of BRAFi followed by MEKi did not generate promising response rate (RR). The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the time to progression (TTP) with a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway upstream inhibition strategy in BRAF mutated melanoma patients. BRAF mutation positive metastatic melanoma patients were identified within the Dermatology Cooperative Oncology Group (DeCOG) network and were treated first with a MEKi and upon progression with a selective BRAFi. A total of 23 melanoma patients (six females, 17 males, aged 47-80 years) were retrospectively analysed for TTP. The total median TTP was 8.9 months. The median TTP for MEKi was 4.8 (1.2-23.2) and subsequent for BRAFi 4.5 (1.2-15.7) months, respectively. A higher RR for MEKi (39%, nine partial responses and 0 complete responses) than previously reported was observed. Our analysis suggests that the reversed inhibition of the MAPK pathway is feasible in BRAF mutated melanoma. The median TTP (8.9 months) is close to the promising BRAF- and MEKi combination therapy (median progression-free survival (PFS) 9.4 months). The total treatment duration of the MAPK inhibition when a MEKi is administered first is similar compared to the reversed sequence, but TTP shifts in favour to the MEKi. This approach is feasible with reasonable tolerability. This clinical investigation encourages further studies in prospective clinical trials to define the optimal treatment schedule for the MAPK pathway inhibition and should be accompanied by molecular monitoring using repeated biopsies. PMID:24183461

  9. Structural Bioinformatics and Protein Docking Analysis of the Molecular Chaperone-Kinase Interactions: Towards Allosteric Inhibition of Protein Kinases by Targeting the Hsp90-Cdc37 Chaperone Machinery

    PubMed Central

    Lawless, Nathan; Blacklock, Kristin; Berrigan, Elizabeth; Verkhivker, Gennady

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental role of the Hsp90-Cdc37 chaperone system in mediating maturation of protein kinase clients and supporting kinase functional activity is essential for the integrity and viability of signaling pathways involved in cell cycle control and organism development. Despite significant advances in understanding structure and function of molecular chaperones, the molecular mechanisms and guiding principles of kinase recruitment to the chaperone system are lacking quantitative characterization. Structural and thermodynamic characterization of Hsp90-Cdc37 binding with protein kinase clients by modern experimental techniques is highly challenging, owing to a transient nature of chaperone-mediated interactions. In this work, we used experimentally-guided protein docking to probe the allosteric nature of the Hsp90-Cdc37 binding with the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4) kinase clients. The results of docking simulations suggest that the kinase recognition and recruitment to the chaperone system may be primarily determined by Cdc37 targeting of the N-terminal kinase lobe. The interactions of Hsp90 with the C-terminal kinase lobe may provide additional “molecular brakes” that can lock (or unlock) kinase from the system during client loading (release) stages. The results of this study support a central role of the Cdc37 chaperone in recognition and recruitment of the kinase clients. Structural analysis may have useful implications in developing strategies for allosteric inhibition of protein kinases by targeting the Hsp90-Cdc37 chaperone machinery. PMID:24287464

  10. Aurora Kinase Inhibition Overcomes Cetuximab Resistance in Squamous Cell Cancer of the Head and Neck

    PubMed Central

    Hoellein, Alexander; Pickhard, Anja; von Keitz, Fabienne; Schoeffmann, Stephanie; Piontek, Guido; Rudelius, Martina; Baumgart, Anja; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Peschel, Christian; Dechow, Tobias; Bier, Henning; Keller, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Squamous cell cancer of the head and neck (SCCHN) is the sixth leading cause for cancer deaths worldwide. Despite extense knowledge of risk factors and pathogenesis about 50 percent of all patients and essentially every patient with metastatic SCCHN eventually die from this disease. We analyzed the clinical data and performed immunohistochemistry for Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Aurora kinase A (Aurora-A) expression in 180 SCCHN patients. Patients characterized by elevated EGFR and elevated Aurora-A protein expression in tumor tissue represent a risk group with poor disease-free and overall survival (EGFRlow Aurora-Alow versus EGFRhigh Aurora-Ahigh, p = 0.024). Treating SCCHN cell lines with a pan-Aurora kinase inhibitor resulted in defective cytokinesis, polyploidy and apoptosis, which was effective irrespective of the EGFR status. Combined Aurora kinase and EGFR targeting using a monoclonal anti-EGFR antibody was more effective compared to single EGFR and Aurora kinase inhibition. Comparing pan-Aurora kinase and Aurora-A targeting hints towards a strong and clinically relevant biological effect mediated via Aurora kinase B. Taken together, our findings characterize a new poor risk group in SCCHN patients defined by elevated EGFR and Aurora-A protein expression. Our results demonstrate that combined targeting of EGFR and Aurora kinases represents a therapeutic means to activate cell cycle checkpoints and apoptosis in SCCHN. PMID:21865609

  11. Silver nanoclusters-based fluorescence assay of protein kinase activity and inhibition.

    PubMed

    Shen, Congcong; Xia, Xiaodong; Hu, Shengqiang; Yang, Minghui; Wang, Jianxiu

    2015-01-01

    A simple and sensitive fluorescence method for monitoring the activity and inhibition of protein kinase (PKA) has been developed using polycytosine oligonucleotide (dC12)-templated silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs). Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) was found to enhance the fluorescence of Ag NCs, while the hydrolysis of ATP to adenosine diphosphate (ADP) by PKA decreased the fluorescence of Ag NCs. Compared to the existing methods for kinase activity assay, the developed method does not involve phosphorylation of the substrate peptides, which significantly simplifies the detection procedures. The method exhibits high sensitivity, good selectivity, and wide linear range toward PKA detection. The inhibition effect of kinase inhibitor H-89 on the activity of PKA was also studied. The sensing protocol was also applied to the assay of drug-stimulated activation of PKA in HeLa cell lysates. PMID:25517425

  12. Inhibition of Focal Adhesion Kinase and Src Increases Detachment and Apoptosis in Human Neuroblastoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Beierle, Elizabeth A.; Ma, Xiaojie; Trujillo, Angelica; Kurenova, Elena V.; Cance, William G.; Golubovskaya, Vita M.

    2010-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is an intracellular kinase that is overexpressed in a number of human tumors including neuroblastoma, and regulates both cellular adhesion and survival. We have studied the effects of FAK inhibition upon neuroblastoma using adenovirus-containing FAK-CD (AdFAK-CD). Utilizing an isogenic MYCN+ / MYCN− neuroblastoma cell line, we found that the MYCN+ cells are more sensitive to FAK inhibition with AdFAK-CD than their MYCN negative counterparts. In addition, we have shown that phosphorylation of Src is increased in the untreated isogenic MYCN− neuroblastoma cells, and that the decreased sensitivity of the MYCN− neuroblastoma cells to FAK inhibition with AdFAK-CD is abrogated by the addition of the Src family kinase inhibitor, PP2. The results of the current study suggest that both FAK and Src play a role in protecting neuroblastoma cells from apoptosis, and that dual inhibition of these kinases may be important when designing therapeutic interventions for this tumor. PMID:19885861

  13. Can Structural Features of Kinase Receptors Provide Clues on Selectivity and Inhibition?: A Molecular Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Ravichandran, Sarangan; Luke, Brian T.; Collins, Jack R.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease resulting from the uncontrolled proliferation of cell signaling events. Protein kinases have been identified as central molecules that participate overwhelmingly in oncogenic events, thus becoming key targets for anticancer drugs. A majority of studies converged on the idea that ligand-binding pockets of kinases retain clues to the inhibiting abilities and cross-reacting tendencies of inhibitor drugs. Even though these ideas are critical for drug discovery, validating them using experiments is not only difficult, but in some cases infeasible. To overcome these limitations and to test these ideas at the molecular level, we present here the results of receptor-focused in-silico docking of nine marketed drugs to 19 different wild-type and mutated kinases chosen from a wide range of families. This investigation highlights the need for using relevant models to explain the correct inhibition trends and the results are used to make predictions that might be able to influence future experiments. Our simulation studies are able to correctly predict the primary targets for each drug studied in majority of cases and our results agree with the existing findings. Our study shows that the conformations a given receptor acquires during kinase activation, and their micro-environment, defines the ligand partners. Type II drugs display high compatibility and selectivity for DFG-out kinase conformations. On the other hand Type I drugs are less selective and show binding preferences for both the open and closed forms of selected kinases. Using this receptor-focused approach, it is possible to capture the observed fold change in binding affinities between the wild-type and disease-centric mutations in ABL kinase for Imatinib and the second-generation ABL drugs. The effects of mutation are also investigated for two other systems, EGFR and B-Raf. Finally, by including pathway information in the design it is possible to model kinase inhibitors with potentially

  14. Inhibition of epithelial Na sup + transport by atriopeptin, protein kinase c, and pertussis toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Mohrmann, M.; Cantiello, H.F.; Ausiello, D.A. )

    1987-08-01

    The authors have recently shown the selective inhibition of an amiloride-sensitive, conductive pathway for Na{sup +} by atrial natriuretic peptide and 8-bromoguanosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (8-BrcGMP) in the renal epithelial cell line, LLC-PK{sub i}. Using {sup 22}Na{sup +} fluxes, they further investigated the modulation of Na{sup +} transport by atrial natriuretic peptide and by agents that increase cGMP production, activate protein kinase c, or modulate guanine nucleotide regulatory protein function. Sodium nitroprusside increases intracellular cGMP concentrations without affecting cAMP concentrations and completely inhibits amiloride-sensitive Na{sup +} uptake in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Oleoyl 2-acetylglycerol and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, activators of protein kinase c, inhibit Na{sup +} uptake by 93 {plus minus} 13 and 51 {plus minus} 10%, respectively. Prolonged incubation with phorbol ester results in the downregulation of protein kinase c activity and reduces the inhibitory effect of atrial natriuretic peptide, suggesting that the action of this peptide involves stimulation of protein kinase c. Pertussis toxin, which induces the ADP-ribosylation of a 41-kDa guanine nucleotide regulatory protein in LLC-PK{sub i} cells, inhibits {sup 22}Na{sup +} influx to the same extent as amiloride. Thus, increasing cGMP, activating protein kinase c, and ADP-ribosylating a guanine nucleotide regulatory protein all inhibit Na{sup +} uptake. These events may be sequentially involved in the action of atrial natriuretic peptide.

  15. Integrated transcriptomic and proteomic analysis identifies protein kinase CK2 as a key signaling node in an inflammatory cytokine network in ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kulbe, Hagen; Iorio, Francesco; Chakravarty, Probir; Milagre, Carla S.; Moore, Robert; Thompson, Richard G.; Everitt, Gemma; Canosa, Monica; Montoya, Alexander; Drygin, Denis; Braicu, Ioana; Sehouli, Jalid; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Cutillas, Pedro R.; Balkwill, Frances R.

    2016-01-01

    We previously showed how key pathways in cancer-related inflammation and Notch signaling are part of an autocrine malignant cell network in ovarian cancer. This network, which we named the “TNF network”, has paracrine actions within the tumor microenvironment, influencing angiogenesis and the immune cell infiltrate. The aim of this study was to identify critical regulators in the signaling pathways of the TNF network in ovarian cancer cells that might be therapeutic targets. To achieve our aim, we used a systems biology approach, combining data from phospho-proteomic mass spectrometry and gene expression array analysis. Among the potential therapeutic kinase targets identified was the protein kinase Casein kinase II (CK2). Knockdown of CK2 expression in malignant cells by siRNA or treatment with the specific CK2 inhibitor CX-4945 significantly decreased Notch signaling and reduced constitutive cytokine release in ovarian cancer cell lines that expressed the TNF network as well as malignant cells isolated from high grade serous ovarian cancer ascites. The expression of the same cytokines was also inhibited after treatment with CX-4945 in a 3D organotypic model. CK2 inhibition was associated with concomitant inhibition of proliferative activity, reduced angiogenesis and experimental peritoneal ovarian tumor growth. In conclusion, we have identified kinases, particularly CK2, associated with the TNF network that may play a central role in sustaining the cytokine network and/or mediating its effects in ovarian cancer. PMID:26871292

  16. Quantitative proteomic profiling identifies protein correlates to EGFR kinase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kani, Kian; Faca, Vitor M; Hughes, Lindsey D; Zhang, Wenxuan; Fang, Qiaojun; Shahbaba, Babak; Luethy, Roland; Erde, Jonathan; Schmidt, Joanna; Pitteri, Sharon J; Zhang, Qing; Katz, Jonathan E; Gross, Mitchell E; Plevritis, Sylvia K; McIntosh, Martin W; Jain, Anjali; Hanash, Samir; Agus, David B; Mallick, Parag

    2012-05-01

    Clinical oncology is hampered by lack of tools to accurately assess a patient's response to pathway-targeted therapies. Serum and tumor cell surface proteins whose abundance, or change in abundance in response to therapy, differentiates patients responding to a therapy from patients not responding to a therapy could be usefully incorporated into tools for monitoring response. Here, we posit and then verify that proteomic discovery in in vitro tissue culture models can identify proteins with concordant in vivo behavior and further, can be a valuable approach for identifying tumor-derived serum proteins. In this study, we use stable isotope labeling of amino acids in culture (SILAC) with proteomic technologies to quantitatively analyze the gefitinib-related protein changes in a model system for sensitivity to EGF receptor (EGFR)-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We identified 3,707 intracellular proteins, 1,276 cell surface proteins, and 879 shed proteins. More than 75% of the proteins identified had quantitative information, and a subset consisting of 400 proteins showed a statistically significant change in abundance following gefitinib treatment. We validated the change in expression profile in vitro and screened our panel of response markers in an in vivo isogenic resistant model and showed that these were markers of gefitinib response and not simply markers of phospho-EGFR downregulation. In doing so, we also were able to identify which proteins might be useful as markers for monitoring response and which proteins might be useful as markers for a priori prediction of response. PMID:22411897

  17. Quantitative Proteomic profiling identifies protein correlates to EGFR kinase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kani, Kian; Faca, Vitor M.; Hughes, Lindsey D.; Zhang, Wenxuan; Fang, Qiaojun; Shahbaba, Babak; Luethy, Roland; Erde, Jonathan; Schmidt, Joanna; Pitteri, Sharon J.; Zhang, Qing; Katz, Jonathan E.; Gross, Mitchell E.; Plevritis, Sylvia K.; McIntosh, Martin W.; Jain, Anjali; Hanash, Sam; Agus, David B.; Mallick, Parag

    2014-01-01

    Clinical oncology is hampered by a lack of tools to accurately assess a patient’s response to pathway-targeted therapies. Serum and tumor cell surface proteins whose abundance, or change in abundance in response to therapy, differentiates patients responding to a therapy from patients not-responding to a therapy could be usefully incorporated into tools for monitoring response. Here we posit and then verify that proteomic discovery in in vitro tissue culture models can identify proteins with concordant in vivo behavior and further, can be a valuable approach for identifying tumor-derived serum proteins. In this study we use Stable Isotope Labeling of Amino acids in Culture (SILAC) with proteomic technologies to quantitatively analyze the gefitinib-related protein changes in a model system for sensitivity to EGFR targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We identified 3,707 intracellular proteins, 1,276 cell surface proteins, and 879 shed proteins. More than 75% of the proteins identified had quantitative information and a subset consisting of [400] proteins showed a statistically significant change in abundance following gefitinib treatment. We validated the change in expression profile in vitro and screened our panel of response markers in an in vivo isogenic resistant model and demonstrated that these were markers of gefitinib response and not simply markers of phospho-EGFR downregulation. In doing so, we also were able to identify which proteins might be useful as markers for monitoring response and which proteins might be useful as markers for a priori prediction of response. PMID:22411897

  18. Protein kinase C-δ inhibitor, Rottlerin inhibits growth and survival of mycobacteria exclusively through Shikimate kinase.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sapna; Chatterjee, Aditi; Jaiswal, Swati; Kumar, Sanjay; Ramachandran, Ravishankar; Srivastava, Kishore K

    2016-09-16

    The molecular bases of disease provide exceptional prospect to translate research findings into new drugs. Nevertheless, to develop new and novel chemical entities takes huge amount of time and efforts, mainly due to the stringent processes. Therefore, drug repurposing is one of such strategies which is being used in recent times to identify new pharmacophores. The essential first step in discovery of the specific inhibitor with low toxicity is the identification and elucidation of pathways exclusive to target pathogen. One such target is the shikimate pathway, which is essential for algae, higher plants, bacteria and fungi. Since, this enzyme system is absent in higher eukaryotes and in mammals, the enzymes involved in the pathway provide an attractive target for the development of potentially selective and non toxic antimicrobial agents. Since, so far there is no specific inhibitor which is able to restrain mycobacterial shikimate pathway; we expanded the use of a known kinase inhibitor; Rottlerin, in order to predict the prototype in discovering the specific molecules against this enzyme. For the first time we have shown that Rottlerin inhibits extracellular mycobacteria by affecting Shikimate Kinase (SK) and this effect is further enhanced during the intracellular infection due to the added effect of PKC- δ down-regulation. The molecular docking of Rottlerin with both the mycobacterial SKs, corroborated the inhibition data, and revealed that the effects of SK, in slow and in fast grower mycobacteria are due to the changes in affinity of binding with the drug. PMID:27498028

  19. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Nef binds directly to Lck and mitogen-activated protein kinase, inhibiting kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Greenway, A; Azad, A; Mills, J; McPhee, D

    1996-01-01

    It is now well established that human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) Nef contributes substantially to disease pathogenesis by augmenting virus replication and markedly perturbing T-cell function. The effect of Nef on host cell activation could be explained in part by its interaction with specific cellular proteins involved in signal transduction, including at least a member of the src family kinase, Lck, and the serine/threonine kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Recombinant Nef directly interacted with purified Lck and MAPK in coprecipitation experiments and binding assays. A proline-rich repeat sequence [(Pxx)4] in Nef occurring between amino acid residues 69 to 78 is highly conserved and bears strong resemblance to a defined consensus sequence identified as an SH3 binding domain present in several proteins which can interact with the SH3 domain of various signalling and cytoskeletal proteins. Binding and coprecipitation assays with short synthetic peptides corresponding to the proline-rich repeat sequence [(Pxx)4] of Nef and the SH2, SH3, or SH2 and SH3 domains of Lck revealed that the interaction between these two proteins is at least in part mediated by the proline repeat sequence of Nef and the SH3 domain of Lck. In addition to direct binding to full-length Nef, MAPK was also shown to bind the same proline repeat motif. Nef protein significantly decreased the in vitro kinase activity of Lck and MAPK. Inhibition of key members of signalling cascades, including those emanating from the T-cell receptor, by the HIV-1 Nef protein undoubtedly alters the ability of the infected T cell to respond to antigens or cytokines, facilitating HIV-1 replication and contributing to HIV-1-induced disease pathogenesis. PMID:8794306

  20. Synthesis and Pharmacological Evaluation of 4-Iminothiazolidinones for Inhibition of PI3 Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Pinson, Jo-Anne; Schmidt-Kittler, Oleg; Frazzetto, Mark; Zheng, Zhaohua; Jennings, Ian G.; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert; Chalmers, David K.; Thompson, Philip E.

    2012-01-01

    The thiazolidinedione, compound 1, has previously shown pan-inhibition of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) class I isoforms. We hypothesized the derivatization of the thiazolidinedione core of compound 1 could introduce isoform selectivity. We report the synthesis, characterization, and inhibitory activity of a novel series of 4-iminothiazolidin-2-ones for inhibition of the class I PI3K isoforms. Their synthesis was successfully achieved by multiple pathways described in this paper. Initial in vitro data of 28 analogues demonstrated poor inhibition of all class I PI3K isoforms. However, we identified an alternate target, the phosphodiesterases, and present preliminary screening results showing improved inhibitory activity. PMID:23997244

  1. Inhibition of protein kinase C induces differentiation in Neuro-2a cells.

    PubMed Central

    Miñana, M D; Felipo, V; Grisolía, S

    1990-01-01

    1-(5-Isoquinolinylsulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine (H7), a potent inhibitor of protein kinase C, induced neuritogenesis in Neuro-2a cells, whereas N-(2-guanidinoethyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (HA 1004), which inhibits more efficiently cAMP- and cGMP-dependent protein kinases, did not. The effect, noticeable after 3 hr, was maximum (13-fold increase at 500 microM H7) between 1 and 3 days and was maintained over 2 months. In controls, 90% of the cells were undifferentiated, whereas after 3 hr with 500 microM H7 only 25% of the cells remained undifferentiated. DNA synthesis decreased as the number of differentiated cells increased. Differentiation is also functional since acetylcholinesterase activity increased approximately 7-fold after 48 hr with 500 microM H7. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, a specific activator of protein kinase C, prevented or reversed the induction of neuritogenesis and the inhibition of DNA synthesis by H7. There is a good correlation between the level of protein kinase C and the percentage of differentiated cells. The results indicate that protein kinase C may play a key role in the control of differentiation of neural cells. Some possible clinical implications are briefly discussed. Images PMID:1693437

  2. Adamantyl arotinoids that inhibit IκB kinase α and IκB kinase β.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Paula; Ortiz, María A; Alvarez, Rosana; Piedrafita, F Javier; de Lera, Angel R

    2013-07-01

    A series of analogues of the adamantyl arotinoid (AdAr) chalcone MX781 with halogenated benzyloxy substituents at C2' and heterocyclic derivatives replacing the chalcone group were found to inhibit IκBα kinase α (IKKα) and IκBα kinase β (IKKβ) activities. The growth inhibitory capacity of some analogues against Jurkat T cells as well as prostate carcinoma (PC-3) and chronic myelogenous leukemia (K562) cells, which contain elevated basal IKK activity, correlates with the induction of apoptosis and increased inhibition of recombinant IKKα and IKKβ in vitro, pointing toward inhibition of IKK/NFκB signaling as the most likely target of the anticancer activities of these AdArs. While the chalcone functional group present in many dietary compounds has been shown to mediate interactions with IKKβ via Michael addition with cysteine residues, AdArs containing a five-membered heterocyclic ring (isoxazoles and pyrazoles) in place of the chalcone of the parent system are potent inhibitors of IKKs as well, which suggests that other mechanisms for inhibition exist that do not depend on the presence of a reactive α,β-unsaturated ketone. PMID:23653373

  3. Small molecule kinase inhibitor LRRK2-IN-1 demonstrates potent activity against colorectal and pancreatic cancer through inhibition of doublecortin-like kinase 1

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Doublecortin-like kinase 1 (DCLK1) is emerging as a tumor specific stem cell marker in colorectal and pancreatic cancer. Previous in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated the therapeutic effects of inhibiting DCLK1 with small interfering RNA (siRNA) as well as genetically targeting the DCLK1+ cell for deletion. However, the effects of inhibiting DCLK1 kinase activity have not been studied directly. Therefore, we assessed the effects of inhibiting DCLK1 kinase activity using the novel small molecule kinase inhibitor, LRRK2-IN-1, which demonstrates significant affinity for DCLK1. Results Here we report that LRRK2-IN-1 demonstrates potent anti-cancer activity including inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion as well as induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Additionally we found that it regulates stemness, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and oncogenic targets on the molecular level. Moreover, we show that LRRK2-IN-1 suppresses DCLK1 kinase activity and downstream DCLK1 effector c-MYC, and demonstrate that DCLK1 kinase activity is a significant factor in resistance to LRRK2-IN-1. Conclusions Given DCLK1’s tumor stem cell marker status, a strong understanding of its biological role and interactions in gastrointestinal tumors may lead to discoveries that improve patient outcomes. The results of this study suggest that small molecule inhibitors of DCLK1 kinase should be further investigated as they may hold promise as anti-tumor stem cell drugs. PMID:24885928

  4. Molecular Determinants Underlying Binding Specificities of the ABL Kinase Inhibitors: Combining Alanine Scanning of Binding Hot Spots with Network Analysis of Residue Interactions and Coevolution

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Amanda; Verkhivker, Gennady M.

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying binding specificity and drug resistance of protein kinase inhibitors is of fundamental importance and remains highly challenging due to complex interplay of structural and thermodynamic factors. In this work, molecular simulations and computational alanine scanning are combined with the network-based approaches to characterize molecular determinants underlying binding specificities of the ABL kinase inhibitors. The proposed theoretical framework unveiled a relationship between ligand binding and inhibitor-mediated changes in the residue interaction networks. By using topological parameters, we have described the organization of the residue interaction networks and networks of coevolving residues in the ABL kinase structures. This analysis has shown that functionally critical regulatory residues can simultaneously embody strong coevolutionary signal and high network centrality with a propensity to be energetic hot spots for drug binding. We have found that selective (Nilotinib) and promiscuous (Bosutinib, Dasatinib) kinase inhibitors can use their energetic hot spots to differentially modulate stability of the residue interaction networks, thus inhibiting or promoting conformational equilibrium between inactive and active states. According to our results, Nilotinib binding may induce a significant network-bridging effect and enhance centrality of the hot spot residues that stabilize structural environment favored by the specific kinase form. In contrast, Bosutinib and Dasatinib can incur modest changes in the residue interaction network in which ligand binding is primarily coupled only with the identity of the gate-keeper residue. These factors may promote structural adaptability of the active kinase states in binding with these promiscuous inhibitors. Our results have related ligand-induced changes in the residue interaction networks with drug resistance effects, showing that network robustness may be compromised by targeted mutations of key mediating

  5. Molecular Determinants Underlying Binding Specificities of the ABL Kinase Inhibitors: Combining Alanine Scanning of Binding Hot Spots with Network Analysis of Residue Interactions and Coevolution.

    PubMed

    Tse, Amanda; Verkhivker, Gennady M

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying binding specificity and drug resistance of protein kinase inhibitors is of fundamental importance and remains highly challenging due to complex interplay of structural and thermodynamic factors. In this work, molecular simulations and computational alanine scanning are combined with the network-based approaches to characterize molecular determinants underlying binding specificities of the ABL kinase inhibitors. The proposed theoretical framework unveiled a relationship between ligand binding and inhibitor-mediated changes in the residue interaction networks. By using topological parameters, we have described the organization of the residue interaction networks and networks of coevolving residues in the ABL kinase structures. This analysis has shown that functionally critical regulatory residues can simultaneously embody strong coevolutionary signal and high network centrality with a propensity to be energetic hot spots for drug binding. We have found that selective (Nilotinib) and promiscuous (Bosutinib, Dasatinib) kinase inhibitors can use their energetic hot spots to differentially modulate stability of the residue interaction networks, thus inhibiting or promoting conformational equilibrium between inactive and active states. According to our results, Nilotinib binding may induce a significant network-bridging effect and enhance centrality of the hot spot residues that stabilize structural environment favored by the specific kinase form. In contrast, Bosutinib and Dasatinib can incur modest changes in the residue interaction network in which ligand binding is primarily coupled only with the identity of the gate-keeper residue. These factors may promote structural adaptability of the active kinase states in binding with these promiscuous inhibitors. Our results have related ligand-induced changes in the residue interaction networks with drug resistance effects, showing that network robustness may be compromised by targeted mutations of key mediating

  6. Nitric oxide reversibly inhibits the epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, C; Gómez, C; Martín-Nieto, J; De Frutos, T; Jiménez, A; Villalobo, A

    1997-01-01

    Although it has been demonstrated that NO inhibits the proliferation of different cell types, the mechanisms of its anti-mitotic action are not well understood. In this work we have studied the possible interaction of NO with the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), using transfected fibroblasts which overexpress the human EGFR. The NO donors S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP), 1,1-diethyl-2-hydroxy-2-nitrosohydrazine (DEA-NO) and N-¿4-[1-(3-aminopropyl)-2-hydroxy-2-nitrosohydrazino]butyl¿propane -1, 3-diamine (DETA-NO) inhibited DNA synthesis of fibroblasts growing in the presence of fetal calf serum, epidermal growth factor (EGF) or EGF plus insulin, as assessed by [methyl-3H]thymidine incorporation. Neither 8-bromo-cGMP nor the cGMP-phosphodiesterase inhibitor zaprinast mimicked this effect, suggesting that NO is unlikely to inhibit cell proliferation via a cGMP-dependent pathway. SNAP, DEA-NO and DETA-NO also inhibited the transphosphorylation of the EGFR and its tyrosine kinase activity toward the exogenous substrate poly-l-(Glu-Tyr), as measured in permeabilized cells using [gamma-32P]ATP as phosphate donor. In contrast, 3-[morpholinosydnonimine hydrochloride] (SIN-1), a peroxynitrite-forming compound, did not significantly inhibit either DNA synthesis or the EGFR tyrosine kinase activity. The inhibitory action of DEA-NO on the EGFR tyrosine kinase was prevented by haemoglobin, an NO scavenger, but not by superoxide dismutase, and was reversed by dithiothreitol. The binding of EGF to its receptor was unaffected by DEA-NO. The inhibitory action of DEA-NO on the EGF-dependent transphosphorylation of the receptor was also demonstrated in intact cells by immunoblot analysis using an anti-phosphotyrosine antibody. Taken together, these results suggest that NO, but not peroxynitrite, inhibits in a reversible manner the EGFR tyrosine kinase activity by S-nitrosylation of the receptor. PMID:9291107

  7. Inhibition of protein kinase CK2 by flavonoids and tyrphostins. A structural insight.

    PubMed

    Lolli, Graziano; Cozza, Giorgio; Mazzorana, Marco; Tibaldi, Elena; Cesaro, Luca; Donella-Deana, Arianna; Meggio, Flavio; Venerando, Andrea; Franchin, Cinzia; Sarno, Stefania; Battistutta, Roberto; Pinna, Lorenzo A

    2012-08-01

    Sixteen flavonoids and related compounds have been tested for their ability to inhibit three acidophilic Ser/Thr protein kinases: the Golgi apparatus casein kinase (G-CK) recently identified with protein FAM20C, protein kinase CK1, and protein kinase CK2. While G-CK is entirely insensitive to all compounds up to 40 μM concentration, consistent with the view that it is not a member of the kinome, and CK1 is variably inhibited in an isoform-dependent manner by fisetin and luteolin, and to a lesser extent by myricetin and quercetin, CK2 is susceptible to drastic inhibition by many flavonoids, displaying with six of them IC(50) values < 1 μM. A common denominator of these compounds (myricetin, quercetin, fisetin, kaempferol, luteolin, and apigenin) is a flavone scaffold with at least two hydroxyl groups at positions 7 and 4'. Inhibition is competitive with respect to the phospho-donor substrate ATP. The crystal structure of apigenin and luteolin in complex with the catalytic subunit of Zea mays CK2 has been solved, revealing their ability to interact with both the hinge region (Val116) and the positive area near Lys68 and the conserved water W1, the two main polar ligand anchoring points in the CK2 active site. Modeling experiments account for the observation that luteolin but not apigenin inhibits also CK1. The observation that luteolin shares its pyrocatechol moiety with tyrphostin AG99 prompted us to solve also the structure of this compound in complex with CK2. AG99 was found inside the ATP pocket, consistent with its mode of inhibition competitive with respect to ATP. As in the case of luteolin, the pyrocatechol group of AG99 is critical for binding, interacting with the positive area in the deepest part of the CK2 active site. PMID:22794353

  8. ADP inhibits function of the ABC transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator via its adenylate kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Randak, Christoph O; Welsh, Michael J

    2005-02-01

    ADP interacts with the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) to inhibit its Cl- channel activity. Because CFTR NBD2 has reversible adenylate kinase activity (ATP + AMP<==> ADP + ADP) that gates the channel, we asked whether ADP might inhibit current through this enzymatic activity. In adenylate kinases, binding of the two ADP molecules is cooperative. Consistent with this hypothesis, CFTR current inhibition showed positive cooperativity for ADP. We also found that ADP inhibition of current was attenuated when we prevented adenylate kinase activity with P1,P5-di(adenosine-5') pentaphosphate. Additional studies suggested that adenylate kinase-dependent inhibition involved phosphotransfer between two nucleotide diphosphates. These data indicate that the adenylate kinase reaction at NBD2 contributed to the inhibitory effect of ADP. Finding that ADP inhibits function via an adenylate kinase activity also helps explain the earlier observation that mutations that disrupt adenylate kinase activity also disrupt ADP inhibition. Thus, the results reveal a previously unrecognized mechanism by which ADP inhibits an ABC transporter. PMID:15684079

  9. ADP inhibits function of the ABC transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator via its adenylate kinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Randak, Christoph O.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    ADP interacts with the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) to inhibit its Cl- channel activity. Because CFTR NBD2 has reversible adenylate kinase activity (ATP + AMP ⇆ ADP + ADP) that gates the channel, we asked whether ADP might inhibit current through this enzymatic activity. In adenylate kinases, binding of the two ADP molecules is cooperative. Consistent with this hypothesis, CFTR current inhibition showed positive cooperativity for ADP. We also found that ADP inhibition of current was attenuated when we prevented adenylate kinase activity with P1,P5-di(adenosine-5′) pentaphosphate. Additional studies suggested that adenylate kinase-dependent inhibition involved phosphotransfer between two nucleotide diphosphates. These data indicate that the adenylate kinase reaction at NBD2 contributed to the inhibitory effect of ADP. Finding that ADP inhibits function via an adenylate kinase activity also helps explain the earlier observation that mutations that disrupt adenylate kinase activity also disrupt ADP inhibition. Thus, the results reveal a previously unrecognized mechanism by which ADP inhibits an ABC transporter. PMID:15684079

  10. Selective chemical genetic inhibition of protein kinase C epsilon reduces ethanol consumption in mice.

    PubMed

    Maiya, Rajani; McMahon, Thomas; Wang, Dan; Kanter, Benjamin; Gandhi, Dev; Chapman, Holly L; Miller, Jacklyn; Messing, Robert O

    2016-08-01

    Reducing expression or inhibiting translocation of protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε) prolongs ethanol intoxication and decreases ethanol consumption in mice. However, we do not know if this phenotype is due to reduced PKCε kinase activity or to impairment of kinase-independent functions. In this study, we used a chemical-genetic strategy to determine whether a potent and highly selective inhibitor of PKCε catalytic activity reduces ethanol consumption. We generated ATP analog-specific PKCε (AS-PKCε) knock-in mice harboring a point mutation in the ATP binding site of PKCε that renders the mutant kinase highly sensitive to inhibition by 1-tert-butyl-3-naphthalen-1-ylpyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidin-4-amine (1-NA-PP1). Systemically administered 1-NA-PP1 readily crossed the blood brain barrier and inhibited PKCε-mediated phosphorylation. 1-NA-PP1 reversibly reduced ethanol consumption by AS-PKCε mice but not by wild type mice lacking the AS-PKCε mutation. These results support the development of inhibitors of PKCε catalytic activity as a strategy to reduce ethanol consumption, and they demonstrate that the AS- PKCε mouse is a useful tool to study the role of PKCε in behavior. PMID:26947945

  11. Resveratrol inhibits Trypanosoma cruzi arginine kinase and exerts a trypanocidal activity.

    PubMed

    Valera Vera, Edward A; Sayé, Melisa; Reigada, Chantal; Damasceno, Flávia S; Silber, Ariel M; Miranda, Mariana R; Pereira, Claudio A

    2016-06-01

    Arginine kinase catalyzes the reversible transphosphorylation between ADP and phosphoarginine which plays a critical role in the maintenance of cellular energy homeostasis. Arginine kinase from the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, meets the requirements to be considered as a potential therapeutic target for rational drug design including being absent in its mammalian hosts. In this study a group of polyphenolic compounds was evaluated as potential inhibitors of arginine kinase using molecular docking techniques. Among the analyzed compounds with the lowest free binding energy to the arginine kinase active site (<-6.96kcal/mol), resveratrol was chosen for subsequent assays. Resveratrol inhibits 50% of recombinant arginine kinase activity at 325μM. The trypanocidal effect of resveratrol was evaluated on the T. cruzi trypomastigotes bursting from infected CHO K1 cells, with IC50=77μM. Additionally epimastigotes overexpressing arginine kinase were 5 times more resistant to resveratrol compared to controls. Taking into account that: (1) resveratrol is considered as completely nontoxic; (2) is easily accessible due to its low market price; and (3) has as a well-defined target enzyme which is absent in the mammalian host, it is a promising compound as a trypanocidal drug for Chagas disease. PMID:26976067

  12. Chemogenetic profiling identifies RAD17 as synthetically lethal with checkpoint kinase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Shen, John Paul; Srivas, Rohith; Gross, Andrew; Li, Jianfeng; Jaehnig, Eric J.; Sun, Su Ming; Bojorquez-Gomez, Ana; Licon, Katherine; Sivaganesh, Vignesh; Xu, Jia L.; Klepper, Kristin; Yeerna, Huwate; Pekin, Daniel; Qiu, Chu Ping; van Attikum, Haico; Sobol, Robert W.; Ideker, Trey

    2015-01-01

    Chemical inhibitors of the checkpoint kinases have shown promise in the treatment of cancer, yet their clinical utility may be limited by a lack of molecular biomarkers to identify specific patients most likely to respond to therapy. To this end, we screened 112 known tumor suppressor genes for synthetic lethal interactions with inhibitors of the CHEK1 and CHEK2 checkpoint kinases. We identified eight interactions, including the Replication Factor C (RFC)-related protein RAD17. Clonogenic assays in RAD17 knockdown cell lines identified a substantial shift in sensitivity to checkpoint kinase inhibition (3.5-fold) as compared to RAD17 wild-type. Additional evidence for this interaction was found in a large-scale functional shRNA screen of over 100 genotyped cancer cell lines, in which CHEK1/2 mutant cell lines were unexpectedly sensitive to RAD17 knockdown. This interaction was widely conserved, as we found that RAD17 interacts strongly with checkpoint kinases in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the setting of RAD17 knockdown, CHEK1/2 inhibition was found to be synergistic with inhibition of WEE1, another pharmacologically relevant checkpoint kinase. Accumulation of the DNA damage marker γH2AX following chemical inhibition or transient knockdown of CHEK1, CHEK2 or WEE1 was magnified by knockdown of RAD17. Taken together, our data suggest that CHEK1 or WEE1 inhibitors are likely to have greater clinical efficacy in tumors with RAD17 loss-of-function. PMID:26437225

  13. Chemogenetic profiling identifies RAD17 as synthetically lethal with checkpoint kinase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Shen, John Paul; Srivas, Rohith; Gross, Andrew; Li, Jianfeng; Jaehnig, Eric J; Sun, Su Ming; Bojorquez-Gomez, Ana; Licon, Katherine; Sivaganesh, Vignesh; Xu, Jia L; Klepper, Kristin; Yeerna, Huwate; Pekin, Daniel; Qiu, Chu Ping; van Attikum, Haico; Sobol, Robert W; Ideker, Trey

    2015-11-01

    Chemical inhibitors of the checkpoint kinases have shown promise in the treatment of cancer, yet their clinical utility may be limited by a lack of molecular biomarkers to identify specific patients most likely to respond to therapy. To this end, we screened 112 known tumor suppressor genes for synthetic lethal interactions with inhibitors of the CHEK1 and CHEK2 checkpoint kinases. We identified eight interactions, including the Replication Factor C (RFC)-related protein RAD17. Clonogenic assays in RAD17 knockdown cell lines identified a substantial shift in sensitivity to checkpoint kinase inhibition (3.5-fold) as compared to RAD17 wild-type. Additional evidence for this interaction was found in a large-scale functional shRNA screen of over 100 genotyped cancer cell lines, in which CHEK1/2 mutant cell lines were unexpectedly sensitive to RAD17 knockdown. This interaction was widely conserved, as we found that RAD17 interacts strongly with checkpoint kinases in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the setting of RAD17 knockdown, CHEK1/2 inhibition was found to be synergistic with inhibition of WEE1, another pharmacologically relevant checkpoint kinase. Accumulation of the DNA damage marker γH2AX following chemical inhibition or transient knockdown of CHEK1, CHEK2 or WEE1 was magnified by knockdown of RAD17. Taken together, our data suggest that CHEK1 or WEE1 inhibitors are likely to have greater clinical efficacy in tumors with RAD17 loss-of-function. PMID:26437225

  14. Casein kinase 1 promotes synchrony of the circadian clock network.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiangzhong; Sowcik, Mallory; Chen, Dechun; Sehgal, Amita

    2014-07-01

    Casein kinase 1, known as DOUBLETIME (DBT) in Drosophila melanogaster, is a critical component of the circadian clock that phosphorylates and promotes degradation of the PERIOD (PER) protein. However, other functions of DBT in circadian regulation are not clear, in part because severe reduction of dbt causes preadult lethality. Here we report the molecular and behavioral phenotype of a viable dbt(EY02910) loss-of-function mutant. We found that DBT protein levels are dramatically reduced in adult dbt(EY02910) flies, and the majority of mutant flies display arrhythmic behavior, with a few showing weak, long-period (∼32 h) rhythms. Peak phosphorylation of PER is delayed, and both hyper- and hypophosphorylated forms of the PER and CLOCK proteins are present throughout the day. In addition, molecular oscillations of the circadian clock are dampened. In the central brain, PER and TIM expression is heterogeneous and decoupled in the canonical clock neurons of the dbt(EY02910) mutants. We also report an interaction between dbt and the signaling pathway involving pigment dispersing factor (PDF), a synchronizing peptide in the clock network. These data thus demonstrate that overall reduction of DBT causes long and arrhythmic behavior, and they reveal an unexpected role of DBT in promoting synchrony of the circadian clock network. PMID:24820422

  15. Casein Kinase 1 Promotes Synchrony of the Circadian Clock Network

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiangzhong; Sowcik, Mallory; Chen, Dechun

    2014-01-01

    Casein kinase 1, known as DOUBLETIME (DBT) in Drosophila melanogaster, is a critical component of the circadian clock that phosphorylates and promotes degradation of the PERIOD (PER) protein. However, other functions of DBT in circadian regulation are not clear, in part because severe reduction of dbt causes preadult lethality. Here we report the molecular and behavioral phenotype of a viable dbtEY02910 loss-of-function mutant. We found that DBT protein levels are dramatically reduced in adult dbtEY02910 flies, and the majority of mutant flies display arrhythmic behavior, with a few showing weak, long-period (∼32 h) rhythms. Peak phosphorylation of PER is delayed, and both hyper- and hypophosphorylated forms of the PER and CLOCK proteins are present throughout the day. In addition, molecular oscillations of the circadian clock are dampened. In the central brain, PER and TIM expression is heterogeneous and decoupled in the canonical clock neurons of the dbtEY02910 mutants. We also report an interaction between dbt and the signaling pathway involving pigment dispersing factor (PDF), a synchronizing peptide in the clock network. These data thus demonstrate that overall reduction of DBT causes long and arrhythmic behavior, and they reveal an unexpected role of DBT in promoting synchrony of the circadian clock network. PMID:24820422

  16. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 inhibition and angiotensin II converting inhibition in mice with cardiomyopathy caused by lamin A/C gene mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Muchir, Antoine; Wu, Wei; Sera, Fusako; Homma, Shunichi; Worman, Howard J.

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • Both ACE and MEK1/2 inhibition are beneficial on cardiac function in Lmna cardiomyopathy. • MEK1/2 inhibitor has beneficial effects beyond ACE inhibition for Lmna cardiomyopathy. • These results provide further preclinical rationale for a clinical trial of a MEK1/2 inhibitor. - Abstract: Background: Mutations in the LMNA gene encoding A-type nuclear lamins can cause dilated cardiomyopathy with or without skeletal muscular dystrophy. Previous studies have shown abnormally increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activity in hearts of Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice, a small animal model. Inhibition of this abnormal signaling activity with a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2) inhibitor has beneficial effects on heart function and survival in these mice. However, such treatment has not been examined relative to any standard of care intervention for dilated cardiomyopathy or heart failure. We therefore examined the effects of an angiotensin II converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor on left ventricular function in Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice and assessed if adding a MEK1/2 inhibitor would provide added benefit. Methods: Male Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice were treated with the ACE inhibitor benazepril, the MEK1/2 inhibitor selumetinib or both. Transthoracic echocardiography was used to measure left ventricular diameters and fractional shortening was calculated. Results: Treatment of Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice with either benazepril or selumetinib started at 8 weeks of age, before the onset of detectable left ventricular dysfunction, lead to statistically significantly increased fractional shortening compared to placebo at 16 weeks of age. There was a trend towards a great value for fractional shortening in the selumetinib-treated mice. When treatment was started at 16 weeks of age, after the onset of left ventricular dysfunction, the addition of selumetinib treatment to benazepril lead to a statistically significant increase in left

  17. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase causes increased sensitivity to radiation through a PKB-dependent mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Gottschalk, Alexander R. . E-mail: gottschalk@radonc17.ucsf.edu; Doan, Albert; Nakamura, Jean L.; Stokoe, David; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: To identify whether inhibition of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) causes increased radiosensitivity through inhibition of protein kinase B (PKB), implicating PKB as an important therapeutic target in prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: The prostate cancer cell line LNCaP was treated with the PI3K inhibitor LY294002, radiation, and combinations of the two therapies. Apoptosis and survival were measured by cell cycle analysis, Western blot analysis for cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, and clonogenic survival. To test the hypothesis that inhibition of PKB is responsible for LY294002-induced radiosensitivity, LNCaP cells expressing a constitutively active form of PKB were used. Results: The combination of PI3K inhibition and radiation caused an increase in apoptosis and a decrease in clonogenic survival when compared to either modality alone. The expression of constitutively activated PKB blocked apoptosis induced by combination of PI3K inhibition and radiation and prevented radiosensitization by LY294002. Conclusion: These data indicate that PI3K inhibition increases sensitivity of prostate cancer cell lines to ionizing radiation through inactivation of PKB. Therefore, PTEN mutations, which lead to PKB activation, may play an important role in the resistance of prostate cancer to radiation therapy. Targeted therapy against PKB could be beneficial in the management of prostate cancer patients.

  18. Slow Inhibition and Conformation Selective Properties of Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 1 and 2 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Johannes; Xiao, Yao; Pardi, Arthur; Ahn, Natalie G.

    2016-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway is a target for anticancer therapy, validated using inhibitors of B-Raf and MAP kinase kinase (MKK) 1 and 2. Clinical outcomes show a high frequency of acquired resistance in patient tumors, involving upregulation of activity of the MAP kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1 and 2. Thus, inhibitors for ERK1/2 are potentially important for targeted therapeutics against cancer. The structures and potencies of different ERK inhibitors have been published, but their kinetic mechanisms have not been characterized. Here we perform enzyme kinetic studies on six representative ERK inhibitors, with potencies varying from 100 pM to 20 μM. Compounds with significant biological activity (IC50 < 100 nM) that inhibit in the subnanomolar range (Vertex-11e and SCH772984) display slow-onset inhibition and represent the first inhibitors of ERK2 known to demonstrate slow dissociation rate constants (values of 0.2 and 1.1 h−1, respectively). Furthermore, we demonstrate using kinetic competition assays that Vertex-11e binds with differing affinities to ERK2 in its inactive, unphosphorylated and active, phosphorylated forms. Finally, two-dimensional heteronuclear multiple-quantum correlation nuclear magnetic resonance experiments reveal that distinct conformational states are formed in complexes of Vertex-11e with inactive and active ERK2. Importantly, two conformers interconvert in equilibrium in the active ERK2 apoenzyme, but Vertex-11e strongly shifts the equilibrium completely to one conformer. Thus, a high-affinity, slow dissociation inhibitor stabilizes different enzyme conformations depending on the activity state of ERK2 and reveals properties of conformational selection toward the active kinase. PMID:25350931

  19. The Structural Basis for Activation and Inhibition of ZAP-70 Kinase Domain

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Roland G.; Fan, Hao; Bond, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    ZAP–70 (Zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70) is a tyrosine kinase that interacts directly with the activated T-cell receptor to transduce downstream signals, and is hence a major player in the regulation of the adaptive immune response. Dysfunction of ZAP–70 causes selective T cell deficiency that in turn results in persistent infections. ZAP–70 is activated by a variety of signals including phosphorylation of the kinase domain (KD), and binding of its regulatory tandem Src homology 2 (SH2) domains to the T cell receptor. The present study investigates molecular mechanisms of activation and inhibition of ZAP–70 via atomically detailed molecular dynamics simulation approaches. We report microsecond timescale simulations of five distinct states of the ZAP–70 KD, comprising apo, inhibited and three phosphorylated variants. Extensive analysis of local flexibility and correlated motions reveal crucial transitions between the states, thus elucidating crucial steps in the activation mechanism of the ZAP–70 KD. Furthermore, we rationalize previously observed staurosporine-bound crystal structures, suggesting that whilst the KD superficially resembles an “active-like” conformation, the inhibitor modulates the underlying protein dynamics and restricts it in a compact, rigid state inaccessible to ligands or cofactors. Finally, our analysis reveals a novel, potentially druggable pocket in close proximity to the activation loop of the kinase, and we subsequently use its structure in fragment-based virtual screening to develop a pharmacophore model. The pocket is distinct from classical type I or type II kinase pockets, and its discovery offers promise in future design of specific kinase inhibitors, whilst mutations in residues associated with this pocket are implicated in immunodeficiency in humans. PMID:26473606

  20. Roscovitine blocks leukocyte extravasation by inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases 5 and 9

    PubMed Central

    Berberich, Nina; Uhl, Bernd; Joore, Jos; Schmerwitz, Ulrike K; Mayer, Bettina A; Reichel, Christoph A; Krombach, Fritz; Zahler, Stefan; Vollmar, Angelika M; Fürst, Robert

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Roscovitine, a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor that induces tumour cell death, is under evaluation as an anti-cancer drug. By triggering leukocyte apoptosis, roscovitine can also enhance the resolution of inflammation. Beyond death-inducing properties, we tested whether roscovitine affects leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction, a vital step in the onset of inflammation. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions were evaluated in venules of mouse cremaster muscle, using intravital microscopy. In primary human endothelial cells, we studied the influence of roscovitine on adhesion molecules and on the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway. A cellular kinome array, in vitro CDK profiling and RNAi methods were used to identify targets of roscovitine. KEY RESULTS In vivo, roscovitine attenuated the tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-induced leukocyte adherence to and transmigration through, the endothelium. In vitro, roscovitine strongly inhibited TNF-α-evoked expression of endothelial adhesion molecules (E-selectin, intercellular cell adhesion molecule, vascular cell adhesion molecule). Roscovitine blocked NF-κB-dependent gene transcription, but not the NF-κB activation cascade [inhibitor of κB (IκB) kinase activity, IκB-α degradation, p65 translocation]. Using a cellular kinome array and an in vitro CDK panel, we found that roscovitine inhibited protein kinase A, ribosomal S6 kinase and CDKs 2, 5, 7 and 9. Experiments using kinase inhibitors and siRNA showed that the decreased endothelial activation was due solely to blockade of CDK5 and CDK9 by roscovitine. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our study highlights a novel mode of action for roscovitine, preventing endothelial activation and leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction by inhibition of CDK5 and 9. This might expand its usage as a promising anti-inflammatory compound. PMID:21391976

  1. Sensitive nanochannel biosensor for T4 polynucleotide kinase activity and inhibition detection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lei; Liu, Yang; Yan, Jing; Wang, Xingsheng; Li, Jinghong

    2013-01-01

    5'-Polynucleotide kinase is a crucial class of enzyme that catalyzes the phosphorylation of nucleic acids with 5'-hydroxyl termini. This process regulates many important cellular events, especially DNA repair during strand damage and interruption. The activity and inhibition of nucleotide kinase have proven to be an evident effect on cellular nucleic acid regulation and metabolism. Here, we describe a novel nanochannel biosensor for monitoring the activity and inhibition of T4 polynucleotide kinase (PNK), a famous member of the 5'-kinase family playing a major role in the cellular responses to DNA damage. On the basis of the functionalized nanochannel system and coupled λ exonuclease cleavage reaction, the nanochannel-sensing platform exhibits high sensitivity and convenience toward kinase analysis. Biotin-labeled dsDNA effectively blocks the streptavidin-modified nanochannel through forming a closely packed arrangement of DNA structure inside the channel. When dsDNA is phosphorylated by PNK and then immediately cleaved by λ exonuclease, the pore-blocking effect almost disappears. This PNK-induced microstructural distinctness can be directly and accurately monitored by the nanochannel system, which benefits from its high sensitivity to the change of the effective pore size. Furthermore, modification convenience and mechanical robustness also ensure the stability of the test platform. This as-proposed strategy exhibits excellent analytical performance in both PNK activity analysis and inhibition evaluation. The simple and sensitive nanochannel biosensor shows great potential in developing on-chip, high-throughput assays for fundamental biochemical process research, molecular-target therapies, and clinic diagnostics. PMID:23194085

  2. A chrysin derivative suppresses skin cancer growth by inhibiting cyclin-dependent kinases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haidan; Liu, Kangdong; Huang, Zunnan; Park, Chan-Mi; Thimmegowda, N R; Jang, Jae-Hyuk; Ryoo, In-Ja; He, Long; Kim, Sun-Ok; Oi, Naomi; Lee, Ki Won; Soung, Nak-Kyun; Bode, Ann M; Yang, Yifeng; Zhou, Xinmin; Erikson, Raymond L; Ahn, Jong-Seog; Hwang, Joonsung; Kim, Kyoon Eon; Dong, Zigang; Kim, Bo-Yeon

    2013-09-01

    Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone), a natural flavonoid widely distributed in plants, reportedly has chemopreventive properties against various cancers. However, the anticancer activity of chrysin observed in in vivo studies has been disappointing. Here, we report that a chrysin derivative, referred to as compound 69407, more strongly inhibited EGF-induced neoplastic transformation of JB6 P(+) cells compared with chrysin. It attenuated cell cycle progression of EGF-stimulated cells at the G1 phase and inhibited the G1/S transition. It caused loss of retinoblastoma phosphorylation at both Ser-795 and Ser-807/811, the preferred sites phosphorylated by Cdk4/6 and Cdk2, respectively. It also suppressed anchorage-dependent and -independent growth of A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells. Compound 69407 reduced tumor growth in the A431 mouse xenograft model and retinoblastoma phosphorylation at Ser-795 and Ser-807/811. Immunoprecipitation kinase assay results showed that compound 69407 attenuated endogenous Cdk4 and Cdk2 kinase activities in EGF-stimulated JB6 P(+) cells. Pulldown and in vitro kinase assay results indicated that compound 69407 directly binds with Cdk2 and Cdk4 in an ATP-independent manner and inhibited their kinase activities. A binding model between compound 69407 and a crystal structure of Cdk2 predicted that compound 69407 was located inside the Cdk2 allosteric binding site. The binding was further verified by a point mutation binding assay. Overall results indicated that compound 69407 is an ATP-noncompetitive cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor with anti-tumor effects, which acts by binding inside the Cdk2 allosteric pocket. This study provides new insights for creating a general pharmacophore model to design and develop novel ATP-noncompetitive agents with chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic potency. PMID:23888052

  3. G Protein-coupled Receptor Kinase 5 Phosphorylates Nucleophosmin and Regulates Cell Sensitivity to Polo-like Kinase 1 Inhibition*

    PubMed Central

    So, Christopher H.; Michal, Allison M.; Mashayekhi, Rouzbeh; Benovic, Jeffrey L.

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) phosphorylate activated G protein-coupled receptors, leading to their desensitization and endocytosis. GRKs have also been implicated in phosphorylating other classes of proteins and can localize in a variety of cellular compartments, including the nucleus. Here, we attempted to identify potential nuclear substrates for GRK5. Our studies reveal that GRK5 is able to interact with and phosphorylate nucleophosmin (NPM1) both in vitro and in intact cells. NPM1 is a nuclear protein that regulates a variety of cell functions including centrosomal duplication, cell cycle control, and apoptosis. GRK5 interaction with NPM1 is mediated by the N-terminal domain of each protein, and GRK5 primarily phosphorylates NPM1 at Ser-4, a site shared with polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1). NPM1 phosphorylation by GRK5 and PLK1 correlates with the sensitivity of cells to undergo apoptosis with cells having higher GRK5 levels being less sensitive and cells with lower GRK5 being more sensitive to PLK1 inhibitor-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our results demonstrate that GRK5 phosphorylates Ser-4 in nucleophosmin and regulates the sensitivity of cells to PLK1 inhibition. PMID:22467873

  4. Myricetin inhibits UVB-induced angiogenesis by regulating PI-3 kinase in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sung Keun; Lee, Ki Won; Byun, Sanguine; Lee, Eun Jung; Kim, Jong-Eun; Bode, Ann M; Dong, Zigang; Lee, Hyong Joo

    2010-05-01

    Myricetin is one of the principal phytochemicals in onions, berries and red wine. Previous studies showed that myricetin exhibits potent anticancer and chemopreventive effects. The present study examined the effect of myricetin on ultraviolet (UV) B-induced angiogenesis in an SKH-1 hairless mouse skin tumorigenesis model. Topical treatment with myricetin inhibited repetitive UVB-induced neovascularization in SKH-1 hairless mouse skin. The induction of vascular endothelial growth factor, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and MMP-13 expression by chronic UVB irradiation was significantly suppressed by myricetin treatment. Immunohistochemical and western blot analyses revealed that myricetin inhibited UVB-induced hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha expression in mouse skin. Western blot analysis and kinase assay data revealed that myricetin suppressed UVB-induced phosphatidylinositol-3 (PI-3) kinase activity and subsequently attenuated the UVB-induced phosphorylation of Akt/p70(S6K) in mouse skin lysates. A pull-down assay revealed the direct binding of PI-3 kinase and myricetin in mouse skin lysates. Our results indicate that myricetin suppresses UVB-induced angiogenesis by regulating PI-3 kinase activity in vivo in mouse skin. PMID:20008033

  5. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and the actin network are not required for the stimulation of glucose transport caused by mitochondrial uncoupling: comparison with insulin action.

    PubMed Central

    Tsakiridis, T; Vranic, M; Klip, A

    1995-01-01

    In L6 myotubes insulin stimulates glucose transport through the translocation of glucose transporters GLUT1, GLUT3 and GLUT4 from intracellular stores to the plasma membrane. An intact actin network and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity are required for this process. Glucose transport is also stimulated by the mitochondrial ATP-production uncoupler dinitrophenol. We show here that, in serum-depleted myotubes, dinitrophenol induced translocation of GLUT1 and GLUT4, but not GLUT3. This response was not affected by inhibiting phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase or disassembling the actin network. Insulin, but not dinitrophenol, caused tyrosine phosphorylation of several polypeptides, including the insulin-receptor substrate-1 and mitogen-activated protein kinase. Similarly, insulin, but not dinitrophenol, caused actin reorganization, which was inhibited by wortmannin. We conclude that insulin and dinitrophenol stimulate glucose transport by different mechanisms. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7619042

  6. The case for inhibiting p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Arabacilar, Pelin; Marber, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This minireview discusses the evidence that the inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38 MAPKs) maybe of therapeutic value in heart failure. Most previous experimental studies, as well as past and ongoing clinical trials, have focussed on the role of p38 MAPKs in myocardial infarction and acute coronary syndromes. There is now growing evidence that these kinases are activated within the myocardium of the failing human heart and in the heart and blood vessels of animal models of heart failure. Furthermore, from a philosophical viewpoint the chronic activation of the adaptive stress pathways that lead to the activation of p38 MAPKs in heart failure is analogous to the chronic activation of the sympathetic, renin-aldosterone-angiotensin and neprilysin systems. These have provided some of the most effective therapies for heart failure. This minireview questions whether similar and synergistic advantages would follow the inhibition of p38 MAPKs. PMID:26029107

  7. Direct Inhibition of Choline Kinase by a Near-Infrared Fluorescent Carbocyanine

    PubMed Central

    Arlauckas, Sean P.; Popov, Anatoliy V.; Delikatny, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    Choline kinase alpha (ChoK) expression is increasingly being recognized as an important indicator of breast cancer prognosis, however previous efforts to non-invasively measure ChoK status have been complicated by the spectral limitations of in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and the complex network of enzymes involved in choline metabolism. The most effective ChoK inhibitors are symmetric and contain quaternary ammonium groups within heterocyclic head groups connected by an aliphatic spacer. Characterization of these bis-pyridinium and bis-quinolinium compounds has led to Phase I clinical trials to assess small molecule inhibitors of ChoK for solid tumor treatment. We report the development of a novel carbocyanine dye, JAS239, whose bis-indolium structure conforms to the parameters established for ChoK specificity and whose spacer length confers fluorescence in the near-infrared window. Fluorimetry and confocal microscopy were used to demonstrate that JAS239 rapidly enters breast cancer cells independent of the choline transporters, with accumulation in the cytosolic space where ChoK is active. Radio-tracing and 1H MRS techniques were used to determine that JAS239 binds and competitively inhibits ChoK intracellularly preventing choline phosphorylation while inducing cell death in breast cancer cell lines with similar efficacy to known ChoK inhibitors. Fluorescent molecules that report on ChoK status have potential use as companion diagnostics for non-invasive breast tumor staging, since NIR fluorescence allows for detection of real time probe accumulation in vivo. Furthermore, their ability as novel ChoK inhibitors may prove effective against aggressive, therapy-resistant tumors. PMID:25028471

  8. Dysregulation of epithelial Na+ absorption induced by inhibition of the kinases TORC1 and TORC2

    PubMed Central

    Mansley, Morag K; Wilson, Stuart M

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Although the serum and glucocorticoid-inducible protein kinase 1 (SGK1) appears to be involved in controlling epithelial Na+ absorption, its role in this physiologically important ion transport process is undefined. As SGK1 activity is dependent upon target of rapamycin complex 2 (TORC2)-catalysed phosphorylation of SGK1-Ser422, we have explored the effects of inhibiting TORC2 and/or TORC1 upon the hormonal control of Na+ absorption. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Na+ absorption was quantified electrometrically in mouse cortical collecting duct cells (mpkCCD) grown to confluence on permeable membranes. Kinase activities were assessed by monitoring endogenous protein phosphorylation, with or without TORC1/2 inhibitors (TORIN1 and PP242) and the TORC1 inhibitor: rapamycin. KEY RESULTS Inhibition of TORC1/2 (TORIN1, PP242) suppressed basal SGK1 activity, prevented insulin- and dexamethasone-induced SGK1 activation, and caused modest (10–20%) inhibition of basal Na+ absorption and substantial (∼80%) inhibition of insulin/dexamethasone-induced Na+ transport. Inhibition of TORC1 did not impair SGK1 activation or insulin-induced Na+ transport, but did inhibit (∼80%) dexamethasone-induced Na+ absorption. Arginine vasopressin stimulated Na+ absorption via a TORC1/2-independent mechanism. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS Target of rapamycin complex 2, but not TORC1, is important to SGK1 activation. Signalling via phosphoinositide-3-kinase/TORC2/SGK1 can explain insulin-induced Na+ absorption. TORC2, but not TORC1, is also involved in glucocorticoid-induced SGK1 activation but its role is permissive. Glucocorticoid-induced Na+ transport displayed a requirement for TORC1 activity. Therefore, TORC1 and TORC2 contribute to the regulation of Na+ absorption. Pharmacological manipulation of TORC1/2 signalling may provide novel therapies for Na+-sensitive hypertension. PMID:20735411

  9. Casein Kinase 2 Reverses Tail-Independent Inhibition of Kinesin-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jing; Shu, Zhanyong; Anand, Preetha; Reddy, Babu; Cermelli, Silvia; Whisenant, Thomas; King, Stephen; Bardwell, Lee; Huang, Lan; Gross, Steven

    2011-03-01

    Kinesin-1 is a plus-end microtubule-based molecular motor, and defects in kinesin transport are linked to diseases including neurodegeneration. Kinesin can auto-inhibit via a direct head-tail interaction, but is believed to be active otherwise. In contrast, this study uncovers a fast but reversible inhibition distinct from the canonical auto-inhibition pathway. The majority of the initially active kinesin (full-length or tail-less) loses its ability to bind/interact with microtubule, and Casein Kinase 2 (CK2) reverses this inactivation (up to 4-fold) without altering kinesin's single motor properties. Motor phosphorylation is not required for this CK2 -mediated kinesin activation. In cultured mammalian cells, knockdown of CK2 level, but not kinase activity, was sufficient to decrease the force required to stall lipid droplet transport, consistent with a reduction in the number of active motors. We propose that CK2 forms a positive regulating complex with the motor. This study provides the first direct evidence of a protein kinase positively regulating kinesin-transport, and uncovers a pathway whereby inactive cargo-bound kinesin can be activated. This work is supported by NIGMS grants GM64624 and GM079156 to SPG, GM-74830 to LH, NIH grants GM76516 and GM60366 to LB, and AHA grant 825278F to JX.

  10. Effect of sialylation on EGFR phosphorylation and resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Yen, Hsin-Yung; Liu, Ying-Chih; Chen, Nai-Yu; Tsai, Chia-Feng; Wang, Yi-Ting; Chen, Yu-Ju; Hsu, Tsui-Ling; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2015-06-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a heavily glycosylated transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase. Upon EGF-binding, EGFR undergoes conformational changes to dimerize, resulting in kinase activation and autophosphorylation and downstream signaling. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been used to treat lung cancer by inhibiting EGFR phosphorylation. Previously, we demonstrated that EGFR sialylation suppresses its dimerization and phosphorylation. In this report, we further investigated the effect of sialylation on the phosphorylation profile of EGFR in TKI-sensitive and TKI-resistant cells. Sialylation was induced in cancer progression to inhibit the association of EGFR with EGF and the subsequent autophosphorylation. In the absence of EGF the TKI-resistant EGFR mutant (L858R/T790M) had a higher degree of sialylation and phosphorylation at Y1068, Y1086, and Y1173 than the TKI-sensitive EGFR. In addition, although sialylation in the TKI-resistant mutants suppresses EGFR tyrosine phosphorylation, with the most significant effect on the Y1173 site, the sialylation effect is not strong enough to stop cancer progression by inhibiting the phosphorylation of these three sites. These findings were supported further by the observation that the L858R/T790M EGFR mutant, when treated with sialidase or sialyltransferase inhibitor, showed an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation, and the sensitivity of the corresponding resistant lung cancer cells to gefitinib was reduced by desialylation and was enhanced by sialylation. PMID:25971727

  11. Pharmacological inhibition of Rho-kinase (ROCK) signaling enhances cisplatin resistance in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Street, Catharine A; Routhier, Alissa A; Spencer, Carrie; Perkins, Ashley L; Masterjohn, Katherine; Hackathorn, Alexander; Montalvo, John; Dennstedt, Emily A; Bryan, Brad A

    2010-11-01

    The role of the RhoA/Rho kinase (ROCK) signaling pathway in cell survival remains a very controversial issue, with its activation being pro-apoptotic in many cell types and anti-apoptotic in others. To test if ROCK inhibition contributes to tumor cell survival or death following chemotherapy, we treated cisplatin damaged neuroblastoma cells with a pharmacological ROCK inhibitor (Y27632) or sham, and monitored cell survival, accumulation of a chemoresistant phenotype, and in vivo tumor formation. Additionally, we assayed if ROCK inhibition altered the expression of genes known to be involved in cisplatin resistance. Our studies indicate that ROCK inhibition results in increased cell survival, acquired chemoresistance, and enhanced tumor survival following cisplatin cytotoxicity, due in part to altered expression of cisplatin resistance genes. These findings suggest that ROCK inhibition in combination with cisplatin chemotherapy may lead to enhanced tumor chemoresistance in neuroblastoma. PMID:20878077

  12. Pharmacological inhibition of Rho-kinase (ROCK) signaling enhances cisplatin resistance in neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    STREET, CATHARINE A.; ROUTHIER, ALISSA A.; SPENCER, CARRIE; PERKINS, ASHLEY L.; MASTERJOHN, KATHERINE; HACKATHORN, ALEXANDER; MONTALVO, JOHN; DENNSTEDT, EMILY A.; BRYAN, BRAD A.

    2011-01-01

    The role of the RhoA/Rho kinase (ROCK) signaling pathway in cell survival remains a very controversial issue, with its activation being pro-apoptotic in many cell types and anti-apoptotic in others. To test if ROCK inhibition contributes to tumor cell survival or death following chemotherapy, we treated cisplatin damaged neuroblastoma cells with a pharmacological ROCK inhibitor (Y27632) or sham, and monitored cell survival, accumulation of a chemoresistant phenotype, and in vivo tumor formation. Additionally, we assayed if ROCK inhibition altered the expression of genes known to be involved in cisplatin resistance. Our studies indicate that ROCK inhibition results in increased cell survival, acquired chemoresistance, and enhanced tumor survival following cisplatin cytotoxicity, due in part to altered expression of cisplatin resistance genes. These findings suggest that ROCK inhibition in combination with cisplatin chemotherapy may lead to enhanced tumor chemoresistance in neuroblastoma. PMID:20878077

  13. PD-1 Increases PTEN Phosphatase Activity While Decreasing PTEN Protein Stability by Inhibiting Casein Kinase 2

    PubMed Central

    Patsoukis, Nikolaos; Li, Lequn; Sari, Duygu; Petkova, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Programmed death 1 (PD-1) is a potent inhibitor of T cell responses. PD-1 abrogates activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway, but the mechanism remains unclear. We determined that during T cell receptor (TCR)/CD3- and CD28-mediated stimulation, PTEN is phosphorylated by casein kinase 2 (CK2) in the Ser380-Thr382-Thr383 cluster within the C-terminal regulatory domain, which stabilizes PTEN, resulting in increased protein abundance but suppressed PTEN phosphatase activity. PD-1 inhibited the stabilizing phosphorylation of the Ser380-Thr382-Thr383 cluster within the C-terminal domain of PTEN, thereby resulting in ubiquitin-dependent degradation and diminished abundance of PTEN protein but increased PTEN phosphatase activity. These effects on PTEN were secondary to PD-1-mediated inhibition of CK2 and were recapitulated by pharmacologic inhibition of CK2 during TCR/CD3- and CD28-mediated stimulation without PD-1. Furthermore, PD-1-mediated diminished abundance of PTEN was reversed by inhibition of ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation. Our results identify CK2 as a new target of PD-1 and reveal an unexpected mechanism by which PD-1 decreases PTEN protein expression while increasing PTEN activity, thereby inhibiting the PI3K/Akt signaling axis. PMID:23732914

  14. Lithium potentiates GSK-3β activity by inhibiting phosphoinositide 3-kinase-mediated Akt phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Nie; Kanno, Takeshi; Jin, Yu; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2014-07-18

    Accumulating evidence has pointed to the direct inhibitory action of lithium, an anti-depressant, on GSK-3β. The present study investigated further insight into lithium signaling pathways. In the cell-free assay Li2CO3 significantly inhibited phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-mediated phosphorylation of Akt1 at Ser473, but Li2CO3 did not affect PI3K-mediated PI(3,4,5)P3 production and 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1)-mediated phosphorylation of Akt1 at Thr308. This indicates that lithium could enhance GSK-3β activity by suppressing Akt-mediated Ser9 phosphorylation of GSK-3β in association with inhibition of PI3K-mediated Akt activation. There was no direct effect of Li2CO3 on Akt1-induced phosphorylation of GSK-3β at Ser9, but otherwise Li2CO3 significantly reduced GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation of β-catenin at Ser33/37 and Thr41. This indicates that lithium directly inhibits GSK-3β in an Akt-independent manner. In rat hippocampal slices Li2CO3 significantly inhibited phosphorylation of Akt1/2 at Ser473/474, GSK-3β at Ser9, and β-catenin at Ser33/37 and Thr41. Taken together, these results indicate that lithium exerts its potentiating and inhibiting bidirectional actions on GSK-3β activity. PMID:24950409

  15. Biologic sequelae of I{kappa}B kinase (IKK) inhibition in multiple myeloma: therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Hideshima, Teru; Chauhan, Dharminder; Kiziltepe, Tanyel; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Okawa, Yutaka; Podar, Klaus; Raje, Noopur; Protopopov, Alexei; Munshi, Nikhil C; Richardson, Paul G; Carrasco, Ruben D; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2009-05-21

    Nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) has an important role in multiple myeloma (MM) cell pathogenesis in the context of the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment. In NF-kappaB signaling cascades, IkappaB kinase alpha (IKKalpha) and IKKbeta are key molecules that predominantly mediate noncanonical and canonical pathways, respectively. In this study, we examined the biologic sequelae of the inhibition of IKKalpha versus IKKbeta in MM cell lines. All MM cell lines have constitutive canonical NF-kappaB activity, and a subset of MM cell lines shows noncanonical NF-kappaB activity. Adhesion to BM stromal cells further activates both canonical and noncanonical NF-kappaB activity. IKKbeta inhibitor MLN120B blocks canonical pathway and growth of MM cell lines but does not inhibit the noncanonical NF-kappaB pathway. Although IKKalpha knockdown induces significant growth inhibition in the cell lines with both canonical and noncanonical pathways, it does not inhibit NF-kappaB activation. Importantly, IKKalpha down-regulation decreases expression of beta-catenin and aurora-A, which are known to mediate MM cell growth and survival. Finally, IKKbeta inhibitor enhances the growth inhibition triggered by IKKalpha down-regulation in MM cells with both canonical and noncanonical NF-kappaB activity. Combination therapy targeting these kinases therefore represents a promising treatment strategy in MM. PMID:19270264

  16. Estradiol rapidly modulates spinogenesis in hippocampal dentate gyrus: Involvement of kinase networks.

    PubMed

    Hojo, Yasushi; Munetomo, Arisa; Mukai, Hideo; Ikeda, Muneki; Sato, Rei; Hatanaka, Yusuke; Murakami, Gen; Komatsuzaki, Yoshimasa; Kimoto, Tetsuya; Kawato, Suguru

    2015-08-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Estradiol and cognition". Estradiol (E2) is locally synthesized within the hippocampus and the gonads. Rapid modulation of hippocampal synaptic plasticity by E2 is essential for synaptic regulation. The molecular mechanisms of modulation through the synaptic estrogen receptor (ER) and its downstream signaling, however, are largely unknown in the dentate gyrus (DG). We investigated the E2-induced modulation of dendritic spines in male adult rat hippocampal slices by imaging Lucifer Yellow-injected DG granule cells. Treatments with 1 nM E2 increased the density of spines by approximately 1.4-fold within 2h. Spine head diameter analysis showed that the density of middle-head spines (0.4-0.5 μm) was significantly increased. The E2-induced spine density increase was suppressed by blocking Erk MAPK, PKA, PKC and LIMK. These suppressive effects by kinase inhibitors are not non-specific ones because the GSK-3β antagonist did not inhibit E2-induced spine increase. The ER antagonist ICI 182,780 also blocked the E2-induced spine increase. Taken together, these results suggest that E2 rapidly increases the density of spines through kinase networks that are driven by synaptic ER. PMID:26122288

  17. 1,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrazoles: identification of a potent Aurora kinase inhibitor with a favorable antitumor kinase inhibition profile.

    PubMed

    Fancelli, Daniele; Moll, Jürgen; Varasi, Mario; Bravo, Rodrigo; Artico, Roberta; Berta, Daniela; Bindi, Simona; Cameron, Alexander; Candiani, Ilaria; Cappella, Paolo; Carpinelli, Patrizia; Croci, Walter; Forte, Barbara; Giorgini, Maria Laura; Klapwijk, Jan; Marsiglio, Aurelio; Pesenti, Enrico; Rocchetti, Maurizio; Roletto, Fulvia; Severino, Dino; Soncini, Chiara; Storici, Paola; Tonani, Roberto; Zugnoni, Paola; Vianello, Paola

    2006-11-30

    The optimization of a series of 5-phenylacetyl 1,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrazole derivatives toward the inhibition of Aurora kinases led to the identification of compound 9d. This is a potent inhibitor of Aurora kinases that also shows low nanomolar potency against additional anticancer kinase targets. Based on its high antiproliferative activity on different cancer cell lines, favorable chemico-physical and pharmacokinetic properties, and high efficacy in in vivo tumor models, compound 9d was ultimately selected for further development. PMID:17125279

  18. Insulin Receptor Substrate 2-mediated Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase Signaling Selectively Inhibits Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β to Regulate Aerobic Glycolysis*

    PubMed Central

    Landis, Justine; Shaw, Leslie M.

    2014-01-01

    Insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) and IRS-2 are cytoplasmic adaptor proteins that mediate the activation of signaling pathways in response to ligand stimulation of upstream cell surface receptors. Despite sharing a high level of homology and the ability to activate PI3K, only Irs-2 positively regulates aerobic glycolysis in mammary tumor cells. To determine the contribution of Irs-2-dependent PI3K signaling to this selective regulation, we generated an Irs-2 mutant deficient in the recruitment of PI3K. We identified four tyrosine residues (Tyr-649, Tyr-671, Tyr-734, and Tyr-814) that are essential for the association of PI3K with Irs-2 and demonstrate that combined mutation of these tyrosines inhibits glucose uptake and lactate production, two measures of aerobic glycolysis. Irs-2-dependent activation of PI3K regulates the phosphorylation of specific Akt substrates, most notably glycogen synthase kinase 3β (Gsk-3β). Inhibition of Gsk-3β by Irs-2-dependent PI3K signaling promotes glucose uptake and aerobic glycolysis. The regulation of unique subsets of Akt substrates by Irs-1 and Irs-2 may explain their non-redundant roles in mammary tumor biology. Taken together, our study reveals a novel mechanism by which Irs-2 signaling preferentially regulates tumor cell metabolism and adds to our understanding of how this adaptor protein contributes to breast cancer progression. PMID:24811175

  19. Inhibition of Pim1 kinase, new therapeutic approach in virus-induced asthma exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Vries, Maaike de; Bedke, Nicole; Smithers, Natalie P; Loxham, Matthew; Howarth, Peter H; Nawijn, Martijn C; Davies, Donna E

    2016-03-01

    Therapeutic options to treat virus-induced asthma exacerbations are limited and urgently needed. Therefore, we tested Pim1 kinase as potential therapeutic target in human rhinovirus (HRV) infections. We hypothesised that inhibition of Pim1 kinase reduces HRV replication by augmenting the interferon-induced anti-viral response due to increased activity of the janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) pathway.Air-liquid interface (ALI) cultures of primary bronchial epithelial cells (PBECs) from healthy individuals and moderate-to-severe asthmatic volunteers were infected with HRV-16 with or without a specific Pim1 inhibitor; viral replication and induction of anti-viral responses were measured using RT-qPCR. Viral titres were measured by 50% tissue culture infective dose and release of interferon-γ-induced protein 10 (IP-10) and RANTES protein assessed by ELISA. Phosphorylation of STAT-1 was determined using western blotting.Viral replication was reduced in ALI cultures of healthy and asthmatic PBECs treated with the Pim1 inhibitor. Using cultures from healthy donors, enhanced STAT-1 phosphorylation upon inhibition of Pim1 kinase activity resulted in increased mRNA expression of interferon-β, interleukin-29, IP-10 and RANTES 12 h after infection and increased protein levels of IP-10 and RANTES 24 h after infection.We have identified Pim1 kinase as novel target to reduce viral replication in ALI cultures of PBECs. This may open new avenues for therapeutic interventions in virus-induced asthma exacerbations. PMID:26869670

  20. TRPM6 kinase activity regulates TRPM7 trafficking and inhibits cellular growth under hypomagnesic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Brandao, Katherine; Deason-Towne, Francina; Zhao, Xiaoyun; Perraud, Anne-Laure; Schmitz, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    The channel kinases TRPM6 and TRPM7 are both members of the melastatin related transient receptor potential (TRPM) subfamily of ion channels and the only known fusions of an ion channel pore with a kinase domain. TRPM6 and TRPM7 form functional, tetrameric channel complexes at the plasma membrane by heteromerization. TRPM6 was previously shown to cross-phosphorylate TRPM7 on threonine residues, but not vice versa. Genetic studies demonstrated that TRPM6 and TRPM7 fulfill non-redundant functions, and that each channel contributes uniquely to the regulation of Mg2+ homeostasis. Although there are indications that TRPM6 and TRPM7 can influence each other’s cellular distribution and activity, little is known about the functional relationship between these two channel-kinases. In the present study, we examined how TRPM6 kinase activity influences TRPM7 serine phosphorylation, intracellular trafficking, and cell surface expression of TRPM7, as well as Mg2+-dependent cellular growth. We found TRPM7 serine phosphorylation via the TRPM6 kinase, but no TRPM6 serine phosphorylation via the TRPM7 kinase. Intracellular trafficking of TRPM7 was altered in HEK-293 epithelial kidney cells and DT40 B cells in the presence of TRPM6 with intact kinase activity, independently of the availability of extracellular Mg2+, but TRPM6/7 surface labeling experiments indicate comparable levels of the TRPM6/7 channels at the plasma membrane. Furthermore, using a complementation approach in TRPM7-deficient DT40 B-cells, we demonstrated that wildtype TRPM6 inhibited cell growth under hypomagnesic cell culture conditions in cells co-expressing TRPM6 and TRPM7, however co-expression of a TRPM6 kinase dead mutant had no effect – a similar phenotype was also observed in TRPM6/7 co-expressing HEK-293 cells. Our results provide first clues about how heteromer formation between TRPM6 and TRPM7 influences the biological activity of these ion channels. We show that TRPM6 regulates TRPM7 intracellular

  1. Quercetin inhibits a large panel of kinases implicated in cancer cell biology.

    PubMed

    Boly, Rainatou; Gras, Thierry; Lamkami, Touria; Guissou, Pierre; Serteyn, Didier; Kiss, Robert; Dubois, Jacques

    2011-03-01

    Flavonoids are polyphenolic secondary metabolites from plants that possess a common phenylbenzopyrone structure (C6-C3-C6). Depending upon variations in their heterocyclic C-ring, flavonoids are categorised into one of the following groups: flavones, flavonols, flavanones, flavanols, anthocyanidins, isoflavones or chalcones. Flavonols include, among others, the molecules quercetin, myricetin and kaempferol. The anticancer activity of flavonols was first attributed to their electron-donating ability, which comes from the presence of phenolic hydroxyl groups. However, an emerging view is that flavonoids, including quercetin, may also exert modulatory actions in cells by acting through the protein kinase and lipid kinase signalling pathways. Data from the current study showed that 2 μM quercetin, a low concentration that represents less than 10% of its IC50 growth-inhibitory concentration as calculated from the average of eight distinct cancer cell lines, decreased the activity of 16 kinases by more than 80%, including ABL1, Aurora-A, -B, -C, CLK1, FLT3, JAK3, MET, NEK4, NEK9, PAK3, PIM1, RET, FGF-R2, PDGF-Rα and -Rß. Many of these kinases are involved in the control of mitotic processes. Quantitative video microscopy analyses revealed that quercetin displayed strong anti-mitotic activity, leading to cell death. In conclusion, quercetin partly exerts its anticancer activity through the inhibition of the activity of a large set of kinases. Quercetin could be an interesting chemical scaffold from which to generate novel derivatives possessing various types of anti-kinase activities. PMID:21206969

  2. Several herbal compounds in Okinawa plants directly inhibit the oncogenic/aging kinase PAK1.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Binh Cao Quan; Taira, Nozomi; Tawata, Shinkichi

    2014-12-01

    The p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1) is emerging as a promising therapeutic target, and the search for blockers of this oncogenic/aging kinase would be potentially useful for the treatment of various diseases/disorders in the future. Here, we report for the first time the anti-PAK1 activity of compounds derived from three distinct Okinawa plants. 5,6-Dehydrokawain (DK) and dihydro-5,6-dehydrokawain (DDK) from alpinia inhibited directly PAK1 more strongly than mimosine and mimosinol from leucaena. Cucurbitacin I isolated from bitter gourd/melon also exhibited a moderate anti-PAK1 activity. Hispidin, a metabolite of DK, strongly inhibited PAK1 with the IC50 = 5.7 μM. The IC50 of three hispidin derivatives (H1-3) for PAK1 inhibition ranges from 1.2 to 2.0 μM, while mimosine tetrapeptides [mimosine-Phe-Phe-Tyr (MFFY) and mimosine-Phe-Trp-Tyr (MFWY)] inhibit PAK1 at nanomolar level (IC50 of 0.13 and 0.60 μM, respectively). Thus, we hope these derivatives of hispidin and mimosine could be used as potential leading compounds for developing far more potent anti-PAK1 drugs which would be useful for clinical application in the future. PMID:25639302

  3. JAK2 inhibition sensitizes resistant EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma to tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Sizhi P.; Chang, Qing; Mao, Ninghui; Daly, Laura A.; Vogel, Robert; Chan, Tyler; Liu, Shu Hui; Bournazou, Eirini; Schori, Erez; Zhang, Haiying; Brewer, Monica Red; Pao, William; Morris, Luc; Ladanyi, Marc; Arcila, Maria; Manova-Todorova, Katia; de Stanchina, Elisa; Norton, Larry; Levine, Ross L.; Altan-Bonnet, Gregoire; Solit, David; Zinda, Michael; Huszar, Dennis; Lyden, David; Bromberg, Jacqueline F.

    2016-01-01

    Lung adenocarcinomas with mutant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) respond to EGFR-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), but resistance invariably occurs. We found that the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transduction and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway was aberrantly increased in TKI-resistant EGFR-mutant non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. JAK2 inhibition restored sensitivity to the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib in TKI-resistant cell lines and xenograft models of EGFR-mutant TKI-resistant lung cancer. JAK2 inhibition uncoupled EGFR from its negative regulator, suppressor of cytokine signaling 5 (SOCS5), consequently increasing EGFR abundance and restoring the tumor cells’ dependence on EGFR signaling. Furthermore, JAK2 inhibition led to heterodimerization of mutant and wild-type EGFR subunits, the activity of which was then blocked by TKIs. Our results reveal a mechanism whereby JAK2 inhibition overcomes acquired resistance to EGFR inhibitors and support the use of combination therapy with JAK and EGFR inhibitors for the treatment of EGFR-dependent NSCLC. PMID:27025877

  4. Protein kinaseinhibits myocardin-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through the promotion of myocardin phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Li, Weizong; Wang, Nan; Li, Man; Gong, Huiqin; Liao, Xinghua; Yang, Xiaolong; Zhang, Tongcun

    2015-09-01

    Myocardin plays a key role in the development of cardiac hypertrophy. However, the upstream signals that control the stability and transactivity of myocardin remain to be fully understood. The expression of protein kinase Cα (PKCα) also induces cardiac hypertrophy. An essential downstream molecule of PKCα, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, was reported to negatively regulate the activities of myocardin. But, the effect of cooperation between PKCα and myocardin and the potential molecular mechanism by which PKCα regulates myocardin-mediated cardiac hypertrophy are unclear. In this study, a luciferase assay was performed using H9C2 cells transfected with expression plasmids for PKCα and myocardin. Surprisingly, the results showed that PKCα inhibited the transcriptional activity of myocardin. PKCα inhibited myocardin-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, demonstrated by the decrease in cell surface area and fetal gene expression, in cardiomyocyte cells overexpressing PKCα and myocardin. The potential mechanism underlying the inhibition effect of PKCα on the function of myocardin is further explored. PKCα directly promoted the basal phosphorylation of endogenous myocardin at serine and threonine residues. In myocardin-overexpressing cardiomyocyte cells, PKCα induced the excessive phosphorylation of myocardin, resulting in the degradation of myocardin and a transcriptional suppression of hypertrophic genes. These results demonstrated that PKCα inhibits myocardin-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through the promotion of myocardin phosphorylation. PMID:26206583

  5. JAK2 inhibition sensitizes resistant EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma to tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gao, Sizhi P; Chang, Qing; Mao, Ninghui; Daly, Laura A; Vogel, Robert; Chan, Tyler; Liu, Shu Hui; Bournazou, Eirini; Schori, Erez; Zhang, Haiying; Red Brewer, Monica; Pao, William; Morris, Luc; Ladanyi, Marc; Arcila, Maria; Manova-Todorova, Katia; de Stanchina, Elisa; Norton, Larry; Levine, Ross L; Altan-Bonnet, Gregoire; Solit, David; Zinda, Michael; Huszar, Dennis; Lyden, David; Bromberg, Jacqueline F

    2016-01-01

    Lung adenocarcinomas with mutant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) respond to EGFR-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), but resistance invariably occurs. We found that the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transduction and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway was aberrantly increased in TKI-resistant EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. JAK2 inhibition restored sensitivity to the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib in TKI-resistant cell lines and xenograft models of EGFR-mutant TKI-resistant lung cancer. JAK2 inhibition uncoupled EGFR from its negative regulator, suppressor of cytokine signaling 5 (SOCS5), consequently increasing EGFR abundance and restoring the tumor cells' dependence on EGFR signaling. Furthermore, JAK2 inhibition led to heterodimerization of mutant and wild-type EGFR subunits, the activity of which was then blocked by TKIs. Our results reveal a mechanism whereby JAK2 inhibition overcomes acquired resistance to EGFR inhibitors and support the use of combination therapy with JAK and EGFR inhibitors for the treatment of EGFR-dependent NSCLC. PMID:27025877

  6. Mercuric ions inhibit mitogen-activated protein kinase dephosphorylation by inducing reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Haase, Hajo; Engelhardt, Gabriela; Hebel, Silke; Rink, Lothar

    2011-01-01

    Mercury intoxication profoundly affects the immune system, in particular, signal transduction of immune cells. However, the mechanism of the interaction of mercury with cellular signaling pathways, such as mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), remains elusive. Therefore, the objective of this study is to investigate three potential ways in which Hg(2+) ions could inhibit MAPK dephosphorylation in the human T-cell line Jurkat: (1) by direct binding to phosphatases; (2) by releasing cellular zinc (Zn(2+)); and (3) by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hg(2+) causes production of ROS, measured by dihydrorhodamine 123, and triggers ROS-mediated Zn(2+) release, detected with FluoZin-3. Yet, phosphatase-inhibition is not mediated by binding of Zn(2+) or Hg(2+). Rather, phosphatases are inactivated by at least two forms of thiol oxidation; initial inhibition is reversible with reducing agents such as Tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine. Prolonged inhibition leads to non-reversible phosphatase oxidation, presumably oxidizing the cysteine thiol to sulfinic- or sulfonic acid. Notably, phosphatases are a particularly sensitive target for Hg(2+)-induced oxidation, because phosphatase activity is inhibited at concentrations of Hg(2+) that have only minor impact on over all thiol oxidation. This phosphatase inhibition results in augmented, ROS-dependent MAPK phosphorylation. MAPK are important regulators of T-cell function, and MAPK-activation by inhibition of phosphatases seems to be one of the molecular mechanisms by which mercury affects the immune system. PMID:20951154

  7. Annexin V inhibits protein kinase C activity via a mechanism of phospholipid sequestration.

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, T; Mira, J P; Feliers, D; Solito, E; Russo-Marie, F; Oudinet, J P

    1998-01-01

    In this study, we assessed the role of annexin V, a Ca2+-dependent phospholipid-binding protein, as a regulator of protein kinase C (PKC) and characterized its mechanism of inhibition. Several mutants obtained by oligonucleotide site-directed mutagenesis were tested in vitro on PKC activity in cytosolic fractions from Jurkat cells and on purified PKCalpha. Annexin V inhibited phosphorylation of annexin II by endogenous PKC and phosphorylation of myelin basic protein by PKCalpha. In both systems, the use of single Ca2+-binding-site mutants of annexin V led to a partial reversal of inhibition, and the Ca2+-binding site located in the first domain of annexin V was found to have the most important role. An increase in the number of mutated Ca2+-binding sites led to a greater loss of inhibition. These results corroborated those showing the progressive loss of binding of these mutants to phospholipid liposomes. In conclusion, we show that PKC inhibition by annexin V is the consequence of a mechanism involving phospholipid sequestration by annexin V, and that the Ca2+-binding site located in domain 1 of annexin V plays a predominant role in this process. In addition, we show that the R122AIK site, which may act analogously to a PKC-inhibitory pseudosubstrate site, is not involved in PKC inhibition, and that a peptide corresponding to the C-terminal tail of annexin V inhibits PKC activity but to a lesser extent than annexin V itself. PMID:9494097

  8. Kinase Inhibition-Related Adverse Events Predicted from in vitro Kinome and Clinical Trial Data

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xinan; Huang, Yong; Crowson, Matthew; Li, Jianrong; Maitland, Michael L.; Lussier, Yves A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Kinase inhibition is an increasingly popular strategy for pharmacotherapy of human diseases. Although many of these agents have been described as “targeted therapy”, they will typically inhibit multiple kinases with varying potency. Pre-clinical model testing has not predicted the numerous significant toxicities identified during clinical development. The purpose of this study was to develop a bioinformatics-based method to predict specific adverse events (AEs) in humans associated with the inhibition of particular kinase targets (KTs). Methods The AE frequencies of protein kinase inhibitors (PKIs) were curated from three sources (PubMed, Thompson Physician Desk Reference and PharmGKB), and affinities of 38 PKIs for 317 kinases, representing > 50% of the predicted human kinome, were collected from published in vitro assay results. A novel quantitative computational method was developed to predict associations between KTs and AEs that included a whole panel of 71 AEs and 20 PKIs targeting 266 distinct kinases with Kd < 10uM. The method calculated an unbiased, kinome-wide association score via linear algebra on (i) the normalized frequencies of AEs associated with 20 PKIs and (ii) the negative log-transformed dissociation constant of kinases targeted by these PKIs. Finally, a reference standard was calculated by applying Fisher’s exact test to the co-occurrence of indexed Pubmed terms (p≤0.05, and manually verified) for AE and associated kinase targets (AE-KT) pairs from standard literature search techniques. We also evaluated the enrichment of predictions between the quantitative method and the literature search by Fisher’s Exact testing. Results We identified significant associations among already empirically well established pairs of AEs (e.g. diarrhea and rash) and KTs (e.g. EGFR). The following less well recognized AE-KT pairs had similar association scores: diarrhea-(DDR1; ERBB4), rash-ERBB4, and fatigue-(CSF1R; KIT). With no filtering, the

  9. Ribosomal protein mutations induce autophagy through S6 kinase inhibition of the insulin pathway.

    PubMed

    Heijnen, Harry F; van Wijk, Richard; Pereboom, Tamara C; Goos, Yvonne J; Seinen, Cor W; van Oirschot, Brigitte A; van Dooren, Rowie; Gastou, Marc; Giles, Rachel H; van Solinge, Wouter; Kuijpers, Taco W; Gazda, Hanna T; Bierings, Marc B; Da Costa, Lydie; MacInnes, Alyson W

    2014-01-01

    Mutations affecting the ribosome lead to several diseases known as ribosomopathies, with phenotypes that include growth defects, cytopenia, and bone marrow failure. Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), for example, is a pure red cell aplasia linked to the mutation of ribosomal protein (RP) genes. Here we show the knock-down of the DBA-linked RPS19 gene induces the cellular self-digestion process of autophagy, a pathway critical for proper hematopoiesis. We also observe an increase of autophagy in cells derived from DBA patients, in CD34+ erythrocyte progenitor cells with RPS19 knock down, in the red blood cells of zebrafish embryos with RP-deficiency, and in cells from patients with Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS). The loss of RPs in all these models results in a marked increase in S6 kinase phosphorylation that we find is triggered by an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). We show that this increase in S6 kinase phosphorylation inhibits the insulin pathway and AKT phosphorylation activity through a mechanism reminiscent of insulin resistance. While stimulating RP-deficient cells with insulin reduces autophagy, antioxidant treatment reduces S6 kinase phosphorylation, autophagy, and stabilization of the p53 tumor suppressor. Our data suggest that RP loss promotes the aberrant activation of both S6 kinase and p53 by increasing intracellular ROS levels. The deregulation of these signaling pathways is likely playing a major role in the pathophysiology of ribosomopathies. PMID:24875531

  10. Inhibition of Fast Axonal Transport by Pathogenic SOD1 Involves Activation of p38 MAP Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Morfini, Gerardo A.; Bosco, Daryl A.; Brown, Hannah; Gatto, Rodolfo; Kaminska, Agnieszka; Song, Yuyu; Molla, Linda; Baker, Lisa; Marangoni, M. Natalia; Berth, Sarah; Tavassoli, Ehsan; Bagnato, Carolina; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Hayward, Lawrence J.; Pigino, Gustavo F.; Watterson, D. Martin; Huang, Chun-Fang; Banker, Gary; Brown, Robert H.; Brady, Scott T.

    2013-01-01

    Dying-back degeneration of motor neuron axons represents an established feature of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS) associated with superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutations, but axon-autonomous effects of pathogenic SOD1 remained undefined. Characteristics of motor neurons affected in FALS include abnormal kinase activation, aberrant neurofilament phosphorylation, and fast axonal transport (FAT) deficits, but functional relationships among these pathogenic events were unclear. Experiments in isolated squid axoplasm reveal that FALS-related SOD1 mutant polypeptides inhibit FAT through a mechanism involving a p38 mitogen activated protein kinase pathway. Mutant SOD1 activated neuronal p38 in mouse spinal cord, neuroblastoma cells and squid axoplasm. Active p38 MAP kinase phosphorylated kinesin-1, and this phosphorylation event inhibited kinesin-1. Finally, vesicle motility assays revealed previously unrecognized, isoform-specific effects of p38 on FAT. Axon-autonomous activation of the p38 pathway represents a novel gain of toxic function for FALS-linked SOD1 proteins consistent with the dying-back pattern of neurodegeneration characteristic of ALS. PMID:23776455

  11. GNF-2 Inhibits Dengue Virus by Targeting Abl Kinases and the Viral E Protein.

    PubMed

    Clark, Margaret J; Miduturu, Chandra; Schmidt, Aaron G; Zhu, Xuling; Pitts, Jared D; Wang, Jinhua; Potisopon, Supanee; Zhang, Jianming; Wojciechowski, Amy; Hann Chu, Justin Jang; Gray, Nathanael S; Yang, Priscilla L

    2016-04-21

    Dengue virus infects more than 300 million people annually, yet there is no widely protective vaccine or drugs against the virus. Efforts to develop antivirals against classical targets such as the viral protease and polymerase have not yielded drugs that have advanced to the clinic. Here, we show that the allosteric Abl kinase inhibitor GNF-2 interferes with dengue virus replication via activity mediated by cellular Abl kinases but additionally blocks viral entry via an Abl-independent mechanism. To characterize this newly discovered antiviral activity, we developed disubstituted pyrimidines that block dengue virus entry with structure-activity relationships distinct from those driving kinase inhibition. We demonstrate that biotin- and fluorophore-conjugated derivatives of GNF-2 interact with the dengue glycoprotein, E, in the pre-fusion conformation that exists on the virion surface, and that this interaction inhibits viral entry. This study establishes GNF-2 as an antiviral compound with polypharmacological activity and provides "lead" compounds for further optimization efforts. PMID:27105280

  12. Preclinical efficacy of maternal embryonic leucine-zipper kinase (MELK) inhibition in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Alachkar, Houda; Mutonga, Martin B G; Metzeler, Klaus H; Fulton, Noreen; Malnassy, Gregory; Herold, Tobias; Spiekermann, Karsten; Bohlander, Stefan K; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Matsuo, Yo; Stock, Wendy; Nakamura, Yusuke

    2014-12-15

    Maternal embryonic leucine-zipper kinase (MELK), which was reported to be frequently up-regulated in various types of solid cancer, plays critical roles in formation and maintenance of cancer stem cells. However, little is known about the relevance of this kinase in hematologic malignancies. Here we report characterization of possible roles of MELK in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). MELK is expressed in AML cell lines and AML blasts with higher levels in less differentiated cells. MELK is frequently upregulated in AML with complex karyotypes and is associated with worse clinical outcome. MELK knockdown resulted in growth inhibition and apoptosis of leukemic cells. Hence, we investigated the potent anti-leukemia activity of OTS167, a small molecule MELK kinase inhibitor, in AML, and found that the compound induced cell differentiation and apoptosis as well as decreased migration of AML cells. MELK expression was positively correlated with the expression of FOXM1 as well as its downstream target genes. Furthermore, MELK inhibition resulted in downregulation of FOXM1 activity and the expression of its downstream targets. Taken together, and given that OTS167 is undergoing a phase I clinical trial in solid cancer, our study warrants clinical evaluation of this compound as a novel targeted therapy for AML patients. PMID:25365263

  13. Enhanced Degradation of Dihydrofolate Reductase through Inhibition of NAD Kinase by Nicotinamide Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yi-Ching; Tedeschi, Philip; AdeBisi Lawal, Rialnat; Banerjee, Debabrata; Scotto, Kathleen; Kerrigan, John E.; Lee, Kuo-Chieh; Johnson-Farley, Nadine; Bertino, Joseph R.

    2013-01-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), because of its essential role in DNA synthesis, has been targeted for the treatment of a wide variety of human diseases, including cancer, autoimmune diseases, and infectious diseases. Methotrexate (MTX), a tight binding inhibitor of DHFR, is one of the most widely used drugs in cancer treatment and is especially effective in the treatment of acute lymphocytic leukemia, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, and osteosarcoma. Limitations to its use in cancer include natural resistance and acquired resistance due to decreased cellular uptake and decreased retention due to impaired polyglutamylate formation and toxicity at higher doses. Here, we describe a novel mechanism to induce DHFR degradation through cofactor depletion in neoplastic cells by inhibition of NAD kinase, the only enzyme responsible for generating NADP, which is rapidly converted to NADPH by dehydrogenases/reductases. We identified an inhibitor of NAD kinase, thionicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPS), which led to accelerated degradation of DHFR and to inhibition of cancer cell growth. Of importance, combination treatment of NADPS with MTX displayed significant synergy in a metastatic colon cancer cell line and was effective in a MTX-transport resistant leukemic cell line. We suggest that NAD kinase is a valid target for further inhibitor development for cancer treatment. PMID:23197646

  14. Pranlukast inhibits renal epithelial cyst progression via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Pathomthongtaweechai, Nutthapoom; Soodvilai, Sunhapas; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj; Muanprasat, Chatchai

    2014-02-01

    Cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 1 (CysLT1 receptor) antagonists were found to inhibit chloride secretion in human airway epithelial cells. Since chloride secretion in renal epithelial cells, which shares common mechanisms with airway epithelial cells, plays important roles in renal cyst progression in polycystic kidney disease (PKD), this study was aimed to investigate effects of drugs acting as CysLT1 receptor antagonists on renal cyst progression and its underlying mechanisms. Effects of CysLT1 receptor antagonists on renal cyst growth and formation were determined using Madine Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cyst models. Mechanisms of actions of CysLT1 receptor antagonists were determined using short-circuit current measurement, assays of cell viability and cell proliferation, and immunoblot analysis of signaling proteins. Of the three drugs acting as CysLT1 receptor antagonists (montelukast, pranlukast and zafirlukast) tested, pranlukast was the most promising drug that inhibited MDCK cyst growth and formation without affecting cell viability. Its effect was independent of the inhibition of CysLT1 receptors. Instead, it reduced cAMP-activated chloride secretion and proliferation of MDCK cells in an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent manner and had no effect on CFTR protein expression. Interestingly, pranlukast enhanced AMPK activation via calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase beta (CaMKKβ) with consequent activation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. These results indicate that pranlukast retards renal epithelial cyst progression by inhibiting cAMP-activated chloride secretion and cell proliferation via CaMKKβ-AMPK-mTOR pathway. Therefore, pranlukast represents a class of known drugs that may have potential utility in PKD treatment. PMID:24360935

  15. Inhibition of Survivin and Aurora B Kinase Sensitizes Mesothelioma Cells by Enhancing Mitotic Arrests

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kwang Woon; Mutter, Robert W.; Willey, Christopher D.; Subhawong, Ty K.; Shinohara, Eric T.; Albert, Jeffrey M.; Ling Geng; Cao, Carolyn; Gi, Young Jin; Bo Lu . E-mail: bo.lu@vanderbilt.edu

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: Survivin, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis gene family, has also been shown to regulate mitosis. It binds Aurora B kinase and the inner centromere protein to form the chromosome passenger complex. Both Aurora B and survivin are overexpressed in many tumors. In this study, we examined whether irradiation affected survivin and Aurora B expression in mesothelioma cells, and how inhibition of these molecules affected radiosensitivity. Methods and Materials: ZM447439 and survivin antisense oligonucleotides were used to inhibit survivin and Aurora B kinase respectively. Western blot was performed to determine the expression of survivin, Aurora B, phosphorylated-histone H3 (Ser 10), and caspase cleavage. Multinucleated cells were counted using flow cytometry, and cell survival after treatment was determined using clonogenic assay. Results: At 3-Gy irradiation an increase was observed in levels of survivin and Aurora B as well as the kinase activity of Aurora B, with an increase in G2/M phase. The radiation-induced upregulation of these molecules was effectively attenuated by antisense oligonucleotides against survivin and a small-molecule inhibitor of Aurora B, ZM447439. Dual inhibition of survivin and Aurora B synergistically radiosensitized mesothelioma cells with a dose enhancement ratio of 2.55. This treatment resulted in increased formation of multinucleated cells after irradiation but did not increase levels of cleaved caspase 3. Conclusion: Inhibition of survivin and Aurora B induces mitotic cell arrest in mesothelioma cells after irradiation. These two proteins may be potential therapeutic targets for the enhancement of radiotherapy in malignant pleural mesothelioma.

  16. Policosanol inhibits cholesterol synthesis in hepatoma cells by activation of AMP-kinase.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dev K; Li, Li; Porter, Todd D

    2006-09-01

    Policosanol is a mixture of long-chain primary alcohols that has been shown to decrease serum cholesterol in animals and in humans. The hypocholesterolemic effect results from a decrease in cholesterol synthesis by suppression of HMG-CoA reductase activity, but the mechanism of this suppression and the active components of policosanol have not been established. In the present study, we investigated the ability of policosanol and its principal components to inhibit cholesterol synthesis in cultured rat hepatoma cells. Maximal inhibition by policosanol yielded a 30% decrease in [(14)C]acetate incorporation without evidence of cellular toxicity. Octacosanol (C28, the major constituent of policosanol), heptacosanol (C27), and hexacosanol (C26) yielded smaller and statistically insignificant decreases in cholesterol synthesis, whereas triacontanol (1-hydroxytriacontane; C30) replicated the inhibition obtained with policosanol. At pharmacological concentrations (<5 microg/ml), policosanol and triacontanol decreased [(14)C]acetate incorporation into cholesterol without affecting the incorporation of [(14)C]mevalonate, indicating that these compounds act at or above HMG-CoA reductase. Policosanol and triacontanol did not directly inhibit HMG-CoA reductase, and incubation of these compounds with hepatoma cells did not affect reductase enzyme levels. However, reductase activity was decreased by up to 55% in lysates prepared from these cells, suggesting that HMG-CoA reductase activity was down-regulated by policosanol treatment. Consistent with this hypothesis, a 3-fold increase in AMP-kinase phosphorylation was noted in policosanol-treated cells. Because AMP-kinase is activated by phosphorylation and is well established to suppress HMG-CoA reductase activity, these results suggest that policosanol or a metabolite decreases HMG-CoA reductase activity by activating AMP-kinase. PMID:16714400

  17. A Dopamine- and Protein Kinase A-Dependent Mechanism for Network Adaptation in Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vaquero, C. F.; Pignatelli, A.; Partida, G. J.; Ishida, A. T.

    2011-01-01

    Vertebrates can detect light intensity changes in vastly different photic environments, in part, because post-receptoral neurons undergo “network adaptation”. Previous data implicated dopaminergic, cAMP-dependent inhibition of retinal ganglion cells in this process, yet left unclear how this occurs, and whether this occurs in darkness versus light. To test for light- and dopamine-dependent changes in ganglion cell cAMP levels in situ, we immunostained dark- and light-adapted retinas with anti-cAMP antisera, in the presence and absence of various dopamine receptor ligands. To test for direct effects of dopamine receptor ligands and membrane-permeable protein kinase ligands on ganglion cell excitability, we recorded spikes from isolated ganglion cells in perforated-patch whole-cell mode, before and during application of these agents by microperfusion. Our immunostainings show that light, endogenous dopamine, and exogenous dopamine elevate ganglion cell cAMP levels in situ by activating D1-type dopamine receptors. Our spike recordings show that D1-type agonists and 8-bromo cAMP reduce spike frequency and curtail sustained spike firing, and that these effects entail protein kinase A activation. These effects resemble those of background light on ganglion cell responses to light flashes. Network adaptation could thus be produced, to some extent, by dopaminergic modulation of ganglion cell spike generation, a mechanism distinct from modulation of transmitter release onto ganglion cells or of transmitter-gated currents in ganglion cells. Combining these observations, with results obtained in studies of photoreceptor, bipolar, and horizontal cells, indicates that all three layers of neurons in the retina are equipped with mechanisms for adaptation to ambient light. PMID:11606650

  18. Durability of Kinase-Directed Therapies--A Network Perspective on Response and Resistance.

    PubMed

    Murray, Brion W; Miller, Nichol

    2015-09-01

    Protein kinase-directed cancer therapies yield impressive initial clinical responses, but the benefits are typically transient. Enhancing the durability of clinical response is dependent upon patient selection, using drugs with more effective pharmacology, anticipating mechanisms of drug resistance, and applying concerted drug combinations. Achieving these tenets requires an understanding of the targeted kinase's role in signaling networks, how the network responds to drug perturbation, and patient-to-patient network variations. Protein kinases create sophisticated, malleable signaling networks with fidelity coded into the processes that regulate their presence and function. Robust and reliable signaling is facilitated through network processes (e.g., feedback regulation, and compensatory signaling). The routine use of kinase-directed therapies and advancements in both genomic analysis and tumor cell biology are illuminating the complexity of tumor network biology and its capacity to respond to perturbations. Drug efficacy is attenuated by alterations of the drug target (e.g., steric interference, compensatory activity, and conformational changes), compensatory signaling (bypass mechanisms and phenotype switching), and engagement of other oncogenic capabilities (polygenic disease). Factors influencing anticancer drug response and resistance are examined to define the behavior of kinases in network signaling, mechanisms of drug resistance, drug combinations necessary for durable clinical responses, and strategies to identify mechanisms of drug resistance. PMID:26264276

  19. Combined inhibition of AXL, Lyn and p130Cas kinases block migration of triple negative breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Pénzes, Kinga; Baumann, Christine; Szabadkai, István; Őrfi, László; Kéri, György; Ullrich, Axel; Torka, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Blocking the migration of metastatic cancer cells is a major goal in the therapy of cancer. The receptor tyrosine kinase AXL is one of the main triggers for cancer cell migration in neoplasia of breast, colon, skin, thyroid and prostate. In our study we analyzed the effect of AXL inhibition on cell motility and viability in triple negative breast cancer cell lines overexpressing AXL. Thereby we reveal that the compound BMS777607, exhibiting the lowest IC50 values for inhibition of AXL kinase activity in the studied cell lines, attenuates cell motility to a lower extent than the kinase inhibitors MPCD84111 and SKI606. By analyzing the target kinases of MPCD84111 and SKI606 with kinase profiling assays we identified Lyn, a Src family kinase, as a target of both compounds. Knockdown of Lyn and the migration-related CRK-associated substrate (p130Cas), had a significant inhibitory effect on cell migration. Taken together, our findings highlight the importance of combinatorial or multikinase inhibition of non-receptor tyrosine kinases and AXL receptor tyrosine kinase in the therapy of triple negative breast cancer. PMID:25482942

  20. Protein kinase B/Akt1 inhibits autophagy by down-regulating UVRAG expression

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Wonseok; Ju, Ji-hyun; Lee, Kyung-min; Nam, KeeSoo; Oh, Sunhwa; Shin, Incheol

    2013-02-01

    Autophagy, or autophagocytosis, is a selective intracellular degradative process involving the cell's own lysosomal apparatus. An essential component in cell development, homeostasis, repair and resistance to stress, autophagy may result in either cell death or survival. The targeted region of the cell is sequestered within a membrane structure, the autophagosome, for regulation of the catabolic process. A key factor in both autophagosome formation and autophagosome maturation is a protein encoded by the ultraviolet irradiation resistance-associated gene (UVRAG). Conversely, the serine/threonine-specific protein kinase B (PKB, also known as Akt), which regulates survival in various cancers, inhibits autophagy through mTOR activation. We found that Akt1 may also directly inhibit autophagy by down-regulating UVRAG both in a 293T transient transfection system and breast cancer cells stably expressing Akt1. The UVRAG with mutations at putative Akt1-phosphorylation sites were still inhibited by Akt1, and dominant-negative Akt1 also inhibited UVRAG expression, suggesting that Akt1 down-regulates UVRAG by a kinase activity-independent mechanism. We showed that Akt1 overexpression in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells down-regulated UVRAG transcription. Cells over-expressing Akt1 were more resistant than control cells to ultraviolet light-induced autophagy and exhibited the associated reduction in cell viability. Levels of the autophagosome indicator protein LC3B-II and mRFP-GFP-LC3 were reduced in cells that over-expressing Akt1. Inhibiting Akt1 by siRNA or reintroducing UVRAG gene rescued the level of LC3B-II in UV-irradiation. Altogether, these data suggest that Akt1 may inhibit autophagy by decreasing UVRAG expression, which also sensitizes cancer cells to UV irradiation.

  1. Inhibition of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide

    SciTech Connect

    Toner-Webb, J.; Taylor, S.S.

    1987-11-17

    The hydrophobic carbodiimide dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) has been shown to inhibit the catalytic (C) subunit of adenosine cyclic 3',5'-phosphate dependent protein kinase in a time-dependent, irreversible manner. The rate of inactivation was first order and showed saturation kinetics with an apparent K/sub i/ of 60 ..mu..M. Magnesium adenosine 5'-triphosphate (MgATP) was capable of protecting against this inhibition, whereas neither a synthetic peptide substrate nor histone afforded protection. Mg alone afforded some protection. When the catalytic subunit was aggregated with the regulatory subunit in the holoenzyme complex, no inhibition was observed. The inhibition was enhanced at low pH, suggesting that a carboxylic acid group was the target for interaction with DCCD. On the basis of the protection studies, it is most likely that this carboxylic acid group is associated with the MgATP binding site, perhaps serving as a ligand for the metal. Efforts to identify the site that was modified by DCCD were made. In no case was radioactivity incorporated into the protein, suggesting that the irreversible inhibition was due to an intramolecular cross-link between a reactive carboxylic acid group and a nearby amino group. Differential peptide mapping identified a single peptide that was consistently lost as a consequence of DCCD inhibition. This peptide (residues 166-189) contained four carboxylic acid residues as well as an internal Lys. Two of these carboxyl groups, Asp-166 and Asp-184, are conserved in all protein kinases, including oncogene transforming proteins and growth factor receptors, and thus are likely to play an essential role.

  2. Lithium potentiates GSK-3β activity by inhibiting phosphoinositide 3-kinase-mediated Akt phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Nie; Kanno, Takeshi; Jin, Yu; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Lithium suppresses Akt activity by reducing PI3K-mediated Akt phosphorylation. • Lithium enhances GSK-3β activity by reducing Akt-mediated GSK-3β phosphorylation. • Lithium suppresses GSK-3β activity through its direct inhibition. - Abstract: Accumulating evidence has pointed to the direct inhibitory action of lithium, an anti-depressant, on GSK-3β. The present study investigated further insight into lithium signaling pathways. In the cell-free assay Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} significantly inhibited phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-mediated phosphorylation of Akt1 at Ser473, but Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} did not affect PI3K-mediated PI(3,4,5)P{sub 3} production and 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1)-mediated phosphorylation of Akt1 at Thr308. This indicates that lithium could enhance GSK-3β activity by suppressing Akt-mediated Ser9 phosphorylation of GSK-3β in association with inhibition of PI3K-mediated Akt activation. There was no direct effect of Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} on Akt1-induced phosphorylation of GSK-3β at Ser9, but otherwise Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} significantly reduced GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation of β-catenin at Ser33/37 and Thr41. This indicates that lithium directly inhibits GSK-3β in an Akt-independent manner. In rat hippocampal slices Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} significantly inhibited phosphorylation of Akt1/2 at Ser473/474, GSK-3β at Ser9, and β-catenin at Ser33/37 and Thr41. Taken together, these results indicate that lithium exerts its potentiating and inhibiting bidirectional actions on GSK-3β activity.

  3. Janus kinase inhibition with tofacitinib: changing the face of inflammatory bowel disease treatment.

    PubMed

    Vuitton, Lucine; Koch, Stéphane; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2013-11-01

    The advent of anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) therapy has changed the way of treating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, primary and secondary failure are relatively frequent with all anti-TNF agents, which are available only as parenteral agents. Tofacitinib is an oral janus kinase (JAK) inhibitor that inhibits JAK family kinase members, in particular JAK1 and JAK3, achieving a broad limitation of inflammation by interfering with several cytokine receptors. It first proved its efficacy as an immunosuppressive regimen after renal transplantation, and was recently approved by the FDA for rheumatoid arthritis. First data in IBD are promising, especially in ulcerative colitis. Ongoing clinical trials in both UC and Crohn's disease (CD) are needed to further explore its efficacy in CD and to better assess its safety profile. PMID:23627915

  4. n-Butyrate inhibits Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase activation and cytokine transcription in mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Diakos, Christos; Prieschl, Eva E.; Saeemann, Marcus D.; Boehmig, Georg A.; Csonga, Robert; Sobanov, Yury; Baumruker, Thomas; Zlabinger, Gerhard J. . E-mail: gerhard.zlabinger@meduniwien.ac.at

    2006-10-20

    Mast cells are well known to contribute to type I allergic conditions but only recently have been brought in association with chronic relapsing/remitting autoimmune diseases such as celiac disease and ulcerative colitis. Since the bacterial metabolite n-butyrate is considered to counteract intestinal inflammation we investigated the effects of this short chain fatty acid on mast cell activation. Using RNAse protection assays and reporter gene technology we show that n-butyrate downregulates TNF-{alpha} transcription. This correlates with an impaired activation of the Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) but not other MAP kinases such as ERK and p38 that are largely unaffected by n-butyrate. As a consequence, we observed a decreased nuclear activity of AP-1 and NF-AT transcription factors. These results indicate that n-butyrate inhibits critical inflammatory mediators in mast cells by relatively selectively targeting the JNK signalling.

  5. Disruption of the EF-2 kinase/Hsp90 protein complex: a possible mechanism to inhibit glioblastoma by geldanamycin.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Yang, J M; Iannone, M; Shih, W J; Lin, Y; Hait, W N

    2001-05-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most treatment-resistant brain tumor. Elongation factor-2 (EF-2) kinase (calmodulin kinase III) is a unique protein kinase that is overexpressed in glioma cell lines and in human surgical specimens. Several mitogens activate this kinase and inhibitors block mitogen activation and produce cell death. Geldanamycin (GA) is a benzoquinone ansamycin antibiotic that disrupts Hsp90-protein interactions. Because EF-2 kinase is chaperoned by Hsp90, we investigated the effects of GA on the viability of glioma cells, the expression of EF-2 kinase protein, and the interaction between Hsp90 and EF-2 kinase. GA was a potent inhibitor of the clonogenicity of four glioma cells lines with IC(50)s ranging from 1 to 3 nM. 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), a less toxic and less potent derivative of GA, inhibited the clonogenicity of glioma cells with IC(50) values of 13 nM in C6 cells and 35 nM in T98G cells. Treatment of cell lines for 24-48 h of GA or 17-AAG disrupted EF-2-kinase/Hsp90 interactions as measured by coimmunoprecipitation, resulting in a decreased amount of recoverable kinase in cell lysates. The ability of GA to inhibit the growth of glioma cells was abrogated by overexpressing EF-2 kinase. In addition, 17-AAG significantly inhibited the growth of a glioma xenograft in nude mice. These studies demonstrate for the first time the activity of GAs against human gliomas in vitro and in vivo and suggest that destruction of EF-2 kinase may be an important cytotoxic mechanism of this unique class of drug. PMID:11358819

  6. Anti-myeloma activity of a multi targeted kinase inhibitor, AT9283, via potent Aurora Kinase and STAT3 inhibition either alone or in combination with lenalidomide

    PubMed Central

    Santo, Loredana; Hideshima, Teru; Cirstea, Diana; Bandi, Madhavi; Nelson, Erik A.; Gorgun, Gullu; Rodig, Scott; Vallet, Sonia; Pozzi, Samantha; Patel, Kishan; Unitt, Christine; Squires, Matt; Hu, Yiguo; Chauhan, Dharminder; Mahindra, Anuj; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Raje, Noopur

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Aurora Kinases, whose expression is linked to genetic instability and cellular proliferation, are under investigation as novel therapeutic targets in multiple myeloma (MM). Here, we investigated the preclinical activity of a small molecule–multi-targeted kinase inhibitor, AT9283, with potent activity against Aurora kinase A (AURKA), Aurora kinase B (AURKB) and Janus Kinase 2/3. Experimental design We evaluated the in vitro anti myeloma activity of AT9283 alone and in combination with lenalidomide and the in vivo efficacy by using a Xenograft mouse model of human MM. Results Our data demonstrated AT9283 induced cell growth inhibition and apoptosis in MM. Studying the apoptosis mechanism of AT9283 in MM, we observed features consistent with both AURKA and AURKB inhibition, e.g increase of cells with polyploid DNA content, decrease in phospho-Histone H3, and decrease of phospho-Aurora A. Importantly, AT9283 also inhibited STAT3 tyrosine phosphorylation in MM cells. Genetic depletion of STAT3, AURKA or AURKB showed growth inhibition of MM cells, suggesting a role of AT9283-induced inhibition of these molecules in the underlying mechanism of MM cell death. In vivo studies demonstrated decreased MM cell growth and prolonged survival in AT9283-treated mice compared to controls. Importantly, combination studies of AT9283 with lenalidomide showed significant synergistic cytotoxicity in MM cells, even in the presence of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Enhanced cytotoxicity was associated with increased inhibition of pSTAT3 and pERK. Conclusions Demonstration of in vitro and in vivo anti-MM activity of AT9283 provides the rationale for the clinical evaluation of AT9283 as monotherapy and in combination in patients with MM. PMID:21430070

  7. Inhibition of protein kinase C affects on mode of synaptic vesicle exocytosis due to cholesterol depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, Alexey M. Zakyrjanova, Guzalija F. Yakovleva, Anastasia A. Zefirov, Andrei L.

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • We examine the involvement of PKC in MCD induced synaptic vesicle exocytosis. • PKC inhibitor does not decrease the effect MCD on MEPP frequency. • PKC inhibitor prevents MCD induced FM1-43 unloading. • PKC activation may switch MCD induced exocytosis from kiss-and-run to a full mode. • Inhibition of phospholipase C does not lead to similar change in exocytosis. - Abstract: Previous studies demonstrated that depletion of membrane cholesterol by 10 mM methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MCD) results in increased spontaneous exocytosis at both peripheral and central synapses. Here, we investigated the role of protein kinase C in the enhancement of spontaneous exocytosis at frog motor nerve terminals after cholesterol depletion using electrophysiological and optical methods. Inhibition of the protein kinase C by myristoylated peptide and chelerythrine chloride prevented MCD-induced increases in FM1-43 unloading, whereas the frequency of spontaneous postsynaptic events remained enhanced. The increase in FM1-43 unloading still could be observed if sulforhodamine 101 (the water soluble FM1-43 quencher that can pass through the fusion pore) was added to the extracellular solution. This suggests a possibility that exocytosis of synaptic vesicles under these conditions could occur through the kiss-and-run mechanism with the formation of a transient fusion pore. Inhibition of phospholipase C did not lead to similar change in MCD-induced exocytosis.

  8. Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) inhibition reverses low cell activity on hydrophobic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Yu Shun; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Hyun-Man

    2009-08-28

    Hydrophobic polymers do not offer an adequate scaffold surface for cells to attach, migrate, proliferate, and differentiate. Thus, hydrophobic scaffolds for tissue engineering have traditionally been physicochemically modified to enhance cellular activity. However, modifying the surface by chemical or physical treatment requires supplementary engineering procedures. In the present study, regulation of a cell signal transduction pathway reversed the low cellular activity on a hydrophobic surface without surface modification. Inhibition of Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) by Y-27632 markedly enhanced adhesion, migration, and proliferation of osteoblastic cells cultured on a hydrophobic polystyrene surface. ROCK inhibition regulated cell-cycle-related molecules on the hydrophobic surface. This inhibition also decreased expression of the inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases such as p21{sup cip1} and p27{sup kip1} and increased expression of cyclin A and D. These results indicate that defective cellular activity on the hydrophobic surface can be reversed by the control of a cell signal transduction pathway without physicochemical surface modification.

  9. PI3 Kinase Pathway and MET Inhibition is Efficacious in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Kanteti, Rajani; Riehm, Jacob J; Dhanasingh, Immanuel; Lennon, Frances E; Mirzapoiazova, Tamara; Mambetsariev, Bolot; Kindler, Hedy L; Salgia, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive cancer that is commonly associated with prior asbestos exposure. Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) such as MET and its downstream target PI3K are overexpressed and activated in a majority of MPMs. Here, we studied the combinatorial therapeutic efficacy of the MET/ALK inhibitor crizotinib, with either a pan-class I PI3K inhibitor, BKM120, or with a PI3K/mTOR dual inhibitor, GDC-0980, in mesothelioma. Cell viability results showed that MPM cells were highly sensitive to crizotinib, BKM120 and GDC-0980 when used individually and their combination was more effective in suppressing growth. Treatment of MPM cells with these inhibitors also significantly decreased cell migration, and the combination of them was synergistic. Treatment with BKM120 alone or in combination with crizotinib induced G2-M arrest and apoptosis. Both crizotinib and BKM120 strongly inhibited the activity of MET and PI3K as evidenced by the decreased phosphorylation of MET, AKT and ribosomal S6 kinase. Using a PDX mouse model, we showed that a combination of crizotinib with BKM120 was highly synergetic in inhibiting MPM tumor growth. In conclusion our findings suggest that dual inhibition of PI3K and MET pathway is an effective strategy in treating MPM as compared to a single agent. PMID:27623107

  10. LRRK2 kinase inhibition prevents pathological microglial phagocytosis in response to HIV-1 Tat protein

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1) associated neurocognitive disorders (HANDs) are accompanied by significant morbidity, which persists despite the use of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). While activated microglia play a role in pathogenesis, changes in their immune effector functions, including phagocytosis and proinflammatory signaling pathways, are not well understood. We have identified leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) as a novel regulator of microglial phagocytosis and activation in an in vitro model of HANDs, and hypothesize that LRRK2 kinase inhibition will attenuate microglial activation during HANDs. Methods We treated BV-2 immortalized mouse microglia cells with the HIV-1 trans activator of transcription (Tat) protein in the absence or presence of LRRK2 kinase inhibitor (LRRK2i). We used Western blot, qRT-PCR, immunocytochemistry and latex bead engulfment assays to analyze LRRK2 protein levels, proinflammatory cytokine and phagocytosis receptor expression, LRRK2 cellular distribution and phagocytosis, respectively. Finally, we utilized ex vivo microfluidic chambers containing primary hippocampal neurons and BV-2 microglia cells to investigate microglial phagocytosis of neuronal axons. Results We found that Tat-treatment of BV-2 cells induced kinase activity associated phosphorylation of serine 935 on LRRK2 and caused the formation of cytoplasmic LRRK2 inclusions. LRRK2i decreased Tat-induced phosphorylation of serine 935 on LRRK2 and inhibited the formation of Tat-induced cytoplasmic LRRK2 inclusions. LRRK2i also decreased Tat-induced process extension in BV-2 cells. Furthermore, LRRK2i attenuated Tat-induced cytokine expression and latex bead engulfment. We examined relevant cellular targets in microfluidic chambers and found that Tat-treated BV-2 microglia cells cleared axonal arbor and engulfed neuronal elements, whereas saline treated controls did not. LRRK2i was found to protect axons in the presence of Tat

  11. Inhibiting Polo-like kinase 1 causes growth reduction and apoptosis in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Hartsink-Segers, Stefanie A.; Exalto, Carla; Allen, Matthew; Williamson, Daniel; Clifford, Steven C.; Horstmann, Martin; Caron, Huib N.; Pieters, Rob; Den Boer, Monique L.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated Polo-like kinase 1, a mitotic regulator often over-expressed in solid tumors and adult hematopoietic malignancies, as a potential new target in the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Polo-like kinase 1 protein and Thr210 phosphorylation levels were higher in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n=172) than in normal bone marrow mononuclear cells (n=10) (P<0.0001). High Polo-like kinase 1 protein phosphorylation, but not expression, was associated with a lower probability of event-free survival (P=0.042) and was a borderline significant prognostic factor (P=0.065) in a multivariate analysis including age and initial white blood cell count. Polo-like kinase 1 was necessary for leukemic cell survival, since short hairpin-mediated Polo-like kinase 1 knockdown in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines inhibited cell proliferation by G2/M cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis through caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. Primary patient cells with a high Polo-like kinase 1 protein expression were sensitive to the Polo-like kinase 1-specific inhibitor NMS-P937 in vitro, whereas cells with a low expression and normal bone marrow cells were resistant. This sensitivity was likely not caused by Polo-like kinase 1 mutations, since only one new mutation (Ser335Arg) was found by 454-sequencing of 38 pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases. This mutation did not affect Polo-like kinase 1 expression or NMS-P937 sensitivity. Together, these results indicate a pivotal role for Polo-like kinase 1 in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia and show potential for Polo-like kinase 1-inhibiting drugs as an addition to current treatment strategies for cases expressing high Polo-like kinase 1 levels. PMID:23753023

  12. Inhibition of Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β Improves Tolerance to Ischemia in Hypertrophied Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Barillas, Rodrigo; Friehs, Ingeborg; Cao-Danh, Hung; Martinez, Joseph F.; del Nido, Pedro J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Hypertrophied myocardium is more susceptible to ischemia/reperfusion injury, in part owing to impaired insulin-mediated glucose uptake. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) is a key regulatory enzyme in glucose metabolism that, when activated, phosphorylates/inactivates target enzymes of the insulin signaling pathway. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β is regulated upstream by Akt-1. We sought to determine whether GSK-3β is activated in ischemic hypertrophied myocardium owing to impaired Akt-1 function, and whether inhibition with lithium (Li) or indirubin-3′-monoxime,5-iodo- (IMI), a specific inhibitor, improves post-ischemic myocardial recovery by improving glucose metabolism. Methods Pressure-overload hypertrophy was achieved by aortic banding in neonatal rabbits. At 6 weeks, isolated hypertrophied hearts underwent 30 minutes of normothermic ischemia and reperfusion with or without GSK-3β inhibitor (0.1 mM Li; 1 µM IMI) as cardioplegic additives. Cardiac function was measured before and after ischemia. Expression, activity of Akt-1 and GSK-3β, and lactate were determined at end-ischemia. Results Contractile function after ischemia was better preserved in hypertrophied hearts treated with GSK-3β inhibitors. Activity of Akt-1 was significantly impaired in hypertrophied myocardium at end-ischemia. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β enzymatic activity at end-ischemia was increased in hypertrophied hearts and was blocked by Li or IMI concomitant with significantly increased lactate production, indicating increased glycolysis. Conclusions Regulatory inhibition of GSK-3β by Akt-1 in hypertrophied hearts is impaired, leading to activation during ischemia. Inhibition of GSK-3β by Li or IMI improves tolerance to ischemia/reperfusion injury in hypertrophied myocardium. The likely protective mechanism is an increase in insulin-mediated glucose uptake, resulting in greater substrate availability for glycolysis during ischemia and early reperfusion. PMID:17588398

  13. Protein kinase C regulates tonic GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition in the hippocampus and thalamus

    PubMed Central

    Bright, Damian P; Smart, Trevor G

    2013-01-01

    Tonic inhibition mediated by extrasynaptic GABAA receptors (GABAARs) is an important regulator of neuronal excitability. Phosphorylation by protein kinase C (PKC) provides a key mode of regulation for synaptic GABAARs underlying phasic inhibition; however, less attention has been focused on the plasticity of tonic inhibition and whether this can also be modulated by receptor phosphorylation. To address this issue, we used whole-cell patch clamp recording in acute murine brain slices at both room and physiological temperatures to examine the effects of PKC-mediated phosphorylation on tonic inhibition. Recordings from dentate gyrus granule cells in the hippocampus and dorsal lateral geniculate relay neurons in the thalamus demonstrated that PKC activation caused downregulation of tonic GABAAR-mediated inhibition. Conversely, inhibition of PKC resulted in an increase in tonic GABAAR activity. These findings were corroborated by experiments on human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing recombinant α4β2δ GABAARs, which represent a key extrasynaptic GABAAR isoform in the hippocampus and thalamus. Using bath application of low GABA concentrations to mimic activation by ambient neurotransmitter, we demonstrated a similar inhibition of receptor function following PKC activation at physiological temperature. Live cell imaging revealed that this was correlated with a loss of cell surface GABAARs. The inhibitory effects of PKC activation on α4β2δ GABAAR activity appeared to be mediated by direct phosphorylation at a previously identified site on the β2 subunit, serine 410. These results indicate that PKC-mediated phosphorylation can be an important physiological regulator of tonic GABAAR-mediated inhibition. PMID:24102973

  14. Elongation factor 2 kinase promotes cell survival by inhibiting protein synthesis without inducing autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Claire E.J.; Wang, Xuemin; Xie, Jianling; Pickford, Jo; Barron, John; Regufe da Mota, Sergio; Versele, Matthias; Proud, Christopher G.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase (eEF2K) inhibits the elongation stage of protein synthesis by phosphorylating its only known substrate, eEF2. eEF2K is tightly regulated by nutrient-sensitive signalling pathways. For example, it is inhibited by signalling through mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). It is therefore activated under conditions of nutrient deficiency. Here we show that inhibiting eEF2K or knocking down its expression renders cancer cells sensitive to death under nutrient-starved conditions, and that this is rescued by compounds that block protein synthesis. This implies that eEF2K protects nutrient-deprived cells by inhibiting protein synthesis. Cells in which signalling through mTORC1 is highly active are very sensitive to nutrient withdrawal. Inhibiting mTORC1 protects them. Our data reveal that eEF2K makes a substantial contribution to the cytoprotective effect of mTORC1 inhibition. eEF2K is also reported to promote another potentially cytoprotective process, autophagy. We have used several approaches to test whether inhibition or loss of eEF2K affects autophagy under a variety of conditions. We find no evidence that eEF2K is involved in the activation of autophagy in the cell types we have studied. We conclude that eEF2K protects cancer cells against nutrient starvation by inhibiting protein synthesis rather than by activating autophagy. PMID:26795954

  15. Structural basis for UCN-01 (7-hydroxystaurosporine) specificity and PDK1 (3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1) inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Komander, David; Kular, Gursant S; Bain, Jennifer; Elliott, Matthew; Alessi, Dario R; Van Aalten, Daan M F

    2003-01-01

    PDK1 (3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1) is a member of the AGC (cAMP-dependent, cGMP-dependent, protein kinase C) family of protein kinases, and has a key role in insulin and growth-factor signalling through phosphorylation and subsequent activation of a number of other AGC kinase family members, such as protein kinase B. The staurosporine derivative UCN-01 (7-hydroxystaurosporine) has been reported to be a potent inhibitor for PDK1, and is currently undergoing clinical trials for the treatment of cancer. Here, we report the crystal structures of staurosporine and UCN-01 in complex with the kinase domain of PDK1. We show that, although staurosporine and UCN-01 interact with the PDK1 active site in an overall similar manner, the UCN-01 7-hydroxy group, which is not present in staurosporine, generates direct and water-mediated hydrogen bonds with active-site residues. Inhibition data from UCN-01 tested against a panel of 29 different kinases show a different pattern of inhibition compared with staurosporine. We discuss how these differences in inhibition could be attributed to specific interactions with the additional 7-hydroxy group, as well as the size of the 7-hydroxy-group-binding pocket. This information could lead to opportunities for structure-based optimization of PDK1 inhibitors. PMID:12892559

  16. Sphingosine kinase 1 inhibition sensitizes hormone-resistant prostate cancer to docetaxel.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Lysann; Nunes, Joao; Salunkhe, Vishal; Skalska, Lenka; Kohama, Takafumi; Cuvillier, Olivier; Waxman, Jonathan; Pchejetski, Dmitry

    2009-12-01

    It has recently been shown that docetaxel chemotherapy is effective in prolonging life in patients with prostate cancer (PCa). We have investigated potential ways of increasing the effectiveness of chemotherapy in this disease. We have previously reported that sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) inhibition is a key step in docetaxel-induced apoptosis in the PC-3 PCa cell line and that pharmacologicalSphK1 inhibition is chemosensitizing in the docetaxel-resistant PCa LNCaP cell line. In this study we have addressed the mechanism of docetaxel-induced apoptosis of PC-3 cells and identified SphK1-dependent and -independent components. We have shown that SphK1 inhibition by docetaxel is a two-step process involving an initial loss of enzyme activity followed by a decrease in SphK1 gene expression. Using hormoneresistant PC-3 and DU145 PCa cells we have demonstrated that both pharmacological and siRNA-mediated SphK1 inhibition leads to a four-fold decrease in the docetaxel IC50 dose. This work points out to potential ways of increasing the effectiveness of chemotherapy for PCa by SphK1 inhibition. PMID:19521959

  17. Inhibition of the Aurora A kinase augments the anti-tumor efficacy of oncolytic measles virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Iankov, I D; Kurokawa, C B; D'Assoro, A B; Ingle, J N; Domingo-Musibay, E; Allen, C; Crosby, C M; Nair, A A; Liu, M C; Aderca, I; Federspiel, M J; Galanis, E

    2015-09-01

    Oncolytic measles virus (MV) strains have demonstrated broad spectrum preclinical anti-tumor efficacy, including breast cancer. Aurora A kinase controls mitotic spindle formation and has a critical role in malignant transformation. We hypothesized that the Aurora A kinase inhibitor MLN8237 (alisertib) can increase MV oncolytic effect and efficacy by causing mitotic arrest. Alisertib enhanced MV oncolysis in vitro and significantly improved outcome in vivo against breast cancer xenografts. In a disseminated MDA-231-lu-P4 lung metastatic model, the MV/alisertib combination treatment markedly increased median survival to 82.5 days with 20% of the animals being long-term survivors versus 48 days median survival for the control animals. Similarly, in a pleural effusion model of advanced breast cancer, the MV/alisertib combination significantly improved outcome with a 74.5 day median survival versus the single agent groups (57 and 40 days, respectively). Increased viral gene expression and IL-24 upregulation were demonstrated, representing possible mechanisms for the observed increase in anti-tumor effect. Inhibiting Aurora A kinase with alisertib represents a novel approach to enhance MV-mediated oncolysis and antitumor effect. Both oncolytic MV strains and alisertib are currently tested in clinical trials, this study therefore provides the basis for translational applications of this combinatorial strategy in the treatment of patients with advanced breast cancer. PMID:26272026

  18. Huanglian, A chinese herbal extract, inhibits cell growth by suppressing the expression of cyclin B1 and inhibiting CDC2 kinase activity in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, X K; Motwani, M; Tong, W; Bornmann, W; Schwartz, G K

    2000-12-01

    Huanglian is an herb that is widely used in China for the treatment of gastroenteritis. We elected to determine whether huanglian could inhibit tumor cell growth by modulating molecular events directly associated with the cell cycle. Huanglian inhibited tumor growth and colony formation of gastric, colon, and breast cancer cell lines in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Cell growth was completely inhibited after 3 days of continuous drug exposure to 10 microg/ml of herb. This degree of growth inhibition was significantly greater than that observed with berberine, the major constituent of the herb. The inhibition of cell growth by huanglian was associated with up to 8-fold suppression of cyclin B1 protein. This resulted in complete inhibition of cdc2 kinase activity and accumulation of cells in G(2). The mRNA expression of cyclin B1 was not changed after huanglian treatment. There was no change in the protein expression of cyclins A or E. Therefore, the effect of huanglian on inhibiting tumor growth seems to be mediated by the selective suppression of cyclin B1, which results in the inhibition of cdc2 kinase activity. Inhibition of cyclin dependent kinase (cdk) activity is emerging as an attractive target for cancer chemotherapy. Huanglian represents a class of agents that can inhibit tumor cell growth by directly suppressing the expression of a cyclin subunit that is critical for cell cycle progression. These results indicate that traditional Chinese herbs may represent a new source of agents designed for selective inhibition of cyclin dependent kinases in cancer therapy. PMID:11093765

  19. Noninvasive imaging of cell proliferation following mitogenic extracellular kinase inhibition by PD0325901.

    PubMed

    Leyton, Julius; Smith, Graham; Lees, Mark; Perumal, Meg; Nguyen, Quang-de; Aigbirhio, Franklin I; Golovko, Oksana; He, Quimin; Workman, Paul; Aboagye, Eric O

    2008-09-01

    The mitogenic extracellular kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2) inhibitor, PD0325901, has potent activity in a number of cancer cell types in vitro. In SKMEL-28 human melanoma cells (BRAF mutant), the drug rapidly decreased phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, cyclin D1, and thymidine kinase 1 protein levels. We investigated if 3'-deoxy-3'-[18F]fluorothymidine-positron emission tomography ([18F]FLT-PET) could be used to image changes in cell proliferation following MEK1/2 inhibition in vivo. Mice bearing SKMEL-28 and human colon cancer HCT116 (K-RAS mutant) xenografts were treated daily with PD0325901 at 25 mg/kg and imaged by dynamic [18F]FLT-PET after 1 and 10 days of initiating treatment. The drug decreased tumor [18F]FLT uptake after 1 and 10 days of treatment compared with control animals. The normalized (maximal) [18F]FLT uptake in SKMEL-28 xenografts (at 60 minutes; NUVmax) after 1 day of vehicle or PD0325901 therapy was 1.81 +/- 0.18 versus 1.23 +/- 0.10, respectively (P = 0.03). In this model, NUVmax after 10 days was 2.07 +/- 0.40 versus 1.08 +/- 0.14, respectively (P = 0.03). The corresponding values for HCT116 tumors were 2.30 +/- 0.84 versus 1.88 +/- 0.36 (P = 0.045) after 1 day, and 1.97 +/- 0.13 versus 1.00 +/- 0.03 (P = 0.03) after 10 days. Similar changes were found for other [18F]FLT retention variables. The drug decreased phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, cyclin D1, and thymidine kinase 1 protein. Tumor [18F]FLT-PET variables correlated with proliferation as measured by Ki67 labeling index (r > or = 0.6; P > or = 0.003). In summary, [18F]FLT-PET is a sensitive imaging biomarker for detecting the antiproliferative effect of MEK1/2 inhibition by PD0325901. PMID:18790789

  20. BCL6 enables Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells to survive BCR-ABL1 kinase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Duy, Cihangir; Hurtz, Christian; Shojaee, Seyedmehdi; Cerchietti, Leandro; Geng, Huimin; Swaminathan, Srividya; Klemm, Lars; Kweon, Soo-mi; Nahar, Rahul; Braig, Melanie; Park, Eugene; Kim, Yong-mi; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Herzog, Sebastian; Jumaa, Hassan; Koeffler, H Phillip; Yu, J. Jessica; Heisterkamp, Nora; Graeber, Thomas G.; Wu, Hong; Ye, B. Hilda; Melnick, Ari; Müschen, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) are widely used to treat patients with leukemia driven by BCR-ABL11 and other oncogenic tyrosine kinases2,3. Recent efforts focused on the development of more potent TKI that also inhibit mutant tyrosine kinases4,5. However, even effective TKI typically fail to eradicate leukemia-initiating cells6–8, which often cause recurrence of leukemia after initially successful treatment. Here we report on the discovery of a novel mechanism of drug-resistance, which is based on protective feedback signaling of leukemia cells in response to TKI-treatment. We identified BCL6 as a central component of this drug-resistance pathway and demonstrate that targeted inhibition of BCL6 leads to eradication of drug-resistant and leukemia-initiating subclones. BCL6 is a known proto-oncogene that is often translocated in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL)9. In response to TKI-treatment, BCR-ABL1 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells upregulate BCL6 protein levels by ~90-fold, i.e. to similar levels as in DLBCL (Fig. 1a). Upregulation of BCL6 in response to TKI-treatment represents a novel defense mechanism, which enables leukemia cells to survive TKI-treatment: Previous work suggested that TKI-mediated cell death is largely p53-independent. Here we demonstrate that BCL6 upregulation upon TKI-treatment leads to transcriptional inactivation of the p53 pathway. BCL6-deficient leukemia cells fail to inactivate p53 and are particularly sensitive to TKI-treatment. BCL6−/− leukemia cells are poised to undergo cellular senescence and fail to initiate leukemia in serial transplant recipients. A combination of TKI-treatment and a novel BCL6 peptide inhibitor markedly increased survival of NOD/SCID mice xenografted with patient-derived BCR-ABL1 ALL cells. We propose that dual targeting of oncogenic tyrosine kinases and BCL6-dependent feedback (Supplementary Fig. 1) represents a novel strategy to eradicate drug-resistant and leukemia-initiating subclones in

  1. Hepatocyte growth factor sensitizes brain tumors to c-MET kinase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Farenholtz, Kaitlyn E.; Yang, Yanzhi; Guessous, Fadila; diPierro, Charles G.; Calvert, Valerie S.; Deng, Jianghong; Schiff, David; Xin, Wenjun; Lee, Jae K.; Purow, Benjamin; Christensen, James; Petricoin, Emanuel; Abounader, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) c-MET and its ligand hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) are deregulated and promote malignancy in cancer and brain tumors. Consequently, clinically applicable c-MET inhibitors have been developed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the not well known molecular determinants that predict responsiveness to c-MET inhibitors, and to explore new strategies for improving inhibitor efficacy in brain tumors. Experimental design We investigated the molecular factors and pathway activation signatures that determine sensitivity to c-MET inhibitors in a panel of glioblastoma and medulloblastoma cells, glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs), and established cell line-derived xenografts using functional assays, reverse protein microarrays, and in vivo tumor volume measurements, but validation with animal survival analyses remains to be done. We also explored new approaches for improving the efficacy of the inhibitors in vitro and in vivo. Results We found that HGF co-expression is a key predictor of response to c-MET inhibition among the examined factors, and identified an ERK/JAK/p53 pathway activation signature that differentiates c-MET inhibition in responsive and non-responsive cells. Surprisingly, we also found that short pre-treatment of cells and tumors with exogenous HGF moderately but statistically significantly enhanced the anti-tumor effects of c-MET inhibition. We observed a similar ligand-induced sensitization effect to an EGFR small molecule kinase inhibitor. Conclusions These findings allow the identification of a subset of patients that will be responsive to c-MET inhibition, and propose ligand pre-treatment as a potential new strategy for improving the anti-cancer efficacy of RTK inhibitors. PMID:23386689

  2. Mercuric ions inhibit mitogen-activated protein kinase dephosphorylation by inducing reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Haase, Hajo; Engelhardt, Gabriela; Hebel, Silke; Rink, Lothar

    2011-01-01

    Mercury intoxication profoundly affects the immune system, in particular, signal transduction of immune cells. However, the mechanism of the interaction of mercury with cellular signaling pathways, such as mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), remains elusive. Therefore, the objective of this study is to investigate three potential ways in which Hg{sup 2+} ions could inhibit MAPK dephosphorylation in the human T-cell line Jurkat: (1) by direct binding to phosphatases; (2) by releasing cellular zinc (Zn{sup 2+}); and (3) by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hg{sup 2+} causes production of ROS, measured by dihydrorhodamine 123, and triggers ROS-mediated Zn{sup 2+} release, detected with FluoZin-3. Yet, phosphatase-inhibition is not mediated by binding of Zn{sup 2+} or Hg{sup 2+}. Rather, phosphatases are inactivated by at least two forms of thiol oxidation; initial inhibition is reversible with reducing agents such as Tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine. Prolonged inhibition leads to non-reversible phosphatase oxidation, presumably oxidizing the cysteine thiol to sulfinic- or sulfonic acid. Notably, phosphatases are a particularly sensitive target for Hg{sup 2+}-induced oxidation, because phosphatase activity is inhibited at concentrations of Hg{sup 2+} that have only minor impact on over all thiol oxidation. This phosphatase inhibition results in augmented, ROS-dependent MAPK phosphorylation. MAPK are important regulators of T-cell function, and MAPK-activation by inhibition of phosphatases seems to be one of the molecular mechanisms by which mercury affects the immune system.

  3. Inhibition of myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate (MARCKS) protein inhibits ozone-induced airway neutrophilia and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Damera, Gautam; Jester, William F.; Jiang, Meiqi; Zhao, Hengjiang; Fogle, Homer W.; Mittelman, Michael; Haczku, Angela; Murphy, Edwin; Parikh, Indu; Panettieri, Reynold A.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence suggests inhibition of leukocyte trafficking mitigates, in part, ozone-induced inflammation. In the present study, the authors postulated that inhibition of myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate (MARCKS), an 82-kDa protein with multiple biological roles, could inhibit ozone-induced leukocyte trafficking and cytokine secretions. BALB/c mice (n = 5/cohort) were exposed to ozone (100 ppb) or forced air (FA) for 4 hours. MARCKS-inhibiting peptides, MANS, BIO-11000, BIO-11006, or scrambled control peptide RNS, were intratracheally administered prior to ozone exposure. Ozone selectively enhanced bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) levels of killer cells (KCs; 6 ± 0.9-fold), interleukin-6 (IL-6; 12.7 ± 1.9-fold), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF; 2.1 ± 0.5-fold) as compared to cohorts exposed to FA. Additionally, ozone increased BAL neutrophils by 21% ± 2% with no significant (P > .05) changes in other cell types. MANS, BIO-11000, and BIO-11006 significantly reduced ozone-induced KC secretion by 66% ± 14%, 47% ± 15%, and 71.1% ± 14%, and IL-6 secretion by 69% ± 12%, 40% ± 7%, and 86.1% ± 11%, respectively. Ozone-mediated increases in BAL neutrophils were reduced by MANS (86% ± 7%) and BIO-11006 (84% ± 2.5%), but not BIO-11000. These studies identify for the first time the novel potential of MARCKS protein inhibitors in abrogating ozone-induced increases in neutrophils, cytokines, and chemokines in BAL fluid. BIO-11006 is being developed as a treatment for chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD) and is currently being evaluated in a phase 2 clinical study. PMID:20205598

  4. Inhibition of protein kinase C affects on mode of synaptic vesicle exocytosis due to cholesterol depletion.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Alexey M; Zakyrjanova, Guzalija F; Yakovleva, Anastasia A; Zefirov, Andrei L

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that depletion of membrane cholesterol by 10mM methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MCD) results in increased spontaneous exocytosis at both peripheral and central synapses. Here, we investigated the role of protein kinase C in the enhancement of spontaneous exocytosis at frog motor nerve terminals after cholesterol depletion using electrophysiological and optical methods. Inhibition of the protein kinase C by myristoylated peptide and chelerythrine chloride prevented MCD-induced increases in FM1-43 unloading, whereas the frequency of spontaneous postsynaptic events remained enhanced. The increase in FM1-43 unloading still could be observed if sulforhodamine 101 (the water soluble FM1-43 quencher that can pass through the fusion pore) was added to the extracellular solution. This suggests a possibility that exocytosis of synaptic vesicles under these conditions could occur through the kiss-and-run mechanism with the formation of a transient fusion pore. Inhibition of phospholipase C did not lead to similar change in MCD-induced exocytosis. PMID:25446113

  5. Inflammatory Signaling by NOD-RIPK2 Is Inhibited by Clinically Relevant Type II Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Canning, Peter; Ruan, Qui; Schwerd, Tobias; Hrdinka, Matous; Maki, Jenny L.; Saleh, Danish; Suebsuwong, Chalada; Ray, Soumya; Brennan, Paul E.; Cuny, Gregory D.; Uhlig, Holm H.; Gyrd-Hansen, Mads; Degterev, Alexei; Bullock, Alex N.

    2015-01-01

    Summary RIPK2 mediates pro-inflammatory signaling from the bacterial sensors NOD1 and NOD2, and is an emerging therapeutic target in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. We observed that cellular RIPK2 can be potently inhibited by type II inhibitors that displace the kinase activation segment, whereas ATP-competitive type I inhibition was only poorly effective. The most potent RIPK2 inhibitors were the US Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs ponatinib and regorafenib. Their mechanism of action was independent of NOD2 interaction and involved loss of downstream kinase activation as evidenced by lack of RIPK2 autophosphorylation. Notably, these molecules also blocked RIPK2 ubiquitination and, consequently, inflammatory nuclear factor κB signaling. In monocytes, the inhibitors selectively blocked NOD-dependent tumor necrosis factor production without affecting lipopolysaccharide-dependent pathways. We also determined the first crystal structure of RIPK2 bound to ponatinib, and identified an allosteric site for inhibitor development. These results highlight the potential for type II inhibitors to treat indications of RIPK2 activation as well as inflammation-associated cancers. PMID:26320862

  6. Inhibition of inflammation by a p38 MAP kinase targeted cell permeable peptide.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jing; Meng, Xianmei; He, Junyun; Gu, Jun

    2008-11-01

    p38 MAPK has been the key therapeutic target for multiple inflammation diseases. However, the clinical applications of p38 inhibitors, most of which target on the ATP binding groove in the kinase, have been held back, largely because of their limited specificity and severe side-effects. An alternative strategy to generate highly selective p38 inhibitor is to block the specific interaction in the p38 signal pathway. Based on the hypothesis that specific binding peptides targeting on the docking groove would interfere the intrinsic interaction between p38 and its partners, we have designed a fusion peptide containing 12aa p38 docking sequence derived from MKK3b and 11aa HIV-TAT transmembrane sequence to form a cell permeable peptide. The peptide specifically binds to p38, and aborts its interaction with upstream kinase as well as downstream substrates, and thus to inhibit p38 phosphorylation and its signaling. Furthermore, the induction and secretion of TNFalpha and other inflammatory factors by LPS are blocked in peptide treated cells and mice. Finally the peptide has been shown to significantly inhibit ear oedema in mice. Therefore, the peptide holds great potential as an anti-inflammation agent for the treatment of inflammation and its related diseases. PMID:18991745

  7. Inhibition of Janus activated kinase-3 protects against myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Young-Bin; Ahn, Min; Lee, Sang-Myeong; Koh, Hyoung-Won; Lee, Sun-Hwa; Kim, Suhn Hee; Park, Byung-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have documented that Janus-activated kinase (JAK)–signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway can modulate the apoptotic program in a myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) model. To date, however, limited studies have examined the role of JAK3 on myocardial I/R injury. Here, we investigated the potential effects of pharmacological JAK3 inhibition with JANEX-1 in a myocardial I/R model. Mice were subjected to 45 min of ischemia followed by varying periods of reperfusion. JANEX-1 was injected 1 h before ischemia by intraperitoneal injection. Treatment with JANEX-1 significantly decreased plasma creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase activities, reduced infarct size, reversed I/R-induced functional deterioration of the myocardium and reduced myocardial apoptosis. Histological analysis revealed an increase in neutrophil and macrophage infiltration within the infarcted area, which was markedly reduced by JANEX-1 treatment. In parallel, in in vitro studies where neutrophils and macrophages were treated with JANEX-1 or isolated from JAK3 knockout mice, there was an impairment in the migration potential toward interleukin-8 (IL-8) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), respectively. Of note, however, JANEX-1 did not affect the expression of IL-8 and MCP-1 in the myocardium. The pharmacological inhibition of JAK3 might represent an effective approach to reduce inflammation-mediated apoptotic damage initiated by myocardial I/R injury. PMID:23680658

  8. Inflammatory Signaling by NOD-RIPK2 Is Inhibited by Clinically Relevant Type II Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Canning, Peter; Ruan, Qui; Schwerd, Tobias; Hrdinka, Matous; Maki, Jenny L; Saleh, Danish; Suebsuwong, Chalada; Ray, Soumya; Brennan, Paul E; Cuny, Gregory D; Uhlig, Holm H; Gyrd-Hansen, Mads; Degterev, Alexei; Bullock, Alex N

    2015-09-17

    RIPK2 mediates pro-inflammatory signaling from the bacterial sensors NOD1 and NOD2, and is an emerging therapeutic target in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. We observed that cellular RIPK2 can be potently inhibited by type II inhibitors that displace the kinase activation segment, whereas ATP-competitive type I inhibition was only poorly effective. The most potent RIPK2 inhibitors were the US Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs ponatinib and regorafenib. Their mechanism of action was independent of NOD2 interaction and involved loss of downstream kinase activation as evidenced by lack of RIPK2 autophosphorylation. Notably, these molecules also blocked RIPK2 ubiquitination and, consequently, inflammatory nuclear factor κB signaling. In monocytes, the inhibitors selectively blocked NOD-dependent tumor necrosis factor production without affecting lipopolysaccharide-dependent pathways. We also determined the first crystal structure of RIPK2 bound to ponatinib, and identified an allosteric site for inhibitor development. These results highlight the potential for type II inhibitors to treat indications of RIPK2 activation as well as inflammation-associated cancers. PMID:26320862

  9. Quantitative Proteomics Reveals That Hsp90 Inhibition Preferentially Targets Kinases and the DNA Damage Response*

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Kirti; Vabulas, R. Martin; Macek, Boris; Pinkert, Stefan; Cox, Jürgen; Mann, Matthias; Hartl, F. Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Despite the increasing importance of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitors as chemotherapeutic agents in diseases such as cancer, their global effects on the proteome remain largely unknown. Here we use high resolution, quantitative mass spectrometry to map protein expression changes associated with the application of the Hsp90 inhibitor, 17-(dimethylaminoethylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-DMAG). In depth data obtained from five replicate SILAC experiments enabled accurate quantification of about 6,000 proteins in HeLa cells. As expected, we observed activation of a heat shock response with induced expression of molecular chaperones, which refold misfolded proteins, and proteases, which degrade irreparably damaged polypeptides. Despite the broad range of known Hsp90 substrates, bioinformatics analysis revealed that particular protein classes were preferentially affected. These prominently included proteins involved in the DNA damage response, as well as protein kinases and especially tyrosine kinases. We followed up on this observation with a quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of about 4,000 sites, which revealed that Hsp90 inhibition leads to much more down- than up-regulation of the phosphoproteome (34% down versus 6% up). This study defines the cellular response to Hsp90 inhibition at the proteome level and sheds light on the mechanisms by which it can be used to target cancer cells. PMID:22167270

  10. Mediator Kinase Inhibition Further Activates Super-Enhancer Associated Genes in AML

    PubMed Central

    Nitulescu, Ioana I.; Tangpeerachaikul, Anupong; Poss, Zachary C.; Da Silva, Diogo H.; Caruso, Brittany T.; Arefolov, Alexander; Fadeyi, Olugbeminiyi; Christie, Amanda L.; Du, Karrie; Banka, Deepti; Schneider, Elisabeth V.; Jestel, Anja; Zou, Ge; Si, Chong; Ebmeier, Christopher C.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Krivtsov, Andrei V.; Myers, Andrew G.; Kohl, Nancy E.; Kung, Andrew L.; Armstrong, Scott A.; Lemieux, Madeleine E.; Taatjes, Dylan J.; Shair, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Super-enhancers (SEs), which are composed of large clusters of enhancers densely loaded with the Mediator complex, transcription factors (TFs), and chromatin regulators, drive high expression of genes implicated in cell identity and disease, such as lineage-controlling TFs and oncogenes 1, 2. BRD4 and CDK7 are positive regulators of SE-mediated transcription3,4,5. In contrast, negative regulators of SE-associated genes have not been well described. Here we report that Mediator-associated kinases cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) and CDK19 restrain increased activation of key SE-associated genes in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cells. We determined that the natural product cortistatin A (CA) selectively inhibited Mediator kinases, had antileukaemic activity in vitro and in vivo, and disproportionately induced upregulation of SE-associated genes in CA-sensitive AML cell lines but not in CA-insensitive cell lines. In AML cells, CA upregulated SE-associated genes with tumour suppressor and lineage-controlling functions, including the TFs CEBPA, IRF8, IRF1 and ETV6 6, 7, 8. The BRD4 inhibitor I-BET151 downregulated these SE-associated genes, yet also has antileukaemic activity. Individually increasing or decreasing expression of these TFs suppressed AML cell growth, providing evidence that leukaemia cells are sensitive to dosage of SE-associated genes. Our results demonstrate that Mediator kinases can negatively regulate SE-associated gene expression in specific cell types and can be pharmacologically targeted as a therapeutic approach to AML. PMID:26416749

  11. Mediator kinase inhibition further activates super-enhancer-associated genes in AML.

    PubMed

    Pelish, Henry E; Liau, Brian B; Nitulescu, Ioana I; Tangpeerachaikul, Anupong; Poss, Zachary C; Da Silva, Diogo H; Caruso, Brittany T; Arefolov, Alexander; Fadeyi, Olugbeminiyi; Christie, Amanda L; Du, Karrie; Banka, Deepti; Schneider, Elisabeth V; Jestel, Anja; Zou, Ge; Si, Chong; Ebmeier, Christopher C; Bronson, Roderick T; Krivtsov, Andrei V; Myers, Andrew G; Kohl, Nancy E; Kung, Andrew L; Armstrong, Scott A; Lemieux, Madeleine E; Taatjes, Dylan J; Shair, Matthew D

    2015-10-01

    Super-enhancers (SEs), which are composed of large clusters of enhancers densely loaded with the Mediator complex, transcription factors and chromatin regulators, drive high expression of genes implicated in cell identity and disease, such as lineage-controlling transcription factors and oncogenes. BRD4 and CDK7 are positive regulators of SE-mediated transcription. By contrast, negative regulators of SE-associated genes have not been well described. Here we show that the Mediator-associated kinases cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) and CDK19 restrain increased activation of key SE-associated genes in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cells. We report that the natural product cortistatin A (CA) selectively inhibits Mediator kinases, has anti-leukaemic activity in vitro and in vivo, and disproportionately induces upregulation of SE-associated genes in CA-sensitive AML cell lines but not in CA-insensitive cell lines. In AML cells, CA upregulated SE-associated genes with tumour suppressor and lineage-controlling functions, including the transcription factors CEBPA, IRF8, IRF1 and ETV6 (refs 6-8). The BRD4 inhibitor I-BET151 downregulated these SE-associated genes, yet also has anti-leukaemic activity. Individually increasing or decreasing the expression of these transcription factors suppressed AML cell growth, providing evidence that leukaemia cells are sensitive to the dosage of SE-associated genes. Our results demonstrate that Mediator kinases can negatively regulate SE-associated gene expression in specific cell types, and can be pharmacologically targeted as a therapeutic approach to AML. PMID:26416749

  12. Molecular Mechanism for Inhibition of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 by a Selective RNA Aptamer

    SciTech Connect

    Tesmer, Valerie M.; Lennarz, Sabine; Mayer, Günter; Tesmer, John J.G.

    2012-08-31

    Cardiovascular homeostasis is maintained in part by the rapid desensitization of activated heptahelical receptors that have been phosphorylated by G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2). However, during chronic heart failure GRK2 is upregulated and believed to contribute to disease progression. We have determined crystallographic structures of GRK2 bound to an RNA aptamer that potently and selectively inhibits kinase activity. Key to the mechanism of inhibition is the positioning of an adenine nucleotide into the ATP-binding pocket and interactions with the basic {alpha}F-{alpha}G loop region of the GRK2 kinase domain. Constraints imposed on the RNA by the terminal stem of the aptamer also play a role. These results highlight how a high-affinity aptamer can be used to selectively trap a novel conformational state of a protein kinase.

  13. Molecular mechanism for inhibition of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 by a selective RNA aptamer

    PubMed Central

    Tesmer, Valerie M.; Lennarz, Sabine; Mayer, Günter; Tesmer, John J. G.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Cardiovascular homeostasis is maintained in part by the rapid desensitization of activated heptahelical receptors that have been phosphorylated by G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2). However, during chronic heart failure GRK2 is upregulated and believed to contribute to disease progression. We have determined crystallographic structures of GRK2 bound to an RNA aptamer that potently and selectively inhibits kinase activity. Key to the mechanism of inhibition is the positioning of an adenine nucleotide into the ATP-binding pocket and interactions with the basic αF-αG loop region of the GRK2 kinase domain. Constraints imposed on the RNA by the terminal stem of the aptamer also play a role. These results highlight how a high affinity aptamer can be used to selectively trap a novel conformational state of a protein kinase. PMID:22727813

  14. Hypoxia induces a phase transition within a kinase signaling network in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Shi, Qihui; Remacle, Francoise; Qin, Lidong; Shackelford, David B; Shin, Young Shik; Mischel, Paul S; Levine, R D; Heath, James R

    2013-04-01

    Hypoxia is a near-universal feature of cancer, promoting glycolysis, cellular proliferation, and angiogenesis. The molecular mechanisms of hypoxic signaling have been intensively studied, but the impact of changes in oxygen partial pressure (pO2) on the state of signaling networks is less clear. In a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cancer cell model, we examined the response of signaling networks to targeted pathway inhibition between 21% and 1% pO2. We used a microchip technology that facilitates quantification of a panel of functional proteins from statistical numbers of single cells. We find that near 1.5% pO2, the signaling network associated with mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1)--a critical component of hypoxic signaling and a compelling cancer drug target--is deregulated in a manner such that it will be unresponsive to mTOR kinase inhibitors near 1.5% pO2, but will respond at higher or lower pO2 values. These predictions were validated through experiments on bulk GBM cell line cultures and on neurosphere cultures of a human-origin GBM xenograft tumor. We attempt to understand this behavior through the use of a quantitative version of Le Chatelier's principle, as well as through a steady-state kinetic model of protein interactions, both of which indicate that hypoxia can influence mTORC1 signaling as a switch. The Le Chatelier approach also indicates that this switch may be thought of as a type of phase transition. Our analysis indicates that certain biologically complex cell behaviors may be understood using fundamental, thermodynamics-motivated principles. PMID:23530221

  15. Activation of pp70/85 S6 kinases in interleukin-2-responsive lymphoid cells is mediated by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and inhibited by cyclic AMP.

    PubMed Central

    Monfar, M; Lemon, K P; Grammer, T C; Cheatham, L; Chung, J; Vlahos, C J; Blenis, J

    1995-01-01

    Activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and activation of the 70/85-kDa S6 protein kinases (alpha II and alpha I isoforms, referred to collectively as pp70S6k) have been independently linked to the regulation of cell proliferation. We demonstrate that these kinases lie on the same signalling pathway and that PI3K mediates the activation of pp70 by the cytokine interleukin-2 (IL-2). We also show that the activation of pp70S6k can be blocked at different points along the signalling pathway by using specific inhibitors of T-cell proliferation. Inhibition of PI3K activity with structurally unrelated but highly specific PI3K inhibitors (wortmannin or LY294002) results in inhibition of IL-2-dependent but not phorbol ester (conventional protein kinase C [cPKC])-dependent pp70S6k activation. The T-cell immunosuppressant rapamycin potently antagonizes IL-2-(PI3K)- and phorbol ester (cPKC)-mediated activation of pp70S6k. Thus, wortmannin and rapamycin antagonize IL-2-mediated activation of pp70S6k at distinct points along the PI3K-regulated signalling pathway, or rapamycin antagonizes another pathway required for pp70S6k activity. Agents that raise the concentration of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) and activate cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) also inhibit IL-2-dependent activation of pp70S6k. In this case, inhibition appears to occur at least two points in this signalling path. Like rapamycin, PKA appears to act downstream of cPKC-mediated pp70S6k activation, and like wortmannin, PKA antagonizes IL-2-dependent activation of PI3K. The results with rapamycin and wortmannin are of added interest since the yeast and mammalian rapamycin targets resemble PI3K in the catalytic domain. PMID:7528328

  16. Inhibition of diacylglycerol kinases as a physiological way to promote diacylglycerol signaling.

    PubMed

    Baldanzi, Gianluca

    2014-05-01

    Diacylglycerol is a key regulator of cell physiology, controlling the membrane recruitment and activation of signaling molecules. Accordingly, diacylglycerol generation and metabolism are strictly controlled, allowing for localized regulation of its concentration. While the increased production of diacylglycerol upon receptor triggering is well recognized, the modulation of diacylglycerol metabolism by diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) is less characterized. Some agonists induce DGK activation and recruitment to the plasma membrane, promoting diacylglycerol metabolism to phosphatidic acid. Conversely, several reports indicate that signaling pathways that selectively inhibits DGK isoforms can enhance cellular diacylglycerol levels and signal transduction. For example, the impairment of DGKθ activity by RhoA binding to the catalytic domain represents a conserved mechanism controlling diacylglycerol signaling from Caenorhabditis elegans motoneurons to mammalian hepatocytes. Similarly, DGKα activity is inhibited in lymphocytes by TCR signaling, thus contributing to a rise in diacylglycerol concentration for downstream signaling. Finally, DGKμ activity is inhibited by ischemia-reperfusion-generated reactive oxygen species in airway endothelial cells, promoting diacylglycerol-mediated ion channel opening and edema. In those systems, DGKs provide a gatekeeper function by blunting diacylglycerol levels or possibly establishing permissive domains for diacylglycerol signaling. In this review, I discuss the possible general relevance of DGK inhibition to enhanced diacylglycerol signaling. PMID:24582387

  17. Chemosensitizing effects of sphingosine kinase-1 inhibition in prostate cancer cell and animal models.

    PubMed

    Pchejetski, Dimitri; Doumerc, Nicolas; Golzio, Muriel; Naymark, Maria; Teissié, Justin; Kohama, Takafumi; Waxman, Jonathan; Malavaud, Bernard; Cuvillier, Olivier

    2008-07-01

    We have previously reported that, in prostate cancer, inhibition of the oncogenic sphingosine kinase-1/sphingosine 1-phosphate (SphK1/S1P) pathway is a key element in chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. Here, we show that selective pharmacologic inhibition of SphK1 triggers apoptosis in LNCaP and PC-3 prostate cancer cells, an effect that is reversed by SphK1 enforced expression. More importantly, we show for the first time that the up-regulation of the SphK1/S1P pathway plays a crucial role in the resistance of prostate cancer cells to chemotherapy. Importantly, pharmacologic SphK1 inhibition with the B-5354c compound sensitizes LNCaP and PC-3 cells to docetaxel and camptothecin, respectively. In vivo, camptothecin and B-5354c alone display a limited effect on tumor growth in PC-3 cells, whereas in combination there is a synergy of effect on tumor size with a significant increase in the ceramide to S1P sphingolipid ratio. To conclude, our study highlights the notion that drugs specifically designed to inhibit SphK1 could provide a means of enhancing the effects of conventional treatment through the prosurvival antiapoptotic SphK1/S1P pathway. PMID:18644996

  18. Synthesis and preliminary in vitro kinase inhibition evaluation of new diversely substituted pyrido[3,4-g]quinazoline derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zeinyeh, Wael; Esvan, Yannick J; Nauton, Lionel; Loaëc, Nadège; Meijer, Laurent; Théry, Vincent; Anizon, Fabrice; Giraud, Francis; Moreau, Pascale

    2016-09-01

    The synthesis of new diversely substituted pyrido[3,4-g]quinazolines is described. The inhibitory potencies of prepared compounds toward a panel of five CMGC protein kinases (CDK5, CLK1, DYRK1A, CK1, GSK3), that are known to play a potential role in Alzheimer's disease, were evaluated. The best overall kinase inhibition profile was found for nitro compound 4 bearing an ethyl group at the 5-position. PMID:27469128

  19. Regulation of alveolar macrophage p40phox: hierarchy of activating kinases and their inhibition by PGE2

    PubMed Central

    Bourdonnay, Emilie; Serezani, Carlos H.; Aronoff, David M.; Peters-Golden, Marc

    2012-01-01

    PGE2, produced in the lung during infection with microbes such as Klebsiella pneumoniae, inhibits alveolar macrophage (AM) antimicrobial functions by preventing H2O2 production by NADPH oxidase (NADPHox). Activation of the NADPHox complex is poorly understood in AMs, although in neutrophils it is known to be mediated by kinases including PI3K/Akt, protein kinase C (PKC) δ, p21-activated protein kinase (PAK), casein kinase 2 (CK2), and MAPKs. The p40phox cytosolic subunit of NADPHox has been recently recognized to function as a carrier protein for other subunits and a positive regulator of oxidase activation, a role previously considered unique to another subunit, p47phox. The regulation of p40phox remains poorly understood, and the effect of PGE2 on its activation is completely undefined. We addressed these issues in rat AMs activated with IgG-opsonized K. pneumoniae. The kinetics of kinase activation and the consequences of kinase inhibition and silencing revealed a critical role for a PKCδ-PAK-class I PI3K/Akt1 cascade in the regulation of p40phox activation upon bacterial challenge in AMs; PKCα, ERK, and CK2 were not involved. PGE2 inhibited the activation of p40phox, and its effects were mediated by protein kinase A type II, were independent of interactions with anchoring proteins, and were directed at the distal class I PI3K/Akt1 activation step. Defining the kinases that control AM p40phox activation and that are the targets for inhibition by PGE2 provides new insights into immunoregulation in the infected lung. PMID:22544939

  20. Inhibition of Janus kinase signaling during controlled mechanical ventilation prevents ventilation-induced diaphragm dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ira J.; Godinez, Guillermo L.; Singh, Baljit K.; McCaughey, Kelly M.; Alcantara, Raniel R.; Gururaja, Tarikere; Ho, Melissa S.; Nguyen, Henry N.; Friera, Annabelle M.; White, Kathy A.; McLaughlin, John R.; Hansen, Derek; Romero, Jason M.; Baltgalvis, Kristen A.; Claypool, Mark D.; Li, Wei; Lang, Wayne; Yam, George C.; Gelman, Marina S.; Ding, Rongxian; Yung, Stephanie L.; Creger, Daniel P.; Chen, Yan; Singh, Rajinder; Smuder, Ashley J.; Wiggs, Michael P.; Kwon, Oh-Sung; Sollanek, Kurt J.; Powers, Scott K.; Masuda, Esteban S.; Taylor, Vanessa C.; Payan, Donald G.; Kinoshita, Taisei; Kinsella, Todd M.

    2014-01-01

    Controlled mechanical ventilation (CMV) is associated with the development of diaphragm atrophy and contractile dysfunction, and respiratory muscle weakness is thought to contribute significantly to delayed weaning of patients. Therefore, therapeutic strategies for preventing these processes may have clinical benefit. The aim of the current study was to investigate the role of the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway in CMV-mediated diaphragm wasting and weakness in rats. CMV-induced diaphragm atrophy and contractile dysfunction coincided with marked increases in STAT3 phosphorylation on both tyrosine 705 (Tyr705) and serine 727 (Ser727). STAT3 activation was accompanied by its translocation into mitochondria within diaphragm muscle and mitochondrial dysfunction. Inhibition of JAK signaling during CMV prevented phosphorylation of both target sites on STAT3, eliminated the accumulation of phosphorylated STAT3 within the mitochondria, and reversed the pathologic alterations in mitochondrial function, reduced oxidative stress in the diaphragm, and maintained normal diaphragm contractility. In addition, JAK inhibition during CMV blunted the activation of key proteolytic pathways in the diaphragm, as well as diaphragm atrophy. These findings implicate JAK/STAT3 signaling in the development of diaphragm muscle atrophy and dysfunction during CMV and suggest that the delayed extubation times associated with CMV can be prevented by inhibition of Janus kinase signaling.—Smith, I. J., Godinez, G. L., Singh, B. K., McCaughey, K. M., Alcantara, R. R., Gururaja, T., Ho, M. S., Nguyen, H. N., Friera, A. M., White, K. A., McLaughlin, J. R., Hansen, D., Romero, J. M., Baltgalvis, K. A., Claypool, M. D., Li, W., Lang, W., Yam, G. C., Gelman, M. S., Ding, R., Yung, S. L., Creger, D. P., Chen, Y., Singh, R., Smuder, A. J., Wiggs, M. P., Kwon, O.-S., Sollanek, K. J., Powers, S. K., Masuda, E. S., Taylor, V. C., Payan, D. G

  1. Specific inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase delays preterm labour and reduces mortality.

    PubMed

    Pirianov, Grisha; MacIntyre, David A; Lee, Yun; Waddington, Simon N; Terzidou, Vasso; Mehmet, Huseyin; Bennett, Phillip R

    2015-10-01

    Preterm labour (PTL) is commonly associated with infection and/or inflammation. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from different bacteria can be used to independently or mutually activate Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/AP1- or NF-κB-driven inflammatory pathways that lead to PTL. Previous studies using Salmonella abortus LPS, which activates both JNK/AP-1 and NF-κB, showed that selective inhibition of NF-κB delays labour and improves pup outcome. Where labour is induced using Escherichia coli LPS (O111), which upregulates JNK/AP-1 but not NF-κB, inhibition of JNK/AP-1 activation also delays labour. In this study, to determine the potential role of JNK as a therapeutic target in PTL, we investigated the specific contribution of JNK signalling to S. Abortus LPS-induced PTL in mice. Intrauterine administration of S. Abortus LPS to pregnant mice resulted in the activation of JNK in the maternal uterus and fetal brain, upregulation of pro-inflammatory proteins COX-2, CXCL1, and CCL2, phosphorylation of cPLA2 in myometrium, and induction of PTL. Specific inhibition of JNK by co-administration of specific D-JNK inhibitory peptide (D-JNKI) delayed LPS-induced preterm delivery and reduced fetal mortality. This is associated with inhibition of myometrial cPLA2 phosphorylation and proinflammatory proteins synthesis. In addition, we report that D-JNKI inhibits the activation of JNK/JNK3 and caspase-3, which are important mediators of neural cell death in the neonatal brain. Our data demonstrate that specific inhibition of TLR4-activated JNK signalling pathways has potential as a therapeutic approach in the management of infection/inflammation-associated PTL and prevention of the associated detrimental effects to the neonatal brain. PMID:26183892

  2. Specific inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase delays preterm labour and reduces mortality

    PubMed Central

    Pirianov, Grisha; MacIntyre, David A; Lee, Yun; Waddington, Simon N; Terzidou, Vasso; Mehmet, Huseyin; Bennett, Phillip R

    2015-01-01

    Preterm labour (PTL) is commonly associated with infection and/or inflammation. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from different bacteria can be used to independently or mutually activate Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/AP1- or NF-κB-driven inflammatory pathways that lead to PTL. Previous studies using Salmonella abortus LPS, which activates both JNK/AP-1 and NF-κB, showed that selective inhibition of NF-κB delays labour and improves pup outcome. Where labour is induced using Escherichia coli LPS (O111), which upregulates JNK/AP-1 but not NF-κB, inhibition of JNK/AP-1 activation also delays labour. In this study, to determine the potential role of JNK as a therapeutic target in PTL, we investigated the specific contribution of JNK signalling to S. Abortus LPS-induced PTL in mice. Intrauterine administration of S. Abortus LPS to pregnant mice resulted in the activation of JNK in the maternal uterus and fetal brain, upregulation of pro-inflammatory proteins COX-2, CXCL1, and CCL2, phosphorylation of cPLA2 in myometrium, and induction of PTL. Specific inhibition of JNK by co-administration of specific D-JNK inhibitory peptide (D-JNKI) delayed LPS-induced preterm delivery and reduced fetal mortality. This is associated with inhibition of myometrial cPLA2 phosphorylation and proinflammatory proteins synthesis. In addition, we report that D-JNKI inhibits the activation of JNK/JNK3 and caspase-3, which are important mediators of neural cell death in the neonatal brain. Our data demonstrate that specific inhibition of TLR4-activated JNK signalling pathways has potential as a therapeutic approach in the management of infection/inflammation-associated PTL and prevention of the associated detrimental effects to the neonatal brain. PMID:26183892

  3. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate competitively inhibits phorbol ester binding to protein kinase C

    SciTech Connect

    Chauhan, A.; Cauhan, V.P.S.; Deshmukh, D.S.; Brokerhoff, H. )

    1989-06-13

    Calcium phospholipid dependent protein kinase C (PKC) is activated by diacylglycerol (DG) and by phorbol esters and is recognized to be the phorbol ester receptor of cells; DG displaces phorbol ester competitively from PKC. A phospholipid, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP{sub 2}), can also activate PKC in the presence of phosphatidylserine (PS) and Ca{sup 2+} with a K{sub PIP{sub 2}} of 0.04 mol %. Preliminary experiments have suggested a common binding site for PIP{sub 2} and DG on PKC. Here, the authors investigate the effect of PIP{sub 2} on phorbol ester binding to PKC in a mixed micellar assay. In the presence of 20 mol % PS, PIP{sub 2} inhibited specific binding of ({sup 3}H)phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) in a dose-dependent fashion up to 85% at 1 mol %. Inhibition of binding was more pronounced with PIP{sub 2} than with DG. Scatchard analysis indicated that the decrease in binding of PDBu in the presence of PIP{sub 2} is the result of an altered affinity for the phorbol ester rather than of a change in maximal binding. The plot of apparent dissociation constants (K{sub d{prime}}) against PIP{sub 2} concentration was linear over a range of 0.01-1 mol % with a K{sub i} of 0.043 mol % and confirmed the competitive nature of inhibition between PDBu and PIP{sub 2}. Competition between PIP{sub 2} and phorbol ester could be determined in a liposomal assay system also. These results indicate that PIP{sub 2}, DG, and phorbol ester all compete for the same activator-receiving region on the regulatory moiety of protein kinase C, and they lend support to the suggestion that PIP{sub 2} is a primary activator of the enzyme.

  4. Phosphorylation by the c-Abl protein tyrosine kinase inhibits parkin's ubiquitination and protective function

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Han Seok; Lee, Yunjong; Shin, Joo-Ho; Karuppagounder, Senthilkumar S.; Gadad, Bharathi Shrikanth; Koleske, Anthony J.; Pletnikova, Olga; Troncoso, Juan C.; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in PARK2/Parkin, which encodes a ubiquitin E3 ligase, cause autosomal recessive Parkinson disease (PD). Here we show that the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase c-Abl phosphorylates tyrosine 143 of parkin, inhibiting parkin's ubiquitin E3 ligase activity and protective function. c-Abl is activated by dopaminergic stress and by dopaminergic neurotoxins, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) in vitro and in vivo by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), leading to parkin inactivation, accumulation of the parkin substrates aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase-interacting multifunctional protein type 2 (AIMP2) (p38/JTV-1) and fuse-binding protein 1 (FBP1), and cell death. STI-571, a c-Abl-family kinase inhibitor, prevents the phosphorylation of parkin, maintaining parkin in a catalytically active and protective state. STI-571’s protective effects require parkin, as shRNA knockdown of parkin prevents STI-571 protection. Conditional knockout of c-Abl in the nervous system also prevents the phosphorylation of parkin, the accumulation of its substrates, and subsequent neurotoxicity in response to MPTP intoxication. In human postmortem PD brain, c-Abl is active, parkin is tyrosine-phosphorylated, and AIMP2 and FBP1 accumulate in the substantia nigra and striatum. Thus, tyrosine phosphorylation of parkin by c-Abl is a major posttranslational modification that inhibits parkin function, possibly contributing to pathogenesis of sporadic PD. Moreover, inhibition of c-Abl may be a neuroprotective approach in the treatment of PD. PMID:20823226

  5. On the mechanism of Escherichia coli pyridoxal kinase inhibition by pyridoxal and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate.

    PubMed

    di Salvo, Martino Luigi; Nogués, Isabel; Parroni, Alessia; Tramonti, Angela; Milano, Teresa; Pascarella, Stefano; Contestabile, Roberto

    2015-09-01

    Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), the catalytically active form of vitamin B6, plays a crucial role in several cellular processes. In most organisms, PLP is recycled from nutrients and degraded B6-enzymes in a salvage pathway that involves pyridoxal kinase (PLK), pyridoxine phosphate oxidase and phosphatase activities. Regulation of the salvage pathway is poorly understood. Escherichia coli possesses two distinct pyridoxal kinases, PLK1, which is the focus of the present work, and PLK2. From previous studies dating back to thirty years ago, pyridoxal (PL) was shown to inhibit E. coli PLK1 forming a covalent link with the enzyme. This inhibition was proposed to play a regulative role in vitamin B6 metabolism, although its details had never been clarified. Recently, we have shown that also PLP produced during PLK1 catalytic cycle acts as an inhibitor, forming a Schiff base with Lys229, without being released in the solvent. The question arises as to which is the actual inhibition mechanism by PL and PLP. In the present work, we demonstrated that also PL binds to Lys229 as a Schiff base. However, the isolated covalent PLK1-PL complex is not inactive but, in the presence of ATP, is able to catalyse the single turnover production of PLP, which binds tightly to the enzyme and is ultimately responsible for its inactivation. The inactivation mechanism mediated by Lys229 may play a physiological role in controlling cellular levels of PLP. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cofactor-dependent proteins: evolution, chemical diversity and bio-applications. PMID:25655354

  6. Aromatase Inhibition in a Transcriptional Network Context

    EPA Science Inventory

    A variety of chemicals in the environment have the potential to inhibit aromatase, an enzyme critical to estrogen synthesis. We examined the responses of female fathead minnow ovaries (FHM, Pimephales promelas) to a model aromatase inhibitor, fadrozole, using a transcriptional ne...

  7. Selective inhibition of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase by isoquinoline derivatives.

    PubMed

    Lu, Z X; Quazi, N H; Deady, L W; Polya, G M

    1996-06-01

    A large series of isoquinoline derivatives was synthesised including derivatives of isoquinoline, isoquinolino[3,4-c]furazan, 1,2-dihydro-1-oxoisoquinoline, 6-oxopyrimido[1,2-d]isoquinoline, benzo[c][1,8]-naphthyridine, pyrazino[2,3-c]isoquinoline and benzimidazo[2,1-a]isoquinoline as well as further structurally related isoquinoline derivatives and pyrido-2,3-furazans. Representatives of all of these classes of isoquinolines are potent and selective inhibitors of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) catalytic subunit (cAK) from rat liver. The most effective cAK inhibitors are a series of 1,3-di-substituted and 1,3,4-tri-substituted isoquinolines (IC50 values 30-50 nM) (compounds A1, A2, A3, A4 and A5) and 2-ethylcarboxy-3-amino-5,6-dihydro-6-oxobenzo[c] [1,8]naphthyridine (E1) (IC50 0.08 microM). Compounds A1-A5 inhibit cAK in a fashion that is competitive with respect to ATP as substrate. The isoquinoline inhibitors A1-A5 are ineffective or very poor inhibitors of wheat embryo Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) and rat brain Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase C (PKC), chicken gizzard myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and potato tuber cyclic nucleotide-binding phosphatase (Pase). E1 is a moderately effective inhibitor of CDPK and PKC (IC50 values 30 and 61 microM, respectively). The bisisoquinoline-1(2H)-one compound B7 inhibits cAK, CDPK, PKC and MLCK (IC50 values 8, 95, 24 and 7 microM, respectively) as does J1 [2-(p-bromophenyl)pyrrolo-[2,3-c]isoquinoline-5(4H)-one] (IC50 values 2, 50, 44 and 7 microM, respectively). The very potent isoquinoline-derived cAK inhibitors found here involve substitution of the N-containing isoquinoline ring system and these inhibitors show high specificity for cAK. PMID:8839983

  8. Assaying Bcr-Abl kinase activity and inhibition in whole cell extracts by phosphorylation of substrates immobilized on agarose beads

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ding; Nair-Gill, Evan; Sher, Dorie A.; Parker, Laurie L.; Campbell, Jennifer M.; Siddiqui, Mariah; Stock, Wendy; Kron, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    There is a current and increasing demand for simple, robust, nonradioactive assays of protein tyrosine kinase activity with applications for clinical diagnosis and high-throughput screening of potential molecularly targeted therapeutic agents. One significant challenge is to detect and measure the activity of specific kinases with key roles in cell signaling as an approach to distinguish normal cells from cancer cells and as a means of evaluating targeted drug efficacy and resistance in cancer cells. Here, we describe a method in which kinase substrates fused to glutathione-S-transferase and immobilized on glutathione agarose beads are phosphorylated, eluted, and then assayed to detect kinase activity. The activity of recombinant, purified c-Abl kinase or Bcr-Abl kinase in whole cell extracts can be detected with equivalent specificity, sensitivity, and reproducibility. Similarly, inhibition of recombinant c-Abl or Bcr-Abl in cells or cell extracts by imatinib mesylate and other Bcr-Abl targeted kinase inhibitors is readily assayed. This simple kinase assay is sufficiently straightforward and robust for use in clinical laboratories and is potentially adaptable to high-throughput assay formats. PMID:16236241

  9. Rapid Discovery and Structure-Activity Relationships of Pyrazolopyrimidines That Potently Suppress Breast Cancer Cell Growth via SRC Kinase Inhibition with Exceptional Selectivity over ABL Kinase.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Craig; Dawson, John C; Dowling, Reece; Houston, Douglas R; Weiss, Jason T; Munro, Alison F; Muir, Morwenna; Harrington, Lea; Webster, Scott P; Frame, Margaret C; Brunton, Valerie G; Patton, E Elizabeth; Carragher, Neil O; Unciti-Broceta, Asier

    2016-05-26

    Novel pyrazolopyrimidines displaying high potency and selectivity toward SRC family kinases have been developed by combining ligand-based design and phenotypic screening in an iterative manner. Compounds were derived from the promiscuous kinase inhibitor PP1 to search for analogs that could potentially target a broad spectrum of kinases involved in cancer. Phenotypic screening against MCF7 mammary adenocarcinoma cells generated target-agnostic structure-activity relationships that biased subsequent designs toward breast cancer treatment rather than to a particular target. This strategy led to the discovery of two potent antiproliferative leads with phenotypically distinct anticancer mode of actions. Kinase profiling and further optimization resulted in eCF506, the first small molecule with subnanomolar IC50 for SRC that requires 3 orders of magnitude greater concentration to inhibit ABL. eCF506 exhibits excellent water solubility, an optimal DMPK profile and oral bioavailability, halts SRC-associated neuromast migration in zebrafish embryos without inducing life-threatening heart defects, and inhibits SRC phosphorylation in tumor xenografts in mice. PMID:27115835

  10. Rapid Discovery and Structure–Activity Relationships of Pyrazolopyrimidines That Potently Suppress Breast Cancer Cell Growth via SRC Kinase Inhibition with Exceptional Selectivity over ABL Kinase

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Novel pyrazolopyrimidines displaying high potency and selectivity toward SRC family kinases have been developed by combining ligand-based design and phenotypic screening in an iterative manner. Compounds were derived from the promiscuous kinase inhibitor PP1 to search for analogs that could potentially target a broad spectrum of kinases involved in cancer. Phenotypic screening against MCF7 mammary adenocarcinoma cells generated target-agnostic structure–activity relationships that biased subsequent designs toward breast cancer treatment rather than to a particular target. This strategy led to the discovery of two potent antiproliferative leads with phenotypically distinct anticancer mode of actions. Kinase profiling and further optimization resulted in eCF506, the first small molecule with subnanomolar IC50 for SRC that requires 3 orders of magnitude greater concentration to inhibit ABL. eCF506 exhibits excellent water solubility, an optimal DMPK profile and oral bioavailability, halts SRC-associated neuromast migration in zebrafish embryos without inducing life-threatening heart defects, and inhibits SRC phosphorylation in tumor xenografts in mice. PMID:27115835

  11. Troglitazone inhibits endothelial cell proliferation through suppression of casein kinase 2 activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kuy-Sook; Park, Jin-Hee; Lee, Seahyoung; Lim, Hyun-Joung; Jang, Yangsoo; Park, Hyun-Young . E-mail: hypark65@nih.go.kr

    2006-07-21

    Troglitazone, an agonist of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}), has been reported to inhibit endothelial cell proliferation by suppressing Akt activation. Recently, it has been also proposed that phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted from chromosome 10 (PTEN) plays an important role in such effect of troglitazone. However, the mechanism of how troglitazone regulates PTEN remains to be elucidated. We therefore investigated the effects of troglitazone on casein kinase 2 (CK2), which is known to negatively regulate PTEN activity. Troglitazone significantly inhibited serum-induced proliferation of HUVEC in a concentration dependent manner. Serum-induced Akt and its downstream signaling pathway activation was attenuated by troglitazone (10 {mu}M) pretreatment. The phosphorylation of PTEN, which was directly related to Akt activation, was decreased with troglitazone pretreatment and was inversely proportional to CK2 activity. DRB, a CK2 inhibitor, also showed effects similar to that of troglitazone on Akt and its downstream signaling molecules. In conclusion, our results suggest that troglitazone inhibits proliferation of HUVECs through suppression of CK2 activity rendering PTEN to remain activated, and this effect of troglitazone in HUVECs seems to be PPAR{gamma} independent.

  12. Truncated RAF kinases drive resistance to MET inhibition in MET-addicted cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Petti, Consalvo; Picco, Gabriele; Martelli, Maria Luisa; Trisolini, Elena; Bucci, Enrico; Perera, Timothy; Isella, Claudio; Medico, Enzo

    2015-01-01

    Constitutively active receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are known oncogenic drivers and provide valuable therapeutic targets in many cancer types. However, clinical efficacy of RTK inhibitors is limited by intrinsic and acquired resistance. To identify genes conferring resistance to inhibition of the MET RTK, we conducted a forward genetics screen in the GTL-16 gastric cancer cell line, carrying MET amplification and exquisitely sensitive to MET inhibition. Cells were transduced with three different retroviral cDNA expression libraries and selected for growth in the presence of the MET inhibitor PHA-665752. Selected cells displayed robust and reproducible enrichment of library-derived cDNAs encoding truncated forms of RAF1 and BRAF proteins, whose silencing reversed the resistant phenotype. Transduction of naïve GTL-16 cells with truncated, but not full length, RAF1 and BRAF conferred in vitro and in vivo resistance to MET inhibitors, which could be reversed by MEK inhibition. Induction of resistance by truncated RAFs was confirmed in other MET-addicted cell lines, and further extended to EGFR-addicted cells. These data show that truncated RAF1 and BRAF proteins, recently described as products of genomic rearrangements in gastric cancer and other malignancies, have the ability to render neoplastic cells resistant to RTK-targeted therapy. PMID:25473895

  13. Casein kinase 2 inhibits HomolD-directed transcription by Rrn7 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Moreira-Ramos, Sandra; Rojas, Diego A; Montes, Matías; Urbina, Fabiola; Miralles, Vicente J; Maldonado, Edio

    2015-02-01

    In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, ribosomal protein gene (RPG) promoters contain a TATA analogue element called the HomolD box. The HomolD-binding protein Rrn7 forms a complex with the RNA polymerase II machinery. Despite the importance of ribosome biogenesis to cell survival, the mechanisms involved in the regulation of transcription of eukaryotic RPGs are unknown. In this study, we identified Rrn7 as a new substrate of the pleiotropic casein kinase 2 (CK2), which is a regulator of basal transcription. Recombinant Rrn7 from S. pombe, which is often used as a model organism for studying eukaryotic transcription, interacted with CK2 in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, CK2-mediated phosphorylation of Rrn7 inhibited its HomolD-directed transcriptional activity and ability to bind to an oligonucleotide containing a HomolD box in vitro. Mutation of Rrn7 at Thr67 abolished these effects, indicating that this residue is a critical CK2 phosphorylation site. Finally, Rrn7 interacted with the regulatory subunit of CK2 in vivo, inhibition of CK2 in vivo potentiated ribosomal protein gene transcription, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses identified that the catalytic subunit of CK2 was associated with the rpk5 gene promoter in S. pombe. Taken together, these data suggest that CK2 inhibits ribosomal protein gene transcription in S. pombe via phosphorylation of Rrn7 at Thr67. PMID:25410910

  14. The antipsoriatic drug, anthralin, inhibits protein kinase C--implications for its mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Hegemann, L; Fruchtmann, R; van Rooijen, L A; Müller-Peddinghaus, R; Mahrle, G

    1992-01-01

    In psoriatic patients, anthralin is known to attenuate lesional inflammation, but often generates perilesional dermatitis. This phenomenon is well reflected by the contrasting action of anthralin on human leukocytes. The release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is inhibited by anthralin in phorbol ester-activated leukocytes, whereas anthralin directly induces this cellular response in unstimulated cells. In order to elaborate further the underlying mechanisms, we compared the kinetics of anthralin and different well-characterized stimuli, including the phorbol ester, phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate, in this test system. Compared with standard stimuli, anthralin only marginally induced the release of ROS from human leukocytes and displayed different kinetics. Protein kinase C (PKC), the major cellular phorbol ester receptor, is considered to be involved in the regulation of this cellular response. Furthermore, its involvement in the pathophysiology of psoriasis has been suggested. Therefore, we also investigated the effects of anthralin on purified PKC. Anthralin was found to inhibit the enzyme activity in a dose-dependent manner but not to display any stimulatory effects. The present results provide first evidence that the therapeutic activity of anthralin, at least in part, might be mediated by inhibition of PKC. PMID:1503504

  15. Lithium inhibits invasion of glioma cells; possible involvement of glycogen synthase kinase-3

    PubMed Central

    Nowicki, Michal O.; Dmitrieva, Nina; Stein, Andrew M.; Cutter, Jennifer L.; Godlewski, Jakub; Saeki, Yoshinaga; Nita, Masayuki; Berens, Michael E.; Sander, Leonard M.; Newton, Herbert B.; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Lawler, Sean

    2008-01-01

    Therapies targeting glioma cells that diffusely infiltrate normal brain are highly sought after. Our aim was to identify novel approaches to this problem using glioma spheroid migration assays. Lithium, a currently approved drug for the treatment of bipolar illnesses, has not been previously examined in the context of glioma migration. We found that lithium treatment potently blocked glioma cell migration in spheroid, wound-healing, and brain slice assays. The effects observed were dose dependent and reversible, and worked using every glioma cell line tested. In addition, there was little effect on cell viability at lithium concentrations that inhibit migration, showing that this is a specific effect. Lithium treatment was associated with a marked change in cell morphology, with cells retracting the long extensions at their leading edge. Examination of known targets of lithium showed that inositol monophosphatase inhibition had no effect on glioma migration, whereas inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) did. This suggested that the effects of lithium on glioma cell migration could possibly be mediated through GSK-3. Specific pharmacologic GSK-3 inhibitors and siRNA knockdown of GSK-3α or GSK-3β isoforms both reduced cell motility. These data outline previously unidentified pathways and inhibitors that may be useful for the development of novel anti-invasive therapeutics for the treatment of brain tumors. PMID:18715951

  16. Estradiol rapidly modulates synaptic plasticity of hippocampal neurons: Involvement of kinase networks.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yoshitaka; Hojo, Yasushi; Kojima, Hiroki; Ikeda, Muneki; Hotta, Keisuke; Sato, Rei; Ooishi, Yuuki; Yoshiya, Miyuki; Chung, Bon-Chu; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Kawato, Suguru

    2015-09-24

    Estradiol (E2) is locally synthesized within the hippocampus in addition to the gonads. Rapid modulation of hippocampal synaptic plasticity by E2 is essential for synaptic regulation. Molecular mechanisms of modulation through synaptic estrogen receptor (ER) and its downstream signaling, however, have been still unknown. We investigated induction of LTP by the presence of E2 upon weak theta burst stimulation (weak-TBS) in CA1 region of adult male hippocampus. Since only weak-TBS did not induce full-LTP, weak-TBS was sub-threshold stimulation. We observed LTP induction by the presence of E2, after incubation of hippocampal slices with 10nM E2 for 30 min, upon weak-TBS. This E2-induced LTP was blocked by ICI, an ER antagonist. This E2-LTP induction was inhibited by blocking Erk MAPK, PKA, PKC, PI3K, NR2B and CaMKII, individually, suggesting that Erk MAPK, PKA, PKC, PI3K and CaMKII may be involved in downstream signaling for activation of NMDA receptors. Interestingly, dihydrotestosterone suppressed the E2-LTP. We also investigated rapid changes of dendritic spines (=postsynapses) in response to E2, using hippocampal slices from adult male rats. We found 1nM E2 increased the density of spines by approximately 1.3-fold within 2h by imaging Lucifer Yellow-injected CA1 pyramidal neurons. The E2-induced spine increase was blocked by ICI. The increase in spines was suppressed by blocking PI3K, Erk MAPK, p38 MAPK, PKA, PKC, LIMK, CaMKII or calcineurin, individually. On the other hand, blocking JNK did not inhibit the E2-induced spine increase. Taken together, these results suggest that E2 rapidly induced LTP and also increased the spine density through kinase networks that are driven by synaptic ER. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Brain and Memory. PMID:25595055

  17. A Series of Beta-Carboline Derivatives Inhibit the Kinase Activity of PLKs

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Liang; Cao, Rihui; Li, Yongzhen; Li, Ni; Ma, Qin; Wu, Jialin; Wang, Yanchang; Si, Shuyi

    2012-01-01

    Polo-like kinases play an essential role in the ordered execution of mitotic events and 4 mammalian PLK family members have been identified. Accumulating evidence indicates that PLK1 is an attractive target for anticancer drugs. In this paper, a series of beta-carboline derivatives were synthesized and three compounds, DH281, DH285 and DH287, were identified as potent new PLK inhibitors. We employed various biochemical and cellular approaches to determine the effects of these compounds on the activity of PLK1 and other mitotic kinases and on cell cycle progression. We found that these three compounds could selectively inhibit the kinase activity of purified PLK1, PLK2 and PLK3 in vitro. They show strong antitumor activity against a number of cancer cell lines with relatively low micromolar IC50s, but are relatively less toxic to non-cancer cells (MRC5). Moreover, these compounds could induce obvious accumulation of HeLa cells in G2/M and S phases and trigger apoptosis. Although MRC5 cells show clear S-phase arrest after treatment with these compounds, the G2/M arrest and apoptosis are less insignificant, indicating the distinct sensitivity between normal and cancer cells. We also found that HeLa cells treated with these drugs exhibit monopolar spindles and increased Wee1 protein levels, the characteristics of cells treated with PLK1 inhibitors. Together, these results demonstrate that DH281, DH285 and DH287 beta-carboline compounds are new PLK inhibitors with potential for cancer treatment. PMID:23056340

  18. Fenofibrate inhibits aldosterone-induced apoptosis in adult rat ventricular myocytes via stress-activated kinase-dependent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    De Silva, Deepa S.; Wilson, Richard M.; Hutchinson, Christoph; Ip, Peter C.; Garcia, Anthony G.; Lancel, Steve; Ito, Masa; Pimentel, David R.; Sam, Flora

    2009-01-01

    Aldosterone induces extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-dependent cardiac remodeling. Fenofibrate improves cardiac remodeling in adult rat ventricular myocytes (ARVM) partly via inhibition of aldosterone-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation and inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases. We sought to determine whether aldosterone caused apoptosis in cultured ARVM and whether fenofibrate ameliorated the apoptosis. Aldosterone (1 μM) induced apoptosis by increasing terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive nuclei in ARVM. Spironolactone (100 nM), an aldosterone receptor antagonist, but not RU-486, a glucocorticoid receptor, inhibited aldosterone-mediated apoptosis, indicating that the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) plays a role. SP-600125 (3 μM)—a selective inhibitor of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK)—inhibited aldosterone-induced apoptosis in ARVM. Although aldosterone increased the expression of both stress-activated protein kinases, pretreatment with fenofibrate (10 μM) decreased aldosterone-mediated apoptosis by inhibiting only JNK phosphorylation and the aldosterone-induced increases in Bax, p53, and cleaved caspase-3 and decreases in Bcl-2 protein expression in ARVM. In vivo studies demonstrated that chronic fenofibrate (100 mg·kg body wt−1·day−1) inhibited myocardial Bax and increased Bcl-2 expression in aldosterone-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Similarly, eplerenone, a selective MR inhibitor, used in chronic pressure-overload ascending aortic constriction inhibited myocardial Bax expression but had no effect on Bcl-2 expression. Therefore, involvement of JNK MAPK-dependent mitochondrial death pathway mediates ARVM aldosterone-induced apoptosis and is inhibited by fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)α ligand. Fenofibrate mediates beneficial effects in cardiac remodeling by inhibiting programmed cell death and the stress-activated kinases. PMID:19395558

  19. Synchrony with shunting inhibition in a feedforward inhibitory network

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Dong-Uk; Carney, Paul R.; Ditto, William L.

    2010-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that GABAA receptor mediated inhibition in adult hippocampus is shunting rather than hyperpolarizing. Simulation studies of realistic interneuron networks with strong shunting inhibition have been demonstrated to exhibit robust gamma band (20–80 Hz) synchrony in the presence of heterogeneity in the intrinsic firing rates of individual neurons in the network. In order to begin to understand how shunting can contribute to network synchrony in the presence of heterogeneity, we develop a general theoretical framework using spike time response curves (STRC's) to study patterns of synchrony in a simple network of two unidirectionally coupled interneurons (UCI network) interacting through a shunting synapse in the presence of heterogeneity. We derive an approximate discrete map to analyze the dynamics of synchronous states in the UCI network by taking into account the nonlinear contributions of the higher order STRC terms. We show how the approximate discrete map can be used to successfully predict the domain of synchronous 1:1 phase locked state in the UCI network. The discrete map also allows us to determine the conditions under which the two interneurons can exhibit in-phase synchrony. We conclude by demonstrating how the information from the study of the discrete map for the dynamics of the UCI network can give us valuable insight into the degree of synchrony in a larger feedforward network of heterogeneous interneurons. PMID:20135213

  20. JAK kinase inhibition abrogates STAT3 activation and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Sen, Malabika; Pollock, Netanya I; Black, John; DeGrave, Kara A; Wheeler, Sarah; Freilino, Maria L; Joyce, Sonali; Lui, Vivian W Y; Zeng, Yan; Chiosea, Simion I; Grandis, Jennifer R

    2015-03-01

    Aberrant activation of the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 has been implicated in cell proliferation and survival of many cancers including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). AZD1480, an orally active pharmacologic inhibitor of JAK1/JAK2, has been tested in several cancer models. In the present study, the in vitro and in vivo effects of AZD1480 were evaluated in HNSCC preclinical models to test the potential use of JAK kinase inhibition for HNSCC therapy. AZD1480 treatment decreased HNSCC proliferation in HNSCC cell lines with half maximal effective concentration (EC50) values ranging from 0.9 to 4 μM in conjunction with reduction of pSTAT3(Tyr705) expression. In vivo antitumor efficacy of AZD1480 was demonstrated in patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models derived from two independent HNSCC tumors. Oral administration of AZD1480 reduced tumor growth in conjunction with decreased pSTAT3(Tyr705) expression that was observed in both PDX models. These findings suggest that the JAK1/2 inhibitors abrogate STAT3 signaling and may be effective in HNSCC treatment approaches. PMID:25810010

  1. Inhibition of dihydroceramide desaturase activity by the sphingosine kinase inhibitor SKI II[S

    PubMed Central

    Cingolani, Francesca; Casasampere, Mireia; Sanllehí, Pol; Casas, Josefina; Bujons, Jordi; Fabrias, Gemma

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine kinase inhibitor (SKI) II has been reported as a dual inhibitor of sphingosine kinases (SKs) 1 and 2 and has been extensively used to prove the involvement of SKs and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in cellular processes. Dihydroceramide desaturase (Des1), the last enzyme in the de novo synthesis of ceramide (Cer), regulates the balance between dihydroceramides (dhCers) and Cers. Both SKs and Des1 have interest as therapeutic targets. Here we show that SKI II is a noncompetitive inhibitor (Ki = 0.3 μM) of Des1 activity with effect also in intact cells without modifying Des1 protein levels. Molecular modeling studies support that the SKI II-induced decrease in Des1 activity could result from inhibition of NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase. SKI II, but not the SK1-specific inhibitor PF-543, provoked a remarkable accumulation of dhCers and their metabolites, while both SKI II and PF-543 reduced S1P to almost undetectable levels. SKI II, but not PF543, reduced cell proliferation with accumulation of cells in the G0/G1 phase. SKI II, but not PF543, induced autophagy. These overall findings should be taken into account when using SKI II as a pharmacological tool, as some of the effects attributed to decreased S1P may actually be caused by augmented dhCers and/or their metabolites. PMID:24875537

  2. Effects of p21-activated kinase 1 inhibition on 11q13-amplified ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Prudnikova, T Y; Villamar-Cruz, O; Rawat, S J; Cai, K Q; Chernoff, J

    2016-04-28

    p21-activated kinases (Paks) are Cdc42/Rac-activated serine-threonine protein kinases that regulate several key cancer-relevant signaling pathways, such as the Mek/Erk, PI3K/Akt and Wnt/b-catenin signaling pathways. Pak1 is frequently overexpressed and/or hyperactivated in different human cancers, including human breast, ovary, prostate and brain cancer, due to amplification of the PAK1 gene in an 11q13 amplicon. Genetic or pharmacological inactivation of Pak1 has been shown to reduce proliferation of different cancer cells in vitro and reduce tumor progression in vivo. In this work, we examined the roles of Pak1 in cellular and animal models of PAK1-amplified ovarian cancer. We found that inhibition of Pak1 leads to decreased proliferation and migration in PAK1-amplified/overexpressed ovarian cancer cells, and has no effect in cell that lack such amplification/overexpression. Further, we observed that loss of Pak1 function causes 11q13-amplified ovarian cancer cells to arrest in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. This arrest correlates with activation of p53 and p21(Cip) and decreased expression of cyclin B1. These findings suggest that small-molecule inhibitors of Pak1 may have a therapeutic role in the ~25% of ovarian cancers characterized by PAK1 gene amplification. PMID:26257058

  3. LRRK2 G2019S mutation attenuates microglial motility by inhibiting focal adhesion kinase

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Insup; Kim, Beomsue; Byun, Ji-Won; Baik, Sung Hoon; Huh, Yun Hyun; Kim, Jong-Hyeon; Mook-Jung, Inhee; Song, Woo Keun; Shin, Joo-Ho; Seo, Hyemyung; Suh, Young Ho; Jou, Ilo; Park, Sang Myun; Kang, Ho Chul; Joe, Eun-Hye

    2015-01-01

    In response to brain injury, microglia rapidly extend processes that isolate lesion sites and protect the brain from further injury. Here we report that microglia carrying a pathogenic mutation in the Parkinson's disease (PD)-associated gene, G2019S-LRRK2 (GS-Tg microglia), show retarded ADP-induced motility and delayed isolation of injury, compared with non-Tg microglia. Conversely, LRRK2 knockdown microglia are highly motile compared with control cells. In our functional assays, LRRK2 binds to focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and phosphorylates its Thr–X–Arg/Lys (TXR/K) motif(s), eventually attenuating FAK activity marked by decreased pY397 phosphorylation (pY397). GS-LRRK2 decreases the levels of pY397 in the brain, microglia and HEK cells. In addition, treatment with an inhibitor of LRRK2 kinase restores pY397 levels, decreased pTXR levels and rescued motility of GS-Tg microglia. These results collectively suggest that G2019S mutation of LRRK2 may contribute to the development of PD by inhibiting microglial response to brain injury. PMID:26365310

  4. Inhibition of Eimeria tenella CDK-related Kinase 2: From Target Identification to Lead Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Engels, Kristin; Beyer, Carsten; Fernández, Maria L. Suárez; Bender, Frank; Gaßel, Michael; Unden, Gottfried; Marhöfer, Richard J.; Mottram, Jeremy C.; Selzer, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites encompass several human-pathogenic as well as animal-pathogenic protozoans like Plasmodium falciparum, Toxoplasma gondii, and Eimeria tenella. E. tenella is the causative agent of coccidiosis a disease of chickens, which causes tremendous economic losses to the world poultry industry. Considerable increase of drug resistance makes it necessary to develop and pursue new therapeutic strategies. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are key molecules in the regulation of the cell cycle and are therefore prominent target proteins in parasitic diseases. Bioinformatic analysis revealed four potential CDK-like proteins of which one – E. tenella CDK-related kinase 2 (EtCRK2) – is already cloned, expressed and characterized.[1] Using the CDK specific inhibitor Flavopiridol in EtCRK2 enzyme assays and schizont maturation assays we could chemically validate CDK-like proteins as potential drug targets. An X-ray crystal structure of human CDK2 (HsCDK2) served as template to built protein models of EtCRK2 by comparative homology modeling. Structural differences in the ATP-binding site between EtCRK2 and HsCDK2 as well as chicken CDK3 have been addressed for the optimization of selective ATP-competitive inhibitors. Virtual screening and “wet-bench” high throughput screening campaigns on large compound libraries resulted in an initial set of hit compounds. These compounds were further analyzed and characterized leading to a set of four promising lead compounds inhibiting EtCRK2. PMID:20575139

  5. Rho kinase inhibition by fasudil in the striatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesion mouse model of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Tatenhorst, Lars; Tönges, Lars; Saal, Kim-Ann; Koch, Jan C; Szegő, Éva M; Bähr, Mathias; Lingor, Paul

    2014-08-01

    Chronic degeneration of nigrostriatal projections, followed by nigral dopaminergic cell death, is a key feature of Parkinson disease (PD). This study examines the neuroprotective potential of the rho kinase inhibitor fasudil in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) mouse model of PD in vivo. C57Bl/6 mice were lesioned by striatal stereotactic injections with 4 μg of 6-OHDA and treated with fasudil 30 or 100 mg/kg body weight via drinking water. Motor behavior was tested biweekly; histologic and biochemical analyses were performed at 4 and 12 weeks after lesion. Motor behavior was severely impaired after 6-OHDA lesion and was not improved by fasudil treatment. Fasudil 100 mg/kg did not significantly increase the number of dopaminergic cells in the substantia nigra after 12 weeks versus lesion controls. Interestingly, however, high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of dopamine metabolites revealed that striatal levels of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid were significantly increased after 12 weeks, suggesting a regenerative response. In contrast to recent findings in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridin model, fasudil effects seem limited in this severe 6-OHDA model of PD. Nevertheless, high therapeutic concentrations of fasudil are suggestive of a proregenerative potential for dopaminergic neurons, making further evaluations of rho kinase inhibition as a proregenerative therapeutic strategy in PD promising. PMID:25003236

  6. Mechanism of action of MK-401 against Fasciola hepatica: inhibition of phosphoglycerate kinase.

    PubMed

    Schulman, M D; Ostlind, D A; Valentino, D

    1982-03-01

    The effect of MK-401 (4-amino-6-trichloroethenyl 1,3-benzenedisulfonamide) on Fasciola hepatica phosphoglycerate kinase (EC 2.7.2.3) was investigated. MK-401 was a competitive inhibitor of both 3-phosphoglycerate and ATP and had a Ki of 0.29 mM. ATP, 1,3-diphosphoglycerate and MK-401 protected the Fasciola enzyme from inhibition by N-ethylmaleimide. Analogues of MK-401 with different substituents at the 6 position (R = Cl, CF3, C2 F3, C3 F7) were competitive inhibitors of both 3-phosphoglycerate and ATP and a good correlation between the Ki and in vivo activity of these analogues was observed. PMID:7088033

  7. Receptor-Interacting Protein Kinase-2 Inhibition by CYLD Impairs Antibacterial Immune Responses in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wex, Katharina; Schmid, Ursula; Just, Sissy; Wang, Xu; Wurm, Rebecca; Naumann, Michael; Schlüter, Dirk; Nishanth, Gopala

    2016-01-01

    Upon infection with intracellular bacteria, nucleotide oligomerization domain protein 2 recognizes bacterial muramyl dipeptide and binds, subsequently, to receptor-interacting serine/threonine kinase 2 (RIPK2), which activates immune responses via the nuclear factor kappa-light-chain enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathways. Activation of RIPK2 depends on its K63 ubiquitination by E3 ligases, whereas the deubiquitinating enzyme A20 counter regulates RIPK2 activity by cleaving K63-polyubiquitin chains from RIPK2. Here, we newly identify the deubiquitinating enzyme CYLD as a new inhibitor of RIPK2. We show that CYLD binds to and removes K63-polyubiquitin chains from RIPK2 in Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) infected murine bone marrow-derived macrophages. CYLD-mediated K63 deubiquitination of RIPK2 resulted in an impaired activation of both NF-κB and ERK1/2 pathways, reduced production of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-12, anti-listerial reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO), and, finally, impaired pathogen control. In turn, RIPK2 inhibition by siRNA prevented activation of NF-κB and ERK1/2 and completely abolished the protective effect of CYLD deficiency with respect to the production of IL-6, NO, ROS, and pathogen control. Noteworthy, CYLD also inhibited autophagy of Listeria in a RIPK2-ERK1/2-dependent manner. The protective function of CYLD deficiency was dependent on interferon gamma (IFN-γ) prestimulation of infected macrophages. Interestingly, the reduced NF-κB activation in CYLD-expressing macrophages limited the protective effect of IFN-γ by reducing NF-κB-dependent signal transducers and activators of transcription-1 (STAT1) activation. Taken together, our study identifies CYLD as an important inhibitor of RIPK2-dependent antibacterial immune responses in macrophages. PMID:26834734

  8. The Raf Kinase Inhibitor Sorafenib Inhibits JAK-STAT Signal Transduction in Human Immune Cells.

    PubMed

    Martin del Campo, Sara E; Levine, Kala M; Mundy-Bosse, Bethany L; Grignol, Valerie P; Fairchild, Ene T; Campbell, Amanda R; Trikha, Prashant; Mace, Thomas A; Paul, Bonnie K; Jaime-Ramirez, Alena Cristina; Markowitz, Joseph; Kondadasula, Sri Vidya; Guenterberg, Kristan D; McClory, Susan; Karpa, Volodymyr I; Pan, Xueliang; Olencki, Thomas E; Monk, J Paul; Mortazavi, Amir; Tridandapani, Susheela; Lesinski, Gregory B; Byrd, John C; Caligiuri, Michael A; Shah, Manisha H; Carson, William E

    2015-09-01

    Sorafenib is an oral multikinase inhibitor that was originally developed as a Raf kinase inhibitor. We hypothesized that sorafenib would also have inhibitory effects on cytokine signaling pathways in immune cells. PBMCs from normal donors were treated with varying concentrations of sorafenib and stimulated with IFN-α or IL-2. Phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT5 was measured by flow cytometry and confirmed by immunoblot analysis. Changes in IFN-α- and IL-2-stimulated gene expression were measured by quantitative PCR, and changes in cytokine production were evaluated by ELISA. Cryopreserved PBMCs were obtained from cancer patients before and after receiving 400 mg sorafenib twice daily. Patient PBMCs were thawed, stimulated with IL-2 or IFN-α, and evaluated for phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT5. Pretreatment of PBMCs with 10 μM sorafenib decreased STAT1 and STAT5 phosphorylation after treatment with IFN-α or IL-2. This inhibitory effect was observed in PBMCs from healthy donors over a range of concentrations of sorafenib (5-20 μM), IL-2 (2-24 nM), and IFN-α (10(1)-10(6) U/ml). This effect was observed in immune cell subsets, including T cells, B cells, NK cells, regulatory T cells, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Pretreatment with sorafenib also inhibited PBMC expression of IFN-α- and IL-2-regulated genes and inhibited NK cell production of IFN-γ, RANTES, MIP1-α, and MIG in response to IFN-α stimulation. PBMCs from patients receiving sorafenib therapy showed decreased responsiveness to IL-2 and IFN-α treatment. Sorafenib is a Raf kinase inhibitor that could have off-target effects on cytokine-induced signal transduction in immune effector cells. PMID:26238487

  9. Inhibition of c-Abl Kinase Activity Renders Cancer Cells Highly Sensitive to Mitoxantrone

    PubMed Central

    Tuomela, Johanna; Sandholm, Jouko; Aittokallio, Kaappo; Siljamäki, Elina; Kallio, Marko; Kähäri, Veli-Matti; Hietanen, Sakari

    2014-01-01

    Although c-Abl has increasingly emerged as a key player in the DNA damage response, its role in this context is far from clear. We studied the effect of inhibition of c-Abl kinase activity by imatinib with chemotherapy drugs and found a striking difference in cell survival after combined mitoxantrone (MX) and imatinib treatment compared to a panel of other chemotherapy drugs. The combinatory treatment induced apoptosis in HeLa cells and other cancer cell lines but not in primary fibroblasts. The difference in MX and doxorubicin was related to significant augmentation of DNA damage. Transcriptionally active p53 accumulated in cells in which human papillomavirus E6 normally degrades p53. The combination treatment resulted in caspase activation and apoptosis, but this effect did not depend on either p53 or p73 activity. Despite increased p53 activity, the cells arrested in G2 phase became defective in this checkpoint, allowing cell cycle progression. The effect after MX treatment depended partially on c-Abl: Short interfering RNA knockdown of c-Abl rendered HeLa cells less sensitive to MX. The effect of imatinib was decreased by c-Abl siRNA suggesting a role for catalytically inactive c-Abl in the death cascade. These findings indicate that MX has a unique cytotoxic effect when the kinase activity of c-Abl is inhibited. The treatment results in increased DNA damage and c-Abl–dependent apoptosis, which may offer new possibilities for potentiation of cancer chemotherapy. PMID:25148385

  10. A novel flow cytometric-based method to measure kinase inhibition in sputum from COPD subjects

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, G C; Holloway, R A; Leaker, B R; Kilty, I; Salganik, M; Tan, L; Barnes, P J; Donnelly, L E

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Janus kinases (JAKs) regulate inflammatory gene expression through phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins. Expression of STAT proteins is increased in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and may be involved in driving chronic inflammation. Oral JAK inhibitors are effective as anti-inflammatory therapy but exhibit dose-limiting adverse effects. Development of inhaled compounds would be enhanced by robust biomarkers that directly reflect the anti-inflammatory and pharmacological activity in the lung. Methods A novel flow cytometry assay was developed to measure STAT1 phosphorylation in sputum inflammatory cells. The standard sputum processing method was refined to improve sputum cell viability. The flow cytometric assay was used to assess the reproducibility of the measurement of STAT1 phosphorylation and the in vitro activity of a pan JAK-inhibitor on three separate visits in patients with COPD. Results Upregulation of STAT1 phosphorylation was measured following in vitro IFNγ stimulation of sputum macrophages (stimulated/unstimulated ratio 1.57; p<0.00001). Upregulation was inhibited following in vitro preincubation with a pan JAK-inhibitor (inhibited+stimulated/unstimulated ratio 0.97). STAT1 phosphorylation activity could only be measured in macrophages. Conclusions Sputum from patients with COPD can be used to reproducibly measure phospho-STAT expression in sputum macrophages. The flow cytometry-based method can be used to evaluate kinase inhibitors in vitro and subsequently in ex vivo studies. The assay is particularly useful for the assessment of inhaled compounds where whole blood assays may not be relevant. PMID:27403320

  11. Vascular tumors have increased p70 S6-kinase activation and are inhibited by topical rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Du, Wa; Gerald, Damien; Perruzzi, Carole A; Rodriguez-Waitkus, Paul; Enayati, Ladan; Krishnan, Bhuvaneswari; Edmonds, Joseph; Hochman, Marcelo L; Lev, Dina C; Phung, Thuy L

    2013-10-01

    Vascular tumors are endothelial cell neoplasms whose cellular and molecular mechanisms, leading to tumor formation, are poorly understood, and current therapies have limited efficacy with significant side effects. We have investigated mechanistic (mammalian) target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling in benign and malignant vascular tumors, and the effects of mTOR kinase inhibitor as a potential therapy for these lesions. Human vascular tumors (infantile hemangioma and angiosarcoma) were analyzed by immunohistochemical stains and western blot for the phosphorylation of p70 S6-kinase (S6K) and S6 ribosomal protein (S6), which are activated downstream of mTOR complex-1 (mTORC1). To assess the function of S6K, tumor cells with genetic knockdown of S6K were analyzed for cell proliferation and migration. The effects of topical rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor, on mTORC1 and mTOR complex-2 (mTORC2) activities, as well as on tumor growth and migration, were determined. Vascular tumors showed increased activation of S6K and S6. Genetic knockdown of S6K resulted in reduced tumor cell proliferation and migration. Rapamycin fully inhibited mTORC1 and partially inhibited mTORC2 activities, including the phosphorylation of Akt (serine 473) and PKCα, in vascular tumor cells. Rapamycin significantly reduced vascular tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. As a potential localized therapy for cutaneous vascular tumors, topically applied rapamycin effectively reduced tumor growth with limited systemic drug absorption. These findings reveal the importance of mTOR signaling pathways in benign and malignant vascular tumors. The mTOR pathway is an important therapeutic target in vascular tumors, and topical mTOR inhibitors may provide an alternative and well-tolerated therapy for the treatment of cutaneous vascular lesions. PMID:23938603

  12. Multi-kinase inhibitor C1 triggers mitotic catastrophe of glioma stem cells mainly through MELK kinase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Minata, Mutsuko; Gu, Chunyu; Joshi, Kaushal; Nakano-Okuno, Mariko; Hong, Christopher; Nguyen, Chi-Hung; Kornblum, Harley I; Molla, Annie; Nakano, Ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly lethal brain tumor. Due to resistance to current therapies, patient prognosis remains poor and development of novel and effective GBM therapy is crucial. Glioma stem cells (GSCs) have gained attention as a therapeutic target in GBM due to their relative resistance to current therapies and potent tumor-initiating ability. Previously, we identified that the mitotic kinase maternal embryonic leucine-zipper kinase (MELK) is highly expressed in GBM tissues, specifically in GSCs, and its expression is inversely correlated with the post-surgical survival period of GBM patients. In addition, patient-derived GSCs depend on MELK for their survival and growth both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we demonstrate evidence that the role of MELK in the GSC survival is specifically dependent on its kinase activity. With in silico structure-based analysis for protein-compound interaction, we identified the small molecule Compound 1 (C1) is predicted to bind to the kinase-active site of MELK protein. Elimination of MELK kinase activity was confirmed by in vitro kinase assay in nano-molar concentrations. When patient-derived GSCs were treated with C1, they underwent mitotic arrest and subsequent cellular apoptosis in vitro, a phenotype identical to that observed with shRNA-mediated MELK knockdown. In addition, C1 treatment strongly induced tumor cell apoptosis in slice cultures of GBM surgical specimens and attenuated growth of mouse intracranial tumors derived from GSCs in a dose-dependent manner. Lastly, C1 treatment sensitizes GSCs to radiation treatment. Collectively, these data indicate that targeting MELK kinase activity is a promising approach to attenuate GBM growth by eliminating GSCs in tumors. PMID:24739874

  13. Inhibition of the Inositol Kinase Itpkb Augments Calcium Signaling in Lymphocytes and Reveals a Novel Strategy to Treat Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Andrew T.; Dahlberg, Carol; Sandberg, Mark L.; Wen, Ben G.; Beisner, Daniel R.; Hoerter, John A. H.; Parker, Albert; Schmedt, Christian; Stinson, Monique; Avis, Jacqueline; Cienfuegos, Cynthia; McPate, Mark; Tranter, Pamela; Gosling, Martin; Groot-Kormelink, Paul J.; Dawson, Janet; Pan, Shifeng; Tian, Shin-Shay; Seidel, H. Martin; Cooke, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging approaches to treat immune disorders target positive regulatory kinases downstream of antigen receptors with small molecule inhibitors. Here we provide evidence for an alternative approach in which inhibition of the negative regulatory inositol kinase Itpkb in mature T lymphocytes results in enhanced intracellular calcium levels following antigen receptor activation leading to T cell death. Using Itpkb conditional knockout mice and LMW Itpkb inhibitors these studies reveal that Itpkb through its product IP4 inhibits the Orai1/Stim1 calcium channel on lymphocytes. Pharmacological inhibition or genetic deletion of Itpkb results in elevated intracellular Ca2+ and induction of FasL and Bim resulting in T cell apoptosis. Deletion of Itpkb or treatment with Itpkb inhibitors blocks T-cell dependent antibody responses in vivo and prevents T cell driven arthritis in rats. These data identify Itpkb as an essential mediator of T cell activation and suggest Itpkb inhibition as a novel approach to treat autoimmune disease. PMID:26121493

  14. Inhibition of the Inositol Kinase Itpkb Augments Calcium Signaling in Lymphocytes and Reveals a Novel Strategy to Treat Autoimmune Disease.

    PubMed

    Miller, Andrew T; Dahlberg, Carol; Sandberg, Mark L; Wen, Ben G; Beisner, Daniel R; Hoerter, John A H; Parker, Albert; Schmedt, Christian; Stinson, Monique; Avis, Jacqueline; Cienfuegos, Cynthia; McPate, Mark; Tranter, Pamela; Gosling, Martin; Groot-Kormelink, Paul J; Dawson, Janet; Pan, Shifeng; Tian, Shin-Shay; Seidel, H Martin; Cooke, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Emerging approaches to treat immune disorders target positive regulatory kinases downstream of antigen receptors with small molecule inhibitors. Here we provide evidence for an alternative approach in which inhibition of the negative regulatory inositol kinase Itpkb in mature T lymphocytes results in enhanced intracellular calcium levels following antigen receptor activation leading to T cell death. Using Itpkb conditional knockout mice and LMW Itpkb inhibitors these studies reveal that Itpkb through its product IP4 inhibits the Orai1/Stim1 calcium channel on lymphocytes. Pharmacological inhibition or genetic deletion of Itpkb results in elevated intracellular Ca2+ and induction of FasL and Bim resulting in T cell apoptosis. Deletion of Itpkb or treatment with Itpkb inhibitors blocks T-cell dependent antibody responses in vivo and prevents T cell driven arthritis in rats. These data identify Itpkb as an essential mediator of T cell activation and suggest Itpkb inhibition as a novel approach to treat autoimmune disease. PMID:26121493

  15. (-)-β-hydrastine suppresses the proliferation and invasion of human lung adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting PAK4 kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Bingyu; Li, Xiaodong; Song, Shuai; Chen, Meng; Cheng, Maosheng; Zhao, Dongmei; Li, Feng

    2016-04-01

    (-)-β-hydrastine is one of the main active components of the medicinal plant, Hydrastis canadensis, which is used in many dietary supplements intended to enhance the immune system. However, whether (-)-β-hydrastine affects the tumor signaling pathway remains unexplored. In the present study, we found that (-)-β-hydrastine inhibited the kinase activity of p21-activated kinase 4 (PAK4), which is involved in the regulation of cytoskeletal reorganization, cell proliferation, gene transcription, oncogenic transformation and cell invasion. In the present study, (-)-β-hydrastine suppressed lung adenocarcinoma cell proliferation by inhibiting expression of cyclin D1/D3 and CDK2/4/6, leading to cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase, in a PAK4 kinase-dependent manner. Moreover, inhibition of PAK4 kinase activity by (-)-β-hydrastine also promoted the early apoptosis of lung adenocarcinoma cells through the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. In addition, (-)-β-hydrastine significantly suppressed the migration and invasion of human lung adenocarcinoma cells in conjunction with concomitant blockage of the PAK4/LIMK1/cofilin, PAK4/SCG10 and PAK4/MMP2 pathways. All of these data indicate that (-)-β-hydrastine, as a novel PAK4 inhibitor, suppresses the proliferation and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma cells. Taken together, these results provide novel insight into the development of a PAK4 kinase inhibitor and a potential therapeutic strategy for lung cancer. PMID:26821251

  16. NFκB-inducing kinase inhibits NFκB activity specifically in neurons of the CNS.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xianrong; Phanavanh, Bounleut; Hamdan, Hamdan; Moerman-Herzog, Andréa M; Barger, Steven W

    2016-04-01

    The control of NFκB in CNS neurons appears to differ from that in other cell types. Studies have reported induction of NFκB in neuronal cultures and immunostaining in vivo, but others have consistently detected little or no transcriptional activation by NFκB in brain neurons. To test if neurons lack some component of the signal transduction system for NFκB activation, we transfected cortical neurons with several members of this signaling system along with a luciferase-based NFκB-reporter plasmid; RelA was cotransfected in some conditions. No component of the NFκB pathway was permissive for endogenous NFκB activity, and none stimulated the activity of exogenous RelA. Surprisingly, however, the latter was inhibited by cotransfection of NFκB-inducing kinase (NIK). Fluorescence imaging of RelA indicated that co-expression of NIK sequestered RelA in the cytoplasm, similar to the effect of IκBα. NIK-knockout mice showed elevated expression of an NFκB-reporter construct in neurons in vivo. Cortical neurons cultured from NIK-knockout mice showed elevated expression of an NFκB-reporter transgene. Consistent with data from other cell types, a C-terminal fragment of NIK suppressed RelA activity in astrocytes as well as neurons. Therefore, the inhibitory ability of the NIK C-terminus was unbiased with regard to cell type. However, inhibition of NFκB by full-length NIK is a novel outcome that appears to be specific to CNS neurons. This has implications for unique aspects of transcription in the CNS, perhaps relevant to aspects of development, neuroplasticity, and neuroinflammation. Full-length NIK was found to inhibit (down arrow) transcriptional activation of NFκB in neurons, while it elevated (up arrow) activity in astrocytes. Deletion constructs corresponding to the N-terminus or C-terminus also inhibited NFκB in neurons, while only the C-terminus did so in astrocytes. One possible explanation is that the inhibition in neurons occurs via two different

  17. A novel method to identify protein kinase substrates: eEF2 kinase is phosphorylated and inhibited by SAPK4/p38δ

    PubMed Central

    Knebel, Axel; Morrice, Nick; Cohen, Philip

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a method of general application for identifying putative substrates of protein kinases in cell extracts. Using this procedure, we identified the physiological substrates of several mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases and an authentic substrate of stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) 2a/p38. A 120 kDa protein was detected in skeletal muscle extracts that was phosphorylated rapidly by SAPK4/p38δ, but poorly by SAPK2/p38, SAPK3/p38γ, SAPK1/JNK or extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2). It was purified and identified as eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase (eEF2K). SAPK4/p38δ phosphorylated eEF2K at Ser359 in vitro, causing its inactivation. eEF2K became phosphorylated at Ser359 and its substrate eEF2 became dephosphorylated (activated) when KB cells were exposed to anisomycin, an agonist that activates all SAPKs, including SAPK4/p38δ. The anisomycin-induced phosphorylation of Ser359 was unaffected by SB 203580, U0126 or rapamycin, and was prevented by overexpression of a catalytically inactive SAPK4/p38δ mutant, suggesting that SAPK4/p38δ may mediate the inhibition of eEF2K by this stress. The phosphorylation of eEF2K at Ser359 was also induced by insulin-like growth factor-1. However, this was blocked by rapamycin, indicating that Ser359 is targeted by at least two signalling pathways. PMID:11500363

  18. Adenylate Kinase and AMP Signaling Networks: Metabolic Monitoring, Signal Communication and Body Energy Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Dzeja, Petras; Terzic, Andre

    2009-01-01

    Adenylate kinase and downstream AMP signaling is an integrated metabolic monitoring system which reads the cellular energy state in order to tune and report signals to metabolic sensors. A network of adenylate kinase isoforms (AK1-AK7) are distributed throughout intracellular compartments, interstitial space and body fluids to regulate energetic and metabolic signaling circuits, securing efficient cell energy economy, signal communication and stress response. The dynamics of adenylate kinase-catalyzed phosphotransfer regulates multiple intracellular and extracellular energy-dependent and nucleotide signaling processes, including excitation-contraction coupling, hormone secretion, cell and ciliary motility, nuclear transport, energetics of cell cycle, DNA synthesis and repair, and developmental programming. Metabolomic analyses indicate that cellular, interstitial and blood AMP levels are potential metabolic signals associated with vital functions including body energy sensing, sleep, hibernation and food intake. Either low or excess AMP signaling has been linked to human disease such as diabetes, obesity and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Recent studies indicate that derangements in adenylate kinase-mediated energetic signaling due to mutations in AK1, AK2 or AK7 isoforms are associated with hemolytic anemia, reticular dysgenesis and ciliary dyskinesia. Moreover, hormonal, food and antidiabetic drug actions are frequently coupled to alterations of cellular AMP levels and associated signaling. Thus, by monitoring energy state and generating and distributing AMP metabolic signals adenylate kinase represents a unique hub within the cellular homeostatic network. PMID:19468337

  19. Therapeutic Blockade of Immune Complex-Mediated Glomerulonephritis by Highly Selective Inhibition of Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Samantha A; Doerner, Jessica; Bosanac, Todd; Khalil, Sara; Smith, Dustin; Harcken, Christian; Dimock, Janice; Der, Evan; Herlitz, Leal; Webb, Deborah; Seccareccia, Elise; Feng, Di; Fine, Jay S; Ramanujam, Meera; Klein, Elliott; Putterman, Chaim

    2016-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a potentially dangerous end organ pathology that affects upwards of 60% of lupus patients. Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) is important for B cell development, Fc receptor signaling, and macrophage polarization. In this study, we investigated the effects of a novel, highly selective and potent BTK inhibitor, BI-BTK-1, in an inducible model of LN in which mice receive nephrotoxic serum (NTS) containing anti-glomerular antibodies. Mice were treated once daily with vehicle alone or BI-BTK-1, either prophylactically or therapeutically. When compared with control treated mice, NTS-challenged mice treated prophylactically with BI-BTK-1 exhibited significantly attenuated kidney disease, which was dose dependent. BI-BTK-1 treatment resulted in decreased infiltrating IBA-1+ cells, as well as C3 deposition within the kidney. RT-PCR on whole kidney RNA and serum profiling indicated that BTK inhibition significantly decreased levels of LN-relevant inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Renal RNA expression profiling by RNA-seq revealed that BI-BTK-1 dramatically modulated pathways related to inflammation and glomerular injury. Importantly, when administered therapeutically, BI-BTK-1 reversed established proteinuria and improved renal histopathology. Our results highlight the important role for BTK in the pathogenesis of immune complex-mediated nephritis, and BTK inhibition as a promising therapeutic target for LN. PMID:27192942

  20. Olanzapine May Inhibit Colonic Motility Associated with the 5-HT Receptor and Myosin Light Chain Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiarui; Qiao, Ying; Le, Jingjing

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study whether the effects of olanzapine on gastrointestinal motility is related to the serotonin antagonism and myosin light chain kinase. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups. Olanzapine gavage was performed for each treatment group during the course of 30 continuous days, while the same volume of saline was given to the rats in the control group. Defecation of the rats was observed on days 7 and 30 after olanzapine gavage. The effects of olanzapine on contraction of colonic smooth muscles were observed in ex vivo experiments. A Western blot was used to evaluate expression levels of the serotonin transporter (SERT) and MLCK in colon segments of the rats. Results ResultsaaCompared to the control group, 5-160 µ M of olanzapine could inhibit dose-dependently the contraction of colonic smooth muscle ex vivo experiments. The maximum smooth muscle contraction effects of 5-HT and acetylcholine significantly decreased after treatment with 40-160 µ M of olanzapine. Constipation was found in the olanzapine-treated rats on day 7 and have sustained day 30 after gavage. Expression of MLCK in olanzapine-treated rats was significantly decreased, whereas the expression of SERT significantly increased on the day 7, then significantly decreased on the day 30 after olanzapine gavage. Conclusion SERT and MLCK may involve in the inhibition of colonic contraction induced by olanzapine. PMID:27081386

  1. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase γ/δ inhibition limits infarct size after myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Doukas, John; Wrasidlo, Wolfgang; Noronha, Glenn; Dneprovskaia, Elena; Fine, Richard; Weis, Sara; Hood, John; DeMaria, Anthony; Soll, Richard; Cheresh, David

    2006-01-01

    Although phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) play beneficial pro-cell survival roles during tissue ischemia, some isoforms (γ and δ) paradoxically contribute to the inflammation that damages these same tissues upon reperfusion. We therefore considered the possibility that selectively inhibiting proinflammatory PI3K isoforms during the reperfusion phase could ultimately limit overall tissue damage seen in ischemia/reperfusion injuries such as myocardial infarction. Panreactive and isoform-restricted PI3K inhibitors were identified by screening a novel chemical family; molecular modeling studies attributed isoform specificity based on rotational freedom of substituent groups. One compound (TG100-115) identified as a selective PI3K γ/δ inhibitor potently inhibited edema and inflammation in response to multiple mediators known to participate in myocardial infarction, including vascular endothelial growth factor and platelet-activating factor; by contrast, endothelial cell mitogenesis, a repair process important to tissue survival after ischemic damage, was not disrupted. In rigorous animal MI models, TG100-115 provided potent cardioprotection, reducing infarct development and preserving myocardial function. Importantly, this was achieved when dosing well after myocardial reperfusion (up to 3 h after), the same time period when patients are most accessible for therapeutic intervention. In conclusion, by targeting pathologic events occurring relatively late in myocardial damage, we have identified a potential means of addressing an elusive clinical goal: meaningful cardioprotection in the postreperfusion time period. PMID:17172449

  2. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase gamma/delta inhibition limits infarct size after myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Doukas, John; Wrasidlo, Wolfgang; Noronha, Glenn; Dneprovskaia, Elena; Fine, Richard; Weis, Sara; Hood, John; Demaria, Anthony; Soll, Richard; Cheresh, David

    2006-12-26

    Although phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) play beneficial pro-cell survival roles during tissue ischemia, some isoforms (gamma and delta) paradoxically contribute to the inflammation that damages these same tissues upon reperfusion. We therefore considered the possibility that selectively inhibiting proinflammatory PI3K isoforms during the reperfusion phase could ultimately limit overall tissue damage seen in ischemia/reperfusion injuries such as myocardial infarction. Panreactive and isoform-restricted PI3K inhibitors were identified by screening a novel chemical family; molecular modeling studies attributed isoform specificity based on rotational freedom of substituent groups. One compound (TG100-115) identified as a selective PI3K gamma/delta inhibitor potently inhibited edema and inflammation in response to multiple mediators known to participate in myocardial infarction, including vascular endothelial growth factor and platelet-activating factor; by contrast, endothelial cell mitogenesis, a repair process important to tissue survival after ischemic damage, was not disrupted. In rigorous animal MI models, TG100-115 provided potent cardioprotection, reducing infarct development and preserving myocardial function. Importantly, this was achieved when dosing well after myocardial reperfusion (up to 3 h after), the same time period when patients are most accessible for therapeutic intervention. In conclusion, by targeting pathologic events occurring relatively late in myocardial damage, we have identified a potential means of addressing an elusive clinical goal: meaningful cardioprotection in the postreperfusion time period. PMID:17172449

  3. Focal adhesion kinase autophosphorylation inhibition decreases colon cancer cell growth and enhances the efficacy of chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Heffler, Melissa; Golubovskaya, Vita M; Dunn, Kelli M Bullard; Cance, William

    2013-08-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) increasingly has been implicated in cancer growth and progression. 1,2,4,5-Benzenetetraamine tetrahydrochloride (Y15) is a small molecule FAK inhibitor that blocks the Y397 autophosphorylation site. FAK inhibitor, Y15 decreased Y397 FAK in different colon cancer cells lines in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, Y15 decreased phosphorylated Src in SW480 and SW620 cells. Y15 decreased cell viability, increased detachment, and increased apoptosis in SW480 and SW620 cells in vitro. Combination of FAK inhibitor Y15 and Src inhibitor PP2 decreased colon cancer cell viability more effectively than each agent alone. In addition, when combined with 5-FU, oxaliplatin or 5-FU and oxaliplatin, colon cancer viability was decreased further, demonstrating that dual and triple therapy synergistically inhibits cell viability. In vivo, Y15 decreased subcutaneous SW620 tumor growth by 28%. Combination of oral Y15 with 5-FU/or oxaliplatin decreased tumor growth by 48% more effectively than each inhibitor alone. Finally, tumors treated with Y15 expressed less Y397 phosphorylation, Src phosphorylation and had greater apoptosis than controls. Thus, the small molecule FAK inhibitor, Y15, inhibits cell growth in vitro and in vivo and enhances the efficacy of chemotherapy, demonstrating that it can be an effective therapeutic inhibitor for treating colon cancer. PMID:23792569

  4. Morelloflavone, a biflavonoid, inhibits tumor angiogenesis by targeting rho GTPases and extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiufeng; Yi, Tingfang; Yi, Zhengfang; Cho, Sung Gook; Qu, Weijing; Pinkaew, Decha; Fujise, Ken; Liu, Mingyao

    2009-01-15

    Morelloflavone, a biflavonoid extracted from Garcinia dulcis, has shown antioxidative, antiviral, and anti-inflammatory properties. However, the function and the mechanism of this compound in cancer treatment and tumor angiogenesis have not been elucidated to date. In this study, we postulated that morelloflavone might have the ability to inhibit angiogenesis, the pivotal step in tumor growth, invasiveness, and metastasis. We showed that morelloflavone could inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and capillary-like tube formation of primary cultured human umbilical vascular endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. Morelloflavone effectively inhibited microvessel sprouting of endothelial cells in the mouse aortic ring assay and the formation of new blood microvessels induced by VEGF in the mouse Matrigel plug assay. Furthermore, morelloflavone inhibited tumor growth and tumor angiogenesis of prostate cancer cells (PC-3) in xenograft mouse tumor model in vivo, suggesting that morelloflavone inhibited tumorigenesis by targeting angiogenesis. To understand the underlying mechanism of morelloflavone on the inhibitory effect of tumor growth and angiogenesis, we showed that morelloflavone could inhibit the activation of both RhoA and Rac1 GTPases but have little effect on the activation of Cdc42 GTPase. Additionally, morelloflavone inhibited the phosphorylation and activation of Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase/ERK pathway kinases without affecting VEGF receptor 2 activity. Together, our results indicate that morelloflavone exerts antiangiogenic action by targeting the activation of Rho-GTPases and ERK signaling pathways. These findings are the first to reveal the novel functions of morelloflavone in tumor angiogenesis and its molecular basis for the anticancer action. PMID:19147565

  5. Image enhancement algorithm based on improved lateral inhibition network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Haijiao; Wu, Zhiyong; Wang, Guanjun; Tong, Gang; Yang, Hua

    2016-05-01

    There is often substantial noise and blurred details in the images captured by cameras. To solve this problem, we propose a novel image enhancement algorithm combined with an improved lateral inhibition network. Firstly, we built a mathematical model of a lateral inhibition network in conjunction with biological visual perception; this model helped to realize enhanced contrast and improved edge definition in images. Secondly, we proposed that the adaptive lateral inhibition coefficient adhere to an exponential distribution thus making the model more flexible and more universal. Finally, we added median filtering and a compensation measure factor to build the framework with high pass filtering functionality thus eliminating image noise and improving edge contrast, addressing problems with blurred image edges. Our experimental results show that our algorithm is able to eliminate noise and the blurring phenomena, and enhance the details of visible and infrared images.

  6. Neuroblastoma Tyrosine Kinase Signaling Networks Involve FYN and LYN in Endosomes and Lipid Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ailan; Stokes, Matthew P.; Kuehn, Emily D.; George, Lynn; Comb, Michael; Grimes, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays a central role in creating a highly dynamic network of interacting proteins that reads and responds to signals from growth factors in the cellular microenvironment. Cells of the neural crest employ multiple signaling mechanisms to control migration and differentiation during development. It is known that defects in these mechanisms cause neuroblastoma, but how multiple signaling pathways interact to govern cell behavior is unknown. In a phosphoproteomic study of neuroblastoma cell lines and cell fractions, including endosomes and detergent-resistant membranes, 1622 phosphorylated proteins were detected, including more than half of the receptor tyrosine kinases in the human genome. Data were analyzed using a combination of graph theory and pattern recognition techniques that resolve data structure into networks that incorporate statistical relationships and protein-protein interaction data. Clusters of proteins in these networks are indicative of functional signaling pathways. The analysis indicates that receptor tyrosine kinases are functionally compartmentalized into distinct collaborative groups distinguished by activation and intracellular localization of SRC-family kinases, especially FYN and LYN. Changes in intracellular localization of activated FYN and LYN were observed in response to stimulation of the receptor tyrosine kinases, ALK and KIT. The results suggest a mechanism to distinguish signaling responses to activation of different receptors, or combinations of receptors, that govern the behavior of the neural crest, which gives rise to neuroblastoma. PMID:25884760

  7. Cigarette smoke inhibits efferocytosis via deregulation of sphingosine kinase signaling: reversal with exogenous S1P and the S1P analogue FTY720.

    PubMed

    Tran, Hai B; Barnawi, Jameel; Ween, Miranda; Hamon, Rhys; Roscioli, Eugene; Hodge, Greg; Reynolds, Paul N; Pitson, Stuart M; Davies, Lorena T; Haberberger, Rainer; Hodge, Sandra

    2016-07-01

    Alveolar macrophages from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients and cigarette smokers are deficient in their ability to phagocytose apoptotic bronchial epithelial cells (efferocytosis). We hypothesized that the defect is mediated via inhibition of sphingosine kinases and/or their subcellular mislocalization in response to cigarette smoke and can be normalized with exogenous sphingosine-1-phosphate or FTY720 (fingolimod), a modulator of sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling, which has been shown to be clinically useful in multiple sclerosis. Measurement of sphingosine kinase 1/2 activities by [(32)P]-labeled sphingosine-1-phosphate revealed a 30% reduction of sphingosine kinase 1 (P < 0.05) and a nonsignificant decrease of sphingosine kinase 2 in THP-1 macrophages after 1 h cigarette smoke extract exposure. By confocal analysis macrophage sphingosine kinase 1 protein was normally localized to the plasma membrane and cytoplasm and sphingosine kinase 2 to the nucleus and cytoplasm but absent at the cell surface. Cigarette smoke extract exposure (24 h) led to a retraction of sphingosine kinase 1 from the plasma membrane and sphingosine kinase 1/2 clumping in the Golgi domain. Selective inhibition of sphingosine kinase 2 with 25 µM ABC294640 led to 36% inhibition of efferocytosis (P < 0.05); 10 µM sphingosine kinase inhibitor/5C (sphingosine kinase 1-selective inhibitor) induced a nonsignificant inhibition of efferocytosis, but its combination with ABC294640 led to 56% inhibition (P < 0.01 vs. control and < 0.05 vs. single inhibitors). Cigarette smoke-inhibited efferocytosis was significantly (P < 0.05) reversed to near-control levels in the presence of 10-100 nM exogenous sphingosine-1-phosphate or FTY720, and FTY720 reduced cigarette smoke-induced clumping of sphingosine kinase 1/2 in the Golgi domain. These data strongly support a role of sphingosine kinase 1/2 in efferocytosis and as novel therapeutic targets in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID

  8. The response of the metabolic network of the red blood cell to pyruvate kinase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoliang; Lu, Zuhong

    2005-01-01

    The response of the metabolic network of human red blood cell is investigated using the E-Cell simulation system when pyruvate kinase (PK) is deficient. The results that several downstream metabolites of the glycolysis pathway accumulate are in a good agreement with experimental data reported in literatures. This accumulation results in the reaction that phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) catalyzes reversing its direction. Mathematical analysis to the simulation results shows that the PGK-catalyzing reaction reversing its direction happens simultaneously with an abrupt change of the second derivative of the ATP quantity. PMID:17282332

  9. Registered Report: COT drives resistance to RAF inhibition through MAP kinase pathway reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vidhu; Young, Lisa; Cavadas, Miguel; Owen, Kate

    2016-01-01

    The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology seeks to address growing concerns about reproducibility in scientific research by conducting replications of selected experiments from a number of high-profile papers in the field of cancer biology. The papers, which were published between 2010 and 2012, were selected on the basis of citations and Altmetric scores (Errington et al., 2014). This Registered Report describes the proposed replication plan of key experiments from “COT drives resistance to RAF inhibition through MAPK pathway reactivation” by Johannessen and colleagues, published in Nature in 2010 (Johannessen et al., 2010). The key experiments to be replicated are those reported in Figures 3B, 3D-E, 3I, and 4E-F. In Figures 3B, D-E, RPMI-7951 and OUMS023 cells were reported to exhibit robust ERK/MEK activity concomitant with reduced growth sensitivity in the presence of the BRAF inhibitor PLX4720. MAP3K8 (COT/TPL2) directly regulated MEK/ERK phosphorylation, as the treatment of RPMI-7951 cells with a MAP3K8 kinase inhibitor resulted in a dose-dependent suppression of MEK/ERK activity (Figure 3I). In contrast, MAP3K8-deficient A375 cells remained sensitive to BRAF inhibition, exhibiting reduced growth and MEK/ERK activity during inhibitor treatment. To determine if RAF and MEK inhibitors together can overcome single-agent resistance, MAP3K8-expressing A375 cells treated with PLX4720 along with MEK inhibitors significantly inhibited both cell viability and ERK activation compared to treatment with PLX4720 alone, as reported in Figures 4E-F. The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology is collaboration between the Center for Open Science and Science Exchange and the results of the replications will be published in eLife. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11414.001 PMID:26999821

  10. Janus kinase inhibition lessens inflammation and ameliorates disease in murine models of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Das, Rupali; Guan, Peng; Sprague, Leslee; Verbist, Katherine; Tedrick, Paige; An, Qi Angel; Cheng, Cheng; Kurachi, Makoto; Levine, Ross; Wherry, E John; Canna, Scott W; Behrens, Edward M; Nichols, Kim E

    2016-03-31

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) comprises an emerging spectrum of inherited and noninherited disorders of the immune system characterized by the excessive production of cytokines, including interferon-γ and interleukins 2, 6, and 10 (IL-2, IL-6, and IL-10). The Janus kinases (JAKs) transduce signals initiated following engagement of specific receptors that bind a broad array of cytokines, including those overproduced in HLH. Based on the central role for cytokines in the pathogenesis of HLH, we sought to examine whether the inhibition of JAK function might lessen inflammation in murine models of the disease. Toward this end, we examined the effects of JAK inhibition using a model of primary (inherited) HLH in which perforin-deficient (Prf1(-∕-)) mice are infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and secondary (noninherited) HLH in which C57BL/6 mice receive repeated injections of CpG DNA. In both models, treatment with the JAK1/2 inhibitor ruxolitinib significantly lessened the clinical and laboratory manifestations of HLH, including weight loss, organomegaly, anemia, thrombocytopenia, hypercytokinemia, and tissue inflammation. Importantly, ruxolitinib treatment also significantly improved the survival of LCMV-infectedPrf1(-∕-)mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that in vivo exposure to ruxolitinib inhibited signal transducer and activation of transcription 1-dependent gene expression, limited CD8(+)T-cell expansion, and greatly reduced proinflammatory cytokine production, without effecting degranulation and cytotoxic function. Collectively, these findings highlight the JAKs as novel, druggable targets for mitigating the cytokine-driven hyperinflammation that occurs in HLH. These observations also support the incorporation of JAK inhibitors such as ruxolitinib into future clinical trials for patients with these life-threatening disorders. PMID:26825707

  11. Inhibition of Rho Kinase (ROCK) Leads to Increased Cerebral Blood Flow and Stroke Protection

    PubMed Central

    Rikitake, Yoshiyuki; Kim, Hyung-Hwan; Huang, Zhihong; Seto, Minoru; Yano, Kazuo; Asano, Toshio; Moskowitz, Michael A.; Liao, James K.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose Endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) plays a pivotal role in vascular protection. The Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, hydroxyfasudil, prevents the downregulation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) under hypoxic conditions. However, it is unknown whether inhibition of ROCK can attenuate ischemia-induced endothelial dysfunction and tissue damage in vivo. Methods Human vascular endothelial cells were treated with increasing concentrations of hydroxyfasudil (0.1 to 100 μmol/L) and eNOS expression and activity were measured. To determine the physiological relevance of eNOS regulation by ROCK, we administered fasudil, which is metabolized to hydroxyfasudil in vivo, to mice for 2 days before subjecting them to middle cerebral artery occlusion. Cerebral blood flow, cerebral infarct size, and neurologic deficit were measured. Results In a concentration-dependent manner, hydroxyfasudil increased eNOS mRNA and protein expression, resulting in a 1.9- and 1.6-fold increase, respectively, at 10 μmol/L (P<0.05 for both). This correlated with a 1.5- and 2.3-fold increase in eNOS activity and NO production, respectively (P<0.05 for both). Fasudil increased cerebral blood flow to both ischemic and nonischemic brain areas, reduced cerebral infarct size by 33%, and improved neurologic deficit score by 37% (P<0.05). This correlated with inhibition of brain and vascular ROCK activity and increased eNOS expression and activity. Another ROCK inhibitor, Y-27632, also showed similar effects. The neuroprotective effects of fasudil were absent in eNOS-deficient mice. Conclusions These findings indicate that the neuroprotective effect of ROCK inhibition is mediated by endothelium-derived NO and suggest that ROCK may be an important therapeutic target for ischemic stroke. PMID:16141422

  12. Inhibition of Rho-Associated Kinase 1/2 Attenuates Tumor Growth in Murine Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hinsenkamp, Isabel; Schulz, Sandra; Roscher, Mareike; Suhr, Anne-Maria; Meyer, Björn; Munteanu, Bogdan; Fuchser, Jens; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Ebert, Matthias P A; Wängler, Björn; Hopf, Carsten; Burgermeister, Elke

    2016-08-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) remains a malignant disease with high mortality. Patients are frequently diagnosed in advanced stages where survival prognosis is poor. Thus, there is high medical need to find novel drug targets and treatment strategies. Recently, the comprehensive molecular characterization of GC subtypes revealed mutations in the small GTPase RHOA as a hallmark of diffuse-type GC. RHOA activates RHO-associated protein kinases (ROCK1/2) which regulate cell contractility, migration and growth and thus may play a role in cancer. However, therapeutic benefit of RHO-pathway inhibition in GC has not been shown so far. The ROCK1/2 inhibitor 1-(5-isoquinoline sulfonyl)-homopiperazine (HA-1077, fasudil) is approved for cerebrovascular bleeding in patients. We therefore investigated whether fasudil (i.p., 10 mg/kg per day, 4 times per week, 4 weeks) inhibits tumor growth in a preclinical model of GC. Fasudil evoked cell death in human GC cells and reduced the tumor size in the stomach of CEA424-SV40 TAg transgenic mice. Small animal PET/CT confirmed preclinical efficacy. Mass spectrometry imaging identified a translatable biomarker for mouse GC and suggested rapid but incomplete in situ distribution of the drug to gastric tumor tissue. RHOA expression was increased in the neoplastic murine stomach compared with normal non-malignant gastric tissue, and fasudil reduced (auto) phosphorylation of ROCK2 at THR249 in vivo and in human GC cells in vitro. In sum, our data suggest that RHO-pathway inhibition may constitute a novel strategy for treatment of GC and that enhanced distribution of future ROCK inhibitors into tumor tissue may further improve efficacy. PMID:27566106

  13. Rho-associated protein kinase inhibition enhances airway epithelial Basal-cell proliferation and lentivirus transduction.

    PubMed

    Horani, Amjad; Nath, Aditya; Wasserman, Mollie G; Huang, Tao; Brody, Steven L

    2013-09-01

    The identification of factors that regulate airway epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation are essential for understanding the pathophysiology of airway diseases. Rho-associated protein kinases (ROCKs) are downstream effector proteins of RhoA GTPase that direct the functions of cell cytoskeletal proteins. ROCK inhibition with Y27632 has been shown to enhance the survival and cloning of human embryonic stem cells and pluripotent cells in other tissues. We hypothesized that Y27632 treatment exerts a similar effect on airway epithelial basal cells, which function as airway epithelial progenitor cells. Treatment with Y27632 enhanced basal-cell proliferation in cultured human tracheobronchial and mouse tracheal epithelial cells. ROCK inhibition accelerated the maturation of basal cells, characterized by a diminution of the cell size associated with cell compaction and the expression of E-cadherin at cell-cell junctions. Transient treatment of cultured basal cells with Y27632 did not affect subsequent ciliated or mucous cell differentiation under air-liquid interface conditions, and allowed for the initial use of lower numbers of human or mouse primary airway epithelial cells than otherwise possible. Moreover, the use of Y27632 during lentivirus-mediated transduction significantly improved posttransduction efficiency and the selection of a transduced cell population, as determined by reporter gene expression. These findings suggest an important role for ROCKs in the regulation of proliferation and maturation of epithelial basal cells, and demonstrate that the inhibition of ROCK pathways using Y27632 provides an adjunctive tool for the in vitro genetic manipulation of airway epithelial cells by lentivirus vectors. PMID:23713995

  14. Structural and Functional Analysis of G Protein–Coupled Receptor Kinase Inhibition by Paroxetine and a Rationally Designed Analog

    PubMed Central

    Homan, Kristoff T.; Wu, Emily; Wilson, Michael W.; Singh, Puja; Larsen, Scott D.

    2014-01-01

    Recently we identified the serotonin reuptake inhibitor paroxetine as an inhibitor of G protein–coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) that improves cardiac performance in live animals. Paroxetine exhibits up to 50-fold selectivity for GRK2 versus other GRKs. A better understanding of the molecular basis of this selectivity is important for the development of even more selective and potent small molecule therapeutics and chemical genetic probes. We first sought to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying paroxetine selectivity among GRKs. We directly measured the KD for paroxetine and assessed its mechanism of inhibition for each of the GRK subfamilies and then determined the atomic structure of its complex with GRK1, the most weakly inhibited GRK tested. Our results suggest that the selectivity of paroxetine for GRK2 largely reflects its lower affinity for adenine nucleotides. Thus, stabilization of off-pathway conformational states unique to GRK2 will likely be key for the development of even more selective inhibitors. Next, we designed a benzolactam derivative of paroxetine that has optimized interactions with the hinge of the GRK2 kinase domain. The crystal structure of this compound in complex with GRK2 confirmed the predicted interactions. Although the benzolactam derivative did not significantly alter potency of inhibition among GRKs, it exhibited 20-fold lower inhibition of serotonin reuptake. However, there was an associated increase in the potency for inhibition of other AGC kinases, suggesting that the unconventional hydrogen bond formed by the benzodioxole ring of paroxetine is better accommodated by GRKs. PMID:24220010

  15. MAP Kinase Inhibition Promotes T Cell and Anti-tumor Activity in Combination with PD-L1 Checkpoint Blockade.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Peter J R; Cheung, Jeanne; Yang, Yagai; McNamara, Erin; Hong, Rebecca; Moskalenko, Marina; Gould, Stephen E; Maecker, Heather; Irving, Bryan A; Kim, Jeong M; Belvin, Marcia; Mellman, Ira

    2016-03-15

    Targeted inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase (MEK) can induce regression of tumors bearing activating mutations in the Ras pathway but rarely leads to tumor eradication. Although combining MEK inhibition with T-cell-directed immunotherapy might lead to more durable efficacy, T cell responses are themselves at least partially dependent on MEK activity. We show here that MEK inhibition did profoundly block naive CD8(+) T cell priming in tumor-bearing mice, but actually increased the number of effector-phenotype antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells within the tumor. MEK inhibition protected tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells from death driven by chronic TCR stimulation while sparing cytotoxic activity. Combining MEK inhibition with anti-programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) resulted in synergistic and durable tumor regression even where either agent alone was only modestly effective. Thus, despite the central importance of the MAP kinase pathway in some aspects of T cell function, MEK-targeted agents can be compatible with T-cell-dependent immunotherapy. PMID:26944201

  16. The tumor suppressor p53 inhibits Net, an effector of Ras/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Nakade, Koji; Zheng, Hong; Ganguli, Gitali; Buchwalter, Gilles; Gross, Christian; Wasylyk, Bohdan

    2004-02-01

    The tumor suppressor function of p53 is linked to its ability to repress gene expression, but the mechanisms of specific gene repression are poorly understood. We report that wild-type p53 inhibits an effector of the Ras oncogene/mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway, the transcription factor Net. Tumor-associated mutant p53s are less efficient inhibitors. p53 inhibits by preventing phosphorylation of Net by MAP kinases. Loss of p53 in vivo leads to increased Net phosphorylation in response to wound healing and UV irradiation of skin. Our results show that p53 can repress specific gene expression by inhibiting Net, a factor implicated in cell cycle entry. PMID:14729959

  17. Structural Analysis of the Mechanism of Inhibition and Allosteric Activation of the Kinase Domain of HER2 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Aertgeerts, Kathleen; Skene, Robert; Yano, Jason; Sang, Bi-Ching; Zou, Hua; Snell, Gyorgy; Jennings, Andy; Iwamoto, Keiji; Habuka, Noriyuki; Hirokawa, Aki; Ishikawa, Tomoyasu; Tanaka, Toshimasa; Miki, Hiroshi; Ohta, Yoshikazu; Sogabe, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    Aberrant signaling of ErbB family members human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is implicated in many human cancers, and HER2 expression is predictive of human disease recurrence and prognosis. Small molecule kinase inhibitors of EGFR and of both HER2 and EGFR have received approval for the treatment of cancer. We present the first high resolution crystal structure of the kinase domain of HER2 in complex with a selective inhibitor to understand protein activation, inhibition, and function at the molecular level. HER2 kinase domain crystallizes as a dimer and suggests evidence for an allosteric mechanism of activation comparable with previously reported activation mechanisms for EGFR and HER4. A unique Gly-rich region in HER2 following the α-helix C is responsible for increased conformational flexibility within the active site and could explain the low intrinsic catalytic activity previously reported for HER2. In addition, we solved the crystal structure of the kinase domain of EGFR in complex with a HER2/EGFR dual inhibitor (TAK-285). Comparison with previously reported inactive and active EGFR kinase domain structures gave insight into the mechanism of HER2 and EGFR inhibition and may help guide the design and development of new cancer drugs with improved potency and selectivity. PMID:21454582

  18. Phosphodiesterase 5 Inhibition Limits Doxorubicin-induced Heart Failure by Attenuating Protein Kinase G Iα Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Prysyazhna, Oleksandra; Burgoyne, Joseph Robert; Scotcher, Jenna; Grover, Steven; Kass, David; Eaton, Philip

    2016-08-12

    Phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors limit myocardial injury caused by stresses, including doxorubicin chemotherapy. cGMP binding to PKG Iα attenuates oxidant-induced disulfide formation. Because PDE5 inhibition elevates cGMP and protects from doxorubicin-induced injury, we reasoned that this may be because it limits PKG Iα disulfide formation. To investigate the role of PKG Iα disulfide dimerization in the development of apoptosis, doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy was compared in male wild type (WT) or disulfide-resistant C42S PKG Iα knock-in (KI) mice. Echocardiography showed that doxorubicin treatment caused loss of myocardial tissue and depressed left ventricular function in WT mice. Doxorubicin also reduced pro-survival signaling and increased apoptosis in WT hearts. In contrast, KI mice were markedly resistant to the dysfunction induced by doxorubicin in WTs. In follow-on experiments the influence of the PDE5 inhibitor tadalafil on the development of doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy in WT and KI mice was investigated. In WT mice, co-administration of tadalafil with doxorubicin reduced PKG Iα oxidation caused by doxorubicin and also protected against cardiac injury and loss of function. KI mice were again innately resistant to doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity, and therefore tadalafil afforded no additional protection. Doxorubicin decreased phosphorylation of RhoA (Ser-188), stimulating its GTPase activity to activate Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) in WTs. These pro-apoptotic events were absent in KI mice and were attenuated in WTs co-administered tadalafil. PKG Iα disulfide formation triggers cardiac injury, and this initiation of maladaptive signaling can be blocked by pharmacological therapies that elevate cGMP, which binds kinase to limit its oxidation. PMID:27342776

  19. Inhibition of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 enhances endochondral bone formation by increasing chondrocyte survival.

    PubMed

    Eaton, G J; Zhang, Q-S; Diallo, C; Matsuzawa, A; Ichijo, H; Steinbeck, M J; Freeman, T A

    2014-01-01

    Endochondral ossification is the result of chondrocyte differentiation, hypertrophy, death and replacement by bone. The careful timing and progression of this process is important for normal skeletal bone growth and development, as well as fracture repair. Apoptosis Signal-Regulating Kinase 1 (ASK1) is a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), which is activated by reactive oxygen species and other cellular stress events. Activation of ASK1 initiates a signaling cascade known to regulate diverse cellular events including cytokine and growth factor signaling, cell cycle regulation, cellular differentiation, hypertrophy, survival and apoptosis. ASK1 is highly expressed in hypertrophic chondrocytes, but the role of ASK1 in skeletal tissues has not been investigated. Herein, we report that ASK1 knockout (KO) mice display alterations in normal growth plate morphology, which include a shorter proliferative zone and a lengthened hypertrophic zone. These changes in growth plate dynamics result in accelerated long bone mineralization and an increased formation of trabecular bone, which can be attributed to an increased resistance of terminally differentiated chondrocytes to undergo cell death. Interestingly, under normal cell culture conditions, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from ASK1 KO mice show no differences in either MAPK signaling or osteogenic or chondrogenic differentiation when compared with wild-type (WT) MEFs. However, when cultured with stress activators, H2O2 or staurosporine, the KO cells show enhanced survival, an associated decrease in the activation of proteins involved in death signaling pathways and a reduction in markers of terminal differentiation. Furthermore, in both WT mice treated with the ASK1 inhibitor, NQDI-1, and ASK1 KO mice endochondral bone formation was increased in an ectopic ossification model. These findings highlight a previously unrealized role for ASK1 in regulating endochondral bone formation. Inhibition of ASK1 has

  20. Calm down when the heart is stressed: Inhibiting calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II for antiarrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Dayue Darrel

    2015-01-01

    Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) plays a pivotal role in many regulatory processes of cellular functions ranging from membrane potentials and electric–contraction (E-C) coupling to mitochondrial integrity and survival of cardiomyocytes. The review article by Hund and Mohler in this issue of Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine highlights the importance of the elevated CaMKII signaling pathways under stressed conditions such as myocardial hypertrophy and ischemia in the detrimental remodeling of ion channels and in the genesis of cardiac arrhythmias. Down-regulation of the elevated CaMKII is now emerging as a powerful therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias and other forms of heart disease such as hypertrophic and ischemic heart failure. The development of new specific and effective CaMKII inhibitors as therapeutic agents for cardiac arrhythmias is challenged by the tremendous complexity of CaMKII expression and distribution of multi isoforms, as well as the multitude of downstream targets in the CaMKII signaling pathways and regulatory processes. A systematic understanding of the structure and regulation of the CaMKII signaling and functional network under the scope of genome and phenome may improve and extend our knowledge about the role of CaMKII in cardiac health and disease and accelerate the discovery of new CaMKII inhibitors that target not only the ATP-binding site but also the regulation sites in the CaMKII signaling and functional network. PMID:25910598

  1. Calm down when the heart is stressed: Inhibiting calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II for antiarrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Duan, Dayue Darrel

    2015-07-01

    Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) plays a pivotal role in many regulatory processes of cellular functions ranging from membrane potentials and electric-contraction (E-C) coupling to mitochondrial integrity and survival of cardiomyocytes. The review article by Hund and Mohler in this issue of Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine highlights the importance of the elevated CaMKII signaling pathways under stressed conditions such as myocardial hypertrophy and ischemia in the detrimental remodeling of ion channels and in the genesis of cardiac arrhythmias. Down-regulation of the elevated CaMKII is now emerging as a powerful therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias and other forms of heart disease such as hypertrophic and ischemic heart failure. The development of new specific and effective CaMKII inhibitors as therapeutic agents for cardiac arrhythmias is challenged by the tremendous complexity of CaMKII expression and distribution of multi isoforms, as well as the multitude of downstream targets in the CaMKII signaling pathways and regulatory processes. A systematic understanding of the structure and regulation of the CaMKII signaling and functional network under the scope of genome and phenome may improve and extend our knowledge about the role of CaMKII in cardiac health and disease and accelerate the discovery of new CaMKII inhibitors that target not only the ATP-binding site but also the regulation sites in the CaMKII signaling and functional network. PMID:25910598

  2. Dopamine D1 receptor inhibition of NMDA receptor currents mediated by tyrosine kinase-dependent receptor trafficking in neonatal rat striatum

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Huaxia; Gibb, Alasdair J

    2008-01-01

    NMDA receptors are of particular importance in the control of synaptic strength and integration of synaptic activity. Dopamine receptor modulation of NMDA receptors in neonatal striatum may influence the efficacy of synaptic transmission in the cortico-striatal pathway and if so, this modulation will affect the behaviour of the basal ganglia network. Here, we show that in acute brain slices of neonatal (P7) rat striatum the dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF-82958 significantly decreases NMDA receptor currents in patch-clamp whole-cell recordings. This inhibition is not abolished by application of a G protein inhibitor (GDP-β-S) or irreversible G protein activator (GTP-γ-S) suggesting a G protein-independent mechanism. In addition, intracellular application of protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors (lavendustin A or PP2) abolished D1 inhibition of NMDA currents. In contrast, in older animals (P28) D1 receptor activation produces a potentiation of the NMDA response which suggests there is a developmental switch in D1 modulation of striatal NMDA receptors. Single-channel recordings show that direct D1 receptor inhibition of NMDA receptors cannot be observed in isolated membrane patches. We hypothesize that D1 inhibition in whole-cell recordings from neonatal rats may be mediated by a change in NMDA receptor trafficking. Consistent with this hypothesis, intracellular application of a dynamin inhibitory peptide (QVPSRPNRAP) abolished D1 inhibition of NMDA receptor currents. We therefore conclude that a tyrosine kinase-dependent alteration of NMDA receptor trafficking underlies D1 dopamine receptor-mediated down-regulation of NMDA receptor currents in medium spiny neurons of neonatal rat striatum. PMID:18703578

  3. Targeting Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase/Extracellular Signal–Regulated Kinase Kinase in the Mutant (V600E) B-Raf Signaling Cascade Effectively Inhibits Melanoma Lung Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Arati; Tran, Melissa A.; Liang, Shile; Sharma, Arun K.; Amin, Shantu; Smith, Charles D.; Dong, Cheng; Robertson, Gavin P.

    2009-01-01

    Malignant melanoma has a high propensity for metastatic spread, making it the most deadly form of skin cancer. B-RAF has been identified as the most mutated gene in these invasive cells and therefore an attractive therapeutic target. However, for uncertain reasons, chemotherapy inhibiting B-Raf has not been clinically effective. This has raised questions whether this pathway is important in melanoma metastasis or whether targeting a protein other than B-Raf in the signaling cascade could more effectively inhibit this pathway to reduce lung metastases. Here, we investigated the role played by V600EB-Raf in melanoma metastasis and showed that targeting this signaling cascade significantly reduces lung metastases. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)–mediated inhibition was used in mice to reduce expression (activity) of each member of the signaling cascade and effects on metastasis development were measured. Targeting any member of the signaling cascade reduced metastasis but inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal–regulated kinase kinase (Mek) 1 and Mek 2 almost completely prevented lung tumor development. Mechanistically, metastatic inhibition was mediated through reduction of melanoma cell extravasation through the endothelium and decreased proliferative capacity. Targeting B-Raf with the pharmacologic inhibitor BAY 43-9006, which was found ineffective in clinical trials and seems to act primarily as an angiogenesis inhibitor, did not decrease metastasis, whereas inhibition of Mek using U0126 decreased cellular proliferative capacity, thereby effectively reducing number and size of lung metastases. In summary, this study provides a mechanistic basis for targeting Mek and not B-Raf in the mutant V600EB-Raf signaling cascade to inhibit melanoma metastases. PMID:16912199

  4. Inhibition of human insulin gene transcription and MafA transcriptional activity by the dual leucine zipper kinase

    PubMed Central

    Stahnke, Marie-Jeannette; Dickel, Corinna; Schröder, Sabine; Kaiser, Diana; Blume, Roland; Stein, Roland; Pouponnot, Celio; Oetjen, Elke

    2016-01-01

    Insulin biosynthesis is an essential β-cell function and inappropriate insulin secretion and biosynthesis contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus type 2. Previous studies showed that the dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK) induces β-cell apoptosis. Since β-cell dysfunction precedes β-cell loss, in the present study the effect of DLK on insulin gene transcription was investigated in the HIT-T15 β-cell line. Downregulation of endogenous DLK increased whereas overexpression of DLK decreased human insulin gene transcription. 5′- and 3′-deletion human insulin promoter analyses resulted in the identification of a DLK responsive element that mapped to the DNA binding-site for the β-cell specific transcription factor MafA. Overexpression of DLK wild-type but not its kinase-dead mutant inhibited MafA transcriptional activity conferred by its transactivation domain. Furthermore, in the non-β-cell line JEG DLK inhibited MafA overexpression-induced human insulin promoter activity. Overexpression of MafA and DLK or its kinase-dead mutant into JEG cells revealed that DLK but not its mutant reduced MafA protein content. Inhibition of the down-stream DLK kinase c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) by SP600125 attenuated DLK-induced MafA loss. Furthermore, mutation of the serine 65 to alanine, shown to confer MafA protein stability, increased MafA-dependent insulin gene transcription and prevented DLK-induced MafA loss in JEG cells. These data suggest that DLK by activating JNK triggers the phosphorylation and degradation of MafA thereby attenuating insulin gene transcription. Given the importance of MafA for β-cell function, the inhibition of DLK might preserve β-cell function and ultimately retard the development of diabetes mellitus type 2. PMID:24726898

  5. Inhibition of human insulin gene transcription and MafA transcriptional activity by the dual leucine zipper kinase.

    PubMed

    Stahnke, Marie-Jeannette; Dickel, Corinna; Schröder, Sabine; Kaiser, Diana; Blume, Roland; Stein, Roland; Pouponnot, Celio; Oetjen, Elke

    2014-09-01

    Insulin biosynthesis is an essential β-cell function and inappropriate insulin secretion and biosynthesis contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus type 2. Previous studies showed that the dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK) induces β-cell apoptosis. Since β-cell dysfunction precedes β-cell loss, in the present study the effect of DLK on insulin gene transcription was investigated in the HIT-T15 β-cell line. Downregulation of endogenous DLK increased whereas overexpression of DLK decreased human insulin gene transcription. 5'- and 3'-deletion human insulin promoter analyses resulted in the identification of a DLK responsive element that mapped to the DNA binding-site for the β-cell specific transcription factor MafA. Overexpression of DLK wild-type but not its kinase-dead mutant inhibited MafA transcriptional activity conferred by its transactivation domain. Furthermore, in the non-β-cell line JEG DLK inhibited MafA overexpression-induced human insulin promoter activity. Overexpression of MafA and DLK or its kinase-dead mutant into JEG cells revealed that DLK but not its mutant reduced MafA protein content. Inhibition of the down-stream DLK kinase c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) by SP600125 attenuated DLK-induced MafA loss. Furthermore, mutation of the serine 65 to alanine, shown to confer MafA protein stability, increased MafA-dependent insulin gene transcription and prevented DLK-induced MafA loss in JEG cells. These data suggest that DLK by activating JNK triggers the phosphorylation and degradation of MafA thereby attenuating insulin gene transcription. Given the importance of MafA for β-cell function, the inhibition of DLK might preserve β-cell function and ultimately retard the development of diabetes mellitus type 2. PMID:24726898

  6. Rho GTPase/Rho Kinase Negatively Regulates Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Phosphorylation through the Inhibition of Protein Kinase B/Akt in Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Xiu-Fen; Viswambharan, Hema; Barandier, Christine; Ruffieux, Jean; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Rusconi, Sandro; Yang, Zhihong

    2002-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is an important regulator of cardiovascular homeostasis by production of nitric oxide (NO) from vascular endothelial cells. It can be activated by protein kinase B (PKB)/Akt via phosphorylation at Ser-1177. We are interested in the role of Rho GTPase/Rho kinase (ROCK) pathway in regulation of eNOS expression and activation. Using adenovirus-mediated gene transfer in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), we show here that both active RhoA and ROCK not only downregulate eNOS gene expression as reported previously but also inhibit eNOS phosphorylation at Ser-1177 and cellular NO production with concomitant suppression of PKB activation. Moreover, coexpression of a constitutive active form of PKB restores the phosphorylation but not gene expression of eNOS in the presence of active RhoA. Furthermore, we show that thrombin inhibits eNOS phosphorylation, as well as expression via Rho/ROCK pathway. Expression of the active PKB reverses eNOS phosphorylation but has no effect on downregulation of eNOS expression induced by thrombin. Taken together, these data demonstrate that Rho/ROCK pathway negatively regulates eNOS phosphorylation through inhibition of PKB, whereas it downregulates eNOS expression independent of PKB. PMID:12446767

  7. Effect of Protein Kinase C delta (PKC-δ) Inhibition on the Transcriptome of Normal and Systemic Sclerosis Human Dermal Fibroblasts In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wermuth, Peter J.; Addya, Sankar; Jimenez, Sergio A.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that protein kinase C- δ (PKC-δ) inhibition with the selective inhibitor, rottlerin, resulted in potent downregulation of type I collagen expression and production in normal human dermal fibroblasts and abrogated the exaggerated type I collagen production and expression in fibroblasts cultured from affected skin from patients with the fibrosing disorder systemic sclerosis (SSc). To elucidate the mechanisms involved in the ability of PKC-δ to regulate collagen production in fibroblasts, we examined the effects of PKC-δ inhibition on the transcriptome of normal and SSc human dermal fibroblasts. Normal and SSc human dermal fibroblasts were incubated with rottlerin (5 µM), and their gene expression was analyzed by microarrays. Pathway analysis and gene ontology analysis of differentially expressed genes in each comparison were performed. Identification of significantly overrepresented transcriptional regulatory elements (TREs) was performed using the Promoter Analysis and Interaction Network Toolset (PAINT) program. PKC-δ activity was also inhibited using RNA interference (siRNA) and by treating fibroblasts with a specific PKC-δ inhibitory cell permeable peptide. Differential gene expression of 20 genes was confirmed using real time PCR. PKC-δ inhibition caused a profound change in the transcriptome of normal and SSc human dermal fibroblasts in vitro. Pathway and gene ontology analysis identified multiple cellular and organismal pathways affected by PKC-δ inhibition. Furthermore, both pathway and PAINT analyses indicated that the transcription factor NFκB played an important role in the transcriptome changes induced by PKC-δ inhibition. Multiple genes involved in the degradation of the extracellular matrix components were significantly reduced in SSc fibroblasts and their expression was increased by PKC-δ inhibition. These results indicate that isoform-specific inhibition of PKC-δ profibrotic effects may represent a novel

  8. Effects of Src-kinase inhibition in cancer-induced bone pain

    PubMed Central

    De Felice, Milena; Lambert, Daniel; Holen, Ingunn; Escott, K Jane

    2016-01-01

    Background Bone metastases occur frequently in advanced breast, lung, and prostate cancer, with approximately 70% of patients affected. Pain is a major symptom of bone metastases, and current treatments may be inadequate or have unacceptable side effects. The mechanisms that drive cancer-induced bone pain are not fully understood; however, it is known that there is sensitization of both peripheral bone afferents and central spinal circuits. It is well established that the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor plays a major role in the pathophysiology of pain hypersensitivity. Inhibition of the non-receptor tyrosine kinase Src controls N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activity and inhibiting Src reduces the hypersensitivity associated with neuropathic and inflammatory pains. As Src is also implicated in osteoclastic bone resorption, we have investigated if inhibiting Src ameliorates cancer-induced bone pain. We have tested this hypothesis using an orally bioavailable Src inhibitor (saracatinib) in a rat model of cancer-induced bone pain. Results Intra-tibial injection of rat mammary cancer cells (Mammary rat metastasis tumor cells -1), but not vehicle, in rats produced hindpaw hypersensitivity to thermal and mechanical stimuli that was maximal after six days and persisted for at least 13 days postinjection. Daily oral gavage with saracatinib (20 mg/kg) beginning seven days after intra-tibial injection reversed the thermal hyperalgesia but not the mechanical allodynia. The analgesic mechanisms of saracatinib appear to be due to an effect on the nervous system as immunoblotting of L2-5 spinal segments showed that mammary rat metastasis tumor cells-1 injection induced phosphorylation of the GluN1 subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, indicative of receptor activation, and this was reduced by saracatinib. Additionally, histology showed no anti-tumor effect of saracatinib at any dose and no significant effect on bone preservation. Conclusions This is the first

  9. Synergistic effect of repulsive inhibition in synchronization of excitatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belykh, Igor; Reimbayev, Reimbay; Zhao, Kun

    2015-06-01

    We show that the addition of pairwise repulsive inhibition to excitatory networks of bursting neurons induces synchrony, in contrast to one's expectations. Through stability analysis, we reveal the mechanism underlying this purely synergistic phenomenon and demonstrate that it originates from the transition between different types of bursting, caused by excitatory-inhibitory synaptic coupling. This effect is generic and observed in different models of bursting neurons and fast synaptic interactions. We also find a universal scaling law for the synchronization stability condition for large networks in terms of the number of excitatory and inhibitory inputs each neuron receives, regardless of the network size and topology. This general law is in sharp contrast with linearly coupled networks with positive (attractive) and negative (repulsive) coupling where the placement and structure of negative connections heavily affect synchronization.

  10. Metformin inhibits growth of human non-small cell lung cancer cells via liver kinase B-1-independent activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    GUO, QIANQIAN; LIU, ZHIYAN; JIANG, LILI; LIU, MENGJIE; MA, JIEQUN; YANG, CHENGCHENG; HAN, LILI; NAN, KEJUN; LIANG, XUAN

    2016-01-01

    Metformin, the most widely administered oral anti-diabetic therapeutic agent, exerts its glucose-lowering effect predominantly via liver kinase B1 (LKB1)-dependent activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that metformin possesses potential antitumor effects. However, whether the antitumor effect of metformin is via the LKB1/AMPK signaling pathway remains to be determined. In the current study, the effects of metformin on proliferation, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) H460 (LKB1-null) and H1299 (LKB1-positive) cells were assessed, and the role of LKB1/AMPK signaling in the anti-growth effects of metformin were investigated. Cell viability was determined using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were assessed by flow cytometry, and protein expression levels were measured by western blotting. Metformin inhibited proliferation, induced significant cell cycle arrest at the G0–G1 phase and increased apoptosis in NSCLC cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, regardless of the level of LKB1 protein expression. Furthermore, knockdown of LKB1 with short hairpin RNA (shRNA) did not affect the antiproliferative effect of metformin in the H1299 cells. Metformin stimulated AMPK phosphorylation and subsequently suppressed the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin and its downstream effector, 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase in the two cell lines. These effects were abrogated by silencing AMPK with small interfering RNA (siRNA). In addition, knockdown of AMPK with siRNA inhibited the effect of metformin on cell proliferation in the two cell lines. These results provide evidence that the growth inhibition of metformin in NSCLC cells is mediated by LKB1-independent activation of AMPK, indicating that metformin may be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of

  11. Cinnamyl alcohol attenuates vasoconstriction by activation of K+ channels via NO-cGMP-protein kinase G pathway and inhibition of Rho-kinase

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yun Hwan; Yang, In Jun; Morgan, Kathleen G.

    2012-01-01

    Cinnamyl alcohol (CAL) is known as an antipyretic, and a recent study showed its vasodilatory activity without explaining the mechanism. Here we demonstrate the vasodilatory effect and the mechanism of action of CAL in rat thoracic aorta. The change of tension in aortic strips treated with CAL was measured in an organ bath system. In addition, vascular strips or human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were used for biochemical experiments such as Western blot and nitrite and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) measurements. CAL attenuated the vasoconstriction of phenylephrine (PE, 1 µM)-precontracted aortic strips in an endothelium-dependent manner. CAL-induced vasorelaxation was inhibited by pretreatment with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 10-4 M), methylene blue (MB; 10-5 M) and 1 H-[1,2,4]-oxadiazolole-[4,3-a] quinoxalin-10one, (ODQ; 10-6 or 10-7 M) in the endothelium-intact aortic strips. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP; 10-8 or 10-9 M) did not affect the vasodilatory effect of CAL. The phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and generation of nitric oxide (NO) were stimulated by CAL treatment in HUVECs and inhibited by treatment with L-NAME. In addition, cGMP and PKG1 activation in aortic strips treated with CAL were also significantly inhibited by L-NAME. Furthermore, CAL relaxed Rho-kinase activator calpeptin-precontracted aortic strips, and the vasodilatory effect of CAL was inhibited by the ATP-sensitive K+ channel inhibitor glibenclamide (Gli; 10-5 M) and the voltage-dependent K+ channel inhibitor 4-aminopyridine (4-AP; 2 × 10-4 M). These results suggest that CAL induces vasorelaxation by activating K+ channels via the NO-cGMP-PKG pathway and the inhibition of Rho-kinase. PMID:23178275

  12. Polo-like kinase 1 inhibition sensitizes neuroblastoma cells for vinca alkaloid-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Czaplinski, Sebastian; Hugle, Manuela; Stiehl, Valerie; Fulda, Simone

    2016-01-01

    High polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) expression has been linked to poor outcome in neuroblastoma (NB), indicating that it represents a relevant therapeutic target in this malignancy. Here, we identify a synergistic induction of apoptosis by the PLK1 inhibitor BI 2536 and vinca alkaloids in NB cells. Synergistic drug interaction of BI 2536 together with vincristine (VCR), vinblastine (VBL) or vinorelbine (VNR) is confirmed by calculation of combination index (CI). Also, BI 2536 and VCR act in concert to reduce long-term clonogenic survival. Importantly, BI 2536 significantly enhances the antitumor activity of VCR in an in vivo model of NB. Mechanistically, BI 2536/VCR co-treatment triggers prolonged mitotic arrest, which is necessary for BI 2536/VCR-mediated apoptosis, since pharmacological inhibition of mitotic arrest by the CDK1 inhibitor RO-3306 significantly reduces cell death. Prolonged mitotic arrest leads to phosphorylation-mediated inactivation of BCL-2 and BCL-XL as well as downregulation of MCL-1, since inhibition of mitotic arrest by RO-3306 also prevents phosphorylation of BCL-2 and BCL-XL and MCL-1 downregulation. This inactivation of antiapoptotic BCL-2 proteins promotes activation of BAX and BAK, cleavage of caspase-9 and -3 and caspase-dependent apoptosis. Engagement of the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis is critically required for BI 2536/VCR-induced apoptosis, since ectopic expression of a non-degradable MCL-1 phospho-mutant, BCL-2 overexpression or BAK knockdown significantly reduce BI 2536/VCR-mediated apoptosis. Thus, PLK1 inhibitors may open new perspectives for chemosensitization of NB. PMID:26046302

  13. Inhibition of smooth muscle force generation by focal adhesion kinase inhibitors in the hyperplastic human prostate.

    PubMed

    Kunit, Thomas; Gratzke, Christian; Schreiber, Andrea; Strittmatter, Frank; Waidelich, Raphaela; Rutz, Beata; Loidl, Wolfgang; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Stief, Christian G; Hennenberg, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Smooth muscle contraction may be critical for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in patients with benign prostate hyperplasia and requires stable anchorage of the cytoskeleton to the cell membrane. These connections are regulated by focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Here, we addressed the involvement of FAK in the regulation of smooth muscle contraction in hyperplastic human prostate tissues. Prostate tissues were obtained from radical prostatectomy. Expression of FAK and focal adhesion proteins was assessed by Western blot analysis and immunohistochemical stainings. Effects of the FAK inhibitors PF-573228 and Y-11 on contraction of prostate strips were examined in the organ bath. Expression of FAK and focal adhesion proteins (integrin-5α, paxilin, and c-Src) was detected by Western blot analysis in prostate samples. By double immunofluorescence staining with calponin and pan-cytokeratin, expression of FAK was observed in stromal and epithelial cells. Immunoreactivity for FAK colocalized with integrin-5α, paxilin, talin, and c-Src. Stimulation of prostate tissues with the α1-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine increased the phosphorylation state of FAK at Tyr³⁹⁷ and Tyr⁹²⁵ with different kinetics, which was blocked by the α1-adrenoceptor antagonist tamsulosin. Norepinephrine and phenylephrine induced concentration-dependent contractions of prostate strips. Both FAK inhibitors PF-573228 and Y-11 significantly inhibited norepinephrine- and phenylephrine-induced contractions. Finally, PF-573228 and Y-11 inhibited contractions induced by electric field stimulation, which was significant at the highest frequency. In conclusion, α1-adrenergic smooth muscle contraction or its regulation involves FAK in the human prostate. Consequently, FAK may be involved in the pathophysiology of LUTS and in current or future LUTS therapies. PMID:25056351

  14. Pharmacological Inhibition of the Protein Kinase MRK/ZAK Radiosensitizes Medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Markowitz, Daniel; Powell, Caitlin; Tran, Nhan L; Berens, Michael E; Ryken, Timothy C; Vanan, Magimairajan; Rosen, Lisa; He, Mingzu; Sun, Shan; Symons, Marc; Al-Abed, Yousef; Ruggieri, Rosamaria

    2016-08-01

    Medulloblastoma is a cerebellar tumor and the most common pediatric brain malignancy. Radiotherapy is part of the standard care for this tumor, but its effectiveness is accompanied by significant neurocognitive sequelae due to the deleterious effects of radiation on the developing brain. We have previously shown that the protein kinase MRK/ZAK protects tumor cells from radiation-induced cell death by regulating cell-cycle arrest after ionizing radiation. Here, we show that siRNA-mediated MRK depletion sensitizes medulloblastoma primary cells to radiation. We have, therefore, designed and tested a specific small molecule inhibitor of MRK, M443, which binds to MRK in an irreversible fashion and inhibits its activity. We found that M443 strongly radiosensitizes UW228 medulloblastoma cells as well as UI226 patient-derived primary cells, whereas it does not affect the response to radiation of normal brain cells. M443 also inhibits radiation-induced activation of both p38 and Chk2, two proteins that act downstream of MRK and are involved in DNA damage-induced cell-cycle arrest. Importantly, in an animal model of medulloblastoma that employs orthotopic implantation of primary patient-derived UI226 cells in nude mice, M443 in combination with radiation achieved a synergistic increase in survival. We hypothesize that combining radiotherapy with M443 will allow us to lower the radiation dose while maintaining therapeutic efficacy, thereby minimizing radiation-induced side effects. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(8); 1799-808. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27207779

  15. Silencing cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 3 inhibits the migration of breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Miao; Wang, Jianguang; Chen, Yanbin; Zhang, Like; Xie, Gangqiang; Liu, Qipeng; Zhang, Ting; Yuan, Pengfei; Liu, Dechun

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 3 (CDKN3) belongs to the dual-specificity protein phosphatase family, which is hypothesized to regulate cell cycle progression in tumor cells. However, whether CDKN3 is a potential therapeutic target for breast cancer remains to be elucidated. The present in vitro study aimed to investigate the potential roles of CDKN3 in breast cancer. Breast cancer cell lines were used to detect CDKN3 expression, and CDKN3 expression was silenced to investigate its role in cell apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and migration. The underlying mechanisms were screened by detecting proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), Ras homolog gene family, member A (RhoA), vimentin, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) expression. CDKN3 was highly expressed in MCF-7 and BT474 cell lines. The silencing of CDKN3 in MCF-7 and BT474 cell lines promoted cell apoptosis, induced G1 phase cell cycle arrest and inhibited cell migration. The expression levels of PCNA, RhoA, vimentin and Bcl-2 were downregulated following CDKN3 silencing. Conversely, Bax expression was increased, as compared with the vehicle control. These results suggest that CDKN3 acts as an oncogene during breast cancer progression. The in vitro silencing of CDKN3 promoted apoptosis, induced G1 phase cell cycle arrest and inhibited cell migration. Possible mechanisms are associated with the regulation of PCNA, Bcl-2, vimentin, RhoA and Bax expression. CDKN3 may therefore be considered a potential target for the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:27314680

  16. Rho-kinase inhibition improves vasodilator responsiveness during hyperinsulinemia in the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schinzari, Francesca; Tesauro, Manfredi; Rovella, Valentina; Di Daniele, Nicola; Gentileschi, Paolo; Mores, Nadia; Campia, Umberto; Cardillo, Carmine

    2012-09-15

    In patients with the metabolic syndrome (MetS), the facilitatory effect of insulin on forearm vasodilator responsiveness to different stimuli is impaired. Whether the RhoA/Rho kinase (ROCK) pathway is involved in this abnormality is unknown. We tested the hypotheses that, in MetS patients, ROCK inhibition with fasudil restores insulin-stimulated vasodilator reactivity and that oxidative stress plays a role in this mechanism. Endothelium-dependent and -independent forearm blood flow responses to acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP), respectively, were assessed in MetS patients (n = 8) and healthy controls (n = 5) before and after the addition of fasudil (200 μg/min) to an intra-arterial infusion of insulin (0.1 mU/kg/min). In MetS patients (n = 5), fasudil was also infused without hyperinsulinemia. The possible involvement of oxidative stress in the effect of fasudil during hyperinsulinemia was investigated in MetS patients (n = 5) by infusing vitamin C (25 mg/min). In MetS patients, compared with saline, fasudil enhanced endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilator responses during insulin infusion (P < 0.001 and P = 0.008, respectively), but not in the absence of hyperinsulinemia (P = 0.25 and P = 0.13, respectively). By contrast, fasudil did not affect vasoreactivity to ACh and SNP during hyperinsulinemia in controls (P = 0.11 and P = 0.56, respectively). In MetS patients, fasudil added to insulin and vitamin C did not further enhance vasodilation to ACh and SNP (P = 0.15 and P = 0.43, respectively). In the forearm circulation of patients with the MetS, ROCK inhibition by fasudil improves endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilator responsiveness during hyperinsulinemia; increased oxidative stress seems to be involved in the pathophysiology of this phenomenon. PMID:22829585

  17. Polo-like kinase 1 inhibition sensitizes neuroblastoma cells for vinca alkaloid-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Czaplinski, Sebastian; Hugle, Manuela; Stiehl, Valerie; Fulda, Simone

    2016-02-23

    High polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) expression has been linked to poor outcome in neuroblastoma (NB), indicating that it represents a relevant therapeutic target in this malignancy. Here, we identify a synergistic induction of apoptosis by the PLK1 inhibitor BI 2536 and vinca alkaloids in NB cells. Synergistic drug interaction of BI 2536 together with vincristine (VCR), vinblastine (VBL) or vinorelbine (VNR) is confirmed by calculation of combination index (CI). Also, BI 2536 and VCR act in concert to reduce long-term clonogenic survival. Importantly, BI 2536 significantly enhances the antitumor activity of VCR in an in vivo model of NB. Mechanistically, BI 2536/VCR co-treatment triggers prolonged mitotic arrest, which is necessary for BI 2536/VCR-mediated apoptosis, since pharmacological inhibition of mitotic arrest by the CDK1 inhibitor RO-3306 significantly reduces cell death. Prolonged mitotic arrest leads to phosphorylation-mediated inactivation of BCL-2 and BCL-XL as well as downregulation of MCL-1, since inhibition of mitotic arrest by RO-3306 also prevents phosphorylation of BCL-2 and BCL-XL and MCL-1 downregulation. This inactivation of antiapoptotic BCL-2 proteins promotes activation of BAX and BAK, cleavage of caspase-9 and -3 and caspase-dependent apoptosis. Engagement of the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis is critically required for BI 2536/VCR-induced apoptosis, since ectopic expression of a non-degradable MCL-1 phospho-mutant, BCL-2 overexpression or BAK knockdown significantly reduce BI 2536/VCR-mediated apoptosis. Thus, PLK1 inhibitors may open new perspectives for chemosensitization of NB. PMID:26046302

  18. Adapalene inhibits the activity of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 in colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    SHI, XI-NAN; LI, HONGJIAN; YAO, HONG; LIU, XU; LI, LING; LEUNG, KWONG-SAK; KUNG, HSIANG-FU; LIN, MARIE CHIA-MI

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) has been reported to be overexpressed in human colorectal cancer; it is responsible for the G1-to-S-phase transition in the cell cycle and its deregulation is a hallmark of cancer. The present study was the first to use idock, a free and open-source protein-ligand docking software developed by our group, to identify potential CDK2 inhibitors from 4,311 US Food and Drug Administration-approved small molecular drugs with a re-purposing strategy. Among the top compounds identified by idock score, nine were selected for further study. Among them, adapalene (ADA; CD271,6-[3-(1-adamantyl)-4-methoxyphenyl]-2-naphtoic acid) exhibited the highest anti-proliferative effects in LoVo and DLD1 human colon cancer cell lines. Consistent with the expected properties of CDK2 inhibitors, the present study demonstrated that ADA significantly increased the G1-phase population and decreased the expression of CDK2, cyclin E and retinoblastoma protein (Rb), as well as the phosphorylation of CDK2 (on Thr-160) and Rb (on Ser-795). Furthermore, the anti-cancer effects of ADA were examined in vivo on xenograft tumors derived from DLD1 human colorectal cancer cells subcutaneously inoculated in BALB/C nude mice. ADA (20 mg/kg orally) exhibited marked anti-tumor activity, comparable to that of oxaliplatin (40 mg/kg), and dose-dependently inhibited tumor growth (P<0.05), while combined administration of ADA and oxaliplatin produced the highest therapeutic effect. To the best of our knowledge, the present study was the first to indicate that ADA inhibits CDK2 and is a potential candidate drug for the treatment of human colorectal cancer. PMID:26398439

  19. Pharmaceutical inhibition of glycogen synthetase kinase 3 beta suppresses wear debris-induced osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Geng, Dechun; Wu, Jian; Shao, Hongguo; Zhu, Shijun; Wang, Yijun; Zhang, Wen; Ping, Zichuan; Hu, Xuanyang; Zhu, Xuesong; Xu, Yaozeng; Yang, Huilin

    2015-11-01

    Aseptic loosening is associated with the development of wear debris-induced peri-implant osteolytic bone disease caused by an increased osteoclastic bone resorption and decreased osteoblastic bone formation. However, no effective measures for the prevention and treatment of peri-implant osteolysis currently exist. The aim of this study was to determine whether lithium chloride (LiCl), a selective inhibitor of glycogen synthetase kinase 3 beta (GSK-3β), mitigates wear debris-induced osteolysis in a murine calvarial model of osteolysis. GSK-3β is activated by titanium (Ti) particles, and implantation of Ti particles on the calvarial surface in C57BL/6 mice resulted in osteolysis caused by an increase in the number of osteoclasts and a decrease in the number of osteoblasts. Mice implanted with Ti particles were gavage-fed LiCl (50 or 200 mg kg(-1)d(-1)), 6 days per week for 2 weeks. The LiCl treatment significantly inhibited GSK-3β activity and increased β-catenin and axin-2 expression in a dose-dependent manner, dramatically mitigating the Ti particle-induced suppression of osteoblast numbers and the expression of bone formation markers. Finally, we demonstrated that inhibition of GSK-3β suppresses osteoclast differentiation and reduces the severity of Ti particle-induced osteolysis. The results of this study indicate that Ti particle-induced osteolysis is partly dependent on GSK-3β and, therefore, the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. This suggests that selective inhibitors of GSK-3β such as LiCl may help prevent and treat wear debris-induced osteolysis. PMID:26275858

  20. Inhibition of Aurora Kinase B Is Important for Biologic Activity of the Dual Inhibitors of BCR-ABL and Aurora Kinases R763/AS703569 and PHA-739358 in BCR-ABL Transformed Cells

    PubMed Central

    Illert, Anna L.; Seitz, Anna K.; Rummelt, Christoph; Kreutmair, Stefanie; Engh, Richard A.; Goodstal, Samantha; Peschel, Christian; Duyster, Justus; von Bubnoff, Nikolas

    2014-01-01

    ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) like Imatinib, Dasatinib and Nilotinib are the gold standard in conventional treatment of CML. However, the emergence of resistance remains a major problem. Alternative therapeutic strategies of ABL TKI-resistant CML are urgently needed. We asked whether dual inhibition of BCR-ABL and Aurora kinases A-C could overcome resistance mediated by ABL kinase mutations. We therefore tested the dual ABL and Aurora kinase inhibitors PHA-739358 and R763/AS703569 in Ba/F3- cells ectopically expressing wild type (wt) or TKI-resistant BCR-ABL mutants. We show that both compounds exhibited strong anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activity in ABL TKI resistant cell lines including cells expressing the strongly resistant T315I mutation. Cell cycle analysis indicated polyploidisation, a consequence of continued cell cycle progression in the absence of cell division by Aurora kinase inhibition. Experiments using drug resistant variants of Aurora B indicated that PHA-739358 acts on both, BCR-ABL and Aurora Kinase B, whereas Aurora kinase B inhibition might be sufficient for the anti-proliferative activity observed with R763/AS703569. Taken together, our data demonstrate that dual ABL and Aurora kinase inhibition might be used to overcome ABL TKI resistant CML. PMID:25426931

  1. Involvement of protein kinase C and Src tyrosine kinase in acute tolerance to ethanol inhibition of spinal NMDA-induced pressor responses in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, W-K; Lin, H-H; Lai, C-C

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: The present study was carried out to examine the role of protein kinases in the development of acute tolerance to the effects of ethanol on spinal N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated pressor responses during prolonged ethanol exposure. Experimental approach: Blood pressure responses induced by intrathecal injection of NMDA were recorded. The levels of several phosphorylated residues on NMDA receptor NR1 (GluN1) (NR1) and NMDA receptor NR2B (GluN2B) (NR2B) subunits were determined by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Key results: Ethanol inhibited spinal NMDA-induced pressor responses at 10 min, but the inhibition was significantly reduced at 40 min following continuous infusion. This effect was dose-dependently blocked by chelerythrine [a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, 1–1000 pmol] or PP2 (a Src family tyrosine kinase inhibitor, 1–100 pmol) administered intrathecally 10 min following ethanol infusion. A significant increase in the immunoreactivity of phosphoserine 896 of NR1 subunits (pNR1-Ser896) and phosphotyrosine 1336 of NR2B subunits (pNR2B-Tyr1336) was found in neurons of intermediolateral cell column during the development of tolerance. Levels of pNR1-Ser896 and pNR2B-Tyr1336 were also significantly increased in lateral horn regions of the spinal cord slices incubated with ethanol for 40 min in vitro. The increases in pNR1-Ser896 and pNR2B-Tyr1336 levels were inhibited by post-treatment with chelerythrine and PP2, respectively, both in the in vivo and in vitro studies. Conclusions and implications: The results suggest that activation of PKC and Src tyrosine kinase during prolonged ethanol exposure leading to increases in the levels of pNR1-Ser896 and pNR2B-Tyr1336 may contribute to acute tolerance to inhibition by ethanol of NMDA receptor function. PMID:19703167

  2. LY294002 inhibits glucocorticoid-induced COX-2 gene expression in cardiomyocytes through a phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase-independent mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Haipeng; Xu Beibei; Sheveleva, Elena; Chen, Qin M.

    2008-10-01

    Glucocorticoids induce COX-2 expression in rat cardiomyocytes. While investigating whether phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) plays a role in corticosterone (CT)-induced COX-2, we found that LY294002 (LY29) but not wortmannin (WM) attenuates CT from inducing COX-2 gene expression. Expression of a dominant-negative mutant of p85 subunit of PI3K failed to inhibit CT from inducing COX-2 expression. CT did not activate PI3K/AKT signaling pathway whereas LY29 and WM decreased the activity of PI3K. LY303511 (LY30), a structural analogue and a negative control for PI3K inhibitory activity of LY29, also suppressed COX-2 induction. These data suggest PI3K-independent mechanisms in regulating CT-induced COX-2 expression. LY29 and LY30 do not inhibit glucocorticoid receptor transactivity. Both compounds have been reported to inhibit Casein Kinase 2 activity and modulate potassium and calcium levels independent of PI3K, while LY29 has been reported to inhibit mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR), and DNA-dependent Protein Kinase (DNA-PK). Inhibitor of Casein Kinase 2 (CK2), mTOR or DNA-PK failed to prevent CT from inducing COX-2 expression. Tetraethylammonium (TEA), a potassium channel blocker, and nimodipine, a calcium channel blocker, both attenuated CT from inducing COX-2 gene expression. CT was found to increase intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration, which can be inhibited by LY29, TEA or nimodipine. These data suggest a possible role of calcium instead of PI3K in CT-induced COX-2 expression in cardiomyocytes.

  3. Phosphorylation-Independent Inhibition of Cdc28p by the Tyrosine Kinase Swe1p in the Morphogenesis Checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, John N.; Sia, Rey A. L.; Bardes, Elaine S. G.; Lew, Daniel J.

    1999-01-01

    The morphogenesis checkpoint in budding yeast delays cell cycle progression in G2 when the actin cytoskeleton is perturbed, providing time for cells to complete bud formation prior to mitosis. Checkpoint-induced G2 arrest involves the inhibition of the master cell cycle regulatory cyclin-dependent kinase, Cdc28p, by the Wee1 family kinase Swe1p. Results of experiments using a nonphosphorylatable CDC28Y19F allele suggested that the checkpoint stimulated two inhibitory pathways, one that promoted phosphorylation at tyrosine 19 (Y19) and a poorly characterized second pathway that did not require Cdc28p Y19 phosphorylation. We present the results from a genetic screen for checkpoint-defective mutants that led to the repeated isolation of the dominant CDC28E12K allele that is resistant to Swe1p-mediated inhibition. Comparison of this allele with the nonphosphorylatable CDC28Y19F allele suggested that Swe1p is still able to inhibit CDC28Y19F in a phosphorylation-independent manner and that both the Y19 phosphorylation-dependent and -independent checkpoint pathways in fact reflect Swe1p inhibition of Cdc28p. Remarkably, we found that a Swe1p mutant lacking catalytic activity could significantly delay the cell cycle in vivo during a physiological checkpoint response, even when expressed at single copy. The finding that a Wee1 family kinase expressed at physiological levels can inhibit a nonphosphorylatable cyclin-dependent kinase has broad implications for many checkpoint studies using such mutants in other organisms. PMID:10454545

  4. Synergism of FAK and tyrosine kinase inhibition in Ph+ B-ALL

    PubMed Central

    Churchman, Michelle L.; Evans, Kathryn; Richmond, Jennifer; Robbins, Alissa; Jones, Luke; Shapiro, Irina M.; Pachter, Jonathan A.; Weaver, David T.; Houghton, Peter J.; Smith, Malcolm A.; Lock, Richard B.; Mullighan, Charles G.

    2016-01-01

    BCR-ABL1+ B progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph+ B-ALL) is an aggressive disease that frequently responds poorly to currently available therapies. Alterations in IKZF1, which encodes the lymphoid transcription factor Ikaros, are present in over 80% of Ph+ ALL and are associated with a stem cell–like phenotype, aberrant adhesion molecule expression and signaling, leukemic cell adhesion to the bone marrow stem cell niche, and poor outcome. Here, we show that FAK1 is upregulated in Ph+ B-ALL with further overexpression in IKZF1-altered cells and that the FAK inhibitor VS-4718 potently inhibits aberrant FAK signaling and leukemic cell adhesion, potentiating responsiveness to tyrosine kinase inhibitors, inducing cure in vivo. Thus, targeting FAK with VS-4718 is an attractive approach to overcome the deleterious effects of FAK overexpression in Ph+ B-ALL, particularly in abrogating the adhesive phenotype induced by Ikaros alterations, and warrants evaluation in clinical trials for Ph+ B-ALL, regardless of IKZF1 status. PMID:27123491

  5. Targeting tumour vasculature by inhibiting activin receptor-like kinase (ALK)1 function.

    PubMed

    de Vinuesa, Amaya García; Bocci, Matteo; Pietras, Kristian; Ten Dijke, Peter

    2016-08-15

    Angiogenesis is a hallmark of cancer and is now a validated therapeutic target in the clinical setting. Despite the initial success, anti-angiogenic compounds impinging on the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway display limited survival benefits in patients and resistance often develops due to activation of alternative pathways. Thus, finding and validating new targets is highly warranted. Activin receptor-like kinase (ALK)1 is a transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) type I receptor predominantly expressed in actively proliferating endothelial cells (ECs). ALK1 has been shown to play a pivotal role in regulating angiogenesis by binding to bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)9 and 10. Two main pharmacological inhibitors, an ALK1-Fc fusion protein (Dalantercept/ACE-041) and a fully human antibody against the extracellular domain of ALK1 (PF-03446962) are currently under clinical development. Herein, we briefly recapitulate the role of ALK1 in blood vessel formation and the current status of the preclinical and clinical studies on inhibition of ALK1 signalling as an anti-angiogenic strategy. Future directions in terms of new combination regimens will also be presented. PMID:27528762

  6. The Structure of KinA-Sda Complex Suggests An Allosteric Mechanism of Histidine Kinase Inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Whitten, A.E.; Jacques, D.A.; Hammouda, B.; Hanley, T.; King, G.F.; Guss, J.Mitchell.; Trewhella, J.; Langley, D.B.; /Sydney U. /NIST, Wash., D.C. /Utah U.

    2007-07-13

    The Bacillus subtilis histidine kinase KinA controls activation of the transcription factor governing sporulation, Spo0A. The decision to sporulate involves KinA phosphorylating itself on a conserved histidine residue, after which the phosphate moiety is relayed via two other proteins to Spo0A. The DNA-damage checkpoint inhibitor Sda halts this pathway by binding KinA and blocking the autokinase reaction. We have performed small-angle X-ray scattering and neutron contrast variation studies on the complex formed by KinA and Sda. The data show that two Sda molecules bind to the base of the DHp dimerization domain of the KinA dimer. In this position Sda does not appear to be able to sterically block the catalytic domain from accessing its target histidine, as previously proposed, but rather may effect an allosteric mode of inhibition involving transmission of the inhibitory signal via the four-helix bundle that forms the DHp domain.

  7. Aorta-derived mesoangioblasts differentiate into the oligodendrocytes by inhibition of the Rho kinase signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Kamath, Anant; Frye, Janie; Iwamoto, Gary A; Chun, Ju Lan; Berry, Suzanne E

    2012-05-01

    Mesoangioblasts are vessel-derived stem cells that differentiate into mesodermal derivatives. We have isolated postnatal aorta-derived mesoangioblasts (ADMs) that differentiate into smooth, skeletal, and cardiac muscle, and adipocytes, and regenerate damaged skeletal muscle in a murine model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We report that the marker profile of ADM is similar to that of mesoangioblasts isolated from embryonic dorsal aorta, postnatal bone marrow, and heart, but distinct from mesoangioblasts derived from skeletal muscle. We also demonstrate that ADM differentiate into myelinating glial cells. ADM localize to peripheral nerve bundles in regenerating muscles and exhibit morphology and marker expression of mature Schwann cells, and myelinate axons. In vitro, ADM spontaneously express markers of oligodendrocyte progenitors, including the chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan NG2, nestin, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor α, the A2B5 antigen, thyroid hormone nuclear receptor α, and O4. Pharmacological inhibition of Rho kinase (ROCK) initiated process extension by ADM, and when combined with insulin-like growth factor 1, PDGF, and thyroid hormone, enhanced ADM expression of oligodendrocyte precursor markers and maturation into the oligodendrocyte lineage. ADM injected into the right lateral ventricle of the brain migrate to the corpus callosum, and cerebellar white matter, where they express components of myelin. Because ADM differentiate or mature into cell types of both mesodermal and ectodermal origin, they may be useful for treatment of a variety of degenerative diseases, or repair and regeneration of multiple cell types in severely damaged tissue. PMID:21793703

  8. The chemosensitizing agent lubeluzole binds calmodulin and inhibits Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Claudio; Cavalluzzi, Maria Maddalena; Rusciano, Maria Rosaria; Lovece, Angelo; Carrieri, Antonio; Pracella, Riccardo; Giannuzzi, Giulia; Polimeno, Lorenzo; Viale, Maurizio; Illario, Maddalena; Franchini, Carlo; Lentini, Giovanni

    2016-06-30

    An affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE) method to estimate apparent dissociation constants between bovine brain calmodulin (CaM) and non-peptidic ligands was developed. The method was validated reproducing the dissociation constants of a number of well-known CaM ligands. In particular, the potent antagonist 125-C9 was ad hoc synthesized through an improved synthetic procedure. The ACE method was successfully applied to verify CaM affinity for lubeluzole, a well-known neuroprotective agent recently proved useful to potentiate the activity of anti-cancer drugs. Lubeluzole was slightly less potent than 125-C9 (Kd = 2.9 ± 0.7 and 0.47 ± 0.06 μM, respectively) and displayed Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibition (IC50 = 40 ± 1 μM). Possible binding modes of lubeluzole to CaM were explored by docking studies based on the X-ray crystal structures of several trifluoperazine-CaM complexes. An estimated dissociation constant in good agreement with the experimental one was found and the main aminoacidic residues and interactions contributing to complex formation were highlighted. The possibility that interference with Ca(2+) pathways may contribute to the previously observed chemosensitizing effects of lubeluzole on human ovarian adenocarcinoma and lung carcinoma cells are discussed. PMID:27043269

  9. FTY720 (fingolimod) sensitizes prostate cancer cells to radiotherapy by inhibition of sphingosine kinase-1.

    PubMed

    Pchejetski, Dmitri; Bohler, Torsten; Brizuela, Leyre; Sauer, Lysann; Doumerc, Nicolas; Golzio, Muriel; Salunkhe, Vishal; Teissié, Justin; Malavaud, Bernard; Waxman, Jonathan; Cuvillier, Olivier

    2010-11-01

    Radiotherapy is widely used as a radical treatment for prostate cancer, but curative treatments are elusive for poorly differentiated tumors where survival is just 15% at 15 years. Dose escalation improves local response rates but is limited by tolerance in normal tissues. A sphingosine analogue, FTY720 (fingolimod), a drug currently in phase III studies for treatment of multiple sclerosis, has been found to be a potent apoptosis inducer in prostate cancer cells. Using in vitro and in vivo approaches, we analyzed the impact of FTY720 on sphingolipid metabolism in hormone-refractory metastatic prostate cancer cells and evaluated its potential as a radiosensitizer on cell lines and prostate tumor xenografts. In prostate cancer cell lines, FTY720 acted as a sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) inhibitor that induced prostate cancer cell apoptosis in a manner independent of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors. In contrast, γ irradiation did not affect SphK1 activity in prostate cancer cells yet synergized with FTY720 to inhibit SphK1. In mice bearing orthotopic or s.c. prostate cancer tumors, we show that FTY720 dramatically increased radiotherapeutic sensitivity, reducing tumor growth and metastasis without toxic side effects. Our findings suggest that low, well-tolerated doses of FTY720 could offer significant improvement to the clinical treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:20959468

  10. Inhibition of Receptor Interacting Protein Kinases Attenuates Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy Induced by Palmitic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Mingyue; Lu, Lihui; Lei, Song; Chai, Hua; Wu, Siyuan; Tang, Xiaoju; Bao, Qinxue; Chen, Li; Wu, Wenchao; Liu, Xiaojing

    2016-01-01

    Palmitic acid (PA) is known to cause cardiomyocyte dysfunction. Cardiac hypertrophy is one of the important pathological features of PA-induced lipotoxicity, but the mechanism by which PA induces cardiomyocyte hypertrophy is still unclear. Therefore, our study was to test whether necroptosis, a receptor interacting protein kinase 1 and 3 (RIPK1 and RIPK3-) dependent programmed necrosis, was involved in the PA-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. We used the PA-treated primary neonatal rat cardiac myocytes (NCMs) or H9c2 cells to study lipotoxicity. Our results demonstrated that cardiomyocyte hypertrophy was induced by PA treatment, determined by upregulation of hypertrophic marker genes and cell surface area enlargement. Upon PA treatment, the expression of RIPK1 and RIPK3 was increased. Pretreatment with the RIPK1 inhibitor necrostatin-1 (Nec-1), the PA-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, was attenuated. Knockdown of RIPK1 or RIPK3 by siRNA suppressed the PA-induced myocardial hypertrophy. Moreover, a crosstalk between necroptosis and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was observed in PA-treated cardiomyocytes. Inhibition of RIPK1 with Nec-1, phosphorylation level of AKT (Ser473), and mTOR (Ser2481) was significantly reduced in PA-treated cardiomyocytes. In conclusion, RIPKs-dependent necroptosis might be crucial in PA-induced myocardial hypertrophy. Activation of mTOR may mediate the effect of necroptosis in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by PA. PMID:27057269

  11. Src tyrosine kinase signaling antagonizes nuclear localization of FOXO and inhibits its transcription factor activity.

    PubMed

    Bülow, Margret H; Bülow, Torsten R; Hoch, Michael; Pankratz, Michael J; Jünger, Martin A

    2014-01-01

    Biochemical experiments in mammalian cells have linked Src family kinase activity to the insulin signaling pathway. To explore the physiological link between Src and a central insulin pathway effector, we investigated the effect of different Src signaling levels on the Drosophila transcription factor dFOXO in vivo. Ectopic activation of Src42A in the starved larval fatbody was sufficient to drive dFOXO out of the nucleus. When Src signaling levels were lowered by means of loss-of-function mutations or pharmacological inhibition, dFOXO localization was shifted to the nucleus in growing animals, and transcription of the dFOXO target genes d4E-BP and dInR was induced. dFOXO loss-of-function mutations rescued the induction of dFOXO target gene expression and the body size reduction of Src42A mutant larvae, establishing dFOXO as a critical downstream effector of Src signaling. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the regulation of FOXO transcription factors by Src is evolutionarily conserved in mammalian cells. PMID:24513978

  12. Inhibition of host extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation decreases new world alphavirus multiplication in infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, Kelsey; Amaya, Moushimi; Mueller, Claudius; Roberts, Brian; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Bailey, Charles; Petricoin, Emanuel; Narayanan, Aarthi

    2014-11-15

    New World alphaviruses belonging to the family Togaviridae are classified as emerging infectious agents and Category B select agents. Our study is focused on the role of the host extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in the infectious process of New World alphaviruses. Infection of human cells by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) results in the activation of the ERK-signaling cascade. Inhibition of ERK1/2 by the small molecule inhibitor Ag-126 results in inhibition of viral multiplication. Ag-126-mediated inhibition of VEEV was due to potential effects on early and late stages of the infectious process. While expression of viral proteins was down-regulated in Ag-126 treated cells, we did not observe any influence of Ag-126 on the nuclear distribution of capsid. Finally, Ag-126 exerted a broad-spectrum inhibitory effect on New World alphavirus multiplication, thus indicating that the host kinase, ERK, is a broad-spectrum candidate for development of novel therapeutics against New World alphaviruses. - Highlights: • VEEV infection activated multiple components of the ERK signaling cascade. • Inhibition of ERK activation using Ag-126 inhibited VEEV multiplication. • Activation of ERK by Ceramide C6 increased infectious titers of TC-83. • Ag-126 inhibited virulent strains of all New World alphaviruses. • Ag-126 treatment increased percent survival of infected cells.

  13. p130 and p107 use a conserved domain to inhibit cellular cyclin-dependent kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Woo, M S; Sánchez, I; Dynlacht, B D

    1997-01-01

    The pRB-related proteins p107 and p130 are thought to suppress growth in part through their associations with two important cell cycle kinases, cyclin A-cdk2 and cyclin E-cdk2, and transcription factor E2F. Although each protein plays a critical role in cell proliferation, the functional consequences of the association among growth suppressor, cyclin-dependent kinase, and transcription factor have remained elusive. In an attempt to understand the biochemical properties of such complexes, we reconstituted each of the p130-cyclin-cdk2 and p107-cyclin-cdk2 complexes found in vivo with purified, recombinant proteins. Strikingly, stoichiometric association of p107 or p130 with either cyclin E-cdk2 or cyclin A-cdk2 negated the activities of these kinases. The results of our experiments suggest that inhibition does not result from substrate competition or loss of cdk2 activation. Kinase inhibitory activity was dependent upon an amino-terminal region of p107 that is highly conserved with p130. Further, a role for this amino-terminal region in growth suppression was uncovered by using p107 mutants unable to bind E2F. To determine whether cellular complexes might display similar regulatory properties, we purified p130-cyclin A-cdk2 complexes from human cells and found that such complexes exist in two forms, one that contains E2F-4-DP-1 and one that lacks the heterodimer. These endogenous complexes behaved like the in vitro-reconstituted complexes, exhibiting low levels of associated kinase activity that could be significantly augmented by dissociation of p130. The results of these experiments suggest a mechanism whereby p130 and p107 suppress growth by inhibiting important cell cycle kinases. PMID:9199292

  14. Rapid increase of spines by dihydrotestosterone and testosterone in hippocampal neurons: Dependence on synaptic androgen receptor and kinase networks.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Yusuke; Hojo, Yasushi; Mukai, Hideo; Murakami, Gen; Komatsuzaki, Yoshimasa; Kim, Jonghyuk; Ikeda, Muneki; Hiragushi, Ayako; Kimoto, Tetsuya; Kawato, Suguru

    2015-09-24

    Rapid modulation of hippocampal synaptic plasticity by locally synthesized androgen is important in addition to circulating androgen. Here, we investigated the rapid changes of dendritic spines in response to the elevation of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and testosterone (T), by using hippocampal slices from adult male rats, in order to clarify whether these signaling processes include synaptic/extranuclear androgen receptor (AR) and activation of kinases. We found that the application of 10nM DHT and 10nM T increased the total density of spines by approximately 1.3-fold within 2h, by imaging Lucifer Yellow-injected CA1 pyramidal neurons. Interestingly, DHT and T increased different head-sized spines. While DHT increased middle- and large-head spines, T increased small-head spines. Androgen-induced spinogenesis was suppressed by individually blocking Erk MAPK, PKA, PKC, p38 MAPK, LIMK or calcineurin. On the other hand, blocking CaMKII did not inhibit spinogenesis. Blocking PI3K altered the spine head diameter distribution, but did not change the total spine density. Blocking mRNA and protein synthesis did not suppress the enhancing effects induced by DHT or T. The enhanced spinogenesis by androgens was blocked by AR antagonist, which AR was localized postsynaptically. Taken together, these results imply that enhanced spinogenesis by DHT and T is mediated by synaptic/extranuclear AR which rapidly drives the kinase networks. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Brain and Memory. PMID:25511993

  15. Genetic and Pharmacological Inhibition of PDK1 in Cancer Cells: Characterization of a Selective Allosteric Kinase Inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Nagashima, Kumiko; Shumway, Stuart D.; Sathyanarayanan, Sriram; Chen, Albert H.; Dolinski, Brian; Xu, Youyuan; Keilhack, Heike; Nguyen, Thi; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Li, Lixia; Lutterbach, Bart A.; Chi, An; Paweletz, Cloud; Allison, Timothy; Yan, Youwei; Munshi, Sanjeev K.; Klippel, Anke; Kraus, Manfred; Bobkova, Ekaterina V.; Deshmukh, Sujal; Xu, Zangwei; Mueller, Uwe; Szewczak, Alexander A.; Pan, Bo-Sheng; Richon, Victoria; Pollock, Roy; Blume-Jensen, Peter; Northrup, Alan; Andersen, Jannik N.

    2013-11-20

    Phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1) is a critical activator of multiple prosurvival and oncogenic protein kinases and has garnered considerable interest as an oncology drug target. Despite progress characterizing PDK1 as a therapeutic target, pharmacological support is lacking due to the prevalence of nonspecific inhibitors. Here, we benchmark literature and newly developed inhibitors and conduct parallel genetic and pharmacological queries into PDK1 function in cancer cells. Through kinase selectivity profiling and x-ray crystallographic studies, we identify an exquisitely selective PDK1 inhibitor (compound 7) that uniquely binds to the inactive kinase conformation (DFG-out). In contrast to compounds 1-5, which are classical ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors (DFG-in), compound 7 specifically inhibits cellular PDK1 T-loop phosphorylation (Ser-241), supporting its unique binding mode. Interfering with PDK1 activity has minimal antiproliferative effect on cells growing as plastic-attached monolayer cultures (i.e. standard tissue culture conditions) despite reduced phosphorylation of AKT, RSK, and S6RP. However, selective PDK1 inhibition impairs anchorage-independent growth, invasion, and cancer cell migration. Compound 7 inhibits colony formation in a subset of cancer cell lines (four of 10) and primary xenograft tumor lines (nine of 57). RNAi-mediated knockdown corroborates the PDK1 dependence in cell lines and identifies candidate biomarkers of drug response. In summary, our profiling studies define a uniquely selective and cell-potent PDK1 inhibitor, and the convergence of genetic and pharmacological phenotypes supports a role of PDK1 in tumorigenesis in the context of three-dimensional in vitro culture systems.

  16. Nimbolide, a neem limonoid inhibits Phosphatidyl Inositol-3 Kinase to activate Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β in a hamster model of oral oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sophia, Josephraj; Kiran Kishore T., Kranthi; Kowshik, Jaganathan; Mishra, Rajakishore; Nagini, Siddavaram

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), a serine/threonine kinase is frequently inactivated by the oncogenic signalling kinases PI3K/Akt and MAPK/ERK in diverse malignancies. The present study was designed to investigate GSK-3β signalling circuits in the 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis model and the therapeutic potential of the neem limonoid nimbolide. Inactivation of GSK-3β by phosphorylation at serine 9 and activation of PI3K/Akt, MAPK/ERK and β-catenin was associated with increased cell proliferation and apoptosis evasion during stepwise evolution of HBP carcinomas. Administration of nimbolide inhibited PI3K/Akt signalling with consequent activation of GSK-3β thereby inducing trafficking of β-catenin away from the nucleus and enhancing the expression of miR-126 and let-7. Molecular docking studies confirmed interaction of nimbolide with PI3K, Akt, ERK and GSK-3β. Furthermore, nimbolide attenuated cell proliferation and induced apoptosis as evidenced by increased p-cyclin D1Thr286 and pro-apoptotic proteins. The present study has unravelled aberrant phosphorylation as a key determinant for oncogenic signalling and acquisition of cancer hallmarks in the HBP model. The study has also provided mechanistic insights into the chemotherapeutic potential of nimbolide that may be a useful addition to the armamentarium of natural compounds targeting PI3K for oral cancer treatment. PMID:26902162

  17. Nimbolide, a neem limonoid inhibits Phosphatidyl Inositol-3 Kinase to activate Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β in a hamster model of oral oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sophia, Josephraj; Kiran Kishore T, Kranthi; Kowshik, Jaganathan; Mishra, Rajakishore; Nagini, Siddavaram

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), a serine/threonine kinase is frequently inactivated by the oncogenic signalling kinases PI3K/Akt and MAPK/ERK in diverse malignancies. The present study was designed to investigate GSK-3β signalling circuits in the 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis model and the therapeutic potential of the neem limonoid nimbolide. Inactivation of GSK-3β by phosphorylation at serine 9 and activation of PI3K/Akt, MAPK/ERK and β-catenin was associated with increased cell proliferation and apoptosis evasion during stepwise evolution of HBP carcinomas. Administration of nimbolide inhibited PI3K/Akt signalling with consequent activation of GSK-3β thereby inducing trafficking of β-catenin away from the nucleus and enhancing the expression of miR-126 and let-7. Molecular docking studies confirmed interaction of nimbolide with PI3K, Akt, ERK and GSK-3β. Furthermore, nimbolide attenuated cell proliferation and induced apoptosis as evidenced by increased p-cyclin D1(Thr286) and pro-apoptotic proteins. The present study has unravelled aberrant phosphorylation as a key determinant for oncogenic signalling and acquisition of cancer hallmarks in the HBP model. The study has also provided mechanistic insights into the chemotherapeutic potential of nimbolide that may be a useful addition to the armamentarium of natural compounds targeting PI3K for oral cancer treatment. PMID:26902162

  18. Inhibition of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase (PFKFB3) induces autophagy as a survival mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Unlike glycolytic enzymes that directly catabolize glucose to pyruvate, the family of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatases (PFKFBs) control the conversion of fructose-6-phosphate to and from fructose-2,6-bisphosphate, a key regulator of the glycolytic enzyme phosphofructokinase-1 (PFK-1). One family member, PFKFB3, has been shown to be highly expressed and activated in human cancer cells, and derivatives of a PFKFB3 inhibitor, 3-(3-pyridinyl)-1-(4-pyridinyl)-2-propen-1-one (3PO), are currently being developed in clinical trials. However, the effectiveness of drugs such as 3PO that target energetic pathways is limited by survival pathways that can be activated by reduced ATP and nutrient uptake. One such pathway is the process of cellular self-catabolism termed autophagy. We hypothesized that the functional glucose starvation induced by inhibition of PFKFB3 in tumor cells would induce autophagy as a pro-survival mechanism and that inhibitors of autophagy could increase the anti-tumor effects of PFKFB3 inhibitors. Results We found that selective inhibition of PFKFB3 with either siRNA transfection or 3PO in HCT-116 colon adenocarcinoma cells caused a marked decrease in glucose uptake simultaneously with an increase in autophagy based on LC3-II and p62 protein expression, acridine orange fluorescence of acidic vacuoles and electron microscopic detection of autophagosomes. The induction of autophagy caused by PFKFB3 inhibition required an increase in reactive oxygen species since N-acetyl-cysteine blocked both the conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II and the increase in acridine orange fluorescence in acidic vesicles after exposure of HCT-116 cells to 3PO. We speculated that the induction of autophagy might protect cells from the pro-apoptotic effects of 3PO and found that agents that disrupt autophagy, including chloroquine, increased 3PO-induced apoptosis as measured by double staining with Annexin V and propidium iodide in both HCT-116 cells and

  19. Global Effects of Kinase Inhibitors on Signaling Networks Revealed by Quantitative Phosphoproteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Cuiping; Olsen, Jesper V.; Daub, Henrik; Mann, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Aberrant signaling causes many diseases, and manipulating signaling pathways with kinase inhibitors has emerged as a promising area of drug research. Most kinase inhibitors target the conserved ATP-binding pocket; therefore specificity is a major concern. Proteomics has previously been used to identify the direct targets of kinase inhibitors upon affinity purification from cellular extracts. Here we introduce a complementary approach to evaluate the effects of kinase inhibitors on the entire cell signaling network. We used triple labeling SILAC (stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture) to compare cellular phosphorylation levels for control, epidermal growth factor stimulus, and growth factor combined with kinase inhibitors. Of thousands of phosphopeptides, less than 10% had a response pattern indicative of targets of U0126 and SB202190, two widely used MAPK inhibitors. Interestingly, 83% of the growth factor-induced phosphorylation events were affected by either or both inhibitors, showing quantitatively that early signaling processes are predominantly transmitted through the MAPK cascades. In contrast to MAPK inhibitors, dasatinib, a clinical drug directed against BCR-ABL, which is the cause of chronic myelogenous leukemia, affected nearly 1,000 phosphopeptides. In addition to the proximal effects on ABL and its immediate targets, dasatinib broadly affected the downstream MAPK pathways. Pathway mapping of regulated sites implicated a variety of cellular functions, such as chromosome remodeling, RNA splicing, and cytoskeletal organization, some of which have been described in the literature before. Our assay is streamlined and generic and could become a useful tool in kinase drug development. PMID:19651622

  20. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibition by the KLF6 tumor suppressor protein through interaction with cyclin D1.

    PubMed

    Benzeno, Sharon; Narla, Goutham; Allina, Jorge; Cheng, George Z; Reeves, Helen L; Banck, Michaela S; Odin, Joseph A; Diehl, J Alan; Germain, Doris; Friedman, Scott L

    2004-06-01

    Kruppel-like factor 6 (KLF6) is a tumor suppressor gene inactivated in prostate and colon cancers, as well as in astrocytic gliomas. Here, we establish that KLF6 mediates growth inhibition through an interaction with cyclin D1, leading to reduced phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) at Ser(795). Furthermore, introduction of KLF6 disrupts cyclin D1-cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) 4 complexes and forces the redistribution of p21(Cip/Kip) onto cdk2, which promotes G(1) cell cycle arrest. Our data suggest that KLF6 converges with the Rb pathway to inhibit cyclin D1/cdk4 activity, resulting in growth suppression. PMID:15172998

  1. Retinoblastoma cells are inhibited by aminoimidazole carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) partially through activation of AMP-dependent kinase.

    PubMed

    Theodoropoulou, Sofia; Kolovou, Paraskevi E; Morizane, Yuki; Kayama, Maki; Nicolaou, Fotini; Miller, Joan W; Gragoudas, Evangelos; Ksander, Bruce R; Vavvas, Demetrios G

    2010-08-01

    5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-4-ribofuranoside (AICAR), an analog of AMP, is widely used as an activator of AMP-kinase (AMPK), a protein that regulates the responses of the cell to energy change. We studied the effects of AICAR on the growth of retinoblastoma cell lines (Y79, WERI, and RB143). AICAR inhibited Rb cell growth, induced apoptosis and S-phase cell cycle arrest, and led to activation of AMPK. These effects were abolished by treatment with dypiridamole, an inhibitor that blocks entrance of AICAR into cells. Treatment with the adenosine kinase inhibitor 5-iodotubericidin to inhibit the conversion of AICAR to ZMP (the direct activator of AMPK) reversed most of the growth-inhibiting effects of AICAR, indicating that some of the antiproliferative effects of AICAR are mediated through AMPK activation. In addition, AICAR treatment was associated with inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, decreased phosphorylation of ribosomal protein-S6 and 4E-BP1, down-regulation of cyclins A and E, and decreased expression of p21. Our results indicate that AICAR-induced activation of AMPK inhibits retinoblastoma cell growth. This is one of the first descriptions of a nonchemotherapeutic drug with low toxicity that may be effective in treating Rb patients. PMID:20371623

  2. Atomoxetine restores the response inhibition network in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rae, Charlotte L; Nombela, Cristina; Rodríguez, Patricia Vázquez; Ye, Zheng; Hughes, Laura E; Jones, P Simon; Ham, Timothy; Rittman, Timothy; Coyle-Gilchrist, Ian; Regenthal, Ralf; Sahakian, Barbara J; Barker, Roger A; Robbins, Trevor W; Rowe, James B

    2016-08-01

    Parkinson's disease impairs the inhibition of responses, and whilst impulsivity is mild for some patients, severe impulse control disorders affect ∼10% of cases. Based on preclinical models we proposed that noradrenergic denervation contributes to the impairment of response inhibition, via changes in the prefrontal cortex and its subcortical connections. Previous work in Parkinson's disease found that the selective noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor atomoxetine could improve response inhibition, gambling decisions and reflection impulsivity. Here we tested the hypotheses that atomoxetine can restore functional brain networks for response inhibition in Parkinson's disease, and that both structural and functional connectivity determine the behavioural effect. In a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study, 19 patients with mild-to-moderate idiopathic Parkinson's disease underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging during a stop-signal task, while on their usual dopaminergic therapy. Patients received 40 mg atomoxetine or placebo, orally. This regimen anticipates that noradrenergic therapies for behavioural symptoms would be adjunctive to, not a replacement for, dopaminergic therapy. Twenty matched control participants provided normative data. Arterial spin labelling identified no significant changes in regional perfusion. We assessed functional interactions between key frontal and subcortical brain areas for response inhibition, by comparing 20 dynamic causal models of the response inhibition network, inverted to the functional magnetic resonance imaging data and compared using random effects model selection. We found that the normal interaction between pre-supplementary motor cortex and the inferior frontal gyrus was absent in Parkinson's disease patients on placebo (despite dopaminergic therapy), but this connection was restored by atomoxetine. The behavioural change in response inhibition (improvement indicated by reduced stop-signal reaction

  3. Adenosine kinase inhibition and suppression of RNA silencing by geminivirus AL2 and L2 proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Buckley, Kenneth J; Yang, Xiaojuan; Buchmann, R Cody; Bisaro, David M

    2005-06-01

    Most plant viruses are initiators and targets of RNA silencing and encode proteins that suppress this adaptive host defense. The DNA-containing geminiviruses are no exception, and the AL2 protein (also known as AC2, C2, and transcriptional activator protein) encoded by members of the genus Begomovirus has been shown to act as a silencing suppressor. Here, a three-component, Agrobacterium-mediated transient assay is used to further examine the silencing suppression activity of AL2 from Tomato golden mosaic virus (TGMV, a begomovirus) and to determine if the related L2 protein of Beet curly top virus (BCTV, genus Curtovirus) also has suppression activity. We show that TGMV AL2, AL2(1-100) (lacking the transcriptional activation domain), and BCTV L2 can all suppress RNA silencing directed against a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene when silencing is induced by a construct expressing an inverted repeat GFP RNA (dsGFP). We previously found that these viral proteins interact with and inactivate adenosine kinase (ADK), a cellular enzyme important for adenosine salvage and methyl cycle maintenance. Using the GFP-dsGFP system, we demonstrate here that codelivery of a construct expressing an inverted repeat ADK RNA (dsADK), or addition of an ADK inhibitor (the adenosine analogue A-134974), suppresses GFP-directed silencing in a manner similar to the geminivirus proteins. In addition, AL2/L2 suppression phenotypes and nucleic acid binding properties are shown to be different from those of the RNA virus suppressors HC-Pro and p19. These findings provide strong evidence that ADK activity is required to support RNA silencing, and indicate that the geminivirus proteins suppress silencing by a novel mechanism that involves ADK inhibition. Further, since AL2(1-100) is as effective a suppressor as the full-length AL2 protein, activation and silencing suppression appear to be independent activities. PMID:15919897

  4. Inhibition of adenosine kinase attenuates inflammation and neurotoxicity in traumatic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Saif; Elsherbiny, Nehal M; Bhatia, Kanchan; Elsherbini, Ahmed M; Fulzele, Sadanand; Liou, Gregory I

    2014-12-15

    Traumatic optic neuropathy (TON) is associated with apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells. Local productions of reactive oxygen species and inflammatory mediators from activated microglial cells have been hypothesized to underlie apoptotic processes. We previously demonstrated that the anti-inflammatory effect of adenosine, through A2A receptor activation had profound protective influence against retinal injury in traumatic optic neuropathy. This protective effect is limited due to rapid cellular re-uptake of adenosine by equilibrative nucleotside transporter-1 (ENT1) or break down by adenosine kinase (AK), the key enzyme in adenosine clearance pathway. Further, the use of adenosine receptors agonists are limited by systemic side effects. Therefore, we seek to investigate the potential role of amplifying the endogenous ambient level of adenosine by pharmacological inhibition of AK. We tested our hypothesis by comparing TON-induced retinal injury in mice with and without ABT-702 treatment, a selective AK inhibitor (AKI). The retinal-protective effect of ABT-702 was demonstrated by significant reduction of Iba-1, ENT1, TNF-α, IL-6, and iNOS/nNOS protein or mRNA expression in TON as revealed by western blot and real time PCR. TON-induced superoxide anion generation and nitrotyrosine expression were reduced in ABT-702 treated mice retinal sections as determined by immunoflourescence. In addition, ABT-702 attenuated p-ERK1/2 and p-P38 activation in LPS induced activated mouse microglia cells. The results of the present investigation suggested that ABT-702 had a protective role against marked TON-induced retinal inflammation and damage by augmenting the endogenous therapeutic effects of site- and event-specific accumulation of extracellular adenosine. PMID:25457840

  5. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor bafetinib inhibits PAR2-induced activation of TRPV4 channels in vitro and pain in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Grace, M S; Lieu, T; Darby, B; Abogadie, F C; Veldhuis, N; Bunnett, N W; McIntyre, P

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is expressed on nociceptive neurons, and can sensitize transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels to amplify neurogenic inflammation and pain. The mechanisms by which this occurs are not fully understood. PAR2 causes receptor-operated activation of TRPV4 channels and TRPV4 null mice have attenuated PAR2-stimulated neurogenic inflammation and mechanical hyperalgesia. Here we investigate the intracellular signalling mechanisms underlying PAR2-induced TRPV4 channel activation and pain. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Responses of non-transfected and TRPV4-transfected HEK293 cells to agonists of PAR2 (trypsin and SLIGRL) and TRPV4 channels (GSK1016790A) were determined using calcium imaging. Inhibitors of TRPV4 channels (HC067047), sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium transport ATPase (thapsigargin), Gαq (UBO-QIC), tyrosine kinases (bafetinib and dasatinib) or PI3 kinases (wortmannin and LY294002) were used to investigate signalling mechanisms. In vivo effects of tyrosine kinase inhibitors on PAR2-induced mechanical hyperalgesia were assessed in mice. KEY RESULTS In non-transfected HEK293 cells, PAR2 activation transiently increased intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i). Functional expression of TRPV4 channels caused a sustained increase of [Ca2+]i, inhibited by HC067047, bafetinib and wortmannin; but not by thapsigargin, UBO-QIC, dasatinib or LY294002. Bafetinib but not dasatinib inhibited PAR2-induced mechanical hyperalgesia in vivo. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS This study supports a role for tyrosine kinases in PAR2-mediated receptor-operated gating of TRPV4 channels, independent of Gαq stimulation. The ability of a tyrosine kinase inhibitor to diminish PAR2-induced activation of TRPV4 channels and consequent mechanical hyperalgesia identifies bafetinib (which is in development in oncology) as a potential novel analgesic therapy. PMID:24779362

  6. Structural Mechanisms Determining Inhibition of the Collagen Receptor DDR1 by Selective and Multi-Targeted Type II Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Canning, Peter; Tan, Li; Chu, Kiki; Lee, Sam W.; Gray, Nathanael S.; Bullock, Alex N.

    2014-01-01

    The discoidin domain receptors (DDRs), DDR1 and DDR2, form a unique subfamily of receptor tyrosine kinases that are activated by the binding of triple-helical collagen. Excessive signaling by DDR1 and DDR2 has been linked to the progression of various human diseases, including fibrosis, atherosclerosis and cancer. We report the inhibition of these unusual receptor tyrosine kinases by the multi-targeted cancer drugs imatinib and ponatinib, as well as the selective type II inhibitor DDR1-IN-1. Ponatinib is identified as the more potent molecule, which inhibits DDR1 and DDR2 with an IC50 of 9 nM. Co-crystal structures of human DDR1 reveal a DFG-out conformation (DFG, Asp-Phe-Gly) of the kinase domain that is stabilized by an unusual salt bridge between the activation loop and αD helix. Differences to Abelson kinase (ABL) are observed in the DDR1 P-loop, where a β-hairpin replaces the cage-like structure of ABL. P-loop residues in DDR1 that confer drug resistance in ABL are therefore accommodated outside the ATP pocket. Whereas imatinib and ponatinib bind potently to both the DDR and ABL kinases, the hydrophobic interactions of the ABL P-loop appear poorly satisfied by DDR1-IN-1 suggesting a structural basis for its DDR1 selectivity. Such inhibitors may have applications in clinical indications of DDR1 and DDR2 overexpression or mutation, including lung cancer. PMID:24768818

  7. Inhibition of human T cell activation by novel Src kinase inhibitors is dependent upon the complexity of the signal delivered to the cell.

    PubMed

    Rapecki, Stephen; Allen, Rodger

    2002-12-01

    The activity of a novel series of protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors that are selective for the Src family has been assessed. The activity of these compounds [named CT-SKI (Celltech Src kinase inhibitors)] was investigated by assessing their potential to modulate T cell receptor activation, an event thought to involve the Src kinases Lck and Fyn. This series of compounds contained low-nanomolar inhibitors of Src kinases with selectivity over Csk, epidermal growth factor receptor kinase, protein kinase C, and zeta-associated 70-kDa protein. These compounds were shown to attenuate anti-CD3-induced T cell proliferation and block interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, and interferon-gamma production, and CD25 expression in anti-CD3-activated T cells. In addition, inhibition of anti-CD3-induced, but not phorbol ester and calcium ionophore-induced IL-2 production, correlated with inhibition of in vitro Lck kinase activity. When more complex stimuli were used to activate T cells, as in the mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR), these inhibitors proved to be less effective and inhibition of the MLR did not correlate with inhibition of isolated Lck enzyme. Interestingly, inhibition of anti-CD3-induced proliferation could be reversed by the addition of exogenous IL-2, indicating that signaling through the IL-2 receptor may not be critically dependent on any functional Src enzymes. PMID:12438558

  8. p-HPEA-EDA, a phenolic compound of virgin olive oil, activates AMP-activated protein kinase to inhibit carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Prem; Oh, Won-Keun; Yun, Hyo Jeong; Namgoong, Gwang Mo; Ahn, Sang-Gun; Kwon, Seong-Min; Choi, Hoo-Kyun; Choi, Hong Seok

    2011-04-01

    Phenolic constituents of virgin olive oil are reported to have antitumor activity. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms and specific target proteins of virgin olive oil remain to be elucidated. Here, we report that dialdehydic form of decarboxymethyl ligstroside aglycone (p-HPEA-EDA), a phenolic compound of virgin olive oil, inhibits tumor promoter-induced cell transformation in JB6 Cl41 cells and suppress cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and tumorigenicity by adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation in HT-29 cells. p-HPEA-EDA inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 and p90RSK in JB6 Cl41 cells, resulting in the inhibition of cell proliferation, activator protein-1 transactivation and cell transformation promoted by TPA. Moreover, p-HPEA-EDA strongly inhibited the cell viability and COX-2 expression by activation of AMPK activity in HT-29 cells, resulted from depletion of intracellular adenosine triphosphate. p-HPEA-EDA-induced activation of caspase-3 and poly-adenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase, phosphorylation of p53 (Ser15) and DNA fragmentation in HT-29 cells, leading to apoptosis. Importantly, p-HPEA-EDA suppressed the colony formation of HT-29 cells in soft agar. In contrast, Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, and Z-DEVD-FMK, a caspase-3 inhibitor, blocked the p-HPEA-EDA-inhibited colony formation in HT-29 cells. In vivo chorioallantoic membrane assay also showed that p-HPEA-EDA-inhibited tumorigenicity of HT-29 cells. These findings revealed that targeted activation of AMPK and inhibition of COX-2 expression by p-HPEA-EDA contribute to the chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic potential of virgin olive oil against colon cancer cells. PMID:21216846

  9. Dominant-negative inhibition of the Axl receptor tyrosine kinase suppresses brain tumor cell growth and invasion and prolongs survival

    PubMed Central

    Vajkoczy, Peter; Knyazev, Pjotr; Kunkel, Andrea; Capelle, Hans-Holger; Behrndt, Sandra; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Kiessling, Fabian; Eichelsbacher, Uta; Essig, Marco; Read, Tracy-Ann; Erber, Ralf; Ullrich, Axel

    2006-01-01

    Malignant gliomas remain incurable brain tumors because of their diffuse-invasive growth. So far, the genetic and molecular events underlying gliomagenesis are poorly understood. In this study, we have identified the receptor tyrosine kinase Axl as a mediator of glioma growth and invasion. We demonstrate that Axl and its ligand Gas6 are overexpressed in human glioma cell lines and that Axl is activated under baseline conditions. Furthermore, Axl is expressed at high levels in human malignant glioma. Inhibition of Axl signaling by overexpression of a dominant-negative receptor mutant (AXL-DN) suppressed experimental gliomagenesis (growth inhibition >85%, P < 0.05) and resulted in long-term survival of mice after intracerebral glioma cell implantation when compared with Axl wild-type (AXL-WT) transfected tumor cells (survival times: AXL-WT, 10 days; AXL-DN, >72 days). A detailed analysis of the distinct hallmarks of glioma pathology, such as cell proliferation, migration, and invasion and tumor angiogenesis, revealed that inhibition of Axl signaling interfered with cell proliferation (inhibition 30% versus AXL-WT), glioma cell migration (inhibition 90% versus mock and AXL-WT, P < 0.05), and invasion (inhibition 62% and 79% versus mock and AXL-WT, respectively; P < 0.05). This study describes the identification, functional manipulation, in vitro and in vivo validation, and preclinical therapeutic inhibition of a target receptor tyrosine kinase mediating glioma growth and invasion. Our findings implicate Axl in gliomagenesis and validate it as a promising target for the development of approaches toward a therapy of these highly aggressive but, as yet, therapy-refractory, tumors. PMID:16585512

  10. The Pan-Aurora Kinase Inhibitor, PHA-739358, Induces Apoptosis and Inhibits Migration in Melanoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Lifang; Meyskens, Frank L

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of metastatic melanoma has long been a challenge due to its resistance to traditional chemotherapeutics leading to the search for alternative strategies. Aurora kinases are key mitotic regulators that are frequently overexpressed in various cancers including melanoma, making them ideal targets for anticancer therapeutics. Several Aurora kinase inhibitors have been developed and tested pre-clinically and clinically. PHA-739358 is currently the most advanced clinical compound; however its antitumor effect has not been tested in melanoma. In this study, the anti-proliferative and anti-invasive effects of PHA-739358 were investigated in melanoma cell lines. The results demonstrated that PHA-739358 produces a time and dose dependent inhibition of cell proliferation, induction of apoptosis, and inhibition of cell migration. Downregulation of MMP-2 via inhibition of NFκB signaling pathway may contribute to PHA-739358-induced migration inhibition. Furthermore, PHA-739358 enhanced temozolomide-induced caspase activation. This study provides a promising new strategy for the treatment of advanced melanoma. PMID:23344158

  11. BRAFV600E inhibition stimulates AMP-activated protein kinase-mediated autophagy in colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Sueda, Toshinori; Sakai, Daisuke; Kawamoto, Koichi; Konno, Masamitsu; Nishida, Naohiro; Koseki, Jun; Colvin, Hugh; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Haraguchi, Naotsugu; Nishimura, Junichi; Hata, Taishi; Takemasa, Ichiro; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Satoh, Taroh; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Ishii, Hideshi

    2016-01-01

    Although BRAFV600E mutation is associated with adverse clinical outcomes in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), response and resistance mechanisms for therapeutic BRAFV600E inhibitors remains poorly understood. In the present study, we demonstrate that selective BRAFV600E inhibition activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which induces autophagy as a mechanism of therapeutic resistance in human cancers. The present data show AMPK-dependent cytoprotective roles of autophagy under conditions of therapeutic BRAFV600E inhibition, and AMPK was negatively correlated with BRAFV600E-dependent activation of MEK-ERK-RSK signaling and positively correlated with unc-51-like kinase 1 (ULK1), a key initiator of autophagy. Furthermore, selective BRAFV600E inhibition and concomitant suppression of autophagy led to the induction of apoptosis. Taken together, present experiments indicate that AMPK plays a role in the survival of BRAFV600E CRC cells by selective inhibition and suggest that the control of autophagy contributes to overcome the chemoresistance of BRAFV600E CRC cells. PMID:26750638

  12. Molecular mechanism for the regulation of rho-kinase by dimerization and its inhibition by fasudil.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Hiroto; Kasa, Miyuki; Amano, Mutsuki; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Hakoshima, Toshio

    2006-03-01

    Rho-kinase is a key regulator of cytoskeletal events and a promising drug target in the treatment of vascular diseases and neurological disorders. Unlike other protein kinases, Rho-kinase requires both N- and C-terminal extension segments outside the kinase domain for activity, although the details of this requirement have been elusive. The crystal structure of an active Rho-kinase fragment containing the kinase domain and both the extensions revealed a head-to-head homodimer through the N-terminal extension forming a helix bundle that structurally integrates the C-terminal extension. This structural organization enables binding of the C-terminal hydrophobic motif to the N-terminal lobe, which defines the correct disposition of helix alphaC that is important for the catalytic activity. The bound inhibitor fasudil significantly alters the conformation and, consequently, the mode of interaction with the catalytic cleft that contains local structural changes. Thus, both kinase and drug conformational pliability and stability confer selectivity. PMID:16531242

  13. Helicobacter pylori CagA Inhibits PAR1-MARK Family Kinases by Mimicking Host Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Nesic, D.; Miller, M; Quinkert, Z; Stein, M; Chait, B; Stebbins, C

    2010-01-01

    The CagA protein of Helicobacter pylori interacts with numerous cellular factors and is associated with increased virulence and risk of gastric carcinoma. We present here the cocrystal structure of a subdomain of CagA with the human kinase PAR1b/MARK2, revealing that a CagA peptide mimics substrates of this kinase family, resembling eukaryotic protein kinase inhibitors. Mutagenesis of conserved residues central to this interaction renders CagA inactive as an inhibitor of MARK2.

  14. Combined inhibition of MEK and Aurora A kinase in KRAS/PIK3CA double-mutant colorectal cancer models.

    PubMed

    Davis, S Lindsey; Robertson, Kelli M; Pitts, Todd M; Tentler, John J; Bradshaw-Pierce, Erica L; Klauck, Peter J; Bagby, Stacey M; Hyatt, Stephanie L; Selby, Heather M; Spreafico, Anna; Ecsedy, Jeffrey A; Arcaroli, John J; Messersmith, Wells A; Tan, Aik Choon; Eckhardt, S Gail

    2015-01-01

    Aurora A kinase and MEK inhibitors induce different, and potentially complementary, effects on the cell cycle of malignant cells, suggesting a rational basis for utilizing these agents in combination. In this work, the combination of an Aurora A kinase and MEK inhibitor was evaluated in pre-clinical colorectal cancer models, with a focus on identifying a subpopulation in which it might be most effective. Increased synergistic activity of the drug combination was identified in colorectal cancer cell lines with concomitant KRAS and PIK3CA mutations. Anti-proliferative effects were observed upon treatment of these double-mutant cell lines with the drug combination, and tumor growth inhibition was observed in double-mutant human tumor xenografts, though effects were variable within this subset. Additional evaluation suggests that degree of G2/M delay and p53 mutation status affect apoptotic activity induced by combination therapy with an Aurora A kinase and MEK inhibitor in KRAS and PIK3CA mutant colorectal cancer. Overall, in vitro and in vivo testing was unable to identify a subset of colorectal cancer that was consistently responsive to the combination of a MEK and Aurora A kinase inhibitor. PMID:26136684

  15. Phosphorylation of the TOR ATP binding domain by AGC kinase constitutes a novel mode of TOR inhibition.

    PubMed

    Hálová, Lenka; Du, Wei; Kirkham, Sara; Smith, Duncan L; Petersen, Janni

    2013-11-25

    TOR (target of rapamycin) signaling coordinates cell growth, metabolism, and cell division through tight control of signaling via two complexes, TORC1 and TORC2. Here, we show that fission yeast TOR kinases and mTOR are phosphorylated on an evolutionarily conserved residue of their ATP-binding domain. The Gad8 kinase (AKT homologue) phosphorylates fission yeast Tor1 at this threonine (T1972) to reduce activity. A T1972A mutation that blocked phosphorylation increased Tor1 activity and stress resistance. Nitrogen starvation of fission yeast inhibited TOR signaling to arrest cell cycle progression in G1 phase and promoted sexual differentiation. Starvation and a Gad8/T1972-dependent decrease in Tor1 (TORC2) activity was essential for efficient cell cycle arrest and differentiation. Experiments in human cell lines recapitulated these yeast observations, as mTOR was phosphorylated on T2173 in an AKT-dependent manner. In addition, a T2173A mutation increased mTOR activity. Thus, TOR kinase activity can be reduced through AGC kinase-controlled phosphorylation to generate physiologically significant changes in TOR signaling. PMID:24247430

  16. Combined inhibition of MEK and Aurora A kinase in KRAS/PIK3CA double-mutant colorectal cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Davis, S. Lindsey; Robertson, Kelli M.; Pitts, Todd M.; Tentler, John J.; Bradshaw-Pierce, Erica L.; Klauck, Peter J.; Bagby, Stacey M.; Hyatt, Stephanie L.; Selby, Heather M.; Spreafico, Anna; Ecsedy, Jeffrey A.; Arcaroli, John J.; Messersmith, Wells A.; Tan, Aik Choon; Eckhardt, S. Gail

    2015-01-01

    Aurora A kinase and MEK inhibitors induce different, and potentially complementary, effects on the cell cycle of malignant cells, suggesting a rational basis for utilizing these agents in combination. In this work, the combination of an Aurora A kinase and MEK inhibitor was evaluated in pre-clinical colorectal cancer models, with a focus on identifying a subpopulation in which it might be most effective. Increased synergistic activity of the drug combination was identified in colorectal cancer cell lines with concomitant KRAS and PIK3CA mutations. Anti-proliferative effects were observed upon treatment of these double-mutant cell lines with the drug combination, and tumor growth inhibition was observed in double-mutant human tumor xenografts, though effects were variable within this subset. Additional evaluation suggests that degree of G2/M delay and p53 mutation status affect apoptotic activity induced by combination therapy with an Aurora A kinase and MEK inhibitor in KRAS and PIK3CA mutant colorectal cancer. Overall, in vitro and in vivo testing was unable to identify a subset of colorectal cancer that was consistently responsive to the combination of a MEK and Aurora A kinase inhibitor. PMID:26136684

  17. A label-free and sensitive fluorescent assay for one step detection of protein kinase activity and inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Yan, Xu; Su, Xingguang

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a label-free, highly sensitive and simple assay for one step detection of protein kinase (PKA) activity and inhibition that avoids the fluorescent dye process has been established. The detection was based on the fluorescence (FL) quenching of peptide-Ag nanoclusters (Ag NCs) caused by antibody modified Au nanoparticles (anti-Au NPs) via fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). With PKA and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) introduced, the substrate peptide of Ag NCs could react with PKA via targeted phosphorylation, and followed by the linking interactions between peptide-Ag NCs and anti-Au NPs. According to the fluorescence quenching of Ag NCs, the activity of protein kinase can be facilely monitored in the range of 0.1-2000 mU/μL with high sensitivity. The detection limit for PKA is 0.039 mU/μL. We further explored the inhibitory effect of H-89 for protein kinase activity. The developed method was also applied to the investigation of drug-induced PKA activation in HeLa cells, which provides a promising means for screening of kinase-related drugs and the clinical diagnosis of disease. PMID:27543031

  18. Conserved herpesviral kinase plays a critical role in viral persistence by inhibiting IRF-3 mediated type I interferon response

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Seungmin; Kim, Kyeong Seon; Flano, Emilio; Wu, Ting-Ting; Tong, Leming M.; Park, Ann N.; Song, Moon Jung; Sanchez, David Jesse; O’Connell, Ryan M.; Cheng, Genhong; Sun, Ren

    2009-01-01

    Summary A conserved herpesviral kinase has been shown to play multiple vital roles in the life cycle of herpesviruses. ORF36, the kinase of murine gamma-herpesvirus 68 (MHV-68), was identified to counteract antiviral type I interferon (IFN) response through the screening of mutant viruses. ORF36 binds to activated interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3) in the nucleus and inhibits the interaction between the IRF-3 and the co-transcriptional activator CBP, thereby suppressing the recruitment of RNA polymerase II to interferon beta promoter. Although the conserved kinase activity is not absolutely required for this interaction, the anti-IFN function of ORF36 is conserved among all herpesvirus subfamilies. Mutant viruses without ORF36 induce more interferon response and are attenuated both in vitro and in vivo. Our data suggest that herpesviruses have evolved an inhibitor of antiviral IFN defense within their conserved kinase, which is critical for herpesvirus to evade host immune control and persist in a host. PMID:19218087

  19. Clionosterol and ethyl cholestan-22-enol isolated from the rhizome of Polygala tenuifolia inhibit phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway.

    PubMed

    Le, Thi Kim Van; Jeong, Jin Ju; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt inhibitors were isolated from the rhizome of Polygala tenuifolia WILLD (PT, Polygalaceae), which has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for inflammation, dementia, amnesia, neurasthenia and cancer, by activity-guided fractionation. For the assay of PI3K/Akt pathway, cytoprotective Tat-transduced CHME5 cells, which are the cytoprotective phenotype against lypopolysaccharide (LPS)/cycloheximide (CHX), were used. We isolated 4 anti-cytoprotective compounds, clionasterol (1), ethyl cholestan-22-enol (2), 3-O-β-D-glucosyl ethyl cholestan-22-enol (3), and 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl clionasterol (4) from EtOAc fraction of PT against Tat-transduced CHME5 cells. Of them, (1) and (2) most potently abolished cytoprotective effect of Tat-transduced CHME5 cells. These constituents (1) and (2) inhibited the activation of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1) and its downstream molecules, Akt/glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)3β, in PI3K/Akt cell survival signaling pathway, but did not suppress the activation of PI3K. Based on these finding, (1) and (2) may abolish the cytoprotective phenotype of Tat-transduced CHME5 cells by inhibiting PDK1 phosphorylation in PI3K/Akt pathway. PMID:22863942

  20. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibition Regulates Early Systemic Immune Changes and Modulates the Neuroimmune Response in α-Synucleinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hebron, Michaeline L.; Lonskaya, Irina; Olopade, Paul; Selby, Sandra T.; Pagan, Fernando; Moussa, Charbel E-H

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Neuro-inflammation is common in α-Synucleinopathies and Tauopathies; and evidence suggests a link between the tyrosine kinase Abl and neurodegeneration. Abl upregulates α-Synuclein and promotes Tau hyper-phosphorylation (p-Tau), while Abl inhibitors facilitate autophagic clearance. Methods A model of α-Synucleinopathy harboring human mutant A53T α-Synuclein and exhibits concomitant increase in murine p-Tau was used to determine the immunological response to Abl inhibition. Results Age-dependent alterations of brain immunity, including loss of IL-10 and decreased levels of IL-2 and IL-3 were observed in old A53T mice. Brain CCL2 and CCL5 were decreased, but CX3CL1 remained constantly elevated. Young A53T mice exhibited differential systemic and central immune profiles in parallel with increased blood markers of adaptive immunity, suggesting an early systemic immune response. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), including nilotinib and bosutinib reduced brain and peripheral α-Synuclein and p-Tau and modulated blood immunological responses. TKIs did not affect brain IL-10, but they changed the levels of all measured blood immune markers, except CX3CL1. TKIs altered microglia morphology and reduced the number of astrocyte and dendritic cells, suggesting beneficial regulation of microglia. Conclusions These data indicate that tyrosine kinase inhibition affects neuro-inflammation via early changes of the peripheral immune profile, leading to modulation of the neuro-immune response to α-Synuclein and p-Tau. PMID:25635231

  1. H-Ras Modulates N-Methyl-d-aspartate Receptor Function via Inhibition of Src Tyrosine Kinase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Claire; Yaka, Rami; Dinh, Son; Ron, Dorit

    2005-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation of the NR2A and NR2B subunits of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor by Src protein-tyrosine kinases modulates receptor channel activity and is necessary for the induction of long term potentiation (LTP). Deletion of H-Ras increases both NR2 tyrosine phosphorylation and NMDA receptor-mediated hippocampal LTP. Here we investigated whether H-Ras regulates phosphorylation and function of the NMDA receptor via Src family protein-tyrosine kinases. We identified Src as a novel H-Ras binding partner. H-Ras bound to Src but not Fyn both in vitro and in brain via the Src kinase domain. Cotransfection of H-Ras and Src inhibited Src activity and decreased NR2A tyrosine phosphorylation. Treatment of rat brain slices with Tat-H-Ras depleted NR2A from the synaptic membrane, decreased endogenous Src activity and NR2A phosphorylation, and decreased the magnitude of hip-pocampal LTP. No change was observed for NR2B. We suggest that H-Ras negatively regulates Src phosphorylation of NR2A and retention of NR2A into the synaptic membrane leading to inhibition of NMDA receptor function. This mechanism is specific for Src and NR2A and has implications for studies in which regulation of NMDA receptor-mediated LTP is important, such as synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory and addiction. PMID:12695509

  2. Protein-tyrosine-phosphatase 2C is phosphorylated and inhibited by 44-kDa mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Peraldi, P; Zhao, Z; Filloux, C; Fischer, E H; Van Obberghen, E

    1994-01-01

    Protein-tyrosine-phosphatase 2C (PTP2C, also named SHPTP2, SHPTP3, or PTP1D) is a cytosolic enzyme with two Src homology 2 domains. We have investigated its regulation by phosphorylation in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells. In untreated cells, PTP2C was phosphorylated predominantly on serine residues. A 5-min treatment with epidermal growth factor (EGF) induced an increase in phosphorylation on threonine and, to a lesser degree, on serine. After 45 min of exposure to EGF, PTP2C phosphorylation returned to basal levels. Using an in vitro kinase assay, we found that the 44-kDa mitogen-activated protein kinase, p44mapk, phosphorylated PTP2C on serine and threonine residues. This phosphorylation resulted in a pronounced inhibition of PTP2C enzyme activity measured with phosphorylated EGF receptors as substrate. Moreover, in intact PC12 cells, PTP2C was also inhibited following a short EGF treatment, but its activity returned to normal when the exposure to EGF was maintained for 45 min. The profile of this response to EGF can be inversely correlated to that of the stimulatory action of EGF on p44mapk. These data suggest that the EGF-induced regulation of PTP2C activity is mediated by p44mapk. These findings provide evidence for an additional role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade--namely, the regulation of a PTP. Images PMID:8197172

  3. Down-regulation of phospho-non-receptor Src tyrosine kinases contributes to growth inhibition of cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lu; Deng, Zhihong; Zhao, Yanzhong; Wang, Yamei; Sarkar, Fazlul H; Zhang, Yuxiang

    2011-12-01

    Non-receptor Src tyrosine kinases (nrTKs) are overexpressed in a variety of human tumors, including cancer of the colon, breast, and pancreas, and their inhibitors are under intensive investigations as novel anti-tumor agents. However, these studies are not clear in the case of cervical cancer. Therefore, we studied the role of nrTKs and their inhibitors in the cervical cancer. The expression level of phospho-SrcY416 (pSrcY416) in several cervical cancer cell lines, normal cervical tissues, and cervical cancer tissues have been examined, and it has also been done whether PP2, an inhibitor of Src kinase, can inhibit the growth of cervical cells in vitro and in vivo. Immunohistochemical and confocal microscope studies suggested that pSrcY416 is overexpressed in HeLa and SiHa cells, as well as in the clinical cervical cancer tissues, compared to the normal cervical tissues. Down-regulation of pSrcY416 inhibited the cell proliferation by increasing the HeLa or SiHa cell population in the G0-G1 phase or S phase, respectively. Down-regulation of pSrcY416 led to up-regulation of p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 in both HeLa and SiHa cells and decreased the expression of cyclin A1, cyclin E, and cyclin-dependent kinase-2,-6 (CDK-2,-6) in HeLa cells and of cyclin B and CDK-2 in SiHa cells. Nude mice xenograft data showed that PP2 inhibited subcutaneous tumor growth significantly (P<0.05, compared with the control). Down-regulation of pSrcY416 contributes to cell growth inhibition in cervical cancer cells. nrTKs could therefore be a novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:20532678

  4. Gene expression in bovine oocytes and cumulus cells after meiotic inhibition with the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor butyrolactone I.

    PubMed

    Leal, C L V; Mamo, S; Fair, T; Lonergan, P

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of temporary inhibition of meiosis using the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor butyrolactone I (BLI) on gene expression in bovine oocytes and cumulus cells. Immature bovine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were assigned to groups: (i) Control COCs collected immediately after recovery from the ovary or (ii) after in vitro maturation (IVM) for 24 h, (iii) Inhibited COCs collected 24 h after incubation with 100 μm BLI or (iv) after meiotic inhibition for 24 h followed by IVM for a further 22 h. For mRNA relative abundance analysis, pools of 10 denuded oocytes and respective cumulus cells were collected. Transcripts related to cell cycle regulation and oocyte competence were evaluated in oocytes and cumulus cells by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Most of the examined transcripts were downregulated (p < 0.05) after IVM in control and inhibited oocytes (19 of 35). Nine transcripts remained stable (p > 0.05) after IVM in control oocytes; only INHBA did not show this pattern in inhibited oocytes. Seven genes were upregulated after IVM in control oocytes (p < 0.05), and only PLAT, RBP1 and INHBB were not upregulated in inhibited oocytes after IVM. In cumulus cells, six genes were upregulated (p < 0.05) after IVM and eight were downregulated (p < 0.05). Cells from inhibited oocytes showed the same pattern of expression regarding maturation profile, but were affected by the temporary meiosis inhibition of the oocyte when the same maturation stages were compared between inhibited and control groups. In conclusion, changes in transcript abundance in oocytes and cumulus cells during maturation in vitro were mostly mirrored after meiotic inhibition followed by maturation. PMID:22034924

  5. The Novel Anticancer Drug Hydroxytriolein Inhibits Lung Cancer Cell Proliferation via a Protein Kinase Cα- and Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 1/2-Dependent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Guardiola-Serrano, Francisca; Beteta-Göbel, Roberto; Rodríguez-Lorca, Raquel; Ibarguren, Maitane; López, David J; Terés, Silvia; Alvarez, Rafael; Alonso-Sande, María; Busquets, Xavier; Escribá, Pablo V

    2015-08-01

    Membrane lipid therapy is a novel approach to rationally design or discover therapeutic molecules that target membrane lipids. This strategy has been used to design synthetic fatty acid analogs that are currently under study in clinical trials for the treatment of cancer. In this context, and with the aim of controlling tumor cell growth, we have designed and synthesized a hydroxylated analog of triolein, hydroxytriolein (HTO). Both triolein and HTO regulate the biophysical properties of model membranes, and they inhibit the growth of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines in vitro. The molecular mechanism underlying the antiproliferative effect of HTO involves regulation of the lipid membrane structure, protein kinase C-α and extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation, the production of reactive oxygen species, and autophagy. In vivo studies on a mouse model of NSCLC showed that HTO, but not triolein, impairs tumor growth, which could be associated with the relative resistance of HTO to enzymatic degradation. The data presented explain in part why olive oil (whose main component is the triacylglycerol triolein) is preventive but not therapeutic, and they demonstrate a potent effect of HTO against cancer. HTO shows a good safety profile, it can be administered orally, and it does not induce nontumor cell (fibroblast) death in vitro or side effects in mice, reflecting its specificity for cancer cells. For these reasons, HTO is a good candidate as a drug to combat cancer that acts by regulating lipid structure and function in the cancer cell membrane. PMID:26065701

  6. Inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase triggers apoptosis in prostate cancer cells via down-regulation of protein kinase C-epsilon

    PubMed Central

    Sarveswaran, Sivalokanathan; Thamilselvan, Vijayalakshmi; Brodie, Chaya; Ghosh, Jagadananda

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that human prostate cancer cells constitutively generate 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) metabolites from arachidonic acid, and inhibition of 5-LOX blocks production of 5-LOX metabolites and triggers apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. This apoptosis is prevented by exogenous metabolites of 5-LOX, suggesting an essential role of 5-LOX metabolites in the survival of prostate cancer cells. However, downstream signaling mechanisms which mediate the survival-promoting effects of 5-LOX metabolites in prostate cancer cells are still unknown. Recently, we reported that MK591, a specific inhibitor of 5-LOX activity, induces apoptosis in prostate cancer cells without inhibition of Akt, or ERK, two well-characterized regulators of pro-survival mechanisms, suggesting the existence of an Akt and ERK-independent survival mechanism in prostate cancer cells regulated by 5-LOX. Here, we report that 5-LOX inhibition-induced apoptosis in prostate cancer cells occurs via rapid inactivation of protein kinase C-epsilon (PKCε), and that exogenous 5-LOX metabolites prevent both 5-LOX inhibition-induced down-regulation of PKCε and induction of apoptosis. Interestingly, pre-treatment of prostate cancer cells with diazoxide (a chemical activator of PKCε), or KAE1-1 (a cell-permeable, octa-peptide specific activator of PKCε) prevents 5-LOX inhibition-induced apoptosis, which indicates that inhibition of 5-LOX triggers apoptosis in prostate cancer cells via down-regulation of PKCε. Altogether, these findings suggest that metabolism of arachidonic acid by 5-LOX activity promotes survival of prostate cancer cells via signaling through PKCε, a pro-survival serine/threonine kinase. PMID:21824498

  7. Allosteric inhibition of Aurora-A kinase by a synthetic vNAR domain.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Selena G; Oleksy, Arkadiusz; Cavazza, Tommaso; Richards, Mark W; Vernos, Isabelle; Matthews, David; Bayliss, Richard

    2016-07-01

    The vast majority of clinically approved protein kinase inhibitors target the ATP-binding pocket directly. Consequently, many inhibitors have broad selectivity profiles and most have significant off-target effects. Allosteric inhibitors are generally more selective, but are difficult to identify because allosteric binding sites are often unknown or poorly characterized. Aurora-A is activated through binding of TPX2 to an allosteric site on the kinase catalytic domain, and this knowledge could be exploited to generate an inhibitor. Here, we generated an allosteric inhibitor of Aurora-A kinase based on a synthetic, vNAR single domain scaffold, vNAR-D01. Biochemical studies and a crystal structure of the Aurora-A/vNAR-D01 complex show that the vNAR domain overlaps with the TPX2 binding site. In contrast with the binding of TPX2, which stabilizes an active conformation of the kinase, binding of the vNAR domain stabilizes an inactive conformation, in which the αC-helix is distorted, the canonical Lys-Glu salt bridge is broken and the regulatory (R-) spine is disrupted by an additional hydrophobic side chain from the activation loop. These studies illustrate how single domain antibodies can be used to characterize the regulatory mechanisms of kinases and provide a rational basis for structure-guided design of allosteric Aurora-A kinase inhibitors. PMID:27411893

  8. Allosteric inhibition of Aurora-A kinase by a synthetic vNAR domain

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Selena G.; Oleksy, Arkadiusz; Cavazza, Tommaso; Richards, Mark W.; Vernos, Isabelle; Matthews, David

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of clinically approved protein kinase inhibitors target the ATP-binding pocket directly. Consequently, many inhibitors have broad selectivity profiles and most have significant off-target effects. Allosteric inhibitors are generally more selective, but are difficult to identify because allosteric binding sites are often unknown or poorly characterized. Aurora-A is activated through binding of TPX2 to an allosteric site on the kinase catalytic domain, and this knowledge could be exploited to generate an inhibitor. Here, we generated an allosteric inhibitor of Aurora-A kinase based on a synthetic, vNAR single domain scaffold, vNAR-D01. Biochemical studies and a crystal structure of the Aurora-A/vNAR-D01 complex show that the vNAR domain overlaps with the TPX2 binding site. In contrast with the binding of TPX2, which stabilizes an active conformation of the kinase, binding of the vNAR domain stabilizes an inactive conformation, in which the αC-helix is distorted, the canonical Lys-Glu salt bridge is broken and the regulatory (R-) spine is disrupted by an additional hydrophobic side chain from the activation loop. These studies illustrate how single domain antibodies can be used to characterize the regulatory mechanisms of kinases and provide a rational basis for structure-guided design of allosteric Aurora-A kinase inhibitors. PMID:27411893

  9. Inhibition of protein kinase CK2 by anthraquinone-related compounds. A structural insight.

    PubMed

    De Moliner, Erika; Moro, Stefano; Sarno, Stefania; Zagotto, Giuseppe; Zanotti, Giuseppe; Pinna, Lorenzo A; Battistutta, Roberto

    2003-01-17

    Protein kinases play key roles in signal transduction and therefore are among the most attractive targets for drug design. The pharmacological aptitude of protein kinase inhibitors is highlighted by the observation that various diseases with special reference to cancer are because of the abnormal expression/activity of individual kinases. The resolution of the three-dimensional structure of the target kinase in complex with inhibitors is often the starting point for the rational design of this kind of drugs, some of which are already in advanced clinical trial or even in clinical practice. Here we present and discuss three new crystal structures of ATP site-directed inhibitors in complex with "casein kinase-2" (CK2), a constitutively active protein kinase implicated in a variety of cellular functions and misfunctions. With the help of theoretical calculations, we disclose some key features underlying the inhibitory efficiency of anthraquinone derivatives, outlining three different binding modes into the active site. In particular, we show that a nitro group in a hydroxyanthraquinone scaffold decreases the inhibitory constants K(i) because of electron-withdrawing and resonance effects that enhance the polarization of hydroxylic substituents in paraposition. PMID:12419810

  10. Distinct cellular properties of oncogenic KIT receptor tyrosine kinase mutants enable alternative courses of cancer cell inhibition.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiarong; Sousa, Leiliane P; Mandel-Bausch, Elizabeth M; Tome, Francisco; Reshetnyak, Andrey V; Hadari, Yaron; Schlessinger, Joseph; Lax, Irit

    2016-08-16

    Large genomic sequencing analysis as part of precision medicine efforts revealed numerous activating mutations in receptor tyrosine kinases, including KIT. Unfortunately, a single approach is not effective for inhibiting cancer cells or treating cancers driven by all known oncogenic KIT mutants. Here, we show that each of the six major KIT oncogenic mutants exhibits different enzymatic, cellular, and dynamic properties and responds distinctly to different KIT inhibitors. One class of KIT mutants responded well to anti-KIT antibody treatment alone or in combination with a low dose of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). A second class of KIT mutants, including a mutant resistant to imatinib treatment, responded well to a combination of TKI with anti-KIT antibodies or to anti-KIT toxin conjugates, respectively. We conclude that the preferred choice of precision medicine treatments for cancers driven by activated KIT and other RTKs may rely on clear understanding of the dynamic properties of oncogenic mutants. PMID:27482095

  11. Arg Kinase-binding Protein 2 (ArgBP2) Interaction with α-Actinin and Actin Stress Fibers Inhibits Cell Migration*

    PubMed Central

    Anekal, Praju Vikas; Yong, Jeffery; Manser, Ed

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration requires dynamic remodeling of the actomyosin network. We report here that an adapter protein, ArgBP2, is a component of α-actinin containing stress fibers and inhibits migration. ArgBP2 is undetectable in many commonly studied cancer-derived cell lines. COS-7 and HeLa cells express ArgBP2 (by Western analysis), but expression was detectable only in approximately half the cells by immunofluorescence. Short term clonal analysis demonstrated 0.2–0.3% of cells switch ArgBP2 expression (on or off) per cell division. ArgBP2 can have a fundamental impact on the actomyosin network: ArgBP2 positive COS-7 cells, for example, are clearly distinguishable by their denser actomyosin (stress fiber) network. ArgBP2γ binding to α-actinin appears to underlie its ability to localize to stress fibers and decrease cell migration. We map a small α-actinin binding region in ArgBP2 (residues 192–228) that is essential for these effects. Protein kinase A phosphorylation of ArgBP2γ at neighboring Ser-259 and consequent 14-3-3 binding blocks its interaction with α-actinin. ArgBP2 is known to be down-regulated in some aggressively metastatic cancers. Our work provides a biochemical explanation for the anti-migratory effect of ArgBP2. PMID:25429109

  12. Faster O2 uptake kinetics in canine skeletal muscle in situ after acute creatine kinase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Bruno; Rossiter, Harry B; Hogan, Michael C; Howlett, Richard A; Harris, James E; Goodwin, Matthew L; Dobson, John L; Gladden, L Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Creatine kinase (CK) plays a key role both in energy provision and in signal transduction for the increase in skeletal muscle O2 uptake () at exercise onset. The effects of acute CK inhibition by iodoacetamide (IA; 5 mm) on kinetics were studied in isolated canine gastrocnemius muscles in situ (n = 6) during transitions from rest to 3 min of electrically stimulated contractions eliciting ∼70% of muscle peak , and were compared to control (Ctrl) conditions. In both IA and Ctrl muscles were pump-perfused with constantly elevated blood flows. Arterial and venous [O2] were determined at rest and every 5–7 s during contractions. was calculated by Fick's principle. Muscle biopsies were obtained at rest and after ∼3 min of contractions. Muscle force was measured continuously. There was no fatigue in Ctrl (final force/initial force (fatigue index, FI) = 0.97 ± 0.06 (x ± s.d.)), whereas in IA force was significantly lower during the first contractions, slightly recovered at 15–20 s and then decreased (FI 0.67 ± 0.17). [Phosphocreatine] was not different in the two conditions at rest, and decreased during contractions in Ctrl, but not in IA. at 3 min was lower in IA (4.7 ± 2.9 ml 100 g−1 min−1) vs. Ctrl (16.6 ± 2.5 ml 100 g−1 min−1). The time constant (τ) of kinetics was faster in IA (8.1 ± 4.8 s) vs. Ctrl (16.6 ± 2.6 s). A second control condition (Ctrl-Mod) was produced by modelling a response that accounted for the ‘non-square’ force profile in IA, which by itself could have influenced kinetics. However, τ in IA was faster than in Ctrl-Mod (13.8 ± 2.8 s). The faster kinetics due to IA suggest that in mammalian skeletal muscle in situ, following contractions onset, temporal energy buffering by CK slows the kinetics of signal transduction for the activation of oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:21059760

  13. A derivative of chrysin suppresses two-stage skin carcinogenesis by inhibiting mitogen- and stress-activated kinase 1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haidan; Hwang, Joon-Sung; Li, Wei; Choi, Tae Woong; Liu, Kangdong; Huang, Zunnan; Jang, Jae-Hyuk; Thimmegowda, N. R.; Lee, Ki-Won; Ryoo, In-Ja; Ahn, Jong-Seog; Bode, Ann M.; Zhou, Xinmin; Yang, Yifeng; Erikson, Raymond L.; Kim, Bo-Yeon; Dong, Zigang

    2013-01-01

    Mitogen-activated and stress-activated kinase 1 (MSK1) is a nuclear serine/threonine protein kinase that acts downstream of both ERKs and p38 MAP kinases in response to stress or mitogenic extracellular stimuli. Increasing evidence has shown that MSK1 is closely associated with malignant transformation and cancer development. MSK1 should be an effective target for cancer chemoprevention and chemotherapy. However, very few MSK1 inhibitors, especially natural compounds, have been reported. We used virtual screening of a natural products database and the active conformation of the C-terminal kinase domain of MSK1 (PDB id 3KN) as the receptor structure to identify chrysin and its derivative, compound 69407, as inhibitors of MSK1. Compared with chrysin, compound 69407 more strongly inhibited proliferation and TPA-induced neoplastic transformation of JB6 P+ cells with lower cytotoxicity. Western blot data demonstrated that compound 69407 suppressed phosphorylation of the MSK1 downstream effector histone H3 in intact cells. Knocking down the expression of MSK1 effectively reduced the sensitivity of JB6 P+ cells to compound 69407. Moreover, topical treatment with compound 69407 prior to TPA application significantly reduced papilloma development in terms of number and size in a two-stage mouse skin carcinogenesis model. The reduction in papilloma development was accompanied by the inhibition of histone H3 phosphorylation at Ser10 in tumors extracted from mouse skin. The results indicated that compound 69407 exerts inhibitory effects on skin tumorigenesis by directly binding with MSK1 and attenuates the MSK1/histone H3 signaling pathway, which makes it an ideal chemopreventive agent against skin cancer. PMID:24169959

  14. Inhibition of protein kinase C decreases sensitivity of GABA receptor subtype to fipronil insecticide in insect neurosecretory cells.

    PubMed

    Murillo, Laurence; Hamon, Alain; Es-Salah-Lamoureux, Zeineb; Itier, Valérie; Quinchard, Sophie; Lapied, Bruno

    2011-12-01

    Phosphorylation by serine/threonine kinases has been described as a new mechanism for regulating the effects of insecticides on insect neuronal receptors and channels. Although insect GABA receptors are commercially important targets for insecticides (e.g. fipronil), their modulation by kinases is poorly understood and the influence of phosphorylation on insecticide sensitivity is unknown. Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we investigated the modulatory effect of PKC and CaMKinase II on GABA receptor subtypes (GABAR1 and GABAR2) in DUM neurons isolated from the terminal abdominal ganglion (TAG) of Periplaneta americana. Chloride currents through GABAR2 were selectively abolished by PMA and PDBu (the PKC activators) and potentiated by Gö6983, an inhibitor of PKC. Furthermore, using KN-62, a specific CaMKinase II inhibitor, we demonstrated that CaMKinase II activation was also involved in the regulation of GABAR2 function. In addition, using CdCl(2) (the calcium channel blocker) and LOE-908, a blocker of TRPγ, we revealed that calcium influx through TRPγ played an important role in kinase activations. Comparative studies performed with CACA, a selective agonist of GABAR1 in DUM neurons confirmed the involvement of these kinases in the specific regulation of GABAR2. Furthermore, our study reported that GABAR1 was less sensitive than GABAR2 to fipronil. This was demonstrated by the biphasic concentration-response curve and the current-voltage relationship established with both GABA and CACA. Finally, we demonstrated that GABAR2 was 10-fold less sensitive to fipronil following inhibition of PKC, whereas inhibition of CaMKinase II did not alter the effect of fipronil. PMID:21684305

  15. Inhibition of small G proteins by clostridium sordellii lethal toxin activates cdc2 and MAP kinase in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Rime, H; Talbi, N; Popoff, M R; Suziedelis, K; Jessus, C; Ozon, R

    1998-12-15

    The lethal toxin (LT) from Clostridium sordellii is a glucosyltransferase that modifies and inhibits small G proteins of the Ras family, Ras and Rap, as well as Rac proteins. LT induces cdc2 kinase activation and germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) when microinjected into full-grown Xenopus oocytes. Toxin B from Clostridium difficile, that glucosylates and inactivates Rac proteins, does not induce cdc2 activation, indicating that proteins of the Ras family, Ras and/or Rap, negatively regulate cdc2 kinase activation in Xenopus oocyte. In oocyte extracts, LT catalyzes the incorporation of [14C]glucose into a group of proteins of 23 kDa and into one protein of 27 kDa. The 23-kDa proteins are recognized by anti-Rap1 and anti-Rap2 antibodies, whereas the 27-kDa protein is recognized by several anti-Ras antibodies and probably corresponds to K-Ras. Microinjection of LT into oocytes together with UDP-[14C]glucose results in a glucosylation pattern similar to the in vitro glucosylation, indicating that the 23- and 27-kDa proteins are in vivo substrates of LT. In vivo time-course analysis reveals that the 27-kDa protein glucosylation is completed within 2 h, well before cdc2 kinase activation, whereas the 23-kDa proteins are partially glucosylated at GVBD. This observation suggests that the 27-kDa Ras protein could be the in vivo target of LT allowing cdc2 kinase activation. Interestingly, inactivation of Ras proteins does not prevent the phosphorylation of c-Raf1 and the activation of MAP kinase that occurs normally around GVBD. PMID:9882492

  16. Comparative inhibition patterns of adenylate kinases from mammals, bird, fish and microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Williams, A; Taulane, J P; Russell, P J

    1994-03-01

    The S8 inhibitions of AKs from six different sources were studied in mammals, birds, fish, and a microorganism. All AKs tested were inhibited by S8. Except for carp, all inhibited AKs from those tested were reactivated by DTT. Inhibitions of AKs by other hydrophobic inhibitors, NEM, butanol and ethanol were also studied. The inhibitions by S8 suggest that the hydrophobic pockets in the AKs cover a wide phylogenetic range. All inhibitions by S8 are reactivated by DTT. Unlike the inhibitions by S8, the characteristics of inhibitions by the other hydrophobic inhibitors differed among the AK sources tested and none was the irreversible type. The data suggest that no covalent bonds were formed with NEM. Similarly, the ability to reactivate the inhibitions by DTT differed among the AK sources. The possibility that the hydrophobic domains in the AKs may serve as part of an enzyme activity control mechanism is discussed. PMID:7749617

  17. Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 enhances the differentiation and reduces the proliferation of adult human olfactory epithelium neural precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Manceur, Aziza P.; Tseng, Michael; Holowacz, Tamara; Witterick, Ian; Weksberg, Rosanna; McCurdy, Richard D.; Warsh, Jerry J.; Audet, Julie

    2011-09-10

    The olfactory epithelium (OE) contains neural precursor cells which can be easily harvested from a minimally invasive nasal biopsy, making them a valuable cell source to study human neural cell lineages in health and disease. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) has been implicated in the etiology and treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders and also in the regulation of murine neural precursor cell fate in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we examined the impact of decreased GSK-3 activity on the fate of adult human OE neural precursors in vitro. GSK-3 inhibition was achieved using ATP-competitive (6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime and CHIR99021) or substrate-competitive (TAT-eIF2B) inhibitors to eliminate potential confounding effects on cell fate due to off-target kinase inhibition. GSK-3 inhibitors decreased the number of neural precursor cells in OE cell cultures through a reduction in proliferation. Decreased proliferation was not associated with a reduction in cell survival but was accompanied by a reduction in nestin expression and a substantial increase in the expression of the neuronal differentiation markers MAP1B and neurofilament (NF-M) after 10 days in culture. Taken together, these results suggest that GSK-3 inhibition promotes the early stages of neuronal differentiation in cultures of adult human neural precursors and provide insights into the mechanisms by which alterations in GSK-3 signaling affect adult human neurogenesis, a cellular process strongly suspected to play a role in the etiology of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  18. Inhibition of host extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation decreases new world alphavirus multiplication in infected cells.

    PubMed

    Voss, Kelsey; Amaya, Moushimi; Mueller, Claudius; Roberts, Brian; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Bailey, Charles; Petricoin, Emanuel; Narayanan, Aarthi

    2014-11-01

    New World alphaviruses belonging to the family Togaviridae are classified as emerging infectious agents and Category B select agents. Our study is focused on the role of the host extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in the infectious process of New World alphaviruses. Infection of human cells by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) results in the activation of the ERK-signaling cascade. Inhibition of ERK1/2 by the small molecule inhibitor Ag-126 results in inhibition of viral multiplication. Ag-126-mediated inhibition of VEEV was due to potential effects on early and late stages of the infectious process. While expression of viral proteins was down-regulated in Ag-126 treated cells, we did not observe any influence of Ag-126 on the nuclear distribution of capsid. Finally, Ag-126 exerted a broad-spectrum inhibitory effect on New World alphavirus multiplication, thus indicating that the host kinase, ERK, is a broad-spectrum candidate for development of novel therapeutics against New World alphaviruses. PMID:25261871

  19. Inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase CDK1 by oxindolimine ligands and corresponding copper and zinc complexes.

    PubMed

    Miguel, Rodrigo Bernardi; Petersen, Philippe Alexandre Divina; Gonzales-Zubiate, Fernando A; Oliveira, Carla Columbano; Kumar, Naresh; do Nascimento, Rafael Rodrigues; Petrilli, Helena Maria; da Costa Ferreira, Ana Maria

    2015-10-01

    Oxindolimine-copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes that previously have shown to induce apoptosis, with DNA and mitochondria as main targets, exhibit here significant inhibition of kinase CDK1/cyclin B protein. Copper species are more active than the corresponding zinc, and the free ligand shows to be less active, indicating a major influence of coordination in the process, and a further modulation by the coordinated ligand. Molecular docking and classical molecular dynamics provide a better understanding of the effectiveness and kinase inhibition mechanism by these compounds, showing that the metal complex provides a stronger interaction than the free ligand with the ATP-binding site. The metal ion introduces charge in the oxindole species, giving it a more rigid conformation that then becomes more effective in its interactions with the protein active site. Analogous experiments resulted in no significant effect regarding phosphatase inhibition. These results can explain the cytotoxicity of these metal complexes towards different tumor cells, in addition to its capability of binding to DNA, and decreasing membrane potential of mitochondria. PMID:26411703

  20. Inhibition of sphingosine kinase prevents lipopolysaccharide-induced preterm birth and suppresses proinflammatory responses in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Vibhuti; Ashby, Charles R; Olgun, Nicole S; Sundaram, Sruthi; Salami, Oluwabukola; Munnangi, Swapna; Pekson, Ryan; Mahajan, Prathamesh; Reznik, Sandra E

    2015-03-01

    Premature delivery occurs in 12% of all births, and accounts for nearly half of long-term neurological morbidity, and 60% to 80% of perinatal mortality. Despite advances in obstetrics and neonatology, the rate of premature delivery has increased approximately 12% since 1990. The single most common cause of spontaneous preterm birth is infection. Several lines of evidence have demonstrated the role of endothelin-1 as both a constrictor of uterine myometrial smooth muscle and a proinflammatory mediator. Endothelin-1 activates the phospholipase C pathway, leading to activation of protein kinase C and, in turn, sphingosine kinase (SphK). The inhibition of SphK has been recently shown to control the proinflammatory response associated with sepsis. We show herein, for the first time, that SphK inhibition prevents inflammation-associated preterm birth in a murine model. Rescue of pups from premature abortion with an SphK inhibitor occurs by suppression of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α, Il-1β, and Il-6 and attenuation of polymorphonuclear inflammatory cells into the placental labyrinth. Moreover, we postulate that inhibition of SphK leads to suppression of endothelin-converting enzyme-1 expression, indicating the presence of an endothelin-converting enzyme 1/endothelin 1-SphK positive feedback loop. This work introduces a novel approach for the control of infection-triggered preterm labor, a condition for which there is no effective treatment. PMID:25579843

  1. Radiation-induced upregulation of telomerase activity escapes PI3-kinase inhibition in two malignant glioma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    MILLET, P.; GRANOTIER, C.; ETIENNE, O.; BOUSSIN, F.D.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor relapse after radiotherapy is a great concern in the treatment of high-grade gliomas. Inhibition of the PI3-kinase/AKT pathway is known to radiosensitize cancer cells and to delay their DNA repair after irradiation. In this study, we show that the radiosensitization of CB193 and T98G, two high-grade glioma cell lines, by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002, correlates with the induction of G1 and G2/M arrest, but is inconsistently linked to a delayed DNA double-strand break (DSBs) repair. The PI3K/AKT pathway has been shown to activate radioprotective factors such as telomerase, whose inhibition may contribute to the radiosensitization of cancer cells. However, we show that radiation upregulates telomerase activity in LY-294002-treated glioma cells as well as untreated controls, demonstrating a PI3K/AKT-independent pathway of telomerase activation. Our study suggests that radiosensitizing strategies based on PI3-kinase inhibition in high-grade gliomas may be optimized by additional treatments targeting either telomerase activity or telomere maintenance. PMID:23727752

  2. 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside and AMP-activated protein kinase inhibit signalling through NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Katerelos, Marina; Mudge, Stuart J; Stapleton, David; Auwardt, Russell B; Fraser, Scott A; Chen, C-G; Kemp, Bruce E; Power, David A

    2010-10-01

    Activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) is one of the most important pro-inflammatory mechanisms in disease. In this study, we show that 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside (AICAR), an intermediate in nucleoside metabolism, inhibits signalling by NF-κB in three cell types, including bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). The block in the NF-κB signalling pathway occurred beyond degradation of IκB-α and movement of p65 into the nucleus of BAEC. There was, however, reduced binding of NF-κB from AICAR-treated cells to a κB-consensus oligonucleotide, suggesting that part of the mechanism was a reduction in NF-κB DNA-binding activity. Although AICAR is metabolized to ZMP and then adenosine, adenosine had no effect on activation of an NF-κB reporter. ZMP, however, activates the metabolic stress-sensing AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Transfection of active AMPK into BAEC reduced NF-κB reporter activity compared with a kinase-dead mutant, suggesting that part of the ability of AICAR to inhibit NF-κB signalling is due to activation of AMPK. Inhibition of NF-κB signalling may be important in the anti-inflammatory action of drugs such as sulfasalazine and methotrexate, which led to the accumulation of AICAR within target cells. PMID:20404837

  3. BRAF kinase inhibitor exerts anti-tumor activity against breast cancer cells via inhibition of FGFR2

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zong Xin; Jin, Wen Jun; Yang, Sheng; Ji, Cun Li

    2016-01-01

    Most anti-angiogenic therapies currently being evaluated in clinical trials targetvascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway; however, the tumor vasculature can acquire resistance to VEGF-targeted therapy by shifting to other angiogenesis mechanisms. Therefore, other potential therapeutic agents that block non-VEGF angiogenic pathways need to be evaluated. Here we identified BRAF kinase inhibitor, vemurafenibas an agent with potential anti-angiogenic and anti-breast cancer activities. Vemurafenib demonstrated inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and tube formation in response to basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). In ex vivo and in vivo angiogenesis assays, vemurafenib suppressed bFGF-induced microvessel sprouting of rat aortic rings and angiogenesis in vivo. To understand the underlying molecular basis, we examined the effects of vemurafenib on different molecular components in treated endothelial cell, and found that vemurafenib suppressed bFGF-triggered activation of FGFR2 and protein kinase B (AKT). Moreover, vemurafenib directly inhibited proliferation and blocked the oncogenic signaling pathways in breast cancer cell. In vivo, using xenograft models of breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231, vemurafenib showed growth-inhibitory activity associated with inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. Taken together, our results indicate that vemurafenib targets the FGFR2-mediated AKT signaling pathway in endothelial cells, leading to the suppression of tumor growth and angiogenesis. PMID:27293997

  4. Inhibition of protein kinase CK2 by condensed polyphenolic derivatives. An in vitro and in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Meggio, Flavio; Pagano, Mario A; Moro, Stefano; Zagotto, Giuseppe; Ruzzene, Maria; Sarno, Stefania; Cozza, Giorgio; Bain, Jenny; Elliott, Matthew; Deana, Arianna Donella; Brunati, Anna Maria; Pinna, Lorenzo A

    2004-10-12

    ATP site-directed inhibitors that can target individual kinases are powerful tools for use in signal transduction research, all the more so in the case of a pleiotropic, constitutively active protein kinase such as CK2, which is not turned on in response to specific stimuli. By screening a library of more than 200 derivatives of natural polyphenolic compounds, we have identified 16 molecules which inhibit CK2 with IC(50) values of kinases tested. Treatment of Jurkat cells with these compounds promotes inhibition of endogenous CK2 and induction of apoptosis. A correlation is observed between their efficacy as CK2 inhibitors (as judged from IC(50) values) and their capacity to induce cell death (DC(50) values). Mutations of the unique CK2alpha residues Val66 and/or Ile174 to alanine have a detrimental effect on inhibition by these compounds with 16-67-fold increases in IC(50) values. The combined usage of these reagents can be exploited to gain information about cellular functions mediated by CK2. PMID:15461466

  5. Protein kinase C inhibits the transplasma membrane influx of Ca2+ triggered by 4-aminopyridine in Jurkat T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Barbar, Elie; Rola-Pleszczynski, Marek; Payet, Marcel D; Dupuis, Gilles

    2003-07-23

    4-aminopyridine (4AP) is a general blocker of voltage-dependent K+ channels. This pyridine derivative has also been shown to inhibit T cell proliferation, to modulate immune responses and to alleviate some of the symptoms associated with neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis and Alzheimer's disease. 4AP triggers a Ca2+ response in lymphocytes, astrocytes, neurons and muscle cells but little is known about the regulation of the 4AP response in these cells. We report that 4AP induced a non-capacitative transplasma membrane influx of Ca2+ in Jurkat T lymphocytes. The influx of Ca2+ was not affected by activation or inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA). In contrast, activation of protein kinase C (PKC) by phorbol myristyl acetate (PMA), mezerein or 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG) inhibited the influx of Ca2+ triggered by 4AP. The inhibitory effect of PKC could be prevented by prior exposure of the cells to the PKC inhibitor GF 109203X. Under these conditions, mezerein and OAG no longer inhibited the 4AP-dependent Ca2+ response. Inhibition of serine and threonine protein phosphatases PP1 and PP2A by treating the cells with calyculin A (CalA) reduced the Ca2+ response to 4AP. Okadaic acid (OA) had no effect, suggesting an involvement of PP1. A combination of CalA and OAG (or PMA) abolished the influx of Ca2+ induced by 4AP, adding further evidence to the importance of protein phosphorylation in the modulation of the 4AP response. Our data suggest that the transplasma membrane influx of Ca2+ triggered by 4AP in Jurkat T cells can be modulated by the opposite actions of PKC and protein serine and threonine phosphatase(s). PMID:12880946

  6. Synthesis, molecular docking and Brugia malayi thymidylate kinase (BmTMK) enzyme inhibition study of novel derivatives of [6]-shogaol.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vinay Kr; Doharey, Pawan K; Kumar, Vikash; Saxena, J K; Siddiqi, M I; Rathaur, Sushma; Narender, Tadigoppula

    2015-03-26

    [6]-Shogaol (1) was isolated from Zingiber officinale. Twelve novel compounds have been synthesized and evaluated for their Brugia malayi thymidylate kinase (BmTMK) inhibition activity, which plays important role for the DNA synthesis in parasite. [6]-Shogaol (1) and shogaol with thymine head group (2), 5-bromouracil head group (3), adenine head group (4) and 2-amino-3-methylpyridine head group (5) showed potential inhibitory effect on BmTMK activity. Further molecular docking studies were carried out to explore the putative binding mode of compounds 1-5. PMID:25659753

  7. Targeting inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase pathway with AZD6244 (ARRY-142886) suppresses growth and angiogenesis of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jin-Hang; Wang, Chun-Hui; Tong, Huan; Wen, Shi-Lei; Huang, Zhi-Yin; Tang, Cheng-Wei

    2015-01-01

    AZD6244 (ARRY-142886), a highly selective MAPK-ERK kinase inhibitor, has shown excellent clinical efficacy in many tumors. However, the anti-tumor and anti-angiogenesis efficacy of AZD6244 on gastric cancer has not been well characterized. In this study, high p-ERK expression was associated with advanced TNM stage, increased lymphovascular invasion and poor survival. For absence of NRAS, KRAS and BRAF mutation, SGC7901 and BGC823 gastric cancer cells were relative resistance to AZD6244 in vitro. And such resistance was not attributed to the insufficient inhibition of ERK phosphorylation. However, tumor growth was significantly suppressed in SGC7901 xenografts by blockage of angiogenesis. This result was further supported by suppression of tube formation and migration in HUVEC cells after treatment with AZD6244. Moreover, the anti-angiogenesis effect of AZD6244 may predominantly attribute to its modulation on VEGF through p-ERK − c-Fos − HIF-1α integrated signal pathways. In conclusions, High p-ERK expression was associated with advanced TNM stage, increased lymphovascular invasion and poor survival. Targeting inhibition of p-ERK by AZD6244 suppress gastric cancer xenografts by blockage of angiogenesis without systemic toxicity. The anti-angiogenesis effect afford by AZD6244 may attribute to its modulation on p-ERK − c-Fos − HIF-1α − VEGF integrated signal pathways. PMID:26567773

  8. Structural Basis for Selective Small Molecule Kinase Inhibition of Activated c-Met

    SciTech Connect

    Rickert, Keith W.; Patel, Sangita B.; Allison, Timothy J.; Byrne, Noel J.; Darke, Paul L.; Ford, Rachael E.; Guerin, David J.; Hall, Dawn L.; Kornienko, Maria; Lu, Jun; Munshi, Sanjeev K.; Reid, John C.; Shipman, Jennifer M.; Stanton, Elizabeth F.; Wilson, Kevin J.; Young, Jonathon R.; Soisson, Stephen M.; Lumb, Kevin J.

    2012-03-15

    The receptor tyrosine kinase c-Met is implicated in oncogenesis and is the target for several small molecule and biologic agents in clinical trials for the treatment of cancer. Binding of the hepatocyte growth factor to the cell surface receptor of c-Met induces activation via autophosphorylation of the kinase domain. Here we describe the structural basis of c-Met activation upon autophosphorylation and the selective small molecule inhibiton of autophosphorylated c-Met. MK-2461 is a potent c-Met inhibitor that is selective for the phosphorylated state of the enzyme. Compound 1 is an MK-2461 analog with a 20-fold enthalpy-driven preference for the autophosphorylated over unphosphorylated c-Met kinase domain. The crystal structure of the unbound kinase domain phosphorylated at Tyr-1234 and Tyr-1235 shows that activation loop phosphorylation leads to the ejection and disorder of the activation loop and rearrangement of helix {alpha}C and the G loop to generate a viable active site. Helix {alpha}C adopts a orientation different from that seen in activation loop mutants. The crystal structure of the complex formed by the autophosphorylated c-Met kinase domain and compound 1 reveals a significant induced fit conformational change of the G loop and ordering of the activation loop, explaining the selectivity of compound 1 for the autophosphorylated state. The results highlight the role of structural plasticity within the kinase domain in imparting the specificity of ligand binding and provide the framework for structure-guided design of activated c-Met inhibitors.

  9. Inhibition of protein kinase C by isojacareubin suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma metastasis and induces apoptosis in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xing; Chen, Hao; Li, Xia; Dai, Ming; Zeng, Huawu; Shan, Lei; Sun, Qingyan; Zhang, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Targeted inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) proliferation and metastasis. We previously reported the cytotoxicity of a series of synthetic phenyl-substituted polyoxygenated xanthone derivatives against human HCC. In the current study, the most potent natural product, isojacareubin (ISJ), was synthesized, and its cellular-level antihepatoma activities were evaluated. ISJ significantly inhibited cell proliferation and was highly selective for HCC cells in comparison to nonmalignant QSG-7701 hepatocytes. Moreover, ISJ exhibited pro-apoptotic effects on HepG2 hepatoma cells, as well as impaired HepG2 cell migration and invasion. Furthermore, ISJ was a potent inhibitor of PKC, with differential actions against various PKC isotypes. ISJ selectively inhibited the expression of aPKC (PKCζ) in the cytosol and the translocation of cytosolic PKCζ to membrane site. ISJ also directly interacted with cPKC (PKCα) and nPKC (PKCδ, PKCε and PKCμ) and thereby inhibited the early response of major MAPK phosphorylation and the late response of HCC cell invasion and proliferation. In a hepatoma xenograft model, ISJ pretreatment resulted in significant antihepatoma activity in vivo. These findings identify ISJ as a promising lead compound for the development of new antihepatoma agents and may guide the search for additional selective PKC inhibitors. PMID:26245668

  10. Meliae cortex extract exhibits anti-allergic activity through the inhibition of Syk kinase in mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jun Ho; Ko, Na Young; Kim, Nam Wook; Mun, Se Hwan; Kim, Jie Wan; Her, Erk; Kim, Bo Kyung; Seo, Dong Wan; Chang, Hyun Wook; Moon, Tae Chul; Han, Jeung Whan; Kim, Young Mi; Choi, Wahn Soo . E-mail: wahnchoi@kku.ac.kr

    2007-05-01

    The anti-allergic action of various Oriental medicinal herbs was investigated using in vitro and in vivo experimental models. Of these extracts, the ethanol extract of Meliae cortex (MC) exhibited the most potent activity in mast cells; its IC{sub 50} values were 29 {+-} 1.5 {mu}g/ml for antigen stimulation and 57 {+-} 3.4 {mu}g/ml for thapsigargin stimulation. It inhibited compound-48/80-induced systemic anaphylaxis by 52.9% at a dose of 300 mg/kg in mice; it also inhibited the expression of the proinflammatory mediator TNF-{alpha}. With regard to its mechanism of action, MC suppressed the activating phosphorylation of Syk, a key enzyme in mast-cell signaling processes and that of Akt in a dose-dependent manner. It also inhibited the MAP kinase ERK1/2, which is critical for the production of inflammatory cytokines in mast cells, as indicated by the suppression of the activating phosphorylation of ERK1/2. Taken together, these results suggest that the anti-allergic activity of MC may be due to the inhibition of histamine secretion and cytokine expression through the Syk inhibition in mast cells.

  11. Structural Basis for the Potent and Selective Inhibition of Casein Kinase 1 Epsilon

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Alexander M.; Zhao, Huilin; Huang, Xin

    2012-10-29

    Casein kinase 1 epsilon (CK1ε) and its closest homologue CK1δ are key regulators of diverse cellular processes. We report two crystal structures of PF4800567, a potent and selective inhibitor of CK1ε, bound to the kinase domains of human CK1ε and CK1δ as well as one apo CK1ε crystal structure. These structures provide a molecular basis for the strong and specific inhibitor interactions with CK1ε and suggest clues for further development of CK1δ inhibitors.

  12. The chemopreventive agent myoinositol inhibits Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase in bronchial lesions from heavy smokers.

    PubMed

    Han, Wei; Gills, Joell J; Memmott, Regan M; Lam, Stephen; Dennis, Phillip A

    2009-04-01

    Myoinositol is an isomer of glucose that has chemopreventive activity in animal models of cancer. In a recent phase I clinical trial, myoinositol administration correlated with a statistically significant regression of preexisting bronchial dysplastic lesions in heavy smokers. To shed light on the potential mechanisms involved, activation of Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), two kinases that control cellular proliferation and survival, was assessed in 206 paired bronchial biopsies from 21 patients who participated in this clinical trial. Before myoinositol treatment, strongly positive staining for activation of Akt was detected in 27% of hyperplastic/metaplastic lesions and 58% of dysplastic lesions (P = 0.05, chi(2) test). There was also a trend toward increased activation of ERK (28% in regions of hyperplasia/metaplasia to 42% of dysplastic lesions). Following myoinositol treatment, significant decreases in Akt and ERK phosphorylation were observed in dysplastic (P < 0.01 and 0.05, respectively) but not hyperplastic/metaplastic lesions (P > 0.05). In vitro, myoinositol decreased endogenous and tobacco carcinogen-induced activation of Akt and ERK in immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells, which decreased cell proliferation and induced a G(1)-S cell cycle arrest. These results show that the phenotypic progression of premalignant bronchial lesions from smokers correlates with increased activation of Akt and ERK and that these kinases are targets of myoinositol. Moreover, they suggest that myoinositol might cause regression of bronchial dysplastic lesions through inhibition of active Akt and ERK. PMID:19336734

  13. Small molecules that allosterically inhibit p21-activated kinase activity by binding to the regulatory p21-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Duk-Joong; Choi, Chang-Ki; Lee, Chan-Soo; Park, Mee-Hee; Tian, Xizhe; Kim, Nam Doo; Lee, Kee-In; Choi, Joong-Kwon; Ahn, Jin Hee; Shin, Eun-Young; Shin, Injae; Kim, Eung-Gook

    2016-01-01

    p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are key regulators of actin dynamics, cell proliferation and cell survival. Deregulation of PAK activity contributes to the pathogenesis of various human diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders. Using an ELISA-based screening protocol, we identified naphtho(hydro)quinone-based small molecules that allosterically inhibit PAK activity. These molecules interfere with the interactions between the p21-binding domain (PBD) of PAK1 and Rho GTPases by binding to the PBD. Importantly, they inhibit the activity of full-length PAKs and are selective for PAK1 and PAK3 in vitro and in living cells. These compounds may potentially be useful for determining the details of the PAK signaling pathway and may also be used as lead molecules in the development of more selective and potent PAK inhibitors. PMID:27126178

  14. Small molecules that allosterically inhibit p21-activated kinase activity by binding to the regulatory p21-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Duk-Joong; Choi, Chang-Ki; Lee, Chan-Soo; Park, Mee-Hee; Tian, Xizhe; Kim, Nam Doo; Lee, Kee-In; Choi, Joong-Kwon; Ahn, Jin Hee; Shin, Eun-Young; Shin, Injae; Kim, Eung-Gook

    2016-01-01

    p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are key regulators of actin dynamics, cell proliferation and cell survival. Deregulation of PAK activity contributes to the pathogenesis of various human diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders. Using an ELISA-based screening protocol, we identified naphtho(hydro)quinone-based small molecules that allosterically inhibit PAK activity. These molecules interfere with the interactions between the p21-binding domain (PBD) of PAK1 and Rho GTPases by binding to the PBD. Importantly, they inhibit the activity of full-length PAKs and are selective for PAK1 and PAK3 in vitro and in living cells. These compounds may potentially be useful for determining the details of the PAK signaling pathway and may also be used as lead molecules in the development of more selective and potent PAK inhibitors. PMID:27126178

  15. The cytomegalovirus homolog of interleukin-10 requires phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity for inhibition of cytokine synthesis in monocytes.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Juliet V

    2007-02-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) has evolved numerous strategies for evading host immune defenses, including piracy of cellular cytokines. A viral homolog of interleukin-10, designated cmvIL-10, binds to the cellular IL-10 receptor and effects potent immune suppression. The signaling pathways employed by cmvIL-10 were investigated, and the classic IL-10R/JAK1/Stat3 pathway was found to be activated in monocytes. However, inhibition of JAK1 had little effect on cmvIL-10-mediated suppression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) production. Inhibition of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway had a more significant impact on TNF-alpha levels but did not completely relieve the immune suppression, demonstrating that cmvIL-10 stimulates multiple signaling pathways to modulate cell function. PMID:17121792

  16. Inhibition of protein kinase B activity induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis during early G₁ phase in CHO cells.

    PubMed

    van Opstal, Angélique; Bijvelt, José; van Donselaar, Elly; Humbel, Bruno M; Boonstra, Johannes

    2012-04-01

    Inhibition of PKB (protein kinase B) activity using a highly selective PKB inhibitor resulted in inhibition of cell cycle progression only if cells were in early G1 phase at the time of addition of the inhibitor, as demonstrated by time-lapse cinematography. Addition of the inhibitor during mitosis up to 2 h after mitosis resulted in arrest of the cells in early G1 phase, as deduced from the expression of cyclins D and A and incorporation of thymidine. After 24 h of cell cycle arrest, cells expressed the cleaved caspase-3, a central mediator of apoptosis. These results demonstrate that PKB activity in early G1 phase is required to prevent the induction of apoptosis. Using antibodies, it was demonstrated that active PKB translocates to the nucleus during early G1 phase, while an even distribution of PKB was observed through cytoplasm and nucleus during the end of G1 phase. PMID:22251027

  17. Inhibiting the Aurora B Kinase Potently Suppresses Repopulation During Fractionated Irradiation of Human Lung Cancer Cell Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Sak, Ali; Stuschke, Martin; Groneberg, Michael; Kuebler, Dennis; Poettgen, Christoph; Eberhardt, Wilfried E.E.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: The use of molecular-targeted agents during radiotherapy of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a promising strategy to inhibit repopulation, thereby improving therapeutic outcome. We assessed the combined effectiveness of inhibiting Aurora B kinase and irradiation on human NSCLC cell lines in vitro. Methods and Materials: NSCLC cell lines were exposed to concentrations of AZD1152-hydroxyquinazoline pyrazol anilide (AZD1152-HQPA) inhibiting colony formation by 50% (IC50{sub clone}) in combination with single dose irradiation or different fractionation schedules using multiple 2-Gy fractions per day up to total doses of 4-40 Gy. The total irradiation dose required to control growth of 50% of the plaque monolayers (TCD50) was determined. Apoptosis, G2/M progression, and polyploidization were also analyzed. Results: TCD50 values after single dose irradiation were similar for the H460 and H661 cell lines with 11.4 {+-} 0.2 Gy and 10.7 {+-} 0.3 Gy, respectively. Fractionated irradiation using 3 Multiplication-Sign 2 Gy/day, 2 Multiplication-Sign 2 Gy/day, and 1 Multiplication-Sign 2 Gy/day schedules significantly increased TCD50 values for both cell lines grown as plaque monolayers with increasing radiation treatment time. This could be explained by a repopulation effect per day that counteracts 75 {+-} 8% and 27 {+-} 6% of the effect of a 2-Gy fraction in H460 and H661 cells, respectively. AZD1152-HQPA treatment concomitant to radiotherapy significantly decreased the daily repopulation effect (H460: 28 {+-} 5%, H661: 10 {+-} 4% of a 2-Gy fraction per day). Treatment with IC50{sub clone} AZD1152-HPQA did not induce apoptosis, prolong radiation-induced G2 arrest, or delay cell cycle progression before the spindle check point. However, polyploidization was detected, especially in cell lines without functional p53. Conclusions: Inhibition of Aurora B kinase with low AZD1152-HQPA concentrations during irradiation of NSCLC cell lines affects repopulation during

  18. Inhibition of protein kinase C catalytic activity by additional regions within the human protein kinase Calpha-regulatory domain lying outside of the pseudosubstrate sequence.

    PubMed

    Kirwan, Angie F; Bibby, Ashley C; Mvilongo, Thierry; Riedel, Heimo; Burke, Thomas; Millis, Sherri Z; Parissenti, Amadeo M

    2003-07-15

    The N-terminal pseudosubstrate site within the protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha)-regulatory domain has long been regarded as the major determinant for autoinhibition of catalytic domain activity. Previously, we observed that the PKC-inhibitory capacity of the human PKCalpha-regulatory domain was only reduced partially on removal of the pseudosubstrate sequence [Parissenti, Kirwan, Kim, Colantonio and Schimmer (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 8940-8945]. This finding suggested that one or more additional region(s) contributes to the inhibition of catalytic domain activity. To assess this hypothesis, we first examined the PKC-inhibitory capacity of a smaller fragment of the PKCalpha-regulatory domain consisting of the C1a, C1b and V2 regions [GST-Ralpha(39-177): this protein contained the full regulatory domain of human PKCalpha fused to glutathione S-transferase (GST), but lacked amino acids 1-38 (including the pseudosubstrate sequence) and amino acids 178-270 (including the C2 region)]. GST-Ralpha(39-177) significantly inhibited PKC in a phorbol-independent manner and could not bind the peptide substrate used in our assays. These results suggested that a region within C1/V2 directly inhibits catalytic domain activity. Providing further in vivo support for this hypothesis, we found that expression of N-terminally truncated pseudosubstrate-less bovine PKCalpha holoenzymes in yeast was capable of inhibiting cell growth in a phorbol-dependent manner. This suggested that additional autoinhibitory force(s) remained within the truncated holoenzymes that could be relieved by phorbol ester. Using tandem PCR-mediated mutagenesis, we observed that mutation of amino acids 33-86 within GST-Ralpha(39-177) dramatically reduced its PKC-inhibitory capacity when protamine was used as substrate. Mutagenesis of a broad range of sequences within C2 (amino acids 159-242) also significantly reduced PKC-inhibitory capacity. Taken together, these observations support strongly the existence of

  19. Uveal Melanoma Cell Growth Is Inhibited by Aminoimidazole Carboxamide Ribonucleotide (AICAR) Partially Through Activation of AMP-Dependent Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Al-Moujahed, Ahmad; Nicolaou, Fotini; Brodowska, Katarzyna; Papakostas, Thanos D.; Marmalidou, Anna; Ksander, Bruce R.; Miller, Joan W.; Gragoudas, Evangelos; Vavvas, Demetrios G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the effects and mechanism of aminoimidazole carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR), an AMP-dependent kinase (AMPK) activator, on the growth of uveal melanoma cell lines. Methods. Four different cell lines were treated with AICAR (1–4 mM). Cell growth was assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium (MTT) assay. Cell cycle analysis was conducted by flow cytometry; additionally, expression of cell-cycle control proteins, cell growth transcription factors, and downstream effectors of AMPK were determined by RT-PCR and Western blot. Results. Aminoimidazole carboxamide ribonucleotide inhibited cell growth, induced S-phase arrest, and led to AMPK activation. Aminoimidazole carboxamide ribonucleotide treatment was associated with inhibition of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-BP1 phosphorylation, a marker of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway activity. Aminoimidazole carboxamide ribonucleotide treatment was also associated with downregulation of cyclins A and D, but had minimal effects on the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 or levels of the macroautophagy marker LC3B. The effects of AICAR were abolished by treatment with dipyridamole, an adenosine transporter inhibitor that blocks the entry of AICAR into cells. Treatment with adenosine kinase inhibitor 5-iodotubericidin, which inhibits the conversion of AICAR to its 5′-phosphorylated ribotide 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-D-ribofuranosyl-5′-monophosphate (ZMP; the direct activator of AMPK), reversed most of the growth-inhibitory effects, indicating that some of AICAR's antiproliferative effects are mediated at least partially through AMPK activation. Conclusions. Aminoimidazole carboxamide ribonucleotide inhibited uveal melanoma cell proliferation partially through activation of the AMPK pathway and downregulation of cyclins A1 and D1. PMID:24781943

  20. Multiple signal amplification electrogenerated chemiluminescence biosensors for sensitive protein kinase activity analysis and inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zonghua; Yan, Zhiyong; Sun, Na; Liu, Yang

    2015-06-15

    A novel electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) biosensor was built for the detection of kinase activity based on multiple signal amplification nanoprobes. In this strategy, the Xanthine oxidase (XOD) and 5'-phosphate group end DNA conjugated AuNPs was integrated with the phosphorylated peptide by Zr(4+). The XOD on gold nanoparticles can catalyze dissolved oxygen to produce H2O2 in the presence of hypoxanthine (HA) which acts as a coreactor for luminol ECL reaction. In addition, due to the excellent catalytic activity of gold nanoparticle toward luminol ECL reaction and its large surface area that can accommodate large number of XOD and DNA on the surface, the ECL signal of luminol was significantly amplified, affording a highly sensitive ECL analysis of kinase activity. The as-proposed biosensor presents a low detection limit of 0.09 U mL(-1) for protein kinase A (PKA) activity, wide linear range (from 0.1 to 10 U mL(-1)) and excellent stability even in serum samples. This biosensor can also be applied for quantitative kinase inhibitor evaluation. The robust ECL biosensor provides a valuable tool for the high throughput assay in the applications of clinic diagnostic and therapeutic. PMID:25682506

  1. Inhibition of Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase (MAPK)-interacting Kinase (MNK) Preferentially Affects Translation of mRNAs Containing Both a 5'-Terminal Cap and Hairpin.

    PubMed

    Korneeva, Nadejda L; Song, Anren; Gram, Hermann; Edens, Mary Ann; Rhoads, Robert E

    2016-02-12

    The MAPK-interacting kinases 1 and 2 (MNK1 and MNK2) are activated by extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) or p38 in response to cellular stress and extracellular stimuli that include growth factors, cytokines, and hormones. Modulation of MNK activity affects translation of mRNAs involved in the cell cycle, cancer progression, and cell survival. However, the mechanism by which MNK selectively affects translation of these mRNAs is not understood. MNK binds eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G (eIF4G) and phosphorylates the cap-binding protein eIF4E. Using a cell-free translation system from rabbit reticulocytes programmed with mRNAs containing different 5'-ends, we show that an MNK inhibitor, CGP57380, affects translation of only those mRNAs that contain both a cap and a hairpin in the 5'-UTR. Similarly, a C-terminal fragment of human eIF4G-1, eIF4G(1357-1600), which prevents binding of MNK to intact eIF4G, reduces eIF4E phosphorylation and inhibits translation of only capped and hairpin-containing mRNAs. Analysis of proteins bound to m(7)GTP-Sepharose reveals that both CGP and eIF4G(1357-1600) decrease binding of eIF4E to eIF4G. These data suggest that MNK stimulates translation only of mRNAs containing both a cap and 5'-terminal RNA duplex via eIF4E phosphorylation, thereby enhancing the coupled cap-binding and RNA-unwinding activities of eIF4F. PMID:26668315

  2. Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK)-related Non-kinase Inhibits Myofibroblast Differentiation through Differential MAPK Activation in a FAK-dependent Manner*

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Qiang; Gladson, Candece L.; Wu, Hongju; Hayasaka, Haurko; Olman, Mitchell A.

    2008-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 induces fibroblast transdifferentiation to myofibroblasts, a process that requires the involvement of integrin-mediated signaling and focal adhesion kinase (FAK). FAK-related non-kinase (FRNK) is known for its role in inhibiting integrin-mediated cell migration; however, its role in myofibroblast differentiation has not been defined. Here, we report that FRNK abrogates TGF-β1-induced myofibroblast differentiation in vitro and in vivo. TGF-β1 can induce α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression in the presence or absence of FAK; however, TGF-β1-induced α-SMA expression is reduced (∼73%) in FAK-deficient fibroblasts. Although both ERK and p38 MAPK activation is required for maximal TGF-β1-induced α-SMA expression, ERK is the major signaling intermediate in cells that express FAK. In contrast, p38 MAPK is the dominant mediator of TGF-β1-induced α-SMA expression in FAK-deficient cells. FRNK overexpression blocks TGF-β1-induced ERK or p38 MAPK activation in the presence, and surprisingly, in the absence of FAK. The loss of FRNK was tested in vivo during experimentally induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice. FRNK knock-out mice have a greater increase in α-SMA-expressing cells in response to a pulmonary fibrotic stimulus in vivo, as compared with congenic wild type mice. This is the first time that FRNK loss has been shown to modify the pathobiology in any animal disease model. Together, the data demonstrate that FRNK negatively regulates myofibroblast differentiation in vitro and in vivo. These data further suggest that modulation FRNK expression may be a novel avenue for therapeutic intervention in tissue fibrosis. PMID:18669633

  3. Inhibition of the Raf-1 kinase by cyclic AMP agonists causes apoptosis of v-abl-transformed cells.

    PubMed Central

    Weissinger, E M; Eissner, G; Grammer, C; Fackler, S; Haefner, B; Yoon, L S; Lu, K S; Bazarov, A; Sedivy, J M; Mischak, H; Kolch, W

    1997-01-01

    Here we investigate the role of the Raf-1 kinase in transformation by the v-abl oncogene. Raf-1 can activate a transforming signalling cascade comprising the consecutive activation of Mek and extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (Erks). In v-abl-transformed cells the endogenous Raf-1 protein was phosphorylated on tyrosine and displayed high constitutive kinase activity. The activities of the Erks were constitutively elevated in both v-raf- and v-abl-transformed cells. In both cell types the activities of Raf-1 and v-raf were almost completely suppressed after activation of the cyclic AMP-dependent kinase (protein kinase A [PKA]), whereas the v-abl kinase was not affected. Raf inhibition substantially diminished the activities of Erks in v-raf-transformed cells but not in v-abl-transformed cells, indicating that v-abl can activate Erks by a Raf-1-independent pathway. PKA activation induced apoptosis in v-abl-transformed cells while reverting v-raf transformation without severe cytopathic effects. Overexpression of Raf-1 in v-abl-transformed cells partially protected the cells from apoptosis induced by PKA activation. In contrast to PKA activators, a Mek inhibitor did not induce apoptosis. The diverse biological responses correlated with the status of c-myc gene expression. v-abl-transformed cells featured high constitutive levels of expression of c-myc, which were not reduced following PKA activation. Myc activation has been previously shown to be essential for transformation by oncogenic Abl proteins. Using estrogen-regulated c-myc and temperature-sensitive Raf-1 mutants, we found that Raf-1 activation could protect cells from c-myc-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, these results suggest (i) that Raf-1 participates in v-abl transformation via an Erk-independent pathway by providing a survival signal which complements c-myc in transformation, and (ii) that cAMP agonists might become useful for the treatment of malignancies where abl oncogenes are involved, such as

  4. The stress-activated protein kinases p38α/β and JNK1/2 cooperate with Chk1 to inhibit mitotic entry upon DNA replication arrest

    PubMed Central

    Llopis, Alba; Salvador, Noelia; Ercilla, Amaia; Guaita-Esteruelas, Sandra; Barrantes, Ivan del Barco; Gupta, Jalaj; Gaestel, Matthias; Davis, Roger J.; Nebreda, Angel R.; Agell, Neus

    2012-01-01

    Accurate DNA replication is crucial for the maintenance of genome integrity. To this aim, cells have evolved complex surveillance mechanisms to prevent mitotic entry in the presence of partially replicated DNA. ATR and Chk1 are key elements in the signal transduction pathways of DNA replication checkpoint; however, other kinases also make significant contributions. We show here that the stress kinases p38 and JNK are activated when DNA replication is blocked, and that their activity allows S/M, but not G₂/M, checkpoint maintenance when Chk1 is inhibited. Activation of both kinases by DNA replication inhibition is not mediated by the caffeine-sensitive kinases ATR or ATM. Phosphorylation of MKK3/6 and MKK4, p38 and JNK upstream kinases was also observed upon DNA replication inhibition. Using a genetic approach, we dissected the p38 pathway and showed that both p38α and p38β isoforms collaborate to inhibit mitotic entry. We further defined MKK3/6 and MK2/3 as the key upstream and downstream elements in the p38 signaling cascade after replication arrest. Accordingly, we found that the stress signaling pathways collaborate with Chk1 to keep cyclin B1/Cdk1 complexes inactive when DNA replication is inhibited, thereby preventing cell cycle progression when DNA replication is stalled. Our results show a complex response to replication stress, where multiple pathways are activated and fulfill overlapping roles to prevent mitotic entry with unreplicated DNA. PMID:22935704

  5. Involvement of inhibition of RhoA/Rho kinase signaling in simvastatin-induced amelioration of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Ohsawa, Masahiro; Ishikura, Kei-Ichiro; Mutoh, Junpei; Hisa, Hiroaki

    2016-10-01

    Small molecular G-protein plays a key role in several diseases. This study was designed to reveal the role of RhoA signaling in the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain in mice. Partial sciatic nerve injury caused thermal hyperalgesia, mechanical allodynia, and increased plasma membrane translocation of RhoA in the lumber spinal cord. GFAP-immunoreactivity (ir), Iba-1-ir, and Rho kinase 2 (ROCK2-ir) was also increased in the ipsilateral spinal dorsal horn of nerve-ligated mice. Moreover, partial nerve ligation increased the expression of phosphorylated myristoylated alanine-rich protein kinase C substrate (MARCKS)-ir in the ipsilateral spinal dorsal horn. Daily intrathecal administration of simvastatin, beginning 3days before nerve injury, completely blocked all these changes in nerve-ligated mice. Pharmacological inhibition of ROCK also attenuated the increased expression of GFAP-ir and phosphorylated MARCKS-ir. Together, it is suggested that astrogliosis initiated by the activation of RhoA/ROCK signaling results in MARCKS phosphorylation in nerve terminals, which leads to hyperalgesia in neuropathic pain. Furthermore, simvastatin exerts antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects through the inhibition of spinal RhoA activation. PMID:27457035

  6. Inhibition of diacylglycerol kinase α restores restimulation-induced cell death and reduces immunopathology in XLP-1.

    PubMed

    Ruffo, Elisa; Malacarne, Valeria; Larsen, Sasha E; Das, Rupali; Patrussi, Laura; Wülfing, Christoph; Biskup, Christoph; Kapnick, Senta M; Verbist, Katherine; Tedrick, Paige; Schwartzberg, Pamela L; Baldari, Cosima T; Rubio, Ignacio; Nichols, Kim E; Snow, Andrew L; Baldanzi, Gianluca; Graziani, Andrea

    2016-01-13

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP-1) is an often-fatal primary immunodeficiency associated with the exuberant expansion of activated CD8(+) T cells after Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. XLP-1 is caused by defects in signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP), an adaptor protein that modulates T cell receptor (TCR)-induced signaling. SAP-deficient T cells exhibit impaired TCR restimulation-induced cell death (RICD) and diminished TCR-induced inhibition of diacylglycerol kinase α (DGKα), leading to increased diacylglycerol metabolism and decreased signaling through Ras and PKCθ (protein kinase Cθ). We show that down-regulation of DGKα activity in SAP-deficient T cells restores diacylglycerol signaling at the immune synapse and rescues RICD via induction of the proapoptotic proteins NUR77 and NOR1. Pharmacological inhibition of DGKα prevents the excessive CD8(+) T cell expansion and interferon-γ production that occur in SAP-deficient mice after lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection without impairing lytic activity. Collectively, these data highlight DGKα as a viable therapeutic target to reverse the life-threatening EBV-associated immunopathology that occurs in XLP-1 patients. PMID:26764158

  7. Inhibition of human neutrophil responses by alpha-cyano-3,4-dihydroxythiocinnamamide; a protein-tyrosine kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Dryden, P.; Duronio, V.; Martin, L.; Hudson, A. T.; Salari, H.

    1992-01-01

    1. Activation of neutrophils results in increased tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins that may have important roles in receptor/effector coupling. In this study, the effect of a protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor on receptor-mediated neutrophil activation by platelet-activating factor (PAF), leukotriene, B4 (LTB4) and N-formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine (FMLP) is investigated. 2. alpha-Cyano-3,4-dihydroxythiocinnamamide dose-dependently inhibited intracellular calcium release and superoxide generation from human neutrophils activated by 1 microM LTB4, PAF, and FMLP. 3. In the presence of cytochalasin B, FMLP stimulated elastase release from neutrophils was also inhibited to unstimulated levels by 5 min pretreatment with alpha-cyano-3,4-dihydroxythiocinnamamide. 4. The inhibitory action of alpha-cyano-3,4-dihydroxythiocinnamamide was found to be at or upstream of phospholipase C activation, blocking both phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis and protein kinase C activation. alpha-Cyano-3,4-dihydroxythiocinnamamide did not affect agonist receptor binding sites or receptor affinity in neutrophils. 5. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated the tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins of 41, 56, 66, and 104 kDa in neutrophils treated with agonists. Treatment of neutrophils with alpha-cyano-3,4-dihydroxythiocinnamamide prior to stimulation with chemoattractants reduced tyrosine phosphorylation of the above phosphoproteins. 6. These results indicate that alpha-cyano-3,4-dihydroxythiocinnamamide might be a useful agent in characterizing the essential proteins and biochemical pathways that regulate neutrophil activation. PMID:1504749

  8. The clinically approved drugs dasatinib and bosutinib induce anti-inflammatory macrophages by inhibiting the salt-inducible kinases

    PubMed Central

    Ozanne, James; Prescott, Alan R.; Clark, Kristopher

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages switch to an anti-inflammatory, ‘regulatory’-like phenotype characterized by the production of high levels of interleukin (IL)-10 and low levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines to promote the resolution of inflammation. A potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases would be to administer drugs that could induce the formation of ‘regulatory’-like macrophages at sites of inflammation. In the present study, we demonstrate that the clinically approved cancer drugs bosutinib and dasatinib induce several hallmark features of ‘regulatory’-like macrophages. Treatment of macrophages with bosutinib or dasatinib elevates the production of IL-10 while suppressing the production of IL-6, IL-12p40 and tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) in response to Toll-like receptor (TLR) stimulation. Moreover, macrophages treated with bosutinib or dasatinib express higher levels of markers of ‘regulatory’-like macrophages including LIGHT, SPHK1 and arginase 1. Bosutinib and dasatinib were originally developed as inhibitors of the protein tyrosine kinases Bcr-Abl and Src but we show that, surprisingly, the effects of bosutinib and dasatinib on macrophage polarization are the result of the inhibition of the salt-inducible kinases. Consistent with the present finding, bosutinib and dasatinib induce the dephosphorylation of CREB-regulated transcription co-activator 3 (CRTC3) and its nuclear translocation where it induces a cAMP-response-element-binding protein (CREB)-dependent gene transcription programme including that of IL-10. Importantly, these effects of bosutinib and dasatinib on IL-10 gene expression are lost in macrophages expressing a drug-resistant mutant of salt-inducible kinase 2 (SIK2). In conclusion, our study identifies the salt-inducible kinases as major targets of bosutinib and dasatinib that mediate the effects of these drugs on the innate immune system and provides novel mechanistic insights into the anti

  9. Kinase domain inhibition of leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) using a [1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-b]pyridazine scaffold.

    PubMed

    Galatsis, Paul; Henderson, Jaclyn L; Kormos, Bethany L; Han, Seungil; Kurumbail, Ravi G; Wager, Travis T; Verhoest, Patrick R; Noell, G Stephen; Chen, Yi; Needle, Elie; Berger, Zdenek; Steyn, Stefanus J; Houle, Christopher; Hirst, Warren D

    2014-09-01

    Leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) has been genetically linked to Parkinson's disease (PD). The most common mutant, G2019S, increases kinase activity, thus LRRK2 kinase inhibitors are potentially useful in the treatment of PD. We herein disclose the structure, potential ligand-protein binding interactions, and pharmacological profiling of potent and highly selective kinase inhibitors based on a triazolopyridazine chemical scaffold. PMID:25113930

  10. Antispasmodic and myorelaxant effects of the flavoring agent methyl cinnamate in gut: potential inhibition of tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Lima, Francisco J B; Cosker, François; Brito, Teresinha S; Ribeiro-Filho, Hélder V; Silva, Camila M S; Aragão, Karoline S; Lahlou, Saad; Souza, Marcellus H L P; Santos, Armênio A; Magalhães, Pedro J C

    2014-10-01

    Methyl cinnamate (MC) is a safe flavoring agent useful to food industry. Although chemically analog to tyrosine kinase inhibitors, there is little information regarding its biological actions. Here, we aimed at assessing the MC effects on gastrointestinal contractility and the putative involvement of tyrosine kinase in the mediation of these effects. Isometric contractions were recorded in rat isolated strips from stomach, duodenum and colon segments. In gastric strips, MC (3-3000 µM) showed antispasmodic effects against carbachol-induced contractions, which remained unchanged by either l-NAME or tetraethylammonium pretreatment and occurred with potency similar to that obtained against contractions evoked by potassium or U-46619. In colon strips, MC was four times more potent than in gastric ones. MC and the positive control genistein inhibited phasic contractions induced by acetylcholine in Ca2+-free medium, an effect fully prevented by sodium orthovanadate. Both MC and genistein decreased the spontaneous contractions of duodenal strips and shortened the time necessary for gastric fundic tissues to reach 50% of maximal relaxation. In freshly isolated colon myocytes, MC decreased the basal levels of cytoplasmic Ca2+, but not the potassium-elicited cytoplasmic Ca2+ elevation. Colon strips obtained from rats subjected to intracolonic acetic acid instillation showed reduced contractility to potassium, which was partially recovered in MC-treated rats. Inhibitory effect of nifedipine against cholinergic contractions, blunted in acetic acid-induced colitis, was also recovered in MC-treated rats. In conclusion, MC inhibited the gastrointestinal contractility with a probable involvement of tyrosine kinase pathways. In vivo, it was effective to prevent the deleterious effects of colitis resulting from acetic acid injury. PMID:25046838

  11. Rearrangement of energetic and substrate utilization networks compensate for chronic myocardial creatine kinase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Dzeja, Petras P; Hoyer, Kirsten; Tian, Rong; Zhang, Song; Nemutlu, Emirhan; Spindler, Matthias; Ingwall, Joanne S

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Plasticity of the cellular bioenergetic system is fundamental to every organ function, stress adaptation and disease tolerance. Here, remodelling of phosphotransfer and substrate utilization networks in response to chronic creatine kinase (CK) deficiency, a hallmark of cardiovascular disease, has been revealed in transgenic mouse models lacking either cytosolic M-CK (M-CK−/−) or both M-CK and sarcomeric mitochondrial CK (M-CK/ScCKmit−/−) isoforms. The dynamic metabolomic signatures of these adaptations have also been defined. Tracking perturbations in metabolic dynamics with 18O and 13C isotopes and 31P NMR and mass spectrometry demonstrate that hearts lacking M-CK have lower phosphocreatine (PCr) turnover but increased glucose-6-phosphate (G-6-P) turnover, glucose utilization and inorganic phosphate compartmentation with normal ATP γ-phosphoryl dynamics. Hearts lacking both M-CK and sarcomeric mitochondrial CK have diminished PCr turnover, total phosphotransfer capacity and intracellular energetic communication but increased dynamics of β-phosphoryls of ADP/ATP, G-6-P and γ-/β-phosphoryls of GTP, indicating redistribution of flux through adenylate kinase (AK), glycolytic and guanine nucleotide phosphotransfer circuits. Higher glycolytic and mitochondrial capacities and increased glucose tolerance contributed to metabolic resilience of M-CK/ScCKmit−/− mice. Multivariate analysis revealed unique metabolomic signatures for M-CK−/− and M-CK/ScCKmit−/− hearts suggesting that rearrangements in phosphotransfer and substrate utilization networks provide compensation for genetic CK deficiency. This new information highlights the significance of integrated CK-, AK-, guanine nucleotide- and glycolytic enzyme-catalysed phosphotransfer networks in supporting the adaptivity and robustness of the cellular energetic system. PMID:21878522

  12. Phosphoinositide-3-Kinase Is the Primary Mediator of Phosphoinositide-Dependent Inhibition in Mammalian Olfactory Receptor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ukhanov, Kirill; Corey, Elizabeth; Ache, Barry W.

    2016-01-01

    Odorants inhibit as well as excite primary olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) in many animal species. Growing evidence suggests that inhibition of mammalian ORNs is mediated by phosphoinositide (PI) signaling through activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), and that canonical adenylyl cyclase III signaling and PI3K signaling interact to provide the basis for ligand-induced selective signaling. As PI3K is known to act in concert with phospholipase C (PLC) in some cellular systems, the question arises as to whether they work together to mediate inhibitory transduction in mammalian ORNs. The present study is designed to test this hypothesis. While we establish that multiple PLC isoforms are expressed in the transduction zone of rat ORNs, that odorants can activate PLC in ORNs in situ, and that pharmacological blockade of PLC enhances the excitatory response to an odorant mixture in some ORNs in conjunction with PI3K blockade, we find that by itself PLC does not account for an inhibitory response. We conclude that PLC does not make a measurable independent contribution to odor-evoked inhibition, and that PI3K is the primary mediator of PI-dependent inhibition in mammalian ORNs. PMID:27147969

  13. The inhibition of tyrosine kinase receptor signalling in leiomyosarcoma cells using the small molecule kinase inhibitor PTK787/ZK222584 (Vatalanib®).

    PubMed

    Gaumann, Andreas K A; Drexler, Hannes C A; Lang, Sven A; Stoeltzing, Oliver; Diermeier-Daucher, Simone; Buchdunger, Elisabeth; Wood, Jeanette; Bold, Guido; Breier, Georg

    2014-12-01

    Leiomyosarcomas remain challenging tumors to manage and novel therapy strategies besides radiation and conventional chemotherapy are needed. Targeting angiogenesis by inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) of the tumor vasculature with small molecules is a promising new therapy. It has been shown recently that these receptors are not only expressed on tumor endothelium but also on tumor cells themselves. Thus, we investigated the expression of members of the VEGF receptor (VEGFR) family and corresponding growth factors in leiomyosarcoma tissue specimens and in the leiomyosarcoma cell lines SK-LMS-1 and SK-UT-1. We evaluated the influence of the VEGFR inhibitor PTK787/ZK222584 (PTK787) on cell growth, migration, apoptosis and phosphorylation of intracellular signalling molecules. In human leiomyosarcoma tissue specimens VEGFR‑1/-2 and platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR-β) were strongly expressed. Both leiomyosarcoma cell lines expressed VEGFR‑1/-3 and PDGFR-β but VEGFR-2 protein expression was positive only in SK-UT-1. SK-LMS-1 and SK-UT-1 cells secreted high and low amounts of VEGF-A, respectively, whereas PDGF-BB secretion was similar in both cell lines. Application of PTK787 led to partial inhibition of PDGF-BB-activated AKT/p90RSK and ERK1/2 signalling pathways. In contrast, protein phosphorylation was not affected by PTK787 in VEGF-A-treated cells. PTK787 turned out to inhibit cell migration even though no effects were observed upon stimulation with VEGF-A or PDGF-BB. In line, cell growth in leiomyosarcoma cell lines remained unchanged upon PTK787 treatment alone and with subsequent VEGF-A- or PDGF-BB-stimulation. However, VEGF-A, but not PDGF-BB-treated cells showed increased cell death upon PTK787 treatment. VEGFR family members are expressed in leiomyosarcomas in vivo and in vitro. Upon receptor stimulation, PTK787 is able to inhibit subsequent phosphorylation events and influences cell

  14. Mapping the Hsp90 Genetic Network Reveals Ergosterol Biosynthesis and Phosphatidylinositol-4-Kinase Signaling as Core Circuitry Governing Cellular Stress

    PubMed Central

    O’Meara, Teresa R.; Valaei, Seyedeh Fereshteh; Diezmann, Stephanie; Cowen, Leah E.

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is a leading human fungal pathogen that causes life-threatening systemic infections. A key regulator of C. albicans stress response, drug resistance, morphogenesis, and virulence is the molecular chaperone Hsp90. Targeting Hsp90 provides a powerful strategy to treat fungal infections, however, the therapeutic utility of current inhibitors is compromised by toxicity due to inhibition of host Hsp90. To identify components of the Hsp90-dependent circuitry governing virulence and drug resistance that are sufficiently divergent for selective targeting in the pathogen, we pioneered chemical genomic profiling of the Hsp90 genetic network in C. albicans. Here, we screen mutant collections covering ~10% of the genome for hypersensitivity to Hsp90 inhibition in multiple environmental conditions. We identify 158 HSP90 chemical genetic interactors, most of which are important for growth only in specific environments. We discovered that the sterol C-22 desaturase gene ERG5 and the phosphatidylinositol-4-kinase (PI4K) gene STT4 are HSP90 genetic interactors under multiple conditions, suggesting a function upstream of Hsp90. By systematic analysis of the ergosterol biosynthetic cascade, we demonstrate that defects in ergosterol biosynthesis induce cellular stress that overwhelms Hsp90’s functional capacity. By analysis of the phosphatidylinositol pathway, we demonstrate that there is a genetic interaction between the PI4K Stt4 and Hsp90. We also establish that Stt4 is required for normal actin polarization through regulation of Wal1, and suggest a model in which defects in actin remodeling induces stress that creates a cellular demand for Hsp90 that exceeds its functional capacity. Consistent with this model, actin inhibitors are synergistic with Hsp90 inhibitors. We highlight new connections between Hsp90 and virulence traits, demonstrating that Erg5 and Stt4 enable activation of macrophage pyroptosis. This work uncovers novel circuitry regulating Hsp90

  15. Mapping the Hsp90 Genetic Network Reveals Ergosterol Biosynthesis and Phosphatidylinositol-4-Kinase Signaling as Core Circuitry Governing Cellular Stress.

    PubMed

    O'Meara, Teresa R; Veri, Amanda O; Polvi, Elizabeth J; Li, Xinliu; Valaei, Seyedeh Fereshteh; Diezmann, Stephanie; Cowen, Leah E

    2016-06-01

    Candida albicans is a leading human fungal pathogen that causes life-threatening systemic infections. A key regulator of C. albicans stress response, drug resistance, morphogenesis, and virulence is the molecular chaperone Hsp90. Targeting Hsp90 provides a powerful strategy to treat fungal infections, however, the therapeutic utility of current inhibitors is compromised by toxicity due to inhibition of host Hsp90. To identify components of the Hsp90-dependent circuitry governing virulence and drug resistance that are sufficiently divergent for selective targeting in the pathogen, we pioneered chemical genomic profiling of the Hsp90 genetic network in C. albicans. Here, we screen mutant collections covering ~10% of the genome for hypersensitivity to Hsp90 inhibition in multiple environmental conditions. We identify 158 HSP90 chemical genetic interactors, most of which are important for growth only in specific environments. We discovered that the sterol C-22 desaturase gene ERG5 and the phosphatidylinositol-4-kinase (PI4K) gene STT4 are HSP90 genetic interactors under multiple conditions, suggesting a function upstream of Hsp90. By systematic analysis of the ergosterol biosynthetic cascade, we demonstrate that defects in ergosterol biosynthesis induce cellular stress that overwhelms Hsp90's functional capacity. By analysis of the phosphatidylinositol pathway, we demonstrate that there is a genetic interaction between the PI4K Stt4 and Hsp90. We also establish that Stt4 is required for normal actin polarization through regulation of Wal1, and suggest a model in which defects in actin remodeling induces stress that creates a cellular demand for Hsp90 that exceeds its functional capacity. Consistent with this model, actin inhibitors are synergistic with Hsp90 inhibitors. We highlight new connections between Hsp90 and virulence traits, demonstrating that Erg5 and Stt4 enable activation of macrophage pyroptosis. This work uncovers novel circuitry regulating Hsp90

  16. SELPHI: correlation-based identification of kinase-associated networks from global phospho-proteomics data sets.

    PubMed

    Petsalaki, Evangelia; Helbig, Andreas O; Gopal, Anjali; Pasculescu, Adrian; Roth, Frederick P; Pawson, Tony

    2015-07-01

    While phospho-proteomics studies have shed light on the dynamics of cellular signaling, they mainly describe global effects and rarely explore mechanistic details, such as kinase/substrate relationships. Tools and databases, such as NetworKIN and PhosphoSitePlus, provide valuable regulatory details on signaling networks but rely on prior knowledge. They therefore provide limited information on less studied kinases and fewer unexpected relationships given that better studied signaling events can mask condition- or cell-specific 'network wiring'. SELPHI is a web-based tool providing in-depth analysis of phospho-proteomics data that is intuitive and accessible to non-bioinformatics experts. It uses correlation analysis of phospho-sites to extract kinase/phosphatase and phospho-peptide associations, and highlights the potential flow of signaling in the system under study. We illustrate SELPHI via analysis of phospho-proteomics data acquired in the presence of erlotinib-a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)-in cancer cells expressing TKI-resistant and -sensitive variants of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor. In this data set, SELPHI revealed information overlooked by the reporting study, including the known role of MET and EPHA2 kinases in conferring resistance to erlotinib in TKI sensitive strains. SELPHI can significantly enhance the analysis of phospho-proteomics data contributing to improved understanding of sample-specific signaling networks. SELPHI is freely available via http://llama.mshri.on.ca/SELPHI. PMID:25948583

  17. SELPHI: correlation-based identification of kinase-associated networks from global phospho-proteomics data sets

    PubMed Central

    Petsalaki, Evangelia; Helbig, Andreas O.; Gopal, Anjali; Pasculescu, Adrian; Roth, Frederick P.; Pawson, Tony

    2015-01-01

    While phospho-proteomics studies have shed light on the dynamics of cellular signaling, they mainly describe global effects and rarely explore mechanistic details, such as kinase/substrate relationships. Tools and databases, such as NetworKIN and PhosphoSitePlus, provide valuable regulatory details on signaling networks but rely on prior knowledge. They therefore provide limited information on less studied kinases and fewer unexpected relationships given that better studied signaling events can mask condition- or cell-specific ‘network wiring’. SELPHI is a web-based tool providing in-depth analysis of phospho-proteomics data that is intuitive and accessible to non-bioinformatics experts. It uses correlation analysis of phospho-sites to extract kinase/phosphatase and phospho-peptide associations, and highlights the potential flow of signaling in the system under study. We illustrate SELPHI via analysis of phospho-proteomics data acquired in the presence of erlotinib—a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)—in cancer cells expressing TKI-resistant and -sensitive variants of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor. In this data set, SELPHI revealed information overlooked by the reporting study, including the known role of MET and EPHA2 kinases in conferring resistance to erlotinib in TKI sensitive strains. SELPHI can significantly enhance the analysis of phospho-proteomics data contributing to improved understanding of sample-specific signaling networks. SELPHI is freely available via http://llama.mshri.on.ca/SELPHI. PMID:25948583

  18. [Possibilities for inhibiting tumor-induced angiogenesis: results with multi-target tyrosine kinase inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Török, Szilvia; Döme, Balázs

    2012-03-01

    Functional blood vasculature is essential for tumor progression. The main signalization pathways that play a key role in the survival and growth of tumor vessels originate from the VEGF-, PDGF- and FGF tyrosine kinase receptors. In the past decade, significant results have been published on receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (RTKIs). In this paper, the mechanisms of action and the results so far available of experimental and clinical studies on multi-target antiangiogenic TKIs are discussed. On the one hand, notable achievements have been made recently and these drugs are already used in clinical practice in some patient populations. On the other hand, the optimal combination and dosage of these drugs, selection of the apropriate biomarker and better understanding of the conflicting role of PDGFR and FGFR signaling in angiogenesis remain future challenges. PMID:22403757

  19. Specific Inhibition of Cyclin-dependent Kinase 5 Activity Induces Motor Neuron Development in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kanungo, Jyotshnabala; Zheng, Ya-Li; Amin, Niranjana D.; Kaur, Sukhbir; Ramchandran, Ramani; Pant, Harish C.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (cdk5) is a ubiquitous protein activated by specific activators, p35 and p39. Cdk5 regulates neuronal migration, differentiation, axonogenesis, synaptic transmission and apoptosis. However, its role in motor neuron development remains unexplored. Here, using gain and loss-of-function analyses in developing zebrafish embryos, we report that cdk5 plays a critical role in spinal and cranial motor neuron development. Cdk5 knockdown results in supernumerary spinal and cranial motor neurons. While a dominant negative, kinase-dead cdk5 promotes the generation of supernumerary motor neurons; over-expression of cdk5 suppresses motor neuron development. Thus, modulating cdk5 activity seems promising in inducing motor neuron development in vivo. PMID:19523926

  20. Leishmania major MPK7 Protein Kinase Activity Inhibits Intracellular Growth of the Pathogenic Amastigote Stage ▿

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Miguel A.; Pescher, Pascale; Späth, Gerald F.

    2010-01-01

    During the infectious cycle, protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania undergo several adaptive differentiation steps that are induced by environmental factors and crucial for parasite infectivity. Genetic analyses of signaling proteins underlying Leishmania stage differentiation are often rendered difficult due to lethal null mutant phenotypes. Here we used a transgenic strategy to gain insight into the functions of the mitogen-activated Leishmania major protein kinases LmaMPK7 and LmaMPK10 in parasite virulence. We established L. major and Leishmania donovani lines expressing episomal green fluorescent protein (GFP)-LmaMPK7 and GFP-LmaMPK10 fusion proteins. The transgenic lines were normal in promastigote morphology, growth, and the ability to differentiate into metacyclic and amastigote stages. While parasites expressing GFP-LmaMPK10 showed normal infectivity by mouse footpad analysis and macrophage infection assays, GFP-LmaMPK7 transgenic parasites displayed a strong delay in lesion formation and reduced intracellular parasite growth. Significantly, the effects of GFP-LmaMPK7 on virulence and proliferation were due exclusively to protein kinase activity, as the overexpression of two kinase-dead mutants had no effect on parasite infectivity. GFP-LmaMPK7 transgenic L. donovani cells revealed a reversible, stage-specific growth defect in axenic amastigotes that was independent of cell death but linked to nonsynchronous growth arrest and a significant reduction of de novo protein biosynthesis. Our data suggest that LmaMPK7 protein kinase activity may be implicated in parasite growth control and thus relevant for the development of nonproliferating stages during the infectious cycle. PMID:19801421

  1. A Dual Non-ATP Analogue Inhibitor of Aurora Kinases A and B, Derived from Resorcinol with a Mixed Mode of Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Karthigeyan, Dhanasekaran; Surabhi, Sudhevan; Mizar, Pushpak; Soumik, Siddhanta; Banerjee, Amrita; Sinha, Sarmistha Halder; Dasgupta, Dipak; Narayana, Chandrabhas; Kundu, Tapas K

    2016-06-01

    Aurora kinases are the most commonly targeted mitotic kinases in the intervention of cancer progression. Here, we report a resorcinol derivative, 5-methyl-4-(2-thiazolylazo) resorcinol (PTK66), a dual inhibitor of Aurora A and Aurora B kinases. PTK66 is a surface binding non-ATP analogue inhibitor that shows a mixed pattern of inhibition against both of Aurora A and B kinases. The in vitro IC50 is approximately 47 and 40 μm for Aurora A and Aurora B kinases, respectively. In cellular systems, PTK66 exhibits a substantially low cytotoxicity at micromolar concentrations but it can induce aneuploidy under similar dosages as a consequence of Aurora kinase inhibition. This result was corroborated by a drop in the histone H3 (S10) phosphorylation level detected via Western blot analysis using three different cell types. Altogether, our findings indicate that the ligand containing resorcinol backbone is one of the novel scaffolds targeting the Aurora family of kinases, which could be a target for antineoplastic drug development. PMID:26808391

  2. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase in OK-cells reduces Na/Pi-cotransport but does not interfere with its regulation by parathyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    Pfister, M F; Brunskill, N J; Forgo, J; Stange, G; Biber, J; Murer, H

    1999-08-01

    The importance of phosphatidylinositide 3- kinase(s) [PI 3-kinase(s)] in membrane trafficking processes led us to examine its/their possible role in parathyroid-hormone- (PTH-) induced endocytosis and lysosomal degradation of the type IIa Na/Pi-cotransporter in opossum kidney cells (OK-cells). We used wortmannin, a potent inhibitor of several mammalian PI 3-kinase isoforms, and measured Na/Pi-cotransporter activity and type IIa Na/Pi-cotransporter protein expression; also the induction of a negative dominant subunit (Deltap85) was used to reduce PI 3-kinase activity. Wortmannin and Deltap85 led to a reduction of Na/Pi-cotransport activity but were unable to prevent its inhibition by PTH. Wortmannin led in a dose- and time-dependent manner to a reduction of Na/Pi-cotransport activity and transporter protein expression, and retarded their recovery from PTH-induced inhibition/degradation. The data suggest that a PI 3-kinase "controlled" mechanism is involved in the synthesis (and/or routing) of the apical type IIa Na/Pi-cotransporter in OK-cells. PMID:10398872

  3. Infralimbic cortex Rho-kinase inhibition causes antidepressant-like activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Inan, Salim Yalcin; Soner, Burak Cem; Sahin, Ayse Saide

    2015-03-01

    Depression is one of the most common psychiatric disorders in the world; however, its mechanisms remain unclear. Recently, a new signal-transduction pathway, namely Rho/Rho-kinase signalling, has been suggested to be involved in diverse cellular events in the central nervous system; such as epilepsy, anxiety-related behaviors, regulation of dendritic and axonal morphology, antinociception, subarachnoid haemorrhage, spinal cord injury and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. However there is no evidence showing the involvement of Rho-kinase pathway in depression. In addition, the infralimbic cortex, rodent equivalent to subgenual cingulate cortex has been shown to be responsible for emotional responses. Thus, in the present study, intracranial guide cannulae were stereotaxically implanted bilaterally into the infralimbic cortex, and the effects of repeated microinjections of a Rho-kinase (ROCK) inhibitor Y-27632 (10 nmol) were investigated in rats. Y-27632 significantly decreased immobility time and increased swimming and climbing behaviors when compared to fluoxetine (10 μg) and saline groups in the forced swim test. In addition, Y-27632 treatment did not affect spontaneous locomotor activity and forelimb use in the open-field and cylinder tests respectively; but it enhanced limb placing accuracy in the ladder rung walking test. Our results suggest that Y-27632 could be a potentially active antidepressant agent. PMID:25445474

  4. Pelargonidin attenuates PDGF-BB-induced aortic smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration by direct inhibition of focal adhesion kinase.

    PubMed

    Son, Joe Eun; Jeong, Hyein; Kim, Heejoo; Kim, Yeong A; Lee, Eunjung; Lee, Hyong Joo; Lee, Ki Won

    2014-05-15

    Pelargonidin is a natural red pigment found in fruits and vegetables, and has been reported to exhibit various effects potentially beneficial for human health. However, the possible preventive effects of pelargonidin toward atherosclerosis and mechanisms involved have not been investigated to date. Here, we compared the effects of pelargonidin and its glucoside-conjugated form, pelargonidin-3-glucoside (P3G), on proliferation and migration induced by platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). Pelargonidin, but not P3G, exhibited strong inhibitory effects against PDGF-BB-induced HASMC proliferation and migration, while suppressing PDGF-BB-induced ex vivo rat aortic ring sprouting. Immunoblot analysis revealed that pelargonidin inhibited PDGF-BB-induced phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) as well as F-actin reduction, whereas Src, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and Akt phosphorylation status were not altered. We also observed that the anti-proliferative and migratory effects of both pelargonidin and P3G corresponded with the extent of FAK inhibition. Both in vitro and ex vivo pull-down assays revealed that pelargonidin binds directly with FAK in an adenosine triphosphate-competitive manner, suggesting that FAK could be a molecular target of pelargonidin. Interestingly, pelargonidin did not exhibit inhibitory effects on the proliferation, migration or FAK phosphorylation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Taken together, our results suggest that pelargonidin exhibits potential preventive effects toward atherosclerosis through the attenuation of HASMC proliferation and migration, as well as aortic sprouting via the direct inhibition of FAK activity. PMID:24582770

  5. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibition attenuates fibroblast activation and development of fibrosis following renal ischemia-reperfusion in mice

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shailendra P.; Tao, Shixin; Fields, Timothy A.; Webb, Sydney; Harris, Raymond C.; Rao, Reena

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that plays an important role in renal tubular injury and regeneration in acute kidney injury. However, its role in the development of renal fibrosis, often a long-term consequence of acute kidney injury, is unknown. Using a mouse model of renal fibrosis induced by ischemia-reperfusion injury, we demonstrate increased GSK3β expression and activity in fibrotic kidneys, and its presence in myofibroblasts in addition to tubular epithelial cells. Pharmacological inhibition of GSK3 using TDZD-8 starting before or after ischemia-reperfusion significantly suppressed renal fibrosis by reducing the myofibroblast population, collagen-1 and fibronectin deposition, inflammatory cytokines, and macrophage infiltration. GSK3 inhibition in vivo reduced TGF-β1, SMAD3 activation and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels. Consistently in vitro, TGF-β1 treatment increased GSK3β expression and GSK3 inhibition abolished TGF-β1-induced SMAD3 activation and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression in cultured renal fibroblasts. Importantly, overexpression of constitutively active GSK3β stimulated α-SMA expression even in the absence of TGF-β1 treatment. These results suggest that TGF-β regulates GSK3β, which in turn is important for TGF-β–SMAD3 signaling and fibroblast-to-myofibroblast differentiation. Overall, these studies demonstrate that GSK3 could promote renal fibrosis by activation of TGF-β signaling and the use of GSK3 inhibitors might represent a novel therapeutic approach for progressive renal fibrosis that develops as a consequence of acute kidney injury. PMID:26092126

  6. Network analysis of neurotransmitter related human kinase genes: possible role of SRC, RAF1, PTK2B?

    PubMed

    Brys, Zoltan; Pluhar, Andras; Kis, Janos Tibor; Buda, Bela; Szabo, Attila

    2013-09-01

    Previous co-expression analysis of human kinase genes highlighted 119 genes in neurotransmitter-related activity (based on Go:Terms). Using a merged interactome dataset, we analyzed the network of these Neurotransmitter Related Human Kinase Genes. Using the full interactome dataset we extended the network and calculating degrees and closeness centralities we identified SRC, MAPK1, RAF1, PTK2B and AKT1 kinase genes as potentially relevant nodes which did not show relevant activity in the original experimental study. As AKT1 and MAPK1 have already been indicated in various neuronal functions, we hypothesize a potential direct or indirect role for SRC, RAF1, PTK2B genes in neurotransmission and in central nervous system signaling processes. PMID:24108181

  7. Statins and Selective Inhibition of Rho Kinase Protect Small Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channel Function (KCa2.3) in Cerebral Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Altayo, Francesc; Cottrell, Graeme S.

    2012-01-01

    Background In rat middle cerebral and mesenteric arteries the KCa2.3 component of endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH) is lost following stimulation of thromboxane (TP) receptors, an effect that may contribute to the endothelial dysfunction associated with cardiovascular disease. In cerebral arteries, KCa2.3 loss is associated with NO synthase inhibition, but is restored if TP receptors are blocked. The Rho/Rho kinase pathway is central for TP signalling and statins indirectly inhibit this pathway. The possibility that Rho kinase inhibition and statins sustain KCa2.3 hyperpolarization was investigated in rat middle cerebral arteries (MCA). Methods MCAs were mounted in a wire myograph. The PAR2 agonist, SLIGRL was used to stimulate EDH responses, assessed by simultaneous measurement of smooth muscle membrane potential and tension. TP expression was assessed with rt-PCR and immunofluorescence. Results Immunofluorescence detected TP in the endothelial cell layer of MCA. Vasoconstriction to the TP agonist, U46619 was reduced by Rho kinase inhibition. TP receptor stimulation lead to loss of KCa2.3 mediated hyperpolarization, an effect that was reversed by Rho kinase inhibitors or simvastatin. KCa2.3 activity was lost in L-NAME-treated arteries, but was restored by Rho kinase inhibition or statin treatment. The restorative effect of simvastatin was blocked after incubation with geranylgeranyl-pyrophosphate to circumvent loss of isoprenylation. Conclusions Rho/Rho kinase signalling following TP stimulation and L-NAME regulates endothelial cell KCa2.3 function. The ability of statins to prevent isoprenylation and perhaps inhibit of Rho restores/protects the input of KCa2.3 to EDH in the MCA, and represents a beneficial pleiotropic effect of statin treatment. PMID:23056429

  8. A comprehensive protein–protein interactome for yeast PAS kinase 1 reveals direct inhibition of respiration through the phosphorylation of Cbf1

    PubMed Central

    DeMille, Desiree; Bikman, Benjamin T.; Mathis, Andrew D.; Prince, John T.; Mackay, Jordan T.; Sowa, Steven W.; Hall, Tacie D.; Grose, Julianne H.

    2014-01-01

    Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) kinase is a sensory protein kinase required for glucose homeostasis in yeast, mice, and humans, yet little is known about the molecular mechanisms of its function. Using both yeast two-hybrid and copurification approaches, we identified the protein–protein interactome for yeast PAS kinase 1 (Psk1), revealing 93 novel putative protein binding partners. Several of the Psk1 binding partners expand the role of PAS kinase in glucose homeostasis, including new pathways involved in mitochondrial metabolism. In addition, the interactome suggests novel roles for PAS kinase in cell growth (gene/protein expression, replication/cell division, and protein modification and degradation), vacuole function, and stress tolerance. In vitro kinase studies using a subset of 25 of these binding partners identified Mot3, Zds1, Utr1, and Cbf1 as substrates. Further evidence is provided for the in vivo phosphorylation of Cbf1 at T211/T212 and for the subsequent inhibition of respiration. This respiratory role of PAS kinase is consistent with the reported hypermetabolism of PAS kinase–deficient mice, identifying a possible molecular mechanism and solidifying the evolutionary importance of PAS kinase in the regulation of glucose homeostasis. PMID:24850888

  9. Oxidative stress-dependent sphingosine kinase-1 inhibition mediates monoamine oxidase A-associated cardiac cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Pchejetski, Dimitri; Kunduzova, Oxana; Dayon, Audrey; Calise, Denis; Seguelas, Marie-Hélène; Leducq, Nathalie; Seif, Isabelle; Parini, Angelo; Cuvillier, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    The mitochondrial enzyme monoamine oxidase (MAO), its isoform MAO-A, plays a major role in reactive oxygen species-dependent cardiomyocyte apoptosis and postischemic cardiac damage. In the current study, we investigated whether sphingolipid metabolism can account for mediating MAO-A- and reactive oxygen species-dependent cardiomyocyte apoptosis. In H9c2 cardiomyoblasts, MAO-A-dependent reactive oxygen species generation led to mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, along with sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) inhibition. These phenomena were associated with generation of proapoptotic ceramide and decrease in prosurvival sphingosine 1-phosphate. These events were mimicked by inhibition of SphK1 with either pharmacological inhibitor or small interfering RNA, as well as by extracellular addition of C(2)-ceramide or H(2)O(2). In contrast, enforced expression of SphK1 protected H9c2 cells from serotonin- or H(2)O(2)-induced apoptosis. Analysis of cardiac tissues from wild-type mice subjected to ischemia/reperfusion revealed significant upregulation of ceramide and inhibition of SphK1. It is noteworthy that SphK1 inhibition, ceramide accumulation, and concomitantly infarct size and cardiomyocyte apoptosis were significantly decreased in MAO-A-deficient animals. In conclusion, we show for the first time that the upregulation of ceramide/sphingosine 1-phosphate ratio is a critical event in MAO-A-mediated cardiac cell apoptosis. In addition, we provide the first evidence linking generation of reactive oxygen species with SphK1 inhibition. Finally, we propose sphingolipid metabolites as key mediators of postischemic/reperfusion cardiac injury. PMID:17158340

  10. Inhibition of focal adhesion kinase prevents experimental lung fibrosis and myofibroblast formation

    PubMed Central

    Lagares, David; Busnadiego, Oscar; García-Fernández, Rosa Ana; Kapoor, Mohit; Liu, Shangxi; Carter, David E.; Abraham, David; Shi-Wen, Xu; Carreira, Patricia; Fontaine T, Benjamin A; Shea, Barry S; Tager, Andrew M; Leask, Andrew; Lamas, Santiago; Rodríguez-Pascual, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Objective Enhanced adhesive signaling including activation of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a hallmark of fibroblasts from lung fibrosis patients, and FAK has been therefore hypothesized to be a key mediator of this disease. This study was undertaken to characterize the contribution of FAK to the development of pulmonary fibrosis both in vivo and in vitro. Methods FAK expression and activity were analyzed in lung tissue samples from lung fibrosis patients by immunohistochemistry. Mice orally treated with the FAK inhibitor, PF-562,271, or with siRNA-mediated silencing of FAK, were exposed to intratracheally instilled bleomycin to induce lung fibrosis, and the lungs were harvested for histological and biochemical analysis. Using endothelin-1 (ET-1) as stimulus, cell adhesion and contraction, as well as profibrotic gene expression were studied in fibroblasts isolated from wild type and FAK-deficient mouse embryos. ET-1-mediated FAK activation and gene expression were studied in primary mouse lung fibroblasts, as well as in wild type and integrin β1-deficient fibroblasts. Results Increased FAK expression and activity are upregulated in fibroblast foci and remodeled vessels in lung fibrosis patients. Pharmacological or siRNA-mediated targeting of FAK resulted in marked abrogation of bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis. Loss of FAK impaired the acquisition of a profibrotic phenotype in response to ET-1. Profibrotic gene expression leading to myofibroblast differentiation required cell adhesion, and was driven by Jun N-terminal kinase activation through integrin β1/FAK signaling. Conclusion These results implicate FAK as a central mediator of fibrogenesis, and highlight this kinase as a potential therapeutic target in fibrotic diseases. PMID:22492165

  11. Mechanism of concerted inhibition of alpha2beta2-type hetero-oligomeric aspartate kinase from Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Ayako; Tomita, Takeo; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Nishiyama, Makoto

    2010-08-27

    Aspartate kinase (AK) is the first and committed enzyme of the biosynthetic pathway producing aspartate family amino acids, lysine, threonine, and methionine. AK from Corynebacterium glutamicum (CgAK), a bacterium used for industrial fermentation of amino acids, including glutamate and lysine, is inhibited by lysine and threonine in a concerted manner. To elucidate the mechanism of this unique regulation in CgAK, we determined the crystal structures in several forms: an inhibitory form complexed with both lysine and threonine, an active form complexed with only threonine, and a feedback inhibition-resistant mutant (S301F) complexed with both lysine and threonine. CgAK has a characteristic alpha(2)beta(2)-type heterotetrameric structure made up of two alpha subunits and two beta subunits. Comparison of the crystal structures between inhibitory and active forms revealed that binding inhibitors causes a conformational change to a closed inhibitory form, and the interaction between the catalytic domain in the alpha subunit and beta subunit (regulatory subunit) is a key event for stabilizing the inhibitory form. This study shows not only the first crystal structures of alpha(2)beta(2)-type AK but also the mechanism of concerted inhibition in CgAK. PMID:20573952

  12. Dual PI-3 kinase/mTOR inhibition impairs autophagy flux and induces cell death independent of apoptosis and necroptosis

    PubMed Central

    Button, Robert W.; Vincent, Joseph H.; Strang, Conor J.; Luo, Shouqing

    2016-01-01

    The PI-3 kinase (PI-3K)/mTOR pathway is critical for cell growth and proliferation. Strategies of antagonising this signaling have proven to be detrimental to cell survival. This observation, coupled with the fact many tumours show enhanced growth signaling, has caused dual inhibitors of PI-3K and mTOR to be implicated in cancer treatment, and have thus been studied across various tumour models. Since PI-3K (class-I)/mTOR pathway negatively regulates autophagy, dual inhibitors of PI-3K/mTOR are currently believed to be autophagy activators. However, our present data show that the dual PI-3K/mTOR inhibition (DKI) potently suppresses autophagic flux. We further confirm that inhibition of Vps34/PI3KC3, the class-III PI-3K, causes the blockade to autophagosome-lysosome fusion. Our data suggest that DKI induces cell death independently of apoptosis and necroptosis, whereas autophagy perturbation by DKI may contribute to cell death. Given that autophagy is critical in cellular homeostasis, our study not only clarifies the role of a dual PI-3K/mTOR inhibitor in autophagy, but also suggests that its autophagy inhibition needs to be considered if such an agent is used in cancer chemotherapy. PMID:26814436

  13. Mutational analysis to identify the residues essential for the inhibition of N-acetyl glutamate kinase of Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Hao; Tian, Hongming; Li, Cheng; Han, Shuangyan; Lin, Ying; Zheng, Suiping

    2015-09-01

    N-acetyl glutamate kinase (NAGK) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of L-arginine that is inhibited by its end product L-arginine in Corynebacterium glutamicum (C. glutamicum). In this study, the potential binding sites of arginine and the residues essential for its inhibition were identified by homology modeling, inhibitor docking, and site-directed mutagenesis. The allosteric inhibition of NAGK was successfully alleviated by a mutation, as determined through analysis of mutant enzymes, which were overexpressed in vivo in C. glutamicum ATCC14067. Analysis of the mutant enzymes and docking analysis demonstrated that residue W23 positions an arginine molecule, and the interaction between arginine and residues L282, L283, and T284 may play an important role in the remote inhibitory process. Based on the results of the docking analysis of the effective mutants, we propose a linkage mechanism for the remote allosteric regulation of NAGK activity, in which residue R209 may play an essential role. In this study, the structure of the arginine-binding site of C. glutamicum NAGK (CgNAGK) was successfully predicted and the roles of the relevant residues were identified, providing new insight into the allosteric regulation of CgNAGK activity and a solid platform for the future construction of an optimized L-arginine producing strain. PMID:25750030

  14. Endothelium-Independent Hypoxic Contraction Is Prevented Specifically by Nitroglycerin via Inhibition of Akt Kinase in Porcine Coronary Artery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huixia; Li, Yanjing; An, Yuanming; He, Peixin; Wu, Liling; Gao, Yuansheng; Dou, Dou

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Hypoxia-induced sustained contraction of porcine coronary artery is endothelium-independent and mediated by PI3K/Akt/Rho kinase. Nitroglycerin (NTG) is a vasodilator used to treat angina pectoris and acute heart failure. The present study was to determine the role of NTG in hypoxia-induced endothelium-independent contraction and the underlying mechanism. Methods and Results. Organ chamber technique was used to measure the isometric vessel tension of isolated porcine coronary arteries. Protein levels of phosphorylated and total Akt were determined by western blot. A sustained contraction of porcine coronary arteries induced by hypoxia was significantly reduced by NTG but not by isoproterenol. This contraction was also inhibited by DETA NONOate, 8-Br-cGMP, which can be reversed by ODQ, and Rp-8-Br-PET-cGMPS. The restored contraction was blocked by LY294002. The reduction of Akt-p at Ser-473 by NTG, DETA NONOate, and 8-Br-cGMP was significantly inhibited by ODQ, PKG-I. The decrease in Akt-p level by NTG and 8-Br-cGMP was prevented by calyculin A but not by okadaic acid. Conclusions. These results demonstrated that the endothelium-independent sustained hypoxic vasoconstriction can be prevented by NTG and that the inhibition of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway may be involved. PMID:26839558

  15. Althaea rosea Cavanil and Plantago major L. suppress neoplastic cell transformation through the inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor kinase.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun-Sun; Cho, Sung-Dae; Shin, Ji-Ae; Kwon, Ki Han; Cho, Nam-Pyo; Shim, Jung-Hyun

    2012-10-01

    For thousands of years in Asia, Althaea rosea Cavanil (ARC) and Plantago major L. (PML) have been used as powerful non-toxic therapeutic agents that inhibit inflammation. However, the anticancer mechanisms and molecular targets of ARC and PML are poorly understood, particularly in epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced neoplastic cell transformation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the chemopreventive effects and mechanisms of the methanol extracts from ARC (MARC) and PML (MPML) in EGF-induced neoplastic cell transformation of JB6 P+ mouse epidermal cells using an MTS assay, anchorage-independent cell transformation assay and western blotting. Our results showed that MARC and MPML significantly suppressed neoplastic cell transformation by inhibiting the kinase activity of the EGF receptor (EGFR). The activation of EGFR by EGF was suppressed by MARC and MPML treatment in EGFR(+/+) cells, but not in EGFR(-/-) cells. In addition, MARC and MPML inhibited EGF-induced cell proliferation in EGFR-expressing murine embryonic fibroblasts (EGFR(+/+)). These results strongly indicate that EGFR targeting by MARC and MPML may be a good strategy for chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic applications. PMID:22767187

  16. Activation of AMP-activated kinase modulates sensitivity of glioma cells against epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition.

    PubMed

    Hartel, Ines; Ronellenfitsch, Michael; Wanka, Christina; Wolking, Stefan; Steinbach, Joachim P; Rieger, Johannes

    2016-07-01

    The epidermal growth factor (EGFR) pathway is frequently activated in glioblastoma but the clinical efficacy of EGFR inhibitors in malignant glioma has been disappointing. The reasons for the failure of the mechanisms of resistance of these inhibitors are unclear, but may involve factors of the tumor microenvironment such as limited glucose availability and hypoxia. It was therefore examined whether glucose and oxygen influenced the response of glioma cells to EGFR inhibition. Decreased levels of glucose and oxygen led to resistance against the EGFR inhibitor PD153035, whereas high glucose amounts and normoxia sensitised glioma cells towards the inhibitor. Low levels of glucose and oxygen stimulated AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) in glioma cells. 2DG, an inhibitor of glycolysis, and the AMPK activator A769662 reduced glucose consumption, induced phosphorylation of AMPK and mimicked the effects of low glucose availability on the toxicity of PD153035. Similarly, 2DG reduced toxicity of imatinib in K562 leukemia cells. In contrast, inhibition of AMPK by compound C or by short-hairpin (sh)-mediated gene suppression increased cell death induced by the EGFR inhibitor and reverted the protective effects of 2DG and A769662. In conclusion, cytotoxicity of EGFR inhibition can be diminished by AMPK activation in glioma cells. These results may provide one explanation for the low activity of EGFR inhibitors in clinical trials and suggest antagonism of AMPK or of AMPK-regulated metabolic alterations as a promising approach to enhance their therapeutic efficacy. PMID:27121290

  17. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase dependent inhibition as a broad basis for opponent coding in Mammalian olfactory receptor neurons.

    PubMed

    Ukhanov, Kirill; Corey, Elizabeth A; Ache, Barry W

    2013-01-01

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling has been implicated in mediating inhibitory odorant input to mammalian olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs). To better understand the breadth of such inhibition in odor coding, we screened a panel of odorants representing different chemical classes, as well as odorants known to occur in a natural odor object (tomato), for their ability to rapidly activate PI3K-dependent inhibitory signaling. Odorants were screened on dissociated native rat ORNs before and after pre-incubation with the PI3K-isoform specific blockers AS252424 and TGX221. Many different odorants increased their excitatory strength for particular ORNs following PI3K blockade in a manner consistent with activating PI3K-dependent inhibitory signaling in those cells. The PI3K-dependent inhibitory odorants overlapped with conventional excitatory odorants, but did not share the same bias, indicating partial partitioning of the odor space. Finding that PI3K-dependent inhibition can be activated by a wide range of otherwise conventional excitatory odorants strongly implies PI3K-dependent inhibition provides a broad basis for opponent coding in mammalian ORNs. PMID:23585911

  18. Overcoming acquired resistance to kinase inhibition: the cases of EGFR, ALK and BRAF.

    PubMed

    Giroux, Simon

    2013-01-15

    In the past decade, several kinase inhibitors have been approved based on their clinical benefit for cancer patients. Unfortunately, in many cases, patients develop resistance to these agents via secondary mutations and alternative mechanisms. This review will focus on the cases of acquired resistance to EGFR and ALK inhibitors for non-small cell lung cancer patients and BRAF inhibitors for melanoma patients. I will overview the main causes of acquired resistance, and explore the chemical scaffolds as well as combination of drugs, used to tackle these major causes of resistance. PMID:23245516

  19. Regulating Cortical Oscillations in an Inhibition-Stabilized Network.

    PubMed

    Jadi, Monika P; Sejnowski, Terrence J

    2014-04-21

    Understanding the anatomical and functional architecture of the brain is essential for designing neurally inspired intelligent systems. Theoretical and empirical studies suggest a role for narrowband oscillations in shaping the functional architecture of the brain through their role in coding and communication of information. Such oscillations are ubiquitous signals in the electrical activity recorded from the brain. In the cortex, oscillations detected in the gamma range (30-80 Hz) are modulated by behavioral states and sensory features in complex ways. How is this regulation achieved? Although several underlying principles for the genesis of these oscillations have been proposed, a unifying account for their regulation has remained elusive. In a network of excitatory and inhibitory neurons operating in an inhibition-stabilized regime, we show that strongly superlinear responses of inhibitory neurons facilitate bidirectional regulation of oscillation frequency and power. In such a network, the balance of drives to the excitatory and inhibitory populations determines how the power and frequency of oscillations are modulated. The model accounts for the puzzling increase in their frequency with the salience of visual stimuli, and a decrease with their size. Oscillations in our model grow stronger as the mean firing level is reduced, accounting for the size dependence of visually evoked gamma rhythms, and suggesting a role for oscillations in improving the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of signals in the brain. Empirically testing such predictions is still challenging, and implementing the proposed coding and communication strategies in neuromorphic systems could assist in our understanding of the biological system. PMID:24966414

  20. Compatibility of Astragalus and Salvia extract inhibits myocardial fibrosis and ventricular remodeling by regulation of protein kinase D1 protein

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Bingyu; Nuan, Liu; Yang, Lei; Zeng, Xiaotao

    2015-01-01

    Aims: This study is to determine the effect of astragalus and salvia extract on the alteration of myocardium in a rat model of myocardial infarction. Methods: A total of 40 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into the sham-operated group, the control group, the Astragalus group, the Salvia group, and the compatibility of Astragalus and Salvia and group. The cardiac functions were determined at 8 weeks after treatment. Hematoxylin-eosin staining was performed to observe the morphology and arrangement of cardiomyocytes. Masson’s trichrome staining was performed to investigate the distribution of myocardial interstitial collagen. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to determine the expression ofprotein kinase D1 in myocardial tissues. Results: In the sham-operated group, the Astragalus group, the Salvia group, and the compatibility of Astragalus and Salvia group, the left ventricular systolic pressure and the maximum rate of left ventricular pressure were significantly increased while the left ventricular end diastolic pressure were significantly decreased when compared with those in the control group (P < 0.05). Normal morphology and arrangement of cardiomyocytes were maintained in the compatibility of Astragalus and Salvia group. Contents of collagen fibers in myocardial tissues were decreased in the compatibility of Astragalus and Salvia group (P < 0.05). Expression levels of protein kinase D1 were significantly decreased in cardiomyocytes of the compatibility of Astragalus and Salvia group. Conclusions: Compatibility of Astragalus and Salvia extract may inhibit myocardial fibrosis and ventricular remodeling by regulation of protein kinase D1 protein in a rat model of myocardial infarction. PMID:26064267

  1. ABL Tyrosine Kinase Inhibition Variable Effects on the Invasive Properties of Different Triple Negative Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, Clément; Cannet, Aude; Descamps, Simon; Sirvent, Audrey; Simon, Valérie; Roche, Serge; Benistant, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The non-receptor tyrosine kinase ABL drives myeloid progenitor expansion in human chronic myeloid leukemia. ABL inhibition by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor nilotinib is a first-line treatment for this disease. Recently, ABL has also been implicated in the transforming properties of solid tumors, including triple negative (TN) breast cancer. TN breast cancers are highly metastatic and several cell lines derived from these tumors display high invasive activity in vitro. This feature is associated with the activation of actin-rich membrane structures called invadopodia that promote extracellular matrix degradation. Here, we investigated nilotinib effect on the invasive and migratory properties of different TN breast cancer cell lines. Nilotinib decreased both matrix degradation and invasion in the TN breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB 231 and MDA-MB 468. However, and unexpectedly, nilotinib increased by two-fold the invasive properties of the TN breast cancer cell line BT-549 and of Src-transformed fibroblasts. Both display much higher levels of ABL kinase activity compared to MDA-MB 231. Similar effects were obtained by siRNA-mediated down-regulation of ABL expression, confirming ABL central role in this process. ABL anti-tumor effect in BT-549 cells and Src-transformed fibroblasts was not dependent on EGF secretion, as recently reported in neck and squamous carcinoma cells. Rather, we identified the TRIO-RAC1 axis as an important downstream element of ABL activity in these cancer cells. In conclusion, the observation that TN breast cancer cell lines respond differently to ABL inhibitors could have implications for future therapies. PMID:25803821

  2. ABL tyrosine kinase inhibition variable effects on the invasive properties of different triple negative breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Clément; Cannet, Aude; Descamps, Simon; Sirvent, Audrey; Simon, Valérie; Roche, Serge; Benistant, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The non-receptor tyrosine kinase ABL drives myeloid progenitor expansion in human chronic myeloid leukemia. ABL inhibition by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor nilotinib is a first-line treatment for this disease. Recently, ABL has also been implicated in the transforming properties of solid tumors, including triple negative (TN) breast cancer. TN breast cancers are highly metastatic and several cell lines derived from these tumors display high invasive activity in vitro. This feature is associated with the activation of actin-rich membrane structures called invadopodia that promote extracellular matrix degradation. Here, we investigated nilotinib effect on the invasive and migratory properties of different TN breast cancer cell lines. Nilotinib decreased both matrix degradation and invasion in the TN breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB 231 and MDA-MB 468. However, and unexpectedly, nilotinib increased by two-fold the invasive properties of the TN breast cancer cell line BT-549 and of Src-transformed fibroblasts. Both display much higher levels of ABL kinase activity compared to MDA-MB 231. Similar effects were obtained by siRNA-mediated down-regulation of ABL expression, confirming ABL central role in this process. ABL anti-tumor effect in BT-549 cells and Src-transformed fibroblasts was not dependent on EGF secretion, as recently reported in neck and squamous carcinoma cells. Rather, we identified the TRIO-RAC1 axis as an important downstream element of ABL activity in these cancer cells. In conclusion, the observation that TN breast cancer cell lines respond differently to ABL inhibitors could have implications for future therapies. PMID:25803821

  3. Inhibition of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activity prevents anchorage-independent ovarian carcinoma cell growth and tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Kristy K.; Tancioni, Isabelle; Lawson, Christine; Miller, Nichol L.G.; Jean, Christine; Chen, Xiao Lei; Uryu, Sean; Kim, Josephine; Tarin, David; Stupack, Dwayne G.; Plaxe, Steven C.; Schlaepfer, David D.

    2013-01-01

    Recurrence and spread of ovarian cancer is the 5th leading cause of death for women in the United States. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a cytoplasmic protein-tyrosine kinase located on chromosome 8q24.3 (gene is Ptk2), a site commonly amplified in serous ovarian cancer. Elevated FAK mRNA levels in serous ovarian carcinoma are associated with decreased (logrank P = 0.0007, hazard ratio 1.43) patient overall survival, but how FAK functions in tumor progression remains undefined. We have isolated aggressive ovarian carcinoma cells termed ID8-IP after intraperitoneal (IP) growth of murine ID8 cells in C57Bl6 mice. Upon orthotopic implantation within the periovarian bursa space, ID8-IP cells exhibit greater tumor growth, local and distant metastasis, and elevated numbers of ascites-associated cells compared to parental ID8 cells. ID8-IP cells exhibit enhanced growth under non-adherent conditions with elevated FAK and c-Src tyrosine kinase activation compared to parental ID8 cells. In vitro, the small molecule FAK inhibitor (Pfizer, PF562,271, PF-271) at 0.1 uM selectively prevented anchorage-independent ID8-IP cell growth with the inhibition of FAK tyrosine (Y)397 but not c-Src Y416 phosphorylation. Oral PF-271 administration (30 mg/kg, twice daily) blocked FAK but not c-Src tyrosine phosphorylation in ID8-IP tumors. This was associated with decreased tumor size, prevention of peritoneal metastasis, reduced tumor-associated endothelial cell number, and increased tumor cell-associated apoptosis. FAK knockdown and re-expression assays showed that FAK activity selectively promoted anchorage-independent ID8-IP cell survival. These results support the continued evaluation of FAK inhibitors as a promising clinical treatment for ovarian cancer. PMID:23275034

  4. Inhibition of spinal c-Jun-NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) improves locomotor activity of spinal cord injured rats.

    PubMed

    Martini, Alessandra C; Forner, Stefânia; Koepp, Janice; Rae, Giles Alexander

    2016-05-16

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) have been implicated in central nervous system injuries, yet the roles within neurodegeneration following spinal cord injury (SCI) still remain partially elucidated. We aimed to investigate the changes in expression of the three MAPKs following SCI and the role of spinal c-jun-NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) in motor impairment following the lesion. SCI induced at the T9 level resulted in enhanced expression of phosphorylated MAPKs shortly after trauma. SCI increased spinal cord myeloperoxidase levels, indicating a local neutrophil infiltration, and elevated the number of spinal apoptotic cells. Intrathecal administration of a specific inhibitor of JNK phosphorylation, SP600125, given at 1 and 4h after SCI, reduced the p-JNK expression, the number of spinal apoptotic cells and many of the histological signs of spinal injury. Notably, restoration of locomotor performance was clearly ameliorated by SP600125 treatment. Altogether, the results demonstrate that SCI induces activation of spinal MAPKs and that JNK plays a major role in mediating the deleterious consequences of spinal injury, not only at the spinal level, but also those regarding locomotor function. Therefore, inhibition of JNK activation in the spinal cord shortly after trauma might constitute a feasible therapeutic strategy for the functional recovery from SCI. PMID:27080425

  5. Diacylglycerol kinase ζ limits B cell antigen receptor-dependent activation of ERK signaling to inhibit early antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Matthew L; Dong, Matthew B; Brink, Robert; Zhong, Xiao-Ping; DeFranco, Anthony L

    2013-10-15

    Signaling downstream of the B cell antigen receptor (BCR) is tightly regulated to enable cells to gauge the strength and duration of antigen-receptor interactions and to respond appropriately. We investigated whether metabolism of the second messenger diacylglycerol (DAG) by members of the family of DAG kinases (DGKs) played a role in modulating the magnitude of signaling by DAG downstream of the BCR. In the absence of DGKζ, the threshold for BCR signaling, measured as activation of the Ras-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway, was markedly reduced in mature follicular B cells, which resulted in enhanced responses to antigen in vitro and in vivo. Inhibition of DAG signaling by DGKζ limited the number of antibody-secreting cells that were generated early in response to T cell-independent type 2 antigens, as well as to T cell-dependent antigens. Furthermore, the effect of loss of DGKζ closely resembled the effect of increasing the affinity of the BCR for antigen during the T cell-dependent antibody response. These results suggest that the magnitude of DAG signaling is important for translating the affinity of the BCR for antigen into the amount of antibody produced during the early stages of an immune response. PMID:24129701

  6. JAK Kinase Inhibition Abrogates STAT3 Activation and Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Tumor Growth12

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Malabika; Pollock, Netanya I.; Black, John; DeGrave, Kara A.; Wheeler, Sarah; Freilino, Maria L.; Joyce, Sonali; Lui, Vivian W.Y.; Zeng, Yan; Chiosea, Simion I.; Grandis, Jennifer R.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 has been implicated in cell proliferation and survival of many cancers including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). AZD1480, an orally active pharmacologic inhibitor of JAK1/JAK2, has been tested in several cancer models. In the present study, the in vitro and in vivo effects of AZD1480 were evaluated in HNSCC preclinical models to test the potential use of JAK kinase inhibition for HNSCC therapy. AZD1480 treatment decreased HNSCC proliferation in HNSCC cell lines with half maximal effective concentration (EC50) values ranging from 0.9 to 4 μM in conjunction with reduction of pSTAT3Tyr705 expression. In vivo antitumor efficacy of AZD1480 was demonstrated in patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models derived from two independent HNSCC tumors. Oral administration of AZD1480 reduced tumor growth in conjunction with decreased pSTAT3Tyr705 expression that was observed in both PDX models. These findings suggest that the JAK1/2 inhibitors abrogate STAT3 signaling and may be effective in HNSCC treatment approaches. PMID:25810010

  7. Cell-based screen for altered nuclear phenotypes reveals senescence progression in polyploid cells after Aurora kinase B inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Sadaie, Mahito; Dillon, Christian; Narita, Masashi; Young, Andrew R. J.; Cairney, Claire J.; Godwin, Lauren S.; Torrance, Christopher J.; Bennett, Dorothy C.; Keith, W. Nicol; Narita, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a widespread stress response and is widely considered to be an alternative cancer therapeutic goal. Unlike apoptosis, senescence is composed of a diverse set of subphenotypes, depending on which of its associated effector programs are engaged. Here we establish a simple and sensitive cell-based prosenescence screen with detailed validation assays. We characterize the screen using a focused tool compound kinase inhibitor library. We identify a series of compounds that induce different types of senescence, including a unique phenotype associated with irregularly shaped nuclei and the progressive accumulation of G1 tetraploidy in human diploid fibroblasts. Downstream analyses show that all of the compounds that induce tetraploid senescence inhibit Aurora kinase B (AURKB). AURKB is the catalytic component of the chromosome passenger complex, which is involved in correct chromosome alignment and segregation, the spindle assembly checkpoint, and cytokinesis. Although aberrant mitosis and senescence have been linked, a specific characterization of AURKB in the context of senescence is still required. This proof-of-principle study suggests that our protocol is capable of amplifying tetraploid senescence, which can be observed in only a small population of oncogenic RAS-induced senescence, and provides additional justification for AURKB as a cancer therapeutic target. PMID:26133385

  8. Inhibition of receptor tyrosine kinases restores immunocompetence and improves immune-dependent chemotherapy against experimental leishmaniasis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Jane E.; Maroof, Asher; Owens, Benjamin M.J.; Narang, Priyanka; Johnson, Katherine; Brown, Najmeeyah; Rosenquist, Lovisa; Beattie, Lynette; Coles, Mark; Kaye, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases are involved in multiple cellular processes, and drugs that inhibit their action are used in the clinic to treat several types of cancer. However, the value of receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (RTKIs) for treating infectious disease has yet to be explored. Here, we have shown in mice that administration of the broad-spectrum RTKI sunitinib maleate (Sm) blocked the vascular remodeling and progressive splenomegaly associated with experimental visceral leishmaniasis. Furthermore, Sm treatment restored the integrity of the splenic microarchitecture. Although restoration of splenic architecture was accompanied by an increase in the frequency of IFN-γ+CD4+ T cells, Sm treatment alone was insufficient to cause a reduction in tissue parasite burden. However, preconditioning by short-term Sm treatment proved to be successful as an adjunct therapy, increasing the frequency of IFN-γ+ and IFN-γ+TNF+CD4+ T cells, enhancing NO production by splenic macrophages, and providing dose-sparing effects when combined with a first-line immune-dependent anti-leishmanial drug. We propose, therefore, that RTKIs may prove clinically useful as agents to restore immune competence before the administration of chemo- or immunotherapeutic drugs in the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis or other diseases involving lymphoid tissue remodeling, including cancer. PMID:20234089

  9. A cobalt oxyhydroxide nanoflake-based nanoprobe for the sensitive fluorescence detection of T4 polynucleotide kinase activity and inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cen, Yao; Yang, Yuan; Yu, Ru-Qin; Chen, Ting-Ting; Chu, Xia

    2016-04-14

    Phosphorylation of nucleic acids with 5'-OH termini catalyzed by polynucleotide kinase (PNK) is an inevitable process and has been implicated in many important cellular events. Here, we found for the first time that there was a significant difference in the adsorbent ability of cobalt oxyhydroxide (CoOOH) nanoflakes between single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), which resulted in the fluorescent dye-labeled dsDNA still retaining strong fluorescence emission, while the fluorescence signal of ssDNA was significantly quenched by CoOOH nanoflakes. Based on this discovery, we developed a CoOOH nanoflake-based nanoprobe for the fluorescence sensing of T4 PNK activity and its inhibition by combining it with λ exonuclease cleavage reaction. In the presence of T4 PNK, dye-labeled dsDNA was phosphorylated and then cleaved by λ exonuclease to generate ssDNA, which could adsorb on the CoOOH nanoflakes and whose fluorescence was quenched by CoOOH nanoflakes. Due to the high quenching property of CoOOH nanoflakes as an efficient energy acceptor, a sensitive and selective sensing approach with satisfactory performance for T4 PNK sensing in a complex biological matrix has been successfully constructed and applied to the screening of inhibitors. The developed approach may potentially provide a new platform for further research, clinical diagnosis, and drug discovery of nucleotide kinase related diseases. PMID:27030367

  10. Janus kinase inhibition as a potential strategy for the treatment of psoriasis: state of the art and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Cassano, N; Vena, G A

    2012-01-01

    Research is focusing the attention on drugs acting on intracellular signaling as a possible strategy for various malignancies and autoimmune disorders, as well as prevention of transplant rejection. In such a context, an intriguing therapeutic target appears to be the signaling pathway mediated by Janus kinases (JAK)/signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) protein family. Several companies are developing and evaluating JAK inhibitors for immune-mediated disorders, including psoriasis. Among these drugs, ruxolitinib and especially tofacitinib have reached more advanced phases of clinical and experimental development. This review discusses the potential role of JAK inhibition in the treatment of psoriasis and presents the preliminary data regarding the clinical development of JAK inhibitors in this disease. PMID:23241109

  11. [Tyrosine kinase inhibiting the VEGF pathway and elderly people: Tolerance, pre-treatment assessment and side effects management].

    PubMed

    Bretagne, Marie; Boudou-Rouquette, Pascaline; Huillard, Olivier; Thomas-Schoemann, Audrey; Chahwakilian, Anne; Orvoen, Galdric; Arrondeau, Jennifer; Tlemsani, Camille; Cessot, Anatole; Cabanes, Laure; Blanchet, Benoit; Coriat, Romain; Alexandre, Jérôme; Goldwasser, François

    2016-03-01

    Angiogenesis inhibition is a major antitumor strategy that has emerged during the last decade. Oral tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) targeting the VEGF receptor, including sunitinib, sorafenib, axitinib, regorafenib, pazopanib, and vandetanib reduce tumor growth and metastasis. These agents are approved for the treatment of metastatic diseases in first or second-line. They display a narrow therapeutic index. However, data in the elderly and/or in patients with multiple illnesses remain scarce. This population is classically excluded from clinical trials. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of existing literature regarding antiangiogenic TKI tolerance in the elderly (>70 years old). We also highlight key points of the pre-therapeutic evaluation and summarize the management of common toxicities. PMID:26832420

  12. Downregulation of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) by cord blood stem cells inhibits angiogenesis in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Dasari, Venkata Ramesh; Kaur, Kiranpreet; Velpula, Kiran Kumar; Dinh, Dzung H; Tsung, Andrew J; Mohanam, Sanjeeva; Rao, Jasti S

    2010-11-01

    Angiogenesis involves the formation of new blood vessels by rerouting or remodeling existing ones and is believed to be the primary method of vessel formation in gliomas. To study the mechanisms by which angiogenesis of glioma cells can be inhibited by human umbilical cord blood stem cells (hUCBSC), we studied two glioma cell lines (SNB19, U251) and a glioma xenograft cell line (5310) alone and in co-culture with hUCBSC. Conditioned media from co-cultures of glioma cells with hUCBSC showed reduced angiogenesis as evaluated by in vitro angiogenesis assay using HMEC cells. Reduction in angiogenesis was associated with downregulation of FAK and integrin αvβ3 in the co-cultures of glioma cells. Downregulation of FAK gene is correlated with downregulation of many angiogenesis-related genes, including Ang1, VEGFA and Akt. Under in vivo conditions, neovascularization by glioma cells was inhibited by hUCBSC. Further, intracranial tumor growth was inhibited by hUCBSC in athymic nude mice. Similar to in vitro results, we observed downregulation of FAK, VEGF and Akt molecules to inhibit angiogenesis in the hUCBSC-treated nude mice brains. Taken together, our results suggest that hUCBSC have the potential to inhibit the angiogenesis of glioma cells both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:21068464

  13. Downregulation of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) by cord blood stem cells inhibits angiogenesis in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Venkata Ramesh; Kaur, Kiranpreet; Velpula, Kiran Kumar; Dinh, Dzung H.; Tsung, Andrew J.; Mohanam, Sanjeeva; Rao, Jasti S.

    2010-01-01

    Angiogenesis involves the formation of new blood vessels by rerouting or remodeling existing ones and is believed to be the primary method of vessel formation in gliomas. To study the mechanisms by which angiogenesis of glioma cells can be inhibited by human umbilical cord blood stem cells (hUCBSC), we studied two glioma cell lines (SNB19, U251) and a glioma xenograft cell line (5310) alone and in co-culture with hUCBSC. Conditioned media from co-cultures of glioma cells with hUCBSC showed reduced angiogenesis as evaluated by in vitro angiogenesis assay using HMEC cells. Reduction in angiogenesis was associated with downregulation of FAK and integrin αvβ3 in the co-cultures of glioma cells. Downregulation of FAK gene is correlated with downregulation of many angiogenesis-related genes, including Ang1, VEGFA and Akt. Under in vivo conditions, neovascularization by glioma cells was inhibited by hUCBSC. Further, intracranial tumor growth was inhibited by hUCBSC in athymic nude mice. Similar to in vitro results, we observed downregulation of FAK, VEGF and Akt molecules to inhibit angiogenesis in the hUCBSC-treated nude mice brains. Taken together, our results suggest that hUCBSC have the potential to inhibit the angiogenesis of glioma cells both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:21068464

  14. Quercetin attenuates cardiomyocyte apoptosis via inhibition of JNK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengqiu; Wang, Ting; Zhang, Chunyuan; Xuan, Jichang; Su, Changjiang; Wang, Yuqi

    2016-02-15

    Quercetin (Que), a plant-derived flavonoid, possesses various biological functions. Moreover, Que exerts multiple beneficial actions in treatment of cardiovascular diseases and there are an inverse association between Que intakes and occurrence and development of various cardiovascular diseases. Some researchers have inferred that the mechanisms of Que to protect cardiomyocytes from ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury may be involved in modulation of intracellular signal pathways and regulation of proteins expression in vivo. The current study investigated whether Que has any protective effects on cardiomyocytes from hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) in vitro and its potential cardioprotective mechanisms. The cell viability of Que on H9c2 cardiomyoblast cells was assessed by MTT. Apoptosis was evaluated by both Hoechst33342 staining and Flow cytometric analysis (FACS). Furthermore, the effect of Que, SP600125 (JNK inhibitor) and SB203580 (p38 inhibitor) on mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and the expression of apoptosis related proteins (Bcl-2, Bax and caspase-3) was determined by Western blotting. MTT assays showed that pretreatment with Que could increase the viability of H9c2 cardiomyocytes that suffered H/R. Both Hoechst33342 staining and FACS confirmed that Que could remarkably suppress the H/R-induced apoptotic cardiomyocytes. In addition, Que significantly alleviated H/R-induced the phosphorylation of JNK and p38, which further increased Bcl-2 expression and inhibited the activation of Bax and caspase-3 directly or indirectly. In summary, our results imply that Que can induce cardioprotection by inhibition of JNK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways and modulate the expression of Bcl-2 and Bax proteins that provides a new experimental foundation for myocardial ischemia disease therapy. PMID:26680104

  15. Curcumin Attenuates Opioid Tolerance and Dependence by Inhibiting Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II α Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaoyu; Huang, Fang; Szymusiak, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Chronic use of opioid analgesics has been hindered by the development of opioid addiction and tolerance. We have reported that curcumin, a natural flavonoid from the rhizome of Curcuma longa, attenuated opioid tolerance, although the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that curcumin may inhibit Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II α (CaMKIIα), a protein kinase that has been previously proposed to be critical for opioid tolerance and dependence. In this study, we used state-of-the-art polymeric formulation technology to produce poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)-curcumin nanoparticles (nanocurcumin) to overcome the drug’s poor solubility and bioavailability, which has made it extremely difficult for studying in vivo pharmacological actions of curcumin. We found that PLGA-curcumin nanoparticles reduced the dose requirement by 11- to 33-fold. Pretreatment with PLGA-curcumin (by mouth) prevented the development of opioid tolerance and dependence in a dose-dependent manner, with ED50 values of 3.9 and 3.2 mg/kg, respectively. PLGA-curcumin dose-dependently attenuated already-established opioid tolerance (ED50 = 12.6 mg/kg p.o.) and dependence (ED50 = 3.1 mg/kg p.o.). Curcumin or PLGA-curcumin did not produce antinociception by itself or affect morphine (1–10 mg/kg) antinociception. Moreover, we found that the behavioral effects of curcumin on opioid tolerance and dependence correlated with its inhibition of morphine-induced CaMKIIα activation in the brain. These results suggest that curcumin may attenuate opioid tolerance and dependence by suppressing CaMKIIα activity. PMID:25515789

  16. Intratumoral Heterogeneity in EGFR-Mutant NSCLC Results in Divergent Resistance Mechanisms in Response to EGFR Tyrosine Kinase Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Soucheray, Margaret; Capelletti, Marzia; Pulido, Inés; Kuang, Yanan; Paweletz, Cloud P; Becker, Jeffrey H; Kikuchi, Eiki; Xu, Chunxiao; Patel, Tarun B; Al-Shahrour, Fatima; Carretero, Julián; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Jänne, Pasi A; Shapiro, Geoffrey I; Shimamura, Takeshi

    2015-10-15

    Non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) that have developed resistance to EGF receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), including gefitinib and erlotinib, are clinically linked to an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype. Here, we examined whether modulating EMT maintains the responsiveness of EGFR-mutated NSCLCs to EGFR TKI therapy. Using human NSCLC cell lines harboring mutated EGFR and a transgenic mouse model of lung cancer driven by mutant EGFR (EGFR-Del19-T790M), we demonstrate that EGFR inhibition induces TGFβ secretion followed by SMAD pathway activation, an event that promotes EMT. Chronic exposure of EGFR-mutated NSCLC cells to TGFβ was sufficient to induce EMT and resistance to EGFR TKI treatment. Furthermore, NSCLC HCC4006 cells with acquired resistance to gefitinib were characterized by a mesenchymal phenotype and displayed a higher prevalence of the EGFR T790M mutated allele. Notably, combined inhibition of EGFR and the TGFβ receptor in HCC4006 cells prevented EMT but was not sufficient to prevent acquired gefitinib resistance because of an increased emergence of the EGFR T790M allele compared with cells treated with gefitinib alone. Conversely, another independent NSCLC cell line, PC9, reproducibly developed EGFR T790M mutations as the primary mechanism underlying EGFR TKI resistance, even though the prevalence of the mutant allele was lower than that in HCC4006 cells. Thus, our findings underscore heterogeneity within NSCLC cells lines harboring EGFR kinase domain mutations that give rise to divergent resistance mechanisms in response to treatment and anticipate the complexity of EMT suppression as a therapeutic strategy. PMID:26282169

  17. Type II cGMP-dependent protein kinase directly inhibits HER2 activation of gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Miaolin; Yao, Xiaoyuan; Wu, Min; Qian, Hai; Wu, Yan; Chen, Yongchang

    2016-02-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that type II cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG II) inhibited epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced phosphorylation/activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Since human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) has a similar molecular structure to EGFR, the present study was designed to investigate whether PKG II also inhibits HER2 activation. The human gastric cancer cell line HGC‑27 was infected with an adenoviral construct encoding cDNA of PKG II (Ad‑PKG II) to increase the expression of PKG II and treated with 8‑(4‑chlorophenylthio)guanosine‑3',5'‑cyclic monophosphate (8‑pCPT‑cGMP) to activate the kinase. Western blotting was performed to detect the tyrosine and serine/threonine phosphorylation of HER2. Co‑immunoprecipitation was performed in order to determine the binding between PKG II and HER2. In addition, a QuikChange Lightning Site‑Directed Mutagenesis kit was used to mutate threonine 686 of HER2 to glutamic acid or alanine. The results demonstrated that EGF treatment increased the tyrosine phosphorylation (activation) of HER2. Increasing the PKG II activity of HGC‑27 cells through infection with Ad‑PKG II and stimulation with 8‑pCPT‑cGMP inhibited the EGF‑induced tyrosine phosphorylation/activation of HER2. PKG II bound directly with HER2 and caused phosphorylation of threonine 686. When threonine 686 of HER2 was mutated to alanine, which could not be phosphorylated by PKG II, the inhibitory effect of PKG II on the activation of HER2 was eradicated. When threonine 686 of HER2 was mutated to glutamic acid, which mimicked the phosphorylation of this site, treatment with EGF had no stimulating effect on tyrosine phosphorylation/activation of the mutant HER2. The results suggested that PKG II inhibits EGF‑induced activation of HER2 through binding with and causing threonine 686 phosphorylation of this oncogenic protein. PMID:26676300

  18. Benzothiazole Derivative as a Novel Mycobacterium tuberculosis Shikimate Kinase Inhibitor: Identification and Elucidation of Its Allosteric Mode of Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Rukmankesh; Rajput, Vikrant Singh; Gupta, Monika; Chib, Reena; Kumar, Amit; Wazir, Priya; Khan, Inshad Ali; Nargotra, Amit

    2016-05-23

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis shikimate kinase (Mtb-SK) is a key enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids through the shikimate pathway. Since it is proven to be essential for the survival of the microbe and is absent from mammals, it is a promising target for anti-TB drug discovery. In this study, a combined approach of in silico similarity search and pharmacophore building using already reported inhibitors was used to screen a procured library of 20,000 compounds of the commercially available ChemBridge database. From the in silico screening, 15 hits were identified, and these hits were evaluated in vitro for Mtb-SK enzyme inhibition. Two compounds presented significant enzyme inhibition with IC50 values of 10.69 ± 0.9 and 46.22 ± 1.2 μM. The best hit was then evaluated for the in vitro mode of inhibition where it came out to be an uncompetitive and noncompetitive inhibitor with respect to shikimate (SKM) and ATP, respectively, suggesting its binding at an allosteric site. Potential binding sites of Mtb-SK were identified which confirmed the presence of an allosteric binding pocket apart from the ATP and SKM binding sites. The docking simulations were performed at this pocket in order to find the mode of binding of the best hit in the presence of substrates and the products of the enzymatic reaction. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations elucidated the probability of inhibitor binding at the allosteric site in the presence of ADP and shikimate-3-phosphate (S-3-P), that is, after the formation of products of the reaction. The inhibitor binding may prevent the release of the product from Mtb-SK, thereby inhibiting its activity. The binding stability and the key residue interactions of the inhibitor to this product complex were also revealed by the MD simulations. Residues ARG43, ILE45, and PHE57 were identified as crucial that were involved in interactions with the best hit. This is the first report of an allosteric binding site of Mtb-SK, which

  19. Identification of Novel Compounds Inhibiting Chikungunya Virus-Induced Cell Death by High Throughput Screening of a Kinase Inhibitor Library

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Rafael G. B.; da Silva, Camila T.; Taniguchi, Juliana B.; No, Joo Hwan; Lombardot, Benoit; Schwartz, Olivier; Hansen, Michael A. E.; Freitas-Junior, Lucio H.

    2013-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne arthrogenic alphavirus that causes acute febrile illness in humans accompanied by joint pains and in many cases, persistent arthralgia lasting weeks to years. The re-emergence of CHIKV has resulted in numerous outbreaks in the eastern hemisphere, and threatens to expand in the foreseeable future. Unfortunately, no effective treatment is currently available. The present study reports the use of resazurin in a cell-based high-throughput assay, and an image-based high-content assay to identify and characterize inhibitors of CHIKV-infection in vitro. CHIKV is a highly cytopathic virus that rapidly kills infected cells. Thus, cell viability of HuH-7 cells infected with CHIKV in the presence of compounds was determined by measuring metabolic reduction of resazurin to identify inhibitors of CHIKV-associated cell death. A kinase inhibitor library of 4,000 compounds was screened against CHIKV infection of HuH-7 cells using the resazurin reduction assay, and the cell toxicity was also measured in non-infected cells. Seventy-two compounds showing ≥50% inhibition property against CHIKV at 10 µM were selected as primary hits. Four compounds having a benzofuran core scaffold (CND0335, CND0364, CND0366 and CND0415), one pyrrolopyridine (CND0545) and one thiazol-carboxamide (CND3514) inhibited CHIKV-associated cell death in a dose-dependent manner, with EC50 values between 2.2 µM and 7.1 µM. Based on image analysis, these 6 hit compounds did not inhibit CHIKV replication in the host cell. However, CHIKV-infected cells manifested less prominent apoptotic blebs typical of CHIKV cytopathic effect compared with the control infection. Moreover, treatment with these compounds reduced viral titers in the medium of CHIKV-infected cells by up to 100-fold. In conclusion, this cell-based high-throughput screening assay using resazurin, combined with the image-based high content assay approach identified compounds against CHIKV having a novel

  20. The Hsp70 homolog Ssb is essential for glucose sensing via the SNF1 kinase network

    PubMed Central

    von Plehwe, Ulrike; Berndt, Uta; Conz, Charlotte; Chiabudini, Marco; Fitzke, Edith; Sickmann, Albert; Petersen, Astrid; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Rospert, Sabine

    2009-01-01

    Yeast senses the availability of external energy sources via multiple interconnected signaling networks. One of the central components is SNF1, the homolog of mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase, which in yeast is essential for the expression of glucose-repressed genes. When glucose is available hyperphosphorylated SNF1 is rendered inactive by the type 1 protein phosphatase Glc7. Dephosphorylation requires Reg1, which physically targets Glc7 to SNF1. Here we show that the chaperone Ssb is required to keep SNF1 in the nonphosphorylated state in the presence of glucose. Using a proteome approach we found that the Δssb1Δssb2 strain displays alterations in protein expression and suffers from phenotypic characteristics reminiscent of glucose repression mutants. Microarray analysis revealed a correlation between deregulation on the protein and on the transcript level. Supporting studies uncovered that SSB1 was an effective multicopy suppressor of severe growth defects caused by the Δreg1 mutation. Suppression of Δreg1 by high levels of Ssb was coupled to a reduction of Snf1 hyperphosphorylation back to the wild-type phosphorylation level. The data are consistent with a model in which Ssb is crucial for efficient regulation within the SNF1 signaling network, thereby allowing an appropriate response to changing glucose levels. PMID:19723765

  1. Protein Kinase C-Independent Inhibition of Organic Cation Transporter 1 Activity by the Bisindolylmaleimide Ro 31-8220

    PubMed Central

    Mayati, Abdullah; Bruyere, Arnaud; Moreau, Amélie; Jouan, Elodie; Denizot, Claire; Parmentier, Yannick; Fardel, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Ro 31–8220 is a potent protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor belonging to the chemical class of bisindolylmaleimides (BIMs). Various PKC-independent effects of Ro 31–8220 have however been demonstrated, including inhibition of the ATP-binding cassette drug transporter breast cancer resistance protein. In the present study, we reported that the BIM also blocks activity of the solute carrier organic cation transporter (OCT) 1, involved in uptake of marketed drugs in the liver, in a PKC-independent manner. Ro 31–8220, in contrast to other pan-PKC inhibitors such as staurosporine and chelerythrine, was thus shown to cis-inhibit uptake of the reference OCT1 substrate tetraethylammonium in OCT1-transfected HEK293 cells in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 = 0.18 μM) and without altering membrane expression of OCT1. This blockage of OCT1 was also observed in human hepatic HepaRG cells that constitutionally express OCT1. It likely occurred through a mixed mechanism of inhibition. Ro 31–8220 additionally trans-inhibited TEA uptake in OCT1-transfected HEK293 cells, which likely discards a transport of Ro 31–8220 by OCT1. Besides Ro 31–8220, 7 additional BIMs, including the PKC inhibitor LY 333531, inhibited OCT1 activity, whereas 4 other BIMs were without effect. In silico analysis of structure-activity relationships next revealed that various molecular descriptors, especially 3D-WHIM descriptors related to total size, correspond to key physico-chemical parameters for inhibition of OCT1 activity by BIMs. In addition to activity of OCT1, Ro 31–8220 inhibited those of other organic cation transporters such as multidrug and toxin extrusion protein (MATE) 1 and MATE2-K, whereas, by contrast, it stimulated that of OCT2. Taken together, these data extend the nature of cellular off-targets of the BIM Ro 31–8220 to OCT1 and other organic cation transporters, which has likely to be kept in mind when using Ro 31–8220 and other BIMs as PKC inhibitors in experimental

  2. Receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor 1, a target of NKX2-1/TTF-1 lineage-survival oncogene, inhibits apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1-mediated pro-apoptotic signaling in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ida, Lisa; Yamaguchi, Tomoya; Yanagisawa, Kiyoshi; Kajino, Taisuke; Shimada, Yukako; Suzuki, Motoshi; Takahashi, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    We previously identified receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor 1 (ROR1) as a transcriptional target of the NKX2-1/TTF-1 lineage-survival oncogene in lung adenocarcinoma. ROR1 consequently sustains a favorable balance between pro-survival phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-protein kinase B and pro-apoptotic apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1)-p38MAPK signaling. In contrast to recent advances in understanding how ROR1 sustains pro-survival signaling, the mechanism of ROR1 repression of pro-apoptotic signaling remains rather elusive. In the present study, we investigated the underlying mechanism of ROR1-mediated inhibition of the ASK1-p38MAPK signaling pathway. Growth inhibition mediated by siROR1 was partially but significantly alleviated by ASK1 co-knockdown in lung adenocarcinoma cell lines. Also, ASK1 phosphorylation at Thr845, which reflects its activated state, was clearly inhibited by ROR1 overexpression in both steady state and oxidative stress-elicited conditions in MSTO-211H cells. In addition, we found that ROR1 was physically associated with ASK1 at the C-terminal serine threonine-rich domain of ROR1. Furthermore, ROR1 kinase activity was shown to be required to repress the ASK1-p38 axis and oxidative stress-induced cell death. The present findings thus support our notion that ROR1 sustains lung adenocarcinoma survival, at least in part, through direct physical interaction with ASK1 and consequential repression of the pro-apoptotic ASK1-p38 axis in a ROR1 kinase activity-dependent manner. PMID:26661061

  3. MicroRNA-30 inhibits neointimal hyperplasia by targeting Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIδ (CaMKIIδ)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong Feng; Spinelli, Amy; Sun, Li-Yan; Jiang, Miao; Singer, Diane V.; Ginnan, Roman; Saddouk, Fatima Z.; Van Riper, Dee; Singer, Harold A.

    2016-01-01

    The multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II δ-isoform (CaMKIIδ) promotes vascular smooth muscle (VSM) proliferation, migration, and injury-induced vascular wall neointima formation. The objective of this study was to test if microRNA-30 (miR-30) family members are endogenous regulators of CaMKIIδ expression following vascular injury and whether ectopic expression of miR-30 can inhibit CaMKIIδ-dependent VSM cell function and neointimal VSM hyperplasia induced by vascular injury. The CaMKIIδ 3′UTR contains a consensus miR-30 binding sequence that is highly conserved across species. A significant decrease in miR-30 family members and increase in CaMKIIδ2 protein expression, with no change in CaMKIIδ mRNA expression, was observed in medial layers of VSM 7 days post-injury. In vitro, overexpression of miR-30c or miR-30e inhibited CaMKIIδ2 protein expression by ~50% in cultured rat aortic VSM cells, and inhibited VSM cell proliferation and migration. In vivo, lenti-viral delivery of miR-30c into injured rat carotid arteries prevented the injury-induced increase in CaMKIIδ2. Furthermore, neointima formation was dramatically inhibited by lenti-viral delivery of miR-30c in the injured medial smooth muscle. These studies define a novel mechanism for regulating CaMKIIδ expression in VSM and provide a new potential therapeutic strategy to reduce progression of vascular proliferative diseases, including atherosclerosis and restenosis. PMID:27199283

  4. Kinetics of the inhibition of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II by pea protein-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Li, Huan; Aluko, Rotimi E

    2005-11-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) catalyzes the phosphorylation of various cellular proteins and excessive activities have been implicated in the pathogenesis of various chronic diseases. We hypothesized that positively charged peptides can be produced through enzymatic hydrolysis of pea proteins; such peptides could then bind to negatively charged calmodulin (CaM) at a physiological pH level and inhibit CaMKII activity. Pea protein isolate was hydrolyzed with an alkaline protease (alcalase) and filtered through a 1000-mol wt cutoff membrane. The permeate, which contained low-molecular weight peptides, was used to isolate cationic peptides on an SP-Sepharose column by ion exchange chromatography. Separation of the permeate on the SP-Sepharose column yielded two fractions with net positive charges that were subsequently used for enzyme inhibition studies. Fraction I eluted earlier from the column and contained lower contents of lysine and arginine than Fraction II, which eluted later. Results show that both peptide fractions inhibited CaMKII activity mostly in a competitive manner, although kinetic data suggested that inhibition by Fraction II may be of the mixed type. Kinetic analysis (K(m) and K(i)) showed that affinity of peptides in Fraction II for CaM was more than that in Fraction I, which was directly correlated with the higher inhibitory properties of Fraction II against CaMKII. The results suggest that it may be possible to use pea protein-derived cationic peptides to modulate CaMKII activities. PMID:16111873

  5. Inhibition of p70 S6 Kinase (S6K1) Activity by A77 1726 and Its Effect on Cell Proliferation and Cell Cycle Progress12

    PubMed Central

    Doscas, Michelle E.; Williamson, Ashley J.; Usha, Lydia; Bogachkov, Yedida; Rao, Geetha S.; Xiao, Fei; Wang, Yimin; Ruby, Carl; Kaufman, Howard; Zhou, Jingsong; Williams, James W.; Li, Yi; Xu, Xiulong

    2014-01-01

    Leflunomide is a novel immunomodulatory drug prescribed for treating rheumatoid arthritis. It inhibits the activity of protein tyrosine kinases and dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, a rate-limiting enzyme in the pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis pathway. Here, we report that A77 1726, the active metabolite of leflunomide, inhibited the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 and two other substrates of S6K1, insulin receptor substrate-1 and carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 2, in an A375 melanoma cell line. A77 1726 increased the phosphorylation of AKT, p70 S6 (S6K1), ERK1/2, and MEK through the feedback activation of the IGF-1 receptor–mediated signaling pathway. Invitro kinase assay revealed that leflunomide and A77 1726 inhibited S6K1 activity with IC50 values of approximately 55 and 80 μM, respectively. Exogenous uridine partially blocked A77 1726–induced inhibition of A375 cell proliferation. S6K1 knockdown led to the inhibition of A375 cell proliferation but did not potentiate the antiproliferative effect of A77 1726. A77 1726 stimulated bromodeoxyuridine incorporation in A375 cells but arrested the cell cycle in the S phase, which was reversed by addition of exogenous uridine or by MAP kinase pathway inhibitors but not by rapamycin and LY294002 (a phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor). These observations suggest that A77 1726 accelerates cell cycle entry into the S phase through MAP kinase activation and that pyrimidine nucleotide depletion halts the completion of the cell cycle. Our study identified a novel molecular target of A77 1726 and showed that the inhibition of S6K1 activity was in part responsible for its antiproliferative activity. Our study also provides a novel mechanistic insight into A77 1726–induced cell cycle arrest in the S phase. PMID:25379019

  6. Cucurbitacin-I inhibits Aurora kinase A, Aurora kinase B and survivin, induces defects in cell cycle progression and promotes ABT-737-induced cell death in a caspase-independent manner in malignant human glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Premkumar, Daniel R; Jane, Esther P; Pollack, Ian F

    2015-01-01

    Because STAT signaling is commonly activated in malignant gliomas as a result of constitutive EGFR activation, strategies for inhibiting the EGFR/JAK/STAT cascade are of significant interest. We, therefore, treated a panel of established glioma cell lines, including EGFR overexpressors, and primary cultures derived from patients diagnosed with glioblastoma with the JAK/STAT inhibitor cucurbitacin-I. Treatment with cucurbitacin-I depleted p-STAT3, p-STAT5, p-JAK1 and p-JAK2 levels, inhibited cell proliferation, and induced G2/M accumulation, DNA endoreduplication, and multipolar mitotic spindles. Longer exposure to cucurbitacin-I significantly reduced the number of viable cells and this decrease in viability was associated with cell death, as confirmed by an increase in the subG1 fraction. Our data also demonstrated that cucurbitacin-I strikingly downregulated Aurora kinase A, Aurora kinase B and survivin. We then searched for agents that exhibited a synergistic effect on cell death in combination with cucurbitacin-I. We found that cotreatment with cucurbitacin-I significantly increased Bcl-2/Bcl-xL family member antagonist ABT-737-induced cell death regardless of EGFR/PTEN/p53 status of malignant human glioma cell lines. Although >50% of the cucurbitacin-I plus ABT-737 treated cells were annexin V and propidium iodide positive, PARP cleavage or caspase activation was not observed. Pretreatment of z-VAD-fmk, a pan caspase inhibitor did not inhibit cell death, suggesting a caspase-independent mechanism of cell death. Genetic inhibition of Aurora kinase A or Aurora kinase B or survivin by RNA interference also sensitized glioma cells to ABT-737, suggesting a link between STAT activation and Aurora kinases in malignant gliomas. PMID:25482928

  7. Decreased activity of neutrophils in the presence of diferuloylmethane (curcumin) involves protein kinase C inhibition.

    PubMed

    Jancinová, Viera; Perecko, Tomás; Nosál, Radomír; Kostálová, Daniela; Bauerová, Katarína; Drábiková, Katarína

    2009-06-10

    Diferuloylmethane (curcumin) has been shown to act beneficially in arthritis, particularly through downregulated expression of proinflammatory cytokines and collagenase as well as through the modulated activities of T lymphocytes and macrophages. In this study its impact on activated neutrophils was investigated both in vitro and in experimental arthritis. Formation of reactive oxygen species in neutrophils was recorded on the basis of luminol- or isoluminol-enhanced chemiluminescence. Phosphorylation of neutrophil protein kinases C alpha and beta II was assessed by Western blotting, using phosphospecific antibodies. Adjuvant arthritis was induced in Lewis rats by heat-killed Mycobacterium butyricum. Diferuloylmethane or methotrexate was administered over a period of 28 days after arthritis induction. Under in vitro conditions, diferuloylmethane (1-100 microM) reduced dose-dependently oxidant formation both at extra- and intracellular level and it effectively reduced protein kinase C activation. Adjuvant arthritis was accompanied by an increased number of neutrophils in blood and by a more pronounced spontaneous as well as PMA (phorbol myristate acetate) stimulated chemiluminescence. Whereas the arthritis-related alterations in neutrophil count and in spontaneous chemiluminescence were not modified by diferuloylmethane, the increased reactivity of neutrophils to PMA was less evident in diferuloylmethane-treated animals. The effects of diferuloylmethane were comparable with those of methotrexate. Diferuloylmethane was found to be a potent inhibitor of neutrophil functions both in vitro and in experimental arthritis. As neutrophils are considered to be cells with the greatest capacity to inflict damage within diseased joints, the observed effects could represent a further mechanism involved in the antirheumatic activity of diferuloylmethane. PMID:19371737

  8. Discovery of a Novel Mode of Protein Kinase Inhibition Characterized by the Mesenchymal-epithelial Transition Factor (c-Met) Protein Autophosphorylation by ARQ 197

    SciTech Connect

    S Eathiraj; R Palma; E Volckova; M Hirschi; D France; M Ashwell; T Chan

    2011-12-31

    A number of human malignancies exhibit sustained stimulation, mutation, or gene amplification of the receptor tyrosine kinase human mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (c-Met). ARQ 197 is a clinically advanced, selective, orally bioavailable, and well tolerated c-Met inhibitor, currently in Phase 3 clinical testing in non-small cell lung cancer patients. Herein, we describe the molecular and structural basis by which ARQ 197 selectively targets c-Met. Through our analysis we reveal a previously undisclosed, novel inhibitory mechanism that utilizes distinct regulatory elements of the c-Met kinase. The structure of ARQ 197 in complex with the c-Met kinase domain shows that the inhibitor binds a conformation that is distinct from published kinase structures. ARQ 197 inhibits c-Met autophosphorylation and is highly selective for the inactive or unphosphorylated form of c-Met. Through our analysis of the interplay between the regulatory and catalytic residues of c-Met, and by comparison between the autoinhibited canonical conformation of c-Met bound by ARQ 197 to previously described kinase domains of type III receptor tyrosine kinases, we believe this to be the basis of a powerful new in silico approach for the design of similar inhibitors for other protein kinases of therapeutic interest.

  9. The Crystal Structure of BRAF in Complex with an Organoruthenium Inhibitor Reveals a Mechanism for Inhibition of an Active Form of BRAF Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Peng; Streu, Craig; Qin, Jie; Bregman, Howard; Pagano, Nicholas; Meggers, Eric; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2012-06-19

    Substitution mutations in the BRAF serine/threonine kinase are found in a variety of human cancers. Such mutations occur in 70% of human malignant melanomas, and a single hyperactivating V600E mutation is found in the activation segment of the kinase domain and accounts for more than 90% of these mutations. Given this correlation, the molecular mechanism for BRAF regulation as well as oncogenic activation has attracted considerable interest, and activated forms of BRAF, such as BRAF{sup V600E}, have become attractive targets for small molecule inhibition. Here we report on the identification and subsequent optimization of a potent BRAF inhibitor, CS292, based on an organometallic kinase inhibitor scaffold. A cocrystal structure of CS292 in complex with the BRAF kinase domain reveals that CS292 binds to the ATP binding pocket of the kinase and is an ATP competitive inhibitor. The structure of the kinase-inhibitor complex also demonstrates that CS292 binds to BRAF in an active conformation and suggests a mechanism for regulation of BRAF by phosphorylation and BRAF{sup V600E} oncogene-induced activation. The structure of CS292 bound to the active form of the BRAF kinase also provides a novel scaffold for the design of BRAF{sup V600E} oncogene selective BRAF inhibitors for therapeutic application.

  10. Inhibiting cortical protein kinase A in spinal cord injured rats enhances efficacy of rehabilitative training.

    PubMed

    Wei, David; Hurd, Caitlin; Galleguillos, Danny; Singh, Jyoti; Fenrich, Keith K; Webber, Christine A; Sipione, Simonetta; Fouad, Karim

    2016-09-01

    Elevated levels of the second messenger molecule cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) are often associated with neuron sprouting and neurite extension (i.e., neuroplasticity). Phosphokinase A (PKA) is a prominent downstream target of cAMP that has been associated with neurite outgrowth. We hypothesized that rehabilitative motor training following spinal cord injuries promotes neuroplasticity via PKA activation. However, in two independent experiments, inhibition of cortical PKA using Rp-cAMPS throughout rehabilitative training robustly increased functional recovery and collateral sprouting of injured corticospinal tract axons, an indicator of neuroplasticity. Consistent with these in vivo findings, using cultured STHdh neurons, we found that Rp-cAMPS had no effect on the phosphorylation of CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein), a prominent downstream target of PKA, even with the concomitant application of the adenylate cyclase agonist forskolin to increase cAMP levels. Conversely, when cAMP levels were increased using the phosphodiesterase inhibitor IBMX, Rp-cAMPS potently inhibited CREB phosphorylation. Taken together, our results suggest that an alternate cAMP dependent pathway was involved in increasing CREB phosphorylation and neuroplasticity. This idea was supported by an in vitro neurite outgrowth assay, where inhibiting PKA did enhance neurite outgrowth. However, when PKA inhibition was combined with inhibition of EPAC2 (exchange protein directly activated by cAMP), another downstream target of cAMP in neurons, neurite outgrowth was significantly reduced. In conclusion, blocking PKA in cortical neurons of spinal cord injured rats increases neurite outgrowth of the lesioned corticospinal tract fibres and the efficacy of rehabilitative training, likely via EPAC. PMID:27401133

  11. Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaMKP/PPM1F) interacts with neurofilament L and inhibits its filament association.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Hana; Katoh, Tsuyoshi; Nakagawa, Ryoko; Ishihara, Yasuhiro; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki; Kameshita, Isamu; Taniguchi, Takanobu; Hirano, Tetsuo; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Ishida, Atsuhiko

    2016-09-01

    Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaMKP/PPM1F) is a Ser/Thr phosphatase that belongs to the PPM family. Growing evidence suggests that PPM phosphatases including CaMKP act as a complex with other proteins to regulate cellular functions. In this study, using the two-dimensional far-western blotting technique with digoxigenin-labeled CaMKP as a probe, in conjunction with peptide mass fingerprinting analysis, we identified neurofilament L (NFL) as a CaMKP-binding protein in a Triton-insoluble fraction of rat brain. We confirmed binding of fluorescein-labeled CaMKP (F-CaMKP) to NFL in solution by fluorescence polarization. The analysis showed that the dissociation constant of F-CaMKP for NFL is 73 ± 17 nM (n = 3). Co-immunoprecipitation assay using a cytosolic fraction of NGF-differentiated PC12 cells showed that endogenous CaMKP and NFL form a complex in cells. Furthermore, the effect of CaMKP on self-assembly of NFL was examined. Electron microscopy revealed that CaMKP markedly prevented NFL from forming large filamentous aggregates, suggesting that CaMKP-binding to NFL inhibits its filament association. These findings may provide new insights into a novel mechanism for regulating network formation of neurofilaments during neuronal differentiation. PMID:27369073

  12. Direct inhibition of the signaling functions of the mammalian target of rapamycin by the phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors, wortmannin and LY294002.

    PubMed Central

    Brunn, G J; Williams, J; Sabers, C; Wiederrecht, G; Lawrence, J C; Abraham, R T

    1996-01-01

    The immunosuppressant, rapamycin, inhibits cell growth by interfering with the function of a novel kinase, termed mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). The putative catalytic domain of mTOR is similar to those of mammalian and yeast phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinases. This study demonstrates that mTOR is a component of a cytokine-triggered protein kinase cascade leading to the phosphorylation of the eukaryotic initiation factor-4E (eIF-4E) binding protein, PHAS-1, in activated T lymphocytes. This event promotes G1 phase progression by stimulating eIF-4E-dependent translation initiation. A mutant YAC-1 T lymphoma cell line, which was selected for resistance to the growth-inhibitory action of rapamycin, was correspondingly resistant to the suppressive effect of this drug on PHAS-1 phosphorylation. In contrast, the PI 3-kinase inhibitor, wortmannin, reduced the phosphorylation of PHAS-1 in both rapamycin-sensitive and -resistant T cells. At similar drug concentrations (0.1-1 microM), wortmannin irreversibly inhibited the serine-specific autokinase activity of mTOR. The autokinase activity of mTOR was also sensitive to the structurally distinct PI 3-kinase inhibitor, LY294002, at concentrations (1-30 microM) nearly identical to those required for inhibition of the lipid kinase activity of the mammalian p85-p110 heterodimer. These studies indicate that the signaling functions of mTOR, and potentially those of other high molecular weight PI 3-kinase homologs, are directly affected by cellular treatment with wortmannin or LY294002. Images PMID:8895571

  13. The Yeast Sks1p Kinase Signaling Network Regulates Pseudohyphal Growth and Glucose Response

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Cole; Kweon, Hye Kyong; Sheidy, Daniel; Shively, Christian A.; Mellacheruvu, Dattatreya; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I.; Andrews, Philip C.; Kumar, Anuj

    2014-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergoes a dramatic growth transition from its unicellular form to a filamentous state, marked by the formation of pseudohyphal filaments of elongated and connected cells. Yeast pseudohyphal growth is regulated by signaling pathways responsive to reductions in the availability of nitrogen and glucose, but the molecular link between pseudohyphal filamentation and glucose signaling is not fully understood. Here, we identify the glucose-responsive Sks1p kinase as a signaling protein required for pseudohyphal growth induced by nitrogen limitation and coupled nitrogen/glucose limitation. To identify the Sks1p signaling network, we applied mass spectrometry-based quantitative phosphoproteomics, profiling over 900 phosphosites for phosphorylation changes dependent upon Sks1p kinase activity. From this analysis, we report a set of novel phosphorylation sites and highlight Sks1p-dependent phosphorylation in Bud6p, Itr1p, Lrg1p, Npr3p, and Pda1p. In particular, we analyzed the Y309 and S313 phosphosites in the pyruvate dehydrogenase subunit Pda1p; these residues are required for pseudohyphal growth, and Y309A mutants exhibit phenotypes indicative of impaired aerobic respiration and decreased mitochondrial number. Epistasis studies place SKS1 downstream of the G-protein coupled receptor GPR1 and the G-protein RAS2 but upstream of or at the level of cAMP-dependent PKA. The pseudohyphal growth and glucose signaling transcription factors Flo8p, Mss11p, and Rgt1p are required to achieve wild-type SKS1 transcript levels. SKS1 is conserved, and deletion of the SKS1 ortholog SHA3 in the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans results in abnormal colony morphology. Collectively, these results identify Sks1p as an important regulator of filamentation and glucose signaling, with additional relevance towards understanding stress-responsive signaling in C. albicans. PMID:24603354

  14. Sensitive and rapid screening of T4 polynucleotide kinase activity and inhibition based on coupled exonuclease reaction and graphene oxide platform.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lei; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Xin; Li, Jinghong

    2011-11-15

    Phosphorylation of DNA with 5'-hydroxyl termini plays a critical role in a majority of normal cellular events, including DNA recombination, DNA replication, and repair of DNA during strand interruption. Determination of nucleotide kinase activity and inhibition is under intense development due to its importance in regulating nucleic acid metabolism. Here, by using T4 polynucleotide kinase (PNK) as a model, which plays an essential role in cellular nucleic acid metabolism, particularly in the cellular responses to DNA damage, we describe a strategy for simply and accurately determining nucleotide kinase activity and inhibition by means of a coupled λ exonuclease cleavage reaction and graphene oxide (GO) based platform. The dye attached dsDNA preserves most of the fluorescence when mixed with GO. While dsDNA is phosphorylated by PNK and then immediately cleaved by λ exonuclease, fluorescence is greatly quenched. Because of the super quenching ability and the high specific surface area of GO, the as-proposed platform presents an excellent performance with wide linear range and low detection limit in the cell extracts environment. Additionally, inhibition effects of adenosine diphosphate, ammonium sulfate, and sodium hydrogen phosphate have also been investigated. The method not only provides a universal platform for monitoring activity and inhibition of nucleotide kinase but also shows great potential in biological process researches, drug discovery, and clinic diagnostics. PMID:22026510

  15. Rho kinase inhibition following traumatic brain injury in mice promotes functional improvement and acute neuron survival but has little effect on neurogenesis, glial responses or neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Bye, Nicole; Christie, Kimberly J; Turbic, Alisa; Basrai, Harleen S; Turnley, Ann M

    2016-05-01

    Inhibition of the Rho/Rho kinase pathway has been shown to be beneficial in a variety of neural injuries and diseases. In this manuscript we investigate the role of Rho kinase inhibition in recovery from traumatic brain injury using a controlled cortical impact model in mice. Mice subjected to a moderately severe TBI were treated for 1 or 4weeks with the Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632, and functional outcomes and neuronal and glial cell responses were analysed at 1, 7 and 35days post-injury. We hypothesised that Y27632-treated mice would show functional improvement, with augmented recruitment of neuroblasts from the SVZ and enhanced survival of newborn neurons in the pericontusional cortex, with protection against neuronal degeneration, neuroinflammation and modulation of astrocyte reactivity and blood-brain-barrier permeability. While Rho kinase inhibition enhanced recovery of motor function after trauma, there were no substantial increases in the recruitment of DCX(+) neuroblasts or the number of BrdU(+) or EdU(+) labelled newborn neurons in the pericontusional cortex of Y27632-treated mice. Inhibition of Rho kinase significantly reduced the number of degenerating cortical neurons at 1day post-injury compared to saline controls but had no longer term effect on neuronal degeneration, with only modest effects on astrocytic reactivity and macrophage/microglial responses. Overall, this study showed that Rho kinase contributes to acute neurodegenerative processes in the injured cortex but does not play a significant role in SVZ neural precursor cell-derived adult neurogenesis, glial responses or blood-brain barrier permeability following a moderately severe brain injury. PMID:26896832

  16. Equol inhibits prostate cancer growth through degradation of androgen receptor by S-phase kinase-associated protein 2.

    PubMed

    Itsumi, Momoe; Shiota, Masaki; Takeuchi, Ario; Kashiwagi, Eiji; Inokuchi, Junichi; Tatsugami, Katsunori; Kajioka, Shunichi; Uchiumi, Takeshi; Naito, Seiji; Eto, Masatoshi; Yokomizo, Akira

    2016-07-01

    Chemopreventive and potential therapeutic effects of soy isoflavones have been shown to be effective in numerous preclinical studies as well as clinical studies in prostate cancer. Although the inhibition of androgen receptor signaling has been supposed as one mechanism underlying their effects, the precise mechanism of androgen receptor inhibition remains unclear. Thus, this study aimed to clarify their mechanism. Among soy isoflavones, equol suppressed androgen receptor as well as prostate-specific antigen expression most potently in androgen-dependent LNCaP cells. However, the inhibitory effect on androgen receptor expression and activity was less prominent in castration-resistant CxR and 22Rv1 cells. Consistently, cell proliferation was suppressed and cellular apoptosis was induced by equol in LNCaP cells, but less so in CxR and 22Rv1 cells. We revealed that the proteasome pathway through S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2) was responsible for androgen receptor suppression. Taken together, soy isoflavones, especially equol, appear to be promising as chemopreventive and therapeutic agents for prostate cancer based on the fact that equol augments Skp2-mediated androgen receptor degradation. Moreover, because Skp2 expression was indicated to be crucial for the effect of soy isoflavones, soy isoflavones may be applicable for precancerous and cancerous prostates. PMID:27088761

  17. Porcine circovirus type 2 replication is impaired by inhibition of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Li; Liu Jue

    2009-03-30

    Postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome, which is primarily caused by porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), is an emerging and important swine disease. We have recently shown that PCV2 induces nuclear factor kappa B activation and its activation is required for active replication, but the other cellular factors involved in PCV2 replication are not well defined. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) which served as an important component of cellular signal transduction pathways has been shown to regulate many viral infections. In this report, we show that PCV2 activates ERK1/2 in PCV2-infected PK15 cells dependent on viral replication. The PCV2-induced ERK1/2 leads to phosphorylation of the ternary complex factor Elk-1, which kinetically paralleled ERK1/2 activation. Inhibition of ERK activation with U0126, a specific MEK1/2 inhibitor, significantly reduced viral progeny release. Investigations into the mechanism of ERK1/2 regulation revealed that inhibition of ERK activation leads to decreased viral transcription and lower virus protein expression. These data indicate that the ERK signaling pathway is involved in PCV2 infection and beneficial to PCV2 replication in the cultured cells.

  18. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein B1 protein impairs DNA repair mediated through the inhibition of DNA-dependent protein kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanaga, Kentaro; Sueoka, Naoko; Sato, Akemi; Hayashi, Shinichiro; Sueoka, Eisaburo . E-mail: sueokae@post.saga-med.ac.jp

    2005-08-05

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein B1, an RNA binding protein, is overexpressed from the early stage of lung cancers; it is evident even in bronchial dysplasia, a premalignant lesion. We evaluated the proteins bound with hnRNP B1 and found that hnRNP B1 interacted with DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) complex, and recombinant hnRNP B1 protein dose-dependently inhibited DNA-PK activity in vitro. To test the effect of hnRNP B1 on DNA repair, we performed comet assay after irradiation, using normal human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells treated with siRNA for hnRNP A2/B1: reduction of hnRNP B1 treated with siRNA for hnRNP A2/B1 induced faster DNA repair in normal HBE cells. Considering these results, we assume that overexpression of hnRNP B1 occurring in the early stage of carcinogenesis inhibits DNA-PK activity, resulting in subsequent accumulation of erroneous rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks, causing tumor progression.

  19. Inhibition of Rho-Associated Protein Kinase Increases the Angiogenic Potential of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Aggregates via Paracrine Effects.

    PubMed

    Hong, Soyoung; Lee, Jae Yeon; Hwang, Changmo; Shin, Jennifer H; Park, Yongdoo

    2016-02-01

    The aggregation of multiple cells, such as mesenchymal condensation, is an important biological process in skeletal muscle development, osteogenesis, and adipogenesis. Due to limited in vivo study model systems, a simple and effective in vitro three-dimensional (3D) aggregation system is required to study the mechanisms of multicellular aggregation and its applications. We first generated controlled mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) aggregates using a bioprinting technique to monitor their aggregation and sprouting. We induced the angiogenic potential of the MSCs through chemical inhibition of the Rho/Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) pathway, which led to hairy sprouting in the aggregates. The angiogenic potential of this 3D construct was then tested by subcutaneously implanting the Matrigel with 3D MSC aggregates in a rat. Treatment of 3D MSCs with the ROCK inhibitor, Y27632, increased their angiogenic activity in vivo. The gene expressions and histological staining indicated that angiogenesis and neovascularization were mainly regulated by the paracrine factors secreted from human 3D MSC constructs. Our results demonstrate the enhancement of the angiogenic potential of the MSC constructs through the secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) by the inhibition of the Rho/ROCK pathway. PMID:26592750

  20. TARGETING SPHINGOSINE KINASE 1 INHIBITS AKT SIGNALING, INDUCES APOPTOSIS, AND SUPPRESSES GROWTH OF HUMAN GLIOBLASTOMA CELLS AND XENOGRAFTS

    PubMed Central

    Kapitonov, Dmitri; Allegood, Jeremy C.; Mitchell, Clint; Hait, Nitai C.; Almenara, Jorge A.; Adams, Jeffrey K.; Zipkin, Robert E.; Dent, Paul; Kordula, Tomasz; Milstien, Sheldon; Spiegel, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a potent sphingolipid mediator of diverse processes important for brain tumors, including cell growth, survival, migration, invasion, and angiogenesis. Sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1), one of the two isoenzymes that produce S1P, is upregulated in glioblastoma and has been linked to poor prognosis in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). In the present study, we found that a potent isotype-specific SphK1 inhibitor, SK1-I, suppressed growth of LN229 and U373 glioblastoma cell lines and non-established human GBM6 cells. SK1-I also enhanced GBM cell death and inhibited their migration and invasion. SK1-I rapidly reduced phosphorylation of Akt but had no significant effect on activation of ERK1/2, another important survival pathway for GBM. Inhibition of the concomitant activation of the JNK pathway induced by SK1-I attenuated death of GBM cells. Importantly, SK1-I markedly reduced tumor growth rate of glioblastoma xenografts, inducing apoptosis and reducing tumor vascularization and enhanced the survival of mice harboring LN229 intracranial tumors. Our results support the notion that SphK1 may be an important factor in GBM and suggest that an isozyme-specific inhibitor of SphK1 deserves consideration as a new therapeutic agent for this disease. PMID:19723667

  1. Intrathecal inhibition of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in diabetic neuropathy adversely affects pain-related behavior.

    PubMed

    Jelicic Kadic, Antonia; Boric, Matija; Ferhatovic, Lejla; Banozic, Adriana; Sapunar, Damir; Puljak, Livia

    2013-10-25

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is considered an important enzyme contributing to the pathogenesis of persistent pain. The aim of this study was to test whether intrathecal injection of CaMKII inhibitors may reduce pain-related behavior in diabetic rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Diabetes was induced with intraperitoneal injection of 55mg/kg streptozotocin. Two weeks after diabetes induction, CaMKII inhibitor myristoil-AIP or KN-93 was injected intrathecally. Behavioral testing with mechanical and thermal stimuli was performed before induction of diabetes, the day preceding the injection, as well as 2h and 24h after the intrathecal injection. The expression of total CaMKII and its alpha isoform in dorsal horn was quantified using immunohistochemistry. Intrathecal injection of mAIP and KN-93 resulted in significant decrease in expression of total CaMKII and CaMKII alpha isoform activity. Also, mAIP and KN93 injection significantly increased sensitivity to a mechanical stimulus 24h after i.t. injection. Intrathecal inhibition of CaMKII reduced the expression of total CaMKII and its CaMKII alpha isoform activity in diabetic dorsal horn, which was accompanied with an increase in pain-related behavior. Further studies about the intrathecal inhibition of CaMKII should elucidate its role in nociceptive processes of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:24035897

  2. Protein kinase C inhibition of cloned inward rectifier (HRK1/KIR2.3) K+ channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Henry, P; Pearson, W L; Nichols, C G

    1996-01-01

    1. The effect of protein kinase activators on cloned inward rectifier channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes was examined using a two-electrode voltage clamp. PKA activators caused no change in KIR1.1, KIR2.1, or KIR2.3 current. The PKC activators phorbol 12-myristate 14-acetate (PMA) and phorbol 12, 13-dibutyrate (PDBu) inhibited KIR2.3 currents, but not KIR2.1 or KIR1.1 current. This inhibition was blocked by staurosporine. An inactive phorbol ester, 4 alpha-phorbol 12, 13-didecanoate (4 alpha-PDD), had no effect on KIR2.3. 2. Upon changing solution from 2 to 98 microM K+, KIR2.3 but not KIR1.1 or KIR2.1 currents typically 'ran down' over 5 min to 60-80% of maximum amplitude. Rundown occurred even if PMA was applied before changing to high [K+] solution, indicating that rundown was independent of PKC activity. Rundown was evoked by substituting NMG+ for Na+, showing that it results from low [Na+] and not from high [K+]. 3. These results suggest that KIR2.3, but not KIR1.1 or KIR2.1, is subject to regulation, both by PKC activation and as a consequence of low [Na+]o. The difference in secondary regulation may account for specific responses to PKC stimulation of tissues expressing otherwise nearly identical KIR channels. PMID:8887775

  3. Qushi Huayu Decoction Inhibits Hepatic Lipid Accumulation by Activating AMP-Activated Protein Kinase In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Qin; Gou, Xiao-jun; Meng, Sheng-xi; Huang, Cheng; Zhang, Yu-quan; Tang, Ya-jun; Wang, Wen-jing; Xu, Lin; Peng, Jing-hua; Hu, Yi-yang

    2013-01-01

    Qushi Huayu Decoction (QHD), a Chinese herbal formula, has been proven effective on alleviating nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in human and rats. The present study was conducted to investigate whether QHD could inhibit hepatic lipid accumulation by activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in vivo and in vitro. Nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) model was duplicated with high-fat diet in rats and with free fatty acid (FFA) in L02 cells. In in vivo experimental condition, QHD significantly decreased the accumulation of fatty droplets in livers, lowered low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels in serum. Moreover, QHD supplementation reversed the HFD-induced decrease in the phosphorylation levels of AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and decreased hepatic nuclear protein expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1) and carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP) in the liver. In in vitro, QHD-containing serum decreased the cellular TG content and alleviated the accumulation of fatty droplets in L02 cells. QHD supplementation reversed the FFA-induced decrease in the phosphorylation levels of AMPK and ACC and decreased the hepatic nuclear protein expression of SREBP-1 and ChREBP. Overall results suggest that QHD has significant effect on inhibiting hepatic lipid accumulation via AMPK pathway in vivo and in vitro. PMID:23573117

  4. Polydatin-induced cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest are potentiated by Janus kinase 2 inhibition in leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wei-Jie; Wu, Ke; Wang, Chong; Wan, Ding-Ming

    2016-04-01

    Polydatin (PD), a natural precursor of resveratrol, has a variety of biological activities, including anti‑tumor effects. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of the anti-cancer activity of PD has not been fully elucidated. The present study demonstrated that PD significantly inhibited the proliferation of the MOLT-4 leukemia cell line in a dose‑ and time-dependent manner by using Cell Counting Kit‑8 assay. PD also dose-dependently increased the apoptotic rate and caused cell cycle arrest in S phase in MOLT‑4 cells, as revealed by flow cytometry. In addition, PD dose-dependently decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential and led to the generation of reactive oxygen species in MOLT-4 cells. Western blot analysis revealed that the expression of anti‑apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) was decreased, whereas that of pro‑apoptotic protein Bcl‑2‑associated X was increased by PD. Furthermore, the expression of two cell cycle regulatory proteins, cyclin D1 and cyclin B1, was suppressed by PD. Of note, the pro‑apoptotic and cell cycle‑inhibitory effects of PD were potentiated by Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) inhibition. In conclusion, the results of the present study strongly suggested that PD is a promising therapeutic compound for the treatment of leukemia, particularly in combination with JAK inhibitors. PMID:26934953

  5. Propyl Gallate Inhibits Adipogenesis by Stimulating Extracellular Signal-Related Kinases in Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeung-Eun; Kim, Jung-Min; Jang, Hyun-Jun; Lim, Se-young; Choi, Seon-Jeong; Lee, Nan-Hee; Suh, Pann-Ghill; Choi, Ung-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Propyl gallate (PG) used as an additive in various foods has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Although the functional roles of PG in various cell types are well characterized, it is unknown whether PG has effect on stem cell differentiation. In this study, we demonstrated that PG could inhibit adipogenic differentiation in human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs) by decreasing the accumulation of intracellular lipid droplets. In addition, PG significantly reduced the expression of adipocyte-specific markers including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ), CCAAT enhancer binding protein-α (C/EBP-α), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), and adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein 2 (aP2). PG inhibited adipogenesis in hAMSCs through extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. Decreased adipogenesis following PG treatment was recovered in response to ERK blocking. Taken together, these results suggest a novel effect of PG on adipocyte differentiation in hAMSCs, supporting a negative role of ERK1/2 pathway in adipogenic differentiation. PMID:25813451

  6. An adenosine kinase inhibitor, ABT-702, inhibits spinal nociceptive transmission by adenosine release via equilibrative nucleoside transporters in rat.

    PubMed

    Otsuguro, Ken-ichi; Tomonari, Yuki; Otsuka, Saori; Yamaguchi, Soichiro; Kon, Yasuhiro; Ito, Shigeo

    2015-10-01

    Adenosine kinase (AK) inhibitor is a potential candidate for controlling pain, but some AK inhibitors have problems of adverse effects such as motor impairment. ABT-702, a non-nucleoside AK inhibitor, shows analgesic effect in animal models of pain. Here, we investigated the effects of ABT-702 on synaptic transmission via nociceptive and motor reflex pathways in the isolated spinal cord of neonatal rats. The release of adenosine from the spinal cord was measured by HPLC. ABT-702 inhibited slow ventral root potentials (sVRPs) in the nociceptive pathway more potently than monosynaptic reflex potentials (MSRs) in the motor reflex pathway. The inhibitory effects of ABT-702 were mimicked by exogenously applied adenosine, blocked by 8CPT (8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine), an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, and augmented by EHNA (erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine), an adenosine deaminase (ADA) inhibitor. Equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) inhibitors reversed the effects of ABT-702, but not those of adenosine. ABT-702 released adenosine from the spinal cord, an effect that was also reversed by ENT inhibitors. The ABT-702-facilitated release of adenosine by way of ENTs inhibits nociceptive pathways more potently than motor reflex pathways in the spinal cord via activation of A1 receptors. This feature is expected to lead to good analgesic effects, but, caution may be required for the use of AK inhibitors in the case of ADA dysfunction or a combination with ENT inhibitors. PMID:26066576

  7. Inhibition of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase at the Allosteric Drug-Binding Site Promotes Islet Insulin Release.

    PubMed

    Scott, John W; Galic, Sandra; Graham, Kate L; Foitzik, Richard; Ling, Naomi X Y; Dite, Toby A; Issa, Samah M A; Langendorf, Chris G; Weng, Qing Ping; Thomas, Helen E; Kay, Thomas W; Birnberg, Neal C; Steinberg, Gregory R; Kemp, Bruce E; Oakhill, Jonathan S

    2015-06-18

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a metabolic stress-sensing αβγ heterotrimer responsible for energy homeostasis. Pharmacological inhibition of AMPK is regarded as a therapeutic strategy in some disease settings including obesity and cancer; however, the broadly used direct AMPK inhibitor compound C suffers from poor selectivity. We have discovered a dihydroxyquinoline drug (MT47-100) with novel AMPK regulatory properties, being simultaneously a direct activator and inhibitor of AMPK complexes containing the β1 or β2 isoform, respectively. Allosteric inhibition by MT47-100 was dependent on the β2 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) and determined by three non-conserved CBM residues (Ile81, Phe91, Ile92), but was independent of β2-Ser108 phosphorylation. Whereas MT47-100 regulation of total cellular AMPK activity was determined by β1/β2 expression ratio, MT47-100 augmented glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from isolated mouse pancreatic islets via a β2-dependent mechanism. Our findings highlight the therapeutic potential of isoform-specific AMPK allosteric inhibitors. PMID:26091167

  8. Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibition is a novel therapeutic strategy targeting tumor in the bone marrow microenvironment in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Betty Y.; Kong, Sun-Young; Fulciniti, Mariateresa; Yang, Guang; Calle, Yolanda; Hu, Yiguo; Lin, Jianhong; Zhao, Jian-Jun; Cagnetta, Antonia; Cea, Michele; Sellitto, Michael A.; Zhong, Mike Y.; Wang, Qiuju; Acharya, Chirag; Carrasco, Daniel R.; Buggy, Joseph J.; Elias, Laurence; Treon, Steven P.; Matsui, William; Richardson, Paul; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2012-01-01

    Bruton tyrosine kinase (Btk) has a well-defined role in B-cell development, whereas its expression in osteoclasts (OCs) further suggests a role in osteoclastogenesis. Here we investigated effects of PCI-32765, an oral and selective Btk inhibitor, on osteoclastogenesis as well as on multiple myeloma (MM) growth within the BM microenvironment. PCI-32765 blocked RANKL/M-CSF–induced phosphorylation of Btk and downstream PLC-γ2 in OCs, resulting in diminished TRAP5b (ED50 = 17nM) and bone resorption activity. PCI-32765 also inhibited secretion of multiple cytokines and chemokines from OC and BM stromal cell cultures from both normal donors (ED50 = 0.5nM) and MM patients. It decreased SDF-1–induced migration of MM cells, and down-regulated MIP1-α/CCL3 in MM cells. It also blocked MM cell growth and survival triggered by IL-6 or coculture with BM stromal cells or OCs in vitro. Importantly, PCI-32765 treatment significantly inhibits in vivo MM cell growth (P < .03) and MM cell–induced osteolysis of implanted human bone chips in SCID mice. Moreover, PCI-32765 prevents in vitro colony formation by stem-like cells from MM patients. Together, these results delineate functional sequelae of Btk activation mediating osteolysis and growth of MM cells, supporting evaluation of PCI-32765 as a novel therapeutic in MM. PMID:22689860

  9. A Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor, Dinaciclib, Impairs Homologous Recombination and Sensitizes Multiple Myeloma Cells to PARP Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Alagpulinsa, David A; Ayyadevara, Srinivas; Yaccoby, Shmuel; Shmookler Reis, Robert J

    2016-02-01

    PARP1/2 are required for single-strand break repair, and their inhibition causes DNA replication fork collapse and double-strand break (DSB) formation. These DSBs are primarily repaired via homologous recombination (HR), a high-fidelity repair pathway. Should HR be deficient, DSBs may be repaired via error-prone nonhomologous end-joining mechanisms, or may persist, ultimately resulting in cell death. The combined disruption of PARP and HR activities thus produces synthetic lethality. Multiple myeloma cells are characterized by chromosomal instability and pervasive DNA damage, implicating aberrant DNA repair. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK), upstream modulators of HR, are dysregulated in multiple myeloma. Here, we show that a CDK inhibitor, dinaciclib, impairs HR repair and sensitizes multiple myeloma cells to the PARP1/2 inhibitor ABT-888. Dinaciclib abolishes ABT-888-induced BRCA1 and RAD51 foci and potentiates DNA damage, indicated by increased γH2AX foci. Dinaciclib treatment reduces expression of HR repair genes, including Rad51, and blocks BRCA1 phosphorylation, a modification required for HR repair, thus inhibiting HR repair of chromosome DSBs. Cotreatment with dinaciclib and ABT-888 in vitro resulted in synthetic lethality of multiple myeloma cells, but not normal CD19(+) B cells, and slowed growth of multiple myeloma xenografts in SCID mice almost two-fold. These findings support combining dinaciclib with PARP inhibitors for multiple myeloma therapy. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(2); 241-50. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26719576

  10. Knockdown of PFTAIRE Protein Kinase 1 (PFTK1) Inhibits Proliferation, Invasion, and EMT in Colon Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiankang; Liu, Chongzhong; Liu, Fengyue; Wang, Yadong; Zhu, Min

    2016-01-01

    PFTK1 is a member of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) family and is upregulated in many types of tumors. However, its expression and role in colon cancer remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate the expression and function of PFTK1 in colon cancer. Our results showed that PFTK1 was highly expressed in colon cancer cell lines. The in vitro experiments demonstrated that knockdown of PFTK1 inhibited the proliferation, migration, and invasion of colon cancer cells as well as the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) progress. Furthermore, knockdown of PFTK1 suppressed the expression of Shh as well as Smo, Ptc, and Gli-1 in colon cancer cells. Taken together, these results suggest that knockdown of PFTK1 inhibited the proliferation and invasion of colon cancer cells as well as the EMT progress by suppressing the Sonic hedgehog signaling pathway. Therefore, these findings reveal that PFTK1 may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:27458094

  11. Molecular and cellular effects of multi-targeted cyclin-dependent kinase inhibition in myeloma: biological and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    McMillin, Douglas W; Delmore, Jake; Negri, Joseph; Buon, Leutz; Jacobs, Hannah M; Laubach, Jacob; Jakubikova, Jana; Ooi, Melissa; Hayden, Patrick; Schlossman, Robert; Munshi, Nikhil C; Lengauer, Christoph; Richardson, Paul G; Anderson, Kenneth C; Mitsiades, Constantine S

    2011-02-01

    Cell cycle regulators, such as cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), are appealing targets for multiple myeloma (MM) therapy given the increased proliferative rates of tumour cells in advanced versus early stages of MM. We hypothesized that a multi-targeted CDK inhibitor with a different spectrum of activity compared to existing CDK inhibitors could trigger distinct molecular sequelae with therapeutic implications for MM. We therefore studied the small molecule heterocyclic compound NVP-LCQ195/AT9311 (LCQ195), which inhibits CDK1, CDK2 and CDK5, as well as CDK3 and CDK9. LCQ195 induced cell cycle arrest and eventual apoptotic cell death of MM cells, even at sub-μmol/l concentrations, spared non-malignant cells, and overcame the protection conferred to MM cells by stroma or cytokines of the bone marrow milieu. In MM cells, LCQ195 triggered decreased amplitude of transcriptional signatures associated with oncogenesis, drug resistance and stem cell renewal, including signatures of activation of key transcription factors for MM cells e.g. myc, HIF-1α, IRF4. Bortezomib-treated MM patients whose tumours had high baseline expression of genes suppressed by LCQ195 had significantly shorter progression-free and overall survival than those with low levels of these transcripts in their MM cells. These observations provide insight into the biological relevance of multi-targeted CDK inhibition in MM. PMID:21223249

  12. Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibition is a novel therapeutic strategy targeting tumor in the bone marrow microenvironment in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Tai, Yu-Tzu; Chang, Betty Y; Kong, Sun-Young; Fulciniti, Mariateresa; Yang, Guang; Calle, Yolanda; Hu, Yiguo; Lin, Jianhong; Zhao, Jian-Jun; Cagnetta, Antonia; Cea, Michele; Sellitto, Michael A; Zhong, Mike Y; Wang, Qiuju; Acharya, Chirag; Carrasco, Daniel R; Buggy, Joseph J; Elias, Laurence; Treon, Steven P; Matsui, William; Richardson, Paul; Munshi, Nikhil C; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2012-08-30

    Bruton tyrosine kinase (Btk) has a well-defined role in B-cell development, whereas its expression in osteoclasts (OCs) further suggests a role in osteoclastogenesis. Here we investigated effects of PCI-32765, an oral and selective Btk inhibitor, on osteoclastogenesis as well as on multiple myeloma (MM) growth within the BM microenvironment. PCI-32765 blocked RANKL/M-CSF-induced phosphorylation of Btk and downstream PLC-γ2 in OCs, resulting in diminished TRAP5b (ED50 = 17 nM) and bone resorption activity. PCI-32765 also inhibited secretion of multiple cytokines and chemokines from OC and BM stromal cell cultures from both normal donors (ED50 = 0.5 nM) and MM patients. It decreased SDF-1-induced migration of MM cells, and down-regulated MIP1-α/CCL3 in MM cells. It also blocked MM cell growth and survival triggered by IL-6 or coculture with BM stromal cells or OCs in vitro. Importantly, PCI-32765 treatment significantly inhibits in vivo MM cell growth (P < .03) and MM cell-induced osteolysis of implanted human bone chips in SCID mice. Moreover, PCI-32765 prevents in vitro colony formation by stem-like cells from MM patients. Together, these results delineate functional sequelae of Btk activation mediating osteolysis and growth of MM cells, supporting evaluation of PCI-32765 as a novel therapeutic in MM. PMID:22689860

  13. Therapeutic Blockade of Immune Complex-Mediated Glomerulonephritis by Highly Selective Inhibition of Bruton’s Tyrosine Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Chalmers, Samantha A.; Doerner, Jessica; Bosanac, Todd; Khalil, Sara; Smith, Dustin; Harcken, Christian; Dimock, Janice; Der, Evan; Herlitz, Leal; Webb, Deborah; Seccareccia, Elise; Feng, Di; Fine, Jay S.; Ramanujam, Meera; Klein, Elliott; Putterman, Chaim

    2016-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a potentially dangerous end organ pathology that affects upwards of 60% of lupus patients. Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) is important for B cell development, Fc receptor signaling, and macrophage polarization. In this study, we investigated the effects of a novel, highly selective and potent BTK inhibitor, BI-BTK-1, in an inducible model of LN in which mice receive nephrotoxic serum (NTS) containing anti-glomerular antibodies. Mice were treated once daily with vehicle alone or BI-BTK-1, either prophylactically or therapeutically. When compared with control treated mice, NTS-challenged mice treated prophylactically with BI-BTK-1 exhibited significantly attenuated kidney disease, which was dose dependent. BI-BTK-1 treatment resulted in decreased infiltrating IBA-1+ cells, as well as C3 deposition within the kidney. RT-PCR on whole kidney RNA and serum profiling indicated that BTK inhibition significantly decreased levels of LN-relevant inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Renal RNA expression profiling by RNA-seq revealed that BI-BTK-1 dramatically modulated pathways related to inflammation and glomerular injury. Importantly, when administered therapeutically, BI-BTK-1 reversed established proteinuria and improved renal histopathology. Our results highlight the important role for BTK in the pathogenesis of immune complex-mediated nephritis, and BTK inhibition as a promising therapeutic target for LN. PMID:27192942

  14. Rho-kinase inhibition attenuates calcium-induced contraction in β-escin but not Triton X-100 permeabilized rabbit femoral artery.

    PubMed

    Clelland, Lyndsay J; Browne, Brendan M; Alvarez, Silvina M; Miner, Amy S; Ratz, Paul H

    2011-09-01

    K+-depolarization (KCl) of smooth muscle has long been known to cause Ca2+-dependent contraction, but only recently has this G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-independent stimulus been associated with rhoA kinase (ROCK)-dependent myosin light chain (MLC) phosphatase inhibition and Ca2+ sensitization. This study examined effects of ROCK inhibition on the concentration-response curves (CRCs) generated in femoral artery by incrementally adding increasing concentrations of KCl to intact tissues, and Ca2+ to tissues permeabilized with Triton X-100, β-escin and α-toxin. For a comparison, tissue responses were assessed also in the presence of protein kinase C (PKC) and MLC kinase inhibition. The ROCK inhibitor H-1152 induced a strong concentration-dependent inhibition of a KCl CRC. A relatively low GF-109203X concentration (1 μM) sufficient to inhibit conventional PKC isotypes also inhibited the KCl CRC but did not affect the maximum tension. ROCK inhibitors had no effect on the Ca2+ CRC induced in Triton X-100 or α-toxin permeabilized tissues, but depressed the maximum contraction induced in β-escin permeabilized tissue. GF-109203X at 1 μM depressed the maximum Ca2+-dependent contraction induced in α-toxin permeabilized tissue and had no effect on the Ca2+ CRC induced in Triton X-100 permeabilized tissue. The MLC kinase inhibitor wortmannin (1 μM) strongly depression the Ca2+ CRCs in tissues permeabilized with Triton X-100, α-toxin and β-escin. H-1152 inhibited contraction