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1

Kinetics of killing Listeria monocytogenes by macrophages: rapid killing accompanying phagocytosis  

SciTech Connect

The kinetics of bactericidal activity of activated macrophages can be precisely described by a mathematical model in which phagocytosis, killing, digestion, and release of degraded bacterial material are considered to occur continuously. To gain a better understanding of these events, I have determined the period of time between first contact of bacteria with macrophages and the onset of killing. Activated rat peritoneal macrophages were incubated for various times up to 15 min with Listeria monocytogenes previously labeled with /sup 3/H-thymidine and the unassociated bacteria removed by two centrifugations through a density interface. Both cell-associated radioactivity and cell-associated viable bacteria, determined as colony forming units after sonication of the cell pellet, increased with time of incubation. However, the specific viability of these bacteria, expressed as the ratio of number of viable bacteria per unit radioactivity declined with time, as an approximate inverse exponential, after a lag period of 2.9 +/- 0.8 min. Evidence is given that other possible causes for this decline in specific viability, other than death of the bacteria, such as preferential ingestion of dead Listeria, clumping of bacteria, variations in autolytic activity, or release of Listericidins are unlikely. I conclude therefore that activated macrophages kill Listeria approximately 3 min after the cell and the bacterium first make contact.

Davies, W.A.

1983-08-01

2

Genius Sand: A Miniature Kill Vehicle Technology to Support Boost Phase Intercepts and Midcourse Engagements  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) approach to a proposed Technology Demonstration program for the development of a new class of miniature kill vehicles (MKVs), that they have termed Genius Sand (GS). These miniaturized kinetic kill vehicles offer new capabilities for boost phase intercept (BPI) missions, as well as midcourse intercepts and the defeat of advanced countermeasures. The specific GS MKV properties will depend on the choice of mission application and system architecture, as well as the level of coordinated or autonomous operations in these missions. In general the GS MKVs will mass from between 1 to 5 kilograms and have several hundred meters per second of {Delta}v and be capable of several g's of acceleration. Based on the results of their previous study effort, they believe that it is feasible to develop and integrate the required technologies into a fully functional GS MKV prototype within the scope of a three-year development effort. They will discuss some of the system architecture trades and applicable technologies that can be applied in an operational MKV system, as a guide to focus any technology demonstration program. They will present the results of a preliminary 6DOF analysis to determine the minimum capabilities of an MKV system. They also will discuss a preliminary design configuration of a 2 kg GS MKV that has between 300-500 m/s of {Delta}v and has at least 2-g's of acceleration capability. They believe a successful GS MKV development effort will require not only a comprehensive component miniaturization program, but a rapid hardware prototyping process, and the ability to utilize high fidelity ground testing methodologies.

Ledebuhr, A.G.; Ng, L.C.; Kordas, J.F.; Jones, M.S.; McMahon, D.H.

2002-06-30

3

Speed kills: ineffective avian escape responses to oncoming vehicles.  

PubMed

Animal-vehicle collisions cause high levels of vertebrate mortality worldwide, and what goes wrong when animals fail to escape and ultimately collide with vehicles is not well understood. We investigated alert and escape behaviours of captive brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater) in response to virtual vehicle approaches of different sizes and at speeds ranging from 60 to 360 km h(-1). Alert and flight initiation distances remained similar across vehicle speeds, and accordingly, alert and flight initiation times decreased at higher vehicle speeds. Thus, avoidance behaviours in cowbirds appeared to be based on distance rather than time available for escape, particularly at 60-150 km h(-1); however, at higher speeds (more than or equal to 180 km h(-1)) no trend in response behaviour was discernible. As vehicle speed increased, cowbirds did not have enough time to assess the approaching vehicle, and cowbirds generally did not initiate flight with enough time to avoid collision when vehicle speed exceeded 120 km h(-1). Although potentially effective for evading predators, the decision-making process used by cowbirds in our study appears maladaptive in the context of avoiding fast-moving vehicles. Our methodological approach and findings provide a framework to assess how novel management strategies could affect escape rules, and the sensory and cognitive abilities animals use to avoid vehicle collisions. PMID:25567648

DeVault, Travis L; Blackwell, Bradley F; Seamans, Thomas W; Lima, Steven L; Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

2015-02-22

4

Type, size and age of vehicles driven by teenage drivers killed in crashes during 2008-2012.  

PubMed

Given teenagers' elevated crash rates, it is especially important that their vehicles have key safety features and good crash protection. A profile of vehicles driven by teenagers killed in crashes was developed. Data on vehicles of drivers ages 15-17 and ages 35-50 who died in crashes during 2008-2012 were obtained from the Fatality Analysis Reporting System. Using vehicle identification numbers, the vehicle make, model and model year were identified. 29% of fatally injured teenagers were driving mini or small cars, 82% were driving vehicles at least 6?years old, and 48% were driving vehicles at least 11?years old. Compared with middle-aged drivers, teenagers' vehicles more often were small or mini cars or older vehicles. Few teenagers' vehicles had electronic stability control or side airbags as standard features. Parents should consider safety when choosing vehicles for their teenagers. PMID:25525130

McCartt, Anne T; Teoh, Eric R

2015-04-01

5

THE KILL KINETICS OF AZADIRACHTA INDICA A. JUSS. (MELIACEAE) EXTRACTS ON STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS, ESCHERICHIA COLI, PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA AND CANDIDA ALBICANS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Crude extracts of the neem plant Azadirachta indica A. Juss (meliaceae) which were previously determined to have strong antibacterial activity were investigated for their rate and extent of bacterial killing (kill kinetics). Various extract dilutions related to the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of type culture strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans were used. Inoculated strains

P. O. Okemo; W. E. Mwatha; S. C. Chhabra; W. Fabry

6

Child Passengers Killed in Reckless and Alcohol-Related Motor Vehicle Crashes  

PubMed Central

Introduction About 20 years ago, concern was raised about the dangers children face when driven by drinking drivers in the United States. During the last decade, the pace of research on this topic subsided. Yet in 2010, every day three children younger than age 15 were killed, and 469 were injured in motor-vehicle crashes. Method The aim of this effort is to describe the status of the problem in the United States and suggest lines of research. From the Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS), we selected crashes in which a driver aged 21 or older was driving at least one child younger than age 15. We identified crashes that occurred at different times of the day in which the driver was speeding, ran a red light, or was alcohol positive. We described the drivers’ demographics and examined how they relate to the different crash types. Results We found that, although driving a child seems to protect against the studied forms of risky driving, such protection varies sharply depending upon the drivers’ and children’s demographics and the crash type. There is no clear reason to explain the drivers’ decision to endanger the children they drive. The percent of children killed in speeding-related and red-light running motor-vehicle crashes has remained relatively stable during the last decade. Future research must (a) examine the effectiveness of current child endangerment laws; (b) examine crashes other than fatal; and (c) be more targeted, looking at specific drivers’ age and gender, specific children’s ages, the time of the crash, and the type of crash. PMID:24529098

Kelley-Baker, Tara; Romano, Eduardo

2014-01-01

7

Utilization of rotor kinetic energy storage for hybrid vehicles  

DOEpatents

A power system for a motor vehicle having an internal combustion engine, the power system comprises an electric machine (12) further comprising a first excitation source (47), a permanent magnet rotor (28) and a magnetic coupling rotor (26) spaced from the permanent magnet rotor and at least one second excitation source (43), the magnetic coupling rotor (26) also including a flywheel having an inertial mass to store kinetic energy during an initial acceleration to an operating speed; and wherein the first excitation source is electrically connected to the second excitation source for power cycling such that the flywheel rotor (26) exerts torque on the permanent magnet rotor (28) to assist braking and acceleration of the permanent magnet rotor (28) and consequently, the vehicle. An axial gap machine and a radial gap machine are disclosed and methods of the invention are also disclosed.

Hsu, John S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2011-05-03

8

From the Kinetic Energy Recovery System to the Thermo-Hydraulic Hybrid Motor Vehicle  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The paper presents some theoretical and experimental results obtained by the Hydraulics and Pneumatics Research Institute INOE 2000-IHP with its partners, regarding the creating of one hydraulic system able to recovering the kinetic energy of the motor vehicles, in the braking phases, and use this recovered energy in the starting and accelerating phases. Also, in the article is presented a testing stand, which was especially designed for testing the hydraulic system for recovery the kinetic energy. Through mounting of the kinetic energy recovering hydraulic system, on one motor vehicle, this vehicle became a thermo-hydraulic hybrid vehicle. Therefore, the dynamic behavior was analyzed for the whole hybrid motor vehicle, which includes the energy recovery system. The theoretical and experimental results demonstrate the possible performances of the hybrid vehicle and that the kinetic energy recovery hydraulic systems are good means to increase energy efficiency of the road motor vehicles and to decrease of the fuel consumption.

Cristescu, Corneliu; Drumea, Petrin; Guta, Dragos; Dumitrescu, Catalin

2011-12-01

9

MKV Carrier Vehicle Sensor Calibration  

E-print Network

The Multiple Kill Vehicle (MKV) system, which is being developed by the US Missile Defense Agency (MDA), is a midcourse payload that includes a carrier vehicle and a number of small kill vehicles. During the mission, the ...

Plotnik, Aaron M.

10

Bactericidal Activity, Absence of Serum Effect, and Time-Kill Kinetics of Ceftazidime-Avibactam against ?-Lactamase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa  

PubMed Central

Avibactam, a non-?-lactam ?-lactamase inhibitor with activity against extended-spectrum ?-lactamases (ESBLs), KPC, AmpC, and some OXA enzymes, extends the antibacterial activity of ceftazidime against most ceftazidime-resistant organisms producing these enzymes. In this study, the bactericidal activity of ceftazidime-avibactam against 18 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates and 15 Enterobacteriaceae isolates, including wild-type isolates and ESBL, KPC, and/or AmpC producers, was evaluated. Ceftazidime-avibactam MICs (0.016 to 32 ?g/ml) were lower than those for ceftazidime alone (0.06 to ?256 ?g/ml) against all isolates except for 2 P. aeruginosa isolates (1 blaVIM-positive isolate and 1 blaOXA-23-positive isolate). The minimum bactericidal concentration/MIC ratios of ceftazidime-avibactam were ?4 for all isolates, indicating bactericidal activity. Human serum and human serum albumin had a minimal effect on ceftazidime-avibactam MICs. Ceftazidime-avibactam time-kill kinetics were evaluated at low MIC multiples and showed time-dependent reductions in the number of CFU/ml from 0 to 6 h for all strains tested. A ?3-log10 decrease in the number of CFU/ml was observed at 6 h for all Enterobacteriaceae, and a 2-log10 reduction in the number of CFU/ml was observed at 6 h for 3 of the 6 P. aeruginosa isolates. Regrowth was noted at 24 h for some of the isolates tested in time-kill assays. These data demonstrate the potent bactericidal activity of ceftazidime-avibactam and support the continued clinical development of ceftazidime-avibactam as a new treatment option for infections caused by Enterobacteriaceae and P. aeruginosa, including isolates resistant to ceftazidime by mechanisms dependent on avibactam-sensitive ?-lactamases. PMID:24957838

Gomez, Marcela; Celeri, Chris; Nichols, Wright W.; Krause, Kevin M.

2014-01-01

11

Killing Range  

PubMed Central

This paper presents an analysis of the Provisional Irish Republican Army's (PIRA) brigade level behavior during the Northern Ireland Conflict (1970-1998) and identifies the organizational factors that impact a brigade's lethality as measured via terrorist attacks. Key independent variables include levels of technical expertise, cadre age, counter-terrorism policies experienced, brigade size, and IED components and delivery methods. We find that technical expertise within a brigade allows for careful IED usage, which significantly minimizes civilian casualties (a specific strategic goal of PIRA) while increasing the ability to kill more high value targets with IEDs. Lethal counter-terrorism events also significantly affect a brigade's likelihood of killing both civilians and high-value targets but in different ways. Killing PIRA members significantly decreases IED fatalities but also significantly decreases the possibility of zero civilian IED-related deaths in a given year. Killing innocent Catholics in a Brigade's county significantly increases total and civilian IED fatalities. Together the results suggest the necessity to analyze dynamic situational variables that impact terrorist group behavior at the sub-unit level.

Asal, Victor; Rethemeyer, R. Karl; Horgan, John

2015-01-01

12

Kinetics of killing Listeria monocytogenes by macrophages: correlation of /sup 3/H-DNA release from labeled bacteria and changes in numbers of viable organisms by mathematical model  

SciTech Connect

Conventional methods of assessing antibacterial activities of macrophages by viable counting are limited by the precision of the statistics and are difficult to interpret quantitatively because of unrestrained extracellular growth of bacteria. An alternative technique based on the release of radioactive DNA from labeled bacteria has been offered as overcoming these drawbacks. To assess it for use with macrophages I have made a correlation with the conventional viable counting method using a mathematical model. Opsonized Listeria monocytogenes labeled with /sup 3/H-thymidine were exposed to rat macrophages for periods up to 4 hr. Numbers of viable bacteria determined after sonication increased exponentially in the absence of live cells and this growth rate was progressively inhibited by increasing numbers of macrophages. After a lag period of 30-60 min soluble /sup 3/H appeared in the supernatant, the amount increasing with time and numbers of macrophages. To correlate these data I developed a mathematical model that considered that changes in numbers of viable organisms were due to the difference between rates of 1) growth of extracellular bacteria and 2) killing within the macrophage. On the basis of this model curves of best fit to the viable counts data were used to predict the release of radioactivity, assuming that death of a bacterium led to the total release of its label. These predictions and the experimental data agreed well, the lag period of 30-60 min between death of the bacterium and release of radioactivity being consistent with intracellular digestion. Release of soluble radioactivity appears to be an accurate reflection of the number of bacteria killed within the macrophage.

Davies, W.A.

1982-12-01

13

Kinetics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Conceptual questions about kinetics. For example, "[w]hat are the reaction velocity, the rates of formation of N2 and H2, and the rate of decomposition of ammonia for the decomposition of ammonia on a tungsten surface under the conditions reflected in the figure."

Nurrenbern, Susan C.

14

Kinetic Monte Carlo study of the type1/type 2 choice in apoptosis elucidates selective killing of cancer cells under death ligand induction  

E-print Network

Death ligand mediated apoptotic activation is a mode of programmed cell death that is widely used in cellular and physiological situations. Interest in studying death ligand induced apoptosis has increased due to the promising role of recombinant soluble forms of death ligands (mainly recombinant TRAIL) in anti-cancer therapy. A clear elucidation of how death ligands activate the type 1 and type 2 apoptotic pathways in healthy and cancer cells may help develop better chemotherapeutic strategies. In this work, we use kinetic Monte Carlo simulations to address the problem of type 1/ type 2 choice in death ligand mediated apoptosis of cancer cells. Our study provides insights into the activation of membrane proximal death module that results from complex interplay between death and decoy receptors. Relative abundance of death and decoy receptors was shown to be a key parameter for activation of the initiator caspases in the membrane module. Increased concentration of death ligands frequently increased the type 1...

Raychaudhuri, Subhadip

2015-01-01

15

PAYCOS - A multidisciplinary design optimization tool for hypersonic vehicle design  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Payload Conceptual Sizing Code (PAYCOS), developed at Lockheed Missiles and Space Company (LMSC), is a multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) code for hypersonic maneuvering reentry and kinetic kill vehicle concept design. The purpose of PAYCOS is to rapidly perform concept sizing, concept evaluation, and associated trade studies for supersonic and hypersonic maneuvering vehicles. PAYCOS is a multidisciplinary analysis code that allows the engineer to determine the best geometric configuration for each design through parametric trade studies and mathematical optimization. This paper presents a brief overview of PAYCOS, with an emphasis on the Optimization Module. The paper concludes with a list of 'lessons learned' for those seeking to implement MDO.

Stubbe, J. R.

1992-09-01

16

Ion-kill dosimetry  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Unanticipated late effects in neutron and heavy ion therapy, not attributable to overdose, imply a qualitative difference between low and high LET therapy. We identify that difference as 'ion kill', associated with the spectrum of z/beta in the radiation field, whose measurement we label 'ion-kill dosimetry'.

Katz, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Fromm, M.; Chambaudet, A.

2001-01-01

17

Bacterial Growth Kinetics under a Novel Flexible Methacrylate Dressing Serving as a Drug Delivery Vehicle for Antiseptics  

PubMed Central

A flexible methacrylate powder dressing (Altrazeal®) transforms into a wound contour conforming matrix once in contact with wound exudate. We hypothesised that it may also serve as a drug delivery vehicle for antiseptics. The antimicrobial efficacy and influence on bacterial growth kinetics in combination with three antiseptics was investigated in an in vitro porcine wound model. Standardized in vitro wounds were contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA; ATCC 33591) and divided into six groups: no dressing (negative control), methacrylate dressing alone, and combinations with application of 0.02% Polyhexamethylene Biguanide (PHMB), 0.4% PHMB, 0.1% PHMB + 0.1% betaine, 7.7 mg/mL Povidone-iodine (PVP-iodine), and 0.1% Octenidine-dihydrochloride (OCT) + 2% phenoxyethanol. Bacterial load per gram tissue was measured over five days. The highest reduction was observed with PVP-iodine at 24 h to log10 1.43 cfu/g, followed by OCT at 48 h to log10 2.41 cfu/g. Whilst 0.02% PHMB resulted in a stable bacterial load over 120 h to log10 4.00 cfu/g over 120 h, 0.1% PHMB + 0.1% betaine inhibited growth during the first 48 h, with slightly increasing bacterial numbers up to log10 5.38 cfu/g at 120 h. These results indicate that this flexible methacrylate dressing can be loaded with various antiseptics serving as drug delivery system. Depending on the selected combination, an individually shaped and controlled antibacterial effect may be achieved using the same type of wound dressing. PMID:23698780

Forstner, Christina; Leitgeb, Johannes; Schuster, Rupert; Dosch, Verena; Kramer, Axel; Cutting, Keith F.; Leaper, David J.; Assadian, Ojan

2013-01-01

18

Bacterial Growth Kinetics under a Novel Flexible Methacrylate Dressing Serving as a Drug Delivery Vehicle for Antiseptics.  

PubMed

A flexible methacrylate powder dressing (Altrazeal®) transforms into a wound contour conforming matrix once in contact with wound exudate. We hypothesised that it may also serve as a drug delivery vehicle for antiseptics. The antimicrobial efficacy and influence on bacterial growth kinetics in combination with three antiseptics was investigated in an in vitro porcine wound model. Standardized in vitro wounds were contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA; ATCC 33591) and divided into six groups: no dressing (negative control), methacrylate dressing alone, and combinations with application of 0.02% Polyhexamethylene Biguanide (PHMB), 0.4% PHMB, 0.1% PHMB + 0.1% betaine, 7.7 mg/mL Povidone-iodine (PVP-iodine), and 0.1% Octenidine-dihydrochloride (OCT) + 2% phenoxyethanol. Bacterial load per gram tissue was measured over five days. The highest reduction was observed with PVP-iodine at 24 h to log10 1.43 cfu/g, followed by OCT at 48 h to log10 2.41 cfu/g. Whilst 0.02% PHMB resulted in a stable bacterial load over 120 h to log10 4.00 cfu/g over 120 h, 0.1% PHMB + 0.1% betaine inhibited growth during the first 48 h, with slightly increasing bacterial numbers up to log10 5.38 cfu/g at 120 h. These results indicate that this flexible methacrylate dressing can be loaded with various antiseptics serving as drug delivery system. Depending on the selected combination, an individually shaped and controlled antibacterial effect may be achieved using the same type of wound dressing. PMID:23698780

Forstner, Christina; Leitgeb, Johannes; Schuster, Rupert; Dosch, Verena; Kramer, Axel; Cutting, Keith F; Leaper, David J; Assadian, Ojan

2013-01-01

19

HOW NEUTROPHILS KILL MICROBES  

Microsoft Academic Search

? Abstract Neutrophils provide the first line of defense of the innate immune,sys- tem by phagocytosing, killing, and digesting bacteria and fungi. Killing was previously believed to be accomplished,by oxygen,free radicals and other reactive oxygen,species generated by the NADPH oxidase, and by oxidized halides produced by myeloperoxi- dase. We now,know,this is incorrect. The oxidase pumps,electrons into the phagocytic vacuole, thereby

Anthony W. Segal

2005-01-01

20

33 CFR 117.801 - Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. 117...801 Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. (a...bridges across Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills, and their tributaries:...

2013-07-01

21

33 CFR 117.801 - Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... false Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. 117...801 Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. (a...bridges across Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills, and their tributaries:...

2014-07-01

22

33 CFR 117.801 - Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... false Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. 117...801 Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. (a...bridges across Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills, and their tributaries:...

2012-07-01

23

33 CFR 117.801 - Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. 117...801 Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. (a...bridges across Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills, and their tributaries:...

2011-07-01

24

Susceptibility testing of Candida albicans isolated from oropharyngeal mucosa of HIV+ patients to fluconazole, amphotericin B and Caspofungin. killing kinetics of caspofungin and amphotericin B against fluconazole resistant and susceptible isolates  

PubMed Central

A clear understanding of the pharmacodynamic properties of antifungal agents is important for the adequate treatment of fungal infections like candidiasis. For certain antifungal agents, the determination of Minimal Fungicidal Concentration (MFC) and time kill curve could be clinically more relevant than the determination of the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC). In this study, MIC and MFC to fluconazole, amphotericin B and caspofungin against C. albicans isolates and the killing patterns obtained with caspofungin and amphotericin B against susceptible and resistant strains to fluconazole were determined. The results of MICs showed that all C. albicans isolates were highly susceptible to amphotericin B, but two isolates were fluconazole resistant. The comparative analysis between MIC and MFC showed that MFC of fluconazole was fourfold higher than MIC in 41.9% of the C. albicans isolates. Same values of MFC and MIC of amphotericin B and caspofungin were found for 71% of the isolates. Correlation between time kill curves and MFC of amphotericin B and caspofungin against all 4 isolates tested was observed. The caspofungin killing effect was more evident at MFC in 6 hours of incubation than at MIC in this time, suggesting dependence of concentration. The similarity of results of time-kill curve and MFC values indicate that determination of MFC is an alternative for the detection of the fungicidal activity of these drugs. PMID:24031337

de Aquino Lemos, Janine; Costa, Carolina Rodrigues; de Araújo, Crystiane Rodrigues; Souza, Lúcia Kioko Hasimoto e; Silva, Maria do Rosário Rodrigues

2009-01-01

25

The Fish Kill Mystery  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this case study, students speculate on what may have caused a major fish kill in an estuary in North Carolina. In the process, they explore how land runoff and excess nutrients affect aquatic communities, and learn about the complex life cycle of the dinoflagellate Pfiesteria. The case is appropriate for an introductory environmental science course, a general biology course that covers ecology, or a general zoology course.

Erica F. Kosal

2003-01-01

26

How does the type of vehicle influence the in vitro skin absorption and elimination kinetics of terpenes?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Terpenes are widely used in the topical dermal preparations, cosmetics and toiletries and also in the experimental dermopharmacy, as penetration enhancers. Terpenes do not need to penetrate into viable skin tissue and this event is not even desired. The aim of this study was to investigate skin absorption and elimination kinetics of two terpenes, namely linalool and terpinen-4-ol, incorporated in

Krzysztof Cal

2006-01-01

27

Whisper of a Kill  

E-print Network

...lijLoU p3eltiH# / o; go.-;. >-/ ;J" f/i I by Lois Welling Cover by Suzan Lovett P.O. Box 592 Goleta,CA 93116 AGE STATEMENT REQUIRED Whisper of a Kill isavailable from Manacles Press for$18.00plus postage. SASE forcurrent rates... floor window, he reached inside his leather jacket and retrieved the Browning Highpower. His other hand secured the suppressor from a hidden pocket in his jacket sleeve and with a soft click the weapon was ready. He didn't really expect his target...

Weilling, L.

1992-01-01

28

Killing horizons and spinors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the near-horizon geometry of generic Killing horizons constructing suitable coordinates and taking the appropriate scaling limit. We are able to show that the geometry will always show an enhancement of symmetries, and, in the extremal case, will develop a causally disconnected "throat" as expected. We analyze the implications of this to the Kerr/CFT conjecture and the attractor mechanism. We are also able to construct a set of special (pure) spinors associated with the horizon structure using their interpretation as maximally isotropic planes. The structure generalizes the usual reduced holonomy manifold in an interesting way and may be fruitful to the search of new types of compactification backgrounds.

Carneiro da Cunha, Bruno; de Queiroz, Amilcar

2014-05-01

29

Charged conformal Killing spinors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the twistor equation on pseudo-Riemannian Spinc-manifolds whose solutions we call charged conformal Killing spinors (CCKSs). We derive several integrability conditions for the existence of CCKS and study their relations to spinor bilinears. A construction principle for Lorentzian manifolds admitting CCKS with nontrivial charge starting from CR-geometry is presented. We obtain a partial classification result in the Lorentzian case under the additional assumption that the associated Dirac current is normal conformal and complete the classification of manifolds admitting CCKS in all dimensions and signatures ?5 which has recently been initiated in the study of supersymmetric field theories on curved space.

Lischewski, Andree

2015-01-01

30

Killing Horizons and Spinors  

E-print Network

We study the near horizon geometry of generic Killing horizons constructing suitable coordinates and taking the appropriate scaling limit. We are able to show that the geometry will always show an enhancement of symmetries, and, in the extremal case, will develop a causally disconnected "throat" as expected. We analyze the implications of this to the Kerr/CFT conjecture and the attractor mechanism. We are also able to construct a set of special (pure) spinors associated with the horizon structure using their interpretation as maximally isotropic planes. The structure generalizes the usual reduced holonomy manifold in an interesting way and may be fruitful to the search of new types of compactification backgrounds.

Bruno Carneiro da Cunha; Amilcar de Queiroz

2014-06-19

31

Optimal planning and control for hazard avoidance of front-wheel steered ground vehicles  

E-print Network

Hazard avoidance is an important capability for safe operation of robotic vehicles at high speed. It is also an important consideration for passenger vehicle safety, as thousands are killed each year in passenger vehicle ...

Peters, Steven C. (Steven Conrad)

2012-01-01

32

Conflict theory and police killings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although there has been considerable interest in the homicide of law enforcement officers, there has been little systematic analysis of the effects of structural variables on police killings across macro social units. Recently, Peterson and Bailey (1988) have examined the macro social determinants of police killings within a theoretical context and concluded that social conditons which bring civilians and law

Mitchell B. Chamlin

1989-01-01

33

How electroshock weapons kill!  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Growing numbers of law enforcement officers now carry an electroshock weapon (ESW). Over 500 U.S. deaths have followed ESW use in the past 26 years; over 450 of these deaths followed use of an electromuscular disruptor in the past 9 years. Most training courses teach that ESWs are safe; that they can kill only by the direct effect of electric current on the heart; and that a death following use of an ESW always has some other cause. All these teachings are false! The last was disproved by Lundquist.^1 Williams^2 ruled out direct electrical effects as a cause of almost all the 213 deaths he studied, leaving disruption of normal physiological processes as the only alternative explanation. Careful study of all such deaths identifies 4 different ways that death has or could have been brought about by the ESW: kidney failure following rhabdomyolysis [rare]; cardiac arrest from hyperkalemia following rhabdomyolysis [undocumented]; lactic acid-induced ventricular fibrillation [conclusive proof impossible]; and [most common] anoxia from so much lactic acid in the circulating blood that it acts as an oxygen scavenger, continuously depleting the blood of oxygen until most of the lactate has been metabolized. ^1M. Lundquist, BAPS 54(1) K1.270(2009). ^2Howard E. Williams, Taser Electronic Control Devices and Sudden In-Custody Death, 2008.

Lundquist, Marjorie

2010-03-01

34

33 CFR 117.801 - Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries...New York § 117.801 Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries...apply to all bridges across Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills, and their...

2010-07-01

35

Curiosity Killed the App  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students gain experience with the software/system design process, closely related to the engineering design process, to solve a problem. First, they learn about the Mars Curiosity rover and its mission, including the difficulties that engineers must consider and overcome to operate a rover remotely. Students observe a simulation of a robot being controlled remotely. These experiences guide discussion on how the design process is applied in these scenarios. The lesson culminates in a hands-on experience with the design process as students simulate the remote control of a rover. In the associated activity, students gain further experience with the design process by creating an Android application using App Inventor to control one aspect of a remotely controlled vehicle. (Note: The lesson requires a LEGO® MINDSTORMS® Education NXT base set.)

IMPART RET Program, College of Information Science & Technology,

36

The influence of body-size and diet on road-kill trends in mammals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Roads negatively impact animals in a variety of ways. One of the most obvious impacts is vehicle-induced mortality. We have\\u000a little understanding of the patterns and rates of road mortality for mammals. The aims of this study were to determine representative\\u000a road-kill rates for local mammal species, compare road-kill rates between mammals of different sizes and diets, and compare\\u000a patterns

Erika L. BarthelmessMargot; Margot S. Brooks

2010-01-01

37

Phagocyte roulette in Salmonella killing.  

PubMed

Salmonella propagates in macrophages to cause life-threatening infections, but the role of neutrophils in combating Salmonella has been controversial. In this issue, Burton et al. (2014) use single cell analyses and modeling to explain the ability of Salmonella to survive in macrophages while being killed by neutrophils. PMID:24439894

Fenlon, Luke A; Slauch, James M

2014-01-15

38

Euthanasia: Killing as Due Care?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary On 10 April 2001, the Netherlands was the first country to pass a law on the killing of patients at their request (euthanasia), which took effect on 1 April 2002. Belgium followed and passed a euthanasia law on 16 May 2002, which took effect on 23 September 2002 and is even more liberal than the Dutch one. Physicians will

Fuat S. Oduncu

2003-01-01

39

Human Neutrophils Kill Bacillus anthracis  

PubMed Central

Bacillus anthracis spores cause natural infections and are used as biological weapons. Inhalation infection with B. anthracis, the etiological agent of anthrax, is almost always lethal, yet cutaneous infections usually remain localized and resolve spontaneously. Neutrophils are typically recruited to cutaneous but seldom to other forms of anthrax infections, raising the possibility that neutrophils kill B. anthracis. In this study we infected human neutrophils with either spores or vegetative bacteria of a wild-type strain, or strains, expressing only one of the two major virulence factors. The human neutrophils engulfed B. anthracis spores, which germinated intracellularly and were then efficiently killed. Interestingly, neutrophil killing was independent of reactive oxygen species production. We fractionated a human neutrophil granule extract by high-performance liquid chromatography and identified ?-defensins as the component responsible for B. anthracis killing. These data suggest that the timely recruitment of neutrophils can control cutaneous infections and possibly other forms of B. anthracis infections, and that ?-defensins play an important role in the potent anti-B. anthracis activity of neutrophils. PMID:16292357

2005-01-01

40

Farm Education at Stony Kill.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes typical winter farm lessons for students visiting Stony Kill Farm Environmental Education Center located 70 miles north of New York City: butter and corncake making, soil erosion experiments, dissecting and growing seeds. Emphasizes major theme of conservation of farmland from destructive farming practices and careless development. (NEC)

Parisio, Richard

1986-01-01

41

Beetle Kill Wall at NREL  

SciTech Connect

When it comes to designing an interior decorative feature for one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world, very few would consider bringing in a beetle to do the job. But thats what happened at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Research Support Facility (RSF) located on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) campus.In June, the RSF will become home to more than 800 workers from DOE and NREL and building visitors will be greeted with a soaring, two-story high wall entirely covered with wood harvested from the bark beetle infestation that has killed millions of pine trees in the Western U.S. But, the use of beetle kill wood is just one example of the resources being leveraged to make the RSF a model for sustainability and one more step toward NRELs goal to be a net zero energy campus.

None

2010-01-01

42

Beetle Kill Wall at NREL  

ScienceCinema

When it comes to designing an interior decorative feature for one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world, very few would consider bringing in a beetle to do the job. But thats what happened at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Research Support Facility (RSF) located on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) campus.In June, the RSF will become home to more than 800 workers from DOE and NREL and building visitors will be greeted with a soaring, two-story high wall entirely covered with wood harvested from the bark beetle infestation that has killed millions of pine trees in the Western U.S. But, the use of beetle kill wood is just one example of the resources being leveraged to make the RSF a model for sustainability and one more step toward NRELs goal to be a net zero energy campus.

None

2013-05-29

43

Did Vertigo Kill America's Forgotten Astronaut?  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On November 15, 1967, U.S. Air Force test pilot Major Michael J. Adams was killed while flying the X-15 rocket-propelled research vehicle in a parabolic spaceflight profile. This flight was part of a joint effort with NASA. An electrical short in one of the experiments aboard the vehicle caused electrical transients, resulting in excessive workload by the pilot. At altitude Major Adams inappropriately initiated a flat spin that led to a series of unusual aircraft attitudes upon atmospheric re-entry, ultimately causing structural failure of the airframe. Major Adams was known to experience vertigo (i.e. spatial disorientation) while flying the X-15, but all X-15 pilots most likely experienced vertigo (i.e. somatogravic, or "Pitch-Up", illusion) as a normal physiologic response to the accelerative forces involved. Major Adams probably experienced vertigo to a greater degree than did others, since prior aeromedical testing for astronaut selection at Brooks AFB revealed that he had an unusually high degree of labyrinthine sensitivity. Subsequent analysis reveals that after engine burnout, and through the zenith of the flight profile, he likely experienced the oculoagravic ("Elevator") illusion. Nonetheless, painstaking investigation after the mishap revealed that spatial disorientation (Type II, Recognized) was NOT the cause, but rather, a contributing factor. The cause was in fact the misinterpretation of a dual-use flight instrument (i.e. Loss of Mode Awareness), resulting in confusion between yaw and roll indications, with subsequent flight control input that was inappropriate. Because of the altitude achieved on this flight, Major Adams was awarded Astronaut wings posthumously. Understanding the potential for spatial disorientation, particularly the oculoagravic illusion, associated with parabolic spaceflight profiles, and understanding the importance of maintaining mode awareness in the context of automated cockpit design, are two lessons that have direct application to the commercial space industry today.

Bendrick, Gregg A.; Merlin, Peter W.

2007-01-01

44

Desert Dust Kills Florida Fish  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) article discusses the connection between dust storms in Africa, and red tides along the Florida coast. Red tides are blooms of toxic algae that kill fish, birds, and mammals, as well as cause health problems in humans. Storm activity in the Sahara Desert region kicks up topsoil that winds transport into the Gulf of Mexico. These clouds fertilize the water with iron, which bacteria named Trichodesmium use to create nitrogen. The nitrogen makes the water a friendly environment for the toxic algae. This article discusses this process and research that is going on to help solve the problem. Audio version is available as well.

45

Integrability conditions for Killing-Yano tensors and conformal Killing-Yano tensors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The integrability conditions for the existence of a conformal Killing-Yano tensor of arbitrary order are worked out in all dimensions and expressed in terms of the Weyl tensor. As a consequence, the integrability conditions for the existence of a Killing-Yano tensor are also obtained. By means of such conditions, it is shown that in certain Einstein spaces one can use a conformal Killing-Yano tensor of order p to generate a Killing-Yano tensor of order (p -1 ) . Finally, it is proved that in maximally symmetric spaces the covariant derivative of a Killing-Yano tensor is a closed conformal Killing-Yano tensor and that every conformal Killing-Yano tensor is uniquely decomposed as the sum of a Killing-Yano tensor and a closed conformal Killing-Yano tensor.

Batista, Carlos

2015-01-01

46

Euthanasia: killing as due care?  

PubMed

On 10 April 2001, the Netherlands was the first country to pass a law on the killing of patients at their request (euthanasia), which took effect on 1 April 2002. Belgium followed and passed a euthanasia law on 16 May 2002, which took effect on 23 September 2002 and is even more liberal than the Dutch one. Physicians will be exempted from criminal liability provided they satisfy the so-called 'due care criteria'. However, in medical history euthanasia has never been part of the medical duty of care. Instead, the goals of medicine have always been the relief of pain and suffering. The current article provides insights into the Dutch, Belgian and Oregon euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide practices and reflects upon some central medical and legal documents on the regulation of euthanasia and the provision of palliative care. Modern palliative care includes both the delivery of competent palliative skills and a virtuous attitude of compassionate caring about the terminally ill patient as an autonomous person. Here, the author rejects killing as due care and proposes a novel concept of 'RAHME' (Aramaic: compassion, love, mercy), which calls for a holistically oriented concept where physicians act as companions to the terminally ill and dying patients. PMID:14571664

Oduncu, Fuat S

2003-01-01

47

A kill curve for Phanerozoic marine species  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A kill curve for Phanerozoic species is developed from an analysis of the stratigraphic ranges of 17,621 genera, as compiled by Sepkoski. The kill curve shows that a typical species' risk of extinction varies greatly, with most time intervals being characterized by very low risk. The mean extinction rate of 0.25/m.y. is thus a mixture of long periods of negligible extinction and occasional pulses of much higher rate. Because the kill curve is merely a description of the fossil record, it does not speak directly to the causes of extinction. The kill curve may be useful, however, to li inverted question markmit choices of extinction mechanisms.

Raup, D. M.

1991-01-01

48

75 FR 62469 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills, and Their...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 [Docket No. USCG-2010-0907] Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills, and Their Tributaries, NY, Maintenance AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary...

2010-10-12

49

75 FR 30299 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills, and Their...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 [Docket No. USCG-2010-0355] Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills, and Their Tributaries, NY, Maintenance AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary...

2010-06-01

50

The killing consensus : homicide detectives, police that kill and organized crime in São Paulo, Brazil  

E-print Network

Policing is widely understood, empirically and theoretically, as a core function of the state. Much of the knowledge presumes that police are the only body that may kill and arbitrate killing, routinely and without retaliation ...

Willis, Graham Arthur Neill, 1979-

2013-01-01

51

Parallel Hybrid Vehicle Optimal Storage System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A paper reports the results of a Hybrid Diesel Vehicle Project focused on a parallel hybrid configuration suitable for diesel-powered, medium-sized, commercial vehicles commonly used for parcel delivery and shuttle buses, as the missions of these types of vehicles require frequent stops. During these stops, electric hybridization can effectively recover the vehicle's kinetic energy during the deceleration, store it onboard, and then use that energy to assist in the subsequent acceleration.

Bloomfield, Aaron P.

2009-01-01

52

Peeling the onion: an heuristic overview of hit-to-kill missile defense in the 21st century  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Researchers engaged in the development of infrared detector technologies may well benefit from a broader understanding of their products from the perspective of the end-user. An appreciation of how this technology is to be used by system designers, many of whom possess only a rudimentary understanding of quantum physics, is highly germane. Answers to questions like: "What device technology will be employed," "How will the device be used?" and "What are the impacts on signal-to-noise?" are of critical importance. In this paper, some of the fundamentals of hit-to-kill missile defense technology are examined in a largely non-mathematical context. From its "Star Wars" inception during the Reagan administration, to today"s Missile Defense Agency, the core requirement of missile defense has not changed - find the threat and destroy it before it reaches its destination. This fundamental requirement, while conceptually straightforward, is extraordinarily difficult to satisfy, and is almost exclusively dependent on our ability to detect and designate a relatively small, very fast-moving, room-temperature object, at great distances, and usually in a severe environment of shock and vibration further clouded by error and uncertainty. With an obvious bias toward passive IR detection and associated focal plane array characteristics, the flight of a fictitious interceptor is followed from launch to impact. At various points along the interceptor"s trajectory, a "peel the onion" approach is utilized to expose increasingly detailed layers of behavior, including the eventual release of the kinetic kill vehicle, and its autonomous flight to a body-to-body impact with its target. Various sources of error and their impact on the success of the mission are examined, and an overall understanding of the key features of the infrared seeker and its critical role in missile defense are ultimately developed.

LaCroix, Len; Kurzius, Shelby

2005-03-01

53

Approximate Killing Vectors on S^2  

E-print Network

We present a new method for computing the best approximation to a Killing vector on closed 2-surfaces that are topologically S^2. When solutions of Killing's equation do not exist, this method is shown to yield results superior to those produced by existing methods. In addition, this method appears to provide a new tool for studying the horizon geometry of distorted black holes.

Gregory B. Cook; Bernard F. Whiting

2007-06-01

54

Finding Ultimate Limits of Performance for Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hybrid electric vehicles are seen as a solution to improving fuel economy and reducing pollution emissions from automobiles. By recovering kinetic energy during braking and optimizing the engine operation to reduce fuel consumption and emissions, a hybrid vehicle can outperform a traditional vehicle. In designing a hybrid vehicle, the task of finding optimal component sizes and an appropriate control strategy

Edward D. Tate; Stephen P. Boyd

55

Killing in Okaraygua: An Inspector Irronogaray Mystery  

E-print Network

1 Citation: Levine, Stuart. (2012) Killing in Okaraygua: An Inspector Irronogaray Mystery [Kindle Edition]. Amazon Digital Services, Amazon.com. Published version: http://www.amazon.com/Killing-Okaraygua-Inspector-Irronogaray- ebook.../dp/B0096TUC9K/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1347294990&sr=8-9&keywords=Stuart+Levine Description: Killing in Okaraygua is an historical novel as well as a murder mystery that takes place in an imaginary Latin American nation in the 1980s. The characters found...

Levine, Stuart

2012-09-05

56

Killing vector fields and harmonic superfield theories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The harmonic action functional allows a natural generalisation to semi-Riemannian supergeometry, also referred to as harmonic, which resembles the supersymmetric sigma models studied in high energy physics. We show that Killing vector fields are infinitesimal supersymmetries of this harmonic action and prove three different Noether theorems in this context. En passant, we provide a homogeneous treatment of five characterisations of Killing vector fields on semi-Riemannian supermanifolds, thus filling a gap in the literature.

Groeger, Josua

2014-09-01

57

Wildlife road-kills on three major roads in north-eastern New South Wales  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although vehicle-induced mortality of wildlife is well known on roads throughout Australia, few empirical studies describe the extent of this mortality or assess the potential effects on wildlife populations. We recorded 529 roadkills of 53 vertebrate species along a 100-km circuit of three major roads during 20 weekly surveys across winter, spring and summer. This equates to 0.3 road-kills km-1

Brendan D. TaylorA; Ross L. GoldingayA

58

Kinetic Tetrazolium Microtiter Assay  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Kinetic tetrazolium microtiter assay (KTMA) involves use of tetrazolium salts and Triton X-100 (or equivalent), nontoxic, in vitro color developer solubilizing colored metabolite formazan without injuring or killing metabolizing cells. Provides for continuous measurement of metabolism and makes possible to determine rate of action of antimicrobial agent in real time as well as determines effective inhibitory concentrations. Used to monitor growth after addition of stimulatory compounds. Provides for kinetic determination of efficacy of biocide, greatly increasing reliability and precision of results. Also used to determine relative effectiveness of antimicrobial agent as function of time. Capability of generating results on day of test extremely important in treatment of water and waste, disinfection of hospital rooms, and in pharmaceutical, agricultural, and food-processing industries. Assay also used in many aspects of cell biology.

Pierson, Duane L.; Stowe, Raymond; Koenig, David

1993-01-01

59

Differential timing of antibody-mediated phagocytosis and cell-free killing of invasive African Salmonella allows immune evasion.  

PubMed

Nontyphoidal Salmonellae commonly cause fatal bacteraemia in African children lacking anti-Salmonella antibodies. These are facultative intracellular bacteria capable of cell-free and intracellular survival within macrophages. To better understand the relationship between extracellular and intracellular infection in blood and general mechanisms of Ab-related protection against Salmonella, we used human blood and sera to measure kinetics of Ab and complement deposition, serum-mediated bactericidal killing and phagocytosis of invasive African Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium D23580. Binding of antibodies peaked by 30 s, but C3 deposition lagged behind, peaking after 2-4 min. C5b-9 deposition was undetectable until between 2 and 6 min and peaked after 10 min, after which time an increase in serum-mediated killing occurred. In contrast, intracellular, opsonized Salmonellae were readily detectable within 5 min. By 10 min, around half of monocytes and most neutrophils contained bacteria. The same kinetics of serum-mediated killing and phagocytosis were observed with S. enterica Typhimurium laboratory strain SL1344, and the S. enterica Enteritidis African invasive isolate D24954 and laboratory strain PT4. The differential kinetics between cell-free killing and phagocytosis of invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella allows these bacteria to escape the blood and establish intracellular infection before they are killed by the membrane attack complex. PMID:24375424

Siggins, Matthew K; O'Shaughnessy, Colette M; Pravin, John; Cunningham, Adam F; Henderson, Ian R; Drayson, Mark T; MacLennan, Calman A

2014-04-01

60

Killing of Brucella abortus by bovine serum.  

PubMed Central

Studies of the serum bactericidal system in bovine brucellosis were undertaken to investigate the role of the humoral immune response in protection of cattle against the facultative intracellular parasite Brucella abortus. Fresh sera from normal control cattle, infected cattle, and cattle immunized with B. abortus cell envelopes were collected before treatment and during the course of immunization or infection. Normal fresh bovine serum or fresh agammaglobulinemic serum from colostrum-deprived calves was effective in killing smooth virulent B. abortus 2308, but rough strains RB51 (a rough mutant of strain 2308) and 45/20 were much more sensitive to serum. The difference in susceptibility to serum was shown to be correlated with differences in lipopolysaccharide chemotype, with the more resistant strain 2308 having O polysaccharide and the more susceptible strains 45/20 and RB51 lacking O side chains. By treatment of fresh serum with MgCl2 and EGTA [ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid] killing was shown to occur via the classical pathway of complement activation. When antibody to B. abortus was present, killing of strain RB51 increased but killing of smooth strain 2308 decreased. The earliest antibody response in serum from infected animals did not interfere with killing. When affinity-purified bovine immunoglobulins specific for B. abortus smooth lipopolysaccharide were added to fresh normal bovine serum, immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) and IgG2 isotypes blocked killing but IgM and IgA isotypes did not. Thus, it appears that serum from previously unexposed animals or animals early during infection can kill smooth B. abortus, an appropriate defense mechanism before the organism becomes intracellular. At later stages of infection, blocking antibodies predominate. Images PMID:3141287

Corbeil, L B; Blau, K; Inzana, T J; Nielsen, K H; Jacobson, R H; Corbeil, R R; Winter, A J

1988-01-01

61

Interaction of human leukocytes and Entamoeba histolytica. Killing of virulent amebae by the activated macrophage.  

PubMed

Capable effector mechanisms in the human immune response against the cytolytic, protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica have not been described. To identify a competent human effector cell, we studied the in vitro interactions of normal human polymorphonuclear neutrophils, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), monocytes (MC), and MC-derived macrophages with virulent axenic amebae (strain HMI-IMSS). Amebae killed neutrophils, PBMC, MC, and MC-derived macrophages (P less than 0.001), without loss of parasite viability. The addition of heat-inactivated immune serum did not enable leukocytes to kill amebae, nor did it protect these host cells from amebae. MC-derived macrophages, activated with lymphokine elicited by the mitogens conconavalin A, phytohemagglutinin, or an amebic soluble protein preparation (strain HK9), killed 55% of amebae by 3 h in a trypan blue exclusion assay (P less than 0.001); during this time, 40% of the activated macrophages died. Lysis of amebae was confirmed using 111Indium oxine radiolabeled parasites and was antibody independent. Macrophage death appeared to be due to the deleterious effect of lysed amebae rather than the contact-dependent effector mechanisms of E. histolytica. Adherence between activated macrophages and amebae was greater than that between other leukocytes and amebae (P less than 0.001). Microscopic observations, kinetic analysis of the killing of amebae by activated macrophages, and suspension of amebae with adherent activated macrophages in a 10% dextran solution indicated that contact by activated macrophages was necessary to initiate the killing of amebae. Catalase but not superoxide dismutase inhibited the amebicidal capacity of activated macrophages (P less than 0.001). However, activated macrophages from an individual with chronic granulomatous disease were able to kill amebae, but not as effectively as normal cells (P less than 0.01). In summary, activated MC-derived macrophages killed virulent E. histolytica trophozoites through a contact-dependent, antibody-independent mechanism involving oxidative-dependent and -independent processes. PMID:2863284

Salata, R A; Pearson, R D; Ravdin, J I

1985-08-01

62

Evaluation of five kill traps for effective capture and killing of Australian brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Five types of kill trap for possible use by professional possum trappers in New Zealand were tested for their potential to kill possums quickly and for their capture efficiency. Traps were evaluated using the testing requirements outlined in a draft International Trap Standard. This involved sequential mechanical testing, pen testing with free?moving possums, and field testing. The Banya and Loka?asklem

B. Warburton; I. Orchard

1996-01-01

63

Proteasomes Control Caspase-1 Activation in Anthrax Lethal Toxin-mediated Cell Killing*S  

E-print Network

Proteasomes Control Caspase-1 Activation in Anthrax Lethal Toxin-mediated Cell Killing*S Received York 10461 Activation of caspase-1 through the inflammasome protein Nalp1b controls anthrax lethal. The spore-forming bacterium Bacillus anthracis is the caus- ative agent of anthrax disease (1

Brojatsch, Jürgen

64

A Communication Protocol for Vehicle Collision Warning System Computing and Information Sciences  

E-print Network

that 5,811,000 vehicle crashes were reported by police across US in 2008 with 37,261 people killed and 2 or in intersections. Collision warning systems integrate several-purposed apparatus such as radar, infrared ray, radio

Singh, Gurdip

65

Electric vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Quiet, clean, and efficient, electric vehicles (EVs) may someday become a practical mode of transportation for the general public. Electric vehicles can provide many advantages for the nation's environment and energy supply because they run on electricity, which can be produced from many sources of energy such as coal, natural gas, uranium, and hydropower. These vehicles offer fuel versatility to the transportation sector, which depends almost solely on oil for its energy needs. Electric vehicles are any mode of transportation operated by a motor that receives electricity from a battery or fuel cell. EVs come in all shapes and sizes and may be used for different tasks. Some EVs are small and simple, such as golf carts and electric wheel chairs. Others are larger and more complex, such as automobile and vans. Some EVs, such as fork lifts, are used in industries. In this fact sheet, we will discuss mostly automobiles and vans. There are also variations on electric vehicles, such as hybrid vehicles and solar-powered vehicles. Hybrid vehicles use electricity as their primary source of energy, however, they also use a backup source of energy, such as gasoline, methanol or ethanol. Solar-powered vehicles are electric vehicles that use photovoltaic cells (cells that convert solar energy to electricity) rather than utility-supplied electricity to recharge the batteries. This paper discusses these concepts.

Not Available

1990-03-01

66

Motor vehicle  

SciTech Connect

An improvement in a motor vehicle is described including: a vehicle body; a front road wheel disposed in the front part of the vehicle body; a rear road wheel disposed in the rear part of the vehicle body; an engine for driving at least either of the front and rear road wheels; and a steering wheel for steering at least either of the front and rear road wheels; comprising: detection means connected to the vehicle for detecting the transverse sliding angle of the vehicle body; and display means connected to the detection means for visually displaying the moving direction of the vehicle body on the basis of an output of the detection means; and the detection means comprises a first sensor for detecting the advancing speed of the vehicle, a second sensor for detecting the transverse acceleration of the vehicle, a third sensor for detecting the yawing velocity of the vehicle, and a processor for calculating the transverse sliding angle on the basis of the advancing speed, the transverse acceleration and the yawing velocity.

Furukawa, Y.; Sano, S.

1986-04-15

67

Electric vehicles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quiet, clean, and efficient, electric vehicles (EVs) may someday become a practical mode of transportation for the general public. Electric vehicles can provide many advantages for the nation's environment and energy supply because they run on electricity, which can be produced from many sources of energy such as coal, natural gas, uranium, and hydropower. These vehicles offer fuel versatility to the transportation sector, which depends almost solely on oil for its energy needs. Electric vehicles are any mode of transportation operated by a motor that receives electricity from a battery or fuel cell. EVs come in all shapes and sizes and may be used for different tasks. Some EVs are small and simple, such as golf carts and electric wheel chairs. Others are larger and more complex, such as automobile and vans. Some EVs, such as fork lifts, are used in industries. In this fact sheet, we will discuss mostly automobiles and vans. There are also variations on electric vehicles, such as hybrid vehicles and solar-powered vehicles. Hybrid vehicles use electricity as their primary source of energy, however, they also use a backup source of energy, such as gasoline, methanol or ethanol. Solar-powered vehicles are electric vehicles that use photovoltaic cells (cells that convert solar energy to electricity) rather than utility-supplied electricity to recharge the batteries. These concepts are discussed.

1990-03-01

68

HIV transcription is induced with cell killing  

SciTech Connect

In this report, we demonstrate that this induction of HIV-LTR transcription occurs when stably transfected HeLa cells are exposed to agents which mediate cell killing, such as UV radiation, electroporation of sucrose buffer, prolonged heating, and low and high pH. Cells cultured following UV exposure demonstrated a peak in CAT expression that is evident in viable (but not necessarily cell division-competent) cells 24 h after exposure; this inductive response continued until at least 72 h after exposure. HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent, and the amount of CAT transcription induced was correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture.

Woloschak, G.E.; Schreck, S.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R. [Loyola Univ. Medical Center, Maywood, IL (United States)

1993-11-01

69

Internet Resources on Genocide and Mass Killings  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Internet Resources on Genocide and Mass Killings is an extensive compilation of primary materials and annotated links related to "twentieth-century genocidal and mass man-made killing occurrences." Divided into fifteen sections, subject coverage includes topics such as The Jewish Holocaust, War Crimes and Criminals, Yugoslavia and Kosovo, among others. Most of the original documents in the compilation have been uploaded to the site, facilitating navigation and research. Documents not residing at the site are linked via succinct annotations. The compilation is searchable and updated continuously by its creator Dr. Stuart D. Stein, Senior Lecturer in Sociology and Social Psychology at the University of West England.

70

Cytotoxic Killing and Immune Evasion by Repair  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The interaction between the immune system and pathogens is a complex one, with pathogens constantly developing new ways of evading destruction by the immune system. The immune system's task is made even harder when the pathogen in question is an intra-cellular one (such as a virus or certain bacteria) and it is necessary to kill the infected host cell in order to eliminate the pathogen. This causes damage to the host, and such killing therefore needs to be carefully controlled, particularly in tissues with poor regenerative potential, or those involved in the immune response itself. Host cells therefore possess repair mechanisms which can counteract killing by immune cells. These in turn can be subverted by pathogens which up-regulate the resistance of infected cells to killing. In this paper, we explore the hypothesis that this repair process plays an important role in determining the efficacy of evasion and escape from immune control. We model a situation where cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and natural killer (NK) cells kill pathogen-infected and tumour cells by directed secretion of preformed granules containing perforin and granzymes. Resistance to such killing can be conferred by the expression of serine protease inhibitors (serpins). These are utilized by several virally infected and tumour cells, as well as playing a role in the protection of host bystander, immune and immuneprivileged cells. We build a simple stochastic model of cytotoxic killing, where serpins can neutralize granzymes stoichiometrically by forming an irreversible complex, and the survival of the cell is determined by the balance between serpin depletion and replenishment, which in its simplest form is equivalent to the well known shot noise process. We use existing analytical results for this process, and additional simulations to analyse the effects of repair on cytotoxic killing. We then extend the model to the case of a replicating target cell population, which gives a branching process coupled to shot noise. We show how the process of repair can have a major impact on the dynamics of pathogen evasion and escape of tumour cells from immune surveillance

Chan, Cliburn; George, Andrew J. T.; Stark, Jaroslav

2007-07-01

71

Timelike Killing Fields and Relativistic Statistical Mechanics  

E-print Network

For spacetimes with timelike Killing fields, we introduce a "Fermi-Walker-Killing" coordinate system and use it to prove a Liouville Theorem for an appropriate volume element of phase space for a statistical mechanical system of particles. We derive an exact relativistic formula for the Helmholtz free energy of an ideal gas and compare it, for a class of spacetimes, to its Newtonian analog, derived both independently and as the Newtonian limit of our formula. We also find the relativistic thermodynamic equation of state. Specific examples are given in Kerr spacetime.

David Klein; Peter Collas

2008-12-12

72

Generalized Korn's inequality and conformal Killing vectors  

E-print Network

Korn's inequality plays an important role in linear elasticity theory. This inequality bounds the norm of the derivatives of the displacement vector by the norm of the linearized strain tensor. The kernel of the linearized strain tensor are the infinitesimal rigid-body translations and rotations (Killing vectors). We generalize this inequality by replacing the linearized strain tensor by its trace free part. That is, we obtain a stronger inequality in which the kernel of the relevant operator are the conformal Killing vectors. The new inequality has applications in General Relativity.

Sergio Dain

2005-05-04

73

Integrating Poetry and "To Kill a Mockingbird."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Outlines a method of teaching "To Kill a Mockingbird" along with the study of poetry. Notes that this method allows students to consider the themes of courage and developing compassion. Concludes that teaching such a multigenre unit allows students to look for connections among fact and fiction, the past and present, their own lives and…

Jolley, Susan Arpajian

2002-01-01

74

MECHANISM BY WHICH AMMONIUM FERTILIZERS KILL LARKSPUR  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Environmental concerns of using pesticides on public lands have greatly reduced the use of herbicides to control tall larkspur (Delphinium barbeyi). Alternative methods of control have used ammonium sulfate placed in the crown of individual plants to kill larkspur. The objective of this study was ...

75

Oxidative killing of microbes by neutrophils  

Microsoft Academic Search

Neutrophils and other phagocytic leukocytes contain a phagocyte NADPH oxidase enzyme that generates superoxide after cell activation. Reactive oxygen species derived from superoxide, together with proteases liberated from the granules, are used to kill ingested microbes. Dysfunction of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase results in chronic granulomatous disease, with life-threatening infections.

Dirk Roos; Robin van Bruggen; Christof Meischl

2003-01-01

76

Red Tide Kills Fish, Fouls Gulf Coast  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This CBS news article reports a toxic algae bloom that spread along the Texas Gulf coast in 2000, killing millions of fish and fouling beaches with their remains. The article explains how red tide affects fish and describes health threats to humans.

CBS News

77

How to Make a Killing Jar  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Biodiversity Counts illustration shows students how to make a simple killing jar to preserve arthropods for further study. As the labeled drawing shows, all that's needed is a jar with a lid, tape for reinforcement, a few drops of ethyl acetate, and a paper towel.

78

Pulpability of Beetle-Killed Spruce  

E-print Network

stands of dead and dying timber on the Kenai Penin- sula in Alaska. Tests were conducted to evaluate the value of beetle-killed spruce as pulpwood. The results showed that live and dead spruce wood can of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, and marital

Abubakr, Said

79

Pfiesteria shumwayae kills fish by micropredation not  

E-print Network

and the lateral line canal, associated with extensive tissue damage, has been observed16 . A direct physical, acute fish kills and human disease in mid-Atlantic USA estuaries1­7 . However, Pfies- teria toxins have recently demonstrated that A. invadans is a primary pathogen, able to elicit menhaden ulcer disease

80

Killing Hitler: A Writer's Journey and Angst.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the author's experiences in preparing a talk that "evokes the specter" of Adolf Hitler and in writing an historical account of a British plot to kill Hitler. Address the question of why the British allowed him to live that final year of the war. Muses on why scholars write, and the impact of violence and terrorism. (SG)

Thaler, Paul

2002-01-01

81

Vehicle systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Perspectives of the subpanel on expendable launch vehicle structures and cryotanks are: (1) new materials which provide the primary weight savings effect on vehicle mass/size; (2) today's investment; (3) typically 10-20 years to mature and fully characterize new materials.

Bales, Tom; Modlin, Tom; Suddreth, Jack; Wheeler, Tom; Tenney, Darrel R.; Bayless, Ernest O.; Lisagor, W. Barry; Bolstad, Donald A.; Croop, Harold; Dyer, J.

1993-01-01

82

Kinetic Demonstration.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a unit on chemical reaction kinetics that consists of a predemonstration activity, the demonstration, and a set of postdemonstration activities that help students transfer the concepts to actual chemical reactions. Simulates various aspects of chemical reaction kinetics. (JRH)

Burgardt, Erik D.; Ryan, Hank

1996-01-01

83

Kinetic Atom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Surveys the research of scientists like Joule, Kelvin, Maxwell, Clausius, and Boltzmann as it comments on the basic conceptual issues involved in the development of a more precise kinetic theory and the idea of a kinetic atom. (Author/SK)

Wilson, David B.

1981-01-01

84

Enzyme Kinetics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Conveys an appreciation of enzyme kinetic analysis by using a practical and intuitive approach. Discusses enzyme assays, kinetic models and rate laws, the kinetic constants (V, velocity, and Km, Michaels constant), evaluation of V and Km from experimental data, and enzyme inhibition. (CW)

Moe, Owen; Cornelius, Richard

1988-01-01

85

9 CFR 113.204 - Mink Enteritis Vaccine, Killed Virus.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...false Mink Enteritis Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.204 Section 113.204 Animals...INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS...VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.204 Mink...

2014-01-01

86

9 CFR 113.205 - Newcastle Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Newcastle Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.205 Section 113.205 Animals...INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS...VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.205 Newcastle...

2013-01-01

87

9 CFR 113.204 - Mink Enteritis Vaccine, Killed Virus.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Mink Enteritis Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.204 Section 113.204 Animals...INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS...VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.204 Mink...

2010-01-01

88

9 CFR 113.205 - Newcastle Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...false Newcastle Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.205 Section 113.205 Animals...INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS...VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.205 Newcastle...

2014-01-01

89

9 CFR 113.206 - Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-01-01 false Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.206 Section 113.206 Animals...INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS...VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.206 Wart...

2012-01-01

90

9 CFR 113.208 - Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.208 Section 113.208 Animals...INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS...VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.208 Avian...

2010-01-01

91

9 CFR 113.206 - Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.206 Section 113.206 Animals...INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS...VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.206 Wart...

2011-01-01

92

9 CFR 113.206 - Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-01-01 false Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.206 Section 113.206 Animals...INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS...VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.206 Wart...

2013-01-01

93

9 CFR 113.208 - Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.208 Section 113.208 Animals...INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS...VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.208 Avian...

2014-01-01

94

9 CFR 113.205 - Newcastle Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Newcastle Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.205 Section 113.205 Animals...INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS...VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.205 Newcastle...

2012-01-01

95

9 CFR 113.205 - Newcastle Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Newcastle Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.205 Section 113.205 Animals...INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS...VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.205 Newcastle...

2010-01-01

96

9 CFR 113.205 - Newcastle Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...false Newcastle Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.205 Section 113.205 Animals...INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS...VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.205 Newcastle...

2011-01-01

97

9 CFR 113.208 - Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.208 Section 113.208 Animals...INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS...VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.208 Avian...

2011-01-01

98

9 CFR 113.206 - Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 false Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.206 Section 113.206 Animals...INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS...VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.206 Wart...

2010-01-01

99

9 CFR 113.208 - Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.208 Section 113.208 Animals...INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS...VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.208 Avian...

2013-01-01

100

9 CFR 113.208 - Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.208 Section 113.208 Animals...INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS...VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.208 Avian...

2012-01-01

101

9 CFR 113.206 - Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-01-01 false Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.206 Section 113.206 Animals...INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS...VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.206 Wart...

2014-01-01

102

9 CFR 113.204 - Mink Enteritis Vaccine, Killed Virus.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Mink Enteritis Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.204 Section 113.204 Animals...INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS...VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.204 Mink...

2012-01-01

103

9 CFR 113.204 - Mink Enteritis Vaccine, Killed Virus.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...false Mink Enteritis Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.204 Section 113.204 Animals...INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS...VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.204 Mink...

2011-01-01

104

9 CFR 113.204 - Mink Enteritis Vaccine, Killed Virus.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Mink Enteritis Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.204 Section 113.204 Animals...INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS...VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.204 Mink...

2013-01-01

105

GOETHALS BRIDGE FROM NORTH SIDE OVER ARTHUR KILL. RAILROAD BRIDGE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

GOETHALS BRIDGE FROM NORTH SIDE OVER ARTHUR KILL. RAILROAD BRIDGE IN FOREGROUND - Goethals Bridge, Spanning Arthur Kill from New Jersey to Staten Island, Staten Island (subdivision), Richmond County, NY

106

Conformal Killing Tensors and covariant Hamiltonian Dynamics  

E-print Network

A covariant algorithm for deriving the conserved quantities for natural Hamiltonian systems is combined with the non-relativistic framework of Eisenhart, and of Duval, in which the classical trajectories arise as geodesics in a higher dimensional space-time, realized by Brinkmann manifolds. Conserved quantities which are polynomial in the momenta can be built using time-dependent conformal Killing tensors with flux. The latter are associated with terms proportional to the Hamiltonian in the lower dimensional theory and with spectrum generating algebras for higher dimensional quantities of order $1$ and $2$ in the momenta. Illustrations of the general theory include the Runge-Lenz vector for planetary motion with a time-dependent gravitational constant $G(t)$, motion in a time-dependent electromagnetic field of a certain form, quantum dots, the H\\'enon-Heiles and Holt systems, respectively, providing us with Killing tensors of rank that ranges from one to six.

M. Cariglia; G. W. Gibbons; J. -W. van Holten; P. A. Horvathy; P. -M. Zhang

2014-10-31

107

Underground blowout killed with quick snubbing operation  

SciTech Connect

A shallow underground blowout off the island of Trinidad required quick action and the importing of snubbing equipment to kill the well and avert cratering the sea floor beneath the platform. The blowout was controlled in 16 days. The blowout at Trintomar's Pelican platform on the east coast of Trinidad posed a most challenging well control problem. Most of the service companies with equipment to control the well were not available in this relatively remote area. Because of the high gas and condensate flow rates and high pressure, the blowout at the Pelican platform had the potential to destroy the entire platform, endanger the lives of many crew members, result in the loss of natural resources, and interrupt the supply of natural gas to the island of Trinidad. The paper discusses the Pelican platform, the underground blowout, temperature survey, the kill plan, and snubbing operations.

Grace, R. (Grace, Shursen, Moore and Associates Inc., Amarillo, TX (United States)); Stanislaus, G. (Trinmar Ltd., Point Fortin (Trinidad and Tobago)); Cudd, B. (Cudd Pressure Control, Woodward, OK (United States))

1993-10-18

108

Conformal killing tensors and covariant Hamiltonian dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A covariant algorithm for deriving the conserved quantities for natural Hamiltonian systems is combined with the non-relativistic framework of Eisenhart, and of Duval, in which the classical trajectories arise as geodesics in a higher dimensional space-time, realized by Brinkmann manifolds. Conserved quantities which are polynomial in the momenta can be built using time-dependent conformal Killing tensors with flux. The latter are associated with terms proportional to the Hamiltonian in the lower dimensional theory and with spectrum generating algebras for higher dimensional quantities of order 1 and 2 in the momenta. Illustrations of the general theory include the Runge-Lenz vector for planetary motion with a time-dependent gravitational constant G(t), motion in a time-dependent electromagnetic field of a certain form, quantum dots, the Hénon-Heiles and Holt systems, respectively, providing us with Killing tensors of rank that ranges from one to six.

Cariglia, M.; Gibbons, G. W.; van Holten, J.-W.; Horvathy, P. A.; Zhang, P.-M.

2014-12-01

109

40 CFR 180.1107 - Delta endotoxin of Bacillus thuringiensis variety kurstaki encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens; exemption from the requirement...encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens; exemption from the...encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens is exempt from the...

2011-07-01

110

40 CFR 180.1107 - Delta endotoxin of Bacillus thuringiensis variety kurstaki encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens; exemption from the requirement...encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens; exemption from the...encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens is exempt from the...

2012-07-01

111

40 CFR 180.1107 - Delta endotoxin of Bacillus thuringiensis variety kurstaki encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens; exemption from the requirement...encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens; exemption from the...encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens is exempt from the...

2010-07-01

112

40 CFR 180.1107 - Delta endotoxin of Bacillus thuringiensis variety kurstaki encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens; exemption from the requirement...encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens; exemption from the...encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens is exempt from the...

2014-07-01

113

40 CFR 180.1107 - Delta endotoxin of Bacillus thuringiensis variety kurstaki encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens; exemption from the requirement...encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens; exemption from the...encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens is exempt from the...

2013-07-01

114

killed-virus influenza vaccine Polio vaccine  

E-print Network

killed-virus influenza vaccine Polio vaccine FluMist Thomas Francis, Jr. National Institutes of Health live-virus influenza vaccine Hunein Maassab Jonas Salk Type-A virus trivalent cold-adapted retrofitting virus 18 19Findings L A B O R A T O R Y D R E A M S U N I V E R S I T Y O F M I C H I G A N S C H

Shyy, Wei

115

Monoclonal antibody targets, kills leukemia cells  

Cancer.gov

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego Moores Cancer Center have identified a humanized monoclonal antibody that targets and directly kills chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells. The findings, published in the online Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on March 25, 2013 represent a potential new therapy for treating at least some patients with CLL, the most common type of blood cancer in the United States.

116

Killed Vaccines: Cholera, Typhoid, and Plague  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a As reviewed in previous chapters of this work, the earliest vaccines were of the live variety, either based on a naturally\\u000a occurring weaker version of pathogen, as with Jenner’s use of cowpox, or the laboratory-manipulated, attenuated forms of anthrax\\u000a and rabies employed by his vaccine heir, Pasteur. The next important concept in vaccine science, killed vaccines, was introduced\\u000a in animals

Charles C. J. Carpenter; Richard B. Hornick

117

Inhomogeneous problems Q. How do you kill a blue elephant?  

E-print Network

Inhomogeneous problems Q. How do you kill a blue elephant? A. With a blue elephant gun Q. How do you kill a pink elephant? A. Squeeze its trunk until it turns blue, and then shoot it with a blue elephant gun. Q. How do you kill a white elephant? A. Tickle it pink, then squeeze its trunk until it turns

DeTurck, Dennis

118

Road-Killed Animals as Resources for Ecological Studies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Summarizes 19 literature sources identifying road-killed vertebrates and frequency of kill by numbers. Examples of how these animals can be incorporated into curricula (integrating biology, society, people, and values) are given, followed by an illustrated example of how a road-killed raccoon's skull demonstrated a human/wildlife interaction prior…

Adams, Clark E.

1983-01-01

119

Robotic vehicle  

SciTech Connect

A robotic vehicle for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendable appendages, each of which is radially extendable relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle.

Box, W. Donald (Oak Ridge, TN)

1997-01-01

120

Robotic vehicle  

SciTech Connect

A robotic vehicle for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendable appendages, each of which is radially extendable relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle.

Box, W. Donald (Oak Ridge, TN)

1998-01-01

121

Robotic vehicle  

DOEpatents

A robotic vehicle is described for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendable appendages, each of which is radially extendable relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle. 20 figs.

Box, W.D.

1997-02-11

122

Robotic vehicle  

DOEpatents

A robotic vehicle is described for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendible appendages, each of which is radially extendible relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendible members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle. 20 figs.

Box, W.D.

1998-08-11

123

Designing surfaces that kill bacteria on contact  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Poly(4-vinyl-N-alkylpyridinium bromide) was covalently attached to glass slides to create a surface that kills airborne bacteria on contact. The antibacterial properties were assessed by spraying aqueous suspensions of bacterial cells on the surface, followed by air drying and counting the number of cells remaining viable (i.e., capable of growing colonies). Amino glass slides were acylated with acryloyl chloride, copolymerized with 4-vinylpyridine, and N-alkylated with different alkyl bromides (from propyl to hexadecyl). The resultant surfaces, depending on the alkyl group, were able to kill up to 94 ± 4% of Staphylococcus aureus cells sprayed on them. A surface alternatively created by attaching poly(4-vinylpyridine) to a glass slide and alkylating it with hexyl bromide killed 94 ± 3% of the deposited S. aureus cells. On surfaces modified with N-hexylated poly(4-vinylpyridine), the numbers of viable cells of another Gram-positive bacterium, Staphylococcus epidermidis, as well as of the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, dropped more than 100-fold compared with the original amino glass. In contrast, the number of viable bacterial cells did not decline significantly after spraying on such common materials as ceramics, plastics, metals, and wood.

Tiller, Joerg C.; Liao, Chun-Jen; Lewis, Kim; Klibanov, Alexander M.

2001-05-01

124

Phototoxic aptamers selectively enter and kill epithelial cancer cells  

PubMed Central

The majority of cancers arise from malignant epithelial cells. We report the design of synthetic oligonucleotides (aptamers) that are only internalized by epithelial cancer cells and can be precisely activated by light to kill such cells. Specifically, phototoxic DNA aptamers were selected to bind to unique short O-glycan-peptide signatures on the surface of breast, colon, lung, ovarian and pancreatic cancer cells. These surface antigens are not present on normal epithelial cells but are internalized and routed through endosomal and Golgi compartments by cancer cells, thus providing a focused mechanism for their intracellular delivery. When modified at their 5? end with the photodynamic therapy agent chlorin e6 and delivered to epithelial cancer cells, these aptamers exhibited a remarkable enhancement (>500-fold increase) in toxicity upon light activation, compared to the drug alone and were not cytotoxic towards cell types lacking such O-glycan-peptide markers. Our findings suggest that these synthetic oligonucleotide aptamers can serve as delivery vehicles in precisely routing cytotoxic cargoes to and into epithelial cancer cells. PMID:19103663

Ferreira, Cátia S. M.; Cheung, Melissa C.; Missailidis, Sotiris; Bisland, Stuart; Gariépy, Jean

2009-01-01

125

Kinetic Turbulence  

E-print Network

The weak collisionality typical of turbulence in many diffuse astrophysical plasmas invalidates an MHD description of the turbulent dynamics, motivating the development of a more comprehensive theory of kinetic turbulence. In particular, a kinetic approach is essential for the investigation of the physical mechanisms responsible for the dissipation of astrophysical turbulence and the resulting heating of the plasma. This chapter reviews the limitations of MHD turbulence theory and explains how kinetic considerations may be incorporated to obtain a kinetic theory for astrophysical plasma turbulence. Key questions about the nature of kinetic turbulence that drive current research efforts are identified. A comprehensive model of the kinetic turbulent cascade is presented, with a detailed discussion of each component of the model and a review of supporting and conflicting theoretical, numerical, and observational evidence.

Howes, Gregory G

2015-01-01

126

Kinetic Turbulence  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The weak collisionality typical of turbulence in many diffuse astrophysical plasmas invalidates an MHD description of the turbulent dynamics, motivating the development of a more comprehensive theory of kinetic turbulence. In particular, a kinetic approach is essential for the investigation of the physical mechanisms responsible for the dissipation of astrophysical turbulence and the resulting heating of the plasma. This chapter reviews the limitations of MHD turbulence theory and explains how kinetic considerations may be incorporated to obtain a kinetic theory for astrophysical plasma turbulence. Key questions about the nature of kinetic turbulence that drive current research efforts are identified. A comprehensive model of the kinetic turbulent cascade is presented, with a detailed discussion of each component of the model and a review of supporting and conflicting theoretical, numerical, and observational evidence.

Howes, Gregory G.

127

Slow-moving vehicles in Swedish traffic.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to reach a better understanding of accidents on Swedish roads involving slow-moving vehicles and to suggest ways of preventing such accidents. We analyzed accident data from a 5-year period (1992-1996) involving all types of farm vehicles as well as horses and horse-drawn vehicles. During each year of the period under investigation, slow-moving vehicles were involved in more than 250 traffic accidents on Swedish roads, and an average of 10 people were killed, 66 sustained serious injuries, and 192 sustained slight injuries. This was about 1.3% of all persons injured in traffic accidents in Sweden. The deaths and injuries mostly involved car drivers and passengers. Tractor drivers and unprotected road users (people walking or traveling by motorcycle, moped, or bicycle) also sustained serious injuries and deaths. Vehicles overtaking slow-moving vehicles from behind were the most common type of accident (30%), followed by turning accidents (27%), accidents at crossroads (26%), and with oncoming vehicles (17%). To strengthen the suggestions for improvement, a questionnaire was sent out to driving school teachers in Sweden. Subjects were asked about their experiences with farm vehicles on the roads and their suggestions for ways to increase traffic safety. Based on the accident data and the questionnaire responses, we developed several suggestions for reducing road accidents, including measures for making farm vehicles more visible, improvement of the training provided at driving schools, and information campaigns directed at drivers of farm vehicles and other road users. Further in-depth research is needed to analyze road accidents involving slow-moving vehicles and to test different intervention measures. PMID:15216651

Pinzke, S; Lundqvist, P

2004-05-01

128

Time-kill behavior against eight bacterial species and cytotoxicity of antibacterial monomers  

PubMed Central

Objectives The objectives of this study were to investigate: (1) the antibacterial activity of two antibacterial monomers, dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMADDM) and dimethylammoniumethyl dimethacrylate (DMAEDM), against eight different species of oral pathogens for the first time; (2) the cytotoxicity of DMAEDM and DMADDM. Methods DMAEDM and DMADDM were synthesized by reacting a tertiary amine group with an organo-halide. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) against eight species of bacteria were tested. Time-kill determinations were performed to examine the bactericidal kinetics. Cytotoxicity of monomers on human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) was assessed using a methyl thiazolyltetrazolium assay and live/dead viability assay. Results DMADDM showed strong bactericidal activity against all bacteria, with MIC of 1.2 to 9.8?g/mL. DMAEDM had MIC of 20 to 80mg/mL. Time-kill determinations indicated that DMADDM and DMAEDM had rapid killing effects against eight species of bacteria, and eliminated all bacteria in 30min at the concentration of 4-fold MBC. Median lethal concentration for DMADDM and DMAEDM was between 20 to 40?g/mL, which was 20-fold higher than 1 to 2?g/mL for BisGMA control. Conclusions DMAEDM and DMADDM were tested in time-kill assay against eight species of oral bacteria for the first time. Both were effective in bacteria-inhibition, but DMADDM had a higher potency than DMAEDM. Different killing efficacy was found against different bacteria species. DMAEDM and DMADDM had much lower cytotoxicity than BisGMA. Therefore, DMADDM and DMAEDM are promising for use in bonding agents and other restorative/preventive materials to combat a variety of oral pathogens. PMID:23876930

Li, Fang; Weir, Michael D.; Fouad, Ashraf F.; Xu, Hockin H. K.

2013-01-01

129

The Kinematics of Cytotoxic Lymphocytes Influence Their Ability to Kill Target Cells  

PubMed Central

Cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTL) have been reported to show a range of motility patterns from rapid long-range tracking to complete arrest, but how and whether these kinematics affect their ability to kill target cells is not known. Many in vitro killing assays utilize cell lines and tumour-derived cells as targets, which may be of limited relevance to the kinetics of CTL-mediated killing of somatic cells. Here, live-cell microscopy is used to examine the interactions of CTL and primary murine skin cells presenting antigens. We developed a qualitative and quantitative killing assay using extended-duration fluorescence time-lapse microscopy coupled with large-volume objective software-based data analysis to obtain population data of cell-to-cell interactions, motility and apoptosis. In vivo and ex vivo activated antigen-specific cytotoxic lymphocytes were added to primary keratinocyte targets in culture with fluorometric detection of caspase-3 activation in targets as an objective determinant of apoptosis. We found that activated CTL achieved contact-dependent apoptosis of non-tumour targets after a period of prolonged attachment – on average 21 hours – which was determined by target cell type, amount of antigen, and activation status of CTL. Activation of CTL even without engagement of the T cell receptor was sufficient to mobilise cells significantly above baseline, while the addition of cognate antigen further enhanced their motility. Highly activated CTL showed markedly increased vector displacement, and velocity, and lead to increased antigen-specific target cell death. These data show that the inherent kinematics of CTL correlate directly with their ability to kill non-tumour cells presenting cognate antigen. PMID:24801876

Bhat, Purnima; Leggatt, Graham; Matthaei, Klaus I.; Frazer, Ian H.

2014-01-01

130

Autonomous vehicles  

SciTech Connect

There are various kinds of autonomous vehicles (AV`s) which can operate with varying levels of autonomy. This paper is concerned with underwater, ground, and aerial vehicles operating in a fully autonomous (nonteleoperated) mode. Further, this paper deals with AV`s as a special kind of device, rather than full-scale manned vehicles operating unmanned. The distinction is one in which the AV is likely to be designed for autonomous operation rather than being adapted for it as would be the case for manned vehicles. The authors provide a survey of the technological progress that has been made in AV`s, the current research issues and approaches that are continuing that progress, and the applications which motivate this work. It should be noted that issues of control are pervasive regardless of the kind of AV being considered, but that there are special considerations in the design and operation of AV`s depending on whether the focus is on vehicles underwater, on the ground, or in the air. The authors have separated the discussion into sections treating each of these categories.

Meyrowitz, A.L. [Navy Center for Applied Research in Artificial Intelligence, Washington, DC (United States)] [Navy Center for Applied Research in Artificial Intelligence, Washington, DC (United States); Blidberg, D.R. [Autonomous Undersea Systems Inst., Lee, NH (United States)] [Autonomous Undersea Systems Inst., Lee, NH (United States); Michelson, R.C. [Georgia Tech Research Inst., Smyrna, GA (United States)] [Georgia Tech Research Inst., Smyrna, GA (United States); [International Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems, Smyrna, GA (United States)

1996-08-01

131

Hybrid Vehicles  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The first site takes you to the very informative essay at Motor Trend's site on its car of the year, the Toyota Prius (1). The next site is from the Union of Concerned Scientists. This great resource, called Clean Vehicles, offers all sorts of info about vehicles for the future (2). The Department of Energy's Hybrid Electric Vehicle Program page (3 ) offers lots of good information about the technology surrounding the cars as well as information on how you can get a tax break if you buy one. In fairness to both Honda (4 ) (Note: Honda also makes the Insight) and Toyota (5 ) these two sites take you to their webpages devoted to their two comparable hybrid cars, the Honda Civic Hybrid and the Toyota Prius. The last site takes you to a recent story on NPR about the future of hybrid technology and hybrid SUVs (6 )

132

Bacterial Killing by Dry Metallic Copper Surfaces?  

PubMed Central

Metallic copper surfaces rapidly and efficiently kill bacteria. Cells exposed to copper surfaces accumulated large amounts of copper ions, and this copper uptake was faster from dry copper than from moist copper. Cells suffered extensive membrane damage within minutes of exposure to dry copper. Further, cells removed from copper showed loss of cell integrity. Acute contact with metallic copper surfaces did not result in increased mutation rates or DNA lesions. These findings are important first steps for revealing the molecular sensitive targets in cells lethally challenged by exposure to copper surfaces and provide a scientific explanation for the use of copper surfaces as antimicrobial agents for supporting public hygiene. PMID:21148701

Santo, Christophe Espírito; Lam, Ee Wen; Elowsky, Christian G.; Quaranta, Davide; Domaille, Dylan W.; Chang, Christopher J.; Grass, Gregor

2011-01-01

133

Why are potential women being killed?  

PubMed

The persistence of traditional practices that provide disincentives to having daughters is giving rise to widespread infanticide in India. In a survey conducted in Madras in 1993, over half of the mothers interviewed acknowledged having killed an infant girl. The infanticide rate is believed to be even higher in India's rural areas. Families who can afford ultrasound to determine the fetal sex are reportedly using selective abortion to avert the birth of a daughter. Of 8000 abortions induced in a Bombay clinic, 7999 involved a female fetus. Families cite the financial burden inherent in providing a dowry as the primary reason for female infanticide. Also cited is the need for a son to both provide financial support to parents in old age and to light their funeral pyre. There are reports of mothers who refuse to kill female infants being abandoned or physically battered by their husbands. At present, there are 116 males to every 100 females in India--an imbalance that is likely to increase in the future and make it impossible for many men to form families. Just as television has been implicated in creating a demand for large dowries that would enable husbands' families to purchase Western luxury items, the mass media should use its influence to alter the attitudes that perpetuate the low status of women in India. PMID:8283950

Thomson, A

1993-12-01

134

Robotic vehicle  

DOEpatents

A robotic vehicle is described for travel through an enclosed or partially enclosed conduit or pipe including vertical and/or horizontal conduit or pipe. The robotic vehicle comprises forward and rear housings each provided with a surface engaging mechanism for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit through which the vehicle is travelling, whereby the housings are selectively held in a stationary position within the conduit. The vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members, each of which defines a cavity therein. The forward end portion of each extendable member is secured to the forward housing and the rear end portion of each housing is secured to the rear housing. Each of the extendable members is independently extendable from a retracted position to an extended position upon the injection of a gas under pressure into the cavity of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing and the rear housing can be selectively increased. Further, each of the extendable members is independently retractable from the extended position to the retracted position upon the application of a vacuum to the cavity of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing and the rear housing can be selectively decreased. 11 figures.

Box, W.D.

1994-03-15

135

Robotic vehicle  

DOEpatents

A robotic vehicle is described for travel through an enclosed or partially enclosed conduit or pipe including vertical and/or horizontal conduit or pipe. The robotic vehicle comprises forward and rear housings each provided with a surface engaging mechanism for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit through which the vehicle is travelling, whereby the housings are selectively held in a stationary position within the conduit. The vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members, each of which defines a cavity therein. The forward end portion of each extendable member is secured to the forward housing and the rear end portion of each housing is secured to the rear housing. Each of the extendable members is independently extendable from a retracted position to an extended position upon the injection of a gas under pressure into the cavity of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing and the rear housing can be selectively increased. Further, each of the extendable members is independently retractable from the extended position to the retracted position upon the application of a vacuum to the cavity of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing and the rear housing can be selectively decreased. 14 figs.

Box, W.D.

1996-03-12

136

Robotic vehicle  

DOEpatents

A robotic vehicle (10) for travel through an enclosed or partially enclosed conduit or pipe including vertical and/or horizontal conduit or pipe. The robotic vehicle (10) comprises forward and rear housings (32 and 12) each provided with a surface engaging mechanism for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit through which the vehicle is travelling, whereby the housings (32 and 12) are selectively held in a stationary position within the conduit. The vehicle (10) also includes at least three selectively extendable members (46), each of which defines a cavity (56) therein. The forward end portion (50) of each extendable member (46) is secured to the forward housing (32) and the rear end portion (48) of each housing is secured to the rear housing (12). Each of the extendable members (46) is independently extendable from a retracted position to an extended position upon the injection of a gas under pressure into the cavity (56) of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing (32 ) and the rear housing (12) can be selectively increased. Further, each of the extendable members (46) is independently retractable from the extended position to the retracted position upon the application of a vacuum to the cavity (56) of the extendable member (46) such that the distance between the forward housing (32) and the rear housing (12) can be selectively decreased.

Box, W. Donald (Oak Ridge, TN)

1996-01-01

137

Robotic vehicle  

DOEpatents

A robotic vehicle (10) for travel through an enclosed or partially enclosed conduit or pipe including vertical and/or horizontal conduit or pipe. The robotic vehicle (10) comprises forward and rear housings (32 and 12) each provided with a surface engaging mechanism for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit through which the vehicle is travelling, whereby the housings (32 and 12) are selectively held in a stationary position within the conduit. The vehicle (10) also includes at least three selectively extendable members (46), each of which defines a cavity (56) therein. The forward end portion (50) of each extendable member (46) is secured to the forward housing (32) and the rear end portion (48) of each housing is secured to the rear housing (12). Each of the extendable members (46) is independently extendable from a retracted position to an extended position upon the injection of a gas under pressure into the cavity (56) of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing (32 ) and the rear housing (12) can be selectively increased. Further, each of the extendable members (46) is independently retractable from the extended position to the retracted position upon the application of a vacuum to the cavity (56) of the extendable member (46) such that the distance between the forward housing (32) and the rear housing (12) can be selectively decreased.

Box, W. Donald (115 Newhaven Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37830)

1994-01-01

138

Killing forms and toric Sasaki-Einstein spaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The construction of the special Killing forms on toric Sasaki-Einstein manifolds is presented. This goal is achieved using the interplay between complex coordinates of the Calabi-Yau metric cone and the special Killing forms on the toric Sasaki-Einstein space. As a concrete example, we present the complete set of special Killing forms on the five-dimensional Einstein-Sasaki Yp,q spaces. It is pointed out the existence of two additional special Killing forms associated with the complex holomorphic volume form of Calabi-Yau cone manifold.

Slesar, Vladimir; Visinescu, Mihai; Vîlcu, Gabriel Eduard

2014-11-01

139

Enzyme Kinetics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resrouce provides detailed protocols for performing a laboratory exercise in enzyme kinetics. The activity of enzymes are characterized both by reaction rates and the effect of different concentrations of substrates.

Carl Stiefbold (University of Oregon; )

1998-01-01

140

Self-forces from generalized Killing fields  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A non-perturbative formalism is developed that simplifies the understanding of self-forces and self-torques acting on extended scalar charges in curved spacetimes. Laws of motion are locally derived using momenta generated by a set of generalized Killing fields. Self-interactions that may be interpreted as arising from the details of a body's internal structure are shown to have very simple geometric and physical interpretations. Certain modifications to the usual definition for a center-of-mass are identified that significantly simplify the motions of charges with strong self-fields. A derivation is also provided for a generalized form of the Detweiler Whiting axiom that pointlike charges should react only to the so-called regular component of their self-field. Standard results are shown to be recovered for sufficiently small charge distributions.

Harte, Abraham I.

2008-12-01

141

Antimicrobial peptide killing of African trypanosomes.  

PubMed

The diseases caused by trypanosomes are medically and economically devastating to the population of Sub-Saharan Africa. Parasites of the genus Trypanosoma infect both humans, causing African sleeping sickness, and livestock, causing Nagana. The development of effective treatment strategies has suffered from severe side effects of approved drugs, resistance and major difficulties in delivering drugs. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are ubiquitous components of immune defence and are being rigorously pursued as novel sources of new therapeutics for a variety of pathogens. Here, we review the role of AMPs in the innate immune response of the tsetse fly to African trypanosomes, catalogue trypanocidal AMPs from diverse organisms and highlight the susceptibility of bloodstream form African trypanosomes to killing by unconventional toxic peptides. PMID:21517904

Harrington, J M

2011-08-01

142

Mechanisms of Contact-Mediated Killing of Yeast Cells on Dry Metallic Copper Surfaces?  

PubMed Central

Surfaces made of copper or its alloys have strong antimicrobial properties against a wide variety of microorganisms. However, the molecular mode of action responsible for the antimicrobial efficacy of metallic copper is not known. Here, we show that dry copper surfaces inactivate Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae within minutes in a process called contact-mediated killing. Cellular copper ion homeostasis systems influenced the kinetics of contact-mediated killing in both organisms. Deregulated copper ion uptake through a hyperactive S. cerevisiae Ctr1p (ScCtr1p) copper uptake transporter in Saccharomyces resulted in faster inactivation of mutant cells than of wild-type cells. Similarly, lack of the C. albicans Crp1p (CaCrp1p) copper-efflux P-type ATPase or the metallothionein CaCup1p caused more-rapid killing of Candida mutant cells than of wild-type cells. Candida and Saccharomyces took up large quantities of copper ions as soon as they were in contact with copper surfaces, as indicated by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) analysis and by the intracellular copper ion-reporting dye coppersensor-1. Exposure to metallic copper did not cause lethality through genotoxicity, deleterious action on a cell's genetic material, as indicated by a mutation assay with Saccharomyces. Instead, toxicity mediated by metallic copper surfaces targeted membranes in both yeast species. With the use of Live/Dead staining, onset of rapid and extensive cytoplasmic membrane damage was observed in cells from copper surfaces. Fluorescence microscopy using the indicator dye DiSBaC2(3) indicated that cell membranes were depolarized. Also, during contact-mediated killing, vacuoles first became enlarged and then disappeared from the cells. Lastly, in metallic copper-stressed yeasts, oxidative stress in the cytoplasm and in mitochondria was elevated. PMID:21097600

Quaranta, Davide; Krans, Travis; Santo, Christophe Espírito; Elowsky, Christian G.; Domaille, Dylan W.; Chang, Christopher J.; Grass, Gregor

2011-01-01

143

The effect of road kills on amphibian populations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The diurnal movement patterns of Triturus vulgaris, Triturus cristatus, Pelobates fuscus, Bufo bufo, Rana temporaria, and Rana arvalis were investigated during five breeding seasons (1994–1998). Two main questions were addressed: (1) What is the probability of an individual amphibian getting killed when crossing the road? and (2) What fraction of the amphibian populations gets killed by traffic? The rate of

Tove Hels; Erik Buchwald

2001-01-01

144

Microwave irradiation for rapid killing and fixing of plant tissue  

SciTech Connect

Irradiation by microwaves allows for rapid killing and fixing of plant tissue, with excellent cellular integrity for histological examination. One or two exposures to microwaves for three seconds in formalin/acetic acid/alcohol gave good preservation of nuclei, chloroplasts, and other plant structures. The microwave method offers a considerable saving of time over traditional methods for killing and fixing plant tissue.

Walsh, G.E.; Bohannon, P.M.; Wessinger-Duvall, P.B.

1989-01-01

145

9. GENERAL INTERIOR VIEW OF BEEF KILLING FLOOR; LOOKING SOUTHEAST; ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

9. GENERAL INTERIOR VIEW OF BEEF KILLING FLOOR; LOOKING SOUTHEAST; PLATFORMS IN FOREGROUND WERE USED BY SPLITTERS, TRIMMERS AND GOVERNMENT INSPECTORS; SKINNING TABLE RAN ALONG THE WINDOWS NEAR THE CENTER OF THE PHOTO - Rath Packing Company, Beef Killing Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

146

The Seal Killing Controversy: What Are the Facts?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the seal controversy using the harp and Alaska fur seals to illustrate the two distinct issues, i.e., conservation (the effect of killing upon the animal population); and two, morality (the effect of killing upon the human spirit). Factual information combines with personal philosophy. (LK)

Scheffer, Victor B.

1973-01-01

147

PDE5 Inhibitors Enhance Celecoxib Killing in Multiple Tumor Types.  

PubMed

The present studies determined whether clinically relevant phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors interacted with a clinically relevant NSAID, celecoxib, to kill tumor cells. Celecoxib and PDE5 inhibitors interacted in a greater than additive fashion to kill multiple tumor cell types. Celecoxib and sildenafil killed ex vivo primary human glioma cells as well as their associated activated microglia. Knock down of PDE5 recapitulated the effects of PDE5 inhibitor treatment; the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME suppressed drug combination toxicity. The effects of celecoxib were COX2 independent. Over-expression of c-FLIP-s or knock down of CD95/FADD significantly reduced killing by the drug combination. CD95 activation was dependent on nitric oxide and ceramide signaling. CD95 signaling activated the JNK pathway and inhibition of JNK suppressed cell killing. The drug combination inactivated mTOR and increased the levels of autophagy and knock down of Beclin1 or ATG5 strongly suppressed killing by the drug combination. The drug combination caused an ER stress response; knock down of IRE1?/XBP1 enhanced killing whereas knock down of eIF2?/ATF4/CHOP suppressed killing. Sildenafil and celecoxib treatment suppressed the growth of mammary tumors in vivo. Collectively our data demonstrate that clinically achievable concentrations of celecoxib and sildenafil have the potential to be a new therapeutic approach for cancer. J. Cell. Physiol. 230: 1115-1127, 2015. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company. PMID:25303541

Booth, Laurence; Roberts, Jane L; Cruickshanks, Nichola; Tavallai, Seyedmehrad; Webb, Timothy; Samuel, Peter; Conley, Adam; Binion, Brittany; Young, Harold F; Poklepovic, Andrew; Spiegel, Sarah; Dent, Paul

2015-05-01

148

Life After Fresh Kills: Moving Beyond New York City's  

E-print Network

no position as to the appropriateness of the city's current waste export plan in the short-term, it doesLife After Fresh Kills: Moving Beyond New York City's Current Waste Management Plan Policy disposal plan and the impact of the Fresh Kills landfill closing. The report concludes that New York City

Columbia University

149

Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Kills Caenorhabditis elegans by Cyanide Poisoning  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this report we describe experiments to investigate a simple virulence model in which Pseudomonas aerugi- nosa PAO1 rapidly paralyzes and kills the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Our results imply that hydrogen cyanide is the sole or primary toxic factor produced by P. aeruginosa that is responsible for killing of the nematode. Four lines of evidence support this conclusion. First, a

LARRY A. GALLAGHER; COLIN MANOIL

2001-01-01

150

KILLING ELEPHANTS: BRIEF COMMENTS ON PROFESSOR HENNIE LOTTER'S PAPER, "SHOULD  

E-print Network

KILLING ELEPHANTS: BRIEF COMMENTS ON PROFESSOR HENNIE LOTTER'S PAPER, "SHOULD ELEPHANTS BE CULLED situated and the killing of elephants sanctioned. In this view, individuality is denied. As long the animal represents the gene pool of its species and that is what defines it as an elephant or whatever

151

FACTORS AFFECTING SECONDARY KILL OF THE GERMAN COCKROACH (DICTYOPTERA  

E-print Network

153 FACTORS AFFECTING SECONDARY KILL OF THE GERMAN COCKROACH (DICTYOPTERA: BLATTELLIDAE) BY GEL of Forestry, Nanning, Guangxi 530022, China Abstract Secondary kill of the German cockroach, Blattella of four cockroach gel baits against various developmental stages of a laboratory (Jwax) and a field (Dorie

Wang, Changlu

152

Rickettsia associated with male-killing in a buprestid beetle  

E-print Network

bacterium that causes male-killing in an unrelated ladybird beetle species. Low levels of parthenogenesisRickettsia associated with male-killing in a buprestid beetle EILLEEN T. LAWSON , TIMOTHY A populations of the buprestid leaf-mining beetle, Brachys tessellatus, from central South Carolina, USA, show

Werren, John H.

153

Mechanisms of Dendritic Cell Lysosomal Killing of Cryptococcus  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic pulmonary fungal pathogen that disseminates to the CNS causing fatal meningitis in immunocompromised patients. Dendritic cells (DCs) phagocytose C. neoformans following inhalation. Following uptake, cryptococci translocate to the DC lysosomal compartment and are killed by oxidative and non-oxidative mechanisms. DC lysosomal extracts kill cryptococci in vitro; however, the means of antifungal activity remain unknown. Our studies determined non-oxidative antifungal activity by DC lysosomal extract. We examined DC lysosomal killing of cryptococcal strains, anti-fungal activity of purified lysosomal enzymes, and mechanisms of killing against C. neoformans. Results confirmed DC lysosome fungicidal activity against all cryptococcal serotypes. Purified lysosomal enzymes, specifically cathepsin B, inhibited cryptococcal growth. Interestingly, cathepsin B combined with its enzymatic inhibitors led to enhanced cryptococcal killing. Electron microscopy revealed structural changes and ruptured cryptococcal cell walls following treatment. Finally, additional studies demonstrated that osmotic lysis was responsible for cryptococcal death.

Hole, Camaron R.; Bui, Hoang; Wormley, Floyd L.; Wozniak, Karen L.

2012-10-01

154

Cosmeceutical vehicles.  

PubMed

Consumers will pay a premium for high-performance skin and hair care products. The demand exists, and in return for the high cost, consumers expect the product to perform as claimed and to meet aesthetic standards beyond many products found in the mass market. To be successful in this highly competitive market, products must function as claimed or consumers will not repurchase. Effective contemporary high-end products must be properly formulated in nonirritating vehicles that consumers will perceive as elegant. PMID:19695476

Epstein, Howard

2009-01-01

155

Optimization of power management in an hybrid electric vehicle using dynamic programming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hybrid electric vehicles are those powered from two different sources. Typically, they are equipped with an internal combustion engine, and also with an electrical storage system, such as a bank of batteries or ultra-capacitors. While braking, these vehicles may convert kinetic energy to electrical energy and send it back to the electrical storage system (regenerative braking). The whole vehicle system

Laura V. Pérez; Guillermo R. Bossio; Diego Moitre; Guillermo O. García

2006-01-01

156

The use of stable isotope ratio analysis to distinguish multiple prey kill events from mass kill events  

Microsoft Academic Search

Archaeologists working with prey animal bonebeds are interested in determining whether the animals were obtained through a single, mass kill event or instead accumulated over time from multiple hunting events. This is often difficult to determine. The author investigated the use of stable isotope ratio analysis to distinguish accumulations of individuals derived from multiple populations from mass kills of individuals

Jack N. Fenner

2008-01-01

157

Combinatorial stresses kill pathogenic Candida species  

PubMed Central

Pathogenic microbes exist in dynamic niches and have evolved robust adaptive responses to promote survival in their hosts. The major fungal pathogens of humans, Candida albicans and Candida glabrata, are exposed to a range of environmental stresses in their hosts including osmotic, oxidative and nitrosative stresses. Significant efforts have been devoted to the characterization of the adaptive responses to each of these stresses. In the wild, cells are frequently exposed simultaneously to combinations of these stresses and yet the effects of such combinatorial stresses have not been explored. We have developed a common experimental platform to facilitate the comparison of combinatorial stress responses in C. glabrata and C. albicans. This platform is based on the growth of cells in buffered rich medium at 30°C, and was used to define relatively low, medium and high doses of osmotic (NaCl), oxidative (H 2O2) and nitrosative stresses (e.g., dipropylenetriamine (DPTA)-NONOate). The effects of combinatorial stresses were compared with the corresponding individual stresses under these growth conditions. We show for the first time that certain combinations of combinatorial stress are especially potent in terms of their ability to kill C. albicans and C. glabrata and/or inhibit their growth. This was the case for combinations of osmotic plus oxidative stress and for oxidative plus nitrosative stress. We predict that combinatorial stresses may be highly signif cant in host defences against these pathogenic yeasts. PMID:22463109

Kaloriti, Despoina; Tillmann, Anna; Cook, Emily; Jacobsen, Mette; You, Tao; Lenardon, Megan; Ames, Lauren; Barahona, Mauricio; Chandrasekaran, Komelapriya; Coghill, George; Goodman, Daniel; Gow, Neil A. R.; Grebogi, Celso; Ho, Hsueh-Lui; Ingram, Piers; McDonagh, Andrew; De Moura, Alessandro P. S.; Pang, Wei; Puttnam, Melanie; Radmaneshfar, Elahe; Romano, Maria Carmen; Silk, Daniel; Stark, Jaroslav; Stumpf, Michael; Thiel, Marco; Thorne, Thomas; Usher, Jane; Yin, Zhikang; Haynes, Ken; Brown, Alistair J. P.

2012-01-01

158

Combinatorial stresses kill pathogenic Candida species.  

PubMed

Pathogenic microbes exist in dynamic niches and have evolved robust adaptive responses to promote survival in their hosts. The major fungal pathogens of humans, Candida albicans and Candida glabrata, are exposed to a range of environmental stresses in their hosts including osmotic, oxidative and nitrosative stresses. Significant efforts have been devoted to the characterization of the adaptive responses to each of these stresses. In the wild, cells are frequently exposed simultaneously to combinations of these stresses and yet the effects of such combinatorial stresses have not been explored. We have developed a common experimental platform to facilitate the comparison of combinatorial stress responses in C. glabrata and C. albicans. This platform is based on the growth of cells in buffered rich medium at 30°C, and was used to define relatively low, medium and high doses of osmotic (NaCl), oxidative (H(2)O(2)) and nitrosative stresses (e.g., dipropylenetriamine (DPTA)-NONOate). The effects of combinatorial stresses were compared with the corresponding individual stresses under these growth conditions. We show for the first time that certain combinations of combinatorial stress are especially potent in terms of their ability to kill C. albicans and C. glabrata and/or inhibit their growth. This was the case for combinations of osmotic plus oxidative stress and for oxidative plus nitrosative stress. We predict that combinatorial stresses may be highly significant in host defences against these pathogenic yeasts. PMID:22463109

Kaloriti, Despoina; Tillmann, Anna; Cook, Emily; Jacobsen, Mette; You, Tao; Lenardon, Megan; Ames, Lauren; Barahona, Mauricio; Chandrasekaran, Komelapriya; Coghill, George; Goodman, Daniel; Gow, Neil A R; Grebogi, Celso; Ho, Hsueh-Lui; Ingram, Piers; McDonagh, Andrew; de Moura, Alessandro P S; Pang, Wei; Puttnam, Melanie; Radmaneshfar, Elahe; Romano, Maria Carmen; Silk, Daniel; Stark, Jaroslav; Stumpf, Michael; Thiel, Marco; Thorne, Thomas; Usher, Jane; Yin, Zhikang; Haynes, Ken; Brown, Alistair J P

2012-10-01

159

Unmanned Vehicle Situation Awareness  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the concept of unmanned vehicle situation awareness and provides a discussion of how unmanned vehicle situation awareness can be defined based upon human situation awareness. A broadly accepted human situation awareness definition is directly applied to the notion of unmanned vehicle situation awareness. The paper also discusses unique unmanned vehicle aspects that will influence unmanned vehicle situation

Julie A. Adams

160

Kinetic energy management in road traffic injury prevention: a call for action  

PubMed Central

Abstract: By virtue of their variability, mass and speed have important roles in transferring energies during a crash incidence (kinetic energy). The sum of kinetic energy is important in determining an injury severity and that is equal to one half of the vehicle mass multiplied by the square of the vehicle speed. To meet the Vision Zero policy (a traffic safety policy) prevention activities should be focused on vehicle speed management. Understanding the role of kinetic energy will help to develop measures to reduce the generation, distribution, and effects of this energy during a road traffic crash. Road traffic injury preventive activities necessitate Kinetic energy management to improve road user safety. PMID:24284810

Khorasani-Zavareh, Davoud; Bigdeli, Maryam; Saadat, Soheil; Mohammadi, Reza

2015-01-01

161

Motor Vehicle Trauma: An Unnecessary Disease  

PubMed Central

The motor vehicle accident kills and maims more of our young people than any other affliction. Yet prevention of injuries and deaths from MVA receives less emphasis in medical education, medical publications and collective political action than the problem merits. In daily practice, there are numerous opportunities for prevention counselling, alcoholic driver case finding, and critical assessment of the privilege of driving. Within their community, family physicians can have input into some preventive programs. At government level, physicians should increase their pressure for legislative action to reduce MVA injuries and deaths. PMID:21267343

Johnson, Douglas H.

1987-01-01

162

Generalized Killing-Yano equations in D=5 gauged supergravity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We propose a generalization of the (conformal) Killing-Yano equations relevant to D=5 minimal gauged supergravity. The generalization stems from the fact that the dual of the Maxwell flux, the 3-form ?F, couples naturally to particles in the background as a ‘torsion’. Killing-Yano tensors in the presence of torsion preserve most of the properties of the standard Killing-Yano tensors — exploited recently for the higher-dimensional rotating black holes of vacuum gravity with cosmological constant. In particular, the generalized closed conformal Killing-Yano 2-form gives rise to the tower of generalized closed conformal Killing-Yano tensors of increasing rank which in turn generate the tower of Killing tensors. An example of a generalized Killing-Yano tensor is found for the Chong-Cveti?-Lü-Pope black hole spacetime [Z.W. Chong, M. Cvetic, H. Lu, C.N. Pope, hep-th/0506029]. Such a tensor stands behind the separability of the Hamilton-Jacobi, Klein-Gordon, and Dirac equations in this background.

Kubiz?ák, David; Kunduri, Hari K.; Yasui, Yukinori

2009-07-01

163

Interventions to reduce risks associated with vehicle incompatibility.  

PubMed

Occupants of smaller, lighter passenger cars are more likely to be killed or injured in collisions with larger, heavier sport utility vehicles and light trucks than in collisions with other cars. Interventions are needed to reduce this vehicle "incompatibility" and its consequences. The authors conducted a systematic literature review to identify evaluations of interventions to reduce incompatibility. They reviewed engineering, biomedical, and other technical literature. To be included, a study must have 1) evaluated an intervention to reduce vehicle incompatibility, or its consequences, in a crash; 2) reported new research; and 3) been published in English from 1990 to 2010. Seventeen studies met the inclusion criteria. Interventions were designed to reduce the aggressivity of larger vehicles or improve the crashworthiness of smaller vehicles. Effective interventions included 1) modified bumper heights, 2) improved side strength of smaller vehicles, 3) side-impact air bags, 4) changes to vehicle stiffness, and 5) modifications of other front-end structures. Some of the interventions shown to be effective are now in wide use. However, others have yet to be required by regulators or voluntarily agreed to by manufacturers. If larger, heavier vehicles remain on the nation's roads, countermeasures will be needed to reduce risks for occupants of other vehicles. PMID:21926064

Vernick, Jon S; Tung, Gregory J; Kromm, Jonathan N

2012-01-01

164

Potassium channels mediate killing by human natural killer cells  

SciTech Connect

Human natural killer (NK) cells in peripheral blood spontaneously recognize and kill a wide variety of target cells. It has been suggested that ion channels are involved in the killing process because there is a Ca-dependent stage and because killing by presensitized cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which in many respects resembles NK killing, is associated with changes in K and Na transport in the target cell. Using the whole-cell variation of the patch-clamp technique, the authors found a voltage-dependent potassium (K/sup +/) current in NK cells. The K/sup +/ current was reduced in a dose-dependent manner by the K-channel blockers 4-aminopyridine and quinidine and by the traditional Ca-channel blockers verapamil and Cd/sup 2 +/. They tested the effects of ion-channel blockers on killing of two commonly used target cell lines: K562, which is derived from a human myeloid leukemia, and U937, which is derived from a human histiocytic leukemia. Killing of K562 target cells, determined in a standard /sup 51/Cr-release assay, was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by verapamil, quinidine, Cd/sup 2 +/, and 4-aminopyridine at concentrations comparable to those that blocked the K/sup +/ current in NK cells. In K562 target cells only a voltage-dependent Na= current was found and it was blocked by concentrations of tetrodotoxin that had no effect on killing. Killing of U937 target cells was also inhibited by the two ion-channel blockers tested, quinidine and verapamil. In this cell line only a small K/sup +/ current was found that was similar to the one in NK cells. The findings show that there are K channels in NK cells and that these channels play a necessary role in the killing process.

Schlichter, L.; Sidell N.; Hagiwara, S.

1986-01-01

165

40 CFR 180.1108 - Delta endotoxin of Bacillus thuringiensis variety San Diego encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens; exemption from the requirement...encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens; exemption from the...encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens is exempt from the...

2010-07-01

166

40 CFR 180.1108 - Delta endotoxin of Bacillus thuringiensis variety San Diego encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens; exemption from the requirement...encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens; exemption from the...encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens is exempt from the...

2013-07-01

167

40 CFR 180.1108 - Delta endotoxin of Bacillus thuringiensis variety San Diego encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens; exemption from the requirement...encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens; exemption from the...encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens is exempt from the...

2014-07-01

168

40 CFR 180.1108 - Delta endotoxin of Bacillus thuringiensis variety San Diego encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens; exemption from the requirement...encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens; exemption from the...encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens is exempt from the...

2011-07-01

169

40 CFR 180.1108 - Delta endotoxin of Bacillus thuringiensis variety San Diego encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens; exemption from the requirement...encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens; exemption from the...encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens is exempt from the...

2012-07-01

170

Factors Affecting Zebra Mussel Kill by the Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens  

SciTech Connect

The specific purpose of this research project was to identify factors that affect zebra mussel kill by the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens. Test results obtained during this three-year project identified the following key variables as affecting mussel kill: treatment concentration, treatment duration, mussel siphoning activity, dissolved oxygen concentration, water temperature, and naturally suspended particle load. Using this latter information, the project culminated in a series of pipe tests which achieved high mussel kill inside power plants under once-through conditions using service water in artificial pipes.

Daniel P. Molloy

2004-02-24

171

HIV transcription is induced with some forms of cell killing  

SciTech Connect

Using HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct`, we demonstrated a peak in CAT induction that occurs in viable (but not necessarily cell-division-competent) cells 24 h following exposure to some cell-killing agents. {Gamma} rays were the only cell-killing agent which did not induce HIV transcription; this can be attributed to the fact that {gamma}-ray-induced apoptotic death requires function p53, which is missing in HeLa cells. For all other agents, HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent and correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture.

Woloschak, G.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Schreck, S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)][South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Panozzo, J. [Loyola Univ. Medical Center, Maywood, IL (United States); Chang-Liu, C.-M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Libertin, C.R. [Loyola Univ. Medical Center, Maywood, IL (United States)

1996-11-01

172

Can Nanomedicines Kill Cancer Stem Cells?  

PubMed Central

Most tumors are heterogeneous and many cancers contain small population of highly tumorigenic and intrinsically drug resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs). Like normal stem cell, CSCs have ability to self-renew and differentiate to other tumor cell types. They are believed to be a source for drug resistance, tumor recurrence and metastasis. CSCs often overexpress drug efflux transporters, spend most of their time in non-dividing G0 cell cycle state, and therefore, can escape the conventional chemotherapies. Thus, targeting CSCs is essential for developing novel therapies to prevent cancer relapse and emerging of drug resistance. Nanocarrier-based therapeutic agents (nanomedicines) have been used to achieve longer circulation times, better stability and bioavailability over current therapeutics. Recently, some groups have successfully applied nanomedicines to target CSCs to eliminate the tumor and prevent its recurrence. These approaches include 1) delivery of therapeutic agents (small molecules, siRNA, antibodies) that affect embryonic signaling pathways implicated in self-renewal and differentiation in CSCs, 2) inhibiting drug efflux transporters in an attempt to sensitize CSCs to therapy, 3) targeting metabolism in CSCs through nanoformulated chemicals and field-responsive magnetic nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes, and 4) disruption of multiple pathways in drug resistant cells using combination of chemotherapeutic drugs with amphiphilic Pluronic block copolymers. Despite clear progress of these studies the challenges of targeting CSCs by nanomedicines still exist and leave plenty of room for improvement and development. This review summarizes biological processes that are related to CSCs, overviews the current state of anti-CSCs therapies, and discusses state-of-the-art nanomedicine approaches developed to kill CSCs. PMID:24120657

Zhao, Yi; Alakhova, Daria Y.; Kabanov, Alexander V.

2014-01-01

173

On the Lie subalgebra of Killing-Milne and Killing-Cartan vector fields in Newtonian space-time  

E-print Network

The Galilean (and more generally Milne) invariance of Newtonian theory allows for Killing vector fields of a general kind, whereby the Lie derivative of a field is not required to vanish but only to be cancellable by some infinitesimal Galilean (respectively Milne) gauge transformation. In this paper, it is shown that both the Killing-Milne vector fields, which preserve the background Newtonian space-time structure, and the Killing-Cartan vector fields, which in addition preserve the gravitational field, form a Lie subalgebra.

Chamel, N

2014-01-01

174

On the Lie subalgebra of Killing-Milne and Killing-Cartan vector fields in Newtonian space-time  

E-print Network

The Galilean (and more generally Milne) invariance of Newtonian theory allows for Killing vector fields of a general kind, whereby the Lie derivative of a field is not required to vanish but only to be cancellable by some infinitesimal Galilean (respectively Milne) gauge transformation. In this paper, it is shown that both the Killing-Milne vector fields, which preserve the background Newtonian space-time structure, and the Killing-Cartan vector fields, which in addition preserve the gravitational field, form a Lie subalgebra.

N. Chamel

2014-12-18

175

NK cells kill mycobacteria directly by releasing perforin and granulysin.  

PubMed

Although the mechanisms underlying the cytotoxic effect of NK cells on tumor cells and intracellular bacteria have been studied extensively, it remains unclear how these cells kill extracellular bacterial pathogens. In this study, we examine how human NK cells kill Mycobacterium kansasii and M.tb. The underlying mechanism is contact dependent and requires two cytolytic proteins: perforin and granulysin. Mycobacteria induce enhanced expression of the cytolytic proteins via activation of the NKG2D/NCR cell-surface receptors and intracellular signaling pathways involving ERK, JNK, and p38 MAPKs. These results suggest that NK cells use similar cellular mechanisms to kill both bacterial pathogens and target host cells. This report reveals a novel role for NK cells, perforin, and granulysin in killing mycobacteria and highlights a potential alternative defense mechanism that the immune system can use against mycobacterial infection. PMID:25139289

Lu, Chia-Chen; Wu, Ting-Shu; Hsu, Ya-Jing; Chang, Chih-Jung; Lin, Chuan-Sheng; Chia, Ju-Hsin; Wu, Tsu-Lan; Huang, Tsung-Teng; Martel, Jan; Ojcius, David M; Young, John D; Lai, Hsin-Chih

2014-12-01

176

Surface structure influences contact killing of bacteria by copper  

PubMed Central

Copper kills bacteria rapidly by a mechanism that is not yet fully resolved. The antibacterial property of copper has raised interest in its use in hospitals, in place of plastic or stainless steel. On the latter surfaces, bacteria can survive for days or even weeks. Copper surfaces could thus provide a powerful accessory measure to curb nosocomial infections. We here investigated the effect of the copper surface structure on the efficiency of contact killing of Escherichia coli, an aspect which so far has received very little attention. It was shown that electroplated copper surfaces killed bacteria more rapidly than either polished copper or native rolled copper. The release of ionic copper was also more rapid from electroplated copper compared to the other materials. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the bacteria nudged into the grooves between the copper grains of deposited copper. The findings suggest that, in terms of contact killing, more efficient copper surfaces can be engineered. PMID:24740976

Zeiger, Marco; Solioz, Marc; Edongué, Hervais; Arzt, Eduard; Schneider, Andreas S

2014-01-01

177

The Variety of Integrable Killing Tensors on the 3-Sphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Integrable Killing tensors are used to classify orthogonal coordinates in which the classical Hamilton-Jacobi equation can be solved by a separation of variables. We completely solve the Nijenhuis integrability conditions for Killing tensors on the sphere S^3 and give a set of isometry invariants for the integrability of a Killing tensor. We describe explicitly the space of solutions as well as its quotient under isometries as projective varieties and interpret their algebro-geometric properties in terms of Killing tensors. Furthermore, we identify all Stäckel systems in these varieties. This allows us to recover the known list of separation coordinates on S^3 in a simple and purely algebraic way. In particular, we prove that their moduli space is homeomorphic to the associahedron K_4.

Schöbel, Konrad

2014-07-01

178

Alcohol Poisoning Kills 6 Americans Every Day, CDC Says  

MedlinePLUS

... enable JavaScript. Alcohol Poisoning Kills 6 Americans Every Day, CDC Says Older adults hardest hit by binge- ... six people die in the United States each day after consuming far too much alcohol in too ...

179

(M-theory-)Killing spinors on symmetric spaces  

E-print Network

We show how the theory of invariant principal bundle connections for reductive homogeneous spaces can be applied to determine the holonomy of generalised Killing spinor covariant derivatives of the form $D= \

Hustler, Noel

2015-01-01

180

Erythrocyte and leukocyte: two partners in bacteria killing.  

PubMed

Leukocytes can't perform phagocytosis in blood stream. Blood velocity prevents phagocytosis because there is no time for leukocyte to recognize and catch bacteria. Bloodstream clearance from pathogens is performed by erythrocytes. During motion in bloodstream erythrocytes become charged by triboelectric effect. This charge attracts bacteria and fixes them on the surface of erythrocyte, then bacteria are engulfed and killed by hemoglobin oxygen. In bloodstream, leukocyte thin-wrinkled elastic membrane can't be charged by triboelectric effect and so leukocyte can't catch bacteria by means of electrostatic attraction force. Leukocytes engulf and kill bacteria out of blood circulatory system: in tissues, lymph nodes, slow velocity lymph, etc. Erythrocyte and leukocyte are bactericidal partners: the first kills bacteria in bloodstream, the second kills them locally, out of blood circulation. PMID:25259410

Minasyan, Hayk A

2014-01-01

181

Drought and Beetle-Killed Piñon Pines in Arizona  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Drought and beetle-killed piñon pines in Walnut Canyon National Monument near Flagstaff, Arizona, amid some surviving trees. Forest drought stress is highly correlated with mortality from poor growth, bark beetle outbreaks, and high-severity fire....

182

Drought and Beetle-Killed Piñon Pines in Arizona  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Drought and beetle-killed piñon pines in Walnut Canyon National Monument near Flagstaff, Arizona, amid a few surviving trees. Forest drought stress is strongly correlated with tree mortality from poor growth, bark beetle outbreaks, and high-severity fire....

183

Why Are Bad Products So Hard to Kill?  

E-print Network

It is puzzling that firms often continue to invest in product development projects when they should know that demand will be low. We argue that bad products are hard to kill because firms face an inherent conflict when ...

Simester, Duncan

184

PFIESTERIA SHUMWAYAE KILLS FISH BY MICROPREDATION NOT ECOTOXIN SECRETION  

EPA Science Inventory

Massive fish kills in mid-Atlantic USA estuaries involving several million Atlantic menhaden, Brevoortia tyrannus,have been attributed to dinoflagellates of the toxic Pfiesteria complex (TPC). Potent ichthyotoxins secreted during Pfiesteria blooms are thought to be responsible fo...

185

Kinetic Sculpture  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this design challenge activity, learners build a tower that’s at least 12 inches high with two or more parts that move (spin, sway, or flap) in the wind. This art meets construction activity allows learners to think about design challenges while creating a kinetic sculpture (a sculpture that moves). This is an excellent follow-up activity to "High Rise" from the same source.

WGBH

2010-01-01

186

Potassium Channels Mediate Killing by Human Natural Killer Cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Human natural killer (NK) cells in peripheral blood spontaneously recognize and kill a wide variety of target cells. It has been suggested that ion channels are involved in the killing process because there is a Ca-dependent stage and because killing by presensitized cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which in many respects resembles NK killing, is associated with changes in K and Na transport in the target cell. However, no direct evidence exists for ion channels in NK cells or in their target cells. Using the whole-cell variation of the patch-clamp technique, we found a voltage-dependent potassium (K+) current in NK cells. The K+ current was reduced in a dose-dependent manner by the K-channel blockers 4-aminopyridine and quinidine and by the traditional Ca-channel blockers verapamil and Cd2+. We tested the effects of ion-channel blockers on killing of two commonly used target cell lines: K562, which is derived from a human myeloid leukemia, and U937, which is derived from a human histiocytic leukemia. Killing of K562 target cells, determined in a standard 51Cr-release assay, was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by verapamil, quinidine, Cd2+, and 4-aminopyridine at concentrations comparable to those that blocked the K+ current in NK cells. In K562 target cells only a voltage-dependent Na+ current was found and it was blocked by concentrations of tetrodotoxin that had no effect on killing. Killing of U937 target cells was also inhibited by the two ion-channel blockers tested, quinidine and verapamil. In this cell line only a small K+ current was found that was similar to the one in NK cells. We could not find any evidence of a Ca2+ current in target cells or in NK cells; therefore, our results cannot explain the Ca dependence of killing. Our findings show that there are K channels in NK cells and that these channels play a necessary role in the killing process. In contrast, the endogenous channel type in the target cell is probably not a factor in determining target cell sensitivity to natural killing.

Schlichter, Lyanne; Sidell, Neil; Hagiwara, Susumu

1986-01-01

187

Approximate Killing vectors on S{sup 2}  

SciTech Connect

We present a new method for computing the best approximation to a Killing vector on closed 2-surfaces that are topologically S{sup 2}. When solutions of Killing's equation do not exist, this method is shown to yield results superior to those produced by existing methods. In addition, this method appears to provide a new tool for studying the horizon geometry of distorted black holes.

Cook, Gregory B. [Department of Physics, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27006 (United States); Whiting, Bernard F. [Department of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

2007-08-15

188

STJ X-ray detectors with killed electrode  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tunnel junctions Al(0)/Nb/Al(1)/AlOx/Al(2)/Nb/NbN with bottom electrode Al(0)/Nb/Al(1) as a killed electrode were studied at temperatures 1.35 and 0.3 K. It was found that at T=0.3 K tunneling from the killed electrode, absent at T=1.35 K, appeared. It increases the detector signal and broadens the spectrum. .

Andrianov, V. A.; Dmitriev, P. N.; Koshelets, V. P.; Kozin, M. G.; Romashkina, I. L.; Sergeev, S. A.

2002-02-01

189

On completeness of orbits of Killing vector fields  

E-print Network

A Theorem is proved which reduces the problem of completeness of orbits of Killing vector fields in maximal globally hyperbolic, say vacuum, space--times to some properties of the orbits near the Cauchy surface. In particular it is shown that all Killing orbits are complete in maximal developements of asymptotically flat Cauchy data, or of Cauchy data prescribed on a compact manifold. This result gives a significant strengthening of the uniqueness theorems for black holes.

Piotr T. Chrusciel

1993-04-21

190

Conformal Killing vector fields and a virial theorem  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The virial theorem is formulated both intrinsically and in local coordinates for a Lagrangian system of a mechanical type on a Riemann manifold. An important case studied in this paper is that of an affine virial function associated with a vector field on the configuration manifold. The special cases of a virial function associated with a Killing, a homothetic, and a conformal Killing vector field are considered and the corresponding virial theorems are established for these types of functions.

Cariñena, José F.; Gheorghiu, Irina; Martínez, Eduardo; Santos, Patrícia

2014-11-01

191

Rates of CTL Killing in Persistent Viral Infection In Vivo  

PubMed Central

The CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response is an important defence against viral invasion. Although CTL-mediated cytotoxicity has been widely studied for many years, the rate at which virus-infected cells are killed in vivo by the CTL response is poorly understood. To date the rate of CTL killing in vivo has been estimated for three virus infections but the estimates differ considerably, and killing of HIV-1-infected cells was unexpectedly low. This raises questions about the typical anti-viral capability of CTL and whether CTL killing is abnormally low in HIV-1. We estimated the rate of killing of infected cells by CD8+ T cells in two distinct persistent virus infections: sheep infected with Bovine Leukemia Virus (BLV) and humans infected with Human T Lymphotropic Virus type 1 (HTLV-1) which together with existing data allows us to study a total of five viruses in parallel. Although both BLV and HTLV-1 infection are characterised by large expansions of chronically activated CTL with immediate effector function ex vivo and no evidence of overt immune suppression, our estimates are at the lower end of the reported range. This enables us to put current estimates into perspective and shows that CTL killing of HIV-infected cells may not be atypically low. The estimates at the higher end of the range are obtained in more manipulated systems and may thus represent the potential rather than the realised CTL efficiency. PMID:24699260

Elemans, Marjet; Florins, Arnaud; Willems, Luc; Asquith, Becca

2014-01-01

192

Suitable vehicles: Framing blame and justice when children kill a child  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents the results of a comparative analysis of English and Norwegian newspaper coverage of two child-on-child homicides from the 1990s. Domestic coverage of the English case of James Bulger presented it as alarmingly symptomatic of deep-seated moral decline in Britain that only tough, remoralizing strategies could address. Coverage of the Norwegian case of Silje Redergård constructed it as

David A. Green

2008-01-01

193

Vehicle year and the risk of car crash injury  

PubMed Central

Objective: To quantify the association between vehicle age and risk of car crash injury. Design and setting: Data from a population based case-control study conducted in the Auckland region in 1998/99 was used to examine the adjusted risk of car crash injury or death due to vehicle age, after controlling for a range of known confounders. Cases were all cars involved in crashes in which at least one occupant was hospitalized or killed anywhere in the Auckland region, and controls were randomly selected cars on Auckland roads. The drivers of the 571 case vehicles and 588 control vehicles completed a structured interview. Main outcome measure: Hospitalisation or death of a vehicle occupant due to car crash injury. Results: Vehicles constructed before 1984 had significantly greater chance of being involved in an injury crash than those constructed after 1994 (odds ratio 2.88, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.20 to 6.91), after adjustment for potential confounders. There was also a trend for increasing crash risk with each one year increase in vehicle age after adjustment for potential confounders (odds ratio 1.05, 95% CI 0.99 to 1.11; p = 0.09). Conclusion: This study quantifies the increased risk of car crash injury associated with older vehicle year and confirms this as an important public health issue. PMID:14693899

Blows, S; Ivers, R; Woodward, M; Connor, J; Ameratunga, S; Norton, R

2003-01-01

194

Green Vehicle Guide  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site is geared toward consumers to help them choose the most fuel-efficient and clean vehicles. Users can download vehicle lists, look up vehicle ratings, learn more about reducing vehicle pollution, and use the links section to find further information. This is a timely site for a period when Americans might well want to think about reducing their dependence on oil.

195

Alternative Fuel Vehicle Data  

EIA Publications

Annual data released on the number of on-road alternative fuel vehicles and hybrid vehicles made available by both the original equipment manufacturers and aftermarket vehicle conversion facilities. Data on the use of alternative fueled vehicles and the amount of fuel they consume is also available.

2013-01-01

196

Kinetic City  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Developed by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, this website offers an assortment of science experiments, games, activities, and projects. In the Shape it Up game, students can learn about land formations and processes. Users can learn the basic interactions of mixing different chemicals in the Slush Rush link. Educators can find Leader packets and information on how to start a Kinetic City club. Besides the games educating users about topics in the physical sciences, the website also offers a variety of biology-related activities. After filling out the free sign-up form, the website saves individual's power points and results.

197

Hybrid Vehicle Design Challenge  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Through four lessons and four hands-on associated activities, this unit provides a way to teach the overarching concept of energy as it relates to both kinetic and potential energy. Within these topics, students are exposed to gravitational potential, spring potential, the Carnot engine, temperature scales and simple magnets. During the module, students apply these scientific concepts to solve the following engineering challenge: "The rising price of gasoline has many effects on the US economy and the environment. You have been contracted by an engineering firm to help design a physical energy storage system for a new hybrid vehicle for Nissan. How would you go about solving this problem? What information would you consider to be important to know? You will create a small prototype of your design idea and make a sales pitch to Nissan at the end of the unit." This module is built around the Legacy Cycle, a format that incorporates findings from educational research on how people best learn. This module is written for a first-year algebra-based physics class, though it could easily be modified for conceptual physics.

2014-09-18

198

Microfluor ¡metric Evaluation of Cell Kill Kinetics with 1-ß-D-Arabinofuranosylcytosinel  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY The effect of different concentrations of 1-0-D-arabino- furanosylcytosine (ara-C) on the progression of an established cell line of human lymphoid cells through the cell cycle was studied using a fluorescent DNA-specific Feulgen-type staining technique and a flow microfluorimeter. In addition to the distribution analysis of the relative DNA content, the number of intact cells, the percentage of incorporation of

Xenophon Yataganas; Annabel Strife; Amaury Perez; Bayard D. Clarkson

199

Wound healing properties and kill kinetics of Clerodendron splendens G. Don, a Ghanaian wound healing plant  

PubMed Central

As part of our general objective of investigating indigenous plants used in wound healing in Ghana, we hereby report our findings from some in vitro and in vivo studies related to wound healing activities of Clerodendron splendens G. Don (Verbanaceae). Methanolic extract of the aerial parts of the plant was tested for antimicrobial activity against Gram positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus faecalis, Micrococcus flavus, as well as resistant strains of Staph. aureus SA1199B, RN4220 and XU212), Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteous mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae) and Candida albicans using the micro-well dilution method. Survivor–time studies of the microorganisms, radical scavenging activity using 2,2’-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and various in vivo wound healing activity studies were also conducted on the extract. The extract exhibited biostatic action against all the test microorganisms with a Minimum Inhibition Concentration (MIC) ranging between 64 and 512 ?g/ml and a free radical scavenging property with an IC50 value of 103.2 ?g/ml. The results of the in vivo wound healing tests showed that upon application of C. splendens ointment, there was a reduction in the epithelization period from 26.7 days (control) to 13.6 days along with a marked decrease in the scar area from 54.2 mm2 (control) to 25.2 mm2. Significant increase in the tensile strength and hydroxyproline content were also observed as compared to the control and was comparable to nitrofurazone. The above results appear to justify the traditional use of C. splendens in wound healing and treatment of skin infections in Ghana. PMID:21808542

Gbedema, Stephen Y.; Emelia, Kisseih; Francis, Adu; Kofi, Annan; Eric, Woode

2010-01-01

200

Cell kill kinetics and cell cycle effects of taxol on human and hamster ovarian cell lines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Taxol is a clinically active anticancer drug, which exerts its cytotoxicity by the unique mechanism of polymerizing tubulin monomers into microtubules and stabilizing microtubules. Our studies with ovarian (hamster CHO and human A2780) cells showed that taxol is a phase-specific agent that is much more cytotoxic to mitotic cells than interphase cells. First, the dose-survival pattern of taxol resembled that

Narima M. Lopes; Earl G. Adams; Thomas W. Pitts; Bijoy K. Bhuyan

1993-01-01

201

Alternate vehicles for engine/vehicle optimization  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The space shuttle main engine, full flow staged combustion, integrated modular engine concept, split expander, and expander bleed rocket engine cycles were studied for use on Single-Stage-to-Orbit fully reusable vehicles. The vehicle uses vertical take-off and horizontal landing and liquid hydrogen rockets for propulsion. The PROPSIZE computer code was modified for use on the available computers. Vehicle sizing was done after trajectory optimization for various engine designs. The various rocket engine cycles were compared and it was found that the full flow staged combustion cycle had the lowest vehicle dry mass. The split expander cycle could have advantages in safety and cooling which could make it the preferred choice in some cases. Comparison to previous work with two-stage heavy-lift vehicles showed that the same ranking of the cycles was found for both vehicle concepts.

Venkatasubramanyam, G.; Martin, James A.

1993-01-01

202

Effect of hybrid system battery performance on determining CO 2 emissions of hybrid electric vehicles in real-world conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) can potentially reduce vehicle CO2 emissions by using recuperated kinetic vehicle energy stored as electric energy in a hybrid system battery (HSB). HSB performance affects the individual net HEV CO2 emissions for a given driving pattern, which is considered to be equivalent to unchanged net energy content in the HSB. The present study investigates the influence

Robert Alvarez; Peter Schlienger; Martin Weilenmann

2010-01-01

203

Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing  

SciTech Connect

The light-duty vehicle transportation sector in the United States depends heavily on imported petroleum as a transportation fuel. The Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is testing advanced technology vehicles to help reduce this dependency, which would contribute to the economic stability and homeland security of the United States. These advanced technology test vehicles include internal combustion engine vehicles operating on 100% hydrogen (H2) and H2CNG (compressed natural gas) blended fuels, hybrid electric vehicles, neighborhood electric vehicles, urban electric vehicles, and electric ground support vehicles. The AVTA tests and evaluates these vehicles with closed track and dynamometer testing methods (baseline performance testing) and accelerated reliability testing methods (accumulating lifecycle vehicle miles and operational knowledge within 1 to 1.5 years), and in normal fleet environments. The Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant and H2-fueled vehicles are demonstrating the feasibility of using H2 as a transportation fuel. Hybrid, neighborhood, and urban electric test vehicles are demonstrating successful applications of electric drive vehicles in various fleet missions. The AVTA is also developing electric ground support equipment (GSE) test procedures, and GSE testing will start during the fall of 2003. All of these activities are intended to support U.S. energy independence. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory manages these activities for the AVTA.

James Francfort

2003-11-01

204

Inflatable kill packers used in working over Kuwaiti wells  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on inflatable packers which are being used with great success in post-well capping workover operations in Kuwait oil fields. In mid-January, about one kill packer was being run per day. Use is expected to increase in March when a second post-capping crew arrives. Of several thousand unconventional ideas submitted to Kuwait Oil Co. (KOC) for controlling the well fires left in the aftermath of lst year's Gulf War, only about a dozen were actually used. Inflatable kill packers, designed and manufactured by Baker Service Tools and marketed by Baker Oil Tools, were one of the ideas that proved effective. The kill packers are modifications of Baker's inflatable packers that have successfully been used in capping producers on many blowouts throughout the world, including the Piper Alpha disaster in the North Sea and the Saga blowout offshore Norway.

Miller, D. (Baker Oil Tools, Houston, TX (US)); Conover, G. (Baker Service Tools, Houston, TX (US))

1992-03-09

205

[Serial killings in a nursing home for the elderly].  

PubMed

In 2005, a 27-year-old nurse had been sentenced to life imprisonment for killing 9 female residents of the home within 3 years. After the post-mortem examination a natural death had been certified for all the victims. These 9 deaths were retrospectively analysed as to the motive and circumstances of the crime, the method applied, the results of the postmortem examination and the autopsy as well as the profile of the perpetrator. 8 victims had been smothered by blocking the external air passages with a soft fabric and one had been killed by omitting to remove secretion from the respiratory tract. The autopsies performed after exhumation did not furnish unequivocal evidence of homicide. Generally, the method of killing applied in these cases is known to leave almost no traces. Apart from the circumstantial evidence, the court had to base its decision on the confessions of the emotionally disturbed perpetrator, although she partly revoked these confessions later. PMID:19323148

Doberentz, Elke; Musshoff, Frank; Madea, Burkhard

2009-01-01

206

Almost-Killing conserved currents: A general mass function  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new class of conserved currents, describing nongravitational energy-momentum density, is presented. The proposed currents do not require the existence of a (timelike) Killing vector, and are not restricted to spherically symmetric spacetimes (or similar ones, in which the Kodama vector can be defined). They are based instead on almost-Killing vectors, which could in principle be defined on generic spacetimes. We provide local arguments, based on energy density profiles in highly simplified (stationary, rigidly rotating) star models, which confirm the physical interest of these almost-Killing currents. A mass function is defined in this way for the spherical case, qualitatively different from the Hernández-Misner mass function. An elliptic equation determining the new mass function is derived for the Tolman-Bondi spherically symmetric dust metrics, including a simple solution for the Oppenheimer-Snyder collapse. The equations for the nonsymmetric case are shown to be of a mixed elliptic-hyperbolic nature.

Ruiz, Milton; Palenzuela, Carlos; Bona, Carles

2014-01-01

207

Immunology 101 Killing in acute viral infections Killing in chronic viral infections Appendix I Appendix II Extra Mathematical models of CD8 T cell responses  

E-print Network

Immunology 101 Killing in acute viral infections Killing in chronic viral infections Appendix I in vivo Vitaly V. Ganusov Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, NM, USA 1 / 55 #12;Immunology 101 1 Immunology 101 Immune system 2 Killing in acute viral infections Experimental details Model 3

Haase, Markus

208

Electric and hybrid vehicles  

SciTech Connect

A study of the energy utilization of gasoline and battery-electric powered special purpose vehicles is discussed along with the impact of electric cars on national energy consumption, the development of electric vehicles in Japan, the applicability of safety standards to electric and hybrid-vehicles, and crashworthiness tests on two electric vehicles. Aspects of energy storage are explored, taking into account a review of battery systems for electrically powered vehicles, the dynamic characterization of lead-acid batteries for vehicle applications, nickel-zinc storage batteries as energy sources for electric vehicles, and a high energy tubular battery for a 1800 kg payload electric delivery van. Subjects considered in connection with drive systems include the drive system of the DOE near-term electric vehicle, a high performance AC electric drive system, an electromechanical transmission for hybrid vehicle power trains, and a hybrid vehicle for fuel economy. Questions of vehicle development are examined, giving attention to the Electrovair electric car, special purpose urban cars, the system design of the electric test vehicle, a project for city center transport, and a digital computer program for simulating electric vehicle performance.

Jacovides, L.J.; Cornell, E.P.; Kirk, R.

1981-01-01

209

SMART BOMBS, SERIAL KILLING, AND THE RAPTURE: RT BOMBS, SERIAL KILLING, AND THE RAPTURE: RT BOMBS, SERIAL KILLING, The Vanishing Bodies of Imperial Apocalypticism  

Microsoft Academic Search

1. One of the most well-publicized hypotheses regarding the terror of 9\\/11 is the notion that religious fantasies played a major role in inspiring the militants of al-Qaeda to launch their suicide attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. Only irrational fanatics could have been capable of killing themselves for the sake of taking thousands of innocent lives

Peter Yoonsuk Paik

210

Social networking in vehicles  

E-print Network

In-vehicle, location-aware, socially aware telematic systems, known as Flossers, stand to revolutionize vehicles, and how their drivers interact with their physical and social worlds. With Flossers, users can broadcast and ...

Liang, Philip Angus

2006-01-01

211

Automotive vehicle sensors  

SciTech Connect

This report is an introduction to the field of automotive vehicle sensors. It contains a prototype data base for companies working in automotive vehicle sensors, as well as a prototype data base for automotive vehicle sensors. A market analysis is also included.

Sheen, S.H.; Raptis, A.C.; Moscynski, M.J.

1995-09-01

212

Green Vehicle Guide  

MedlinePLUS

What is a Green Vehicle? What you drive, how you drive, and what fuel you use can impact both the environment and your pocketbook. Learn ... and increases emissions? See More » Search for SmartWay Vehicles Find the cleanest, most fuel efficient vehicle that ...

213

Electric Vehicle Technician  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With President Obama's goal to have one million electric vehicles (EV) on the road by 2015, the electric vehicle technician should have a promising and busy future. "The job force in the car industry is ramping up for a revitalized green car industry," according to Greencareersguide.com. An electric vehicle technician will safely troubleshoot and…

Moore, Pam

2011-01-01

214

Energy 101: Electric Vehicles  

ScienceCinema

This edition of Energy 101 highlights the benefits of electric vehicles, including improved fuel efficiency, reduced emissions, and lower maintenance costs. For more information on electric vehicles from the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, visit the Vehicle Technologies Program website: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/

None

2013-05-29

215

Scratch from Pet Rat Kills Child; CDC Warns of Risk  

MedlinePLUS

... this page, please enable JavaScript. Scratch From Pet Rat Kills Child; CDC Warns of Risk 'Rat-bite fever' also sickened 16 others in 2000- ... 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The tragic death from "rat-bite fever" of a 10-year-old San ...

216

Illegal killing for ivory drives global decline in African elephants.  

PubMed

Illegal wildlife trade has reached alarming levels globally, extirpating populations of commercially valuable species. As a driver of biodiversity loss, quantifying illegal harvest is essential for conservation and sociopolitical affairs but notoriously difficult. Here we combine field-based carcass monitoring with fine-scale demographic data from an intensively studied wild African elephant population in Samburu, Kenya, to partition mortality into natural and illegal causes. We then expand our analytical framework to model illegal killing rates and population trends of elephants at regional and continental scales using carcass data collected by a Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species program. At the intensively monitored site, illegal killing increased markedly after 2008 and was correlated strongly with the local black market ivory price and increased seizures of ivory destined for China. More broadly, results from application to continental data indicated illegal killing levels were unsustainable for the species between 2010 and 2012, peaking to ? 8% in 2011 which extrapolates to ? 40,000 elephants illegally killed and a probable species reduction of ? 3% that year. Preliminary data from 2013 indicate overharvesting continued. In contrast to the rest of Africa, our analysis corroborates that Central African forest elephants experienced decline throughout the last decade. These results provide the most comprehensive assessment of illegal ivory harvest to date and confirm that current ivory consumption is not sustainable. Further, our approach provides a powerful basis to determine cryptic mortality and gain understanding of the demography of at-risk species. PMID:25136107

Wittemyer, George; Northrup, Joseph M; Blanc, Julian; Douglas-Hamilton, Iain; Omondi, Patrick; Burnham, Kenneth P

2014-09-01

217

Illegal killing for ivory drives global decline in African elephants  

PubMed Central

Illegal wildlife trade has reached alarming levels globally, extirpating populations of commercially valuable species. As a driver of biodiversity loss, quantifying illegal harvest is essential for conservation and sociopolitical affairs but notoriously difficult. Here we combine field-based carcass monitoring with fine-scale demographic data from an intensively studied wild African elephant population in Samburu, Kenya, to partition mortality into natural and illegal causes. We then expand our analytical framework to model illegal killing rates and population trends of elephants at regional and continental scales using carcass data collected by a Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species program. At the intensively monitored site, illegal killing increased markedly after 2008 and was correlated strongly with the local black market ivory price and increased seizures of ivory destined for China. More broadly, results from application to continental data indicated illegal killing levels were unsustainable for the species between 2010 and 2012, peaking to ?8% in 2011 which extrapolates to ?40,000 elephants illegally killed and a probable species reduction of ?3% that year. Preliminary data from 2013 indicate overharvesting continued. In contrast to the rest of Africa, our analysis corroborates that Central African forest elephants experienced decline throughout the last decade. These results provide the most comprehensive assessment of illegal ivory harvest to date and confirm that current ivory consumption is not sustainable. Further, our approach provides a powerful basis to determine cryptic mortality and gain understanding of the demography of at-risk species. PMID:25136107

Wittemyer, George; Northrup, Joseph M.; Blanc, Julian; Douglas-Hamilton, Iain; Omondi, Patrick; Burnham, Kenneth P.

2014-01-01

218

7 CFR 29.1018 - Fire-killed.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

Any leaf of which 5 percent or more of its surface has a set green color caused by excessive heat in the curing process. Any lot containing 5 percent or more of such tobacco may be described as fire-killed. (See Rule 23.) [42 FR 21092, Apr. 25, 1977. Redesignated at 51 FR 25027, July 10,...

2012-01-01

219

Entropy from conformal field theory at Killing horizons  

Microsoft Academic Search

On a manifold with a boundary, the constraint algebra of general relativity may acquire a central extension, which can be computed using covariant phase space techniques. When the boundary is a (local) Killing horizon, a natural set of boundary conditions leads to a Virasoro subalgebra with a calculable central charge. Conformal field theory methods may then be used to determine

S. Carlip

1999-01-01

220

Control instrumentation for wellheads and mud kill system  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work describes the wellhead and mud kill system instrumentation installed at the Mobile Oil Indonesia Arun natural gas field in N. Sumatra. The first part describes the controls and instrumentation associated with the field production wells. The philosophy behind the design of the pressure controls and pressure protection system is discussed, including details of the layout and operation of

1982-01-01

221

KILLED VACCINE IN ADJUVANT AND PROTECTION OF MICE  

E-print Network

KILLED VACCINE IN ADJUVANT AND PROTECTION OF MICE AGAINST AN INTRAPERITONEAL CHALLENGE OF BRUCELLA the ioth day, decreased and then remained at a nearly constant level. In animals vaccinated with a suitable of control animals reached higher weights than those of vaccinated ones. The effect of graduated doses

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

222

Anthrax Toxin Receptor 2Dependent Lethal Toxin Killing In Vivo  

E-print Network

Anthrax Toxin Receptor 2­Dependent Lethal Toxin Killing In Vivo Heather M. Scobie1,2 , Darran J Jolla, California, United States of America Anthrax toxin receptors 1 and 2 (ANTXR1 and ANTXR2) have by residue D683 of the protective antigen (PA) subunit of anthrax toxin. The receptor-bound metal ion and PA

Sejnowski, Terrence J.

223

Licence to Kill: About Accreditation Issues and James Bond  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Accreditation has become something of a hot topic in higher education. In Europe it has been described as a 'Licence to Kill'. The James Bond metaphor is particularly illustrative when reflecting on quality assurance challenges in higher education. Publications on this subject in recent years reveal that the array of issues associated with…

Scheele, Ko

2004-01-01

224

Who Killed Parliamentary Government By Dr. Gary Levy  

E-print Network

for this presentation was inspired by the 2006 documentary film "Who Killed the Electric Car" It looked at the development, production and subsequent dismantling of a perfectly good electric car invented in the 1990s. Of course the electric car is making a comeback and perhaps Parliament will as well. The presentation

Peak, Derek

225

How Moist Heat Kills Spores of Bacillus subtilis?  

PubMed Central

Populations of Bacillus subtilis spores in which 90 to 99.9% of the spores had been killed by moist heat gave only two fractions on equilibrium density gradient centrifugation: a fraction comprised of less dense spores that had lost their dipicolinic acid (DPA), undergone significant protein denaturation, and were all dead and a fraction with the same higher density as that of unheated spores. The latter fraction from heat-killed spore populations retained all of its DPA, but ?98% of the spores could be dead. The dead spores that retained DPA germinated relatively normally with nutrient and nonnutrient germinants, but the outgrowth of these germinated spores was significantly compromised, perhaps because they had suffered damage to some proteins such that metabolic activity during outgrowth was greatly decreased. These results indicate that DPA release takes place well after spore killing by moist heat and that DPA release during moist-heat treatment is an all-or-nothing phenomenon; these findings also suggest that damage to one or more key spore proteins causes spore killing by moist heat. PMID:17890306

Coleman, William H.; Chen, De; Li, Yong-qing; Cowan, Ann E.; Setlow, Peter

2007-01-01

226

Killing for Girls: Predation Play and Female Empowerment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Predation games--games in which the player is actively encouraged and often required to hunt and kill in order to survive--have historically been the purview of male players. Females, though now much more involved in digital games than before, generally play games that stress traditionally feminine values such as socializing with others, shopping,…

Bertozzi, Elena

2012-01-01

227

Population genetics of the frog-killing fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis  

E-print Network

Population genetics of the frog-killing fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis Jess A. T. Morgan fungal genotype, and evidence of human-assisted fungus migration. In support of endemism, at a local species die soon after their skin is infected by the fungus, Batrachochytrium dendro- batidis (3, 4

California at Berkeley, University of

228

Timelike Killing Fields and Relativistic Statisti-cal Mechanics  

E-print Network

-time, and this corresponds to a Newtonian gas subject to gravitational, tidal, and in some instances "centrifugal forces gas and compare it, for a class of spacetimes, to its Newtonian analog, derived both independently examples are given in Kerr spacetime. KEY WORDS: Statistical mechanics; Relativistic ideal gas; Killing

Klein, David

229

Just War and Robots' Killings Thomas W. Simpson  

E-print Network

1 Just War and Robots' Killings Thomas W. Simpson Associate Professor of Philosophy and Public systems--`killer robots'--be used in war? There is a growing campaign in favour of an international on an implicitly consequentialist basis. Our task is to defend the permissibility of killer robots, and indeed

Wallace, Mark

230

Tree-Killing Las Conchas Fire in New Mexico  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

USGS scientist Craig D. Allen observes the results of the extensive, tree-killing fire that consumed almost all above-ground biomass in this part of the Las Conchas Fire burn area in the Jemez Mountains, New Mexico. Photo taken in late August 2011, two months post-fire. Forest drought stress is high...

231

Evolution Operators for Linearly Polarized Two-Killing Cosmological Models  

E-print Network

We give a general procedure to obtain non perturbative evolution operators in closed form for quantized linearly polarized two Killing vector reductions of general relativity with a cosmological interpretation. We study the representation of these operators in Fock spaces and discuss in detail the conditions leading to unitary evolutions.

J. Fernando Barbero G.; Daniel Gómez Vergel; Eduardo J. S. Villaseñor

2006-06-15

232

Detailed kinetic models for catalytic reforming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Catalyst reforming was used as a “vehicle” process chemistry to validate a set of tools for the automated construction of kinetic models. This is because the catalytic reforming process exposes many important modeling concepts and features, including multiple reaction families, catalyst deactivation, temperature profiling, parameter optimization, recycling, etc. A previously published [P.V. Joshi, S.D. Iyer, M.T. Klein, Computer assisted modeling

Wei Wei; Craig A. Bennett; Ryuzo Tanaka; Gang Hou; Michael T. Klein

2008-01-01

233

A Scope for the Research and Development Activities on Electric Vehicle Technology in Pune City  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ever increasing prices of petroleum products and serious environmental pollution problems have accelerated the development of non-polluting electric and hybrid vehicles during last few decades. The new technology of battery operated electric vehicles is likely to replace conventional IC engine automobile technology soon. Pune is a major automobile hub of India. Tata Motors, Bajaj Auto, Kinetic engineering etc. have

V. Gulhane; M. R. Tarambale; Y. P. Nerkar

2006-01-01

234

Building Spacecraft & Launch Vehicles! Space Vehicle Design!  

E-print Network

Astronautics, 1958" ·! Energy budgets" ·! MALLAR, MORAD, ARP, MALLIR" ·! Safety and reliability of LOR Braun's acquiescence for LOR" Joe Shea" ·! Evolution of Saturn launch vehicles" ·! Development of rocket

Stengel, Robert F.

235

The Vehicle Ecosystem  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ubiquitous computing in the vehicle industry has primarily focused on sensor data serving different ubiquitous on-board services (e.g., crash detection, antilock brake systems, or air conditioning). These services mainly address vehicle drivers while driving. However, in view of the role of vehicles in today's society, it goes without saying that vehicles relate to more than just the driver or occupants; they are part of a larger ecosystem, including traffic participants, authorities, customers and the like. To serve the ecosystem with ubiquitous services based on vehicle sensor data, there is a need for an open information infrastructure that enables service development close to the customer. This paper presents results from a research project on designing such an infrastructure at a major European vehicle manufacturer. Our empirical data shows how the vehicle manufacturer's conceptualization of services disagrees with the needs of vehicle stakeholders in a more comprehensive vehicle ecosystem. In light of this, we discuss the effect on information infrastructure design and introduce the distinction between information infrastructure as product feature and service facilitator. In a more general way, we highlight the importance of information infrastructure to contextualize the vehicle as part of a larger ecosystem and thus support open innovation.

Kuschel, Jonas

236

Comparison of killing of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria by pure singlet oxygen. [Salmonella typhimurium; Escherichia coli; Sarcina lutea; Staphylococcus aureus; Streptococcus lactis; Streptococcus faecalis  

SciTech Connect

Gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria were found to display different sensitivities to pure singlet oxygen generated outside of cells. Killing curves for Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli strains were indicative of multihit killing, whereas curves for Sarcina lutea, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus lactis, and Streptococcus faecalis exhibited single-hit kinetics. The S. typhimurium deep rough strain TA1975, which lacks nearly all of the cell wall lipopolysaccharide coat and manifests concomitant enhancement of penetration by some exogenous substances, responded to singlet oxygen with initially faster inactivation than did the S. typhimurium wild-type strain, although the maximum rates of killing appeared to be quite similar. The structure of the cell wall thus plays an important role in susceptibility to singlet oxygen. The outer membrane-lipopolysaccharide portion of the gram-negative cell wall initially protects the bacteria from extracellular singlet oxygen, although it may also serve as a source for secondary reaction products which accentuate the rates of cell killing. S. typhimurium and E. coli strains lacking the cellular antioxidant, glutathione, showed no difference from strains containing glutathione in response to the toxic effects of singlet oxygen. Strains of Sarcina lutea and Staphylococcus aureus that contained carotenoids, however, were far more resistant to singlet oxygen lethality than were both carotenoidless mutants of the same species and other gram-positive species lacking high levels of protective carotenoids.

Dahl, T.A.; Midden, W.R. (Bowling Green State Univ., OH (USA)); Hartman, P.E. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (USA))

1989-04-01

237

9 CFR 113.200 - General requirements for killed virus vaccines.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false General requirements for killed virus vaccines. 113.200 Section 113...INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS...VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.200 General...

2013-01-01

238

9 CFR 113.207 - Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Eastern, Western, and Venezuelan, Killed Virus.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Eastern, Western, and Venezuelan, Killed Virus. 113.207 Section 113.207 Animals...INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS...VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.207...

2014-01-01

239

9 CFR 113.207 - Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Eastern, Western, and Venezuelan, Killed Virus.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Eastern, Western, and Venezuelan, Killed Virus. 113.207 Section 113.207 Animals...INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS...VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.207...

2012-01-01

240

9 CFR 113.207 - Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Eastern, Western, and Venezuelan, Killed Virus.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Eastern, Western, and Venezuelan, Killed Virus. 113.207 Section 113.207 Animals...INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS...VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.207...

2011-01-01

241

9 CFR 113.200 - General requirements for killed virus vaccines.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...false General requirements for killed virus vaccines. 113.200 Section 113...INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS...VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.200 General...

2011-01-01

242

9 CFR 113.207 - Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Eastern, Western, and Venezuelan, Killed Virus.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Eastern, Western, and Venezuelan, Killed Virus. 113.207 Section 113.207 Animals...INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS...VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.207...

2013-01-01

243

9 CFR 113.200 - General requirements for killed virus vaccines.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...false General requirements for killed virus vaccines. 113.200 Section 113...INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS...VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.200 General...

2014-01-01

244

Killing tensors in two-dimensional space-times with applications to cosmology.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The existence of Killing vectors and Killing tensors in two-dimensional space-times is discussed. The corresponding mechanical problem having a potential with two exponential terms is analyzed in detail and a number of cases admitting Killing tensors are given. The Killing tensors give rise to new exact solutions in perfect fluid Bianchi and Kantowski-Sachs cosmologies as well as in inflationary models with a scalar field source.

Rosquist, K.; Uggla, C.

1991-12-01

245

Spacetimes with Killing tensors. [for Einstein-Maxwell fields with certain spinor indices  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The characteristics of the Killing equation and the Killing tensor are discussed. A conformal Killing tensor is of interest inasmuch as it gives rise to a quadratic first integral for null geodesic orbits. The Einstein-Maxwell equations are considered together with the Bianchi identity and the conformal Killing tensor. Two examples for the application of the considered relations are presented, giving attention to the charged Kerr solution and the charged C-metric.

Hughston, L. P.; Sommers, P.

1973-01-01

246

Fathers who kill their children: an analysis of the literature.  

PubMed

Roughly half of filicidal acts are committed by fathers, though the majority of the literature focuses on maternal filicide. This paper reviews the existing literature on paternal filicide with the goal of identifying characteristics common among these fathers. Fathers who killed their children were, on average, in their mid thirties. The mean age of their victims was five. They may have multiple victims. Sons and daughters were killed in equal numbers. Reasons included death related to abuse, mental illness (including psychosis and depression), and revenge against a spouse. The method often involved wounding violence. Suicide following the act occurred frequently. After being tried for their crimes, filicidal fathers were more frequently incarcerated than hospitalized. Given the range of those capable of this act, mental health professionals must be alert to the possibility of filicide in a variety of fathers. Considering this risk, clinicians should inquire about thoughts of harming children, partners, and themselves. PMID:19187457

West, Sara G; Friedman, Susan Hatters; Resnick, Phillip J

2009-03-01

247

Geometric properties of stationary and axisymmetric Killing horizons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study some geometric properties of Killing horizons in four-dimensional stationary and axisymmetric space-times with an electromagnetic field and a cosmological constant. Using a (1 +1 +2 ) space-time split, we construct relations between the space-time Riemann tensor components and the components of the Riemann tensor corresponding to the horizon surface. The Einstein equations allow to derive the space-time scalar curvature invariants—Kretschmann, Chern-Pontryagin, and Euler—on the two-dimensional spacelike horizon surface. The derived relations generalize the relations known for Killing horizons of static and axisymmetric four-dimensional space-times. We also present the generalization of Hartle's curvature formula.

Shoom, Andrey A.

2015-01-01

248

Electric vehicle parametric analysis  

SciTech Connect

During the period from 1990 to 1995, the automobile manufacturers of Europe, America, and Japan have been responsive to the need to re-evaluate the battery electric vehicle (EV) an a zero emission vehicle, and have released key design specifications and vehicle performance characteristics for more than thirty electric vehicles displayed at the: 55th IAA International Motor Show in Frankfurt, NAIAS`95 North American International Auto Show in Detroit, and the 30th International Motor Show in Tokyo. This paper includes a comparative parametric correlation analysis of these key design parameters which include: vehicle test mass, tire coefficients, overall aerodynamic drag and skin friction drag coefficients, equivalent flat plate frontal area, length to hydraulic diameter ratio, peak tractive force, peak traction motor power, and battery energy storage capacity. The conclusions show that the automobile manufacturers have achieved dramatic improvements in many of these key design parameters, and as a result the battery electric vehicle now promises to have a brighter future.

Wyczalek, F.A. [FW Lilly Inc., Bloomfield Hills, MI (United States)

1995-12-31

249

Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is to increase the body of knowledge as well as the awareness and acceptance of electric drive and other advanced technology vehicles (ATV). The AVTA accomplishes this goal by testing ATVs on test tracks and dynamometers (Baseline Performance testing), as well as in real-world applications (Fleet and Accelerated Reliability testing and public demonstrations). This enables the AVTA to provide Federal and private fleet managers, as well as other potential ATV users, with accurate and unbiased information on vehicle performance and infrastructure needs so they can make informed decisions about acquiring and operating ATVs. The ATVs currently in testing include vehicles that burn gaseous hydrogen (H2) fuel and hydrogen/CNG (H/CNG) blended fuels in internal combustion engines (ICE), and hybrid electric (HEV), urban electric, and neighborhood electric vehicles. The AVTA is part of DOE's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program.

James Francfort

2004-06-01

250

Automatic vehicle location system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An automatic vehicle detection system is disclosed, in which each vehicle whose location is to be detected carries active means which interact with passive elements at each location to be identified. The passive elements comprise a plurality of passive loops arranged in a sequence along the travel direction. Each of the loops is tuned to a chosen frequency so that the sequence of the frequencies defines the location code. As the vehicle traverses the sequence of the loops as it passes over each loop, signals only at the frequency of the loop being passed over are coupled from a vehicle transmitter to a vehicle receiver. The frequencies of the received signals in the receiver produce outputs which together represent a code of the traversed location. The code location is defined by a painted pattern which reflects light to a vehicle carried detector whose output is used to derive the code defined by the pattern.

Hansen, G. R., Jr. (inventor)

1973-01-01

251

Vehicle underbody fairing  

DOEpatents

A vehicle underbody fairing apparatus for reducing aerodynamic drag caused by a vehicle wheel assembly, by reducing the size of a recirculation zone formed under the vehicle body immediately downstream of the vehicle wheel assembly. The fairing body has a tapered aerodynamic surface that extends from a front end to a rear end of the fairing body with a substantially U-shaped cross-section that tapers in both height and width. Fasteners or other mounting devices secure the fairing body to an underside surface of the vehicle body, so that the front end is immediately downstream of the vehicle wheel assembly and a bottom section of the tapered aerodynamic surface rises towards the underside surface as it extends in a downstream direction.

Ortega, Jason M. (Pacifica, CA); Salari, Kambiz (Livermore, CA); McCallen, Rose (Livermore, CA)

2010-11-09

252

New Geometry with All Killing Vectors Spanning the Poincaré Algebra  

E-print Network

The new 4D geometry whose Killing vectors span the Poincar\\'e algebra is presented and its structure is analyzed. The new geometry can be regarded as the Poincar\\'e-invariant solution of the degenerate extension of the vacuum Einstein field equations with a negative cosmological constant and provides a static cosmological space-time with a Lobachevsky space. The motion of free particles in the space-time is discussed.

Chao-Guang Huang; Yu Tian; Xiao-Ning Wu; Zhan Xu; Bin Zhou

2012-04-19

253

[Belgian memorials to animals wounded and killed in war].  

PubMed

Compassion is a feeling that makes man sensitive to the suffering and the death of animals. This feeling is not always shared by men and frequently they forget to recognize the merits of the animals wounded or killed while fighting side by side. In the past the horses were even more exposed to the dangers of war than men. In Belgium marks of these sufferings can be found on some monuments as well as in awards added to high military decorations. PMID:11762437

Mammerickx, M

2001-01-01

254

Investigation of hot ductility in Al-killed boron steels  

Microsoft Academic Search

The influence of boron to nitrogen ratio, strain rate and cooling rate on hot ductility of aluminium-killed, low carbon, boron microalloyed steel was investigated. Hot tensile testing was performed on steel samples reheated in argon to 1300°C, cooled at rates of 0.3, 1.2 and 3.0°Cs?1 to temperatures in the range 750–1050°C, and then strained to failure at initial strain rates

L. H. Chown; L. A. Cornish

2008-01-01

255

Charged Particles Kill Pathogens and Round Up Dust  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

To keep plants fresh longer in space, Marshall Space Flight Center awarded funding to the University of Wisconsin-Madison to develop a titanium oxide-based device that reduced the amount of decay-inducing ethylene gas in the air. Electrolux (now Dallas-based Aerus Holdings) furthered the technology by developing an air purification product that kills pathogens both in the atmosphere and on surfaces.

2015-01-01

256

Development of novel antibacterial peptides that kill resistant isolates  

Microsoft Academic Search

The rapid emergence of bacterial strains that are resistant to current antibiotics requires the development of novel types of antimicrobial compounds. Proline-rich cationic antibacterial peptides such as pyrrhocoricin kill responsive bacteria by binding to the 70kDa heat shock protein DnaK and inhibiting protein folding. We designed and synthesized multiply protected dimeric analogs of pyrrhocoricin and optimized the in vitro antibacterial

Mare Cudic; Barry A. Condie; Daniel J. Weiner; Elena S. Lysenko; Zhi Q. Xiang; O. Insug; Philippe Bulet; Laszlo Otvos Jr

2002-01-01

257

Pulpability of beetle-killed spruce. Forest Service research paper  

SciTech Connect

Infestation of the Dendroctonus rufipennis beetle has resulted in large stands of dead and dying timber on the Kenai Peninsula in Alaska. Tests were conducted to evaluate the value of beetle-killed spruce as pulpwood. The results showed that live and dead spruce wood can be pulped effectively. The two least deteriorated classes and the most deteriorated class of logs had similar characteristics when pulped; the remaining class had somewhat poorer pulpability.

Scott, G.M.; Bormett, D.W.; Sutherland, N.R.; Abubakr, S.; Lowell, E.

1996-08-01

258

Accounting for Genocide: How Many Were Killed in Srebrenica?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The takeover of the UN ‘safearea’ of Srebrenica by Bosnian Serb forces inJuly 1995 was followed by the killing of alarge number of male Bosnian Muslim civilians,in what has been characterized as the worstmassacre in Europe since World War II. Thisarticle is based on a report submitted asevidence to the UN International CriminalTribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) inthe case

Helge Brunborg; Torkild Hovde Lyngstad; Henrik Urdal

2003-01-01

259

Morphological effect of oscillating magnetic nanoparticles in killing tumor cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Forced oscillation of spherical and rod-shaped iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) via low-power and low-frequency alternating magnetic field (AMF) was firstly used to kill cancer cells in vitro. After being loaded by human cervical cancer cells line (HeLa) and then exposed to a 35-kHz AMF, MNPs mechanically damaged cell membranes and cytoplasm, decreasing the cell viability. It was found that the concentration and morphology of the MNPs significantly influenced the cell-killing efficiency of oscillating MNPs. In this preliminary study, when HeLa cells were pre-incubated with 100 ?g/mL rod-shaped MNPs (rMNP, length of 200 ± 50 nm and diameter of 50 to 120 nm) for 20 h, MTT assay proved that the cell viability decreased by 30.9% after being exposed to AMF for 2 h, while the cell viability decreased by 11.7% if spherical MNPs (sMNP, diameter of 200 ± 50 nm) were used for investigation. Furthermore, the morphological effect of MNPs on cell viability was confirmed by trypan blue assay: 39.5% rMNP-loaded cells and 15.1% sMNP-loaded cells were stained after being exposed to AMF for 2 h. It was also interesting to find that killing tumor cells at either higher (500 ?g/mL) or lower (20 ?g/mL) concentration of MNPs was less efficient than that achieved at 100 ?g/mL concentration. In conclusion, the relatively asymmetric morphological rod-shaped MNPs can kill cancer cells more effectively than spherical MNPs when being exposed to AMF by virtue of their mechanical oscillations.

Cheng, Dengfeng; Li, Xiao; Zhang, Guoxin; Shi, Hongcheng

2014-04-01

260

40 CFR 180.1314 - Killed, nonviable Streptomyces acidiscabies strain RL-110T; exemption from the requirement of a...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-07-01 false Killed, nonviable Streptomyces acidiscabies strain RL-110T; exemption... § 180.1314 Killed, nonviable Streptomyces acidiscabies strain RL-110T ...established for residues of killed, nonviable Streptomyces acidiscabies strain...

2014-07-01

261

40 CFR 180.1314 - Killed, nonviable Streptomyces acidiscabies strain RL-110T; exemption from the requirement of a...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Killed, nonviable Streptomyces acidiscabies strain RL-110T; exemption... § 180.1314 Killed, nonviable Streptomyces acidiscabies strain RL-110T ...established for residues of killed, nonviable Streptomyces acidiscabies strain...

2013-07-01

262

40 CFR 180.1314 - Killed, nonviable Streptomyces acidiscabies strain RL-110T; exemption from the requirement of a...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Killed, nonviable Streptomyces acidiscabies strain RL-110T; exemption... § 180.1314 Killed, nonviable Streptomyces acidiscabies strain RL-110T ...established for residues of killed, nonviable Streptomyces acidiscabies strain...

2012-07-01

263

It’s Not Just Conflict That Motivates Killing of Orangutans  

PubMed Central

We investigated why orangutans are being killed in Kalimantan, Indonesia, and the role of conflict in these killings. Based on an analysis of interview data from over 5,000 respondents in over 450 villages, we also assessed the socio-ecological factors associated with conflict and non-conflict killings. Most respondents never kill orangutans. Those who reported having personally killed an orangutan primarily did so for non-conflict reasons; for example, 56% of these respondents said that the reason they had killed an orangutan was to eat it. Of the conflict-related reasons for killing, the most common reasons orangutans were killed was fear of orangutans or in self-defence. A similar pattern was evident among reports of orangutan killing by other people in the villages. Regression analyses indicated that religion and the percentage of intact forest around villages were the strongest socio-ecological predictors of whether orangutans were killed for conflict or non-conflict related reasons. Our data indicate that between 44,170 and 66,570 orangutans were killed in Kalimantan within the respondents’ active hunting lifetimes: between 12,690 and 29,024 for conflict reasons (95%CI) and between 26,361 and 41,688 for non-conflict reasons (95% CI). These findings confirm that habitat protection alone will not ensure the survival of orangutans in Indonesian Borneo, and that effective reduction of orangutan killings is urgently needed. PMID:24130707

Davis, Jacqueline T.; Mengersen, Kerrie; Abram, Nicola K.; Ancrenaz, Marc; Wells, Jessie A.; Meijaard, Erik

2013-01-01

264

The Shape of Things to Come? Assessing the Effectiveness of Suicide Attacks and Targeted Killings  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we assess the effectiveness of suicide attacks and targeted killings in the Second Intifada. We find evidence that the targeted killings of Palestinian leaders by Israel reduce realized Palestinian violence. We find, however, that intended Palestinian violence is increasing at low levels of targeted killings, but decreasing at higher levels. There is little evidence to suggest that

David A. Jaeger; M. Daniele Paserman

2007-01-01

265

Kill rates and predation patterns of jaguars (Panthera onca) in the southern Pantanal, Brazil  

Microsoft Academic Search

Jaguars (Panthera onca) often prey on livestock, resulting in conflicts with humans. To date, kill rates and predation patterns by jaguars have not been well documented. We studied the foraging ecology of jaguars in an area with both livestock and native prey and documented kill rates, characteristics of prey killed, patterns of predation, and the influence of prey size on

Sandra M. C. Cavalcanti; Eric M. Gese

2010-01-01

266

Male Killing and Incomplete Inheritance of a Novel Spiroplasma in the Moth Ostrinia zaguliaevi  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bacteria of the genus Spiroplasma are widely found in plants and arthropods. Some of the maternally transmitted Spiroplasma endosymbionts in arthropods are known to kill young male hosts (male killing). Here, we describe a new case of Spiroplasma-induced male killing in a moth, Ostrinia zaguliaevi. The all-female trait caused by Spiroplasma was maternally inherited for more than 11 generations but

Jun Tabata; Yuuki Hattori; Hironori Sakamoto; Fumiko Yukuhiro; Takeshi Fujii; Soichi Kugimiya; Atsushi Mochizuki; Yukio Ishikawa; Daisuke Kageyama

2011-01-01

267

Phagocytosis and killing of Staphylococcus aureus by human neutrophils.  

PubMed

Neutrophils are essential for host defense against Staphylococcus aureus infections. Although significant progress has been made, our understanding of neutrophil interactions with S. aureus remains incomplete. To provide a more comprehensive view of this process, we investigated phagocytosis and killing of S. aureus by human neutrophils using varied assay conditions in vitro. A greater percentage of bacteria were internalized by adherent neutrophils compared to those in suspension, and, unexpectedly, uptake of S. aureus by adherent neutrophils occurred efficiently in the absence of opsonins. An antibody specific for S. aureus promoted uptake of unopsonized bacteria in suspension, but had little or no capacity to enhance phagocytosis of S. aureus opsonized with normal human serum or by adherent neutrophils. Collectively, these results indicate that assay conditions can have a significant influence on the phagocytosis and killing of S. aureus by neutrophils. More importantly, the results suggest a vaccine approach directed to enhance opsonophagocytosis alone is not sufficient to promote increased killing of S. aureus by human neutrophils. With the emergence and reemergence of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms, establishing parameters that are optimal for studying neutrophil-S. aureus interactions will pave the way towards developing immune-directed strategies for anti-staphylococcal therapies. PMID:24713863

Lu, Thea; Porter, Adeline R; Kennedy, Adam D; Kobayashi, Scott D; DeLeo, Frank R

2014-01-01

268

Defects in the oxidative killing of microorganisms by phagocytic leukocytes.  

PubMed

One of the most important mechanisms of phagocytic killing of ingested microorganisms by leukocytes is the generation of toxic oxygen products. During phagocytosis, neutrophils, as well as monocytes and macrophages, display a strongly increased cell respiration. Quantitatively the most important product of this reaction is hydrogen peroxide. Superoxide is also generated in large amounts, probably as an intermediate in the formation of hydrogen peroxide. Indications exist that singlet oxygen and hydroxyl radicals are also formed in this process. Some of these oxygen products have microbicidal properties by themselves. The effect of hydrogen peroxide is greatly enhanced by the enzyme myeloperoxidase. Several dysfunctions of this sytem are known. In chronic granulomatous disease the enzyme system that produces superoxide is not operative. Thus, no superoxide or hydrogen peroxide is generated, leading to a severely decreased bacterial killing capacity. The exact molecular defects in the X-linked and the autosomal form are as yet undefined. Two variants are also known: lipochrome histiocytosis, with different clinical and histological manifestations, and a 'triggering defect' where only strongly opsonized particles trigger the respiratory burst. Myeloperoxidase deficiency leads to slightly decreased killing capacity, especially for yeasts. In glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency no oxygen radicals or hydrogen peroxide are produced because no equivalents for oxygen reduction can be generated in the hexose-monophosphate shunt. Deficiencies in the glutathione redox system also result in impaired phagocyte function, probably because the cells have to be protected against their own toxic oxygen products. PMID:225141

Roos, D; Weening, R S

269

Influence of killing method on Lepidoptera DNA barcode recovery.  

PubMed

The global DNA barcoding initiative has revolutionized the field of biodiversity research. Such large-scale sequencing projects require the collection of large numbers of specimens, which need to be killed and preserved in a way that is both DNA-friendly and which will keep voucher specimens in good condition for later study. Factors such as time since collection, correct storage (exposure to free water and heat) and DNA extraction protocol are known to play a role in the success of downstream molecular applications. Limited data are available on the most efficient, DNA-friendly protocol for killing. In this study, we evaluate the quality of DNA barcode (cytochrome oxidase I) sequences amplified from DNA extracted from specimens collected using three different killing methods (ethyl acetate, cyanide and freezing). Previous studies have suggested that chemicals, such as ethyl acetate and formaldehyde, degraded DNA and as such may not be appropriate for the collection of insects for DNA-based research. All Lepidoptera collected produced DNA barcodes of good quality, and our study found no clear difference in nucleotide signal strength, probability of incorrect base calling and phylogenetic utility among the three different treatment groups. Our findings suggest that ethyl acetate, cyanide and freezing can all be used to collect specimens for DNA analysis. PMID:25229871

Willows-Munro, Sandi; Schoeman, M Corrie

2015-05-01

270

Antimicrobial metallic copper surfaces kill Staphylococcus haemolyticus via membrane damage  

PubMed Central

Recently, copper (Cu) in its metallic form has regained interest for its antimicrobial properties. Use of metallic Cu surfaces in worldwide hospital trials resulted in remarkable reductions in surface contaminations. Yet, our understanding of why microbes are killed upon contact to the metal is still limited and different modes of action have been proposed. This knowledge, however, is crucial for sustained use of such surfaces in hospitals and other hygiene-sensitive areas. Here, we report on the molecular mechanisms by which the Gram-positive Staphylococcus haemolyticus is inactivated by metallic Cu. Staphylococcus haemolyticus was killed within minutes on Cu but not on stainless steel demonstrating the antimicrobial efficacy of metallic Cu. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) analysis and in vivo staining with Coppersensor-1 indicated that cells accumulated large amounts of Cu ions from metallic Cu surfaces contributing to lethal damage. Mutation rates of Cu- or steel-exposed cells were similarly low. Instead, live/dead staining indicated cell membrane damage in Cu- but not steel-exposed cells. These findings support a model of the cellular targets of metallic Cu toxicity in bacteria, which suggests that metallic Cu is not genotoxic and does not kill via DNA damage. In contrast, membranes constitute the likely Achilles’ heel of Cu surface-exposed cells. PMID:22950011

Santo, Christophe Espírito; Quaranta, Davide; Grass, Gregor

2012-01-01

271

Surface Acoustic Waves Enhance Neutrophil Killing of Bacteria  

PubMed Central

Biofilms are structured communities of bacteria that play a major role in the pathogenicity of bacteria and are the leading cause of antibiotic resistant bacterial infections on indwelling catheters and medical prosthetic devices. Failure to resolve these biofilm infections may necessitate the surgical removal of the prosthetic device which can be debilitating and costly. Recent studies have shown that application of surface acoustic waves to catheter surfaces can reduce the incidence of infections by a mechanism that has not yet been clarified. We report here the effects of surface acoustic waves (SAW) on the capacity of human neutrophils to eradicate S. epidermidis bacteria in a planktonic state and within biofilms. Utilizing a novel fibrin gel system that mimics a tissue-like environment, we show that SAW, at an intensity of 0.3 mW/cm2, significantly enhances human neutrophil killing of S. epidermidis in a planktonic state and within biofilms by enhancing human neutrophil chemotaxis in response to chemoattractants. In addition, we show that the integrin CD18 plays a significant role in the killing enhancement observed in applying SAW. We propose from out data that this integrin may serve as mechanoreceptor for surface acoustic waves enhancing neutrophil chemotaxis and killing of bacteria. PMID:23936303

Loike, John D.; Plitt, Anna; Kothari, Komal; Zumeris, Jona; Budhu, Sadna; Kavalus, Kaitlyn; Ray, Yonatan; Jacob, Harold

2013-01-01

272

From coprophagy to predation: a dung beetle that kills millipedes  

PubMed Central

The dung beetle subfamily Scarabaeinae is a cosmopolitan group of insects that feed primarily on dung. We describe the first case of an obligate predatory dung beetle and contrast its behaviour and morphology with those of its coprophagous sympatric congeners. Deltochilum valgum Burmeister killed and consumed millipedes in lowland rainforest in Peru. Ancestral ball-rolling behaviour shared by other canthonine species is abandoned, and the head, hind tibiae and pygidium of D. valgum are modified for novel functions during millipede predation. Millipedes were killed by disarticulation, often through decapitation, using the clypeus as a lever. Beetles killed millipedes much larger than themselves. In pitfall traps, D. valgum was attracted exclusively to millipedes, and preferred injured over uninjured millipedes. Morphological similarities placing D. valgum in the same subgenus with non-predatory dung-feeding species suggest a major and potentially rapid behavioural shift from coprophagy to predation. Ecological transitions enabling the exploitation of dramatically atypical niches, which may be more likely to occur when competition is intense, may help explain the evolution of novel ecological guilds and the diversification of exceptionally species-rich groups such as insects. PMID:19158030

Larsen, Trond H.; Lopera, Alejandro; Forsyth, Adrian; Génier, François

2009-01-01

273

Default risk modeling with position-dependent killing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Diffusion in a linear potential in the presence of position-dependent killing is used to mimic a default process. Different assumptions regarding transport coefficients, initial conditions, and elasticity of the killing measure lead to diverse models of bankruptcy. One “stylized fact” is fundamental for our consideration: empirically default is a rather rare event, especially in the investment grade categories of credit ratings. Hence, the action of killing may be considered as a small parameter. In a number of special cases we derive closed-form expressions for the entire term structure of the cumulative probability of default, its hazard rate, and intensity. Comparison with historical data on aggregate global corporate defaults confirms the validity of the perturbation method for estimations of long-term probability of default for companies with high credit quality. On a single company level, we implement the derived formulas to estimate the one-year likelihood of default of Enron on a daily basis from August 2000 to August 2001, three months before its default, and compare the obtained results with forecasts of traditional structural models.

Katz, Yuri A.

2013-04-01

274

Phagocytosis and Killing of Staphylococcus aureus by Human Neutrophils  

PubMed Central

Neutrophils are essential for host defense against Staphylococcus aureus infections. Although significant progress has been made, our understanding of neutrophil interactions with S. aureus remains incomplete. To provide a more comprehensive view of this process, we investigated phagocytosis and killing of S. aureus by human neutrophils using varied assay conditions in vitro. A greater percentage of bacteria were internalized by adherent neutrophils compared to those in suspension, and unexpectedly, uptake of S. aureus by adherent neutrophils occurred efficiently in the absence of opsonins. Antibody specific for S. aureus promoted uptake of unopsonized bacteria in suspension, but had little or no capacity to enhance phagocytosis of S. aureus opsonized with normal human serum or by adherent neutrophils. Collectively, these results indicate that assay conditions can have a significant influence on the phagocytosis and killing of S. aureus by neutrophils. More importantly, the results suggest a vaccine approach directed to enhance opsonophagocytosis alone is not sufficient to promote increased killing of S. aureus by human neutrophils. With the emergence and reemergence of antibiotic resistant microorganisms, establishing parameters that are optimal for studying neutrophil-S. aureus interactions will pave the way towards developing immune-directed strategies for anti-staphylococcal therapies. PMID:24713863

Lu, Thea; Porter, Adeline R.; Kennedy, Adam D.; Kobayashi, Scott D.; DeLeo, Frank R.

2014-01-01

275

Routing Vehicles with Ants  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Routing vehicles involve the design of an optimal set of routes for a fleet of vehicles to serve a number of customers with known demands. This research develops an Ant Colony Optimization for the vehicle routing with one central depot and identical vehicles. The procedure simulates the behavior of real ants that always find the shortest path between their nest and a food source through a form of communication, pheromone trail. Finally, preliminary results on the learning of the algorithm testing on benchmark data set will be presented in this paper.

Tan, Wen Fang; Lee, Lai Soon; Majid, Zanariah Abdul; Seow, Hsin Vonn

276

Railway vehicle body structures  

SciTech Connect

The strength and durability of railway vehicle structures is a major topic of engineering research and design. To reflect this importance the Railway Division of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers organised a conference to discuss all matters relating to railway vehicle design. This book presents the papers discussed in that conference. The contents include: Vehicle body design and the UIC's international contribution; LUL prototype 1986 stock - body structure; vehicle structure for the intermediate capacity transmit system vehicles; car body technology of advanced light rapid transit vehicles; concepts, techniques and experience in the idealization of car body structures for finite element analysis; Calcutta metropolitan railway; design for a lightweight diesel multiple unit body; the design of lightweight inter-city coal structures; the BREL international coach body shell structure; new concepts and design techniques versus material standards; structures of BR diesel electric freight locomotives; structural design philosophy for electric locomotives; suspension design for a locomotive with low structural frequencies; freight wagon structures; a finite element study of coal bodyside panels including the effects of joint flexibility; a fresh approach to the problem of car body design strength; energy absorption in automatic couplings and draw gear; passenger vehicle design loads and structural crashworthiness; design of the front part of railway vehicles (in case of frontal impact); the development of a theoretical technique for rail vehicle structural crashworthiness.

Not Available

1985-01-01

277

Electric vehicle propulsion alternatives  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Propulsion technology development for electric vehicles is summarized. Analytical studies, technology evaluation, and the development of technology for motors, controllers, transmissions, and complete propulsion systems are included.

Secunde, R. R.; Schuh, R. M.; Beach, R. F.

1983-01-01

278

Overview of Electrified Vehicle Systems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource contains a chart describing the components of electrified vehicle systems based on the vehicle drive system. Vehicle drive systems in the chart include conventional internal combustion engine, start/stop, mild hybrid electric vehicle (HEV), medium HEV, full HEV, plug-in series HEV, and battery electric vehicle. The chart is provided in both .jpg and .ppt (PowerPoint) formats.

Center for Advanced Automotive Technology (CAAT)

279

ROBUST SCALABLE VEHICLE CONTROL VIA NON-DIMENSIONAL VEHICLE DYNAMICS  

E-print Network

- 1 - ROBUST SCALABLE VEHICLE CONTROL VIA NON-DIMENSIONAL VEHICLE DYNAMICS S. Brennan & A. Alleyne published sets of Vehicle Dynamics reveals a normal distribution about a line through - space. The normal

Brennan, Sean

280

Kinetic-energy absorber employs frictional force between mating cylinders  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A kinetic energy absorbing device uses a series of coaxial, mating cylindrical surfaces. These surfaces have high frictional resistance to relative motion when axial impact forces are applied. The device is designed for safe deceleration of vehicles impacting on landing surfaces.

Conrad, E. W.

1964-01-01

281

Vehicle Dynamics and Control  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vehicle Dynamics and Control provides a comprehensive coverage of vehicle control systems and the dynamic models used in the development of these control systems. The control system topics covered in the book include cruise control, adaptive cruise control, ABS, automated lane keeping, automated highway systems, yaw stability control, engine control, passive, active and semi-active suspensions, tire models and tire-road friction

Rajesh Rajamani

2006-01-01

282

Photon Propelled Space Vehicles  

Microsoft Academic Search

The interplanetary trajectories of vehicles propelled by solar radiation pressure are analyzed, and are shown to be logarithmic spirals if thrust direction is constant with respect to the vehicle-sun line. The required thrust may be obtained with a solar sail. Sail size as a function of trip time to Mars is determined for solar thrust, oriented tangent to the trajectory.

D. C. Hock; F. N. Mcmillan; A. R. Tanguay

1960-01-01

283

Understanding Older Vehicle Users  

Microsoft Academic Search

Future adaptations in vehicle design should be linked in some parts to the age-related changes often faced by the older users. The aim of this research is to investigate the multiple age-related changes of Chinese older vehicle users in order to assist designers to better understand current and future older users' needs. Although qualitative interpretative approaches have rarely been applied

Chao Zhao; Vesna Popovic; Luis Ferreira; Xiaobo Lu

2008-01-01

284

Vehicle electronic control method  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method is described of electronically controlling a vehicle having a clutch controlled by a clutch actuator, a transmission for changing gear ratios by a transmission actuator and having a synchromesh mechanism provided at gear positions other than a reverse gear position, and an electronic control unit for controlling both actuators in accordance with the vehicle running conditions. The method

T. Hattori; M. Ishihara

1986-01-01

285

Vehicle barrier systems  

SciTech Connect

The ground vehicle is one of the most effective tools available to an adversary force. Vehicles can be used to penetrate many types of perimeter barriers, transport equipment and personnel rapidly over long distances, and deliver large amounts of explosives directly to facilities in suicide missions. The function of a vehicle barrier system is to detain or disable a defined threat vehicle at a selected distance from a protected facility. Numerous facilities are installing, or planning to install, vehicle barrier systems and many of these facilities are requesting guidance to do so adequately. Therefore, vehicle barriers are being evaluated to determine their stopping capabilities so that systems can be designed that are both balanced and capable of providing a desired degree of protection. Equally important, many of the considerations that should be taken into account when establishing a vehicle barrier system have been identified. These considerations which pertain to site preparation, barrier selection, system integration and operation, and vehicle/barrier interaction, are discussed in this paper. 2 tabs.

Sena, P.A.

1986-01-01

286

Vehicle barrier systems  

SciTech Connect

The ground vehicle is one of the most effective tools available to an adversary force. Vehicles can be used to penetrate many types of perimeter barriers, transport equipment, and personnel rapidly over long distances, and deliver large amounts of explosives directly to facilities in suicide missions. The function of a vehicle barrier system is to detain or disable a defined threat vehicle at a selected distance from a protected facility. Numerous facilities are installing, or planning to install, vehicle barrier systems and many of these facilities are requesting guidance to do so adequately. Therefore, vehicle barriers are being evaluated to determine their stopping capabilities so that systems can be designed that are both balanced and capable of providing a desired degree of protection. Equally important, many of the considerations that should be taken into account when establishing a vehicle barrier system have been identified. These considerations which pertain to site preparation, barrier selection, system integration and operation, and vehicle/barrier interaction, are discussed in this paper.

Sena, P.A.

1986-01-01

287

Vehicle barrier systems  

SciTech Connect

The ground vehicle is one of the most effective tools available to an adversary force. Vehicles can be used to penetrate many types of perimeter barriers, transport equipment and personnel rapidly over long distances, and deliver large amounts of explosives directly to facilities in suicide missions. The function of a vehicle barrier system is to detain or disable a defined threat vehicle at a selected distance from a protected facility. Numerous facilities are installing, or planning to install, vehicle barrier systems and many of these facilities are requesting guidance to do so adequately. Therefore, vehicle barriers are being evaluated to determine their stopping capabilities so that systems can be designed that are both balanced and capable of providing a desired degree of protection. Equally important, many of the considerations that should be taken into account when establishing a vehicle barrier system have been identified. These considerations which pertain to site preparation, barrier selection, system integration and operation, and vehicle/barrier interaction, are discussed in this paper.

Sena, P.A.

1986-01-01

288

Nuclear air cushion vehicles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The state-of-the-art of the still-conceptual nuclear air cushion vehicle, particularly the nuclear powerplant is identified. Using mission studies and cost estimates, some of the advantages of nuclear power for large air cushion vehicles are described. The technology studies on mobile nuclear powerplants and conceptual ACV systems/missions studies are summarized.

Anderson, J. L.

1973-01-01

289

Electric Vehicle Battery Challenge  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A serious drawback to electric vehicles [batteries only] is the idle time needed to recharge their batteries. In this challenge, students can develop ideas and concepts for battery change-out at automotive service stations. Such a capability would extend the range of electric vehicles.

Roman, Harry T.

2014-01-01

290

Intelligent Vehicle Health Management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As a part of the overall goal of developing Integrated Vehicle Health Management systems for aerospace vehicles, the NASA Faculty Fellowship Program (NFFP) at Marshall Space Flight Center has performed a pilot study on IVHM principals which integrates researched IVHM technologies in support of Integrated Intelligent Vehicle Management (IIVM). IVHM is the process of assessing, preserving, and restoring system functionality across flight and ground systems (NASA NGLT 2004). The framework presented in this paper integrates advanced computational techniques with sensor and communication technologies for spacecraft that can generate responses through detection, diagnosis, reasoning, and adapt to system faults in support of INM. These real-time responses allow the IIVM to modify the affected vehicle subsystem(s) prior to a catastrophic event. Furthermore, the objective of this pilot program is to develop and integrate technologies which can provide a continuous, intelligent, and adaptive health state of a vehicle and use this information to improve safety and reduce costs of operations. Recent investments in avionics, health management, and controls have been directed towards IIVM. As this concept has matured, it has become clear the INM requires the same sensors and processing capabilities as the real-time avionics functions to support diagnosis of subsystem problems. New sensors have been proposed, in addition, to augment the avionics sensors to support better system monitoring and diagnostics. As the designs have been considered, a synergy has been realized where the real-time avionics can utilize sensors proposed for diagnostics and prognostics to make better real-time decisions in response to detected failures. IIVM provides for a single system allowing modularity of functions and hardware across the vehicle. The framework that supports IIVM consists of 11 major on-board functions necessary to fully manage a space vehicle maintaining crew safety and mission objectives: Guidance and Navigation; Communications and Tracking; Vehicle Monitoring; Information Transport and Integration; Vehicle Diagnostics; Vehicle Prognostics; Vehicle mission Planning; Automated Repair and Replacement; Vehicle Control; Human Computer Interface; and Onboard Verification and Validation. Furthermore, the presented framework provides complete vehicle management which not only allows for increased crew safety and mission success through new intelligence capabilities, but also yields a mechanism for more efficient vehicle operations. The representative IVHM technologies for computer platform using heterogeneous communication, 3) coupled electromagnetic oscillators for enhanced communications, 4) Linux-based real-time systems, 5) genetic algorithms, 6) Bayesian Networks, 7) evolutionary algorithms, 8) dynamic systems control modeling, and 9) advanced sensing capabilities. This paper presents IVHM technologies developed under NASA's NFFP pilot project and the integration of these technologies forms the framework for IIVM.

Paris, Deidre E.; Trevino, Luis; Watson, Michael D.

2005-01-01

291

LIGHT-DUTYVEHICLES Vehicle Technology  

E-print Network

LIGHT-DUTYVEHICLES Vehicle Technology Deployment Pathways: An Examination of Timing and Investment areas ­ light- duty vehicles, non-light-duty vehicles, fuels, and transportation demand ­ in the context

292

NISt Chemical Kinetics Database  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The NIST Chemical Kinetics Database includes essentially all reported kinetics results for thermal gas-phase chemical reactions. The database is designed to be searched for kinetics data based on the specific reactants involved, for reactions resulting in specified products, for all the reactions of a particular species, or for various combinations of these.

293

Lunar material transport vehicle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The proposed vehicle, the Lunar Material Transport Vehicle (LMTV), has a mission objective of efficient lunar soil material transport. The LMTV was designed to meet a required set of performance specifications while operating under a given set of constraints. The LMTV is essentially an articulated steering, double-ended dump truck. The vehicle moves on four wheels and has two identical chassis halves. Each half consists of a chassis frame, a material bucket, two wheels with integral curvilinear synchronous motors, a fuel cell and battery arrangement, an electromechanically actuated dumping mechanism, and a powerful microprocessor. The vehicle, as designed, is capable of transporting up to 200 cu ft of material over a one mile round trip per hour. The LMTV is capable of being operated from a variety of sources. The vehicle has been designed as simply as possible with attention also given to secondary usage of components.

Fisher, Charles D.; Lyons, Douglas; Wilkins, W. Allen, Jr.; Whitehead, Harry C., Jr.

1988-01-01

294

Dust Mitigation Vehicle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A document describes the development and demonstration of an apparatus, called a dust mitigation vehicle, for reducing the amount of free dust on the surface of the Moon. The dust mitigation vehicle would be used to pave surfaces on the Moon to prevent the dust from levitating or adhering to surfaces. The basic principle of operation of these apparatuses is to use a lens or a dish mirror to concentrate solar thermal radiation onto a small spot to heat lunar regolith. In the case of the prototype dust mitigation vehicle, a Fresnel lens was used to heat a surface layer of regolith sufficiently to sinter or melt dust grains into a solid mass. The prototype vehicle has demonstrated paving rates up to 1.8 square meters per day. The proposed flight design of the dust mitigation vehicle is also described.

Cardiff, Eric H.

2011-01-01

295

Liposomal Cholesterol Delivery Activates the Macrophage Innate Immune Arm To Facilitate Intracellular Leishmania donovani Killing  

PubMed Central

Leishmania donovani causes visceral leishmaniasis (VL) by infecting the monocyte/macrophage lineage and residing inside specialized structures known as parasitophorous vacuoles. The protozoan parasite has adopted several means of escaping the host immune response, with one of the major methods being deactivation of host macrophages. Previous reports highlight dampened macrophage signaling, defective antigen presentation due to increased membrane fluidity, and the downregulation of several genes associated with L. donovani infection. We have reported previously that the defective antigen presentation in infected hamsters could be corrected by a single injection of a cholesterol-containing liposome. Here we show that cholesterol in the form of a liposomal formulation can stimulate the innate immune arm and reactivate macrophage function. Augmented levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI), along with proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?) and interleukin 6 (IL-6), corroborate intracellular parasite killing. Cholesterol incorporation kinetics is favored in infected macrophages more than in normal macrophages. Such an enhanced cholesterol uptake is associated with preferential apoptosis of infected macrophages in an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-dependent manner. All these events are coupled with mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation, while inhibition of such pathways resulted in increased parasite loads. Hence, liposomal cholesterol is a potential facilitator of the macrophage effector function in favor of the host, independently of the T-cell arm. PMID:24478076

Ghosh, June; Guha, Rajan; Das, Shantanabha

2014-01-01

296

Tobacco smoking killed ~100 million people during the 20th century and is projected to kill ~1 billion people during the  

E-print Network

Reports Tobacco smoking killed ~100 million people during the 20th century and is projected to kill ~1 billion people during the current century, assuming that the current frequency of smoking is retained (1, 2). Lung cancer is the prime cause of cancer-associated death in relation to smoking. However

Napp, Nils

297

Trichinella spiralis: killing of newborn larvae by lung cells.  

PubMed

The migratory stage of Trichinella spiralis, the newborn larva (NBL), travels along the pulmonary microvascular system on its way to the skeletal muscle cells. The present work studies the capability of lung cells to kill NBL. For this purpose, in vitro cytotoxicity assays were performed using NBL, lung cell suspensions from Wistar rats, rat anti-NBL surface sera, and fresh serum as complement source. The cytotoxic activity of lung cells from rats infected on day 6 p.i. was compared with that from noninfected rats. Two and 20 h-old NBL (NBL2 and NBL20) were used as they had shown to exhibit different surface antigens altering their biological activity. Sera antibodies were analyzed by indirect immunofluorescence assay, and cell populations used in each assay were characterized by histological staining. The role of IgE in the cytotoxic attack against NBL was analyzed using heated serum. The Fc?RI expression on cell suspensions was examined by flow cytometry. Results showed that lung cells were capable of killing NBL by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). Lung cells from infected animals yielded the highest mortality percentages of NBL, with NBL20 being the most susceptible to such attack. IgE yielded a critical role in the cytotoxic attack. Regarding the analysis of cell suspensions, cells from infected rats showed an increase in the percentage of eosinophils, neutrophils, and the number of cells expressing the Fc?RI receptor. We conclude that lung cells are capable of killing NBL in the presence of specific antibodies, supporting the idea that the lung is one of the sites where the NBL death occurs due to ADCC. PMID:25416332

Falduto, Guido H; Vila, Cecilia C; Saracino, María P; Calcagno, Marcela A; Venturiello, Stella M

2015-02-01

298

Killed oral cholera vaccines: history, development and implementation challenges  

PubMed Central

Cholera is still a major global health problem, affecting mainly people living in unsanitary conditions and who are at risk for outbreaks of cholera. During the past decade, outbreaks are increasingly reported from more countries. From the early killed oral cholera vaccine, rapid improvements in vaccine development occurred as a result of a better understanding of the epidemiology of the disease, pathogenesis of cholera infection and immunity. The newer-generation oral killed cholera vaccines have been shown to be safe and effective in field trials conducted in cholera endemic areas. Likewise, they have been shown to be protective when used during outbreak settings. Aside from providing direct protection to vaccinated individuals, recent studies have demonstrated that these killed oral vaccines also confer indirect protection through herd immunity. Although new-generation oral cholera vaccines should not be considered in isolation from other preventive approaches in countries where they are most needed, especially improved water quality and sanitation, these vaccines serve as immediately available public health tools for preventing further morbidity and mortality from cholera. However, despite its availability for more than two decades, use of these vaccines has not been optimized. Although there are limitations of the currently available oral cholera vaccines, recent data show that the vaccines are safe, feasible to use even in difficult circumstances and able to provide protection in various settings. Clear identification of the areas and target population groups who will benefit from the use of the cholera vaccines will be required and strategies to facilitate accessibility and usage of these vaccines in these areas and population groups will need to be developed. PMID:25177492

Gonzales, Maria Liza Antoinette; Aldaba, Josephine G.; Nair, G. Balakrish

2014-01-01

299

Entropy from near-horizon geometries of Killing horizons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We "derive" the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy for black holes based on the near-horizon symmetries of black hole space-times. To find out these symmetries we make use of an (R,T) plane close to a Killing horizon. We identify a set of vector fields that preserves this plane and forms a Witt algebra. The corresponding algebra of Hamiltonians is shown to have a nontrivial central extension. Using the Cardy formula and the central charge we obtain the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy.

Dreyer, Olaf; Ghosh, Amit; Ghosh, Avirup

2014-01-01

300

Analysis of murine cellular receptors for tumor-killing factor  

SciTech Connect

Receptors for tumor-killing factor (TKF) on the surface of murine cells were analyzed using radioiodinated TKF. Not only sensitive cells but also insensitive cells were found to have specific receptors. Among the sensitive cells, no clear relation was observed between the number of receptors on the cell surface and sensitivity to TKF. Compounds affecting microfilaments (cytochalasin B and D) and microtubules (colchicine and Colcemid) significantly inhibited cytolysis of sensitive cells induced by receptor-bound TKF. It is concluded that internalization of receptor-bound TKF is a prerequisite for triggering cytolysis.

Ohsawa, F.; Natori, S.

1987-01-01

301

Selective killing of T lymphocytes by phototoxic liposomes.  

PubMed Central

Two-fold specificity in drug delivery obtained through the localized activation of drugs by physical means and the attachment of drugs to proteins that bind to target cells might be used for highly selective cancer chemotherapy or for immunosuppression. Toward this end, a monoclonal antibody against an antigen on the surface of T lymphocytes was covalently attached to liposomes containing a phototoxic drug, pyrene, bound to the lipid bilayer. When unfractionated peripheral blood lymphocytes, or B- and T-cell lines, were irradiated after treatment with these liposomes, T cells were killed while B cells were spared, demonstrating the validity of the approach in a simple in vitro assay. PMID:3491992

Yemul, S; Berger, C; Estabrook, A; Suarez, S; Edelson, R; Bayley, H

1987-01-01

302

Creating Psychological Profiles of Characters in To Kill a Mockingbird  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson asks students to explore the motivation behind characters' actions in To Kill a Mockingbird. Students first engage in a freewrite activity. They then do research and creative thinking to design a poster and plan a presentation representing a psychological profile for a selected character, while determining what specific factors (such as family, career, environment, and so forth) have the greatest influence on the characters' decision making throughout the novel. The groups present their findings to the class by assuming the persona of their character and explaining the psychological factors influencing their behavior in the novel.

Lauren A. Gibbons

2012-07-29

303

Infinitesimal moduli for the Strominger system and generalized Killing spinors  

E-print Network

We construct the space of infinitesimal variations for the Strominger system and an obstruction space to integrability, using elliptic operator theory. Motivated by physics, we provide refinements of these finite-dimensional vector spaces using generalized geometry and establish a comparison with previous work by de la Ossa--Svanes and Anderson--Grey--Sharpe. Finally, we propose a unifying framework for metrics with $SU(3)$-holonomy and solutions of the Strominger system, by means of generalized Killing spinors equations on a Courant algebroid.

Garcia-Fernandez, Mario; Tipler, Carl

2015-01-01

304

Kinetic energy management in road traffic injury prevention: a call for action.  

PubMed

By virtue of their variability, mass and speed have important roles in transferring energies during a crash incidence (kinetic energy). The sum of kinetic energy is important in determining an injury severity and that is equal to one half of the vehicle mass multiplied by the square of the vehicle speed. To meet the Vision Zero policy (a traffic safety policy) prevention activities should be focused on vehicle speed management. Understanding the role of kinetic energy will help to develop measures to reduce the generation, distribution, and effects of this energy during a road traffic crash. Road traffic injury preventive activities necessitate Kinetic energy management to improve road user safety. © 2015 KUMS, All rights reserved. PMID:24284810

Khorasani-Zavareh, Davoud; Bigdeli, Maryam; Saadat, Soheil; Mohammadi, Reza

2015-01-01

305

Methane emissions from vehicles.  

PubMed

Methane (CH4) is an important greenhouse gas emitted by vehicles. We report results of a laboratory study of methane emissions using a standard driving cycle for 30 different cars and trucks (1995-1999 model years) from four different manufacturers. We recommend the use of an average emission factor for the U.S. on-road vehicle fleet of (g of CH/g of CO2) = (15 +/- 4) x 10(-5) and estimate that the global vehicle fleet emits 0.45 +/- 0.12 Tg of CH4 yr(-1) (0.34 +/- 0.09 Tg of C yr(-1)), which represents < 0.2% of anthropogenic CH4 emissions. This estimate includes the effects of vehicle aging, cold start, and hot running emissions. The contribution of CH4 emissions from vehicles to radiative forcing of climate change is 0.3-0.4% of that of CO2 emissions from vehicles. The environmental impact of CH4 emissions from vehicles is negligible and is likely to remain so for the foreseeable future. PMID:15112800

Nam, E K; Jensen, T E; Wallington, T J

2004-04-01

306

Assured crew return vehicle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A return vehicle is disclosed for use in returning a crew to Earth from low earth orbit in a safe and relatively cost effective manner. The return vehicle comprises a cylindrically-shaped crew compartment attached to the large diameter of a conical heat shield having a spherically rounded nose. On-board inertial navigation and cold gas control systems are used together with a de-orbit propulsion system to effect a landing near a preferred site on the surface of the Earth. State vectors and attitude data are loaded from the attached orbiting craft just prior to separation of the return vehicle.

Cerimele, Christopher J. (inventor); Ried, Robert C. (inventor); Peterson, Wayne L. (inventor); Zupp, George A., Jr. (inventor); Stagnaro, Michael J. (inventor); Ross, Brian P. (inventor)

1991-01-01

307

Blast resistant vehicle seat  

DOEpatents

Disclosed are various seats for vehicles particularly military vehicles that are susceptible to attack by road-bed explosive devices such as land mines or improvised explosive devices. The seats often have rigid seat shells and may include rigid bracing for rigidly securing the seat to the chassis of the vehicle. Typically embodiments include channels and particulate media such as sand disposed in the channels. A gas distribution system is generally employed to pump a gas through the channels and in some embodiments the gas is provided at a pressure sufficient to fluidize the particulate media when an occupant is sitting on the seat.

Ripley, Edward B

2013-02-12

308

Introduction to Electrified Vehicles  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This PowerPoint presentation was delivered by Anthony Tisler from the Michigan Academy for Green Mobility Alliance (MAGMA) at the Utica Community Schools’ Professional Development Day for Teachers in the Industrial Arts/Engineering Pathway, held at the Instructional Resource Center in Sterling Heights, MI on April 15, 2014. The presentation provides information on electric vehicle architecture and components. It is a great tool for introducing students at the high school or college level to various battery electric vehicle (BEV) and hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) components, configurations, and operation.

2014-05-28

309

Design Criteria for Low Risk Re-Entry Vehicles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The paper shows how a sharp vehicle with low wing loading, is able to follow re-entry trajectories with low thermal risks by using Ultra High Temperature Ceramics (UHTC) to thermally protect the vehicle front edges. These reusable materials can withstand the global radiative equilibrium temperatures that are experienced during reentry characterized by a longer and a more gradual conversion of the kinetic and potential energy of the vehicle into thermal energy. A number of aerothermodynamic problems are addressed to assess the feasibility of the vehicle design and of the thermal protection of the payload. In particular, the boundary layer thermal protection concept is illustrated to show how a UHTC massive tip edges (fuselage and wings) are able to protect also the remaining vehicle structure made of conventional material, promoting a revolutionary approach to the Thermal Protection System (TPS) configuration for hypersonic vehicle flying at small angle of attack. CFD results and engineering formulations are adopted for the computation of the aerodynamic coefficients and heat fluxes. The analysis identifies the design criteria for a conventional looking vehicle for a crew return from LEO (e.g. from the International Space Station).

Monti, R.; Pezzella, G.

2005-02-01

310

Incidence of Male-Killing Rickettsia spp. ( -Proteobacteria) in the Ten-Spot Ladybird Beetle Adalia decempunctata L. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The diversity of endosymbiotic bacteria that kill male host offspring during embryogenesis and their frequencies in certain groups of host taxa suggest that the evolution of male killing and the subsequent spread of male-killing symbionts are primarily determined by host life history characteristics. We studied the 10-spot ladybird beetle, Adalia decempunctata L. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), in which male killing has not

J. HINRICH GRAF VON DER SCHULENBURG; MICHAEL HABIG; JOHN J. SLOGGETT; K. MARY WEBBERLEY; DOMINIQUE BERTRAND; GREGORY D. D. HURST; MICHAEL E. N. MAJERUS

2001-01-01

311

Photoacoustically-guided photothermal killing of mosquitoes targeted by nanoparticles.  

PubMed

In biomedical applications, nanoparticles have demonstrated the potential to eradicate abnormal cells in small localized pathological zones associated with cancer or infections. Here, we introduce a method for nanotechnology-based photothermal (PT) killing of whole organisms considered harmful to humans or the environment. We demonstrate that laser-induced thermal, and accompanying nano- and microbubble phenomena, can injure or kill C. elegans and mosquitoes fed carbon nanotubes, gold nanospheres, gold nanoshells, or magnetic nanoparticles at laser energies that are safe for humans. In addition, a photoacoustic (PA) effect was used to control nanoparticle delivery. Through the integration of this technique with molecular targeting, nanoparticle clustering, magnetic capturing and spectral sharpening of PA and PT plasmonic resonances, our laser-based PA-PT nano-theranostic platform can be applied to detection and the physical destruction of small organisms and carriers of pathogens, such as malaria vectors, spiders, bed bugs, fleas, ants, locusts, grasshoppers, phytophagous mites, or other arthropod pests, irrespective of their resistance to conventional treatments. PMID:23450780

Foster, Stephen R; Galanzha, Ekaterina I; Totten, Daniel C; Beneš, Helen; Shmookler Reis, Robert J; Zharov, Vladimir P

2014-07-01

312

Killing for the state: the darkest side of American nursing.  

PubMed

The aim of this article is to bring to the attention of the international nursing community the discrepancy between a pervasive 'caring' nursing discourse and a most unethical nursing practice in the United States. In this article, we present a duality: the conflict in American prisons between nursing ethics and the killing machinery. The US penal system is a setting in which trained healthcare personnel practice the extermination of life. We look upon the sanitization of deathwork as an application of healthcare professionals' skills and knowledge and their appropriation by the state to serve its ends. A review of the states' death penalty statutes shows that healthcare workers are involved in the capital punishment process and shielded by American laws (and to a certain extent by professional boards through their inaction). We also argue that the law's language often masks that involvement; and explain how states further that duplicity behind legal formalisms. In considering the important role healthcare providers, namely nurses and physicians, play in administering death to the condemned, we assert that nurses and physicians are part of the states' penal machinery in America. Nurses and physicians (as carriers of scientific knowledge, and also as agents of care) are intrinsic to the American killing enterprise. Healthcare professionals who take part in execution protocols are state functionaries who approach the condemned body as angels of death: they constitute an extension of the state which exercises its sovereign power over captive prisoners. PMID:12622799

Holmes, Dave; Federman, Cary

2003-03-01

313

Women who kill their husbands: mariticides in contemporary Ghana.  

PubMed

Homicide by wives against husbands is a largely unexplored subject in lethal violence research. The paucity of information on the phenomenon is particularly acute in the non-Western world where scholarly research is virtually nonexistent. The specific goal for this article, then, was to provide additional insights into the issue by investigating wife-to-husband killings that occurred in Ghana, a non-Western society, during 1990-2005. In line with the scant, extant literature, the results of the analysis demonstrate that victims were invariably slain at home. The motive for the crime was to punish a womanizing husband, a husband who had taken another wife, or one who was contemplating wedding another wife in this polygynous society. In other instances, the homicidal intent was to physically eliminate a husband to facilitate an amorous relationship between the assailant and her new lover. In several cases, husband-slayers killed a latent or predisposing victim (e.g. sleeping or ill) via burning, slashing with a machete or food poisoning. The implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:17918281

Adinkrah, Mensah

2007-01-01

314

Bacterial killing via a type IV secretion system.  

PubMed

Type IV secretion systems (T4SSs) are multiprotein complexes that transport effector proteins and protein-DNA complexes through bacterial membranes to the extracellular milieu or directly into the cytoplasm of other cells. Many bacteria of the family Xanthomonadaceae, which occupy diverse environmental niches, carry a T4SS with unknown function but with several characteristics that distinguishes it from other T4SSs. Here we show that the Xanthomonas citri T4SS provides these cells the capacity to kill other Gram-negative bacterial species in a contact-dependent manner. The secretion of one type IV bacterial effector protein is shown to require a conserved C-terminal domain and its bacteriolytic activity is neutralized by a cognate immunity protein whose 3D structure is similar to peptidoglycan hydrolase inhibitors. This is the first demonstration of the involvement of a T4SS in bacterial killing and points to this special class of T4SS as a mediator of both antagonistic and cooperative interbacterial interactions. PMID:25743609

Souza, Diorge P; Oka, Gabriel U; Alvarez-Martinez, Cristina E; Bisson-Filho, Alexandre W; Dunger, German; Hobeika, Lise; Cavalcante, Nayara S; Alegria, Marcos C; Barbosa, Leandro R S; Salinas, Roberto K; Guzzo, Cristiane R; Farah, Chuck S

2015-01-01

315

Univalent antibodies kill tumour cells in vitro and in vivo  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Antibody molecules are bivalent, or less often multivalent, with each antibody site within a single molecule having the same specificity. Bivalency must enhance the tenacity of antibody attachment to cell surfaces, as dissociation will require simultaneous release at both sites. However, the bivalency of the antibody sometimes induces a target cell to undergo antigenic modulation1-3, thereby offering the cell a means of evading complement and the various effector cells recruited by the antibody. We have investigated the attack by univalent antibodies, which, despite removal of one antibody site, retain their Fc zones and hence their ability to recruit the killing agents, on neoplastic B lymphocytes of the guinea pig L2C line. Rabbit antibodies raised against surface immunoglobulin of these cells were partially digested with papain to yield the univalent Fab/c derivatives4,5. We report here that these derivatives showed enhanced cell killing both in vitro and in vivo, and that this enhancement appeared to derive from avoiding antigenic modulation.

Glennie, M. J.; Stevenson, G. T.

1982-02-01

316

Electric Vehicles 101  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This presentation was developed by a member of MIT’s electric vehicle team and provides a basic overview of electric and hybrid electric vehicle (EV and HEV) history, operation, challenges, and advantages. Discussed is EV/HEV history dating from 1830- 2010, the operation of EV/HEV systems (networking and sourcing of power throughout components), challenges (ranges, energy equivalence, consumer acceptance, charge time, grid integration, and cost), advantages (energy efficiency, fuel cost, and emissions), meeting challenges (convenient charging and improving technology), EV/HEV vehicles today (Chevrolet Volt, Tesla Roadster, and Fisker Karma), and MIT’s electric vehicle team (projects, awards, and competitions). For more info on the MIT team visit http://web.mit.edu/evt/.

2013-06-25

317

Remotely Operated Vehicles  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this video adapted from the Marine Advanced Technology Education (MATE) Center, learn how some students are putting to work both technical skills as well as soft skills, such as teamwork and problem solving, in creating underwater remotely operated vehicles.

WGBH Educational Foundation

2011-10-25

318

Aerodynamics of Small Vehicles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this review we describe the aerodynamic problems that must be addressed in order to design a successful small aerial vehicle. The effects of Reynolds number and aspect ratio (AR) on the design and performance of fixed-wing vehicles are described. The boundary-layer behavior on airfoils is especially important in the design of vehicles in this flight regime. The results of a number of experimental boundary-layer studies, including the influence of laminar separation bubbles, are discussed. Several examples of small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) in this regime are described. Also, a brief survey of analytical models for oscillating and flapping-wing propulsion is presented. These range from the earliest examples where quasi-steady, attached flow is assumed, to those that account for the unsteady shed vortex wake as well as flow separation and aeroelastic behavior of a flapping wing. Experiments that complemented the analysis and led to the design of a successful ornithopter are also described.

Mueller, Thomas J.

319

Space Vehicle Valve System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The present invention is a space vehicle valve system which controls the internal pressure of a space vehicle and the flow rate of purged gases at a given internal pressure and aperture site. A plurality of quasi-unique variable dimension peaked valve structures cover the purge apertures on a space vehicle. Interchangeable sheet guards configured to cover valve apertures on the peaked valve structure contain a pressure-activated surface on the inner surface. Sheet guards move outwardly from the peaked valve structure when in structural contact with a purge gas stream flowing through the apertures on the space vehicle. Changing the properties of the sheet guards changes the response of the sheet guards at a given internal pressure, providing control of the flow rate at a given aperture site.

Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor); Lindner, Jeffrey L. (Inventor)

2014-01-01

320

Compact Robotic Vehicle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Radio-controlled microrover features light weight and agility. Miniature robotic vehicle, called Go-For, implements new fork-wheeled mobility concept to traverse extremely rough terrain. Weighs 4 kg and is 0.4 m long, climbs over obstacles as large as 60 percent of its length. Mobility concept applied to much larger vehicles. Demonstrates such applications as exploration of planetary surfaces, military surveillance, and assessing hazardous situations. Video camera on vehicle sends images to control station, where human supervisor chooses sequence of paths to traverse to reach locations of interest. For planetary exploration, spectrometer and seisometer on vehicle sends scientific data to control station, and onboard tools collect soil and rock samples. Terrestrial version equipped similarly to take samples in chemically and/or biologically contaminated areas.

Wilcox, Brian H.; Ohm, Timothy R.

1993-01-01

321

Launch Vehicle Communications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) planning for updated launch vehicle operations progresses, there is a need to consider improved methods. This study considers the use of phased array antennas mounted on launch vehicles and transmitting data to either NASA's Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) satellites or to the commercial Iridium, Intelsat, or Inmarsat communications satellites. Different data rate requirements are analyzed to determine size and weight of resulting antennas.

Welch, Bryan; Greenfeld, Israel

2005-01-01

322

Emergency Brake for Tracked Vehicles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Caliper brake automatically stops tracked vehicle as vehicle nears end of travel. Bar on vehicle, traveling to right, dislodges block between brake pads. Pads then press against bar, slowing vehicle by friction. Emergencybraking system suitable for elevators, amusement rides and machine tools.

Green, G. L.; Hooper, S. L.

1986-01-01

323

Vehicle detection from aerial imagery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vehicle detection from aerial images is becoming an increasingly important research topic in surveillance, traffic monitoring and military applications. The system described in this paper focuses on vehicle detection in rural environments and its applications to oil and gas pipeline threat detection. Automatic vehicle detection by unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) will replace current pipeline patrol services that rely on pilot

Joshua Gleason; Ara V. Nefian; Xavier Bouyssounousse; Terry Fong; George Bebis

2011-01-01

324

Upgraded demonstration vehicle task report  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Vehicle/battery performance capabilities and interface problems that occurred when upgraded developmental batteries were integrated with upgraded versions of comercially available electric vehicles were investigated. Developmental batteries used included nickel zinc batteries, a nickel iron battery, and an improved lead acid battery. Testing of the electric vehicles and upgraded batteries was performed in the complete vehicle system environment to characterize performance and identify problems unique to the vehicle/battery system. Constant speed tests and driving schedule range tests were performed on a chassis dynamometer. The results from these tests of the upgraded batteries and vehicles were compared to performance capabilities for the same vehicles equipped with standard batteries.

Bryant, J.; Hardy, K.; Livingston, R.; Sandberg, J.

1981-01-01

325

Potential roles for DNA replication and repair functions in cell killing by streptomycin  

PubMed Central

The aminoglycoside streptomycin binds to ribosomes to promote mistranslation and eventual inhibition of translation. Streptomycin kills bacteria, whereas many other non-aminoglycoside inhibitors of translation do not. Because mistranslation is now known to affect DNA replication, we asked if hydroxyurea, a specific inhibitor of DNA synthesis, affects killing, and find that hydroxyurea significantly attenuates killing by streptomycin. We find that the hydroxyl radical scavengers D-mannitol and thiourea have either no effect or only a modest protective effect. The iron chelator 2,2?-dipyridyl eliminated killing by streptomycin, but further investigation revealed that it blocks streptomycin uptake. Prior treatment of cells with low-levels of methyl methanesulfonate to induce the adaptive response to alkylation leads to a significant attenuation of killing, which, together with the hydroxyurea effect, suggests roles for DNA replication and repair functions in cell killing by streptomycin. PMID:23958411

Humayun, M. Zafri; Ayyappan, Vasudevan

2013-01-01

326

Potential roles for DNA replication and repair functions in cell killing by streptomycin.  

PubMed

The aminoglycoside streptomycin binds to ribosomes to promote mistranslation and eventual inhibition of translation. Streptomycin kills bacteria, whereas many other non-aminoglycoside inhibitors of translation do not. Because mistranslation is now known to affect DNA replication, we asked if hydroxyurea, a specific inhibitor of DNA synthesis, affects killing, and find that hydroxyurea significantly attenuates killing by streptomycin. We find that the hydroxyl radical scavengers d-mannitol and thiourea have either no effect or only a modest protective effect. The iron chelator 2,2'-dipyridyl eliminated killing by streptomycin, but further investigation revealed that it blocks streptomycin uptake. Prior treatment of cells with low-levels of methyl methanesulfonate to induce the adaptive response to alkylation leads to a significant attenuation of killing, which, together with the hydroxyurea effect, suggests roles for DNA replication and repair functions in cell killing by streptomycin. PMID:23958411

Humayun, M Zafri; Ayyappan, Vasudevan

2013-09-01

327

Spacetime encodings. IV. The relationship between Weyl curvature and Killing tensors in stationary axisymmetric vacuum spacetimes  

SciTech Connect

The problem of obtaining an explicit representation for the fourth invariant of geodesic motion (generalized Carter constant) of an arbitrary stationary axisymmetric vacuum spacetime generated from an Ernst potential is considered. The coupling between the nonlocal curvature content of the spacetime as encoded in the Weyl tensor, and the existence of a Killing tensor is explored and a constructive, algebraic test for a fourth-order Killing tensor suggested. The approach used exploits the variables defined for the Baecklund transformations to clarify the relationship between Weyl curvature, constants of geodesic motion, expressed as Killing tensors, and the solution-generation techniques. A new symmetric noncovariant formulation of the Killing equations is given. This formulation transforms the problem of looking for fourth-order Killing tensors in 4D into one of looking for four interlocking two-manifolds admitting fourth-order Killing tensors in 2D.

Brink, Jeandrew [Theoretical Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91103 (United States)

2010-01-15

328

Killing of Plasmodium yoelii by enzyme-induced products of the oxidative burst.  

PubMed Central

The murine malaria parasite Plasmodium yoelii was killed in vitro when incubated with glucose and glucose oxidase, a system generating hydrogen peroxide, or with xanthine and xanthine oxidase, a system which produces the superoxide anion and subsequently other products of the oxidative burst. Catalase blocked the killing in both cases; superoxide dismutase and scavengers of hydroxyl radicals or singlet oxygen were ineffective in the xanthine oxidase system. Thus, hydrogen peroxide appears to be the main reactive oxygen species killing P. yoelii. PMID:6546375

Dockrell, H M; Playfair, J H

1984-01-01

329

Null Killing vectors and geometry of null strings in Einstein spaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Einstein complex spacetimes admitting null Killing or null homothetic Killing vectors are studied. Such vectors define totally null and geodesic 2-surfaces called the null strings or twistor surfaces. Geometric properties of these null strings are discussed. It is shown, that spaces considered are hyperheavenly spaces (-spaces) or, if one of the parts of the Weyl tensor vanishes, heavenly spaces (-spaces). The explicit complex metrics admitting null Killing vectors are found. Some Lorentzian and ultrahyperbolic slices of these metrics are discussed.

Chudecki, Adam

2014-04-01

330

Age and Sex Composition of Seals Killed by Polar Bears in the Eastern Beaufort Sea  

PubMed Central

Background Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) of the Beaufort Sea enter hyperphagia in spring and gain fat reserves to survive periods of low prey availability. We collected information on seals killed by polar bears (n?=?650) and hunting attempts on ringed seal (Pusa hispida) lairs (n?=?1396) observed from a helicopter during polar bear mark-recapture studies in the eastern Beaufort Sea in spring in 1985–2011. We investigated how temporal shifts in ringed seal reproduction affect kill composition and the intraspecific vulnerabilities of ringed seals to polar bear predation. Principal Findings Polar bears primarily preyed on ringed seals (90.2%) while bearded seals (Erignathus barbatus) only comprised 9.8% of the kills, but 33% of the biomass. Adults comprised 43.6% (150/344) of the ringed seals killed, while their pups comprised 38.4% (132/344). Juvenile ringed seals were killed at the lowest proportion, comprising 18.0% (62/344) of the ringed seal kills. The proportion of ringed seal pups was highest between 2007–2011, in association with high ringed seal productivity. Half of the adult ringed seal kills were ?21 years (60/121), and kill rates of adults increased following the peak of parturition. Determination of sex from DNA revealed that polar bears killed adult male and adult female ringed seals equally (0.50, n?=?78). The number of hunting attempts at ringed seal subnivean lair sites was positively correlated with the number of pup kills (r2?=?0.30, P?=?0.04), but was not correlated with the number of adult kills (P?=?0.37). Conclusions/Significance Results are consistent with decadal trends in ringed seal productivity, with low numbers of pups killed by polar bears in spring in years of low pup productivity, and conversely when pup productivity was high. Vulnerability of adult ringed seals to predation increased in relation to reproductive activities and age, but not gender. PMID:22829949

Pilfold, Nicholas W.; Derocher, Andrew E.; Stirling, Ian; Richardson, Evan; Andriashek, Dennis

2012-01-01

331

The culpability of drivers killed in New Zealand road crashes and their use of alcohol and other drugs.  

PubMed

Over a period of five years, blood samples were taken from 1046 drivers killed as a result of a motor vehicle crash on New Zealand roads. These were analysed for the presence of alcohol and a range of both illicit drugs and psychoactive medicinal drugs. Driver culpability was determined for all crashes. The control group of drug- and alcohol-free drivers comprised 52.2% of the study population. Drivers positive for psychoactive drugs were more likely to be culpable (odds ratio (OR) 3.5, confidence interval (CI) 95% 2.4-5.2) than the control group. Driver culpability exhibited the expected positive association with alcohol use (OR 13.7, 95% CI 4.3-44) and with combined alcohol and cannabis use (OR 6.9, 95% CI 3.0-16). There was only a weak positive association between cannabis use (with no other drug) and culpability (OR 1.3, CI 95% 0.8-2.3). Furthermore, the OR for drivers with blood tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) concentrations greater than 5 ng/mL was lower (OR 1.0, CI 95% 0.4-2.4) than drivers with blood THC concentrations less than 2 ng/mL (OR 3.1, CI 95% 0.9-10). This is inconsistent with results reported by other studies where a significant increase in crash risk was found with blood THC levels greater than 5 ng/mL. In this study, there were very few drivers who had used a single drug, other than cannabis or alcohol. Therefore, from this study, it is not possible to comment on any relationship between opioid, stimulant or sedative drug use and an increased risk of being killed in a crash for the drivers using these drugs. The results from a multivariate analysis indicate that driver gender, age group and licence status, (P=0.022, P=0.016, P=0.026, respectively), the type of vehicle being driven (P=0.013), the number of vehicles in the crash (P<0.001), the blood alcohol concentration of the driver (P<0.001) and the use of any drug other than alcohol and cannabis (P=0.044), are all independently associated with culpability. PMID:24636874

Poulsen, Helen; Moar, Rosemary; Pirie, Ruth

2014-06-01

332

Quasilocal conformal Killing horizons: Classical phase space and the first law  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In realistic situations, black hole spacetimes do not admit a global timelike Killing vector field. However, it is possible to describe the horizon in a quasilocal setting by introducing the notion of a quasilocal boundary with certain properties which mimic the properties of a black hole inner boundary. Isolated horizons and Killing horizons are examples of such a kind. In this paper, we construct such a boundary of spacetime which is null and admits a conformal Killing vector field. Furthermore we construct the space of solutions (in general relativity) which admits such quasilocal conformal Killing boundaries. We also establish a form of the first law for these quasilocal horizons.

Chatterjee, Ayan; Ghosh, Avirup

2015-03-01

333

Monitoring CO2 Emissions in Tree-Kill Areas near the  

E-print Network

-5038 #12;COVER Dead trees and thermal ground at Basalt Canyon, Long Valley Caldera, California. (USGS .............................................................................................................................................................5 Basalt Canyon Tree Kills, Soil Temperatures, and CO2 Emissions

334

First integrals of motion in a gauge covariant framework, Killing-Maxwell system and quantum anomalies  

SciTech Connect

Hidden symmetries in a covariant Hamiltonian framework are investigated. The special role of the Stackel-Killing and Killing-Yano tensors is pointed out. The covariant phase-space is extended to include external gauge fields and scalar potentials. We investigate the possibility for a higher-order symmetry to survive when the electromagnetic interactions are taken into account. Aconcrete realization of this possibility is given by the Killing-Maxwell system. The classical conserved quantities do not generally transfer to the quantized systems producing quantum gravitational anomalies. As a rule the conformal extension of the Killing vectors and tensors does not produce symmetry operators for the Klein-Gordon operator.

Visinescu, M., E-mail: mvisin@theory.nipne.ro [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Department of Theoretical Physics (Romania)

2012-10-15

335

Invasion of one insect species, Adalia bipunctata, by two different male-killing bacteria.  

PubMed

Male-killing bacteria, which are inherited through the female line and kill male progeny only, are known from five different orders of insect. Our knowledge of the incidence of these elements has stemmed from discovery of their phenotype in different species. Our estimate of the frequency with which insects have been invaded by these elements therefore depends on each observation of the male-killing phenotype within a species being associated with a single microorganism. We here record an example of a single insect species being infected with two taxonomically distinct male-killing bacteria. Western European populations of the two-spot ladybird, Adalia bipunctata, have previously been shown to bear a male-killing Rickettsia. However, we here show that the majority of the male-killing lines tested from Central and Eastern Europe do not bear this bacterium. Rather, 16S rDNA sequence analysis suggests male-killing is associated with a member of the genus Spiroplasma. We discuss this conclusion in relation to the evolutionary genetics of male-killing bacteria, and the evolution of male-killing behaviour in the eubacteria. PMID:9927182

Hurst, G D; Graf von der Schulenburg, J H; Majerus, T M; Bertrand, D; Zakharov, I A; Baungaard, J; Völkl, W; Stouthamer, R; Majerus, M E

1999-02-01

336

Roadblocks on the kill curve: Testing the Raup hypothesis  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The documented presence of two large (???100-km diameter), possibly coeval impact craters of late Eocene age, requires modification of the impact-kill curve proposed by David M. Raup. Though the estimated meteorite size for each crater alone is large enough to have produced considerable global environmental stress, no horizons of mass mortality or pulsed extinction are known to be associated with either crater or their ejecta deposits. Thus, either there is no fixed relationship between extinction magnitude and crater diameter, or a meteorite that would produce a crater of >100-km diameter is required to raise extinction rates significantly above a ???5% background level. Both impacts took place ???1-2 m.y. before the "Terminal Eocene Event"( =early Oligocene pulsed extinction). Their collective long-term environmental effects, however, may have either delayed that extinction pulse or produced threshold conditions necessary for it to take place.

Poag, C.W.

1997-01-01

337

Do physicians have an inviolable duty not to kill?  

PubMed

An important part of the debate over physician-assisted suicide concerns moral duties that are specific to physicians. It is sometimes argued that physicians, by virtue of special commitments rooted in the nature of their profession, may never intentionally kill a patient, and that therefore, whether or not assisted suicide may be justifiable, it can never be right for a physician to take part in such an act. I examine four types of argument that have been offered in support of this conclusion, and find that none succeeds. Each attempts to show why the duty to conserve life must be unconditional for physicians, yet a consideration of the ways in which contemporary medicine has evolved shows that such a duty is now no more fundamental to the profession than a duty to relieve suffering, which may in some cases override it. PMID:11262642

Seay, G

2001-02-01

338

Development of Al-killed/Ti stabilized steels  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several Al-killed/Ti-stabilized low carbon steels were developed in a Mexican steel industry with the aim of obtaining an interstitial free steel for automotive applications. The steelmaking route involved the use of 100% sponge iron which was feed into an electric arc furnace, vacuum degassed, ladle treated and continuously casted. The resulting slabs were then hot rolled at 1100 °C and coiled at 650 °C. Then, the steel plates were cold rolled at room temperature and sheets annealed at 700 °C. As-cast micro structure showed the presence of ?-ferrite with titanium nitrides in matrix and grain boundaries while in the ashot rolled condition, elongated grains showed the presence of titanium nitrides, titanium sulfides and titanium carbosulfides. The annealed sheets showed, additionally to the other precipitates, the presence of titanium carbides. Microstructure, texture, the Lankford ratio and mechanical properties of fully recrystallized coils fulfilled the target properties established by the automobile industry.

Ramirez-Ledesma, A. L.; Aguilar-Mendez, M. A.; Rodriguez-Diaz, R. A.; >G Aramburo,

2015-01-01

339

Bacteria can mobilize nematode-trapping fungi to kill nematodes.  

PubMed

In their natural habitat, bacteria are consumed by bacterivorous nematodes; however, they are not simply passive preys. Here we report a defensive mechanism used by certain bacteria to mobilize nematode-trapping fungi to kill nematodes. These bacteria release urea, which triggers a lifestyle switch in the fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora from saprophytic to nematode-predatory form; this predacious form is characterized by formation of specialized cellular structures or 'traps'. The bacteria significantly promote the elimination of nematodes by A. oligospora. Disruption of genes involved in urea transport and metabolism in A. oligospora abolishes the urea-induced trap formation. Furthermore, the urea metabolite ammonia functions as a signal molecule in the fungus to initiate the lifestyle switch to form trap structures. Our findings highlight the importance of multiple predator-prey interactions in prey defense mechanisms. PMID:25514608

Wang, Xin; Li, Guo-Hong; Zou, Cheng-Gang; Ji, Xing-Lai; Liu, Tong; Zhao, Pei-Ji; Liang, Lian-Ming; Xu, Jian-Ping; An, Zhi-Qiang; Zheng, Xi; Qin, Yue-Ke; Tian, Meng-Qing; Xu, You-Yao; Ma, Yi-Cheng; Yu, Ze-Fen; Huang, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Shu-Qun; Niu, Xue-Mei; Yang, Jin-Kui; Huang, Ying; Zhang, Ke-Qin

2014-01-01

340

Bacteria can mobilize nematode-trapping fungi to kill nematodes  

PubMed Central

In their natural habitat, bacteria are consumed by bacterivorous nematodes; however, they are not simply passive preys. Here we report a defensive mechanism used by certain bacteria to mobilize nematode-trapping fungi to kill nematodes. These bacteria release urea, which triggers a lifestyle switch in the fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora from saprophytic to nematode–predatory form; this predacious form is characterized by formation of specialized cellular structures or ‘traps’. The bacteria significantly promote the elimination of nematodes by A. oligospora. Disruption of genes involved in urea transport and metabolism in A. oligospora abolishes the urea-induced trap formation. Furthermore, the urea metabolite ammonia functions as a signal molecule in the fungus to initiate the lifestyle switch to form trap structures. Our findings highlight the importance of multiple predator–prey interactions in prey defense mechanisms. PMID:25514608

Wang, Xin; Li, Guo-Hong; Zou, Cheng-Gang; Ji, Xing-Lai; Liu, Tong; Zhao, Pei-Ji; Liang, Lian-Ming; Xu, Jian-Ping; An, Zhi-Qiang; Zheng, Xi; Qin, Yue-Ke; Tian, Meng-Qing; Xu, You-Yao; Ma, Yi-Cheng; Yu, Ze-Fen; Huang, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Shu-Qun; Niu, Xue-Mei; Yang, Jin-Kui; Huang, Ying; Zhang, Ke-Qin

2014-01-01

341

Pyruvate Protects Pathogenic Spirochetes from H2O2 Killing  

PubMed Central

Pathogenic spirochetes cause clinically relevant diseases in humans and animals, such as Lyme disease and leptospirosis. The causative agent of Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, and the causative agent of leptospirosis, Leptospria interrogans, encounter reactive oxygen species (ROS) during their enzootic cycles. This report demonstrated that physiologically relevant concentrations of pyruvate, a potent H2O2 scavenger, and provided passive protection to B. burgdorferi and L. interrogans against H2O2. When extracellular pyruvate was absent, both spirochetes were sensitive to a low dose of H2O2 (?0.6 µM per h) generated by glucose oxidase (GOX). Despite encoding a functional catalase, L. interrogans was more sensitive than B. burgdorferi to H2O2 generated by GOX, which may be due to the inherent resistance of B. burgdorferi because of the virtual absence of intracellular iron. In B. burgdorferi, the nucleotide excision repair (NER) and the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) pathways were important for survival during H2O2 challenge since deletion of the uvrB or the mutS genes enhanced its sensitivity to H2O2 killing; however, the presence of pyruvate fully protected ?uvrB and ?mutS from H2O2 killing further demonstrating the importance of pyruvate in protection. These findings demonstrated that pyruvate, in addition to its classical role in central carbon metabolism, serves as an important H2O2 scavenger for pathogenic spirochetes. Furthermore, pyruvate reduced ROS generated by human neutrophils in response to the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) agonist zymosan. In addition, pyruvate reduced neutrophil-derived ROS in response to B. burgdorferi, which also activates host expression through TLR2 signaling. Thus, pathogenic spirochetes may exploit the metabolite pyruvate, present in blood and tissues, to survive H2O2 generated by the host antibacterial response generated during infection. PMID:24392147

Troxell, Bryan; Zhang, Jun-Jie; Bourret, Travis J.; Zeng, Melody Yue; Blum, Janice; Gherardini, Frank; Hassan, Hosni M.; Yang, X. Frank

2014-01-01

342

An evaluation of Sex-Age-Kill (SAK) model performance  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The sex-age-kill (SAK) model is widely used to estimate abundance of harvested large mammals, including white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Despite a long history of use, few formal evaluations of SAK performance exist. We investigated how violations of the stable age distribution and stationary population assumption, changes to male or female harvest, stochastic effects (i.e., random fluctuations in recruitment and survival), and sampling efforts influenced SAK estimation. When the simulated population had a stable age distribution and ?? > 1, the SAK model underestimated abundance. Conversely, when ?? < 1, the SAK overestimated abundance. When changes to male harvest were introduced, SAK estimates were opposite the true population trend. In contrast, SAK estimates were robust to changes in female harvest rates. Stochastic effects caused SAK estimates to fluctuate about their equilibrium abundance, but the effect dampened as the size of the surveyed population increased. When we considered both stochastic effects and sampling error at a deer management unit scale the resultant abundance estimates were within ??121.9 of the true population level 95 of the time. These combined results demonstrate extreme sensitivity to model violations and scale of analysis. Without changes to model formulation, the SAK model will be biased when ?? ??? 1. Furthermore, any factor that alters the male harvest rate, such as changes to regulations or changes in hunter attitudes, will bias population estimates. Sex-age-kill estimates may be precise at large spatial scales, such as the state level, but less so at the individual management unit level. Alternative models, such as statistical age-at-harvest models, which require similar data types, might allow for more robust, broad-scale demographic assessments.

Millspaugh, J.J.; Skalski, J.R.; Townsend, R.L.; Diefenbach, D.R.; Boyce, M.S.; Hansen, L.P.; Kammermeyer, K.

2009-01-01

343

Activation of AMPK Enhances Neutrophil Chemotaxis and Bacterial Killing  

PubMed Central

An inability of neutrophils to eliminate invading microorganisms is frequently associated with severe infection and may contribute to the high mortality rates associated with sepsis. In the present studies, we examined whether metformin and other 5? adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activators affect neutrophil motility, phagocytosis and bacterial killing. We found that activation of AMPK enhanced neutrophil chemotaxis in vitro and in vivo, and also counteracted the inhibition of chemotaxis induced by exposure of neutrophils to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In contrast, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of AMPK?1 or blockade of AMPK activation through treatment of neutrophils with the AMPK inhibitor compound C diminished neutrophil chemotaxis. In addition to their effects on chemotaxis, treatment of neutrophils with metformin or aminoimidazole carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) improved phagocytosis and bacterial killing, including more efficient eradication of bacteria in a mouse model of peritonitis-induced sepsis. Immunocytochemistry showed that, in contrast to LPS, metformin or AICAR induced robust actin polymerization and distinct formation of neutrophil leading edges. Although LPS diminished AMPK phosphorylation, metformin or AICAR was able to partially decrease the effects of LPS/toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) engagement on downstream signaling events, particularly LPS-induced I?B? degradation. The I?B kinase (IKK) inhibitor PS-1145 diminished I?B? degradation and also prevented LPS-induced inhibition of chemotaxis. These results suggest that AMPK activation with clinically approved agents, such as metformin, may facilitate bacterial eradication in sepsis and other inflammatory conditions associated with inhibition of neutrophil activation and chemotaxis. PMID:24091934

Park, Dae Won; Jiang, Shaoning; Tadie, Jean-Marc; Stigler, William S; Gao, Yong; Deshane, Jessy; Abraham, Edward; Zmijewski, Jaroslaw W

2013-01-01

344

Male killing Spiroplasma protects Drosophila melanogaster against two parasitoid wasps.  

PubMed

Maternally transmitted associations between endosymbiotic bacteria and insects are diverse and widespread in nature. Owing to imperfect vertical transmission, many heritable microbes have evolved compensational mechanisms to enhance their persistence in host lineages, such as manipulating host reproduction and conferring fitness benefits to host. Symbiont-mediated defense against natural enemies of hosts is increasingly recognized as an important mechanism by which endosymbionts enhance host fitness. Members of the genus Spiroplasma associated with distantly related Drosophila hosts are known to engage in either reproductive parasitism (i.e., male killing) or defense against natural enemies (the parasitic wasp Leptopilina heterotoma and a nematode). A male-killing strain of Spiroplasma (strain Melanogaster Sex Ratio Organism (MSRO)) co-occurs with Wolbachia (strain wMel) in certain wild populations of the model organism Drosophila melanogaster. We examined the effects of Spiroplasma MSRO and Wolbachia wMel on Drosophila survival against parasitism by two common wasps, Leptopilina heterotoma and Leptopilina boulardi, that differ in their host ranges and host evasion strategies. The results indicate that Spiroplasma MSRO prevents successful development of both wasps, and confers a small, albeit significant, increase in larva-to-adult survival of flies subjected to wasp attacks. We modeled the conditions under which defense can contribute to Spiroplasma persistence. Wolbachia also confers a weak, but significant, survival advantage to flies attacked by L. heterotoma. The host protective effects exhibited by Spiroplasma and Wolbachia are additive and may provide the conditions for such cotransmitted symbionts to become mutualists. Occurrence of Spiroplasma-mediated protection against distinct parasitoids in divergent Drosophila hosts suggests a general protection mechanism. PMID:24281548

Xie, J; Butler, S; Sanchez, G; Mateos, M

2014-04-01

345

Vehicle-based road dust emission measurement—Part II: Effect of precipitation, wintertime road sanding, and street sweepers on inferred PM 10 emission potentials from paved and unpaved roads  

Microsoft Academic Search

Testing Re-Entrained Kinetic Emissions from Roads (TRAKER) is a new technique to infer paved and unpaved road dust PM10 emission potentials based on particulate matter (PM) measurements made onboard a moving vehicle. Light scattering instruments mounted in front and behind the vehicle's tires measure the differential particle concentration of dust suspended by the vehicle's tire in contact with the road

H Kuhns; V Etyemezian; M Green; Karin Hendrickson; Michael McGown; Kevin Barton; Marc Pitchford

2003-01-01

346

China's Launch Vehicle Operations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

China's Launch Vehicle technologies have been started since 1950s. With the efforts made by several-generation Chinese Space people, the Long March (LM) Launch Vehicles, China's main space transportation tools, have undergone a development road from conventional propellants to cryogenic propellants, from stage-by-stage to strap-on, from dedicated-launch to multiple-launch, from satellite-launching to space capsule-launching. The LM Launch Vehicles are capable of sending various payloads to different orbits with low cost and high reliability. Till now, the LM Launch Vehicles have conducted 67 launch missions, putting 76 spacecraft into the given orbits since the successful mission made by LM-1 in 1970. Especially, they have performed 22 international commercial satellite-launching missions, sending 27 foreign satellites successfully. The footprints of LM Launch Vehicles reflect the development and progress of Chinese Space Industry. At the beginning of the 21st century, with the development of launch vehicle technology and the economic globalization, it is an inexorable trend that Chinese space industry must participate in the international cooperation and competition. Being faced with both opportunities and challenges, Chinese Space Industry should promote actively the commercial launch service market to increase service quality and improve the comprehensive competition capabilities. In order to maintain the sustaining development of China's launch vehicle technology and to meet the increasing needs in the international commercial launch service market, Chinese space industry is now doing research work on developing new-generation Chinese launchers. The new launchers will be large-scale, powerful and non-contamination. The presence of the new-generation Chinese launchers will greatly speed up the development of the whole space-related industries in China, as well as other parts of the world. In the first part, this paper gives an overview on China Aerospace Science &Technology Corporation (CASC), which builds LM Launch Vehicle and is working on the new-generation Chinese Launchers. In the second part, the paper pays more attentions to introduce LM Launch Vehicles, as well as their commercial launch services. Then in the third part, the paper firstly describes the new-generation launchers.

Bai, Jingwu

2002-01-01

347

Retrofiting survivability of military vehicles  

SciTech Connect

In Iraq the terrain was such that vehicles could be distributed horizontally, which reduced the effectiveness of mines. In the mountainous terrain of Pakistan and Afghanistan vehicles are forced to use the few, passable roads, which are dirt and easily seeded with plentiful, cheap, intelligent mines. It is desirable to reduce the losses to such mines, preferably by retrofit means that do not greatly increase weight or cost or reduce maneuverability. V-bottom vehicles - A known approach to reducing vulnerability is the Buffalo, a large vehicle developed by South Africa to address mine warfare. It has large tires, high axles, and a reinforced, v-shaped bottom that deflects the blast from explosions below. It is developed and tested in combat, but is expensive and has reduced off-road mobility. The domestic MRAP has similar cost and mobility issue. The addition of v-shaped blast deflectors to vehicles such as Humvees could act much as the deflector on a Buffalo, but a Humvee is closer to the ground, so the explosive's expansion would be reduced. The deflector would also reduce a Humvee's clearance for rough terrain, and a deflector of adequate thickness to address the blast by itself could further increase cost and reduce mobility. Reactive armor is developed and has proven effective against shaped and explosive charges from side or top attack. It detects their approach, detonates, and defeats them by interfering with jet formation. If the threat was a shaped charge from below, they would be a logical choice. But the bulk of the damage to Humvees appears to be from the blast from high explosive mines for which the colliding shock from reactive armor could increase that from the explosive. Porous materials such as sand can strongly attenuate the kinetic energy and pressure of a strong shock. Figure 1 shows the kinetic energy (KE), momentum (Mu), velocity (u), and mass (M) of a spherically expanding shock as functions of radius for a material with a porosity of 0.5. Over the range from 0.5 to 4.5 cm the shock KE is attenuated by a factor of {approx}70, while its momentum is changed little. The shock and particle velocity falls by a factor of 200 while the mass increases by a factor of 730. In the limit of very porous media u {approx} 1/M, so KE {approx} 1/M, which falls by a factor of {approx}600, while momentum Mu does not change at all. Figure 2 shows the KE, Mu, u, and M for a material with a porosity of 1.05, for which the KE changes little. In the limit of media of very low porosity, u {approx} 1/{radical}M, so KE is constant while Mu {approx} {radical}M, which increases by a factor of 15. Thus, if the goal is to reduce the peak pressure from strong explosions below, very porous materials, which strongly reduce pressure but do not increase momentum, are preferred to non-porous materials, which amplify momentum but do not decrease pressure. These predictions are in qualitative accord with the results of experiments at Los Alamos in which projectiles from high velocity, large caliber cannons were stopped by one to two sandbags. The studies were performed primarily to determine the effectiveness of sand in stopping fragments of various sizes, but could be extended to study sand's effectiveness in attenuating blast pressure. It would also be useful to test the above predictions on the effectiveness of media with higher porosity. Water barriers have been discussed but not deployed in previous retrofit survivability studies for overseas embassies. They would detect the flash from the mine detonation below, trigger a thin layer of explosive above a layer of water, and drive water droplets into the approaching blast wave. The blast loses energy in evaporating the droplets and loses momentum in slowing them. Under favorable conditions that could attenuate the pressure in the blast enough to prevent the penetration or disruption of the vehicle. However, such barriers would depend on prompt and reliable detonation detection and water droplet dispersal, which have not been tested. There is a large literature on the theoretical effec

Canavan, Gregory H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01

348

Distributed Propulsion Vehicles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since the introduction of large jet-powered transport aircraft, the majority of these vehicles have been designed by placing thrust-generating engines either under the wings or on the fuselage to minimize aerodynamic interactions on the vehicle operation. However, advances in computational and experimental tools along with new technologies in materials, structures, and aircraft controls, etc. are enabling a high degree of integration of the airframe and propulsion system in aircraft design. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been investigating a number of revolutionary distributed propulsion vehicle concepts to increase aircraft performance. The concept of distributed propulsion is to fully integrate a propulsion system within an airframe such that the aircraft takes full synergistic benefits of coupling of airframe aerodynamics and the propulsion thrust stream by distributing thrust using many propulsors on the airframe. Some of the concepts are based on the use of distributed jet flaps, distributed small multiple engines, gas-driven multi-fans, mechanically driven multifans, cross-flow fans, and electric fans driven by turboelectric generators. This paper describes some early concepts of the distributed propulsion vehicles and the current turboelectric distributed propulsion (TeDP) vehicle concepts being studied under the NASA s Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project to drastically reduce aircraft-related fuel burn, emissions, and noise by the year 2030 to 2035.

Kim, Hyun Dae

2010-01-01

349

Methylotroph cloning vehicle  

DOEpatents

A cloning vehicle comprising: a replication determinant effective for replicating the vehicle in a non-C.sub.1 -utilizing host and in a C.sub.1 -utilizing host; DNA effective to allow the vehicle to be mobilized from the non-C.sub.1 -utilizing host to the C.sub.1 -utilizing host; DNA providing resistance to two antibiotics to which the wild-type C.sub.1 -utilizing host is susceptible, each of the antibiotic resistance markers having a recognition site for a restriction endonuclease; a cos site; and a means for preventing replication in the C.sub.1 -utilizing host. The vehicle is used for complementation mapping as follows. DNA comprising a gene from the C.sub.1 -utilizing organism is inserted at the restriction nuclease recognition site, inactivating the antibiotic resistance marker at that site. The vehicle can then be used to form a cosmid structure to infect the non-C.sub.1 -utilizing (e.g., E. coli) host, and then conjugated with a selected C.sub.1 -utilizing mutant. Resistance to the other antibiotic by the mutant is a marker of the conjugation. Other phenotypical changes in the mutant, e.g., loss of an auxotrophic trait, is attributed to the C.sub.1 gene. The vector is also used to inactivate genes whose protein products catalyze side reactions that divert compounds from a biosynthetic pathway to a desired product, thereby producing an organism that makes the desired product in higher yields.

Hanson, Richard S. (Deephaven, MN); Allen, Larry N. (Excelsior, MN)

1989-04-25

350

The kill date as a management tool for cover cropping success.  

PubMed

Integrating cover crops (CC) in rotations provides multiple ecological services, but it must be ensured that management does not increase pre-emptive competition with the subsequent crop. This experiment was conducted to study the effect of kill date on: (i) CC growth and N content; (ii) the chemical composition of residues; (iii) soil inorganic N and potentially mineralizable N; and (iv) soil water content. Treatments were fallow and a CC mixture of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and vetch (Vicia sativa L.) sown in October and killed on two different dates in spring. Above-ground biomass and chemical composition of CC were determined at harvest, and ground cover was monitored based on digital image analysis. Soil mineral N was determined before sowing and after killing the CC, and potentially mineralizable N was measured by aerobic incubation at the end of the experiment. Soil water content was monitored daily to a depth of 1.1 m using capacitance sensors. Under the present conditions of high N availability, delaying kill date increased barley above-ground biomass and N uptake from deep soil layers; little differences were observed in vetch. Postponing kill date increased the C/N ratio and the fiber content of plant residues. Ground cover reached >80% by the first kill date (?1250°C days). Kill date was a means to control soil inorganic N by balancing the N retained in the residue and soil, and showed promise for mitigating N losses. The early kill date decreased the risk of water and N pre-emptive competition by reducing soil depletion, preserving rain harvested between kill dates and allowing more time for N release in spring. The soil potentially mineralizable N was enhanced by the CC and kill date delay. Therefore kill date is a crucial management variable for maximizing the CC benefits in agricultural systems. PMID:25296333

Alonso-Ayuso, María; Gabriel, José Luis; Quemada, Miguel

2014-01-01

351

The Kill Date as a Management Tool for Cover Cropping Success  

PubMed Central

Integrating cover crops (CC) in rotations provides multiple ecological services, but it must be ensured that management does not increase pre-emptive competition with the subsequent crop. This experiment was conducted to study the effect of kill date on: (i) CC growth and N content; (ii) the chemical composition of residues; (iii) soil inorganic N and potentially mineralizable N; and (iv) soil water content. Treatments were fallow and a CC mixture of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and vetch (Vicia sativa L.) sown in October and killed on two different dates in spring. Above-ground biomass and chemical composition of CC were determined at harvest, and ground cover was monitored based on digital image analysis. Soil mineral N was determined before sowing and after killing the CC, and potentially mineralizable N was measured by aerobic incubation at the end of the experiment. Soil water content was monitored daily to a depth of 1.1 m using capacitance sensors. Under the present conditions of high N availability, delaying kill date increased barley above-ground biomass and N uptake from deep soil layers; little differences were observed in vetch. Postponing kill date increased the C/N ratio and the fiber content of plant residues. Ground cover reached >80% by the first kill date (?1250°C days). Kill date was a means to control soil inorganic N by balancing the N retained in the residue and soil, and showed promise for mitigating N losses. The early kill date decreased the risk of water and N pre-emptive competition by reducing soil depletion, preserving rain harvested between kill dates and allowing more time for N release in spring. The soil potentially mineralizable N was enhanced by the CC and kill date delay. Therefore kill date is a crucial management variable for maximizing the CC benefits in agricultural systems. PMID:25296333

Alonso-Ayuso, María; Gabriel, José Luis; Quemada, Miguel

2014-01-01

352

Carbon stocks of trees killed by bark beetles and wildfire in the western United States  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Forests are major components of the carbon cycle, and disturbances are important influences of forest carbon. Our objective was to contribute to the understanding of forest carbon cycling by quantifying the amount of carbon in trees killed by two disturbance types, fires and bark beetles, in the western United States in recent decades. We combined existing spatial data sets of forest biomass, burn severity, and beetle-caused tree mortality to estimate the amount of aboveground and belowground carbon in killed trees across the region. We found that during 1984-2010, fires killed trees that contained 5-11 Tg C year-1 and during 1997-2010, beetles killed trees that contained 2-24 Tg C year-1, with more trees killed since 2000 than in earlier periods. Over their periods of record, amounts of carbon in trees killed by fires and by beetle outbreaks were similar, and together these disturbances killed trees representing 9% of the total tree carbon in western forests, a similar amount to harvesting. Fires killed more trees in lower-elevation forest types such as Douglas-fir than higher-elevation forest types, whereas bark beetle outbreaks also killed trees in higher-elevation forest types such as lodgepole pine and Engelmann spruce. Over 15% of the carbon in lodgepole pine and spruce/fir forest types was in trees killed by beetle outbreaks; other forest types had 5-10% of the carbon in killed trees. Our results document the importance of these natural disturbances in the carbon budget of the western United States.

Hicke, Jeffrey A.; Meddens, Arjan J. H.; Allen, Craig D.; Kolden, Crystal A.

2013-09-01

353

Carbon stocks of trees killed by bark beetles and wildfire in the western United States  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Forests are major components of the carbon cycle, and disturbances are important influences of forest carbon. Our objective was to contribute to the understanding of forest carbon cycling by quantifying the amount of carbon in trees killed by two disturbance types, fires and bark beetles, in the western United States in recent decades. We combined existing spatial data sets of forest biomass, burn severity, and beetle-caused tree mortality to estimate the amount of aboveground and belowground carbon in killed trees across the region. We found that during 1984-2010, fires killed trees that contained 5-11 Tg C year-1 and during 1997-2010, beetles killed trees that contained 2-24 Tg C year-1, with more trees killed since 2000 than in earlier periods. Over their periods of record, amounts of carbon in trees killed by fires and by beetle outbreaks were similar, and together these disturbances killed trees representing 9% of the total tree carbon in western forests, a similar amount to harvesting. Fires killed more trees in lower-elevation forest types such as Douglas-fir than higher-elevation forest types, whereas bark beetle outbreaks also killed trees in higher-elevation forest types such as lodgepole pine and Engelmann spruce. Over 15% of the carbon in lodgepole pine and spruce/fir forest types was in trees killed by beetle outbreaks; other forest types had 5-10% of the carbon in killed trees. Our results document the importance of these natural disturbances in the carbon budget of the western United States.

Hicke, Jeffrey A.; Meddens, Arjan J.H.; Allen, Craig D.; Kolden, Crystal A.

2013-01-01

354

Smart Vehicle System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An approach to overcome the accidental problem happens in the night, while the driver is drunk or feels sleepy. This system controls the speed of the vehicle at steep turns. It is designed, to provide the information to the driver, whether the next turn is right/left, is there any traffic jam or land sliding in the coming way. It also assists during heavy rains and mist conditions. It may be implemented by using computer or by using a dedicated microcontroller. If we have a group of vehicles connected with the system then we can locate them by using the cameras, at different places. Information regarding any vehicle can be transmitted anywhere using Internet provided at the monitoring system, so as to prevent accidents or provide information during any calamity.

Pahadiya, Pallavi; Gupta, Rajni

2010-11-01

355

Dynamics of aerospace vehicles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The focus of this research was to address the modeling, including model reduction, of flexible aerospace vehicles, with special emphasis on models used in dynamic analysis and/or guidance and control system design. In the modeling, it is critical that the key aspects of the system being modeled be captured in the model. In this work, therefore, aspects of the vehicle dynamics critical to control design were important. In this regard, fundamental contributions were made in the areas of stability robustness analysis techniques, model reduction techniques, and literal approximations for key dynamic characteristics of flexible vehicles. All these areas are related. In the development of a model, approximations are always involved, so control systems designed using these models must be robust against uncertainties in these models.

Schmidt, David K.

1991-01-01

356

Aerobraking orbital transfer vehicle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An aerobraking orbital transfer vehicle which includes an aerobraking device which also serves as a heat shield in the shape of a raked-off elliptic or circular cone with a circular or elliptical base, and with an ellipsoid or other blunt shape nose. The aerobraking device is fitted with a toroid-like skirt and is integral with the support structure of the propulsion system and other systems of the space vehicle. The vehicle is intended to be transported in components to a space station in lower earth orbit where it is assembled for use as a transportation system from low earth orbit to geosynchronous earth orbit and return. Conventional guidance means are included for autonomous flight.

Scott, Carl D. (Inventor); Nagy, Kornel (Inventor); Roberts, Barney B. (Inventor); Ried, Robert C. (Inventor); Kroll, Kenneth R. (Inventor); Gamble, Joe (Inventor)

1989-01-01

357

High speed electric vehicle  

SciTech Connect

The Formula Lighting is an exciting new addition to GMI Engineering and Management Institute. This project is an excellent opportunity for students to use their acquired skills in a real life application. The vehicle is slated to compete in several races around the country. These events offer students the exposure to high caliber competitions in engineering design, combined with the thrill of racing. The Formula Lightning is an electric vehicle. Most of the challenging design tasks lie within the drive train setup and battery system efficiency. Part of the battery system efficiency includes a quick and reliable exchange technique of battery packs under race conditions. The vehicle is designed and built by GMI students, except for the chassis. This project allows students from all fields of engineering to gain experience in mechanical and electrical design as well as project management.

Nasa, K.; Tavakoli, M.; Thompson, M.; Jordan, C. [GMI Engineering and Management Inst., Flint, MI (United States)

1997-12-31

358

Assured Crew Return Vehicle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The developmental status is discussed regarding the 'lifeboat' vehicle to enhance the safety of the crew on the Space Station Freedom (SSF). NASA's Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV) is intended to provide a means for returning the SSF crew to earth at all times. The 'lifeboat' philosophy is the key to managing the development of the ACRV which further depends on matrixed support and total quality management for implementation. The risk of SSF mission scenarios are related to selected ACRV mission requirements, and the system and vehicle designs are related to these precepts. Four possible ACRV configurations are mentioned including the lifting-body, Apollo shape, Discoverer shape, and a new lift-to-drag concept. The SCRAM design concept is discussed in detail with attention to the 'lifeboat' philosophy and requirements for implementation.

Stone, D. A.; Craig, J. W.; Drone, B.; Gerlach, R. H.; Williams, R. J.

1991-01-01

359

Personnel emergency carrier vehicle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A personnel emergency carrier vehicle is disclosed which includes a vehicle frame supported on steerable front wheels and driven rear wheels. A supply of breathing air is connected to quick connect face mask coupling and umbilical cord couplings for supplying breathing air to an injured worker or attendant either with or without a self-contained atmospheric protection suit for protection against hazardous gases at an accident site. A non-sparking hydraulic motion is utilized to drive the vehicle and suitable direction and throttling controls are provided for controlling the delivery of a hydraulic driving fluid from a pressurized hydraulic fluid accumulator. A steering axis is steerable through a handle to steer the front wheels through a linkage assembly.

Owens, Lester J. (inventor); Fedor, Otto H. (inventor)

1987-01-01

360

Aeroacoustics of Space Vehicles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

While for airplanes the subject of aeroacoustics is associated with community noise, for space vehicles it is associated with vibro-acoustics and structural dynamics. Surface pressure fluctuations encountered during launch and travel through lower part of the atmosphere create intense vibro-acoustics environment for the payload, electronics, navigational equipment, and a large number of subsystems. All of these components have to be designed and tested for flight-certification. This presentation will cover all three major sources encountered in manned and unmanned space vehicles: launch acoustics, ascent acoustics and abort acoustics. Launch pads employ elaborate acoustic suppression systems to mitigate the ignition pressure waves and rocket plume generated noise during the early part of the liftoff. Recently we have used large microphone arrays to identify the noise sources during liftoff and found that the standard model by Eldred and Jones (NASA SP-8072) to be grossly inadequate. As the vehicle speeds up and reaches transonic speed in relatively denser part of the atmosphere, various shock waves and flow separation events create unsteady pressure fluctuations that can lead to high vibration environment, and occasional coupling with the structural modes, which may lead to buffet. Examples of wind tunnel tests and computational simulations to optimize the outer mold line to quantify and reduce the surface pressure fluctuations will be presented. Finally, a manned space vehicle needs to be designed for crew safety during malfunctioning of the primary rocket vehicle. This brings the subject of acoustic environment during abort. For NASAs Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV), abort will be performed by lighting rocket motors atop the crew module. The severe aeroacoustics environments during various abort scenarios were measured for the first time by using hot helium to simulate rocket plumes in the Ames unitary plan wind tunnels. Various considerations used for the helium simulation and the final confirmation from a flight test will be presented.

Panda, Jayanta

2014-01-01

361

Medicinal Chemistry and Enzyme Kinetics  

E-print Network

Medicinal Chemistry and Enzyme Kinetics Elizabeth Amin and C. R. Wagner, Medicinal Chemistry Jiali Stankovich, Jiali Gao, and Donald G. Truhlar, University of Minnesota February 2007 Enzyme Kinetics Kinetic isotope effects Variational transition state theory Multidimensional tunneling Ensemble averaging

Truhlar, Donald G

362

Vehicle brake testing system  

DOEpatents

This invention relates to a force measuring system capable of measuring forces associated with vehicle braking and of evaluating braking performance. The disclosure concerns an invention which comprises a first row of linearly aligned plates, a force bearing surface extending beneath and beside the plates, vertically oriented links and horizontally oriented links connecting each plate to a force bearing surface, a force measuring device in each link, a transducer coupled to each force measuring device, and a computing device coupled to receive an output signal from the transducer indicative of measured force in each force measuring device. The present invention may be used for testing vehicle brake systems.

Stevens, Samuel S. (Harriman, TN); Hodgson, Jeffrey W. (Lenoir City, TN)

2002-11-19

363

BEEST: Electric Vehicle Batteries  

SciTech Connect

BEEST Project: The U.S. spends nearly a $1 billion per day to import petroleum, but we need dramatically better batteries for electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles (EV/PHEV) to truly compete with gasoline-powered cars. The 10 projects in ARPA-E’s BEEST Project, short for “Batteries for Electrical Energy Storage in Transportation,” could make that happen by developing a variety of rechargeable battery technologies that would enable EV/PHEVs to meet or beat the price and performance of gasoline-powered cars, and enable mass production of electric vehicles that people will be excited to drive.

None

2010-07-01

364

Changes in phonotaxis by the female cricket Acheta domesticus L. after killing identified acoustic interneurons  

Microsoft Academic Search

Phonotactic selectivity of female crickets to natural and model calling songs (CSs) has been well documented. No identified acoustic interneurons or groups of them exhibited sufficiently selective responses to CSs to explain this behavioral selectivity. In this study identified acoustic interneurons were killed and pre- and post-killing phonotactic responses to model CSs were compared.1.Acoustic interneurons were iontophoretically filled with lucifer

Gordon Atkins; Scott Ligman; Frederick Burghardt; John F. Stout

1984-01-01

365

Mothers Who Kill Their Offspring: Testing Evolutionary Hypothesis in a 110-Case Italian Sample  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: This research aimed to identify incidents of mothers in Italy killing their own children and to test an adaptive evolutionary hypothesis to explain their occurrence. Methods: 110 cases of mothers killing 123 of their own offspring from 1976 to 2010 were analyzed. Each case was classified using 13 dichotomic variables. Descriptive…

Camperio Ciani, Andrea S.; Fontanesi, Lilybeth

2012-01-01

366

What are 60 warblers worth? Killing in the name of conservation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ecological research sometimes entails animal suffering and even animal killing. The ethical appropriateness of animal suffering and killing in conservation research may entail considerations that differ from many other kinds of research. This is true, insomuch as conservation research is specifically motivated by an ethical premise: an appreciation for non-human life. In striking contrast with other academic fields (e.g. medicine),

John A. Vucetich; Michael P. Nelson

2007-01-01

367

ANALYSIS OF MATERIALS IN AN EXPERIMENTAL TESTING PIPE SYSTEM FOR AN INHIBITOR OF MUSSEL KILL  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive series of 16 laboratory experiments demonstrated that the presence of vinyl tubing within a recirculating pipe system was responsible for lowering zebra mussel kill following treatment with the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens. All vinyl tubing was replaced in all testing units with silicone tubing, and high mussel kill (>95%) was then obtained.

Daniel P. Molloy

2003-06-04

368

Laboratory and field evaluations for efficacy of a fast-killing baculovirus isolate from Spodoptera frugiperda  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Three biopesticide parameters were evaluated for a fast-killing isolate (3AP2) Spodoptera frugiperda multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (SfMNPV) and a wild-type isolate (Sf3) of the same baculovirus. Both isolates were evaluated for virus production using in vivo methods, for speed of kill based on bioas...

369

Green functions and Martin compactification for killed random walks related to SU(3)  

E-print Network

Green functions and Martin compactification for killed random walks related to SU(3) Kilian Raschel of the Green functions along all infinite paths of states, and from this we deduce that the Martin compactification is the one-point compactification. Keywords : killed random walks, Green functions, Martin

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

370

Conformal techniques in cosmology: Conformal Killing horizons and cosmological black holes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates the use of conformal Killing horizons in time dependent black hole spacetimes, particularly expanding black holes in a FLRW universe. It examines the use of conformal techniques to generate these cosmological black hole models. The role played by conformal techniques in generating black holes with non-spherical event horizons is also studied. The concept of conformal Killing horizons

Joseph Sultana

2003-01-01

371

Bax/Bak action in mitochondria. These agents release Ca2+ themselves and kill  

E-print Network

67 Bax/Bak action in mitochondria. These agents release Ca2+ themselves and kill more efficiently or Bak in mitochondria, and both ER Ca2+ and Bax/Bak levels mod- ulate their killing potency. The Bax and Bax/Bak indeed coregulate ER Ca2+. The Scorrano et al. study defines a new role for the ER-mitochondria

Latham, Peter

372

Peptidoglycan Recognition Proteins Kill Bacteria by Inducing Oxidative, Thiol, and Metal Stress  

PubMed Central

Mammalian Peptidoglycan Recognition Proteins (PGRPs) are a family of evolutionary conserved bactericidal innate immunity proteins, but the mechanism through which they kill bacteria is unclear. We previously proposed that PGRPs are bactericidal due to induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), a mechanism of killing that was also postulated, and later refuted, for several bactericidal antibiotics. Here, using whole genome expression arrays, qRT-PCR, and biochemical tests we show that in both Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis PGRPs induce a transcriptomic signature characteristic of oxidative stress, as well as correlated biochemical changes. However, induction of ROS was required, but not sufficient for PGRP killing. PGRPs also induced depletion of intracellular thiols and increased cytosolic concentrations of zinc and copper, as evidenced by transcriptome changes and supported by direct measurements. Depletion of thiols and elevated concentrations of metals were also required, but by themselves not sufficient, for bacterial killing. Chemical treatment studies demonstrated that efficient bacterial killing can be recapitulated only by the simultaneous addition of agents leading to production of ROS, depletion of thiols, and elevation of intracellular metal concentrations. These results identify a novel mechanism of bacterial killing by innate immunity proteins, which depends on synergistic effect of oxidative, thiol, and metal stress and differs from bacterial killing by antibiotics. These results offer potential targets for developing new antibacterial agents that would kill antibiotic-resistant bacteria. PMID:25032698

Kashyap, Des Raj; Rompca, Annemarie; Gaballa, Ahmed; Helmann, John D.; Chan, Jefferson; Chang, Christopher J.; Hozo, Iztok; Gupta, Dipika; Dziarski, Roman

2014-01-01

373

Topics in Representation Theory: The Killing Form, Reflections and Classification of Root  

E-print Network

Topics in Representation Theory: The Killing Form, Reflections and Classification of Root Systems 1 Roots and the Killing Form So far we have just used the combinatorial structure coming from the roots restrict it to tC and use the fact that for H tC, ad(H) is diagonal with eigenvalues given by the roots i

Woit, Peter

374

Conditions for the existence of quasi-stationary distributions for birth-death processes with killing  

E-print Network

Conditions for the existence of quasi-stationary distributions for birth-death processes Enschede, The Netherlands E-mail: e.a.vandoorn@utwente.nl August 18, 2011 Abstract. We consider birth killing rates equal to zero is recurrent. Keywords: birth-death process with killing, orthogonal

Al Hanbali, Ahmad

375

Killing technique of North American badgers preying on Richardson's ground squirrels  

Microsoft Academic Search

Carcasses of 13 Richardson's ground squirrels (Spermophilus richardsonii) cached during autumn by North American badgers (Taxidea taxus) in southern Alberta, Canada, were inspected to determine the capture and killing technique. Regardless of prey size (251-651 g) or torpor status (normothermic or torpid), badgers killed ground squir - rels with a single grasping bite directed dorsally or laterally to the thorax.

Gail R. Michener; Andrew N. Iwaniuk

2001-01-01

376

The Effect of Vine Kill and Harvest Date on Tuber Respiration Rates and Tuber Sugars  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Russet Burbank potatoes were grown using standard procedures for planting, fertilization, irrigation, and pest management. Vine kill and harvest occurred on three staggered dates that spanned approximately six weeks. Vines were either killed chemically or left untreated and ubers were harvested from...

377

Hydrogen as a fuel for fuel cell vehicles: A technical and economic comparison  

SciTech Connect

All fuel cells currently being developed for near term use in vehicles require hydrogen as a fuel. Hydrogen can be stored directly or produced onboard the vehicle by reforming methanol, ethanol or hydrocarbon fuels derived from crude oil (e.g., Diesel, gasoline or middle distillates). The vehicle design is simpler with direct hydrogen storage, but requires developing a more complex refueling infrastructure. In this paper, the authors compare three leading options for fuel storage onboard fuel cell vehicles: compressed gas hydrogen storage; onboard steam reforming of methanol; onboard partial oxidation (POX) of hydrocarbon fuels derived from crude oil. Equilibrium, kinetic and heat integrated system (ASPEN) models have been developed to estimate the performance of onboard steam reforming and POX fuel processors. These results have been incorporated into a fuel cell vehicle model, allowing us to compare the vehicle performance, fuel economy, weight, and cost for various fuel storage choices and driving cycles. A range of technical and economic parameters were considered. The infrastructure requirements are also compared for gaseous hydrogen, methanol and hydrocarbon fuels from crude oil, including the added costs of fuel production, storage, distribution and refueling stations. Considering both vehicle and infrastructure issues, the authors compare hydrogen to other fuel cell vehicle fuels. Technical and economic goals for fuel cell vehicle and hydrogen technologies are discussed. Potential roles for hydrogen in the commercialization of fuel cell vehicles are sketched.

Ogden, J.; Steinbugler, M.; Kreutz, T. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Center for Energy and Environmental Studies

1997-12-31

378

Distinct mechanisms of cell-kill by triapine and its terminally dimethylated derivative Dp44mT due to a loss or gain of activity of their copper(II) complexes.  

PubMed

Triapine, currently being evaluated as an antitumor agent in phase II clinical trials, and its terminally dimethylated derivative Dp44mT share the ?-pyridyl thiosemicarbazone backbone that functions as ligands for transition metal ions. Yet, Dp44mT is approximately 100-fold more potent than triapine in cytotoxicity assays. The aims of this study were to elucidate the mechanisms underlying their potency disparity and to determine their kinetics of cell-kill in culture to aid in the formulation of their clinical dosing schedules. The addition of Cu(2+) inactivated triapine in a 1:1 stoichiometric fashion, while it potentiated the cytotoxicity of Dp44mT. Clonogenic assays after finite-time drug-exposure revealed that triapine produced cell-kill in two phases, one completed within 20 min that caused limited cell-kill, and the other occurring after 16 h of exposure that produced extensive cell-kill. The ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor triapine at 0.4 ?M caused immediate complete arrest of DNA synthesis, whereas Dp44mT at this concentration did not appreciably inhibit DNA synthesis. The inhibition of DNA synthesis by triapine was reversible upon its removal from the medium. Cell death after 16 h exposure to triapine paralleled the appearance of phospho-(?)H2AX, a marker of DNA double-strand breaks induced by collapse of DNA replication forks after prolonged replication arrest. In contrast to triapine, Dp44mT produced robust cell-kill within 1h in a concentration-dependent manner. The short-term action of both agents was prevented by thiols, indicative of the involvement of reactive oxygen species. The time dependency in the production of cell-kill by triapine should be considered in treatment regimens. PMID:25130544

Ishiguro, Kimiko; Lin, Z Ping; Penketh, Philip G; Shyam, Krishnamurthy; Zhu, Rui; Baumann, Raymond P; Zhu, Yong-Lian; Sartorelli, Alan C; Rutherford, Thomas J; Ratner, Elena S

2014-10-01

379

ROBUST SCALABLE VEHICLE CONTROL VIA NON-DIMENSIONAL VEHICLE DYNAMICS  

E-print Network

ROBUST SCALABLE VEHICLE CONTROL VIA NON-DIMENSIONAL VEHICLE DYNAMICS S. Brennan & A. Alleyne Dept called pi-groups. Investigation of these pi- groups using compiled data from 44 published sets of Vehicle Dynamics reveals that the data does not span the pi-space, but instead follows a multi-dimensional line

Brennan, Sean

380

Vehicle dynamics and external disturbance estimation for vehicle path prediction  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper addresses the onboard prediction of a motor vehicle's path to help enable a variety of emerging functions in autonomous vehicle control and active safety systems. It is shown in simulation that good accuracy of path prediction is achieved using numerical integration of a linearized two degree of freedom vehicle handling model. To improve performance, a steady-state Kalman filter

Chiu-Feng Lin; A. Galip Ulsoy; David J. LeBlanc

2000-01-01

381

Vehicle system controller design for a hybrid electric vehicle  

Microsoft Academic Search

As a way to meet the challenge of developing more fuel efficient and lower emission producing vehicles, auto manufacturers are increasingly looking toward revolutionary changes to conventional powertrain technologies as a solution. One alternative under consideration is that of hybrid electric vehicles (HEV). An HEV combines some of the benefits of electric vehicles (efficient and clean motive power supplied by

Anthony M. Phillips; Miroslava Jankovic; Kathleen E. Bailey

2000-01-01

382

77 FR 30765 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Electronic Stability Control Systems for Heavy Vehicles  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...For light vehicles, the focus...assist the driver in preventing the vehicle from leaving...when light vehicles run off the...for light vehicles equipped with...communicate to the driver the condition...malfunctioning vehicle system...

2012-05-23

383

Household vehicles energy consumption 1991  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide information on the use of energy in residential vehicles in the 50 States and the District of Columbia. Included are data about: the number and type of vehicles in the residential sector, the characteristics of those vehicles, the total annual Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT), the per household and per vehicle VMT, the vehicle fuel consumption and expenditures, and vehicle fuel efficiencies. The data for this report are based on the household telephone interviews from the 1991 RTECS, conducted during 1991 and early 1992. The 1991 RTECS represents 94.6 million households, of which 84.6 million own or have access to 151.2 million household motor vehicles in the 50 States and the District of Columbia.

Not Available

1993-12-09

384

Parametrized maneuvers for autonomous vehicles  

E-print Network

This thesis presents a method for creating continuously parametrized maneuver classes for autonomous vehicles. These classes provide useful tools for motion planners, bundling sets of related vehicle motions based on a ...

Dever, Christopher W. (Christopher Walden), 1972-

2004-01-01

385

Vehicle Integrated Propulsion Research Tests  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Overview of the Vehicle Integrated Propulsion Research Tests in the Vehicle Systems Safety Technologies project. This overview covers highlights of the completed VIPR I and VIPR II tests and also covers plans for the VIPR III test.

Lekki, John D.; Hunter, Gary W.; Simon, Don; Meredith, Roger; Wrbanek, John; Woike, Mark; Tokars, Roger; Guffanti, Marianne; Lyall, Eric

2013-01-01

386

VCU researchers develop and test new molecule as a delivery vehicle to image and kill brain tumors:  

Cancer.gov

A single compound with dual function – the ability to deliver a diagnostic and therapeutic agent – may one day be used to enhance the diagnosis, imaging and treatment of brain tumors, according to findings from Virginia Commonwealth University and Virginia Tech.

387

Low temperature reveals genetic variability against male-killing Spiroplasma in Drosophila melanogaster natural populations.  

PubMed

Spiroplasma endosymbionts are maternally inherited microorganisms which infect many arthropod species. In some Drosophila species, it acts as a reproductive manipulator, spreading in populations by killing the sons of infected mothers. Distinct Drosophila melanogaster populations from Brazil exhibit variable male-killing Spiroplasma prevalences. In this study, we investigated the presence of variability for the male-killing phenotype among Drosophila and/or Spiroplasma strains and verified if it correlates with the endosymbiont prevalence in natural populations. For that, we analyzed the male-killing expression when Spiroplasma strains from different populations were transferred to a standard D. melanogaster line (Canton-S) and when a common Spiroplasma strain was transferred to different wild-caught D. melanogaster lines, both at optimal and challenging temperatures for the bacteria. No variation was observed in the male-killing phenotype induced by different Spiroplasma strains. No phenotypic variability among fly lines was detected at optimal temperature (23 °C), as well. Conversely, significant variation in the male-killing expression was revealed among D. melanogaster lines at 18.5 °C, probably caused by imperfect transmission of the endosymbiont. Distinct lines differed in their average sex ratios as well as in the pattern of male-killing expression as the infected females aged. Greater variation occurred among lines from one locality, although there was no clear correlation between the male-killing intensity and the endosymbiont prevalence in each population. Imperfect transmission or male killing may also occur in the field, thus helping to explain the low or intermediate prevalences reported in nature. We discuss the implications of our results for the dynamics of male-killing Spiroplasma in natural populations. PMID:24121800

Ventura, Iuri Matteuzzo; Costa, Thais; Klaczko, Louis Bernard

2014-01-01

388

Massachusetts Electric Vehicle Efforts  

E-print Network

Massachusetts Electric Vehicle Efforts Christine Kirby, MassDEP ZE-MAP Meeting October 24, 2014 #12 deployment · Provides ongoing support to region and states on EVs. #12;Massachusetts EV Initiative (MEVI-miles driven by state fleets; develop MA fuel efficiency standard for public fleets #12;Massachusetts Electric

California at Davis, University of

389

Vehicle Cabin Atmosphere Monitor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Vehicle Cabin Atmosphere Monitor (VCAM) identifies gases that are present in minute quantities in the International Space Station (ISS) breathing air that could harm the crew s health. If successful, instruments like VCAM could accompany crewmembers during long-duration exploration missions to the Moon or traveling to Mars.

Chutjian, Ara; Darrach, Muray

2007-01-01

390

Diesel Vehicle Maintenance Competencies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed to provide a model set of competencies, this manual presents tasks which were identified by employers, employees, and teachers as important in a postsecondary diesel vehicle maintenance curriculum. The tasks are divided into seven major component areas of instruction: chassis and suspension, diesel engines, diesel fuel, electrical,…

Braswell, Robert; And Others

391

Fire vehicle hardening  

Microsoft Academic Search

After attack, the wartime fire fighter faces a harsh environment in which he must operate to perform his mission. Debris, unexploded bombs, and munitions pose hazards that must be overcome. Without modification to the fire-fighting vehicles, there is little assurance that the fire fighter would even be able to reach the locations necessary for performing his mission. Adding armor to

1988-01-01

392

Heavy Vehicle Systems  

SciTech Connect

Heavy Vehicle (HV) systems are a necessary component of achieving OHVT goals. Elements are in place for a far-ranging program: short, intermediate, and long-term. Solicitation will bring industrial input and support. Future funding trend is positive, outlook for HV systems is good.

Sid Diamond; Richard Wares; Jules Routbort

2000-04-11

393

Load-carrying vehicles  

Microsoft Academic Search

This patent describes a vehicle having a chassis supporting a loadbed at the rear of the chassis; a first longitudinally extending linear member pivotally mounted at one of its ends to pivot about a transverse axis adjacent the rear end of the chassis from a first position in which the first member underlies the loadbed to a second position in

Boughton

1987-01-01

394

Hybrid Turbine Electric Vehicle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Hybrid electric power trains may revolutionize today's ground passenger vehicles by significantly improving fuel economy and decreasing emissions. The NASA Lewis Research Center is working with industry, universities, and Government to develop and demonstrate a hybrid electric vehicle. Our partners include Bowling Green State University, the Cleveland Regional Transit Authority, Lincoln Electric Motor Division, the State of Ohio's Department of Development, and Teledyne Ryan Aeronautical. The vehicle will be a heavy class urban transit bus offering double the fuel economy of today's buses and emissions that are reduced to 1/10th of the Environmental Protection Agency's standards. At the heart of the vehicle's drive train is a natural-gas-fueled engine. Initially, a small automotive engine will be tested as a baseline. This will be followed by the introduction of an advanced gas turbine developed from an aircraft jet engine. The engine turns a high-speed generator, producing electricity. Power from both the generator and an onboard energy storage system is then provided to a variable-speed electric motor attached to the rear drive axle. An intelligent power-control system determines the most efficient operation of the engine and energy storage system.

Viterna, Larry A.

1997-01-01

395

Mars Exploratory Vehicles.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an activity in which students learn about the characteristics of the planet Mars. Challenges students to design and build a model of a robotic vehicle that can travel on the surface of Mars and accomplish an assigned task that will provide information useful for future manned trips to the planet. Outlines mission task cards and progress…

Canizo, Thea L.; And Others

1997-01-01

396

The Electric Vehicle Challenge  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes a design activity that provides students with a solid understanding of the many issues involved with alternate energy system design. In this activity, students will be able to learn about electric vehicles and have the opportunity to design a way to recharge the batteries while the cars are parked in a commuter garage. The…

Roman, Harry T.

2010-01-01

397

Deep Submergence Vehicle Alvin  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the site to go to for information about Alvin, the deep submergence vehicle. Describes the history of Alvin, dive statistics, dive logs, dive site viewer, publication, and photos. Students will love the interactive Alvin simulator. Also available are a user manual, observer information, and cruise planning tips. An excellent marine technology resource.

398

Lunar transfer vehicle studies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lunar transportation architectures exist for several different mission scenarios. Direct flights from Earth are possible, as the Apollo program clearly demonstrated. Alternatively, a space transfer vehicle could be constructed in space by using the Space Station as a base of operations, or multiple vehicles could be launched from Earth and dock in LEO without using a space station for support. Similarly, returning personnel could proceed directly to Earth or rendezvous at the Space Station for a ride back home on the Space Shuttle. Multiple design concepts exist which are compatible with these scenarios and which can support requirements of cargo, personnel, and mission objectives. Regardless of the ultimate mission selected, some technologies will certainly play a key role in the design and operation of advanced lunar transfer vehicles. Current technologies are capable of delivering astronauts to the lunar surface, but improvements are needed to affordably transfer the material and equipment that will be needed for establishing a lunar base. Materials and structures advances, in particular, will enable the development of more capable cryogenic fluid management and propulsion systems, improved structures, and more efficient vehicle assembly, servicing and processing.

Keeley, Joseph T.

1993-01-01

399

Electric vehicle technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

This book covers the design and development of electric and hybrid vehicles. EV and hybrid drivetrains and their major components are described. Analytical and computer methods for analyzing, specifying, and designing such components as batteries, motors, electronic controllers and transmissions, are provided. Safety issues, operating costs, structural considerations, and battery charging and maintenance are examined. Topics include: fundamental concepts in

L. E. Unnewehr; S. A. Naser

1982-01-01

400

Flywheel batteries for vehicles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Energy storage flywheels are useful in power conditioning applications, i.e. when there is a mismatch between the power generated and the power required by the load. Two examples of this mismatch are a temporal mismatch and a mismatch in magnitude. The use of a flywheel in a hybrid vehicle, for example, permits the engine to be designed to provide only

J. Beno; R. Thompson; R. Hebner

2002-01-01

401

Recreational Vehicle Trades.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum guide provides materials for a competency-based course in recreational vehicle trades at the secondary level. The curriculum design uses the curriculum infused model for the teaching of basic skills as part of vocational education and demonstrates the relationship of vocationally related skills to communication, mathematics, and…

Felice, Michael

402

Methylotroph cloning vehicle  

DOEpatents

A cloning vehicle comprising: a replication determinant effective for replicating the vehicle in a non-C[sub 1]-utilizing host and in a C[sub 1]-utilizing host; DNA effective to allow the vehicle to be mobilized from the non-C[sub 1]-utilizing host to the C[sub 1]-utilizing host; DNA providing resistance to two antibiotics to which the wild-type C[sub 1]-utilizing host is susceptible, each of the antibiotic resistance markers having a recognition site for a restriction endonuclease; a cos site; and a means for preventing replication in the C[sub 1]-utilizing host. The vehicle is used for complementation mapping as follows. DNA comprising a gene from the C[sub 1]-utilizing organism is inserted at the restriction nuclease recognition site, inactivating the antibiotic resistance marker at that site. The vehicle can then be used to form a cosmid structure to infect the non-C[sub 1]-utilizing (e.g., E. coli) host, and then conjugated with a selected C[sub 1]-utilizing mutant. Resistance to the other antibiotic by the mutant is a marker of the conjugation. Other phenotypical changes in the mutant, e.g., loss of an auxotrophic trait, is attributed to the C[sub 1] gene. The vector is also used to inactivate genes whose protein products catalyze side reactions that divert compounds from a biosynthetic pathway to a desired product, thereby producing an organism that makes the desired product in higher yields. 3 figs.

Hanson, R.S.; Allen, L.N.

1989-04-25

403

Nanotechnology for the detection and kill of circulating tumor cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) represent a surrogate biomarker of hematogenous metastases and thus could be considered as a `liquid biopsy' which reveals metastasis in action. But it is absolutely a challenge to detect CTCs due to their extreme rarity. At present, the most common principle is to take advantage of the epithelial surface markers of CTCs which attach to a specific antibody. Antibody-magnetic nanobeads combine with the epithelial surface markers, and then the compound is processed by washing, separation, and detection. However, a proportion of CTC antigen expressions are down-regulated or lost in the process of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and thus, this part of CTCs cannot be detected by classical detection methods such as CellSearch. To resolve this problem, some multiple-marker CTC detections have been developed rapidly. Additionally, nanotechnology is a promising approach to kill CTCs with high efficiency. Implantable nanotubes coated with apoptosis-promoting molecules improve the disease-free survival and overall survival. The review introduces some novel CTC detection techniques and therapeutic methods by virtue of nanotechnology to provide a better knowledge of the progress about CTC study.

Gao, Yang; Yuan, Zhou

2014-09-01

404

BACTERIAL CELL KILLING MEDIATED BY TOPOISOMERASE I DNA CLEAVAGE ACTIVITY  

PubMed Central

DNA topoisomerases are important clinical targets for antibacterial and anticancer therapy. At least one type IA DNA topoisomerases can be found in every bacterium, making it a logical target for antibacterial agents that can convert the enzyme into poison by trapping its covalent complex with DNA. However, it has not been possible previously to observe the consequence of having such stabilized covalent complex of bacterial topoisomerase I in vivo. We isolated a mutant of recombinant Yersinia pestis topoisomerase I that forms a stabilized covalent complex with DNA by screening for the ability to induce the SOS response in Escherichia coli. Overexpression of this mutant topoisomerase I resulted in bacterial cell death. From sequence analysis and site-directed mutagenesis, it was determined that a single amino acid substitution in the TOPRIM domain changing a strictly conserved glycine residue to serine in either the Y. pestis or E. coli topoisomerase I can result in a mutant enzyme that has the SOS inducing and cell killing properties. Analysis of the purified mutant enzymes showed that they have no relaxation activity but retain the ability to cleave DNA and form a covalent complex. These results demonstrate that perturbation of the active site region of bacterial topoisomerase I can result in stabilization of the covalent intermediate, with the in vivo consequence of bacterial cell death. Small molecules that induce similar perturbation in the enzyme-DNA complex should be candidates as leads for novel antibacterial agents. PMID:16159875

Cheng, Bokun; Shukla, Shikha; Vasunilashorn, Sarinnapha; Mukhopadhyay, Somshuvra; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

2005-01-01

405

Electromagnetic self-forces and generalized Killing fields  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Building upon previous results in scalar field theory, a formalism is developed that uses generalized Killing fields to understand the behavior of extended charges interacting with their own electromagnetic fields. New notions of effective linear and angular momenta are identified, and their evolution equations are derived exactly in arbitrary (but fixed) curved spacetimes. A slightly modified form of the Detweiler-Whiting axiom that a charge's motion should only be influenced by the so-called regular component of its self-field is shown to follow very easily. It is exact in some interesting cases and approximate in most others. Explicit equations describing the center-of-mass motion, spin angular momentum and changes in mass of a small charge are also derived in a particular limit. The chosen approximations—although standard—incorporate dipole and spin forces that do not appear in the traditional Abraham-Lorentz-Dirac or Dewitt-Brehme equations. They have, however, been previously identified in the test body limit.

Harte, Abraham I.

2009-08-01

406

Killing Vector Fields, Maxwell Equations and Lorentzian Spacetimes  

E-print Network

In this paper we first analyze the structure of Maxwell equations in a Lorentzian spacetime where the potential A is proportional to 1-form K physically equivalent to a Killing vector field (supposed to exist). We show that such A obeys the Lorenz gauge and also a wave equation that can be written in terms of the covariant D'Alembertian or the Ricci operator. Moreover, we determine the correct current defined by that potential showing that it is of superconducting type, being two times the product of the components of A by the Ricci 1-form fields. We also study the structure of the spacetime generated by the coupled system consisting of a electromagnetic field F = dA (A, as above), an ideal charged fluid with dynamics described by an action function S and the gravitational field. We show that Einstein equations in this situation is then equivalent to Maxwell equations with a current givn by fFAF (the product meaning the Clifford product of the corresponding form fields), where f is a scalar function which satisfies a well determined algebraic quadratic equation.

Waldyr A. Rodrigues Jr

2008-08-13

407

HIV Treatments Have Malaria Gametocyte Killing and Transmission Blocking Activity  

PubMed Central

Background.?Millions of individuals being treated for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) live in malaria-endemic areas, but the effects of these treatments on malaria transmission are unknown. While drugs like HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) have known activity against parasites during liver or asexual blood stages, their effects on transmission stages require further study. Methods.?The HIV PIs lopinavir and saquinavir, the nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor nevirapine, and the antibiotic TMP-SMX were assessed for activity against Plasmodium falciparum transmission stages. The alamarBlue assay was used to determine the effects of drugs on gametocyte viability, and exflagellation was assessed to determine the effects of drugs on gametocyte maturation. The effects of drug on transmission were assessed by calculating the mosquito oocyst count as a marker for infectivity, using standard membrane feeding assays. Results.?Lopinavir and saquinavir have gametocytocidal and transmission blocking activities at or approaching clinically relevant treatment levels, while nevirapine does not. TMP-SMX is not gametocytocidal, but at prophylactic levels it blocks transmission. Conclusions.?Specific HIV treatments have gametocyte killing and transmission-blocking effects. Clinical studies are warranted to evaluate these findings and their potential impact on eradication efforts. PMID:23539746

Hobbs, Charlotte V.; Tanaka, Takeshi Q.; Muratova, Olga; Van Vliet, Jillian; Borkowsky, William; Williamson, Kim C.; Duffy, Patrick E.

2013-01-01

408

Rapid Kill—Novel Endodontic Sealer and Enterococcus faecalis  

PubMed Central

With growing concern over bacterial resistance, the identification of new antimicrobial means is paramount. In the oral cavity microorganisms are essential to the development of periradicular diseases and are the major causative factors associated with endodontic treatment failure. As quaternary ammonium compounds have the ability to kill a wide array of bacteria through electrostatic interactions with multiple anionic targets on the bacterial surface, it is likely that they can overcome bacterial resistance. Melding these ideas, we investigated the potency of a novel endodontic sealer in limiting Enterococcus faecalis growth. We used a polyethyleneimine scaffold to synthesize nano-sized particles, optimized for incorporation into an epoxy-based endodontic sealer. The novel endodontic sealer was tested for its antimicrobial efficacy and evaluated for biocompatibility and physical eligibility. Our results show that the novel sealer foundation affixes the nanoparticles, achieving surface bactericidal properties, but at the same time impeding nanoparticle penetration into eukaryotic cells and thereby mitigating a possible toxic effect. Moreover, adequate physical properties are maintained. The nanosized quaternary amine particles interact within minutes with bacteria, triggering cell death across wide pH values. Throughout this study we demonstrate a new antibacterial perspective for endodontic sealers; a novel antibacterial, effective and safe antimicrobial means. PMID:24223159

Zaltsman, Nathan; Houri-Haddad, Yael; Abramovitz, Itzhak; Davidi, Michael Perez; Weiss, Ervin I.

2013-01-01

409

Contact killing antimicrobial acrylic bone cements: preparation and characterization.  

PubMed

Novel antimicrobial poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-based bone cement was synthesized by co-polymerizing PMMA/MMA with various percentages of quaternary amine dimethacrylate (QADMA) by free radical bulk polymerization technique at room temperature using benzoyl peroxide and N,N-dimethyl-p-toulidine (DMPT) as a redox initiator. The modified bone cement was characterized by FT-IR and 1H-NMR spectral studies. The thermal and physical properties of the bone cements of varying composition of QADMA were evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential calorimetry (DSC) and contact angle measurements. Peak exothermic temperature was observed to decrease, while setting time increased with increase in QADMA content in the bone cement formulations. The antibacterial activity of the synthesized bone cement containing quaternary amine dimethacrylate against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus was studied by zone of inhibition, colony count method and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). QADMA containing acrylic bone cement showed a broad spectrum of contact killing antimicrobial properties. Retention of E. coli onto the surface of PMMA bone cement was observed, whereas there was complete prevention of retention of E. coli onto the modified PMMA bone cement with 15% QADMA. The studies were compared with the acrylic bone cement synthesized using 15% N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (NVP) in place of QADMA to which iodine was added as an antimicrobial agent during co-polymerization. PMID:17323849

Punyani, Supriya; Deb, Sanjukta; Singh, Harpal

2007-01-01

410

A rare case of serial killing by poisoning.  

PubMed

A case of serial killing by poisoning by a 59-year-old practical nurse is discussed. Following a report by an emergency-room doctor of an attempted murder, police performed an investigation into all deaths of patients in the nurse's care. Earlier, a medico-legal cause-of-death investigation had been performed on two of these cadavers, but in the other three cases the death certificate had been issued after a medical investigation only. In two of these latter cases, the body had been cremated, but fixed histological samples taken at medical autopsy were available, while in one case the person had died recently and the body was thereafter exhumed and autopsied. All of the suspected victims were older people who required nursing, and the nurse's course of action was consistent in all cases. In the absence of ordinary post-mortem toxicology samples in the medical cases, extraordinary evidence--paraffin-embedded liver tissue samples originally taken for histology at autopsy--was successfully recovered in two cases and analyzed for drugs. In all five cases, drugs not prescribed to the patient were detected, including digoxin, dixyrazine, citalopram, venlafaxine, and benzodiazepines (diazepam, chlordiazepoxide, temazepam, and oxazepam). The nurse was eventually found guilty of five murders by poisoning, five attempted murders, and three aggravated assaults. The nurse was sentenced to life imprisonment. PMID:23613335

Vuori, Erkki; Pelander, Anna; Rasanen, Ilpo; Juote, Mikko; Ojanperä, Ilkka

2013-01-01

411

Fluconazole Assists Berberine To Kill Fluconazole-Resistant Candida albicans  

PubMed Central

It was found in our previous study that berberine (BBR) and fluconazole (FLC) used concomitantly exhibited a synergism against FLC-resistant Candida albicans in vitro. The aim of the present study was to clarify how BBR and FLC worked synergistically and the underlying mechanism. Antifungal time-kill curves indicated that the synergistic effect of the two drugs was BBR dose dependent rather than FLC dose dependent. In addition, we found that BBR accumulated in C. albicans cells, especially in the nucleus, and resulted in cell cycle arrest and significant change in the transcription of cell cycle-related genes. Besides BBR, other DNA intercalators, including methylene blue, sanguinarine, and acridine orange, were all found to synergize with FLC against FLC-resistant C. albicans. Detection of intracellular BBR accumulation by fluorescence measurement showed that FLC played a role in increasing intracellular BBR concentration, probably due to its effect in disrupting the fungal cell membrane. Similar to the case with FLC, other antifungal agents acting on the cell membrane were able to synergize with BBR. Interestingly, we found that the efflux of intracellular BBR was FLC independent but strongly glucose dependent and associated with the drug efflux pump Cdr2p. These results suggest that BBR plays a major antifungal role in the synergism of FLC and BBR, while FLC plays a role in increasing the intracellular BBR concentration. PMID:24060867

Li, De-Dong; Xu, Yi; Zhang, Da-Zhi; Quan, Hua; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Hu, Dan-Dan; Li, Ming-Bang; Zhao, Lan-Xue; Zhu, Liang-Hua

2013-01-01

412

Fluconazole assists berberine to kill fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans.  

PubMed

It was found in our previous study that berberine (BBR) and fluconazole (FLC) used concomitantly exhibited a synergism against FLC-resistant Candida albicans in vitro. The aim of the present study was to clarify how BBR and FLC worked synergistically and the underlying mechanism. Antifungal time-kill curves indicated that the synergistic effect of the two drugs was BBR dose dependent rather than FLC dose dependent. In addition, we found that BBR accumulated in C. albicans cells, especially in the nucleus, and resulted in cell cycle arrest and significant change in the transcription of cell cycle-related genes. Besides BBR, other DNA intercalators, including methylene blue, sanguinarine, and acridine orange, were all found to synergize with FLC against FLC-resistant C. albicans. Detection of intracellular BBR accumulation by fluorescence measurement showed that FLC played a role in increasing intracellular BBR concentration, probably due to its effect in disrupting the fungal cell membrane. Similar to the case with FLC, other antifungal agents acting on the cell membrane were able to synergize with BBR. Interestingly, we found that the efflux of intracellular BBR was FLC independent but strongly glucose dependent and associated with the drug efflux pump Cdr2p. These results suggest that BBR plays a major antifungal role in the synergism of FLC and BBR, while FLC plays a role in increasing the intracellular BBR concentration. PMID:24060867

Li, De-Dong; Xu, Yi; Zhang, Da-Zhi; Quan, Hua; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Hu, Dan-Dan; Li, Ming-Bang; Zhao, Lan-Xue; Zhu, Liang-Hua; Wang, Yan; Jiang, Yuan-Ying

2013-12-01

413

77 FR 12355 - Enabling a Secure Environment for Vehicle-to-Vehicle and Vehicle-to-Infrastructure Transactions...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...OF TRANSPORTATION Enabling a Secure Environment for Vehicle-to-Vehicle and Vehicle...Research Workshop on Enabling a Secure Environment for Vehicle- to-Vehicle (V2V) and...About the Connected Vehicle Secure Environment Establishing a secure trust...

2012-02-29

414

Nonlinearities in Road Vehicle Dynamics  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the study of lateral vehicle dynamics with the objective to enhance stability and handling qualities, non-linear aspects may have to be included to cover also larger lateral accelerations and amplitudes. The paper treats whole vehicle motions and relative motions of vehicle subsystems. In particular, single car stability, also in the large, is discussed as well as the shimmy phenomenon

H. B. Pacejka

1986-01-01

415

Logistics planning for agricultural vehicles  

Microsoft Academic Search

At the present time, agricultural operations are mostly carried out with agricultural vehicles. To maximize the economic returns from agricultural production, the operating costs of the vehicles have to be minimized. This paper presents an integer linear programming formulation to improve the utilization of the agricultural vehicles during the crop harvesting process. Crops are harvested by combine harvesters. The harvested

O. Ali; D. Van Oudheusden

2009-01-01

416

Hybrid electric sport utility vehicles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Drive-train hybridization improves the fuel economy and emissions of vehicles. This is the concept of hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Application of this concept in sport utility vehicles (SUVs), which consume more fuel as compared to passenger cars, will positively have a great impact. However, dynamic performances such as acceleration and gradeability also are of great importance in SUVs. Therefore, the

Jason M. Tyrus; Ryan M. Long; Marina Kramskaya; Yuriy Fertman; Ali Emadi

2004-01-01

417

Knowledge Navigation for Virtual Vehicles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A virtual vehicle is a digital model of the knowledge surrounding a potentially real vehicle. Knowledge consists not only of the tangible information, such as CAD, but also what is known about the knowledge - its metadata. This paper is an overview of technologies relevant to building a virtual vehicle, and an assessment of how to bring those technologies together.

Gomez, Julian E.

2004-01-01

418

A "Stationery" Kinetics Experiment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a simple redox reaction that occurs between potassium permanganate and oxalic acid that can be used to prepare an interesting disappearing ink for demonstrating kinetics for introductory chemistry. Discusses laboratory procedures and factors that influence disappearance times. (CW)

Hall, L.; Goberdhansingh, A.

1988-01-01

419

Chemical Kinetics Database  

National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

SRD 17 NIST Chemical Kinetics Database (Web, free access)   The NIST Chemical Kinetics Database includes essentially all reported kinetics results for thermal gas-phase chemical reactions. The database is designed to be searched for kinetics data based on the specific reactants involved, for reactions resulting in specified products, for all the reactions of a particular species, or for various combinations of these. In addition, the bibliography can be searched by author name or combination of names. The database contains in excess of 38,000 separate reaction records for over 11,700 distinct reactant pairs. These data have been abstracted from over 12,000 papers with literature coverage through early 2000.

420

Modular kinetic analysis.  

PubMed

Modularization is an important strategy to tackle the study of complex biological systems. Modular kinetic analysis (MKA) is a quantitative method to extract kinetic information from such a modularized system that can be used to determine the control and regulatory structure of the system, and to pinpoint and quantify the interaction of effectors with the system. The principles of the method are described, and the relation with metabolic control analysis is discussed. Examples of application of MKA are given. PMID:21943914

Krab, Klaas

2011-01-01

421

Integrated development of light armored vehicles based on wargaming simulators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Vehicles are evolving into vehicle networks through improved sensors, computers and communications. Unless carefully planned, these complex systems can result in excessive crew workload and difficulty in optimizing the use of the vehicle. To overcome these problems, a war-gaming simulator is being developed as a common platform to integrate contributions from three different groups. The simulator, OneSAF, is used to integrate simplified models of technology and natural phenomena from scientists and engineers with tactics and doctrine from the military and analyzed in detail by operations analysts. This approach ensures the modelling of processes known to be important regardless of the level of information available about the system. Vehicle survivability can be improved as well with better sensors, computers and countermeasures to detect and avoid or destroy threats. To improve threat detection and reliability, Defensive Aids Suite (DAS) designs are based on three complementary sensor technologies including: acoustics, visible and infrared optics and radar. Both active armour and softkill countermeasures are considered. In a typical scenario, a search radar, providing continuous hemispherical coverage, detects and classifies the threat and cues a tracking radar. Data from the tracking radar is processed and an explosive grenade is launched to destroy or deflect the threat. The angle of attack and velocity from the search radar can be used by the soft-kill system to carry out an infrared search and track or an illuminated range-gated scan for the threat platform. Upon detection, obscuration, countermanoeuvres and counterfire can be used against the threat. The sensor suite is completed by acoustic detection of muzzle blast and shock waves. Automation and networking at the platoon level contribute to improved vehicle survivability. Sensor data fusion is essential in avoiding catastrophic failure of the DAS. The modular DAS components can be used with Light Armoured Vehicle (LAV) variants including: armoured personnel carriers and direct-fire support vehicles. OneSAF will be used to assess the performance of these DAS-equipped vehicles on a virtual battlefield.

Palmarini, Marc; Rapanotti, John

2004-08-01

422

50 CFR 21.42 - Authority to issue depredating orders to permit the killing of migratory game birds.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...orders to permit the killing of migratory game birds. 21.42 Section 21.42 ...orders to permit the killing of migratory game birds. Upon the receipt of evidence clearly showing that migratory game birds have accumulated in such...

2010-10-01

423

76 FR 36910 - Astoria Generating Company, L.P., NRG Power Marketing LLC, Arthur Kill Power LLC, Astoria Gas...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...NRG Power Marketing LLC, Arthur Kill Power LLC, Astoria Gas Turbine Power LLC, Dunkirk Power LLC, Huntley Power LLC, Oswego...NRG Power Marketing LLC, Arthur Kill Power LLC, Astoria Gas Turbine Power [[Page 36911

2011-06-23

424

76 FR 34692 - Astoria Generating Company, L.P., NRG Power Marketing LLC, Arthur Kill Power LLC, Astoria Gas...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...NRG Power Marketing LLC, Arthur Kill Power LLC, Astoria Gas Turbine Power LLC, Dunkirk Power LLC, Huntley Power LLC, Oswego...NRG Power Marketing LLC, Arthur Kill Power LLC, Astoria Gas Turbine Power LLC, Dunkirk Power LLC, Huntley Power LLC,...

2011-06-14

425

76 FR 36914 - Astoria Generating Company, L.P., NRG Power Marketing LLC, Arthur Kill Power LLC, Astoria Gas...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...NRG Power Marketing LLC, Arthur Kill Power LLC, Astoria Gas Turbine Power LLC, Dunkirk Power LLC, Huntley Power LLC, Oswego...NRG Power Marketing LLC, Arthur Kill Power LLC, Astoria Gas Turbine Power LLC, Dunkirk Power LLC, Huntley Power LLC,...

2011-06-23

426

11/12/12 Climate change could kill off pandas -Telegraph 1/2www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/earthnews/9670194/Climate-change-could-kill-off-pandas.html  

E-print Network

11/12/12 Climate change could kill off pandas - Telegraph 1/2www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/earthnews/9670194/Climate-change-could-kill-off-pandas.html Climate change could kill off pandas Climate change threatens to drive pandas to extinction in the wild as rising temperatures wipe out bamboo in the last

427

Launch Vehicle Failure Dynamics and Abort Triggering Analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Launch vehicle ascent is a time of high risk for an on-board crew. There are many types of failures that can kill the crew if the crew is still on-board when the failure becomes catastrophic. For some failure scenarios, there is plenty of time for the crew to be warned and to depart, whereas in some there is insufficient time for the crew to escape. There is a large fraction of possible failures for which time is of the essence and a successful abort is possible if the detection and action happens quickly enough. This paper focuses on abort determination based primarily on data already available from the GN&C system. This work is the result of failure analysis efforts performed during the Ares I launch vehicle development program. Derivation of attitude and attitude rate abort triggers to ensure that abort occurs as quickly as possible when needed, but that false positives are avoided, forms a major portion of the paper. Some of the potential failure modes requiring use of these triggers are described, along with analysis used to determine the success rate of getting the crew off prior to vehicle demise.

Hanson, John M.; Hill, Ashely D.; Beard, Bernard B.

2011-01-01

428

Miniature Autonomous Robotic Vehicle (MARV)  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has recently developed a 16 cm{sup 3} (1 in{sup 3}) autonomous robotic vehicle which is capable of tracking a single conducting wire carrying a 96 kHz signal. This vehicle was developed to assess the limiting factors in using commercial technology to build miniature autonomous vehicles. Particular attention was paid to the design of the control system to search out the wire, track it, and recover if the wire was lost. This paper describes the test vehicle and the control analysis. Presented in the paper are the vehicle model, control laws, a stability analysis, simulation studies and experimental results.

Feddema, J.T.; Kwok, K.S.; Driessen, B.J.; Spletzer, B.L.; Weber, T.M.

1996-12-31

429

Stabilizing Wheels For Rover Vehicle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Proposed articulated, normally-four-wheeled vehicle holds extra pair of wheels in reserve. Deployed to lengthen wheelbase on slopes, thereby making vehicle more stable, and to aid vehicle in negotiating ledge or to right vehicle if turned upside down. Extra wheels are drive wheels mounted on arms so they pivot on axis of forward drive wheels. Both extra wheels and arms driven by chains, hydraulic motors, or electric motors. Concept promises to make remotely controlled vehicles more stable and maneuverable in such applications as firefighting, handling hazardous materials, and carrying out operations in dangerous locations.

Collins, Earl R., Jr.

1990-01-01

430

Electric Vehicle History Online Archive  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website is self-proclaimed as the "first online archive created to encourage electric vehicle enthusiasts to help preserve the recent history of electric vehicles." A wide variety of information is presented, ranging from performance data and historical policy documents to retrospective articles and amusing forecasts of electric vehicle technology from decades past. The operators of the archive encourage electric vehicle drivers and enthusiasts to contribute anything they might have to the archive. The only shortcoming of the site is the very small number of historical electric vehicle photos, but this problem can be remedied by more submissions.

Kirsch, David A.

431

Killing of Aspergillus fumigatus by Alveolar Macrophages Is Mediated by Reactive Oxidant Intermediates  

PubMed Central

Phagocytosis and mechanisms of killing of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia by murine alveolar macrophages (AM), which are the main phagocytic cells of the innate immunity of the lung, were investigated. Engulfment of conidia by murine AM lasts 2 h. Killing of A. fumigatus conidia by AM begins after 6 h of phagocytosis. Swelling of the conidia inside the AM is a prerequisite for killing of conidia. The contributions of NADPH oxidase and inducible nitric oxide synthase to the conidicidal activity of AM were studied using AM from OF1, wild-type and congenic p47phox?/? 129Sv, and wild-type and congenic iNOS?/? C57BL/6 mice. AM from p47phox?/? mice were unable to kill A. fumigatus conidia. Inhibitors of NADPH oxidase that decreased the production of reactive oxidant intermediates inhibited the killing of A. fumigatus without altering the phagocytosis rate. In contrast to NADPH oxidase, nitric oxide synthase does not play a role in killing of conidia. Corticosteroids did not alter the internalization of conidia by AM but did inhibit the production of reactive oxidant intermediates and the killing of A. fumigatus conidia by AM. Impairment of production of reactive oxidant intermediates by corticosteroids is responsible for the development of invasive aspergillosis in immunosuppressed mice. PMID:12761080

Philippe, B.; Ibrahim-Granet, O.; Prévost, M. C.; Gougerot-Pocidalo, M. A.; Sanchez Perez, M.; Van der Meeren, A.; Latgé, J. P.

2003-01-01

432

A qualitative analysis of the experience and impact of killing in hand-to-hand combat.  

PubMed

A growing body of research suggests that killing during military combat is closely associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), as well as a number of other adverse mental health related conditions (e.g., dissociative experiences, violent behavior, functional impairment). This article provides first-person perspectives on the experiences and impact of killing by service members with the goal of expanding our understanding of the impact of taking a life during war. In audio-recorded phenomenological interviews, 9 service members described their experiences and the subsequent impact of killing during hand-to-hand combat. A description, supported by participant quotations, was constructed to represent the participants' experiences. Results suggest the experience and aftermath of taking a life in hand-to-hand combat was disturbing, psychologically stressful, and necessitated some form of coping after the event. Service members who killed in hand-to-hand combat viewed their actions as necessary to preserve their life and that killing in hand-to-hand combat was more emotionally taxing than killing by shooting. Our findings may help to improve providers' understanding of service members' first-person experiences of killing in hand-to-hand combat and thus provide the basis for the development of a connected and genuine relationship with such military clients. PMID:25158640

Jensen, Peter R; Simpson, Duncan

2014-08-01

433

Interactions between Antibiotics and Human Neutrophils in the Killing of Staphylococci  

PubMed Central

Normal and antibiotic-pretreated staphylococci were incubated with human neutrophils to determine the interactions between cells and antimicrobials in the killing of the organisms. Staphylococcus aureus 502A pretreated during log-phase growth with subinhibitory (¼ minimum inhibiting concentration) (MIC) concentrations of penicillin G were more susceptible to killing by normal neutrophils than untreated bacteria (intracellular survival 0.17±0.04 vs. 1.5±0.38%, mean±SEM, respectively, at 35 min in 14 experiments; P < 0.01 by t test). Furthermore, this enhanced susceptibility to killing was observed even when phagosome formation was inhibited by cytochalasin B (65.6±4.6% pencillintreated vs. 30.5±4.5% untreated killed at 30 min in 14 experiments, P < 0.001). Pretreatment of S. aureus with vancomycin similarly enhanced susceptibility to killing by cytochalasin B-treated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), whereas pretreatment with gentamicin did not. The enchancement of killing by pretreatment with cell wall-active antibiotics was present in a dose-response fashion to 1/16th the MIC. It required specific antimicrobial activity; i.e., penicillin activity was inhibited by penicillinase or by incubation with bacteria at 4°C. It also required active cellular metabolism and intact neutrophils. For antibiotic-pretreated bacteria to be killed by normal and cytochalasin B-treated cells, phagocytosis or binding to the cells was essential via a serum opsonindependent mechanism. In experiments with the cytochalasin B-treated cells, all bound penicillin-treated bacteria were killed vs. only a fraction (70%) of the bound untreated bacteria. Penicillin in 10 times the MIC had no direct effects on PMN phagocytic, metabolic, or microbicidal functions against a nonsusceptible organism, Candida albicans. The results indicate a cooperative effect between cell wall-active antibiotics at low concentrations and human PMN in the killing of staphylococci. The model establishes conditions for the study of the mechanisms involved in the cooperation of these bactericidal systems. Images PMID:7451652

Root, Richard K.; Isturiz, Raul; Molavi, Abdolghader; Metcalf, Julia A.; Malech, Harry L.

1981-01-01

434

Household vehicles energy consumption 1994  

SciTech Connect

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 reports on the results of the 1994 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). The RTECS is a national sample survey that has been conducted every 3 years since 1985. For the 1994 survey, more than 3,000 households that own or use some 6,000 vehicles provided information to describe vehicle stock, vehicle-miles traveled, energy end-use consumption, and energy expenditures for personal vehicles. The survey results represent the characteristics of the 84.9 million households that used or had access to vehicles in 1994 nationwide. (An additional 12 million households neither owned or had access to vehicles during the survey year.) To be included in then RTECS survey, vehicles must be either owned or used by household members on a regular basis for personal transportation, or owned by a company rather than a household, but kept at home, regularly available for the use of household members. Most vehicles included in the RTECS are classified as {open_quotes}light-duty vehicles{close_quotes} (weighing less than 8,500 pounds). However, the RTECS also includes a very small number of {open_quotes}other{close_quotes} vehicles, such as motor homes and larger trucks that are available for personal use.

NONE

1997-08-01

435

Structural basis for benzothiazinone-mediated killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

BTZ043, a tuberculosis drug candidate with nanomolar whole-cell activity, targets the DprE1 enzyme of the essential decaprenylphosphoryl-?-D-ribofuranose-2?-epimerase thus blocking biosynthesis of arabinans, vital cell-wall components of mycobacteria. Crystal structures of DprE1, in its native form and in complex with BTZ043, unambiguously reveal formation of a semimercaptal adduct between the drug and an active-site cysteine, as well as contacts to a neighbouring catalytic lysine residue. Kinetic studies confirm BTZ043 as a mechanism-based, covalent inhibitor. This explains the exquisite potency of BTZ043, which, when fluorescently labelled, localizes DprE1 at the poles of growing bacteria. Menaquinone can reoxidize the FAD cofactor in DprE1 and may be the natural electron acceptor for this reaction in the cell. Our structural and kinetic analysis provides both insight into a critical epimerization reaction and a platform for structure-based design of improved inhibitors. Surprisingly, given the colossal tuberculosis burden globally, BTZ043 is the only new drug candidate to have been co-crystallized with its target. PMID:22956199

Neres, João; Pojer, Florence; Molteni, Elisabetta; Chiarelli, Laurent R.; Dhar, Neeraj; Boy-Röttger, Stefanie; Buroni, Silvia; Fullam, Elizabeth; Degiacomi, Giulia; Lucarelli, Anna Paola; Read, Randy J.; Zanoni, Giuseppe; Edmondson, Dale E.; De Rossi, Edda; Pasca, Maria Rosalia; McKinney, John D.; Dyson, Paul J.; Riccardi, Giovanna; Mattevi, Andrea; Cole, Stewart T.; Binda, Claudia

2013-01-01

436

Drive assembly, especially for motor vehicles  

SciTech Connect

A drive assembly, especially for motor vehicles, of the type comprising an internal combustion engine and an exhaust gas turbine unit including an exhaust gas driven turbine is improved by virtue of structure for utilizing the heat energy of the exhaust gases of the internal combustion engine in addition to the kinetic energy. According to a preferred embodiment, the exhaust gas turbine unit comprises, in addition to the exhaust gas turbine, a compressor and a secondary turbine for deriving power from the heat energy of the exhaust gases. Still further, another feature includes the provision of a heat exchanger for transferring thermal energy from the exhaust gases to a working medium after the working medium has been compressed by the compressor, the heat exchanger being formed by hollow blades of the exhaust gas driven turbine.

Striebich, H.

1981-10-13

437

Rapid road repair vehicle  

DOEpatents

Disclosed is a rapid road repair vehicle capable of moving over a surface to be repaired at near normal posted traffic speeds to scan for and find an the high rate of speed, imperfections in the pavement surface, prepare the surface imperfection for repair by air pressure and vacuum cleaning, applying a correct amount of the correct patching material to effect the repair, smooth the resulting repaired surface, and catalog the location and quality of the repairs for maintenance records of the road surface. The rapid road repair vehicle can repair surface imperfections at lower cost, improved quality, at a higher rate of speed than was was heretofor possible, with significantly reduced exposure to safety and health hazards associated with this kind of road repair activities in the past.

Mara, Leo M. (Livermore, CA)

1998-01-01

438

Rapid road repair vehicle  

DOEpatents

Disclosed is a rapid road repair vehicle capable of moving over a surface to be repaired at near normal posted traffic speeds to scan for and find at the high rate of speed, imperfections in the pavement surface, prepare the surface imperfection for repair by air pressure and vacuum cleaning, applying a correct amount of the correct patching material to effect the repair, smooth the resulting repaired surface, and catalog the location and quality of the repairs for maintenance records of the road surface. The rapid road repair vehicle can repair surface imperfections at lower cost, improved quality, at a higher rate of speed than was not heretofor possible, with significantly reduced exposure to safety and health hazards associated with this kind of road repair activities in the past. 2 figs.

Mara, L.M.

1998-05-05

439

Methane-Powered Vehicles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Liquid methane is beginning to become an energy alternative to expensive oil as a power source for automotive vehicles. Methane is the principal component of natural gas, costs less than half as much as gasoline, and its emissions are a lot cleaner than from gasoline or diesel engines. Beech Aircraft Corporation's Boulder Division has designed and is producing a system for converting cars and trucks to liquid methane operation. Liquid methane (LM) is a cryogenic fuel which must be stored at a temperature of 260 degrees below zero Fahrenheit. The LM system includes an 18 gallon fuel tank in the trunk and simple "under the hood" carburetor conversion equipment. Optional twin-fuel system allows operator to use either LM or gasoline fuel. Boulder Division has started deliveries for 25 vehicle conversions and is furnishing a liquid methane refueling station. Beech is providing instruction for Northwest Natural Gas, for conversion of methane to liquid state.

1982-01-01

440

Gauge conditions for binary black hole puncture data based on an approximate helical Killing vector  

E-print Network

We show that puncture data for quasicircular binary black hole orbits allow a special gauge choice that realizes some of the necessary conditions for the existence of an approximate helical Killing vector field. Introducing free parameters for the lapse at the punctures we can satisfy the condition that the Komar and ADM mass agree at spatial infinity. Several other conditions for an approximate Killing vector are then automatically satisfied, and the 3-metric evolves on a timescale smaller than the orbital timescale. The time derivative of the extrinsic curvature however remains significant. Nevertheless, quasicircular puncture data are not as far from possessing a helical Killing vector as one might have expected.

Wolfgang Tichy; Bernd Bruegmann; Pablo Laguna

2003-06-04

441

Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy to Kill Gram-negative Bacteria  

PubMed Central

Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT) or photodynamic inactivation (PDI) is a new promising strategy to eradicate pathogenic microorganisms such as Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeasts and fungi. The search for new approaches that can kill bacteria but do not induce the appearance of undesired drug-resistant strains suggests that PDT may have advantages over traditional antibiotic therapy. PDT is a non-thermal photochemical reaction that involves the simultaneous presence of visible light, oxygen and a dye or photosensitizer (PS). Several PS have been studied for their ability to bind to bacteria and efficiently generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon photostimulation. ROS are formed through type I or II mechanisms and may inactivate several classes of microbial cells including Gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which are typically characterized by an impermeable outer cell membrane that contains endotoxins and blocks antibiotics, dyes, and detergents, protecting the sensitive inner membrane and cell wall. This review covers significant peer-reviewed articles together with US and World patents that were filed within the past few years and that relate to the eradication of Gram-negative bacteria via PDI or PDT. It is organized mainly according to the nature of the PS involved and includes natural or synthetic food dyes; cationic dyes such as methylene blue and toluidine blue; tetrapyrrole derivatives such as phthalocyanines, chlorins, porphyrins, chlorophyll and bacteriochlorophyll derivatives; functionalized fullerenes; nanoparticles combined with different PS; other formulations designed to target PS to bacteria; photoactive materials and surfaces; conjugates between PS and polycationic polymers or antibodies; and permeabilizing agents such as EDTA, PMNP and CaCl2. The present review also covers the different laboratory animal models normally used to treat Gram-negative bacterial infections with antimicrobial PDT. PMID:23550545

Sperandio, Felipe F; Huang, Ying-Ying; Hamblin, Michael R

2013-01-01

442

Liming Poultry Manures to Kill Pathogens and Decrease Soluble Phosphorus  

SciTech Connect

Received for publication September 9, 2005. Stabilizing phosphorus (P) in poultry waste to reduce P losses from manured soils is important to protect surface waters, while pathogens in manures are an emerging issue. This study was conducted to evaluate CaO and Ca(OH){sub 2} for killing manure bacterial populations (pathogens) and stabilizing P in poultry wastes and to investigate the influence on soils following amendment with the treated wastes. Layer manure and broiler litter varying in moisture content were treated with CaO and Ca(OH){sub 2} at rates of 2.5, 5, 10, and 15% by weight. All treated wastes were analyzed for microbial plate counts, pH, and water-soluble phosphorus (WSP), while a few selected layer manures were analyzed by phosphorus X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES). A loamy sand and a silt loam were amended with broiler litter and layer manure treated with CaO at rates of 0, 2.5, 5, 10, and 15% and soil WSP and pH were measured at times 1, 8, and 29 d. Liming reduced bacterial populations, with greater rates of lime leading to greater reductions; for example 10% CaO applied to 20% solids broiler litter reduced the plate counts from 793 000 to 6500 mL{sup -1}. Liming also reduced the WSP in the manures by over 90% in all cases where at least 10% CaO was added. Liming the manures also reduced WSP in soils immediately following application and raised soil pH. The liming process used successfully reduced plate counts and concerns about P losses in runoff following land application of these limed products due to decreased WSP.

Maguire,R.; Hesterberg, D.; Gernat, A.; Anderson, K.; Wineland, M.; Grimes, J.

2006-01-01

443

Robotics vehicle mobility study  

Microsoft Academic Search

A nine-month study was conducted under the direction of Tank-Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) in Warren, MI. to determine the best platform design for inherent all-terrain mobility of an unmanned robotic vehicle in the 15000-2500 lb. range. Reference platforms were the DEMO III 4x4 and the Utah State University 6x6 with omni-directional wheels. The study systematically developed desired

Kurt H. Ansorge; James E. Pond

2000-01-01

444

The Cargo Transfer Vehicle  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

NASA's Cargo Transfer Vehicle is a key element of the National Launch System currently under definition by a joint USAF and NASA development program. The CTV reference mission and configuration are described. Key mission and system requirements are analyzed and summarized including CTV electrical power and energy, main engine thrust, RCS configurations. Methods of control system validation using full 6DoF simulations are presented.

Rourke, K. H.

1992-03-01

445

Mars transportation vehicle concept  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A concept of Mars planet propulsion vehicles is analyzed. Aluminum or magnesium combustion in CO2 is considered as the main energy production cycle. The flight possibilities in rarefied Martian atmosphere are analyzed. The problem of lift force determination in compressible gas in the proximity of rigid surface was solved theoretically. It was demonstrated that lift force increase on approaching rigid surface could guarantee reliable flights in Martian atmosphere.

Smirnova, Maria

2014-10-01

446

Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle Workshop  

SciTech Connect

The Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle (UAV) Workshop concentrated on reviewing and refining the science experiments planned for the UAV Demonstration Flights (UDF) scheduled at the Oklahoma Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) in April 1994. These experiments were focused around the following sets of parameters: Clear sky, daylight; Clear-sky, night-to-day transition; Clear sky - improve/validate the accuracy of radiative fluxes derived from satellite-based measurements; Daylight, clouds of opportunity; and, Daylight, broken clouds.

Vitko, J. Jr. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

1995-04-01

447

High mobility vehicle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A vehicle, for driving over a ground surface, has a body with a left side, a right side, a front and a back. The vehicle includes left and right drive mechanisms. Each mechanism includes first and second traction elements for engaging the ground surface and transmitting a driving force between the vehicle and ground surface. Each mechanism includes first and second arms coupled to the first and second traction elements for relative rotation about first and second axis respectively. Each mechanism includes a rotor having a third axis, the rotor coupled to the body for rotation about the third axis and coupled to the first and second arms for relative rotation about the third axis. The mechanism includes first and second drive motors for driving the first and second traction elements and first and second transmissions, driven by the first and second motors and engaging the rotor. Driving the first and second traction elements simultaneously rotates the rotor relative to the first and second arms, respectively.

Wilcox, Brian H. (Inventor); Nasif, Annette K. (Inventor)

2001-01-01

448

Lunar construction utility vehicle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The lunar construction utility vehicle (LCUV) is an all-purpose construction vehicle which will aid in the robotic assembly of a lunar outpost. The LCUV will have the following capabilities: (1) must be self supporting including repairs; (2) must offload itself from a lunar lander; (3) must be telerobotic and semi-autonomous; (4) must be able to transport one space station common module; (5) must allow for man-rated operation; and (6) must be able to move lunar regolith for site preparation. This study recommends the use of an elastic tracked vehicle. Detailed material analyses of most of the LCUV components were accomplished. The body frame, made of pinned truss elements, was stress analyzed using NASTRAN. A track connection system was developed; however, kinematic and stress analyses are still required. This design recommends the use of hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells for power. Thermal control has proven to be a problem which may be the most challenging technically. A tentative solution has been proposed which utilizes an onboard and towable radiator. Detailed study of the heat dissipation requirements is needed to finalize radiator sizing. Preliminary work on a man-rated cabin has begun; however, this is not required during the first mission phase of the LCUV. Finally, still in the conceptual phases, are the communication, navigation and mechanical arm systems.

1989-01-01

449

Vehicle ignition system  

SciTech Connect

A vehicle ignition system comprises a transformer having a primary winding and a secondary winding for providing the desired high voltage to the spark plug of the vehicle engine and a circuit including a further winding for said transformer connected across a switch and a load. The switch is operable only by a security device and when it is closed, the load absorbs energy from the transformer so that insufficient voltage is generated at the spark plug and the vehicle is immobilized. The load can be replaced by a reverse flux generator, the reverse flux opposing that generated by the primary winding. The security device may comprise a conventional key and keyhole, or more sophisticated devices such as code readers which read a code inputted from a magnetic card or from a keyboard. Further security may be provided by a further switch in series with the primary winding and battery, the further switch being operable in synchronism with and in the opposite sense to the first mentioned switch.

Cheung, W.S.H.

1984-03-27

450

Antibiotic Attack (Kinetic City)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This game is a part of the Tau Pack of the Kinetic City site (see description below). In this simulation, the patient's bodies are filled with bacteria. The object is to cure as many patients as possible. Learning concepts enforced here are that antibiotics are specific for the type of bacteria they treat, their strength, and that the bacteria may also become resistant to the bacteria by mutations.KINETIC CITY DESCRIPTION: "Kinetic City" (www.kineticcity.com) is a fun, Web-based after-school science club for kids, ages 8 through 11. It combines exciting online animations and activities with boxes of hands-on science experiments. Children earn "Kinetic City" power points and collect stickers as they complete missions and learn standards-based science content. Here's how it works: The "Kinetic City" super crew (Keisha, Curtis, Megan and Max) needs the help of Earth kids to save their planet Vearth, from the science-distorting computer virus Deep Delete. Each of Deep Delete's 60 hideous strains attacks a different area of science with disastrous consequences. After each attack, teams of Earth kids fight back by viewing a short online animation describing the situation on Vearth; performing a series of activities to re-learn the lost science and going on a mission to Vearth during which they answer science questions and gobble up Deep Delete viruses. Their scores appear on their own Kinetic City Club Web page. "Kinetic City" is produced by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), with a grant from the National Science Foundation. AAAS writes the "Project 2061 Benchmarks for Science Literacy," which forms the basis of most state science standards.

American Association for the Advancement of Science (; )

2005-01-01

451

Evolutionary algorithm for vehicle driving cycle generation.  

PubMed

Modeling transit bus emissions and fuel economy requires a large amount of experimental data over wide ranges of operational conditions. Chassis dynamometer tests are typically performed using representative driving cycles defined based on vehicle instantaneous speed as sequences of "microtrips", which are intervals between consecutive vehicle stops. Overall significant parameters of the driving cycle, such as average speed, stops per mile, kinetic intensity, and others, are used as independent variables in the modeling process. Performing tests at all the necessary combinations of parameters is expensive and time consuming. In this paper, a methodology is proposed for building driving cycles at prescribed independent variable values using experimental data through the concatenation of "microtrips" isolated from a limited number of standard chassis dynamometer test cycles. The selection of the adequate "microtrips" is achieved through a customized evolutionary algorithm. The genetic representation uses microtrip definitions as genes. Specific mutation, crossover, and karyotype alteration operators have been defined. The Roulette-Wheel selection technique with elitist strategy drives the optimization process, which consists of minimizing the errors to desired overall cycle parameters. This utility is part of the Integrated Bus Information System developed at West Virginia University. PMID:22010377

Perhinschi, Mario G; Marlowe, Christopher; Tamayo, Sergio; Tu, Jun; Wayne, W Scott

2011-09-01

452

Three-wheeled motor vehicle  

SciTech Connect

A three-wheeled motor vehicle is described consisting of: (a) a vehicle body; (b) two front wheels rotatably mounted on the vehicle body; (c) a single rear wheel rotatably mounted on the vehicle body; (d) an engine disposed on the vehicle body between the front wheels; (e) a driver's compartment defined in the vehicle body; (f) the vehicle body including a front portion covering the engine and the front wheels and a rear portion disposed behind the front portion and covering the compartment and the rear wheel, the front portion having a relatively wide and flat shape and the rear portion being narrower than the front portion and progressively higher in a rearward direction for a substantial proportion of the rear portion; and (g) the vehicle body also including lateral wing portions on each side extending longitudinally rearwardly from behind the front wheels and tapering into the rear portion for causing the vehicle body to have a substantially constant cross-sectional area throughout a substantial proportion of both the front and rear portions and the transition between the front and rear portions for producing an aerodynamically improved vehicle body shape.

Irimajiri, S.; Komuro, K.; Aikawa, K.

1986-03-04

453

Advanced Vehicle Testing and Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy?s (DOEs) Advanced Vehicle Testing and Evaluation (AVTE) project was to provide test and evaluation services for advanced technology vehicles, to establish a performance baseline, to determine vehicle reliability, and to evaluate vehicle operating costs in fleet operations. Vehicles tested include light and medium-duty vehicles in conventional, hybrid, and all-electric configurations using conventional and alternative fuels, including hydrogen in internal combustion engines. Vehicles were tested on closed tracks and chassis dynamometers, as well as operated on public roads, in fleet operations, and over prescribed routes. All testing was controlled by procedures developed specifically to support such testing. Testing and evaluations were conducted in the following phases: ? Development of test procedures, which established testing procedures; ? Baseline performance testing, which established a performance baseline; ? Accelerated reliability testing, which determined vehicle reliability; ? Fleet testing, used to evaluate vehicle economics in fleet operation, and ? End of test performance evaluation. Test results are reported by two means and posted by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to their website: quarterly progress reports, used to document work in progress; and final test reports. This final report documents work conducted for the entirety of the contract by the Clarity Group, Inc., doing business as ECOtality North America (ECOtality). The contract was performed from 1 October 2005 through 31 March 2013. There were 113 light-duty on-road (95), off-road (3) and low speed (15) vehicles tested.

Garetson, Thomas

2013-03-31

454

Robust Scalable Vehicle Control via Non-Dimensional Vehicle Dynamics  

Microsoft Academic Search

A temporal and spatial re-parameterization of the well- known linear vehicle Bicycle Model is presented. This parameterization utilizes non-dimensional ratios of vehicle parameters called pi-groups. Investigation of these pi- groups using compiled data from 44 published sets of Vehicle Dynamics reveals that the data does not span the pi-space, but instead follows a multi-dimensio nal line through pi-space with a

S. Brennan; A. Alleyne

2001-01-01

455

Vehicle following controller design for autonomous intelligent vehicles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new vehicle following controller is proposed for autonomous intelligent vehicles. The proposed vehicle following controller not only provides smooth transient maneuvers for unavoidable nonzero initial conditions but also guarantees the asymptotic platoon stability without the availability of feedforward information. Furthermore, the achieved asymptotic platoon stability is shown to be robust to sensor delays and an upper bound for the allowable sensor delays is also provided in this paper.

Chien, C. C.; Lai, M. C.; Mayr, R.

1994-01-01

456

Opsonophagocytic killing activity of rabbit antibody to Pseudomonas aeruginosa mucoid exopolysaccharide.  

PubMed Central

We used an in vitro opsonophagocytic killing assay to measure the functional activity of antibody directed at the mucoid exopolysaccharide (MEP) antigen expressed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from cystic fibrosis patients. Rabbit antibodies raised to purified MEP were able to mediate phagocytic killing in the presence of human peripheral blood leukocytes and a low level (final concentration, 0.3%) of fresh normal human serum as a complement source. No bacterial killing was observed when peripheral blood leukocytes, antiserum, or complement was omitted. Specificity of the antibody for the MEP antigen was shown by adsorption and inhibition assays. Affinity-purified antibody to MEP also mediate phagocytic killing. These data indicate that antiphagocytic properties attributable to MEP can be overcome by specific antibody. PMID:3160660

Ames, P; DesJardins, D; Pier, G B

1985-01-01

457

Blood Clots That Kill: Preventing DVT | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine  

MedlinePLUS

... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Deep Vein Thrombosis Blood Clots That Kill: Preventing DVT ... Illustration courtesy of: Shutterstock CLICK IMAGE TO ENLARGE Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) can be a killer. Here’s ...

458

Biodiversity: climate change or habitat loss - which will kill more species?  

PubMed

Habitat loss and climate change both kill off species. New studies show that the latter is a potent threat. Worse, its victims will likely be mostly those not presently threatened by habitat loss. PMID:18269905

Pimm, Stuart L

2008-02-12

459

IN VITRO KILLING OF PERKINSUS MARINUS BY HEMOCYTES OF OYSTERS CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA  

EPA Science Inventory

A colorimetric microbicidal assay was adapted, optimized and applied in experiments to characterize the in vitro capacity of eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) hemocytes to kill cultured isolates of Perkinsus marinus, a protozoan parasite causing a highly destructive disease...

460

Male-killing bacterium in a fifth ladybird beetle, Coleomegilla maculata (Coleoptera:Coccinellidae).  

PubMed

Inherited symbionts which selectively cause the death of male hosts are found widely across the Insecta. Previous studies have shown a single, but different micro-organism to be responsible for male-killing in each taxonomic group studied. We here produce evidence that within a group of insects, the Coccinellidae, there is more than one causal agent of male lethality. We report a novel observation of a male-killing trait in the species Coleomegilla maculata. Six of 26 crosses were found to produce a female-biased sex ratio associated with a low egg hatch-rate. The trait was matrilinearly inherited and was observed to be tetracycline-sensitive. However, tests which indicate the presence of a Rickettsia, previously found to cause male-killing in another member of the Coccinellidae, Adalia bipunctata, proved negative. We therefore conclude that the phenomenon of male-killing is multicausal, within, as well as between, taxonomic groups of the Insecta. PMID:8760399

Hurst, G D; Hammarton, T C; Obrycki, J J; Majerus, T M; Walker, L E; Bertrand, D; Majerus, M E

1996-08-01

461

OPTIMAL SEDUCING POLICIES FOR DYNAMIC CONTINUOUS LOVERS UNDER RISK OF BEING KILLED BY A RIVAL  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper provides useful decision rules for finite horizon dynamic continuous lovers to find an optimal tradeoff between satisfaction by fooling around with girls and the risk of being killed by the former friends of the latter.

RICHARD F. HARTL; ALEXANDER MEHLMANN

1984-01-01

462

Ultrapdeep water blowouts: COMASim dynamic kill simulator validation and best practices recommendations  

E-print Network

............................................................................. 60 3.6 13000 ft TVD, 5000 ft water depth, kill rate increases with increasing casing size .................................................................. 64 3.7 Increasing relief well MD/TVD ratio increases relief well...

Noynaert, Samuel F.

2005-02-17

463

3.8 Million Chickens to Be Killed After Bird Flu Outbreak At Iowa Farm  

MedlinePLUS

... 8 Million Chickens To Be Killed After Bird Flu Outbreak at Iowa Farm Experts stress this strain ... Tuesday, April 21, 2015 Related MedlinePlus Page Bird Flu TUESDAY, April 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Bird flu ...

464

A Nanoparticle-Based Combination Chemotherapy Delivery System for Enhanced Tumor Killing by Dynamic Rewiring of Signaling Pathways  

PubMed Central

Exposure to the EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) inhibitor erlotinib promotes the dynamic rewiring of apoptotic pathways, which sensitizes cells within a specific period to subsequent exposure to the DNA-damaging agent doxorubicin. A critical challenge for translating this therapeutic network rewiring into clinical practice is the design of optimal drug delivery systems. We report the generation of a nanoparticle delivery vehicle that contained more than one therapeutic agent and produced a controlled sequence of drug release. Liposomes, representing the first clinically approved nanomedicine systems, are well-characterized, simple, and versatile platforms for the manufacture of functional and tunable drug carriers. Using the hydrophobic and hydrophilic compartments of liposomes, we effectively incorporated both hydrophobic (erlotinib) and hydrophilic (doxorubicin) small molecules, through which we achieved the desired time sequence of drug release. We also coated the liposomes with folate to facilitate targeting to cancer cells. When compared to the time-staggered application of individual drugs, staggered release from tumor-targeted single liposomal particles enhanced dynamic rewiring of apoptotic signaling pathways, resulting in improved tumor cell killing in culture and tumor shrinkage in animal models. PMID:24825919

Morton, Stephen W.; Lee, Michael J.; Deng, Zhou J.; Dreaden, Erik C.; Siouve, Elise; Shopsowitz, Kevin E.; Shah, Nisarg J.; Yaffe, Michael B.; Hammond, Paula T.

2014-01-01

465

H-ferritin–nanocaged doxorubicin nanoparticles specifically target and kill tumors with a single-dose injection  

PubMed Central

An ideal nanocarrier for efficient drug delivery must be able to target specific cells and carry high doses of therapeutic drugs and should also exhibit optimized physicochemical properties and biocompatibility. However, it is a tremendous challenge to engineer all of the above characteristics into a single carrier particle. Here, we show that natural H-ferritin (HFn) nanocages can carry high doses of doxorubicin (Dox) for tumor-specific targeting and killing without any targeting ligand functionalization or property modulation. Dox-loaded HFn (HFn-Dox) specifically bound and subsequently internalized into tumor cells via interaction with overexpressed transferrin receptor 1 and released Dox in the lysosomes. In vivo in the mouse, HFn-Dox exhibited more than 10-fold higher intratumoral drug concentration than free Dox and significantly inhibited tumor growth after a single-dose injection. Importantly, HFn-Dox displayed an excellent safety profile that significantly reduced healthy organ drug exposure and improved the maximum tolerated dose by fourfold compared with free Dox. Moreover, because the HFn nanocarrier has well-defined morphology and does not need any ligand modification or property modulation it can be easily produced with high purity and yield, which are requirements for drugs used in clinical trials. Thus, these unique properties make the HFn nanocage an ideal vehicle for efficient anticancer drug delivery. PMID:25267615

Liang, Minmin; Fan, Kelong; Zhou, Meng; Duan, Demin; Zheng, Jiyan; Yang, Dongling; Feng, Jing; Yan, Xiyun

2014-01-01

466

A nanoparticle-based combination chemotherapy delivery system for enhanced tumor killing by dynamic rewiring of signaling pathways.  

PubMed

Exposure to the EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) inhibitor erlotinib promotes the dynamic rewiring of apoptotic pathways, which sensitizes cells within a specific period to subsequent exposure to the DNA-damaging agent doxorubicin. A critical challenge for translating this therapeutic network rewiring into clinical practice is the design of optimal drug delivery systems. We report the generation of a nanoparticle delivery vehicle that contained more than one therapeutic agent and produced a controlled sequence of drug release. Liposomes, representing the first clinically approved nanomedicine systems, are well-characterized, simple, and versatile platforms for the manufacture of functional and tunable drug carriers. Using the hydrophobic and hydrophilic compartments of liposomes, we effectively incorporated both hydrophobic (erlotinib) and hydrophilic (doxorubicin) small molecules, through which we achieved the desired time sequence of drug release. We also coated the liposomes with folate to facilitate targeting to cancer cells. When compared to the time-staggered application of individual drugs, staggered release from tumor-targeted single liposomal particles enhanced dynamic rewiring of apoptotic signaling pathways, resulting in improved tumor cell killing in culture and tumor shrinkage in animal models. PMID:24825919

Morton, Stephen W; Lee, Michael J; Deng, Zhou J; Dreaden, Erik C; Siouve, Elise; Shopsowitz, Kevin E; Shah, Nisarg J; Yaffe, Michael B; Hammond, Paula T

2014-05-13

467

Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.  

SciTech Connect

Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

2006-11-01

468

Sensor Technology for Integrated Vehicle Health Management of Aerospace Vehicles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA is focusing considerable efforts on technology development for Integrated Vehicle Health Management systems. The research in this area is targeted toward increasing aerospace vehicle safety and reliability, while reducing vehicle operating and maintenance costs. Onboard, real-time sensing technologies that can provide detailed information on structural integrity are central to such a health management system. This paper describes a number of sensor technologies currently under development for integrated vehicle health management. The capabilities, current limitations, and future research needs of these technologies are addressed.

Prosser, W. H.; Brown, T. L.; Woodard, S. E.; Fleming, G. A.; Cooper, E. G.

2002-01-01

469

Motor vehicle drivers' injuries in train-motor vehicle crashes.  

PubMed

The objectives of this research were to: (1) identify a more suitable model for modeling injury severity of motor vehicle drivers involved in train-motor vehicle crashes at highway-rail grade crossings from among three commonly used injury severity models and (2) to investigate factors associated with injury severity levels of motor vehicle drivers involved in train-motor vehicle crashes at such crossings. The 2009-2013 highway-rail grade crossing crash data and the national highway-rail crossing inventory data were combined to produce the analysis dataset. Four-year (2009-2012) data were used for model estimation while 2013 data were used for model validation. The three injury severity levels-fatal, injury and no injury-were based on the reported intensity of motor-vehicle drivers' injuries at highway-rail grade crossings. The three injury severity models evaluated were: ordered probit, multinomial logit and random parameter logit. A comparison of the three models based on different criteria showed that the random parameter logit model and multinomial logit model were more suitable for injury severity analysis of motor vehicle drivers involved in crashes at highway-rail grade crossings. Some of the factors that increased the likelihood of more severe crashes included higher train and vehicle speeds, freight trains, older drivers, and female drivers. Where feasible, reducing train and motor vehicle speeds and nighttime lighting may help reduce injury severities of motor vehicle drivers. PMID:25463957

Zhao, Shanshan; Khattak, Aemal

2015-01-01

470

Antimicrobial properties of the Escherichia coli R1 plasmid host killing peptide  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 52 amino acid host killing peptide (Hok) from the hok\\/sok post-segregational killer system of the Escherichia coli plasmid R1 was synthesized using Fmoc (9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl) chemistry, and its molecular weight was confirmed by mass spectroscopy. Hok kills cells by depolarizing the cytoplasmic membrane when it is made in the cytosol. Six microorganisms, E. coli, Bacillus subtilis,Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. putida, Salmonella

Douglas C. Pecota; George Osapay; Michael E. Selsted; Thomas K. Wood

2003-01-01

471

Dual Killing-Yano symmetry and multipole moments in electromagnetism and mechanics of continua  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this work we introduce the Killing-Yano symmetry on the phase space and we\\u000ainvestigate the symplectic structure on the space of Killing-Yano tensors. We\\u000aperform the detailed analyze of the $n$-dimensional flat space and the\\u000aRiemaniann manifolds with constant scalar curvature. We investigate the form of\\u000asome multipole tensors, which arise in the expansion of a system of charges

D. Bùaleanu; V. M. Dubovik; S. Misicu

1998-01-01

472

Dual Killing-Yano symmetry and multipole moments in electromagnetism and mechanics of continua  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this work we introduce the Killing-Yano symmetry on the phase space and we investigate the symplectic structure on the space of Killing-Yano tensors. We perform the detailed analyze of the $n$-dimensional flat space and the Riemaniann manifolds with constant scalar curvature. We investigate the form of some multipole tensors, which arise in the expansion of a system of charges

Dumitru Baleanu; V. M. Dubovik; S. Misicu

1998-01-01

473

Kill Rates and Predation by Wolves on Ungulate Populations in Bialowieza Primeval Forest (Poland)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wolf (Canis lupus) kill rates, factors affecting their variation, and predation impact on ungulates were studied in the Polish part of Biaowieza Primeval Forest (580 km2). With the mean size of hunting groups being 4.4 individuals, wolves killed, on average, 0.513 6 0.04 prey·(pack) 21 ·d 21 (mean 6 1 SE); 63% of prey were red deer (Cervus elaphus), 28%

Wlodzimierz Jedrzejewski; Krzysztof Schmidt; Jorn Theuerkauf; Bogumila Jedrzejewska; Nuria Selva; Karol Zub; Lucyna Szymura

2002-01-01

474

Life cycle, physiology, ecology and red tide occurrences of the fish-killing raphidophyte Chattonella  

Microsoft Academic Search

The marine fish-killing raphidophytes of the genus Chattonella currently consist of five species, i.e. C. antiqua, C. marina, C. minima, C. ovata and C. subsalasa. The distribution of Chattonella species was confirmed in tropical, subtropical and temperate regions in the world accompanying mass mortalities of fishes in nature and in aquaculture. The fish-killing mechanisms are still unclear, but suffocation is

Ichiro Imai; Mineo Yamaguchi

475

Interference competition in entomopathogenic nematodes: male Steinernema kill members of their own and other species.  

PubMed

There is evidence of competition within and between helminth species, but the mechanisms involved are not well described. In interference competition, organisms prevent each other from using the contested resource through direct negative interactions, either chemical or physical. Steinernema spp. are entomopathogenic nematodes; they enter a living insect host which they kill and consume with the aid of symbiotic bacteria. Several studies have demonstrated intra- and interspecific competition in Steinernema, mediated by a scramble for resources and by incompatibility of the bacterial symbiont. Here we describe a mechanism by which male Steinernema may compete directly for resources, both food (host) and females, by physically injuring or killing members of another species as well as males of their own species. A series of experiments was conducted in hanging drops of insect haemolymph. Males of each of four species (Steinernemalongicaudum, Steinernemacarpocapsae, Steinernemakraussei and Steinernemafeltiae), representing three of the five phylogenetic clades of the genus, killed each other. Within 48h, up to 86% of pairs included at least one dead male, compared with negligible mortality in single male controls. There was evidence of intraspecific difference: one strain of S. feltiae (4CFMO) killed while another (UK76) did not. Males also killed both females and males of other Steinernema spp. There was evidence of a hierarchy of killing, with highest mortality due to S. longicaudum followed by S. carpocapsae, S. kraussei and S. feltiae. Wax moth larvae were co-infected with members of two Steinernema spp. to confirm that killing also takes place in the natural environment of an insect cadaver. When insects were co-infected with one infective juvenile of each species, S. longicaudum males killed both S. feltiae UK76 and Steinernema hermaphroditum. Wax moths co-infected with larger, equal numbers of S. longicaudum and S. feltiae UK76 produced mainly S. longicaudum progeny, as expected based on hanging drop experiments. PMID:25110292

O'Callaghan, Kathryn M; Zenner, Annemie N R L; Hartley, Cathryn J; Griffin, Christine T

2014-11-01

476

Vacuum spacetimes with a spacelike, hypersurface-orthogonal Killing vector: reduced equations in a canonical frame  

E-print Network

The Newman-Penrose equations for spacetimes having one spacelike Killing vector are reduced -- in a geometrically defined "canonical frame'' -- to a minimal set, and its differential structure is studied. Expressions for the frame vectors in an arbitrary coordinate basis are given, and coordinate-independent choices of the metric functions are suggested which make the components of the Ricci tensor in the direction of the Killing vector vanish.

S. Bonanos

2003-10-03

477

Women’s Role in Serial Killing Teams: Reconstructing a Radical Feminist Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines women’s roles in serial killing teams and reconsiders the traditional applications of radical feminist\\u000a research on serial killers. These applications limit the utility of radical feminist theory for understanding female serial\\u000a killers who kill in teams. An analysis of patriarchal power relations, which emphasizes the constitutive element of radical\\u000a feminist theory, provides a useful framework to achieve

Jennie Thompson; Suzanne Ricard

2009-01-01

478

Terpinen-4-ol is the Most Active Ingredient of Tea Tree Oil to Kill Demodex Mites  

PubMed Central

Purpose To determine the active ingredient in tea tree oil (TTO) responsible for its reported killing effect on Demodex mites, the most common ectoparasite found in the human skin extending to the eye. Methods Using a reported in vitro killing assay to measure the survival time of adult Demodex folliculorum up to 150 minutes, we have screened serial concentrations of 13 of the 15 known ingredients of TTO (ISO4730:2004) that were soluble in mineral oil and examined their synergistic relationships in killing mites. The most potent ingredient was then tested for its efficacy in killing Demodex in vivo. Results All ingredients exhibited a dose-dependent killing effect. Besides Terpinen-4-ol, the order of relative potency did not correlate with the order of relative abundance in TTO for the remaining 12 ingredients. Terpinen-4-ol was the most potent ingredient followed by ?-Terpineol, 1,8-Cineole and Sabinene. Terpinen-4-ol, the most abundant ingredient in TTO, was more potent than TTO at equivalent concentrations and its killing effect was even observable at a mere concentration of 1%. Terpinen-4-ol exhibited a significant synergistic effect with Terpinolene, but an antagonistic effect with ?-Terpineol in killing mites (both P < 0.05). In vivo, Terpinen-4-ol was shown to eradicate mites. Conclusions The above finding suggests that deployment of Terpinen-4-ol alone should enhance its potency in killing Demodex mites by reducing the adverse and antagonistic effects from other ingredients in TTO. Translational Relevance Terpinen-4-ol can be adopted in future formulations of acaricides to treat a number of ocular and cutaneous diseases caused by demodicosis. PMID:24349880

Tighe, Sean; Gao, Ying-Ying; Tseng, Scheffer C. G.

2013-01-01

479

Comparative Killing Rates of Fluoroquinolones and Cell Wall-Active Agents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Killing rates of fluoroquinolones, b-lactams, and vancomycin were compared against Enterobacteriaceae, Staphylococcus aureus, pneumococci, streptococci, and Enterococcus faecalis. The times required for fluoroquino- lones to decrease viability by 3 log10 were 1.5 h for Enterobacteriaceae, 4 to 6 h for staphylococci, and >6 h for streptococci and enterococci. Thus, the rate of killing by fluoroquinolones is organism group dependent; overall,

JOAN C. FUNG-TOMC; ELIZABETH GRADELSKI; LOURDES VALERA; BENJAMIN KOLEK; DANIEL P. BONNER

2000-01-01

480

Recruitment of scleractinians onto the skeletons of corals killed by black band disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

To determine what happens to scleractinian corals that have been killed by black band disease (BBD), massive corals with\\u000a BBD were monitored for 11 years on a shallow reef (2) were used to compare the rates of scleractinian recruitment to the skeletons of corals killed by either BBD or physical\\u000a disturbance (Hurricane Hugo 1989). Coral recruitment was also quantified on

P. J. Edmunds

2000-01-01

481

Vehicle System Dynamics Vol. 46, Supplement, 2008, 315  

E-print Network

-impact vehicle dynamics and the development of enhanced vehicle safety systems. Keywords: vehicle collision model; 4-DOF vehicle dynamics model; post-impact vehicle states 1. Introduction Vehicle collision mechanics

Peng, Huei

482

77 FR 46677 - Vehicle Certification; Contents of Certification Labels  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...motorcycles, and low-speed vehicles (those vehicle types not identified by...Requirements for Motor Vehicles (Except the Vehicle Identification Number...Part 567 Labeling, Motor vehicle safety, Motor vehicles. In consideration...

2012-08-06

483

On the construction of Hartle-Hawking-Israel states across a static bifurcate Killing horizon  

E-print Network

We consider a linear scalar quantum field propagating in a space-time with a static bifurcate Killing horizon and a wedge reflection. We prove the existence of a Hadamard state which is pure, quasi-free, invariant under the Killing flow and which restricts to a double KMS state at the inverse Hawking temperature on the union of the exterior wedge regions. The existence of such a state was first conjectured by Hartle and Hawking (1976) and Israel (1976) for stationary black hole space times. Our result complements a uniqueness result of Kay and Wald (1991), who considered a general bifurcate Killing horizon and proved that a certain (large) subalgebra of the free field algebra admits at most one Hadamard state which is invariant under the Killing flow. In the presence of a wedge reflection this state reduces to a pure, quasi-free KMS state on the smaller subalgebra associated to one of the exterior wedge regions. Our result establishes the existence of such a state on the full algebra in the static case. Our proof follows the arguments of Sewell (1982) and Jacobson (1994), exploiting a Wick rotation in the Killing time coordinate to construct a corresponding Euclidean theory. Because the Killing time coordinate is ill-defined on the bifurcation surface we systematically replace it by a Gaussian normal coordinate. A crucial part of our proof is to establish that the Euclidean ground state satisfies the necessary analogs of analyticity and reflection positivity with respect to this coordinate.

Ko Sanders

2015-01-29

484

Inefficacy of vancomycin and teicoplanin in eradicating and killing Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms in vitro.  

PubMed

Biofilm-associated bacteria display a decreased susceptibility towards antibiotics. Routine assessment of antibiotic susceptibility of planktonic bacteria therefore offers an insufficient prediction of the biofilm response. In this study, in vitro biofilms of eight clinical Staphylococcus epidermidis strains were subjected to treatment with vancomycin, teicoplanin, oxacillin, rifampicin and gentamicin. In addition, the biofilms were subjected to combinations of an antibiotic with rifampicin. The effects on the biofilms were assessed by crystal violet staining to determine the total biofilm biomass, staining with XTT to determine bacterial cell viability, and microscopy. Combining these methods showed that treatment of S. epidermidis biofilms with glycopeptides increased the total biofilm biomass and that these antibiotics were not effective in killing bacteria embedded in biofilms. The decreased killing efficacy was more pronounced in biofilms produced by strains that were classified as 'strong' biofilm producers. Rifampicin, oxacillin and gentamicin effectively killed biofilm-associated bacteria of all tested strains. Combining antibiotics with rifampicin increased the killing efficacy without influencing the total biofilm biomass. When vancomycin or teicoplanin were combined with rifampicin, the increase in biofilm biomass was neutralised and also the killing efficacy was influenced in a positive way. We conclude that the combined methodology used in this study showed that glycopeptides were not effective in eradicating S. epidermidis biofilms but that combination with rifampicin improved the killing efficacy in vitro. PMID:25614358

Claessens, J; Roriz, M; Merckx, R; Baatsen, P; Van Mellaert, L; Van Eldere, J

2015-04-01

485

Optimal killing for obligate killers: the evolution of life histories and virulence of semelparous parasites.  

PubMed Central

Many viral, bacterial and protozoan parasites of invertebrates first propagate inside their host without releasing any transmission stages and then kill their host to release all transmission stages at once. Life history and the evolution of virulence of these obligately killing parasites are modelled, assuming that within-host growth is density dependent. We find that the parasite should kill the host when its per capita growth rate falls to the level of the host mortality rate. The parasite should kill its host later when the carrying capacity, K, is higher, but should kill it earlier when the parasite-independent host mortality increases or when the parasite has a higher birth rate. When K(t), for parasite growth, is not constant over the duration of an infection, but increases with time, the parasite should kill the host around the stage when the growth rate of the carrying capacity decelerates strongly. In case that K(t) relates to host body size, this deceleration in growth is around host maturation. PMID:9263465

Ebert, D; Weisser, W W

1997-01-01

486

Remote control for motor vehicle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A remote controller is disclosed for controlling the throttle, brake and steering mechanism of a conventional motor vehicle, with the remote controller being particularly advantageous for use by severely handicapped individuals. The controller includes a remote manipulator which controls a plurality of actuators through interfacing electronics. The remote manipulator is a two-axis joystick which controls a pair of linear actuators and a rotary actuator, with the actuators being powered by electric motors to effect throttle, brake and steering control of a motor vehicle adapted to include the controller. The controller enables the driver to control the adapted vehicle from anywhere in the vehicle with one hand with minimal control force and range of motion. In addition, even though a conventional vehicle is adapted for use with the remote controller, the vehicle may still be operated in the normal manner.

Johnson, Dale R. (Inventor); Ciciora, John A. (Inventor)

1984-01-01

487

Energy management and vehicle synthesis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The major drivers in the development of launch vehicles for the twenty-first century are reduction in cost of vehicles and operations, continuous reusability, mission abort capability with vehicle recovery, and readiness. One approach to the design of such vehicles is to emphasize energy management and propulsion as being the principal means of improvements given the available industrial capability and the required freedom in selecting configuration concept geometries. A methodology has been developed for the rational synthesis of vehicles based on the setting up and utilization of available data and projections, and a reference vehicle. The application of the methodology is illustrated for a single stage to orbit (SSTO) with various limits for the use of airbreathing propulsion.

Czysz, P.; Murthy, S. N. B.

1995-01-01

488

International Human Powered Vehicle Association  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The International Human Powered Vehicle Association is an association of national associations and organizations who are "dedicated to promoting improvement, innovation and creativity in the use of human power, especially in the design and development of human-powered vehicles." The website provides updates on the world of human-powered vehicles, such as upcoming world championships and innovations in bicycle technology. The Source Guide includes links to directories with details on human-powered vehicle providers and companies selling materials needed for bicycle builders. The Library provides information on video, software, books and periodicals, while the Builder's Corner section offers how-to articles and guides. Information on human-powered vehicle races and schools with Human Powered Vehicle programs is also provided.

489

Space vehicle gyroscope sensor applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Considerations which form the basis for the specification, design and evaluation of gyroscopes for spaceborne sensor applications are presented. The applications are distinguished by basic vehicle category: launch vehicles, spacecraft, entry vehicles and sounding rockets. Specifically excluded from discussion are gyroscope effector applications. Exotic or unconventional gyroscopes for which operational experience is nonexistent are mentioned only briefly to alert the reader of future trends. General requirements for testing and evaluation are discussed.

1972-01-01

490

Prediction of vehicle impact forces  

E-print Network

) This model was developed to help researchers and designers become more informed about longitudinal collisions, namely frontal and rear-end collisions. This information was used in a study to obtain design criteria for safety harnesses and vehicle interior... and rear vehicle impacts. These sine functions represent load vs. time curves of vehicle-barrier collisions. A comparison was made between load vs. time curves determined from the final model and load vs. time curves taken from experimental data used...

Kaderka, Darrell Laine

1990-01-01

491

Systems Challenges for Hypersonic Vehicles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper examines the system challenges posed by fully reusable hypersonic cruise airplanes and access to space vehicles. Hydrocarbon and hydrogen fueled airplanes are considered with cruise speeds of Mach 5 and 10, respectively. The access to space matrix is examined. Airbreathing and rocket powered, single- and two-stage vehicles are considered. Reference vehicle architectures are presented. Major systems/subsystems challenges are described. Advanced, enhancing systems concepts as well as common system technologies are discussed.

Hunt, James L.; Laruelle, Gerard; Wagner, Alain

1997-01-01

492

Suspension for vehicle  

SciTech Connect

A suspension is described for a vehicle comprising: a shock absorber capable of adjusting the damping force for damping vibration given from a wheel; a bushing interposed between the shock absorber and a car body and capable of adjusting the spring constant and damping force; an air spring capable of adjusting the spring constant for damping the vibration given from the wheel in cooperation with the shock absorber; and at least an actuator for adjusting the damping force of the shock absorber, the spring constant and damping force of the bushing and the spring constant of the air spring.

Buma, S.

1987-01-13

493

Space Vehicles Directorate  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Space Vehicles Directorate is a division of the Air Force Research Laboratory and is located on Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The directorate is composed of four divisions specializing in research and development, specifically the Battlespace Environment, Spacecraft Technology, Innovative Concepts, and Integrated Experiments divisions. The Web site contains information on all of these divisions, as well as facility and technology program fact sheets, photo and video galleries, and technology demonstrations. Each video even has three versions (small, medium, and large) to make downloading on slow connections easier. There are many projects and areas of research detailed on the site; so, visitors will have plenty of exploring to do.

494

Hybrid vehicle motor alignment  

DOEpatents

A rotor of an electric motor for a motor vehicle is aligned to an axis of rotation for a crankshaft of an internal combustion engine having an internal combustion engine and an electric motor. A locator is provided on the crankshaft, a piloting tool is located radially by the first locator to the crankshaft. A stator of the electric motor is aligned to a second locator provided on the piloting tool. The stator is secured to the engine block. The rotor is aligned to the crankshaft and secured thereto.

Levin, Michael Benjamin (Ann Arbor, MI)

2001-07-03

495

Alternative Fuel Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

This Federal Technology Alert on alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs), prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), is intended for fleet managers in government agencies and other government officials who need to use more alternative fuels and AFVs in their fleets of cars and trucks. This publication describes the government's plans and progress in meeting goals for the use of AFVs, which are stated in the Energy Policy Act and various Executive Orders. It describes the types of AFVs available, lists actual and potential