Science.gov

Sample records for kinetic studies progress

  1. Structure and thermochemical kinetic studies of coal pyrolysis. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Dodoo, J.N.D.

    1991-12-31

    The overall objectives of this project is an intensive effort on the application of laser to the microscopic structure and thermochemical kinetic studies of coal particles pyrolysis, char combustion and ash transformation at combustion level heat fluxes in a laser beam. Research emphasis in FY91 is placed on setup and calibration of the laser pyrolysis system, preparation and mass loss studies of Beulah lignite and subbituminous coals. The task is therefore divided into three subtasks.

  2. Pulsed laser kinetic studies of liquids under high pressure. Progress report, November 29, 1990--November 25, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Eyring, E.M.

    1991-11-25

    A high pressure apparatus constructed for measuring the rates of reactions in liquids under pressures ranging from 1 atm to 2000 atm has been used to measure the complexation kinetics of molybdenum hexacarbonyl reacting with 2,2-bipyridine, 4,4{prime}-dimethyl-2-2{prime}-bipyridine and 4,4{prime}-diphenyl-2-2{prime} bipyridine in toluene. Pentacarbonyl reaction intermediates are created by a 10 nsec flash of frequency tripled Nd:YAG laser light. Measured activation volumes for chelate ligand ring closure indicate a change in mechanism from associative interchange to dissociative interchange as steric hindrance increases. A similar high pressure kinetics study of molybdenum carbonyl complexation by several substituted phenanthrolines is now well advanced that indicates that with the more rigid phenanthroline ligands steric effects from bulky substituents have less effect on the ring closure mechanism than in the case of the bipyridine ligands. An experimental concentration dependence of the fluorescence quantum yield of cresyl violet has been harmonized with previously published contradictory reports. Fluorescence of cresyl violet in various solvents and in micellar systems has also been systematically explored.

  3. Pulsed laser kinetic studies of liquids under high pressure. Progress report, November 25, 1991--September 18, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Eyring, E.M.

    1992-09-22

    A laser flash photolysis kinetic study of 2,2{prime}-bipyridine bidentate chelating ligands with one claw in the first coordination sphere of a molybdenum carbonyl complex has been completed at pressures up to 150 MPa. The reaction mechanism for thermal ring closure is found from activation volumes to change from associative interchange to dissociative interchange as substituents on the 2,2{prime}-bipyridine ligands become bulkier. In a similar study of more rigid, substituted phenanthroline bidentate ligands it was found that substituent bulkiness had little effect on the thermal ring closure mechanism. Stability constants for lithium ion complexes with crown ethers in a room temperature molten salt, fluorescence quantum yields for cresyl violet and several other dyes in solution, and the oxidation of alcohols by OsO{sub 4} have also been investigated.

  4. Combustion Research Program: Flame studies, laser diagnostics, and chemical kinetics. Progress report, 15 July 1987--3 December 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Crosley, D.R.

    1991-01-22

    We have made a detailed study of the care that must be taken to correctly measure OH radical concentrations in flames. A large part of these studies has concerned collisional quenching of hydride radical species (OH, NH, and NH{sub 2}), in particular the dependence upon rotational level and collision velocity (temperature). The results on OH and NH have shown unique and interesting behavior from the viewpoint of fundamental molecular dynamics, pointing to quenching often governed by collisions on an anisotropic, attractive surface, whereas NH{sub 2} quenching appears to depend on state-mixing considerations, not dynamic control. This state-specific behavior of these small, theoretically tractable hydrides has direct ramifications for quantitative flame diagnostics. Our other effort in the diagnostic area has been repeated but unsuccessful searches for laser induced fluorescence in the vinyl radical.

  5. Kinetics studies following state-selective laser excitation. Final progress report, March 15, 1984--July 15, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Keto, J.W.

    1994-04-01

    The objective of this contract was the study of state-to-state, electronic energy transfer reactions relevant to the excited state chemistry observed in discharges. We studied deactivation reactions and excitation transfer in collisions of excited states of xenon and krypton atoms with Ar, Kr, Xe and chlorine. The reactant states were excited selectively in two-photon transitions using tunable u.v. and v.u.v. lasers. Excited states produced by the collision were observed by their fluorescence. Reaction rates were measured by observing the time dependent decay of signals from reactant and product channels. In addition we measured interaction potentials of the reactants by laser spectroscopy where the laser induced fluorescence or ionization is measured as a function of laser wavelength (excitation spectra) or by measuring fluorescence spectra at fixed laser frequencies with monochromators. The spectra were obtained in the form of either lineshapes or individual lines from rovibrational transitions of bound states. Our research then required several categories of experiments in order to fully understand a reaction process: 1. High resolution laser spectroscopy of bound molecules or lineshapes of colliding pairs is used to determine potential curves for reactants. 2. Direct measurements of state-to-state reaction rates were measured by studying the time dependent loss of excited reactants and the time dependent formation of products. 3. The energy selectivity of a laser can be used to excite reactants on an excited surface with controlled internuclear configurations. For free states of reactants (as exist in a gas cell) this has been termed laser assisted reactions, while for initially bound states (as chemically bound reactants or dimers formed in supersonic beams) the experiments have been termed photo-fragmentation spectroscopy.

  6. Kinetic study on biomass gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Bingyan, X.; Chuangzhi, W.; Zhengfen, L.; Guang, Z.X. )

    1992-09-01

    An experimental apparatus, with the features of fast heating rate and continuous record of reaction parameters, was developed to study kinetics of fast pyrolysis. The temperature effects, at a range of 400 C to 900 C, on pyrolysis rate, products profile, gas quality and quantity, and so on, were studied and the results are listed and analyzed. The effect of secondary reaction of gas phase at 700 C was tested and the regression result is expressed in an experimental formula. Based on the experimental results, the three-stage-reaction mechanism module is suggested. The kinetic expression to calculate gas formation rate is concluded as: d{alpha}/dt = A exp({minus}E/RT)(1 {minus} {alpha}){sup n}. The kinetic parameters of A, E, and n at different temperatures are given in the paper.

  7. Thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of surface acidity. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Dumesic, J.A.

    1992-04-01

    Our research in the general area of acid catalysis involves the characterization of solid acidity and the corresponding assessment of catalytic performance of acidic materials. Acid characterization studies are required to provide essential information about the type of acid site (i.e., Lewis versus Bronsted), the strength of the sites, and the mobility of molecules adsorbed on the acid sites. An accurate measure of acid strength is given by the heat of adsorption of a basic probe molecule on the acid site. A thermodynamic representation of the mobility of adsorbed species on these sites is given by the entropy of adsorption. Important techniques used in these acid site characterization studies include microcalorimetry, thermogravimetric measurements, temperature programmed desorption, infrared spectroscopy and solid state nuclear magnetic resonance. The combination of these acid site characterization studies with reaction kinetics measurements of selected catalytic processes allows the elucidation of possible relationships between surface thermodynamic and kinetic properties of acidic sites. Such relationships are important milestones in formulating effective strategies for the effective utilization of solid acid catalysts. Current work in this direction involves methylamine syntheses over various zeolites, and the basic probe molecules employed include ammonia, methanol, water and mono-, di- and tri-methylamines. 31 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Progress Toward the Analysis of the Kinetic Stabilizer Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R F; Byers, J A; Cohen, R H; Fowler, T K; Ryutov, D D; Tung, L S

    2005-02-08

    The Kinetic Stabilizer (K-S) concept [1] represents a means for stabilizing axisymmetric mirror and tandem-mirror (T-M) magnetic fusion systems against MHD interchange instability modes. Magnetic fusion research has given us examples of axisymmetric mirror confinement devices in which radial transport rates approach the classical ''Spitzer'' level, i.e. situations in which turbulence if present at all, is at too low a level to adversely affect the radial transport [2,3,4]. If such a low-turbulence condition could be achieved in a T-M system it could lead to a fusion power system that would be simpler, smaller, and easier to develop than one based on closed-field confinement, e.g., the tokamak, where the transport is known to be dominated by turbulence. However, since conventional axisymmetric mirror systems suffer from the MHD interchange instability, the key to exploiting this new opportunity is to find a practical way to stabilize this mode. The K-S represents one avenue to achieving this goal. The starting point for the K-S concept is a theoretical analysis by Ryutov [5]. He showed that a MHD-unstable plasma contained in an axisymmetric mirror cell can be MHD-stabilized by the presence of a low-density plasma on the expanding field lines outside the mirrors. If this plasma communicates well electrically with the plasma in the then this exterior plasma can stabilize the interior, confined, plasma. This stabilization technique was conclusively demonstrated in the Gas Dynamic Trap (GDT) experiment [6] at Novosibirsk, Russia, at mirror-cell plasma beta values of 40 percent. The GDT operates in a high collisionality regime. Thus the effluent plasma leaking through the mirrors, though much lower in density than that of the confined plasma, is still high enough to satisfy the stabilization criterion. This would not, however, be the case in a fusion T-M with axisymmetric plug and central cell fields. In such a case the effluent plasma would be far too low in density to

  9. On fast reactor kinetics studies

    SciTech Connect

    Seleznev, E. F.; Belov, A. A.; Matveenko, I. P.; Zhukov, A. M.; Raskach, K. F.

    2012-07-01

    The results and the program of fast reactor core time and space kinetics experiments performed and planned to be performed at the IPPE critical facility is presented. The TIMER code was taken as computation support of the experimental work, which allows transient equations to be solved in 3-D geometry with multi-group diffusion approximation. The number of delayed neutron groups varies from 6 to 8. The code implements the solution of both transient neutron transfer problems: a direct one, where neutron flux density and its derivatives, such as reactor power, etc, are determined at each time step, and an inverse one for the point kinetics equation form, where such a parameter as reactivity is determined with a well-known reactor power time variation function. (authors)

  10. Kinetic studies of ICF implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Kagan, Grigory; Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y. -H.; Schmitt, M. J.; Hakel, P.; Hsu, S. C.; Hoffman, N. M.; Svyatsky, D.; Baalrud, S. D.; Daligault, J. O.; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Albright, B. J.; Taitano, W.; Kyrala, G. A.; Bradley, P. A.; Huang, C. -K.; McDevitt, C. J.; Chacon, L.; Srinivasan, B.; McEvoy, A. M.; Joshi, T. R.; Adams, C. S.

    2016-01-01

    Here, kinetic effects on inertial confinement fusion have been investigated. In particular, inter-ion-species diffusion and suprathermal ion distribution have been analyzed. The former drives separation of the fuel constituents in the hot reacting core and governs mix at the shell/fuel interface. The latter underlie measurements obtained with nuclear diagnostics, including the fusion yield and inferred ion burn temperatures. Basic mechanisms behind and practical consequences from these effects are discussed.

  11. Kinetic studies of ICF implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Grigory; Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y.-H.; Schmitt, M. J.; Hakel, P.; Hsu, S. C.; Hoffman, N. M.; Svyatsky, D.; Baalrud, S. D.; Daligault, J. O.; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Albright, B. J.; Taitano, W.; Kyrala, G. A.; Bradley, P. A.; Huang, C.-K.; McDevitt, C. J.; Chacon, L.; Srinivasan, B.; McEvoy, A. M.; Joshi, T. R.; Adams, C. S.

    2016-05-01

    Kinetic effects on inertial confinement fusion have been investigated. In particular, inter-ion-species diffusion and suprathermal ion distribution have been analyzed. The former drives separation of the fuel constituents in the hot reacting core and governs mix at the shell/fuel interface. The latter underlie measurements obtained with nuclear diagnostics, including the fusion yield and inferred ion burn temperatures. Basic mechanisms behind and practical consequences from these effects are discussed.

  12. Liquefaction chemistry and kinetics: Hydrogen utilization studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rothenberger, K.S.; Warzinski, R.P.; Cugini, A.V.

    1995-12-31

    The objectives of this project are to investigate the chemistry and kinetics that occur in the initial stages of coal liquefaction and to determine the effects of hydrogen pressure, catalyst activity, and solvent type on the quantity and quality of the products produced. The project comprises three tasks: (1) preconversion chemistry and kinetics, (2) hydrogen utilization studies, and (3) assessment of kinetic models for liquefaction. The hydrogen utilization studies work will be the main topic of this report. However, the other tasks are briefly described.

  13. Progresses in proton radioactivity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, L. S.; Maglione, E.

    2016-07-01

    In the present talk, we will discuss recent progresses in the theoretical study of proton radioactivity and their impact on the present understanding of nuclear structure at the extremes of proton stability.

  14. Progress in Chemical Kinetic Modeling for Surrogate Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O; Silke, E J

    2008-06-06

    Gasoline, diesel, and other alternative transportation fuels contain hundreds to thousands of compounds. It is currently not possible to represent all these compounds in detailed chemical kinetic models. Instead, these fuels are represented by surrogate fuel models which contain a limited number of representative compounds. We have been extending the list of compounds for detailed chemical models that are available for use in fuel surrogate models. Detailed models for components with larger and more complicated fuel molecular structures are now available. These advancements are allowing a more accurate representation of practical and alternative fuels. We have developed detailed chemical kinetic models for fuels with higher molecular weight fuel molecules such as n-hexadecane (C16). Also, we can consider more complicated fuel molecular structures like cyclic alkanes and aromatics that are found in practical fuels. For alternative fuels, the capability to model large biodiesel fuels that have ester structures is becoming available. These newly addressed cyclic and ester structures in fuels profoundly affect the reaction rate of the fuel predicted by the model. Finally, these surrogate fuel models contain large numbers of species and reactions and must be reduced for use in multi-dimensional models for spark-ignition, HCCI and diesel engines.

  15. Progress in kinetic inductance thermometers for X-ray calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawley, G. L.; Kelley, R. L.; Moseley, S. H.; Szymkowiak, A. E.

    1989-11-01

    Conventional X-ray microcalorimeters have so far used ionimplanted resistors for thermometers. Recently, however, several new methods for sensing small temperature changes have been suggested that are nondissipative. Such devices may have intrinsically better energy resolution by eliminating the Johnson noise present in resistive devices. The use of kinetic inductance thermometers for X-ray microcalorimeters is being investigated. This technique exploits the strong temperature dependence of magnetic penetration depth of thin superconducting films. The prototype system, designed for operation at 1.5 K, uses films of aluminum and tin. Once the expected temperature sensitivity and alpha particle detection have been demonstrated, aluminum will be replaced with titanium or another material with a suitable critical temperature and the device will be operated at 0.3 K. At this temperature, the energy resolution from thermal noise should be sufficiently good to allow X-ray detection.

  16. Progress in kinetic inductance thermometers for X-ray calorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawley, G. L.; Kelley, R. L.; Moseley, S. H.; Szymkowiak, A. E.

    1989-01-01

    Conventional X-ray microcalorimeters have so far used ionimplanted resistors for thermometers. Recently, however, several new methods for sensing small temperature changes have been suggested that are nondissipative. Such devices may have intrinsically better energy resolution by eliminating the Johnson noise present in resistive devices. The use of kinetic inductance thermometers for X-ray microcalorimeters is being investigated. This technique exploits the strong temperature dependence of magnetic penetration depth of thin superconducting films. The prototype system, designed for operation at 1.5 K, uses films of aluminum and tin. Once the expected temperature sensitivity and alpha particle detection have been demonstrated, aluminum will be replaced with titanium or another material with a suitable critical temperature and the device will be operated at 0.3 K. At this temperature, the energy resolution from thermal noise should be sufficiently good to allow X-ray detection.

  17. Heterogeneous kinetics of coal gasification. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 April 1983-30 June 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Calo, J.M.; Ganapathi, R.

    1983-01-01

    In the current quarterly technical progress report we present data and results on transient kinetic studies of the steam-char reaction system for activated coconut and lignite chars. These experiments were conducted in a fashion similar to the previous char-CO/sub 2/ studies, under approximately the same experimental conditions. The two principal product species, H/sub 2/ and CO, were monitored using the automatic mass programming system developed especially for this project. In order to perform the steam-char experiments, the original apparatus was modified by the addition of a steam generation/condensate removal system. The steam-char reaction system, being somewhat more complex than the CO/sub 2/-char reaction system, was modeled with a six-parameter, elementary kinetic scheme. The ''effective'' active site concentrations determined from the steam gasification data were of the same order of magnitude, and behaved in a similar fashion, to those obtained for the CO/sub 2/ gasification studies. The implications of this result are briefly discussed. 21 refs., 23 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Coherent Raman spectroscopy: From statics to dynamics and kinetics, progress in nonlinear methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmanov, S. A.

    1987-12-01

    In spite of its 60-year history Raman spectroscopy is still progressing nowadays. Highly stable lasers and short pulse oscillators, perfect electronic data acquisition systems, new nonlinear optical approaches created new exciting perspectives for Raman spectroscopy. One of the most important tendencies is Raman spectroscopy application for studying nonequilibrium states, fast dynamics and kinetics of atoms, molecules and condensed matter. All these problems were until recently regarded as inaccessible for optical spectroscopy. Nonlinear optical techniques of Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) and modulation spectroscopy appeared to be most effective and provided important real-time information on molecular excitation and dissociation dynamics, deep cooling of molecules in a supersonic jet, short laser pulse induced phase transitions at semiconductor interface and so on. Problems yet to be solved include direct measurement of intramolecular vibrational relaxation, conformations in biomolecules, optical “oscilloscopy” of molecular vibrations.

  19. Kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Durant, J.L. Jr.

    1993-12-01

    This program concerning kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions is presently focussed on understanding reactions of NH{sub x} species. To reach this goal, the author is pursuing experimental studies of reaction rate coefficients and product branching fractions as well as using electronic structure calculations to calculate transition state properties and reaction rate calculations to relate these properties to predicted kinetic behavior. The synergy existing between the experimental and theoretical studies allow one to gain a deeper insight into more complex elementary reactions.

  20. Plyometric Long Jump Training With Progressive Loading Improves Kinetic and Kinematic Swimming Start Parameters.

    PubMed

    Rebutini, Vanessa Z; Pereira, Gleber; Bohrer, Roberta C D; Ugrinowitsch, Carlos; Rodacki, André L F

    2016-09-01

    Rebutini, VZ, Pereira, G, Bohrer, RCD, Ugrinowitsch, C, and Rodacki, ALF. Plyometric long jump training with progressive loading improves kinetic and kinematic swimming start parameters. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2392-2398, 2016-This study was aimed to determine the effects of a plyometric long jump training program on torque around the lower limb joints and kinetic and kinematics parameters during the swimming jump start. Ten swimmers performed 3 identical assessment sessions, measuring hip and knee muscle extensors during maximal voluntary isometric contraction and kinetic and kinematics parameters during the swimming jump start, at 3 instants: INI (2 weeks before the training program, control period), PRE (2 weeks after INI measurements), and POST (24-48 hours after 9 weeks of training). There were no significant changes from INI to PRE measurements. However, the peak torque and rate of torque development increased significantly from PRE to POST measurements for both hip (47 and 108%) and knee (24 and 41%) joints. There were significant improvements to the horizontal force (7%), impulse (9%), and angle of resultant force (19%). In addition, there were significant improvements to the center of mass displacement (5%), horizontal takeoff velocity (16%), horizontal velocity at water entrance (22%), and peak angle velocity for the knee (15%) and hip joints (16%). Therefore, the plyometric long jump training protocol was effective to enhance torque around the lower limb joints and to control the resultant vector direction, to increase the swimming jump start performance. These findings suggest that coaches should use long jump training instead of vertical jump training to improve swimming start performance. PMID:24531431

  1. Supramolecular polymer transformation: a kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Baram, Jonathan; Weissman, Haim; Rybtchinski, Boris

    2014-10-16

    Investigation of supramolecular kinetics is essential for elucidating self-assembly mechanisms. Recently, we reported on a noncovalent system involving a bolaamphiphilic perylene diimide dimer that is kinetically trapped in water but can rearrange into a different, more ordered assembly in water/THF mixtures ( Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2014 , 53 , 4123 ). Here we present a kinetic mechanistic study of this process by employing UV-vis spectroscopy. The transformation exhibits a rapid decrease in the red-shifted absorption band, which is monitored in order to track the kinetics at different temperatures (15-50 °C) and concentrations. Fitting the data with the 1D KJMA (Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami) model affords the activation parameters. The latter as well as seeding experiments indicates that the transformation occurs without the detachment of covalent units, and that hydration dynamics plays a significant role in nucleation, with entropic factors being dominant. Switching off the transformation, and the formation of off-pathway intermediates were observed upon heating to temperatures above 55 °C. These insights into kinetically controlled supramolecular polymer transformations provide mechanistic information that is needed for a fundamental understanding of noncovalent processes, and the rational design of noncovalent materials. PMID:25238603

  2. Oxidation and hydrolysis kinetic studies on UN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, G. A. Rama; Mukerjee, S. K.; Vaidya, V. N.; Venugopal, V.; Sood, D. D.

    1991-11-01

    The reaction of oxygen and water vapour with UN microspheres containing 0.78 and 10.9 mol% UO 2 as impurity was studied under non-isothermal heating conditions in a thermobalance under different partial pressures of oxygen, a fixed pressure of water vapour in argon, and in air. Uranium mononitride was ultimately converted to U 3O 8, with the formation of UO 2 and U 2N 3 as intermediates. The end product of pyrohydrolysis was UO 2. The kinetic parameters were evaluated and the mechanism of the reaction was suggested. Different kinetic models were used to explain the oxidation behaviour of UN.

  3. Progress with the COGENT Edge Kinetic Code: Collision operator options

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dorf, M. A.; Cohen, R. H.; Compton, J. C.; Dorr, M.; Rognlien, T. D.; Angus, J.; Krasheninnikov, S.; Colella, P.; Martin, D.; McCorquodale, P.

    2012-06-27

    In this study, COGENT is a continuum gyrokinetic code for edge plasmas being developed by the Edge Simulation Laboratory collaboration. The code is distinguished by application of the fourth order conservative discretization, and mapped multiblock grid technology to handle the geometric complexity of the tokamak edge. It is written in v∥-μ (parallel velocity – magnetic moment) velocity coordinates, and making use of the gyrokinetic Poisson equation for the calculation of a self-consistent electric potential. In the present manuscript we report on the implementation and initial testing of a succession of increasingly detailed collision operator options, including a simple drag-diffusion operatormore » in the parallel velocity space, Lorentz collisions, and a linearized model Fokker-Planck collision operator conserving momentum and energy (© 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim)« less

  4. Progress with the COGENT Edge Kinetic Code: Collision operator options

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, M. A.; Cohen, R. H.; Compton, J. C.; Dorr, M.; Rognlien, T. D.; Angus, J.; Krasheninnikov, S.; Colella, P.; Martin, D.; McCorquodale, P.

    2012-06-27

    In this study, COGENT is a continuum gyrokinetic code for edge plasmas being developed by the Edge Simulation Laboratory collaboration. The code is distinguished by application of the fourth order conservative discretization, and mapped multiblock grid technology to handle the geometric complexity of the tokamak edge. It is written in v∥-μ (parallel velocity – magnetic moment) velocity coordinates, and making use of the gyrokinetic Poisson equation for the calculation of a self-consistent electric potential. In the present manuscript we report on the implementation and initial testing of a succession of increasingly detailed collision operator options, including a simple drag-diffusion operator in the parallel velocity space, Lorentz collisions, and a linearized model Fokker-Planck collision operator conserving momentum and energy (© 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Kinetic study and mechanism of Niclosamide degradation.

    PubMed

    Zaazaa, Hala E; Abdelrahman, Maha M; Ali, Nouruddin W; Magdy, Maimana A; Abdelkawy, M

    2014-11-11

    A spectrophotometric kinetic study of Niclosamide alkaline degradation as a function of drug concentration, alkaline concentration and temperature has been established utilizing double divisor-ratio spectra spectrophotometric method. The developed method allowed determination of Niclosamide in presence of its alkaline degradation products; namely; 2-chloro-4-nitro aniline (DEG I) and 5-chloro salicylic acid (DEG II) with characterization of its degradation mechanism. It was found that degradation kinetic of Niclosamide followed pseudo-first order under the established experimental conditions with a degradation rate constant (k) of 0.0829 mol/h and half life (t1/2) of 8.35 h. The overall degradation rate constant as a function of the temperature under the given conditions obeyed Arrhenius equation where the activation energy was calculated to be 3.41 kcal/mol. PMID:24892546

  6. Kinetic study and mechanism of Niclosamide degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaazaa, Hala E.; Abdelrahman, Maha M.; Ali, Nouruddin W.; Magdy, Maimana A.; Abdelkawy, M.

    2014-11-01

    A spectrophotometric kinetic study of Niclosamide alkaline degradation as a function of drug concentration, alkaline concentration and temperature has been established utilizing double divisor-ratio spectra spectrophotometric method. The developed method allowed determination of Niclosamide in presence of its alkaline degradation products; namely; 2-chloro-4-nitro aniline (DEG I) and 5-chloro salicylic acid (DEG II) with characterization of its degradation mechanism. It was found that degradation kinetic of Niclosamide followed pseudo-first order under the established experimental conditions with a degradation rate constant (k) of 0.0829 mol/h and half life (t1/2) of 8.35 h. The overall degradation rate constant as a function of the temperature under the given conditions obeyed Arrhenius equation where the activation energy was calculated to be 3.41 kcal/mol.

  7. Studies of combustion kinetics and mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Gutman, D.

    1993-12-01

    The objective of the current research is to gain new quantitative knowledge of the kinetics and mechanisms of polyatomic free radicals which are important in hydrocarbon combustion processes. The special facility designed and built for these (which includes a heatable tubular reactor coupled to a photoionization mass spectrometer) is continually being improved. Where possible, these experimental studies are coupled with theoretical ones, sometimes conducted in collaboration with others, to obtain an improved understanding of the factors determining reactivity. The decomposition of acetyl radicals, isopropyl radicals, and n-propyl radicals have been studied as well as the oxidation of methylpropargyl radicals.

  8. Kinetics of Mn-based sorbents for hot coal gas desulfurization: Quarterly progress report, December 15, 1994--March 15, 1995. Task 2 -- Exploratory experimental studies: Single pellet tests; Rate mechanism analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hepworth, M.T.

    1995-03-15

    In earlier studies, zinc ferrite and zinc titanate were developed as regenerable sorbents capable of removing hydrogen sulfide from hot fuel gases originating from coal gasification. Manganese ore as well as manganese carbonate, precipitated from aqueous solutions, combined with alumina to form indurated pellets hold promise of being a highly-effective, inexpensive, regenerable sorbent for hot fuel gases. Although the thermodynamics for sulfur removal by manganese predicts somewhat higher hydrogen sulfide over-pressures (i.e. poorer degree of desulfurization) than can be accomplished with zinc-based sorbents, zinc tends to be reduced to the metallic state under coal gasification conditions resulting in loss of capacity and reactivity by volatilization of reactive surfaces. This volatilization phenomenon limits the temperatures for which desulfurization can be effectively accomplished to less than 500 C for zinc ferrite and 700 C for zinc titanate; whereas, manganese-based sorbents can be utilized at temperatures well in temperatures exceeding 700 C. Also the regeneration of manganese-based pellets under oxidizing conditions may be superior to that of zinc titanate since they can be loaded from a simulated reducing coal-derived gas and then be regenerated at higher temperatures (up to 1,300 C). The topics that will be addressed by this study include: preparation of an effective manganese-based sorbent, thermodynamics and kinetics of sulfur removal from hot fuel gases by this sorbent, analysis of kinetics and mechanisms by which sulfur is absorbed by the sorbent (i.e., whether by gaseous diffusion, surface-controlled reaction, ore pore diffusion), and cyclic sulfidation and regeneration of the sorbent and recovery of the sulfur.

  9. Plant cytosolic pyruvate kinase: a kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Podestá, F E; Plaxton, W C

    1992-11-20

    The kinetic properties of cytosolic pyruvate kinase (PKc) from germinating castor oil seeds (COS) have been investigated. From experiments in which the free Mg2+ concentration was varied at constant levels of either the complexed or free forms of the substrates it was determined that the true substrates are the free forms of both phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and ADP. This conclusion is corroborated by the quenching of intrinsic PKC tryptophan fluorescence by free PEP and ADP. Mg2+ is bound as the free bivalent cation but is likely released as MgATP. The fluorescence data, substrate interaction kinetics, and pattern of inhibition by products and substrate analogues (adenosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) for ADP and phenyl phosphate for PEP) are compatible with a sequential, compulsory-ordered, Tri-Bi type kinetic reaction mechanism. PEP is the leading substrate, and pyruvate the last product to abandon the enzyme. The dissociation constant and limiting Km for free PEP (8.2 to 22 and 38 microM, respectively) and the limiting Km for free ADP (2.9 microM) are considerably lower than those reported for the non-plant enzyme. The results indicate that COS PKc exists naturally in an activated state, similar to the fructose 1,6-bisphosphate-activated yeast enzyme. This deduction is consistent with a previous study (F.E. Podestá and W.C. Plaxton (1991) Biochem. J. 279, 495-501) that failed to identify any allosteric activators for the COS PKc, but which proposed a regulatory mechanism based upon ATP levels and pH-dependent alterations in the enzyme's response to various metabolite inhibitors. As plant phosphofructokinases display potent inhibition by PEP, the overall rate of glycolytic flux from hexose 6-phosphate to pyruvate in the plant cytosol will ultimately depend upon variations in PEP levels brought about by the regulation of PKc. PMID:1445948

  10. Mechanisms and kinetics of coal hydrogenation. Quarterly progress report, April-June

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, R.M.; Furlong, M.W.

    1981-07-01

    Colorado School of Mines is engaged in an experimental program for the Department of Energy to develop comprehensive models for the effects of coal composition upon the kinetics and mechanisms of coal hydrogenation, for the effects of mineral matter additives (disposable catalysts) upon kinetics and mechanisms of coal hydrogenation, and for the kinetics and mechanisms of the hydrogenation of coal derived products such as preasphaltenes and asphaltenes. The continuous flow coal processing unit was modified to alleviate problems with non-representative sampling during the course of operation. A synthetic recycle oil solvent was prepared to allay any doubts regarding the distribution of reacted solvent components in the product samples. Data from the coal reactivity study was fitted by true second-order reversible kinetics expressions. The forward rate constants were correlated with H/C ratio, mean-max reflectance, and fraction reactive macerals of the parent coals. Kinetic reactivities were also shown to correlate with the percentage of volatile carbon in the parent coals. Intrinsic THF solubilities of the parent coals were measured experimentally and the resulting values incorporated in the evaluation of second-order rate constants. The reactivities were not significantly affected by this modification. Reproductibility tests were initiated in the disposable catalysts study. Agreement between these data and those from the initial phase of this study were fair. Further tests will be made to verify these results.

  11. A kinetic study on pantetheinase inhibition by disulfides.

    PubMed

    Pitari, G; Maurizi, G; Ascenzi, P; Ricci, G; Duprè, S

    1994-11-15

    The mammalian enzyme pantetheinase, which hydrolyzes pantetheine to pantothenic acid and cysteamine, is inhibited by many thiol reagents and activated by thiols. Two thiol groups of different reactivity and accessibility are involved in the catalytic process [Ricci, G., Nardini, M., Chiaraluce, R., Duprè, S. & Cavallini, D. (1986) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 870, 82-91]. The inhibition kinetics by some natural and synthetic disulfides [pantethine, cystamine, 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid), 4,4'-dithiodipyridine and oxidized mercaptoethanol] has been studied by two experimental approaches, either by monitoring activity after incubation of the enzyme with the inhibitor or by determining the progress curves in the presence of substrate and inhibitor. Data reported here indicate that pantetheinase reacts irreversibly with various disulfides in a time-dependent manner with the formation of a mixed disulfide apparently preceeded by a conformational change, giving a modified E* form with new kinetic parameters. This modified form may be further competitively inhibited by disulfides interacting with the enzyme at the active site. PMID:7957261

  12. KINETIC STUDIES OF SIMULATED POLLUTED ATMOSPHERES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The kinetics and reaction mechanisms of several important atmospheric contaminants - SO2, formaldehyde, nitrous acid, and the nitrosamines - were assessed to help quantify some key aspects of the chemistry of polluted atmospheres. The reactions and lifetimes of excited sulfur dio...

  13. Early axonal damage and progressive myelin pathology define the kinetics of CNS histopathology in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Recks, Mascha S; Stormanns, Eva R; Bader, Jonas; Arnhold, Stefan; Addicks, Klaus; Kuerten, Stefanie

    2013-10-01

    Studies of MS histopathology are largely dependent on suitable animal models. While light microscopic analysis gives an overview of tissue pathology, it falls short in evaluating detailed changes in nerve fiber morphology. The ultrastructural data presented here and obtained from studies of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG):35-55-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in C57BL/6 mice delineate that axonal damage and myelin pathology follow different kinetics in the disease course. While myelin pathology accumulated with disease progression, axonal damage coincided with the initial clinical disease symptoms and remained stable over time. This pattern applied both to irreversible axolysis and early axonal pathology. Notably, these histopathological patterns were reflected by the normal-appearing white matter (NAWM), suggesting that the NAWM is also in an active neurodegenerative state. The data underline the need for neuroprotection in MS and suggest the MOG model as a highly valuable tool for the assessment of different therapeutic strategies. PMID:23899992

  14. Nuclear spectroscopic studies. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, C.R.; Riedinger, L.L.; Sorensen, S.P.

    1996-01-16

    This report describes progress in the experimental nuclear physics program of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. It presents findings related to properties of high-spin states, low-energy levels of nuclei far from stability, and high-energy heavy-ion physics, as well as a brief description of the Joint Institute of Heavy Ion Research (a collaboration between the University of Tennessee, Vanderbilt University, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory) and its activities (particularly those of the last few years), and a list of publications. 89 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Prognostic markers and tumour growth kinetics in melanoma patients progressing on vemurafenib.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Heike; Fisher, Rosalie; Martin-Liberal, Juan; Edmonds, Kim; Hughes, Peta; Khabra, Komel; Gore, Martin; Larkin, James

    2016-04-01

    The BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib is an effective drug in patients with BRAF mutant metastatic melanoma, but resistance occurs after a median of 6 months. The anti-CTLA4-antibody, ipilimumab, is a standard first-line and second-line treatment option in Europe, with a median time to response of 2-3 months, but some patients show rapid clinical deterioration before that. The aim of this analysis was to identify prognostic markers for survival after failure of vemurafenib treatment to identify patients who have a sufficient life expectancy to respond to new immunotherapy treatments. We retrospectively analysed 101 consecutive unselected patients treated with vemurafenib for metastatic melanoma at a single institution. The association between clinical parameters and death within 3 months after cessation of vemurafenib (n=69) was assessed by binary logistic and Cox regression. Of the patients, 45% died within 3 months of progression on vemurafenib. Elevated baseline serum lactate dehydrogenase, absence of normalization of serum lactate dehydrogenase on vemurafenib therapy, performance status of at least 2 at progression and time from primary tumour to metastatic disease less than 5 years were identified as poor prognostic markers. In an exploratory tumour growth kinetics analysis (n=16), we found that following cessation of vemurafenib, approximately a third each showed a stable, decelerated or accelerated rate of tumour growth. Patients with these poor prognostic markers are unlikely to have sufficient life expectancy to complete ipilimumab treatment after failure with vemurafenib. Consideration needs to be given to the elective use of immunotherapy before patients become resistant to vemurafenib. This requires prospective randomized evaluation. Our tumour growth kinetics analysis requires confirmation; however, it may suggest that intermittent vemurafenib treatment should be investigated in clinical trials. PMID:26684061

  16. Mechanisms, chemistry, and kinetics of anaerobic biodegradation of cis-dichloroethylene and vinyl chloride. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, P.L.; Spormann, A.M.

    1998-06-01

    'The objectives of this study are to: (1) determine the biochemical pathways for reductive dehalogenation of cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE) and vinyl chloride (VC), including identification of the enzymes involved, (2) determine the chemical requirements, especially the type and quantity of electron donors needed by the microorganisms for reductive dehalogenation, and (3) evaluate the kinetics of the process with respect to the concentration of both the electron donors and the electron acceptors (cDCE and VC). Progress has been made under each of the three primary objectives. One manuscript related to the first objective has been published. Manuscripts related to the other two objectives have been submitted for publication. Findings related to the three objectives are summarized.'

  17. Mechanisms and kinetics of coal hydrogenation. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Gary, J H; Baldwin, R M; Bain, R L; Furlong, M W

    1981-01-01

    Colorado School of Mines is engaged in an experimental program to develop comprehensive models for the effects of coal composition upon the kinetics and mechanisms of coal hydrogenation, for the effects of mineral matter additives (disposable catalysts) upon kinetics and mechanisms of coal hydrogenation, and for the kinetics and mechanisms of the hydrogenation of coal-derived products such as preasphaltenes and asphaltenes. Safety modifications to the CSM continuous processing unit were completed to shield the control room from the gas and liquid-solid product sampling systems. A mass balance analysis of sample validity was begun. All but two of sixteen coals in the suite of coal reactivity study coals have been run. Computer modelling of proposed reaction networks was started. Initial efforts at coal property versus reactivity correlations were begun. Feed material preparation for the asphaltene hydrogenation study was completed, and preliminary testing of the reactor system was begun. The experimental portion of the disposable catalyst study screening program was completed. Conclusions are pending statistical analyses of the data.

  18. Kinetic studies of stress-corrosion cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noronha, P. J.

    1977-01-01

    Use of time-to-failure curves for stress-corrosion cracking processes may lead to incorrect estimates of structural life, if material is strongly dependent upon prestress levels. Technique characterizes kinetics of crackgrowth rates and intermediate arrest times by load-level changes.

  19. Kinetics of organic matter removal and humification progress during sewage sludge composting.

    PubMed

    Kulikowska, Dorota

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated the kinetics of organic matter (OM) removal and humification during composting of sewage sludge and lignocellulosic waste (wood chips, wheat straw, leaves) in an aerated bioreactor. Both OM degradation and humification (humic substances, HS, and humic acids, HA formation) proceeded according to 1. order kinetics. The rate constant of OM degradation was 0.196d(-1), and the rate of OM degradation was 39.4mg/gOMd. The kinetic constants of HS and HA formation were 0.044d(-1) and 0.045d(-1), whereas the rates of HS and HA formation were 3.46mgC/gOMd and 3.24mgC/gOMd, respectively. The concentration profiles of HS and HA indicated that humification occurred most intensively during the first 3months of composting. The high content of HS (182mgC/gOM) in the final product indicated that the compost could be used in soil remediation as a source of HS for treating soils highly contaminated with heavy metals. PMID:26783099

  20. Insights into Coupled Folding and Binding Mechanisms from Kinetic Studies.

    PubMed

    Shammas, Sarah L; Crabtree, Michael D; Dahal, Liza; Wicky, Basile I M; Clarke, Jane

    2016-03-25

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are characterized by a lack of persistent structure. Since their identification more than a decade ago, many questions regarding their functional relevance and interaction mechanisms remain unanswered. Although most experiments have taken equilibrium and structural perspectives, fewer studies have investigated the kinetics of their interactions. Here we review and highlight the type of information that can be gained from kinetic studies. In particular, we show how kinetic studies of coupled folding and binding reactions, an important class of signaling event, are needed to determine mechanisms. PMID:26851275

  1. [Meibomian gland morphology study progression].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuqian; Dong, Nuo; Wu, Huping

    2014-04-01

    The meibomian gland (MG) in the eyelids, which is the largest sebaceous gland throughout the body, synthesize and secrete lipids to form the superficial tear film layer. It plays a key role in maintaining the ocular surface health. Abnormalities in meibomian gland morphology lead to meibomian gland dysfunction, which is the main cause of evaporative dry eye. Study on meibomian gland morphology will contribute significantly to the diagnosis and treatment of meibomian gland dysfunction. This review is just focusing on the current studies about techniques to visualize the morphology of the MG and changes of meibomian gland morphology related to diseases. PMID:24931156

  2. Update on Progress of Space Station Integrated Kinetic Launcher for Orbital Payload Systems (SSIKLOPS) - Cyclops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newswander, Daniel; Smith, James P.; Lamb, Craig R.; Ballard, Perry G.

    2014-01-01

    The Space Station Integrated Kinetic Launcher for Orbital Payload Systems (SSIKLOPS), known as "Cyclops" to the International Space Station (ISS) community, was introduced last August (2013) during Technical Session V: From Earth to Orbit of the 27th Annual AIAA/USU Conference on Small Satellites. Cyclops is a collaboration between the NASA ISS Program, NASA Johnson Space Center Engineering, and Department of Defense (DoD) Space Test Program (STP) communities to develop a dedicated 50-100 kg class ISS small satellite deployment system. This paper will address the progress of Cyclops through its fabrication, assembly, flight certification, and on-orbit demonstration phases. It will also go into more detail regarding its anatomy, its satellite deployment concept of operations, and its satellite interfaces and requirements. Cyclops is manifested to fly on Space-X 4 which is currently scheduled in July 2014 with its initial satellite deployment demonstration of DoD STP's SpinSat and UT/TAMU's Lonestar satellites being late summer or fall of 2014.

  3. Nuclear spectroscopic studies. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, C.R.; Guidry, M.W.; Riedinger, L.L.; Sorensen, S.P.

    1994-02-18

    The Nuclear Physics group at UTK is involved in heavy-ion physics including both nuclear structure and reaction mechanisms. During the last year experimental work has been in 3 broad areas: structure of nuclei at high angular momentum, structure of nuclei far from stability, and ultra-relativistic heavy-ion physics. Results in these areas are described in this document under: properties of high-spin states, study of low-energy levels of nuclei far from stability, and high-energy heavy-ion physics (PHENIX, etc.). Another important component of the work is theoretical interpretation of experimental results (Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research).

  4. Progressive hemifacial atrophy. A natural history study.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, M T; Spencer, M A

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe two very different natural history courses in 2 patients with hemifacial atrophy. Progressive hemifacial atrophy (Parry-Romberg syndrome, Romberg syndrome, PHA) is characterized by slowly progressive atrophy, frequently involving only one side of the face, primarily affecting the subcutaneous tissue and fat. The onset usually occurs during the first 2 decades of life. The cause and pathophysiology are unknown. Ophthalmic involvement is common, with progressive enophthalmos a frequent finding. Pupillary disturbances, heterochromia, uveitis, pigmentary disturbances of the ocular fundus, and restrictive strabismus have also been reported. Neurologic findings may be present, but the natural history and progression of ocular findings are often not described in the literature. METHODS: We studied the records and present findings of 2 patients with progressive hemifacial atrophy who were observed in our institution over a 10-year period. RESULTS: Both patients showed progression of ophthalmic findings, primarily on the affected side. One patient has had chronic uveitis with secondary cataract and glaucoma, in addition to retinal pigmentary changes. She also had a third-nerve paresis of the contralateral eye and mild seizure activity. The other patient had mild uveitis, some progression of unilateral retinal pigmentary changes, and a significant increase in hyperopia in the affected eye, in addition to hypotony at age 19 without a clear cause, but with secondary retinal and refractive changes. CONCLUSION: Ocular manifestations of progressive hemifacial atrophy are varied, but can progress from mild visual impairment to blindness. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3A FIGURE 3B FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:8719679

  5. Nuclear spectroscopic studies. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, C.R.; Guidry, M.W.; Riedinger, L.L.; Sorensen, S.P.

    1993-02-08

    The Nuclear Physics group at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville is involved in several aspects of heavy-ion physics including both nuclear structure and reaction mechanisms. While our main emphasis is on experimental problems involving heavy-ion accelerators, we have maintained a strong collaboration with several theorists in order to best pursue the physics of our measurements. During the last year we have led several experiments at the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility and participated in others at Argonne National Laboratory. Also, we continue to be very active in the collaboration to study ultra-relativistic heavy ion physics utilizing the SPS accelerator at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland and in a RHIC detector R&D project. Our experimental work is in four broad areas: (1) the structure of nuclei at high angular momentum, (2) heavy-ion induced transfer reactions, (3) the structure of nuclei far from stability, and (4) ultra-relativistic heavy-ion physics. The results of studies in these particular areas will be described in this document in sections IIA, IIB, IIC, and IID, respectively. Areas (1), (3), and (4) concentrate on the structure of nuclear matter in extreme conditions of rotational motion, imbalance of neutrons and protons, or very high temperature and density. Area (2) pursues the transfer of nucleons to states with high angular momentum, both to learn about their structure and to understand the transfer of particles, energy, and angular momentum in collisions between heavy ions. An important component of our program is the strong emphasis on the theoretical aspects of nuclear structure and reactions.

  6. Planning a Kinetic and Mechanistic Study with Cerium (IV)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanna, Samir B.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Presents a kinetic study that utilizes a method for varying the concentrations of the possible Ce(IV) species and computing the concentration distribution of the sulfato and hydroxo species of Ce(IV). (MLH)

  7. Energetics and kinetics of anaerobic aromatic and fatty acid degradation. Progress report, June 1991--November 1992

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney, M.J.

    1992-11-16

    The kinetics of benzoate degradation by the anaerobic syntrophic bacterium, Syntrophus buswellii, was studied in coculture with Desulfovibrio strain G11. The threshold value for benzoate degradation was dependent on the acetate concentration with benzoate threshold values ranging from 2.4 {mu}M at 20 mM acetate to 30.0 {mu}M at 65 mM acetate. Increasing acetate concentrations also inhibited the rate of benzoate degradation with a apparent K{sub i} for acetate inhibition of 7.0 mM. Lower threshold values were obtained when nitrate rather than sulfate was the terminal electron acceptor. These data are consistent with a thermodynamic explanation for the threshold, and suggest that there is a minimum Gibbs free energy value required for the degradation of benzoate. An acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase has been isolated from Syntrophomonas wolfei; it is apparently a key enzyme controlling the synthesis of poly-B-hydroxyalkanoate from acetyl-CoA in this organism. Kinetic characterization of the acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase from S. wolfei showed that it is similar in its structural, kinetic, and apparent regulatory properties to other biosynthetic acetoacetyl-CoA thiolases from phylogenetically distinct bacteria that synthesize PHA. Intracellular concentrations of CoA and acetyl-CoA are believed to be critical factors regulating the activity of the acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase in S. wolfei. We have also isolated and characterized several new halophilic anaerobic fermentative anaerobes. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that one of these bacteria is a new species in the genus, Haloanaerobium. Two other species appear to be members of the genus, Halobacteroides. Several halophilic acetoclastic methanogenic bacteria have also been isolated and their physiological properties are currently under investigation. We have also isolated an acetate-using dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium.

  8. Kinetic study of seawater reverse osmosis membrane fouling.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Tariq; de O Manes, Carmem-Lara; Aubry, Cyril; Gutierrez, Leonardo; Croue, Jean Philippe

    2013-10-01

    Reverse osmosis (RO) membrane fouling is not a static state but a dynamic phenomenon. The investigation of fouling kinetics and dynamics of change in the composition of the foulant mass is essential to elucidate the mechanism of fouling and foulant-foulant interactions. The aim of this work was to study at a lab scale the fouling process with an emphasis on the changes in the relative composition of foulant material as a function of operating time. Fouled membrane samples were collected at 8 h, and 1, 2, and 4 weeks on a lab-scale RO unit operated in recirculation mode. Foulant characterization was performed by CLSM, AFM, ATR-FTIR, pyrolysis GC-MS, and ICP-MS techniques. Moreover, measurement of active biomass and analysis of microbial diversity were performed by ATP analysis and DNA extraction, followed by pyro-sequencing, respectively. A progressive increase in the abundance of almost all the foulant species was observed, but their relative proportion changed over the age of the fouling layer. Microbial population in all the membrane samples was dominated by specific groups/species belonging to Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria phyla; however, similar to abiotic foulant, their relative abundance also changed with the biofilm age. PMID:24032659

  9. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies of sulforaphane adsorption on macroporous resin.

    PubMed

    Yuanfeng, Wu; Lei, Zhang; Jianwei, Mao; Shiwang, Liu; Jun, Huang; Yuru, You; Lehe, Mei

    2016-08-15

    The adsorption equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic of sulforaphane (SF) adsorption onto macroporous resin in aqueous phase were studied. The SP850 resin was screened as the appropriate resin for SF purification. From the equilibrium studies, the Redlich-Peterson model was found to be the best for description of the adsorption behavior of SF onto SP850 resin, followed by the Freundlich model and the Langmuir model. Batch equilibrium experiments demonstrated that, in the examined temperature range, the equilibrium adsorption capacity of SP850 resin decreased with increasing adsorption temperature. Thermodynamics studies indicated that the adsorption of SF was a physical, exothermic, and spontaneous process. The adsorption kinetics revealed that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model was suitable to characterize the kinetics of adsorption of SF onto SP850. Finally, the intra-particle diffusion model demonstrated that SF diffused quickly into macropores, and that diffusion slowed down in the meso- and micropores. PMID:27391585

  10. Rheological studies of tautomerization kinetics in supercooled glibenclamide drug.

    PubMed

    Wojnarowska, Z; Wang, Y; Sokolov, A P; Paluch, M

    2012-12-01

    Rheological measurements have been applied to study the tautomerization of the pharmaceutically active compound glibenclamide. The rate constant and activation energy of the imidic-acid-amide transformation have been successfully determined by monitoring the evolution of shear viscosity. The kinetic parameters from rheological measurements agree reasonably well with the data previously obtained from dielectric spectroscopy. The present Brief Report demonstrates that rheology can provide a fast and precise way to characterize the reaction kinetics of tautomerization. PMID:23368084

  11. Rheological studies of tautomerization kinetics in supercooled glibenclamide drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojnarowska, Z.; Wang, Y.; Sokolov, A. P.; Paluch, M.

    2012-12-01

    Rheological measurements have been applied to study the tautomerization of the pharmaceutically active compound glibenclamide. The rate constant and activation energy of the imidic-acid-amide transformation have been successfully determined by monitoring the evolution of shear viscosity. The kinetic parameters from rheological measurements agree reasonably well with the data previously obtained from dielectric spectroscopy. The present Brief Report demonstrates that rheology can provide a fast and precise way to characterize the reaction kinetics of tautomerization.

  12. Rhealogical studies of tautomerization kinetics in supercooled glibenclamide drug

    SciTech Connect

    Wojnarowska, S; Wang, Yangyang; Sokolov, Alexei P; Paluch, Marian W

    2012-01-01

    Rheological measurements have been applied to study the tautomerization of the pharmaceutically active compound glibenclamide. The rate constant and activation energy of the imidic-acid-amide transformation have been successfully determined by monitoring the evolution of shear viscosity. The kinetic parameters from rheological measurements agree reasonably well with the data previously obtained from dielectric spectroscopy. The present Brief Report demonstrates that rheology can provide a fast and precise way to characterize the reaction kinetics of tautomerization.

  13. Energetics and kinetics of anaerobic aromatic and fatty acid degradation. Progress report, November 1993--November 1994

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney, M.J.

    1994-12-06

    Factors influencing the rate and extent of benzoate degradation by the anaerobic syntrophic consortia were studied. Nonlinear regression analysis showed that the cause of the benzoate threshold was not a diminished benzoate degradation capacity. Analysis of cocultures with hydrogen users that differed in their hydrogen utilization capacities showed that the threshold did not depend on the kinetic properties of the syntrophic partner. These data support a thermodynamic explanation for the threshold, and exclude the possibility that a change in the affinity of the enzyme system due to acetate inhibition caused the threshold. Modeling studies showed that the threshold value could be predicted from the concentrations of the end products, assuming a critical Gibb`s free energy value. This work shows that interspecies acetate transfer is important in controlling the extent of metabolism by syntrophic organisms.

  14. Kinetic and spectroscopic studies on nitrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Gutheil, W.G.

    1989-01-01

    A detailed procedure and description of the apparatus used for the purification of sodium dithionite obtained from commercial sources is presented with yields 98+% pure material with yields of 25-35%. The effect of the purified dithionite on nitrogenase specific activities was determined and found to be insignificant. Mass spectra analysis of the P{sub i} obtained from nitrogenase catalyzed labeled ATP hydrolysis indicated that nitrogenase acts as a normal ATPase catalyzing nucleophilic attack at the {lambda} phosphorus atom of ATP. Recovered ATP was analyzed for positional isotope exchange (PIX) by {sup 31}P NMR. A numerical model to quantitatively interpret these results in terms of the currently available information on the kinetics of nitrogenase catalyzed ATP hydrolysis was developed. CD monitored titrations of the oxidized Fe protein at 360 nm with MgADP and MgATP are presented. Data were analyzed by fitting to models where cooperativity was allowed or not allowed. Analytical and numerical solutions for non cooperative and cooperative models were implemented. Statistical analysis of the data are presented and discussed as supporting non cooperative vs. cooperative behavior between the nucleotide binding sites. The thermodynamic analysis and incorporation of redox data allow a proposed model of the interactions between the ligand binding sites and the redox center of this protein to be presented. Several complete spectral titrations with various nucleotide analogs are also presented.

  15. Energetics and kinetics of anaerobic aromatic and fatty acid degradation. Progress report, November 1992--November 1993

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney, M.J.

    1993-11-12

    The kinetics of benzoate degradation by the anaerobic syntrophic bacterium, Syntrophus buswellii, in coculture with different sulfate reducers was studied with sulfate or nitrate as the electron acceptor. A threshold value for benzoate degradation dependent on the acetate concentration was observed with sulfate, but not nitrate, as the electron acceptor. No threshold was observed in tricultures containing an acetate-using sulfate reducer. The addition of the acetate-using sulfate reducer to cocultures that had degraded benzoate to its threshold value resulted in further degradation of benzoate to levels below the analytical detection limit (ca. 200 nM). These data are consistent with a thermodynamic explanation for the threshold, and exclude the possibility that the threshold was the result of the inhibitory action of the undissociated form of acetate.

  16. Progress with the COGENT Edge Kinetic Code: Implementing the Fokker-Plank Collision Operator

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, M. A.; Cohen, R. H.; Dorr, M.; Hittinger, J.; Rognlien, T. D.

    2014-06-20

    Here, COGENT is a continuum gyrokinetic code for edge plasma simulations being developed by the Edge Simulation Laboratory collaboration. The code is distinguished by application of a fourth-order finite-volume (conservative) discretization, and mapped multiblock grid technology to handle the geometric complexity of the tokamak edge. The distribution function F is discretized in v∥ – μ (parallel velocity – magnetic moment) velocity coordinates, and the code presently solves an axisymmetric full-f gyro-kinetic equation coupled to the long-wavelength limit of the gyro-Poisson equation. COGENT capabilities are extended by implementing the fully nonlinear Fokker-Plank operator to model Coulomb collisions in magnetized edge plasmas. The corresponding Rosenbluth potentials are computed by making use of a finite-difference scheme and multipole-expansion boundary conditions. Details of the numerical algorithms and results of the initial verification studies are discussed. (© 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Research in chemical kinetics. Progress report, July 20, 1988--August 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, F.S.

    1996-09-01

    A major aspect of our research over the past decade under this contract has been the application of radioisotopes generated by nuclear reactions for the study of various kinetic mechanisms. Two general theoretical concepts have been explored in detail by this technique: (a) The addition of halogen atoms to olefins, which have been described for fifty years by the phrase {open_quotes}anti-Markownikoff{close_quotes} to indicate that the preference for one or the other end of an unsymmetric olefin is opposite to that ({open_quotes}Markownikoff addition{close_quotes}) for hydrogen halide addition. (b) The redistribution of internal energy within a molecule after an energetic addition reaction, for which the usual assumption is rapid equilibration into all available degrees of freedom, as calculated by the Rice-Rarnsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) model. In both instances, significant results have been obtained which expand the overall view of each of these two concepts.

  18. Basic Studies: A Description and Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Charles N.; And Others

    This is a description and a progress report of the Basic Studies Program at Tarrant County Junior College (Texas), a 1-year program in general education designed for students who rank in the lower quarter of their junior college class and who have experienced little academic success in the past. Communications, humanities, social science, natural…

  19. Kinetics of nitrogen and sulfur reactions in combustion systems: Quarterly technical progress report No. 9

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The main thrust of the work was the continuation of the modeling studies of NO destruction by soot particulates. The computation took into account the decrease of soot concentration via oxidation. Since the mechanism of soot oxidation is governed mainly by the reaction between OH radicals and soot particulates, we have incorporated a limited set of detailed kinetics for the downflow coal flame. The kinetics included one hundred and nineteen reactions with twenty-seven species. The details of the modeling and the results are described. EER currently has four models of the SO/sub 2/-CaO high-temperature reaction: (1) the grain model of Silcox et al. (1985); (2) a pore model similar to that of Bhatia and Perlmutter (1980, 1981); (3) the distributed pore model of Newton and Pershing (1987); and (4) a distributed pore model similar to that of Christman and Edgar (1983). Recent work has focused on the latter two models, which are similar in many respects. They both consider a distribution of pore sizes obtained from porosimetry measurements, internal pore diffusion, filling of the pore structure with product (CaSO/sub 4/) as the reaction occurs, external diffusion to the particle surface, and sintering of the pore structure. The primary difference is that the model of Christman and Edgar (1983) considers the pores to be interconnected, while the model of Newton and Pershing (1987) assumes non-connected pores. Both models yield the same predictions of sorbent utilization when a mono-sized pore is considered (using the same physical constants). Pore mouth closure is predicted to control the extent of the SO/sub 2/-CaO reaction. When a distribution of pores is considered, the interconnected model yields higher predictions than the non-interconnected model.

  20. Kinetic Study on Pyrolysis of Oil Palm Frond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soon, V. S. Y.; Chin, B. L. F.; Lim, A. C. R.

    2016-03-01

    The pyrolysis of oil palm frond is studied using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) equipment. The present study investigates the thermal degradation behaviour and determination of the kinetic parameters such as the activation energy (EA ) and pre-exponential factor (A) values of oil palm frond under pyrolysis condition. The kinetic data is produced based on first order rate of reaction. In this study, the experiments are conducted at different heating rates of 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 K/min in the temperature range of 323-1173 K under non-isothermal condition. Argon gas is used as an inert gas to remove any entrapment of gases in the TGA equipment.

  1. A Novel Approach to Experimental Studies of Mineral Dissolution Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhu; William E. Seyfried

    2005-01-01

    Currently, DOE is conducting pilot CO{sub 2} injection tests to evaluate the concept of geological sequestration. One strategy that potentially enhances CO{sub 2} solubility and reduces the risk of CO{sub 2} leak back to the surface is dissolution of indigenous minerals in the geological formation and precipitation of secondary carbonate phases, which increases the brine pH and immobilizes CO{sub 2}. Clearly, the rates at which these dissolution and precipitation reactions occur directly determine the efficiency of this strategy. However, one of the fundamental problems in modern geochemistry is the persistent two to five orders of magnitude discrepancy between laboratory-measured and field derived feldspar dissolution rates. To date, there is no real guidance as to how to predict silicate reaction rates for use in quantitative models. Current models for assessment of geological carbon sequestration have generally opted to use laboratory rates, in spite of the dearth of such data for compositionally complex systems, and the persistent disconnect between lab and field applications. Therefore, a firm scientific basis for predicting silicate reaction kinetics in CO{sub 2} injected geological formations is urgently needed to assure the reliability of the geochemical models used for the assessments of carbon sequestration strategies. The funded experimental and theoretical study attempts to resolve this outstanding scientific issue by novel experimental design and theoretical interpretation to measure silicate dissolution rates and iron carbonate precipitation rates at conditions pertinent to geological carbon sequestration. In the first year of the project, we have successfully developed a sample preparation method and completed three batch feldspar dissolution experiments at 200 C and 300 bars. The changes of solution chemistry as dissolution experiments progressed were monitored with on-line sampling of the aqueous phase at the constant temperature and pressure

  2. Progress on long-time kinetic simulation of tokamak turbulence with very weak dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Scott; Chen, Yang; Kahut, Jason

    2006-04-01

    Recent progress on convergence studies of long-time simulations for both electron-temperature-gradient (ETG) and ion-temperature-gradient driven microturbulence will be reported. It was surprising to us to find that low-noise ETG turbulence simulations are well-converged with rather modest particle number (30-70 million particles). Progress on the particle-continuum method [Vadlamani et al., Comp. Phys. Comm., 209 164 (2004)] will also be reported. The particle-continuum method is really a general class of a variety of methods and has been shown to solve the so-called ``growing weight problem" in two-dimensional simulations. The method is implemented in four-dimensions with the μ∇B force neglected. In this case, v is a constant of motion and resetting of the particle δf on a four-dimensional grid is more reasonable. Discussion of issues related to applying particle continuum method in five dimensions will also be presented. Work supported by DOE SciDAC Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation Center and Center for Plasma Edge Simulation.

  3. Comparative study of gyrokinetic, hybrid-kinetic and fully kinetic wave physics for space plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Told, D.; Cookmeyer, J.; Muller, F.; Astfalk, P.; Jenko, F.

    2016-06-01

    A set of numerical solvers for the linear dispersion relations of the gyrokinetic (GK), the hybrid-kinetic (HK), and the fully kinetic (FK) model is employed to study the physics of the KAW and the fast magnetosonic mode in these models. In particular, we focus on parameters that are relevant for solar wind oriented applications (using a homogeneous, isotropic background), which are characterized by wave propagation angles averaging close to 90°. It is found that the GK model, while lacking high-frequency solutions and cyclotron effects, faithfully reproduces the FK {{Alfv\\acute{e}n}} wave physics close to, and sometimes significantly beyond, the boundaries of its range of validity. The HK model, on the other hand, is much more complete in terms of high-frequency waves, but owing to its simple electron model it is found to severely underpredict wave damping rates even on ion spatial scales across a large range of parameters, despite containing full kinetic ion physics.

  4. ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR KINETIC STUDIES OF BIOLOGICAL INTERACTIONS: A REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiwei; Bi, Cong; Li, Zhao; Podariu, Maria; Hage, David S.

    2015-01-01

    The rates at which biological interactions occur can provide important information concerning the mechanism and behavior of these processes in living systems. This review discusses several analytical methods that can be used to examine the kinetics of biological interactions. These techniques include common or traditional methods such as stopped-flow analysis and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, as well as alternative methods based on affinity chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. The general principles and theory behind these approaches are examined, and it is shown how each technique can be utilized to provide information on the kinetics of biological interactions. Examples of applications are also given for each method. In addition, a discussion is provided on the relative advantages or potential limitations of each technique regarding its use in kinetic studies. PMID:25700721

  5. Analytical methods for kinetic studies of biological interactions: A review.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiwei; Bi, Cong; Li, Zhao; Podariu, Maria; Hage, David S

    2015-09-10

    The rates at which biological interactions occur can provide important information concerning the mechanism and behavior of these processes in living systems. This review discusses several analytical methods that can be used to examine the kinetics of biological interactions. These techniques include common or traditional methods such as stopped-flow analysis and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, as well as alternative methods based on affinity chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. The general principles and theory behind these approaches are examined, and it is shown how each technique can be utilized to provide information on the kinetics of biological interactions. Examples of applications are also given for each method. In addition, a discussion is provided on the relative advantages or potential limitations of each technique regarding its use in kinetic studies. PMID:25700721

  6. Heterogeneous kinetics of coal gasification. Technical progress report, 1 August 1981-31 January 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Sy, O.; Calo, J.M.

    1982-02-01

    The continuing development of an experimental apparatus for the study of the heterogeneous reactions of coal-char gasifiction under conditions of industrial significance is described. The apparatus consists of: (1) a continuous gas flow, fixed solids gradientless reactor; (2) an automatic gas addition system for generating concentration perturbations in the reactor feed stream under conditions of constant flow rate, temperature, and pressure; and (3) a supersonic, modulated molecular beam mass spectrometer sampling system to monitor and resolve the transient response of the gas phase composition at the reactor exit. Work was concentrated on experimental runs of the transient behavior of the char-CO/sub 2/ reaction system. In addition, reactor mixing performance and estimates of possible interphase heat and mass transfer limitations on the kinetic rates were also determined. Modifications, testing and calibration of the beam sampling system and the mass spectrometer were also performed. Computer codes were written to simulate the transient response of the reaction system under varying experimental conditions for different mechanisms found in the literature. These codes are primarily used for model discrimination. An optimization code based on the Marquardt technique was also written for model parameter estimation from the data.

  7. Progress with the COGENT Edge Kinetic Code: Implementing the Fokker-Plank Collision Operator

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dorf, M. A.; Cohen, R. H.; Dorr, M.; Hittinger, J.; Rognlien, T. D.

    2014-06-20

    Here, COGENT is a continuum gyrokinetic code for edge plasma simulations being developed by the Edge Simulation Laboratory collaboration. The code is distinguished by application of a fourth-order finite-volume (conservative) discretization, and mapped multiblock grid technology to handle the geometric complexity of the tokamak edge. The distribution function F is discretized in v∥ – μ (parallel velocity – magnetic moment) velocity coordinates, and the code presently solves an axisymmetric full-f gyro-kinetic equation coupled to the long-wavelength limit of the gyro-Poisson equation. COGENT capabilities are extended by implementing the fully nonlinear Fokker-Plank operator to model Coulomb collisions in magnetized edge plasmas.more » The corresponding Rosenbluth potentials are computed by making use of a finite-difference scheme and multipole-expansion boundary conditions. Details of the numerical algorithms and results of the initial verification studies are discussed. (© 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim)« less

  8. Reaction progress kinetic analysis of a copper-catalyzed aerobic oxidative coupling reaction with N-phenyl tetrahydroisoquinoline.

    PubMed

    Scott, Martin; Sud, Abhishek; Boess, Esther; Klussmann, Martin

    2014-12-19

    The results from a kinetic investigation of a Cu-catalyzed oxidative coupling reaction between N-phenyl tetrahydroisoquinoline and a silyl enol ether using elemental oxygen as oxidant are presented. By using reaction progress kinetic analysis as an evaluation method for the obtained data, we discovered information regarding the reaction order of the substrates and catalysts. Based on this information and some additional experiments, a refined model for the initial oxidative activation of the amine substrate and the activation of the nucleophile by the catalyst was developed. The mechanistic information also helped to understand why silyl nucleophiles have previously failed in a related Cu-catalyzed reaction using tert-butyl hydroperoxide as oxidant and how to overcome this limitation. PMID:25203932

  9. Kinetic Study of the Heck Reaction: An Interdisciplinary Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gozzi, Christel; Bouzidi, Naoual

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is to study and calculate the kinetic constant of a Heck reaction: the arylation of but-3-en-2-ol by iodobenzene catalyzed by palladium acetate in presence of triethylamine in DMF. The reaction leads to a mixture of two ketones. Students use GC analysis to quantify reagents and products of reaction. They control the…

  10. Photosynthetic hydrogen and oxygen production - Kinetic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenbaum, E.

    1982-01-01

    The simultaneous photoproduction of hydrogen and oxygen was measured in a study of the steady-state turnover times of two biological systems, by driving them into the steady state with repetitive, single-turnover flash illumination. The systems were: (1) in vitro, isolated chloroplasts, ferredoxin and hydrogenase; and (2) the anaerobically-adapted green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. It is found that the turnover times for production of both oxygen and hydrogen in photosynthetic water splitting are in milliseconds, and either equal to, or less than, the turnover time for carbon dioxide reduction in intact algal cells. There is therefore mutual compatibility between hydrogen and oxygen turnover times, and partial compatibility with the excitation rate of the photosynthetic reaction centers under solar irradiation conditions.

  11. Progress in improving thermodynamics and kinetics of new hydrogen storage materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Li-fang; Jiang, Chun-hong; Liu, Shu-sheng; Jiao, Cheng-li; Si, Xiao-liang; Wang, Shuang; Li, Fen; Zhang, Jian; Sun, Li-xian; Xu, Fen; Huang, Feng-lei

    2011-06-01

    Hydrogen storage material has been much developed recently because of its potential for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell applications. A successful solid-state reversible storage material should meet the requirements of high storage capacity, suitable thermodynamic properties, and fast adsorption and desorption kinetics. Complex hydrides, including boron hydride and alanate, ammonia borane, metal organic frameworks (MOFs), covalent organic frameworks (COFs) and zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs), are remarkable hydrogen storage materials because of their advantages of high energy density and safety. This feature article focuses mainly on the thermodynamics and kinetics of these hydrogen storage materials in the past few years.

  12. Coordination: southeast continental shelf studies. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, D.W.

    1980-03-01

    The GABEX I experiment is designed to provide synoptic coverage of a series of Gulf Stream wave-like disturbances, the effect of these on the circulation of the entire shelf, and on biological and chemical processes. This study was initiated in February 1980 when current meter arrays were deployed. These meters will be removed in July 1980. In April three ships will simultaneously study the effects of Gulf Stream disturbances on the hydrography, chemistry, and biology of the shelf. One vessel will track a specific wave-like disturbance and provide synoptic coverage of the shelf area. The second vessel will determine the effect of shelf break processes on adjacent shelf water; and the third will study trace metal distributions in and outside of disturbances. Research progress is reported in continental shelf studies, nearshore and estuarine studies (diffusion of freshwater out of nearshore zone), tidal currents and material transport, and mixing of inlet plumes.

  13. Competitive ion kinetics in direct mass spectrometric organic speciation. 1993 Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Sieck, L.W.

    1993-12-31

    The following joint projects are either in progress, or have been completed. (1) Southern Illinois University, Prof. S. Scheiner--Combined experimental-theoretical study of the thermochemistry of protonation, complexation, and hydration of di- and polyfunctional ethers. (2) Eastern illinois University, Prof. C. Deakyne--Essentially the same framework as above. The focus here was to determine whether C or N lone pair electrons were more effective in forming ionic hydrogen bonds. (3) Virginia Commonwealth University-Prof. S. El-Shall--The author put the wrap on a joint thermochemical (NIST) and beam expansion study (VCU) which probed structures and stabilities of methanol clusters incorporating either CH{sub 3}CN or (CH{sub 3}){sub 3}N. MeCN and TMA were chosen because of their widely differing proton affinities (PA`s) and the fact that they form single H-bonds (i.e., complex intraclusters involving multiple bonding are unlikely). (4) University of Maryland-Baltimore County-Prof. J. Liebman and the Phillips Laboratory Supercomputer Center, Kirtland Air Force Base, NM-A. Fant--One of the most perplexing problems among physical organic chemists has involved the site of protonation of a class of molecules referred to as quinones and, in particular, the symmetric member, para-benzoquinone, C{sub 6}H{sub 4} (=O{sub 2}), designated below as PBQ. Possible protonation sites either the ring or carbonyl function.

  14. COMSOL-based Nuclear Reactor Kinetics Studies at the HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, David; Freels, James D; Maldonado, G Ivan; Primm, Trent

    2011-01-01

    The computational ability to accurately predict the dynamic behavior of a nuclear reactor core in response to reactivity-induced perturbations is an important subject in reactor physics. Space-time and point kinetics methodologies were developed for the purpose of studying the transient-induced behavior of the High Flux Isotope Reactor s (HFIR) compact core. The space-time simulations employed the three-energy-group neutron diffusion equations, and transients initiated by control cylinder and hydraulic tube rabbit ejections were studied. The work presented here is the first step towards creating a comprehensive multiphysics methodology for studying the dynamic behavior of the HFIR core during reactivity perturbations. The results of these studies show that point kinetics is adequate for small perturbations in which the power distribution is assumed to be time-independent, but space-time methods must be utilized to determine localized effects.

  15. Covalent binding of aniline to humic substances. 1. Kinetic studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weber, E.J.; Spidle, D.L.; Thorn, K.A.

    1996-01-01

    The reaction kinetics for the covalent binding of aniline with reconstituted IHSS humic and fulvic acids, unfractionated DOM isolated from Suwannee River water, and whole samples of Suwannee River water have been investigated. The reaction kinetics in each of these systems can be adequately described by a simple second-order rate expression. The effect of varying the initial concentration of aniline on reaction kinetics suggested that approximately 10% of the covalent binding sites associated with Suwannee River fulvic acid are highly reactive sites that are quickly saturated. Based on the kinetic parameters determined for the binding of aniline with the Suwannee River fulvic and humic acid isolates, it was estimated that 50% of the aniline concentration decrease in a Suwannee River water sample could be attributed to reaction with the fulvic and humic acid components of the whole water sample. Studies with Suwannee River fulvic acid demonstrated that the rate of binding decreased with decreasing pH, which parallels the decrease in the effective concentration of the neutral form, or reactive nucleophilic species of aniline. The covalent binding of aniline with Suwannee River fulvic acid was inhibited by prior treatment of the fulvic acid with hydrogen sulfide, sodium borohydride, or hydroxylamine. These observations are consistent with a reaction pathway involving nucleophilic addition of aniline to carbonyl moieties present in the fulvic acid.

  16. Structure and thermochemical kinetic studies of coal pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dodoo, J.N.D.

    1991-01-01

    The overall objectives of this project is an intensive effort on the application of laser to the microscopic structure and thermochemical kinetic studies of coal particles pyrolysis, char combustion and ash transformation at combustion level heat fluxes in a laser beam. Research emphasis in FY91 is placed on setup and calibration of the laser pyrolysis system, preparation and mass loss studies of Beulah lignite and subbituminous coals. The task is therefore divided into three subtasks.

  17. Computational Kinetic Study for the Unimolecular Decomposition Pathways of Cyclohexanone.

    PubMed

    Zaras, Aristotelis M; Dagaut, Philippe; Serinyel, Zeynep

    2015-07-16

    There has been evidence lately that several endophytic fungi can convert lignocellulosic biomass into ketones among other oxygenated compounds. Such compounds could prove useful as biofuels for internal combustion engines. Therefore, their combustion properties are of high interest. Cyclohexanone was identified as an interesting second-generation biofuel ( Boot , M. ; et al. Cyclic Oxygenates: A New Class of Second-Generation Biofuels for Diesel Engines? Energy Fuels 2009 , 23 , 1808 - 1817 ; Klein-Douwel , R. J. H. ; et al. Soot and Chemiluminescence in Diesel Combustion of Bio-Derived, Oxygenated and Reference Fuels . Proc. Combust. Inst. 2009 , 32 , 2817 - 2825 ). However, until recently ( Serinyel , Z. ; et al. Kinetics of Oxidation of Cyclohexanone in a Jet- Stirred Reactor: Experimental and Modeling . Proc. Combust. Inst. 2014 ; DOI: 10.1016/j.proci.2014.06.150 ), no previous studies on the kinetics of oxidation of that fuel could be found in the literature. In this work, we present the first theoretical kinetic study of the unimolecular decomposition pathways of cyclohexanone, a cyclic ketone that could demonstrate important fuel potential. Using the quantum composite G3B3 method, we identified six different decomposition pathways for cyclohexanone and computed the corresponding rate constants. The rate constants were calculated using the G3B3 method coupled with Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory in the temperature range of 800-2000 K. Our calculations show that the kinetically more favorable channel for thermal decomposition is pathway 2 that produces 1,3-butadien-2-ol, which in turn can isomerize easily to methyl vinyl ketone through a small barrier. The results presented here can be used in a future kinetic combustion mechanism. PMID:25354027

  18. Competitive ion kinetics in direct mass spectrometric organic speciation. 1994 Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Sieck, L.W.

    1994-12-31

    The experimental work on the gas phase proton affinity (PA) scale, discussed in some detail in last year`s Progress Report, will be completed within the next few weeks. Basically this effort involves the development of a precise and accurate interlocking ladder of relative PA`s derived from the temperature dependence of proton transfer equilibria incorporating a variety of reactant pairs using the technique of pulsed high pressure mass spectrometry (NIST has the only US facility). The PA subset under investigation was expanded from the original list to cover the region between CH{sub 3}CHO and (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}CO, which spans a PA range of approximately 12 kcal/mol. More than 300 separate equilibrium measurements have been carried out to date over the temperature range 240--395 C. The thermochemical region under study creates a bridge between the so-called upper and lower PA scales, and includes two primary reference standards, CH{sub 3}CHO and i-C{sub 4}H{sub 8}, with PA`s independently defined elsewhere via photoionization techniques.

  19. A Novel Approach to Experimental Studies of Mineral Dissolution Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhu

    2006-08-31

    Currently, DOE is conducting pilot CO{sub 2} injection tests to evaluate the concept of geological sequestration. One strategy that potentially enhances CO{sub 2} solubility and reduces the risk of CO{sub 2} leak back to the surface is dissolution of indigenous minerals in the geological formation and precipitation of secondary carbonate phases, which increases the brine pH and immobilizes CO{sub 2}. Clearly, the rates at which these dissolution and precipitation reactions occur directly determine the efficiency of this strategy. However, one of the fundamental problems in modern geochemistry is the persistent two to five orders of magnitude discrepancy between laboratory measured and field derived feldspar dissolution rates. To date, there is no real guidance as to how to predict silicate reaction rates for use in quantitative models. Current models for assessment of geological carbon sequestration have generally opted to use laboratory rates, in spite of the dearth of such data for compositionally complex systems, and the persistent disconnect between laboratory and field applications. Therefore, a firm scientific basis for predicting silicate reaction kinetics in CO2 injected geological formations is urgently needed to assure the reliability of the geochemical models used for the assessments of carbon sequestration strategies. The funded experimental and theoretical study attempts to resolve this outstanding scientific issue by novel experimental design and theoretical interpretation to measure silicate dissolution rates and iron carbonate precipitation rates at conditions pertinent to geological carbon sequestration. In the second year of the project, we completed CO{sub 2}-Navajo sandstone interaction batch and flow-through experiments and a Navajo sandstone dissolution experiment without the presence of CO{sub 2} at 200 C and 250-300 bars, and initiated dawsonite dissolution and solubility experiments. We also performed additional 5-day experiments at the

  20. PROGRESS IN DETAILED KINETIC MODELING OF THE COMBUSTION OF OXYGENATED COMPONENTS OF BIOFUELS

    PubMed Central

    Sy Tran, Luc; Sirjean, Baptiste; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Fournet, René; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique

    2013-01-01

    Due to growing environmental concerns and diminishing petroleum reserves, a wide range of oxygenated species has been proposed as possible substitutes to fossil fuels: alcohols, methyl esters, acyclic and cyclic ethers. After a short review the major detailed kinetic models already proposed in the literature for the combustion of these molecules, the specific classes of reactions considered for modeling the oxidation of acyclic and cyclic oxygenated molecules respectively, are detailed. PMID:23700355

  1. Tyrosinase inhibition kinetic studies of standardized extract of Berberis aristata.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Rajarshi; Mukherjee, Pulok K; Chaudhary, Sushil K

    2016-06-01

    The stem bark and wood of Berberis aristata DC (Daruharidra) are one of the principal ingredients of traditional skin lighting and exfoliating scrub preparation in India. The standardised extract of B. aristata was screened to evaluate their in vitro antityrosinase activity and inhibition kinetics. Phytochemical and pharmacological studies were carried out with different solvent fractions of the methanol extract of B. aristata (MEBA). RP-HPLC analysis was used to determine the berberine content in extract and fractions of B. aristata. MEBA showed maximum berberine content. Extract and fractions of B. aristata contain the maximum amount of alkaloids than other constituents. In tyrosinase inhibition assay, MEBA was found to possess highest dose-dependent monophenolase and moderate diphenolase activity. The enzyme kinetic study revealed that MEBA possessed mixed type inhibition of monophenolase activity of tyrosinase. These bioactivities indicate that the MEBA has antihyperpigmentation potential in human skin. PMID:26212353

  2. A chemical kinetic modeling study of chlorinated hydrocarbon combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K.

    1990-09-05

    The combustion of chloroethane is modeled as a stirred reactor so that we can study critical emission characteristics of the reactor as a function of residence time. We examine important operating conditions such as pressure, temperature, and equivalence ratio and their influence on destructive efficiency of chloroethane. The model uses a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism that we have developed previously for C{sub 3} hydrocarbons. We have added to this mechanism the chemical kinetic mechanism for C{sub 2} chlorinated hydrocarbons developed by Senkan and coworkers. In the modeling calculations, sensitivity coefficients are determined to find which reaction-rate constants have the largest effect on destructive efficiency. 24 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Kinetic Study of Acid Hydrolysis of Rice Straw

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Nibedita; Aikat, Kaustav

    2013-01-01

    Rice straw is a renewable, cheap, and abundant waste in tropical countries. The pentose content of rice straw can be used as a substrate for many types of value-added products such as xylitol and biofuel. Dilute acid hydrolysis mainly releases pentose from rice straw. The objective of the study was to determine the effect of H2SO4 concentration and reaction time on the xylose production. The variation of the main product xylose with the reaction time was described by a kinetic model and kinetic parameters were calculated to describe the variation of the xylose production with time. The optimum yield (19.35 g/L) was obtained at 0.24 mol/L H2SO4 and 30 minutes. PMID:25969789

  4. Kinetic Studies of Biological Interactions By Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Schiel, John E.; Hage, David S.

    2009-01-01

    The rates at which biological interactions occur can provide important information on the mechanism and behavior of such processes in living systems. This review will discuss how affinity chromatography can be used as a tool to examine the kinetics of biological interactions. This approach, referred to here as biointeraction chromatography, uses a column with an immobilized binding agent to examine the association or dissociation of this agent with other compounds. The use of HPLC-based affinity columns in kinetic studies has received particular attention in recent years. Advantages of using HPLC with affinity chromatography for this purpose include the ability to reuse the same ligand within a column for a large number of experiments, and the good precision and accuracy of this approach. A number of techniques are available for kinetic studies through the use of affinity columns and biointeraction chromatography. These approaches include plate height measurements, peak profiling, peak fitting, split-peak measurements, and peak decay analysis. The general principles for each of these methods are discussed in this review and some recent applications of these techniques are presented. The advantages and potential limitations of each approach are also considered. PMID:19391173

  5. Stochastic theory of interfacial enzyme kinetics: A kinetic Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Biswajit; Gangopadhyay, Gautam

    2012-01-01

    In the spirit of Gillespie's stochastic approach we have formulated a theory to explore the advancement of the interfacial enzyme kinetics at the single enzyme level which is ultimately utilized to obtain the ensemble average macroscopic feature, lag-burst kinetics. We have provided a theory of the transition from the lag phase to the burst phase kinetics by considering the gradual development of electrostatic interaction among the positively charged enzyme and negatively charged product molecules deposited on the phospholipid surface. It is shown that the different diffusion time scales of the enzyme over the fluid and product regions are responsible for the memory effect in the correlation of successive turnover events of the hopping mode in the single trajectory analysis which again is reflected on the non-Gaussian distribution of turnover times on the macroscopic kinetics in the lag phase unlike the burst phase kinetics.

  6. [Methodologic aspects of body water kinetic dynamic studies].

    PubMed

    Lobachik, V I; Chupushtanov, S A; Pishchulina, G N; Voronov, S F; Nosovskiĭ, A M

    1998-01-01

    In studying the level of hydration and liquid phases (LPs) in a space mission there use the stable and/or radioactive isotopes. The investigations are unique, the methods are adequate but not adapted in full measure to the challenges of the problem under study. The methodical approaches to the study of the dynamics of water metabolism are not available. Repeated introduction of the markers for these purposes is not acceptable. Another problem associates with taking the markers orally. In this case, a concentration of the markers will depend on the absorption and excretion processes. Prior to, during and in the readaptation period these functions will be different, making a correlation of the accumulated data difficult. There advances a possible version of solving these problems, namely, to use for the dynamic studies the residual contents of the markers in the LPs after single injection. However, this approach calls for investigating the kinetics of markers in weightlessness or during its ground-based simulation. The kinetics of tritium water has been studied in 6 volunteers under conditions of the 5-day bedrest and in 9 healthy men during free motor activity. There determined the characteristics of marker kinetics in a healthy man during his routine living activities. Under bedrest conditions there have been noted slowing-down of the rate and a decrease in the degree of marker accumulation in the body after its single injection, the shift of a period of relative stabilization of marker content in LP to the more late dates of experiment, slowing-down of the marker excretion rate from the body. PMID:9858979

  7. Mechanisms and kinetics of coal hydrogenation. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Gary, J. H.; Baldwin, R. M.; Bain, R. L.

    1980-02-01

    Colorado School of Mines is conducting coal hydrogenation research with the following objectives and scope of work: (1) Comparison of the rates of coal hydrogenation in continuous flow stirred tank and tube flow reactors using pure hydrogen, catalyzed CO-STEAM, and syngas processing conditions; (2) Investigation of the influence of coal rank on the rate of hydrogenation of coal to preasphaltene, asphaltenes, and oil in batch reactors; (3) Batch evaluation of the effect of operating conditions (temperature and pressure) on the rate of hydrogenation of coal-derived preasphaltanes and asphaltenes; (4) Determination of the effect of selected disposable catalysts on the rate of batch hydrogenation of preasphaltenes and asphaltenes and selected bituminous coals. Testing and evaluation of promising catalyst systems in the contunuous processing unit; (5) Formulation of a unified kinetic/mechanistic model for coal liquefaction taking into account petrography of the feed coal and hydrocarbon lumps in the product oil.

  8. FY-1979 progress report. Hydrotransport plugging study.

    SciTech Connect

    Eyler, L.L.; Lombardo, N.J.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of the Hydrotransport Plugging Study is to investigate phenomena associated with predicting the onset and occurrence of plugging in pipeline transport of coal. This study addresses large particle transport plugging phenomena that may be encountered in run-of-mine operations. The project is being conducted in four tasks: review and analysis of current capabilities and available data, analytical modeling, experimental investigations, and unplugging and static start-up. This report documents work completed in FY-1979 as well as work currently in progress. A review of currently available prediction methods was completed. Applicability of the methods to large particle hydrotransport and the prediction of plugging was evaluated. It was determined that available models were inadequate, either because they are empirical and tuned to a given solid or because they are simplified analytical models incapable of accounting for a wide range of parameters. Complicated regression curve fit models lacking a physical basis cannot be extrapolated with confidence. Several specific conclusions were reached: Recent developments in mechanistic modeling, describing flow conditions at the limit of stationary deposition, provide the best basis for prediction and extrapolation of large particle flow. Certain modeled phenomena require further analytical and experimental investigation to improve confidence levels. Experimental work needs to be performed to support modeling and to provide an adequate data base for comparison purposes. No available model permits treatment of solids mixtures such as coal and rock.

  9. A progress report on seismic model studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, J.H.; Mangan, G.B.

    1963-01-01

    The value of seismic-model studies as an aid to understanding wave propagation in the Earth's crust was recognized by early investigators (Tatel and Tuve, 1955). Preliminary model results were very promising, but progress in model seismology has been restricted by two problems: (1) difficulties in the development of models with continuously variable velocity-depth functions, and (2) difficulties in the construction of models of adequate size to provide a meaningful wave-length to layer-thickness ratio. The problem of a continuously variable velocity-depth function has been partly solved by a technique using two-dimensional plate models constructed by laminating plastic to aluminum, so that the ratio of plastic to aluminum controls the velocity-depth function (Healy and Press, 1960). These techniques provide a continuously variable velocity-depth function, but it is not possible to construct such models large enough to study short-period wave propagation in the crust. This report describes improvements in our ability to machine large models. Two types of models are being used: one is a cylindrical aluminum tube machined on a lathe, and the other is a large plate machined on a precision planer. Both of these modeling techniques give promising results and are a significant improvement over earlier efforts.

  10. High-temperature dehydration of talc: a kinetics study using in situ X-ray powder diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Duojun; Yi, Li; Huang, Bojin; Liu, Chuanjiang

    2015-06-01

    High-temperature in situ X-ray powder diffraction patterns were used to study the dehydration kinetics of natural talc with a size of 10-15 µm. The talc was annealed from 1073 to 1223 K, and the variations in the characteristic peaks corresponding to talc with the time were recorded to determine the reaction progress. The decomposition of talc occurred, and peaks corresponding to talc and peaks corresponding to enstatite and quartz were observed. The enstatite and talc exhibited a topotactic relationship. The dehydration kinetics of talc was studied as a function of temperature between 1073 and 1223 K. The kinetics data could be modeled using an Avrami equation that considers nucleation and growth processes ? where n varies from 0.4 to 0.8. The rate constant (k) equation for the natural talc is ? The reaction mechanism for the dehydration of talc is a heterogeneous nucleation and growth mechanism.

  11. Study of heavy flavored particles. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    This report discusses progress on the following topics: time-of- flight system; charmed baryon production and decays; D decays to baryons; measurement of sigma plus particles magnetic moments; and strong interaction coupling. (LSP)

  12. Kinetic studies of microinstabilities in toroidal plasmas: Simulation and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.W.; Haham, T.S.; Parker, S.E.; Perkins, F.W.; Rath, S.; Rewoldt, G.; Reynders, J.V.W.; Santoro, R.A.; Tang, W.M.

    1992-12-01

    A comprehensive program for the development and use of particle simulation techniques for solving the gyrokinetic Vlasov-Maxwell equations on massively parallel computers has been carried out at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. This is a key element of our ongoing theoretical efforts to systematically investigate physics issues vital to understanding tokamak plasmas. In this paper, our focus is on spatial-gradient-driven microinstabilities. Their importance is supported by the recent progress in achieving a physics-based understanding of anomalous transport in toroidal systems which has been based on the proposition that these drift-type electrostatic modes dependent on ion temperature gradient (ITG) and trapped particle effects are dominant in the bulk ( confinement'') region. Although their presence is consistent with a number of significant confinement trends, results from high temperature tokamaks such as TFTR have highlighted the need for better insight into the nonlinear properties of such instabilities in long-mean-free-path plasmas. In addressing this general issue, we report important new results including (i) the first fully toroidal 3D gyrokinetic simulation of ITG modes and (ii) realistic toroidal eigenmode calculations demonstrating the unique capability to deal with large scale kinetic behavior extending over many rational surfaces. The effects of ITG modes (iii) on the inward pinch of impurities in 3D slab geometry and (iv) on the existence of microtearing modes in 2D slab are also discussed. Finally, (v) sheared toroidal flow effects on trapped-particle modes are presented.

  13. Kinetic studies of microinstabilities in toroidal plasmas: Simulation and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.W.; Haham, T.S.; Parker, S.E.; Perkins, F.W.; Rath, S.; Rewoldt, G.; Reynders, J.V.W.; Santoro, R.A.; Tang, W.M.

    1992-12-01

    A comprehensive program for the development and use of particle simulation techniques for solving the gyrokinetic Vlasov-Maxwell equations on massively parallel computers has been carried out at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. This is a key element of our ongoing theoretical efforts to systematically investigate physics issues vital to understanding tokamak plasmas. In this paper, our focus is on spatial-gradient-driven microinstabilities. Their importance is supported by the recent progress in achieving a physics-based understanding of anomalous transport in toroidal systems which has been based on the proposition that these drift-type electrostatic modes dependent on ion temperature gradient (ITG) and trapped particle effects are dominant in the bulk (``confinement``) region. Although their presence is consistent with a number of significant confinement trends, results from high temperature tokamaks such as TFTR have highlighted the need for better insight into the nonlinear properties of such instabilities in long-mean-free-path plasmas. In addressing this general issue, we report important new results including (i) the first fully toroidal 3D gyrokinetic simulation of ITG modes and (ii) realistic toroidal eigenmode calculations demonstrating the unique capability to deal with large scale kinetic behavior extending over many rational surfaces. The effects of ITG modes (iii) on the inward pinch of impurities in 3D slab geometry and (iv) on the existence of microtearing modes in 2D slab are also discussed. Finally, (v) sheared toroidal flow effects on trapped-particle modes are presented.

  14. Reactivity of organic micropollutants with ozone: A kinetic study

    SciTech Connect

    Brambilla, A.; Bolzacchini, E.; Meinardi, S.

    1995-12-01

    Studies about the chemical reactivity of compounds widely used in the environment are needed. The chemical reactivity of triazines (simazine, atrazine, terbutylazine) and phenylureas (linuron and diuron) was studied. The kinetics of the oxidation of the triazines and phenylureas with ozone at pH 3 and the kinetics of the saturation of the solution with ozone were evaluated. These data may be useful for the prediction of the persistency of these compuonds in the environment and for the treatment of wastewaters contaminated with these compounds. The solution was presaturated with ozone before the addition of the substrate, and the reaction constants for the pseudo first order kinetics -d[substrate]/dt = k{sub app} [substrate] at 298{degree}K were obtained, assuming a steady state concentration of ozone of 1.91 10{sup -4} mol L{sup -1} for the phenylureas and of 3.03 10{sup -4} and L{sup -1} for the triazines. The data obtained were: atrazine k = 6.86 (L mol{sup -1}s{sup -1}); simazine: 9.26; t-butylazine 7.26; linuron 11.00; diuron 43.90. The activation parameters for the reaction of simazine were {Delta}H{sup =} = 9.35 kcal mol{sup -1} and {Delta}S{sup =} = -22.3 cal mol{sup -1} {degree}K{sup -1} and for the reaction of diuron were {Delta}H{sup =} = 16.83 Kcal mol{sup -1}, {Delta}S{sup =} = 5.696 cal mol{sup -1} {degree}K{sup -1}.

  15. Kinetic studies of the hydroxyl radical reaction with PAHs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananthula, Rajeshwar

    An existing quartz optical reactor heating system was designed to permit higher temperature kinetic measurements more closely associated with post-combuston conditions (up to 1200 K). A pulsed laser photolysis/pulsed laser-induced fluorescence (PLP/PLIF) technique was then applied with this modified reactor to study the OH radical kinetics with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The kinetics of the reaction of a surrogate three-ring PAH, anthracene (and its deuterated form) with hydroxyl (OH) radicals was investigated over the temperature range of 373 to 1200 K. This study represents the first examination of the OH kinetics for this class of reactions at elevated temperatures (>470 K). The results indicate a complex temperature dependence similar to that observed for simpler aromatic compounds, e.g., benzene. At low temperatures (373-498 K), the rate measurements exhibited Arrhenius behavior (1.82 x 10-11 exp(542.35/T) in units of cm3 molecule -1 s-1) and kinetic isotope effect (KIE) measurements were consistent with an OH addition mechanism. The low temperature results are extrapolated to atmospheric temperatures and compared with previous measurements. Rate measurements between 673 and 923 K exhibited a sharp decrease in the magnitude of the rate coefficients (a factor of 9). KIE measurements under these conditions were still consistent with an OH addition mechanism. The following modified Arrhenius equation is the best fit to our anthracene measurements between 373 and 923 K, 8.17 x 1014 T-8.3 exp(-3171.71/T) (in units of cm3 molecule-1 s-1). For a limited temperature range between 1000 and 1200 K, the rate measurements exhibited an apparent positive temperature dependence with the following Arrhenius equation the best fit to the data, 2.18 x 10-11*exp(-1734.11/T) (in units of cm3molecule-1s -1). KIE measurements above 999 K were slightly larger than unity, but inclusive regarding the mechanism of the reaction. Theoretical calculations of the KIE indicate

  16. Kinetics study on biomass pyrolysis for fuel gas production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guan-Yi; Fang, Meng-Xiang; Andries, J; Luo, Zhong-Yang; Spliethoff, H; Cen, Ke-Fa

    2003-01-01

    Kinetic knowledge is of great importance in achieving good control of the pyrolysis and gasification process and optimising system design. An overall kinetic pyrolysis scheme is therefore addressed here. The kinetic modelling incorporates the following basic steps: the degradation of the virgin biomass materials into primary products (tar, gas and semi-char), the decomposition of primary tar into secondary products and the continuous interaction between primary gas and char. The last step is disregarded completely by models in the literature. Analysis and comparison of predicted results from different kinetic schemes and experimental data on our fixed bed pyrolyser yielded very positive evidence to support our kinetic scheme. PMID:12861621

  17. Experimental and Kinetic Modeling Study of 2-Methyl-2-Butene: Allylic Hydrocarbon Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, Charles K; Pitz, William J; Mehl, Marco; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Herbinet, Olivier; Bax, Sarah; Battin-Leclerc, Frederique; Mathieu, Olivier; Petersen, Eric L; Bugler, John; Curran, Henry J

    2015-07-16

    Two experimental studies have been carried out on the oxidation of 2-methyl-2-butene, one measuring ignition delay times behind reflected shock waves in a stainless steel shock tube, and the other measuring fuel, intermediate, and product species mole fractions in a jet-stirred reactor (JSR). The shock tube ignition experiments were carried out at three different pressures, approximately 1.7, 11.2, and 31 atm, and at each pressure, fuel-lean (ϕ = 0.5), stoichiometric (ϕ = 1.0), and fuel-rich (ϕ = 2.0) mixtures were examined, with each fuel/oxygen mixture diluted in 99% Ar, for initial postshock temperatures between 1330 and 1730 K. The JSR experiments were performed at nearly atmospheric pressure (800 Torr), with stoichiometric fuel/oxygen mixtures with 0.01 mole fraction of 2M2B fuel, a residence time in the reactor of 1.5 s, and mole fractions of 36 different chemical species were measured over a temperature range from 600 to 1150 K. These JSR experiments represent the first such study reporting detailed species measurements for an unsaturated, branched hydrocarbon fuel larger than iso-butene. A detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism was developed to study the important reaction pathways in these experiments, with particular attention on the role played by allylic C-H bonds and allylic pentenyl radicals. The results show that, at high temperatures, this olefinic fuel reacts rapidly, similar to related alkane fuels, but the pronounced thermal stability of the allylic pentenyl species inhibits low temperature reactivity, so 2M2B does not produce "cool flames" or negative temperature coefficient behavior. The connections between olefin hydrocarbon fuels, resulting allylic fuel radicals, the resulting lack of low-temperature reactivity, and the gasoline engine concept of octane sensitivity are discussed. PMID:25822578

  18. New techniques for positron emission tomography in the study of human neurological disorders. Progress report, June 1990--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1993-06-01

    This progress report describes accomplishments of four programs. The four programs are entitled (1) Faster,simpler processing of positron-computing precursors: New physicochemical approaches, (2) Novel solid phase reagents and methods to improve radiosynthesis and isotope production, (3) Quantitative evaluation of the extraction of information from PET images, and (4) Optimization of tracer kinetic methods for radioligand studies in PET.

  19. Lipase-catalyzed ethanolysis of borage oil: a kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Torres, Carlos F; Hill, Charles G; Otero, Cristina

    2004-01-01

    Ethanolysis of borage oil catalyzed by two commercial lipases (from Pseudomonas cepacia and Candida antarctica) was studied using two different methodologies. Multiresponse models derived from a generalized Michaelis-Menten mechanism were utilized to describe the rates of formation of ethyl esters of the primary fatty acids present in the precursor oil. The relative rate constants determined for each of the fatty acid residues indicated that both lipases discriminate against release of gamma-linolenic acid residues under the reaction conditions studied. However, both lipases also released some of the residues located at the sn-2 position, indicating that for the experimental conditions studied, both lipases are nonspecific. Moreover, inactivation of Novozym 435 was rapid. Because the half-life of this enzyme (ca. 2.2 h) is comparable to the half-life of the reaction, the intrinsic reaction rate and enzyme deactivation must both be considered in modeling the kinetics. PMID:15176879

  20. Orszag Tang vortex - Kinetic study of a turbulent plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Parashar, T. N.; Servidio, S.; Shay, M. A.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Cassak, P. A.

    2010-03-25

    Kinetic evolution of the Orszag-Tang vortex is studied using collisionless hybrid simulations based on particle in cell ions and fluid electrons. In magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) this configuration leads rapidly to broadband turbulence. An earlier study estimated the dissipation in the system. A comparison of MHD and hybrid simulations showed similar behavior at large scales but substantial differences at small scales. The hybrid magnetic energy spectrum shows a break at the scale where Hall term in the Ohm's law becomes important. The protons heat perpendicularly and most of the energy is dissipated through magnetic interactions. Here, the space time structure of the system is studied using frequency-wavenumber (k-omega) decomposition. No clear resonances appear, ruling out the cyclotron resonances as a likely candidate for the perpendicular heating. The only distinguishable wave modes present, which constitute a small percentage of total energy, are magnetosonic modes.

  1. Reduction of Carbon Dioxide by a Molybdenum-Containing Formate Dehydrogenase: A Kinetic and Mechanistic Study.

    PubMed

    Maia, Luisa B; Fonseca, Luis; Moura, Isabel; Moura, José J G

    2016-07-20

    Carbon dioxide accumulation is a major concern for the ecosystems, but its abundance and low cost make it an interesting source for the production of chemical feedstocks and fuels. However, the thermodynamic and kinetic stability of the carbon dioxide molecule makes its activation a challenging task. Studying the chemistry used by nature to functionalize carbon dioxide should be helpful for the development of new efficient (bio)catalysts for atmospheric carbon dioxide utilization. In this work, the ability of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans formate dehydrogenase (Dd FDH) to reduce carbon dioxide was kinetically and mechanistically characterized. The Dd FDH is suggested to be purified in an inactive form that has to be activated through a reduction-dependent mechanism. A kinetic model of a hysteretic enzyme is proposed to interpret and predict the progress curves of the Dd FDH-catalyzed reactions (initial lag phase and subsequent faster phase). Once activated, Dd FDH is able to efficiently catalyze, not only the formate oxidation (kcat of 543 s(-1), Km of 57.1 μM), but also the carbon dioxide reduction (kcat of 46.6 s(-1), Km of 15.7 μM), in an overall reaction that is thermodynamically and kinetically reversible. Noteworthy, both Dd FDH-catalyzed formate oxidation and carbon dioxide reduction are completely inactivated by cyanide. Current FDH reaction mechanistic proposals are discussed and a different mechanism is here suggested: formate oxidation and carbon dioxide reduction are proposed to proceed through hydride transfer and the sulfo group of the oxidized and reduced molybdenum center, Mo(6+)═S and Mo(4+)-SH, are suggested to be the direct hydride acceptor and donor, respectively. PMID:27348246

  2. Large-scale epitaxial growth kinetics of graphene: A kinetic Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Huijun; Hou, Zhonghuai

    2015-08-28

    Epitaxial growth via chemical vapor deposition is considered to be the most promising way towards synthesizing large area graphene with high quality. However, it remains a big theoretical challenge to reveal growth kinetics with atomically energetic and large-scale spatial information included. Here, we propose a minimal kinetic Monte Carlo model to address such an issue on an active catalyst surface with graphene/substrate lattice mismatch, which facilitates us to perform large scale simulations of the growth kinetics over two dimensional surface with growth fronts of complex shapes. A geometry-determined large-scale growth mechanism is revealed, where the rate-dominating event is found to be C{sub 1}-attachment for concave growth-front segments and C{sub 5}-attachment for others. This growth mechanism leads to an interesting time-resolved growth behavior which is well consistent with that observed in a recent scanning tunneling microscopy experiment.

  3. Kinetic Study of [2]Pseudorotaxane Formation with an Asymmetrical Thread.

    PubMed

    Quiroga, Miguel; Parajó, Mercedes; Rodríguez-Dafonte, Pedro; García-Río, Luis

    2016-06-28

    Kinetic and thermodynamic studies on cyclodextrin (CD)-based [2]pseudorotaxane formation have been carried out by a combination of NMR and calorimetric techniques using bolaform surfactants as axles. Experimental evidence of the formation of an external complex between the trimethylammonium head groups of the axle and the external hydrogen atoms of α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) is reported. Inclusion of this external complex in the reaction pathway allows us to explain the kinetic behavior as well as the nonlinear dependence of the observed rate constant on CD concentrations. The equilibrium constant for [2]pseudorotaxane formation is strongly affected by the spacer length of the axle. This effect is a consequence of increasing rotaxane stability because the threading rate constant is almost independent of the spacer length, but dethreading strongly decreases on increasing the axle size. Using a nonsymmetrical axle with tripropyl and trimethylammonium cations precludes CD threading by the large head side. CDs will thread this asymmetrical bolaform by both their wide and narrow sides, yielding two isomeric [2]pseudorotaxanes. Threading by the wide side of the CD is 60% more favorable than that by the narrow one, but dethreading rate constants are the same for both isomers. PMID:27232769

  4. Pulsed laser kinetic studies of liquids under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Eyring, E.M.

    1991-11-25

    A high pressure apparatus constructed for measuring the rates of reactions in liquids under pressures ranging from 1 atm to 2000 atm has been used to measure the complexation kinetics of molybdenum hexacarbonyl reacting with 2,2-bipyridine, 4,4{prime}-dimethyl-2-2{prime}-bipyridine and 4,4{prime}-diphenyl-2-2{prime} bipyridine in toluene. Pentacarbonyl reaction intermediates are created by a 10 nsec flash of frequency tripled Nd:YAG laser light. Measured activation volumes for chelate ligand ring closure indicate a change in mechanism from associative interchange to dissociative interchange as steric hindrance increases. A similar high pressure kinetics study of molybdenum carbonyl complexation by several substituted phenanthrolines is now well advanced that indicates that with the more rigid phenanthroline ligands steric effects from bulky substituents have less effect on the ring closure mechanism than in the case of the bipyridine ligands. An experimental concentration dependence of the fluorescence quantum yield of cresyl violet has been harmonized with previously published contradictory reports. Fluorescence of cresyl violet in various solvents and in micellar systems has also been systematically explored.

  5. Kinetic Batch Soil Adsorption Studies of 2, 4-dinitroanisole (DNAN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, J.; Mark, N. W.; Taylor, S.; Brusseau, M. L.; Dontsova, K.

    2014-12-01

    Currently the explosive 2, 4, 6- trinitrotoluene (TNT) is used as a main ingredient in munitions; however the compound has failed to meet sensitivity requirements. The replacement compound being tested is 2, 4-dinitroanisole (DNAN). DNAN is less sensitive to shock, high temperatures, and has good detonation characteristics. However, DNAN is more soluble than TNT, which can influence transport and fate behavior and thus bioavailability and exposure potential. DNAN has been shown to have some human and environmental toxicity. The objective of this study was to investigate the environmental fate of DNAN in soil, with a specific focus on sorption processes. Batch experiments were conducted using 11 soils collected from military installations located across the United States. The soils were characterized for pH, specific surface area, electrical conductivity, cation exchange capacity, and organic carbon content. Adsorption kinetic data determined at room temperature were fitted using the first order kinetic equation. Adsorption isotherms were fitted with linear and Freundlich isotherm equations. The magnitudes of the linear adsorption coefficients ranged from 0.6 to 6 cm3/g. Results indicated that the adsorption of DNAN is strongly dependent on the amount of organic carbon present in the soil.

  6. Hydrodynamic shock wave studies within a kinetic Monte Carlo approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagert, Irina; Bauer, Wolfgang; Colbry, Dirk; Howell, Jim; Pickett, Rodney; Staber, Alec; Strother, Terrance

    2014-06-01

    We introduce a massively parallelized test-particle based kinetic Monte Carlo code that is capable of modeling the phase space evolution of an arbitrarily sized system that is free to move in and out of the continuum limit. Our code combines advantages of the DSMC and the Point of Closest Approach techniques for solving the collision integral. With that, it achieves high spatial accuracy in simulations of large particle systems while maintaining computational feasibility. Using particle mean free paths which are small with respect to the characteristic length scale of the simulated system, we reproduce hydrodynamic behavior. To demonstrate that our code can retrieve continuum solutions, we perform a test-suite of classic hydrodynamic shock problems consisting of the Sod, the Noh, and the Sedov tests. We find that the results of our simulations which apply millions of test-particles match the analytic solutions well. In addition, we take advantage of the ability of kinetic codes to describe matter out of the continuum regime when applying large particle mean free paths. With that, we study and compare the evolution of shock waves in the hydrodynamic limit and in a regime which is not reachable by hydrodynamic codes.

  7. Pyrolysis of microalgae residues--A kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Bui, Hau-Huu; Tran, Khanh-Quang; Chen, Wei-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    Pyrolysis of residues from the oil extraction process of two types of microalgae, Chlamydomonas (C. sp. JSC4) and Chlorella sorokiniana (C. Sorokiniana CY1) was studied by means of a thermogravimetric analyzer. Five pseudo-components (hemicellulose, cellulose, lignin, lipid and protein) model with n=1 or n#1 was assumed for a kinetic analysis of the collected pyrolysis data. The model with n#1 resulted in a slightly better fit quality and reasonable kinetic parameters. The calculated activation energy of hemicellulose, cellulose, lignin, lipid, protein was 115.12-117.12 kJ/mol, 181.67-198.30 kJ/mol, 61.74-62.75 kJ/mol, 104.93-114.14 kJ/mol and 90.75-99.31 kJ/mol, respectively, for C. sp. JSC4; and 113.12-117.12 kJ/mol, 218.73-28.79 kJ/mol, 64.77-66.39 kJ/mol, 131.97-143.63 kJ/mol and 108.03-118.13 kJ/mol, respectively, for C. Sorokiniana CY1. PMID:26342785

  8. Biosorption of uranium by melanin: kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Saini, Amardeep Singh; Melo, Jose Savio

    2013-12-01

    Limitation of conventional techniques for the removal of heavy metals present at low concentrations, has led to the need for developing alternate technologies like biosorption. In the present study we describe the use of melanin pigment synthesized through green technology, for sorption of uranium from aqueous system. Biosynthesized melanin showed good uptake over a broad pH range. Removal of uranium was rapid and equilibrium was reached within 2h of contact. It was observed that the kinetic data fits well into Lagergren's pseudo-second order equation. A maximum loading capacity of 588.24 mg g(-1) was calculated from Langmuir plot. Thermodynamic studies performed revealed that sorption process was favorable. Binding of uranium on the surface of melanin was confirmed by FT-IR and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Thus, biosynthesized melanin can be efficiently used as a sorbent for removal of uranium from aqueous solution. PMID:24099972

  9. Radiochemical study of the kinetics of crystal growth in gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecal, Alexandru; Palamaru, Mircea; Juverdeanu, Anca; Giosan, Marcel

    1996-01-01

    A kinetic study was performed on nucleation and growth of crystals containing radioactive ions in gelatin and agar gels. The investigated crystals were: 60CoHPO 4, 60CoS, 60Co(OH) 2, 60Co(SCN) 2, 204Tl(OH) 3, and 204Tl[(C 2H 5) 2NCS 2] 3. The study shows that the crystal growth rate depends on the cation size and charge, the nature of anion as well as on the colloidal medium. The crystallisation process in the gel has two distinctive steps: diffusion of reactant ions in the gel followed by a chemical reaction which leads to nucleation of the crystal. Both steps are described quantitatively.

  10. Kinetic Study of the Combustion of Phosphorus Containing Species

    SciTech Connect

    Glaude, P.A.; Curran, H.J.; Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K.

    1999-10-22

    The combustion of organophosphorus compounds is of great interest for the incineration of chemical warfare agent and their use in flame inhibition as halon replacement. The thermochemical data of these species and the reactions involved at high temperature are not well known, despite some recent experimental studies. With BAC-MP4 ab initio estimations as a basis and semi-empirical estimations for many new compounds, the thermochemistry of organophosphorus compounds is studied. New group additivity values are proposed for enthalpies of formation at 298K, entropies and heat capacities of species involving pentavalent phosphorus bonded to carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, fluorine, nitrogen and sulfur atoms. The kinetic of unimolecular elimination is investigated by modeling pyrolysis experiments of DEMP, TEP and DIMP. A new combustion mechanism is described and applied to the modeling of DMMP reaction in a H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} flame.

  11. Pulsed laser kinetic studies of liquids under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Eyring, E.M.

    1992-09-22

    A laser flash photolysis kinetic study of 2,2{prime}-bipyridine bidentate chelating ligands with one claw in the first coordination sphere of a molybdenum carbonyl complex has been completed at pressures up to 150 MPa. The reaction mechanism for thermal ring closure is found from activation volumes to change from associative interchange to dissociative interchange as substituents on the 2,2{prime}-bipyridine ligands become bulkier. In a similar study of more rigid, substituted phenanthroline bidentate ligands it was found that substituent bulkiness had little effect on the thermal ring closure mechanism. Stability constants for lithium ion complexes with crown ethers in a room temperature molten salt, fluorescence quantum yields for cresyl violet and several other dyes in solution, and the oxidation of alcohols by OsO{sub 4} have also been investigated.

  12. Progress in studying scintillator proportionality: Phenomenological model

    SciTech Connect

    Bizarri, Gregory; Cherepy, Nerine; Choong, Woon-Seng; Hull, Giulia; Moses, William; Payne, Sephen; Singh, Jai; Valentine, John; Vasilev, Andrey; Williams, Richard

    2009-04-30

    We present a model to describe the origin of non-proportional dependence of scintillator light yield on the energy of an ionizing particle. The non-proportionality is discussed in terms of energy relaxation channels and their linear and non-linear dependences on the deposited energy. In this approach, the scintillation response is described as a function of the deposited energy deposition and the kinetic rates of each relaxation channel. This mathematical framework allows both a qualitative interpretation and a quantitative fitting representation of scintillation non-proportionality response as function of kinetic rates. This method was successfully applied to thallium doped sodium iodide measured with SLYNCI, a new facility using the Compton coincidence technique. Finally, attention is given to the physical meaning of the dominant relaxation channels, and to the potential causes responsible for the scintillation non-proportionality. We find that thallium doped sodium iodide behaves as if non-proportionality is due to competition between radiative recombinations and non-radiative Auger processes.

  13. Personal Commitment, Support and Progress in Doctoral Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinsuo, Miia; Turkulainen, Virpi

    2011-01-01

    Earlier research on doctoral education has associated study progress with the student's own capabilities and faculty support. The purpose of this study is to investigate how students' personal commitment and various forms of support, as well as their complementary effects, explain progress in doctoral studies. Data were collected by a…

  14. [Experimental and kinetic modeling of acid/base and redox reactions over oxide catalysts]. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The research has involved the characterization of catalyst acidity, {sup 2}D NMR studies of Bronsted acid sites, and kinetic, calorimetric, and spectroscopic studies of methylamine synthesis and related reactions over acid catalysts. Approach of this work was to explore quantitative correlations between factors that control the generation, type, strength, and catalytic properties of acid sites on zeolite catalysts. Microcalorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, IR spectroscopy, and NMR spectroscopy have provided information about the nature and strength of acid sites in zeolites. This was vital in understanding the catalytic cycles involved in methylamine synthesis and related reactions over zeolite catalysts.

  15. Thermogravimetric kinetic study of agricultural residue biomass pyrolysis based on combined kinetics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xun; Hu, Mian; Hu, Wanyong; Chen, Zhihua; Liu, Shiming; Hu, Zhiquan; Xiao, Bo

    2016-11-01

    Pyrolytic kinetic of an agricultural residue (AR) feedstock, a mixture of plants (cotton, wheat, rich, corn) stems, was investigated based on combined kinetics. The most suitable mechanism for AR one-step pyrolysis was f(α)=(1-α)(1.1816)α(-1.8428) with kinetic parameters of: apparent activation energy 221.7kJ/mol, pre-exponential factor 4.17E16s(-1). Pyrolysis of AR feedstock could not be described by one-step reaction attributes to heterogeneous features of pyrolysis processes. Combined kinetics three-parallel-reaction (CK-TPR) model fitted the pyrolysis experimental data very well. Reaction mechanisms for pseudo hemicelluloses, cellulose, lignin in CK-TPR model was f(α)=(1-α)(1.6244)α(-0.3371)[-ln(1-α)](-0.0515), f(α)=(1-α)(1.0597)α(-0.6909)[-ln(1-α)](0.9026) and f(α)=(1-α)(2.9577)α(-4.7719), respectively. Apparent activation energy of three pseudo components followed the order of Elignin(197.3kJ/mol)>Ecellulose(176.3kJ/mol)>Ehemicelluloses (151.1kJ/mol). Mechanism of hemicelluloses pyrolysis could be further expressed as f(α)=(1-α)(1.4). The pyrolytic mechanism of cellulose met the Nucleation well. However, mechanism of lignin pyrolysis was complex, which possibly was the combined effects of Nucleation, Diffusion, Geometrical contraction, and Power law. PMID:27521788

  16. Coordination: southeast continental shelf studies. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, D.W.

    1981-02-01

    The objectives are to identify important physical, chemical and biological processes which affect the transfer of materials on the southeast continental shelf, determine important parameters which govern observed temporal and spatial varibility on the continental shelf, determine the extent and modes of coupling between events at the shelf break and nearshore, and determine physical, chemical and biological exchange rates on the inner shelf. Progress in meeting these research objectives is presented. (ACR)

  17. Kinetic Study of Denatonium Sorption to Smectite Clay Minerals

    PubMed Central

    Crosson, Garry S.; Sandmann, Emily

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The denatonium cation, as a benzoate salt, is the most bitter cation known to modern society and is frequently added to consumer products to reduce accidental and intentional consumption by humans and animals. Denatonium can enter the environment by accidental discharges, potentially rendering water supplies undrinkable. Interactions of denatonium with soil components (i.e., smectite minerals) ultimately control the environmental fate of denatonium, but the current literature is devoid of studies that evaluate denatonium sorption to smectite minerals. This study investigated the mechanism and kinetics of denatonium sorption to smectite clay minerals as a function of smectite type, temperature, pH and ionic strength. Uptake by synthetic mica montmorillonite (Syn-1), Wyoming montmorillonite (SWy-2), and Texas montmorillonite (STx-1b) at 305K was rapid, with equilibrium being reached within 2 min for all clays. Complete removal of denatonium was observed for STx-1b at pH 6.9, while partial removal was observed for Syn-1 and SWy-2. Kinetic behavior of SWy-2 and Syn-1 is consistent with a pseudo–second-order model at 305K. An activation energy of +25.9 kJ/mol was obtained for sorption to Syn-1 and was independent of temperature between 286K and 338K. Activation-free energy (ΔG*), activation enthalpy (ΔH*), and activation entropy (ΔS*) for Syn-1 were found to be +62.91 kJ/mol, +23.36 kJ/mol, and −0.130 kJ/(K·mol), respectively. Sorption capacities at pH 3.6, 6.9, and 8.2 were constant at 1.3×10−2 g denatonium/g clay; however, the kinetic rate constant increased by 56%, going from acidic to basic solution conditions. Distribution coefficients were negatively correlated with ionic strength, suggesting cation exchange. Collectively, results suggested that smectite minerals can serve as efficient sinks for denatonium cations. This is much-needed information for agencies developing regulations regarding denatonium usage and for water treatment

  18. Kinetic Study of Denatonium Sorption to Smectite Clay Minerals.

    PubMed

    Crosson, Garry S; Sandmann, Emily

    2013-06-01

    The denatonium cation, as a benzoate salt, is the most bitter cation known to modern society and is frequently added to consumer products to reduce accidental and intentional consumption by humans and animals. Denatonium can enter the environment by accidental discharges, potentially rendering water supplies undrinkable. Interactions of denatonium with soil components (i.e., smectite minerals) ultimately control the environmental fate of denatonium, but the current literature is devoid of studies that evaluate denatonium sorption to smectite minerals. This study investigated the mechanism and kinetics of denatonium sorption to smectite clay minerals as a function of smectite type, temperature, pH and ionic strength. Uptake by synthetic mica montmorillonite (Syn-1), Wyoming montmorillonite (SWy-2), and Texas montmorillonite (STx-1b) at 305K was rapid, with equilibrium being reached within 2 min for all clays. Complete removal of denatonium was observed for STx-1b at pH 6.9, while partial removal was observed for Syn-1 and SWy-2. Kinetic behavior of SWy-2 and Syn-1 is consistent with a pseudo-second-order model at 305K. An activation energy of +25.9 kJ/mol was obtained for sorption to Syn-1 and was independent of temperature between 286K and 338K. Activation-free energy (ΔG*), activation enthalpy (ΔH*), and activation entropy (ΔS*) for Syn-1 were found to be +62.91 kJ/mol, +23.36 kJ/mol, and -0.130 kJ/(K·mol), respectively. Sorption capacities at pH 3.6, 6.9, and 8.2 were constant at 1.3×10(-2) g denatonium/g clay; however, the kinetic rate constant increased by 56%, going from acidic to basic solution conditions. Distribution coefficients were negatively correlated with ionic strength, suggesting cation exchange. Collectively, results suggested that smectite minerals can serve as efficient sinks for denatonium cations. This is much-needed information for agencies developing regulations regarding denatonium usage and for water treatment professionals who may

  19. Kinetic studies of interfacial photocurrents in platinized chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.

    1992-12-01

    The present experiments focus on kinetic studies of phototocurrents generated in a photobioelectrochemical cell constructed from platinized chloroplast membranes. These chloroplast membranes although separated from the CO{sub 2}-reducing enzymes of the Calvin-Benson cycle, contain the full complement of photosystem I and II reaction centers along with the electron transport chain linking these two centers. The vectorial model of photosynthesis indicates that the orientation of the reaction centers in the photosynthetic membranes is such that electrons emerge from the membranes into the stroma region of the chloroplasts. Since the flattened saclike vesicles of the thylakoid membranes are topologically equivalent to spheres, it follows that, irrespective of the rotational orientation of the membranes, the photogenerated electrons emerge from the reaction centers in a radial direction away from the intra-thylakoid region.

  20. Kinetic study of lead adsorption to composite biopolymer adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Seki, H.; Suzuki, A.

    1999-03-15

    A kinetic study of lead adsorption to composite biopolymer adsorbents was carried out. Spherical and membranous adsorbents containing two biopolymers, humic acid and alginic acid, were used for lead adsorption in dilute acidic solutions. The shrinking core model derived by M.G. Rao and A.K. Gupta was applied to describe the rate process of lead adsorption to spherical adsorbents (average radii of 0.12, 0.15, and 0.16 cm). Furthermore, the shrinking core model was modified and adapted for description of the rate process of lead adsorption to membranous adsorbent (average thickness of 0.0216 cm). The adsorption rate process for both the cases was well described and average apparent lead diffusion coefficients of about 6 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} and 7 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} cm{sup 2}/s were found for the spherical and membranous adsorbents, respectively.

  1. Kinetic Study of Lead Adsorption to Composite Biopolymer Adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Seki; Suzuki

    1999-03-15

    A kinetic study of lead adsorption to composite biopolymer adsorbents was carried out. Spherical and membranous adsorbents containing two biopolymers, humic acid and alginic acid, were used for lead adsorption in dilute acidic solutions. The shrinking core model derived by M. G. Rao and A. K. Gupta (Chem. Eng. J. 24, 181, 1982) was applied to describe the rate process of lead adsorption to spherical adsorbents (average radii of 0.12, 0.15, and 0.16 cm). Furthermore, the shrinking core model was modified and adapted for description of the rate process of lead adsorption to membranous adsorbent (average thickness of 0.0216 cm). The adsorption rate process for the both cases was well described and average apparent lead diffusion coefficients of about 6 x 10(-6) and 7 x 10(-6) cm2 s-1 were found for the spherical and membranous adsorbents, respectively. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:10049553

  2. An Experimental and Kinetic Modeling Study of Methyl Decanoate Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Sarathy, S M; Thomson, M J; Pitz, W J; Lu, T

    2010-02-19

    Biodiesel is typically a mixture of long chain fatty acid methyl esters for use in compression ignition engines. Improving biofuel engine performance requires understanding its fundamental combustion properties and the pathways of combustion. This research study presents new combustion data for methyl decanoate in an opposed-flow diffusion flame. An improved detailed chemical kinetic model for methyl decanoate combustion is developed, which serves as the basis for deriving a skeletal mechanism via the direct relation graph method. The novel skeletal mechanism consists of 648 species and 2998 reactions. This mechanism well predicts the methyl decanoate opposed-flow diffusion flame data. The results from the flame simulations indicate that methyl decanoate is consumed via abstraction of hydrogen atoms to produce fuel radicals, which lead to the production of alkenes. The ester moiety in methyl decanoate leads to the formation of low molecular weight oxygenated compounds such as carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, and ketene.

  3. Cross-metathesis of polynorbornene with polyoctenamer: a kinetic study

    PubMed Central

    Denisova, Yulia I; Gringolts, Maria L; Peregudov, Alexander S; Krentsel, Liya B; Litmanovich, Ekaterina A; Litmanovich, Arkadiy D; Finkelshtein, Eugene Sh

    2015-01-01

    Summary The cross-metathesis of polynorbornene and polyoctenamer in d-chloroform mediated by the 1st generation Grubbs’ catalyst Cl2(PCy3)2Ru=CHPh is studied by monitoring the kinetics of carbene transformation and evolution of the dyad composition of polymer chains with in situ 1H and ex situ 13C NMR spectroscopy. The results are interpreted in terms of a simple kinetic two-stage model. At the first stage of the reaction all Ru-benzylidene carbenes are transformed into Ru-polyoctenamers within an hour, while the polymer molar mass is considerably decreased. The second stage actually including interpolymeric reactions proceeds much slower and takes one day or more to achieve a random copolymer of norbornene and cyclooctene. Its rate is limited by the interaction of polyoctenamer-bound carbenes with polynorbornene units, which is hampered, presumably due to steric reasons. Polynorbornene-bound carbenes are detected in very low concentrations throughout the whole process thus indicating their higher reactivity, as compared with the polyoctenamer-bound ones. Macroscopic homogeneity of the reacting media is proved by dynamic light scattering from solutions containing the polymer mixture and its components. In general, the studied process can be considered as a new way to unsaturated multiblock statistical copolymers. Their structure can be controlled by the amount of catalyst, mixture composition, and reaction time. It is remarkable that this goal can be achieved with a catalyst that is not suitable for ring-opening metathesis copolymerization of norbornene and cis-cyclooctene because of their substantially different monomer reactivities. PMID:26664599

  4. Cross-metathesis of polynorbornene with polyoctenamer: a kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Denisova, Yulia I; Gringolts, Maria L; Peregudov, Alexander S; Krentsel, Liya B; Litmanovich, Ekaterina A; Litmanovich, Arkadiy D; Finkelshtein, Eugene Sh; Kudryavtsev, Yaroslav V

    2015-01-01

    The cross-metathesis of polynorbornene and polyoctenamer in d-chloroform mediated by the 1(st) generation Grubbs' catalyst Cl2(PCy3)2Ru=CHPh is studied by monitoring the kinetics of carbene transformation and evolution of the dyad composition of polymer chains with in situ (1)H and ex situ (13)C NMR spectroscopy. The results are interpreted in terms of a simple kinetic two-stage model. At the first stage of the reaction all Ru-benzylidene carbenes are transformed into Ru-polyoctenamers within an hour, while the polymer molar mass is considerably decreased. The second stage actually including interpolymeric reactions proceeds much slower and takes one day or more to achieve a random copolymer of norbornene and cyclooctene. Its rate is limited by the interaction of polyoctenamer-bound carbenes with polynorbornene units, which is hampered, presumably due to steric reasons. Polynorbornene-bound carbenes are detected in very low concentrations throughout the whole process thus indicating their higher reactivity, as compared with the polyoctenamer-bound ones. Macroscopic homogeneity of the reacting media is proved by dynamic light scattering from solutions containing the polymer mixture and its components. In general, the studied process can be considered as a new way to unsaturated multiblock statistical copolymers. Their structure can be controlled by the amount of catalyst, mixture composition, and reaction time. It is remarkable that this goal can be achieved with a catalyst that is not suitable for ring-opening metathesis copolymerization of norbornene and cis-cyclooctene because of their substantially different monomer reactivities. PMID:26664599

  5. Tissue cholinesterases. A comparative study of their kinetic properties.

    PubMed

    Dave, K R; Syal, A R; Katyare, S S

    2000-01-01

    The substrate saturation and temperature-dependent kinetic properties of soluble and membrane-bound forms of acetylcholinestarase (AChE) from brain and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) from heart and liver were examined. In simultaneous studies these parameters were also measured for AChE in erythrocyte membranes and for BChE in the serum from rat and humans. For both soluble and membrane-bound forms of the enzyme from the three tissues, two components were discernible. In the brain, Km of component I (high affinity) and component II (low affinity) was somewhat higher in membrane-bound form than that of the soluble form components, while the Vmax values were significantly higher by about five fold. In the heart, Km of component II was lower in membrane-bound form than in the soluble form, while Vmax for both the components was about four to six fold higher in the membrane-bound form. In the liver, Vmax was marginally higher for the two components of the membrane-bound enzyme; the Km only of component I was higher by a factor of 2. In the rat erythrocyte membranes three components of AChE were present showing increasing values of Km and Vmax. In contrast, in the human erythrocyte membranes only two components could be detected; the one corresponding to component II of rat erythrocyte membranes was absent. In the rat serum two components of BChE were present while the human serum was found to possess three components. Component I of the human serum was missing in the rat serum. Temperature kinetics studies revealed that the Arrhenius plots were biphasic for most of the systems except for human serum. Membrane binding of the enzyme resulted in decreased energy of activation with shift in phase transition temperature (Tt) to near physiological temperature. PMID:10739108

  6. Kinetic studies on the tensile state of water in trees.

    PubMed

    Tributsch, Helmut; Cermak, Jan; Nadezhdina, Nadezhda

    2005-09-22

    The solar-powered generation and turnover of tensile, cohesive water in trees is described as a kinetic phenomenon of irreversible thermodynamics. A molecular kinetic model for tensile water formation and turnover is presented, which is found to be mathematically equivalent with an autocatalytic reaction (Brusselator). It is also shown to be consistent with the van der Waals equation for real liquid-gas systems, which empirically considers intermolecular forces. It can therefore be used to explain both the irreversible thermodynamics and the kinetics of the tensile liquid state of water. A nonlinear bistable evaporation behavior of tensile water is predicted, which has not yet been experimentally characterized in trees. Conventional sap flow techniques in combination with infrared imaging of heat flow around a local heat source were used to study the dynamics and energetics of water transport of trees during the eclipse of August 11, 1999. The evaporative "pulling force" in a tree was demonstrated with infrared techniques and shown to respond within seconds. While the ambient temperature during the eclipse did not drop by more than 2 degrees C, evaporative water transport was reduced by a factor of up to 2-3. The expected hysteresis (with an up to 50% decrease in energy-conversion-related entropy production) was measured, reflecting a bistable mode of conversion of solar energy into tensile water flow. This nonlinear (autocatalytic) phenomenon, together with tensile molecular order, damped the oscillating behavior of xylem tensile water, and its occasional all-or-none rupture (cavitation) can thus be explained by the nonlinear nature of intermolecular forces active in the water conduit/parenchyma environment. This characterizes the physical chemistry and energetics of tensile water in trees as an active-solar-energy-driven self-organizing process. Water is handled in the form of microcanonical ensembles and transformed into a stretched, metastable icelike state

  7. Progress in the study of drug nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jing; Guo, Fei; Zheng, Aiping; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Sun, Jianxu

    2015-12-01

    The poor water solubility of many candidate drugs remains a major obstacle to their development and clinical use, especially for oral drug delivery. Nanocrystal technology can improve the solubility and dissolution rates of many poorly water-soluble drugs very effectively, significantly improving their oral bioavailability and decreasing the food effect. For this reason, this technology is becoming a key area of drug delivery research. This review presents much of the recent progress in nanocrystal drug pharmaceuticals, including the characteristics, composition, preparation technology, and clinical applications of these drugs. Finally, the effect of nanocrystal technology on insoluble drugs is quantified and described. PMID:26817271

  8. Research in chemical kinetics. Progress report, May 1, 1990--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, F.S.

    1992-12-31

    The following were studied: reactions of thermal {sup 38}Cl atoms (tests for heavy-atom blocking hypothesis with tetravinyl tin and the substrate reacted with {sup 38}Cl; reactions of thermal {sup 38}Cl with tetramethyl tin; reactions of thermal {sup 38}Cl with Si(CH{double_bond}CH{sub 2}){sub 4}[possible test for Si as a heavy -atom blocking agent in energy transfer]; rate constants for thermal {sup 38}Cl addition to olefinic positions), reactions of thermalized tritium atoms from nuclear recoil (thermal tritium atom addition to 3-chloropropene; thermal tritium atom reactions with propene; thermal tritium atom reactions with tetra-allyl tin and trimethylbutenyl tin), and hydrolysis of sulfur compounds in aqueous systems including the ocean (abstract only). Details of the research are reported in each section, except the latter; abstracts of published or submitted papers are also given.

  9. Energetics and kinetics of anaerobic aromatic and fatty acid degradation. Progress report, March 1992--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney M.J.

    1995-06-23

    Factors affecting the rate and extent of benzoate degradation by anaerobic syntrophic consortia were studied. Cocultures of a syntrophic benzoate degrader, strain SB, with a hydrogen/formate-using sulfate reducer degraded benzoate to a threshold that depended on the amount of substrate and acetate present. The benzoate threshold was not a function of the inhibition of benzoate degradation capacity by acetate or the toxicity of the undissociated form of acetate. Rather, a critical or minimal Gibb`s free energy value may exist where thermodynamic constraints preclude further benzoate degradation. A sensitive assay to detect low formate concentrations was developed to measure the formate levels when the benzoate threshold was reached. We showed that increased acetate concentrations, even when hydrogen and formate levels are low, affects the extent of benzoate degradation, implicating the importance of interspecies acetate transfer. In addition to benzoate, various saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, 2-methylbutyrate, and methyl esters of fatty acids supported growth in coculture with a hydrogen-using partner. SB is the only syntrophic bacterium known to use both benzoate and fatty acids. Phylogenetic analysis showed that SB clustered with sulfate reducers in the delta subclass of the Proteobacteria. SB grew well in coculture with Desulfoarculus baarsii, a sulfate reducer that uses formate but not hydrogen. This unequivocally shows that SB can grow by interspecies formate transfer.

  10. Experimental kinetic study of the smectite-to-illite transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuadros, J.; Linares, J.

    1996-02-01

    The <20 μm size fraction of a bentonite from the Serrata de Níjar deposit (Almería, southeastern Spain) was hydrothermally treated to study the kinetics of the smectite-to-illite transformation, in order to estimate the performance life of a bentonite barrier in a high level nuclear waste repository. The bentonite studied consisted of randomly interstratified illite/montmorillonite with 15% illite. Minor amounts of other minerals (3% quartz, plagioclase, and cristobalite) were also present. The run conditions of the hydrothermal treatments were combinations of the following variables: KCl concentration 0.025, 0.05, 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, and 1 mol L-1; temperature 60, 120, 175, and 200°C; time 1, 5, 15, 30, 90, and 180 days. The solid:solution ratio was 1:5. Pressures were those corresponding to water vapor. The solid reaction products were analyzed by means of XRD, DTA/TG, FTIR, and NMR. The final solutions were chemically analyzed for Si and exchange cations (K, Ca, Mg, and Na), and pH. XRD detected some transformation (up to 15%), while DTA/TG, FTIR, NMR, and exchange cation analysis did not show any appreciable transformation. This leads to the conclusion that analysis of the amount of illite in illite/smectite, in hydrothermally treated samples, by means of XRD can be inaccurate. Transformation to illite was observed, however, when aqueous silica concentrations were examined. These concentrations yielded the kinetic expression -dS/dt = kK1/4Sn, where S is the fraction of smectite in illite/smectite, t time, k the rate constant, and K potassium concentration in solution. The exact value for n could not be determined, although data from this and other studies suggest n > 1. The activation energy of the process is ˜7 kcal mol-1, suggesting a solid transformation mechanism. Based on these results, smectite seems to offer a safe barrier for nuclear waste.

  11. An improved pyrite pretreatment protocol for kinetic and isotopic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzoyan, Natella; Kamyshny, Alexey; Halevy, Itay

    2014-05-01

    An improved pyrite pretreatment protocol for kinetic and isotopic studies Natella Mirzoyan1, Alexey Kamyshny Jr.2, Itay Halevy1 1Earth and Planetary Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel 2Geological and Environmental Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva 84105, Israel Pyrite is one of the most abundant and widespread of the sulfide minerals with a central role in biogeochemical cycles of iron and sulfur. Due to its diverse roles in the natural and anthropogenic sulfur cycle, pyrite has been extensively studied in various experimental investigations of the kinetics of its dissolution and oxidation, the isotopic fractionations associated with these reactions, and the microbiological processes involved. Pretreatment of pyrite for removal of oxidation impurities to prevent experimental artifacts and inaccuracies is often practiced. While numerous pyrite-cleaning methods have been used in experiments, a common pyrite pretreatment method, often used to investigate pyrite chemistry by the isotopic fractionations associated with it, includes several rinses by HCl, acetone and deionized water. Elemental sulfur (S0) is a common product of incomplete pyrite oxidation. Removal of S0 is desirable to avoid experimental biases associated with its participation in pyrite transformations, but is more complicated than the removal of sulfate. Although rinsing with an organic solvent is in part aimed at removing S0, to the best of our knowledge, the extraction efficiency of S0 in existing protocols has not been assessed. We have developed and tested a new protocol for elemental sulfur removal from the surface of pyrite by ultrasonication with warm acetone. Our data demonstrate the presence of large fractions of S0 on untreated pyrite particle surfaces, of which only approximately 60% was removed by the commonly used pretreatment method. The new protocol described here was found to be more efficient at S0 removal than the commonly used method

  12. A Validity Study of the Kinetic School Drawing Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prout, H. Thompson; Celmer, David S.

    1984-01-01

    Examined the relationship between Kinetic School Drawing responses and academic achievement in 100 normal fifth-grade students. Significant correlations were found for a number of measures, generally supporting the validity of the technique. (JAC)

  13. Catalytic deactivation on methane steam reforming catalysts. 2. Kinetic study

    SciTech Connect

    Agnelli, M.E.; Ponzi, E.N.; Yeramian, A.A.

    1987-08-01

    The kinetics of methane steam reforming reaction over an alumina-supported nickel catalyst was investigated at a temperature range of 640-740/sup 0/C in a flow reactor at atmospheric pressure. The experiments were performed varying the inlet concentration of methane, hydrogen, and water. A kinetic scheme of the Houghen-Watson type was satisfactorily proposed assuming the dissociative adsorption of CH/sub 4/ as the rate-limiting step, but this kinetic scheme can be easily replaced by a first-order kinetics (r/sub CH/4/sub / = kapparho/sub CH/4/sub /) for engineering purposes. Catalyst activation with H/sub 2/ and N/sub 2/ mixtures or with the reactant mixture results in the same extent of reaction.

  14. Laboratory Kinetic Studies of OH and CO2 Relevant to Upper Atmospheric Radiation Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, David D.; Villalta, Peter; Zahniser, Mark S.; Kolb, Charles E.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to quantify the rates of two processes which are crucial to our understanding of radiative energy balance in the upper atmosphere. The first process is radiative emission from vibrationally hot OH radicals following the H + O3 reaction in the upper mesosphere. The importance of this process depends strongly on the OH radiative emission coefficients. Our goal was to measure the OH permanent dipole moment in excited vibrational states and to use these measurements to construct an improved OH dipole moment function and improved radiative emission coefficients. Significant progress was made on these experiments including the construction of a supersonic jet source for vibrationally excited OH radicals. Unfortunately, our efforts to transport the OH radicals into a second lower pressure vacuum chamber were not successful, and we were unable to make improved dipole moment measurements for OH. The second key kinetic process which we attempted to quantify during this project is the rate of relaxation of bend-excited CO2 by oxygen atoms. Since excitation of the bending vibrational mode of CO2 is the major cooling mechanism in the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere, the cooling rate of this region depends crucially on the rate of energy transfer out of this state. It is believed that the most efficient transfer mechanism is via atomic oxygen but the rate for this process has not been directly measured in the laboratory at appropriate temperatures and even the room temperature rate remains controversial. We attempted to directly measure the relaxation rate Of CO2 (010) by oxygen atoms using the discharge flow technique. This experiment was set up at Aerodyne Research. Again, significant progress was achieved in this experiment. A hot CO2 source was set up, bend excited CO2 was detected and the rate of relaxation of bend excited CO2 by He atoms was measured. Unfortunately, the project ran out of time before the oxygen atom kinetic studies could

  15. Combustion Research Program: Flame studies, laser diagnostics, and chemical kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Crosley, D.R.

    1992-09-01

    This project has comprised laser flame diagnostic experiments, chemical kinetics measurements, and low pressure flame studies. Collisional quenching has been investigated for several systems: the OH radical, by H{sub 2}0 in low pressure flames; the rotational level dependence for NH, including measurements to J=24; and of NH{sub 2} at room temperature. Transition probability measurements for bands involving v{prime} = 2 and 3 of the A-X system of OH were measured in a flame. Laser-induced fluorescence of vinyl radicals was unsuccessfully attempted. RRKM and transition state theory calculations were performed on the OH + C{sub 2}H{sub 4} reaction, on the t-butyl radical + HX; and transition state theory has been applied to a series of bond scission reactions. OH concentrations were measured quantitatively in low pressure H{sub 2}/N{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} flames, and the ability to determine spatially precise flame temperatures accurately using OH laser-induced fluorescence was studied.

  16. Structural and Kinetic Studies of Formate Dehydrogenase from Candida boidinii.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qi; Gakhar, Lokesh; Wickersham, Kyle; Francis, Kevin; Vardi-Kilshtain, Alexandra; Major, Dan T; Cheatum, Christopher M; Kohen, Amnon

    2016-05-17

    The structure of formate dehydrogenase from Candida boidinii (CbFDH) is of both academic and practical interests. First, this enzyme represents a unique model system for studies on the role of protein dynamics in catalysis, but so far these studies have been limited by the availability of structural information. Second, CbFDH and its mutants can be used in various industrial applications (e.g., CO2 fixation or nicotinamide recycling systems), and the lack of structural information has been a limiting factor in commercial development. Here, we report the crystallization and structural determination of both holo- and apo-CbFDH. The free-energy barrier for the catalyzed reaction was computed and indicates that this structure indeed represents a catalytically competent form of the enzyme. Complementing kinetic examinations demonstrate that the recombinant CbFDH has a well-organized reactive state. Finally, a fortuitous observation has been made: the apoenzyme crystal was obtained under cocrystallization conditions with a saturating concentration of both the cofactor (NAD(+)) and inhibitor (azide), which has a nanomolar dissociation constant. It was found that the fraction of the apoenzyme present in the solution is less than 1.7 × 10(-7) (i.e., the solution is 99.9999% holoenzyme). This is an extreme case where the crystal structure represents an insignificant fraction of the enzyme in solution, and a mechanism rationalizing this phenomenon is presented. PMID:27100912

  17. Dusty Plasmas - Kinetic Studies of Strong Coupling Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morfill, Gregor

    2011-10-01

    ``Dusty plasmas'' can be found almost everywhere - in the interstellar medium, in star and planet formation, in the solar system in the Earth's atmosphere and in the laboratory. In astrophysical plasmas the dust component accounts for only about 1% of the mass, nevertheless this component has a profound influence on the thermodynamics, the chemistry and the dynamics. Important physical processes are charging, sputtering, cooling, light absorption and radiation pressure, connecting electromagnetic forces to gravity. Surface chemistry is another important aspect. In the laboratory there is great interest in industrial processes (e.g. etching, vapor deposition) and at the fundamental physics level - the main topic here - the study of strong coupling phenomena. Here the dust (or microparticles) are the dominant component of the multi-species plasma. The particles can be observed in real time and pace, individually resolved at all relevant length and time scales. This provides an unprecedented means for studying self-organisation processes in many particle systems including the onset of cooperative phenomena. Due to the comparatively large mass of the microparticles (10-12 to 10-9 g) precision experiments are performed on the ISS. The following topics will be discussed: Phase transitions, phase separation, electrorheology, flow phenomena including the onset of turbulence at the kinetic level.

  18. [Research progress on case-control study].

    PubMed

    Zhang, F F; Liu, Z D; Zhang, C X; Jiang, B F

    2016-04-10

    Several new varients related to the case-control designs have been developed in the recent decades, and this article briefly summarized four new designs: two-stage design, case-specular study, exposure-crossover study and case-case-time-control study. This paper involved principles of study design, requisites for application, advantages and disadvantages on all the studies. PMID:27087230

  19. Biological conversion of synthesis gas. Mass transfer/kinetic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Klasson, K.T.; Basu, R.; Johnson, E.R.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    Mass transfer and kinetic studies were carried out for the Rhodospirillum rubrum and Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum bacterial systems. R. rubrum is a photosynthetic anaerobic bacterium which catalyzes the biological water gas shift reaction: CO + H{sub 2}0 {yields} CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}. C. thiosulfatophilum is also a H{sub 2}S and COS to elemental sulfur. The growth of R. rubrum may be satisfactorily carried out at 25{degree} and 30{degree}C, while CO uptake and thus the conversion of CO best occurs at temperatures of either 30{degree}, 32{degree} or 34{degree}C. The rate of conversion of COs and H{sub 2}O to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S may be modeled by a first order rate expression. The rate constant at 30{degree}C was found to be 0.243 h{sup {minus}1}. The growth of C. thiosulfatophilum may be modeled in terms of incoming light intensity using a Monod equation: {mu} = {sub 351} + I{sub o}/{sup 0.152}I{sub o}. Comparisons of the growth of R. rubrum and C. thiosulfatophilum shows that the specific growth rate of C. thiosulfatophilum is much higher at a given light intensity.

  20. Photodegradation of the acaricide abamectin: a kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Escalada, Juan Pablo; Gianotti, José; Pajares, Adriana; Massad, Walter A; Amat-Guerri, Francisco; García, Norman A

    2008-08-27

    The acaricide abamectin is a mixture of two colorless homologues in a molar ratio of at least 4:1 with the same structure of macrocyclic lactone. The kinetics of its degradation under direct (254 nm) and dye-sensitized (>400 nm) photoirradiation in methanol solution has been studied by UV-vis spectrophotometry, potentiometric detection of dissolved oxygen, stationary fluorescence, laser flash photolysis, and time-resolved detection of singlet molecular oxygen (O2((1)Delta(g))) phosphorescence. The results indicate that the degradation is very efficient under direct irradiation with UV light (254 nm), with a quantum yield of 0.23. On the contrary, under visible-light irradiation, using the natural pigment riboflavin or the synthetic dye rose bengal as sensitizers, the degradation is very inefficient and proceeds through a O2((1)Delta(g))-mediated mechanism, with a bimolecular rate constant for the overall O2((1)Delta(g)) quenching (the sum of physical and chemical quenching) of 5.5 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1). This value is similar to those reported for the rate constants of the reactions of O2((1)Delta(g)) with isolated double bonds or conjugated dienes and points to similar processes in the case of abamectin. PMID:18642837

  1. Aqueous chlorination of diclofenac: kinetic study and transformation products identification.

    PubMed

    Soufan, M; Deborde, M; Legube, B

    2012-06-15

    Diclofenac reactivity and fate during water chlorination was investigated in this work. In the first step, chlorination kinetic of diclofenac (DCF) was studied in the pH range of 4-10 at 20 ± 2 °C and in the presence of an excess of total chlorine. A second-order reaction (first-order relative to DCF concentration and first-order relative to free chlorine concentration) was shown with rate constant about 3.89 ± 1.17 M(-1) s(-1) at pH 7. The elementary reactions (i.e. reactions of hypochlorous acid (HOCl) with neutral and ionized forms of DCF, and acid-catalysed reaction of HOCl with neutral and ionized forms of DCF) were proposed to explain the pH-dependence of the rate constants and intrinsic constant of each of them were calculated. In the second step, several degradation products formed during chlorination of DCF were identified. These compounds could come from an initial chlorine electrophilic attack on aromatic ring or amine function of DCF. Some of these chlorinated derivatives seem to accumulate in solution in the presence of an excess of chlorine. PMID:22525458

  2. Complex (dusty) plasmas-kinetic studies of strong coupling phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Morfill, Gregor E.; Ivlev, Alexei V.; Thomas, Hubertus M.

    2012-05-15

    'Dusty plasmas' can be found almost everywhere-in the interstellar medium, in star and planet formation, in the solar system in the Earth's atmosphere, and in the laboratory. In astrophysical plasmas, the dust component accounts for only about 1% of the mass, nevertheless this component has a profound influence on the thermodynamics, the chemistry, and the dynamics. Important physical processes are charging, sputtering, cooling, light absorption, and radiation pressure, connecting electromagnetic forces to gravity. Surface chemistry is another important aspect. In the laboratory, there is great interest in industrial processes (e.g., etching, vapor deposition) and-at the fundamental level-in the physics of strong coupling phenomena. Here, the dust (or microparticles) are the dominant component of the multi-species plasma. The particles can be observed in real time and space, individually resolved at all relevant length and time scales. This provides an unprecedented means for studying self-organisation processes in many-particle systems, including the onset of cooperative phenomena. Due to the comparatively large mass of the microparticles (10{sup -12}to10{sup -9}g), precision experiments are performed on the ISS. The following topics will be discussed: Phase transitions, phase separation, electrorheology, flow phenomena including the onset of turbulence at the kinetic level.

  3. Kinetic studies of cascade reactions in high-throughput systems.

    PubMed

    Iron, David; Boelens, Hans F M; Westerhuis, Johan A; Rothenberg, Gadi

    2003-12-01

    The application of robotic systems to the study of complex reaction kinetics is considered, using the cascade reaction A --> B --> C as a working example. Practical problems in calculating the rate constants k1 and k2 for the reactions A --> B and B --> C from concentration measurements of CA, CB, or CC are discussed in the light of the symmetry and invertability of the rate equations. A D-optimal analysis is used to determine the points in time and the species that will give the best (i.e., most accurate) results. When exact data are used, the most robust solution results from measuring the pair of concentrations (CA, CC). The system's information function is computed using numeric methods. This function is then used to estimate the amount of information obtainable from a given cascade reaction at any given time. The theoretical findings are compared with experimental results from a set of two-stage cascade experiments monitored using UV-visible spectroscopy. Finally, the pros and cons of using a single reaction sample to estimate both k1 and k2 are discussed. PMID:16465720

  4. Complex (dusty) plasmas—kinetic studies of strong coupling phenomenaa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morfill, Gregor E.; Ivlev, Alexei V.; Thomas, Hubertus M.

    2012-05-01

    "Dusty plasmas" can be found almost everywhere—in the interstellar medium, in star and planet formation, in the solar system in the Earth's atmosphere, and in the laboratory. In astrophysical plasmas, the dust component accounts for only about 1% of the mass, nevertheless this component has a profound influence on the thermodynamics, the chemistry, and the dynamics. Important physical processes are charging, sputtering, cooling, light absorption, and radiation pressure, connecting electromagnetic forces to gravity. Surface chemistry is another important aspect. In the laboratory, there is great interest in industrial processes (e.g., etching, vapor deposition) and—at the fundamental level—in the physics of strong coupling phenomena. Here, the dust (or microparticles) are the dominant component of the multi-species plasma. The particles can be observed in real time and space, individually resolved at all relevant length and time scales. This provides an unprecedented means for studying self-organisation processes in many-particle systems, including the onset of cooperative phenomena. Due to the comparatively large mass of the microparticles (10-12to10-9g), precision experiments are performed on the ISS. The following topics will be discussed: Phase transitions, phase separation, electrorheology, flow phenomena including the onset of turbulence at the kinetic level.

  5. Aqueous photodegradation of antibiotic florfenicol: kinetics and degradation pathway studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya; Li, Jianhua; Zhou, Lei; Wang, Guoqing; Feng, Yanhong; Wang, Zunyao; Yang, Xi

    2016-04-01

    The occurrence of antibacterial agents in natural environment was of scientific concern in recent years. As endocrine disrupting chemicals, they had potential risk on ecology system and human beings. In the present study, the photodegradation kinetics and pathways of florfenicol were investigated under solar and xenon lamp irradiation in aquatic systems. Direct photolysis half-lives of florfenicol were determined as 187.29 h under solar irradiation and 22.43 h under xenon lamp irradiation, respectively. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as hydroxyl radical (·OH) and singlet oxygen ((1)O2) were found to play an important role in indirect photolysis process. The presence of nitrate and dissolved organic matters (DOMs) could affect photolysis of florfenicol in solutions through light screening effect, quenching effect, and photoinduced oxidization process. Photoproducts of florfenicol in DOMs solutions were identified by solid phase extraction-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPE-LC-MS) analysis techniques, and degradation pathways were proposed, including photoinduced hydrolysis, oxidation by (1)O2 and ·OH, dechlorination, and cleavage of the side chain. PMID:26705756

  6. Kinetic and Structural Studies of Interactions between Glycosaminoglycans and Langerin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Liu, Xinyue; Kao, Chelsea; Zhang, Emily; Li, Quanhong; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J

    2016-08-16

    Langerin, a C-type lectin, is expressed in Langerhans cells. It was reported that langerin binds sulfated glycans, which is an important initial step for its role in blocking human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission by capturing HIV pathogens and mediating their internalization into Birbeck granules for their elimination. It is fundamentally important to understand these interactions at the molecular level for the design of new highly specific therapeutic agents for HIV. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR), which allows for the real-time, direct, quantitative analysis of the label-free molecular interactions, has been used successfully for biophysical characterization of glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-protein interactions. In this study, we report kinetics, structural analysis, and the effects of physiological conditions (e.g., pH, salt concentration, and Ca(2+) and Zn(2+)concentrations) on the interactions between GAGs and langerin using SPR. SPR results revealed that langerin binds to heparin with high affinity (KD ∼ 2.4 nM) and the oligosaccharide length required for the interactions is larger than a tetrasaccharide. This heparin/heparan sulfate-binding protein also interacts with other GAGs, including dermatan sulfate, chondroitin sulfates C-E and KS. In addition, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis was used to characterize the structure of sulfated glycans that bound to langerin. PMID:27447199

  7. Thiolate alkylation in tripod zinc complexes: a comparative kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Rombach, Michael; Seebacher, Jan; Ji, Mian; Zhang, Guofang; He, Guosen; Ibrahim, Mohamed M; Benkmil, Boumahdi; Vahrenkamp, Heinrich

    2006-05-29

    The biologically relevant alkylations of the thiolate ligands in tripod zinc thiolates by methyl iodide were studied kinetically. Five tripod ligands of the pyrazolyl/thioimidazolyl borate type were employed, offering N3, N2S, NS2, and S3 donor sets. For each of them, the ethyl-, benzyl-, phenyl-, and p-nitrophenylthiolate zinc complexes were investigated, yielding a total of 20 second-order rate constants. The comparison of these rate constants shows three effects: (1) the electronic effect among the thiolates, i.e., the ethanethiolates react about 3 orders of magnitude faster than the p-nitrophenylthiolates; (2) the steric effect among the pyrazolylborates, i.e., the phenyl-substituted ones react about 2 orders of magnitude faster than the tert-butyl-substituted ones; and (3) the strong acceleration by the sulfur donors in the tripods, reaching 4 orders of magnitude between the reaction times of the (N3)Zn-SR and (S3)Zn-SR complexes. PMID:16711708

  8. Detailed kinetic modeling study of n-pentanol oxidation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Heufer, K. Alexander; Sarathy, S. Mani; Curran, Henry J.; Davis, Alexander C.; Westbrook, Charles K.; Pitz, William J.

    2012-09-28

    To help overcome the world’s dependence upon fossil fuels, suitable biofuels are promising alternatives that can be used in the transportation sector. Recent research on internal combustion engines shows that short alcoholic fuels (e.g., ethanol or n-butanol) have reduced pollutant emissions and increased knock resistance compared to fossil fuels. Although higher molecular weight alcohols (e.g., n-pentanol and n-hexanol) exhibit higher reactivity that lowers their knock resistance, they are suitable for diesel engines or advanced engine concepts, such as homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI), where higher reactivity at lower temperatures is necessary for engine operation. The present study presents a detailedmore » kinetic model for n-pentanol based on modeling rules previously presented for n-butanol. This approach was initially validated using quantum chemistry calculations to verify the most stable n-pentanol conformation and to obtain C–H and C–C bond dissociation energies. In addition, the proposed model has been validated against ignition delay time data, speciation data from a jet-stirred reactor, and laminar flame velocity measurements. Overall, the model shows good agreement with the experiments and permits a detailed discussion of the differences between alcohols and alkanes.« less

  9. Case Study Evaluations: A Decade of Progress?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Robert K.

    1997-01-01

    In the last 10 years, there has been increased use of case study methodology, with accompanying refinement and improvement of the methods. Case studies have become legitimate research methods in evaluation, but it is too soon to say whether improvements in methodology are really resulting in improvements in the case studies conducted. (SLD)

  10. Kinetics and mechanisms of metal retention/release in geochemical processes in soil. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.W.

    1997-05-01

    'Remediation of soils polluted with heavy metals is a major challenge facing the nation. This is especially so at many DOE facilities and other superfund sites. In many cases, speciation of the metals is inaccurate and difficult and the mechanisms by which the metals are retained/released in soils over long times are poorly understood. Consequently, the long-term fate of metals in soils cannot be precisely predicted and often, the remediation recommendations and techniques that are employed to clean up soils may be ineffective or unnecessary. Accordingly, the authors are proposing work to generate basic knowledge on the kinetics and mechanism(s) of heavy metal retention/release by soil mineral colloids as affected by inorganic anion. The nature of the interaction of Cd(II), Co(II), Cr(VI), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Pb(II) with pure soil minerals and extracted soil clays will be investigated. The colloids will be characterized in terms of surface area, surface charge and surface site density. They will be used to study the effect(s) of pH, phosphate rate, and temperature on metals retention/release. The experiments will involve using various kinetic and isothermic sorption equations as models to describe the data thus acquired. The spectroscopic methods will involve using extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The data generated from the proposed study will assist in designing better remediation strategies to effectively clean up toxic heavy metal contaminated soils at DOE facilities and other superfund sites.'

  11. Kinetic studies of chemical shrinkage and residual stress formation in thermoset epoxy adhesives under confined curing conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, M.; Geiß, P. L.

    2015-05-01

    Faultless processing of thermoset polymers in demanding applications requires a profound mastering of the curing kinetics considering both the physico-chemical changes in the transition from the liquid to the solid state and the consolidation of the polymers network in the diffusion controlled curing regime past the gel point. Especially in adhesive joints shrinkage stress occurring at an early state of the curing process under confined conditions is likely to cause defects due to local debonding and thus reduce their strength and durability1. Rheometry is considered the method of choice to investigate the change of elastic and viscous properties in the progress of curing. Drawbacks however relate to experimental challenges in accessing the full range of kinetic parameters of thermoset resins with low initial viscosity from the very beginning of the curing reaction to the post-cure consolidation of the polymer due to the formation of secondary chemical bonds. Therefore the scope of this study was to interrelate rheological data with results from in-situ measurements of the shrinkage stress formation in adhesive joints and with the change of refractive index in the progress of curing. This combination of different methods has shown to be valuable in gaining advanced insight into the kinetics of the curing reaction. The experimental results are based on a multi component thermoset epoxy-amine adhesive.

  12. EPA releases progress report on hydraulic fracturing study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) provided a 21 December progress report on its ongoing national study about the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water resources. The agency said that a draft of the congressionally requested study will be released in 2014 for public and peer review and that its progress report does not draw conclusions about the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing, often referred to as fracking.

  13. The Study of a Simple Redox Reaction as an Experimental Approach to Chemical Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elias, Horst; Zipp, Arden P.

    1988-01-01

    Recommends using iodide ions and peroxodisulfate ions for studying rate laws instead of the standard iodine clock for kinetic study. Presents the methodology and a discussion of the kinetics involved for a laboratory experiment for a high school or introductory college course. (ML)

  14. Chemical kinetic studies on dry sorbents. Final report. [Sodium bicarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, W.T.; Keener, T.C.

    1982-02-15

    The scope of this research investigation has included a review of potential additives suitable for dry flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) and a bench scale laboratory study to determine the chemical kinetics for the reaction of five different sorbents with sulfur dioxide. The sorbents chosen included sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO/sub 3/), soda ash (Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/), trona, lime (CaO) and hydrated lime (Ca(OH)/sub 2/). This study has shown that: (1) The reaction rate increases with temperature for soda ash and calcium oxide. The reaction temperature has an inverse effect on sodium bicarbonate and trona due, primarily, to the simultaneous thermal activation reaction. The calcium hydroxide-SO/sub 2/ reaction increased up to 550/sup 0/F, and then decreased, due to uneven gas flow distribution. (2) The reaction rates for soda ash, calcium oxide and calcium hydroxide were increased by decreasing their particle size. This effect was not confirmed for sodium bicarbonate and trona where reaction temperature was the most important reaction parameter. (3) Reaction with soda ash was found to be limited by the presence of an impervious ash layer which prevented interparticle gaseous diffusion. Calcium oxide and calcium hydroxide were found to be limited by a slow chemical reaction rate. Results on the rate-limiting steps for sodium bicarbonate and trona were inconclusive because of the simultaneous thermal activation reaction. (4) The effect of thermal activation was to increase the reaction rate for sodium bicarbonate and trona at lower temperatures. This effect was less pronounced at higher temperatures. (5) Results obtained for nitric oxide show limited adsorption for the five sorbents tested as compared to the finding for sulfur dioxide.

  15. Studies in genetic discrimination. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    We have screened 1006 respondents in a study of genetic discrimination. Analysis of these responses has produced evidence of the range of institutions engaged in genetic discrimination and demonstrates the impact of this discrimination on the respondents to the study. We have found that both ignorance and policy underlie genetic discrimination and that anti-discrimination laws are being violated.

  16. Aqueous chlorination of carbamazepine: kinetic study and transformation product identification.

    PubMed

    Soufan, M; Deborde, M; Delmont, A; Legube, B

    2013-09-15

    Carbamazepine reactivity and fate during chlorination was investigated in this study. From a kinetic standpoint, a third-order reaction (first-order relative to the CBZ concentration and second-order relative to the free chlorine concentration) was observed at neutral and slightly acidic pH, whereas a second-order reaction (first order relative to the CBZ concentration and first order relative to the free chlorine concentration) was noted under alkaline conditions. In order to gain insight into the observed pH-dependence of the reaction order, elementary reactions (i.e. reactions of Cl2, Cl2O, HOCl with CBZ and of ClO(-) with CBZ or of HOCl with the ionized form of CBZ) were highlighted and second order rate constants of each of them were calculated. Close correlations between the experimental and modeled values were obtained under these conditions. Cl2 and Cl2O were the main chlorination agents at neutral and acidic pH. These results indicate that, for a 1 mg/L free chlorine concentration and 1-10 mg/L chloride concentration at pH 7, halflives about 52-69 days can be expected. A low reactivity of chlorine with CBZ could thus occur under the chlorination steps used during water treatment. From a mechanistic viewpoint, several transformation products were observed during carbamazepine chlorination. As previously described for the chlorination of polynuclear aromatic or unsaturated compounds, we proposed monohydroxylated, epoxide, diols or chlorinated alcohol derivatives of CBZ for the chemical structures of these degradation products. Most of these compounds seem to accumulate in solution in the presence of excess chlorine. PMID:23891541

  17. Kinetic study of aluminum adsorption by aluminosilicate clay minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, W.J.; Cronan, C.S.; Patterson, H.H.

    1988-01-01

    The adsorption kinetics of Al/sup 3 +/ by montmorillonite, kaolinite, and vermiculite were investigated as a function of the initial Al concentration, the surface area of the clay, and H/sup +/ concentration, at 25/sup 0/, 18/sup 0/, and 10/sup 0/C. In order to minimize complicated side reactions the pH range was kept between 3.0 and 4.1. Results showed that the adsorption rate was first order with respect to both the initial Al concentration and the clay surface area. Changes in pH within this narrow range had virtually no effect on adsorption rate. This zero order reaction dependence suggested that the H/sup +/, compared to Al, has a weak affinity for the surface. The rates of adsorption decreased in the order of montmorillonite > kaolinite > vermiculite when compared on the basis of equal surface areas, but changed to kaolinite > montmorillonite > vermiculite when the clays were compared on an equal exchange capacity basis. The calculated apparent activation energies were < 32 kJ mol/sup -1/, indicating that over the temperature range of the study the adsorption process is only marginally temperature sensitive. The mechanism is governed by a simple electrostatic cation exchange involving outer sphere complexes between adsorbed Al and the clay surface. Vermiculite, may have a second reaction step governed by both electrostatic attraction and internal ion diffusion. Equilibrium constants for the formation of an adsorbed Al clay complex were also estimated and are 10/sup 5.34/, 10/sup 5.18/, and 10/sup 4.94/ for kaolinite, montmorillonite, and vermiculite, respectively, suggesting that these clays could play a significant role in controlling soil solutions Al concentrations.

  18. Kinetic studies of the sucrose adsorption onto an alumina interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kaman; Mohan, Sudhanshu

    2004-01-01

    An account is given of an experimental kinetic study of adsorption of analar reagent sucrose (ARS) onto an alumina interface spectrometrically ( λmax=570 nm) at pH 8.0 and at room temperature. The adsorption isotherm is a typical Langmuirian isotherm (S-type) and adsorption parameters have been deduced according to the Langmuir's model. The adsorption coefficient evaluated from the Langmuir's equation was found to be 2.52×10 2 l mol -1. Adsorption mechanism has been interpreted on the basis of metal-saccharide interaction as found in organometallic compounds and interaction due to negatively charged ends on the disaccharide molecules and positively charge groups on the surface on alumina which depends on the pH value. The effects of variation in experimental conditions of the adsorption system have also been investigated. The adsorption exhibited a typical response to the pH effect and on going towards the PZC the net charge decreases and any reaction making dependence on charge and maximum adsorption (amount) was found near the isoelectric point of alumina (pH 9.0). The presence of ions like Cl -, SO 42- and PO 43- affect the adsorbed amount quantitatively and it seems that these anions compete with sucrose for the positively charged surface sites. The addition of similar concentration of cations was found to reduce the adsorbed amount. The temperature was found to have an inverse effect on adsorption. The additions of catonic and anionic detergents influence both the adsorbed amount and the adsorption rate. The thermodynamics of the titled adsorption model indicates the spontaneous and exothermic nature. The negative value of entropy is an indication of probability of favorable and complex nature of the adsorption.

  19. Recent Progress in Presolar Grain Studies

    PubMed Central

    Amari, Sachiko

    2014-01-01

    Presolar grains are stardust that condensed in stellar outflows or stellar ejecta, and was incorporated in meteorites. They remain mostly intact throughout the journey from stars to the earth, keeping information of their birthplaces. Studies of presolar grains, which started in 1987, have produced a wealth of information about nucleosynthesis in stars, mixing in stellar ejecta, and temporal variations of isotopic and elemental abundances in the Galaxy. Recent instrumental advancements in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) brought about the identification of presolar silicate grains. Isotopic and mineralogical investigations of sub-μm grains have been performed using a combination of SIMS, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and focused ion beam (FIB) techniques. Two instruments have been developed to study even smaller grains (∼50 nm) and measure isotopes and elements of lower abundances than those in previous studies. PMID:26819886

  20. Recent Progress in Presolar Grain Studies.

    PubMed

    Amari, Sachiko

    2014-01-01

    Presolar grains are stardust that condensed in stellar outflows or stellar ejecta, and was incorporated in meteorites. They remain mostly intact throughout the journey from stars to the earth, keeping information of their birthplaces. Studies of presolar grains, which started in 1987, have produced a wealth of information about nucleosynthesis in stars, mixing in stellar ejecta, and temporal variations of isotopic and elemental abundances in the Galaxy. Recent instrumental advancements in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) brought about the identification of presolar silicate grains. Isotopic and mineralogical investigations of sub-μm grains have been performed using a combination of SIMS, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and focused ion beam (FIB) techniques. Two instruments have been developed to study even smaller grains (∼50 nm) and measure isotopes and elements of lower abundances than those in previous studies. PMID:26819886

  1. Coordination: Southeast Continental Shelf studies. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, D.W.

    1981-02-01

    An overview of the Oceanograhic Program of Skidaway Institute of Oceanograhy is presented. Included are the current five year plan for studies of the Southeast Continental Shelf, a summary of research accomplishments, proposed research for 1981-1982, current status of the Savannah Navigational Light Tower, and a list of publications. (ACR)

  2. A Case Study in Chemical Kinetics: The OH + CO Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weston, Ralph E., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews some important properties of the bimolecular reaction between the hydroxyl radical and carbon monoxide. Investigates the kinetics of the reaction, the temperature and pressure dependence of the rate constant, the state-to-state dynamics of the reaction, and the reverse reaction. (MVL)

  3. Kinetic Studies of the Solvolysis of Two Organic Halides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, J. A.; Pasto, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory experiment which utilizes the solvolysis of organic halides to demonstrate first and second order reaction kinetics. The experiment also investigates the effect of a change of solvent polarity on reaction rate, common-ion and noncommon-ion salt effects, and the activation parameters of a…

  4. Penicillin Hydrolysis: A Kinetic Study of a Multistep, Multiproduct Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarrick, Thomas A.; McLafferty, Fred W.

    1984-01-01

    Background, procedures used, and typical results are provided for an experiment in which students carry out the necessary measurements on the acid-catalysis of penicillin in two hours. By applying kinetic theory to the data obtained, the reaction pathways for the hydrolysis of potassium benzyl penicillin are elucidated. (JN)

  5. An Undergraduate Laboratory Exercise for Studying Kinetics of Batch Crystallization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louhi­-Kultanen, Marjatta; Han, Bing; Nurkka, Annikka; Hatakka, Henry

    2015-01-01

    The present work describes an undergraduate laboratory exercise for improving understanding of fundamental phenomena in cooling crystallization. The exercise of nucleation and crystal growth kinetics supports learning of theories and models presented in lectures and calculation exercises. The teaching methodology incorporates precepts the…

  6. ICPP water inventory study progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, B.T.

    1993-05-01

    Recent data from the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) indicate that water is entering the sumps located in the bottom of Tank Firm Vaults in quantities that exceed expected levels. In addition, perched water body(s) exist beneath the northern portion of the ICPP. Questions have been raised concerning the origin of water entering the Tank Farm sumps and the recharge sources for the perched water bodies. Therefore, in an effort to determine the source of water, a project has been initiated to identify the source of water for Tank Farm sumps and the perched water bodies. In addition, an accurate water balance for the ICPP will be developed. The purpose of this report is to present the specific results and conclusions for the ICPP water balance portion of the study. In addition, the status of the other activities being conducted as part of study, along with the associated action plans, is provided.

  7. Progress report on nuclear spectroscopic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, C.R.; Guidry, M.W.; Riedinger, L.L.; Sorensen, S.P.

    1994-02-18

    The Nuclear Physics group at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) is involved in several aspects of heavy-ion physics including both nuclear structure and reaction mechanisms. While the main emphasis is on experimental problems, the authors have maintained a strong collaboration with several theorists in order to best pursue the physics of their measurements. During the last year they have had several experiments at the ATLAS at Argonne National Laboratory, the GAMMASPHERE at the LBL 88 Cyclotron, and with the NORDBALL at the Niels Bohr Institute Tandem. Also, they continue to be very active in the WA93/98 collaboration studying ultra-relativistic heavy ion physics utilizing the SPS accelerator at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland and in the PHENIX Collaboration at the RHIC accelerator under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. During the last year their experimental work has been in three broad areas: (1) the structure of nuclei at high angular momentum, (2) the structure of nuclei far from stability, and (3) ultra-relativistic heavy-ion physics. The results of studies in these particular areas are described in this document. These studies concentrate on the structure of nuclear matter in extreme conditions of rotational motion, imbalance of neutrons and protons, or very high temperature and density. Another area of research is heavy-ion-induced transfer reactions, which utilize the transfer of nucleons to states with high angular momentum to learn about their structure and to understand the transfer of particles, energy, and angular momentum in collisions between heavy ions.

  8. Kinetic study of hydrated lime reaction with HCl.

    PubMed

    Yan, Rong; Chin, Terence; Liang, David Tee; Laursen, Karin; Ong, Wan Yean; Yao, Kaiwen; Tay, Joo Hwa

    2003-06-01

    Hydrochloride (HCl) is an acidic pollutant present in the flue gas of most municipal or hazardous waste incinerators. Hydrated lime (Ca(OH)2) is often used as a dry sorbent for injection in a spray reactor to remove HCI. However, due to the short residence time encountered, this control method has generally been found to have low conversion efficiencies which results in the high lime usage and generates large amount of fly ash as solid wastes. A fundamental study was carried outto investigate the kinetics of HCl-lime reaction under simulated flue gas conditions in order to better understand the process thereby providing a basis for an optimized lime usage and reduced fly ash production. The initial reaction rate and conversion of three limes were studied using a thermogravimetric analyzer by varying the gas flow rate, temperature (170-400 degrees C), and HCI concentrations (600-1200 mg/m3) as well as the associated particle size and surface area of the limes. The initial lime conversions were found to rely mostly on the residence time, while the ultimate lime conversions were strongly influenced by temperature and the reaction products. CaOHCI was found to be the primary product in most cases, while for one specific lime, CaCl2 was the ultimate conversion product after an extended time period. The true utilization of lime in flue gas cleanup is thus higher when CaOHCl is considered as the final product than those based on CaCl2 as the final product, which has been commonly used in previous studies. The initial reaction was controlled by diffusion of HCl in gas phase and the subsequent reaction by gaseous diffusion through the developing product layer. Increasing the HCI concentration raised the initial rate as well as conversion. However, overloading the lime with excessive HCI caused clogging at its surface and a drop in the ultimate conversion. Limes with smaller particle diameters and higher surface areas were found to be more reactive. The effect of gas

  9. [Laser enhanced chemical reaction studies]. [Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    Experimental studies of dynamic molecular processes are described with particular emphasis on the use of a powerful infrared diode laser probe technique developed in our laboratory. This technique allows us to determine the final states of CO{sub 2} (and other molecules) produced by collisions, photofragmentation, or chemical reactions with a spectral resolution of 0.0003 cm{sup {minus}1} and a time resolution of 10{sup {minus}7} sec. Such high spectral resolution provides a detailed picture of the vibrational and rotational states of molecules produced by these dynamic events. We have used this experimental method to probe collisions between hot hydrogen/deuterium atoms and CO{sub 2}, between O({sup 1}D) atoms and CO{sub 2}, to study the final states of DC1 molecules produced as a result of the reactions of hot Cl atoms, and to investigate the dynamics of the reaction between OH and CO molecules. Advances in our techniques over the past two years have allowed us to identify and study more than 200 final rotational states in ten different vibrational levels of CO{sub 2} encompassing all 3 normal modes, many overtones, and combination states of the molecule. We have extended the technique to probe a variety of new molecules such as OCS, N{sub 2}O, DCl, and CS{sub 2}. All of this work is aimed at providing experimental tests for polyatomic molecule potential energy surfaces, chemical transition states in complex systems, and theories of reaction dynamic in molecules with more than 3 atoms.

  10. Progress report on nuclear spectroscopic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, C.R.; Riedinger, L.L.; Sorensen, S.P.

    1996-01-16

    The experimental program in nuclear physics at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, is led by Professors Carrol Bingham, Lee Riedinger, and Soren Sorenseni who respectively lead the studies of the exotic decay modes of nuclei far from stability, the program of high-spin research, and our effort in relativistic heavy-ion physics. Over the years, this broad program of research has been successful partially because of the shared University resources applied to this group effort. The proximity of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has allowed us to build extremely strong programs of joint research, and in addition to play an important leadership role in the Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research (JIHIR). Our experimental program is also very closely linked with those at other national laboratories: Argonne (collaborations involving the Fragment Mass Analyzer (FMA) and {gamma}-ray arrays), Brookhaven (the RHIC and Phenix projects), and Berkeley (GAMMASPHERE). We have worked closely with a variety of university groups in the last three years, especially those in the UNISOR and now UNIRIB collaborations. And, in all aspects of our program, we have maintained close collaborations with theorists, both to inspire the most exciting experiments to perform and to extract the pertinent physics from the results. The specific areas discussed in this report are: properties of high-spin states; study of low-energy levels of nuclei far from stability; and high energy heavy-ion physics.

  11. KINETIC STUDIES OF THE REDUCTION OF AROMATIC AZO COMPOUNDS IN ANAEROBIC SEDIMENT/WATER SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reductive transformation of azobenzene and selected derivatives was investigated in anaerobic sediment/water systems. The azo compounds exhibited pseudo-first-order disappearance kinetics through at least three half-lives. The reduction kinetics of these compounds was studied...

  12. Evaluation of the National Assessment of Educational Progress. Study Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckendahl, Chad W.; Davis, Susan L.; Plake, Barbara S.; Sireci, Stephen G.; Hambleton, Ronald K.; Zenisky, April L.; Wells, Craig S.

    2009-01-01

    The "Evaluation of the National Assessment of Educational Progress: Study Reports" describes the special studies that comprised the design of the evaluation. In the Final Report, the authors presented a practical discussion of the evaluation studies to its primary, intended audience, namely policymakers. On this accompanying CD, readers will find…

  13. [Kinetic studies of protein kinase A in rat liver during late sepsis].

    PubMed

    Jin, Y W; Yang, S L; Hsu, H K; Wu, S N; Liu, M S

    1992-09-01

    The covalent modification of receptor proteins via phosphorylation and dephosphorylation is one of the principal mechanisms controlling carbohydrate metabolism and is known to be regulated by various protein kinases. Recent studies indicated that many hormones may exert their effects on cellular metabolism by regulating intracellular c-AMP levels and by activating a c-AMP dependent protein kinase, i.e., protein kinase A. The metabolic disturbances during sepsis are characterized by an initial hyperglycemia followed by a progressive hypoglycemia and a depletion of hepatic glycogen content. The latter is coupled with a slowdown in glycogenesis, an accelerated glycogenolysis, and a depression in gluconeogenesis in the liver. Since the liver is the major organ that regulates the homeostatic level of blood glucose, it is conceivable that the sepsis-induced glucose dyshomeostasis might be mediated by changes in protein kinase activity and the kinetic characteristics of enzymes. The present experiment was designed to study the correlation between protein kinase A and the pathophysiology of hepatic glucose dyshomeostasis during sepsis. Sepsis was induced in rats by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Late sepsis occurred 18 hours after CLP. Protein kinase A was extracted from the rat livers by acid precipitation and ammonium sulfate fractionation, and then partially purified by DEAE-cellulose. The results show that in the late sepsis, type-I protein kinase A (eluted at low ionic strength) activity was significantly decreased by 34-52% (P < 0.01). The kinetic parameters such as Vmax's for ATP, histone, and c-AMP were also significantly decreased from the control values of 6.1 +/- 0.9, 5.4 +/- 0.8, and 5.1 +/- 1.9 nmoles/mg.min. to 3.6 +/- 0.5, 2.8 +/- 0.3, and 2.5 +/- 0.5 nmoles/mg.min., respectively. Analysis using Hill's equation indicates that the S0.5 and n (Hill coefficient) values of the various substrates and activators for type-I protein kinase A remained unchanged

  14. Hydroxylamine nitrate self-catalytic kinetics study with adiabatic calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lijun; Wei, Chunyang; Guo, Yuyan; Rogers, William J; Sam Mannan, M

    2009-03-15

    Hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN) is an important member of the hydroxylamine compound family with applications that include equipment decontamination in the nuclear industry and aqueous or solid propellants. Due to its instability and autocatalytic behavior, HAN has been involved in several incidents at the Hanford and Savannah River Site (SRS) [Technical Report on Hydroxylamine Nitrate, US Department of Energy, 1998]. Much research has been conducted on HAN in different areas, such as combustion mechanism, decomposition mechanism, and runaway behavior. However, the autocatalytic decomposition behavior of HAN at runaway stage has not been fully addressed due to its highly exothermic and rapid decomposition behavior. This work is focused on extracting HAN autocatalytic kinetics and analyzing HAN critical behavior from adiabatic calorimetry measurements. A lumped autocatalytic kinetic model for HAN and associated model parameters are determined. Also the storage and handling critical conditions of diluted HAN solution without metal presence are quantified. PMID:18639378

  15. A study of the Sabatier-methanation reaction kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verostko, C. E.; Forsythe, R. K.

    1974-01-01

    The kinetics of the Sabatier methanation reaction, the reduction of carbon dioxide with hydrogen to methane and water, was investigated for 58 percent nickel on kieselguhr catalyst and 20 percent ruthenium on alumina catalyst. Differential rate data from an experimental program were correlated with a power function rate equation both for forward and reverse reactions. The kinetic parameters of activation energy, frequency rate constant and reaction order were determined for the rate equation. The values of these parameters were obtained from an Arrhenius plot of the experimental differential rate data. Also the carbon monoxide side reaction effect was measured and included in the correlation of parameters. The reaction was found to fit the rate equation experimentally within the temperature range 421 K, where the reaction effectively begins, the 800 K where the reaction rate drops and departs from the rate equation form.

  16. Catalyst Screening and Kinetic Studies Using Microchannel Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Chunshe; Palo, Daniel R.; Tonkovich, Annalee Y.; Wang, Yong

    2007-07-15

    A multi-parallel microchannel reactor system is described, as related to catalyst screening and discovery for heat-intensive heterogeneous catalytic reactions. Example systems are detailed, in which the rapid heat transfer of the screening device is utilized to maintain isothermal operation in multiple channels for catalyst screening as well as kinetic investigations. The advantages of the system and pertinent results are discussed, specifically for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, methanol oxidation to formaldehyde, and methanol steam reforming.

  17. Kinetic study of asphaltene dissolution in amphiphile/alkane solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Permsukarome, P.; Chang, C.; Fogler, H.S.

    1997-09-01

    The kinetics of dissolution of pentane-insoluble solid asphaltene precipitates by amphiphile/alkane solutions were investigated using a differential reactor flow system. Two amphiphiles, dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid and nonylphenol, and five alkane solvents, ranging from hexane to hexadecane, were used. Results showed that the rate of asphaltene dissolution in amphiphile/alkane fluids could be approximated with a first-order kinetics with respect to the undissolved asphaltene mass in solution. The specific dissolution rate constant, k, varied with the concentration of amphiphiles, the type of alkane solvents, the temperature, and the fluid flow rate. The rate of asphaltene dissolution displayed a Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics with respect to the concentration of amphiphiles. Increasing the temperature of amphiphile/alkane fluids also enhanced the rate of asphaltene dissolution. The apparent activation energy for asphaltene dissolution was approximated to be 4--7 kcal/mol. The rate of asphaltene dissolution was also greater in amphiphile solutions containing lighter alkanes, such as hexane, with lower viscosities. These trends suggest that both surface reaction and mass transfer processes are important to the rate of asphaltene dissolution in amphiphile/alkane fluids.

  18. Effect of community structure on the kinetics of anaerobic degradation of aromatic compounds. Progress report, March 1989--June 1991

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney, M.J.

    1991-06-01

    The physiology of fatty acid metabolism and the kinetics of benzoate degradation by anaerobic syntrophic bacteria were studied. We have shown that: a threshold for benzoate degradation by a syntrophic coculture of Syntrophus buswellii and Desulfovibrio strain G11 exists and the value of the threshold depends on the amount of benzoate and acetate suggesting a thermodynamic limitation. Syntrophomonas wolfei has the enzymatic ability to produce formate and that low levels of formate are made during growth in pure culture with crotonate or in coculture with butyrate. However, the high specific activities of hydrogenase compared to formate dehydrogenase indicate that hydrogen rather than formate is the intermediate involved in the interspecies transfer of reducing equivalents. We have isolated Syntrophus buswellii and a novel anaerobic bacteria that catalyzes an aryl-ether cleavage reaction using crotonate as the energy source. Several novel obligately halophilic anaerobes from hypersaline oil reservoir brines were isolated and characterized. Two of these degraded pyrogallate with the production of acetate. We have shown that S. wolfei synthesizes poly-{beta}hydroxyalkanoate (PHA) by two routes, directly from a {beta}-oxidation intermediate without cleaving a C-C bond and by the condensation of two acetyl-CoA molecules. The formation of D-3-hydroxyacyl-CoA needed for PHA synthesis occurs by the activity of a acetoacetyl-CoA reductase rather than a enoyl-CoA hydratase. The genes for PHA synthesis in S. wolfei have been cloned into Escherichia coli.

  19. Kinetics and mechanisms of metal retention/release in geochemical processes in soil. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.W.

    1998-06-01

    'The long-term fate of toxic metals in soils cannot be precisely predicted, and often remediation recommendations and techniques may be ineffective or unnecessary. This work will generate basic knowledge on the kinetics and mechanism(s) of heavy metal retention/release by soil mineral colloids. The information should assist in improving remediation strategies for toxic heavy metal contaminated soils. The objectives are: (1) To determine the effects of residence time on the mechanisms of Cr(VI), Cu(II), Co(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), and Ni(II) sorption/release on Fe and Al oxide and clay mineral surfaces using kinetic studies coupled to extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. (2) To study the effect of temperature, pH, and phosphate on metal sorption by oxides, and derive thermodynamic parameters to describe the sorption process. As of June, 16, 1997 several clay minerals were tested for their efficiency of removing Cr from aqueous systems. The materials tested--smectite, vermiculites, illites, and kaolinite--represent the natural clay minerals that are abundant in soils and sediments. The clays were used in either their original or reduced (reduced with sodium dithionite) forms. The experimental result indicate that the reduced clays acted as an efficient remover of Cr(VI) from an aqueous system. The XANES spectra of Cr-treated clays provided evidence that the clays reduced Cr(VI) to Cr(III) and immobilized Cr in the clays at the same time. Sodium dithionite applied directly into aqueous systems reduced Cr(VI) to Cr(III), but could not immobilize Cr even in the presence of the clays. The Cr(VI) removal capacity varied with the clay mineral type and the structural Fe content. For the clays used in this study, the removal capacity follows the orders of smectites > vermiculites and illites > kaolinite. Within the same type of clay minerals, reduction of Cr(VI) is highly related to the ferrous iron

  20. Enzymatic Synthesis of Furfuryl Alcohol Ester with Oleic Acid by Candida antarctica Lipase B and Its Kinetic Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Avery; Dey, Tanmoy; Ghosh, Mahua; Ghosh, Jaydip; Ghosh, Santinath

    2012-08-01

    This study investigated the successful enzymatic production of furfuryl oleate and its detailed kinetic study by Michaelis-Menten model. Esterification of oleic acid and furfuryl alcohol by Candida antarctica lipase B (Novozym 435 preparation) in a solvent free system was studied in the present work at 1:1 molar ratio of furfuryl alcohol and oleic acid. About 99 % conversion (on the basis of oleic acid) has been achieved within 6 h at 5 % enzyme concentration. Ping-pong bi-bi mechanism (inhibition phenomenon taken into account) was applied to describe the ratios as a complex kinetic model. The kinetic parameters were determined using MATLAB language programme. The two initial rate constants KA and KB respectively were found out by different progress curves plotted with the help of MATLAB language programme. It was concluded from the results that furfuryl alcohol considerably inhibited the enzymatic reaction while oleic acid had negligible inhibitory effect. It was clearly seen that the initial rate was increased with the increase in the furfuryl alcohol concentration until 2 M/L after which there was a drop in the initial rate depicting the inhibitory effect of furfuryl alcohol. Surprisingly, it has been observed that addition of 0.1 mol of product activated the esterification reaction. Finally, the model was found to be statistically fitting well with the experimental data.

  1. Social Studies Progress Monitoring and Intervention for Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyers, Sarah J.; Lembke, Erica S.; Curs, Bradley

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the technical adequacy of vocabulary-matching curriculum-based measurement (CBM) to identify and monitor the progress of 148 middle school students in social studies. In addition, the effectiveness of a reading comprehension intervention, Collaborative Strategic Reading (Klingner, Vaughn, Dimino, Schumm, & Bryant, 2001),…

  2. Ion kinetics and thermochemistry pertinent to mass spectrometric organic speciation. Progress report, November 15, 1992--14 November 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Sieck, L.W.

    1998-05-01

    Essentially all of the completed/in progress studies during the last contract period have involved the NIST HPMS unit. Three distinct areas of in-house research are recognizable: (i) determinations of binding energies and entropies for association and cluster ions, which is accomplished by measuring the temperature dependence of the appropriate equilibrium, (ii) measurement of the temperature dependence unimolecular and bimolecular rate constants, and (iii) evaluation of PA`s, HA`s, and IP`s via measurement of variable-temperature equilibria of the type AH{sup +} + B {leftrightarrow} BH{sup +} + A, A{sup -} + BH {leftrightarrow} AH + B{sup -}, and A{sup +} + B {leftrightarrow} B+ + A. Key results from some representative projects are summarized below.

  3. Kinetic studies of nitrate removal from aqueous solution using granular chitosan-Fe(III) complex.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qili; Chen, Nan; Feng, Chuanping; Zhang, Jing; Hu, Weiwu; Lv, Long

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, a granular chitosan-Fe(III) complex was prepared as a feasible adsorbent for the removal of nitrate from an aqueous solution. There was no significant change in terms of nitrate removal efficiency over a wide pH range of 3-11. Nitrate adsorption on the chitosan-Fe(III) complex followed the Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm model. In order to more accurately reflect adsorption and desorption behaviors at the solid/solution interface, kinetic model I and kinetic model II were proposed to simulate the interfacial process in a batch system. Nitrate adsorption on the chitosan-Fe(III) complex followed the pseudo-first-order kinetic model and kinetic model I. The proposed half-time could provide useful information for optimizing process design. Adsorption and desorption rate constants obtained from kinetic model I and kinetic model II were beneficial to understanding the interfacial process and the extent of adsorption reaction. Kinetic model I and kinetic model II implied that nitrate uptake exponentially approaches a limiting value. PMID:26942545

  4. Molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) porous electrode and kinetic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Selman, J.R. )

    1992-10-01

    This report sumarizes a research project undertaken to improve the performance and understand the limitations of porous electrodes for molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs). Using a novel MCFC rotating-disk'' electrode, the electrode kinetic and mass transfer properties of commonly used electrode materials were determined, and a practical performance model for MCFC electrodes was developed. The report also outlines a general strategy for designing a high-performance MCFC electrode, assesses the current understanding of porous electrode operation, and discusses some of the unresolved questions of the field. An appendix gives a complete list of the many theses, journal articles, and symposium contributions based on this research.

  5. Kinetic study of ion-acoustic plasma vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, S. A.; Aman-ur-Rehman; Mendonca, J. T.

    2014-09-15

    The kinetic theory of electron plasma waves with finite orbital angular momentum has recently been introduced by Mendonca. This model shows possibility of new kind of plasma waves and instabilities. We have extended the theory to ion-acoustic plasma vortices carrying orbital angular momentum. The dispersion equation is derived under paraxial approximation which exhibits a kind of linear vortices and their Landau damping. The numerical solutions are obtained and compared with analytical results which are in good agreement. The physical interpretation of the ion-acoustic plasma vortices and their Landau resonance conditions are given for typical case of Maxwellian plasmas.

  6. Progress in the Laboratory Study of Interstellar Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recent progress in the laboratory study of cosmic carbon analogs will be discussed. After a brief review of the history of laboratory studies of interstellar carbon molecules and ions, new gas-phase results will be discussed and contrasted to previous studies that used the techniques of matrix isolation spectroscopy. Finally, the impact of these new laboratory studies on the field of astrophysics will be discussed.

  7. Pharmacodynamic properties of faropenem demonstrated by studies of time-kill kinetics and postantibiotic effect.

    PubMed

    Boswell, F J; Andrews, J M; Wise, R

    1997-03-01

    The pharmacodynamic properties of faropenem, a new oral penem antibiotic, were investigated by studying time-kill kinetics and postantibiotic effect. Time-kill kinetics were employed against strains of Bacteroides fragilis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis and Streptococcus pyogenes. The postantibiotic effects of faropenem were studied using strains of E. coli, S. aureus, H. influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae. The time-kill kinetic data demonstrated that faropenem has bactericidal activity. Faropenem exhibited a significant postantibiotic effect against all strains except H. influenzae. PMID:9096193

  8. A kinetic study of hydrolysis of polyester elastomer in magnetic tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, K.; Watanabe, H.

    1994-01-01

    A useful method for kinetic study of the hydrolysis of polyester elastomer is established which uses the number-average molecular weight. The reasonableness of this method is confirmed and the effect of magnetic particles on hydrolysis is considered.

  9. Studies on cultivation kinetics for elastase production by Bacillus sp. EL31410.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi-He; He, Guo-Qing; Schwarz, Paul

    2004-06-01

    It was the first time to study elastase batch cultivation kinetics. This paper discusses the growth kinetics, elastase production, and substrate consumption kinetics model of Bacillus sp. EL31410 in batch cultivation. A simple model was proposed using a logistic equation for growth, the Luedeking-Piret equation for elastase production, and the Luedeking-Piret-like equation for glucose consumption. The model appeared to provide a reasonable description for each parameter during the growth phase. This study could provide some support for studying elastase fermentation kinetics, especially for studying its singular growth phenomenon. However, the model for elastase production is not good for explaining the real process and is still up to research. PMID:15161197

  10. Study of the kinetics of catalytic decomposition of hydrazine vapors on palladium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khomenko, A. A.; Apelbaum, L. O.

    1987-01-01

    The decomposition rates of N2H4 on a palladium surface are studied. Experiments were conducted in a circulating unit at atmosphere pressure. The experimental method is described. The laws found for the reaction kinetics are explained by equations.

  11. A Study in Enzyme Kinetics Using an Ion-Specific Electrode.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turchi, Sandra; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory experiment on enzyme kinetics using the D-amino acid oxidase system and an ammonia electrode. Preparation of an ammonia standard curve, a sample preparation, and inhibition studies are discussed. (YP)

  12. A kinetic study of the antihistaminic effect of terfenadine.

    PubMed

    Cheng, H C; Woodward, J K

    1982-01-01

    Kinetics of the antihistaminic effect of alpha-[4-(1,1-dimethylethyl)phenyl]-4-(hydroxydiphenylmethyl)-1- piperidinebutanol (terfenadine, RMI 9918, Triludan, Teldane, resp.) were examined in the isolated guinea pig ileum and spirally cut tracheal strip preparations. In the isolated guinea pig ileum, terfenadine produced a parallel or competitive shift (3.16 X 10(-8) and 10(-7) mol/l) as well as a nonparallel or unsurmountable shift (3.16 X 10(-7) and 10(-6) mol/l) of the histamine dose response curves. Using the dose ratio test, it was concluded that terfenadine competes at the same receptors as chlorpheniramine, namely, the histamine H1-receptors. The antihistaminic effects of terfenadine, both the competitive and unsurmountable effects, were difficult to reverse by washout techniques whereas the nonspecific effects (against acetylcholine and barium chloride) could be readily washed out. The unsurmountable antagonism of histamine by terfenadine may result from a slow dissociation of terfenadine from the histamine H1-receptor. When terfenadine (2 mg/kg) or chlorpheniramine (2 mg/kg) was administered systemically, either orally or intraperitoneally, to guinea pigs and the antihistaminic effect assessed in vitro (isolated ileal strips and tracheal strips) terfenadine consistently produced a longer duration of action than chlorpheniramine. It is concluded that terfenadine is a potent, selective histamine H1-receptor antagonist; the kinetics of association/dissociation of terfenadine with histamine H1-receptors may account for the long-lasting antihistaminic effect in various animal models. PMID:6129862

  13. A study of switchgrass pyrolysis: Product variability and reaction kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovee, Jonathan Matthew

    Samples of the same cultivar of cave-in-rock switchgrass were harvested from plots in Frankenmuth, Roger City, Cass County, and Grand Valley, Michigan. It was determined that variation exists, between locations, among the pyrolytic compounds which can lead to variability in bio-oil and increased processing costs at bio-refineries to make hydrocarbon fuels. Washed and extractives-free switchgrass samples, which contain a lower alkali and alkaline earth metals content than untreated samples, were shown to produce lower amounts of acids, esters, furans, ketones, phenolics, and saccharides and also larger amounts of aldehydes upon pyrolysis. Although the minerals catalyzed pyrolytic reactions, there was no evidence indicating their effect on reducing the production of anhydrosugars, specifically levoglucosan. To further link minerals present in the biomass to a catalytic pathway, mathematic models were employed to determine the kinetic parameters of the switchgrass. While the calculated activation energies of switchgrass, using the FWO and KAS methods, were 227.7 and 217.8 kJ/mol, correspondingly, it was concluded that the activation energies for the switchgrass hemicellulose and cellulose peaks were 115.5 and 158.2 kJ/mol, respectively, using a modified model-fitting method. The minerals that effect the production of small molecules and levoglucosan also have an observable catalytic effect on switchgrass reaction rate, which may be quantifiable through the use of reaction kinetics so as to determine activation energy.

  14. Stable isotope studies of nicotine kinetics and bioavailability

    SciTech Connect

    Benowitz, N.L.; Jacob, P. 3d.; Denaro, C.; Jenkins, R. )

    1991-03-01

    The stable isotope-labeled compound 3',3'-dideuteronicotine was used to investigate the disposition kinetics of nicotine in smokers, the systemic absorption of nicotine from cigarette smoke, and the bioavailability of nicotine ingested as oral capsules. Blood levels of labeled nicotine could be measured for 9 hours after a 30-minute intravenous infusion. Analysis of disposition kinetics in 10 healthy men revealed a multiexponential decline after the end of an infusion, with an elimination half-life averaging 203 minutes. This half-life was longer than that previously reported, indicating the presence of a shallow elimination phase. Plasma clearance averaged 14.6 ml/min/kg. The average intake of nicotine per cigarette was 2.29 mg. A cigarette smoke-monitoring system that directly measured particulate matter in smoke was evaluated in these subjects. Total particulate matter, number of puffs on the cigarette, total puff volume, and time of puffing correlated with the intake of nicotine from smoking. The oral bioavailability of nicotine averaged 44%. This bioavailability is higher than expected based on the systemic clearance of nicotine and suggests that there may be significant extrahepatic metabolism of nicotine.

  15. Computational Study and Kinetic Analysis of the Aminolysis of Thiolactones.

    PubMed

    Desmet, Gilles B; D'hooge, Dagmar R; Sabbe, Maarten K; Marin, Guy B; Du Prez, Filip E; Espeel, Pieter; Reyniers, Marie-Françoise

    2015-09-01

    The aminolysis of three differently α-substituted γ-thiolactones (C4H5OSX, X = H, NH2, and NH(CO)CH3) is modeled based on CBS-QB3 calculated free energies corrected for solvation using COSMO-RS. For the first time, quantitative kinetic and thermodynamic data are provided for the concerted path and the stepwise path over a neutral tetrahedral intermediate. These paths can take place via an unassisted, an amine-assisted, or a thiol-assisted mechanism. Amine assistance lowers the free energy barriers along both paths, while thiol assistance only lowers the formation of the neutral tetrahedral intermediate. Based on the ab initio calculated rate coefficients, a kinetic model is constructed that is able to reliably describe experimental observations for the aminolysis of N-acetyl-dl-homocysteine thiolactone with n-butylamine in THF and CHCl3. Reaction path analysis shows that for all conditions relevant for applications in polymer synthesis and postpolymer modification, an assisted stepwise mechanism is operative in which the formation of the neutral tetrahedral intermediate is rate-determining and which is mainly amine-assisted at low conversions and thiol-assisted at high conversions. PMID:26280542

  16. Optical studies of dynamical processes in disordered systems. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, W.M.

    1994-05-01

    The authors present an abbreviated summary of the progress they have attained in the course of the abbreviated first year of the present three-year grant. The focus of their research continues to be on studies which help them understand various dynamical processes which affect the structure and the optical properties of disordered and amorphous materials. They continue to make significant progress in their attempts to understand the factors which affect, for example, the efficiencies of activated glasses. This report contains a brief description of the work they have carried out during the present grant period and an outline of the initiatives they are presently undertaking or continuing during the second period.

  17. Biological Sciences Curriculum Study Newsletter Number 56, Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, George M., Ed.

    This newsletter presents a progress report for the 1973-74 year for the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS). The program for the Educable Mentally Handicapped is reviewed and a new series of Animal Behavior films is described. Other articles in the newsletter include information on the Human Sciences Program with emphasis on the…

  18. On Studies of Moral Socialization of Students: Progress and Perplexities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Renjie

    2008-01-01

    Moral socialization of students consists of five elements: process, subject, agent, content and pattern. This paper discusses the studies of the former three: their progress and perplexities, covering the following puzzles: "Why does the youth socialization take longer time?" "Are there any critical periods in student socialization?" "How do we…

  19. Progressive Macular Hypomelanosis in Korean Patients: A Clinicopathologic Study

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Seon Wook; Hong, Soon Kwon; Kim, Sang Hyun; Park, Jeong Hoon; Seo, Jong Keun; Sung, Ho Suk

    2009-01-01

    Background Progressive macular hypomelanosis is characterized by ill-defined, non-scaly, hypopigmented macules primarily on the trunk of the body. Although numerous cases of progressive macular hypomelanosis have been reported, there have been no clinicopathologic studies of progressive macular hypomelanosis in Korean patients. Objective In this study we examined the clinical characteristics, histologic findings, and treatment methods for progressive macular hypomelanosis in a Korean population. Methods Between 1996 and 2005, 20 patients presented to the Department of Dermatology at Busan Paik Hospital with acquired, non-scaly, confluent, hypopigmented macules on the trunk, and with no history of inflammation or infection. The medical records, clinical photographs, and pathologic findings for each patient were examined. Results The patients included 5 men and 15 women. The mean age of onset was 21.05±3.47 years. The back was the most common site of involvement. All KOH examinations were negative. A Wood's lamp examination showed hypopigmented lesions compared with the adjacent normal skin. A microscopic examination showed a reduction in the number of melanin granules in the lesions compared with the adjacent normal skin, although S-100 immunohistochemical staining did not reveal significant differences in the number of melanocytes. Among the 20 patients, 7 received topical drug therapy, 6 were treated with narrow-band ultraviolet B phototherapy, 4 received oral minocycline, and 3 did not receive any treatment. Conclusion Most of the patients with progressive macular hypomelanosis had asymptomatic ill-defined, non-scaly, and symmetric hypopigmented macules, especially on the back and abdomen. Histologically, the number of melanocytes did not differ significantly between the hypopigmented macules and the normal perilesional skin. No effective treatment is known for progressive macular hypomelanosis; however, narrow-band ultraviolet B phototherapy may be a useful

  20. Dechlorination of polychlorinated biphenyls: A kinetic study of removal of PCBs from mineral oils

    SciTech Connect

    Filippis, P. de; Scarsella, M.; Pochetti, F.

    1999-02-01

    A kinetic study was done of the dechlorination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) eliminated from contaminated dielectric oils by using the potassium poly(ethylene glycolate) (KPEG) process. Experimental runs at laboratory scale showed that the kinetics of the removal reaction was first-order for each PCB present and first-order with respect to the KPEG concentration. The PCB elimination grade was also affected by the KOH/PEG ratio. An exponential correlation was found between the kinetic constant for each congener and its respective gas chromatographic relative retention time.

  1. Study of Aspect Ratio Effects on Kinetic MHD Instabilities in NSTX and DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    E.D. Fredrickson; W.W. Heidbrink; C.Z. Cheng; N.N. Gorelenkov; E. Belova; A.W. Hyatt; G.J. Kramer; J. Manickam; J. Menard; R. Nazikian; T.L. Rhodes; E. Ruskov

    2004-10-21

    We report general observations of kinetic instabilities on the low aspect-ratio National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) and describe explicit aspect ratio scaling studies of kinetic instabilities using both the NSTX and the DIII-D tokamak. The NSTX and the DIII-D tokamak are nearly ideal for such experiments, having a factor of two difference in major radius but otherwise similar parameters. We also introduce new theoretical work on the physics of kinetic ballooning modes (KBM), toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAE), and compressional Alfven eigenmodes (CAE) with applications to NSTX.

  2. Autoignition chemistry of the hexane isomers: An experimental and kinetic modeling study

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, H.J.; Gaffuri, P.; Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K.; Leppard, W.R.

    1995-06-01

    Autoignition of the five distinct isomers of hexane is studied experimentally under motored engine conditions and computationally using a detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism. Computed and experimental results are compared and used to help understand the chemical factors leading to engine knock in spark-ignited engines and the molecular structure factors contributing to octane rating for hydrocarbon fuels. The kinetic model reproduces observed variations in critical compression ratio with fuel structure, and it also provides intermediate and final product species concentrations in very dose agreement with observed results. In addition, the computed results provide insights into the kinetic origins of fuel octane sensitive.

  3. New techniques for positron emission tomography in the study of human neurological disorders: Progress report, December 15, 1987-June 14, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1988-02-01

    A brief progress report is presented describing the preparation and animal testing of /sup 11/C scopolamine and /sup 18/F fluoride. Additional studies entitled ''Automated Arterial Blood Sampling System for PET,'' Rapid Data Analysis Schemes for Functional Imaging in PET,'' and ''Tracer Kinetic Modeling in PET Measures of Cholinergic Receptors'' are described

  4. Alkaline assisted thermal oil recovery: Kinetic and displacement studies

    SciTech Connect

    Saneie, S.; Yortsos, Y.C.

    1993-06-01

    This report deals with two major issues of chemical assisted flooding - the interaction of caustic, one of the proposed additives to steam flood, with the reservoir rock, and the displacement of oil by a chemical flood at elevated temperatures. A mathematical model simulating the kinetics of silica dissolution and hydroxyl ion consumption in a typical alkaline flooding environment is first developed. The model is based on the premise that dissolution occurs via hydrolysis of active sites through the formation of an intermediate complex, which is in equilibrium with the silicic acid in solution. Both static (batch) and dynamic (core flood) processes are simulated to examine the sensitivity of caustic consumption and silica dissolution to process parameters, and to determine rates of propagation of pH values. The model presented provides a quantitative description of the quartz-alkali interaction in terms of pH, salinity, ion exchange properties, temperature and contact time, which are of significant importance in the design of soluble silicate flooding processes. The modeling of an adiabatic hot waterflood assisted by the simultaneous injection of a chemical additive is next presented. The model is also applicable to the hot alkaline flooding under conditions of negligible adsorption of the generated anionic surfactant and of hydroxide adsorption being Langmuirian. The theory of generalized simple waves (coherence ) is used to develop solutions for the temperature, concentration, and oil saturation profiles, as well as the oil recovery curves. It is shown that, for Langmuir adsorption kinetics, the chemical resides in the heated region of the reservoir if its injection concentration is below a critical value, and in the unheated region if its concentration exceeds this critical value. Results for a chemical slug injection in a tertiary recovery process indicate recovery performance is maximized when chemical resides in the heated region of the reservior.

  5. Fabrication and kinetics study of nano-Al/NiO thermite film by electrophoretic deposition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Daixiong; Li, Xueming

    2015-05-21

    Nano-Al/NiO thermites were successfully prepared as film by electrophoretic deposition (EPD). For the key issue of this EPD, a mixture solvent of ethanol-acetylacetone (1:1 in volume) containing 0.00025 M nitric acid was proved to be a suitable dispersion system for EPD. The kinetics of electrophoretic deposition for both nano-Al and nano-NiO were investigated; the linear relation between deposition weight and deposition time in short time and parabolic relation in prolonged time were observed in both EPDs. The critical transition time between linear deposition kinetics and parabolic deposition kinetics for nano-Al and nano-NiO were 20 and 10 min, respectively. The theoretical calculation of the kinetics of electrophoretic deposition revealed that the equivalence ratio of nano-Al/NiO thermites film would be affected by the behavior of electrophoretic deposition for nano-Al and nano-NiO. The equivalence ratio remained steady when the linear deposition kinetics dominated for both nano-Al and nano-NiO. The equivalence ratio would change with deposition time when deposition kinetics for nano-NiO changed into parabolic kinetics dominated after 10 min. Therefore, the rule was suggested to be suitable for other EPD of bicomposites. We also studied thermodynamic properties of electrophoretic nano-Al/NiO thermites film as well as combustion performance. PMID:25950271

  6. Kinetic study of antibiotic ciprofloxacin ozonation by MWCNT/MnO2 using Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Jalali, Hamed Moradmand

    2016-02-01

    Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation was used to investigate kinetics of antibiotic ciprofloxacin degradation by direct and heterogeneous catalytic (MnO2 and carbon nano-tube loaded with MnO2) ozonation. The reaction kinetic mechanisms of each system have been obtained. The rate constant values for the each step of the reaction mechanisms were attained as adjustable parameters by kinetic Monte Carlo simulation. The carbon nano-tube loaded with MnO2 plays important role as catalyst in the ciprofloxacin ozonation by increasing reactivity of ozone and ciprofloxacin drug on the surface of carbon nano-tube. Optimized amount of ozone and catalysts were obtained via studying the effect of inlet ozone concentration and initial amount of catalyst on the rate of ciprofloxacin degradation using Monte Carlo simulation. The simulation results of this study have reasonably agreement with the present experimental data for the ozonation of ciprofloxacin drug. PMID:26652449

  7. Flow-Based Systems for Rapid and High-Precision Enzyme Kinetics Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hartwell, Supaporn Kradtap; Grudpan, Kate

    2012-01-01

    Enzyme kinetics studies normally focus on the initial rate of enzymatic reaction. However, the manual operation of steps of the conventional enzyme kinetics method has some drawbacks. Errors can result from the imprecise time control and time necessary for manual changing the reaction cuvettes into and out of the detector. By using the automatic flow-based analytical systems, enzyme kinetics studies can be carried out at real-time initial rate avoiding the potential errors inherent in manual operation. Flow-based systems have been developed to provide rapid, low-volume, and high-precision analyses that effectively replace the many tedious and high volume requirements of conventional wet chemistry analyses. This article presents various arrangements of flow-based techniques and their potential use in future enzyme kinetics applications. PMID:22577614

  8. Effectiveness study of atropine for progressive myopia in Europeans

    PubMed Central

    Polling, J R; Kok, R G W; Tideman, J W L; Meskat, B; Klaver, C C W

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Randomized controlled trials have shown the efficacy of atropine for progressive myopia, and this treatment has become the preferred pattern for this condition in Taiwan. This study explores the effectiveness of atropine 0.5% treatment for progressive high myopia and adherence to therapy in a non-Asian country. Methods An effectiveness study was performed in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Overall 77 children (mean age 10.3 years±2.3), of European (n=53), Asian (n=18), and African (n=6) descent with progressive myopia were prescribed atropine 0.5% eye drops daily. Both parents and children filled in a questionnaire regarding adverse events and adherence to therapy. A standardized eye examination including cycloplegic refraction and axial length was performed at baseline and 1, 4, and 12 months after initiation of therapy. Results Mean spherical equivalent at baseline was −6.6D (±3.3). The majority (60/77, 78%) of children adhered to atropine treatment for 12 months; 11 of the 17 children who discontinued therapy did so within 1 month after the start of therapy. The most prominent reported adverse events were photophobia (72%), followed by reading problems (38%), and headaches (22%). The progression rate of spherical equivalent before treatment (−1.0D/year±0.7) diminished substantially during treatment (−0.1D/year±0.7) compared to those who ceased therapy (−0.5D/year±0.6; P=0.03). Conclusions Despite the relatively high occurrence of adverse events, our study shows that atropine can be an effective and sustainable treatment for progressive high myopia in Europeans. PMID:27101751

  9. Effectiveness study of atropine for progressive myopia in Europeans.

    PubMed

    Polling, J R; Kok, R G W; Tideman, J W L; Meskat, B; Klaver, C C W

    2016-07-01

    PurposeRandomized controlled trials have shown the efficacy of atropine for progressive myopia, and this treatment has become the preferred pattern for this condition in Taiwan. This study explores the effectiveness of atropine 0.5% treatment for progressive high myopia and adherence to therapy in a non-Asian country.MethodsAn effectiveness study was performed in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Overall 77 children (mean age 10.3 years±2.3), of European (n=53), Asian (n=18), and African (n=6) descent with progressive myopia were prescribed atropine 0.5% eye drops daily. Both parents and children filled in a questionnaire regarding adverse events and adherence to therapy. A standardized eye examination including cycloplegic refraction and axial length was performed at baseline and 1, 4, and 12 months after initiation of therapy.ResultsMean spherical equivalent at baseline was -6.6D (±3.3). The majority (60/77, 78%) of children adhered to atropine treatment for 12 months; 11 of the 17 children who discontinued therapy did so within 1 month after the start of therapy. The most prominent reported adverse events were photophobia (72%), followed by reading problems (38%), and headaches (22%). The progression rate of spherical equivalent before treatment (-1.0D/year±0.7) diminished substantially during treatment (-0.1D/year±0.7) compared to those who ceased therapy (-0.5D/year±0.6; P=0.03).ConclusionsDespite the relatively high occurrence of adverse events, our study shows that atropine can be an effective and sustainable treatment for progressive high myopia in Europeans. PMID:27101751

  10. Continuous-mixture kinetics of coal thermolysis in supercritical fluid. [Quarterly technical progress report, August--October 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.

    1992-11-09

    The model developed builds on earlier models and introduces the following features: new rate expressions for both single-and two- fragment reactions; representation of initial coal composition by molecular weight distributions of chemical functional groups releasable from coal matrix by bond rupture; and applicability to semi-batch reactor. For the rate of coal depolymerization, two types of reactions are considered, one producing a single product species and the other producing two product species. A visualization of the reaction kinetics is presented.

  11. [Study on Chemical Kinetic Effect of Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma].

    PubMed

    Zrang, Peng; Hong, Yan-ji; Shen, Shuang-yan; Ding, Xiao-yu; Ma, Di

    2015-03-01

    To reveal the mechanism of plasma (assisted the ignition process of methane/air further, schematic of dielectric barrier discharge plasma system with atmospheric air was designed and set up, the emission spectrum of dielectric barrier discharge plasma with atmospheric air was measured, and the active particles produced by the interaction of dielectric barrier discharge plasma with atmospheric air were analyzed with the spectrum technology, the ignition model and calculation methods of sensitivity analysis and reaction path analysis were given, effects of NO and O3 on the ignition delay time were simulated, and the chemical kinetics mechanism of NO and O3 assisted ignition was revealed via sensitivity analysis and reaction path analysis. The results show that main excited particles of N2 and O3 are generated via effect of plasma on the atmospheric air, which are converted into active particles of NO(ξ) and O3 in the end, the life of which are longer than any other active particles, effects of plasma on the ignition is simplified as effects of NO(ξ) and O3 on the ignition; NO and O3 could reduce the ignition delay time significantly, but the amplitude decrease with increase of the initial temperature, this is because the rate of ignition is decided by the oxidation rate of CH3, the oxidized pathway of CH3 is R155 and R156 for auto-ignition and their rates are slower when temperature is low, so the ignition delay time of methane/air is longer; NO could reduce the ignition delay time significantly because of the oxidized pathway of CH3 is changed to R327 CH3O2 + NO = CH3O + NO2, R328 CH3 + NO2 = CH3O + NO for NO(ξ) (assisted ignition process from R155 and R156 for auto-ignition; and the chemical kinetic effect is the dominating factor of O3 on the ignition and which change the reaction path. PMID:26117883

  12. Sorption kinetic studies of ammonium from aqueous solution on different inorganic and organic media.

    PubMed

    Kucić, Dajana; Cosić, Ivana; Vuković, Marija; Briski, Felicita

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the sorption of ammonium from aqueous solution onto activated carbon, natural zeolite, peat and potting soil was studied by performing batch kinetic sorption experiments. The activated carbon wasn't efficiently removing ammonium at concentrations higher than 50 mg L(-1). Sorption isotherms of ammonium on zeolite, peat and potting soil were determined at 25 degrees C and 200 rpm with the initial concentration of 50-7000 mg L(-1). Equilibrium data were fitted by Freundlich, Langmuir and Temkin isotherm and parameters were evaluated according these models. Langmuir model gives better fit to experimental data than Freundlich and Temkin models. Maximum adsorption capacities were for activated carbon 0.631 mg g(-1), zeolite 58 mg g(-1), peat 595 mg g(-1) and for potting soil 575 mg g(-1). The equilibrium kinetic data were analyzed using adsorption kinetic models: the pseudo-first and second-order equations and were found to follow the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. A comparison between linear and non-linear regression method for estimating the adsorption and kinetics parameters was examined. The obtained results showed that non-linear method may be a better way to determine the kinetic parameters. Thermodynamic studies showed exothermic and endothermic nature of the adsorption of NH4(+) on inorganic and organic adsorbents, respectively. From present results it can be seen that zeolite, peat and potting soil are good adsorbents for removal ammonium from aqueous solution. PMID:23841339

  13. The kinetics of the oxidation of pyrite by ferric ions and dissolved oxygen: An electrochemical study

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, P.R.; Crundwell, F.K.

    2000-01-01

    The dissolution of pyrite is important in the geochemical cycling of iron and sulphur, in the formation of acid mine drainage, and in the extraction of metals by bacterial leaching. Many researchers have studied the kinetics of dissolution, and the rate of dissolution has often been found to be half-order in ferric ions or oxygen. Previous work has not adequately explained the kinetics of dissolution of pyrite. The dissolution of pyrite is an oxidation-reduction reaction. The kinetics of the oxidation and reduction half-reactions was studied independently using electrochemical techniques of voltammetry. The kinetics of the overall reaction was studied by the electrochemical technique of potentiometry, which consisted of measuring the mixed potential of a sample of corroding pyrite in solutions of different compositions. The kinetics of the half reactions are related to the kinetics of the overall dissolution reaction by the condition that there is no accumulation of charge. This principle is used to derive expressions for the mixed potential and the rate of dissolution, which successfully describe the mixed potential measurements and the kinetics of dissolution reported in the literature. It is shown that the observations of half-order kinetics and that the oxygen in the sulphate product arises from water are both a direct consequence of the electrochemical mechanism. Thus it is concluded that the electrochemical reaction steps occurring at the mineral-solution interface control the rate of dissolution. Raman spectroscopy was used to analyze reaction products formed on the pyrite surface. The results indicated that small amounts of polysulphides form on the surface of the pyrite. However, it was also found that the mixed (corrosion) potential does not change over a 14-day leaching period. This indicates that even though polysulphide material is present on the surface, it does not influence the rate of the reactions occurring at the surface. Measurement of the

  14. SMX degradation by ozonation and UV radiation: a kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaowei; Garoma, Temesgen; Chen, Zhonglin; Wang, Lili; Wu, Youxian

    2012-06-01

    The rate constants of sulfamethoxazole (SMX) degradation by ozonation and UV(254) radiation were investigated under various parameters including influent ozone gas concentration, initial SMX concentration, UV light intensity, ionic strength, water quality in terms of varying anions (bicarbonate, sulfate and nitrate), humic acid (HA) and pH. The results indicated that the removal of SMX by ozonation and UV(254) radiation fitted well to a pseudo first-order kinetic model and the rate constants were in the range of (0.9-9.8)×10(-3) and (1.7-18.9)×10(-3) s(-1), respectively. The second-order rate constants of SMX with ozone (ko(3)), under varying operational parameters, were also determined and varied in the range of (0.60-3.38)±0.13×10(5)M(-1) s(-1). In addition, SMX degradation through UV pretreatment followed by ozonation in the presence of HA was proved to be an effective method which can remove SMX with a low ozone dose. The results suggested that ozonation of SMX was more affected by concentration of influent ozone gas, alkalinity, and HA, while incident UV light intensity, pH, and HA were the dominant factors influencing UV degradation of SMX. PMID:22386457

  15. Kinetic studies of amylase and biomass production by Calvatia gigantea

    SciTech Connect

    Kekos, D.; Macris, B.J.

    1987-01-01

    Production of alpha-amylase (alpha-4, glucan 4-glucanohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.1) by microorganisms has been practiced for many years in small and large scale operations and the literature on this enzyme is voluminous. Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus oryzae have been reported as the main fungal species used for commercial production of the enzyme. On the other hand, large volumes of low-cost agricultural products such as acorn (the perisperm-free dry seed contains approximately 60% starch) are wasted in many countries and provide a challenge to biotechnology to efficiently utilize these rich sources of starch for the production of high added value products like enzymes. C. gigantea is an edible puffball excreting high levels of alpha-amylase when cultivated on different sources of starch containing elevated quantities of toxic tannic compounds. This fungus has been employed for the production of microbial protein from wastes and acorns containing high levels of toxic tannic compounds. The same fungus was also reported to grow on both hydrolyzable and condensed tannins as sole carbon sources. The present work was undertaken to investigate certain kinetic characteristics of alpha-amylase and biomass production by C. gigantea grown on soluble and acorn starch in a lab fermenter. (Refs. 18).

  16. Study on kinetic model of microwave thermocatalytic treatment of biomass tar model compound.

    PubMed

    Anis, Samsudin; Zainal, Z A

    2014-01-01

    Kinetic model parameters for toluene conversion under microwave thermocatalytic treatment were evaluated. The kinetic rate constants were determined using integral method based on experimental data and coupled with Arrhenius equation for obtaining the activation energies and pre-exponential factors. The model provides a good agreement with the experimental data. The kinetic model was also validated with standard error of 3% on average. The extrapolation of the model showed a reasonable trend to predict toluene conversion and product yield both in thermal and catalytic treatments. Under microwave irradiation, activation energy of toluene conversion was lower in the range of 3-27 kJ mol(-1) compared to those of conventional heating reported in the literatures. The overall reaction rate was six times higher compared to conventional heating. As a whole, the kinetic model works better for tar model removal in the absence of gas reforming within a level of reliability demonstrated in this study. PMID:24231266

  17. Kinetic Studies with Ion Selective Electrodes: Determination of Creatinine in Urine with a Picrate Ion Selective Electrode: A Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamandis, E. P.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The kinetic of the Jaffe reaction with picrate ion selective electrode (ISE) and a kinetic method for determining creatinine in urine is presented. The experiment could be used to familarize students with the application of ISE in kinetic studies and chemical analysis. (Author/JN)

  18. Studies of heavy ion reactions and transuranic nuclei. Progress report, September 1, 1985-August 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Huizenga, J.R.; Schroeder, W.U.

    1986-08-01

    Progress is reported of research directed to explore nuclear relaxation and transport phenomena induced in heavy-ion collisions, in the range from near-barrier energies to more than 20 MeV per nucleon above the interaction barrier. Transport processes studied include the redistribution of kinetic energy of relative motion and of linear momentum as well as the gradual relaxation of various conditions of a colliding heavy-ion system, initially far from thermodynamic equilibrium, towards a uniform population of phase space. And, finally, they include the stochastic, equilibrium, and nonequilibrium patterns of nuclear disintegration. The group activities range from design of hardware to theoretical modeling. 112 refs., 56 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Study Progress on Tissue Culture of Maize Mature Embryo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongzhen; Cheng, Jun; Cheng, Yanping; Zhou, Xioafu

    It has been paid more and more attention on maize tissue culture as it is a basic work in maize genetic transformation, especially huge breakthrough has been made in maize tissue culture utilizing mature embryos as explants in the recent years. This paper reviewed the study progress on maize tissue culture and plant regeneration utilizing mature embryos as explants from callus induction, subculture, plant regeneration and browning reduction and so on.

  20. Fundamentals of the Plasma Sail Concept: MHD and Kinetic Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G.; Delamere, P.; Kabin, K.; Linde, T. J.; Krivorutsky, E.

    2003-01-01

    The Mini-Magnetospheric Plasma Propulsion (M2P2), originally proposed by Winglee et al. [2000] predicts that a 15-km standoff distance (or 20-km cross-sectional dimension) of the magnetic bubble will provide for sufficient momentum transfer from the solar wind to accelerate a spacecraft to the unprecedented speeds of 50-80 km/s after an acceleration period of about three months. Such velocities will enable travel out of the solar system in period of about seven years-almost an order of magnitude improvement over present chemical based propulsion systems. However, for the parameters of the simulation of Winglee et al. [2000], a fluid model for the interaction of M2P2 with the solar wind is not valid. It is assumed in the MHD fluid model, normally applied to planetary magnetospheres, that the characteristic scale-size is much greater than the Larmor radius and ion skin depth of the solar wind. In the case of M2P2, the size of the magnetic bubble is actually less than or, comparable to, the scale of these characteristic parameters. Therefore, a kinetic approach, which addresses the small-scale physical mechanisms, must be used. We have adopted a two-component approach to determining a preliminary estimate of the momentum transfer to the plasma sail. The first component is a self-consistent MHD simulation of the small-scale expansion phase of the magnetic bubble. The fluid treatment is valid to roughly 5 km from the source and the steady-state MHD solution at the 5 km boundary was then used as initial conditions for the hybrid simulation. The hybrid simulations showed that the momentum transfer to the innermost regions of the plasma sail is negligible.

  1. Kinetic study of acetaminophen degradation by visible light photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Gotostos, Mary Jane N; Su, Chia-Chi; De Luna, Mark Daniel G; Lu, Ming-Chun

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a novel photocatalyst K3[Fe(CN)6]/TiO2 synthesized via a simple sol-gel method was utilized to degrade acetaminophen (ACT) under visible light with the use of blue and green LED lights. Parameters (medium pH, initial concentration of reactant, catalyst concentration, temperature, and number of blue LED lights) affecting photocatalytic degradation of ACT were also investigated. The experimental result showed that compared to commercially available Degussa P-25 (DP-25) photocatalyst, K3[Fe(CN)6]/TiO2 gave higher degradation efficiency and rate constant (kapp) of ACT. The degradation efficiency or kapp decreased with increasing initial ACT concentration and temperature, but increased with increased number of blue LED lamps. Additionally, kapp increased as initial pH was increased from 5.6 to 6.9, but decreased at a high alkaline condition (pH 8.3). Furthermore, the degradation efficiency and kapp of ACT increased as K3[Fe(CN)6]/TiO2 loading was increased to 1 g L(-1) but decreased and eventually leveled off at photocatalyst loading above this value. Photocatalytic degradation of ACT in K3[Fe(CN)6]/TiO2 catalyst system follows a pseudo-first-order kinetics. The Langmuir-Hinshelwood equation was also satisfactorily used to model the degradation of ACT in K3[Fe(CN)6]/TiO2 catalyst system indicated by a satisfactory linear correlation between 1/kapp and Co, with kini = 6.54 × 10(-4) mM/min and KACT = 17.27 mM(-1). PMID:24766590

  2. Studying The Kinetics Of Crystalline Silicon Nanoparticle Lithiation With In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mcdowell, Matthew T.; Ryu, Ill; Lee, Seokwoo; Wang, Chong M.; Nix, William D.; Cui, Yi

    2012-11-27

    Silicon is an attractive high-capacity anode material for Li-ion batteries, but a comprehensive understanding of the massive ~300% volume change and fracture during lithiation/delithiation is necessary to reliably employ Si anodes. Here, in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the lithiation of crystalline Si nanoparticles reveals that the reaction slows down as it progresses into the particle interior. Analysis suggests that this behavior is due to the influence of mechanical stress at the reaction front on the driving force for the reaction. These experiments give insight into the factors controlling the kinetics of this unique reaction.

  3. Kinetic studies on the regulation of rabbit liver pyruvate kinase

    PubMed Central

    Irving, M. G.; Williams, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    Two kinetically distinct forms of pyruvate kinase (EC 2.7.1.40) were isolated from rabbit liver by using differential ammonium sulphate fractionation. The L or liver form, which is allosterically activated by fructose 1,6-diphosphate, was partially purified by DEAE-cellulose chromatography to give a maximum specific activity of 20 units/mg. The L form was allosterically activated by K+ and optimum activity was recorded with 30mm-K+, 4mm-MgADP−, with a MgADP−/ADP2− ratio of 50:1, but inhibition occurred with K+ concentrations in excess of 60mm. No inhibition occurred with either ATP or GTP when excess of Mg2+ was added to counteract chelation by these ligands. Alanine (2.5mm) caused 50% inhibition at low concentrations of phosphoenolpyruvate (0.15mm). The homotropic effector, phosphoenolpyruvate, exhibited a complex allosteric pattern (nH=2.5), and negative co-operative interactions were observed in the presence of low concentrations of this substrate. The degree of this co-operative interaction was pH-dependent, with the Hill coefficient increasing from 1.1 to 3.2 as the pH was raised from 6.5 to 8.0. Fructose 1,6-diphosphate interfered with the activation by univalent ions, markedly decreased the apparent Km for phosphoenolpyruvate from 1.2mm to 0.2mm, and transformed the phosphoenolpyruvate saturation curve into a hyperbola. Concentrations of fructose 1,6-diphosphate in excess of 0.5mm inhibited this stimulated reaction. The M or muscle-type form of the enzyme was not activated by fructose 1,6-diphosphate and gave a maximum specific activity of 0.3 unit/mg. A Michaelis–Menten response was obtained when phosphoenolpyruvate was the variable substrate (Km=0.125mm), and this form was inhibited by ATP, as well as alanine, even in the presence of excess of Mg2+. PMID:4722439

  4. Hydride Transfer in DHFR by Transition Path Sampling, Kinetic Isotope Effects, and Heavy Enzyme Studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Antoniou, Dimitri; Schwartz, Steven D; Schramm, Vern L

    2016-01-12

    Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (ecDHFR) is used to study fundamental principles of enzyme catalysis. It remains controversial whether fast protein motions are coupled to the hydride transfer catalyzed by ecDHFR. Previous studies with heavy ecDHFR proteins labeled with (13)C, (15)N, and nonexchangeable (2)H reported enzyme mass-dependent hydride transfer kinetics for ecDHFR. Here, we report refined experimental and computational studies to establish that hydride transfer is independent of protein mass. Instead, we found the rate constant for substrate dissociation to be faster for heavy DHFR. Previously reported kinetic differences between light and heavy DHFRs likely arise from kinetic steps other than the chemical step. This study confirms that fast (femtosecond to picosecond) protein motions in ecDHFR are not coupled to hydride transfer and provides an integrative computational and experimental approach to resolve fast dynamics coupled to chemical steps in enzyme catalysis. PMID:26652185

  5. Human telomeric G-quadruplex: thermodynamic and kinetic studies of telomeric quadruplex stability

    PubMed Central

    Chaires, Jonathan B.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Thermodynamic and kinetic studies complement high-resolution structures of G-quadruplexes. Such studies are essential for a thorough understanding of the mechanisms that govern quadruplex folding and conformational changes in quadruplexes. This perspective article reviews representative thermodynamic and kinetic studies of the folding of human telomeric quadruplex structures. Published thermodynamic data vary widely and are inconsistent. Possible reasons for these inconsistencies are discussed. The key issue of whether or not such folding reactions are a simple two-state process is examined. A tentative energy balance for the folding of telomeric quadruplexes in Na+ and K+ solution, and for conformational transition between these forms will be presented. PMID:19951355

  6. Estuarine Physical Processes Research: Some Recent Studies and Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uncles, R. J.

    2002-12-01

    The literature on estuarine physical studies is vast, diverse and contains many valuable case studies in addition to pure, process-based research. This essay is an attempt to summarize both some of the more recent studies that have been undertaken during the last several years, as well as some of the trends in research direction and progress that they represent. The topics covered include field and theoretical studies on hydrodynamics, turbulence, salt and fine sediment transport and morphology. The development and ease-of-application of numerical and analytical models and technical software has been essential for much of the progress, allowing the interpretation of large amounts of data and assisting with the understanding of complex processes. The development of instrumentation has similarly been essential for much of the progress with field studies. From a process viewpoint, much more attention is now being given to interpreting intratidal behaviour, including the effects of tidal straining and suspended fine sediment on water column stratification, stability and turbulence generation and dissipation. Remote sensing from satellites and aircraft, together with fast sampling towed instruments and high frequency radar now provide unique, frequently high resolution views of spatial variability, including currents, frontal and plume phenomena, and tidal and wave-generated turbidity. Observations of fine sediment characteristics (floc size, aggregation mechanisms, organic coatings and settling velocity) are providing better parameterizations for sediment transport models. These models have enhanced our understanding both of the estuarine turbidity maximum and its relationship to fronts and intratidal hydrodynamic and sedimentological variability, as well as that of simple morphological features such as intertidal mudflats. Although few, interdisciplinary studies to examine the relationships between biology and estuarine morphology show that bivalve activity and the

  7. Progress in computational studies of host-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hufeng; Jin, Jingjing; Wong, Limsoon

    2013-04-01

    Host-pathogen interactions are important for understanding infection mechanism and developing better treatment and prevention of infectious diseases. Many computational studies on host-pathogen interactions have been published. Here, we review recent progress and results in this field and provide a systematic summary, comparison and discussion of computational studies on host-pathogen interactions, including prediction and analysis of host-pathogen protein-protein interactions; basic principles revealed from host-pathogen interactions; and database and software tools for host-pathogen interaction data collection, integration and analysis. PMID:23600809

  8. [Progress in molecular biology study of DNA computer].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Zhou; Zhao, Jian; He, Lin

    2003-09-01

    DNA (deoxyribonucleotide acids) computer is an emerging new study area that basically combines molecular biology study of DNA molecules and computational study on how to employ these specific molecules to calculate. In 1994 Adleman described his pioneering research on DNA computing in Science. This is the first experimental report on DNA computer study. In 2001 Benenson et al published a paper in Nature regarding a programmable and autonomous DNA computing device. Because of its Turing-like functions, the device is regarded as another milestone progress for DNA computer study. The main features of DNA computer are massively parallel computing ability and potential enormous data storage capacity. Comparing with conventional electronic computers, DNA molecules provide conceptually a revolution in computing, and more and more implications have been found in various disciplines. DNA computer studies have brought great progress not only in its own computing mechanisms, but also in DNA manipulation technologies especially nano-technology. This article presents the basic principles of DNA computer, its applications, its important relationship with genomic research and our comments on all above issues. PMID:14577383

  9. In vitro dissolution kinetic study of theophylline from hydrophilic and hydrophobic matrices.

    PubMed

    Maswadeh, Hamzah M; Semreen, Mohammad H; Abdulhalim, Abdulatif A

    2006-01-01

    Oral dosage forms containing 300 mg theophylline in matrix type tablets, were prepared by direct compression method using two kinds of matrices, glycerylbehenate (hydrophobic), and (hydroxypropyl)methyl cellulose (hydrophilic). The in vitro release kinetics of these formulations were studied at pH 6.8 using the USP dissolution apparatus with the paddle assemble. The kinetics of the dissolution process were studied by analyzing the dissolution data using four kinetic equations, the zero-order equation, the first-order equation, the Higuchi square root equation and the Hixson-Crowell cube root law. The analysis of the dissolution kinetic data for the theophylline preparations in this study shows that it follows the first order kinetics and the release process involves erosion / diffusion and an alteration in the surface area and diameter of the matrix system, as well as in the diffusion path length from the matrix drug load during the dissolution process. This relation is best described by the use of both the first-order equation and the Hixson-Crowell cube root law. PMID:17515331

  10. Kinetic study of alkaline protease 894 for the hydrolysis of the pearl oyster Pinctada martensii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin; Chen, Hua; Cai, Bingna; Liu, Qingqin; Sun, Huili

    2013-05-01

    A new enzyme (alkaline protease 894) obtained from the marine extremophile Flavobacterium yellowsea (YS-80-122) has exhibited strong substrate-binding and catalytic activity, even at low temperature, but the characteristics of the hydrolysis with this enzyme are still unclear. The pearl oyster Pinctada martensii was used in this study as the raw material to illustrate the kinetic properties of protease 894. After investigating the intrinsic relationship between the degree of hydrolysis and several factors, including initial reaction pH, temperature, substrate concentration, enzyme concentration, and hydrolysis time, the kinetics model was established. This study showed that the optimal conditions for the enzymatic hydrolysis were an initial reaction pH of 5.0, temperature of 30°C, substrate concentration of 10% (w/v), enzyme concentration of 2 500 U/g, and hydrolysis time of 160 min. The kinetic characteristics of the protease for the hydrolysis of P. martensii were obtained. The inactivation constant was found to be 15.16/min, and the average relative error between the derived kinetics model and the actual measurement was only 3.04%, which indicated a high degree of fitness. Therefore, this study provides a basis for the investigation of the concrete kinetic characteristics of the new protease, which has potential applications in the food industry.

  11. Study of atmospheric pollution scavenging. Twenty-fourth progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, A.L.

    1990-08-01

    Atmospheric scavenging research conducted by the Illinois State Water Survey under contract with the Department of Energy has been a significant factor in the historical development of the field of precipitation scavenging. Emphasis of the work during the 1980`s became focused on the problem of acid rain problem with the Survey being chosen as the Central Analytical Laboratory for sample analysis of the National Atmospheric Deposition Program National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). The DOE research was responsible for laying the groundwork from the standpoint of sampling and chemical analysis that has now become routine features of NADP/NTN. A significant aspect of the research has been the participation by the Water Survey in the MAP3S precipitation sampling network which is totally supported by DOE, is the longest continuous precipitation sampling network in existence, and maintains an event sampling protocol. The following review consists of a short description of each of the papers appearing in the Study of Atmospheric Scavenging progress reports starting with the Eighteenth Progress Report in 1980 to the Twenty- Third Progress Report in 1989. In addition a listing of the significant publications and interviews associated with the program are given in the bibliography.

  12. Atomic Force Microscopy Study of Atherosclerosis Progression in Arterial Walls.

    PubMed

    Timashev, Peter S; Kotova, Svetlana L; Belkova, Galina V; Gubar'kova, Ekaterina V; Timofeeva, Lidia B; Gladkova, Natalia D; Solovieva, Anna B

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Here we suggest a novel approach for tracking atherosclerosis progression based on the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Using AFM, we studied cross-sections of coronary arteries with the following types of lesions: Type II-thickened intima; Type III-thickened intima with a lipid streak; Type IV-fibrotic layer over a lipid core; Type Va-unstable fibrotic layer over a lipid core; Type Vc-very thick fibrotic layer. AFM imaging revealed that the fibrotic layer of an atherosclerotic plaque is represented by a basket-weave network of collagen fibers and a subscale network of fibrils that become looser with atherosclerosis progression. In an unstable plaque (Type Va), packing of the collagen fibers and fibrils becomes even less uniform than that at the previous stages, while a stable fibrotic plaque (Vc) has significantly tighter packing. Such alterations of the collagen network morphology apparently, led to deterioration of the Type Va plaque mechanical properties, that, in turn, resulted in its instability and propensity to rupture. Thus, AFM may serve as a useful tool for tracking atherosclerosis progression in the arterial wall tissue. PMID:26843417

  13. A bioenergetics-kinetics coupled modeling study on subsurface microbial metabolism in a field biostimulation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Q.; Zheng, Z.; Zhu, C.

    2006-12-01

    Microorganisms in nature conserve energy by catalyzing various geochemical reactions. To build a quantitative relationship between geochemical conditions and metabolic rates, we propose a bioenergetics-kinetics coupled modeling approach. This approach describes microbial community as a metabolic network, i.e., fermenting microbes degrade organic substrates while aerobic respirer, nitrate reducer, metal reducer, sulfate reducer, and methanogen consume the fermentation products. It quantifies the control of substrate availability and biological energy conservation on the metabolic rates using thermodynamically consistent rate laws. We applied this simulation approach to study the progress of microbial metabolism during a field biostimulation experiment conducted in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the experiment, ethanol was injected into a monitoring well and groundwater was sampled to monitor changes in the chemistry. With time, concentrations of ethanol and SO42- decreased while those of NH4+, Fe2+, and Mn2+ increased. The simulation results fitted well to the observation, indicating simultaneous ethanol degradation and terminal electron accepting processes. The rates of aerobic respiration and denitrification were mainly controlled by substrate concentrations while those of ethanol degradation, sulfate reduction, and methanogenesis were controlled dominantly by the energy availability. The simulation results suggested two different microbial growth statuses in the subsurface. For the functional groups with significant growth, variations with time in substrate concentrations demonstrated a typical S curve. For the groups without significant growth, initial decreases in substrate concentrations were linear with time. Injecting substrates followed by monitoring environmental chemistry therefore provides a convenient approach to characterize microbial growth in the subsurface where methods for direct observation are currently unavailable. This research was funded by the

  14. Gas-kinetic numerical studies of three-dimensional complex flows on spacecraft re-entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Hui; Zhang, Han-Xin

    2009-03-01

    The gas-kinetic numerical algorithm solving the Boltzmann model equation is extended and developed to study the three-dimensional hypersonic flows of spacecraft re-entry into the atmosphere in perfect gas. In this study, the simplified velocity distribution function equation for various flow regimes is presented on the basis of the kinetic Boltzmann-Shakhov model. The discrete velocity ordinate technique and numerical quadrature methods, such as the Gauss quadrature formulas with the weight function 2/ π1/2exp(- V2) and the Gauss-Legendre numerical quadrature rule, are studied to resolve the barrier in simulating complex flows from low Mach numbers to hypersonic problems. Specially, the gas-kinetic finite-difference scheme is constructed for the computation of three-dimensional flow problems, which directly captures the time evolution of the molecular velocity distribution function. The gas-kinetic boundary conditions and numerical procedures are studied and implemented by directly acting on the velocity distribution function. The HPF (high performance fortran) parallel implementation technique for the gas-kinetic numerical method is developed and applied to study the hypersonic flows around three-dimensional complex bodies. The main purpose of the current research is to provide a way to extend the gas-kinetic numerical algorithm to the flow computation of three-dimensional complex hypersonic problems with high Mach numbers. To verify the current method and simulate gas transport phenomena covering various flow regimes, the three-dimensional hypersonic flows around sphere and spacecraft shape with different Knudsen numbers and Mach numbers are studied by HPF parallel computing. Excellent results have been obtained for all examples computed.

  15. A kinetic study of lipase-catalyzed alcoholysis of palm kernel oil.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, D; Alves, T L

    2000-01-01

    The use of lipases as biocatalysts in interesterification reactions has been the object of growing interest, owing to the importance of esters as emulsifiers, intermediates to produce oleochemicals, and fuel alternatives. We consider in this article a kinetic study of lipase-catalyzed alcoholysis of palm kernel oil, using n-hexane as the solvent. In a first step the ester production was maximized by using a Taguchi design, and then an empirical model was built to determine the influence of the process variables. Taking into account the results obtained in the first step, we performed a kinetic study and developed a simple model for this system. PMID:10849779

  16. Application of controlled interfacial pore structures to kinetic studies in alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Roedel, J.; Glaeser, A.M.

    1988-04-01

    The application of controlled-geometry interfacial pore structures to fundamental kinetic studies in alumina is described. Results from studies of the morphological stability of high aspect ratio pore channels, crack healing, pore coarsening and pore elimination in sapphire are presented.

  17. PHYTO-REMOVAL OF TRINITROTOLUENE FROM WATER WITH BATCH KINETIC STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of batch reactor studies were conducted to obtain kinetic data for optimizing phyto-treatment of water contaminated with trinitrotoluene (TNT). A plant screening study indicated that stonewort and parrotfeather were the most effective among the plants tested; parrotfeath...

  18. Removal Rate of Organic Matter Using Natural Cellulose via Adsorption Isotherm and Kinetic Studies.

    PubMed

    Din, Mohd Fadhil Md; Ponraj, Mohanadoss; Low, Wen-Pei; Fulazzaky, Mohamad Ali; Iwao, Kenzo; Songip, Ahmad Rahman; Chelliapan, Shreeshivadasan; Ismail, Zulhilmi; Jamal, Mohamad Hidayat

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the removal of natural organic matter (NOM) using coconut fiber (CF) and palm oil fiber (POF) was investigated. Preliminary analysis was performed using a jar test for the selection of optimal medium before the fabricated column model experiment. The equilibrium studies on isotherms and kinetic models for NOM adsorption were analyzed using linearized correlation coefficient. Results showed that the equilibrium data were fitted to Langmuir isotherm model for both CF and POF. The most suitable adsorption model was the pseudo-first-order kinetic model for POF and pseudo-second-order kinetic model for CF. The adsorption capacities achieved by the CF and POF were 15.67 and 30.8 mg/g respectively. Based on this investigation, it can be concluded that the POF is the most suitable material for the removal of NOM in semi polluted river water. PMID:26803100

  19. A study of the non-isothermal crystallization kinetic of Zn10Se90 glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Rahim, M. A.; Hafiz, M. M.; Abdel-Latief, A. Y.; Abd-Elnaiem, Alaa M.; Alwany, A. Elwhab. B.

    2015-06-01

    The glass transition and the crystallization kinetics of Zn10Se90 glass by differential thermal analysis (DTA) technique under non-isothermal conduction were studied. The effective activation energies of the glass transition and the crystallization have been evaluated on the basses of the Kissinger and Matusita et al. approximations. Kinetic parameters of the crystallization process are significantly influenced by the heating rate. We have compared the experimental DTA with the calculated data curves for Zn10Se90 system using the Johanson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) and Sestak-Berggren SB( M, N) models. Simulation results indicated that the SB( M, N) model is more suitable for describing the crystallization kinetics for the studied composition. Furthermore, the crystalline phases of annealed Zn10Se90 were characterized by X-ray diffraction. The surface morphology of the annealed samples was examined using scanning electron microscopy.

  20. Single-molecule enzymology of steroid transforming enzymes: Transient kinetic studies and what they tell us.

    PubMed

    Penning, Trevor M

    2016-07-01

    Structure-function studies on steroid transforming enzymes often use site-directed mutagenesis to inform mechanisms of catalysis and effects on steroid binding, and data are reported in terms of changes in steady state kinetic parameters kcat, Km and kcat/Km. However, this dissection of function is limited since kcat is governed by the rate-determining step and Km is a complex macroscopic kinetic constant. Often site-directed mutagenesis can lead to a change in the rate-determining step which cannot be revealed by just reporting a decrease in kcat alone. These issues are made more complex when it is considered that many steroid transforming enzymes have more than one substrate and product. We present the case for using transient-kinetics performed with stopped-flow spectrometry to assign rate constants to discrete steps in these multi-substrate reactions and their use to interpret enzyme mechanism and the effects of disease and engineered mutations. We demonstrate that fluorescence kinetic transients can be used to measure ligand binding that may be accompanied by isomerization steps, revealing the existence of new enzyme intermediates. We also demonstrate that single-turnover reactions can provide a klim for the chemical step and Ks for steroid-substrate binding and that when coupled with kinetic isotope effect measurements can provide information on transition state intermediates. We also demonstrate how multiple turnover experiments can provide evidence for either "burst-phase" kinetics, which can reveal a slow product release step, or linear-phase kinetics, in which the chemical step can be rate-determining. With these assignments it becomes more straightforward to analyze the effects of mutations. We use examples from the hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (AKR1Cs) and human steroid 5β-reductase (AKR1D1) to illustrate the utility of the approach, which are members of the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily. PMID:26596239

  1. Progressive Failure Studies of Stiffened Panels Subjected to Shear Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; Jaunky, Navin; Hilburger, Mark W.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Experimental and analytical results are presented for progressive failure of stiffened composite panels with and without a notch and subjected to in plane shear loading well into their postbuckling regime. Initial geometric imperfections are included in the finite element models. Ply damage modes such as matrix cracking, fiber-matrix shear, and fiber failure are modeled by degrading the material properties. Experimental results from the test include strain field data from video image correlation in three dimensions in addition to other strain and displacement measurements. Results from nonlinear finite element analyses are compared with experimental data. Good agreement between experimental data and numerical results are observed for the stitched stiffened composite panels studied.

  2. Effects of General Medical Health on Alzheimer Progression: the Cache County Dementia Progression Study

    PubMed Central

    Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S.; Han, Dingfen; Mielke, Michelle M.; Forrester, Sarah N.; Tschanz, JoAnn T.; Corcoran, Chris D.; Green, Robert C.; Norton, Maria C.; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A.; Lyketsos, Constantine G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Several observational studies suggested a link between health status and rate of decline among individuals with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We sought to quantify the relationship in a population-based study of incident AD, and to compare global comorbidity ratings to counts of comorbid conditions and medications as predictors of AD progression. Methods Design Case-only cohort study arising from population-based longitudinal study of memory and aging. Setting Cache County, Utah Participants 335 individuals with incident AD followed for up to 11 years. Measurements Patient descriptors included sex, age, education, dementia duration at baseline, and APOE genotype. Measures of health status made at each visit included the GMHR (General Medical Health Rating), number of comorbid medical conditions, and number of non-psychiatric medications. Dementia outcomes included the Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE), Clinical Dementia Rating – sum of boxes (CDR-sb), and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI). Results Health Status tended to fluctuate over time within individuals. None of the baseline medical variables (GMHR, comorbidities, non-psychiatric medications) were associated with differences in rates of decline in longitudinal linear mixed effects models. Over time, low GMHR ratings, but not comorbidities or medications, were associated with poorer outcomes (MMSE: β=−1.07 p=0.01; CDR-sb: β=1.79 p<0.001; NPI: β=4.57 p=0.01) Conclusions Given that time-varying GMHR, but not baseline GMHR, was associated with the outcomes, there is likely a dynamic relationship between medical and cognitive health. GMHR is a more sensitive measure of health than simple counts of comorbidities or medications. Since health status is a potentially modifiable risk factor, further study is warranted. PMID:22687143

  3. Mechanistic Study of Manganese-Substituted Glycerol Dehydrogenase Using a Kinetic and Thermodynamic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Baishan; Niu, Jin; Ren, Hong; Guo, Yingxia; Wang, Shizhen

    2014-01-01

    Mechanistic insights regarding the activity enhancement of dehydrogenase by metal ion substitution were investigated by a simple method using a kinetic and thermodynamic analysis. By profiling the binding energy of both the substrate and product, the metal ion's role in catalysis enhancement was revealed. Glycerol dehydrogenase (GDH) from Klebsiella pneumoniae sp., which demonstrated an improvement in activity by the substitution of a zinc ion with a manganese ion, was used as a model for the mechanistic study of metal ion substitution. A kinetic model based on an ordered Bi-Bi mechanism was proposed considering the noncompetitive product inhibition of dihydroxyacetone (DHA) and the competitive product inhibition of NADH. By obtaining preliminary kinetic parameters of substrate and product inhibition, the number of estimated parameters was reduced from 10 to 4 for a nonlinear regression-based kinetic parameter estimation. The simulated values of time-concentration curves fit the experimental values well, with an average relative error of 11.5% and 12.7% for Mn-GDH and GDH, respectively. A comparison of the binding energy of enzyme ternary complex for Mn-GDH and GDH derived from kinetic parameters indicated that metal ion substitution accelerated the release of dioxyacetone. The metal ion's role in catalysis enhancement was explicated. PMID:24896258

  4. Studies of Reaction Kinetics of Methane Hydrate Dissocation in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, George J.; Seol, Yongkoo; Kneafsey, Timothy J.

    2005-03-10

    The objective of this study is the description of the kinetic dissociation of CH4-hydrates in porous media, and the determination of the corresponding kinetic parameters. Knowledge of the kinetic dissociation behavior of hydrates can play a critical role in the evaluation of gas production potential of gas hydrate accumulations in geologic media. We analyzed data from a sequence of tests of CH4-hydrate dissociation by means of thermal stimulation. These tests had been conducted on sand cores partially saturated with water, hydrate and CH4 gas, and contained in an x-ray-transparent aluminum pressure vessel. The pressure, volume of released gas, and temperature (at several locations within the cores) were measured. To avoid misinterpreting local changes as global processes, x-ray computed tomography scans provided accurate images of the location and movement of the reaction interface during the course of the experiments. Analysis of the data by means of inverse modeling (history matching ) provided estimates of the thermal properties and of the kinetic parameters of the hydration reaction in porous media. Comparison of the results from the hydrate-bearing porous media cores to those from pure CH4-hydrate samples provided a measure of the effect of the porous medium on the kinetic reaction. A tentative model of composite thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing media was also developed.

  5. Study of kinetics of degradation of cyclohexane carboxylic acid by acclimated activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunhua; Shi, Shuian; Chen, Hongyan

    2016-01-01

    Activated sludge contains complex microorganisms, which are highly effective biodegrading agents. In this study, the kinetics of biodegradation of cyclohexane carboxylic acid (CHCA) by an acclimated aerobic activated sludge were investigated. The results showed that after 180 days of acclimation, the activated sludge could steadily degrade >90% of the CHCA in 120 h. The degradation of CHCA by the acclimated activated sludge could be modeled using a first-order kinetics equation. The equations for the degradation kinetics for different initial CHCA concentrations were also obtained. The kinetics constant, kd, decreased with an increase in the CHCA concentration, indicating that, at high concentrations, CHCA had an inhibiting effect on the microorganisms in the activated sludge. The effects of pH on the degradation kinetics of CHCA were also investigated. The results showed that a pH of 10 afforded the highest degradation rate, indicating that basic conditions significantly promoted the degradation of CHCA. Moreover, it was found that the degradation efficiency for CHCA increased with an increase in temperature and concentration of dissolved oxygen under the experimental conditions. PMID:27191578

  6. Kinetic measurements on elementary fossil fuel combustion reactions over wide temperatures ranges. Progress report, December 1, 1990--November 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Fontijin, A.

    1992-01-01

    The goals of this work are to provide accurate data on the temperature dependence of the kinetics of elementary combustion reactions (i) for use by combustion modelers, and (ii) to gain a better fundamental understanding of, and hence predictive ability for, the chemistry involved. Experimental measurements are made using the pseudo-static HTP (high-temperature photochemistry) technique. This approach allows observations on single reactions in the 300 to 1800 K temperature range to be made. Typical total (bath gas) pressures are in the 100 to 1000 mbar range. Ground-state O and H atoms are produced by flash or excimer laser photolysis of suitable precursors (O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}). The relative atom concentrations are monitored by resonance fluorescence pumped by a cw microwave discharge flow lamp. The molecular reactant-in-excess is introduced through a cooled inlet. Adequate time for mixing, 0.1 to 10 s, between this inlet and the photolysis/observation zone is achieved by using slow flows (typically less than 20 cm s{sup {minus}1}). Results are reported for: O-Atom Reactions with the Four Isomeric Butenes, H + HCl {yields} H{sub 2} + Cl, and the O-atom 1,3-butadiene reaction.

  7. Progress report on DOE research project [Thermodynamic and kinetic behavior of systems with intermetallic and intermediate phases

    SciTech Connect

    Tsakalakos, T.; Semenovskaya-Khachaturyan, S.; Khachaturyan, A.G.

    2000-12-13

    A theoretical investigation was made of the coherent displacive phase transformation between two equilibrium single-phase states producing several orientation variants of the product phase. The research was focused on a behavior of coherent systems (martensitic systems, metal and ceramic, and ferroelectric systems) with defects. The computer simulation demonstrated that randomly distributed static defects may drastically affect the thermodynamics, kinetics, and morphology of the transformation. In particular, the interaction of the transformation mode with the defects may be responsible for appearance of two new fields in the phase diagram: (i) the two-phase field describing the tweed microstructure, which consists of the retain parent phase and the variants of the product phase and (ii) the single-phase field describing the tweed microstructure, which consists of the variants of the product phase. These new fields can be attributed to the pre-transitional states observed in some of th e displacive transformations. The microstructure evolution resulting in formation of the thermoelastic equilibrium is path dependent. This unusual behavior is expected in systems with a sharp dependence of the transition temperature on the defect concentration.

  8. Theoretical Studies in Chemical Kinetics - Annual Report, 1970.

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Karplus, Martin

    1970-10-01

    The research performed includes (a) Alkali-Halide, Alkali-Halide (MX, M’X’) Exchange Reactions; (b) Inversion Problem; (c) Quantum Mechanics of Scattering Processes, (d) Transition State Analysis of Classical Trajectories, (e) Differential Cross Sections from Classical Trajectories; and (f) Other Studies.

  9. A study of spin isomer conversion kinetics in supercritical fluid hydrogen for cyrogenic fuel storage technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Manyalibo J.; Petitpas, Guillaume; Aceves, Salvador M.

    2011-08-01

    A detailed kinetic study of para-ortho hydrogen conversion under supercritical conditions using rotational Raman scattering is presented. Isochoric measurements of initially low ortho concentrations over temperatures 32 < T < 280 K and densities 0.014 < ρ < 0.060 g/cm3 were used to derive kinetic rate constants k(ρ, T) by solving an autocatalytic kinetic rate equation. At low ortho concentrations and T < 100 K, k is found to be ˜2× higher than previous results based on thermal conductivity measurements, decreasing weakly with temperature, similar to Wigner's original paramagnetic theory. Accurate modeling of k(ρ, T) is critical in predicting cryogenic hydrogen fuel tank dormancy performance for hydrogen-power vehicles.

  10. Kinetic Study of Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol Fermentation in Continuous Culture

    PubMed Central

    Buehler, Edward A.; Mesbah, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by clostridia has shown promise for industrial-scale production of biobutanol. However, the continuous ABE fermentation suffers from low product yield, titer, and productivity. Systems analysis of the continuous ABE fermentation will offer insights into its metabolic pathway as well as into optimal fermentation design and operation. For the ABE fermentation in continuous Clostridium acetobutylicum culture, this paper presents a kinetic model that includes the effects of key metabolic intermediates and enzymes as well as culture pH, product inhibition, and glucose inhibition. The kinetic model is used for elucidating the behavior of the ABE fermentation under the conditions that are most relevant to continuous cultures. To this end, dynamic sensitivity analysis is performed to systematically investigate the effects of culture conditions, reaction kinetics, and enzymes on the dynamics of the ABE production pathway. The analysis provides guidance for future metabolic engineering and fermentation optimization studies. PMID:27486663

  11. Kinetic study of non-isothermal decomposition of a composite diasporic-boehmitic bauxite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samouhos, M.; Angelopoulos, P.; Pilatos, G.; Taxiarchou, M.; Papageorgiou, S.

    2016-04-01

    In the current study, the kinetic of the thermal decomposition of a composite diasporic-boehmitic bauxite is investigated under non-isothermal heating conditions by means of thermogravimetric analysis. The calculation of activation energy (Ea) has been performed by various methods and the attained values range from 185000 to 190000 J.mol-1 for conversion rate of 0.5. The first-order kinetic model can adequately be used to describe thermal decomposition of bauxite composite, while the pre-exponential factor value was found to be 2.088*1011 min-1. The calculated activation energy value together with pre-exponential factor and the solid state kinetic model factors enable the simulation of the thermal decomposition under various heating conditions by the implementation of an ordinary differential equation. The calculated values are in satisfactory agreement with the experimental ones.

  12. Kinetic and thermodynamic study of the liquid-phase etherification of isoamylenes with methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Piccoli, R.L. ); Lovisi, H.R. )

    1995-02-01

    The kinetics and thermodynamics of liquid-phase etherification of isoamylenes with methanol on ion exchange catalyst (Amberlyst 15) were studied. Thermodynamic properties and rate data were obtained in a batch reactor operating under 1,013 kPa and 323--353 K. The kinetic equation was modeled following the Langmuir-Hinshelwood-Hougen-Watson formalism according to a proposed surface mechanism where the rate-controlling step is the surface reaction. According to the experimental results, methanol adsorbs very strongly on the active sites, covering them completely, and thus the reaction follows an apparent first-order behavior. The isoamylenes, according to the proposed mechanism, adsorb simultaneously on the same single active center already occupied by methanol, migrating through the liquid layer formed by the alcohol around the catalyst to react in the acidic site. From the proposed mechanism a model was suggested and the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were obtained using nonlinear estimation methods.

  13. Kinetic Study of Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol Fermentation in Continuous Culture.

    PubMed

    Buehler, Edward A; Mesbah, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by clostridia has shown promise for industrial-scale production of biobutanol. However, the continuous ABE fermentation suffers from low product yield, titer, and productivity. Systems analysis of the continuous ABE fermentation will offer insights into its metabolic pathway as well as into optimal fermentation design and operation. For the ABE fermentation in continuous Clostridium acetobutylicum culture, this paper presents a kinetic model that includes the effects of key metabolic intermediates and enzymes as well as culture pH, product inhibition, and glucose inhibition. The kinetic model is used for elucidating the behavior of the ABE fermentation under the conditions that are most relevant to continuous cultures. To this end, dynamic sensitivity analysis is performed to systematically investigate the effects of culture conditions, reaction kinetics, and enzymes on the dynamics of the ABE production pathway. The analysis provides guidance for future metabolic engineering and fermentation optimization studies. PMID:27486663

  14. A kinetic study of textile dyeing wastewater degradation by Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Durruty, Ignacio; Fasce, Diana; González, Jorge Froilán; Wolski, Erika Alejandra

    2015-06-01

    The potential of Penicillium chrysogenum to decolorize azo dyes and a real industrial textile wastewater was studied. P. chrysogenum was able to decolorize and degrade three azo dyes (200 mg L(-1)), either independently or in a mixture of them, using glucose as a carbon source. A kinetic model for degradation was developed and it allowed predicting the degradation kinetics of the mixture of the three azo dyes. In addition, P. chrysogenum was able to decolorize real industrial wastewater. The kinetic model proposed was also able to predict the decolorization of the real wastewater. The calibration of the proposed model makes it a useful tool for future wastewater facilities' design and for practical applications. PMID:25555702

  15. Herpes Simplex Virus: Genome Size and Redundancy Studied by Renaturation Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Frenkel, Niza; Roizman, Bernard

    1971-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus subtype 1 deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was sheared in a French press to uniform fragments, denatured by heating, then allowed to reassociate. The renaturation reaction followed second-order kinetics with a single rate constant indicating that at least 95% of the genome was unique and that repetitive sequences, if present, were not detectable by this technique. The kinetic complexity of the herpes simplex genome was determined by DNA renaturation kinetics to be (95 ± 1) × 106 daltons. Since this value is in excellent agreement with the molecular weight of viral DNA [(99 ± 5) × 106 daltons] obtained from velocity sedimentation studies, it is concluded that virions contain only one species of double-stranded DNA molecules 95 × 106 to 99 × 106 daltons in molecular weight. PMID:4331657

  16. A Frustrated Phosphane-Borane Lewis Pair and Hydrogen: A Kinetics Study.

    PubMed

    Özgün, Thomas; Bergander, Klaus; Liu, Lei; Daniliuc, Constantin G; Grimme, Stefan; Kehr, Gerald; Erker, Gerhard

    2016-08-16

    The energy profile of a frustrated Lewis pair (FLP) dihydrogen splitting system was determined by a combined experimental kinetic and DFT study. A trimethylene-bridged phosphane-borane FLP was converted into its endothermic H2 -cleavage product by sequential H(+) /H(-) addition. The system could be handled at low temperature, and the kinetics of the H2 elimination were determined to give a rate constant of kHH,exp (299 K)=(2.87±0.1)×10(-4)  s(-1) in solution. The primary kinetic isotope effects were determined; for example, (kHH /kDD )exp =3.19. The system was accurately analyzed by DFT calculations. PMID:27355568

  17. Kinetic and product composition study on the cellulose liquefaction in polyhydric alcohols.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yan; Li, Jingdan; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Tiantian; Yang, Hongmin; Jiang, Jianchun; Jiang, Xiaoxiang

    2016-08-01

    The liquefaction process of cellulose in polyhydric alcohols (PEG 400 and glycerol) was studied by TG-FTIR. Three stages were observed during the solvolysis process and the main liquefaction stage could be further divided into two zones. The differences of liquefaction behavior of cellulose in the two solvents were compared, and the functional groups of volatiles produced by solvolysis were also evaluated. A step-wise procedure based on iso-conversional and Master-plots methods was used for the kinetic and mechanism analysis of the main liquefaction stage. The calculation results based on the kinetic model were in agreement with the experimental data of the conversion rate. The kinetic parameters and mechanism functions between cellulose liquefaction in PEG400 and in glycerol were quite different, which verified that solvolysis behavior and reaction process were seriously influenced by solvent species. Finally, the detailed types of volatiles and product distribution were measured by Py-GC-MS. PMID:27155797

  18. Single-filament kinetic studies provide novel insights into regulation of actin-based motility

    PubMed Central

    Shekhar, Shashank; Carlier, Marie-France

    2016-01-01

    Polarized assembly of actin filaments forms the basis of actin-based motility and is regulated both spatially and temporally. Cells use a variety of mechanisms by which intrinsically slower processes are accelerated, and faster ones decelerated, to match rates observed in vivo. Here we discuss how kinetic studies of individual reactions and cycles that drive actin remodeling have provided a mechanistic and quantitative understanding of such processes. We specifically consider key barbed-end regulators such as capping protein and formins as illustrative examples. We compare and contrast different kinetic approaches, such as the traditional pyrene-polymerization bulk assays, as well as more recently developed single-filament and single-molecule imaging approaches. Recent development of novel biophysical methods for sensing and applying forces will in future allow us to address the very important relationship between mechanical stimulus and kinetics of actin-based motility. PMID:26715420

  19. Crystallization kinetics in a multiply saturated basalt magma - An experimental study of Luna 24 ferrobasalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grove, T. L.; Bence, A. E.

    1979-01-01

    The paper deals with the effects of kinetics on mineral/melt partitioning and on fractional crystallization for a Luna-24 ferrobasalt. The composition is nearly multiply saturated under lunar surface conditions, making it possible to study the response of several mineral phases to kinetic factors during cooling. The differential suppression of the temperature of appearance of olivine, clinopyroxene, and plagioclase causes changes in the liquid line of descent. The course of liquid line of descent is mapped as a function of the cooling rate, and the partitioning of elements between pyroxene/liquid and olivine/liquid is examined.

  20. Kinetics of Oxygen Reduction in Aprotic Li-O2 Cells: A Model-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Safari, M; Adams, B D; Nazar, L F

    2014-10-16

    A comprehensive and general kinetic model is developed for the oxygen reduction reaction in aprotic Li-O2 cells. The model is based on the competitive uptake of lithium superoxide by the surface and solution. A demonstrative kinetic study is provided to demystify the origin of curvature in Tafel plots as well as the current dependency and aberrant diversity of the nature and morphology of discharge products in these systems. Our results are general and extend to any system where solubilization of superoxide is favored, such as where phase-transfer catalysts play an important role. PMID:26278597

  1. A multiscale numerical study into the cascade of kinetic energy leading to severe local storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paine, D. A.; Kaplan, M. L.

    1977-01-01

    The cascade of kinetic energy from macro- through mesoscales is studied on the basis of a nested grid system used to solve a set of nonlinear differential equations. The kinetic energy cascade and the concentration of vorticity through the hydrodynamic spectrum provide a means for predicting the location and intensity of severe weather from large-scale data sets. A mechanism described by the surface pressure tendency equation proves to be important in explaining how initial middle-tropospheric mass-momentum imbalances alter the low-level pressure field.

  2. Combustion Research Program: Flame studies, laser diagnostics, and chemical kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Crosley, D.R.

    1991-01-22

    We have made a detailed study of the care that must be taken to correctly measure OH radical concentrations in flames. A large part of these studies has concerned collisional quenching of hydride radical species (OH, NH, and NH{sub 2}), in particular the dependence upon rotational level and collision velocity (temperature). The results on OH and NH have shown unique and interesting behavior from the viewpoint of fundamental molecular dynamics, pointing to quenching often governed by collisions on an anisotropic, attractive surface, whereas NH{sub 2} quenching appears to depend on state-mixing considerations, not dynamic control. This state-specific behavior of these small, theoretically tractable hydrides has direct ramifications for quantitative flame diagnostics. Our other effort in the diagnostic area has been repeated but unsuccessful searches for laser induced fluorescence in the vinyl radical.

  3. The Siblings With Ischemic Stroke Study (SWISS): A Progress Report

    PubMed Central

    Meschia, James F.; Kissela, Brett M.; Brott, Thomas G.; Brown, Robert D.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Beck, Jeanne; Skarp, Alexa N.

    2006-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that genetic factors are associated with ischemic stroke, including multiple recent reports of association with the gene PDE4D, encoding phosphodiesterase 4D, on chromosome 5q12. Genetic studies of stroke are important but can be logistically difficult to perform. This article reviews the design of the Siblings With Ischemic Stroke Study (SWISS) and discusses problems in performing a sibling-based pedigree study where proband-initiated consent is used to enroll pedigree members. Proband-initiated enrollment optimizes privacy protections for family members, but it is associated with a substantial pedigree non-completion rate such that 3 to 4 probands must be identified to obtain one completed sibling pedigree. This report updates the progress of enrollment in the SWISS protocol, discusses barriers to pedigree completion and describes innovative approaches used by the SWISS investigators to enhance enrollment. PMID:16595789

  4. PIXE study of the kinetics of biomaterials ossification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, G.; Robaye, G.; Braye, F.; Oudadesse, H.; Irigaray, J. L.

    1994-05-01

    Biomaterials are frequently implanted in bones. This implantation is followed by a phenomenon of ossification. The purpose of this work was to study the time evolution of the gradient of characteristic atomic element's concentrations in the bone, the implant and the bone-implant interface. We have studied two types of neutral biomaterials: pure synthetic hydroxyapatite and porite's asteroid coral. The animal implantations have been made on sheep of the same age and sex having received the same basic diet. The implantations have been made in the cortical femur. On both sides of the implant, at the same distance, two screws were placed to allow further determination of the position of the implant. The PIXE method is particularly suitable here because of the possibility to analyze directly the samples without any preparation and to choose easily the dimensions of beam used for the gradient study. The X-rays have been detected with an ultra LEGe instead of the usual Si(Li) device to avoid the Si escape peak associated with the K α X-ray of calcium, the major constituent of bone. This peak is particularly disturbing here because its energy corresponds to the K α line of phosphorus, an important constituent of bone. The results of these determinations are presented and discussed.

  5. Kinetics of combustion-related processes at high temperatures. Progress report, June 1, 1991--May 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Kiefer, J.H.

    1992-02-01

    Again this year, progress is mainly reflected in publications. The following lists titles published, in press, or submitted during late 1990--91. Tunable Laser Flash Absorption, High Temperature Pyrolyses of Acetylene and Diacetylene Behind Reflected Shock Waves, Rate of the Retro-Diels-Alder Dissociation of 1,2,3,6-Tetrahydropyridine Over a Wide Temperature Range, The Reaction of C{sub 4}H{sub 2} and H{sub 2} Behind Reflected Shock Waves, Thermal Isomerization of Cyclopropanecarbonitrile, The Homogeneous Pyrolysis of Acetylene II, The Importance Of Hindered Rotations and Other Anharmonic Effects in the Thermal Dissociation of Small Unsaturated Molecules, Dissociation Rates of Propyne and Allene at High Temperatures and the Subsequent Formation of Benzene, and The Formaldehyde Decomposition Chain Mechanism. This report consists of the abstracts, titles, and authors for each of these publications.

  6. Sorption of basic dyes onto granulated pillared clays: thermodynamic and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Cheknane, B; Zermane, F; Baudu, M; Bouras, O; Basly, J P

    2012-09-01

    Effect of the granulation process onto the thermodynamic and kinetic sorption parameters of two basic dyes (Basic Yellow 28-BY 28 and Basic Green 4-BG 4) was evaluated in the present work. The charge surface properties of the surfactant-modified aluminium-pillared clay (CTAB-Al-Mont-PILC) particles were not modified, and the isoelectric point remains constant after high shear wet granulation. The Gibbs free energy of both BY 28 and BG 4 sorption was negative and decreased with the granulation; the endothermic nature of the sorption process was confirmed by the positive values of ΔH°. Adsorption kinetics of the two dyes, studied at pH 6 and 150 mg L(-1), follow the pseudo-first order kinetic model with observed rate constants of 2.5-4.2×10(-2) min(-1). The intraparticle diffusion model, proposed by Weber and Morris, was applied, and the intraparticle plots revealed three distinct sections representing external mass transfer, intraparticle diffusion and adsorption/desorption equilibrium. Diffusion coefficients, calculated from the Boyd kinetic equation, increased with the granulation and the particle size. Pseudo-first order kinetic constants, intraparticle diffusion rate constants and diffusion coefficients were determined for two other initial concentrations (50 and 100 mg L(-1)) and include in a statistical study to evaluate the impact of granulation and initial concentration on the kinetic parameters. Kruskal-Wallis tests, Spearman's rank order correlation and factor analysis revealed a correlation between (i) the diffusion coefficients and granulation, and between (ii) the intraparticle diffusion rate constants and initial concentration. PMID:22721789

  7. Effect of organic solvent exposure on chronic kidney disease progression: the GN-PROGRESS cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Sophie; Héry, Michel; Protois, Jean-Claude; Rossert, Jérôme; Stengel, Bénédicte

    2007-01-01

    It has been suggested that solvent exposure may have a role in the progression of glomerulonephritis (GN) to end-stage renal failure (ESRD), but this has never been tested with an appropriate cohort study design. We included 338 nonESRD patients with a first biopsy for primary GN between 1994 and 2001: 194 IgA nephropathies (IgAN), 75 membranous nephropathies (MN) and 69 focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). ESRD, defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate < 15 mL/min/1.73m2 or dialysis, was registered over a mean follow-up period of 5 years. Patients’ lifelong solvent exposures before and after diagnosis were recorded by interview and assessed by industrial hygienist experts. We used Cox models to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HR) of ESRD related to exposures. Overall, 15% of the patients had been exposed at a low level before diagnosis and 14% at a high level. Forty-two with IgA N reached ESRD, 12 with MN, and 22 with FSGS. A graded relationship was observed for MN: age- and gender-adjusted HR [95% confidence interval] for low exposure vs none 3.1 [0.5–18.2], and for high exposure vs none 8.2 [1.9–34.7], as well as for IgA N: 1.6 [0.7–3.9] and 2.2 [1.0–4.8], respectively, but not for FSGS. Solvent risk was only partly mediated by baseline proteinuria: adjusted HR for high exposure vs none = 5.5 [1.3 – 23.9] for MN and 1.8 [0.8 – 3.9] for IgA N. In patients with IgA N, there was a trend in increasing HR with exposure duration before and its persistence after diagnosis. These findings support the hypothesized association of solvent exposure with the progression of GN to ESRD. They should prompt clinicians to give greater attention to patients’ occupational exposures and possibly to consider professional reclassification. PMID:17135394

  8. An Experimental and Kinetic Modeling Study of Methyl Decanoate Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Sarathy, S M; Thomson, M J; Pitz, W J; Lu, T

    2009-12-04

    Biodiesel is a mixture of long chain fatty acid methyl esters derived from fats and oils. This research study presents opposed-flow diffusion flame data for one large fatty acid methyl ester, methyl decanoate, and uses the experiments to validate an improved skeletal mechanism consisting of 648 species and 2998 reactions. The results indicate that methyl decanoate is consumed via abstraction of hydrogen atoms to produce fuel radicals, which lead to the production of alkenes. The ester moiety in methyl decanoate leads to the formation of low molecular weight oxygenated compounds such as carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, and ketene.

  9. Gas absorption using a nanofluid solvent: kinetic and equilibrium study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, S.; Peyghambarzadeh, S. M.; Saremi, M.; Tahmasebi, H.

    2014-12-01

    An experimental study has been performed to explore gas absorption in a nanofluid solvent. Propane and propylene were separately absorbed in a non-aqueous based nanofluid composed of N-methyl 2-pyrolidone (NMP) + small amount of TiO2 nanoparticle. Absorption was performed at different initial pressures and nanoparticle concentrations. Results showed that the addition of small amount of nanoparticle enhances the rate of absorption. Nanofluid decreased the time needed to achieve equilibrium and increased the maximum amount of gas absorbed.

  10. Comparative study of thermal inactivation kinetics of Salmonella spp. in peanut butter and peanut butter spread

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peanut butter has been implicated in multi-state outbreaks of salmonellosis in recent years. Studies have shown that Salmonella exhibited increased thermal resistance in peanut butter. However, little is known about the effect of product formulation on the kinetics of survival of Salmonella during...

  11. Study of kinetics of crystallization of Ge7Se75Sb18 chalcogenide glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanwar, Naveen; Saraswat, Vibhav K.

    2014-04-01

    Present paper is an attempt to study kinetics of crystallization of Ge7Se75Sb18 chalcogenide glass by Differential Scanning Calorimetery (DSC) under non-isothermal condition. The sample was prepared by melt quenched technique and amorphous nature has been confirmed by XRD. Activation energy of crystallization has been evaluated using Kissinger, Augis-Bennett and Ozawa models.

  12. Kinetic Monte Carlo models for the study of chemical reactions in the Earth's upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchak, L. I.; Shematovich, V. I.

    2016-06-01

    A stochastic approach to study the non-equilibrium chemistry in the Earth's upper atmosphere is presented, which has been developed over a number of years. Kinetic Monte Carlo models based on this approach are an effective tool for investigating the role of suprathermal particles both in local variations of the atmospheric chemical composition and in the formation of the hot planetary corona.

  13. SPECIAL APPLICATIONS OF INSECT GUT MICROFLORA IN KINETIC STUDIES OF MICROBIAL SUBSTRATE REMOVAL RATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because of the highly controlled environment in which they live and their unique genetic history, the gut microflora of some insects may be useful for studying some of the underlying principles that govern the kinetics of uptake and metabolism of substrates by microorganisms. n t...

  14. Kinetic considerations about the study of alcoholic fermentations in starch hydrolysate

    SciTech Connect

    Converti, A.; Perego, P.; Del Borghi, M.; Parisi, F.; Ferraiolo, G.

    1986-05-01

    Alcoholic fermentations of starch hydrolysate by two different yeast strains, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (var. Vinal) and Saccharomyces oviformis (IMAP 383), have been studied in batch runs. In order to evaluate the different inhibition phenomena due to both substrate and product, a new kinetic equation is suggested. 23 references.

  15. COMPARATIVE KINETIC STUDIES OF PHOSPHATE-LIMITED GROWTH AND PHOSPHATE UPTAKE IN PHYTOPLANKTON IN CONTINUOUS CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comparative kinetic study of phosphate-limited growth and phosphate uptake was carried out in chemostat cultures of Anabaena flos-aquae Lyng. Breb., Ankistrodesmus falcatus (Corda) Ralfs, Asterionella formosa Hass., Fragilaria crotonensis Kitt., and Microcystis sp. Lemm. For ea...

  16. COMPARATIVE KINETIC STUDIES OF NITRATE-LIMITED GROWTH AND NITRATE UPTAKE IN PHYTOPLANKTON IN CONTINUOUS CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comparative kinetic study of nitrate-limited growth and nitrate uptake was carried out in chemostat cultures of Ankistrodesmus falcatus, Asterionella formosa, Fragilaria crotonensis. In each species growth rate (microgram) was related to total cell nitrogen or cell quota (q) by...

  17. Kinetic studies of porphyrin distribution in suspensions of tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorin, Vladimir P.; Mel'nov, Sergey B.; Savitsky, Valery P.; Zorina, Tatyana E.

    1996-12-01

    Using a fluorescence activated cell sorting, we investigated the dynamics of porphyrins in suspensions of tumor cells. In addition to direct studies of the incorporation and output of several porphyrins (hematoporphyrin, hematoporphyrin dimethyl ester, chlorin e6 and its mono-, di-, trimethyl esters) from cells, their transfer between cells was investigated. It was shown that the rate of pigment accumulation by cells correlated with the rate of porphyrin penetration across the plasma membrane. As a result, apolar chlorins and HpDME displayed enhanced staining capacity which was independent on the integrity of plasma membrane of cells. To estimate the rate of pigment redistribution between cells, the suspension of tumor cells loaded with porphyrin had been mixed with unloaded cells and the distribution of all cells according to porphyrin fluorescence was determined in different intervals of time. It was obtained that the highest rate of the pigment transfer between cells was exhibited in the case of moderately apolar pigment. Porphyrins with dominantly hydrophobic and hydrophilic properties had a decreased capacity to intercellular migration. The results of this study indicate that, depending on the photosensitizer used, the processes of its distribution in the bulk of tumor tissue mediated by intercellular exchange may occur with a different rate.

  18. Pulsed laser kinetic studies of liquids under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyring, E. M.

    1993-06-01

    Experiments have been developed for measuring the rates of chemical reactions liquids and in supercritical CO2. A pulsed (Q-switch) Nd:YAG laser at 355 nm was the pump beam for laser flash photolysis studies of molybdenum and tungsten hexacarbonyls undergoing ligand displacement reactions by bidentate chelating agents such as 2,2'-bipyridine in toluene. Experiments were carried out at 0.1 to 150 MPa. In the case of molybdenum complexes, the reaction mechanism for thermal ring closure is found from activation volumes to change from associative interchange to dissociative interchange as substituents on the 2,2'-bipyridine ligands become bulkier. In a similar study of more rigid, substituted phenanthroline bidentate ligands it was found that substituent bulkiness had little effect on the thermal ring closure mechanism. Similar high pressure flash photolysis experiments with tungsten hexacarbonyl have also been completed. The concentration dependence of the fluorescence and nonradiative decay quantum yields for cresyl violet in several solvents has been reported as well as stability constants for the complexation of lithium ion by four different crown ethers dissolved in a room temperature molten salt.

  19. Pulsed laser kinetic studies of liquids under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Eyring, E.M.

    1993-06-21

    Experiments have been developed for measuring the rates of chemical reactions liquids and in supercritical Co[sub 2]. A pulsed (Q-switch) Nd:YAG laser at 355 nm was the pump beam for laser flash photolysis studies of molybdenum and tungsten hexacarbonyls undergoing ligand displacement reactions by bidentate chelating agents such as 2,2[prime]-bipyridine in toluene. Experiments were carried out at 0.1 to 150 MPa. In the case of molybdenum complexes, the reaction mechanism for thermal ring closure is found from activation volumes to change from associative interchange to dissociative interchange as substituents on the 2,2[prime]-bipyridine ligands become bulkier. In a similar study of more rigid, substituted phenanthroline bidentate ligands it was found that substituent bulkiness had little effect on the thermal ring closure mechanism. Similar high pressure flash photolysis experiments with tungsten hexacarbonyl have also been completed. The concentration dependence of the fluorescence and nonradiative decay quantum yields for cresyl violet in several solvent have been reported as well as stability constants for the complexation of lithium ion by four different crown ethers dissolved in a room temperature molten salt.

  20. Atmospheric chemistry: Laboratory studies of kinetics of important reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. J.

    Experiments to measure the rate constants for some reactions of the atmospherically important nitrate radical (NO3) are described using the discharge-flow technique. The nitrate radical was monitored by optical absorption at lambda = 662 nm. The reactions of NO3 with some stable organic and inorganic substrates are reported. The temperature dependences of some of the rate constants were also determined (298 less than T less than 523 K). In most cases, computer simulation was used to extract the rate constant for the primary process because the time-dependent behavior of (NO3) was affected by secondary reactions of NO3 with products of the primary interaction. The Arrhenius parameter for the reactions of NO3 with CH3CH3, CH2CH2, CH3OH, CHCl3, and HCl were determined. The activation energies for the reactions studied between NO3 and some alkynes are presented along with the corresponding pre-exponential factors. Some reactions were studied at room temperature (298 plus or minus 2 K) only and the rate constants found (in units of cubic cm/molecule sec) are: buta-1,3-diene (1.8 x 10 (exp -13), isobutene (2.8 x 10 (exp -13), HBr (1.3 x 10 (exp -15) and hex-2-yne (3.0 x 10 (exp -14). Non-Arrhenius behavior was found in the reactions of NO3 with n-butane, isobutane and propene. The empirical variation of these rate constants with temperature is presented. The curvature of the Arrhenius plots is discussed in terms of (1) a temperature-dependent pre-exponential factor, and (2) the possibility that two competing channels, possessing differing activation energies, exist for each reaction. The atmospheric implications of these reactions are discussed with reference to the nighttime production of nitric acid and the importance of the these reactions as loss processes for NO3.

  1. Transient kinetics study of catalytic char gasification in carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Lizzio, A.A.; Radovic, L.R. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1991-08-01

    In this paper, the deactivation behavior of K, Ca, and Ni catalysts during carbon (char) gasification in CO{sub 2} is investigated. Correlations were sought between gasification rates and reactive surface areas (RSA) of the chars. In addition, the results allowed some speculation on recently proposed mechanisms of catalysis. An excellent correlation was found in the case of K catalysis, suggesting the rate-determining step in the overall mechanism to be the same as in the uncatalyzed reaction, i.e., desorption of the reactive C(O) intermediate. For the Ca-catalyzed reaction, the quality of the correlation depended on catalyst dispersion, suggesting that an additional process, besides the direct decomposition of the reactive C(O) intermediate, contributed to the transient evolution of CO (e.g., oxygen spillover). No correlation was found for Ni-catalyzed gasification; an oxygen-transfer mechanism is proposed to explain these findings. Mixed catalyst systems (Ca/K, K/Ni, Ca/Ni) were also studied. An excellent correlation between reactivity and RSA was observed in cases where the K-catalyzed reaction was dominant.

  2. Equilibrium and kinetics studies of arsenate adsorption by FePO(4).

    PubMed

    Hamayun, M; Mahmood, T; Naeem, A; Muska, M; Din, S U; Waseem, M

    2014-03-01

    The present work is focusing on removal of arsenate from aqueous solution using FePO4. The equilibrium study regarding the removal of arsenic by FePO4 was carried out at 298, 308, 318 and 328K. Langmuir parameters were found to increase with the increase in temperature indicating that the adsorption is favorable at high temperature. Kinetic study of arsenate adsorption on FePO4 was also carried out at different temperatures and at pH 6 and 8. Different kinetic models were used to the kinetic data amongst which pseudo second order model was best fitted. The mechanism of the adsorption kinetics was investigated by employing intraparticle diffusion and Richenberg models. The energy of activation (Ea) was found to be 30 and 35.52kJmol(-1) at pH 6 and pH 8, respectively, suggesting chemisorption nature of the adsorption process. The negative entropic values of activation signified the existence of entropy barrier while the positive ΔG(#) values indicated the existence of energy barrier to be crossed over for the occurrence of a chemical reaction. Both the spectroscopic studies and increase in equilibrium pH reveal the anion exchange removal of arsenate from aqueous solution to the solid surface. PMID:24280053

  3. Molecular dynamics and kinetic study of carbon coagulation in the release wave of detonation products.

    PubMed

    Chevrot, Guillaume; Sollier, Arnaud; Pineau, Nicolas

    2012-02-28

    We present a combined molecular dynamics and kinetic study of a carbon cluster aggregation process in thermodynamic conditions relevant for the detonation products of oxygen deficient explosives. Molecular dynamics simulations with the LCBOPII potential under gigapascal pressure and high temperatures indicate that (i) the cluster motion in the detonation gas is compatible with Brownian diffusion and (ii) the coalescence probability is 100% for two clusters entering the interaction cutoff distance. We used these results for a subsequent kinetic study with the Smoluchowski model, with realistic models applied for the physical parameters such as viscosity and cluster size. We found that purely aggregational kinetics yield too fast clustering, with moderate influence of the model parameters. In agreement with previous studies, the introduction of surface reactivity through a simple kinetic model is necessary to approach the clustering time scales suggested by experiments (1000 atoms after 100 ns, 10 000 atoms after 1 μs). However, these models fail to reach all experimental criteria simultaneously and more complex modelling of the surface process seems desirable to go beyond these current limitations. PMID:22380052

  4. Bench-scale Kinetics Study of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Blythe; John Currie; David DeBerry

    2008-03-31

    This document is the final report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42314, 'Kinetics Study of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors'. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory and EPRI. The objective of the project has been to determine the mechanisms and kinetics of the aqueous reactions of mercury absorbed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, and develop a kinetics model to predict mercury reactions in wet FGD systems. The model may be used to determine optimum wet FGD design and operating conditions to maximize mercury capture in wet FGD systems. Initially, a series of bench-top, liquid-phase reactor tests were conducted and mercury species concentrations were measured by UV/visible light spectroscopy to determine reactant and byproduct concentrations over time. Other measurement methods, such as atomic absorption, were used to measure concentrations of vapor-phase elemental mercury, that cannot be measured by UV/visible light spectroscopy. Next, a series of bench-scale wet FGD simulation tests were conducted. Because of the significant effects of sulfite concentration on mercury re-emission rates, new methods were developed for operating and controlling the bench-scale FGD experiments. Approximately 140 bench-scale wet FGD tests were conducted and several unusual and pertinent effects of process chemistry on mercury re-emissions were identified and characterized. These data have been used to develop an empirically adjusted, theoretically based kinetics model to predict mercury species reactions in wet FGD systems. The model has been verified in tests conducted with the bench-scale wet FGD system, where both gas-phase and liquid-phase mercury concentrations were measured to determine if the model accurately predicts the tendency for mercury re-emissions. This report presents and discusses results from the initial laboratory kinetics measurements, the bench-scale wet FGD tests, and the kinetics modeling efforts.

  5. Theoretical study of the kinetics of reactions of the monohalogenated methanes with atomic chlorine.

    PubMed

    Brudnik, Katarzyna; Twarda, Maria; Sarzyński, Dariusz; Jodkowski, Jerzy T

    2013-04-01

    Ab initio calculations at the G2 level were used in a theoretical description of the kinetics and mechanism of the hydrogen abstraction reactions from fluoro-, chloro- and bromomethane by chlorine atoms. The profiles of the potential energy surfaces show that mechanism of the reactions under investigation is complex and consists of two - in the case of CH3F+Cl - and of three elementary steps for CH3Cl+Cl and CH3Br+Cl. The heights of the energy barrier related to the H-abstraction are of 8-10 kJ mol(-1), the lowest value corresponds to CH3Cl+Cl and the highest one to CH3F+Cl. The rate constants were calculated using the theoretical method based on the RRKM theory and the simplified version of the statistical adiabatic channel model. The kinetic equations derived in this study[Formula: see text]and[Formula: see text]allow a description of the kinetics of the reactions under investigation in the temperature range of 200-3000 K. The kinetics of reactions of the entirely deuterated reactants were also included in the kinetic analysis. Results of ab initio calculations show that D-abstraction process is related with the energy barrier of 5 kJ mol(-1) higher than the H-abstraction from the corresponding non-deuterated reactant molecule. The derived analytical equations for the reactions, CD3X+Cl, CH2X+HCl and CD2X+DCl (X = F, Cl and Br) are a substantial supplement of the kinetic data necessary for the description and modeling of the processes of importance in the atmospheric chemistry. PMID:23239396

  6. Atmospheric Chemistry: Laboratory Studies of Kinetics of Important Reactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. J.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. This thesis describes the experiments to measure the rate constants for some reactions of the atmospherically important nitrate radical (NO_3) using the discharge-flow technique. The nitrate radical was monitored by optical absorption at lambda = 662 nm. The reactions of NO_3 with some stable organic and inorganic substrates are reported. The temperature dependences of some of the rate constants have also been determined (298 < T < 523 K). In most cases, computer simulation was used to extract the rate constant for the primary process because the time-dependent behaviour of (NO_3) was affected by secondary reactions of NO_3 with products of the primary interaction. The Arrhenius parameter in parentheses (E _{rm a}/kJ mol^ {-1}, A/cm^3 molecule ^{-1}s^ {-1} respectively) for the following reactions have been determined: ethane (37, 6.7 times 10^{-12}), ethylene (25.8, 6.3 times 10^ {-12}), CH_3OH (21.3, 1.2 times 10^ {-12}), CHCiota_3 (23.4, 8.6 times 10 ^{-13}) and HCl (27.7, 4 times 10^{-12}). The activation energies for the reactions studied between NO_3 and some alkynes are represented well by the value 25 +/- 3 kJ mol^{-1} and the corresponding pre-exponential factors (expressed as ln(10 ^{13}A/cm^3 molecule^{-1}s ^{-1}) are as follows: C_2H_2 (1.6 +/- 1.4), C_3H _4 (5.0 +/- 1.4), 1-C_4H_6 (5.8 +/- 1.0), 1-C_5 H_8 (5.7 +/- 0.6) and 1-C_6H _{10} (4.5 +/- 0.4). Some reactions were studied at room temperature _3(298 +/- 2 K) only and the rate constants found (in units of cm ^3 molecule^{ -1}s^{-1}) are: buta-1,3-diene (1.8 times 10 ^{-13}), isobutene (2.8 times 10^{-13 }), HBr (1.3 times 10 ^{-15}) and hex-2-yne (3.0 times 10^{-14 }). Non-Arrhenius behaviour was found in the reactions of NO_3 with n-butane, isobutane and propene. The empirical variation of these rate constants with temperature is well represented by the three parameter expressions:. k(T) = 1.2 times 10 ^{-46}T^{11

  7. Kinetic and equilibrium studies of bile salt-liposome interactions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lin; Feng, Feifei; Fawcett, J Paul; Tucker, Ian G

    2015-03-01

    Research has suggested that exposure to sub-micellar concentrations of bile salts (BS) increases the permeability of lipid bilayers in a time-dependent manner. In this study, incubation of soy phosphatidylcholine small unilamellar vesicles (liposomes) with sub-micellar concentrations of cholate (C), deoxycholate (DC), 12-monoketocholate (MKC) or taurocholate (TC) in pH 7.2 buffer increased membrane fluidity and negative zeta potential in the order of increasing BS liposome-pH 7.2 buffer distribution coefficients (MKC < C ≈ TC < DC). In liposomes labeled with the dithionite-sensitive fluorescent lipid N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)phosphatidylethanolamine (NBD-PE) in both leaflets and equilibrated with sub-micellar concentrations of BS, fluorescence decline during continuous exposure to dithionite was biphasic involving a rapid initial phase followed by a slower second phase. Membrane permeability to dithionite as measured by the rate of the second phase increased in the order control < MKC < TC ∼ C < DC. In liposomes labeled with NBD-PE in the inner leaflet only and incubated with the same concentrations of C, DC and MKC, membrane permeability to dithionite initially increased very rapidly in the order MKC < C < DC before impermeability to dithionite was restored after which fluorescence decline was consistent with NBD-PE flip-flop. For liposomes incubated with TC, membrane permeability to dithionite was only slightly increased and the decline in fluorescence was mainly the result of NBD-PE flip-flop. These results provide evidence that BS interact with lipid bilayers in a time-dependent manner that is different for conjugated and unconjugated BS. MKC appears to cause least disturbance to liposomal membranes but, when the actual MKC concentration in liposomes is taken into account, MKC is actually the most disruptive. PMID:24960448

  8. A Kinetic Study of the Diels-Alder Reaction. An Experiment Illustrating Simple Second-Order Reaction Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silvestri, Michael G.; Dills, Charles E.

    1989-01-01

    Describes an organic chemistry experiment for teaching the basic concepts of chemical kinetics. Provides background information about first- and second-order reactions, experimental procedures of the Diels-Alder reaction between cyclopentadiene and dimethyl fumarate, and the experimental results. (YP)

  9. Kinetically Stabilized Axisymmetric Tandem Mirrors: Summary of Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R F

    2005-02-08

    The path to practical fusion power through plasma confinement in magnetic fields, if it is solely based on the present front-runner, the tokamak, is clearly long, expensive, and arduous. The root causes for this situation lie in the effects of endemic plasma turbulence and in the complexity the tokamak's ''closed'' field geometry. The studies carried out in the investigations described in the attached reports are aimed at finding an approach that does not suffer from these problems. This goal is to be achieved by employing an axisymmetric ''open'' magnetic field geometry, i.e. one generated by a linear array of circular magnet coils, and employing the magnetic mirror effect in accomplishing the plugging of end leakage. More specifically, the studies were aimed at utilizing the tandem-mirror concept in an axisymmetric configuration to achieve performance superior to the tokamak, and in a far simpler system, one for which the cost and development time could be much lower than that for the tokamak, as exemplified by ITER and its follow-ons. An important stimulus for investigating axisymmetric versions of the tandem mirror is the fact that, beginning from early days in fusion research there have been examples of axisymmetric mirror experiments where the plasma exhibited crossfield transport far below the turbulence-enhanced rates characteristic of tokamaks, in specific cases approaching the ''classical'' rate. From the standpoint of theory, axisymmetric mirror-based systems have special characteristics that help explain the low levels of turbulence that have been observed. Among these are the facts that there are no parallel currents in the equilibrium state, and that the drift surfaces of all of the trapped particles are closed surfaces, as shown early on by Teller and Northrop. In addition, in such systems it is possible to arrange that the radial boundary of the confined plasma terminates without contact with the chamber wall. This possibility reduces the

  10. An experimental and kinetic modeling study of combustion of isomers of butanol

    SciTech Connect

    Grana, Roberto; Frassoldati, Alessio; Faravelli, Tiziano; Ranzi, Eliseo; Niemann, Ulrich; Seiser, Reinhard; Cattolica, Robert; Seshadri, Kalyanasundaram

    2010-11-15

    A kinetic model is developed to describe combustion of isomers of butanol - n-butanol (n-C{sub 4}H{sub 9}OH), sec-butanol (sec-C{sub 4}H{sub 9}OH), iso-butanol (iso-C{sub 4}H{sub 9}OH), and tert-butanol (tert-C{sub 4}H{sub 9}OH). A hierarchical approach is employed here. This approach was previously found to be useful for developing detailed and semi-detailed mechanism of oxidation of various hydrocarbon fuels. This method starts from lower molecular weight compounds of a family of species and proceeds to higher molecular weight compounds. The pyrolysis and oxidation mechanisms of butanol isomers are similar to those for hydrocarbon fuels. Here, the development of the complete set of the primary propagation reactions for butanol isomers proceeds from the extension of the kinetic parameters for similar reactions already studied and recently revised for ethanol, n-propanol and iso-propanol. A detailed description leading to evaluation of rate constants for initiation reactions, metathesis reactions, decomposition reactions of alkoxy radicals, isomerization reactions, and four-center molecular dehydration reactions are given. Decomposition and oxidation of primary intermediate products are described using a previously developed semi-detailed kinetic model for hydrocarbon fuels. The kinetic mechanism is made up of more than 7000 reactions among 300 species. The model is validated by comparing predictions made using this kinetic model with previous and new experimental data on counterflow non-premixed flames of n-butanol and iso-butanol. The structures of these flames were measured by removing gas samples from the flame and analyzing them using a gas chromatograph. Temperature profiles were measured using coated thermocouples. The flame structures were measured under similar conditions for both fuels to elucidate the similarities and differences in combustion characteristics of the two isomers. The profiles measured include those of butanol, oxygen, carbon dioxide

  11. Studies of NO-char reaction kinetics obtained from drop-tube furnace and thermogravimetric experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Shaozeng Sun; Juwei Zhang; Xidong Hu; Shaohua Wu; Jiancheng Yang; Yang Wang; Yukun Qin

    2009-01-15

    Four coal chars were prepared in a flat flame flow reactor (FFR), which can simulate the temperature and gas composition of a real pulverized coal combustion environment. The pore structure of chars was measured by mercury porosimetry and nitrogen adsorption, and the Hg and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas were obtained. The kinetics of NO-char was studied in a drop-tube furnace (DTF) and thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). In the TGA experiments, the random pore model (RPM) was applied to describe the NO-char reactions and obtain the intrinsic kinetics. By presenting the data of DTF and TGA experiments on the same Arrhenius plot, it can be concluded that TGA is an available tool to study the kinetics of a high-temperature NO-char reaction. With respect to the DTF experiments, in comparison to the BET surface area, the Hg surface area is a better basis for normalizing the reactivity of different coal chars because of less scatter in the measured values, better agreement with TGA experimental data, and more stable values during the process of reaction. Moreover, by comparing the Hg surface area of chars before and after reactions, it is believed that the Hg surface area basis is more appropriate for high-rank coal chars. The determined kinetic rate constants are in good agreement with other data in the literature, and a new rate constant expression is proposed. 30 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Study of the kinetic parameters for synthesis and hydrolysis of pharmacologically active salicin isomer catalyzed by baker's yeast maltase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veličković, D. V.; Dimitrijević, A. S.; Bihelović, F. J.; Jankov, R. M.; Milosavić, N.

    2011-12-01

    One of the key elements for understanding enzyme reactions is determination of its kinetic parameters. Since transglucosylation is kinetically controlled reaction, besides the reaction of synthesis, very important is the reaction of enzymatic hydrolysis of created product. Therefore, in this study, kinetic parameters for synthesis and secondary hydrolysis of pharmacologically active α isosalicin by baker's yeast maltase were calculated, and it was shown that specifity of maltase for hydrolysis is approximately 150 times higher then for synthesis.

  13. Progress in the Study of ALFALFA Galaxy Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troischt, Parker; Nichols, Nathan

    2013-04-01

    The Undergraduate ALFALFA (Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA) Team Groups Project is a collaborative undertaking of faculty and students at 11 institutions, aimed at investigating properties of galaxy groups surveyed by the ALFALFA blind HI survey. The survey covers 7,000 square degrees and is expected to include more than 30,000 extragalactic sources when completed. Here we present analysis of HI spectra taken at the National Astronomy and Ionosphere Center and report on progress made with developing analysis software tools as part of the UAT study. These tools will be implemented with follow up observations of targeted sources generated from the original blind survey. This work has been supported by NSF grants AST-0724918, AST-0725267 and AST-0725380.

  14. Progress in studies of solar eclipses recorded in early China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ciyuan

    2003-03-01

    Systematic records of solar eclipses started from Chunqiu period. Such records are complete and regular from the Han to the Qing Dynasties. Before then, in the Xia, Shang and West Zhou Dynasties, records of solar eclipses were vague and scattered. Many people investigated them, but it is difficult to get final conclusions. With recent progress in astronomical computation and historic chronology, new achievements have been reached in studies of early solar eclipses. These records include "Sanmiao" and "Zhongkang" eclipses in the legends of the Xia Dynasty; "Three flames ate the Sun", "The sun and the moon were eclipsed" and "The sun was Zhi" on the oracle bones of the Shang Dynasty; "Tianda yi", "Double dawn" and "Poem eclipse" in the literature of West Zhou Dynasty.

  15. Progress of drug-loaded polymeric micelles into clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Horacio; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2014-09-28

    Targeting tumors with long-circulating nano-scaled carriers is a promising strategy for systemic cancer treatment. Compared with free small therapeutic agents, nanocarriers can selectively accumulate in solid tumors through the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, which is characterized by leaky blood vessels and impaired lymphatic drainage in tumor tissues, and achieve superior therapeutic efficacy, while reducing side effects. In this way, drug-loaded polymeric micelles, i.e. self-assemblies of amphiphilic block copolymers consisting of a hydrophobic core as a drug reservoir and a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrophilic shell, have demonstrated outstanding features as tumor-targeted nanocarriers with high translational potential, and several micelle formulations are currently under clinical evaluation. This review summarizes recent efforts in the development of these polymeric micelles and their performance in human studies, as well as our recent progress in polymeric micelles for the delivery of nucleic acids and imaging. PMID:24993430

  16. THREE STUDIES OF THE STANDARD PROGRESSIVE MATRICES IN MOROCCO (.).

    PubMed

    Attallah Bakhiet, Salaheldin Farah; Lynn, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Results are given for three studies of samples tested with the Standard Progressive Matrices (SPM) in Morocco. The first consisted of 85 children (boys, girls; M age = 8.5 yr.) in the town of Kenitra and obtained a British IQ of 74. The second consisted of 202 adults (92 men, 110 women; M age = 26 yr.) in four cities and obtained a British IQ of 81. The third consisted of 1,177 secondary school children (723 boys, 454 girls; ages 12-17 yr.) in a rural area and obtained a British IQ of 73.3. It is proposed that the best estimate of the Moroccan IQ can be obtained as the average of the three results, giving an IQ of 76. PMID:26595289

  17. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies on the disulfide-bond reducing potential of hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Vasas, Anita; Dóka, Éva; Fábián, István; Nagy, Péter

    2015-04-30

    The significance of persulfide species in hydrogen sulfide biology is increasingly recognized. However, the molecular mechanisms of their formation remain largely elusive. The obvious pathway of the reduction of biologically abundant disulfide moieties by sulfide was challenged on both thermodynamic and kinetic grounds. Using DTNB (5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid), also known as Ellman's reagent) as a model disulfide we conducted a comprehensive kinetic study for its reaction with sulfide. The bimolecular reaction is relatively fast with a second-order rate constant of 889 ± 12 M(-1)s(-1) at pH = 7.4. pH dependence of the rate law revealed that the reaction proceeds via the bisulfide anion species with an initial nucleophilic thiol-disulfide exchange reaction to give 5-thio-2-nitrobenzoic acid (TNB) and TNB-persulfide with a pH independent second-order rate constant of 1090 ± 12 M(-1)s(-1). However, kinetic studies and stoichiometric analyses in a wide range of reactant ratios together with kinetic simulations revealed that it is a multistep process that proceeds via kinetically driven, practically irreversible reactions along the disulfide → persulfide → inorganic polysulfides axis. The kinetic model postulated here, which is fully consistent with the experimental data, suggests that the TNB-persulfide is further reduced by sulfide with a second-order rate constant in the range of 5 × 10(3) - 5 × 10(4) M(-1)s(-1) at pH 7.4 and eventually yields inorganic polysulfides and TNB. The reactions of cystine and GSSG with sulfide were found to be significantly slower and to occur via more complicated reaction schemes. (1)H NMR studies suggest that these reactions also generate Cys-persulfide and inorganic polysulfide species, but in contrast with DTNB, in consecutive equilibrium processes that are sensitive to changes in the reactant and product ratios. Collectively, our results demonstrate that the reaction of disulfides with sulfide is a highly system

  18. The dissociation kinetics of NO on Rh(111) as studied by temperature programmed static secondary ion mass spectrometry and desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borg, H. J.; Reijerse, J. F. C.-J. M.; van Santen, R. A.; Niemantsverdriet, J. W.

    1994-12-01

    Temperature programmed static secondary ion mass spectrometry (TPSSIMS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) have been used to study the kinetics of adsorption, dissociation, and desorption of NO on Rh(111). At 100 K, NO adsorption is molecular and proceeds via mobile precursor state kinetics with a high initial sticking probability. SSIMS indicates the presence of two distinct NO adsorption states, indicative of threefold adsorption at low coverage, and occupation of bridge sites at higher coverages. Three characteristic coverage regimes appear with respect to NO dissociation. At low coverages θNO<0.25 ML, NO dissociates completely at temperatures between 275 and 340 K. If we neglect lateral interactions and assume pure first order dissociation kinetics, we find effective values for the activation barrier and preexponential factor of 40±6 kJ/mol and 106±1 s-1 for the dissociation of 0.15-0.20 ML NO. However, if we assume that a NO molecule needs an ensemble of three to four vacant sites in order to dissociate, the preexponential factor and activation energy are ˜1011 s-1 and 65 kJ/mol, in better agreement with transition state theory expectations. The Nads and Oads dissociation products desorb as N2 and O2, respectively, with desorption parameters Edes=118±10 kJ/mol and νdes=1010.1±1.0 s-1 for N2 in the zero coverage limit. At higher coverages, the desorption kinetics of N2 is strongly influenced by the presence of coadsorbed oxygen. In the medium coverage range 0.25<θNO<0.50 ML, part of the NO desorbs molecularly, with an estimated desorption barrier of 113±10 kJ/mol and a preexponential of 1013.5±1.0 s-1. Dissociation of NO becomes progressively inhibited due to site blocking, the onset shifting from 275 K at 0.25 ML to 400 K, coinciding with the NO desorption temperature, at a coverage of 0.50 ML. The accumulation of nitrogen and oxygen atoms on the highly covered surface causes a destabilization of the nitrogen atoms, which results in an

  19. Simulation study on nitrogen vibrational kinetics in a single nanosecond pulse high voltage air discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei; Zhou, Qianhong; Dong, Zhiwei

    2016-05-01

    We report a simulation study on nitrogen vibrational kinetics N 2 ( X 1 Σg + , v = 0 - 12 ) in a single nanosecond pulse high voltage discharge in dry-air at a pressure of 100 Torr. Apart from the usual processes such as vibrational-vibrational exchange and vibrational-translational relaxation, the state-specific vibrational kinetics take into account the electronic-vibrational (E-V) process and chemical-vibrational process. The vibrational kinetics, coupled with electron Boltzmann equation solver, plasma chemical kinetics, and gas thermal balance are used to model the 100 ns discharge and its subsequent 10 ms afterglow. The self-consistent model shows good agreement with recent experimental results, with regard to time-resolved vibrational and translational temperature. According to the modeling results, The E-V mechanism has a small but non-negligible effect (about 2%) in rising of vibrational quanta in the early afterglow from 100 ns to 1μs. Another possible reason is the convective transport associated with the gas dynamic expansion in time delays around 1μs to 10 μs.

  20. Fluctuating bottleneck model studies on kinetics of DNA escape from α-hemolysin nanopores.

    PubMed

    Bian, Yukun; Wang, Zilin; Chen, Anpu; Zhao, Nanrong

    2015-11-14

    We have proposed a fluctuation bottleneck (FB) model to investigate the non-exponential kinetics of DNA escape from nanometer-scale pores. The basic idea is that the escape rate is proportional to the fluctuating cross-sectional area of DNA escape channel, the radius r of which undergoes a subdiffusion dynamics subjected to fractional Gaussian noise with power-law memory kernel. Such a FB model facilitates us to obtain the analytical result of the averaged survival probability as a function of time, which can be directly compared to experimental results. Particularly, we have applied our theory to address the escape kinetics of DNA through α-hemolysin nanopores. We find that our theoretical framework can reproduce the experimental results very well in the whole time range with quite reasonable estimation for the intrinsic parameters of the kinetics processes. We believe that FB model has caught some key features regarding the long time kinetics of DNA escape through a nanopore and it might provide a sound starting point to study much wider problems involving anomalous dynamics in confined fluctuating channels. PMID:26567685

  1. Kinetic study of austenite formation during continuous heating of unalloyed ductile iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Gómez, Octavio; Barrera-Godínez, José Antonio; Vergara-Hernández, Héctor Javier

    2015-01-01

    The austenite formation kinetics in unalloyed cast ductile iron was studied on the basis of dilatometry measurements, and Avrami's equation was used to estimate the material's kinetic parameters. A continuous heating transformation diagram was constructed using heating rates in the range of 0.06 to 0.83°C·s-1. As the heating rate was augmented, the critical temperatures, A c1 and A α, as well as the intercritical range, which was evaluated as the difference between the critical temperatures, Δ T = A α - A c1, increased. At a low heating rate, the kinetics of austenite formation was slow as a consequence of the iron's silicon content. The effect of heating rate on k and n, the kinetic parameters of Avrami's equation, was also determined. Parameter n, which is associated with nucleation sites and growth geometry, decreased with an increase in heating rate. In addition, parameter k increased with the increase of heating rate, suggesting that the nucleation and growth rates are carbon- and silicon-diffusion controlled during austenite formation under continuous heating.

  2. Calorimetric Studies of Precipitation and Dissolution Kinetics in Aluminum Alloys 2219 and 7075

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papazian, John M.

    1982-05-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to study the kinetics of precipitation and dissolution of metastable and stable phases in aluminum alloys 2219 and 7075. A comparison of DSC scans obtained at heating rates of 1, 5, 10, and 20 K per minute showed that, during a DSC scan, the rates of precipitation of θ' and θ in 2219 and η' and η in 7075 were limited by their reaction kinetics. Likewise, the rates of dissolution of GP zones, θ' and η', were found to be dominated by kinetics. In contrast, the dissolution of θ and η was dominated by the thermodynamic equilibrium between these phases and the matrix. Analysis of the kinetically dominated reaction peaks and their dependence on heating rate and particle size showed that the GP zone dissolution reaction could best be described by a three-dimensional volume diffusion limited rate expression with an activation energy equal to that for diffusion. The rate of formation of θ' was best described by an Avrami expression with n = 1.1, indicating that nucleation was not the rate controlling step. A pronounced dependence of the θ' formation rate on prior plastic deformation was observed and ascribed to the influence of the matrix dislocation density on diffusivity.

  3. Theoretical study of the kinetics of chlorine atom abstraction from chloromethanes by atomic chlorine.

    PubMed

    Brudnik, Katarzyna; Twarda, Maria; Sarzyński, Dariusz; Jodkowski, Jerzy T

    2013-10-01

    Ab initio calculations at the G3 level were used in a theoretical description of the kinetics and mechanism of the chlorine abstraction reactions from mono-, di-, tri- and tetra-chloromethane by chlorine atoms. The calculated profiles of the potential energy surface of the reaction systems show that the mechanism of the studied reactions is complex and the Cl-abstraction proceeds via the formation of intermediate complexes. The multi-step reaction mechanism consists of two elementary steps in the case of CCl4 + Cl, and three for the other reactions. Rate constants were calculated using the theoretical method based on the RRKM theory and the simplified version of the statistical adiabatic channel model. The temperature dependencies of the calculated rate constants can be expressed, in temperature range of 200-3,000 K as [Formula: see text]. The rate constants for the reverse reactions CH3/CH2Cl/CHCl2/CCl3 + Cl2 were calculated via the equilibrium constants derived theoretically. The kinetic equations [Formula: see text] allow a very good description of the reaction kinetics. The derived expressions are a substantial supplement to the kinetic data necessary to describe and model the complex gas-phase reactions of importance in combustion and atmospheric chemistry. PMID:23455925

  4. Kinetic Defects Induced by Melittin in Model Lipid Membranes: A Solution Atomic Force Microscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jianjun; Khadka, Nawal K

    2016-05-26

    Quantitative characterization of membrane defects (pores) is important for elucidating the molecular basis of many membrane-active peptides. We study kinetic defects induced by melittin in vesicular and planar lipid bilayers. Fluorescence spectroscopy measurements indicate that melittin induces time-dependent calcein leakage. Solution atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to visualize melittin-induced membrane defects. After initial equilibration, the most probable defect radius is ∼3.8 nm in 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DLPC) bilayers. Unexpectedly, defects become larger with longer incubation, accompanied by substantial shape transformation. The initial defect radius is ∼4.7 nm in 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) bilayers. Addition of 30 mol % cholesterol to DOPC bilayers suppresses defect kinetics, although the inhibitory impact is negated by longer incubation. Overall, the kinetic rate of defect development follows DLPC > DOPC > DOPC/cholesterol. Kinetic defects are also observed when anionic lipids are present. Based on the observation that defects can occupy as large as 40% of the bilayer surface, we propose a kinetic defect growth model. We also study the effect of melittin on the phase behavior of DOPC/egg-sphingomyelin/cholesterol bilayers. We find that melittin initially suppresses or eliminates liquid-ordered (Lo) domains; Lo domains gradually emerge and become the dominant species with longer incubation; and defects in phase-coexisting bilayers have a most probable radius of ∼5 nm and are exclusively localized in the liquid-disordered (Ld) phase. Our experimental data highlight that melittin-induced membrane defects are not static; conversely, spontaneous defect growth is intrinsically associated with membrane permeabilization exerted by melittin. PMID:27167473

  5. Temperature dependence of protein solubility-determination, application to crystallization, and growth kinetics studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz

    1993-01-01

    A scintillation method was developed for determinations of the temperature dependence of the solubility, and of nucleation induction times of proteins, in 50-100 mu(l) volumes of solution. Solubility data for lysozyme and horse serum albumin were obtained for various combinations of pH and precipitant concentrations. These data and the nucleation induction information were used for dynamic crystallization control, that is, for the controlled separation of nucleation and growth stages. Individual lysozyme and horse serum albumin crystals were grown in 15-20 mu(l) solution volumes contained in x-ray capillaries. The morphology and kinetics of the growth and dissolution of lysozyme in aqueous solutions with 2.5 percent NaCl and at pH = 4.5 was studied in situ with a depth resolution of 300 A (4 unit cells) by high resolution optical microscopy and digital image processing. The bulk super- or under saturation, sigma, of the solution inside a closed growth cell was controlled by temperature. The growth habit was bound by (110) and (101) faces that grew through layer spreading, although with different growth rate dependencies on supersaturation/temperature. At sigma less than 10 (obtained at higher temperatures) growth was purely kinetic ally controlled, with impurity effects (macrostep formation and kinetic hindrance) becoming significant for sigma less than 2. At sigma greater than 10 (lower temperatures), anisotropies in the interfacial kinetics were more pronounced, with interfacial kinetics and bulk transport becoming equally important to the growth morphology. Growth rates were growth history dependent. The formation of striations (layers of irregularly incorporated solution) was unambiguously correlated with growth temperature variations. Etching exposed dislocations and various high-index faces whose growth morphologies were studied during return to the steady state growth form. Growth steps were observed to originate from two-dimensional nuclei or from outcrops

  6. Kinetic studies of the infrared-induced reaction between atomic chlorine and solid parahydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raston, Paul L.; Kettwich, Sharon C.; Anderson, David T.

    2015-04-01

    We present Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic studies of the IR-induced Cl + H2(v = 1) → HCl + H reaction in a parahydrogen (pH2) matrix aimed at distinguishing between two proposed reactions mechanisms; direct-IR and vibron-mediated. The Cl atom reactants are produced via 355 nm in situ photolysis of a Cl2 doped pH2 matrix. After photolysis is complete, a long-pass IR filter in the FTIR beam is removed and we measure the ensuing IR-induced reaction kinetics using rapid scan FTIR spectroscopy. We follow both the decay of the Cl atom reactant and growth of the HCl product using the Cl spin-orbit (SO) + Q1(0) and HCl R1(0) transitions, respectively. We show the IR-induced reaction mechanism depends on the spectral profile of the IR radiation; for IR spectral profiles that have significant IR intensities between 4000 and 5000 cm-1 we observe first-order kinetics that are assigned to a vibron-mediated mechanism and for spectral profiles that have significant IR intensities that include the Cl SO + Q1(0) transition near 5094 cm-1 we observe bi-exponential kinetics that are dominated by the direct-IR mechanism at early reaction times. We can distinguish between the two mechanisms using the observed kinetics. We investigate the reaction kinetics for different FTIR optical setups, for a range of sample conditions, and start and stop the IR-induced reaction to investigate the importance of secondary H atom reactions. We also study the IR-induced reaction in Br/Cl co-doped pH2 samples and show the presence of the Br atom quenches the vibron-mediated reaction kinetics presumably because the Br-atoms serve as efficient vibron traps. This paper indicates that in a highly enriched pH2 matrix the H atoms that are produced by the IR-induced Cl atom reaction likely do not play a significant role in the measured reaction kinetics which implies these secondary H atom reactions are highly selective.

  7. Speech Therapy in Primary Progressive Aphasia: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Farrajota, Luísa; Maruta, Carolina; Maroco, João; Martins, Isabel Pavão; Guerreiro, Manuela; de Mendonça, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    Background Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a neurodegenerative disorder with no effective pharmacological treatment. Cognition-based interventions are adequate alternatives, but their benefit has not been thoroughly explored. Our aim was to study the effect of speech and language therapy (SLT) on naming ability in PPA. Methods An open parallel prospective longitudinal study involving two centers was designed to compare patients with PPA submitted to SLT (1 h/week for 11 months) with patients receiving no therapy. Twenty patients were enrolled and undertook baseline language and neuropsychological assessments; among them, 10 received SLT and 10 constituted an age- and education-matched historical control group. The primary outcome measure was the change in group mean performance on the Snodgrass and Vanderwart naming test between baseline and follow-up assessments. Results Intervention and control groups did not significantly differ on demographic and clinical variables at baseline. A mixed repeated measures ANOVA revealed a significant main effect of therapy (F(1,18) = 10.763; p = 0.005) on the performance on the Snodgrass and Vanderwart naming test. Conclusion Although limited by a non-randomized open study design with a historical control group, the present study suggests that SLT may have a benefit in PPA, and it should prompt a randomized, controlled, rater-blind clinical trial. PMID:22962556

  8. Photochemical energy storage: studies of inorganic photoassistance agents. Progress report, December 17, 1979-March 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Wrighton, M. S.

    1980-12-01

    Research progress has been made in the study of p-type semiconductor (photocathode) electrode materials. A number of small band gap (E/sub g/ approximately equal to 1.1 to 1.4 eV) p-type semiconductors have been demonstrated to have poor H/sub 2/ evolution kinetics despite the fact that a reasonable output photovoltage (E/sub V/) compared to E/sub g/ could be expected. Special emphasis has been on p-type Si (E/sub g/ = 1.1 eV) and p-type InP (E/sub g/ = 1.35 eV). Both of these materials give poor kinetics for H/sub 2/ evolution from H/sub 2/O, while the kinetics for N,N'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridinium, MV/sup 2 +/, reduction to MV/sup +/ are good at a pH where E/sup 0/(H/sub 2/O/H/sub 2/) is the same as E/sup 0/(MV/sup 2+/+/). A surface derivatizing reagent from diquarternizing 4,4'-bipyridine with 1-bromo-3-trimethyloxysilylpropane can be used to functionalize p-type Si with polymeric quantities of redox reagent. The surface-confined bipyridinium reagent, (PQ/sup 2 +/)/sub surf./, can be photoreduced to (PQ/sup +/)/sub surf./ and this reduced species can be used to effect H/sub 2/ evolution if a Pt catalyst is incorporated into the polymer. Efficiency for conversion of monochromatic 632.8 nm light to H/sub 2/ exceeds 6%, compared to much less than 1% for the naked p-type Si without the surface catalyst system. Studies of n-type semiconductor (photoanode) electrode materials modified with biferrocene-based redox mediators for I/sup -/ ..-->.. I/sub 3//sup -/ oxidation have been undertaken for comparison to ferrocene-based reagents for the same reaction; a five- to ten-fold overall improvement in heterogeneous I/sup -/ ..-->.. I/sub 3//sup -/ rate can be achieved using the two-electron mediator compared to the one-electron transfer system.

  9. Theoretical studies in nuclear reactions and nuclear structure. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    Research in the Maryland Nuclear Theory Group focusses on problems in four basic areas of current relevance. Hadrons in nuclear matter; the structure of hadrons; relativistic nuclear physics and heavy ion dynamics and related processes. The section on hadrons in nuclear matter groups together research items which are aimed at exploring ways in which the properties of nucleons and the mesons which play a role in the nuclear force are modified in the nuclear medium. A very interesting result has been the finding that QCD sum rules supply a new insight into the decrease of the nucleon`s mass in the nuclear medium. The quark condensate, which characterizes spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking of the late QCD vacuum, decreases in nuclear matter and this is responsible for the decrease of the nucleon`s mass. The section on the structure of hadrons contains progress reports on our research aimed at understanding the structure of the nucleon. Widely different approaches are being studied, e.g., lattice gauge calculations, QCD sum rules, quark-meson models with confinement and other hedgehog models. A major goal of this type of research is to develop appropriate links between nuclear physics and QCD. The section on relativistic nuclear physics represents our continuing interest in developing an appropriate relativistic framework for nuclear dynamics. A Lorentz-invariant description of the nuclear force suggests a similar decrease of the nucleon`s mass in the nuclear medium as has been found from QCD sum rules. Work in progress extends previous successes in elastic scattering to inelastic scattering of protons by nuclei. The section on heavy ion dynamics and related processes reports on research into the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} problem and heavy ion dynamics.

  10. Kinetic, isotherm and thermodynamic studies of amaranth dye biosorption from aqueous solution onto water hyacinth leaves.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Coronilla, Imelda; Morales-Barrera, Liliana; Cristiani-Urbina, Eliseo

    2015-04-01

    The present study explored the kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamics of amaranth (acid red 27) anionic dye (AD) biosorption to water hyacinth leaves (LEC). The effect of LEC particle size, contact time, solution pH, initial AD concentration and temperature on AD biosorption was studied in batch experiments. AD biosorption increased with rising contact time and initial AD concentration, and with decreasing LEC particle size and solution pH. Pseudo-second-order chemical reaction kinetics provided the best correlation for the experimental data. Isotherm studies showed that the biosorption of AD onto LEC closely follows the Langmuir isotherm, with a maximum biosorption capacity of about 70 mg g(-1). The thermodynamic parameters confirm that AD biosorption by LEC is non-spontaneous and endothermic in nature. Results indicate that LEC is a strong biosorbent capable of effective detoxification of AD-laden wastewaters. PMID:25617874

  11. Macro kinetic studies for photocatalytic degradation of benzoic acid in immobilized systems.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Kanheya; Yablonsky, Gregory S; Ray, Ajay K

    2005-09-01

    Semiconductor photocatalytic process has been studied extensively in recent years due to its intriguing advantages in environmental remediation. In this study, a two-phase swirl-flow monolithic-type reactor is used to study the kinetics of photocatalytic degradation of benzoic acid in immobilized systems. Transport contributions into the observed degradation rates were determined when catalyst is immobilized. Intrinsic kinetic rate constants and its dependence on light intensity and catalyst layer thickness, values of adsorption equilibrium constant, internal as well as external mass transfer parameters were determined. The simultaneous effect of catalyst loading and light intensity and optimum catalyst layer thickness were also determined experimentally. Reaction rate constants and overall observed degradation rates were compared with slurry systems. PMID:16054912

  12. The Gaseous Explosive Reaction : A Study of the Kinetics of Composite Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, F W

    1929-01-01

    This report deals with the results of a series of studies of the kinetics of gaseous explosive reactions where the fuel under observation, instead of being a simple gas, is a known mixture of simple gases. In the practical application of the gaseous explosive reaction as a source of power in the gas engine, the fuels employed are composite, with characteristics that are apt to be due to the characteristics of their components and hence may be somewhat complex. The simplest problem that could be proposed in an investigation either of the thermodynamics or kinetics of the gaseous explosive reaction of a composite fuel would seem to be a separate study of the reaction characteristics of each component of the fuel and then a study of the reaction characteristics of the various known mixtures of those components forming composite fuels more and more complex. (author)

  13. Laser microbeam - kinetic studies combined with molecule - structures reveal mechanisms of DNA repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altenberg, B.; Greulich, K. O.

    2011-10-01

    Kinetic studies on double strand DNA damages induced by a laser microbeam have allowed a precise definition of the temporal order of recruitment of repair molecules. The order is KU70 / KU80 - XRCC4 --NBS1 -- RAD51. These kinetic studies are now complemented by studies on molecular structures of the repair proteins, using the program YASARA which does not only give molecular structures but also physicochemical details on forces involved in binding processes. It turns out that the earliest of these repair proteins, the KU70 / KU80 heterodimer, has a hole with high DNA affinity. The next molecule, XRCC4, has a body with two arms, the latter with extremely high DNA affinity at their ends and a binding site for Ligase 4. Together with the laser microbeam results this provides a detailed view on the early steps of DNA double strand break repair. The sequence of DNA repair events is presented as a movie.

  14. Progressive Non-Fluent Aphasia in Malayalam: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Annamma; Mathuranath, P. S.

    2010-01-01

    Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA) is a degenerative condition characterized by deterioration in language for at least two years without deterioration in other cognitive domains. This report highlights the language profile in a 79-year-old male with progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA) who was assessed using the Western Aphasia Battery and the…

  15. Waste lubricating oil removal in a batch reactor by mixed bacterial consortium: a kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Munna; Guchhait, Sugata; Biswas, Dipa; Datta, Sriparna

    2015-11-01

    The growth kinetics and biodegradation of two waste lubricating oil samples including waste engine oil (WEO) and waste transformer oil (WTO) were studied using pure isolates and mixed culture of Ochrobactrum sp. C1 and Bacillus sp. K1. The mixed culture significantly influenced degradation efficiency of the pure isolates through bioaugmentation process. In particular, the mixed culture was capable of growing on various n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and was able to tolerate unusually high concentrations of waste lubricants (WEO-86.0 g/L and WTO-81.5 g/L). The initial concentration of waste lubricating oils has been varied in the range of 1-10 % (v/v). Under this experimental range, the bacterial growth has been observed to follow Haldane-type kinetics characterizing the presence of substrate inhibition. Haldane model was used to fit the exponential growth data and the following kinetic parameters were obtained: μ max = 0.078 h(-1), K S = 23.101 g/L, K i = 43.844 g/L for WEO; and μ max = 0.044 h(-1), K S = 10.662 g/L, K i = 58.310 g/L for WTO. The values of intrinsic kinetic parameters, like specific growth rate μ max, half saturation constant, K S, inhibition constant, K i and the maximum substrate concentration, S max and growth yield coefficient Y x/s , have been determined using each model hydrocarbon and their mixture as limiting substrate. Relative changes in the values of the kinetic parameters have been correlated to the number of carbon atoms present in n-alkanes. The metabolites from degradation of model hydrocarbon compounds have been identified by GC-MS to elucidate the possible pathway of waste lubricating oil degradation process. PMID:26271337

  16. Chemical Kinetic Study of Toluene Oxidation Under Premixed and Nonpremixed Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, I D; Bozzelli, J W; Seiser, R; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Chen, C -; Fournet, R; Seshadri, K; Battin-Leclerc, F; Billaud, F

    2003-12-10

    A study was performed to elucidate the chemical-kinetic mechanism of combustion of toluene. A detailed chemical-kinetic mechanism for toluene was improved by adding a more accurate description of the phenyl + O{sub 2} reaction channels, toluene decomposition reactions and the benzyl + O reaction. Results of the chemical kinetic mechanism are compared with experimental data obtained from premixed and non-premixed systems. Under premixed conditions, predicted ignition delay times are compared with new experimental data obtained in shock tube. Also, calculated species concentration histories are compared to experimental flow reactor data from the literature. Under non-premixed conditions, critical conditions of extinction and autoignition were measured in strained laminar flows in the counterflow configuration. Numerical calculations are performed using the chemical-kinetic mechanism at conditions corresponding to those in the experiments. Critical conditions of extinction and autoignition are predicted and compared with the experimental data. Comparisons between the model predictions and experimental results of ignition delay times in shock tube, and extinction and autoignition in non-premixed systems show that the chemical-kinetic mechanism predicts that toluene/air is overall less reactive than observed in the experiments. For both premixed and non-premixed systems, sensitivity analysis was used to identify the reaction rate constants that control the overall rate of oxidation in each of the systems considered. Under shock tube conditions, the reactions that influence ignition delay time are H + O{sub 2} chain branching, the toluene decomposition reaction to give an H atom, and the toluene + H abstraction reaction. The reactions that influence autoignition in non-premixed systems involve the benzyl + HO{sub 2} reaction and the phenyl + O{sub 2} reaction.

  17. Thermodynamic and kinetic study of phenol degradation by a non-catalytic wet air oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Sébastien; Boutin, Olivier; Ferrasse, Jean-Henry; Malleret, Laure; Faucherand, Rémy; Viand, Alain

    2011-08-01

    This work is dedicated to an accurate evaluation of thermodynamic and kinetics aspects of phenol degradation using wet air oxidation process. Phenol is a well known polluting molecule and therefore it is important having data of its behaviour during this process. A view cell is used for the experimental study, with an internal volume of 150 mL, able to reach pressures up to 30 MPa and temperatures up to 350°C. Concerning the thermodynamic phase equilibria, experimental and modelling results are obtained for different binary systems (water/nitrogen, water/air) and ternary system (water/nitrogen/phenol). The best model is the Predictive Soave Redlich Kwong one. This information is necessary to predict the composition of the gas phase during the process. It is also important for an implementation in a process simulation. The second part is dedicated to kinetics evaluation of the degradation of phenol. Different compounds have been detected using GC coupled with a MS. A kinetic scheme is deduced, taking into account the evolution of phenol, hydroquinones, catechol, resorcinol and acetic acid. The kinetic parameters are calculated for this scheme. These data are important to evaluate the evolution of the concentration of the different polluting molecules during the process. A simplified kinetic scheme, which can be easily implemented in a process simulation, is also determined for the direct degradation of phenol into H(2)O and CO(2). The Arrhenius law data obtained for the phenol disappearance are the following: k=1.8×10(6)±3.9×10(5)M(-1)s(-1) (pre-exponential factor) and E(a)=77±8 kJ mol(-1) (activation energy). PMID:21700312

  18. Determining Degradation and Synthesis Rates of Arabidopsis Proteins Using the Kinetics of Progressive 15N Labeling of Two-dimensional Gel-separated Protein Spots*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Nelson, Clark J.; Solheim, Cory; Whelan, James; Millar, A. Harvey

    2012-01-01

    The growth and development of plant tissues is associated with an ordered succession of cellular processes that are reflected in the appearance and disappearance of proteins. The control of the kinetics of protein turnover is central to how plants can rapidly and specifically alter protein abundance and thus molecular function in response to environmental or developmental cues. However, the processes of turnover are largely hidden during periods of apparent steady-state protein abundance, and even when proteins accumulate it is unclear whether enhanced synthesis or decreased degradation is responsible. We have used a 15N labeling strategy with inorganic nitrogen sources coupled to a two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry analysis of two-dimensional IEF/SDS-PAGE gel spots to define the rate of protein synthesis (KS) and degradation (KD) of Arabidopsis cell culture proteins. Through analysis of MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectra from 120 protein spots, we were able to quantify KS and KD for 84 proteins across six functional groups and observe over 65-fold variation in protein degradation rates. KS and KD correlate with functional roles of the proteins in the cell and the time in the cell culture cycle. This approach is based on progressive 15N labeling that is innocuous for the plant cells and, because it can be used to target analysis of proteins through the use of specific gel spots, it has broad applicability. PMID:22215636

  19. Kinetic study on the effect of temperature on biogas production using a lab scale batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Deepanraj, B; Sivasubramanian, V; Jayaraj, S

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, biogas production from food waste through anaerobic digestion was carried out in a 2l laboratory-scale batch reactor operating at different temperatures with a hydraulic retention time of 30 days. The reactors were operated with a solid concentration of 7.5% of total solids and pH 7. The food wastes used in this experiment were subjected to characterization studies before and after digestion. Modified Gompertz model and Logistic model were used for kinetic study of biogas production. The kinetic parameters, biogas yield potential of the substrate (B), the maximum biogas production rate (Rb) and the duration of lag phase (λ), coefficient of determination (R(2)) and root mean square error (RMSE) were estimated in each case. The effect of temperature on biogas production was evaluated experimentally and compared with the results of kinetic study. The results demonstrated that the reactor with operating temperature of 50°C achieved maximum cumulative biogas production of 7556ml with better biodegradation efficiency. PMID:25963808

  20. Application of Electrode Methods in Studies of Nitric Oxide Metabolism and Diffusion Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoping; Zweier, Jay L.

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has many important physiological roles in the body. Since NO electrodes can directly measure NO concentration in the nM range and in real time, NO electrode methods have been generally used in laboratories for measuring NO concentration in vivo and in vitro. This review focuses on the application of electrode methods in studies of NO diffusion and metabolic kinetics. We have described the physical and chemical properties that need to be considered in the preparation of NO stock solution, discussed the effect of several interfering factors on the measured curves of NO concentration that need to be eliminated in the experimental setup for NO measurements, and provided an overview of the application of NO electrode methods in measuring NO diffusion and metabolic kinetics in solution and in biological systems. This overview covers NO metabolism by oxygen (O2), superoxide, heme proteins, cells and tissues. Important conclusions and physiological implication of these studies are discussed. PMID:23730264

  1. A real-time kinetic study of luciferase inactivation by pulsed ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, D.H.; Gould, J.M.; Patterson, L.K.

    1982-06-01

    The real-time kinetics of radiation-induced inactivation of the luminescent firefly luciferase-luciferin system were investigated. A single, microsecond pulse from a Van de Graaff accelerator delivered to the system is sufficient to decrease the luminescence by over 60%. This decrease exhibits exponential behavior and has a half-time of 46 +/- 6 msec. In both steady-state and pulsed studies, the dose dependence of the inactivation is independent of the dose rate. Likewise, the decay kinetics are independent of the dose per pulse. These studies suggest that the enzyme is altered in a way that inteferes with the initial steps of catalysis without affecting the subsequent steps which lead to light emission.

  2. Kinetic study of antibody adhesion on a silicon wafer by laser reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riquelme, Bibiana D.; Valverde, Juana R.; Rasia, Rodolfo J.

    2003-05-01

    Antibody adhesion kinetic in real time has been studied by laser reflectometry technique. An ellipsometer is used to measure the light intensity reflected by a silicon wafer. Light intensity reflected by the wafer presents a minimum at the pseudo-Brewster angle. Then, the reflectance increases as the antibodies (monoclonal anti- AB) adhere on interface. Mathematical analysis of reflectance curves versus time verifies that the antibody adhesion at the interface follows Langmuir kinetics (Prog. Biomed. Opt. Imaging 1(5) (2000) 19) for low antibody concentrations. Parameters obtained allow to carry out a detailed study of the antibody adsorption and the antigen-antibody interaction. This conduces to development of an optical immunosensor for detection and quantification of soluble antigens, and a novel method for commercial antiserum quality control. This technique does not require labeled antibodies, being also independent of cellular factors. Also, this technique is quicker and sensible than the conventional immunohematology methods.

  3. TL kinetics study of LiF nanophosphors for high exposures of gamma-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, A. K.; Vij, Ankush; Kumar, Ravi; Kumar, Satinder; Lochab, S. P.

    2013-02-05

    We report the thermoluminescence (TL) kinetics study of LiF nanophosphors synthesized by chemical co-precipitation at 8.00 pH and exposed to high gamma dose. XRD and TEM studies confirm the formation of single phase LiF nanophosphors. TL properties of LiF phosphors irradiated with gamma rays at different doses of 100 Gy - 70 KGy shows a major peak around 395 K in addition to other low intensity peaks. The major peak in the TL glow curve is almost resolved from other peaks, which has been analyzed using Chen's peak shape method to determine the TL kinetic parameters. TL intensity almost increases linearly with gamma dose, however TL glow curve shift slightly to lower temperature values as a function of gamma exposure.

  4. DSC and curing kinetics study of epoxy grouting diluted with furfural -acetone slurry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, H.; Sun, D. W.; Li, B.; Liu, Y. T.; Ran, Q. P.; Liu, J. P.

    2016-07-01

    The use of furfural-acetone slurry as active diluents of Bisphenol-A epoxy resin (DGEBA) groutings has been studied by dynamic and non-isothermal DSC for the first time. Curing kinetics study was investigated by non-isothermal differential scanning calorimetries at different heating rates. Activation enery (Ea) was calculated based on Kissinger and Ozawa Methods, and the results showed that Ea increased from 58.87 to 71.13KJ/mol after the diluents were added. The furfural-acetone epoxy matrix could cure completely at the theoretical curing temperature of 365.8K and the curing time of 139mins, which were determined by the kinetic model parameters.

  5. Biosorption of zinc from aqueous solution using Azadirachta indica bark: equilibrium and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    King, P; Anuradha, K; Lahari, S Beena; Prasanna Kumar, Y; Prasad, V S R K

    2008-03-21

    The removal of zinc ions from aqueous solutions on the biomass of Azadirachta indica bark has been studied by using batch adsorption technique. The biosorption studies were determined as a function of contact time, pH, initial metal ion concentration, average biosorbent size and biosorbent dosage. The equilibrium metal uptake was increased and percentage biosorption was decreased with an increase in the initial concentration and particle size of biosorbent. The maximum zinc biosorption occurred at pH 6 and percentage biosorption increases with increase in the biosorbent dosage. Experimental data obtained were tested with the adsorption models like Langmuir, Freundlich and Redlich-Peterson isotherms. Biosorption isothermal data were well interpreted by Langmuir model with maximum biosorption capacity of 33.49mg/g of zinc ions on A. indica bark biomass and kinetic data were properly fitted with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. PMID:17681426

  6. On pressure-shear plate impact for studying the kinetics of stress-induced phase transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar, Joanne C.; Clifton, Rodney J.

    1992-07-01

    Pressure-shear plate impact experiments are proposed for studying the kinetics of stress-induced phase transformations. The purpose of this paper is to determine loading conditions and specimen orientations which can be expected to activate a single habit plane variant parallel to the impact plane, thereby simplifying the study of the kinetics of the transformation through monitoring the wave profiles associated with the propagating phase boundary. The Wechsler Lieberman-Read phenomenological theory was used to determine habit plane indices and directions of shape deformation for a Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloy which undergoes a martensitic phase transformation under stress. Elastic waves generated by pressure-shear impact were analyzed for wave propagation in the direction of the normal to a habit plane. A critical resolved shear stress criterion was used to predict variants which are expected to be activated for a range of impact velocities and relative magnitudes of the normal and transverse components of the impact velocity.

  7. Reaction kinetics and product distributions in photoelectrochemical cells. Technical progress report, March 15, 1992--March 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Koval, C.A.

    1992-12-01

    Hot electron reaction studies at p-InP/CH{sub 3}CN interface revealed essential/desirable features for redox systems used to investigate hot carriers in photoelectrocehmical cells. Reduction of dibromoethylbenzene (DBEB) in presence of metallocene couples is being studied using rotating rink disk electrodes of n-and p-InP disks and Pt rings. At highly doped p-InP electrodes, reduction of DBEB can be very efficient (>30%). A minielectrochemical cell was used to investigate electron transfer at nonilluminated n-WSe{sub 2}/dimethylferrocene{sup +/0} interfaces.

  8. Kinetic measurements on elementary fossil fuel combustion reactions over wide temperature ranges. Progress report, May 1, 1984--November 30, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Fontijn, A.; Mahmud, K.; Marshall, P.

    1986-12-01

    The HTP (high-temperature photochemistry technique) has been used to study the reactions of ground state 0 atoms with C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} over the 300 to 1500 K temperature range. The results are described and discussed, as are the plans for study of the 0 + 1,3 butadiene and C{sub 2}H{sub 6} reactions in the remainder of the present grant period.

  9. Kinetic study of the reaction of chlorine atoms with hydroxyacetone in gas-phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeffler, Clara; Joly, Lilian; Durry, Georges; Cousin, Julien; Dumelié, Nicolas; Bruyant, Aurélien; Roth, Estelle; Chakir, Abdelkhaleq

    2013-12-01

    In this letter the kinetics of the reaction of hydroxyacetone CH3C(O)CH2OH with Cl atoms is investigated using the relative rate technique. Experiments are carried out in a 65 L multipass photoreactor in the temperature range of 281-350 K. A mid-infrared spectrometer based on a quantum cascade laser in external cavity emitting at 9.5 μm is used to analyze the reactants. The determined rate coefficient for the investigated reaction is (1.7 ± 0.3) × 10-11exp(381.5 ± 57.3/T). The results are presented and discussed in terms of precision and compared with those obtained previously. The impact of Cl atoms on the atmospheric life time of hydroxyacetone is also discussed. Developing analytical techniques to quantify this compound in the atmosphere. Several methods of measurement have been used including the technique of proton transfer mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) [2] and derivatization with a chemical agent such as dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) [3,4] followed by GC/MS or HPLC analyses. The HA amount in the troposphere was found to be in the order of a few hundred parts per trillion by volume [4], Performing laboratory experiments in order to study the HA reactivity with atmospheric oxidants. The first study on the kinetic of the reaction between OH radicals and HA was made by Dagault et al. [5] whose work was performed at room temperature by flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence. The determined rate constant implies a lifetime of a few days for HA relative to oxidation by OH radicals. Orlando et al. performed mechanistic and kinetics studies of the reaction of HA with OH radicals and Cl atoms at room temperature using a relative method [6]. Products detection was performed using FTIR spectroscopy. Moreover, these authors studied the photolysis of HA to determine its quantum yield and UV absorption spectrum. These studies showed that HA is principally removed from the atmosphere by reaction with OH radicals. Kinetic studies of the reaction of OH radicals with HA as a

  10. Recent progress of 10Be tracer studies in Chinese loess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weijian; Xie, Xingjun; Beck, Warren; Kong, Xianghui; Xian, Feng; Du, Yajuan; Wu, Zhenkun

    2015-10-01

    Studies of cosmogenic 10Be in Chinese loess began about twenty-five years ago and since then a number of research groups worldwide have contributed to a firm understanding of the production, transport, deposition and storage of 10Be in loess. The essential characteristics that make 10Be a useful isotopic tracer in loess, include: (1) dominant atmospheric production directly linked to the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field; (2) climate-dependent deposition; and (3) subsequent immobility, so that as 10Be accumulates in a loess profile its stratigraphic integrity is preserved. This fact, combined with very high deposition rates in loess on the Chinese Loess Plateau, makes 10Be an especially valuable continental archive of paleoclimate and paleomagnetism, complementing marine and ice-core records. Here we provide in particular the most recent progress of 10Be tracer studies in Chinese loess, including the determination of the correct age of the Brunhes-Matuyama polarity reversal at 780 ± 3 ka B.P., in accord with marine and ice records, and quantitative reconstruction of 130-ka paleoprecipitation using 10Be from Chinese loess profiles.

  11. Simulation studies on shape and growth kinetics for fractal aggregates in aerosol and colloidal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinson, William Raymond

    The aim of this work is to explore, using computational techniques that simulate the motion and subsequent aggregation of particles in aerosol and colloidal systems, many common but not well studied systems that form fractal clusters. Primarily the focus is on cluster shape and growth kinetics. The structure of clusters made under diffusion limited cluster-cluster aggregation (DLCA) is looked at. More specifically, the shape anisotropy is found to have an inverse relationship on the scaling prefactor k0 and have no effect on the fractal dimension Df . An analytical model that predicts the shape and fractal dimension of diffusion limited cluster-cluster aggregates is tested and successfully predicts cluster shape and dimensionality. Growth kinetics of cluster-cluster aggregation in the free molecular regime where the system starts with ballistic motion and then transitions to diffusive motion as the aggregates grow in size is studied. It is shown that the kinetic exponent will crossover from the ballistic to the diffusional values and the onset of this crossover is predicted by when the nearest neighbor Knudsen number reaches unity. Simulations were carried out for a system in which molten particles coalesce into spheres, then cool till coalescing stops and finally the polydispersed monomers stick at point contacts to form fractal clusters. The kinetic exponent and overall cluster structure for these aggregates was found to be in agreement with DLCA that started with monodispersed monomers. Colloidal aggregation in the presence of shear was studied in detail. Study of a colloidal system characterized a by short-range attractive potential showed that weak shear enhanced the aggregation process. Strong shear led to fragmentation and subsequent nucleation as cluster growth rebounded after an induction time.

  12. Nickel biosorption from aqueous systems: Studies on single and multimetal equilibria, kinetics, and recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Suhasini, I.P.; Sriram, G.; Asolekar, S.R.; Sureshkumar, G.K.

    1999-10-01

    This paper reports studies on the removal of toxic trace metals (nickel separately, and simultaneously with cobalt) from aqueous solutions by employing fungal biosorbents, PFB1 and PFB2, which were developed in the authors' laboratory. The observed maximum equilibrium uptake of nickel on the biosorbent was 214 mg/g (PFB1) and 110 mg/g (PFB2). The average efficiency for nickel removal was 84.5% (PFB1) and 60.8% (PFB2). The equilibrium uptake of nickel followed first-order Langmuir kinetics in the case of PFB1 and second-order Langmuir kinetics in the case of PFB2. Studies on simultaneous removal of cobalt and nickel indicated that the extent of secondary interactions between cobalt and nickel can be quantified by the change in Langmuir equilibrium constants for both metals. A mathematical model based on Fick's law of diffusion and Langmuir adsorption was developed to simulate the kinetics of nickel removal. The model was able to predict the experimentally observed kinetics well. From the simulations, the diffusivity of nickel in PFB1 was found to be 1.6 x 10{sup {minus}8} m{sup 2}/s. Desorption studies indicated that it was possible to reuse the biosorbent over three sorption-desorption cycles, and that acidic solutions desorbed better than basic or salt solutions. Among the desorbents studied, HCl and CaCl{sub 2}, with desorption efficiencies equal to 73.2 and 74.1%, respectively, for PFB1 and 70.0 and 63.1%, respectively, for PFB2 at the end of three cycles, were found to be the best desorbents.

  13. A kinetic study of jack-bean urease denaturation by a new dithiocarbamate bismuth compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, D. C.; Borges, E.; Torres, M. F.; Braga, J. P.

    2012-10-01

    A kinetic study concerning enzymatic inhibitory effect of a new bismuth dithiocarbamate complex on jack-bean urease is reported. A neural network approach is used to solve the ill-posed inverse problem arising from numerical treatment of the subject. A reaction mechanism for the urease denaturation process is proposed and the rate constants, relaxation time constants, equilibrium constants, activation Gibbs free energies for each reaction step and Gibbs free energies for the transition species are determined.

  14. Kinetic Studies on Photodeposition of Polydiacetylene Thin Film from Solution: Preliminary Determination of the Rate Law

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paley, M. S.; Armstrong, S.; Witherow, W. K.; Frazier, D. O.

    1996-01-01

    Preliminary kinetic studies were undertaken on the photodeposition of thin films of a polydiacetylene derivative of 2-methyl-4-nitroaniline from monomer solutions onto quartz substrates. Solutions of the monomer, DAMNA, in 1,2-dichloroethane at various concentrations were irradiated at 364 nm using an argon-ion laser at several intensities. It was found that the rate of polydiacetylene (PDAMNA) film photodeposition varies linearly with UV light intensity and as the square root of monomer concentration.

  15. Inhibition of yeast hexokinase: a kinetic and phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willson, Michèle; Perie, Jacques

    1999-04-01

    Glucosamine analogues are inhibitors of yeast hexokinase (HK); kinetic analysis with respect to glucose and ATP suggests a pseudo-substrate behaviour for these compounds. However, a spectroscopy study by 31P NMR indicates that they are not phosphorylated but that, in fact, they enhance the ATPase activity of HK; this result gives a further insight into the phosphorylation or ATP hydrolysis process in HK.

  16. Benchmark studies of the gyro-Landau-fluid code and gyro-kinetic codes on kinetic ballooning modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, T. F.; Xu, X. Q.; Ma, C. H.; Bass, E. M.; Holland, C.; Candy, J.

    2016-03-01

    A Gyro-Landau-Fluid (GLF) 3 + 1 model has been recently implemented in BOUT++ framework, which contains full Finite-Larmor-Radius effects, Landau damping, and toroidal resonance [Ma et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 055903 (2015)]. A linear global beta scan has been conducted using the JET-like circular equilibria (cbm18 series), showing that the unstable modes are kinetic ballooning modes (KBMs). In this work, we use the GYRO code, which is a gyrokinetic continuum code widely used for simulation of the plasma microturbulence, to benchmark with GLF 3 + 1 code on KBMs. To verify our code on the KBM case, we first perform the beta scan based on "Cyclone base case parameter set." We find that the growth rate is almost the same for two codes, and the KBM mode is further destabilized as beta increases. For JET-like global circular equilibria, as the modes localize in peak pressure gradient region, a linear local beta scan using the same set of equilibria has been performed at this position for comparison. With the drift kinetic electron module in the GYRO code by including small electron-electron collision to damp electron modes, GYRO generated mode structures and parity suggest that they are kinetic ballooning modes, and the growth rate is comparable to the GLF results. However, a radial scan of the pedestal for a particular set of cbm18 equilibria, using GYRO code, shows different trends for the low-n and high-n modes. The low-n modes show that the linear growth rate peaks at peak pressure gradient position as GLF results. However, for high-n modes, the growth rate of the most unstable mode shifts outward to the bottom of pedestal and the real frequency of what was originally the KBMs in ion diamagnetic drift direction steadily approaches and crosses over to the electron diamagnetic drift direction.

  17. Kinetics of some reactions of HCN at high temperatures. Progress report, October 1, 1982-September 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, R.K.; Bowman, C.T.

    1983-01-01

    The work was divided into two phases: Phase I, now completed, involved studies in shock-heated HCN/Ar and C/sub 2/N/sub 2//H/sub 2//Ar mixtures to determine rate coefficients for the thermal decompostion reactions HCN + M ..-->.. H + CN + M, H/sub 2/ + CN ..-->.. H + HCN, CN + HCN ..-->.. H + C/sub 2/N/sub 2/, and C/sub 2/N/sub 2/ + M ..-->.. 2CN + M. Phase II entails shock tube studies in various HCN/N/sub 2/O/Ar and C/sub 2/N/sub 2//H/sub 2/O/Ar mixtures to determine rate coefficients for major oxidation reactions including O + HCN ..-->.. NCO + H, (6) O + HCN ..-->.. CN + OH, (7) O + HCN ..-->.. NH + CO, OH + HCN ..-->.. Products, and OH + HCN ..-->.. CN + H/sub 2/O, with the last reaction to be studied in both the forward and reverse directions. Preliminary results show that reaction (7) plays a substantially greater role, and reaction (6) a lesser role, than previously believed in the O-atom oxidation of HCN.

  18. Electron scattering as a tool to study zero-point kinetic energies of atoms in molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreh, R.; Finkelstein, Y.; Vos, M.

    2015-07-01

    High resolution electron compton scattering (ECS) is being used to study the atomic momentum distributions and hence the zero-point kinetic energies (ZPKE) of the scattering atoms. Such studies have shown that the scattering is from a single atom of the scattering sample. For an electron beam with a well defined incident energy, the scattered electron energy at any angle from each atomic species is Doppler broadened. The broadening reflects the atomic momentum distribution contributed by both the internal and external motions of the molecular system. By measuring the Doppler broadening of the scattered electron lines it was possible to determine the kinetic energy of the scattering atom including that of its zero-point motion. Thus, the atomic kinetic energies in gases such as H2, D2, HD, CH4 and in H2O, D2O and NH3 were measured and compared with those calculated semi-empirically using the measured optical infra red (IR) and Raman frequencies of the internal vibrations of the molecules. In general, good agreement between the measured and calculated values was found. Electron scattering was also used to study the ratio of e-scattering intensities from the H- and O-atoms in water (H2O), where some anomalies were reported to exist.

  19. Studying the Kinetics of n-Butyl-Cyanoacrylate Tissue Adhesive and Its Oily Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedvedova, Marie; Kresalek, Vojtech; Vaskova, Hana; Provaznik, Ivo

    2016-06-01

    This study deals with the measurement of the kinetics of tissue adhesives used for supporting the hemostasis and wound closure during surgical intervention. There are available several types of adhesives of different composition which is closely related with their application. When selecting an appropriate adhesive, the time of curing could play an important role because some applications may require very fast polymerization for prompt vessel or wound closure; conversely, some situations need slower solidification because of longer manipulation with the glue during surgery. The terahertz time-domain spectroscopy is used for studying the kinetics of the n-butyl-cyanoacrylate glue in this study. An oily substance is added to the glue samples to slow the reaction rate. The technique of attenuated total reflection is used in this application; the defined amount of glue sample or its mixture is applied on the silicon crystal and the terahertz response is measured in time. This time dependences are analyzed to find time constants for mathematical description of the glue kinetics. Further, the investigated samples were analyzed using light microscopy and Raman spectroscopy for description of the structures and compositions.

  20. A kinetic study of gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT)-mediated S-nitrosoglutathione catabolism.

    PubMed

    Angeli, Valeria; Tacito, Alessia; Paolicchi, Aldo; Barsacchi, Renata; Franzini, Maria; Baldassini, Riccardo; Vecoli, Cecilia; Pompella, Alfonso; Bramanti, Emilia

    2009-01-15

    S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) is a nitric oxide (NO) donor compound which has been postulated to be involved in transport of NO in vivo. It is known that gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) is one of the enzymes involved in the enzyme-mediated decomposition of GSNO, but no kinetics studies of the reaction GSNO-GGT are reported in literature. In this study we directly investigated the kinetics of GGT with respect to GSNO as a substrate and glycyl-glycine (GG) as acceptor co-substrate by spectrophotometry at 334 nm. GGT hydrolyses the gamma-glutamyl moiety of GSNO to give S-nitroso-cysteinylglycine (CGNO) and gamma-glutamyl-GG. However, as both the substrate GSNO and the first product CGNO absorb at 334 nm, we optimized an ancillary reaction coupled to the enzymatic reaction, based on the copper-mediated decomposition of CGNO yielding oxidized cysteinyl-glycine and NO. The ancillary reaction allowed us to study directly the GSNO/GGT kinetics by following the decrease of the characteristic absorbance of nitrosothiols at 334 nm. A K(m) of GGT for GSNO of 0.398+/-31 mM was thus found, comparable with K(m) values reported for other gamma-glutamyl substrates of GGT. PMID:19000649

  1. Kinetics and mechanisms of NO{sub x} - char reduction. Quarterly technical progress report, May 1, 1995--July 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Suuberg, E.M.

    1995-12-01

    The emission of nitrogen oxides from combustion of coal remains a problem of considerable interest, whether the concern is with acid rain, stratospheric ozone chemistry, or {open_quotes}greenhouse{close_quotes} gases. Whereas earlier the concern was focused mainly on NO (as a primary combustion product) and to a lesser extent NO{sub 2} (since it is mainly a secondary product of combustion), in recent years the emissions of N{sub 2}O have also captured considerable attention, particularly in the context of fluidized bed combustion, in which the problem appears to be most acute. The research community has only recently begun to take solid hold on the N{sub 2}O problem. This is in part because earlier estimates of the importance of N{sub 2}O in combustion processes were clouded by artifacts in sampling which have now been resolved. This project is concerned with the mechanism of reduction of both NO and N{sub 2}O by carbons. It was recognized some years ago that NO formed during fluidized bed coal combustion can be heterogeneously reduced in-situ by the carbonaceous solid intermediates of combustion. This has been recently supplemented by the knowledge that heterogeneous reaction with carbon can also play an important role in reducing emissions of N{sub 2}O, but that the NO-carbon reactions might also contribute to formation of N{sub 2}O. The precise role of carbon in N{sub 2}O reduction and formation has yet to be established, since in one case the authors of a recent study were compelled to comment that {open_quotes}the basic knowledge of N{sub 2}O formation and reduction still has to be improved{close_quotes}. The same can be said of the NO-carbon system. In this program, carbons studied include graphite, resin char, coconut char, and a Wyodak coal char.

  2. Synchrotron Study on Crystallization Kinetics of Milk Fat under Shear Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzanti, G.; Marangoni, A; Idziak, S

    2009-01-01

    A detailed synchrotron X-ray diffraction study on the kinetics of crystallization of anhydrous milk fat (AMF) and milk fat triacylglycerols (MFT) was done in a Couette cell at 17 C, 17.5 C and 20 C under shear rates between 0 and 2880 s-1. We observed shear-induced acceleration of the transition from phase ? to ?? and the presence of crystalline orientation, but no effect of shear on the onset time of phase ? was observed. A two stage regime was observed for the growth of phase ??. The first stage follows a series-parallel system of differential equations describing the conversion between liquid and crystalline phases. The second stage follows a diffusion-controlled regime. These mechanisms are consistent with the crystalline orientation, the growth of the crystalline domains and the observed displacement of the diffraction peak positions. The absence of the polar lipids explains the faster kinetics of MFT.

  3. Accelerated hydrolysis of substituted cellulose for potential biofuel production: kinetic study and modeling.

    PubMed

    Mu, Bingnan; Xu, Helan; Yang, Yiqi

    2015-11-01

    In this work, kinetics of substitution accelerated cellulose hydrolysis with multiple reaction stages was investigated to lay foundation for mechanism study and molecular design of substituting compounds. High-efficiency hydrolysis of cellulose is critical for cellulose-based bioethanol production. It is known that, substitution could substantially decrease activation energy and increase reaction rate of acidic hydrolysis of glycosidic bonds in cellulose. However, reaction kinetics and mechanism of the accelerated hydrolysis were not fully revealed. In this research, it was proved that substitution therefore accelerated hydrolysis only occurred in amorphous regions of cellulose fibers, and was a process with multiple reaction stages. With molar ratio of substitution less than 1%, the overall hydrolysis rate could be increased for around 10 times. We also quantified the relationship between the hydrolysis rate of individual reaction stage and its major influences, including molar ratio of substitution, activation energy of acidic hydrolysis, pH and temperature. PMID:26253917

  4. Stoichiometric and kinetic studies of phenolic antioxidants from Andean purple corn and red-fleshed sweetpotato.

    PubMed

    Cevallos-Casals, Bolívar A; Cisneros-Zevallos, Luis

    2003-05-21

    Stoichiometric and kinetic values of phenolics against DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) were determined for Andean purple corn (Zea mays L.) and red sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas). Both crops had higher antioxidant capacity and antiradical kinetics than blueberries and higher or similar anthocyanin and phenolic contents. The second-order rate constant (k(2)) was 1.56, 1.12, 0.57, and 0.26 (mg antiradical/mL)(-1) s(-1) for red sweetpotato, Trolox, purple corn, and blueberry, respectively. On the molar basis of active hydroxyl groups, k(2)' showed the same order as for k(2). Corn cob and sweetpotato endodermis contributed the most in phenolic compounds and antioxidant capacity. Both crops studied can be considered as excellent novel sources of natural antioxidants for the functional food and dietary supplement markets. PMID:12744660

  5. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies on the removal of oil from water using superhydrophobic kapok fiber.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jintao; Zheng, Yian; Wang, Aiqin

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, an oil sorbent based on superhydrophobic kapok fiber fabricated by the sol-gel method was used for the selective sorption of oil from the surface of artificial seawater. The effects of process parameters such as seawater pH, seawater temperature, and contact time on the extent of oil sorption were investigated. The as-prepared fiber showed higher oil sorption capacity than raw fiber in both the trenchant acid and alkaline seawater environment. Results of the kinetic studies show that the sorption process follows pseudo-second-order reaction kinetics. The thermodynamic investigations demonstrate that the sorption process is spontaneous and endothermic. In addition, the as-prepared fiber can float on the water surface after the sorption of oil, which facilitates the post-processing of oil-loaded fiber. The modified fiber might provide a simple method for the removal and collection of oil on the water surface. PMID:24851332

  6. [Photosynthetic Parameters Inversion Algorithm Study Based on Chlorophyll Fluorescence Induction Kinetics Curve].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xiao-han; Zhang, Yu-jun; Yin, Gao-fang; Shi, Chao-yi; Yu, Xiao-ya; Zhao, Nan-jing; Liu, Wen-qing

    2015-08-01

    The fast chlorophyll fluorescence induction curve contains rich information of photosynthesis. It can reflect various information of vegetation, such as, the survival status, the pathological condition and the physiology trends under the stress state. Through the acquisition of algae fluorescence and induced optical signal, the fast phase of chlorophyll fluorescence kinetics curve was fitted. Based on least square fitting method, we introduced adaptive minimum error approaching method for fast multivariate nonlinear regression fitting toward chlorophyll fluorescence kinetics curve. We realized Fo (fixedfluorescent), Fm (maximum fluorescence yield), σPSII (PSII functional absorption cross section) details parameters inversion and the photosynthetic parameters inversion of Chlorella pyrenoidosa. And we also studied physiological variation of Chlorella pyrenoidosa under the stress of Cu(2+). PMID:26672292

  7. Study of the kinetics and mechanism of the thermal nitridation of SiO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, R. P.; Madhukar, A.; Grunthaner, F. J.; Naiman, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been used to study the nitridation time and temperature dependence of the nitrogen distribution in thermally nitrided SiO2 films. The XPS data show that the maximum nitrogen concentration near the (SiO(x)N(y)/Si interface is initially at the interface, but moves 20-25 A away from the interface with increasing nitridation time. Computer modeling of the kinetic processes involved is carried out and reveals a mechanism in which diffusing species, initially consisting primarily of nitrogen, react with the substrate, followed by formation of the oxygen-rich oxynitride due to reaction of the diffusing oxygen displaced by the slower nitridation of the SiO2. The data are consistent with this mechanism provided the influence of the interfacial strain on the nitridation and oxidation kinetics is explicitly accounted for.

  8. Kinetics of Methane Hydrate Decomposition Studied via in Situ Low Temperature X-ray Powder Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, Susan M; Rawn, Claudia J; Keffer, David J.; Mull, Derek L; Payzant, E Andrew; Phelps, Tommy Joe

    2013-01-01

    Gas hydrates are known to have a slowed decomposition rate at ambient pressure and temperatures below the melting point of ice termed self-preservation or anomalous preservation. As hydrate exothermically decomposes, gas is released and water of the clathrate cages transforms into ice. Two regions of slowed decomposition for methane hydrate, 180 200 K and 230 260 K, were observed, and the kinetics were studied by in situ low temperature x-ray powder diffraction. The kinetic constants for ice formation from methane hydrate were determined by the Avrami model within each region and activation energies, Ea, were determined by the Arrhenius plot. Ea determined from the data for 180 200 K was 42 kJ/mol and for 230 260 K was 22 kJ/mol. The higher Ea in the colder temperature range was attributed to a difference in the microstructure of ice between the two regions.

  9. Kinetic study of the reaction of chlorine atoms with hydroxyacetone in gas-phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeffler, Clara; Joly, Lilian; Durry, Georges; Cousin, Julien; Dumelié, Nicolas; Bruyant, Aurélien; Roth, Estelle; Chakir, Abdelkhaleq

    2013-12-01

    In this letter the kinetics of the reaction of hydroxyacetone CH3C(O)CH2OH with Cl atoms is investigated using the relative rate technique. Experiments are carried out in a 65 L multipass photoreactor in the temperature range of 281-350 K. A mid-infrared spectrometer based on a quantum cascade laser in external cavity emitting at 9.5 μm is used to analyze the reactants. The determined rate coefficient for the investigated reaction is (1.7 ± 0.3) × 10-11exp(381.5 ± 57.3/T). The results are presented and discussed in terms of precision and compared with those obtained previously. The impact of Cl atoms on the atmospheric life time of hydroxyacetone is also discussed. Developing analytical techniques to quantify this compound in the atmosphere. Several methods of measurement have been used including the technique of proton transfer mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) [2] and derivatization with a chemical agent such as dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) [3,4] followed by GC/MS or HPLC analyses. The HA amount in the troposphere was found to be in the order of a few hundred parts per trillion by volume [4], Performing laboratory experiments in order to study the HA reactivity with atmospheric oxidants. The first study on the kinetic of the reaction between OH radicals and HA was made by Dagault et al. [5] whose work was performed at room temperature by flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence. The determined rate constant implies a lifetime of a few days for HA relative to oxidation by OH radicals. Orlando et al. performed mechanistic and kinetics studies of the reaction of HA with OH radicals and Cl atoms at room temperature using a relative method [6]. Products detection was performed using FTIR spectroscopy. Moreover, these authors studied the photolysis of HA to determine its quantum yield and UV absorption spectrum. These studies showed that HA is principally removed from the atmosphere by reaction with OH radicals. Kinetic studies of the reaction of OH radicals with HA as a

  10. Progress in preliminary studies at Ottana Solar Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demontis, V.; Camerada, M.; Cau, G.; Cocco, D.; Damiano, A.; Melis, T.; Musio, M.

    2016-05-01

    The fast increasing share of distributed generation from non-programmable renewable energy sources, such as the strong penetration of photovoltaic technology in the distribution networks, has generated several problems for the management and security of the whole power grid. In order to meet the challenge of a significant share of solar energy in the electricity mix, several actions aimed at increasing the grid flexibility and its hosting capacity, as well as at improving the generation programmability, need to be investigated. This paper focuses on the ongoing preliminary studies at the Ottana Solar Facility, a new experimental power plant located in Sardinia (Italy) currently under construction, which will offer the possibility to progress in the study of solar plants integration in the power grid. The facility integrates a concentrating solar power (CSP) plant, including a thermal energy storage system and an organic Rankine cycle (ORC) unit, with a concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) plant and an electrical energy storage system. The facility has the main goal to assess in real operating conditions the small scale concentrating solar power technology and to study the integration of the two technologies and the storage systems to produce programmable and controllable power profiles. A model for the CSP plant yield was developed to assess different operational strategies that significantly influence the plant yearly yield and its global economic effectiveness. In particular, precise assumptions for the ORC module start-up operation behavior, based on discussions with the manufacturers and technical datasheets, will be described. Finally, the results of the analysis of the: "solar driven", "weather forecasts" and "combined storage state of charge (SOC)/ weather forecasts" operational strategies will be presented.

  11. Progressive macular hypomelanosis among Egyptian patients: a clinicopathological study

    PubMed Central

    Selim, Mohamed Khaled; Ahmed, El-Shahat Farag; Abdelgawad, Mamdouh Morsy; El-Kamel, Mohammed Fawzy

    2011-01-01

    Background: Progressive macular hypomelanosis (PMH) is a disease of unclear etiology. Propionbacterium acnes (P. acnes) was claimed to be an etiological factor. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to document the clinicopathological features of PMH in Egyptian patients and to evaluate the therapeutic outcome. Methods: Patients with clinical features of PMH were recruited. Wood’s lamp examination, skin scrapings for fungi, and skin biopsy specimens were obtained. Biopsies were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, PAS, Fontana-Masson, and S100 protein. Patients received either narrow-band UVB (nbUVB) or nbUVB plus daily topical clindamycin 1% and benzoyl peroxide gel 5% (bcUVB). The period of active treatment was 14 weeks followed by a follow-up period of 24 weeks. Results: Twenty-nine patients were included. Microscopic evaluation of skin biopsy specimens showed no significant differences between lesional and normal skin. Fontana-Masson stained sections showed overall reduction of melanin granules in the basal layer of lesional skin only and S100 staining did not detect significant differences in the number of melanocytes in lesional and normal skin. Nearly complete repigmentation was reported in 10 patients treated with bcUVB compared to 9 patients treated with nbUVb with no significant differences between both groups after 14 weeks. Only 2 patients in each group retained the pigmentation and the remaining patients returned to the baseline color before treatment. Conclusions: This study documented the clinicopathological features of PMH among Egyptians. No permanently effective treatment is available. Further studies are needed to prove or disprove the pathogenic role of P. acnes in PMH. PMID:24396712

  12. Study of nonlinear 3-D evolution of kinetic Alfvén wave and fluctuation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Prachi; Yadav, Nitin; Sharma, R. P.

    2015-11-01

    Waves and instabilities play a very crucial role in astrophysical plasmas e.g. solar wind, Geospace etc. The main objective of current study is to investigate the importance of nonlinear processes associated with kinetic Alfvén waves (KAWs) in order to understand the physical mechanism behind the magnetopause turbulence. Numerical simulation of the coupled equations guiding the dynamics of three dimensionally propagating kinetic Alfvén wave (KAW) and slow magnetosonic wave has been performed for intermediate beta plasma (i.e. me/mi ≪ β < 1, where β is thermal to magnetic pressure ratio) applicable to the magnetopause. A simplified semi-analytical model based on paraxial approach has also been developed. We have examined the field localization and associated power spectrum of 3-D kinetic Alfvén wave for this nonlinear interaction. Governing dynamical equations of KAW and slow magnetosonic wave get coupled when the ponderomotive force arising due to pump KAW is taken into account while studying the slow magnetosonic wave dynamics. The numerical prediction of power law scaling is just consistent with the observation of THEMIS spacecraft in the magnetopause.

  13. Kinetic studies on Na+/K+-ATPase and inhibition of Na+/K+-ATPase by ATP.

    PubMed

    Xia, Li; Yuwen, Liu; Jie, Li; Huilin, Li; Xi, Yang; Cunxin, Wang; Zhiyong, Wang

    2004-08-01

    Na+/K+-ATPase (EC 3.6.1.3) is an important membrane-bound enzyme. In this paper, kinetic studies on Na+/K+-ATPase were carried out under mimetic physiological conditions. By using microcalorimeter, a thermokinetic method was employed for the first time. Compared with other methods, it provided accurate measurements of not only thermodynamic data (deltarHm) but also the kinetic data (Km and Vmax). At 310.15K and pH 7.4, the molar reaction enthalpy (deltarHm) was measured as -40.514 +/- 0.9kJmol(-1). The Michaelis constant (Km) was determined to be 0.479 +/- 0.020 mM and consistent with literature data. The reliability of the thermokinetic method was further confirmed by colorimetric studies. Furthermore, a simple and reliable kinetic procedure was presented for ascertaining the true substrate for Na+/K+-ATPase and determining the effect of free ATP. Results showed that the MgATP complex was the real substrate with a Km value of about 0.5mM and free ATP was a competitive inhibitor with a Ki value of 0.253 mM. PMID:15558949

  14. Understanding long-time vacancy aggregation in iron: A kinetic activation-relaxation technique study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brommer, Peter; Béland, Laurent Karim; Joly, Jean-François; Mousseau, Normand

    2014-10-01

    Vacancy diffusion and clustering processes in body-centered-cubic (bcc) Fe are studied using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo method with on-the-fly catalog building capabilities. For monovacancies and divacancies, k-ART recovers previously published results while clustering in a 50-vacancy simulation box agrees with experimental estimates. Applying k-ART to the study of clustering pathways for systems containing from one to six vacancies, we find a rich set of diffusion mechanisms. In particular, we show that the path followed to reach a hexavacancy cluster influences greatly the associated mean-square displacement. Aggregation in a 50-vacancy box also shows a notable dispersion in relaxation time associated with effective barriers varying from 0.84 to 1.1 eV depending on the exact pathway selected. We isolate the effects of long-range elastic interactions between defects by comparing to simulations where those effects are deliberately suppressed. This allows us to demonstrate that in bcc Fe, suppressing long-range interactions mainly influences kinetics in the first 0.3 ms, slowing down quick energy release cascades seen more frequently in full simulations, whereas long-term behavior and final state are not significantly affected.

  15. Chemical kinetic study of the oxidation of toluene and related cyclic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Mehl, M; Frassoldati, A; Fietzek, R; Faravelli, T; Pitz, W; Ranzi, E

    2009-10-01

    Chemical kinetic models of hydrocarbons found in transportation fuels are needed to simulate combustion in engines and to improve engine performance. The study of the combustion of practical fuels, however, has to deal with their complex compositions, which generally involve hundreds of compounds. To provide a simplified approach for practical fuels, surrogate fuels including few relevant components are used instead of including all components. Among those components, toluene, the simplest of the alkyl benzenes, is one of the most prevalent aromatic compounds in gasoline in the U.S. (up to 30%) and is a promising candidate for formulating gasoline surrogates. Unfortunately, even though the combustion of aromatics been studied for a long time, the oxidation processes relevant to this class of compounds are still matter of discussion. In this work, the combustion of toluene is systematically approached through the analysis of the kinetics of some important intermediates contained in its kinetic submechanism. After discussing the combustion chemistry of cyclopentadiene, benzene, phenol and, finally, of toluene, the model is validated against literature experimental data over a wide range of operating conditions.

  16. Kinetic approach to the study of froth flotation applied to a lepidolite ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieceli, Nathália; Durão, Fernando O.; Guimarães, Carlos; Nogueira, Carlos A.; Pereira, Manuel F. C.; Margarido, Fernanda

    2016-07-01

    The number of published studies related to the optimization of lithium extraction from low-grade ores has increased as the demand for lithium has grown. However, no study related to the kinetics of the concentration stage of lithium-containing minerals by froth flotation has yet been reported. To establish a factorial design of batch flotation experiments, we conducted a set of kinetic tests to determine the most selective alternative collector, define a range of pulp pH values, and estimate a near-optimum flotation time. Both collectors (Aeromine 3000C and Armeen 12D) provided the required flotation selectivity, although this selectivity was lost in the case of pulp pH values outside the range between 2 and 4. Cumulative mineral recovery curves were used to adjust a classical kinetic model that was modified with a non-negative parameter representing a delay time. The computation of the near-optimum flotation time as the maximizer of a separation efficiency (SE) function must be performed with caution. We instead propose to define the near-optimum flotation time as the time interval required to achieve 95%-99% of the maximum value of the SE function.

  17. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of free-radical reactions in combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Tully, F.P.

    1993-12-01

    Combustion is driven by energy-releasing chemical reactions. Free radicals that participate in chain reactions carry the combustion process from reactants to products. Research in chemical kinetics enables us to understand the microscopic mechanisms involved in individual chemical reactions as well as to determine the rates at which they proceed. Both types of information are required for an understanding of how flames burn, why engines knock, how to minimize the production of pollutants, and many other important questions in combustion. In this program the authors emphasize accurate measurements over wide temperature ranges of the rates at which ubiquitous free radicals react with stable molecules. The authors investigate a variety of OH, CN, and CH + stable molecule reactions important to fuel conversion, emphasizing application of the extraordinarily precise technique of laser photolysis/continuous-wave laser-induced fluorescence (LP/cwLIF). This precision enables kinetic measurements to serve as mechanistic probes. Since considerable effort is required to study each individual reaction, prudent selection is critical. Two factors encourage selection of a specific reaction: (1) the rates and mechanisms of the subject reaction are required input to a combustion model; and (2) the reaction is a chemical prototype which, upon characterization, will provide fundamental insight into chemical reactivity, facilitate estimation of kinetic parameters for similar reactions, and constrain and test the computational limits of reaction-rate theory. Most studies performed in this project satisfy both conditions.

  18. A kinetic study of mercury(II) transport through a membrane assisted by new transport reagent

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A new organodithiophosphorus derivative, namely O-(1,3-Bispiperidino-2-propyl)-4-methoxy phenyldithiophosphonate, was synthesized and then the kinetic behavior of the transport process as a function of concentration, temperature, stirring rate and solvents was investigated. Results The compound 1 was characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopies. The transport of mercury(II) ion by a zwitterionic dithiophosphonate 1 in the liquid membrane was studied and the kinetic behavior of the transport process as a function of concentration, temperature, stirring rate and solvents was investigated. The compound 1 is expected to serve as a model liquid membrane transport with mercury(II) ions. Conclusion A kinetic study of mercury(II) transport through a membrane assisted by O-(1,3-Bispiperidino-2-propyl)-4-methoxy phenyldithiophosphonate was performed. It can be concluded that the compound 1 can be provided a general and straightforward route to remove toxic metals ions such as mercury(II) ion from water or other solution. PMID:21762513

  19. Kinetic Study to Predict Sigma Phase Formation in Duplex Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Daniella Caluscio; Magnabosco, Rodrigo

    2016-04-01

    This work presents an improved kinetic study of sigma phase formation during isothermal aging between 973 K and 1223 K (700 °C and 950 °C), based on Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (K-J-M-A) model, established from volume fraction of sigma phase determined in backscattered electron images over polished surfaces of aged samples. The kinetic study shows a change in the main mechanism of sigma formation between 973 K and 1173 K (700 °C and 900 °C), from a nucleation-governed stage to a diffusion-controlled growth-coarsening stage, confirmed by a double inclination in K-J-M-A plots and microstructural observations. A single inclination in K-J-M-A plots was observed for the 1223 K (950 °C) aging temperature, showing that kinetic behavior in this temperature is only related to diffusion-controlled growth of sigma phase. The estimated activation energies for the nucleation of sigma phase are close to the molybdenum diffusion in ferrite, probably the controlling mechanism of sigma phase nucleation. The proposed time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagram shows a "double c curve" configuration, probably associated to the presence of chi-phase formed between 973 K and 1073 K (700 °C and 800 °C), which acts as heterogeneous nuclei for sigma phase formation in low aging temperatures.

  20. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic study of cesium adsorption onto nanocrystalline mordenite from high-salt solution.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keun-Young; Park, Minsung; Kim, Jimin; Oh, Maengkyo; Lee, Eil-Hee; Kim, Kwang-Wook; Chung, Dong-Yong; Moon, Jei-Kwon

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics of cesium adsorption by nanocrystalline mordenite were investigated under cesium contamination with high-salt solution, simulating the case of an operation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities or an accident during the processes. The adsorption rate constants were determined using a pseudo second-order kinetic model. The kinetic results strongly demonstrated that the cesium adsorption rate of nano mordenite is extremely fast, even in a high-salt solution, and much faster than that of micro mordenite. In the equilibrium study, the Langmuir isotherm model fit the cesium adsorption data of nano mordenite better than the Freundlich model, which suggests that cesium adsorption onto nano mordenite is a monolayer homogeneous adsorption process. The obtained thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption involved a very stable chemical reaction. In particular, the combination of rapid particle dispersion and rapid cesium adsorption of the nano mordenite in the solution resulted in a rapid and effective process for cesium removal without stirring, which may offer great advantages for low energy consumption and simple operation. PMID:26683820

  1. Kinetics and mechanisms of NOx - char reduction. Quarterly technical progress report, August 1, 1995--October 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Suuberg, E.M.; Lilly, W.D.; Aarna, I.

    1996-05-01

    The emission of nitrogen oxides from combustion of coal remains a problem of considerable interest, whether the concern is with acid rain, stratospheric ozone chemistry, or {open_quotes}greenhouse{close_quotes} gases. Whereas earlier the concern was focused mainly on NO (as a primary combustion product) and to a lesser extent NO{sub 2} (since it is mainly a secondary product of combustion), in recent years the emissions of N{sub 2}O have also captured considerable attention, particularly in the context of fluidized bed combustion, in which the problem appears to be most acute. The research community has only recently begun to take solid hold on the N{sub 2}O problem. This is in part because earlier estimates of the importance of N{sub 2}O in combustion processes were clouded by artifacts in sampling which have now been resolved. This project is concerned with the mechanism of reduction of both NO and N{sub 2}O by carbons. It was recognized some years ago that NO formed during fluidized bed coal combustion can be heterogeneously reduced in-situ by the carbonaceous solid intermediates of combustions. This has been recently supplemented by the knowledge that heterogeneous reaction with carbon can also play an important role in reducing emissions of N{sub 2}O, but that the NO-carbon reactions might also contribute to formation of N{sub 2}O. The precise role of carbon in N{sub 2}O reduction and formation has yet to be established, since in one case the authors of a recent study were compelled to comment that the basic knowledge of N{sub 2}O formation and reduction still has to be improved. The same can be said of the NO-carbon system.

  2. Kafirin adsorption on ion-exchange resins: isotherm and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prashant; Lau, Pei Wen; Kale, Sandeep; Johnson, Stuart; Pareek, Vishnu; Utikar, Ranjeet; Lali, Arvind

    2014-08-22

    Kafirin is a natural, hydrophobic and celiac safe prolamin protein obtained from sorghum seeds. Today kafirin is found to be useful in designing delayed delivery systems and coatings of pharmaceuticals and nutraceuticals where its purity is important and this can be obtained by adsorptive chromatography. This study is the first scientific insight into the isotherm and kinetic studies of kafirin adsorption on anion- and cation-exchange resins for practical applications in preparative scale chromatography. Adsorption isotherms of kafirin were determined for five anion- and two cation-exchange resins in batch systems. Isotherm parameters such as maximum binding capacity and dissociation constant were determined from Langmuir isotherm, and adsorptive capacity and affinity constant from Freundlich isotherm. Langmuir isotherm was found to fit the adsorption equilibrium data well. Batch uptake kinetics for kafirin adsorption on these resins was also carried out and critical parameters including the diffusion coefficient, film mass transfer coefficient, and Biot number for film-pore diffusion model were calculated. Both the isotherm and the kinetic parameters were considered for selection of appropriate resin for kafirin purification. UNOsphere Q (78.26 mg/ml) and Toyopearl SP-650M (57.4 mg/ml) were found to offer better kafirin binding capacities and interaction strength with excellent uptake kinetics under moderate operating conditions. With these adsorbents, film diffusion resistance was found to be major governing factor for adsorption (Bi<10 and δ<1). Based on designer objective function, UNOsphere Q was found be best adsorbent for binding of kafirin. The data presented is valuable for designing large scale preparative adsorptive chromatographic kafirin purification systems. PMID:25022481

  3. Infrared absorption spectroscopy and chemical kinetics of free radicals. Progress report, February 1, 1991--March 1, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Curl, R.F.; Glass, G.P.

    1994-08-01

    Rate of reaction of ketenyl radical with O{sub 2} at room temperature was determined as 6.5(6) {times} 10-{sup {minus}13} CM{sup 3} molecules{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} and an upper bound of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}13} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} was estimated for the reaction rate of acetylene with ketenyl. The high resolution spectrum of the {nu}1 acetylenic CH stretch of propargy1 radical (HCCCH{sub 2}) near 3322 cm{sup {minus}1} has obtained and analyzed. Nuclear spin weights demonstrate that the CH{sub 2} hydrogen atoms are in the carbon atom plane. We have attempted to measure the propargy1 recombination rate constant at 296 K; however, the observed rate constant of (1.2{times}0.2) x 10{sup {minus}10} cc-molecule{sup {minus}1}-s{sup {minus}1} may be affected by other reactions. The CH stretch fundamental, {nu}1, of HCCN has been observed, assigned, and analyzed. Analysis of the hot bands associated with bending shows that HCCN is a quasilinear molecule with a very floppy potential function for the HCC bending angle. The barrier to linearity is estimated to be about 100 cm{sup {minus}1}. Rate of the reaction between C{sub 2}H and H{sub 2} has been measured at 295--855 K. The rate constant exhibited a non-Arrhenius form well represented by k = (9.44{plus_minus}0.50) {times} 10{sup {minus}14}T{sup 0.9}exp(-1003{plus_minus}40/T)cm{sup 3}molecule{sup {minus}1}s{sup {minus}1}. The reaction between atomic oxygen and the amidogen radical, NH{sub 2} has been studied at 295 K; the room temperature rate constant was measured as (6.5 {plus_minus} 1.3) {times} 10{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. The minor channel leading to NH + OH was observed but accounted for at most about 8% of the NH{sub 2} reacting. The rate constant for the reaction NH+O was determined from fitting the NH time profile to be 6.6{plus_minus}10{sub {minus}11} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}.

  4. Kinetics of Mn-based sorbents for hot coal gas desulfurization. Quarterly progress report, September 15--December 15, 1994. Task 1: Literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Hepworth, M.T.

    1995-01-06

    Manganese ore as well as manganese carbonate, precipitated from aqueous solutions, combined with alumina to form indurated pellets hold promise of being a high-effective, inexpensive, regenerable sorbent for hot fuel gases. Although the thermodynamics for sulfur removal by manganese predicts somewhat higher hydrogen sulfide over-pressures (i.e. poorer degree of desulfurization) than can be accomplished with zinc-based sorbents, zinc tends to be reduced to the metallic state under coal gasification conditions resulting in loss of capacity and reactivity by volatilization of reactive surfaces. This volatilization phenomenon limits the temperatures for which desulfurization can be effectively accomplished to less than 550 C for zinc ferrite and 700 C for zinc titanate; whereas, manganese-based sorbents can be utilized at temperatures well in temperatures exceeding 700 C. Also the regeneration of manganese-based pellets under oxidizing conditions may be superior to that of zinc titanate since they can be loaded from a simulated reducing coal-derived gas and then be regenerated at higher temperatures (up to 1,300 C). The topics that will be addressed by this study include: preparation of an effective manganese-based sorbent; thermodynamics and kinetics of sulfur removal from hot fuel gases by this sorbent; analysis of kinetics and mechanisms by which sulfur is absorbed by the sorbent (i.e., whether by gaseous diffusion, surface-controlled reaction, or pore diffusion); and cyclic sulfidation and regeneration of the sorbent and recovery of the sulfur. 38 refs.

  5. Theoretical studies in high energy nuclear physics. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This paper is a progress report for the period 1-1-93 to 6-30-95 on a project primarily directed at the application of high energy physics techniques to nuclear structure studies, and the ability to study hadron dynamics through interactions with nuclear targets. This work has included the first legitimate QCD calculations of hard coherent diffractive processes off nucleon (nuclear) targets which established novel features of color transparency phenomenon not anticipated in the previous intuitive or QCD inspired model calculations and predicted the fast increase of the cross section for electroproduction of {rho}-mesons with increase of the energy, which was confirmed very recently by the first HERA data on this reaction. First theoretical demonstration that color transparency phenomenon for the hard diffractive processes follow from QCD in the kinematics when both x{yields}0 and Q{sup 2}{yields}{infinity}. Establishing the pattern of color (cross section) fluctuations in hadrons. Confirmed by the FNAL inelastic diffraction data. Finding that in realistic quark, skyrmion models of a hadron large momentum transfer elastic lepton-hadron scattering occurs through formation of small spatial size configurations. Discovering a novel class of color transparency sensitive double interaction processes which is complementary to quasielastic reactions originally suggested by S. Brodsky and A. Mueller. Adopting ideas suggested elsewhere for hadron initiated reactions they developed a method for taking into account nuclear correlations in (e,e{prime}p) reactions. Such an approach gives practical possibility to overcome ambiguities of optical model approximation used before and to reliably interpret color transparency effects at intermediate Q{sup 2}.

  6. An experimental study of the kinetics of lherzolite and basalt interaction: Effect of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Liang, Y.; Xu, W.

    2012-12-01

    Melt-rock reaction happens in the asthenospheric mantle when interstitial melt and its host mantle rock are out of chemical equilibrium. It occurs in almost all major active tectonic regimes within the upper mantle and is responsible or partially responsible for a range of petrologic and geochemical observations. Significant progresses have been made in understanding the kinetics of melt-peridotite interaction in anhydrous systems through laboratory peridotite reactive dissolution experiments. The present study focuses on the effect of water on melt-peridotite interaction, a topic that is especially relevant to magma transport in the mantle wedge. A series of hydrous basalt-lherzolite interaction experiments were conducted at 1250-1385°C and 0.8-2 GPa (3 hrs) using Au-Pd lined Mo capsules. To minimize Fe-loss, we first pre-saturated the Au-Pd-Mo capsule with the reacting melt at T-P conditions identical to dissolution runs, although Fe-unsaturated Au-Pd-Mo capsules were also used in a set of preliminary experiments. Starting material for the reacting hydrous basalt is a hornblende-bearing garnet pyroxenite (~13% Hb). For comparison, an anhydrous basalt-lherzolite dissolution experiment was also conducted at 1385°C and 2 GPa (6 hrs) using the same starting composition but a graphite-lined Mo capsule that cannot retain water in the experimental charge. In the hydrous experiments, the starting pyroxenite is completely molten and the spinel lherzolite is partially molten. A layer (100-760 μm) of mostly orthopyroxene (opx) + melt is formed between the reacting melt and starting lherzolite that has transformed into a clinopyroxene depleted harzburgite. The opx grains in the high-porosity orthopyroxenite layer are euhedral and significantly larger than olivine and opx in the harzburgite. Furthermore, these opx grains are chemically zoned, and have small olivine inclusions, suggesting the growth of opx is at the expense of olivine. The opx rims are lower in MgO and SiO2

  7. Use of a Reliable Homemade Dilatometer To Study the Kinetics of the Radical Chain Polymerization of PMMA: An Undergraduate Polymer Chemistry Laboratory Kinetics Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendicuti, Francisco; Martín, Olga; Tarazona, Maria Pilar

    1998-11-01

    In this laboratory experiment, a simple, reliable homemade dilatometer was used to study the kinetics of the radical chain polymerization of PMMA. The reaction was carried out in toluene with benzoyl peroxide as the initiator at a temperature of 80 °C. Each student studied the kinetics at a different initiator concentration constant. Pseudo-first-order plots permit students to obtain kapp and to demonstrate order 1 with respect to the monomer concentration. Finally, a log-log plot of kapp versus the initiator concentration from the data collected by each student demonstrates order 0.5 with respect to the initiator concentration. Results also agree with the rate constants of the process implicated in this type of polymerization.

  8. Removal of imidazolium ionic liquids by microbial associations: study of the biodegradability and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Liwarska-Bizukojc, Ewa; Gendaszewska, Dorota

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the biodegradability of the selected imidazolium ionic liquids and to determine the kinetic parameters for the biological treatment of wastewater containing these ionic liquids. Biodegradability was evaluated with the help of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) tests, while oxygen uptake rate (OUR) tests were made in order to calculate the values of Monod kinetic parameters. The results obtained from both types of the tests showed that ionic liquids of chemical structure of 1-alkyl-3-methyl imidazolium bromide were poorly biodegradable and co-biodegradable compounds, although their biodegradability increased with the elongation of the alkyl chain length. At the same time the presence of the imidazolium-based ionic liquids in wastewater at concentration of 50 mg l(-1) did not inhibit biomass growth as well as did not decrease the affinity of substrate to biomass. The values of both Monod kinetic parameters, i.e., maximum specific growth rate (μ(max)) and half saturation constant (K(S)), increased with the increase in chain length of the alkyl substituent. PMID:22925899

  9. Oxidative dehydrogenation dimerization of propylene over bismuth oxide: kinetic and mechanistic studies

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.G.; Hightower, J.W.

    1983-07-01

    Classical kinetic experiments together with pulse microreactor studies involving deuterium and carbon-13-labeled isotopic tracers were used to investigate the oxidative dehydrogenation dimerization (OXDD) of propylene to 1,5-hexadiene and benzene over bismuth oxide between 748 and 898/sup 0/K. The kinetic data, which indicated that the OXDD reaction is of variable order with respect to oxygen and propylene concentrations, could be fit to rate equations based on either the Langmuir-Hinshelwood model or the Mars-van Krevelen model, although the former gave more linear Arrhenius plots. A significant kinetic isotope effect (k/sub H//k/sub D/ = 1.7 at 873/sup 0/K) shows that the rate-limiting step for the OXDD reaction involves C-H cleavage, and there is only a small amount of H/D scrambling among reactant and product molecules. Analysis of liquid products by infrared spectroscopy indicated that both 1,5-hexadiene and 1,3-cyclohexadiene are stable reaction intermediates; microreactor results involving unlabeled propylene, 1,5-hexadiene, 1,3-cyclohexadiene, and 1,4-cyclohexadiene as reactants confirmed the infrared findings. Pulse microreactor experiments with /sup 13/C-labeled propylene clearly showed that deep oxidation (complete combustion) occurs via a consecutive-parallel network involving the partially oxidized intermediates as well as the starting propylene. Changes in the particle size do not alter the overall activity, although larger particles have lower selectivities for C/sub 6/ products than do smaller particles.

  10. Kinetic study on the isothermal and nonisothermal crystallization of monoglyceride organogels.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zong; Yang, Lijun; Geng, Wenxin; Yao, Yubo; Wang, Xingguo; Liu, Yuanfa

    2014-01-01

    The isothermal and nonisothermal crystallization kinetics of monoglyceride (MAG) organogels were studied by pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (pNMR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), respectively. The Avrami equation was used to describe the isothermal crystallization kinetics and experimental data fitted the equation fairly well. Results showed that the crystal growth of MAG organogels was a rod-like growth of instantaneous nuclei at higher degrees of supercooling and a plate-like form with high nucleation rate at lower degrees of supercooling. The exothermic peak in nonisothermal DSC curves for the MAG organogels became wider and shifted to lower temperature when the cooling rate increased, and nonisothermal crystallization was analyzed by Mo equation. Results indicated that at the same crystallization time, to get a higher degree of relative crystallinity, a higher cooling rate was necessary. The activation energy of nonisothermal crystallization was calculated as 739.59 kJ/mol according to the Kissinger method. Therefore, as the results of the isothermal and nonisothermal crystallization kinetics for the MAG organogels obtained, the crystallization rate, crystal nucleation, and growth during the crystallization process could be preliminarily monitored through temperature and cooling rate regulation, which laid the foundation for the real industrial manufacture and application of the MAG organogels. PMID:24701138

  11. REACTION KINETICS AND X-RAY ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY STUDIES OF YTTRIUM CONTAINING METAL HYDRIDE ELECTRODES

    SciTech Connect

    TICIANELLI,E.A.; MUKERJEE,S.; MCBREEN,J.; ADZIC,G.D.; JOHNSON,J.R.; REILLY,J.J.

    1998-11-01

    This was a study of electrode degradation mechanisms and the reaction kinetics of LaNi{sub 4.7}Sn{sub 0.3}, La{sub (1{minus}x)}, (x = 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3) and La{sub 0.7}Y{sub 0.3}Ni{sub 4.6}Sn{sub 0.3}Co{sub 0.1} metal hydride electrodes. Alloy characterization included x-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray absorption (XAS), hydrogen absorption in a Sieverts apparatus, and electrochemical cycling of alloy electrodes. The atomic volume of H was determined for two of the alloys. Electrochemical kinetic measurements were made using steady state galvanostatic measurements, galvanodynamic sweep, and electrochemical impedance techniques. XAS was used to examine the degree of corrosion of the alloys with cycling. Alloying with Y decreased the corrosion rate. The results are consistent with corrosion inhibition by a Y containing passive film. The increase in the kinetics of the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) with increasing depth of discharge was much greater on the Y containing alloys. This may be due to the dehydriding of the catalytic species on the surface of the metal hydride particles.

  12. Reaction kinetics and x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of yttrium containing metal hydride electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Ticianelli, E.A.; Mukerjee, S.; McBreen, J.; Adzic, G.D.; Johnson, J.R.; Reilly, J.J.

    1998-12-31

    This was a study of electrode degradation mechanisms and the reaction kinetics of LaNi{sub 4.7}Sn{sub 0.3}, La{sub (1{minus}x)} Y{sub x}Ni{sub 4.7}Sn{sub 0.3} (x = 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3) and La{sub 0.7}Y{sub 0.3}Ni{sub 4.6}Sn{sub 0.3}Co{sub 0.1} metal hydride electrodes. Alloy characterization included x-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray absorption (XAS), hydrogen absorption in a Sieverts apparatus, and electrochemical cycling of alloy electrodes. The atomic volume of H was determined for two of the alloys. Electrochemical kinetic measurements were made using steady state galvanostatic measurements, galvanodynamic sweep, and electrochemical impedance techniques. XAS was used to examine the degree of corrosion of the alloys with cycling. Alloying with Y decreased the corrosion rate. The results are consistent with corrosion inhibition by a Y containing passive film. The increase in the kinetics of the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) with increasing depth of discharge was much greater on the Y containing alloys. This may be due to the dehydriding of the catalytic species on the surface of the metal hydride particles.

  13. Equilibrium and Kinetic Studies of Cd2+ Biosorption by the Brown Algae Sargassum fusiforme

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Hui-Xi; Li, Nan; Wang, Li-Hua; Yu, Ping; Yan, Xiu-Feng

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental investigation of the biosorption of Cd2+ from aqueous solution by the edible seaweed Sargassum fusiforme was performed under batch conditions. The influences of experimental parameters, such as the initial pH, sorption time, temperature, and initial Cd2+ concentration, on Cd2+ uptake by S. fusiforme were evaluated. The results indicated that the biosorption of Cd2+ depended on the initial Cd2+ concentration, as well as the pH. The uptake of Cd2+ could be described by the Langmuir isotherm model, and both the Langmuir biosorption equilibrium constant and the maximum biosorption capacity of the monolayer decreased with increasing temperature, thereby confirming the exothermic character of the sorption process. The biosorption kinetics follows the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, and intraparticle diffusion is the sole rate-limiting step for the entire biosorption period. These fundamental equilibrium and kinetic results can support further studies to the removal of cadmium from S. fusiforme harvested from cadmium-polluted waters. PMID:24736449

  14. Kinetic Study on the Isothermal and Nonisothermal Crystallization of Monoglyceride Organogels

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Zong; Yang, Lijun; Geng, Wenxin; Yao, Yubo; Wang, Xingguo; Liu, Yuanfa

    2014-01-01

    The isothermal and nonisothermal crystallization kinetics of monoglyceride (MAG) organogels were studied by pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (pNMR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), respectively. The Avrami equation was used to describe the isothermal crystallization kinetics and experimental data fitted the equation fairly well. Results showed that the crystal growth of MAG organogels was a rod-like growth of instantaneous nuclei at higher degrees of supercooling and a plate-like form with high nucleation rate at lower degrees of supercooling. The exothermic peak in nonisothermal DSC curves for the MAG organogels became wider and shifted to lower temperature when the cooling rate increased, and nonisothermal crystallization was analyzed by Mo equation. Results indicated that at the same crystallization time, to get a higher degree of relative crystallinity, a higher cooling rate was necessary. The activation energy of nonisothermal crystallization was calculated as 739.59 kJ/mol according to the Kissinger method. Therefore, as the results of the isothermal and nonisothermal crystallization kinetics for the MAG organogels obtained, the crystallization rate, crystal nucleation, and growth during the crystallization process could be preliminarily monitored through temperature and cooling rate regulation, which laid the foundation for the real industrial manufacture and application of the MAG organogels. PMID:24701138

  15. Kinetics and thermodynamic studies for removal of acid blue 129 from aqueous solution by almond shell

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Efficiency and performance of Almond shell (AS) adsorbent for the removal and recovery of Acid Blue 129 (AB129) from wastewater is presented in this report. The influence of variables including pH, initial dye concentration, adsorbent dosage, particle size, contact time and temperature on the dye removal have been investigated in batch method by one at a time optimization method. The experimental equilibrium data were tested by four widely used isotherm models namely, Langmuir, Freundlich, Tempkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D–R). It was found that adsorption of AB129 on AS well with the Langmuir isotherm model, implying monolayer coverage of dye molecules onto the surface of the adsorbent. More than 98% removal efficiency was obtained within 14 min at adsorbent dose of 0.4 g for initial dye concentration of 40 mg/L at pH 2. Kinetics of the adsorption process was tested by pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetics, and intraparticle diffusion mechanism. Pseudo-second-order kinetic model provided a better correlation for the experimental data studied in comparison to the pseudo-first-order model. Calculation of various thermodynamic parameters such as, Gibb’s free energy, entropy and enthalpy of the on-going adsorption process indicate feasibility and endothermic nature of AB129 adsorption on all adsorbents. This work can be used in design of adsorption columns for dyes removal. PMID:24620822

  16. A kinetic study of the polymorphic transformation of nimodipine and indomethacin during high shear granulation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhen; Ma, Mingxin; Wang, Tianyi; Chang, Di; Jiang, Tongying; Wang, Siling

    2011-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the mechanism, kinetics, and factors affecting the polymorphic transformation of nimodipine (NMD) and indomethacin (IMC) during high shear granulation. Granules containing active pharmaceutical ingredient, microcrystalline cellulose, and low-substituted hydroxypropylcellulose were prepared with ethanolic hydroxypropylcellulose solution, and the effects of independent process variables including impeller speed and granulating temperature were taken into consideration. Two polymorphs of the model drugs and granules were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction analysis and quantitatively determined by differential scanning calorimetry. A theoretical kinetic method of ten kinetic models was applied to analyze the polymorphic transformation of model drugs. The results obtained revealed that both the transformation of modification I to modification II of NMD and the transformation of the α form to the γ form of IMC followed a two-dimensional nuclei growth mechanism. The activation energy of transformation was calculated to be 7.933 and 56.09 kJ·mol(-1) from Arrhenius plot, respectively. Both the granulating temperature and the impeller speed affected the transformation rate of the drugs and, in particular, the high shear stress significantly accelerated the transformation process. By analyzing the growth mechanisms of granules in high-shear mixer, it was concluded that the polymorphic transformation of NMD and IMC took place in accordance with granule growth in a high-shear mixer. PMID:21553164

  17. Kinetics, thermodynamics and mechanistic studies of carbofuran removal using biochars from tea waste and rice husks.

    PubMed

    Vithanage, Meththika; Mayakaduwa, S S; Herath, Indika; Ok, Yong Sik; Mohan, Dinesh

    2016-05-01

    This study reports the thermodynamic application and non-linear kinetic models in order to postulate the mechanisms and compare the carbofuran adsorption behavior onto rice husk and tea waste derived biochars. Locally available rice husk and infused tea waste biochars were produced at 700 °C. Biochars were characterized by using proximate, ultimate and surface characterization methods. Batch experiments were conducted at 25, 35, and 45 °C for a series of carbofuran solutions ranging from 5 to 100 mg L(-1) with a biochar dose of 1 g L(-1) at pH 5.0 with acetate buffer. Molar O/C ratios indicated that rice husk biochar (RHBC700) is more hydrophilic than tea waste biochar (TWBC700). Negative ΔG (Gibbs free energy change) values indicated the feasibility of carbofuran adsorption on biochar. Increasing ΔG values with the rise in temperature indicated high favorability at higher temperatures for both RHBC and TWBC. Enthalpy values suggested the involvement of physisorption type interactions. Kinetic data modeling exhibited contribution of both physisorption, via pore diffusion, π*-π electron donor-acceptor interaction, H-bonding, and van der Waals dispersion forces and chemisorption via chemical bonding with phenolic, and amine groups. Equilibrium adsorption capacities of RHBC and TWBC determined by pseudo second order kinetic model were 25.2 and 10.2 mg g(-1), respectively. PMID:26607239

  18. Lipase-catalyzed synthesis of palmitanilide: Kinetic model and antimicrobial activity study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuan-Miao; Liu, Kuan-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Enzymatic syntheses of fatty acid anilides are important owing to their wide range of industrial applications in detergents, shampoo, cosmetics, and surfactant formulations. The amidation reaction of Mucor miehei lipase Lipozyme IM20 was investigated for direct amidation of triacylglycerol in organic solvents. The process parameters (reaction temperature, substrate molar ratio, enzyme amount) were optimized to achieve the highest yield of anilide. The maximum yield of palmitanilide (88.9%) was achieved after 24 h of reaction at 40 °C at an enzyme concentration of 1.4% (70 mg). Kinetics of lipase-catalyzed amidation of aniline with tripalmitin has been investigated. The reaction rate could be described in terms of the Michaelis-Menten equation with a Ping-Pong Bi-Bi mechanism and competitive inhibition by both the substrates. The kinetic constants were estimated by using non-linear regression method using enzyme kinetic modules. The enzyme operational stability study showed that Lipozyme IM20 retained 38.1% of the initial activity for the synthesis of palmitanilide (even after repeated use for 48 h). Palmitanilide, a fatty acid amide, exhibited potent antimicrobial activity toward Bacillus cereus. PMID:26672452

  19. A Study of the Optimal Model of the Flotation Kinetics of Copper Slag from Copper Mine BOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanojlović, Rodoljub D.; Sokolović, Jovica M.

    2014-10-01

    In this study the effect of mixtures of copper slag and flotation tailings from copper mine Bor, Serbia on the flotation results of copper recovery and flotation kinetics parameters in a batch flotation cell has been investigated. By simultaneous adding old flotation tailings in the ball mill at the rate of 9%, it is possible to increase copper recovery for about 20%. These results are compared with obtained copper recovery of pure copper slag. The results of batch flotation test were fitted by MatLab software for modeling the first-order flotation kinetics in order to determine kinetics parameters and define an optimal model of the flotation kinetics. Six kinetic models are tested on the batch flotation copper recovery against flotation time. All models showed good correlation, however the modified Kelsall model provided the best fit.

  20. Mechanistic studies with solubilized rat liver steroid 5 alpha-reductase: Elucidation of the kinetic mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, M.A.; Brandt, M.; Greway, A.T. )

    1990-03-20

    A solubilized preparation of steroid 5 alpha-reductase from rat liver has been used in studies focused toward an understanding of the kinetic mechanism associated with enzyme catalysis. From the results of analyses with product and dead-end inhibitors, a preferentially ordered binding of substrates and release of products from the surface of the enzyme is proposed. The observations from these experiments were identical with those using the steroid 5 alpha-reductase activity associated with rat liver microsomes. The primary isotope effects on steady-state kinetic parameters when (4S-2H)NADPH was used also were consistent with an ordered kinetic mechanism. Normal isotope effects were observed for all three kinetic parameters (Vm/Km for both testosterone and NADPH and Vm) at all substrate concentrations used experimentally. Upon extrapolation to infinite concentration of testosterone, the isotope effect on Vm/Km for NADPH approached unity, indicating that the nicotinamide dinucleotide phosphate is the first substrate binding to and the second product released from the enzyme. The isotope effects on Vm/Km for testosterone at infinite concentration of cofactor and on Vm were 3.8 +/- 0.5 and 3.3 +/- 0.4, respectively. Data from the pH profiles of these three steady-state parameters and the inhibition constants (1/Ki) of competitive inhibitors versus both substrates indicate that the binding of nicotinamide dinucleotide phosphate involves coordination of its anionic 2'-phosphate to a protonated enzyme-associated base with an apparent pK near 8.0. From these results, relative limits have been placed on several of the internal rate constants used to describe the ordered mechanism of the rat liver steroid 5 alpha-reductase.

  1. A Three-Dimensional Kinematic and Kinetic Study of the College-Level Female Softball Swing

    PubMed Central

    Milanovich, Monica; Nesbit, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper quantifies and discusses the three-dimensional kinematic and kinetic characteristics of the female softball swing as performed by fourteen female collegiate amateur subjects. The analyses were performed using a three-dimensional computer model. The model was driven kinematically from subject swings data that were recorded with a multi-camera motion analysis system. Each subject used two distinct bats with significantly different inertial properties. Model output included bat trajectories, subject/bat interaction forces and torques, work, and power. These data formed the basis for a detailed analysis and description of fundamental swing kinematic and kinetic quantities. The analyses revealed that the softball swing is a highly coordinated and individual three-dimensional motion and subject-to-subject variations were significant in all kinematic and kinetic quantities. In addition, the potential effects of bat properties on swing mechanics are discussed. The paths of the hands and the centre-of-curvature of the bat relative to the horizontal plane appear to be important trajectory characteristics of the swing. Descriptions of the swing mechanics and practical implications are offered based upon these findings. Key Points The female softball swing is a highly coordinated and individual three-dimensional motion and subject-to-subject variations were significant in all kinematic and kinetic quantities. The paths of the grip point, bat centre-of-curvature, CG, and COP are complex yet reveal consistent patterns among subjects indicating that these patterns are fundamental components of the swing. The most important mechanical quantity relative to generating bat speed is the total work applied to the bat from the batter. Computer modeling of the softball swing is a viable means for study of the fundamental mechanics of the swing motion, the interactions between the batter and the bat, and the energy transfers between the two. PMID:24570623

  2. Fundamental studies on kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of hydrogen isotope fractionation in natural gas systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yunyan; Ma, Qisheng; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Dai, Jinxing; Katz, Barry; Zhang, Shuichang; Tang, Yongchun

    2011-05-01

    Based on quantum chemistry calculations for normal octane homolytic cracking, a kinetic hydrogen isotope fractionation model for methane, ethane, and propane formation is proposed. The activation energy differences between D-substitute and non-substituted methane, ethane, and propane are 318.6, 281.7, and 280.2 cal/mol, respectively. In order to determine the effect of the entropy contribution for hydrogen isotopic substitution, a transition state for ethane bond rupture was determined based on density function theory (DFT) calculations. The kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with bond rupture in D and H substituted ethane results in a frequency factor ratio of 1.07. Based on the proposed mathematical model of hydrogen isotope fractionation, one can potentially quantify natural gas thermal maturity from measured hydrogen isotope values. Calculated gas maturity values determined by the proposed mathematical model using δD values in ethane from several basins in the world are in close agreement with similar predictions based on the δ 13C composition of ethane. However, gas maturity values calculated from field data of methane and propane using both hydrogen and carbon kinetic isotopic models do not agree as closely. It is possible that δD values in methane may be affected by microbial mixing and that propane values might be more susceptible to hydrogen exchange with water or to analytical errors. Although the model used in this study is quite preliminary, the results demonstrate that kinetic isotope fractionation effects in hydrogen may be useful in quantitative models of natural gas generation, and that δD values in ethane might be more suitable for modeling than comparable values in methane and propane.

  3. Fundamental studies on kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of hydrogen isotope fractionation in natural gas systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ni, Y.; Ma, Q.; Ellis, G.S.; Dai, J.; Katz, B.; Zhang, S.; Tang, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Based on quantum chemistry calculations for normal octane homolytic cracking, a kinetic hydrogen isotope fractionation model for methane, ethane, and propane formation is proposed. The activation energy differences between D-substitute and non-substituted methane, ethane, and propane are 318.6, 281.7, and 280.2cal/mol, respectively. In order to determine the effect of the entropy contribution for hydrogen isotopic substitution, a transition state for ethane bond rupture was determined based on density function theory (DFT) calculations. The kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with bond rupture in D and H substituted ethane results in a frequency factor ratio of 1.07. Based on the proposed mathematical model of hydrogen isotope fractionation, one can potentially quantify natural gas thermal maturity from measured hydrogen isotope values. Calculated gas maturity values determined by the proposed mathematical model using ??D values in ethane from several basins in the world are in close agreement with similar predictions based on the ??13C composition of ethane. However, gas maturity values calculated from field data of methane and propane using both hydrogen and carbon kinetic isotopic models do not agree as closely. It is possible that ??D values in methane may be affected by microbial mixing and that propane values might be more susceptible to hydrogen exchange with water or to analytical errors. Although the model used in this study is quite preliminary, the results demonstrate that kinetic isotope fractionation effects in hydrogen may be useful in quantitative models of natural gas generation, and that ??D values in ethane might be more suitable for modeling than comparable values in methane and propane. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  4. [Electromagnetic studies of nuclear structure and reactions]. Progress summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    The experimental goals are focused on developing an understanding of strong interactions and the structure of hadronic systems by determination of the electromagnetic response; these goals will be accomplished through coincidence detection of final states. Nuclear modeling objectives are to organize and interpret the data through a consistent description of a broad spectrum of reaction observables; calculations are performed in a nonrelativistic diagrammatic framework as well as a relativistic QHD approach. Work is described according to the following arrangement: direct knockout reactions (completion of {sup 16}O(e,e{prime}p), {sup 12}C(e,e{prime}pp) progress, large acceptance detector physics simulations), giant resonance studies (intermediate-energy experiments with solid-state detectors, the third response function in {sup 12}C(e,e{prime}p{sub 0}) and {sup 16}O(e,e{prime}p{sub 0}), comparison of the {sup 12}C(e, e{prime}p{sub 0}) and {sup 16}O(e,e{prime}p{sub 3}) reactions, quadrupole strength in the {sup 16}O(e,e{prime}{alpha}{sub 0}) reaction, quadrupole strength in the {sup 12}C(e,e{prime}{alpha}) reaction, analysis of the {sup 12}C(e,e{prime}p{sub 1}) and {sup 16}O(e,e{prime}p{sub 3}) angular distributions, analysis of the {sup 40}Ca(e,e{prime}x) reaction at low q, analysis of the higher-q {sup 12}C(e,e{prime}x) data from Bates), models of nuclear structure (experimental work, Hartree-Fock calculations, phonon excitations in spherical nuclei, shell model calculations, variational methods for relativistic fields), and instrumentation development efforts (developments at CEBAF, CLAS contracts, BLAST developments).

  5. A Study of the Kinetics of the Electrochemical Deposition of Ce3+/Ce4+ Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valov, I.; Guergova, Desislava; Stoychev, D.

    The kinetics of cathodic electrodeposition of Ce3+ and/or Ce4+ oxides from alcoholic electrolytes on gold substrates has been studied. It was found that, depending on the oxygen content in the CeCl3-based electrolyte, Ce2O3 (in oxygen atmosphere) or CeO2 (in an inert atmosphere), respectively, were obtained. XPS studies clearly separated the two valence states of Ce ions in the oxide layers. The microstructure of the coatings was analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM).

  6. The kinetics of ulvoespinel reduction - Synthetic study and applications to lunar rocks.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccallister, R. H.; Taylor, L. A.

    1973-01-01

    The kinetics of Fe2TiO4 reduction to FeTiO3 + Fe were studied using CO-CO2 gas mixtures with fO2 measured by a solid ceramic (calcia-zirconia) oxygen electrolyte cell. Isothermal rate studies at 900 C suggest that the mechanism of Fe2TiO4 reduction is one of nucleation and growth, where the growth stage may be controlled by the diffusion of the reactant through the product layer or volume diffusion. The activation energy for the growth stage of the process was determined to be 46 plus or minus 4 kcal/mole.

  7. Analysing properties of proteasome inhibitors using kinetic and X-ray crystallographic studies.

    PubMed

    Gallastegui, Nerea; Groll, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The combination of X-ray crystallography and kinetic studies of proteasome:ligand complexes has proven to be an important tool in inhibitor analysis of this crucial protein degradation machinery. Here, we describe in detail the purification protocols, proteolytic activity assays, crystallisation methods, and structure determination for the yeast 20S proteasome (CP) in complex with its inhibitors. The fusion of these advanced techniques offers the opportunity to further optimise drugs which are already tested in different clinical phase studies, as well as to design new promising proteasome lead structures which might be suitable for their application in medicine, plant protection, and antibiotics. PMID:22350899

  8. Stabilization and transformation of amorphous calcium carbonate: structural and kinetic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Millicent Promise

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is a common transient precursor in the formation of more stable crystalline calcium carbonate minerals, most notably calcite, vaterite, and aragonite. Formation of ACC from calcium carbonate rich aqueous solution rather than direct crystallization of crystalline polymorphs by organisms provides several advantages: control of morphology, grain size, orientation, hardness, and other bulk properties as well as reduction of energy costs during growth cycles. Despite decades of study, stabilization and transformation mechanisms of synthetic and biogenic ACC remain unclear. In particular, the roles of H2O and inorganic phosphate in ACC structure and transformation, and the variables affecting transformation kinetics and polymorph selection are understudied. In this research, we addressed structure and kinetic behavior of ACC through four complementary investigations: two studies focus on synthetic ACC stabilization and two focus on synthetic and biogenic ACC transformation behavior in solution at ambient temperatures. We explored ACC stabilization via compositional and thermal analyses, X-ray scattering, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Transformation experiments used a novel method of in situ structural analysis that provided quantitative kinetic and structural data and allowed us to visualize the ACC transformation pathway. Results revealed the complexity of H2O structure in ACC samples synthesized from three methods, indicating that the distinct hydrous populations produced define ACC behavior. Transformation kinetics and polymorph selection were strongly affected by the hydration state and type of synthetic ACC reacted. In situ transformation experiments also showed differences in kinetic behavior due to reaction medium. The structural role of hydrous components was again evident in in situ transformation experiments for ACC from a biogenic lobster gastrolith (LG) reacted with water. LG

  9. Laboratory studies of the kinetics of tropospheric and stratospheric atom and radical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golde, Michael F.

    1987-01-01

    Direct measurements of reaction rate constants and branching fractions for elementary reactions necessary in the modeling of the troposphere or stratosphere are provided. Details of reaction mechanisms are elucidated by studying pressure and temperature dependences of reactions, as well as by use of isotopic labels. Measurement techniques are improved for radical species in the laboratory. Progress and results in each area are given.

  10. A KINETIC STUDY OF THE METHANOLYSIS OF THE SULFONYLUREAS BENSULFURON METHYL AND SULFOMETURON METHYL USING CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The instability of sulfonylureas in solution in methanol has led us to a kinetic study of methanolysis of two sulfonylureas using capillary electrophoresis. In a preliminary experiment solutions of the seven compounds, bensulfuron methyl, sulfometuron methyl, nicosulfuron, chlori...

  11. Studies in iodine metabolism. Progress report, 1982-1983

    SciTech Connect

    Van Middlesworth, L.

    1983-01-01

    Research progress is reported for the period 1982 to 1983 in the following areas: (1) monitoring of animal thyroids for /sup 129/I, /sup 125/I, /sup 131/I, /sup 226/Ra, and /sup 228/Ra; and (2) neonatal hypo-l thyroidism in laboratory rats. (ACR)

  12. 21 CFR 601.70 - Annual progress reports of postmarketing studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Annual progress reports of postmarketing studies. 601.70 Section 601.70 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS LICENSING Postmarketing Studies § 601.70 Annual progress reports of postmarketing studies. (a) General requirements....

  13. A Kinetic Degradation Study of Curcumin in Its Free Form and Loaded in Polymeric Micelles.

    PubMed

    Naksuriya, Ornchuma; van Steenbergen, Mies J; Torano, Javier S; Okonogi, Siriporn; Hennink, Wim E

    2016-05-01

    Curcumin, a phenolic compound, possesses many pharmacological activities and is under clinical evaluation to treat different diseases. However, conflicting data about its stability have been reported. In this study, the kinetic degradation of curcumin from a natural curcuminoid mixture under various conditions (pH, temperature, and dielectric constant of the medium) was investigated. Moreover, the degradation of pure curcumin at some selected conditions was also determined. To fully solubilize curcumin and to prevent precipitation of curcumin that occurs when low concentrations of co-solvent are present, a 50:50 (v/v) aqueous buffer/methanol mixture was used as standard medium to study its degradation kinetics. The results showed that degradation of curcumin both as pure compound and present in the curcuminoid mixture followed first order kinetic reaction. It was further shown that an increasing pH, temperature, and dielectric constant of the medium resulted in an increase in the degradation rate. Curcumin showed rapid degradation due to autoxidation in aqueous buffer pH = 8.0 with a rate constant of 280 × 10(-3) h(-1), corresponding with a half-life (t1/2) of 2.5 h. Dioxygenated bicyclopentadione was identified as the final degradation product. Importantly, curcumin loaded as curcuminoid mixture in ω-methoxy poly (ethylene glycol)-b-(N-(2-benzoyloxypropyl) methacrylamide) (mPEG-HPMA-Bz) polymeric micelles and in Triton X-100 micelles was about 300-500 times more stable than in aqueous buffer. Therefore, loading of curcumin into polymeric micelles is a promising approach to stabilize this compound and develop formulations suitable for further pharmaceutical and clinical studies. PMID:27038456

  14. Study on the kinetics of homogeneous enzyme reactions in a micro/nanofluidics device.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Li, Su-Juan; Wu, Zeng-Qiang; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan; Xia, Xing-Hua

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, a micro/nanofluidic preconcentration device integrated with an electrochemical detector has been used to study the enrichment of enzymes and homogeneous enzyme reaction kinetics. The enzymes are first concentrated in front of a nanochannel via an exclusion-enrichment effect (EEE) mechanism of the nanochannel integrated in a microfluidics device. If a substrate is electrokinetically transported to the concentrated enzymes, homogeneous enzymatic reaction occurs. The enzymatic reaction product can penetrate through the nanochannel to be detected electrochemically. In this device, the enriched enzymes can be well retained and repeatedly used, thus, the enzymatic reaction occurs in a continuous-flow mode. For demonstration, Glucose oxidase (GOx) was chosen as the model enzyme to study the influence of enzyme concentration on its reaction kinetics. The different concentration of GOx in front of the nanochannel was simply achieved by using different enrichment time. When substrate glucose was introduced electrokinetically, a rapid electrochemical steady-state response could be obtained. It was found that the electrochemical response to a constant glucose concentration increased with the increase of enzyme enrichment time, which is expected for homogeneous enzymatic reactions. Under proper conditions, the electrochemical responds linearly to the glucose concentration ranging from 0 to 15 mM, and the Michaelis constants (K(m)) are relatively low, which indicates a more efficient complex formation between enzyme and substrate. These results suggest that the present micro/nanofluidics device is promising for the study of enzymatic reaction kinetics and other bioassays such as cell assays, drug discovery, and clinical diagnosis. PMID:20162240

  15. Kinetic study of carbon dioxide absorption into glycine promoted diethanolamine (DEA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudjiastuti, Lily; Susianto, Altway, Ali; IC, Maria Hestia; Arsi, Kartika

    2015-12-01

    In industry, especially petrochemical, oil and natural gas industry, required separation process of CO2 gas which is a corrosive gas (acid gas). This characteristic can damage the plant utility and piping systems as well as reducing the caloric value of natural gas. Corrosive characteristic of CO2 will appear in areas where there is a decrease in temperature and pressure, such as at the elbow pipe, tubing, cooler and injector turbine. From disadvantages as described above, then it is important to do separation process in the CO2 gas stream, one of the method for remove CO2 from the gas stream is reactive absorption using alkanolamine based solution with promotor. Therefore, this study is done to determine the kinetics constant of CO2 absorption in diethanolamine (DEA) solution using a glycine promoter. Glycine is chosen as a promoter because glycine is a primary amine compound which is reactive, moreover, glycine has resistance to high temperatures so it will not easy to degradable and suitable for application in industry. The method used in this study is absorption using laboratory scale wetted wall column equipment at atmospheric of pressure. This study will to provide the reaction kinetics data information in order to optimize the separation process of CO2 in the industrialized world. The experimental results show that rising temperatures from 303,15 - 328,15 K and the increase of concentration of glycine from 1% - 3% weight will increase the absorption rate of carbon dioxide in DEA promoted with glycine by 24,2% and 59,764% respectively, also the reaction kinetic constant is 1.419 × 1012 exp (-3634/T) (m3/kmol.s). This result show that the addition of glycine as a promoter can increase absorption rate of carbon dioxide in diethanolamine solution and cover the weaknesses of diethanolamine solution.

  16. Study of Electron Acceleration and Multiple Dipolarization Fronts in 3D kinetic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Ashour-Abdalla, Maha; Walker, Raymond; El-Alaoui, Mostafa

    2014-05-01

    The THEMIS mission encountered a depolarization front (DF) during a magnetotail crossing in the interval 035600 - 035900 UT on February 15, 2008 [1]. We present the results of an innovative investigative approach: we combine a global MHD model of the full Earth environment with a local PIC simulation. The global MHD view is provided on the UCLA model applied to the conditions for the interval of interest on Feb 15, 2008. At the specific time of 034800UT, a reconnection site first appear at about x=-15RE, y=4RE. We then use this specific MHD state as the initial setup for a fully kinetic PIC simulation, performed with the iPic3D code [2]. We consider a one way coupling where the MHD state is used as initial state and boundary conditions for the kinetic study [3]. In the present case, the time span of the kinetic simulation is short form the perspective of the global MHD simulation and does not require a full coupling where the MHD then process the information received back from the kinetic run [4]. The fields and particles are advanced self-consistently from the MHD state using a completely kinetic treatment. Many features missed by the MHD model emerge. Most notably a fast reconnection pattern develops and an unsteady reconnection process develops. The typical signatures of fast kinetic reconnection (Hall field) are observed and particle acceleration is obtained self consistently in the fields generated by the PIC simulation. The focus of the presentation will be the mechanisms of unsteady reconnection leading to multiple DFs. We observe intense wave activity propagating off the separatrices. We conduct a spectral analysis to isolate the different wave components in the lower hybrid and whistler regime. The unsteady reconnection and multiple DFs are also analysed in their impact on the energy transfer. We track the conversion of magnetic energy to particle energy and Poynting flux. The processes observed in the simulation are then compared with in situ THEMIS data

  17. Modelling and kinetics studies of a corn-rape blend combustion in an oxy-fuel atmosphere.

    PubMed

    López, R; Fernández, C; Martínez, O; Sánchez, M E

    2015-05-01

    A kinetic oxy-combustion study of a previously optimized lignocellulose blend is proposed. Kinetic and diffusion control mechanism are considered. The proposed correlations fit properly with the experimental results and diffusion effects are identified as be important enough to be taken into account. Afterwards, with the results obtained in the kinetic study, a detailed consecutive and parallel kinetic scheme is proposed for modelling the oxy-combustion of the blend. A discussion of the temperature and concentration profiles are included. Variation of products final distribution is considered. Smaller particles than 0.001 m are proposed for reducing temperature and concentration profiles and obtaining a good final product distribution. CO2-char reaction is identified as one of the most important step to be optimized for obtaining the lowest final residue. In this study, char is mainly oxidised at 950 K and this situation is attributed to an optimized blending of the bioresidues. PMID:25731924

  18. Simulation of atomic diffusion in the Fcc NiAl system: A kinetic Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonso, Dominic R.; Tafen, De Nyago

    2015-04-28

    The atomic diffusion in fcc NiAl binary alloys was studied by kinetic Monte Carlo simulation. The environment dependent hopping barriers were computed using a pair interaction model whose parameters were fitted to relevant data derived from electronic structure calculations. Long time diffusivities were calculated and the effect of composition change on the tracer diffusion coefficients was analyzed. These results indicate that this variation has noticeable impact on the atomic diffusivities. A reduction in the mobility of both Ni and Al is demonstrated with increasing Al content. As a result, examination of the pair interaction between atoms was carried out for the purpose of understanding the predicted trends.

  19. Influence of defects on excess charge carrier kinetics studied by transient PC and transient PA

    SciTech Connect

    Feist, H.; Kunst, M.; Swiatkowski, C.

    1997-07-01

    By comparison of transient photoconductivity (TPC) and transient photoinduced absorption (PA) the influence of the density of states in the bandgap on excess charge carrier kinetics is studied for a-Si:H films deposited at different temperatures and for state of the art a-Si:H films in two different states of light soaking. In both series the rising deep defect density leads to an enhancement of electron trapping rather than recombination via deep defects. The samples deposited at temperatures lower than 250 C additionally show a lower effective electron mobility, i.e., a broader conduction band tail.

  20. High temperature chemical kinetic study of the H2-CO-CO2-NO reaction system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jachimowski, C. J.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental study of the kinetics of the H2-CO-CO2-NO reaction system was made behind incident shock waves at temperatures of 2460 and 2950 K. The overall rate of the reaction was measured by monitoring radiation from the CO + O yields CO2 + h upoilon reaction. Correlation of these data with a detailed reaction mechanism showed that the high-temperature rate of the reaction N + OH yields NO + H can be described by the low-temperature (320 K) rate coefficient. Catalytic dissociation of molecular hydrogen was an important reaction under the tests conditions.

  1. Application of convergence acceleration to the reactor kinetic equations: A comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Picca, P.; Furfaro, R.; Ganapol, B. D.

    2013-07-01

    This presentation provides a comparison of two methodologies for the solution of reactor kinetic equations, namely for a standard finite difference and a semi-analytical approach. The above-mentioned methods are implemented in a convergence acceleration framework to enhance their efficiency and a comparative study is reported to verify whether it is more convenient to use a rudimentary but fast algorithm (finite difference) with respect to the more refined but computationally intense approach of the semi-analytical method. Performance on several test cases from the literature are compared. (authors)

  2. Nonlinear simplified model to study localization of kinetic Alfvén wave

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R. P. Gaur, Nidhi

    2014-04-15

    We have presented the numerical simulation of the coupled equations governing the dynamics of kinetic Alfvén wave (KAW) and ion acoustic wave in the intermediate β plasma, where β is the ratio of thermal pressure to the background magnetic pressure. We have also developed a simplified model for this nonlinear interaction using the results obtained from the simulation to understand the physics of nonlinear evolution of KAW. Localization of magnetic field intensity of KAW has been studied by means of the simplified model.

  3. Kinetic modeling and docking study of immobilized lipase catalyzed synthesis of furfuryl acetate.

    PubMed

    Mathpati, Ashwini C; Badgujar, Kirtikumar C; Bhanage, Bhalchandra M

    2016-03-01

    The present work deals with the kinetic modeling and docking study for the furfuryl acetate synthesis using immobilized Burkholderia cepacia (BCL) lipase. Initially various lipases were immobilized on hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC) and poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) base hybrid polymer matrix. After screening of various immobilized biocatalysts, HPMC:PVA:BCL was found to be a robust biocatalyst. Various reaction conditions were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM) based on a four-factor-three-level Box-Behnken design. The optimal conditions were obtained at molar ratio of 1:2 of furfuryl alcohol to acyl donor, temperature 50°C with catalyst loading of 30mg in 3mL of non-aqueous media toluene. Under these conditions 99.98% yield was obtained in 3h. The Arrhenius plot showed that the activation energy for furfuryl acetate synthesis was 10.68kcal/mol. The kinetics of reaction was studied close to optimized conditions which obey order bi-bi model. Molecular docking study was carried out to understand the active site of BCL which is responsible for the reaction. It was observed that the reaction proceeds via acylation of the active serine of BCL and demonstrating strong hydrogen bond between the substrate and histidine site. The catalyst recyclability study was carried up to five cycles. PMID:26827768

  4. Hydrous ferric oxide doped alginate beads for fluoride removal: Adsorption kinetics and equilibrium studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sujana, M. G.; Mishra, A.; Acharya, B. C.

    2013-04-01

    A new biopolymer beads, composite of hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) and alginate were synthesised, characterised and studied for its fluoride efficiency from water. The beads were characterised by chemical analysis, BET surface area, pHPZC and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The optimum conditions for fluoride removal were determined by studying operational variables viz. pH, contact time, initial F- concentration, bead dose and temperature. Presence of other anions like SO42-, PO43-, NO3-, Cl- and HCO3- effect on fluoride removal efficiency of prepared beads was also tested. The beads were 0.8-0.9 mm in size and contain 32-33% Fe (III) and showed specific surface area of 25.80 m2 g-1 and pHPZC of 5.15. Modified beads demonstrated Langmuir F- adsorption capacity of 8.90 mg g-1 at pH 7.0. The adsorption kinetics were best described by the pseudo-second order kinetic model followed by intra-particle diffusion as the rate determining step. It was found that about 80% of the adsorbed fluoride could be desorbed by using 0.05 M HCl. The FTIR, Raman and SEM-EDAX analysis were used to study the fluoride adsorption mechanisms on beads. Studies were also conducted to test the potential application of beads for F- removal from drinking water and the treated water quality.

  5. Defluoridation using biomimetically synthesized nano zirconium chitosan composite: kinetic and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Kumar Suranjit; Amin, Yesha; Selvaraj, Kaliaperumal

    2014-07-15

    The present study reports a novel approach for synthesis of Zr nanoparticles using aqueous extract of Aloe vera. Resulting nanoparticles were embedded into chitosan biopolymer and termed as CNZr composite. The composite was subjected to detailed adsorption studies for removal of fluoride from aqueous solution. The synthesized Zr nanoparticles showed UV-vis absorption peak at 420nm. TEM result showed the formation of polydispersed, nanoparticles ranging from 18nm to 42nm. SAED and XRD analysis suggested an fcc (face centered cubic) Zr crystallites. EDAX analysis suggested that Zr was an integral component of synthesized nanoparticles. FT-IR study indicated that functional group like NH, CO, CN and CC were involved in particle formation. The adsorption of fluoride on to CNZr composite worked well at pH 7.0, where ∼99% of fluoride was found to be adsorbed on adsorbent. Langmuir isotherm model best fitted the equilibrium data since it presented higher R(2) value than Freundlich model. In comparison to pseudo-first order kinetic model, the pseudo-second order model could explain adsorption kinetic behavior of F(-) onto CNZr composite satisfactorily with a good correlation coefficient. The present study revealed that CNZr composite may work as an effective tool for removal of fluoride from contaminated water. PMID:24887125

  6. Removal of ibuprofen, naproxen and carbamazepine in aqueous solution onto natural clay: equilibrium, kinetics, and thermodynamic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazri, Hassen; Ghorbel-Abid, Ibtissem; Kalfat, Rafik; Trabelsi-Ayadi, Malika

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to describe the adsorption of three pharmaceuticals compounds (ibuprofen, naproxen and carbamazepine) onto natural clay on the basis of equilibrium parameters such as a function of time, effect of pH, varying of the concentration and the temperature. Adsorption kinetic data were modeled using the Lagergren's first-order and the pseudo-second-order kinetic equations. The kinetic results of adsorption are described better using the pseudo-second order model. The isotherm results were tested in the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich models. The thermodynamic parameters obtained indicate that the adsorption of pharmaceuticals on the clay is a spontaneous and endothermic process.

  7. Kinetic and isotherm studies of adsorption and biosorption processes in the removal of phenolic compounds from aqueous solutions: comparative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The phenolic compounds are known by their carcinogenicity and high toxicity as well as creating unpleasant taste and odor in water resources. The present study develops a cost-effective technology for the treatment of water contaminated with phenolic compounds, including Phenol (Ph), 2-chlorophenol (2-CP), and 4-chlorophenol (4-CP). So, two sorbents, rice bran ash (RBA) and biomass of brown algae, Cystoseiraindica, were used and results were compared with the commercially granular activated carbon (GAC). The phenolic compounds were determined using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) under batch equilibrium conditions. The effects of contact time, pH, initial adsorbate concentration, and adsorbent dosages on the removal efficiency were studied. The adsorption data were simulated by isotherm and kinetic models. Results indicated that RBA and GAC had the lowest efficiency for the removal of 2-CP, while the order of removal efficiency for C. indica biomass was as follows: 2-CP > 4-CP > phenol. The efficiency of GAC was higher than those of other adsorbents for all of the phenolic compounds. Furthermore, the adsorption capacity of RBA was found to be higher than that of C. indica biomass. The optimal initial pH for the removal of phenol, 2-CP and 4-CP was determined to be 5, 7, and 7 for RBA, GAC, and algal biomass, respectively. Kinetic studies suggested that the pseudo-second order best fitted the kinetic data. PMID:24355013

  8. Photo-Darkening Kinetics and Structural Anisotropic Modifications in the Chalcogenide Glass Arsenic Trisulfide: a Study of Kinetic X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jay Min

    1990-08-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate the mechanisms involved with photo-induced atomic structural modifications in the chalcogenide glass As_2 S_3. This glass exhibits the reversible effects of photo-darkening followed by thermal bleaching. We observed the time behavior of photo-induced properties under the influence of linearly polarized band -gap light. In a macroscopic optical investigation, we monitor optical changes in the photo-darkening process, and in a local structural probe we study kinetic (or time -resolved dispersive) x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our observations center on kinetic phenomena and structural modifications induced by polarized excitation of lone-pair orbitals in the chalcogenide glass. Experimental results include the following observations: (i) The polarity of the optically induced anisotropy is critically dependent on the intensity and the polarization of the band-gap irradiation beam. (ii) The near edge peak height in x-ray absorption spectra shows subtle but sensitive change during the photo-darkening process. (iii) Photon intensity dependent dichroic kinetics reflect a connection between the optically probed macroscopic property and the x-ray probed local anisotropic structure. Analysis of the x-ray absorption results includes a computer simulation of the polarized absorption spectra. These results suggest that specific structural units tend to orient themselves with respect to the photon polarization. A substantial part of the analysis involves a major effort in dealing with the x-ray kinetic data manipulation and the experimental difficulties caused by a synchrotron instability problem. Based on our observations, we propose a possible mechanism for the observed photo-structural modifications. Through a model of computer relaxed photo-darkening kinetics, we support the notion that a twisting of a specific intermediate range order structure is responsible for local directional variations and global network distortions. In the

  9. LLNL Chemical Kinetics Modeling Group

    SciTech Connect

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

    2008-09-24

    The LLNL chemical kinetics modeling group has been responsible for much progress in the development of chemical kinetic models for practical fuels. The group began its work in the early 1970s, developing chemical kinetic models for methane, ethane, ethanol and halogenated inhibitors. Most recently, it has been developing chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, hexenes, and large methyl esters. These component models are needed to represent gasoline, diesel, jet, and oil-sand-derived fuels.

  10. Study on gas kinetic unified algorithm for flows from rarefied transition to continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Hui; Zhang, Han-Xin

    2004-01-01

    The modified BGK equation adapted to various flow regimes can be presented by the aid of the basic characteristics on molecular movement and collision approaching to equilibrium. The discrete velocity ordinate method is developed and applied to the velocity distribution function to remove its continuous dependency on the velocity space, and then the velocity distribution function equation is cast into hyperbolic conservation law form with nonlinear source terms. Based on the unsteady time-splitting method and the non-oscillatory, containing no free parameters, and dissipative (NND) scheme, the gas kinetic finite difference second-order scheme is constructed for the computation of the discrete velocity distribution functions. The mathematical model on the interaction of molecules with solid surface is studied and used in the numerical method. Four types of numerical quadrature rules, such as the modified Gauss-Hermite formula, the composite Newton-Cotes integration method, the Gauss-Legendre numerical quadrature rule, and the Golden Section number-theoretic integral method, are developed and applied to the discretized velocity space to evaluate the macroscopic flow parameters at each point in the physical space. As a result, a unified simplified gas kinetic algorithm is established for the flows from rarefied transition to continuum regime. Based on analyzing the inner parallel degree of the unified algorithm, the parallel strategy adapted to the gas kinetic numerical algorithm is studied, and then the HPF parallel processing software for the unified algorithm is developed. To test the present method, the one-dimensional shock-tube problems, the flows past two-dimensional circular cylinder, and the flows around three-dimensional sphere and spacecraft shape with various Knudsen numbers are simulated. The computational results are found in high resolution of the flow fields and good agreement with the theoretical, DSMC, N-S, and experimental results.

  11. Kinetic study of the inactivation of ascorbate peroxidase by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed Central

    Hiner, A N; Rodríguez-López, J N; Arnao, M B; Lloyd Raven, E; García-Cánovas, F; Acosta, M

    2000-01-01

    The activity of ascorbate peroxidase (APX) has been studied with H(2)O(2) and various reducing substrates. The activity decreased in the order pyrogallol>ascorbate>guaiacol>2, 2'-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS). The inactivation of APX with H(2)O(2) as the sole substrate was studied. The number of H(2)O(2) molecules required for maximal inactivation of the enzyme was determined as approx. 2.5. Enzymic activity of approx. 20% of the original remained at the end of the inactivation process (i.e. approx. 20% resistance) when ascorbate or ABTS was used as the substrate in activity assays. With pyrogallol or guaiacol no resistance was seen. Inactivation by H(2)O(2) followed over time with ascorbate or pyrogallol assays exhibited single-exponential decreases in enzymic activity. Hyperbolic saturation kinetics were observed in both assay systems; a similar dissociation constant (0.8 microM) for H(2)O(2) was obtained in each case. However, the maximum rate constant (lambda(max)) obtained from the plots differed depending on the assay substrate. The presence of reducing substrate in addition to H(2)O(2) partly or completely protected the enzyme from inactivation, depending on how many molar equivalents of reducing substrate were added. An oxygen electrode system has been used to confirm that APX does not exhibit a catalase-like oxygen-releasing reaction. A kinetic model was developed to interpret the experimental results; both the results and the model are compared and contrasted with previously obtained results for horseradish peroxidase C. The kinetic model has led us to the conclusion that the inactivation of APX by H(2)O(2) represents an unusual situation in which no enzyme turnover occurs but there is a partition of the enzyme between two forms, one inactive and the other with activity towards reducing substrates such as ascorbate and ABTS only. The partition ratio is less than 1. PMID:10816425

  12. Kinetic and equilibrium studies of porphyrin interactions with unilamellar lipidic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kuzelová, K; Brault, D

    1994-08-16

    The interaction of deuteroporphyrin with dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine unilamellar vesicles of various sizes (ranging from 38 to 222 nm) has been studied using a stopped flow with fluorescence detection. Beside the kinetics of porphyrin incorporation into vesicles, the transfer of porphyrin from vesicles to human serum albumin has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The effects of both vesicle and albumin concentrations indicate that the transfer proceeds through the aqueous phase. It is governed by the rate of incorporation of porphyrin into the outer vesicle hemileaflet (kon), by the exit to the bulk aqueous medium (koff), and by the association (kas) and dissociation (kdis) constants relative to albumin. In both systems studied, a slower transbilayer flip-flop accounts for the biphasic character of the kinetics. This model is strongly supported by the effects of vesicle size, temperature, and cholesterol. The dependence of kon on the vesicle size indicates that the incorporation is diffusion controlled. The constant koff is found to be closely coupled to the phase state of the bilayer. The transbilayer flip-flop rate constant is approximately the same in both directions (approximately 0.4 s-1 at 32 degrees C and pH 7.4). It is strongly affected by the presence of cholesterol in vesicles and by the temperature, with a sharp enhancement around the phase transition. With the exception of very small vesicles obtained by sonication, no influence of the vesicle size on the flip-flop rate was observed. An accelerating effect of tetrahydrofuran, used to improve the solubility of porphyrin, has been noted. Steady-state measurements and kinetics results were in excellent agreement. The interest of systems involving albumin as a scavenger to extract important rate constants, is emphasized. PMID:8068619

  13. Progressive Failure Studies of Composite Panels with and without Cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaunky, Navin; Ambur, Damodar R.; Davila, Carlos G.; Hilburger, Mark; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Progressive failure analyses results are presented for composite panels with and without a cutout and subjected to in-plane shear loading and compression loading well into their postbuckling regime. Ply damage modes such as matrix cracking, fiber-matrix shear, and fiber failure are modeled by degrading the material properties. Results from finite element analyses are compared with experimental data. Good agreement between experimental data and numerical results are observed for most structural configurations when initial geometric imperfections are appropriately modeled.

  14. Kinetic characterisation and thermal inactivation study of red alga (Mastocarpus stellatus) peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Fortea, M I; López-Miranda, S; Serrano-Martínez, A; Hernández-Sánchez, P; Zafrilla, M P; Martínez-Cachá, A; Núñez-Delicado, E

    2011-08-01

    Peroxidase (POD) was extracted from red alga (Mastocarpus stellatus) using Triton X-114 and characterised by UV-spectrophotometry. Optimum activity using 2,2´-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazolinesulphonic acid) (ABTS) as the H-donor was obtained at pH 5.0. In the presence of the anionic detergent, sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), however, POD was inactivated at all the pH values studied and totally inactivated at 1mM SDS. When the enzyme was kinetically characterised, the KM and Vm values for ABTS were found to be 13mM and 40μM/min, respectively. In addition, when the H2O2 concentration was increased, at a fixed concentration of ABTS, the activity was inhibited at the highest H2O2 concentrations. In a study of the effect of several reducing agents, l-cysteine was found to be the most active. A thermal inactivation study showed a first-order inactivation kinetic, and the Arrhenius plot yielded a straight line with a slope equivalent to an activation energy of 121.6kJ/mol. Significant inactivation occurred at temperatures of>35°C, with>90% of the relative activity being lost after only 5min of incubation at 48.4°C. PMID:25214100

  15. Study of the photodegradation kinetics and pathways of hexaflumuron in liquid media.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chengying; Yin, Xing; Liu, Xiaofeng; Wang, Minghua

    2014-01-01

    Hexaflumuron, one of the benzoylphenylurea insect growth regulators, can be leached into surface water and thus having a potential impact on aquatic organisms. In this study, the photodegradation processes of hexaflumuron under high-pressure mercury lamp irradiation were assessed. The photodegradation kinetics were studied, as were the effects of pH, different light sources, organic solvents and environmental substances, including nitrate ions (NO3(-)), nitrite ions (NO2(-)), ferrous ions (Fe(2+)), ferric ions (Fe(3+)), humic acid, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Three photodegradation products in methanol were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In general, the degradation of hexaflumuron followed first-order kinetics. In the four media studied, the photodegradation rate order was n-hexane > methanol > ultrapure water > acetone. Faster degradation was observed under high-pressure mercury lamp irradiation than under xenon lamp irradiation. The pH had a considerable effect, with the most rapid degradation occurring at pH 5.0. The photodegradation rate of hexaflumuron was promoted in the presence of NO3(-), NO2(-), Fe(2+), humic acid, SDS and H2O2, but inhibited by Fe(3+). Moreover, the presumed photodegradation pathway was proposed to be the cleavage of the urea linkage. PMID:25039252

  16. Studying the unfolding kinetics of proteins under pressure using long molecular dynamic simulation runs.

    PubMed

    Chara, Osvaldo; Grigera, José Raúl; McCarthy, Andrés N

    2007-12-01

    The usefulness of computational methods such as molecular dynamics simulation has been extensively established for studying systems in equilibrium. Nevertheless, its application to complex non-equilibrium biological processes such as protein unfolding has been generally regarded as producing results which cannot be interpreted straightforwardly. In the present study, we present results for the kinetics of unfolding of apomyoglobin, based on the analysis of long simulation runs of this protein in solution at 3 kbar (1 atm = 1.01325, bar = 101,325 Pa). We hereby demonstrate that the analysis of the data collected within a simulated time span of 0.18 mus suffices for producing results, which coincide remarkably with the available unfolding kinetics experimental data. This not only validates molecular dynamics simulation as a valuable alternative for studying non-equilibrium processes, but also enables a detailed analysis of the actual structural mechanism which underlies the unfolding process of proteins under elusive denaturing conditions such as high pressure. PMID:19669536

  17. A kinetic model based on experimental study of structural evolution of natural carbonaceous material to graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Yoshino, T.; Satish-Kumar, M.

    2015-12-01

    We report here new experimental kinetic data on the structural evolution of carbonaceous materials (CM) to graphite in a wide range of temperature conditions (1000 and 1450 °C) and treatment time (10 min to 115 hrs) under a pressure condition of 1GPa. The morphologies and crystallinities of natural CM, extracted from sediments in the Shimanto accretionary complex and Hidaka metamorphic belt, transformed to fully ordered graphite with increasing temperature and annealing duration. The time-temperature relations of each crystal parameter obtained using XRD analysis and micro-Raman spectroscopy demonstrated sigmoidal transformations from amorphous to graphitic structure, suggesting the complexity of chemical reactions undergoing during graphitization. To assess these kinetic processes, the results were analyzed using a superposition method in which the crystal parameters were superposed to reference temperature with non-linear regression curves. The master curves fitted by sigmoidal and power functions exhibited very good correlation coefficients of 0.940 to 0.991, suggesting the Arrhenian relation between temperature and time. On the basis of master curves and shift values, we obtained the effective activation energies of 274 +/- 9 kJmol-1 and 339 +/- 6 kJmol-1 for two different natural CM. When compared with the previous studies, our data gave remarkably low activation energies for natural graphitization, which can be represented in a time-temperature relation. In addition, the sigmoidal functions obtained from time-temperature relations can be extrapolated for low temperature condition at 1GPa. Our kinetic model predicts that if the CM underwent metamorphism for about one million years, it begins to crystallize at ≈ 420 °C and transform to fully ordered graphite at over ≈ 510 °C. Thus, natural graphitization could be discussed by the laboratory experiments using natural precursor materials under realistic pressure condition and time span in the Earth's crust.

  18. Advances in Studies of Electrode Kinetics and Mass Transport in AMTEC Cells (abstract)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; Kisor, A.; O'Connor, D.; Kikkert, S.

    1993-01-01

    Previous work reported from JPL has included characterization of electrode kinetics and alkali atom transport from electrodes including Mo, W, WRh(sub x), WPt(sub x)(Mn), in sodium AMTEC cells and vapor exposure cells, and Mo in potassium vapor exposure cells. These studies were generally performed in cells with small area electrodes (about 1 to 5 cm(sup 2)), and device geometry had little effect on transport. Alkali diffusion coefficients through these electrodes have been characterized, and approximate surface diffusion coefficients derived in cases of activated transport. A basic model of electrode kinetic at the alkali metal vapor/porous metal electrode/alkali beta'-alumina solid electrolyte three phase boundary has been proposed which accounts for electrochemical reaction rates with a collision frequency near the three phase boundary and tunneling from the porous electrode partially covered with adsorbed alkali metal atoms. The small electrode effect in AMTEC cells has been discussed in several papers, but quantitative investigations have described only the overall effect and the important contribution of electrolyte resistance. The quantitative characterization of transport losses in cells with large area electrodes has been limited to simulations of large area electrode effects, or characterization of transport losses from large area electrodes with significant longitudinal temperature gradients. This paper describes new investigations of electrochemical kinetics and transport, particularily with WPt(sub 3.5) electrodes, including the influence of electrode size on the mass transport loss in the AMTEC cell. These electrodes possess excellent sodium transport properties making verification of device limitations on transport much more readily attained.

  19. Crystallographic, kinetic, and spectroscopic study of the first ligninolytic peroxidase presenting a catalytic tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Miki, Yuta; Calviño, Fabiola R; Pogni, Rebecca; Giansanti, Stefania; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; Martínez, María Jesús; Basosi, Riccardo; Romero, Antonio; Martínez, Angel T

    2011-04-29

    Trametes cervina lignin peroxidase (LiP) is a unique enzyme lacking the catalytic tryptophan strictly conserved in all other LiPs and versatile peroxidases (more than 30 sequences available). Recombinant T. cervina LiP and site-directed variants were investigated by crystallographic, kinetic, and spectroscopic techniques. The crystal structure shows three substrate oxidation site candidates involving His-170, Asp-146, and Tyr-181. Steady-state kinetics for oxidation of veratryl alcohol (the typical LiP substrate) by variants at the above three residues reveals a crucial role of Tyr-181 in LiP activity. Moreover, assays with ferrocytochrome c show that its ability to oxidize large molecules (a requisite property for oxidation of the lignin polymer) originates in Tyr-181. This residue is also involved in the oxidation of 1,4-dimethoxybenzene, a reaction initiated by the one-electron abstraction with formation of substrate cation radical, as described for the well known Phanerochaete chrysosporium LiP. Detailed spectroscopic and kinetic investigations, including low temperature EPR, show that the porphyrin radical in the two-electron activated T. cervina LiP is unstable and rapidly receives one electron from Tyr-181, forming a catalytic protein radical, which is identified as an H-bonded neutral tyrosyl radical. The crystal structure reveals a partially exposed location of Tyr-181, compatible with its catalytic role, and several neighbor residues probably contributing to catalysis: (i) by enabling substrate recognition by aromatic interactions; (ii) by acting as proton acceptor/donor from Tyr-181 or H-bonding the radical form; and (iii) by providing the acidic environment that would facilitate oxidation. This is the first structure-function study of the only ligninolytic peroxidase described to date that has a catalytic tyrosine. PMID:21367853

  20. Polymer conformations of gas-hydrate kinetic inhibitors: A small-angle neutron scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, H. E.; Hutter, Jeffrey L.; Lin, Min Y.; Sun, Thomas

    2000-02-01

    We have used small-angle neutron scattering to characterize the polymer conformations of four nonionic water soluble polymers: poly(ethylene oxide), poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrollidone), poly(N-vinyl-2-caprolactam), and an N-methyl, N-vinylacetamide/N-vinyl-2-caprolactam copolymer. The last three of these are able to kinetically suppress hydrate crystallization, and their inhibitor activity ranges from moderate to very effective. This attribute is of significant commercial importance to the oil and gas industry, but the mechanism of the activity is unknown. The dilute-solution polymer conformation in a hydrate-forming tetrahydrofuran/water fluid shows little difference among the four polymers: the majority of the scattering is that expected for a polymer in a good solvent. Each solution also exhibits some additional low-q scattering which we attribute to aggregates. In the presence of a hydrate-crystal/liquid slurry, the three inhibitor polymers significantly change their conformation. Utilizing results from our previous contrast variation study, we show that this arises from polymer adsorbed to the hydrate-crystal surface. Furthermore, we find a strong correlation between the scattering intensity at low q values and the effectiveness of the inhibitor polymer. We suggest this is an indication that as surface adsorption increases, the inhibitor's blocking of growth sites increases. Also measured for one of the kinetic-inhibitor polymers was the dilute-solution polymer conformation in a hydrate-forming propane/water fluid (hydrate crystal free). This system shows additional low-q scattering, possibly indicating a polymer-propane interaction prior to crystal formation. This may affect hydrate nucleation behavior and offer a second mechanism for kinetic hydrate inhibition.

  1. Study of the Reaction Stages and Kinetics of the Europium Oxide Carbochlorination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomiro, Federico J.; Fouga, Gastón G.; Gaviría, Juan P.; Bohé, Ana E.

    2015-02-01

    The europium oxide (Eu2O3(s)) chlorination reaction with sucrose carbon was studied by thermogravimetry between room temperature and 1223 K (950 °C). The nonisothermal thermogravimetry showed that the reaction consists of three stages, and their stoichiometries were studied. The product of the first stage was europium oxychloride, and it showed independence of the reaction kinetics with the carbon content. Subsequently, in the second stage, the EuOCl(s) was carbochlorinated with formation of EuCl3(l) and its evaporation is observed in the third stage. The analysis by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of gaseous species showed that the reaction at second stage occurs with the formation of CO2(g) and CO(g). Both reactants and products were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. The influence of carbon content, total flow rate, sample initial mass, chlorine partial pressure, and temperature were evaluated. The second stage kinetics was analyzed, which showed an anomalous behavior caused by generation of chlorine radicals during interaction of Cl2(g) and carbon. It was found that the reaction rate at 933 K (660 °C) was proportional to a potential function of the chlorine partial pressure whose exponent is 0.56. The conversion curves were analyzed with the Avrami-Erofeev model and it was obtained an activation energy of 154 ± 5 kJ mol-1.

  2. Preliminary study: kinetics of oil extraction from sandalwood by microwave-assisted hydrodistillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusuma, H. S.; Mahfud, M.

    2016-04-01

    Sandalwood and its oil, is one of the oldest known perfume materials and has a long history (more than 4000 years) of use as mentioned in Sanskrit manuscripts. Sandalwood oil plays an important role as an export commodity in many countries and its widely used in the food, perfumery and pharmaceuticals industries. The aim of this study is to know and verify the kinetics and mechanism of microwave-assisted hydrodistillation of sandalwood based on a second-order model. In this study, microwave-assisted hydrodistillation is used to extract essential oils from sandalwood. The extraction was carried out in ten extraction cycles of 15 min to 2.5 hours. The initial extraction rate, the extraction capacity and the second-order extraction rate constant were calculated using the model. Kinetics of oil extraction from sandalwood by microwave-assisted hydrodistillation proved that the extraction process was based on the second-order extraction model as the experimentally done in three different steps. The initial extraction rate, h, was 0.0232 g L-1 min-1, the extraction capacity, C S, was 0.6015 g L-1, the second-order extraction rate constant, k, was 0.0642 L g-1 min-1 and coefficient of determination, R 2, was 0.9597.

  3. Crystallization kinetics and molecular mobility of an amorphous active pharmaceutical ingredient: A case study with Biclotymol.

    PubMed

    Schammé, Benjamin; Couvrat, Nicolas; Malpeli, Pascal; Delbreilh, Laurent; Dupray, Valérie; Dargent, Éric; Coquerel, Gérard

    2015-07-25

    The present case study focuses on the crystallization kinetics and molecular mobility of an amorphous mouth and throat drug namely Biclotymol, through differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), temperature resolved X-ray powder diffraction (TR-XRPD) and hot stage microscopy (HSM). Kinetics of crystallization above the glass transition through isothermal and non-isothermal cold crystallization were considered. Avrami model was used for isothermal crystallization process. Non-isothermal cold crystallization was investigated through Augis and Bennett model. Differences between crystallization processes have been ascribed to a site-saturated nucleation mechanism of the metastable form, confirmed by optical microscopy images. Regarding molecular mobility, a feature of molecular dynamics in glass-forming liquids as thermodynamic fragility index m was determined through calorimetric measurements. It turned out to be around m=100, describing Biclotymol as a fragile glass-former for Angell's classification. Relatively long-term stability of amorphous Biclotymol above Tg was analyzed indirectly by calorimetric monitoring to evaluate thermodynamic parameters and crystallization behavior of glassy Biclotymol. Within eight months of storage above Tg (T=Tg+2°C), amorphous Biclotymol does not show a strong inclination to crystallize and forms a relatively stable glass. This case study, involving a multidisciplinary approach, points out the importance of continuing looking for stability predictors. PMID:26003417

  4. Flow-tube kinetics study of the reaction between ground-state hydrogen atoms and nitromethane

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Taeho; Flaherty, W.F.; Fontijn, A. )

    1991-09-05

    The kinetics of the H + CH{sub 3}NO{sub 2} reaction have been studied by using a discharge-flow resonance-fluorescence technique. H atoms are produced from microwave discharges through NH{sub 3}Ar mixtures. The data in the 360-570 K range are well fitted by the empirical expression k(T) = 7.8 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} exp(-1878K/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. Precision of the data varies from {plus minus} 6 to {plus minus} 11%, and the resulting accuracy is estimated to be better than {+-} 20%, where both figures represent 2{sigma} statistical confidence intervals. Results of some experiments where h{sub 2} was discharged indicate that the channel leading to OH and CH{sub 3}NO is significant for the reaction. A comparison of the kinetics of several reactions where a methyl-group hydrogen is abstracted by H atoms indicates that such a channel is not important in the present work but could become significant at elevated temperatures. To confirm the accuracy achieved with the present apparatus, measurements on the H + C{sub 6}H{sub 6} reaction have been made in the 410-530 K range and are compared to results from other studies.

  5. Kinetic and equilibrium studies of adsorptive removal of phenol onto eggshell waste.

    PubMed

    Daraei, H; Mittal, A; Noorisepehr, M; Daraei, F

    2013-07-01

    The aim of the present research is to develop economic, fast, and versatile method for the removal of toxic organic pollutant phenol from wastewater using eggshell. The batch experiments are conducted to evaluate the effect of pH, phenol concentration, dosage of adsorbent, and contact time on the removal of phenol. The paper includes in-depth kinetic studies of the ongoing adsorption process. Attempts have also been made to verify Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms. The morphology and characteristics of eggshell have also been studied using scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray fluorescence analysis. At ambient temperature, the maximum adsorption of phenol onto eggshells has been achieved at pH 9 and the contact time, 90 min. The experimental data give best-fitted straight lines for pseudo-first-order as well as pseudo-second-order kinetic models. Furthermore, the adsorption process verifies Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption isotherms, and on the basis of mathematical expressions of these models, various necessary adsorption constants have been calculated. Using adsorption data, various thermodynamic parameters like change in enthalpy (∆H(0)), change in entropy (∆S(0)), and change in free energy ∆G(0) have also been evaluated. Results clearly reveal that the solid waste material eggshell acts as an effective adsorbent for the removal of phenol from aqueous solutions. PMID:23274804

  6. On the applicability of the standard kinetic theory to the study of nanoplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angola, A.; Boella, E.; Coppa, G.

    2014-08-01

    Kinetic theory applies to systems with a large number of particles, while nanoplasma generated by the interaction of ultra-short laser pulses with atomic clusters are systems composed by a relatively small number (102 ÷ 104) of electrons and ions. In the paper, the applicability of the kinetic theory for studying nanoplasmas is discussed. In particular, two typical phenomena are investigated: the collisionless expansion of electrons in a spherical nanoplasma with immobile ions and the formation of shock shells during Coulomb explosions. The analysis, which is carried out comparing ensemble averages obtained by solving the exact equations of motion with reference solutions of the Vlasov-Poisson model, shows that for the dynamics of the electrons the error of the usually employed models is of the order of few percents (but the standard deviation in a single experiment can be of the order of 10%). Instead, special care must be taken in the study of shock formation, as the discrete structure of the electric charge can destroy or strongly modify the phenomenon.

  7. Optimization and kinetic studies on algal oil extraction from marine macroalgae Ulva lactuca.

    PubMed

    Suganya, Tamilarasan; Renganathan, Sahadevan

    2012-03-01

    In this present investigation, kinetic studies on oil extraction were performed in marine macroalgae Ulva lactuca. The algal biomass was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and Fourier Transform-Infra Red Spectroscopy. Six different pre-treatment methods were carried out to evaluate the best method for maximum oil extraction. Optimization of extraction parameters were performed and high oil yield was obtained at 5% moisture content, 0.12 mm particle size, 500 rpm stirrer speed, 55°C temperature, 140 min time and solvent-to-solid ratio as 6:1 with 1% diethyl-ether and 10% methylene chloride in n-hexane solvent mixture. After optimization, 10.88% (g/g) of oil extraction yield was achieved from 30 g of algal biomass. The rate constant was obtained for the first order kinetic study by differential method. The activation energy (Ea) was calculated as 63.031 kJ/mol. From the results obtained in the investigation, U. lactuca biomass was proved to be a suitable source for the biodiesel production. PMID:22209436

  8. Interactions of vinca alkaloid subunits with chiral amido[4]resorcinarenes: a dynamic, kinetic, and spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Botta, Bruno; Fraschetti, Caterina; Novara, Francesca R; Tafi, Andrea; Sacco, Fabiola; Mannina, Luisa; Sobolev, Anatoli P; Mattay, Jochen; Letzel, Matthias C; Speranza, Maurizio

    2009-05-01

    The stereoselectivity of the reaction between (R)-(-)-2-butylamine and the diastereomeric proton-bound complexes of (+)-catharanthine (C) or (-)-vindoline (V) with some chiral amido[4]resorcinarenes has been investigated in the gas phase by ESI-FT-ICR-MS. The reaction stereoselectivity (0.56 < k(homo)/k(hetero) < 16.9) is found to depend critically on the functional groups present in the chiral pendants of the hosts. Rationalisation of the kinetic results is based on careful computational and spectroscopic studies of the most stable conformations of (+)-catharanthine and its protonated form in the isolated state and in water, as well as in a representative host structure. The emerging picture points to the relevant diastereomeric proton-bound complexes as quasi-degenerate, thus suggesting that their stereoselectivity in the guest exchange reaction is mostly due to kinetic factors. The results of this study may represent a starting point for a deeper comprehension of the intrinsic factors that endow these molecules, and their dimeric forms, with their biochemical properties. PMID:19590774

  9. Applications of SXPS for studying surface structure, reaction mechanisms and kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, D.R.; Huntley, D.R.; Overbury, S.H.

    1994-12-31

    Soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (SXPS) from the S 2p core level has been used to study adsorbate induced reconstruction, identify reaction intermediates and study reaction kinetics on the Ni(111) surface. The S 2p binding energy is affected by the nature of the surface adsorption site. It has been determined from the number of S 2p states and their relative binding energies that adsorbed S induces a reconstruction of the Ni(111) surface and that the S adsorbs in fourfold sites on terraces and in troughs. S 2p SXPS has also been used to identify adsorbed species during the thermal decomposition of methanethiol on Ni(111). CH{sub 3}SH adsorbs as CH{sub 3}S{minus} at low temperatures. Above 200 K, the CH{sub 3}S{minus} changes adsorption site and the C-S bond begins to cleave. The relative concentrations of CH{sub 3}S{minus} in the two different sites and of atomic S have been monitored as a function of temperature and initial coverage. As a result of the sensitivity and resolution available in SXPS, reaction rates and kinetic parameters have been obtained for the decomposition of benzenethiol on Ni(111) by monitoring the changes in the surface composition continuously as a function of temperature and time.

  10. Adsorption kinetics and equilibrium study of nitrogen species onto radiata pine (Pinus radiata) sawdust.

    PubMed

    Harmayani, Kadek D; Faisal Anwar, A H M

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen species (NH3-N, NO3-N, and NO2-N) are found as one of the major dissolved constituents in wastewater or stormwater runoff. In this research, laboratory experiments were conducted to remove these pollutants from the water environment using radiata pine (Pinus radiata) sawdust. A series of batch tests was conducted by varying initial concentration, dosage, particle size, pH, and contact time to check the removal performance. Test results confirmed the effectiveness of radiata pine sawdust for removing these contaminants from the aqueous phase (100% removal of NO3-N, and NO2-N; 55% removal of NH3-N). The adsorbent dosage and initial concentration showed a significantly greater effect on the removal process over pH or particle sizes. The optimum dosage for contaminant removal on a laboratory scale was found to be 12 g. Next, the adsorption kinetics were studied using intraparticle diffusion, liquid-film diffusion, and a pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order model. The adsorption of all species followed a pseudo-second order model but NO2-N adsorption followed both models. In addition, the kinetics of NO2-N adsorption showed two-step adsorption following intraparticle diffusion and liquid-film diffusion. The isotherm study showed that NO3-N and NO2-N adsorption fitted slightly better with the Freundlich model but that NH3-N adsorption followed both Freundlich and Langmuir models. PMID:27438245

  11. Adsorption kinetics of phosphate and arsenate on goethite. A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Luengo, Carina; Brigante, Maximiliano; Avena, Marcelo

    2007-07-15

    The adsorption kinetics of phosphate and arsenate on goethite is studied and compared. Batch adsorption experiments were performed at different adsorbate concentrations, pH, temperatures and stirring rates. For both oxoanions the adsorption rate increases by increasing adsorbate concentration, decreasing pH and increasing temperature. It does not change by changing stirring rate. The adsorption takes place in two processes: a fast one that takes place in less than 5 min and a slow one that takes place in several hours or more. The rate of the slow process does not depend directly on the concentration of phosphate or arsenate in solution, but depends linearly on the amount of phosphate or arsenate that was adsorbed during the fast process. Apparent activation energies and absence of stirring rate effects suggest that the slow process is controlled by diffusion into pores, although the evidence is not conclusive. The similarities in the adsorption kinetics of phosphate and arsenate are quantitatively shown by using a three-parameters equation that takes into account both the fast and the slow processes. These similarities are in line with the similar reactivity that phosphate and arsenate have in general and may be important for theoretical and experimental studies of the fate of these oxoanions in the environment. PMID:17448491

  12. A Kinetic Study of Indium Leaching from Indium-Bearing Zinc Ferrite Under Microwave Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Linye; Mo, Jiamei; Li, Xuanhai; Pan, Liuping; Liang, Xinyuan; Wei, Guangtao

    2013-12-01

    To obtain information about leaching reaction and kinetics of indium from indium-bearing materials under microwave heating (MH), leaching of indium from indium-bearing zinc ferrite (IBZF) has been investigated. IBZF samples under MH and under conventional heating (CH) were studied by X-ray diffraction and specific surface area. Compared with that of CH, the effect of MH and the effects of various control parameters on indium leaching were studied. The results showed that compared with CH, MH enhanced the indium leaching from IBZF and increased the leaching rate. The leaching behavior of indium from IBZF was analyzed by unreacted shrinking core model, and the regression of kinetic equations showed that leaching of indium from IBZF obeyed the model very well. The activation energies under MH and under CH were 77.374 kJ/mol and 53.555 kJ/mol, respectively; the ratio of frequency factor K 0(MH)/ K 0(CH) was 10,818.36. The activation mechanism involved in leaching of indium under MH was mainly the increase of reactant energy and effective collision, which caused by the thermal and nonthermal microwave effect. Compared with the activation energy, the effective collision played a more important role in the acceleration of leaching of indium.

  13. Kinetics studies with fruit bromelain (Ananas comosus) in the presence of cysteine and divalent ions.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Tajwinder; Kaur, Amandeep; Grewal, Ravneet K

    2015-09-01

    The kinetics of cysteine and divalent ion modulation viz. Ca(2+), Cu(2+), Hg(2+) of fruit bromelain (EC 3.4.22.33) have been investigated in the present study. Kinetic studies revealed that at pH 4.5, cysteine induced V-type activation of bromelain catalyzed gelatin hydrolysis. At pH 3.5, Ca(2+) inhibited the enzyme noncompetitively, whereas, both K-and V-type activations of bromelain were observed in the presence of 0.5 mM Ca(2+) at pH 4.5 and 7.5. Bromelain was inhibited competitively at 0.6 mM Cu(2+) ions at pH 3.5, which changed to an uncompetitive inhibition at pH 4.5 and 7.5. An un-competitive inhibition of bromelain catalyzed gelatin hydrolysis was observed in the presence of 0.6 mM Hg(2+) at pH 3.5 and 4.5. These findings suggest that divalent ions modulation of fruit bromelain is pH dependent. PMID:26345013

  14. Hydrolysis of Sulfur Dioxide in Small Clusters of Sulfuric Acid: Mechanistic and Kinetic Study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingjing; Fang, Sheng; Wang, Zhixiu; Yi, Wencai; Tao, Fu-Ming; Liu, Jing-Yao

    2015-11-17

    The deposition and hydrolysis reaction of SO2 + H2O in small clusters of sulfuric acid and water are studied by theoretical calculations of the molecular clusters SO2-(H2SO4)n-(H2O)m (m = 1,2; n = 1,2). Sulfuric acid exhibits a dramatic catalytic effect on the hydrolysis reaction of SO2 as it lowers the energy barrier by over 20 kcal/mol. The reaction with monohydrated sulfuric acid (SO2 + H2O + H2SO4 - H2O) has the lowest energy barrier of 3.83 kcal/mol, in which the cluster H2SO4-(H2O)2 forms initially at the entrance channel. The energy barriers for the three hydrolysis reactions are in the order SO2 + (H2SO4)-H2O > SO2 + (H2SO4)2-H2O > SO2 + H2SO4-H2O. Furthermore, sulfurous acid is more strongly bonded to the hydrated sulfuric acid (or dimer) clusters than the corresponding reactant (monohydrated SO2). Consequently, sulfuric acid promotes the hydrolysis of SO2 both kinetically and thermodynamically. Kinetics simulations have been performed to study the importance of these reactions in the reduction of atmospheric SO2. The results will give a new insight on how the pre-existing aerosols catalyze the hydrolysis of SO2, leading to the formation and growth of new particles. PMID:26450714

  15. Chemical kinetic studies of atmospheric reactions using tunable diode laser spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worsnop, Douglas R.; Nelson, David D.; Zahniser, Mark S.

    1993-01-01

    IR absorption using tunable diode laser spectroscopy provides a sensitive and quantitative detection method for laboratory kinetic studies of atmospheric trace gases. Improvements in multipass cell design, real time signal processing, and computer controlled data acquisition and analysis have extended the applicability of the technique. We have developed several optical systems using off-axis resonator mirror designs which maximize path length while minimizing both the sample volume and the interference fringes inherent in conventional 'White' cells. Computerized signal processing using rapid scan (300 kHz), sweep integration with 100 percent duty cycle allows substantial noise reduction while retaining the advantages of using direct absorption for absolute absorbance measurements and simultaneous detection of multiple species. Peak heights and areas are determined by curve fitting using nonlinear least square methods. We have applied these techniques to measurements of: (1) heterogeneous uptake chemistry of atmospheric trace gases (HCl, H2O2, and N2O5) on aqueous and sulfuric acid droplets; (2) vapor pressure measurements of nitric acid and water over prototypical stratospheric aerosol (nitric acid trihydrate) surfaces; and (3) discharge flow tube kinetic studies of the HO2 radical using isotopic labeling for product channel and mechanistic analysis. Results from each of these areas demonstrate the versatility of TDL absorption spectroscopy for atmospheric chemistry applications.

  16. On the applicability of the standard kinetic theory to the study of nanoplasmas

    SciTech Connect

    D'Angola, A.; Boella, E.

    2014-08-15

    Kinetic theory applies to systems with a large number of particles, while nanoplasma generated by the interaction of ultra–short laser pulses with atomic clusters are systems composed by a relatively small number (10{sup 2} ÷ 10{sup 4}) of electrons and ions. In the paper, the applicability of the kinetic theory for studying nanoplasmas is discussed. In particular, two typical phenomena are investigated: the collisionless expansion of electrons in a spherical nanoplasma with immobile ions and the formation of shock shells during Coulomb explosions. The analysis, which is carried out comparing ensemble averages obtained by solving the exact equations of motion with reference solutions of the Vlasov-Poisson model, shows that for the dynamics of the electrons the error of the usually employed models is of the order of few percents (but the standard deviation in a single experiment can be of the order of 10%). Instead, special care must be taken in the study of shock formation, as the discrete structure of the electric charge can destroy or strongly modify the phenomenon.

  17. Biosorption of Malachite Green from aqueous solutions onto aerobic granules: kinetic and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xue-Fei; Wang, Shu-Guang; Liu, Xian-Wei; Gong, Wen-Xin; Bao, Nan; Gao, Bao-Yu; Zhang, Hua-Yong

    2008-06-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to study the biosorption characteristics of a cationic dye, Malachite Green (MG), onto aerobic granules. Effects of pH, aerobic granule dosage, contact time and solution temperature on MG biosorption by aerobic granules were evaluated. Simultaneity the thermodynamic analysis was also performed. The results showed that alkaline pH was favorable for the biosorption of MG and chemisorption seemed to play a major role in the biosorption process. Kinetic studies indicate that MG biosorption on aerobic granules in the system follows the pseudo-second order kinetics. The equilibrium time was 60 min for both 50 and 60 mg/L and 120 min for both 70 and 80 mg/L MG concentrations, respectively. Moreover, the experimental equilibrium data have been analyzed using the linearized forms of Langmuir, Freundlich, and Redlich-Peterson isotherms and the Langmuir isotherm was found to provide the best theoretical correlation of the experimental data for the biosorption of MG. The monolayer biosorption (saturation) capacities were determined to be 56.8 mg of MG per gram of aerobic granules at 30 degrees C. Thermodynamic analysis show that biosorption follows an endothermic path of the positive value of Delta H( composite function) and spontaneous with negative value of Delta G( composite function). PMID:17855080

  18. Experimental Studies of the Growth Kinetics of Methane Clathrate Hydrates & Superfluid Hydrodynamics on the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botimer, Jeffrey David

    This thesis details the experimental findings of three distinct research projects. The first studies the growth kinetics of methane clathrate hydrates grown under the influence of multiple factors including surfactants, porous media, substrate wetting properties, and salt content. The second investigates the flow behaviors of superfluid helium through single, high aspect ratio nanopipes. The third models the frequency response of a quartz tuning fork in high pressure normal and superfluid helium and demonstrates how quartz tuning forks can be used as cheap, small, in situ, cryogenic pressure gauges. The first project reports studies of the kinetics of growth of methane hydrates from liquid water containing small amounts of surfactant (<500 ppm of sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS). The kinetics are monitored using simultaneous measurements of the uptake of methane detected by a pressure drop in the gas phase, and either visual observations of the amount of liquid water and solid phase in the reaction vessel, or in situ micro-Raman measurements or in situ NMR measurements. These diagnostics show that the uptake of methane and the conversion of liquid water to a solid phase do not occur simultaneously; the uptake of gas always lags the visual and spectroscopic signatures of the disappearance of liquid water and the formation of solid. The evidence suggests that the SDS causes water to form an intermediate immobile solid-like state before combining with the methane to form hydrate. The growth mechanism is related to the surfactant and disappears for low SDS concentrations (<25 ppm). Also reported are studies of the growth rates of methane hydrates as a function of substrate wetting properties, driving force, and growth media. The second project studies pressure driven flow of superfluid helium through single high aspect ratio glass nanopipes into a vacuum has been studied for a wide range of pressure drop (0--30 atm), reservoir temperature (0.8--2.5K), pipe lengths (1-30mm

  19. Progressive Failure Studies of Composite Panels With and Without Cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; Jaunky, Navin; Davila, Carlos G.; Hilburger, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Progressive failure analyses results are presented for composite panels with and without a cutout and are subjected to in-plane shear loading and compression loading well into their post-buckling regime. Ply damage modes such as matrix cracking, fiber-matrix shear, and fiber failure are modeled by degrading the material properties. Results from finite element analyses are compared with experimental data. Good agreement between experimental data and numerical results are observed for most structural configurations when initial geometric imperfections are appropriately modeled.

  20. Hydrogen micro-kinetics in titanium under mechanical stress studied by ion beam analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T. S.; Lv, H. Y.; Grambole, D.; Yang, Z.; Peng, H. B.; Han, Y. C.

    2009-04-01

    Hydrogen (H) is continuously produced by the large dose fast neutron irradiation on fusion reactor material. The concentration, diffusion and evolution of H in the structure material may cause H-embrittlement. Ion beam analysis is one of the most useful methods for studying the micro-kinetics of H in solids. In this work, the H-distribution in titanium (Ti) has been studied by resonance nuclear reaction analysis (resonance-NRA) and micro-elastic recoil detection analysis (micro-ERDA). The evolution of H-depth-profile in titanium samples has been studied versus the change of normal stress. Evident H diffusion has been observed, while a normal stress is changed in the range of 107-963 MPa. The H diffusion is related to the concentration of H in samples.

  1. Internal friction study of decomposition kinetics of SAF 2507 type duplex stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Smuk, O.; Smuk, S.; Hanninen, H.; Jagodzinski, Yu.; Tarasenko, O.

    1999-01-08

    During the last decade, super duplex stainless steels (DSSs) with increased nitrogen content have been an object of intensive studies. Present work is devoted to the study of the peculiarities of {delta}-ferrite decomposition in SAF 2507 type duplex steel, and redistribution of nitrogen between ferrite and austenite phases in a wide temperature range by means of internal fraction (IF). Unlike local methods of electron microscopy or engineering methods of hardness or impact toughness testing, which give basically information on the formation of brittle intermetallic phases, the internal friction technique allows to study the state of solid solution and kinetics of changes in the relative amounts of ferrite and austenite phases during thermal treatment.

  2. Filtration method for studies of the kinetics of hypo-osmotic pore closure in erythrocyte.

    PubMed

    Shurkhina, E S; Nesterenko, V M; Tsvetaeva, N V; Kolodey, S V; Nikulina, O F

    2010-11-01

    Filterability of erythrocytes through small (3 μ) pores decreases with decreasing osmolarity of suspension medium because of hypo-osmotic swelling of cells. After appearance of lytic pores, erythrocyte filterability increases for some time, while after recovery of membrane integrity it decreases again. We suggest filtration method for studies of the kinetics of hypo-osmotic lytic pores closure. The dynamics of changes in erythrocyte filterability was studied in 2 patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and 6 donors (Ht 0.01%, Na phosphate buffer 5 mM, pH 7.4, 35 mOsm, 24°C). The method can be used for studies of erythrocyte membrane characteristics in various diseases and for evaluation of the membranotropic effects of drugs, infusion media, hemolysins, ethanol, etc. PMID:21165443

  3. Progress report on the kinetic measurements of the reactions of the silicates at the Yucca Mountain potential repository site; [Final] report, June 15, 1993--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Lasaga, A.C.; Ganor, J.

    1994-10-01

    Preliminary results are provided on: Synthesis and characterization of analcime and Na-clinoptilolite (Penn State), batch solubility experiments on analcime and clinoptilolite, thermodynamic modelling of solubility data, and kinetic flow-through experiments on analcime and clinoptilolite.

  4. Study of the kinetics and equilibria of the oligomerization reactions of 2-methylglyceric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birdsall, A. W.; Zentner, C. A.; Elrod, M. J.

    2012-11-01

    The presence of a variety of chemical species related to the gaseous precursor isoprene in ambient secondary organic aerosol (SOA) has stimulated investigations of the nature of SOA-phase chemical processing. Recent work has demonstrated that 2-methylglyceric acid (2-MG) is an important isoprene-derived ambient SOA component and atmospheric chamber experiments have suggested that 2-MG may exist in oligomeric form (as oligoesters) under conditions of low SOA water content. In order to better understand the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of such oligomerization reactions, nuclear magnetic resonance techniques were used to study the bulk phase acid-catalyzed aqueous reactions (Fischer esterification) of 2-MG. While the present results indicate that 2-MG oligoesters are formed in the bulk phase with similar water content equilibrium dependences as observed in atmospheric chamber SOA experiments, the acid-catalyzed rate of the Fischer esterification mechanism may be too slow to rationalize the 2-MG oligoester production timescales observed in the atmospheric chamber experiments. Furthermore, it appears that unrealistically high ambient SOA acidities would also be required for significant 2-MG oligoester content to arise via Fischer esterification. Therefore, the present results suggest that other, more kinetically facile, esterification mechanisms may be necessary to rationalize the existence of 2-MG oligomers in atmospheric chamber-generated and ambient SOA.

  5. Study of the kinetics and equilibria of the oligomerization reactions of 2-methylglyceric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birdsall, A. W.; Zentner, C. A.; Elrod, M. J.

    2013-03-01

    The presence of a variety of chemical species related to the gaseous precursor isoprene in ambient secondary organic aerosol (SOA) has stimulated investigations of the nature of SOA-phase chemical processing. Recent work has demonstrated that 2-methylglyceric acid (2-MG) is an important isoprene-derived ambient SOA component and atmospheric chamber experiments have suggested that 2-MG may exist in oligomeric form (as oligoesters) under conditions of low SOA water content. In order to better understand the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of such oligomerization reactions, nuclear magnetic resonance techniques were used to study the bulk phase acid-catalyzed aqueous reactions (Fischer esterification) of 2-MG. While the present results indicate that 2-MG oligoesters are formed in the bulk phase with similar water content equilibrium dependences as observed in atmospheric chamber SOA experiments, the acid-catalyzed rate of the Fischer esterification mechanism may be too slow to rationalize the 2-MG oligoester production timescales observed in the atmospheric chamber experiments. Furthermore, it appears that unrealistically high ambient SOA acidities would also be required for significant 2-MG oligoester content to arise via Fischer esterification. Therefore, the present results suggest that other, more kinetically facile, esterification mechanisms may be necessary to rationalize the existence of 2-MG oligomers in atmospheric chamber-generated and ambient SOA.

  6. Eriobotrya japonica seed biocomposite efficiency for copper adsorption: Isotherms, kinetics, thermodynamic and desorption studies.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Mehwish; Bhatti, Haq Nawaz; Iqbal, Munawar; Noreen, Saima

    2016-07-01

    Adsorption techniques are widely used to remove pollutants from wastewater; however, composites are gaining more importance due to their excellent adsorption properties. Bentonite composite with Eriobotrya japonica seed was prepared and used for the adsorption of copper (Cu) metal from aqueous media. The process variables such as pH, Cu(II) ions initial concentration, adsorbent dose, contact time and temperature were optimized for maximum Cu(II) adsorption. At pH 5, adsorbent dose 0.1 g, contact time 45 min, Cu(II) ions initial concentration 75 mg/L and temperature 45 °C, maximum Cu(II) adsorption was achieved. Desorption studies revealed that biocomposite is recyclable. Langmuir, Freundlich and Harkins-Jura isotherms as well as pseudo-first and pseudo-second-order kinetics models were applied to understand the adsorption mechanism. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔG(0), ΔH(0) and ΔS(0)) suggest that the adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic in nature. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Langmuir isotherm fitted well to the adsorption data. Results showed that biocomposite was more efficient for Cu(II) adsorption in comparison to individuals native Eriobotrya japonica seed biomass and Na-bentonite. PMID:27039361

  7. BDE-209: kinetic studies and effect of humic substances on photodegradation in water.

    PubMed

    Leal, J F; Esteves, V I; Santos, E B H

    2013-12-17

    BDE-209 is a brominated flame retardant and a priority contaminant, which has been found in several environmental matrices, namely, in water. To date, there are no quantum yield data for BDE-209 photodegradation by sunlight in water, to allow predicting half-life times in aquatic systems. In this work, the kinetics of BDE-209 photodegradation in water was studied and the influence of different fractions of aquatic humic substances (HS) was evaluated. Aqueous solutions of BDE-209 exposed for different periods of time to simulated sunlight were analyzed by HPLC-UV after being concentrated using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) or solid-phase extraction (SPE). The photodegradation of BDE-209 in aqueous solution followed pseudo-first-order kinetics. The average quantum yield obtained of 0.010 ± 0.001 (about 20-fold lower than the quantum yield determined in ethanol) allow to predict an outdoor half-life time of 3.5 h. The photodegradation percentage of BDE-209 was not significantly affected by the XAD-4 fraction of HS, but it decreased substantially in the presence of humic and fulvic acids. Light screening by the humic substances could not explain this delay, which is probably the result of the association of the compound with the hydrophobic sites of the humic material. PMID:24245794

  8. Experimental and kinetic studies for phycoremediation and dye removal by Chlorella pyrenoidosa from textile wastewater.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Vinayak V; Kothari, Richa; Chopra, A K; Singh, D P

    2015-11-01

    Potential of Chlorella pyrenoidosa was experimentally investigated for phycoremediation and dye removal from textile wastewater (TWW) in batch cultures. Growth of alga was observed at various concentration of textile wastewater (25%, 50%, 75% and 100%) and was found in a range of 8.1-14 μg ml(-1) day(-1). Growth study revealed that alga potentially grows up to 75% concentrated textile wastewater and reduces phosphate, nitrate and BOD by 87%, 82% and 63% respectively. Methylene blue dye (MB) removal was also observed by using dry and wet algal biomass harvested after phycoremediation. Adsorption isotherms (Langmuir and Freundlich) and kinetic models (pseudo first and second order) were applied on adsorption process. Dry algal biomass (DAB) was found more efficient biosorbent with large surface area and showed high binding affinity for MB dye in compare to wet algal biomass (WAB). The RL value for both biosorbent showed feasible adsorption process as the obtained value was between 0 and 1. Pseudo second order kinetic model with high degree of correlation coefficient and low sum of error squares (SSE %) value was found more suitable for representation of adsorption process in case of both biosorbents, however pseudo first order also showed high degree of correlation for both biosorbents. PMID:26349408

  9. Kinetics of methane hydrate decomposition studied via in situ low temperature X-ray powder diffraction.

    PubMed

    Everett, S Michelle; Rawn, Claudia J; Keffer, David J; Mull, Derek L; Payzant, E Andrew; Phelps, Tommy J

    2013-05-01

    Gas hydrate is known to have a slowed decomposition rate at ambient pressure and temperatures below the melting point of ice. As hydrate exothermically decomposes, gas is released and water of the clathrate cages transforms into ice. Based on results from the decomposition of three nominally similar methane hydrate samples, the kinetics of two regions, 180-200 and 230-260 K, within the overall decomposition range 140-260 K, were studied by in situ low temperature X-ray powder diffraction. The kinetic rate constants, k(a), and the reaction mechanisms, n, for ice formation from methane hydrate were determined by the Avrami model within each region, and activation energies, E(a), were determined by the Arrhenius plot. E(a) determined from the data for 180-200 K was 42 kJ/mol and for 230-260 K was 22 kJ/mol. The higher E(a) in the colder temperature range was attributed to a difference in the microstructure of ice between the two regions. PMID:23557375

  10. Novel Collimated Beam Setup to Study the Kinetics of VUV-Induced Reactions.

    PubMed

    Duca, Clara; Imoberdorf, Gustavo; Mohseni, Madjid

    2014-01-01

    Vacuum UV (VUV) process is an incipient advanced oxidation process, which can be used for water treatment. This process relies on the formation of hydroxyl radicals through the VUV-induced photolysis of water. In particular, the use of ozone-generating mercury vapor lamps, which emit 10% of the radiation at 185 nm and 90% at 254 nm, is showing very promising results for the degradation of micropollutants. The kinetics of VUV process has been studied in batch- and flow-through reactors, but the effect of 254 and 185 nm photons cannot be isolated, mass transfer resistances can take place and the interpretation of the results is complex. In this technical note, a new VUV collimated beam to conduct kinetic tests is presented, which offers several advantages: (1) it allows the irradiation of samples with 185, 254 nm photons, or both, (2) the concentration of reagents is uniform in the reaction volume and (3) it allows to change the fluence rate by changing the distance between the lamp and the photoreactor. Details of the geometry are presented, as well as an analysis of the collimation and uniformity of the radiation of the new VUV-collimated beam setup. PMID:23952050

  11. [Study on Kinetic of Hg2+ from Wastewater Absorbed by Lemon Residues].

    PubMed

    Shen, Wang-qing; Wang, Miao; Yang, Ting

    2016-03-01

    With low price and its superior adsorption performance after modification, currently agricultural waste is used as adsorbent of heavy metals in wastewater, which has become a hot research topic. To study on Hg2+ from wastewater absorbed by lemon residues that has been modified by 15% concentration of sulphuric acid. The pore volume, pore size and other properties of the adsorbent were test. The samples were characterized by differential thermal analysis, IR, electron microscopy and spectroscopy. The result showed that the adsorption rate was controlled by membrane diffusion kinetics that was viewed as the first order kinetics equation of the Lagergren, which was physically absorbed. The adsorption properties of modified lemon residues were improved greatly, and the pore size distribution mainly was medium. There were three losses-weight process. There was a endothermic peak around 66 degrees C and two exotherm near 316 degrees C and 494 degrees C. Basic framework of Lemon residues was not changed and structure of Lemon residues was amorphous; the surface of modified lemon residues loosen and many pores formed, and Hg2+ have been adsorbed effectively. PMID:27400525

  12. Photodegradation of levofloxacin in aqueous and organic solvents: a kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Iqbal; Bano, Raheela; Sheraz, Muhammad Ali; Ahmed, Sofia; Mirza, Tania; Ansari, Shakeel Ahmad

    2013-06-01

    The kinetics of photodegradation of levofloxacin in solution on UV irradiation in the pH range 2.0-12.0 has been studied using a HPLC method. Levofloxacin undergoes first-order kinetics in the initial stages of the reaction and the apparent first-order rate constants are of the order of 0.167 to 1.807×10-3 min-1. The rate-pH profile is represented by a curve indicating the presence of cationic, dipolar and anionic species during the reaction. The singly ionized form of the molecule is non-fluorescent and is less susceptible to photodegradation. The increase in the degradation rate in the pH range 5.0-9.0 may be due to greater reactivity of the ionized species existing in that range. The rate appears to vary with a change in the degree of ionization of the species present in a particular pH range and their susceptibility to photodegradation. Above pH 9, the decrease in the rate of photodegradation may be a result of deprotonation of the piperazinyl group. The levofloxacin molecule is more stable in the pH range around 7, which is then suitable for formulation purposes. The photodegradation of levofloxacin was found to be affected by the dielectric constant and viscosity of the medium. PMID:23846144

  13. Clinical study of quantitative diagnosis of early cervical cancer based on the classification of acetowhitening kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tao; Cheung, Tak-Hong; Yim, So-Fan; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2010-03-01

    A quantitative colposcopic imaging system for the diagnosis of early cervical cancer is evaluated in a clinical study. This imaging technology based on 3-D active stereo vision and motion tracking extracts diagnostic information from the kinetics of acetowhitening process measured from the cervix of human subjects in vivo. Acetowhitening kinetics measured from 137 cervical sites of 57 subjects are analyzed and classified using multivariate statistical algorithms. Cross-validation methods are used to evaluate the performance of the diagnostic algorithms. The results show that an algorithm for screening precancer produced 95% sensitivity (SE) and 96% specificity (SP) for discriminating normal and human papillomavirus (HPV)-infected tissues from cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) lesions. For a diagnostic algorithm, 91% SE and 90% SP are achieved for discriminating normal tissue, HPV infected tissue, and low-grade CIN lesions from high-grade CIN lesions. The results demonstrate that the quantitative colposcopic imaging system could provide objective screening and diagnostic information for early detection of cervical cancer.

  14. Oxidation and combustion of the n-hexene isomers: a wide range kinetic modeling study

    SciTech Connect

    Mehl, M; Vanhove, G; Pitz, W J; Ranzi, E

    2008-03-12

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed to study the oxidation of the straight-chain isomers of hexene over a wide range of operating conditions. The main features of this detailed kinetic mechanism, which includes both high and low temperature reaction pathways, are presented and discussed with special emphasis on the main classes of reactions involved in alkene oxidation. Simulation results have been compared with experimental data over a wide range of operating conditions including shock tube, jet stirred reactor and rapid compression machine. The different reactivities of the three isomers have been successfully predicted by the model. Isomerization reactions of the hexenyl radicals were found to play a significant role in the chemistry and interactions of the three n-hexene isomers. A comparative reaction flux analysis is used to verify and discuss the fundamental role of the double bond position in the isomerization reactions of alkenyl radicals, as well as the impact of the allylic site in the low and high temperature mechanism of fuel oxidation.

  15. Thermoluminescence of kunzite: A study of kinetic processes and dosimetry characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogundare, F. O.; Alatishe, M. A.; Chithambo, M. L.; Costin, G.

    2016-04-01

    Since the use of natural minerals for dating and dose reconstruction using luminescence techniques is well-established and always of interest, we present thermoluminescence characteristics of kunzite, a gem variety of spodumene. The chemical composition of the sample was determined using an Electron Probe MicroAnalyzer to be (Li0.996Na0.009Mn0.006)∑ = 1.016(Al0.981Cr0.003Fe2+0.001)∑ = 0.995[(Si1.993Al0.008)∑ = 2.000O6]. Thermoluminescence glow curves measured at 0.5 K/s after laboratory irradiation consist of three prominent peaks at 338 K (labelled as peak I), 454 K (peak II) and 681 K (peak III). The dose response of these three peaks is linear in the range 20-308 Gy studied. The position of each of the peaks is independent of dose, an archetypical feature of first order behaviour. However, detailed kinetic analyses showed that in fact, the peaks are not subject to first order kinetics. Each of the three peaks is affected by thermal quenching with an associated activation energy of thermal quenching estimated to be 0.70, 1.35 and 0.54 eV for peaks I, II and III respectively. In terms of dosimetry use, only peak III was found to be reliable for possible use in luminescence dating and dose reconstruction.

  16. A kinetic study of the interaction between atomic oxygen and aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akers, F. I.; Wightman, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    This study was concerned with the effects of NH4Cl and (NH4)2SO4 aerosols on the kinetics of disappearance of atomic oxygen. Atomic oxygen was generated by a 2.45-GHz microwave discharge and the kinetics of disappearance measured in a fast flow system using NO2 titration. Values of the recombination coefficient for heterogeneous wall recombination were determined for clean, H2SO4-coated, and (NH4)2SO4-coated Pyrex to be 0.000050, 0.000020, and 0.000019, respectively. A rapid exothermic chemical reaction was found to occur between atomic oxygen and an NH4Cl wall coating; the products were NH3, NO, H2O, and HCl. The NH4Cl aerosol was generated by gas phase reaction of NH3 with HCl. The aerosol particles were approximately spherical and nearly monodisperse with a mean diameter of 1.6 plus or minus 0.2 micron. The rate constant for the disappearance of atomic oxygen in the presence of NH4Cl aerosol was measured. No significant decrease was observed in the rate of disappearance of atomic oxygen in the presence of an (NH4)2SO4 aerosol at a concentration of 285 mg per cu m.

  17. Kinetic Study and Mathematical Model of Hemimorphite Dissolution in Low Sulfuric Acid Solution at High Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hongsheng; Wei, Chang; Li, Cunxiong; Deng, Zhigan; Li, Minting; Li, Xingbin

    2014-10-01

    The dissolution kinetics of hemimorphite with low sulfuric acid solution was investigated at high temperature. The dissolution rate of zinc was obtained as a function of dissolution time under the experimental conditions where the effects of sulfuric acid concentration, temperature, and particle size were studied. The results showed that zinc extraction increased with an increase in temperature and sulfuric acid concentration and with a decrease in particle size. A mathematical model able to describe the process kinetics was developed from the shrinking core model, considering the change of the sulfuric acid concentration during dissolution. It was found that the dissolution process followed a shrinking core model with "ash" layer diffusion as the main rate-controlling step. This finding was supported with a linear relationship between the apparent rate constant and the reciprocal of squared particle radius. The reaction order with respect to sulfuric acid concentration was determined to be 0.7993. The apparent activation energy for the dissolution process was determined to be 44.9 kJ/mol in the temperature range of 373 K to 413 K (100 °C to 140 °C). Based on the shrinking core model, the following equation was established:

  18. Kinetic and theoretical study of the reaction of Cl atoms with a series of linear thiols

    SciTech Connect

    Garzon, Andres; Albaladejo, Jose

    2008-11-21

    The reactions of Cl with a series of linear thiols: 1-propanethiol (k{sub 1}), 1-butanethiol (k{sub 2}), and 1-pentanethiol (k{sub 3}) were investigated as a function of temperature (in the range of 268-379 K) and pressure (in the range of 50-200 Torr) by laser photolysis-resonance fluorescence. Only 1-propanethiol has previously been studied, but at 1 Torr of total pressure. The derived Arrhenius expressions obtained using our kinetic data were as follows: k{sub 1}=(3.97{+-}0.44)x10{sup -11} exp[(410{+-}36)/T], k{sub 2}=(1.01{+-}0.16)x10{sup -10} exp[(146{+-}23)/T], and k{sub 3}=(1.28{+-}0.10)x10{sup -10} exp[(129{+-}25)/T] (in units of cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1}). Moreover, a theoretical insight into mechanisms of these reactions has also been pursued through ab initio Moeller-Plesset second-order perturbation treatment calculations with 6-311G** basis set. Optimized geometries have been obtained for transition states and molecular complexes appearing along the different reaction pathways. Furthermore, molecular energies have been calculated at QCISD(T) level in order to get an estimation of the activation energies. Finally, the nature of the molecular complexes and transitions states is analyzed by using kinetic-potential and natural bond orbital total energy decomposition schemes.

  19. Kinetic Reaction Mechanism of Sinapic Acid Scavenging NO2 and OH Radicals: A Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yang; Wang, AiHua; Shi, Peng; Zhang, Hui; Li, ZeSheng

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism and kinetics underlying reactions between the naturally-occurring antioxidant sinapic acid (SA) and the very damaging ·NO2 and ·OH were investigated through the density functional theory (DFT). Two most possible reaction mechanisms were studied: hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) and radical adduct formation (RAF). Different reaction channels of neutral and anionic sinapic acid (SA-) scavenging radicals in both atmosphere and water medium were traced independently, and the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters were calculated. We find the most active site of SA/SA- scavenging ·NO2 and ·OH is the -OH group in benzene ring by HAT mechanism, while the RAF mechanism for SA/SA- scavenging ·NO2 seems thermodynamically unfavorable. In water phase, at 298 K, the total rate constants of SA eliminating ·NO2 and ·OH are 1.30×108 and 9.20×109 M-1 S-1 respectively, indicating that sinapic acid is an efficient scavenger for both ·NO2 and ·OH. PMID:27622460

  20. Dye adsorption of cotton fabric grafted with PPI dendrimers: Isotherm and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Salimpour Abkenar, Samera; Malek, Reza Mohammad Ali; Mazaheri, Firouzmehr

    2015-11-01

    In this research, the cotton fabrics grafted with two generations of the poly(propylene imine) dendrimers were applied to adsorb textile dyes from aqueous solutions. Direct Red 80 (anionic dye), Disperse Yellow 42 (nonionic dye) and Basic Blue 9 (cationic dye) were selected as model dyes. The effect of various experimental parameters such as initial concentration of dyes, charge of dyes molecule, salt and pH was investigated on the adsorption process. Furthermore, kinetics and equilibrium of the adsorption process on the grafted samples were studied. It was found that maximum adsorption of anionic and disperse dyes took place at around pH 3, while cationic dye could be adsorbed at around pH 11. The Langmuir equation was able to describe the mechanism of dyes adsorption. In addition, the second-order equation was found to be fit with the kinetics data. Interestingly, it seems that the dye adsorption of the grafted fabrics is strongly pH dependent. PMID:26292774

  1. Liquid precursor infiltration processing of powder compacts. 1: Kinetic studies and microstructure development

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, W.C.; Lange, F.F.

    1995-12-01

    The kinetics of infiltrating a solution precursor into Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} powder compacts were studied using either water or an aqueous solution of Zr-nitrate and Y-nitrate that formed a crystalline Zr(Y)O{sub 2} (3 mol% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) solid solution during pyrolysis. When the powder compact contained air, the infiltration involved two steps: (1) relatively rapid intrusion of liquid via flow due to capillary pressure and (2) diffusion of entrapped gas to the surface as its pressure became equal to the capillary pressure. The kinetics of both processes are described with different parabolic rate laws--Darcy`s law and Fick`s law, respectively. When the intruded precursor is converted to an inorganic during heat treatment, the void space is partially filled with pyrolyzed precursor without shrinkage of the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} powder. The movement of precursor molecules was prevented by gelling prior to drying, viz., by soaking the infiltrated bodies in an aqueous NH{sub 4}OH solution. Microstructures developed during cyclic precursor infiltration and pyrolysis were characterized to show that cracklike voids are produced within the pyrolyzed precursor due to its large volume change during pyrolysis and densification; the size distribution of the cracklike voids is proportional to the size distribution of the voids within the initial powder compact.

  2. The chemical shock tube as a tool for studying high-temperature chemical kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brabbs, Theodore A.

    1986-01-01

    Although the combustion of hydrocarbons is our primary source of energy today, the chemical reactions, or pathway, by which even the simplest hydro-carbon reacts with atmospheric oxygen to form CO2 and water may not always be known. Furthermore, even when the reaction pathway is known, the reaction rates are always under discussion. The shock tube has been an important and unique tool for building a data base of reaction rates important in the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels. The ability of a shock wave to bring the gas sample to reaction conditions rapidly and homogeneously makes shock-tube studies of reaction kinetics extremely attractive. In addition to the control and uniformity of reaction conditions achieved with shock-wave methods, shock compression can produce gas temperatures far in excess of those in conventional reactors. Argon can be heated to well over 10 000 K, and temperatures around 5000 K are easily obtained with conventional shock-tube techniques. Experiments have proven the validity of shock-wave theory; thus, reaction temperatures and pressures can be calculated from a measurement of the incident shock velocity. A description is given of the chemical shock tube and auxiliary equipment and of two examples of kinetic experiments conducted in a shock tube.

  3. Photochemical Kinetics of Excited States of Ozone and Oxygen: Laboratory Studies and Atmospheric Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jichun

    The photochemistry of O_3 has matured through the extensive research efforts of the last two decades, but its completeness has been questioned by several laboratory and atmospheric observations, including the unusually complex kinetics for the ozone three-body recombination reaction at high pressures, the unexplained heavy ozone isotope enhancement in the stratosphere, and the deficiencies of current chemical models at 90-120 km. The model deficiencies may be related to several of the excited states of O_3 and O_2 . In this dissertation, the photochemical kinetics of these excited species have been studied in a series of laboratory measurements, which are divided into two groups: (1) the study of the excited intermediates formed in the ozone recombination reaction, and (2) the investigation of the unusual odd oxygen formation in O_2 under laser irradiation at 248 nm. The ozone recombination reaction has been investigated at room temperature by monitoring the time-resolved infrared chemiluminescence of ozone at 9.6 mum, 4.7 mum, and 3.4 mu m. These studies have indicated that the recombination reaction (O+O_2+M) apparently proceeds through an intermediate complex OM, and, for M=O _2, the recombination also involves the participation of a metastable electronic state, O_3(E). The three infrared emissions have also been used to analyze the deactivation of vibrationally excited O_3 (v). The unusual odd oxygen formation in O _2 at 248 nm has been studied in both pure O_2 and O_2+N _2 and O_2+Ar mixtures at pressures between 200 and 1600 torr and at temperatures between 298 and 370^circ K. The results have indicated that this odd oxygen formation is initiated by O_2 absorption in the Herzberg continuum, and it is autocatalytically accelerated by the photodissociation of vibrationally excited O_2(v) at 248 nm. These kinetics results have been used to study the possible roles of excited O_3 and O_2 species in the sources and sinks of odd oxygen at 90-120 km, and in the

  4. Experimental and numerical studies of burning velocities and kinetic modeling for practical and surrogate fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhenwei

    To help understand the fuel oxidation process in practical combustion environments, laminar flame speeds and high temperature chemical kinetic models were studied for several practical fuels and "surrogate" fuels, such as propane, dimethyl ether (DME), and primary reference fuel (PRF) mixtures, gasoline and n-decane. The PIV system developed for the present work is described. The general principles for PIV measurements are outlined and the specific considerations are also reported. Laminar flame speeds were determined for propane/air over a range of equivalence ratios at initial temperature of 298 K, 500 K and 650 K and atmospheric pressure. Several data sets for propane/air laminar flame speeds with N 2 dilution are also reported. These results are compared to the literature data collected at the same conditions. The propane flame speed is also numerically calculated with a detailed kinetic model and multi component diffusion, including Soret effects. This thesis also presents experimentally determined laminar flame speeds for primary reference fuel (PRF) mixtures of n-heptane/iso-octane and real gasoline fuel at different initial temperature and at atmospheric pressure. Nitrogen dilution effects on the laminar flame speed are also studied for selected equivalence ratios at the same conditions. A minimization of detailed kinetic model for PRF mixtures on laminar flame speed conditions was performed and the measured flame speeds were compared with numerical predictions using this model. The measured laminar flame speeds of n-decane/air mixtures at 500 K and at atmospheric pressure with and without dilution were determined. The measured flame speeds are significantly different that those predicted using existing published kinetic models, including a model validated previously against high temperature data from flow reactor, jet-stirred reactor, shock tube ignition delay, and burner stabilized flame experiments. A significant update of this model is described which

  5. Bcl-2 and c-myc expression, cell cycle kinetics and apoptosis during the progression of chronic myelogenous leukemia from diagnosis to blastic phase.

    PubMed

    Handa, H; Hegde, U P; Kotelnikov, V M; Mundle, S D; Dong, L M; Burke, P; Rose, S; Gaskin, F; Raza, A; Preisler, H D

    1997-06-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) has a progressive course but little is known about the biologic characteristics of disease progression. This study was designed to assess the changes in cell proliferative characteristics, apoptosis, the expression of the bcl-2 and c-myc genes between the time of initial diagnosis and entrance into the blastic phase of the disease. We observed that the rate of cell proliferation decreased and the cell death rate did not significantly change as the disease accelerated. The level of bcl-2 expression was significantly higher in accelerated/blastic phase cells than in the chronic phase cells in the population as a whole, however, the bcl-2 expression level did not change in blast cell subpopulation. c-myc Expression was significantly higher in the blast cell subpopulation of accelerated/blastic phase than in that of earlier phases of the disease. In conclusion, the characteristics of CML cells, namely proliferation rate, c-myc and bcl-2 change during the course of the disease. It is possible that the change in c-myc expression plays a causative role in evolution of the blastic phase from the chronic phase. PMID:9279359

  6. Kinetic and spectroscopic study of catalysts for water-gas shift and nitrogen oxide removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kispersky, Vincent Frederick

    adsorbed CO2 proved less competitive for NOx sorption sites, explaining the weak reduction of NSC by CO2 on low Ba loadings. Contrary to CO2, H2O exhibited both beneficial and inhibitory effects on the NSC. Over long periods of time, and at high Ba loadings, the addition of H2O in the feed increased the NSC, attributed to enhanced O2 spillover on the hydroxylated Ba surface allowing greater access to available NOx storage sites. When the Ba loading was reduced, the interaction sphere of Pt particles with the Ba storage component required for O2 to spillover to assist in NOx storage was reduced. Thus, despite the enhanced spillover capacity of oxygen on the hydroxylated storage component other NSC decreasing effects of H2O addition, such as Ba agglomeration, became more dominant and reduced the NSC. Recent developments in selective catalytic reduction have shown Cu and Fe/chabazite (CHA) based zeolites to be particularly well suited to sustaining high catalytic rates without degradation in the harsh environment of diesel engine exhaust. Little has been published about these catalysts as the academic community has just recently learned about the materials and their commercial implementation. Using operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy, combined with first-principles thermodynamics simulations and kinetic analysis, we have studied the nature of the Cu active site on Cu/SSZ-13, Cu/SAPO-34 and Cu/ZSM-5. Examining the catalysts under operando standard SCR conditions (300 ppm NO, 300 ppm NH3, 5% O2, 5% H2O and 5% CO2) showed the catalyst to be in a mixed Cu(I)-Cu(II) oxidation state. Neither the amount of Cu(I) nor Cu(II) individually correlated with the different rates measured on the various zeolite catalysts, and so we proposed that the SCR reaction progresses via a redox mechanism requiring both Cu(I) and Cu(II). First principles thermodynamic calculations found that the redox couple of Cu(I)H2O and Cu(II)(OH)2 were the most thermodynamically stable species of any of the Ox

  7. Fouling of an anion exchange chromatography operation in a monoclonal antibody process: Visualization and kinetic studies

    PubMed Central

    Close, Edward J; Salm, Jeffrey R; Iskra, Timothy; Sørensen, Eva; Bracewell, Daniel G

    2013-01-01

    Fouling of chromatographic resins over their operational lifetimes can be a significant problem for commercial bioseparations. In this article, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), batch uptake experiments, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and small-scale column studies were applied to characterize a case study where fouling had been observed during process development. The fouling was found to occur on an anion exchange (AEX) polishing step following a protein A affinity capture step in a process for the purification of a monoclonal antibody. Fouled resin samples analyzed by SEM and batch uptake experiments indicated that after successive batch cycles, significant blockage of the pores at the resin surface occurred, thereby decreasing the protein uptake rate. Further studies were performed using CLSM to allow temporal and spatial measurements of protein adsorption within the resin, for clean, partially fouled and extensively fouled resin samples. These samples were packed within a miniaturized flowcell and challenged with fluorescently labeled albumin that enabled in situ measurements. The results indicated that the foulant has a significant impact on the kinetics of adsorption, severely decreasing the protein uptake rate, but only results in a minimal decrease in saturation capacity. The impact of the foulant on the kinetics of adsorption was further investigated by loading BSA onto fouled resin over an extended range of flow rates. By decreasing the flow rate during BSA loading, the capacity of the resin was recovered. These data support the hypothesis that the foulant is located on the particle surface, only penetrating the particle to a limited degree. The increased understanding into the nature of the fouling can help in the continued process development of this industrial example. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), batch uptake experiments, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and small-scale column experiments were applied to characterize a

  8. Kinetic study of mannitol production using cashew apple juice as substrate.

    PubMed

    Fontes, Cláudia P M L; Honorato, Talita L; Rabelo, Maria Cristiane; Rodrigues, Sueli

    2009-06-01

    The use of agriculture excess as substrate in industrial fermentations became an interesting alternative to reduce production costs and to reduce negative environmental impact caused by the disposal of these products. In this work, a kinetic study of mannitol production using cashew apple juice as substrate was studied. The carbohydrates of cashew apple juice are glucose and fructose. Sucrose addition favored the yield of mannitol (85%) at the expense of lower productivity. The best results were obtained applying only cashew apple juice as substrate, containing 50 g L(-1) of total reducing sugar (28 g L(-1) of fructose), yielding 18 g L(-1) of mannitol with 67% of fructose conversion into mannitol and productivity of 1.8 g L(-1) h(-1). PMID:18853193

  9. Study on the Kinetics of Aluminum Removal from Liquid Silicon to Slag with Mechanical Stirring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaewoo; White, Jesse F.; Hildal, Kjetil; Sichen, Du

    2016-08-01

    The kinetics of aluminum removal from silicon melt to CaO-SiO2-Al2O3 slag was studied. A recently designed experimental setup using mechanical stirring was employed to focus the study on the chemical reaction. The slag and metal were found to reach chemical equilibrium in 300 seconds. A simple model could reproduce the experimental data satisfactorily. Both the experimental results and the model prediction further confirmed that the process was controlled by the chemical reaction, since the reaction rate constant was found to be independent of the amount of slag and the initial slag composition. The experimental data at equilibrium were compared with the model calculations. The discrepancy between the model calculations and the experimental data strongly suggests the need for careful thermodynamic measurements.

  10. Lymphoid cell kinetics under continuous low dose-rate gamma irradiation: A comparison study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, B. R.

    1975-01-01

    A comparison study was conducted of the effects of continuous low dose-rate gamma irradiation on cell population kinetics of lymphoid tissue (white pulp) of the mouse spleen with findings as they relate to the mouse thymus. Experimental techniques employed included autoradiography and specific labeling with tritiated thymidine (TdR-(h-3)). The problem studied involved the mechanism of cell proliferation of lymphoid tissue of the mouse spleen and thymus under the stress of continuous irradiation at a dose rate of 10 roentgens (R) per day for 105 days (15 weeks). The aim was to determine whether or not a steady state or near-steady state of cell population could be established for this period of time, and what compensatory mechanisms of cell population were involved.

  11. A quantitative study of chemical kinetics for the synthesis of doped oxide nanocrystals using FTIR

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Na; Wang, Xin; Ye, Zhizhen; Jin, Yizheng

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis of Mg-doped ZnO nanocrystals was employed as a model system to quantitatively study the chemical kinetics of the precursor conversion reactions at synthetic conditions and the correlations with the formation of doped nanocrystals. An accurate method using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was developed to explore the alcoholysis reactions of the cationic precursors. Our study showed that three independent factors, molar ratio of dopant precursor, reaction temperature and coordination ligands of cationic precursors influenced the relative reactivity of magnesium to zinc precursor, and in turn the formation of Mg-doped ZnO nanocrystals with defined shapes and properties. This understanding underpins the advancement of the syntheses of doped nanocrystals and should be useful for future rational design of new synthetic systems. PMID:24619066

  12. Structural basis for selective inhibition of purine nucleoside phosphorylase from Schistosoma mansoni: kinetic and structural studies.

    PubMed

    Castilho, Marcelo S; Postigo, Matheus P; Pereira, Humberto M; Oliva, Glaucius; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2010-02-15

    Selectivity plays a crucial role in the design of enzyme inhibitors as novel antiparasitic agents, particularly in cases where the target enzyme is also present in the human host. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase from Schistosoma mansoni (SmPNP) is an attractive target for the discovery of potential antischistosomal agents. In the present work, kinetic studies were carried out in order to determine the inhibitory potency, mode of action and enzyme selectivity of a series of inhibitors of SmPNP. In addition, crystallographic studies provided important structural insights for rational inhibitor design, revealing consistent structural differences in the binding mode of the inhibitors in the active sites of the SmPNP and human PNP (HsPNP) structures. The molecular information gathered in this work should be useful for future medicinal chemistry efforts in the design of new inhibitors of SmPNP having increased affinity and selectivity. PMID:20129792

  13. A laboratory study of the nucleation kinetics of nitric acid hydrates under stratospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Alexander D.; Murray, Benjamin J.; Plane, John M. C.

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of the kinetics of crystallisation of ternary H2O-H2SO4-HNO3 mixtures to produce nitric acid hydrate phases, as occurs in the lower stratosphere, have been a long-standing challenge for investigators in the laboratory. Understanding polar stratospheric chlorine chemistry and thereby ozone depletion is increasingly limited by descriptions of nucleation processes. Meteoric smoke particles have been considered in the past as heterogeneous nuclei, however recent studies suggest that these particles will largely dissolve, leaving mainly silica and alumina as solid inclusions. In this study the nucleation kinetics of nitric acid hydrate phases have been measured in microliter droplets at polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) temperatures, using a droplet freezing assay. A clear heterogeneous effect was observed when silica particles were added. A parameterisation based on the number of droplets activated per nuclei surface area (ns) has been developed and compared to global model data. Nucleation experiments on identical droplets have been performed in an X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD) to determine the nature of the phase which formed. β-Nitric Acid Trihydrate (NAT) was observed alongside a mixture of Nitric Acid Dihydrate (NAD) phases. It is not possible to determine whether NAT nucleates directly or is formed by a phase transition from NAD (likely requiring the presence of a mediating liquid phase). Regardless, these results demonstrate the possibility of forming NAT on laboratory timescales. In the polar stratosphere, sulfuric acid (present at several weight percent of the liquid under equilibrium conditions) could provide such a liquid phase. This study therefor provides insight into previous discrepancies between phases formed in the laboratory and those observed in the atmosphere. It also provides a basis for future studies into atmospheric nucleation of solid PSCs.

  14. Progression of Microstructural Degeneration in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy and Corticobasal Syndrome: A Longitudinal Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Rudolph; Ng, Peter; Luong, Phi N.; Dutt, Shubir; Heuer, Hilary; Rojas-Rodriguez, Julio C.; Tsai, Richard; Litvan, Irene; Dickerson, Bradford C.; Tartaglia, Maria Carmela; Rabinovici, Gil; Miller, Bruce L.; Rosen, Howard J.

    2016-01-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and corticobasal syndrome (CBS) are both 4 microtubule binding repeat tauopathy related disorders. Clinical trials need new biomarkers to assess the effectiveness of tau-directed therapies. This study investigated the regional distribution of longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging changes, measured by fractional anisotropy, radial and axial diffusivity over 6 months median interval, in 23 normal control subjects, 35 patients with PSP, and 25 patients with CBS. A mixed-effects framework was used to test longitudinal changes within and between groups. Correlations between changes in diffusion variables and clinical progression were also tested. The study found that over a 6 month period and compared to controls, the most prominent changes in PSP were up to 3±1% higher rates of FA reduction predominantly in superior cerebellar peduncles, and up to 18±6% higher rates of diffusivity increases in caudate nuclei. The most prominent changes in CBS compared to controls were up to 4±1% higher rates of anisotropy reduction and 18±6% higher rates of diffusivity increase in basal ganglia and widespread white matter regions. Compared to PSP, CBS was mainly associated with up to 3±1% greater rates of anisotropy reduction around the central sulci, and 11±3% greater rates of diffusivity increase in superior fronto-occipital fascicules. Rates of diffusivity increases in the superior cerebellar peduncle correlated with rates of ocular motor decline in PSP patients. This study demonstrated that longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging measurement is a promising surrogate marker of disease progression in PSP and CBS over a relatively short period. PMID:27310132

  15. Progress on the Europium Neutron-Capture Study using DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Agvaanluvsan, U; Becker, J A; Macri, R A; Parker, W; Wilk, P; Wu, C Y; Bredeweg, T A; Esch, E; Haight, R C; O'Donnell, J M; Reifarth, R; Rundberg, R S; Schwantes, J M; Ullmann, J L; Vieira, D J; Wilhelmy, J B; Wouters, J M; Mitchell, G E; Sheets, S A; Becvar, F; Krticka, M

    2006-09-05

    The accurate measurement of neutron-capture cross sections of the Eu isotopes is important for many reasons including nuclear astrophysics and nuclear diagnostics. Neutron capture excitation functions of {sup 151,153}Eu targets were measured recently using a 4{pi} {gamma}-ray calorimeter array DANCE located at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for E{sub n} = 0.1-100 keV. The progress on the data analysis efforts is given in the present paper. The {gamma}-ray multiplicity distributions for the Eu targets and Be backing are significantly different. The {gamma}-ray multiplicity distribution is found to be the same for different neutron energies for both {sup 151}Eu and {sup 153}Eu. The statistical simulation to model the {gamma}-ray decay cascade is summarized.

  16. [The progress of study about endoplasmic reticulum stress in glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Hu, J; Jiang, B

    2016-03-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the most secreted proteins and membrane proteins are compounded, modified and folded into the correct structure in the endoplasmic reticulum. Only correctly folded proteins can be transported to the golgi apparatus for further processing. If the endoplasmic reticulum is insufficient to deal with the accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins, balance will be broken, and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) will be started. To eliminate the unfolded proteins, cells will activate unfolded protein response (UPR) immediately for self-protection. If the induced ERS is strong or persistent, the UPR could not maintain the balance of homeostasis in endoplasmic reticulum. Then the ERS will lead to C/EBP homologous protein activation and initiate cell apoptosis. The continuous ERS may participate in the occurrence and development of many diseases, such as neurodegenerative diseases and type 2 diabetes. In this article, the research progress of ERS and its relationship with glaucoma is reviewed. PMID:26979122

  17. The Perceptions of Women's Roles and Progress: A Study of Malay Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdullah, Kalthom; Noor, Noraini M.; Wok, Saodah

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the general perceptions of women towards their roles, their interpretation of progress, as well as the facilitating factors and barriers to their progress. Questionnaires were distributed to 1,000 Malay women in Malaysia from rural and urban areas, from various age and income groups. Interviews were also carried out on the…

  18. Predictors of waterpipe smoking progression among youth in Irbid, Jordan: A Longitudinal Study (2008-2011)

    PubMed Central

    Jaber, Rana; Madhivanan, Purnima; Khader, Yousef; Mzayek, Fawaz; Ward, Kenneth; Maziak, Wasim

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The predictors of waterpipe smoking progression are yet to be examined using a longitudinal study that is guided by a theoretical model of behavioral change. This study identifies the gender-specific predictors of waterpipe smoking progression among adolescents in Irbid, Jordan. METHODS This study uses data from a school longitudinal study of smoking behavior in Irbid, Jordan. A random sample of 19 schools was selected by probability proportionate to size. A total of 1781 seventh graders were enrolled at baseline, and completed a questionnaire annually from 2008 through 2011. Students who reported ever smoking waterpipe (N = 864) at any time point were assessed for progression (escalation in the frequency of waterpipe smoking) in the subsequent follow-up. Grouped-time survival analysis was used to identify the risk of progression. RESULTS During the three years of follow-up, 29.6% of students progressed in waterpipe smoking. Predictors of waterpipe smoking progression were higher mother's education, enrollment in public school, frequent physical activity, and low refusal self-efficacy among boys, having ever smoked cigarettes, and having friends and siblings who smoke waterpipe among girls. Awareness of harms of waterpipe was protective among boys and seeing warning labels on the tobacco packs was protective among girls. CONCLUSIONS Even at this early stage, about a third of waterpipe smokers progressed in their habit during the 3 year follow up. Factors predicting progression of use differed by gender, which calls for gender-specific approaches to waterpipe interventions among Jordanian youth. PMID:26024787

  19. The Educational Progress of Language Minority Children: Findings from the NAEP 1985-86 Special Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baratz-Snowden, Joan; And Others

    From 1985-86, the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) conducted a special survey of reading and mathematics performance of language minority Asian American, Hispanic American, and Native American children to determine the progress of these children at grades 3, 7, and 11. The study also sought to identify whether the differences in…

  20. Mechanisms, chemistry and kinetics of the anaerobic biodegradation of cis-dichloroethylene and vinyl chloride. First annual progress report, September 15, 1996--September 14, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, P.L.; Spormann, A.

    1997-01-01

    'This three-year project is to study the anaerobic biological conversion of cis-1,2- dichloroethene (cDCE) and vinyl Chloride (VC) to ethene. The study is being conducted in three separate phases, the first to better understand the mechanisms involved in cDCE and VC biodegradation, the second to evaluate the chemistry of the processes involved, and the third, to study factors affecting reaction kinetics. Major funding is being provided by the US Department of Energy, but the DuPont Chemical Company has also agreed to directly cost-share on the project at a rate of $75,000 per year for the three year period. Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) are solvents that are among the most widely occurring organic groundwater contaminants. The biological anaerobic reduction-of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) such as PCE and TCE to cDCE and VC in groundwater was reported in the early 1980s. Further reduction of PCE and its intermediates to ethene was reported in 1989. Several pure cultures of anaerobic bacteria have been found to reductively dehalogenate PCE to cDCE Rates of reduction of PCE and TCE to cDCE are high and the need for electron donor addition for the reactions is small. However, the subsequent reduction of cDCE to VC, and then of VC to the harmless end product, ethene, is much slower and only recently has a pure culture been reported that is capable of reducing cDCE to VC or VC to ethene. There are numerous. reports of such conversions in mixed cultures. The reduction of cDCE and VC to ethene is where basic research is most needed and is the subject of this study.'

  1. Size dependence of the thermal decomposition kinetics of nano- CaC2O4: A theoretical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Qingshan; Cui, Zixiang; Xue, Yongqiang

    2015-10-01

    In the processes of preparation and application of nanomaterials, the thermal decomposition of nanoparticles is often involved. An improved general theory of thermal decomposition kinetics of nanoparticles, developed over the past 10 years, was presented in this paper where the relations between reaction kinetic parameters and particle size were derived. Experimentally, the thermal decomposition kinetics of nano-sized calcium oxalate (nano- CaC2O4 with different sizes was studied by means of Thermogravimetry Analysis (TGA) at different heating rates. The values of the apparent activation energy and the logarithm of pre-exponential factor were calculated using the equation of Iterative Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (IKAS) and its deformations. The influence regularities of particle size on the apparent activation energy and the pre-exponential factor were summarized, which are consistent with the thermal decomposition kinetics theory of nanoparticles. Based on the theory, the method of obtaining the surface thermodynamic properties by the determination of kinetic parameters was presented. Theoretical and experimental results show that the particle size, through the effect on the surface thermodynamic properties, has notable effect on the thermal decomposition kinetics. With the particle size decreasing, the partial molar surface enthalpy and the partial molar surface entropy increases, leading to the decrease of the apparent activation energy and the pre-exponential factor, respectively. Furthermore, the apparent activation energy, the pre-exponential factor, the partial molar surface enthalpy and the partial molar surface entropy are linearly related to the reciprocal of particle diameter, respectively.

  2. Microbial degradation of Paclitaxel using Citrobacter amalonaticus Rashtia isolated from pharmaceutical wastewater: kinetic and thermodynamic study.

    PubMed

    Zamani, Hojjatolah; Grakoee, Seyed Reza; Rakhshaee, Roohan

    2016-08-01

    Paclitaxel is a highly toxic anticancer agent which is used in a wide range against ovarian, breast, lung, and prostate cancers. Paclitaxel is manufactured recently in the north of Iran which may lead to the introduction of the drug into the environment via pharmaceutical wastewater. To our knowledge, Paclitaxel degradation is currently performed using physicochemical methods and biological degradation of Paclitaxel has not been reported. In this study, a Paclitaxel degrading bacterium was isolated from pharmaceutical wastewater for the first time. The bacterium was identified using biochemical and molecular assays and its Paclitaxel degradation potential was evaluated using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). In addition, kinetic and thermodynamic study of Paclitaxel degradation at different experimental conditions was performed. A Citrobacter species named as C. amalonaticus Rashtia able to degrade and utilize Paclitaxel as the sole carbon source was isolated. The isolated strain tolerated high level concentration of Paclitaxel (0.4 mg/mL) in liquid culture media and was able to degrade spillage-level concentrations of the drug (0.01-0.1 mg/mL) with 87-93 % efficacy under aerobic condition. Kinetic and thermodynamic study at different pHs (4.0, 7.0 and 10.0) and temperatures (285, 295 and 310 K) revealed that Paclitaxel degradation is a non-spontaneous process and the highest rate constant was observed in the basic condition and at the highest temperature. The ΔG values at 285, 295 and 310 K were determined 103.3, 105.9 and 109.9 kJ/mol, respectively. In addition, The ΔH and activation energy (Ea) of the process were determined +28.7 kJ/mol and +30.87 kJ/mol, respectively. PMID:27339310

  3. Adsorption of surfactants on sand surface in enhanced oil recovery: Isotherms, kinetics and thermodynamic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Achinta; Kumar, T.; Ojha, Keka; Mandal, Ajay

    2013-11-01

    Adsorption of surfactants onto reservoir rock surface may result in the loss and reduction of their concentrations in surfactant flooding, which may render them less efficient or ineffective in practical applications of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) techniques. Surfactant flooding for EOR received attraction due to its ability to increase the displacement efficiency by lowering the interfacial tension between oil and water and mobilizing the residual oil. This article highlights the adsorption of surfactants onto sand surface with variation of different influencing factors. It has been experimentally found that adsorption of cationic surfactant on sand surface is more and less for anionic surfactant, while non-ionic surfactant shows intermediate behaviour. X-ray diffraction (XRD) study of clean sand particles has been made to determine the main component present in the sand particles. The interaction between sand particles and surfactant has been studied by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy of the sand particles before and after aging with surfactant. Salinity plays an important role in adsorption of anionic surfactant. Batch experiments were also performed to understand the effects of pH and adsorbent dose on the sorption efficiency. The sand particles exhibited high adsorption efficiency at low pH for anionic and nonionic surfactants. But opposite trend was found for cationic surfactant. Adsorption data were analyzed by fitting with Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson, and Sips isotherm models. Results show that the Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second order kinetics models suit the equilibrium and kinetics of adsorption on sand surface. Thermodynamics feasibility of the adsorption process was also studied to verify the spontaneity of the process.

  4. A study of hydriding kinetics of metal hydrides using a physically based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voskuilen, Tyler G.

    The reaction of hydrogen with metals to form metal hydrides has numerous potential energy storage and management applications. The metal hydrogen system has a high volumetric energy density and is often reversible with a high cycle life. The stored hydrogen can be used to produce energy through combustion, reaction in a fuel cell, or electrochemically in metal hydride batteries. The high enthalpy of the metal-hydrogen reaction can also be used for rapid heat removal or delivery. However, improving the often poor gravimetric performance of such systems through the use of lightweight metals usually comes at the cost of reduced reaction rates or the requirement of pressure and temperature conditions far from the desired operating conditions. In this work, a 700 bar Sievert system was developed at the Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory to study the kinetic and thermodynamic behavior of high pressure hydrogen absorption under near-ambient temperatures. This system was used to determine the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of TiCrMn, an intermetallic metal hydride of interest due to its ambient temperature performance for vehicular applications. A commonly studied intermetallic hydride, LaNi5, was also characterized as a base case for the phase field model. The analysis of the data obtained from such a system necessitate the use of specialized techniques to decouple the measured reaction rates from experimental conditions. These techniques were also developed as a part of this work. Finally, a phase field model of metal hydride formation in mass-transport limited interstitial solute reactions based on the regular solution model was developed and compared with measured kinetics of LaNi5 and TiCrMn. This model aided in the identification of key reaction features and was used to verify the proposed technique for the analysis of gas-solid reaction rates determined volumetrically. Additionally, the phase field model provided detailed quantitative predictions of the

  5. Kinetic and spectroscopic study of catalysts for water-gas shift and nitrogen oxide removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kispersky, Vincent Frederick

    adsorbed CO2 proved less competitive for NOx sorption sites, explaining the weak reduction of NSC by CO2 on low Ba loadings. Contrary to CO2, H2O exhibited both beneficial and inhibitory effects on the NSC. Over long periods of time, and at high Ba loadings, the addition of H2O in the feed increased the NSC, attributed to enhanced O2 spillover on the hydroxylated Ba surface allowing greater access to available NOx storage sites. When the Ba loading was reduced, the interaction sphere of Pt particles with the Ba storage component required for O2 to spillover to assist in NOx storage was reduced. Thus, despite the enhanced spillover capacity of oxygen on the hydroxylated storage component other NSC decreasing effects of H2O addition, such as Ba agglomeration, became more dominant and reduced the NSC. Recent developments in selective catalytic reduction have shown Cu and Fe/chabazite (CHA) based zeolites to be particularly well suited to sustaining high catalytic rates without degradation in the harsh environment of diesel engine exhaust. Little has been published about these catalysts as the academic community has just recently learned about the materials and their commercial implementation. Using operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy, combined with first-principles thermodynamics simulations and kinetic analysis, we have studied the nature of the Cu active site on Cu/SSZ-13, Cu/SAPO-34 and Cu/ZSM-5. Examining the catalysts under operando standard SCR conditions (300 ppm NO, 300 ppm NH3, 5% O2, 5% H2O and 5% CO2) showed the catalyst to be in a mixed Cu(I)-Cu(II) oxidation state. Neither the amount of Cu(I) nor Cu(II) individually correlated with the different rates measured on the various zeolite catalysts, and so we proposed that the SCR reaction progresses via a redox mechanism requiring both Cu(I) and Cu(II). First principles thermodynamic calculations found that the redox couple of Cu(I)H2O and Cu(II)(OH)2 were the most thermodynamically stable species of any of the Ox

  6. Simulation of atomic diffusion in the Fcc NiAl system: A kinetic Monte Carlo study

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Alfonso, Dominic R.; Tafen, De Nyago

    2015-04-28

    The atomic diffusion in fcc NiAl binary alloys was studied by kinetic Monte Carlo simulation. The environment dependent hopping barriers were computed using a pair interaction model whose parameters were fitted to relevant data derived from electronic structure calculations. Long time diffusivities were calculated and the effect of composition change on the tracer diffusion coefficients was analyzed. These results indicate that this variation has noticeable impact on the atomic diffusivities. A reduction in the mobility of both Ni and Al is demonstrated with increasing Al content. As a result, examination of the pair interaction between atoms was carried out formore » the purpose of understanding the predicted trends.« less

  7. Kinetic study of Pt nanocrystal deposition on Ag nanowires with clean surfaces via galvanic replacement

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Without using any templates or surfactants, this study develops a high-yield process to prepare vertical Ag-Pt core-shell nanowires (NWs) by thermally assisted photoreduction of Ag NWs and successive galvanic replacement between Ag and Pt ions. The clean surface of Ag nanowires allows Pt ions to reduce and deposit on it and forms a compact sheath comprising Pt nanocrystals. The core-shell structural feature of the NWs thus produced has been demonstrated via transmission electron microscopy observation and Auger electron spectroscopy elemental analysis. Kinetic analysis suggests that the deposition of Pt is an interface-controlled reaction and is dominated by the oxidative dissolution of Ag atoms. The boundaries in between Pt nanocrystals may act as microchannels for the transport of Ag ions during galvanic replacement reactions. PMID:22559242

  8. A detailed kinetic modeling study of aromatics formation in laminar premixed acetylene and ethylene flames

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Frenklach, M.

    1997-07-01

    A computational study was performed for the formation and growth of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in laminar premixed acetylene and ethylene flames. A new detailed reaction mechanism describing fuel pyrolysis and oxidation, benzene formation, and PAH mass growth and oxidation is presented and critically tested. It is shown that the reaction model predicts reasonably well the concentration profiles of major and intermediate species and aromatic molecules in a number of acetylene and ethylene flames reported in the literature. It is demonstrated that reactions of n-C{sub 4}H{sub x} + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} leading to the formation of one-ring aromatics are as important as the propargyl recombination, and hence must be included in kinetic modeling of PAH formation in hydrocarbon flames. It is further demonstrated that the mass growth of PAHs can be accounted for by the previously proposed H-abstraction-C{sub 2}H{sub 2}-addiction mechanism.

  9. Thermal oxidation of single-crystal silicon carbide - Kinetic, electrical, and chemical studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petit, J. B.; Neudeck, P. G.; Matus, L. G.; Powell, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents kinetic data from oxidation studies of the polar faces for 3C and 6H SiC in wet and dry oxidizing ambients. Values for the linear and parabolic rate constants were obtained, as well as preliminary results for the activation energies of the rate constants. Examples are presented describing how thermal oxidation can be used to map polytypes and characterize defects in epitaxial layers grown on low tilt angle 6H SiC substrates. Interface widths were measured using Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) with Ar ion beam depth profiling and variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE) with effective medium approximation (EMA) models. Preliminary electrical measurements of MOS capacitors are also presented.

  10. A study to investigate phase transitions and nucleation kinetics of nickel and copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, F. A.; Yildiz, A. K.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we investigate the homogeneous nucleation kinetics of copper and nickel system during cooling process using molecular dynamics simulation (MDS). The calculation is carried out for a different number of atoms consisting of 500, 2048, 8788 and 13,500 based on embedded atom method (EAM). It is observed that the melting points for the both model increases with increasing the size of systems (i.e. the number of atoms) as expected from Parrinello and Rahman MD method. The interfacial free energies and critical nucleus radius of nickel and copper are also determined by molecular dynamics, and the results are consistent with the classical nucleation theory. The structural development and phase transformation are also determined from the radial distribution function (RDF) and local bond orientational order parameters (LBOO).

  11. Effects of kinetics on the crystallization of quartz normative basalt 15597 - An experimental study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grove, T. L.; Raudsepp, M.

    1978-01-01

    Equilibrium experiments on a residual liquid composition from the dynamic crystallization study on quartz normative basalt (QNB) 15597 are used to evaluate the effects of kinetics on the crystallization of pyroxene-porphyritic basalts. The results indicate that the liquids coexisting with pyroxene phenocryst rims before the precipitation of groundmass plagioclase + pyroxene have left the equilibrium liquid line of descent and metastably penetrated the plagioclase primary phase volume. The precipitation of groundmass plagioclase + pyroxene brings the basalt system closer to equilibrium with respect to the residual liquid and crystals. At rapid cooling rates pyroxene phenocryst growth produces substantial compositional gradients in the residual silicate liquid at the pyroxene/liquid interface. The compositional gradients enhance the nucleation and growth of groundmass phases at the phenocryst interface, because effects related to constitutional supercooling for these phases (e.g., plagioclase, pyroxene, etc.) favor nucleation at the interface.

  12. Functionalized Graphene Sheets As Immobilization Matrix for Fenugreek β-Amylase: Enzyme Kinetics and Stability Studies

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Garima; Singh, Kritika; Talat, Mahe; Srivastava, Onkar Nath; Kayastha, Arvind M.

    2014-01-01

    β-Amylase finds application in food and pharmaceutical industries. Functionalized graphene sheets were customised as a matrix for covalent immobilization of Fenugreek β-amylase using glutaraldehyde as a cross-linker. The factors affecting the process were optimized using Response Surface Methodology based Box-Behnken design of experiment which resulted in 84% immobilization efficiency. Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy (SEM, TEM) and Fourier Tansform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were employed for the purpose of characterization of attachment of enzyme on the graphene. The enzyme kinetic studies were carried out for obtaining best catalytic performance and enhanced reusability. Optimum temperature remained unchanged, whereas optimum pH showed shift towards acidic range for immobilized enzyme. Increase in thermal stability of immobilized enzyme and non-toxic nature of functionalized graphene can be exploited for production of maltose in food and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:25412079

  13. Mechanistic and kinetic studies of the thermal decomposition of TNAZ and NDNAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K.; Homsy, J.; Behrens, R.; Bulusu, S.

    1998-12-31

    The authors have studied the mechanism and detailed reaction kinetics of the thermal decomposition of 1,3,3-trinitroazetidine (TNAZ), and separately, its key decomposition intermediate, 1-nitroso-3,3-dinitroacetidine (NDNAZ), using a simultaneous thermogravimetric modulated beam mass spectrometer (STMBMS). These decompositions were conducted in a sealed alumina cell with a 2.5 {micro}m orifice, at varying temperatures and at a range of isothermal temperatures (at 10 C intervals from 120--160 C for NDNAZ and 160--210 C for TNAZ). The gaseous products have been identified and their rates of formation have been measured as a function of time, temperature, and pressure. This system is complex, with TNAZ decomposing by four separate routes, one of which leads to NDNAZ, which itself decomposes by at least two distinct routes.

  14. Theoretical study on the mechanism and kinetics of acetaldehyde and hydroperoxyl radical: An important atmospheric reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnia, Solaleh; Vahedpour, Morteza; Abedi, Mostafa; Farrokhpour, Hossein

    2013-09-01

    A systematic theoretical study was performed on the mechanism and kinetics of the atmospheric reaction of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) and hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) in the gas phase. The DFT-B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,3pd) and CCSD(T)/6-311++G(d,p) methods were employed for calculations. Based on the calculations, this reaction leads to four different products through radical addition and hydrogen abstraction mechanisms which are very important in atmospheric and combustion chemistry. The favorable reaction paths begin with α-hydroxyethylperoxy radical, CH3CH(OO)OH, in a exothermic process and finally leads to the product P1 (CH3COOH + OH). The overall rate constants for favorite reaction paths have been calculated at different temperatures (200-2500 K).

  15. Functionalized graphene sheets as immobilization matrix for Fenugreek β-amylase: enzyme kinetics and stability studies.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Garima; Singh, Kritika; Talat, Mahe; Srivastava, Onkar Nath; Kayastha, Arvind M

    2014-01-01

    β-Amylase finds application in food and pharmaceutical industries. Functionalized graphene sheets were customised as a matrix for covalent immobilization of Fenugreek β-amylase using glutaraldehyde as a cross-linker. The factors affecting the process were optimized using Response Surface Methodology based Box-Behnken design of experiment which resulted in 84% immobilization efficiency. Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy (SEM, TEM) and Fourier Tansform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were employed for the purpose of characterization of attachment of enzyme on the graphene. The enzyme kinetic studies were carried out for obtaining best catalytic performance and enhanced reusability. Optimum temperature remained unchanged, whereas optimum pH showed shift towards acidic range for immobilized enzyme. Increase in thermal stability of immobilized enzyme and non-toxic nature of functionalized graphene can be exploited for production of maltose in food and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:25412079

  16. Equilibrium and kinetic studies on the interaction of tetracyclines with calcium and magnesium.

    PubMed

    Martin, S R

    1979-11-01

    The interaction of Ca2+ and Mg2+ with three Tetracycline antibiotics (tetracycline, chlorotetracycline, and oxytetracycline) has been investigated. Spectrophotometric measurements have been used to determine the apparent association constant for this interaction as a function of pH. It is shown that the results are consistent with a model in which the metal ion can form complexes with both the fully-deprotonated and mono-protonated forms of the Tetracycline. The temperature-jump relaxation method has been used to measure the kinetics of formation of the complexes of Mg2+ with the Tetracyclines. The results are compared with those of previous studies of Mg2+ complex formation reactions and it is shown that the data is consistent with the normal dissociative model. A possible role for metal ion chelation in the mechanism of antibacterial action of the Tetracyclines is discussed. PMID:16997226

  17. Hydride precipitation kinetics in Zircaloy-4 studied using synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courty, Olivier F.; Motta, Arthur T.; Piotrowski, Christopher J.; Almer, Jonathan D.

    2015-06-01

    As a result of in-reactor corrosion during operation in nuclear reactors, hydrogen can enter the zirconium fuel cladding and precipitate as brittle hydride particles, which may reduce cladding ductility. Dissolved hydrogen responds to temperature gradients, resulting in transport and precipitation into cold spots so that the distribution of hydrides in the cladding is inhomogeneous. The hydrogen precipitation kinetics plays a strong role in the spatial distribution of the hydrides in the cladding. The precipitation rate is normally described as proportional to the supersaturation of hydrogen in solid solution. The proportionality constant, α2, for hydride precipitation in Zircaloy-4 is measured directly using in situ synchrotron X-Ray diffraction, at different temperatures and with three different initial hydrogen concentrations. The results validate the linear approximation of the phenomenological model and a near constant value of α2 = 4.5 × 10-4 s-1 was determined for the temperature range studied.

  18. Semi-aerobic stabilized landfill leachate treatment by ion exchange resin: isotherm and kinetic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamri, Mohd Faiz Muaz Ahmad; Kamaruddin, Mohamad Anuar; Yusoff, Mohd Suffian; Aziz, Hamidi Abdul; Foo, Keng Yuen

    2015-03-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the treatability of ion exchange resin (Indion MB 6 SR) for the removal of chromium (VI), aluminium (III), zinc (II), copper (II), iron (II), and phosphate (PO4)3-, chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N) and colour from semi-aerobic stabilized leachate by batch test. A range of ion exchange resin dosage was tested towards the removal efficiency of leachate parameters. It was observed that equilibrium data were best represented by the Langmuir model for metal ions and Freundlich was ideally fit for COD, NH3-N and colour. Intra particle diffusion model, pseudo first-order and pseudo second-order isotherm models were found ideally fit with correlation of the experimental data. The findings revealed that the models could describe the ion exchange kinetic behaviour efficiently, which further suggests comprehensive outlook for the future research in this field.

  19. Crystallization kinetics study of cerium titanate CeTi2O6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valeš, Václav; Matějová, Lenka; Matěj, Zdeněk; Brunátová, Tereza; Holý, Václav

    2014-02-01

    Cerium titanate CeTi2O6 has been investigated recently for its photocatalytic activity and as a safe analogue to actinide-containing brannerite-like titanates (UTi2O6, PuTi2O6, e.g.) which are intensively studied because of their use for storing nuclear waste. In this paper we report on the monoclinic phase CeTi2O6 obtained from the Ti-Ce oxide mixture prepared by a reverse micelles directed sol-gel method and subsequently annealed. The kinetics of the isothermal crystallization process is investigated by means of Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov equation. The effective activation energy of the formation of CeTi2O6 particles, which is an important parameter for its synthesis, is estimated.

  20. Kinetic study of carbon dioxide reaction with tertiary amines in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, D.; Tondre, C.; Lappai, G.; Delpuech, J.J.

    1981-11-26

    Reaction kinetics of CO/sub 2/ with triethanolamine (TEA) and methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) in aqueous solution have been studied by using a stopped-flow technique with pH detection. Rate constants are obtained from the comparison of experimental and theoretical curves giving the optical density as a function of time. At concentrations of CO/sub 2/ well below the saturation limit, the results are consistent with the hydration reactions of the CO/sub 2/ molecules either with neutral water molecules or with hydroxide ions, depending upon the pH, itself governed by the ionization equilibrium of the dissolved amine. Moreover, a specific (catalytic) reaction, first order with respect to both carbon dioxide and amine (rate constant, 2.85 M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ at 25/sup 0/C), has been shown to contribute significantly to the reaction rate in the case of the first amine (TEA) only.